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Sample records for north carolina estuary

  1. Hydrology of major estuaries and sounds of North Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Giese, G.L.; Wilder, Hugh B.; Parker, Garald G.

    1985-01-01

    Hydrology-related problems associated with North Carolina 's major estuaries and sounds include contamination of some estuaries with municipal and industrial wastes and drainage from adjacent, intensively farmed areas, and nuisance-level algal blooms. In addition, there is excessive shoaling in some navigation channels, salt-water intrusion into usually fresh estuarine reaches, too high or too-low salinities in nursery areas for various estuarine species, and flood damage due to hurricanes. The Cape Fear River is the only major North Carolina estuary having a direct connection to the sea. Short-term flow throughout most of its length is dominated by ocean tides. Freshwater entering the major estuaries is, where not contaminated, of acceptable quality for drinking with minimum treatment. However, iron concentrations in excess of 0.3 milligrams per liter sometimes occur and water draining from swampy areas along the Coastal Plain is often highly colored, but these problems may be remedied with proper treatment. Nuisance-level algal blooms have been a recurring problem on the lower estuarine reaches of the Neuse, Tar-Pamlico, and Chowan Rivers where nutrients (compounds of phosphorous and nitrogen) are abundant. The most destructive blooms tend to occur in the summer months during periods of low freshwater discharge and relatively high water temperatures. Saltwater intrusion occurs from time to time in all major estuaries except the Roanoke River, where releases from Roanoke Rapids Lake and other reservoirs during otherwise low-flow periods effectively block saline water from the estuary. New shoaling materials found in the lower channelized reaches of the Cape Fear and Northeast Cape Fear Rivers are primarily derived, not from upstream sources, but from nearby shore erosion, from slumping of material adjacent to the dredged channels, from old spoil areas, or from ocean-derived sediments carried upstream by near-bottom density currents.

  2. Continuous resistivity profiling data from the upper Neuse River Estuary, North Carolina, 2004-2005

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cross, VeeAnn A.; Bratton, John F.; Bergeron, Emile M.; Meunier, Jeff K.; Crusius, John; Koopmans, Dirk

    2006-01-01

    The Neuse River Estuary in North Carolina has suffered impacts of eutrophication in recent years. As part of a larger project to better constrain nutrient budgets in the estuary, field investigations were performed to study occurrence and discharge of fresh and brackish ground water and nutrients beneath the estuary itself (fig. 1). A Continuous Resistivity Profiling (CRP) system (Manheim and others, 2004) was used to map the depth of the freshwater-saltwater interface (FSI) in sub-estuarine groundwater. This study area serves as a typological representation of a submarine groundwater environment characteristic of a shallow estuary in a wide coastal plain that has not experienced glaciation. Similar settings extend from New Jersey to Georgia, and along the Gulf of Mexico in the U.S. This report archives 29 lines of data collected during 2004 and 2005 surveys representing almost 210 km of survey lines. These data are further explained in the Data Processing section of the report and previews available of the processed data are available.

  3. A dynamic water-quality modeling framework for the Neuse River estuary, North Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bales, Jerad D.; Robbins, Jeanne C.

    1999-01-01

    As a result of fish kills in the Neuse River estuary in 1995, nutrient reduction strategies were developed for point and nonpoint sources in the basin. However, because of the interannual variability in the natural system and the resulting complex hydrologic-nutrient inter- actions, it is difficult to detect through a short-term observational program the effects of management activities on Neuse River estuary water quality and aquatic health. A properly constructed water-quality model can be used to evaluate some of the potential effects of manage- ment actions on estuarine water quality. Such a model can be used to predict estuarine response to present and proposed nutrient strategies under the same set of meteorological and hydrologic conditions, thus removing the vagaries of weather and streamflow from the analysis. A two-dimensional, laterally averaged hydrodynamic and water-quality modeling framework was developed for the Neuse River estuary by using previously collected data. Development of the modeling framework consisted of (1) computational grid development, (2) assembly of data for model boundary conditions and model testing, (3) selection of initial values of model parameters, and (4) limited model testing. The model domain extends from Streets Ferry to Oriental, N.C., includes seven lateral embayments that have continual exchange with the main- stem of the estuary, three point-source discharges, and three tributary streams. Thirty-five computational segments represent the mainstem of the estuary, and the entire framework contains a total of 60 computa- tional segments. Each computational cell is 0.5 meter thick; segment lengths range from 500 meters to 7,125 meters. Data that were used to develop the modeling framework were collected during March through October 1991 and represent the most comprehensive data set available prior to 1997. Most of the data were collected by the North Carolina Division of Water Quality, the University of North Carolina

  4. Estimation of groundwater and nutrient fluxes to the Neuse River estuary, North Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Spruill, T.B.; Bratton, J.F.

    2008-01-01

    A study was conducted between April 2004 and September 2005 to estimate groundwater and nutrient discharge to the Neuse River estuary in North Carolina. The largest groundwater fluxes were observed to occur generally within 20 m of the shoreline. Groundwater flux estimates based on seepage meter measurements ranged from 2.86??108 to 4.33??108 m3 annually and are comparable to estimates made using radon, a simple water-budget method, and estimates derived by using Darcy's Law and previously published general aquifer characteristics of the area. The lower groundwater flux estimate (equal to about 9 m3 s-1), which assumed the narrowest groundwater discharge zone (20 m) of three zone widths selected for an area west of New Bern, North Carolina, most closely agrees with groundwater flux estimates made using radon (3-9 m3 s-1) and Darcy's Law (about 9 m3 s-1). A groundwater flux of 9 m 3 s-1 is about 40% of the surface-water flow to the Neuse River estuary between Streets Ferry and the mouth of the estuary and about 7% of the surface-water inflow from areas upstream. Estimates of annual nitrogen (333 tonnes) and phosphorus (66 tonnes) fluxes from groundwater to the estuary, based on this analysis, are less than 6% of the nitrogen and phosphorus inputs derived from all sources (excluding oceanic inputs), and approximately 8% of the nitrogen and 17% of the phosphorus annual inputs from surface-water inflow to the Neuse River estuary assuming a mean annual precipitation of 1.27 m. We provide quantitative evidence, derived from three methods, that the contribution of water and nutrients from groundwater discharge to the Neuse River estuary is relatively minor, particularly compared with upstream sources of water and nutrients and with bottom sediment sources of nutrients. Locally high groundwater discharges do occur, however, and could help explain the occurrence of localized phytoplankton blooms, submerged aquatic vegetation, or fish kills. ?? 2008 Coastal and Estuarine

  5. Simulation of hydrodynamics and solute transport in the Pamlico River estuary, North Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bales, Jerad; Robbins, Jeanne C.

    1995-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to characterize flow, circulation, and solute transport in the Pamlico River estuary, North Carolina. The study included a detailed field-measurement program and the calibration, validation, and application of a physically realistic numerical model of hydro- dynamics and transport. Water level, salinity, water temperature, wind speed and direction, and current data were collected during March 1988 through September 1992, and were used to characterize physical conditions in the estuary. Data from pre- existing streamflow gaging stations and meteoro- logical stations were also used. A two-dimensional vertically averaged hydrodynamic and solute transport model was applied to the 48-kilometer study reach. The model domain was discretized into 5,620 separate 200- by 200-meter computational cells. Model calibration was achieved through adjustment of parameters for June 14-30, 1991. Data from selected periods in 1989 and 1991 were used for model validation. Water levels used for model calibration and validation ranged from -0.052 to 0.698 meter; salinities ranged from 0.1 to 13.1 parts per thousand; and wind speeds ranged from calm to 22 meters per second. The model was tested for stratified and unstratified conditions. Simulated and observed data were used to evaluate model performance. The calibrated model was applied for selected periods in 1989 and 1991. Instantaneous flows were simulated at each boundary and at mid- estuary. Circulation patterns were characterized using vector plots, particle tracking, and solute transport. Particle tracks showed that materials released at mid-estuary may remain in the system for 25 days or longer.

  6. Assessing the effects of nutrient management in an estuary experiencing climatic change: the Neuse River Estuary, North Carolina.

    PubMed

    Paerl, Hans W; Valdes, Lexia M; Piehler, Michael F; Stow, Craig A

    2006-03-01

    Eutrophication is a serious water quality problem in estuaries receiving increasing anthropogenic nutrient loads. Managers undertaking nutrient-reduction strategies aimed at controlling estuarine eutrophication are faced with the challenge that upstream freshwater segments often are phosphorus (P)-limited, whereas more saline downstream segments are nitrogen (N)-limited. Management also must consider climatic (hydrologic) variability, which affects nutrient delivery and processing. The interactive effects of selective nutrient input reductions and climatic perturbations were examined in the Neuse River Estuary (NRE), North Carolina, a shallow estuary with more than a 30-year history of accelerated nutrient loading and water quality decline. The NRE also has experienced a recent increase in Atlantic hurricanes and record flooding, which has affected hydrology and nutrient loadings. The authors examined the water quality consequences of selective nutrient (P but not N) reductions in the 1980s, followed by N reductions in the 1990s and an increase in hurricane frequency since the mid-1990s. Selective P reductions decreased upstream phytoplankton blooms, but increased downstream phytoplankton biomass. Storms modified these trends. In particular, upstream annual N and P concentrations have decreased during the elevated hurricane period. Increased flushing and scouring from storms and flooding appear to have enhanced nutrient retention capabilities of the NRE watershed. From a management perspective, one cannot rely on largely unpredictable changes in storm frequency and intensity to negate anthropogenic nutrient enrichment and eutrophication. To control eutrophication along the hydrologically variable freshwater-marine continuum, N and P reductions should be applied adaptively to reflect point-source-dominated drought and non-point-source-dominated flood conditions.

  7. Two-dimensional circulation modeling of the Pamlico River estuary, North Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Giese, G.L.; Bales, Jerad

    1992-01-01

    A two dimensional, vertically averaged, unsteady flow model was applied to a 50- kilometer reach of the Pamlico River estuary, North Carolina. The model computational grid, which consists of about 16,000 square cells, each 200 meters on a side, was developed from more than one million depth soundings. Information from a comprehensive data-collection network, including six water-level stations, six temperature and salinity measurement stations, and one wind measurement station, was used to provide data for boundary conditions and for model calibration. Preliminary model results for this ongoing study were sensitive to the presence of a lateral water-level gradient at the downstream boundary. For the simulation period, water-level oscillations at the downstream boundary were much more important in controlling Pamlico River flows than were local winds blowing over the surface of the estuary. Average absolute differences between observed and simulated water levels at two measurement sites were less than 2 centimeters for the 8-day calibration period.

  8. Nitrogen loading sources and eutrophication of the Neuse River estuary, North Carolina: Direct and indirect roles of atmospheric deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Paerl, H.W.; Mallin, M.A.; Donahue, C.A.; Go, M.; Peierls, B.L.

    1995-01-01

    A multi-year (1990-1993) field survey and in situ bioassay study was undertaken to examine trophic and biogeochemical impacts of nutrient loading events at 3 representative oligohaline and mesohaline locations in the Neuse River Estuary North Carolina. Additional data were evaluated from an earlier study (1987-1990) at a mesohaline location. Previous studies showed the estuary as being nitrogen-limited throughout much of th year. In addition there is evidence and concern that recent increases in nitrogen loading have led to spatial and temporal expansion of phytoplankton blooms, indicating accelerating eutrophication. Accordingly, we examined the roles of significant nitrogen (N) inputs on the eutrophication process.

  9. Estuary-associated syndrome in North Carolina: an occupational prevalence study.

    PubMed Central

    Swinker, M; Koltai, D; Wilkins, J; Hudnell, K; Hall, C; Darcey, D; Robertson, K; Schmechel, D; Stopford, W; Music, S

    2001-01-01

    Atlantic coast estuaries recently have experienced fish kills and fish with lesions attributed to Pfiesteria piscicida and related dinoflagellates. Human health effects have been reported from laboratory exposure and from a 1997 Maryland fish kill. North Carolina has recorded Pfiesteria-related fish kill events over the past decade, but human health effects from environmental exposure have not been systematically investigated or documented here. At the request of the state health agency, comprehensive examinations were conducted in a cross-sectional prevalence study of watermen working where Pfiesteria exposure may occur: waters where diseased or stressed fish were reported from June to September 1997, and where Pfiesteria had been identified in the past. Controls worked on unaffected waterways. The study was conducted 3 months after the last documented Pfiesteria-related fish kill. The goal was to document any persistent health effects from recent or remote contact with fish kills, fish with lesions, or affected waterways, using the 1997 U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention case description for estuary-associated syndrome (EAS). Examinations included comprehensive medical, occupational, and environmental history, general medical, dermatologic, and neurologic examinations, vision testing, and neuropsychologic evaluations. Seventeen of 22 watermen working in affected waters and 11 of 21 in unaffected waters reported exposure to a fish kill or to fish with lesions. We found no pattern of abnormalities on medical, neurologic, neuropsychologic, or NES-2 evaluation. By history, one subject in each group met the EAS criteria, neither of whom had significant neuropsychological impairment when examined. Watermen from affected waterways had a significant reduction in visual contrast sensitivity (VCS) at the midspatial frequencies, but we did not identify a specific factor or exposure associated with this reduction. The cohorts did not differ in reported

  10. Water-quality data from continuously monitored sites in the Pamlico and Neuse River estuaries, North Carolina, 1991-92

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Garrett, R.G.

    1994-01-01

    Water-quality measurements were made at six sites in or near North Carolina?s Pamlico River estuary and at five sites in or near the Neuse River estuary. Measurements taken at 15-minute intervals included near-surface and near-bottom specific conductance; near-surface water temperature; and near-surface, mid-depth, and near-bottom dissolved-oxygen concentrations. In the Pamlico River estuary, salinities generally ranged from less than 0.1 to 20 parts per thousand during the period October 1991 through September 1992. Recorded water temperatures in the Pamlico River were between 3.5 and 33 degrees Celsius during the measurement period. Dissolved-oxygen concentrations ranged from less than 1 to 23 milligrams per liter. In the Neuse River estuary, salinities ranged from 0.3 to 27 parts per thousand between October 1991 and September 1992. During the same period, recorded water temperatures in this estuary were between 4 and 34 degrees Celsius. Dissolved-oxygen concentrations ranged from less than 1 to greater than 22 milligrams per liter. Daily mean values of salinity; water temperature; dissolved-oxygen concentrations; and dissolved oxygen, percent saturation, are presented in tables and graphs. Five-day mean values of water temperature and dissolved-oxygen concentrations for day and night conditions also are presented in tables. Data are presented illustrating the vertical distribution of selected constituents at each site for selected dates.

  11. SPACE/TIME ANALYSIS OF FECAL POLLUTION AND RAINFALL IN AN EASTERN NORTH CAROLINA ESTUARY

    PubMed Central

    Coulliette, Angela D.; Money, Eric S.; Serre, Marc L.; Noble, Rachel T.

    2009-01-01

    The Newport River Estuary (NPRE) is a high priority shellfish harvesting area in eastern North Carolina (NC) that is impaired due to fecal contamination, specifically exceeding recommended levels for fecal coliforms. A hydrologic-driven mean trend model was developed, as a function of antecedent rainfall, in the NPRE to predict levels of E. coli (EC, measured as a proxy for fecal coliforms). This mean trend model was integrated in a Bayesian Maximum Entropy (BME) framework to produce informative Space/Time (S/T) maps depicting fecal contamination across the NPRE during winter and summer months. These maps showed that during dry winter months, corresponding to the oyster harvesting season in NC (October 1st to March 30th), predicted EC concentrations were below the shellfish harvesting standard (14 MPN per 100 ml). However, after substantial rainfall 3.81 cm (1.5 inches), the NPRE did not appear to meet this requirement. Warmer months resulted in the predicted EC concentrations exceeding the threshold for the NPRE. Predicted ENT concentrations were generally below the recreational water quality threshold (104 MPN per 100 ml), except for warmer months after substantial rainfall. Once established, this combined approach produces near real-time visual information on which to base water quality management decisions. PMID:19544880

  12. Observations on spiny dogfish ( Squalus acanthias) captured in late spring in a North Carolina estuary

    PubMed Central

    Bangley, Charles; Rulifson, Roger

    2014-01-01

    Five spiny dogfish were captured in early-mid May during gillnet and longline sampling targeting juvenile coastal sharks in inshore North Carolina waters.  Dogfish captures were made within Back Sound and Core Sound, North Carolina. All dogfish were females measuring 849-905 mm total length, well over the size at 50% maturity. Dogfish were caught at stations 1.8-2.7 m in depth, with temperatures 22.9-24.2 °C, 32.8-33.4 ppt salinity, and 6.9-8.0 mg/L dissolved oxygen. These observations are among the latest in the spring for spiny dogfish in the southeastern U.S. and occurred at higher temperatures than previously recorded for this species.  It is unclear whether late-occurring spiny dogfish in this area represent a cryptic late-migrating or resident segment of the Northwest Atlantic population. PMID:25469229

  13. Satellite remote sensing of chlorophyll a in support of nutrient management in the Neuse and Tar-Pamlico River (North Carolina) estuaries

    EPA Science Inventory

    The North Carolina Environmental Management Commission (EMC) has adopted as a water quality standard that chlorophyll a concentration should not exceed 40 ug/L in sounds, estuaries and other slow-moving waters. Exceedances require regulators to develop a Total Maximum Daily Limit...

  14. Water-quality data from continuously monitored sites in the Pamlico and Neuse River estuaries, North Carolina, 1990-91

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Garrett, Ronald G.

    1992-01-01

    Water quality measurements were made at six sites in or near North Carolina's Pamlico River estuary and at five sites in or near the Neuse River estuary. Measurements taken at 15-minute intervals included near-surface and near-bottom specific conductance; near-surface water temperature; and near-surface, mid-depth, and near-bottom dissolved-oxygen concentrations. In the Pamlico River estuary, salinities generally ranged from near zero to about 20 parts per thousand during the period April 1989 through September 1991; however, unnaturally high salinities (up to about 51 parts per thousand) were observed at one site on July 11, 1990. Recorded water temperatures in the Pamlico River were between 0 and 33 degrees Celsius during the measurement period. Dissolved-oxygen concentrations ranged from less than 1 to 20 milligrams per liter. In the Neuse River estuary, salinities ranged from less than 0.1 to nearly 33 parts per thousand between May 1989 and September 1991. During the same period, recorded water temperatures in this estuary were between 0 and 33 degrees Celsius. Dissolved-oxygen concentrations ranged from less than 1 to 21 milligrams per liter. Instantaneous values for selected periods are summarized in a series of box plots. Daily mean values of salinity, water temperature, dissolved-oxygen concentrations, and dissolved oxygen, percent saturation, are presented in tables and graphs, as are 5-day mean values for day and night conditions. This is the second in a series of reports summarizing water quality data obtained from these continuously monitored sites.

  15. Mesozooplankton abundance in relation to the chlorophyll maximum in the Neuse River Estuary, North Carolina, USA: Implications for trophic dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimmel, David G.; McGlaughon, Benjamin D.; Leonard, Jeremy; Paerl, Hans W.; Taylor, J. Christopher; Cira, Emily K.; Wetz, Michael S.

    2015-05-01

    Estuaries often have distinct zones of high chlorophyll a concentrations, known as chlorophyll maximum (CMAX). The persistence of these features is often attributed to physical (mixing and light availability) and chemical (nutrient availability) features, but the role of mesozooplankton grazing is rarely explored. We measured the spatial and temporal variability of the CMAX and mesozooplankton community in the eutrophic Neuse River Estuary, North Carolina. We also conducted grazing experiments to determine the relative impact of mesozooplankton grazing on the CMAX during the phytoplankton growing season (spring through late summer). The CMAX was consistently located upriver of the zone of maximum zooplankton abundance, with an average spatial separation of 18 km. Grazing experiments in the CMAX region revealed negligible effect of mesozooplankton on chlorophyll a during March, and no effect during June or August. These results suggest that the spatial separation of the peak in chlorophyll a concentration and mesozooplankton abundance results in minimal impact of mesozooplankton grazing, contributing to persistence of the CMAX for prolonged time periods. In the Neuse River Estuary, the low mesozooplankton abundance in the CMAX region is attributed to lack of a low salinity tolerant species, predation by the ctenophore Mnemiopsis leidyi, and/or physiologic impacts on mesozooplankton growth rates due to temperature (in the case of low wintertime abundances). The consequences of this lack of overlap result in exacerbation of the effects of eutrophication; namely a lack of trophic transfer to mesozooplankton in this region and the sinking of phytodetritus to the benthos that fuels hypoxia.

  16. Solving problems resulting from solutions: evolution of a dual nutrient management strategy for the eutrophying Neuse River Estuary, North Carolina.

    PubMed

    Paerl, Hans W; Valdes, Lexia M; Joyner, Alan R; Piehler, Michael F; Lebo, Martin E

    2004-06-01

    In estuaries, phosphorus (P) and nitrogen (N) inputs generally control freshwater and saltwater primary production, respectively. Improved wastewater P removal and a P-detergent ban in the late 1980s decreased P loading to the nutrient over-enriched Neuse River Estuary, NC, without a contemporaneous reduction in N loading. This led to a decrease in upstream freshwater phytoplankton production and a reduction in nuisance algal blooms. While this nutrient management approach appeared to be effective in reducing the symptoms of freshwater eutrophication, it may have also diminished the upstream algal N filter, promoting N enrichment, relative to P enrichment, and eutrophication of the more saline downstream N-limited waters. Recent N controls implemented by the State of North Carolina should help address the problem. These findings underscore the need for watershed- and basin-scale, dual nutrient (N and P) reduction strategies that consider the entire freshwater--marine continuum as well as hydrologic variability (e.g., hurricanes, floods, droughts) when formulating long-term controls of estuarine eutrophication.

  17. Distribution and abundance of American eels in the White Oak River estuary, North Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hightower, J.E.; Nesnow, C.

    2006-01-01

    Apparent widespread declines in abundance of Anguilla rostrata (American eel) have reinforced the need for information regarding its life history and status. We used commercial eel pots and crab (peeler) pots to examine the distribution, condition, and abundance of American eels within the White Oak River estuary, NC, during summers of 2002-2003. Catch of American eels per overnight set was 0.35 (SE = 0.045) in 2002 and 0.49 (SE = 0.044) in 2003. There was not a significant linear relationship between catch per set and depth in 2002 (P = 0.31, depth range 0.9-3.4 m) or 2003 (P = 0.18, depth range 0.6-3.4 m). American eels from the White Oak River were in good condition, based on the slope of a length-weight relationship (3.41) compared to the median slope (3.15) from other systems. Estimates of population density from grid sampling in 2003 (300 mm and larger: 4.0-13.8 per ha) were similar to estimates for the Hudson River estuary, but substantially less than estimates from other (smaller) systems including tidal creeks within estuaries. Density estimates from coastal waters can be used with harvest records to examine whether overfishing has contributed to the recent apparent declines in American eel abundance.

  18. Sources and fate of bioavailable dissolved organic nitrogen in the Neuse River Estuary, North Carolina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paerl, H. W.; Peierls, B. L.; Hounshell, A.; Osburn, C. L.

    2015-12-01

    Eutrophication is a widespread problem affecting the structure and function of estuaries and is often linked to anthropogenic nitrogen (N) enrichment, since N is the primary nutrient limiting algal production. Watershed management actions typically have ignored dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) loading because of its perceived refractory nature and instead focused on inorganic N as targets for loading reductions. A fluorescence-based model indicated that anthropogenic sources of DON near the head of the microtidal Neuse River Estuary (NRE), NC were dominated by septic systems and poultry waste. A series of bioassays were used to determine the bioavailability of river DON and DON-rich sources to primary producers and whether those additions promoted the growth of certain phytoplankton taxa, particularly harmful species. Overall, at time scales up to two to three weeks, estuarine phytoplankton and bacteria only showed limited responses to additions of high molecular weight (HMW, >1 kDa) river DON. When increases in productivity and biomass did occur, they were quite small compared with the response to inorganic N. Low molecular weight (LMW) river DON, waste water treatment plant effluent, and poultry litter extract did have a positive effect on phytoplankton and bacterial production, indicating a bioavailable fraction. High variability of bulk DON concentration suggested that bioavailable compounds added in the experimental treatments were low in concentration and turned over quite rapidly. Some phytoplankton taxa, as measured by diagnostic photopigments, appeared to be selectively enhanced by the HMW and specific source DON additions, although the taxa could not be positively identified as harmful species. Preliminary tests show that labile autochthonous organic matter may act as a primer for the mineralization of the HMW DON. These and other, longer-term bioavailability studies will be needed to adequately address the fate of watershed DON in estuarine ecosystems.

  19. North Carolina and SREB

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southern Regional Education Board (SREB), 2009

    2009-01-01

    The Southern Regional Education Board (SREB) is a nonprofit organization that works collaboratively with North Carolina and 15 other member states to improve education at every level--from pre-K to postdoctoral study--through many effective programs and initiatives. SREB's "Challenge to Lead" Goals for Education, which call for the region to lead…

  20. North Carolina Farm Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lilley, Stephen; And Others

    Interviews with 725 North Carolina farm operators revealed: the extent of economic, social, and emotional stresses on farm families; perceptions of the future of agriculture; the degree of reliance on off-farm income; financial management practices; and programs needed from the Agricultural Extension Service. Almost 66% viewed their future in…

  1. Winter winds and river discharge determine juvenile southern flounder ( Paralichthys lethostigma) recruitment and distribution in North Carolina estuaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, J. Christopher; Miller, John M.; Pietrafesa, Leonard J.; Dickey, David A.; Ross, Steve W.

    2010-07-01

    Retrospective analyses of a 23 year data set on abundance of Age 0 southern flounder in 105 estuarine nursery areas in the coastal region of North Carolina showed that discernible temporal and spatial patterns exist among clusters of stations. Furthermore, these patterns could be quantitatively related to certain meteorological and hydrological variables, namely winds from the east-southeast (E-SE) and from the north-northeast (N-NE) sectors and river runoff, which explained up to 83% of the interannual variability in numbers. We developed a regression model using recent catch data (1987-2002) and used the model to hindcast an earlier segment of the time series (1979-1986). The model was found to be quite robust, and could predict year class strength within 1 to 80% in the test set of data. We interpret these results to mean that hydrodynamic factors are principally responsible for the observed interannual recruitment variability in southern flounder in NC, since the interannual pattern in abundance of Age 0 fish persists for 2 more years of adult life. Finally, we discuss the implications of the variable spatial distribution patterns for estimates of year class strength from juvenile abundance data. It is possible that estimates of year class strength with a useful level of confidence could be obtained from meteorological data during the larval migration period.

  2. Water-quality data from continuously monitored sites in the Pamlico and Neuse River estuaries, North Carolina, 1989-90

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Garrett, Ronald G.; Bales, Jerad

    1991-01-01

    Beginning in April 1989, water quality measurements were made at six sites in or near Pamlico River estuary and at five sites in or near the Neuse River estuary. Measurements taken at 15-minute intervals included near-surface and near-bottom specific conductance; near-surface water temperature; and near-surface, mid-depth, and near-bottom dissolved-oxygen concentrations. Water-quality data obtained from continuously-monitored sites in the Pamlico River estuary and the Neuse River estuary are presented for the period April 1989 through September 1990. Instantaneous values for selected periods are summarized in a series of box plots. Instantaneous maximum and minimum values are also tabulated. Daily mean values of salinity, water temperature, and dissolved-oxygen concentrations for the entire period are presented in tables and graphs.

  3. North Carolina surgical workforce trends.

    PubMed

    Poley, Stephanie T; Kasper, Elizabeth W; Walker, Elizabeth K; Lyons, Jessica C; Newkirk, Vann R; Thompson, Kristie

    2011-01-01

    Between 1997 and 2008, the number of general surgeons in North Carolina increased and shifted demographically, geographically, and by specialty. However, surgeon numbers--overall and by specialty--do not appear to have increased as quickly or to have shifted in the same ways as North Carolina's general population.

  4. Schools & Taxes in North Carolina.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levin, Betsy; And Others

    This report is one of a series on education finance undertaken to document existing disparities in expenditures for education, to analyze the sources of the disparities, and to describe and evaluate the gains and losses that would occur in differing types of school districts under alternative fiscal policies. This study shows that North Carolina's…

  5. The North Carolina PEPSE Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Veal, Mary Lou; Campbell, Melinda; Johnson, Dennis; McKethan, Robert

    2002-01-01

    North Carolina high school physical education teachers and teacher educators have collaborated to implement the Physical Education Partnership for Sport Education (PEPSE), which recreates the learning environment with a focus on curricular revision and assessment. This article describes current conditions, the PEPSE project's solution, how the…

  6. Resources of North Carolina Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Downs, Robert B., Ed.

    The conclusion of the survey is that North Carolina libraries do not have sufficient resources, physical facilities or staff to provide adequate library service for the state. The survey covers the present and potential roles of the State Library, the State Department of Archives and History, public libraries, university libraries, senior and…

  7. The North Carolina Field Test

    SciTech Connect

    Sharp, T.R.; Ternes, M.P.

    1990-08-01

    The North Carolina Field Test will test the effectiveness of two weatherization approaches: the current North Carolina Low-Income Weatherization Assistance Program and the North Carolina Field Test Audit. The Field Test Audit will differ from North Carolina's current weatherization program in that it will incorporate new weatherization measures and techniques, a procedure for basing measure selection of the characteristics of the individual house and the cost-effectiveness of the measure, and also emphasize cooling energy savings. The field test will determine the differences of the two weatherization approaches from the viewpoints of energy savings, cost effectiveness, and implementation ease. This Experimental Plan details the steps in performing the field test. The field test will be a group effort by several participating organizations. Pre- and post-weatherization data will be collected over a two-year period (November 1989 through August 1991). The 120 houses included in the test will be divided into a control group and two treatment groups (one for each weatherization procedure) of 40 houses each. Weekly energy use data will be collected for each house representing whole-house electric, space heating and cooling, and water heating energy uses. Corresponding outdoor weather and house indoor temperature data will also be collected. The energy savings of each house will be determined using linear-regression based models. To account for variations between the pre- and post-weatherization periods, house energy savings will be normalized for differences in outdoor weather conditions and indoor temperatures. Differences between the average energy savings of treatment groups will be identified using an analysis of variance approach. Differences between energy savings will be quantified using multiple comparison techniques. 9 refs., 8 figs., 5 tabs.

  8. Anguilliform larvae collected off North Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ross, S.W.; Casazza, T.L.; Quattrini, A.M.; Sulak, K.J.

    2007-01-01

    distributions were less clear partly due to low catches and lower Tucker trawl sampling effort. While net avoidance may account for some of the low daytime catches, an alternative explanation is that many species of larval eels occur during the day at depths > 350 m. Larvae of 21 taxa of typically shallow water eels were collected at depths > 350 m, but additional discrete depth diel sampling is needed to resolve leptocephalus vertical distributions. The North Carolina adult eel fauna (estuary to at least 2,000 m) consists of 51 species, 41% of which were represented in these collections. Many species of leptocephali collected are not yet known to have juveniles or adults established in the South Atlantic Bight or north of Cape Hatteras. Despite Gulf Stream transport and a prolonged larval stage, many of these eel leptocephali may not contribute to their respective populations. ?? 2006 Springer-Verlag.

  9. North Carolina state revamps geosciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    North Carolina State University's Department of Marine Sciences and Engineering and the Department of Geosciences have been combined to form the Department of Marine, Earth, and Atmospheric Sciences, according to university chancellor Joab L. Thomas. The new department is headed by Jay Langfelder, former head of the marine sciences and engineering department.Langfelder said that the new department will be able to provide a stronger program for students. The marine science and engineering department has traditionally been graduate and research oriented, while undergraduate studies were emphasized in the other department, he said. ‘The combination should help both programs.’

  10. North Carolina School Nurse Leadership Institute

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guttu, Martha

    2007-01-01

    Recognizing that school nurse leaders are essential to the development of school nurses, the North Carolina School Nurse Leadership Institute was developed to enable school nurse leaders to update and advance their leadership skills. The Institute was a collaborative endeavor between the North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services,…

  11. Financial Flexibility in North Carolina Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suarez, Tanya M.; Polen, Deborah A.

    This paper explores educational financial flexibility with a focus on the specific issues surrounding local flexibility in North Carolina school districts. Strategies that states have used to increase local financial flexibility include waivers, reduction of budget categories, block grants, and school-based budgeting. The North Carolina system of…

  12. North Carolina Medical Technology Manpower Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevens, R. Carole; And Others

    A survey of the medical technology profession in North Carolina was undertaken in 1981 by the North Carolina Area Health Education Center to promote statewide planning. One survey focus was institutional characteristics, including: current staff level, budget vacancies, qualifications to fill vacancies, number of resignations in the last year, and…

  13. Mentoring North Carolina Novice Teachers, 1998.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Carolina State Dept. of Public Instruction, Raleigh.

    This introductory-level training program is designed to develop in classroom teachers the knowledge, skills, and attitudes necessary for functioning as successful mentors to novice North Carolina teachers. This includes background and perspectives for mentoring in North Carolina; Interstate New Teacher Assessment and Support Consortium (INTASC)…

  14. Meeting the Challenge in Rural North Carolina

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barwick, Joseph T.

    2004-01-01

    If the nation's economy over the past 10 years can be described as a roller coaster, North Carolina was riding in the first car. The 1990s offered the promise of North Carolina's moving to the forefront of the nation's prosperity, since it outranked most states on many positive indices and outranked other southern states on most of them. North…

  15. Colon Cancer Screening in North Carolina.

    PubMed

    Harvin, Glenn

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the 2nd leading cause of cancer death both in North Carolina and in the United States. The goal of CRC screening is early detection and prevention. This commentary reviews the evidence for screening, discusses current screening options, and explores which options are best suited for use in North Carolina. PMID:27154885

  16. Ecosystem responses to extreme natural events: impacts of three sequential hurricanes in fall 1999 on sediment quality and condition of benthic fauna in the Neuse River Estuary, North Carolina.

    PubMed

    Balthis, W Leonard; Hyland, Jeffrey L; Bearden, Daniel W

    2006-08-01

    A study was conducted in November 1999 to assess sediment quality and condition of benthic fauna in the Neuse River Estuary (NRE), North Carolina, USA, following the passage of three Atlantic hurricanes during the two months prior. Samples for analysis of macroinfauna (>0.5 mm sieve size), chemical contamination of sediments, and other abiotic environmental variables (salinity, dissolved oxygen, pH, depth, sediment granulometry) were collected at 20 sites from the mouth of the Neuse River at Pamlico Sound to approximately 90 km upstream. Results were compared to those obtained from the same area in July 1998 using similar protocols. Depressed salinity, caused by extreme rainfall and associated high freshwater flow, persisted throughout much of the estuary, which had experienced periods of water-column stratification and hypoxia of underlying waters. Fifteen of the 20 sites, representing 299 km2 (76% of the survey area), also showed signs of benthic stress based on a multi-metric benthic index of biotic integrity (B-IBI). Benthic impacts included reductions in the abundance, diversity, and numbers of species and shifts in taxonomic composition, with a notable increase in dominance of the opportunistic polychaete Mediomastus ambiseta as other former dominant species declined. There was no significant increase in the extent of chemical contamination compared to pre-hurricane conditions. Storm-related reductions in dissolved oxygen and salinity were the more likely causes of the observed benthic impacts, though it was not possible, based on these results, to separate storm effects from seasonal changes in the benthos and annual episodes of summer anoxia and hypoxia.

  17. SHINING ROCK WILDERNESS, NORTH CAROLINA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lesure, Frank G.; Dunn, Maynard L.

    1984-01-01

    The Shining Rock Wilderness, in the Blue Ridge Mountains of Haywood County, North Carolina, is underlain by complexly folded mica gneiss and schist of Precambrian age. A mineral-resource survey determined that two commodities, quartz as a source of silica (SiO//2) and gneiss and schist suitable for common building stone and crushed rock, are present in large quantities. Demonstrated resources of silica occur at Shining Rock Mountain and small amounts of sheet muscovite (mica) and scrap mica are present at about 10 localities. Until deep drilling is done to test the results of the seismic studies, no estimate of the potential for gas can be made, but the presence of gas cannot be totally discounted.

  18. Quaternary geophysical framework of the northeastern North Carolina coastal system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thieler, E.R.; Foster, D.S.; Mallinson, D.M.; Himmelstoss, E.A.; McNinch, J.E.; List, J.H.; Hammar-Klose, E.S.

    2013-01-01

    The northeastern North Carolina coastal system, from False Cape, Virginia, to Cape Lookout, North Carolina, has been studied by a cooperative research program that mapped the Quaternary geologic framework of the estuaries, barrier islands, and inner continental shelf. This information provides a basis to understand the linkage between geologic framework, physical processes, and coastal evolution at time scales from storm events to millennia. The study area attracts significant tourism to its parks and beaches, contains a number of coastal communities, and supports a local fishing industry, all of which are impacted by coastal change. Knowledge derived from this research program can be used to mitigate hazards and facilitate effective management of this dynamic coastal system.

  19. Libraries in North Carolina: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: https://medlineplus.gov/libraries/northcarolina.html Libraries in North Carolina To use the sharing features ... page, please enable JavaScript. Asheboro Randolph Hospital Medical Library 364 White Oak Street Asheboro, NC 27204-1048 ...

  20. Chloritoid-sillimanite assemblage from North Carolina.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Milton, D.J.

    1986-01-01

    The occurrence of sillimanite and Fe-rich chloritoid in apparent equilibrium in a quartzite near Charlotte, North Carolina, is reported. The implications for the kyanite-andalusite-sillimanite triple point are discussed.-J.A.Z.

  1. A healthier economy for North Carolina.

    PubMed

    Hood, John

    2012-01-01

    There is solid empirical evidence for a positive relationship between economic development and health outcomes. A successful strategy for promoting economic growth in North Carolina would include reforms of the state's education, infrastructure, tax, and regulatory policies.

  2. Ecology of Albemarle Sound, North Carolina: an estuarine profile

    SciTech Connect

    Copeland, B.J.; Hodson, R.G.; Riggs, S.R.; Easley, J.E. Jr.

    1983-09-01

    Albemarle Sound, a large oligohaline estuary in northeastern North Carloina, constitutes a significant portion of North Carolina's coastal system. It is shallow, wind dominated, and strongly influenced by freshwater inflow. These conditions, combined with limited oceanic access and exchange, maintain fresh- to brackish water conditions throughout most of the estuary during the year. The nekton are the most well-known biological component of this extensive estuarine system. Albemarle Sound is an important nursery area for a number of anadromous and migratory fish as well as the blue crab and supports fisheries for many of these species. Other biological components (phytoplankton, zooplankton, and benthos) in the estuary are less well studied. Declining fisheries, algal blooms in freshwater tributaries, and changing patterns of land and water use are among the critical issues facing managers of Albemarle Sound. This report discusses current steps being taken toward holistic management and provides a state-of-the-art information base and ecological synthesis of the estuary and its watershed. 89 references, 50 figures, 19 tables.

  3. Pleistocene plants from North Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Berry, Edward Wilber

    1926-01-01

    The field work upon which this report is based was done in 1906 and 1907 as a part of the cooperative study of the Atlantic Coastal Plain, under the direction of the late William Bullock Clark. Associated with the writer in this work were L. W. Stephenson, B. L. Miller, Jr., and J. E. Pogue. Preliminary accounts of the plants collected were published in 1907 and 1909. As has been frequently emphasized, the study of the Pleistocene floras in this country is in an exceedingly backward state as measured by the volume and precision of our knowledge of Pleistocene floras in Europe. Researches in Pleistocene geology in North America have been confined almost entirely to glaciology, and the problem of the correlation of the glacial deposits with those outside the glaciated area has not been solved, nor is there any general agreement regarding the genesis of the Pleistocene deposits south of the terminal moraines. The present account of what is known of the Pleistocene flora of North Carolina and the conclusions that may be legitimately derived from it is offered in the hope that it may stimulate an interest in a neglected field of research and form a small part of the evidence upon which to base future more comprehensive conclusions and generalizations. A word of explanation regarding the illustrations is required. Nearly all of them have been made from leaves preserved as carbonaceous films in the peaty clays. These specimens were carefully washed out, and blue prints were made directly from them. Outlines and as much of the venation as could be seen were inked on the blue prints, which were then bleached. This procedure made it possible to handle a much larger amount of material and prevented any possible damage to the exceedingly fragile specimens, which were mounted on cards or between glass. The accompanying drawings were made from tracings of the original nature prints.

  4. 30 CFR 933.700 - North Carolina Federal program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false North Carolina Federal program. 933.700 Section... INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE NORTH CAROLINA § 933.700 North Carolina Federal program. (a) This part contains all rules that are applicable to surface...

  5. Eat Smart, Move More North Carolina: an obesity prevention movement.

    PubMed

    Gardner, David

    2014-01-01

    Eat Smart, Move More North Carolina was established in response to the state's rapidly worsening obesity epidemic. Since its inception in 2002, the Eat Smart, Move More North Carolina movement has grown to include more than 90 member organizations and has developed and disseminated North Carolina's plan to address obesity for 2007-2012 and 2013-2020.

  6. Student Sampler: Facts in Brief on North Carolina

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Carolina Department of Public Instruction, 2006

    2006-01-01

    This student sampler has been compiled to assist North Carolina students (4th and 8th grade) in their study of North Carolina. It is designed to introduce them to the people, places and events that have shaped North Carolina history. Topics include state symbols, descriptions of the state flag, and seal, the lyrics to the state song, and the…

  7. Student Sampler: Facts in Brief on North Carolina.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Carolina State Dept. of Public Instruction, Raleigh.

    This information sampler was compiled to assist students in their study of North Carolina. Every year North Carolina students must complete a special project on their state. The sampler was designed to introduce students to the people, places, and events that have shaped North Carolina's history. Topics in the sampler include state symbols,…

  8. North Carolina Child Health Report Card, 2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Carolina Child Advocacy Inst., Raleigh.

    This sixth annual report card is produced to heighten awareness of the health of the children of North Carolina by summarizing important child health indicators. The report is intended to assist health administrators, legislators, and family advocates in their efforts to improve the health and safety of children statewide. Data are presented for…

  9. Renewables and restructuring in North Carolina

    SciTech Connect

    Larsen, C.; Shirley, L.

    1999-07-01

    North Carolina is one of 33 states that are evaluating whether and how to restructure their electric utility industries. In most states where restructuring has either already been passed or is being considered, there has been considerable effort on the part of advocacy organizations to implement new policies to support renewable energy growth. It remains unclear, however, when the North Carolina electric industry will be restructured and whether the state will move ahead on its own or wait for a federal mandate. This paper presents the experience and lessons learned to date from efforts to incorporate renewable energy into the proposed restructured electric market structure in North Carolina. This paper focuses on the work of the North Carolina Solar Energy Association, the state's leading renewable energy advocacy organization. Discussion includes the history and status of renewable energy in the state. The paper outlines and discusses NCSEA's proposed policies for a restructured market. These are: (1) opening the market to retail competition so that customers will have a choice of renewable energy providers, (2) mandating fuel mix and emissions disclosure, (3) creating a renewable portfolio standard of 20% renewables by 2010, and (4) establishing a public benefits fund of 2.5 mills/kWh to support both renewable energy and energy efficiency investments. These policy recommendations are based on the long standing recommendation of NCSEA and the NC Energy Policy Council that the state should receive 20% of its energy from renewables by 2010.

  10. Providing Internet Access for North Carolina's Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burgin, Robert

    1996-01-01

    Because North Carolina's telecommunications services have been unable to provide cost-effective, statewide dial-access service to public libraries, the state library has had to identify a suitable alternative for public library network access. This article outlines the state library's efforts to provide access to the Internet and to electronic…

  11. Developmental Education in North Carolina Community Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clotfelter, Charles T.; Ladd, Helen F.; Muschkin, Clara; Vigdor, Jacob L.

    2015-01-01

    This article contributes to the empirical literature on remediation in community colleges by using policy variation across North Carolina's community colleges to examine how remediation affects various outcomes for traditional-age college students. We find that being required to take a remedial course (as we define it in this article) either in…

  12. Facilities Guidelines. North Carolina Public Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Carolina State Dept. of Public Instruction, Raleigh.

    In July 1987, the North Carolina General Assembly enacted legislation to provide funds for public school construction to assist county governments in meeting their capital building needs and to provide additional funds for selected counties with the most critical school facility needs. This document, in accordance with the legislation's direction,…

  13. Juvenile Justice and North Carolina Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mason, Janet

    1984-01-01

    Discusses North Carolina's Alcoholic Beverage Control (ABC) laws that are relevant to colleges (especially public) and elementary and secondary schools generally, and then applies ABC laws to typical circumstances of alcohol use on campuses. Examines civil liability for use of alcohol on campuses. (MLF)

  14. School Choice and the North Carolina Constitution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roland, David

    2006-01-01

    There continues to be a significant debate as to the most effective means of providing North Carolina's children with the best possible education. The one point upon which a great majority agree is that, despite substantial increases in funding, public education is not meeting the needs of a large proportion of the state's students. This paper…

  15. The Conservation of North Carolina's Natural Resources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Washington City Board of Education, NC.

    This is a course designed specifically for use in eastern North Carolina or a similar geographic region but this does not preclude the use of its concepts and basic structure for other geographic regions. Plans and activities are student-centered and many are problem-solving oriented and, therefore, may be modified without disrupting the…

  16. North Carolina Child Health Report Card, 2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vitaglione, Tom; Weisner, Kristie

    This seventh annual report card is produced to heighten awareness of the health of the children of North Carolina by summarizing important child health indicators. The report is intended to assist health administrators, legislators, and family advocates in their efforts to improve the health and safety of children statewide. Data are presented for…

  17. North Carolina Environmental Internship Program 1971.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finnin, William

    The North Carolina Environmental Internship Program allows students to work for the State in various environmental agencies during the summer months. The program has been conducted during the summers of 1970 and 1971 thus far, and 41 college students have participated. This report summarizes the history and accomplishments of these students in the…

  18. North Carolina Foods and Nutrition Curriculum Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Carolina State Dept. of Public Instruction, Raleigh. Div. of Vocational Education.

    This guide was developed to be used by consumer home economics teachers as a resource in planning and teaching a year-long course in foods and nutrition for high school students in North Carolina. The guide is organized in units of instruction for a first semester course and a second semester course. Each unit contains a content outline, including…

  19. An Outline of North Carolina History.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Easterly, John W., Jr.; Williford, Jo Ann

    Designed for teachers and researchers, this comprehensive outline of the history of North Carolina traces the state's history from its earliest Indian occupants to political events occurring during the 1960's. Over 40 chapters are included in the outline. In general, topics deal with expansion and settlement, agriculture and industry,…

  20. A Profile of Anson County, North Carolina.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farr, M. Gaston; And Others

    Since 1950 Anson County, North Carolina, has had major contributions to economic development, a source of great concern to residents of the almost entirely rural area. The increased capacity of the Blewitt Falls Dam power output and the county-wide water filtration system (one of only a few in the United States today) are attractive to industry.…

  1. A Profile of Ashe County, North Carolina.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rash, James O., Jr.; And Others

    From 1950 to 1970, the shift from agriculture to industry dominated Ashe County, North Carolina, isolated on the Blue Ridge by rugged terrain and severe weather. Rural farm population declined by 2/3 but rural non-farm population tripled. Many new industries helped shift the bulk of the work force to industry. In 1950, 45% of the work force farmed…

  2. North Carolina School Law: The Principal's Role.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dellinger, Anne M.

    This book outlines the legal aspects of the principal's role in North Carolina and is intended to be used as an instructive and advisory aid when formulating school policy. The principal's legal status, including a definition of authority and employment rights, is discussed. The author delineates the principal's responsibilities for student…

  3. Distribution of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in oyster (Crassostrea virginica) and surface sediment from two estuaries in South Carolina.

    PubMed

    Sanders, M

    1995-05-01

    The concentration of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) was determined in oysters and sediments collected from two high salinity estuaries from the coast of South Carolina. The two estuaries were Murrells Inlet (urban), an estuary receiving urbanized drainage and run-off, and North Inlet (non-urban), receiving drainage from heavily forested terrain and minimal anthropogenic input. A minimum of thirty (30 stations were sampled in Murrells and North Inlets, respectively. A composite oyster sample (n = 30) was analyzed for each station. For sediment, a sample from the top 3-5 cm of the sediment surface from each station was analyzed. In oyster from Murrells Inlet, total PAHs concentrations within the 75 percentile were located in the northern portion of the estuary near marinas, adjacent to residential areas of high population density, near commercial enterprises or run-off from storm drains. Total PAHs within the 25 percentile were located near the mouth of the estuary. These results showed PAHs concentration gradient in the estuary that was highest in narrow creeks, where the urban shore interfaced with tidal creeks and lowest at the mouth of the estuary. In the case for sediment, a similar gradient was observed. In comparing the mean total PAHs of the two inlets, Murrells Inlet had significantly higher (p < 0.01) total PAHs concentrations than North Inlet for oyster and sediment, respectively. In comparing PAHs concentrations among the two matrices in Murrells Inlet, these data showed that the pattern of individual PAHs in oyster and in sediment were different. Oysters tended to accumulate the lower molecular weight and the more water-soluble PAHs compared to PAHs found in sediment. As expected, differences in octanol/water partition coefficient among individual PAHs and the greater persistence of the higher molecular weight PAHs contributed to the accumulation patterns in oyster and sediment.

  4. Arsenic in North Carolina: public health implications.

    PubMed

    Sanders, Alison P; Messier, Kyle P; Shehee, Mina; Rudo, Kenneth; Serre, Marc L; Fry, Rebecca C

    2012-01-01

    Arsenic is a known human carcinogen and relevant environmental contaminant in drinking water systems. We set out to comprehensively examine statewide arsenic trends and identify areas of public health concern. Specifically, arsenic trends in North Carolina private wells were evaluated over an eleven-year period using the North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services database for private domestic well waters. We geocoded over 63,000 domestic well measurements by applying a novel geocoding algorithm and error validation scheme. Arsenic measurements and geographical coordinates for database entries were mapped using Geographic Information System techniques. Furthermore, we employed a Bayesian Maximum Entropy (BME) geostatistical framework, which accounts for geocoding error to better estimate arsenic values across the state and identify trends for unmonitored locations. Of the approximately 63,000 monitored wells, 7712 showed detectable arsenic concentrations that ranged between 1 and 806μg/L. Additionally, 1436 well samples exceeded the EPA drinking water standard. We reveal counties of concern and demonstrate a historical pattern of elevated arsenic in some counties, particularly those located along the Carolina terrane (Carolina slate belt). We analyzed these data in the context of populations using private well water and identify counties for targeted monitoring, such as Stanly and Union Counties. By spatiotemporally mapping these data, our BME estimate revealed arsenic trends at unmonitored locations within counties and better predicted well concentrations when compared to the classical kriging method. This study reveals relevant information on the location of arsenic-contaminated private domestic wells in North Carolina and indicates potential areas at increased risk for adverse health outcomes.

  5. Utilization of ERTS-1 data in North Carolina

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welby, C. W. (Principal Investigator); Lammi, J. O.; Carson, R. J., III

    1973-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. A wide range of potential uses for ERTS-1 imagery is described. Special emphasis has been placed upon studies in the Coastal Plain of North Carolina. Soil groups, water quality, and suspended sediment patterns in estuaries and offshore have been studied. A phytoplankton bloom has possibly been detected. The usefulness of the imagery in coastal landform surveys has been demonstrated as has its usefulness in monitoring developmental activity in the forests. Planners appear hesitant to use the imagery because of its small scale, but it is felt that as they become familiar with the imagery they will find it useful and time-saving for many purposes.

  6. 75 FR 55594 - North Carolina; Emergency and Related Determinations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-13

    ... SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency North Carolina; Emergency and Related Determinations AGENCY... declaration of an emergency for the State of North Carolina (FEMA-3314-EM), dated September 1, 2010, and...: I have determined that the emergency conditions in certain areas of the State of North...

  7. AIRSHED DOMAINS FOR MODELING ATMOSPHERIC DEPOSITION OF OXIDIZED AND REDUCED NITROGEN TO THE NEUSE/PAMLICO SYSTEM OF NORTH CAROLINA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Atmospheric deposition is important to nutrient loadings to coastal estuaries. Atmospheric emissions of nitrogen travel hundreds of kilometers as they are removed via atmospheric deposition. Long-range transport from outside the Neuse/Pamlico system in North Carolina is an impo...

  8. 77 FR 43077 - Federal Acquisition Regulation; Information Collection; North Carolina Sales Tax Certification

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-23

    ... Regulation; Information Collection; North Carolina Sales Tax Certification AGENCY: Department of Defense (DOD... approved information collection requirement concerning North Carolina sales tax certification. Public...: Submit comments identified by Information Collection 9000- 0059, North Carolina Sales Tax...

  9. Minerals yearbook, 1991: North Carolina. Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Sikich, S.W.; Carpenter, P.A.; Wiener, L.S.

    1993-05-01

    The value of nonfuel minerals produced in North Carolina decreased 6.2% from that of 1990. The value dropped from $589.7 million in 1990 to $552.9 million in 1991, largely as a result of the recession that has impacted the Nation in recent years. Decreases in the sales of the State's leading mineral commodity, crushed stone, as well as clays, feldspar, gemstones, scrap mica, olivine, construction sand and gravel, and pyrophyllite, more than offset small to moderate increases in the sales of lithium minerals, peat, phosphate rock, and industrial sand and gravel. Tables and statistical data are included in the annual report.

  10. Optics professional development in North Carolina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilchrist, Pamela O.; Hilliard-Clark, Joyce; Bowles, Tuere

    2010-08-01

    Using the Photonics Leaders (PL2) program model of recruitment and retention, photonics content, parental engagement, internship, and a hybrid virtual format, the session's goal is to inform outreach coordinators and scientists of strategies used to develop teachers' awareness and skills in teaching Optics to ethnically diverse students who lack traditional experiences in the discipline. The National Science Foundation (NSF) Innovative Technology Experiences for Students and Teachers (ITEST) funded program highlights initial findings of a pilot study with middle and high school teachers from The Science House at North Carolina State University sharing lessons learned and future scale-up plans.

  11. The Russell gold deposit, Carolina Slate Belt, North Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Klein, T.L.; Cunningham, C.G.; Logan, M.A.V.; Seal, R.R.

    2007-01-01

    Gold deposits have been mined in the Carolina slate belt from the early 1800s to recent times, with most of the production from large mines in South Carolina. The Russell mine, one of the larger producers in North Carolina, is located in the central Uwharrie Mountains, and produced over 470 kg of gold. Ore grades averaged about 3.4 grams per tonne (g/ t), with higher-grade zones reported. The Russell deposit is interpreted to be a sediment-hosted, gold-rich, base-metal poor, volcanogenic massive sulfide deposit in which gold was remobilized, in part, during Ordovician metamorphism. The ore was deposited syngenetically with laminated siltstones of the late Proterozoic Tillery Formation that have been metamorphosed to a lower greenschist facies. The Tillery Formation regionally overlies subaerial to shallow marine rhyolitic volcanic and volcaniclastic rocks of the Uwharrie Formation and underlies the marine volcanic and sedimentary rocks of the Cid Formation. Recent mapping has shown that a rhyolitic dome near the Russell mine was extruded during the deposition of the lower part of the Tillery Formation, at about the same time as ore deposition. Relict mafic, rock fragments present in the ore zones suggest contemporaneous bimodal (rhyolite-basalt) volcanism. The maximum formation age of the Russell deposit is younger than 558 Ma, which is similar to that of the larger, well known Brewer, Haile, and Ridgeway deposits of South Carolina. Gold was mined from at least six zones that are parallel to the regional metamorphic foliation. These strongly deformed zones consist of northeast-trending folds, high-angle reverse faults, and asymmetric doubly plunging folds overturned to the southeast. The dominant structure at the mine is an asymmetric doubly plunging anticline with the axis trending N 45?? E, probably related to late Ordovician (456 ?? 2 Ma) regional metamorphism and deformation. Two stages of pyrite growth are recognized. Stage 1, primary, spongy pyrite, is

  12. Water resources of northeast North Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilder, Hugh B.; Robison, Tully M.; Lindskov, K.L.

    1978-01-01

    Several water-related problems are associated with economic development of northeast North Carolina. The solution to these problems depends in part on adequate knowledge of the hydrology of this 8,930 square mile coastal area. Average annual precipitation on the area is about 50 inches. Of this amount, about 34 inches returns to the atmosphere by evapotranspiration, about 15 inches leaves the area as runoff, and about one inch leaves through ground-water outflow. No large stream originates within the area, but major streams entering from the north and west bring in three times as much streamflow as originates within the study area. The flat, low-lying terrane does not offer opportunities for extensive development of surface-water supplies through the use of reservoirs. Much of the surface water is contaminated by saltwater from the ocean. Ground water occurs in three major aquifers, all of which contain both freshwater and saltwater.

  13. 2014-15 North Carolina Wheat Survey Results

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An informal survey of North Carolina wheat growers was conducted in 2014- 15. The survey asked how many acres of which wheat varieties they planted in 2014. A major reason for gathering this information was to estimate the percentage of wheat acres in North Carolina that are moderately resistant (MR...

  14. Subgroup Achievement and Gap Trends: North Carolina, 2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2010

    2010-01-01

    This paper profiles the student subgroup achievement and gap trends in North Carolina for 2010. In grade 8 math (the only grade in which subgroup trends were analyzed by achievement level), North Carolina made gains across the board for all major subgroups at the basic-and-above, proficient-and-above, and advanced levels. Progress in narrowing…

  15. U. of North Carolina Chooses Slow and Steady Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carnevale, Dan

    2007-01-01

    After watching the University of Phoenix become a national leader in online education, officials of the University of North Carolina system thought they could do it, too. Unlike Phoenix, which is a for-profit institution, the North Carolina system benefits from having a strong traditional reputation that comes with being a state university.…

  16. Teacher Salary Bonuses in North Carolina. Research Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center on Performance Incentives, 2008

    2008-01-01

    In "Teacher Salary Bonuses in North Carolina"--a paper presented at the February 2008 National Center on Performance Incentives research to policy conference--Jacob Vigdor of Duke University reviews a teacher salary bonus program operating in North Carolina. Known officially as the ABC's of Public Education, the program awards teachers with…

  17. 78 FR 67382 - North Carolina; Major Disaster and Related Determinations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-12

    ... Presidential declaration of a major disaster for the State of North Carolina (FEMA-4153-DR), dated October 29... declare that such a major disaster exists in the State of North Carolina. In order to provide Federal... sufficient severity and magnitude to warrant a major disaster declaration under the Robert T....

  18. 76 FR 61726 - North Carolina; Emergency and Related Determinations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-05

    ... SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency North Carolina; Emergency and Related Determinations AGENCY: Federal Emergency Management Agency, DHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a notice of the Presidential declaration of an emergency for the State of North Carolina (FEMA-3327-EM), dated August 25, 2011, and...

  19. North Carolina Marine Education Manual, Unit One: Coastal Geology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mauldin, Lundie; Frankenberg, Dirk

    Presented are teaching materials designed to supplement North Carolina's course of study plans in earth science for the intermediate grades and junior high schools. This manual is one of a collection produced by North Carolina teachers and university faculty under a Sea Grant project entitled "Man and the Seacoast." Included are 27 activities and…

  20. Publishing Trends within State Government: The Situation in North Carolina

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Kristin E.

    2004-01-01

    The State Library of North Carolina is responsible for ensuring public access to North Carolina state government publications and maintaining a permanent state documents depository collections. Over the last 7 years, state agencies have increasingly disseminated information in digital formats via the Internet, posing challenges for the State…

  1. Community College Laws of North Carolina, 1987 Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Carolina State Dept. of Community Colleges, Raleigh.

    This publication contains the laws governing the community college system of North Carolina (Chapter 115D of the General Statutes of North Carolina, and other relevant statutes in Chapters 115, 115B, and 116). Chapter 115D contains provisions applying to state administration, local administration, financial support, budgeting, accounting, and…

  2. Elk habitat suitability map for North Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, Steven G.; Cobb, David T.; Collazo, Jaime

    2015-01-01

    Although eastern elk (Cervus elaphus canadensis) were extirpated from the eastern United States in the 19th century, they were successfully reintroduced in the North Carolina portion of the Great Smoky Mountains National Park in the early 2000s. The North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission (NCWRC) is evaluating the prospect of reintroducing the species in other locations in the state to augment recreational opportunities. As a first step in the process, we created a state-wide elk habitat suitability map. We used medium-scale data sets and a two-component approach to iden- tify areas of high biological value for elk and exclude from consideration areas where elk-human conflicts were more likely. Habitats in the state were categorized as 66% unsuitable, 16.7% low, 17% medium, and <1% high suitability for elk. The coastal plain and Piedmont contained the most suitable habitat, but prospective reintroduction sites were largely excluded from consideration due to extensive agricultural activities and pervasiveness of secondary roads. We ranked 31 areas (≥ 500 km2) based on their suitability for reintroduction. The central region of the state contained the top five ranked areas. The Blue Ridge Mountains, where the extant population of elk occurs, was ranked 21st. Our work provides a benchmark for decision makers to evaluate potential consequences and trade-offs associated with the selection of prospective elk reintroduction sites.

  3. Estimated depth to water, North Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eimers, Jo Leslie; Terziotti, Silvia; Giorgino, Mary J.

    2001-01-01

    This web site contains the Federal Geographic Data Committee-compliant metadata (documentation) for digital data produced for the North Carolina, Department of Environment and Natural Resources, Public Water Supply Section, Source Water Assessment Program. The metadata are for 11 individual Geographic Information System data sets. An overlay and indexing method was used with the data to derive a rating for unsaturated zone and watershed characteristics for use by the State of North Carolina in assessing more than 11,000 public water-supply wells and approximately 245 public surface-water intakes for susceptibility to contamination. For ground-water supplies, the digital data sets used in the assessment included unsaturated zone rating, vertical series hydraulic conductance, land-surface slope, and land cover. For assessment of public surface-water intakes, the data sets included watershed characteristics rating, average annual precipitation, land-surface slope, land cover, and ground-water contribution. Documentation for the land-use data set applies to both the unsaturated zone and watershed characteristics ratings. Documentation for the estimated depth-to-water map used in the calculation of the vertical series hydraulic conductance also is included.

  4. Unsaturated zone characteristics rating for North Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Terziotti, Silvia; Eimers, Jo Leslie

    2001-01-01

    This web site contains the Federal Geographic Data Committee-compliant metadata (documentation) for digital data produced for the North Carolina, Department of Environment and Natural Resources, Public Water Supply Section, Source Water Assessment Program. The metadata are for 11 individual Geographic Information System data sets. An overlay and indexing method was used with the data to derive a rating for unsaturated zone and watershed characteristics for use by the State of North Carolina in assessing more than 11,000 public water-supply wells and approximately 245 public surface-water intakes for susceptibility to contamination. For ground-water supplies, the digital data sets used in the assessment included unsaturated zone rating, vertical series hydraulic conductance, land-surface slope, and land cover. For assessment of public surface-water intakes, the data sets included watershed characteristics rating, average annual precipitation, land-surface slope, land cover, and ground-water contribution. Documentation for the land-use data set applies to both the unsaturated zone and watershed characteristics ratings. Documentation for the estimated depth-to-water map used in the calculation of the vertical series hydraulic conductance also is included.

  5. Watershed characteristics rating for North Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Terziotti, Silvia; Eimers, Jo Leslie; Weaver, J. Curtis

    2001-01-01

    This web site contains the Federal Geographic Data Committee-compliant metadata (documentation) for digital data produced for the North Carolina, Department of Environment and Natural Resources, Public Water Supply Section, Source Water Assessment Program. The metadata are for 11 individual Geographic Information System data sets. An overlay and indexing method was used with the data to derive a rating for unsaturated zone and watershed characteristics for use by the State of North Carolina in assessing more than 11,000 public water-supply wells and approximately 245 public surface-water intakes for susceptibility to contamination. For ground-water supplies, the digital data sets used in the assessment included unsaturated zone rating, vertical series hydraulic conductance, land-surface slope, and land cover. For assessment of public surface-water intakes, the data sets included watershed characteristics rating, average annual precipitation, land-surface slope, land cover, and ground-water contribution. Documentation for the land-use data set applies to both the unsaturated zone and watershed characteristics ratings. Documentation for the estimated depth-to-water map used in the calculation of the vertical series hydraulic conductance also is included.

  6. 76 FR 77021 - In the Matter of Carolina Power & Light Company, North Carolina Eastern Municipal Power Agency...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-09

    ... COMMISSION In the Matter of Carolina Power & Light Company, North Carolina Eastern Municipal Power Agency... Carolina Power & Light Company (CP&L, the licensee) and North Carolina Eastern Municipal Power Agency are... Hearing,'' was published in the Federal Register on August 30, 2011 (76 FR 53967). No comments or...

  7. Multiple deformation at the western edge of the Carolina slate belt, north-central North Carolina

    SciTech Connect

    Hibbard, J.P.; Shell, G.S.; Wilkins, J.K. ); Samson, S.; Wortman, G. . Dept. of Geology)

    1994-03-01

    In north-central North Carolina, volcanic-plutonic rocks of the Carolina slate belt are separated from gneisses of the Milton belt to the west by a wide, ENE-trending, polygenetic structural zone. Within a portion of this zone, the Country Line Creek complex (CLCC) forms the western edge of the slate belt. Rocks of the CLCC span a wide age range and include mafic and granitoid gneisses with subordinate pelitic schist, granitoid pegmatite, and a concordant sheet-like intrusion, the Yanceyville metagranite. The complex is heterogeneously deformed and metamorphosed. Along the SE margin of the structural zone, steeply-dipping, strongly foliated biotite granitoid and mafic gneisses of the complex appear to be intruded by the Roxboro metagranite of the Carolina slate belt. To the NW, in more interior portions of the zone, the CLCC is affected by multiphase foliations and folds that record a dextral oblique normal shear event. Here, the Yanceyville metagranite is affected by a strong foliation that is folded. A preliminary new date on the Roxboro pluton of ca. 545 Ma, indicates a Late Precambrian or older timing of deformation along the SE margin of the zone. In contrast, a preliminary, ca. 340 Ma, age on the Yanceyville metagranite indicates multiple stage Late Paleozoic deformation for interior portions of the zone. Regional structural and isotopic data hint that the Precambrian deformation may record initial interactions between the Milton and Carolina slate belts. Subsequently, this contact was reactivated during Alleghanian orogenesis.

  8. Physical oceanographic processes affecting larval transport around and through North Carolina inlets

    SciTech Connect

    Pietrafesa, L.J.; Janowitz, G.S.

    1985-01-01

    Atlantic Spot, Flounder, Croaker and Menhaden all spawn in shelf waters of North Carolina during late fall to early winter. The juveniles use estuaries such as Pamlico Sound and the Cape Fear River as nurseries during their first winter and spring. Previous studies of recruitment into the estuaries through barrier island inlets or estarine mouths assume that the pre and post metamorphosed larvae enter the estuaries at the bottom of the water column and move upstream thereafter. The mechanisms were presumed tidal. The Pamlico Sound has several inlets, Oregon, Hatteras and ocracroke, through which larvae can enter not only during flood stages of the tide but also in the presence of favorable oceanic to estuary sea level pressure gradients. The Cape Fear River has a strong semi-diurnal tidal flow both flood and ebb and also responds vigorously to one-sided divergences and convergences at its mouth. Flow, looking out of the mouth, is in at the left and out on the right. The conclusions are that, in addition to flooding tides, non-local forcing at the estuary mouths can effect transport of larval fish through the estuary mouths, throughout the entire water column.

  9. OVERFLOW ROADLESS AREA, GEORGIA AND NORTH CAROLINA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Koeppen, Robert P.; Davis, Michael P.

    1984-01-01

    The Overflow Roadless Area in the Blue Ridge Mountains of Georgia and North Carolina is underlain by complexly folded schist and gneiss of Proterozoic age. A mineral-resource survey found little likelihood for the occurrence of mineral or energy resources in the area. Minor isolated localities of mica pegmatite and amethyst gemstone occur in the area. Gneiss and schist suitable for rock aggregate are present in large quantities, but similar rocks abound outside the area. Natural gas may possibly be present at great depth beneath the overthrust of the Blue Ridge. Further seismic studies and exploratory drilling are needed to evaluate the natural gas potential of this part of the Eastern Overthrust Belt.

  10. Evaluating the Effect of Bottom Trawls in Pamlico River, North Carolina

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corbett, D. Reide; West, Terry; Clough, Lisa; Frank, James; Calfee, Worth

    2003-01-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate and quantify the amount of sediment resuspension on shallow estuarine systems, with specific comparisons between natural and trawling-induced events. This aids in the assessment of water quality and sediment processes on a specific coastal system of North Carolina, providing a basis for future studies on other shallow estuarine ecosystems. Categorizing these sediment processes into distinct individual units (e.g. natural vs. anthropogenic) is an important component toward fully realizing proper management of our coastal habitats. Heavy trawling activity along North Carolina s coast is one of the major obstacles in management plans. Therefore, it is imperative to quantify the effects of trawling to gain a more specific understanding of the human impact on estuaries.

  11. 103. North Carolina Route 1130 grade separation structure at Air ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    103. North Carolina Route 1130 grade separation structure at Air Bellows Gap. Elevation view of concrete slab bridge built in 1937. Looking southeast. - Blue Ridge Parkway, Between Shenandoah National Park & Great Smoky Mountains, Asheville, Buncombe County, NC

  12. 105. North Carolina Route 1130 grade separation structure at Air ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    105. North Carolina Route 1130 grade separation structure at Air Bellows Gap. View showing the access road from the parkway. - Blue Ridge Parkway, Between Shenandoah National Park & Great Smoky Mountains, Asheville, Buncombe County, NC

  13. 104. North Carolina Route 1130 grade separation structure at Air ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    104. North Carolina Route 1130 grade separation structure at Air Bellows Gap. Detail of the stepped wing wall. Looking southwest. - Blue Ridge Parkway, Between Shenandoah National Park & Great Smoky Mountains, Asheville, Buncombe County, NC

  14. 78 FR 64232 - North Carolina; Major Disaster and Related Determinations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-28

    ..., Watauga, and Yancey Counties and the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians for Public Assistance. All counties and Indian Tribes within the State of North Carolina are eligible to apply for assistance under...

  15. 75 FR 11582 - North Carolina Disaster #NC-00023

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-11

    ... and Flooding. Incident Period: 12/18/2009 through 12/25/2009. DATES: Effective Date: 03/02/2010... disaster declaration for Private Non-Profit organizations in the State of NORTH CAROLINA, dated...

  16. Wind Powering America: The Next Steps in North Carolina

    SciTech Connect

    Banks, Jennifer L.; Scanlin, Dennis; Quinlan, Paul

    2013-06-18

    The goal of this project is to apply the WPA’s proactive outreach strategy to the problem of educating the public about the likely transmission infrastructure developments concomitant to the significant development of wind energy resources in North Carolina. Given the lead time to develop significant new transmission infrastructure (5-10 years), it is critical to begin this outreach work today, so that wind resources can be developed to adequately meet the 20% by 2030 goal in the mid- to long-term (10-20 years). The project team planned to develop a transmission infrastructure outreach campaign for North Carolina by: (1) convening a utility interest group (UIG) of the North Carolina Wind Working Group (NC WWG) consisting of electric utilities in the state and the Southeast; and (2) expanding outreach to local and state government officials in North Carolina.

  17. 75 FR 65695 - North Carolina Disaster Number NC-00030

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-26

    ... of North Carolina (FEMA-1942-DR), dated 10/14/2010. ] Incident: Severe Storms, Flooding, and Straight-line Winds associated with remnants of Tropical Storm Nicole. Incident Period: 09/27/2010 through...

  18. 75 FR 68848 - North Carolina Disaster Number NC-00030

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-09

    ... of North Carolina (FEMA-1942-DR), dated 10/14/2010. Incident: Severe Storms, Flooding, and Straight-line Winds associated with remnants of Tropical Storm Nicole. Incident Period: 09/27/2010 through...

  19. Regional assessment of nonforestry related biomass resources: North Carolina

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-11-01

    This document is a collection of spreadsheets detailing in a county by county manner the agricultural crop, agricultural wastes, municipal wastes and industrial wastes of North Carolina that are potential biomass energy sources.

  20. University of North Carolina's experience with state medical assistance teams.

    PubMed

    Strickler, Jeff; Murtaugh, Lisa; Hoffman, Randy

    2010-01-01

    Events in the last several years have shown a clear need for better preparation regarding disaster management. In an effort to improve this preparation, North Carolina implemented state medical assistant teams to provide alternative care facilities, decontamination facilities, and shelter assistance during times of disaster. This article explores these teams from the perspective of the University of North Carolina, which serves as a lead agency for one of these teams. Key components of the team, training provided, and lessons learned will be discussed.

  1. Water quality of North Carolina streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harned, Douglas; Meyer, Dann

    1983-01-01

    Interpretation of water quality data collected by the U.S. Geological Survey and the North Carolina Department of Natural Resources and Community Development, for the Yadkin-Pee Dee River system, has identified water quality variations, characterized the current condition of the river in reference to water quality standards, estimated the degree of pollution caused by man, and evaluated long-term trends in concentrations of major dissolved constituents. Three stations, Yadkin River at Yadkin College (02116500), Rocky River near Norwood (02126000), and Pee Dee River near Rockingham (02129000) have been sampled over different periods of time beginning in 1906. Overall, the ambient water quality of the Yadkin-Pee Dee River system is satisfactory for most water uses. Iron and manganese concentrations are often above desirable levels, but they are not unusually high in comparison to other North Carolina streams. Lead concentrations also periodically rise above the recommended criterion for domestic water use. Mercury concentrations frequently exceed, and pH levels fall below, the recommended criteria for protection of aquatic life. Dissolved oxygen levels, while generally good, are lowest at the Pee Dee near Rockingham, due to the station 's location not far downstream from a lake. Suspended sediment is the most significant water quality problem of the Yadkin-Pee Dee River. The major cation in the river is sodium and the major anions are bicarbonate and carbonate. Eutrophication is currently a problem in the Yadkin-Pee Dee, particularly in High Rock Lake. An estimated nutrient and sediment balance of the system indicates that lakes along the Yadkin-Pee Dee River serve as a sink for sediment, ammonia, and phosphorus. Pollution makes up approximately 59% of the total dissolved solids load of the Yadkin River at Yadkin College, 43% for the Rocky River near Norwood, and 29% for the Pee Dee River near Rockingham. Statistically significant trends show a pattern of increasing

  2. 77 FR 14857 - Final Federal Agency Actions on Proposed Highway in North Carolina

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-13

    ..., North Carolina, to I-485 near the Charlotte-Douglas International Airport in Mecklenburg County, North... following highway project in the State of North Carolina: The Gaston East-West Connector, a 22-mile...

  3. A geochemical atlas of North Carolina, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reid, J.C.

    1993-01-01

    A geochemical atlas of North Carolina, U.S.A., was prepared using National Uranium Resource Evaluation (NURE) stream-sediment data. Before termination of the NURE program, sampling of nearly the entire state (48,666 square miles of land area) was completed and geochemical analyses were obtained. The NURE data are applicable to mineral exploration, agriculture, waste disposal siting issues, health, and environmental studies. Applications in state government include resource surveys to assist mineral exploration by identifying geochemical anomalies and areas of mineralization. Agriculture seeks to identify areas with favorable (or unfavorable) conditions for plant growth, disease, and crop productivity. Trace elements such as cobalt, copper, chromium, iron, manganese, zinc, and molybdenum must be present within narrow ranges in soils for optimum growth and productivity. Trace elements as a contributing factor to disease are of concern to health professionals. Industry can use pH and conductivity data for water samples to site facilities which require specific water quality. The North Carolina NURE database consists of stream-sediment samples, groundwater samples, and stream-water analyses. The statewide database consists of 6,744 stream-sediment sites, 5,778 groundwater sample sites, and 295 stream-water sites. Neutron activation analyses were provided for U, Br, Cl, F, Mn, Na, Al, V, Dy in groundwater and stream water, and for U, Th, Hf, Ce, Fe, Mn, Na, Sc, Ti, V, Al, Dy, Eu, La, Sm, Yb, and Lu in stream sediments. Supplemental analyses by other techniques were reported on U (extractable), Ag, As, Ba, Be, Ca, Co, Cr, Cu, K, Li, Mg, Mo, Nb, Ni, P, Pb, Se, Sn, Sr, W, Y, and Zn for 4,619 stream-sediment samples. A small subset of 334 stream samples was analyzed for gold. The goal of the atlas was to make available the statewide NURE data with minimal interpretation to enable prospective users to modify and manipulate the data for their end use. The atlas provides only

  4. Novel fen ecosystems in western North Carolina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilcox, J. D.

    2012-12-01

    Western North Carolina is mountainous, and groundwater flows from hillslope recharge zones to valley stream and spring discharge zones. Depending on surface topography and geologic conditions, the water table may approach or intersect the ground surface to form seepage wetlands, or fens. Fen ecosystems can be very sensitive to changes in land use, groundwater pumping, and upslope development. This presentation will focus on two sites where historical land use and human activity played important roles in creating or preserving fen ecosystems. Both sites now support—and are being managed to protect—federally endangered flora and fauna. The first site is home to Sarracenia oreophilia, an endangered pitcher plant that thrives on saturated soils with low nutrient content. The site's early history includes tree clearing, drain tile installation, and cattle grazing, while more recent management activities have included drain tile excavation, manual invasive removal, and prescribed burns. A 15-year water-level record indicates seasonal artesian conditions wet a 3m clay unit (K=2E-5 cm/sec) beneath the site, which is able to retain moisture during drier periods. Shorter "clay wetting periods" during drought years (1999-2000; 2007-2008) correspond to reduced clump counts in pitcher-plant surveys. The second site is a former aggregate quarry that now supports over 60 bog turtles (Clemmys muhlenbergii). The biggest threat to this site is encroachment of non-native and invasive multiflora rose (Rosa multiflora) and other large woody species. Management activities include manual removal and prescribed goat herbivory. Current efforts to characterize the springs, water-table, and surface-water flows will be used to detect changes in the future to the hydrologic regime in the fen.

  5. Environmental injustice in North Carolina's hog industry.

    PubMed

    Wing, S; Cole, D; Grant, G

    2000-03-01

    Rapid growth and the concentration of hog production in North Carolina have raised concerns of a disproportionate impact of pollution and offensive odors on poor and nonwhite communities. We analyzed the location and characteristics of 2,514 intensive hog operations in relation to racial, economic, and water source characteristics of census block groups, neighborhoods with an average of approximately 500 households each. We used Poisson regression to evaluate the extent to which relationships between environmental justice variables and the number of hog operations persisted after consideration of population density. There are 18.9 times as many hog operations in the highest quintile of poverty as compared to the lowest; however, adjustment for population density reduces the excess to 7.2. Hog operations are approximately 5 times as common in the highest three quintiles of the percentage nonwhite population as compared to the lowest, adjusted for population density. The excess of hog operations is greatest in areas with both high poverty and high percentage nonwhites. Operations run by corporate integrators are more concentrated in poor and nonwhite areas than are operations run by independent growers. Most hog operations, which use waste pits that can contaminate groundwater, are located in areas with high dependence on well water for drinking. Disproportionate impacts of intensive hog production on people of color and on the poor may impede improvements in economic and environmental conditions that are needed to address public health in areas which have high disease rates and low access to medical care as compared to other areas of the state. PMID:10706528

  6. Environmental injustice in North Carolina's hog industry.

    PubMed

    Wing, S; Cole, D; Grant, G

    2000-03-01

    Rapid growth and the concentration of hog production in North Carolina have raised concerns of a disproportionate impact of pollution and offensive odors on poor and nonwhite communities. We analyzed the location and characteristics of 2,514 intensive hog operations in relation to racial, economic, and water source characteristics of census block groups, neighborhoods with an average of approximately 500 households each. We used Poisson regression to evaluate the extent to which relationships between environmental justice variables and the number of hog operations persisted after consideration of population density. There are 18.9 times as many hog operations in the highest quintile of poverty as compared to the lowest; however, adjustment for population density reduces the excess to 7.2. Hog operations are approximately 5 times as common in the highest three quintiles of the percentage nonwhite population as compared to the lowest, adjusted for population density. The excess of hog operations is greatest in areas with both high poverty and high percentage nonwhites. Operations run by corporate integrators are more concentrated in poor and nonwhite areas than are operations run by independent growers. Most hog operations, which use waste pits that can contaminate groundwater, are located in areas with high dependence on well water for drinking. Disproportionate impacts of intensive hog production on people of color and on the poor may impede improvements in economic and environmental conditions that are needed to address public health in areas which have high disease rates and low access to medical care as compared to other areas of the state.

  7. A Community Based Study of Adult Literacy in North Carolina.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brannon, Yevonne S.; And Others

    A North Carolina study examined the problem of adult illiteracy in Spring 1988. Secondary data for the service areas of eight community colleges chosen as study sites indicated that approximately 25 percent of North Carolinans aged 25 years and older had completed less than the ninth grade in 1980 and the majority of them were unemployed. A review…

  8. Silica Content of a Mesohaline Tidal Marsh in North Carolina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norris, A. R.; Hackney, C. T.

    1999-10-01

    Studies of silicon (Si) cycling in estuarine systems have primarily focused on terrestrial inputs, benthic fluxes and uptake and recycling of Si by diatoms. However, intertidal marsh vegetation, which often covers a large area and contributes a high biomass to estuarine systems, also contains Si. Silica contents of two marsh plants, Spartina alterniflora and Juncus roemerianus, were measured in a mesohaline tidal marsh in the Cape Fear River estuary, North Carolina. Plant silica contents in the two species were significantly different in three age categories with new culms having the lowest and dead culms having the highest silica content. Mean silica contents in S. alterniflora were 4·1, 5·2 and 7·8 mg g -1dry biomass in new, mature and dead culms, respectively. Mean silica contents in J. roemerianus were 0·67, 4·2 and 9·2 mg -1dry biomass in new, mature and dead culms, respectively. Porewater dissolved silicic acid (DSi) was measured at three depths (0-10, 11-20 and 21-30 cm) and was lowest in the upper 10 cm. Mean porewater DSi concentrations were 198 μM from January to May and 295 μM from June to September. Sediment biogenic silica content (BSi) was 0·76 and 1·0% in J. roemerianus and S. alterniflora vegetative zones, respectively. Biomass estimates were used to obtain an estimate of the amorphous silica inventory of the marsh. Vascular plants and sediments contained approximately 7·1 g SiO 2 m -2and 82·0 g SiO 2 m -2, respectively. These data indicate that intertidal marshes may be an important reservoir of Si in estuarine systems.

  9. Effects of Hurricane Floyd Inland Flooding, September-October 1999, on Tributaries to Pamlico Sound, North Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bales, J.D.

    2003-01-01

    Hurricane Floyd in September 1999 caused disastrous flooding from South Carolina to Massachusetts in the United States, with particularly severe and prolonged flooding in eastern North Carolina resulting in record flood-flow loadings of freshwater and contaminants to Pamlico Sound, North Carolina. The inland flooding, water quality, and loadings to Pamlico Sound were determined as part of a multi-agency response to the floods and in an effort to understand the effects of the floods on the greater Pamlico Sound Basin. All major river basins draining to Pamlico Sound experienced floods at the 500-yr recurrence level. The volume of flood waters entering Pamlico Sound during September-October 1999 was estimated to be equivalent to about 95% of the volume of Pamlico Sound, meaning that flood waters could have essentially displaced most of the water present in Pamlico Sound. Nitrogen and phosphorus loads to the Pamlico River estuary and Neuse River estuary, the two principal estuaries draining to Pamlico Sound, in a 36-d period during the flooding were between 50-90% of the long term average annual loads. Pesticide concentrations in flood waters were surprisingly high, given the amount of dilution produced by the floodwaters.

  10. Vegetational analysis with Skylab-3 imagery. [Perquimans County, North Carolina

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welby, C. W. (Principal Investigator); Holman, R. E.

    1975-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Color infrared photography from Skylab 3 appeared to be superior to ERTS imagery in a vegetational study of northeastern North Carolina. An accuracy of 87% was achieved in delimiting species composition and zonation patterns of three coastal, vegetation classes. A vegetation map of Perquimans County, North Carolina, seemed to have a high degree of correlation with information provided by high altitude U-2 photography. Random verification sites revealed an overall interpretation accuracy above 84%. Comparison of maps drawn utilizing Skylab photography with North Carolina Dept. of Agriculture estimates of crop acreage revealed some marked discrepancies. The chief difference lies in the nonagricultural category in which there is a 30% discrepancy. This fact raised some questions as to the definition of nonagricultural land uses and methods used by the State Dept. of Agriculture to determine actual percentages of crops grown.

  11. La Crosse Encephalitis: A Persistent Arboviral Threat in North Carolina.

    PubMed

    Byrd, Brian D

    2016-01-01

    Mosquito-borne diseases remain a significant cause of economic, social, and health burdens in North Carolina. Although recently overshadowed by emerging threats such as chikungunya virus and Zika virus, La Crosse virus and other endemic arboviruses remain persistent environmental health hazards. Indeed, La Crosse virus, West Nile virus, and Eastern equine encephalitis virus accounted for more than 98% of the reported human arboviral diseases acquired in North Carolina in the past decade. Arbovirus infection is increasingly prevalent in Western North Carolina, with La Crosse encephalitis being endemic in this area. While infections are often asymptomatic and seldom fatal, the long-term neurologic sequelae of La Crosse encephalitis represent a significant burden. PMID:27621342

  12. 76 FR 77024 - In the Matter of Carolina Power & Light Company North Carolina Eastern, Municipal Power Agency...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-09

    ... COMMISSION [NRC-2011-0284; License Nos. DPR-71 and DPR-62; Docket Nos. 50-325 and 50-324] In the Matter of Carolina Power & Light Company North Carolina Eastern, Municipal Power Agency, Brunswick Steam Electric Plant, Units 1 and 2; Order Approving Indirect Transfer of Control of Licenses I Carolina Power &...

  13. 76 FR 78335 - North Carolina & Virginia Railroad Company, LLC, Chesapeake & Albemarle Railroad Division-Lease...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-16

    ... Surface Transportation Board North Carolina & Virginia Railroad Company, LLC, Chesapeake & Albemarle Railroad Division--Lease Amendment Exemption--Norfolk Southern Railway Company North Carolina & Virginia Railroad, LLC, Chesapeake & Albemarle Railroad Division (NCVR), a Class III carrier, has filed a...

  14. 75 FR 15704 - Old Dominion Electric Cooperative; North Carolina Electric Membership Corporation, Complainants v...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-30

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Old Dominion Electric Cooperative; North Carolina Electric Membership Corporation, Complainants v. Virginia Electric and Power Company, Respondent; Notice of Complaint March 23...), Old Dominion Electric Cooperative and North Carolina Electric Membership Corporation...

  15. Segregation Again: North Carolina's Transition from Leading Desegregation Then to Accepting Segregation Now

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ayscue, Jennifer B.; Woodward, Brian

    2014-01-01

    North Carolina has a storied history of school integration efforts spanning several decades. In response to the "Brown" decision, North Carolina's strategy of delayed integration was more subtle than the overt defiance of other Southern states. Numerous North Carolina school districts were early leaders in employing strategies to…

  16. Making Teacher Incentives Work: Lessons from North Carolina's Teacher Bonus Program. Education Outlook. No. 5

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ahn, Thomas; Vigdor, Jacob L.

    2011-01-01

    North Carolina has operated one of the country's largest pay-for-performance teacher-bonus programs since the late 1990s. New research shows that a North Carolina-style incentive-pay program has the potential to improve student learning by encouraging teachers to exert more effort on the job. The North Carolina model avoids three pitfalls…

  17. An Analysis of Diversity Inclusion in North Carolina Secondary Agricultural Education Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warren, Chastity K.; Alston, Antoine J.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to gauge the perceptions of North Carolina secondary agricultural educators regarding the benefits and barriers to diversity inclusion in North Carolina secondary agricultural education programs. Additionally, the perceived solutions to increasing diversity inclusion in North Carolina secondary agricultural education…

  18. A Narrative History of the North Carolina Association of Community College Trustees.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiggs, Jon L.; Wiggs, Caroline M.

    The North Carolina Association of Community College Trustees (NCACCT) is a private nonprofit corporation founded to assist in furthering the aims, goals and development of North Carolina's community colleges. The Associations' stated purpose is to "improve and expand the opportunities and resources available to the people of North Carolina for…

  19. 75 FR 51949 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; North Carolina and South Carolina...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-24

    ... SIPs. 74 FR 21550. On November 12, 2009, and April 5, 2010, North Carolina submitted all components of... Determination for the Purpose of Stopping Sanctions Clock AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Notice of Letter to Governor Regarding Completeness and Stopping of Sanctions Clock. SUMMARY: EPA is...

  20. Durham, North Carolina, Students Study Martian Volcanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    This image of the wall of a graben a depressed block of land between two parellel faults in Tyrrhena Terra, in Mars' ancient southern highlands, was taken by the Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM) at 0914 UTC (4:14 a.m. EST) on February 6, 2008, near 17.3 degrees south latitude, 95.5 degrees east longitude. CRISM's image was taken in 544 colors covering 0.36-3.92 micrometers, and shows features as small as 35 meters (115 feet) across. The region covered is just over 10 kilometers (6.2 miles) wide at its narrowest point.

    This image was part of an investigation planned by students in four high schools in Durham, North Carolina. The students are working with the CRISM science team in a project called the Mars Exploration Student Data Teams (MESDT), which is part of NASA's Mars Public Engagement Program and Arizona State University's Mars Education Program. Starting with a medium-resolution map of the area, taken as part of CRISM's 'multispectral survey' campaign to map Mars in 72 colors at 200 meters (660 feet) per pixel, the students identified a key rock outcrop to test their hypothesis that the irregular depression was formed by Martian volcanism. They provided the coordinates of the target to CRISM's operations team, who took a high-resolution image of the site. The Context Imager (CTX) accompanied CRISM with a 6 meter (20 feet) per pixel, high-resolution image to sharpen the relationship of spectral variations to the underlying surface structures. The Durham students worked with a mentor on the CRISM team to analyze the data, and presented their results at the 39th Lunar and Planetary Science Conference, held in League City, Texas, on March 10-14, 2008.

    The upper panel of the image shows the location of the CRISM data and the surrounding, larger CTX image, overlain on an image mosaic taken by the Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) on Mars Odyssey. The mosaic has been color-coded for elevation using data from the Mars

  1. Dillard Drive Middle & Elementary School, Raleigh, North Carolina.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Design Cost Data, 2001

    2001-01-01

    Presents design features of the Dillard Drive Middle & Elementary School (North Carolina) that incorporates daylighting in the majority of the classrooms, the gymnasium, dining room, and media center. The design also uses advanced lighting controls, fiber optic networking, automatic environmental controls, and an energy management system that…

  2. State Norms for the North Carolina Testing Program. 1998 Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Carolina State Dept. of Public Instruction, Raleigh. Div. of Accountability/Testing.

    This publication provides a reference for educators and others interested in conducting comparative studies relative to North Carolina tests. It includes norms, tables, and other statistical information for all state-developed tests (state-mandated and local-option tests for which baseline data are available) that were administered during the…

  3. 76 FR 28842 - North Carolina Disaster Number NC-00033

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-18

    ... declaration of a major disaster for the State of North Carolina (FEMA--1969-DR), dated 04/19/2011 . Incident: Severe Storms, Tornadoes, and Flooding. Incident Period: 04/16/2011. Effective Date: 05/07/2011. Physical Loan Application Deadline Date: 06/20/2011. EIDL Loan Application Deadline Date: 01/20/2012....

  4. 76 FR 64419 - NORTH CAROLINA Disaster Number NC-00036

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-18

    ... of NORTH CAROLINA (FEMA-4019-DR), dated 08/31/2011. Incident: Hurricane Irene. Incident Period: 08/25/2011 through 09/01/2011. Effective Date: 10/07/2011. Physical Loan Application Deadline Date: 10/31/2011. EIDL Loan Application Deadline Date: 05/31/2012. ADDRESSES: Submit completed loan applications...

  5. 76 FR 58328 - North Carolina Disaster Number NC-00036

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-20

    ... of North Carolina (FEMA-4019-DR), dated 08/31/2011. Incident: Hurricane Irene. Incident Period: 08/25/2011 through 09/01/2011. Effective Date: 09/11/2011. Physical Loan Application Deadline Date: 10/31/2011. EIDL Loan Application Deadline Date: 05/31/2012. ADDRESSES: Submit completed loan applications...

  6. 76 FR 66110 - North Carolina Disaster Number NC-00036

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-25

    ... of North Carolina (FEMA-4019-DR), dated 08/31/2011. Incident: Hurricane Irene. Incident Period: 08/25/2011 through 09/01/2011. Effective Date: 10/17/2011. Physical Loan Application Deadline Date: 11/30/2011. EIDL Loan Application Deadline Date: 05/31/2012. ADDRESSES: Submit completed loan applications...

  7. 76 FR 38717 - North Carolina Disaster Number NC-00033

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-01

    ... of North Carolina (FEMA-1969-DR), dated 04/19/2011. Incident: Severe Storms, Tornadoes, and Flooding. Incident Period: 04/16/2011. Effective Date: 06/22/2011. Physical Loan Application Deadline Date: 07/05/2011. EIDL Loan Application Deadline Date: 01/20/2012. ADDRESSES: Submit completed loan applications...

  8. Bicycles in Traffic. A North Carolina Driver Education Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    East Carolina Univ., Greenville, NC.

    This unit is designed to provide driver educators with information for teaching automobile drivers about the traffic-mix problem between bicycles and motor vehicles on roadways. The purpose of the unit is to improve the safety of bicyclists on North Carolina highways and help to decrease the number of bicycle deaths and injuries caused by traffic…

  9. 161. North Carolina Route 80 grade separation structure. The structure ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    161. North Carolina Route 80 grade separation structure. The structure at Buck Creek Gap, built in 1942, has a clear span of 139. Both the roadway running atop and under the structure have a curving alignment. - Blue Ridge Parkway, Between Shenandoah National Park & Great Smoky Mountains, Asheville, Buncombe County, NC

  10. Preventing Childhood Obesity: Policy and Practice Strategies for North Carolina

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Owen, Jenni, Ed.; Rosch, Joel, Ed.; Smith, Shannon, Ed.

    2011-01-01

    North Carolina Family Impact Seminars (NCFIS) include annual seminars, briefing reports and follow-up activities designed specifically for state policymakers, including legislators and legislative staff, the governor and executive branch staff, and state agency representatives. The Center for Child and Family Policy at Duke University convenes the…

  11. North Carolina Today: Contrasting Conditions and Common Concerns.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calhoun, Craig

    This report provides a statistical profile for thinking about education and development decisions in North Carolina. It profiles the state primarily in terms of population patterns, economy, labor force, education, and environment; secondarily in terms of health and social services, infrastructure and aspects of government performance. State and…

  12. North Carolina Administrative Code. Title 23. Department of Community Colleges.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Carolina Community Coll. System, Raleigh.

    This document is Title 23 of the North Carolina Administrative Code, which deals with the Department of Community Colleges. Chapter 1 contains general administrative provisions regarding the college system, including definition of terms, authority, state planning, and procedural information. Chapter 2 identifies the mission of the community…

  13. North Carolina Community College System Information Resources and Technology Plan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Carolina Community Coll. System, Raleigh.

    The North Carolina Community College System engaged in a strategic planning process in 1998 that was the basis for the information resources and technology plans for the entire System. A focus of the planning was technology, and a technology environmental scanning team developed a set of planning assumptions, which led to the creation of 15 goals…

  14. 77 FR 56250 - North Carolina Disaster #NC-00044

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-12

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION North Carolina Disaster NC-00044 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice... Deadline Date: 06/05/2013. ADDRESSES: Submit completed loan applications to: U.S. Small...

  15. 76 FR 26603 - Reorganization of Sector North Carolina; Technical Amendment

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-09

    ... the Port DHS Department of Homeland Security FR Federal Register MSU Marine Safety Unit NPRM Notice of... realignment (72 FR 36316, July 2, 2007). At that time, Sector North Carolina's office was located in Fort... Wilmington. The consolidation into one COTP zone will strengthen unity of command in the Sector...

  16. Health burden from peat wildfire in North Carolina

    EPA Science Inventory

    In June 2008, a wildfire smoldering through rich peat deposits in the Pocosin Lakes National Wildlife Refuge produced massive amounts of smoke and exposed a largely rural North Carolina area to air pollution in access of the National Ambient Air Quality Standards. In this talk, w...

  17. A Cross Generational Dialect Study in Western North Carolina

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holt, Yolanda Feimster

    2011-01-01

    This dissertation evaluates the relationship between African American English and White Vernacular English as spoken in a small rural town in western North Carolina for consistencies in vowel production by group membership and for participation in the Southern Vowel Shift (SVS), a vowel rotation currently occurring in the Southern United States. A…

  18. Instructor's Field Manual: North Carolina Outward Bound School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Outward Bound, Morganton, NC.

    A supplement to the North Carolina Outward Bound School's Instructor's Handbook, this field manual presents useful, but not required, information gleaned from old timers and resource books which may enable the instructor to conduct a better course. Section one considers advantages and disadvantages and provides directions and topographical maps…

  19. 75 FR 65500 - North Carolina; Major Disaster and Related Determinations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-25

    ... authority of the Robert T. Stafford Disaster Relief and Emergency Assistance Act, 42 U.S.C. 5121 et seq... severity and magnitude to warrant a major disaster declaration under the Robert T. Stafford Disaster Relief... SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency North Carolina; Major Disaster and Related...

  20. Mineral Localities of North Carolina. [1971 Revised Edition].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patterson, O. F., III; Ganis, G. Robert

    Described are mineral locations in the state of North Carolina. The localities are presented in annotated form, by counties, with a brief description of the minerals occurring at each deposit. No attempt is made to explain the mode of occurrence or the geologic origin of the deposits. The descriptions are accompanied by county highway maps for…

  1. North Carolina and the Southern Regional Education Board, December 2014

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southern Regional Education Board (SREB), 2014

    2014-01-01

    This document details North Carolina's participation in Southern Regional Education Board (SREB) programs and services from December 2013 through November 2014. Appropriations from member states support SREB's core operations and general services. SREB leverages the long-standing commitment of member states to attract external funding for an array…

  2. National Environmental/Energy Workforce Assessment for North Carolina.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Field Research Center Inc., Iowa City, IA.

    This report presents existing workforce levels, training programs and career potentials and develops staffing level projections (1976-1982) based on available information for the State of North Carolina. The study concerns itself with the environmental pollution control areas of air, noise, potable water, pesticides, radiation, solid waste,…

  3. First on the Land: The North Carolina Indians.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wetmore, Ruth Y.

    Written for students at the secondary level, this book details the historical development (10,000 B.C. to the present) of the 3 American Indian linguistic groups located in the 4 geographical areas of North Carolina (the Algonquians on the coast, the Iroquoians, including the Tuscarora on the coastal plain and the Cherokee in the mountains, and…

  4. Genetic characterization of the North Carolina State University maize lines

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Since 1980, 150 North Carolina State University maize inbreds have been developed and released on the basis of superior performance for topcross yield and other traits of agronomic importance. During this time there has been great emphasis placed on breeding with exotic germplasm, with 86 NCSU inbr...

  5. North Carolina Farm and Rural Life Study. 1988 Summary Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lilley, Stephen; And Others

    This survey of North Carolina farmers focuses on the impact of important social changes and their interplay with ongoing changes in agriculture. It provides information for policymakers and education researchers to prepare for possible changes in the rural education system. State farmers were interviewed in 1987 and again in 1988. Of 883 people…

  6. North Carolina Marine Education Manual, Unit Two: Seawater.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mauldin, Lundie; Frankenberg, Dirk

    Although North Carolina's coastal water is chemically and physically similar to other bodies of sea water, the specific manner in which tides and waves act upon the coastline is unique. Accordingly, the 30 activities presented in this manual are intended to help junior high school students understand how physical forces modify coastal areas. While…

  7. Fatal and nonfatal firearm injuries in North Carolina.

    PubMed

    Coyne-Beasley, Tamera; Lees, Abigail C

    2010-01-01

    This commentary discusses fatal and nonfatal injuries due to firearms in North Carolina and reviews epidemiologic trends in firearm-related homicide, suicide, and unintentional injuries. This commentary also provides an overview of strategies for reducing the risk of firearm-related injury and suggests future research to prevent these injuries. PMID:21500672

  8. Profile of North Carolina Central University Freshmen Class, Fall 1978.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fuller, Vicki S.; And Others

    Demographic and academic information on 1978 North Carolina Central University (NCCU) freshmen were assessed, using the NCCU Freshman Survey and 66 items from the College Student Questionnaire. Attention was directed to student attitudes about family and peer relationships, instructional/learning styles, and political, social, cultural, and moral…

  9. North Carolina Pilot Kindergarten Program. Fourth Annual Evaluation Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Learning Inst. of North Carolina, Durham.

    This evaluation report on the North Carolina Pilot Kindergarten Program covers the 74 local educational units involved in the program for the 1972-73 school year. The first part of the document is narrative, including (1) an historical perspective from the program's beginning in 1969, (2) discussion of philosophy, objectives, and guidelines, (3)…

  10. Retaining Physical Therapists in North Carolina Public Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ray, Laurie

    2011-01-01

    The intent of this research was to describe school-based physical therapists in North Carolina (NC) and examine relationships between personality traits of this group, their job satisfaction and their perception of factors that influence decisions to remain at or leave their jobs. School-based physical therapists across NC (n=97) anonymously…

  11. 78 FR 61442 - North Carolina Disaster #NC-00056

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-03

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION North Carolina Disaster NC-00056 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice...: 06/25/2014. ADDRESSES: Submit completed loan applications to: U.S. Small Business...

  12. North Carolina Marine Education Manual, Unit Three: Coastal Ecology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mauldin, Lundie; Frankenberg, Dirk

    Two dozen activities on the ecology of coastal areas, with special emphasis on North Carolina's coastline, comprise this manual for junior high school science teachers. Provided are a table correlating these lessons with state curriculum guidelines, and a summary of the unit's goals and behavioral objectives. Among the topics included are coastal…

  13. North Carolina Tales Fly with Fourth Grade Tellers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westman, Gretchen Daub

    2008-01-01

    In fourth grade, North Carolina students are required to write their own personal narratives. The teachers felt that telling a story would be a great stepping stone toward writing one. Rather than focusing on grammar and the mechanics of writing, students could focus on story development and creativity. In this article, the author describes how…

  14. Municipal Broadband in Wilson, North Carolina: A Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Boyle, Timothy

    2012-01-01

    Relatively little empirical attention has been paid to the political economy of publicly-retailed fiber-optic broadband internet service. To address this gap in the literature, this dissertation examines the history, dynamics and trends in the municipal broadband movement. In specific, Wilson, North Carolina's Greenlight service is examined…

  15. North Carolina's Higher Education System: Success or Failure?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gillen, Andrew; Vedder, Richard

    2008-01-01

    North Carolina has long prided itself on what many perceive to be one of the finest systems of higher education in the country. Aside from having a number of nationally recognized private schools of distinction (e.g., Duke, Wake Forest, Davidson), the state has invested aggressively with public funds. State government appropriations for higher…

  16. State Secret: North Carolina and the Cherokee Trail of Tears

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bryant, James

    2008-01-01

    This paper is an analytic essay that examines the treatment of the Cherokee Trail of Tears in a North Carolina fourth grade textbook. I begin by offering a satiric look at an imaginary textbook's treatment of the Holocaust that is based closely on the actual narrative of the Trail of Tears written in the fourth grade text. Following this, close…

  17. Phosphorus dynamics in a North Carolina Piedmont reservoir

    SciTech Connect

    Kuenzler, E.J.; Greer, L.E.

    1980-01-01

    University Lake, a water-supply impoundment in the Piedmont Province of North Carolina, was sampled twice monthly for ten months to determine the patterns of phosphate uptake at different depths throughout the year. The lake is oxygenated at all depths in winter but beginning in March, thermal stratification prevents oxygen transport to the hypolimnion.

  18. Seastrokes: A New Threat for North Carolina Swimmers?

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, Francisco; Castillo, Mauricio

    2014-01-01

    Summary Spinal cord infarcts have been reported in young healthy patients following contact with the water on the beaches of North Carolina. Although their exact cause is not known, contact with a toxic marine animal has been proposed. We describe a patient who suffered a “seastroke” and review the pertinent literature. PMID:25196627

  19. 30 CFR 933.700 - North Carolina Federal program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... have a significantly adverse effect on the purposes of a publicly owned park, forest, or recreation area and may condition permit approval on a requirement of visual screening, vegetative or otherwise... publication of the notice to that effect in the Federal Register. (1) North Carolina Mining Act of 1971,...

  20. 30 CFR 933.700 - North Carolina Federal program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... have a significantly adverse effect on the purposes of a publicly owned park, forest, or recreation area and may condition permit approval on a requirement of visual screening, vegetative or otherwise... publication of the notice to that effect in the Federal Register. (1) North Carolina Mining Act of 1971,...

  1. Approaches to Relocation; North Carolina Mobility Project, 1970-71.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Carolina Manpower Development Corp., Chapel Hill.

    This report covers the contract period from October 1, 1970-September 30, 1971. It follows earlier reports and summarizes much that has been learned about assisted relocation of rural workers to urban locations within North Carolina. These developments include attempted linkage with training programs, some successful others not and various…

  2. Continuing Education Resource Manual, North Carolina Community College System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Carolina Community Coll. System, Raleigh.

    The North Carolina Department of Community Colleges (NCDCC) prepared this reference manual as a resource guide for planning and implementing continuing education (CE) courses. The manual includes essential information on courses, rules, resources, and procedures that are appropriate to course implementation and operation of a continuing education…

  3. Mixing Waters and Moving Ships off the North Carolina Coast

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The estuarine and marine environments of the United States' eastern seaboard provide the setting for a variety of natural and human activities associated with the flow of water. This set of Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer images from October 11, 2000 (Terra orbit 4344) captures the intricate system of barrier islands, wetlands, and estuaries comprising the coastal environments of North Carolina and southern Virginia. On the right-hand side of the images, a thin line of land provides a tenuous separation between the Albemarle and Pamlico Sounds and the Atlantic Ocean. The wetland communities of this area are vital to productive fisheries and water quality.

    The top image covers an area of about 350 kilometers x 260 kilometers and is a true-color view from MISR's 46-degree backward-looking camera. Looking away from the Sun suppresses glint from the reflective water surface and enables mapping the color of suspended sediments and plant life near the coast. Out in the open sea, the dark blue waters indicate the Gulf Stream. As it flows toward the northeast, this ocean current presses close to Cape Hatteras (the pointed cape in the lower portion of the images), and brings warm, nutrient-poor waters northward from equatorial latitudes. North Carolina's Outer Banks are often subjected to powerful currents and storms which cause erosion along the east-facing shorelines. In an effort to save the historic Cape Hatteras lighthouse from the encroaching sea, it was jacked out of the ground and moved about 350 meters in 1999.

    The bottom image was created with red band data from the 46-degree backward, 70-degree forward, and 26-degree forward cameras displayed as red, green, and blue, respectively. The color variations in this multi-angle composite indicate different angular (rather than spectral) signatures. Here, the increased reflection of land vegetation at the angle viewing away from the Sun causes a reddish tint. Water, on the other hand, appears

  4. 142. North Carolina route 181 grade separation structure. This single ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    142. North Carolina route 181 grade separation structure. This single span, reinforced concrete, elliptical, spandrel arch structure, built in 1959, is on a slight skew as it passes over the parkway accounting for its wide span of 80. It is one of the few structures to pass over the parkway. This view of the elevation is to the north. - Blue Ridge Parkway, Between Shenandoah National Park & Great Smoky Mountains, Asheville, Buncombe County, NC

  5. 257. North Carolina Route 181 grade separation structure is a ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    257. North Carolina Route 181 grade separation structure is a single-span, reinforced concrete, elliptical spandrel arch structure built in 1959, it is on a slight skew as it passes over the parkway accounting for its wide span of 80. It is one of the few structures to pass over the parkway. This view is to the north. - Blue Ridge Parkway, Between Shenandoah National Park & Great Smoky Mountains, Asheville, Buncombe County, NC

  6. 75 FR 2580 - Carolina Coastal Railway, Inc.-Acquisition and Operation Exemption-North Carolina State Ports...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-15

    ... Railroad Co.'s (MHSF) lease with the North Carolina State Ports Authority (SPA) and to operate approximately 0.87 miles of SPA's rail lines as follows: (1) From milepost 0.0 to milepost 0.87 at Gallants... railroad tracks owned or leased by SPA (or previously owned or leased by North Carolina Ports...

  7. Monitoring Rehabilitation in Temperate North American Estuaries

    SciTech Connect

    Rice, Casimir A.; Hood, W Gregory; Tear, Lucinda M.; Simenstad, Charles; Williams, Gregory D.; Johnson, L. L.; Feist, B. E.; Roni, P.

    2005-02-01

    In this chapter, we propose that monitoring rehabilitation in estuarine ecosystems by necessity requires quantifying relationships between dynamic estuarine processes and sensitive indicators of ecosystem function. While we do discuss temperate systems in general, emphasis is placed on anadromous salmon habitats in the Pacific Northwest because anadromous fishes are such a major focus of rehabilitation efforts, and present some of the greater challenges in linking function of one segment of their life history to conditions in a specific habitat. We begin with a basic overview of the ecological and socioeconomic significance of, as well as anthropogenic effects on, estuaries. Next, we briefly summarize the various kinds of estuarine rehabilitation historically practiced in temperate regions, and review estuarine rehabilitation monitoring design and methods, highlighting the unique challenges involved in monitoring estuarine systems. We then close with a summary and conclusions.

  8. Cirsium nuttallii (Asteraceae: Cynareae) new to North Carolina and an illustrated key to southeastern congeners

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Krings, A.; Westbrooks, R.; Lloyd, J.

    2002-01-01

    Cirsium nuttallii (Asteraceae) is documented for North Carolina. The species had previously been known from Florida to South Carolina and from disjunct populations in Virginia. An illustrated key is provided to aid others in the diagnosis of Cirsium in North Carolina and the southeast.

  9. 40 CFR 81.334 - North Carolina.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Section 107 Attainment Status Designations § 81.334 North... Creek Township, Broadbay Township, Kernersville Township, Middle Fork Township, Old Town Township, South... County (2) Attainment. Burke County (part) Unifour Metropolitan Planning Organization Boundary...

  10. 40 CFR 81.334 - North Carolina.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Section 107 Attainment Status Designations § 81.334 North... Creek Township, Broadbay Township, Kernersville Township, Middle Fork Township, Old Town Township, South...) Attainment. Burke County (part) Unifour Metropolitan Planning Organization Boundary (2) Attainment....

  11. Long-term variation of fiddler crab populations in North Carolina salt marshes

    SciTech Connect

    Cammen, L.M.; Seneca, E.D.; Stroud, L.M.

    1984-06-01

    As part of the environmental monitoring of possible effects of the Brunswick nuclear power plant fiddle crab populations were sampled in several salt marshes in the lower Cape Fear River estuary, North Carolina for five years. Total biomass of the fiddler crabs Uca Pugnax and U. minax in four Spartina marshes declined by 65 to 70% between the summers of 1974-1975 and 1976-1977 with no significant decrease in population density; there was evidence of a recovery in summer of 1978 to the 1974-1975 levels. The cause of these fluctuations is unknown, but such a degree of variability in intertidal populations emphasizes the need for caution in using one or two-year baseline studies to evalute potential environmental impacts. 1 figure, 2 table.

  12. Carolinas Coastal Change Processes Project data report for nearshore observations at Cape Hatteras, North Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Armstrong, Brandy N.; Warner, John C.; Voulgaris, George; List, Jeffrey H.; Thieler, Robert; Martini, Marinna A.; Montgomery, Ellyn T.; McNinch, Jesse E.; Book, Jeffrey W.; Haas, Kevin

    2013-01-01

    An oceanographic field study conducted in February 2010 investigated processes that control nearshore flow and sediment transport dynamics at Cape Hatteras, North Carolina. This report describes the project background, field program, instrumentation setup, and locations of the sensor deployments. The data collected, and supporting meteorological and streamflow observations, are presented as time-series plots for data visualization. Additionally, the data are available as part of this report.

  13. 'Carolina' session growth, reproduction, and biomass of hydrilla in North Carolina

    SciTech Connect

    Harlan, S.M.; Davis, G.J.; Pesacreta, G.

    1984-06-01

    Certain morphological and physiological characteristics are associated with the phenomenal ability of hydrilla to invade an aquatic system, overtop more desirable native rooted aquatic species, and form very dense monospecific mats. One of these adaptations is the formation of tubers which are vegetative propagules formed at the ends of positively geotropic rhizomes (Van, Haller, and Garrard 1978). Tubers develop in the hydrosoil and thus are very resistant to all control methods. Also, hydrilla's ability to become established and photosynthesize under low light intensities is unequaled by any other submersed rooted aquatic macrophyte (Van, Haller, and Bowes 1976). Hydrilla growing in lakes in Umstead State Park in North Carolina was first identified by William Haller in 1981 and had apparently been established in the area for several years. Since its initial identification, hydrilla has been found in 18 other water bodies, all in Wake Country. Hydrilla has the potential to become a very serious problem as there are presently no effective means of halting its spreading or eradicating it after infestation occurs. For effective management in North Carolina, knowledge of the growth, reproduction, and biomass of hydrilla in North Carolina is needed. This research addresses these questions.

  14. Reconstruction of silica exposure in the North Carolina dusty trades.

    PubMed

    Rice, C; Harris, R L; Lumsden, J C; Symons, M J

    1984-10-01

    The current occupational standard for quartz exposure is largely drawn from studies of the granite workers at Barre, Vermont. Since 1935, the North Carolina Dusty Trades program has accumulated data on work-place environmental conditions, occupational history and health status for persons exposed to silica in a broad range of mineral industries, including granite dimension stone. The environmental data have been collected with Greenburg-Smith and midget impingers and the respirable mass dust sampler. A procedure is presented to combine the results of these sampling methods and estimate exposure at the various jobs at each dusty trades plant. From an individual's occupational history, the environmental exposure estimates are used to formulate personal lifetime exposure summaries. The results of this procedure in the North Carolina granite industry compared well with historical data from Vermont granite sheds.

  15. Estimated water use, by county, in North Carolina, 1995

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Walters, D.A.

    1997-01-01

    Data on water use in North Carolina were compiled for 1995 as part of a cooperative agreement between the U.S. Geological Survey and the Division of Water Resources of the North Carolina Department of Environment and Natural Resources. Data were compiled from a number of Federal, State, and private sources for the offstream water-use categories of public supply, domestic, commercial, industrial, mining, livestock, irrigation, and thermoelectric-power generation. Data also were collected for instream use from hydroelectric facilities. Total withdrawals (fresh and saline) during 1995 were an estimated 9,286 million gallons per day for the offstream water-use categories. About 94 percent of the water withdrawn was from surface water. Thermoelectric-power generation accounted for 80 percent of all withdrawals. Instream water use for hydroelectric-power generation totaled about 56,400 million gallons per day. Each water-use category is summarized in this report by county and source of water supply.

  16. Reproductive maturation and breeding of woodcock in North Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stamps, R.T.; Doerr, P.D.

    1977-01-01

    Breeding woodcock (PhiJohela minor) were studied in North Carolina during the winters and springs of 1974-75 and 1975-76.. Measurements of testes and ovaries from 19 male and 30 female woodcock suggest that gonadal recrudescence in many woodcock occurs on the wintering grounds. In males, testicular recrudescence occurred as early as December and was accompanied by territory selection and courtship activity. Of 15 females collected in February, 5 had shelled eggs in the oviduct. Seven woodcock broods, located from 1 March to 30 April, were banded, aged, and released. From estimated clutch completion dates it appears that broods were successfully hatched from clutches completed as early as 21 January. Because of the early nesting of woodcock in North Carolina, hunters and land managers need to be aware of woodcock breeding habits and their need for protection during late winter.

  17. Analysis of storm-water infiltration ponds on the North Carolina Outer Banks

    SciTech Connect

    Chescheir, G.M.; Fipps, G.; Skaggs, R.W.

    1990-09-01

    Increasing development along the North Carolina coast has been linked to the deterioration of water quality in adjacent sounds and estuaries. Degradation of water quality in sounds and estuaries threatens the coastal ecology which provides resources for the area's fishing and tourism industries. The state of N.C. adopted the current Stormwater Runoff Disposal Rules in 1988 requiring stormwater management plans for new development in 20 coastal counties. Stormwater infiltration pond systems are approved by the State as an option for retaining stormwater on the developed site; however, the long-term performance of these systems has not been measured or determined. The study was conducted to monitor the hydrology of stormwater infiltration ponds on the North Carolina barrier islands and to develop a model that continuously simulates the performance of these ponds. The hydrology of two operating infiltration ponds systems was evaluated in an 18-month field study. Rainfall, pond stage, and water table elevations at selected locations were monitored continuously. Water table elevations at additional locations were monitored on a biweekly basis. Soil hydraulic conductivities and soil water characteristic relationships were determined at both field sites. The subsurface geology was described at one site and an aquifer pump test was performed to determine aquifer transmissivity and specific yield. Both of the infiltration ponds in the field studies effectively served their primary purpose of retaining on site the stormwater runoff from the first 38 mm (1.5 in) of rainfall. In nearly every case, the pond seepage rate was sufficient to completely draw down the pond within 5 days. The hydrology of the infiltration ponds at the two research sites was very different.

  18. North Carolina Linking Study: A Study of the Alignment of the NWEA RIT Scale with the North Carolina State End of Grade (EOG) Testing Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Northwest Evaluation Association, 2014

    2014-01-01

    Recently, the Northwest Evaluation Association (NWEA) completed a study to connect the scale of the North Carolina State End of Grade (EOG) Testing Program used for North Carolina's mathematics and reading assessments with NWEA's Rausch Interval Unit (RIT) scale. Information from the state assessments was used in a study to establish…

  19. Problems and Progress in the Desegregation of the Predominantly Black Public Universities of North Carolina: With Particular Focus on North Carolina A & T State University.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laukaitis, William E.

    1980-01-01

    Chronicles the history of racial separation in North Carolina's system of higher education. Shows that desegregation progress has been minimal and stresses the importance of strengthening the educational program at predominantly Black North Carolina A & T in order to better serve all students. (GC)

  20. The Relationship of Fast ForWord Scientific Learning to North Carolina End of Grade Reading Scores at a Middle School in Anson County, North Carolina

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benfield, Jamie Ledsinger

    2012-01-01

    Anson County School District wished to determine the relationship between Fast ForWord Scientific Learning data and North Carolina End of Grade reading scores at Anson Middle School in Anson County, North Carolina. The specific research questions that guided this study include: 1. How does the literacy intervention, Fast ForWord, affect EOG growth…

  1. LOST COVE AND HARPER CREEK ROADLESS AREAS, NORTH CAROLINA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Griffitts, W.R.; Crandall, T.M.

    1984-01-01

    An investigation indicated that a part of the Lost Cove and Harper Creek Roadless Areas, North Carolina has a probable mineral-resource potential for uranium, niobium, and beryllium. The study areas lie within the Blue Ridge physiographic province and are predominantly underlain by Precambrian plutonic and metasedimentary rocks of low metamorphic grade. The uranium occurs in vein-type deposits and in supergene-enriched foliated rocks. The geologic setting precludes the presence of fossil fuel resources.

  2. Vacuolar myelinopathy in waterfowl from a North Carolina impoundment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Augspurger, T.; Fischer, John R.; Thomas, Nancy; Sileo, L.; Brannian, Roger E.; Miller, Kimberli J.; Rocke, Tonie E.

    2003-01-01

    Vacuolar myelinopathy was confirmed by light and electron microscopic examination of mallards (Anas platyrhynchos), ring-necked ducks (Aythya collaris), and buffleheads (Bucephala albeola) collected during an epizootic at Lake Surf in central North Carolina (USA) between November 1998 and February 1999. Clinical signs of affected birds were consistent with central nervous system impairment of motor function (incoordination, abnormal movement and posture, weakness, paralysis). This is the first report of this disease in wild waterfowl (Anseriformes).Aug

  3. State Education Finance and Governance Profile: North Carolina

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yao, Wang

    2010-01-01

    This article presents the state education finance and governance profile of North Carolina. The state has 214 school districts and a total enrollment of 1,461,740 students in 2,513 public elementary and secondary schools. The current expenditures per pupil in 2007-2008 added up to $8,521, equaling 19.8% of the median state household income. As in…

  4. Mica deposits of the Blue Ridge in North Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lesure, Frank Gardner

    1968-01-01

    Pegmatites in the Blue Ridge of North Carolina are important sources of sheet and scrap mica, feldspar, kaolin, and quartz.  Small amounts of beryl, columbite-tantalite, monazite, samarskite, and uranium minerals also have been produced.  The mica-bearing pegmatites occur in mica and hornblende gneiss and schist throughout the Blue Ridge province but are concentrated in the Spruce Pine and Franklin-Sylva districts.

  5. 40 CFR 81.334 - North Carolina.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Section 107 Attainment Status Designations § 81.334 North... Creek Township, Broadbay Township, Kernersville Township, Middle Fork Township, Old Town Township, South...-Lenoir, NC: Alexander County (2) Attainment. Burke County (part) Unifour Metropolitan...

  6. Magnitude and extent of sediment toxicity in selected estuaries of South Carolina and Georgia. Technical memo

    SciTech Connect

    Long, E.R.; Scott, G.I.; Kucklick, J.; Fulton, M.; Thompson, B.

    1998-04-01

    Surficial sediment samples were collected from 162 locations within five estuaries -- Charleston Harbor, Winyah Bay, Leadenwah Creek, Savannah River, and St. Simons Sound -- in coastal South Carolina and Georgia in a survey of sediment toxicity performed in 1993 and 1994. All samples were tested for toxicity with a battery of complimentary laboratory bioassays. The laboratory bioassays consisted of amphipod survival tests in solid-phase sediments, microbial bioluminescence (Microtox{trademark}) tests of organic solvent extracts, and sea urchin fertilization and embryo development tests of porewaters. Some samples also were tested in copepod reproduction and cytochrome P-450 RGS bioassays. Chemical analyses for a suite of trace metals, organic compounds, and sedimentological factors were performed with portions of most samples.

  7. The Quality of Drinking Water in North Carolina Farmworker Camps

    PubMed Central

    Weir, Maria; Summers, Phillip; Chen, Haiying; Quandt, Sara A.; Liebman, Amy K.; Arcury, Thomas A.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives. The purpose of this study was to assess water quality in migrant farmworker camps in North Carolina and determine associations of water quality with migrant farmworker housing characteristics. Methods. We collected data from 181 farmworker camps in eastern North Carolina during the 2010 agricultural season. Water samples were tested using the Total Coliform Rule (TCR) and housing characteristics were assessed using North Carolina Department of Labor standards. Results. A total of 61 (34%) of 181 camps failed the TCR. Total coliform bacteria were found in all 61 camps, with Escherichia coli also being detected in 2. Water quality was not associated with farmworker housing characteristics or with access to registered public water supplies. Multiple official violations of water quality standards had been reported for the registered public water supplies. Conclusions. Water supplied to farmworker camps often does not comply with current standards and poses a great risk to the physical health of farmworkers and surrounding communities. Expansion of water monitoring to more camps and changes to the regulations such as testing during occupancy and stronger enforcement are needed to secure water safety. PMID:22897558

  8. A new species of Perlesta (Plecoptera: Perlidae) from North Carolina with additional records for North Carolina and Virginia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kondratieff, B.C.; Zuellig, R.E.; Lenat, D.R.

    2011-01-01

    Twenty-eight species of Nearctic Perlesta are currently recognized (Stark 1989, 2004; Kondratieff et al. 2006, 2008; Grubbs and DeWalt 2008, Grubbs and DeWalt 2011, Kondratieff and Myers 2011). Interestingly, but needing confirmation, Perlesta has been recently recorded from Central America (Gutiérrez-Fonseca and Springer 2011). Continued collecting and study of Perlesta from North Carolina by the authors revealed one additional undescribed species. Ten species of Perlesta currently have been recorded from North Carolina (Stark 1989, 2004, Kondratieff et al. 2006, 2008, Grubbs and DeWalt 2008). Additionally, new Perlesta species records are given for Virginia. The terminology used in the description of the male adult follows Stark (1989, 2004).

  9. [Zooplankton in north branch waters of Changiiang Estuary].

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhaoli

    2005-07-01

    Based on the investigation data during the high-water (July, 2003) and low-water (January, 2004) periods, a causal analysis was made on the variation of zooplankton distribution in the north branch waters of the Changjiang Estuary. The results showed that in high-water period, the average of zooplankton biomass was 234.38 mg x m(-3), being 141.35 mg x m(-3) in flood tide and 327.40 mg x m(-3) in ebb tide, while in low-water period, it was 188.81 mg x m(-3), being 184.69 mg x m(-3) in flood tide and 192.93 mg x m(-3) in ebb tide. The biomass increased from the east to the west in flood tide, but a contrary trend was observed in ebb tide. The species number did not change obviously both in flood tide and in ebb tide. The value of diversity index (H') was higher in flood tide than in ebb tide. In high-water period, the biomass near the north shore was higher than that near the south shore, but it was contrary in the ebb tide. The difference between the waters of two shores was not obvious in low-water period as in high-water period, though the trend of biomass variation was similar. The variation of zooplankton distribution in the north branch waters of the Changjiang Estuary had a close relation with the seasonal changes of zooplankton biomass outside the Changjiang Estuary and the tide, but not significantly related with the Changjiang runoff water. Coriolis force accounted for the difference of zooplankton biomass in the waters of two shores via tide movement.

  10. 40 CFR 282.83 - North Carolina State-Administered Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... approved the North Carolina program on April 26, 2001 with an effective date of August 14, 2001. (b) North... RCRA, 42 U.S.C. 6991c, and 40 CFR part 281, subpart E. If North Carolina obtains approval for the... program application for final approval and approved by EPA on April 26, 2001. Copies may be obtained...

  11. 40 CFR 282.83 - North Carolina State-Administered Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... approved the North Carolina program on April 26, 2001 with an effective date of August 14, 2001. (b) North... RCRA, 42 U.S.C. 6991c, and 40 CFR part 281, subpart E. If North Carolina obtains approval for the... program application for final approval and approved by EPA on April 26, 2001. Copies may be obtained...

  12. Predicted impact and evaluation of North Carolina's phosphorus indexing tool.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Amy M; Osmond, Deanna L; Hodges, Steven C

    2005-01-01

    Increased concern about potential losses of phosphorus (P) from agricultural fields receiving animal waste has resulted in the implementation of new state and federal regulations related to nutrient management. In response to strengthened nutrient management standards that require consideration of P, North Carolina has developed a site-specific P indexing system called the Phosphorus Loss Assessment Tool (PLAT) to predict relative amounts of potential P loss from agricultural fields. The purpose of this study was to apply the PLAT index on farms throughout North Carolina in an attempt to predict the percentage and types of farms that will be forced to change management practices due to implementation of new regulations. Sites from all 100 counties were sampled, with the number of samples taken from each county depending on the proportion of the state's agricultural land that occurs in that county. Results showed that approximately 8% of producers in the state will be required to apply animal waste or inorganic fertilizer on a P rather than nitrogen basis, with the percentage increasing for farmers who apply animal waste (approximately 27%). The PLAT index predicted the greatest amounts of P loss from sites in the Coastal Plain region of North Carolina and from sites receiving poultry waste. Loss of dissolved P through surface runoff tended to be greater than other loss pathways and presents an area of concern as no best management practices (BMPs) currently exist for the reduction of in-field dissolved P. The PLAT index predicted the areas in the state that are known to be disproportionately vulnerable to P loss due to histories of high P applications, high densities of animal units, or soil type and landscapes that are most susceptible to P loss. PMID:16151232

  13. Attitudes of North Carolina law enforcement officers toward syringe decriminalization

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Corey S.; Johnston, Jill; Zerden, Lisa de Saxe; Clark, Katie; Castillo, Tessie; Childs, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Background North Carolina, like much of the U.S. South, is disproportionately affected by HIV and hepatitis. This persistently high disease burden may be driven in part by laws that criminalize the possession and distribution of syringes for illicit drug use. Legal change to decriminalize syringes may reduce infection rates in the state, but is unlikely absent support from law enforcement actors. Methods We analyzed the responses of 350 North Carolina law enforcement officers to a confidential, anonymous survey. The survey instrument collected data regarding self-reported needle-stick injury (NSI), blood borne disease risk perception and attitudes toward syringe decriminalization. Results 82% of respondents reported that contracting HIV was a “big concern” for them. 3.8% of respondents reported ever receiving a job-related NSI, a rate of 36 NSI per 10,000 officer-years. Majorities of respondents reported positive views regarding syringe decriminalization, with approximately 63% agreeing that it would be “good for the community” and 60% agreeing that it would be “good for law enforcement.” Black and female officers were significantly less likely to agree that on-the-job NSI was a “big concern” and significantly more likely to agree that it would be good for law enforcement. Conclusions These findings suggest that many North Carolina LEOs understand the public health benefits of syringe access programs and may be inclined to support syringe decriminalization legislation. Further research is indicated to determine the causes of observed differences in perceptions of bloodborne disease risk and attitudes toward syringe decriminalization by race and sex. PMID:25193720

  14. Mortality among North Carolina construction workers, 1988-1994.

    PubMed

    Wang, E; Dement, J M; Lipscomb, H

    1999-01-01

    This study evaluated proportionate mortality patterns among all male construction workers in North Carolina who resided and died in North Carolina during the period 1988-1994. Proportionate Mortality Ratios (PMRs) and Proportionate Cancer Mortality Ratios (PCMRs) compared the number of deaths among male construction workers with the number of deaths expected based on the gender, race, and cause-specific mortality experience of the entire North Carolina population by five-year age groups for the same years of study. PMRs based on United States death rates also were calculated. Among all male construction workers, significantly elevated mortality was observed for several causes possibly related to work including malignant neoplasms of buccal cavity (PMR = 143), pharynx (PMR = 134), and lung (PMR = 113), pneumoconiosis (PMR = 111), transportation accidents (PMR = 106), and accidental falls (PMR = 132). Elevated mortality also was observed for causes more related to lifestyle and non-occupational factors including alcoholism (PMR = 145), cirrhosis of the liver (PMR = 129), accidental poisoning (PMR = 136), and homicide (PMR = 141). Patterns of elevated mortality for Whites and Black men were similar and PCMR mortality patterns for Blacks and Whites combined were similar to PMRs. Construction workers were at significantly increased risk for deaths resulting from falls from ladders or scaffolds, falls from or out of buildings or structures, and electrocutions. Construction trades found to have statistically elevated cancer risks include laborers and roofers (buccal cavity), painters (pharynx), laborers (peritoneum), and carpenters, painters, brick masons, and operating engineers (lung). These data are consistent with other reports demonstrating excess mortality from asbestos-related diseases (pneumoconiosis, lung cancer, and mesothelioma) among construction workers. Dry-wall workers and laborers were found to have a statistically elevated risk of death as a result of

  15. Granulocytic ehrlichiosis in dogs from North Carolina and Virginia.

    PubMed

    Goldman, E E; Breitschwerdt, E B; Grindem, C B; Hegarty, B C; Walls, J J; Dumler, J S

    1998-01-01

    Medical records of 3 dogs from North Carolina and 3 dogs from Virginia with ehrlichial morulae in circulating neutrophils were studied retrospectively. Two clinically distinct disease syndromes, including chronic, moderate to severe anemia (n = 3) and polyarthritis (n = 2) were associated with canine granulocytic ehrlichiosis (CGE) in these dogs. One dog was clinically healthy, and abnormalities were not detected during physical examination. Clinical signs were nonspecific and included fever, lethargy, anorexia, vomiting, and diarrhea. The most frequent laboratory abnormalities were normocytic normochromic nonregenerative anemia, moderate thrombocytopenia with large platelets, lymphopenia, and eosinopenia. Considerable variability was found in the serologic responses to Ehrlichia equi, Ehrlichia canis, and Ehrlichia chaffeensis antigens among the 5 dogs for which stored sera were available for indirect fluorescent antibody testing. Polymerase chain reaction amplification and sequencing of portions of the 16S rRNA gene from blood (collected in ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid) of 1 severely anemic dog (dog 3) and 1 polyarthritic dog (dog 4) resulted in DNA sequences nearly identical to the GenBank accessions for Ehrlichia ewingii. The DNA sequence from a 3rd dog (dog 5) was most similar to that of E. canis. Serologic or molecular results support the possibility of E. ewingii, E. equi, and E. canis coinfection or serologic cross-reactivity among canine granulocytic and monocytic Ehrlichia species in dogs from North Carolina and Virginia. Variability in response to tetracycline or doxycycline treatment was noted in these dogs, with more rapid resolution of signs in dogs with polyarthritis. We report the 1st cases of CGE in dogs from North Carolina and Virginia, including recognition of CGE in a healthy dog.

  16. Anatomy of a shoreface sand ridge revisted using foraminifera: False Cape Shoals, Virginia/North Carolina inner shelf

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robinson, Marci M.; McBride, Randolph A.

    2008-01-01

    Certain details regarding the origin and evolution of shelf sand ridges remain elusive. Knowledge of their internal stratigraphy and microfossil distribution is necessary to define the origin and to determine the processes that modify sand ridges. Fourteen vibracores from False Cape Shoal A, a well-developed shoreface-attached sand ridge on the Virginia/North Carolina inner continental shelf, were examined to document the internal stratigraphy and benthic foraminiferal assemblages, as well as to reconstruct the depositional environments recorded in down-core sediments. Seven sedimentary and foraminiferal facies correspond to the following stratigraphic units: fossiliferous silt, barren sand, clay to sandy clay, laminated and bioturbated sand, poorly sorted massive sand, fine clean sand, and poorly sorted clay to gravel. The units represent a Pleistocene estuary and shoreface, a Holocene estuary, ebb tidal delta, modern shelf, modern shoreface, and swale fill, respectively. The succession of depositional environments reflects a Pleistocene sea-level highstand and subsequent regression followed by the Holocene transgression in which barrier island/spit systems formed along the Virginia/North Carolina inner shelf not, vert, ~5.2 ka and migrated landward and an ebb tidal delta that was deposited, reworked, and covered by shelf sand.

  17. Anatomy of a shoreface sand ridge revisited using foraminifera: False Cape Shoals, Virginia/North Carolina inner shelf

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robinson, M.M.; McBride, R.A.

    2008-01-01

    Certain details regarding the origin and evolution of shelf sand ridges remain elusive. Knowledge of their internal stratigraphy and microfossil distribution is necessary to define the origin and to determine the processes that modify sand ridges. Fourteen vibracores from False Cape Shoal A, a well-developed shoreface-attached sand ridge on the Virginia/North Carolina inner continental shelf, were examined to document the internal stratigraphy and benthic foraminiferal assemblages, as well as to reconstruct the depositional environments recorded in down-core sediments. Seven sedimentary and foraminiferal facies correspond to the following stratigraphic units: fossiliferous silt, barren sand, clay to sandy clay, laminated and bioturbated sand, poorly sorted massive sand, fine clean sand, and poorly sorted clay to gravel. The units represent a Pleistocene estuary and shoreface, a Holocene estuary, ebb tidal delta, modern shelf, modern shoreface, and swale fill, respectively. The succession of depositional environments reflects a Pleistocene sea-level highstand and subsequent regression followed by the Holocene transgression in which barrier island/spit systems formed along the Virginia/North Carolina inner shelf ???5.2 ka and migrated landward and an ebb tidal delta that was deposited, reworked, and covered by shelf sand.

  18. Power for all? Electricity and uneven development in North Carolina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, Conor M.

    Many towns in eastern North Carolina face a number of challenges common to the rural South, including high rates of poverty and diminishing employment opportunities. However, some residents of this region also confront a unique hardship---electricity prices that are vastly higher than those of surrounding areas. This dissertation examines the origins of pricing inequalities in the electricity market of eastern North Carolina---namely how such inequalities developed and their role in the production of racial and economic disparities in the South. This dissertation examines the evolving relations between federal and state agencies, corporations, and electric utilities, and asks why these interactions produced varying social outcomes across different places and spatial settings. The research focuses on the origins and subsequent development of electric utilities in eastern North Carolina, and examines how electricity as a material technology interacted with geographies of race and class, as well as the dictates of capital accumulation. This approach enables a rethinking of several concepts that are rarely examined by scholars of electric utilities, most notably the monopoly service territory, which I argue served as a spatial fix to accumulation problems in the industry. Further, examining the way that electric utilities developed in North Carolina during the 20th century brings to the forefront the at times contradictory relationships among systems of electricity provision, Jim Crow segregation, the Progressive Era, and the New Deal. Such a focus highlights the important role that the control of electricity provision played in shaping racial inequalities that continue to persist in the region. With most urban areas were electrified in the 1930s, the research also traces the electricity distribution lines as they moved out of cities through rural electrification programs, a shift that highlights the state as a multi-scalar and variegated actor that both aided and

  19. Manual for leveling at gaging stations in North Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thomas, N.O.; Jackson, N.M.

    1981-01-01

    This manual was prepared to serve several purposes in the U.S. Geological Survey North Carolina District. This manual sets forth District policy as to frequency of levels, accuracy criteria, procedures for checking the datum and setting of the various types of gages, general rules to follow in establishing the original datum of a gage, and contains sample notes to be used as guides in level notekeeping. The manual also serves as a training tool in that the reasoning behind District policy is explained and reasons are given for following the recommended techniques to assist in a better understanding of the purpose of levels and maintaining gage datum.

  20. Correlates of Mental Health among Latino Farmworkers in North Carolina

    PubMed Central

    Crain, Rebecca; Grzywacz, Joseph G.; Schwantes, Melody; Isom, Scott; Quandt, Sara A.; Arcury, Thomas A.

    2013-01-01

    Latino farmworkers are a vulnerable population who confront multiple threats to their mental health. Informed by the stress-process model of psychiatric disorder, the goal of this paper is to determine personal and situational correlates of poor mental health among Latino farmworkers. Structured interview data were obtained from farmworkers (N=69) in six counties in eastern and western North Carolina. Results indicated that a substantial number of farmworkers have poor mental health, as indicated by elevated depressive symptoms (52.2%) and anxiety (16.4%). Results also indicated that each mental health outcome had different predictors. Addressing the mental health issues of farmworkers requires a comprehensive, multifaceted approach. PMID:22757952

  1. Certification Manual: Standards and Procedures for the Certification of North Carolina Professional School Personnel.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Carolina State Dept. of Public Instruction, Raleigh.

    This Certification Manual explains the many policies and procedures that guide the process of certification in North Carolina. The certification process requires educators in North Carolina to meet established standards of professional competence. The publication is organized into 14 sections: (1) an Introduction; (2) General Information; (3) The…

  2. ABCs of Public Education in North Carolina: A Journey toward Excellence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Carolina State Board of Education, Raleigh.

    In 1995, the North Carolina General Assembly directed the North Carolina State Board of Education to develop a plan to bolster student growth and performance in grades 4-8 throughout the state. In response, the board developed the ABCs of Public Education. (ABC stands for Accountability; teaching the Basics of reading, writing, and mathematics;…

  3. Hope, Opportunity, and Access: The In-State Tuition Debate in North Carolina

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanders, Marla S.

    2010-01-01

    This qualitative case study explores the political debate that surrounded North Carolina's House Bill 1183, also known as Access to Higher Education and A Better Economic Future. This bill would have made undocumented students eligible for in-state tuition at North Carolina's colleges and universities. This article discusses the political debate,…

  4. 76 FR 4592 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plan; North Carolina; Disapproval of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-26

    ... to Executive Order 13211 (66 FR 28355, May 22, 2001) because it is not a significant regulatory..., through the North Carolina Department of Environment and Natural Resources (NC DENR), provided a letter to... EPA proposing in today's notice? On September 21, 2009, the State of North Carolina, through NC...

  5. 40 CFR 282.83 - North Carolina State-Administered Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false North Carolina State-Administered Program. 282.83 Section 282.83 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) APPROVED UNDERGROUND STORAGE TANK PROGRAMS Approved State Programs § 282.83 North Carolina State-Administered Program. (a)...

  6. Impact of North Carolina's Early Childhood Initiatives on Special Education Placements in Third Grade

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muschkin, Clara G.; Ladd, Helen F.; Dodge, Kenneth A.

    2015-01-01

    This study examines the community-wide effects of investments in two early childhood initiatives in North Carolina (Smart Start and More at Four) on the likelihood of a student being placed into special education. We take advantage of variation across North Carolina counties and years in the timing of the introduction and funding levels of the two…

  7. 75 FR 59325 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on Proposed Highway in North Carolina

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-27

    ... actions relate to a proposed highway project, the Monroe Connector/Bypass, from US 74 near I-485 in..., North Carolina. The Monroe Connector/Bypass is also known as State Transportation Improvement Program... the following highway project in the State of North Carolina: The Monroe Connector/Bypass, a...

  8. 76 FR 42162 - Final Federal Agency Actions on Proposed Highway in North Carolina

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-18

    ..., the Monroe Connector/Bypass, from US 74 near I-485 in Mecklenburg County, North Carolina, to US 74 between the towns of Wingate and Marshville in Union County, North Carolina. The Monroe Connector/Bypass... Register in Volume 75, Number 186 for the following highway project: The Monroe Connector/Bypass, a 20...

  9. A History of the Community College Internship Program at North Carolina State University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Broadhurst, Christopher J.; Bartlett, James E.

    2014-01-01

    Following World War II, North Carolina created public junior colleges and industrial education centers to meet the educational demands of veterans and expand the technical skills of the state's workforce. Despite the creation of these campuses, in the early 1960s North Carolina ranked 47th in the number of citizens in college, and 66 counties…

  10. 77 FR 52135 - HomeTrust Bank, Clyde, North Carolina; Approval of Conversion Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-28

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY Office of the Comptroller of the Currency HomeTrust Bank, Clyde, North Carolina; Approval of Conversion...) approved the application of HomeTrust Bank, Clyde, North Carolina to convert to the stock form...

  11. Science K-12. Teacher Handbook. North Carolina Competency-Based Curriculum Subject-by-Subject.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Carolina State Dept. of Public Instruction, Raleigh. Instructional Services.

    An integrated competency-based course of study in the sciences is provided in the handbook for North Carolina teachers of grades K-12. Recommended goals, objectives, and suggested measures for each subject and skill area related to the sciences are outlined. This guide contains: (1) an introduction (defining North Carolina's basic educational…

  12. The North Carolina Capitol: Pride of the State. Teaching with Historic Places.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Draper, Howard

    North Carolina's state capitol rises majestically on Union Square in downtown Raleigh, a city created in 1792 to serve as North Carolina's permanent capital. Built between 1833-40, the granite building is one of the finest and best preserved examples of civic Greek Revival architecture in the United States. This lesson is based on the National…

  13. A Long and Happy Life: Library and Records Preservation in North Carolina.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greene, Harlan; And Others

    A solid approach to preservation can prevent or minimize the losses North Carolina is suffering because library books are falling apart, legal records are disintegrating, and computer files are being lost. Preventing losses before they occur saves tax money. For this and other reasons prevention should be public policy. North Carolina information…

  14. The High Cost of Low Graduation Rates in North Carolina. School Choice Issues in the State

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gottlob, Brian J.

    2007-01-01

    North Carolina has a dropout crisis--only two thirds of North Carolina high school students graduate. One reason this crisis has not received the attention it deserves is because the state was reporting badly inflated graduation rates (supposedly as high as 97 percent) until it finally adopted a more realistic reporting method earlier this year.…

  15. Utilization of ERTS-1 data in North Carolina. [forested wetlands, water management, and land use

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welby, C. W. (Principal Investigator); Lammi, J. O.; Carson, R. J., III

    1973-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. ERTS-1 imagery has been used to study forested wetlands, dynamic processes off Coastal North Carolina, and land use patterns in the Wilmington, North Carolina area. The thrust of the investigation is still involvement of state and regional agencies in the use of ERTS-1 imagery in solving some of their day-to-day problems.

  16. A Goal for North Carolina's Schools. First in America 2001 Progress Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cunningham, Elizabeth Kolb, Ed.; Thompson, Charles L., Ed.

    This second annual report details North Carolina's performance and progress since 2000 in the five goal areas: high student performance; every child ready to learn; safe, orderly, and caring schools; quality teachers and administrators; and strong family, business, and community support. Over the years, North Carolina's education system has…

  17. New Pioneers. The North Carolina Program to Eliminate Sex Bias in Occupational Education. Reflections and Recommendations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Amanda J.

    Designed to eliminate sex bias in occupational education, a strategic model for change in the educational system and an inservice program to implement the model were developed by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. Over 1700 teachers, representing 74 of North Carolina's 148 local education agencies, participated in the inservice…

  18. Adverse Impact of Racial Isolation on Student Performance: A Study in North Carolina

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sharma, Andy; Joyner, Ann Moss; Osment, Ashley

    2014-01-01

    This study examines the impact of racial isolation on high school student performance in North Carolina, a state in the southeast United States. Our research goal is to investigate if increased isolation negatively impacts Black students' academic performance. Employing the North Carolina State Department of Public Instruction (NCDPI)…

  19. Statistical Abstract of Higher Education in North Carolina, 2003-04. Research Report 1-04

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yang, Xiaoyun

    2004-01-01

    The University of North Carolina presents the thirty-sixth annual Statistical Abstract of Higher Education in North Carolina. This report covers the breadth of higher education activities in the State in their quantitative aspect, from simple counts of enrollment and degrees conferred to complex analyses of the flow of student transfers among…

  20. Statistical Abstract of Higher Education in North Carolina, 2008-09. Research Report 01-09

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dow, Daphne

    2009-01-01

    The University of North Carolina presents the forty-first annual "Statistical Abstract of Higher Education in North Carolina." This abstract covers the breadth of higher education activities in the State in their quantitative aspect, from simple counts of enrollment and degrees conferred to complex analyses of the flow of student transfers among…

  1. 78 FR 28747 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; North Carolina; State Implementation Plan...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-16

    ... 73 FR 16436. Accordingly, in a February 3, 2010, SIP submission, North Carolina updated state rule... the primary and secondary standards. See 73 FR 66964. Accordingly, in a February 3, 2010, SIP... period. See 71 FR 61144. Accordingly, in a February 3, 2010, SIP submission, North Carolina updated...

  2. Evaluation of the School-Wide Positive Behavioral Support Program in Eight North Carolina Elementary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wasilewski, Yvonne; Gifford, Beth; Bonneau, Kara

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction (NCDPI) with information about teachers' responses to School-wide Positive Behavioral Support (PBS) and key educational outcomes on students in North Carolina elementary schools implementing School-wide (PBS). A web-based survey of teachers at eight…

  3. Multiple Response System (MRS) Evaluation Report to the North Carolina Division of Social Services (NCDSS)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Child and Family Policy, Duke University (NJ1), 2004

    2004-01-01

    In response to a request from the North Carolina Division of Social Services (DSS), Center for Child and Family Policy at The Terry Sanford Institute at Duke University evaluated the Multiple Response System reform for families reported for child maltreatment. The North Carolina State Legislature has mandated the evaluation of five key aspects of…

  4. Work Front--Home Front: A Cooperative Extension Contribution to Work First in North Carolina.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeBord, Karen; Matthews, D. Wayne; Canu, Rebecca; Parris, Pam

    North Carolina's Work First (WF) program, like other welfare reform programs, incorporates personal responsibility contracts; paid work, volunteer work, or school requirements; and time limitations. Using telephone interviews, this study examined perceptions of 31 former welfare recipients who were enrolled in the North Carolina Work First (WF)…

  5. The North Carolina Online Sex Offender Registry: Awareness and Utilization by Childcare Providers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Jennifer L.; Malesky, L. Alvin, Jr.

    2009-01-01

    This study examined childcare providers' usage of the North Carolina Sex Offender and Public Protection Registry. One hundred twenty three childcare providers in 76 counties in North Carolina were surveyed via telephone interview about their utilization of the registry Web site. Responses revealed that most providers knew about the registry…

  6. University of North Carolina Lets Professors Ease Their Way into Retirement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    June, Audrey Williams

    2008-01-01

    This article reports on the University of North Carolina's "phased-retirement" plan, which lets professors formally ease their way into retirement. The challenges of personnel planning in the North Carolina system, made tougher when higher education was stripped of a mandatory retirement age 14 years ago, have lessened because the program has…

  7. An Analysis of the North Carolina Cooperative Extension Service's Role in Bridging the Digital Divide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alston, Antoine J.; Hilton, Lashawn; English, Chastity Warren; Elbert, Chanda; Wakefield, Dexter

    2011-01-01

    The study reported here sought to determine the perception of North Carolina County Cooperative Extension directors in regard to the North Carolina Cooperative Extension Service's role in bridging the digital divide. It was perceived by respondents that variables such as income, education, gender, disability status, race/ethnicity, age, and…

  8. Estimated water use, by county, in North Carolina, 1990

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Terziotti, Silvia; Schrader, Tony P.; Treece, M.W.

    1994-01-01

    Data on water use in North Carolina were compiled for 1990 as part of a cooperative agreement between the U.S. Geological Survey and the Division of Water Resources of the North Carolina Department of Environment, Health, and Natural Resources. Data were compiled from a number of Federal, State, and private sources for the offstream water-use categories of public supply, domestic, commercial, industrial, mining, livestock, irrigation, and thermoelectric-power generation. Data also were collected for instream use from hydroelectric facilities. Total estimated offstream water use in the State for 1990 was about 8,940 million gallons per day. About 95 percent of the water withdrawn was from surface-water sources. Thermoelectric-power generation accounted for about 81 percent of all withdrawals. Data for instream water use for hydroelectric-power generation also were compiled. This instream water use totaled about 66,900 million gallons per day. eAch water-use category is summarized in this report by county and source of water supply.

  9. Analgesic medication errors in North Carolina nursing homes.

    PubMed

    Desai, Rishi J; Williams, Charrlotte E; Greene, Sandra B; Pierson, Stephanie; Caprio, Anthony J; Hansen, Richard A

    2013-06-01

    The objective of this study was to characterize analgesic medication errors and to evaluate their association with patient harm. The authors conducted a cross-sectional analysis of individual medication error incidents reported by North Carolina nursing homes to the Medication Error Quality Initiative (MEQI) during fiscal years 2010-2011. Bivariate associations between analgesic medication errors with patient factors, error-related factors, and impact on patients were tested with chi-square tests. A multivariate logistic regression model explored the relationship between type of analgesic medication errors and patient harm, controlling for patient- and error-related factors. A total of 32,176 individual medication error incidents were reported over a 2-year period in North Carolina nursing homes, 12.3% (n = 3949) of which were analgesic medication errors. Of these analgesic medication errors, opioid and nonopioid analgesics were involved in 3105 and 844 errors, respectively. Opioid errors were more likely to be wrong drug errors, wrong dose errors, and administration errors compared with nonopioid errors (P < .0001 for all comparisons). In the multivariate model, opioid errors were found to have higher odds of patient harm compared with nonopioid errors (odds ratio [OR] = 3, 95% confodence interval [CI]: 1.1-7.8). The authors conclude that opioid analgesics represent the majority of analgesic error reports, and these error reports reflect an increased likelihood of patient harm compared with nonopioid analgesics. PMID:23458096

  10. Building a Value-Based Workforce in North Carolina.

    PubMed

    Fraher, Erin P; Ricketts, Thomas C

    2016-01-01

    Health care in the United States is likely to change more in the next 10 years than in any previous decade. However, changes in the workforce needed to support new care delivery and payment models will likely be slower and less dramatic. In this issue of the NCMJ, experts from education, practice, and policy reflect on the "state of the state" and what the future holds for multiple health professional groups. They write from a broad range of perspectives and disciplines, but all point toward the need for change-change in the way we educate, deploy, and recruit health professionals. The rapid pace of health system change in North Carolina means that the road map is being redrawn as we drive, but some general routes are evident. In this issue brief we suggest that, to make the workforce more effective, we need to broaden our definition of who is in the health workforce; focus on retooling and retraining the existing workforce; shift from training workers in acute settings to training them in community-based settings; and increase accountability in the system so that public funds spent on the health professions produce the workforce needed to meet the state's health care needs. North Carolina has arguably the best health workforce data system in the country; it has historically provided the data needed to inform policy change, but adequate and ongoing financial support for that system needs to be assured. PMID:26961828

  11. Average annual precipitation classes to characterize watersheds in North Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Terziotti, Silvia; Eimers, Jo Leslie

    2001-01-01

    This web site contains the Federal Geographic Data Committee-compliant metadata (documentation) for digital data produced for the North Carolina, Department of Environment and Natural Resources, Public Water Supply Section, Source Water Assessment Program. The metadata are for 11 individual Geographic Information System data sets. An overlay and indexing method was used with the data to derive a rating for unsaturated zone and watershed characteristics for use by the State of North Carolina in assessing more than 11,000 public water-supply wells and approximately 245 public surface-water intakes for susceptibility to contamination. For ground-water supplies, the digital data sets used in the assessment included unsaturated zone rating, vertical series hydraulic conductance, land-surface slope, and land cover. For assessment of public surface-water intakes, the data sets included watershed characteristics rating, average annual precipitation, land-surface slope, land cover, and ground-water contribution. Documentation for the land-use data set applies to both the unsaturated zone and watershed characteristics ratings. Documentation for the estimated depth-to-water map used in the calculation of the vertical series hydraulic conductance also is included.

  12. Percent-slope classes to characterize watersheds in North Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Terziotti, Silvia; Eimers, Jo Leslie

    2001-01-01

    This web site contains the Federal Geographic Data Committee-compliant metadata (documentation) for digital data produced for the North Carolina, Department of Environment and Natural Resources, Public Water Supply Section, Source Water Assessment Program. The metadata are for 11 individual Geographic Information System data sets. An overlay and indexing method was used with the data to derive a rating for unsaturated zone and watershed characteristics for use by the State of North Carolina in assessing more than 11,000 public water-supply wells and approximately 245 public surface-water intakes for susceptibility to contamination. For ground-water supplies, the digital data sets used in the assessment included unsaturated zone rating, vertical series hydraulic conductance, land-surface slope, and land cover. For assessment of public surface-water intakes, the data sets included watershed characteristics rating, average annual precipitation, land-surface slope, land cover, and ground-water contribution. Documentation for the land-use data set applies to both the unsaturated zone and watershed characteristics ratings. Documentation for the estimated depth-to-water map used in the calculation of the vertical series hydraulic conductance also is included.

  13. Land-cover classes to characterize watersheds in North Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Terziotti, Silvia; Eimers, Jo Leslie

    2001-01-01

    This web site contains the Federal Geographic Data Committee-compliant metadata (documentation) for digital data produced for the North Carolina, Department of Environment and Natural Resources, Public Water Supply Section, Source Water Assessment Program. The metadata are for 11 individual Geographic Information System data sets. An overlay and indexing method was used with the data to derive a rating for unsaturated zone and watershed characteristics for use by the State of North Carolina in assessing more than 11,000 public water-supply wells and approximately 245 public surface-water intakes for susceptibility to contamination. For ground-water supplies, the digital data sets used in the assessment included unsaturated zone rating, vertical series hydraulic conductance, land-surface slope, and land cover. For assessment of public surface-water intakes, the data sets included watershed characteristics rating, average annual precipitation, land-surface slope, land cover, and ground-water contribution. Documentation for the land-use data set applies to both the unsaturated zone and watershed characteristics ratings. Documentation for the estimated depth-to-water map used in the calculation of the vertical series hydraulic conductance also is included.

  14. Evaluation of the North Carolina "Baby Think It Over" project.

    PubMed

    Tingle, Lynne R

    2002-05-01

    The North Carolina "Baby Think It Over" (BTIO) evaluation was conducted during spring semester 2000. Data were collected from participating teachers, students, and parents. Twenty-five teachers were selected randomly from different counties in North Carolina. Each randomly selected teacher coordinated the evaluation in conjunction with the intervention. Student surveys determined whether using the BTIO doll changed perceptions and attitudes toward teen parenting. Information also was collected on the veracity of each student's participation based on data provided from the computer in the baby. Surveys were sent home to the parents of participating students so information on communication, disruption of the household, and parenting perceptions could be obtained. Each teacher completed a survey that sought information on topics discussed throughout the intervention, hours of the program, and perceptions of program effectiveness. Parents and teachers were offered participation incentives. Overall, support existed for the BTIO intervention by parents and teachers. Most teachers and parents felt the program was effective at increasing communication about parenting and changing teens' attitudes in a desired direction. Most teachers reported that the intervention was not disruptive to their classes. However, results from student surveys did not reveal the same support. Student changes in attitudes and beliefs about parenting after the intervention were minimal.

  15. Airborne Observations of Ammonia Emissions from North Carolina Swine Facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowak, J. B.; Neuman, J. A.; Liao, J.; Welti, A.; Middlebrook, A. M.; McKeen, S. A.; Trainer, M.; Parrish, D. D.

    2013-12-01

    Ammonia (NH3) is the dominant gas-phase base in the troposphere. As a consequence, NH3 abundance influences particle formation and composition. Anthropogenic emissions of NH3 can react with sulfuric acid (H2SO4) and nitric acid (HNO3), photochemical oxidation products of sulfur dioxide (SO2) and nitrogen oxides (NOx (NO + NO2)), to form ammoniated particles that typically account for half or more of measured PM2.5 mass in the Eastern US. NH3 emissions are predominantly from agricultural sources, primarily livestock animal waste and crop fertilization. Accurate NH3 emissions estimates from these sources are necessary for developing effective particle control strategies. Swine facilities in North Carolina are one of the largest source of NH3 emissions in the Southeastern US. Airborne measurements of NH3 and particulate ammonium (NH4+) made aboard the NOAA WP-3D aircraft as part of the recent 2013 SENEX field campaign are used to quantify NH3 emissions from North Carolina swine facilities. The observed NH3 emissions are compared to swine facility emissions estimates from current emissions inventories. In addition, the NH3 emissions from swine facilities are placed in the broader context of NH3 sources through comparison to recent emissions observations from dairy facilities in California. The July 10 SENEX WP-3D flight track colored and sized by observed NH3 mixing ratios.

  16. Hydrogeologic framework of the North Carolina coastal plain

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Winner, M.D.; Coble, R.W.

    1996-01-01

    The hydrogeologic framework of the North Carolina Coastal Plain aquifer system consists of 10 aquifers separated by 9 confining units. From top to bottom, the aquifers are the surficial aquifer, Yorktown aquifer, Pungo River aquifer, Castle Hayne aquifer, Beaufort aquifer, Peedee aquifer, Black Creek aquifer, upper Cape Fear aquifer, lower Cape Fear aquifer, and Lower Cretaceous aquifer. The uppermost aquifer (the surficial aquifer in most places) is a water-table aquifer, and the bottom of the system is underlain by crystalline bedrock. The sedimentary deposits forming the aquifers are of Holocene to Cretaceous age and are composed mostly of sand, with lesser amounts of gravel and limestone. The confining units between the aquifers are composed primarily of clay and silt. The thickness of the aquifers ranges from zero along the Fall Line to more than 10,000 feet at Cape Hatteras. Prominent structural features are the increasing easterly homoclinal dip of the sediments and the Cape Fear arch, the axis of which trends in a southeast direction. Stratigraphic continuity was determined from correlations of 161 geophysical logs along with data from drillers? and geologists? logs. Aquifers were defined by means of these logs as well as water-level and water-quality data and evidence of the continuity of pumping effects. Eighteen hydrogeologic sections depict the correlation of these aquifers throughout the North Carolina Coastal Plain.

  17. Pivoting to Value-Based Care in North Carolina.

    PubMed

    Sangvai, Devdutta G

    2016-01-01

    Health care in the United States, and by extension in North Carolina, is in a perpetual state of flux. From the Nixon-era predictions of runaway costs to the insurance-anchored efforts of Hillarycare to wide-sweeping reforms of Obamacare, established providers are regularly counseling the next generation on how different medicine will look when they are in practice. The accuracy of some of these predictions aside, one thing is sure: the pace and magnitude of change is palpably different this time. Pushed by both private and public payers to move from fee-for-service to value-based care while striving to meet the Triple Aim of improving patient experience, improving population health, and reducing costs, all arenas of medicine--hospital-based, ambulatory, and public health--are feeling the pressure. At the same time, patients are acting more like consumers, demanding transparency in pricing and increased quality. In this issue of the NCMJ, experts from a broad range of backgrounds and health care organizations discuss the trials and rewards facing providers and health systems as they promise better outcomes and assume greater financial risk in care delivery. The ways that we are striving to meet new payment models--and the successes we are achieving--are as varied as the practices across North Carolina. In the following pages, you will read about the many efforts to implement these new models, both stories of success and a few cautionary tales. PMID:27422945

  18. Geology of the Plumtree area, Spruce Pine district, North Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brobst, Donald Albert

    1953-01-01

    This report describes the results of study and geologic mapping (1:12,000) in the 70-square-mile Plumtree area in the northeastern part of the Spruce Pine pegmatite district, on the Blue Ridge upland in western North Carolina. The district has been the chief domestic source of feldspar and sheet mica. The mining belt just west of the Blue Ridge Front trends northeast and is 25 miles long and 10 miles wide. The center of the Plumtree area lies 10 miles northeast of Spruce Pine pegmatite district, on the Blue Ridge upland in western North Carolina. The district has been the chief domestic source of feldspar and sheet mica. The mining belt just west of the Blue Ridge Front trends northeast and is 25 miles long and 10 miles wide. The center of the Plumtree area lies 10 miles northeast of Spruce Pine and includes parts of Mitchell and Avery Counties shown on the portions of the 7.5-minute Spruce Pine, Linville Falls, Newland, North Carolina, and Carvers Gap, North Carolina and Tennessee quadrangle. The topography varies from rugged mountains to rounded or flat topped hills near the entrenched, meandering master streams. Old erosion surfaces are approximately 600,1,100, 1,500, and 2,500 feet above the present master stream level. The area is in late youth or early maturity after rejuvenation.. The regionally metamorphosed rocks of the amophibolite facies form three mappable units: mica gneiss, mica schist, and hornblende rock. These rocks, perhaps of Precambrian age, are intimately interlayered with thicknesses of the individual layers ranging from less than one inch to several tons of feet. Field relationships and chemical data suggest that the mica (Carolina-type) rocks were derived from sandstones, graywackes, and shales and that the hornblende-rich (Roan-type) layers were derived from impure carbonate rocks. The igneous rocks include alaskite and associated pegmatite of early Paleozoic age (?), dunite and associated soapstone of a prepegmatite age, and a few diabasic

  19. 33 CFR 334.430 - Neuse River and tributaries at Marine Corps Air Station Cherry Point, North Carolina; restricted...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Marine Corps Air Station Cherry Point, North Carolina; restricted area and danger zone. 334.430 Section... Air Station Cherry Point, North Carolina; restricted area and danger zone. (a) The restricted area... Station, Cherry Point, North Carolina, extending from the mouth of Hancock Creek to a point...

  20. 33 CFR 334.430 - Neuse River and tributaries at Marine Corps Air Station Cherry Point, North Carolina; restricted...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Marine Corps Air Station Cherry Point, North Carolina; restricted area and danger zone. 334.430 Section... Air Station Cherry Point, North Carolina; restricted area and danger zone. (a) The restricted area... Station, Cherry Point, North Carolina, extending from the mouth of Hancock Creek to a point...

  1. Spatio-temporal Trends of Climate Variability in North Carolina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayemuzzaman, Mohammad

    Climatic trends in spatial and temporal variability of maximum temperature (Tmax), minimum temperature (Tmin), mean temperature (Tmean) and precipitation were evaluated for 249 ground-based stations in North Carolina for 1950-2009. The Mann-Kendall (MK), the Theil-Sen Approach (TSA) and the Sequential Mann-Kendall (SQMK) tests were applied to quantify the significance of trend, magnitude of trend and the trend shift, respectively. The lag-1 serial correlation and double mass curve techniques were used to address the data independency and homogeneity. The pre-whitening technique was used to eliminate the effect of auto correlation of the data series. The difference between minimum and maximum temperatures, and so the diurnal temperature range (DTR), at some stations was found to be decreasing on both an annual and a seasonal basis, with an overall increasing trend in the mean temperature. For precipitation, a statewide increasing trend in fall (highest in November) and decreasing trend in winter (highest in February) were detected. No pronounced increasing/decreasing trends were detected in annual, spring, and summer precipitation time series. Trend analysis on a spatial scale (for three physiographic regions: mountain, piedmont and coastal) revealed mixed results. Coastal zone exhibited increasing mean temperature (warming) trend as compared to other locations whereas mountain zone showed decreasing trend (cooling). Three main moisture components (precipitation, total cloud cover, and soil moisture) and the two major atmospheric circulation modes (North Atlantic Oscillation and Southern Oscillation) were used for correlative analysis purposes with the temperature (specifically with DTR) and precipitation trends. It appears that the moisture components are associated with DTR more than the circulation modes in North Carolina.

  2. Geology of the Flat Swamp Mountain caldera and related rocks, Carolina slate belt, central North Carolina

    SciTech Connect

    Butler, J.R. . Dept. of Geology)

    1994-03-01

    The Flat Swamp Member (FSM) of the Cid Formation (Late Proterozoic) and related volcanogenic deposits in the Carolina slate belt of central North Carolina constitute a submarine caldera complex, mildly deformed and metamorphosed to lower greenschist facies. The intracaldera facies, including mudflow breccias, ashfall tuffs, pyroclastic flows and lava flows, are 1.2 to 1.8 km thick in the Denton area. The FSM thins abruptly near Badin, passing laterally into extracaldera facies less than 150 m thick of coarse- to fine-grained crystal-rich ashfall tuffs with an upper unit of extremely fine-grained devitrified vitric tuffs. The thickness and average grainsize decrease to the south and east, until the FSM merges with adjacent mudstones. The Morrow Mountain Rhyolite includes bodies of homogeneous rhyolite as much as several km across emplaced within the FSM and stratigraphically lower units, interpreted to be shallow intrusions and some surface-breaking lava domes, emplaced at depths from 0 to 3 km within the caldera and along the ring-fractures. The FSM has been mapped over an area of about 2,400 km[sup 2], and it forms a time-constant layer useful in elucidating slate belt stratigraphy.

  3. Thrust belt geometry in the central Carolina slate belt North Carolina

    SciTech Connect

    Huntsman, J.R.; Dockal, J.A.

    1985-01-01

    Newly recognized eastward-directed thrust faults and associated folds and cleavage constitute a major structural element in the central Carolina slate belt near Albemarle, North Carolina. At least two northwest-trending imbricate thrusts occur in a 10 km wide zone that trends 30 km along a northeast strike. Reconnaissance mapping suggests the presence of faults with similar style towards the west of this zone. Rocks directly involved in the thrust include the deep water rhythmites of the Tillery Formation that act as surface of detachment, and, also, a mafic rock that previously was mapped as a gabbro sill. Other field evidence documenting the thrusts includes: drag folds with a pronounced axial planar cleavage that parallels the faults; ramp areas with characteristic rootless folds; dragging of an earlier cleavage into fault surfaces; shear zones and kink bands with the same sense of movement as the thrusts. Axial planar cleavage results in part from pressure solution. The intensity of cleavage and the relative overall strain of the rocks increases from west to east across the thrust zone and suggests that thrusting progressed by successive propogation of footwall faults. Systematic and regular changes in the ratio of Bouma sequence intervals ((A+B+C+D)/E) show a marked discontinuity at the faults and suggest relative horizontal displacements of up to 14 km. Reconnaissance work suggests that the thrust may pre-date but are not younger than the regional low grade metamorphism.

  4. Pegmatite geology of the Shelby district, North Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Griffitts, Wallace R.

    1957-01-01

    The Shelby district is divided into a northwestern and a southeastern province. The rocks in the southeastern province include various units in the Battleground schist formation and the Yorkville granodiorite. Those in the northwestern province include the Carolina gneiss, with its Shelby gneiss member, and the Toluca quartz monzonite. The Cherryville quartz monzonite forms a batholith that is just west of the boundary between the two provinces. Pegmatites related to both the Toluca and the Cherryville quartz monzonites lie in the Carolina gneiss and many dikes of pegmatite that are related to the Cherryville quartz monzonite are in the tin-spodumene belt that lies along the boundary between provinces. The rocks of the southeastern province have been bent into steep isoclinal folds; those of the northwestern province were bent into open folds and gently-dipping isoclinal folds. The rocks to the southeast have been metamorphosed in the epidote-amphibolite facies whereas the rocks to the northwest represent the amphibolite or granulite facies. The pegmatites related to the Toluca quartz monzonite form sills, dikes, and concordant lenses in the Carolina gneiss, as well as dikes in the Toluca quartz monzonite. The bodies are unzoned and consist mainly of gneissic microcline-plagioclase-quartz pegmatite. The pegmatites related to the Cherryville quartz monzonite form dikes and disconformable lenses in the Carolina gneiss and the Toluca quartz monzonite. These pegmatites range widely in composition and many are zoned. The dikes west of the Cherryville batholith are rich in muscovite and plagioclase and may contain no microcline or only a moderate amount of microcline. Quartz cores and microcline-rich intermediate zones are common. Similar pegmatite forms dikes along the west edge of the tin-spodumene belt. The tin-spodumene belt containes albite-microcline-spodumene-quartz pegmatite. These dikes of albitic pegmatite are largest and most nearly parallel to one another

  5. Evaluation of urban storm-water maintenance in North Carolina

    SciTech Connect

    Roenigk, D.J.; Paterson, R.G.; Heraty, M.A.; Kaiser, E.J.; Burby, R.J.

    1992-06-01

    Spurred by continuing urban growth and new federal mandates for control of nonpoint source pollution, local governments are increasingly concerned about the need to improve stormwater management. Long-term maintenance is a critical aspect of stormwater management if both water quality and water quantity benefits are to be realized in practice. The report examines what is actually being done in North Carolina cities to maintain stormwater systems and what selected stormwater experts feel should be done. Several actions are needed. First, local governments are recommended to pay greater attention to system planning, apply more stringent design standards, and monitor the effectiveness of structures protecting water quality as the most critical basis for successful long-term maintenance. Second, policy makers at all levels of government and researchers need to determine appropriate strategies for the treatment and disposal of accumulated sediments. Finally, further research about the best maintenance practices and financing arrangements may be needed.

  6. Feeling the heat: displaced tobacco workers in North Carolina.

    PubMed

    Barbeau, E M; Levenstein, C

    1999-01-01

    Tobacco control is a successful public health movement, but little attention is being paid to what this success means for workers and communities who are economically dependent on tobacco. The social context of job loss for these workers remains largely unstudied. We conducted a case study of a cigarette manufacturing facility closure in Reidsville, North Carolina and report on the effects of the closure for workers and the community. Results suggest the need for: 1) worker education directed toward developing skills for jobs that pay family-supporting wages, and 2) community-driven strategies to attract new businesses that offer such jobs. Public health organizations, labor unions, community development groups, business representatives, civic leaders, academic institutions, and others should unite in efforts to assist tobacco-dependent workers and communities to transition to other economic bases. These efforts should be funded by the tobacco industry. PMID:17208916

  7. Binge drinking among male Mexican immigrants in Rural North Carolina.

    PubMed

    Loury, Sharon; Jesse, Elizabeth; Wu, Qiang

    2011-08-01

    While it is clear that alcohol use among immigrants from Mexico has serious consequences, limited data exist on the correlates of this behavior for Mexican immigrants residing in rural, traditionally non-Hispanic settings. A cross-sectional survey with an outreach approach was used to target 173 male Mexican immigrants in rural eastern North Carolina. Questionnaires including demographics, pre and post immigration alcohol use, acculturation, stress, social support, and depressive symptoms were administered through oral interview by trained bilingual interpreters. Results show a higher prevalence of binge drinking in the study sample compared to rate of alcohol use by Hispanics in the United States. Relationships were identified between Pre-immigration alcohol use, lower perceived social support, socialization within one's own cultural group, and binge drinking. These findings provide a preliminary basis in the development of interventions to address the problem of binge drinking in this population. Further exploration of the interaction between social isolation and social support is also needed.

  8. U.S. hydropower resource assessment for North Carolina

    SciTech Connect

    Conner, A.M.; Francfort, J.E.

    1997-10-01

    The US Department of Energy is developing an estimate of the undeveloped hydropower potential in the US. The Hydropower Evaluation Software (HES) is a computer model that was developed by the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory for this purpose. HES measures the undeveloped hydropower resources available in the US, using uniform criteria for measurement. The software was developed and tested using hydropower information and data provided by the Southwestern Power Administration. It is a menu-driven program that allows the personal computer user to assign environmental attributes to potential hydropower sites, calculate development suitability factors for each site based on the environmental attributes present, and generate reports based on these suitability factors. This report describes the resource assessment results for the State of North Carolina.

  9. Characterization of marine debris in North Carolina salt marshes.

    PubMed

    Viehman, Shay; Vander Pluym, Jenny L; Schellinger, Jennifer

    2011-12-01

    Marine debris composition, density, abundance, and accumulation were evaluated in salt marshes in Carteret County, North Carolina seasonally between 2007 and 2009. We assessed relationships between human use patterns and debris type. Wave effects on marine debris density were examined using a GIS-based forecasting tool. We assessed the influence of site wave exposure, period, and height on debris quantity. Presence and abundance of debris were related to wave exposure, vegetation type and proximity of the strata to human population and human use patterns. Plastic pieces accounted for the majority of all debris. Small debris (0-5 cm) was primarily composed of foam pieces and was frequently affiliated with natural wrack. Large debris (>100 cm) was encountered in all marsh habitat types surveyed and was primarily composed of anthropogenic wood and derelict fishing gear. Marsh cleanup efforts should be targeted to specific habitat types or debris types to minimize further damage to sensitive habitats.

  10. North Carolina court affirms conviction of HIV-positive rapist.

    PubMed

    1999-03-01

    The North Carolina Court of Appeals upheld the conviction of [name removed] [name removed], convicted of raping a 12-year-old girl. The defense had claimed that in admitting testimony about [name removed]'s AIDS diagnosis, the court prejudiced the jury against [name removed] was sentenced to 35 to 42.75 years in prison on the rape charge, and 22 to 32 months for an indecent liberties charge. Because of [name removed]'s HIV infection, indictments were made against him for attempted murder and assault with a deadly weapon. Those charges were dropped during the trial. The Court of Appeals refused to look into the case because the argument made in the appeal differed from the argument made at the original trial. The girl involved in the case received AZT prophylaxis following the rape and has not tested positive. PMID:11366398

  11. Cryptosporidiosis outbreak at a summer camp--North Carolina, 2009.

    PubMed

    2011-07-15

    In July 2009, local, regional, state, and federal public health officials investigated a cryptosporidiosis outbreak at a youth summer camp in North Carolina. The investigation identified 46 laboratory-confirmed and probable cryptosporidiosis cases at the camp. Analyses of data from a retrospective cohort study of staff members revealed that eating ham from a sandwich bar that included camp-grown raw produce and sharing a cabin with an ill person were significantly associated with illness. Cryptosporidium isolates from stool specimens of livestock and humans at the camp were of the identical Cryptosporidium parvum subtype, IIaA17G2R1, indicating that zoonotic transmission had occurred, and suggesting a link not implicated by traditional epidemiologic methods. This investigation underscores the importance of reducing the risk for Cryptosporidium transmission in camp settings and the value of Cryptosporidium subtyping as a tool to elucidate cryptosporidiosis epidemiology.

  12. Safety on North Carolina and Kentucky trout farms.

    PubMed

    Ogunsanya, T J; Durborow, R M; Myers, M L; Cole, H P; Thompson, S L

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to identify and describe work-related safety hazards, injuries, and near-injury events (close calls) that occurred on trout farms in North Carolina and Kentucky. An interview instrument was used to collect information on occupational hazards, injuries, and near-injury events that resulted from work-related activities. Trout farmers reported occupational hazards including falling live tank lids, slippery surfaces on hauling trucks, lifting strains, falls from raceway walls and walkways, needlesticks while vaccinating fish, allergies, hypothermia/drowning, falls from cranes, chemical exposure, fire/explosions related to oxygen exposure, and electrical contact with overhead power lines. This study also reports solutions suggested by farm safety researchers or used by farmers to prevent the safety hazards found on trout farms. PMID:21452757

  13. Utilization of ERTS-1 data in North Carolina

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welby, C. W. (Principal Investigator); Lammi, J. O.; Carson, R. J.

    1972-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Initial study and interpretation of ERTS-1 imagery indicates its usefulness for regional land use planning purposes in North Carolina. Quarries, many secondary roads, and the existence of urbanization as well as changes in urban areas may be mapped. Differences in spectral response for various parts of the major cities suggests that the type of activity in urbanized areas may be monitored. Geological mapping at a scale of 1:250,000 may be possible. The major unfavorable comment from various organizations and agencies who are potential users has been to the relatively small scale. The imagery is a powerful illustrative tool for the several state agencies cooperating in the investigation.

  14. Using topographic lidar data to delineate the North Carolina Shoreline

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Limber, Patrick W.; List, Jeffrey H.; Warren, Jeffrey D.; Farris, Amy S.; Weber, Kathryn M.

    2007-01-01

    In North Carolina, shoreline change rates are an important component of the state's coastal management program. To enhance methods of measuring shoreline change, the NC Division of Coastal Management (DCM) is considering using mean high water (MHW) shorelines extracted from lidar data together with traditional wet/dry shorelines digitized from aerial photography. To test their compatibility, a wet/dry line and MHW shoreline derived from a concurrent 2004 oceanfront photography and lidar dataset were compared along a distance of 244 km. Results show that the MHW shoreline was seaward of the wet/dry shoreline by 2.82 m on average, and that this offset biased shoreline change rates by an average of 0.05 m/yr. The offset was greatest on low-sloping beaches experiencing higher water levels at the time of photography, but overall was small enough to suggest that the MHW shoreline can be a reliable substitute for the wet/dry shoreline.

  15. Hunting for tularaemia - a review of cases in North Carolina.

    PubMed

    Rimawi, R H; Shah, K B; Chowdhary, R A; Cook, P P

    2015-05-01

    Human infections with Francisella tularensis can be acquired via numerous routes, including ingestion, inhalation, arthropod bite or direct contact with infected animals. Since 1991, there have been 25 reported cases of tularaemia in North Carolina, most of which were associated with rabbit hunting or cat bites. We present two adults cases of pulmonary and oropharyngeal tularaemia and review the reported cases since 1991-2013. We also present the fifth case of pulmonary empyema. While cavitary pneumonias are primarily treated with drainage, we illustrate a case of cavitary pneumonia associated with tularaemia successfully treated with oral ciprofloxacin after drainage. Tularaemia should be considered in patients with a perplexing radiographic image, animal exposure and lack of response to conventional empiric broad-spectrum antibiotics. Even in serious cases of pneumonic tularaemia, fluoroquinolones may provide a suitable alternative to aminoglycosides.

  16. Race, Wealth, and Solid Waste Facilities in North Carolina

    PubMed Central

    Norton, Jennifer M.; Wing, Steve; Lipscomb, Hester J.; Kaufman, Jay S.; Marshall, Stephen W.; Cravey, Altha J.

    2007-01-01

    Background Concern has been expressed in North Carolina that solid waste facilities may be disproportionately located in poor communities and in communities of color, that this represents an environmental injustice, and that solid waste facilities negatively impact the health of host communities. Objective Our goal in this study was to conduct a statewide analysis of the location of solid waste facilities in relation to community race and wealth. Methods We used census block groups to obtain racial and economic characteristics, and information on solid waste facilities was abstracted from solid waste facility permit records. We used logistic regression to compute prevalence odds ratios for 2003, and Cox regression to compute hazard ratios of facilities issued permits between 1990 and 2003. Results The adjusted prevalence odds of a solid waste facility was 2.8 times greater in block groups with ≥50% people of color compared with block groups with < 10% people of color, and 1.5 times greater in block groups with median house values < $60,000 compared with block groups with median house values ≥$100,000. Among block groups that did not have a previously permitted solid waste facility, the adjusted hazard of a new permitted facility was 2.7 times higher in block groups with ≥50% people of color compared with block groups with < 10% people of color. Conclusion Solid waste facilities present numerous public health concerns. In North Carolina solid waste facilities are disproportionately located in communities of color and low wealth. In the absence of action to promote environmental justice, the continued need for new facilities could exacerbate this environmental injustice. PMID:17805426

  17. BME analysis of spatiotemporal particulate matter distributions in North Carolina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christakos, George; Serre, Marc L.

    Spatiotemporal maps of particulate matter (PM) concentrations contribute considerably to the understanding of the underlying natural processes and the adequate assessment of the PM health effects. These maps should be derived using an approach that combines rigorous mathematical formulation with sound science. To achieve such a task, the PM 10 distribution in the state of North Carolina is studied using the Bayesian maximum entropy (BME) mapping method. This method is based on a realistic representation of the spatiotemporal domain, which can integrate rigorously and efficiently various forms of physical knowledge and sources of uncertainty. BME offers a complete characterization of PM 10 concentration patterns in terms of multi-point probability distributions and allows considerable flexibility regarding the choice of the appropriate concentration estimates. The PM 10 maps show significant variability both spatially and temporally, a finding that may be associated with geographical characteristics, climatic changes, seasonal patterns, and random fluctuations. The inherently spatiotemporal nature of PM 10 variation is demonstrated by means of theoretical considerations as well as in terms of the more accurate PM 10 predictions of composite space/time analysis compared to spatial estimation. It is shown that the study of PM 10 distributions in North Carolina can be improved by properly incorporating uncertain data into the mapping process, whereas more informative estimates are generated by considering soft data at the estimation points. Uncertainty maps illustrate the significance of stochastic PM 10 characterization in space/time, and identify limitations associated with inadequate interpolation techniques. Stochastic PM 10 analysis has important applications in the optimization of monitoring networks in space and time, environmental risk assessment, health management and administration, etc.

  18. Effect of North Carolina's restriction on teenage driver cell phone use two years after implementation.

    PubMed

    Goodwin, Arthur H; O'Brien, Natalie P; Foss, Robert D

    2012-09-01

    A majority of states now restrict teenagers from using a mobile communication device while driving. The effect of these restrictions is largely unknown. In a previous study, we found North Carolina's teenage driver cell phone restriction had little influence on young driver behavior four months after the law took effect (Foss et al., 2009). The goal of the present study was to examine the longer-term effect of North Carolina's cell phone restriction. It was expected that compliance with the restriction would increase, as awareness of the restriction grew over time. Teenagers were observed at high schools in North Carolina approximately two years after the law was implemented. Observations were also conducted in South Carolina, which did not have a cell phone restriction. In both states, there was a broad decrease in cell phone use. A logistic regression analysis showed the decrease in cell phone use did not significantly differ between the two states. Although hand-held cell phone use decreased, there was an increase in the likelihood that drivers in North Carolina were observed physically manipulating a phone. Finally, a mail survey of teenagers in North Carolina showed awareness for the cell phone restriction now stands at 78% among licensed teens. Overall, the findings suggest North Carolina's cell phone restriction has had no long-term effect on the behavior of teenage drivers. Moreover, it appears many teenage drivers may be shifting from talking on a phone to texting. PMID:22664702

  19. Effect of North Carolina's restriction on teenage driver cell phone use two years after implementation.

    PubMed

    Goodwin, Arthur H; O'Brien, Natalie P; Foss, Robert D

    2012-09-01

    A majority of states now restrict teenagers from using a mobile communication device while driving. The effect of these restrictions is largely unknown. In a previous study, we found North Carolina's teenage driver cell phone restriction had little influence on young driver behavior four months after the law took effect (Foss et al., 2009). The goal of the present study was to examine the longer-term effect of North Carolina's cell phone restriction. It was expected that compliance with the restriction would increase, as awareness of the restriction grew over time. Teenagers were observed at high schools in North Carolina approximately two years after the law was implemented. Observations were also conducted in South Carolina, which did not have a cell phone restriction. In both states, there was a broad decrease in cell phone use. A logistic regression analysis showed the decrease in cell phone use did not significantly differ between the two states. Although hand-held cell phone use decreased, there was an increase in the likelihood that drivers in North Carolina were observed physically manipulating a phone. Finally, a mail survey of teenagers in North Carolina showed awareness for the cell phone restriction now stands at 78% among licensed teens. Overall, the findings suggest North Carolina's cell phone restriction has had no long-term effect on the behavior of teenage drivers. Moreover, it appears many teenage drivers may be shifting from talking on a phone to texting.

  20. Rapid Holocene coastal change revealed by high-resolution micropaleontological analysis, Pamlico Sound, North Carolina, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grand, Pre C.; Culver, S.J.; Mallinson, D.J.; Farrell, K.M.; Corbett, D.R.; Horton, B.P.; Hillier, C.; Riggs, S.R.; Snyder, S.W.; Buzas, M.A.

    2011-01-01

    Foraminiferal analyses of 404 contiguous samples, supported by diatom, lithologic, geochronologic and seismic data, reveal both rapid and gradual Holocene paleoenvironmental changes in an 8.21-m vibracore taken from southern Pamlico Sound, North Carolina. Data record initial flooding of a latest Pleistocene river drainage and the formation of an estuary 9000. yr ago. Estuarine conditions were punctuated by two intervals of marine influence from approximately 4100 to 3700 and 1150 to 500. cal. yr BP. Foraminiferal assemblages in the muddy sand facies that accumulated during these intervals contain many well-preserved benthic foraminiferal species, which occur today in open marine settings as deep as the mid shelf, and significant numbers of well-preserved planktonic foraminifera, some typical of Gulf Stream waters. We postulate that these marine-influenced units resulted from temporary destruction of the southern Outer Banks barrier islands by hurricanes. The second increase in marine influence is coeval with increased rate of sea-level rise and a peak in Atlantic tropical cyclone activity during the Medieval Climate Anomaly. This high-resolution analysis demonstrates the range of environmental variability and the rapidity of coastal change that can result from the interplay of changing climate, sea level and geomorphology in an estuarine setting. ?? 2011 University of Washington.

  1. Program Evaluation of Alternative Schools in North Carolina: A Companion Dissertation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Michael O.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the evaluation was to evaluate two alternative programs in a North Carolina (NC) and South Carolina (SC) public school district to determine if they are effective in delivering constructive interventions that modify student behavior once students have left the programs and have returned to their regular learning environments. This…

  2. Penal Reform and Construction of the Western North Carolina Railroad 1875-1892

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carson, Homer S., III

    2005-01-01

    On March 13, 1879, the "Salisbury Carolina Watchman" noted that the longest and most difficult tunnel in the struggle to lay a railroad line across the Blue Ridge Mountains has been opened. Convicts from North Carolina's new penitentiary built this transportation system and solved the state's need for a cheap labor force as well as the prison's…

  3. A hierarchical community occurrence model for North Carolina stream fish

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Midway, S.R.; Wagner, Tyler; Tracy, B.H.

    2016-01-01

    The southeastern USA is home to one of the richest—and most imperiled and threatened—freshwater fish assemblages in North America. For many of these rare and threatened species, conservation efforts are often limited by a lack of data. Drawing on a unique and extensive data set spanning over 20 years, we modeled occurrence probabilities of 126 stream fish species sampled throughout North Carolina, many of which occur more broadly in the southeastern USA. Specifically, we developed species-specific occurrence probabilities from hierarchical Bayesian multispecies models that were based on common land use and land cover covariates. We also used index of biotic integrity tolerance classifications as a second level in the model hierarchy; we identify this level as informative for our work, but it is flexible for future model applications. Based on the partial-pooling property of the models, we were able to generate occurrence probabilities for many imperiled and data-poor species in addition to highlighting a considerable amount of occurrence heterogeneity that supports species-specific investigations whenever possible. Our results provide critical species-level information on many threatened and imperiled species as well as information that may assist with re-evaluation of existing management strategies, such as the use of surrogate species. Finally, we highlight the use of a relatively simple hierarchical model that can easily be generalized for similar situations in which conventional models fail to provide reliable estimates for data-poor groups.

  4. Cancer mortality in Native Americans in North Carolina.

    PubMed Central

    Horner, R D

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes age-adjusted mortality from malignant neoplasms for Native Americans in North Carolina for 1968-72 and 1978-82. Sex-specific standardized mortality ratios were calculated from death certificate data, using the cancer mortality experience of White North Carolinians to obtain the number of expected deaths. For most categories and specific sites of cancer, mortality was at or below the expected level, but higher than expected mortality was found for genitourinary cancers in males (SMR = 1.62, 95% CI = 1.15, 2.21) for the 1978-82 period; within this category, there was a higher than expected level of mortality from prostate cancer (SMR = 2.00; 95% CI = 1.36, 2.83) and cancer of the penis and other male genital organs (SMR = 9.09; 95% CI = 1.10, 32.84). Female Native Americans had an elevated mortality from cervical cancer (SMR = 2.27, 95% CI = 1.09, 4.17) for the 1968-72 period only. PMID:2368854

  5. MERIS Retrieval of Water Quality Components in the Turbid Albemarle-Pamlico Sound Estuary, USA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Biological, geophysical and optical field observations carried out in the Neuse River Estuary, North Carolina, USA were used to develop a semi-empirical optical algorithm for assessing inherent optical properties associated with water quality components (WQCs). Three wavelengths ...

  6. Series of Case Patients with Nontuberculous Mycobacteria Isolation, Central North Carolina, 2006-2010

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) infection/colonization, associated with human morbidity/mortality, is linked to drinking water and drinking water distribution systems. To characterize rates and distribution of NTM isolation among residents living in three North Carolina countie...

  7. North Carolina State Briefing Book for low-level radioactive waste management

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-08-01

    The North Carolina State Briefing Book is one of a series of state briefing books on low-level radioactive waste management practices. It has been prepared to assist state and federal agency officials in planning for safe low-level radioactive waste disposal. The report contains a profile of low-level radioactive waste generators in North Carolina. The profile is the result of a survey of NRC licensees in North Carolina. The briefing book also contains a comprehensive assessment of low-level radioactive waste management issues and concerns as defined by all major interested parties including industry, government, the media, and interest groups. The assessment was developed through personal communications with representatives of interested parties, and through a review of media sources. Lastly, the briefing book provides demographic and socioeconomic data and a discussion of relevant government agencies and activities, all of which may impact waste management practices in North Carolina.

  8. RELATION OF ENVIRONMENTAL CHARACTERISTICS TO FISH ASSEMBLAGES IN THE UPPER FRENCH BROAD RIVER BASIN, NORTH CAROLINA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fish assemblages at 16 sites in the upper French Broad River basin, North Carolina were related to environmental variables using detrended correspondence analysis (DCA) and linear regression. This study was conducted at the landscape scale because regional variables are controlle...

  9. Shallow stratigraphic control on pockmark distribution in north temperate estuaries

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brothers, Laura L.; Kelley, Joseph T.; Belknap, Daniel F.; Barnhardt, Walter A.; Andrews, Brian D.; Legere, Christine; Hughes-Clarke, John E.

    2012-01-01

    Pockmark fields occur throughout northern North American temperate estuaries despite the absence of extensive thermogenic hydrocarbon deposits typically associated with pockmarks. In such settings, the origins of the gas and triggering mechanism(s) responsible for pockmark formation are not obvious. Nor is it known why pockmarks proliferate in this region but do not occur south of the glacial terminus in eastern North America. This paper tests two hypotheses addressing these knowledge gaps: 1) the region's unique sea-level history provided a terrestrial deposit that sourced the gas responsible for pockmark formation; and 2) the region's physiography controls pockmarks distribution. This study integrates over 2500 km of high-resolution swath bathymetry, Chirp seismic reflection profiles and vibracore data acquired in three estuarine pockmark fields in the Gulf of Maine and Bay of Fundy. Vibracores sampled a hydric paleosol lacking the organic-rich upper horizons, indicating that an organic-rich terrestrial deposit was eroded prior to pockmark formation. This observation suggests that the gas, which is presumably responsible for the formation of the pockmarks, originated in Holocene estuarine sediments (loss on ignition 3.5–10%), not terrestrial deposits that were subsequently drowned and buried by mud. The 7470 pockmarks identified in this study are non-randomly clustered. Pockmark size and distribution relate to Holocene sediment thickness (r2 = 0.60), basin morphology and glacial deposits. The irregular underlying topography that dictates Holocene sediment thickness may ultimately play a more important role in temperate estuarine pockmark distribution than drowned terrestrial deposits. These results give insight into the conditions necessary for pockmark formation in nearshore coastal environments.

  10. How to Implement Differentiated Instruction? Adjust, Adjust, Adjust: North Carolina Project Begins with Encouragement from Administrators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Sylvia G.; Batts, Kelly

    2005-01-01

    To help teachers meet the diverse needs of individual students, North Topsail Elementary School in North Carolina developed a differentiated instruction program. North Topsail began its change with staff focusing on the principles of Accelerated Schools, including differentiation. Teachers reflected, developed a vision, and set priorities for…

  11. Improving the Return on Investment of Graduate Medical Education in North Carolina.

    PubMed

    Newton, Warren; Wouk, Noah; Spero, Julie C

    2016-01-01

    The National Academy of Medicine has called for fundamental reform in the governance and accountability of graduate medical education, but how to implement this change is unclear. We describe the North Carolina graduate medical education system, and we propose tracking outcomes and aligning residency stipends with outcomes such as specialty choice, practice in North Carolina, and acceptance of new Medicaid and Medicare patients. PMID:26961836

  12. Gulf Stream Marine Hydrokinetic Energy Observations for North Carolina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muglia, M.; Edge, B.; Lowcher, C.

    2014-12-01

    North Carolina and Florida are likely the only two states on the US east coast that have practical access to energy extraction from the Gulf Stream. After leaving the Florida Straits, the Gulf Stream in the region offshore of Cape Hatteras, NC exhibits the least variability in position of any location on the east coast, while simultaneously being closest to land. These important characteristics have made this area the focus of observations to quantify the hydrokinetic energy that may be available from the Gulf Stream for the state of North Carolina. Three types of observations to quantify the energy resource off NC began in 2013. A 150 kHz Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP) was moored on the 225 meter isobath at the location estimated to be best for energy extraction, and recovered after a 9-month continuous deployment. Another ADCP was moored in nearly the same location to continue observations, and will be retrieved this fall. Currents from the first deployment averaged 1.15 m/s, and the average Betz Power was 0.8 kW/m2 at a depth of 30 meters over the 9-month duration. Significant variability in current speed, and thus power, occurred over the deployment period. Additionally, current measurements from a vessel mounted 300 kHz ADCP were made from water depths of 100m to 1000 m on a cross-isobath transect that included the location of the ADCP mooring. Currents from the ship transects are still under evaluation and comparison with the 150 kHz ADCP mooring, and will provide valuable information about the spatial variability of the current and its dependence on depth. A coastal ocean radar was added to an existing radar network to provide hourly surface current measurements over the larger study area. Methods to use the relative vorticity in the surface currents to identify the shoreward front of the Gulf Stream are being developed and compared with existing frontal determinations such as Navy Gulf Stream frontal charts produced bi-daily. Frontal estimates are

  13. Fishing mortality in North Carolina's southern flounder fishery: direct estimates of instantaneous fishing mortality from a tag return experiment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, William E.; Scharf, Frederick S.; Hightower, Joseph E.

    2009-01-01

    Estimation of harvest rates is often a critical component of fishery stock assessment and management. These assessments are often based on catch-at-age data sets generated over many years, but estimates of instantaneous fishing mortality (F) can also be obtained from a shorter-term tag return study. We conducted a 2-year tag return experiment to generate direct estimates of F for southern flounder Paralichthys lethostigma in a North Carolina estuary. The southern flounder supports lucrative commercial and recreational fisheries within the state and has experienced heavy fishing pressure for more than a decade. During 2005 and 2006, fish were captured and tagged with the assistance of commercial harvesters in the New River estuary. Tag returns were used to generate monthly estimates of F, which demonstrated a clear seasonal pattern that was consistent between years. Several important assumptions of the tag return model were accounted for through the use of double-tagged individuals, the distribution of both high- and standard-reward tags, and the completion of an independent controlled experiment to evaluate mortality related to tagging. Annual estimates of F exceeded the short-term management target in both years. Residual patterns suggest that the estimates may actually have been biased low, possibly due to delayed mixing of tagged fish. Thus, despite recently amended fishery regulations, F in the North Carolina southern flounder gill-net fishery still has the potential to greatly exceed targeted levels, which may delay stock recovery. Tag return studies can provide reliable (and nearly real-time) information about F and natural mortality as long as the experimental design addresses specific assumptions related to tagging-induced mortality, tag shedding, and nonreporting of tags.

  14. Gold, base-metal, and related deposits of North Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Luttrell, Gwendolyn Werth

    1978-01-01

    Gold, silver, copper, lead, zinc, pyrite, tin, cobalt, molybdenum, tungsten, barite, and rare-earths have been mined in North Carolina. Gold, with by-product silver, occurs in veins and mineralized shear zones in metamorphic rocks of the Piedmont province and in placers derived from these deposits. Copper occurs with complex sulfide ores in quartz veins in the metamorphic rocks of the Piedmont province and in massive pyrrhotite-pyrite deposits in crystalline rocks west of the Blue Ridge. Lead and zinc occur in complex ores of gold, copper, lead, zinc, and silver in veins and replacements in metamorphic rocks. Pyrite occurs in crystalline metamorphic rocks. Tin occurs in pegmatite and placer deposits in crystalline rocks near Kings Mountain. Cobalt minerals with ores of iron or gold have been reported in a few areas in the Piedmont. Molybdenum occurs along the borders of a granite body in Halifax County. Tungsten minerals occur with copper sulfide ores in Cabarrus and Vance Counties. Barite occurs in quartz veins and associated with sulfide minerals in Orange, Madison, Cleveland, and Gaston Counties. Ore-earths occur with sulfides in vein deposits in Cabarrus County.

  15. Dabbling duck behavior and aircraft activity in coastal North Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Conomy, J.T.; Collazo, J.A.; Dubovsky, J.A.; Fleming, W.J.

    1998-01-01

    Requests to increase military aircraft activity in some training facilities in the United States have prompted the need to determine if waterfowl and other wildlife are adversely affected by aircraft disturbance. We quantified behavioral responses of wintering American black ducks (Anas rubripes), American wigeon (A. americana), gadwall (A. strepera), and American green-winged teal (A. crecca carolinensis) exposed to low-level flying military aircrafts at Piney and Cedar islands, North Carolina, in 1991 and 1992. Waterfowl spent ???1.4% of their time responding to aircraft, which included flying, swimming, and alert behaviors. Mean duration of responses by species ranged from 10 to 40 sec. Costs to each species were deemed low because disruptions represented a low percentage of their time-activity budgets only a small proportion of birds reacted to disturbance (13/672; 2%); and the likelihood of resuming the activity disrupted by an aircraft disturbance event was high (64%). Recorded levels of aircraft disturbance (i.e., x?? = 85.1 dBA) were not adversely affecting the time-activity budgets of selected waterfowl species wintering at Piney and Cedar islands.

  16. Hydrogeologic framework of the North Carolina Coastal Plain aquifer system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Winner, M.D.; Coble, R.W.

    1989-01-01

    The hydrogeologic framework of the North Carolina Coastal Plain aquifer system consists of ten aquifers separated by nine confining units. From top to bottom the aquifers are: the surficial aquifer, Yorktown aquifer, Pungo River aquifer, Castle Hayne aquifer, Beaufort aquifer, Peedee aquifer, Black Creek aquifer, upper Cape Fear aquifer, lower Cape Fear aquifer, and the Lower Cretaceous aquifer. The uppermost aquifer (the surficial aquifer in most places) is a water-table aquifer and the bottom of the system is underlain by crystalline bedrock. The sedimentary deposits forming the aquifers are of Holocene to Cretaceous age and are composed mostly of sand with lesser amounts of gravel and limestone. Confining units between aquifers are composed primarily of clay and silt. The thickness of the aquifers ranges from zero along the Fall Line to more than 10,000 feet at Cape Hatteras. Prominent structural features are the increasing easterly homoclinal dip of the sediments and the Cape Fear arch, the axis of which trends in a southeast direction. The stratigraphic continuity is determined from correlations of 161 geophysical logs along with data from drillers' and geologists' logs. Aquifers were defined by means of these logs plus water-level and water-quality data and evidence of the continuity of pumping effects. Eighteen hydrogeologic sections depict the correlation of these aquifers throughout the Coastal Plain.

  17. Geographic signatures of North American West Coast estuaries

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Emmett, Robert; Llansó, Roberto; Newton, Jan; Thom, Ron; Hornberger, Michelle; Morgan, Cheryl; Levings, Colin; Copping, Andrea; Fishman, Paul

    2000-01-01

    West Coast estuaries are geologically young and composed of a variety of geomorphological types. These estuaries range from large fjords to shallow lagoons; from large to low freshwater flows. Natural hazards include E1 Niños, strong Pacific storms, and active tectonic activity. West Coast estuaries support a wide range of living resources: five salmon species, harvestable shellfish, waterfowl and marine birds, marine mammals, and a variety of algae and plants. Although populations of many of these living resources have declined (salmonids), others have increased (marine mammals). West Coast estuaries are also centers of commerce and increasingly large shipping traffic. The West Coast human population is rising faster than most other areas of the U.S. and Canada, and is distributed heavily in southern California, the San Francisco Bay area, around Puget Sound, and the Fraser River estuary. While water pollution is a problem in many of the urbanized estuaries, most estuaries do not suffer from poor water quality. Primary estuarine problems include habitat alterations, degradation, and loss; diverted freshwater flows; marine sediment contamination; and exotic species introductions. The growing West Coast economy and population are in part related to the quality of life, which is dependent on the use and enjoyment of abundant coastal natural resources.

  18. Impact of North Carolina's motorcycle helmet law on hospital admissions and charges for care of traumatic brain injuries.

    PubMed

    Naumann, Rebecca B; Marshall, Stephen W; Proescholdbell, Scott K; Austin, Anna; Creppage, Kathleen

    2015-04-01

    BACKGROUND North Carolina requires motorcyclists of all ages to wear federally approved safety helmets. The purpose of this article is to estimate the impact of this state law in terms of hospital admissions for traumatic brain injury (TBI) and associated hospital charges. METHODS Hospital admissions of North Carolina motorcyclists with TBIs and associated hospital charges in 2011 were extracted from the North Carolina Hospital Discharge Data system. We estimated hospital admissions and charges for the same year under the counterfactual condition of North Carolina without a universal motorcycle helmet law by using various substitutes (Florida, Pennsylvania, and South Carolina residents treated in North Carolina). RESULTS North Carolina's universal helmet law prevented an estimated 190 to 226 hospital admissions of North Carolina motorcyclists with TBI in 2011. Averted hospital charges to taxpayer-funded sources (ie, government and public charges) were estimated to be between $9.5 million and $11.6 million for 2011, and total averted hospital charges for 2011 were estimated to be between $25.3 million and $31.0 million. LIMITATIONS Cost estimates are limited to inpatients during the initial period of hospital care. This study was unable to capture long-term health care costs and productivity losses incurred by North Carolina's TBI patients and their caregivers. CONCLUSIONS North Carolina's universal motorcycle helmet law generates health and economic benefits for the state and its taxpayers.

  19. Impact of North Carolina's motorcycle helmet law on hospital admissions and charges for care of traumatic brain injuries.

    PubMed

    Naumann, Rebecca B; Marshall, Stephen W; Proescholdbell, Scott K; Austin, Anna; Creppage, Kathleen

    2015-04-01

    BACKGROUND North Carolina requires motorcyclists of all ages to wear federally approved safety helmets. The purpose of this article is to estimate the impact of this state law in terms of hospital admissions for traumatic brain injury (TBI) and associated hospital charges. METHODS Hospital admissions of North Carolina motorcyclists with TBIs and associated hospital charges in 2011 were extracted from the North Carolina Hospital Discharge Data system. We estimated hospital admissions and charges for the same year under the counterfactual condition of North Carolina without a universal motorcycle helmet law by using various substitutes (Florida, Pennsylvania, and South Carolina residents treated in North Carolina). RESULTS North Carolina's universal helmet law prevented an estimated 190 to 226 hospital admissions of North Carolina motorcyclists with TBI in 2011. Averted hospital charges to taxpayer-funded sources (ie, government and public charges) were estimated to be between $9.5 million and $11.6 million for 2011, and total averted hospital charges for 2011 were estimated to be between $25.3 million and $31.0 million. LIMITATIONS Cost estimates are limited to inpatients during the initial period of hospital care. This study was unable to capture long-term health care costs and productivity losses incurred by North Carolina's TBI patients and their caregivers. CONCLUSIONS North Carolina's universal motorcycle helmet law generates health and economic benefits for the state and its taxpayers. PMID:25856346

  20. Estimating flood magnitude and frequency for urban and small, rural streams in Georgia, South Carolina, and North Carolina, 2011

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Feaster, Toby D.; Gotvald, Anthony J.; Weaver, J. Curtis

    2014-01-01

    Reliable estimates of the magnitude and frequency of floods are essential for the design of transportation and water-conveyance structures, flood insurance studies, and flood-plain management. Flood-frequency estimates are particularly important in densely populated urban areas. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) used a multistate approach to update methods for determining the magnitude and frequency of floods in urban and small, rural streams that are not substantially affected by regulation or tidal fluctuations in Georgia, South Carolina, and North Carolina (Feaster and others, 2014). The multistate approach has the advantage over a single state approach of increasing the number of streamflow-gaging station (streamgages) available for analysis, expanding the geographical coverage that would allow for application of regional regression equations across state boundaries, and building on a previous flood-frequency investigation of rural streamgages in the Southeastern United States. This investigation was funded as part of a cooperative program of water-resources investigations between the USGS, the South Carolina Department of Transportation, and the North Carolina Department of Transportation. In addition, much of the data and information for the Georgia streamgages was funded through a similar cooperative program with the Georgia Department of Transportation.

  1. Special Review of Smart Start Expenditures by Save Our Brothers, Inc. (Pittsboro, North Carolina) and Liberty Chapel United Church of Christ (Moncure, North Carolina).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Carolina Office of the State Auditor, Raleigh.

    This report of the Office of the State Auditor in North Carolina details audit findings regarding allegations of misuse of Smart Start funds by Save Our Brothers, Inc. and the Liberty Chapel United Church of Christ. Save Our Brothers, Inc., a nonprofit agency, received two contracts totaling $46,327 from the Chatham County Partnership for Children…

  2. North Carolina Children's Index, 2000: A Profile of Leading Indicators of the Health and Well-Being of North Carolina's Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haggerty, Joann H.

    This Kids Count report examines statewide trends in the well-being of North Carolina's children. The statistical portrait is based on 20 key indicators of child well-being: (1) infant mortality; (2) low birth weight infants; (3) births to teens; (4) births to mothers with early prenatal care; (5) child deaths; (6) regulated child care enrollment;…

  3. The Policies, Politics, and Players in the North Carolina Parental School Choice Voucher Debate: Why Wisconsin Said Yes, but North Carolina Says No

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haire, Rita C.

    2010-01-01

    This qualitative study examines the education policies, political dynamics, and key players in Wisconsin (WI) and North Carolina (NC) to develop a theory to explain how a targeted parental school choice voucher policy was legislated in WI but not in NC. The study seeks to offer a theoretical policy framework that explains the absence of a targeted…

  4. North Carolina Rural Adjustment Studies. A Study of Farm Families and Their Level of Living-Income Patterns in Watauga County, North Carolina.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCann, Glenn C.

    The purposes of this 1961 study were to identify attitudes and goals of farm people in low income areas and to relate these factors and selected social and personal factors to patterns of adjustment to economic and situational conditions. The sample for the study consisted of 296 farm families in Watauga County, North Carolina. Results of the…

  5. Arsenic in groundwater in the North Carolina Eastern slate belt (Esb): Nash and halifax counties, north carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reid, J.C.; Haven, W.T.; Eudy, D.D.; Milosh, R.M.; Stafford, E.G.

    2010-01-01

    Naturally occurring arsenic-contaminated groundwater is present within the Eastern Slate Belt (ESB) of North Carolina. Long-term, integrated geologic and geo-chemical investigations havedetermined the presence of arsenic by analyzing precipitates from first and second order streams under base flow conditions. When groundwater discharges into streams, arsenic and other metals are precipitated from solution, due to redox changes between the subsurface and surface environments. Analyses (As, base metals, Fe and Mn) were determined following chemical extraction ofnaturally occurring manganese-iron oxide-coatings, which had precipitated from solution onto stream-bed cobbles. Additionally, artificial redox fronts were produced by placing ceramic tilesin streambeds to collect and analyze oxide precipitates. Thermochemical plots from these data, as well as information from respective stream water measurements (pH and Eh), water sampling, and rock chemical analyses indicate mobile arsenic in predicted stability fields. Initial results show that naturally occurring arsenic-contaminated groundwater is present within the study area. However, the resulting oxidation and pre-cipitation within streams appreciably removes thiscontaminant from surface water solution.

  6. Anaerobic oral flora in the North American black bear (Ursus americanus) in eastern North Carolina.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Elsburgh O; Stoskopf, Michael K; Minter, Larry J; Stringer, Elizabeth M

    2012-06-01

    Microbial flora can provide insight into the ecology and natural history of wildlife in addition to improving understanding of health risks. This study examines the anaerobic oral flora of hunter killed black bears (Ursus americanus) in eastern North Carolina. Oral swabs from the buccal and lingual supragingival tooth surfaces of the first and second mandibular and maxillary molars of 22 black bears were inoculated onto Brucella Blood Agar plates supplemented with hemin and vitamin K after transport from the field using reduced oxoid nutrient broth. Sixteen anaerobic bacterial species, representing nine genera were identified using the RapID ANA II Micromethod Kit system and a number of organisms grown that could not be identified with the system. The most frequently identified anaerobes were Peptostreptococcus prevotii, Streptococcus constellatus, and Porphyromonas gingivalis. The diversity in the anaerobic oral flora of black bear in eastern North Carolina suggests the importance of including these organisms in basic health risk assessment protocols and suggests a potential tool for assessment of bear/habitat interactions. PMID:22503889

  7. Evaluating the Persistence of Shoreline Change Hotspots, Northern North Carolina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    List, J. H.; Farris, A. S.; Sullivan, C.

    2002-12-01

    Shoreline change hotspots are sections of coast that exhibit significantly higher rates of erosion than adjacent areas. Although hotspots may occur at a wide range of spatial and temporal scales, we consider two distinct types of hotspots that have been observed on high-energy coasts away from the influence of coastal structures: 1. hotspots related to individual storms, with an alongshore spatial scale of 2-5 km and the characteristic of being almost completely reversed by accretion within 1-2 weeks of calm conditions following the storm, and referred to here as short-term reversible hotspots, and 2. hotspots related to the long-term trend of shoreline change on a time scale of decades, with a similar spatial scale as short-term hotspots but not readily reversible during fair weather, and referred to here as long-term hotspots. Here we evaluate these hotspot types with respect to their persistence, i.e., the degree to which hotspot locations remain fixed through time. Relevant to this session, hotspots that are spatially fixed and/or recurring are more consistent with hypotheses relating hotspot formation to geologic framework controls than hotspots with variable or moving locations. Observations consist of a recently-completed three-year time series of monthly shoreline position measurements along 130 km of North Carolina's Outer Banks using SWASH, a ground-based system for surveying regional shoreline position as the mean high water datum's intersection with the beach foreshore. We identify short-term reversible hotspots through the comparison of pre-, mid-, and post-storm shoreline surveys. The pre- to mid-storm comparison typically exhibits 2-5 km wide regions of significant shoreline erosion (10-20 m) alternating with areas of little change. The mid- to post-storm accretion appears as a mirror image of the erosion pattern, almost completely reversing the storm erosion. We identify long-term hotspots through a comparison between our three-year SWASH time

  8. Heavy metals exposures among Mexican farmworkers in eastern North Carolina

    SciTech Connect

    Quandt, Sara A.; Jones, Bradley T.; Talton, Jennifer W.; Whalley, Lara E.; Galvan, Leonardo; Vallejos, Quirina M.; Grzywacz, Joseph G.; Chen, Haiying; Pharr, Kathryn E.; Isom, Scott; Arcury, Thomas A.

    2010-01-15

    Background: Immigrant farmworkers are a population at risk for numerous environmental and occupational exposures. The metals arsenic, lead, mercury, and cadmium are known neurotoxins to which workers can be exposed both in the US and in their country of origin. Because farmworkers are exposed to neurotoxic pesticides, they may be at risk for adverse health effects from the combined exposure. Objectives: To examine the relationship between exposure to metals, as measured in urine, with personal and work-related characteristics of Mexican migrant and seasonal farmworkers in the US. Methods: We analyzed data on metals found in urine of 258 farmworkers recruited from 44 camps in eastern North Carolina in 2007. Geometric means and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were used to compare data with data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES). We used multivariate regression models fitted for each metal to estimate the association of creatinine-corrected urinary metals and worker characteristics related to environmental and occupational exposures. Results: Geometric mean urinary metals concentrations ({mu}g/g creatinine) exceeded NHANES reference values for arsenic (13.23 [CI 11.11, 15.35] vs. 8.55 [CI 7.23, 9.86]) and lead (1.26 [CI 1.08, 1.43] vs. 0.63 [CI 0.60, 0.66]). Age, being from the central region of Mexico, and pack years of cigarette smoking were significant predictors of metals exposure; being a current smoker and years worked in US agriculture were not. Conclusions: This first study to examine indicators of worker body burdens of metals shows that workers have body burdens related to exposures other than work in the US. Further research should address their risk for adverse health outcomes due to combined exposures to neurotoxins in pesticides.

  9. Heavy Metals Exposures among Mexican Farmworkers in Eastern North Carolina

    PubMed Central

    Quandt, Sara A.; Jones, Bradley T.; Talton, Jennifer W.; Whalley, Lara E.; Galvan, Leonardo; Vallejos, Quirina M.; Grzywacz, Joseph G.; Chen, Haiying; Pharr, Kathryn E.; Isom, Scott; A. Arcury, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Background Immigrant farmworkers are a population at risk for numerous environmental and occupational exposures. The metals arsenic, lead, mercury, and cadmium are known neurotoxins to which workers can be exposed both in the US and in their country of origin. Because farmworkers are exposed to neurotoxic pesticides, they may be at risk for adverse health effects from the combined exposure. Objectives To examine the relationship between exposure to metals, as measured in urine, with personal and work-related characteristics of Mexican migrant and seasonal farmworkers in the US. Methods We analyzed data on metals found in urine of 258 farmworkers recruited from 44 camps in eastern North Carolina in 2007. Geometric means and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were used to compare data with data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES). We used multivariate regression models fitted for each metal to estimate the association of creatinine-corrected urinary metals and worker characteristics related to environmental and occupational exposures. Results Geometric mean urinary metals concentrations (µg/g creatinine) exceeded NHANES reference values for arsenic (13.23 [CI 11.11, 15.35] vs. 8.55 [CI 7.23, 9.86]) and lead (1.26 [CI 1.08, 1.43] vs. 0.63 [CI 0.60, 0.66]). Age, being from the central region of Mexico, and pack years of cigarette smoking were significant predictors of metals exposure; being a current smoker and years worked in US agriculture were not. Conclusions This first study to examine indicators of worker body burdens of metals shows that workers have body burdens related to exposures other than work in the US. Further research should address their risk for adverse health outcomes due to combined exposures to neurotoxins in pesticides. PMID:19818439

  10. Characterization of turf practices in five North Carolina communities.

    PubMed

    Osmond, Deanna L; Hardy, David H

    2004-01-01

    Limited information exists on specific urban lawn care practices in the United States. We conducted a door-to-door lawn care survey in five North Carolina communities to determine suburban fertilizer, pesticide, and water use. These communities, Cary, Goldsboro, Kinston, New Bern, and Greenville, are mostly located within the Neuse River basin, a nutrient-sensitive water resource. Residents in Cary used lawn care companies more than twice as frequently as residents in the other communities (43 compared with 20%). Cary had the smallest mean lawn size (445 m2), while the largest was in Goldsboro (1899 m2). Tall fescue [Festuca arundinacea Schreb.] was the predominant grass type in Cary (99%), and centipedegrass [Eremochloa ophiuroides (Munro) Hack.] or centipedegrass mixtures were the predominant grass types in Greenville and New Bern. Kinston had the lowest fertilizer usage with only 54% of the residents using fertilizer; Cary had the highest rate of 83%. The average N fertilizer rate applied to the lawns was dissimilar ranging from 24 to 151 kg N ha(-1). Analysis of variance results for fertilizer rates and household income indicated a significant difference (P < 0.05) in application rate between high- and medium-income levels and the low-income level. Cary, Goldsboro, and Greenville had approximately the same number of fertilizer applications per year (1.5), whereas the average number of fertilizer applications per year in New Bern was 3.0. Most household residents (53%) used instructions on the bag and either grass type and/or lawn area to guide them on fertilizer application rates.

  11. Assessing multimodal school travel safety in North Carolina.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Noreen C; McGrane, Ann B; Rodgman, Eric A; Steiner, Ruth L; Palmer, W Mathew; Lytle, Benjamin F

    2015-01-01

    School transportation has been the subject of numerous federal and state policies since the early twentieth century-the Safe Routes to School program is the most recent example. However, few recent studies have thoroughly analyzed the risks and costs associated with different modes of transportation to school. Our descriptive study assessed the injury and fatality rates and related safety costs of different modes of school transportation using crash and exposure data from North Carolina, USA from 2005 to 2012. We found that riding with a teen driver is the most dangerous mode on a per trip basis with injury rates 20 times higher and fatality rates 90 times higher than school buses, which had the lowest injury rates. Non-motorized modes had per trip injury rates equivalent to school buses but per trip fatality rates were 15 times higher than for school buses. The economic costs of school travel-related injuries and fatalities for walking, biking, and teen drivers were substantially higher than other modes. This research has important policy implications because it quantified the risks of different school travel modes which allows policymakers to consider how safety investments can reduce risks. Decades of effort by schools, communities, and the government have made school buses a very safe mode and endeavored to reduce risks to teen drivers. This study highlighted the need for these same actors to reduce the risks of injury for walking and bicycling. As more improvements are made to infrastructure around schools, repeated studies of this type will allow practitioners to examine whether the improvements help mitigate the risks.

  12. Ground-water level data for North Carolina, 1987

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coble, Ronald W.; Strickland, A.G.; Bailey, M. Carl

    1989-01-01

    Continuous and periodic measurements in 54 key wells and water-level measurements emplaced in Coastal Plain aquifers across North Carolina in 193 supplemental wells are presented in this report. Hydrographs of selected wells show changes in ground-water storage in the State. The water table in the shallow aquifers was higher throughout most of the State in 1987 than in 1986, indicating that rain had recharged these aquifers sufficiently to replenish the deficit in ground water storage that accumulated in the western and central parts of the State during 1986. Water levels in the heavily pumped Coastal Plain aquifers show a general downward trend for the year, indicating ground water is being withdrawn from aquifer storage. Record low water levels were measured in 4 of 13 wells in the Castle Hayne aquifer; the greatest decline measured during 1987 was 0.3 ft. Water levels in wells in the Peedee, Black Creek, upper Cape Fear, and lower Cape Fear aquifers generally show downward trends. Record low water levels were measured in 4 of 8 wells in the Peedee aquifer; the maximum decline measured during 1987 was 1.5 ft. All wells in the Black Creek, upper Cape Fear, and lower Cape Fear aquifers had record low water levels for 1987, with maximum measured declines in 1987 of 8.6, 3.1, and 3.1 ft., respectively. Record high water levels were measured in two wells, one each in the Castle Hayne and Peedee aquifers. Potentiometric surface maps show the effects of major centers of pumping for the Castle Hayne, Black Creek, and lower Cape Fear aquifers of the Coastal Plain.

  13. Burden of Cancer from Chemicals in North Carolina Drinking Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeFelice, N.

    2013-12-01

    Monitoring programs required by the U.S. Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA) currently do not consider potential differences in chemical exposure patterns and human health risks. Rather, U.S. agencies establish monitoring requirements based on the type of water system and the number of people the system serves; within categories of systems, all potentially carcinogenic chemicals must be monitored with equal frequency, regardless of the potential level of risk these chemicals pose. To inform future policies concerning contaminant monitoring under the SDWA, we examined the potential health threats in North Carolina from the 34 carcinogenic chemicals covered under the SDWA. We analyzed reported contaminant concentration data for all community water systems (CWSs) for the years 1998-2011. We employed an attributable fraction approach that uses probabilistic inputs to evaluate the percent of cancer cases that may be attributable to chemical exposure in drinking water. We found that cancer risks are dominated by 3 of the 34 chemicals and chemical classes (total trihalomethanes (TTHMs), arsenic and gross alpha particles); all other chemicals contribute to less than one cancer case per year in the state. We showed that around 840 cases of cancer annually (2% of annual cancer cases) are attributable to contaminated drinking water. The majority cases are due to TTHMs, arsenic and gross alpha particles, which contributed 810 (95% CI 560-1,280), 14 (95% CI 3 -32), and 13 (95% CI 2-48) cases, respectively. Sixty-seven counties had annual cancer rates higher than 1 in 10,000 attributable to community water systems. Annual cancer rate attributable to chemicals found in drinking water that are regulated under the safe drinking water act.

  14. Correlates of gonorrhoea among African Americans in North Carolina.

    PubMed

    Doherty, Irene A; Adimora, Adaora A; Schoenbach, Victor J; Aral, Sevgi O

    2007-02-01

    Rates of gonorrhoea (GC) infections are highest among African Americans in the USA, but risk factors for GC in this population have not been well defined. The purpose of this study was to study these risk factors. We used secondary analysis of cross-sectional data from a population-based case-control study of African Americans, aged 18-59 years, in rural North Carolina, USA. A history of past infection was 2.4 times (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.3, 4.4) as likely among men (35%) than women (18%). Among men, a history of gonorrhoea was associated with earlier age at first intercourse (adjusted Odds Ratio [aOR] = 2.0 95% CI [1.2, 3.4]), substance use (aOR = 4.4 95% CI [1.1, 17.9]), and having a partner who had been incarcerated (aOR = 18.1 [2.8, 118.0]). Among women, factors associated with GC included diagnosis of another STD (aOR = 5.9 [1.9, 16.9]), lifetime number of sex partners (aOR = 1.9 [1.1, 3.4]), and a sex partner who used drugs (aOR = 4.1 (1.3, 12.9)). In conclusion, African Americans with a history of GC are likely to have traditional STD risk factors, including partners at high risk for sexually transmitted disease (STD). STD screening is warranted upon entry to treatment facilities for substance abuse or correctional facilities.

  15. Beryllium resources of the tin-spodumene belt, North Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Griffitts, Wallace R.

    1954-01-01

    Pegmatite dikes in the tin-spodumene belt of North and South Carolina uniformly contain about 0.05 percent BeO. The most abundant minerals in the pegmatite contain from 0. 0001 to 0.01 percent BeO. Beryl, having 12.0 to 12.3 percent BeO, is the only beryllium-rich mineral and contains more than 80 percent of the total beryllium in the rock. Beryl-bearing pegmatite crops out on hillsides near streams that flow through the pegmatite belt. Much of the pegmatite contains spodumene, feldspar, mica, cassiterite, and columbite, as well as beryl, but separating these minerals will require milling. The minable spodumene ore in the Kings Mountain area, above a depth of 300 feet contains about 40,000 tons of beryl, equivalent to 6, 000 tons of BeO, if 80 percent of the BeO is assumed to be in beryl. Other pegmatite in that area contains an additional 238,000 tons of beryl, or 35, 900 tons of BeO. On the basis of the same assumptions the spodumene ore above a depth of 300 feet 1 in the Beaverdam Creek area contains 6, 000 tons of beryl, or 800 tons of BeO, and all other pegmatite in that area contains an additional 13, 000 tons of beryl, or 1, 700 tons of BeO. The entire tin-spodumene belt contains 823, 000 tons of beryl, equivalent to 122,800 tons of BeO. Little beryllium was found in the Piedmont province outside of the tin-spodumene belt.

  16. 78 FR 64594 - Final Federal Agency Actions on Proposed Highway in North Carolina

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-29

    ... to a proposed highway project, I-77 High Occupancy/Toll (HOT) lanes, from I-277 (Brookshire Freeway... the following highway project in the State of North Carolina: I-77 High Occupancy/Toll (HOT) lanes...--Construct two HOT lanes along I-77 from just north of the I-77/I-85 interchange (connecting to I-5405...

  17. Statistical Abstract of Higher Education in North Carolina, 2006-07. Research Report 1-07

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yang, Xiaoyun

    2007-01-01

    The University of North Carolina presents the thirty-ninth annual "Statistical Abstract of Higher Education in North Carolinaa." This abstract covers the breadth of higher education activities in the State in their quantitative aspect, from simple counts of enrollment and degrees conferred to complex analyses of the flow of student transfers among…

  18. Who Cares for Children? A Survey of Child Care Services in North Carolina.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Learning Inst. of North Carolina, Durham.

    This report represents a statewide survey of child care services in North Carolina, including day care centers, family day care homes, nursery schools, and kindergartens. Interviews were conducted to ascertain the extent to which North Carolinian children were receiving adequate health care, adequate nutrition, and other basic care. Data on family…

  19. Subseasonal climate variability for North Carolina, United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayemuzzaman, Mohammad; Jha, Manoj K.; Mekonnen, Ademe; Schimmel, Keith A.

    2014-08-01

    Subseasonal trends in climate variability for maximum temperature (Tmax), minimum temperature (Tmin) and precipitation were evaluated for 249 ground-based stations in North Carolina for 1950-2009. The magnitude and significance of the trends at all stations were determined using the non-parametric Theil-Sen Approach (TSA) and the Mann-Kendall (MK) test, respectively. The Sequential Mann-Kendall (SQMK) test was also applied to find the initiation of abrupt trend changes. The lag-1 serial correlation and double mass curve were employed to address the data independency and homogeneity. Using the MK trend test, statistically significant (confidence level ≥ 95% in two-tailed test) decreasing (increasing) trends by 44% (45%) of stations were found in May (June). In general, trends were decreased in Tmax and increased in Tmin data series in subseasonal scale. Using the TSA method, the magnitude of lowest (highest) decreasing (increasing) trend in Tmax is - 0.050 °C/year (+ 0.052 °C/year) in the monthly series for May (March) and for Tmin is - 0.055 °C/year (+ 0.075 °C/year) in February (December). For the precipitation time series using the TSA method, it was found that the highest (lowest) magnitude of 1.00 mm/year (- 1.20 mm/year) is in September (February). The overall trends in precipitation data series were not significant at the 95% confidence level except that 17% of stations were found to have significant (confidence level ≥ 95% in two-tailed test) decreasing trends in February. The statistically significant trend test results were used to develop a spatial distribution of trends: May for Tmax, June for Tmin, and February for precipitation. A correlative analysis of significant temperature and precipitation trend results was examined with respect to large scale circulation modes (North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) and Southern Oscillation Index (SOI). A negative NAO index (positive-El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) index) was found to be associated with

  20. ASSESSING THE CONDITION OF SOUTH CAROLINA'S ESTUARIES: A NEW APPROACH INVOLVING INTEGRATED MEASURES OF CONDITION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The South Carolina Estuarine and Coastal Assessment Program (SCECAP) was initiated in 1999 to assess the condition of the state's coastal habitats using multiple measures of water quality, sediment quality, and biological condition. Sampling has subsequently been expanded to incl...

  1. 75 FR 65389 - North Carolina Disaster #NC-00030

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-22

    ... Carolina (FEMA-1942-DR), dated 10/14/ 2010. Incident: Severe storms, flooding, and straight-line winds associated with remnants of Tropical Storm Nicole. Incident Period: 09/27/2010 through 10/01/2010....

  2. The Effect of Oyster Reef Morphology on Particulate Transfer in a North Carolina Tidal Creek

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemon, M. G.; Posey, M.; Mallin, M.; Alphin, T.

    2014-12-01

    The eastern oyster (Crassostrea virginica) is a vital ecosystem engineer species, providing a number of ecosystem services that structure and maintain estuarine environments through the construction of large, hard-bottom reef complexes. Through suspension feeding, oysters clear the water column of particulates, leading to decreased suspended material and enhanced benthic pelagic coupling. Past field studies have indicated the potential importance of the physical reef structure in regulating the transfer of particulate material in the seston. In order to directly assess the existence of the physical reef effect, multiple field experiments were performed in a small tidal creek estuary along the south eastern coast of North Carolina. Comparison of clearance rates derived from two different in situ methods, one accounting for the physical structure of the oyster reef in addition to oyster filtration and one looking at oyster filtration alone, indicate that the reef structure may increase the amount of particulate removal performed by the reef by more than 4 times the removal performed by oyster filtration alone. A defaunation experiment was performed by eliminating the live component of the oyster reef and comparing particulate transfer of this defaunated transect to that of an adjacent faunated transect. The defaunated transect had reduced but not significantly lower material removal when compared to the faunated transect prior to defaunation. Results from short and long term sediment collection and flow velocity measurements indicate that the physical effect of oyster reefs is strong over short temporal scales (days) but is much smaller when evaluated over longer time periods (months). Generally, large silt and small sand sized material is permanently removed from the seston due to the interaction of oyster reef structure and tidal flows, however the transfer of small and medium sized silt grains is only slowed down by the presence of large reef complexes. This

  3. A Preliminary Evaluation of ohe Sediment Dynamics in the Albemarle Estuarine System, North Carolina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corbett, D. R.; Mallinson, D.; Letrick, E.; Vance, D.

    2002-12-01

    The Albemarle estuarine system (AES) drainage basin covers an area of approximately 45,500 km2 within Virginia and North Carolina, and is comprised of the Roanoke River Basin, Chowan River Basin, and Albemarle Sound Basin. The AES, a product of rising sea level (eg. drowned-river estuarine system), covers approximately 2,340 km2 and includes several major and minor embayed (lateral) tributaries. As earlier studies have pointed out, the estuarine system is the settling basin for sediments, organic matter, and anthropogenic waste from these three major drainage basins. The most abundant sediment within the AES, forming the benthic habitat for nearly 70% of the estuarine system, is a chemically active organic-rich mud (ORM). This sediment type has been shown to be important to the water quality, contaminant characteristics, and potentially the ecosystem dynamics. During the summer of 2001, several short cores (~ 50 cm) were collected in the AES, and downcore measurements for radiochemical tracers (210Pb, 137Cs) and organic matter signatures (13C, 15N, C:N, LOI) were conducted. These organic matter signatures have been used to elucidate potential temporal changes in fluxes and cycles of organic matter in the AES. Pb-210 analyses indicate temporal and spatial variations in sediment deposition rates (0.05 - 0.50 cm/yr). Sedimentation rate variations are potentially associated with dam construction on the Roanoke River and increased estuarine shoreline erosion along many banks of the Albemarle Sound. Sediment deposition varies spatially in the AES and is highest near its western limit relative to the rest of the estuary. δ13C and δ 15N concentrations from cores collected in the AES range from -21.7 to -28.3 \\permil and 0.4 to 4.6 \\permil, respectively. The variation signatures indicate typical mixing between terrestrial and marine end members, as well as potential influences associated with increased agriculture over the last century.

  4. Mercury distribution in contaminated surface sediments from four estuaries, Khuzestan shore, north part of Persian Gulf.

    PubMed

    Sarasiab, Abdolah Raeisi; Hosseini, Mehdi; Mirsalari, Zohreh

    2014-11-01

    The distribution of mercury in surface sediment from four estuaries along the Khuzestan shore, north part of Persian Gulf, was measured. The concentration of mercury varied among sampling stations (p < 0.05). The concentrations of mercury in all estuaries were from 0.01 to 2.16 µg g(-1). Relatively high mercury concentrations were observed in sediments from Musa estuary. The percentage of mercury associated with different fractions in the sediment from all stations were in the order of residual (70.4 %) > organic matter (16.6 %) > easily and exchangeable (2.2 %) > acid reduction (0.8 %). I geo values calculated for mercury (1.5) showed higher values in Musa estuary than in the other stations. The bioavailability of mercury in sediments could be controlled by physicochemical factors such as pH, oxidation and reduction potential, organic carbon content and cation exchange capacity.

  5. Making a World of Difference. Dimension: Language '91. Selected Papers from the Joint Meeting of the Southern Conference on Language Teaching and the Foreign Language Association of North Carolina (Research Triangle Park, North Carolina, 1991).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Terry, Robert M., Ed.

    Papers from the 1991 joint Southern Conference on Language Teaching (SCOLT)/ Foreign Language Association of North Carolina (FLANC) conference are presented. Because the state of North Carolina is in the forefront of state-mandated foreign language education in the elementary schools (FLES), 4 of the 10 articles in this volume address FLES…

  6. Trends in fatal occupational injuries and industrial restructuring in North Carolina in the 1980s.

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, D; Loomis, D

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study examined the relationship between changes in employment in North Carolina in the 1980s and fatal occupational injury rates. METHODS: Unintentional fatal occupational injuries (n = 1989) in North Carolina between 1978 and 1991 were identified via the medical examiner's system. RESULTS: Overall fatal injury rates declined during the 1980s, but rates increased 9.6% per year among manufacturing industries that declined in employment size; rates fell among service sector and manufacturing industries that grew. CONCLUSIONS: Increasing occupational fatal injury rates accompanied the decline in workforce in North Carolina's traditional, labor-intensive manufacturing industries during the 1980s, while service sector and expanding manufacturing industries have experienced declining fatal injury rates. PMID:9224194

  7. Frontal Eddy Dynamics (FRED) experiment off North Carolina: Volume 1. Executive summary

    SciTech Connect

    Ebbesmeyer, C.C.

    1989-03-01

    In preparation for oil and gas lease sales on the outer continental shelf offshore of North Carolina, the Minerals Management Service was requested to investigate the potential transport and impacts of oil spilled offshore. The Gulf Stream and associated eddies are an important aspect of the transport. Although the speed and location of the Gulf Stream are reasonably well known, knowledge of the meanders of the Gulf Stream is limited. How the circulatory structure and movement of associated frontal eddies and filaments affect the North Carolina coastal waters is not clear. This study investigates the interactions of these circulatory elements and follows the evolution of frontal eddies as they migrate along the North Carolina coast.

  8. Frontal Eddy Dynamics (FRED) experiment off North Carolina: Volume 2. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Ebbesmeyer, C.C.

    1988-03-01

    In preparation for oil and gas lease sales on the outer continental shelf offshore of North Carolina, the Minerals Management Service was requested to investigate the potential transport and impacts of oil spilled offshore. Of particular concern is estimating the movement of spilled oil, especially the probability of shoreward transport and/or beaching of the floatable fraction. Although the speed and location of the Gulf Stream are well known, knowledge of the meanders of the Gulf Stream is limited. How the circulatory structure and movement of associated frontal eddies and filaments affect the North Carolina coastal waters is not clear. This present study investigates the interactions of these circulatory elements and follows the evolution of frontal eddies as they migrate along the North Carolina coast.

  9. Evaluation of public health response to hurricanes finds North Carolina better prepared for public health emergencies.

    PubMed

    Davis, Mary V; MacDonald, Pia D M; Cline, J Steven; Baker, Edward L

    2007-01-01

    Reviews of state public health preparedness improvements have been primarily limited to measuring funds expenditures and achievement of cooperative agreement benchmarks. Such reviews fail to assess states' actual capacity for meeting the challenges they may face during an emergency, as evidenced by activities undertaken during the various phases of a disaster. This article examines North Carolina's public health preparedness and response performance during two hurricanes, Hurricane Floyd in 1999 and Hurricane Isabel in 2003, as well as capacity building activities in the intervening years. North Carolina created new infrastructures, enhanced laboratory capacity, and strengthened communications after Hurricane Floyd. These activities facilitated implementation of functional capabilities through effective centralized communication, command and control incident management, and a rapid needs assessment and medical surveillance during Hurricane Isabel. North Carolina continues to implement these capabilities in public health emergencies. Measuring and implementing functional capabilities during exercises or real events facilitates achievement of preparedness performance standards, goals, and objectives.

  10. Herpetofaunal diversity of Alligator River National Wildlife Refuge, North Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Meyers, J.M.; Pike, D.A.

    2006-01-01

    In the past century, habitat alteration and fragmentation have increased dramatically, which increases the need for improving our understanding of how species and biological communities react to these modifications. A national strategy on biological diversity has focused attention on how these habitat modifications affect species, especially herpetofauna (i.e., changes in species richness, community evenness and similarity, and dominant/rare species). As part of this strategy, we surveyed Alligator River National Wildlife Refuge, a coastal, mixed second-growth forested swamp (MFS) and pocosin wetland (PW), in North Carolina for amphibians and reptiles from September 2000 to August 2001. We randomly selected three sites (3 x 3 km) in two major habitat types (MFS, PW) and completed random surveys and trapping using transects, quadrats, nighttime aural road surveys, drift fences, canal transects, coverboards, incidental captures, and evening road surveys. We also collected herpetofauna opportunistically throughout the refuge to establish an updated species list. For analysis, we used Shannon-Weiner species diversity (H'), evenness (1'), species richness and species detectability (COMDYN4), and community percent similarity index to determine herpetofaunal community differences. We estimated 39 species in MFS and 32 species in PW (P < 0.10). Species detectability was similar between habitats (0.84 to 0.86). More reptilian species (+ 31 %) inhabited MFS than PW, but estimated amphibian species richness was identical (17 spp.). H' was higher (P < 0.000 I) for PW (2.6680) than for MFS (2.1535) because of lower J' in the latter (0.6214 vs. 0.8010). Dominance of three Rana species caused lower J' and H' in MFS. Similarity between the communities was 56.6%; we estimated 22-24 species in common for each habitat (95% CI = 18 to 31 spp.). We verified 49 of the 52 herpetofaunal species on the refuge that were known to exist in the area. Restoration of natural water flows may

  11. Biotechnology education and training in North Carolina historically minority public universities: A five-year evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nunn, Eleanor Frances

    A five-year evaluation of the implementation of a special legislative initiative established by the North Carolina General Assembly is the focus of my study. The legislation was to improve and enhance biotechnology in the six historically minority public universities in North Carolina---five historically black and one historically Native American. Post secondary minority institutions traditionally enroll more minorities than non-minority ones, and they graduate more minority students who major in the sciences. Traditionally, minority institutions do not receive and therefore lack the funding and resources to prepare adequately students for jobs in biotechnology and related technologies. The legislation was a response to this problem. The program was a collaboration among the North Carolina government; the North Carolina Biotechnology Center, a private, non-profit organization; and the six institutions. Questionnaires, developed by the researcher were mailed to 55 science faculty and staff at the institutions. There was a 71% return rate. Major findings resulting from data analysis. (1) Individualized institutional problem identification and problem solving. (2) Appropriate equipment was purchased. (3) Enrollment tripled in biological and physical sciences. (4) Every school had at least one faculty member retrained in biotechnology. However, time for training in technological advances for more of the faculty is needed. (5) Bioscience courses were revised or developed to include biotechnology. Major results of the program. (1) In September 2001, the North Carolina General Assembly established a permanent appropriation for the program. It concluded that the universities accomplished the goals and objectives and the program was a success. (2) Dispelled was the illusion that minorities are not capable of being successful in the sciences. Major recommendations. (1) Preliminary data on job placement of students after the program is available. A longitudinal study is

  12. Flock sizes and sex ratios of canvasbacks in Chesapeake Bay and North Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haramis, G.M.; Derleth, E.L.; Link, W.A.

    1994-01-01

    Knowledge of the distribution, size, and sex ratios of flocks of wintering canvasbacks (Aythya valisineria) is fundamental to understanding the species' winter ecology and providing guidelines for management. Consequently, in winter 1986-87, we conducted 4 monthly aerial photographic surveys to investigate temporal changes in distribution, size, and sex ratios of canvasback flocks in traditional wintering areas of Chesapeake Bay and coastal North Carolina. Surveys yielded 35mm imagery of 194,664 canvasbacks in 842 flocks. Models revealed monthly patterns of flock size in North Carolina and Virginia, but no pattern of change in Maryland. A stepwise analysis of flock size and sex ratio fit a common positive slope (increasing proportion male) for all state-month datasets, except for North Carolina in February where the slope was larger (P lt 0.001). State and month effects on intercepts were significant (P lt 0.001) and confirmed a previously identified latitudinal gradient in sex ratio in the survey region. There was no relationship between flock purity (% canvasbacks vs. other species) and flock size except in North Carolina in January, February, and March when flock purity was related to flock size. Contrasting characteristics in North Carolina with regard to flock size (larger flocks) and flock purity suggested that proximate factors were reinforcing flocking behavior and possibly species fidelity there. Of possible factors, the need to locate foraging sites within this large, open-water environment was hypothesized to be of primary importance. Comparison of January 1981 and 1987 sex ratios indicated no change in Maryland, but lower (P lt 0.05) canvasback sex ratios (proportion male) in Virginia and North Carolina.

  13. Heavy Metals (Cd, Cu, Cr, Pb and Zn) in Meretrix meretrix Roding, Water and Sediments from Estuaries in Sabah, North Borneo

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abdullah, Mohd. Harun; Sidi, Jovita; Aris, Ahmad Zaharin

    2007-01-01

    Concentrations of heavy metals (Cd, Cu, Cr, Pb and Zn) in tissues of Meretrix meretrix Roding (M. meretrix R.), water and sediments from two estuaries were determined. One estuary is located in an urban area of Kota Kinabalu (Likas estuary) and the other in a rural district of Kota Belud (Kota Belud estuary), where both are in Sabah, North of…

  14. WATERFOWL-HABITAT ASSOCIATIONS DURING WINTER IN A URBAN NORTH ATLANTIC ESTUARY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Coastal habitats near urban centres in North Atlantic estuaries often support substantial numbers of wintering waterfowl, but little is known of the effects of landscape setting and urbanisation on habitat use. We conducted surveys of waterfowl at 32 wintering sites in Narraganse...

  15. Impact of North Carolina's Early Childhood Initiatives on Special Education Placements in Third Grade. Working Paper 121

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muschkin, Clara G.; Ladd, Helen F.; Dodge, Kenneth A.

    2015-01-01

    This study examines the community-wide effects of investments in two early childhood initiatives in North Carolina (Smart Start and More at Four) on the likelihood of a student being placed into special education. We take advantage of variation across North Carolina counties and years in the timing of the introduction and funding levels of the two…

  16. 33 CFR 334.430 - Neuse River and tributaries at Marine Corps Air Station Cherry Point, North Carolina; restricted...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Marine Corps Air Station Cherry Point, North Carolina; restricted area and danger zone. 334.430 Section... DEFENSE DANGER ZONE AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.430 Neuse River and tributaries at Marine Corps Air Station Cherry Point, North Carolina; restricted area and danger zone. (a) The restricted...

  17. Saving a Generation: North Carolina Public Health Department Partners with State's Black Colleges to Raise Awareness about HIV/AIDS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keels, Crystal L.

    2005-01-01

    North Carolina A&T does it. Across the street, Bennett College does it too. So do Elizabeth City State University, Livingstone and Fayetteville State. These North Carolina-based historically Black institutions have made HIV/AIDS education a part of the student experience at their respective campuses, and one school, Johnson C. Smith University,…

  18. 77 FR 3611 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; North Carolina: Approval of Section 110(a)(1...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-25

    ...-hour ozone NAAQS on November 6, 1991. See 56 FR 56694. The designation for the Triad Area was effective on January 6, 1992. See 60 FR 7124. On November 13, 1992, the State of North Carolina, through NCDENR..., 1993, EPA approved North Carolina's request to redesignate the Triad Area (58 FR 4731) to...

  19. Taxation--Rejection of the "Public Purpose" Requirement for State Tax Exemption--In re University of North Carolina.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Massey, David Sanders

    1981-01-01

    The origin of the "public purpose" requirement in North Carolina and the contrary authority exempting property from taxation solely on the basis of state ownership is examined. The North Carolina Supreme Court declared exemptions for "public purposes" unconstitutional. (Available from: Wake Forest University School of Law, Winston-Salem, NC 27109,…

  20. Race to the Top. North Carolina Report. Year 2: School Year 2011-2012. [State-Specific Summary Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    US Department of Education, 2013

    2013-01-01

    This State-specific summary report serves as an assessment of North Carolina's second year of Race to the Top implementation. The report highlights successes and accomplishments, identifies challenges, and provides lessons learned from implementation from approximately September 2011 through September 2012. In Year 2, North Carolina continued the…

  1. School Segregation under Color-Blind Jurisprudence: The Case of North Carolina. Working Papers Series. SAN08-02

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clotfelter, Charles T.; Ladd, Helen F.; Vigdor, Jacob L.

    2008-01-01

    Using detailed administrative data for the public K-12 schools of North Carolina, we measure racial segregation in the public schools of North Carolina. With data for the 2005/06 school year, we update previously published calculations that measure segregation in terms of unevenness in racial enrollment patterns both between schools and within…

  2. Counseling Services Resource Guide: An Internet Guide for the North Carolina Community College Counselor To Assist Virtual Learning Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Carolina Community Coll. System, Raleigh.

    This handbook is intended to assist North Carolina community colleges in enhancing their online counseling services. Based on reviews of 58 community colleges in North Carolina, along with several state, national, and university web sites, and the collective efforts of a statewide committee, this handbook offers: (1) General tips for improving…

  3. An observation-well network concept as applied to North Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Winner, M.D.

    1981-01-01

    A statewide observation-well program is proposed for North Carolina based on four networks of observation wells with different but clearly-defined objectives. These are referred to as the (1) climatic-effects network, (2) terrane-effects network, (3) local-effects network, and (4) areal-effects network. The characteristics of each network are related to natural and man-made stresses in aquifers, and the areas and hydrogeologic units in North Carolina where these networks are needed are identified. Formats for collection, processing, and publication of data from these networks is suggested.

  4. A Closer Look at the North Carolina Board of Dental Examiners and Who Can Practice Dentistry.

    PubMed

    Parker, M Alec

    2015-01-01

    On February 25, 2015, the U.S. Supreme Court rendered a six-to-three opinion in favor of the Federal Trade Commission in their dispute with the North Carolina State Board of Dental Examiners concerning teeth-whitening services provided by nondentists. That decision was the culmination of almost nine years of arguments and allegations that began with a disagreement regarding the definition of the practice of dentistry. The ethical aspect of this dispute resides in the one's perspective regarding the motivation behind the actions taken in the North Carolina State Board of Dental Examiners.

  5. Assessment of active solar systems in the residential sector of North Carolina, 1974 - 1995

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, D.; St. John, K.

    1981-02-01

    An evaluation is presented of the contribution active solar systems can make in North Carolina's residential sector over the next 15 years. The report is divided into 5 parts: introduction; current solar industry status; projected use of active solar systems to 1995; maximum potential for active solar systems to 1995; recommendations for state solar incentives. Information in the appendices includes: conversion methodology; square feet of collector to Btu; economic analysis of solar systems based on life costs; methodology for percentage breakdowns on projected solar system sales; North Carolina solar manufacturers/distributors and national manufacturers; solar legislation; economic analysis of solar systems; and data sources.

  6. A Closer Look at the North Carolina Board of Dental Examiners and Who Can Practice Dentistry.

    PubMed

    Parker, M Alec

    2015-01-01

    On February 25, 2015, the U.S. Supreme Court rendered a six-to-three opinion in favor of the Federal Trade Commission in their dispute with the North Carolina State Board of Dental Examiners concerning teeth-whitening services provided by nondentists. That decision was the culmination of almost nine years of arguments and allegations that began with a disagreement regarding the definition of the practice of dentistry. The ethical aspect of this dispute resides in the one's perspective regarding the motivation behind the actions taken in the North Carolina State Board of Dental Examiners. PMID:26697649

  7. First Case of Bioterrorism-Related Inhalational Anthrax, Florida, 2001: North Carolina Investigation

    PubMed Central

    Maillard, Jean-Marie; McKee, Kelly T.; Turner, Lou F.; Cline, J. Steven

    2002-01-01

    The index case of inhalational anthrax in October 2001 was in a man who lived and worked in Florida. However, during the 3 days before illness onset, the patient had traveled through North Carolina, raising the possibility that exposure to Bacillus anthracis spores could have occurred there. The rapid response in North Carolina included surveillance among hospital intensive-care units, microbiology laboratories, medical examiners, and veterinarians, and site investigations at locations visited by the index patient to identify the naturally occurring or bioterrorism-related source of his exposure. PMID:12396911

  8. Institutional Research and Strategies for Higher Education Issues in the 1980's and Research Exchange Forum. Proceedings of the Annual Meeting of the North Carolina Association for Institutional Research (7th, Raleigh, North Carolina, November 1, 1979) and the Drive-In Conference (Chapel Hill, North Carolina, April 18, 1980).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Charles I., Ed.; Ussery, Robert M., Ed.

    Proceedings of the 1979 conference of the North Carolina Association for Institutional Research and the 1980 Research Search Exchange Drive-In Conference Program, which address the skills needed by institutional researchers to deal with the issues in higher education in the 1980s, are presented. Highlights of the North Carolina association…

  9. Regional carbon and CO2 budgets of North Sea tidal estuaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volta, C.; Laruelle, G. G.; Regnier, P.

    2016-07-01

    This study presents the first regional application of the generic estuarine reactive-transport model C-GEM (Carbon-Generic Estuary Model) that is here combined with high-resolution databases to produce a carbon and CO2 budget for all tidal estuaries discharging into the North Sea. Steady-state simulations are performed for yearly-averaged conditions to quantify the carbon processing in the six main tidal estuaries Elbe, Ems, Humber, Scheldt, Thames, and Weser, which show contrasted physical and biogeochemical dynamics and contribute the most to the regional filter. The processing rates derived from these simulations are then extrapolated to the riverine carbon loads of all the other North Sea catchments intercepted by smaller tidal estuarine systems. The Rhine-Meuse estuarine system is also included in the carbon budget and overall, we calculate that the export of organic and inorganic carbon from tidal estuaries to the North sea amounts to 44 and 409 Gmol C yr-1, respectively, while 41 Gmol C are lost annually through CO2 outgassing. The carbon is mostly exported from the estuaries in its inorganic form (>90%), a result that reflects the low organic/inorganic carbon ratio of the riverine waters, as well as the very intense decomposition of organic carbon within the estuarine systems. Our calculations also reveal that with a filtering capacity of 15% for total carbon, the contribution of estuaries to the CO2 outgassing is relatively small. Organic carbon dynamics is dominated by heterotrophic degradation, which also represents the most important contribution to the estuarine CO2 evasion. Nitrification only plays a marginal role in the CO2 dynamics, while the contribution of riverine oversaturated waters to the CO2 outgassing is generally significant and strongly varies across systems.

  10. Carolinas Coastal Change Processes Project data report for observations near Diamond Shoals, North Carolina, January-May 2009

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Armstrong, Brandy N.; Warner, John C.; Voulgaris, George; List, Jeffrey H.; Thieler, E. Robert; Martini, Marinna A.; Montgomery, Ellyn T.

    2011-01-01

    This Open-File Report provides information collected for an oceanographic field study that occurred during January - May 2009 to investigate processes that control the sediment transport dynamics at Diamond Shoals, North Carolina. The objective of this report is to make the data available in digital form and to provide information to facilitate further analysis of the data. The report describes the background, experimental setup, equipment, and locations of the sensor deployments. The edited data are presented in time-series plots for rapid visualization of the data set, and in data files that are in the Network Common Data Format (netcdf). Supporting observational data are also included.

  11. North Carolina Youth Risk Behavior Survey: 2013 WCPSS Middle School Results. Data Trends. D&A Report No. 14.07

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Townsend, Megan

    2014-01-01

    The 2013 North Carolina Youth Risk Behavior Survey (NCYRBS) was developed by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and adapted by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction (NCDPI) to monitor health-risk behaviors and to measure progress toward achieving Healthy North Carolina 2020 objectives. The survey, administered in…

  12. North Carolina Youth Risk Behavior Survey: 2013 WCPSS High School Results. Data Trends. D&A Report No. 14.06

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Townsend, Megan

    2014-01-01

    The 2013 North Carolina Youth Risk Behavior Survey (NCYRBS) was developed by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and adapted by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction (NCDPI) to monitor the health-risk behaviors and to measure progress toward achieving Healthy North Carolina 2020 objectives. The survey, administered…

  13. Status of the North Carolina/Southeast Compact low-level radioactive waste disposal project

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, C.K.

    1993-03-01

    The Southeast Compact is a sited region for low-level radioactive waste because of the current facility at Barnwell, South Carolina. North Carolina has been designated as the next host state for the compact, and the North Carolina Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management Authority is the agency charged with developing the new facility. Chem-Nuclear Systems, Inc., has been selected by the Authority as its primary site development and operations contractor. This paper will describe the progress currently being made toward the successful opening of the facility in January 1996. The areas to be addressed include site characterization, performance assessment, facility design, public outreach, litigation, finances, and the continued operation of the Barnwell facility.

  14. A history of early geologic research in the Deep River Triassic Basin, North Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, T.W.

    1998-01-01

    The Deep River Triassic basin has one of the longest recorded histories of geologic research in North Carolina. A quick perusal of nineteenth century geologic literature in North Carolina reveals the Deep River basin has received a tremendous amount of attention, second only, perhaps, to the gold deposits of the Carolina slate belt. While these early researchers' primary interests were coal deposits, many other important discoveries, observations, and hypotheses resulted from their investigations. This article highlights many of the important advances made by these early geo-explorers by trying to include information from every major geologic investigation made in the Deep River basin from 1820 to 1955. This article also provides as thorough a consolidated history as is possible to preserve the exploration history of the Deep River basin for future investigators.

  15. Opening Windows Onto the Future: Theory of the Governor's School of North Carolina.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, H. Michael

    Presented is the curriculum theory designed for 400 gifted boys and girls, from rising junior and senior classes in high school, who attend the 8-week summer Governor's School (GS) of North Carolina. The main aim of the GS is given to be inspiring and guiding future leaders by providing opportunities for special aptitude, general conceptual, and…

  16. Twenty-five years of serving the health care needs of rural North Carolina.

    PubMed

    Walker, Franklin

    2015-01-01

    The Community Practitioner Program seeks to improve access to quality health care for North Carolina's most vulnerable people by providing educational loan repayment grants to primary care physicians, physician assistants, and nurse practitioners in return for their service in rural and underserved communities.

  17. CHARACTERIZATION OF LAND USE IN RIPARIAN AREAS WITHIN THE CONTENTNEA WATERSHED OF NORTH CAROLINA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Characterization of land use in riparian areas within the Contentnea watershed of North Carolina.

    Wright, C.J.,1 and S.W. Alberty.2 1U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Athens, GA 30605 USA; 2OAO Corporation, Athens, GA 30605 USA.

    Legislation mandating riparian bu...

  18. The North Carolina Partnership Training System: Distance Education Project. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Carolina Univ., Chapel Hill.

    This final report describes accomplishments and activities of the North Carolina Partnership Training System Distance Education Project, a 3-year federally supported project to establish a distance education personnel development program to prepare more qualified and certified teachers for students with behavioral and/or emotional handicaps (BEH),…

  19. Marriage Choices in North Carolina and Virginia, 1969-71 and 1979-81.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schoen, Robert; Wooldredge, John

    1989-01-01

    Investigated age, race, and educational patterns of marriage choice in North Carolina and Virginia during 1969-71 and 1979-81. Results support exchange theories of marriage behavior; females emphasized male economic characteristics; males emphasized female noneconomic characteristics. Major changes over 10 years were decline in level of marriage…

  20. An Investigation of the Workload and Job Satisfaction of North Carolina's Special Education Directors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cash, Jennifer Brown

    2013-01-01

    Keywords: special education directors, workload, job satisfaction, special education administration. The purpose of this mixed methods research study was to investigate employee characteristics, workload, and job satisfaction of special education directors employed by local education agencies in North Carolina (N = 115). This study illuminates the…

  1. Reflective Practice and North Carolina's Developmental Reading and English Redesign Efforts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dees, Lori; Moore, Emily; Hoggan, Chad

    2016-01-01

    As developmental education practitioners in the midst of North Carolina's Developmental Reading and English Redesign, we are interested in researching best practices for instructional design and application. We discovered that the principles of reflective practice pervade much of the literature on program planning and practice, so we began to…

  2. Training North Carolina's Secondary Mathematics Teachers for the Implementation of Computers in Their Classrooms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shotsberger, Paul G.

    This report describes the need for a state-level inservice education program for secondary mathematics public school teachers in North Carolina, in order to enable them to effectively implement computer use in classrooms. A decision model for policy analysis was used to determine optimal strategy for the program. Following a review of the…

  3. Importance of regular testing of private drinking water systems in North Carolina.

    PubMed

    Barros, Nirmalla; Rudo, Kenneth; Shehee, Mina

    2014-01-01

    North Carolina state laws require that water from newly constructed private wells be tested for chemical and microbiologic contamination, but existing wells are not routinely tested. This commentary highlights the importance of regular testing of all private sources of drinking water.

  4. Policy Adoption in North Carolina and Tennessee: A Comparative Case Study of Lottery Beneficiaries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ness, Erik C.; Mistretta, Molly A.

    2009-01-01

    This study analyzes the policy process through which two states determined education beneficiary programs of newly adopted state lotteries. Tennessee, in 2003, followed the regional pattern of allocating all lottery proceeds to merit-based college scholarships. North Carolina, in 2005, bucked this trend by allotting no lottery revenue for merit…

  5. The Future Role of Instructional Technology in Agricultural Education in North Carolina and Virginia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alston, Antoine J.; Miller, W. Wade; Williams, David L.

    2003-01-01

    A stratified random sample of agriculture teachers in North Carolina (n=210) and Virginia (n=170) returned 85 and 110 usable surveys respectively. Teachers were undecided about future uses of instructional technology although they perceived benefits. Accessing Internet lesson plans was a primary use. Hardware/software costs were the principal…

  6. Assessment of the Adoption of Agroforestry Technologies by Limited-Resource Farmers in North Carolina

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Faulkner, Paula E.; Owooh, Bismark; Idassi, Joshua

    2014-01-01

    Agroforestry is a natural resource management system that integrates trees, forages, and livestock. The study reported here was conducted to determine farmers' knowledge about and willingness to adopt agroforestry technologies in North Carolina. The study reported participants were primarily older, male farmers, suggesting the need to attract…

  7. 76 FR 58819 - North Carolina; Amendment No. 2 to Notice of an Emergency Declaration

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-22

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency North Carolina; Amendment No. 2 to Notice of an Emergency... Disaster Loans; 97.031, Cora Brown Fund; 97.032, Crisis Counseling; 97.033, Disaster Legal Services;...

  8. Use of big data by Blue Cross and Blue Shield of North Carolina.

    PubMed

    Helm-Murtagh, Susan C

    2014-01-01

    The health care industry is grappling with the challenges of working with and analyzing large, complex, diverse data sets. Blue Cross and Blue Shield of North Carolina provides several promising examples of how big data can be used to reduce the cost of care, to predict and manage health risks, and to improve clinical outcomes.

  9. Allied Health Education/Transfer of Credit: Recommendations of the North Carolina Articulation Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boatman, Ralph H., Ed.; Huther, John W., Ed.

    The North Carolina Allied Health Articulation Project was launched to develop procedures which would enable an individual to transfer credit from an allied health education program in one setting to some program in higher education. In 1972-73, study committees were appointed to deal with the allied health professions of physical therapy,…

  10. Critical Success Factors for the North Carolina Community College System. A Background Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Kathryn Baker

    In response to legislative mandate, the North Carolina State Board of Community Colleges developed a list of Critical Success Factors (CSF) to help define statewide measures of accountability for all community colleges. Developed by staff members of the State Board with input from the state's community college presidents, the CSFs emphasize…

  11. 48 CFR 52.229-2 - North Carolina State and Local Sales and Use Tax.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... State and local sales and use taxes aggregating $__ (State) and $__ (local), with respect to building... Local Sales and Use Tax. 52.229-2 Section 52.229-2 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL... Provisions and Clauses 52.229-2 North Carolina State and Local Sales and Use Tax. As prescribed in...

  12. 48 CFR 52.229-2 - North Carolina State and Local Sales and Use Tax.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... State and local sales and use taxes aggregating $__ (State) and $__ (local), with respect to building... Local Sales and Use Tax. 52.229-2 Section 52.229-2 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL... Provisions and Clauses 52.229-2 North Carolina State and Local Sales and Use Tax. As prescribed in...

  13. 78 FR 9729 - Eastern States: Filing of Plat of Survey, North Carolina

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-11

    ... Bureau of Land Management Eastern States: Filing of Plat of Survey, North Carolina AGENCY: Bureau of Land...: Filing of Plats of Survey''. In said notice were plats of survey representing the dependent resurvey of a portion of the Qualla Indian Boundary, lands held in trust for the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians,...

  14. Single- and Multi-Prime Contracting in North Carolina Public Construction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bluestein, Frayda S.

    1995-01-01

    The North Carolina General Assembly directed the State Building Commission to study the comparative costs of multi- and single-prime contracting and report the results to the 1995 General Assembly. Describes the analysis of data collected from governmental units that had awarded construction contracts. Identifies some alternative contracting…

  15. A Matter of Facts: The North Carolina Community College System Fact Book, 2002.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Carolina Community Coll. System, Raleigh.

    This is the 2002 edition of North Carolina's annual Community College System Fact Book. It provides information on the status of the state's 58 community, technical and other public two-year colleges. The book discusses the system's history, governance, and funding; college program briefs; finance and college facilities; student data; and staff…

  16. Job-Related Stress and Sleep Disorders among North Carolina College Presidents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Royal, Patricia; Grobe, William J.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was threefold. First, the study was to determine the extent of job-related stress among North Carolina community college presidents. Second, the study was to determine the extent of sleep disorders that exist in the target population. And finally, the study was to measure, if any, the relationship between job-related…

  17. Freedom of Expression for High School Journalists: A Case Study of Selected North Carolina Public Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, Kay D.

    A study examined the freedom of the high school press in North Carolina to determine whether publication guidelines should be in place, and if so, what those guidelines should contain. High school newspaper advisors, high school principals, and high school newspaper editors from large and small, urban and rural, eastern and western high schools…

  18. The Treatment of the Mentally Retarded Offender in the State of North Carolina.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kazar, David Byron

    Two programs developed by the State of North Carolina are described which are designed to provide special services to the mentally retarded incarcerated adult male. Based on results of an assessment of adaptive skills believed relevant to coping in the prison population, coupled with an intellectual quotient (IQ) below 70, offenders may be placed…

  19. The North Carolina Court Counselor's Intensive Supervision Experiment, Phase III: Final Evaluation Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Land, Kenneth C.; McCall, Patricia L.

    For 3.5 years, North Carolina has conducted a randomized experimental program designed to provide intensive supervision services for undisciplined youths (status offenders) placed under the protective supervision of the juvenile courts. Updated results from an ongoing systematic evaluation of the project indicate that, for undisciplined youths…

  20. Knocking at the College Door: Projections of High School Graduates. North Carolina

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Western Interstate Commission for Higher Education, 2013

    2013-01-01

    National and regional trends mask important variation among states in the supply of high school graduates. This profile provides brief indicators for North Carolina related to: current levels of educational attainment, projections of high school graduates into the future, and two common barriers to student access and success--insufficient academic…

  1. Rhetoric and Materiality in the Museum Park at the North Carolina Museum of Art

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zagacki, Kenneth S.; Gallagher, Victoria J.

    2009-01-01

    The material rhetoric of physical locations like the Museum Park at the North Carolina Museum of Art creates "spaces of attention" wherein visitors are invited to experience the landscape around them as a series of enactments that identify the inside/outside components of sub/urban existence, as well as the regenerative/transformative…

  2. Current Trends in Early Hearing Diagnosis and Intervention in North Carolina

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pretto, Aneesha Patrice

    2010-01-01

    In North Carolina, the eligibility criteria for enrollment in Part C early intervention services do not exclude infants and toddlers based on the severity or laterality of hearing loss. As such, the state's early intervention population represents a widely diverse array of children ranging from those with minimal to profound hearing losses. While…

  3. Predictors of Successful Nursing Education Outcomes: A Study of the North Carolina Central University's Nursing Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ukpabi, Chinasa Victor

    2008-01-01

    The primary purpose of this study was to specify the variables that would play the greatest role in predicting success of North Carolina Central University (NCCU) nursing graduates in the National Certification Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses (NCLEX-RN). Participants for this study include a convenience sample of 39 students who…

  4. Statistical Abstract of Higher Education in North Carolina, 1988-89.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Carolina Univ., Chapel Hill.

    Tabular data are presented on higher education in North Carolina, as of 1988-89. Types of data presented on 83 tables and 14 figures include enrollment counts, degrees conferred, characteristics of students in various types of institutions, student costs, admission test scores, financial aid, and analyses of flow of student transfers among…

  5. Preventing Health Care-Associated Infections: Connecting North Carolina's Patients to National Efforts.

    PubMed

    Moore, Zack; Billings, Corrianne; DeRienzo, Chris

    2016-01-01

    With increased federal and state attention to prevention and control of health care-associated infections (HAIs), broad multifacility collaboratives have emerged to guide providers' work at the bedside. This commentary reviews how HAI prevention flows from federal-level guidance through state leadership and into hospitals, connecting governance to its impact on North Carolina's patients. PMID:27621344

  6. North Carolina Migrant Education Program. 1971 Project Evaluation Reports, Vol. II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Carolina State Dept. of Public Instruction, Raleigh.

    Evaluation reports for 13 of the 23 1971 Summer Migrant Projects in North Carolina are presented in Volume II of this compilation. Each report contains the following information: (1) descriptive statistics and results of student achievement; (2) description of the project as obtained from site team reports and other available information; and (3)…

  7. DIRECT PERSONAL COARSE PARTICULATE MATTER CONCENTRATIONS ASSOCIATED WITH THE NORTH CAROLINA ADULT ASTHMA AND ENVIRONMENT STUDY.

    EPA Science Inventory

    A prototype coarse particulate matter PM(10-2.5) monitor was field evaluated as part of the North Carolina Adult Asthma and Environment Study (NCAAES). The NCAAES was designed to evaluate if airway and blood inflammatory markers in moderate asthmatic adults vary with changes in ...

  8. Personnel Management in North Carolina Municipalities: An Examination of Use, Size, and Structure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daley, Dennis M.

    1993-01-01

    Responses from 303 of 411 North Carolina municipalities determined that use of modern personnel practices was greatest in recruitment/selection, moderate in compensation/benefits and employee rights/regulations, and marginal in performance appraisal. Factors affecting greater use were larger work force and presence of city managers. (SK)

  9. Labor Market Returns to Community College: Evidence from North Carolina. Research Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belfield, Clive; Liu, Yuen Ting; Trimble, Madeline Joy

    2014-01-01

    In this brief, we summarize our research on the wage returns to community college pathways in North Carolina. We use detailed individual and college transcript information on approximately 830,000 students who attended community college during the 2000s. This transcript data is matched with earnings data from Unemployment Insurance records. We…

  10. A Multiple Case Study of the Literacy Instructional Leadership Behaviors of Elementary Principals in North Carolina

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herridge, Robin Lea

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the literacy instructional leadership behaviors of principals in two high poverty elementary schools in North Carolina who have experienced success with student growth in reading achievement over a three year period. This was a qualitative exploratory multiple case study. Data was gathered from 21…

  11. The New Gateway, an Old Paradox: Immigrants and Involuntary Americans in North Carolina History Textbooks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hilburn, Jeremy; Fitchett, Paul G.

    2012-01-01

    The authors conducted a content analysis of North Carolina history textbooks to explore how the definition of immigration has changed over the last century. They also examined how immigrant groups and involuntary Americans have been portrayed throughout the state's history. Findings suggest that as a burgeoning gateway state for immigrants, North…

  12. A Comparative Study of Student Achievement in Traditional Schools and Schools of Choice in North Carolina

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Okpala, Comfort O.; Bell, Genniver C.; Tuprah, Kwami

    2007-01-01

    This policy study examined the differences in student achievement scores in reading and mathematics in selected public middle schools of choice and in traditional public middle schools with similar demographics and socioeconomic characteristics in a southeastern school district in North Carolina during the 1997-1998, 1998-1999, and 1999-2000…

  13. Follow-Up of North Carolina Community College Cooperative Education Graduates: Additional Education and Salary Gains.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Lillian Riggs

    In this study, North Carolina Community College System (NCCCS) graduates from 1986-1987 were examined 10 years after graduation to see if they had gained additional education and salary. The study's primary purpose was to address the accountability of community college co-op education. Within the study, the term, co-op refers to an educational…

  14. A Profile of North Carolina Lesbian, Gay, and Bisexual Health Disparities, 2011

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Joseph G. L.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. We investigated the health profile of lesbian, gay, and bisexual (LGB) adults in North Carolina, the first state in the South to include a measure of sexual orientation identity in a probability-based statewide health survey. Methods. Using data from 9876 respondents in the 2011 North Carolina Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance Survey, we compared sexual minorities to heterosexuals on a variety of health indicators. Results. LGB respondents were younger and more likely to be reached by cell phone. Many examined indicators were not different by sexual orientation. Significant results, however, were consistent with findings from state population surveys in other regions of the country, including disparities in mental health and, among women, smoking. Conclusions. Reporting LGB identity in North Carolina is associated with poorer health. The concentration of anti-LGB policies in the South warrants ongoing monitoring of LGB health disparities in North Carolina and in other Southeastern states for potential effects on the health and well-being of LGB populations. PMID:24825240

  15. North Carolina Minimum Skills Diagnostic Testing Program. Administrative Information, 1992-93.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Carolina State Dept. of Public Instruction, Raleigh. Div. of Accountability Services/Research.

    Information is presented regarding the administration of the North Carolina Minimum Skills Diagnostic Testing Program. This testing program, mandated by the state's basic education program under the Secondary School Reform Act of 1984, checks the necessity for remediation by determining a student's mastery of specific objectives and diagnoses…

  16. Landowners' Knowledge, Attitudes, and Aspirations towards Woody Biomass Markets in North Carolina

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaw, Jasmine; Hazel, Dennis; Bardon, Robert; Jayaratne, K. S. U.

    2012-01-01

    Non-industrial private forest (NIPF) landowners are often not included in discussions of emerging woody biomass markets for energy, yet they will likely be principal suppliers of the resource. Surveys administered to 475 forest landowners before and after an Extension Forestry education program in 10 counties across North Carolina indicated that…

  17. Revisioning a School Administrator Preparation Program: A North Carolina Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, Joy C.

    2013-01-01

    This article provides a descriptive case study of the process used at one of North Carolina's public universities to respond to a state-mandated "revisioning" directive for educational leadership preparation programs. The case provides an overview of the state educational leadership policy context, discussion of state and local…

  18. 76 FR 36468 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; North Carolina: Clean Smokestacks Act

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-22

    ..., improving visibility in the mountains and other scenic vistas, and reducing acid rain. Reducing NO X and SO... value period. See 76 FR 20293 (April 12, 2011). North Carolina has identified the CSA as part of its... requirements for redesignation to attainment. See 75 FR 54 (January 4, 2010) and 75 FR 230 (January 5,...

  19. Black Students in the North Carolina Community College System: Implications for Educational Programming.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Isaac A.; Shearon, Ronald W.

    A 45-item questionnaire was used in a survey of 3,396 of the 39,988 black students enrolled in the 57 institutions in the North Carolina Community College System (NCCCS). Beyond identifying the students in relation to their demographic, socio-economic, academic, attendance, program area, and institutional attraction characteristics, the study…

  20. "Racing to the Top" to Prepare Turnaround Principals in North Carolina: Homegrown Regional Leadership Academies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Kathleen M.

    2016-01-01

    North Carolina's Race to the Top (RttT) grant earmarked approximately $17.5 million to "increase the number of principals qualified to lead transformational change in low-performing schools in both rural and urban areas" (NCDPI, 2010, p.10). To accomplish this, the state established three Regional Leadership Academies (RLAs)…

  1. Statistical Abstract of Higher Education in North Carolina, 1971-1972.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Carolina State Board of Education, Raleigh.

    This abstract covers the breadth of higher education activities in the state of North Carolina during 1971 from simple counts of degrees conferred to a complex analysis of the flow of student transfers among institutions. Some of the highlights of the findings are: (1) 148,708 full-time students were enrolled in N.C. colleges and universities with…

  2. Statistical Abstract of Higher Education in North Carolina, 1973-74. Research Report 1-74.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, John B., Comp.; Balfour, Linda, Comp.

    This document reviews higher education activities in North Carolina including current enrollment, enrollment trends, undergraduate transfers, degrees conferred, faculty, library resources, extension activities, student costs, admissions, student financial aid, student housing, and financial statistics. Highlights indicate: (1) In fall 1973 a total…

  3. 77 FR 62159 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; North Carolina Portion of the Charlotte...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-12

    ... 30, 2004 (effective June 15, 2004) using 2001-2003 ambient air quality data (69 FR 23857, April 30... by June 15, 2011, based on 2008- 2010 data. Table 2--2002 Point and Area Sources Annual Emissions for... 77 FR 26441 (May 4, 2012). Table 3--2002 VOC Emissions Inventory for the North Carolina Portion...

  4. Air Emissions from Organic Soil Burning on the Coastal Plain of North Carolina

    EPA Science Inventory

    Emissions of trace gases and particles <10 and 2.5 microns aerodynamic diameter (PM10 and PM2.5, respectively) from fires during 2009-2011 on the North Carolina coastal plain were collected and analyzed. Carbon mass balance techniques were used to quantify emission factors (EFs)....

  5. The Lumbee Indians of Robeson County, North Carolina, and Their Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, E. Dale

    Since 1835 when a state constitutional convention denied them the right to attend school, the Lumbee Indians of Robeson County, North Carolina have established a strong educational system. Although another constitutional convention in 1868 mandated public school terms for all children, the county had few schools until 1885 and no schools…

  6. A Goal for North Carolina's Schools. First in America 2000 Progress Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Charles L., Ed.; Cunningham, Elizabeth Kolb, Ed.

    This first annual report details North Carolina's performance and progress in five areas of its First in America goals: high student performance (every student in school and making strong progress, every graduate ready for college and work, and every school accountable for student learning); every child ready to learn (every child with access to…

  7. Pre-Kindergarten Programs in North Carolina: Preferences of Superintendents and Principals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lubeck, Sally A.; Garrett, Patricia M.

    This report on prekindergarten programs in North Carolina in 1988 presents information from the first statewide survey of public school administrators concerning the incorporation of 3- and 4-year-olds into public schools. Superintendents and principals were asked to provide factual data on their districts and schools and to express their opinions…

  8. Understanding Effective Higher Education Programs in Prisons: Considerations from the Incarcerated Individuals Program in North Carolina

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anders, Allison Daniel; Noblit, George W.

    2011-01-01

    The North Carolina Workplace and Community Transition Youth Offender Program (YOP), recently renamed the Incarcerated Individuals Program (IPP), has proven to be effective in terms of its growth and expansion, the support of education directors across the correctional facilities, university collaboration, student evaluations, and a low recidivism…

  9. Backtracking from Oklahoma to North Carolina: An Interview with Robert J. Conley.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conley, Robert J.

    2001-01-01

    An author of historical fiction about the Cherokee Indians discusses how stories told by his Cherokee grandmother were woven into his books, differences between Cherokee reservation life in Oklahoma and North Carolina, the Cherokee education system, the writing system that Sequoyah developed, and the "ugly realities" of being a full-time writer.…

  10. Local School Finance in North Carolina. A Yardstick for Measuring Local Support of Our Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Public School Forum of North Carolina, Raleigh.

    This document presents the results of a Forum study of local financial support of schools. The primary objective was to devise a yardstick to measure the local effort in a way useful to both citizens and policymakers. Data on property wealth for each of the 140 local school systems in North Carolina were developed. School systems making the…

  11. Accentuate the Positive! North Carolina Band Director Boosts His Students' Confidence and Earns Statewide Leadership Role

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olson, Catherine Applefeld

    2009-01-01

    In this article, the author shares the background of James Daugherty in music education, a band director who was elected to serve as president of the North Carolina Bandmasters Association, the highest leadership role for a band director in the state. His passion for music only grew in high school, where he gleaned both musical and life lessons…

  12. Our North Carolina Stories Weaving Standards into a Fourth Grade Digital History Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luke, Nancy; Binkley, Russell; Marotta, Naomi; Pirkl, Melissa

    2014-01-01

    This article describes a project that helped fourth-grade students connect personally with and bring North Carolina history to life. Over the months of this project, students asked questions, investigated topics of interest that they chose, conducted in-depth research that included interviewing experts, learned to use a video editor to combine…

  13. 76 FR 19096 - National Starch and Chemical Company, Salisbury, Rowan County, North Carolina; Notice of Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-06

    ... AGENCY National Starch and Chemical Company, Salisbury, Rowan County, North Carolina; Notice of... Liability Act (CERCLA), concerning the National Starch and Chemical Company Site located in Salisbury, Rowan..., identified by Docket ID No. EPA-RO4- SFUND-2011-0278 or Site name National Starch and Chemical...

  14. Student Project Work and Abstracts. Beaufort, North Carolina Environmental Studies Project, No. 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carteret County Board of Education, Beaufort, NC.

    This collection contains reports of 22 environmental study projects conducted by junior and senior students in a North Carolina high school. The scope of the projects covered total community service and sought to emphasize the students' roles as useful participants in the community. Fire, postal, health, and school services were surveyed, in…

  15. Campaign 76: A Report of Political Attitudes and Preferences of North Carolina State University Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Solomon, Donald H.

    North Carolina State University students were surveyed to assess their political attitudes and preferences prior to the 1976 general election and to compare results with those obtained in a 1972 survey. Information was obtained on: voter registration, party affiliation, political views, candidate preference for president, candidate preference for…

  16. Carbonaceous aerosol over a Pinus taeda forest in Central North Carolina, USA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Organic aerosol is the least understood component of ambient fine particulate matter (PM2.5). Presented in this study are organic and elemental carbon (OC and EC) within ambient PM2.5 over a three-year period at a forested site in the North Carolina Piedmon. EC exhibited signifi...

  17. Surviving the Silver Tsunami: Training a Health Care Workforce to Care for North Carolina's Aging Population.

    PubMed

    Heflin, Mitchell T

    2016-01-01

    North Carolina's aging population will require a health care workforce prepared to meet patients' complex care needs. The keys to training this workforce include continuing to mobilize the state's educational infrastructure to provide interprofessional, community-based experiences and maximizing exposure to new models of care. PMID:26961830

  18. Computer Literacy. Report to the 1983 General Assembly of North Carolina, 1984 Session.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Carolina Legislative Research Commission, Raleigh.

    This final report analyzes computer literacy and the use of computers in the public schools and community colleges of North Carolina, based on testimony from educators and administrators at the university, community college, and public school levels; from organizations concerned about education; and from corporations that produce computer hardware…

  19. North Carolina Star Rated License System: QRS Profile. The Child Care Quality Rating System (QRS) Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Child Trends, 2010

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a profile of North Carolina's Star Rated License System prepared as part of the Child Care Quality Rating System (QRS) Assessment Study. The profile consists of several sections and their corresponding descriptions including: (1) Program Information; (2) Rating Details; (3) Quality Indicators for Center-Based Programs; (4)…

  20. [North Carolina Gifted and Talented Minigrant Curriculum Projects: Two Biology Projects].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brooks, Mary L.; McGrady, Katherine K.

    Overviews of two biology units for junior and senior high school gifted and talented students are presented. The Durham North Carolina City School units are entitled, "The Identification, Collection, and Control of the Japanese Beetle through the Growth of Roses and Lawn Care" and "Treasure along the Nantahala River." The first, an entomology unit…

  1. A new species of Tallaperla (Plecoptera: Peltoperlidae) from North Carolina, U.S.A.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kondratieff, B.C.; Kirchner, R.F.; Zuellig, R.E.; Lenat, D.R.

    2007-01-01

    A new species of Tallaperla, T. maiyae, is described from Wilkes County, North Carolina, U.S.A. from two males. The new species is similar to T. maria and T. anna, but can be distinguished by the combination of a prominent spine-like epiproct and brown coloration.

  2. Self Study Report: Department of Agricultural Information, North Carolina State University.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh. Dept. of Agricultural Information.

    The purpose of North Carolina State University's Department of Agricultural Information is to reach people with information that will help them in their everyday lives. Major areas of concern are production and marketing, family living, 4-H and youth, community resource development, and natural resources. This report discusses the Department…

  3. 78 FR 28775 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; North Carolina; State Implementation Plan...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-16

    ... Resources. This revision updates the North Carolina SIP to reflect EPA's current national ambient air... as a direct final rule without prior proposal because the Agency views this as a noncontroversial... received will be addressed in a subsequent final rule based on this proposed rule. EPA will not institute...

  4. AN ANALYSIS OF THE STUDENT POPULATION IN AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION AT NORTH CAROLINA STATE UNIVERSITY.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    PASOUR, HENRY A.; AND OTHERS

    IN THE FACE OF DECREASING NUMBERS OF STUDENTS PREPARING TO TEACH VOCATIONAL AGRICULTURE IN THE LAND-GRANT INSTITUTIONS AND THE INCREASING DEMAND FOR VOCATIONAL AGRICULTURE TEACHERS, A STUDY WAS UNDERTAKEN TO DETERMINE THE SOURCE OF PAST AND PRESENT AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION STUDENTS IN NORTH CAROLINA. DATA WERE GATHERED FROM STUDENT FILES ON 554…

  5. North Carolina FHA/HERO Proficiency Event Handbook 1988-1990. "Students Taking Action for Recognition."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Carolina State Dept. of Public Instruction, Raleigh. Div. of Vocational Education.

    This handbook is designed to provide opportunities for members of the North Carolina Association of Future Homemakers of America (FHA) to demonstrate their proficiency with the competencies they have developed through participation in FHA and the home economics education program. The 25 events are designed to help develop lifetime skills in…

  6. Statistical Abstract of Higher Education in North Carolina, 1976-77. Research Report No. 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Carolina Univ., Chapel Hill.

    The tenth annual statistical abstract of higher education in North Carolina covers higher education activities in the state in their quantitative aspect, from simple counts of enrollment and degrees conferred to complex analyses of the flow of student transfers among institutions. The specific areas abstracted include current enrollment,…

  7. 76 FR 77952 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; North Carolina; 110(a)(1) and (2...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-15

    ... 62 FR 38856. Pursuant to section 110(a)(1) of the CAA, states are required to submit SIPs meeting the...-hour ozone NAAQS. See 73 FR 16205. For those states that did receive findings, such as North Carolina... (See 70 FR 71612, 71699) that made nitrogen oxides (NO X ) a precursor for ozone in 40 CFR 51.166...

  8. Rural Housing Site Planning in North Carolina. Agricultural Extension Publication 105.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hester, Randolph T., Jr.; And Others

    Addressing the problems of rural housing site selection and development in North Carolina, this guide is designed for cooperative and coordinated use by: technical assistance personnel employed by the Farmers Home Administration; local lending institutions; Health Departments; the Agricultural Extension Service; the Soil Conservation Service; and…

  9. 76 FR 6561 - North Carolina: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revisions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-07

    ..., effective December 31, 1984 (49 FR 48694) to implement its base hazardous waste management program. EPA....0112(b), (c). Cosmetic Colorants. 207--Uniform Hazardous Waste 70 FR 10776, 03/ 15A NCAC 13A.0102(b... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 271 North Carolina: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management...

  10. Assessment of College and University Campus Tobacco-Free Policies in North Carolina

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Joseph G. L.; Goldstein, Adam O.; Klein, Elizabeth G.; Ranney, Leah M.; Carver, Ashlea M.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To develop a reliable and efficient method for assessing prevalence and strength of college/university tobacco-related policies. Participants: North Carolina (NC) public universities, community colleges, and private colleges/universities (N = 110). Methods: A census of policies using campus handbooks and Web sites was conducted in March…

  11. Surviving the Silver Tsunami: Training a Health Care Workforce to Care for North Carolina's Aging Population.

    PubMed

    Heflin, Mitchell T

    2016-01-01

    North Carolina's aging population will require a health care workforce prepared to meet patients' complex care needs. The keys to training this workforce include continuing to mobilize the state's educational infrastructure to provide interprofessional, community-based experiences and maximizing exposure to new models of care.

  12. The Evaluation of North Carolina's State-Sponsored Youth Tobacco Prevention Media Campaign

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kandra, K. L.; McCullough, A.; Summerlin-Long, S.; Agans, R.; Ranney, L.; Goldstein, A. O.

    2013-01-01

    In 2003, the state of North Carolina (NC) implemented a multi-component initiative focused on teenage tobacco use prevention and cessation. One component of this initiative is "Tobacco.Reality.Unfiltered." ("TRU"), a tobacco prevention media campaign, aimed at NC youth aged 11-17 years. This research evaluates the first 5 years of the TRU media…

  13. North Carolina Tobacco Farmers' Changing Perceptions of Tobacco Control and Tobacco Manufacturers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crankshaw, Erik C.; Beach, Robert H.; Austin, W. David; Altman, David G.; Jones, Alison Snow

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To examine tobacco farmers' attitudes toward tobacco control, public health, and tobacco manufacturers in order to determine the extent to which rapidly changing economic conditions have influenced North Carolina tobacco farmer attitudes in ways that may provide tobacco control advocates with new opportunities to promote tobacco control…

  14. Vertical distribution of benthic infauna in continental slope sediments off Cape Lookout, North Carolina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blake, James A.

    The vertical distribution of 30 species of benthic infauna from continental slope (583-3000 m) sediments off Cape Lookout, North Carolina was closely correlated with feeding types. Carnivores, omnivores, filter feeders, and surface deposit feeders were mostly concentrated in the upper 0-2 cm of the cores. The depth distribution of subsurface deposit feeders was more variable, even among related taxa.

  15. North Carolina Computer Skills Curriculum Lesson Plans, 1-8: Ethical Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Carolina State Dept. of Public Instruction, Raleigh.

    This curriculum guide contains computer skills activities for the public schools of North Carolina; these lesson plans are designed specifically for grades 1-8 and focus on ethical issues. The lesson plans for each grade include a list of materials needed, lesson time, teacher preparation activities, outline of activities, and instructional…

  16. Arts Education K-12: Teacher Handbook. North Carolina Competency-Based Curriculum Subject-by-Subject.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chapman, Barbara Holland

    The North Carolina arts education curriculum encompasses K-12 programs in dance, folk arts, music, theater arts, and visual arts. It is designed to provide a scope and sequence which encourages students to develop the essential senses of sight, hearing, smell, taste, touch, and kinetic awareness. It provides opportunities to develop thinking…

  17. Diffusion of Photovoltaic Occupational Skills Training: Awareness and Adoption in the North Carolina Community Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porto, Deborah Ruth

    2012-01-01

    Educational administrators in the North Carolina Community College System (NCCCS) play a key role in the decisions to adopt or reject educational innovations and as a result are the gatekeepers of technology innovations reaching students. In this study the innovation-decision process and other aspects of the diffusion of innovation model are used…

  18. North Carolina Community College System Economic & Workforce Development Annual Report, 1999-2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lancaster, H. Martin

    During the 1999-2000 program year, the Division of Economic and Workforce Development attempted to further the North Carolina Community College System's (NCCCS) tradition of excellence by modeling key strategies of the business sector. These strategies included: (1) Economies of scale, a term that refers to unit cost decreasing as number of units…

  19. First report of potato spindle tuber viroid naturally infecting greenhouse tomatoes in North Carolina

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In Spring of 2012, an unusual severe disease (plant stunting, chlorosis and small fruits) was observed on 18% of tomato plants (Solanum lycopersicum L.) in a research greenhouse facility in western North Carolina. Over time, the disease spread to other tomato plants inside the greenhouse. Initial ...

  20. An Analysis of North Carolina's Rural Health Problems as Perceived by County Rural Development Panels.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamilton, Vance E., Comp.

    A State Task Force on Rural Health was formed (January 1973) by the State Rural Development Committee to identify and analyze major rural health problems in North Carolina and to recommend alleviation strategies. The Task Force submitted open-ended questionnaires to members of the County Rural Development Panels to secure their perceptions of…

  1. Unblocking Occluded Genres in Graduate Writing: Thesis and Dissertation Support Services at North Carolina State University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Autry, Meagan Kittle; Carter, Michael

    2015-01-01

    In 2013, the Graduate School at North Carolina State University launched Thesis and Dissertation Support Services, a rhetorical, genre-based approach to assisting students with their graduate writing. Through a description of the program's founding, goals, and first year of services, we summarize this genre-based approach that is informed by the…

  2. Public School Choice and Integration: Evidence from Durham, North Carolina. Working Paper 14

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bifulco, Robert; Ladd, Helen F.; Ross, Stephen

    2008-01-01

    Using evidence from Durham, North Carolina, we examine the impact of school choice programs on racial and class-based segregation across schools. Theoretical considerations suggest that how choice programs affect segregation will depend not only on the family preferences emphasized in the sociology literature but also on the linkages between…

  3. A death certificate analysis of nasal cancer among furniture workers in North Carolina.

    PubMed

    Brinton, L A; Blot, W J; Stone, B J; Fraumeni, J F

    1977-10-01

    A case-control study of nasal cancer, based on death certificate statements on occupation in North Carolina counties with furniture-manufacturing industries, revealed a 4-fold excess risk linked to this occupation. Although woodworking exposures have been associated with nasal adenocarcinomas in several areas of the world, this is the first report of such a relationship in the United States.

  4. More than Child's Play: North Carolina Professor Explores the History of Dolls and Their Sociological Impact

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yates, Eleanor Lee

    2004-01-01

    For Dr. Sabrina Thomas, dolls are not just child's play. In fact, they are the subject of her research, which recently landed her a $40,000 grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities. Thomas, an assistant professor of family and consumer sciences at North Carolina Central University, was awarded the grant to write a book on the history…

  5. Examining the Effects of School Composition on North Carolina Student Achievement over Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southworth, Stephanie

    2010-01-01

    This study explores the effects of school-level characteristics on North Carolina students' reading and math achievement from fourth through eighth grade, focusing on the relationships between achievement and the racial and poverty composition of schools. After creating race-by-poverty cohorts of schools, I use multilevel models to examine math…

  6. North Carolina Instructional Technology Plan and Guide: Technological Recommendations and Standards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Carolina School Technology Commission.

    This long-range state technology plan for North Carolina is the culmination of a series of research and planning efforts on improving student performance and enhancing the teaching/learning process through the effective use of technology. The plan includes the following components: a mission statement and vision; instructional technology…

  7. North Carolina Instructional Technology Plan Guide: Technological Recommendations and Standards. [Revised].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Carolina State Dept. of Public Instruction, Raleigh.

    The purpose of this guide is to present the essential technical considerations for implementing the North Carolina Instructional Technology Plan (NCITP). It addresses three main areas fundamental to the development and execution of long-range technology plans: collaboration, connectivity, and hardware/software configurations. The first section…

  8. 77 FR 5703 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; North Carolina; 110(a)(1) and (2...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-06

    ... new or revised NAAQS, sections 110(a)(1) and (2) of the CAA require states to address basic SIP... June 20, 2008, SIP revision. See 76 FR 49313. EPA has determined that North Carolina's federally... to make a SIP submission to EPA for a new or revised NAAQS, but the contents of that submission...

  9. North Carolina Computer Skills Curriculum Lesson Plans, K-3: Terms, Operation and Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Carolina State Dept. of Public Instruction, Raleigh.

    This document contains computer skills curriculum for the public schools of North Carolina; these lesson plans are designed specifically for grades K-3. Activities focus on students learning computer terminology as well as the correct use and care of computer technology. Included for each grade are descriptions of learning activities, with lists…

  10. Cost-effectiveness of the stream-gaging program in North Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mason, R.R.; Jackson, N.M.

    1985-01-01

    This report documents the results of a study of the cost-effectiveness of the stream-gaging program in North Carolina. Data uses and funding sources are identified for the 146 gaging stations currently operated in North Carolina with a budget of $777,600 (1984). As a result of the study, eleven stations are nominated for discontinuance and five for conversion from recording to partial-record status. Large parts of North Carolina 's Coastal Plain are identified as having sparse streamflow data. This sparsity should be remedied as funds become available. Efforts should also be directed toward defining the efforts of drainage improvements on local hydrology and streamflow characteristics. The average standard error of streamflow records in North Carolina is 18.6 percent. This level of accuracy could be improved without increasing cost by increasing the frequency of field visits and streamflow measurements at stations with high standard errors and reducing the frequency at stations with low standard errors. A minimum budget of $762,000 is required to operate the 146-gage program. A budget less than this does not permit proper service and maintenance of the gages and recorders. At the minimum budget, and with the optimum allocation of field visits, the average standard error is 17.6 percent.

  11. [Speech to the] North Carolina Association of Community College Trustees Law Conference.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lancaster, H. Martin

    This speech discusses the role of community colleges in meeting three huge challenges to North Carolina in the immediate future: (1) responding to demand for dramatic improvements in the public schools; (2) finding effective, affordable ways to educate the echo boomers; and (3) helping create a workforce that can cope with the continuing reality…

  12. Guide for Implementation of the Continuing Education Unit in the University of North Carolina: Three Documents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh.

    These three documents offer an overview of the efforts of the University of North Carolina to implement the Continuing Education Unit (CEU) in its constituent institutions. Included are a preliminary statement, defining and offering general information regarding the CEU; a speech examining its development, applications, and future; and a guide…

  13. 75 FR 70018 - North Carolina; Amendment No. 2 to Notice of a Major Disaster Declaration

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-16

    ... SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency North Carolina; Amendment No. 2 to Notice of a Major Disaster Declaration AGENCY: Federal Emergency Management Agency, DHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This notice amends the... CONTACT: Peggy Miller, Office of Response and Recovery, Federal Emergency Management Agency, 500 C...

  14. 75 FR 65503 - North Carolina; Amendment No. 1 to Notice of a Major Disaster Declaration

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-25

    ... SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency North Carolina; Amendment No. 1 to Notice of a Major Disaster Declaration AGENCY: Federal Emergency Management Agency, DHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This notice amends the... CONTACT: Peggy Miller, Office of Response and Recovery, Federal Emergency Management Agency, 500 C...

  15. 76 FR 64094 - North Carolina; Amendment No. 9 to Notice of a Major Disaster Declaration

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-17

    ... SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency North Carolina; Amendment No. 9 to Notice of a Major Disaster Declaration AGENCY: Federal Emergency Management Agency, DHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This notice amends the... CONTACT: Peggy Miller, Office of Response and Recovery, Federal Emergency Management Agency, 500 C...

  16. Along Freedom Road. Hyde County, North Carolina and the Fate of Black Schools in the South.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cecelski, David S.

    The 1968-69 school boycott in Hyde County (North Carolina) was one of the most sustained and successful protests of the civil rights movement. For a year, the county's black citizens refused to send their children to school in protest of a desegregation plan that required closing two historically black schools in their remote coastal community.…

  17. The Community College System in North Carolina: A Silver Anniversary History, 1963-1988.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiggs, Jon Lee

    Documenting the 25-year history of the North Carolina Community College System (NCCCS), this book focuses on each of the successive academic terms from 1963-64 to 1987-88. The chapters are grouped into five sections, corresponding to the lengths of tenure of the five NCCCS presidents: the (Isaac) Ready years from 1963 to 1970; the (Ben) Fountain…

  18. Critical Success Factors, 2003 for the North Carolina Community College System. Fourteenth Annual Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Carolina Community Coll. System, Raleigh.

    This document is the fourteenth annual report on the critical successes of the North Carolina Community Colleges published in July 2003. The purpose of this document is to report on the performance measures for purposes of accountability and performance funding. Furthermore, the annual report serves as an evaluation instrument for the System…

  19. Does Private School Competition Affect Public School Achievement? An Analysis of North Carolina Data.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howard, Eric S.

    This report describes a study conducted to determine if there were any applicable effects from private-school competition on public-school student achievement in North Carolina. The study examined multiple student outcomes, including elementary and secondary student achievement results, student dropout rates, and high school student achievement…

  20. [North Carolina Gifted and Talented Minigrant Curriculum Projects: Two Microcomputer Projects].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parrish, Ronald; Baker, Reginald

    Computer awareness and literacy programs for gifted and talented high school students were developed at two Washington City Schools (North Carolina). At Carteret High School, a variety of computer programs were purchased for biology and physics studies, trigonometry and algebra studies, aptitude and merit exam preparation, basic skills math…

  1. Student Project Work and Abstracts. Beaufort, North Carolina Environmental Studies Project, No. 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carteret County Board of Education, Beaufort, NC.

    This document contains reports of 11 environmental study projects conducted by junior and senior students in a North Carolina high school. Topics range from the construction of an artificial reef and a survey of seashore changes to surveys of past and present development of various facets of the county ecology. The emphasis is on student…

  2. TUNL XIX. Annual report, January 1-December 31, 1980. [North Carolina State Univ. activities at TUNL

    SciTech Connect

    1980-12-31

    Research performed by North Carolina State University personnel at TUNL is highlighted in this report, which is actually the complete TUNL progress report for 1980. Studies in the areas of neutron cross sections, neutron polarization, radiative capture, atomic physics and development activities are included. One may expect completed projects to be reported in physics journals or conference proceedings. (RWR)

  3. Desegregation, Accountability, and Equality: North Carolina and the Nation, 1971-2002

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Scott; Myers, Anthony; Vasquez, Brittany

    2014-01-01

    Using North Carolina as a lens to illuminate broader national developments, this paper examines how and why educational policy in the United States turned away from a civil rights agenda of opportunity and embraced test-based accountability as a way of promoting racial equality. We show that comprehensive desegregation, enforcement of the Civil…

  4. State Teacher Policy Yearbook: What States Can Do to Retain Effective New Teachers, 2008. North Carolina

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Council on Teacher Quality, 2008

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents the North Carolina edition of the National Council on Teacher Quality's 2008 "State Teacher Policy Yearbook". The 2008 "Yearbook" focuses on how state policies impact the retention of effective new teachers. This policy evaluation is broken down into three areas that encompass 15 goals. Broadly, these goals examine the impact…

  5. The Art of Learning: A Guide to Outstanding North Carolina Arts in Education Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herman, Miriam L.

    The Arts in Education programs delineated in this guide complement the rigorous arts curriculum taught by arts specialists in North Carolina schools and enable students to experience the joy of the creative process while reinforcing learning in other curricula: language arts, mathematics, social studies, science, and physical education. Programs…

  6. North Carolina Today and Tomorrow, Vol. 8: Peoples' Views on Community Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christenson, James A.

    Using the Guttman scale of quality and availability of community services, two mail surveys probing 46 community services via a 1/1000 proportional sample based on the total population in each of North Carolina's 100 counties and a county sample (an average of 88 responses out of 150 questionnaires per county) were ranked by county and social…

  7. 2009-2010 Seasonal Influenza Vaccination Coverage among College Students from 8 Universities in North Carolina

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poehling, Katherine A.; Blocker, Jill; Ip, Edward H.; Peters, Timothy R.; Wolfson, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The authors sought to describe the 2009-2010 seasonal influenza vaccine coverage of college students. Participants: A total of 4,090 college students from 8 North Carolina universities participated in a confidential, Web-based survey in October-November 2009. Methods: Associations between self-reported 2009-2010 seasonal influenza…

  8. Evaluation of the North Carolina Multi-Purpose Occupational Information System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jurado, Eugene A.; Wolff, Warren W.

    A study assessed North Carolina's Multi-Purpose Occupational Information System (MPOIS). Evaluated during the study were various dimensions of the MPOIS, including its content, efficiency, operations, training, and outcomes. In addition, the development of the system was examined in terms of how it addresses both the technical and non-technical…

  9. Outcomes of an Elementary School-Based Vision Screening Program in North Carolina

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kemper, Alex R.; Helfrich, Anya; Talbot, Jennifer; Patel, Nita

    2012-01-01

    School nurses can play a key role in the detection of significant refractive error. The purpose of this study was to assess the impact of a statewide school nurse vision screening program by evaluating the outcomes of screening among first, third, and fifth graders in 10 schools in North Carolina during the 2009-2010 school year. Of the 2,726…

  10. Examining Literature on Hispanic Student Achievement in the Southeastern United States and North Carolina

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parker, Michele A.; Segovia, Edelmira; Tap, Bethany

    2016-01-01

    We surveyed literature on factors that may influence Hispanic students academically including generational status, gender roles, and use of language in the Southeastern United States and North Carolina. We discuss how risk factors can be addressed (e.g., increasing awareness of risk factors, tutoring, mentoring, and after-school programs). We…

  11. 78 FR 34303 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; North Carolina; Removal of Stage II Gasoline...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-07

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 52 Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; North Carolina; Removal of Stage... redesignation requests and the maintenance plans for the Charlotte-Gastonia Area on July 5, 1995 (60 FR 34859), Greensboro- Winston-Salem-High Point Area on September 9, 1993 (58 FR 47391), and the Raleigh-Durham Area...

  12. Plan of Work for Rural Development in North Carolina, July 1, 1975 - June 30, 1976.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hyatt, George, Jr.; And Others

    Serving primarily as a policy group for local Rural Development Panels, the North Carolina Rural Development Committee's major objective for 1976 is to work with local leaders, private businesses and governmental agencies at all levels in planning and implementing comprehensive rural development programs. Specifically, the Committee's objectives…

  13. Disaster Down East: Using Participatory Action Research to Explore Intimate Partner Violence in Eastern North Carolina

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frasier, Pamela York; Belton, Leigh; Hooten, Elizabeth; Campbell, Marci Kramish; DeVellis, Brenda; Benedict, Salli; Carrillo, Carla; Gonzalez, Pam; Kelsey, Kristine; Meier, Andrea

    2004-01-01

    In the aftermath of Hurricane Floyd in 1999, a Community Advisory Committee requested assistance from its university partners (University of North Carolina) to address stress and increased risk for intimate partner violence (IPV). Collected from 12 study work sites, baseline data indicated that IPV rates were higher among blue-collar women in…

  14. EAARL coastal topography-Northern Outer Banks, North Carolina, post-Nor'Ida, 2009

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bonisteel-Cormier, J.M.; Nayegandhi, Amar; Wright, C.W.; Sallenger, A.H.; Brock, J.C.; Nagle, D.B.; Vivekanandan, Saisudha; Klipp, E.S.; Fredericks, Xan

    2011-01-01

    This DVD contains lidar-derived first-surface (FS) and bare-earth (BE) topography GIS datasets of a portion of the northern Outer Banks beachface in North Carolina. These datasets were acquired post-Nor'Ida on November 27 and 29, 2009.

  15. 76 FR 43167 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plan; North Carolina; Disapproval of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-20

    ... interstate transport (i.e., 110(a)(2)(D)(i)(I)) for the 2006 PM 2.5 NAAQS. See 76 FR 4592. A summary of the... (See 70 FR 25162), required states to reduce emissions of sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxides that... Rule,'' 75 FR 45210 (August 2, 2010). On September 21, 2009, the State of North Carolina, through...

  16. 75 FR 17792 - North Carolina Disaster # NC-00025 Declaration of Economic Injury

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-07

    ... ADMINISTRATION North Carolina Disaster NC-00025 Declaration of Economic Injury AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a notice of an Economic Injury Disaster Loan (EIDL) declaration... the Administrator's EIDL declaration, applications for economic injury disaster loans may be filed...

  17. The North Carolina Department of Commerce: a healthy workforce promotes economic security.

    PubMed

    Smith, Libby; Morck, John

    2012-01-01

    To thrive economically, North Carolina needs a healthy, productive workforce. The public and private sectors should collaborate on the prevention and management of chronic diseases, which significantly impact the state's economy. Evidence-based prevention strategies should be prioritized, and communities should be designed with public health considerations in mind.

  18. 78 FR 35766 - North Carolina: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revisions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-14

    ... a Gasification .0106(a). System to Produce Synthesis Gas. 217--NESHAP: Final Standards for 73 FR... (49 FR 48694), to implement a hazardous waste management program. EPA granted authorization for changes to North Carolina's program on the following dates: March 25, 1986, effective April 8, 1986 (51...

  19. An Epidemologic Study of High School Football Injuries in North Carolina--1968-1972. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blyth, Carl S.; Mueller, Frederick O.

    This report describes a study to demonstrate the effectiveness of applying epidemiologic methods in determining the extent of the problem of high school football injuries in North Carolina and to interrelate certain variables associated with the problem of risk in athletics. It provides a descriptive baseline of data on high school football…

  20. 33 CFR 165.515 - Safety Zone: Cape Fear River, Wilmington, North Carolina.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Safety Zone: Cape Fear River... § 165.515 Safety Zone: Cape Fear River, Wilmington, North Carolina. (a) Location. The following area is a safety zone: (1) The waters of the Cape Fear River bounded by a line connecting the...

  1. 33 CFR 165.515 - Safety Zone: Cape Fear River, Wilmington, North Carolina.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Safety Zone: Cape Fear River... § 165.515 Safety Zone: Cape Fear River, Wilmington, North Carolina. (a) Location. The following area is a safety zone: (1) The waters of the Cape Fear River bounded by a line connecting the...

  2. 33 CFR 165.515 - Safety Zone: Cape Fear River, Wilmington, North Carolina.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Safety Zone: Cape Fear River... § 165.515 Safety Zone: Cape Fear River, Wilmington, North Carolina. (a) Location. The following area is a safety zone: (1) The waters of the Cape Fear River bounded by a line connecting the...

  3. 33 CFR 165.515 - Safety Zone: Cape Fear River, Wilmington, North Carolina.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Safety Zone: Cape Fear River... § 165.515 Safety Zone: Cape Fear River, Wilmington, North Carolina. (a) Location. The following area is a safety zone: (1) The waters of the Cape Fear River bounded by a line connecting the...

  4. 33 CFR 165.515 - Safety Zone: Cape Fear River, Wilmington, North Carolina.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Safety Zone: Cape Fear River... § 165.515 Safety Zone: Cape Fear River, Wilmington, North Carolina. (a) Location. The following area is a safety zone: (1) The waters of the Cape Fear River bounded by a line connecting the...

  5. North Carolina Standard Course of Study and Grade Level Competencies: Social Studies K-12. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Carolina State Dept. of Public Instruction, Raleigh.

    The revised North Carolina Standard Course of Study has moved from a detailed, prescriptive curriculum guide to a more flexible instructional guide, emphasizing what students should know and be able to do as they progress through various levels of proficiency and ultimately exit from high school. The revised curriculum focuses on themes and…

  6. An Evaluation of the North Carolina Annual Report on School Violence: Scientific Realism in Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carruthers, William L.; Stacey, Dennis

    To analyze perceptions of what constitutes a safe school. different perceptions of what constitutes a safe school, an assessment of the first 4 years of North Carolina's Annual Report on School Violence (ARSV) is reported here. The ARSV is a collection of data on specific acts of violence occurring on school property. Data on acts of violence were…

  7. Lawrence A. Oxley and Social Services for Blacks in North Carolina's Appalachian Counties.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, John L.

    This paper examines the history of the organization of statewide social services and activities of the Division of Work among Negroes in the Appalachian counties. From 1925-1934--its first 9 years--North Carolina's Division of Work among Negroes was directed by Lawrence Oxley. This agency was established to study black social problems and to help…

  8. The North Carolina Division of Public Health's vision for healthy and sustainable communities.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Cathy; Rhew, Lori K; Petersen, Ruth

    2012-01-01

    The North Carolina Division of Public Health is working to improve access to physical activity through changes in the built environment by participating in the Healthy Environments Collaborative and by leading the state's Communities Putting Prevention to Work project and the Shape Your World movement.

  9. 76 FR 56463 - North Carolina; Amendment No. 6 to Notice of a Major Disaster Declaration

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-13

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency North Carolina; Amendment No. 6 to Notice of a Major Disaster Declaration AGENCY: Federal Emergency Management Agency, DHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This notice amends...

  10. School Segregation under Color-Blind Jurisprudence: The Case of North Carolina. Working Paper 16

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clotfelter, Charles T.; Ladd, Helen F.; Vigdor, Jacob L.

    2008-01-01

    Using detailed administrative data for the public K-12 schools of North Carolina, we measure racial segregation in its public schools. With data for the 2005-2006 school year, we update previously published calculations that measure segregation by unevenness in racial enrollment patterns, both between schools and within schools. We find that…

  11. Administrators in North Carolina Community Colleges: A Comparative Study by Gender. Preliminary Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gillett-Karam, Rosemary; And Others

    As part of a study of the advancement and support of women in administrative positions at institutions of higher education in North Carolina, administrators at the state's community colleges were surveyed in 1996 to determine their characteristics, satisfaction with their careers, and experiences with respect to obstacles and mentors. Surveys were…

  12. An Initial Evaluation of the North Carolina Alcohol and Drug Education Traffic Schools. Volume II: Appendices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Popkin, Carol L.; And Others

    This volume is the second part of a report evaluating the North Carolina Alcohol Drug Education Traffic Schools (ADETS), established for the primary purpose of treating first offenders convicted of driving under the influence (DUI). These appendices include copies of legislation pertaining to the schools; a copy of the DMH 2604 referral form; an…

  13. Kids and Cops. Law Enforecement Services for Children in North Carolina. Interim Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Mason P., Jr.; Hogue, L. Lynn

    This book is designed to meet the practical needs of law enforcement officers working with children in North Carolina. Chapters on the law and children's rights, changes in the law enforcement officer's role, legal procedures applicable to juveniles, the use of juvenile detention resources, and child abuse and neglect contain historical background…

  14. Powdery mildew caused by Podosphaera macularis on hop (Humulus lupulus) in North Carolina

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In June 2015, a grower in western North Carolina detected powdery mildew in a small hop yard. Characteristic colonies of the pathogen where observed on cultivars Cashmere, Cascade, and Chinook. Leaves with powdery mildew were collected from cultivar Cashmere for confirmation of the pathogen identi...

  15. Exploring Rapid Achievement Gains in North Carolina and Texas. Lessons from the States.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grissmer, David; Flanagan, Ann

    The National Education Goals Panel (NEGP) tracks and reports annually on 33 indicators linked to the 8 National Education Goals. The NEGP's 1997 report showed positive gains on the greatest number of indicators for North Carolina and Texas. These gains included significant gains on the 1996 National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) in…

  16. Microphytobenthos interannual variations in a north-European estuary (Loire estuary, France) detected by visible-infrared multispectral remote sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benyoucef, Ismaïl; Blandin, Elodie; Lerouxel, Astrid; Jesus, Bruno; Rosa, Philippe; Méléder, Vona; Launeau, Patrick; Barillé, Laurent

    2014-01-01

    Estuarine intertidal sediments are colonized by photosynthetic microorganisms grouped under the generic term of microphytobenthos (MPB). These microbial assemblages form transient biofilms at the sediment surface and have important ecosystem functions. MPB biofilms are well known to exhibit high microscale patchiness whereas meso- and macroscale spatio-temporal structures are little known. In this work, satellite remote sensing was used to map MPB assemblages at such scales. MPB interannual distribution was investigated in the poly- and mesohaline domain of the north-European estuary (Loire estuary), using a multispectral SPOT image time series (1991-2009). The Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) was calculated from two SPOT channels, XS2 and XS3, (red and near-infrared wavelengths, respectively). MPB biofilms were identified by NDVI values between 0 and 0.3. At the scale of the whole intertidal area, the results showed that MPB biofilms in the Loire estuary exhibited perennial structures in both the polyhaline and mesohaline sectors, occupying nearly 90% of the mudflat surfaces. MPB biofilm density was closely associated with intertidal position, with thicker biofilms developing mostly in the upper and middle shore, and formed kilometric longitudinal structures parallel to the shoreline. Mean NDVI values showed a strong positive correlation with mean seasonal air temperature (τ = 0.714, p < 0.05 in the polyhaline domain and τ = 0.810, p < 0.05 in the mesohaline domain), with a strong correlation in the upper intertidal mudflat (between +3 and 4 m isobaths). Negative wind effect was mainly detected in the upper intertidal areas, particularly between the +3 and 4 m isobaths (τ = -0.810, p < 0.05 in the polyhaline domain and τ = -0.910 in the mesohaline).

  17. Prevalence of the invasive Rhizocephalan parasite Loxothylacus panopaei in Eurypanopeus depressus in South Carolina and genetic relationships of the parasite in North and South Carolina.

    PubMed

    O'Shaughnessy, Kathryn A; Freshwater, D Wilson; Burge, Erin J

    2014-08-01

    The rhizocephalan barnacle Loxothylacus panopaei is a parasitic castrator of xanthid crabs that has invaded the U.S. Atlantic coast. It was transported to the Chesapeake Bay in the mid-1960s with mud crabs associated with Gulf coast oysters and has since spread north to Long Island Sound, New York, and south to Cape Canaveral, Florida. Here we report parasite prevalence at 3 South Carolina sites--2 from which the parasite had not been previously reported--and examine the genetic relationships of North and South Carolina L. panopaei populations relative to Gulf of Mexico and other Atlantic coast parasite populations. Total L. panopaei prevalence was 24.2% among all 3 sites, with monthly prevalence as high as 51.6% at Waties Island, South Carolina. Sequence analyses of North and South Carolina specimens revealed the presence of 4 cytochrome c oxidase subunit I haplotypes--3 commonly found in other invasive populations and 1 new haplotype found in a single specimen from the Rachel Carson Reserve in Carteret County, North Carolina--and indicate that the Carolina populations are a result of range expansion from the original Atlantic coast invasion.

  18. Prevalence of the invasive Rhizocephalan parasite Loxothylacus panopaei in Eurypanopeus depressus in South Carolina and genetic relationships of the parasite in North and South Carolina.

    PubMed

    O'Shaughnessy, Kathryn A; Freshwater, D Wilson; Burge, Erin J

    2014-08-01

    The rhizocephalan barnacle Loxothylacus panopaei is a parasitic castrator of xanthid crabs that has invaded the U.S. Atlantic coast. It was transported to the Chesapeake Bay in the mid-1960s with mud crabs associated with Gulf coast oysters and has since spread north to Long Island Sound, New York, and south to Cape Canaveral, Florida. Here we report parasite prevalence at 3 South Carolina sites--2 from which the parasite had not been previously reported--and examine the genetic relationships of North and South Carolina L. panopaei populations relative to Gulf of Mexico and other Atlantic coast parasite populations. Total L. panopaei prevalence was 24.2% among all 3 sites, with monthly prevalence as high as 51.6% at Waties Island, South Carolina. Sequence analyses of North and South Carolina specimens revealed the presence of 4 cytochrome c oxidase subunit I haplotypes--3 commonly found in other invasive populations and 1 new haplotype found in a single specimen from the Rachel Carson Reserve in Carteret County, North Carolina--and indicate that the Carolina populations are a result of range expansion from the original Atlantic coast invasion. PMID:24588508

  19. Performance of a building integrated PV/thermal system on a bank in North Carolina

    SciTech Connect

    Fitzpatrick, S.

    1999-07-01

    In an effort to improve PV building economics, two building integrated photovoltaic/thermal (BIPV/T) systems for commercial applications were recently designed and installed in North Carolina. This work was done under the first round of the US Department of Energy's PV Building Opportunities In the US (PV:BONUS) program. The first system was installed on Central Carolina Bank in Bessemer City, NC, with the second installed on Applebee's Restaurant in Salisbury, NC. The PV:BONUS team members for these projects were Innovative Design, North Carolina Solar Center, Central Carolina Bank, Applebee's Restaurant, and Duke Energy. The projects were designed to improve the economics of the PV installation by (1) displacing traditional building materials and (2) harvesting thermal energy. This paper describes the performance of the Central Carolina Bank PV:BONUS system. It became operational in May of 1997 and was monitored for one year, beginning January, 1998. The system was designed to provide on-peak demand reduction, on-peak kWh reduction, heated winter ventilation air, and an uninterruptible power supply.

  20. Wildlife underpasses on U.S. 64 in North Carolina: integrating management and science objectives

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jones, Mark D.; Van Manen, Frank T.; Wilson, Travis W.; Cox, David R.

    2010-01-01

    This chapter on wildlife underpasses on U.S. Highway 64 in North Carolina is from a book on highways, wildlife, and habitat connectivity. U.S. 64 is an important route in North Carolina connecting major population centers and highways that underwent a major upgrade from a two-lane rural road to a major highway. New routes were proposed for a large portion of the project (28 miles) to improve driver safety and increase speed limits to 70 miles per hour (from the previously posted 55 mph). The authors review the geographical, historical, political, and social setting; the roadway and environmental issues; the rationale for the project; critical factors; outcomes of the project; and lessons learned. The area of the project supports high wildlife densities, including American black bears, white-tailed deer, red wolves, and bobcats. Critical factors to be incorporated into wildlife mitigation measures: driver safety, underpass construction costs, and permitting by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. The U.S. 64 underpasses, completed in 2005, were the first in North Carolina designed specifically for wildlife and according to specifications provided by the North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission (NCWRC). The authors describe the underpass specifications recommended based on this project, including size, control of public access, fencing, gates, and maintenance (notably vegetation management). The authors conclude that one of the most beneficial outcomes of this project was the fact that, since the completion of the U.S. 64 underpasses, the North Carolina Department of Transportation (NCDOT) routinely considers wildlife passageways for road projects in the state.

  1. IMPACT OF BURROWING SHRIMP POPULATIONS ON NITROGEN CYCLING AND WATER QUALITY IN WESTERN NORTH AMERICAN TEMPERATE ESTUARIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Thalassinid burrowing shrimp (predominantly, Neotrypaea californiensis and Upogebia pugettensis) inhabit large expanses of tide flats in North American Pacific estuaries, from British Columbia to Baja California. Feeding, burrowing, and burrow irrigation by burrowing shrimp can ...

  2. IMPACT OF BURROWING SHRIMP POPULATIONS ON C, N CYCLING AND WATER QUALITY IN WESTERN NORTH AMERICAN TEMPERATE ESTUARIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Thalassinid burrowing shrimp (predominantly, Neotrypaea californiensis and Upogebia pugettensis) inhabit large expanses of tide flats in North American Pacific estuaries, from British Columbia to Baja California. Feeding, burrowing, and burrow irrigation by burrowing shrimp can ...

  3. Distribution of suspended sediment in a partially mixed estuary, Charleston Harbor, South Carolina, U.S.A.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Althausen, J. D.; Kjerfve, Björn

    1992-11-01

    A well-defined turbidity maximum zone (TMZ) exists 15-45 km upstream of the entrance to Charleston Harbor, South Carolina, on the Cooper River, where the salinity varies between 5-15 ppt. The TMZ is characterized by less than 60% light transmission over a 5 cm path-length near the bottom, as compared to 70-90% light transmission elsewhere. The TMZ oscillates along the Cooper River 3-13 km during a tidal cycle. The range of total suspended sediment (TSS) concentration is 40-100 mg l -1 in the TMZ, while 10-30 mg l -1 is the most common TSS concentration elsewhere in the estuarine portion of Charleston Harbor and the Cooper River. Transmissivity is well-correlated with TSS ( r2 = 0·77) throughout the estuary. TSS concentration depends largely on tidal stage and varies significantly from spring to neap tide. Spring tide TSS concentrations are 2-3 times greater than concentrations during neap tides. The net downstream transport of suspended sediment is primarily a function of fresh water discharge, but is particularly large when flood events coincide with spring tides as was evident during the sampling of the TMZ following Hurricane Hugo (22 September 1989).

  4. Remote detection of metal anomalies on Pilot Mountain, Randolph County, North Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Milton, N.M.; Collins, William; Chang, S.-H.; Schmidt, R.G.

    1982-01-01

    A biogeophysical technique used successfully to delineate mineralized zones under coniferous forests has been extended to a deciduous region in the Piedmont physiographic province of North Carolina. Pilot Mountain, a hydrothermally altered monadnock within the Carolina slate belt, contains areas of anomalously high amounts of Cu, Mo, and Sn in the soils. Leaves of canopy trees in the mineralized zone also contain significant amounts of Cu. Spectral data acquired from a high-resolution airborne spectroradiometer were processed using a waveform analysis technique to minimize background noise caused by canopy variations and slope effects. Areas containing anomalous metals were detected by spectral changes in the chlorophyll absorption region.

  5. Honoring their service: behavioral health services in North Carolina for military service members, veterans, and their families.

    PubMed

    Alexander-Bratcher, Kimberly M; Martin, Grier; Purcell, William R; Watson, Michael; Silberman, Pam

    2011-01-01

    The North Carolina Institute of Medicine Task Force on Behavioral Health Services for the Military and Their Families examined the adequacy of Medicaid- and state-funded services for mental health conditions, developmental disabilities (including traumatic brain injury), and substance abuse that are currently available in North Carolina to military service members, veterans, and their families. The task force determined that there are several gaps in services and made 13 recommendations related to federal, state, and local community resources. This article reviews the work of the task force and current efforts to improve services in North Carolina.

  6. The drought of 1998-2002 in North Carolina - precipitation and hydrologic conditions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Weaver, J. Curtis

    2005-01-01

    Drought conditions prevailed across much of North Carolina during 1998-2002, resulting in widespread record-low streamflow and ground-water levels in many areas. During this 4-year period, the drought was continuous in areas of western North Carolina, although eastern areas of the State had some periods of relief from tropical storms in 1998 and 1999. The occurrence of dry winters in 2001 and 2002 along with a dry spring in 2002, exacerbated drought conditions across the State and resulted in substantial declines in streamflow and ground-water levels during the summer of 2002. The drought caused widespread hardship and economic losses across North Carolina. During the latter months of 2002, more than 200 municipalities that included most major cities operated under some form of voluntary, mandatory, or emergency water conservation. Reservoirs across North Carolina were at record or near record-low levels, including some of the largest ones used for multiple purposes (flood control, low-flow augmentation, and(or) recreation), and required continuous and careful operation to balance the upstream and downstream needs of users. Precipitation deficits during the 1998-2002 drought for some locations in North Carolina were among the largest documented since the beginning of systematic collection of weather data. The largest deficits occurred primarily in the western Piedmont and were as much as 60 to 70 inches in some locations during the 4-year period. Cumulative monthly precipitation departures for the period May 1998 through September 2002 at 13 selected precipitation sites across the State ranged from 5.3 inches below normal in Greenville (eastern North Carolina) to 66.7 inches below normal in Hickory (western North Carolina). During the 12-month period October 2002 through September 2003, precipitation departures at 7 of the 13 sites were more than 20 inches above normal, primarily in the western Piedmont. Precipitation data for the period of record were examined for

  7. Outer Banks Climate - Utilizing NASA Earth Observations to Establish a Methodology for Assessing Coastal Change in North Carolina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaughan, M. A.; Morgan, K.; Doddridge, D.; Norman, D.; Burns, C.; Collins, C.; Warren, J.

    2010-12-01

    North Carolina’s dynamic and ever changing coastal region, defined by the Outer Banks and nearby estuarine systems, is especially vulnerable to the effects of climate change. In addition to the shoreline transformations resultant from erosion and the natural processes of land subsistence, this coastal zone is experiencing increased effects of global climate change. Accelerated rates of rising temperatures in recent years have contributed to thermal expansion, melting ice and thus, a rising sea level that is especially stressful for these low lying coastal regions. Current trends in human behavior are predicted to only accelerate the process of climate change, making the future of this region all the more uncertain. With higher temperatures and added water volume, more frequent and intense storms can be expected to make landfall on or near the North Carolina coast that present hazards threatening entire communities. This study first applied remote sensing tools and techniques to delineate an accurate shoreline envelope. Then, through examination of Landsat imagery taken before and after named storms, observation of images at nine year intervals, and a process of acquiring NDVI values, short and long term vegetative differences were identified. Models based on historical data were also produced with the intention of forecasting future sea level rise along North Carolina’s estuary and coastal shorelines; a particular focus on sea level changes surrounding hurricane episodes corresponds to rates discerned in existing studies. This project will provide a methodology using NASA satellite instrumentation to analyze and delineation shoreline change and measure erosion. Including vegetation loss, sea level rise and the effects of natural and anthropogenic climate change in the study will supplement explanations of current shoreline loss, highest risk areas, and forecasts of future impacts. This information will assist officials in their strategic planning and policy

  8. First records of the rarely collected bug Nannocoris arenarius from Georgia, North Carolina, and Virginia (Heteroptera: Schizopteridae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The schizopterid, Nannocoris arenarius Blatchley, originally described from Dunedin, Florida, and later recorded from South Carolina, is reported for the first time from Georgia, North Carolina, and Virginia. The original Florida specimens were sifted from debris collected at the bases of grasses i...

  9. Sanitation in classroom and food preparation areas in child-care facilities in North Carolina and South Carolina.

    PubMed

    Wohlgenent, Kelly C; Cates, Sheryl C; Fraser, Angela; Chapman, Benjamin; Jaykus, Lee-Ann; Chen, Xi

    2014-11-01

    Approximately 60% of U.S. children aged five and younger spend time in child-care settings. Such environments increase the risk of diarrheal disease, including diseases caused by enteric pathogens. To describe adherence to sanitation standards in classrooms and food preparation areas in child-care facilities, the authors conducted site visits in 40 North Carolina and South Carolina child-care facilities. Audits in up to two classrooms (rooms providing care for infants and toddlers) and the kitchen were performed using a form similar to a regulatory inspection form. Audit data were used to calculate indices to describe adherence to sanitation standards and were based on state environmental health regulations for child-care centers, the Food and Drug Administration's Food Code 2009, and guidance from food safety experts. Most facilities participating in the authors' study adhered to sanitation standards within the classroom; however, deficiencies with regard to sanitation in food preparation areas and refrigerator operating temperatures were noted. These results provide insight into possible risk factors for enteric disease transmission in child-care facilities. PMID:25603619

  10. Aeromagnetic map and selected aeroradiometric data for the Ellicott Rock Wilderness and additions, South Carolina, North Carolina, and Georgia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Luce, Robert W.; Daniels, David L.

    1985-01-01

    The aeromagnetic and aeroradiometric data presented herin for the Ellicott Rock Wilderness and additions are taken from an airborne survey that covered a larger area in Georgia, North Carolina and South Carolina, and that was flown in December 1980 and January 1981 under contract to the U.S. Geological Survey. The flight lines were oriented northwest-southeast, approximately perpendicular to the general strike of the geology, at 0.5-mi (0.8-km) separation and at a nominal altitude of 500 ft (150 m) above mean terrain. A small amount of areomagnetic data from previous survey (Riggle and others, 1980) along the southeast edge of the study area is based on east-west flight lines spaced 1 mi (1.6 km) apart. Because of the rugged topography in the region, holding the airplane at a constant elevation abive the terrain was not possible. Actual ground clearance over short distances ranged between about 200 and 1200 ft. The International Geomagnetic Reference Field (IGRF) has been removed from the magnetic data (Barraclough and Fabiano, 1975) and 5000 gammas were added to make all values positive. 

  11. Siting of USArray Seismic Stations in North Carolina and southern Virginia: Experience of NC-1 Team

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, P.; Howard, J.; Horne, T.

    2012-12-01

    The USArray component of the EarthScope, a transportable array of 400 seismometers installed in a grid about 70 km apart, is in the next two years entering its final stage with station deployment along the Atlantic coast of the United States. Here, we present the experience of the student-faculty team from North Carolina Central University (NCCU) in finding and documenting the suitable sites for the twenty five USArray stations in North Carolina and southern Virginia. The ideal sites are easily accessible yet far from traffic and other sources of noise, with good cell phone coverage, sun exposure and out of flood-prone areas. Although the initial selection of potential locations was done using geospatial mapping and analysis software provided by EarthScope, finding and finalizing the sites involved driving more then 1,000 miles each week for over two months inspecting possible site locations. Aside from driving, the majority of time was spent talking about the EarthScope project and hosting of USArray stations to mostly reluctant landowners. In addition to facing various challenges in finding appropriate sites due to land use issues, such as suburban sprawl of central North Carolina, or topography factors, such as low lying flood prone coastal areas, by far the major challenge was finding the landowners willing to host the seismic station for the necessary three years. In addition to involving students from an HBCU in seismology related project and increasing the visibility of NCCU geophysics program in the University and local community through publicity releases in local media and on university web site, the project had an important outreach component. As North Carolina is located along the seismically quiet, passive Atlantic margin, most residents are not familiar with earthquakes and seismology and the siting experience provided students an opportunity to practice explaining the earthquake research to the general public. The dialog also highlighted science

  12. StreamStats in North Carolina: a water-resources Web application

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Weaver, J. Curtis; Terziotti, Silvia; Kolb, Katharine R.; Wagner, Chad R.

    2012-01-01

    A statewide StreamStats application for North Carolina was developed in cooperation with the North Carolina Department of Transportation following completion of a pilot application for the upper French Broad River basin in western North Carolina (Wagner and others, 2009). StreamStats for North Carolina, available at http://water.usgs.gov/osw/streamstats/north_carolina.html, is a Web-based Geographic Information System (GIS) application developed by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in consultation with Environmental Systems Research Institute, Inc. (Esri) to provide access to an assortment of analytical tools that are useful for water-resources planning and management (Ries and others, 2008). The StreamStats application provides an accurate and consistent process that allows users to easily obtain streamflow statistics, basin characteristics, and descriptive information for USGS data-collection sites and user-selected ungaged sites. In the North Carolina application, users can compute 47 basin characteristics and peak-flow frequency statistics (Weaver and others, 2009; Robbins and Pope, 1996) for a delineated drainage basin. Selected streamflow statistics and basin characteristics for data-collection sites have been compiled from published reports and also are immediately accessible by querying individual sites from the web interface. Examples of basin characteristics that can be computed in StreamStats include drainage area, stream slope, mean annual precipitation, and percentage of forested area (Ries and others, 2008). Examples of streamflow statistics that were previously available only through published documents include peak-flow frequency, flow-duration, and precipitation data. These data are valuable for making decisions related to bridge design, floodplain delineation, water-supply permitting, and sustainable stream quality and ecology. The StreamStats application also allows users to identify stream reaches upstream and downstream from user-selected sites

  13. Documentation of Data Collection in Currituck Sound, North Carolina and Virginia, 2006-2007

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fine, Jason M.

    2008-01-01

    During 2006 and 2007, scientists from Elizabeth City State University, North Carolina Estuarine Research Reserve, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, and the U.S. Geological Survey collected hydrologic and water-quality data at nine sites in and around Currituck Sound. Hydrologic and water-quality data were collected at five tributary sites--the Northwest River near Moyock, Tull Creek near Currituck, and Intracoastal Waterway near Coinjock in North Carolina, and the Albemarle and Chesapeake Canal near Princess Anne, and the North Landing River near Creeds in Virginia. In addition, data were collected at one site at the mouth of Currituck Sound (Currituck Sound at Point Harbor, North Carolina). Only water-quality data were collected at three sites in Currituck Sound and Back Bay-Currituck Sound near Jarvisburg, and Upper Currituck Sound near Corolla in North Carolina, and Back Bay near Back Bay in Virginia. The hydrologic data included water elevation and velocity, and discharge. The water-quality data included discrete samples and continuous measurements of water temperature, specific conductance, dissolved oxygen, pH, turbidity, and chlorophyll a. The hydrologic and water-quality data collected for this study were quality assured by the U.S. Geological Survey and stored in the National Water Information System database. The data collected for this project are being used to develop an unsteady multidimensional hydrodynamic and water-quality model of Currituck Sound by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. The purpose of this model is to provide the basis for planning and the development of best-management practices and restoration projects for Currituck Sound and its tributaries.

  14. 78 FR 70531 - Foreign-Trade Zone (FTZ) 93-Raleigh/Durham, North Carolina; Notification of Proposed Production...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-26

    ... Proposed Production Activity; GlaxoSmithKline, PLC (Pharmaceutical Products); Zebulon, North Carolina The... activity to the FTZ Board on behalf of GlaxoSmithKline, PLC (GlaxoSmithKline), located in Zebulon,...

  15. 78 FR 43141 - Foreign-Trade Zone 93-Raleigh-Durham, North Carolina, Authorization of Production Activity...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-19

    ... inviting public comment (78 FR 17635, 3-22-2013). The FTZ Board has determined that no further review of... Production Activity, Southern Lithoplate, Inc. (Aluminum Printing Plates), Youngsville, North Carolina...

  16. 76 FR 24474 - Adequacy Status of the Greensboro/Winston-Salem/Highpoint North Carolina 1997 Annual PM2.5

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-02

    ... Maintenance Plan Motor Vehicle Emissions Budgets for Transportation Conformity Purposes AGENCY: Environmental... emissions budgets (MVEBs) in the Greensboro/Winston-Salem/Highpoint, North Carolina area (hereafter referred... Natural Resources (NCDENR) are adequate for transportation conformity purposes. The Triad Area...

  17. 33 CFR 334.430 - Neuse River and tributaries at Marine Corps Air Station Cherry Point, North Carolina; restricted...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Station, Cherry Point, North Carolina, extending from the mouth of Hancock Creek to a point approximately 6,800 feet west of the mouth of Slocum Creek, and all waters of Hancock and Slocum Creeks and...

  18. 33 CFR 334.430 - Neuse River and tributaries at Marine Corps Air Station Cherry Point, North Carolina; restricted...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Station, Cherry Point, North Carolina, extending from the mouth of Hancock Creek to a point approximately 6,800 feet west of the mouth of Slocum Creek, and all waters of Hancock and Slocum Creeks and...

  19. Water resources data, North Carolina, water year 2003. Volume 1B: Surface-water records

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ragland, B.C.; Barker, R.G.; Robinson, J.B.

    2004-01-01

    Water-resources data for the 2003 water year for North Carolina consist of records of stage, discharge, water quality for streams; stage and contents for lakes and reservoirs; precipitation; and ground-water levels and water quality of ground water. Volume 1 contains discharge records for 213 gaging stations; stage for 61 gaging stations; and continuous precipitation at 118 sites. Volume 2 contains ground-water-level data from 143 observation wells and ground-water-quality data from 72 wells. The collection of water-resources data in North Carolina is a part of the National Water-Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with State, municipal, and Federal agencies.

  20. Serologic survey of woodchuck hepatitis virus in North Carolina woodchucks (Marmota monax).

    PubMed

    Cullen, J M; Lindsey-Pegram, D; Cote, P J

    2008-06-01

    The prevalence of woodchuck hepatitis virus (WHV) in wild populations of woodchucks is understudied and therefore unclear. Although infection is common in the southeastern region of Pennsylvania and surrounding states, it is virtually absent in New York and New England. Sera were collected from wild woodchucks from Orange County, North Carolina and tested for the presence of markers of current or previous infection with WHV. Of the 24 woodchucks tested, there were three animals (12.5%) with WHV surface antigen as well as antibodies to woodchuck hepatitis core antigen in their serum, indicative of active infection. There were four (17%) animals with antibodies to WHV core antigen but no woodchuck hepatitis surface antigen, indicative of prior infections. The remaining 17 animals had no detectable markers of WHV infection. These data indicate that WHV is present in central North Carolina at rates approaching those seen in endemic areas, such as the mid-Atlantic region of the United States.