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Sample records for northern conditions influencing

  1. Factors influencing fire severity under moderate burning conditions in the Klamath Mountains, northern California, USA

    Treesearch

    Becky L. Estes; Eric E. Knapp; Carl N. Skinner; Jay D. Miller; Haiganoush K. Preisler

    2017-01-01

    Topography, weather, and fuels are known factors driving fire behavior, but the degree to which each contributes to the spatial pattern of fire severity under different conditions remains poorly understood. The variability in severity within the boundaries of the 2006 wildfires that burned in the Klamath Mountains, northern California, along with data on burn...

  2. Northern conditions influencing the selection of countermeasures after radioactive fallout in Finland.

    PubMed

    Root, Tarja; Tattari, Sirkka; Rantavaara, Aino

    2005-01-01

    The paper summarizes an evaluation of practicability of rural countermeasures after radioactive fallout in northern conditions carried out by a Finnish group of experts in the FARMING Network project. Snow and soil frost limit the selection of crops, and the short growing season allows mostly one harvest yearly. Cold climate restricts fruit production to apples and berries. Due to the long indoor feeding period, conserved and stored clean feed is available almost all year round. The use of fertilisers and lime on poor and acidic soils leads to high potassium and calcium intake of cows increasing the incidence of milk fever. The surface soil layer is thin and ploughing deeper than 20 cm is problematic due to stony and compacted soils. It also increases soil acidity and decreases fertility. Cultivation of peatlands limits the selection of plants and increases long-term radiocaesium contamination of crops. Frost and snow delay ploughing and spreading of waste milk on arable land, but removal of snow is a decontamination option. Long distances and high transport costs complicate carrying out the countermeasures. The Finnish stakeholder group considered it vital to be prepared for implementation of practicable measures for the safety of food.

  3. Nutritional condition of Northern Yellowstone Elk

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cook, R.C.; Cook, J.G.; Mech, L.D.

    2004-01-01

    Ultrasonography and body condition scoring was used to estimate nutritional condition of northern Yellowstone elk in late winter. Probability of pregnancy was related to body fat, and lactating cows had 50% less fat than non-lactating cows. For mild to normal winters, most of the elk were in good condition.

  4. Influence of Sub-Surface Irrigation on Soil Conditions and Water Irrigation Efficiency in a Cherry Orchard in a Hilly Semi-Arid Area of Northern China

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Gao; Bing, Wang; Guangcan, Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Sub-surface irrigation (SUI) is a new water-saving irrigation technology. To explore the influence of SUI on soil conditions in a cherry orchard and its water-saving efficiency, experiments were conducted from 2009 to 2010 using both SUI and flood irrigation (FLI) and different SUI quotas in hilly semi-arid area of northern China. The results demonstrated the following: 1) The bulk density of the soil under SUI was 6.8% lower than that of soil under FLI (P<0.01). The total soil porosity, capillary porosity and non-capillary porosity of soils using SUI were 11.7% (P<0.01), 8.7% (P<0.01) and 43.8% (P<0.01) higher than for soils using FLI. 2) The average soil temperatures at 0, 5, 10, 15 and 20 cm of soil depth using SUI were 1.7, 1.1, 0.7, 0.4 and 0.3°C higher than those for FLI, specifically, the differences between the surface soil layers were more significant. 3) Compared with FLI, the average water-saving efficiency of SUI was 55.6%, and SUI increased the irrigation productivity by 7.9-12.3 kg m-3 ha-1. 4) The soil moisture of different soil layers using SUI increased with increases in the irrigation quotas, and the soil moisture contents under SUI were significantly higher in the 0-20 cm layer and in the 21-50 cm layer than those under FLI (P<0.01). 5) The average yields of cherries under SUI with irrigation quotas of 80-320 m3 ha-1 were 8.7%-34.9% higher than those in soil with no irrigation (CK2). The average yields of cherries from soils using SUI were 4.5%-12.2% higher than using FLI. It is appropriate to irrigate 2-3 times with 230 m3 ha-1 per application using SUI in a year with normal rainfall. Our findings indicated that SUI could maintain the physical properties, greatly improve irrigation water use efficiency, and significantly increase fruit yields in hilly semi-arid areas of northern China. PMID:24039986

  5. Influence of slab thermal structure on basalt source regions and melting conditions: REE and HFSE constraints from the Garibaldi volcanic belt, northern Cascadia subduction system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, Nathan L.

    2006-03-01

    Garibaldi volcanic belt (GVB) basalts were erupted above the relatively young (≤ 24 Ma) Juan de Fuca plate, which comprises the subducted oceanic lithosphere that becomes progressively younger (22-13 Ma), and presumably hotter, northward along the northern Cascadia convergent margin. Primitive and near-primitive mafic lavas of the 15-km-wide volcanic belt change from high-alumina olivine tholeiites and magnesian andesites near Glacier Peak, northwestern Washington, through transitional basalts to alkali-olivine basalts and basanites in the Bridge River-Salal Glacier areas, southwestern British Columbia. The distribution of different basalt types is consistent with varied source conditions imposed by differences in the thermal structure of the underlying subducted plate. Significant arc-parallel variations characterize REE and HFSE contents in GVB basalts and suggest that source enrichment processes and melting conditions vary within the mantle wedge as the age and thermal state of the underlying subducted plate changes. More northerly GVB basaltic suites tend to have higher TiO 2, Nb, Ta, total REE, La, Sm / Yb, Nb / Yb, Ti / V, Y / Sc and Zr / Yb and lower Th / U, Zr / Ti and Zr / Nb than their southern counterparts. The basalts have sub-chondritic to chondritic Nb / Ta (6-21) and super-chondritic Zr / Hf (up to 55.90) ratios that exhibit positive correlation. Only Mount Baker and Glacier Peak basalts exhibit the distinctive negative Nb-Ta anomalies associated with arc lavas. Inter-HFSE and REE fractionations (including La / Yb, La / Nb and Ce / Pb) show significant correlations with the inferred age of the underlying subducted plate. Proportions of slab-derived HFSE-REE components (SC) transferred to basalt sources in the Cascadia mantle wedge appear to vary from negligible (Ti, Nb, Ta, Zr, Hf, Y, Sm, Eu and Tb: less than 15% SC) to perceptible (Nd: up to 35% SC) through moderate (La: up to 75% SC) to substantial (U, Th and Pb: up to 95% SC). Arc-parallel HFSE

  6. Ground ice conditions in Salluit, Northern Quebec

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allard, M.; Fortier, R.; Calmels, F.; Gagnon, O.; L'Hérault, E.

    2011-12-01

    Salluit in Northern Québec (ca. 1300 inhabitants) faces difficult ground ice conditions for its development. The village is located in a U-shaped valley, along a fjord that was deglaciated around 8000 cal BP. The post-glacial marine limit is at the current elevation of 150 m ASL. Among the mapped surficial geology units, three contain particularly ice-rich permafrost: marine clays, till and silty colluviums. A diamond drill was used to extract 10 permafrost cores down to 23 m deep. In addition, 18 shallow cores (to 5 m deep) were extracted with a portable drill. All the frozen cores were shipped to Québec city where ground ice contents were measured and cryostructures were imaged by CT-Scanning. Water contents, grain-size and pore water salinity were measured. Refraction seismic profiles were run to measure the depth to bedrock. GPR and electrical resistivity surveys helped to map ice-rich areas. Three cone penetration tests (CPT) were run in the frozen clays to depths ranging from 8 to 21 m. Maximum clay thickness is ca. 50 m deep near the shoreline. The cone penetration tests and all the cores in clays revealed large amounts of both segregated and aggradational ice (volumetric contents up to 93% over thicknesses of one meter) to depths varying between 2.5 and 4 m, below which the ice content decreases and the salinity increases (values measured up to 42 gr/L between 4.5 and 6 m deep). Chunks of organic matter buried below the actual active layer base indicate past cryoturbations under a somewhat warmer climate, most probably associated with intense frost boil action, as widely observed today. The stony till has developed large quantities of segregation ice which can be seen in larger concentrations and as thicker lenses under boulders and in matrix rich (≥ 50% sand and silt) parts of the glacial sediment. As digging for a sewage pond was undertaken in winter 2008 by blasting, the clast-influenced cryostructure of the till could be observed in cuts and in

  7. Meteorological and oceanographic conditions in the northern Adriatic Sea during the period June 1999-July 2002: influence on the mucilage phenomenon.

    PubMed

    Russo, Aniello; Maccaferri, Simona; Djakovac, Tamara; Precali, Robert; Degobbis, Danilo; Deserti, Marco; Paschini, Elio; Lyons, Daniel M

    2005-12-15

    Mucilage events (formation of very large organic aggregates and gelatinous surface layers) have been documented several times during the past two centuries in the northern Adriatic Sea (NA), while their frequency has significantly increased since 1988. In this work, meteorological and oceanographic conditions in the NA during the period June 1999-July 2002 are described and their relation to the outbreak and fate of the mucilage phenomenon was investigated. Salinity and temperature data were collected during approximately monthly cruises along three transects in the NA. Relevant meteorological situations (air temperature, rainfall, wind) were selected from large-scale ECMWF analyses and from the Local Analysis and Prediction System (LAPS; Emilia Romagna Meteorological Service), while sea conditions (waves) were analysed by means of the Wave Adriatic Model (WAM). Data for air temperature, rainfall, and wind from several meteorological stations in the region were used. Average seasonal cycles of sea temperature and salinity simulated with statistical models, based on historical data collected in the NA since 1972, were used to determine thermal and haline anomalies. The monthly anomaly variability of maximum and minimum air temperatures, rainfall amount and number of rainy days did not appear to be relevant for the mucilage phenomenon outbreak. In contrast, both vertical and horizontal thermohaline gradients in the region were more developed during late spring and summer of 2000 and particularly of 2002, when the mucilage events were of greatest extent in space and time, compared to 2001 (short-lived event) and 1999 (no event). These more pronounced gradients were due to a combination of several unusual conditions: sharp heating of the sea surface in May-June, domination of eastwards transport of freshened waters formed in the Po Delta area, and intrusion of very high salinity intermediate waters originating in the eastern Mediterranean. Moreover, in winter of both

  8. Forest conditions and trends in the northern United States

    Treesearch

    Stephen R. Shifley; Francisco X. Aguilar; Nianfu Song; Susan I. Stewart; David J. Nowak; Dale D. Gormanson; W. Keith Moser; Sherri Wormstead; Eric J. Greenfield

    2012-01-01

    This section describes current conditions and trends for the 20 Northern States by focusing on selected characteristics associated with forest sustainability. Its format is based upon a set of 64 indicators within 7 broad criteria that the United States and 11 other countries have adopted under the auspices of the Montréal Process Working Group on Criteria and...

  9. The Influence of Multilingualism on a Northern Norwegian Dialect.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bull, Tove

    The noun phrase of the Norwegian dialect of the multilingual village of Skibotn, in northern Norway, is analyzed. Attention is focused on the possible influence of two other languages, Finnish, an imported language, and Sami, the original language of the area, in the development of three different clusters of features characteristic of nominal…

  10. Season - dependent and source-influenced aerosol in Northern Siberia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popovicheva, Olga; Makshtas, Alexander; Bogorodsky, Peter; Eleftheriadis, Kostantinos; Diapouli, Evangelia; Shonia, Natalia; Uttal, Taneil

    2016-04-01

    Aerosol may serve as a tracer of arctic pollution, allowing a link to climate response if its major characteristics relating to natural and anthropogeneous sources are defined. It has been shown that BC and sulfates are the most important aerosol constituents measured in the Arctic boundary layer; these species demonstrate similar seasonal variations with a peak during winter to early spring and a minimum in summer. Long - time gap in consistent aerosol observations in the Russian Arctic strongly limits the assessment of air pollution and climate impacts. On-line monitoring, sampling, and analyses of atmospheric aerosols were carried out at the Tiksi Hydrometeorological Observatory, Northern Siberia, during one year from September 2014 to 2015. Physico-chemical characterization combining aethalometry, thermo-optical analysis, and analytical chemistry was used in order to identify the seasonal variability of aerosols and to link their composition to possible sources, as well as to characterize the differences in aerosol chemical composition between natural background conditions and BC-pollution episodes. The present study reports the first results from the Tiksi Observatory on season-dependent and source-influenced characteristics of aerosol species, such as carbon fractions (OC, EC), inorganic and organic functionalities of chemical compounds, sulfates, nitrates and other ion components, and elements. In addition, data obtained by individual particles analysis provide insight into micromarkers of combustion sources. Aerosol at the Tiksi Observatory is found to be originated from natural marine, biogenic, and continental sources as well as influenced by local residential activity and regional pollution. Characterization of aerosols during OC and BC-pollution episodes, combined with analysis of the wind direction, atmosphere stability, and air mass trajectories, allows for the identification of the sources which are responsible for the emission of hazardous compounds

  11. Factors influencing reproductive performance of northern bobwhite in South Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rolland, V.; Hostetler, J.A.; Hines, T.C.; Percival, H.F.; Oli, M.K.

    2011-01-01

    Reproductive success is a critical component of individual fitness, and also an important determinant of growth rates of populations characterized by early maturity and high fecundity. We used radiotelemetry data collected during 2003-2008 to estimate reproductive parameters in a declining northern bobwhite (Colinus virginianus) population in South Florida, and to test hypotheses regarding factors influencing these parameters. The overall clutch size was 12.10 ?? 0.22, but females laid more eggs in their first clutch (12.43 ?? 0.24) than in subsequent clutches (10.19 ?? 0.53) within a nesting season. Daily nest survival was higher for first (0.966 ?? 0.003) than subsequent nests (0.936 ?? 0.011). Hatchability (proportion of laid eggs that hatched conditional upon nest survival to hatching) was 0.853 ?? 0.008, but was higher for nests incubated by females (0.873 ?? 0.009) than those incubated by males (0.798 ?? 0.018). The proportion of individuals attempting a second nest was 0.112 ?? 0.024 and 0.281 ?? 0.040 when the first nest was successful and failed, respectively. Hatchability was lower when the nesting habitat was burned the previous winter. We found no evidence that food strip density (a management practice to provide supplemental food) influenced any of the reproductive parameters. Mean summer temperature affected hatchability, nest survival, and proportion of nests incubated by males. Overall, the reproductive output in our study population was lower than that reported for most other bobwhite populations, indicating that low reproductive performance may have contributed to bobwhite population declines in our study site. These results suggest that current management practices, particularly those related to habitat and harvest management, need careful evaluation. ?? 2010 Springer-Verlag.

  12. Atmospheric and oceanologic conditions favouring large bioproduction of northern Adriatic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraus, Romina; Lučić, Davor; Njire, Jakica; Djakovac, Tamara; Precali, Robert; Supić, Nastjenjka

    2016-04-01

    An interdisciplinary study based on long term data collected in the northern Adriatic relieved winter period to be crucial for the total annual zooplankton production in the region. Namely, yearly averages of some investigated zooplankton species in the 2000-2007 interval were highly related to their February and/or March abundances. The large winter zooplankton abundances appeared in winters of the "A type", in which freshened waters from the Po River spread over the region. Also, the production of phytoplankton was in winters of the "A type" higher than in winters of the "B type", in which these waters are restricted to the coastal areas and do not impact the open sea. That was presumably due to increase in nutrients. In fact, the total inorganic nitrogen and ortophosphate concentration in eastern part reached maximal February values in the 1990-2007 interval in winters of the "A type". Spreading of the Po River water across the northern Adriatic and appearance of the two winter types depends on the existing geostrophic circulation patterns and atmospheric and hydrologic conditions in the preceding months, thus enabling forecast. Obtained results are basis for the future theoretical ecological model which can explain long term changes in bioproduction in the region and be used in planning future environment actions aimed to sustained development, especially as winter phytoplankton and zooplankton production seems to reflect on annual catch of small pelagic fish important for Adriatic fishery, anchovy (Engraulis encrasicolus).

  13. Diseases and Conditions That Influence Fertility

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Conditions That Influence Fertility Skip sharing on social media links Share this: Page Content Many different health issues can affect a woman's ability to get pregnant. Some of the more common ...

  14. Conditions influencing the marketing efforts of hospitals.

    PubMed

    Myrtle, R C; Martinez, C F

    1990-01-01

    This research assesses the degree to which environmental change, competitive conditions and position, hospital characteristics, and organizational performance influence the extensiveness of a hospital's marketing activities. Changes in occupancy, revenue, and patient mix did not predict the level of marketing activities. Instead, the perceptions of marketing decision makers about changing environmental conditions were found to predict these activities.

  15. Influences Preceding "Nunatsiavut" Self-Determination: Historical, Political and Educational Influences on the People of Northern Labrador (Canada)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Kirk David

    2007-01-01

    What were the influences on the Inuit of Northern Labrador preceding the creation of the self-governing territory of Nunatsiavut? What are the preterritorial influences of the Inuit on the territory's five schools? To answer these questions and to share the success of one Indigenous people, the Nunatsiavut Inuit (the Inuit of Northern Labrador,…

  16. Environmental factors that influence prescribed burning in the Northern Plains

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kruse, A.D.; Higgins, K.F.; Piehl, J.L.

    1983-01-01

    Several environmental conditions were recorded and analyzed for 192 prescribed burns in the Northern Great Plains. The purpose of these burns was to improve wildlife habitat and manipulate native prairie vegetation. All of the fires occurred in grassland and shrubsteppe vegetation types. Fuels were predominantly grasses and forbs intermixed with patches of shrubs. Nearly all of the fuels were 0.05 cm/h, do not burn. However, these are good conditions to burn stockpiles of unwanted fuels that are usually high risk elements during regular prescribed burns.2) Produce partial burns. Partial burns are defined as those where fire is discontinuous and patches of standing and lodged vegetation are left unburned. Partial burns occur most often when fine fuels feel moist when handled, where less than 2 days have passed since the last measurable precipitation, and when cloud cover is complete. Other conditions associated with partial burns are relative humidities >50 percent, temperatures 32 km/h, relative humidities 35 deg.C. These conditions occur most often in July, August, and September, but can occur anytime from April through October.

  17. Impact of mesoscale meteorological processes on anomalous radar propagation conditions over the northern Adriatic area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Telišman Prtenjak, Maja; Horvat, Igor; Tomažić, Igor; Kvakić, Marko; Viher, Mladen; Grisogono, Branko

    2015-09-01

    The impact of mesoscale structures on the occurrence of anomalous propagation (AP) conditions for radio waves, including ducts, superrefractive, and subrefractive conditions, was studied. The chosen meteorological situations are the bora wind and the sporadic sea/land breeze (SB/LB) during three selected cases over a large portion of the northern Adriatic. For this purpose, we used available radio soundings and numerical mesoscale model simulations (of real cases and their sensitivity tests) at a horizontal resolution of 1.5 km and 81 vertical levels. The model simulated the occurrences of AP conditions satisfactorily, although their intensities and frequency were underestimated at times. Certain difficulties appeared in reproducing the vertical profile of the modified refractive index, which is mainly dependent on the accuracy of the modeled humidity. The spatial distributions of summer AP conditions reveal that the surface layer above the sea (roughly between 30 and 100 m asl) is often covered by superrefractive conditions and ducts. The SB is highly associated with the formations of AP conditions: (i) in the first 100 m asl, where trapping and superrefractive conditions form because of the advection of cold and moist air, and (ii) inside the transition layer between the SB body and the elevated return flow in the form of subrefractive conditions. When deep convection occurs, all three types of AP conditions are caused by the downdraft beneath the cumulonimbus cloud base in its mature phase that creates smaller but marked pools of cold and dry air. The bora wind usually creates a pattern of AP conditions associated with the hydraulic jump and influences distribution of AP conditions over the sea surface.

  18. Icing Conditions Over Northern Eurasia in Changing Climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulygina, O.; Arzhanova, N.; Groisman, P. Y.

    2013-12-01

    Climate of the Russian Federation for the national territory. This Reference Book addresses the current state of these weather phenomena. However, the ongoing and projected humidity changes in the high latitudes will strongly affect the circum-polar area (land and ocean) and impact the frequency and intensity of these potentially dangerous weather phenomena across the entire extratropical land area. Therefore the goal of the present study is to quantify icing conditions over the northern Eurasia. Our analysis includes data of 958 Russian stations from 1977 to 2012. Regional analysis of gololed characteristics was carried out using quasi-homogeneous climatic regions. Maps (climatology, trends) are presented mostly for visualization purposes. The area-averaging technique using station values converted to anomalies with respect to a common reference period (in this study, from 1977 to 2012). Anomalies were arithmetically averaged first within 1N x 2E grid cells and thereafter by a weighted average value derived over the quasi-homogeneous climatic regions. This approach provides a more uniform spatial field for averaging.

  19. Environmental Conditions in northern Gulf of Mexico Estuaries: before and after the BP Oil Spill

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation provides a summary of ecological condition and sediment chemistry data for northern Gulf of Mexico estuaries that were exposed to oil and oil-related contaminants from the BP Oil Spill.

  20. Environmental Conditions in northern Gulf of Mexico Estuaries: before and after the BP Oil Spill

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation provides a summary of ecological condition and sediment chemistry data for northern Gulf of Mexico estuaries that were exposed to oil and oil-related contaminants from the BP Oil Spill.

  1. Does urban vegetation mitigate air pollution in northern conditions?

    PubMed

    Setälä, Heikki; Viippola, Viljami; Rantalainen, Anna-Lea; Pennanen, Arto; Yli-Pelkonen, Vesa

    2013-12-01

    It is generally accepted that urban vegetation improves air quality and thereby enhances the well-being of citizens. However, empirical evidence on the potential of urban trees to mitigate air pollution is meager, particularly in northern climates with a short growing season. We studied the ability of urban park/forest vegetation to remove air pollutants (NO2, anthropogenic VOCs and particle deposition) using passive samplers in two Finnish cities. Concentrations of each pollutant in August (summer; leaf-period) and March (winter, leaf-free period) were slightly but often insignificantly lower under tree canopies than in adjacent open areas, suggesting that the role of foliage in removing air pollutants is insignificant. Furthermore, vegetation-related environmental variables (canopy closure, number and size of trees, density of understorey vegetation) did not explain the variation in pollution concentrations. Our results suggest that the ability of urban vegetation to remove air pollutants is minor in northern climates. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Harmful and favourable ultraviolet conditions for human health over Northern Eurasia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chubarova, Nataly; Zhdanova, Ekaterina

    2014-05-01

    We provide the analysis of the spatial and temporal distribution of ultraviolet (UV) radiation over Northern Eurasia taking into account for both its detrimental (erythema and eye-damage effects) and favourable (vitamin D synthesis) influence on human health. The UV effects on six different skin types are considered in order to cover the variety of skin types of European and Asian inhabitants. To better quantifying the vitamin D irradiance threshold we accounted for an open body fraction S as a function of effective air temperature. The spatial and temporal distribution of UV resources was estimated by radiative transfer (RT) modeling (8 stream DISORT RT code) with 1x 1 degree grid and monthly resolution. For this purpose special datasets of main input geophysical parameters (total ozone content, aerosol characteristics, surface UV albedo, UV cloud modification factor) have been created over the territory of Northern Eurasia, which can be of separate interest for the different multidisciplinary scientific applications over the PEEX domain. The new approaches were used to retrieve aerosol and cloud transmittance from different satellite and re-analysis datasets for calculating the solar UV irradiance at ground. Using model simulations and some experimental data we provide the altitude parameterization for different types of biologically active irradiance in mountainous area taking into account not only for the effects of molecular scattering but for the altitude dependence of aerosol parameters and surface albedo. Based on the new classification of UV resources (Chubarova, Zhdanova, 2013) we show that the distribution of harmful (UV deficiency and UV excess) and favorable UV conditions is regulated by various geophysical parameters (mainly, total ozone, cloudiness and open body fraction) and can significantly deviate from latitudinal dependence. The interactive tool for providing simulations of biologically active irradiance and its attribution to the different

  3. Game theory, conditional preferences, and social influence.

    PubMed

    Stirling, Wynn C; Felin, Teppo

    2013-01-01

    Neoclassical noncooperative game theory is based on a simple, yet powerful synthesis of mathematical and logical concepts: unconditional and immutable preference orderings and individual rationality. Although this structure has proven useful for characterizing competitive multi-player behavior, its applicability to scenarios involving complex social relationships is problematic. In this paper we directly address this limitation by the introduction of a conditional preference structure that permits players to modulate their preference orderings as functions of the preferences of other players. Embedding this expanded preference structure in a formal and graphical framework provides a systematic approach for characterizing a complex society. The result is an influence network that allows conditional preferences to propagate through the community, resulting in an emergent social model which characterizes all of the social relationships that exist and which leads to solution concepts that account for both group and individual interests. The Ultimatum game is presented as an example of how social influence can be modeled with conditional preferences.

  4. The northern Yellowstone elk: density dependence and climatic conditions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Taper, Mark L.; Gogan, Peter J.P.

    2002-01-01

    We analyzed a time series of estimates of elk (Cervus elaphus) numbers on the northern Yellowstone winter range from 1964 to 1979 and 1986 to 1995 using a variety of discrete time stochastic population dynamic models. These models included adjustments for density, an increase in the area of winter range used by elk, lagged effects of the weather covariates of spring precipitation, snow depth and winter temperature, and the impacts of the 1988 drought and fires. An information-criteria-based model-selection process strongly supported evidence of density dependence. The best model, a Ricker model, distinguished between the 2 time periods. The bulk of the difference between the 2 periods is attributed to an increase in the amount of winter range used by elk. Inclusion of the covariates spring precipitation and spring precipitation squared greatly improved the model fit. We detected a short-lived increase in elk population growth rate following the 1988 drought and fires. Fertility and survivorship of adults appeared to have different density-dependent forms that together result in a biphasic relationships between population growth rate and density. This study confirms the presence of density-dependent regulation in the norther Yellowstone elk herd, and enhances our understanding of population dynamics of these ungulates.

  5. Climatic conditions in northern Canada: past and future.

    PubMed

    Prowse, Terry D; Furgal, Chris; Bonsal, Barrie R; Edwards, Thomas W D

    2009-07-01

    This article reviews the historical, instrumental, and future changes in climate for the northern latitudes of Canada. Discussion of historical climate over the last 10 000 years focuses on major climatic shifts including the Medieval Warm Period and the Little Ice Age, and how these changes compare with those most recently experienced during the period of instrumental records. In reference to the latter, details are noted about observed trends in temperature and precipitation that have been recorded over the last half century, which exhibit strong west to east and north to south spatial contrasts. A comprehensive review of future changes is also provided based on outputs from seven atmosphere-ocean global climate models and six emission scenarios. Discussion focuses on annual, seasonal, and related spatial changes for three 30-year periods centered on the 2020s, 2050s, and 2080s. In summary, substantial changes to temperature and precipitation are projected for the Canadian North during the twenty-first century. Although there is considerable variability within the various projections, all scenarios show higher temperature and, for the most part, increasing precipitation over the entire region.

  6. Body condition of Morelet’s Crocodiles (Crocodylus moreletii) from northern Belize

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mazzotti, Frank J.; Cherkiss, Michael S.; Brandt, Laura A.; Fujisaki, Ikuko; Hart, Kristen; Jeffery, Brian; McMurry, Scott T.; Platt, Steven G.; Rainwater, Thomas R.; Vinci, Joy

    2012-01-01

    Body condition factors have been used as an indicator of health and well-being of crocodilians. We evaluated body condition of Morelet's Crocodiles (Crocodylus moreletii) in northern Belize in relation to biotic (size, sex, and habitat) and abiotic (location, water level, and air temperature) factors. We also tested the hypothesis that high water levels and warm temperatures combine or interact to result in a decrease in body condition. Size class, temperature, and water level explained 20% of the variability in condition of Morelet's Crocodiles in this study. We found that adult crocodiles had higher condition scores than juveniles/subadults but that sex, habitat, and site had no effect. We confirmed our hypothesis that warm temperatures and high water levels interact to decrease body condition. We related body condition of Morelet's Crocodiles to natural fluctuations in air temperatures and water levels in northern Belize, providing baseline conditions for population and ecosystem monitoring.

  7. Habitat conditions associated with lynx hunting behavior during winter in northern Washington

    Treesearch

    Benjamin T. Maletzke; Gary M. Koehler; Robert B. Wielgus; Keith B. Aubry; Marc A. Evans

    2008-01-01

    Effectively managing habitat for threatened populations of Canada lynx (Lynx canadensis) requires knowledge of habitat conditions that provide for the ecological needs of lynx. We snow-tracked lynx to identify habitat conditions associated with hunting behavior and predation during winters of 2002-2003 and 2003-2004 in the northern Cascade Range in...

  8. Game Theory, Conditional Preferences, and Social Influence

    PubMed Central

    Stirling, Wynn C.; Felin, Teppo

    2013-01-01

    Neoclassical noncooperative game theory is based on a simple, yet powerful synthesis of mathematical and logical concepts: unconditional and immutable preference orderings and individual rationality. Although this structure has proven useful for characterizing competitive multi-player behavior, its applicability to scenarios involving complex social relationships is problematic. In this paper we directly address this limitation by the introduction of a conditional preference structure that permits players to modulate their preference orderings as functions of the preferences of other players. Embedding this expanded preference structure in a formal and graphical framework provides a systematic approach for characterizing a complex society. The result is an influence network that allows conditional preferences to propagate through the community, resulting in an emergent social model which characterizes all of the social relationships that exist and which leads to solution concepts that account for both group and individual interests. The Ultimatum game is presented as an example of how social influence can be modeled with conditional preferences. PMID:23451078

  9. Motivational conditions influence tongue motor performance.

    PubMed

    Kothari, Mohit; Svensson, Peter; Huo, Xueliang; Ghovanloo, Maysam; Baad-Hansen, Lene

    2013-04-01

    Motivation plays an important role in the outcome of motor learning but has not received attention in tongue-training-induced plasticity of the corticomotor pathways. The present study investigated the influence of two different motivational conditions and gender on performance during a complex tongue-training paradigm using the tongue drive system (TDS). In addition, subject-based reports of motivation, fun, pain, and fatigue were compared between groups and genders. Sixteen subjects were randomized into three groups and were asked to use the TDS for 40 min. A motivational condition (monetary reward or self-controlled practice) was introduced in two groups and the third group served as the control. The subjects were instructed to play a computer game using the TDS, having control of the computer cursor through a magnet attached to the tongue, and performance was compared among groups. Performance improved in all groups and in both genders. The monetary reward group tended towards higher performance scores compared with the control group, whereas the self-controlled practice group performed significantly better compared with the control group. There was no significant difference between groups and genders in the subject-based report for level of motivation, fun, pain, or fatigue. In conclusion, introduction of motivational conditions influenced tongue motor performance.

  10. The combined influences of autumnal snow and sea ice on Northern Hemisphere winters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furtado, J. C.; Cohen, J. L.; Tziperman, E.

    2016-04-01

    Past studies have demonstrated a significant relationship between the phase and amplitude of the Northern Annular Mode (NAM) and both Arctic sea ice and high-latitude snow cover during boreal autumn. However, those studies have considered these forcings separately. Here we consider the collective effect of Arctic sea ice and snow cover variability for producing skillful subseasonal forecasts for Northern Hemisphere (NH) winter conditions. We find that these two cryospheric elements interact with the extratropical atmosphere differently through the cold season. Sea ice extent minima during November play a role in stratospheric and tropospheric circulation anomalies during November/December with a secondary maximum in late January/February. October snow cover anomalies, however, have impacts on the NAM primarily during middle to late winter. These timing differences are likely tied to differences in anomalous wave driving between the two cases, though other processes may be in play. We exploit these different influences to produce a skillful forecast model of subseasonal NH surface temperatures using both sea ice and snow cover as predictors, with large gains in skills in January. Overall, our study suggests that the Arctic has a demonstrable and detectable influence on midlatitude winter weather in the present and likely future climate.

  11. Influence of heavy snow on the feeding behavior of Japanese macaques (macaca fuscata) in northern Japan.

    PubMed

    Enari, Hiroto; Sakamaki-Enari, Haruka

    2013-06-01

    Natural disasters can degrade primate habitat and alter feeding behavior. Here, we examined the influence of unusually heavy snow on diet and feeding-site use by Japanese macaques (Macaca fuscata) in northern Japan. To compare the winter-feeding behavior under different snow conditions, we recorded the plant species foraged on by macaques in multiple transects of the Shirakami Mountains from 2008 to 2012 (excluding 2011). We used cluster analysis to describe foraged plant assemblages, and applied multiple dimensional scaling and decision tree modeling to evaluate annual variation in feeding-site use by macaques. Our cluster analysis revealed five types of foraged plant assemblages. The proportion of each type present in transects varied considerably across the years, indicating that the diet of macaques in heavy snow conditions was influenced more by resource accessibility than by preference. Multiple dimensional scaling and decision tree modeling demonstrated that heavy snow conditions restricted feeding-site use. Moreover, the distribution of refuges relative to severe external ambient environments was a stronger limiting factor for feeding-site use than was the availability of food resources. While most primate species facing unexpected starvation employ risk-prone foraging tactics (i.e., choosing the option with higher pay-off by accepting risk), Japanese macaques have a tendency to adopt risk-averse foraging behavior (i.e., minimizing energy loss when searching for preferred diet items under long-lasting heavy snow conditions), because winters with temperatures below freezing have higher thermoregulatory costs.

  12. Icing conditions over Northern Eurasia in changing climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulygina, Olga N.; Arzhanova, Natalia M.; Groisman, Pavel Ya

    2015-02-01

    Icing conditions, particularly in combination with wind, affect greatly the operation of overhead communication and transmission lines causing serious failures, which result in tremendous economic damage. Icing formation is dangerous to agriculture, forestry, high seas fishery, for land and off coast man-made infrastructure. Quantitative icing characteristics such as weight, thickness, and duration are very important for the economy and human wellbeing when their maximum values exceed certain thresholds. Russian meteorological stations perform both visual and instrumental monitoring of icing deposits. Visual monitoring is ocular estimation of the type and intensity of icing and the date of ice appearance and disappearance. Instrumental monitoring is performed by ice accretion indicator that in addition to the type, intensity and duration of ice deposits reports also their weight and size. We used observations at 958 Russian stations for the period 1977-2013 to analyze changes in the ice formation frequency at individual meteorological stations and on the territory of quasi-homogeneous climatic regions in Russia. It was found that hoar frosts are observed in most parts of Russia, but icing only occurs in European Russia and the Far East. On the Arctic coast of Russia, this phenomenon can even be observed in summer months. Statistically significant decreasing trends in occurrence of icing and hoar frost events are found over most of Russia. An increasing trend in icing weights (IWs) was found in the Atlantic Arctic region in autumn. Statistically significant large negative trends in IWs were found in the Pacific Arctic in winter and spring.

  13. Northern spotted owls: influence of prey base and landscape character.

    Treesearch

    A.B. Carey; S.P. Horton; B.L. Biswell

    1992-01-01

    We studied prey populations and the use and composition of home ranges of 47 Northern Spotted Owls (Strix occidentalis caurina) over 12 mo in five landscapes in two forest types in southwestern Oregon. We measured 1-yr home ranges of 23 owl pairs, 2-yr home ranges of 13 pairs, and 3-yr home ranges of 3 pairs. The landscapes differed in the degree...

  14. Land degradation and economic conditions of agricultural households in a marginal region of northern Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorent, Hugues; Evangelou, Christakis; Stellmes, Marion; Hill, Joachim; Papanastasis, Vasilios; Tsiourlis, Georgios; Roeder, Achim; Lambin, Eric F.

    2008-12-01

    Land degradation is caused by and has impacts on both the social and natural components of coupled human-environment systems. However, few studies integrate both aspects simultaneously. The main objective of this study is to test a method to evaluate land degradation based on the integration of aggregate metrics of biophysical and socio-economic "degradation". We applied a framework that integrates the biophysical and socio-economic dimensions of land degradation to test the hypothesis that macro-economic policies, and in particular agricultural subsidies, are an important driving force of land degradation in marginal regions of the Mediterranean Europe. We analysed the influence of subsidies on the profitability of each crop and livestock type found in a sample of farms in a region of northern Greece. Spatial and socio-economic data on agricultural households were collected to link remote sensing data and land degradation maps to socio-economic conditions of these households, as measured by the standard gross margin. The results demonstrate that subsidies provide a crucial socio-economic support to maintain the profitability of agricultural activities but may also promote land-use practices with damaging ecological impacts. Different levels of biophysical and socio-economic "degradation" were associated with different land use practices. The integration of the socio-economic and biophysical dimensions of land degradation reveals associations that would not be detectable if indicators along one dimension alone would be used.

  15. Condition and mass impact oxygen stores and dive duration in adult female northern elephant seals.

    PubMed

    Hassrick, J L; Crocker, D E; Teutschel, N M; McDonald, B I; Robinson, P W; Simmons, S E; Costa, D P

    2010-02-15

    The range of foraging behaviors available to deep-diving, air-breathing marine vertebrates is constrained by their physiological capacity to breath-hold dive. We measured body oxygen stores (blood volume and muscle myoglobin) and diving behavior in adult female northern elephant seals, Mirounga angustirostris, to investigate age-related effects on diving performance. Blood volume averaged 74.4+/-17.0 liters in female elephant seals or 20.2+/-2.0% of body mass. Plasma volume averaged 32.2+/-7.8 liters or 8.7+/-0.7% of body mass. Absolute plasma volume and blood volume increased independently with mass and age. Hematocrit decreased weakly with mass but did not vary with age. Muscle myoglobin concentration, while higher than previously reported (7.4+/-0.7 g%), did not vary with mass or age. Pregnancy status did not influence blood volume. Mean dive duration, a proxy for physiological demand, increased as a function of how long seals had been at sea, followed by mass and hematocrit. Strong effects of female body mass (range, 218-600 kg) on dive duration, which were independent of oxygen stores, suggest that larger females had lower diving metabolic rates. A tendency for dives to exceed calculated aerobic limits occurred more frequently later in the at-sea migration. Our data suggest that individual physiological state variables and condition interact to determine breath-hold ability and that both should be considered in life-history studies of foraging behavior.

  16. Public preferences for future conditions in disturbed and undisturbed northern forest sites

    Treesearch

    Terry C. Daniel

    2006-01-01

    This study presented computer visualizations (pictures) of projected changes over an 80-year period to conditions in a northern forest that had been hit by a major blowdown. Study participants included local residents and forest visitors who were asked to choose between visualizations of projected outcome scenarios for 10 pairs of treatment versus no-treatment options...

  17. REFINEMENT, VALIDATION, AND APPLICATION OF A BENTHIC CONDITION INDEX FOR NORTHERN GULF OF MEXICO ESTUARIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    By applying discriminant analysis to benthic macroinvertebrate data to produce a benthic index, we have developed an indicator of benthic condition for northern Gulf of Mexico estuaries. The data used were collected by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (USEPA) Environmen...

  18. Characterization of aerosols above the Northern Adriatic Sea: Case studies of offshore and onshore wind conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piazzola, J.; Mihalopoulos, N.; Canepa, E.; Tedeschi, G.; Prati, P.; Zarmpas, P.; Bastianini, M.; Missamou, T.; Cavaleri, L.

    2016-05-01

    Aerosol particles in coastal areas result from a complex mixing between sea spray aerosols locally generated at the sea surface by the wind-waves interaction processes and a continental component resulting from natural and/or anthropogenic sources. This paper presents a physical and chemical analysis of the aerosol data acquired from May to September 2014 in the Adriatic Sea. Aerosol distributions were measured on the Acqua Alta platform located 15 km off the coast of Venice using two Particle Measuring System probes and a chemical characterization was made using an Ion Chromatography analysis (IC). Our aim is to study both the sea-spray contribution and the anthropogenic influence in the coastal aerosol of this Mediterranean region. To this end, we focus on a comparison between the present data and the aerosol size distributions measured south of the French Mediterranean coast. For air masses of marine origin transported by southern winds on the French coast and by the Sirocco in the Adriatic, we note a good agreement between the concentrations of super-micrometer aerosols measured in the two locations. This indicates a similar sea surface production of sea-spray aerosols formed by bubble bursting processes in the two locations. In contrast, the results show larger concentrations of submicron particles in the North-Western Mediterranean compared to the Adriatic, which result probably from a larger anthropogenic background for marine conditions. In contrast, for a coastal influence, the chemical analysis presented in the present paper seems to indicate a larger importance of the anthropogenic impact in the Northern Adriatic compared to the North-Western Mediterranean.

  19. February 2003 marine atmospheric conditions and the bora over the northern Adriatic

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dorman, C.E.; Carniel, S.; Cavaleri, L.; Sclavo, M.; Chiggiato, J.; Doyle, J.; Haack, T.; Pullen, J.; Grbec, B.; Vilibic, I.; Janekovic, I.; Lee, C.; Malacic, V.; Orlic, M.; Paschini, E.; Russo, A.; Signell, R.P.

    2007-01-01

    A winter oceanographic field experiment provided an opportunity to examine the atmospheric marine conditions over the northern Adriatic. Mean February winds are from a northeasterly direction over most of the Adriatic and a more northerly direction along the western coast. Wind speeds are fastest in jets over the NE coast during bora events and weakest in the mid-northwestern Adriatic. Diurnal air temperature cycles are smallest on the NE coast and largest in the midwestern Adriatic. The maximum sea-air difference is +10??C on the eastern coast and near zero on the midwestern Adriatic. Boras are northeasterly (from) wind events that sweep off Croatia and Slovenia, bringing slightly colder and drier air over the northern Adriatic. The main bora season is December to March. Winter 2002-2003 was normal for bora events. Synoptic-scale temporal variations are correlated over the northern Adriatic. Fastest Bora winds and highest wind stress over the northern Adriatic is concentrated in four topographically controlled jets. The strongest is the Senj Jet, while the Trieste Jet extends across the entire northern Adriatic. Between each two jets is a weak wind zone. The greatest mean net heat loss is in bora jets in the NE Adriatic, where it was -438 W m-2 and is weakest in the midwestern northern Adriatic, where it was near zero. Wind stress is concentrated over the NE half of Adriatic in four bora jets, while wind stress is weak in the NW Adriatic. There is significant variation in wind stress mean and standard deviation structure over the northern Adriatic with each bora event. Copyright 2006 by the American Geophysical Union.

  20. Climatic and topographical influences on fire regime attributes in the northern Cascade Range, Washington, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cansler, C.; McKenzie, D.

    2010-12-01

    We examined the influence of annual climate and topography on fire occurrence, size, severity, and within-fire severity pattern in the northern Cascade Range of Washington, USA. Landsat Thematic Mapper (LTM) data were used to quantify fire severity for all fires greater than 10 ha (n = 125) that occurred during a 25 year period (1984-2008). Categorical burn severity images were developed from an index of burn severity (Relative differenced Normalized Burn Ratio) derived from LTM data and parameterized with data from 639 field plots. Spring snowpack and summer temperature were negatively and positively correlated, respectively, with fire occurrence, annual area burned, and proportion of landscape burned at high severity. As the proportion of high severity within individual fires increased high severity patches became larger and increasingly spatially aggregated. Fires in areas with greater topographical complexity had lower proportional area burned at high severity, decreased spatial aggregation of individual burn severity classes, and more complex overall patch structure. These results show that the fire regime of the northern Cascade Range responds to annual climatic variation. Nevertheless, within-fire severity mosaic reflects the underlying topographic complexity, even under climatic conditions conducive to the development of large fires. Several recent studies in the western United States have documented a positive relationship between warm and dry climate conditions and annual area burned. The relationship between climate drivers and fire regime attributes identified in this study—a positive relationship between warm and dry conditions and both proportion of area burned at high severity and greater spatial aggregation of high severity patches—add nuance the climate-area burned relationship documented in previous studies.

  1. Comparison of survival patterns of northern and southern genotypes of the North American tick Ixodes scapularis (Acari: Ixodidae) under northern and southern conditions.

    PubMed

    Ginsberg, Howard S; Rulison, Eric L; Azevedo, Alexandra; Pang, Genevieve C; Kuczaj, Isis M; Tsao, Jean I; LeBrun, Roger A

    2014-08-26

    Several investigators have reported genetic differences between northern and southern populations of Ixodes scapularis in North America, as well as differences in patterns of disease transmission. Ecological and behavioral correlates of these genetic differences, which might have implications for disease transmission, have not been reported. We compared survival of northern with that of southern genotypes under both northern and southern environmental conditions in laboratory trials. Subadult I. scapularis from laboratory colonies that originated from adults collected from deer from several sites in the northeastern, north central, and southern U.S. were exposed to controlled conditions in environmental chambers. Northern and southern genotypes were exposed to light:dark and temperature conditions of northern and southern sites with controlled relative humidities, and mortality through time was recorded. Ticks from different geographical locations differed in survival patterns, with larvae from Wisconsin surviving longer than larvae from Massachusetts, South Carolina or Georgia, when held under the same conditions. In another experiment, larvae from Florida survived longer than larvae from Michigan. Therefore, survival patterns of regional genotypes did not follow a simple north-south gradient. The most consistent result was that larvae from all locations generally survived longer under northern conditions than under southern conditions. Our results suggest that conditions in southern North America are less hospitable than in the north to populations of I. scapularis. Southern conditions might have resulted in ecological or behavioral adaptations that contribute to the relative rarity of I. scapularis borne diseases, such as Lyme borreliosis, in the southern compared to the northern United States.

  2. Comparison of survival patterns of northern and southern genotypes of the North American tick Ixodes scapularis (Acari: Ixodidae) under northern and southern conditions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ginsberg, Howard S.; Rulison, Eric L.; Azevedo, Alexandra; Pang, Genevieve C.; Kuczaj, Isis M.; Tsao, Jean I.; LeBrun, Roger A.

    2014-01-01

    BackgroundSeveral investigators have reported genetic differences between northern and southern populations of Ixodes scapularis in North America, as well as differences in patterns of disease transmission. Ecological and behavioral correlates of these genetic differences, which might have implications for disease transmission, have not been reported. We compared survival of northern with that of southern genotypes under both northern and southern environmental conditions in laboratory trials.MethodsSubadult I. scapularis from laboratory colonies that originated from adults collected from deer from several sites in the northeastern, north central, and southern U.S. were exposed to controlled conditions in environmental chambers. Northern and southern genotypes were exposed to light:dark and temperature conditions of northern and southern sites with controlled relative humidities, and mortality through time was recorded.ResultsTicks from different geographical locations differed in survival patterns, with larvae from Wisconsin surviving longer than larvae from Massachusetts, South Carolina or Georgia, when held under the same conditions. In another experiment, larvae from Florida survived longer than larvae from Michigan. Therefore, survival patterns of regional genotypes did not follow a simple north–south gradient. The most consistent result was that larvae from all locations generally survived longer under northern conditions than under southern conditions.ConclusionsOur results suggest that conditions in southern North America are less hospitable than in the north to populations of I. scapularis. Southern conditions might have resulted in ecological or behavioral adaptations that contribute to the relative rarity of I. scapularis borne diseases, such as Lyme borreliosis, in the southern compared to the northern United States.

  3. Processes influencing seasonal hypoxia in the northern California Current System

    PubMed Central

    Connolly, T. P.; Hickey, B. M.; Geier, S. L.; Cochlan, W. P.

    2010-01-01

    This paper delineates the role of physical and biological processes contributing to hypoxia, dissolved oxygen (DO) < 1.4 mL/L, over the continental shelf of Washington State in the northern portion of the California Current System (CCS). In the historical record (1950–1986) during the summer upwelling season, hypoxia is more prevalent and severe off Washington than further south off northern Oregon. Recent data (2003–2005) show that hypoxia over the Washington shelf occurred at levels previously observed in the historical data. 2006 was an exception, with hypoxia covering ~5000 km2 of the Washington continental shelf and DO concentrations below 0.5 mL/L at the inner shelf, lower than any known previous observations at that location. In the four years studied, upwelling of low DO water and changes in source water contribute to interannual variability, but cannot account for seasonal decreases below hypoxic concentrations. Deficits of DO along salinity surfaces, indicating biochemical consumption of DO, vary significantly between surveys, accounting for additional decreases of 0.5–2.5 mL/L by late summer. DO consumption is associated with denitrification, an indicator of biochemical sediment processes. Mass balances of DO and nitrate show that biochemical processes in the water column and sediments each contribute ~50% to the total consumption of DO in near-bottom water. At shorter than seasonal time scales on the inner shelf, along-shelf advection of hypoxic patches and cross-shelf advection of seasonal gradients are both shown to be important, changing DO concentrations by 1.5 mL/L or more over five days. PMID:20463844

  4. Processes influencing seasonal hypoxia in the northern California Current System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connolly, T. P.; Hickey, B. M.; Geier, S. L.; Cochlan, W. P.

    2010-03-01

    This paper delineates the role of physical and biological processes contributing to hypoxia, dissolved oxygen (DO) < 1.4 mL/L, over the continental shelf of Washington State in the northern portion of the California Current System. In the historical record (1950-1986), during the summer upwelling season, hypoxia is more prevalent and severe off Washington than further south off northern Oregon. Recent data (2003-2005) show that hypoxia over the Washington shelf occurred at levels previously observed in the historical data. The year 2006 was an exception, with hypoxia covering ˜5000 km2 of the Washington continental shelf and DO concentrations below 0.5 mL/L at the inner shelf, lower than any known previous observations at that location. In the 4 years studied, upwelling of low DO water and changes in source water contribute to interannual variability, but cannot account for seasonal decreases below hypoxic concentrations. Deficits of DO along salinity surfaces, indicating biochemical consumption of DO, vary significantly between surveys, accounting for additional decreases of 0.5-2.5 mL/L by late summer. DO consumption is associated with denitrification, an indicator of biochemical sediment processes. Mass balances of DO and nitrate show that biochemical processes in the water column and sediments each contribute ˜50% to the total consumption of DO in near-bottom water. At shorter than seasonal time scales on the inner shelf, along-shelf advection of hypoxic patches and cross-shelf advection of seasonal gradients are both shown to be important, changing DO concentrations by 1.5 mL/L or more over 5 days.

  5. Oceanographic Conditions Off Northern Chile During the 1996 La Nina and 1997-1998 El Nino: Part1 - Hydrographic Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blanco, J.; Thomas, A.; Strub, T.; Carr, M.

    2000-01-01

    The evolution of oceanographic conditions in the upwelling region off northern Chile (18(sup o) - 24(sup o)S) betweeen 1996 and 1998 (including 1997-1998 El Nino) is presented using hydrographic measurements acquired on quarterly cruises of the Chilean Fisheries Institute, sea-surface temperature (SST), sea level, and wind speeds from Arica (18.5(sup o)S), Iquique (20.5(sup o)S), and Antofagasta (23.5(sup o)S), and a time series of vertical temperature profiles off Iquique.

  6. Oceanographic Conditions Off Northern Chile During the 1996 La Nina and 1997-1998 El Nino: Part1 - Hydrographic Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blanco, J.; Thomas, A.; Strub, T.; Carr, M.

    2000-01-01

    The evolution of oceanographic conditions in the upwelling region off northern Chile (18(sup o) - 24(sup o)S) betweeen 1996 and 1998 (including 1997-1998 El Nino) is presented using hydrographic measurements acquired on quarterly cruises of the Chilean Fisheries Institute, sea-surface temperature (SST), sea level, and wind speeds from Arica (18.5(sup o)S), Iquique (20.5(sup o)S), and Antofagasta (23.5(sup o)S), and a time series of vertical temperature profiles off Iquique.

  7. Parental influence on obesity in Northern Plains American Indian youth.

    PubMed

    Ricci, Christiana L; Brown, Blakely D; Noonan, Curtis; Harris, Kari Jo; Dybdal, Laura; Parker, Martin; Gress, Shannon

    2012-01-01

    Little is known regarding American Indian (AI) parental influence on children's diet and physical activity (PA), or if this influence is associated with childhood weight. We compared AI parents' diet, PA, and support for these behaviors with the child's body mass index. Scores for parental support of positive PA and diet were higher among parents of overweight/obese children. Parent PA and nutrition behaviors were in a similar, but not significant, direction with respect to child body mass index. Findings suggest that future research is needed to determine what parental, societal, or community variables influence AI children to engage in healthy eating and PA, especially if they are overweight or obese, and the age at which these variables would have the most impact on these behaviors.

  8. Cues of Maternal Condition Influence Offspring Selfishness

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Janine W. Y.; Lucas, Christophe; Kölliker, Mathias

    2014-01-01

    The evolution of parent-offspring communication was mostly studied from the perspective of parents responding to begging signals conveying information about offspring condition. Parents should respond to begging because of the differential fitness returns obtained from their investment in offspring that differ in condition. For analogous reasons, offspring should adjust their behavior to cues/signals of parental condition: parents that differ in condition pay differential costs of care and, hence, should provide different amounts of food. In this study, we experimentally tested in the European earwig (Forficula auricularia) if cues of maternal condition affect offspring behavior in terms of sibling cannibalism. We experimentally manipulated female condition by providing them with different amounts of food, kept nymph condition constant, allowed for nymph exposure to chemical maternal cues over extended time, quantified nymph survival (deaths being due to cannibalism) and extracted and analyzed the females’ cuticular hydrocarbons (CHC). Nymph survival was significantly affected by chemical cues of maternal condition, and this effect depended on the timing of breeding. Cues of poor maternal condition enhanced nymph survival in early broods, but reduced nymph survival in late broods, and vice versa for cues of good condition. Furthermore, female condition affected the quantitative composition of their CHC profile which in turn predicted nymph survival patterns. Thus, earwig offspring are sensitive to chemical cues of maternal condition and nymphs from early and late broods show opposite reactions to the same chemical cues. Together with former evidence on maternal sensitivities to condition-dependent nymph chemical cues, our study shows context-dependent reciprocal information exchange about condition between earwig mothers and their offspring, potentially mediated by cuticular hydrocarbons. PMID:24498046

  9. Pore Size Distribution and Methane Equilibrium Conditions at Walker Ridge Block 313, Northern Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bihani, A. D.; Daigle, H.; Cook, A.; Glosser, D.; Shushtarian, A.

    2015-12-01

    Coexistence of three methane phases (liquid (L), gas (G), hydrate (H)) in marine gas hydrate systems may occur according to in-situ pressure, temperature, salinity and pore size. In sediments with salinity close to seawater, a discrete zone of three-phase (3P) equilibrium may occur near the base of the regional hydrate stability zone (RHSZ) due to capillary effects. The existence of a 3P zone influences the location of the bottom-simulating reflection (BSR) and has implications for methane fluxes at the base of the RHSZ. We studied hydrate stability conditions in two wells, WR313-G and WR313-H, at Walker Ridge Block 313 in the northern Gulf of Mexico. We determined pore size distributions (PSD) by constructing a synthetic nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxation time distribution. Correlations were obtained by non-linear regression on NMR, gamma ray, and bulk density logs from well KC-151 at Keathley Canyon. The correlations enabled construction of relaxation time distributions for WR313-G and WR313-H, which were used to predict PSD through comparison with mercury injection capillary pressure measurements. With the computed PSD, L+H and L+G methane solubility was determined from in-situ pressure and temperature. The intersection of the L+G and L+H curves for various pore sizes allowed calculation of the depth range of the 3P equilibrium zone. As in previous studies at Blake Ridge and Hydrate Ridge, the top of the 3P zone moves upwards with increasing water depth and overlies the bulk 3P equilibrium depth. In clays at Walker Ridge, the predicted thickness of the 3P zone is approximately 35 m, but in coarse sands it is only a few meters due to the difference in absolute pore sizes and the width of the PSD. The thick 3P zone in the clays may explain in part why the BSR is only observed in the sand layers at Walker Ridge, although other factors may influence the presence or absence of a BSR.

  10. Pore size distribution and methane equilibrium conditions at Walker Ridge Block 313, northern Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Bihani, Abhishek; Daigle, Hugh; Cook, Ann; Glosser, Deborah; Shushtarian, Arash

    2015-12-15

    Coexistence of three methane phases (liquid (L), gas (G), hydrate (H)) in marine gas hydrate systems may occur according to in-situ pressure, temperature, salinity and pore size. In sediments with salinity close to seawater, a discrete zone of three-phase (3P) equilibrium may occur near the base of the regional hydrate stability zone (RHSZ) due to capillary effects. The existence of a 3P zone influences the location of the bottom-simulating reflection (BSR) and has implications for methane fluxes at the base of the RHSZ. We studied hydrate stability conditions in two wells, WR313-G and WR313-H, at Walker Ridge Block 313 in the northern Gulf of Mexico. We determined pore size distributions (PSD) by constructing a synthetic nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxation time distribution. Correlations were obtained by non-linear regression on NMR, gamma ray, and bulk density logs from well KC-151 at Keathley Canyon. The correlations enabled construction of relaxation time distributions for WR313-G and WR313-H, which were used to predict PSD through comparison with mercury injection capillary pressure measurements. With the computed PSD, L+H and L+G methane solubility was determined from in-situ pressure and temperature. The intersection of the L+G and L+H curves for various pore sizes allowed calculation of the depth range of the 3P equilibrium zone. As in previous studies at Blake Ridge and Hydrate Ridge, the top of the 3P zone moves upwards with increasing water depth and overlies the bulk 3P equilibrium depth. In clays at Walker Ridge, the predicted thickness of the 3P zone is approximately 35 m, but in coarse sands it is only a few meters due to the difference in absolute pore sizes and the width of the PSD. The thick 3P zone in the clays may explain in part why the BSR is only observed in the sand layers at Walker Ridge, although other factors may influence the presence or absence of a BSR.

  11. Influence of long-period oscillations on the development of droughts in Northern Eurasia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semenov, V. A.; Chernokulskii, A. V.; Solomina, O. N.

    2016-11-01

    Estimates of the influence of the Atlantic long-period oscillation (ALO) on the formation of droughts in Northern Eurasia were obtained using the results of numerical experiments with the ECHAM5 atmospheric chemistry general circulation model and the mixed layer ocean model. In general, the model results are consistent with the empirical estimates.

  12. Remote sensing of Northern mines: supporting operation and environmental monitoring in cold conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuomela, Anne; Davids, Corine; Knutsson, Sven; Knutsson, Roger; Rauhala, Anssi; Rossi, Pekka M.; Rouyet, Line

    2017-04-01

    Northern areas of Finland, Sweden and Norway have mineral-rich deposits. There are several active mines in the area but also closed ones and deposits with plans for future mining. With increasing demand for environmental protection in the sensitive Northern conditions, there is a need for more comprehensive monitoring of the mining environment. In our study, we aim to develop new opportunities to use remote sensing data from satellites and unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) in improving mining safety and monitoring, for example in the case of mine waste storage facilities. Remote sensing methods have evolved fast, and could in many cases enable precise, reliable, and cost-efficient data collection over large areas. The study has focused on four mining areas in Northern Fennoscandia. Freely available medium-resolution (e.g. Sentinel-1), commercial high-resolution (e.g. TerraSAR-X) and Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data has been collected during 2015-2016 to study how satellite remote sensing could be used e.g. for displacement monitoring using SAR Interferometry (InSAR). Furthermore, UAVs have been utilized in similar data collection in a local scale, and also in collection of thermal infrared data for hydrological monitoring of the areas. The development and efficient use of the methods in mining areas requires experts from several fields. In addition, the Northern conditions with four distinct seasons bring their own challenges for the efficient use of remote sensing, and further complicate their integration as standardised monitoring methods for mine environments. Based on the initial results, remote sensing could especially enhance the monitoring of large-scale structures in mine areas such as tailings impoundments.

  13. Influence of atmospheric stability and transport on CH4 concentrations in northern Spain.

    PubMed

    García, M Ángeles; Sánchez, M Luisa; Pérez, Isidro A; Ozores, Marta I; Pardo, Nuria

    2016-04-15

    Continuous methane (CH4) concentrations were measured in Northern Spain over two years (2011-2012) by multi-point sampling at 1.8, 3.7 and 8.3m using a Picarro analyser. The technique is based on cavity ring-down spectroscopy. The contrast in mean concentrations was about 1.2ppb, with 95th percentiles differing by 2.2ppb and mean minimum concentrations proving similar. Temporal variations of CH4 were also analysed, with a similar seasonal variability being found for the three heights. The highest CH4 concentrations were obtained in late autumn and winter and the lowest in summer, yielding a range of 52ppb. This variation may depend on the active photochemical reaction with OH radical during a period of intense solar radiation and changes in soil conditions together with variations in emissions. Peak concentration levels were recorded at night-time, between 5:00-7:00 GMT, with mean values ranging between 1920 and 1923ppb. The lowest value, around 1884ppb, was obtained at 16:00 GMT. This diurnal variation was mainly related to vertical mixing and photochemistry. Therefore, CH4 concentrations were also examined using the bulk Richardson number (RB) as a stability indicator. Four groups were distinguished: unstable cases, situations with pure shear flow, transitional stages and drainage flows. The highest contrast in mean CH4 concentrations between lower and upper heights was obtained for the transition and drainage cases, mainly associated to high concentrations from nearby sources. The impact of long range transport was analysed by means of 3-day isobaric backward air mass trajectories, which were calculated taking into account origins from Europe, Africa, the Atlantic Ocean and Local conditions. Assessment of the results showed the influence of S and SE wind sectors, especially with Local conditions associated with low winds. Finally, an estimation of the background CH4 concentration in the study period provided an average value of about 1892ppb.

  14. Relationship between Prevailing Oceanographic conditions on the fishing operations in the Northern Indian Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moazzam Khan, Muhammad

    2014-05-01

    Marked seasonality in fishing operation and catch composition was observed in the Northern Indian Ocean. These variations are more pronounced and noticeable in case of trawling for fish and shrimp as well as in the surface gillnetting for tuna and large pelagics. Although oceanographic conditions of the Northern Indian Ocean has been studied comprehensively, some facets of these are not well understood especially their relation with the fish distribution and abundance. Important oceanographic factors especially migration of oxygen minimum layer towards coastal areas after the cessation of South-West Monsoon seems to the most important factor responsible for the seasonal variation in the fishing intensity and species composition. Distribution and abundance of some of the commercially important marine animals especially billfishes was observed to be associated with the physical features of the area especially their abundance was noticed along continental margin and on the ridges in the Arabian Sea. The paper describes seasonal variation in abundance and catch composition of various fishing operations in the Indian Ocean and relates its to prevailing oceanographic conditions. Fishermen traditional knowledge about the seasonality of these conditions is also documented in the paper.

  15. Kinematic evidence for the effect of changing plate boundary conditions on the tectonics of the northern U.S. Rockies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmeelk, Dylan; Bendick, Rebecca; Stickney, Michael; Bomberger, Cody

    2017-06-01

    We derive surface velocities from GPS sites in the interior Northwest U.S. relative to a fixed North American reference frame to investigate surface tectonic kinematics from the Snake River Plain (SRP) to the Canadian border. The Centennial Tectonic Belt (CTB) on the northern margin of the SRP exhibits west directed extensional velocity gradients and strain distributions similar to the main Basin and Range Province (BRP) suggesting that the CTB is part of the BRP. North of the CTB, however, the vergence of velocities relative to North America switches from westward to eastward along with a concomitant rotation of the principal stress axes based on available seismic focal mechanisms, revealing paired extension in the northern Rockies and shortening across the Rocky Mountain Front. This change in orientation of surface velocities suggests that the change in the boundary conditions on the western margin of North America influences the direction of gravitational collapse of Laramide thickened crust. Throughout the study region, fault slip rate estimates calculated from the new geodetic velocity field are consistently larger than previously reported fault slip rates determined from limited geomorphic and paleoseismic studies.

  16. Relationship between physical condition of the carbonate fraction and sediment environments: northern Puerto Rico shelf

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pilkey, O.H.; Fierman, E.I.; Trumbull, J.V.A.

    1979-01-01

    Each of three sediment types recognizable on the northern Puerto Rico shelf and beaches is characterized by calcareous material in different physical condition. Dark terrigenous sand is accumulating at a relatively rapid rate and has a carbonate fraction containing fresh-appearing angular particles. The pure-carbonate skeletal-sand sediment type has a much lower rate of deposition, and its old-appearing calcareous particles have a dull surface luster. The third sediment type, a mixture of the first two, is largely from beaches and is characterized by highly polished, very well-rounded grains. Differences in length of sea-floor exposure and intensity of abrasion appear to be responsible for the variable physical condition of the carbonate fractions. We suggest that on other shelves having less distinctive sedimentary regimes, the physical condition of the carbonate grains could be used to interpret present shelf processes. ?? 1979.

  17. El Nino. [influence on climatic conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cane, M. A.

    1986-01-01

    An attempt is made to provide the background for a coupled model of ENSO (El Nino-Southern Oscillation) with emphasis placed on the oceanography (i.e. on El Nino). Observations of the normal annual cycle in the Pacific and of the evolution of a typical El Nino event are reviewed, and a theory for the oceanography of El Nino is proposed. The influence of SST anomalies on the tropical atmosphere is assessed, and results from a numerical model for the coupled system able to generate El Nino events are presented. Implications for the real ENSO cycle are discussed. In both the model and nature, ENSO has the character of a relaxation oscillation of the coupled system, and its cycle is aperiodic. Results on the predictability of dynamical systems show the impossibility of predicting ahead several events.

  18. Natural and Human Influences on Water Quality in a Shallow Regional Unconsolidated Aquifer, Northern Atlantic Coastal Plain

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ator, Scott W.

    2008-01-01

    Data collected from more than 400 wells in the surficial unconfined aquifer in the Northern Atlantic Coastal Plain (New York through North Carolina) were compiled and analyzed to improve understanding of multiple natural and human influences on water quality in such shallow regional aquifers. Geochemical patterns were identified and described through principal components analysis on major ions, and correlation and logistic regression were used to relate observed concentrations of nitrate and selected pesticide compounds (atrazine, metolachlor, simazine, and deethylatrazine, an atrazine degradate) and volatile organic compounds (chloroform, 1,1,1-trichloroethane, tetrachlorethene, and methyl tert-butyl ether) to likely influences, such as observed geochemical patterns, land use, hydrogeology, and soils. Variability in major-ion concentrations is primarily related to ionic strength and redox condition. Concentrations of nitrate, pesticides, and volatile organic compounds are related to natural conditions, as well as the distribution of likely sources reflected in land use. Nitrate is most common in aerobic ground water and in relatively well-drained areas, for example; concentrations greater than 0.4 milligrams per liter may result from a variety of human activities, although concentrations greater than 3 milligrams per liter are more likely in agricultural areas. Atrazine, deethylatrazine, and metolachlor also are related to geochemical patterns, likely because ground-water geochemistry reflects hydrogeologic and soil conditions affecting pesticide transport to the water table. Results demonstrate the value of geochemical information along with the distribution of sources and other influences to understanding the regional occurrence of selected compounds in ground water. Such influences are not unique to the Northern Atlantic Coastal Plain, and thus observations and interpretations are relevant to broader areas.

  19. Influence of volcanic eruptions on the troposphere through stratospheric dynamical processes in the northern hemisphere winter

    SciTech Connect

    Kodera, K.

    1994-01-20

    Volcanic eruptions contribute significant quantities of aerosols into the stratosphere which may create strong polar wind anomalies, particularly in the winter stratosphere. This article examines the idea that the influence of volcano-derived aerosols may produce changes in winter atmospheric circulation in the northern hemisphere. Changes in atmospheric circulation following three recent volcanic eruptions are monitored and possible mechanisms for the production of tropospheric effects through dynamic stratospheric process are discussed. 21 refs., 9 figs.

  20. Latitudinal Discontinuity in Thermal Conditions along the Nearshore of Central-Northern Chile

    PubMed Central

    Tapia, Fabian J.; Largier, John L.; Castillo, Manuel; Wieters, Evie A.; Navarrete, Sergio A.

    2014-01-01

    Over the past decade, evidence of abrupt latitudinal changes in the dynamics, structure and genetic variability of intertidal and subtidal benthic communities along central-northern Chile has been found consistently at 30–32°S. Changes in the advective and thermal environment in nearshore waters have been inferred from ecological patterns, since analyses of in situ physical data have thus far been missing. Here we analyze a unique set of shoreline temperature data, gathered over 4–10 years at 15 sites between 28–35°S, and combine it with satellite-derived winds and sea surface temperatures to investigate the latitudinal transition in nearshore oceanographic conditions suggested by recent ecological studies. Our results show a marked transition in thermal conditions at 30–31°S, superimposed on a broad latitudinal trend, and small-scale structures associated with cape-and-bay topography. The seasonal cycle dominated temperature variability throughout the region, but its relative importance decreased abruptly south of 30–31°S, as variability at synoptic and intra-seasonal scales became more important. The response of shoreline temperatures to meridional wind stress also changed abruptly at the transition, leading to a sharp drop in the occurrence of low-temperature waters at northern sites, and a concurrent decrease in corticated algal biomass. Together, these results suggest a limitation of nitrate availability in nearshore waters north of the transition. The localized alongshore change results from the interaction of latitudinal trends (e.g., wind stress, surface warming, inertial period) with a major headland-bay system (Punta Lengua de Vaca at 30.25°S), which juxtaposes a southern stretch of coast characterized by upwelling with a northern stretch of coast characterized by warm surface waters and stratification. This transition likely generates a number of latitude-dependent controls on ecological processes in the nearshore that can explain species

  1. Latitudinal discontinuity in thermal conditions along the nearshore of central-northern Chile.

    PubMed

    Tapia, Fabian J; Largier, John L; Castillo, Manuel; Wieters, Evie A; Navarrete, Sergio A

    2014-01-01

    Over the past decade, evidence of abrupt latitudinal changes in the dynamics, structure and genetic variability of intertidal and subtidal benthic communities along central-northern Chile has been found consistently at 30-32°S. Changes in the advective and thermal environment in nearshore waters have been inferred from ecological patterns, since analyses of in situ physical data have thus far been missing. Here we analyze a unique set of shoreline temperature data, gathered over 4-10 years at 15 sites between 28-35°S, and combine it with satellite-derived winds and sea surface temperatures to investigate the latitudinal transition in nearshore oceanographic conditions suggested by recent ecological studies. Our results show a marked transition in thermal conditions at 30-31°S, superimposed on a broad latitudinal trend, and small-scale structures associated with cape-and-bay topography. The seasonal cycle dominated temperature variability throughout the region, but its relative importance decreased abruptly south of 30-31°S, as variability at synoptic and intra-seasonal scales became more important. The response of shoreline temperatures to meridional wind stress also changed abruptly at the transition, leading to a sharp drop in the occurrence of low-temperature waters at northern sites, and a concurrent decrease in corticated algal biomass. Together, these results suggest a limitation of nitrate availability in nearshore waters north of the transition. The localized alongshore change results from the interaction of latitudinal trends (e.g., wind stress, surface warming, inertial period) with a major headland-bay system (Punta Lengua de Vaca at 30.25°S), which juxtaposes a southern stretch of coast characterized by upwelling with a northern stretch of coast characterized by warm surface waters and stratification. This transition likely generates a number of latitude-dependent controls on ecological processes in the nearshore that can explain species

  2. Hydro-edaphic conditions defining richness and species composition in savanna areas of the northern Brazilian Amazonia

    PubMed Central

    Araújo, Maria Aparecida de Moura; da Rocha, Antônio Elielson Sousa; Miranda, Izildinha de Souza

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background Studies on plant communities in the Amazon have reported that different hydro-edaphic conditions can affect the richness and the species composition of different ecosystems. However, this aspect is poorly known in the different savanna habitats. Understanding how populations and plant communities are distributed in these open vegetation areas is important to improve the knowledge about which environmental variables influence the occurrence and diversity of plants in this type of regional ecosystem. Thus, this study investigated the richness and composition of plant species in two savanna areas of the northern Brazilian Amazonia, using the coverage (%) of the different life forms observed under different hydro-edaphic conditions as a structural reference. New information We report 128 plant species classified in 34 botanical families distributed in three savanna habitats with different levels of hydro-edaphic restrictions. In this study, the habitats are conceptually presented and they integrate environmental information (edaphic factors and drainage type), which determines differences between floristic composition, species richness and coverage (%) of plant life forms. PMID:28848372

  3. Influence of weather-climatic conditions on biospheric processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Govorushko, S. M.

    2012-12-01

    The significance of meteorological processes and phenomena in the biosphere functioning is revealed. The influence of various weather conditions on human health is considered; the factors and mechanisms of their action are described. The impact of meteorological processes on animals is discussed and concrete examples of such impacts are presented. The influence of meteorological processes and phenomena on plants at different stages of their life (pollination, growth, ripening, transport of seeds, damage, and death) and on some abiotic natural components is shown. It is inferred that weather-climatic conditions have a great influence on biospheric processes.

  4. Northern-Hemisphere snow cover patterns and formation conditions in winter 2007 and 2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Hongyan; Qiao, Fangli; Shu, Qi; Yu, Long

    2016-06-01

    The Arctic sea ice minimum records appeared in the Septembers of 2007 and 2012, followed by high snow cover areas in the Northern Hemisphere winters. The snow cover distributions show different spatial patterns in these two years: increased snow cover in Central Asia and Central North America in 2007, while increased snow cover in East Asia and northwestern Europe in 2012. The high snow cover anomaly shifted to higher latitudes in winter of 2012 compared to 2007. It is noticed that the snow cover had positive anomaly in 2007 and 2012 with the following conditions: the negative geopotential height and the related cyclonic wind anomaly were favorable for upwelling, and, with the above conditions, the low troposphere and surface air temperature anomaly and water vapor anomaly were favorable for the formation and maintenance of snowfalls. The negative geopotential height, cyclonic wind and low air temperature conditions were satisfied in different locations in 2007 and 2012, resulting in different spatial snow cover patterns. The cross section of lower air temperature move to higher latitudes in winter of 2012 compared to 2007.

  5. Learning to Coach through Experience: Conditions that Influence Reflection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, Wade D.; Trudel, Pierre

    2005-01-01

    The goal of the present article is to describe conditions that influence coach reflection, and to provide suggestions for nurturing coach reflection. Coach reflection varies based on the interaction of four conditions: (a) peer access, (b) stage of learning, (c) issue characteristics, and (d) environment. Data are presented to support the four…

  6. Factors influencing happiness of the grandmothers raising grandchildren in rural areas of Northern Thailand.

    PubMed

    Nanthamongkolchai, Sutham; Munsawaengsub, Chokchai; Taechaboonsermsak, Pimsurang; Powwattana, Arpaporn

    2013-12-01

    To study the factors influencing happiness of grandmothers raising grandchildren in the rural areas of Northern Thailand. Cross-sectional survey research was conducted among 400 grandmothers, aged 50-79 years, who raised their grandchildren in the rural areas of Northern Thailand. Participants were selected by cluster sampling. Data were collected through a structured interview from April to July 2009 and analyzed by frequency, percentage, Pearson product moment correlation coefficient, and Multiple regression analysis. Nearly half (46.8%) of grandmothers raising grandchildren had high level of happiness, followed by moderate level (40.4%) and low level (12.8%). The factors, which significantly influenced the happiness of the grandmothers, were self-esteem, social support, and family relationships (p-value < 0.05). In addition, self-esteem, social support, and family relationships could significantly predict happiness of the grandmothers by 48.1%. Self-esteem had the highest predictive power of happiness among grandmothers. The factors influencing happiness of grandmothers raising grandchildren were self-esteem, social support, and family relationships. To promote happiness of grandmothers, responsible organizations should establish activities that enhance the grandmother's self-esteem, provide sufficient social support, and promote good family relationships.

  7. Large-scale forcing of environmental conditions on subarctic copepods in the northern California Current system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hui; Bi, Hongsheng; Peterson, William T.

    2015-05-01

    In the ocean, dominant physical processes often change at various spatial and temporal scales. Here, we examined associations between large-scale physical forcing indexed by the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO), regional ocean conditions including alongshore currents in relation to the abundance of two subarctic oceanic copepods, Neocalanus plumchrus, and N. cristatus in the offshore portions of the northern California Current (NCC) system in spring of 1998-2008. We found significant relationships between the abundance of copepods, water temperature, and alongshore currents with a lag of two or four months in response to the PDO in the NCC system. During the growth season in March/April both subarctic copepod species displayed consistent cross-shelf patterns with shoreward decreasing gradient in abundance, and were negatively correlated with the PDO, sea water temperature, and alongshore currents. Our studies highlight the responses of regional ocean conditions to large-scale physical forcing and illustrate the potential for Neocalanus copepods as unique vectors for a new understanding of the ecological response in the offshore oceanic waters of the NCC system to climate variability.

  8. Refinement, validation, and application of a benthic condition index for northern Gulf of Mexico estuaries

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Engle, V.D.; Summers, J.K.

    1999-01-01

    By applying discriminant analysis to benthic macroinvertebrate data, we have developed an indicator of benthic condition for northern Gulf of Mexico estuaries. The data used were collected by the United States Environmental Protection Agency's Environmental Monitoring and Assessment Program (EMAP) in the Louisianian Province from 1991 to 1994. This benthic index represents a linear combination of the following weighted parameters: the proportion of expected species diversity, the mean abundance of tubificid oligochaetes, the percent of total abundance represented by capitellid polychaetes, the percent of total abundance represented by bivalve mollusks, and the percent of total abundance represented by amphipods. We successfully validated and retrospectively applied the benthic index to all of the benthic data collected by EMAP in the Louisianian Province. This benthic index was also calculated for independent data collected from Pensacola Bay, Florida, in order to demonstrate its flexibility and applicability to different estuarine systems within the same biogeographic region. The benthic index is a useful and valid indicator of estuarine condition that is intended to provide environmental managers with a simple tool for assessing the health of benthic macroinvertebrate communities.

  9. Influence of Coral Community Structure and Thermal Stress Exposure on Observed Patterns of Bleaching across the Northern Mariana Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, L.; Heron, S. F.; Johnson, S.; Okano, R.; Benavente, D.; Iguel, J.; Perez, D. I.; Liu, G.; Geiger, E.; Eakin, C. M.

    2016-02-01

    In 2013 and 2014, the Mariana Archipelago experienced consecutive thermal stress events that resulted in widespread coral bleaching and mortality. Using in situ survey data collected across seven of the Northern Mariana Islands during the 2014 event, we undertook the first quantitative comparison between the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Coral Reef Watch 5 km satellite monitoring products and coral bleaching observations. Analysis of coral community characteristics, historical temperature conditions and thermal stress revealed a strong influence of coral biodiversity in the patterns of observed bleaching. This illustrates the importance of using local benthic characteristics to interpret the level of impact from thermal stress exposure. In an era of continuing climate change, accurate monitoring of thermal stress and prediction of coral bleaching are essential for resource managers and stakeholders to direct resources to the most effective management actions to conserve coral reefs.

  10. DISTRIBUTION AND COMPOSITION OF DISSOLVED AND PARTICULATE ORGANIC CARBON IN NORTHERN SAN FRANCISCO BAY DURING LOW FRESHWATER FLOW CONDITIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The distribution of dissolved and particulate organic matter was studied in northern San Francisco Bay on seven dates during declining flow conditions from April to October 1996. Measurements were made at 3 to 11 stations (usually 8) along the salinity gradient from the Sacrament...

  11. DISTRIBUTION AND COMPOSITION OF DISSOLVED AND PARTICULATE ORGANIC CARBON IN NORTHERN SAN FRANCISCO BAY DURING LOW FRESHWATER FLOW CONDITIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The distribution of dissolved and particulate organic matter was studied in northern San Francisco Bay on seven dates during declining flow conditions from April to October 1996. Measurements were made at 3 to 11 stations (usually 8) along the salinity gradient from the Sacrament...

  12. Influence of climate variability on anchovy reproductive timing off northern Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contreras-Reyes, Javier E.; Canales, T. Mariella; Rojas, Pablo M.

    2016-12-01

    We investigated the relationship between environmental variables and the Gonadosomatic Monthly Mean (GMM) index of anchovy (Engraulis ringens) to understand how the environment affects the dynamics of anchovy reproductive timing. The data examined corresponds to biological information collected from samples of the landings off northern Chile (18°21‧S, 24°00‧S) during the period 1990-2010. We used the Humboldt Current Index (HCI) and the Multivariate ENSO Index (MEI), which combine several physical-oceanographic factors in the Tropical and South Pacific regions. Using the GMM index, we studied the dynamics of anchovy reproductive timing at different intervals of length, specifically females with a length between 11.5 and 14 cm (medium class) and longer than 14 cm (large class). Seasonal Autoregressive Integrated Mobile Average (SARIMA) was used to predict missing observations. The trends of the environment and reproductive indexes were explored via the Breaks For Additive Season and Trend (BFAST) statistical technique and the relationship between these indexes via cross-correlation functions (CCF) analysis. Our results showed that the habitat of anchovy switched from cool to warm condition, which also influenced gonad development. This was revealed by two and three significant changes (breaks) in the trend of the HCI and MEI indexes, and two significant breaks in the GMM of each time series of anchovy females (medium and large). Negative cross-correlation between the MEI index and GMM of medium and large class females was found, indicating that as the environment gets warmer (positive value of MEI) a decrease in the reproductive activity of anchovy can be expected. Correlation between the MEI index and larger females was stronger than with medium females. Additionally, our results indicate that the GMM index of anchovy for both length classes reaches two maximums per year; the first from August to September and the second from December to January. The

  13. High altitude C(4) grasslands in the northern Andes: relicts from glacial conditions?

    PubMed

    Boom, A; Mora, G; Cleef, A M.; Hooghiemstra, H

    2001-06-01

    The altitudinal vegetation distribution in the northern Andes during glacial time differed from the present-day conditions as a result of temperature and precipitation change. New evidence indicate that as a response to a reduced atmospheric partial CO(2) pressure (pCO(2)), the competitive balance between C(3) and C(4) plants have changed. Effects may have remained virtually undetected in pollen records, but can be observed using a stable carbon isotope analysis. Vegetation dominated by C(4) taxa, belonging to the families Cyperaceae (e.g. Bulbostylis and Cyperus) and Poaceae (e.g. Muhlenbergia, Paspalum and Sporobolus), may have been able to replace for a significant part the modern type C(3) taxa (e.g. species belonging to Carex, Rhynchospora, Aciachne, Agrostis, Calamagrostis, and Chusquea). Impact of reduced glacial atmospheric pCO(2) levels and lower glacial temperatures on the composition and the elevational distribution of the vegetation types is discussed. The present high Andean vegetation communities may differ from the glacial equivalents (non-modern analogue situation). We identified dry Sporobolus lasiophyllus tussock grassland and Arcytophyllum nitidum dwarfshrub paramo as the possible relict communities from glacial time. The effect on previous estimates of paleo-temperatures is estimated to be small.

  14. Air- ice-snow interaction in the Northern Hemisphere under different stability conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Repina, Irina; Chechin, Dmitry; Artamonov, Arseny

    2013-04-01

    even high latitudes of the Northern Hemisphere because the stable conditions above Arctic ice field dominate. Under such conditions the air flow over the uneven surface behaves in the way it does over the even one. This happens because depressions between ridges are filled with heavier air up to the height of irreguralities. As a result, the air moves at the level of ridges without entering depressions. Increased heat and mass transfer over polynyas and leads through self-organization of turbulent convection is found. The work was sponsored by RFBR grants and funded by the Government of the Russian Federation grants.

  15. The influence of the river inflow on the circulation and dynamics of the Adriatic and Northern Ionian Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verri, Giorgia; Pinardi, Nadia; Oddo, Paolo; Ciliberti, Stefania; Coppini, Giovanni

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this study is to understand and to assess the effects of the river runoff on the circulation and dynamics of the Central Mediterranean Sea in particular regarding to the Adriatic Sea, which is known to be a dilution basin, and the Northern Ionian Sea. River mouths are sources of both momentum and buoyancy produced by the release of light fluid into a denser ambient. River inflow strongly affects the shelf area near estuaries called Regions Of Freshwater Influence, ROFIs, but it is often also a significant forcing of the large scale thermohaline circulation. The first objective is to understand how the riverine freshwater inflow affects the estuarine/antiestuarine character and the strength of the Adriatic general circulation in the meridional direction involving both the surface and the basin interior, called Meridional Overturning Circulation, MOC. A second objective is to assess how well-known processes of the Adriatic and Northern Ionian dynamics are conditioned by the river runoff (dense water formation processes, inflow/outflow boudary currents and Northern Ionian Spreading). In order to achieve our goal a three dimensional, finite difference model based on the Nucleus for European Modeling of the Ocean (NEMO) code has been implemented in the Central Mediterranean covering both the Adriatic and the Ionian Seas. Two twin experiments, respectively with and without the river inflow, have been performed spanning the period from the beginning of 1999 to the end of 2012. As far as it concerns the river runoff contribution, the model considers the estimate (via hydrological modeling and available observations) of the runoff of the major rivers flowing into the Adriatic and the Ionian Seas available from several datasets. River discharge consists of monthly climatologies for all rivers except Po, for which daily observed data have been adopted. All the rivers included in the model, 52 flowing into the Adriatic Sea and 15 into the Ionian Sea, have been

  16. Body condition and pregnancy in northern Yellowstone elk: evidence for predation risk effects?

    PubMed

    White, P J; Garrott, Robert A; Hamlin, Kenneth L; Cook, Rachel C; Cook, John G; Cunningham, Julie A

    2011-01-01

    S. Creel et al. reported a negative correlation between fecal progesterone concentrations and elk:wolf ratios in greater Yellowstone elk (Cervus elaphus) herds and interpreted this correlation as evidence that pregnancy rates of elk decreased substantially in the presence of wolves (Canis lupus). Apparently, the hypothesized mechanism is that decreased forage intake reduces body condition and either results in elk failing to conceive during the autumn rut or elk losing the fetus during winter. We tested this hypothesis by comparing age-specific body condition (percentage ingesta-free body fat) and pregnancy rates for northern Yellowstone elk, one of the herds sampled by Creel et al., before (1962-1968) and after (2000-2006) wolf restoration using indices developed and calibrated for Rocky Mountain elk. Mean age-adjusted percentage body fat of female elk was similarly high in both periods (9.0%-0.9% pre-wolf; 8.9%-0.8% post-wolf). Estimated pregnancy rates (proportion of females that were pregnant) were 0.91 pre-wolf and 0.87 post-wolf for 4-9 year-old elk (95% CI on difference = -0.15 to 0.03, P = 0.46) and 0.64 pre-wolf and 0.78 post-wolf for elk > 9 years old (95% CI on difference = -0.01 to 0.27, P = 0.06). Thus, there was little evidence in these data to support strong effects of wolf presence on elk pregnancy. We caution that multiple lines of evidence and/or strong validation should be brought to bear before relying on indirect measures of how predators affect pregnancy rates.

  17. Influencing and Facilitating Conditions for Developing Reflective Assessment Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rønsen, Anne Kristin; Smith, Kari

    2014-01-01

    By following a professional development project focusing on enhancing assessment competence amongst teachers, the current study examines how teachers use reflective writing and systematic discussions as tools for developing competence in assessment. More specifically, the article aims at identifying conditions that influence and facilitate…

  18. Influencing and Facilitating Conditions for Developing Reflective Assessment Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rønsen, Anne Kristin; Smith, Kari

    2014-01-01

    By following a professional development project focusing on enhancing assessment competence amongst teachers, the current study examines how teachers use reflective writing and systematic discussions as tools for developing competence in assessment. More specifically, the article aims at identifying conditions that influence and facilitate…

  19. Influences of acidic conditions on formazan assay: a cautionary note.

    PubMed

    Johno, Hisashi; Takahashi, Shuhei; Kitamura, Masanori

    2010-11-01

    Formazan assay has been used for several decades to evaluate metabolic activity of eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells. In particular, it has been often applied for quantitative assessment of viable cells under acidic circumstances caused by, e.g., ischemia and hypoxia. However, little attention has been paid to the influence of acidic pH on formazan assays. We found that acidic culture conditions significantly affect outcomes of the assays. Absorbance of tetrazolium-formazan decreased in a pH-dependent manner without affecting cell viability. This nonspecific effect was ascribed to influences of acidic pH on the production of formazan. Replacement of culture media to fresh medium at physiologic pH partially overcame this problem. The influence of acidic culture conditions should be carefully considered when formazan assays are used for the assessment of viable cells under various experimental situations.

  20. Variations in glacial and interglacial marine conditions over the last two glacial cycles off northern Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Löwemark, Ludvig; Chao, Weng-Si; Gyllencreutz, Richard; Hanebuth, Till J. J.; Chiu, Pin-Yao; Yang, Tien-Nan; Su, Chih-Chieh; Chuang, Chih-Kai; León Dominguez, Dora Carolina; Jakobsson, Martin

    2016-09-01

    Five sediment cores from the Lomonosov Ridge and the Morris Jesup Rise north of Greenland show the history of sea-ice coverage and primary productivity over the last two glacial cycles. Variations in Manganese content, benthic and planktonic foraminifera, bioturbation, and trace fossil diversity are interpreted to reflect differences in sea-ice cover and sediment depositional conditions between the identified interglacials. Marine Isotope Stage (MIS) 1 and MIS 2 are represented by thin (<<5 cm) sediment units while the preceding interglacial MIS 5 and glacial MIS 6 are characterized by thick (10-20 cm) deposits. Foraminiferal abundances and bioturbation suggest that MIS 1 was generally characterized by severe sea-ice conditions north of Greenland while MIS 5 appears to have been considerably warmer with more open water, higher primary productivity, and higher sedimentation rates. Strengthened flow of Atlantic water along the northern continental shelf of Greenland rather than development of local polynyas is here suggested as a likely cause for the relatively warmer marine conditions during MIS 5 compared to MIS 1. The cores also suggest distinct differences between the glacial intervals MIS 2 and MIS 6. While MIS 6 is distinguished by a relatively thick sediment unit poor in foraminifera and with low Mn values, MIS 2 is practically missing. We speculate that this could be the effect from a paleocrystic sea-ice cover north of Greenland during MIS 2 that prevented sediment delivery from sea ice and icebergs. In contrast, the thick sequence deposited during MIS 6 indicates a longer glacial period with dynamic intervals characterized by huge drifting icebergs delivering ice rafted debris (IRD). A drastic shift from thinner sedimentary cycles where interglacial sediment parameters indicate more severe sea-ice conditions gave way to larger amplitude cycles with more open water indicators was observed around the boundary between MIS 7/8. This shift is in agreement with a

  1. Influence of Medical Representatives on Prescribing Practices in Mekelle, Northern Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Workneh, Birhanu Demeke; Gebrehiwot, Mehari Gebregergis; Bayo, Tigist Assefa; Gidey, Meles Tekie; Belay, Yared Belete; Tesfaye, Desalegn Mergiaw; Kassa, Terefe Teshome

    2016-01-01

    Drug promotion by medical representatives is one of the factors that influence physicians' prescribing decisions and choice of drugs. To assess the influence of medical representatives on prescribing practice of physicians in health facilities, Mekelle, Northern Ethiopia. Facility-based cross-sectional study was conducted enrolling all physicians working in public and private health facilities. All public and private health facilities were included and similarly, all physicians rendering services in these facilities were sampled in the study. The data were collected from February to March, 2015. Data were then entered into Epidata Version 3.1 and transferred to STATA version 12 for analysis. Both bivariable and multivariable logistic regressions were used to determine predictors. Of the ninety physicians approached in this study, 40 (48.2%) of the physicians believed that their prescribing decisions were influenced by visits of medical representatives (MRs). The odds of physicians who received gifts from MRs being influenced to prescribe their respective products was six times higher than those who reported not accepting any gifts [AOR = 6.56, 95% CI: 2.25, 19.13]. Stationery materials 23(35.4%) and drug samples 20(54.2%) were the commonest kinds of gifts given to physicians and face to face talking 45(54.2%) was the most frequent promotional methods. The finding of this study showed that around thirty-nine percent of MRs have had negative attitude toward competitors' product. Moreover, working in private health facility was also another predictor of influence of prescribing decision in the study area [AOR = 12.78, 95% CI: 1.31, 124.56]. Nearly half of the physicians working in Mekelle reported that their prescribing decisions were influenced by MRs in the last 12 months. Accepting gifts and working in private health facilities were predictors of influencing prescribing decisions. However, most MRs fails to provide adequate and accurate information regarding their

  2. Population dynamics of a northern-adapted mammal: disentangling the influence of predation and climate change.

    PubMed

    Pokallus, John W; Pauli, Jonathan N

    2015-09-01

    Community structure and interspecific interactions are particularly vulnerable to rapidly changing climatic regimes. Recent changes in both climate and vertebrate community assemblages have created a unique opportunity to examine the impacts of two dynamic forces on population regulation. We examined the effects of warming winter conditions and the reestablishment of a previously extirpated predator, the fisher (Martes pennanti), on regulatory mechanisms in a northern-adapted mammal, the porcupine (Erethizon dorsatum), along their southern range boundary. Using a long-term (17-year) capture-recapture data set, we (1) quantified the impacts of climate change and increased fisher predation on the survival of adult porcupines at their regional southern terminus, (2) assessed recruitment (via both adult fecundity and juvenile survival) of porcupines, and (3) modeled the relative importance of predation and winter conditions on the demography and population growth rate (λ). Severe winters and abundant predators interacted synergistically to reduce adult survivorship by as much as 44%, while expanding predator populations led to near reproductive failure among porcupines. Increasing predatory pressure, disruptions in this community module, and more frequent extreme winter weather events led to predicted extirpation within 50 years, whereas in the absence of predators, the population was viable. Our results provide a mechanistic understanding behind distributional shifts resulting from climate change and may be broadly relevant for predicting future distributional shifts in other northern-adapted mammalian species.

  3. The influence of past endogamy and consanguinity on genetic disorders in northern Sweden.

    PubMed

    Bittles, A H; Egerbladh, I

    2005-09-01

    It has been widely believed that consanguineous marriage was infrequent in northern Europe. As part of ongoing studies into the population structure of northern Sweden, the Demographic DataBase of Umeå University has undertaken digitization of the parish record books of the Swedish Lutheran Church, which date back to the late 17th century. To examine the prevalence and patterns of consanguineous marriage, information from the DataBase was abstracted for the Skellefteå region during the period 1720-1899 and extended family pedigrees constructed. Of the 14,639 marriages recorded, 3,043 (20.8%) were between couples related as sixth cousins or closer. Following changes in the Swedish civil law in 1844 that removed the requirement of royal dispensation for first cousin unions, a significant increase in first cousin marriages occurred during the next two generations, even though the total population of the region grew significantly. There was also strong evidence that consanguineous marriages were favoured within particular families. The findings of the study are consistent with the patterns of single gene disorders reported in specific communities in the region, and they suggest that founder effect, drift and consanguinity all were important influences on population genetic structure in previous generations.

  4. Decadal variation of the Northern Hemisphere Annular Mode and its influence on the East Asian trough

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Chunhui; Zhou, Botao; Ding, Yihui

    2016-06-01

    We analyze the decadal variation of the stratosphere-troposphere coupled system around the year 2000 by using the NCEP reanalysis-2 data. Specifically, the relationship between the Northern Hemisphere Annular Mode (NAM) and the tropospheric East Asian trough is investigated in order to find the effective stratospheric signals during cold air outbreaks in China. Statistical analyses and dynamic diagnoses both indicate that after 2000, increased stratospheric polar vortex disturbances occur and the NAM is mainly in negative phase. The tropospheric polar areas are directly affected by the polar vortex, and in the midlatitudes, the Ural blocking high and East Asian trough are more active, which lead to enhanced cold air activities in eastern and northern China. Further investigation reveals that under this circulation pattern, downward propagations of negative NAM index are closely related to the intensity variation of the East Asian trough. When negative NAM anomalies propagate down to the upper troposphere and reach a certain intensity (standardized NAM index less than-1), they result in apparent reinforcement of the East Asian trough, which reaches its maximum intensity about one week later. The northerly wind behind the trough transports cold air southward and eastward, and the range of influence and the intensity are closely associated with the trough location. Therefore, the NAM index can be used as a measure of the signals from the disturbed stratosphere to give some indication of cold air activities in China.

  5. Working in hot conditions--a study of electrical utility workers in the northern territory of Australia.

    PubMed

    Brearley, Matt; Harrington, Phillip; Lee, Doug; Taylor, Raymond

    2015-01-01

    Environmental conditions of Australia's Northern Territory are seasonally conducive to excessive body heat storage by outdoor workers. For electrical utility workers who periodically work at height, in confined space, and in proximity to live power sources, the impact of the climate may be considered a hazardous condition. Therefore, this study examined the physiological and fluid balance responses of 20 power network workers (31.5 years; 86.0 kg; 1.71 m; BMI 29.5) throughout work shifts in the Northern and Southern regions of the Northern Territory, Australia. Twenty male heat-acclimatized power network workers provided written informed consent to be monitored during maintenance of electrical infrastructure that included replacing power pole components and transformer and substation repairs in the Northern (n = 13) and Southern regions (n = 7) of the Northern Territory (mean wet-bulb globe temperatures of 32.0°C and 28.7°C, respectively). An ingestible telemetry pill provided measurement of gastrointestinal temperature (Tgi), that when combined with heart rate values, provided physiological strain index (PSI). Urine specific gravity, sweat rate, and level of dehydration were also determined. The Tgi values of this study were within the ISO9886 limit for monitored, heat-acclimatized workers, with a peak of 38.4°C. Mean PSI was 2.6, which represents overall low strain, with periods of moderate strain. Urinary analysis indicated that workers were dehydrated prior to and following the work shift, however the mean sweat rate of 0.44 L.h(-1) was matched by fluid consumption of 0.42 L.h(-1) to limit body mass loss to 0.1% during the shift. This study demonstrates that heat acclimatized electrical utility workers adhere to ISO9886 requirements when undertaking self-paced activity in hot conditions.

  6. Growth, condition, diet, and consumption rates of northern pike in three Arizona reservoirs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Flinders, J.M.; Bonar, Scott A.

    2008-01-01

    Northern pike (Esox lucius L.) introductions are controversial in the western United States due to suspected impacts they might have on established sport fisheries and potential illegal introductions. Tbree Arizona reservoirs, Parker Canyon Lake, Upper Lake Mary and Long Lake were sampled to examine the diet, consumption dynamics, and growth of northern pike. Northern pike diets varied by season and reservoir. In Parker Canyon Lake, diets were dominated by rainbow trout in winter and spring and bluegill and green sunfish in the fall. In Long Lake the northern pike ate crayfish in spring and early summer and switched to young of the year common carp in summer and fall. Black crappie, golden shiners, and crayfish were the major prey in Upper Lake Mary during spring, but they switched to stocked rainbow trout in the fall. Northern pike growth was in the high range of growth reported throughout the United States. Estimated northern pike specific consumption rate (scr) of rainbow trout (g/g/d ?? 10-6) was greatest in Upper Lake Mary (scr = 329.1 ?? 23.7 g/g/d ?? 10-6) where stocked fingerling (280 mm TL) rainbow trout stocked in Long Lake (scr = 1.4 ?? 0.1 g/g/d ?? 10-6) and Parker Canyon Lake (scr = 287.2 ?? 15.1 g/g/d ?? 10-6) where catchable-sized rainbow trout were stocked. Managers should consider the cost-benefits of stocking fish >200 mm TL in lakes containing northern pike. ?? Copyright by the North American Lake Management Society 2008.

  7. Influence of oil and gas emissions on summertime ozone in the Colorado Northern Front Range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDuffie, Erin E.; Edwards, Peter M.; Gilman, Jessica B.; Lerner, Brian M.; Dubé, William P.; Trainer, Michael; Wolfe, Daniel E.; Angevine, Wayne M.; deGouw, Joost; Williams, Eric J.; Tevlin, Alex G.; Murphy, Jennifer G.; Fischer, Emily V.; McKeen, Stuart; Ryerson, Thomas B.; Peischl, Jeff; Holloway, John S.; Aikin, Kenneth; Langford, Andrew O.; Senff, Christoph J.; Alvarez, Raul J.; Hall, Samuel R.; Ullmann, Kirk; Lantz, Kathy O.; Brown, Steven S.

    2016-07-01

    Tropospheric O3 has been decreasing across much of the eastern U.S. but has remained steady or even increased in some western regions. Recent increases in VOC and NOx emissions associated with the production of oil and natural gas (O&NG) may contribute to this trend in some areas. The Northern Front Range of Colorado has regularly exceeded O3 air quality standards during summertime in recent years. This region has VOC emissions from a rapidly developing O&NG basin and low concentrations of biogenic VOC in close proximity to urban-Denver NOx emissions. Here VOC OH reactivity (OHR), O3 production efficiency (OPE), and an observationally constrained box model are used to quantify the influence of O&NG emissions on regional summertime O3 production. Analyses are based on measurements acquired over two summers at a central location within the Northern Front Range that lies between major regional O&NG and urban emission sectors. Observational analyses suggest that mixing obscures any OPE differences in air primarily influenced by O&NG or urban emission sector. The box model confirms relatively modest OPE differences that are within the uncertainties of the field observations. Box model results also indicate that maximum O3 at the measurement location is sensitive to changes in NOx mixing ratio but also responsive to O&NG VOC reductions. Combined, these analyses show that O&NG alkanes contribute over 80% to the observed carbon mixing ratio, roughly 50% to the regional VOC OHR, and approximately 20% to regional photochemical O3 production.

  8. Community-based birth waiting homes in Northern Sierra Leone: Factors influencing women's use.

    PubMed

    Kyokan, Michiko; Whitney-Long, Melissa; Kuteh, Mabel; Raven, Joanna

    2016-08-01

    to explore the factors influencing women's use of birth waiting homes in the Northern Bombali district, Sierra Leone. this was a descriptive exploratory study using qualitative research methodology, which included in depth interviews, key informant interviews, focus group discussions, document review and observations. two chiefdoms in the Northern Bombali district, Sierra Leone. eight interviews were conducted with women who had delivered in the past one year and used birth waiting homes; eight key informant interviews with a project manager, birth waiting homes hosts, and community members; thirteen women who delivered in the past year without using birth waiting homes (four interviews and two focus group discussions). there are several factors influencing the use of birth waiting homes (BWHs) including: past experience of childbirth, promotion of the birth waiting homes by traditional birth attendance, distance and costs of transport to the homes, child care and other family commitments, family's views of the importance of the homes, the costs of food during women's stay, and information given to women and families about when and how to use the homes. some barriers, especially those related to family commitments and costs of food, are challenging to solve. In order to make a BWH a user-friendly and viable option, it may be necessary to adjust ways in which BWHs are used. Good linkage with the health system is strength of the programme. However, further strengthening of community participation in monitoring and managing the BWHs is needed for the long term success and sustainability of the BWHs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Ecology of cultivable yeasts in pristine forests in northern Patagonia (Argentina) influenced by different environmental factors.

    PubMed

    Mestre, María Cecilia; Fontenla, Sonia; Rosa, Carlos A

    2014-06-01

    Environmental factors influencing the occurrence and community structure of soil yeasts in forests are not well studied. There are few studies dedicated to Southern Hemisphere soil yeasts populations and even fewer focused on temperate forests influenced by volcanic activity. The present work aimed to study the ecology of soil yeast communities from pristine forests influenced by different environmental factors (precipitation, physicochemical properties of soil, tree species, soil region, and season). The survey was performed in 4 northern Patagonian forests: 2 dominated by Nothofagus pumilio and 2 by Nothofagus antarctica. Yeast communities were described with ecological indices and species accumulation curves, and their association with environmental characteristics was assessed using multivariate analysis. Each forest site showed a particular arrangement of species as a result of environmental characteristics, such as dominant plant species, nutrient availability, and climatic characteristics. Cryptococcus podzolicus was most frequently isolated in nutrient-rich soils, Trichosporon porosum dominated cold mountain forests with low nutrient and water availability in soil, and capsulated yeasts such as Cryptococcus phenolicus dominated forest sites with low precipitation. The present work suggests that environmental factors affecting yeast communities may not be the current soil characteristics but the result of complex interactions of factors including natural disturbances like volcanic activity.

  10. Growth conditions influence the melatonin content of tomato plants.

    PubMed

    Arnao, Marino Bañón; Hernández-Ruiz, Josefa

    2013-06-01

    Melatonin (N-acetyl-5-methoxytryptamine) is an interesting molecule with well-known functions in vertebrates. Since its discovery in plants in 1995, many data indicate that its role as a cellular antioxidant is very relevant. Agents that induce stress cause increased melatonin levels in plant organs and melatonin levels fluctuate over the light:dark cycle; there are also conflicting data on the influence of environmental conditions on the melatonin content of plants. In this contribution we describe how cultivation conditions decisively influence melatonin levels in roots, stems and leaves of tomato plants, and we establish some guidelines for interpreting data with the intention of opening up new discussion options, given the lack of data on the place/s of melatonin biosynthesis and its mode of action in plant cells as an antioxidant.

  11. Influence of Surface Condition over Siberia on the East Asian Climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arai, M.; Kimoto, M.

    2006-12-01

    Using observational data and atmospheric general circulation model, relationship between surface condition over Siberia and circulation over East Asia is examined. We notice particularly the influence of springtime surface temperature over Siberia, which becomes high when the snowmelt is encouraged in situ. It is found that when the surface temperature over Siberia is high in April, blocking events over northeastern Siberia and the Okhotsk Sea in May and June occur more frequently than climatology. In the year when the surface temperature over Siberia is high, a jet stream over the north of Siberia is formed in the upper troposphere corresponding to the enhanced meridional temperature gradient, and the polar frontal jet is observed earlier than climatology. Blocking anticyclones over northeastern Siberia and the Okhotsk Sea is considered to be formed by Rossby wave propagation along the polar frontal jet in early summer. Therefore, the early establishment of the polar frontal jet is consistent with the increase of the blocking frequency. Associated with the enhancement of blocking activity is the intensification of the surface Okhotsk high, and cold anomaly to its south over the northern part of Japan during the early summer season. The amplified Okhotsk high also causes the enhancement of the Baiu front, which is a part of East Asian monsoon. The finding of this study suggests monitoring the springtime surface condition over northern Siberia as one of the promising predictors for the early summer climate over East Asia. We also examined the future climate change on the Eurasian Continent and East Asia due to the global warming, using a general circulation model. The surface temperature over Siberia increases and springtime snowmelt is enhanced under doubled CO2 condition. Summertime blocking anticyclones are also increased and the Baiu front is enhanced, compared with the simulation of the present climate. These results are manifestation of relationship between

  12. Influence of Medical Representatives on Prescribing Practices in Mekelle, Northern Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Workneh, Birhanu Demeke; Gebrehiwot, Mehari Gebregergis; Bayo, Tigist Assefa; Gidey, Meles Tekie; Belay, Yared Belete; Tesfaye, Desalegn Mergiaw; Kassa, Terefe Teshome

    2016-01-01

    Background Drug promotion by medical representatives is one of the factors that influence physicians’ prescribing decisions and choice of drugs. Objective To assess the influence of medical representatives on prescribing practice of physicians in health facilities, Mekelle, Northern Ethiopia. Materials and Methods Facility-based cross-sectional study was conducted enrolling all physicians working in public and private health facilities. All public and private health facilities were included and similarly, all physicians rendering services in these facilities were sampled in the study. The data were collected from February to March, 2015. Data were then entered into Epidata Version 3.1 and transferred to STATA version 12 for analysis. Both bivariable and multivariable logistic regressions were used to determine predictors. Results Of the ninety physicians approached in this study, 40 (48.2%) of the physicians believed that their prescribing decisions were influenced by visits of medical representatives (MRs). The odds of physicians who received gifts from MRs being influenced to prescribe their respective products was six times higher than those who reported not accepting any gifts [AOR = 6.56, 95% CI: 2.25, 19.13]. Stationery materials 23(35.4%) and drug samples 20(54.2%) were the commonest kinds of gifts given to physicians and face to face talking 45(54.2%) was the most frequent promotional methods. The finding of this study showed that around thirty-nine percent of MRs have had negative attitude toward competitors’ product. Moreover, working in private health facility was also another predictor of influence of prescribing decision in the study area [AOR = 12.78, 95% CI: 1.31, 124.56]. Conclusion Nearly half of the physicians working in Mekelle reported that their prescribing decisions were influenced by MRs in the last 12 months. Accepting gifts and working in private health facilities were predictors of influencing prescribing decisions. However, most MRs

  13. Modeling the potential of the Northern China forest shelterbelt in improving hydroclimate conditions

    Treesearch

    Yongqiang Liu; John Stanturf; Houquan Lu

    2008-01-01

    The forest shelterbelt (afforestation) project in northern China is the most significant ecosystem project initiated in China during the past three decades. It aims to improve and conserve the ecological environment in the project areas. The tree belt stands along the southern edge of the sandy lands, nearly paralleling to the Great Wall. This study used a regional...

  14. Ecological Condition of Streams in Northern Nevada EPA R-MAP Humboldt Basin Project

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report presents stream data on the Humboldt River Basin in northern Nevada using the R-EMAP Program. Water is of primary importance to both the economy and the ecology of the region. Many of the waters of Nevada have previously received relatively little attention in regar...

  15. Ecological Condition of Streams in Northern Nevada EPA R-MAP Humboldt Basin Project

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report presents stream data on the Humboldt River Basin in northern Nevada using the R-EMAP Program. Water is of primary importance to both the economy and the ecology of the region. Many of the waters of Nevada have previously received relatively little attention in regar...

  16. The influence of rainfall, vegetation, elephants and people on fire frequency of miombo woodlands, northern Mozambique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribeiro, N. S.; Okin, G. S.; Shugart, H.; Swap, R.

    2007-12-01

    Miombo woodlands are important in southern Africa as they occupy over 50% of the land and, their good and services support a large proportion of people in the region. Anthropogenic fires occur in miombo every year especially in the dry season (May - October). This study explores the influence of annual rainfall, elephant density, human density and corridors, and vegetation on the fire frequency. It was carried out in Niassa Reserve located in northern Mozambique, the largest and more pristine conservation area of miombo woodlands in the world. We used a time series analysis and statistical t-test of MODIS-derived Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) and Enhanced Vegetation Index (EVI) to explore the relationship between biomass and fire frequency. The influence of rainfall, elephants, people and vegetation on fire return was explored using a stepwise logistic regression analysis. The results of this study indicate that fire frequency is higher in places with high biomass at beginning of the dry season. In these areas fire seems to be more intense and to strongly reduce biomass in the late dry season. Land cover is the strongest predictor of fire frequency, but elephant density, annual rainfall and human corridors are also important.

  17. The Influence of Rainfall, Vegetation, Elephants and People on Fire Frequency of Miombo Woodlands, Northern Mozambique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribeiro, N. S.; Okin, G. S.; Shugart, H. H.; Swap, R. J.

    2008-12-01

    Miombo woodlands are important in southern Africa as they occupy over 50% of the land and, their good and services support a large proportion of people in the region. Anthropogenic fires occur in miombo every year especially in the dry season (May - October). This study explores the influence of annual rainfall, elephant density, human density and corridors, and vegetation on the fire frequency. It was carried out in Niassa Reserve located in northern Mozambique, the largest and more pristine conservation area of miombo woodlands in the world. We used a time series analysis and statistical t-test of MODIS-derived Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) and Enhanced Vegetation Index (EVI) to explore the relationship between biomass and fire frequency. The influence of rainfall, elephants, people and vegetation on fire return was explored using a stepwise logistic regression analysis. The results of this study indicate that fire frequency is higher in places with high biomass at beginning of the dry season. In these areas fire seems to be more intense and to strongly reduce biomass in the late dry season. Land cover is the strongest predictor of fire frequency, but elephant density, annual rainfall and human corridors are also important.

  18. Saltier sea surface water conditions recorded by multiple mid-Holocene corals in the northern South China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Yangrui; Deng, Wenfeng; Chen, Xuefei; Wei, Gangjian; Yu, Kefu; Zhao, Jian-xin

    2016-08-01

    The typical features of the mid-Holocene can be used to better understand present-day climate conditions and the potential trends of future climate change. The surface conditions, including sea surface temperature (SST) and sea surface salinity (SSS), of the South China Sea (SCS) are largely controlled by the East Asian monsoon system. Surface water conditions reconstructed from coral proxies can be used to study the evolution of the East Asian monsoon during the mid-Holocene. However, there are some discrepancies among existing coral-based studies regarding whether the mid-Holocene sea surface water was much saltier than the present day surface waters. Based on paired Sr/Ca and δ18O of modern and three fossil corals, this paper reconstructs the patterns of seasonal variation in SSS during the mid-Holocene in the northern SCS. The Δδ18O records (a proxy for SSS) derived from the three fossil corals were all heavier than that from the modern coral, which suggests the presence of more saline surface waters during the mid-Holocene in the northern SCS. These results are consistent with previous studies based on records reconstructed from coral and foraminifera, as well as from numerical simulations. Reduced rainfall caused by the strengthened Asian Monsoon and/or the northward shift of the intertropical convergence zone during the mid-Holocene would explain the increased salinity of the surface waters of the northern SCS. The findings presented here clarify the discrepancies among previous studies and confirm the existence of saltier surface waters in the northern SCS during the mid-Holocene.

  19. Influence of Late-Holocene Climate on Northern Rocky Mountain Mammals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadly, Elizabeth Anne

    1996-11-01

    An exceptionally rich paleontological site containing thousands of mammalian fossils and well-dated with 18 radiocarbon samples provides evidence of late-Holocene ecological response to climatic change in northern Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming. The mammalian fauna, composed of 10,597 identified specimens, shows surprising affinity to the local habitat with little evidence of long-distance transport of faunal elements, thus revealing the faithfulness of a fossil site to the community from which it is derived. The mammals illustrate ecological sensitivity to a series of mesic to xeric climatic excursions in the sagebrush-grassland ecotone during the past 3200 yr. From 3200 cal yr B.P. to a maximum of 1100 cal yr B.P., the species composition of mammals indicates wetter conditions than today. Beginning about 1200 cal yr B.P., the fauna becomes more representative of xeric conditions with maxima in xeric-indicator taxa and minima in mesic-indicator taxa, concordant with the Medieval Warm Period (circa 1000 to 650 yr B.P.). Cooler, wetter conditions which prevailed for most of the Little Ice Age (700 to 100 yr B.P.) in general correspond to a return to a more mesic mammalian fauna. A warm period within the Little Ice Age is documented by a xeric fauna. These data show that mammalian ecological sensitivity to climatic change over this intermediate time scale holds promise for predictions about the impacts of future global warming.

  20. Conditions for Viral Influence Spreading through Multiplex Correlated Social Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yanqing; Havlin, Shlomo; Makse, Hernán A.

    2014-04-01

    A fundamental problem in network science is to predict how certain individuals are able to initiate new networks to spring up "new ideas." Frequently, these changes in trends are triggered by a few innovators who rapidly impose their ideas through "viral" influence spreading, producing cascades of followers and fragmenting an old network to create a new one. Typical examples include the rise of scientific ideas or abrupt changes in social media, like the rise of Facebook to the detriment of Myspace. How this process arises in practice has not been conclusively demonstrated. Here, we show that a condition for sustaining a viral spreading process is the existence of a multiplex-correlated graph with hidden "influence links." Analytical solutions predict percolation-phase transitions, either abrupt or continuous, where networks are disintegrated through viral cascades of followers, as in empirical data. Our modeling predicts the strict conditions to sustain a large viral spreading via a scaling form of the local correlation function between multilayers, which we also confirm empirically. Ultimately, the theory predicts the conditions for viral cascading in a large class of multiplex networks ranging from social to financial systems and markets.

  1. Phoning while driving II: a review of driving conditions influence.

    PubMed

    Collet, C; Guillot, A; Petit, C

    2010-05-01

    The first paper examined how the variables related to driving performance were impacted by the management of holding a phone conversation. However, the conditions under which this dual task is carried out are dependent upon a set of factors that may particularly influence the risk of crash. These conditions are defined by several independent variables, classified into five main categories: i) legislation; ii) phone type (hands-free or hand-held); iii) drivers' features regarding age, gender, personal individual profile and driving experience; iv) conversation content (casual or professional) and its context (held with passengers or with a cell (mobile) phone); v) driving conditions (actual or simulated driving, road type, traffic density and weather). These independent variables determine the general conditions. The way in which these factors are combined and interact one with another thus determines the risk that drivers undergo when a cell phone is used while driving. Finally, this review defined the general conditions of driving for which managing a phone conversation is likely to elicit a high risk of car crash or, conversely, may provide a situation of lower risk, with sufficient acceptance to ensure safety.

  2. Influence of site and soil properties on the DRIFT spectra of northern cold-region soils [Influence of site and soil properties on the mid-infrared spectra of northern cold-region soils

    DOE PAGES

    Matamala, Roser; Calderon, Francisco J.; Jastrow, Julie D.; ...

    2017-06-05

    Here, we investigated the influence of site characteristics and soil properties on the chemical composition of organic matter in soils collected from a latitudinal transect across Alaska through analysis of diffuse reflectance Fourier transform mid infrared (MidIR) spectra of bulk soils. The study included 119 soil samples collected from 28 sites including tundra, boreal forest, and grassland ecosystems. Organic, mineral, and cryoturbated soil horizons, both seasonally and perennially frozen, from a variety of depths and edaphic conditions were examined. The amount and chemical composition of organic matter as well as site and soil properties exerted a strong influence on themore » MidIR spectra. The spectra were highly sensitive to the extent of organic matter decomposition, enabling the ordination of Oi, Oe and Oa organic horizons. Differences in absorbance intensity for several spectral bands indicated that Oi horizons contained greater abundance of relatively fresh residues, phenolic-OH compounds, aliphatic compounds (waxes, lipids and fats), and carbohydrates. In contrast, Oa horizons had a greater presence of amide groups (possibly from microbial residues), aromatics, C=C bonds, carboxylates and carboxylic acids. Another significant factor differentiating these horizons was the incorporation of clays and silicates into the decomposing organic matter of Oa horizons. Calculated height peak ratios showed a clear trend to greater decomposition among Oi, Oe and Oa. The MidIR spectra were related to many site/soil attributes including land cover type, parent material, and associated factors, such as permafrost presence/absence, soil drainage, horizon depth, bulk density, cation exchange capacity, and pH. Single MidIR spectral bands were identified that might be used in future studies to quickly estimate the organic and inorganic carbon, total nitrogen, and carbon:nitrogen ratios of soils from northern latitudes. Lastly, our results demonstrate that the

  3. Thermal structure and melting conditions associated with `hot' subduction: Implications from thermobarometry of Garibaldi belt basalts, northern Cascadia Subduction System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, N. L.

    2005-12-01

    The northern Cascadia margin of North America is the classic example of a "hot" subduction system. The downgoing Juan de Fuca plate decreases in age from ca. 10 m.y. off the central Washington coast to less than 5 m.y. off central Vancouver Island; beneath the Garibaldi volcanic belt (GVB) 250 km east of the convergent margin, inferred age of the oceanic lithosphere decreases northward from ca. 22 m.y to 13 m.y. Primitive and near-primitive mafic lavas, which primarily occur trenchward of the GVB volcanic front, range northward from high-Al olivine tholeiites, Mg-andesites and LILE- and LREE-enriched calc-alkaline basalts at Glacier Peak, through transitional basalts in the Cheakamus Valley to alkali olivine basalts and trachybasalts at Meager Mountain, Salal Glacier and Bridge River. The more northerly GVB basaltic magmas show the least evidence of slab-derived components in their source regions. Application of various olivine-melt and pyroxene-melt thermobarometers to GVB basalts indicates a general increase in magmatic temperatures from 1150-1200 C in Mount Baker and Glacier Peak basalts to 1225-1300 C in Bridge River and Salal Glacier lavas. Fe-Ti oxide thermobarometry suggests that northernmost basalts equilibrated under oxygen fugacities conditions between QFM and NNO, whereas Glacier Peak lavas equilibrated at higher oxygen fugacities (ca. 1 log unit above NNO). Estimated P and T conditions of mantle segregation suggest that GVB basalts ascended from increasingly greater depths northward along the volcanic arc. Similar variation is indicated by calculated P-T of basalt equilibrations with both Mg- and Fe-rich peridotite mineral assemblages, based on diopside and albite activity-composition relations. Estimated mantle equilibration temperatures correlate positively with some HFSE abundances (e.g., Hf), but negatively with those of fluid mobile elements (e.g., Cs and B). These relationships are considered in terms of the influence of slab thermal structure on

  4. [Influence of meteorologic conditions on pollution level of Aralsk territory].

    PubMed

    Muhametzhanova, Z T; Sakiev, K Z; Shadetova, A Zh; Grebeneva, O V; Hanturina, G R; Seitkasymova, G Zh; Ibrayeva, A D

    2015-01-01

    The article deals with data on meteorologic conditions influence on pollution of Aralsk territory. Aralsk climate over recent years appeared to be characterized by positive temperature anomalies (within 1-2 degrees C). Air pollution in Aralsk territory depends on increased air temperature (over 35 degrees C), on lay of land (general slope towards Aral sea) and wind scheme, with repeated south-west (11%), west (8%) and south (6%) winds result in high levels of air pollution with low-disperse particles of dust.

  5. Hydrochemical evaluation of the influences of mining activities on river water chemistry in central northern Mongolia.

    PubMed

    Batsaikhan, Bayartungalag; Kwon, Jang-Soon; Kim, Kyoung-Ho; Lee, Young-Joon; Lee, Jeong-Ho; Badarch, Mendbayar; Yun, Seong-Taek

    2017-01-01

    Although metallic mineral resources are most important in the economy of Mongolia, mining activities with improper management may result in the pollution of stream waters, posing a threat to aquatic ecosystems and humans. In this study, aiming to evaluate potential impacts of metallic mining activities on the quality of a transboundary river (Selenge) in central northern Mongolia, we performed hydrochemical investigations of rivers (Tuul, Khangal, Orkhon, Haraa, and Selenge). Hydrochemical analysis of river waters indicates that, while major dissolved ions originate from natural weathering (especially, dissolution of carbonate minerals) within watersheds, they are also influenced by mining activities. The water quality problem arising from very high turbidity is one of the major environmental concerns and is caused by suspended particles (mainly, sediment and soil particles) from diverse erosion processes, including erosion of river banks along the meandering river system, erosion of soils owing to overgrazing by livestock, and erosion by human activities, such as mining and agriculture. In particular, after passing through the Zaamar gold mining area, due to the disturbance of sediments and soils by placer gold mining, the Tuul River water becomes very turbid (up to 742 Nephelometric Turbidity Unit (NTU)). The Zaamar area is also the contamination source of the Tuul and Orkhon rivers by Al, Fe, and Mn, especially during the mining season. The hydrochemistry of the Khangal River is influenced by heavy metal (especially, Mn, Al, Cd, and As)-loaded mine drainage that originates from a huge tailing dam of the Erdenet porphyry Cu-Mo mine, as evidenced by δ(34)S values of dissolved sulfate (0.2 to 3.8 ‰). These two contaminated rivers (Tuul and Khangal) merge into the Orkhon River that flows to the Selenge River near the boundary between Mongolia and Russia and then eventually flows into Lake Baikal. Because water quality problems due to mining can be critical

  6. Behavioural responses to thermal conditions affect seasonal mass change in a heat-sensitive northern ungulate.

    PubMed

    van Beest, Floris M; Milner, Jos M

    2013-01-01

    Empirical tests that link temperature-mediated changes in behaviour (activity and resource selection) to individual fitness or condition are currently lacking for endotherms yet may be critical to understanding the effect of climate change on population dynamics. Moose (Alces alces) are thought to suffer from heat stress in all seasons so provide a good biological model to test whether exposure to non-optimal ambient temperatures influence seasonal changes in body mass. Seasonal mass change is an important fitness correlate of large herbivores and affects reproductive success of female moose. Using GPS-collared adult female moose from two populations in southern Norway we quantified individual differences in seasonal activity budget and resource selection patterns as a function of seasonal temperatures thought to induce heat stress in moose. Individual body mass was recorded in early and late winter, and autumn to calculate seasonal mass changes (n = 52 over winter, n = 47 over summer). We found large individual differences in temperature-dependent resource selection patterns as well as within and between season variability in thermoregulatory strategies. As expected, individuals using an optimal strategy, selecting young successional forest (foraging habitat) at low ambient temperatures and mature coniferous forest (thermal shelter) during thermally stressful conditions, lost less mass in winter and gained more mass in summer. This study provides evidence that behavioural responses to temperature have important consequences for seasonal mass change in moose living in the south of their distribution in Norway, and may be a contributing factor to recently observed declines in moose demographic performance. Although the mechanisms that underlie the observed temperature mediated habitat-fitness relationship remain to be tested, physiological state and individual variation in thermal tolerance are likely contributory factors. Climate-related effects on animal

  7. Behavioural Responses to Thermal Conditions Affect Seasonal Mass Change in a Heat-Sensitive Northern Ungulate

    PubMed Central

    van Beest, Floris M.; Milner, Jos M.

    2013-01-01

    Background Empirical tests that link temperature-mediated changes in behaviour (activity and resource selection) to individual fitness or condition are currently lacking for endotherms yet may be critical to understanding the effect of climate change on population dynamics. Moose (Alces alces) are thought to suffer from heat stress in all seasons so provide a good biological model to test whether exposure to non-optimal ambient temperatures influence seasonal changes in body mass. Seasonal mass change is an important fitness correlate of large herbivores and affects reproductive success of female moose. Methodology/Principal Findings Using GPS-collared adult female moose from two populations in southern Norway we quantified individual differences in seasonal activity budget and resource selection patterns as a function of seasonal temperatures thought to induce heat stress in moose. Individual body mass was recorded in early and late winter, and autumn to calculate seasonal mass changes (n = 52 over winter, n = 47 over summer). We found large individual differences in temperature-dependent resource selection patterns as well as within and between season variability in thermoregulatory strategies. As expected, individuals using an optimal strategy, selecting young successional forest (foraging habitat) at low ambient temperatures and mature coniferous forest (thermal shelter) during thermally stressful conditions, lost less mass in winter and gained more mass in summer. Conclusions/Significance This study provides evidence that behavioural responses to temperature have important consequences for seasonal mass change in moose living in the south of their distribution in Norway, and may be a contributing factor to recently observed declines in moose demographic performance. Although the mechanisms that underlie the observed temperature mediated habitat-fitness relationship remain to be tested, physiological state and individual variation in thermal tolerance

  8. Pressure-temperature conditions in granulite facies rocks of the northern Canadian Shield, Arctic Canada

    SciTech Connect

    Frisch, T.

    1985-01-01

    The northernmost part of the Churchill Structural Province of the Canadian Shield, underlying 60,000 km/sup 2/ of southeastern Ellesmere Island, Coburg Island and eastern Devon Island, consists of granulite facies metasedimentary, meta-igneous and plutonic intrusive rocks 2400 to 1900 m.y. old. Garnet+pyroxene+plagioclase of quartzofeldspathic gneisses from Ellesmere and Coburg islands indicate pressures, at 750/sup 0/C, ranging from greater than or equal to 6 to approx. 4kb; the lower pressures are derived largely, but not solely, from rim compositions. Similar rocks from Devon Island consistently indicate higher pressures of 6 to 7 kb. Garnet and plagioclase cores in sillimanite+cordierite-rich pelitic gneisses give pressures between 5 and 6.5 kb at 750/sup 0/C, the highest pressures being found in Devon Island rocks. Orthopyroxene+cordierite symplectites around garnet in magnesian metapelites indicate pressures under 4 kb at 650/sup 0/C. All cordierite is clearly of retrograde origin, having formed as a result of decompression during uplift, but even the highest pressures determined fall below the stability limit of cordierite in metapelites. Circumstantial evidence exists for the former stable coexistence of orthopyroxene+sillimanite, which would attest to pressures well in excess of 7 kb, but existing geobarometric equilibria have been strongly influenced by retrograde processes. Retrograde pressure-temperature conditions may well predominate in many granulite terranes but are not always recognized due to a scarcity of suitable mineral assemblages.

  9. The Influence of Fold and Fracture Development on Reservoir Behavior of the Lisburne Group of Northern Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Wallace, Wesley K.; Hanks, Catherine L.; Whalen, Michael T.; Jensen1, Jerry; Shackleton, J. Ryan; Jadamec, Margarete A.; McGee, Michelle M.; Karpov1, Alexandre V.

    2001-07-23

    The Carboniferous Lisburne Group is a major carbonate reservoir unit in northern Alaska. The lisburne is detachment folded where it is exposed throughout the northeastern Brooks Range, but is relatively underformed in areas of current production in the subsurface of the North Slope. The objectives of this study are to develop a better understanding of four major aspects of the Lisburne: (1) The geometry and kinematics of detachment folds and their truncation by thrust faults, (2) The influence of folding on fracture patterns, (3) The influence of deformation on fluid flow, and (4) Lithostratigraphy and its influence on folding, faulting, fracturing, and reservoir characteristics.

  10. Marine foraging ecology influences mercury bioaccumulation in deep-diving northern elephant seals

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Sarah H.; Ackerman, Joshua T.; Costa, Daniel P.

    2015-01-01

    Mercury contamination of oceans is prevalent worldwide and methylmercury concentrations in the mesopelagic zone (200–1000 m) are increasing more rapidly than in surface waters. Yet mercury bioaccumulation in mesopelagic predators has been understudied. Northern elephant seals (Mirounga angustirostris) biannually travel thousands of kilometres to forage within coastal and open-ocean regions of the northeast Pacific Ocean. We coupled satellite telemetry, diving behaviour and stable isotopes (carbon and nitrogen) from 77 adult females, and showed that variability among individuals in foraging location, diving depth and δ13C values were correlated with mercury concentrations in blood and muscle. We identified three clusters of foraging strategies, and these resulted in substantially different mercury concentrations: (i) deeper-diving and offshore-foraging seals had the greatest mercury concentrations, (ii) shallower-diving and offshore-foraging seals had intermediate levels, and (iii) coastal and more northerly foraging seals had the lowest mercury concentrations. Additionally, mercury concentrations were lower at the end of the seven-month-long foraging trip (n = 31) than after the two-month- long post-breeding trip (n = 46). Our results indicate that foraging behaviour influences mercury exposure and mesopelagic predators foraging in the northeast Pacific Ocean may be at high risk for mercury bioaccumulation. PMID:26085591

  11. Marine foraging ecology influences mercury bioaccumulation in deep-diving northern elephant seals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peterson, Sarah H.; Ackerman, Joshua T.; Costa, Daniel P.

    2015-01-01

    Mercury contamination of oceans is prevalent worldwide and methylmercury concentrations in the mesopelagic zone (200–1000 m) are increasing more rapidly than in surface waters. Yet mercury bioaccumulation in mesopelagic predators has been understudied. Northern elephant seals (Mirounga angustirostris) biannually travel thousands of kilometres to forage within coastal and open-ocean regions of the northeast Pacific Ocean. We coupled satellite telemetry, diving behaviour and stable isotopes (carbon and nitrogen) from 77 adult females, and showed that variability among individuals in foraging location, diving depth and δ13C values were correlated with mercury concentrations in blood and muscle. We identified three clusters of foraging strategies, and these resulted in substantially different mercury concentrations: (i) deeper-diving and offshore-foraging seals had the greatest mercury concentrations, (ii) shallower-diving and offshore-foraging seals had intermediate levels, and (iii) coastal and more northerly foraging seals had the lowest mercury concentrations. Additionally, mercury concentrations were lower at the end of the seven-month-long foraging trip (n = 31) than after the two-month- long post-breeding trip (n = 46). Our results indicate that foraging behaviour influences mercury exposure and mesopelagic predators foraging in the northeast Pacific Ocean may be at high risk for mercury bioaccumulation.

  12. Biodiversity and Complexity Influence Seagrass Functioning: A Comparative-Experimental Approach Across the Northern Hemisphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynolds, P. L.

    2016-02-01

    Coastal ecosystems are mediated by interactions between resource supply, consumer pressure, and community composition, with the balance shifting along environmental gradients. Comparative-experimental approaches, including observational and experimental networks, are a promising way forward to organizing this complexity into predictive models and to quantify the role of biodiversity on ocean processes. Through the Zostera Experimental Network we utilize this approach to study the community ecology of eelgrass (Zostera marina), the most widespread marine plant and foundation of important but threatened coastal ecosystems throughout the northern hemisphere. In 2014, parallel field surveys and experiments were conducted at 50 field sites to measure correlations between mesograzer species diversity, eelgrass genetic diversity, predation pressure, and seagrass dynamics. Biodiversity was positively correlated with plant and grazer biomass across sites. Predation pressure in these systems decreased with grazer biomass and latitude. In subsequent experiments in 2015, habitat complexity influenced the grazer community. These results suggest that the impacts of biodiversity loss on ecosystems will be of comparable magnitude to those of other global change factors and should be accounted for in relevant monitoring and restoration activities.

  13. Influence of repeated prescribed fire on tree growth and mortality in Pinus resinosa forests, northern Minnesota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bottero, Alessandra; D'Amato, Anthony W.; Palik, Brian J.; Kern, Christel C.; Bradford, John B.; Scherer, Sawyer S.

    2017-01-01

    Prescribed fire is widely used for ecological restoration and fuel reduction in fire-dependent ecosystems, most of which are also prone to drought. Despite the importance of drought in fire-adapted forests, little is known about cumulative effects of repeated prescribed burning on tree growth and related response to drought. Using dendrochronological data in red pine (Pinus resinosa Ait.)-dominated forests in northern Minnesota, USA, we examined growth responses before and after understory prescribed fires between 1960 and 1970, to assess whether repeated burning influences growth responses of overstory trees and vulnerability of overstory tree growth to drought. We found no difference in tree-level growth vulnerability to drought, expressed as growth resistance, resilience, and recovery, between areas receiving prescribed fire treatments and untreated forests. Annual mortality rates during the period of active burning were also low (less than 2%) in all treatments. These findings indicate that prescribed fire can be effectively integrated into management plans and climate change adaptation strategies for red pine forest ecosystems without significant short- or long-term negative consequences for growth or mortality rates of overstory trees.

  14. Influence of Siberian High on temperature variability over northern areas of South Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riaz, Syed Muhammad Fahad; Iqbal, Muhammad Jawed; Baig, Mirza Jawwad

    2017-05-01

    Siberian High pressure plays a significant role in wintertime climate variability over South Asia. It brings coldest air masses in the region. The available literature has linked Siberian High with climate of East Asia, central Asia, and Eurasia. This paper examines the linkage between Siberian High pressure and inter-annual variations in temperature over the region of South Asia during winters. The methods employed in this study are that of centers of action approach, maximum covariance, and canonical correlation analyses. The wintertime temperature is not only significantly influenced by the intensity of Siberian High pressure, but it is also significantly correlated with zonal movement of Indian Ocean High. The intensity of Siberian High pressure explains more variance of the temperature during winters over the South Asian region than that of large-scale circulation phenomena, namely, Arctic Oscillation, North Atlantic Oscillation, and El-Nino-Southern Oscillation. A linear model of wintertime temperature has also been constructed using the Siberian High pressure index and the Indian Ocean High longitudinal index, which explains 28% variability of wintertime temperature for the Northern part of South Asia. We have also presented the justification that this statistical evidence is supported by the circulations and changes in the atmosphere. The modes having maximum possible covariance between the regional wintertime temperature and sea-level pressure of Siberian High have been isolated using the method of maximum covariance analysis and the modes having maximum possible correlations between the two fields have been isolated using canonical correlation analysis.

  15. Turbidity and salinity in a tropical northern Australian estuary and their influence on fish distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cyrus, D. P.; Blaber, S. J. M.

    1992-12-01

    Turbidity and salinity and their influences on fish distribution were studied for two and a half years in the Embley Estuary in tropical northern Australia. Both turbidity and salinity varied significantly during the year but three clearly distinguishable seasonal patterns existed. These are referred to as the Wet, Early Dry and Late Dry Seasons. During each of these seasons distinct gradients of turbidity and salinity were present. The turbidity and salinity gradients were continuous with those in the adjacent marine environment of Albatross Bay. The levels and ranges of both factors were largely determined by the seasonal rainfall patterns in the catchment of the Embley River. The distribution and abundance of the 45 most common species was analysed in relation to turbidity, salinity and temperature patterns in the estuary. These data showed that fish densities within the estuary were related to turbidity and salinity but not temperature. There was a strong inverse relationship between turbidity and salinity. The Catch per Unit Effort (CPUE) of each species was determined in each of three broad ranges of turbidity and salinity. From this, patterns related to these two factors were found for 30 of the 45 species of fish.

  16. Marine foraging ecology influences mercury bioaccumulation in deep-diving northern elephant seals.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Sarah H; Ackerman, Joshua T; Costa, Daniel P

    2015-07-07

    Mercury contamination of oceans is prevalent worldwide and methylmercury concentrations in the mesopelagic zone (200-1000 m) are increasing more rapidly than in surface waters. Yet mercury bioaccumulation in mesopelagic predators has been understudied. Northern elephant seals (Mirounga angustirostris) biannually travel thousands of kilometres to forage within coastal and open-ocean regions of the northeast Pacific Ocean. We coupled satellite telemetry, diving behaviour and stable isotopes (carbon and nitrogen) from 77 adult females, and showed that variability among individuals in foraging location, diving depth and δ(13)C values were correlated with mercury concentrations in blood and muscle. We identified three clusters of foraging strategies, and these resulted in substantially different mercury concentrations: (i) deeper-diving and offshore-foraging seals had the greatest mercury concentrations, (ii) shallower-diving and offshore-foraging seals had intermediate levels, and (iii) coastal and more northerly foraging seals had the lowest mercury concentrations. Additionally, mercury concentrations were lower at the end of the seven-month-long foraging trip (n = 31) than after the two-month- long post-breeding trip (n = 46). Our results indicate that foraging behaviour influences mercury exposure and mesopelagic predators foraging in the northeast Pacific Ocean may be at high risk for mercury bioaccumulation.

  17. Landscape Changes Influence the Occurrence of the Melioidosis Bacterium Burkholderia pseudomallei in Soil in Northern Australia

    PubMed Central

    Kaestli, Mirjam; Mayo, Mark; Harrington, Glenda; Ward, Linda; Watt, Felicity; Hill, Jason V.; Cheng, Allen C.; Currie, Bart J.

    2009-01-01

    Background The soil-dwelling saprophyte bacterium Burkholderia pseudomallei is the cause of melioidosis, a severe disease of humans and animals in southeast Asia and northern Australia. Despite the detection of B. pseudomallei in various soil and water samples from endemic areas, the environmental habitat of B. pseudomallei remains unclear. Methodology/Principal Findings We performed a large survey in the Darwin area in tropical Australia and screened 809 soil samples for the presence of these bacteria. B. pseudomallei were detected by using a recently developed and validated protocol involving soil DNA extraction and real-time PCR targeting the B. pseudomallei–specific Type III Secretion System TTS1 gene cluster. Statistical analyses such as multivariable cluster logistic regression and principal component analysis were performed to assess the association of B. pseudomallei with environmental factors. The combination of factors describing the habitat of B. pseudomallei differed between undisturbed sites and environmentally manipulated areas. At undisturbed sites, the occurrence of B. pseudomallei was found to be significantly associated with areas rich in grasses, whereas at environmentally disturbed sites, B. pseudomallei was associated with the presence of livestock animals, lower soil pH and different combinations of soil texture and colour. Conclusions/Significance This study contributes to the elucidation of environmental factors influencing the occurrence of B. pseudomallei and raises concerns that B. pseudomallei may spread due to changes in land use. PMID:19156200

  18. Hunting influences the diel patterns in habitat selection by northern pintails Anas acuta

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Casazza, Michael L.; Coates, Peter S.; Miller, Michael R.; Overton, Cory T.; Yparraguirre, Daniel R.

    2012-01-01

    Northern pintail Anas acuta (hereafter pintail) populations wintering within Suisun Marsh, a large estuarine managed wetland near San Francisco Bay, California,USA, have declined markedly over the last four decades. The reasons for this decline are unclear. Information on how hunting and other factors influence the selection of vegetation types and sanctuaries would be beneficial to manage pintail populations in SuisunMarsh. During 1991-1993, we radio-marked and relocated female pintails (individuals: N = 203, relocations: N = 7,688) within Suisun Marsh to investigate habitat selection during the non-breeding months (winter). We calculated selection ratios for different vegetation types and for sanctuaries, and examined differences in those ratios between hunting season (i.e. hunting and non-hunting), age (hatchyear and after-hatch-year), and time of day (daylight or night hours). We found that diel patterns in selection were influenced by hunting disturbance. For example, prior to the hunting season and during daylight hours, pintails selected areas dominated by brass buttons Cotula coronopifolia, a potentially important food source, usually outside of sanctuary boundaries. However, during the hunting season, pintails did not select brass buttons during daylight hours, but instead highly selected permanent pools, mostly within sanctuaries. Also, during the hunting season, pintails showed strong selection for brass buttons at night. Sanctuaries provided more area of permanent water pools than within hunting areas and appeared to function as important refugia during daylight hours of the hunting season. Wildlife managers should encourage large protected permanent pools adjacent to hunted wetlands to increase pintail numbers within wetland environments and responsibly benefit hunting opportunities while improving pintail conservation.

  19. Influences of changing freeze-thaw seasons on evapotranspiration in northern high latitudes and associated uncertainty analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, K.; Kimball, J. S.; Kim, Y.; McDonald, K. C.

    2012-12-01

    Seasonal landscape transitions between predominantly frozen and thawed conditions are analogous to a biospheric and hydrologic on/off switch, with marked differences in evapotranspiration (ET) and other biological activity between largely dormant winter and active summer conditions. We investigated changes in freeze-thaw (FT) seasons and ET from 1983 to 2006, and their connections in the northern cryosphere by analyzing independent satellite remote sensing derived FT and ET records. We also inspected the impact of uncertainty in the FT record on the investigated connections between the seasonal FT dynamics and ET. Our findings show that the northern cryosphere has experienced advancing (-2.5 days/decade; P =0.005) and lengthening (3.5 days/decade; P =0.007) non-frozen season trends over the 24-year period, coinciding with an upward trend (6.4 mm/yr/decade; P = 0.014) in regional mean annual ET over the same period. Regional average timing of spring primary thaw and the annual non-frozen period are highly correlated with regional annual ET ( |r|≥0.75; P < 0.001), with corresponding impacts to annual ET of approximately 0.6% day-1 and 0.5% day-1, respectively. The impact of primary fall freeze timing on ET is relatively minor compared to primary spring thaw timing. Earlier onset of the non-frozen season generally promotes annual ET in colder areas, but appears to suppress summer ET by increasing drought stress in the southernmost parts of the domain where water supply is the leading constraint to ET. The cumulative effect of future freeze-thaw changes on ET in the region will largely depend on future changes of large-scale atmosphere circulations and rates of vegetation disturbance and adaptation to continued warming. Uncertainty in FT generally weakens the correlations between annual ET and the seasonal FT dynamics. Impacts of uncertainty in FT on the relationship between annual ET and primary spring thaw are more evident in higher latitudes than in lower

  20. The influence of initial conditions on dispersion and reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, B. D.

    2016-12-01

    In various generalizations of the reaction-dispersion problem, researchers have developed frameworks in which the apparent dispersion coefficient can be negative. Such dispersion coefficients raise several difficult questions. Most importantly, the presence of a negative dispersion coefficient at the macroscale leads to a macroscale representation that illustrates an apparent decrease in entropy with increasing time; this, then, appears to be in violation of basic thermodynamic principles. In addition, the proposition of a negative dispersion coefficient leads to an inherently ill-posed mathematical transport equation. The ill-posedness of the problem arises because there is no unique initial condition that corresponds to a later-time concentration distribution (assuming that if discontinuous initial conditions are allowed). In this presentation, we explain how the phenomena of negative dispersion coefficients actually arise because the governing differential equation for early times should, when derived correctly, incorporate a term that depends upon the initial and boundary conditions. The process of reactions introduces a similar phenomena, where the structure of the initial and boundary condition influences the form of the macroscopic balance equations. When upscaling is done properly, new equations are developed that include source terms that are not present in the classical (late-time) reaction-dispersion equation. These source terms depend upon the structure of the initial condition of the reacting species, and they decrease exponentially in time (thus, they converge to the conventional equations at asymptotic times). With this formulation, the resulting dispersion tensor is always positive-semi-definite, and the reaction terms directly incorporate information about the state of mixedness of the system. This formulation avoids many of the problems that would be engendered by defining negative-definite dispersion tensors, and properly represents the effective

  1. Earthworm species influence on carbon-mineral association in a sugar maple forest in northern Minnesota

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyttle, A.; Yoo, K.; Aufdenkampe, A. K.; Hale, C. M.; Sebestyen, S. D.

    2011-12-01

    Non-native European earthworms are invading previously earthworm-free hardwood forests in the northern Great Lakes Region. Whereas earthworms' impacts on soil morphology and geochemical properties have been well documented in agricultural settings, the role of earthworms in biogeochemical cycles of undisturbed forests remains poorly understood. The forest soils that were recently invaded by exotic earthworms, therefore, provide a unique opportunity to understand how and how much earthworms contribute to biogeochemistry of non-agricultural environments. Increased degree and extent of soil mixing is one of the better known consequences of the earthworm invasion. Our hypothesis is that invasive earthworms positively affect carbon (C) stabilization by enhancing contacts between organic matter and minerals. We are studying C-mineral complexation along a well-established earthworm chronosequence in a sugar maple forest in northern Minnesota. We have observed changes in total earthworm biomass, A horizon C storage, and total specific surface area (SSA) of minerals as the invasion progresses. Because each earthworm species has different feeding and dwelling habits, biogeochemical imprints of the invasion reflect not only earthworms' biomass but also their species composition. All earthworm species show an increase in their biomass with greater time length since the invasion, though epigeic earthworms tend to be the pioneer species. As the total earthworm biomass increases, we find greater incorporation of organic C into the A horizon; the O horizon thickness decreases from 8 to 0 cm as the A horizon thickens from ~5 cm to ~12 cm. While leaf litter biomass is negatively correlated with total earthworm biomass, dramatic decreases in litter biomass are coupled with considerable increases in the biomass of epi-endogeic species. Despite the general decrease in C storage in the A horizon with greater degree of invasion, the storages fluctuate along the transect because

  2. Human and biophysical factors influencing modern fire disturbance in northern Wisconsin

    Treesearch

    Brian R. Sturtevant; David T. Cleland

    2007-01-01

    Humans cause most wildfires in northern Wisconsin, but interactions between human and biophysical variables affecting fire starts and size are not well understood. We applied classification tree analyses to a 16-year fire database from northern Wisconsin to evaluate the relative importance of human v. biophysical variables affecting fire occurrence within (1) all cover...

  3. Low impact of dry conditions on the CO2 exchange of a Northern-Norwegian blanket bog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lund, Magnus; Bjerke, J. W.; Drake, B. G.; Engelsen, O.; Hansen, G. H.; Parmentier, F. J. W.; Powell, T. L.; Silvennoinen, H.; Sottocornola, M.; Tømmervik, H.; Weldon, S.; Rasse, D. P.

    2015-02-01

    Northern peatlands hold large amounts of organic carbon (C) in their soils and are as such important in a climate change context. Blanket bogs, i.e. nutrient-poor peatlands restricted to maritime climates, may be extra vulnerable to global warming since they require a positive water balance to sustain their moss dominated vegetation and C sink functioning. This study presents a 4.5 year record of land-atmosphere carbon dioxide (CO2) exchange from the Andøya blanket bog in northern Norway. Compared with other peatlands, the Andøya peatland exhibited low flux rates, related to the low productivity of the dominating moss and lichen communities and the maritime settings that attenuated seasonal temperature variations. It was observed that under periods of high vapour pressure deficit, net ecosystem exchange was reduced, which was mainly caused by a decrease in gross primary production. However, no persistent effects of dry conditions on the CO2 exchange dynamics were observed, indicating that under present conditions and within the range of observed meteorological conditions the Andøya blanket bog retained its C uptake function. Continued monitoring of these ecosystem types is essential in order to detect possible effects of a changing climate.

  4. Geoeffective and Climate-Influencing Solar and Interplanetary Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baranyi, T.; Ludmány, A.

    Several connections have been detected and demonstrated between solar magnetic conditions and climatic responses which hint at a highly complicated mechanism of sun-climate relations through plasma streams. The present contribution overviews our results about the possible factors of this mechanism. The main factor is the negative value of the interplanetary magnetic B_z component which exhibits a fairly complex behaviour. Its strength is influenced by the solar dipole cycle, the nature of ejected plasma (CME or fast stream), the magnetic topology of the CME and the position of the Earth (Rosenberg-Coleman and Russell-McPherron effects). The persistence of the negative B_z is also effective. The impacts of these features can be pointed out in the climatic responses.

  5. The influence of landscape position on lake chemical responses to drought in northern Wisconsin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Webster, K.E.; Kratz, T.K.; Bowser, C.J.; Magnuson, J.J.; Rose, W.J.

    1996-01-01

    Climatic shifts to drier conditions during drought alter the hydrologic pathways of water and solute flow to aquatic ecosystems. We examined differences in drought-induced trends in the semiconservative cations, Ca+Mg, in seven northern Wisconsin lakes. These spanned the range of hydrologic settings in the region, including hydraulically mounded, groundwater flowthrough, and groundwater-discharge lakes. Parallel increases in concentration across the seven lakes during drought were attributable to evapoconcentration. However, we observed divergent trends for mass, which better reflects altered solute flux by accounting for changes in lake volume. Ca+Mg mass increased in three groundwater-dominated lakes as precipitation inputs were low and groundwater discharging from longer flowpaths became proportionately more important. In contrast, decreases in Ca+Mg mass for two precipitation-dominated lakes reflected diminished inputs of solute-rich groundwater. Landscape position, defined by the spatial position of a lake within a hydrologic flow system, accounted for the divergence in chemical responses to drought.

  6. Influence of overconsolidated condition on permeability evolution in silica sand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, S.; Kaneko, H.; Ito, T.; Nishimura, O.; Minagawa, H.

    2013-12-01

    Permeability of sediments is important factors for production of natural gas from natural gas hydrate bearing layers. Methane-hydrate is regarded as one of the potential resources of natural gas. As results of coring and logging, the existence of a large amount of methane-hydrate is estimated in the Nankai Trough, offshore central Japan, where many folds and faults have been observed. In the present study, we investigate the permeability of silica sand specimen forming the artificial fault zone after large displacement shear in the ring-shear test under two different normal consolidated and overconsolidated conditions. The significant influence of overconsolidation ratio (OCR) on permeability evolution is not found. The permeability reduction is influenced a great deal by the magnitude of normal stress during large displacement shearing. The grain size distribution and structure observation in the shear zone of specimen after shearing at each normal stress level are analyzed by laser scattering type particle analyzer and scanning electron microscope, respectively. It is indicated that the grain size and porosity reduction due to the particle crushing are the factor of the permeability reduction. This study is financially supported by METI and Research Consortium for Methane Hydrate Resources in Japan (the MH21 Research Consortium).

  7. Physical Conditions Associated with Widespread Seafloor Methane Discharge on the Northern US Atlantic Margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skarke, A. D.; Ruppel, C. D.; Brothers, D. S.

    2014-12-01

    Recent analysis of water column backscatter data and remotely operated vehicle (ROV) video imagery collected by NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer between 2011 and 2013 revealed methane discharge from the seafloor at over 570 gas seep locations along the northern US Atlantic margin. To the best of our knowledge, such large-scale seepage has not previously been observed on a passive margin outside the Arctic or not spatially associated with a petroleum basin. This seepage has implications for the global carbon cycle, ocean chemistry (e.g., acidification), and in some cases, the climate system. Using data collected by Okeanos Explorer and NOAA's Deep Discoverer ROV, we combine water column backscatter data with video imagery and seafloor backscatter data to estimate gas flux and constrain the geoacoustic properties of the seabed at methane discharge sites. The total methane flux from the northern US Atlantic margin seeps is conservatively estimated at ~15-90 Mg y-1, based on observations of gas bubble volume, discharge rates, and discharge points per site. However, fewer than 1% of the identified seep sites have been inspected with a ROV, and this estimate is likely to be revised upward as the characteristics of the seeps are further constrained. Another important observation to emerge from our analysis is the lack of spatial correlation between seep sites and the ~5000 pockmarks mapped on the northern part of the US Atlantic margin. In this region, pockmarks, which are often easily identified by geophysical imaging of the seafloor, should not be considered potential target sites for finding undiscovered areas of seepage. Conversely, discrete patches of elevated relative seafloor acoustic backscatter amplitude do appear to be correlated with the spatial distribution of methane seeps, implying anomalous seafloor characteristic at seep loci. This finding is consistent with ROV video observations of authigenic carbonate outcrops and extensive chemosynthetic bivalve communities

  8. Growth conditions influence melanization of Brazilian clinical Sporothrix schenckii isolates

    PubMed Central

    Almeida-Paes, Rodrigo; Frases, Susana; Monteiro, Paulo Cezar Fialho; Gutierrez-Galhardo, Maria Clara; Zancopé-Oliveira, Rosely Maria; Nosanchuk, Joshua D.

    2009-01-01

    Sporothrix schenckii is known to produce DHN melanin on both conidial and yeast cells, however little information is available regarding the factors inducing fungal melanization. We evaluated whether culture conditions influenced melanization of 25 Brazilian S. schenckii strains and one control strain (ATCC 10212). Tested conditions included different media, pH, temperature, incubation time, glucose concentrations, and presence or absence of tricyclazole or L-DOPA. Melanization was reduced on Sabouraud compared to defined chemical medium. The majority of strains produced small amounts of melanin at 37°C and none melanized at basic pH. Increased glucose concentrations did not inhibit melanization, rather increasing glucose enhanced pigment production in 27% of strains. Melanin synthesis was also enhanced by the addition of L-DOPA and its addition to medium with tricyclazole, an inhibitor of melanin synthesis, resulted in fungal melanization, including hyphal melanin production. Our results suggest that different S. schenckii strains have distinct control of melanization and that this fungus can use phenolic compounds to enhance melanization in vitro. PMID:19328867

  9. Evaluation of sampling strategies to characterize dissolved oxygen conditions in northern Gulf of Mexico estuaries

    SciTech Connect

    Summers, J.K.; Engle, V.D.

    1993-01-01

    Dissolved oxygen was continuously monitored in eight sites of northern Gulf of Mexico estuaries in August, 1990. Monte Carlo analyses on subsamples of the data were used to evaluate several commonly used monitoring strategies. Monitoring strategies which involve single point sampling of dissolved oxygen may often misclassify an estuary as having good water quality. In the case of shallow, often well-mixed estuaries that experience diurnal cycles, such monitoring often does not occur at night, during the time of lowest dissolved oxygen concentration. The authors' objective was to determine the minimum sampling effort required to correctly classify a site in terms of the observed frequency of hypoxia. Tests concluded that the most successful classification strategy used the minimum dissolved oxygen concentration from a continuously sampled 24-hour period. (Copyright (c) 199e Kluwer Academic Publishers.)

  10. Evaluation of the ground-water flow model for northern Utah Valley, Utah, updated to conditions through 2002

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thiros, Susan A.

    2006-01-01

    This report evaluates the performance of a numerical model of the ground-water system in northern Utah Valley, Utah, that originally simulated ground-water conditions during 1947-1980 and was updated to include conditions estimated for 1981-2002. Estimates of annual recharge to the ground-water system and discharge from wells in the area were added to the original ground-water flow model of the area.The files used in the original transient-state model of the ground-water flow system in northern Utah Valley were imported into MODFLOW-96, an updated version of MODFLOW. The main model input files modified as part of this effort were the well and recharge files. Discharge from pumping wells in northern Utah Valley was estimated on an annual basis for 1981-2002. Although the amount of average annual withdrawals from wells has not changed much since the previous study, there have been changes in the distribution of well discharge in the area. Discharge estimates for flowing wells during 1981-2002 were assumed to be the same as those used in the last stress period of the original model because of a lack of new data. Variations in annual recharge were assumed to be proportional to changes in total surface-water inflow to northern Utah Valley. Recharge specified in the model during the additional stress periods varied from 255,000 acre-feet in 1986 to 137,000 acre-feet in 1992.The ability of the updated transient-state model to match hydrologic conditions determined for 1981-2002 was evaluated by comparing water-level changes measured in wells to those computed by the model. Water-level measurements made in February, March, or April were available for 39 wells in the modeled area during all or part of 1981-2003. In most cases, the magnitude and direction of annual water-level change from 1981 to 2002 simulated by the updated model reasonably matched the measured change. The greater-than-normal precipitation that occurred during 1982-84 resulted in period-of-record high

  11. Influence of Spanwise Boundary Conditions on Slat Noise Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lockard, David P.; Choudhari, Meelan M.; Buning, Pieter G.

    2015-01-01

    The slat noise from the 30P/30N high-lift system is being investigated through computational fluid dynamics simulations with the OVERFLOW code in conjunction with a Ffowcs Williams-Hawkings acoustics solver. In the present study, two different spanwise grids are being used to investigate the effect of the spanwise extent and periodicity on the near-field unsteady structures and radiated noise. The baseline grid with periodic boundary conditions has a short span equal to 1/9th of the stowed chord, whereas the other, longer span grid adds stretched grids on both sides of the core, baseline grid to allow inviscid surface boundary conditions at both ends. The results indicate that the near-field mean statistics obtained using the two grids are similar to each other, as are the directivity and spectral shapes of the radiated noise. However, periodicity forces all acoustic waves with less than one wavelength across the span to be two-dimensional, without any variation in the span. The spanwise coherence of the acoustic waves is what is needed to make estimates of the noise that would be radiated from realistic span lengths. Simulations with periodic conditions need spans of at least six slat chords to allow spanwise variation in the low-frequencies associated with the peak of broadband slat noise. Even then, the full influence of the periodicity is unclear, so employing grids with a fine, central region and highly stretched meshes that go to slip walls may be a more efficient means of capturing the spanwise decorrelation of low-frequency acoustic phenomena.

  12. Annual- versus decadal-scale climatic influences on tree establishment and mortality in northern Patagonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villalba, Ricardo; Veblen, Thomas T.

    Current capability to predict climate-induced vegetation change is limited by an inadequate understanding of the effects of climate variations on tree regeneration, tree mortality and disturbance regimes. Climatic controls of vegetation patterns are most evident at broad spatial and temporal scales. However, over periods ranging from a few years to several decades, the influence of climatic fluctuations on forest dynamics has been poorly recognized. This study explores the role that climatic fluctuations at annual- to decadal-scales have on Austrocedrus chilensis establishment and mortality at the forest-steppe border in northern Patagonia, Argentina, from 37 to 43°S latitude. Recent episodes of tree establishment and mortality are reconstructed based on age frequency distributions from living trees, and dendrochronological dating of snags, respectively. Austrocedrus establishment at the forest-steppe ecotone appears to be episodic in relation to climatically distinct episodes. Wet-cool summers prevailing for a decade or longer facilitate tree establishment. For the past 150 years, tree establishment at the forest-steppe ecotone has involved interactions between climate and disturbance (mainly fire and grazing). The nature and intensity of these interactions have varied through time. Episodic mortality is associated with extremely dry-warm climatic events during a single summer, or more commonly during two consecutive summers. Most episodes of tree establishment and mortality are concurrent with years of above- and below-average tree growth, respectively. However, regional episodes of Austrocedrus establishment are related to decadal-scale climatic events, whereas mortality episodes are mainly controlled by extreme, annual-scale climatic fluctuations. The distinction between the effect of short- versus long-lasting climatic fluctuations on forest dynamics is crucial to properly predicting forest response to climatic changes.

  13. Influences of the 2010 Eyjafjallajökull volcanic plume on air quality in the northern Alpine region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schäfer, K.; Thomas, W.; Peters, A.; Ries, L.; Obleitner, F.; Schnelle-Kreis, J.; Birmili, W.; Diemer, J.; Fricke, W.; Junkermann, W.; Pitz, M.; Emeis, S.; Forkel, R.; Suppan, P.; Flentje, H.; Gilge, S.; Wichmann, H. E.; Meinhardt, F.; Zimmermann, R.; Weinhold, K.; Soentgen, J.; Münkel, C.; Freuer, C.; Cyrys, J.

    2011-08-01

    A series of major eruptions of the Eyjafjallajökull volcano in Iceland started on 14 April 2010 and continued until the end of May 2010. The volcanic emissions moved over nearly the whole of Europe and were observed first on 16 April 2010 in Southern Germany with different remote sensing systems from the ground and space. Enhanced PM10 and SO2 concentrations were detected on 17 April at mountain stations (Zugspitze/Schneefernerhaus and Schauinsland) as well as in Innsbruck by in situ measurement devices. On 19 April intensive vertical mixing and advection along with clear-sky conditions facilitated the entrainment of volcanic material down to the ground. The subsequent formation of a stably stratified lower atmosphere with limited mixing near the ground during the evening of 19 April led to an additional enhancement of near-surface particle concentrations. Consequently, on 19 April and 20 April exceedances of the daily threshold value for particulate matter (PM10) were reported at nearly all monitoring stations of the North Alpine foothills as well as at mountain and valley stations in the northern Alps. The chemical analyses of ambient PM10 at monitoring stations of the North Alpine foothills yielded elevated Titanium concentrations on 19/20 April which prove the presence of volcanic plume material. Following this result the PM10 threshold exceedances are also associated with the volcanic plume. The entrainment of the volcanic plume material mainly affected the concentrations of coarse particles (>1 μm) - interpreted as volcanic ash - and ultrafine particles (<100 nm), while the concentrations of accumulation mode aerosol (0.1-1 μm) were not changed significantly. With regard to the occurrence of ultrafine particles, it is concluded that their formation was triggered by high sulphuric acid concentrations which are necessarily generated by the photochemical processes in a plume rich in sulphur dioxide under high solar irradiance. It became evident that during

  14. Influence of iron precipitated condition and light intensity on microalgae activated sludge based wastewater remediation.

    PubMed

    Anbalagan, Anbarasan; Schwede, Sebastian; Lindberg, Carl-Fredrik; Nehrenheim, Emma

    2017-02-01

    The indigenous microalgae-activated sludge (MAAS) process during remediation of municipal wastewater was investigated by studying the influence of iron flocculation step and light intensity. In addition, availability of total phosphorous (P) and photosynthetic activity was examined in fed-batch and batch mode under northern climatic conditions and limited lighting. This was followed by a semi-continuous operation with 4 d of hydraulic retention time and mean cell residence time of 6.75 d in a photo-bioreactor (PBR) with varying P availability. The fed-batch condition showed that P concentrations of 3-4 mg L(-1) were effective for photosynthetic chl. a development in iron flocculated conditions. In the PBR, the oxygen evolution rate increased with increase in the concentration of MAAS (from 258 to 573 mg TSS L(-1)) at higher surface photosynthetic active radiation (250 and 500 μmol m(-2) s(-1)). Additionally, the rate approached a saturation phase at low MAAS (110 mg L(-1)) with higher light intensities. Semi-continuous operation with luxury P uptake and effective P condition showed stable average total nitrogen removal of 88 and 92% respectively, with residual concentrations of 3.77 and 2.21 mg L(-1). The corresponding average P removal was 68 and 59% with residual concentrations of 2.32 and 1.75 mg L(-1). The semi-continuous operation produced a rapidly settleable MAAS under iron flocculated condition with a settling velocity of 92-106 m h(-1) and sludge volume index of 31-43 ml g(-1) in the studied cases.

  15. Factors influencing the food choices and eating habits of restaurant chefs in northern New Jersey: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Mahadevan, Meena; Feldman, Charles

    2011-01-01

    This study was conducted to understand the factors influencing the food habits of restaurant chefs in northern New Jersey. Data was collected from participants (N = 12) using dietary recalls, and semi-structured interviews based on the socio-ecological model. Dietary recall analysis revealed multiple nutritional intake hazards including skipping meals, and substitution of foods rich in fats and sugar for fruits and vegetables, and increased consumption of alcohol. Qualitative data analysis revealed that their food habits were influenced by a repertoire of individual, organizational, and interpersonal factors. The relevance of these findings to nutrition intervention programs for this population is discussed.

  16. Watershed land use influences on river discharge and channel characteristics across northern New Jersey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galster, J. C.; Palmer, K.; Birrer, M.; Espinosa, S.; Pope, G. A.; Feng, H.; Wu, M. S.

    2012-12-01

    River characteristics such as sediment size, channel dimensions, and discharges can be strongly controlled by watershed land use. This project investigated three watersheds in northern New Jersey with varying degrees of forested, agriculture, and urban land uses to determine the effects of land use on these rivers. The watersheds are the Flatbrook, the Wallkill, and the Rockaway rivers and are predominantly forested, forested/agricultural, and forested/urban respectively. Eight sites across these fourth and fifth-order watersheds were investigated including: 1) the grain size using the Wolman pebble count method, 2) channel dimensions (slope, width, depth) with a total station, and 3) channel stability using the rapid geomorphic assessment (RGA). Channel width changes from 1930 to present were determined using historic aerial photographs, and river discharge characteristics were compiled using custom software to determine the flashiness (as measured by the Reynolds-Baker Index) and the Baseflow Index. The three adjacent watersheds have minimal variations in potential confounding variables such as watershed slope, climate, and precipitation, allowing for the isolation of the effects of land use changes. While some of the general relationship between how land use changes affect rivers (e.g., urban streams typically have larger grain sizes and flashier discharges), studies such as this one are important in determining how rivers respond locally. Across the studied watersheds, forested land uses are positively associated with rapid geomorphic assessments scores, indicating the influence of upstream land use and the importance of vegetation. Forested land use is also associated with efficient discharges as measured by hydraulic radius, although there were not significant changes in channel width from 1930 to present. The flashiness of all rivers has increased over time while the baseflow index has decreased, which may be a climatic signal as opposed to being influenced

  17. Location and continuity of the annual northern Gulf of Mexico hypoxic zone influences microbial diversity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillies, L.; Thrash, C.; Rabalais, N. N.; Mason, O. U.

    2016-02-01

    Areas of low oxygen have spread exponentially over the past 40 years, and are cited as a key stressor on coastal ecosystems. The world's second largest coastal hypoxic (≤ 2 mg O2 L-1) zone occurs annually in the northern Gulf of Mexico (nGOM). The July 2013 and 2014 microbial communities in the nGOM were characterized along a hypoxic to oxic gradient. In 2013, the hypoxic zone was continuous, deep and shelfwide, compared to 2014, which was discontinuous, shallower and primarily located at the mouth of the Mississippi River (MR). Previously we reported that the 2013 nGOM hypoxic zone was dominated by Thaumarchaeota and amoA genes. Analysis of the 2014 hypoxic zone 16S rRNA gene iTag data revealed that Thaumarchaeota were again abundant, but not to the same extent as 2013. The dominant Thaumarchaeota, N. maritimus species in 2013 was also abundant in 2014, but its abundance was significantly lower in 2014. In both years, the normalized abundance of this Thaumarchaeota species was inversely correlated with DO concentrations. In contrast to the 2014 iTag data, qPCR of Thaumarchaeota 16S rRNA and amoA genes (1:1 ratio) revealed higher abundances in the hypoxic zone located at the mouth of the MR, as compared to 2013. At this location qPCR showed higher than expected Thaumarchaeota and amoA copy number given the iTag data. We hypothesize that iTag primers did not discern the full breadth of Thaumarchaeota diversity in comparison to qPCR primers, particularly at the mouth of the MR. Taken together, the iTag and qPCR data suggested that the location near the mouth of the MR, for example, and the lack of continuity of the 2014 nGOM hypoxic zone influenced not only Thaumarchaeota abundances, but also the diversity of Thaumarchaeota species. Given that the abundances and diversity of ammonia-oxidizing Thaumarchaeota is influenced by the shape and location of the hypoxic zone, we will next examine changes in function as it corresponds to oxygen concentrations.

  18. Historical Influences on Contemporary Tobacco Use by Northern Plains and Southwestern American Indians.

    PubMed

    Kunitz, Stephen J

    2016-02-01

    There are great differences in smoking- and tobacco-related mortality between American Indians on the Northern Plains and those in the Southwest that are best explained by (1) ecological differences between the two regions, including the relative inaccessibility and aridity of the Southwest and the lack of buffalo, and (2) differences between French and Spanish Indian relations policies. The consequence was the disruption of inter- and intratribal relations on the Northern Plains, where as a response to disruption the calumet (pipe) ceremony became widespread, whereas it did not in the Southwest. Tobacco was, thus, integrated into social relationships with religious sanctions on the Northern Plains, which increased the acceptability of commercial cigarettes in the 20th century. Smoking is, therefore, more deeply embedded in religious practices and social relationships on the Northern Plains than in the Southwest.

  19. Historical Influences on Contemporary Tobacco Use by Northern Plains and Southwestern American Indians

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    There are great differences in smoking- and tobacco-related mortality between American Indians on the Northern Plains and those in the Southwest that are best explained by (1) ecological differences between the two regions, including the relative inaccessibility and aridity of the Southwest and the lack of buffalo, and (2) differences between French and Spanish Indian relations policies. The consequence was the disruption of inter- and intratribal relations on the Northern Plains, where as a response to disruption the calumet (pipe) ceremony became widespread, whereas it did not in the Southwest. Tobacco was, thus, integrated into social relationships with religious sanctions on the Northern Plains, which increased the acceptability of commercial cigarettes in the 20th century. Smoking is, therefore, more deeply embedded in religious practices and social relationships on the Northern Plains than in the Southwest. PMID:26691134

  20. Significant Events or Persons Influencing College Decisions of Conditionally-admitted and Early-Admitted Freshmen.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nieves, Edwin; Hartman, Kathleen

    2001-01-01

    Examines reasons cited by conditionally-admitted and early-admitted freshmen for choosing to attend college. Finds that parents and family had the greatest influence on both groups; however, the conditionally-admitted students cited these influences more often as the primary influence. Discusses other influences cited by both groups, such as…

  1. Northern pintail body condition during wet and dry winters in the Sacramento Valley, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, M.R.

    1986-01-01

    Body weights and carcass composition of male and female adult northern pintails (Anas acuta) were investigated in the Sacramento Valley, California, from August to March 1979-82. Pintails were lightweight, lean, and had reduced breast, leg, and heart muscles during August-September. Ducks steadily gained weight after arrival; and body, carcass (body wt minus feathers and gastrointestinal content), fat protein, and muscle weights peaked in October-November. Fat-free dry weight remained high but variable the rest of the winter, whereas body and carcass weight and fat content declined to lows in December or January, then increased again in February or March. Gizzard weights declined from early fall to March. Males were always heavier than females, but females were fatter (percentage) than males during mid-winter. Mid-winter body weight, carcass fat, and protein content were significantly (P < 0.01) lower in the dry winter of 1980-81 than in 2 wet winters (1979-80 and 1981-82). Changes in pintail body weight and composition during winter are probably adaptations to mild climate, predictable food supplies, and requirements for pair formation and molt.

  2. Influence of a flood event on salinity and nutrients in the Changshan Archipelago area (Northern Yellow Sea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Guangtao; Zhao, Zengxia; Liu, Changhua; Liu, Qun; Ren, Jianming

    2012-09-01

    River discharge can deliver nutrients to the coastal zone and change the hydrologic properties of the water column. Soon after a flash flood from the Yalu River (Northeast China) in August 2010, we investigated the salinity and nutrient concentrations, as well as other environmental conditions in the Changshan Archipelago area, located approximately 100 km west of the river mouth in the northern Yellow Sea. Diluted water was mainly observed in the upper layers shallower than 15 m, with surface salinity between 18.13 and 30.44 in the eastern study area and between 28.16 and 29.72 in the western area. Surface salinity showed a significant negative correlation with concentrations of dissolved nutrients ( P < 0.05), but not with that of Chlorophyll- a (Chl- a), dissolved oxygen (DO), particulate materials or pH. The average concentrations of nitrite, nitrate, and silicic acid decreased from the surface layer to bottom layer and were significantly higher in the east area than in the west area ( P < 0.05). In contrast, average ammonium and phosphate concentrations were highest in the bottom layer of both areas, with no significant spatial differences. DO varied between 6.06 and 8.25 mg L-1 in the surface layer, and was significantly higher in the eastern area than in the western area in the surface and middle layers. Chl- a concentration was constantly below 4.09 μg L-1. Our work demonstrated the strong influences of Yalu River on proportions of various nutrient components in the Changshan Archipelago area. Silicic acid and total inorganic nitrogen levels were significantly elevated comparing to phosphate in the eastern area. Such changes can potentially induce phosphate limit to phytoplankton growth.

  3. Personal and social conditions potentially influencing women's hearing loss management.

    PubMed

    Garstecki, D C; Erler, S F

    2001-12-01

    Little gender-specific data related to hearing loss and hearing loss management are available. The purpose of this investigation was to examine personal and social conditions affecting women at selected stages of the adult life course that may influence hearing loss management. In all, 191 women in three age groups, ranging from 35 to 85 years old, participated. None reported hearing problems. Participants completed a demographic data form and were given a standard audiometric evaluation to confirm age-normal hearing. Each completed assessments of speech understanding in quiet and noise, auditory signal duration discrimination, and binaural processing. Measures of hearing knowledge, behaviors, and attitudes; health-related locus of control; ego strength; and, social support were administered. Results revealed that although some variables deteriorate among subsequent age groups (i.e., hearing thresholds, central auditory processing, and ego strength), the reverse is true for others (i.e., social interaction and satisfaction with income). Age-specific sociodemographic burdens that may interfere with hearing loss management were noted. New psychosocial data are revealed against which women and men with impaired hearing may be compared.

  4. The influence of scaffold material on chondrocytes under inflammatory conditions.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Heenam; Sun, Lin; Cairns, Dana M; Rainbow, Roshni S; Preda, Rucsanda C; Kaplan, David L; Zeng, Li

    2013-05-01

    Cartilage tissue engineering aims to repair damaged cartilage tissue in arthritic joints. As arthritic joints have significantly higher levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines (such as IL-1β and TNFα that cause cartilage destruction, it is critical to engineer stable cartilage in an inflammatory environment. Biomaterial scaffolds constitute an important component of the microenvironment for chondrocytes in engineered cartilage. However, it remains unclear how the scaffold material influences the response of chondrocytes seeded in these scaffolds under inflammatory stimuli. Here we have compared the responses of articular chondrocytes seeded within three different polymeric scaffolding materials (silk, collagen and polylactic acid (PLA)) to IL-1β and TNFα. These scaffolds have different physical characteristics and yielded significant differences in the expression of genes associated with cartilage matrix production and degradation, cell adhesion and cell death. The silk and collagen scaffolds released pro-inflammatory cytokines faster and had higher uptake water abilities than PLA scaffolds. Correspondingly, chondrocytes cultured in silk and collagen scaffolds maintained higher levels of cartilage matrix than those in PLA, suggesting that these biophysical properties of scaffolds may regulate gene expression and the response to inflammatory stimuli in chondrocytes. Based on this study we conclude that selecting the proper scaffold material will aid in the engineering of more stable cartilage tissues for cartilage repair, and that silk and collagen are better scaffolds in terms of supporting the stability of three-dimensional cartilage under inflammatory conditions.

  5. The Influence of European Pollution on Ozone in the Near East and Northern Africa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duncan, B. N.; West, J. J.; Yoshida, Y.; Fiore, A. M.; Ziemke, J. R.

    2008-01-01

    We present a modeling study of the long-range transport of pollution from Europe, showing that European emissions regularly elevate surface ozone by as much as 20 ppbv in summer in northern Africa and the Near East. European emissions cause 50-150 additional violations per year (i.e. above those that would occur without European pollution) of the European health standard for ozone (8-h average greater than 120 micrograms per cubic meters or approximately 60 ppbv) in northern Africa and the Near East. We estimate that European ozone pollution is responsible for 50 000 premature mortalities globally each year, of which the majority occurs outside of Europe itself, including 37% (19 000) in northern Africa and the Near East. Much of the pollution from Europe is exported southward at low altitudes in summer to the Mediterranean Sea, northern Africa and the Near East, regions with favorable photochemical environments for ozone production. Our results suggest that assessments of the human health benefits of reducing ozone precursor emissions in Europe should include effects outside of Europe, and that comprehensive planning to improve air quality in northern Africa and the Near East likely needs to address European emissions.

  6. The Influence of European Pollution on Ozone in the Near East and Northern Africa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duncan, B. N.; West, J. J.; Yoshida, Y.; Fiore, A. M.; Ziemke, J. R.

    2008-01-01

    We present a modeling study of the long-range transport of pollution from Europe, showing that European emissions regularly elevate surface ozone by as much as 20 ppbv in summer in northern Africa and the Near East. European emissions cause 50-150 additional violations per year (i.e. above those that would occur without European pollution) of the European health standard for ozone (8-h average greater than 120 micrograms per cubic meters or approximately 60 ppbv) in northern Africa and the Near East. We estimate that European ozone pollution is responsible for 50 000 premature mortalities globally each year, of which the majority occurs outside of Europe itself, including 37% (19 000) in northern Africa and the Near East. Much of the pollution from Europe is exported southward at low altitudes in summer to the Mediterranean Sea, northern Africa and the Near East, regions with favorable photochemical environments for ozone production. Our results suggest that assessments of the human health benefits of reducing ozone precursor emissions in Europe should include effects outside of Europe, and that comprehensive planning to improve air quality in northern Africa and the Near East likely needs to address European emissions.

  7. Habitat manipulation influences northern bobwhite resource selection on a reclaimed surface mine

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brooke, Jarred M.; Peters, David C.; Unger, Ashley M.; Tanner, Evan P.; Harper, Craig A.; Keyser, Patrick D.; Clark, Joseph D.; Morgan, John J.

    2015-01-01

    More than 600,000 ha of mine land have been reclaimed in the eastern United States, providing large contiguous tracts of early successional vegetation that can be managed for northern bobwhite (Colinus virginianus). However, habitat quality on reclaimed mine land can be limited by extensive coverage of non-native invasive species, which are commonly planted during reclamation. We used discrete-choice analysis to investigate bobwhite resource selection throughout the year on Peabody Wildlife Management Area, a 3,330-ha reclaimed surface mine in western Kentucky. We used a treatment-control design to study resource selection at 2 spatial scales to identify important aspects of mine land vegetation and whether resource selection differed between areas with habitat management (i.e., burning, disking, herbicide; treatment) and unmanaged units (control). Our objectives were to estimate bobwhite resource selection on reclaimed mine land and to estimate the influence of habitat management practices on resource selection. We used locations from 283 individuals during the breeding season (1 Apr–30 Sep) and 136 coveys during the non-breeding season (1 Oct–Mar 31) from August 2009 to March 2014. Individuals were located closer to shrub cover than would be expected at random throughout the year. During the breeding season, individuals on treatment units used areas with smaller contagion index values (i.e., greater interspersion) compared with individuals on control units. During the non-breeding season, birds selected areas with greater shrub-open edge density compared with random. At the microhabitat scale, individuals selected areas with increased visual obstruction >1 m aboveground. During the breeding season, birds were closer to disked areas (linear and non-linear) than would be expected at random. Individuals selected non-linear disked areas during winter but did not select linear disked areas (firebreaks) because they were planted to winter wheat each fall and

  8. Benthic conditions around a historic shipwreck: Vrouw Maria (1771) in the northern Baltic proper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruuskanen, A. T.; Kraufvelin, P.; Alvik, R.; Díaz, E. R.; Honkonen, J.; Kanerva, J.; Karell, K.; Kekäläinen, P.; Lappalainen, J.; Mikkola, R.; Mustasaari, T.; Nappu, N.; Nieminen, A.; Roininen, J.; Svahnbäck, K.

    2015-04-01

    Since her shipwreck in 1771, the wooden vessel Vrouw Maria has been lying on the seabed at 41 m depth on the border between the Archipelago Sea and the northern Baltic proper, off the southern coast of Finland. The wreck lies in an upward position in a right angle to the dominating bottom current, which is potentially affecting seabed topography, sediment characteristics and zoobenthic communities both upstream (NE) and downstream (SW) of the wreck. This multidisciplinary study attempts to clarify abiotic and biotic patterns and processes in the vicinity of the wreck by combining field investigations with physical simulation studies in the field and in the laboratory. Multibeam echo-sounder techniques were utilised to generate a map of the wreck area and sediment grab samples were taken to characterize the sediment type and its zoobenthic community. A medium-sized field experiment generated data on the accumulation of sediment organic matter in the presence and absence of a current and/or a barrier on the seafloor and a small-scaled laboratory study was conducted to simulate scour forming processes. The results showed that a deeper basin, scour area, with the dimensions 150×300 m, was present downstream of the wreck and there was also a smaller scour area upstream of the wreck. Similar traces on the bottom were simulated in the laboratory. The organic content (recent mud) and the proportion of finer sediment were more pronounced in areas closer to both sides of the wreck. These results were in turn imitated in a field experiment, where the accumulation of organic matter in the sediment increased significantly downstream, when a current was interrupted by a barrier. Regarding zoobenthos in the wreck area, 11 taxa and a mean total abundance of 773 individuals per m2 were registered. The dominant species were Macoma balthica and Marenzelleria sp., which together made up >80% of the total number of individuals. Multivariate data analyses showed significant differences

  9. The environmental history and present condition of Saudi Arabia's northern sand seas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Whitney, John W.; Faulkender, D.J.; Rubin, Meyer

    1983-01-01

    Saudi Arabia's northern sand seas are composed dominantly of stable dune systems, even though the modern climate is arid. The stable dunes are large and support a sparse semidesert vegetation. Active dunes are small and commonly confined to the crests of stable dunes; they comprise less than 5 percent of the dunes in the sand seas. Both the stability of the major dune systems and the small percentage of active dunes in the modern environment indicate a significant decrease in the average velocity and frequency of sand-moving winds since the time of stable-dune deposition. Comparison of modern wind directions with dune trends indicates that southwesterly winds responsible for dune formation in the southern and western An Nafud sand sea and in Nafud Urayq are no longer prevailing winds. Lake deposits are locally interbedded with deposits of eolian sand and in the lee of stable dunes. Radiocarbon dating of calcareous lake deposits defines at least two episodes of moisture-effective climate and minimal eolianactivity: between about 32,000 and 24,000 B.P., just before the onset of the last worldwide glacial stade of the Pleistocene, and during the Holocene between about 8,500 and 5,000 B.P. One lake deposit is more than 38,000 years old and may have been deposited during an earlier pluvial episode about 85,000 to 70,000 B.P. Pollen extracted from these lake deposits indicates that vegetation during late Pleistocene and Holocene pluvial episodes was similar to the present semidesert vegetation; however, the density of shrubs and grasses on the dunes was greater. The main dune systems overlie the 32,000 to 24,000-yearold lake deposits, whereas the Holocene lakebeds are found in modern interdunal environments, usually at the base of stable dunes. The main dune systems probably formed between 24,000 and 8,500 B.P., during the last episode of worldwide cold temperatures. Increased windiness at this time is also recorded in the world's oceans and in both polar ice caps

  10. The conditions of malaria transmission in Katsina Province, Northern Nigeria, and a discussion of the effects of dichlorvos application*

    PubMed Central

    Foll, C. V.; Pant, C. P.

    1966-01-01

    A study has been made of the conditions of malaria transmission in the northern part of the Guinea savannah belt of West Central Africa. It was found that, in this holoendemic area, transmission occurs principally from August to December but continues on a much reduced scale throughout the rest of the year, even when anopheline densities are as low as 0.02 per hut. Longitudinal parasitological studies on infants, carried out on an area rather than an individual village basis, provide the most useful epidemiological technique during the minor transmission period. Examination of the spleens of children from areas that had been treated with dichlorvos suggested that the reduced hut anopheline densities resulting from the treatment were subsequently reflected in the reduced number of children showing markedly enlarged spleens. PMID:20604208

  11. Influence of combined oral contraceptives on the periodontal condition

    PubMed Central

    DOMINGUES, Roberta Santos; FERRAZ, Bruna Fidêncio Rahal; GREGHI, Sebastião Luiz Aguiar; de REZENDE, Maria Lúcia Rubo; PASSANEZI, Euloir; SANT'ANA, Adriana Campos Passanezi

    2012-01-01

    Most studies investigating the impact of oral contraceptives have been performed some years ago, when the level of sexual hormones was greater than the actual formulations. Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of current combined oral contraceptives (COC) on periodontal tissues, correlating the clinical parameters examined with the total duration of continuous oral contraceptive intake. Material and methods Twenty-five women (19-35 years old) taking combined oral contraceptives for at least 1 year were included in the test group. The control group was composed by 25 patients at the same age range reporting no use of hormone-based contraceptive methods. Clinical parameters investigated included pocket probing depth (PD), clinical attachment level (CAL), sulcular bleeding index (SBI) and plaque index (Pl.I). Data were statistically evaluated by unpaired t test, Pearson's correlation test and Spearman's correlation test. Results The test group showed increased PD (2.228±0.011 x 2.154±0.012; p<0.0001) and SBI (0.229±0.006 x 0.148±0.005, p<0.0001) than controls. No significant differences between groups were found in CAL (0.435±0.01 x 0.412±0.01; p=0.11). The control group showed greater Pl.I than the test group (0.206±0.007 x 0.303±0.008; p<0.0001). No correlation between the duration of oral contraceptive intake, age and periodontal parameters was observed. Conclusions These findings suggest that the use of currently available combined oral contraceptives can influence the periodontal conditions of the patients, independently of the level of plaque accumulation or total duration of medication intake, resulting in increased gingival inflammation. PMID:22666846

  12. Summer Fish Communities in Northern Gulf of Mexico Estuaries: Indices of Ecological Condition

    EPA Science Inventory

    We used fish community data from trawl samples in >100 estuaries, bayous, and coastal lagoons of the Louisianan Biogeographic Province (Gulf of Mexico) to develop indicators of ecological condition. One data set, from which we derived reference values for fish community indicator...

  13. Environmental Conditions in Northern Gulf of Mexico Estuaries: Before and After the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill

    EPA Science Inventory

    When conducting an environmental assessment to determine the ecological effects of the Deepwater Horizon (DWH) Oil Spill in the Gulf of Mexico (GOM), baseline environmental data is essential to establish ecosystem condition prior to the incident. EPA’s National Coastal Assessment...

  14. Environmental Conditions in Northern Gulf of Mexico Estuaries: Before and After the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill

    EPA Science Inventory

    When conducting an environmental assessment to determine the ecological effects of the Deepwater Horizon (DWH) Oil Spill in the Gulf of Mexico (GOM), baseline environmental data is essential to establish ecosystem condition prior to the incident. EPA’s National Coastal Assessment...

  15. Effects of Socioeconomic Status on Television Viewing Conditions of Preschoolers in Northern Greece

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Natsiopoulou, Triantafillia; Melissa-Halikiopoulou, Chrisoula

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the effects of television (TV) on preschoolers, their TV viewing patterns and the conditions under which they watch TV, taking into consideration their different socioeconomic and regional backgrounds. The survey instrument was a questionnaire with 23 closed-ended questions, given to parents whose children…

  16. Woodland pond salamander abundance in relation to forest management and environmental conditions in northern Wisconsin

    Treesearch

    Deahn M. Donner; Christine A. Ribic; Albert J. Beck; Dale Higgins; Dan Eklund; Susan. Reinecke

    2015-01-01

    Woodland ponds are important landscape features that help sustain populations of amphibians that require this aquatic habitat for successful reproduction. Species abundance patterns often reflect site-specific differences in hydrology, physical characteristics, and surrounding vegetation. Large-scale processes such as changing land cover and environmental conditions...

  17. Summer Fish Communities in Northern Gulf of Mexico Estuaries: Indices of Ecological Condition

    EPA Science Inventory

    We used fish community data from trawl samples in >100 estuaries, bayous, and coastal lagoons of the Louisianan Biogeographic Province (Gulf of Mexico) to develop indicators of ecological condition. One data set, from which we derived reference values for fish community indicator...

  18. Soil response to perennial herbaceous biofeedstocks under rainfed conditions in the northern Great Plains, USA

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Perennial herbaceous biofeedstocks (PHB) have been proposed to confer multiple ecosystem services to agricultural lands. However, the role of PHBs to affect change in soil condition is not well documented, particularly for treatments with multiple species. The objective of this study was to quanti...

  19. Fluvial depositional environment evolving into deltaic setting with marine influences in the buntsandstein of northern vosges (France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gall, Jean-Claude

    The Buntsandstein in the Northern Vosges (France) originates mainly in an inland braidplain fluvial environment which passes in the upper part of the sequence into deltaic milieu in the coastal plain along the border of the sea, with the continental environment finally being drowned with the transgression of the shallow sea. The fluvial sedimentation is characterized by the presence of two facies throughout the Buntsandstein : channel facies and overbank plain facies. The channel facies comprises sandy and conglomeratic deposits forming within active streams by strong currents, whereas the overbank plain facies is built up of silty-clayey sandstones or silt/clay originating in stagnant water in abandoned watercourses, ponds, pools and puddles. The significance of particularly the floodplain sediments is subjected to considerable changes throughout the Buntsandstein sequence. There are all stages of transition between overbank plain deposits being only preserved in ghost-like facies as reworked clasts due to effective secondary removal of primarily occasionally formed suspension fines, and an abundance of autochthonous floodplain sediments in the depositional record resulting from favourable conditions of primary origin and secondary preservation. Reworked ventifacts within fluvial channel sediments testify to subordinate aeolian influences in the alluvial plain, with reasonable reworking, however, having removed all in situ traces of wind activity. Declining aridity of palaeoclimate towards the top is indicated by the appearance of violet horizon palaeosols in the Zone-Limite-Violette and the Couches intermédiaires being accompanied by Bröckelbank carbonate breccias originating from concentration of reworked fragments of pedogenic carbonate nodules. Biogenic traces are in the lower part of the sequence mainly present as Planolites burrows in the finer-grained sediments. Palaeosalinities as revealed from boron contents indicate progressively increasing

  20. Serum POP concentrations are highly predictive of inner blubber concentrations at two extremes of body condition in northern elephant seals.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Michael G; Peterson, Sarah H; Debier, Cathy; Covaci, Adrian; Dirtu, Alin C; Malarvannan, Govindan; Crocker, Daniel E; Costa, Daniel P

    2016-11-01

    Long-lived, upper trophic level marine mammals are vulnerable to bioaccumulation of persistent organic pollutants (POPs). Internal tissues may accumulate and mobilize POP compounds at different rates related to the body condition of the animal and the chemical characteristics of individual POP compounds; however, collection of samples from multiple tissues is a major challenge to ecotoxicology studies of free-ranging marine mammals and the ability to predict POP concentrations in one tissue from another tissue remains rare. Northern elephant seals (Mirounga angustirostris) forage on mesopelagic fish and squid for months at a time in the northeastern Pacific Ocean, interspersed with two periods of fasting on land, which results in dramatic seasonal fluctuations in body condition. Using northern elephant seals, we examined commonly studied tissues in mammalian toxicology to describe relationships and determine predictive equations among tissues for a suite of POP compounds, including ΣDDTs, ΣPCBs, Σchlordanes, and ΣPBDEs. We collected paired blubber (inner and outer) and blood serum samples from adult female and male seals in 2012 and 2013 at Año Nuevo State Reserve (California, USA). For females (N = 24), we sampled the same seals before (late in molting fast) and after (early in breeding fast) their approximately seven month foraging trip. For males, we sampled different seals before (N = 14) and after (N = 15) their approximately four month foraging trip. We observed strong relationships among tissues for many, but not all compounds. Serum POP concentrations were strong predictors of inner blubber POP concentrations for both females and males, while serum was a more consistent predictor of outer blubber for males than females. The ability to estimate POP blubber concentrations from serum, or vice versa, has the potential to enhance toxicological assessment and physiological modeling. Furthermore, predictive equations may illuminate commonalities or

  1. The Influence of Global Climate Changes on Storm-Tracks of Northern Hemisphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martynova, Y.; Krupchatnikov, V. N.

    2012-12-01

    Non-stationary eddies in mid-latitude storm-tracks are an important mechanism of energy, moment and moisture transfer in climate system [1]. Baroclinic eddies bring heavy rains and other hazard weather phenomena in the middle latitudes, play an important role in the global energy and the hydrological cycle. Recently, the increase of a cyclones rate at high latitudes with their frequency decrease in the second half of the 20th century was discovered using reanalysis data [2,3]. However, there is still no common point of view about how storm-track's distribution and intensity will be changed under the climate change influence [4,5]. In our work we investigate a variation of transient eddies general propagation tracks as a result of the global climate change effect. Using global large-scale intermediate complexity model of climate system [6] the numerical experiment was provided for the time period from 850 to 3000 year with a scenario of greenhouse gases influence on climate. From 850 to 2005 this impact was set according to the protocol "Historical simulations" of CMIP5 [7]. For 21th century anthropogenic effects were set according to the most aggressive scenario RCP 8.5 [8]. For the period 22-23 centuries CO2 concentration was on the level of 2100 year, and for 24-30 centuries it returned to pre-industrial value linearly in time of 100 years. Using a filter [9] we defined three variation intervals: low-frequency, medium-frequency and high-frequency. In our work we paid attention to medium-scale waves (i.e. 2-8 days). Two seasons were chosen: winter and summer. For each season we considered average fields of parameters characterizing poleward heat flux at 700 mb and transient eddies variance at 250 mb. Besides of the sensitivity of storm-track dynamic we considered some other features of "warm" climate. The work is partially supported by The Ministry of Education and Science of the Russian Federation #(#07.514.11.4044), RFBR grants #10-07-00547, #11-05-01190, and SB

  2. Solar Absorption Refrigeration System for Air-Conditioning of a Classroom Building in Northern India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agrawal, Tanmay; Varun; Kumar, Anoop

    2015-10-01

    Air-conditioning is a basic tool to provide human thermal comfort in a building space. The primary aim of the present work is to design an air-conditioning system based on vapour absorption cycle that utilizes a renewable energy source for its operation. The building under consideration is a classroom of dimensions 18.5 m × 13 m × 4.5 m located in Hamirpur district of Himachal Pradesh in India. For this purpose, cooling load of the building was calculated first by using cooling load temperature difference method to estimate cooling capacity of the air-conditioning system. Coefficient of performance of the refrigeration system was computed for various values of strong and weak solution concentration. In this work, a solar collector is also designed to provide required amount of heat energy by the absorption system. This heat energy is taken from solar energy which makes this system eco-friendly and sustainable. A computer program was written in MATLAB to calculate the design parameters. Results were obtained for various values of solution concentrations throughout the year. Cost analysis has also been carried out to compare absorption refrigeration system with conventional vapour compression cycle based air-conditioners.

  3. Optimal environmental conditions to detect moisture in ancient buildings: case studies in Northern Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosina, Elisabetta; Ludwig, Nicola; Rosi, Lorenzo

    1998-03-01

    IR thermography allows to identify the thermal anomalies due to moisture in ancient walls. Wet zones can appear warmer or colder in IR images, according to the atmospheric conditions during the scanning; furthermore, thermal monitoring, even in qualitative thermography, allows to obtain a more effective diagnosis of the defects because it records thermal behaviors of the material in different environmental conditions. Thermographic system allows an accurate analysis of transpiration effects on buildings and precise measurements of water content starting from environmental temperature, relative balance and wind speed. These variables play a major role in the causes of damages in buildings. Particularly, the evaluation of transpiration is essential to determine the evaporative rate of water content within the wall. The research has been carried out on two ancient buildings during a period of several months. The main experimental tests were on the church of 'Guardia di Sotto', Corsico, a seventeenth century building on the bank of Pavese Canal. Five thermal scanning have been disposed in different seasons from March 14, 1996 to June 16, 1997. The causes of the wet zones were identified at the basis of the walls were rising damp and rain spread in the ground. The repeated thermographies and thermo-hygrometric test allowed to distinguish the size and the location of the areas damaged by the different causes. In other cases studied - Addolorate Church, Gessate the thermal scanning and the other supporting tests confirmed the list of optimal environmental condition required to detect humidity in walls by thermography.

  4. Clinical observation on hearing conditions of centenarians in northern district of China.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chen-Qing; Cheng, Xiao-Ting; Zhu, Yu-Hua; Shen, Wei-Dong; Bian, Bo-Wen; Cao, Ju-Yang; Zhai, Suo-Qiang; Chen, Chuan-Xin; Yang, Shi-Ming; Yuan, Hui-Jun; Yu, Ning

    2015-05-01

    The hearing conditions of the centenarians were quite poor as regards hearing thresholds and speech detection ability. To investigate hearing conditions of centenarians. A total of 54 centenarians in Rizhao and Linyi Districts in Shandong Province were investigated to assess hearing conditions of centenerians comprehensively by questionnaire investigation, pure-tone audiometry, acoustic immitance, intelligence evaluation, and speech detection scores. Also, 135 individuals were recruited as controls and divided into four groups according to their age: 45-59 years, 60-69 years, 70-79 years, and 80-89 years. The hearing thresholds of the centenarians were dramatically higher than those of the control group (p < 0.05) and all centenarians suffered moderate to profound hearing loss according to the World Health Organization (WHO) criteria. Few centenarians had normal level of speech detection scores. All centenarians showed descending hearing curve, and the hearing threshold of the male centenarians at 8000 Hz was higher than that of the females (p = 0.047). There was a significant air-bone conduction gap in the centenarians (p < 0.05).

  5. Local and regional variability in snow conditions in northern Finland: A reindeer herding perspective.

    PubMed

    Rasmus, Sirpa; Kivinen, Sonja; Bavay, Mathias; Heiskanen, Janne

    2016-05-01

    Weather station measurements were used to force the SNOWPACK snow model and combined with reindeer herders' experiences to study the local and regional variations in snow conditions in a Finnish reindeer herding area for the 1981-2010 period. Winter conditions varied significantly between the four selected herding districts and between open and forest environments within the districts. The highest snow depths and densities, the thicknesses of ground ice, and the lengths of snow cover period were generally found in the northernmost districts. The snow depths showed the strongest regional coherence, whereas the thicknesses of ground ice were weakly correlated among the districts. The local variation in snow depths was higher than the regional variation and limits for rare or exceptional events varied notably between different districts and environments. The results highlight that forests diversify snow and foraging conditions, e.g., ground ice rarely forms simultaneously in different environments. Sufficient and diverse forest pastures are important during the critical winter season if reindeer herding is pursued on natural grazing grounds also in the future.

  6. The Influence of Stand Density and Structure on Growth of Northern Hardwoods in New England

    Treesearch

    Dale S. Solomon

    1977-01-01

    Growth of northern hardwoods over a 10-year period was studied in plots that were treated to produce residual densities of 40, 60, 80, and 100 square feet of basal area per acre with stand structures of 30, 45 and 60 percent sawtimber. Both diameter and basal area growth are tabulated by treatment and species.

  7. Culture and Caregivers: Factors Influencing Breastfeeding among Mothers in West Belfast, Northern Ireland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bishop, Hilary; Cousins, Wendy; Casson, Karen; Moore, Ann

    2008-01-01

    Breastfeeding is a key public health measure to protect and promote the health of one of the most vulnerable groups of the population--infants and children. Northern Ireland, however, has one of the lowest breastfeeding rates in the world. This paper reports the results of a questionnaire survey of 120 mothers attending mother and toddler groups…

  8. Cultural Attitudes, Parental Aspirations, and Socioeconomic Influence on Post-Primary School Selection in Northern Ireland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelleher, Luke; Smyth, Austin; McEldowney, Malachy

    2016-01-01

    This research considers implications of planned reform of the education system in Northern Ireland for school choice and travel behavior. The school system is currently segregated on the basis of religion and academic ability at age 11. Discrete Choice Models based on a Stated Preference experiment included in a program of parental surveys yielded…

  9. Lake Characteristics Influencing Spawning Success of Muskellunge in Northern Wisconsin Lakes

    Treesearch

    Ashley J. Rust; James S. Diana; Terry L. Margenau; Clayton J. Edwards

    2002-01-01

    We determined the physical, chemical, biological, and land use characteristics that distinguish northern Wisconsin lakes with self-sustaining populations of muskellunge Esox masquinongy from lakes where stocking is required to maintain populations. Lakes that supported self-sustaining muskellunge populations were characterized by fewer shoreline...

  10. Influence of Bromus tectorum invasion on soil properties in northern Nevada

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In the last 50 years, the exotic annual grass, Bromus tectorum, has come to dominate rangelands over northern Nevada. Long-term occupation of soil by B. tectorum has the potential to alter soil processes particularly carbon and nitrogen cycles. Using a paired design, we compared surface soil propert...

  11. Exploring the Influences on Classroom-Based Contact via Shared Education in Northern Ireland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loader, Rebecca

    2017-01-01

    Initiatives in intercultural education have frequently involved the promotion of contact between members of different groups as a means of improving intergroup relations. Experience from Northern Ireland suggests, however, that such schemes have often been organised and delivered in such a way that opportunities for sustained, high-quality contact…

  12. Factors influencing northern spruce engraver colonization of white spruce slash in interior Alaska

    Treesearch

    Christopher J. Fettig; Roger E. Burnside; Chistopher J. Hayes; James J. Kruse; Nicholas J. Lisuzzo; Stephen R. McKelvey; Sylvia R. Mori; Stephen K. Nickel; Mark E. Schultz

    2013-01-01

    In interior Alaska, increased use of mechanical fuel reduction treatments, increased interests in the use of wood energy systems as alternatives to fossil fuels, and elevated populations of northern spruce engraver, Ips perturbatus (Eichhoff), have raised concerns regarding the impact of this bark beetle to forest resources. We conducted a large-...

  13. Plant succession on talus slopes in northern Idaho as influenced by slope exposure

    Treesearch

    R. Daubenmire; A. W. Slipp

    1943-01-01

    One of the most conspicuous features of the forested regions of northern Idaho is the small treeless areas which occupy portions of the southerly exposures of especially prominent peaks and ridges. These areas, sometimes referred to as parks or balds, begin at the summits of the prominences and extend down over the south-facing slopes sometimes as much as approximately...

  14. Influence of forest management alternatives and land type on susceptibility to fire in northern Wisconsin, USA

    Treesearch

    Eric J. Gustafson; Patrick A. Zollner; Brian R. Sturtevant; S. He Hong; David J. Mladenoff

    2004-01-01

    We used the LANDIS disturbance and succession model to study the effects of six alternative vegetation management scenarios on forest succession and the subsequent risk of canopy fire on a 2791 km2 landscape in northern Wisconsin, USA. The study area is a mix of fire-prone and fire-resistant land types. The alternatives vary the spatial...

  15. Financial incentive programs' influence in promoting sustainable forestry in the northern region

    Treesearch

    Michael G. Jacobson; Thomas J. Straka; John L. Greene; Michael A. Kilgore; Steven E. Daniels

    2009-01-01

    Selected forestry officials in each of the 20 northern states were surveyed concerning their opinions on the public and private financial incentive programs available to nonindustrial private forest owners in their state. The officials were asked to name and describe the programs and to assess forest owners' awareness of each one, its appeal among the owners aware...

  16. Climatic and pollution influences on ecosystem processes in northern hardwood forests

    Treesearch

    Kurt S. Pregitzer; David D. Reed; Glenn D. Mroz; Andrew J. Burton; John A. Witter; Donald A. Zak

    1996-01-01

    The Michigan gradient study was established in 1987 to examine the effects of climate and atmospheric deposition on forest productivity and ecosystem processes in the Great Lakes region. Four intensively-monitored northern hardwood study sites are located along a climatic and pollutant gradient extending from southern lower Michigan to northwestern upper Michigan. The...

  17. Cultural Attitudes, Parental Aspirations, and Socioeconomic Influence on Post-Primary School Selection in Northern Ireland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelleher, Luke; Smyth, Austin; McEldowney, Malachy

    2016-01-01

    This research considers implications of planned reform of the education system in Northern Ireland for school choice and travel behavior. The school system is currently segregated on the basis of religion and academic ability at age 11. Discrete Choice Models based on a Stated Preference experiment included in a program of parental surveys yielded…

  18. Culture and Caregivers: Factors Influencing Breastfeeding among Mothers in West Belfast, Northern Ireland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bishop, Hilary; Cousins, Wendy; Casson, Karen; Moore, Ann

    2008-01-01

    Breastfeeding is a key public health measure to protect and promote the health of one of the most vulnerable groups of the population--infants and children. Northern Ireland, however, has one of the lowest breastfeeding rates in the world. This paper reports the results of a questionnaire survey of 120 mothers attending mother and toddler groups…

  19. Exploring the Influences on Classroom-Based Contact via Shared Education in Northern Ireland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loader, Rebecca

    2017-01-01

    Initiatives in intercultural education have frequently involved the promotion of contact between members of different groups as a means of improving intergroup relations. Experience from Northern Ireland suggests, however, that such schemes have often been organised and delivered in such a way that opportunities for sustained, high-quality contact…

  20. Large-scale forest composition influences northern goshawk nesting in Wisconsin

    Treesearch

    Deahn M. Donner; Dean Anderson; Daniel Eklund; Matthew. St.Pierre

    2013-01-01

    The northern goshawk (Accipiter gentilis atricapillus) is a woodland raptor that uses a variety of forest types for nesting across its breeding range, but strongly depends on older forests with large trees and open understories. Goshawks may select nesting locations by maximizing the convergence of nesting and foraging habitats. Insights into goshawk...

  1. The influence of shade on northern red oak seedlings growth and carbon balance

    Treesearch

    Jennifer L. Jennings

    1995-01-01

    One management problem of the Southern Appalachian mixed hardwood forest is the lack of development of northern red oak (Quercus rubra L.) seedlings on high quality sites. Regeneration of red oak is not the problem. Following the removal of a stand, a combination of new seedlings, advanced reproduction and stump sprouts ensure red oak's initial...

  2. Conditions Influencing the Career Accomplishments of Ph.D.s.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Mary Jo; Centra John A.

    The influence of academic ability, training, and personal characteristics on postdegree careers and attainments of recent Ph.D.s were analyzed in two studies. Publication rates and income were used as indicators of attainments. The path model employed viewed the employment setting as well as the kind of employment activity as influences on the…

  3. The Influence of Specific Physical Health Conditions on Retirement Decisions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shultz, Kenneth S.; Wang, Mo

    2007-01-01

    Physical health has consistently been shown to strongly influence the retirement decision-making process. Unfortunately, "physical health" is typically operationalized in global terms. As a result, we know little about the specific aspects of physical health that influence the decision to retire. Therefore, in the present study, data from three…

  4. The Influence of Specific Physical Health Conditions on Retirement Decisions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shultz, Kenneth S.; Wang, Mo

    2007-01-01

    Physical health has consistently been shown to strongly influence the retirement decision-making process. Unfortunately, "physical health" is typically operationalized in global terms. As a result, we know little about the specific aspects of physical health that influence the decision to retire. Therefore, in the present study, data from three…

  5. Orientation, composition, and entrapment conditions of fluid inclusions in the footwall of the northern Snake Range detachment, Nevada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carter, Matthew J.; Siebenaller, Luc; Teyssier, Christian

    2015-12-01

    Footwall rocks of the northern Snake Range detachment fault (Hampton and Hendry's Creeks) offer exposures of quartzite mylonites (sub-horizontal foliation) that were permeated by surface fluids. An S-C-C‧ mylonitic fabric is defined by dynamically recrystallized quartz and mica. Electron backscatter diffraction analyses indicate a strong preferred orientation of quartz that is overprinted by two sets of sub-vertical, ESE and NNE striking fractures. Analyses of sets of three perpendicular thin sections indicate that fluid inclusions (FIs) are arranged according to macroscopic fracture patterns. FIs associated with NNE and ESE-striking fractures coevally trapped unmixed CO2 and H2O-rich fluids at conditions near the critical CO2-H2O solvus, giving minimum trapping conditions of T = 175-200 °C and ∼100 MPa H2O-rich FIs trapped along ESE-trending microcracks in single crystals of quartz may have been trapped at conditions as low as 150 °C and 50 MPa indicating the latest microfracturing and annealing of quartz in an overall extensional system. Results suggest that the upper crust was thin (4-8 km) during FI trapping and had an elevated geotherm (>50 °C/km). Footwall rocks that have been exhumed through the brittle-ductile transition in such extensional systems experience both brittle and crystal-plastic deformation that may allow for circulation of meteoric fluids and grain-scale fluid-rock interactions.

  6. The Influence of Meteorological Conditions on Air Pollution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, N. A.; Gipps, J.

    1975-01-01

    Explains the distribution of air pollutants as related to such meteorological conditions as temperature inversions, ground inversion, and wind velocity. Uses a power station to illustrate the effect of some of the meteorological conditions mentioned. (GS)

  7. The Influence of Meteorological Conditions on Air Pollution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, N. A.; Gipps, J.

    1975-01-01

    Explains the distribution of air pollutants as related to such meteorological conditions as temperature inversions, ground inversion, and wind velocity. Uses a power station to illustrate the effect of some of the meteorological conditions mentioned. (GS)

  8. The Influence of Solar Power Plants on Microclimatic Conditions and the Biotic Community in Chilean Desert Environments.

    PubMed

    Suuronen, Anna; Muñoz-Escobar, Christian; Lensu, Anssi; Kuitunen, Markku; Guajardo Celis, Natalia; Espinoza Astudillo, Pablo; Ferrú, Marcos; Taucare-Ríos, Andrés; Miranda, Marcelo; Kukkonen, Jussi V K

    2017-06-22

    The renewable energy sector is growing at a rapid pace in northern Chile and the solar energy potential is one of the best worldwide. Therefore, many types of solar power plant facilities are being built to take advantage of this renewable energy resource. Solar energy is considered a clean source of energy, but there are potential environmental effects of solar technology, such as landscape fragmentation, extinction of local biota, microclimate changes, among others. To be able to minimize environmental impacts of solar power plants, it is important to know what kind of environmental conditions solar power plants create. This study provides information about abiotic and biotic conditions in the vicinity of photovoltaic solar power plants. Herein, the influence of these power plants as drivers of new microclimate conditions and arthropods diversity composition in the Atacama Desert was evaluated. Microclimatic conditions between panel mounts was found to be more extreme than in the surrounding desert yet beneath the panels temperature is lower and relative humidity higher than outside the panel area. Arthropod species composition was altered in fixed-mount panel installations. In contrast, solar tracking technology showed less influence on microclimate and species composition between Sun and Shade in the power plant. Shady conditions provided a refuge for arthropod species in both installation types. For example, Dipterans were more abundant in the shade whereas Solifugaes were seldom present in the shade. The presented findings have relevance for the sustainable planning and construction of solar power plants.

  9. "It's up to the woman's people": how social factors influence facility-based delivery in Rural Northern Ghana.

    PubMed

    Moyer, Cheryl A; Adongo, Philip B; Aborigo, Raymond A; Hodgson, Abraham; Engmann, Cyril M; Devries, Raymond

    2014-01-01

    To explore the impact of social factors on place of delivery in northern Ghana. We conducted 72 in-depth interviews and 18 focus group discussions in the Upper East Region of northern Ghana among women with newborns, grandmothers, household heads, compound heads, community leaders, traditional birth attendants, traditional healers, and formally trained healthcare providers. We audiotaped, transcribed, and analyzed interactions using NVivo 9.0. Social norms appear to be shifting in favor of facility delivery, and several respondents indicated that facility delivery confers prestige. Community members disagreed about whether women needed permission from their husbands, mother-in-laws, or compound heads to deliver in a facility, but all agreed that women rely upon their social networks for the economic and logistical support to get to a facility. Socioeconomic status also plays an important role alone and as a mediator of other social factors. Several "meta themes" permeate the data: (1) This region of Ghana is undergoing a pronounced transition from traditional to contemporary birth-related practices; (2) Power hierarchies within the community are extremely important factors in women's delivery experiences ("someone must give the order"); and (3) This community shares a widespread sense of responsibility for healthy birth outcomes for both mothers and their babies. Social factors influence women's delivery experiences in rural northern Ghana, and future research and programmatic efforts need to include community members such as husbands, mother-in-laws, compound heads, soothsayers, and traditional healers if they are to be maximally effective in improving women's birth outcomes.

  10. West Nile Virus Surveillance in 2013 via Mosquito Screening in Northern Italy and the Influence of Weather on Virus Circulation

    PubMed Central

    Calzolari, Mattia; Pautasso, Alessandra; Montarsi, Fabrizio; Albieri, Alessandro; Bellini, Romeo; Bonilauri, Paolo; Defilippo, Francesco; Lelli, Davide; Moreno, Ana; Chiari, Mario; Tamba, Marco; Zanoni, Mariagrazia; Varisco, Giorgio; Bertolini, Silvia; Modesto, Paola; Radaelli, Maria Cristina; Iulini, Barbara; Prearo, Marino; Ravagnan, Silvia; Cazzin, Stefania; Mulatti, Paolo; Monne, Isabella; Bonfanti, Lebana; Marangon, Stefano; Goffredo, Maria; Savini, Giovanni; Martini, Simone; Mosca, Andrea; Farioli, Marco; Gemma Brenzoni, Laura; Palei, Manlio; Russo, Francesca; Natalini, Silvano; Angelini, Paola; Casalone, Cristina; Dottori, Michele; Capelli, Gioia

    2015-01-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) is a recently re-emerged health problem in Europe. In Italy, an increasing number of outbreaks of West Nile disease, with occurrences of human cases, have been reported since 2008. This is particularly true in northern Italy, where entomological surveillance systems have been implemented at a regional level. The aim of this study was to use, for the first time, all the entomological data collected in the five regions undergoing surveillance for WNV in northern Italy to characterize the viral circulation (at a spatial and temporal scale), identify potential mosquito vectors, and specify relationships between virus circulation and meteorological conditions. In 2013, 286 sites covering the entire Pianura Padana area were monitored. A total of 757,461 mosquitoes were sampled. Of these, 562,079 were tested by real-time PCR in 9,268 pools, of which 180 (1.9%) were positive for WNV. The largest part of the detected WNV sequences belonged to lineage II, demonstrating that, unlike those in the past, the 2013 outbreak was mainly sustained by this WNV lineage. This surveillance also detected the Usutu virus, a WNV-related flavivirus, in 241 (2.6%) pools. The WNV surveillance systems precisely identified the area affected by the virus and detected the viral circulation approximately two weeks before the occurrence of onset of human cases. Ninety percent of the sampled mosquitoes were Culex pipiens, and 178/180 WNV-positive pools were composed of only this species, suggesting this mosquito is the main WNV vector in northern Italy. A significantly higher abundance of the vector was recorded in the WNV circulation area, which was characterized by warmer and less rainy conditions and greater evapotranspiration compared to the rest of the Pianura Padana, suggesting that areas exposed to these conditions are more suitable for WNV circulation. This observation highlights warmer and less rainy conditions as factors able to enhance WNV circulation and cause virus

  11. West Nile Virus Surveillance in 2013 via Mosquito Screening in Northern Italy and the Influence of Weather on Virus Circulation.

    PubMed

    Calzolari, Mattia; Pautasso, Alessandra; Montarsi, Fabrizio; Albieri, Alessandro; Bellini, Romeo; Bonilauri, Paolo; Defilippo, Francesco; Lelli, Davide; Moreno, Ana; Chiari, Mario; Tamba, Marco; Zanoni, Mariagrazia; Varisco, Giorgio; Bertolini, Silvia; Modesto, Paola; Radaelli, Maria Cristina; Iulini, Barbara; Prearo, Marino; Ravagnan, Silvia; Cazzin, Stefania; Mulatti, Paolo; Monne, Isabella; Bonfanti, Lebana; Marangon, Stefano; Goffredo, Maria; Savini, Giovanni; Martini, Simone; Mosca, Andrea; Farioli, Marco; Gemma Brenzoni, Laura; Palei, Manlio; Russo, Francesca; Natalini, Silvano; Angelini, Paola; Casalone, Cristina; Dottori, Michele; Capelli, Gioia

    2015-01-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) is a recently re-emerged health problem in Europe. In Italy, an increasing number of outbreaks of West Nile disease, with occurrences of human cases, have been reported since 2008. This is particularly true in northern Italy, where entomological surveillance systems have been implemented at a regional level. The aim of this study was to use, for the first time, all the entomological data collected in the five regions undergoing surveillance for WNV in northern Italy to characterize the viral circulation (at a spatial and temporal scale), identify potential mosquito vectors, and specify relationships between virus circulation and meteorological conditions. In 2013, 286 sites covering the entire Pianura Padana area were monitored. A total of 757,461 mosquitoes were sampled. Of these, 562,079 were tested by real-time PCR in 9,268 pools, of which 180 (1.9%) were positive for WNV. The largest part of the detected WNV sequences belonged to lineage II, demonstrating that, unlike those in the past, the 2013 outbreak was mainly sustained by this WNV lineage. This surveillance also detected the Usutu virus, a WNV-related flavivirus, in 241 (2.6%) pools. The WNV surveillance systems precisely identified the area affected by the virus and detected the viral circulation approximately two weeks before the occurrence of onset of human cases. Ninety percent of the sampled mosquitoes were Culex pipiens, and 178/180 WNV-positive pools were composed of only this species, suggesting this mosquito is the main WNV vector in northern Italy. A significantly higher abundance of the vector was recorded in the WNV circulation area, which was characterized by warmer and less rainy conditions and greater evapotranspiration compared to the rest of the Pianura Padana, suggesting that areas exposed to these conditions are more suitable for WNV circulation. This observation highlights warmer and less rainy conditions as factors able to enhance WNV circulation and cause virus

  12. Suboptimal Light Conditions Influence Source-Sink Metabolism during Flowering.

    PubMed

    Christiaens, Annelies; De Keyser, Ellen; Pauwels, Els; De Riek, Jan; Gobin, Bruno; Van Labeke, Marie-Christine

    2016-01-01

    Reliance on carbohydrates during flower forcing was investigated in one early and one late flowering cultivar of azalea (Rhododendron simsii hybrids). Carbohydrate accumulation, invertase activity, and expression of a purported sucrose synthase gene (RsSUS) was monitored during flower forcing under suboptimal (natural) and optimal (supplemental light) light conditions, after a cold treatment (7°C + dark) to break flower bud dormancy. Post-production sucrose metabolism and flowering quality was also assessed. Glucose and fructose concentrations and invertase activity increased in petals during flowering, while sucrose decreased. In suboptimal light conditions RsSUS expression in leaves increased as compared to optimal light conditions, indicating that plants in suboptimal light conditions have a strong demand for carbohydrates. However, carbohydrates in leaves were markedly lower in suboptimal light conditions compared to optimal light conditions. This resulted in poor flowering of plants in suboptimal light conditions. Post-production flowering relied on the stored leaf carbon, which could be accumulated under optimal light conditions in the greenhouse. These results show that flower opening in azalea relies on carbohydrates imported from leaves and is source-limiting under suboptimal light conditions.

  13. Suboptimal Light Conditions Influence Source-Sink Metabolism during Flowering

    PubMed Central

    Christiaens, Annelies; De Keyser, Ellen; Pauwels, Els; De Riek, Jan; Gobin, Bruno; Van Labeke, Marie-Christine

    2016-01-01

    Reliance on carbohydrates during flower forcing was investigated in one early and one late flowering cultivar of azalea (Rhododendron simsii hybrids). Carbohydrate accumulation, invertase activity, and expression of a purported sucrose synthase gene (RsSUS) was monitored during flower forcing under suboptimal (natural) and optimal (supplemental light) light conditions, after a cold treatment (7°C + dark) to break flower bud dormancy. Post-production sucrose metabolism and flowering quality was also assessed. Glucose and fructose concentrations and invertase activity increased in petals during flowering, while sucrose decreased. In suboptimal light conditions RsSUS expression in leaves increased as compared to optimal light conditions, indicating that plants in suboptimal light conditions have a strong demand for carbohydrates. However, carbohydrates in leaves were markedly lower in suboptimal light conditions compared to optimal light conditions. This resulted in poor flowering of plants in suboptimal light conditions. Post-production flowering relied on the stored leaf carbon, which could be accumulated under optimal light conditions in the greenhouse. These results show that flower opening in azalea relies on carbohydrates imported from leaves and is source-limiting under suboptimal light conditions. PMID:26973689

  14. Lactase non-persistent genotype influences milk consumption and gastrointestinal symptoms in Northern Russians

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Milk is an important source of nutrients. The consumption of milk, however, may cause abdominal complaints in lactose intolerant individuals. The frequency of -13910C/C genotype is known to be high among Northern Russians, exceeding the prevalence in northern Europe. In our study we tested two hypotheses: 1) subjects with lactase non-persistent genotype (-13910C/C) have more gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms associated with milk 2) subjects with lactase non-persistence avoid using milk. Methods In total, 518 students aged 17 to 26 years were randomly selected from different departments in the Northern State Medical University (NSMU) for genotyping the lactase activity-defining -13910C/T variant. All subjects filled in a questionnaire covering their personal data, self-reported GI symptoms and milk consumption habits. Results Northern Russians consume very small amounts of milk daily. Among carriers of the lactase non-persistent (LNP) genotype there were 10 percentage units of milk-consumers fewer than among lactase-persistent (LP) subjects (p = 0.03). Complaints of GI disorders caused by milk were different between the genotypes (p = 0.02). Among all types of food analyzed only milk was associated with increased GI symptoms among subjects with the LNP genotype (OR = 1.95, CI 1.03-3.69) Conclusions Subjects with -13910C/C have more GI symptoms from milk. Subjects with lactase non-persistent genotype avoid using milk. In the case of increasing milk consumption symptoms may increase the need for medical consultation. It is thus important either for people themselves or for health care staff to be aware of lactase persistence/non-persistence. PMID:22078123

  15. Lactase non-persistent genotype influences milk consumption and gastrointestinal symptoms in Northern Russians.

    PubMed

    Khabarova, Yulia; Tornianen, Suvi; Tuomisto, Sari; Järvelä, Irma; Karhunen, Pekka; Isokoski, Mauri; Mattila, Kari

    2011-11-13

    Milk is an important source of nutrients. The consumption of milk, however, may cause abdominal complaints in lactose intolerant individuals. The frequency of -13910C/C genotype is known to be high among Northern Russians, exceeding the prevalence in northern Europe. In our study we tested two hypotheses: 1) subjects with lactase non-persistent genotype (-13910C/C) have more gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms associated with milk 2) subjects with lactase non-persistence avoid using milk. In total, 518 students aged 17 to 26 years were randomly selected from different departments in the Northern State Medical University (NSMU) for genotyping the lactase activity-defining -13910C/T variant. All subjects filled in a questionnaire covering their personal data, self-reported GI symptoms and milk consumption habits. Northern Russians consume very small amounts of milk daily. Among carriers of the lactase non-persistent (LNP) genotype there were 10 percentage units of milk-consumers fewer than among lactase-persistent (LP) subjects (p = 0.03). Complaints of GI disorders caused by milk were different between the genotypes (p = 0.02). Among all types of food analyzed only milk was associated with increased GI symptoms among subjects with the LNP genotype (OR = 1.95, CI 1.03-3.69) Subjects with -13910C/C have more GI symptoms from milk. Subjects with lactase non-persistent genotype avoid using milk. In the case of increasing milk consumption symptoms may increase the need for medical consultation. It is thus important either for people themselves or for health care staff to be aware of lactase persistence/non-persistence.

  16. Stocktype and harvest gap size influence northern red oak regeneration success

    Treesearch

    Douglass F. Jacobs; Ron A. Rathfon; Anthony S. Davis; Don E. Carlson

    2006-01-01

    Four different northern red oak (Quercus rubra L.) stocktypes (standard- or low-nursery-density bareroot seedlings and 11.4 or 18.9 L container seedlings) were outplanted into large-, medium-, and small-harvested gap openings (0.400, 0.024, and 0.100 ha, respectively) and closed-canopy control plots in southern Indiana. Two-year survival, height, and...

  17. Terdiurnal oscillations in OH Meinel rotational temperatures for fall conditions at northern mid-latitude sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pendleton, W. R., Jr.; Taylor, M. J.; Gardner, L. C.

    2000-06-01

    High-precision (˜0.5 K) measurements of OH Meinel (M) (6,2) rotational temperatures above the Bear Lake Observatory, UT (42°N, 112°W) during October 1996 have revealed an interesting and unexpected mean nocturnal pattern. Ten quality nights (>100 h) of data have been used to form a mean night for autumnal, near-equinoctial conditions. The mean temperature and RMS variability associated with this mean night were 203 ± 5 K and 2.4 K, respectively, and compare very favorably with expectations based on Na-lidar measurements of mean tidal temperature perturbations over Urbana, IL (40°N, 88°W) during the fall 1996. Furthermore, this comparison shows that the 8-h tide was the dominant source of the mean nocturnal temperature variability in the OH M region during this period. Additional data, obtained at Fort Collins, CO (41°N, 105°W) in November 1997, illustrate the occurrence of an 8-h component of OH temperature variability about two months after the equinox and show that daily amplitudes as high as ≅15 K are possible.

  18. Gambling, housing conditions, community contexts and child health in remote indigenous communities in the Northern Territory, Australia

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Recent government reports have identified gambling, along with alcohol abuse, drug abuse and pornography, as contributing to child neglect and abuse in Indigenous communities in the Northern Territory (NT). These reports also identify gaps in empirical evidence upon which to base sound policy. To address this shortfall, data from ten remote Indigenous communities was analysed to determine the relationship between gambling problems, housing conditions, community contexts and child health in indigenous communities. Methods Logistic regression was used to assess associations between gambling problems, community contexts, housing conditions and child health. Separate multivariable models were developed for carer reported gambling problems in houses and six child health outcomes. Results Carer reported gambling problems in households across the ten communities ranged from 10% to 74%. Inland tropical communities had the highest level of reported gambling problems. Less access to a doctor in the community showed evidence of a multivariable adjusted association with gambling problems in houses. No housing variables showed evidence for a multivariable association with reported gambling problems. There was evidence for gambling problems having a multivariable adjusted association with carer report of scabies and ear infection in children. Conclusions The analyses provide evidence that gambling is a significant problem in Indigenous communities and that gambling problems in households is related to poor child health outcomes. A comprehensive (prevention, treatment, regulation and education) public health approach to harm minimisation associated with gambling amongst the Indigenous population is required that builds on current normative community regulation of gambling. PMID:22632458

  19. Pre-development conditions to assess the impact of growth in an urbanizing watershed in Northern Virginia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Saurav; Godrej, Adil N.; Grizzard, Thomas J.

    2016-09-01

    Pre-development conditions are an easily understood state to which watershed nonpoint nutrient reduction targets may be referenced. Using the pre-development baseline, a ;developed-excess; measure may be computed for changes due to anthropogenic development. Developed-excess is independent of many geographical, physical, and hydrological characteristics of the region and after normalization by area may be used for comparison among various sub-sets of the watershed, such as jurisdictions or land use types. We have demonstrated this method by computing pre-development nitrogen and phosphorus loads entering the Occoquan Reservoir from its tributary watershed in Northern Virginia. The pre-development loads in this study were computed using the calibrated water quality models for the period 2002-2007. Current forest land was used as a surrogate for pre-development land use conditions for the watershed and developed-excess was estimated for fluvial loads of Total Inorganic Nitrogen (TIN) and Orthophosphate-Phosphorus (OP) by subtracting simulated predevelopment loads from observed loads. It was observed that within the study period (2002-2007), the average annual developed-excess represented about 30% of the TIN and OP average annual loads exported to the reservoir. Comparison of the two disturbed land use types, urban and agricultural, showed that urban land uses exported significantly more excess nonpoint nutrient load per unit area than agricultural land uses.

  20. Chronic Heat Stress and Cognitive Development: An Example of Thermal Conditions Influencing Human Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riniolo, Todd C.; Schmidt, Louis A.

    2006-01-01

    Although thermal conditions influence the development of living organisms in a wide variety of ways, this topic has been recently ignored in humans. This paper reintroduces thermal conditions as a topic of importance for developmentalists by presenting an example of how thermal conditions are hypothesized to influence a particular developmental…

  1. Chronic Heat Stress and Cognitive Development: An Example of Thermal Conditions Influencing Human Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riniolo, Todd C.; Schmidt, Louis A.

    2006-01-01

    Although thermal conditions influence the development of living organisms in a wide variety of ways, this topic has been recently ignored in humans. This paper reintroduces thermal conditions as a topic of importance for developmentalists by presenting an example of how thermal conditions are hypothesized to influence a particular developmental…

  2. What is known about the health and living conditions of the indigenous people of northern Scandinavia, the Sami?

    PubMed

    Sjölander, Per

    2011-01-01

    The Sami are the indigenous ethnic population of northern Scandinavia. Their health condition is poorly known, although the knowledge has improved over the last decade. The aim was to review the current information on mortality, diseases, and risk factor exposure in the Swedish Sami population. Health-related research on Sami cohorts published in scientific journals and anthologies was used to compare the health condition among the Sami and the majority non-Sami population. When relevant, data from the Sami populations in Swedish were compared with corresponding data from Norwegian and Finnish Sami populations. Life expectancy and mortality patterns of the Sami are similar to those of the majority population. Small differences in incidences of cancer and cardiovascular diseases have been reported. The traditional Sami lifestyle seems to contain elements that reduce the risk to develop cancer and cardiovascular diseases, e.g. physical activity, diet rich in antioxidants and unsaturated fatty acids, and a strong cultural identity. Reindeer herding is an important cultural activity among the Sami and is associated with high risks for accidents. Pain in the lower back, neck, shoulders, elbows, and hands are frequent among both men and women in reindeer-herding families. For men, these symptoms are related to high exposure to terrain vehicles, particularly snowmobile, whereas for women psychosocial risk factors seem to more important, e.g. poor social support, high effort, low reward, and high economical responsibilities. Although the health condition of the Sami population appears to be rather similar to that of the general Swedish population, a number of specific health problems have been identified, especially among the reindeer-herding Sami. Most of these problems have their origin in marginalization and poor knowledge of the reindeer husbandry and the Sami culture in the majority population. It is suggested that the most sustainable measure to improve the health

  3. Surface Water Conditions In The Northern Benguela Region (se Atlantic) During The Last 450 Ky Reconstructed From Assemblages of Planktonic Foraminifera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    West, S.; Jansen, J. H. F.; van Raaphorst, W.; Stuut, J.-B. W.

    show that during the last 450 ky global climate variations influenced surface water conditions in the Northern Cape Basin directly by local processes (upwelling driven by SE trade winds) and indirectly by processes being forced further from the core site (frontal movements).

  4. Management regime influences shrubland birds and habitat conditions in the Northern Appalachians, USA

    Treesearch

    Jennifer R. Smetzer; David I. King; Scott. Schlossberg

    2014-01-01

    Population declines of birds that breed in early-successional shrubland habitat are of great concern to conservationists throughout the northeastern United States. To help increase the efficiency and effectiveness of efforts to conserve these species and their habitats, we studied birds in temporary forest openings created through even-aged timber harvest, and...

  5. Influences of the 2010 Eyjafjallajökull volcanic plume on air quality in the northern Alpine region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schäfer, K.; Thomas, W.; Peters, A.; Ries, L.; Obleitner, F.; Schnelle-Kreis, J.; Birmili, W.; Diemer, J.; Fricke, W.; Junkermann, W.; Pitz, M.; Emeis, S.; Forkel, R.; Suppan, P.; Flentje, H.; Wichmann, H. E.; Gilge, S.; Meinhardt, F.; Zimmermann, R.; Weinhold, K.; Soentgen, J.; Münkel, C.; Freuer, C.; Cyrys, J.

    2011-03-01

    A series of major eruptions of the Eyjafjallajökull volcano in Iceland started on 14 April 2010 and continued until the end of May 2010. The volcanic emissions moved over nearly the whole of Europe and were observed first on 16 April 2010 in Southern Germany with different remote sensing systems from the ground and space. Enhanced PM10 and SO2 concentrations were detected on 17 April at mountain stations (Zugspitze/Schneefernerhaus and Schauinsland) as well as in Innsbruck by in situ measurement devices. On 19 April intensive vertical mixing and advection along with clear sky-conditions facilitated the entrainment of volcanic material down to the ground. The subsequent formation of a stably stratified lower atmosphere with limited mixing near the ground during the evening of 19 April led to an additional enhancement of near-surface particle concentrations. Consequently, on 19 April and 20 April exceedances of the daily threshold value for particulate matter (PM10) were reported at nearly all monitoring stations of the North Alpine foothills as well as at mountain and valley stations in the northern Alps. The chemical analyses of ambient PM10 at monitoring stations of the North Alpine foothills yielded elevated Titanium concentrations on 19/20 April which prove the presence of volcanic plume material. Following this result the PM10 threshold exceedances are also associated with the volcanic plume. The entrainment of the volcanic plume material mainly affected the concentrations of coarse particles (>1 μm) - interpreted as volcanic ash - and ultrafine particles (<100 nm), while the concentrations of accumulation mode aerosol (0.1-1 μm) were not changed significantly. With regard to the occurrence of ultrafine particles, it is concluded that their formation was triggered by high sulphuric acid concentrations which are necessarily generated by the photochemical processes in a plume rich in sulphur dioxide under high solar irradiance. It became evident that during

  6. Analysis of technological conditions influence on efficiency of oilfield treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usheva, N. V.; Moizes, O. E.; Kuzmenko, E. A.; Kim, S. F.; Khlebnikova, E. S.; Dyalilova, S. N.; Filippova, T. V.

    2015-11-01

    The results of influence of process parameters on oil quality and recommended effective technological modes of oilfield treatment processes are presented in this paper. It is shown that the parameters that significantly affect the efficiency of oil processes are temperature and water-oil emulsion flow rate with a given number of working process units and the structure of flowsheet flows.

  7. Conditions that Influence Drivers' Yielding Behavior for Uncontrolled Crossings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bourquin, Eugene; Emerson, Robert Wall; Sauerburger, Dona

    2011-01-01

    Pedestrians with visual impairments need to cross streets where traffic signals and traffic signage are not present. This study examined the influences of several interventions, including a pedestrian's use of a mobility cane, on the behavior of drivers when they were expected to yield to a pedestrian crossing at an uncontrolled crossing.…

  8. Conditions that Influence Drivers' Yielding Behavior for Uncontrolled Crossings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bourquin, Eugene; Emerson, Robert Wall; Sauerburger, Dona

    2011-01-01

    Pedestrians with visual impairments need to cross streets where traffic signals and traffic signage are not present. This study examined the influences of several interventions, including a pedestrian's use of a mobility cane, on the behavior of drivers when they were expected to yield to a pedestrian crossing at an uncontrolled crossing.…

  9. The effect of northern fowl mite (Ornithonyssus sylviarum) infestation on hen physiology, physical condition, and egg quality.

    PubMed

    Vezzoli, Giuseppe; King, Annie J; Mench, Joy A

    2016-05-01

    The northern fowl mite (NFM),Ornithonyssus sylviarum, is the most common ectoparasite of laying hens in North America. Infestation can cause a reduction in egg production, egg weights, and feed conversion efficiency. However, there is a lack of information on the effects of NFM on hen physiology, physical condition, and egg quality. Singly caged beak-trimmed White Leghorn hens (N=32) were infested with mites at 25 wk of age. The condition of each hen was assessed at wk 0 (infestation) and wk 5 and 7 post-infestation to determine comb temperatures and feather, skin, and comb condition. Heterophil-lymphocyte (H/L) ratios and body weight (BW) were evaluated at wk 0 and wk 1, 3, 5, and 7 post-infestation. Egg weight, egg specific gravity, yolk color, Haugh unit (HU), and eggshell thickness were determined prior to infestation (wk -1) and at 1, 3, 5, and 7 wk post-infestation. The H/L ratio (P<0.0001), HU (P<0.0001), and egg specific gravity (P=0.001) were lowest, and the egg yolk color was lightest (P=0.087) at wk 5, the peak of infestation. At wk 5 and 7, more than 65% of the hens had red skin and more than 75% had scabs on the vent; in addition more than 84% had grey-black vent feathers. There were no effects of infestation on comb color, comb temperature, feather cover, BW, or eggshell thickness. It was concluded that infestation with NFM has negative effects on interior egg quality and hen integument. A decrease in H/L ratio was also observed at the peak of infestation. However, the effects of NFM on the immune system are unclear, and H/L ratio might not be a good stress measure in hens highly infested with NFM. © 2016 Poultry Science Association Inc.

  10. Stable climatic conditions in the Eemian interglacial recorded by stable isotopes from a limnic sediment sequence Parsau (northern Germany)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boettger, T.; Junge, F. W.; Stottmeister, L.

    2003-04-01

    An approx. 4m long high-resolution limnic sediment core was drilled near Parsau (south of the town of Jahrstedt) on the bank of the River Ohre in Lower Saxony (northern Germany). The lower part of the sequence consists of calcareous muds while the upper part comprises peats. It corresponds to the Eemian Interglacial period from the beginning of the Corylus (E4a) up to the Pinus (E6b) pollen assemblage zones (PAZ). The sediment sequence was studied by stable isotope analyses of bulk autochthoneous carbonate. According to the δ18O values, the middle part we investigated of the Eemian Interglacial in the Parsau profile indicates a stable climate. From bottom to top, the δ18O values for the first part of the profile (5.0-3.8m deep) are relatively constant with a mean value of -6.70 ±0.11 ppm vs. PDB. Then the 18O level increases continuously without any fluctuations to the top (between 3.8-3.0m) and reaches a maximum between 3.0 and 2.8m (δ18Omean= -5.52± 0.07 ppm vs. PDB) before decreasing in the upper part. Warm climatic conditions began in PAZ E4a. The δ18O data of lake carbonate reflect warm, stable climatic conditions during the Corylus and Carpinus PAZ. The climatic optimum is reached in the course of PAZ E4b to E5. The relatively heavier δ13C values varying between 0.73 and -2.08 ppm vs. PDB reflect the high, continuously increasing eutrophication in the lake. These results confirm that stable climatic conditions prevailed during the middle Eemian and during the climatic optimum of the Eemian as previously found from sediment sequences at opencast mines in Saxony, central Germany.

  11. Are life history events of a northern breeding population of Cooper's Hawks influenced by changing climate?

    PubMed

    Rosenfield, Robert N; Hardin, Madeline G; Bielefeldt, John; Keyel, Edward R

    2017-01-01

    Numerous studies have demonstrated earlier timing of spring migration and egg-laying in small passerines, but documentation of such responses to recent climate change in the life histories of higher trophic feeding birds such as raptors is relatively scarce. Raptors may be particularly susceptible to possible adverse effects of climate change due to their longer generation turnover times and lower reproductive capacity, which could lead to population declines because of an inability to match reproductive timing with optimal brood rearing conditions. Conversely adaptively favorable outcomes due to the influence of changing climate may occur. In general, birds that seasonally nest earlier typically have higher reproductive output compared to conspecifics that nest later in the season. Given the strong seasonal decline in reproductive output, and the heritability of nesting phenology, it is possible that nesting seasons would (adaptively) advance over time. Recent climate warming may release prior ecological constraints on birds that depend on food availability at the time of egg production, as do various raptors including Cooper's Hawks (Accipiter cooperii). Under this scenario, productivity, especially clutch size, might increase because it is likely that this reproductive demographic may be the most immediate response to the earlier seasonal presence of food resources. We demonstrated a statistically significant shift of about 4-5 days to an earlier timing of egg-hatching in spring across 36 years during 1980-2015 for a partially migratory population of Cooper's Hawks in Wisconsin, United States, which is consistent with a recent study that showed that Cooper's Hawks had advanced their timing of spring migration during 1979-2012. Both studies occurred in the Great Lakes region, an area that compared to global averages is experiencing earlier and increased warming particularly in the spring in Wisconsin. The nesting period did not lengthen. We suggest that the

  12. Aircraft Observations of Soil Hydrological Influence on the Atmosphere in Northern India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Christopher M.; Barton, Emma J.; Belusic, Danijel; Böing, Steven J.; Hunt, Kieran M. R.; Mitra, Ashis K.; Parker, Douglas J.; Turner, Andrew G.

    2017-04-01

    India is considered to be a region of the world where the influence of land surface fluxes of sensible and latent heat play an important role in regional weather and climate. Indian rainfall simulations in GCMs are known to be particularly sensitive to soil moisture. However, in a monsoon region where seasonal convective rainfall dominates, it is a big challenge for GCMs to capture, on the one hand, a realistic depiction of surface fluxes during wetting up and drying down at seasonal and sub-seasonal scales, and on the other, the sensitivity of convective rainfall and regional circulations to space-time fluctuations in land surface fluxes. On top of this, most GCMs and operational atmospheric forecast models don't explicitly consider irrigation. In the Indo-Gangetic plains of the Indian sub-continent, irrigated agriculture has become the dominant land use. Irrigation suppresses temporal flux variability for much of the year, and at the same time enhances spatial heterogeneity. One of the key objectives of the Anglo-Indian Interaction of Convective Organization and Monsoon Precipitation, Atmosphere, Surface and Sea (INCOMPASS) collaborative project is to better understand the coupling between the land surface and the Indian summer monsoon, and build this understanding into improved prediction of rainfall on multiple time and space scales. During June and July 2016, a series of research flights was performed across the sub-continent using the NERC/Met Office BAe146 aircraft. Here we will present results for a case study from a flight on 30th June which sampled the Planetary Boundary Layer (PBL) on a 700 km low level transect, from the semi-arid region of Rajasthan eastwards into the extensively irrigated state of Uttar Pradesh. As well as crossing different land uses, the flight also sampled mesoscale regions with contrasting recent rainfall conditions. Here we will show how variations in surface hydrology, driven by both irrigation and rainfall, influence the

  13. Post-bomb coral Δ14C record from Iki Island, Japan: possible evidence of oceanographic conditions on the northern East China Sea shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitsuguchi, Takehiro; Hirota, Masashi; Group, Paleo Labo AMS Dating; Yamazaki, Atsuko; Watanabe, Tsuyoshi; Yamano, Hiroya

    2016-10-01

    Nansei Islands area; (2) the shelf-surface water is conveyed from the northern ECS to Iki Island by the Tsushima Current. Thus, it can be suggested that the post-bomb coral Δ14C record from Iki Island reflects oceanographic conditions of the northern ECS shelf.

  14. Do breeding phase and detection distance influence the effective area surveyed for northern goshawks?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Roberson, A.M.; Andersen, D.E.; Kennedy, P.L.

    2005-01-01

    Broadcast surveys using conspecific calls are currently the most effective method for detecting northern goshawks (Accipiter gentilis) during the breeding season. These surveys typically use alarm calls during the nestling phase and juvenile food-begging calls during the fledgling-dependency phase. Because goshawks are most vocal during the courtship phase, we hypothesized that this phase would be an effective time to detect goshawks. Our objective was to improve current survey methodology by evaluating the probability of detecting goshawks at active nests in northern Minnesota in 3 breeding phases and at 4 broadcast distances and to determine the effective area surveyed per broadcast station. Unlike previous studies, we broadcast calls at only 1 distance per trial. This approach better quantifies (1) the relationship between distance and probability of detection, and (2) the effective area surveyed (EAS) per broadcast station. We conducted 99 broadcast trials at 14 active breeding areas. When pooled over all distances, detection rates were highest during the courtship (70%) and fledgling-dependency phases (68%). Detection rates were lowest during the nestling phase (28%), when there appeared to be higher variation in likelihood of detecting individuals. EAS per broadcast station was 39.8 ha during courtship and 24.8 ha during fledgling-dependency. Consequently, in northern Minnesota, broadcast stations may be spaced 712m and 562 m apart when conducting systematic surveys during courtship and fledgling-dependency, respectively. We could not calculate EAS for the nestling phase because probability of detection was not a simple function of distance from nest. Calculation of EAS could be applied to other areas where the probability of detection is a known function of distance.

  15. Interoceptive awareness and unaware fear conditioning: are subliminal conditioning effects influenced by the manipulation of visceral self-perception?

    PubMed

    Raes, An K; De Raedt, Rudi

    2011-12-01

    Research has shown repeatedly that attention influences implicit learning effects. In a similar vein, interoceptive awareness might be involved in unaware fear conditioning: The fact that the CS is repeatedly presented in the context of aversive bodily experiences might facilitate the development of conditioned responding. We investigated the role of interoceptive attention in a subliminal conditioning paradigm. Conditioning was embedded in a spatial cueing task with subliminally presented cues that were followed by a masking stimulus. Response times to the targets that were either validly or invalidly predicted by the cues served as index of conditioning. Interoceptive attention was manipulated between-subjects. Half the participants completed a heartbeat detection task before conditioning. This task tunes attention to one's own bodily signals. We found that conditioned responding was facilitated in this latter group of participants. These results are in line with the hypothesis that a rise interoceptive attention enhances unaware conditioned responding.

  16. Sensory system development influences the ontogeny of eyeblink conditioning.

    PubMed

    Goldsberry, Mary E; Elkin, Magdalyn E; Freeman, John H

    2014-09-01

    A rate-limiting factor in the ontogeny of auditory eyeblink conditioning (EBC) is the development of sensory inputs to the pontine nucleus. One possible way to facilitate the emergence of EBC would be to use a conditioned stimulus (CS) that activates an earlier-developing sensory system. The goal of the current study was to investigate whether using a vibration CS would facilitate the ontogeny of delay EBC relative to an auditory CS. Rat pups received six sessions of delay EBC or unpaired training using either a tone or vibration CS on postnatal day (P)14-15, 17-18, 21-22, or 24-25. Conditioning with a vibration CS resulted in rapid learning as early as P17-18, whereas conditioning with a tone CS did not result in rapid conditioning until after P17-18. Control experiments verified that the differences in EBC were due to CS-specific sensory properties. The results suggest that the ontogeny of EBC depends on sensory system development.

  17. Influence of impurity gases and operating conditions on PAFC performance

    SciTech Connect

    Hirai, K.; Iwasa, N.; Suzuki, M.; Okada, O.

    1996-12-31

    On-site Phosphoric Acid Fuel Cell (PAFC) Cogeneration system is installed at various test sites, such as at underground parking lot, within chemical plant premises and near urban streets. Since in the current PAFC system, cathode air is supplied to the cell with no particular pretreatment, impurity gases in the air might influence on cell performance. We have investigated the influence of various impurity gases in the cathode gas, on sub-scale single cells, and have found that NO{sub 2}, SO{sub 2} and toluene affect negatively on cell performance. The results of these experiments and the conceivable mechanism of these effects on cell degradation are reported. We have also investigated the influence of other operating parameters, such as temperature, current density, fuel utilization on cell performance. From these experiments, we have found that operating temperature is a significant factor, which mainly determines cell voltage decline rate. The results of sub-scale single cell tests and a short-stack verification test are also reported.

  18. Impact of winter oceanographic conditions on zooplankton abundance in northern Adriatic with implications on Adriatic anchovy stock prognosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraus, Romina; Supić, Nastjenjka; Lučić, Davor; Njire, Jakica

    2015-12-01

    Anchovy, Engraulis encrasicolus (L.), is commercially one of the most important Adriatic small pelagic fish. Despite the prevailing oligotrophication trend in the northern Adriatic (NA), the anchovy catch increased after 2000, coinciding with an increased number of the winter type A occurrences, when Po River waters are favoured to spread across the NA. Namely, winter type A is characterised by conditions resulting with Po River waters spreading across the NA along with salinity decrease. On the contrary, in winters of type B, salinity is high. We hypothesized in previous paper, based on correlation between circulation patterns and phytoplankton with anchovy catch, that excess feeding of anchovy in this winter pre-spawning period (February) can lead to increased amounts of the anchovy eggs two months later and subsequently to the total fish catch of the same year. In this paper, we investigate in more details and based on longer time series the relation between anchovy catch and winter circulation patterns of the NA. Additionally, we studied the association between anchovy catch and zooplankton, as anchovy is predominantly zooplanktivorous. We found that zooplankton abundances in winters of A type enhance and that ciliates play an important role in the NA anchovy food web and enrichment of the region with anchovy. Finally, the results of our investigation might in time represent the basics for a sustainable anchovy management in the Adriatic Sea as they enable the development of prediction models of the anchovy stock.

  19. Influence of Baltimore's Urban Atmosphere on Organic Contaminants over the Northern Chesapeake Bay.

    PubMed

    Offenberg, John H; Baker, Joel E

    1999-08-01

    Air and precipitation samples were collected along an urban to over-water to rural transect across the northern Chesapeake Bay as a preliminary investigation into the spatial extent of elevated atmospheric concentrations of urban-derived persistent organic pollutants. Air samples were collected daily from June 3-9, 1996, along the transect as part of the Atmospheric Exchange over Lakes and Oceans project. Total (gas + particle bound) atmospheric polycy-clic aromatic hydrocarbon concentrations [∑-PAH] ranged from 0.4 to 114 ng/m(3), and gas phase polychlorinated bi-phenyl concentrations [∑-PCB] ranged from 0.02 to 3.4 ng/m(3). Strong concentration gradients were found for both PAHs and PCBs, with the highest concentrations in the city and the lowest at the downwind rural site. Gas and particle bound PAHs varied independently in the city, possibly due to strong but geographically separated emission sources. A precipitation event collected during westerly winds contained fourfold higher ∑-PAH and twelvefold higher ∑-PCB concentrations at the over-water site than at the rural background location, further indicating that the urban plume extends from Baltimore, MD, over the northern Chesapeake Bay over a spatial scale of approximately 30 km.

  20. Influence of heat and vibration on the movement of the northern fowl mite (Acari: Macronyssidae).

    PubMed

    Owen, Jeb P; Mullens, Bradley A

    2004-09-01

    Heat and vibration are common host-generated cues that ectoparasites use to orient to hosts. Three experiments evaluated effects of heat and vibration on the movement of northern fowl mite, Ornithonyssus sylviarum (Canestrini & Fanzago). Individual arrested mites in an isolation chamber always initiated movement (walking) after substrate vibration (7.8-min walking duration), but only initiated movement 50% of the time (2.8-min walking duration) upon exposure to a 3 degrees C heat fluctuation. Heat fluctuation in combination with vibration extended the period of activity by approximately 50% (11.6-min walking duration) compared with activity initiated by vibration alone. Mites with longer time off-host moved for shorter durations. In a choice test, individual mites consistently moved closer to a 35 degrees C heat source 1 or 6 mm away, but not to a heat source 11 mm away. In a circular arena, mites were able to orient accurately to a 35 degrees C heat source and reached the arena edge almost 4 times faster (11.2 s) than mites without a heat source (41.2 s). These results suggest that northern fowl mite is capable of directed thermo-orientation, as well as modulation of activity depending on the type of sensory information perceived. The adaptive significance of this orientation for a "permanent" ectoparasite is discussed.

  1. Spatial patterns of soil pH and the factors that influence them in plantation forests of northern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Songbai; Liu, Yongwen; Piao, Shilong

    2017-04-01

    Climate and anthropogenic activities such as afforestation and nitrogen deposition all impact soil pH. Understanding the spatial pattern of soil pH and the factors that influence it can provide basic information for generating appropriate strategies for soil resource management and protection, especially in light of increasing anthropogenic influences and climate change. In this study, we investigated the spatial and vertical pattern of soil pH and evaluated the influence of climate and nitrogen deposition using 1647 soil profiles 1 meter in depth from 549 plots in plantation forests of northern China. We found that soil pH decreased from the southwest to the northeast in the study region and had a similar spatial pattern before and after afforestation. Furthermore, our results show that climate and nitrogen deposition fundamentally influence the pattern of soil pH. Specifically, increasing precipitation significantly decreased soil pH (with a mean rate of 0.3 for every 100 mm rainfall, p<0.001), whereas increasing temperature significantly increased soil pH (0.13 for every degree centigrade, p<0.001). Nitrogen deposition, especially nitrate nitrogen, significantly decreased soil pH (p<0.01). All these factors impact soil pH directly and indirectly through climate-plant-soil interactions. As the risks from both climate change and nitrogen deposition increase, there is an urgent need to further understanding of soil pH dynamics and to develop informed policies to protect soil resources.

  2. Influencing Children's Pregambling Game Playing via Conditional Discrimination Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Taylor E.; Dixon, Mark R.

    2009-01-01

    Past research has demonstrated a transformation of stimulus functions under similar conditions using gambling tasks and adults (e.g., Zlomke & Dixon, 2006), and the present study attempted to extend this research. Experimenters exposed 7 children (ages 7 to 10 years) to a simulated board game with concurrently available dice differing only by…

  3. Influence of anomalous thermal losses of ignition conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Coppi, B.; Tang, W.M.

    1986-05-01

    In the process of achieving ignition conditions, it is likely that microinstabilities, which lead to anomalous thermal transport of the fusing nuclei, will be present. When such phenomena are taken into account, an appropriate formulation of ignition criteria becomes necessary. In particular, a new type of plasma density limit is identified.

  4. INFLUENCE OF PH AND REDOX CONDITIONS ON COPPER LEACHING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Leaching behavior of metals from a mineral processing waste at varying pH and redox conditions was studies. Effect of combinations of pH and Eh on leaching of copper is described. Leaching of copper was found to be dependent on both pH and Eh. Higher concentrations of Cu were ...

  5. Influence of pavement condition on horizontal curve safety.

    PubMed

    Buddhavarapu, Prasad; Banerjee, Ambarish; Prozzi, Jorge A

    2013-03-01

    Crash statistics suggest that horizontal curves are the most vulnerable sites for crash occurrence. These crashes are often severe and many involve at least some level of injury due to the nature of the collisions. Ensuring the desired pavement surface condition is one potentially effective strategy to reduce the occurrence of severe accidents on horizontal curves. This study sought to develop crash injury severity models by integrating crash and pavement surface condition databases. It focuses on developing a causal relationship between pavement condition indices and severity level of crashes occurring on two-lane horizontal curves in Texas. In addition, it examines the suitability of the existing Skid Index for safety maintenance of two-lane curves. Significant correlation is evident between pavement condition and crash injury severity on two-lane undivided horizontal curves in Texas. Probability of a crash becoming fatal is appreciably sensitive to certain pavement indices. Data suggested that road facilities providing a smoother and more comfortable ride are vulnerable to severe crashes on horizontal curves. In addition, the study found that longitudinal skid measurement barely correlates with injury severity of crashes occurring on curved portions. The study recommends exploring the option of incorporating lateral friction measurement into Pavement Management System (PMS) databases specifically at curved road segments.

  6. Recession of spring hydrographs: Influence of initial conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birk, Steffen; Hergarten, Stefan

    2017-04-01

    The hydrograph recession of karst springs is known to provide information about the aquifer properties. However, it has been shown (e.g. Birk and Hergarten, J. Hydrol., 2010) that the early stage of the recession is dependent on the initial condition at the onset of the recession and thus on the preceding recharge events. This contribution provides a summary of the effects of the initial conditions on the recession behaviour. In addition to the recession hydrographs, showing the spring discharge as a function of time, we examine how different initial conditions affect the relationship between the discharge and its first time derivatives ('Brutsaert-Nieber plot'). The latter appears to be rarely considered in karst hydrogeology, but is frequently used for baseflow recession analysis in hydrology, as it eliminates the need to identify the onset of the recession. We argue, first, that this approach might be also useful for the analysis of the hydrograph recession of karst aquifers, and second, that the effect of the initial condition on the slope in the Brutsaert-Nieber plot needs to be understood and considered in the analysis.

  7. Methods and background characteristics of the TOHNN study: a population-based study of oral health conditions in northern Norway

    PubMed Central

    Holde, Gro Eirin; Oscarson, Nils; Tillberg, Anders; Marstrander, Peter; Jönsson, Birgitta

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The aim of the Tromstannen – Oral Health in Northern Norway (TOHNN) study was to investigate oral health and dental-related diseases in an adult population. This article provides an overview of the background of the study and a description of the sample characteristics and methods employed in data collection. Study design Cross-sectional population-based study including a questionnaire and clinical dental examination. Methods A randomly selected sample of 2,909 individuals (20–79 years old) drawn from the population register was invited to participate in the study. The data were collected between October 2013 and November 2014 in Troms County in northern Norway. The questionnaire focused on oral health-related behaviours and attitudes, oral health-related quality of life, sense of coherence, dental anxiety and symptoms from the temporomandibular joint. The dental examinations, including radiographs, were conducted by 11 dental teams in 5 dental offices. The examination comprised of registration of dental caries, full mouth periodontal status, temporomandibular disorders, mucosal lesions and height and weight. The participants were grouped by age (20–34, 35–49, 50–64 and 65–79) and ethnicity (Norwegian, Sámi, other European and other world). Results From the original sample of 2,909 individuals, 1,986 (68.3%) people participated, of whom 1,019 (51.3%) were women. The highest attendance rate was among women 20–34 years old (80.3%) and the lowest in the oldest age group of women (55.4%). There was no difference in response rate between rural and urban areas. There was a positive correlation between population size and household gross income (p < 0.001) and education level (p < 0.001). The majority of Sámi resided in smaller municipalities. In larger cities, most participants used private dental health care services, whereas, in rural areas, most participants used the public dental health care service. Conclusion The TOHNN study has the

  8. Methods and background characteristics of the TOHNN study: a population-based study of oral health conditions in northern Norway.

    PubMed

    Holde, Gro Eirin; Oscarson, Nils; Tillberg, Anders; Marstrander, Peter; Jönsson, Birgitta

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the Tromstannen-Oral Health in Northern Norway (TOHNN) study was to investigate oral health and dental-related diseases in an adult population. This article provides an overview of the background of the study and a description of the sample characteristics and methods employed in data collection. Cross-sectional population-based study including a questionnaire and clinical dental examination. A randomly selected sample of 2,909 individuals (20-79 years old) drawn from the population register was invited to participate in the study. The data were collected between October 2013 and November 2014 in Troms County in northern Norway. The questionnaire focused on oral health-related behaviours and attitudes, oral health-related quality of life, sense of coherence, dental anxiety and symptoms from the temporomandibular joint. The dental examinations, including radiographs, were conducted by 11 dental teams in 5 dental offices. The examination comprised of registration of dental caries, full mouth periodontal status, temporomandibular disorders, mucosal lesions and height and weight. The participants were grouped by age (20-34, 35-49, 50-64 and 65-79) and ethnicity (Norwegian, Sámi, other European and other world). From the original sample of 2,909 individuals, 1,986 (68.3%) people participated, of whom 1,019 (51.3%) were women. The highest attendance rate was among women 20-34 years old (80.3%) and the lowest in the oldest age group of women (55.4%). There was no difference in response rate between rural and urban areas. There was a positive correlation between population size and household gross income (p < 0.001) and education level (p < 0.001). The majority of Sámi resided in smaller municipalities. In larger cities, most participants used private dental health care services, whereas, in rural areas, most participants used the public dental health care service. The TOHNN study has the potential to generate new knowledge on a wide range of oral health

  9. Carbohydrate Supplementation Influences Serum Cytokines after Exercise under Hypoxic Conditions.

    PubMed

    Caris, Aline Venticinque; Da Silva, Edgar Tavares; Dos Santos, Samile Amorim; Lira, Fabio Santos; Oyama, Lila Missae; Tufik, Sergio; Dos Santos, Ronaldo Vagner Thomatieli

    2016-11-05

    Exercise performed at the hypoxia equivalent of an altitude of 4200 m is associated with elevated inflammatory mediators and changes in the Th1/Th2 response. By contrast, supplementation with carbohydrates has an anti-inflammatory effect when exercise is performed under normoxic conditions. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of carbohydrate supplementation on cytokines and cellular damage markers after exercise under hypoxic conditions at a simulated altitude of 4200 m. Seven adult male volunteers who exercised for 60 min at an intensity of 50% VO2Peak were randomly evaluated under three distinct conditions; normoxia, hypoxia and hypoxia + carbohydrate supplementation. Blood samples were collected at rest, at the end of exercise and after 60 min of recovery. To evaluate hypoxia + carbohydrate supplementation, volunteers received a solution of 6% carbohydrate (maltodextrin) or a placebo (strawberry-flavored Crystal Light(®); Kraft Foods, Northfield, IL, USA) every 20 min during exercise and recovery. Statistical analyses comprised analysis of variance, with a one-way ANOVA followed by the Tukey post hoc test with a significance level of p < 0.05. Under normoxic and hypoxic conditions, there was a significant increase in the concentration of IL-6 after exercise and after recovery compared to at rest (p < 0.05), while in the hypoxia + carbohydrate group, there was a significant increase in the concentration of IL-6 and TNF-α after exercise compared to at rest (p < 0.05). Furthermore, under this condition, TNF-α, IL-2 and the balance of IL-2/IL-4 were increased after recovery compared to at rest (p < 0.05). We conclude that carbohydrate supplementation modified the IL-6 and TNF-α serum concentrations and shifted the IL-2/IL-4 balance towards Th1 in response without glycemic, glutaminemia and cell damage effects.

  10. Carbohydrate Supplementation Influences Serum Cytokines after Exercise under Hypoxic Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Caris, Aline Venticinque; Da Silva, Edgar Tavares; Dos Santos, Samile Amorim; Lira, Fabio Santos; Oyama, Lila Missae; Tufik, Sergio; Dos Santos, Ronaldo Vagner Thomatieli

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Exercise performed at the hypoxia equivalent of an altitude of 4200 m is associated with elevated inflammatory mediators and changes in the Th1/Th2 response. By contrast, supplementation with carbohydrates has an anti-inflammatory effect when exercise is performed under normoxic conditions. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of carbohydrate supplementation on cytokines and cellular damage markers after exercise under hypoxic conditions at a simulated altitude of 4200 m. Methods: Seven adult male volunteers who exercised for 60 min at an intensity of 50% VO2Peak were randomly evaluated under three distinct conditions; normoxia, hypoxia and hypoxia + carbohydrate supplementation. Blood samples were collected at rest, at the end of exercise and after 60 min of recovery. To evaluate hypoxia + carbohydrate supplementation, volunteers received a solution of 6% carbohydrate (maltodextrin) or a placebo (strawberry-flavored Crystal Light®; Kraft Foods, Northfield, IL, USA) every 20 min during exercise and recovery. Statistical analyses comprised analysis of variance, with a one-way ANOVA followed by the Tukey post hoc test with a significance level of p < 0.05. Results: Under normoxic and hypoxic conditions, there was a significant increase in the concentration of IL-6 after exercise and after recovery compared to at rest (p < 0.05), while in the hypoxia + carbohydrate group, there was a significant increase in the concentration of IL-6 and TNF-α after exercise compared to at rest (p < 0.05). Furthermore, under this condition, TNF-α, IL-2 and the balance of IL-2/IL-4 were increased after recovery compared to at rest (p < 0.05). Conclusion: We conclude that carbohydrate supplementation modified the IL-6 and TNF-α serum concentrations and shifted the IL-2/IL-4 balance towards Th1 in response without glycemic, glutaminemia and cell damage effects. PMID:27827949

  11. Use of color maps and wavelet coherence to discern seasonal and interannual climate influences on streamflow variability in northern catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carey, Sean K.; Tetzlaff, Doerthe; Buttle, Jim; Laudon, Hjalmar; McDonnell, Jeff; McGuire, Kevin; Seibert, Jan; Soulsby, Chris; Shanley, Jamie

    2013-10-01

    The higher midlatitudes of the northern hemisphere are particularly sensitive to change due to the important role the 0°C isotherm plays in the phase of precipitation and intermediate storage as snow. An international intercatchment comparison program called North-Watch seeks to improve our understanding of the sensitivity of northern catchments to change by examining their hydrological and biogeochemical variability and response. Here eight North-Watch catchments located in Sweden (Krycklan), Scotland (Girnock and Strontian), the United States (Sleepers River, Hubbard Brook, and HJ Andrews), and Canada (Dorset and Wolf Creek) with 10 continuous years of daily precipitation and runoff data were selected to assess daily to seasonal coupling of precipitation (P) and runoff (Q) using wavelet coherency, and to explore the patterns and scales of variability in streamflow using color maps. Wavelet coherency revealed that P and Q were decoupled in catchments with cold winters, yet were strongly coupled during and immediately following the spring snowmelt freshet. In all catchments, coupling at shorter time scales occurred during wet periods when the catchment was responsive and storage deficits were small. At longer time scales, coupling reflected coherence between seasonal cycles, being enhanced at sites with enhanced seasonality in P. Color maps were applied as an alternative method to identify patterns and scales of flow variability. Seasonal versus transient flow variability was identified along with the persistence of that variability on influencing the flow regime. While exploratory in nature, this intercomparison exercise highlights the importance of climate and the 0°C isotherm on the functioning of northern catchments.

  12. Body condition and forage type influence intramuscular and rump fat, and reproductive performance of postpartum Brahman-influenced cows

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Multiparous Brahman-influenced cows were managed to achieve marginal (BCS = 4.9 ± 0.1; n = 55) or moderate (BCS = 6.5 ± 0.1; n = 55) body condition (BC) to determine the influence of forage type on estrous characteristics, intramuscular fat percentage (IMF), rump fat (RF), and reproductive performan...

  13. Susceptibility of volcanic ash-influenced soil in northern Idaho to mechanical compaction

    Treesearch

    Deborah S. Page-Dumroese

    1993-01-01

    Timber harvesting and mechanical site preparation can reduce site productivity if they excessively disturb or compact the soil. Volcanic ash-influenced soils with low undisturbed bulk densities and rock content are particularly susceptible. This study evaluates the effects of harvesting and site preparation on changes in the bulk density of ash-influenced forest soils...

  14. [Influence endophytic bacteria to promote plants growth in stress conditions].

    PubMed

    Napora, Anna; Kacprzak, Małgorzata; Nowak, Kamil; Grobelak, Anna

    2015-01-01

    The growth of plants under stress conditions is often assisted by microorganisms colonizing the rhizosphere (the root zone of the highest microbial activity). One of the most important bacterial groups to encourage the growth of plants (PGPB) are endophytes. These microorganisms penetrate living cells of plants and there they lead the microbiological activity as endosymbionts. These microorganisms can effectively promote the growth of plants under stress conditions and stimulate biochemical activities: nitrogen fixation, production of growth hormones (auxins, cytokinins and gibberellins), reduction of the high concentration of ethylene as well as facilitation of the collection plant minerals and water. This paper is an attempt to summarize the current state of knowledge about the biochemical activity of bacterial endophytes.

  15. Influence of interface condition on spin-Seebeck effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Z.; Hou, D.; Uchida, K.; Saitoh, E.

    2015-04-01

    The longitudinal spin-Seebeck effect (LSSE) has been investigated for Pt/yttrium iron garnet (YIG) bilayer systems. The magnitude of the voltage induced by the LSSE is found to be sensitive to the Pt/YIG interface condition. We observed a large LSSE voltage in a Pt/YIG system with a better crystalline interface, while the voltage decays steeply when an amorphous layer is introduced at the interface artificially.

  16. Can environmental conditions experienced in early life influence future generations?

    PubMed Central

    Burton, Tim; Metcalfe, Neil B.

    2014-01-01

    The consequences of early developmental conditions for performance in later life are now subjected to convergent interest from many different biological sub-disciplines. However, striking data, largely from the biomedical literature, show that environmental effects experienced even before conception can be transmissible to subsequent generations. Here, we review the growing evidence from natural systems for these cross-generational effects of early life conditions, showing that they can be generated by diverse environmental stressors, affect offspring in many ways and can be transmitted directly or indirectly by both parental lines for several generations. In doing so, we emphasize why early life might be so sensitive to the transmission of environmentally induced effects across generations. We also summarize recent theoretical advancements within the field of developmental plasticity, and discuss how parents might assemble different ‘internal’ and ‘external’ cues, even from the earliest stages of life, to instruct their investment decisions in offspring. In doing so, we provide a preliminary framework within the context of adaptive plasticity for understanding inter-generational phenomena that arise from early life conditions. PMID:24807254

  17. The Dynamical Influence of Separate Teleconnections from the Pacific and Indian Oceans on the Northern Annular Mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fletcher, C. G.; Cassou, C.

    2015-12-01

    This study uses simulations with a coupled ocean-atmosphere GCM to examine the influence of quasi-stationary wave teleconnections from the tropical oceans on the sign and amplitude of wintertime variability of the Northern Annular Mode (NAM). Composites constructed from a 1000-yr pre-industrial control simulation show that increased precipitation in the central/eastern Pacific drives a negative NAM response. In contrast, when isolated from ENSO variability, increased precipitation over the western-central Indian Ocean drives a strong and persistent positive NAM response. The sign and amplitude of the NAM responses are largely explained by opposite linear interference of the wave teleconnections propagating from the tropics. This mechanism is confirmed using a new set of experiments where the tropical ocean is nudged separately over the Pacific and Indian Oceans toward the large amplitude 1997/98 -- 1998/99 ENSO cycle. The phase of the quasi-stationary wave and NAM responses in these two cases are of opposite sign, providing strong evidence that precipitation changes over the Indian Ocean, driven by internal variability and/or in response to climate change, can induce teleconnections that affect the northern extratropics independent of--and with opposite-sign to--those associated with ENSO.

  18. The influence of social affiliation on individual vocal signatures of northern resident killer whales (Orcinus orca).

    PubMed

    Nousek, Anna E; Slater, Peter J B; Wang, Chao; Miller, Patrick J O

    2006-12-22

    Northern resident killer whales (Orcinus orca) live in highly stable groups and use group-specific vocal signals, but individual variation in calls has not been described previously. A towed beam-forming array was used to ascribe stereotyped pulsed calls with two independently modulated frequency contours to visually identified individual killer whales in Johnstone Strait, British Columbia. Overall, call similarity determined using neural networks differed significantly between different affiliation levels for both frequency components of all the call types analysed. This method distinguished calls from individuals within the same matriline better than different calls produced by a single individual and better than by chance. The calls of individuals from different matrilines were more distinctive than those within the same matriline, confirming previous studies based on group recordings. These results show that frequency contours of stereotyped calls differ among the individuals that are constantly associated with each other and use group-specific vocalizations, though across-group differences were substantially more pronounced.

  19. Influence of growth conditions on bacteriocin production by Brevibacterium linens.

    PubMed

    Motta, A S; Brandelli, A

    2003-08-01

    The influence of temperature, NaCl concentration and cheese whey media on growth of Brevibacterium linens ATCC 9175 and production of bacteriocin-like antimicrobial activity was studied. Bacteriocin production and activity were higher at 25 degrees C than at 30 degrees C. No significant growth or production of bacteriocins was observed at 37 degrees C. When bacteriocin production was investigated in media containing different concentrations of NaCl, increased activity was observed in media containing 40 or 80 g l(-1), but not 120 g l(-1) NaCl. The addition of NaCl resulted in a significant increase in specific production rates of bacteriocin-like activity. Antimicrobial activity was also observed by cultivation of B. linens at 25 degrees C in cheese whey media.

  20. Basement structure and its influence on the structural configuration of the northern North Sea rift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fazlikhani, Hamed; Fossen, Haakon; Gawthorpe, Robert L.; Faleide, Jan Inge; Bell, Rebecca E.

    2017-06-01

    The northern North Sea rift basin developed on a heterogeneous crust comprising structures inherited from the Caledonian orogeny and Devonian postorogenic extension. Integrating two-dimensional regional seismic reflection data and information from basement wells, we investigate the prerift structural configuration in the northern North Sea rift. Three seismic facies have been defined below the base rift surface: (1) relatively low-amplitude and low-frequency reflections, interpreted as pre-Caledonian metasediments, Caledonian nappes, and/or Devonian clastic sediments; (2) packages of high-amplitude dipping reflections (>500 ms thick), interpreted as basement shear zones; and (3) medium-amplitude and high-frequency reflections interpreted as less sheared crystalline basement of Proterozoic and Paleozoic (Caledonian) origin. Some zones of Seismic Facies 2 can be linked to onshore Devonian shear zones, whereas others are restricted to the offshore rift area. Interpreted offshore shear zones dip S, ESE, and WNW in contrast to W to NW dipping shear zones onshore West Norway. Our results indicate that Devonian strain and ductile deformation was distributed throughout the Caledonian orogenic belt from central South Norway to the Shetland Platform. Most of the Devonian basins related to this extension are, however, removed by erosion during subsequent exhumation. Basement shear zones reactivated during the rifting and locally control the location and geometry of rift depocenters, e.g., in the Stord and East Shetland basins. Prerift structures with present-day dips >15° were reactivated, although some of the basement shear zones are displaced by rift faults regardless of their orientation relative to rift extension direction.

  1. Assessment of the potential for hydro-solidarity within plural legal conditions of traditional irrigation systems in northern Tanzania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kemerink, J. S.; Ahlers, R.; van der Zaag, P.

    Competition over water resources and related disputes over water are inherently local and context-specific in their manifestations. In Makanya catchment, located in the mid-reaches of the Pangani river basin in northern Tanzania, competition over water is apparent and with increased demands for water disputes are likely to become fiercer in the near future. Negotiations between upstream and downstream users at various levels in the catchment have resulted in water sharing arrangements or are still on-going while other negotiations seem to be stranded in impasses. Why in certain situations water sharing among users evolves, while in other cases mutual agreements can not be reached, is not yet well understood. Insight in the plural legal context in which water sharing arrangement among water users develop could set light on complex resource use and management realities as well as the ability of various water users to influence the negotiations over water. The hydro-solidarity concept is referred to as potential mechanism to reconcile conflicts over water. Hydro-solidarity promotes ethical dimensions as integral part of decision making and is assumed to be based on a universal set of commonly accepted norms and rules. Through analysis of the plural legal context in which water sharing arrangements among the smallholder farmers in the Makanya catchment develop, the paper explores the existence of ethical dimensions in decision making and their legitimacy. In this way the potential of the hydro-solidarity concept as mechanism to reconcile conflicts over water can be assessed in the context-specific plural reality. The paper concludes that, although ethical dimensions in decision making in the Makanya catchment exist, the hydro-solidarity concept as mechanism to reconcile disputes over water has limited potential as long as it does not embrace the plural reality. The authors argue that, instead of searching for a universal normative order, legal plural analysis can serve

  2. DISTRIBUTION AND COMPOSITION OF DISSOLVED AND PARTICULATE ORGANIC CARBON IN NORTHERN SAN FRANCISCO BAY DURING LOW FRESHWATER FLOW CONDITIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The distribution of organic matter was studied in northern San Francisco Bay monthly through spring and summer 1996 along the salinity gradient from the Sacramento River to Central Bay. Dissolved constituents included monosaccharides (MONO), total carbohydrates (TCHO), dissolved ...

  3. DISTRIBUTION AND COMPOSITION OF DISSOLVED AND PARTICULATE ORGANIC CARBON IN NORTHERN SAN FRANCISCO BAY DURING LOW FRESHWATER FLOW CONDITIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The distribution of organic matter was studied in northern San Francisco Bay monthly through spring and summer 1996 along the salinity gradient from the Sacramento River to Central Bay. Dissolved constituents included monosaccharides (MONO), total carbohydrates (TCHO), dissolved ...

  4. Influence of boundary conditions on fluid flow on hydrophobic surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simona, Fialová; František, Pochylý; Michal, Havlásek; Jiři, Malík

    2017-09-01

    The work is focused on the shape of velocity profiles of viscous liquid (water) in contact with hydrophobic surface. A demonstration is done on an example of liquid flow between two parallel plates. The solution is carried out at both the constant and variable viscosity of the liquid near the wall. The slip boundary condition of the liquid on the wall is expressed by the coefficient of adhesion and the shear stress on the wall. As a result, presented are the shapes of the velocity profiles in dependence on the coefficient of adhesion and the slip velocity on the wall. This solution is for laminar flow.

  5. Influence of culture conditions on glutathione production by Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Santos, Lucielen Oliveira; Gonzales, Tatiane Araujo; Ubeda, Beatriz Torsani; Monte Alegre, Ranulfo

    2007-12-01

    A strategy of experimental design using a fractional factorial design (FFD) and a central composite rotatable design (CCRD) were carried out with the aim to obtain the best conditions of temperature (20-30 degrees C), agitation rate (100-300 rpm), initial pH (5.0-7.0), inoculum concentration (5-15%), and glucose concentration (30-70 g/l) for glutathione (GSH) production in shake-flask culture by Saccharomyces cerevisiae ATCC 7754. By a FFD (2(5-2)), the agitation rate, temperature, and pH were found to be significant factors for GSH production. In CCRD (2(2)) was obtained a second-order model equation, and the percent of variation explained by the model was 95%. The results showed that the optimal culture conditions were agitation rate, 300 rpm; temperature, 20 degrees C; initial pH, 5; glucose, 54 g/l; and inoculum concentration, 5%. The highest GSH concentration (154.5 mg/l) was obtained after 72 h of fermentation.

  6. Dark chocolate acceptability: influence of cocoa origin and processing conditions.

    PubMed

    Torres-Moreno, Miriam; Tarrega, Amparo; Costell, Elvira; Blanch, Consol

    2012-01-30

    Chocolate properties can vary depending on cocoa origin, composition and manufacturing procedure, which affect consumer acceptability. The aim of this work was to study the effect of two cocoa origins (Ghana and Ecuador) and two processing conditions (roasting time and conching time) on dark chocolate acceptability. Overall acceptability and acceptability for different attributes (colour, flavour, odour and texture) were evaluated by 95 consumers. Differences in acceptability among dark chocolates were mainly related to differences in flavour acceptability. The use of a long roasting time lowered chocolate acceptability in Ghanaian samples while it had no effect on acceptability of Ecuadorian chocolates. This response was observed for most consumers (two subgroups with different frequency consumption of dark chocolate). However, for a third group of consumers identified as distinguishers, the most acceptable dark chocolate samples were those produced with specific combinations of roasting time and conching time for each of the cocoa geographical origin considered. To produce dark chocolates from a single origin it is important to know the target market preferences and to select the appropriate roasting and conching conditions. Copyright © 2011 Society of Chemical Industry.

  7. Influence of different drying and aging conditions on saffron constituents.

    PubMed

    Carmona, Manuel; Zalacain, Amaya; Pardo, José Emilio; López, Eulogio; Alvarruiz, Andrés; Alonso, Gonzalo Luis

    2005-05-18

    A dehydration postharvesting treatment is necessary to convert Crocus sativus L. stigmas into saffron spice. Three different dehydration treatments were evaluated: dehydration at room temperature; dehydration with hot air at different temperatures (70, 90, and 110 degrees C); and dehydration following traditional processing in Castille-La Mancha (Spain) with three different heating sources (vineshoot charcoal, gas cooker, and electric coil). The time (between 28 and 55 min) and mean temperature (between 54 and 83 degrees C) conditions for traditional dehydration were established for the first time. The highest coloring strength was obtained when saffron was submitted to higher temperatures and lower times. These findings may be supported by the fact that samples dehydrated at high temperature were more porous than those dehydrated at room temperature, as was observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The higher the temperature during the process, the higher the proportion of trans-crocetin di-(beta-D-gentibiosyl) ester, although trans-crocetin (beta-D-glucosyl)-(beta-D-gentibiosyl) and trans-crocetin di-(beta-D-glucosyl) ester decrease while cis-crocins did not change significantly. A thermal aging process reveals that the trans-crocetin di-(beta-D-gentibiosyl) ester increases when saffron is resubmitted to a heating treatment before it is decomposed by the extreme conditions. The picrocrocin extinction during the aging process does not imply a consistent generation of safranal.

  8. Analysis of weather condition influencing fire regime in Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bacciu, Valentina; Masala, Francesco; Salis, Michele; Sirca, Costantino; Spano, Donatella

    2014-05-01

    Fires have a crucial role within Mediterranean ecosystems, with both negative and positive impacts on all biosphere components and with reverberations on different scales. Fire determines the landscape structure and plant composition, but it is also the cause of enormous economic and ecological damages, beside the loss of human life. In addition, several authors are in agreement suggesting that, during the past decades, changes on fire patterns have occurred, especially in terms of fire-prone areas expansion and fire season lengthening. Climate and weather are two of the main controlling agents, directly and indirectly, of fire regime influencing vegetation productivity, causing water stress, igniting fires through lightning, or modulating fire behavior through wind. On the other hand, these relationships could be not warranted in areas where most ignitions are caused by people (Moreno et al. 2009). Specific analyses of the driving forces of fire regime across countries and scales are thus still required in order to better anticipate fire seasons and also to advance our knowledge of future fire regimes. The objective of this work was to improve our knowledge of the relative effects of several weather variables on forest fires in Italy for the period 1985-2008. Meteorological data were obtained through the MARS (Monitoring Agricultural Resources) database, interpolated at 25x25 km scale. Fire data were provided by the JRC (Join Research Center) and the CFVA (Corpo Forestale e di Vigilanza Ambientale, Sardinia). A hierarchical cluster analysis, based on fire and weather data, allowed the identification of six homogeneous areas in terms of fire occurrence and climate (pyro-climatic areas). Two statistical techniques (linear and non-parametric models) were applied in order to assess if inter-annual variability in weather pattern and fire events had a significant trend. Then, through correlation analysis and multi-linear regression modeling, we investigated the

  9. Susceptibility of volcanic ash-influenced soil in Northern Idaho to mechanical compaction. Forest Service research note

    SciTech Connect

    Page-Dumroese, D.S.

    1993-02-01

    Timber harvesting and mechanical site preparation can reduce site productivity if they excessively disturb or compact the soil. Volcanic ash-influenced soils with low undisturbed bulk densities and rock content are particularly susceptible. The study evaluates the effects of harvesting and site preparation on changes in the bulk density of ash-influenced forest soils in northern Idaho. Three different levels of surface organic matter were studied. Soil samples were taken before and after harvesting to determine the extent and depth of compaction. Soil bulk densities increased significantly after extensive compaction from site preparation, especially when little logging slash and surface organic matter were left on the soil surface. As site preparation intensity increased, bulk density increased significantly at greater depths in the soil profile. Although ash-influenced soils have naturally low bulk densities, they can easily be compacted to levels that limit growth. The experimental site has been designated as part of the Forest Service's national long-term site productivity study into the impacts of organic matter depletion and soil compaction on stand development.

  10. The Influence of fold and fracture development on reservoir behavior of the Lisburne Group of northern Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Wesley K. Wallace; Catherine L. Hanks; Jerry Jensen: Michael T. Whalen; Paul Atkinson; Joseph Brinton; Thang Bui; Margarete Jadamec; Alexandre Karpov; John Lorenz; Michelle M. McGee; T.M. Parris; Ryan Shackleton

    2004-07-01

    The Carboniferous Lisburne Group is a major carbonate reservoir unit in northern Alaska. The Lisburne is folded and thrust faulted where it is exposed throughout the Brooks Range, but is relatively undeformed in areas of current production in the subsurface of the North Slope. The objectives of this study were to develop a better understanding of four major aspects of the Lisburne: (1) The geometry and kinematics of folds and their truncation by thrust faults. (2) The influence of folding on fracture patterns. (3) The influence of deformation on fluid flow. (4) Lithostratigraphy and its influence on folding, faulting, fracturing, and reservoir characteristics. Symmetrical detachment folds characterize the Lisburne in the northeastern Brooks Range. In contrast, Lisburne in the main axis of the Brooks Range is deformed into imbricate thrust sheets with asymmetrical hangingwall anticlines and footwall synclines. The Continental Divide thrust front separates these different structural styles in the Lisburne and also marks the southern boundary of the northeastern Brooks Range. Field studies were conducted for this project during 1999 to 2001 in various locations in the northeastern Brooks Range and in the vicinity of Porcupine Lake, immediately south of the Continental Divide thrust front. Results are summarized below for the four main subject areas of the study.

  11. Mycotoxins: toxicity, carcinogenicity, and the influence of various nutritional conditions*

    PubMed Central

    Newberne, Paul M.

    1974-01-01

    Toxicologic diseases of man and animals, associated with molds growing on foods, have been recognized for centuries. Only in recent years, however, have these mycotoxicoses received the attention of many laboratories and skilled scientists around the world in a broad inter-disciplinary effort. This review covers the literature on mycotoxicoses but centers on those about which most is known, particularly the diseases associated with metabolites elaborated by some strains of Aspergilli, Penicillia, Fusaria, Stachybotrys, and Claviceps. The ubiquitous nature of the aflatoxins, toxic metabolites produced by Aspergillus flavus, make them important to public health, especially since it is now known that certain areas of endemic liver disease coincide with consumption of aflatoxins and, often, malnutrition. The older disease of ergotism, the scourge of Europe for centuries, is considered in detail. Alimentary toxic aleukia, which has caused enormous suffering in Russian human and animal populations, is better understood as a result of relatively recent experimental investigations. Stachybotryotoxicosis, a disease previously considered to be of significance only to man has now been identified in domestic animals. Finally, Japanese studies have clearly revealed the hepatotoxicity of certain metabolites of Penicillium molds. Factors that influence susceptibility to mycotoxins and the hazards they present to man are also reviewed. ImagesFIGURE 2. PMID:4620330

  12. Pulping of holm oak wood. Influence of the operating conditions.

    PubMed

    López, Francisco; Alaejos, Joaquín; Rodríguez, Alejandro; Jiménez, Luis

    2008-03-01

    This paper reports on the influence of independent variables in the pulping of holm oak wood (Quercus ilex L.) [viz. temperature (135-195 degrees C), cooking time (30-90min) and soda concentration (10-20%)] on the yield, holocellulose content, alpha-cellulose content, brightness and viscosity of the resulting pulp. By using a central composite factorial design, equations relating each dependent variable to the different independent variables were derived that reproduced the experimental results for the dependent variables with errors less than 5-15% in all cases. The highest pulp yield (56.9%) was obtained with the lowest values of the operating variables. However, obtaining the optimum holocellulose content, alpha-cellulose content and viscosity (viz. 94.5%, 78.5% and 1395ml/g, respectively) entailed using values of the independent variables above their mean levels. Also, ensuring optimal brightness (viz. 24.3%) required using higher temperatures and soda concentrations. A compromise that saves equipment immobilized capital and about 25% of soda is using a soda concentration of 15% at 195 degrees C for 30min. The yield thus obtained differs by less than 29.5% from the highest level; also, the resulting holocellulose content, alpha-cellulose content and brightness differ by less than 12% from their respective optimum values.

  13. Influence of Musculoskeletal Conditions on Oral Health Among Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Kelsey, Jennifer L.; Lamster, Ira B.

    2008-01-01

    Both musculoskeletal disorders and diseases of the oral cavity are common and potentially serious problems among older persons, yet little attention has been given to the links between them. Several musculoskeletal diseases, including osteoporosis, Paget’s disease, and arthritic disorders, may directly involve the oral cavity and contiguous structures. Drugs used to treat musculoskeletal diseases, including corticosteroids and bisphosphonates, increase the risk of suppression of the immune system and osteonecrosis of the jaw, respectively. Many people with disabling osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, and other conditions have difficulty practicing good oral hygiene and traveling to dental offices for professional help. Various inexpensive measures can help such individuals, including education of their caregivers and provision of antimicrobial mouthwashes and special toothbrushes. PMID:18511715

  14. Influence of estuarine sediment on virus survival under field conditions.

    PubMed

    LaBelle, R L; Gerba, C P

    1980-04-01

    The survival of poliovirus 1 (LSc) and echovirus 1 (Farouk) in estuarine water and sediment was studied in Galveston Bay, Texas. Viruses were suspended in estuarine water and sediment both in dialysis tubing and in chambers constructed with polycarbonate membrane walls. Virus inactivation rates in seawater were similar in both types of chambers. Virus adsorption to sediment greatly increased survival time. The time required to inactivate 99% (T-99) of poliovirus increased from 1.4 days in seawater alone to 6.0 days for virus adsorbed to sediment at a relatively nonpolluted site. At a more polluted site, poliovirus T-99 was increased from approximately 1 h to 4925 days by virus adsorption to sediment. This study demonstrates that under field conditions virus association with estuarine sediment acts to prolong its survival in the marine environment.

  15. Comparing Observed Hurricane Conditions Against Potential Future Climate Change Influences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, W. D.

    2012-12-01

    Climate Adaptation Science Investigators: (CASI) is to advance and apply NASA's scientific expertise and products to develop climate adaptation strategies that support NASA's overall mission by minimizing risks to each center's operations, physical assets, and personnel. Using Hurricane Katrina observations as a baseline, we use ADCIRC to model surge extent with simple modifications of the storm track. We examine two time now (T0) scenarios of present-day climatological factors: 1) translating the 2005 path 7 km west; and 2) rotating the approach angle from due-north to WNW. Second, we examine two future time scenarios (TX) by infusing climate change conditions, such as sea level rise and increased storm intensity, into a T0 baseline to assess future impacts. The primary goal of this work entails planning and protecting NASA assets and infrastructure. The adjacent communities, state and local emergency managers, gain benefit from this NASA work as data and analysis includes the surrounding geography.

  16. How do climate and human impact affect Sphagnum peatlands under oceanic-continental climatic conditions? 2000 years of fire and hydrological history of a bog in Northern Poland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcisz, Katarzyna; Tinner, Willy; Colombaroli, Daniele; Kołaczek, Piotr; Słowiński, Michał; Fiałkiewicz-Kozieł, Barbara; Lamentowicz, Mariusz

    2014-05-01

    Climate change affects many natural processes and the same applies to human impact For instance climate change and anthropogenic activities may cause increased fire activity or change peatland dynamics. Currently it is still unknown how Sphagnum peatlands in the oceanic-continental transition zone of Poland may respond to combined effects of heat waves, drought and fire. The aim of the study was to reconstruct the last 2000 years palaeohydrology and fire history at Linje bog in Northern Poland. The main task was to determine the drivers of fire episodes, particularly to identify climatic and anthropogenic forcing. A two-meter peat core was extracted and subsampled with a high resolution. Micro- and macroscopic charcoal analyses were applied to determine past fire activity and the results compared with palaeohydrological reconstructions based on testate amoeba analysis. Palynological human indicators were used to reconstruct human activity. A depth-age model including 20 14C dates was constructed to calculate peat accumulation rates and charcoal influx. We hypothesised that: 1) fire frequency in Northern Poland was determined by climatic conditions (combination of low precipitation and heat waves), as reflected in peatland water table, and that 2) past fire episodes in the last millennium were intensified by human activity. Furthermore climate may have influenced human activity over harvest success and the carrying capacity. Our study shows that fire was important for the studied ecosystem, however, its frequency has increased in the last millennium in concomitance with land use activities. Landscape humanization and vegetation opening were followed by a peatland drying during the Little Ice Age (from ca. AD 1380). Similarly to other palaeoecological studies from Poland, Linje peatland possessed an unstable hydrology during the Little Ice Age. Increased fire episodes appeared shortly before the Little Ice Age and most severe fires were present in the time when

  17. Influence of ammonia on sulfate formation under haze conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turšič, Janja; Berner, Axel; Podkrajšek, Boštjan; Grgić, Irena

    In the presence of hygroscopic material, stable aqueous droplets form at relative humidity below 100%. In this work, we examined the role and importance of NH 3 in SO 2 oxidation under haze conditions. Synthetic deposits composed mainly of NaCl and NaNO 3 were exposed to SO 2/NH 3/air gas mixture under controlled conditions, typical for heavily polluted atmosphere. In contrast to catalytic reaction by Mn(II) in the absence of NH 3, which is self-limited, the production of sulfate in the presence of NH 3 at RH 80% increases considerably and linearly with time. The catalytic effect of Mn(II) was observed only for NaNO 3 deposits. Non-catalytic SO 2 oxidation in the presence of NH 3 is negligible below the deliquescent relative humidity, i.e. RH<75%. Above this value a considerable increase of sulfate formation in a narrow range of relative humidity (75-80%) was noticed. We found out that the reaction rate is not proportional to the volume of condensed water; we suggest that available surface play a role in limiting the reaction. The rate of conversion for both pure salts at RH⩾80% was found to be 1.1% h -1 ([SO 2]=2 ppm, [NH 3]=1 ppm, T=10°C), which is more than an order of magnitude higher in comparison with our previous results on MnCl 2/NaCl and MnCl 2/NaNO 3 at RH=80% in the absence of NH 3.

  18. Simulation of size-segregated aerosol chemical composition over northern Italy in clear sky and wind calm conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landi, T. C.; Curci, G.; Carbone, C.; Menut, L.; Bessagnet, B.; Giulianelli, L.; Paglione, M.; Facchini, M. C.

    2013-05-01

    The present article compares the outputs of the 3-D regional chemistry-transport model (CTM) CHIMERE against observations of the size-resolved aerosol chemical composition over northern Italy in clear sky and wind calm conditions. Two 4-day intensive field campaigns were carried out in July 2007 and February 2008 at three sites (urban, rural and mountain backgrounds) in the framework of the AEROCLOUDS project. Predicted levels are in reasonable agreement with observations for the urban and rural sites. Bias ranges from - 30%, for the rural site in winter, to + 38%, for the urban site during summer. In addition, the model is able to capture both the daily evolution of the bulk aerosol mass as well as its spatial gradients. Aerosol size distribution and chemical composition remain difficult to predict. The largest discrepancies were found for secondary organic aerosol (SOA) during summer and nitrates during the cold season. Compared with observations, modelled size distribution is shifted towards fine mode in winter, and towards coarse mode in summer. More accurate predictions can be achieved for both seasons by tuning the gas to particle absorption process. By reducing the SOA absorption rate by 25% at the urban sampling site in summer, the correlation between observed and simulated SOA size distributions increases from - 0.30 to + 0.70, and the bias is reduced from 200% to 0%. In winter, increasing the intra-sectional flux of particles from smaller to larger ones by a factor of 5, the Pearson correlation coefficient calculated over the nitrate size distribution goes up to + 0.85, compared to + 0.50 from CTRL, also resulting in a better agreement with the size distribution of PM10. As expected, the nitrate bulk mass concentration does not vary with respect to the base-case, and therefore nitrate overestimation remains present in the model.

  19. Northern Hemisphere Atmospheric Influence of the Solar Proton Events and Ground Level Enhancement in January 2005

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackman, C. H.; Marsh, D. R.; Vitt, F. M.; Roble, R. G.; Randall, C. E.; Bernath, P. F.; Funke, B.; Lopez-Puertas, M.; Versick, S.; Stiller, G. P.; Tylka, A. J.; Fleming, E. L.

    2011-01-01

    Solar eruptions in early 2005 led substantial barrage of charged particles on the Earth's atmosphere during the January 16-21 period. Proton fluxes were greatly increased during these several days and led to the production ofHO(x)(H, OH, BO2)and NO(x)(N, NO, NO2), which then caused the destruction of ozone. We focus on the Northern polar region, where satellite measurements and simulations with the Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model (WACCM3) showed large enhancements in mesospheric HO(x) and NO(x) constituents, and associated ozone reductions, due 10 these solar proton events (SPEs). The WACCM3 simulations show enhanced short-lived OH throughout the mesosphere in the 60-82.5degN latitude band due to the SPEs for most days in the Jan.16-2l,2005 period, in reasonable agreement with the Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) measurements. Mesospheric HO2 is also predicted to be increased by the SPEs, however, the modeled HO2 results are somewhat larger than the MLS measurements. These HO(x) enhancements led to huge predicted and MLS-measured ozone decreases of greater than 40% throughout most of the Northern polar mesosphere during the SPE period. Envisat Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding (MIPAS) measurements of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) show increases throughout the stratosphere with highest enhancements of about 60 ppt y in the lowermost mesosphere over the Jan. 16-18, 2005 period due to the solar protons. WACCM3 predictions indicate H2O2 enhancements over the same time period of more than twice that amount. Measurements of nitric acid (HNO3) by both MLS and MIPAS show an increase of about 1 ppbv above background levels in the upper stratosphere during January 16-29, 2005. WACCM3 simulations show only minuscule HNO3 changes in the upper stratosphere during this time period. However due to the small loss rates during winter, polar mesospheric enhancements of NO(x) are computed to be greater than 50 ppbv during the SPE period. Computed NO

  20. Influence of hydrologic processes on reproduction of the introduced bivalve Potamocorbula amurensis in northern San Francisco Bay, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Parchaso, F.; Thompson, J.K.

    2002-01-01

    Monthly censusing of reproductive condition of the Asian clam Potamocorbula amurensis at four sites in northern San Francisco Bay over a 9-yr period revealed year-to-year differences in local reproductive activity that are associated with patterns of hydrologic variability. Between 1989 and 1992, Northern California experienced a drought, whereas the period between 1993 and 1998 was marked by a mix of wet and dry years. We took advantage of the extreme year-to-year differences to examine reproductive responses to river inflow patterns. Populations of P. amurensis at the upstream sites in Suisun Bay and Carquinez Strait were more reproductively active during wet years than dry years. Conversely, at the downstream site in San Pablo Bay, the population was more reproductively active during dry years than wet years. We suggest that the different reproductive patterns observed reflect the clam's response to different sources of food. During wet years, organic matter from the rivers augments food supplies in Suisun Bay. During dry years, when inflow into the San Francisco Bay Estuary from the rivers is reduced, water transported from the adjacent ocean into the estuary as far as San Pablo Bay provides a supplemental food supply for the local production. The populations take advantage of these spatially distinct food supplies by initiating and maintaining local reproductive activity. We conclude that the ability of P. amurensis to consume and use various types of food to regulate its reproductive activity is part of the reason for its success as an invasive species.

  1. [Influence of Mapuche origin and socioeconomic conditions on adult height].

    PubMed

    Erazo B, Marcia; Amigo C, Hugo; Bustos M, Patricia

    2005-04-01

    Studies in Chilean adults of low socioeconomic level suggest that their low height is likely to be due to their indigenous background. However this group also has been marginalized from socioeconomic development. To determine the influence of Mapuche ethnic origin and socioeconomic factors on the height of adults. In a cross sectional design, the height of 1,293 adults (528 males and 765 females) of Mapuche and non Mapuche origin were studied in the Araucania Region (Southern Chile) and in the Metropolitan Region (Central Chile). Subjects with Mapuche surnames were considered as pertaining to this ethnic community and those with Spanish surnames were considered as non Mapuche. Linear regression models were done, stratifying by sex, considering ethnic origin, to live in counties of different social vulnerability, and the level of family poverty. Among males, the mean height was 166.6+/-7.3 cm and among females, the figure was 153.6+/-5.9 cm. Mapuche subjects were significantly shorter: -3.2 cm (95% Confidence Interval (CI) -4.0 to -2.3) among females and -4.8 cm (CI -6.0 to -3.6) among males (non adjusted models). This deficit increased to -4.5 and -7.6 cm among females and males, respectively when they lived in poverty and in areas with highest social vulnerability. These differences decreased significantly if Mapuche subjects lived in communities with low social vulnerability and less poverty (-0.59 and -1.14 cm among females and males respectively). The studied population had low height, being lower in Mapuche subjects. The differences decreased among subjects living in counties of less vulnerability and less family poverty.

  2. Polar Northern Hemisphere Middle Atmospheric Influence due to Energetic Particle Precipitation in January 2005

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackman, Charles H.

    2010-01-01

    Solar eruptions and geomagnetic activity led to energetic particle precipitation in early 2005, primarily during the January 16-21 period. Production of OH and destruction of ozone have been documented due to the enhanced energetic solar proton flux in January 2005 [e.g., Verronen et al., Geophys. Res. Lett.,33,L24811,doi:10.1029/2006GL028115, 2006; Seppala et al., Geophys. Res. Lett.,33,L07804, doi:10.1029/2005GL025571,2006]. These solar protons as well as precipitating electrons also led to the production of NO(x) (NO, NO2). Our simulations with the Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model (WACCM) show that NO(x) is enhanced by 20-50 ppbv in the polar Northern Hemisphere middle mesosphere (approx.60-70 km) by January 18. Both the SCISAT-1 Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (ACE) NO(x) measurements and Envisat Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding (MIP AS) nighttime NO2 observations show large increases during this period, in reasonable agreement with WACCM predictions. Such enhancements are considerable for the mesosphere and led to simulated increases in polar Northern Hemisphere upper stratospheric odd nitrogen (NO(y)) of2-5 ppbv into February 2005. The largest ground level enhancement (GLE) of solar cycle 23 occurred on January 20, 2005 with a neutron monitor increase of about 270 percent [Gopalswamy et al., 29th International Cosmic Ray Conference, Pune,00,101-104,2005]. We found that protons of energies 300 to 20,000 MeV, not normally included in our computations, led to enhanced stratospheric NO(y) of less than 1 percent as a result of this GLE. The atmospheric impact of precipitating middle energy electrons (30-2,500 keV) during the January 16-21, 2005 period is also of interest, and an effort is ongoing to include these in WACCM computations. This presentation will show both short- and longer-term changes due to the January 2005 energetic particle precipitation.

  3. Architecture of the tectonically influenced Sobrarbe deltaic complex in the Ainsa Basin, northern Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dreyer, Tom; Corregidor, Jordi; Arbues, Pau; Puigdefabregas, Cai

    1999-09-01

    The syn-tectonic Sobrarbe deltaic complex (Eocene of the Ainsa Basin, Spanish Pyrenees) is confined by lateral thrust ramps and influenced by intra-basinal growth anticlines. Six facies associations have been distinguished within the deltaic complex: (i) slope marls and turbidite sandstones; (ii) distal delta front silty and bioturbated sandstones; (iii) proximal delta front and delta plain deposits (tidal inlet, tidal flat, mouth-bar, bay, distributary channel, and floodplain environments); (iv) biogenic deposits at flooding surfaces; (v) collapse zone sediments; and (vi) Nummulite-dominated shallow-marine carbonates. The deltaic complex comprises four composite sequences, which each contain a number of minor sequences of the genetic (maximum flooding surface bounded) type. Regressive unconformities and their correlative surfaces separate the composite sequences (CS), and each CS can be divided into lowstand, transgressive and highstand components. At the base, the Comaron CS is a WNW-prograding deltaic complex containing six minor sequences characterized by basinward-stepping sandstone wedges separated by transgressive mudstones. Double regressive unconformities are often associated with these sandstone wedges proximally in the basin. Growth of the intra-basinal Arcusa anticline caused gentle folding of the Comaron CS, and syn-growth strata at the base of the overlying Las Gorgas CS contain a prominent forced regressive sandstone wedge (the Las Gorgas sandbody) and display thinning of bedsets onto the crest of the anticline. Moreover, it can be demonstrated that relative sea-level rise took place in the growth synclines at the same time as a fall in relative sea level occurred on the growth anticlines. The tectonic deformation caused a shift in the direction of deltaic progradation towards the north-northwest, as demonstrated by the well-developed clinoforms in the highstand sequence set of the Las Gorgas CS. A second phase of tectonic activity, this time

  4. Age at menarche: the influence of environmental conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saar, E.; Shalev, C.; Dalal, I.; Sod-Moriah, U. A.

    1988-03-01

    Age at menarche was studied by the recollection method in two groups of Causasian Jewish high school girls, inhabitants of two towns in Israel, Safad and Elat. The two towns differ mainly in climatic conditions. The age at menarche was found to be significantly lower ( P<0.02) in the hot town of Elat than in the temperate town of Safad: 13.30±1.21 and 13.58±0.9 years, respectively (mean ±SD). A significant association was found between the age at menarche and the town in which the girls lived. Accordingly, in the hot town of Elat, the percentage of girls who had their first menstrual cycle by the age of 12 years and earlier, was more than double that of the girls in Safad (17.9% and 7.1%, respectively). It is concluded that the environmental temperature, with or without any possible interaction of humidity, is probably responsible for the tendency for an earlier onset of menarche in girls living in the hot town of Elat.

  5. Sample storage conditions significantly influence faecal microbiome profiles

    PubMed Central

    Choo, Jocelyn M; Leong, Lex EX; Rogers, Geraint B

    2015-01-01

    Sequencing-based studies of the human faecal microbiota are increasingly common. Appropriate storage of sample material is essential to avoid the introduction of post-collection bias in microbial community composition. Rapid freezing to −80 °C is commonly considered to be best-practice. However, this is not feasible in many studies, particularly those involving sample collection in participants’ homes. We determined the extent to which a range of stabilisation and storage strategies maintained the composition of faecal microbial community structure relative to freezing to −80 °C. Refrigeration at 4 °C, storage at ambient temperature, and the use of several common preservative buffers (RNAlater, OMNIgene.GUT, Tris-EDTA) were assessed relative to freezing. Following 72 hours of storage, faecal microbial composition was assessed by 16 S rRNA amplicon sequencing. Refrigeration was associated with no significant alteration in faecal microbiota diversity or composition. However, samples stored using other conditions showed substantial divergence compared to −80 °C control samples. Aside from refrigeration, the use of OMNIgene.GUT resulted in the least alteration, while the greatest change was seen in samples stored in Tris-EDTA buffer. The commercially available OMNIgene.GUT kit may provide an important alternative where refrigeration and cold chain transportation is not available. PMID:26572876

  6. Influence of Wall Conditioning on ADITYA Plasma Discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanna, R. L.; Jadeja, K. A.; Bhatt, S. B.; Bawankar, P. S.; Gupta, C. N.; Joisa, Y. S.; Atrey, P. K.; Manchanda, R.; Ramaiya, Nilam; Ghosh, J.; Raju, D.; Chattopadhyay, P. K.; Jha, R.; the Aditya Team

    2012-11-01

    ADITYA (R0 = 75 cm, a = 25 cm), an ohmically heated circular limiter tokamak is regularly being operated to carry out several experiments related to controlled thermonuclear fusion research. In recent operational campaign, various experiments have been carried out to enhance the discharge performance as well as improve the plasma parameters. A comparative plasma discharges study with SiC and Graphite limiter was carried out to increase the plasma heating and reduce runaways. Excellent plasma heating has been observed in many discharges using Graphite limiter. Good repeatability of low hard X-rays, high temperature discharges was obtained. The control of plasma impurities and hydrogen recycling is very much essential for high performance discharges. The wall conditioning in ADITYA tokamak is carried out by hydrogen glow discharge cleaning (GDC), Pulse discharge cleaning and electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) discharge cleaning techniques with and without lithium wall coating. GDC assisted Lithiumization was found to be the most effective technique for substantial reduction in Ha and low Z (CIII & O-I) impurities. The partial pressure of mass number 18 (H2O) and 28 (N2/C2H4/CO) were regularly monitored before plasma discharge operation. Furthermore, experiment on optimization of pulse gas feed was helped in reducing wall loading and recycling. However, hard X-rays suppression with the application of multiple gas puff has been successfully achieved during negative converter operation, which led to the extension of plasma pulse length up to ~ 250 ms. All the supporting facts and operation aspects are reported.

  7. Evolution of a karst polje influenced by glaciation: The Gomance piedmont polje (northern Dinaric Alps)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Žebre, Manja; Stepišnik, Uroš; Colucci, Renato R.; Forte, Emanuele; Monegato, Giovanni

    2016-03-01

    Gomance is a piedmont karst polje in the northern Dinaric Alps presenting geomorphological and sedimentological evidence of past glaciation. During the Pleistocene the polje was situated at the edge of the Snežnik and Gorski Kotar ice fields from where two outlet glaciers reached Gomance. The morphogenesis of the polje was reconstructed by means of geomorphological mapping, sedimentological studies, and ground penetrating radar (GPR) measurements, supported by hand-drillings. With GPR an almost entirely buried moraine system was also imaged and mapped, crucial in reconstructing the polje history. The depression was karstified and well drained without any surface streams before the Last Glaciation. When the glacier front reached the depression, the entire floor became covered by glacial and outwash deposits. Surface runoff dominated over karst drainage in a large part of the polje, particularly where distal outwash deposits with low effective porosity functioned as an aquitard. These deposits diverted surface drainage toward the lowest edge of the polje, which functioned as a ponor front along the entire length. The outwash system of the Gomance polje was active during the Last Glaciation as suggested by radiocarbon-dated outwash deposits.

  8. Using supplemental food and its influence on survival of northern bobwhite (Colinus virginianus)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Townsend, D.E.; Lochmiller, R.L.; DeMaso, S.J.; Leslie, David M.; Peoples, A.D.; Scott, A C.; Parry, E.S.

    2000-01-01

    Biologists have debated the effectiveness of supplemental feeders as a management tool for the northern bobwhite (Colinus virginianus), but few extensive evaluations have been conducted. We examined 783 crops from harvested bobwhites during 1992-1996 to determine effects of climatic stress in winter on use of supplemental feeders and their impact on survival rate in winter. Crops of bobwhites harvested from areas with supplemental feeders contained 28.2% supplemental food compared with 5.5% (P<0.001) for those from areas without supplemental feeders. Winter climate was not a significant predictor of the proportional use of supplemental feeders. Rates of winter survival were greater on areas with supplemental feeders compared with non-supplemented areas in winters 1992-1993 (P=0.001) and 1993-1994 (P=0.002), but in 1994-1995, rates were greater on nonsupplemented areas (P=0.032). Cause-specific mortality rates indicated that supplemental feeders did not predispose bobwhites to hunter harvest or predators. Results suggested that bobwhites can gain nutritional benefits from supplemental feeders during times of severe winter stress.

  9. Land use influences arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal communities in the farming-pastoral ecotone of northern China.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Dan; Verbruggen, Erik; Hu, Yajun; Veresoglou, Stavros D; Rillig, Matthias C; Zhou, Wenping; Xu, Tianle; Li, Huan; Hao, Zhipeng; Chen, Yongliang; Chen, Baodong

    2014-12-01

    We performed a landscape-scale investigation to compare the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal (AMF) communities between grasslands and farmlands in the farming-pastoral ecotone of northern China. AMF richness and community composition were examined with 454 pyrosequencing. Structural equation modelling (SEM) and multivariate analyses were applied to disentangle the direct and indirect effects (mediated by multiple environmental factors) of land use on AMF. Land use conversion from grassland to farmland significantly reduced AMF richness and extraradical hyphal length density, and these land use types also differed significantly in AMF community composition. SEM showed that the effects of land use on AMF richness and hyphal length density in soil were primarily mediated by available phosphorus and soil structural quality. Soil texture was the strongest predictor of AMF community composition. Soil carbon, nitrogen and soil pH were also significantly correlated with AMF community composition, indicating that these abiotic variables could be responsible for some of the community composition differences among sites. Our study shows that land use has a partly predictable effect on AMF communities across this ecologically relevant area of China, and indicates that high soil phosphorus concentrations and poor soil structure are particularly detrimental to AMF in this fragile ecosystem.

  10. Barred owls and landscape attributes influence territory occupancy of northern spotted owls.

    PubMed

    Sovern, Stan G; Forsman, Eric D; Olson, Gail S; Biswell, Brian L; Taylor, Margaret; Anthony, Robert G

    2014-11-01

    We used multi-season occupancy analyses to model 2 fates of northern spotted owl territories in relation to habitat amount, habitat fragmentation, and the presence of barred owls in Washington State, USA, 1989-2005. Local colonization is the probability a territory unoccupied by a spotted owl in year i would be occupied in year i + 1, and local extinction is the probability a territory that was occupied by a spotted owl in year i would be unoccupied in year i + 1. We found a negative relationship between local extinction probability and amount of late-seral forest edge. We found a negative relationship between colonization probability and the number of late-seral forest patches (higher fragmentation), and a negative relationship between colonization probability and the amount of non-habitat within 600 m of a spotted owl territory center (Akaike weight = 0.59). The presence of barred owls was positively related to extinction probability and negatively related to detection probability of spotted owls. The negative relationship between presence of barred owls and detectability of spotted owls indicated that spotted owls could be modifying their calling behavior in the presence of barred owls. The positive relationship between barred owl detections and local extinction probability suggests that because of competition with barred owls, spotted owls are being displaced. Published 2014. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  11. Influence of variations in extratropical wintertime teleconnections on Northern Hemisphere temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Hurrell, J.W.

    1996-03-15

    Pronounced changes in the wintertime atmospheric circulation have occurred since the mid-1970s over the ocean basins of the Northern Hemisphere, and these changes have had a profound effect on surface temperatures. The variations over the North Atlantic are related to changes in the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO), while the changes over the North Pacific are linked to the tropics and involve variations in the Aleutian low with teleconnections downstream over North America. Multivariate linear regression is used to show that nearly all of the cooling in the northwest Atlantic and the warming across Europe and downstream over Eurasia since the mid-1970s results from the changes in the NAO, and the NAO accounts for 31% of the hemispheric interannual variance over the past 60 winters. Over the Pacific basin and North America, the temperature anomalies result in part from tropical forcing associated with the El Nino-Southern Oscillation phenomenon but with important feedbacks in the extratropics. The changes in circulation over the past two decades have resulted in a surface temperature anomaly pattern of warmth over the continents and coolness over the oceans. This pattern of temperature change has amplified the observed hemispheric-averaged warming because of it interaction with land and ocean; temperature changes are larger over land compared to the oceans because of the small heat capacity of the former. 13 refs., 5 fig., 2 tab.

  12. Does predation risk influence habitat use by northern redbelly dace Phoxinus eos at different spatial scales?

    PubMed

    Dupuch, A; Magnan, P; Bertolo, A; Dill, L M; Proulx, M

    2009-05-01

    This study investigated the relationship between spatial variations in predation risk and abundance of northern redbelly dace Phoxinus eos at both macroscale (littoral v. pelagic zones) and microscale (structured v. open water habitats in the littoral zone) of Canadian Shield lakes. Minnow traps were placed in both structured and open water habitats in the littoral zone of 13 Canadian Shield lakes, and estimates of the relative predation risk of P. eos in both the pelagic and the littoral zones were obtained from tethering experiments. Results showed that (1) the mean abundance of P. eos in the littoral zone was positively correlated with the relative predation risk in the pelagic zone, (2) P. eos preferentially used structured over open water habitats in the littoral zone and (3) this preference was not related to the relative predation risk in the littoral zone but decreased as the relative predation risk increased in the pelagic zone. At the lake level, these results support the hypothesis that P. eos enter the littoral zone to avoid pelagic piscivores. At the littoral zone level, the results do not necessarily contradict the widely accepted view that P. eos preferentially use structured over open habitats to reduce their predation risk, but suggest that flexibility in antipredator tactics (e.g. shelter use v. shoaling) could explain the spatial distribution of P. eos between structured and open water habitats.

  13. Geographical, linguistic, and cultural influences on genetic diversity: Y-chromosomal distribution in Northern European populations.

    PubMed

    Zerjal, T; Beckman, L; Beckman, G; Mikelsaar, A V; Krumina, A; Kucinskas, V; Hurles, M E; Tyler-Smith, C

    2001-06-01

    We analyzed 10 Y-chromosomal binary markers in 363 males from 8 populations in Northern Europe and 5 Y microsatellites in 346 of these individuals. These populations can be grouped according to cultural, linguistic, or geographical criteria, and the groupings are different in each case. We can therefore ask which criterion best corresponds to the distribution of genetic variation. In an AMOVA analysis using the binary markers, 13% of the Y variation was found between populations, indicating a high level of differentiation within this small area. No significant difference was seen between the traditionally nomadic Saami and the neighboring, historically farming, populations. When the populations were divided into Uralic speakers and Indo-European speakers, 8% of the variation was found between groups, but when they were divided according to geographical location, 14% of the variation was between groups. Geographical factors have thus been the most important in limiting gene flow between these populations, but linguistic differences have also been important in the east.

  14. Barred owls and landscape attributes influence territory occupancy of northern spotted owls

    PubMed Central

    Sovern, Stan G; Forsman, Eric D; Olson, Gail S; Biswell, Brian L; Taylor, Margaret; Anthony, Robert G

    2014-01-01

    We used multi-season occupancy analyses to model 2 fates of northern spotted owl territories in relation to habitat amount, habitat fragmentation, and the presence of barred owls in Washington State, USA, 1989–2005. Local colonization is the probability a territory unoccupied by a spotted owl in year i would be occupied in year i + 1, and local extinction is the probability a territory that was occupied by a spotted owl in year i would be unoccupied in year i + 1. We found a negative relationship between local extinction probability and amount of late-seral forest edge. We found a negative relationship between colonization probability and the number of late-seral forest patches (higher fragmentation), and a negative relationship between colonization probability and the amount of non-habitat within 600 m of a spotted owl territory center (Akaike weight = 0.59). The presence of barred owls was positively related to extinction probability and negatively related to detection probability of spotted owls. The negative relationship between presence of barred owls and detectability of spotted owls indicated that spotted owls could be modifying their calling behavior in the presence of barred owls. The positive relationship between barred owl detections and local extinction probability suggests that because of competition with barred owls, spotted owls are being displaced. Published 2014. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA. PMID:25558093

  15. Reconstructing conditions during dolomite formation on a Carnian coastal sabkha/alluvial plain using 87Sr/86Sr isotopes - Travenanzes Formation, northern Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rieder, Maximilian; Wegner, Wencke; Horschinegg, Monika; Preto, Nereo; Breda, Anna; Klötzli, Urs; Peckmann, Jörn; Meister, Patrick

    2016-04-01

    indicated by oxygen isotopes. The marine 87Sr/86Sr values have been reconstructed for most of the Phanerozoic and are nearly constant in the Carnian (McArthur et al., 2012), while the age of the dolomite beds of the Travenanzes Formation is constrained by their stratigraphic position in the measured section (Dibona Section; Preto et al., 2015). The continental Sr isotope signal is governed by weathering rates, especially during silicate weathering of the source rock in the catchment area (McArthur et al., 2012). Through 87Sr/86Sr isotope investigation of primary dolomite in beds and nodules of the coastal sabkha or alluvial plain environment, the influence of marine or continental conditions can be determined. The finding of celestine SrSO4 and Sr-rich barite BaSO4 within the cemented dolomite by SEM indicates enrichment of Sr, possibly during strong evaporative conditions. Hence, the generation of phase-specific Sr-isotope data will allow for a more precise reconstruction of the conditions that led to dolomite formation in the Triassic shallow coastal sabkha/alluvial plain environment. McArthur et al. (2012) Strontium isotope stratigraphy. In: "The geologic time scale" (F.M Gradstein et al., eds.), Elsevier, p. 127-144. Preto et al. (2015) Primary dolomite in the Late Triassic Travenanzes Formation Dolomites, Northern Italy: Facies control and possible bacterial influence. Sedimentology 62, p. 697-716.

  16. How to comprehensively evaluate river corridor conditions? A comparison of different biotic and morphological indices in northern Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golfieri, Bruno; Surian, Nicola; Hardersen, Sönke; Maiolini, Bruno

    2016-04-01

    The assessment of river conditions is crucial for planning appropriate management actions. The European Water Framework Directive 2000/60/EC (WFD) requires the assessment of biological, physical-chemical and hydromorphological elements to define the ecological status of rivers. The WFD suggests the use of different bioindicators (i.e. benthic macroinvertebrates, diatoms, aquatic macrophytes and fish), the so called "biological quality elements" (BQEs). However, recent studies showed that BQEs-based indices have two main limitations: (i) their standard application is limited to flowing channels and (ii) they are not sensitive to hydromorphological alteration. Hydromorphological conditions are usually evaluated applying methods for physical habitat assessment (i.e. the River Habitat Survey or derived methods) that consist in site-scale inventories of river forms and anthropic structures. The lack of consideration of wider spatial (i.e. reach or catchment scale) and temporal scales (e.g. channel evolution over the last 50-100 years) make such methods inadequate for a sound diagnosis of morphological alterations. The Morphological Quality Index (MQI) and the dragonfly-based Odonate River Index (ORI) were developed in the recent years to overcome the above-mentioned limitations and to assess the condition of the whole river corridor (i.e. the channel and its adjacent floodplain) at reach scale. In this study we correlated the assessments of MQI, ORI and two BQEs-based biotic indices (i.e. STAR_ICMi for benthic macroinvertebrates and ICMi for diatoms) in 15 lowland river reaches in northern Italy. The selected reaches are characterized by a wide range of morphological degradation. MQI and ORI were highly correlated, probably because both methods work at reach scale and consider the integrity of the whole river corridor, either in terms of morphology or considering ecological aspects. In contrast, no significant relationships were found between MQI and ORI and the BQEs

  17. Influence of meteorological conditions on RSV infection in Portugal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira-Santos, M.; Santos, J. A.; Soares, J.; Dias, A.; Quaresma, M.

    2016-12-01

    Acute viral bronchiolitis is a common cause for infant hospital admissions. Of all etiological agents, respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is commonly the most frequent. The present study assesses relationships between atmospheric factors and RSV infections in under 3-year-old patients admitted to the Inpatient Paediatric Service of Vila Real (North of Portugal). For this purpose, (1) clinical files of children admitted with a diagnosis of acute bronchiolitis from September 2005 to December 2015 (>10 years) were scrutinised and (2) local daily temperature/precipitation series, as well as six weather types controlling meteorological conditions in Portugal, were used. Fifty-five percent of all 770 admitted children were effectively infected with a given virus, whilst 48 % (367) were RSV+, i.e. 87 % of virus-infected children were RSV+. The bulk of incidence is verified in the first year of age (82 %, 302), slightly higher in males. RSV outbreaks are typically from December to March, but important inter-annual variability is found in both magnitude and shape. Although no clear connections were found between monthly temperatures/precipitation and RSV outbreaks apart from seasonality, a linkage to wintertime cold spells is apparent on a daily basis. Anomalously low minimum temperatures from the day of admittance back to 10 days before are observed. This relationship is supported by anomalously high occurrences of the E and AA weather types over the same period, which usually trigger dry and cold weather. These findings highlight some predictability in the RSV occurrences, revealing potential for modelling and risk assessments.

  18. The influence of convection parameterisations under alternate climate conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rybka, Harald; Tost, Holger

    2013-04-01

    In the last decades several convection parameterisations have been developed to consider the impact of small-scale unresolved processes in Earth System Models associated with convective clouds. Global model simulations, which have been performed under current climate conditions with different convection schemes, significantly differ among each other in the simulated precipitation patterns due to the parameterisation assumptions and formulations, e.g. the simplified treatment of the cloud microphysics. Additionally, the simulated transport of short-lived trace gases strongly depends on the chosen convection parameterisation due to the differences in the vertical redistribution of mass. Furthermore, other meteorological parameters like the temperature or the specific humidity show substantial differences in convectively active regions. This study presents uncertainties of climate change scenarios caused by different convection parameterisations. For this analysis two experiments (reference simulation with a CO2 concentration of 348 ppm; 2xCO2-simulation with a CO2 concentration of 696 ppm) are calculated with the ECHAM/MESSy atmospheric chemistry (EMAC) model applying four different convection schemes (Tiedtke, ECMWF, Emanuel and Zhang-McFarlane - Hack) and two resolutions (T42 and T63), respectively. The results indicate that the equilibrium climate sensitivity is independent of the chosen convection parameterisation. However, the regional temperature increase, induced by a doubling of the carbon dioxide concentration, demonstrates differences of up to a few Kelvin at the surface as well as in the UTLS for the ITCZ region depending on the selected convection parameterisation. The interaction between cloud and convection parameterisations results in a large disagreement of precipitation patterns. Although every 2xCO2 -experiment simulates an increase in global mean precipitation rates, the change of regional precipitation patterns differ widely. Finally, analysing

  19. Neonatal intensive care practices and the influence on skin condition.

    PubMed

    Visscher, M O; Taylor, T; Narendran, V

    2013-04-01

    Premature skin has a thinner epidermis with a poorly formed stratum corneum (SC) barrier compared to full term skin. Poor skin integrity increases the risk of exposure to irritants and infectious agents. Interventions that facilitate skin maturation are essential. The objective was to examine the effects of prematurity and time from birth on SC maturation and to identify factors that impact skin condition. A retrospective review was conducted among 130 NICU patients. Skin regions were evaluated for erythema, rash, integrity and function. The effects of gestational age, time from birth, stool exposure, nutrition and diagnosis were examined. Three groups emerged: (i) premature and <38 weeks adjusted age; (ii) premature and >38 weeks adjusted age; and (iii) full term. Surprisingly, the premature infants exhibited lower perineal irritation and greater SC integrity (lower transepidermal water loss) than full terms (P < 0.05). Group 2 had a longer time before the first skin-stool contact. Chest skin pH showed maturational changes for Group 1 (P < 0.05) but did not change for premature Group 2 who was older at enrollment. Erythema was lower for infants using elemental formulas or total parenteral nutrition. Premature infants with early stool contact and high exposure, full term infants, and patients with congenital diaphragmatic hernia or trisomy 21 are at high risk for skin compromise and may benefit from prophylactic interventions to minimize compromise. Low stool exposure and greater time before the first stool contact appear to be protective against skin compromise. © 2012 The Authors. Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology © 2012 European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology.

  20. Influence of stand density on stem quality in pole-size northern hardwoods.

    Treesearch

    Richard M. Godman; David J. Books

    1971-01-01

    Relates the type and frequency of limbs and limb-related defects in the first two logs of five hardwood species to residual basal area 15 years after initial cutting. Also discusses other tree characteristics influenced by stand density and the applicability of present silvicultural guides to improve stem quality.

  1. Seasonal weather influences on yearling beef steer production in C3-dominated Northern Great Plains rangeland

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In the face of an increasingly variable climate, long-term cattle weight gain datasets are rare, yet invaluable, for determining site-specific influences of seasonal weather patterns on cattle production. Here, we present a long-term (1936 – 2005) yearling Hereford steer data set collected at the No...

  2. Seasonal weather influences on yearling steer beef production in C3-dominated Northern Great Plains rangeland

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In the face of an increasingly variable climate, long-term cattle weight gain datasets are rare, yet invaluable, for determining site-specific influences of seasonal weather patterns on cattle production. Here, we present a long-term (1936 – 2005) yearling Hereford steer data set collected at the No...

  3. Influence of site and soil properties on the DRIFT spectra of northern cold-region soils

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    We investigated the influence of site characteristics and soil properties on the chemical composition of organic matter in soils collected from a latitudinal transect across Alaska through analysis of diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform mid infrared (MidIR) spectra of bulk soils. The stud...

  4. Chemical evolution of groundwater near a sinkhole lake, northern Florida--1. Flow patterns, age of groundwater, and influence of lakewater leakage

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Katz, Brian G.; Lee, Terrie M.; Plummer, L. Niel; Busenberg, Eurybiades

    1995-01-01

    Leakage from sinkhole lakes significantly influences recharge to the Upper Floridan aquifer in poorly confined sediments in northern Florida. Environmental isotopes (oxygen 18, deuterium, and tritium), chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs: CFC-11, CCl3F; CFC-12, CCl2F2; and CFC-113, C2Cl3F3), and solute tracers were used to investigate groundwater flow patterns near Lake Barco, a seepage lake in a mantled karst setting in northern Florida. Stable isotope data indicated that the groundwater downgradient from the lake contained 11–67% lake water leakage, with a limit of detection of lake water in groundwater of 4.3%. The mixing fractions of lake water leakage, which passed through organic-rich sediments in the lake bottom, were directly proportional to the observed methane concentrations and increased with depth in the groundwater flow system. In aerobic groundwater upgradient from Lake Barco, CFC-modeled recharge dates ranged from 1987 near the water table to the mid 1970s for water collected at a depth of 30 m below the water table. CFC-modeled recharge dates (based on CFC-12) for anaerobic groundwater downgradient from the lake ranged from the late 1950s to the mid 1970s and were consistent with tritium data. CFC-modeled recharge dates based on CFC-11 indicated preferential microbial degradation in anoxic waters. Vertical hydraulic conductivities, calculated using CFC-12 modeled recharge dates and Darcy's law, were 0.17, 0.033, and 0.019 m/d for the surficial aquifer, intermediate confining unit, and lake sediments, respectively. These conductivities agreed closely with those used in the calibration of a three-dimensional groundwater flow model for transient and steady state flow conditions.

  5. Influence of climatic and hydrological factors on structure and composition of peat from northern wetland territories with low anthropogenic impact.

    PubMed

    Parfenova, L N; Selyanina, S B; Trufanova, M V; Bogolitsyn, K G; Orlov, A S; Volkova, N N; Ponomareva, T I; Sokolova, T V

    2016-05-01

    Northern wetlands ecosystems play an important role in the hydrological balance of neighboring areas, where they act as chemical barriers against anthropogenic and technogenic contaminations. Studied region is well known for quantity of peat deposits and the volume of peat resources. Peat can be considered as a highly informative marker for assessing change in environmental conditions. The study presents the results of the first investigation of peat samples, collected from representative ecosystems of northern wetland territories with low anthropogenic impact. Component and element composition of various peat types were studied in a relation to hydrologic, climate and sampling conditions. It was found out that organic and ash contents are more dependent on the type of the bog, than geographic location. Climatic factors are more important for the formation of bitumen. The degradation degree in peat increases proportionally to content of humates. High content of biogenic and lithogenic elements was observed in transition- and low-moor peat. The content of trace elements in peat samples do not depend on the type of the peat. The structural properties of peat were studied by the light microscopy, AFM and dynamic light scattering. It was determined that the conformation of studied peat samples is characterized by elements of asymmetry. The observed particles in the solutions exist in dynamic equilibrium with separated globular macromolecules. The size of these nanoparticles is comparable with the size of the particles of other biopolymers of similar nature. Swelling of peat in liquid water was studied. The relationship between structural specificities, origin of peat and its maximum degree of swelling was found. The degree of swelling can be used as structural-sensitive parameter in further research.

  6. Aerosols and their influence on radiation partitioning and savanna productivity in northern Australia

    SciTech Connect

    Kanniah, K. D.; Beringer, J.; Tapper, N. J.; Long, Charles N.

    2010-05-01

    We investigated the effect of aerosols and clouds on the Net Ecosystem Productivity (NEP) of savannas in northern Australia using aerosol optical depth, clouds and radiation data from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) site in Darwin and carbon flux data measured from eddy covariance techniques from a site at Howard Springs, 35km southeast of Darwin. Generally we found that the concentration of aerosols in this region was relatively low than observed at other sites, therefore the proportion of diffuse radiation reaching the earths surface was only ~ 30%. As a result, we observed only a modest change in carbon uptake under aerosol laden skies and there was no significant difference for dry season Radiation Use Efficiency (RUE) between clear sky, aerosols or thin clouds. On the other hand thick clouds in the wet season produce much more diffuse radiation than aerosols or thin clouds and therefore the initial canopy quantum efficiency was seen to increase 45 and 2.5 times more than under thin clouds and aerosols respectively. The normalized carbon uptake under thick clouds is 57% and 50% higher than under aerosols and thin clouds respectively even though the total irradiance received under thick clouds was reduced 59% and 50% than under aerosols and thin clouds respectively. However, reduction in total irradiance decreases the mean absolute carbon uptake as much as 22% under heavy cloud cover compared to thin clouds or aerosols. Thus, any increase in aerosol concentration or cloud cover that can enhance the diffuse component may have large impacts on productivity in this region.

  7. [Edge influence of soil moisture at farmland-grassland boundary in agriculture-pasturage ecotone of northern China].

    PubMed

    Liu, Hong-lai; Zhang, Wei-hua; Wang, Kun; Zhao, Na

    2009-03-01

    In the agriculture-pasturage ecotone of Northern China, a typical zone with linear boundary of cropland and grassland was chosen to investigate its soil moisture regime, and the moving split-window technique was adopted to study the edge influence of soil moisture at the boundary. The results showed that the edge influence was 10 m, from 6 m within grassland and 4 m within cropland, and was categorized as the acute change type boundary. Accordingly, the farmland-grassland landscape boundary could be divided into three functional zones, i.e., grassland zone, farmland zone, and compositional ecotone zone. Soil moisture content varied abruptly in the ecotone zone, but presented linear distribution in both grassland zone and farmland zone. The average soil moisture content in grassland was about 1 g x g(-1) higher than that in farmland, which was mainly caused by the decreased capillary moisture capacity of farmland. Owing to the different vegetation cover, farmland and grassland had different transpiration and evaporation, which led to the diverse soil moisture regime, making soil water potential changed and water movement from one ecosystem to another possible.

  8. Influence of mowing on dynamics of native phytoseiid mites and Tetranychus urticae in apple orchards in northern Japan.

    PubMed

    Funayama, Ken

    2016-09-01

    To support practical integrated pest management in commercial apple orchards, I investigated the influence of mowing on the occurrence of Tetranychus urticae and native phytoseiid mites in apple orchards sprayed with selective insecticides in Akita Prefecture, northern Japan, from 2013 to 2015. The orchards were not mown in 2013, and unmown and mown plots were compared in 2014 and 2015. There were significantly fewer Typhlodromus vulgaris on apple leaves and Amblyseius tsugawai in the undergrowth in mown plots than in unmown plots in both years. Conversely, there were significantly more T. urticae on leaves and undergrowth in mown plots than in unmown plots. The reason for the decreased populations of these phytoseiid mites may be a lack of food (pollen) needed for reproduction on apple trees and in the undergrowth due to mowing. These results indicate that mowing strongly influences generalist phytoseiid mites in apple orchards. Moreover, mowing might increase the density of T. urticae in apple trees because increased nitrogen in the leaves increases fecundity; in addition, drought might promote the increase of mite numbers. Thus, retention of undergrowth suppresses T. urticae in apple orchards.

  9. Non-polar organic compounds in marine aerosols over the northern South China Sea: Influence of continental outflow.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yan; Zhang, Yingyi; Fu, Pingqing; Ho, Steven Sai Hang; Ho, Kin Fai; Liu, Fobang; Zou, Shichun; Wang, Shan; Lai, Senchao

    2016-06-01

    Filter samples of total suspended particle (TSP) collected during a cruise campaign over the northern South China Sea (SCS) from September to October 2013 were analyzed for non-polar organic compounds (NPOCs) as well as organic carbon (OC), elemental carbon (EC) and water-soluble ions. A total of 115 NPOCs species in groups of n-alkanes, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), iso-/antiso-alkanes, hopanes, steranes, methylalkanes, branched alkanes, cycloalkanes, alkenes and phthalates were detected. The characteristics of NPOCs in marine TSP samples were investigated to understand the sources from the Asian continent and other regions. The concentrations of total NPOCs ranged from 19.8 to 288.2 ng/m(3) with an average of 87.9 ng/m(3), which accounted for 0.8-1.7% (average 1.0%) of organic matter (OM). n-Alkanes was the predominant group, accounting for 43.1-79.5%, followed by PAHs (5.5-44.4%) and hopanes (1.6-11.4%). We found that primary combustion (biomass burning/fossil fuel combustion) was the dominant source for the majority of NPOCs (89.1%). Biomass burning in southern/southeastern China via long-range transport was proposed to be a major contributor of NPOCs in marine aerosols over the northern SCS, suggested by the significant correlations between nss-K(+) and NPOCs groups as well as the analysis of air mass back-trajectory and fire spots. For the samples with strong continental influence, the strong enhancement in concentrations of n-alkanes, PAHs, hopanes and steranes were attributed to fossil fuel (coal/petroleum) combustion. In addition, terrestrial plants waxes were another contributor to NPOCs.

  10. Individualism-Collectivism as a Boundary Condition for Effectiveness of Minority Influence in Decision Making.

    PubMed

    Ng, K. Yee; Van Dyne, Linn

    2001-03-01

    Results of this experiment demonstrate that individualists and collectivists react differently to minority influence. Based on the distinction between objectivity and preference norms in the minority influence literature, we hypothesize that individualism and collectivism influence (A) responses to minority influence (focusing on the target of influence) and (B) effectiveness of minority influence (focusing on the influence agent). Our results replicate past research and demonstrate improved decision quality for individuals exposed to a minority perspective. Moreover, minority influence targets with high horizontal individualism and low horizontal collectivism made higher quality decisions. Influence targets with high vertical collectivism demonstrated higher quality decisions when the influence agent held a high status position in the group. Results also demonstrate that influence agents with high vertical individualism experienced less role stress than those with low vertical individualism. Finally, influence agents with low role stress were more effective in influencing the decision making of others. We discuss our findings in terms of boundary conditions to the minority influence process. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  11. Post-wildfire natural restoration of riparian vegetation under stable hydro-geomorphic conditions: Nahal Grar, Northern Negev Desert, Israel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egozi, Roey

    2015-04-01

    Wildfires are common to the Mediterranean region due to its defined dry season and long historical anthropogenic activities. Most of post-wildfire studies focus on mountains areas and thus refer to the hill-slope and its physical characteristics, e.g. morphology, length, angles, and aspect; its soil characteristics, e.g. type, infiltration rate, repellency; and its vegetative covers, e.g. planted trees vs. natural forest or native vs. exotic vegetation. In contrary there is very limited literature focusing on ecological and hydro-geomorphic aspects of post-wildfire of riparian vegetation / zone probably because of its negligible burned area relative to the spread of the fire, sometimes, over the whole watershed area. The limited literature on the topic is surprising given the fact that riparian vegetation zone has been acknowledged as a unique and important habitat supporting rich biodiversity. Herein we report on a wildfire event occurred on October 14th 2009 in a river section of Nahal Grar, Northern Negev Desert, Israel. The wildfire although was limited in its area (only 3 hectare) extended over the channel alone from bank to bank and thus provide a unique case study of completely burn down of riparian vegetation, mainly dense stands of Common Red (Australis Phragmites. Therefore a detailed study of this event provides an opportunity to tackle one of the basics questions which is determining the rate of natural restoration process that act at the immediate time after the wildfire event occurred. This type of information is most valuable to professional and stakeholders for better management of post-fire riparian zones. The results of the study suggest that under stable conditions, i.e. no major flood events occurred; disturbance time was short and ranged over 200 days due to, almost, immediate recovery of the riparian vegetation. However the re-growth of the riparian vegetation was not even but rather deferential and more complex then reported in the literature

  12. Influence of vegetation canopies on precipitation partitioning and isotope fractionation in northern upland catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, Hannah; Tetzlaff, Doerthe; Soulsby, Chris; Weiler, Markus

    2016-04-01

    Climate change is predicted to have far reaching implications for northern high latitude regions including changing precipitation regimes and increasing temperatures in the coming decades. In many areas this will promote increased forest cover as a result of vegetation succession or mitigation measures. For example, in the Scottish Highlands, forest cover is increasing as a result of adaptive management and increased biofuel production. In the wet, windy Scottish hydroclimate this has the potential to significantly increase interception losses, reduce net precipitation and affect the spatial and temporal distribution of soil moisture. Recent studies have also shown that such processes may also change the isotopic signature of net rainfall in throughfall and stemflow with implications for using isotopes as hydrological tracers. Such effects may be exacerbated by projected higher temperatures and reduced summer precipitation. The main focus of this study was to quantify the effects of forest and non-forest vegetation canopies on the spatio-temporal variability of throughfall and stemflow in the Bruntland Burn, a 3.2 km2 montane experimental catchment in the Scottish Highlands. We investigated differences in both the quantity and isotopic composition of throughfall and stemflow under Scots Pine (Pinus sylvestris) forest and heather (Calluna vulgaris) moorland growing on podzolic soils. Altogether, 75 throughfall and 10 stemflow collectors were placed in four plots with different topographic positions and vegetation characteristics (two different aged Scots pine plantations and two heather sites) and canopy coverage was determined using digital photography. Over a 5 month sampling period, weekly throughfall samples were taken. We also analysed more than 1100 samples for stable isotopes δ18O and δD. Interception losses were 38% under moorland and up to 47% for the plantation sides. Both throughfall and stemflow amounts were found to be highly variable and were mostly

  13. Influence of climate change factors on carbon dynamics in northern forested peatlands

    Treesearch

    C.C Trettin; R. Laiho; K. Minkkinen; J. Laine

    2005-01-01

    Peatlands are carbon-accumulating wetland ecosystems, developed through an imbalance among organic matter production and decomposition processes. Soil saturation is the principal cause of anoxic conditions that constrain organic matter decay. Accordingly, changes in the hydrologic regime will affect the carbon (C) dynamics in forested peatlands. Our objective is to...

  14. Five anthropogenic factors that will radically alter forest conditions and management needs in the Northern United States

    Treesearch

    Stephen R. Shifley; W. Keith Moser; David J. Nowak; Patrick D. Miles; Brett J. Butler; Francisco X. Aguilar; Ryan D. DeSantis; Eric J. Greenfield

    2014-01-01

    The Northern United States includes the 20 states bounded by Maine, Maryland, Missouri, and Minnesota. With 70 million ha of forestland and 124 million people, it is the most densely forested (42% of land area) and most densely populated (74 people/km2) quadrant of the United States. Three recent, large-scale, multiresource assessments of forest...

  15. Environmental Attributes Influencing the Distribution of Burkholderia pseudomallei in Northern Australia

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Anthony L.; Ezzahir, Jessica; Gardiner, Christopher; Shipton, Warren; Warner, Jeffrey M.

    2015-01-01

    Factors responsible for the spatial and temporal clustering of Burkholderia pseudomallei in the environment remain to be elucidated. Whilst laboratory based experiments have been performed to analyse survival of the organism in various soil types, such approaches are strongly influenced by alterations to the soil micro ecology during soil sanitisation and translocation. During the monsoonal season in Townsville, Australia, B. pseudomallei is discharged from Castle Hill (an area with a very high soil prevalence of the organism) by groundwater seeps and is washed through a nearby area where intensive sampling in the dry season has been unable to detect the organism. We undertook environmental sampling and soil and plant characterisation in both areas to ascertain physiochemical and macro-floral differences between the two sites that may affect the prevalence of B. pseudomallei. In contrast to previous studies, the presence of B. pseudomallei was correlated with a low gravimetric water content and low nutrient availability (nitrogen and sulphur) and higher exchangeable potassium in soils favouring recovery. Relatively low levels of copper, iron and zinc favoured survival. The prevalence of the organism was found to be highest under the grasses Aristida sp. and Heteropogon contortus and to a lesser extent under Melinis repens. The findings of this study indicate that a greater variety of factors influence the endemicity of melioidosis than has previously been reported, and suggest that biogeographical boundaries to the organisms’ distribution involve complex interactions. PMID:26398904

  16. Factors that influence the hydrologic recovery of wetlands in the Northern Tampa Bay area, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Metz, P.A.

    2011-01-01

    Although of less importance than the other three factors, a low-lying topographical position benefited the hydrologic condition of several of the study wetlands (S-68 Cypress and W-12 Cypress) both before and after the reductions in groundwater withdrawals. Compared to wetlands in a higher topographical position, those in a lower position had longer hydroperiods because of their greater ability to receive more runoff from higher elevation wetlands and to establish surface-water connections to other isolated wetlands and surface-water bodies through low-lying surface-water channels during wet conditions. In addition, wetlands in low-lying areas benefited from groundwater inflow when groundwater levels were higher than wetland water levels.

  17. Influence of the external DEM on PS-InSAR processing and results on Northern Appennine slopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayer, B.; Schmidt, D. A.; Simoni, A.

    2014-12-01

    We present an InSAR analysis of slow moving landslide in the Northern Appennines, Italy, and assess the dependencies on the choice of DEM. In recent years, advanced processing techniques for synthetic aperture radar interferometry (InSAR) have been applied to measure slope movements. The persistent scatterers (PS-InSAR) approach is probably the most widely used and some codes are now available in the public domain. The Stanford method of Persistent Scatterers (StamPS) has been successfully used to analyze landslide areas. One problematic step in the processing chain is the choice of an external DEM that is used to model and remove the topographic phase in a series of interferograms in order to obtain the phase contribution caused by surface deformation. The choice is not trivial, because the PS InSAR results differ significantly in terms of PS identification, positioning, and the resulting deformation signal. We use four different DEMs to process a set of 18 ASAR (Envisat) scenes over a mountain area (~350 km2) of the Northern Appennines of Italy, using StamPS. Slow-moving landslides control the evolution of the landscape and cover approximately 30% of the territory. Our focus in this presentation is to evaluate the influence of DEM resolution and accuracy by comparing PS-InSAR results. On an areal basis, we perform a statistical analysis of displacement time-series to make the comparison. We also consider two case studies to illustrate the differences in terms of PS identification, number and estimated displacements. It is clearly shown that DEM accuracy positively influences the number of PS, while line-of-sight rates differ from case to case and can result in deformation signals that are difficult to interpret. We also take advantage of statistical tools to analyze the obtained time-series datasets for the whole study area. Results indicate differences in the style and amount of displacement that can be related to the accuracy of the employed DEM.

  18. The role of remote versus local climatic influences in shaping seasonal to interannual rainfall isotopic variations in northern Borneo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moerman, J. W.; Cobb, K. M.; Konecky, B. L.; Noone, D. C.

    2014-12-01

    While interannual and intraseasonal variability are the dominant influences on modern rainfall water isotopes (δ18O and δD) in northern Borneo (Moerman et al., 2013), the strong resemblance between stalagmite δ18O and equatorial boreal fall insolation over the Holocene and late Pleistocene suggests that seasonal δ18O variability is an important control on Borneo stalagmite δ18O over glacial/interglacial timescales (Carolin et al., 2013). A weak, bimodal seasonal cycle of 2-3‰ exists in northern Borneo rainfall δ18O, with relative minima during winter/summer and relative maxima during spring/fall. The seasonal cycle in rainfall δ18O, however, is poorly correlated to seasonal variations in precipitation amount. As a result, the processes driving rainfall δ18O seasonality at Borneo remain unclear. To better constrain the controlling mechanisms, we compare a 7-yr-long timeseries of daily Borneo rainfall δ18O to overlapping satellite-based measurements of GOSAT and TES tropospheric water vapor δD. To investigate the role of moist processes such as evaporation, condensation, and convection, we explore the relationship between seasonal composites of water vapor δD and specific humidity in the Borneo region. We also use HYSPLIT air mass back-trajectories to differentiate local (e.g. moisture recycling, local convection/evaporation) versus regional (e.g. moisture source region, trajectory, and convective activity) controls on the seasonal isotopic composition of Borneo rainfall. Given the sensitivity of Borneo rainfall δ18O to interannual shifts in the zonal location of deep convection in the western Pacific - which drive rainfall δ18O variations of up to 6-8‰ - we perform similar investigations during the weak-to-moderate and moderate-to-strong ENSO cycles of 2006-2008 and 2009-2011 respectively. With this study, we identify the relative influence of local moist processes as well as meridional and zonal shifts in regional hydrology on past western Pacific

  19. Participation and influence of migrant workers on working conditions: a qualitative approach.

    PubMed

    López-Jacob, María J; Safont, Eva Canaleta; García, Ana M; Garí, Aitana; Agudelo-Suárez, Andrés; Gil, Angel; Benavides, Fernando G

    2010-01-01

    Workers participation in the management of employment and working conditions is an important determinant of both positive and negative effects of work on human health. Through a qualitative approach, this study analyzes the degree of control and influence that migrant workers in different Spanish cities have over their own working conditions (Immigration, Work, and Health [ITSAL] Project). Results showed that migrant workers had little influence on employment and working conditions. Immigrant workers are mostly interested in issues such as salaries, hiring, and hours of work. Fear of dismissal makes immigrant workers reluctant to demand improved working conditions. We received limited information about immigrant workers' understanding of their rights and their perceptions of the possibilities to influence working conditions through trade union activity. Informal social networks play an essential role in disseminating information on workers' rights, although the effect is not always positive. Unions need to increase attention to and adapt measures for this particularly vulnerable group of workers.

  20. The influence of living conditions in early life on life satisfaction in old age.

    PubMed

    Deindl, Christian

    2013-03-01

    This article examines the influence of living conditions in early life on life satisfaction in old age in eleven Western European countries. It combines the influence of individual conditions, for example housing and family background, with country characteristics in the decade of birth. Using pooled data from the second and third wave of the Survey of Health, Ageing and Retirement in Europe, multilevel models show that early life living conditions have an influence on life satisfaction in old age. Furthermore, interaction effects between current and past living conditions show that adverse living conditions strengthen the effect of early life on life satisfaction in later life and therefore are an indication of cumulative inequality over the life course. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Age at Menarche and Factors that Influence It: A Study among Female University Students in Tamale, Northern Ghana

    PubMed Central

    Ameade, Evans Paul Kwame; Garti, Helene Akpene

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Age at menarche reflects the health status of a population. This marks the beginning of sexual maturation and is affected by nutritional status and prevailing environmental conditions. This study measured the menarcheal age of female undergraduate students in northern Ghana and explored factors that could impact on the onset of menarche. Method GraphPad 5.01 was used to analyze data collected from 293 randomly selected female university students in a cross-sectional study using a semi-structured questionnaire. Association between different variables was tested using appropriate statistical tests. Results The mean recall age at menarche of participants in this study was 13.66 ±1.87 years for a female population of mean age, 23.04±5.07 years. Compared to female students who lived in rural settings, urban and suburban areas dwellers significantly recorded earlier menarche (p = 0.0006). Again, females from high income earning families experienced menarche earlier than those who were born to or lived with lower income earners (p = 0.003). Lower menarcheal age increased risk of experiencing menstrual pain prior to menses rather than during menstrual flow for dysmenorrhic females. (13.52±2.052 vrs 13.63±1.582 year; χ2 = 7.181, df = 2, p = 0.028). Conclusion Mean menarcheal age of female university students in northern Ghana was 13.66 years. Females from urban areas and high income families had earlier menarche. Compared to the very first Ghanaian study reported in 1989, the menarcheal age decline was 0.11 year per decade. PMID:27171234

  2. Age at Menarche and Factors that Influence It: A Study among Female University Students in Tamale, Northern Ghana.

    PubMed

    Ameade, Evans Paul Kwame; Garti, Helene Akpene

    2016-01-01

    Age at menarche reflects the health status of a population. This marks the beginning of sexual maturation and is affected by nutritional status and prevailing environmental conditions. This study measured the menarcheal age of female undergraduate students in northern Ghana and explored factors that could impact on the onset of menarche. GraphPad 5.01 was used to analyze data collected from 293 randomly selected female university students in a cross-sectional study using a semi-structured questionnaire. Association between different variables was tested using appropriate statistical tests. The mean recall age at menarche of participants in this study was 13.66 ±1.87 years for a female population of mean age, 23.04±5.07 years. Compared to female students who lived in rural settings, urban and suburban areas dwellers significantly recorded earlier menarche (p = 0.0006). Again, females from high income earning families experienced menarche earlier than those who were born to or lived with lower income earners (p = 0.003). Lower menarcheal age increased risk of experiencing menstrual pain prior to menses rather than during menstrual flow for dysmenorrhic females. (13.52±2.052 vrs 13.63±1.582 year; χ2 = 7.181, df = 2, p = 0.028). Mean menarcheal age of female university students in northern Ghana was 13.66 years. Females from urban areas and high income families had earlier menarche. Compared to the very first Ghanaian study reported in 1989, the menarcheal age decline was 0.11 year per decade.

  3. Geophysical features influence the climate change sensitivity of northern Wisconsin pine and oak forests.

    PubMed

    Tweiten, Michael A; Calcote, Randy R; Lynch, Elizabeth A; Hotchkiss, Sara C; Schuurman, Gregor W

    2015-10-01

    Landscape-scale vulnerability assessment from multiple sources, including paleoecological site histories, can inform climate change adaptation. We used an array of lake sediment pollen and charcoal records to determine how soils and landscape factors influenced the variability of forest composition change over the past 2000 years. The forests in this study are located in northwestern Wisconsin on a sandy glacial outwash plain. Soils and local climate vary across the study area. We used the Natural Resource Conservation Service's Soil Survey Geographic soil database and published fire histories to characterize differences in soils and fire history around each lake site. Individual site histories differed in two metrics of past vegetation dynamics: the extent to which white pine (Pinus strobus) increased during the Little Ice Age (LIA) climate period and the volatility in the rate of change between samples at 50-120 yr intervals. Greater increases of white pine during the LIA occurred on sites with less sandy soils (R² = 0.45, P < 0.0163) and on sites with relatively warmer and drier local climate (R² = 0.55, P < 0.0056). Volatility in the rate of change between samples was positively associated with LIA fire frequency (R² = 0.41, P < 0.0256). Over multi-decadal to centennial timescales, forest compositional change and rate-of-change volatility were associated with higher fire frequency. Over longer (multi-centennial) time frames, forest composition change, especially increased white pine, shifted most in sites with more soil moisture. Our results show that responsiveness of forest composition to climate change was influenced by soils, local climate, and fire. The anticipated climatic changes in the next century will not produce the same community dynamics on the same soil types as in the past, but understanding past dynamics and relationships can help us assess how novel factors and combinations of factors in the future may influence various site types. Our

  4. Factors influencing choice of hospitals: a case study of the northern part of Oyo State, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Egunjobi, L

    1983-01-01

    A total number of 859 patients were interviewed in the four hospitals that served Oyo Health Zone, Nigeria in 1979 on why they chose particular hospitals for treatment. The following factors in descending order of magnitude were identified as influencing their choice: nearness, quality of service, relative living in hospital town, finance, ease of transport, religion and connections with hospital staff. Although nearness was the leading factor, it accounted for only 31.8% of the total responses. In effect, about 70% of patients' behaviour are explained by other factors. This study points to the inappropriateness of the emphasis usually placed on linear distance as determining attractiveness of health service supply centres. In reality, a maze of interactions among spatial and non-spatial variables is at work in the choice of hospitals. Policy decisions should take cognizance of this if satisfactory health service to a majority of patients is to be achieved.

  5. Forecasting the Major Influences of Predation and Environment on Cod Recovery in the Northern Gulf of St. Lawrence

    PubMed Central

    Bousquet, Nicolas; Chassot, Emmanuel; Duplisea, Daniel E.; Hammill, Mike O.

    2014-01-01

    The northern Gulf of St. Lawrence (NGSL) stock of Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua), historically the second largest cod population in the Western Atlantic, has known a severe collapse during the early 1990 s and is currently considered as endangered by the Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada. As for many fish populations over the world which are currently being heavily exploited or overfished, urgent management actions in the form of recovery plans are needed for restoring this stock to sustainable levels. Stochastic projections based on a statistical population model incorporating predation were conducted over a period of 30 years (2010–2040) to assess the expected outcomes of alternative fishing strategies on the stock recovery under different scenarios of harp seal (Pagophilus groenlandicus) abundance and environmental conditions. This sensitivity study shows that water temperature is key in the rebuilding of the NGSL cod stock. Model projections suggest that maintaining the current management practice under cooler water temperatures is likely to maintain the species in an endangered status. Under current or warmer conditions in the Gulf of St. Lawrence, partial recovery might only be achieved by significant reductions in both fishing and predation pressure. In the medium-term, a management strategy that reduces catch could be favoured over a complete moratorium so as to minimize socio-economic impacts on the industry. PMID:24523852

  6. Forecasting the major influences of predation and environment on cod recovery in the northern Gulf of St. Lawrence.

    PubMed

    Bousquet, Nicolas; Chassot, Emmanuel; Duplisea, Daniel E; Hammill, Mike O

    2014-01-01

    The northern Gulf of St. Lawrence (NGSL) stock of Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua), historically the second largest cod population in the Western Atlantic, has known a severe collapse during the early 1990 s and is currently considered as endangered by the Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada. As for many fish populations over the world which are currently being heavily exploited or overfished, urgent management actions in the form of recovery plans are needed for restoring this stock to sustainable levels. Stochastic projections based on a statistical population model incorporating predation were conducted over a period of 30 years (2010-2040) to assess the expected outcomes of alternative fishing strategies on the stock recovery under different scenarios of harp seal (Pagophilus groenlandicus) abundance and environmental conditions. This sensitivity study shows that water temperature is key in the rebuilding of the NGSL cod stock. Model projections suggest that maintaining the current management practice under cooler water temperatures is likely to maintain the species in an endangered status. Under current or warmer conditions in the Gulf of St. Lawrence, partial recovery might only be achieved by significant reductions in both fishing and predation pressure. In the medium-term, a management strategy that reduces catch could be favoured over a complete moratorium so as to minimize socio-economic impacts on the industry.

  7. Influence of salinity, bottom topography, and tides on locations of estuarine turbidity maxima in northern San Francisco Bay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schoellhamer, David H.

    2000-01-01

    Time series of salinity and suspended-solids concentration measured at four locations and vertical profiles of salinity and suspended-solids concentration measured during 48 water-quality cruises from January 1993 to September 1997 are analyzed to describe the influence of salinity, bottom topography, and tides on locations of estuarine turbidity maxima in northern San Francisco Bay, California. Estuarine turbidity maxima form when salinity is present but they are not associated with a singular salinity. Bottom topography enhances salinity stratification, gravitational circulation and estuarine turbidity maxima formation seaward of sills. The spring/neap tidal cycle affects locations of estuarine turbidity maxima. Salinity stratification in Carquinez Strait, which is seaward of a sill, is greatest during neap tides, which is the only time when tidally averaged suspended-solids concentration in Carquinez Strait was less than that observed landward at Mallard Island. Spring tides cause the greatest vertical mixing and suspended-solids concentration in Carquinez Strait. Therefore, surface estuarine turbidity maxima always were located in or near the Strait (seaward of Middle Ground) during spring tide cruises, regardless of salinity. During neap tides, surface estuarine turbidity maxima always were observed in the landward half of the study area (landward of Middle Ground) and between 0–2 practical salinity units.

  8. Influence of sediment characteristics on the composition of soft-sediment intertidal communities in the northern Gulf of Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Henkel, Jessica R.; Sigel, Bryan J.; Taylor, Caz M.

    2015-01-01

    Benthic infaunal communities are important components of coastal ecosystems. Understanding the relationships between the structure of these communities and characteristics of the habitat in which they live is becoming progressively more important as coastal systems face increasing stress from anthropogenic impacts and changes in climate. To examine how sediment characteristics and infaunal community composition were related along the northern Gulf of Mexico coast, we sampled intertidal infaunal communities at seven sites covering common habitat types at a regional scale. Across 69 samples, the communities clustered into four distinct groups on the basis of faunal composition. Nearly 70% of the variation in the composition of the communities was explained by salinity, median grain size, and total organic content. Our results suggest that at a regional level coarse habitat characteristics are able to explain a large amount of the variation among sites in infaunal community structure. By examining the relationships between infaunal communities and their sedimentary habitats, we take a necessary first step that will allow the exploration of how changes in habitat and community composition influence higher trophic levels and ecosystem scale processes. PMID:26157603

  9. Do water level fluctuations influence production of walleye and yellow perch young-of-the-year in large northern lakes?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Larson, James H.; Staples, David F.; Maki, Ryan P.; Vallazza, Jon M.; Knights, Brent C.; Peterson, Kevin E.

    2016-01-01

    Many ecological processes depend on the regular rise and fall of water levels (WLs), and artificial manipulations to WL regimes can impair important ecosystem services. Previous research has suggested that differences in WL between late summer and early spring may alter the suitability of shoals used by Walleyes Sander vitreus for spawning. Other species, such as the Yellow Perch Perca flavescens, are unlikely to be affected in the same way by WL fluctuations because their spawning requirements are quite different. We used 11–23 years of data from six northern Minnesota lakes to assess the effects of WL fluctuations on the abundances of young-of-the-year (age-0) Walleyes and Yellow Perch. In two lakes (Rainy Lake and Lake Kabetogama), a change in WL management occurred in 2000, after which these lakes saw increased age-0 Walleye abundance, while the other study lakes experienced decreases or no change. Rainy Lake and Lake Kabetogama also had increases in age-0 Yellow Perch, but another study lake did also. We used partial least-squares regression to assess whether WL metrics were associated with variation in age-0 Walleye and Yellow Perch abundances, but WL metrics were seldom associated with age-0 abundance for either species. Our analysis suggested a potential influence of WL regulation on age-0 Walleye abundance, but we found no evidence that early spring access to spawning shoals was the mechanism by which this occurred.

  10. Influence of seasonal forcing on habitat use by bottlenose dolphins Tursiops truncatus in the Northern Adriatic Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bearzi, Giovanni; Azzellino, Arianna; Politi, Elena; Costa, Marina; Bastianini, Mauro

    2008-12-01

    Bottlenose dolphins are the only cetaceans regularly observed in the northern Adriatic Sea, but they survive at low densities and are exposed to significant threats. This study investigates some of the factors that influence habitat use by the animals in a largely homogeneous environment by combining dolphin data with hydrological and physiographical variables sampled from oceanographic ships. Surveys were conducted year-round between 2003 and 2006, totalling 3,397 km of effort. Habitat modelling based on a binary stepwise logistic regression analysis predicted between 81% and 93% of the cells where animals were present. Seven environmental covariates were important predictors: oxygen saturation, water temperature, density anomaly, gradient of density anomaly, turbidity, distance from the nearest coast and bottom depth. The model selected consistent predictors in spring and summer. However, the relationship (inverse or direct) between each predictor and dolphin presence varied among seasons, and different predictors were selected in fall. This suggests that dolphin distribution changed depending on seasonal forcing. As the study area is relatively uniform in terms of bottom topography, habitat use by the animals seems to depend on complex interactions among hydrological variables, caused primarily by seasonal change and likely to determine shifts in prey distribution.

  11. Influence of the Atchafalaya River on recent evolution of the chenier-plain inner continental shelf, northern Gulf of Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Draut, A.E.; Kineke, G.C.; Velasco, D.W.; Allison, M.A.; Prime, R.J.

    2005-01-01

    This study examines the influence of the Atchafalaya River, a major distributary of the Mississippi River, on stratigraphic evolution of the inner continental shelf in the northern Gulf of Mexico. Sedimentary, geochemical, and shallow acoustic data are used to identify the western limit of the distal Atchafalaya subaqueous delta, and to estimate the proportion of the Atchafalaya River's sediment load that accumulates on the inner shelf seaward of Louisiana's chenier-plain coast. The results demonstrate a link between sedimentary facies distribution on the inner shelf and patterns of shoreline accretion and retreat on the chenier plain. Mudflat progradation on the eastern chenier-plain coast corresponds to the location of deltaic mud accumulation on the inner shelf. On the central chenier-plain shelf, west of the subaqueous delta, relict sediment is exposed that was originally deposited between ???1200 and 600 years BP during activity of the Lafourche lobe of the Mississippi Delta complex. Mass-balance calculations indicate that the eastern chenier-plain inner shelf and coastal zone form a sink for 7??2% of the sediment load carried by the Atchafalaya River. ?? 2004 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Grandmothers as gatekeepers? The role of grandmothers in influencing health-seeking for mothers and newborns in rural northern Ghana.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Mira L; Aborigo, Raymond Akawire; Adongo, Philip Baba; Rominski, Sarah; Hodgson, Abraham; Engmann, Cyril M; Moyer, Cheryl A

    2015-10-01

    Previous research suggests that care-seeking in rural northern Ghana is often governed by a woman's husband or compound head. This study was designed to explore the role grandmothers (typically a woman's mother-in-law) play in influencing maternal and newborn healthcare decisions. In-depth interviews were conducted with 35 mothers of newborns, 8 traditional birth attendants and local healers, 16 community leaders and 13 healthcare practitioners. An additional 18 focus groups were conducted with stakeholders such as household heads, compound leaders and grandmothers. In this region, grandmothers play many roles. They may act as primary support providers to pregnant mothers, care for newborns following delivery, preserve cultural traditions and serve as repositories of knowledge on local medicine. Grandmothers may also serve as gatekeepers for health-seeking behaviour, especially with regard to their daughters and daughters-in-law. This research also sheds light on the potential gap between health education campaigns that target mothers as autonomous decision-makers, and the reality of a more collectivist community structure in which mothers rarely make such decisions without the support of other community members.

  13. Surveillance of biting midges (Culicoides spp.) in Northern Ireland: influence of seasonality, surrounding habitat and livestock housing.

    PubMed

    Jess, S; Thompson, G M; Clawson, S; Forsythe, I W N; Rea, I; Gordon, A W; Murchie, A K

    2017-08-26

    Biting midges, Culicoides spp. (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae), are important vectors of viral pathogens. Following the outbreak of bluetongue serotype 8 in Europe between 2006 and 2009, many Culicoides surveillance programmes were initiated to identify vector-active periods, in accordance with European Commission regulation 2007/1266/EC. This study utilized surveillance data from 4 years of continuous light-trapping at 14 sites in Northern Ireland. The number of captured Culicoides varied from none during the vector-free period (December-April) to more than 36 000 per night during peak activity in the summer. The Obsoletus group represented 75% of Culicoides collected and the Pulicaris group represented 21%. A total of 91% of Culicoides were female, of which 42% were parous. Abundance data, sex ratios and parous rates suggested that both the Obsoletus and Pulicaris groups underwent three generations/year. The Obsoletus group was associated with cattle-rearing habitats and woodland, the Impunctatus group was found in habitats related to sheep rearing and the Pulicaris group were associated with both cattle and sheep. Housing did not reduce incursion of female Obsoletus group Culicoides but it did for males and for the Pulicaris group Culicoides. The influence of housing was strongly affected by time of year, probably reflecting the presence of livestock indoors/outdoors. © 2017 The Royal Entomological Society.

  14. Radiological conditions at Naen, Yugui, Lomiulal, Kabelle and Mellu Islands in the northern half of Rongelap Atoll

    SciTech Connect

    Robison, W.L.; Conrado, C.L.

    1996-03-01

    The data presented in the following tables is the total available for each northern island; they include both the data from the 1978 Northern Marshall Island Radiological Survey (NMIRS) and trips to Rongelap Atoll from 1986 through 1989. In one table we present the number of vegetation samples collected in the 1978 NMIRS and from 1986 through 1989. Again the majority of the {sup 137}Cs data is from the 1986-1989 trips. We have not made additional analyses of {sup 239+240}Pu, {sup 241}Am and {sup 90}Sr because the concentrations are very low and these radionuclides contribute less than 5% of an already very small dose. In another table we show the number of soil samples collected at each island in 1978 and the number collected since 1986. Most of the data are from 1986 through 1989. The major exception is {sup 90}Sr where all of the data are from the 1978 NMIRS. We have done some additional Pu analyses of surface soils (0-5 cm depth) in the northern islands. A significant amount of new data for {sup 137}Cs and {sup 241}Am have been generated from the samples collected from 1986 through 1989. The data are presented in the form of summary tables, graphics, detailed appendices and aerial photographs of the islands with the sample locations marked. The identified sample locations from the 1978 NMIRS will be added later.

  15. Habitat characteristics influence macrofaunal communities in coralline turf more than mesoscale coastal upwelling on the coast of Northern Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelaher, Brendan P.; Carlos Castilla, Juan

    2005-04-01

    Rocky shore communities are often influenced by near-shore coastal upwelling. For macrofauna in algal turf, these effects may be caused directly by well-studied bottom-up mechanisms or indirectly via changes in habitat structure provided by algal turf associated high nutrient loads. Here, we investigated possible interactions between upwelling and habitat structure by sampling diverse faunal assemblages in coralline algal turf on seven rocky intertidal shores in northern Chile, ranging from El Cobre [23°17'1″S, 70°31'40″W] to La Lobería [23°03'40″S, 70°33'14″W]. Some of these shores were located adjacent to strong upwelling centers, while others were in areas rarely affected. On each shore, we sampled four (2 × 2 m) sites separated by 15-50 m. In each site, we collected three replicate cores (80 mm in diameter) from which we measured macrofauna greater than 850 μm, biomass of sediment and epiphytes, frond density and average frond length. We used mean water temperature and its variation at 1-1.5 m water depth (below Extreme Low Water Spring, ELWS) to represent local upwelling intensity because long-term data have shown that these variables make excellent indicators for this region. In total, we found 94 macrofaunal taxa in coralline turf, which is almost three times higher than has previously been reported in Chile. Although macrofaunal assemblages varied significantly among shores, there were no patterns to suggest mesoscale variation in upwelling intensity affected either faunal assemblages or local habitat characteristics. In contrast, multivariate and univariate correlations highlighted sediment and frond density as strong determinants of community structure. We therefore conclude that traditionally studied habitat characteristics, such as structural complexity and habitat heterogeneity, have greater influence on faunal assemblages in mat-like habitats on rocky shores than environmental variables associated with mesoscale coastal upwelling.

  16. Beyond form and functioning: Understanding how contextual factors influence village health committees in northern India

    PubMed Central

    George, Asha S.; Harvey, Steven A.; Mondal, Shinjini; Patel, Gupteswar; Ved, Rajani; Garimella, Surekha; Sheikh, Kabir

    2017-01-01

    Health committees are a common strategy to foster community participation in health. Efforts to strengthen committees often focus on technical inputs to improve committee form (e.g. representative membership) and functioning (e.g. meeting procedures). However, porous and interconnected contextual spheres also mediate committee effectiveness. Using a framework for contextual analysis, we explored the contextual features that facilitated or hindered Village Health, Sanitation and Nutrition Committee (VHSNC) functionality in rural north India. We conducted interviews (n = 74), focus groups (n = 18) and observation over 1.5 years. Thematic content analysis enabled the identification and grouping of themes, and detailed exploration of sub-themes. While the intervention succeeded in strengthening committee form and functioning, participant accounts illuminated the different ways in which contextual influences impinged on VHSNC efficacy. Women and marginalized groups navigated social hierarchies that curtailed their ability to assert themselves in the presence of men and powerful local families. These dynamics were not static and unchanging, illustrated by pre-existing cross-caste problem solving, and the committee’s creation of opportunities for the careful violation of social norms. Resource and capacity deficits in government services limited opportunities to build relationships between health system actors and committee members and engendered mistrust of government institutions. Fragmented administrative accountability left committee members bearing responsibility for improving local health without access to stakeholders who could support or respond to their efforts. The committee’s narrow authority was at odds with widespread community needs, and committee members struggled to involve diverse government services across the health, sanitation, and nutrition sectors. Multiple parallel systems (political decentralization, media and other village groups) presented

  17. Beyond form and functioning: Understanding how contextual factors influence village health committees in northern India.

    PubMed

    Scott, Kerry; George, Asha S; Harvey, Steven A; Mondal, Shinjini; Patel, Gupteswar; Ved, Rajani; Garimella, Surekha; Sheikh, Kabir

    2017-01-01

    Health committees are a common strategy to foster community participation in health. Efforts to strengthen committees often focus on technical inputs to improve committee form (e.g. representative membership) and functioning (e.g. meeting procedures). However, porous and interconnected contextual spheres also mediate committee effectiveness. Using a framework for contextual analysis, we explored the contextual features that facilitated or hindered Village Health, Sanitation and Nutrition Committee (VHSNC) functionality in rural north India. We conducted interviews (n = 74), focus groups (n = 18) and observation over 1.5 years. Thematic content analysis enabled the identification and grouping of themes, and detailed exploration of sub-themes. While the intervention succeeded in strengthening committee form and functioning, participant accounts illuminated the different ways in which contextual influences impinged on VHSNC efficacy. Women and marginalized groups navigated social hierarchies that curtailed their ability to assert themselves in the presence of men and powerful local families. These dynamics were not static and unchanging, illustrated by pre-existing cross-caste problem solving, and the committee's creation of opportunities for the careful violation of social norms. Resource and capacity deficits in government services limited opportunities to build relationships between health system actors and committee members and engendered mistrust of government institutions. Fragmented administrative accountability left committee members bearing responsibility for improving local health without access to stakeholders who could support or respond to their efforts. The committee's narrow authority was at odds with widespread community needs, and committee members struggled to involve diverse government services across the health, sanitation, and nutrition sectors. Multiple parallel systems (political decentralization, media and other village groups) presented

  18. Influence of orbital flight conditions on formation of genitals in Muscari racemosum and Anethum graveolens.

    PubMed

    Kordyum, E L; Popova, A F; Mashinsky, A L

    1979-01-01

    It was shown that under space flight conditions development of male genitals in Muscari racemosum is accelerated compared to that of laboratory and natural field controls. Conditions of space flight produced an inhibitory effect on germination and germinative energy of Anethum graveolens seeds. The first stages of the plant development, right up to the flowering stage, also suffered from the inhibitory influence of space flight conditions. A cytoembryological study of the experiment and control plants found no essential differences between them.

  19. Influences of Northern Hemisphere Sea-Ice Change on Atmospheric Circulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoshi, K.; Ukita, J.; Honda, M.; Iwamoto, K.; Nakamura, T.; Yamazaki, K.; Miyoshi, Y.; Ogawa, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Evidence from both observations and model results suggests a link between changes in the Arctic sea ice conditions and atmospheric circulation in the NH mid latitudes with its possible impacts on severe winters and extreme weather events. This study investigates underlying mechanisms for this Arctic-midlatitudes climate connection based on numerical experiments using a high-top AGCM. We compare and evaluate results from two sets of perpetual simulations (60yrs run each), one with an annual cycle of sea ice conditions from the period of 1979-1983 and the other from the 2005-2009 period while other variables and parameters including SST and GHGs are fixed.Results from the numerical experiments show that the Arctic sea ice reduction leads to cold winters in the mid-latitude land areas centered in Siberia, Europe and the North America. The winter (DJF) mean temperature at 850 hPa averaged over the mid-latitude continents decreases by about 0.4 K associated due solely to sea ice reduction.The analysis based on a wave-activity flux indicates that this cooling is due to low-level cold advection. In early winter negative geopotential height anomalies over Siberia and the North America develop as a stationary Rossby wave response to anomalous turbulent surface heat fluxes associated with the sea-ice reduction in the Barents and Kala Seas. As winter progresses further wave propagation acts to intensify positive geopotential height anomalies over the high Arctic, which eventually leads to cold advections in the lower troposphere. In addition, we identify a pathway via the stratosphere which appears to aid this intensification of positive geopotential height anomalies.Observations in general support a similar relationship. For example, on interannual timescale there is a significant positive relationship between the September NH SIE time series and surface temperatures in continental regions.Our results have significant implications that sea ice can be used as a basis for mid

  20. Factors influencing nesting success of king eiders on northern Alaska's Coastal Plain

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bentzen, R.L.; Powell, A.N.; Suydam, R.S.

    2008-01-01

    visits in future studies and to consider them as a possible negative bias in estimated nest survival. Future models of the impacts of development within the breeding grounds of king eider should consider the influence of humans in the vicinity of nests.

  1. Short-term Influences on Suspended Particulate Matter Distribution in the Northern Gulf of Mexico: Satellite and Model Observations

    PubMed Central

    D'Sa, Eurico J.; Ko, Dong S.

    2008-01-01

    Energetic meteorological events such as frontal passages and hurricanes often impact coastal regions in the northern Gulf of Mexico that influence geochemical processes in the region. Satellite remote sensing data such as winds from QuikSCAT, suspended particulate matter (SPM) concentrations derived from SeaWiFS and the outputs (sea level and surface ocean currents) of a nested navy coastal ocean model (NCOM) were combined to assess the effects of frontal passages between 23-28 March 2005 on the physical properties and the SPM characteristics in the northern Gulf of Mexico. Typical changes in wind speed and direction associated with frontal passages were observed in the latest 12.5 km wind product from QuikSCAT with easterly winds before the frontal passage undergoing systematic shifts in direction and speed and turning northerly, northwesterly during a weak and a strong front on 23 and 27 March, respectively. A quantitative comparison of model sea level results with tide gauge observations suggest better correlations near the delta than in the western part of the Gulf with elevated sea levels along the coast before the frontal passage and a large drop in sea level following the frontal passage on 27 March. Model results of surface currents suggested strong response to wind forcing with westward and onshore currents before the frontal passage reversing into eastward, southeastward direction over a six day period from 23 to 28 March 2005. Surface SPM distribution derived from SeaWiFS ocean color data for two clear days on 23 and 28 March 2005 indicated SPM plumes to be oriented with the current field with increasing concentrations in nearshore waters due to resuspension and discharge from the rivers and bays and its seaward transport following the frontal passage. The backscattering spectral slope γ, a parameter sensitive to particle size distribution also indicated lower γ values (larger particles) in nearshore waters that decreased offshore (smaller particles

  2. Influence of soil site class on growth and decay of northern white-cedar and two associates in Maine

    Treesearch

    P.V. Hofmeyer; R.S. Seymour; L.S. Kenefic

    2009-01-01

    Basal area growth of outwardly sound northern white-cedar (Thuja occidentalis L.) was compared with that of balsam fir (Abies balsamea [L.] Mill.) and red spruce (Picea rubens Sarg.) across site and light exposure class gradients on 60 sites throughout northern Maine. Once adjusted for sapwood area,...

  3. Germanium-silicon fractionation in a river-influenced continental margin: The Northern Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baronas, J. Jotautas; Hammond, Douglas E.; Berelson, William M.; McManus, James; Severmann, Silke

    2016-04-01

    In this study we have sampled the water column and sediments of the Gulf of Mexico to investigate the effects of high riverine terrigenous load and sediment redox conditions on the cycling of Ge and Si. Water column Ge/Si ratios across the Gulf of Mexico continental shelf range from 1.9 to 25 μmol/mol, which is elevated compared to the global ocean value of 0.7 μmol/mol. The Ge enrichment in the Gulf of Mexico seawater is primarily due to anthropogenic contamination of the Mississippi river, which is the main Ge and Si source to the area, and to a smaller extent due to discrimination against Ge during biogenic silica (bSi) production (Ge/Si = 1.2-1.8 μmol/mol), especially by radiolarians and siliceous sponges (Ge/Si = 0.6-1.1 μmol/mol). Most sediment pore waters (Ge/Si = 0.3-4.5 μmol/mol) and sediment incubation experiments (benthic flux Ge/Si = 0.9-1.2 μmol/mol) indicate precipitation of authigenic phases that sequester Ge from pore waters (non-opal sink). This process appears to be independent of oxidation-reduction reactions and suggests that authigenic aluminosilicate formation (reverse weathering) may be the dominant Ge sink in marine sediments. Compilation of previously published data shows that in continental margins, non-opal Ge burial flux is controlled by bSi supply, while in open ocean sediments it is 10-100 times lower and most likely limited by the supply of lithogenic material. We provide a measurement-based estimate of the global non-opal Ge burial flux as 4-32 Mmol yr-1, encompassing the 2-16 Mmol yr-1 needed to keep the global marine Ge cycle at steady state.

  4. Effects of climate warming, North Atlantic Oscillation, and El Niño-Southern Oscillation on thermal conditions and plankton dynamics in northern hemispheric lakes.

    PubMed

    Gerten, Dieter; Adrian, Rita

    2002-03-08

    Impacts of climate warming on freshwater ecosystems have been documented recently for a variety of sites around the globe. Here we provide a review of studies that report long-term (multidecadal) effects of warming trends on thermal properties and plankton dynamics in northern hemispheric lakes. We show that higher lake temperatures, shorter periods with ice cover, and shorter stagnation periods were common trends for lakes across the hemisphere in response to the warmer conditions. Only for shallow dimictic lakes was it observed that deep-water temperatures decreased. Moreover, it became evident that phytoplankton dynamics and primary productivity altered in conjunction with changes in lake physics. Algal spring blooms developed early and were more pronounced in several European lakes after mild winters with short ice cover periods, and primary productivity increased in North American lakes. Effects of elevated temperatures on zooplankton communities were seen in an early development of various species and groups, as is documented for cladocerans, copepods, and rotifers in European lakes. Furthermore, thermophile species reached higher abundance in warmer years. Obviously, the nature of responses is species specific, and depends on the detailed seasonal patterning of warming. Complex responses such as effects propagating across trophic levels are likely, indicating that observed climate-ecosystem relationships are not generally applicable. Nonetheless, the picture emerges that climate-driven changes in freshwater ecosystems may be synchronised to a certain extent among lakes even over great distances if climatic influences are not masked by anthropogenic impacts or differences in lake morphology. Macro-scale climatic fluctuations--such as the North Atlantic Oscillation or the El Niño-Southern Oscillation--were identified as the most important candidates responsible for such coherence, with the former predominating in Europe and the latter in North America. We

  5. Length-weight relationships and condition factor of the eaglebeak pacu Ossubtus xinguense Jégu, 1992 (Characiformes, Serrasalmidae), an endangered species from Rio Xingu rapids, northern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Andrade, M C; Jesus, A J S; Giarrizzo, T

    2015-08-01

    This study reports on the length-weight relationships and condition factor for the endangered rheophilic fish Ossubtus xinguense Jégu from Rio Xingu rapids. This species is threatened by construction of the third largest hydroelectric in the world, the Belo Monte dam close to the city of Altamira, northern Brazil. Specimens were collected in the dry season between July 2012 and September 2012. Male specimens have body length larger than females, atypical in serrasalmid fishes, and different length-weight relationships were found between adult and juvenile specimens. This study presents the first biological characteristics for O. xinguense.

  6. Days out of role due to common physical and mental conditions: results from the Northern Ireland study of health and stress.

    PubMed

    Ennis, Edel; O'Neill, S; Murphy, S; Bunting, B

    2016-11-01

    Days out of role due to health problems are a major source of lost human capital. We examined the relative importance of common physical and mental disorders in accounting for days out of role in Northern Ireland using the Northern Ireland Study of Health and Stress (NISHS) WHO World Mental Health (WMH) Survey. Face-to-face interviews were carried out with 4340 respondents (68.4 % response rate). Multiple regression analysis estimated associations of specific chronic physical disorders and mental disorders conditions and comorbidities with days out of role controlling for basic socio-demographics. Overall, 16.8 % of respondents had at least one day totally out of role in the previous year. The strongest population-level effect was associated with arthritis, which accounted for 23.5 % of all days out of role. The strongest individual-level effects (days out of role per year) were associated with any anxiety disorder (32.3) arthritis (26.1) and pain (22.0). The 11 conditions accounted for 93 % of all days out of role, as measured by population attributable risk proportions (PARPs). Common health conditions, including mental disorders, make up a large proportion of the number of days out of role and should be addressed to substantially increase overall productivity.

  7. Association of vectors and environmental conditions during the emergence of Peruvian horse sickness orbivirus and Yunnan orbivirus in northern Peru.

    PubMed

    Méndez-López, María R; Attoui, Houssam; Florin, David; Calisher, Charles H; Florian-Carrillo, J Christian; Montero, Stephanie

    2015-12-01

    Since 1983, cases of diseased donkeys and horses with symptoms similar to those produced by alphaviruses were identified in two departments in northern Peru; however serological testing ruled out the presence of those viruses and attempts to isolate an agent were also unproductive. In 1997, also in northern Peru, two new orbiviruses were discovered, each recognized as a causative agent of neurological diseases in livestock and domestic animals and, at the same time, mosquitoes were found to be infected with these viruses. Peruvian horse sickness virus (PHSV) was isolated from pools of culicid mosquitoes, Aedes serratus and Psorophora ferox, and Yunnan virus (YUOV) was isolated from Aedes scapularis in the subtropical jungle (upper jungle) located on the slope between the east side of the Andes and the Amazonian basin in the Department of San Martín. Both viruses later were recovered from mosquitoes collected above the slope between the west side of the Andes and the coast (Department of Piura) in humid subtropical areas associated with the Piura River basin. In this region, PHSV was isolated from Anopheles albimanus and YUOV was isolated from Ae. scapularis. We discuss the ecology of vector mosquitoes during the outbreaks in the areas where these mosquitoes were found. © 2015 The Society for Vector Ecology.

  8. Natural and anthropogenic influences on depositional architecture of the Ural Delta, Kazakhstan, northern Caspian Sea, during the past 70 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scarelli, Frederico M.; Cantelli, Luigi; Barboza, Eduardo G.; Gabbianelli, Giovanni

    2017-05-01

    This paper focuses on the Ural Delta in the northern zone of the Caspian Sea, an area with particular characteristics, where intense influence from anthropogenic and natural factors exists, which acts on the fragile delta system. We built a database to integrate the data from the published sources, bathymetric survey, and recent images in the geographical information system (GIS) environment. The results were linked to the Caspian Sea level (CSL) curve, which had many variations, changing the Ural Delta system's dynamics and in its architecture. In addition, the anthropogenic changes contribute to shaping the actual Ural Delta architecture. Through the link between the results and CSL, we reconstructed an evolution model for the Ural Delta system for the last century and identified three different architectures for the Ural Delta, determined by the energy that acted on the system in the last century and by the anthropogenic changes. This work identifies six different delta phases, which are shaped by CSL changes during the last 70 years and by anthropogenic changes. The delta phases recognized are: i) a Lobate Delta phase, shaped during high CSL before 1935; ii) Natural Elongate Delta 1935-1950 formed during rapid CSL fall; iii) Anthropogenic Elongate Delta 1950-1966, formed during rapid CSL fall and after the Ural-Caspian Sea canal construction, which modified the sedimentary deposition on the delta; iv) Anthropogenic Elongate Delta 1966-1982 shaped during low CSL phase; v) Anthropogenic Elongate Delta 1982-1996 formed during a rapid CSL rise phase; and vi) Anthropogenic Elongate Delta 1996-2009 shaped during high CSL that represent the last phase and actual Ural Delta architecture.

  9. Environmental Influences on Vibrio Populations in Northern Temperate and Boreal Coastal Waters (Baltic and Skagerrak Seas)†

    PubMed Central

    Eiler, Alexander; Johansson, Mona; Bertilsson, Stefan

    2006-01-01

    Even if many Vibrio spp. are endemic to coastal waters, their distribution in northern temperate and boreal waters is poorly studied. To identify environmental factors regulating Vibrio populations in a salinity gradient along the Swedish coastline, we combined Vibrio-specific quantitative competitive PCR with denaturant gradient gel electrophoresis-based genotyping. The total Vibrio abundance ranged from 4 × 103 to 9.6 × 104 cells liter−1, with the highest abundances in the more saline waters of the Skagerrak Sea. Several Vibrio populations were present throughout the salinity gradient, with abundances of single populations ranging from 5 × 102 to 7 × 104 cells liter−1. Clear differences were observed along the salinity gradient, where three populations dominated the more saline waters of the Skagerrak Sea and two populations containing mainly representatives of V. anguillarum and V. aestuarianus genotypes were abundant in the brackish waters of the Baltic Sea. Our results suggest that this apparent niche separation within the genus Vibrio may also be influenced by alternate factors such as nutrient levels and high abundances of dinoflagellates. A V. cholerae/V. mimicus population was detected in more than 50% of the samples, with abundances exceeding 103 cells liter−1, even in the cold (annual average water temperature of around 5°C) and low-salinity (2 to 4‰) samples from the Bothnian Bay (latitude, 65°N). The unsuspected and widespread occurrence of this population in temperate and boreal coastal waters suggests that potential Vibrio pathogens may also be endemic to cold and brackish waters and hence may represent a previously overlooked health hazard. PMID:16957222

  10. Calcareous Bio-Concretions in the Northern Adriatic Sea: Habitat Types, Environmental Factors that Influence Habitat Distributions, and Predictive Modeling.

    PubMed

    Falace, Annalisa; Kaleb, Sara; Curiel, Daniele; Miotti, Chiara; Galli, Giovanni; Querin, Stefano; Ballesteros, Enric; Solidoro, Cosimo; Bandelj, Vinko

    2015-01-01

    Habitat classifications provide guidelines for mapping and comparing marine resources across geographic regions. Calcareous bio-concretions and their associated biota have not been exhaustively categorized. Furthermore, for management and conservation purposes, species and habitat mapping is critical. Recently, several developments have occurred in the field of predictive habitat modeling, and multiple methods are available. In this study, we defined the habitats constituting northern Adriatic biogenic reefs and created a predictive habitat distribution model. We used an updated dataset of the epibenthic assemblages to define the habitats, which we verified using the fuzzy k-means (FKM) clustering method. Redundancy analysis was employed to model the relationships between the environmental descriptors and the FKM membership grades. Predictive modelling was carried out to map habitats across the basin. Habitat A (opportunistic macroalgae, encrusting Porifera, bioeroders) characterizes reefs closest to the coastline, which are affected by coastal currents and river inputs. Habitat B is distinguished by massive Porifera, erect Tunicata, and non-calcareous encrusting algae (Peyssonnelia spp.). Habitat C (non-articulated coralline, Polycitor adriaticus) is predicted in deeper areas. The onshore-offshore gradient explains the variability of the assemblages because of the influence of coastal freshwater, which is the main driver of nutrient dynamics. This model supports the interpretation of Habitat A and C as the extremes of a gradient that characterizes the epibenthic assemblages, while Habitat B demonstrates intermediate characteristics. Areas of transition are a natural feature of the marine environment and may include a mixture of habitats and species. The habitats proposed are easy to identify in the field, are related to different environmental features, and may be suitable for application in studies focused on other geographic areas. The habitat model outputs

  11. Calcareous Bio-Concretions in the Northern Adriatic Sea: Habitat Types, Environmental Factors that Influence Habitat Distributions, and Predictive Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Falace, Annalisa; Kaleb, Sara; Curiel, Daniele; Miotti, Chiara; Galli, Giovanni; Querin, Stefano; Ballesteros, Enric; Solidoro, Cosimo; Bandelj, Vinko

    2015-01-01

    Habitat classifications provide guidelines for mapping and comparing marine resources across geographic regions. Calcareous bio-concretions and their associated biota have not been exhaustively categorized. Furthermore, for management and conservation purposes, species and habitat mapping is critical. Recently, several developments have occurred in the field of predictive habitat modeling, and multiple methods are available. In this study, we defined the habitats constituting northern Adriatic biogenic reefs and created a predictive habitat distribution model. We used an updated dataset of the epibenthic assemblages to define the habitats, which we verified using the fuzzy k-means (FKM) clustering method. Redundancy analysis was employed to model the relationships between the environmental descriptors and the FKM membership grades. Predictive modelling was carried out to map habitats across the basin. Habitat A (opportunistic macroalgae, encrusting Porifera, bioeroders) characterizes reefs closest to the coastline, which are affected by coastal currents and river inputs. Habitat B is distinguished by massive Porifera, erect Tunicata, and non-calcareous encrusting algae (Peyssonnelia spp.). Habitat C (non-articulated coralline, Polycitor adriaticus) is predicted in deeper areas. The onshore-offshore gradient explains the variability of the assemblages because of the influence of coastal freshwater, which is the main driver of nutrient dynamics. This model supports the interpretation of Habitat A and C as the extremes of a gradient that characterizes the epibenthic assemblages, while Habitat B demonstrates intermediate characteristics. Areas of transition are a natural feature of the marine environment and may include a mixture of habitats and species. The habitats proposed are easy to identify in the field, are related to different environmental features, and may be suitable for application in studies focused on other geographic areas. The habitat model outputs

  12. Influence of body condition on influenza A virus infection in mallard ducks: experimental infection data.

    PubMed

    Arsnoe, Dustin M; Ip, Hon S; Owen, Jennifer C

    2011-01-01

    Migrating waterfowl are implicated in the global spread of influenza A viruses (IAVs), and mallards (Anas platyrhynchos) are considered a particularly important IAV reservoir. Prevalence of IAV infection in waterfowl peaks during autumn pre-migration staging and then declines as birds reach wintering areas. Migration is energetically costly and birds often experience declines in body condition that may suppress immune function. We assessed how body condition affects susceptibility to infection, viral shedding and antibody production in wild-caught and captive-bred juvenile mallards challenged with low pathogenic avian influenza virus (LPAIV) H5N9. Wild mallards (n = 30) were separated into three experimental groups; each manipulated through food availability to a different condition level (-20%, -10%, and normal ±5% original body condition), and captive-bred mallards (n = 10) were maintained at normal condition. We found that wild mallards in normal condition were more susceptible to LPAIV infection, shed higher peak viral loads and shed viral RNA more frequently compared to birds in poor condition. Antibody production did not differ according to condition. We found that wild mallards did not differ from captive-bred mallards in viral intensity and duration of infection, but they did exhibit lower antibody titers and greater variation in viral load. Our findings suggest that reduced body condition negatively influences waterfowl host competence to LPAIV infection. This observation is contradictory to the recently proposed condition-dependent hypothesis, according to which birds in reduced condition would be more susceptible to IAV infection. The mechanisms responsible for reducing host competency among birds in poor condition remain unknown. Our research indicates body condition may influence the maintenance and spread of LPAIV by migrating waterfowl.

  13. Influence of Body Condition on Influenza A Virus Infection in Mallard Ducks: Experimental Infection Data

    PubMed Central

    Arsnoe, Dustin M.; Ip, Hon S.; Owen, Jennifer C.

    2011-01-01

    Migrating waterfowl are implicated in the global spread of influenza A viruses (IAVs), and mallards (Anas platyrhynchos) are considered a particularly important IAV reservoir. Prevalence of IAV infection in waterfowl peaks during autumn pre-migration staging and then declines as birds reach wintering areas. Migration is energetically costly and birds often experience declines in body condition that may suppress immune function. We assessed how body condition affects susceptibility to infection, viral shedding and antibody production in wild-caught and captive-bred juvenile mallards challenged with low pathogenic avian influenza virus (LPAIV) H5N9. Wild mallards (n = 30) were separated into three experimental groups; each manipulated through food availability to a different condition level (−20%, −10%, and normal ±5% original body condition), and captive-bred mallards (n = 10) were maintained at normal condition. We found that wild mallards in normal condition were more susceptible to LPAIV infection, shed higher peak viral loads and shed viral RNA more frequently compared to birds in poor condition. Antibody production did not differ according to condition. We found that wild mallards did not differ from captive-bred mallards in viral intensity and duration of infection, but they did exhibit lower antibody titers and greater variation in viral load. Our findings suggest that reduced body condition negatively influences waterfowl host competence to LPAIV infection. This observation is contradictory to the recently proposed condition-dependent hypothesis, according to which birds in reduced condition would be more susceptible to IAV infection. The mechanisms responsible for reducing host competency among birds in poor condition remain unknown. Our research indicates body condition may influence the maintenance and spread of LPAIV by migrating waterfowl. PMID:21857940

  14. Influence of body condition on influenza a virus infection in mallard ducks: Experimental infection data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Arsnoe, D.M.; Ip, H.S.; Owen, J.C.

    2011-01-01

    Migrating waterfowl are implicated in the global spread of influenza A viruses (IAVs), and mallards (Anas platyrhynchos) are considered a particularly important IAV reservoir. Prevalence of IAV infection in waterfowl peaks during autumn pre-migration staging and then declines as birds reach wintering areas. Migration is energetically costly and birds often experience declines in body condition that may suppress immune function. We assessed how body condition affects susceptibility to infection, viral shedding and antibody production in wild-caught and captive-bred juvenile mallards challenged with low pathogenic avian influenza virus (LPAIV) H5N9. Wild mallards (n = 30) were separated into three experimental groups; each manipulated through food availability to a different condition level (-20%, -10%, and normal ??5% original body condition), and captive-bred mallards (n = 10) were maintained at normal condition. We found that wild mallards in normal condition were more susceptible to LPAIV infection, shed higher peak viral loads and shed viral RNA more frequently compared to birds in poor condition. Antibody production did not differ according to condition. We found that wild mallards did not differ from captive-bred mallards in viral intensity and duration of infection, but they did exhibit lower antibody titers and greater variation in viral load. Our findings suggest that reduced body condition negatively influences waterfowl host competence to LPAIV infection. This observation is contradictory to the recently proposed condition-dependent hypothesis, according to which birds in reduced condition would be more susceptible to IAV infection. The mechanisms responsible for reducing host competency among birds in poor condition remain unknown. Our research indicates body condition may influence the maintenance and spread of LPAIV by migrating waterfowl. ?? 2011 Arsnoe et al.

  15. Influence of body condition on influenza A virus infection in mallard ducks: Experimental infection data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Arsnoe, Dustin M.; Ip, Hon S.; Owen, Jennifer C.

    2011-01-01

    Migrating waterfowl are implicated in the global spread of influenza A viruses (IAVs), and mallards (Anas platyrhynchos) are considered a particularly important IAV reservoir. Prevalence of IAV infection in waterfowl peaks during autumn pre-migration staging and then declines as birds reach wintering areas. Migration is energetically costly and birds often experience declines in body condition that may suppress immune function. We assessed how body condition affects susceptibility to infection, viral shedding and antibody production in wild-caught and captive-bred juvenile mallards challenged with low pathogenic avian influenza virus (LPAIV) H5N9. Wild mallards (n = 30) were separated into three experimental groups; each manipulated through food availability to a different condition level (-20%, -10%, and normal ±5% original body condition), and captive-bred mallards (n = 10) were maintained at normal condition. We found that wild mallards in normal condition were more susceptible to LPAIV infection, shed higher peak viral loads and shed viral RNA more frequently compared to birds in poor condition. Antibody production did not differ according to condition. We found that wild mallards did not differ from captive-bred mallards in viral intensity and duration of infection, but they did exhibit lower antibody titers and greater variation in viral load. Our findings suggest that reduced body condition negatively influences waterfowl host competence to LPAIV infection. This observation is contradictory to the recently proposed condition-dependent hypothesis, according to which birds in reduced condition would be more susceptible to IAV infection. The mechanisms responsible for reducing host competency among birds in poor condition remain unknown. Our research indicates body condition may influence the maintenance and spread of LPAIV by migrating waterfowl.

  16. Northern Pintail

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, Robert G.; Fleskes, Joseph P.; Guyn, Karla L.; Haukos, David A.; Austin, Jane E.; Miller, Michael R.

    2014-01-01

    This medium-sized dabbling duck of slender, elegant lines and conservative plumage coloration is circumpolar in distribution and abundant in North America, with core nesting habitat in Alaska and the Prairie Pothole Region of southern Canada and the northern Great Plains. Breeders favor shallow wetlands interspersed throughout prairie grasslands or arctic tundra. An early fall migrant, the species arrives on wintering areas beginning in August, after wing molt, often forming large roosting and feeding flocks on open, shallow wetlands and flooded agricultural fields. The birds consume grains, marsh plant seeds, and aquatic invertebrates throughout fall and winter.Northern Pintails are among the earliest nesting ducks in North America, beginning shortly after ice-out in many northern areas. Individuals form new pair bonds each winter but are highly promiscuous during the nesting season, with mated and unmated males often involved in vigorous, acrobatic Pursuit Flights. Annual nest success and productivity vary with water conditions, predation, and weather. Females build nests on the ground, often far from water. Only the female incubates; her mate leaves shortly after incubation begins. Ducklings hatch together in one day, follow the female to water after a day in the nest, and fledge by July or August. Adults and ducklings consume mainly aquatic invertebrates during the breeding season.Predators and farming operations destroy many thousands of Northern Pintail nests annually; farming has also greatly reduced the amount of quality nesting cover available. Winter habitats are threatened by water shortages, agricultural development, contamination, and urbanization. Periods of extended drought in prairie nesting regions have caused dramatic population declines, usually followed by periods of recovery. Over the long term, however, the continental population of Northern Pintails has declined significantly from 6 million birds in the early 1970s to less than 3 million in

  17. Metals, Parasites, and Environmental Conditions Affecting Breeding Populations of Spotted Salamanders (Ambystoma maculatum) in Northern Arkansas, USA.

    PubMed

    DeMali, Heather M; Trauth, Stanley E; Bouldin, Jennifer L

    2016-06-01

    The spotted salamander (Ambystoma maculatum) is indigenous to northern Arkansas, and several breeding sites are known to exist in the region. Spotted salamanders (n = 17) were collected and examined for parasites and only three females harbored nematodes (Physaloptera spp.). Chronic aquatic bioassays were conducted using water collected from eight breeding ponds during different hydroperiod events. No lethal or sublethal effects were measured in Ceriodaphnia dubia; however, decreased growth and survival were seen in Pimephales promelas. Aqueous, sediment, and salamander hepatic samples were analyzed for As, Cd, Cu, Pb, and Ni. Metal analysis revealed possible increased metal exposure following precipitation, with greatest metal concentrations measured in sediment samples. Hepatic metal concentrations were similar in parasitized and non-parasitized individuals, and greatest Pb concentrations were measured following normal precipitation events. Determining environmental stressors of amphibians, especially during their breeding and subsequent larval life stage, is imperative to improve species conservation.

  18. A critical review of social and structural conditions that influence HIV risk among Mexican deportees

    PubMed Central

    Pinedo, Miguel; Burgos, José Luis; Ojeda, Victoria D.

    2014-01-01

    Mexican migrants who are deported from the US may be at elevated risk for HIV infection. Deportations of Mexican migrants by the US have reached record numbers. We critically reviewed existing literature to assess how social and structural conditions in post-deportation settings can influence Mexican deported migrants' HIV risk. We also identify critical research gaps and make research recommendations. PMID:24583278

  19. Past Experience Influences the Processing of Stimulus Compounds in Human Pavlovian Conditioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Melchers, Klaus G.; Lachnit, Harold; Shanks, David R.

    2004-01-01

    In two human skin conductance conditioning experiments we investigated whether processing of stimulus compounds can be influenced by past experience. Participants were either pre-trained with a discrimination problem that could be solved elementally (A+, B-, AB+, C- in Experiment 1 and A+, AB+, C-, CB- in Experiment 2) or one that required a…

  20. A critical review of social and structural conditions that influence HIV risk among Mexican deportees.

    PubMed

    Pinedo, Miguel; Burgos, José Luis; Ojeda, Victoria D

    2014-05-01

    Mexican migrants who are deported from the US may be at elevated risk for HIV infection. Deportations of Mexican migrants by the US have reached record numbers. We critically reviewed existing literature to assess how social and structural conditions in post-deportation settings can influence Mexican deported migrants' HIV risk. We also identify critical research gaps and make research recommendations.

  1. Past Experience Influences the Processing of Stimulus Compounds in Human Pavlovian Conditioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Melchers, Klaus G.; Lachnit, Harold; Shanks, David R.

    2004-01-01

    In two human skin conductance conditioning experiments we investigated whether processing of stimulus compounds can be influenced by past experience. Participants were either pre-trained with a discrimination problem that could be solved elementally (A+, B-, AB+, C- in Experiment 1 and A+, AB+, C-, CB- in Experiment 2) or one that required a…

  2. Competitive flow and anastomosis angle influence on bypass hemodynamics in unsteady flow conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Totorean, A. F.; Bernad, S. I.; Hudrea, I. C.; Susan-Resiga, R. F.

    2017-07-01

    Bypass graft patency is strongly influenced by geometric parameters such as anastomosis angle or the presence of competitive flow. Low values of Wall Shear Stress are associated to regions with flow disturbance, a main cause for intimal hyperplasia development and therefore graft failure. This paper analyzes the influence of anastomosis angle and competitive flow on bypass hemodynamics in unsteady conditions. Straight bypass configurations with anastomosis angles of 15°, 30°, 45° and 60°, respectively with 80% partial and 100% full stenosis were considered. Numerical simulations were performed under pulsatile physiological conditions with main period of T=0,8s. Hemodynamic parameters vary during the cardiac cycle, having the maximum values both for WSS and pressure drop associated to diastolic peak. Results show that these parameters alter as the anastomosis angle increases, whereas the presence of partial non-significant competitive flow positively influence the pressure drop along graft and host artery.

  3. Antibacterial Properties of Copper Nanoparticle Dispersions: Influence of Synthesis Conditions and Physicochemical Characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godymchuk, A.; Frolov, G.; Gusev, A.; Zakharova, O.; Yunda, E.; Kuznetsov, D.; Kolesnikov, E.

    2015-11-01

    The production of bactericidal plasters, bandages and medicines with the inclusion of copper nanoparticles and copper ions may have a great potential in terms of their biomedical application. The work considers the influence of the synthesis conditions, size, aggregation status, and charge of nanoparticles in aqueous solutions as well as the type of microorganisms to the antibacterial properties of water suspensions of electroexplosive copper nanoparticles in the conditions in vitro in relation to strains Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, and Bacillus cereus. Water dispersions of copper nanoparticles were shown to inhibit the growth of test cells for both G+ and G- microbacteria but the degree of such an influence strongly depended on the type of a test strain. The authors have demonstrated that use of deeply purified water and alcohol-containing stabilizers at the synthesis of nanoparticles via metals electric erosion in the liquid prevents the copper nanoparticles coagulation and significantly influences on their physicochemical characteristics and, consequently, antibacterial properties.

  4. [Influence of transcranial electromagnetic brain stimulation on development of conditioned reflex in rats].

    PubMed

    Samoilov, V O; Shadrin, E B; Filippova, E B; Katsnelson, Ya; Backhoff, H; Eventov, M

    2015-01-01

    The influence of transcranial electromagnetic stimulation on the development of an active avoidance reflex with painful reinforcement in laboratory rats is investigated. It is shown, that an exposure of the rats' brain to electromagnetic radiation in the millimeter range ((λ = 5,6 and 7,1 mm), modulated as a series of low-frequency pulses, leads to a suppression of the development of the conditioned avoidance reflex occurred in 50% of cases. In other 25% of cases irradiation leads to inhibition of reflex development. Transcranial electromagnetic stimulation after intraperitoneal injection of the blocking agent of serotonergic receptors (kitryl) has no influence on reflex development. Electromagnetic brain stimulation does not influence reflex retention in the case when it has been acquired. Based on the data obtained it is assumed that transcranial electromagnetic stimulation promotes the development of serotonin, exerting an inhibiting effect on the formation of temporal bindings of the studied conditioned reflex.

  5. The influence of initial and surface boundary conditions on a model-generated January climatology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, K. F.; Spar, J.

    1981-01-01

    The influence on a model-generated January climate of various surface boundary conditions, as well as initial conditions, was studied by using the GISS coarse-mesh climate model. Four experiments - two with water planets, one with flat continents, and one with mountains - were used to investigate the effects of initial conditions, and the thermal and dynamical effects of the surface on the model generated-climate. However, climatological mean zonal-symmetric sea surface temperature is used in all four runs over the model oceans. Moreover, zero ground wetness and uniform ground albedo except for snow are used in the last experiments.

  6. Estimation of water storage changes in small endorheic lakes in Burabay National Nature Park (Northern Kazakhstan, Central Asia); the effect of climate change and anthropogenic influences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yapiyev, Vadim; Sagintayev, Zhanay; Verhoef, Anne; Samarkhanov, Kanat; Jumassultanova, Saltanat

    2017-04-01

    Both climate change and anthropogenic activities contribute to deterioration of terrestrial water resources and ecosystems worldwide. It has been observed in recent decades that water-limited steppe regions of Central Asia are among ecosystems found to exhibit enhanced responses to climate variability. In fact, the largest share of worldwide net loss of permanent water extent is geographically concentrated in the Central Asia and Middle East regions attributed to both climate variability/change and human activities impacts. We used a digital elevation model, digitized bathymetry maps and high resolution Landsat images to estimate the areal water cover extent and volumetric storage changes in small terminal lakes in Burabay National Nature Park (BNNP), located in Northern Central Asia, for the period 2000-2016. Based on the analysis of long-term climatic data from meteorological stations, hydrometeorological network observations as well as regional climate model projections we evaluate the impacts of past thirty years and future climatic conditions on the water balance of BNNP lake catchments. The anthropogenic water consumption was estimated based on data collected at a local water supply company and regulation authorities. One the one hand historical in-situ observations and future climate projections do not show a significant change in precipitation in BNNP. On the other hand both observations and the model demonstrate steadily rising air temperatures in the area. It is concluded that the long-term decline in water levels for most of these lakes can be largely attributed to climate change (but only via changes in air temperature, causing evaporation to exceed precipitation) and not to direct anthropogenic influences such as increased water withdrawals. In addition, the two largest lakes, showing the highest historical water level decline, do not have sufficient water drainage basin area to sustain water levels under increased evaporation rates.

  7. Influence of Photospheric Magnetic Conditions on the Catastrophic Behaviors of Flux Ropes in Solar Active Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Quanhao; Wang, Yuming; Hu, Youqiu; Liu, Rui; Liu, Jiajia

    2017-02-01

    Since only the magnetic conditions at the photosphere can be routinely observed in current observations, it is of great significance to determine the influences of photospheric magnetic conditions on solar eruptive activities. Previous studies about catastrophe indicated that the magnetic system consisting of a flux rope in a partially open bipolar field is subject to catastrophe, but not if the bipolar field is completely closed under the same specified photospheric conditions. In order to investigate the influence of the photospheric magnetic conditions on the catastrophic behavior of this system, we expand upon the 2.5-dimensional ideal magnetohydrodynamic model in Cartesian coordinates to simulate the evolution of the equilibrium states of the system under different photospheric flux distributions. Our simulation results reveal that a catastrophe occurs only when the photospheric flux is not concentrated too much toward the polarity inversion line and the source regions of the bipolar field are not too weak; otherwise no catastrophe occurs. As a result, under certain photospheric conditions, a catastrophe could take place in a completely closed configuration, whereas it ceases to exist in a partially open configuration. This indicates that whether the background field is completely closed or partially open is not the only necessary condition for the existence of catastrophe, and that the photospheric conditions also play a crucial role in the catastrophic behavior of the flux rope system.

  8. Copper dynamics under alternating redox conditions is influenced by soil properties and contamination source.

    PubMed

    Balint, Ramona; Said-Pullicino, Daniel; Ajmone-Marsan, Franco

    2015-02-01

    Understanding the effect of soil redox conditions on contaminant dynamics is of significant importance for evaluating their lability, mobility and potential transfer to other environmental compartments. Under changing redox conditions, soil properties and constituents such as Fe and Mn (hydr)oxides and organic matter (OM) may influence the behavior of associated metallic elements (MEs). In this work, the redox-driven release and redistribution of Cu between different soil pools was studied in three soils having different contamination sources. This was achieved by subjecting soil columns to a series of alternating reducing and oxidizing cycles under non-limiting C conditions, and assessing their influence on soil pore water, leachate and solid phase composition. Results showed that, in all soils, alternating redox conditions led to an increase in the distribution of Cu in the more labile fractions, consequently enhancing its susceptibility to loss. This was generally linked to the redox-driven cycling of Fe, Mn and dissolved organic matter (DOM). In fact, results suggested that the reductive dissolution of Fe and Mn (hydr)oxides and subsequent reprecipitation as poorly-ordered phases under oxic conditions contributed to the release and mobilization of Cu and/or Cu-containing organometallic complexes. However, the behavior of Cu, as well as the mechanisms controlling Cu release and loss with redox cycling, was influenced by both soil properties (e.g. pH, contents of easily reducible Fe and Mn (hydr)oxides) and source of Cu contamination.

  9. Copper dynamics under alternating redox conditions is influenced by soil properties and contamination source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balint, Ramona; Said-Pullicino, Daniel; Ajmone-Marsan, Franco

    2015-02-01

    Understanding the effect of soil redox conditions on contaminant dynamics is of significant importance for evaluating their lability, mobility and potential transfer to other environmental compartments. Under changing redox conditions, soil properties and constituents such as Fe and Mn (hydr)oxides and organic matter (OM) may influence the behavior of associated metallic elements (MEs). In this work, the redox-driven release and redistribution of Cu between different soil pools was studied in three soils having different contamination sources. This was achieved by subjecting soil columns to a series of alternating reducing and oxidizing cycles under non-limiting C conditions, and assessing their influence on soil pore water, leachate and solid phase composition. Results showed that, in all soils, alternating redox conditions led to an increase in the distribution of Cu in the more labile fractions, consequently enhancing its susceptibility to loss. This was generally linked to the redox-driven cycling of Fe, Mn and dissolved organic matter (DOM). In fact, results suggested that the reductive dissolution of Fe and Mn (hydr)oxides and subsequent reprecipitation as poorly-ordered phases under oxic conditions contributed to the release and mobilization of Cu and/or Cu-containing organometallic complexes. However, the behavior of Cu, as well as the mechanisms controlling Cu release and loss with redox cycling, was influenced by both soil properties (e.g. pH, contents of easily reducible Fe and Mn (hydr)oxides) and source of Cu contamination.

  10. THE INFLUENCE OF FOLD AND FRACTURE DEVELOPMENT ON RESERVOIR BEHAVIOR OF THE LISBURNE GROUP OF NORTHERN ALASKA

    SciTech Connect

    Wesley K. Wallace; Catherine L. Hanks; Michael T. Whalen; Jerry Jensen; Paul K. Atkinson; Joseph S. Brinton

    2000-05-01

    The Lisburne Group is a major carbonate reservoir unit in northern Alaska. The Lisburne is detachment folded where it is exposed throughout the northeastern Brooks Range, but is relatively undeformed in areas of current production in the subsurface of the North Slope. The objectives of this study are to develop a better understanding of four major aspects of the Lisburne: (1) The geometry and kinematics of detachment folds and their truncation by thrust faults. (2) The influence of folding and lithostratigraphy on fracture patterns. (3) Lithostratigraphy and its influence on folding, faulting, fracturing, and reservoir characteristics. (4) The influence of lithostratigraphy and deformation on fluid flow. The results of field work during the summer of 1999 offer some preliminary insights: The Lisburne Limestone displays a range of symmetrical detachment fold geometries throughout the northeastern Brooks Range. The variation in fold geometry suggests a generalized progression in fold geometry with increasing shortening: Straight-limbed, narrow-crested folds at low shortening, box folds at intermediate shortening, and folds with a large height-to-width ratio and thickened hinges at high shortening. This sequence is interpreted to represent a progressive change in the dominant shortening mechanism from flexural-slip at low shortening to bulk strain at higher shortening. Structural variations in bed thickness occur throughout this progression. Parasitic folding accommodates structural thickening at low shortening and is gradually succeeded by penetrative strain as shortening increases. The amount of structural thickening at low to intermediate shortening may be inversely related to the local amount of structural thickening of the Kayak Shale, the incompetent unit that underlies the Lisburne. The Lisburne Limestone displays a different structural style in the south, across the boundary between the northeastern Brooks Range and the main axis of the Brooks Range fold

  11. Catchment and in-stream influences on iron-deposit chemistry, algal-bacterial biomass and invertebrate richness in upland streams, Northern Ireland.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macintosh, Katrina Ann; Griffiths, David

    2013-04-01

    The density and composition of upland stream bed iron-deposits is affected by physical, chemical and biological processes. The basic chemical processes producing ochre deposits are well known. Mobilisation of iron and manganese is influenced by bedrock weathering, the presence of acidic and/or reducing conditions and the concentration of dissolved organic carbon. Ferromanganese-depositing bacteria are significant biogenic agents and can cause/enhance the deposition of metals in streams as (hydr)oxides. Metal concentrations from stream waters in two geological blocks in Northern Ireland were compared to determine the contributions of catchment characteristics and in-stream conditions. One block is composed of metamorphosed schist and unconsolidated glacial drift, with peat or peaty podzol (mainly humic) soils, while the other block consists of tertiary basalt with brown earth and gley soils. Water samples were collected from 52 stream sites and analysed for iron, manganese and aluminium as well as a range of other chemical determinands known to affect metal solubility. Stone deposit material was analysed for metal concentrations, organic matter content and epilithic algae, chlorophyll a concentration. Invertebrates were collected by area-standardised kick samples and animals identified to family and numbers counted. Higher conductivities and concentrations of bicarbonate, alkalinity, calcium and magnesium occurred on basalt than on schist. Despite higher iron and manganese oxide concentrations in basalt-derived non-humic soils, stream water concentrations were much lower and stone deposit concentrations only one third of those occurring on schist overlain by humic soils. Peat-generated acidity and the limited acid neutralising capacity of base-poor metamorphosed schist has resulted in elevated concentrations of metals and ochre deposit in surface waters. Algal biomass was determined by catchment level factors whereas in-stream conditions affected bacterial biomass

  12. Regional forest landscape restoration priorities: Integrating historical conditions and an uncertain future in the northern Rocky Mountains

    Treesearch

    Barry L. Bollenbacher; Russell T. Graham; Keith M. Reynolds

    2014-01-01

    National law and policy direct the management of the National Forests, with restoring resilient forest conditions being an overarching theme. Climate is a major driver of disturbances that affect ecosystems, especially those with vegetation that show large departures from historical conditions. Drought, fire, insects, and diseases are common forest stressors whose...

  13. THE INFLUENCE OF FOLD AND FRACTURE DEVELOPMENT ON RESERVOIR BEHAVIOR OF THE LISBURNE GROUP OF NORTHERN ALASKA

    SciTech Connect

    Wesley K. Wallace; Catherine L. Hanks; Jerry Jensen; Michael T. Whalen

    2002-01-01

    The Carboniferous Lisburne Group is a major carbonate reservoir unit in northern Alaska. The Lisburne is detachment folded where it is exposed throughout the northeastern Brooks Range, but is relatively undeformed in areas of current production in the subsurface of the North Slope. The objectives of this study are to develop a better understanding of four major aspects of the Lisburne: (1) The geometry and kinematics of detachment folds and their truncation by thrust faults. (2) The influence of folding on fracture patterns. (3) The influence of deformation on fluid flow. (4) Lithostratigraphy and its influence on folding, faulting, fracturing, and reservoir characteristics. The Lisburne in the main axis of the Brooks Range is characteristically deformed into imbricate thrust sheets with asymmetrical hanging wall anticlines and footwall synclines. In contrast, the Lisburne in the northeastern Brooks Range is characterized by symmetrical detachment folds. The focus of our 2000 field studies was at the boundary between these structural styles in the vicinity of Porcupine Lake, in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge. The northern edge of thrust-truncated folds in Lisburne is marked by a local range front that likely represents an eastward continuation of the central Brooks Range front. This is bounded to the north by a gently dipping panel of Lisburne with local asymmetrical folds. The leading edge of the flat panel is thrust over Permian to Cretaceous rocks in a synclinal depression. These younger rocks overlie symmetrically detachment-folded Lisburne, as is extensively exposed to the north. Six partial sections were measured in the Lisburne of the flat panel and local range front. The Lisburne here is about 700 m thick and is interpreted to consist primarily of the Wachsmuth and Alapah Limestones, with only a thin veneer of Wahoo Limestone. The Wachsmuth (200 m) is gradational between the underlying Missippian Kayak Shale and the overlying Mississippian Alapah, and

  14. Heat budget for a waste lift placed under freezing conditions at a landfill operated in a northern climate.

    PubMed

    Bonany, James E; Van Geel, Paul J; Burak Gunay, H; Burkan Isgor, O

    2013-05-01

    A landfill operated in Ste. Sophie, Québec, Canada was instrumented to better understand the waste stabilization process in northern climates. Instrument bundles were placed within the waste to monitor temperature, settlement, oxygen, moisture content, total load, mounding of leachate and electrical conductivity. A finite element model was developed to simulate the heat budget for the first waste lift placed in the winter months and was calibrated using the first 10.5 months of collected temperature data. The calibrated model was then used to complete a sensitivity analysis for the various parameters that impact the heat budget. The results of the analysis indicated that the heat required for phase change to thaw the liquid fraction within frozen waste had a significant impact on the heat budget causing sections of waste to remain frozen throughout the simulation period. This was supported by the data collected to date at Ste. Sophie and by other researchers indicating that frozen waste placed during the winter months can remain frozen for periods in access of 1.5 years.

  15. Recent and pre-instrumental climatic conditions as reconstructed from temperature logs in wells in western and northern Canada

    SciTech Connect

    Majorowicz, J.A.; Skinner, W.R.

    1997-11-01

    This study reports a subregional analysis of ground surface temperature (GST) and surface air temperature (SAT) in Canada. Temperature logs made to depths of up to 300 m in 80 wells in the Canadian Prairie Provinces were compared with SAT in this area. A statistically significant spatial correlation was found between identical grid samples extracted from the 1950-1990 warming maps for SAT and GST warming. The results of modelling of precise temperature logs show evidence of annual warming of GST over the past half century of 2.1 C with a standard deviation of 0.9C. Annual SAT warming in this region for the same period, as derived from historical climatological records, has been 1.5C with a standard deviation of 0.4C. The difference between GST and SAT warming has been close to 40% in the boreal forest ecozone of northern Alberta and less than 10% in the prairie grassland ecozone of southern Alberta. It is hypothesized that a large portion of GST warming is a result of accelerating natural and anthropogenic land clearing through deforestation and farming. If the rate of climatic warming and anthropogenic change to the land surface continues, the southern boundary of the discontinuous permafrost will move northward at a faster rate than predicted from instrumental SAT warming data alone. 21 refs., 7 figs.

  16. Influence of culture conditions for clinically isolated non-albicans Candida biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Tan, Yulong; Leonhard, Matthias; Ma, Su; Schneider-Stickler, Berit

    2016-11-01

    Non-albicans Candida species have been isolated in increasing numbers in patients. Moreover, they are adept at forming biofilms. This study analyzed biofilm formation of clinically isolated non-albicans Candida, including Candida tropicalis, Candida krusei and Candida parapsilosis under the influence of different growth media (RPMI 1640, YPD and BHI) and several culture variables (inoculum concentration, incubation period and feeding conditions). The results showed that culture conditions strongly influenced non-albicans Candida species biofilm formation. YPD and BHI resulted in larger amount of biofilm formation with higher metabolic activity of biofilms. Furthermore, the growth media seems to have varying effects on adhesion and biofilm development. Growth conditions may also influence biofilm formation, which was enhanced when starting the culture with a larger inoculum, longer incubation period and using a fed-batch system. Therefore, the potential influences of external environmental factors should be considered when studying the non-albicans Candida biofilms in vitro. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. The spatial structure of bacterial communities is influenced by historical environmental conditions.

    PubMed

    Andersson, Martin G I; Berga, Mercè; Lindström, Eva S; Langenheder, Silke

    2014-05-01

    The spatial structure of ecological communities, including that of bacteria, is often influenced by species sorting by contemporary environmental conditions. Moreover, historical processes, i.e., ecological and evolutionary events that have occurred at some point in the past, such as dispersal limitation, drift, priority effects, or selection by past environmental conditions, can be important, but are generally investigated much less. Here, we conducted a field study using 16 rock pools, where we specifically compared the importance of past vs. contemporary environmental conditions for bacterial community structure by correlating present differences in bacterial community composition among pools to environmental conditions measured on the same day, as well as to those measured 2, 4, 6, and 8 d earlier. The results prove that selection by past environmental conditions exists, since we were able to show that bacterial communities are, to a greater extent, an imprint of past compared to contemporary environmental conditions. We suggest that this is the result of a combination of different mechanisms, including priority effects that cause rapid adaptation to new environmental conditions of taxa that have been initially selected by past environmental conditions, and slower rates of turnover in community composition compared to environmental conditions.

  18. Influences of initial launch conditions on flight performance of high altitude balloon ascending process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yi; Liu, Dongxu

    2015-08-01

    Influences of initial launch conditions on flight performance are addressed for the high altitude balloon ascending process. A novel dynamic model was established to describe thermodynamic and kinetic characteristics of balloon which consists of atmospheric, thermal and dynamic submodels. Based on the model, ascending processes of a high altitude balloon under different initial launch conditions were simulated. The initial launch conditions were classified into three types: inflating quantity, launch time and launch position. The ascending velocity and the differential pressure were defined and used as evaluation parameters of flight performance. Results showed that the inflating quantity is the most effective factor for ascending process, and the upper and lower limits were also proposed separately from safety and performance perspectives. For both launch time and launch location conditions, different solar radiation is the main effect approach during ascending process. Specifically, the influence mechanism of launch time in one day and launch longitude are completely identical due to the Earth's rotation. Results also showed that the sunset process is the optimal selection for safety of balloon and efficient utilization of solar energy. Due to the Earth's revolution, the influence mechanism of launch date and launch latitude are identical and the effects are more seasonal and less effective. Launch time and location should be considered comprehensively in practical operation of ballooning.

  19. Body size and condition influence migration timing of juvenile Arctic grayling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heim, Kurt C.; Wipfli, Mark S.; Whitman, Matthew S.; Seitz, Andrew C

    2016-01-01

    Freshwater fishes utilising seasonally available habitats within annual migratory circuits time movements out of such habitats with changing hydrology, although individual attributes of fish may also mediate the behavioural response to environmental conditions. We tagged juvenile Arctic grayling in a seasonally flowing stream on the Arctic Coastal Plain in Alaska and recorded migration timing towards overwintering habitat. We examined the relationship between individual migration date, and fork length (FL) and body condition index (BCI) for fish tagged in June, July and August in three separate models. Larger fish migrated earlier; however, only the August model suggested a significant relationship with BCI. In this model, 42% of variability in migration timing was explained by FL and BCI, and fish in better condition were predicted to migrate earlier than those in poor condition. Here, the majority (33%) of variability was captured by FL with an additional 9% attributable to BCI. We also noted strong seasonal trends in BCI reflecting overwinter mass loss and subsequent growth within the study area. These results are interpreted in the context of size and energetic state-specific risks of overwinter starvation and mortality (which can be very high in the Arctic), which may influence individuals at greater risk to extend summer foraging in a risky, yet prey rich, habitat. Our research provides further evidence that heterogeneity among individuals within a population can influence migratory behaviour and identifies potential risks to late season migrants in Arctic beaded stream habitats influenced by climate change and petroleum development.

  20. Influence of thermal boundary conditions on convection and dynamos in early and present earth-like cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hori, K.; Wicht, J.; Dietrich, W.; Christensen, U. R.

    2012-12-01

    The early dynamos of Earth and Mars probably operated without an inner core being present. They were thus exclusively driven by secular cooling and radiogenic heating, whereas the present geodynamo is thought to be predominantly driven by buoyancy fluxes which arise from the release of latent heat and the compositional enrichment associated with inner core solidification. Dynamo simulations model the secular cooling by volumetric internal buoyancy sources and the inner core-related driving by bottom sources. The impact of the inner core growth on the ancient geodynamo has been discussed extensively but is still controversial. As for Mars, the Mars Global Surveyor detected a strong northern-southern dichotomy in the crustal magnetization. A scenario proposed so far is due to such an ancient dynamo, where thermal heterogeneities at the core mantle boundary (CMB) were imposed by the lower mantle structure. A key issue here is how easily influence of the boundary anomalies emerges. Here we show that the dynamos without inner core solidification are much more sensitive to the CMB heat flows imposed by the lower mantle structure. We compare three-dimensional convection-driven MHD dynamo simulations either driven by homogeneously distributed internal heat sources or by buoyancy sources at the inner core boundary (ICB). Several different boundary heat-flux patterns are used. The effects are found even when boundaries are homogeneous. The impact of the outer boundary condition, fixed temperature or fixed heat flux, is large when convection is predominantly driven by volumetric internal heating. In the dynamos driven by ICB buoyancy sources, the lower boundary condition becomes more important. In both cases, a fixed flux condition promotes larger convective scales than a fixed temperature condition. A dipolar magnetic field can further increase the flow scale. This different sensitivity may also extend to cases when CMB heat flows are laterally inhomogeneous. In the dynamos

  1. Coastal dynamics under conditions of rapid sea-level rise: Late Pleistocene to Early Holocene evolution of barrier lagoon systems on the northern Adriatic shelf (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Storms, Joep E. A.; Weltje, Gert Jan; Terra, Guido J.; Cattaneo, Antonio; Trincardi, Fabio

    2008-06-01

    This multidisciplinary case study of two preserved barrier systems combined the analysis of radiocarbon datings, grain-size distributions, high-resolution seismics, and shelf bathymetry with reconstructions of palaeo-environmental conditions (tides, waves, sea-level change) and forward modelling of barrier-lagoon systems, to provide an integrated view of the coastal transgressive evolution of a large sector of the northern Adriatic shelf between 15 and 8 ka BP. Palaeo-environmental reconstructions point to increased tidal amplitude, low-energy wave climate and high rates of sea-level rise (up to 60 mm/a) during the formation of the oldest preserved barrier system (˜90 m water depth; 14.3 cal ka BP). A younger barrier system (42 m water depth; 10.5 cal ka BP) formed under conditions of lower tidal amplitude, higher wave energy and a lower rate of sea-level rise (10 mm/a). Forward modelling suggests that the probability of barrier-island overstepping during transgression is inversely proportional to tidal amplitude, if all other factors are assumed equal. The oldest barrier-lagoon system developed under conditions of large tidal amplitude, which permitted rapid transgression. However, this system apparently failed to keep up with the anomalously high rate of sea-level rise resulting from melt-water pulse 1A. The youngest barrier system appears to have drowned in place due to antecedent topography. As the barrier system transgressed over an ancient Pleistocene alluvial plain, the rapid increase in backbarrier accommodation caused an abrupt disequilibrium between shoreface and backbarrier sedimentation, which led to barrier overstepping. Although BarSim modelling indicates that tidal deposition can reduce the probability of barrier overstepping, there are other driving mechanisms (in our case extremely rapid sea-level rise and antecedent topography), which are more determinative in explaining the transgressive coastal evolution of barrier-lagoon systems in the

  2. The influence of Ryukyu subduction on magma genesis in the Northern Taiwan Volcanic Zone and Middle Okinawa Trough - Evidence from boron isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pi, Ju-Lien; You, Chen-Feng; Wang, Kuo-Lung

    2016-09-01

    Boron (B) is an excellent geochemical tracer for investigating crustal recycling processes at convergent margins, due to its high fluid mobility under high P-T conditions, distinct elemental abundances and isotopic compositions in the mantle wedge and subducting slabs. The Northern Taiwan Volcanic Zone (NTVZ), wherein the nature of magma genesis has long been a topic of debate, is located at the rear side of the Okinawa Trough (OT), an atypical back-arc rift in the Ryukyu subduction system. In this study, B and B isotopes (δ11B) were measured in 19 volcanic rocks collected from the NTVZ and the middle Okinawa Trough (MOT) to assess the influence of the Ryukyu subduction system on magma genesis. The B concentrations in the MOT and NTVZ volcanic rocks are 5.8 to 13.6 mg/L and 2.2 to 48.6 mg/L, respectively. The large B abundances variation in the NTVZ was caused mainly by variable degrees of partial melting. The Nb/B and δ11B in the MOT have small ranges of 0.5 to 0.6 and - 2.7‰ to 0.2‰, respectively, whereas they range widely from 0.4 to 2.5 and from - 8.6‰ to 2.4‰, respectively in the NTVZ. These Nb/B values suggest that the magma contains a smaller subduction component than that normally observed in arcs, although this component is still more substantial than in a typical back-arc setting. The δ11B results indicate insignificant influence of the subducting Philippine Sea Plate at 2.6 Ma, but it becomes more substantial later in the NTVZ. The mixing proportions of sediment derived fluids in onshore volcanoes in the NTVZ imply a rather heterogeneous mantle wedge near the plate boundary, most likely due to either a heterogeneous source of slab derived fluids or more complicated mantle flow. A substantial B flux from the subducting slab in the incipient back-arc rifting in the MOT and NTVZ may reflect characteristics of a cold, steep and fast subducting slab, which may be capable of carrying volatiles efficiently into greater depth in subduction zones. The

  3. Fertilization of Northern Hardwoods

    Treesearch

    R. Lea; D.G. Brockway

    1986-01-01

    Northern hardwoods grow over a considerable range of climatic and edaphic conditions and exhibit a wide range in productivity.Many northern hardwood forests are capable of high production relative to other forest types, but are often slow to reach maximum productivity because of low nutrient availability.Altering the patterns of biomass accumulation so that managers...

  4. The influence of soil gas transport properties on methane oxidation in a selection of northern European soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ball, B. C.; Smith, K. A.; Klemedtsson, L.; Brumme, R.; Sitaula, B. K.; Hansen, S.; Priemé, A.; MacDonald, J.; Horgan, G. W.

    1997-10-01

    The oxidation of atmospheric methane in soils was measured in situ at a selection of sites in northern Europe, mainly under forest but also under moorland and agricultural arable land and grassland. Our objective was to examine how land use, soil type, and location affected methane oxidation through their impact on gas diffusivity and air permeability. Gas diffusivity at the soil surface and, in some cases, after removal of any surface organic layer was measured in situ using Freon-22 tracer in a portable probe. For about half of the sites, gas diffusivity was also measured in intact topsoil core samples in the laboratory using krypton 85. Air permeability and porosity were also measured on these cores. Although the method of measurement of CH4 oxidation varied between sites, the same techniques were used to measure soil physical properties at all sites. CH4 oxidation rates ranged from 0 to 2.5 mg m-2 d-1. Diffusivity also covered a very wide range, being lowest in loam cores from wet grassland in Norway and highest in relatively dry, sandy soils in Denmark and Scotland. CH4 oxidation tended to increase with gas diffusivity measured in situ at the soil surface, though the relationship was poor at high diffusivities, presumably because CH4 oxidation was not limited by diffusion. Removal of the surface organic layer reduced in situ diffusivity at the surface and improved its relationship with CH4 oxidation rate. Sites where soils had well-developed structure and a loose and permeable organic layer at the surface tended to have the highest CH4 oxidation rates. Core measurements, particularly of air permeability, could not be obtained at some sites owing to the inability to take suitable samples. Diffusivity measured in cores generally decreased with increasing depth of sampling in the topsoil, with the 50-to 100-mm depth giving the best correlation with CH4 uptake; cores from within this layer also gave the highest CH4 oxidation during laboratory incubation. Effective

  5. Influence of Water Temperature and Salinity on Vibrio vulnificus in Northern Gulf and Atlantic Coast Oysters (Crassostrea virginica)

    PubMed Central

    Motes, M. L.; DePaola, A.; Cook, D. W.; Veazey, J. E.; Hunsucker, J. C.; Garthright, W. E.; Blodgett, R. J.; Chirtel, S. J.

    1998-01-01

    This study investigated the temperature and salinity parameters associated with waters and oysters linked to food-borne Vibrio vulnificus infections. V. vulnificus was enumerated in oysters collected at three northern Gulf Coast sites and two Atlantic Coast sites from July 1994 through September 1995. Two of these sites, Black Bay, La., and Apalachicola Bay, Fla., are the source of the majority of the oysters implicated in V. vulnificus cases. Oysters in all Gulf Coast sites exhibited a similar seasonal distribution of V. vulnificus: a consistently large number (median concentration, 2,300 organisms [most probable number] per g of oyster meat) from May through October followed by a gradual reduction during November and December to ≤10 per g, where it remained from January through mid-March, and a sharp increase in late March and April to summer levels. V. vulnificus was undetectable (<3 per g) in oysters from the North and South Carolina sites for most of the year. An exception occurred when a late-summer flood caused a drop in salinity in the North Carolina estuary, apparently causing V. vulnificus numbers to increase briefly to Gulf Coast levels. At Gulf Coast sites, V. vulnificus numbers increased with water temperatures up to 26°C and were constant at higher temperatures. High V. vulnificus levels (>103 per g) were typically found in oysters from intermediate salinities (5 to 25 ppt). Smaller V. vulnificus numbers (<102 per g) were found at salinities above 28 ppt, typical of Atlantic Coast sites. On 11 occasions oysters were sampled at times and locations near the source of oysters implicated in 13 V. vulnificus cases; the V. vulnificus levels and environmental parameters associated with these samples were consistent with those of other study samples collected from the Gulf Coast from April through November. These findings suggest that the hazard of V. vulnificus infection is not limited to brief periods of unusual abundance of V. vulnificus in Gulf Coast

  6. Influence of sound-conditioning on noise-induced susceptibility of distortion-product otoacoustic emissions.

    PubMed

    Luebke, Anne E; Stagner, Barden B; Martin, Glen K; Lonsbury-Martin, Brenda L

    2015-07-01

    Cochlear damage caused by loud sounds can be attenuated by "sound-conditioning" methods. The amount of adaptation for distortion product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAEs) measured in alert rabbits previously predicted an ear's susceptibility to a subsequent noise exposure. The present study investigated if sound-conditioning influenced the robustness of such DPOAE adaptation, and if such conditioning elicited more protection by increasing the amount of DPOAE adaptation. Toward this end, rabbits were divided into two study groups: (1) experimental animals exposed to a sound-conditioning protocol, and (2) unconditioned control animals. After base-line measures, all rabbits were exposed to an overstimulation paradigm consisting of an octave band noise, and then re-assessed 3 weeks post-exposure to determine permanent changes in DPOAEs. A major result was that prior sound-conditioning protected reductions in DPOAE levels by an average of 10-15 dB. However, DPOAE adaptation decreased with sound-conditioning, so that such conditioning was no longer related to noise-induced reductions in DPOAEs. Together, these findings suggest that sound-conditioning affected neural pathways other than those that likely mediate DPOAE adaptation (e.g., medial olivocochlear efferent and/or middle-ear muscle reflexes).

  7. Do conditional cash transfers influence migration? A study using experimental data from the Mexican PROGRESA program.

    PubMed

    Stecklov, Guy; Winters, Paul; Stampini, Marco; Davis, Benjamin

    2005-11-01

    Prior research on Mexican migration has shown that social networks and economic incentives play an important role in determining migration outcomes. We use experimental data from PROGRESA, Mexico's primary poverty-reduction program, to evaluate the effects of conditional cash transfers on migration both domestically and to the United States. Our study complements a growing body of literature aimed at overcoming longstanding hurdles to the establishment of causal validity in empirical studies of migration. Analysis based on the data collected before and after the program's onset shows that conditional transfers reduce U.S. migration but not domestic migration. The data also enable us to explore the role of existing family and community migration networks. The results show that migration networks strongly influence migration, but that the effect of conditional transfers on migration is apparently not mediated by existing migration network structures. Our results suggest that conditional transfers may be helpful in managing rural out-migration, particularly to the United States.

  8. Genotypic influence on aversive conditioning in honeybees, using a novel thermal reinforcement procedure.

    PubMed

    Junca, Pierre; Carcaud, Julie; Moulin, Sibyle; Garnery, Lionel; Sandoz, Jean-Christophe

    2014-01-01

    In Pavlovian conditioning, animals learn to associate initially neutral stimuli with positive or negative outcomes, leading to appetitive and aversive learning respectively. The honeybee (Apis mellifera) is a prominent invertebrate model for studying both versions of olfactory learning and for unraveling the influence of genotype. As a queen bee mates with about 15 males, her worker offspring belong to as many, genetically-different patrilines. While the genetic dependency of appetitive learning is well established in bees, it is not the case for aversive learning, as a robust protocol was only developed recently. In the original conditioning of the sting extension response (SER), bees learn to associate an odor (conditioned stimulus - CS) with an electric shock (unconditioned stimulus - US). This US is however not a natural stimulus for bees, which may represent a potential caveat for dissecting the genetics underlying aversive learning. We thus first tested heat as a potential new US for SER conditioning. We show that thermal stimulation of several sensory structures on the bee's body triggers the SER, in a temperature-dependent manner. Moreover, heat applied to the antennae, mouthparts or legs is an efficient US for SER conditioning. Then, using microsatellite analysis, we analyzed heat sensitivity and aversive learning performances in ten worker patrilines issued from a naturally inseminated queen. We demonstrate a strong influence of genotype on aversive learning, possibly indicating the existence of a genetic determinism of this capacity. Such determinism could be instrumental for efficient task partitioning within the hive.

  9. Genotypic Influence on Aversive Conditioning in Honeybees, Using a Novel Thermal Reinforcement Procedure

    PubMed Central

    Junca, Pierre; Carcaud, Julie; Moulin, Sibyle; Garnery, Lionel; Sandoz, Jean-Christophe

    2014-01-01

    In Pavlovian conditioning, animals learn to associate initially neutral stimuli with positive or negative outcomes, leading to appetitive and aversive learning respectively. The honeybee (Apis mellifera) is a prominent invertebrate model for studying both versions of olfactory learning and for unraveling the influence of genotype. As a queen bee mates with about 15 males, her worker offspring belong to as many, genetically-different patrilines. While the genetic dependency of appetitive learning is well established in bees, it is not the case for aversive learning, as a robust protocol was only developed recently. In the original conditioning of the sting extension response (SER), bees learn to associate an odor (conditioned stimulus - CS) with an electric shock (unconditioned stimulus - US). This US is however not a natural stimulus for bees, which may represent a potential caveat for dissecting the genetics underlying aversive learning. We thus first tested heat as a potential new US for SER conditioning. We show that thermal stimulation of several sensory structures on the bee’s body triggers the SER, in a temperature-dependent manner. Moreover, heat applied to the antennae, mouthparts or legs is an efficient US for SER conditioning. Then, using microsatellite analysis, we analyzed heat sensitivity and aversive learning performances in ten worker patrilines issued from a naturally inseminated queen. We demonstrate a strong influence of genotype on aversive learning, possibly indicating the existence of a genetic determinism of this capacity. Such determinism could be instrumental for efficient task partitioning within the hive. PMID:24828422

  10. The contact condition influence on stability and energy efficiency of quadruped robot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Jingtao; Wang, Tianmiao; Gao, Feng

    2008-10-01

    Quadruped robot has attribute of serial and parallel manipulator with multi-loop mechanism, with more DOF of each leg and intermittent contact with ground during walking, the trot gait of quadruped robot belongs to dynamic waking, compared to the crawl gait, the walking speed is higher, but the robot becomes unstable, it is difficult to keep dynamically stable walking. In this paper, we mainly analyze the condition for the quadruped robot to realize dynamically stable walking, establish centroid orbit equation based on ZMP (Zero Moment Point) stability theory, on the other hand , we study contact impact and friction influence on stability and energy efficiency. Because of the periodic contact between foots and ground, the contact impact and friction are considered to establish spring-damp nonlinear dynamics model. Robot need to be controlled to meet ZMP stability condition and contact constraint condition. Based on the virtual prototyping model, we study control algorithm considering contact condition, the contact compensator and friction compensator are adopted. The contact force and the influence of different contact conditions on the energy efficiency during whole gait cycle are obtained.

  11. Significant Influences on Nature Experiences: A Comparative Study of Southern German and Northern Spanish Pupils Aged 14-15

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zecha, Stefanie

    2015-01-01

    An understanding of the current situation of nature experiences among adolescents is of critical importance for the protection of nature. The participants of this study are 14-15 year-old pupils from Bavaria (Southern Germany) and Asturias (Northern Spain). In particular, the author was interested in a) the level of outdoor experiences of each…

  12. Establishing northern red oak on a degraded upland site in northeastern Pennsylvania: Influence of seedling pedigree and quality

    Treesearch

    Cornelia C. Pinchot; Thomas J. Hall; Scott E. Schlarbaum; Arnold M. Saxton; James. Bailey

    2017-01-01

    Enrichment plantings using large oak seedlings of regional sources may promote superior survival and growth compared to direct seeding or standard nursery seedling material. This study evaluated the survival and growth of planted 1-0 northern red oak (Quercus rubra L.) seedlings among 11 families and 3 seedling size classes (small, average, and...

  13. SAND FLUX IN THE NORTHERN CHIHUAHUAN DESERT, NEW MEXICO, USA, AND THE INFLUENCE OF MESQUITE-DOMINATED LANDSCAPES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study was designed to test two hypotheses: (1) that land dominated by mesquite (Prosopis glandulosa) is the most important area for active sand movement at the Jornada Experimental Range, located in the northern part of the Chihuahuan desert, and (2) that the most active san...

  14. Emergy evaluation of benthic ecosystems influenced by upwelling in northern Chile: Contributions of the ecosystems to the regional economy

    EPA Science Inventory

    Emergy evaluations of three benthic ecosystem networks found in Mejillones, Antofagasta and Tongoy Bays, located on the coast of northern Chile, were carried out with the intent of documenting the contributions of these coastal ecosystems to the economy. The productivity of these...

  15. SAND FLUX IN THE NORTHERN CHIHUAHUAN DESERT, NEW MEXICO, USA, AND THE INFLUENCE OF MESQUITE-DOMINATED LANDSCAPES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study was designed to test two hypotheses: (1) that land dominated by mesquite (Prosopis glandulosa) is the most important area for active sand movement at the Jornada Experimental Range, located in the northern part of the Chihuahuan desert, and (2) that the most active san...

  16. Performance of the Forest Vegetation Simulator in managed white spruce plantations influenced by eastern spruce budworm in northern Minnesota

    Treesearch

    Matthew B. Russell; Anthony W. D' Amato; Michael A. Albers; Christopher W. Woodall; Klaus J. Puettmann; Michael R. Saunders; Curtis L. VanderSchaaf

    2015-01-01

    Silvicultural strategies such as thinning may minimize productivity losses from a variety of forest disturbances, including forest insects. This study analyzed the 10-year postthinning response of stands and individual trees in thinned white spruce (Picea glauca [Moench] Voss) plantations in northern Minnesota, USA, with light to moderate defoliation...

  17. Significant Influences on Nature Experiences: A Comparative Study of Southern German and Northern Spanish Pupils Aged 14-15

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zecha, Stefanie

    2015-01-01

    An understanding of the current situation of nature experiences among adolescents is of critical importance for the protection of nature. The participants of this study are 14-15 year-old pupils from Bavaria (Southern Germany) and Asturias (Northern Spain). In particular, the author was interested in a) the level of outdoor experiences of each…

  18. Topological quantum scattering under the influence of a nontrivial boundary condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mota, Herondy

    2016-04-01

    We consider the quantum scattering problem of a relativistic particle in (2 + 1)-dimensional cosmic string spacetime under the influence of a nontrivial boundary condition imposed on the solution of the Klein-Gordon equation. The solution is then shifted as consequence of the nontrivial boundary condition and the role of the phase shift is to produce an Aharonov-Bohm-like effect. We examine the connection between this phase shift and the electromagnetic and gravitational analogous of the Aharonov-Bohm effect and compare the present results with previous ones obtained in the literature, also considering non-relativistic cases.

  19. Influence of Chemical Conditions on the Nanoporous Structure of Silicate Aerogels

    PubMed Central

    Sinkó, Katalin

    2010-01-01

    Silica or various silicate aerogels can be characterized by highly porous, open cell, low density structures. The synthesis parameters influence the three-dimensional porous structures by modifying the kinetics and mechanism of hydrolysis and condensation processes. Numerous investigations have shown that the structure of porous materials can be tailored by variations in synthesis conditions (e.g., the type of precursors, catalyst, and surfactants; the ratio of water/precursor; the concentrations; the medium pH; and the solvent). The objectives of this review are to summarize and elucidate the effects of chemical conditions on the nanoporous structure of sol-gel derived silicate aerogels.

  20. Influence of Experimental Conditions on Electronic Tongue Results—Case of Valsartan Minitablets Dissolution

    PubMed Central

    Wesoły, Małgorzata; Kluk, Anna; Sznitowska, Małgorzata; Ciosek, Patrycja; Wróblewski, Wojciech

    2016-01-01

    A potentiometric electronic tongue was applied to study the release of valsartan from pharmaceutical formulations, i.e., minitablets uncoated and coated with Eudragit E. Special attention was paid to evaluate the influence of medium temperature and composition, as well as to compare the performances of the sensor arrays working in various hydrodynamic conditions. The drug dissolution profiles registered with the ion-sensitive electrodes were compared with standard dissolution tests performed with USP Apparatus 2 (paddle). Moreover, the signal changes of all sensors were processed by principal component analysis to visualize the release modifications, related to the presence of the coating agent. Finally, the importance and influence of the experimental conditions on the results obtained using potentiometric sensor arrays were discussed. PMID:27563904

  1. Observations on the Influence of Tool-Sheet Contact Conditions on an Incremental Forming Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durante, M.; Formisano, A.; Langella, A.

    2011-08-01

    The influence of tool-sheet contact conditions on features such as surface roughness, forming force, and formability was evaluated for components produced by incremental forming, a highly flexible innovative sheet metal-forming process. Experimental tests were carried out on sheets of AA7075T0 to create two types of component: pyramid frusta (for the evaluation of roughness and force) and cone frusta (for the evaluation of formability). Four different types of tool-sheet contact were analyzed, using two types of tool. From the experimental tests, the influence on the surface finishing and on the trend of the forming forces depending on contact type was revealed. Contact types do not, however, influence sheet formability.

  2. Influence of meteorological conditions on correlation between aerosol and cloud in summer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Lamei; Zhang, Jiahua; Yao, Fengmei; Han, Xinlei; Igbawua, Tertsea; Liu, Yuqin; Zhang, Da

    2017-04-01

    Aerosols can affect the atmospheric radiation balance through direct and indirect effects. The formation and development of cloud and precipitation influenced by aerosols differ significantly from each other in different meteorological conditions. In this work, we used the MODIS's daily Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD), Cloud Effective Radius (CER), Cloud Top Temperature (CTT), Cloud Water Path (CWP) and ECMWF's Relative Humidity (RH), Vertical Velocity (VV) and Horizontal Wind (HW) (from 2005 to 2008) to reveal the influence of meteorological factors on the distribution of aerosols, and also the correlation between aerosols and clouds. The study was designed in such a way that, the RH, VV, Upwind (UW), Downwind (DW) and CWP were divided into several intervals, to quantify the relationship between AOD and CER by controlling one single variable or two comprehensive variables over the mountains and plains. At the same time, the effect of wind speed and direction on polluted conditions was analyzed through the superposed spatial distribution map of wind and AOD. The conclusions are as follows: (1) The wind coming from mountains dispelled aerosols while the sea breeze invigorated aerosols, and the upwind showed a markedly negative relevance with AOD. (2) The strong upwind contributed to the positive relationship between AOD and CER, and the correlation rose by 38% after excluding the condition where CWP < 34 g/m2. (3) For the horizontal wind, only the zonal wind over the plains had obvious effects on the correlation, while the meridonal wind did not show evident influence. (4) For the plains, when CWP values were within the interval of 0-34 g/m2 and 74-150 g/m2, the correlation was positive, while in 34-74 g/m2, it was negative. However, it is generally positive either over the mountains or in clean conditions. Moreover, the influence of RH on the correlation was consistent with that of CWP.

  3. Influence of boundary conditions and plate geometries on buckling optimization of symmetric laminate plates

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, H.T.

    1995-12-31

    The buckling resistance of symmetrically laminated plates with a given material system and subjected to uniaxial compression is maximized with respect to fiber orientations by using a sequential linear programming method together with a simple move-limit strategy. Significant influence of plate thicknesses, aspect ratios, central circular cutouts and end conditions on the optimal fiber orientations and the associated optimal buckling loads of symmetrically laminated plates has been shown through this investigation.

  4. Influence of temper condition on the nonlinear stress-strain behavior of boron-aluminum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennedy, J. M.; Herakovich, E. T.; Tenney, D. R.

    1977-01-01

    The influence of temper condition on the tensile and compressive stress-strain behavior for six boron-aluminum laminates was investigated. In addition to monotonic tension and compression tests, tension-tension, compression-compression, and tension--compression tests were conducted to study the effects of cyclic loading. Tensile strength results are a function of the laminate configuration; unidirectional laminates were affected considerably more than other laminates with some strength values increasing and others decreasing.

  5. Long-term monthly statistics of mid-latitudinal NmF2 in the Northern geographic hemisphere during geomagnetically quiet and steadily low solar activity conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlov, Anatoli; Pavlova, Nadezhda

    2016-07-01

    Long-term mid-latitude hourly values of NmF2 measured in 1957-2015 by 10 ionosondes (Point Arguello, Wallops Is., Boulder, de l'Ebre, Rome, Ottawa, Pruhonice, Dourbes, Slough, and Juliusruh) in the Northern geographic hemisphere were processed to select periods of geomagnetically quiet and low solar activity conditions to calculate several descriptive statistics of the noon NmF2 for each month, including the mathematical expectation, most probable value, arithmetic average, and arithmetic average median. The month-to-month variability of these descriptors allowed us to identify months of a year when they reach their extremes (maxima, minima). The calculated month-to-month variations of the NmF2 statistical parameters made it possible to study the winter anomaly and spring-autumn asymmetry in these statistical parameters.

  6. Environmental conditions of 2 river drainages into the Northern Gulf of Mexico during successful hatching of Alabama shad (Alosa alabamae)

    Treesearch

    Paul F. Mickle; Jacob F. Schaefer; Susan B. Adams; Brian R. Kreiser; Wiliam T. Slack

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, the Alabama shad (Alosa alabamae) has experienced dramatic declines and extirpations from portions of its native range. Habitat degradation and barriers to migration are considered contributing factors to contraction in the distributional range this species. To identify conditions during successful spawning, river temperatures and...

  7. Sampling and storage conditions influencing the measurement of parathyroid hormone in blood samples: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Hanon, Elodie A; Sturgeon, Catharine M; Lamb, Edmund J

    2013-10-01

    Parathyroid hormone (PTH) is relatively unstable: optimisation of pre-analytical conditions, including specimen type, sampling time and storage conditions, is essential. We have undertaken a systematic review of these pre-analytical conditions. An electronic search of the PubMed, Embase, Cochrane, Centre for Research and Dissemination and Bandolier databases was undertaken. Of 5511 papers identified, 96 underwent full text review, of which 83 were finally included. At room temperature PTH was stable in ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) preserved whole blood for at least 24 h and in EDTA plasma for at least 48 h after venepuncture. Losses were observed in clotted blood samples after 3 h and in serum after 2 h. At 4°C PTH was more stable in EDTA plasma (at least 72 h) than serum (at least 24 h). Central venous PTH concentrations were higher than peripheral venous concentrations. In the northern hemisphere, PTH concentrations were higher in winter than summer. PTH has a circadian rhythm characterised by a nocturnal acrophase and mid-morning nadir. Data related to frozen storage of PTH (-20°C and -80°C) were limited and contradictory. We recommend that blood samples for PTH measurement should be taken into tubes containing EDTA, ideally between 10:00 and 16:00, and plasma separated within 24 h of venepuncture. Plasma samples should be stored at 4°C and analysed within 72 h of venepuncture. Particular regard must be paid to the venepuncture site when interpreting PTH concentration. Further research is required to clarify the suitability of freezing samples prior to PTH measurement.

  8. Bupropion induces social anxiety in adolescent mice: Influence of housing conditions.

    PubMed

    Gómez, Carmen; Redolat, Rosa; Carrasco, Carmen

    2017-08-01

    The antidepressant bupropion has received increasing attention as a pharmacological tool to treat addiction although little is known about its effects on social behaviour in adolescents. The present study aimed to evaluate if environmental housing conditions influence bupropion's actions on social behaviour of adolescent mice. Mice were either group- or individually housed for 2-weeks and then randomly divided into 2 cohorts: half of the mice remained in the initial housing condition and the other half were changed to isolated conditions for further 2-weeks. The following groups were compared: isolated/isolated (ISO/ISO), isolated/group-housed (ISO/GR), group-housed/isolated (GR/ISO), and group-housed/group-housed (GR/GR). The effects of bupropion (40, 20, 10mg/kg) or saline on social interaction were assessed for each housing condition. Social encounters were evaluated using ethological analysis. Data showed significant effects of bupropion on grooming and digging. This drug diminished time mice allocated to these behavioural categories in all housing conditions. In ISO/GR and GR/ISO conditions, bupropion increased environmental exploration (non-social exploration and exploration from a distance), reduced social investigation and increased avoidance/flee and defence/submission behaviours. An augment of avoidance/flee during social interactions was observed in bupropion-treated mice in GR/GR housing condition. These results suggest that this drug exhibits anxiogenic-like properties in social encounters between adolescent mice, especially when a transition in housing conditions has been experienced during this period. Changes in housing conditions may be a useful model for evaluating the effects of bupropion on social behaviour and the role of environmental housing conditions. Copyright © 2017 Institute of Pharmacology, Polish Academy of Sciences. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.

  9. Experiments with Seasonal Forecasts of ocean conditions for the Northern region of the California Current upwelling system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siedlecki, Samantha A.; Kaplan, Isaac C.; Hermann, Albert J.; Nguyen, Thanh Tam; Bond, Nicholas A.; Newton, Jan A.; Williams, Gregory D.; Peterson, William T.; Alin, Simone R.; Feely, Richard A.

    2016-06-01

    Resource managers at the state, federal, and tribal levels make decisions on a weekly to quarterly basis, and fishers operate on a similar timeframe. To determine the potential of a support tool for these efforts, a seasonal forecast system is experimented with here. JISAO’s Seasonal Coastal Ocean Prediction of the Ecosystem (J-SCOPE) features dynamical downscaling of regional ocean conditions in Washington and Oregon waters using a combination of a high-resolution regional model with biogeochemistry and forecasts from NOAA’s Climate Forecast System (CFS). Model performance and predictability were examined for sea surface temperature (SST), bottom temperature, bottom oxygen, pH, and aragonite saturation state through model hindcasts, reforecast, and forecast comparisons with observations. Results indicate J-SCOPE forecasts have measurable skill on seasonal timescales. Experiments suggest that seasonal forecasting of ocean conditions important for fisheries is possible with the right combination of components. Those components include regional predictability on seasonal timescales of the physical environment from a large-scale model, a high-resolution regional model with biogeochemistry that simulates seasonal conditions in hindcasts, a relationship with local stakeholders, and a real-time observational network. Multiple efforts and approaches in different regions would advance knowledge to provide additional tools to fishers and other stakeholders.

  10. Experiments with Seasonal Forecasts of ocean conditions for the Northern region of the California Current upwelling system.

    PubMed

    Siedlecki, Samantha A; Kaplan, Isaac C; Hermann, Albert J; Nguyen, Thanh Tam; Bond, Nicholas A; Newton, Jan A; Williams, Gregory D; Peterson, William T; Alin, Simone R; Feely, Richard A

    2016-06-07

    Resource managers at the state, federal, and tribal levels make decisions on a weekly to quarterly basis, and fishers operate on a similar timeframe. To determine the potential of a support tool for these efforts, a seasonal forecast system is experimented with here. JISAO's Seasonal Coastal Ocean Prediction of the Ecosystem (J-SCOPE) features dynamical downscaling of regional ocean conditions in Washington and Oregon waters using a combination of a high-resolution regional model with biogeochemistry and forecasts from NOAA's Climate Forecast System (CFS). Model performance and predictability were examined for sea surface temperature (SST), bottom temperature, bottom oxygen, pH, and aragonite saturation state through model hindcasts, reforecast, and forecast comparisons with observations. Results indicate J-SCOPE forecasts have measurable skill on seasonal timescales. Experiments suggest that seasonal forecasting of ocean conditions important for fisheries is possible with the right combination of components. Those components include regional predictability on seasonal timescales of the physical environment from a large-scale model, a high-resolution regional model with biogeochemistry that simulates seasonal conditions in hindcasts, a relationship with local stakeholders, and a real-time observational network. Multiple efforts and approaches in different regions would advance knowledge to provide additional tools to fishers and other stakeholders.

  11. Experiments with Seasonal Forecasts of ocean conditions for the Northern region of the California Current upwelling system

    PubMed Central

    Siedlecki, Samantha A.; Kaplan, Isaac C.; Hermann, Albert J.; Nguyen, Thanh Tam; Bond, Nicholas A.; Newton, Jan A.; Williams, Gregory D.; Peterson, William T.; Alin, Simone R.; Feely, Richard A.

    2016-01-01

    Resource managers at the state, federal, and tribal levels make decisions on a weekly to quarterly basis, and fishers operate on a similar timeframe. To determine the potential of a support tool for these efforts, a seasonal forecast system is experimented with here. JISAO’s Seasonal Coastal Ocean Prediction of the Ecosystem (J-SCOPE) features dynamical downscaling of regional ocean conditions in Washington and Oregon waters using a combination of a high-resolution regional model with biogeochemistry and forecasts from NOAA’s Climate Forecast System (CFS). Model performance and predictability were examined for sea surface temperature (SST), bottom temperature, bottom oxygen, pH, and aragonite saturation state through model hindcasts, reforecast, and forecast comparisons with observations. Results indicate J-SCOPE forecasts have measurable skill on seasonal timescales. Experiments suggest that seasonal forecasting of ocean conditions important for fisheries is possible with the right combination of components. Those components include regional predictability on seasonal timescales of the physical environment from a large-scale model, a high-resolution regional model with biogeochemistry that simulates seasonal conditions in hindcasts, a relationship with local stakeholders, and a real-time observational network. Multiple efforts and approaches in different regions would advance knowledge to provide additional tools to fishers and other stakeholders. PMID:27273473

  12. The influence of different El Nino types on the northern hemisphere stratosphere simulated by the MPI-ESM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bittner, Matthias; Timmreck, Claudia; Schmidt, Hauke

    2013-04-01

    It is known that the El Nino Southern Oscillation (ENSO), although it is mainly a tropospheric phenomenon, has an impact on the polar winter stratosphere [e.g. van Loon and Labitzke, 1987: Camp and Tung, 2007]. This has also been shown in simulations with general circulation models (GCM) [Sassi,et al. 2004, Manzini et al. 2006]. For a couple of years there are discussions about two different "flavors" of the the El Nino, the central Pacific (or Modoki) El Nino and the east Pacific El Nino [e.g. Wang and Weisberg, 2000; Yu and Kao, 2007; Ashok et al. 2007]. An observational study [Graf and Zanchettin, 2012] indicate that the polar vortex is more disturbed during EP El Ninos. Here we to investigate the influence of the equatorial sea surface temperatures on the stratosphere-troposphere coupling in the northern hemisphere winter season in a fully coupled atmosphere-ocean-land GCM. We use two versions of the Max-Planck-Institute for Meteorology model MPI-ESM, namely MPI-ESM-LR with lower T63 L47 atmosphere and GR15 ocean resolution and the MPI-ESM-MR with the same horizontal resolution in the atmosphere but a higher resolution in the vertical (L95) and in the ocean (TP04). To exclude effects of natural and anthropogenic forcing, we analyze a 1000 year coupled control simulation with pre-industrial greenhouse gas concentration and constant solar forcing (piControl). For comparison with reananlyis data we also analyze uncoupled atmosphere-only simulations with observed sea surface temperatures from 1979 until 2008 (AMIP). We compare three ways of defining El Nino: the central Pacific (CP), the east Pacific (EP) and the canonical Nino3.4 El Nino. We show to what extent the MPI-ESM is able to simulate these different types of El Nino and how they affect the polar stratosphere. The MPI-ESM model is in both versions capable of producing CP and EP El Ninos. However, the CP El Nino is dominant one in terms of magnitude and the EP El Nino has a relative small impact on global

  13. Northern contaminant mixtures induced morphological and functional changes in human coronary artery endothelial cells under culture conditions typifying high fat/sugar diet and ethanol exposure.

    PubMed

    Florian, Maria; Yan, Jin; Ulhaq, Saad; Coughlan, Melanie; Laziyan, Mahemuti; Willmore, William; Jin, Xiaolei

    2013-11-16

    It has been reported that Northern populations are exposed to mixtures of various environmental contaminants unique to the Arctic (Northern contaminant mixtures - NCM) at a large range of concentrations, depending on their geological location, age, lifestyle and dietary habits. To determine if these contaminants may contribute to a cardiovascular health risk, especially when combined with a high fat and sugar diet and ethanol exposure, we treated human coronary artery endothelial cells (HCAEC) with two mixtures of 4 organic (NCM1) or 22 organic and inorganic (NCM2) chemicals detected in Northerners' blood during 2004-2005 in the presence or absence of low-density lipoprotein (1.5mg/ml), very-low-density lipoprotein (1.0mg/ml) and glucose (10mmol/L) (LVG), and in the absence or presence of 0.1% ethanol. After 24h of exposure, cell morphology and markers of cytotoxicity and endothelial function were examined. NCM1 treatment did not affect cell viability, but increased cell size, disrupted cell membrane integrity, and decreased cell density, uptake of small peptides, release of endothelin-1 (ET-1) and plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI), while causing no changes in endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) protein expression and nitric oxide (NO) release. In contrast, NCM2 decreased cell viability, total protein yield, uptake of small peptides, eNOS protein expression, and NO release and caused membrane damage, but caused no changes in the secretion of ET-1, prostacyclin and PAI. The presence of LVG and/or alcohol did or did not influence the effects of NCM1 or NCM2 depending on the endpoint and the mixture examined. These results suggested that the effects of one or one group of contaminants may be altered by the presence of other contaminants, and that with or without the interaction of high fat and sugar diet and/or ethanol exposure, NCMs at the concentrations used caused endothelial dysfunction in vitro. It remains to be investigated if these effects of NCMs also

  14. Geochemical characterisation of Tithonian-Berriasian Chia Gara organic-rich rocks in northern Iraq with an emphasis on organic matter enrichment and the relationship to the bioproductivity and anoxia conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohialdeen, Ibrahim M. J.; Hakimi, Mohammed Hail

    2016-02-01

    Tithonian-Berriasian Chia Gara organic-rich rocks, located in Kurdistan (northern Iraq), were analysed based on inorganic and organic geochemistry to define the origin, type of organic matter, and the influencing factors of organic matter (OM) enrichment, including the OM input and preservation, and their relationship to the paleoenvironment conditions. The δ13Corg values of the Chia Gara rocks range from -29.99‰ to -26.93‰, with average values of approximately -28.8‰, indicating that the organic matter has a predominantly marine origin. Enhanced biological productivity within the photic zone of the water column during deposition of the Chia Gara Fm. is indicated by consistently high organic carbon content in most samples (average 3 wt.%), as well as by bulk geochemical and biomarker characteristics. Major contributions by aquatic algae and microorganisms with a minor terrigenous organic matter contribution are indicated by the n-alkane distribution patterns and the composition of the hopanoids, steroids, and tricyclic terpenoids. Strongly reducing bottom water is indicated by low pristane/phytane ratios, homohopane distribution patterns, and the redox-sensitive trace elements geochemistry. Salinity stratification with alkaline bottom waters is indicated by high Sr/Ba ratios and the presence of gammacerane in the analysed Chia Gara samples. These data indicate that OM enrichment in the Tithonian-Berriasian Chia Gara rocks results from the combination of enhanced biological productivity and salinity stratification with anoxic bottom water conditions, which favoured OM preservation.

  15. Water conditions and geochemistry in northern Adriatic anoxia-prone areas and response of benthic faunas to oxygen deficiencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuschin, Martin; Riedel, Bettina; Stachowitsch, Michael; Cermelj, Branko

    2010-05-01

    One predicted effect of global climate change, specifically global warming, is the increase in the temperatures and stratification of shallow coastal and estuarine systems. This, coupled with ongoing anthropogenic eutrophication, will exacerbate hypoxia and benthic mortalities, significantly damaging these critical marine ecosystems. These phenomena are particularly severe on sublitoral soft-bottoms such as the poorly sorted silty sands at the study site in the northern Adriatic Sea. We deployed a specially developed underwater chamber to artificially induce anoxia in situ. Our Experimental Anoxia Generating Unit (EAGU) is a large plexiglass chamber that combines a digital camera with oxygen/hydrogen sulphide/pH sensors along with flashes and battery packs. The unit can be deployed for up to five days to autonomously generate oxygen crises and quantify both physico-chemical parameters and benthic responses. The system is initially positioned in an "open" configuration (open-sided aluminium frame) over the benthic fauna ("control" experiment). After 24 h the EAGU is switched to its "closed" configuration (plexiglass enclosure) and repositioned over the same assemblage. In this contribution, we focus on the natural oxygen content, temperature and pH of bottom waters during summer, the course of oxygen decrease during our experiments and the onset of H2S development. Oxygen content of the bottom water, a few centimetres above the sediment-water interface, ranges from ~3.5-8 but is mostly between 4-6 ml l-1 during July to September of the study periods (2005 and 2006) and decreases to zero within ~1-3 days after initiation of our experiments. In parallel, H2S starts to develop at the onset of anoxia. Water temperatures at the bottom were stable during experiments and ranged from 18.5°C to 21.4°C, but pH decreased from 8.3 to 8.1 at the beginning to 7.9 to 7.7 at the end of the experiments. Sediment profiling indicates that the diffusive benthic boundary layer is

  16. Influence of industrial processing on orange juice flavanone solubility and transformation to chalcones under gastrointestinal conditions.

    PubMed

    Gil-Izquierdo, Angel; Gil, María Isabel; Tomas-Barberan, Francisco Abraham; Ferreres, Federico

    2003-05-07

    Orange juice manufactured at industrial scale was subjected to digestion under in vitro gastrointestinal conditions (pH, temperature, and enzyme and chemical conditions) to evaluate the influence of individual industrial processing treatments on flavanone solubility, stability, and ability to permeate through a membrane under simulated physiological conditions. Four industrial processes including squeezing, standard pasteurization, concentration, and freezing were evaluated. Hand squeezing was compared with industrial squeezing. After in vitro gastrointestinal digestion of the orange juices, the flavanones able to permeate through a dialysis membrane, and those remaining in the retentate were evaluated by HPLC as were those present in the insoluble fraction. In all of the assayed orange juices, a high content of precipitated chalcones ( approximately 70% of the total flavanones) was formed under the physiological conditions of the gastrointestinal tract. Hand squeezing provided a higher concentration of flavanones in the permeated fraction and lower transformation to chalcones than industrial squeezing. Standard pasteurization did not influence the solubility and permeability of the orange juice flavanones and chalcones. Industrial concentration did not affect the amount of flavanones able to permeate but decreased the chalcones produced. Juices produced from frozen orange juice contained considerably smaller amounts of both soluble flavanones and insoluble chalcones.

  17. Schwann cell migration and neurite outgrowth are influenced by media conditioned by epineurial fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    van Neerven, S G A; Pannaye, P; Bozkurt, A; Van Nieuwenhoven, F; Joosten, E; Hermans, E; Taccola, G; Deumens, R

    2013-11-12

    The regenerative capacity of the peripheral nervous system is largely related to Schwann cells undergoing proliferation and migration after injury and forming growth-supporting substrates for severed axons. Novel data show that fibroblasts to a certain extent regulate the pro-regenerative behavior of Schwann cells. In the setting of peripheral nerve injury, the fibroblasts that form the epineurium come into close contact with both Schwann cells and peripheral axons, but the potential influence on these latter two cell types has not been studied yet. In the present study we explored whether culture media, conditioned by epineurial fibroblasts can influence Schwann cells and/or neurite outgrowth from dorsal root ganglia neurons in vitro. Our data indicate that epineurial fibroblast-conditioned culture media substantially increase Schwann cell migration and the outgrowth of neurites. Schwann cell proliferation remained largely unaffected. These same read-out parameters were assayed in a condition where epineurial fibroblasts were subjected to stretch-cell-stress, a mechanical stressor that plays an important role in traumatic peripheral nerve injuries. Stretch-cell-stress of epineurial fibroblasts did not further change the positive effects of conditioned media on Schwann cell migration and neurite outgrowth. From these data we conclude that an as yet unknown pro-regenerative role can be attributed to epineurial fibroblasts, implying that such cells may affect the outcome of severe peripheral nerve injury. Copyright © 2013 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Two-carbon metabolites, polyphenols and vitamins influence yeast chronological life span in winemaking conditions

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Viability in a non dividing state is referred to as chronological life span (CLS). Most grape juice fermentation happens when Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast cells have stopped dividing; therefore, CLS is an important factor toward winemaking success. Results We have studied both the physical and chemical determinants influencing yeast CLS. Low pH and heat shorten the maximum wine yeast life span, while hyperosmotic shock extends it. Ethanol plays an important negative role in aging under winemaking conditions, but additional metabolites produced by fermentative metabolism, such as acetaldehyde and acetate, have also a strong impact on longevity. Grape polyphenols quercetin and resveratrol have negative impacts on CLS under winemaking conditions, an unexpected behavior for these potential anti-oxidants. We observed that quercetin inhibits alcohol and aldehyde dehydrogenase activities, and that resveratrol performs a pro-oxidant role during grape juice fermentation. Vitamins nicotinic acid and nicotinamide are precursors of NAD+, and their addition reduces mean longevity during fermentation, suggesting a metabolic unbalance negative for CLS. Moreover, vitamin mix supplementation at the end of fermentation shortens CLS and enhances cell lysis, while amino acids increase life span. Conclusions Wine S. cerevisiae strains are able to sense changes in the environmental conditions and adapt their longevity to them. Yeast death is influenced by the conditions present at the end of wine fermentation, particularly by the concentration of two-carbon metabolites produced by the fermentative metabolism, such as ethanol, acetic acid and acetaldehyde, and also by the grape juice composition, particularly its vitamin content. PMID:22873488

  19. Influences of solution chemical conditions on mobilization of TNT from contaminated soil

    SciTech Connect

    Dante, D.A.; Tiller, C.L.; Pennell, K.D.

    1996-12-31

    2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) and its byproducts are common contaminants on US military installations. Many potential remediation processes are in part limited by the transfer of TNT from the contaminated soil into the aqueous phase. The purpose of this research is to assess the release of TNT from contaminated soil under varying solution chemical conditions. In particular, influences of pH, aquatic natural organic matter, and addition of two surfactants is investigated. Uncontaminated soil was collected from a near-surface site at the Alabama Army Ammunition Plant and was artificially contaminated with TNT prior to the mobilization experiments. Results for the pH experiments show that more TNT is mobilized at neutral pH conditions than at low pH conditions. The presence of dissolved organic matter enhances the release of TNT from soil, but not by a large amount. Surfactant addition has the most significant effect on TNT mobilization.

  20. Influence of extreme ambient temperatures and anaerobic conditions on Peltigera aphthosa (L.) Willd. viability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyakov, M. Yu.; Insarova, I. D.; Kharabadze, D. E.; Ptushenko, V. V.; Shtaer, O. V.

    2015-11-01

    Lichen are symbiotic systems constituted by heterotrophic fungi (mycobionts) and photosynthetic microorganism (photobionts). These organisms can survive under extreme stress conditions. The aim of this work was to study the influence of low (- 70 °C) or high (+ 70 °C) temperatures, temperature fluctuations from + 70 °C to - 70 °C, and anaerobic conditions on P. aphthosa (L.) Willd. viability. None of the studied stress factors affected significantly photosynthetic and respiratory activity of the thalli. No changes in morphology or ultrastructure of the cells were revealed for both photobiont and mycobiont components after extreme temperature treatment of P. aphthosa thalli. The data show the extreme tolerance of P. aphthosa to some stress factors inherent to the space flight conditions.

  1. Sertraline influence on morphine-induced conditioned place preference in rats.

    PubMed

    Ciubotariu, Diana; Nechifor, M

    2014-01-01

    Serotonine reuptake inhibitors are an important pharmacological arsenal for treating major depression, a severe disease with poorly understood pathogenic mechanisms. Also, little is known about the action of antidepressants on reward system, the function of which is severely affected in this disorder. To assess the influence of sertraline on brain reward system by conditioned place preference technique in rats. Both 3 and 5 mg/kg doses of sertraline determined a significant rewarding effect, whereas only the 5 mg/kg dose increased the morphine-induced rewarding effect (in the morphine-only group time spent in the conditioning chamber increased by 184.92 +/- 21.43% post-conditioning vs. preconditioning, whereas the increase was 195.56 +/- 18.3% in the group treated with morphine and sertraline 5 mg/kg, p < 0.05). The stimulant effect of sertraline on brain reward function might be involved in its therapeutic efficacy.

  2. Influence of the extreme conditions on the water quality and material exchange flux in the Strait of Istanbul

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altıok, Hüsne; Aslan, Aslı; Övez, Süleyman; Demirel, Nazlı; Yüksek, Ahsen; Kıratlı, Nur; Taş, Seyfettin; Müftüoğlu, Ahmet Edip; Sur, Halil Ibrahim; Okuş, Erdoğan

    2014-11-01

    This study focuses on the influence of extreme hydrological events on the water quality of the Strait of Istanbul (Bosphorus), a stratified waterway, polluted by sewage outfalls and non-point sources. Monthly collected water quality parameters (nitrate + nitrite, ortho-phosphate, silicate, dissolved oxygen, total suspended solids, chlorophyll-a and fecal indicator bacteria (fecal coliform and enterococci)) were evaluated together with the hydrological data (salinity, temperature and current flow) for 1 year. Two blockage events, identified as extreme conditions, were detected during the study: a lower layer blockage in February 2003 and an upper layer blockage in October 2003. During the lower layer blockage, the volume fluxes of the upper layer significantly increased to 28,140 m3 s- 1 and the lower layer almost stopped flowing (19 m3 s- 1). The dissolved oxidative nitrogen, ortho-phosphate and silicate inputs outflowing from the Black Sea were 117, 17.6, and 309 tons which were 3, 2, and 4 times the average daily fluxes respectively, in addition to enhancement of fecal indicator bacteria contamination in the sea surface flow. During the upper layer blockage, the volume flux of the upper layer was 3837 m3 s- 1 and the counter flow reached 24,985 m3 s- 1 at the northern exit of the Strait of Istanbul resulting in 2.7 fold increase in the mean bottom flow. The daily exports of nutrients, total suspended solid and dissolved oxygen by the lower layer flow increased by at least 2 fold compared to the mass fluxes estimated from the seasonal/annual means of volume flux and concentrations. On the other hand, fecal indicator bacteria flux by the lower layer inflow to the Black Sea decreased by at least 2 fold compared to the mean daily flux. These results show that the material exchange between the Marmara and the Black seas becomes more important during blockage events.

  3. Influence of cued-fear conditioning and its impairment on NREM sleep.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Tankesh; Jha, Sushil K

    2017-10-01

    Many studies suggest that fear conditioning influences sleep. It is, however, not known if the changes in sleep architecture after fear conditioning are essentially associated with the consolidation of fearful memory or with fear itself. Here, we have observed that within sleep, NREM sleep consistently remained augmented after the consolidation of cued fear-conditioned memory. But a similar change did not occur after impairing memory consolidation by blocking new protein synthesis and glutamate transmission between glial-neuronal loop in the lateral amygdala (LA). Anisomycin (a protein synthesis inhibitor) and DL-α-amino-adipic acid (DL- α -AA) (a glial glutamine synthetase enzyme inhibitor) were microinjected into the LA soon after cued fear-conditioning to induce memory impairment. On the post-conditioning day, animals in both the groups exhibited significantly less freezing. In memory-consolidated groups (vehicle groups), NREM sleep significantly increased during 2nd to 5th hours after training compared to their baseline days. However, in memory impaired groups (anisomycin and DL- α -AA microinjected groups), similar changes were not observed. Our results thus suggest that changes in sleep architecture after cued fear-conditioning are indeed a consolidation dependent event. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Influence of operating conditions on the optimum design of electric vehicle battery cooling plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarrett, Anthony; Kim, Il Yong

    2014-01-01

    The efficiency of cooling plates for electric vehicle batteries can be improved by optimizing the geometry of internal fluid channels. In practical operation, a cooling plate is exposed to a range of operating conditions dictated by the battery, environment, and driving behaviour. To formulate an efficient cooling plate design process, the optimum design sensitivity with respect to each boundary condition is desired. This determines which operating conditions must be represented in the design process, and therefore the complexity of designing for multiple operating conditions. The objective of this study is to determine the influence of different operating conditions on the optimum cooling plate design. Three important performance measures were considered: temperature uniformity, mean temperature, and pressure drop. It was found that of these three, temperature uniformity was most sensitive to the operating conditions, especially with respect to the distribution of the input heat flux, and also to the coolant flow rate. An additional focus of the study was the distribution of heat generated by the battery cell: while it is easier to assume that heat is generated uniformly, by using an accurate distribution for design optimization, this study found that cooling plate performance could be significantly improved.

  5. Influences and Practices in Colorectal Cancer Screening Among Health Care Providers Serving Northern Plains American Indians, 2011–2012

    PubMed Central

    Walaszek, Anne; Perdue, David G.; Rhodes, Kristine L.; Haverkamp, Donald; Forster, Jean

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The epidemiology of colorectal cancer, including incidence, mortality, age of onset, stage of diagnosis, and screening, varies regionally among American Indians. The objective of the Improving Northern Plains American Indian Colorectal Cancer Screening study was to improve understanding of colorectal cancer screening among health care providers serving Northern Plains American Indians. Methods Data were collected, in person, from a sample of 145 health care providers at 27 health clinics across the Northern Plains from May 2011 through September 2012. Participants completed a 32-question, self-administered assessment designed to assess provider practices, screening perceptions, and knowledge. Results The proportion of providers who ordered or performed at least 1 colorectal cancer screening test for an asymptomatic, average-risk patient in the previous month was 95.9% (139 of 145). Of these 139 providers, 97.1% ordered colonoscopies, 12.9% ordered flexible sigmoidoscopies, 73.4% ordered 3-card, guaiac-based, fecal occult blood tests, and 21.6% ordered fecal immunochemical tests. Nearly two-thirds (64.7%) reported performing in-office guaiac-based fecal occult blood tests using digital rectal examination specimens. Providers who reported receiving a formal update on colorectal cancer screening during the previous 24 months were more likely to screen using digital rectal exam specimens than providers who had received a formal update on colorectal cancer screening more than 24 months prior (73.9% vs 56.9%, respectively, χ2 = 4.29, P = .04). Conclusion Despite recommendations cautioning against the use of digital rectal examination specimens for colorectal cancer screening, the practice is common among providers serving Northern Plains American Indian populations. Accurate up-to-date, ongoing education for patients, the community, and health care providers is needed. PMID:27978410

  6. Influences and Practices in Colorectal Cancer Screening Among Health Care Providers Serving Northern Plains American Indians, 2011-2012.

    PubMed

    Nadeau, Melanie; Walaszek, Anne; Perdue, David G; Rhodes, Kristine L; Haverkamp, Donald; Forster, Jean

    2016-12-15

    The epidemiology of colorectal cancer, including incidence, mortality, age of onset, stage of diagnosis, and screening, varies regionally among American Indians. The objective of the Improving Northern Plains American Indian Colorectal Cancer Screening study was to improve understanding of colorectal cancer screening among health care providers serving Northern Plains American Indians. Data were collected, in person, from a sample of 145 health care providers at 27 health clinics across the Northern Plains from May 2011 through September 2012. Participants completed a 32-question, self-administered assessment designed to assess provider practices, screening perceptions, and knowledge. The proportion of providers who ordered or performed at least 1 colorectal cancer screening test for an asymptomatic, average-risk patient in the previous month was 95.9% (139 of 145). Of these 139 providers, 97.1% ordered colonoscopies, 12.9% ordered flexible sigmoidoscopies, 73.4% ordered 3-card, guaiac-based, fecal occult blood tests, and 21.6% ordered fecal immunochemical tests. Nearly two-thirds (64.7%) reported performing in-office guaiac-based fecal occult blood tests using digital rectal examination specimens. Providers who reported receiving a formal update on colorectal cancer screening during the previous 24 months were more likely to screen using digital rectal exam specimens than providers who had received a formal update on colorectal cancer screening more than 24 months prior (73.9% vs 56.9%, respectively, χ(2) = 4.29, P = .04). Despite recommendations cautioning against the use of digital rectal examination specimens for colorectal cancer screening, the practice is common among providers serving Northern Plains American Indian populations. Accurate up-to-date, ongoing education for patients, the community, and health care providers is needed.

  7. Modeling the influence of dynamic zoning of forest harvesting on ecological succession in a northern hardwoods landscape.

    PubMed

    Zollner, Patrick A; Gustafson, Eric J; He, Hong S; Radeloff, Volker C; Mladenoff, David J

    2005-04-01

    Dynamic zoning (systematic alteration in the spatial and temporal allocation of even-aged forest management practices) has been proposed as a means to change the spatial pattern of timber harvest across a landscape to maximize forest interior habitat while holding timber harvest levels constant. Simulation studies have established that dynamic zoning strategies produce larger tracts of interior, closed canopy forest, thus increasing the value of these landscapes for interior-dependent wildlife. We used the simulation model LANDIS to examine how the implementation of a dynamic zoning strategy would change trajectories of ecological succession in the Great Divide Ranger District of the Chequamegon-Nicolet National Forest in northern Wisconsin over 500 years. The components of dynamic zoning strategies (number of zones in a scenario and the length of the hiatus between successive entries into zones) and their interaction had highly significant impacts on patterns of forest succession. Dynamic zoning scenarios with more zones and shorter hiatus lengths increased the average amount of the forest dominated by early successional aspen (Populus sp.). Dynamic zoning scenarios with two zones produced more late successional mature northern hardwoods than scenarios with four zones. Dynamic zoning scenarios with very short (30 years) or very long (120 years) hiatus lengths resulted in more late successional mature northern hardwoods than scenarios with intermediate hiatus lengths (60 and 90 years). However, none of the dynamic scenarios produced as much late successional mature northern hardwoods as the static alternative. Furthermore, the amounts of all habitat types in all dynamic zoning scenarios fluctuated greatly in time and space relative to static alternatives, which could negatively impact wildlife species that require a stable amount of habitat above some minimum critical threshold. Indeed, implementing dynamic zoning scenarios of different designs would have both

  8. [Increased frequency of CRD in the broiler production in northern Jutland. II. Influence on production and economy (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Haugum, E; Bisgaard, M; Velling, G

    1977-01-01

    The consequences for production and economy caused by an increase in CRD outbreaks in broilers in northern Jutland are estimated by comparing production results from book-keeping farms to the average results of the whole country, where an improvement of 19 gram was found, while a similar increase did not occur in northern Jutland (Table I). The condemnation rate has risen 0.4% in northern Jutland. For the whole country 0.1% rise has been registered. Production results from 6 book-keeping farms with CRD have been compared to the results from all book-keeping farms in the region. It appears from Table III that the 6 farms were lacking 60 gram weight increase and 0.03 in feed conversion. Gross margins for production without problems have been calculated to 0.70 kr. per chicken against 0.42 kr. per chicken in the 71 CRD attacked flocks (Tables IV and V). If in addition also slaughterhouse expenses are added the total loss due to CRD in the 71 flocks sum up to 510.144 kr.

  9. Extensive Analysis of GmFTL and GmCOL Expression in Northern Soybean Cultivars in Field Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Jinlong; Lu, Mingyang; Chen, Fulu; Liu, Linpo; Xi, Zhang-Ying; Bachmair, Andreas; Chen, Qingshan; Fu, Yong-Fu

    2015-01-01

    The FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT) gene is a highly conserved florigen gene among flowering plants. Soybean genome encodes six homologs of FT, which display flowering activity in Arabidopsis thaliana. However, their contributions to flowering time in different soybean cultivars, especially in field conditions, are unclear. We employed six soybean cultivars with different maturities to extensively investigate expression patterns of GmFTLs (Glycine max FT-like) and GmCOLs (Glycine max CO-like) in the field conditions. The results show that GmFTL3 is an FT homolog with the highest transcript abundance in soybean, but other GmFTLs may also contribute to flower induction with different extents, because they have more or less similar expression patterns in developmental-, leaf-, and circadian-specific modes. And four GmCOL genes (GmCOL1/2/5/13) may confer to the expression of GmFTL genes. Artificial manipulation of GmFTL expression by transgenic strategy (overexpression and RNAi) results in a distinct change in soybean flowering time, indicating that GmFTLs not only impact on the control of flowering time, but have potential applications in the manipulation of photoperiodic adaptation in soybean. Additionally, transgenic plants show that GmFTLs play a role in formation of the first flowers and in vegetative growth. PMID:26371882

  10. A Coupled Atmosphere-Ocean modelling system to investigate the exceptional Winter 2012 conditions in the Northern Adriatic Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricchi, Antonio; Marcello Miglietta, M.; Benetazzo, Alvise; Warner, John C.; Zambon, Joseph B.; Bonaldo, Davide; Falcieri, Francesco M.; Bergamasco, Andrea; Sclavo, Mauro; Carniel, Sandro

    2014-05-01

    During late January and early February 2012, a persistent cyclonic circulation associated with an exceptional cold anomaly dominated the Mediterranean region. Among the resulting effects, the northern Adriatic sea basin (NA) experienced a very large energy losses, mostly related to the intense and cold Bora winds blowing from north-east. Sea water temperature along the Italian coast dropped down to 6 °C, while part of the Venice lagoon got frozen. These series of exceptionally cold air outbreak episodes, as well as their effects on the NA circulation and dense water formation, are investigated by means of the Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere-Wave-Sediment Transport (COAWST) Modeling System, where the oceanographic model ROMS, the atmospheric model WRF and the wave model SWAN are coupled via MCT. In this specific application to the NA sea configuration, lasting from January 23 to February 23, 2012, particular emphasis was devoted to the analysis of the atmosphere-ocean-waves interactions. First, we employ the "stand alone" WRF atmospheric model in 4 different modes ("zero mode", i.e. using the skin temperature from the global atmospheric model without updating in the Sea Surface Temperature (SST); "static mode", i.e. retaining the January 23 radiometer SST; "dynamic mode", updating every 6 hours the SST as derived from radiometer data at 0.83 deg resolution; "OML mode", as above, but using a simple Ocean Mixed Layer model available within WRF to predict the temperature evolution). Second, the WRF-ROMS one-way forced case is analyzed, where no feedbacks to the atmosphere are provided from the ocean model ROMS, but momentum and heat fluxes are determined by WRF model. Then, the WRF-ROMS two-way coupled case is implemented (where the atmosphere model exchanges momentum and heat, and the ocean model exchanges SST with the Atmospheric model). Finally, the WRF-ROMS-SWAN two-way coupled case for waves-ocean-atmosphere is performed, where common variables are exchanged every 1200

  11. Influence of incubation conditions on hydrolysis efficiency and iodine enrichment in baker's yeast.

    PubMed

    Dolińska, Barbara; Zieliński, Michał; Dobrzański, Zbigniew; Chojnacka, Katarzyna; Opaliński, Sebastian; Ryszka, Florian

    2012-06-01

    The influence of incubation conditions, enzyme type, hydrolysis time, and potassium iodide concentration on hydrolysis and iodine enrichment were studied in supernatant and pellets of Saccharomyces cervisiae hydrolysates. The type of enzyme used and incubation time significantly influence hydrolysis efficiency and protein concentration in supernatant and pellet. The highest protein hydrolysis efficiency was obtained by 24-h incubation with papain. Significantly lower values were observed for pepsin and autolysis. The potassium iodide concentration influences the iodine content of supernatant and pellet, but not hydrolysis. Iodide enrichment of supernatant and pellet depends on the concentration of iodide using during incubation. High concentration of iodide and long incubation times were the conditions for optimal iodide enrichment and high-protein hydrolysates. The optimal hydrolysis efficiency and iodine enrichment were obtained during 24-h incubation with papain in a 4.5-mM potassium iodide medium. The efficiency reached 98.22% with iodine concentrations of 2,664.91 and 9,200.67 μg/g iodine in pellet and supernatant, respectively.

  12. Individual condition and stream temperature influence early maturation of rainbow and steelhead trout, ncorhynchus mykiss

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McMillan, John R.; Dunham, Jason B.; Reeves, Gordon H.; Mills, Justin S.; Jordan, Chris E.

    2012-01-01

    Alternative male phenotypes in salmonine fishes arise from individuals that mature as larger and older anadromous marine-migrants or as smaller and younger freshwater residents. To better understand the processes influencing the expression of these phenotypes we examined the influences of growth in length (fork length) and whole body lipid content in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). Fish were sampled from the John Day River basin in northeast Oregon where both anadromous ("steelhead") and freshwater resident rainbow trout coexist. Larger males with higher lipid levels had a greater probability of maturing as a resident at age-1+. Among males, 38% were maturing overall, and the odds ratios of the logistic model indicated that the probability of a male maturing early as a resident at age-1+ increased 49% (95% confidence interval (CI) = 23-81%) for every 5 mm increase in length and 33% (95% CI = 10-61%) for every 0.5% increase in whole body lipid content. There was an inverse association between individual condition and water temperature as growth was greater in warmer streams while whole body lipid content was higher in cooler streams. Our results support predictions from life history theory and further suggest that relationships between individual condition, maturation, and environmental variables (e.g., water temperature) are shaped by complex developmental and evolutionary influences.

  13. The influence of surface atmospheric conditions on the range and area reached by animal vocalizations.

    PubMed

    Larom, D; Garstang, M; Payne, K; Raspet, R; Lindeque, M

    1997-02-01

    Low-level vertical changes in temperature and wind exert powerful and predictable influences on the area ensonified by animal vocalizations. Computer modelling of low-frequency sound propagation in measured atmospheric conditions predicts that the calls of the savanna elephant at these frequencies can have ranges exceeding 10 km and that the calls will be highly directional in the presence of wind shear. Calling area is maximized under temperature inversions with low wind speeds. Calling area changes substantially over 24 h periods; on any given day, the calling area undergoes an expansion and contraction which may be as large as one order of magnitude. This cycle is modulated by topography, regional weather patterns, seasonality and possibly by climate variation. Similar influences affect the somewhat higher-frequency calls of lions and may be a selective pressure towards their crepuscular and nocturnal calling behaviour. Coyotes and wolves, which also live in areas with strong and prevalent nocturnal temperature inversions, show similar calling patterns, maximizing their chances of being heard over the longest possible distances. The pronounced dawn and evening vocalization peaks in other animals including birds, frogs and insects may reflect the same influences in combination with other factors which selectively limit high-frequency sound propagation. Atmospheric conditions therefore need to be taken into account in many field studies of animal behaviour. A simplified method for estimating sound propagation during field studies is presented.

  14. Transboundary Influences on Ozone Pollution in the United States: Present Conditions and Future Projections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Sager, P.; Wang, H.; Jacob, D. J.; Park, R. J.

    2007-12-01

    The GEOS-Chem global chemical transport model (v7-02-01) with 1° x1° horizontal resolution over North America is used to investigate the influence of transboundary pollution from Canada and Mexico on surface ozone in the United States. We conduct a series of 4 simulations for present day conditions: (1) a standard simulation with 2001 anthropogenic emissions worldwide, (2) with zero U.S. anthropogenic emissions, (3) with zero anthropogenic emission in North America (Canada, U.S. and Mexico), and (4) with 2006 East Asian emissions and no emission in North America. For future projections, we repeat (1)-(3) with a 2020 worldwide emissions inventory, in addition to a run with U.S. Power plant emissions switched off. The standard simulation is evaluated with observations for U.S. regions most sensitive to transboundary pollution (northeast for Canada, southwest for Mexico). Monthly mean ozone enhancements from transboundary pollution are in the 5-10 ppb range for these regions in June-August, but can exceed 30 ppbv under conditions when ozone is above the U.S. air quality standard (84 ppbv). Unlike intercontinental pollution influence which mainly contributes to the ozone background and is depleted during regional smog episodes, transboundary pollution influence from Canada and Mexico is highly variable and can contribute significantly to these episodes.

  15. Assessment of permafrost conditions under Northern Quebec's airports: an integrative approach for the development of adaptation strategies to climate warming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    L'Hérault, E.; Allard, M.; Doré, G.; Barrette, C.; Verreault, J.; Sarrazin, D.; Doyon, J.; Guimond, A.

    2011-12-01

    Community airports in Nunavik were built between 1984 and 1992 and were designed by using a thick embankment of rock fill placed on undisturbed ground surface to prevent the thawing of the underlying permafrost. However, since around 2000, many of the runways show signs of permafrost disturbance as some localized differential settlements have begun to take place. With the anticipated rise of air temperature, the vulnerability of transportation infrastructures to permafrost degradation raises concerns. Several studies initiated by MTQ were undertaken by CEN to evaluate the permafrost conditions underneath airports. These studies provide valuable baseline information but also reveal the needs for a better understanding of the spatial variability of the surficial deposits, their geotechnical properties and permafrost conditions underneath embankments to assess its sensibility to thawing and to plan adaptation strategies in face of climate warming. A geomorphological and geotechnical investigation campaign, including surficial geology mapping using pre-construction air photographs and recovery of drilled frozen cores, was carried out in the summers 2008 and 2009 at eight airports. The impact of the runway embankments on surface drainage, snow drift accumulation and permafrost thawing was also determined. Stratigraphic information from drilling was used to reinterpret CCR and GPR surveys done in previous studies. High resolution cross-sections of the stratigraphy and permafrost conditions could then be drawn. Lab testing over undisturbed frozen samples was performed to determine the geotechnical properties of the different stratigraphic units encountered, particularly thaw consolidation ratios. Field measurements of ground temperatures and numerical modeling of the thermal regime of the embankment and subgrade were also performed to assess the potential impacts on permafrost stability alongside and beneath embankments under different climate change scenarios. Thermistor

  16. Influence of land-surface and turbulent parameterization schemes on regional-scale boundary layer characteristics over northern India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panda, Jagabandhu; Sharan, Maithili

    2012-08-01

    The influence of turbulent and land-surface parameterizations on regional scale boundary layer features over north India is analyzed using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) modeling system during two contrasting cases of summer and winter. The model predicted surface temperatures, wind speeds, potential temperature profiles and wind speed profiles are compared with the observations from India Meteorological Department and Wyoming Weather Web data archive. The qualitative and quantitative analyses indicate that the model predictions are relatively better over three north Indian cities namely Delhi, Ahmedabad and Jodhpur when the Mellor-Yamada-Janjic boundary layer scheme along with Noah land-surface model is used. The near surface flow features during both summer and winter cases indicate the major role of land surface models (LSMs) as compared to the boundary layer parameterizations in governing the regional scale flow fields. The role of the LSMs and boundary layer parameterizations in the regional scale transport of dust particles from Thar region toward Delhi and its neighborhood depends upon their point of origin during summer. However, the flow trajectories travel in the opposite direction during the winter case because of the contrasting nature of the flow patterns and consequently, the formation of haze-like conditions over Delhi due to Thar dusts is not expected.

  17. Evidence for the influence of the North Atlantic Oscillation on the total ozone column at northern low latitudes and midlatitudes during winter and summer seasons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ossó, Albert; Sola, Yolanda; Bech, Joan; Lorente, Jerónimo

    2011-12-01

    The strong influence of the winter North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) on the total ozone column (TOC) in the Northern Hemisphere has been reported in a number of previous studies. In this study we show that this influence is not restricted to the winter season but is also significant in summer. Especially interesting effects of the summer NAO (SNAO) on the TOC are observed over the eastern Mediterranean region, where a strongly positive SNAO index is related to the creation of a geopotential height-negative anomaly over Greece with maximum amplitude at 200 hPa. Another anomaly was observed west of the Iberian Peninsula with similar effects on the TOC. Analyzing 26 years of Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) and Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) data from the equator to midlatitudes (60°) in the Northern Hemisphere, we demonstrate that the SNAO accounts for up to 30% of the TOC variability with a strong latitudinal and longitudinal dependence. Additionally, we obtain significant correlations between the NAO index and the thermal tropopause pressure and also with the geopotential heights at 200 and 500 hPa. Finally, some indirect connections between NAO and the TOC through teleconnections are also discussed.

  18. Influence of tectonic terranes adjacent to Precambrian Wyoming province of petroleum source and reservoir rock stratigraphy in northern Rocky Mountain region

    SciTech Connect

    Tonnsen, J.J.

    1984-07-01

    The perimeter of the Archean Precambrian Wyoming province can be generally defined. A Proterozoic suture belt separates the province from the Archean Superior province to the east. The western margin of the Precambrian rocks lies under the western Overthrust belt, but the Precambrian province extends at least as far west as southwest Montana and southeast Idaho. The province is bounded on the north and south by more regionally extensive Proterozoic mobile belts. In the northern belt, Archean rocks have been remobilized by Proterozoic tectonic events, but the southern belt does not appear to contain rocks as old as Archean. The tectonic response of these Precambrian terranes to cratonic and continental margin vertical and horizontal forces has exerted a profound influence on Phanerozoic sedimentation and stratigraphic facies distributions. Petroleum source rock and reservoir rock stratigraphy of the Northern Rocky Mountain region has been correlated with this structural history. In particular, the Devonian, Permian, and Jurassic sedimentation patterns can be shown to have been influenced by articulation among the different terranes comprising the ancient substructure. Depositional patterns in the Chester-Morrow carbonate and clastic sequence in the Central Montana trough are also related to this substructure. Further, a correlation between these tectonic terranes and the localization of regional hydrocarbon accumulations has been observed and has been useful in basin analyses for exploration planning.

  19. Influence of syn-sedimentary faults on orogenic structures in a collisional belt: Insights from the inner zone of the Northern Apennines (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brogi, Andrea

    2016-05-01

    This paper discusses the possible influence of syn-sedimentary structures on the development of orogenic structures during positive tectonic inversion in the inner Northern Apennines (Italy). Examples from key areas located in southern Tuscany provided original cartographic, structural and kinematics data for Late Oligocene-Early Miocene thrusts, organized in duplex systems, verging in the opposite direction of the foreland propagation (back-thrusts), which affected the Late Triassic-Oligocene sedimentary succession of the Tuscan Domain, previously affected by pre-orogenic structures. These latter consist of mesoscopic-to cartographic-scale Jurassic syn-sedimentary normal faults and extensional structures, which gave rise to effective stratigraphic lateral variation and mechanical heterogeneities. Structural analysis of both syn-sedimentary faults and back-thrusts were therefore compared in order to discuss the possible role of the pre-existing anisotropies in influencing the evolution of the back-thrusts. As a result, it can be reasonably proposed that back-thrusts trajectories and stacking pattern were controlled by relevant syn-sedimentary normal faults; these latter were reactivated, in some cases, if properly oriented. Such an issue adds new inputs for discussing the potential role of structural inheritance during tectonic inversions, and helps to better understand the processes suitable for the development of back-thrusts in the inner zones of orogenic belts, as it is the case of the inner Northern Apennines.

  20. Effects of synoptic-scale circulation pattern and local land surface condition on fog at Kushiro, northern Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugimoto, S.; Sato, T.; Nakamura, K.

    2012-12-01

    Marine stratiform clouds are frequently observed over western North Pacific offshore of the northeast Japan during summer when warm southerly wind prevails over underlying cold ocean current. Such clouds often migrate over Kushiro located in the coastal area of eastern Hokkaido Island, north Japan and are recognized as sea fog. On the other hand, Kushiro is a middle-sized city with population of over 180,000 and a large wetland expands at the north of Kushiro city. The difference of land surface condition between the city and the wetland might cause heterogeneity of the sea fog distribution over land, via dissipation and regeneration process of fog. In this study, long-term visibility data for Kushiro are investigated to clarify the relationship between interannual variation of fog frequency (FF) and large-scale circulation patterns. Furthermore, frequency of fog/low-level cloud (LC) is identified using satellite images and sensitivity experiments changing land surface condition are conducted using meteorological regional model to understand an impact of land use on the local fog distribution and its physical processes. Monthly mean FF trends observed at Kushiro during 1931 to 2010 shows significant decline (-3.3 day per decade). Since late 1970s, the decline at Kushiro has been particularly remarkable in July and August in association with an increased number of years with very low FF. Analysis of radiosonde data has revealed the development of shallow moist layer under a strong inversion layer during fog occurrence because of abundant moisture supply from southerly wind. However, cold and dry northerly wind prevents the formation of inversion layer during fog-free days. Composite analysis of reanalysis data suggests that the low-level southerly wind toward northeast Japan is weaker in the low FF month of July than climatology owing to a southward shift of the North Pacific High (NPH) and stronger Okhotsk High. In August, eastward displacement or shrinking of the

  1. Estimation of malaria incidence in northern Namibia in 2009 using Bayesian conditional-autoregressive spatial–temporal models☆

    PubMed Central

    Alegana, Victor A.; Atkinson, Peter M.; Wright, Jim A.; Kamwi, Richard; Uusiku, Petrina; Katokele, Stark; Snow, Robert W.; Noor, Abdisalan M.

    2013-01-01

    As malaria transmission declines, it becomes increasingly important to monitor changes in malaria incidence rather than prevalence. Here, a spatio-temporal model was used to identify constituencies with high malaria incidence to guide malaria control. Malaria cases were assembled across all age groups along with several environmental covariates. A Bayesian conditional-autoregressive model was used to model the spatial and temporal variation of incidence after adjusting for test positivity rates and health facility utilisation. Of the 144,744 malaria cases recorded in Namibia in 2009, 134,851 were suspected and 9893 were parasitologically confirmed. The mean annual incidence based on the Bayesian model predictions was 13 cases per 1000 population with the highest incidence predicted for constituencies bordering Angola and Zambia. The smoothed maps of incidence highlight trends in disease incidence. For Namibia, the 2009 maps provide a baseline for monitoring the targets of pre-elimination. PMID:24238079

  2. Estimation of malaria incidence in northern Namibia in 2009 using Bayesian conditional-autoregressive spatial-temporal models.

    PubMed

    Alegana, Victor A; Atkinson, Peter M; Wright, Jim A; Kamwi, Richard; Uusiku, Petrina; Katokele, Stark; Snow, Robert W; Noor, Abdisalan M

    2013-12-01

    As malaria transmission declines, it becomes increasingly important to monitor changes in malaria incidence rather than prevalence. Here, a spatio-temporal model was used to identify constituencies with high malaria incidence to guide malaria control. Malaria cases were assembled across all age groups along with several environmental covariates. A Bayesian conditional-autoregressive model was used to model the spatial and temporal variation of incidence after adjusting for test positivity rates and health facility utilisation. Of the 144,744 malaria cases recorded in Namibia in 2009, 134,851 were suspected and 9893 were parasitologically confirmed. The mean annual incidence based on the Bayesian model predictions was 13 cases per 1000 population with the highest incidence predicted for constituencies bordering Angola and Zambia. The smoothed maps of incidence highlight trends in disease incidence. For Namibia, the 2009 maps provide a baseline for monitoring the targets of pre-elimination. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  3. Assessment and monitoring of recreation impacts and resource conditions on mountain summits: examples from the Northern Forest, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Monz, Christopher A.; Marion, Jeffrey L.; Goonan, Kelly A.; Manning, Robert E.; Wimpey, Jeremy; Carr, Christopher

    2010-01-01

    Mountain summits present a unique challenge to manage sustainably: they are ecologically important and, in many circumstances, under high demand for recreation and tourism activities. This article presents recent advances in the assessment of resource conditions and visitor disturbance in mountain summit environments, by drawing on examples from a multiyear, interdisciplinary study of summits in the northeastern United States. Primary impact issues as a consequence of visitor use, such as informal trail formation, vegetation disturbance, and soil loss, were addressed via the adaption of protocols from recreation ecology studies to summit environments. In addition, new methodologies were developed that provide measurement sensitivity to change previously unavailable through standard recreation monitoring protocols. Although currently limited in application to the northeastern US summit environments, the methods presented show promise for widespread application wherever summits are in demand for visitor activities.

  4. Socio-demographic transformations and living conditions among two indigenous and black populations in Northern Cauca during the period of 1993-2005

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez Sánchez, Diego Alejandro

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: To describe the changes that occurred in some patterns of socio-demographic variables and in living conditions among the Nasa, Guambiana and Afrocolombian populations in the northern region of the Department of Cauca, and those occurring in two residential communities, one white-mestizo and one black, in Cali during the 1993-2005 period. Methods: This paper presents a descriptive study that analyzes several socio-demographic indicators from the census of 1993 and 2005, the specific data include: rate of juvenile dependency; total masculinity index; average size of the household; specific global and local birth rates, and infant mortality rates; life expectancy at birth; average years of schooling; health cover age status; and percentage of the population with unmet basic needs (UBN). In this way, it is possible to note differences in the course of socio-demographic evolution and in the standard of living trends in the differing populations under study. Results: The Guambiana Indian population in the municipality of Silvia presents lower birth rates than the Nasa population, characterized by their seasonal birth rates. Differing from the pattern of the indigenous people of Northern Cauca, the Afro-Colombian population both from this region and from the population residing in the urban zones of Cali's tend to show similar socio-demographic patterns. Conclusions: Although there have been profound changes recorded during this period among these populations under study, the ethnic-racial inequalities and those of social class seem to persist. From this first diagnosis, attention is called to the need for a more adequate reproductive health policy to attend the specific needs presented by the indigenous population. PMID:24893053

  5. Human influence on the abundance and connectivity of high-risk fuels in mixed forests of northern Wisconsin, USA

    Treesearch

    Brian R. Sturtevant; Patrick A. Zollner; Eric J. Gustafson; David T. Cleland

    2004-01-01

    Though fire is considered a "natural" disturbance, humans heavily influence modern wildfire regimes. Humans influence fires both directly, by igniting and suppressing fires, and indirectly, by either altering vegetation, climate, or both. We used the LANDIS disturbance and succession model to compare the relative importance of a direct human influence...

  6. Human influence on the abundance and connectivity of high-risk fuels in mixed forests of northern Wisconsin, USA

    Treesearch

    Brian R. Sturtevant; Patrick A. Zoller; Eric J. Gustafson; David T. Cleland

    2004-01-01

    Though fire is considered a "natural" disturbance, humans heavily influence modern wildfire regimes. Humans influence fires both directly, by igniting and suppressing fires, and indirectly, by either altering vegetation, climate, or both. We used the LANDIS disturbance and succession model to compare the relative importance of a direct human influence (...

  7. On the Offshore Advection of Boundary-Layer Structures and the Influence on Offshore Wind Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dörenkämper, Martin; Optis, Michael; Monahan, Adam; Steinfeld, Gerald

    2015-06-01

    The coastal discontinuity imposes strong signals to the atmospheric conditions over the sea that are important for wind-energy potential. Here, we provide a comprehensive investigation of the influence of the land-sea transition on wind conditions in the Baltic Sea using data from an offshore meteorological tower, data from a wind farm, and mesoscale model simulations. Results show a strong induced stable stratification when warm inland air flows over a colder sea. This stratification demonstrates a strong diurnal pattern and is most pronounced in spring when the land-sea temperature difference is greatest. The strength of the induced stratification is proportional to this parameter and inversely proportional to fetch. Extended periods of stable stratification lead to increased influence of inertial oscillations and increased frequency of low-level jets. Furthermore, heterogeneity in land-surface roughness along the coastline is found to produce pronounced horizontal streaks of reduced wind speeds that under stable stratification are advected several tens of kilometres over the sea. The intensity and length of the streaks dampen as atmospheric stability decreases. Increasing sea surface roughness leads to a deformation of these streaks with increasing fetch. Slight changes in wind direction shift the path of these advective streaks, which when passing through an offshore wind farm are found to produce large fluctuations in wind power. Implications of these coastline effects on the accurate modelling and forecasting of offshore wind conditions, as well as damage risk to the turbine, are discussed.

  8. The influence of the sun, moon, climate and economic conditions on crisis incidence.

    PubMed

    Snoyman, P; Holdstock, T L

    1980-10-01

    Investigated the relationship between 2,344 cases of crisis incidence over a 1-year period (1976) and geophysical, climatic and seasonal conditions. Results revealed an intricate interactive effect between the variables of sex, nature of crisis, period of analysis, and environmental conditions. Males crisis became more likely, with downward economic trends or decreased solar activity. In contrast to female incidence of crisis, which peaked in spring, that of males peaked in autumn. Increased solar activity was related strongly to the incidence of crisis experienced by people who were retarded, abused drugs and were guilty of assault and/or rape. The waxing of the moon was related closely to cases of assault and/or rape, while retardates were influenced further by the moisture content in the air. Temporal considerations revealed a positive relationship between full moon and crisis incidence on alternate months only. Generally, the increased cloud cover, rainfall and temperature in summer, gave rise to more crisis consultations. Finally, geophysical, climatic and economic conditions also were seen to act in conjunction with each other to influence crisis incidence.

  9. Influence of Conditions of Pd/SnO2 Nanomaterial Formation on Properties of Hydrogen Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokovykh, E. V.; Oleksenko, L. P.; Maksymovych, N. P.; Matushko, I. P.

    2017-06-01

    Metal oxide sensors were created using nanosized tin dioxide obtained by a sol-gel method. Gas-sensitive layers of the sensors were impregnated with PdCl2 solutions of different concentrations to increase sensitivities of the proposed sensors. Influence of different temperature conditions of the sensor formation on the sensor properties was studied. It was found that decreasing duration of high-temperature sensor treatment prevents enlargement of particles of the gas-sensitive materials. It was shown that the sensors based on materials with smaller particle sizes showed higher sensor responses to 40 ppm H2. Obtained results were explained in terms of substantial influence of length of the common boundaries between the material particles of tin dioxide and palladium on the gas-sensitive properties of the sensors. The obtained sensors had possessed a fast response and recovery time and demonstrated stable characteristics during their long-term operation.

  10. Influence of boundary conditions and confinement on nonlocal effects in flows of wormlike micellar systems.

    PubMed

    Masselon, Chloé; Colin, Annie; Olmsted, Peter D

    2010-02-01

    In this paper we report on the influence of different geometric and boundary constraints on nonlocal (spatially inhomogeneous) effects in wormlike micellar systems. In a previous paper, nonlocal effects were observable by measuring the local rheological flow curves of micelles flowing in a microchannel under different pressure drops, which appeared to differ from the flow curve measured using conventional rheometry. Here we show that both the confinement and the boundary conditions can influence those nonlocal effects. The role of the nature of the surface is analyzed in detail using a simple scalar model that incorporates inhomogeneities, which captures the flow behavior in both wide and confined geometries. This leads to an estimate for the nonlocal "diffusion" coefficient (i.e., the shear curvature viscosity) which corresponds to a characteristic length from 1 to 10 microm.

  11. Genetic background influences nicotine-induced conditioned place preference and place aversion in mice.

    PubMed

    Ise, Yuya; Mori, Tomohisa; Katayama, Shirou; Suzuki, Tsutomu; Wang, Tzu-Chueh

    2014-01-01

    This study was designed to determine whether genetic differences influence the rewarding effects of nicotine in 4 inbred strains of mice (DBA/2, BALB/c, C3H, and C57BL/6). Nicotine (subcutaneous) induced a place preference in DBA/2 and BALB/c mice but a place aversion in C57BL/6 mice. A low dose of nicotine produced a significant place preference, whereas a high dose of nicotine produced place aversion in C3H mice. These effects were completely reversed by the nicotinic receptor antagonist mecamylamine. These results strongly suggest that a conditioned state, such as rewarding effects or aversive effects, can be influenced by genetic background.

  12. Influence of the boundary conditions on the natural frequencies of a Francis turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valentín, David; Ramos, David; Bossio, Matías; Presas, Alexandre; Egusquiza, Eduard; Valero, Carme

    2016-11-01

    Natural frequencies estimation of Francis turbines is of paramount importance in the stage of design in order to avoid vibration and resonance problems especially during transient events. Francis turbine runners are submerged in water and confined with small axial and radial gaps which considerably decrease their natural frequencies in comparison to the same structure in the air. Acoustic-structural FSI simulations have been used to evaluate the influence of these gaps. This model considers an entire prototype of a Francis turbine, including generator, shaft, runner and surrounding water. The radial gap between the runner and the static parts has been changed from the real configuration (about 0.04% the runner diameter) to 1% of the runner diameter to evaluate its influence on the machine natural frequencies. Mode-shapes and natural frequencies of the whole machine are discussed for all the boundary conditions tested.

  13. Investigation of the solar influence on clean and dusty CO2-ice under Martian conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaufmann, E.; Hagermann, A.; Wolters, S.

    2015-10-01

    CO2 is the main component of the Martian atmosphere. Therefore the polar caps are - depending on hemisphere and season - partially or totally covered with CO2-ice. In contrast to rock and soil surface layers, which absorb and reflect incoming solar radiation immediately at the surface, ices are partially transparent in the visible spectral range, while they are opaque in the infrared. These properties are responsible for the so-called "Solid- State Greenhouse Effect" (SSGE). The SSGE may have a major influence on the sublimation and recondensation of CO2 and its circulation in the Martian atmosphere. Our work will concentrate on the influence of the SSGE on CO2-ice under Martian like conditions.

  14. Influence of Conditions of Pd/SnO2 Nanomaterial Formation on Properties of Hydrogen Sensors.

    PubMed

    Sokovykh, E V; Oleksenko, L P; Maksymovych, N P; Matushko, I P

    2017-12-01

    Metal oxide sensors were created using nanosized tin dioxide obtained by a sol-gel method. Gas-sensitive layers of the sensors were impregnated with PdCl2 solutions of different concentrations to increase sensitivities of the proposed sensors. Influence of different temperature conditions of the sensor formation on the sensor properties was studied. It was found that decreasing duration of high-temperature sensor treatment prevents enlargement of particles of the gas-sensitive materials. It was shown that the sensors based on materials with smaller particle sizes showed higher sensor responses to 40 ppm H2. Obtained results were explained in terms of substantial influence of length of the common boundaries between the material particles of tin dioxide and palladium on the gas-sensitive properties of the sensors. The obtained sensors had possessed a fast response and recovery time and demonstrated stable characteristics during their long-term operation.

  15. Influence of cooling face masks on nasal air conditioning and nasal geometry.

    PubMed

    Lindemann, J; Hoffmann, T; Koehl, A; Walz, E M; Sommer, F

    2017-06-01

    Nasal geometries and temperature of the nasal mucosa are the primary factors affecting nasal air conditioning. Data on intranasal air conditioning after provoking the trigeminal nerve with a cold stimulus simulating the effects of an arctic condition is still missing. The objective was to investigate the influence of skin cooling face masks on nasal air conditioning, mucosal temperature and nasal geometry. Standardized in vivo measurements of intranasal air temperature, humidity and mucosal temperature were performed in 55 healthy subjects at defined detection sites before and after wearing a cooling face mask. Measurements of skin temperature, rhinomanometry and acoustic rhinometry were accomplished. After wearing the face mask the facial skin temperature was significantly reduced. Intranasal air temperature did not change. Absolute humidity and mucosal temperature increased significantly. The acoustic rhinometric results showed a significant increase of the volumes and the cross-sectional areas. There was no change in nasal airflow. Nasal mucosal temperature, humidity of inhaled air, and volume of the anterior nose increased after application of a cold face mask. The response is mediated by the trigeminal nerve. Increased mucosal temperatures as well as changes in nasal geometries seem to guarantee sufficient steady intranasal nasal air conditioning.

  16. Influence of yeast strain, priming solution and temperature on beer bottle conditioning.

    PubMed

    Marconi, Ombretta; Rossi, Serena; Galgano, Fernanda; Sileoni, Valeria; Perretti, Giuseppe

    2016-09-01

    Recently, there has been a significant increase in the number of microbreweries. Usually, craft beers are bottle conditioned; however, few studies have investigated beer refermentation. One of the objectives of this study was to evaluate the impacts of different experimental conditions, specifically yeast strain, priming solution and temperature, on the standard quality attributes, the volatile compounds and the sensory profile of the bottle-conditioned beer. The other aim was to monitor the evolution of volatile compounds and amino acids consumption throughout the refermentation process to check if it is possible to reduce the time necessary for bottle conditioning. The results indicate that the volatile profile was mainly influenced by the strain of yeast, and this may have obscured the possible impacts of the other parameters. Our results also confirm that the two yeast strains showed different metabolic activity, particularly with respect to esters production. Moreover, we found the Safbrew S-33® strain when primed with Siromix® and refermented at 30 °C yielded the fastest formation of higher alcohols while maintaining low production of off-flavours. These results suggest a formulation that may reduce the time needed for bottle conditioning without affecting the quality of the final beer which may simultaneously improve efficiency and economic profits. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  17. Influence of Biogeochemical Conditions on the Stability and Remobilization of Biogenic U(IV)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, L.; Liu, C.; Szecsody, J. E.; Zachara, J. M.

    2004-05-01

    Uranium (U) is a common contaminant at the US Department of Energy (DOE) sites resulting from its central role in nuclear fuel cycle, and at U mine tailing sites associated with its production. U is present in the environment primarily as the hexavalent U(VI) and tetravalent U(IV). U(IV) is typically contained in insoluble precipitates, such as uraninite [UO2(s)], whereas U(VI) exists as uranyl ion, UO22+, and its complexes with various ligands. The mobility of U(VI) is a major concern in the subsurface environments. Under anoxic conditions, U(VI) can be reduced into U(IV) by some metal reducing bacteria, thus immobilizing U from groundwater. The reductive immobilization of U has been proposed as a remediation technology and under active studies at many US DOE sites. A key to the success of such immobilization technology is the maintenance of long term stability of the immobilized U when remediation completes and subsurface environments return to oxic conditions. This study investigated the influence of biogeochemical conditions on the stability and remobilization of biogenic U(IV). The experiments were conducted in a batch system using sediments collected from the US DOE Field Research Center at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Both sediments and U(VI) were first reduced by a dissimilatory metal reducing bacterium, Shewanella putrefaciens strain CN32, and then mixed in a solution containing 0.1 mM bicarbonate and 0.1 M NaNO3 in contact with atmospheric O2. Aqueous U(VI) in the suspensions were monitored as a function of time to determine the rates of U remobilization. The influence of biogeochemical conditions in the initial suspensions including Fe(II) concentration, pH, and the aging of bio-reduced U was evaluated. The results demonstrated that the Fe(II) concentration and pH had significant effects on the rate of U remobilization, while aging had only minor influence. The immobilized U was the most stable under neutral pH condition and its stability increased

  18. Microbial Activity Response to Solar Radiation across Contrasting Environmental Conditions in Salar de Huasco, Northern Chilean Altiplano

    PubMed Central

    Hernández, Klaudia L.; Yannicelli, Beatriz; Olsen, Lasse M.; Dorador, Cristina; Menschel, Eduardo J.; Molina, Verónica; Remonsellez, Francisco; Hengst, Martha B.; Jeffrey, Wade H.

    2016-01-01

    In high altitude environments, extreme levels of solar radiation and important differences of ionic concentrations over narrow spatial scales may modulate microbial activity. In Salar de Huasco, a high-altitude wetland in the Andean mountains, the high diversity of microbial communities has been characterized and associated with strong environmental variability. Communities that differed in light history and environmental conditions, such as nutrient concentrations and salinity from different spatial locations, were assessed for bacterial secondary production (BSP, 3H-leucine incorporation) response from short-term exposures to solar radiation. We sampled during austral spring seven stations categorized as: (a) source stations, with recently emerged groundwater (no-previous solar exposure); (b) stream running water stations; (c) stations connected to source waters but far downstream from source points; and (d) isolated ponds disconnected from ground sources or streams with a longer isolation and solar exposure history. Very high values of 0.25 μE m-2 s-1, 72 W m-2 and 12 W m-2 were measured for PAR, UVA, and UVB incident solar radiation, respectively. The environmental factors measured formed two groups of stations reflected by principal component analyses (near to groundwater sources and isolated systems) where isolated ponds had the highest BSP and microbial abundance (35 microalgae taxa, picoeukaryotes, nanoflagellates, and bacteria) plus higher salinities and PO43- concentrations. BSP short-term response (4 h) to solar radiation was measured by 3H-leucine incorporation under four different solar conditions: full sun, no UVB, PAR, and dark. Microbial communities established in waters with the longest surface exposure (e.g., isolated ponds) had the lowest BSP response to solar radiation treatments, and thus were likely best adapted to solar radiation exposure contrary to ground source waters. These results support our light history (solar exposure) hypothesis

  19. Microbial Activity Response to Solar Radiation across Contrasting Environmental Conditions in Salar de Huasco, Northern Chilean Altiplano.

    PubMed

    Hernández, Klaudia L; Yannicelli, Beatriz; Olsen, Lasse M; Dorador, Cristina; Menschel, Eduardo J; Molina, Verónica; Remonsellez, Francisco; Hengst, Martha B; Jeffrey, Wade H

    2016-01-01

    In high altitude environments, extreme levels of solar radiation and important differences of ionic concentrations over narrow spatial scales may modulate microbial activity. In Salar de Huasco, a high-altitude wetland in the Andean mountains, the high diversity of microbial communities has been characterized and associated with strong environmental variability. Communities that differed in light history and environmental conditions, such as nutrient concentrations and salinity from different spatial locations, were assessed for bacterial secondary production (BSP, (3)H-leucine incorporation) response from short-term exposures to solar radiation. We sampled during austral spring seven stations categorized as: (a) source stations, with recently emerged groundwater (no-previous solar exposure); (b) stream running water stations; (c) stations connected to source waters but far downstream from source points; and (d) isolated ponds disconnected from ground sources or streams with a longer isolation and solar exposure history. Very high values of 0.25 μE m(-2) s(-1), 72 W m(-2) and 12 W m(-2) were measured for PAR, UVA, and UVB incident solar radiation, respectively. The environmental factors measured formed two groups of stations reflected by principal component analyses (near to groundwater sources and isolated systems) where isolated ponds had the highest BSP and microbial abundance (35 microalgae taxa, picoeukaryotes, nanoflagellates, and bacteria) plus higher salinities and PO4(3-) concentrations. BSP short-term response (4 h) to solar radiation was measured by (3)H-leucine incorporation under four different solar conditions: full sun, no UVB, PAR, and dark. Microbial communities established in waters with the longest surface exposure (e.g., isolated ponds) had the lowest BSP response to solar radiation treatments, and thus were likely best adapted to solar radiation exposure contrary to ground source waters. These results support our light history (solar exposure

  20. Effects of fungal inocula and habitat conditions on alder and eucalyptus leaf litter decomposition in streams of northern Spain.

    PubMed

    Pérez, Javier; Galán, Javier; Descals, Enrique; Pozo, Jesús

    2014-02-01

    We investigated how fungal decomposer (aquatic hyphomycetes) communities colonizing alder and eucalyptus leaf litter respond to changes in habitat characteristics (transplantation experiment). We examined the breakdown of leaf materials and the associated fungal communities at two contrasting sites, a headwater stream (H) and a midreach (M). Agroforestry increased from headwater to midreach. One month after the start of experiments at both sites, some leaf samples from the midreach site were transplanted to the headwater site (M-H treatment). Although both sites showed similar dissolved inorganic nutrient concentrations, eucalyptus leaves initially incubated at the midreach site (M, M-H) increased their breakdown rate compared to those incubated along the experiment at the headwater site (H). Alder breakdown rate was not enhanced, suggesting that their consumption was not limited by nutrient availability. Sporulation rates clearly differed between leaf types (alder > eucalyptus) and streams (H > M), but no transplantation effect was detected. When comparing conidial assemblages after transplantation, an inoculum effect (persistence of early colonizing species) was clear in both leaf species. Substrate preference and shifts in the relative importance of some fungal species along the process were also observed. Overall, our results support the determining role of the initial conditioning phase on the whole litter breakdown process, highlighting the importance of intrinsic leaf characteristics and those of the incubation habitat.

  1. Decline in condition of gorgonian octocorals on mesophotic reefs in the northern Gulf of Mexico: before and after the Deepwater Horizon oil spill

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Etnoyer, Peter J.; Wickes, Leslie N.; Silva, Mauricio; Dubick, J. D.; Balthis, Len; Salgado, Enrique; MacDonald, Ian R.

    2016-03-01

    Hard-bottom `mesophotic' reefs along the `40-fathom' (73 m) shelf edge in the northern Gulf of Mexico were investigated for potential effects of the Deepwater Horizon (DWH) oil spill from the Macondo well in April 2010. Alabama Alps Reef, Roughtongue Reef, and Yellowtail Reef were near the well, situated 60-88 m below floating oil discharged during the DWH spill for several weeks and subject to dispersant applications. In contrast, Coral Trees Reef and Madison Swanson South Reef were far from the DWH spill site and below the slick for less than a week or not at all, respectively. The reefs were surveyed by ROV in 2010, 2011, and 2014 and compared to similar surveys conducted one and two decades earlier. Large gorgonian octocorals were present at all sites in moderate abundance including Swiftia exserta, Hypnogorgia pendula, Thesea spp., and Placogorgia spp. The gorgonians were assessed for health and condition in a before-after-control-impact (BACI) research design using still images captured from ROV video transects. Injury was modeled as a categorical response to proximity and time using logistic regression. Condition of gorgonians at sites near Macondo well declined significantly post-spill. Before the spill, injury was observed for 4-9 % of large gorgonians. After the spill, injury was observed in 38-50 % of large gorgonians. Odds of injury for sites near Macondo were 10.8 times higher post-spill, but unchanged at far sites. The majority of marked injured colonies in 2011 declined further in condition by 2014. Marked healthy colonies generally remained healthy. Background stresses to corals, including fishing activity, fishing debris, and coral predation, were noted during surveys, but do not appear to account for the decline in condition at study sites near Macondo well.

  2. Influence of chemistry and hot rolling conditions on high permeability non-grain oriented silicon steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huňady, J.; Černík, M.; Hilinski, E. J.; Predmerský, M.; Magurová, A.

    2006-09-01

    This paper discusses the influence of chemical composition on the final electromagnetic properties in higher permeability material. Furthermore, the effect of the hot rolling practice and the end of austenite transformation temperature range on the hot band microstructure is described. The magnetic polarization J5000 better than 1.7 T, using hot rolling conditions 40 mm transfer bar thickness, finish mill entry temperature 1000 °C, and finishing temperature 800-840 °C and after decarburization heat treatment and grain growth treatment, was obtained.

  3. Interaction of hydrogen chloride with alumina. [influence of outgas and temperature conditions on adsorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, R. R.; Wightman, J. P.

    1975-01-01

    The influence of outgas conditions and temperature on the adsorptive properties of two aluminas Alon-c and Al6sG were studied using adsorption isotherm measurements. Alon-C and Al6SG were characterized using X-ray powder diffraction, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and BET nitrogen surface areas. Some of these techniques were applied to two other aluminas but no isotherm data was obtained. Isotherm data and techniques applied to each alumina are summarized in tabular form.

  4. Influence of convective conditions in radiative peristaltic flow of pseudoplastic nanofluid in a tapered asymmetric channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayat, T.; Iqbal, Rija; Tanveer, Anum; Alsaedi, A.

    2016-06-01

    This paper looks at the influences of magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) and thermal radiation on peristaltic transport of a pseudoplastic nanofluid in a tapered asymmetric channel. The tapered channel walls satisfy convective boundary conditions. The governing equations for the balance of mass, momentum, temperature and volume fraction for pseudoplastic nanofluid are first formulated and then utilized for long wavelength and small Reynolds number considerations. Effects of involved parameters on the flow characteristics have been plotted and examined. It is observed that the heat transfer Biot number shows a dual behavior on the temperature of nanofluid particles whereas the mass transfer Biot number with its increasing values enhances the fluid temperature.

  5. On the Influence of Boundary Conditions in Modeling Heat Transfer in Soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikailsoy, F. D.

    2017-01-01

    A procedure to determine the thermal diffusivity of soils, which is based on the heat-transfer equation, has been developed. Experimental investigations were carried out to establish the influence of boundary conditions on the soil surface on the solution of inverse problems of modeling of heat transfer in soil. On the basis of these data, the author has calculated thermal diffusivity in soils with the proposed methods developed for the case with one and two harmonics and a comparison of these methods has been made; the calculated characteristics and experimental results have also been compared.

  6. [Conditions that influence bacterial luminescence in the presence of blood serum].

    PubMed

    Deriabin, D G; Poliakov, E G

    2005-01-01

    Conditions that influence the luminescence of natural and recombinant luminescent bacteria in the presence of blood serum were studied. In general, blood serum quenched the luminescence of the marine Photobacterium phosphoreum and the recombinant Escherichia coli strains harboring the luminescent system genes of Photobacterium leiognathi, but enhanced the luminescence of the soil bacterium Photorhabdus luminescens Zm1 and the recombinant E. coli strain harboring the lux operon of P. luminescens Zm1. The quenching effect of blood serum increased with its concentration and the time and temperature of incubation. The components of blood serum that determine the degree and specificity of its action on bacterial luminescence were identified.

  7. The Influence of Initial and Boundary Conditions on Gaseous Detonation Waves.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-09-01

    A11D-A1.2 631 THE INFLUENCE OF INITIAL ND BOUNDARY CONDITIONS ON 1/ 4 GASEOUS DETONATION NAVES(U) DEFE CE RESEARCH 6SS ESTABLISHMENT SUFFIELD...RALSTON (ALBERTA) S B MURRAY UNCLASSIFIED SEP 5 DRES-SR-41 F/6 19/ 4 W smmhhmhmhhhml smEEEohhhEEoh [smmhmmmhhhu l III= III1 25 11111_’ 4 1.6 MICROCOPY...handsome and polished looking piece of work. -. 4 Without question, the moral support and encouragement provided by PV parents, nV two sisters and their

  8. Influence of diet on growth, condition and reproductive capacity in Newfoundland and Labrador cod ( Gadus morhua): Insights from stable carbon isotopes ( δ13C)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherwood, Graham D.; Rideout, Rick M.; Fudge, Susan B.; Rose, George A.

    2007-11-01

    Cod populations in Newfoundland and Labrador waters have shown differing growth, condition and recruitment since near-universal declines in these properties during the cold period of the late 1980s and early 1990s. To assess the influence of variable prey communities on these parameters, we compared cod energetics and diet in populations off Labrador and the northeast and south coasts of Newfoundland. Many properties were highest in the southern group(s) and lowest in the northern group(s), including growth, somatic condition, liver index and age-at-maturity. Most differences could be explained by variations in diet, as measured by stomach contents and stable carbon isotopes ( δ13C). The diet of Labrador cod consisted almost entirely of northern shrimp ( Pandalus borealis), and these cod displayed the most benthic δ13C signatures. Northeast cod had a more varied diet that included capelin and other fish, but still had mostly benthic δ13C signatures, suggesting the importance of benthic prey like shrimp in this population. South coast cod exhibited the most varied diet, including capelin ( Mallotus villosus), zooplankton, crabs and other fish, and had the most pelagic δ13C signatures. Among and within populations, the benefits of a more pelagic diet in medium-sized (30-69 cm) cod included higher somatic condition, higher liver index (lipid stores) and greater spawning potential (decreased incidence of atresia). It is hypothesized that major rebuilding of Newfoundland and Labrador cod stocks will require a return to a system that supports mostly pelagic feeding (i.e. capelin) in cod.

  9. Influence of baking conditions on the quality attributes of sponge cake.

    PubMed

    Ureta, M Micaela; Olivera, Daniela F; Salvadori, Viviana O

    2017-03-01

    Sponge cake is a sweet bakery product characterized by its aerated and soft crumb and by its thin-coloured crust. The aim of this work is to analyse the influence of baking conditions (natural or forced convection, steam injection, oven temperature from 140 ℃ to 180 ℃) on sponge cake quality. Both crust and crumb regions were characterized by means of colour development, water content, crust/crumb relation, crust thickness and crumb structure (in terms of porosity, crumb density and texture). Colour measurements allowed obtaining an accurate model for browning kinetics. Crumb water content remains almost constant, while considerable dehydration occurs in the crust. In general, no significant differences due to baking conditions were found in the instrumental quality analysis.

  10. Housing conditions influence motor functions and exploratory behavior following focal damage of the rat brain.

    PubMed

    Gornicka-Pawlak, Elzbieta; Jabłońska, Anna; Chyliński, Andrzej; Domańska-Janik, Krystyna

    2009-01-01

    The present study investigated influence of housing conditions on motor functions recovery and exploratory behavior following ouabain focal brain lesion in the rat. During 30 days post-surgery period rats were housed individually in standard cages (IS) or in groups in enriched environment (EE) and behaviorally tested. The EE lesioned rats showed enhanced recovery from motor impairments in walking beam task, comparing with IS animals. Contrarily, in the open field IS rats (both lesioned and control) traveled a longer distance, showed less habituation and spent less time resting at the home base than the EE animals. Unlike the EE lesioned animals, the lesioned IS rats, presented a tendency to hyperactivity in postinjury period. Turning tendency was significantly affected by unilateral brain lesion only in the EE rats. We can conclude that housing conditions distinctly affected the rat's behavior in classical laboratory tests.

  11. Review of parameters influencing the structural response of a submerged body under cavitation conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escaler, X.; De La Torre, O.; Farhat, M.

    2015-12-01

    Submerged structures that operate under extreme flows are prone to suffer large scale cavitation attached to their surfaces. Under such conditions the added mass effects differ from the expected ones in pure liquids. Moreover, the existence of small gaps between the structure and surrounding bodies filled with fluid also influence the dynamic response. A series of experiments and numerical simulations have been carried out with a truncated NACA0009 hydrofoil mounted as a cantilever beam at the LMH-EPFL cavitation tunnel. The three first modes of vibration have been determined and analysed under various hydrodynamic conditions ranging from air and still water to partial cavitation and supercavitation. A remote nonintrusive excitation system with piezoelectric patches has been used for the experiments. The effects of the cavity properties and the lateral gap size on the natural frequencies and mode shapes have been determined. As a result, the significance of several parameters in the design of such structures is discussed.

  12. Conditions influencing the synthesis of acid protease by Mucor pusillus Lindt.

    PubMed

    Somkuti, G A; Babel, F J

    1967-11-01

    Protease synthesis by Mucor pusillus Lindt, in a wheat bran medium under submerged conditions, was influenced by substrate concentration, initial pH of the medium, and temperature of incubation. A 4% wheat bran (dry weight) concentration was satisfactory for enzyme production. The initial pH of the medium had a substantial effect on enzyme synthesis; adjustment of the enzyme production medium to pH 5.0 prior to sterilization was desirable. Incubation at 35 C resulted in the best enzyme yields. Under optimal conditions of enzyme production, maximal activity was detected after 5 days of incubation. The enrichment of the medium with glucose increased the yield of mycelia but lowered the amount of enzyme produced.

  13. Influence of emulsion composition and spray-drying conditions on microencapsulation of tilapia oil.

    PubMed

    Huang, Hui; Hao, Shuxian; Li, Laihao; Yang, Xianqing; Cen, Jianwei; Lin, Wanling; Wei, Ya

    2014-09-01

    The influence of processing conditions on the microencapsulation of tilapia oil by spray drying was studied. Trehalose, gelatin, sucrose and xanthan were used as emulsion composition. The experimental parameters of spray drying such as inlet air temperature, solid content, drying air flow rate and atomizing pressure were optimized using a central composite design. Encapsulation efficiency and lipid oxidation were determined. Bulk density, powder morphology and particle size were also analyzed. Trehalose improved the glass transition temperature of wall material significantly and prevented the oxidation of the fish oil. Encapsulation efficiency reached a maximum of 90 % under optimum conditions with an inlet air temperature of 121 °C, a drying air flow rate of 0.65 m(3)/min and a spray pressure of 100 kPa.

  14. Environmental Conditions Influence Allometric Patterns in the Blow Fly, Chrysomya albiceps

    PubMed Central

    Horenstein, M Battán; Peretti, Av

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this research was to study variations in allometry of body characters in females and males of two populations of blow flies, Chrysomya albiceps (Wiedemann) (Diptera: Calliphoridae), under different environmental conditions to establish patterns of morphological variation. Body size of both males and females in the experimental population was significantly higher than in the individuals of the natural population, indicating an important influence of food on body size. All genitalic and non-genitalic characters in males and females of the two populations showed a trend towards negative allometry rather than isometry. Allometric patterns were modified in both sexes and between populations. The data show generally larger allometric slopes in females than in males. We confirmed that the environmental conditions have an important effect on allometric patterns and body size. PMID:22224467

  15. Influence of drying conditions on the quality of Origanum syriacum L.

    PubMed

    Hanna Wakim, L; El Beyrouthy, M; Mnif, W; Dhifi, W; Salman, M; Bassal, A

    2013-08-01

    The temperature and the speed of drying may affect the quality of the end product of medicinal plants. In addition, ecotypes and chemotypes could be factors influencing this quality. Thus, the aim of our study was to explore various techniques of drying of Origanum syriacum L., which is considered as a main ingredient in the Lebanese diet. For all these reasons, we decided to study two types of O. syriacum originating from Rkai and Ibrine regions on which analyses were carried out. In view of our results, a moderate temperature, in the absence of light, is more favourable for the safeguarding of the flavours and chlorophylls. On the other hand, these conditions seem to be unsuitable for other substances. In order to clarify the optimal conditions for drying of O. syriacum to lead to a product of quality, the choice of a technique of suitable dehydration seems to be delicate.

  16. Influence of Heat Treatment Conditions on the Properties of Vanadium Oxide Thin Films for Thermochromic Applications.

    PubMed

    Kim, Donguk; Kwon, Samyoung; Park, Young; Boo, Jin-Hyo; Nam, Sang-Hun; Joo, Yang Tae; Kim, Minha; Lee, Jaehyeong

    2016-05-01

    In present work, the effects of the heat treatment on the structural, optical, and thermochromic properties of vanadium oxide films were investigated. Vanadium dioxide (VO2) thin films were deposited on glass substrate by reactive pulsed DC magnetron sputtering from a vanadium metal target in mixture atmosphere of argon and oxygen gas. Various heat treatment conditions were applied in order to evaluate their influence on the crystal phases formed, surface morphology, and optical properties. The films were characterized by an X-ray diffraction (XRD) in order to investigate the crystal structure and identify the phase change as post-annealing temperature of 500-600 degrees C for 5 minutes. Surface conditions of the obtained VO2(M) films were analyzed by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) and the semiconductor-metal transition (SMT) characteristics of the VO2 films were evaluate by optical spectrophotometry in the UV-VIS-NIR, controlling temperature of the films.

  17. The influence of antecedent conditions on flood risk in sub-Saharan Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bischiniotis, Konstantinos; van den Hurk, Bart; Coughlan de Perez, Erin; Jongman, Brenden; Veldkamp, Ted; Aerts, Jeroen

    2017-04-01

    Traditionally, flood risk management has focused on long-term flood protection measures. However, many countries are often not able to afford hard infrastructure that provides sufficient safety levels due to the high investment costs. As a consequence, they rely more on post disaster response and timely warning systems. Most early warning systems have predominantly focused on precipitation as the main predictive factor, having usually lead times of hours or days. However, other variables could also play a role. For instance, anomalous positive water storage, soil saturation and evapotranspiration are physical factors that may influence the length of the flood build-up period. This period can vary from some days to several months before the event and it is particularly important in flood risk management since longer flood warning lead times during this period could result in better flood preparation actions. This study addresses how the antecedent conditions of historical reported flood events over the period 1980 to 2010 in sub-Saharan Africa relate to flood generation. The seasonal-scale conditions are reflected in the Standardized Precipitation Evapotranspiration Index (SPEI), which is calculated using monthly precipitation and temperature data and accounts for the wetness/dryness of an area. Antecedent conditions are separated into a) a short term 'weather-scale' period (0-7 days) and b) a 'seasonal-scale' period (up to 6 months) before the flood event in such a way that they do not overlap. Total 7-day precipitation, which is based on daily meteorological data, was used to evaluate the short-term weather-scale conditions. Using a pair of coordinates, derived from the NatCatSERVICE database on global flood losses, each flood event is positioned on a 0.5°x 0.5° grid cell. The antecedent SPEI conditions of the two periods and their joint influence in flood generation are compared to the same period conditions of the other years of the dataset. First results

  18. Influence of nutrient conditions on the transport of bacteria in saturated porous media.

    PubMed

    Han, Peng; Shen, Xiufang; Yang, Haiyan; Kim, Hyunjung; Tong, Meiping

    2013-02-01

    The influence of nutrient conditions on the transport of bacteria in packed porous media was examined in both NaCl and CaCl(2)-NaCl mixed solutions at pH 6.0. Two representative cell types, Bacillus subtilis (Gram-positive) and Escherichia coli DH5α (Gram-negative), were used to determine the influence of nutrient conditions on cell transport behavior. Under all examined solution conditions, the breakthrough plateaus in the presence of background nutrients in solutions for both examined bacteria types were higher than those without nutrients, indicating that the presence of nutrients in solution enhanced the bacteria transport regardless of the examined cell type (Gram-positive or Gram-negative) and solution chemistry (ionic strength and ion valence). The increased bacteria transport induced by the presence of nutrient in solutions was probably not driven by the changes in the sizes of bacteria, cell surface properties (i.e., zeta potentials), or the contents of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) since these properties were not obviously changed by the presence of nutrients in solutions. Nutrient pre-equilibration experiments demonstrated that the deposition site competition by nutrients contributed to the increased bacteria transport observed with the presence of nutrients in bacterial suspension. Additional nutrient effects on cell transport were examined from the column experiments conducted in the absence of nutrients for the cells under 2-day starvation. Starvation of bacteria also increased the bacteria transport in porous media. The sizes of bacteria, zeta potentials of bacteria, and the EPS composition were changed by the starvation process, which might be responsible for the increased transport of starved bacteria observed for both cell types examined under all solution conditions. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. The Influence of Atmospheric Conditions on the Production of Ozone during VOC Oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coates, J.; Butler, T. M.

    2015-12-01

    Tropospheric ozone is a short-lived climate forcing pollutant that is detrimental to human health and crop growth. Reactions involving volatile organic compounds (VOC) and nitrogen oxides (NOx) in the presence of sunlight produce ozone. Ozone production is a non-linear function of the concentrations of both NOx and VOC, with VOC acting as the "fuel" for ozone production and NOx as the "catalyst". Different VOC, due to their differing structure and carbon content, have different maximum potential to produce ozone. Due to different degrees of reactivity, VOC also differ in the time taken to reach this maximum ozone production potential under ideal conditions. Ozone production is also influenced by meteorological factors such as radiation, temperature, advection and mixing, which may alter the rate of ozone production, and the degree to which VOC are able to reach their maximum ozone production potential. Identifying the chemical and meteorological processes responsible for controlling the degree to which VOC are able to reach their maximum ozone production potential could inform decisions on emission control to efficiently tackle high levels of tropospheric ozone. In this study we use a boxmodel to determine the chemical processes affecting ozone production under different meteorological and chemical conditions. The chemistry scheme used by the boxmodel is "tagged" for each initial VOC enabling attribution of ozone production to its VOC source. We systematically vary a number of meteorological parameters along with the source of NOx within the box model to simulate a range of atmospheric conditions. These simulations are compared with a control simulation done under conditions of maximum ozone formation to determine which parameters affect the rate at which VOC produce ozone and the extent to which they reach their maximum potential to produce ozone. We perform multi-day simulations in order to examine whether these processes can influence ozone production over

  20. [Influence of liquid or solid culture conditions on the volatile components of mycelia of Isariacateinannulata].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Delong; Wang, Xiaodong; Lu, Ruili; Li, Kangle; Hu, Fenglin

    2011-12-01

    To determine the volatile components of mycelia of Isaria cateinannulata cultured under different culture conditions, and to analyze the relationships between the culture conditions and volatile metabolites. Mycelia were cultured in solid plates with SDAY medium and liquid shake flasks with SDY medium. The culture conditions were at 25 degrees C and 8 days. Volatile components in the mycelia of I. cateinannulata were extracted with simultaneous distillation extraction and analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Alkenes, alkanes, heterocyclic and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) were existed abundantly both in the mycelia of liquid and solid cultures, but the kinds and relative concentrations of the volatile components in mycelia of liquid and solid cultures were very different. Forty-one compounds were identified from the mycelia of solid culture and 32 compounds were identified from the mycelia of liquid culture. Esters, quinones and oximes were only found in solid cultured mycelia whereas carboxylic acids were only discovered in the mycelia of liquid culture. At the same time, mycelia of liquid culture contained much more phenols. The most abundant compounds in mycelia of liquid and solid cultures were hydrocarbons. The volatile extracts of solid cultured mycelia contained 57.6% alkenes and 9.19% alkanes. The volatile extracts of liquid cultured mycelia contained 7.85% alkenes and 22.4% alkanes. Liquid or solid culture conditions influenced the volatile components of mycelia of I. cateinannulata.

  1. The influence of reactive oxygen species on local redox conditions in oxygenated natural waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rose, Andrew

    2016-11-01

    Redox conditions in natural waters are a fundamental control on biogeochemical processes and ultimately many ecosystem functions. While the dioxygen/water redox couple controls redox thermodynamics in oxygenated aquatic environments on geological timescales, it is kinetically inert in the extracellular environment on the much shorter timescales on which many biogeochemical processes occur. Instead, electron transfer processes on these timescales are primarily mediated by a relatively small group of trace metals and stable radicals, including the reactive oxygen species superoxide. Such processes are of critical biogeochemical importance because many of these chemical species are scarce nutrients, but may also be toxic at high concentrations. Furthermore, their bioavailability and potentially toxicity is typically strongly influenced by their redox state. In this paper, I examine to what extent redox conditions in oxygenated natural waters are expected to be reflected in the redox states of labile redox-active compounds that readily exchange electrons with the dioxygen/superoxide redox couple, and potentially with each other. Additionally, I present the hypothesis that that the relative importance of the dioxygen/superoxide and superoxide/hydrogen peroxide redox couples exerts a governing control on local redox conditions in oxygenated natural waters on biogeochemically important timescales. Given the recent discovery of widespread extracellular superoxide production by a diverse range of organisms, this suggests the existence of a fundamental mechanism for organisms to tightly regulate local redox conditions in their extracellular environment in oxygenated natural waters.

  2. Influence of storage conditions on the growth of Pseudomonas species in refrigerated raw milk.

    PubMed

    De Jonghe, Valerie; Coorevits, An; Van Hoorde, Koenraad; Messens, Winy; Van Landschoot, Anita; De Vos, Paul; Heyndrickx, Marc

    2011-01-01

    The refrigerated storage of raw milk throughout the dairy chain prior to heat treatment creates selective conditions for growth of psychrotolerant bacteria. These bacteria, mainly belonging to the genus Pseudomonas, are capable of producing thermoresistant extracellular proteases and lipases, which can cause spoilage and structural defects in pasteurized and ultra-high-temperature-treated milk (products). To map the influence of refrigerated storage on the growth of these pseudomonads, milk samples were taken after the first milking turn and incubated laboratory scale at temperatures simulating optimal and suboptimal preprocessing storage conditions. The outgrowth of Pseudomonas members was monitored over time by means of cultivation-independent denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). Isolates were identified by a polyphasic approach. These incubations revealed that outgrowth of Pseudomonas members occurred from the beginning of the dairy chain (farm tank) under both optimal and suboptimal storage conditions. An even greater risk for outgrowth, as indicated by a vast increase of about 2 log CFU per ml raw milk, existed downstream in the chain, especially when raw milk was stored under suboptimal conditions. This difference in Pseudomonas outgrowth between optimal and suboptimal storage was already statistically significant within the farm tank. The predominant taxa were identified as Pseudomonas gessardii, Pseudomonas gessardii-like, Pseudomonas fluorescens-like, Pseudomonas lundensis, Pseudomonas fragi, and Pseudomonas fragi-like. Those taxa show an important spoilage potential as determined on elective media for proteolysis and lipolysis.

  3. Influence of dissolved organic matter on the complexation of mercury under sulfidic conditions.

    PubMed

    Miller, Carrie L; Mason, Robert P; Gilmour, Cynthia C; Heyes, Andrew

    2007-04-01

    The complexation of Hg under sulfidic conditions influences its bioavailability for microbial methylation. Neutral dissolved Hg-sulfide complexes are readily available to Hg-methylating bacteria in culture, and thermodynamic models predict that inorganic Hg-sulfide complexes dominate dissolved Hg speciation under natural sulfidic conditions. However, these models have not been validated in the field. To examine the complexation of Hg in natural sulfidic waters, octanol/water partitioning methods were modified for use under environmentally relevant conditions, and a centrifuge ultrafiltration technique was developed. These techniques demonstrated much lower concentrations of dissolved Hg-sulfide complexes than predicted. Furthermore, the study revealed an interaction between Hg, dissolved organic matter (DOM), and sulfide that is not captured by current thermodynamic models. Whereas Hg forms strong complexes with DOM under oxic conditions, these complexes had not been expected to form in the presence of sulfide because of the stronger affinity of Hg for sulfide relative to its affinity for DOM. The observed interaction between Hg and DOM in the presence of sulfide likely involves the formation of a DOM-Hg-sulfide complex or results from the hydrophobic partitioning of neutral Hg-sulfide complexes into the higher-molecular-weight DOM. An understanding of the mechanism of this interaction and determination of complexation coefficients for the Hg-sulfide-DOM complex are needed to adequately assess how our new finding affects Hg bioavailability, sorption, and flux.

  4. Comparisons of water quality during various streamflow conditions in five streams in northern New Jersey, 1982-97

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hunchak-Kariouk, Kathryn

    2002-01-01

    Relations between water-quality and flow characteristics and the relative importance of constant (point sources and ground-water discharge) and intermittent (nonpoint storm runoff) sources were determined for eight water-quality stations located on the Flat Brook and the Delaware, Musconetcong, Whippany, and Saddle Rivers. Water-quality and streamflow data were categorized on the basis of streamflow at the time of sample collection. Differences in concentrations and yields of selected water-quality constituents, including nutrients and bacteria, (1) among the stations during eight streamflow conditions and (2) at each station (a) between base flow and stormflow; (b) among before, during, and after a storm; and (c) among low, medium, and high flows were determined and related to the predominant type(s) of land development in the areas contributing drainage. At the station on the Delaware River, yields of fecal-coliform bacteria were affected more by contributions from storm runoff than by contributions from point sources and ground-water discharges; yields during a storm [7.0 x 108 (MPN/d)mi2 (most probable number per day per square mile)] were greater than yields during base flow (3.7 x 108 (MPN/d)mi2). Yields of nitrate plus nitrite, alkalinity, and chloride were affected more by contributions from point sources and ground-water discharges than by contributions from storm runoff; yields of these constituents were not significantly different during base flows and stormflows. At the Flat Brook and Whippany River stations, yields of most water-quality constituents were affected more by contributions from storm runoff than by contributions from point sources and ground-water discharge. For example, yields of nitrate plus nitrite were greater during stormflow (1.20 (lb/d)/mi2 (pounds per day per square mile) and 15.88 (lb/d)/mi2, respectively) than during base flow (0.26 (lb/d)/mi2 and 8.20 (lb/d)/mi2, respectively). At the Musconetcong River station, yields of total

  5. The Influence of Fold and Fracture Development on Reservoir Behavior of the Lisburne Group of Northern Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Wallace, W.K.; Hanks, C.L.; Whalen, M.T.; Jensen, J.; Atkinson, P.K.; Brinton, J.S.

    2001-01-09

    The objectives of this study were to develop a better understanding of four major aspects of the Lisburne: (1) The geometry and kinematics of detachment folds and their truncation by thrust faults, (2) The influence of folding and lithostratigraphy on fracture patterns, (3) Lithostratigraphy and its influence on folding, faulting, fracturing, and reservoir characteristics, and (4) The influence of lithostratigraphy and deformation on fluid flow.

  6. Experimental determination of drift and PM10 cooling tower emissions: Influence of components and operating conditions.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, J; Kaiser, A S; Lucas, M

    2017-11-01

    Cooling tower emissions have become an increasingly common hazard to the environment (air polluting, ice formation and salts deposition) and to the health (Legionella disease) in the last decades. Several environmental policies have emerged in recent years limiting cooling tower emissions but they have not prevented an increasing intensity of outbreaks. Since the level of emissions depends mainly on cooling tower component design and the operating conditions, this paper deals with an experimental investigation of the amount of emissions, drift and PM10, emitted by a cooling tower with different configurations (drift eliminators and distribution systems) and working under several operating conditions. This objective is met by the measurement of cooling tower source emission parameters by means of the sensitive paper technique. Secondary objectives were to contextualize the observed emission rates according to international regulations. Our measurements showed that the drift rates included in the relevant international standards are significantly higher than the obtained results (an average of 100 times higher) and hence, the environmental problems may occur. Therefore, a revision of the standards is recommended with the aim of reducing the environmental and human health impact. By changing the operating conditions and the distribution system, emissions can be reduced by 52.03% and 82% on average. In the case of drift eliminators, the difference ranges from 18.18% to 98.43% on average. As the emissions level is clearly influenced by operating conditions and components, regulation tests should be referred to default conditions. Finally, guidelines to perform emission tests and a selection criterion of components and conditions for the tested cooling tower are proposed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Influence of oxic/anoxic condition on sorption behavior of PFOS in sediment.

    PubMed

    Ololade, Isaac Ayodele; Zhou, Qin; Pan, Gang

    2016-05-01

    Sediment components and redox properties change with oxic/anoxic condition, which affect the environmental transport of perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS). Herein, the influence of oxic/anoxic condition on the variation of redox and residual components of sediments, where organic matter, iron and manganese oxides are separated from the original sediment collected from Lake Taihu, China, are investigated. Meanwhile, the distinguishing sorption behaviors of PFOS on various residual sediments under oxic and anoxic condition are studied. Sediment after extracting iron and manganese (S-FeMn), which possessed the highest organic carbon (0.99%), had the highest affinity for PFOS under oxic condition. However, anoxic environment resulted in an increase of the pH, dissolving of organic carbon and de-protonation of S-FeMn, which caused the lower sorption capacity of PFOS on S-FeMn. Sediment after extracting manganese (S-Mn) had the higher sorption ability in anoxic environment because the Fe(2+) from S-Mn provided more effective electrostatic sites for anionic PFOS. When the environment changed to oxic condition, the iron existed as trivalent form in S-Mn, which resulted in a block of effective sorption site and reduced the sorption amounts of PFOS. The higher percentage of manganese oxides restrained the sorption of PFOS. Hence, whether or not oxic/anoxic condition promoted the PFOS sorption depended on both the percentage and form of various components in the sediment. The study generated further insight into the environmental transport of PFOS in the sediments with different properties and the wetland system, where oxic/anoxic subsurface flow was constructed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Assessing the Genetic Influence of Ancient Sociopolitical Structure: Micro-differentiation Patterns in the Population of Asturias (Northern Spain)

    PubMed Central

    Pardiñas, Antonio F.; Roca, Agustín; García-Vazquez, Eva; López, Belén

    2012-01-01

    The human populations of the Iberian Peninsula are the varied result of a complex mixture of cultures throughout history, and are separated by clear social, cultural, linguistic or geographic barriers. The stronger genetic differences between closely related populations occur in the northern third of Spain, a phenomenon commonly known as “micro-differentiation”. It has been argued and discussed how this form of genetic structuring can be related to both the rugged landscape and the ancient societies of Northern Iberia, but this is difficult to test in most regions due to the intense human mobility of previous centuries. Nevertheless, the Spanish autonomous community of Asturias shows a complex history which hints of a certain isolation of its population. This, joined together with a difficult terrain full of deep valleys and steep mountains, makes it suitable for performing a study of genetic structure, based on mitochondrial DNA and Y-Chromosome markers. Our analyses do not only show that there are micro-differentiation patterns inside the Asturian territory, but that these patterns are strikingly similar between both uniparental markers. The inference of barriers to gene flow also indicates that Asturian populations from the coastal north and the mountainous south seem to be relatively isolated from the rest of the territory. These findings are discussed in light of historic and geographic data and, coupled with previous evidence, show that the origin of the current genetic patterning might indeed lie in Roman and Pre-Roman sociopolitical divisions. PMID:23209673

  9. Assessing the genetic influence of ancient sociopolitical structure: micro-differentiation patterns in the population of Asturias (Northern Spain).

    PubMed

    Pardiñas, Antonio F; Roca, Agustín; García-Vazquez, Eva; López, Belén

    2012-01-01

    The human populations of the Iberian Peninsula are the varied result of a complex mixture of cultures throughout history, and are separated by clear social, cultural, linguistic or geographic barriers. The stronger genetic differences between closely related populations occur in the northern third of Spain, a phenomenon commonly known as "micro-differentiation". It has been argued and discussed how this form of genetic structuring can be related to both the rugged landscape and the ancient societies of Northern Iberia, but this is difficult to test in most regions due to the intense human mobility of previous centuries. Nevertheless, the Spanish autonomous community of Asturias shows a complex history which hints of a certain isolation of its population. This, joined together with a difficult terrain full of deep valleys and steep mountains, makes it suitable for performing a study of genetic structure, based on mitochondrial DNA and Y-Chromosome markers. Our analyses do not only show that there are micro-differentiation patterns inside the Asturian territory, but that these patterns are strikingly similar between both uniparental markers. The inference of barriers to gene flow also indicates that Asturian populations from the coastal north and the mountainous south seem to be relatively isolated from the rest of the territory. These findings are discussed in light of historic and geographic data and, coupled with previous evidence, show that the origin of the current genetic patterning might indeed lie in Roman and Pre-Roman sociopolitical divisions.

  10. Warfare rather than agriculture as a critical influence on fires in the late Holocene, inferred from northern Vietnam

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhen; Saito, Yoshiki; Dang, Phong X.; Matsumoto, Eiji; Vu, Quang Lan

    2009-01-01

    Fire has played an essential role in the development of human civilization. Most previous research suggests that frequent-fire regimes in the late Holocene were associated with intensification of human activities, especially agriculture development. Here, we analyze fire regimes recorded in the Song Hong delta area of Vietnam over the past 5,000 years. In the prehistoric period, 2 long-term, low-charcoal abundance periods have been linked to periods of low humidity and cool climate, and 5 short-term fire regimes of 100–150 years in duration occurred at regular intervals of ≈700 years. However, over the last 1,500 years, the number, frequency, and intensity of fire regimes clearly increased. Six intensified-fire regime periods in northern Vietnam during this time coincided with changes of Vietnamese dynasties and associated warfare and unrest. In contrast, agricultural development supported by rulers of stable societies at this time does not show a positive correlation with intensified-fire regime periods. Thus, warfare rather than agriculture appears to have been a critical factor contributing to fire regimes in northern Vietnam during the late Holocene. PMID:19597148

  11. Warfare rather than agriculture as a critical influence on fires in the late Holocene, inferred from northern Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhen; Saito, Yoshiki; Dang, Phong X; Matsumoto, Eiji; Vu, Quang Lan

    2009-07-14

    Fire has played an essential role in the development of human civilization. Most previous research suggests that frequent-fire regimes in the late Holocene were associated with intensification of human activities, especially agriculture development. Here, we analyze fire regimes recorded in the Song Hong delta area of Vietnam over the past 5,000 years. In the prehistoric period, 2 long-term, low-charcoal abundance periods have been linked to periods of low humidity and cool climate, and 5 short-term fire regimes of 100-150 years in duration occurred at regular intervals of approximately 700 years. However, over the last 1,500 years, the number, frequency, and intensity of fire regimes clearly increased. Six intensified-fire regime periods in northern Vietnam during this time coincided with changes of Vietnamese dynasties and associated warfare and unrest. In contrast, agricultural development supported by rulers of stable societies at this time does not show a positive correlation with intensified-fire regime periods. Thus, warfare rather than agriculture appears to have been a critical factor contributing to fire regimes in northern Vietnam during the late Holocene.

  12. Temporal patterns of atmospheric mercury species in northern Mississippi during 2011-2012: influence of sudden population swings.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yi; Cizdziel, James V; Lu, Duanjun

    2013-11-01

    Gaseous elemental mercury (GEM), gaseous oxidized mercury (GOM) and particulate bound mercury (PBM) were measured on the University of Mississippi campus from July 2011 to June 2012. It is believed to be the first time that concentrations of atmospheric mercury species have been documented in northern Mississippi, and at a location with relatively large and sudden swings in population. The mean concentration (±1 SD) of GEM was 1.54±0.32 ng m(-3); levels were lower and generally more stable during the winter (1.48±0.22) and spring (1.46±0.27) compared with the summer (1.56±0.32) and fall (1.63±0.42). Mean concentrations for GOM and PBM were 3.87 pg m(-3) and 4.58 pg m(-3), respectively; levels tended to be highest in the afternoon and lowest in the early morning hours. During the fall and spring academic semesters concentrations and variability of GOM and PBM both increased, possibly from vehicle exhaust. There were moderate negative correlations with wind speed (all species) and humidity (GOM and PBM). Backward air mass trajectory modeling for the ten highest peaks for each mercury species revealed that the majority of these events occurred from air masses that passed through the northern continental US region. Overall, this study illustrates the complexity of temporal fluctuations of airborne mercury species, even in a small town environment.

  13. Influence of introduced vs. native parasites on the body condition of migrant silver eels

    PubMed Central

    Gérard, Claudia; Trancart, Thomas; Amilhat, Elsa; Faliex, Elisabeth; Virag, Laure; Feunteun, Eric; Acou, Anthony

    2013-01-01

    Because parasitism is among the reasons invoked to explain the collapse of Anguilla anguilla, we evaluated the parasitic constraint on body condition (BC) of migrant silver eels as a proxy of fitness with inter-site comparisons. Metazoan parasites were studied in 149 silver eels from five sites (northern Europe). In total, 89% were infected by 13 species including Myxozoa, Monogenea, Cestoda, Nematoda, and Acanthocephala. Anguillicoloides crassus was most common (56%), then Acanthocephalus clavula (30%), and Pseudodactylogyrus sp. (17%). BC, calculated for 58 females, was negatively correlated by abundance of the introduced Pseudodactylogyrus sp. but not by other parasite taxa. Nevertheless, the introduced A. crassus was considered as a severe pathogen based on previous data, whereas the native A. clavula was supposed to have limited impact. Parasite component communities and BC were different between sites. Silver eels from Stockholm Archipelago (Sweden) were the least parasitized (40% vs. 90–95% for other sites) with no parasites on the gills. Burrishoole (Ireland) differed by the absence of A. crassus and high prevalence of A. clavula (84%) but without consequences on BC. Gudenaa (Denmark), Corrib (Ireland), and Frémur (France) were close due to high prevalence of A. crassus (89–93%). Gudenaa and Corrib were the most similar because Pseudodactylogyrus sp. was also highly prevalent (respectively 71% and 60%) whereas absent in Frémur. Our results suggest that the fitness loss induced by the introduced parasites could affect the spawning success of migrant silver eels from Gudenaa and Corrib, and to a lesser extent from Frémur, but probably not those from Stockholm Archipelago and Burrishoole. PMID:24135272

  14. The influence of weather conditions on the relative incident rate of fishing vessels.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yue; Pelot, Ronald P; Hilliard, Casey

    2009-07-01

    There is a long history of studying the relationship between weather and maritime activities. This article analyzes the link between relative incident rate (RIR) and general weather factors within certain gridded areas and time periods. The study area, which encompasses a broad extent of Atlantic Canadian waters, includes fishing incidents recorded by the Canadian Coast Guard from 1997 to 1999. Methodologies used for traffic track generation in a geographical information system and aggregation of all relevant weather data needed for the statistical analyses are presented. Ultimately, a regression tree was built to illustrate the relationship between incident rate and the following six weather factors: wave height; sea surface temperature; air temperature; ice concentration; fog presence; and precipitation. Results from the regression tree reveal that the RIR defined as (incident number per area-day)/(traffic amount per area-day) across grid cells with incidents, increases as the weather conditions deteriorate in a general way, and the concentration of ice has the biggest influence on the magnitude of incident rates for a given level of traffic exposure. The results from this analysis may assist administrators of maritime traffic, especially those associated with fishing activities, through a better understanding of the influence on RIR of certain weather conditions within given areas in specific time periods.

  15. Influence of beaver activity on summer growth and condition of age-2 Atlantic salmon parr

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sigourney, Douglas B.; Letcher, B.H.; Cunjak, R.A.

    2006-01-01

    The activity of beavers Castor canadensis in freshwater environments can have considerable localized impacts on the physical and biological components of riparian ecosystems. By changing the habitat of a stream, beaver dams can cause spatial variation in growth opportunity that may have direct consequences for the growth of resident fish. In a small stream in eastern Canada, we studied the effects of an ephemeral beaver pond on the growth and maturity of age-2 Atlantic salmon Salmo salar parr tagged with passive integrated transponder tags. Water temperature remained relatively uniform throughout the study site. We found very little movement of recaptured fish in the study site. Fish that were recaptured in the beaver pond displayed faster summer growth rates in both length and mass than fish that were recaptured immediately above or below the pond. We also found that parr in the pond maintained relatively high condition factors, whereas fish above and below the pond appeared to decrease in condition factor throughout the summer. In addition to growth, the maturation rates of age-2 males were higher above the dam than below. This study demonstrates the effect a beaver dam can have on individual growth rates. By influencing growth during sensitive periods, the beaver pond may also influence individual life history pathways. This information could be an important component in ecosystem models that predict the effect of beaver population dynamics on the growth of individual salmonids at the landscape scale. ?? Copyright by the American Fisheries Society 2006.

  16. Conditional symbolic analysis detects nonlinear influences of respiration on cardiovascular control in humans

    PubMed Central

    Porta, Alberto; Marchi, Andrea; Bari, Vlasta; Heusser, Karsten; Tank, Jens; Jordan, Jens; Barbic, Franca; Furlan, Raffaello

    2015-01-01

    We propose a symbolic analysis framework for the quantitative characterization of complex dynamical systems. It allows the description of the time course of a single variable, the assessment of joint interactions and an analysis triggered by a conditioning input. The framework was applied to spontaneous variability of heart period (HP), systolic arterial pressure (SAP) and integrated muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) with the aim of characterizing cardiovascular control and nonlinear influences of respiration at rest in supine position, during orthostatic challenge induced by 80° head-up tilt (TILT) and about 3 min before evoked pre-syncope signs (PRESY). The approach detected (i) the exaggerated sympathetic modulation and vagal withdrawal from HP variability and the increased presence of fast MSNA variability components during PRESY compared with TILT; (ii) the increase of the SAP–HP coordination occurring at slow temporal scales and a decrease of that occurring at faster time scales during PRESY compared with TILT; (iii) the reduction of the coordination between fast MSNA and SAP patterns during TILT and PRESY; (iv) the nonlinear influences of respiration leading to an increased likelihood to observe the abovementioned findings during expiration compared with inspiration one. The framework provided simple, quantitative indexes able to distinguish experimental conditions characterized by different states of the autonomic nervous system and to detect the early signs of a life threatening situation such as postural syncope. PMID:25548269

  17. The Influence of the Biological Pump on Marine Redox Conditions During Earth History

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, K. M.; Ridgwell, A.; Payne, J.

    2015-12-01

    Evidence for bottom-water anoxia on the continental shelves waned over the course of the Phanerozoic, which may be influenced by secular changes in the biological pump that led to weaker positive feedbacks within the oceans. The biological pump describes the transfer of carbon from the atmosphere to the deep ocean, which creates vertical gradients in nutrients and oxygen, both important influences in the structure of marine ecosystems. We used the cGENIE Earth system model to quantitatively test the hypothesis that reductions in the efficiency of the nutrient recycling loop of the biological pump during the past 550 Ma reduced the extent of anoxia on the shelves and acted as an important control on marine animal ecosystems. When the modeled remineralization depth is shallow relative to the modern ocean, anoxia tends to be more widespread at continental shelf depths. As the modeled remineralization depth increases toward modern conditions, anoxia is less prevalent and occurs at depths below the continental shelves. Reduced marine productivity in the closed system configuration of cGENIE cannot produce the frequent bottom-water anoxia conditions envisioned for the Paleozoic. We hypothesize that evidence for greater animal abundance and metabolic demand during the Phanerozoic was driven by progressive oxygenation of shelf environments related to changes in the biological pump rather than greater food availability. In general, these model simulations suggest changes in the depth distribution of organic carbon remineralization may have controlled observed shifts in ocean chemistry, biogeochemical cycling, and ecosystem structure during the Phanerozoic.

  18. [Psychological conditions and the influence factors of the Sichuan Three Gorges immigrations].

    PubMed

    Cong, Jianni; Wang, Lin; Wang, Yang; Li, Ge

    2009-01-01

    To learn and analyze the psychological conditions and the influence factors of Sichuan immigrations so as to provide the science basis for the government. Take residents generally questionnaire, symptom checklist (SCL90), psychosocial stress survey for groups(PSSG) and social support rating scale (SSRS) four questionnaires to collect and analyze the mental conditions and influences of Sichuan immigrations and local residents by cluster stratified random sampling. There is no difference in the sex, age, marriage, culture, occupation, economy and character between immigrations and local residents. Immigrations owned medical safeguard are less than local residents (P < 0.01). The SCL-90 (symptom checklist 90) and PSSG (psychosocial stress survey for groups) scores of Sichuan immigrations are higher than the local residents (P < 0.01). Social support of immigrations is worse than local residents (P < 0.01). 56.00% occupations are changed after the immigration. Multiple linear regression analysis that whether immigrates, the age, the marriage, the occupation, psychological stress and social support of migrants relate to the mental health of migrants. The mental health of Sichuan immigrations is bad, so the government should strengthen their financial support and pay attention to their humanist concern.

  19. Wet and cold climate conditions recorded by coral geochemical proxies during the beginning of the first millennium CE in the northern South China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Hangfang; Deng, Wenfeng; Chen, Xuefei; Wei, Gangjian; Zeng, Ti; Zhao, Jian-xin

    2017-03-01

    The past two millennia include some distinct climate intervals, such as the Medieval Warm Period (MWP) and the Little Ice Age (LIA), which were caused by natural forcing factors, as well as the Current Warm Period (CWP) that has been linked to anthropogenic factors. Therefore, this period has been of great interest to climate change researchers. However, most studies are based on terrestrial proxy records, historical documentary data, and simulation results, and the ocean and the tropical record are very limited. The Eastern Han, Three Kingdoms, and Western Jin periods (25-316 CE) cover the beginning first millennium CE in China, and were characterized by a cold climate and frequent wars and regime changes. This study used paired Sr/Ca and δ18O series recovered from a fossil coral to reconstruct the sea surface water conditions during the late Eastern Han to Western Jin periods (167-309 CE) at Wenchang, eastern Hainan Island in the northern South China Sea (SCS), to investigate climate change at this time. The long-term sea surface temperature (SST