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Sample records for northward imf conditions

  1. Latitudinal electron precipitation patterns during large and small IMF magnitudes for northward IMF conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Makita, K.; Meng, C.-I.; Akasofu, S.-I.

    1988-01-01

    It is demonstrated that there are distinct differences in the electron precipitation patterns (or the polar cap size), geomagnetic activity, and field-aligned currents in the highest-latitude region for small and large IMF B(z) values when the IMF B(z) component is positive. First, during periods of weakly northward IMF, there is a distinct area in the highest-latitude region in which the electron precipitation is absent except for the polar rain. By contrast, during strongly northward IMF, the entire polar region is often filled with burst-type soft electron precipitations. Second, geomagnetic disturbances and field-aligned-current intensities in the highest-latitude region are less during a weak IMF B(z) condition than those during a strongly northward IMF B(z) condition. Geomagnetic activity in the auroral zone for both conditions is absent or very weak.

  2. High-Latitude Ionospheric Dynamics During Conditions of Northward IMF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharber, J. R.

    1996-01-01

    In order to better understand the physical processes operating during conditions of northward interplanetary magnetic field (IMF), in situ measurements from the Dynamics Explorer-2 (low altitude) polar satellite and simultaneous observations from the auroral imager on the Dynamics Explorer-1 (high altitude) satellite were used to investigate the relationships between optical emissions, particle precipitation, and convective flows in the high-latitude ionosphere. Field aligned current and convective flow patterns during IMF north include polar cap arcs, the theta aurora or transpolar arc, and the 'horse-collar' aurora. The initial part of the study concentrated on the electrodynamics of auroral features in the horse-collar aurora, a contracted but thickened emission region in which the dawn and dusk portions can spread to very high latitudes, while the latter part focused on the evolution of one type of IMF north auroral pattern to another, specifically the quiet-time horse-collar pattern to a theta aurora.

  3. Reconfiguration of Reverse Convection in the Dayside Throat Region under Varying Northward IMF Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maimaiti, M.; Ruohoniemi, J. M.; Baker, J. B.; Clauer, C. R.; Nicolls, M. J.; Hairston, M. R.

    2016-12-01

    Many previous studies have demonstrated that high-latitude ionospheric convection is strongly influenced by interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) conditions. However, the dynamics of changing convection and the relationship to magnetic reconnection on the magnetopause is relatively unexplored. In this study, we analyze an interval of strongly northward IMF on September 9th, 2014 which provided a rare opportunity to examine variations in the dayside reverse convection throat for an extended period of time. Between 18:00 - 20:00 UT the northward face of the Resolute Bay Incoherent Scatter Radar (RISR-N) was located in the noon sector, and directly measured reverse convection in the dayside throat region. Nearly simultaneous measurements from DMSP satellites confirm the reverse convection and the cusp features expected for northward IMF. Time-series comparison of the north-south flows with the IMF Bz component shows a remarkably high correlation, suggestive of very strong linear coupling, with no sign of velocity saturation. Variations in Bz produced a direct response in the north-south flows. Likewise, the IMF By component was highly correlated with the east-west ionospheric flows. However, time-lagged correlation analysis reveals that the IMF By influence acted on a lag time which was 10 minutes shorter than that of the Bz component. We examine this difference in lag times and discuss its implications for understanding reconnection under varying IMF conditions.

  4. The relationship between the Russell-McPherron effect and solar wind entry under northward IMF condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Shichen; Shi, Quanqi; Tian, Anmin; Nowada, Motoharu; Zong, Qiugang; Fu, Suiyan; Zhou, Xuzhi; Pu, Zuyin

    2017-04-01

    The strong magnetic storms tend to occur in March and September. This phenomenon can be explained by the Russell-McPherron (R-M) effect, since the Bz magnitude is enhanced in March and September under southward IMF condition. Same mechanism should be valid under northward IMF condition, and the semiannual variation of geomagnetic activity under northward IMF condition could be expected. In this paper, the R-M effect under northward IMF condition is verified by utilizing 42 years of Interplanetary Magnetic Field (IMF) data. Cold-dense plasma sheet occurrence is chosen to investigate the monthly variation of solar wind entry under northward IMF condition. CDPS events are identified using multiple satellites' data between 1996 and 2014. We found that the seasonal variation of northward IMF and the occurrence rate of CDPS have semiannual period, these phenomena are related to the R-M effect.The R-M effect will affect the solar wind entry under northward IMF condition. Keywords: Semiannual variation, Russell-McPherron effect, Cold-dense plasma sheet

  5. The Distant Magnetotail Under Long Duration, Very Northward IMF Conditions: October 22-24, 2003

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fairfield, Donald H.; Oieroset, M.; Raeder, J.; Lepping, R. P.; Newell, P. T.; Wind, S.

    2006-01-01

    A unique 32 hour interval of very northward Interplanetary Magnetic Field (IMF) on October 22-24, 2003 created a exceptionally thick cold dense magnetotail plasma sheet, a small polar cap and accompanying small tail lobe. These features were detected by the Cluster DMSP and FAST spacecraft and modeled by a global simulation as described in papers by Oieroset et al. (2005) and Li et al. (2005). During the same interval the Wind spacecraft was passing through the center of the magnetotail about 130 Re downstream of Earth. Wind results will be described that reveal a very unusual magnetotail characterized by (1) continual tailward flow of 200-400 km/s with densities in the range 0.2-3/cc, both of whch are clearly less than those expected in the magnetosheath, (2) a mostly northward Bz but with a predominant Bx field component with sign reversals indicating crossings between the two hemispheres of the tail, and (3) velocity waves superposed on the downstream flow with peak-to-peak amplitudes of 100 to 200 km/s, periods of 10 to 20 minutes and clockwise polarization. Low altitude DMSP and Fast measurements reveal an auroral oval with enhanced latitudinal thickness and a small polar cap filled with structured precipitzting electrons and few ions. A new global MHD simulation of the event exhibits a highly elliptical tail of diminished cross-section at 130 Re with major axis aligned with the northward IMF. The tail current sheet also tends to be aligned in a north-south direction with the two tail hemispheres to the east and west with their polarities depending on prior history of the IMF. The simulation appears to be consistent with many, but not all, of the observations. High latitude cusp reconnection and subsequent downtail flow of closed field lines may explain the tail structure, but the waves are more likely due to the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability often thought to occur during northward IMF conditions.

  6. The Distant Magnetotail Under Long Duration, Very Northward IMF Conditions: October 22-24, 2003

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fairfield, Donald H.; Oieroset, M.; Raeder, J.; Lepping, R. P.; Newell, P. T.; Wind, S.

    2006-01-01

    A unique 32 hour interval of very northward Interplanetary Magnetic Field (IMF) on October 22-24, 2003 created a exceptionally thick cold dense magnetotail plasma sheet, a small polar cap and accompanying small tail lobe. These features were detected by the Cluster DMSP and FAST spacecraft and modeled by a global simulation as described in papers by Oieroset et al. (2005) and Li et al. (2005). During the same interval the Wind spacecraft was passing through the center of the magnetotail about 130 Re downstream of Earth. Wind results will be described that reveal a very unusual magnetotail characterized by (1) continual tailward flow of 200-400 km/s with densities in the range 0.2-3/cc, both of whch are clearly less than those expected in the magnetosheath, (2) a mostly northward Bz but with a predominant Bx field component with sign reversals indicating crossings between the two hemispheres of the tail, and (3) velocity waves superposed on the downstream flow with peak-to-peak amplitudes of 100 to 200 km/s, periods of 10 to 20 minutes and clockwise polarization. Low altitude DMSP and Fast measurements reveal an auroral oval with enhanced latitudinal thickness and a small polar cap filled with structured precipitzting electrons and few ions. A new global MHD simulation of the event exhibits a highly elliptical tail of diminished cross-section at 130 Re with major axis aligned with the northward IMF. The tail current sheet also tends to be aligned in a north-south direction with the two tail hemispheres to the east and west with their polarities depending on prior history of the IMF. The simulation appears to be consistent with many, but not all, of the observations. High latitude cusp reconnection and subsequent downtail flow of closed field lines may explain the tail structure, but the waves are more likely due to the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability often thought to occur during northward IMF conditions.

  7. Strong IMF By-Related Plasma Convection in the Ionosphere and Cusp Field-Aligned Currents Under Northward IMF Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Le, G.; Lu, G.; Strangeway, R. J.; Pfaff, R. F., Jr.; Vondrak, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We present in this paper an investigation of IMF-By related plasma convection and cusp field-aligned currents using FAST data and AMIE model during a prolonged interval with large positive IMF By and northward Bz conditions (By/Bz much greater than 1). Using the FAST single trajectory observations to validate the global convection patterns at key times and key locations, we have demonstrated that the AMIE procedure provides a reasonably good description of plasma circulations in the ionosphere during this interval. Our results show that the plasma convection in the ionosphere is consistent with the anti-parallel merging model. When the IMF has a strongly positive By component under northward conditions, we find that the global plasma convection forms two cells oriented nearly along the Sun-earth line in the ionosphere. In the northern hemisphere, the dayside cell has clockwise convection mainly circulating within the polar cap on open field lines. A second cell with counterclockwise convection is located in the nightside circulating across the polar cap boundary, The observed two-cell convection pattern appears to be driven by the reconnection along the anti-parallel merging lines poleward of the cusp extending toward the dusk side when IMF By/Bz much greater than 1. The magnetic tension force on the newly reconnected field lines drives the plasma to move from dusk to dawn in the polar cusp region near the polar cap boundary. The field-aligned currents in the cusp region flow downward into the ionosphere. The return field-aligned currents extend into the polar cap in the center of the dayside convection cell. The field-aligned currents are closed through the Peterson currents in the ionosphere, which flow poleward from the polar cap boundary along the electric field direction.

  8. Magnetic substorms and northward IMF turning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troshichev, Oleg; Podorozhkina, Nataly

    To determine the relation of the northward IMF turnings to substorm sudden onsets, we separated all events with sharp northward IMF turnings observed in years of solar maximum (1999-2002) and solar minimum (2007-2008). The events (N=261) have been classified in 5 groups in accordance with average magnetic activity in auroral zone (low, moderate or high levels of AL index) at unchanged or slightly changed PC index and with dynamics of PC (steady distinct growth or distinct decline) at arbitrary values of AL index. Statistical analysis of relationships between the IMF turning and changes of PC and AL indices has been fulfilled separately for each of 5 classes. Results of the analysis showed that, irrespective of geophysical conditions and solar activity epoch, the magnetic activity in the polar caps and in the auroral zone demonstrate no response to the sudden northward IMF turning, if the moment of northward turning is taken as a key date. Sharp increases of magnetic disturbance in the auroral zone are observed only under conditions of the growing PC index and statistically they are related to moment of the PC index exceeding the threshold level (~1.5 mV/m), not to northward turnings timed, as a rule, after the moment of sudden onset. Magnetic disturbances observed in these cases in the auroral zone (magnetic substorms) are guided by behavior of the PC index, like to ordinary magnetic substorms or substorms developed under conditions of the prolonged northward IMF impact on the magnetosphere. The evident inconsistency between the sharp IMF changes measured outside of the magnetosphere and behavior of the ground-based PC index, the latter determining the substorm development, provides an additional argument in favor of the PC index as a ground-based proxy of the solar wind energy that entered into magnetosphere.

  9. On the occurrence of magnetic reconnection equatorward of the cusps at the Earth's magnetopause during northward IMF conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trattner, K. J.; Thresher, S.; Trenchi, L.; Fuselier, S. A.; Petrinec, S. M.; Peterson, W. K.; Marcucci, M. F.

    2017-01-01

    Magnetic reconnection changes the topology of magnetic field lines. This process is most readily observable with in situ instrumentation at the Earth's magnetopause as it creates open magnetic field lines to allow energy and momentum flux to flow from the solar wind to the magnetosphere. Most models use the direction of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) to determine the location of these magnetopause entry points, known as reconnection lines. Dayside locations of magnetic reconnection equatorward of the cusps are generally found during sustained intervals of southward IMF, while high-latitude region regions poleward of the cusps are observed for northward IMF conditions. In this study we discuss Double Star magnetopause crossings and a conjunction with a Polar cusp crossing during northward IMF conditions with a dominant IMF BY component. During all seven dayside magnetopause crossings, Double Star detected switching ion beams, a known signature for the presence of reconnection lines. In addition, Polar observed a cusp ion-energy dispersion profile typical for a dayside equatorial reconnection line. Using the cutoff velocities for the precipitating and mirrored ion beams in the cusp, the distance to the reconnection site is calculated, and this distance is traced back to the magnetopause, to the vicinity of the Double Star satellite locations. Our analysis shows that, for this case, the predicted line of maximum magnetic shear also coincides with that dayside reconnection location.

  10. Kelvin-Helmholtz instability during northward IMF conditions: Global 3-Dimensional MHD simulations (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merkin, V. G.; Lyon, J.; Claudepierre, S. G.

    2013-12-01

    The Kelvin-Helmholtz Instability (KHI) has long been suggested to operate on the magnetospheric boundary, where the magnetosheath plasma streams past the magnetosphere. The instability is thought to be responsible for inducing various wave populations in the magnetosphere and for mass, momentum and energy transport across the magnetospheric boundary. Waves attributed to the KHI have been observed at the Earth's magnetosphere flanks as well as at Saturn and Mercury during spacecraft crossings, and remotely at boundaries of Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs). Recent high-resolution global 3D magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations of the magnetosphere confirm the existence of pronounced perturbations of the magnetospheric boundary, which are thought to be due to KHI. Such global simulations had been challenging in the past because of the need to encompass the entire magnetosphere, while sufficiently resolving the boundary layer. Here we present results of such a high-resolution simulation of the magnetosphere, using the Lyon-Fedder-Mobarry (LFM) model, under steady northward Interplanetary Magnetic Field (IMF) conditions. We find the magnetospheric boundary to be globally unstable, including the high-latitude boundary layer (meridional plane), where magnetic tension is apparently not sufficient to stabilize the growth of oscillations. Roughly beyond the terminator, global modes, coupled into the surface modes, become apparent, so that the entire body of the magnetosphere is engaged in an oscillatory motion. The wave vector of the surface oscillations has a component perpendicular to the background flow and tangential to the shear layer (in the equatorial plane, k_z component of the wave vector), which is consistent with the generation of field-aligned currents that flow on closed field lines between the inner portion of the boundary layer and the ionosphere. We calculate the distribution of wave power in the equatorial plane and find it consistent with the existence of a

  11. Empirical convection models for northward IMF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moses, Julie J.; Reiff, Patricia H.

    1994-01-01

    It is clear that polar cap convection during times of northward Interplanetary Magnetic Field (IMF) is more structured and of lower mean speed than at times of southward IMF. This, coupled with the fact that the polar cap is smaller, means that empirical models are more difficult to construct with certainty. It is also clear that sunward flow deep in the polar cap is often observed, but its connection with the rest of the flow pattern is controversial. At present, empirical models are of three types: 'statistical' models wherein data from different days but with similar IMF conditions are averaged together; 'pattern recognition' models, which are built up by examining individually hundreds of passes to derive a 'typical' pattern which embodies features frequently observed; and 'assimilative' models, which use data of different types and from as many locations as possible, but all taken at the same time, in order to derive a snapshot (or series of snapshots) of the entire pattern. Each type of model has its own difficulties. Statistical models, by their very nature, smooth out flow features (e.g. the convection reversal, and the locus of sunward flow deep in the polar cap) which are not found at precisely the same invariant latitudes and magnetic local times on different days. Pattern recognition models are better at reproducing small-scale features, but the large-scale pattern can be a matter of interpretation. Assimilative models (such as AMIE) hold out the best hope for creating instantaneous, global convection patterns; however, the analysis technique tends to be most irregular (and least reliable) in the regions which are not well covered by in situ data. It appears that, at least at times, a four cell model with sunward flow at the highest and lowest latitudes, and antisunward flow in between, is consistent with the observations. At other times, the observations may be consistent with a two-cell convection pattern, but which includes significant meanders

  12. An evidence for prompt electric field disturbance driven by changes in the solar wind density under northward IMF Bz condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rout, Diptiranjan; Chakrabarty, D.; Sekar, R.; Reeves, G. D.; Ruohoniemi, J. M.; Pant, Tarun K.; Veenadhari, B.; Shiokawa, K.

    2016-05-01

    Before the onset of a geomagnetic storm on 22 January 2012 (Ap = 24), an enhancement in solar wind number density from 10/cm3 to 22/cm3 during 0440-0510 UT under northward interplanetary magnetic field (IMF Bz) condition is shown to have enhanced the high-latitude ionospheric convection and also caused variations in the geomagnetic field globally. Conspicuous changes in ΔX are observed not only at longitudinally separated low-latitude stations over Indian (prenoon), South American (midnight), Japanese (afternoon), Pacific (afternoon) and African (morning) sectors but also at latitudinally separated stations located over high and middle latitudes. The latitudinal variation of the amplitude of the ΔX during 0440-0510 UT is shown to be consistent with the characteristics of prompt penetration electric field disturbances. Most importantly, the density pulse event caused enhancements in the equatorial electrojet strength and the peak height of the F layer (hmF2) over the Indian dip equatorial sector. Further, the concomitant enhancements in electrojet current and F layer movement over the dip equator observed during this space weather event suggest a common driver of prompt electric field disturbance at this time. Such simultaneous variations are found to be absent during magnetically quiet days. In absence of significant change in solar wind velocity and magnetospheric substorm activity, these observations point toward perceptible prompt electric field disturbance over the dip equator driven by the overcompression of the magnetosphere by solar wind density enhancement.

  13. Triggered daytime breakups in the case of the northward IMF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabis, I. P.; Pudovkin, M. I.

    1993-04-01

    The anomalous ionization observed in the E-layer in the region of the near-polar boundary of the daytime cusp in the case of the northward IMF might be caused by the pulsed precipitation of particles during reconnection of the geomagnetic field with the northward IMF. It is shown that in about half the cases an increase in anomalous ionization is observed in the case of a sharp reduction in the magnitude of the northward IMF component or in the case of short Bz less than 0 pulses on the background of the positive direction of the IMF.

  14. Magnetotail Structure and its Internal Particle Dynamics During Northward IMF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashour-Abdalia, M.; El-Alaoui, M.; Peroomian, V.

    1998-01-01

    This study uses Global magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations driven by solar wind data along with Geotail observations of the magnetotail to investigate the magnetotail's response to changes in the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF); observed events used in the study occurred on March 29, 1993 and February 9, 1995. For events from February 9, 1995, we also use the time-dependent MHD magnetic and electric fields and the large-scale kinetic (LSK) technique to examine changes in the Geotail ion velocity distributions. Our MHD simulation shows that on March 29, 1993, during a long period of steady northward IMF, the tail was strongly squeezed and twisted around the Sun-Earth axis in response to variations in the IMF B(sub y) component. The mixed (magnetotail and magnetosheath) plasma observed by Geotail results from the spacecraft's close proximity to the magnetopause and its frequent crossings of this boundary. In our second example (February 9, 1995) the IMF was also steady and northward, and in addition had a significant B(sub y) component. Again the magnetotail was twisted, but not as strongly as on March 29, 1993. The Geotail spacecraft, located approximately 30 R(sub E) downtail, observed highly structured ion distribution functions. Using the time-dependent LSK technique, we investigate the ion sources and acceleration mechanisms affecting the Geotail distribution functions during this interval. At 1325 UT most ions are found to enter the magnetosphere on the dusk side earthward of Geotail with a secondary source on the dawn side in the low latitude boundary layer (LLBL). A small percentage come from the ionosphere. By 1347 UT the majority of the ions come from the dawn side LLBL. The distribution functions measured during the later time interval are much warmer, mainly because particles reaching the spacecraft from the dawnside are affected by nonadiabatic scattering and acceleration in the neutral sheet.

  15. Magnetotail Structure and its Internal Particle Dynamics During Northward IMF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashour-Abdalla, M.; Raeder, J.; El-Alaoui, M.; Peroomian, V.

    1998-01-01

    This study uses Global magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations driven by solar wind data along with Geotail observations of the magnetotail to investigate the magnetotail's response to changes in the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF); observed events used in the study occurred on March 29, 1993 and February 9, 1995. For events from February 9, 1995, we also use the time-dependent MHD magnetic and electric fields and the large-scale kinetic (LSK) technique to examine changes in the Geotail ion velocity distributions. Our MHD simulation shows that on March 29, 1993, during a long period of steady northward IMF, the tail was strongly squeezed and twisted around the Sun-Earth axis in response to variations in the IMF B(sub y) component. The mixed (magnetotail and magnetosheath) plasma observed by Geotail results from the spacecraft's close proximity to the magnetopause and its frequent crossings of this boundary. In our second example (February 9, 1995) the IMF was also steady and northward, and in addition had a significant B(sub y) component. Again the magnetotail was twisted, but not as strongly as on March 29, 1993. The Geotail spacecraft, located approximately 30 R(sub E) downtail, observed highly structured ion distribution functions. Using the time-dependent LSK technique, we investigate the ion sources and acceleration mechanisms affecting the Geotail distribution functions during this interval. At 1325 UT most ions are found to enter the magnetosphere on the dusk side earthward of Geotail with a secondary source on the dawn side in the low latitude boundary layer (LLBL). A small percentage come from the ionosphere. By 1347 UT the majority of the ions come from the dawn side LLBL. The distribution functions measured during the later time interval are much warmer, mainly because particles reaching the spacecraft from the dawn side are affected by nonadiabatic scattering and acceleration in the neutral sheet.

  16. Magnetotail Structure and its Internal Particle Dynamics During Northward IMF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashour-Abdalla, M.; Raeder, J.; El-Alaoui, M.; Peroomian, V.

    1998-01-01

    This study uses Global magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations driven by solar wind data along with Geotail observations of the magnetotail to investigate the magnetotail's response to changes in the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF); observed events used in the study occurred on March 29, 1993 and February 9, 1995. For events from February 9, 1995, we also use the time-dependent MHD magnetic and electric fields and the large-scale kinetic (LSK) technique to examine changes in the Geotail ion velocity distributions. Our MHD simulation shows that on March 29, 1993, during a long period of steady northward IMF, the tail was strongly squeezed and twisted around the Sun-Earth axis in response to variations in the IMF B(sub y) component. The mixed (magnetotail and magnetosheath) plasma observed by Geotail results from the spacecraft's close proximity to the magnetopause and its frequent crossings of this boundary. In our second example (February 9, 1995) the IMF was also steady and northward, and in addition had a significant B(sub y) component. Again the magnetotail was twisted, but not as strongly as on March 29, 1993. The Geotail spacecraft, located approximately 30 R(sub E) downtail, observed highly structured ion distribution functions. Using the time-dependent LSK technique, we investigate the ion sources and acceleration mechanisms affecting the Geotail distribution functions during this interval. At 1325 UT most ions are found to enter the magnetosphere on the dusk side earthward of Geotail with a secondary source on the dawn side in the low latitude boundary layer (LLBL). A small percentage come from the ionosphere. By 1347 UT the majority of the ions come from the dawn side LLBL. The distribution functions measured during the later time interval are much warmer, mainly because particles reaching the spacecraft from the dawn side are affected by nonadiabatic scattering and acceleration in the neutral sheet.

  17. Magnetotail Structure and its Internal Particle Dynamics During Northward IMF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashour-Abdalia, M.; El-Alaoui, M.; Peroomian, V.

    1998-01-01

    This study uses Global magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations driven by solar wind data along with Geotail observations of the magnetotail to investigate the magnetotail's response to changes in the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF); observed events used in the study occurred on March 29, 1993 and February 9, 1995. For events from February 9, 1995, we also use the time-dependent MHD magnetic and electric fields and the large-scale kinetic (LSK) technique to examine changes in the Geotail ion velocity distributions. Our MHD simulation shows that on March 29, 1993, during a long period of steady northward IMF, the tail was strongly squeezed and twisted around the Sun-Earth axis in response to variations in the IMF B(sub y) component. The mixed (magnetotail and magnetosheath) plasma observed by Geotail results from the spacecraft's close proximity to the magnetopause and its frequent crossings of this boundary. In our second example (February 9, 1995) the IMF was also steady and northward, and in addition had a significant B(sub y) component. Again the magnetotail was twisted, but not as strongly as on March 29, 1993. The Geotail spacecraft, located approximately 30 R(sub E) downtail, observed highly structured ion distribution functions. Using the time-dependent LSK technique, we investigate the ion sources and acceleration mechanisms affecting the Geotail distribution functions during this interval. At 1325 UT most ions are found to enter the magnetosphere on the dusk side earthward of Geotail with a secondary source on the dawn side in the low latitude boundary layer (LLBL). A small percentage come from the ionosphere. By 1347 UT the majority of the ions come from the dawn side LLBL. The distribution functions measured during the later time interval are much warmer, mainly because particles reaching the spacecraft from the dawnside are affected by nonadiabatic scattering and acceleration in the neutral sheet.

  18. Evidence for extended sub-ion scale current sheets at the subsolar magnetopause under northward and southward IMF conditions: Comparison of MMS observations with global MHD simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorelli, J.; Buzulukova, N.; Gershman, D. J.; Rager, A. C.; Glocer, A.; Avanov, L. A.; Giles, B. L.; Paterson, W. R.; Pollock, C.; Strangeway, R. J.; Khotyaintsev, Y. V.; Russell, C. T.; Ergun, R.; Torbert, R. B.; Burch, J. L.

    2016-12-01

    Global magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) simulations predict that dayside magnetopause reconnection occurs at thin extended Sweet-Parker current sheets that form at large-scale magnetic separators (three-dimensional X-lines). Kinetic simulations of reconnection, on the other hand, show that the current sheets have much smaller aspect ratios than those predicted by resistive MHD, and this is thought to be the basic reason that fast reconnection is possible even in the limit of zero resistivity and large system size. The question of how current sheet aspect ratio scales with system size has been difficult to answer due to the limitation on simulation system size imposed by finite computational resources. The Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) missio, on the other hand, can address this question since it routinely observes the subsolar magnetopause on kinetic scales for a variety of Interplanetary Magnetic Field (IMF) orientations. In this presentation, we show MMS observations for two magentopause crossings: 1) the 2015-10-16 southward IMF crossing published by Burch et al., [Science, 352, 2015]; 2) a northward IMF crossing on 2015-11-25. In both events, sub-ion scale current sheets were observed close to the locations where MHD predicts that Sweet-Parker current sheets should be observed but far from the predicted magnetic separator locations. A possible explanation for this discrepancy is that sub-ion scale current sheets associated with magnetic reconnection extend very large distances (on the order of the magnetopause "system size") away from the topological X line. Implications for the interpretation of plasma signatures of reconnection diffusion regions (e.g., the violation of frozen-flux and deviations from gyrotropy for the electrons) are discussed.

  19. RISR-N observations of the IMF By influence on reverse convection during extreme northward IMF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maimaiti, M.; Ruohoniemi, J. M.; Baker, J. B. H.; Clauer, C. R.; Nicolls, Michael J.; Hairston, Marc R.

    2017-03-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that the high-latitude ionospheric convection is strongly influenced by the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) direction. However, the temporal details of how the convection transitions from one state to another are still not understood completely. In this study, we analyze an interval on 12 September 2014 which provided a rare opportunity to examine dynamic variations in the dayside convection throat as the IMF transitioned from strong By+ to strong Bz+. Between 18:00 and 20:00 UT the northward face of the Resolute Bay Incoherent Scatter Radar (RISR-N) rotated through the noon sector and directly measured strengthening reverse convection flows in the dayside throat region that peaked at ˜2800 m/s. Near-simultaneous measurements from DMSP satellites confirm the magnitude of the reverse convection and its proximity to the cusp. Time series comparison of the RISR-N north-south flows with the IMF Bz component shows a remarkably high correlation, suggestive of strong linear coupling, with no sign of velocity saturation. Likewise, the east-west flow variations were highly correlated with the changes in IMF By. However, time-lagged correlation analysis reveals that the IMF By influence acted on a time scale 10 min shorter than that of the Bz component. As a consequence, the manner in which the convection transitioned from the strong By+ condition to the strong Bz+ condition is inconsistent with either the antiparallel or component reconnection models. Instead, we suggest that these particular observations are consistent with two separate reconnection sites on the magnetopause driven independently by the IMF By and Bz components.

  20. Predictions of Substorms and Intensifications Following Northward Turnings of the IMF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blanchard, G. T.; Lyons, L. R.; Spann, J.

    1999-01-01

    Substorms are often observed to occur at the end of intervals of Southward interplanetary magnetic field (IMF), i.e. following the northward turning. Despite the significant correlation between northward turning and substorms, no direct causal relationship between northward turnings and substorms has been demonstrated. Assuming such a causal relationship, we predict that substorms will occur within a particular interval following the observation of a northward turning in the IMF. We observe 16 northward turnings following steady, southward IMF in data taken by the WIND spacecraft magnetic field instrument (MFI). To ensure that the northward turning was observed at the magnetosphere, we require that the northward turning also be observed by instruments on either one of Geotail or IMP-8 while the separation of the second spacecraft from WIND was more that 10 R(sub E). These two-spacecraft observations also allow us to predict more accurately the arrival time of the northward turning at the Earth. Of the predictions substorms, 10 predictions were clearly successful to within +/- 12 min. Five predictions failed, but the failures reveal clear shortcomings in the criteria for a northward turning that we correct. The failures were caused by an increase in the absolute value of B(sub YGSM) simultaneous with the northward turning in 3 cases, and a weak southward IMF preceding the northward turning in 2 cases. The final northward turning arrived in the recovery phase of an ongoing substorm, and resulted in unusual auroral activity. The implication of the predictability of substorms following sharp northward turnings is that the postulated causal relationship between northward turnings and substorm onset exists. The effect of increases in the absolute value of B(sub YGSM) to negate the triggering ability of northward turnings suggests that the triggering mechanism involves sharp reductions in the magnetospheric convection electric field.

  1. Predictions of Substorms and Intensifications Following Northward Turnings of the IMF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blanchard, G. T.; Lyons, L. R.; Spann, J.

    1999-01-01

    Substorms are often observed to occur at the end of intervals of Southward interplanetary magnetic field (IMF), i.e. following the northward turning. Despite the significant correlation between northward turning and substorms, no direct causal relationship between northward turnings and substorms has been demonstrated. Assuming such a causal relationship, we predict that substorms will occur within a particular interval following the observation of a northward turning in the IMF. We observe 16 northward turnings following steady, southward IMF in data taken by the WIND spacecraft magnetic field instrument (MFI). To ensure that the northward turning was observed at the magnetosphere, we require that the northward turning also be observed by instruments on either one of Geotail or IMP-8 while the separation of the second spacecraft from WIND was more that 10 R(sub E). These two-spacecraft observations also allow us to predict more accurately the arrival time of the northward turning at the Earth. Of the predictions substorms, 10 predictions were clearly successful to within +/- 12 min. Five predictions failed, but the failures reveal clear shortcomings in the criteria for a northward turning that we correct. The failures were caused by an increase in the absolute value of B(sub YGSM) simultaneous with the northward turning in 3 cases, and a weak southward IMF preceding the northward turning in 2 cases. The final northward turning arrived in the recovery phase of an ongoing substorm, and resulted in unusual auroral activity. The implication of the predictability of substorms following sharp northward turnings is that the postulated causal relationship between northward turnings and substorm onset exists. The effect of increases in the absolute value of B(sub YGSM) to negate the triggering ability of northward turnings suggests that the triggering mechanism involves sharp reductions in the magnetospheric convection electric field.

  2. On the Predictability of Substorms Following Sharp Northward Turnings of the IMF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blanchard, G. T.; Lyons, Larry R.; Spann, James F., Jr.; Reeves, G. D.

    1998-01-01

    It has been shown that there is an association between changes of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) that are expected to lead to a reduction in magnetospheric convection (northward turnings, reductions) and the onset of the expansion phase of substorms. This has been previously demonstrated by analyses of IMF data during time intervals associated with identified substorm onsets. Here we examine whether observations of northward turnings of the IMF can be used to predict the occurrence of substorms. We first identified sharp northward turnings that follow an interval of steady, southward IMF using measurements from the Wind spacecraft during the first 180 days of 1997. We also required that the northward turning be observed by either IMP-8 or GEOTAIL, in addition to Wind, and that one of the observing satellites be sufficiently close to the Earth-Sun line, or that the two observing satellites be sufficiently separated, that we are reasonably certain that the northward turning affected the magnetosphere. We also used the dual observations to estimate the arrival of the northward turning at the Earth. Using these criteria, we predicted 17 substorms. We then searched for the following signatures of substorm onset around the time of the predicted onset: auroral brightening followed by auroral bulge expansion observed by Polar UVI, geosynchronous particle injection, geosynchronous magnetic field dipolarization, and an appropriate magnetic disturbance at the surface of the Earth. Of the 17 predictions of substorms, 10 were successful in that a substorm onset was observed within 12 min of the predicted onset, 1 is indeterminate due to a lack of data at the Earth, 1 had unusual activity that we have not been able to identify, and 5 were unsuccessful. The failure of these last 5 predictions is explicable. Two of the northward turnings that failed to produce substorms were preceded by the lowest average of the set. The remaining 3 were the only cases in which the

  3. Separator Reconnection at the Magnetopause for Predominantly Northward and Southward IMF: Techniques and Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glocer, Alex; Dorelli, J.; Toth, G.; Komar, C. M.; Cassak, P. A.

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we demonstrate how to track magnetic separators in three-dimensional simulated magnetic fields with or without magnetic nulls, apply these techniques to enhance our understanding of reconnection at the magnetopause. We present three methods for locating magnetic separators and apply them to 3-D resistive MHD simulations of the Earth's magnetosphere using the Block-Adaptive-Tree Solar-wind Roe-type Upwind Scheme code. The techniques for finding separators and determining the reconnection rate are insensitive to interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) clock angle and can in principle be applied to any magnetospheric model. Moreover, the techniques have a number of advantages over prior separator finding techniques applied to the magnetosphere. The present work examines cases of high and low resistivity for two clock angles. We go beyond previous work examine the separator during Flux Transfer Events (FTEs). Our analysis of reconnection on the magnetopause yields a number of interesting conclusions: Reconnection occurs all along the separator even during predominately northward IMF cases. Multiple separators form in low-resistivity conditions, and in the region of an FTE the separator splits into distinct branches. Moreover, the local contribution to the reconnection rate, as determined by the local parallel electric field, drops in the vicinity of the FTE with respect to the value when there are none.

  4. Impact of Magnetic Draping, Convection, and Field Line Tying on Magnetopause Reconnection Under Northward IMF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wendel, Deirdre E.; Reiff, Patricia H.; Goldstein, Melvyn L.

    2010-01-01

    We simulate a northward IMF cusp reconnection event at the magnetopause using the OpenGGCM resistive MHD code. The ACE input data, solar wind parameters, and dipole tilt belong to a 2002 reconnection event observed by IMAGE and Cluster. Based on a fully three-dimensional skeleton separators, nulls, and parallel electric fields, we show magnetic draping, convection, ionospheric field line tying play a role in producing a series of locally reconnecting nulls with flux ropes. The flux ropes in the cusp along the global separator line of symmetry. In 2D projection, the flux ropes the appearance of a tearing mode with a series of 'x's' and 'o's' but bearing a kind of 'guide field' that exists only within the magnetopause. The reconnecting field lines in the string of ropes involve IMF and both open and closed Earth magnetic field lines. The observed magnetic geometry reproduces the findings of a superposed epoch impact parameter study derived from the Cluster magnetometer data for the same event. The observed geometry has repercussions for spacecraft observations of cusp reconnection and for the imposed boundary conditions reconnection simulations.

  5. Impact of Magnetic Draping, Convection, and Field Line Tying on Magnetopause Reconnection Under Northward IMF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wendel, Deirdre E.; Reiff, Patricia H.; Goldstein, Melvyn L.

    2010-01-01

    We simulate a northward IMF cusp reconnection event at the magnetopause using the OpenGGCM resistive MHD code. The ACE input data, solar wind parameters, and dipole tilt belong to a 2002 reconnection event observed by IMAGE and Cluster. Based on a fully three-dimensional skeleton separators, nulls, and parallel electric fields, we show magnetic draping, convection, ionospheric field line tying play a role in producing a series of locally reconnecting nulls with flux ropes. The flux ropes in the cusp along the global separator line of symmetry. In 2D projection, the flux ropes the appearance of a tearing mode with a series of 'x's' and 'o's' but bearing a kind of 'guide field' that exists only within the magnetopause. The reconnecting field lines in the string of ropes involve IMF and both open and closed Earth magnetic field lines. The observed magnetic geometry reproduces the findings of a superposed epoch impact parameter study derived from the Cluster magnetometer data for the same event. The observed geometry has repercussions for spacecraft observations of cusp reconnection and for the imposed boundary conditions reconnection simulations.

  6. Cusp and LLBL as Sources of the Isolated Dayside Auroral Feature During Northward IMF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, S.; Gallagher, D. L.; Spann, J. F., Jr.; Mende, S.; Greenwald, R.; Newell, P. T.

    2004-01-01

    An intense dayside proton aurora was observed by IMAGE FUV for an extensive period of northward interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) on 17 and 18 September, 2000. This aurora partially coincided with the auroral oval and intruded farther poleward into the polar cap, and it showed longitudinal motions in response to IMF $B-y$ variation. Intense magnetosheath-like electron and ion precipitations have been simultaneously detected by DMSP above the poleward portion of the high-latitude dayside aurora. They resemble the typical plasmas observed in the low-altitude cusp. However, less intense electrons and more intense energetic ions were detected over the equatorward part of the aurora. These plasmas are closer to the low-latitude boundary layer (LLBL) plasmas. Under strongly northward IMF, global ionospheric convection derived from SuperDARN radar measurements showed a 4-cell pattern with sunward convection in the middle of the dayside polar cap and the dayside aurora corresponded to two different convection cells. This result further supports two source regions for the aurora. The cusp proton aurora is on open magnetic field lines convecting sunward whereas the LLBL proton aurora is on closed field lines convecting antisunward. These IMAGE, DMSP and SuperDARN observations reveal the structure and dynamics of the aurora and provide strong evidence for magnetic merging occurring at the high-latitude magnetopause poleward from the cusp. This merging process was very likely quasi-stationary.

  7. Cusp and LLBL as Sources of the Isolated Dayside Auroral Feature During Northward IMF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, S.; Gallagher, D. L.; Spann, J. F., Jr.; Mende, S.; Greenwald, R.; Newell, P. T.

    2004-01-01

    An intense dayside proton aurora was observed by IMAGE FUV for an extensive period of northward interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) on 17 and 18 September, 2000. This aurora partially coincided with the auroral oval and intruded farther poleward into the polar cap, and it showed longitudinal motions in response to IMF $B-y$ variation. Intense magnetosheath-like electron and ion precipitations have been simultaneously detected by DMSP above the poleward portion of the high-latitude dayside aurora. They resemble the typical plasmas observed in the low-altitude cusp. However, less intense electrons and more intense energetic ions were detected over the equatorward part of the aurora. These plasmas are closer to the low-latitude boundary layer (LLBL) plasmas. Under strongly northward IMF, global ionospheric convection derived from SuperDARN radar measurements showed a 4-cell pattern with sunward convection in the middle of the dayside polar cap and the dayside aurora corresponded to two different convection cells. This result further supports two source regions for the aurora. The cusp proton aurora is on open magnetic field lines convecting sunward whereas the LLBL proton aurora is on closed field lines convecting antisunward. These IMAGE, DMSP and SuperDARN observations reveal the structure and dynamics of the aurora and provide strong evidence for magnetic merging occurring at the high-latitude magnetopause poleward from the cusp. This merging process was very likely quasi-stationary.

  8. The structure of the distanct geomagnetic tail during long periods of northward IMF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raeder, J.; Walker, R. J.; Ashour-Abdalla, M.

    1995-01-01

    We have used a newly developed, parallelized, global MHD magnetosphere - ionosphere simulation model with a 400 R(sub E) long tail to study the evolution, structure, and dynamics of the distant magnetotail during extended periods of northward interplanetary magnetic field (IMF). We find that the tail evolves to a nearly time stationary structure about one solar wind transit time after the IMF turns northward. Four regions of different magnetic topology can be distinguished which extend at least to the end of the simulation box at 400 R(sub E). Besides lobe field lines and open solar wind field lines tailward of an X-line, there is a broad boundary layer of closed field lines which we call the tail flank boundary layer (TFBL). Just inside the TFBL there is a region of closed field loops. Besides the X-line we find two O-lines which are enclosed by the closed field loops and are roughly aligned with the tail axis. Together they form a U shaped separator between the northward and the southward plasma sheet fields.

  9. High-latitude electromagnetic and particle energy flux during an event with sustained strongly northward IMF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korth, H.; Anderson, B. J.; Frey, H. U.; Waters, C. L.

    2005-06-01

    We present a case study of a prolonged interval of strongly northward orientation of the interplanetary magnetic field on 16 July 2000, 16:00-19:00 UT to characterize the energy exchange between the magnetosphere and ionosphere for conditions associated with minimum solar wind-magnetosphere coupling. With reconnection occurring tailward of the cusp under northward IMF conditions, the reconnection dynamo should be separated from the viscous dynamo, presumably driven by the Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) instability. Thus, these conditions are also ideal for evaluating the contribution of a viscous interaction to the coupling process. We derive the two-dimensional distribution of the Poynting vector radial component in the northern sunlit polar ionosphere from magnetic field observations by the constellation of Iridium satellites together with drift meter and magnetometer observations from the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) F13 and F15 satellites. The electromagnetic energy flux is then compared with the particle energy flux obtained from auroral images taken by the far-ultraviolet (FUV) instrument on the Imager for Magnetopause to Aurora Global Exploration (IMAGE) spacecraft. The electromagnetic energy input to the ionosphere of 51 GW calculated from the Iridium/DMSP observations is eight times larger than the 6 GW due to particle precipitation all poleward of 78° MLAT. This result indicates that the energy transport is significant, particularly as it is concentrated in a small region near the magnetic pole, even under conditions traditionally considered to be quiet and is dominated by the electromagnetic flux. We estimate the contributions of the high and mid-latitude dynamos to both the Birkeland currents and electric potentials finding that high-latitude reconnection accounts for 0.8 MA and 45kV while we attribute <0.2MA and ~5kV to an interaction at lower latitudes having the sense of a viscous interaction. Given that these conditions are ideal for the

  10. Cusp and LLBL as Sources of the Isolated Dayside Auroral Feature During Northward IMF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, S.-W.; Gallagher, D. L.; Spann, J. F.; Mende, S. B.; Greenwald, R. A.; Newell, P. T.

    2004-01-01

    An intense dayside proton aurora was observed by Imager for Magnetopause-to- Aurora Global Exploration Far Ultra-Violet imager (IMAGE FUV) for an extensive period of northward interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) on 17 and 18 September 2000. This aurora partially coincided with the auroral oval and intruded farther poleward into the polar cap, and it showed longitudinal motions in response to IMF By variation. Intense magnetosheath-like electron and ion precipitations have been simultaneously detected by Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) above the poleward portion of the high-latitude dayside aurora. They resemble the typical plasmas observed in the low-altitude cusp. However, less intense electrons and more energetic ions were detected over the equatonvard part of the aurora. These plasmas are closer to the low-latitude boundary layer (LLBL) plasmas. Under strongly northward IMF, global ionospheric convection derived from Super Dual Auroral Radar Network (SuperDARN) radar measurements showed a four-cell pattern with sunward convection in the middle of the dayside polar cap and the dayside aurora corresponded to two different convection cells. This result further supports two source regions for the aurora. The cusp proton aurora is on open magnetic field lines convecting sunward whereas the LLBL proton aurora is on closed field lines convecting antisunward. These IMAGE, DMSP, and SuperDARN observations reveal the structure and dynamics of the aurora and provide strong evidence for magnetic merging occurring at the high-latitude magnetopause poleward from the cusp. This merging process was very likely quasi-stationary.

  11. Cusp and LLBL as Sources of the Isolated Dayside Auroral Feature During Northward IMF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, S.-W.; Gallagher, D. L.; Spann, J. F.; Mende, S. B.; Greenwald, R. A.; Newell, P. T.

    2004-01-01

    An intense dayside proton aurora was observed by Imager for Magnetopause-to- Aurora Global Exploration Far Ultra-Violet imager (IMAGE FUV) for an extensive period of northward interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) on 17 and 18 September 2000. This aurora partially coincided with the auroral oval and intruded farther poleward into the polar cap, and it showed longitudinal motions in response to IMF By variation. Intense magnetosheath-like electron and ion precipitations have been simultaneously detected by Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) above the poleward portion of the high-latitude dayside aurora. They resemble the typical plasmas observed in the low-altitude cusp. However, less intense electrons and more energetic ions were detected over the equatonvard part of the aurora. These plasmas are closer to the low-latitude boundary layer (LLBL) plasmas. Under strongly northward IMF, global ionospheric convection derived from Super Dual Auroral Radar Network (SuperDARN) radar measurements showed a four-cell pattern with sunward convection in the middle of the dayside polar cap and the dayside aurora corresponded to two different convection cells. This result further supports two source regions for the aurora. The cusp proton aurora is on open magnetic field lines convecting sunward whereas the LLBL proton aurora is on closed field lines convecting antisunward. These IMAGE, DMSP, and SuperDARN observations reveal the structure and dynamics of the aurora and provide strong evidence for magnetic merging occurring at the high-latitude magnetopause poleward from the cusp. This merging process was very likely quasi-stationary.

  12. Observations at Low Latitudes of Magnetic Merging Signatures Within a Flux Transfer Event During a Northward IMF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chandler, M. O.; Avanov, L. A.

    2003-01-01

    Flux transfer events (FTE) have been postulated to result from transient magnetic merging. If so, the ion distributions within an event should exhibit features known to result from merging. Observations of a FTE by instruments on the Polar spacecraft revealed classical merging signatures that included: 1) D-shaped, accelerated, magnetosheath ion distributions, 2) a well defined de Hoffman-Teller frame, 3) local stress balance, and 4) a P-N magnetic field signature. This FTE was observed near the magnetic equator at approx. 13 MLT under conditions of a moderately northward interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) (clock angle of less than 10 deg). The nature of the ion distributions and the consistency of the measured cutoff speed with that calculated from the measured local magnetic field and the derived de Hoffman-Teller speed show the ion injection to be local. Coupled with the northward IMF these results lead to the conclusion that component merging in the low latitude region was responsible for the FTE.

  13. Observations at Low Latitudes of Magnetic Merging Signatures Within a Flux Transfer Event During a Northward IMF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chandler, M. O.; Avanov, L. A.

    2003-01-01

    Flux transfer events (FTE) have been postulated to result from transient magnetic merging. If so, the ion distributions within an event should exhibit features known to result from merging. Observations of a FTE by instruments on the Polar spacecraft revealed classical merging signatures that included: 1) D-shaped, accelerated, magnetosheath ion distributions, 2) a well defined de Hoffman-Teller frame, 3) local stress balance, and 4) a P-N magnetic field signature. This FTE was observed near the magnetic equator at approx. 13 MLT under conditions of a moderately northward interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) (clock angle of less than 10 deg). The nature of the ion distributions and the consistency of the measured cutoff speed with that calculated from the measured local magnetic field and the derived de Hoffman-Teller speed show the ion injection to be local. Coupled with the northward IMF these results lead to the conclusion that component merging in the low latitude region was responsible for the FTE.

  14. Double-cusp simulation during northward IMF using 3D PIC global code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esmaeili, Amin; Kalaee, Mohammad Javad

    2017-07-01

    The cusp has important effects on the transportation of particles and their energy from the solar wind to the magnetosphere, and ionosphere, and high-altitude atmosphere. The cusp can be considered to be a part of the magnetospheric boundary layer with weaker magnetic fields. It has been studied since 1971 by different satellite observations. Despite many years of investigation, some problems, such as the boundaries, shapes, and method of construction, remain to be solved. The double cusp was first reported by Wing using the observation of the DMSP satellite. He also compared the results of observations with the results of a 2D MHD simulation. In this study, by performing simulations and analyzing the results, we report the observation of a V-shaped double-cusp structure under the northward Interplanetary Magnetic Field (IMF). In our simulation, the double cusp was seen only for electrons, although a weak double cusp was observed for ions as well. We showed that this double cusp occurred because of electron precipitation from different sources of solar wind and magnetosphere with different magnetic field strengths. In previous studies of the double cusp, there were debates on its spatial structure or on its temporal behavior due to the cusp movement caused by the sharp solar wind effects on the magnetosphere shape. Here we report the spatial detection of the double cusp similar to the one observed by the DMSP satellite, but for the northward IMF case. Also, we investigate the asymmetry along the dawn-dusk side of the magnetosphere using our 3D PIC simulation code.

  15. Observations of a transient event in the subsolar magnetosheath during strongly northward IMF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dias Silveira, M. V.; Sibeck, D. G.; Gonzalez, W. D.; Koga, D.

    2013-12-01

    We present multipoint THEMIS observation of a transient event in the subsolar magnetosheath on July 10, 2007. The event exhibits some features of a flux transfer event, such as a bipolar variation in the magnetic field component normal to the nominal magnetopause centered on a peak in the total magnetic field strength. Four THEMIS spacecraft were in the magnetosheath and one in the magnetosphere. Timing analysis and the absence of flow perturbation suggest that the event is a small scale structure (~0.12 Re in the direction of the flow) moving with the background magnetosheath flow. Despite the inferred small size of the event, THC and THD both observed large amplitude (~40 nT) bipolar magnetic field signatures normal to the nominal magnetopause. Nearby spacecraft THE (only 0.2 Re further outward in the Xgsm direction) observed no significant magnetic field perturbation. Neither did THB or THA, located further away in the magnetosheath and magnetosphere, respectively. During the event, the IMF was strongly northward (approximately 20nT), which does not favor subsolar magnetic reconnection. Inside the structure, the magnetic field briefly rotates 90° away from northward to dawnward. Ions stream antiparallel to the magnetic field in the magnetosheath, parallel to the magnetic field in the event.

  16. Magnetic Reconnection for Southward and Northward IMF- Coordinate Observations by TC1 and Cluster on Feb.13, 2004

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pu, Z.; Huang, Z.; Xiao, C.; Fu, S.; Liu, Z.; Zong, Q.; Carr, C.; Zhang, T.; Glassmeier, K.; Reme, H.; Dandouras, I.; Dunlop, M.

    2004-12-01

    From 04:40 to 05:20 UT on Feb. 13, 2004, the TC1 satellite of Chinese-ESA joint Double Star Mission was located in the dayside magnetopause boundary near the equator, its GSM position was (9.5, 4.1, -0.4) RE; in the mean time the Cluster four spacecraft were traversing the southern high-latitude magnetopause region, with GSM coordinates being (7.5, 1.8, -10.2) RE. During this time interval, TC1 encountered with the magnetopause four times, the spacecraft saw two magnetic reconnection (MR) events for southward IMF, and two MR events for northward IMF; meanwhile Cluster observed a southward IMF MR and a northward IMF MR phenomenon. A preliminary analysis of these events is made in the present paper. The results are briefly summarized as follows: (1) All MR events are found to be of AƒÆ'A+â_TAƒâ_sA,AøAƒÆ'A,AøAƒAøAøâ_sA¬A.A¡Aƒâ_sA,A¬AƒÆ'Aøâ,¬A¦AƒAøAøâ_sA¬A.â_oComponent ReconnectionAƒÆ'A+â_TAƒâ_sA,AøAƒÆ'A,AøAƒAøAøâ_sA¬A.A¡Aƒâ_sA,A¬ type. In the northward IMF BZ cases a noticeably negative IMF BY component is present. (2) In southward IMF BZ cases, TC1 saw a FTE flux rope and a high-speed plasma flow in the magnetospheric low-latitude boundary layer (LLBL) in each event; while Cluster found a AƒÆ'A+â_TAƒâ_sA,AøAƒÆ'A,AøAƒAøAøâ_sA¬A.A¡Aƒâ_sA,A¬AƒÆ'Aøâ,¬A¦AƒAøAøâ_sA¬A.â_omagnetospheric FTEAƒÆ'A+â_TAƒâ_sA,AøAƒÆ'A,AøAƒAøAøâ_sA¬A.A¡Aƒâ_sA,A¬ flux rope in high-latitudes. (3) For southward IMF, the reconnection structures measured by Cluster in high-latitudes and TC1 in low-latitudes were both originated from the MR process near the dayside equator. (4) In northward IMF BZ cases, the MR phenomenon observed by TC1 near the dayside equatorial plane seems to be closely related to the presence of a noticeable IMF BY. In the two events observed the X-line probably was passing through somewhere between the dayside equatorial magnetopause and the cusp region. For the 04:46-04:49 (UT) event

  17. A global MHD simulation of an event with a quasi-steady northward IMF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merkin, V. G.; Papadopoulos, D.; Lyon, J.; Anderson, B.

    2005-12-01

    We show results of a global MHD simulation, using the Lyon-Fedder-Mobarry (LFM) model, of an event previously examined using data from Iridium spacecraft observations as well as DMSP and IMAGE FUV data. The event is chosen because of the steady northward IMF sustained over a three-hour period during 16 July 2000. The Iridium observations showed very weak or absent Region 2 currents in the ionosphere, which makes the event favorable for global MHD modeling, despite the fact that it occured on the day after the "Bastille Day" storm, and there was a significant remnant ring current in the magnetosphere as indicated by a relatively high Dst index. Here, we compare the ionospheric field-aligned current and electric potential patterns with those recovered from Iridium observations. Particular attention is paid to a comparative analysis of the Pointing flux and the energy flux of precipitating particles, and the verification of the simulated particle flux against IMAGE FUV observations, that is used to validate the LFM precipitation model during weak driving.

  18. An MHD simulation of By-dependent magnetospheric convection and field-aligned currents during northward IMF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ogino, T.; Walker, R. J.; Ashour-Abdalla, M.; Dawson, J. M.

    1985-01-01

    A three-dimensional MHD simulation code is used to model the magnetospheric configuration when the IMF has both a northward B(z) component and a B(y) component in the east-west direction. Projections of the plasma pressure, the field-aligned velocity, the field-aligned vorticity, and the field-aligned current along the magnetic field lines into the northern ionosphere are shown and discussed. Cross-sectional patterns of these parameters are shown. The results demonstrate that the B(y) component of the IMF strongly influences the plasma sheet configuration and the magnetospheric convection pattern.

  19. Investigation of a rare event where the polar ionospheric reverse convection potential does not saturate during a period of extreme northward IMF solar wind driving

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clauer, C. Robert; Xu, Zhonghua; Maimaiti, M.; Ruohoneimi, J. Michael; Scales, Wayne; Hartinger, Michael D.; Nicolls, Michael J.; Kaeppler, Stephen; Wilder, Frederick D.; Lopez, Ramon E.

    2016-06-01

    A variety of statistical studies have shown that the ionospheric polar potential produced by solar wind-magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling is linear for weak to moderate solar wind driving but becomes nonlinear during periods of very strong driving. It has been shown that this applies to the two-cell convection potential that develops during southward interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) and also to the reverse convection cells that develop during northward IMF. This has been described as polar potential saturation, and it appears to begin when the driving solar wind electric field becomes greater than 3 mV/m. Utilizing measurements from the Resolute Incoherent Scatter Radar (RISR-N), we examine ionospheric data near local noon within the reverse convection cells that developed during a period of very strong northward interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) on 12 September 2014. During this period we measure the electric field within the throat of the reverse convection cells to be near 150 mV/m at a time when the IMF is nearly 28 nT northward. This is far in excess of the 30-40 mV/m expected for polar potential saturation of the reverse convection cells. In fact, the development of the electric field responds linearly to the IMF Bz component throughout this period of extreme driving. The conditions in the solar wind show the solar wind velocity near 600 km/s, number density near 20 ions/cm3, and the Alfvén velocity about 75 km/s giving an Alfvén Mach number of 8. A search of several years of solar wind data shows that these values occur together 0.035% of the time. These conditions imply a high plasma β in the magnetosheath. We believe that condition of high β along with high mass density and a strong merging electric field in the magnetosheath are the significant parameters that produce the linear driving of the ionospheric electric field during this unusual period of extreme solar wind conditions. A discussion of current theories to account for cross-polar cap

  20. The efficiency of 'viscous interaction' between the solar wind and the magnetosphere during intense northward IMF events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsurutani, Bruce T.; Gonzalez, W. D.

    1995-01-01

    We examined 11 cases when the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) was intensely northward (greater than 10 nT) for long durations of time (greater than 3 hours), to quantitatively determine an uppler limit on the efficiency of solar wind energy injection into the magnetosphere. We have specifically selected these large B(sub N) events to minimize the effects of magnetic reconnection. Many of these cases occurred during intervals of high-speed streams associated with coronal mass ejections when viscous interaction effects might be at a maximum. It is found that the typical efficiency of solar wind energy injection into the magnetosphere is 1.0 x 10(exp -3) to 4.0 x 10(exp -3), 100 to 30 times less efficient than during periods of intense southward IMFs. Other energy sinks not included in these numbers are discussed. Estimates of their magnitudes are provided.

  1. Auroras in the region of the near-polar boundary of the cusp in the case the northward IMF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabis, I. P.; Pudovkin, M. I.

    1992-08-01

    All-sky camera data from the Antarctic station Vostok are used to analyze the characteristics of auroras associated with midday anomalous ionization in the E-layer appearing in the case of the northward IMF. Arc-type auroras, single or multiple, are shown to appear in the corrected geomagnetic-latitude interval of 80-83 deg a few minutes before or simultaneously with the anomalous ionization in the E-region. The observed midday anomalous ionization and the associated auroras appear to be a manifestation of the reconnection process of the northward interplanetary and geomagnetic fields at the high-latitude magnetopause, leading to the precipitation of particles into the ionosphere.

  2. The Mid-Tail Configuration Under Prolonged Northward IMF: An Event Study With ARTEMIS Observation and Global MHD Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, C. P.; Xing, X.

    2015-12-01

    The magnetotail configuration is strongly controlled by the IMF orientation, but the solar wind-magnetosphere coupling and the resulting plasma and magnetic field structures in the mi-tail, particularly under northward IMF, are not well understood. In this study, we present ARTEMIS observations of the mid-tail magnetosphere (X ~ -60 RE) during a prolonged northward IMF period (> 48 hr, starting from ~22 UT on Feb 12 2014). The two ARTEMIS probes (separated by ~3 RE) were on the duskside plasma sheet (|B| < ~6 nT for most of the time) moving from Y ~22 to 2 RE. ARTEMIS observed the low latitude boundary layer (LLBL) extending from the flank inward to Y ~5 RE with hot (a few keV) plasma sheet ions mixed with cold (several hundreds of eV) tailward-moving plasma. The appearance of the cold plasma is more quasi-periodic (a few minutes) near the flank, suggesting a likely association between the LLBL formation and Kelvin-Helmholtz/surface waves. The magnetic field strength fluctuates substantially and can go down to as small as < 1 nT, suggesting fluctuations in the current sheet thickness that might result from current sheet flapping motion. To evaluate these likely physical processes, we are currently determining the temporal changes of the plasma and magnetic field spatial structures using the two probe measurements and comparing these observations with results from different global MHD simulation runs conducted at NASA Community Coordinated Modeling Center, including LFM, Open GGCM, and BATS-R-US.

  3. Bursty bulk flows at different magnetospheric activity levels: Dependence on IMF conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, L. Q.; Baumjohann, W.; Wang, C.; Dai, L.; Tang, B. B.

    2016-09-01

    Based on concurrent observations of the ACE and Geotail satellites from 1998 to 2005, we statistically analyzed and compared the earthward bursty bulk flows (BBFs) with local positive Bz under different interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) conditions. Four different magnetospheric activity levels (MALs), including quiet times and substorm growth/expansion/recovery phases, are considered. The properties of the BBFs, including their ion temperature (T), Vx component, x component of the energy flux density (Qx), and the solar wind dawn-dusk electric field Ey (observed at 1 AU), are analyzed. Main observations include the following: (1) BBF tends to have less penetration distance for northward IMF (NW-IMF) than for southward IMF (SW-IMF). Inward of 15 RE the BBFs for SW-IMF are dominant. Few BBFs for NW-IMF occur within 15 RE. (2) The occurrence probabilities of the BBFs at each MAL depend highly on the orientations of the IMF. During quiet times, the BBFs for NW-IMF are dominant. Reversely, during the growth and expansion phases of a substorm, the BBFs for SW-IMF are dominant. (3) The strengths of the BBF have significant evolution with substorm development. For SW-IMF condition, the strengths of the BBFs are the lowest for quiet times. The strength of the BBFs tends to increase during the growth phase and reaches to the strongest value during the expansion phase, then, decays during the recovery phase. For NW-IMF condition, the strengths of the BBFs evolve with the substorm development in a similar way as for SW-IMF condition. (4) For SW-IMF, the solar wind Ey evolves with the substorm development in a similar way to the strength of the BBFs. However, no clear evolution is found for NW-IMF. (5) The strengths of the BBF Qx and solar wind Ey are closely related. Both tend to be stronger for growth phase than for quite time, reach the strongest for expansion phase, then decay for recovery phase. It appears that to trigger a substorm, the strength of the BBFs should

  4. Multi-instrument observation of two different types of polar cap aurora occurring simultaneously during northward IMF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reidy, J. A.; Fear, R. C.; Lanchester, B. S.; Whiter, D. K.; Kavanagh, A. J.; Paxton, L. J.; Zhang, Y.

    2016-12-01

    Polar cap aurora are a phenomena associated with periods of northwards IMF. By studying their appearance and formation, we can gain valuable information on the configuration of Earth's magnetosphere during the less understood `quiet' periods that occur approximately half of the time. Observations of high latitude aurora from multiple instruments on 19 January 2008 are presented, including almost simultaneous observations of the northern and southern auroral regions from the Special Sensor Ultra-violet Spectrographic Imager (SSUSI) instruments on board Defence Meteorological Satellite Programme (DMSP) spacecraft F16 and F17. SuperDARN flows are also explored in both hemispheres during the event. In the northern hemisphere, two high latitude structures were seen on opposite sides of the polar cap during the same interval. The energies of the precipitating electrons above the structure on the duskside was estimated to vary between 2-11 keV using the Auroral Structure and Kinetics (ASK) instrument in conjunction with the Southampton ion chemistry model. Further analysis of this structure revealed it to be formed on closed field lines that had protruded into the polar cap, consistent with the mechanism proposed for transpolar arcs. However this structure did not cross the entire polar cap but remained, in the northern hemisphere, at approximately 80° magnetic latitude for at least 40 minutes. This protrusion is hence suggested to be an example of a `failed transpolar arc'. The structure seen on the dawnside of the northern polar cap was analysed using DMSP particle spectrograph data. It was found to be associated with electron precipitation energies lower than 1 keV and no ion signature were present. Hence it is suggested that this sun-aligned structure is consistent with the common low intensity arcs formed by accelerated polar rain. The study shows there are at least two types of high latitude aurora occurring simultaneously during northwards IMF.

  5. Distant Tail Plasma Jetting and B(sub z) Properties at Slow-Mode Shocks: A Model of Reconnection During Northward IMFs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ho, C. M.; Tsurutani, B. T.

    1995-01-01

    66 slow-mode shock events in the distant geotail were used to study the earthward and tailward flow properties of the x-type neural line. A large number of events occurred during northward IMFs, and a model was developed to match them.

  6. Particle precipitation patterns in the dayside polar region for strongly northward IMF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taguchi, S.; Otsubo, M.

    2001-01-01

    A detailed analysis of precipitation particle and electric field data from two DE 2 (northern and southern) polar passes during strongly northward interplanetary magnetic field has been made. The satellite tracks of these two passes are very similar in INVMLT-INVLAT coordinates, and we identified interhemispherical difference in the relation of various plasma regimes with the convection flow. One of the prominent differences is that the cusp/mantle precipitation can be seen at 85° INVLAT in the sunward flow region of the reverse convection pattern in the summer ionosphere, and that at similar latitudes of the winter ionosphere a different type of the ion precipitation, which is referred to as the very high-latitude ion precipitation (VHI), occurs instead of the cusp although a sunward (weaker) flow region can be seen. It is also found that the region that includes the cusp/mantle, VHI, the polar cap, and its boundary-like region shifts toward the dawn (dusk) in the northern (southern) hemisphere with almost the same transpolar distance between in both hemispheres.

  7. Evolution of the magnetic field structure outside the magnetopause under radial IMF conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pi, Gilbert; Shue, Jih-Hong; Grygorov, Kostiantyn; Li, Hsien-Ming; Němeček, Zdeněk.; Å afránková, Jana; Yang, Ya-Hui; Wang, Kaiti

    2017-04-01

    We use the Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms data to investigate the magnetic field structure just outside the magnetopause and its time evolution for radial interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) events. When the magnetic field drapes around the magnetopause in the magnetosheath region, an asymmetric magnetic field orientation in different hemispheres is expected. Our two-case study reveals some conflicts with the predicted draped field configuration in the Southern Hemisphere. The magnetosheath Bz component had a different sign depending on the upstream IMF Bx component's polarity at the beginning of the radial IMF intervals. With time, the observed Bz became northward in both cases with increasing positive values through the events. The increasing value of the Bz component may be explained by two possible mechanisms: by a change of the upstream IMF and by a reconnection between magnetosheath and magnetospheric field lines. Our study shows that both mechanisms contributed to the observed changes. Thus, there was a correlation between the change of the upstream IMF conditions and an increase in the magnetosheath northward magnetic field component. The observed formation of the boundary layer near the magnetopause proves that the reconnection process was ongoing at least for a part of the time. We suggest two possible reconnection scenarios: one near subsolar point and another tailward of the one cusp due to lobe reconnection. The asymmetry of reconnection locations causes rearrangement of the magnetic field structure near the magnetopause and turns the observed magnetosheath Bz component even further into positive values.

  8. Consecutive bursts of Pi2-band and long-period pulsations during a northward and low-clock-angle IMF period

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, C.; Russell, C. T.; Baumjohann, W.; Yumoto, K.

    2013-12-01

    On 14 August 2004, four pulsation bursts, in a period up to 200 s from the Pi2 band, consecutively occurred at the SMALL and 210 MM arrays in the post-midnight sector. Meanwhile, the Double Star TC 1 probe in the plasma sheet at ~XGSM -11.0 Re, observed quasi-periodic magnetic fluctuations at each burst onset. The Cluster 4 probe in the north lobe at ~XGSM -14.0 Re, sensed Pi2-band magnetic perturbations at the second burst onset and long-period ones for the third and fourth bursts. No bursty flow activations occurred at the onset of the first and second bursts. Earthward flow bursts first appeared at TC 1 prior to the third burst onset and ~5 min later at Cluster 4. These flows persisted through the end of the last burst and appeared to have a same periodic variation as in the magnetic field at Cluster 4. Except for the second burst, geostationary LANL 97 probe at ~XGSM -2.0 Re also detected wave-like energetic proton fluxes. The mapping of ground pulsations onset timing to the solar wind observation just in front of Earth's magnetopause shows that they appear during a northward IMF period with low clock-angle variations. Spectral analyses show two distinct spectral features in which Pi2-band bursts become two harmonic and long-period ones monochromatic. Waveform comparisons show that Pi2-band bursts can result from a combination of fast magnetospheric and plasmaspheric cavity resonances and long-period ones from a fast magnetospheric cavity resonance. Although they do not have a one-to-one relationship with earthward plasma flows, these pulsations can be fast compressional waves expectedly driven by magnetic reconnection in the distant-Earth magnetotail under northward IMF as in the two-neutral-point model. Fig. 1. (a-b) The IMF By, the IMF Bz, and the IMF clock angle at 1 AU (corresponding to ~XGSM 17 Re) from 1910 UT to 2010 UT on 14 August 2004. (c-d) Three components of the magnetic field and the ion flow velocity at Cluster 4 (~XGSM -14.0Re). (e-f) Same as

  9. Magnetic configuration around Venus under different IMF conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Jian; Zhang, T. L.; Wang, C.; Baumjohann, W.; Volwerk, M.; Delva, M.

    2010-05-01

    Because Venus has no global intrinsic magnetic field, the solar wind interacts directly with the Venusian ionosphere. The interplanetary magnetic field is draped around the ionosphere to form an induced magnetosphere. Therefore, the draping of the field around Venus should be controlled by the angle between the IMF and the solar wind flow. The previous study was based on the measurements obtained by PVO at solar maximum. Now Venus Express observations provide a new opportunity to investigate the interaction of the solar wind with Venus at solar minimum. In order to investigate the magnetic configuration around Venus under different IMF conditions at solar minimum, a data set consisting of about 4 Venus years (1 Venus year equals about 225 Earth days) of Venus Express magnetic field observations is used in our study. We use a coordinate system determined by solar wind flow and IMF to sort all the magnetic observations. The distribution of magnetic field vectors around Venus is given at different angles between solar wind flow and IMF, and is compared with the previous results at solar maximum.

  10. Characterizing the ionospheric current pattern response to southward and northward IMF turnings with dynamical SuperMAG correlation networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dods, J.; Chapman, S. C.; Gjerloev, J. W.

    2017-02-01

    We characterize the response of the quiet time (no substorms or storms) large-scale ionospheric transient equivalent currents to north-south and south-north IMF turnings by using a dynamical network of ground-based magnetometers. Canonical correlation between all pairs of SuperMAG magnetometer stations in the Northern Hemisphere (magnetic latitude (MLAT) 50-82°) is used to establish the extent of near-simultaneous magnetic response between regions of magnetic local time-MLAT. Parameters and maps that describe spatial-temporal correlation are used to characterize the system and its response to the turnings aggregated over several hundred events. We find that regions that experience large increases in correlation post turning coincide with typical locations of a two-cell convection system and are influenced by the interplanetary magnetic field By. The time between the turnings reaching the magnetopause and a network response is found to be ˜8-10 min and correlation in the dayside occurs 2-8 min before that in the nightside.

  11. Kelvin-Helmholtz Instability under southward IMF: THEMIS observations and OpenGGCM simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kavosi, S.; Raeder, J.

    2015-12-01

    While Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) waves for southward IMF were long thought to be non-existent, both the Kavosi and Raeder [2015] study, and two other independent studies [Hwang et al., 2011; Yan et al., 2014] have found southward IMF KH events. It still remains a mystery, though, why KH under southward IMF occurs only at one quarter of the rate compared to northward IMF [Kavosi and Raeder, 2015], and whether or not such waves occur only under specific conditions. The previous study [Hwang et al., 2011] suggested that the irregular and temporally intermittent structure of KH waves due to dynamically active sub solar behavior under southward IMF condition may explain the preferential in situ detection of KH waves under northward IMF. This explanation is also consistent with the KH events under southward IMF in our database. The majority of the events during southward IMF are irregular, short and polychromatic in compare to regular, long lasting and monochromatic waves under northward IMF. To effectively isolate these differences, we have used both our extensive THEMIS KH event database and OpenGGCM simulations. Our simulation results show that the KH waves under southward IMF are irregular, higher frequency, lower amplitude, and polychromatic compared to northward IMF. Additionally, our statistical analysis shows that occurrence rate of KH wave as a function of solar wind plasma parameters is different under southward IMF compared to northward IMF.

  12. A global MHD simulation study of the vortices at the magnetosphere boundary under the southward IMF condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, K.; Ogino, T.; Lee, D.; Walker, R. J.; Kim, K.

    2013-12-01

    One of the significant problems in magnetospheric physics concerns the nature and properties of the processes which occur at the magnetopause boundary; in particular how energy, momentum, and plasma the magnetosphere receives from the solar wind. Basic processes are magnetic reconnection [Dungey, 1961] and viscouslike interaction, such as Kelvin-Helmholtz instability [Dungey 1955, Miura, 1984] and pressure-pulse driven [Sibeck et al. 1989]. In generally, magnetic reconnection occurs efficiently when the IMF is southward and the rate is largest where the magnetosheath magnetic field is antiparallel to the geomagnetic field. [Sonnerup, 1974; Crooker, 1979; Luhmann et al., 1984; Park et al., 2006, 2009]. The Kelvin-Helmholtz instability is driven by the velocity shear at the boundary, which occur frequently when the IMF is northward. Also variation of the magnetic field and the plasma properties is reported to be quasi-periodic with 2-3min [Otto and Fairfield, 2000] and period of vortex train with 3 to 4 minutes by global MHD simulation [Ogino, 2011]. The pressure-pulse is driven by the solar wind. And the observations of the magnetospheric magnetic field response show quasi-periodic with a period of 8 minutes [Sibeck et al., 1989; Kivelson and Chen, 1995]. There have been few studies of the vortices in the magnetospheric boundary under southward IMF condition. However it is not easy to find the generation mechanism and characteristic for vortices in complicated 3-dimensional space. Thus we have performed global MHD simulation for the steady solar wind and southward IMF conditions. From the simulation results, we find that the vortex occurs at R= 11.7Re (IMF Bz = -2 nT) and R= 10.2Re (IMF Bz = -10 nT) in the dayside magnetopause boundary. Also the vortex rotates counterclockwise in duskside magnetopause (clockwise in dawnside) and propagates tailward. Across the vortex, magnetic field and plasma properties clearly show quasi-periodic fluctuations with a period of 8

  13. Evolution of the Global Aurora During Positive IMF B(sub z) and Varying IMF B(sub y) Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cumnock, J. A.; Sharber, J. A.; Heelis, R. A.; Hairston, M. R.; Craven, J. D.

    1997-01-01

    The DE 1 imaging instrumentation provides a full view of the entire auroral oval every 12 min for several hours during each orbit. We examined five examples of global evolution of the aurora that occurred during the northern hemisphere winter of 1981-1982 when the z component of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) was positive and the y component was changing sign. Evolution of an expanded auroral emission region into a theta aurora appears to require a change in the sign of B(sub y) during northward Interplanetary Magnetic Field. Theta aurora are formed both from expanded duskside emission regions (B(sub y) changes from positive to negative) and dawnside emission regions (B(sub y) changes from negative to positive), however the dawnside-originating and duskside-originating evolutions are not mirror images. The persistence of a theta aurora after its formation suggests that there may be no clear relationship between the theta aurora pattern and the instantaneous configuration of the IMF.

  14. Unusual magnetopause crossings during long-lasting radial IMF conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grygorov, Kostiantyn; Safrankova, Jana; Nemecek, Zdenek; Prech, Lubomir; Pi, Gilbert; Shue, Jih-Hong

    2016-04-01

    One of the factors which affect the solar wind-magnetosphere interaction is the orientation of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF). The very rarely observed radial IMF results in magnetopause locations up to several radii farther away from the Earth than predicted and causes a specific magnetopause shape. We present a case study of magnetopause crossings which were observed by the THEMIS spacecraft and analyze the difference between observed magnetopause positions and those which are predicted by an empirical magnetopause model. We use both the data (if available) from the L1 point and from near-Earth solar wind monitors as a model input. We discuss a role of the long-lasting radial IMF orientation on the magnetopause position and the influences of other parameters such as the dynamic pressure and IMF BZ component at different local times.

  15. Mapping ionospheric convection response to IMF B(sub y) negative and B(sub z) positive conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knipp, D. J.; Emery, B. A.; Richmond, A. D.; Hairston, M. R.

    1994-01-01

    We have used the Assimilative Mapping of Ionospheric Electrodynamics (AMIE) procedure to derive electric potential patterns for a period of strong and slowly varying northward Interplanetary Magnetic Field (IMF). Using these patterns we offer some insight into high-latitude convection response to differing IMF conditions between the hours of 0850 and 1720 UT on 14 January 1988. We introduce a newly assimilated data set, Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) ion drift measurements, as a means of mapping electric fields in polar regions. Also, for the first time we map both southern and northern hemisphere convection flows. We show that significantly different convection patterns are simultaneously possible in the two polar caps when B(sub z) is positive and that asymmetries in these patterns are influenced by the strength of B(sub y) and B(sub x). When the ratio absolute value of B(sub y)/B(sub z) exceeds unity the polar cap convection increases and changes from sunward to anti-sunward for B(sub z) positive conditions.

  16. Turbulence in a Global Magnetohydrodynamic Simulation of the Earth's Magnetosphere during Northward and Southward Interplanetary Magnetic Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    El-Alaoui, M.; Richard, R. L.; Ashour-Abdalla, M.; Walker, R. J.; Goldstein, M. L.

    2012-01-01

    We report the results of MHD simulations of Earth's magnetosphere for idealized steady solar wind plasma and interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) conditions. The simulations feature purely northward and southward magnetic fields and were designed to study turbulence in the magnetotail plasma sheet. We found that the power spectral densities (PSDs) for both northward and southward IMF had the characteristics of turbulent flow. In both cases, the PSDs showed the three scale ranges expected from theory: the energy-containing scale, the inertial range, and the dissipative range. The results were generally consistent with in-situ observations and theoretical predictions. While the two cases studied, northward and southward IMF, had some similar characteristics, there were significant differences as well. For southward IMF, localized reconnection was the main energy source for the turbulence. For northward IMF, remnant reconnection contributed to driving the turbulence. Boundary waves may also have contributed. In both cases, the PSD slopes had spatial distributions in the dissipative range that reflected the pattern of resistive dissipation. For southward IMF there was a trend toward steeper slopes in the dissipative range with distance down the tail. For northward IMF there was a marked dusk-dawn asymmetry with steeper slopes on the dusk side of the tail. The inertial scale PSDs had a dusk-dawn symmetry during the northward IMF interval with steeper slopes on the dawn side. This asymmetry was not found in the distribution of inertial range slopes for southward IMF. The inertial range PSD slopes were clustered around values close to the theoretical expectation for both northward and southward IMF. In the dissipative range, however, the slopes were broadly distributed and the median values were significantly different, consistent with a different distribution of resistivity.

  17. Influence of Geomagnetic and IMF conditions on High Latitude Upper Atmospheric winds and Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhadly, M. S.; Conde, M.; Emmert, J. T.

    2015-12-01

    We analyzed the climatological behavior of upper atmospheric winds (horizontal and vertical) and temperatures above Alaska by combining line-of-sight Doppler shifts of 630 nm optical emissions recorded during the 2011 and 2012 winters using a ground based all-sky wavelength scanning Doppler Fabry-Perot interferometer (SDI) located at Poker Flat (65.12N, 147.47W). The wide field of view covered a large geographic region above Alaska. This field was divided in software into multiple zones (115 used here), allowing independent spectra to be sampled from many directions simultaneously. As a result, it is capable of recording the wind field's spatial variations over a wide geographic region with high spatial resolution, and to resolve these variations over time. Although such climatological studies have been performed previously using satellites, models, and narrow field Fabry-Perot interferometers, there are no published climatological studies of thermospheric winds and temperatures using either SDI data or any other technique with comparable geographic coverage and resolution. Wind summary dial plots were produced to depict the climatology of the horizontal winds and temperatures for different geomagnetic conditions and orientation of interplanetary magnetic field (IMF). Results show that horizontal winds and temperatures had a strong dependence on geospace activity and orientation of IMF. The latitudinal shears in horizontal winds were stronger when geomagnetic conditions were active compared to the latitudinal shears for quiet conditions. Also, shears appeared earlier over Poker Flat when geomagnetic conditions were active. The latitudinal shears showed more dependence on IMF when geomagnetic conditions were active than they did during quieter conditions. F-region temperatures were higher under active geomagnetic conditions than during quiet conditions. They were also observed to be higher in pre-magnetic midnight sector (duskside) than they were post

  18. Multi-fault detection of rolling element bearings under harsh working condition using IMF-based adaptive envelope order analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ming; Lin, Jing; Xu, Xiaoqiang; Li, Xuejun

    2014-10-28

    When operating under harsh condition (e.g., time-varying speed and load, large shocks), the vibration signals of rolling element bearings are always manifested as low signal noise ratio, non-stationary statistical parameters, which cause difficulties for current diagnostic methods. As such, an IMF-based adaptive envelope order analysis (IMF-AEOA) is proposed for bearing fault detection under such conditions. This approach is established through combining the ensemble empirical mode decomposition (EEMD), envelope order tracking and fault sensitive analysis. In this scheme, EEMD provides an effective way to adaptively decompose the raw vibration signal into IMFs with different frequency bands. The envelope order tracking is further employed to transform the envelope of each IMF to angular domain to eliminate the spectral smearing induced by speed variation, which makes the bearing characteristic frequencies more clear and discernible in the envelope order spectrum. Finally, a fault sensitive matrix is established to select the optimal IMF containing the richest diagnostic information for final decision making. The effectiveness of IMF-AEOA is validated by simulated signal and experimental data from locomotive bearings. The result shows that IMF-AEOA could accurately identify both single and multiple faults of bearing even under time-varying rotating speed and large extraneous shocks.

  19. Multi-Fault Detection of Rolling Element Bearings under Harsh Working Condition Using IMF-Based Adaptive Envelope Order Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Ming; Lin, Jing; Xu, Xiaoqiang; Li, Xuejun

    2014-01-01

    When operating under harsh condition (e.g., time-varying speed and load, large shocks), the vibration signals of rolling element bearings are always manifested as low signal noise ratio, non-stationary statistical parameters, which cause difficulties for current diagnostic methods. As such, an IMF-based adaptive envelope order analysis (IMF-AEOA) is proposed for bearing fault detection under such conditions. This approach is established through combining the ensemble empirical mode decomposition (EEMD), envelope order tracking and fault sensitive analysis. In this scheme, EEMD provides an effective way to adaptively decompose the raw vibration signal into IMFs with different frequency bands. The envelope order tracking is further employed to transform the envelope of each IMF to angular domain to eliminate the spectral smearing induced by speed variation, which makes the bearing characteristic frequencies more clear and discernible in the envelope order spectrum. Finally, a fault sensitive matrix is established to select the optimal IMF containing the richest diagnostic information for final decision making. The effectiveness of IMF-AEOA is validated by simulated signal and experimental data from locomotive bearings. The result shows that IMF-AEOA could accurately identify both single and multiple faults of bearing even under time-varying rotating speed and large extraneous shocks. PMID:25353982

  20. IMF By effects in the plasma flow at the polar cap boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlovsky, Alexander; Lukianova, Renata

    2010-05-01

    We used the dataset obtained from the EISCAT Svalbard Radar during 2000-2008 to study statistically the ionospheric convection as related to IMF By conditions, separately for northward and southward IMF. The effects of IMF By are manifested in the intensity and direction of the East-West component of ionospheric flow. The most significant effects are observed near noon and also in the early morning around 03 MLT, whereas in the evening (at 18 MLT) the effect is essentially less prominent. The other feature is an anti-sunward flow across the polar cap, which shows increasing with the magnitude of IMF By. Quantitative characteristics of the IMF By effects are presented and explained in frame of the magnetospheric electric fields generated due to the solar wind, with taking into account position of the open-closed boundary for different IMF conditions. This work was supported by the Academy of Finland.

  1. The impact of IMF conditionality on government health expenditure: A cross-national analysis of 16 West African nations.

    PubMed

    Stubbs, Thomas; Kentikelenis, Alexander; Stuckler, David; McKee, Martin; King, Lawrence

    2017-02-01

    How do International Monetary Fund (IMF) policy reforms-so-called 'conditionalities'-affect government health expenditures? We collected archival documents on IMF programmes from 1995 to 2014 to identify the pathways and impact of conditionality on government health spending in 16 West African countries. Based on a qualitative analysis of the data, we find that IMF policy reforms reduce fiscal space for investment in health, limit staff expansion of doctors and nurses, and lead to budget execution challenges in health systems. Further, we use cross-national fixed effects models to evaluate the relationship between IMF-mandated policy reforms and government health spending, adjusting for confounding economic and demographic factors and for selection bias. Each additional binding IMF policy reform reduces government health expenditure per capita by 0.248 percent (95% CI -0.435 to -0.060). Overall, our findings suggest that IMF conditionality impedes progress toward the attainment of universal health coverage. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Global Auroral Energy Deposition during Substorm Onset Compared with Local Time and Solar Wind IMF Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spann, J. F.; Brittnacher, M.; Fillingim, M. O.; Germany, G. A.; Parks, G. K.

    1998-01-01

    The global images made by the Ultraviolet Imager (UVI) aboard the IASTP/Polar Satellite are used to derive the global auroral energy deposited in the ionosphere resulting from electron precipitation. During a substorm onset, the energy deposited and its location in local time are compared to the solar wind IMF conditions. Previously, insitu measurements of low orbiting satellites have made precipitating particle measurements along the spacecraft track and global images of the auroral zone, without the ability to quantify energy parameters, have been available. However, usage of the high temporal, spatial, and spectral resolution of consecutive UVI images enables quantitative measurement of the energy deposited in the ionosphere not previously available on a global scale. Data over an extended period beginning in January 1997 will be presented.

  3. Global Auroral Energy Deposition during Substorm Onset Compared with Local Time and Solar Wind IMF Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spann, J. F.; Brittnacher, M.; Fillingim, M. O.; Germany, G. A.; Parks, G. K.

    1998-01-01

    The global images made by the Ultraviolet Imager (UVI) aboard the IASTP/Polar Satellite are used to derive the global auroral energy deposited in the ionosphere resulting from electron precipitation. During a substorm onset, the energy deposited and its location in local time are compared to the solar wind IMF conditions. Previously, insitu measurements of low orbiting satellites have made precipitating particle measurements along the spacecraft track and global images of the auroral zone, without the ability to quantify energy parameters, have been available. However, usage of the high temporal, spatial, and spectral resolution of consecutive UVI images enables quantitative measurement of the energy deposited in the ionosphere not previously available on a global scale. Data over an extended period beginning in January 1997 will be presented.

  4. Global variations in Magnetosphere-Ionosphere system due to Sudden Impulses under different IMF By conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozturk, D. S.; Zou, S.; Slavin, J. A.; Ridley, A. J.

    2016-12-01

    A sudden impulse (SI) event is a rapid increase in solar wind dynamic pressure, which compresses the Earth's magnetosphere from the dayside and travels towards the Earth's tail. During the SI events, compression front reconfigures the Magnetosphere-Ionosphere (MI) current systems. This compression launches fast magnetosonic waves that carry the SI through magnetosphere and Alfven waves that enhance the field-aligned currents (FACs) at high-latitudes. FAC systems can be measured by Active Magnetosphere and Polar Electrodynamics Response Experiment (AMPERE). The propagation front also creates travelling convection vortices (TCVs) in the ionosphere that map to the equatorial flank regions of the Earth's magnetosphere. The TCVs then move from dayside to the nightside ionosphere. To understand these SI-driven disturbances globally, we use the University of Michigan Space Weather Modeling Framework (SWMF) with Global Magnetosphere (GM), Inner Magnetosphere (IM) and Ionosphere (IE) modules. We study the changes in the FAC systems, which link ionospheric and magnetospheric propagating disturbances under different IMF By conditions and trace the ionospheric disturbances to magnetospheric system to better understand the connection between two systems. As shown by previous studies, IMF By can cause asymmetries in the magnetic perturbations measured by the ground magnetometers. By using model results we determine the global latitudinal and longitudinal dependencies of the SI signatures on the ground. We also use the SWMF results to drive the Global Ionosphere Thermosphere Model (GITM) to reveal how the Ionosphere-Thermosphere system is affected by the SI propagation. Comparisons are carried out between the IE model output and high latitude convection patterns from Super Dual Auroral Radar Network (SuperDARN) measurements and SuperMAG ground magnetic field perturbations. In closing we have modeled the field-aligned currents, ionospheric convection patterns, temperature and

  5. Effect of solar wind dynamic pressure enhancements on convection and the aurora under different IMF conditions: modeling and observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zesta, E.; Boudouridis, A.; Raeder, J.; Larson, D. J.; Lummerzheim, D.; Strangeway, R.; Lyons, L.

    2007-12-01

    Recent studies have clearly demonstrated the significant effect solar wind dynamic pressure enhancements have on auroral precipitation, ionospheric and magnetospheric currents, and convection. Sudden pressure enhancements can cause significant and rapid closure of the polar cap and thus reduction in the open flux, widening and strengthening of the auroral oval at all local times, as well as an increase of the cross polar cap potential (CPCP) and the efficiency of coupling of the solar wind to the magnetosphere. The effects are most dramatic during periods of strongly southward IMF Bz but are evident at various degrees under most IMF conditions. MHD model simulations of two events, using the Open GGCM model, have also shown increase in the CPCP, but the reduction of open flux was only reproduced in one of the two cases. What seems to be the deciding factor is whether dayside or nightside reconnection dominates. We now simulate a larger number of events that occur under various IMF conditions and compare the results with observations. We use observations from the DMSP and FAST low-altitude spacecraft and auroral images from the Polar UVI instrument. We focus specifically on the CPCP, the area of open flux, the dynamic evolution of the separatrix boundary, and convection. With the larger number of events simulated we focus on the question of why these properties (i.e., the CPCP, open flux, etc) respond differently for different IMF conditions, and how well does the model reproduce such differences. Does the model reproduce the global closure of the polar cap during strong southward IMF Bz as opposed to closure only on the nightside for near-zero IMF Bz, and how are the associated CPCP changes reproduced? Does the dayside or nightside reconnection rate dominate in the changes observed? Can the model reproduce other significant features, like the propagation of the auroral precipitation enhancement from dayside to nightside under zero or positive IMF Bz, or the added

  6. Proton Aurora Dynamics in Response to the IMF and Solar Wind Variations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, S.; Mende, S.; Frey, H.; Gallagher, D. L.; Lepping, R. P.; Six, N. Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    On May 23, 2000, proton auroras observed by IMAGE (Imager for Magnetopause to Aurora Global Exploration) FUV (Far Ultraviolet) on the dayside were very dynamic. Auroral pattern in the cusp is well correlated with Interplanetary Magnetic Field (IMF) and solar wind parameters. When IMF were northward, cusp proton aurora appeared at high latitude poleward from the auroral oval. A high-latitude proton aurora brightened after solar wind ion temperature increased and it disappeared after IMF turned southward. Under the southward IMF condition, auroral activity occurred only in the dayside auroral oval. As IMF $B_z$ reverted to northward, cusp proton aurora reappeared at high latitude. The magnetic local time of the cusp proton aurora changes with the IMF $B_y$ polarity, consistent with previous reports. These results suggest an upstream source of the high-latitude cusp proton aurora for this event. One possible explanation is that bow shock energetic ions are transported into the cusp via the high-latitude magnetic merging process to induce optical emissions in the ionosphere.

  7. Proton Aurora Dynamics in Response to the IMF and Solar Wind Variations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, S.; Mende, S.; Frey, H.; Gallagher, D. L.; Lepping, R. P.; Six, N. Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    On May 23, 2000, proton auroras observed by IMAGE (Imager for Magnetopause to Aurora Global Exploration) FUV (Far Ultraviolet) on the dayside were very dynamic. Auroral pattern in the cusp is well correlated with Interplanetary Magnetic Field (IMF) and solar wind parameters. When IMF were northward, cusp proton aurora appeared at high latitude poleward from the auroral oval. A high-latitude proton aurora brightened after solar wind ion temperature increased and it disappeared after IMF turned southward. Under the southward IMF condition, auroral activity occurred only in the dayside auroral oval. As IMF $B_z$ reverted to northward, cusp proton aurora reappeared at high latitude. The magnetic local time of the cusp proton aurora changes with the IMF $B_y$ polarity, consistent with previous reports. These results suggest an upstream source of the high-latitude cusp proton aurora for this event. One possible explanation is that bow shock energetic ions are transported into the cusp via the high-latitude magnetic merging process to induce optical emissions in the ionosphere.

  8. Impact of solar wind depression on the dayside magnetosphere under northward interplanetary magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baraka, S.; Ben-Jaffel, L.

    2011-01-01

    We present a follow up study of the sensitivity of the Earth's magnetosphere to solar wind activity using a particles-in-cell model (Baraka and Ben Jaffel, 2007), but here during northward Interplanetary Magnetic Field (IMF). The formation of the magnetospheric cavity and its elongation around the planet is obtained with the classical structure of a magnetosphere with parallel lobes. An impulsive disturbance is then applied to the system by changing the bulk velocity of the solar wind to simulate a decrease in the solar wind dynamic pressure followed by its recovery. In response to the imposed drop in the solar wind velocity, a gap (abrupt depression) in the incoming solar wind plasma appears moving toward the Earth. The gap's size is a ~15 RE and is comparable to the sizes previously obtained for both Bz<0 and Bz=0. During the initial phase of the disturbance along the x-axis, the dayside magnetopause (MP) expands slower than the previous cases of IMF orientations as a result of the abrupt depression. The size of the MP expands nonlinearly due to strengthening of its outer boundary by the northward IMF. Also, during the initial 100 Δt, the MP shrank down from 13.3 RE to ~9.2 RE before it started expanding, a phenomenon that was also observed for southern IMF conditions but not during the no IMF case. As soon as they felt the solar wind depression, cusps widened at high altitude while dragged in an upright position. For the field's topology, the reconnection between magnetospheric and magnetosheath fields is clearly observed in both the northward and southward cusps areas. Also, the tail region in the northward IMF condition is more confined, in contrast to the fishtail-shape obtained in the southward IMF case. An X-point is formed in the tail at ~110 RE compared to ~103 RE and ~80 RE for Bz=0 and Bz<0, respectively. Our findings are consistent with existing reports from many space observatories (Cluster, Geotail, Themis, etc.) for which predictions are proposed

  9. Shift of the magnetopause reconnection line to the winter hemisphere under southward IMF conditions: Geotail and MMS observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitamura, N.; Hasegawa, H.; Saito, Y.; Shinohara, I.; Yokota, S.; Nagai, T.; Pollock, C. J.; Giles, B. L.; Moore, T. E.; Dorelli, J. C.; Gershman, D. J.; Avanov, L. A.; Paterson, W. R.; Coffey, V. N.; Chandler, M. O.; Sauvaud, J. A.; Lavraud, B.; Torbert, R. B.; Russell, C. T.; Strangeway, R. J.; Burch, J. L.

    2016-06-01

    At 02:13 UT on 18 November 2015 when the geomagnetic dipole was tilted by -27°, the MMS spacecraft observed southward reconnection jets near the subsolar magnetopause under southward and dawnward interplanetary magnetic field conditions. Based on four-spacecraft estimations of the magnetic field direction near the separatrix and the motion and direction of the current sheet, the location of the reconnection line was estimated to be ~1.8 RE or further northward of MMS. The Geotail spacecraft at GSM Z~1.4 RE also observed southward reconnection jets at the dawnside magnetopause 30-40 min later. The estimated reconnection line location was northward of GSM Z~2 RE. This crossing occurred when MMS observed purely southward magnetic fields in the magnetosheath. The simultaneous observations are thus consistent with the hypothesis that the dayside magnetopause reconnection line shifts from the subsolar point toward the northern (winter) hemisphere due to the effect of geomagnetic dipole tilt.

  10. MARSIS Observations of the Martian Nightside Ionosphere Depending on Solar Wind and IMF Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dieval, C.; Nemec, F.; Morgan, D. D.; Gurnett, D. A.

    2013-12-01

    Despite the absence of solar radiation on the Martian nightside, a weak, irregular and variable ionosphere is produced there. The nightside ionosphere is produced by two main sources: plasma transport from the dayside to the nightside, and precipitation of solar wind electrons. The latter mechanism was proposed for explaining the observation of localized ionospheric reflections on the nightside of Mars by the MARSIS radar onboard the Mars Express orbiter. These ionospheric reflections were observed in regions of strong and vertical remanent crustal magnetic field. The common interpretation is that in such regions, open magnetic field lines form, that connect the Martian crustal magnetic fields to the solar wind. These open field lines allow the precipitating suprathermal electrons to reach low altitudes and to cause localized heating and ionization of the atmosphere. Observations by Mars Express and Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) have shown that the precipitation of suprathermal electrons depends strongly on the crustal field strength and orientation. They have also shown that the electron precipitation depends on external parameters, such as the solar wind dynamic pressure and the orientation of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF). In this work, we look at the effect of these two external parameters on the occurrence rate of observing nightside ionospheric reflections with MARSIS. To estimate the solar wind dynamic pressure and the IMF clock angle, we use the proxies developed by the MGS team. This statistical study extends from November 2005 to November 2006, when MGS ceased to operate. The variable external drivers are expected to influence the supply of plasma to the nightside, and therefore to influence the formation of the irregular nightside ionosphere.

  11. Timescales for the penetration of IMF By into the Earth's magnetotail

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Browett, S. D.; Fear, R. C.; Grocott, A.; Milan, S. E.

    2017-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that there is a correlation between the By component of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) and the By component observed in the magnetotail lobe and in the plasma sheet. However, studies of the effect of IMF By on several magnetospheric processes have indicated that the By component in the tail should depend more strongly on the recent history of the IMF By rather than on the simultaneous measurements of the IMF. Estimates of this timescale vary from ˜25 min to ˜4 h. We present a statistical study of how promptly the IMF By component is transferred into the neutral sheet, based on Cluster observations of the neutral sheet from 2001 to 2008, and solar wind data from the OMNI database. Five thousand nine hundred eighty-two neutral sheet crossings during this interval were identified, and starting with the correlation between instantaneous measurements of the IMF and the magnetotail (recently reported by Cao et al. (2014)), we vary the time delay applied to the solar wind data. Our results suggest a bimodal distribution with peaks at ˜1.5 and ˜3 h. The relative strength of each peak appears to be well controlled by the sign of the IMF Bz component with peaks being observed at 1 h of lag time for southward IMF and up to 5 h for northward IMF conditions, and the magnitude of the solar wind velocity with peaks at 2 h of lag time for fast solar wind and 4 h for slow solar wind conditions.

  12. IMF draping around the geotail - IMP 8 observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaymaz, Zerefsan; Siscoe, George; Luhmann, Janet G.

    1992-01-01

    The draping pattern for the full range of IMF directions is mapped in the GSM yz-plane using a large data set for studying magnetic field draping around the tail. Based on the maps, it is concluded that the dominant pattern is draping as found by Ohtani and Kokubun (1991) and Sanchez and Siscoe (1990). A new finding is that the draping pattern is rotated relative to the plane formed by the IMF and the aberrated x-axis, with the degree of rotation varying from zero for strongly northward and southward IMF to a peak of 17 deg for moderately southward IMF. It is also found that the tail radius is bigger for southward IMF than for northward IMF.

  13. Effect of outer magnetosphere pre-conditioning on the inner magnetosphere during a magnetic storm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, W.; Raeder, J.; Ge, Y.; Gilson, M. L.

    2013-12-01

    It has been suggested that the plasma sheet conditions prior to the main phase of a geomagnetic storm can have a significant effect on the storm development and the minimum Dst. In particular, northward IMF conditions leading up to the storm may load the plasma sheet with cold dense plasma and lead to stronger storms as opposed to those storms that lack a northward IMF phase before storm commencement. We use the OpenGGCM-RCM model to simulate storm events with northward IMF preconditioning before the storm commences. We will show in the simulation how a cold dense plasma sheet is formed in the mid-tail plasma sheet, how a super-dense plasma sheet develops near the inner magnetosphere boundary, and how this dense plasma affects the ring current and Dst index in the storm main phase. In order to quantify the effect we will present comparisons of simulations of the same storm with and without preconditioning by northward IMF.

  14. What is the IMF?

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-01-01

    economic growth, and reduce poverty . Topics in this pamphlet inc hide: What does the IMF do? Why was it created?, How does the IMF serve its member...countries?, Mow does the IMF help poor countries?, Who runs the IMF?, and Where does the IMF get its money?

  15. Shift of the Magnetopause Reconnection Line to the Winter Hemisphere Under Southward IMF Conditions: Geotail and MMS Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kitamura, N.; Hasegawa, H.; Saito, Y.; Shinohara, I.; Yokota, S.; Nagai, T.; Pollock, C. J.; Giles, B. L.; Moore, T. E.; Dorelli, J. C.; hide

    2016-01-01

    At 02:13 UT on 18 November 2015 when the geomagnetic dipole was tilted by -27deg, the MMS spacecraft observed southward reconnection jets near the subsolar magnetopause under southward and dawnward interplanetary magnetic field conditions. Based on four-spacecraft estimations of the magnetic field direction near the separatrix and the motion and direction of the current sheet, the location of the reconnection line was estimated to be approx.1.8 R(sub E) or further northward of MMS. The Geotail spacecraft at GSM Z approx. 1.4 R(sub E) also observed southward reconnection jets at the dawnside magnetopause 30-40 min later. The estimated reconnection line location was northward of GSM Z approx.2 R(sub E). This crossing occurred when MMS observed purely southward magnetic fields in the magnetosheath. The simultaneous observations are thus consistent with the hypothesis that the dayside magnetopause reconnection line shifts from the subsolar point toward the northem (winter) hemisphere due to the effect of geomagnetic dipole tilt.

  16. Seasonal Variations in the Diet and Foraging Behaviour of Dunlins Calidris alpina in a South European Estuary: Improved Feeding Conditions for Northward Migrants

    PubMed Central

    Martins, Ricardo C.; Catry, Teresa; Santos, Carlos D.; Palmeirim, Jorge M.; Granadeiro, José P.

    2013-01-01

    During the annual cycle, migratory waders may face strikingly different feeding conditions as they move between breeding areas and wintering grounds. Thus, it is of crucial importance that they rapidly adjust their behaviour and diet to benefit from peaks of prey abundance, in particular during migration, when they need to accumulate energy at a fast pace. In this study, we compared foraging behaviour and diet of wintering and northward migrating dunlins in the Tagus estuary, Portugal, by video-recording foraging birds and analysing their droppings. We also estimated energy intake rates and analysed variations in prey availability, including those that were active at the sediment surface. Wintering and northward migrating dunlins showed clearly different foraging behaviour and diet. In winter, birds predominantly adopted a tactile foraging technique (probing), mainly used to search for small buried bivalves, with some visual surface pecking to collect gastropods and crop bivalve siphons. Contrastingly, in spring dunlins generally used a visual foraging strategy, mostly to consume worms, but also bivalve siphons and shrimps. From winter to spring, we found a marked increase both in the biomass of invertebrate prey in the sediment and in the surface activity of worms and siphons. The combination of these two factors, together with the availability of shrimps in spring, most likely explains the changes in the diet and foraging behaviour of dunlins. Northward migrating birds took advantage from the improved feeding conditions in spring, achieving 65% higher energy intake rates as compared with wintering birds. Building on these results and on known daily activity budgets for this species, our results suggest that Tagus estuary provides high-quality feeding conditions for birds during their stopovers, enabling high fattening rates. These findings show that this large wetland plays a key role as a stopover site for migratory waders within the East Atlantic Flyway. PMID

  17. Seasonal variations in the diet and foraging behaviour of dunlins Calidris alpina in a south European estuary: improved feeding conditions for northward migrants.

    PubMed

    Martins, Ricardo C; Catry, Teresa; Santos, Carlos D; Palmeirim, Jorge M; Granadeiro, José P

    2013-01-01

    During the annual cycle, migratory waders may face strikingly different feeding conditions as they move between breeding areas and wintering grounds. Thus, it is of crucial importance that they rapidly adjust their behaviour and diet to benefit from peaks of prey abundance, in particular during migration, when they need to accumulate energy at a fast pace. In this study, we compared foraging behaviour and diet of wintering and northward migrating dunlins in the Tagus estuary, Portugal, by video-recording foraging birds and analysing their droppings. We also estimated energy intake rates and analysed variations in prey availability, including those that were active at the sediment surface. Wintering and northward migrating dunlins showed clearly different foraging behaviour and diet. In winter, birds predominantly adopted a tactile foraging technique (probing), mainly used to search for small buried bivalves, with some visual surface pecking to collect gastropods and crop bivalve siphons. Contrastingly, in spring dunlins generally used a visual foraging strategy, mostly to consume worms, but also bivalve siphons and shrimps. From winter to spring, we found a marked increase both in the biomass of invertebrate prey in the sediment and in the surface activity of worms and siphons. The combination of these two factors, together with the availability of shrimps in spring, most likely explains the changes in the diet and foraging behaviour of dunlins. Northward migrating birds took advantage from the improved feeding conditions in spring, achieving 65% higher energy intake rates as compared with wintering birds. Building on these results and on known daily activity budgets for this species, our results suggest that Tagus estuary provides high-quality feeding conditions for birds during their stopovers, enabling high fattening rates. These findings show that this large wetland plays a key role as a stopover site for migratory waders within the East Atlantic Flyway.

  18. Observations of Ion Signatures of Magnetic Reconnection for Northward IMF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chandler, Michael O.; Moore, Thomas E.; Fuselier, S.; Lockwood, Michael

    1998-01-01

    Magnetic merging at Earth's magnetopause produces distinct mixtures of ions and electrons as well as signatures in their distribution functions. High resolution measurements allow for the separation of the different distributions and quantification of their characteristics. This provides details on the temporal and spatial nature of the merging site and the resulting history of the merged fields. The event of May 29, 1996 resulted in remote observations of the effects of reconnection on both magnetosheath and magnetosphere populations for a period of approximately three hours. Three-dimensional ion distributions obtained by the Thermal Ion Dynamics Experiment on the Polar spacecraft show that field lines threading the spacecraft's location in the northern cusp region contained a mix of D-shaped ions from the magnetosheath and accelerated magnetospheric ions both moving parallel to the local magnetic field. This mix of ions resulted from transmission of magnetosheath ions across the magnetopause at speeds greater than the de-Hoffman-Teller speed and the reflection of cold, slow-moving plasmasphere-like ions at the magnetopause. These observations are used to conclude that these field lines were connected to the ionosphere in the northern hemisphere and, southward of the spacecraft, the interplanetary magnetic field and crossed the magnetopause in the equatorial region southward of the spacecraft.

  19. Observations of Ion Signatures of Magnetic Reconnection for Northward IMF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chandler, Michael O.; Moore, Thomas E.; Fuselier, S.; Lockwood, Michael

    1998-01-01

    Magnetic merging at Earth's magnetopause produces distinct mixtures of ions and electrons as well as signatures in their distribution functions. High resolution measurements allow for the separation of the different distributions and quantification of their characteristics. This provides details on the temporal and spatial nature of the merging site and the resulting history of the merged fields. The event of May 29, 1996 resulted in remote observations of the effects of reconnection on both magnetosheath and magnetosphere populations for a period of approximately three hours. Three-dimensional ion distributions obtained by the Thermal Ion Dynamics Experiment on the Polar spacecraft show that field lines threading the spacecraft's location in the northern cusp region contained a mix of D-shaped ions from the magnetosheath and accelerated magnetospheric ions both moving parallel to the local magnetic field. This mix of ions resulted from transmission of magnetosheath ions across the magnetopause at speeds greater than the de-Hoffman-Teller speed and the reflection of cold, slow-moving plasmasphere-like ions at the magnetopause. These observations are used to conclude that these field lines were connected to the ionosphere in the northern hemisphere and, southward of the spacecraft, the interplanetary magnetic field and crossed the magnetopause in the equatorial region southward of the spacecraft.

  20. Magnetic Field Fluctuations in the High Ionosphere at Polar Latitudes: Impact of the IMF Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Michelis, P.; Consolini, G.; Tozzi, R.

    2016-12-01

    The characterization of ionospheric turbulence plays an important role for all those communication systems affected by the ionospheric medium. For instance, independently of geomagnetic latitude, ionospheric turbulence represents a considerable issue for all Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS). Swarm constellation measurements of the Earth's magnetic field allow a precise characterization of ionospheric turbulence. This is possible using a range of indices derived from the analysis of the scaling properties of the geomagnetic field. In particular, by the scaling properties of the 1st order structure function, a scale index can be obtained, with a consequent characterization of the degree of persistence of the fluctuations and of their spectral properties. The knowledge of this index provides a global characterization of the nature and level of ionospheric turbulence on a local scale, which can be displayed along a single satellite orbit or through maps over the region of interest. The present work focuses on the analysis of the scaling properties of the 1st order structure function of magnetic field fluctuations measured by Swarm constellation at polar latitudes in the Northern Hemisphere. They are studied according to different interplanetary magnetic field conditions and Earth's seasons to characterize the possible drivers of magnetic field variability. The obtained results are discussed in the framework of Sun-Earth relationship and ionospheric polar convection. This work is supported by the Italian National Program for Antarctic Research (PNRA) Research Project 2013/AC3.08

  1. The IMF of Simple and Composite Populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroupa, P.

    2008-06-01

    The combination of a finite timescale for star formation, rapid early stellar evolution, and rapid stellar dynamical processes imply that the stellar initial mass function (IMF) cannot be inferred for any star cluster independently of its age (the Cluster IMF Theorem). The IMF can nevertheless be constrained statistically by evolving many theoretical populations drawn from one parent distribution and testing these against observed populations. It follows that all known well-resolved stellar populations are consistent with having been drawn from the same parent mass distribution. The IMF Universality Hypothesis cannot therefore be discarded despite the existence of the Cluster IMF Theorem. This means that the currently existing star formation theory fails to describe the stellar outcome because it predicts a dependency of the IMF on the physical boundary conditions, which is not observed. The Integrated Galactic IMF Theorem, however, predicts a variation of galaxy-wide IMFs in dependence on the galaxy's star formation rate even if the IMF Universality Hypothesis is valid. This variation has now been observed in SDSS galaxy data. Detailed analysis of the binary properties in the very low mass star and brown dwarf mass regime on the one hand and in the stellar regime on the other shows there to be a discontinuity in the IMF near 0.1 M⊙ such that brown dwarfs follow a separate distribution function. Very recent observations of the stellar population within 1 pc of the nucleus of the Milky Way do suggest a top-heavy IMF, perhaps hinting at a variation in the star formation outcome with tidal field and temperature, thereby violating the IMF Universality Hypothesis under these physically extreme conditions. Another violation of this hypothesis appears to emerge for extremely metal-poor stars, such that the primordial IMF appears to have been depleted in low mass stars.

  2. IMF control of small-scale Alfvén wave activity in the magnetosphere-ionosphere transition region: FAST observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatch, S.; Labelle, J. W.; Zhang, B.; Lotko, W.; Chaston, C. C.

    2016-12-01

    We have investigated the nature and extent of interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) control of Alfvénic activity in the high-latitude transition region between the magnetosphere and the ionosphere using FAST satellite observations of small-scale Alfvén waves. We find statistical evidence supporting the prediction of Lyon-Fedder-Mobarry (LFM) global MHD simulations that southward IMF conditions are associated with the greatest Alfvén wave activity, and that the longitudinal dependence of the dayside region of Alfvenic activity on IMF By component is inverted relative to the well-known longitudinal dependence of the locus of the cusp proper on the By component of the IMF. The Alfvénic response to northward IMF Bz is non-negligible, however, and may reflect processes not captured by global MHD simulations. On the basis of simulation and observational statistics we additionally present observations of Alfvén wave-associated broadband electron number flux that longitudinally bifurcates across noon when IMF By is large, as well as observations of asymmetric signatures of Alfvénic activity in each hemisphere. These observations support several recent ground-based studies of the effect of IMF By on auroral activity.

  3. The influence of IMF clock angle on the cross section of the tail bow shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, M.; Lu, J. Y.; Kabin, K.; Yuan, H. Z.; Ma, X.; Liu, Z.-Q.; Yang, Y. F.; Zhao, J. S.; Li, G.

    2016-11-01

    We study effects of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) orientation on the terrestrial tail bow shock location and shape by using global MHD magnetosphere model and empirical bow shock models. It is shown that the tail bow shock cross section is well approximated by an ellipse with the direction of the major axis roughly perpendicular to the IMF clock angle direction. With the increasing IMF clock angle, the eccentricity of the bow shock cross section increases for northward IMF but decreases for southward IMF.

  4. A test of convection models for IMF Bz north

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maynard, N. C.; Sojka, J. J.; Schunk, R. W.; Heppner, J. P.; Brace, L. H.

    1990-09-01

    The Utah State University Ionospheric Model was run to obtain diurnally reproducible ionospheric densities and temperatures for summer and winter conditions using both distorted two-cell and three-cell convection patterns. Differences due to the different convection patterns manifest themselves in the depth and location of polar holes in the F-region electron density. While the total depth of the model holes is a characteristic of the diurnally reproducible pattern, the features appear and are recognizable within 0.5 h. Langmuir probe data from 41 DE-2 passes, during which the IMF Bz component was northward, have been qualitatively checked against the model predictions. The cross polar cap electron density profiles of a large majority of the passes more closely conform to the distorted two-cell runs for both polarities of the IMF By component. This test can be generalized to rule out proposed convection patterns based on the presence/absence and position of polar electron density holes.

  5. A test of convection models for IMF Bz north

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maynard, N. C.; Sojka, J. J.; Schunk, R. W.; Heppner, J. P.; Brace, L. H.

    1990-01-01

    The Utah State University Ionospheric Model was run to obtain diurnally reproducible ionospheric densities and temperatures for summer and winter conditions using both distorted two-cell and three-cell convection patterns. Differences due to the different convection patterns manifest themselves in the depth and location of polar holes in the F-region electron density. While the total depth of the model holes is a characteristic of the diurnally reproducible pattern, the features appear and are recognizable within 0.5 h. Langmuir probe data from 41 DE-2 passes, during which the IMF Bz component was northward, have been qualitatively checked against the model predictions. The cross polar cap electron density profiles of a large majority of the passes more closely conform to the distorted two-cell runs for both polarities of the IMF By component. This test can be generalized to rule out proposed convection patterns based on the presence/absence and position of polar electron density holes.

  6. A test of convection models for IMF Bz north

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maynard, N. C.; Sojka, J. J.; Schunk, R. W.; Heppner, J. P.; Brace, L. H.

    1990-01-01

    The Utah State University Ionospheric Model was run to obtain diurnally reproducible ionospheric densities and temperatures for summer and winter conditions using both distorted two-cell and three-cell convection patterns. Differences due to the different convection patterns manifest themselves in the depth and location of polar holes in the F-region electron density. While the total depth of the model holes is a characteristic of the diurnally reproducible pattern, the features appear and are recognizable within 0.5 h. Langmuir probe data from 41 DE-2 passes, during which the IMF Bz component was northward, have been qualitatively checked against the model predictions. The cross polar cap electron density profiles of a large majority of the passes more closely conform to the distorted two-cell runs for both polarities of the IMF By component. This test can be generalized to rule out proposed convection patterns based on the presence/absence and position of polar electron density holes.

  7. Interaction of the geomagnetic field with northward interplanetary magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattarai, Shree Krishna

    The interaction of the solar wind with Earth's magnetic field causes the transfer of momentum and energy from the solar wind to geospace. The study of this interaction is gaining significance as our society is becoming more and more space based, due to which, predicting space weather has become more important. The solar wind interacts with the geomagnetic field primarily via two processes: viscous interaction and the magnetic reconnection. Both of these interactions result in the generation of an electric field in Earth's ionosphere. The overall topology and dynamics of the magnetosphere, as well as the electric field imposed on the ionosphere, vary with speed, density, and magnetic field orientation of the solar wind as well as the conductivity of the ionosphere. In this dissertation, I will examine the role of northward interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) and discuss the global topology of the magnetosphere and the interaction with the ionosphere using results obtained from the Lyon-Fedder-Mobarry (LFM) simulation. The electric potentials imposed on the ionosphere due to viscous interaction and magnetic reconnection are called the viscous and the reconnection potentials, respectively. A proxy to measure the overall effect of these potentials is to measure the cross polar potential (CPP). The CPP is defined as the difference between the maximum and the minimum of the potential in a given polar ionosphere. I will show results from the LFM simulation showing saturation of the CPP during periods with purely northward IMF of sufficiently large magnitude. I will further show that the viscous potential, which was assumed to be independent of IMF orientation until this work, is reduced during periods of northward IMF. Furthermore, I will also discuss the implications of these results for a simulation of an entire solar rotation.

  8. Comparison of plasma sheet ion composition with the IMF and solar wind plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lennartsson, W.

    1988-01-01

    Plasma sheet energetic ion data (0.1- to 16 keV/e) obtained by the Plasma Composition Experiment on ISEE-1 between 10 and 23 earth radii are compared with concurrent IMF and solar wind plasma data. The densities of H(+) and He(++) ions in the plasma sheet are found to be the highest, and the most nearly proportional to the solar wind density, when the IMF B(z) is not northward. The density of terrestrial O(+) ions increases strongly with increasing magnitude of the IMF, in apparent agreement with the notion that the IMF plays a fundamental role in the electric coupling between the solar wind and the ionosphere.

  9. Comparison of plasma sheet ion composition with the IMF and solar wind plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lennartsson, W.

    Plasma sheet energetic ion data (0.1- to 16 keV/e) obtained by the Plasma Composition Experiment on ISEE-1 between 10 and 23 earth radii are compared with concurrent IMF and solar wind plasma data. The densities of H(+) and He(++) ions in the plasma sheet are found to be the highest, and the most nearly proportional to the solar wind density, when the IMF B(z) is not northward. The density of terrestrial O(+) ions increases strongly with increasing magnitude of the IMF, in apparent agreement with the notion that the IMF plays a fundamental role in the electric coupling between the solar wind and the ionosphere.

  10. A Simulation Study of the Dependence of the Vorticity in Saturn's Magnetosphere on the IMF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukazawa, K.; Walker, R. J.

    2015-12-01

    In a series of simulation studies we have found turbulent convection and vortices formed at Saturn's dawn and dusk magnetopause in simulations when IMF was northward. We interpreted these vortices as resulting from the Kelvin Helmholtz (K-H) instability. The resolution of simulation is an important parameter for the formation of vortices and turbulent convection as it is necessary to capture the small changes in convection which can trigger of vortex formation. Recent developments in computer technology have enabled us to run simulations with much higher resolution (0.06RS) then was previously possible. In this study we perform simulations of the Kronian magnetosphere for various IMF orientations to determine the conditions under which vortices form. In this study we determine the minimum component of BZ for vortex formation and present a physical model showing how the combination of the IMF, Saturn's rotating flows and reconnection determine when vortices form. From the detailed analysis of plasma convection in the magnetosheath and magnetosphere, there are important differences in the flow due to the tail reconnection and it affects the condition for K-H instability and vorticity in the overall magnetosphere.

  11. DC and Wave Electric Fields and Other Plasma Parameters Observed on Two Sounding Rockets in the Dark Cusp During IMF Bz North and South Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pfaff, R. F.; Acuna, M.; Bounds, S.; Farrell, W.; Freudenreich, H.; Lepping, R.; Vondrak, R.; Maynard, N. C.; Moen, J.; Egeland, A.

    1997-01-01

    Two Black Brant IX sounding rockets were launched into the dark, dayside cusp near magnetic noon on December 2 and 3, 1997, from Ny Alesund, Spitzbergen at 79 N reaching altitudes of approximately 450 km. Real-time ground-based and Wind IMF data were used to determine the launch conditions. The first launch, with Bz north conditions, crossed into and back out of an open field region with merging poleward of the projected trajectory. The second flight, into Bz south conditions, was timed to coincide with an enhancement in the merging rate from a increase in the negative Bz, while the DMSP F13 satellite was situated slightly to the north of the rocket trajectory. Each payload returned DC electric and magnetic fields, plasma waves, energetic particles, photometer data, and thermal plasma data. Data from both flights will be shown, with an emphasis on the DC electric field results. In particular, the data gathered on December 2, 1997 will be used to discuss ionospheric signatures of merging and the open/closed character of the the cusp/low latitude boundary layer. In contrast, the data gathered on December 3, 1997 shows evidence of pulsed electric field structures which will be examined in the context of cusp plasma entry processes. Both data sets returned a rich variety of plasma waves, as well as optical emissions and thermal plasma data.

  12. DC and Wave Electric Fields and Other Plasma Parameters Observed on Two Sounding Rockets in the Dark Cusp during IMF BZ North and South Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pfaff, R. F.; Bounds, S.; Acuna, M.; Maynard, N. C.; Moen, J.; Egeland, A.; Holtet, J.; Maseide, K.; Sandholt, P. E.; Soraas, F.

    1999-01-01

    Two Black Brant IX sounding rockets were launched into the dark, dayside cusp near magnetic noon on December 2 and 3, 1997, from Ny Alesund, Spitzbergen at 79degN reaching altitudes of approximately 450 km. Real-time ground-based and Wind (interplanetary magnetic field) IMF data were used to determine the launch conditions. The first launch, with Bz north conditions, crossed into and back out of an open field region with merging poleward of the projected trajectory. The second flight, into Bz south conditions, was timed to coincide with an enhancement in the merging rate from a increase in the negative Bz, while the (Defense Meteorological Satellite Program) DMSP F13 satellite was situated slightly to the north of the rocket trajectory. Each payload returned DC electric and magnetic fields, plasma waves, energetic particles, photometer data, and thermal plasma data. Data from both flights will be shown, with an emphasis on the DC electric field results. In particular, the data gathered on December 2, 1997 will be used to discuss ionospheric signatures of merging and the open/closed character of the the cusp/low latitude boundary layer. In contrast, the data gathered on December 3, 1997 shows evidence of pulsed electric field structures which will be examined in the context of cusp plasma entry processes. Both data sets returned a rich variety of plasma waves, as well as optical emissions and thermal plasma data.

  13. DC and Wave Electric Fields and Other Plasma Parameters Observed on Two Sounding Rockets in the Dark Cusp during IMF Bz North and South Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pfaff, R. F.; Acuna, M.; Bounds, S.; Farrell, W.; Freudenreich, W.; Lepping, R.; Vondrak, R.; Maynard, N. C.; Moen, J.; Egeland, A.

    1999-01-01

    Two Black Brant IX sounding rockets were launched into the dark, dayside cusp near magnetic noon on December 2 and 3, 1997, from Ny Alesund, Spitzbergen at 79 deg N reaching altitudes of about 450 km. Real-time ground-based and Wind IMF data were used to determine the launch conditions. The first launch, with Bz north conditions, crossed into and back out of an open field region with merging poleward of the projected trajectory. The second flight, into Bz south conditions, was timed to coincide with an enhancement in the merging rate from a increase in the negative Bz, while the DMSP Fl 3 satellite was situated slightly to the north of the rocket trajectory. Each payload returned DC electric and magnetic fields, plasma waves, energetic particles, photometer data, and thermal plasma data. Data from both flights will be shown, with an emphasis on the DC electric field results. In particular, the data gathered on December 2, 1997 will be used to discuss ionospheric signatures of merging and the open/closed character of the the cusp/low latitude boundary layer. In contrast, the data gathered on December 3, 1997 shows evidence of pulsed electric field structures which will be examined in the context of cusp plasma entry processes. Both data sets returned a rich variety of plasma waves, as well as optical emissions and thermal plasma data.

  14. DC and Wave Electric Fields and Other Plasma Parameters Observed on Two Sounding Rockets in the Dark Cusp during IMF BZ North and South Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pfaff, R. F.; Bounds, S.; Acuna, M.; Maynard, N. C.; Moen, J.; Egeland, A.; Holtet, J.; Maseide, K.; Sandholt, P. E.; Soraas, F.

    1999-01-01

    Two Black Brant IX sounding rockets were launched into the dark, dayside cusp near magnetic noon on December 2 and 3, 1997, from Ny Alesund, Spitzbergen at 79degN reaching altitudes of approximately 450 km. Real-time ground-based and Wind (interplanetary magnetic field) IMF data were used to determine the launch conditions. The first launch, with Bz north conditions, crossed into and back out of an open field region with merging poleward of the projected trajectory. The second flight, into Bz south conditions, was timed to coincide with an enhancement in the merging rate from a increase in the negative Bz, while the (Defense Meteorological Satellite Program) DMSP F13 satellite was situated slightly to the north of the rocket trajectory. Each payload returned DC electric and magnetic fields, plasma waves, energetic particles, photometer data, and thermal plasma data. Data from both flights will be shown, with an emphasis on the DC electric field results. In particular, the data gathered on December 2, 1997 will be used to discuss ionospheric signatures of merging and the open/closed character of the the cusp/low latitude boundary layer. In contrast, the data gathered on December 3, 1997 shows evidence of pulsed electric field structures which will be examined in the context of cusp plasma entry processes. Both data sets returned a rich variety of plasma waves, as well as optical emissions and thermal plasma data.

  15. High-latitude dayside electric fields and currents during strong northward interplanetary magnetic field - Observations and model simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clauer, C. Robert; Friis-Christensen, Eigil

    1988-01-01

    On July 23, 1983 the IMF turned strongly northward, becoming about 22 nT for several hours. Using a combined data set of ionospheric convection measurements made by the Sondre Stromfjord incoherent scatter radar and convection inferred from Greenland magnetometer measurements, the onset of the reconfiguration of the high-latitude ionospheric currents is found to occur about 3 min after the northward IMF encounters the magnetopause. The large-scale reconfiguration of currents, however, appears to evolve over a period of about 22 min. These observations and the results of numerical simulations indicate that the dayside polar-cap electric field observed during strong northward IMF is produced by a direct electrical current coupling with the solar wind.

  16. High-latitude dayside electric fields and currents during strong northward interplanetary magnetic field - Observations and model simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clauer, C. Robert; Friis-Christensen, Eigil

    1988-01-01

    On July 23, 1983 the IMF turned strongly northward, becoming about 22 nT for several hours. Using a combined data set of ionospheric convection measurements made by the Sondre Stromfjord incoherent scatter radar and convection inferred from Greenland magnetometer measurements, the onset of the reconfiguration of the high-latitude ionospheric currents is found to occur about 3 min after the northward IMF encounters the magnetopause. The large-scale reconfiguration of currents, however, appears to evolve over a period of about 22 min. These observations and the results of numerical simulations indicate that the dayside polar-cap electric field observed during strong northward IMF is produced by a direct electrical current coupling with the solar wind.

  17. The Relation of Polar Arcs to Magnetotail Twisting and IMF Direction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kullen, A.; Janhunen, P.

    2002-12-01

    A large statistical study of polar arcs utilizing the Polar UV imager reveals a strong solar wind control of large-scale polar arcs. They occur preferably for a high solar wind energy flux during northward IMF. Different types of polar arcs are triggered by different IMF clock angle changes. Oval-aligned arcs appear often during constant IMF, moving transpolar arcs usually develop after an IMF By sign change. The relation of these two polar arc types to changes in the magnetotail topology are investigated with help of the GUMICS-4 MHD code by Janhunen. The simulations show that for northward IMF with a nonzero IMF By component the magnetotail becomes long and highly twisted at its tailward end. The closed field line region reaches in this case high into the near-Earth tail lobes and poleward of the average polar cap boundary. The poleward displaced part of the polar cap boundary is a probable location for polar arcs to occur. In the case of an IMF By sign change the tail twist rotates such that in an intermediate state near-Earth and far-tail regions are oppositely twisted. This causes a bifurcation of the closed field line region in the tail and a bridge of closed field lines in the polar cap. The over the entire polar cap moving closed bridge indicates a moving transpolar arc.

  18. Occurrence frequencies of IMF triggered and nontriggered substorms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, Tung-Shin; McPherron, Robert L.

    2003-01-01

    The occurrence of triggered and nontriggered substorm are examined in light of current interest in such issues as substorm identification, IMF By variations, and potentially undetected small-scale solar wind perturbation. Global substorms are identified using a sudden, persistent decrease in the AL index. The onset of this global expansion is taken to be the time of the Pi 2 burst nearest in time to the beginning of the AL, decrease. IMF triggers were identified both subjectively through visual scanning of the data and automatically with a computer algorithm. Both northward turnings of the IMF Bz and decreases in the amplitude of the By component were considered as possible triggers. Two different solar wind monitors were used in the investigation: IMP-8 in a circular orbit with a distance 12 to approx.35 Re to the Earth-Sun line and ISEE-2 in an elliptical orbit with a distance only 5 to approx.10 Re to the Earth-Sun line. The IMP-8 results show that the triggering probability does not depend on the distance of the monitor from the Earth-Sun line in the range 12-35 Re. The ISEE dataset shows that closer than 12 Re the triggering probability is the same as it is in the IMP-8 data set. Thus there appears to be no dependence of triggering on the location of the monitor provided it is within 35 Re of the Earth. We also demonstrate that including the By component does not significantly increase the probability of substorm triggering. Approximately 60% of all substorms appear to be triggered. Of the 40% for which we could not identify a trigger, 10% occurred while the IMF was northward. The data suggest that substorm onset is a consequence of an internal magnetospheric instability that is highly sensitive to changes in magnetospheric convection induced by a sudden change in the IMF, but that these changes are not always necessary.

  19. The Earth's magnetosphere is 165 R(sub E) long: Self-consistent currents, convection, magnetospheric structure, and processes for northward interplanetary magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fedder, J. A.; Lyon, J. G.

    1995-01-01

    The subject of this paper is a self-consistent, magnetohydrodynamic numerical realization for the Earth's magnetosphere which is in a quasi-steady dynamic equilibrium for a due northward interplanetary magnetic field (IMF). Although a few hours of steady northward IMF are required for this asymptotic state to be set up, it should still be of considerable theoretical interest because it constitutes a 'ground state' for the solar wind-magnetosphere interaction. Moreover, particular features of this ground state magnetosphere should be observable even under less extreme solar wind conditions. Certain characteristics of this magnetosphere, namely, NBZ Birkeland currents, four-cell ionospheric convection, a relatively weak cross-polar potential, and a prominent flow boundary layer, are widely expected. Other characteristics, such as no open tail lobes, no Earth-connected magnetic flux beyond 155 R(sub E) downstream, magnetic merging in a closed topology at the cusps, and a 'tadpole' shaped magnetospheric boundary, might not be expected. In this paper, we will present the evidence for this unusual but interesting magnetospheric equilibrium. We will also discuss our present understanding of this singular state.

  20. Typhoons enhancing northward transport through the Taiwan Strait

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wen-Zhou; Hong, Hua-Sheng; Yan, Xiao-Hai

    2013-03-01

    Volume transport in the Taiwan Strait is usually northward for most of the year and varies seasonally because of the adjustment of the East Asian monsoon. Based on model simulations, the influence on this northward transport of every typhoon formed during the period 2005-2009 was examined. The results showed that there were four typhoons which enhanced northward transport during these five years. The current measurements, obtained from a buoy deployed in the Taiwan Strait, matched these events exactly. These typhoons had special moving tracks and life histories. They traveled westward in the area south of the strait or moved northward from the south to the north. Under the influence of such a typhoon, the prophase southward atmospheric forcing in the strait was weak and the anaphase northward atmospheric forcing (mainly along-strait wind stress) was strong, which is necessary and crucial in enhancing the northward transport. The ageostrophic process, another important driving factor in transport change, was generated mainly by local atmospheric forces inside the strait under the typhoon weather conditions and its effect on transport magnitude was comparable to that of direct atmospheric forcing. It first stored some energy from the atmospheric forcing to restrain the transport change, and then released the stored energy to prolong and even to intensify the enhanced northward transport.

  1. A global magnetohydrodynamic simulation of the magnetosheath and magnetosphere when the interplanetary magnetic field is northward

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ogino, Tatsuki; Walker, Raymond I.; Ashour-Abdalla, Maha

    1992-01-01

    We have used a new high-resolution global magnetohydrodynamic simulation model to investigate the configuration of the magnetosphere when the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) is northward. For northward IMF the magnetospheric configuration is dominated by magnetic reconnection at the tail lobe magnetopause tailward of the polar cusp. This results in a local thickening of the plasma sheet equatorward of the region of reconnection and the establishment of a convection system with two cells in each lobe. In the magnetosheath the plasma density and pressure decrease near the subsolar magnetopause, forming a depletion region. Along the flanks of the magnetosphere the magnetosheath flow is accelerated to values larger than the solar wind velocity. The magnetopause shape from the simulations is consistent with the empirically determined shape.

  2. The Myth of the IMF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melnick, J.

    2009-11-01

    The Myth of Science is the idea that complex phenomena in Nature can be reduced to a set of equations based on the fundamental laws of physics. The Myth of the IMF is the notion that the observed distribution of stellar masses at birth (the IMF) can and must be explained by any successful theory of star formation. In this contribution I argue that the IMF is the result of the complex evolution of the interstellar medium in galaxies, and that as such the IMF preserves very little information, if any, about the detailed physics of star formation. Trying to infer the physics of star formation from the IMF is like trying to understand the personality of Beethoven from the power-spectrum of the Ninth Symphony!

  3. Investigation of the IMF By influence on magnetotail By outside the neutral sheet using Cluster data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitkänen, Timo; Hedman, Robert; Norqvist, Patrik; Hamrin, Maria; De Spiegeleer, Alexandre; Vaverka, Jakub; Lindkvist, Jesper; Yao, Shutao; Rong, Zhaojin; Browett, Stephen

    2017-04-01

    We investigate Cluster magnetotail measurements and OMNI interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) data from 2001-2009 to study IMF By influence on the Earth's magnetotail. A few previous studies have focused on what is the tail By component induced by IMF By at the neutral sheet. This statistical investigation pursue how induced tail By is distributed and depends on the IMF outside the neutral sheet. The investigation will provide information how efficiently the additional tail By component is induced at different tail regions during various IMF conditions.

  4. Investigation of isolated substorms: Generation conditions and characteristics of different phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vorobjev, V. G.; Yagodkina, O. I.; Zverev, V. L.

    2016-11-01

    Characteristics of isolated substorms selected by variations in the 1-min values of the AL index are analyzed. The substorms were divided into several types with respect to the behavior of the Bz component of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) during the expansion phase. The probability of observations of substorms associated with the northward turn of the Bz component of IMF was 19%, while the substorms taking place at Bz < 0 were observed in 53% of cases. A substantial number of events in which no substorm magnetic activity was observed in the auroral zone after a long (>30 min) period of the southward IMF and a following sharp turn of the Bz component of IMF before the north was detected. The data suggest that a northward IMF turn is neither a necessary nor sufficient condition for generating substorms. It has been shown for substorms of the both types that the average duration of the southward IMF to moment T 0 and the average intensity of the magnetic perturbation in the maximum are approximately the same and amount to 80 min and-650 nT, respectively. However, for substorms at Bz < 0, their mean duration, including the expansive and recovery phases, is on average 30 min longer than that at a northward turn of IMF. Correlations between the loading-unloading processes in the magnetosphere in the periods of magnetospheric substorms were investigated with different functions that determine the efficiency of the energy transfer from the solar wind to the magnetosphere. It has been shown that the highest correlation coefficient ( r = 0.84) is observed when the function suggested by Newell et al. (2007) is used. It has been detected that a simple function VB S yields a high correlation coefficient ( r = 0.75).

  5. Implications of Galaxy Buildup for Putative IMF Variations in Massive Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blancato, Kirsten; Genel, Shy; Bryan, Greg

    2017-08-01

    Recent observational evidence for initial mass function (IMF) variations in massive quiescent galaxies at z = 0 challenges the long-established paradigm of a universal IMF. While a few theoretical models relate the IMF to birth cloud conditions, the physical driver underlying these putative IMF variations is still largely unclear. Here we use post-processing analysis of the Illustris cosmological hydrodynamical simulation to investigate possible physical origins of IMF variability with galactic properties. We do so by tagging stellar particles in the simulation (each representing a stellar population of ≈ {10}6 {M}⊙ ) with individual IMFs that depend on various physical conditions, such as velocity dispersion, metallicity, or star formation rate, at the time and place in which the stars are formed. We then follow the assembly of these populations throughout cosmic time and reconstruct the overall IMF of each z = 0 galaxy from the many distinct IMFs it is composed of. Our main result is that applying the observed relations between IMF and galactic properties to the conditions at the star formation sites does not result in strong enough IMF variations between z = 0 galaxies. Steeper physical IMF relations are required for reproducing the observed IMF trends, and some stellar populations must form with more extreme IMFs than those observed. The origin of this result is the hierarchical nature of massive galaxy assembly, and it has implications for the reliability of the strong observed trends, for the ability of cosmological simulations to capture certain physical conditions in galaxies, and for theories of star formation aiming to explain the physical origin of a variable IMF.

  6. Seasonal effect for polar cap sunward plasma flows at strongly northward IMF Bz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koustov, A. V.; Yakymenko, K. N.; Ponomarenko, P. V.

    2017-02-01

    We use Super Dual Auroral Radar Network data to study polar cap ionospheric flow under strongly dominant positive interplanetary magnetic field Bz component. We show that the near-noon flow along the magnetic meridian is predominantly sunward in summer. The sunward velocity increase with intensification of the external driver (the reverse convection electric field) is also faster in summer, and the rate of the increase is slightly larger for the Southern Hemisphere. The sunward flows simultaneously detected in both hemispheres are faster in the summer hemisphere. In addition, while sunward flows are aligned with the midnight-noon line in a winter hemisphere, they are oriented toward earlier magnetic local hours in a summer hemisphere.

  7. The role of solar activities & IMF(Bz) on the severe storm of March 13 - 14 1989.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eucharia; Okoro, Chidinma

    We present the statistical study of the severe geomagnetic activity of the 13 - 14th March 1989 as observed using the World Data Centre Observatories; Kyoto, Japan. Increase of the amplitude sudden commencements with solar minima which was not the case was predicted and IMF points Northward(Southward). Discussion that the effect could be from coronal mass ejection and other parameters were illustrated.

  8. Field-aligned current associated with a distorted two-cell convection pattern during northward interplanetary magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, L.; Schunk, R. W.; Sojka, J. J.

    1991-01-01

    The influence of the ionospheric conductance on the field-aligned current associated with a distorted two-cell convection pattern during northward IMF was investigated using the Heppner-Maynard (1987) convection model and the Utah State University conductivity model described by Rasmussen and Schunk (1987). Results show that the variation of the ionospheric conductivity distribution can significantly affect the features of the field-aligned current for northward IMF, where matching or mismatching between the conductance gradient and the convection electric field plays a key role. It was found that the increase of the field-aligned current in the polar cap observed during summer is mainly due to the increasing contribution from the Pedersen current, and that the increase of the field-aligned current in both the oval region and the evening-midnight sector during the active aurora period is mainly due to the increasing contribution from the Hall current.

  9. Optical, radar, and magnetic observations of magnetosheath plasma capture during a positive IMF Bz impulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safargaleev, V.; Kozlovsky, A.; Sergienko, T.; Yeoman, T. K.; Uspensky, M.; Wright, D. M.; Nilsson, H.; Turunen, T.; Kotikov, A.

    2008-03-01

    We present a multi-instrument study of the ionospheric response to a northward turning of the IMF. The observations were made in the near-noon (11:00 MLT) sector on Svalbard (at 75° MLAT). The data set includes auroral observations, ionospheric flows obtained from the EISCAT and CUTLASS radars, the spectral width of the HF radar backscatter, particle precipitation and plasma flow data from the DMSP F13 satellite, and Pc1 frequency band pulsations observed by induction magnetometers. Careful collocation of all the observations has been made with the HF radar backscatter located by a ray-tracing procedure utilizing the elevation angle of arrival of the signals and an ionospheric plasma density profile. Prior to IMF turning northward, three auroral arcs were observed at the poleward boundary of the closed llbl, inside the llbl, and in the equatorward part of the llbl, respectively. The northward IMF turning was accompanied by enhanced HF radar returns with a broad Doppler spectrum collocated with the arcs. The auroral arcs shifted poleward whereas the backscatter region moved in the opposite direction, which is consistent, respectively, with reconnection beyond the cusp and the capturing of magnetosheath plasma during northward IMF. Locally, magnetic noise enhancement in the Pc1 frequency band occurred simultaneously with the anomalous radar backscatter, and the absence of such signals at more remote magnetic observatories indicates a local generation of the Pc1 turbulence, which is collocated with the radar backscatter. Finally, we discuss possible interpretation errors which may be caused by limited observational data.

  10. The First in situ Observation of Kelvin-Helmholtz Waves at High-Latitude Magnetopause during Strongly Dawnward Interplanetary Magnetic Field Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hwang, K.-J.; Goldstein, M. L.; Kuznetsova, M. M.; Wang, Y.; Vinas, A. F.; Sibeck, D. G.

    2012-01-01

    We report the first in situ observation of high-latitude magnetopause (near the northern duskward cusp) Kelvin-Helmholtz waves (KHW) by Cluster on January 12, 2003, under strongly dawnward interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) conditions. The fluctuations unstable to Kelvin-Helmholtz instability (KHI) are found to propagate mostly tailward, i.e., along the direction almost 90 deg. to both the magnetosheath and geomagnetic fields, which lowers the threshold of the KHI. The magnetic configuration across the boundary layer near the northern duskward cusp region during dawnward IMF is similar to that in the low-latitude boundary layer under northward IMF, in that (1) both magnetosheath and magnetospheric fields across the local boundary layer constitute the lowest magnetic shear and (2) the tailward propagation of the KHW is perpendicular to both fields. Approximately 3-hour-long periods of the KHW during dawnward IMF are followed by the rapid expansion of the dayside magnetosphere associated with the passage of an IMF discontinuity that characterizes an abrupt change in IMF cone angle, Phi = acos (B(sub x) / absolute value of Beta), from approx. 90 to approx. 10. Cluster, which was on its outbound trajectory, continued observing the boundary waves at the northern evening-side magnetopause during sunward IMF conditions following the passage of the IMF discontinuity. By comparing the signatures of boundary fluctuations before and after the IMF discontinuity, we report that the frequencies of the most unstable KH modes increased after the discontinuity passed. This result demonstrates that differences in IMF orientations (especially in f) are associated with the properties of KHW at the high-latitude magnetopause due to variations in thickness of the boundary layer, and/or width of the KH-unstable band on the surface of the dayside magnetopause.

  11. Quasi-periodic oscillations of the magnetopause during northward sheath magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kokubun, S.; Kawano, H.; Nakamura, M.; Yamamoto, T.; Tsuruda, K.; Hayakawa, H.; Matsuoka, A.; Frank, L. A.

    1994-01-01

    The Geotail satellite quasi-periodically crossed the dawn flank of magnetopause more than ten times during an interval of 1.5 hours on November 4, 1992. Magnetopause crossings were characterized by quasi-periodic pulses of a sawtooth wave form in the magnetic field and the plasma flow components tangential to the magnetopause. The magnetic field strength in the magnetosheath was larger than that in the magnetosphere. The direction of magnetic field outside the magnetopause current layer was northward with antisunward tilt, indicating the draping of magnetic field on the magnetopause. Boundary normals of wavy magnetopause systematically incline sunward on the upstream side, while they tend to incline antisunward with considerable deviation on the downstream side. Comparison with other multiple crossing events suggests that the November 4 event exhibits wavy structure of the dawn flank magnetopause associated with the northward interplanetary magnetic field (IMF).

  12. Observation of a Unipolar Field-aligned Current System Associated With IMF By-triggered Theta Auroras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hairston, M. R.; Watanabe, M.

    2016-12-01

    We investigate the existence of a specific field-aligned current (FAC) system predicted by numerical magnetohydrodynamic simulations in a past study. The FAC system is expected to occur when a drifting theta aurora is formed in response to a stepwise transition of interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) By during strongly northward IMF periods. When the IMF By changes from positive to negative, a crossbar forms in the Northern Hemisphere that moves dawnward, while in the Southern Hemisphere the crossbar moves in the opposite direction. The crossbar motion reverses when the IMF By changes from negative to positive. The FAC system appears on the trailing side of the drifting crossbar of the theta aurora as it moves either dawnward or duskward. When the theta aurora is drifting dawnward, the FACs flow into the ionosphere. The FAC polarity reverses when the theta aurora is drifting duskward. Using low-altitude satellite data, we confirmed the real existence of the above model-predicted FAC system.

  13. Super dual Auroral Radar Network radar imaging of dayside high-latitude convection under northward interplanetary magnetic field: Toward resolving the distorted two-cell versus multicell controversy

    SciTech Connect

    Greenwald, R.A.; Bristow, W.A.; Szabo, A.

    1995-10-01

    Data from the Kapuskasing and Saskatoon radars of the evolving Super Dual Auroral Radar Network (SuperDARN) HF radar network have been analyzed to study the two-dimensional structure and dynamics of dayside high-latitude ionospheric convection under northward interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) conditions. A period extending from 1600 to 2030 UT ({approximately}0900-1330 MLT) on January 10, 1994, was examined. During this interval, magnetic field data were available from the IMP 8 satellite and indicated moderately stable northward IMF conditions. For the first few hours of observation the B{sub y} component of the IMF was positive, reasonably steady, and approximately twice the magnitude of B{sub z}. During this interval, the high-latitude convection images obtained with the SuperDARN radars were very similar to the distorted two-cell convection maps for positive B{sub y} as presented by Heppner and Maynard. At {approx} 1840 UT, a decrease in B{sub y} in association with an increase in B{sub z}, led to an extended period with B{sub y}{approx}B{sub z}. During this second interval the convection patterns were highly variable and even chaotic. Finally, a sharp decrease in the B{sub y} component at 1914 UT, probably in association with a rotational discontinuity in the solar wind, led to an extended period with B{sub y}<

  14. Intensity asymmetries in the dusk sector of the poleward auroral oval due to IMF Bx

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reistad, J. P.; Østgaard, N.; Laundal, K. M.; Haaland, S.; Tenfjord, P.; Snekvik, K.; Oksavik, K.; Milan, S. E.

    2014-12-01

    In the exploration of global-scale features of the Earth's aurora, little attention has been given to the radial component of the Interplanetary Magnetic Field (IMF). This study investigates the global auroral response in both hemispheres when the IMF is southward and lies in the xz plane. We present a statistical study of the average auroral response in the 12-24 magnetic local time (MLT) sector to an x component in the IMF. Maps of auroral intensity in both hemispheres for two IMF Bx dominated conditionsIMF Bx) are shown during periods of negative IMF Bz, small IMF By, and local winter. This is obtained by using global imaging from the Wideband Imaging Camera on the IMAGE satellite. The analysis indicates a significant asymmetry between the two IMF Bx dominated conditions in both hemispheres. In the Northern Hemisphere the aurora is brighter in the 15-19 MLT region during negative IMF Bx. In the Southern Hemisphere the aurora is brighter in the 16-20 MLT sector during positive IMF Bx. We interpret the results in the context of a more efficient solar wind dynamo in one hemisphere. Both the intensity asymmetry and its location are consistent with this idea. This has earlier been suggested from case studies of simultaneous observations of the aurora in both hemispheres, but hitherto never been observed to have a general impact on global auroral brightness in both hemispheres from a statistical study. The observed asymmetries between the two IMF Bx cases are not large; however, the difference is significant with a 95% confidence level. As the solar wind conditions examined in the study are rather common (37% of the time) the accumulative effect of this small influence may be important for the total energy budget.

  15. Enhanced Thermospheric Density: The Roles of East-West and Northward Interplanetary Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knipp, D. J.; Drake, K. A.; Lei, J.; Crowley, G.

    2009-12-01

    During 2005 solar EUV energy input to the thermosphere waned as Solar Cycle 23 declined. The reduction allowed a clearer delineation of episodic density disturbances caused by geomagnetic storms. We show new views of these disturbances based on Poynting flux calculations from the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) F-series satellites, as well as from 1) accelerometer data from polar orbiting satellites, 2) the assimilative mapping of ionospheric electrodynamics (AMIE) procedure and 3) the Thermospheric Ionospheric Electrodynamic General Circulation Model (TIEGCM). The new Poynting flux estimates and TIEGCM results allow us to trace the origins of disturbances that are poorly specified by ground indices. In particular we find that intervals of enhanced northward Interplanetary Magnetic Field (IMF) combined with strong east-west components of the IMF allow significant electromagnetic energy input into localized dayside regions of the high-latitude thermosphere. In some cases this energy deposition is consistent with IMF-geomagnetic field merging tailward of the Earth’s magnetic cusps. In other cases the energy is deposited in the vicinity of an extremely narrow convection throat. This mode of interaction provides little energy to the magnetotail; and instead concentrates the energy in the dayside thermosphere. We discuss the solar cycle variability of this type of interaction. as well as compare the relative value of Poynting flux and particle energy deposition for such events.

  16. The financial crisis and global health: the International Monetary Fund's (IMF) policy response.

    PubMed

    Ruckert, Arne; Labonté, Ronald

    2013-09-01

    In this article, we interrogate the policy response of the International Monetary Fund (IMF) to the global financial crisis, and discuss the likely global health implications, especially in low-income countries. In doing so, we ask if the IMF has meaningfully loosened its fiscal deficit targets in light of the economic challenges posed by the financial crisis and adjusted its macro-economic policy advice to this new reality; or has the rhetoric of counter-cyclical spending failed to translate into additional fiscal space for IMF loan-recipient countries, with negative health consequences? To answer these questions, we assess several post-crisis IMF lending agreements with countries requiring financial assistance, and draw upon recent academic studies and civil society reports examining policy conditionalities still being prescribed by the IMF. We also reference recent studies examining the health impacts of these conditionalities. We demonstrate that while the IMF has been somewhat more flexible in its crisis response than in previous episodes of financial upheaval, there has been no meaningful rethinking in the application of dominant neoliberal macro-economic policies. After showing some flexibility in the initial crisis response, the IMF is pushing for excessive contraction in most low and middle-income countries. We conclude that there remains a wide gap between the rhetoric and the reality of the IMF's policy and programming advice, with negative implications for global health.

  17. Dependence of Large-Scale Global Poynting Flux on IMF By Polarity Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humberset, B. K.; Gjerloev, J. W.

    2014-12-01

    In this study we present the dependence of the global Poynting flux on the IMF By polarity change. The amount of energy that enters the magnetosphere from the solar wind is a function of the solar wind speed and pressure and the IMF orientation and magnitude. All the various published coupling models show that the polarity of the IMF By component does not change the energy input. In contrast the global convection patterns, and thus the ionospheric Pedersen currents, depend on IMF By polarity. This seems to imply that the ionospheric energy deposition is a function of IMF By polarity. Thus, there appear to be a fundamental difference between the input (from the solar wind) and the output (energy dissipating Pedersen currents). We, therefore, ask the question: To what extend is the global Poynting flux dependent on the IMF By polarity? We have performed a statistical study evaluating 59 abrupt transitions in the IMF By component (polarity changes) as measured by the ACE spacecraft. The effect of other solar wind coupling parameters, such as the IMF Bz component, are minimized by selecting events where these are nearly constant. We use electric field distributions from SuperDARN and field-aligned current distributions from AMPERE to calculate the global distribution of the Poynting Flux. To minimize the effect of magnetospheric energy unloading we focus on the 06-18 MLT region. We further investigate the dependence on solar induced conductivity. We find that the Poynting flux is slightly larger for positive IMF By compared to negative By conditions. For a low conductivity (not sunlit) ionosphere the Poynting flux is smaller than in the high conductivity (sunlit) ionosphere and we find a smaller dependence on IMF By polarity. The study emphasizes the global dynamic behavior of the ionosphere in its response to changes in the external driver (IMF).

  18. IMF-lending programs and suicide mortality.

    PubMed

    Goulas, Eleftherios; Zervoyianni, Athina

    2016-03-01

    While the economic consequences of IMF programs have been extensively analyzed in the literature, much less is known about how key welfare indicators, including suicide-mortality rates, correlate with countries' participation in such programs. This paper examines the impact of IMF lending on suicide mortality, using data from 30 developing and transition countries that received non-concessionary IMF loans during 1991-2008. Our results support the hypothesis of a positive causal relationship between suicide mortality and participation in IMF programs but reveal no systematic suicide-increasing effect from the size of IMF loans. This holds after accounting for self-selection into programs, resulting from the endogeneity of a country's decision to resort to the IMF for funding, and after controlling for standard socio-economic influences on suicidal behaviour. In particular, we find a positive aggregate suicide-mortality differential due to IMF-program participation of between 4 and 14 percentage points. We also find that the positive association between suicides and program participation is stronger and more robust among males. Comparing age groups, individuals belonging to the age group 45-to-64 exhibit the highest increase in suicide due to program-participation, which amounts to over 18 percentage points. Overall, our results imply that when countries are exposed to IMF programs in an attempt to resolve their economic problems, social-safety nets need to be designed to protect the adversely-affected part of the population.

  19. The Stellar IMF from turbulent fragmentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Padoan, P.; Nordlund, A.

    2001-01-01

    In this paper they conclude that turbulent fragmentation is unavoidable in super-sonically turbulent molecular clouds, and given the success of the present model to predict the observed shape of the Stellar IMF, they conclude that turbulent fragmentation is essential to the origin of the stellar IMF.

  20. The Stellar IMF from turbulent fragmentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Padoan, P.; Nordlund, A.

    2001-01-01

    In this paper they conclude that turbulent fragmentation is unavoidable in super-sonically turbulent molecular clouds, and given the success of the present model to predict the observed shape of the Stellar IMF, they conclude that turbulent fragmentation is essential to the origin of the stellar IMF.

  1. Oxygen ion escape from Venus: The acceleration mechanisms and the escape rate under different IMF configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masunaga, K.; Futaana, Y.; Yamauchi, M.; Barabash, S.; Zhang, T.; Fedorov, A.; Okano, S.; Terada, N.

    2012-12-01

    Using data obtained from ASPERA-4 (Analyser of Space Plasma and Energetic Atoms) and MAG (magnetometer) experiments onboard Venus Express, we investigate the acceleration mechanisms, the escape rate of the oxygen ions from the Venus upper atmosphere, and the contribution of the upstream condition to them. We first produce spatial distribution maps of O+ fluxes (>100 eV) around Venus for two different convection electric fields, namely the solar wind electric field (SWEF; Esw = -Vsw x Bsw) and the local convection electric field (LCEF; EL = -VL x BL where VL and BL are the local proton velocity and the local magnetic field that obtained over one-scan (192 s)). Comparison between the two distributions, we find that the O+ fluxes are frequently observed in the hemisphere where LCEF orients. Moreover, such structure can be identified regardless of the upstream interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) direction. Thus we conclude that the O+ ions are accelerated more effectively by LCEF rather than SWEF in the Venusian upper atmosphere. In the induced magnetosphere, O+ fluxes are frequently associated with Bx reversals where the IMF curvature is strong. It indicates that a magnetic tension force also contributes to O+ acceleration. We also investigate the dependency of the O+ escape rates on the upstream IMF directions. Here, the IMF condition is classified into two cases: the perpendicular IMF case and the parallel IMF case, where IMF directs nearly perpendicular to the Venus-Sun line (60° < θ < 120°) and nearly parallel to it (0° < θ < 30° or 150° < θ < 180°). During the data period between 20 Jun 2006 and 20 Dec 2009 we have obtained 141 perpendicular IMF cases and 71 parallel IMF cases. Using these data, total O+ escape rates are estimated by integrating the anti-sunward fluxes in the nightside region. We find that the total escape rates between the two IMF cases are of the same order, and thus we conclude that the upstream IMF direction does not significantly

  2. IMF, World Bank programs hinder AIDS prevention.

    PubMed

    Denoon, D J

    1995-07-10

    International Monetary Fund (IMF) and World Bank structural adjustment programs (SAPs) imposed on developing nations in the 1980s inadvertently helped set the stage for the AIDS epidemic. These programs continue to hinder efforts to prevent HIV transmission. SAPs resulted in the following phenomena which place populations at risk of HIV infection: increased rural-urban migration of cheap labor sparked by a shift to an export-oriented economy, the development of transportation infrastructures in the 1980s to support the changed economy, increased migration and urbanization, and reduced government spending upon health and social services necessitated by the SAPs. For HIV transmission in developing countries to be substantially reduced, the SAP economic policies which may have promoted disease must be modified. An alternative development strategy must satisfy basic human needs such as food, housing, and transport; shift emphasis from the production of a small number of primary commodities for export to diversified agricultural production; support marginal producers and subsistence farmers; emphasize human resource development; end the top-down approach favored by the IMF and World Bank in favor of a truly cooperative development policy; alter the charters of the IMF and World Bank to permit the cancellation or restructuring of debt; and require AIDS Impact Reports of the IMF and World Bank.

  3. High-latitude F region large-scale ionospheric irregularities under different solar wind and zenith angle conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukianova, R. Yu.; Uvarov, V. M.; Coïsson, P.

    2017-01-01

    A numerical model is used to study systematically the evolution of large scale irregularities depending on the IMF Bz and By components, solar zenith angle (seasonal and daily variation), solar and geomagnetic activity. The model enables to reproduce the 3-D distribution of electron density over the high-latitude F region ionosphere in the altitude range between 130 and 640 km. Since the convection electric field driven by changes in solar wind conditions has an important effect on the high-latitude ionosphere, the rotation of the IMF vector in the Y-Z plane causes a significant redistribution of the ionospheric plasma. Under the southward IMF conditions the plasma density is enhanced over a large portion of the near-pole ionosphere as a tongue of ionization, while the northward IMF leads to a considerable depletion and occurrence of the polar hole. The IMF By polarity is crucial for the shift and extension of the tongue of ionization to the dusk or dawn side. Particle precipitation also plays a role through a localized increase of the electron density mostly within the auroral oval and more pronounced auroral peak. The solar zenith angle, especially its seasonal variation, is the strongest regular factor influencing the electron density magnitude and spatial distribution. In winter, when the polar ionosphere is in darkness, large variations associated with different solar wind condition are more prominent. The daily variation of the zenith angle considerably modifies the Ne within a particular pattern. At a given time, the combined action of the IMF, solar zenith angle, level of solar and geomagnetic activity produces a complicated ionospheric response which can be considered as a superposition of different effects. Quantitative estimates of the ionospheric response to each factor are presented.

  4. The Sun Southern Wind Flows Northward Artist Concept

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-12-03

    This artist concept shows how NASA Voyager 1 spacecraft is bathed in solar wind from the southern hemisphere flowing northward. This phenomenon creates a layer of giant bubble of solar ions just inside the outer boundary of the heliosphere.

  5. 4. VIEW NORTHWARD FROM 33 N. THIRD ST. TO 57 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. VIEW NORTHWARD FROM 33 N. THIRD ST. TO 57 N. THIRD ST. (FROM RIGHT TO LEFT). WEST (FRONT) FACADES, LOOKING NORTHEAST - North Third Street Area Study, 17-63 North Third Street (Commercial Buildings), Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  6. 2. VIEW NORTHWARD FROM FROM 17 N. THIRD ST. TO ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. VIEW NORTHWARD FROM FROM 17 N. THIRD ST. TO 63 N. THIRD ST. (FROM RIGHT TO LEFT). WEST (FRONT) FACADES, LOOKING NORTHEAST - North Third Street Area Study, 17-63 North Third Street (Commercial Buildings), Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  7. 3. VIEW NORTHWARD FROM 51 N. THIRD ST. TO 63 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. VIEW NORTHWARD FROM 51 N. THIRD ST. TO 63 N. THIRD ST. (FROM RIGHT TO LEFT). WEST (FRONT) FACADES, LOOKING NORTHEAST - North Third Street Area Study, 17-63 North Third Street (Commercial Buildings), Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  8. SUMMER VIEW LOOKING SOUTHWEST FROM A POINT FURTHER NORTHWARD ALONG ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    SUMMER VIEW LOOKING SOUTHWEST FROM A POINT FURTHER NORTHWARD ALONG THE PRINCIPAL AXIS THROUGH SECTION F THAN THAT IN HALS NO. PA-5-53 - Woodlands Cemetery, 4000 Woodlands Avenue, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  9. 3D Global PIC simulation of Alfvenic transition layers at the cusp outer boundary during IMF rotations from north to south

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, D. S.; Lembege, B.; Esmaeili, A.; Nishikawa, K.

    2013-12-01

    Statistical experimental observations of the cusp boundaries from CLUSTER mission made by Lavraud et al. (2005) have clearly evidenced the presence of a transition layer inside the magnetosheath near the outer boundary of the cusp. This layer characterized by Log(MA)~ 1 allows a transition from super-Alfvenic to sub-Alfvenic bulk flow from the exterior to the interior side of the outer cusp and has been mainly observed experimentally under northward interplanetary magnetic field (IMF). The role of this layer is important in order to understand the flow variations (and later the entry and precipitation of particles) when penetrating the outer boundary of the cusp. In order to analyze this layer, a large 3D PIC simulation of the global solar wind-terrestrial magnetosphere interaction have been performed, and the attention has been focused on the cusp region and its nearby surrounding during IMF rotation from north to south. Present results retrieve quite well the presence of this layer within the meridian plane for exactly northward IMF, but its location differs in the sense that it is located slightly below the X reconnection region associated to the nearby magnetopause (above the outer boundary of the cusp). In order to clarify this question, an extensive study has been performed as follows: (i) a 3D mapping of this transition layer in order to analyze more precisely the thickness, the location and the spatial extension of this layer on the magnetosphere flanks for a fixed Northward IMF configuration; (ii) a parametric study in order to analyze the impact of the IMF rotation from north to south on the persistence and the main features of this transition layer. The locations of this transition layer slightly radially expand and shrink during the IMF rotation and the thickness of the layer increases during the rotation. We show how these transition layers render the flow from super to sub Alfvenic and allow the particles enter into the magnetic cusp region. Alfven

  10. IMF Bx effects on the ionospheric current system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laundal, K.; Reistad, J.; Ostgaard, N.; Tenfjord, P.; Snekvik, K.; Finlay, C. C.

    2016-12-01

    A statistical analysis of UV images have shown a weak but significant difference in auroral intensity at the dusk side for different signs of the IMF Bx component (Reistad et al., 2014). This difference was interpreted as an effect of stronger upward Region 1 currents in the north (south) when Bx is negative (positive). The different Region 1 currents are due to the different field line curvature on newly opened field lines, which leads to more efficient conversion of solar wind kinetic energy to electromagnetic energy. However, the aurora is only an indirect measurement of the Region 1 current, and the relationship between the two quantities is not one-to-one. To our knowledge, the Bx effect has never been reported in direct studies of currents. In this study we use the high precision magnetic field instruments on the CHAMP and Swarm satellites to model global field-aligned and ionospheric currents. By binning the data with respect to sunlight conditions and IMF orientation, we test the explanation of the results by Reistad et al.

  11. Simultaneous conjugate observations of dynamic variations in high-latitude dayside convection due to changes in IMF By

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenwald, R. A.; Baker, K. B.; Ruohoniemi, J. M.; Dudeney, J. R.; Pinnock, M.; Mattin, N.; Leonard, J. M.; Lepping, R. P.

    1990-01-01

    Data from two conjugate HF radars currently operating at Goose Bay (Labrador) and the Halley Station (Antarctica), obtained for a single 45-min period about local noon on April 22, 1988, were used to study the near-instantaneous conjugate two-dimensional patterns of plasma convection in the vicinity of the cusp. In particular, the response of these plasma convection patterns to changes in the By component of the IMF was examined. Results indicate that, under quasi-stationary IMF conditions, the conjugate convection patterns are quite similar to the synthesized patterns of Heppner and Maynard (1987) and that the patterns respond rapidly to changes in the IMF By component. Results also show that transitions between convection states begin to occur within minutes of the time that an IMF state change is incident on the magnetospheric boundary, and that the convection reconfigurations expand poleward, completely filling the field of view of an HF radar within 6 min of the time of onset.

  12. The Role of Stratiform and Convective heating in modifying the northward phase propagation of Monsoon Intraseasonal Oscillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chattopadhyay, R.; Goswami, B.; Sahai, A. K.

    2009-12-01

    In this study, contribution of stratiform and convective rain rate to total rain rate during different phases of the northward propagating boreal summer monsoon Intraseasonal Oscillation (ISO) is brought out using the TRMM data. Two new insights have emerged from this analysis as shown in Fig.1. It may be noted from Fig.1 that the convective component seems to grow and decay in situ during evolution of active/break phases, the northward propagation of the monsoon ISO is contributed by organized movement of the stratiform component. Further, the trade mark meridional dipole pattern of total rainfall between monsoon trough zone (MTZ) and equatorial Indian Ocean (EIO) also arises largely from contribution stratiform anomalies. The northward propagation of the monsoon intraseasonal oscillation is known to be due to the anomalous response of the atmosphere to heating in the presence of mean easterly vertical shear. Modification of vertical profile of heating due to contribution from stratiform rain could influence the northward propagation of monsoon ISO. We test this using a simple dynamical model known as PUMA (Portable Unified Model of Atmosphere) developed by University of Hamburg, Germany to study the response of the ‘convective’ and ‘stratiform’ heating profiles on the modification of the mean condition which facilitates the northward propagation. Such modification in the large scale response (e.g. vertical shear, barotropic vorticity) seen clearly to be related with the structure of the heating profile (convective or stratiform). The presence of stratiform heating favors the northward phase propagation of monsoon ISO. These results underline the importance simulating the partitioning of convective and stratiform rain by cumulous parameterization in climate models if they have to get the space-time structure of the summer ISOs correctly. Fig. 1 Figure showing the northward propagation of total (top), convective (middle) and stratiform (bottom) rainrate

  13. IMF shape constraints from stellar populations and dynamics from CALIFA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyubenova, M.; Martín-Navarro, I.; van de Ven, G.; Falcón-Barroso, J.; Galbany, L.; Gallazzi, A.; García-Benito, R.; González Delgado, R.; Husemann, B.; La Barbera, F.; Marino, R. A.; Mast, D.; Mendez-Abreu, J.; Peletier, R. F. P.; Sánchez-Blázquez, P.; Sánchez, S. F.; Trager, S. C.; van den Bosch, R. C. E.; Vazdekis, A.; Walcher, C. J.; Zhu, L.; Zibetti, S.; Ziegler, B.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; CALIFA Collaboration

    2016-12-01

    In this Paper, we describe how we use stellar dynamics information to constrain the shape of the stellar initial mass function (IMF) in a sample of 27 early-type galaxies from the CALIFA survey. We obtain dynamical and stellar mass-to-light ratios, Υdyn and Υ*, over a homogenous aperture of 0.5 Re. We use the constraint Υdyn≥Υ* to test two IMF shapes within the framework of the extended MILES stellar population models. We rule out a single power-law IMF shape for 75 per cent of the galaxies in our sample. Conversely, we find that a double power-law IMF shape with a varying high-mass end slope is compatible (within 1σ) with 95 per cent of the galaxies. We also show that dynamical and stellar IMF mismatch factors give consistent results for the systematic variation of the IMF in these galaxies.

  14. Anomalous aspects of magnetosheath flow and of the shape and oscillations of the magnetopause during an interval of strongly northward interplanetary magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Sheng-Hsien; Kivelson, Margaret G.; Gosling, Jack T.; Walker, Raymond T.; Lazarus, Allan J.

    1992-01-01

    On 15 Feb. 1978, the orientation of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) remained steadily northward for more than 12 hours. The ISEE 1 and 2 spacecraft were located near apogee on the dawn side flank of the magnetotail. IMP 8 was almost symmetrically located in the magnetosheath on the dusk flank and IMP 7 was upstream in the solar wind. Using plasma and magnetic field data, we show the following: (1) the magnetosheath flow speed on the flanks of the magnetotail steadily exceeded the solar wind speed by 20 percent; (2) surface waves with approximately a 5-min period and very non-sinusoidal waveform were persistently present on the dawn magnetopause and waves of similar period were present in the dusk magnetosheath; and (3) the magnetotail ceased to flare at an antisunward distance of 15 R(sub E). We propose that the acceleration of the magnetosheath flow is achieved by magnetic tension in the draped field configuration for northward IMF and that the reduction of tail flaring is consistent with a decreased amount of open magnetic flux and a larger standoff distance of the subsolar magnetopause. Results of a three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulation support this phenomenological model.

  15. Searching for the bottom of the IMF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esplin, Taran; Luhman, Kevin

    2017-01-01

    The measurement of the substellar initial mass function (IMF) and its minimum mass and their dependence on environment would provide a fundamental test of theories of star formation. To provide better constraints on these properties of the IMF, we have performed a search for the least-massive members of nearby star-forming clusters and associations (150-300 pc, <10 Myr). To identify candidate brown dwarfs in these regions, we have measured proper motions for sources detected in multi-epoch images from the Spitzer Space Telescope. To enable these measurements and more fully realize IRAC's astrometric capabilities, we measured new distortion corrections for IRAC (0.004" systematic error; Esplin & Luhman 2016) and created a pipeline that extracts astrometric positions with errors of 0.02". The resulting proper motion samples of candidate brown dwarfs were then further refined using their color-magnitude diagrams constructed from deep optical and near-IR images. Through spectroscopic observations, we have confirmed many new members of the regions we studied including the least-massive members in several regions (~5 Jupiter masses).

  16. The IMF at intermediate masses from Galactic Cepheids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mor, R.; Robin, A. C.; Figueras, F.; Lemasle, B.

    2014-07-01

    Aims: To constrain the Initial Mass Function (IMF) of the Galactic young (<1 Gyr) thin Disc population using Cepheids. Methods: We have optimized the flexibility of the new Besançon Galaxy Model (Czekaj 2014) to simulate magnitude and distance complete samples of young intermediate mass stars assuming different IMFs and Star Formation Histories (SFH). Comparing the simulated synthetic catalogues with the observational data we studied which IMF reproduces better the observational number of Cepheids in the Galactic thin Disc. We analysed three different IMF: (1) Salpeter, (2) Kroupa-Haywood and (3) Haywood-Robin IMFs with a decreasing SFH from Aumer & Binney (2009). Results: For the first time the Besançon Galaxy Model is used to characterize the galactic Cepheids. We found that for most of the cases the Salpeter IMF overestimates the number of observed Cepheids and Haywood-Robin IMF underestimates it. The Kroupa-Haywood IMF, with a slope α = 3.2, is the one that best reproduces the observed Cepheids. From the comparison of the predicted and observed number of Cepheids up to V = 12, we point that the model might underestimate the scale height of the young population. Conclusions: In agreement with Kroupa & Weidner (2003) our study shows that the Salpeter IMF (α = 2.35) overestimates the star counts in the range 4 ≤ M/M⊙≤ 10 and supports the idea that the slope of the intermediate and massive stars IMF is steeper than the Salpeter IMF. The poster can be found online at: https://gaia.ub.edu/Twiki/pub/GREATITNFC/ProgramFinalconference/Poster_R._Mor_Great.pdf.

  17. 5. CLOSER VIEW: VIEW NORTHWARD FROM 27 N. THIRD ST. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. CLOSER VIEW: VIEW NORTHWARD FROM 27 N. THIRD ST. TO 33 N. THIRD ST. (FROM RIGHT TO LEFT). WEST (FRONT) FACADES, LOOKING NORTHEAST - North Third Street Area Study, 17-63 North Third Street (Commercial Buildings), Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  18. Dependence of Global Poynting Flux on IMF By

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humberset, Beate K.; Gjerloev, Jesper W.

    2014-05-01

    In this study we present the dependence of the global Poynting flux on the IMF By orientation. The amount of energy that enters the near Earth system from the solar wind and IMF interacting with the geomagnetic field is a function of the solar wind speed and pressure and the IMF orientation. All the various published coupling models show that the polarity of the IMF By component does not change the energy input. In contrast the global convection patterns and thus the ionospheric Pedersen currents depends on the IMF By polarity. This apparent contrast between input (from the solar wind) and output (energy dissipating Pedersen currents) raises to the question: To what extend is the global Poynting flux dependent on the IMF By polarity. We have performed a large statistical study using abrupt transitions in the IMF By component (polarity changes) as measured by the ACE spacecraft. The effect of other solar wind parameters such as the solar wind pressure is minimized by selecting events where these are nearly constant. We use electric field distribution from SuperDARN and field-aligned current distributions from AMPERE to calculate the global distribution of the Poynting Flux. We show events as well statistical results to answer the science objective. The study emphasizes the global dynamic behavior of the ionosphere in its response to changes in the external driver (IMF).

  19. The Southern Ocean's Grip on the Northward Meridional Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nof, D.

    2002-12-01

    Recently, a "quasi-island" approach for examining the meridional flux of warm and intermediate water from the Southern Ocean into the South Atlantic, the South Pacific and the Indian Ocean was proposed. The method considers the continents to be "pseudo islands" in the sense that they are entirely surrounded by water but have no circulation around them. The method employs an integration of the linearized momentum equations along a closed contour containing the continents. This allows one to compute the meridional transport into these oceans without finding the detailed solution to the complete wind-thermohaline problem. The solution gives one expected and one unexpected result. It shows that, as expected, about 9 ñ 5 Sv of upper and intermediate water enter the South Atlantic from the Southern Ocean. It also shows, however, the unexpected result that the Pacific-Indian Ocean system should contain a "shallow" meridional overturning cell carrying 18 ñ 5 Sv. By "shallow" it is meant here that the cell does not extend all the way to the bottom (as it does in the Atlantic) but is terminated at mid-depth. (This reflects the fact that there is no bottom water formation in the Pacific.) Both of these calculations rely on the observation that there is almost no flow through the Bering Strait and on the assumption that there is a negligible pressure torque on the Bering Strait's sill. Here, we present a new and different approach which does not rely on the above two conditions regarding the Bering Strait and yet gives essentially the same result. The approach does not involve any quasi-island calculation but rather employs an integration of the linearized zonal momentum equation along a closed open-water latitudinal belt connecting the tips of South Africa and South America. The integration relies on the existence of a belt (corridor) where the linearized general circulation equations are valid. It allows for a net northward mass flux through either the Sverdrup interior or

  20. How chemistry influences cloud structure, star formation, and the IMF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hocuk, S.; Cazaux, S.; Spaans, M.; Caselli, P.

    2016-03-01

    In the earliest phases of star-forming clouds, stable molecular species, such as CO, are important coolants in the gas phase. Depletion of these molecules on dust surfaces affects the thermal balance of molecular clouds and with that their whole evolution. For the first time, we study the effect of grain surface chemistry (GSC) on star formation and its impact on the initial mass function (IMF). We follow a contracting translucent cloud in which we treat the gas-grain chemical interplay in detail, including the process of freeze-out. We perform 3D hydrodynamical simulations under three different conditions, a pure gas-phase model, a freeze-out model, and a complete chemistry model. The models display different thermal evolution during cloud collapse as also indicated in Hocuk, Cazaux & Spaans, but to a lesser degree because of a different dust temperature treatment, which is more accurate for cloud cores. The equation of state (EOS) of the gas becomes softer with CO freeze-out and the results show that at the onset of star formation, the cloud retains its evolution history such that the number of formed stars differ (by 7 per cent) between the three models. While the stellar mass distribution results in a different IMF when we consider pure freeze-out, with the complete treatment of the GSC, the divergence from a pure gas-phase model is minimal. We find that the impact of freeze-out is balanced by the non-thermal processes; chemical and photodesorption. We also find an average filament width of 0.12 pc (±0.03 pc), and speculate that this may be a result from the changes in the EOS caused by the gas-dust thermal coupling. We conclude that GSC plays a big role in the chemical composition of molecular clouds and that surface processes are needed to accurately interpret observations, however, that GSC does not have a significant impact as far as star formation and the IMF is concerned.

  1. Differences in proportion and dynamics of recipient hematopoiesis following hematopoietic cell transplantation in CML and IMF.

    PubMed

    Siebolts, Udo; Thiele, Jürgen; Zander, Thomas; Ditschkowski, Markus; Beelen, Dietrich W; Kröger, Nicolaus; Fehse, Boris; Wickenhauser, Claudia

    2008-01-01

    Since decades myeloablation followed by allogeneic stem cell transplantation offered the only opportunity to cure leukemia patients and only recently the development of STI571 created a further alternative in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). While among all leukemias this transplantation regimen had the best outcome in CML, trials with reduced intensity conditioning regimens (RIC) were rather humbling and recurrence of the neoplastic clone occurred frequently. However, the same therapy in patients with idiopathic myelofibrosis (IMF) resulted in a more favorable outcome. Therefore, long-term mixed chimerism (mCh) was determined on bone marrow (BM) biopsies derived from five IMF patients and from eight CML patients of the pre STI era following sex-mismatched transplantation. All patients presented lasting hematologic remission and were matched concerning age, sex and appearance of GvHD. Analysis of late transplant period (day +100) revealed a concentration of host cells within the CD34+ precursor cell compartment in both diseases. However, in IMF BM biopsies only up to 8% recipient CD34+ precursors but in CML biopsies up to 26% recipient CD34+ precursors were detected. Taken into account that in CML up to 10% of the host BM CD34+ precursors bear the BCR-ABL translocation our data suggest that the neoplastic CD34+ progenitor cell population might dispose of better strategies to escape immune surveillance in CML than in IMF.

  2. Heligmosomoides polygyrus immunomodulatory factor (IMF), targets T-lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Telford, G; Wheeler, D J; Appleby, P; Bowen, J G; Pritchard, D I

    1998-12-01

    Experiments were performed to investigate the immunological site of action of an immunomodulatory factor (IMF), isolated from the gastrointestinal nematode Heligmosomoides polygyrus. IMF inhibited antibody production in murine and human 'T-helper (Th-2) driven' immunoassays. The effects were mediated via T lymphocytes as T cell-depleted cultures failed to respond to IMF, a result confirmed by prepulsing discrete cell subsets with the immunomodulant. Although the molecular nature and mode of action of IMF has yet to be determined, it would appear to be a relatively small non-proteinaceous molecule. From this data, we suggest that H. polygyrus secretes a systemically-active IMF from the intestinal lumen, to down-regulate Th-2 cell development in order to promote its survival in a potentially immunologically hostile environment.

  3. British-Irish ice sheet during the LGM consistent with a reduced northward ocean heat transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, André; Prange, Matthias; Rogozhina, Irina; Bakker, Pepijn; Kucera, Michal; Mulitza, Stefan; Schulz, Michael; Seguinot, Julien

    2017-04-01

    The strength of the northward ocean heat transport during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) remains a topic of considerable debate. Reconstructions and simulations of the climate, Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (AMOC) and implied ocean heat transport during this period are still inconclusive. We provide new, ice sheet-based evidence that supports a reduced ocean heat transport into the North Atlantic region and confront it with existing spatially explicit paleoclimatic evidence, in particular the sea-surface temperature (SST) reconstruction by the Multiproxy Approach for the Reconstruction of the Glacial Ocean Surface (MARGO) project. The British-Irish Ice Sheet was situated in a region that is assumed to be critically sensitive to the northward heat transport by the North Atlantic Ocean. We employ the results of two global climate simulations by the Community Climate System Model (CCSM) versions 3 and 4 at 1° resolution that feature a weak and a strong state of the AMOC during the LGM. The corresponding North Atlantic climate conditions are compared to marine and terrestrial paleoclimatic reconstructions and used to force ice-sheet simulations with the Parallel Ice Sheet Model (PISM). The results show that a reduced northward ocean heat transport that is associated with a weakened AMOC is consistent with extensive ice sheet cover over the British-Irish Isles during the LGM as inferred from independent geological evidence, as well as with the paleoclimatic reconstructions.

  4. Microbial responses to southward and northward Cambisol soil transplant.

    PubMed

    Wang, Mengmeng; Liu, Shanshan; Wang, Feng; Sun, Bo; Zhou, Jizhong; Yang, Yunfeng

    2015-12-01

    Soil transplant serves as a proxy to simulate climate changes. Recently, we have shown that southward transplant of black soil and northward transplant of red soil altered soil microbial communities and biogeochemical variables. However, fundamental differences in soil types have prevented direct comparison between southward and northward transplants. To tackle it, herein we report an analysis of microbial communities of Cambisol soil in an agriculture field after 4 years of adaptation to southward and northward soil transplants over large transects. Analysis of bare fallow soils revealed concurrent increase in microbial functional diversity and coarse-scale taxonomic diversity at both transplanted sites, as detected by GeoChip 3.0 and DGGE, respectively. Furthermore, a correlation between microbial functional diversity and taxonomic diversity was detected, which was masked in maize cropped soils. Mean annual temperature, soil moisture, and nitrate (NO3 ¯-N) showed strong correlations with microbial communities. In addition, abundances of ammonium-oxidizing genes (amoA) and denitrification genes were correlated with nitrification capacity and NO3 ¯-N contents, suggesting that microbial responses to soil transplant could alter microbe-mediated biogeochemical cycle at the ecosystem level.

  5. Microbial responses to southward and northward Cambisol soil transplant

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, Mengmeng; Liu, Shanshan; Wang, Feng; ...

    2015-10-26

    We report that soil transplant serves as a proxy to simulate climate changes. Recently, we have shown that southward transplant of black soil and northward transplant of red soil altered soil microbial communities and biogeochemical variables. However, fundamental differences in soil types have prevented direct comparison between southward and northward transplants. To tackle it, herein we report an analysis of microbial communities of Cambisol soil in an agriculture field after 4 years of adaptation to southward and northward soil transplants over large transects. Analysis of bare fallow soils revealed concurrent increase in microbial functional diversity and coarse-scale taxonomic diversity atmore » both transplanted sites, as detected by GeoChip 3.0 and DGGE, respectively. Furthermore, a correlation between microbial functional diversity and taxonomic diversity was detected, which was masked in maize cropped soils. Mean annual temperature, soil moisture, and nitrate (NO3¯-N) showed strong correlations with microbial communities. In addition, abundances of ammonium-oxidizing genes (amoA) and denitrification genes were correlated with nitrification capacity and NO3¯-N contents, suggesting that microbial responses to soil transplant could alter microbe-mediated biogeochemical cycle at the ecosystem level.« less

  6. Coldness triggers northward flight in remigrant monarch butterflies.

    PubMed

    Guerra, Patrick A; Reppert, Steven M

    2013-03-04

    Each fall, eastern North American monarch butterflies (Danaus plexippus) migrate from their northern range to their overwintering grounds in central Mexico. Fall migrants are in reproductive diapause, and they use a time-compensated sun compass to navigate during the long journey south. Eye-sensed directional cues from the daylight sky (e.g., the horizontal or azimuthal position of the sun) are integrated in the sun compass in the midbrain central complex region. Sun compass output is time compensated by circadian clocks in the antennae so that fall migrants can maintain a fixed flight direction south. In the spring, the same migrants remigrate northward to the southern United States to initiate the northern leg of the migration cycle. Here we show that spring remigrants also use an antenna-dependent time-compensated sun compass to direct their northward flight. Remarkably, fall migrants prematurely exposed to overwintering-like coldness reverse their flight orientation to the north. The temperature microenvironment at the overwintering site is essential for successful completion of the migration cycle, because without cold exposure, aged migrants continue to orient south. Our discovery that coldness triggers the northward flight direction in spring remigrants solves one of the long-standing mysteries of the monarch migration. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. IMF polarity effects on the equatorial ionospheric F-region

    SciTech Connect

    Sastri, J.H.

    1985-01-01

    An exploratory study is made of the influence, during the equinoxes, of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) sector structure on the ionospheric F-region using ionosonde data from several equatorial stations for a 3-yr period around the 19th sunspot cycle maximum. It is found that, compared with days having positive IMF polarity, the post-sunset increase of h'F near the dip equator and the depth of the equatorial ionization anomaly (EIA) are reduced during the vernal equinox and enhanced during the autumnal equinox on days with negative IMF polarity. Similar trends are also noted in the data for the 20th sunspot cycle maximum, but with reduced amplitude. The systematic changes in the F-region characteristics suggest a modification of the equatorial zonal electric fields in association with the IMF polarity-related changes in the semi-annual variation of geomagnetic activity. 24 references.

  8. Role of CMEs in IMF winding statistics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Charles W.; Phillips, John L.

    1995-01-01

    Past studies of the spiral winding of the IMF have revealed an over winding relative to the Parker prediction that is evident in both the omnitape and Pioneer-Venus Orbiter data sets. An asymmetry between the winding of the northern and southern hemispheres is also observed. Both results are seen to be persistent over many years and statistically significant. Both results have implications for cosmic ray propagation in the heliosphere. There has been a suggestion in past analyses that the digression from the Parker prediction is greatest during times of heightened CME activity. We examine the possible role of CMEs in these past analyses by extracting CME observations from the ISEE-3 dataset and analyzing CME and undisturbed periods separately. We use the full ISEE-3 dataset representing the entire L1 mission (1978 1982). This coincides with a period in the solar cycle when CME activity was heightened. Preliminary results are suggestive that CMEs may be responsible for a significant portion of both the spiral angle overwinding and asymmetry. Possible implications for the high latitude fields and cosmic ray propagation will be reviewed in light of this analysis.

  9. Application of immersed MF (IMF) followed by reverse osmosis (RO) membrane for wastewater reclamation: A case study in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Ujang, Z; Ng, K S; Tg Hamzah, Tg Hazmin; Roger, P; Ismail, M R; Shahabudin, S M; Abdul Hamid, M H

    2007-01-01

    A pilot scale membrane plant was constructed and monitored in Shah Alam, Malaysia for municipal wastewater reclamation for industrial application purposes. The aim of this study was to verify its suitability under the local conditions and environmental constraints for secondary wastewater reclamation. Immersed-type crossflow microfiltration (IMF) was selected as the pretreatment step before reverse osmosis filtration. Secondary wastewater after chlorine contact tank was selected as feed water. The results indicated that the membrane system is capable of producing a filtrate meeting the requirements of both WHO drinking water standards and Malaysian Effluent Standard A. With the application of an automatic backwash process, IMF performed well in hydraulic performance with low fouling rate being achieved. The investigations showed also that chemical cleaning is still needed because of some irreversible fouling by microorganisms always remains. RO treatment with IMF pretreatment process was significantly applicable for wastewater reuse purposes and promised good hydraulic performance.

  10. By-controlled convection and field-aligned currents near midnight auroral oval for northward interplanetary magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taguchi, S.; Sugiura, M.; Iyemori, T.; Winningham, J. D.; Slavin, J. A.

    1994-01-01

    Using the Dynamics Explorer (DE) 2 magnetic and electric field and plasma data, B(sub y)- controlled convection and field-aligned currents in the midnight sector for northward interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) are examined. The results of an analysis of the electric field data show that when IMF is stable and when its magnitude is large, a coherent B(sub y)-controlled convection exists near the midnight auroral oval in the ionosphere having adequate conductivities. When B(sub y) is negative, the convection consists of a westward (eastward) plasma flow at the lower latitudes and an eastward (westward) plasma flow at the higher latitudes in the midnight sector in the northern (southern) ionosphere. When B(sub y) is positive, the flow directions are reversed. The distribution of the field-aligned currents associated with the B(sub y)-controlled convection, in most cases, shows a three-sheet structure. In accordance with the convection the directions of the three sheets are dependent on the sign of B(sub y). The location of disappearance of the precipitating intense electrons having energies of a few keV is close to the convection reversal surface. However, the more detailed relationship between the electron precipitation boundary and the convection reversal surface depends on the case. In some cases the precipitating electrons extend beyond the convection reversal surface, and in others the poleward boundary terminates at a latitude lower than the reversal surface. Previous studies suggest that the poleward boundary of the electrons having energies of a few keV is not necessarily coincident with an open/closed bounary. Thus the open/closed boundary may be at a latitude higher than the poleward boundary of the electron precipitation, or it may be at a latitude lower than the poleward boundary of the electron precipitation. We discuss relationships between the open/closed boundary and the convection reversal surface. When as a possible choice we adopt a view that the

  11. FTE Dependence on IMF Orientation and Presence of Hall Physics in Global MHD Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maynard, K. M.; Germaschewski, K.; Lin, L.; Raeder, J.

    2013-12-01

    Flux Transfer Events (FTEs) are poleward traveling flux ropes that form in the dayside magnetopause and represent significant coupling of the solar wind to the magnetosphere during times of southward IMF. In the 35 years since their discovery, FTEs have been extensively observed and modeled; however, there is still no consensus on their generation mechanism. Previous modeling efforts have shown that FTE occurrence and size depend on the resistivity model that is used in simulations and the structure of X-lines in the magnetopause. We use Hall OpenGGCM, a global Hall-MHD code, to study the formation and propagation of FTEs in the dayside magnetopause using synthetic solar wind conditions. We examine large scale FTE structure and nearby magnetic separators for a range of IMF clock angles and dipole tilts. In addition, we investigate how FTE formation and recurrence rate depends on the presence of the Hall term in the generalized Ohm's law compared with resistive MHD.

  12. Filamentary field-aligned currents at the polar cap region during northward interplanetary magnetic field derived with the Swarm constellation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lühr, Hermann; Huang, Tao; Wing, Simon; Kervalishvili, Guram; Rauberg, Jan; Korth, Haje

    2016-10-01

    ESA's Swarm constellation mission makes it possible for the first time to determine field-aligned currents (FACs) in the ionosphere uniquely. In particular at high latitudes, the dual-satellite approach can reliably detect some FAC structures which are missed by the traditional single-satellite technique. These FAC events occur preferentially poleward of the auroral oval and during times of northward interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) orientation. Most events appear on the nightside. They are not related to the typical FAC structures poleward of the cusp, commonly termed NBZ. Simultaneously observed precipitating particle spectrograms and auroral images from Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) satellites are consistent with the detected FACs and indicate that they occur on closed field lines mostly adjacent to the auroral oval. We suggest that the FACs are associated with Sun-aligned filamentary auroral arcs. Here we introduce in an initial study features of the high-latitude FAC structures which have been observed during the early phase of the Swarm mission. A more systematic survey over longer times is required to fully characterize the so far undetected field aligned currents.

  13. Simulated orbits of heavy planetary ions at Mars for different IMF configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curry, Shannon; Luhmann, Janet; Livi, Roberto; Hara, Takuya; Dong, Chuanfei; Ma, Yingjuan; McFadden, James; Bougher, Stephen

    2014-11-01

    We present simulated detections of O+, O2+ and CO2+ ions at Mars along a virtual orbit in the Mars space environment. Planetary pick-up ions are formed through the direct interaction of the solar wind with the neutral upper atmosphere, causing the newly created ions to be picked up and accelerated by the background convective electric field. Because previous missions such as Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) and Mars Express (MEX) have not been able to measure the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) components simultaneously with plasma measurements, the response of heavy planetary pick-up ions to changes in the IMF has not been well characterized. Using a steady-state multi-species MHD model to provide the background electric and magnetic fields, the Mars Test Particle (MTP) simulation can trace each of these particles along field lines in near-Mars space and construct virtual ion detections from a spacecraft orbit. Specifically, we will present energy-time spectrograms and velocity space distributions (VSDs) for a selection of orbits during different IMF configurations and solar cycle conditions. These simulated orbits have broader implications for how to measure ion escape. Using individual particle traces, the origin and trajectories of different ion populations can be analyzed in order to assess how and where they contribute to the total atmospheric escape rate, which is a major objective of the upcoming MAVEN mission.

  14. Reforming a Nation: Implications of IMF Conditionality on Russia

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-06-01

    of time 8 Christopher D. Barth “The Decline and Death of the Soviet Union: 1970’s Détente through...Journal of Political Economy Vol. 100, 4 (1992): 673 - 690. 16 Christopher D. Barth , “The Decline and Death of the Soviet Union: 1970’s Détente...its place arose Russia 17 Christopher D. Barth , “The Decline and Death of the Soviet Union: 1970’s

  15. Unusually long lasting multiple penetration of interplanetary electric field to equatorial ionosphere under oscillating IMF Bz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Yong; Hong, Minghua; Wan, Weixing; Du, Aimin; Lei, Jiuhou; Zhao, Biqiang; Wang, Wenbin; Ren, Zhipeng; Yue, Xinan

    2008-01-01

    During November 11-16, 2003, the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) B z oscillated between northward and southward directions, which suggests discontinuous magnetic reconnection associated with the multiple pulses-like reconnection electric field. The Jicamarca incoherent scatter radar (ISR) measurements of ionospheric zonal electric field showed similar fluctuations during this period. The high correlation coefficient of 0.71 between the reconnection electric field and equatorial zonal electric field during 125 hours suggests that the interplanetary electric field (IEF) pulsively penetrated into the equatorial ionosphere due to the discontinuous magnetic reconnection. It is implied that the short lifetime (<3 hours) dawn-dusk IEF pulses can penetrate into ionosphere without shielding, in other words, they may exhibit the ``shielding immunity''. The averaged penetration efficiency is about 0.136 and highly local time-dependent. Furthermore, the intense AU and AL indices imply that the multiple electric field penetration is associated with a ``High-Intensity Long-Duration Continuous AE Activity (HILDCAA).''

  16. Magnetospheric response and reconfiguration times following IMF By reversals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tenfjord, P.; Østgaard, N.; Strangeway, R.; Haaland, S.; Snekvik, K.; Laundal, K. M.; Reistad, J. P.; Milan, S. E.

    2017-01-01

    The interaction between the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) and the geomagnetic field at the dayside magnetopause leads to transfer of momentum and energy which changes the magnetospheric configuration, but only after a certain time. In this study we quantify this time, to advance our understanding of the causes for the delayed response of the magnetosphere. We study the response and reconfiguration time of the inner magnetosphere to IMF By reversals. A superposed epoch analysis of magnetic field measurements from four Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite spacecraft at different local times both for negative to positive IMF By reversals and for positive to negative reversals is presented. The magnetospheric response time at geosynchronous orbit to the sudden change of IMF By is less than 15 (˜10) min from the bow shock (magnetopause) arrival time, while the reconfiguration time is less than 46 (˜41) min. These results are consistent with a By component induced on closed magnetic field lines due to the asymmetric loading of flux following asymmetric dayside reconnection when IMF By≠0. Our results also confirm our earlier studies that nightside reconnection is not required for generating a By component on closed field lines.

  17. 3D PIC Simulation of the Magnetosphere during IMF Rotation from North to South: Signatures of Substorm Triggering in the Magnetotail

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishikawa, Ken-Ichi; Cao. D/ S/; Lembege, B.

    2008-01-01

    Three dimensional PIC simulations are performed in order to analyse the dynamics of the magnetotail as the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) rotates from northward to southward direction. This dynamics reveals to be quite different within meridian/equatorial planes over two successive phases of this rotation. First, as IMF rotates from North to Dawn-Dusk direction, the X-Point (magnetic reconnection) evidenced in the magnetotail (meridian plane) is moving earthward (from x=-35 Re to x=-17.5 ) distance at which it stabilizes. This motion is coupled with the formation of "Crosstail-S" patterns (within the plane perpendicular to the Sun-Earth mine) through the neutral sheet in the nearby magnetotail. Second, as IMF rotates from dawn-dusk to South, the minimum B field region is expanding within the equatorial plane and forms a ring. This two-steps dynamics is analyzed in strong association with the cross field magnetotail current Jy, in order to recover the signatures of substorms triggering.

  18. 3D PIC Simulation of the Magnetosphere during IMF Rotation from North to South: Signatures of Substorm Triggering in the Magnetotail

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishikawa, Ken-Ichi; Cao. D/ S/; Lembege, B.

    2008-01-01

    Three dimensional PIC simulations are performed in order to analyse the dynamics of the magnetotail as the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) rotates from northward to southward direction. This dynamics reveals to be quite different within meridian/equatorial planes over two successive phases of this rotation. First, as IMF rotates from North to Dawn-Dusk direction, the X-Point (magnetic reconnection) evidenced in the magnetotail (meridian plane) is moving earthward (from x=-35 Re to x=-17.5 ) distance at which it stabilizes. This motion is coupled with the formation of "Crosstail-S" patterns (within the plane perpendicular to the Sun-Earth mine) through the neutral sheet in the nearby magnetotail. Second, as IMF rotates from dawn-dusk to South, the minimum B field region is expanding within the equatorial plane and forms a ring. This two-steps dynamics is analyzed in strong association with the cross field magnetotail current Jy, in order to recover the signatures of substorms triggering.

  19. The IMF as a function of supersonic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertelli Motta, C.; Clark, P. C.; Glover, S. C. O.; Klessen, R. S.; Pasquali, A.

    2016-11-01

    Recent studies seem to suggest that the stellar initial mass function (IMF) in early-type galaxies might be different from a classical Kroupa or Chabrier IMF, i.e. contain a larger fraction of the total mass in low-mass stars. From a theoretical point of view, supersonic turbulence has been the subject of interest in many analytical theories proposing a strong correlation with the characteristic mass of the core mass function (CMF) in star-forming regions, and as a consequence with the stellar IMF. Performing two suites of smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) simulations with different mass resolutions, we aim at testing the effects of variations in the turbulent properties of a dense, star-forming molecular cloud on the shape of the system mass function in different density regimes. While analytical theories predict a shift of the peak of the CMF towards lower masses with increasing velocity dispersion of the cloud, we observe in the low-density regime the opposite trend, with high Mach numbers giving rise to a top-heavy mass distribution. For the high-density regime we do not find any trend correlating the Mach number with the characteristic mass of the resulting IMF, implying that the dynamics of protostellar accretion discs and fragmentation on small scales is not strongly affected by turbulence driven at the scale of the cloud. Furthermore, we suggest that a significant fraction of dense cores are disrupted by turbulence before stars can be formed in their interior through gravitational collapse. Although this particular study has limitations in its numerical resolution, we suggest that our results, along with those from other studies, cast doubt on the turbulent fragmentation models on the IMF that simply map the CMF to the IMF.

  20. Northward extent of East Asian monsoon covaries with intensity on orbital and millennial timescales

    PubMed Central

    Goldsmith, Yonaton; Broecker, Wallace S.; Xu, Hai; Polissar, Pratigya J.; deMenocal, Peter B.; Porat, Naomi; Lan, Jianghu; Cheng, Peng; Zhou, Weijian; An, Zhisheng

    2017-01-01

    The magnitude, rate, and extent of past and future East Asian monsoon (EAM) rainfall fluctuations remain unresolved. Here, late Pleistocene–Holocene EAM rainfall intensity is reconstructed using a well-dated northeastern China closed-basin lake area record located at the modern northwestern fringe of the EAM. The EAM intensity and northern extent alternated rapidly between wet and dry periods on time scales of centuries. Lake levels were 60 m higher than present during the early and middle Holocene, requiring a twofold increase in annual rainfall, which, based on modern rainfall distribution, requires a ∼400 km northward expansion/migration of the EAM. The lake record is highly correlated with both northern and southern Chinese cave deposit isotope records, supporting rainfall “intensity based” interpretations of these deposits as opposed to an alternative “water vapor sourcing” interpretation. These results indicate that EAM intensity and the northward extent covary on orbital and millennial timescales. The termination of wet conditions at 5.5 ka BP (∼35 m lake drop) triggered a large cultural collapse of Early Neolithic cultures in north China, and possibly promoted the emergence of complex societies of the Late Neolithic. PMID:28167754

  1. Northward extent of East Asian monsoon covaries with intensity on orbital and millennial timescales.

    PubMed

    Goldsmith, Yonaton; Broecker, Wallace S; Xu, Hai; Polissar, Pratigya J; deMenocal, Peter B; Porat, Naomi; Lan, Jianghu; Cheng, Peng; Zhou, Weijian; An, Zhisheng

    2017-02-21

    The magnitude, rate, and extent of past and future East Asian monsoon (EAM) rainfall fluctuations remain unresolved. Here, late Pleistocene-Holocene EAM rainfall intensity is reconstructed using a well-dated northeastern China closed-basin lake area record located at the modern northwestern fringe of the EAM. The EAM intensity and northern extent alternated rapidly between wet and dry periods on time scales of centuries. Lake levels were 60 m higher than present during the early and middle Holocene, requiring a twofold increase in annual rainfall, which, based on modern rainfall distribution, requires a ∼400 km northward expansion/migration of the EAM. The lake record is highly correlated with both northern and southern Chinese cave deposit isotope records, supporting rainfall "intensity based" interpretations of these deposits as opposed to an alternative "water vapor sourcing" interpretation. These results indicate that EAM intensity and the northward extent covary on orbital and millennial timescales. The termination of wet conditions at 5.5 ka BP (∼35 m lake drop) triggered a large cultural collapse of Early Neolithic cultures in north China, and possibly promoted the emergence of complex societies of the Late Neolithic.

  2. Northward extent of East Asian monsoon covaries with intensity on orbital and millennial timescales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldsmith, Yonaton; Broecker, Wallace S.; Xu, Hai; Polissar, Pratigya J.; deMenocal, Peter B.; Porat, Naomi; Lan, Jianghu; Cheng, Peng; Zhou, Weijian; An, Zhisheng

    2017-02-01

    The magnitude, rate, and extent of past and future East Asian monsoon (EAM) rainfall fluctuations remain unresolved. Here, late Pleistocene-Holocene EAM rainfall intensity is reconstructed using a well-dated northeastern China closed-basin lake area record located at the modern northwestern fringe of the EAM. The EAM intensity and northern extent alternated rapidly between wet and dry periods on time scales of centuries. Lake levels were 60 m higher than present during the early and middle Holocene, requiring a twofold increase in annual rainfall, which, based on modern rainfall distribution, requires a ˜400 km northward expansion/migration of the EAM. The lake record is highly correlated with both northern and southern Chinese cave deposit isotope records, supporting rainfall “intensity based” interpretations of these deposits as opposed to an alternative “water vapor sourcing” interpretation. These results indicate that EAM intensity and the northward extent covary on orbital and millennial timescales. The termination of wet conditions at 5.5 ka BP (˜35 m lake drop) triggered a large cultural collapse of Early Neolithic cultures in north China, and possibly promoted the emergence of complex societies of the Late Neolithic.

  3. Statistical Comparison of a Southern Auroral Electrojet Index with Northern Hemisphere AE Indices as a Function of Solar Wind and IMF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boudouridis, A.; Weygand, J. M.; Zesta, E.

    2014-12-01

    A Southern Auroral Electrojet (SAE) index has been recently constructed using seven Antarctica magnetometer stations. It has been compared for case studies with the standard Auroral Electrojet (AE) index, and a near-conjugate to the southern stations Northern Auroral Electrojet (NAE) index. Both similarities and differences with the Northern Hemisphere indices have been detected, and they reveal information about the conjugacy of geomagnetic disturbances. In this work we compare the three indices statistically as a function of the accompanying solar wind (SW) and Interplanetary Magnetic Field (IMF) conditions to further explore conjugacy issues. We use 274 days of common north/south data presence between December 2005 and August 2010. We calculate the cross correlation coefficients and differences between all three pairs, AE-SAE, NAE-SAE, and AE-NAE. We estimate the effect of the SW/IMF conditions on the index correlations and differences using three groups of data: 1) the entire data set, 2) periods when there is no station in the Southern Hemisphere located within the 20-02 Magnetic Local Time (MLT) sector where substorms occur, and 3) separately for the four different seasons. We consider the following SW/IMF quantities: IMF By, Bz, clock angle θ = tan-1(|By|/Bz), coupling parameter sin2(θ/2), SW dynamic pressure, density, velocity, and electric field. We find that high north-south correlation coefficients are more common during strong SW/IMF driving, e.g., southward IMF, high IMF |By|, high SW dynamic pressure, high SW electric field, and high θ and sin2(θ/2). All the above studies are also conducted for the index differences instead of their correlations. We find that the index differences are higher for higher SW/IMF driving, suggesting that the SAE index follows the northern indices trend, but has in general lower values than either the standard AE or the conjugate NAE index. The MLT study shows that the number of high AE/SAE correlations is slightly

  4. Alfvén Mach number and IMF clock angle dependencies of sunward flow channels in the magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eriksson, S.; RastäTter, L.

    2013-04-01

    Interplanetary coronal mass ejections associated with strong interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) By have been shown to enhance the neutral density in low Earth orbit. The enhancement has been linked to strong downward Poynting fluxes embedded within ionospheric channels of significant sunward ExB drift (2000-3000 m/s). Here we present MHD results describing the magnetospheric counterpart of the ionospheric flow channel that Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) encountered on 15 May 2005. It is shown that the clock angle of maximum sunward flow (θFC) depends on the IMF clock angle θFC = α * θIMF - 1.3° with α = (0.30, 0.38, 0.43, 0.45) at X = (4, 2, 0, -2) RE. This is poleward of the magnetic null point region. The flow also depends on the solar wind Alfvén Mach number Vx = Vx0 - δv * MA. The critical MA = Vx0 / δV for Vx = 0 decreases from MA = 3.42 (X = 4 RE) to MA = 2.40 (X = -2 RE). The low MA and θIMF conditions that characterized the X = 2 RE flow and resulted in strong Poynting flux occurred for 16% of all 167 h in 1998-2008 with Dst < -180 nT.

  5. Role of IMF By in the prompt electric field disturbances over equatorial ionosphere during a space weather event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakrabarty, D.; Hui, Debrup; Rout, Diptiranjan; Sekar, R.; Bhattacharyya, Archana; Reeves, G. D.; Ruohoniemi, J. M.

    2017-02-01

    On 7 January 2005 (Ap=40) prompt penetration electric field perturbations of opposite polarities were observed over Thumba and Jicamarca on a few occasions during 13:45-16:30 UT. However, the electric field was found to be eastward during 14:45-15:30 UT over both Thumba and Jicamarca contrary to the general expectation wherein opposite polarities are expected at nearly antipodal points. On closer scrutiny, three important observational features are noticed during 14:10-15:15 UT. First, during 14:10-14:45 UT, despite increasing southward interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) Bz condition, the already westward electric field over Thumba weakened (less westward) while the eastward electric field over Jicamarca intensified (more eastward). Second, the electric field not only became anomalously eastward over Thumba but also got intensified further during 14:45-15:00 UT similar to Jicamarca. Third, during 15:00-15:15 UT, despite IMF Bz remaining steadily southward, the eastward electric field continued to intensify over Thumba but weakened over Jicamarca. It is suggested that the changes in IMF By component under southward IMF Bz condition are responsible for skewing the ionospheric equipotential patterns over the dip equator in such a way that Thumba came into the same DP2 cell as that of Jicamarca leading to anomalous electric field variations. Magnetic field measurements along the Indian and Jicamarca longitude sectors and changes in high-latitude ionospheric convection patterns provide credence to this proposition. Thus, the present investigation shows that the variations in IMF By are fundamentally important to understand the prompt penetration effects over low latitudes.

  6. On the IMF in a Triggered Star Formation Context

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Tingtao; Huang, Chelsea X.; Lin, D. N. C.; Gritschneder, Matthias; Lau, Herbert

    2015-07-01

    The origin of the stellar initial mass function (IMF) is a fundamental issue in the theory of star formation. It is generally fit with a composite power law. Some clues on the progenitors can be found in dense starless cores that have a core mass function (CMF) with a similar shape. In the low-mass end, these mass functions increase with mass, albeit the sample may be somewhat incomplete; in the high-mass end, the mass functions decrease with mass. There is an offset in the turn-over mass between the two mass distributions. The stellar mass for the IMF peak is lower than the corresponding core mass for the CMF peak in the Pipe Nebula by about a factor of three. Smaller offsets are found between the IMF and the CMFs in other nebulae. We suggest that the offset is likely induced during a starburst episode of global star formation which is triggered by the formation of a few O/B stars in the multi-phase media, which naturally emerged through the onset of thermal instability in the cloud-core formation process. We consider the scenario that the ignition of a few massive stars photoionizes the warm medium between the cores, increases the external pressure, reduces their Bonnor-Ebert mass, and triggers the collapse of some previously stable cores. We quantitatively reproduce the IMF in the low-mass end with the assumption of additional rotational fragmentation.

  7. ON THE IMF IN A TRIGGERED STAR FORMATION CONTEXT

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Tingtao; Huang, Chelsea X.; Lin, D. N. C.; Gritschneder, Matthias

    2015-07-20

    The origin of the stellar initial mass function (IMF) is a fundamental issue in the theory of star formation. It is generally fit with a composite power law. Some clues on the progenitors can be found in dense starless cores that have a core mass function (CMF) with a similar shape. In the low-mass end, these mass functions increase with mass, albeit the sample may be somewhat incomplete; in the high-mass end, the mass functions decrease with mass. There is an offset in the turn-over mass between the two mass distributions. The stellar mass for the IMF peak is lower than the corresponding core mass for the CMF peak in the Pipe Nebula by about a factor of three. Smaller offsets are found between the IMF and the CMFs in other nebulae. We suggest that the offset is likely induced during a starburst episode of global star formation which is triggered by the formation of a few O/B stars in the multi-phase media, which naturally emerged through the onset of thermal instability in the cloud-core formation process. We consider the scenario that the ignition of a few massive stars photoionizes the warm medium between the cores, increases the external pressure, reduces their Bonnor–Ebert mass, and triggers the collapse of some previously stable cores. We quantitatively reproduce the IMF in the low-mass end with the assumption of additional rotational fragmentation.

  8. Distinct Magnetospheric Responses to Southward IMF in Two Substorms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    El-Alaoui, Mostafa; Ashour-Abdalla, M.; Richard, R. L.; Frank, L. A.; Paterson, W. R.; Sigwarth, J. B.

    2003-01-01

    Solar wind plasma parameters and the Interplanetary Magnetic Field (IMF) observed by the WIND spacecraft upstream of the bow shock were used as input to magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations of two substorm events. The power deposited into the ionosphere due to electron precipitation was calculated both from VIS observations and from the simulations.

  9. Investigating the low-mass slope and possible turnover in the LMC IMF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gennaro, Mario

    2014-10-01

    We propose to derive the Initial Mass Function (IMF) of the field population of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) down to 0.2 solar masses, probing the mass regime where the characteristic IMF turnover is observed in our Galaxy. The power of the HST, using the WFC3 IR channel, is necessary to obtain photometric mass estimates for the faint, cool, dwarf stars with masses below the expected IMF turnover point. Only by probing the IMF down to such masses, it will be possible to clearly distinguish between a bottom-heavy or bottom-light IMF in the LMC. Recent studies, using the deepest available observations for the Small Magellanic Cloud, cannot find clear evidence of a turnover in the IMF for this galaxy, suggesting a bottom-heavy IMF in contrast to the Milky Way. A similar study of the LMC is needed to confirm a possible dependence of the low-mass IMF with galactic environment. Studies of giant ellipticals have recently challenged the picture of a universal IMF, and suggest an enviromental dependence of the IMF, with the most massive galaxies having a larger fraction of low mass stars and no IMF turnover. A study of possible IMF variations from resolved stellar populations in nearby galaxies is of great importance in sheding light on this issue. Our simple approach, using direct evidence from basic star counts, is much less prone to systematic errors with respect to studies of more distant objects which have to rely on the observations of integrated properties.

  10. Modern yields per stellar generation: the effect of the IMF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vincenzo, F.; Matteucci, F.; Belfiore, F.; Maiolino, R.

    2016-02-01

    Gaseous and stellar metallicities in galaxies are nowadays routinely used to constrain the evolutionary processes in galaxies. This requires the knowledge of the average yield per stellar generation, yZ, i.e. the quantity of metals that a stellar population releases into the interstellar medium (ISM), which is generally assumed to be a fixed fiducial value. Deviations of the observed metallicity from the expected value of yZ are used to quantify the effect of outflows or inflows of gas, or even as evidence for biased metallicity calibrations or inaccurate metallicity diagnostics. Here, we show that y_{Z} depends significantly on the initial mass function (IMF), varying by up to a factor larger than three, for the range of IMFs typically adopted in various studies. Varying the upper mass cutoff of the IMF implies a further variation of yZ by an additional factor that can be larger than two. These effects, along with the variation of the gas mass fraction restored into the ISM by supernovae (R, which also depends on the IMF), may yield to deceiving results, if not properly taken into account. In particular, metallicities that are often considered unusually high can actually be explained in terms of yield associated with commonly adopted IMFs such as the Kroupa or Chabrier. We provide our results for two different sets of stellar yields (both affected by specific limitations) finding that the uncertainty introduced by this assumption can be as large as ˜0.2 dex. Finally, we show that yZ is not substantially affected by the initial stellar metallicity as long as Z > 10-3 Z⊙.

  11. Windsock memory COnditioned RAM (CO-RAM) pressure effect: Forced reconnection in the Earth's magnetotail

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vörös, Z.; Facskó, G.; Khodachenko, M.; Honkonen, I.; Janhunen, P.; Palmroth, M.

    2014-08-01

    Magnetic reconnection (MR) is a key physical concept explaining the addition of magnetic flux to the magnetotail and closed flux lines back-motion to the dayside magnetosphere. This scenario elaborated by Dungey (1963) can explain many aspects of solar wind-magnetosphere interaction processes, including substorms. However, neither the Dungey model nor its numerous modifications were able to explain fully the onset conditions for MR in the tail. In this paper, we introduce new onset conditions for forced MR in the tail. We call our scenario the "windsock memory conditioned ram pressure effect." Our nonflux transfer-associated forcing is introduced by a combination of the large-scale windsock motions exhibiting memory effects and solar wind dynamic pressure actions on the nightside magnetopause during northward oriented interplanetary magnetic field (IMF). Using global MHD Grand Unified Magnetosphere Ionosphere Coupling Simulation version 4 simulation results, upstream data from Wind, magnetosheath data from Cluster 1 and distant tail data from the two-probe Acceleration, Reconnection, Turbulence and Electrodynamics of the Moon's Interaction with the Sun mission, we show that the simultaneous occurrence of vertical windsock motions of the magnetotail and enhanced solar wind dynamic pressure introduces strong nightside disturbances, including enhanced electric fields and persistent vertical cross-tail shear flows. These perturbations, associated with a stream interaction region in the solar wind, drive MR in the tail during episodes of northward oriented interplanetary magnetic field (IMF). We detect MR indirectly, observing plasmoids in the tail and ground-based signatures of earthward moving fast flows. We also consider the application to solar system planets and close-in exoplanets, where the proposed scenario can elucidate some new aspects of solar/stellar wind-magnetosphere interactions.

  12. Corotating and transient structures of IMF at Venus and Earth orbits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marubashi, K.

    1995-01-01

    Magnetometer data obtained from the Pioneer Venus orbiter (PVO) provide a unique data base for studying interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) structures at 0.7 AU. Comparison of the same structure observed at 0.7 and 1 AU provides information about the effects of stream interactions between these two distances. Besides, the PVO observations provide solar wind conditions at various longitude separations from the Sun-Earth line, because the orbital motion of Venus is about 0.6 deg/day faster than that of Earth. Thus, it is possible to examine the effects of time variations in the coronal conditions on the solar wind conditions by comparing corotating structures observed at Earth and those from the PVO at different longitude separations. Some results obtained so far are as follows. We have found several transient structures observed at both 0.7 and 1 AU, when the Sun, Venus, and Earth are closely aligned. Each event exhibits magnetic field variations very similar to each other between Venus and Earth, implying that the effects of stream interactions are small. The IMF sector boundaries were compared between the Venus and Earth orbits as typical examples of corotating structures. We have found both well-correlated and poorly-correlated structures depending on the longitude separation between the Earth and Venus, and on the persistence of the sector structures.

  13. Corotating and transient structures of IMF at Venus and Earth orbits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marubashi, K.

    1995-01-01

    Magnetometer data obtained from the Pioneer Venus orbiter (PVO) provide a unique data base for studying interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) structures at 0.7 AU. Comparison of the same structure observed at 0.7 and 1 AU provides information about the effects of stream interactions between these two distances. Besides, the PVO observations provide solar wind conditions at various longitude separations from the Sun-Earth line, because the orbital motion of Venus is about 0.6 deg/day faster than that of Earth. Thus, it is possible to examine the effects of time variations in the coronal conditions on the solar wind conditions by comparing corotating structures observed at Earth and those from the PVO at different longitude separations. Some results obtained so far are as follows. We have found several transient structures observed at both 0.7 and 1 AU, when the Sun, Venus, and Earth are closely aligned. Each event exhibits magnetic field variations very similar to each other between Venus and Earth, implying that the effects of stream interactions are small. The IMF sector boundaries were compared between the Venus and Earth orbits as typical examples of corotating structures. We have found both well-correlated and poorly-correlated structures depending on the longitude separation between the Earth and Venus, and on the persistence of the sector structures.

  14. Auroral Substorm Time Scales: Seasonal and IMF Variations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chua, D.; Parks, G. K.; Brittnacher, M.; Germany, G. A.; Spann, J. F.; Six, N. Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The time scales and phases of auroral substorm, activity are quantied in this study using the hemispheric power computed from Polar Ultraviolet Imager (UVI) images. We have applied this technique to several hundred substorm events and we are able to quantify how the characterist act, of substorms vary with season and IMF Bz orientation. We show that substorm time scales vary more strongly with season than with IMF Bz orientation. The recovery time for substorm. activity is well ordered by whether or not the nightside oral zone is sunlit. The recovery time scales for substorms occurring in the winter and equinox periods are similar and are both roughly a factor of two longer than in summer when the auroral oval is sunlit. Our results support the hypothesis that the ionosphere plays an active role in governing the dynamics of the aurora.

  15. Auroral Substorm Time Scales: Seasonal and IMF Variations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chua, D.; Parks, G. K.; Brittnacher, M.; Germany, G. A.; Spann, J. F.; Six, N. Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The time scales and phases of auroral substorm, activity are quantied in this study using the hemispheric power computed from Polar Ultraviolet Imager (UVI) images. We have applied this technique to several hundred substorm events and we are able to quantify how the characterist act, of substorms vary with season and IMF Bz orientation. We show that substorm time scales vary more strongly with season than with IMF Bz orientation. The recovery time for substorm. activity is well ordered by whether or not the nightside oral zone is sunlit. The recovery time scales for substorms occurring in the winter and equinox periods are similar and are both roughly a factor of two longer than in summer when the auroral oval is sunlit. Our results support the hypothesis that the ionosphere plays an active role in governing the dynamics of the aurora.

  16. Generation of Birkeland Currents during IMF By: Mechanisms and theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tenfjord, Paul; Østgaard, Nikolai; Snekvik, Kristian; Laundal, Karl; Reistad, Jone; Milan, Steve; Haaland, Stein

    2015-04-01

    We investigate the role of IMF By in the generation of Birkeland Currents (BC), comparing observations from AMPERE and MHD simulations. Observations have shown that the intensity and position of the aurora is not always symmetric between the two hemispheres. Asymmetric BCs arise due to non-uniform penetration of IMF BY in to the closed magnetosphere. We investigate associated BCs, and whether asymmetric currents between the two hemispheres can be observed. We show how asymmetrical footpoints are produced, and how this may lead to asymmetrical BCs at conjugate points. We also present current measurements from AMPERE that are consistent with this picture. We argue that the induced BY produces asymmetrical Birkeland currents as a consequence of asymmetric stress balance between the hemispheres. Such an asymmetry will also lead to asymmetrical footpoints and asymmetries in the azimuthal flow in the ionosphere. These phenomena should therefore be treated in a unified way.

  17. On the origins and timescales of geoeffective IMF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lockwood, Mike; Owens, Mathew J.; Barnard, Luke A.; Bentley, Sarah; Scott, Chris J.; Watt, Clare E.

    2016-06-01

    Southward interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) in the geocentric solar magnetospheric (GSM) reference frame is the key element that controls the level of space weather disturbance in Earth's magnetosphere, ionosphere, and thermosphere. We discuss the relation of this geoeffective IMF component to the IMF in the geocentric solar ecliptic (GSE) frame, and using the almost continuous interplanetary data for 1996-2015 (inclusive), we show that large geomagnetic storms are always associated with strong southward, out-of-ecliptic field in the GSE frame: Dipole tilt effects, which cause the difference between the southward field in the GSM and GSE frames, generally make only a minor contribution to these strongest storms. The time-of-day/time-of-year response patterns of geomagnetic indices and the optimum solar wind coupling function are both influenced by the timescale of the index response. We also study the occurrence spectrum of large out-of-ecliptic field and show that for 1 h averages it is, surprisingly, almost identical in ICMEs (interplanetary coronal mass ejections), around CIRs/SIRs (corotating and stream interaction regions) and in the "quiet" solar wind (which is shown to be consistent with the effect of weak SIRs). However, differences emerge when the timescale over which the field remains southward is considered: for longer averaging timescales the spectrum is broader inside ICMEs, showing that these events generate longer intervals of strongly southward average IMF and consequently stronger geomagnetic storms. The behavior of out-of-ecliptic field with timescale is shown to be very similar to that of deviations from the predicted Parker spiral orientation, suggesting the two share common origins.

  18. The observed North-South Asymmetry of IMF spiral

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahluwalia, H. S.; Xue, S. S.

    1995-01-01

    We appraise the finding, reported in the literature, that a small but finite north-south asymmetry (NSA) exists in the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) spiral at Earth's orbit. We have analyzed the data available on the Omnitape for the 1963 to 1993 period. The coverage is very uneven, ranging from less than 40% to greater than 80%. The magnitude of NSA fluctuates considerably during the period of our analysis. This is true even if one considers the period 1967 to 1982 when the coverage is greater than 50%. The values of NSA derived from 27-day averages of the hourly data points range from greater than +50 deg to less than -40 deg. If one arranges the data according to the magnetic polarity epochs of the solar polar field, the epoch averages gives the magnitude of NSA less than approximately 2 deg. This is also true, if one considers the average magnitude of NSA for the 1965 to 1993 period, when the coverage is greater than 25%. A genuine, persistent, NSA of IMF spiral is likely to affect the cosmic ray modulation, on either side of the current sheet, by introducing a corresponding change in the radial diffusion coefficient of energetic particle transport in the heliosphere. The annual mean values of the observed NSA of IMF spiral are compared with the observed off-ecliptic contributions to cosmic ray modulation.

  19. IMF Length Scales and Predictability: The Two Length Scale Medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collier, Michael R.; Szabo, Adam; Slavin, James A.; Lepping, R. P.; Kokubun, S.

    1999-01-01

    We present preliminary results from a systematic study using simultaneous data from three spacecraft, Wind, IMP 8 (Interplanetary Monitoring Platform) and Geotail to examine interplanetary length scales and their implications on predictability for magnetic field parcels in the typical solar wind. Time periods were selected when the plane formed by the three spacecraft included the GSE (Ground Support Equipment) x-direction so that if the parcel fronts were strictly planar, the two adjacent spacecraft pairs would determine the same phase front angles. After correcting for the motion of the Earth relative to the interplanetary medium and deviations in the solar wind flow from radial, we used differences in the measured front angle between the two spacecraft pairs to determine structure radius of curvature. Results indicate that the typical radius of curvature for these IMF parcels is of the order of 100 R (Sub E). This implies that there are two important IMF (Interplanetary Magnetic Field) scale lengths relevant to predictability: (1) the well-established scale length over which correlations observed by two spacecraft decay along a given IMF parcel, of the order of a few tens of Earth radii and (2) the scale length over which two spacecraft are unlikely to even observe the same parcel because of its curvature, of the order of a hundred Earth radii.

  20. The High Mass Stellar IMF in M31

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weisz, Daniel R.; PHAT

    2015-01-01

    I will present a progress report on our analysis of the high mass stellar initial mass (IMF) in M31 from the Panchromatic Hubble Andromeda Treasury program (PHAT), an 828-orbit HST survey of 1/3 of M31's star-forming disk. To date, we have measured the present day mass function (MF) above 2 M⊙ for nearly 1000 young star clusters (< 300 Myr) by modeling their resolved star color-magnitude diagrams. The MF slopes of individual clusters show a tremendous degree of scatter, with some clusters differing substantially from Salpeter. There appears to be little correlation between physical properties of the clusters (e.g., mass, age) and their MF slopes. From analysis of the ensemble of clusters, we recover a global MF that is both steeper than Salpeter and one that exhibits a high degree of variance, which, if taken at face value, does not appear comapabilte with a universal IMF model. We are using an extensive suite of artificial clusters, designed to mimic observations, to investigate whether effects such as finite sampling statistics, dynamical evolution (e.g., mass segregation), stellar multiplicity, cluster membership, crowding, and/or completeness can be responsible for the observed MF properties, or if the M31 cluster population has an intrinsically non-universal IMF.

  1. Venus ionopause 'clouds' and IMF sector boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luhmann, Janet G.; Russell, C. T.; Wei, Hanying; Ma, Yingjuan; Zhang, Tielong; McEnulty, T.

    Disconnected or partially connected structures observed by the PVO Langmuir Probe near the ionopause of Venus were called 'clouds' by Brace et al. (1980). These authors speculated that the loss of atmosphere represented by these features could be significant compared to other loss processes. Russell et al. (1982) subsequently showed that the clouds occurred together with sharp rotations in the magnetic field. They suggested that the extreme draping of the interplanetary field that occurs near the ionopause at the draping poles could exert JxB forces sufficient to pull the ionospheric plasma in the cloud tailward and out into the heliosphere. But in 1991, Ong et al. demonstrated via analysis of many clouds that they are not generally seen in the polar regions of the draped magnetosheath field. Instead they occur at times when the interplanetary magnetic field undergoes a sudden rotation, as in interplanetary field sector boundaries. We discuss the statistics of such rotations at the orbit of Venus and their frequency as a function of solar cycle. Whether they enable or enhance escape or not requires simulation studies, but this study calls attention to the potential importance of time dependent external conditions.

  2. IMF-based chaotic characterization of AP and ML visually-driven postural responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azhar, Hanif; Giraudet, Guillaume; Faubert, Jocelyn

    2013-03-01

    The objective was to analyze visually driven postural responses and characterize any non-linear behaviour. We recorded physiological responses for two adults, 260 trials each. The subjects maintained quite stance while fixating for four seconds within an immersive room, EON Icube, where the reference to the visual stimuli, i.e., the virtual platform, randomly oscillated in Gaussian orientation 90° and 270° for antero-posterior (AP), and, 0° and 180° for medio-lateral (ML) at three different frequencies (0.125, 0.25, and 0.5 Hz). We accomplished stationary derivatives of posture time series by taking the intrinsic mode functions (IMFs). The phase space plot of IMF shows evidence of the existence of non-linear attractors in both ML and AP. Correlation integral slope with increasing embedding dimension is similar to random white noise for ML, and similar to non-linear chaotic series for AP. Next, recurrence plots indicate the existence of more non-linearity for AP than that for ML. The patterns of the dots after 200th time stamp (near onset) appears to be aperodic in AP. At higher temporal windows, AP entropy tends more toward chaotic series, than that of ML. There are stronger non-linear components in AP than that in ML regardless of the speed conditions.

  3. The IMF and Internal Kinematics of the Massive Young Star Cluster, Westerlund 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Jessica

    2014-10-01

    The most massive young star cluster known in the Milky Way, Westerlund 1, represents a far more extreme environment for star formation than nearby, well-studied, and lower-mass star forming regions such as Taurus and Orion. We propose to construct a complete photometric and kinematic census of Westerlund 1 in order to identify cluster members down to 0.1 solar masses, precisely determine the initial mass function (IMF), and measure the internal kinematic structure of the cluster. With these measurements, we will test whether the IMF is universal, as may be the case for nearby lower-mass star forming regions, or favors high-mass star formation, as has been suggested theoretically and from some observational results. We will observe Wd 1 with WFC3-IR, which is the only instrument capable of delivering high spatial resolution, a well-characterized and stable PSF, and a wide field of view at infrared wavelengths. We exploit WFC3's capabilities to cover the full extent of the cluster with photometry, to correct for variable extinction and derive stellar masses, and with proper motions, to distinguish between cluster members and contaminating field stars. Our proposed observations of Westerlund 1 will help determine whether the star formation process, and the emergent stellar mass distribution, varies with initial cloud conditions.

  4. The IMF and Internal Kinematics of the Massive Young Star Cluster, Westerlund 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Jessica

    2012-10-01

    The most massive young star cluster known in the Milky Way, Westerlund 1, represents a far more extreme environment for star formation than nearby, well-studied, and lower-mass star forming regions such as Taurus and Orion. We propose to construct a complete photometric and kinematic census of Westerlund 1 in order to identify cluster members down to 0.1 solar masses, precisely determine the initial mass function {IMF}, and measure the internal kinematic structure of the cluster. With these measurements, we will test whether the IMF is universal, as may be the case for nearby lower-mass star forming regions, or favors high-mass star formation, as has been suggested theoretically and from some observational results. We will observe Wd 1 with WFC3-IR, which is the only instrument capable of delivering high spatial resolution, a well-characterized and stable PSF, and a wide field of view at infrared wavelengths. We exploit WFC3's capabilities to cover the full extent of the cluster with photometry, to correct for variable extinction and derive stellar masses, and with proper motions, to distinguish between cluster members and contaminating field stars. Our proposed observations of Westerlund 1 will help determine whether the star formation process, and the emergent stellar mass distribution, varies with initial cloud conditions.

  5. Kelvin-Helmholtz wave at the subsolar magnetopause boundary layer under radial IMF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grygorov, K.; Němeček, Z.; Šafránková, J.; Přech, L.; Pi, G.; Shue, J.-H.

    2016-10-01

    We present the first observation of the Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) rolled-up vortex at the dayside magnetopause layers under a radial interplanetary magnetic field (IMF). The study uses measurements of four Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms (THEMIS) probes aligned along the YGSE axis about 10 RE upstream of the Earth and located in different regions of the near-Earth environment. THEMIS C and A serve as monitors of the quiet solar wind and fluctuating magnetosheath conditions, respectively, and THEMIS D and E observe the magnetopause and low-latitude boundary layer (LLBL) crossings. The analysis shows the following: (1) a radial IMF changes to the southward pointing magnetosheath magnetic field; (2) dayside reconnection forms the thin but dense LLBL; (3) a large velocity shear at the LLBL inner edge excites a train of KH waves; and (4) in spite of a short path from the subsolar point (≈5 RE), one of the KH waves exhibits all features of a fully developed rolled-up vortex.

  6. On the enhancement of the IMF magnitude during 1978-1979

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, J. H.

    1981-01-01

    The magnitude of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) exhibits an enhancement during 1978-1979 relative to all years back to 1963. It is shown that IMF magnitude variations over the 1966-1979 period represent the combined effect of variations in both the radial flux density of the IMF and the degree of spiraling of the IMF, consistent with the theoretical model of Parker. The 1978-1979 IMF magnitude enhancement is due to an enhancement of radial flux which was in turn related to an increase of magnetic flux leaving solar active regions. It is also shown that during the corotating stream dominated years 1973-1976, the IMF was less wound up than it was during other years, and that 1973-1974 were years of enhanced radial flux.

  7. The IMF of Low-Mass Stars and Brown Dwarfs in Taurus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luhman, K.

    2001-05-01

    By combining deep optical imaging and infrared spectroscopy with data from the Two-Micron All-Sky Survey (2MASS) and from previous studies, I have measured the Initial Mass Function (IMF) for a reddening-limited sample in four fields in the Taurus star forming region. This IMF is representative of the young populations within these fields for masses above 0.02 Msun. Relative to the similarly derived IMF for the Trapezium Cluster (Luhman et al.), the IMF for Taurus exhibits a modest deficit of stars above one solar mass (i.e., steeper slope), the same turnover mass (0.8 Msun), and a significant deficit of brown dwarfs. If the IMF in Taurus were the same as that in the Trapezium, 12.8+/-1.8 brown dwarfs (>0.02 Msun) are expected in these Taurus fields where only one brown dwarf candidate is found. These results are used to test theories of the IMF.

  8. Superposed epoch analysis of vertical plasma flow and its relationship with FACs as observed by DMSP and CHAMP: IMF By and Bx dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kervalishvili, Guram; Lühr, Hermann

    2016-04-01

    This study presents results of a superposed epoch analysis (SEA) method applied to vertical plasma flow and large-scale field aligned currents (FACs) in the Northern Hemisphere cusp region. Our study is based on DMSP (F13 and F15) and CHAMP satellite observations during the years 2001-2005. Interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) data were taken from the NASA/GSFC's OMNI online database. The dependence on IMF By and Bx component orientation is investigated, while the absolute amplitude of IMF Bz is selected to be less than 2 nT. Seasonal variations are also investigated with seasons defined as follows: local winter (1 January ± 65 days), combined equinoxes (1 April and 1 October ± 32 days), and local summer (1 July ± 65 days). The reference time and location for the SEA method are taken from the vertical ion velocity peaks (> 100 m/s for upflow and <-100 m/s for downflow) detected by DMSP in the northern cusp region. Our analyses were performed in the magnetic latitude (MLat) and local time (MLT) coordinate system. In general the vertical plasma downflow is weaker than the upflow. This product, ion density times velocity, shows no dependence on the IMF By orientation, while its value increases towards local summer. The ion density is low in winter and increases towards local summer, while the vertical velocity is much higher in local winter than during equinoxes or local summer. The event number distribution (in MLat-MLT frame) of vertical ion velocity peaks shows no significant dependence on the given conditions. In case of large-scale FACs a clear dependence on IMF By orientation and local season emerges from SEA analysis. Similarly to the vertical plasma upflow, the amplitude of large-scale FACs is also increasing towards local summer. Large-scale FACs show an IMF By dependent regular pattern for upflow cases and no regular pattern for downflow cases in all considered cases.

  9. Strong gravitational lensing and the stellar IMF of early-type galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leier, Dominik; Ferreras, Ignacio; Saha, Prasenjit; Charlot, Stéphane; Bruzual, Gustavo; La Barbera, Francesco

    2016-07-01

    Systematic variations of the initial mass function (IMF) in early-type galaxies, and their connection with possible drivers such as velocity dispersion or metallicity, have been much debated in recent years. Strong lensing over galaxy scales combined with photometric and spectroscopic data provides a powerful method to constrain the stellar mass-to-light ratio and hence the functional form of the IMF. We combine photometric and spectroscopic constraints from the latest set of population synthesis models of Charlot & Bruzual, including a varying IMF, with a non-parametric analysis of the lens masses of 18 ETGs from the SLACS survey, with velocity dispersions in the range 200-300 km s-1. We find that very bottom-heavy IMFs are excluded. However, the upper limit to the bimodal IMF slope (μ ≲ 2.2, accounting for a dark matter fraction of 20-30 per cent, where μ = 1.3 corresponds to a Kroupa-like IMF) is compatible at the 1σ level with constraints imposed by gravity-sensitive line strengths. A two-segment power-law parametrization of the IMF (Salpeter-like for high masses) is more constrained (Γ ≲ 1.5, where Γ is the power index at low masses) but requires a dark matter contribution of ≳25 per cent to reconcile the results with a Salpeter IMF. For a standard Milky Way-like IMF to be applicable, a significant dark matter contribution is required within 1Re. Our results reveal a large range of allowed IMF slopes, which, when interpreted as intrinsic scatter in the IMF properties of ETGs, could explain the recent results of Smith et al., who find Milky Way-like IMF normalizations in a few massive lensing ETGs.

  10. A 21st century northward tropical precipitation shift caused by future anthropogenic aerosol reductions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Robert J.

    2015-09-01

    The tropical rain belt is a narrow band of clouds near the equator, where the most intense rainfall on the planet occurs. On seasonal timescales, the rain moves across the equator following the Sun, resulting in wet and dry seasons in the tropics. The position of the tropical rain belt also varies on longer timescales. Through the latter half of the twentieth century, for example, shifts in tropical rainfall have been associated with severe droughts, including the African Sahel and Amazon droughts. Here I show that climate models project a northward migration of the tropical rain belt through the 21st century, with future anthropogenic aerosol reductions driving the bulk of the shift. Models that include both aerosol indirect effects yield significantly larger northward shifts than models that lack aerosol indirect effects. Moreover, the rate of the shift corresponds to the rate of the decrease of anthropogenic aerosol emissions across different time periods and future emission scenarios. This response is consistent with relative warming of the Northern Hemisphere, a decrease in northward cross-equatorial moist static energy transport, and a northward shift of the Hadley circulation, including the tropical rain belt. The shift is relatively weak in the Atlantic sector, consistent with both a smaller decrease in aerosol emissions and a larger reduction in northward cross-equatorial ocean heat flux. Although aerosol effects remain uncertain, I conclude that future reductions in anthropogenic aerosol emissions may be the dominant driver of a 21st century northward shift of the tropical rain belt.

  11. Relationship between the observed and modeled modulation of the dayside ionospheric convection by the IMF B{sub y} component

    SciTech Connect

    Papitashvili, V.O.; Clauer, C.R.; Levitin, A.E.

    1995-05-01

    The Institute of Terrestrial Magnetism, Ionosphere and Radio Wave Propagation (IZMIRAN) electrodynamic model (IZMEM) provides global patterns of polar ionospheric potential and is parameterized by the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF). Given IMF conditions measured by an upstream satellite, the model yields a good global approximation to the polar ionospheric convection patterns assuming the proper time delay. While the model assumes static patterns and is based upon statistical regression analysis of high-latitude magnetometer data, it can furnish an appropriate global context within which to examine time-varying phenomena. The authors use the IZMEM model to further develop their understanding of the coordinated analysis of Greenland radar, riometer, and magnetometer data on August 2, 1991, which is one of the geospace environment modeling program intervals. The event is characterized by geomagnetic pulsations observed near local magnetic noon, having a 25-min period and poleward phase propagation. A modulation of the intensity and orientation of the convection electric field is observed by the Sondrestrom incoherent scatter radar. Modeled global convection patterns show striking agreement with observations in the area covered by the radar field of view. The authors interpret observed phenomena as a direct ground-based evidence of the IMF B{sub y} component reconnection at the dayside magnetopause. 31 refs., 6 figs.

  12. Are Unusual Solar Wind Conditions in SC23-24 Triggering Changes in the Geospace Response to High Speed Streams? (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozyra, J. U.; Brandt, P. C.; Buzulukova, N.; de Zeeuw, D.; Fok, M. H.; Frey, H. U.; Gibson, S. E.; Ilie, R.; Liemohn, M. W.; Mende, S. B.; Paxton, L. J.; Rastaetter, L.; Ridley, A. J.; Thomsen, M. F.

    2009-12-01

    In the descent to solar minimum in solar cycle 23-24, the high-speed streams (HSS) were faster and longer lived than previous cycles but the average IMF was weaker and the average solar wind density lower than ever before recorded upstream of the Earth. A simulation of high speed stream activity on 22-24 January 2005 using the BATS-R-US MHD model with embedded Rice Convection Model driven by solar wind inputs indicates that, at least for this event, the interaction between high speed streams and the magnetosphere has been modified by these unusual solar wind conditions. Northward IMF in the HSS drove the periodic capture of solar wind/magnetosheath plasma in the dayside magnetosphere due to high-latitude reconnection. At times of observed strong periodic auroral activity, a significant IMF By component produced a magnetospheric sash configuration in the simulations in which fingers of enhanced plasma beta were associated with strong field-aligned currents linking to the nightside auroral region. In agreement with the simulations, IMAGE HENA observed low energy (less than tens of keV) hydrogen energetic neutral atoms peaking on the dayside for the 3-days of the high speed stream activity. IMAGE FUV and TIMED GUVI observed periodic auroral activations during the HSS that resembled poleward boundary intensifications (PBIs) rather than the periodic substorms typically associated with HSS. The locations of the observed PBIs in the southern hemisphere were consistent with the high-beta fingers in the near-Earth plasma sheet predicted by the simulation. Particle injection signatures at LANL geosynchronous satellites accompanied the PBIs. To our knowledge, these results provide the first evidence in support of the role of northward IMF in HSS interactions. Based on these results, a study of energetic neutral atom images from TWINS and IMAGE HENA along with observations from other missions in the Heliophysics System Observatory is underway to determine if these

  13. Arctic Amplification and the Northward shift of a new Greenland melting record

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tedesco, Marco; Mote, Thomas; Fettweis, Xavier; Hanna, Edward; Booth, James; Jeyaratnam, Jeyavinoth; Datta, Rajashree; Briggs, Kate

    2016-04-01

    Large-scale atmospheric circulation controls the mass and energy balance of the Greenland ice sheet through its impact on radiative budget, runoff and accumulation. Using reanalysis data and the outputs of a regional climate model, here we show that the persistence of an exceptional atmospheric ridge, centred over the Arctic Ocean was responsible for a northward shift of surface melting records over Greenland, and for increased accumulation in the south during the summer of 2015. Concurrently, new records of mean monthly zonal winds at 500 hPa and of the maximum latitude of ridge peaks of the 5700±50 m isohypse over the Arctic were also set. An unprecedented (1948 - 2015) and sustained jet stream easterly flow promoted enhanced runoff, increased surface temperatures and decreased albedo in northern Greenland, while inhibiting melting in the south. The exceptional 2015 summer Arctic atmospheric conditions are consistent with the anticipated effects of Arctic Amplification, including slower zonal winds and increased jet stream wave amplitude. Properly addressing the impact of Arctic Amplification on surface runoff of the Greenland ice sheet is crucial for rigorously quantifying its contribution to current and future sea level rise, and the relative impact of freshwater discharge on the surrounding ocean.

  14. The biochemical study of intermaxillary fixation (IMF) stress in oral surgery inpatients.

    PubMed

    Sakaino, H

    2001-01-01

    Although intermaxillary fixation (IMF) is performed to treat the patients with maxillary fracture, this procedure is very stressful to the patients. IMF has been reported to increase noradrenaline (NA) release in the brain and elevate plasma corticosterone contents in the rat. These changes were significantly attenuated by diazepam, an anxiolytic of the benzodiazepine family. These results suggest that IMF could greatly affect the pituitary-adrenal system as a stress. In the present study, in order to examine the influence of IMF on the human body function, we measured levels of 17-hydrocorticosteroids (17-OHCS) and 17-ketosteroid (17-KS), which are metabolites of the adreno-cortical hormone cortisol, in the urine of inpatients undergoing IMF. The subjects were requested to fill out a questionnaire on irritableness caused by IMF. In these patients, urinary 17-OHCS levels were significantly increased after IMF and well correlated to the results of the questionnaire. The finding suggested that urinary 17-OHCS levels reflect stress related to IMF, and that such stress mainly causes an irritated feeling. Natural killer cell activity (NK activity), which is considered to be related to stress, was measured in these patients. The relationship between 17-OHCS levels and NK activity was examined in reference to the results of the questionnaire. Questionnaire showed that most patients noted insomnia and an irritated feeling during IMF. To examine the influence of anxiolytic agents on stress related to IMF, an anxiolytic agent, ethyl loflazepate, was administered during IMF, and urinary 17-OHCS levels were measured. There was no correlation between 17-OHCS levels and NK activity in the patients. Furthermore, no correlation was observed between visual analogue scale (VSA) and NK activity. Increases in 17-OHCS levels in the group treated with ethyl loflazepate, an anxiolytic of the benzodiazepine family, were significantly lower than in the untreated group. This suggests that

  15. Case Study of Solar Wind and IMF Influence on Ionospheric Outflow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elliott, H. A.; Comfort, R. H.; Craven, P. D.; Chandler, M. O.; Moore, T. E.; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    We examine ionospheric outflows in the high attitude magnetospheric polar cap during the POLAR satellite's apogee on 04/19/96 using the TIDE instrument. The pass has a fairly constant flux of H+ which is similar to many other passes, but there is a large amount of O+ present. The elevated levels of O+ may be due both to the geophysical conditions during the apogee pass (Kp=5) and prior to the pass. When the outflows for many high altitude polar cap passes are analyzed the O+ density correlates well with the dynamic pressure. There are several aspects of this pass which are interesting besides the abundance of O+ relative to H+. In this pass both the H+ and O+ outflow velocity correlate with both the solar wind speed and Interplanetary Magnetic Field (IMF) Bx. The geophysical conditions are such that the solar wind speed and IMF Bx are highly correlated with each other. For this case the dynamic pressure of the solar wind is fairly constant and has an average value of about 2.5 nPa which is typical for the solar wind, but the average solar wind speed is about 695 km/s which is greater than 450 km/s which is typical for the solar wind at I AU. The ion outflow measurements themselves are interrelated. The H+ density and parallel speed are anticorrelated which results in the constant flux. The 0+ density does not have as large of a anticorrelation with its parallel speed as H+ does with its parallel speed.

  16. The IMF and sodium abundance trends in passive Coma Cluster galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Russell

    2014-01-01

    Recent spectroscopic studies have found evidence that the stellar initial mass function (IMF) in red-sequence galaxies may be quite different from that in the Milky Way. The most massive ellipticals show unexpectedly strong absorption lines associated with cool dwarf stars, apparently indicating that they have a very bottom-heavy IMF (e.g. a power law with slope x~3). However, there is an important caveat to these conclusions: All of the most widely-used IMF indicators (the Wing-Ford band, Na I doublet, Ca II triplet) are also affected by the abundance of sodium, which has not yet been accurately constrained from independent features. Do giant ellipticals really have very bottom-heavy IMFs, or are they really enriched in sodium, to levels as high as [Na/Fe]~+1.0, as required to fit a Milky Way IMF? Here, we propose spectroscopy with FMOS in the 1.1-1.4mum range, for a sample of 121 Coma Cluster galaxies, to measure new diagnostics which are sensitive to the IMF and to sodium independently. The same sample has been successfully observed with FMOS at shorter wavelengths. The proposed observations will break the IMF/sodium degeneracy and cleanly determine the variation of IMF with galaxy mass, metallicity and Mg/Fe ratio. [Re-application for cancelled 13A run

  17. IMF-sense-dependent cosmic ray anisotropy produced from diffusion-convection in heliosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagashima, K.; Munakata, K.; Tatsuoka, R.

    1985-01-01

    It was demonstrated that an interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) sense dependent 2nd order anisotropy is produced by the diffusion convection of cosmic rays in the heliomagnetosphere. The result implies that the anisotropy cannot be expressed only by the pitch angle with respect to the IMF axis.

  18. On the enhancement of the IMF magnitude during 1978-1979

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, J. H.

    1981-01-01

    The magnitude of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) exhibits an enhancement during 1978 to 1979 relative to all years back to 1963. It is shown that IMF magnitude variations over the 1966 to 1979 period represent the combined effect of variations in both the radial flux density of the IMF and the degree of spiraling of the IMG, consistent with the theoretical model of Parker. The 1978 to 1979 IMF magnitude enhancement is due to an enhancement of radial flux which was in turn related to an increase of magnetic flux leaving solar active regions. It is also shown that during the corotating stream dominated years 1973 to 1976, the IMF was less wound up than during other years, and that 1973 to 1974 were years of enhanced radial flux.

  19. Reconstruction of the IMF polarity using midlatitude geomagnetic observations in the nineteenth century

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vokhmyanin, M. V.; Ponyavin, D. I.

    2016-12-01

    The interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) By component affects the configuration of field-aligned currents (FAC) whose geomagnetic response is observed from high to low latitudes. The ground magnetic perturbations induced by FACs are opposite on the dawnside and duskside and depend upon the IMF By polarity. Based on the multilinear regression analysis, we show that this effect is presented at the midlatitude observatories, Niemegk and Arti, in the X and Y components of the geomagnetic field. This allows us to infer the IMF sector structure from the old geomagnetic records made at Ekaterinburg and Potsdam since 1850 and 1890, respectively. Geomagnetic data from various stations provide proxies of the IMF polarity which coincide for the most part of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. This supports their reliabilities and makes them suitable for studying the large-scale IMF sector structure in the past.

  20. A Northward Shift of the North Atlantic Ocean Intertropical Convergence Zone in Response to Summertime Saharan Dust Outbreaks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilcox, Eric M.; Lau, K. M.; Kim, Kyu-Myong

    2010-01-01

    The influence on the summertime North Atlantic Ocean inter-tropical convergence zone (ITCZ) of Saharan dust outbreaks is explored using nine years of continuous satellite observations and atmospheric reanalysis products. During dust outbreak events rainfall along the ITCZ shifts northward by 1 to 4 degrees latitude. Dust outbreaks coincide with warmer lower-tropospheric temperatures compared to low dust conditions, which is attributable to advection of the warm Saharan Air Layer, enhanced subtropical subsidence, and radiative heating of dust. The enhanced positive meridional temperature gradient coincident with dust outbreaks is accompanied by an acceleration of the easterly winds on the n011h side of the African Easterly Jet (AEJ). The center of the positive vorticity region south of the AEJ moves north drawing the center of low-level convergence and ITCZ rainfall northward with it. The enhanced precipitation on the north side of the ITCZ occurs in spite of widespread sea surface temperature cooling north of the ITCZ owing to reduced surface solar insolation by dust scattering.

  1. Postglacial northward expansion and genetic differentiation between migratory and sedentary populations of the broad-tailed hummingbird (Selasphorus platycercus).

    PubMed

    Malpica, Andreia; Ornelas, Juan Francisco

    2014-02-01

    Unlike other migratory hummingbirds in North America, the broad-tailed hummingbird (Selasphorus platycercus) exhibits both long-distance migratory behaviour in the USA and sedentary behaviour in Mexico and Guatemala. We examined the evolution of migration linked to its northward expansion using a multiperspective approach. We analysed variation in morphology, mitochondrial and nuclear DNA, estimated migration rates between migratory and sedentary populations, compared divergence times with the occurrence of Quaternary climate events and constructed species distribution models to predict where migratory and sedentary populations resided during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) and Last Interglacial (LIG) events. Our results are consistent with a recent northward population expansion driven by migration from southern sedentary populations. Phylogeographical analyses and population genetics methods revealed that migratory populations in the USA and sedentary populations in Mexico of the platycercus subspecies form one admixed population, and that sedentary populations from southern Mexico and Guatemala (guatemalae) undertook independent evolutionary trajectories. Species distribution modelling revealed that the species is a niche tracker and that the climate conditions associated with modern obligate migrants in the USA were not present during the LIG, which provides indirect evidence for recent migratory behaviour in broad-tailed hummingbirds on the temporal scale of glacial cycles. The finding that platycercus hummingbirds form one genetic population and that suitable habitat for migratory populations was observed in eastern Mexico during the LIG also suggests that the conservation of overwintering sites is crucial for obligate migratory populations currently facing climate change effects. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. A Northward Shift of the North Atlantic Ocean Intertropical Convergence Zone in Response to Summertime Saharan Dust Outbreaks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilcox, Eric M.; Lau, K. M.; Kim, Kyu-Myong

    2010-01-01

    The influence on the summertime North Atlantic Ocean inter-tropical convergence zone (ITCZ) of Saharan dust outbreaks is explored using nine years of continuous satellite observations and atmospheric reanalysis products. During dust outbreak events rainfall along the ITCZ shifts northward by 1 to 4 degrees latitude. Dust outbreaks coincide with warmer lower-tropospheric temperatures compared to low dust conditions, which is attributable to advection of the warm Saharan Air Layer, enhanced subtropical subsidence, and radiative heating of dust. The enhanced positive meridional temperature gradient coincident with dust outbreaks is accompanied by an acceleration of the easterly winds on the n011h side of the African Easterly Jet (AEJ). The center of the positive vorticity region south of the AEJ moves north drawing the center of low-level convergence and ITCZ rainfall northward with it. The enhanced precipitation on the north side of the ITCZ occurs in spite of widespread sea surface temperature cooling north of the ITCZ owing to reduced surface solar insolation by dust scattering.

  3. Near-Noon Meridional Plasma Flows for IMF Bz>0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koustov, A. V.; Yakymenko, K.

    2016-12-01

    When the IMF Bz component is positive, sunward meridional plasma flows are persistent in the noon sector of the polar cap ionosphere. Such flows can be setup by the lobe reconnection processes which are theoretically expected to be more intense in a summer hemisphere. In this study, we consider velocity data collected by the southern hemisphere SuperDARN radars at Dome-C and McMurdo to demonstrate that indeed the flows are much more frequent and intense (in terms of a typical velocity) during summer time. The clarity of the effect varies with the magnetic latitude of observations and the trends are inconclusive because the data are, very likely, affected by dramatically changing echo occurrence rates from summer to winter. We also show that, statistically speaking, the plasma flow velocity increases with reverse convection electric field intensification and the increase is stronger in summer. The latter is consistent with earlier results based on the northern hemisphere SuperDARN radars.

  4. Microstructure of the IMF turbulences at 2.5 AU

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mavromichalaki, H.; Vassilaki, A.; Marmatsouri, L.; Moussas, X.; Quenby, J. J.; Smith, E. J.

    1995-01-01

    A detailed analysis of small period (15-900 sec) magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulences of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) has been made using Pioneer-11 high time resolution data (0.75 sec) inside a Corotating Interaction Region (CIR) at a heliocentric distance of 2.5 AU in 1973. The methods used are the hodogram analysis, the minimum variance matrix analysis and the cohenrence analysis. The minimum variance analysis gives evidence of linear polarized wave modes. Coherence analysis has shown that the field fluctuations are dominated by the magnetosonic fast modes with periods 15 sec to 15 min. However, it is also shown that some small amplitude Alfven waves are present in the trailing edge of this region with characteristic periods (15-200 sec). The observed wave modes are locally generated and possibly attributed to the scattering of Alfven waves energy into random magnetosonic waves.

  5. IMF / World Bank boards of governors discuss population, migration.

    PubMed

    1994-05-01

    A brief presentation was given of the statements Dr. Nafis Sadik, Executive Director of the UN Fund for Population Activities (UNFPA) and Secretary General of the 1994 International Conference on Population and Development (ICPD), made before a meeting of the International Monetary Fund (IMF) and the World Bank on resource flows to developing countries, population, international trade, and migration. The meeting was attended by finance ministers from 24 countries. The IMF Managing Director gave an overview at the meeting of the world economic situation and the need for international assistance for effective population and family planning programs. Dr. Sadik emphasized this need as a requirement for implementation of the 20-year ICPD Programme of Action. The increased investment was considered beneficial because it would increase life expectancy, lower demand for health and education services, reduce pressure in the job market, reduce economic hardship, and increase social stability. The growth of prosperity was considered by Dr. Sadik to be tied to increased demand for housing, energy, and utilities. A slower and more balanced population growth would allow for government services to meet demands and for the world to adjust to increasing numbers of people. Several ministers supported the call for increased funding of population programs and poverty reduction programs. A special communique by ministers recognized that the connections between economic growth, population, poverty reduction, health, investment in human resources, and environmental degradation must be integrated into population policy. Ministers urged the ICPD to emphasize improvements in primary school enrollment in low income countries, in access to family planning and health services, and in maternal and child mortality rates. Ministers wanted to see increases in the proportion of aid directed to population programs above the current 1.25%. Requests were made for more research into the social

  6. IMF-By effect on the mid-latitude ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maruyama, Takashi; Jin, Hidekatsu

    The primary factor that controls ionospheric total electron content (TEC) variations is solar UV/EUV radiations through the ionization of the thermospheric neutral particles and through the modification of the thermosphere. Changes in temperature and composition of the neutral atmosphere and the atmospheric circulation greatly affect the ionospheric electron density. Because such a relationship between the solar spectral irradiance and the ionospheric TEC is highly complex, we applied an artificial neural network (ANN) technique that has a great capability of function approximation of complex systems to model solar irradiance effects on TEC. Three solar proxies, F_{10.7}, SOHO_SEM_{26-34} EUV emission index, and MgII_c-w-r were chosen as input parameters to the ANN-TEC model. Another channel of energy flow from the sun to the earth’s ionosphere is the solar wind. The am index and several solar wind magnetosphere coupling functions were chosen as additional inputs to the ANN to model the effects of magnetic disturbances. Somewhat minor but interesting effects on TEC variations emerged when the major effects of solar irradiance and magnetic disturbances were removed. We analyzed the time series of the residual error in TEC prediction by using a wavelet transformation, which revealed a periodic increase in error approximately every 27 days in the summer. Possible origins of the error are (1) insufficient modeling of the solar activity effect, (2) lunar tidal forcing, (3) coupling with planetary waves in the lower atmosphere, and (4) solar wind effects. Examinations refused the first three possibilities. We investigated solar wind parameters that are not concerned in geomagnetic disturbances. The 27-day periodic error during the summer disappeared when the IMF-By component and the solar wind velocity were included in the input space of the ANN. Possible explanation of the IMF-By effect is discussed in terms of changes in the thermospheric general circulation pattern.

  7. Magnetohydrodynamic simulation of the bifurcation of tail lobes during intervals with a northward interplanetary magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Ogino, T.; Walker, R.J.

    1984-10-01

    The interaction of the solar wind with the Earth's magnetosphere during a northward interplanetary magnetic field was studied by using a three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic model. For a northward interplanetary magnetic field of 5 nT, the plasma sheer thickens near the noon-midnight meridian plane. When projected onto the polar cap this appears as a narrow channel extending from midnight towards noon. This plasma pattern is associated with three pairs of convection cells. The high latitude sunward convection and northern B/sub z/ Birkeland current are caused by magnetic merging in the polar region.

  8. High latitude cusp signature observations for southward IMF B sub Z

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoeg, Per

    1993-03-01

    High latitude coherent and incoherent radar systems have given much new information about the physical processes at auroral latitudes. This report presents observational features of the Cusp, situated close to magnetic noon at 70-75 degrees inv. latitude, when the Interplanetary Magnetic Field of the Solar Wind is southward and staying southward for more than half a day. For this condition, the observations of the convectional flow pattern comply with the two-cell model of the global convectional flow at auroral and polar cap latitudes. During moderate disturbed magnetic conditions, the temporal extent of the Cusp can be defined by an increased F-region electron density, while the E-region density decreases or stays constant for mostly northward convectional flow in the magnetic noon sector. The temporal extent of this condition is observed to be up to two hours. When the Cusp is overhead of the radars in Sondre Stromfjord, Greenland, the ionograms show enhanced spread-F condition, a phenomenon associated to electron density enhancements in a turbulent plasma, which flows into the polar cap. Ionogram oblique F-region traces are observed in conjunction with drifting patches. Patches drift through the Cusp region, but they are also observed before and after the defined Cusp and seem not to be confined by the latter. Spectral analysis of F-region electron density variations in the noon sector has been performed. Periods down to the Pc5 range are observed more frequently in the northward convectional flow regime near noon than in the adjacent time sectors. The same analysis of the magnetic pulsations from the Greenland Magnetometer Chain give periods of 10 minutes in the whole dawn sector until the time when the Cusp is observed by the radars.

  9. Dependence of O+ escape rate from the Venusian upper atmosphere on IMF directions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masunaga, K.; Futaana, Y.; Stenberg, G.; Barabash, S.; Zhang, T. L.; Fedorov, A.; Okano, S.; Terada, N.

    2013-09-01

    We investigate the dependence of the O+ escape rate from the Venusian upper atmosphere on the upstream interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) direction. Using the data obtained from the Analyser of Space Plasma and Energetic Atoms (ASPERA-4) instrument and the magnetometer (MAG) onboard Venus Express, O+ fluxes observed in the night side region is statistically calculated. The data is classified into two cases: the perpendicular IMF case and the parallel IMF case, where IMF is nearly perpendicular to the solar wind velocity and nearly parallel to it. In the period between June 21 2006 and May 31, 2010, the O+ escape rates of (5.8 ± 2.9) × 10^24 s^-1 (perpendicular IMF case) and (4.9 ± 2.2) × 10^24 s^-1 (parallel IMF case) are obtained. Since these values are not significantly different, we conclude that the IMF direction does not affect the total amount of O+ outflow from Venus. Several acceleration mechanisms must balance each other in order to keep the escape rate constant.

  10. The Panchromatic Hubble Andromeda Treasury: A Bayesian Method for Constraining the High Mass Stellar IMF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weisz, Daniel R.; Fouesneau, M.; Hogg, D. W.; Rix, H. W.; Dalcanton, J. J.; Johnson, L. C.; PHAT Collaboration

    2012-01-01

    The high mass stellar initial mass function (IMF) underpins virtually all of extragalactic astrophysics. However, measurements of the IMF above a few solar masses exhibit significant dispersion, and recent evidence is suggestive of environmentally dependent IMF variations. The Panchromatic Hubble Andromeda Treasury (PHAT)program is a multi-wavelength survey including hundreds of resolved young clusters extending from the near-UV to near-IR, allowing for a systematic study of the high mass stellar IMF for a large set of clusters over a wide range of environments. Here, we present a new Bayesian technique aimed at constraining the properties of the high mass IMF for resolved stars in individual clusters. This method probabilistically considers uncertainties in stellar mass, completeness, and cluster membership, and uses a Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) to sample the posterior probability distribution. The MCMC analysis allows us to constrain both the slope of the IMF and the upper stellar mass limit for a single cluster, while fully exploring all associated uncertainties and degeneracies. We present simulations that explore the potential biases introduced by the number of observed stars, stellar mass uncertainties, completeness, aging effects and age spread, and binary stars. The application of this technique to the young cluster population in the PHAT survey will result in the one the most comprehensive investigations of the high mass stellar IMF to date. PHAT is supported by HST GO-12055 administered by NASA.

  11. High-time resolution measurements of upstream magnetic field and plasma conditions during flux transfer events at the Earth's dayside magnetopause

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacob, Jamey D.; Carrell, Cynthia

    1993-01-01

    We present preliminary results of a study of upstream magnetic field and plasma conditions measured by IRM during flux transfer events observed at the Earth's magnetopause by CCE. This study was designed to determine the importance of various upstream factors in the formation of bipolar magnetic field signatures called flux transfer events (FTEs). Six FTE encounters were examined. In three cases, the two satellites were on similar magnetic field lines. Preliminary investigation showed that fluctuations occurred in the Bz component of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) resulting in a southward field preceding the FTE in all three of these cases. In two of these cases, the changes were characterized by a distinct rotation from a strong southward to a strong northward field. There were also accompanying changes in the dynamic and thermal pressure in the solar wind immediately before the FTE was encountered. Examination of the 3D plasma distributions showed that these pulses were due to the addition of energetic upstreaming foreshock particles. There were no consistent changes in either Bz or the plasma pressure at IRM for the three events when the satellites were not connected by the IMF.

  12. High-time resolution measurements of upstream magnetic field and plasma conditions during flux transfer events at the Earth's dayside magnetopause

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacob, Jamey D.; Carrell, Cynthia

    1993-01-01

    We present preliminary results of a study of upstream magnetic field and plasma conditions measured by IRM during flux transfer events observed at the Earth's magnetopause by CCE. This study was designed to determine the importance of various upstream factors in the formation of bipolar magnetic field signatures called flux transfer events (FTEs). Six FTE encounters were examined. In three cases, the two satellites were on similar magnetic field lines. Preliminary investigation showed that fluctuations occurred in the Bz component of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) resulting in a southward field preceding the FTE in all three of these cases. In two of these cases, the changes were characterized by a distinct rotation from a strong southward to a strong northward field. There were also accompanying changes in the dynamic and thermal pressure in the solar wind immediately before the FTE was encountered. Examination of the 3D plasma distributions showed that these pulses were due to the addition of energetic upstreaming foreshock particles. There were no consistent changes in either Bz or the plasma pressure at IRM for the three events when the satellites were not connected by the IMF.

  13. The statistical challenge of constraining the low-mass IMF in Local Group dwarf galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Badry, Kareem; Weisz, Daniel R.; Quataert, Eliot

    2017-06-01

    We use Monte Carlo simulations to explore the statistical challenges of constraining the characteristic mass (mc) and width (σ) of a lognormal sub-solar initial mass function (IMF) in Local Group dwarf galaxies using direct star counts. For a typical Milky Way (MW) satellite (MV = -8), jointly constraining mc and σ to a precision of ≲ 20 per cent requires that observations be complete to ≲ 0.2 M⊙, if the IMF is similar to the MW IMF. A similar statistical precision can be obtained if observations are only complete down to 0.4 M⊙, but this requires measurement of nearly 100× more stars, and thus, a significantly more massive satellite (MV ˜ -12). In the absence of sufficiently deep data to constrain the low-mass turnover, it is common practice to fit a single-sloped power law to the low-mass IMF, or to fit mc for a lognormal while holding σ fixed. We show that the former approximation leads to best-fitting power-law slopes that vary with the mass range observed and can largely explain existing claims of low-mass IMF variations in MW satellites, even if satellite galaxies have the same IMF as the MW. In addition, fixing σ during fitting leads to substantially underestimated uncertainties in the recovered value of mc (by a factor of ˜4 for typical observations). If the IMFs of nearby dwarf galaxies are lognormal and do vary, observations must reach down to ˜mc in order to robustly detect these variations. The high-sensitivity, near-infrared capabilities of the James Webb Space Telescope and Wide-Field Infrared Survey Telescope have the potential to dramatically improve constraints on the low-mass IMF. We present an efficient observational strategy for using these facilities to measure the IMFs of Local Group dwarf galaxies.

  14. Testing the Universality of the Stellar IMF with Chandra and HST

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coulter, D. A.; Lehmer, B. D.; Eufrasio, R. T.; Kundu, A.; Maccarone, T.; Peacock, M.; Hornschemeier, A. E.; Basu-Zych, A.; Gonzalez, A. H.; Maraston, C.; hide

    2017-01-01

    The stellar initial mass function (IMF), which is often assumed to be universal across unresolved stellar populations, has recently been suggested to be bottom-heavy for massive ellipticals. In these galaxies, the prevalence of gravity-sensitive absorption lines (e.g., Na I and Ca II) in their near-IR spectra implies an excess of low-mass (m < or approx. = 0.5 Stellar Mass) stars over that expected from a canonical IMF observed in low-mass ellipticals. A direct extrapolation of such a bottom-heavy IMF to high stellar masses (m > or approx. = 8 Stellar Mass) would lead to a corresponding deficit of neutron stars and black holes, and therefore of low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs), per unit near-IR luminosity in these galaxies. Peacock et al. searched for evidence of this trend and found that the observed number of LMXBs per unit K-band luminosity (N/LK) was nearly constant. We extend this work using new and archival Chandra X-ray Observatory and Hubble Space Telescope observations of seven low-mass ellipticals where N/LK is expected to be the largest and compare these data with a variety of IMF models to test which are consistent with the observed N/LK. We reproduce the result of Peacock et al., strengthening the constraint that the slope of the IMF at m > or approx. = 8 Stellar Mass must be consistent with a Kroupa-like IMF. We construct an IMF model that is a linear combination of a Milky Way-like IMF and a broken power-law IMF, with a steep slope (alpha1 = 3.84) for stars < 0.5 Stellar Mass (as suggested by near-IR indices), and that flattens out (alpha2 = 2.14) for stars > 0.5 Stellar Mass, and discuss its wider ramifications and limitations.

  15. Testing the Universality of the Stellar IMF with Chandra and HST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coulter, D. A.; Lehmer, B. D.; Eufrasio, R. T.; Kundu, A.; Maccarone, T.; Peacock, M.; Hornschemeier, A. E.; Basu-Zych, A.; Gonzalez, A. H.; Maraston, C.; Zepf, S. E.

    2017-02-01

    The stellar initial mass function (IMF), which is often assumed to be universal across unresolved stellar populations, has recently been suggested to be “bottom-heavy” for massive ellipticals. In these galaxies, the prevalence of gravity-sensitive absorption lines (e.g., Na i and Ca ii) in their near-IR spectra implies an excess of low-mass (m≲ 0.5 {M}⊙ ) stars over that expected from a canonical IMF observed in low-mass ellipticals. A direct extrapolation of such a bottom-heavy IMF to high stellar masses (m≳ 8 {M}⊙ ) would lead to a corresponding deficit of neutron stars and black holes, and therefore of low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs), per unit near-IR luminosity in these galaxies. Peacock et al. searched for evidence of this trend and found that the observed number of LMXBs per unit K-band luminosity (N/{L}K) was nearly constant. We extend this work using new and archival Chandra X-ray Observatory and Hubble Space Telescope observations of seven low-mass ellipticals where N/{L}K is expected to be the largest and compare these data with a variety of IMF models to test which are consistent with the observed N/{L}K. We reproduce the result of Peacock et al., strengthening the constraint that the slope of the IMF at m≳ 8 {M}⊙ must be consistent with a Kroupa-like IMF. We construct an IMF model that is a linear combination of a Milky Way-like IMF and a broken power-law IMF, with a steep slope ({α }1=3.84) for stars <0.5 {M}⊙ (as suggested by near-IR indices), and that flattens out ({α }2=2.14) for stars >0.5 {M}⊙ , and discuss its wider ramifications and limitations.

  16. Gradient in the IMF slope and Sodium abundance of M87 with MUSE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spiniello, C.; Sarzi, M.; Krajnovic, D.

    2016-06-01

    We present evidence for a radial variation of the stellar initial mass function IMF) in the giant elliptical NGC~4486 based on integral-field MUSE data acquired during the first Science Verification run for this instrument. A steepening of the low-mass end of the IMF towards the centre of this galaxy is necessary to explain the increasing strength of several of the optical IMF sensitive features introduced by Spiniello et al., which we observe in high-quality spectra extracted in annular apertures. The need for a varying slope of the IMF emerges when the strength of these IMF-sensitive features, together with that other classical Lick indices mostly sensitive to stellar metallicity and the bundance of α-elements, are fitted with the state-of-the-art stellar population models from Conroy & van Dokkum and Vazdekis et al., which we modified in order to allow variations in IMF slope, metallicity and α-elements abundance. More specifically, adopting 13-Gyr-old, single-age stellar population models and an unimodal IMF we find that the slope of the latter increases from x=1.8 to x=2.6 in the central 25 arcsec of NGC~4486. Varying IMF accompanied by a metallicity gradient, whereas the abundance of α-element appears constant throughout the MUSE field of view. We found metallicity and α-element abundance gradients perfectly consistent with the literature. A sodium over-abundance is necessary (according to CvD12 models) at all the distances (for all the apertures) and a slight gradient of increasing [Na/Fe] ratio towards the center can be inferred. However, in order to completely break the degeneracies between Na-abundance, total metallicity and IMF variation a more detailed investigation that includes the redder NaI line is required.

  17. NORTHWARD EXPANSION OF A MARINE PARASITE: TESTING THE ROLE OF TEMPERATURE ADAPTATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The known range of the eastern oyster (Crassostrea virginica) parasite, Perkinsus marinus, expanded into the northeastern United States in the early 1990s. We used both in vitro and in vivo data to test the hypothesis that the northward expansion was associated with a low-tempera...

  18. NORTHWARD EXPANSION OF A MARINE PARASITE: TESTING THE ROLE OF TEMPERATURE ADAPTATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The known range of the eastern oyster (Crassostrea virginica) parasite, Perkinsus marinus, expanded into the northeastern United States in the early 1990s. We used both in vitro and in vivo data to test the hypothesis that the northward expansion was associated with a low-tempera...

  19. The Southern Ocean’s grip on the northward meridional flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nof, D.

    2003-02-01

    A ‘quasi-island’ approach for examining the meridional flux of warm and intermediate water from the Southern Ocean into the South Atlantic, the South Pacific and the Indian Ocean has recently been proposed ( Nof, 2000a, 2002). This approach considers the continents to be ‘pseudo islands’ in the sense that they are entirely surrounded by water, but have no circulation around them. The method employs an integration of the linearized momentum equations along a closed contour containing the continents. This allows the meridional transport into these oceans to be computed without having to find the detailed solution to the complete wind-thermohaline problem. The solution gives two results; one expected, the other unexpected. It shows that, as expected, about 9±5 Sv of upper and intermediate water enter the South Atlantic from the Southern Ocean. The unexpected result is that the Pacific-Indian Ocean system should contain a ‘shallow’ meridional overturning cell carrying 18±5 Sv. What is meant by shallow here is that the cell does not extend all the way to the bottom (as it does in the Atlantic) but is terminated at mid-depth. (This reflects the fact that there is no bottom water formation in the Pacific.) Both of these calculations rely on the observation that there is almost no flow through the Bering Strait and on the assumption that there is a negligible pressure torque on the Bering Strait’s sill. Here, we present a new and different approach, which does not rely on either of the above two conditions regarding the Bering Strait and yet gives essentially the same result. The approach does not involve any quasi-island calculation but rather employs an integration of the linearized zonal momentum equation along a closed open-water latitudinal belt connecting the tips of South Africa and South America. The integration relies on the existence of a belt (corridor) where the linearized general circulation equations are valid. It allows for a net northward

  20. The role of CMEs and interplanetary shocks in IMF winding angle statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Charles W.; Phillips, John L.

    1996-07-01

    We examine the possible role of CMEs and interplanetary shocks in past analyses of the large-scale winding of the IMF by extracting CME and shock observations from the ISEE-3 dataset and analyzing periods of the disturbed and undisturbed solar wind separately. We use the full ISEE-3 dataset representing the entire L1 mission (1978-1982). We conclude that CMEs, the shocks upstream of CMEs and other interplanetary shocks are responsible for the apparent overwinding of the IMF spiral relative to the Parker prediction. The IMF winding angle asymmetry appears to be preserved after the removal of the interplanetary disturbances.

  1. Observational study of the IMF spiral north and south of the current sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, C. W.; Bieber, J. W.

    1992-01-01

    We have analyzed 23 years of spacecraft observations spanning 27 AU. Our analysis reveals both an overwinding of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) and a sustained asymmetry between the northern and southern hemispheres of the heliosphere. Nonzero azimuthal field components at the source boundary may account for the observed overwinding. The north-south asymmetry, whereby the IMF spiral north of the current sheet is more tightly wound than the IMF spiral south of the current sheet, persists due to unknown sources. It is also shown that there exist significant, correlated departures from the Parker theory in the azimuthal component of the field.

  2. On the electrodynamical state of the auroral ionosphere during northward interplanetary magnetic field: A transpolar arc case study

    SciTech Connect

    Marklund, G.T.; Blomberg, L.G. ); Murphree, J.S.; Elphinstone, R.D. ); Zanetti, L.J.; Erlandson, R.E. ); Sandahl, I. ); de la Beaujardiere, O. ); Opgenoorth, H. ); Rich, F.J. )

    1991-06-01

    The ionospheric electrodynamical state has been reconstructed for a transpolar arc event during northward interplanetary magnetic field conditions. An extensive set of observations by Viking and other satellites and by ground-based radars has been used to provide realistic model input data or to verify the modeling results. The resulting convection pattern is found to be consistent with the Viking electric field and intimately linked to the prevalent auroral distribution. It is characterized by a large evening cell, well extended across noon and split up by two separated potential minima, and a minor crescent-shaped morning cell. The convection signatures are found to vary a lot along the transpolar arc depending on the relative role of the arc-associated convection and the ambient convection. The transpolar arc is generally embedded in antisunward convective flow except near the connection points with the auroral oval, where sunward flow exists in localized regions.

  3. Application of IMF screws to assist internal rigid fixation of jaw fractures: our experiences of 168 cases

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Zhenxi; Gao, Zhibiao; Xiao, Xia; Zhang, Wenjuan; Fan, Xing; Wang, Zhaoling

    2015-01-01

    Intermaxillary fixation (IMF) screws were first introduced to achieve IMF as a kind of bone borne appliance for jaw fractures in 1989. Because this method can overcome many disadvantages associated with tooth borne appliance, IMF screws have been popularly used for jaw fractures since then. From March 2011 to February 2014, we treated 168 cases with single or multiple jaw fractures by open reduction and a total of 705 IMF screws were intraoperatively applied in all the cases to achieve IMF and maintain dental occlusion as an adjuvant to open reduction. The numbers, implantation sites and complications of IMF screws were retrospectively analyzed. In our experience, we found that IMF screws were important to assist open reduction of jaw fractures but their roles should be objectively assessed and the reliability of open reduction and internal rigid fixation must be emphasized. Much attention should be paid when implanting. PMID:26617892

  4. Application of IMF screws to assist internal rigid fixation of jaw fractures: our experiences of 168 cases.

    PubMed

    Bai, Zhenxi; Gao, Zhibiao; Xiao, Xia; Zhang, Wenjuan; Fan, Xing; Wang, Zhaoling

    2015-01-01

    Intermaxillary fixation (IMF) screws were first introduced to achieve IMF as a kind of bone borne appliance for jaw fractures in 1989. Because this method can overcome many disadvantages associated with tooth borne appliance, IMF screws have been popularly used for jaw fractures since then. From March 2011 to February 2014, we treated 168 cases with single or multiple jaw fractures by open reduction and a total of 705 IMF screws were intraoperatively applied in all the cases to achieve IMF and maintain dental occlusion as an adjuvant to open reduction. The numbers, implantation sites and complications of IMF screws were retrospectively analyzed. In our experience, we found that IMF screws were important to assist open reduction of jaw fractures but their roles should be objectively assessed and the reliability of open reduction and internal rigid fixation must be emphasized. Much attention should be paid when implanting.

  5. Polar, Cluster and SuperDARN Evidence for High-Latitude Merging during Southward IMF: Temporal/Spatial Evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maynard, N. C.; Ober, D. M.; Burke, W. J.; Scudder, J. D.; Lester, M.; Dunlap, M.; Wild, J. A.; Grocott, A.; Farrugia, C. J.; Lund, E. J.; hide

    2003-01-01

    Magnetic merging on the dayside magnetopause often occurs at high latitudes. Polar measured fluxes of accelerated ions and wave Poynting vectors while skimming the subsolar magnetopause. The measurements indicate that their source was located to the north of the spacecraft, well removed from expected component merging sites. This represents the first use of wave Poynting flux as a merging discriminator at the magnetopause. We argue that wave Poynting vectors, like accelerated particle fluxes and the Walen tests, are necessary, but not sufficient, conditions, for identifying merging events. The Polar data are complemented with nearly simultaneous measurements from Cluster in the northern cusp, with correlated observations from the SuperDARN radar, to show that the locations and rates of merging vary. Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations are used to place the measurements into a global context. The MHD simulations confirm the existence of a high-latitude merging site and suggest that Polar and SuperDARN observed effects are attributable to both exhaust regions of a temporally varying X-line. A survey of 13 merging events places the location at high latitudes whenever the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) clock angle is less than approximately 150 degrees. While inferred high-latitude merging sites favor the antiparallel merging hypothesis, our data alone cannot exclude the possible existence of a guide field. Merging can even move away from equatorial latitudes when the IMF has a strong southward component. MHD simulations suggest that this happens when the dipole tilt angle increases or when IMF B(sub X) increases the effective dipole tilt.

  6. IMF Screw: An Ideal Intermaxillary Fixation Device During Open Reduction of Mandibular Fracture.

    PubMed

    Sahoo, N K; Mohan, Ritu

    2010-06-01

    Intermaxillary fixation (IMF) is conventionally used for treatment of fractures involving maxillomandibular complex both for closed reduction and as an adjuvant to open reduction. To overcome the cumbersome procedure of tooth borne appliances cortical bone screws were introduced in the year of 1989 to achieve IMF which is essentially a bone borne appliance. In our institution we treated 45 cases of mandibular fracture both single and multiple fractures by open reduction over a period of 24 months. IMF screws were used to achieve dental occlusion in all the cases. Various advantages, disadvantages and complications are discussed. In our institutional experience we found that the IMF screws are an ideal device for temporary intermaxillary fixation for the cases having only mandibular fracture.

  7. Why brown dwarfs are special . Arguments from IMF theory vs. observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thies, I.; Pflamm-Altenburg, J.; Kroupa, P.

    The lower end of the stellar initial mass function (IMF) is the topic of an ongoing debate. Among the most popular myths is the assumption of a continuous fall off from stars to brown dwarfs in both the IMF itself and the binary statistics of stars and BDs. However, recent analytical star-formation models by Hennebelle & Chabrier (2008) or Padoan & Nordlund (2002) could model the stellar part quite well while failing to reproduce the substellar region satisfactorily. We show that the deviation of these model IMFs to the observed ones is essentially just the IMF of the separate substellar population introduced in Thies & Kroupa (2007) and later confirmed numerically in Thies et al. (2010). In addition, new estimates to the binarity and companion mass-ratio distribution resulting directly from the two-population model are presented.

  8. Modelling the Northward Expansion of Culicoides sonorensis (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) under Future Climate Scenarios

    PubMed Central

    Lysyk, Timothy; Johnson, Gregory; Marshall, Shawn; Berger, Kathryn; Cork, Susan Catherine

    2015-01-01

    Climate change is affecting the distribution of pathogens and their arthropod vectors worldwide, particularly at northern latitudes. The distribution of Culicoides sonorensis (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) plays a key role in affecting the emergence and spread of significant vector borne diseases such as Bluetongue (BT) and Epizootic Hemorrhagic Disease (EHD) at the border between USA and Canada. We used 50 presence points for C. sonorensis collected in Montana (USA) and south-central Alberta (Canada) between 2002 and 2012, together with monthly climatic and environmental predictors to develop a series of alternative maximum entropy distribution models. The best distribution model under current climatic conditions was selected through the Akaike Information Criterion, and included four predictors: Vapour Pressure Deficit of July, standard deviation of Elevation, Land Cover and mean Precipitation of May. This model was then projected into three climate change scenarios adopted by the IPCC in its 5th assessment report and defined as Representative Concentration Pathways (RCP) 2.6, 4.5 and 8.5. Climate change data for each predictor and each RCP were calculated for two time points pooling decadal data around each one of them: 2030 (2021–2040) and 2050 (2041–2060). Our projections showed that the areas predicted to be at moderate-high probability of C. sonorensis occurrence would increase from the baseline scenario to 2030 and from 2030 to 2050 for each RCP. The projection also indicated that the current northern limit of C. sonorensis distribution is expected to move northwards to above 53°N. This may indicate an increased risk of Culicoides-borne diseases occurrence over the next decades, particularly at the USA-Canada border, as a result of changes which favor C. sonorensis presence when associated to other factors (i.e. host and pathogen factors). Recent observations of EHD outbreaks in northern Montana and southern Alberta supported our projections and

  9. Implications of a variable IMF for the interpretation of observations of galaxy populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clauwens, Bart; Schaye, Joop; Franx, Marijn

    2016-11-01

    We investigate the effect of a metallicity-dependent stellar initial mass function (IMF), as deduced observationally by Martín-Navarro et al., on the inferred stellar masses and star formation rates (SFRs) of a representative sample of 186 886 SDSS galaxies. Relative to a Chabrier IMF, for which we show the implied masses to be close to minimal, the inferred masses increase in both the low- and high-metallicity regimes due to the addition of stellar remnants and dwarf stars, respectively. The resulting galaxy stellar mass function (GSMF) shifts towards higher masses by 0.5 dex, without affecting the high-mass slope (and thus the need for effective quenching). The implied low-redshift SFR density increases by an order of magnitude. However, these results depend strongly on the assumed IMF parametrization, which is not directly constrained by the observations. Varying the low-end IMF slope instead of the high-end IMF slope, while maintaining the same dwarf-to-giant ratio, results in a much more modest GSMF shift of 0.2 dex and a 10 per cent increase in the SFR density relative to the Chabrier IMF. A bottom-heavy IMF during the late, metal-rich evolutionary stage of a galaxy would help explain the rapid quenching and the bimodality in the galaxy population by on the one hand making galaxies less quenched (due to the continued formation of dwarf stars) and on the other hand reducing the gas consumption time-scale. We conclude that the implications of the observational evidence for a variable IMF could vary from absolutely dramatic to mild but significant.

  10. On the driving forces of the Pangea breakup and northward drift of the Indian subcontinent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Masaki; Hamano, Yozo

    2015-04-01

    During the breakup of the supercontinent Pangea, the Indian subcontinent became isolated from the southern part of Pangea, called Gondwanaland, at around 130 Ma, moved northwards, and eventually collided with Eurasia to form the Himalayas at around 40-50 Ma. The reason why the Indian subcontinent moved at such a high speed of up to c. 20 cm/yr remains a controversial issue in geodynamics. Here, numerical simulation of 3-D spherical mantle convection with an Earth-like Rayleigh number is reported, considering the assembly of highly viscous continental blocks with the configuration of Pangea, to determine the geodynamic mechanisms of the Pangea breakup, the subsequent continental drift, and the high-speed northward drift of the Indian subcontinent. Our numerical simulations approximately reproduced the process of continental drift from the breakup of Pangea at 200 Ma to the present-day continental distribution. These simulations revealed that a major factor in the northward drift of the Indian subcontinent was the large-scale cold mantle downwelling that developed spontaneously in the North Tethys Ocean, attributed to the overall shape of Pangea. The strong lateral mantle flow caused by the high-temperature anomaly beneath Pangea, due to the thermal insulation effect, enhanced the acceleration of the Indian subcontinent during the early stage of the Pangea breakup. The large-scale hot upwelling plumes from the lower mantle, initially located under Africa, might have contributed to the formation of the large-scale cold mantle downwelling in the North Tethys Ocean. References: [1] Yoshida, M., Effects of various lithospheric yield stresses and different mantle-heating modes on the breakup of the Pangea supercontinent, Geophys. Res. Lett., 41(9), 3060-3067, doi:10.1002/2014GL060023, 2014. [2] Yoshida, M. and Y. Hamano, Pangea breakup and northward drift of the Indian subcontinent reproduced by a numerical model of mantle convection, Submitted to Scientific Reports, 2015

  11. Limits to northward drift of the Paleocene Cantwell Formation, central Alaska.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hillhouse, J.W.; Gromme, C.S.

    1982-01-01

    Volcanic rocks of the Paleocene Cantwell Formation in central Alaska apparently originated at a paleolatitude of 83oN (alpha 95 = 9.7o), as indicated by paleomagnetic results. When compared with the Paleocene pole for the North American craton, the 95% confidence limits of the results suggest that terranes N of the Denali fault have moved no more than 550km northward relative to the North American craton since Paleocene time.-Authors

  12. The role of shallow convection in promoting the northward propagation of boreal summer intraseasonal oscillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Fei; Zhao, Jiuwei; Fu, Xiouhua; Huang, Gang

    2017-02-01

    By conducting idealized experiments in a general circulation model (GCM) and in a toy theoretical model, we test the hypothesis that shallow convection (SC) is responsible for explaining why the boreal summer intraseasonal oscillation (BSISO) prefers propagating northward. Two simulations are performed using ECHAM4, with the control run using a standard detrainment rate of SC and the sensitivity run turning off the detrainment rate of SC. These two simulations display dramatically different BSISO characteristics. The control run simulates the realistic northward propagation (NP) of the BSISO, while the sensitivity run with little SC only simulates stationary signals. In the sensitivity run, the meridional asymmetries of vorticity and humidity fields are simulated under the monsoon vertical wind shear (VWS); thus, the frictional convergence can be excited to the north of the BSISO. However, the lack of SC makes the lower and middle troposphere very dry, which prohibits further development of deeper convection. A theoretical BSISO model is also constructed, and the result shows that SC is a key to convey the asymmetric vorticity effect to induce the BSISO to move northward. Thus, both the GCM and theoretical model results demonstrate the importance of SC in promoting the NP of the BSISO.

  13. Observations of the relationship between ionospheric central polar cap and dayside throat convection velocities, and solar wind/IMF driving

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bristow, W. A.; Amata, E.; Spaleta, J.; Marcucci, M. F.

    2015-06-01

    Convection observations from the Southern Hemisphere Super Dual Auroral Radar Network are presented and examined for their relationship to solar wind and interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) conditions, restricted to periods of steady IMF. Analysis is concentrated on two specific regions, the central polar cap and the dayside throat region. An example time series is discussed in detail with specific examples of apparent direct control of the convection velocity by the solar wind driver. Closer examination, however, shows that there is variability in the flows that cannot be explained by the driving. Scatterplots and histograms of observations from all periods in the year 2013 that met the selection criteria are given and their dependence on solar wind driving is examined. It is found that on average the flow velocity depends on the square root of the rate of flux entry to the polar cap. It is also found that there is a large level of variability that is not strongly related to the solar wind driving.

  14. Polar cap potential distributions during periods of positive IMF B(sub y) and B(sub z)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burke, William J.; Basinska, Ewa M.; Maynard, Nelson C.; Hanson, William B.; Slavin, James A.; Winningham, J. David

    1994-01-01

    We compare the DE-2 electric field measurements used by HEPPNER and MAYNARD (1987) to illustrate strongly distorted, BC convection patterns for interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) B(sub z) greater than 0 and large absolute value of B(sub y), with simultaneous detections of particle spectra, plasma drifts and magnetic perturbations. Measured potentials greater than 50 keV, driven by the solar wind speeds exceeding 500 km/s, are greater than published correlation analysis predictions by up to 27%. The potential distributions show only two extrema and thus support the basic conclusion that under these conditions the solar wind/IMF drives two-rather than four-cell convection patterns. However, several aspects of the distorted two-cell convection pattern must be revised. In addition to the strong east-west convection in the vicinity of the cusp, indicated by Heppner and Maynard, we also detect comparable components of sunward (equatorward) plasma flow. Combined equipotential and particle precipitation distributions indicate the presence of a lobe cell embedded within the larger, afternoon reconnection cell. Both types rotate in the same sense, with the lobe cell carrying 20-40% of the total afternoon cell potential. We detected no lobe cell within morning convection cell.

  15. Initial (prefibrotic) stages of idiopathic (primary) myelofibrosis (IMF) - a clinicopathological study.

    PubMed

    Thiele, J; Kvasnicka, H M; Boeltken, B; Zankovich, R; Diehl, V; Fischer, R

    1999-11-01

    A clinicopathological follow-up study including sequential bone marrow biopsies was performed on 79 patients with idiopathic (primary) myelofibrosis (IMF) to characterize initial (prefibrotic) stages and to elucidate whether development of fibrosis was accompanied by corresponding clinical findings. For this purpose our cohort of patients was divided into two groups of which the first presented with the generally accepted signs and symptoms of IMF (group I; n = 60). Most patients of the second group (group II; n = 19) showed mild to moderate therapy-refractory anemia, minimal to slight splenomegaly and frequently thrombocytosis, but no bone marrow fibrosis at onset. Hematopoiesis was consistent with a striking hypercellularity in comparison to the age-related involution by adipose tissue, a conspicuous clustering and histotopographic dislocation of megakaryocytes, a neutrophil granulocytic proliferation and a reduction of erythropoietic islets with arrest of maturation. Most remarkable was the dysplastic cytology of megakaryocytes with a definitive deviation of differentiation resulting in bizarre forms. Follow-up examinations revealed that at later stages group II patients were not distinguishable from the first group with more advanced IMF. For this reason, these patients were regarded as presenting initial, prefibrotic IMF characterized by distinctive bone marrow features at the beginning. The prominent abnormalities of megakaryopoiesis together with the granulocytic proliferation were extremely helpful to differentiate prefibrotic IMF with accompanying thrombocythemia from essential thrombocythemia (ET). Dynamics of fiber progression were calculated by regarding increase in density per time. Speed of progression during the first year of observation proved to be significantly higher in group II patients with prefibrotic IMF in comparison to full-blown cases (group I). In conclusion, with respect to prospective clinical trials, diagnostic criteria for IMF should

  16. A study on delay between peak Dst and IMF, solar wind parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aslam A., M.; Gwal, Ashok Kumar; Tripathi, Sharad Chandra; Mansoori, Azad Ahmad; Khan, Parvaiz A.; Waheed, Malik Abdul; Bhawre, Purushottam

    This investigation presents the statistical study on the nature and association of time delay (between IMF Bz and Dst) with various solar wind parameters and Inter planetary Magnetic field components. The study integrally covers all (634 storms) the geomagnetic storms observed during 1996 to 2011. We calculated the time delay (∆T) between the peak values of IMF Bz and minimum Dst for each event and statistically investigated its relation with various solar wind and IMF parameters. For this analysis we are taking Solar wind parameters; Velocity, Density, Plasma beta and Temperature as well as IMF Bz, into consideration. We have categorized the storms in to three categories based on the Dst Index as weak (-30nT ≤ Dst ≤ -50nT), moderate (-50nT ≤ Dst ≤ -1000nT) and intense (Dst ≤ -100nT) storms. The relation of delay with solar wind parameters and IMF components were studied separately for different classes of storms and for different delays viz. 0,1,2,3,4. From our analysis we are able to draw some interesting inferences. The characteristic feature describing the geoeffectiveness of the IMF is its z-component; Bz, and the solar wind electric field, VBz, while among solar wind parameters, density seems to have almost no association with the storm intensity. The time delay (∆T) between peak values of IMF Bz and minimum Dst is quite large and varies from 0-10 hours. However, it was found that a major percentage (more than 80%) of the storms have a 0 - 4 hour delay. An attempt has also been made to extract the role of electric field in the process.

  17. Interdecadal change of the northward jump time of the western Pacific subtropical high in association with the Pacific decadal oscillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Tianshu; Shen, Qian; Wang, Kuo; Zhang, Zhisen; Zhao, Junhu

    2015-02-01

    In this paper, the northward jump time of the western Pacific subtropical high (WPSH) is defined and analyzed on the interdecadal timescale. The results show that under global warming, significant interdecadal changes have occurred in the time of the WPSH northward jumps. From 1951 to 2012, the time of the first northward jump of WPSH has changed from "continuously early" to "continuously late", with the transition occurring in 1980. The time of the second northward jump of WPSH shows a similar change, with the transition occurring in 1978. In this study, we offer a new perspective by using the time of the northward jump of WPSH to explain the eastern China summer rainfall pattern change from "north-abundant-south-below-average" to "south-abundant-north-below-average" at the end of the 1970s. The interdecadal change in the time of the northward jump of WPSH corresponds not only with the summer rainfall pattern, but also with the Pacific decadal oscillation (PDO). The WPSH northward jump time corresponding to the cold (warm) phase of the PDO is early (late). Although the PDO and the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) both greatly influence the time of the two northward jumps of WPSH, the PDO's effect is noticed before the ENSO's by approximately 1-2 months. After excluding the ENSO influence, we derive composite vertical atmospheric circulation for different phases of the PDO. The results show that during the cold (warm) phase of the PDO, the atmospheric circulations at 200, 500, and 850 hPa all contribute to an earlier (later) northward jump of the WPSH.

  18. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Gamma Vel cluster membership and IMF (Prisinzano+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prisinzano, L.; Damiani, F.; Micela, G.; Jeffries, R. D.; Franciosini, E.; Sacco, G. G.; Frasca, A.; Klutsch, A.; Lanzafame, A.; Alfaro, E. J.; Biazzo, K.; Bonito, R.; Bragaglia, A.; Caramazza, M.; Vallenari, A.; Carraro, G.; Costado, M. T.; Flaccomio, E.; Jofre, P.; Lardo, C.; Monaco, L.; Morbidelli, L.; Mowlavi, N.; Pancino, E.; Randich, S.; Zaggia, S.

    2016-04-01

    We derived a list as complete as possible of confirmed members of the young open cluster Gamma Velorum, with the aim of deriving general cluster properties such as the IMF. We used all available spectroscopic membership indicators within the Gaia-ESO public archive, based on spectra acquired with FLAMES a the VLT using the GIRAFFE intermediate-resolution spectrograph. In addition, we used literature photometry and X-ray data. For each membership criterion, we derived the most complete list of candidate cluster members. Then, we considered photometry, gravity, and radial velocities as necessary conditions for selecting a subsample of candidates whose membership was confirmed by using the lithium and Halpha lines and X-rays as youth indicators. Table 5 lists the fundamental parameters of the confirmed and possible members in Gamma Velorum, i.e. photometry, radial velocities, equivalent widths of the lithium line, the Halpha activity index, the X-ray flag, the gravity gamma index and the stellar masses. Finally the binarity and membership flags are given. (1 data file).

  19. Large-Scale Structures in Earth Foreshock Waves during Radial IMF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganse, Urs; Pfau-Kempf, Yann; Hoilijoki, Sanni; von Alfthan, Sebastian; Palmroth, Minna; Vainio, Rami

    2016-04-01

    Wave instabilities in the foreshock region of Earth's bow shock lead to formation of magnetic field and density fluctuations, commonly observed by spacecraft as 30-second waves. These waves are oblique to the interplanetary magnetic field, with the mechanism leading to oblique propagation still under discussion. Using the VLASIATOR (http://vlasiator.fmi.fi) global hybrid-Vlasov simulation code, we performed runs of radial and near-radial IMF conditions and were able to reproduce the development of these oblique foreshock wave instabilities, revealing a peculiar global structure, in which waves with different wave-vector directions are arranged around central spines, which are spatially offset from the bow shock's nose. We present analysis of the waves' growth behaviour and combine them with artificial observations, comparing to in-situ spacecraft data. Furthermore, we employed a test particle approach to investigate the formation mechanism of the instabilities' large-scale structure, and found that a coupling between the microphysics of wave-particle interaction and global-scale shock and foreshock geometry is essential to explain them.

  20. A contribution to ULF activity in the Pc 3-4 range correlated with IMF radial orientation. [geomagnetic micropulsations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenstadt, E. W.; Olson, J. V.

    1977-01-01

    The paper describes an experiment to determine whether the radial orientation of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) is associated with ULF activity in the Pc 3-4 range. Data are obtained from base levels, undisturbed intervals, IMF and disturbance selection, and trigonometric correlation. The results obtained are discussed, noting particularly that for low Kp, the probability of enhanced amplitude noise rises as IMF orientation with respect to the nominal solar wind flow decreases in both Pc 3 and Pc 4 channels.

  1. Response of Saturn's Current Sheet Structure to Changes in the Solar Wind Dynamic Pressure and IMF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, K. C.; Jia, X.; Gombosi, T. I.

    2010-12-01

    Using our global MHD model of Saturn’s magnetosphere, we investigate the location, shape and motion of Saturn’s current sheet under a variety of situations. Our global MHD model self consistently treats the entire magnetosphere and includes magnetospheric plasma sources from a major disk-like source from Enceladus and the rings and a secondary toroidal plasma source from Titan. The model produces solutions which are not constrained to be symmetric therefore the results are quite useful in trying to extend previous models that have been generated using Cassini data. Because we can carefully control the inputs to our MHD model, we do not have to worry about separating variations due to local time, varying upstream conditions, spacecraft motion or changes in the mass loading rate that often make interpreting the data complicated. We will present results for both steady state, as well as time varying solar wind conditions. Simulations with constant solar wind conditions allow us to study the effect that upsteam dynamic pressure has on both the shape and size of the current sheet. In addition, we will present results from simulations that include sudden changes in the solar wind dynamics pressure as well as the IMF direction. These simulations will allow us to study the current sheet response and to look for features such as current sheet flapping. Our previous studies have shown that the current sheet in our model does in fact reproduce the “bowl-like” behavior expect at most local times. However, at dusk, the current sheet is often quite warped. We will examine the cause of this warping and under what conditions it occurs.

  2. Geomagnetic disturbances and pulsations as a high-latitude response to considerable alternating IMF Variations during the magnetic storm recovery phase (Case study: May 30, 2003)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levitin, A. E.; Kleimenova, N. G.; Gromova, L. I.; Antonova, E. E.; Dremukhina, L. A.; Zelinsky, N. R.; Gromov, S. V.; Malysheva, L. M.

    2015-11-01

    Features of high-latitude geomagnetic disturbances during the magnetic storm ( Dst min =-144 nT) recovery phase were studied based on the observations on the Scandinavian profile of magnetometers (IMAGE). Certain non-typical effects that occur under the conditions of large positive IMF Bz values (about +20-25 nT) and large negative IMF By values (to-20 nT) were revealed. Thus, an intense (about 400 nT) negative bay in the X component of the magnetic field (the polar electrojet, PE) was observed in the dayside sector at geomagnetic latitudes higher than 70°. As the IMF B y reverses its sign from negative to positive, the bay in the X component was replaced by the bay in the Y component. The possible distribution of the fieldaligned currents of the NBZ system was analyzed based on the CHAMP satellite data. The results were compared with the position of the auroral oval (the OVATION model) and the ion and electron flux observations on the DMSP satellite. Analysis of the particle spectra indicated that these spectra correspond to the auroral oval dayside sector crossings by the satellite, i.e., to the dayside projection of the plasma ring surrounding the Earth. Arguments are presented for the assumption that the discussed dayside electrojet ( PE) is localized near the polar edge of the dayside auroral oval in a the closed magnetosphere. The features of the spectral and spatial dynamics of intense Pc5 geomagnetic pulsations were studied in this time interval. It was established that the spectrum of high-latitude (higher than ~70°) pulsations does not coincide with the spectrum of fluctuations in the solar wind and IMF. It was shown that Pc5 geomagnetic pulsations can be considered as resonance oscillations at latitudes lower than 70° and apparently reflect fluctuations in turbulent sheets adjacent to the magnetopause (the low-latitude boundary layer, a cusp throat) or in a turbulent magnetosheath at higher latitudes.

  3. Constraints on the low-mass IMF in young super-star clusters in starburst galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greissl, Julia Jennifer

    2010-12-01

    As evidence for variations in the initial mass function (IMF) in nearby star forming regions remains elusive we are forced to expand our search to more extreme regions of star formation. Starburst galaxies, which contain massive young clusters have in the past been reported to have IMFs different than that characterizing the field star IMF. In this thesis we use high signal-to-noise near-infrared spectra to place constraints on the shape of the IMF in extreme regions of extragalactic star formation and also try to understand the star formation history in these regions. Through high signal-to-noise near-infrared spectra it is possible to directly detect low-mass PMS stars in unresolved young super-star clusters, using absorption features that trace cool stars. Combining Starburst99 and available PMS tracks it is then possible to constrain the IMF in young super-star clusters using a combination of absorption lines each tracing different ranges of stellar masses and comparing observed spectra to models. Our technique can provide a direct test of the universality of the IMF compared to the Milky Way. We have obtained high signal-to-noise H- and K-band spectra of two young super-star clusters in the starburst galaxies NGC 4039/39 and NGC 253 in order to constrain the low-mass IMF and star formation history in the clusters. The cluster in NGC 4038/39 shows signs of youth such as thermal radio emission and strong hydrogen emission lines as well as late-type absorption lines indicative of cool stars. The strength and ratio of these absorption lines cannot be reproduced through either late-type pre-main sequence stars or red supergiants alone. We interpret the spectrum as a superposition of two star clusters of different ages over the physical region of 90 pc our spectrum represents. One cluster is young (≤ 3 Myr) and is responsible for part of the late-type absorption features, which are due to PMS stars in the cluster, and the hydrogen emission lines. The second

  4. The dependence of the LLBL thickness on IMF Bz and By components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Znatkova, S. S.; Antonova, E. E.; Pulinets, M. S.; Kirpichev, I. P.; Riazantseva, M. O.

    2016-07-01

    The thickness of the low latitude boundary layer (LLBL) is studied as a function of interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) using the data of THEMIS mission. The data from intersections of LLBL by Themis-A and -C satellites are analyzed. Solar wind parameters are provided by Themis-B satellite located before the bow shock. We use earlier developed method of LLBL thickness determination based on the analysis of the variation of plasma velocity in the layer perpendicular to the magnetopause. The database for the present analysis consists of 109 single satellite LLBL crossings where the values of LLBL thickness are obtained. The time shift of solar wind propagation from the spacecraft performing measurements outside the bow shock to the LLBL is taken into account. We analyze the dependence of LLBL thickness on IMF Bz and By using data of IMF measurements with 3 s resolution and produce the 180 s averaging of these data. Large scattering of the values of LLBL thickness and the weak dependence on IMF is demonstrated. Dawn-dusk asymmetry of LLBL thickness is not observed. The dependence of LLBL thickness on IMF clock angle is discussed.

  5. Influence of mapping function parameters on global GPS network analyses: Comparisons between NMF and IMF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vey, S.; Dietrich, R.; Fritsche, M.; Rülke, A.; Rothacher, M.; Steigenberger, P.

    2006-01-01

    One major part in the error budget of GPS measurements is the imperfect modeling of the tropospheric delay. By processing a global network of 195 stations we have compared two different mapping techniques: (1) the commonly used Niell hydrostatic mapping function (NMF) and (2) the isobaric hydrostatic mapping function (IMF) based on numerical weather fields. The two solutions reveal significant differences in the derived zenith total delay (ZTD) parameters and site positions. The largest differences occur in Antarctica, where the annual mean heights differ by up to 15 mm. We infer that the significant differences are related to model deficiencies in NMF since a) IMF improves the repeatability in station heights in high southern latitudes significantly, and b) using IMF reduces the dependence of the solution on the elevation cut-off angle by about 20%. In conclusion, the use of mapping function (MF) parameters based on meteorological data is strongly recommended for global GPS analyses.

  6. Exploring the IMF of star clusters: a joint SLUG and LEGUS effort

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashworth, G.; Fumagalli, M.; Krumholz, M. R.; Adamo, A.; Calzetti, D.; Chandar, R.; Cignoni, M.; Dale, D.; Elmegreen, B. G.; Gallagher, J. S., III; Gouliermis, D. A.; Grasha, K.; Grebel, E. K.; Johnson, K. E.; Lee, J.; Tosi, M.; Wofford, A.

    2017-08-01

    We present the implementation of a Bayesian formalism within the Stochastically Lighting Up Galaxies (slug) stellar population synthesis code, which is designed to investigate variations in the initial mass function (IMF) of star clusters. By comparing observed cluster photometry to large libraries of clusters simulated with a continuously varying IMF, our formalism yields the posterior probability distribution function (PDF) of the cluster mass, age and extinction, jointly with the parameters describing the IMF. We apply this formalism to a sample of star clusters from the nearby galaxy NGC 628, for which broad-band photometry in five filters is available as part of the Legacy ExtraGalactic UV Survey (LEGUS). After allowing the upper-end slope of the IMF (α3) to vary, we recover PDFs for the mass, age and extinction that are broadly consistent with what is found when assuming an invariant Kroupa IMF. However, the posterior PDF for α3 is very broad due to a strong degeneracy with the cluster mass, and it is found to be sensitive to the choice of priors, particularly on the cluster mass. We find only a modest improvement in the constraining power of α3 when adding Hα photometry from the companion Hα-LEGUS survey. Conversely, Hα photometry significantly improves the age determination, reducing the frequency of multi-modal PDFs. With the aid of mock clusters, we quantify the degeneracy between physical parameters, showing how constraints on the cluster mass that are independent of photometry can be used to pin down the IMF properties of star clusters.

  7. Latitudinal and longitudinal displacement of cusp ion precipitation controlled by IMF By and Bz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asai, K. T.; Maezawa, K.; Mukai, T.; Hayakawa, H.

    2005-07-01

    Dependence of the location of the cusp precipitation on the orientation of interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) is investigated using data from the Akebono satellite taken at altitudes of several thousands of km. More than a hundred cusp precipitation events have been identified with the low-energy particle detector (LEP) onboard Akebono. The observed energy spectra of ions precipitating at the cusp are dispersed by the convection motion of field lines. We pay special attention to the location where precipitating ions have the highest energy in the energy dispersion curve as recorded along the satellite's path; such location would represent the one nearest to the foot point of the dayside reconnection line (we here assume that the cusp ion injection is triggered by the magnetopause reconnection). We study this location as a proxy for the foot point of the reconnection line and call it "ion entry point" in this paper. Our analysis shows that the location of the "ion entry point" has a strong dependence on the sign and magnitude of IMF By and Bz . By and Bz have almost orthogonal effects on the location of the entry point, with the latitudinal displacement linearly related to Bz, and the longitudinal displacement linearly related to By . We find that the Bz dependence of the ion entry point is represented by a single regression line for entire range of Bz irrespective of its north/south polarity. We also find that the By dependence is larger for positive Bz than for negative Bz . The distribution of ion entry points for positive IMF By is almost a mirror image of that for negative IMF By with respect to the noon-midnight meridian plane. We discuss the dependence of the "ion entry point" on the IMF from the viewpoint of where and how the magnetopause reconnection (merging) occurs for various orientations of IMF.

  8. The IMF-SFH connection in massive early-type galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreras, I.; Weidner, C.; Vazdekis, A.; La Barbera, F.

    The stellar initial mass function (IMF) is one of the fundamental pillars in studies of stellar populations. It is the mass distribution of stars at birth, and it is traditionally assumed to be universal, adopting generic functions constrained by resolved (i.e. nearby) stellar populations (e.g., Salpeter 1955; Kroupa 2001; Chabrier 2003). However, for the vast majority of cases, stars are not resolved in galaxies. Therefore, the interpretation of the photo-spectroscopic observables is complicated by the many degeneracies present between the properties of the unresolved stellar populations, including IMF, age distribution, and chemical composition. The overall good match of the photometric and spectroscopic observations of galaxies with population synthesis models, adopting standard IMF choices, made this issue a relatively unimportant one for a number of years. However, improved models and observations have opened the door to constraints on the IMF in unresolved stellar populations via gravity-sensitive spectral features. At present, there is significant evidence of a non-universal IMF in early-type galaxies (ETGs), with a trend towards a dwarf-enriched distribution in the most massive systems (see, e.g., van Dokkum & Conroy 2010; Ferreras et al. 2013; La Barbera et al. 2013). Dynamical and strong-lensing constraints of the stellar M/L in similar systems give similar results, with heavier M/L in the most massive ETGs (see, e.g., Cappellari et al. 2012; Posacki et al. 2015). Although the interpretation of the results is still open to discussion (e.g., Smith 2014; La Barbera 2015), one should consider the consequences of such a bottom-heavy IMF in massive galaxies.

  9. Update on ONC's Substellar IMF: A Second Peak in the Brown Dwarf Regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drass, Holger; Bayo, A.; Chini, R.; Haas, M.

    2017-06-01

    The Orion Nebular Cluster (ONC) has become the prototype cluster for studying the Initial Mass Function (IMF). In a deep JHK survey of the ONC with HAWK-I we detected a large population of 900 Brown Dwarfs and Planetary Mass Object candidates presenting a pronounced second peak in the substellar IMF. One of the most obvious issues of this result is the verification of cluster membership. The analysis so far was mainly based on statistical consideration. In this presentation I will show the results from using different high-resolution extinction map to determine the ONC membership.

  10. More-frequent extreme northward shifts of eastern Indian Ocean tropical convergence under greenhouse warming

    PubMed Central

    Weller, Evan; Cai, Wenju; Min, Seung-Ki; Wu, Lixin; Ashok, Karumuri; Yamagata, Toshio

    2014-01-01

    The Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) in the tropical eastern Indian Ocean exhibits strong interannual variability, often co-occurring with positive Indian Ocean Dipole (pIOD) events. During what we identify as an extreme ITCZ event, a drastic northward shift of atmospheric convection coincides with an anomalously strong north-minus-south sea surface temperature (SST) gradient over the eastern equatorial Indian Ocean. Such shifts lead to severe droughts over the maritime continent and surrounding islands but also devastating floods in southern parts of the Indian subcontinent. Understanding future changes of the ITCZ is therefore of major scientific and socioeconomic interest. Here we find a more-than-doubling in the frequency of extreme ITCZ events under greenhouse warming, estimated from climate models participating in the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project phase 5 that are able to simulate such events. The increase is due to a mean state change with an enhanced north-minus-south SST gradient and a weakened Walker Circulation, facilitating smaller perturbations to shift the ITCZ northwards. PMID:25124737

  11. More-frequent extreme northward shifts of eastern Indian Ocean tropical convergence under greenhouse warming.

    PubMed

    Weller, Evan; Cai, Wenju; Min, Seung-Ki; Wu, Lixin; Ashok, Karumuri; Yamagata, Toshio

    2014-08-15

    The Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) in the tropical eastern Indian Ocean exhibits strong interannual variability, often co-occurring with positive Indian Ocean Dipole (pIOD) events. During what we identify as an extreme ITCZ event, a drastic northward shift of atmospheric convection coincides with an anomalously strong north-minus-south sea surface temperature (SST) gradient over the eastern equatorial Indian Ocean. Such shifts lead to severe droughts over the maritime continent and surrounding islands but also devastating floods in southern parts of the Indian subcontinent. Understanding future changes of the ITCZ is therefore of major scientific and socioeconomic interest. Here we find a more-than-doubling in the frequency of extreme ITCZ events under greenhouse warming, estimated from climate models participating in the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project phase 5 that are able to simulate such events. The increase is due to a mean state change with an enhanced north-minus-south SST gradient and a weakened Walker Circulation, facilitating smaller perturbations to shift the ITCZ northwards.

  12. Northward expansion of paddy rice in northeastern Asia during 2000-2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, J.; Xiao, X.; Zhang, G.; Menarguez, M. A.; Choi, C. Y.; Qin, Y.; Luo, P.; Zhang, Y.; Moore, B.

    2016-04-01

    Paddy rice in monsoon Asia plays an important role in global food security and climate change. Here we documented annual dynamics of paddy rice areas in the northern frontier of Asia, including northeastern (NE) China, North Korea, South Korea, and Japan, from 2000 to 2014 through analysis of satellite images. The paddy rice area has increased by 120% (2.5 to 5.5 million ha) in NE China, in comparison to a decrease in South Korea and Japan, and the paddy rice centroid shifted northward from 41.16°N to 43.70°N (~310 km) in this period. Market, technology, policy, and climate together drove the rice expansion in NE China. The increased use of greenhouse nurseries, improved rice cultivars, agricultural subsidy policy, and a rising rice price generally promoted northward paddy rice expansion. The potential effects of large rice expansion on climate change and ecosystem services should be paid more attention to in the future.

  13. Comparative study on microbial removal in immersed membrane filtration (IMF) with and without powdered activated carbon (PAC).

    PubMed

    Ujang, Z; Au, Y L; Nagaoka, H

    2002-01-01

    This paper describes an investigation on the effect of microbial removal using IMF for high quality drinking water production. The comparison of IMF and IMF-PAC configuration was carried out in the study to highlight the importance of PAC in the system. The specific objective of this study was to study the effect of PAC adsorption in the IMF-PAC system particularly in removing microbial substances from contaminated raw water. A bench scale IMF-PAC configuration using a flat sheet microfiltration membrane was set up for experimental purposes. Experimentally, the result has shown high removal of microbial substances with the IMF-PAC system compared to IMF. The result of E. coli removal achieved was below the detectable level due to the microbial size, which is bigger than membrane pore size. The addition of PAC has shown a direct effect on total microbial removal. The adsorption of microbial onto PAC surfaces reduced the amount of smaller microbial present in permeate samples. As a conclusion, the configuration of IMF is a promising separation process in removing microbial substances, especially when the system is combined with PAC.

  14. Spatially resolved variations of the IMF mass normalization in early-type galaxies as probed by molecular gas kinematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Timothy A.; McDermid, Richard M.

    2017-01-01

    We here present the first spatially resolved study of the initial mass function (IMF) in external galaxies derived using a dynamical tracer of the mass-to-light ratio (M/L). We use the kinematics of relaxed molecular gas discs in seven early-type galaxies (ETGs) selected from the ATLAS3D survey to dynamically determine M/L gradients. These M/L gradients are not very strong in the inner parts of these objects, and galaxies that do show variations are those with the highest specific star formation rates. Stellar population parameters derived from star formation histories are then used in order to estimate the stellar IMF mismatch parameter, and shed light on its variation within ETGs. Some of our target objects require a light IMF, otherwise their stellar population masses would be greater than their dynamical masses. In contrast, other systems seem to require heavier IMFs to explain their gas kinematics. Our analysis again confirms that IMF variation seems to be occurring within massive ETGs. We find good agreement between our IMF normalizations derived using molecular gas kinematics and those derived using other techniques. Despite this, we do not see find any correlation between the IMF normalization and galaxy dynamical properties or stellar population parameters, either locally or globally. In the future, larger studies which use molecules as tracers of galaxy dynamics can be used to help us disentangle the root cause of IMF variation.

  15. Magnetospheric Magnetic Reconnection with Southward IMF by a 3D EMPM Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishikawa, K.-I.; Yan, X. Y.; Cai, D. S.; Lembege, B.

    2004-01-01

    We report our new simulation results on magnetospheric magnetic reconnection with southward IMF using a 3D EMPM model, with greater resolution and more particles using the parallelized 3D HPF TRISTAN code on VPP5000 supercomputer. Main parameters used in the new simulation are: domain size is 215 x 145 x 145, grid size = 0.5 Earth radius, initial particle number is 16 per cell, the IMF is southward. Arrival of southward IMF will cause reconnection in the magnetopause, thus allowing particles to enter into the inner magnetosphere. Sunward and tailward high particle flow are observed by satellites, and these phenomena are also observed in the simulation near the neutral line (X line) of the near-Earth magnetotail. This high particle flow goes along with the reconnected island. The magnetic reconnection process contributes to direct plasma entry between the magnetosheath to the inner magnetosphere and plasma sheet, in which the entry process eats the magnetosheath plasma to plasma sheet temperatures. We investigate magnetic, electric fields, density, and current during this magnetic reconnection with southward IMF. Further investigation with this simulation will provide insight into unsolved problems, such as the triggering of storms and substorms, and the storm-substorm relationship. New results will be presented at the meeting.

  16. Non-IMF mandibular fracture reduction techniques: A review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Batbayar, Enkh-Orchlon; van Minnen, Baucke; Bos, Ruud R M

    2017-08-01

    Intermaxillary fixation (IMF) techniques are commonly used in mandibular fracture treatment to reduce bone fragments and re-establish normal occlusion. However, non-IMF reduction techniques such as repositioning forceps may be preferable due to their quick yet adequate reduction. The purpose of this paper is to assess which non-IMF reduction techniques and reduction forceps are available for fracture reduction in the mandible. A systematic search was performed in the databases of Pubmed and EMBASE. The search was updated until February 2016 and no initial date and language preference was set. 14 articles were selected for this review, among them ten articles related to reduction forceps and four articles describing other techniques. Thus, modification and design of reduction forceps and other reduction techniques are qualitatively described. Few designs of repositioning forceps have been proposed in the literature. Quick and adequate reduction of fractures seems possible with non-IMF techniques resulting in anatomic repositioning and shorter operation time, especially in cases with good interfragmentary stability. Further development and clinical testing of reduction forceps is necessary to establish their future role in maxillofacial fracture treatment. Copyright © 2017 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Efficient epileptic seizure detection by a combined IMF-VoE feature.

    PubMed

    Qi, Yu; Wang, Yueming; Zheng, Xiaoxiang; Zhang, Jianmin; Zhu, Junming; Guo, Jianping

    2012-01-01

    Automatic seizure detection from the electroen-cephalogram (EEG) plays an important role in an on-demand closed-loop therapeutic system. A new feature, called IMF-VoE, is proposed to predict the occurrence of seizures. The IMF-VoE feature combines three intrinsic mode functions (IMFs) from the empirical mode decomposition of a EEG signal and the variance of the range between the upper and lower envelopes (VoE) of the signal. These multiple cues encode the intrinsic characteristics of seizure states, thus are able to distinguish them from the background. The feature is tested on 80.4 hours of EEG data with 10 seizures of 4 patients. The sensitivity of 100% is obtained with a low false detection rate of 0.16 per hour. Average time delays are 19.4s, 13.2s, and 10.7s at the false detection rates of 0.16 per hour, 0.27 per hour, and 0.41 per hour respectively, when different thresholds are used. The result is competitive among recent studies. In addition, since the IMF-VoE is compact, the detection system is of high computational efficiency and able to run in real time.

  18. Dual E × B flow responses in the dayside ionosphere to a sudden IMF By rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eriksson, S.; Maimaiti, M.; Baker, J. B. H.; Trattner, K. J.; Knipp, D. J.; Wilder, F. D.

    2017-07-01

    We report for the first time a dual transition state in the dayside ionosphere following a sudden rotation of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) in the upstream magnetosheath from IMF By < 0 to By > 0 during Bz < 0. E × B drifts respond with different time delays in the dayside auroral zone and high-latitude polar cap with an initial 11 min transition state of oppositely directed E × B drifts coexisting at these locations. This is followed by a 6-8 min rotation of lower latitude E × B flow from dusk to dawn. We propose that this sequence of events is consistent with two separate X lines coexisting on the subsolar and lobe magnetopause. Time delays are proposed for merged flux of the draped preceding IMF to exit the subsolar region before the new IMF may be processed along a newly reconfigured component reconnection X line. Finally, a strong direct correlation is observed between magnetosheath plasma density and auroral zone E × B speeds.

  19. MOND and IMF variations in early-type galaxies from ATLAS3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tortora, C.; Romanowsky, A. J.; Cardone, V. F.; Napolitano, N. R.; Jetzer, Ph.

    2014-02-01

    Modified Newtonian Dynamics (MOND) represents a phenomenological alternative to dark matter (DM) for the missing mass problem in galaxies and clusters of galaxies. We analyse the central regions of a local sample of ˜220 early-type galaxies from the ATLAS3D survey, to see if the data can be reproduced without recourse to DM. We estimate dynamical masses in the MOND context through Jeans analysis and compare to ATLAS3D stellar masses from stellar population synthesis. We find that the observed stellar mass-velocity dispersion relation is steeper than expected assuming MOND with a fixed stellar initial mass function (IMF) and a standard value for the acceleration parameter a0. Turning from the space of observables to model space (a) fixing the IMF, a universal value for a0 cannot be fitted, while, (b) fixing a0 and leaving the IMF free to vary, we find that it is `lighter' (Chabrier like) for low-dispersion galaxies and `heavier' (Salpeter like) for high dispersions. This MOND-based trend matches inferences from Newtonian dynamics with DM and from the detailed analysis of spectral absorption lines, adding to the converging lines of evidence for a systematically varying IMF.

  20. On The Upper IMF in Nearby Dwarf Galaxies: Modeling the Effects of Star Formation Histories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weisz, Daniel R.; Johnson, B. D.; Johnson, L. C.; Skillman, E. D.; LVL Team

    2011-01-01

    Observations of lower than expected Hα-FUV flux ratios in nearby dwarf galaxies have led to suggestions that the upper stellar IMF may systematically vary with respect to environment. We investigate the influence of star formation histories (SFHs) on the Hα-FUV flux ratios in nearby galaxies to assess the plausibility that SFHs could account for the observed trends. We model a wide range of SFH parameters, including some that resemble those of measured SFHs from studies of resolved stellar populations in nearby galaxies. Assuming a fully populated Chabrier IMF, we generate model predictions of the Hα-FUV flux ratios, R-band surface brightness, and total stellar mass, and compare to observations of 127 nearby star forming galaxies from the LVL and SDSS samples. We find excellent agreement between the model SFH predications and the observational data, demonstrating that a systematically varying IMF is unnecessary to explain the observed trends. We also explore the how extinction corrections, sample completeness, and choice of independent physical parameter (e.g., stellar mass, R-band surface brightness) can all introduce unphysical biases into the data. Our findings do not rule out competing effects such as photon leakage or stochastic sampling of the IMF, and are consistent with a combination of these effects causing the observed trends.

  1. Transpolar auroras, their particle precipitation, and IMF B sub y component

    SciTech Connect

    Makita, K. ); Meng, C.I. ); Akasofu, S.I. )

    1991-08-01

    Transpolar auroras, their associated particle precipitation, and their occurrence with respect to the IMF B{sub y} polarity are examined on the basis of DMSP F6 auroral images and the corresponding particle data. It is found that the transpolar arcs are located in the poleward edge of the soft particle precipitation region extending from either the dawn or dusk part of the auroral oval precipitation; they are not embedded in the polar rain region. This finding suggests that the transpolar arcs are located along the poleward boundary of the closed field line region (or the equatorward boundary of the open region) as suggested by Meng. Further, the appearance of the extended precipitation region from the oval depends on the polarity of the IMF B{sub y}, in the northern hemisphere morning sector for IMF B{sub y} < 0 or in the evening sector for IMF B{sub y} > 0. In general, the precipitating particle flux in the extended precipitation region is not high enough to produce appreciable luminosity. Thus only the transpolar arcs (associated with relatively intense precipitation) near the poleward boundary tend to become much more luminous, forming the so-called theta aurora.

  2. A Vortical Dawn Flank Boundary Layer for Near-Radial IMF: Wind Observations on 24 October 2001

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farrugia, C. J.; Gratton, F. T.; Gnavi, G.; Torbert, R. B.; Wilson, Lynn B., III

    2014-01-01

    We present an example of a boundary layer tailward of the dawn terminator which is entirely populated by rolled-up flow vortices. Observations were made by Wind on 24 October 2001 as the spacecraft moved across the region at the X plane approximately equal to -13 Earth radii. Interplanetary conditions were steady with a near-radial interplanetary magnetic field (IMF). Approximately 15 vortices were observed over the 1.5 hours duration of Wind's crossing, each lasting approximately 5 min. The rolling up is inferred from the presence of a hot tenuous plasma being accelerated to speeds higher than in the adjoining magnetosheath, a circumstance which has been shown to be a reliable signature of this in single-spacecraft observations. A blob of cold dense plasma was entrained in each vortex, at whose leading edge abrupt polarity changes of field and velocity components at current sheets were regularly observed. In the frame of the average boundary layer velocity, the dense blobs were moving predominantly sunward and their scale size along the X plane was approximately 7.4 Earth radii. Inquiring into the generation mechanism of the vortices, we analyze the stability of the boundary layer to sheared flows using compressible magnetohydrodynamic Kelvin-Helmholtz theory with continuous profiles for the physical quantities. We input parameters from (i) the exact theory of magnetosheath flow under aligned solar wind field and flow vectors near the terminator and (ii) the Wind data. It is shown that the configuration is indeed Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) unstable. This is the first reported example of KH-unstable waves at the magnetopause under a radial IMF.

  3. Cusp region particle precipitation and ion convection for northward interplanetary magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burch, J. L.; Reiff, P. H.; Spiro, R. W.; Heelis, R. A.; Fields, S. A.

    1981-01-01

    Data from Atmosphere Explorer D for periods of strong northward interplanetary magnetic field are discussed. In the dayside magnetospheric cusp region energy time spectrograms of suprathermal positive ion fluxes exhibit a characteristic 'V' pattern as the spacecraft moves toward higher latitudes; that is, with the peak in the energy spectrum falling in energy and then rising again. Convection velocities follow this pattern closely with strong eastwest flows (with antisunward components) occurring in the equatorward half of the 'V' and significant sunward flows occurring in the poleward half of the 'V'. These patterns can be understood qualitatively in terms of a model of ionospheric electric potential produced by the known dependence of Birkeland current densities on magnetic activity.

  4. Small-scale electrodynamics of the cusp with northward interplanetary magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Basinska, Ewa M.; Burke, William J.; Maynard, Nelson C.; Hughes, W. J.; Winningham, J. D.; Hanson, W. B.

    1992-01-01

    Possible low-altitude field signatures of merging occurring at high latitudes during a period of strong northward directed interplanetary magnetic field are reported. Large electric and magnetic field spikes detected at the poleward edge of the magnetosheathlike particle precipitation are interpreted as field signatures of the low-altitude footprint of such merging line locations. A train of phase-shifted, almost linearly polarized electric and magnetic field fluctuations was detected just equatorward of the large electromagnetic spike. It is argued that these may be due to either ion cyclotron waves excited by penetrating magnetosheath ions or transient oscillations in the frame of convecting plasma, brought about by the sudden change in the flow at the magnetospheric end of the field line.

  5. Ring Current Decay During Northward Turnings of The Interplanetary Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monreal MacMahon, R.; Llop, C.; Miranda, R.

    The ring current formation and energization is thought to be the main consequence of geomagnetic storms and its strength is characterized by the Dst index which evolu- tion satisfies a simple and well-known differential equation introduced by Burton et al. (1975). Since then, several attempts and approaches have been done to study the evolution of the ring current whether introducing discrete values or continuous func- tions for the decay time involved. In this work, we study the character of the recovery phase of magnetic storms in response to well defined northward turnings of the inter- planetary magnetic field using our functional form of the decay time of ring current particles introduced previously.

  6. Northward migration of the eastern Himalayan syntaxis revealed by OSL thermochronometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Georgina E.; Herman, Frédéric; Guralnik, Benny

    2016-08-01

    Erosion influences the dynamical evolution of mountains. However, evidence for the impact of surface processes on tectonics mostly relies on the circumstantial coincidence of rugged topography, high stream power, erosion, and rock uplift. Using the optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) thermochronometry technique, we quantified the spatial and temporal exhumation of the eastern Himalayan syntaxis. We found increasing exhumation rates within the past million years at the northeast end of the Namche Barwa-Gyala Peri dome. These observations imply headward propagation of erosion in the Parlung River, suggesting that the locus of high exhumation has migrated northward. Although surface processes influence exhumation rates, they do not necessarily engage in a feedback that sets the location of tectonic deformation.

  7. Northward migration of the eastern Himalayan syntaxis revealed by OSL thermochronometry.

    PubMed

    King, Georgina E; Herman, Frédéric; Guralnik, Benny

    2016-08-19

    Erosion influences the dynamical evolution of mountains. However, evidence for the impact of surface processes on tectonics mostly relies on the circumstantial coincidence of rugged topography, high stream power, erosion, and rock uplift. Using the optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) thermochronometry technique, we quantified the spatial and temporal exhumation of the eastern Himalayan syntaxis. We found increasing exhumation rates within the past million years at the northeast end of the Namche Barwa-Gyala Peri dome. These observations imply headward propagation of erosion in the Parlung River, suggesting that the locus of high exhumation has migrated northward. Although surface processes influence exhumation rates, they do not necessarily engage in a feedback that sets the location of tectonic deformation.

  8. The northward march of summer low cloudiness along the California coast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clemesha, Rachel E. S.; Gershunov, Alexander; Iacobellis, Sam F.; Williams, A. Park; Cayan, Daniel R.

    2016-02-01

    A new satellite-derived low cloud retrieval reveals rich spatial texture and coherent space-time propagation in summertime California coastal low cloudiness (CLC). Throughout the region, CLC is greatest during May-September but has considerable monthly variability within this summer season. On average, June is cloudiest along the coast of southern California and northern Baja, Mexico, while July is cloudiest along northern California's coast. Over the course of the summer, the core of peak CLC migrates northward along coastal California, reaching its northernmost extent in late July/early August, then recedes while weakening. The timing and movement of the CLC climatological structure is related to the summer evolution of lower tropospheric stability and both its component parts, sea surface temperature and potential temperature at 700 hPa. The roughly coincident seasonal timing of peak CLC with peak summertime temperatures translates into the strongest heat-modulating capacity of CLC along California's north coast.

  9. Northward shifts of the distributions of Spanish reptiles in association with climate change.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Rueda, Gregorio; Pleguezuelos, Juan M; Pizarro, Manuel; Montori, Albert

    2012-04-01

    It is predicted that climate change will drive extinctions of some reptiles and that the number of these extinctions will depend on whether reptiles are able to change their distribution. Whether the latitudinal distribution of reptiles may change in response to increases in temperature is unknown. We used data on reptile distributions collected during the 20th century to analyze whether changes in the distributions of reptiles in Spain are associated with increases in temperature. We controlled for biases in sampling effort and found a mean, statistically significant, northward shift of the northern extent of reptile distributions of about 15.2 km from 1940-1975 to 1991-2005. The southern extent of the distributions did not change significantly. Thus, our results suggest that the latitudinal distributions of reptiles may be changing in response to climate change.

  10. Measuring the IMF and Detailed Abundance Patterns from the Integrated Light of Old Stellar Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conroy, Charlie

    The spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of unresolved stellar systems holds key information regarding the detailed abundance pattern, star formation history, dust properties, and initial mass function (IMF) of the underlying stellar population(s). This information can only be extracted with the aid of stellar population synthesis (SPS) models. Such models have been employed to estimate basic properties such as the star formation rate, metallicity (Z, and in certain contexts, alpha-enhancement), and total stellar mass (assuming an IMF). However, much more information is available in the SED than can be extracted by the current generation of SPS models because existing models are plagued by incomplete and poorly calibrated ingredients. The proposers request funds to develop a next generation SPS model capable of measuring the IMF and detailed abundance patterns from the SEDs of composite stellar systems. In particular, we intend to develop an SPS model that makes accurate predictions for the SEDs (from 0.1-3mu m at a resolving power of ~5,000) of composite systems as a function of the IMF, stellar age, metallicity, and individual elemental abundances (including C, N, O, Na, Mg, Ca, Ti, Cr, Mn, Fe, Sr, and Ba). This will require the construction of a new synthetic stellar spectral library and a new isochrone library. This new model will be the first to make predictions for the full SED shape as a function of individual abundance ratios, age, and the IMF. We will extensively calibrate the model predictions against data on individual stars and globular clusters. The new model will be essential for interpreting optical-NIR spectra obtained from the James Webb Space Telescope as well as both present and future ground-based facilities.

  11. Long-period irregular pulsations under the conditions of a quiet magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurazhkovskaya, N. A.; Klain, B. I.; Lavrov, I. P.

    2016-05-01

    Simultaneous observations of high-latitude long-period irregular pulsations at frequencies of 2.0-6.0 mHz ( ipcl) and magnetic field disturbances in the solar wind plasma at low geomagnetic activity ( Kp ~ 0) have been studied. The 1-s data on the magnetic field registration at Godhavn (GDH) high-latitude observatory and the 1-min data on the solar wind plasma and IMF parameters for 2011-2013 were used in an analysis. Ipcl (irregular pulsations continuous, long), which were observed against a background of the IMF Bz reorientation from northward to southward, have been analyzed. In this case other solar wind plasma and IMF parameters, such as velocity V, density n, solar wind dynamic pressure P = ρ V 2 (ρ is plasma density), and strength magnitude B, were relatively stable. The effect of the IMF Bz variation rate on the ipcl spectral composition and intensity has been studied. It was established that the ipcl spectral density reaches its maximum (~10-20 min) after IMF Bz sign reversal in a predominant number of cases. It was detected that the ipcl average frequency ( f) is linearly related to the IMF Bz variation rate (Δ Bz/Δ t). It was shown that the dependence of f on Δ Bz/Δ t is controlled by the α = arctan( By/ Bx) angle value responsible for the MHD discontinuity type at the front boundary of magnetosphere. The results made it possible to assume that the formation of the observed ipcl spectrum, which is related to the IMF Bz reorientation, is caused by solar wind plasma turbulence, which promotes the development of current sheet instability and surface wave amplification at the magnetopause.

  12. EVIDENCE FOR A CONSTANT IMF IN EARLY-TYPE GALAXIES BASED ON THEIR X-RAY BINARY POPULATIONS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zepf, Stephen E.; Maccarone, T. J.; Kundu, A.; Gonzalez, A. H.; Lehmer, B.; Maraston, C.

    2014-01-01

    A number of recent studies have proposed that the stellar initial mass function (IMF) of early type galaxies varies systematically as a function of galaxy mass, with higher mass galaxies having steeper IMFs. These steeper IMFs have more low-mass stars relative to the number of high mass stars, and therefore naturally result in proportionally fewer neutron stars and black holes. In this paper, we specifically predict the variation in the number of black holes and neutron stars in early type galaxies based on the IMF variation required to reproduce the observed mass-to-light ratio trends with galaxy mass. We then test whether such variations are observed by studying the field low-mass X-ray binary populations (LMXBs) of nearby early-type galaxies. These binaries are field neutron stars or black holes accreting from a low-mass donor star. We specifically compare the number of field LMXBs per K-band light in a well-studied sample of elliptical galaxies, and use this result to distinguish between an invariant IMF and one that is Kroupa/Chabrier-like at low masses and steeper at high masses. We discuss how these observations constrain the possible forms of the IMF variations and how future Chandra observations can enable sharper tests of the IMF.

  13. Structure of the Outer Cusp and Sources of the Cusp Precipitation during Intervals of a Horizontal IMF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemecek, Z.; Safrankova, J.; Prech, L.; Simunek, J.; Sauvaud, J.-A.; Fedorov, A.; Stenuit, H.; Fuselier, S. A.; Savin, S.; Zelenyi, L.

    2003-01-01

    The cusp represents a place where the magnetosheath plasma can directly penetrate into the magnetosphere. Since the main transport processes are connected with merging of the interplanetary and magnetospheric field lines, the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) Orientation plays a decisive role in the formation of the high-altitude cusp. The importance of the sign of the IMF Bz component for this process was suggested about 40 years ago and later it was documented by many experimental investigations. However, situations when IMF Bz is the major IMF component are rather rare. The structure of the cusp during periods of a small IMF BZ is generally unknown, probably due to the fully 3-D nature of the interaction. The present case study reveals the importance of horizontal IMF components on the global magnetospheric configuration as well as on small-scale processes at the cusp-magnetosheath interface. We have used simultaneous measurements of several spacecraft (ISTP program) operating in different regions of interplanetary space and two closely spaced satellites (INTERBALL-1/MAGION- 4) crossing the cusp-magnetosheath boundary to show the connection between the short- and large-scale phenomena. In the northern hemisphere, observations suggest a presence of two spots of cusp-like precipitation supplied by reconnection occurring simultaneously in both hemispheres. A source of this bifurcation is the positive IMF By component further enhanced by the field draping in the magnetosheath. This magnetic field component shifts the entry point far away from the local noon but in opposite sense in either hemisphere.

  14. IMF-screws or arch bars as conservative treatment for mandibular condyle fractures: Quality of life aspects.

    PubMed

    van den Bergh, B; de Mol van Otterloo, J J; van der Ploeg, T; Tuinzing, D B; Forouzanfar, T

    2015-09-01

    Arch bars as treatment for a fractured mandibular condyle are inconvenient to patients and lead to lowered quality of life (QOL). To overcome these inconveniences, IMF-screws (IMFS) to facilitate intermaxillary fixation during surgery have been developed. The purpose of the present study is to investigate and compare QOL for patients treated for a fractured mandibular condyle with either IMFS or arch bars. This research trial was conducted from 2010 to 2014 as part of an earlier prospective, multicenter, randomized clinical trial in which the use of IMFS was compared to the use of arch bars in the treatment of mandibular condylar fractures. In total, 50 patients were included: 30 (60%) male patients and 20 (40%) female patients (mean age: 31.8 years, standard deviation [SD] = 13.9 years, range = 18-64 years). A total of 24 (48%) patients were allocated in the IMFS group, and 26 (52%) patients were assigned to the arch-bars control group. Significant results were observed in the subscales social isolation, possibility to eat and vary diet, influence on sleep, and satisfaction with the given treatment, all in favour of IMFS. In conclusion, using IMFS as a method for conservative treatment of condylar fractures led to a higher QOL during the 6-week period of fracture healing. In comparison to arch bars, patients treated with IMFS experienced less social isolation, had fewer problems with eating, and express the feeling they are able to continue their normal diet. Furthermore it seems that the use of IMFS has a lower negative impact on social and financial aspects of the patient. Copyright © 2015 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. A magnetohydrodynamic simulation of the bifurcation of tail lobes during intervals with a northward interplanetary magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ogino, T.; Walker, R. J.

    1984-01-01

    The interaction of the solar wind with the earth's magnetosphere during a northward interplanetary magnetic field was studied by using a three-dimensional magneto-hydrodynamic model. For a northward interplanetary magnetic field on 5 nT, the plasma sheet thickens near the noon-midnight meridian plane. When projected onto the polar cap this appears as a narrow channel extending from midnight towards noon. This plasma pattern is associated with three pairs of convection cells. The high latitude sunward convection and northern B(z) Birkeland current are caused by magnetic merging in the polar region.

  16. Large amplitude undulations of evening site diffuse aurorae. Optical characteristics and conditions of generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vorobjev, V. G.; Roldugin, V. C.; Yagodkina, O. I.

    2015-01-01

    Optical characteristics of large amplitude undulations (LAU) of diffuse aurorae observed by all-sky cameras at Kola Peninsula on December 28, 2010 were examined. Both interplanetary medium conditions and characteristics of magnetic activity before and during LAU were analyzed. It was shown that the development of undulations could be activated by sharp short-living of ˜20 minutes solar wind dynamic pressure impulse and existence of the undulations during about two hours was supported by electric field of stationary magnetospheric convection originated from large smoothly changed southward IMF Bz component of about -12nT. The altitude of undulation luminosity determined by triangulation method was 120 ± 10 km. The undulations amplitude changed from about 100 to 300 km and the average wavelength was ˜250 km. The undulations were observed moving westward with the average phase velocity of ˜0.7 km/s. The pass of DMSP F16 spacecraft just along "the tongue" of undulations showed that the wave of luminosity was located in the region of the predominantly ion (proton) precipitation with the average energy of particles of ˜18 keV. Rayed auroral structures were observed continuously in the region of diffuse aurorae during time interval of LAU existence. These structures were observed moving westward with the velocity of about 2 km/s that corresponds to the northward electric field of ˜100 mV/m.

  17. Pathway seesaw of the northward warm water transport in the Japan/East Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trusenkova, Olga

    The Japan/East Sea stretched out in the meridional direction can be divided into the subtropical and subarctic areas separated by the Subarctic Front. The hydrographic regime is strongly controlled by the throughflow transport of subtropical water entering the Sea in the Korea Strait. It was established from empirical analysis of infrared satellite imagery that warm water is advected northward along both western and eastern coasts by mean currents and chains of mesoscale eddies (Nikitin et al., 2002; Lobanov et al., 2007; Nikitin, 2007). The purpose of this study is to determine statistical patterns associated with these pathways and determine characteristic time scales. To this end, we use AVISO 0.25 degree gridded weekly sea level anomalies (SLA) for the period from October 1992 onwards, eddy kinetic energy (EKE) computed from SLA, and 0.25 degree gridded Merged Satellite and In Situ Data Global Daily Sea Surface Temperature (SST) product by the Japan Meteorological Agency for the period from October 1993 onwards. Multivariate analysis of SST, SLA, and EKE made it possible to detect the east - west seesaw in the Japan/East Sea. On average, sea level and temperature gradients are largest across the Subarctic Front and the eastern part of the Sea is warmer than the western area. In the positive phase of the west - east seesaw (late summer on the seasonal time scale), the entire western Sea is even colder than average, SLA is negative there, and EKE is decreased in the northwestern area off North Korea and Primorye (Russia). SLA and SST anomalies are positive along the eastern coast, while EKE is increased in the southwestern and eastern Sea. The warm water is advected northward within the Tsushima Warm Current (TWC) and then westward towards the Primorye coast, with the TWC western branch originating in the area off the southern Hokkaido Island. In the negative phase, SLA and SST are positive in the western Sea and EKE is increased in the northwestern area off

  18. Wind effects on prey availability: How northward migrating waders use brackish and hypersaline lagoons in the sivash, Ukraine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verkuil, Yvonne; Koolhaas, Anita; Van Der Winden, Jan

    Large numbers of waders migrating northward in spring use the Sivash, a large system of shallow, brackish and hypersaline lagoons in the Black Sea and Azov Sea region (Ukraine). The bottoms of these lagoons are often uncovered by the wind. Hence, for waders the time and space available for feeding depend on wind conditions. In hypersaline lagoons the benthic and pelagic fauna was very poor, consisting mainly of chironomid larvae (0.19 g AFDM·m -2) and brine shrimps Artemia salina, respectively. Brine shrimp abundance was correlated with salinity, wind force, wind direction and water depth. Dunlin Calidris alpina and curlew sandpiper Calidris ferruginea were the only species feeding on brine shrimp. As brine shrimp densities are higher in deeper water, smaller waders such as broad-billed sandpipers Limicola falcinellus are too short-legged to reach exploitable densities of brine shrimp. In brackish lagoons the benthic and pelagic fauna was rich, consisting of polychaetes, bivalves, gastropods, chironomid larvae, isopods and amphipods (8.9 to 30.5 g AFDM·m -2), but there were no brine shrimps. Prey biomass increased with the distance from the coast, being highest on the site that was most frequently inundated. Dunlin, broad-billed sandpiper and grey plover Pluvialis squatarola were the most abundant birds in the brackish lagoon. Due to the effects of wind-tides only a small area was usually available as a feeding site. Gammarus insensibilis was the alternative prey resource in the water layer, and their density varied with wind direction in the same way as brine shrimp. Curlew sandpipers and dunlins in the hypersaline lagoons and broad-billed sandpipers in the brackish lagoons often changed feeding sites, probably following the variation in prey availability. Only because of the large size and variety of lagoons are waders in the Sivash always able to find good feeding sites.

  19. The magnetospheric electric field and convective processes as diagnostics of the IMF and solar wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaye, S. M.

    1979-01-01

    Indirect measurements of the convection field as well as direct of the ionospheric electric field provide a means to at least monitor quanitatively solar wind processes. For instance, asymmetries in the ionospheric electric field and ionospheric Hall currents over the polar cap reflect the solar wind sector polarity. A stronger electric field, and thus convective flow, is found on the side of the polar cap where the y component of the IMF is parallel to the y component of the geomagnetic field. Additionally, the magnitude of the electric field and convective southward B sub Z and/or solar wind velocity, and thus may indicate the arrival at Earth of an interaction region in the solar wind. It is apparent that processes associated with the convention electric field may be used to predict large scale features in the solar wind; however, with present empirical knowledge it is not possible to make quantitative predictions of individual solar wind or IMF parameters.

  20. Hybrid modelling the Venus-solar wind interaction with non-constant IMF clock angle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarvinen, R.; Kallio, E.; Zhang, T. L.; Barabash, S.; Fedorov, A.; Liu, K.; Sillanpää, I.; Jahunen, P.

    2008-09-01

    ABSTRACT When the unmagnetized planet Venus with a dense atmosphere interacts with the solar wind, an induced magnetosphere is formed and the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) is enhanced and draped near the planet. Hybrid modelling is a semi-kinetic method to study the plasma interactions of Venus-like objects in a global planetary scale. HYB simulation code solves numerically the hybrid model equations and provides, for example, a three dimensional structure of the magnetic field in the objectss near-space. It is proposed that the changes in the clock angle of the upstream IMF can be modelled by using a stationary simulation solution. In this method, the solution is rotated around the Venus-Sun axis along the spacecraft trajectory. In the study the magnetic fields produced by the HYB-Venus runs are compared to the Venus Express MAG magnetometer observations.

  1. Influence of IMF draping direction and crustal magnetic field location on Martian ion beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlsson, E.; Brain, D.; Luhmann, J.; Barabash, S.; Grigoriev, A.; Nilsson, H.; Lundin, R.

    2008-05-01

    Data from the Ion Mass Analyzer (IMA) sensor of the ASPERA-3 instrument suite onboard Mars Express and data from the Magnetometer/Electron Reflectometer (MAG/ER) on Mars Global Surveyor have been analyzed to determine whether ion beam events (IBEs) are correlated with the direction of the draped interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) or the proximity of strong crustal magnetic fields to the subsolar point. We examined 150 IBEs and found that they are organized by IMF draping direction. However, no clear dependence on the subsolar longitude of the strongest magnetic anomaly is evident, making it uncertain whether crustal magnetic fields have an effect on the formation of the beams. We also examined data from the IMA sensor of the ASPERA-4 instrument suite on Venus Express and found that IBEs are observed at Venus as well, which indicates the morphology of the Martian and Venusian magnetotails are similar.

  2. Toward a Complete Census of the Low Mass IMF in the Orion Nebula Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robberto, Massimo; Andersen, Morten; Barman, Travis; Bellini, Andrea; da Rio, Nicola; de Mink, Selma; Hillenbrand, Lynne A.; Lu, Jessica R.; Luhman, Kevin; Manara, Carlo Felice; Meyer, Michael; Platais, Imants; Pueyo, Laurent; Soderblom, David; Soummer, Remi; Stahler, Steve; Tan, Jonathan Charles

    2015-08-01

    A 52-orbit Hubble Treasury Program is currently under way to investigate two fundamental questions of star formation: a) the low- mass tail of the IMF, down to a few Jupiter masses; b) the dynamical evolution of clusters, as revealed by stellar proper motions. The program targets the Orion Nebula Cluster using WFC3 and ACS in coordinated parallel mode to perform a synoptic survey in the 1.345micron H2O feature and in the F775W Ic broad-band. In this poster we present early results from the IR survey, aimed at discovering and classify all brown dwarfs and planetary-mass objects in the field, extending the IMF down to lowest masses formed by gravitational collapse. Using the latest generation of high contrast image processing we are also searching for faint companions, reaching down to sub-arcsecond separations and 10-4 flux ratios.

  3. Is coverage a factor in non-Gaussianity of IMF parameters?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahluwalia, H. S.; Fikani, M. M.

    1995-01-01

    Recently, Feynman and Ruzmaikin (1994) showed that IMF parameters for the 1973 to 1990 period are not log-normally distributed as previously suggested by Burlaga and King (1979) for the data obtained over a shorter time period (1963-75). They studied the first four moments, namely: mean, variance, skewness, and kurtosis. For a Gaussian distribution, moments higher than the variance should vanish. In particular, Feynman and Ruzmaikin obtained very high values of kurtosis during some periods of their analysis. We note that the coverage for IMF parameters is very uneven for the period analyzed by them, ranging from less than 40% to greater than 80%. So a question arises as to whether the amount of coverage is a factor in their analysis. We decided to test this for the B(sub z) component of IMF, since it is an effective geoactive parameter for short term disturbances. Like them, we used 1-hour averaged data available on the Omnitape. We studied the scatter plots of the annual mean values of B(sub z)(nT) and its kurtosis versus the percent coverage for the year. We obtain a correlation coefficient of 0.48 and 0.42 respectively for the 1973-90 period. The probability for a chance occurrence of these correlation coefficients for 18 pair of points is less than 8%. As a rough measure of skewness, we determined the percent asymmetry between the areas of the histograms representing the distributions of the positive and the negative values of B(sub z) and studied its correlation with the coverage for the year. This analysis yields a correlation coefficient of 0.41 When we extended the analysis for the whole period for which IMF data are available (1963-93) the corresponding correlation coefficients are 0.59, 0.14, and 0.42. Our findings will be presented and discussed

  4. Effect of chronic contractile activity on SS and IMF mitochondrial apoptotic susceptibility in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Adhihetty, Peter J; Ljubicic, Vladimir; Hood, David A

    2007-03-01

    Chronic contractile activity of skeletal muscle induces an increase in mitochondria located in proximity to the sarcolemma [subsarcolemmal (SS)] and in mitochondria interspersed between the myofibrils [intermyofibrillar (IMF)]. These are energetically favorable metabolic adaptations, but because mitochondria are also involved in apoptosis, we investigated the effect of chronic contractile activity on mitochondrially mediated apoptotic signaling in muscle. We hypothesized that chronic contractile activity would provide protection against mitochondrially mediated apoptosis despite an elevation in the expression of proapoptotic proteins. To induce mitochondrial biogenesis, we chronically stimulated (10 Hz; 3 h/day) rat muscle for 7 days. Chronic contractile activity did not alter the Bax/Bcl-2 ratio, an index of apoptotic susceptibility, and did not affect manganese superoxide dismutase levels. However, contractile activity increased antiapoptotic 70-kDa heat shock protein and apoptosis repressor with a caspase recruitment domain by 1.3- and 1.4-fold (P<0.05), respectively. Contractile activity elevated SS mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) production 1.4- and 1.9-fold (P<0.05) during states IV and III respiration, respectively, whereas IMF mitochondrial state IV ROS production was suppressed by 28% (P<0.05) and was unaffected during state III respiration. Following stimulation, exogenous ROS treatment produced less cytochrome c release (25-40%) from SS and IMF mitochondria, and also reduced apoptosis-inducing factor release (approximately 30%) from IMF mitochondria, despite higher inherent cytochrome c and apoptosis-inducing factor expression. Chronic contractile activity did not alter mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mtPTP) components in either subfraction. However, SS mitochondria exhibited a significant increase in the time to Vmax of mtPTP opening. Thus, chronic contractile activity induces predominantly antiapoptotic adaptations in both

  5. Abundance ratios and IMF slopes in the dwarf elliptical galaxy NGC 1396 with MUSE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mentz, J. J.; La Barbera, F.; Peletier, R. F.; Falcón-Barroso, J.; Lisker, T.; van de Ven, G.; Loubser, S. I.; Hilker, M.; Sánchez-Janssen, R.; Napolitano, N.; Cantiello, M.; Capaccioli, M.; Norris, M.; Paolillo, M.; Smith, R.; Beasley, M. A.; Lyubenova, M.; Munoz, R.; Puzia, T.

    2016-12-01

    Deep observations of the dwarf elliptical (dE) galaxy NGC 1396 (MV = -16.60, Mass ˜4 × 108 M⊙), located in the Fornax cluster, have been performed with the Very Large Telescope/Multi Unit Spectroscopic Explorer spectrograph in the wavelength region from 4750 to 9350 Å. In this paper, we present a stellar population analysis studying chemical abundances, the star formation history (SFH) and the stellar initial mass function (IMF) as a function of galactocentric distance. Different, independent ways to analyse the stellar populations result in a luminosity-weighted age of ˜6 Gyr and a metallicity [Fe/H]˜ -0.4, similar to other dEs of similar mass. We find unusually overabundant values of [Ca/Fe] ˜+ 0.1, and underabundant Sodium, with [Na/Fe] values around -0.1, while [Mg/Fe] is overabundant at all radii, increasing from ˜+ 0.1 in the centre to ˜+ 0.2 dex. We notice a significant metallicity and age gradient within this dwarf galaxy. To constrain the stellar IMF of NGC 1396, we find that the IMF of NGC 1396 is consistent with either a Kroupa-like or a top-heavy distribution, while a bottom-heavy IMF is firmly ruled out. An analysis of the abundance ratios, and a comparison with galaxies in the Local Group, shows that the chemical enrichment history of NGC 1396 is similar to the Galactic disc, with an extended SFH. This would be the case if the galaxy originated from a Large Magellanic Cloud-sized dwarf galaxy progenitor, which would lose its gas while falling into the Fornax cluster.

  6. Paleomagnetism of Midway Atoll lavas and northward movement of the Pacific plate

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gromme, S.; Vine, F.J.

    1972-01-01

    Two deep drill holes through the reef limestones of Midway Atoll penetrated 120 m and 19 m of basaltic lavas that were dated by the KAr method at 18 my. Inclinations of natural remanent magnetization have been measured in 173 specimens cut from 57 core samples from 13 of the lava flows. The mean paleomagnetic inclination is 27.6?? ?? 6.8??, corresponding to a paleolatitude of 14.7?? ?? 4.2??. The present latitude of Midway is 28??, suggesting a northward component of motion of the Pacific plate of approximately 13?? or 1400 km in the last 18 my. The paleolatitude of Midway is thus not significantly different from the present latitude (19??) of the active volcanic island of Hawaii. The paleomagnetic data from the Midway basalts thus support the hypothesis of Wilson and Morgan that volcanic heat sources are fixed with respect to the Earth's mantle below the asthenosphere and their apparent migration with time is due to plate motion. ?? 1972.

  7. On the Effect of IMF Turning on Ion Dynamics at Mercury

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delcourt, D. C.; Moore, T. E.; Fok, M.-C. H.

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the effect of a rotation of the Interplanetary Magnetic Field (IMF) on the transport of magnetospheric ion populations at Mercury. We focus on ions of planetary origin and investigate their large-scale circulation using three-dimensional single-particle simulations. We show that a nonzero Bx component of the IMF leads to a pronounced asymmetry in the overall circulation pattern . In particular, we demonstrate that the centrifugal acceleration due to curvature of the E x B drift paths is more pronounced in one hemisphere than the other, leading to filling of the magnetospheric lobes and plasma sheet with more or less energetic material depending upon the hemisphere of origin. Using a time-varying electric and magnetic field model, we investigate the response of ions to rapid (a few tens of seconds) re-orientation of the IMF. We show that, for ions with gyroperiods comparable to the field variation time scale, the inductive electric field should lead to significant nonadiabatic energization, up to several hundreds of eVs or a few keVs. It thus appears that IMP turning at Mercury should lead to localized loading of the magnetosphere with energetic material of planetary origin (e.g., Na+).

  8. Cloning and Expression of SFRP5 in Tibetan Chicken and its Relationship with IMF Deposition.

    PubMed

    Li, Qian; Zuo, Lu-Lu; Lin, Ya-Qiu; Xu, Ya-Ou; Zhu, Jiang-Jiang; Liao, Hong-Hai; Lin, Sen; Xiong, Xian-Rong; Wang, Yong

    2016-10-01

    Secreted frizzled related protein 5 (SFRP5), an anti-inflammatory adipokine, is relevant to the adipocyte differentiation. In order to clarify its role in regulating intramuscular fat (IMF) deposition in Tibetan chicken, the full-length sequence of the Tibetan chicken SFRP5 gene was cloned. The relative expression of SFRP5 gene was detected using quantitative RT-PCR in various tissues of 154 days old Tibetan chicken, as well as in breast muscle, thigh muscle, and adipose tissue at different growth stages. The results showed that SFRP5 gene was expressed in all examined tissues but highly enriched in adipose tissue. Temporal expression profile showed that the expression of SFRP5 was gradually decreased in breast muscle, but was fluctuated in thigh muscle and adipose tissue with the growth of Tibetan chicken. Furthermore, correlation analysis demonstrated that the expression of SFRP5 in breast muscle, thigh muscle and adipose tissue was correlated with IMF content at different levels. The results indicated that Tibetan chicken SFRP5 is involved in IMF deposition.

  9. [Relationship Between Molecular Marker of Western Main Pig H-FABP Gene and IMF Content.].

    PubMed

    Pang, Wei-Jun; Sun, Shi-Duo; Li, Ying; Chen, Guo-Dong; Yang, Gong-She

    2005-05-01

    By using 265 pigs from eight breeds including Duroc,Landrace,Large White,Neijiang,Rongchang,Hanjiang Black,Hanzhong White,Bamei and wild ones, the genetic variations of 5'-upstream region from and the second intron in porcine H-FABP gene were checked by PCR-RFLP molecular marker with HinfI, Hae III and MspI,and effect of H-FABP gene on IMF content was then analyzed by least square analysis.The results showed as follows:(1) 8 pig breeds and wild pig had polymorphism at Hinf I-RFLP site. In above detected breeds,large white,Bamei pig, Hanjiang Black,Hanzhong White pig breeds and wild pig presented low polymorphism while other breeds have mediate polymorphism;(2)Among the tested breeds only 4 Chinese local pig breeds had no polymorphism at the Hae III-RFLP and Msp I-RFLP sites,but Duroc,Landrace,Largewhite, Hanzhong White pig breeds and wild pig had polymorphism. Wild pig at the Hae III-RFLP , Landrace,Largewhite and wild pig at the Hae III-RFLP and Msp I-RFLP sites were low polymorphism,others were mediate polymorphism;(3) H-FABP gene increased IMF content significantly(p0.05). Genetic effect of H-FABP gene on IMF content were HH>Hh>hh,DD.

  10. Data-based modeling of the geomagnetosphere with an IMF-dependent magnetopause

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsyganenko, N. A.

    2014-01-01

    The paper presents first results of the data-based modeling of the geomagnetospheric magnetic field, using the data of Polar, Geotail, Cluster, and Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms satellites, taken during the period 1995-2012 and covering 123 storm events with SYM-H ≥ -200 nT. The most important innovations in the model are (1) taking into account the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF)-dependent shape of the model magnetopause, (2) a physically more consistent global deformation of the equatorial current sheet due to the geodipole tilt, (3) symmetric and partial components of the ring current are calculated based on a realistic background magnetic field, instead of a purely dipolar field, used in earlier models, and (4) the validity region on the nightside is extended to ˜40-50 RE. The model field is confined within a magnetopause, based on Lin et al. (2010) empirical model, driven by the dipole tilt angle, solar wind pressure, and IMF Bz. A noteworthy finding is a significant dependence of the magnetotail flux connection across the equatorial plane on the model magnetopause flaring rate, controlled by the southward component of the IMF.

  11. IMF orientation, solar wind velocity, and Pc 3-4 signals - A joint distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenstadt, E. W.; Singer, H. J.; Russell, C. T.; Olson, J. V.

    1979-01-01

    Separate studies using the same micropulsation data base in the period range 10-150 s have shown earlier that signal levels recorded during September, October, and November 1969 at Calgary correlated positively with both solar-wind alignment of the IMF and solar-wind speed, but each correlation contained enough scatter to allow for the influence of the other factor. In this report, joint correlations of velocity and field direction with parameters representing hourly distributions rather than minima of IMF orientation angle display the relative effect of the two agents on magnetic pulsation signal levels. The joint correlations reduce the overall scatter and show that solar-wind speeds above 200-300 km/s and angles between the IMF and the sun-earth line of less than 50-60 deg are associated with enlarged magnetic pulsation amplitudes. These threshold effects tend to support both the bow-shock origin and the Kelvin-Helmholtz amplification of daytime signal transients in the Pc 3, 4 period ranges.

  12. Structural adjustment and public spending on health: evidence from IMF programs in low-income countries.

    PubMed

    Kentikelenis, Alexander E; Stubbs, Thomas H; King, Lawrence P

    2015-02-01

    The relationship between health policy in low-income countries (LICs) and structural adjustment programs devised by the International Monetary Fund (IMF) has been the subject of intense controversy over past decades. While the influence of the IMF on health policy can operate through various pathways, one main link is via public spending on health. The IMF has claimed that its programs enhance government spending for health, and that a number of innovations have been introduced to enable borrowing countries to protect health spending from broader austerity measures. Critics have pointed to adverse effects of Fund programs on health spending or to systematic underfunding that does not allow LICs to address health needs. We examine the effects of Fund programs on government expenditures on health in low-income countries using data for the period 1985-2009. We find that Fund programs are associated with higher health expenditures only in Sub-Saharan African LICs, which historically spent less than any other region. This relationship turns negative in LICs in other regions. We outline the implications of these findings for health policy in a development context.

  13. Geomagnetic response to IMF and solar wind over different latitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aslam, A. M.; Tripathi, Sharad Chandra; Mansoori, Azad Ahmad; Waheed, Malik Abdul

    2016-07-01

    In this paper a study on the response of geomagnetic field characteristics to the solar wind variation during three solar cycles (SC 21, SC 22, SC 23) have been conducted in a long term scale. The difference in the response of two different latitudinal characteristic indices has been investigated. For the purpose we have considered the high latitude index AE and the mid-latitude aa index and both gives the knowledge about the perturbations in the geomagnetic field conditions. Eventually we can infer the idea about the ionospheric current system changes in response to the solar wind conditions. The variation found in the AE and aa indices have been found to follow a 11 year cycle as similar to the sunspot variation. Also the correlation between the annual means of the solar wind parameters velocity V, magnetic filed B and the composite parameters BV and BV ^{2 } have been calculated . A difference was found between the correlations obtained for the AE and aa indices. We could also see that the difference in correlation follows a cyclic pattern i.e. the large difference is found during the solar maxima while a small difference is observed during the minima.

  14. Comparison Between Vortices Created and Evolving During Fixed and Dynamic Solar Wind Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collado-Vega, Yaireska M.; Kessel, R. L.; Sibeck, David Gary; Kalb, V. L.; Boller, R. A.; Rastaetter, L.

    2013-01-01

    We employ Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations to examine the creation and evolution of plasma vortices within the Earth's magnetosphere for steady solar wind plasma conditions. Very few vortices form during intervals of such solar wind conditions. Those that do remain in fixed positions for long periods (often hours) and exhibit rotation axes that point primarily in the x or y direction, parallel (or antiparallel) to the local magnetospheric magnetic field direction. Occasionally, the orientation of the axes rotates from the x direction to another direction. We compare our results with simulations previously done for unsteady solar wind conditions. By contrast, these vortices that form during intervals of varying solar wind conditions exhibit durations ranging from seconds (in the case of those with axes in the x or y direction) to minutes (in the case of those with axes in the z direction) and convect antisunward. The local-time dependent sense of rotation seen in these previously reported vortices suggests an interpretation in terms of the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability. For steady conditions, the biggest vortices developed on the dayside (about 6R(E) in diameter), had their rotation axes aligned with the y direction and had the longest periods of duration. We attribute these vortices to the flows set up by reconnection on the high latitude magnetopause during intervals of northward Interplanetary Magnetic Field (IMF) orientation. This is the first time that vortices due to high-latitude reconnection have been visualized. The model also successfully predicts the principal characteristics of previously reported plasma vortices within the magnetosphere, namely their dimension, flow velocities, and durations.

  15. Structure of the Outer Cusp and Sources of the Cusp Precipitation during Intervals of a Horizontal IMF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berchem, Jean; Nemecek, Z.; Safrankova, J.; Prech, L.; Simunek, J.; Sauvaud, J.-A.; Fedorov, A.; Stenuit, H.; Fuselier, S. A.; Savin, S.; hide

    2003-01-01

    The cusp represents a place where the magnetosheath plasma can directly penetrate into the magnetosphere. Since the main transport processes are connected with merging of the interplanetary and magnetospheric field lines: the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) Orientation plays a decisive role in the formation of the high-altitude cusp. The importance of the sign of the IMF B(sub Z) component for this process was suggested about 40 years ago and later it was documented by many experimental investigations. However, situations when IMF Bz is the major IMF component are rather rare. The structure of the cusp during periods of a small IMF B(sub Z) is generally unknown, probably due to the fully 3-D nature of the interaction. The present case study reveals the importance of horizontal IMF components on the global magnetospheric configuration as well as on small-scale processes at the cusp-magnetosheath interface. We have used simultaneous measurements of several spacecraft (ISTP program) operating in different regions of interplanetary space and two closely spaced satellites (INTERBALL-1/MAGION-4) crossing the cusp-magnetosheath boundary to show the connection between the short- and large-scale phenomena. In the northern hemisphere, observations suggest a presence of two spots of cusp-like precipitation supplied by reconnection occurring simultaneously in both hemispheres. A source of this bifurcation is the positive IMF B(sub y) component further enhanced by the field draping in the magnetosheath. This magnetic field component shifts the entry point far away from the local noon but in opposite sense in either hemisphere. The cusp represents a place where the magnetosheath plasma can directly

  16. Transport of Ixodes ricinus infected with Borrelia species to Norway by northward-migrating passerine birds.

    PubMed

    Hasle, Gunnar; Bjune, Gunnar Aksel; Midthjell, Liv; Røed, Knut Håkon; Leinaas, Hans Petter

    2011-03-01

    Birds are capable of transporting ticks and, consequently, tick-borne pathogens over long distances and across geographical barriers such as oceans and deserts. The purpose of this study was to assess the prevalence of Borrelia spp. in ticks transported by birds by using PCR. A total of 9768 northward-migrating passerine birds was examined for ticks at 4 bird observatories along the southern Norwegian coast during their spring migration in 2003-2005. Two of the bird observatories were located on islands where flagging revealed very few or no ticks (Akerøya and Store Færder), while the other 2 were located in areas with established dense tick populations: an island, Jomfruland (>100 ticks per hour of flagging) and a mainland locality, Lista (40 ticks in one hour of flagging). Borrelia spp. were found in 70 (13.6%) of 513 examined Ixodes ricinus nymphs (19 B. afzelii, 38 B. garinii, two B. turdi, and 11 B. valaisiana) and in 14 (8.1%) of 172 examined I. ricinus larvae (ten B. garinii, one B. turdi, and three B. valaisiana). This report is the first to identify B. turdi in Europe. Ticks collected from birds of the genus Turdus (T. merula, T. philomelos, and T. iliacus) had a higher prevalence of Borrelia spp. than ticks from the other passerine genera. Ticks that were cofeeding with a Borrelia-infected tick had an increased probability of being infected with the same Borrelia species. Ticks collected on birds from the south-western locality Lista were less likely to have Borrelia than ticks found on birds from the other, more eastern localities. The Turdus spp. are particularly important, both because they carry many ticks per bird and because ticks carried by these species have a higher prevalence of Borrelia. This higher prevalence may be related to Borrelia infection of the birds or transmission of Borrelia through cofeeding. The prevalence of the different Borrelia species in ticks collected from migratory birds may be related to migration routes.

  17. Coupling the Solar-Wind/IMF to the Ionosphere through the High Latitude Cusps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maynard, Nelson C.

    2003-01-01

    Magnetic merging is a primary means for coupling energy from the solar wind into the magnetosphere-ionosphere system. The location and nature of the process remain as open questions. By correlating measurements form diverse locations and using large-scale MHD models to put the measurements in context, it is possible to constrain out interpretations of the global and meso-scale dynamics of magnetic merging. Recent evidence demonstrates that merging often occurs at high latitudes in the vicinity of the cusps. The location is in part controlled by the clock angle in the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) Y-Z plane. In fact, B(sub Y) bifurcated the cusp relative to source regions. The newly opened field lines may couple to the ionosphere at MLT locations of as much as 3 hr away from local noon. On the other side of noon the cusp may be connected to merging sites in the opposite hemisphere. In face, the small convection cell is generally driven by opposite hemisphere merging. B(sub X) controls the timing of the interaction and merging sites in each hemisphere, which may respond to planar features in the IMF at different times. Correlation times are variable and are controlled by the dynamics of the tilt of the interplanetary electric field phase plane. The orientation of the phase plane may change significantly on time scales of tens of minutes. Merging is temporally variable and may be occurring at multiple sites simultaneously. Accelerated electrons from the merging process excite optical signatures at the foot of the newly opened field lines. All-sky photometer observations of 557.7 nm emissions in the cusp region provide a "television picture" of the merging process and may be used to infer the temporal and spatial variability of merging, tied to variations in the IMF.

  18. Metallicity calibrations of galaxies with low star formation rates: the influence of a stochastic IMF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paalvast, Mieke; Brinchmann, Jarle

    2017-09-01

    We present a study of the consequences of an initial mass function (IMF) that is stochastically sampled on the main emission lines used for gas-phase metallicity estimates in extragalactic sources. We use the stochastic stellar population code slug and the photoionization code cloudy to show that the stochastic sampling of the massive end of the mass function can lead to clear variations in the relative production of energetic emission lines such as [O iii] relative to that of Balmer lines. We use this to study the impact on the Te, N2O2, R23 and O3N2 metallicity calibrators. We find that stochastic sampling of the IMF leads to a systematic overestimate of O/H in galaxies with low star formation rates (SFRs; ≤10-3 M⊙ yr-1) when using the N2O2, R23 and O3N2 strong-line methods, and an underestimate when using the Te method on galaxies of sub-solar metallicity. We point out that while the SFRH α-to-SFRUV ratio can be used to identify systems where the IMF might be insufficiently sampled, it does not provide sufficient information to fully correct the metallicity calibrations at low SFRs. Care must therefore be given in the choice of metallicity indicators in such systems, with the N2O2 indicator proving most robust of those tested by us, with a bias of 0.08 dex for models with SFR = 10-4 M⊙ yr-1 and solar metallicity.

  19. GPS TEC variations in the polar cap ionosphere: Solar wind and IMF dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, Chris; Jayachandran, P. T.; MacDougall, John W.

    2016-09-01

    This statistical study examines the solar wind dependence of total electron content (TEC) variations arising from mesoscale (tens to hundreds of kilometers) structuring of the polar cap ionosphere. Six years of TEC measurements were collected from five high-data rate Global Positioning System (GPS) receivers of the Canadian High Arctic Ionospheric Network (CHAIN), from which high-resolution magnetic local time-latitude maps of TEC variation occurrence rate and amplitude were created. Ionosonde radars were used to identify TEC variations arising from ionization of the E and F region ionospheres. Statistical TEC maps were examined as a function of solar wind and interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) measurements. Statistical results showed that occurrence rate of TEC variations was highest in localized dayside regions, with exact local time and latitude of peak occurrence depending primarily on the dayside coupling rate of the solar wind and magnetosphere, as well as IMF orientation and magnitude in the Y-Z plane. Occurrence of TEC variations throughout the polar cap increased with solar wind-magnetosphere coupling rate and IMF magnitude. The solar wind dependence of occurrence rate largely reflected the location and rate of dayside magnetic reconnection and subsequent particle precipitation and polar cap convection. Amplitudes of TEC variations were largest around noon and increased throughout the polar cap with increased solar wind-magnetosphere coupling rate. These statistical results improve upon the existing observational picture of the polar ionosphere and will potentially facilitate development of models and techniques for mitigating impacts of the polar ionosphere on navigation signals and communication links.

  20. Evolution of the Global Aurora During Positive IMP Bz and Varying IMP By Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cumnock, J. A.; Sharber, J. R.; Heelis. R. A.; Hairston, M. R.; Carven, J. D.

    1997-01-01

    The DE 1 imaging instrumentation provides a full view of the entire auroral oval every 12 min for several hours during each orbit. We examined five examples of global evolution of the aurora that occurred during the northern hemisphere winter of 1981-1982 when the z component of the interplanetary magnetic field was positive and the y component was changing sign. Evolution of an expanded auroral emission region into a theta aurora appears to require a change in the sign of By during northward interplanetary magnetic field (IMF). Theta aurora are formed both from expanded duskside emission regions (By changes from positive to negative) and dawnside emission regions (By changes from negative to positive), however the dawnside-originating and duskside-originating evolutions are not mirror images. The persistence of a theta aurora after its formation suggests that there may be no clear relationship between the theta aurora pattern and the instantaneous configuration of the IMF.

  1. THE STELLAR INITIAL MASS FUNCTION OF ULTRA-FAINT DWARF GALAXIES: EVIDENCE FOR IMF VARIATIONS WITH GALACTIC ENVIRONMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Geha, Marla; Brown, Thomas M.; Tumlinson, Jason; Kalirai, Jason S.; Avila, Roberto J.; Ferguson, Henry C.; Simon, Joshua D.; Kirby, Evan N.; VandenBerg, Don A.; Munoz, Ricardo R.; Guhathakurta, Puragra E-mail: tbrown@stsci.edu

    2013-07-01

    We present constraints on the stellar initial mass function (IMF) in two ultra-faint dwarf (UFD) galaxies, Hercules and Leo IV, based on deep Hubble Space Telescope Advanced Camera for Surveys imaging. The Hercules and Leo IV galaxies are extremely low luminosity (M{sub V} = -6.2, -5.5), metal-poor (([Fe/H]) = -2.4, -2.5) systems that have old stellar populations (>11 Gyr). Because they have long relaxation times, we can directly measure the low-mass stellar IMF by counting stars below the main-sequence turnoff without correcting for dynamical evolution. Over the stellar mass range probed by our data, 0.52-0.77 M{sub Sun }, the IMF is best fit by a power-law slope of {alpha}= 1.2{sub -0.5}{sup +0.4} for Hercules and {alpha} = 1.3 {+-} 0.8 for Leo IV. For Hercules, the IMF slope is more shallow than a Salpeter ({alpha} = 2.35) IMF at the 5.8{sigma} level, and a Kroupa ({alpha} = 2.3 above 0.5 M{sub Sun }) IMF slope at 5.4{sigma} level. We simultaneously fit for the binary fraction, f{sub binary}, finding f{sub binary}= 0.47{sup +0.16}{sub -0.14} for Hercules, and 0.47{sup +0.37}{sub -0.17} for Leo IV. The UFD binary fractions are consistent with that inferred for Milky Way stars in the same mass range, despite very different metallicities. In contrast, the IMF slopes in the UFDs are shallower than other galactic environments. In the mass range 0.5-0.8 M{sub Sun }, we see a trend across the handful of galaxies with directly measured IMFs such that the power-law slopes become shallower (more bottom-light) with decreasing galactic velocity dispersion and metallicity. This trend is qualitatively consistent with results in elliptical galaxies inferred via indirect methods and is direct evidence for IMF variations with galactic environment.

  2. Relationship between the IMF magnitude and Pc 3 magnetic pulsations in the magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yumoto, K.; Saito, T.; Tsurutani, B. T.; Smith, E. J.; Akasofu, S.-I.

    1984-01-01

    The relationships between the IMF magnitude and pulsation frequencies in the Pc 3-4 range simultaneously observed both at synchronous orbit and at low latitudes on the ground are statistically described. A theoretical discussion is given on how these observations can be interpreted in terms of the characteristic frequency of compressional Pc 3-4 magnetic pulsations in the magnetosphere, based on the well-established ion cyclotron resonance mechanism between magnetosonic mode of low-frequency upstream waves and narrowly reflected ion beams in the earth's foreshock.

  3. Survival characteristics of environmental and clinically derived strains of Cronobacter sakazakii in infant milk formula (IMF) and ingredients.

    PubMed

    Walsh, D; Molloy, C; Iversen, C; Carroll, J; Cagney, C; Fanning, S; Duffy, G

    2011-03-01

    The study aimed to compare survival of Cronobacter sakazakii strains in plant-derived infant milk formula (IMF) ingredients and their thermotolerance in reconstituted IMF. Inulin and lecithin were inoculated with isolates of C. sakazakii including the typed clinical strains, NCTC 11467(T) and BAA 894; a mutant strain in which the wcaD gene had been disrupted; and two environmental strains isolated from IMF processing facilities. Samples were stored and examined for C. sakazakii. All strains were still detectable in both matrices after 338 days storage, except for the mutant strain that was no longer detectable at that time. Higher numbers of the environmental strains were recoverable after 338 days than the clinical strains. The thermotolerance of the five strains was investigated in reconstituted IMF at 55, 60 and 65°C. The clinically derived type strain, NCTC 11467(T), and the mutant strain were shown to be significantly more thermotolerant than other strains tested. Environmental strains were more persistent than the clinical strains in inulin and lecithin, indicating that patho-adaptation may have contributed to a reduction in the desiccation tolerance phenotype. However, the thermotolerance results could indicate that the ability to produce extracellular polysaccharide decreases thermotolerance. These results indicate that desiccation resistance may play a role in survival of C. sakazakii in dry IMF ingredients and processing plants; however, this trait may be of less importance in clinical environs. © 2011 The Authors. Journal of Applied Microbiology © 2011 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  4. On the use of a sunward-libration-point orbiting spacecraft as an IMF monitor for magnetospheric studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, T. J.; Crooker, N. U.; Siscoe, G. L.; Russell, C. T.; Smith, E. J.

    1984-01-01

    Magnetospheric studies often require knowledge of the orientation of the IMF. In order to test the accuracy of using magnetometer data from a spacecraft orbiting the sunward libration point for this purpose, the angle between the IMF at ISEE 3, when it was positioned around the libration point, and at ISEE 1, orbiting Earth, has been calculated for a data set of two-hour periods covering four months. For each period, a ten-minute average of ISEE 1 data is compared with ten-minute averages of ISEE 3 data at successively lagged intervals. At the lag time equal to the time required for the solar wind to convect from ISEE 3 to ISEE 1, the median angle between the IMF orientation at the two spacecraft is 20 deg, and 80% of the cases have angles less than 38 deg. The results for the angles projected on the y-z plane are essentially the same.

  5. Stratification of east-west plasma flow channels observed in the ionospheric cusp in response to IMF BY polarity changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rinne, Y.; Moen, J.; Carlson, H. C.; Hairston, M. R.

    2010-07-01

    During a period of predominantly north-westward flow for IMF BZ negative and IMF BY positive, a sequence of three distinct negative excursions of IMF BY resulted in a train of three eastward directed flow channels, interleaved by westward flow enhancements propagating into the polar cap. The high resolution of the EISCAT Svalbard radar data enables us to track formation and movement of the flow channels, which are interpreted as a sequence of intermittent reconnection alternating between different reconnection sites. Our observations are consistent with the view that a new region of reconnected flux manifests as development of a distinct flow channel near the polar cap boundary, and that successive events stay separated while pushing each other into the polar cap. Each flow channel will remain separated from neighboring channels mapping to different reconnection sites as long as the magnetic tension force with its associated field aligned current systems is maintained.

  6. Constraining the PopIII IMF with high-z GRBs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Q.; Maio, U.; Ciardi, B.; Salvaterra, R.

    2017-04-01

    We study the signatures of enrichment from PopIII stars in observations of PopII GRBs (GRBIIs) at high redshift by using numerical N-body/hydrodynamical simulations including atomic and molecular cooling, star formation and metal spreading from stellar populations with different initial mass functions (IMFs), yields and lifetimes. PopIII and PopII star formation regimes are followed simultaneously and both a top-heavy and a Salpeter-like IMF for pristine PopIII star formation are adopted. We find that the fraction of GRBIIs hosted in a medium previously enriched by PopIII stars (PopIII-dominated) is model-independent. Typical abundance ratios, such as [Si/O] versus[C/O] and [Fe/C] versus[Si/C], can help to disentangle enrichment from massive and intermediate PopIII stars, while low-mass first stars are degenerate with regular PopII generations. The properties of galaxies hosting PopIII-dominated GRBIIs are not very sensitive to the particular assumption on the mass of the first stars.

  7. Observations of IMF and seasonal effects in high-latitude convection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruohoniemi, J. M.; Greenwald, R. A.

    1995-01-01

    Strong interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) and seasonal effects in the convection of nightside ionospheric plasma are described. The findings are based on a statistical analysis of observations made with the Johns Hopkins University/ Applied Physics Lab (JHU/APL) HF radar located at Goose Bay, Labrador. For positive sign of the IMF dusk-dawn component, By greater than 0 the dawn cell is more crescent shaped and the dusk cell more round while for BY less than 0 these pairings of size and shape are reversed. The more extreme crescent /round cell dichotomy is obtained for BY greater than 0. The return flows associated with the crescent-shaped cell dominate at midnight MLT (magnetic local time); the reversal in the zonal velocity in the 67 deg-69 deg lambda (magnetic latitude) interval occurs 2.5 hr earlier in summer than in winter. The maximum effects are obtained on the nightside for the pairings By greater than 0, summer and BY less than 0, winter; the first produces the more structured cell in the morning, the second in the evening, and this cell dominates the return flow at midnight. The difference in the zonal flow reversals for these pairings exceeds 4 hr in MLT.

  8. IMF dependence of energetic oxygen and hydrogen ion distributions in the near-Earth magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, H.; Kronberg, E. A.; Nykyri, K.; Trattner, K. J.; Daly, P. W.; Chen, G. X.; Du, A. M.; Ge, Y. S.

    2017-05-01

    Energetic ion distributions in the near-Earth plasma sheet can provide important information for understanding the entry of ions into the magnetosphere and their transportation, acceleration, and losses in the near-Earth region. In this study, 11 years of energetic proton and oxygen observations (> 274 keV) from Cluster/Research with Adaptive Particle Imaging Detectors were used to statistically study the energetic ion distributions in the near-Earth region. The dawn-dusk asymmetries of the distributions in three different regions (dayside magnetosphere, near-Earth nightside plasma sheet, and tail plasma sheet) are examined in Northern and Southern Hemispheres. The results show that the energetic ion distributions are influenced by the dawn-dusk interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) direction. The enhancement of ion intensity largely correlates with the location of the magnetic reconnection at the magnetopause. The results imply that substorm-related acceleration processes in the magnetotail are not the only source of energetic ions in the dayside and the near-Earth magnetosphere. Energetic ions delivered through reconnection at the magnetopause significantly affect the energetic ion population in the magnetosphere. We also believe that the influence of the dawn-dusk IMF direction should not be neglected in models of the particle population in the magnetosphere.

  9. IMF dependence of energetic oxygen and hydrogen ion distributions in the near-Earth plasma sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Hao; Kronberg, Elena; Nykyri, Katariina; Daly, Patrick; Chen, Gengxiong; Du, Aimin; Ge, Yasong

    2017-04-01

    Energetic ion distributions in the near-Earth plasma sheet can provide important information for understanding the entry of ions into the magnetosphere, and their transportation, acceleration, and losses in the near-Earth region. In this study, 11 years of energetic proton and oxygen observations (> 100 keV) from Cluster/RAPID were used to statistically study the energetic ion distributions in the near-Earth region. The dawn-dusk asymmetries of the distributions in three different regions (dayside magnetosphere, near-Earth nightside plasma sheet, and tail plasma sheet) are examined in northern and southern hemispheres. The results show that the energetic ion distributions are influenced by the dawn-dusk IMF direction. The enhancement of intensity largely correlates with the location of the magnetic reconnection at the magnetopause and the consequent formation of a diamagnetic cavity in the same quadrant of the magnetosphere. The results imply that substorm-related processes in the magnetotail are not the only source of energetic ions in the dayside and the near-Earth plasma sheet. We propose that large-scale cusp diamagnetic cavities can be an additional source and can thus significantly affect the energetic ion population in the magnetosphere. We also believe that the influence of the dawn-dusk IMF direction should not be neglected in models of the particle population in the magnetosphere.

  10. Identifying Variations to the IMF at High-z Through Deep Radio Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, E. J.

    2011-06-01

    In this article I briefly describe how deep radio surveys may provide a means to identify variations in the upper end of the initial mass function (IMF) in star-forming galaxies at high redshifts (i.e., z ≳ 3). At such high redshifts, I argue that deep radio continuum observations at frequencies ≳10 GHz using next generation facilities (e.g., EVLA, MeerKAT, SKA/NAA) will likely provide the most accurate measurements for the ionizing photon rates (star formation rates; SFRs) of normal galaxies since their non-thermal emission should be highly suppressed due to the increased inverse Compton (IC) losses from the cosmic microwave background (CMB), leaving only thermal (free-free) emission detectable. Thus, a careful analysis of such observations in combination with future ALMA and JWST data, measuring the rest-frame far-infrared and UV emission from the same population of galaxies, may yield the best means to search for variability in the stellar IMF at such epochs.

  11. Solar Flare and IMF Sector Structure Effects in the Lower Ionosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lastovicka, J.

    1984-01-01

    About 1% of all sudden ionospheric disturbances (SIDs) observed at the Panska Ves Observatory (Czechoslovakia), were found to be not of solar-XUV origin. Among them, the very rare SWF events (observed at L = 2.4) of corpuscular origin are the most interesting. The IMF sector structure effects in the midlatitude lower ionosphere are minor in comparison with effects of solar flares, geomagnetic storms, etc. There are two basic types of effects. The first type is a disturbance, best developed in geomagnetic activity, and observed in the night-time ionosphere. It can be interpreted as a response to sector structure related changes of geomagnetic (= magnetospheric) activity. The other type is best developed in the tropospheric vorticity area index and is also observed in the day-time ionosphere in winter. This effect is quietening in the ionosphere as well as troposphere. While the occurrence of the former type is persistent in time, the latter is severely diminished in some periods. All the stratosphere, the 10-mb level temperature and height above Berlin-Tempelhof do not display any observable IMF section structure effect.

  12. Solar flare and IMF sector structure effects in the lower ionosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Lastovicka, J.

    1984-05-01

    About 1% of all sudden ionospheric disturbances (SIDs) observed at the Panska Ves Observatory (Czechoslovakia), were found to be not of solar-XUV origin. Among them, the very rare SWF events (observed at L 2.4) of corpuscular origin are the most interesting. The IMF sector structure effects in the midlatitude lower ionosphere are minor in comparison with effects of solar flares, geomagnetic storms, etc. There are two basic types of effects. The first type is a disturbance, best developed in geomagnetic activity, and observed in the night-time ionosphere. It can be interpreted as a response to sector structure related changes of geomagnetic (magnetospheric) activity. The other type is best developed in the tropospheric vorticity area index and is also observed in the day-time ionosphere in winter. This effect is quietening in the ionosphere as well as troposphere. While the occurrence of the former type is persistent in time, the latter is severely diminished in some periods. All the stratosphere, the 10-mb level temperature and height above Berlin-Tempelhof do not display any observable IMF section structure effect.

  13. Cluster Mass Dependent Truncation of the Upper IMF: Evidence from Observations and Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clarke, C.; Maschberger, T.

    2011-06-01

    We attempt to evaluate whether the integrated galactic initial mass function (IGIMF) is expected to be steeper than the initial mass function (IMF) within individual clusters through direct evaluation of whether there is a systematic dependence of maximum stellar mass on cluster mass. We show that the result is sensitive to observational selection biases and requires an accurate knowledge of cluster ages, particularly in more populous clusters. At face value there is no compelling evidence for non-random selection of stellar masses in low mass clusters but there is arguably some evidence that the maximum stellar mass is anomalously low (compared with the expectations of random mass selection) in clusters containing more than several thousand stars. Whether or not this effect is then imprinted on the IGIMF then depends on the slope of the cluster mass function. We argue that a more economical approach to the problem would instead involve direct analysis of the upper IMF in clusters using statistical tests for truncation of the mass function. When such an approach is applied to data from hydrodynamic simulations we find evidence for truncated mass functions even in the case of simulations without feedback.

  14. Observations of IMF and seasonal effects in high-latitude convection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruohoniemi, J. M.; Greenwald, R. A.

    1995-01-01

    Strong interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) and seasonal effects in the convection of nightside ionospheric plasma are described. The findings are based on a statistical analysis of observations made with the Johns Hopkins University/ Applied Physics Lab (JHU/APL) HF radar located at Goose Bay, Labrador. For positive sign of the IMF dusk-dawn component, By greater than 0 the dawn cell is more crescent shaped and the dusk cell more round while for BY less than 0 these pairings of size and shape are reversed. The more extreme crescent /round cell dichotomy is obtained for BY greater than 0. The return flows associated with the crescent-shaped cell dominate at midnight MLT (magnetic local time); the reversal in the zonal velocity in the 67 deg-69 deg lambda (magnetic latitude) interval occurs 2.5 hr earlier in summer than in winter. The maximum effects are obtained on the nightside for the pairings By greater than 0, summer and BY less than 0, winter; the first produces the more structured cell in the morning, the second in the evening, and this cell dominates the return flow at midnight. The difference in the zonal flow reversals for these pairings exceeds 4 hr in MLT.

  15. Observations of magnetospheric substorms occurring with no apparent solar wind/IMF trigger

    SciTech Connect

    Henderson, M.G.; Reeves, G.D.; Belian, R.D.; Murphree, J.S.

    1996-03-01

    An outstanding topic in magnetospheric physics is whether substorms are always externally triggered by disturbances in either the interplanetary magnetic field or solar wind, or whether they can also occur solely as the result of an internal magnetospheric instability. Over the past decade, arguments have been made on both sides of this issue. Horwitz and McPherron have shown examples of substorm onsets which they claimed were not externally triggered. However, as pointed out by Lyons, there are several problems associated with these studies that make their results somewhat inconclusive. In particular, in the McPherron et al. study, fluctuations in the B{sub y} component were not considered as possible triggers. Furthermore, Lyons suggests that the sharp decreases in the AL index during intervals of steady IMF/solar wind, are not substorms at all but rather that they are just enhancements of the convection driven DP2 current system that are often observed to occur during steady magnetospheric convection events. In the present study, we utilize a much more comprehensive dataset (consisting of particle data from the Los Alamos energetic particle detectors at geosynchronous orbit, IMP 8 magnetometer and plasma data, Viking UV auroral imager data, mid-latitude Pi2 pulsation data, ground magnetometer data and ISEE1 magnetic field and energetic particle data) to show as unambiguously as possible that typical substorms can indeed occur in the absence of an identifiable trigger in the solar wind/IMF.

  16. Investigating the IMF Cone Angle Control of Pc 3-4 Pulsations Observed on the Ground, 1: Initial Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owusu, N.; Engebretson, M. J.; Posch, J. L.; Lessard, M.

    2013-05-01

    ULF waves with periods in the 15-60 s range, denoted Pc 3-4 pulsations, are generated in Earth's ion foreshock upstream from the bow shock. These waves, whose frequency is directly proportional to the magnitude of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF), are most often observed in the dayside magnetosphere and on the ground when the angle between the IMF and the Earth-Sun line (the IMF cone angle) is < 45°. In this study we compared the occurrence and frequency of band-limited Pc 3-4 pulsations observed by search coil magnetometers at four near-cusp stations on Svalbard (Ny-Ålesund, Longyearbyen, Isfjord Radio, and Hornsund) from June 1, 2010 to December 31, 2011. IMF orientation and magnitude data provided by the OMNI database were used to calculate the IMF cone angle and the empirically expected Pc 3-4 frequency (f in Hz = 0.006 BIMF). This frequency was overplotted on 0-100 mHz daily Fourier spectrograms from these stations, and its trace was color-coded to represent 3 cone angle ranges: 0° - 40°, 40° - 50°, and 50° to 90°. These spectrograms then provided a quick visual test of the expected IMF control of the observed waves. Waves observed within 2 hours of local noon showed good agreement on nearly all days between the observed and expected wave frequency. On most days wave occurrence also coincided with intervals of low cone angle, but a number of days showed band-limited Pc3-4 waves simultaneous with cone angles considerably larger than 50°. Examination of solar wind plasma parameters in the OMNI data base suggests that slightly enhanced values of solar wind pressure (above ~1.5 nPa) are associated with these anomalous cases.

  17. Macroscopic perturbations of the Interplanetary Magnetic Field (IMF) by P/Halley as seen by the Giotto magnetometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raeder, J.; Neubauer, F. M.; Ness, N.; Burlaga, L. F.

    1986-01-01

    Giotto magnetic field data were used to analyze the macroscopic field structure in the vicinity of P/Halley. During the Giotto flyby at comet P/Halley the IMF showed a quite stable away polarity. Draping of magnetic field lines is clearly observed along the outbound leg of the trajectory. Inside the magnetic pile-up region the field reverses its polarity several times. A symmetry of oppositely magnetized sheets with respect to the nucleus is found and explained in terms of convected IMF features.

  18. The possible effect of the IMF By and Bz components on the high latitude COST 251 area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tulunay, Y.; Kaya, A.; Kaymaz, Z.

    1997-01-01

    The possible effects of the orientation of the IMF on the ionosphere has been studied by Tulunay (1995) using foF2 data from 15 ionospheric stations in Europe over the COST 238 area. The results showed that a good amount of the day to day variability of the mid-latitude ionospheric F region could be related to changes in orientation of the southward IMF Bz. This variability is quantified as the maximum change of deltafoF2. This paper investigates the effects of By distribution on the ionospheric critical frequencies.

  19. Large Scale Earth's Bow Shock with Northern IMF as Simulated by PIC Code in Parallel with MHD Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baraka, Suleiman

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we propose a 3D kinetic model (particle-in-cell, PIC) for the description of the large scale Earth's bow shock. The proposed version is stable and does not require huge or extensive computer resources. Because PIC simulations work with scaled plasma and field parameters, we also propose to validate our code by comparing its results with the available MHD simulations under same scaled solar wind (SW) and (IMF) conditions. We report new results from the two models. In both codes the Earth's bow shock position is found to be ≈14.8 R E along the Sun-Earth line, and ≈29 R E on the dusk side. Those findings are consistent with past in situ observations. Both simulations reproduce the theoretical jump conditions at the shock. However, the PIC code density and temperature distributions are inflated and slightly shifted sunward when compared to the MHD results. Kinetic electron motions and reflected ions upstream may cause this sunward shift. Species distributions in the foreshock region are depicted within the transition of the shock (measured ≈2 c/ ω pi for Θ Bn = 90° and M MS = 4.7) and in the downstream. The size of the foot jump in the magnetic field at the shock is measured to be (1.7 c/ ω pi ). In the foreshocked region, the thermal velocity is found equal to 213 km s-1 at 15 R E and is equal to 63 km s -1 at 12 R E (magnetosheath region). Despite the large cell size of the current version of the PIC code, it is powerful to retain macrostructure of planets magnetospheres in very short time, thus it can be used for pedagogical test purposes. It is also likely complementary with MHD to deepen our understanding of the large scale magnetosphere.

  20. Northward extension of Carolina slate belt stratigraphy and structure, South-Central Virginia: Results from geologic mapping

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hackley, P.C.; Peper, J.D.; Burton, W.C.; Horton, J.W.

    2007-01-01

    Geologic mapping in south-central Virginia demonstrates that the stratigraphy and structure of the Carolina slate belt extend northward across a steep thermal gradient into upper amphibolite-facies correlative gneiss and schist. The Neoproterozoic greenschist-facies Hyco, Aaron, and Virgilina Formations were traced northward from their type localities near Virgilina, Virginia, along a simple, upright, northeast-trending isoclinal syncline. This syncline is called the Dryburg syncline and is a northern extension of the more complex Virgilina synclinorium. Progressively higher-grade equivalents of the Hyco and Aaron Formations were mapped northward along the axial trace of the refolded and westwardly-overturned Dryburg syncline through the Keysville and Green Bay 7.5-minute quadrangles, and across the northern end of the Carolina slate belt as interpreted on previous geologic maps. Hyco rocks, including felsic metatuff, metawacke, and amphibolite, become gneisses upgrade with areas of local anatexis and the segregation of granitic melt into leucosomes with biotite selvages. Phyllite of the Aaron Formation becomes garnet-bearing mica schist. Aaron Formation rocks disconformably overlie the primarily felsic volcanic and volcaniclastic rocks of the Hyco Formation as evidenced by repeated truncation of internal contacts within the Hyco on both limbs of the Dryburg syncline at the Aaron-Hyco contact. East-northeast-trending isograds, defined successively by the first appearance of garnet, then kyanite ?? staurolite in sufficiently aluminous rocks, are superposed on the stratigraphic units and synclinal structure at moderate to high angles to strike. The textural distinction between gneisses and identifiable sedimentary structures occurs near the kyanite ?? staurolite-in isograd. Development of the steep thermal gradient and regional penetrative fabric is interpreted to result from emplacement of the Goochland terrane adjacent to the northern end of the slate belt during

  1. Prediction of Sym-H index by NARX neural network from IMF and solar wind data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, L.; Ma, S.-Y.; Liu, R.-S.; Schlegel, K.; Zhou, Y.-L.; Luehr, H.

    2009-04-01

    Similar to Dst, the Sym-H index is also an indicator of magnetic storm intensity, but having distinct advantage of higher time-resolution. In this study an artificial neural network (ANN) of Nonlinear Auto Regressive with eXogenous inputs (NARX) has been developed to predict for the first time Sym-H index from solar wind and IMF parameters. In total 73 great storm events during 1998 to 2006 are used, out of which 67 are selected to train the network and the other 6 samples including 2 super-storms for test. The newly developed NARX model shows much better capability than usual BP and Elman network in Sym-H prediction. When using IMF Bz, By and total B with a history length of 90 minutes along with solar wind proton density Np and velocity Vsw as the original external inputs of the ANN to predict Sym-H index one hour later, the cross-correlation between NARX network predicted and Kyoto observed Sym-H is 0.95 for the 6 test storms as a whole, even as high as 0.95 and 0.98 respectively for the two super-storms. This excellent performance of the NARX model can mainly be attributed to a feedback from the output neuron with a suitable length of about 120 min. to the external input. It is such a feedback that makes the ring current status properly brought into effect in the prediction of storm-time Sym-H index by our NARX network. Furthermore, different parameter combinations with different history length (70 to 120 min.) for IMF and solar wind data as external inputs are examined along with different hidden neuron number. It is found that the NARX network with 10 hidden units and with 100 min. length of Bz, Np and Vsw as external inputs provides the best results in Sym-H prediction. Besides, efforts have also been made to predict Sym-H longer time ahead, showing that the NARX network can predict Sym-H index 180 min. ahead with correlation coefficient of 0.94 between predicted and observed Sym-H and RMSE less than 19 nT for the 6 test samples.

  2. Statistical Properties of the Solar Wind and IMF at 1 AU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McPherron, R. L.

    2006-12-01

    During the declining phase of the solar cycle the evolution of the solar magnetic field produces large regions of unipolar magnetic field that create coronal holes and are the sources of high speed solar wind streams. These streams overtake and interact with slow solar wind emitted from the equatorial belt of closed magnetic field lines. These interaction regions corotate (CIR) with the Sun and sweep across the Earth once per solar rotation. Inside a CIR the properties of the solar wind are well organized by time relative to the interface between the two streams (epoch time). We have compiled lists of stream interfaces in solar cycle #22 (1994- 1996) and in cycle #23 (2003-2005) and used them to study the systematic properties of the solar wind and interplanetary magnetic field at 1 AU. We present the results as dynamic cumulative probability distributions (cdf) for different variables and as traces of the quartiles of these distributions as function of epoch time. We find that the solar wind is highly organized relative to the stream interface and therefore that geomagnetic activity driven by this wind is organized as well. This systematic behavior provides the basis for probabilistic forecasting by air mass climatology. If one can predict the arrival of a stream interface then within certain limits one can predict the probability that various measures of geomagnetic activity will lie within a given range. We also find that the climatology of the solar wind as measured at the Earth has a semiannual variation as a consequence of two different effects: the axial effect that causes the Earth to be at high or low heliographic latitude near equinoxes and the Rosenberg-Coleman (R-C) effect which states that the fraction of time the Earth samples a particular polarity of the IMF is dominated by the polar magnetic field of the Sun emanating from the hemisphere in which the Earth is located. A third phenomenon the Russell-McPherron (R-M) effect is important for the Earth

  3. Rapid northward shift of the Indian Monsoon on the Tibetan Plateau at the end of the Little Ice Age

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaolong; Xu, Baiqing; Günther, Franziska; Witt, Roman; Wang, Mo; Xie, Ying; Zhao, Huabiao; Li, Jiule; Gleixner, Gerd

    2017-09-01

    Variations in the Indian Monsoon (IM) and Westerlies (WS) significantly affect the climate on the Tibetan Plateau (TP) and have widespread ecological and socioeconomic impacts on the whole of Asian society. So far, however, the rate and magnitude of changes in the IM have still remained unclear. Here we report for the first time that the IM rapidly shifted northward at the end of the Little Ice Age (LIA). We used sediment proxies for humidity and moisture sources from the Taro Co Lake, which is located in the transition zone between the WS and IM. Our comprehensive survey of climate records for the TP and its peripheral mountain ranges revealed that the northern boundary of the IM (i.e., the southern boundary of the WS) lay along the southern slope of the Gandise Range ( 29.5°N) in the late LIA. In contrast, it passed quickly over the Gandise Range by at least 1.5° in latitude at the end of the LIA. Our results suggest that this rapid climatic shift was potentially triggered by the counteracting effects of blocking by the TP and its marginal orography, which hindered the northward movement of the IM, and the pulling thermal gradient of the TP.

  4. Pangea breakup and northward drift of the Indian subcontinent reproduced by a numerical model of mantle convection.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Masaki; Hamano, Yozo

    2015-02-12

    Since around 200 Ma, the most notable event in the process of the breakup of Pangea has been the high speed (up to 20 cm yr(-1)) of the northward drift of the Indian subcontinent. Our numerical simulations of 3-D spherical mantle convection approximately reproduced the process of continental drift from the breakup of Pangea at 200 Ma to the present-day continental distribution. These simulations revealed that a major factor in the northward drift of the Indian subcontinent was the large-scale cold mantle downwelling that developed spontaneously in the North Tethys Ocean, attributed to the overall shape of Pangea. The strong lateral mantle flow caused by the high-temperature anomaly beneath Pangea, due to the thermal insulation effect, enhanced the acceleration of the Indian subcontinent during the early stage of the Pangea breakup. The large-scale hot upwelling plumes from the lower mantle, initially located under Africa, might have contributed to the formation of the large-scale cold mantle downwelling in the North Tethys Ocean.

  5. Pangea breakup and northward drift of the Indian subcontinent reproduced by a numerical model of mantle convection

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, Masaki; Hamano, Yozo

    2015-01-01

    Since around 200 Ma, the most notable event in the process of the breakup of Pangea has been the high speed (up to 20 cm yr−1) of the northward drift of the Indian subcontinent. Our numerical simulations of 3-D spherical mantle convection approximately reproduced the process of continental drift from the breakup of Pangea at 200 Ma to the present-day continental distribution. These simulations revealed that a major factor in the northward drift of the Indian subcontinent was the large-scale cold mantle downwelling that developed spontaneously in the North Tethys Ocean, attributed to the overall shape of Pangea. The strong lateral mantle flow caused by the high-temperature anomaly beneath Pangea, due to the thermal insulation effect, enhanced the acceleration of the Indian subcontinent during the early stage of the Pangea breakup. The large-scale hot upwelling plumes from the lower mantle, initially located under Africa, might have contributed to the formation of the large-scale cold mantle downwelling in the North Tethys Ocean. PMID:25673102

  6. Eocene paleomagnetic pole for South America: Northward continental motion in the Cenozoic, opening of Drake Passage and Caribbean convergence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somoza, RubéN.

    2007-03-01

    A paleomagnetic study of Eocene volcanic rocks in Patagonia yields high unblocking temperature and high-coercivity magnetizations. Combining these results with those of a previous study on Patagonian Eocene basalts yields a high-precision, high-quality pole located at latitude 81°S, longitude 337.4°E, A95 = 5.7°. Critically, this paleopole is indistinguishable from that of the Late Cretaceous (circa 85-65 Ma) pole position of South America, indicating that the plate was essentially motionless with respect to the spin axis for a period of ˜45 m.y. The pole position places South America at higher (˜5°) than present-day latitudes during the Eocene, indicating that northward continental motion toward present-day latitudes must have been accomplished sometime since the late Eocene. Paleomagnetic and tectonic correlation admits the hypothesis that Cenozoic northward drift was associated with Oligocene-Miocene extension in the southern continental edge, leading to the opening of the Drake Passage, and it agrees with the timing of foredeep formation and development of fold-thrust belts in the northern continental edge. This positive correlation between the paleomagnetically predicted drift of a major continent with extension at its trailing edge and convergence at its leading edge during times for which seafloor tectonic fabric and the geological record are particularly well preserved illustrates the utility of paleomagnetism in constraining paleogeographic and tectonic reconstructions for pre-Cretaceous times.

  7. Investigating [X/Fe], IMF, and compositeness in integrated-light models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Baitian; Worthey, Guy

    2015-01-01

    Modelling elliptical galaxy integrated-light characteristics with old, metal-rich stellar populations is a common and promising way to study these distant objects. However, different model parameters may change the characteristics in a similar way, causing degeneracy, e.g., the age-metallicity degeneracy. Here, we investigate several under-appreciated effects with the evolving Worthey models, and discuss their detectabilities.We model composite stellar populations with realistic abundance distribution functions (ADFs), tracking the trends of individual elements as a function of overall heavy element abundance as observed in MW bulge stars in addition to solar neighborhood stars. Comparing bulge versus elliptical galaxies, Fe, Ti, and Mg trend about the same for both but C, Na, and Ca seem irreconcilably different.Exploring the behavior of abundance compositeness leads to the concepts of ``red lean'' where a narrower ADF appears more metal rich than a wide one, and ``red spread'' where the spectral difference between wide and narrow ADFs increases as the ADF peak is moved to more metal-rich values. The prospects of measuring the width of the ADF of an old stellar population were investigated and seem bright using UV to IR photometry.Next, we try to disentangle the effects of 1) low-mass cut-off; 2) IMF slope; and 3) AGB strength in several IMF-sensitive indices and NIR colors. In most of the NIR-optical colors, varying low-mass cut-off and AGB strength leads to about 0.03 mag drift, which is comparable to the observable limits. Using a mix of photometric and spectral absorption indices (e.g. [MgFe], Wing-Ford, V-K, and B-V) degeneracy can be lifted, although at an observationally challenging amplitude. We go on to include ADF width and abundance ratio effects, and discuss the accuracy of disentangling multiple effects from integrated-light measurements.

  8. Observations of IMF and seasonal effects in high-latitude convection

    SciTech Connect

    Ruohoniemi, J.M.; Greenwald, R.A.

    1995-05-01

    The authors describe strong interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) and seasonal effects in the convection of nightside ionospheric plasma. The findings are based on a statistical analysis of observations made with the JHU/APL HF radar located at Goose Bay, Labrador. For positive sign of the IMF dawn-dusk component, i.e., B{sub y}>0, the dawn cell is more crescent-shaped and the dusk cell more round while for B{sub y}<0 these pairings of size and shape are reversed. The more extreme crescent/round cell dichotomy is obtained for B{sub y}>0. The return flows associated with the crescent-shaped cell dominate at midnight MLT (Magnetic Local Time); the reversal in the zonal velocity in the 67{degrees}-69{degrees}{Lambda} (magnetic latitude) interval occurs 2 1/2 hr earlier for B{sub y}>0. The seasonal dependence of nightside convection resembles in important respects the B{sub y} dependence. Greater latitudinal velocity shears occur in the morning/afternoon sector for summer/winter and the return flow of this sector dominates at midnight. The zonal flow reversal occurs 2 1/2 hr earlier in summer than in winter. The maximum effects are obtained on the nightside for the pairings [B{sub y}>0, summer] and [B{sub y}<0, winter]; the first produces the more structured cell in the morning, the second in the evening, and this cell dominates the return flow at midnight. The difference in the zonal flow reversals for these pairings exceeds 4 hr in MLT. 15 refs., 4 figs.

  9. Dayside auroras during unusually large positive values of the IMF B z component

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vorobjev, V. G.; Yagodkina, O. I.

    2009-12-01

    The characteristics of dayside auroras during the large (16-24 nT) positive values of the IMF B z component, observed on January 14, 1988, during the interaction between the Earth's magnetosphere and the body of the interplanetary magnetic cloud, have been studied based on the optical observations on Heiss Island. A wide band of diffuse red luminosity with an intensity of 1-2 kilorayleigh (kR) was observed during 6 h in the interval 1030-1630 MLT at latitudes higher than 75° CGL. Rayed auroral arcs, the brightness of which in the 557.7 nm emission sharply increased to 3-7 kR in the postnoon sector immediately after the polarity reversal of the IMF B y component from positive to negative, were continuously registered within the band. Bright auroral arcs were observed at the equatorward edge of red luminosity. It has been found out that the red auroral intensity increases and the band equatorward boundary shifts to lower latitudes with increasing solar wind dynamic pressure. However, a direct proportional dependence of the variations in the auroral features on the dynamic pressure variations has not been found. It has been concluded that the source of bright discrete auroras is located in the region of the low-latitude boundary layer (LLBL) on closed geomagnetic field lines. The estimated LLBL thickness is ˜3 R e . It has been concluded that the intensity of the dayside red band depends on the solar wind plasma density, whereas the position of the position equatorward boundary depends on the dynamic pressure value and its variations.

  10. Radial Trends in IMF-sensitive Absorption Features in Two Early-type Galaxies: Evidence for Abundance-driven Gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McConnell, Nicholas J.; Lu, Jessica R.; Mann, Andrew W.

    2016-04-01

    Samples of early-type galaxies show a correlation between stellar velocity dispersion and the stellar initial mass function (IMF) as inferred from gravity-sensitive absorption lines in the galaxies’ central regions. To search for spatial variations in the IMF, we have observed two early-type galaxies with Keck/LRIS and measured radial gradients in the strengths of absorption features from 4000-5500 Å and 8000-10000 Å. We present spatially resolved measurements of the dwarf-sensitive spectral indices {Na} {{I}} (8190 Å) and Wing-Ford {{FeH}} (9915 Å), as well as indices for species of H, C2, CN, Mg, Ca, {{TiO}}, and Fe. Our measurements show a metallicity gradient in both objects, and Mg/Fe consistent with a shallow gradient in α-enhancement, matching widely observed trends for massive early-type galaxies. The {Na} {{I}} index and the CN1 index at 4160 Å exhibit significantly steeper gradients, with a break at r˜ 0.1 {r}{{eff}} (r˜ 300 pc). Inside this radius, {Na} {{I}} strength increases sharply toward the galaxy center, consistent with a rapid central rise in [Na/Fe]. In contrast, the ratio of the {{FeH}} to Fe index strength decreases toward the galaxy center. This behavior cannot be reproduced by a steepening IMF inside of 0.1 {r}{{eff}} if the IMF is a single power law. While gradients in the mass function above ˜ 0.4 {M}⊙ may occur, exceptional care is required to disentangle these IMF variations from the extreme variations in individual element abundances near the galaxies’ centers.

  11. Rapid Northward Spread of a Zooxanthellate Coral Enhanced by Artificial Structures and Sea Warming in the Western Mediterranean

    PubMed Central

    Serrano, Eduard; Coma, Rafel; Ribes, Marta; Weitzmann, Boris; García, María; Ballesteros, Enric

    2013-01-01

    The hermatypic coral Oculina patagonica can drive a compositional shift in shallow water benthic marine communities in the northwestern Mediterranean. Here, we analyze a long-term, large-scale observational dataset to characterize the dynamics of the species' recent northward range shift along the coast of Catalonia and examine the main factors that could have influenced this spread. The variation in the distributional range of Oculina patagonica was examined by monitoring 223 locations including natural and artificial habitats along >400 km of coastline over the last 19 years (1992–2010). Abundance of the species increased from being present in one location in 1992 to occur on 19% of the locations in 2010, and exhibited an acceleration of its spreading over time driven by the join action of neighborhood and long-distance dispersal. However, the pattern of spread diverged between artificial and natural habitats. A short lag phase and a high slope on the exponential phase characterized the temporal pattern of spread on artificial habitats in contrast to that observed on natural ones. Northward expansion has occurred at the fastest rate (22 km year−1) reported for a coral species thus far, which is sufficiently fast to cope with certain climate warming predictions. The pattern of spread suggests that this process is mediated by the interplay of (i) the availability of open space provided by artificial habitats, (ii) the seawater temperature increase with the subsequent extension of the growth period, and (iii) the particular biological features of O. patagonica (current high growth rates, early reproduction, and survival to low temperature and in polluted areas). These results are indicative of an ongoing fundamental modification of temperate shallow water assemblages, which is consistent with the predictions indicating that the Mediterranean Sea is one of the most sensitive regions to global change. PMID:23341904

  12. Genetic evidence of an East Asian origin and paleolithic northward migration of Y-chromosome haplogroup N.

    PubMed

    Shi, Hong; Qi, Xuebin; Zhong, Hua; Peng, Yi; Zhang, Xiaoming; Ma, Runlin Z; Su, Bing

    2013-01-01

    The Y-chromosome haplogroup N-M231 (Hg N) is distributed widely in eastern and central Asia, Siberia, as well as in eastern and northern Europe. Previous studies suggested a counterclockwise prehistoric migration of Hg N from eastern Asia to eastern and northern Europe. However, the root of this Y chromosome lineage and its detailed dispersal pattern across eastern Asia are still unclear. We analyzed haplogroup profiles and phylogeographic patterns of 1,570 Hg N individuals from 20,826 males in 359 populations across Eurasia. We first genotyped 6,371 males from 169 populations in China and Cambodia, and generated data of 360 Hg N individuals, and then combined published data on 1,210 Hg N individuals from Japanese, Southeast Asian, Siberian, European and Central Asian populations. The results showed that the sub-haplogroups of Hg N have a distinct geographical distribution. The highest Y-STR diversity of the ancestral Hg N sub-haplogroups was observed in the southern part of mainland East Asia, and further phylogeographic analyses supports an origin of Hg N in southern China. Combined with previous data, we propose that the early northward dispersal of Hg N started from southern China about 21 thousand years ago (kya), expanding into northern China 12-18 kya, and reaching further north to Siberia about 12-14 kya before a population expansion and westward migration into Central Asia and eastern/northern Europe around 8.0-10.0 kya. This northward migration of Hg N likewise coincides with retreating ice sheets after the Last Glacial Maximum (22-18 kya) in mainland East Asia.

  13. Genetic Evidence of an East Asian Origin and Paleolithic Northward Migration of Y-chromosome Haplogroup N

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Yi; Zhang, Xiaoming; Ma, Runlin Z.; Su, Bing

    2013-01-01

    The Y-chromosome haplogroup N-M231 (Hg N) is distributed widely in eastern and central Asia, Siberia, as well as in eastern and northern Europe. Previous studies suggested a counterclockwise prehistoric migration of Hg N from eastern Asia to eastern and northern Europe. However, the root of this Y chromosome lineage and its detailed dispersal pattern across eastern Asia are still unclear. We analyzed haplogroup profiles and phylogeographic patterns of 1,570 Hg N individuals from 20,826 males in 359 populations across Eurasia. We first genotyped 6,371 males from 169 populations in China and Cambodia, and generated data of 360 Hg N individuals, and then combined published data on 1,210 Hg N individuals from Japanese, Southeast Asian, Siberian, European and Central Asian populations. The results showed that the sub-haplogroups of Hg N have a distinct geographical distribution. The highest Y-STR diversity of the ancestral Hg N sub-haplogroups was observed in the southern part of mainland East Asia, and further phylogeographic analyses supports an origin of Hg N in southern China. Combined with previous data, we propose that the early northward dispersal of Hg N started from southern China about 21 thousand years ago (kya), expanding into northern China 12–18 kya, and reaching further north to Siberia about 12–14 kya before a population expansion and westward migration into Central Asia and eastern/northern Europe around 8.0–10.0 kya. This northward migration of Hg N likewise coincides with retreating ice sheets after the Last Glacial Maximum (22–18 kya) in mainland East Asia. PMID:23840409

  14. Rapid northward spread of a zooxanthellate coral enhanced by artificial structures and sea warming in the western Mediterranean.

    PubMed

    Serrano, Eduard; Coma, Rafel; Ribes, Marta; Weitzmann, Boris; García, María; Ballesteros, Enric

    2013-01-01

    The hermatypic coral Oculina patagonica can drive a compositional shift in shallow water benthic marine communities in the northwestern Mediterranean. Here, we analyze a long-term, large-scale observational dataset to characterize the dynamics of the species' recent northward range shift along the coast of Catalonia and examine the main factors that could have influenced this spread. The variation in the distributional range of Oculina patagonica was examined by monitoring 223 locations including natural and artificial habitats along >400 km of coastline over the last 19 years (1992-2010). Abundance of the species increased from being present in one location in 1992 to occur on 19% of the locations in 2010, and exhibited an acceleration of its spreading over time driven by the join action of neighborhood and long-distance dispersal. However, the pattern of spread diverged between artificial and natural habitats. A short lag phase and a high slope on the exponential phase characterized the temporal pattern of spread on artificial habitats in contrast to that observed on natural ones. Northward expansion has occurred at the fastest rate (22 km year(-1)) reported for a coral species thus far, which is sufficiently fast to cope with certain climate warming predictions. The pattern of spread suggests that this process is mediated by the interplay of (i) the availability of open space provided by artificial habitats, (ii) the seawater temperature increase with the subsequent extension of the growth period, and (iii) the particular biological features of O. patagonica (current high growth rates, early reproduction, and survival to low temperature and in polluted areas). These results are indicative of an ongoing fundamental modification of temperate shallow water assemblages, which is consistent with the predictions indicating that the Mediterranean Sea is one of the most sensitive regions to global change.

  15. Constraints of subducted slabs under the Indian Ocean on the northward motion of India from Gondwanaland towards Eurasia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suppe, John; Lin, Chris D. J.; Wu, Jonny; Kanda, Ravi V. S.

    2013-04-01

    We find an extensive swath of slabs in the lower mantle under the Indian Ocean at depths of 1000-2200km, with shallower slabs to the north under India and Eurasia at ~200-1500km. These slabs closely correspond to the well-known track that India has travelled northward from Gondwanaland toward its collision with Eurasia, viewed in the Indo-Atlantic moving hotspot reference frame, and account for a significant proportion of the predicted loss of the Ceno- and Neo-Tethyan Oceans since ~140Ma. Our work is based on our methodology of [1] mapping subducted slabs in global tomography (MITP08, Li et al. 2008) as 3D mid-slab surfaces in the Gocad environment, [2] quantitatively unfolding these surfaces to the surface of the earth in a spherical Earth model, minimizing changes in area and distortion, and [3] incorporating them into Gplates global plate tectonic reconstructions (http://www.earthbyte.org). These unfolded subducted slabs provide substantial quantitative constraints for the original location and extent of India and Greater India and for the nature and history of Ceno- and Neo-Tethys. We observe a distinct discontinuity in amplitude of p- and s-wave velocity anomalies between the higher-amplitude Neo-Tethyan slabs to the north under India and the Middle East and the lower-amplitude Ceno-Tethyan slabs under the central Indian Ocean, which is in agreement with a predicted large ~100Ma discontinuity in age-at-subduction between Neo- and Ceno-Tethys in existing plate-tectonic models (e.g. Müller et al., 2008; Seton et al, 2012). We present a plate tectonic reconstruction that incorporates these mapped slab constraints, with the implication that a substantial fraction of the Tethyan Ocean (~3000km) subducted southward under India at an early stage in the northward motion of India from Gondwanaland.

  16. Understanding the mechanisms behind the West African Monsoon northward extension during Mid-Holocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaetani, Marco; Messori, Gabriele; Zhang, Qiong; Flamant, Cyrille; Evan, Amato T.; Pausata, Francesco S. R.

    2016-04-01

    Understanding the West African monsoon (WAM) dynamics in the mid-Holocene (MH) is a crucial issue in climate modelling, because numerical models typically fail to reproduce the extensive precipitation suggested by proxy evidence. This discrepancy is largely due to unrealistic imposed land surface cover and aerosols. Numerical experiments are conducted by imposing a "green Sahara", along with a reduced dust concentration in the atmosphere, coherently with the MH environment in the region, and the atmospheric dynamics response and impact on precipitation are investigated. The response of the WAM system to the imposed conditions shows a dramatic augmentation of the precipitation across West Africa up to the Mediterranean coast. This follows a substantial reorganization of the regional circulation, with some monsoonal circulation features (Saharan heat low, African easterly jet, African easterly waves) weakened in favour of deep convection development over land. The simulated response is dominated by land cover changes, and the reduction in dust concentration further enhances the changes induced by the "green Sahara". The intensity and meridional extent of the WAM is fully consistent with proxy evidence. The results for the MH WAM present important implications for understanding future climate scenarios in the region, in the perspective of projected wetter conditions in West Africa.

  17. The Stellar Initial Mass Function in Early-type Galaxies from Absorption Line Spectroscopy. IV. A Super-Salpeter IMF in the Center of NGC 1407 from Non-parametric Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conroy, Charlie; van Dokkum, Pieter G.; Villaume, Alexa

    2017-03-01

    It is now well-established that the stellar initial mass function (IMF) can be determined from the absorption line spectra of old stellar systems, and this has been used to measure the IMF and its variation across the early-type galaxy population. Previous work focused on measuring the slope of the IMF over one or more stellar mass intervals, implicitly assuming that this is a good description of the IMF and that the IMF has a universal low-mass cutoff. In this work we consider more flexible IMFs, including two-component power laws with a variable low-mass cutoff and a general non-parametric model. We demonstrate with mock spectra that the detailed shape of the IMF can be accurately recovered as long as the data quality is high (S/N ≳ 300 Å‑1) and cover a wide wavelength range (0.4–1.0 μm). We apply these flexible IMF models to a high S/N spectrum of the center of the massive elliptical galaxy NGC 1407. Fitting the spectrum with non-parametric IMFs, we find that the IMF in the center shows a continuous rise extending toward the hydrogen-burning limit, with a behavior that is well-approximated by a power law with an index of ‑2.7. These results provide strong evidence for the existence of extreme (super-Salpeter) IMFs in the cores of massive galaxies.

  18. Extreme events of perceived temperature over Europe: a projected northward extension of dangerous areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scoccimarro, Enrico; Fogli, Pier Giuseppe; Gualdi, Silvio

    2017-04-01

    It is well known that an increase of temperature over Europe, both in terms of averages and extremes, is expected within the current century. In order to consider health impacts under warm conditions, it is important to take into account the combined effect of temperature and humidity on the human body. To this aim a basic index - the humindex - representative of the perceived temperature, under different scenarios and periods, has been investigated in this study. A very low concomitance of extreme temperature events and extreme humindex events is found over the present climate, reinforcing the importance to investigate not only extreme temperature and relative humidity future projections but also the combination of the two parameters. A set of 10-km resolution regional climate simulations provided within the EUR-11 EURO-CORDEX multi-model effort, demonstrates ability in representing the intense and extreme events of the humindex over the present climate and to be eligible as a tool to quantify future changes in geographical patterns of exposed areas over Europe. An enlargement of the domain subject to dangerous conditions is found since the middle of the current century, reaching 60 degrees North when considering really extreme events. The most significant increase in humindex extreme events is found when comparing the 2066-2095 projections under rcp8.5 scenario, to the 1966-2005 period: bearing in mind that changes in relative humidity may either amplify or offset the health effects of temperature extremes, a less pronounced projected reduction of relative humidity intensity in the Northern part of the European domain, associated to extreme temperature and humindex, makes Northern Europe the most prone region to a local increase of the humindex extremes.

  19. Pressure balance across the magnetopause during the solar wind event on 5 June 1998

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, X.; Lu, J. Y.; Wang, M.

    2017-05-01

    A three-dimensional adaptive magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) model, SWMF, is used to simulate the interaction between the solar wind and magnetosphere for a particular event on 5 June 1998, and the simulated results of this event is used to investigate the balances of the dynamic, thermal and magnetic pressure along the Sun-Earth line for the different conditions of interplanetary magnetic field (IMF). The conclusions are as follows: (1) outside the magnetopause, the total and thermal pressures are clearly correlated with upstream solar wind dynamic pressure and increase with the solar wind dynamic pressure. In contrast, the magnetic pressure decreases with the increasing intensity of the southward IMF due to the magnetic reconnection and is enhanced with the increasing intensity of the northward IMF due to the magnetic accumulation. It is similar to the variation inside the magnetopause; (2) the solar wind pressure coefficient is larger for the northward IMF than that for the southward IMF, but it has no obvious dependence on the upstream solar wind dynamic pressure; (3) the magnetic field compression ratio just inside the magnetopause is larger and more stable in northward IMF than in southward IMF; and (4) along the Sun-Earth line, the thermal pressure is dominant on the magnetopause in southward IMF, while the magnetic pressure is dominant on the magnetopause in northward IMF. The magnetic reconnection easily occurs for southward IMF, and results in magnetic pressure decreasing just inside the magnetopause. This factor plays a crucial role in the earthward displacement of the Earth's magnetopause for southward IMF. And the increasing of thermal pressure just outside the magnetopause also has contribution to this displacement, especially for lower IMF.

  20. IMF-Therapy (Intention controlled Myo-Feedback)--an innovative method in the treatment of peripheral nerve lesions.

    PubMed

    Hall, K; Schmidt, U; Schmidhammer, R

    2007-01-01

    Physiotherapy is a well established part of the rehabilitation of peripheral nerve paralysis. The aim of this type of treatment is to re-establish arbitrary functions by improving the patients' active and passive mobility as well as their strength and stamina. IMF-Therapy (Intention controlled Myo-Feedback) is an innovative method in the treatment of peripheral nerve lesions that goes beyond the purely neuro-scientific framework and also takes into account methods and concepts of the psychology of learning. The essential assumption is that things learnt in the past are firmly established in the long term motor memory and can be reactivated by the patient. From results achieved in 32 patients treated with this therapy it can be concluded that IMF-Therapy may be a promising additional rehabilitation tool in peripheral nerve lesion.

  1. Large scale temporal and radial gradients in the IMF - Helios 1, 2, ISEE-3, and Pioneer 10, 11

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slavin, J. A.; Smith, E. J.; Thomas, B. T.

    1984-01-01

    Recent investigations using measurements at 1 AU have discovered three types of long term variation in the interplanetary magnetic field: solar minimum decreases, solar maximum enhancements, and small decreases around solar reversal. In this study the 1972-1982 Helios 1, 2, ISEE-3, and Pioneer 10, 11 observations between 0.3 and 12 AU are examined to further investigate these changes. It was found that all three IMF solar cycle effects are also present in the Helios and Pioneer measurements, confirming that these variations occur throughout the low latitude heliosphere. In addition, the comparison of measurements by identical magnetometers on ISEE-3, Pioneer 10 and Pioneer 11 has revealed a more rapid decrease in IMF intensity than predicted by classical Parker theory. Causes and ramifications of both the long term variations and steeper-than-expected radial gradients in the interplanetary magnetic field are discussed.

  2. A global magnetohydrodynamic simulation of magnetospheric dynamics when the IMF is southward: Mapping to the auroral zone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, Raymond J.; Ogino, Tatsuki; Ashour-Abdalla, Maha; Raeder, Joachim

    1992-01-01

    A high resolution global magnetohydrodynamic simulation model is used to investigate magnetospheric dynamics during intervals with southward interplanetary magnetic field (IMF). When the southward IMF reaches the dayside magnetopause reconnection begins and magnetic flux is convected into the tail lobes. After about 35 m, reconnection begins within the plasma sheet near midnight at x = -14 RE. Later the x-line moves towards the magnetopause. The reconnection occurs just tailward of the region where the tail attaches onto the dipole dominated inner magnetosphere. Later when all the plasma sheet field lines have reconnected a plasmoid moves down the tail. The region of the ionosphere where the energy flux from the magnetosphere is greatest is calculated. The energy flux is confined to a region which approximates the auroral oval.

  3. [Distributions of polymorphism of ADD1, MC4R, H-FABP gene, associated with IMF and BF in 3 populations in pig].

    PubMed

    Li, Chang-Long; Pan, Yu-Chun; Meng, He; Wang, Zi-Lin; Huang, Xue-Gen

    2006-02-01

    Different breeds of pigs varied in traits of meat quality, especially between local abroad varieties. Intramuscular fat content (IMF) and back fat thickness (BF) have extra difference between Chinese breeds and foreign breeds. We have known that polymorphism of H-FABP, MC4R and ADD1 gene associated relation with IMF or BF in recent research. The Meishan, Sutai and Duroc x Landrace x Yorkshair become experimental animal in this research. Result show three breeds have different IMF and BF because different distributions of polymorphism three genes. Meishan has particular genetic background, so it should be protected. The results of associated analysis show that the polymorphism of three genes was associated traits of IMF and BF, polymorphism of MC4R gene was not associated traits BF. The molecular marker can apply to pig breeding by molecular marker-assisted selection (MAS).

  4. The relationship between the IMF B(y) and the distant tail (150-238 Re) lobe and plasmasheet B(y) fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsurutani, B. T.; Smith, E. J.; Jones, D. E.; Lepping, R. P.; Sibeck, D. G.

    1984-01-01

    The relationships between the Solar Magnetospheric (SM) y-component of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) and the lobe and plasmasheet magnetic fields have been studied for the two ISEE-3 deep tail passes. It is found that for positive sector IMFs, 13 percent of the interplanetary magnetic field penetrates into the aberrated north-dawn and south-dusk lobe quadrants, and about the same amount in the north-dusk and south-dawn lobe quadrants for negative sector IMFs. For the above cases, field penetration is significantly less for opposite polarity IMFs. The former results are generally consistent with open magnetospheric models, but the latter (the lack of response in certain quadrants) are unexplained by theory at this time. If the magnitude of the plasmasheet B(y) fields are related to plasma pressure anisotropies, very small anisotropies of about 1.01 are expected.

  5. IMF By effects on ground magnetometer response to increased solar wind dynamic pressure derived from global MHD simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozturk, Dogacan Su; Zou, Shasha; Slavin, James A.

    2017-05-01

    During sudden solar wind dynamic pressure enhancements, the magnetosphere undergoes rapid compression resulting in a reconfiguration of the global current systems, most notably the field-aligned currents (FACs). Ground-based magnetometers are traditionally used to study such compression events. However, factors affecting the polarity and magnitude of the ground-based magnetic perturbations are still not well understood. In particular, interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) By is known to create significant asymmetries in the FAC patterns. We use the University of Michigan Block Adaptive Tree Roe Upwind Scheme (BATS'R'US) magnetohydrodynamic code to investigate the effects of IMF By on the global variations of ground magnetic perturbations during solar wind dynamic pressure enhancements. Using virtual magnetometers in three idealized simulations with varying IMF By, we find asymmetries in the peak amplitude and magnetic local time of the ground magnetic perturbations during the preliminary impulse (PI) and the main impulse (MI) phases. These asymmetries are especially evident at high-latitude ground magnetometer responses where the peak amplitudes differ by 50 nT at different locations. We show that the FACs related with the PI are due to magnetopause deformation, and the FACs related with the MI are generated by vortical flows within the magnetosphere, consistent with other simulation results. The perturbation FACs due to pressure enhancements and their magnetospheric sources do not differ much under different IMF By polarities. However, the conductance profile affected by the superposition of the preexisting FACs and the perturbation FACs including their closure currents is responsible for the magnitude and location asymmetries in the ground magnetic perturbations.

  6. Unveiling Hidden Massive Stars: Star Formation and the IMF in Carina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, Michael; Povich, Matthew; McSwain, M. Virginia

    2014-02-01

    We propose two nights of observations with the OSIRIS IR spectrograph on SOAR to obtain spectra for a large sample of massive star candidates within the Carina Nebula. Target stars have been identified as OB candidates through the use of combined X-ray emission and IR SED fitting and are too extincted to be readily observed at optical wavelengths. We will obtain K-band spectroscopy of 56 highly extincted stars in order to identify their spectral type and luminosity class. The proposed observations will confirm or reject individual stars as massive members of the Carina nebula star forming complex. The placement of these stars around the nebula will address questions on the process of triggered star formation, and the wide distribution of targets may shed light on the idea that OB stars can form in isolation. Additionally, any new OB stars will bolster the high-mass end of the stellar IMF and lead to a more accurate determine of the total stellar mass and a better understanding of the recent star formation history within the region.

  7. Solar Wind and IMF Control of Large-Scale Ionospheric Currents and Their Time Variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juusola, L.; Kauristie, K.; Tanskanen, E.; Partamies, N.; Viljanen, A.; Andréeová, K.; van de Kamp, M.; Vanhamäki, H.; Milan, S. E.; Lester, M.; Grocott, A.; Imber, S. M.

    2014-12-01

    Patterns of high-latitude ionospheric currents are a manifestation of the solar wind-magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling. Rapid variations of the currents are associated with geomagnetically induced currents (GIC) in technological conductor systems and displays of bright, diverse auroras. One advantage of a ground-based magnetometer network over a low-orbit satellite is the possibility to distinguish between temporal and spatial variations in the data. Although ground magnetic field data can only yield distributions of ionospheric equivalent currents instead of the full horizontal and field-aligned current density, estimates for these can be obtained, under certain assumptions. We use data (1994-2013) from the ground-based IMAGE magnetometer network to derive statistical distributions of the large-scale ionospheric equivalent current density and its time-derivative as well as estimates for the field-aligned current density. These are compared with and validated against horizontal and field-aligned current density distributions obtained from low-orbit CHAMP satellite magnetic field data (2000-2010) and convection maps obtained from SuperDARN radar data (2000-2010). The ground-based distributions reveal a strong dependence of the dayside variations on radial interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) orientation and solar wind speed. The spatial distribution of enhanced nightside activity agrees with that of the average substorm bulge and depends on solar wind energy input into the magnetosphere. The most intense time variation events are related to substorm activity and occur on the nightside.

  8. The story of UGC 11919 - a galaxy which could possess a non-standard stellar IMF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saburova, Anna; Zasov, Anatoly; Uklein, Roman; Katkov, Ivan

    2015-08-01

    We performed long-slit observations of a spiral galaxy UGC11919 with the Russian 6-m telescope to study its kinematics and stellar population. The previous studies allowed to suspect that this galaxy possesses a peculiarly low mass-to-light ratio M/L of stellar population. A bottom-light stellar initial mass function (IMF) could explain the low value of M/L. The performed spectral observations and the estimation of stellar mass-to-light ratio for different evolutionary models using both the broad-band magnitudes and the detailed spectral data confirm this peculiarity if to accept the inclination angle i = 30 or higher, as it was obtained earlier from the optical isophotes and HI velocity field based on the WSRT observations. However we show that the HI isophotes are compatible with the lower value of i, hence the question of peculiarly low M/L remains open. The derived stellar kinematic profiles reveal a signature of kinematically decoupled nuclear disk in the galaxy. We show that the disk of UGC11919 is dynamically overheated independently of the adopted inclination angle - probably as the result of the gravitational interaction with companions which were found in the HI line.

  9. Therapeutic effect of TENS on post-IMF trismus and pain.

    PubMed

    Fagade, O O; Obilade, T O

    2003-12-01

    The study set out to investigate the therapeutic effect of Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation (TENS) in the alleviation of pain and post-IMF trismus, in patients undergoing jaw exercises to hasten mouth opening after being treated for fractures of the mandible. Two groups of patients, with 10 patients in each group, were used for the study. The groups were the experimental and the control groups. They were all treated for mandibular fractures, and had their jaws immobilized for 6 weeks, immediately after which they were started on jaw exercises. The Inter-incisal distances and number of acceptable wooden spatulae that the jaws could accommodate were noted and recorded. The experimental group was then placed on the TENS therapy for 20 minutes, after which the new inter-incisal distances and the number of acceptable wooden spatulae were recorded. The control group had no TENS therapy; the patients only waited for 20 minutes without any stimulation, before the new inter-incisal distances and the number of acceptable wooden spatulae were measured and recorded. It was observed that the inter-incisal distance and the number of acceptable wooden spatulae significantly increased in patients in the experimental group compared to the control group. It was concluded that TENS could be useful in relieving the pain associated with forced mouth-opening exercises aimed at overcoming trismus caused by muscle spasm, which is associated with prolonged immobilization of the jaws for the treatment of facial fractures.

  10. The Inframammary Fold (IMF): A Poorly Appreciated Landmark in Prosthetic/Alloplastic Breast Aesthetic and Reconstructive Surgery-Personal Experience.

    PubMed

    Atiyeh, Bishara; Ibrahim, Amir; Saba, Salim; Karamanoukian, Raffy; Chahine, Fadl; Papazian, Nazareth

    2017-08-01

    The inframammary fold (IMF) is the most critical visual landmark that affects final aesthetic outcome of augmentation mammoplasty and even post-mastectomy alloplastic breast reconstruction. Unfortunately, structural integrity of this landmark is greatly overlooked and very often neglected. Excessive undermining of the lower breast pole with aggressive disruption/lowering and subsequent poor reconstitution of the IMF scaffold combined with imbalanced implant-tissue dynamics may result in downward implant displacement with creep bottoming and upward tilt of the nipples. The current report reviews the experience of the senior author (BA) over 30 years in breast aesthetic and reconstructive surgery with IMF reconstruction and fixation to the chest wall at the inferior border of the implant. Illustrative cases are presented. This journal requires that authors assign a level of evidence to each article. For a full description of these Evidence-Based Medicine ratings, please refer to the Table of Contents or the online Instructions to Authors www.springer.com/00266 .

  11. Magnetopause surface waves triggered by a rotating IMF with the global MHD SWMF/BAT-S-RUS model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andriyas, T.; Spencer, E. A.

    2010-12-01

    The solar wind driving of magnetopause surface waves is only partly understood. In particular we do not have a picture of the magnetopause surface wave properties and behavior when a magnetic cloud event, which sometimes involves a rotating IMF, impinges on the magnetosphere. Here we investigate the effect of a twisting or rotational IMF under moderate solar wind velocity (about 500 km/s) upon the magnetosphere with the Global MHD BATS-R-US code. Synthetic solar wind data is constructed to simulate the most important features of a magnetic cloud event, but without including shock features. A sinusoidally varying By component accompanied by a cosinusoidally varying Bz component of the IMF is input into the model with magnitude 10-20 nT. The synthetic data is representative of the magnetic cloud event that occurred on October 3-7 2000. We use the results of the simulation to infer the modes, properties, and particularly the phase speed and wavelength of the surface wave structures.

  12. Is the flow-aligned component of IMF really able to impact the magnetic field structure of Venusian magnetotail?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rong, Z. J.; Stenberg, G.; Wei, Y.; Chai, L. H.; Futaana, Y.; Barabash, S.; Wan, W. X.; Shen, C.

    2016-11-01

    An earlier statistical survey suggested that the flow-aligned component of upstream interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) may play an important role in controlling the lobe asymmetries of the Venusian magnetotail. The tail current sheet would be displaced and the magnetic field configuration would show asymmetries with respect to the current sheet. The asymmetries are expected to be more evident when the flow-aligned component becomes dominant. Here with carefully selected cases as well as a statistical study based on Venus Express observations in the near-Venus tail, we show that the lobe asymmetries of the magnetic field as well as the displacement of the current sheet are common characteristics of the Venusian magnetotail. However, the asymmetries and the displacement of the current sheet do not show a significant dependence on the flow-aligned component of the IMF. Our results suggest that the flow-aligned component of IMF cannot penetrate into the near magnetotail to impact the magnetic field structure.

  13. Distinct responses of the low-latitude ionosphere to CME and HSSWS: The role of the IMF Bz oscillation frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-Zuluaga, J.; Radicella, S. M.; Nava, B.; Amory-Mazaudier, C.; Mora-Páez, H.; Alazo-Cuartas, K.

    2016-11-01

    In this work an attempt to identify the role of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) in the response of the ionosphere to different solar phenomena is presented. For this purpose, the day-to-day variability of the equatorial ionospheric anomaly (EIA) and the main ionospheric disturbances are analyzed during one coronal mass ejection (CME) and two high-speed solar wind streams (HSSWSs). The EIA parameters considered are the zonal electric field and both the strength and position of its northern crest. The disturbances being the prompt penetration of magnetospheric electric field (PPMEF) and disturbance dynamo electric field (DDEF) are studied using the magnetic response of their equivalent current systems. In accordance, ground-based Global Navigation Satellite Systems receivers and magnetometers at geomagnetic low latitudes in the American sector are used. During both phenomena, patterns of PPMEF related to fluctuations of the IMF are observed. Diurnal and semidiurnal magnetic oscillations are found to be likely related to DDEF. Comparisons among the EIA parameters and the DDEF magnetic response exhibit poor relation during the CME in contrast to good relation during the HSSWSs. It is concluded that the response of the low-latitude ionosphere to solar phenomena is largely determined through the oscillation frequency of the IMF Bz by affecting the generation of the PPMEF and DDEF differently. This is seen as an effect of how the energy from the solar wind is transferred into the magnetosphere-ionosphere system.

  14. THE NON-UNIVERSALITY OF THE LOW-MASS END OF THE IMF IS ROBUST AGAINST THE CHOICE OF SSP MODEL

    SciTech Connect

    Spiniello, C.; Trager, S. C.; Koopmans, L. V. E.

    2015-04-20

    We perform a direct comparison of two state-of-the art single stellar population (SSP) models that have been used to demonstrate the non-universality of the low-mass end of the initial mass function (IMF) slope. The two public versions of the SSP models are restricted to either solar abundance patterns or solar metallicity, too restrictive if one aims to disentangle elemental enhancements, metallicity changes, and IMF variations in massive early-type galaxies (ETGs) with star formation histories different from those in the solar neighborhood. We define response functions (to metallicity and α-abundance) to extend the parameter space for each set of models. We compare these extended models with a sample of Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) ETG spectra with varying velocity dispersions. We measure equivalent widths of optical IMF-sensitive stellar features to examine the effect of the underlying model assumptions and ingredients, such as stellar libraries or isochrones, on the inference of the IMF slope down to ∼0.1 M{sub ⊙}. We demonstrate that the steepening of the low-mass end of the IMF based on a non-degenerate set of spectroscopic optical indicators is robust against the choice of the stellar population model. Although the models agree in a relative sense (i.e., both imply more bottom-heavy IMFs for more massive systems), we find non-negligible differences in the absolute values of the IMF slope inferred at each velocity dispersion by using the two different models. In particular, we find large inconsistencies in the quantitative predictions of the IMF slope variations and abundance patterns when sodium lines are used. We investigate the possible reasons for these inconsistencies.

  15. Universal IMF versus dark halo response in early-type galaxies: breaking the degeneracy with the Fundamental Plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutton, Aaron A.; Macciò, Andrea V.; Mendel, J. Trevor; Simard, Luc

    2013-07-01

    We use the relations between aperture stellar velocity dispersion (σap), stellar mass (MSPS) and galaxy size (Re) for a sample of ˜150 000 early-type galaxies from Sloan Digital Sky Survey/DR7 to place constraints on the stellar initial mass function (IMF) and dark halo response to galaxy formation. We build λ cold dark matter-based mass models that reproduce, by construction, the relations between galaxy size, light concentration and stellar mass, and use the spherical Jeans equations to predict σap. Given our model assumptions (including those in the stellar population synthesis models), we find that reproducing the median σap versus MSPS relation is not possible with both a universal IMF and a universal dark halo response. Significant departures from a universal IMF and/or dark halo response are required, but there is a degeneracy between these two solutions. We show that this degeneracy can be broken using the strength of the correlation between residuals of the velocity-mass (Δlog σap) and size-mass (Δlog Re) relations. The slope of this correlation, ∂VR ≡ Δlog σap/Δlog Re, varies systematically with galaxy mass from ∂VR ≃ -0.45 at MSPS ˜ 1010 M⊙ to ∂VR ≃ -0.15 at MSPS ˜ 1011.6 M⊙. The virial Fundamental Plane (FP) has ∂VR = -1/2, and thus we find that the tilt of the observed FP is mass dependent. Reproducing this tilt requires both a non-universal IMF and a non-universal halo response. Our best model has mass-follows-light at low masses (MSPS ≲ 1011.2 M⊙) and unmodified Navarro, Frenk and White haloes at MSPS ˜ 1011.5 M⊙. The stellar masses imply a mass-dependent IMF which is `lighter' than Salpeter at low masses and `heavier' than Salpeter at high masses.

  16. Application of NARX neural network in storm-time SYM-H index prediction from IMF and solar wind data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Lei; Ma, S. Y.; Zhou, Yunliang; Cai, Hongtao

    In this study the NARX neural network has been used for the first time to predict high-resolution magnetic storm index of SYM-H from solar wind (SW) and IMF parameters. In total 73 great storm events with IMF/SW data available from ACE satellite during 1998 to 2006 are used to establish the ANN model. Out of them, 67 are used to train the network and the other 6 samples for test. Additionally, the NARX prediction model is also validated using IMF/SW data from WIND satellite for 7 great storms during 1995-1997 and 2005, as well as for the July 2000 Bastille day storm and November 2001 superstorm using Geotail and OMNI data at 1AU. Five interplanetary parameters of IMF Bz, By and total B components along with proton density and velocity of solar wind are used as the original external inputs of the neural network to predict the SYM-H index about one hour or an even longer time ahead. For the 6 test storms registered by ACE including two super-storms with minimum SYM-H less than -200 nT, the correlation coefficient between observed and NARX network predicted SYM-H is 0.95 as a whole, even as high as 0.95 and 0.98 with average relative variance of 13.2 percent and 7.4 percent for the two super-storms, respectively. The prediction for the 7 storms with WIND data is also satisfactory, showing averaged correlation coefficient about 0.91 and RMSE of 14.2 nT. The newly developed NARX model shows much better capability than Elman network for SYM-H prediction, which can partly be attributed to a key feedback to the input layer from the output neuron with a suitable length (about 120 min). This feedback means that nearly real information of the ring current status is effectively brought to taking part in the prediction of SYM-H index by ANN. The proper history length of the output-feedback may mainly reflect on average the characteristic time of ring current decay which involves various decay mechanisms with ion lifetimes from tens of minutes to tens of hours. Besides, it is

  17. IMF and [Na/Fe] abundance ratios from optical and NIR spectral features in early-type galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La Barbera, F.; Vazdekis, A.; Ferreras, I.; Pasquali, A.; Allende Prieto, C.; Röck, B.; Aguado, D. S.; Peletier, R. F.

    2017-01-01

    We present a joint analysis of the four most prominent sodium-sensitive features (Na D, Na I λ8190Å, Na I λ1.14 μm, and Na I λ2.21 μm), in the optical and near-infrared spectral ranges, of two nearby, massive (σ ˜ 300 km s-1), early-type galaxies (named XSG1 and XSG2). Our analysis relies on deep Very Large Telescope/X-Shooter long-slit spectra, along with newly developed stellar population models, allowing for [Na/Fe] variations, up to ˜1.2 dex, over a wide range of age, total metallicity, and initial mass function (IMF) slope. The new models show that the response of the Na-dependent spectral indices to [Na/Fe] is stronger when the IMF is bottom heavier. For the first time, we are able to match all four Na features in the central regions of massive early-type galaxies finding an overabundance of [Na/Fe] in the range 0.5-0.7 dex and a bottom-heavy IMF. Therefore, individual abundance variations cannot be fully responsible for the trends of gravity-sensitive indices, strengthening the case towards a non-universal IMF. Given current limitations of theoretical atmosphere models, our [Na/Fe] estimates should be taken as upper limits. For XSG1, where line strengths are measured out to ˜0.8 Re, the radial trend of [Na/Fe] is similar to [α/Fe] and [C/Fe], being constant out to ˜0.5 Re, and decreasing by ˜0.2-0.3 dex at ˜0.8 Re, without any clear correlation with local metallicity. Such a result seems to be in contrast to the predicted increase of Na nucleosynthetic yields from asymptotic giant branch stars and Type II supernovae. For XSG1, the Na-inferred IMF radial profile is consistent, within the errors, with that derived from TiO features and the Wing-Ford band presented in a recent paper.

  18. Northward migrating trees establish in treefall gaps at the northern limit of the temperate-boreal ecotone, Ontario, Canada.

    PubMed

    Leithead, Mark D; Anand, Madhur; Silva, Lucas C R

    2010-12-01

    Climate change is expected to promote migration of species. In ecotones, areas of ecological tension, disturbances may provide opportunities for some migrating species to establish in otherwise competitive environments. The size of and time since disturbance may determine the establishment ability of these species. We investigated gap dynamics of an old-growth red pine (Pinus resinosa Sol. ex Aiton) forest in the Great Lakes-St. Lawrence forest in northern Ontario, Canada, a transition zone between temperate and boreal forest. We investigated the effects of gaps of different sizes and ages on tree species abundance and basal area. Our results show that tree species from the temperate forest further south, such as red maple (Acer rubrum L.), red oak (Quercus rubra L.), and white pine (Pinus strobus L.), establish more often in large, old gaps; however, tree species that have more northern distributions, such as black spruce (Picea mariana Mill.), paper birch (Betula papyrifera Marsh.), and red pine show no difference in establishment ability with gap size or age. These differences in composition could not be attributed to autogenic succession. We conclude that treefall gaps in this forest facilitate the establishment of northward migrating species, potentially providing a pathway for future forest migration in response to recent changes in climate.

  19. Northward migration of the Cascadia forearc in the northwestern U.S. and implications for subduction deformation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wells, R.E.; Simpson, R.W.

    2001-01-01

    Geologic and paleomagnetic data from the Cascadia forearc indicate long-term northward migration and clockwise rotation of an Oregon coastal block with respect to North America. Paleomagnetic rotation of coastal Oregon is linked by a Klamath Mountains pole to geodetically and geologically determined motion of the Sierra Nevada block to derive a new Oregon Coast-North America (OC-NA) pole of rotation and velocity field. This long-term velocity field, which is independent of Pacific Northwest GPS data, is interpreted to be the result of Basin-Range extension and Pacific-North America dextral shear. The resulting Oregon Coast pole compares favorably to those derived solely from GPS data, although uncertainties are large. Subtracting the long-term motion from forearc GPS velocities reveals ENE motion with respect to an OC reference frame that is parallel to the direction of Juan de Fuca-OC convergence and decreases inland. We interpret this to be largely the result of subduction-related deformation. The adjusted mean GPS velocities are generally subparallel to those predicted from elastic dislocation models for Cascadia, but more definitive interpretations await refinement of the present large uncertainty in the Sierra Nevada block motion. Copyright ?? The Society of Geomagnetism and Earth, Planetary and Space Sciences (SGEPSS); The Seismological Society of Japan; The Volcanological Society of Japan; The Geodetic Society of Japan; The Japanese Society for Planetary Sciences.

  20. Site selection and resource depletion in black-tailed godwits Limosa l. limosa eating rice during northward migration.

    PubMed

    Lourenço, Pedro M; Mandema, Freek S; Hooijmeijer, Jos C E W; Granadeiro, José P; Piersma, Theunis

    2010-05-01

    1. During migratory stopovers, animals are under strong time stress and need to maximize intake rates. We examine how foragers react to resource depletion by studying the foraging ecology and foraging site selection of black-tailed godwits Limosa l. limosa staging in rice fields during their northward migration stopover (January-March 2007). 2. We analysed godwit abundance and foraging behaviour, sampled the availability of rice in the fields and used the functional response model to predict the giving-up density (GUD) of rice kernels when godwits should give up a rice field. Sightings of individually colour-marked birds were used to verify whether individuals moving between rice fields confirmed the predicted GUD. 3. Black-tailed godwit intake rates at different rice densities fitted Holling's functional response curve. The predicted GUD of rice necessary to balance allometric estimates of daily energy expenditure (DEE) and measured time budgets were confirmed by GUD measured in the field. 4. Individually marked birds moved towards rice fields with higher rather than lower rice densities more often than randomly expected. These birds increased the measured intake rates after this move. 5. Godwit foraging caused a decrease in the rice density of individual fields during the stopover period. Despite this, overall intake rates remained constant as godwits reacted to resource depletion by moving to a new foraging site as soon as their intake rate falls below the required levels to achieve DEE.

  1. Pleistocene northward fold propagation of the Jura within the southern URG: Insight from the coupling of mechanical and geomorphological modelling.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornu, T.; Cartier, S.; Niviere, B.; Winter, T.

    2003-04-01

    On the basis of geophysical, geomorphological and geological data, the modelling addresses the Plio-Pleistocene northward propagation of the Jura fold and thrust belt and its impact on the geomorphology. The structural domain comprises the area up to Mulhouse proceeding from a succession of four ramps (from north to south: Ferrette, Muespach, Magstatt and Rixheim) rooted within the late triassic, acting as a decollement. The mechanical modelling addresses the tectonics evolution of the domain and focuses onto the fault reactivation and its link with the triassic decollement level. This model accounts for 3D elastic deformation of the first kilometers in depth. The geomorphological modelling addresses the landscape evolution according to the tectonic movements, predicted with the mechanical modelling, and highlights the capture of the hydrographic network. Coupling between erosion and tectonic movements are examined through simple erosion power laws depending on local gradient and water discharge. The combination of the two approaches provides different scenarii for the faults reactivation history and the influence of the tectonics onto the observed large scale morphological features such as river profiles, river captures or diversion.

  2. The northward shift of the Tibetan Plateau as an important factor for understanding East Asian climate during Cenozoic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ran; Jiang, Dabang; Ramstein, Gilles; Zhang, Zhongshi; Lippert, Peter C.; Yu, Entao

    2017-04-01

    Previous climate modeling studies suggest that the surface uplift of the Himalaya-Tibetan plateau (TP) is a crucial parameter for the onset and enhancement of the East Asian monsoon during the Cenozoic. However, most of these studies have only considered the Himalaya-TP in its present location despite numerous geophysical studies that reconstruct the Himalaya-TP 10° or more of latitude to the south during the early Paleogene. We have designed a series of climate simulations that account for not only changes in the surface elevation of the Himalaya-TP, but also the latitudinal distribution of this regionally high elevation. Here we demonstrate that the East Asian climate strongly depends on the latitude of the Himalaya-TP. The northward motion of the Himalaya-TP likely contribute to the reorganization atmospheric circulation in East Asia, thereby leading to intensified inland Asian aridity and enhanced monsoon climate over East Asia. Moreover, our simulations also bring new constrains on the southern margin of a modern-elevation proto-Himalaya-TP in the Eocene.

  3. The northward tectonic transport in the southern Apennines: examples from the Capri Island and western Sorrento Peninsula (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vitale, Stefano; Tramparulo, Francesco D'Assisi; Ciarcia, Sabatino; Amore, Filomena Ornella; Prinzi, Ernesto Paolo; Laiena, Fabio

    2017-01-01

    We analyzed a thrust fault system located in the western Sorrento Peninsula and Capri Island (southern Italy) where several mesoscale structures related to the main thrusts, such as Riedel shear planes, overturned folds, minor thrust and back-thrust faults, suggest a dominant northward tectonic transport. Major and minor thrust faults, generally characterized by a ramp-flat geometry, involved the Mesozoic Apennine carbonates, the Middle Miocene foredeep, and the unconformable thrust-top basin deposits. The biostratigraphic analysis of calcareous nannoplankton assemblages on the thrust-top basin sediments indicates an age not older than late Tortonian. We propose that this out-of-sequence thrusting stage was related to a regional tectonic event widespread in the entire southern Apennines, probably occurred in the Pliocene time simultaneously with the activity of deep-seated thrust faults that involved the buried carbonates of the Apulian platform. These out-of-sequence thrust faults, here referred to as "envelopment thrusts," were enucleated in a lower structural level with respect to the allochthonous wedge, representing the W-E segments of large regional arcuate structures.

  4. Oxygen abundance in local disk and bulge: chemical evolution with a strictly universal IMF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caimmi, R.; Milanese, E.

    2009-09-01

    This paper has two parts: one about observational constraints related to the empirical differential oxygen abundance distribution (EDOD), and the other about inhomogeneous models of chemical evolution, in particular the theoretical differential oxygen abundance distribution (TDOD). In the first part, the EDOD is deduced from subsamples related to two different samples involving (i) N=532 solar neighbourhood (SN) stars within the range, -1.5<[Fe/H]<0.5, for which the oxygen abundance has been determined both in presence and in absence of the local thermodynamical equilibrium (LTE) approximation (Ramirez et al. in Astron. Astrophys. 465:271, 2007); and (ii) N=64 SN thick disk, SN thin disk, and bulge K-giant stars within the range, -1.7<[Fe/H]<0.5, for which the oxygen abundance has been determined (Melendez et al. in Astron. Astrophys. 484:L21, 2008). A comparison is made with previous results implying use of [O/H]-[Fe/H] empirical relations (Caimmi in Astron. Nachr. 322:241, 2001b; New Astron. 12:289, 2007) related to (iii) 372 SN halo subdwarfs (Ryan and Norris in Astron. J. 101:1865, 1991); and (iv) 268 K-giant bulge stars (Sadler et al. in Astron. J. 112:171, 1996). The EDOD of the SN thick + thin disk is determined by weighting the mass, for assumed SN thick to thin disk mass ratio within the range, 0.1-0.9. In the second part, inhomogeneous models of chemical evolution for the SN thick disk, the SN thin disk, the SN thick + thin disk, the SN halo, and the bulge, are computed assuming the instantaneous recycling approximation. The EDOD data are fitted, to an acceptable extent, by their TDOD counterparts with the exception of the thin or thick + thin disk, where two additional restrictions are needed: (i) still undetected, low-oxygen abundance thin disk stars exist, and (ii) a single oxygen overabundant star is removed from a thin disk subsample. In any case, the (assumed power-law) stellar initial mass function (IMF) is universal but gas can be inhibited from

  5. Prediction of SYM-H index during large storms by NARX neural network from IMF and solar wind data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, L.; Ma, S. Y.; Zhou, Y. L.

    2010-02-01

    Similar to the Dst index, the SYM-H index may also serve as an indicator of magnetic storm intensity, but having distinct advantage of higher time-resolution. In this study the NARX neural network has been used for the first time to predict SYM-H index from solar wind (SW) and IMF parameters. In total 73 time intervals of great storm events with IMF/SW data available from ACE satellite during 1998 to 2006 are used to establish the ANN model. Out of them, 67 are used to train the network and the other 6 samples for test. Additionally, the NARX prediction model is also validated using IMF/SW data from WIND satellite for 7 great storms during 1995-1997 and 2005, as well as for the July 2000 Bastille day storm and November 2001 superstorm using Geotail and OMNI data at 1 AU, respectively. Five interplanetary parameters of IMF Bz, By and total B components along with proton density and velocity of solar wind are used as the original external inputs of the neural network to predict the SYM-H index about one hour ahead. For the 6 test storms registered by ACE including two super-storms of min. SYM-H<-200 nT, the correlation coefficient between observed and NARX network predicted SYM-H is 0.95 as a whole, even as high as 0.95 and 0.98 with average relative variance of 13.2% and 7.4%, respectively, for the two super-storms. The prediction for the 7 storms with WIND data is also satisfactory, showing averaged correlation coefficient about 0.91 and RMSE of 14.2 nT. The newly developed NARX model shows much better capability than Elman network for SYM-H prediction, which can partly be attributed to a key feedback to the input layer from the output neuron with a suitable length (about 120 min). This feedback means that nearly real information of the ring current status is effectively directed to take part in the prediction of SYM-H index by ANN. The proper history length of the output-feedback may mainly reflect on average the characteristic time of ring current decay which

  6. Hall-MHD simulations of the magnetosphere-northward solar wind interface : the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability as an entry mechanism for the solar wind through mixing and reconnections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leroy, Matthieu; Keppens, Rony

    2016-04-01

    The transfer of matter from the solar-wind to the Earth's magnetosphere during southward solar wind is mostly well understood but the processes governing the same phenomenon during northward solar wind remains to be fully apprehended. Numerous numerical studies have investigated the topic with many interesting results but most of these were considering two-dimensional situations with simplified magnetic configuration and often neglecting the inhomogeneities for the sake of clarity. Given the typical parameters at the magnetosphere-solar wind interface, the situation must be considered in the frame of Hall-MHD, due to the fact that the current layers widths and the gradient lengths can be in the order of the ion inertial length. As a consequence of Hall-MHD creating a third vector component from two planar ones, and also because magnetic perturbations can affect the field configuration at a distance in all directions and not only locally, three-dimensional treatment is necessary. In this spirit three-dimensional simulations of a configuration approaching the conditions leading to the development of Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities at the flank of the magnetosphere during northward oriented solar-wind are performed as means to study the entry of solar-wind matter into Earth's magnetic field. In the scope of assessing the effect of the Hall-term in the physical processes, the simulations are also performed in the MHD frame. Furthermore the influence of the density and velocity jump through the shear layer on the rate of mass entering the magnetosphere is explored. Indeed, depending on the exact values of the physical quantities, the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability may have to compete with secondary instabilities and the non-linear phase may exhibit vortex merging and large-scale structures reorganisation, creating very different mixing layers, or generate different reconnection sites, locally and at a distance. These different configurations may have discernible signatures

  7. Changes in energy intake and cost of transport by skipjack tuna (Katsuwonus pelamis) during northward migration in the northwestern Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoki, Yoshinori; Kitagawa, Takashi; Kiyofuji, Hidetada; Okamoto, Suguru; Kawamura, Tomohiko

    2017-06-01

    Energy intake during the northward migration of tagged juvenile skipjack tuna (Katsuwonus pelamis) was estimated using the heat increment of feeding (HIF) determined through peritoneal cavity temperature data acquired with an archival tag. The effectiveness of this method was confirmed by feeding experiments, even in a species without visceral heat exchangers. Applying these experimental results to the data from tagged fish in the wild revealed that the estimated energy intake of skipjack tuna was, on average, 2.2 times greater in temperate waters than in subtropical waters. This difference was likely due to the differences in the food supply between habitats. In contrast, the estimated energy cost of their daily travel distance decreased with northward migration. This result suggests that skipjack spend less energy in acquiring prey in temperate than in subtropical waters since prey are available in higher densities, thereby providing excess energy for growth or lipid reserves.

  8. The northward shift of Meiyu rain belt and its possible association with rainfall intensity changes and the Pacific-Japan pattern

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Qingjiu; Sun, Yuting; You, Qinglong

    2016-12-01

    The meridional location change of Meiyu rain belt and its relationship with the rainfall intensity and circulation background changes for the period 1958-2009 are examined using daily rainfall datasets from 756 stations in China, the 6-h ERA-Interim reanalyses, CRU monthly temperature and daily outgoing long-wave radiation (OLR) data from the US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). The results indicate that the Meiyu rain belt experienced a northward shift in the late 1990s in response to global warming. Moreover, the intensity of interannual and day-to-day variability of rainfall within Meiyu period has been increasing in the warming climate. The amplification of the variability within Meiyu period over the northern Yangtze-Huai River Valley (YHRV) is much larger than that of the southern YHRV. The large difference in the trends of variance within the Meiyu period between these two regions induces a spatial varying for different rainfall categories in terms of intensity. More significant positive trends in heavy and extreme heavy rainfall occur over northern YHRV compared with southern YHRV, which is a crucial indicator of changes in the rain band, despite the observation of an increase in heavy and very heavy rain events and a decrease in weak events throughout the entire YHRV. A composite of the atmospheric circulation indicates that intense northward horizontal transport and the convergence of water vapor fluxes are the immediate causes of the rain band shift. Besides, through forcing a northward extended convection over the tropics, the Pacific-Japan (P-J) pattern induces a northward expansion of western Pacific Subtropical High, leading to intensified convergence and enhanced rainfall over Northern YHRV.

  9. Northward expansion and rainfall seasonality amplification of the mediterranean climate zones projected in 21st century scenario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alessandri, Andrea; Cherchi, Annalisa; De Felice, Matteo; Mariotti, Annarita; Pan, Yutong; Zeng, Ning

    2013-04-01

    The Mediterranean climate is a major climate type of the Köppen classification that is characterized by hot, dry summers and cool, wet winters and located between about 30° and 45° latitude on the western sides of the continents (Koppen, 1900; Lionello 2012). By applying the latest development of the Koppen-Geiger classification scheme, we assessed the projected change of Mediterranean climate areas in the 21st century under the RCP4.5 stabilization scenario. The capability of the CMIP5 models in reproducing realistic Mediterranean climate regions is firstly assessed globally for the historical period (1980-2005). The projected multi-model change in the 21st century with respect to the historical period is then evaluated with particular focus on the Euro-Mediterranean region. In the northern hemisphere over both the Euro-Mediterranean and the Western-US regions, the Mediterranean climate zones expand considerably during the 21st century. In particular, over Europe, the expansion is accompanied by a northward shift of the Mediterranean climate in countries like UK, France, even Scandinavia, while its southern margins being replaced by the arid climate types. This behavior characterizes some part of southern Italy, southern Greece and Middle East, where the annual mean precipitation decreases below the threshold that characterizes arid climates. In the Euro-Mediterranean sector, the poleward expansion of the Mediterranean-type climate zone is related to the amplification of the rainfall seasonal cycle. In fact, the difference between winter and summer precipitation increases to fulfill the Mediterranean climate seasonality in more regions towards the north. By applying a vertically-integrated moisture budget analysis we show that the amplification of rainfall seasonality is primarily related to the "direct moisture effect" (i.e. the increase of moisture transport by assuming no change in atmospheric circulation), thus consistent with a "poor-get-poorer" mechanism

  10. Remagnetization and northward coastwise transport of Franciscan Complex Rocks, northern California: A reinterpretation of the paleomagnetic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagstrum, Jonathan T.

    1990-10-01

    (middle Cretaceous to Oligocene) for the Franciscan rocks. Subsequent northward diplacements (800 to 3700 km) and clockwise rotations (56° and 154°) of these rocks inferred from the paleomagnetic data are consistent with potential displacements along the western margin of North America during late Mesozoic and Cenozoic time calculated using examples of modern subduction zones and current plate reconstruction models.

  11. Kelvin-Helmholtz vortices observed by Themis at the dusk side of the magnetopause under southward IMF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qing, Yan Guang; McFadden, James; Parks, George; Shen, Chao; Mozer, Forrest; Chen, professor. Tao; Cai, Chunlin

    Under southward interplanetary magnetic field (IMF), 3 spacecraft of Themis observed several crossings of the magnetopause periodically at the duskside of the magnetopause, with tailward shear flows in the magnetosheath and significant sunward returning flows inside the magnetopause. The observed flow velocity shows rotating features for each of the spacecraft, and periodical enhancements could be seen in the vorticity calculated normal to the 3-point spacecraft plain based on the 3-point velocity measurements. The rotating features of the velocity and the periodic enhancements in the normal vorticity could be considered the evidence of the Kelvin-Helmholtz vortices due to the velocity shear at the dusk side of the magnetopause. The tailward propagation of the vortices along the flank magnetopause could be notable in the time lags from one spacecraft to another, which could be estimated as about 330 km/s, similar to the previous estimate under southward IMF. At the edges of the vortices, enhancements in the magnetic field due to the compression of the magnetic field could be found. By investigating the difference between the observed and convective electric fields, the non-convective electric field of 5-8 mV/m was observed at small scale from electron gyro-radius to ion gyro-radius, some of which consistent with the compression of the magnetic field at the distorted magnetopause. The non-convective electric field might possibly be one of the factors to induce possible reconnection inside the vortices.

  12. Exploring the substellar IMF in the Taurus cloud. New brown dwarfs in the Taurus star forming region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guieu, S.; Dougados, C.; Monin, J.-L.; Magnier, E.; Mart{í}n, E.

    Recent studies of the substellar population in the Taurus cloud have revealed a deficit of substellar objects by a factor ≃ 2 compared to the Trapezium cluster population (Briceno et al. 1998; Luhman 2000). If confirmed, the higher low-mass cutoff in Taurus could have strong implications on IMF and substellar formation models. However, all studies to date have concentrated on the highest stellar density regions of the Taurus cloud. Reipurth & Clarke (2001) have proposed that brown dwarfs are stellar embryos ejected from their birth site early in their evolution. In order to test this scenario and investigate a possible spatial segregation between stars and brown dwarfs, we have performed a large scale optical survey of the Taurus cloud covering a total area of ≃ 30 deg2 down to a mass detection limits of 15 M_Jup. We first present results from a spectroscopic follow-up of a sub-sample of substellar candidates that revealed 4 new Brown Dwarfs and one Very Low Mass Taurus member. We then discuss the selection of candidates from a larger scale optical survey and the implications for the substellar IMF in Taurus.

  13. Hα-FUV Flux Ratios of Local Volume Galaxies: Effects of Systematic Biases on Upper IMF Constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Lent C.; Weisz, D. R.; Johnson, B. D.; Skillman, E. D.; LVL Team

    2011-01-01

    Recent observational evidence has shown that dwarf galaxies exhibit lower Hα-FUV flux ratios than typical star-forming galaxies. While this fact has been interpreted as evidence for a variable upper IMF, these results are subject to systematics due to imperfect internal dust attenuation corrections and other biases. Using observations of 127 Local Volume star-forming galaxies derived from the LVL and SDSS datasets, we explore how different internal dust corrections and sample completeness can affect the resulting physical interpretation. We also examine the susceptibility of our Hα-FUV ratio distribution and correlation analyses to biases that result from our choice of independent parameter (e.g., stellar mass, R-band surface brightness). We then apply our understanding of these factors to test the possibility that the observed ratio distribution could be the result of age effects. Using model star formation histories, we can explain the distribution of Hα-FUV ratios without invoking variations in the upper IMF.

  14. The developmental changes and effect on IMF content of H-FABP and PPARgamma mRNA expression in sheep muscle.

    PubMed

    Huang, Zhi-Guo; Xiong, Li; Liu, Zhen-Shan; Qiao, Yong; Liu, Shou-Ren; Ren, Hang-Xing; Xie, Zhuang; Liu, Guo-Qing; Li, Xue-Bin

    2006-06-01

    Male Kazak sheep and Xinjiang fine wool sheep of different ages were selected to investigate the developmental changes and effect on intramuscular fat (IMF) content of heart fatty acid-binding protein (H-FABP) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARgamma) mRNA expression in muscle. Longissimus dorsal muscle was sampled to measure IMF content; and total RNA was extracted to determine H-FABP and PPARgamma mRNA expression levels by real-time PCR. The results showed that: (1) The IMF content increased continuously with growing and showed significant differences (P<0.05) between ages in male Kazak sheep, but no such differences (P>0.05) existed in Xinjiang fine wool sheep. Furthermore, the IMF content in Kazak sheep was very much higher (P<0.01) than that of the other breed from day 30 to 90; (2) H-FABP mRNA expression level was the highest on day 2 and showed significant differences (P<0.05) between ages in male Kazak sheep as well as in Xinjiang fine wool sheep. In the former breed, the expression reached the lowest point at day 30, and then rose continuously. But in the latter breed, it declined continuously from day 2 to 90, and then increased; (3) Significant differences (P<0.05) of PPARgamma mRNA expression between ages occurred in both breeds. In male Kazak sheep, PPARgamma mRNA expression declined from day 2 to 90, while in the other breed it increased continuously from day 2 to 60, but reached the lowest level at day 90, then increased; (4) In male Kazak sheep, the mRNA expression level of H-FABP was highly positively correlated (r=0.737, P<0.01) with IMF content from day 30 to 90, but that of PPARgamma was highly negatively correlated (r=-0.835, P<0.01) with IMF content from day 2 to 90.

  15. Detecting the Gender Dimension of the Choice of the Teaching Profession Prior to the Economic Crisis and IMF (International Monetary Fund) Memorandum in Greece--A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asimaki, Anna; Vergidis, Dimitris K.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this research paper is the investigation of, and the sociological approach to, and interpretation of the attitudes of male and female students in the University Department of Primary Education (U.D.P.E.) at the University of Patras in Greece, before the enforcement of the IMF Memorandum, concerning the choice of the teaching…

  16. The SL2S galaxy-scale lens sample. V. dark matter halos and stellar IMF of massive early-type galaxies out to redshift 0.8

    SciTech Connect

    Sonnenfeld, Alessandro; Treu, Tommaso; Marshall, Philip J.; Suyu, Sherry H.; Gavazzi, Raphaël; Auger, Matthew W.; Nipoti, Carlo

    2015-02-17

    Here, we investigate the cosmic evolution of the internal structure of massive early-type galaxies over half of the age of the universe. We also perform a joint lensing and stellar dynamics analysis of a sample of 81 strong lenses from the Strong Lensing Legacy Survey and Sloan ACS Lens Survey and combine the results with a hierarchical Bayesian inference method to measure the distribution of dark matter mass and stellar initial mass function (IMF) across the population of massive early-type galaxies. Lensing selection effects are taken into account. Furthermore, we found that the dark matter mass projected within the inner 5 kpc increases for increasing redshift, decreases for increasing stellar mass density, but is roughly constant along the evolutionary tracks of early-type galaxies. The average dark matter slope is consistent with that of a Navarro-Frenk-White profile, but is not well constrained. The stellar IMF normalization is close to a Salpeter IMF at log M * = 11.5 and scales strongly with increasing stellar mass. No dependence of the IMF on redshift or stellar mass density is detected. The anti-correlation between dark matter mass and stellar mass density supports the idea of mergers being more frequent in more massive dark matter halos.

  17. The SL2S galaxy-scale lens sample. V. dark matter halos and stellar IMF of massive early-type galaxies out to redshift 0.8

    DOE PAGES

    Sonnenfeld, Alessandro; Treu, Tommaso; Marshall, Philip J.; ...

    2015-02-17

    Here, we investigate the cosmic evolution of the internal structure of massive early-type galaxies over half of the age of the universe. We also perform a joint lensing and stellar dynamics analysis of a sample of 81 strong lenses from the Strong Lensing Legacy Survey and Sloan ACS Lens Survey and combine the results with a hierarchical Bayesian inference method to measure the distribution of dark matter mass and stellar initial mass function (IMF) across the population of massive early-type galaxies. Lensing selection effects are taken into account. Furthermore, we found that the dark matter mass projected within the innermore » 5 kpc increases for increasing redshift, decreases for increasing stellar mass density, but is roughly constant along the evolutionary tracks of early-type galaxies. The average dark matter slope is consistent with that of a Navarro-Frenk-White profile, but is not well constrained. The stellar IMF normalization is close to a Salpeter IMF at log M * = 11.5 and scales strongly with increasing stellar mass. No dependence of the IMF on redshift or stellar mass density is detected. The anti-correlation between dark matter mass and stellar mass density supports the idea of mergers being more frequent in more massive dark matter halos.« less

  18. THE SL2S GALAXY-SCALE LENS SAMPLE. V. DARK MATTER HALOS AND STELLAR IMF OF MASSIVE EARLY-TYPE GALAXIES OUT TO REDSHIFT 0.8

    SciTech Connect

    Sonnenfeld, Alessandro; Treu, Tommaso; Marshall, Philip J.; Suyu, Sherry H.; Gavazzi, Raphaël; Auger, Matthew W.; Nipoti, Carlo

    2015-02-20

    We investigate the cosmic evolution of the internal structure of massive early-type galaxies over half of the age of the universe. We perform a joint lensing and stellar dynamics analysis of a sample of 81 strong lenses from the Strong Lensing Legacy Survey and Sloan ACS Lens Survey and combine the results with a hierarchical Bayesian inference method to measure the distribution of dark matter mass and stellar initial mass function (IMF) across the population of massive early-type galaxies. Lensing selection effects are taken into account. We find that the dark matter mass projected within the inner 5 kpc increases for increasing redshift, decreases for increasing stellar mass density, but is roughly constant along the evolutionary tracks of early-type galaxies. The average dark matter slope is consistent with that of a Navarro-Frenk-White profile, but is not well constrained. The stellar IMF normalization is close to a Salpeter IMF at log M {sub *} = 11.5 and scales strongly with increasing stellar mass. No dependence of the IMF on redshift or stellar mass density is detected. The anti-correlation between dark matter mass and stellar mass density supports the idea of mergers being more frequent in more massive dark matter halos.

  19. Boosting Lyα and He II λ1640 Line Fluxes from Population III Galaxies: Stochastic IMF Sampling and Departures from Case-B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mas-Ribas, Lluís; Dijkstra, Mark; Forero-Romero, Jaime E.

    2016-12-01

    We revisit calculations of nebular hydrogen Lyα and He ii λ1640 line strengths for Population III (Pop III) galaxies, undergoing continuous, and bursts of, star formation. We focus on initial mass functions (IMFs) motivated by recent theoretical studies, which generally span a lower range of stellar masses than earlier works. We also account for case-B departures and the stochastic sampling of the IMF. In agreement with previous work, we find that departures from case-B can enhance the Lyα flux by a factor of a few, but we argue that this enhancement is driven mainly by collisional excitation and ionization, and not due to photoionization from the n = 2 state of atomic hydrogen. The increased sensitivity of the Lyα flux to the high-energy end of the galaxy spectrum makes it more subject to stochastic sampling of the IMF. The latter introduces a dispersion in the predicted nebular line fluxes around the deterministic value by as much as a factor of ∼4. In contrast, the stochastic sampling of the IMF has less impact on the emerging Lyman Werner photon flux. When case-B departures and stochasticity effects are combined, nebular line emission from Pop III galaxies can be up to one order of magnitude brighter than predicted by “standard” calculations that do not include these effects. This enhances the prospects for detection with future facilities such as the James Webb Space Telescope and large, ground-based telescopes.

  20. The SL2S Galaxy-scale Lens Sample. V. Dark Matter Halos and Stellar IMF of Massive Early-type Galaxies Out to Redshift 0.8

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonnenfeld, Alessandro; Treu, Tommaso; Marshall, Philip J.; Suyu, Sherry H.; Gavazzi, Raphaël; Auger, Matthew W.; Nipoti, Carlo

    2015-02-01

    We investigate the cosmic evolution of the internal structure of massive early-type galaxies over half of the age of the universe. We perform a joint lensing and stellar dynamics analysis of a sample of 81 strong lenses from the Strong Lensing Legacy Survey and Sloan ACS Lens Survey and combine the results with a hierarchical Bayesian inference method to measure the distribution of dark matter mass and stellar initial mass function (IMF) across the population of massive early-type galaxies. Lensing selection effects are taken into account. We find that the dark matter mass projected within the inner 5 kpc increases for increasing redshift, decreases for increasing stellar mass density, but is roughly constant along the evolutionary tracks of early-type galaxies. The average dark matter slope is consistent with that of a Navarro-Frenk-White profile, but is not well constrained. The stellar IMF normalization is close to a Salpeter IMF at log M * = 11.5 and scales strongly with increasing stellar mass. No dependence of the IMF on redshift or stellar mass density is detected. The anti-correlation between dark matter mass and stellar mass density supports the idea of mergers being more frequent in more massive dark matter halos.

  1. Model and observation comparison of the universal time and IMF by dependence of the ionospheric polar hole

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sojka, J. J.; Schunk, R. W.; Hoegy, W. R.; Grebowsky, J. M.

    1991-01-01

    The polar ionospheric F-region often exhibits regions of marked density depletion. These depletions have been observed by a variety of polar orbiting ionospheric satellites over a full range of solar cycle, season, magnetic activity, and universal time (UT). An empirical model of these observations has recently been developed to describe the polar depletion dependence on these parameters. Specifically, the dependence has been defined as a function of F10.7 (solar), summer or winter, Kp (magnetic), and UT. Polar cap depletions have also been predicted /1, 2/ and are, hence, present in physical models of the high latitude ionosphere. Using the Utah State University Time Dependent Ionospheric Model (TDIM) the predicted polar depletion characteristics are compared with those described by the above empirical model. In addition, the TDIM is used to predict the IMF By dependence of the polar hole feature.

  2. Statistical investigation of IMF Bz effects on energetic (0.1- to 16-keV) magnetospheric O+ ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lennartsson, O. W.

    1995-12-01

    More than 2 years of magnetospheric O+ data from the Plasma Composition Experiment on the ISEE 1 spacecraft are compared, in a statistical manner, with concurrent data on the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) and the solar wind plasma in an attempt to clarify the geophysical responses to varying solar wind inputs, in particular to variations in the GSM Bz component of the IMF. It is found that the energy density of 0.1- to 16-keV O+ ions in the plasma sheet, inside of 23RE, is well correlated with the average solar wind energy flux during the preceding few hours, whether that flux is measured by its electromagnetic (Poynting) component P or by its far greater kinetic component K. Although P and K are well correlated with each other, the correlation of the O+ energy density is slightly better with K than with P during times of positive Bz, while the opposite holds for negative Bz. In either case the O+ energy density is more nearly proportional to K, and, given a typical value of K, there is at most a marginal (less than a factor of 2) increase in this density associated with a negative Bz. Except for this latter effect, which can perhaps be taken as evidence that a change in polarity of Bz from positive to negative may induce ``unloading'' of internal tail energy, there is no evidence in these O+ data, including data from the inner magnetosphere (L<10), that a negative, or southward, Bz is inherently favorable to the transfer of solar wind power across the magnetopause. These findings, together with the results of correlating the hourly AE index with P and K, suggest that the strong dependence of the AE on the Bz polarity is substantially exaggerated by the lack of AE magnetometers above 71° magnetic latitude.

  3. Prevalence of autoantibodies (ANA, anti ds-DNA, ENA, IMF) and rheumatic syndromes in patients with lymphoproliferative diseases.

    PubMed

    Chloraki-Bobota, A; Megalakaki, C; Repousis, P; Chalkiopoulou, Ir; Lalaki, I; Trafalis, D T; Athanassiou, A E; Mitsouli-Mentzikof, Chr

    2006-01-01

    In the development of rheumatic syndromes as well as of lymphoproliferative disorders it is probable that there are common genetic, environmental and immunoregulatory pathogenetic mechanisms. The purpose of this study was to determine the frequency of simultaneous presentation of both lymphoma or other lymphoproliferative diseases, and rheumatic syndromes. In this study included were all patients with lymphoproliferative diseases (1920 patients) followed at our hospital during the last 5 years. 312/1920 (16.2%) patients presented with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL), 645/1920 (33.5%) had myeloma, 558/1920 (29%) had leukemia and miscellaneous other hematological malignancies (Hodgkin's lymphoma, cryoglogulinaemia etc) had 405/1920 patients (21%). Antinuclear antibodies (ANA), ribosome P and intermediate filament antibodies (IMF) were measured by immunofluorescence (IF). Anti-double-stranded DNA (ds-DNA) antibodies and extractable nuclear antigens (ENA: Sm, RNP, SSA, SSB, Scl70) were measured by ELISA and the rheumatoid factor (RF) by nephelometry. 388/1920 (4.6%) patients were ANA positive (antibody titres>1/160). On the other hand, clinical symptoms attributed autoimmune diseases (arthralgias, morning stiffness etc) plus autoantibodies other than ANA were present only in 8/312 (2.56%) patients with NHL, among them one with anti-cardiolipin antibodies. It is interesting that from these 8 patients, 3 had MALT lymphoma and 3 diffuse B-cell large cell lymphoma. Also, we detected anti-IMF and IgM and lgG anti-CMV antibodies in 2/312 (0.42%) patients with NHL. We conclude that the simultaneous presence of lymphoproliferative diseases and rheumatic syndromes are more frequent among lymphoma patients than in other lymphoproliferative diseases. Therefore, the screening of antibodies in NHL patients may be useful for the discovery and the treatment of an underlying autoimmune disease.

  4. The role of the northward-directed (sub)surface limb of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation during the 8.2 ka Event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tegzes, A. D.; Jansen, E.; Telford, R. J.

    2014-02-01

    The so-called "8.2 ka Event" has been widely regarded as a major climate perturbation over the Holocene. It is most readily identifiable in the oxygen-isotope records from Greenland ice cores as an approximately 160 yr-long cold interval between 8250-8090 yr BP. The prevailing view has been that the cooling over Greenland, and potentially over the northern North Atlantic at least, was triggered by the catastrophic final drainage of the Agassiz-Ojibway proglacial lake as part of the remnant Laurentide Ice Sheet collapsed over Hudson Bay at around 8420 ± 80 yr BP. The consequent freshening of surface waters in the northern North Atlantic Ocean and the Nordic Seas resulted in weaker overturning, hence reduced northward heat transport. Here we present proxy records from site JM97-MD95-2011 on the mid-Norwegian Margin indicating a (sharp) decline in the strength of the eastern branch of the Atlantic Inflow into the Nordic Seas immediately following a uniquely large drop in (sub)surface ocean temperatures coeval with the lake outbursts. We propose that the final drainage of Lake Agassiz-Ojibway was accompanied by a major iceberg discharge from Hudson Bay, which resulted in the cooling of the northward-directed northern Gulf Stream-North Atlantic Drift-Norwegian Atlantic Current system. Since our current-strength proxy records from the mid-Norwegian Margin do not evidence an exceptionally strong reduction in the main branch of the Atlantic Inflow into the Nordic Seas at the time, we argue that a chilled northward-directed (sub)surface-current system and an already colder background climate state could be the main factors responsible for the 8.2 ka climate perturbation.

  5. East flank of the Sibumasu block in NW Thailand and Myanmar and its possible northward continuation into Yunnan: a review and suggested tectono-stratigraphic interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ridd, Michael F.

    2015-05-01

    The east flank of the Sibumasu block was a passive continental margin, and in NW Thailand is marked by the absence of the autochthonous Middle Permian-Triassic platform carbonates which are widespread across the rest of Sibumasu further west. Instead, the carbonates are represented by hemipelagic cherts, mudstones and sandstones including turbidites. During the northward drift of Sibumasu, following its Early Permian rifting from Gondwana, an accretionary complex was present where Palaeotethyan pelagic rocks as old as Devonian were subducted beneath the Sukhothai volcanic arc. At the time of Sibumasu's collision with the Sukhothai arc, beginning in the Middle Triassic, the accretionary complex was thrust westwards across the east flank of Sibumasu. It is suggested that in the Late Triassic the thrust pile which had been the accretionary complex underwent erosion and was the source of terrigenous clastic rocks deposited further west in a foredeep basin. The boundary of Sibumasu's east flank with the Permo-Triassic carbonate platform further west is the arcuate Mae Ping-Nam Teng Fault system. Notwithstanding later Cenozoic strike-slip displacement, those faults (as well as the Mae Yuam Fault) are interpreted to have had an earlier history of westward-directed Indosinian thrusting. Northwards in Myanmar and Yunnan the Sibumasu Permo-Triassic carbonate shelf continues as the Shan Plateau and Baoshan Block. The east flank is represented by the Changning-Menglian Belt, and the Palaeotethys 'cryptic suture' in Thailand possibly joins with the Lancangjiang Suture.

  6. Fault geometry and cumulative offsets in the central Coast Ranges, California: Evidence for northward increasing slip along the San Gregorio-San Simeon-Hosgri fault

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Langenheim, V.E.; Jachens, R.C.; Graymer, R.W.; Colgan, J.P.; Wentworth, C.M.; Stanley, R.G.

    2012-01-01

    Estimates of the dip, depth extent, and amount of cumulative displacement along the major faults in the central California Coast Ranges are controversial. We use detailed aeromagnetic data to estimate these parameters for the San Gregorio–San Simeon–Hosgri and other faults. The recently acquired aeromagnetic data provide an areally consistent data set that crosses the onshore-offshore transition without disruption, which is particularly important for the mostly offshore San Gregorio–San Simeon–Hosgri fault. Our modeling, constrained by exposed geology and in some cases, drill-hole and seismic-reflection data, indicates that the San Gregorio–San Simeon–Hosgri and Reliz-Rinconada faults dip steeply throughout the seismogenic crust. Deviations from steep dips may result from local fault interactions, transfer of slip between faults, or overprinting by transpression since the late Miocene. Given that such faults are consistent with predominantly strike-slip displacement, we correlate geophysical anomalies offset by these faults to estimate cumulative displacements. We find a northward increase in right-lateral displacement along the San Gregorio–San Simeon–Hosgri fault that is mimicked by Quaternary slip rates. Although overall slip rates have decreased over the lifetime of the fault, the pattern of slip has not changed. Northward increase in right-lateral displacement is balanced in part by slip added by faults, such as the Reliz-Rinconada, Oceanic–West Huasna, and (speculatively) Santa Ynez River faults to the east.

  7. Dichothermal layer deepening in relation with halocline depth change associated with northward shrinkage of North Pacific western subarctic gyre in early 2000s

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagano, Akira; Wakita, Masahide; Watanabe, Shuichi

    2016-02-01

    In the western subarctic North Pacific, a wind-driven cyclonic circulation, called the western subarctic gyre (WSAG), exists. We examined year-to-year changes of the gyre and hydrographic structures, applying the altimetry-based gravest empirical mode (AGEM) method to hydrographic and altimetric sea surface height (SSH) data, and relation to the in situ variation of the temperature minimum layer, i.e., the dichothermal layer, depth at station K2 (47∘ N, 160∘ E). The AGEM-based geostrophic volume transport and the streamfunction of the WSAG in the top 1000-dbar layer show that the gyre changes substantially. From the late 1990s to the mid-2000s, the gyre shrunk northward. Due to the shrinkage, the halocline bottom, which is equivalent to the top of the main pycnocline, deepens at K2 outside the central part of the gyre. The downward displacement of the dichothermal layer at K2 was found to be significantly related to that of the underlying halocline due to the northward shrinkage of the WSAG.

  8. Possible relationship between changes in IMF, M7+ earthquakes and VEI index, during the transition between the solar minimum cycle 23 and the rise of solar cycle 24

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casati, Michele; Straser, Valentino

    2013-04-01

    Numerous scientific papers seem to suggest a possible influence of solar activity on geological dynamics (hypothesis triggers earthquakes or volcanic activity) on Earth. In the following study, all earthquakes around the globe with a magnitude greater than or equal to 7, from January 2010 to November 2012, were taken into account which corresponds to the appearance of the first sunspot of Solar Cycle SC24. The data was then compared with the graph that shows the variations of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF). This second track is the result of a moving average equal to 27 (solar rotation of Bartel) starting from the daily values of the field, detected by the magnetometer on board the probe Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE). The analysis reveals a first major change in February 2010, when the IMF changes from 4.5 nT to about 5.8 nT . A second identical significant change is found in February 2011, when the IMF, went from 4.5 nT to about 5.8 nT. In March 2012, we have, the other way around, a third important change in the IMF, with later's dynamics registering a variation from 5.6 nT to about 6.8 nT. We find that the three most important seismic events of the last three years (M8.8 in Chile 27/02/2010; M9 in Japan on 11/03/2011, and M8.6 on 11/04/2012 in Sumatra) occurred at the same time or slightly after the peaks (Bmax) of increase in the magnetic field of the heliosphere "facing the Earth" were reached. The analysis also suggests further connections between earthquakes with M> 7 and when the peak (maximum value the IMF) were reached, recorded in other changes in the field in these three years. Like, for example, the earthquake of M7.5 in India of 12/06/2010, when the IMF increased from 4.5 nT to 5.2 nT, or the earthquake in Sumatra 25/10/2010, when the IMF went from 4.4 nT to 5.1 nT. The variation of the IMF, recorded in May 2011, from 4.7 nT to 5.9 nT, relates, for example, not only with the M7.6 earthquake in Kermadec (07/06/2011), but also with

  9. Northward invasion of the parasitic deer ked ( Lipoptena cervi), is there geographical variation in pupal size and development duration?

    PubMed

    Kaunisto, Sirpa; Härkönen, Laura; Niemelä, Pekka; Roininen, Heikki; Ylönen, Hannu

    2011-03-01

    The deer ked (Lipoptena cervi) is a common ectoparasite of cervids. During the last decades the species has rapidly invaded in northern Europe, especially in Finland, towards the north and increased its prevalence on the moose population. Consequently, during this rapid invasion the deer ked has faced more severe climatic conditions. We studied whether pupal size (measured as pupal weight) and pupal development duration of the deer ked varies along historical invasion zones and temperature zones towards north in Finland. Moreover, we explored possible size- and gender-dependent variation in pupal development duration. We divided wild-collected pupae in respect to their origin in two ways: (1) temperature zones (from south-west to colder north-east) and (2) invasion history (from early to late establishment). We reared pupae in the controlled laboratory conditions in identical temperature and light conditions. Pupal size decreased towards north and the smaller pupae developed faster. However, the results do not show differences in pupal size or developmental characteristics between the invasion zones. This supports the idea of rapid developmental plasticity of the deer ked and that not the invasion history but the current temperature regime determines the life history of the deer ked when invading towards a colder environment.

  10. Reconstructing the low-mass IMF of the Orion Nebula Cluster through HST photometry in the H2O band at 1.4micron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giulia Ubeira Gabellini, Maria; Ubeda, Leonardo; Da Rio, Nicola; Robberto, Massimo; HST Treasury Program on the Orion Nebula Team

    2016-01-01

    We present a progress report on a 52-orbit Hubble Treasury Program aimed at investigating two key characteristics of the Orion Nebula Cluster: a) the low-mass tail of the IMF, down to a few Jupiter masses; b) the dynamical evolution of clusters, as revealed by stellar proper motions. The program, completed a few weeks ago, uses WFC3 and ACS in coordinated parallel mode to perform a synoptic survey in the 1.345micron H2O feature and in the F775W Ic broad-band. In this contribution we concentrate on the WFC3 photometry; the strength of the H2O absorption feature is strongly correlated with the effective temperature of low-mass stars, brown dwarfs and planetary-mass objects, and allows extending the IMF down to lowest masses formed by gravitational collapse. We present the first results on the central and densest part of the cluster.

  11. The evolution of CNO isotopes: a new window on cosmic star formation history and the stellar IMF in the age of ALMA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romano, D.; Matteucci, F.; Zhang, Z.-Y.; Papadopoulos, P. P.; Ivison, R. J.

    2017-09-01

    We use state-of-the-art chemical models to track the cosmic evolution of the CNO isotopes in the interstellar medium of galaxies, yielding powerful constraints on their stellar initial mass function (IMF). We re-assess the relative roles of massive stars, asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars and novae in the production of rare isotopes such as 13C, 15N, 17O and 18O, along with 12C, 14N and 16O. The CNO isotope yields of super-AGB stars, novae and fast-rotating massive stars are included. Having reproduced the available isotope enrichment data in the solar neighbourhood, and across the Galaxy, and having assessed the sensitivity of our models to the remaining uncertainties, e.g. nova yields and star formation history, we show that we can meaningfully constrain the stellar IMF in galaxies using C, O and N isotope abundance ratios. In starburst galaxies, where data for multiple isotopologue lines are available, we find compelling new evidence for a top-heavy stellar IMF, with profound implications for their star formation rates and efficiencies, perhaps also their stellar masses. Neither chemical fractionation nor selective photodissociation can significantly perturb globally averaged isotopologue abundance ratios away from the corresponding isotope ones, as both these processes will typically affect only small mass fractions of molecular clouds in galaxies. Thus, the Atacama Large Millimeter Array now stands ready to probe the stellar IMF, and even the ages of specific starburst events in star-forming galaxies across cosmic time unaffected by the dust obscuration effects that plague optical/near-infrared studies.

  12. Bifurcation and Hysteresis of the Magnetospheric Structure with a varying Southward IMF: Field Topology and Global Three-dimensional Full Particle Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cai, DongSheng; Tao, Weinfeng; Yan, Xiaoyang; Lembege, Bertrand; Nishikawa, Ken-Ichi

    2007-01-01

    Using a three-dimensional full electromagnetic particle model (EMPM), we have performed global simulations of the interaction between the solar wind and the terrestrial magnetosphere, and have investigated its asymptotic stability. The distance between the dayside magnetopause subsolar point and the Earth center, R(sub mp) is measured, as the intensity of southward IMF |B(sub z)| is slowly varying. Based on the field topology theory, one analyzes the variation of R(sub mp) as a reference index of the dynamics of this interaction, when IMF |B(sub z)| successively increases and decreases to its original value. Two striking results are observed. First, as the IMF |B(sub z)| increases above a critical value, the variation of R(sub mp) suddenly changes (so called 'bifurcation' process in field topology). Above this critical value, the overall magnetic field topology changes drastically and is identified as being the signature of magnetic reconnection at the subsolar point on the magnetopause. Second, this subsolar point recovers its original location R(sub mp) by following different paths as the IMF |B(sub z)| value increases (from zero to a maximum fixed value) and decreases (from this maximum to zero) passing through some critical values. These different paths are the signature of 'hysteresis' effect, and are characteristic of the so-called 'subcritical-type' bifurcation. This hysteresis signature indicates that dissipation processes take place via an energy transfer from the solar wind to the magnetosphere by some irreversible way, which leads to a drastic change in the magnetospheric field topology. This hysteresis is interpreted herein as a consequence of the magnetic reconnection taking place at the dayside magnetopause. The field topology reveals to be a very powerful tool to analyze the signatures of three-dimensional magnetic reconnection without the obligation for determining the mechanisms responsible for, and the consequences of the reconnection on the

  13. Who Gets a Bailout? A Comparative Analysis of U.S. and IMF Responses to Economic Crisis in Mexico (1995), Brazil (1998), and Argentina (2001)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-12-01

    ECONOMIC CRISIS IN MEXICO (1995), BRAZIL (1998), AND ARGENTINA (2001) by Jeremy L. Watkins December 2009 Thesis Advisor: Maiah Jaskoski...and IMF Responses to Economic Crisis in Mexico (1995), Brazil (1998), and Argentina (2001) 6. AUTHOR(S) LT Jeremy L.Watkins, USN 5. FUNDING NUMBERS...learn and apply lessons from past policy experiences. 15. NUMBER OF PAGES 73 14. SUBJECT TERMS Economic Crisis, Bailout, Latin America, Mexico

  14. From Stars to Super-Planets: The Low-Mass IMF in the Young Cluster IC348

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Najita, Joan R.; Tiede, Glenn P.; Carr, John S.

    2000-01-01

    We investigate the low-mass population of the young cluster IC348 down to the deuterium-burning limit, a fiducial boundary between brown dwarf and planetary mass objects, using a new and innovative method for the spectral classification of late-type objects. Using photometric indices, constructed from HST/NICMOS narrow-band imaging, that measure the strength of the 1.9 micron water band, we determine the spectral type and reddening for every M-type star in the field, thereby separating cluster members from the interloper population. Due to the efficiency of our spectral classification technique, our study is complete from approximately 0.7 solar mass to 0.015 solar mass. The mass function derived for the cluster in this interval, dN/d log M alpha M(sup 0.5), is similar to that obtained for the Pleiades, but appears significantly more abundant in brown dwarfs than the mass function for companions to nearby sun-like stars. This provides compelling observational evidence for different formation and evolutionary histories for substellar objects formed in isolation vs. as companions. Because our determination of the IMF is complete to very low masses, we can place interesting constraints on the role of physical processes such as fragmentation in the star and planet formation process and the fraction of dark matter in the Galactic halo that resides in substellar objects.

  15. Proton events at geostationary altitude during 2005, their relationship to solar wind and IMF parameters, and their `geoeffectiveness'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajaram, Girija; Chandrasekhar Reddy, A.; Alyana, Radharani; Rathod, Jatan; Misra, D. S.; Patil, C. G.; Prasad, M. Y. S.

    2007-12-01

    Solar wind and IMF parameters from the ACE satellite at the Earth's dayside Lagrangian point LI, are examined during solar proton events of 2005 for `shock' structures. The GOES-10 satellite at geostationary orbit (G) sees proton events in the 10-30 MeV energy range only when the flux of these particles exceeds (5 × 10^{-1}) protons/cm^{2}.sec.sr. (also known as pfu). Such events are invariably followed at G by REE (Relativistic Electron Events) which commence with an RED (Relative Electron Dropout). During REE, the enhanced flux of >2 MeV electrons can exceed (> 5 × 10^{4}) pfu, and can cause operational anomalies on geostationary satellite instruments. Such large proton events also trigger off at Earth (E), ssc type of storms with typical signatures in the geomagnetic indices Dst and Kp, and large Forbush decreases in the Cosmic Ray Neutron Monitor (CRNM) Count. Relationships between the various Space Weather parameters recorded at L1, G and E during Proton events, assume special importance from the point of view of Satellite Anomaly predictions.

  16. Statistical mapping of ULF Pc3 velocity fluctuations in the Earth's dayside magnetosheath as a function of solar wind conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimmock, A. P.; Nykyri, K.; Osmane, A.; Pulkkinen, T. I.

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we present the results of a statistical study of Pc3 velocity fluctuations in the Earth's dayside magnetosheath. There exists a notable dawn-dusk asymmetry, such that velocity fluctuations generally exhibit enhanced spectral power in the magnetosheath downstream of the quasi-parallel shock. The fluctuations in the central magnetosheath and close to bow shock tend to dampen with increasing tail-ward distance while the opposite trend is observed close to the magnetopause. This strongly suggests that velocity shear driven processes such as the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability drive Pc3 flow variations close to the magnetopause as the velocity shear increases with increasing tail-ward distance. We also show strong evidence that Pc3 velocity fluctuations are significantly enhanced during intervals of faster solar wind speeds. We see negligible differences between data collected during northward and southward IMF orientations, but in general, a dawn-favoured asymmetry persists.

  17. Northward laramide thrusting in the quitovac region, northwestern sonora, mexico: Implications for the juxtaposition of paleoproterozoic basement blocks and the mojave-sonora megashear hypothesis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Iriondo, A.; Martinez-Torres, L. M.; Kunk, M.J.; Atkinson, W.W.; Premo, W.R.; McIntosh, W.C.

    2005-01-01

    Restoration of 12%-30% Basin and Range extension allows direct interpretation of ductile fabrics associated with a stack of Laramide thrust faults in the Quito- vac region in northwestern Sonora. The inferred direction of displacement of these thrusts varies gradually from N63??W to N23??E and is interpreted to represent a clockwise rotation of the direction of Laramide thrusting through time. The thrust faults represent a piggy-back sequence of thrusting propagating north, toward the foreland. The average direction and sense of displacement of the thrusts is N18??W, and the cumulative 45 km of estimated northward-directed displacement corresponds to ???86% of shortening. ?? 2005 Geological Society of America.

  18. Cenozoic metamorphism along the Shan Scarp (Myanmar): Evidences for ductile shear along the Sagaing Fault or the northward migration of the Eastern Himalayan Syntaxis?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertrand, Guillaume; Rangin, Claude; Maluski, Henri; Han, Tin Aung; Thein, Myint; Myint, Ohn; Maw, Win; Lwin, San

    The Mogok metamorphic belt, exposed along the N-S trending Shan scarp and Sagaing fault, in the eastern part of Myanmar, has been regarded as Paleozoic to Precambrian for a long time. New observations in the Shan scarp area, close to the Sagaing fault, from Thaton in the south to Mandalay in the north, allowed us to collect samples of high grade metamorphic and intrusive rocks that have been analyzed by 40Ar/39Ar step heating method. The 13 samples we analyzed provide Oligocene to Lower Miocene ages for this metamorphism. Oriented thin sections and field observations suggest that this metamorphism was caused by a NNW-SSE to N-S ductile extension. Therefore, we suggest that this metamorphism is not directly related to the Sagaing fault, but could be instead related to the northward migration of the eastern Himalayan syntaxis, characterized by crustal thinning, resulting from the India-Asia oblique collision.

  19. Northward collapse of the Variscan orogen in response to multiple detachments: a view from the French internides to the Irish Sea foreland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Praeg, D.

    2003-04-01

    The Permo-Carboniferous transition from compression to extension across the Variscan orogen and its northern foreland has been attributed to models driven by plate movements, such as wrench-faulting, that imply regionally synchronous post-orogenic activity. In contrast, models of late-orogenic collapse predict diachronous tectonism, in which outward migrating extension may be compensated by peripheral compression. A review of published data on the ages of extensional and compressional structures along a 1500 km transect from the Variscan internides (Massif Central) to the foreland in the Irish Sea area provides evidence of diachronous tectonism. Three stages of outward collapse are identified: i) late Visean to mid-Westphalian (ca. 330-310 Ma) crustal extension within a relatively narrow (<500 km) central axis, accompanied to the north by deposition within a broad seaway inherited from closure of the Rheic ocean; ii) a dramatic expansion of tectonic activity, beginning with a mid-Westphalian (ca. 310 Ma) phase of compression that extended northward to the foreland, followed by the Stephanian formation of basins (outward younging and thinning), coeval with final nappe emplacement along the northern orogenic front; iii) widespread uplift and erosion of the foreland in the late Stephanian (ca. 300-295 Ma), followed by equally widespread basin formation in the Early Permian. The first two stages are consistent with previous proposals that the collapse of the Variscan orogen was driven by successive detachments from the base of the lithosphere of an orogenic root and of a previously subducted (Rheic) oceanic slab. The third stage is argued to record the detachment of a second Rheic oceanic slab subducted northward beneath the Irish foreland. Multiple detachments of lower lithospheric material are a predictable consequence of ocean closure and continental collision, so that episodic collapse may be a common process in the rise and fall of orogens and the tectonic

  20. Remagnetization of Cretaceous forearc strata on Santa Margarita and Magdalena Islands, Baja California Sur: Implications for northward transport along the California margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagstrum, Jonathan T.; Sedlock, Richard L.

    1998-12-01

    Paleomagnetic data for two sections of Cretaceous forearc strata with different structural attitudes on Santa Margarita and Magdalena Islands in Baja California Sur, Mexico, indicate that these rocks have been remagnetized, probably during the late Cenozoic. The in situ paleomagnetic directions, however, are similar to data from other Cretaceous rocks on peninsular California with unexpectedly shallow inclinations and easterly declinations. These data have been interpreted as indicating either northward tectonic transport (10°-15° of latitude) and clockwise rotation (>20°) or compaction shallowing of magnetic inclinations in sedimentary rocks combined with southwestward tilting of plutonic rocks. The available paleomagnetic data for Cretaceous forearc strata in southern and Baja California can be divided into three groups: (1) sections with normal-polarity magnetizations that fail fold tests and are remagnetized, (2) sections with normal-polarity magnetizations with no or inconclusive fold tests that may or may not be remagnetized, and (3) sections with both normal-and reversed-polarity intervals where pervasive remagnetization has not occurred. Other rocks of the Mesozoic Great Valley Group, Coast Range ophiolite, and Franciscan Complex in California also have secondary magnetizations with directions similar to younger geomagnetic field directions. Although these widespread remagnetizations could have variable local causes, we propose regional burial and uplift, related to changes in subduction parameters, as a possible explanation. Two episodes of remagnetization are apparent: one in the Late Cretaceous and a second in the late Cenozoic. On the other hand, the unremagnetized and apparently reliable data from sedimentary and plutonic rocks on the Baja Peninsula consistently indicate northward translation (14° ± 3°) and clockwise rotation (29° ± 8°) with respect to North America since the Late Cretaceous.

  1. Comparative study of the therapeutic effect of a systemic analgesic and transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) on post-IMF trismus and pain in Nigerian patients.

    PubMed

    Fagade, O O; Oginni, F O; Obilade, T O

    2005-06-01

    To compare the therapeutic effect of paracetamol and Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation (TENS), on post-Intermaxillary Fixation (IMF) trismus, and pain in some Nigerian patients. Twenty patients treated for mandibular fractures with IMF were randomly selected into two groups of ten patients each. After the release of IMF, they were started on jaw exercises with the aid of wooden spatulae to overcome trismus due to muscle spasm. Patients in Group I underwent jaw exercises before and after TENS therapy which lasted for 30 minutes while those in Group II had jaw exercises before and 30 minutes after ingestion of 100 mg of paracetamol. Their inter-incisal distances were recorded pre and post intervention. Analysis of the data showed that for both therapeutic interventions, there was an appreciable gain in mouth-opening which was more prominent for patients with unusual difficulty in mouth-opening initially. However, a comparison between the mean improvements produced by TENS and analgesic revealed no significant difference between the two groups. Both the TENS therapy and paracetamol provided similarly appreciable differences in inter-incisal distances (mouth-opening) after their applications.

  2. How the IMF By induces a By component in the closed magnetosphere and how it leads to asymmetric currents and convection patterns in the two hemispheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tenfjord, P.; Østgaard, N.; Snekvik, K.; Laundal, K. M.; Reistad, J. P.; Haaland, S.; Milan, S. E.

    2015-11-01

    We used the Lyon-Fedder-Mobarry global magnetohydrodynamics model to study the effects of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) By component on the coupling between the solar wind and magnetosphere-ionosphere system. When the IMF reconnects with the terrestrial magnetic field with IMF By≠0, flux transport is asymmetrically distributed between the two hemispheres. We describe how By is induced in the closed magnetosphere on both the dayside and nightside and present the governing equations. The magnetosphere imposes asymmetric forces on the ionosphere, and the effects on the ionospheric flow are characterized by distorted convection cell patterns, often referred to as "banana" and "orange" cell patterns. The flux asymmetrically added to the lobes results in a nonuniform induced By in the closed magnetosphere. By including the dynamics of the system, we introduce a mechanism that predicts asymmetric Birkeland currents at conjugate foot points. Asymmetric Birkeland currents are created as a consequence of y directed tension contained in the return flow. Associated with these currents, we expect fast localized ionospheric azimuthal flows present in one hemisphere but not necessarily in the other. We also present current density measurements from Active Magnetosphere and Planetary Electrodynamics Response Experiment that are consistent with this picture. We argue that the induced By produces asymmetrical Birkeland currents as a consequence of asymmetric stress balance between the hemispheres. Such an asymmetry will also lead to asymmetrical foot points and asymmetries in the azimuthal flow in the ionosphere. These phenomena should therefore be treated in a unified way.

  3. The Initial Conditions of Star Formation: Cosmic Rays as the Fundamental Regulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papadopoulos, Padelis P.; Thi, Wing-Fai

    Cosmic rays (CRs) control the thermal, ionization and chemical state of the dense H2 gas regions that otherwise remain shielded from far-UV and optical stellar radiation propagating through the dusty ISM of galaxies. It is in such CR-dominated regions (CRDRs) rather than Photon-dominated regions (PDRs) of H2 clouds where the star formation initial conditions are set, making CRs the ultimate star-formation feedback factor in galaxies, able to operate even in their most deeply dust-enshrouded environments. CR-controlled star formation initial conditions naturally set the stage for a near-invariant stellar Initial Mass Function (IMF) in galaxies as long as their average CR energy density UCR permeating their molecular ISM remains within a factor of ˜ 10 of its Galactic value. Nevertheless, in the extreme environments of the compact starbursts found in merging galaxies, where UCR ˜ (few) × 103 UCR,Gal, CRs dramatically alter the initial conditions of star formation. In the resulting extreme CRDRs H2 cloud fragmentation will produce far fewer low mass ( < 8 M⊙) stars, yielding a top-heavy stellar IMF. This will be a generic feature of CR-controlled star-formation initial conditions, lending a physical base for a bimodal IMF during galaxy formation, with a top-heavy one for compact merger-induced starbursts, and an ordinary IMF preserved for star formation in isolated gas-rich disks. In this scheme the integrated galactic IMFs (IGIMF) are expected to be strong functions of the star formation history of galaxies. Finally the large, CR-induced, ionization fractions expected for (far-UV)-shielded H2 gas in the CRDRs of compact starbursts will lengthen the ambipolar diffusion (AD) timescales so much as to render the alternative AD-regulated rather (Jeans mass)-driven star formation scenario as utterly unrealistic for the ISM in such galaxies.

  4. Comment on - 'Upstream energetic ions under radial IMF - A critical test of the Fermi model'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuselier, Stephen A.

    1989-01-01

    A criticism is offered by Fusilier of the conclusion by Sarris and Krimigis (SK, 1988) that the failure to observe energetic ions continuously under near radial interplanetary magnetic field conditions contradicts a fundamental prediction of the Fermi mechanism for the origin of the upstream ions. It is argued that both events reported by SK fall short of critical tests of the Fermi mechanism because the magnetic turbulence required by the Fermi process is not guaranteed to be present. Sarris replies that the ad hoc limit on the local angle between the magnetic field and the shock normal imposed by Fusilier is not a relevant consideration to upstream ion activity.

  5. Responses of the open-closed field line boundary in the evening sector to IMF changes: A source mechanism for Sun-aligned arcs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maynard, N. C.; Burke, W. J.; Moen, J.; Ober, D. M.; Scudder, J. D.; Sigwarth, J. B.; Siscoe, G. L.; Sonnerup, B. U. Ã.-.; White, W. W.; Siebert, K. D.; Weimer, D. R.; Erickson, G. M.; Frank, L. A.; Lester, M.; Peterson, W. K.; Russell, C. T.; Wilson, G. R.; Egeland, A.

    2003-01-01

    Simultaneous measurements from the Polar satellite and by ground-based optical sensors suggest that brief variations of the poleward auroral boundary on the nightside correlate with changes in the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) about an hour after a structure has propagated in the solar wind past the Earth. Short-lived Sun-aligned arcs may emerge along the open-closed magnetic field line boundary (OCB) and then disappear after ˜10 min. The arcs are fueled by energetic particles whose spectral characteristics are similar to those of the of boundary plasma sheet (BPS). Polar measurements confirm that these auroral protrusions into the polar cap occur on nearly isolated closed magnetic flux. Optical emissions from these arcs appear strongest at their intersection with the poleward boundary of the auroral oval. Detailed magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations of dayside interactions, when the dominant IMF component BY changes sign, indicate that near the polarity reversal merging can occur between interplanetary field line segments within the magnetosheath [, 2001b]. Newly formed loops of interplanetary flux sweep past the Earth without interacting with the magnetosphere. Here, we consider some consequences within the distant magnetotail as the loops of disconnected flux propagate to XGSM ≈ -200 RE. The MHD simulations indicate that about an hour after intra-IMF merging events fingers of closed field lines protrude from the OCB into the polar cap. Like the observed Sun-aligned arc, these simulated auroral features grow and decay on scales of ˜10 min and have ionospheric footprints that are nearly surrounded by open magnetic flux. The simulated auroral fingers are conjugate to high-pressure channels in the distant plasma sheet. We suggest that the short-lived Sun-aligned arcs are created via an interchange process similar to that proposed by [1985] to explain one class of theta auroral forms. The continuity of magnetotail currents across a high-pressure channel

  6. Fitness consequences of northward dispersal as possible adaptation to climate change, using experimental translocation of a migratory passerine.

    PubMed

    Burger, Claudia; Nord, Andreas; Nilsson, Jan-Åke; Gilot-Fromont, Emmanuelle; Both, Christiaan

    2013-01-01

    Climate change leads to rapid, differential changes in phenology across trophic levels, often resulting in temporal mismatches between predators and their prey. If a species cannot easily adjust its timing, it can adapt by choosing a new breeding location with a later phenology of its prey. In this study, we experimentally investigated whether long-distance dispersal to northern breeding grounds with a later phenology could be a feasible process to restore the match between timing of breeding and peak food abundance and thus improve reproductive success. Here, we report the successful translocation of pied flycatchers (Ficedula hypoleuca) to natural breeding sites 560 km to the Northeast. We expected translocated birds to have a fitness advantage with respect to environmental phenology, but to potentially pay costs through the lack of other locally adapted traits. Translocated individuals started egg laying 11 days earlier than northern control birds, which were translocated only within the northern site. The number of fledglings produced was somewhat lower in translocated birds, compared to northern controls, and fledglings were in lower body condition. Translocated individuals were performing not significantly different to control birds that remained at the original southern site. The lack of advantage of the translocated individuals most likely resulted from the exceptionally cold spring in which the experiment was carried out. Our results, however, suggest that pied flycatchers can successfully introduce their early breeding phenotype after dispersing to more northern areas, and thus that adaptation through dispersal is a viable option for populations that get locally maladapted through climate change.

  7. Body condition and forage type influence intramuscular and rump fat, and reproductive performance of postpartum Brahman-influenced cows

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Multiparous Brahman-influenced cows were managed to achieve marginal (BCS = 4.9 ± 0.1; n = 55) or moderate (BCS = 6.5 ± 0.1; n = 55) body condition (BC) to determine the influence of forage type on estrous characteristics, intramuscular fat percentage (IMF), rump fat (RF), and reproductive performan...

  8. Fitness Consequences of Northward Dispersal as Possible Adaptation to Climate Change, Using Experimental Translocation of a Migratory Passerine

    PubMed Central

    Burger, Claudia; Nord, Andreas; Nilsson, Jan-Åke; Gilot-Fromont, Emmanuelle; Both, Christiaan

    2013-01-01

    Climate change leads to rapid, differential changes in phenology across trophic levels, often resulting in temporal mismatches between predators and their prey. If a species cannot easily adjust its timing, it can adapt by choosing a new breeding location with a later phenology of its prey. In this study, we experimentally investigated whether long-distance dispersal to northern breeding grounds with a later phenology could be a feasible process to restore the match between timing of breeding and peak food abundance and thus improve reproductive success. Here, we report the successful translocation of pied flycatchers (Ficedula hypoleuca) to natural breeding sites 560 km to the Northeast. We expected translocated birds to have a fitness advantage with respect to environmental phenology, but to potentially pay costs through the lack of other locally adapted traits. Translocated individuals started egg laying 11 days earlier than northern control birds, which were translocated only within the northern site. The number of fledglings produced was somewhat lower in translocated birds, compared to northern controls, and fledglings were in lower body condition. Translocated individuals were performing not significantly different to control birds that remained at the original southern site. The lack of advantage of the translocated individuals most likely resulted from the exceptionally cold spring in which the experiment was carried out. Our results, however, suggest that pied flycatchers can successfully introduce their early breeding phenotype after dispersing to more northern areas, and thus that adaptation through dispersal is a viable option for populations that get locally maladapted through climate change. PMID:24349454

  9. Direct Measurements of the Plasma Velocity During Intervals of Reverse Convection in the Southern Polar Cap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makarevich, R. A.

    2016-12-01

    Observations of the plasma convection near the dayside throat region, including resolution of reverse convection cells during intervals of northward interplanetary magnetic field (IMF), often involve assimilation of data from multiple sources such as the map potential technique utilized by the Super Dual Auroral Radar Network (SuperDARN). In this study, we also examine direct measurements of the plasma convection velocity by the SuperDARN Dome Concordia East and McMurdo radars which for >4 hours a day directly observe convection flows along the magnetic noon-midnight meridian. Solar wind control of these flows is examined by conducting a statistical analysis of the average and peak plasma velocities for various solar wind conditions. It is shown that signatures of reverse convection appear above a certain threshold in IMF Bz. The threshold appears to depend on IMF By and is, on average, 2 nT. Noticeable cross-polar-cap (CPC) convection asymmetry with respect to IMF By is also observed. The CPC convection dependence on IMF Bz or interplanetary electric field (IEF) is mostly linear, with some evidence of saturation for both northward and southward IMF at most extreme values. The implications for the high-altitude reconnection efficiency for different IMF conditions are discussed.

  10. Evolution of the Rodgers Creek–Maacama right-lateral fault system and associated basins east of the northward-migrating Mendocino Triple Junction, northern California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McLaughlin, Robert J.; Sarna-Wojcicki, Andrei M.; Wagner, David L.; Fleck, Robert J.; Langenheim, V.E.; Jachens, Robert C.; Clahan, Kevin; Allen, James R.

    2012-01-01

    The Rodgers Creek–Maacama fault system in the northern California Coast Ranges (United States) takes up substantial right-lateral motion within the wide transform boundary between the Pacific and North American plates, over a slab window that has opened northward beneath the Coast Ranges. The fault system evolved in several right steps and splays preceded and accompanied by extension, volcanism, and strike-slip basin development. Fault and basin geometries have changed with time, in places with younger basins and faults overprinting older structures. Along-strike and successional changes in fault and basin geometry at the southern end of the fault system probably are adjustments to frequent fault zone reorganizations in response to Mendocino Triple Junction migration and northward transit of a major releasing bend in the northern San Andreas fault. The earliest Rodgers Creek fault zone displacement is interpreted to have occurred ca. 7 Ma along extensional basin-forming faults that splayed northwest from a west-northwest proto-Hayward fault zone, opening a transtensional basin west of Santa Rosa. After ca. 5 Ma, the early transtensional basin was compressed and extensional faults were reactivated as thrusts that uplifted the northeast side of the basin. After ca. 2.78 Ma, the Rodgers Creek fault zone again splayed from the earlier extensional and thrust faults to steeper dipping faults with more north-northwest orientations. In conjunction with the changes in orientation and slip mode, the Rodgers Creek fault zone dextral slip rate increased from ∼2–4 mm/yr 7–3 Ma, to 5–8 mm/yr after 3 Ma. The Maacama fault zone is shown from several data sets to have initiated ca. 3.2 Ma and has slipped right-laterally at ∼5–8 mm/yr since its initiation. The initial Maacama fault zone splayed northeastward from the south end of the Rodgers Creek fault zone, accompanied by the opening of several strike-slip basins, some of which were later uplifted and compressed

  11. Steepening of waves at the duskside magnetopause

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plaschke, F.; Kahr, N.; Fischer, D.; Nakamura, R.; Baumjohann, W.; Magnes, W.; Burch, J. L.; Torbert, R. B.; Russell, C. T.; Giles, B. L.; Strangeway, R. J.; Leinweber, H. K.; Bromund, K. R.; Anderson, B. J.; Le, G.; Chutter, M.; Slavin, J. A.; Kepko, E. L.

    2016-07-01

    Surface waves at the magnetopause flanks typically feature steeper, i.e., more inclined leading (antisunward facing) than trailing (sunward facing) edges. This is expected for Kelvin-Helmholtz instability (KHI) amplified waves. Very rarely, during northward interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) conditions, anomalous/inverse steepening has been observed. The small-scale tetrahedral configuration of the Magnetospheric Multiscale spacecraft and their high time resolution measurements enable us to routinely ascertain magnetopause boundary inclinations during surface wave passage with high accuracy by four-spacecraft timing analysis. At the dusk flank magnetopause, 77%/23% of the analyzed wave intervals exhibit regular/inverse steepening. Inverse steepening happens during northward IMF conditions, as previously reported and, in addition, during intervals of dominant equatorial IMF. Inverse steepening observed under the latter conditions may be due to the absence of KHI or due to instabilities arising from the alignment of flow and magnetic fields in the magnetosheath.

  12. Steepening of Waves at the Duskside Magnetopause

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plaschke, F.; Kahr, N.; Fischer, D.; Nakamura, R.; Baumjohann, W.; Magnes, W.; Burch, J. L.; Torbert, R.; Russell, C. T.; Giles, B. L.; hide

    2016-01-01

    Surface waves at the magnetopause flanks typically feature steeper, i.e., more inclined leading (antisunward facing) than trailing (sunward facing) edges. This is expected for Kelvin-Helmholtz instability (KHI) amplified waves. Very rarely, during northward interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) conditions, anomalous inverse steepening has been observed. The small-scale tetrahedral configuration of the Magnetospheric Multiscale spacecraft and their high time resolution measurements enable us to routinely ascertain magnetopause boundary inclinations during surface wave passage with high accuracy by four-spacecraft timing analysis. At the dusk flank magnetopause, 77%/23% of the analyzed wave intervals exhibit regular inverse steepening. Inverse steepening happens during northward IMF conditions, as previously reported and, in addition, during intervals of dominant equatorial IMF. Inverse steepening observed under the latter conditions may be due to the absence of KHI or due to instabilities arising from the alignment of flow and magnetic fields in the magnetosheath.

  13. Hyalomma ticks on northward migrating birds in southern Spain: Implications for the risk of entry of Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever virus to Great Britain.

    PubMed

    England, Marion E; Phipps, Paul; Medlock, Jolyon M; Atkinson, Peter M; Atkinson, Barry; Hewson, Roger; Gale, Paul

    2016-06-01

    Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever virus (CCHFV) is a zoonotic virus transmitted by Hyalomma ticks, the immature stages of which may be carried by migratory birds. In this study, a total of 12 Hyalomma ticks were recovered from five of 228 migratory birds trapped in Spring, 2012 in southern Spain along the East Atlantic flyway. All collected ticks tested negative for CCHFV. While most birds had zero Hyalomma ticks, two individuals had four and five ticks each and the statistical distribution of Hyalomma tick counts per bird is over-dispersed compared to the Poisson distribution, demonstrating the need for intensive sampling studies to avoid underestimating the total number of ticks. Rates of tick exchange on migratory birds during their northwards migration will affect the probability that a Hyalomma tick entering Great Britain is positive for CCHFV. Drawing on published data, evidence is presented that the latitude of a European country affects the probability of entry of Hyalomma ticks on wild birds. Further data on Hyalomma infestation rates and tick exchange rates are required along the East Atlantic flyway to further our understanding of the origin of Hyalomma ticks (i.e., Africa or southern Europe) and hence the probability of entry of CCHFV into GB. © 2016 The Society for Vector Ecology.

  14. The role of the northward-directed (sub)surface limb of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation during the 8.2 ka event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tegzes, A. D.; Jansen, E.; Telford, R. J.

    2014-10-01

    The so-called "8.2 ka event" is widely regarded as a major Holocene climate perturbation. It is most readily identifiable in the oxygen-isotope records from Greenland ice cores as an approximately 160-year-long cold interval between 8250 and 8090 years BP. The prevailing view has been that the cooling over Greenland, and potentially over the northern North Atlantic at least, was triggered by the catastrophic final drainage of the Agassiz-Ojibway proglacial lake as part of the remnant Laurentide Ice Sheet collapsed over Hudson Bay at around 8420 ± 80 years BP. The consequent freshening of surface waters in the northern North Atlantic Ocean and the Nordic Seas resulted in weaker overturning, and hence reduced northward ocean heat transport. We have reconstructed variations in the strength of the eastern branch of the Atlantic Inflow into the Nordic Seas around the time of the lake outbursts. While the initial freshwater forcing may have been even larger than originally thought, as the lake outbursts may have been accompanied by a major iceberg discharge from Hudson Bay, our proxy records from the mid-Norwegian Margin do not evidence a uniquely large slowdown in the eastern branch of the Atlantic Inflow at the time. Therefore, its main role in the 8.2 ka event may have been the (rapid) advection of fresh and cold waters to high northern latitudes, initiating rapid sea-ice expansion and an increase in surface albedo.

  15. Intertidal biofilm distribution underpins differential tide-following behavior of two sandpiper species (Calidris mauri and Calidris alpina) during northward migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiménez, Ariam; Elner, Robert W.; Favaro, Corinna; Rickards, Karen; Ydenberg, Ronald C.

    2015-03-01

    The discovery that some shorebird species graze heavily on biofilm adds importance to elucidating coastal processes controlling biofilm, as well as impetus to better understand patterns of shorebird use of intertidal flats. Western sandpipers (Calidris mauri) and dunlin (Calidris alpina) stopover in the hundreds of thousands on the Fraser River estuary, British Columbia, Canada, during northward migration to breeding areas. Western sandpipers show greater modification of tongue and bill morphology for biofilm feeding than dunlin, and their diet includes more biofilm. Therefore, we hypothesized that these congeners differentially use the intertidal area. A tide following index (TFI) was used to describe their distributions in the upper intertidal during ebbing tides. Also, we assessed sediment grain size, biofilm (= microphytobenthic or MPB) biomass and invertebrate abundance. Foraging dunlin closely followed the ebbing tide line, exploiting the upper intertidal only as the tide retreated through this area. In contrast, western sandpipers were less prone to follow the tide, and spent more time in the upper intertidal. Microphytobenthic biomass and sediment water content were highest in the upper intertidal, indicating greater biofilm availability for shorebirds in the first 350 m from shore. Invertebrate density did not differ between sections of the upper intertidal. Overall, western sandpiper behaviour and distribution more closely matched MPB biofilm availability than invertebrate availability. Conservation of sandpipers should consider physical processes, such as tides and currents, which maintain the availability of biofilm, a critical food source during global migration.

  16. A counterimage to the gravitational arc in Abell 1201: Evidence for IMF variations, or a 1010 M⊙ black hole?★†

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Russell J.; Lucey, John R.; Edge, Alastair C.

    2017-05-01

    Abell 1201 is a massive galaxy cluster at z = 0.169 with a brightest cluster galaxy (BCG) that acts as a gravitational lens to a background source at z = 0.451. The lensing configuration is unusual, with a single bright arc formed at small radius (˜2 arcsec), where stars and dark matter are both expected to contribute substantially to the total lensing mass. Here, we present deep spectroscopic observations of the Abell 1201 BCG with MUSE (Multi-Unit Spectroscopic Explorer), which reveal emission lines from a faint counterimage, opposite to the main arc, at a radius of 0.6 arcsec. We explore models in which the lensing mass is described by a combination of stellar mass and a standard dark matter halo. The counterimage is not predicted in such models, unless the dark matter component is negligible, which would imply an extremely heavy stellar initial mass function (IMF) in this galaxy. We consider two modifications to the model, which can produce the observed configuration without resorting to extreme IMFs. Imposing a radial gradient in the stellar mass-to-light ratio, ϒ, can generate a counterimage close to the observed position if ϒ increases by ≳ 60 per cent within the inner ˜1 arcsec (e.g. variation from a Milky Way-like to a Salpeter-like IMF). Alternatively, the counterimage can be produced by introducing a central supermassive black hole. The required mass is MBH = (1.3 ± 0.6) × 1010 M⊙, which is comparable to the largest black holes known to date, several of which are also hosted by BCGs. We comment on future observations that promise to distinguish between these alternatives.

  17. Screening of different stress factors and development of growth/no growth models for Zygosaccharomyces rouxii in modified Sabouraud medium, mimicking intermediate moisture foods (IMF).

    PubMed

    Vermeulen, A; Daelman, J; Van Steenkiste, J; Devlieghere, F

    2012-12-01

    The microbial stability of intermediate moisture foods (IMF) is linked with the possible growth of osmophilic yeast and xerophilic moulds. As most of these products have a long shelf life the assessment of the microbial stability is often an important hurdle in product innovation. In this study a screening of several Zygosaccharomyces rouxii strains towards individual stress factors was performed and growth/no growth models were developed, incorporating a(w), pH, acetic acid and ethanol concentrations. These stress factors are important for sweet IMF such as chocolate fillings, ganache, marzipan, etc. A comparison was made between a logistic regression model with and without the incorporation of time as an explanatory variable. Next to the model development, a screening of the effect of chemical preservatives (sorbate and benzoate) was performed, in combination with relevant stress factors within the experimental design of the model. The results of the study showed that the influence of the investigated environmental stress factors on the growth/no growth boundary of Z. rouxii is the most significant in the first 30-40 days of incubation. Incorporating time as an explanatory variable in the model had the advantage that the growth/no growth boundary could be predicted at each time between 0 and 60 days of incubation at 22 °C. However, the growth/no growth boundary enlarged significantly leading to a less accurate prediction on the growth probability of Z. rouxii. The developed models can be a useful tool for product developers of sweet IMF. Screening with chemical preservatives revealed that benzoic acid was much less active towards Z. rouxii than sorbic acid or a mixture of both acids. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. A counter-image to the gravitational arc in Abell 1201:Evidence for IMF variations, or a 1010 M⊙ black hole?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Russell J.; Lucey, John R.; Edge, Alastair C.

    2017-01-01

    Abell 1201 is a massive galaxy cluster at z=0.169 with a brightest cluster galaxy (BCG) that acts as a gravitational lens to a background source at z=0.451. The lensing configuration is unusual, with a single bright arc formed at small radius (˜2 arcsec), where stars and dark matter are both expected to contribute substantially to the total lensing mass. Here, we present deep spectroscopic observations of the Abell 1201 BCG with MUSE, which reveal emission lines from a faint counter-image, opposite to the main arc, at a radius of 0.6 arcsec. We explore models in which the lensing mass is described by a combination of stellar mass and a standard dark-matter halo. The counter-image is not predicted in such models, unless the dark-matter component is negligible, which would imply an extremely heavy stellar initial mass function (IMF) in this galaxy. We consider two modifications to the model which can produce the observed configuration without resorting to extreme IMFs. Imposing a radial gradient in the stellar mass-to-light ratio, Υ, can generate a counter-image close to the observed position if Υ increases by ≳60 per cent within the inner ˜1 arcsec (e.g. variation from a Milky-Way-like to a Salpeter-like IMF). Alternatively, the counter-image can be produced by introducing a central super-massive black hole. The required mass is MBH = (1.3±0.6)× 1010 M⊙, which is comparable to the largest black holes known to date, several of which are also hosted by BCGs. We comment on future observations which promise to distinguish between these alternatives.

  19. The response of the HF radar spectral width boundary to a switch in the IMF By direction: Ionospheric consequences of transient dayside reconnection?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chisham, G.; Pinnock, M.; Rodger, A. S.

    2001-01-01

    In the high-latitude dayside ionosphere, the movement of the HF radar spectral width boundary (SWB) provides a good proxy for the movement of the open-closed field line boundary around magnetic local noon. By studying the dynamics of the spectral width boundary we can investigate features of the dayside ionospheric response to changes in the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF). The high temporal and spatial resolution of the Super Dual Auroral Radar Network (SuperDARN) HF radars make them good tools to study these features. In this paper, we use the Halley HF radar in Antarctica to study the equatorward motion of the SWB which appears to occur in response to a large change in the direction of IMF By. The spectral width boundary initially moves equatorward in the form of a U-shaped bulge close to magnetic local noon. This bulge then expands longitudinally to earlier and later magnetic local times. Merged velocity vectors from two Antarctic HF radars describe the flow velocity variation in the boundary region. The flow equatorward of the boundary follows the contours of the boundary as it expands. The flow poleward of the boundary is directed at more oblique angles to the boundary. This study represents the first clear two-dimensional observation of the formation of an equatorward bulge on the polar cap boundary which may be associated with changes in dayside reconnection and presents a unique observation of the variation of the ionospheric flow in the locality of the boundary. We discuss the possible interpretations of this event and its consequences to our present understanding of the ionospheric response to changes in the IMF.

  20. The effect of the changing polarity and neutral sheet of the IMF on the cosmic ray diurnal anisotropy at neutron monitor energies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Staden, M. L.; Potgieter, M. S.

    1991-01-01

    A drift with a simulated wavy neutral sheet have been used to study the effects of the reversal of the solar magnetic field every 11 years and the changes in the waviness of the heliospheric neutral sheet, corresponding to changes in solar activity, on the diurnal anisotropy at an energy of 20 GeV. The results indicate that the long-term behavior of the diurnal anisotropy, especially the phase shift from one solar minimum period to another, which seems to depend on the polarity of the IMF, has a theoretical explanation in the drift picture of the modulation of cosmic rays in the heliosphere.

  1. Placing Marine Protected Areas Within a Broader Marine Landscape: the Role of Science in the Northward Expansion of Two West-Coast National Marine Sanctuaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Largier, J. L.; Brown, M.; Howard, D.

    2016-12-01

    Off San Francisco, the coastal waters in the Gulf of Farallones and over Cordell Bank have long been valued as a key marine ecosystem. Two National Marine Sanctuaries were established to protect and steward the remarkable marine resources in this region: the Cordell Bank NMS in 1989 and the Gulf of Farallones NMS in 1981. There is an abundance of birds, fish, sharks, whales and other mammals that reside in or visit this region. Fed by the bounty of plankton served up by coastal upwelling, this is one of the most productive marine ecosystems on the planet. In contrast to terrestrial systems, the components of marine systems are connected by water circulation - in the case of these west coast sanctuaries, this meant that the planktonic bounty was being imported from adjacent waters not protected by the sanctuary. In analogy to river systems, the headwaters were not included in the watershed plan. The Point Arena upwelling center represents a perennial supply of nutrients that are carried south into sanctuary waters, developing dense blooms of phytoplankton as they travel south, and in turn supporting an abundance of zooplankton and forage fish. With sanctuary waters derived from the Point Arena upwelling cell more than 90% of the time, this "food machine" is the foundation of the upper-trophic-level fame of the sanctuary waters. The northward expansion of these sanctuaries in 2015 emerged when local politics met local science, allowing for an integration of science and management that reached to Washington DC. In an ocean where everything is connected, one cannot protect everything - by using science to understand landscapes, we can identify the primary source waters that are the very foundation of protected ecosystems. Linking to the theme of the session, this landscape also includes runoff that connects estuaries and watersheds to ocean waters. Too little attention has been given to the role of runoff in marine protected areas, both federal sanctuaries and marine

  2. Placing Marine Protected Areas Within a Broader Marine Landscape: the Role of Science in the Northward Expansion of Two West-Coast National Marine Sanctuaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Largier, J. L.; Brown, M.; Howard, D.

    2016-02-01

    Off San Francisco, the coastal waters in the Gulf of Farallones and over Cordell Bank have long been valued as a key marine ecosystem. Two National Marine Sanctuaries were established to protect and steward the remarkable marine resources in this region: the Cordell Bank NMS in 1989 and the Gulf of Farallones NMS in 1981. There is an abundance of birds, fish, sharks, whales and other mammals that reside in or visit this region. Fed by the bounty of plankton served up by coastal upwelling, this is one of the most productive marine ecosystems on the planet. In contrast to terrestrial systems, the components of marine systems are connected by water circulation - in the case of these west coast sanctuaries, this meant that the planktonic bounty was being imported from adjacent waters not protected by the sanctuary. In analogy to river systems, the headwaters were not included in the watershed plan. The Point Arena upwelling center represents a perennial supply of nutrients that are carried south into sanctuary waters, developing dense blooms of phytoplankton as they travel south, and in turn supporting an abundance of zooplankton and forage fish. With sanctuary waters derived from the Point Arena upwelling cell more than 90% of the time, this "food machine" is the foundation of the upper-trophic-level fame of the sanctuary waters. The northward expansion of these sanctuaries in 2015 emerged when local politics met local science, allowing for an integration of science and management that reached to Washington DC. In an ocean where everything is connected, one cannot protect everything - by using science to understand landscapes, we can identify the primary source waters that are the very foundation of protected ecosystems. Linking to the theme of the session, this landscape also includes runoff that connects estuaries and watersheds to ocean waters. Too little attention has been given to the role of runoff in marine protected areas, both federal sanctuaries and marine

  3. Howthe IMF By induces a By component in the closed magnetosphere and how it leads to asymmetric currents and convection patterns in the two hemispheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tenfjord, Paul; Østgaard, Nikolai; Snekvik, Kristian; Reistad, Jone; Magnus Laundal, Karl; Haaland, Stein; Milan, Steve

    2016-04-01

    We describe the effects of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) By component on the coupling between the solar wind and magnetosphere-ionosphere system using AMPERE observations and MHD simulations. We show how By is induced on closed magnetospheric field lines on both the dayside and nightside. The magnetosphere imposes asymmetric forces on the ionosphere, and the effects on the ionospheric flow are characterized by distorted convection cell patterns, often referred to as "banana" and "orange" cell patterns. The flux asymmetrically added to the lobes results in a nonuniform induced By in the closed magnetosphere. We present a mechanism that predicts asymmetric Birkeland currents at conjugate foot points. Asymmetric Birkeland currents are created as a consequence of y directed tension contained in the return flow. Associated with these currents, we expect aurora and fast localized ionospheric azimuthal flows present in one hemisphere but not necessarily in the other. We present a statistical study where we show that these processes should occur on timescales of about 30 minutes after the IMF By has arrived at the magnetopause. We also present an event with simultaneous global imaging of the aurora and SuperDARN measurements from both hemisphere. The event is interpreted as an example of the of the proposed asymmetric current mechanism.

  4. Clockwise rotation and implications for northward drift of the western Transverse Ranges from paleomagnetism of the Piuma Member, Sespe Formation, near Malibu, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hillhouse, John W.

    2010-01-01

    New paleomagnetic results from mid-Tertiary sedimentary beds in the Santa Monica Mountains reinforce the evidence for large-scale rotation of the western Transverse Ranges, and anisotropy measurements indicate that compaction-induced inclination flattening may resolve a long-standing controversy regarding the original paleolatitude of the rotated block. Previously published paleomagnetic data indicate that post-Oligocene rotation amounts to 70°–110° clockwise, affecting the Channel Islands, Santa Monica Mountains, and Santa Ynez Mountains. The Sespe Formation near Malibu consists of a lower member dominated by nonmarine sandstone and conglomerate and an upper section, the Piuma Member, which consists of gray-red sandstone and mudstone interbedded with minor tuff and limestone beds. The Piuma Member has a paleomagnetic pole at 36.6°N, 326.7°E (A95min = 5.0°, A95max = 9.6°), obtained by thermal demagnetization of 34 oriented cores from Oligocene and early Miocene beds. After correcting for plunge of the geologic structure, the data are consistent with significant clockwise rotation (77° ± 7°) of the region relative to stable North America. Rotation of the western Transverse Ranges is generally viewed as a consequence of Pacific–North American plate interactions after 28 Ma, when east–west subduction gave way to northwest transform motion in southern California. Inclinations from the Piuma study indicate a paleolatitude anomaly of 11° ± 7° and are consistent with a mean northward drift that exceeds generally accepted San Andreas fault displacement by a factor of 3. However, sedimentary inclination error may accentuate the anomaly. Anisotropy of isothermal remanent magnetization indicates inclination flattening of approximately 8°, and correction for the effect reduces the paleolatitude anomaly to 5.3° ± 5.8°. Compaction may explain the inclination flattening in these sedimentary rocks, but the process does not adequately explain lower

  5. Where East Africa and the Levant Are Climatically Connected: An Alternative View of the Northward Shifts of Either the ITCZ and/or the Indian Summer Monsoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enzel, Y.; Kushnir, Y.; Quade, J.

    2014-12-01

    Lake levels in basins in areas bordering northern Arabian Sea have been used to reconstruct regional paleohydrological patterns through lake-level statuses. For the early-middle Holocene, dramatic increases in regional rainfall have been proposed. These rainfall changes are commonly thought to be associated with an intensified Indian summer monsoon (ISM) and a large northward shift in the latitude of the boreal summer ITCZ over the Indian Ocean; this shift was proposed to reach latitudes as far north as the Levant. However, the ISM currently forces total summer drought not rains, in the Levant and neighboring deserts, including Arabia. The drought is due to large-scale air subsidence forced by the ISM and dries the region except in southernmost Arabia, where topography lifts air and produces orographic rain. This Arabian summer drought is assisted by increased upwelling that limits rainfall inland. How large the actual changes in paleohydrology were in the Arabian Peninsula? If not the ISM, what are the real causes of these changes? We summarize paleohydrologic information from Arabia and revisit the paleolake status of all lacustrine-like deposits and their basins in Arabia. From reinterpretation of these data and sedimentology and fauna, we conclude that these basins were occupied by shallow marsh environments, not lakes. Consequently, the paleohydrologic changes required to support restricted wetland versus lakes were much smaller. These conclusions are supported by the temporal and spatial distribution of other paleoenvironmental indicators such as pollen and speleothems. They indicate that (a) rainfall changes were very small in the heart of and northern Arabia, and (b) that these changes were only at the elevated edges of southwestern, southern, and southeastern Arabian Peninsula, where it rains at present, mainly due to orographic effects on precipitation in the presence of increased moisture supply. We propose that (a) latitudinal and slight inland impact

  6. Magnetic Field Perturbations from Currents in the Dark Polar Regions During Quiet Geomagnetic Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friis-Christensen, E.; Finlay, C. C.; Hesse, M.; Laundal, K. M.

    2017-02-01

    In the day-side sunlit polar ionosphere the varying and IMF dependent convection creates strong ionospheric currents even during quiet geomagnetic conditions. Observations during such times are often excluded when using satellite data to model the internal geomagnetic main field. Observations from the night-side or local winter during quiet conditions are, however, also influenced by variations in the IMF. In this paper we briefly review the large scale features of the ionospheric currents in the polar regions with emphasis on the current distribution during undisturbed conditions. We examine the distribution of scalar measurements of the magnetic field intensity minus predictions from a geomagnetic field model. These `residuals' fall into two main categories. One category is consistently distributed according to the well-known ionospheric plasma convection and its associated Birkeland currents. The other category represent contributions caused by geomagnetic activity related to the substorm current wedge around local magnetic midnight. A new observation is a strong IMF By control of the residuals in the midnight sector indicating larger ionospheric currents in the substorm current wedge in the northern polar region for By > 0 and correspondingly in the southern hemisphere for By < 0.

  7. Magnetic Field Perturbations from Currents in the Dark Polar Regions During Quiet Geomagnetic Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friis-Christensen, E.; Finlay, C. C.; Hesse, M.; Laundal, K. M.

    2017-03-01

    In the day-side sunlit polar ionosphere the varying and IMF dependent convection creates strong ionospheric currents even during quiet geomagnetic conditions. Observations during such times are often excluded when using satellite data to model the internal geomagnetic main field. Observations from the night-side or local winter during quiet conditions are, however, also influenced by variations in the IMF. In this paper we briefly review the large scale features of the ionospheric currents in the polar regions with emphasis on the current distribution during undisturbed conditions. We examine the distribution of scalar measurements of the magnetic field intensity minus predictions from a geomagnetic field model. These `residuals' fall into two main categories. One category is consistently distributed according to the well-known ionospheric plasma convection and its associated Birkeland currents. The other category represent contributions caused by geomagnetic activity related to the substorm current wedge around local magnetic midnight. A new observation is a strong IMF By control of the residuals in the midnight sector indicating larger ionospheric currents in the substorm current wedge in the northern polar region for By > 0 and correspondingly in the southern hemisphere for By < 0.

  8. Study of field-aligned current (FAC), interplanetary electric field component (Ey), interplanetary magnetic field component (Bz), and northward (x) and eastward (y) components of geomagnetic field during supersubstorm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adhikari, Binod; Dahal, Subodh; Chapagain, Narayan P.

    2017-05-01

    A dominant process by which energy and momentum are transported from the magnetosphere to the ionosphere is known as field-aligned current (FAC). It is enhanced during magnetic reconnection and explosive energy release at a substorm. In this paper, we studied FAC, interplanetary electric field component (Ey), interplanetary magnetic field component (Bz), and northward (x) and eastward (y) components of geomagnetic field during three events of supersubstorm occurred on 24 November 2001, 21 January 2005, and 24 August 2005. Large-scale FAC, supposed to be produced during supersubstorm (SSS), has potentiality to cause blackout on Earth. We examined temporal variations of the x and y components of high-latitude geomagnetic field during SSS, which is attributed to the FACs. We shall report the characteristics of high-latitude northward and eastward components of geomagnetic field variation during the growth phase of SSS by the implementation of discrete wavelet transform (DWT) and cross-correlation analysis. Among three examples of SSS events, the highest peak value of FAC was estimated to be 19 μAm-2. This is shore up with the prediction made by Parks (1991) and Stasiewicz et al. (1998) that the FACs may vary from a few tens to several hundred μAm-2. Although this peak value of FACs for SSS event is much higher than the average FACs associated with regular substorms or magnetic storms, it is expedient and can be expect for SSS events which might be due to very high density solar wind plasma parcels (PPs) triggering the SSS events. In all events, during growth phase, the FAC increases to extremely high level and the geomagnetic northward component decreases to extremely low level. This represents a strong positive correlation between FAC and geomagnetic northward component. The DWT analysis accounts that the highest amplitude of the wavelet coefficients indicates singularities present in FAC during SSS event. But the amplitude of squared wavelet coefficient is found

  9. The SLUGGS survey: breaking degeneracies between dark matter, anisotropy and the IMF using globular cluster subpopulations in the giant elliptical NGC 5846

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Napolitano, Nicola R.; Pota, Vincenzo; Romanowsky, Aaron J.; Forbes, Duncan A.; Brodie, Jean P.; Foster, Caroline

    2014-03-01

    We study the mass and anisotropy distribution of the giant elliptical galaxy NGC 5846 using stars, as well as the red and blue globular cluster (GC) subpopulations. We break degeneracies in the dynamical models by taking advantage of the different phase space distributions of the two GC subpopulations to unambiguously constrain the mass of the galaxy and the anisotropy of the GC system. Red GCs show the same spatial distribution and behaviour as the starlight, whereas blue GCs have a shallower density profile, a larger velocity dispersion and a lower kurtosis, all of which suggest a different orbital distribution. We use a dispersion-kurtosis Jeans analysis and find that the solutions of separate analyses for the two GC subpopulations overlap in the halo parameter space. The solution converges on a massive dark matter halo, consistent with expectations from Λ cold dark matter (ΛCDM) and 7-year Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP7) cosmology in terms of virial mass (log MDM ˜ 13.3 M⊙) and concentration (cvir ˜ 8). This is the first such analysis that solves the dynamics of the different GC subpopulations in a self-consistent manner. Our method improves the uncertainties on the halo parameter determination by a factor of 2 and opens new avenues for the use of elliptical galaxy dynamics as tests of predictions from cosmological simulations. The implied stellar mass-to-light ratio derived from the dynamical modelling is fully consistent with a Salpeter initial mass function (IMF) and rules out a bottom light IMF. The different GC subpopulations show markedly distinct orbital distributions at large radii, with red GCs having an anisotropy parameter β˜0.4 outside ˜ 3 Re (Re is the effective radius), and the blue GCs having β˜0.15 at the same radii, while centrally ( ˜ 1 Re) they are both isotropic. We discuss the implications of our findings within the two-phase formation scenario for early-type galaxies.

  10. The interaction of a magnetic cloud with the Earth - Ionospheric convection in the Northern and Southern Hemispheres for a wide range of quasi-steady interplanetary magnetic field conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freeman, M. P.; Farrugia, C. J.; Burlaga, L. F.; Hairston, M. R.; Greenspan, M. E.; Ruohoniemi, J. M.; Lepping, R. P.

    1993-01-01

    Observations are presented of the ionospheric convection in cross sections of the polar cap and auroral zone as part of the study of the interaction of the Earth's magnetosphere with the magnetic cloud of January 13-15, 1988. For strongly northward IMF, the convection in the Southern Hemisphere is characterized by a two-cell convection pattern comfined to high latitudes with sunward flow over the pole. The strength of the flows is comparable to that later seen under southward IMF. Superimposed on this convection pattern there are clear dawn-dusk asymmetries associated with a one-cell convection component whose sense depends on the polarity of the magnetic cloud's large east-west magnetic field component. When the cloud's magnetic field turns southward, the convection is characterized by a two-cell pattern extending to lower latitude with antisunward flow over the pole. There is no evident interhemispheric difference in the structure and strength of the convection. Superimposed dawn-dusk asymmetries in the flow patterns are observed which are only in part attributable to the east-west component of the magnetic field.

  11. The quiet time polar cap: DE 1 observations and conceptual model

    SciTech Connect

    Burch, J.L. ); Saflekos, N.A. ); Gurnett, D.A.; Frank, L.A. ); Craven, J.D. )

    1992-12-01

    Auroral activity increases over the polar caps during quiet times, which are associated with northward interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) components. Polar cap auroras (Sun-aligned arcs, theta auroras, and horse collar auroras) occur under these conditions. DE 1 data have provided partial characterization of these events. A conceptual northward IMF merging model containing lobe cells, merging cells, and viscous cells is shown to be consistent with the observations. As the IMF becomes more northward, the polar arc configuration changes from the horse collar pattern to the theta aurora pattern in the model, and this is shown to be generally true for the set of published data on these phenomena. The model involves dayside merging both at high latitudes on open field lines and at lower latitudes on closed field lines. The ratio between the merged flux produced by the high-latitude merging to that produced by the lower-latitude merging increases as the IMF becomes more northward. Two types of open field lines, equator-crossing and non-equator-crossing, are produced by the higher- and lower-latitude merging, respectively. The equator-crossing field lines have a strong azimuthal component of convection as they flow around the magnetopause, while the non-equator-crossing field lines can convect more or less directly across the polar cap, leading to an antisunward flow channel across the central polar cap. This antisunward flow region grows as the IMF becomes less northward, causing dual polar cap arcs to spread out into the horse collar configuration.

  12. Relationships of storm-time changes in thermospheric mass density with solar wind/IMF parameters and ring current index of Sym-H

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yunliang; Ma, S. Y.; Xiong, Chao; Luehr, Hermann

    The total air mass densities at about 500 km altitude are derived using super-STAR accelerom-eter measurements onboard GRACE satellites for 25 great magnetic storms with minimum Dst less than 100 nT during 2002 to 2006 years. Taking NRLMSISE-00 model-predicted densities without active ap index input as a reference baseline of quiet-time mass density, the storm-time changes in upper thermospheric mass densities are obtained by subtraction for all the storm events and sorted into different grids of latitude by local time sector. The relationships of the storm-time density changes with various interplanetary parameters and magnetospheric ring current index of Sym-H are statistically investigated. The parameters include Akasofu energy coupling function, the merging electric field Em, the magnitude of IMF component in the GSM y-z plane etc. as calculated from OMNI data at 1 AU. It is found that the storm-time changes in the upper thermospheric mass density have the best linear correlation with the Sym-H index in general, showing nearly zero time delay at low-latitudes and a little time ahead at high-latitudes for most cases. Unexpectedly, the magnitude of IMF component in the y-z plane, Byz, shows correlation with storm-time mass density changes better and closer than Akasofu function and even Em. And, the mass density changes lag behind Byz about 1-4 hours for most cases at low-latitudes. The correlations considered above are local time dependent, showing the lowest at dusk sectors. For the largest superstorm of November 2003, the changes in mass density are correlated very closely with Byz, Em, and Sym-H index, showing correlation coefficients averaged over all latitudes in noon sector as high as 0.93, 0.91 and 0.90 separately. The physical factors controlling the lag times between the mass density changes at mid-low-latitudes and the interplanetary parameter variations are also analyzed. The results in this study may pro-vide useful suggestions for establishing

  13. Cosmic Rays during Intense Geomagnetic Conditions and their Solar / Interplanetary features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaushik, Subhash Chandra

    In this study we discuss the behavior of cosmic rays during the phase of highly intense or ultra intense geomagnetic storms, as shocks driven by energetic coronal mass ejections (CME’s) and other interplanetary (IP) transients are mainly responsible for initiating large and intense geomagnetic storms. Observational results indicate that galactic cosmic rays (CR) coming from deep surface interact with these abnormal solar and IP conditions and suffer modulation effects. In this paper a systematic study has been performed to analyze the CRI variation during super storms i.e. very intense geomagnetic storms with Dst index ≥ -300 nT. The neutron monitor data of three stations Oulu (Rc = 0.77 GV), Climax (Rc = 2.97 GV) and Huancayo (Rc = 13.01 GV) well distributed over different latitudes and hourly values of IMF parameters derived from satellite observations near Earth IP medium from OMNI Data base is used for the period spanning over solar cycles 20, 21, 22 and 23. It is found that AP and AE indices show rise before the forward turnings of IMF, while the Dst index shows a classic storm time decrease. The analysis indicates that the magnitude of all the responses depends on BZ component of IMF being well correlated with solar maximum and minimum periods. Transient decrease in cosmic ray intensity with slow recovery is observed during the storm phase duration.

  14. Financing Reduction of Information Poverty in Nigerian University Libraries: A Study of the IMF and World Bank Credit Facility.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawal, Olu Olat

    1995-01-01

    Examines the financing of 20 Federal University Libraries in Nigeria by the World Bank, which provides for acquisition of books, journals, and equipment based on conditions to be met by the universities. Considers socioeconomic effects and assesses the impact of the loan on selection, acquisition, and staff development. Discusses the inability of…

  15. Financing Reduction of Information Poverty in Nigerian University Libraries: A Study of the IMF and World Bank Credit Facility.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawal, Olu Olat

    1995-01-01

    Examines the financing of 20 Federal University Libraries in Nigeria by the World Bank, which provides for acquisition of books, journals, and equipment based on conditions to be met by the universities. Considers socioeconomic effects and assesses the impact of the loan on selection, acquisition, and staff development. Discusses the inability of…

  16. Testing alternative tectono-stratigraphic interpretations of the Late Palaeozoic-Early Mesozoic Karakaya Complex in NW Turkey: support for an accretionary origin related to northward subduction of Palaeotethys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, Alastair; Ustaömer, Timur

    2010-05-01

    The mainly Permian-Triassic rocks of the Karakaya Complex exposed E-W across Turkey are critical to reconstruction of Tethys in the E Mediterranean region. Their origin remains controversial with both stratigraphic layer-cake and accretionary-type settings being advocated. Suggested tectonic settings range from back-arc rift, to accretionary prism- related to either northward or southward subduction. To test alternatives we have studied the contact relations and the internal fabric of each of the main litho-tectonic units making up the Karakaya Complex and related "basement" in nine outcrop areas across NW Turkey, also taking account of existing chemical and dating evidence. Our results show that the Karakaya Complex was assembled by regional-scale thrust faulting without evidence of layer cake-type stratigraphical contacts, or even of deformed sedimentary contacts separating the major lithotectonic units. In several areas (e.g. Havran) the outcrops of meta-siliciclastic sediments of presumed Palaeozoic-age (~Kalabak Unit) are locally cut by Early-Mid Devonian granites. These outcrops represent one or more high-level crustal imbricates made up of basement rocks together with depositionally overlying U. Triassic siliciclastic rocks. Evidence from structurally lower, high pressure-low temperature Karakaya rocks (~Nilüfer Unit) reveals an imbricated, mainly volcaniclastic-carbonate sequence. Both these relatively high-grade Karakaya rocks and the structurally overlying, lower-grade Karakaya rocks (i.e. Çal and Ortaoba units) are interpreted as tectonically emplaced accretionary melange rather than sedimentary "olistostromes". MOR-type basalts (Ortaoba Unit) are locally overlain by red ribbon radiolarites that then pass upwards into feldspar-rich siliciclastics. Triassic oceanic crust and oceanic siliceous sediments were overlain by terrigenous turbidites derived from the north (Sakarya continent), followed by tectonic accretion at a subduction trench bordering the

  17. Tail plasma sheet models derived from Geotail particle data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsyganenko, N. A.; Mukai, T.

    2003-03-01

    . Faster (slower) solar wind flow and southward (northward) IMF Bz result in a hotter (cooler) CPS. The CPS ion pressure P is essentially a function of only XGSM in the midtail (20-50 RE); at closer distances the isobars gradually bend to approximately follow the contours of constant geomagnetic field strength. For northward IMF conditions combined with a slow solar wind, the isobars remain quasi-circular up to larger distances, reflecting a weaker tail current and, hence, more dipole-like magnetic field.

  18. Solar Wind-Magnetosphere Coupling During an Isolated Substorm Event: A Multispacecraft ISTP Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pulkkinen, T. I.; Baker, D. N.; Turner, N. E.; Singer, H. J.; Frank, L. A.; Sigwarth, J. B.; Scudder, J.; Anderson, R.; Kokubun, S.; Mukai, T.; Nakamura, R.; Blake, J. B.; Russell, C. T.; Kawano, H.; Mozer, F.; Slavin, J. A.

    1997-01-01

    Multispacecraft data from the upstream solar wind, polar cusp, and inner magnetotail are used to show that the polar ionosphere responds within a few minutes to a southward IMF turning, whereas the inner tail signatures are visible within ten min from the southward turning. Comparison of two subsequent substorm onsets, one during southward and the other during northward IMF, demonstrates the dependence of the expansion phase characteristics on the external driving conditions. Both onsets are shown to have initiated in the midtail, with signatures in the inner tail and auroral oval following a few minutes later.

  19. Structured subauroral polarization streams and related auroral undulations occurring on the storm day of 21 January 2005

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horvath, Ildiko; Lovell, Brian C.

    2016-02-01

    We investigate structured subauroral polarization streams (SAPS) and their impacts on the midlatitude trough and auroral regions during the 21-22 January 2005 geomagnetic storm. This was a storm with two sudden commencements occurring under varying interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) conditions and three main phases, two of them unfolding during northward IMF. Its onset at ~1700 UT allowed us to investigate SAPS wave structures (WS) and their impacts during the local evening hours under both southward and northward IMF conditions in the American sector. Results suggest that during southward IMF, SAPS-WS might be related with standing (toroidal) Alfven waves and structured most intensively the stagnation trough. During northward IMF, the trough was created by SAPS electric (E) field effects only and became less structured by SAPS-WS that were of Alfvenic origin. Auroral wave structures and undulations occurred in the structured and unstructured oval regions, respectively, and triggered the subauroral region's response to produce SAPS-WS. Spectrogram images (only one shown) confirmed ring current injections implying magnetotail reconnections during the four SAPS-WS events investigated. Periodic tail connections are also evidenced by the periodic increases seen in both the solar wind-magnetosphere coupling function (ɛ) and the energy input efficiency. Finally, we conclude for the time period investigated that (1) the nature of SAPS-WS was informative of IMF orientation, (2) plasma stagnation enhanced SAPS E field and SAPS-WS development, and (3) more efficient energy input into the magnetosphere contributed to the better development of auroral undulations and SAPS-WS.

  20. MERGER RATES OF DOUBLE NEUTRON STARS AND STELLAR ORIGIN BLACK HOLES: THE IMPACT OF INITIAL CONDITIONS ON BINARY EVOLUTION PREDICTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Mink, S. E. de; Belczynski, K. E-mail: kbelczyn@astrouw.edu.pl

    2015-11-20

    The initial mass function (IMF), binary fraction, and distributions of binary parameters (mass ratios, separations, and eccentricities) are indispensable inputs for simulations of stellar populations. It is often claimed that these are poorly constrained, significantly affecting evolutionary predictions. Recently, dedicated observing campaigns have provided new constraints on the initial conditions for massive stars. Findings include a larger close binary fraction and a stronger preference for very tight systems. We investigate the impact on the predicted merger rates of neutron stars and black holes. Despite the changes with previous assumptions, we only find an increase of less than a factor of 2 (insignificant compared with evolutionary uncertainties of typically a factor of 10–100). We further show that the uncertainties in the new initial binary properties do not significantly affect (within a factor of 2) our predictions of double compact object merger rates. An exception is the uncertainty in IMF (variations by a factor of 6 up and down). No significant changes in the distributions of final component masses, mass ratios, chirp masses, and delay times are found. We conclude that the predictions are, for practical purposes, robust against uncertainties in the initial conditions concerning binary parameters, with the exception of the IMF. This eliminates an important layer of the many uncertain assumptions affecting the predictions of merger detection rates with the gravitational wave detectors aLIGO/aVirgo.

  1. Dynamics of Solar Wind Flows and Characteristics of Geomagnetic Activity at Different Angles of IMF Spiral for Period of Space Measurements at Near-Earth Orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsova, Tamara

    Solar wind streams form a spiral with a different longitude angle U: fast-moving streams moving more directly and slow-moving streams wrapping more around Sun. The azimuth component of spiral corresponds to east-west component By (GSE) which plays important role in reconnection on magnetopause and in progress of geomagnetic activity (GA). We take as our aim to find connection between solar wind parameters (IMF B, solar wind velocity V, concentration N, electric field Е =[VхB], Poyting vector of electromagnetic flux density P =[ExB]) and angle U during period of SC 20-24. Such approach allows not only to identify power quasi-stationary flows on basis of the solar wind parameters for each solar cycle, but to see evolution of the flows during period of 4 SC. Dependence of parameters of flows for odd-even SC and their effects in GA from U allows to find influence of the 22-yr magnetic cycle on interaction efficiency. We use data base of B, V, N, temperature T measured at 1 a.u. near ecliptic plane for period of 1963-2013. In particular, it was shown that E and P for By>0 have its maxima in each solar cycle at mean U=80 deg, herewith the maxima for odd SC 21, 23 are considerably larger than ones for even SC 20, 22. Besides, the value of P for 23 cycle has absolute maximum among SC 20-23! These peaks of P and E for By>0 belongs to slow flow of dense cold plasma. The fact that Bx changes its sign at its external boundary points to internal edge of HCS. We have obtained not only new characteristic of SC23, but and its influence on GA. Really, Dst(U) shows absolute maximum of depression for SC 23 at near the same U=80 (By>0). Polar cap index Pc obtained at Thule shows also absolute maximum for SC23 at the same U for By>0. Our analysis confirms that odd SC with low maximal sunspot numbers Wm will have high P and E for similar flows with By>0 and consequently high GA. So, low value of Wm=121 of SC 23 is a parameter, which does not determine power of solar wind

  2. Evidence for a 17-year cycle in the IMF directions at 1 AU, in coronal hole variations, and in planetary magnetospheric modulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juckett, David A.

    1998-11-01

    A dominant 16-17yr cycle was observed in the net exposure times of the Earth to Toward and Away field directions of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF). A cycle of the same frequency and phase was observed in the polarity of the long-term hemispheric differences in coronal hole distributions. This was determined from north/south differences in average Fexiv green line `quiet' regions at high- and mid-latitudes. It is argued that the 17-yr cycle is a fundamental oscillation of coronal hole topology, which is transferred to Earth via variations in the neutral sheet. A comparison of the 17-yr cycle to the 22-yr Hale cycle indicated that they are not identical, but rather, can mix to form a 75-yr cycle plus a 9-yr cycle. Evidence for the 75-yr cycle existed in the Earth's net exposure times to fields from the solar North and South, and in the long-term imbalance of solar quiet regions between the northern and southern hemispheres. The 9-yr cycle was manifested in the mid- to low- latitude Fexiv modulations and in solar wind velocity variations in the ecliptic. At Earth, evidence for a similar 17-yr cycle was observed in the horizontal magnetic field observations in a multitude of surface magnetic recording stations. In addition, the detection of a 17-yr cycle in the Huancayo neutron monitor cosmic ray series suggests that the effects of this cycle extend to the heliospheric boundaries. It is concluded that sufficient preliminary evidence exists to consider the hypothesis that the Sun contains a magnetic moment with an oscillatory cycle of 17years.

  3. Response of dayside auroras to abrupt increases in the solar wind dynamic pressure at positive and negative polarity of the IMF B z component

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vorobjev, V. G.; Zverev, V. L.; Yagodkina, O. I.

    2009-12-01

    The optical observations on Heiss Island (Φ' = 75.0°) have been used to study the characteristics of auroras in the near-noon MLT sector after abrupt increases in the solar wind dynamic pressure at negative and positive polarity of the IMF B z component. It has been found out that the 427.8 and 557.7 nm emission intensities considerably increased at B z < 0 both equatorward of the dayside red luminosity band and within this band. The value of the emission intensities at a red luminosity maximum ( I 6300/ I 5577 ˜ 0.5) indicates that energetic electron precipitation is of the magnetospheric origin. At B z > 0, fluxes of harder ( E > 1 keV) precipitating electrons were superimposed on the soft spectrum of precipitating particles in the equatorial part of the red luminosity band. This red band part was hypothetically caused by the low-latitude boundary layer (LLBL) on closed lines of the geomagnetic field, the estimated thickness of which is ˜3 R e . The 557.7 nm emission intensity increased during 3-5 min after SC/SI and was accompanied by the displacement of the red band equatorward boundary toward lower latitudes. The displacement value was ˜150-200 km when the dynamic pressure abruptly increased by a factor of 3-5. After SC/SI, the 630.0 nm emission intensity continued increasing during 16-18 min. It is assumed that the time of an increase in the red line intensity corresponds to the time of saturation of the magnetospheric boundary layers with magnetosheath particles after an abrupt increase in their density.

  4. Submillimeter Galaxies at z ~ 2: Evidence for Major Mergers and Constraints on Lifetimes, IMF, and CO-H2 Conversion Factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tacconi, L. J.; Genzel, R.; Smail, I.; Neri, R.; Chapman, S. C.; Ivison, R. J.; Blain, A.; Cox, P.; Omont, A.; Bertoldi, F.; Greve, T.; Förster Schreiber, N. M.; Genel, S.; Lutz, D.; Swinbank, A. M.; Shapley, A. E.; Erb, D. K.; Cimatti, A.; Daddi, E.; Baker, A. J.

    2008-06-01

    We report subarcsecond resolution IRAM PdBI millimeter CO interferometry of four z ~ 2 submillimeter galaxies (SMGs), and sensitive CO(3-2) flux limits toward three z ~ 2 UV/optically selected star-forming galaxies. The new data reveal for the first time spatially resolved CO gas kinematics in the observed SMGs. Two of the SMGs show double or multiple morphologies, with complex, disturbed gas motions. The other two SMGs exhibit CO velocity gradients of ~500 km s-1 across <=0.2'' (1.6 kpc) diameter regions, suggesting that the star-forming gas is in compact, rotating disks. Our data provide compelling evidence that these SMGs represent extreme, short-lived "maximum" star-forming events in highly dissipative mergers of gas-rich galaxies. The resulting high-mass surface and volume densities of SMGs are similar to those of compact quiescent galaxies in the same redshift range and much higher than those in local spheroids. From the ratio of the comoving volume densities of SMGs and quiescent galaxies in the same mass and redshift ranges, and from the comparison of gas exhaustion timescales and stellar ages, we estimate that the SMG phase duration is about 100 Myr. Our analysis of SMGs and optically/UV selected high-redshift star-forming galaxies supports a "universal" Chabrier IMF as being valid over the star-forming history of these galaxies. We find that the 12CO luminosity to total gas mass conversion factors at z ~ 2-3 are probably similar to those assumed at z ~ 0. The implied gas fractions in our sample galaxies range from 20% to 50%. Based on observations obtained at the IRAM Plateau de Bure Interferometer (PdBI). IRAM is funded by the Centre National de la Recherché Scientifique (France), the Max-Planck Gesellschaft (Germany), and the Instituto Geografico Nacional (Spain).

  5. Polar and high latitude substorms and solar wind conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Despirak, I. V.; Lyubchich, A. A.; Kleimenova, N. G.

    2014-09-01

    All substorm disturbances observed in polar latitudes can be divided into two types: polar, which are observable at geomagnetic latitudes higher than 70° in the absence of substorms below 70°, and high latitude substorms, which travel from auroral (<70°) to polar (>70°) geomagnetic latitudes. The aim of this study is to compare conditions in the IMF and solar wind, under which these two types of substorms are observable on the basis of data from meridional chain of magnetometers IMAGE and OMNI database for 1995, 2000, and 2006-2011. In total, 105 polar and 55 high latitude substorms were studied. It is shown that polar substorms are observable at a low velocity of solar wind after propagation of a high-speed recurrent stream during the late recovery phase of a magnetic storm. High latitude substorms, in contrast, are observable with a high velocity of solar wind, increased values of the Bz component of the IMF, the Ey component of the electric field, and solar wind temperature and pressure, when a high-speed recurrent stream passes by the Earth.

  6. Solar Wind Influence on the Oxygen Content of Ion Outflow in the High Altitude Polar Cap During Solar Minimum Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elliott, Heather A.; Comfort, Richard H.; Craven, Paul D.; Chandler, Michael O.; Moore, Thomas E.

    2000-01-01

    We correlate solar wind and IMF properties with the properties of O(+) and H(+) in the polar cap in early 1996 during solar minimum conditions at altitudes between 5.5 and 8.9 Re geocentric using the Thermal Ion Dynamics Experiment (TIDE) on the POLAR satellite. Throughout the high altitude polar cap, we observe H(+) to be more abundant than O(+). H(+) is a significant fraction of both the ionosphere and the solar wind, and O(+) is not a significant species in the solar wind. O(+) is the major species in the ionosphere so the faction of O(+) present in the magnetosphere is commonly used as a measure of the ionospheric contribution to the magnetosphere. For these reasons, 0+ is of primary interest in this study. We observe O(+) to be most abundant at lower latitudes when the solar wind speed is low (and low Kp), and at higher solar wind speeds (and high Kp) O(+) is observed across most of the polar cap. We also find that O(+) density and parallel flux are well organized by solar wind dynamic pressure; they both increase with solar wind dynamic pressure. H(+) is not as highly correlated with solar wind and IMF parameters, but H(+) density and parallel flux have some negative correlation with IMF By, and some positive correlation with VswBIMF. In this solar minimum data set, H(+) is dominant so that contributions of this plasma to the plasma sheet would have a very low O(+) to H(+) ratio.

  7. Concerning the Motion and Orientation of Flux Transfer Events Produced by Component and Antiparallel Reconnection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sibeck, D. G.; Lin, R.-Q.

    2011-01-01

    We employ the Cooling et al. (2001) model to predict the location, orientation, motion, and signatures of flux transfer events (FTEs) generated at the solstices and equinoxes along extended subsolar component and high ]latitude antiparallel reconnection curves for typical solar wind plasma conditions and various interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) strengths and directions. In general, events generated by the two mechanisms maintain the strikingly different orientations they begin with as they move toward the terminator in opposite pairs of magnetopause quadrants. The curves along which events generated by component reconnection form bow toward the winter cusp. Events generated by antiparallel reconnection form on the equatorial magnetopause during intervals of strongly southward IMF orientation during the equinoxes, form in the winter hemisphere and only reach the dayside equatorial magnetopause during the solstices when the IMF strength is very large and the IMF points strongly southward, never reach the equatorial dayside magnetopause when the IMF has a substantial dawnward or duskward component, and never reach the equatorial flank magnetopause during intervals of northward and dawnward or duskward IMF orientation. Magnetosheath magnetic fields typically have strong components transverse to events generated by component reconnection but only weak components transverse to the axes of events generated by antiparallel reconnection. As a result, much stronger bipolar magnetic field signatures normal to the nominal magnetopause should accompany events generated by component reconnection. The results presented in this paper suggest that events generated by component reconnection predominate on the dayside equatorial and flank magnetopause for most solar wind conditions.

  8. Breeding on the leading edge of a northward range expansion: differences in morphology and the stress response in the arctic Gambel's white-crowned sparrow.

    PubMed

    Krause, Jesse S; Chmura, Helen E; Pérez, Jonathan H; Quach, Lisa N; Asmus, Ashley; Word, Karen R; McGuigan, Michaela A; Sweet, Shannan K; Meddle, Simone L; Gough, Laura; Boelman, Natalie; Wingfield, John C

    2016-01-01

    Individuals at the forefront of a range shift are likely to exhibit phenotypic traits that distinguish them from the population breeding within the historic range. Recent studies have examined morphological, physiological and behavioral phenotypes of individuals at the edge of their range. Several studies have found differences in the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis activity in response to acute restraint stress in individuals at the range limits. HPA axis activation leads to elevations in glucocorticoids that regulate physiology and behavior. Here we compare the hormonal profiles and morphometrics from Gambel's white-crowned sparrows (Zonotrichia leucophrys gambelii) breeding at the northern limit of the population's range to those birds breeding within the historic population range. Birds breeding at the northern limit experienced a harsher environment with colder temperatures; however, we found no differences in arthropod prey biomass between the northern limit and more southern (historic) sites. Males at the northern limit had higher body condition scores (mass corrected for body size) compared to individuals within the historic range, but no differences were found in beak and tarsus lengths, wing chord, muscle profile or fat stores. In males during the pre-parental stage, before breeding commenced, HPA axis activity was elevated in birds at the northern limit of the range, but no differences were found during the parental or molt stages. Females showed no differences in HPA axis activity during the parental stage. This study suggests that "pioneering" individuals at the limits of their breeding range exhibit physiology and morphology that are distinct from individuals within the historic range.

  9. Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMF)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Peter H.

    1994-01-01

    The IMP camera is a near-surface sensing experiment with many capabilities beyond those normally associated with an imager. It is fully pointable in both elevation and azimuth with a protected, stowed position looking straight down. Stereo separation is provided with two optical paths; each has a 12-position filter wheel. The primary function of the camera, strongly tied to mission success, is to take a color panorama of the surrounding terrain. IMP requires approximately 120 images to give a complete downward hemisphere from the deployed position. IMP provides the geologist, and everyone else, a view of the local morphology with millimeter-tometer-scale resolution over a broad area. In addition to the general morphology of the scale, IMP has a large compliment of specially chosen filters to aid in both the identification of the mineral types and their degree of weathering.

  10. Solar Wind Entry into the magnetosphere lobes and its Related Auroral activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Q.; Gou, X.; Mailyan, B. G.; Maggiolo, R.; Zhang, Y.; Fu, S.; Zong, Q.; Parks, G. K.; Pu, Z.; Dunlop, M. W.

    2014-12-01

    Using Cluster multi-spacecrafts observation between August to October each year from 2002 to 2004, Shi, et al. [2013] have reported an unexpected discovery of regions of solar wind entry into the Earth's high-latitude magnetospheric lobes where the solar wind plasmas may penetrate into magnetosphere through high-latitude magnetic reconnection when the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) is northward. From statistical analysis, they found that the IMF Bx component may influence the solar wind entry into the magnetosphere by changing the occurring conditions of high-latitude magnetic reconnection. Based on their studies, in this paper we use another period of Cluster data which is between January to April each year from 2001 to 2006 to do a further study. As a result, the influence of the IMF Bx component is consistent with the results from [Shi, et al. 2013]. We find that the IMF By component affects the events along with the IMF Bx component, which is consistent with the Parker Spiral of the IMF. We have also studied some transpolar arc observations in correlation with the solar wind entry events. The properties of entry plasma, electron and ion properties associated with aurorae are examined using multiple spacecraft data (Cluster, TIMED, DMSP, IMAGE and POLAR etc) , as can be seen from another work presented this meeting by Mailyan et al.

  11. Lack of magnetopause Kelvin Helmoltz waves in the THEMIS era

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    kavosi, S.; Raeder, J.

    2012-12-01

    It has been long suggested that The Kelvin Helmholtz Instability (KHI) at Earth's low latitude magnetopause plays a significant role for the entry of solar wind plasma into the magnetosphere under northward interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) conditions. In this study we analyze surface waves commonly observed by the THEMIS spacecraft at the flank magnetopause throughout the entire THEMIS mission. In select cases we perform OpenGGCM simulations of observed surface wave events in order to investigate the nature of the waves. In particular, we compare simulations driven by the full set of solar wind and IMF data with simulations in which the solar wind speed and density are held constant at appropriate average values. This allows us to compare the occurrences of surface waves caused by KHI with those caused by solar wind pressure fluctuations, and to determine the relative importance of each mechanism. Our results show that solar wind pressure fluctuations are the dominant mechanisms for generating surface waves observed during northward IMF. The KHI seems to occur much less frequently than typically expected. Since THEMIS spacecraft are often in a good position to observe KHI, the absence of KHI waves is conspicuous. In order to understand the lack of KH waves during the THEMIS era we statistically examine key quantities of the solar wind and IMF to better establish the conditions under which KHI occurs.

  12. View Northward from Spirit's Winter Roost

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    One part of the research program that NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit is conducting while sitting at a favorable location for wintertime solar energy is the most detailed panorama yet taken on the surface of Mars. This view is a partial preliminary product from the continuing work on the full image, which will be called the 'McMurdo Panorama.'

    Spirit's panoramic camera (Pancam) began taking exposures for the McMurdo Panorama on the rover's 814th Martian day (April 18, 2006). The rover has accumulated more than 900 exposures for this panorama so far, through all of the Pancam mineralogy filters and using little or no image compression. Even with a tilt toward the winter sun, the amount of energy available daily is small, so the job will still take one to two more months to complete.

    This portion of the work in progress looks toward the north. 'Husband Hill,' which Spirit was climbing a year ago, is on the horizon near the center. 'Home Plate' is a between that hill and the rover's current position. Wheel tracks imprinted when Spirit drove south from Home Plate can be seen crossing the middle distance of the image from the center to the right.

    This is an approximate true-color rendering combining exposures taken through three of the panoramic camera's filters. The filters used are centered on wavelengths of 750 nanometers, 530 nanometers and 430 nanometers.

  13. The Earth's magnetosphere under continued forcing: Substorm activity during the passage of an interplanetary magnetic cloud

    SciTech Connect

    Farrugia, C.J.; Burlaga, L.F.; Lepping, R.P. ); Freeman, M.P. ); Takahashi, K. )

    1993-05-01

    This is the third of three papers dealing with the interaction of an interplanetary magnetic field with the earth's magnetosphere in Jan 1988. Here the authors report on substorm observations made during this time period. They sampled information from six spacecraft and a larger number of ground based systems to serve as signals for the initiation of substorm behavior. They relate the interplanetary magnetic field and plasma conditions to the time of observation of substorm initiation. Current models tie substorm occurrence to magnetic reconnection in the magnetosphere. The IMF B[sub y] and B[sub z] components varied slowly over a range of 20 nT on both sides of zero during this observation period. During the period of northward IMF the magnetosphere was quiescent, but during the period of southward IMF a large magnetic storm was initiated. During this interval substorms were observed roughly every 50 minutes.

  14. Chromosomal Conditions

    MedlinePlus

    ... 150 babies is born with a chromosomal condition. Down syndrome is an example of a chromosomal condition. Because ... all pregnant women be offered prenatal tests for Down syndrome and other chromosomal conditions. A screening test is ...

  15. Observation of magnetopause fluctuations during a Cluster-THEMIS conjunction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Kyoung-Joo; Goldstein, Mevlyn

    On April 27, 2007, THEMIS observed quasi-periodic magnetopause fluctuations for a prolonged time period (9 hrs) as they skimmed the dusk-side magnetopause, while Cluster detected 1.5-hour-long boundary undulations as they traversed the morning-side magnetopause. The com-parison between Cluster and THEMIS with ACE data implies that: 1) Similar periodicity and patterns of its variability between Cluster and THEMIS observations, with a certain time in-terval longer than is expected from the upstream magnetosheath travel time between THEMIS and Cluster locations, indicate that the dusk-side surface waves have been excited at the nearly subsolar region; 2) The complicated inner-LLBL fluctuations observed by THEMIS have been resulted from the development and modulation of the waves according to the local environment during convection along the LLBL, while Cluster observed the magnetopause fluctuations that appear to be more explicitly controlled by SW variations in the morning sector; 3) The intensity of KHW, often well characterized by Bm power spectra reflect the effects of IMF conditions, exhibiting a correlation with SW temperature and IMF clock angle, i.e., a more solid power law when IMF points due north or south rather than due dawn or dusk; 4) Steeper wavefront at the anti-sunward/sunward edge of KHW during southward/northward IMF support more rapid and turbulent evolution of KHW under southward IMF conditions [Hwang et al., 2010; Kuznetsova et al., 2008], and the steepening effects of the curvature forces of the magnetosheath flux tubes during northward IMF [Chen et al., 1997].

  16. Future changes in atmospheric condition for the baiu under RCP scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okada, Y.; Takemi, T.; Ishikawa, H.

    2015-12-01

    This study focuses on atmospheric circulation fields during the baiu in Japan with global warming projection experimental data conducted using a 20-km mesh global atmospheric model (MRI-AGCM3.2) under Representative Concentration Pathways (RCP) scenarios. This model also used 4 different sea surface temperature (SST) initial conditions. Support of this dataset is provided by the Meteorological Research Institute (MRI). The baiu front indicated by the north-south gradient of moist static energy moves northward in present-day climate, whereas this northward shift in future climate simulations is very slow during May and June. In future late baiu season, the baiu front stays in the northern part of Japan even in August. As a result, the rich water vapor is transported around western Japan and the daily precipitation amount will increase in August. This northward shift of baiu front is associated with the westward expansion of the enhanced the North Pacific subtropical high (NPSH) into Japan region. However, the convective activity around northwest Pacific Ocean is inactive and is unlikely to occur convective jump (CJ). These models show that the weak trough exists in upper troposphere around Japan. Therefore, the cold advection stays in the northern part of Japan during June. In July, the front due to the strengthening of the NPSH moves northward, and then it stays until August. This feature is often found between the clustered SSTs, Cluster 2 and 3. The mean field of future August also show the inflow of rich water vapor content to Japan islands. In this model, the extreme rainfall suggested tends to almost increase over the Japan islands during future summer. This work was conducted under the Program for Risk Information on Climate Change supported by the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science, and Technology-Japan (MEXT).