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Sample records for nosocomial infections surveillance

  1. [General epidemiology of nosocomial infections. Surveillance systems and programs].

    PubMed

    Pujol, Miquel; Limón, Enric

    2013-02-01

    Infections related to the health-care system are those associated with health care practices in hospitalized patients as well as in out-patients with health-care contact. Nosocomial infections affect 5% of in-patients, and carry a high morbidity, mortality and economic cost. The main types of nosocomial infections are related to invasive procedures, and include respiratory tract infection, surgical site infections, urinary tract infections, and vascular catheter bacteremia. It has been shown that the application of checklists and a bundle of measures are useful in preventing these infections. Epidemiological surveillance, defined as the gathering of information to take actions, is the basis of infection control programs. These have evolved from a global surveillance targeted at processes and indicators of nosocomial infection. The comparison of these indicators can be useful in establishing preventive measures.

  2. Impact of nosocomial infections surveillance on nosocomial infection rates: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Li, Ye; Gong, Zhenyu; Lu, Ye; Hu, Guoqing; Cai, Ran; Chen, Zhiping

    2017-06-01

    According to previously studies, nosocomial infections (NIs) surveillance could effectively reduce infection rates. As NIs surveillance systems have been implemented in some hospitals for several years, their impact on NIs need to be explored. Therefore, the purpose of this review is to evaluate the tendency of NI rates during the surveillance period and the impact of surveillance on NI rates. A systematic literature search of the PubMed database to identify papers that evaluated effect of surveillance on NIs, all kinds of NIs occurred during hospitalization or discharged were included. Exclude articles investigated the surveillance combined with other infection control measures. Twenty-five articles were included. NI rates had different levels of reduction during surveillance period, the reduction were not limited by state, department, surveillance system, and NI type. Continuous surveillance had a positive impact on NI, OR/RR were ranged from 0.43 to 0.95. Participation in NI surveillance is associated with reducing infection rates, though RCTs need to further prove the effective role of surveillance. Hospitals may consider to perform NIs surveillance systems according to its own conditions. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  3. Surveillance for surgical site infection (SSI) after neurosurgery: influence of the US or Brest (France) National Nosocomial Infection Surveillance risk index on SSI rates.

    PubMed

    Lietard, Claire; Thébaud, Véronique; Besson, Gérard; Lejeune, Benoist

    2008-11-01

    A total of 5,628 neurosurgical patients were observed in France to assess the occurrence of surgical site infection (SSI). Their risk of SSI was defined by calculating both the US National Nosocomial Infection Surveillance and the Brest National Nosocomial Infection Surveillance risk indexes. This study compares SSI rates stratified according to either the US or Brest (France) National Nosocomial Infection Surveillance risk index. The SSI rates were correlated with National Nosocomial Infection Surveillance data involving only local operation durations.

  4. [Surveillance of nosocomial infections related to anesthesia. A multicenter study].

    PubMed

    Hajjar, J; Girard, R

    2000-01-01

    To determine incidence rate, main characteristics and risk factors of nosocomial infections associated with anesthesia (NIAA). Prospective, descriptive multicentre survey. All patients aged more than 15 years and undergoing surgery (except cardio-thoracic, ENT or ambulatory surgery) under general or regional anaesthesia. Voluntary participation of surgical units from public or private hospitals. Use of pre-established definitions of infections and a 72 hours postanesthetic follow-up. Anaesthesia and operation related risk factors collected. End point based on occurrence, or not, of clinical infection. Record, control, treatment and analysis of the data by Epi Info--5.0 software. Statistics used: Fischer's exact test, Mantel-Haenszel test, Anova method, Kruskall-Wallis test. Among 7,300 patients belonging to 13 hospitals, 25 developed an infection (nine vascular catheter related infections, 12 respiratory tract infections, two infections of the eye and two of the mouth). Only two infections have been bacteriologically documented. The overall incidence of NIAA was 3.4 per 1,000 patients. It was significantly higher after an anaesthetic of more than 2 hours and after transfusion. This first prospective survey of NIAA confirmed that nosocomial infections are a real problem in the practice of anaesthesia and the necessity to use preventive measures. A survey with a larger sample size would allow to specify the respective part of the various risk factors and to develop a risk index.

  5. The incidence of nosocomial infection in the Intensive Care Unit, Hospital Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia: ICU-acquired nosocomial infection surveillance program 1998-1999.

    PubMed

    Rozaidi, S W; Sukro, J; Dan, A

    2001-06-01

    CU-acquired nosocomial infection (NI) remains one of the major causes of ICU mortality. This study presents the incidence of ICU-acquired nosocomial infection in ICU HUKM for the years 1998 and 1999, as part of the ongoing ICU-acquired nosocomial infection surveillance program. The overall incidence was 23%. The main types of NI was lower respiratory tract infection (15.3%), primary bacteraemia (8.1%), ventilator associated pneumonia (5.4%), urinary tract infection (2.0%), skin infection (1.6%) central venous catheter sepsis (1.2%) and surgical skin infection (0.8%). The overall culture positive nosocomial infection rate was only 12.1%, majority from the lungs (12.6%), blood (7.3%), skin swabs (2.0%), and urine (1.6%). The main gram-negative organism cultured was Acinetobacter sp. (19%) and Staph. aureus (8.5%) was the gram-positive organism. The overall ICU mortality rate was 27.5% of which 60.9% of patients who died were attributed directly to sepsis.

  6. Surveillance of nosocomial infections in the Yaounde University Teaching Hospital, Cameroon.

    PubMed

    Nouetchognou, Julienne Stéphanie; Ateudjieu, Jérôme; Jemea, Bonaventure; Mesumbe, Edmond Nzene; Mbanya, Dora

    2016-12-08

    Nosocomial infections (NI) represent a real public health problem in developing countries. Their surveillance is recommended to provide needed information for better control. The aim of this study was to describe the frequency and distribution of NI in the Yaoundé University Teaching Hospital (YUTH). It was a longitudinal and descriptive study targeting hospitalized patients in the intensive care, gynaecological, surgical and neonatal units. Each consenting patient was administered a questionnaire at the beginning of the study and followed up daily for the duration of their hospitalization using a standardized grid to detect all nosocomial infections. Cumulative incidence was used to estimate NI frequency. There were 307 patients included. The cumulative incidence and specific mortality rate of NI were 19.21% (16.9-21.5) and 28% (16.2-42.5) respectively. Septicaemia (20.34%), infection of the skin and soft tissues (20.34%) and urinary tract infections (15.25%) were the most frequent type of NI. Klebsiella spp. was the most frequently isolated bacterium (27%). Nosocomial infections contribute to high hospital morbidity in the Yaounde University Teaching Hospital. Strategies need to be identified for a sustainable and continuous monitoring of NI in all health facilities of Cameroon. In addition, Further studies should identify NI determinants and interventions for efficient and better control.

  7. [Nosocomial infection: clinical aspects].

    PubMed

    Frottier, J

    1993-05-01

    Nosocomial infections develop within a hospital or are produced by microorganisms acquired during hospitalization. They may involve not only patients (2 to 10 percent) but also hospital personnel. They arise from complex interactions of multiple causal factors. Patients risk factors are these that reduce the patient's capacity for resisting the injurious effects of the microorganisms and impair natural host defense mechanisms: patients with malignant disorders or immunosuppressive therapy, poor nutritional status, extensive burn wounds ... The young and the elderly are generally more susceptible to infection. Other infections are preventable. Disease causation is often multifactorial. Nosocomial urinary tract infections had the highest rate, followed by lower respiratory tract infections, surgical infections and bacteremias. The emergence of other nosocomial infections, caused by bacteria (tuberculosis), virus (HIV, hepatitis B and C virus, cytomegalovirus...), Aspergillus species or Pneumocystis carinii appears to be recent in origin and is of importance to immunocompromised hosts, other patients and hospital personnel. Nosocomial infections and their social and economic impacts require for their prevention vigorous organized hospital-wide surveillance and control programs.

  8. Nosocomial infection update.

    PubMed Central

    Weinstein, R. A.

    1998-01-01

    Historically, staphylococci, pseudomonads, and Escherichia coli have been the nosocomial infection troika; nosocomial pneumonia, surgical wound infections, and vascular access-related bacteremia have caused the most illness and death in hospitalized patients; and intensive care units have been the epicenters of antibiotic resistance. Acquired antimicrobial resistance is the major problem, and vancomycin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus is the pathogen of greatest concern. The shift to outpatient care is leaving the most vulnerable patients in hospitals. Aging of our population and increasingly aggressive medical and surgical interventions, including implanted foreign bodies, organ transplantations, and xenotransplantation, create a cohort of particularly susceptible persons. Renovation of aging hospitals increases risk of airborne fungal and other infections. To prevent and control these emerging nosocomial infections, we need to increase national surveillance, "risk adjust" infection rates so that interhospital comparisons are valid, develop more noninvasive infection-resistant devices, and work with health-care workers on better implementation of existing control measures such as hand washing. PMID:9716961

  9. Five-year decreased incidence of surgical site infections following gastrectomy and prosthetic joint replacement surgery through active surveillance by the Korean Nosocomial Infection Surveillance System.

    PubMed

    Choi, H J; Adiyani, L; Sung, J; Choi, J Y; Kim, H B; Kim, Y K; Kwak, Y G; Yoo, H; Lee, Sang-Oh; Han, S H; Kim, S R; Kim, T H; Lee, H M; Chun, H K; Kim, J-S; Yoo, J D; Koo, H-S; Cho, E H; Lee, K W

    2016-08-01

    Surveillance of healthcare-associated infection has been associated with a reduction in surgical site infection (SSI). To evaluate the Korean Nosocomial Infection Surveillance System (KONIS) in order to assess its effects on SSI since it was introduced. SSI data after gastrectomy, total hip arthroplasty (THA), and total knee arthroplasty (TKA) between 2008 and 2012 were analysed. The pooled incidence of SSI was calculated for each year; the same analyses were also conducted from hospitals that had participated in KONIS for at least three consecutive years. Standardized SSI rates for each year were calculated by adjusting for SSI risk factors. SSI trends were analysed using the Cochran-Armitage test. The SSI rate following gastrectomy was 3.12% (522/16,918). There was a significant trend of decreased crude SSI rates over five years. This trend was also evident in analysis of hospitals that had participated for more than three years. The SSI rate for THA was 2.05% (157/7656), which decreased significantly from 2008 to 2012. The risk factors for SSI after THA included the National Nosocomial Infections Surveillance risk index, trauma, reoperation, and age (60-69 years). The SSI rate for TKA was 1.90% (152/7648), which also decreased significantly during a period of five years. However, the risk-adjusted analysis of SSI did not show a significant decrease for all surgical procedures. The SSI incidence of gastrectomy and prosthetic joint replacement declined over five years as a result of active surveillance by KONIS. Copyright © 2016 The Healthcare Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Epidemiology and microbiology of nosocomial bloodstream infections: analysis of 482 cases from a retrospective surveillance study.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jian-nong; Gan, Tie-er; Zhu, Yue-xian; Cao, Jun-min; Ji, Cong-hua; Wu, Yi-hua; Lv, Bin

    2015-01-01

    In many traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) hospitals, most patients are elderly with chronic diseases. Nosocomial bloodstream infections (nBSIs) are an important cause of morbidity and mortality. A retrospective surveillance study was performed to examine the epidemiology and microbiology of nBSIs in a TCM hospital from 2009 to 2011. A total of 482 patients with nBSIs were included in the study period. The incidence rate was 5.7/1000 admissions. Escherichia coli (25.5%) was the most common Gram-negative and coagulase-negative staphylococcus (CoNS) (14.1%) was the most common Gram-positive organism isolated. One-third of the E. coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae isolated from the nBSIs were the third-generation cephalosporin-resistant. Half of the Acinetobacter species isolates were resistant to imipenem. Of all the CoNS isolates, 90.7% were resistant to methicillin. Carbapenems and glycopeptide were the most frequently used for nBSI therapy. Only about one-third of patients (157/482) received appropriate empirical therapy. Septic shock, hemodialysis, Pitt bacteremia score >4, urinary tract infection, and appropriate empirical therapy were most strongly associated with 28-d mortality. The incidence of nBSIs was low in the TCM hospital but the proportion of nBSIs due to antibiotic-resistant organisms was high. A high Pitt bacteremia score was one of the most important risk factors for mortality in nBSIs. Therefore, the implementation of appropriate empirical therapy is crucial to improve the clinical outcome of nBSIs.

  11. Epidemiology and microbiology of nosocomial bloodstream infections: analysis of 482 cases from a retrospective surveillance study*

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jian-nong; Gan, Tie-er; Zhu, Yue-xian; Cao, Jun-min; Ji, Cong-hua; Wu, Yi-hua; Lv, Bin

    2015-01-01

    In many traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) hospitals, most patients are elderly with chronic diseases. Nosocomial bloodstream infections (nBSIs) are an important cause of morbidity and mortality. A retrospective surveillance study was performed to examine the epidemiology and microbiology of nBSIs in a TCM hospital from 2009 to 2011. A total of 482 patients with nBSIs were included in the study period. The incidence rate was 5.7/1000 admissions. Escherichia coli (25.5%) was the most common Gram-negative and coagulase-negative staphylococcus (CoNS) (14.1%) was the most common Gram-positive organism isolated. One-third of the E. coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae isolated from the nBSIs were the third-generation cephalosporin-resistant. Half of the Acinetobacter species isolates were resistant to imipenem. Of all the CoNS isolates, 90.7% were resistant to methicillin. Carbapenems and glycopeptide were the most frequently used for nBSI therapy. Only about one-third of patients (157/482) received appropriate empirical therapy. Septic shock, hemodialysis, Pitt bacteremia score >4, urinary tract infection, and appropriate empirical therapy were most strongly associated with 28-d mortality. The incidence of nBSIs was low in the TCM hospital but the proportion of nBSIs due to antibiotic-resistant organisms was high. A high Pitt bacteremia score was one of the most important risk factors for mortality in nBSIs. Therefore, the implementation of appropriate empirical therapy is crucial to improve the clinical outcome of nBSIs. PMID:25559958

  12. [Evaluation of antibiotic resistance in the frame of the surveillance system for nosocomial infections. Strong and weak points].

    PubMed

    Serban, Roxana; Codiţă, Irina

    2010-01-01

    Since 2005 a sentinel system for surveillance of nosocomial diseases has been introduced in Romania which had, among other objectives, the evaluation of antibiotic resistance. The surveillance methodology was shared annually, the number of participants varying between 12 and 40 hospitals. During 2005-2008 the Reference Laboratory for Nosocomial Infections and Antibiotic Resistance in the "Cantacusino" NIRDMI received 1481 bacterial strains, comprising 531 S. aureus, 486 Pseudomonas aeruginosa, 439 enterobacteria and 25 enterococci strains. The resistance percents widely differred for some species, especially regarding the type of hospital unit that sent the strains (ex., Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated form patients with burns). A great variability was noted concerning the manner in which nominalized hospitals responded to the solicitations in the methodology that was shared. especially regarding participation to a national bank for bacterial strains. Only for 5 out of the 40 hospitals that participated along the 4 years in the sentinel programme the annual comparative evaluations of antibiotic resistance were achieved. for a small number of microorganisms that underwent surveillance (S. aureus, E. coli). Among the strong points of the system we can point out: unity in methodology; working protocols for microbiological investigation given to all the participants; special forms for reporting. Among the weak points, we consider: modification in the number of participant hospitals during the program: unequal participation of hospitals, with unwanted effects on the sample representativity of analysed microbial strains; difficulties in stocking and processing laboratory data. In order to increase the quality of data provided, we consider the following as useful: harmonization of the objectives regarding integrated surveillance of nosocomial infections and antibiotic resistance in hospital environment, correlated with the ECDC demands and recommendations; inclusion in

  13. National nosocomial infection surveillance system: from benchmark to bedside in trauma patients.

    PubMed

    Miller, Preston R; Johnson, James C; Karchmer, Tobi; Hoth, Jason J; Meredith, J Wayne; Chang, Michael C

    2006-01-01

    Ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in the injured patient. Identification of those with VAP is important both in immediate clinical decision making as well as for the epidemiologic evaluation of the disease and benchmarking of rates across institutions with variable practice patterns. Despite this, controversy exists over the optimal method of VAP diagnosis. Many centers currently use invasive culture methods such as bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) for diagnosis. Another diagnostic method, and the most common epidemiologic tool used to track VAP, is the definition employed by the National Nosocomial Infections Surveillance (NNIS) system. This relies on a combination of clinical and culture data. Our goal was to evaluate the accuracy of the NNIS definition as compared with BAL diagnosis in trauma patients. Records of all ventilated patients admitted to the trauma intensive care unit at a Level I center who were evaluated for the presence of pneumonia over a 2.5-year period were reviewed. VAP diagnosis was established if > or =10 cfu/mL were cultured on BAL. VAP rates and time of onset were compared with the hospital infection control database, which defines VAP by NNIS criteria. Assuming BAL to be correct, sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values were calculated for NNIS VAP. From September 1, 2001, through December 31, 2003, 292 patients underwent BAL for suspected pneumonia. The pneumonia rate in this group was 34 per 1,000 ventilator days. The NNIS definition showed excellent overall agreement, with a rate of 36 per 1,000 ventilator days. The use of the NNIS definition for bedside decision making, however, is less accurate. Sensitivity and positive predictive value were reasonably good (84% and 83%, respectively), whereas specificity and negative predictive value suffer (69% and 69%, respectively). Most importantly, the use of NNIS would have led to no treatment in 16% of patients

  14. Nosocomial infection characteristics in a burn intensive care unit: analysis of an eleven-year active surveillance.

    PubMed

    Öncül, Oral; Öksüz, Sinan; Acar, Ali; Ülkür, Ersin; Turhan, Vedat; Uygur, Fatih; Ulçay, Asım; Erdem, Hakan; Özyurt, Mustafa; Görenek, Levent

    2014-08-01

    The objective of this study was to describe nosocomial infection (NI) rates, risk factors, etiologic agents, antibiotic susceptibility, invasive device utilization and invasive device associated infection rates in a burn intensive care unit (ICU) in Turkey. Prospective surveillance of nosocomial infections was performed according to Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and National Healthcare Safety Network (NHSN) criteria between 2001 and 2012. The data was analyzed retrospectively. During the study period 658 burn patients were admitted to our burn ICU. 469 cases acquired 602 NI for an overall NI rate of 23.1 per 1000 patient days. 109 of all the cases (16.5%) died. Pseudomonas aeruginosa (241), Acinetobacter baumannii (186) and Staphylococcus aureus (69) were the most common identified bacteria in 547 strains. Total burn surface area, full thickness burn, older age, presence of inhalation injury were determined to be the significant risk factors for acquisition of NI. Determining the NI profile at a certain burn ICU can lead the medical staff apply the appropriate treatment regimen and limit the drug resistance. Eleven years surveillance report presented here provides a recent data about the risk factors of NI in a Turkish burn ICU. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  15. Nosocomial infection surveillance in a surgical intensive care unit in Spain, 1996-2000: a time-trend analysis.

    PubMed

    Lizan-Garcia, Maxima; Peyro, Ramon; Cortina, Manuel; Crespo, Maria Dolores; Tobias, Aurelio

    2006-01-01

    To establish the occurrence, distribution, and secular time trend of nosocomial infections (NIs) in a surgical intensive care unit (ICU). Follow-up study in a teaching hospital in Spain. In May 1995 we established an nosocomial infection surveillance system in our surgical ICU. We collected information daily for all patients who were in the ICU for at least 48 hours (546 patients from 1996 through 2000). We used the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention definitions and criteria for infections. Monthly, we determined the site-specific incidence densities of NIs, the rates of medical device use, and the Poisson probability distribution, which determined whether the case count equalled the number of expected cases (the mean number of cases during the previous year, with extreme values excluded). We compared yearly and monthly infection rates by Poisson regression, using site-specific NIs as a dependent variable and year and month as dummy variables. We tested annual trends with an alternative Poisson regression model fitting a single linear trend. The average rate of catheter-associated urinary tract infections was 8.4 per 1000 catheter-days; that of ventilator-associated pneumonia, 21 per 1000 ventilator-days; and that of central line-associated bloodstream infections, 30 per 1000 central line-days. The rate of urinary tract infections did not change over the study period, but there was a trend toward decreases in the rates of central line-associated bloodstream infections and ventilator-associated pneumonia. An NI surveillance and control program contributed to a progressive decrease in NI rates.

  16. Results from the Canadian Nosocomial Infection Surveillance Program on Carbapenemase-Producing Enterobacteriaceae, 2010 to 2014

    PubMed Central

    Mataseje, Laura F.; Abdesselam, Kahina; Vachon, Julie; Mitchel, Robyn; Bryce, Elizabeth; Roscoe, Diane; Boyd, David A.; Embree, Joanne; Katz, Kevin; Kibsey, Pamela; Simor, Andrew E.; Taylor, Geoffrey; Turgeon, Nathalie; Langley, Joanne; Gravel, Denise; Amaratunga, Kanchana

    2016-01-01

    Carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae (CPE) are increasing globally; here we report on the investigation of CPE in Canada over a 5-year period. Participating acute care facilities across Canada submitted carbapenem-nonsusceptible Enterobacteriaceae from 1 January 2010 to 31 December 2014 to the National Microbiology Laboratory. All CPE were characterized by antimicrobial susceptibilities, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, multilocus sequence typing, and plasmid restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis and had patient data collected using a standard questionnaire. The 5-year incidence rate of CPE was 0.09 per 10,000 patient days and 0.07 per 1,000 admissions. There were a total of 261 CPE isolated from 238 patients in 58 hospitals during the study period. blaKPC-3 (64.8%) and blaNDM-1 (17.6%) represented the highest proportion of carbapenemase genes detected in Canadian isolates. Patients who had a history of medical attention during international travel accounted for 21% of CPE cases. The hospital 30-day all-cause mortality rate for the 5-year surveillance period was 17.1 per 100 CPE cases. No significant increase in the occurrence of CPE was observed from 2010 to 2014. Nosocomial transmission of CPE, as well as international health care, is driving its persistence within Canada. PMID:27600052

  17. Real-time automatic hospital-wide surveillance of nosocomial infections and outbreaks in a large Chinese tertiary hospital.

    PubMed

    Du, Mingmei; Xing, Yubin; Suo, Jijiang; Liu, Bowei; Jia, Na; Huo, Rui; Chen, Chunping; Liu, Yunxi

    2014-01-29

    We aimed to develop a real-time nosocomial infection surveillance system (RT-NISS) to monitor all nosocomial infections (NIs) and outbreaks in a Chinese comprehensive hospital to better prevent and control NIs. The screening algorithm used in RT-NISS included microbiological reports, antibiotic usage, serological and molecular testing, imaging reports, and fever history. The system could, in real-time, identify new NIs, record data, and produce time-series reports to align NI cases. Compared with a manual survey of NIs (the gold standard), the sensitivity and specificity of RT-NISS was 98.8% (84/85) and 93.0% (827/889), with time-saving efficiencies of about 200 times. RT-NISS obtained the highest hospital-wide monthly NI rate of 2.62%, while physician and medical record reviews reported rates of 1.52% and 2.35% respectively. It took about two hours for one infection control practitioner (ICP) to deal with 70 new suspicious NI cases; there were 3,500 inpatients each day in the study hospital. The system could also provide various updated data (i.e. the daily NI rate, surgical site infection (SSI) rate) for each ward, or the entire hospital. Within 3 years of implementing RT-NISS, the ICPs monitored and successfully controlled about 30 NI clusters and 4 outbreaks at the study hospital. Just like the "ICPs' eyes", RT-NISS was an essential and efficient tool for the day-to-day monitoring of all NIs and outbreak within the hospital; a task that would not have been accomplished through manual process.

  18. Accounting for incomplete postdischarge follow-up during surveillance of surgical site infection by use of the National Nosocomial Infections Surveillance system's risk index.

    PubMed

    Biscione, Fernando Martín; Couto, Renato Camargos; Pedrosa, Tânia M G

    2009-05-01

    We examined the usefulness of a simple method to account for incomplete postdischarge follow-up during surveillance of surgical site infection (SSI) by use of the National Nosocomial Infections Surveillance (NNIS) system's risk index. Retrospective cohort study that used data prospectively collected from 1993 through 2006. Five private, nonuniversity healthcare facilities in Belo Horizonte, Brazil. Consecutive patients undergoing the following NNIS operative procedures: 20,981 operations on the genitourinary system, 11,930 abdominal hysterectomies, 7,696 herniorraphies, 6,002 cholecystectomies, and 6,892 laparotomies. For each operative procedure category, 2 SSI risk models were specified. First, a model based on the NNIS system's risk index variables was specified (hereafter referred to as the NNIS-based model). Second, a modified model (hereafter referred to as the modified NNIS-based model), which was also based on the NNIS system's risk index, was specified with a postdischarge surveillance indicator, which was assigned the value of 1 if the patient could be reached during follow-up and a value of 0 if the patient could not be reached. A formal comparison of the capabilities of the 2 models to assess the risk of SSI was conducted using measures of calibration (by use of the Pearson goodness-of-fit test) and discrimination (by use of receiver operating characteristic curves). Goodman-Kruskal correlations (G) were also calculated. The rate of incomplete postdischarge follow-up varied between 29.8% for abdominal hysterectomies and 50.5% for cholecystectomies. The modified NNIS-based model for laparotomy did not show any significant benefit over the NNIS-based model in any measure. For all other operative procedures, the modified NNIS-based model showed a significantly improved discriminatory ability and higher G statistics, compared with the NNIS-based model, with no significant impairment in calibration, except if used to assess the risk of SSI after operations

  19. Five-year prospective surveillance of nosocomial bloodstream infections in an Estonian paediatric intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Mitt, P; Metsvaht, T; Adamson, V; Telling, K; Naaber, P; Lutsar, I; Maimets, M

    2014-02-01

    Few studies provide rates of nosocomial bloodstream infections (BSIs) in mixed neonatal and paediatric intensive care units (PICUs). To determine the rate, pathogens and outcome of BSIs in an Estonian PICU. Data were collected prospectively from 1st January 2004 to 31st December 2008 in the PICU of Tartu University Hospital. The definition criteria of the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention were applied for the diagnosis of laboratory-confirmed BSI. A total of 126 episodes of BSI were identified in 89 patients (74 neonates, eight infants, seven patients aged >1 year). Among neonates 42 (57%) had birth weight <1000 g. The overall incidence of BSI was 9.2 per 100 admissions, incidence density 12.8 per 1000 patient-days. Primary BSI was diagnosed in 92 episodes. Central line (CL)-associated BSI incidence density for neonates was 8.6 per 1000 CL-days with the highest incidence (27.4) among neonates with extremely low birth weight. The most common pathogens were coagulase-negative staphylococci (43%) and Serratia marcescens (14%). Resistance to meticillin was detected in four out of seven S. aureus isolates (all were part of an outbreak) and 23% of Enterobacteriaceae were extended spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL)-producing strains. Overall case-fatality rate was 10%. We observed higher rates of BSIs in our mixed PICU than reported previously. High levels of antimicrobial resistance were detected. Future research should focus on the effects of infection control measures to prevent outbreaks and to decrease incidence of CL-associated BSI. Copyright © 2013 The Healthcare Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Epidemiologic surveillance of nosocomial infections in a Pediatric Intensive Care Unit of a developing country

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Nosocomial Infections (NI) are a frequent and relevant problem. The purpose of this study was to determine the epidemiology of the three most common NI in a Pediatric Intensive Care Unit from a developing country. Methods We performed a prospective study in a single Pediatric Intensive Care Unit during 12 months. Children were assessed for 3 NI: bloodstream infections (BSI), ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) and urinary tract infections (UTI), according to Center for Disease Control criteria. Use of devices (endotracheal tube [ETT], central venous catheter [CVC] and urinary catheter [UC]) was recorded. Results Four hundred fourteen patients were admitted; 81 patients (19.5%) developed 85 NIs. Density of incidence of BSI, VAP and UTI was 18.1, 7.9 and 5.1/1000 days of use of CVC, ETT and UC respectively. BSI was more common in children with CVCs than in those without CVCs (20% vs. 4.7%, p < 0.05). Candida spp. was the commonest microorganism in BSI (41%), followed by Coagulase-negative Staphylococcus (17%). Pseudomonas (52%) was the most common germ for VAP and Candida (71%) for UTI. The presence of NI was associated with increased mortality (38.2% vs. 20.4% in children without NI; p < 0.001) and the median length of ICU stay (23 vs. 6 days in children without NI; p < 0.001). Children with NI had longer average hospital stay previous to diagnosis of this condition (12.3 vs. 6 days; p < 0.001). Conclusions One of every 5 children acquires an NI in the PICU. Its presence was associated with increased mortality and length of stay. At the same time a longer stay was associated with an increased risk of developing NI. PMID:20831797

  1. [Nosocomial infections in pediatrics. Problems and perspectives].

    PubMed

    Aujard, Y; Rajguru, M; Bingen, E

    2000-12-01

    High incidence of nosocomial infections in children is largely explained by immunodeficiency, particularly in newborns. Central venous catheter is the main risk factor and coagulase negative staphylococcus the main pathogen in cause. Large variations of nosocomial infection incidences are observed by Nososcomial Infection Surveillance Networks and depend on the pediatric speciality. The highest rate is observed in neonatal intensive care, where incidence density of catheter-related sepsis varies from four to 23 infections for 1000 catheter-days. Local surveillance in each ward, risk factors and knowledge of bacterial epidemiology allow the development of rational preventive and therapeutic protocols. However, prophylactic use of vancomycin is dangerous and immunoglobulins are inefficient.

  2. Molecular epidemiology of vancomycin-resistant enterococcal bacteraemia: results from the Canadian Nosocomial Infection Surveillance Program, 1999-2009.

    PubMed

    McCracken, M; Wong, A; Mitchell, R; Gravel, D; Conly, J; Embil, J; Johnston, L; Matlow, A; Ormiston, D; Simor, A E; Smith, S; Du, T; Hizon, R; Mulvey, M R

    2013-07-01

    Vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) can be associated with serious bacteraemia. The focus of this study was to characterize the molecular epidemiology of VRE from bacteraemia cases that were isolated from 1999 to 2009 as part of Canadian Nosocomial Infection Surveillance Program (CNISP) surveillance activities. From 1999 to 2009, enterococci were collected from across Canada in accordance with the CNISP VRE surveillance protocol. MICs were determined using broth microdilution. PCR was used to identify vanA, B, C, D, E, G and L genes. Genetic relatedness was examined using multilocus sequence typing (MLST). A total of 128 cases of bacteraemia were reported to CNISP from 1999 to 2009. In 2007, a significant increase in bacteraemia rates was observed in western and central Canada. Eighty-one of the 128 bacteraemia isolates were received for further characterization and were identified as Enterococcus faecium. The majority of isolates were from western Canada (60.5%), followed by central (37.0%) and eastern (2.5%) Canada. Susceptibilities were as follows: daptomycin, linezolid, tigecycline and chloramphenicol, 100%; quinupristin/dalfopristin, 96.3%; high-level gentamicin, 71.6%; tetracycline, 50.6%; high-level streptomycin, 44.4%; rifampicin, 21.0%; nitrofurantoin, 11.1%; clindamycin, 8.6%; ciprofloxacin, levofloxacin and moxifloxacin, 1.2%; and ampicillin, 0.0%. vanA contributed to vancomycin resistance in 90.1% of isolates and vanB in 9.9%. A total of 17 sequence types (STs) were observed. Beginning in 2006 there was a shift in ST from ST16, ST17, ST154 and ST80 to ST18, ST412, ST203 and ST584. The increase in bacteraemia observed since 2007 in western and central Canada appears to coincide with the shift of MLST STs. All VRE isolates remained susceptible to daptomycin, linezolid, chloramphenicol and tigecycline.

  3. Nosocomial Bloodstream Infections in Brazilian Hospitals: Analysis of 2,563 Cases from a Prospective Nationwide Surveillance Study▿

    PubMed Central

    Marra, Alexandre R.; Camargo, Luis Fernando Aranha; Pignatari, Antonio Carlos Campos; Sukiennik, Teresa; Behar, Paulo Renato Petersen; Medeiros, Eduardo Alexandrino Servolo; Ribeiro, Julival; Girão, Evelyne; Correa, Luci; Guerra, Carla; Brites, Carlos; Pereira, Carlos Alberto Pires; Carneiro, Irna; Reis, Marise; de Souza, Marta Antunes; Tranchesi, Regina; Barata, Cristina U.; Edmond, Michael B.

    2011-01-01

    Nosocomial bloodstream infections (nBSIs) are an important cause of morbidity and mortality. Data from a nationwide, concurrent surveillance study, Brazilian SCOPE (Surveillance and Control of Pathogens of Epidemiological Importance), were used to examine the epidemiology and microbiology of nBSIs at 16 Brazilian hospitals. In our study 2,563 patients with nBSIs were included from 12 June 2007 to 31 March 2010. Ninety-five percent of BSIs were monomicrobial. Gram-negative organisms caused 58.5% of these BSIs, Gram-positive organisms caused 35.4%, and fungi caused 6.1%. The most common pathogens (monomicrobial) were Staphylococcus aureus (14.0%), coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS) (12.6%), Klebsiella spp. (12.0%), and Acinetobacter spp. (11.4%). The crude mortality was 40.0%. Forty-nine percent of nBSIs occurred in the intensive-care unit (ICU). The most frequent underlying conditions were malignancy, in 622 patients (24.3%). Among the potential factors predisposing patients to BSI, central venous catheters were the most frequent (70.3%). Methicillin resistance was detected in 157 S. aureus isolates (43.7%). Of the Klebsiella sp. isolates, 54.9% were resistant to third-generation cephalosporins. Of the Acinetobacter spp. and Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates, 55.9% and 36.8%, respectively, were resistant to imipenem. In our multicenter study, we found high crude mortality and a high proportion of nBSIs due to antibiotic-resistant organisms. PMID:21411591

  4. Antibiotic consumption to detect epidemics of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in a burn centre: A paradigm shift in the epidemiological surveillance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa nosocomial infections.

    PubMed

    Fournier, Anne; Voirol, Pierre; Krähenbühl, Marie; Bonnemain, Claire-Lise; Fournier, Camille; Pantet, Olivier; Pagani, Jean-Luc; Revelly, Jean-Pierre; Dupuis-Lozeron, Elise; Sadeghipour, Farshid; Pannatier, André; Eggimann, Philippe; Que, Yok-Ai

    2016-05-01

    The control of antibiotic resistance and nosocomial infections are major challenges for specialized burn centres. Early detection of those epidemic outbreaks is crucial to limit the human and financial burden. We hypothesize that data collected by antibiotic consumption medico-economic surveys could be used as warning signal to detect early nosocomial outbreaks. A retrospective analysis was conducted that included all burn patients staying >48h on the Lausanne BICU (Burn Intensive Care Unit) between January 2001 and October 2012 who received systemic therapeutic antibiotics. Infection episodes were characterized according to predefined criteria. Antibiotic consumption data, obtained from the quarterly surveillance of drug consumption surveys, were translated into defined daily doses (DDDs). In total, 297 out of 414 burn patients stayed >48h, giving a total of 7458 'burn-days'. We identified 610 infection episodes (burn wound [32.0%], respiratory [31.1%], and catheter [21.8%]), from 774 microorganisms. Pseudomonas aeruginosa (26.2%), Staphylococcus aureus (11.5%), and Candida albicans (7.0%) were the main pathogens. We observed three distinct outbreaks of P. aeruginosa infections in 2002-2003, 2006, and 2009-2011. These outbreaks correlated with an increase in the DDDs of anti-Pseudomonas antibiotics. Our data support a paradigm shift in the epidemiological surveillance of nosocomial P. aeruginosa epidemics in burn centres, using the rise in antibiotic consumption as an early trigger to initiate the molecular typing of P. aeruginosa strains and the reinforcement of standard infection control procedures. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  5. Health care-associated Clostridium difficile infection in adults admitted to acute care hospitals in Canada: a Canadian Nosocomial Infection Surveillance Program Study.

    PubMed

    Gravel, Denise; Miller, Mark; Simor, Andrew; Taylor, Geoffrey; Gardam, Michael; McGeer, Allison; Hutchinson, James; Moore, Dorothy; Kelly, Sharon; Boyd, David; Mulvey, Michael

    2009-03-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is the most frequent cause of health care-associated infectious diarrhea in industrialized countries. The only previous report describing the incidence of health care-associated CDI (HA CDI) in Canada was conducted in 1997 by the Canadian Nosocomial Infection Surveillance Program. We re-examined the incidence of HA CDI with an emphasis on patient outcomes. A prospective surveillance was conducted from 1 November 2004 through 30 April 2005. Basic demographic data were collected, including age, sex, type of patient ward where the patient was hospitalized on the day HA CDI was identified, and patient comorbidities. Data regarding severe outcome were collected 30 days after the diagnosis of HA CDI; severe outcome was defined as an admission to the intensive care unit because of complications of CDI, colectomy due to CDI, and/or death attributable to CDI. A total of 1430 adults with HA CDI were identified in 29 hospitals during the 6-month surveillance period. The overall incidence rate of HA CDI for adult patients admitted to these hospitals was 4.6 cases per 1000 patient admissions and 65 per 100,000 patient-days. At 30 days after onset of HA CDI, 233 patients (16.3%) had died from all causes; 31 deaths (2.2%) were a direct result of CDI, and 51 deaths (3.6%) were indirectly related to CDI, for a total attributable mortality rate of 5.7%. The rates are remarkably similar to those found in our previous study; although we found wide variations in HA CDI among the participating hospitals. However, the attributable mortality increased almost 4-fold (5.7% vs. 1.5%; P<.001).

  6. Nosocomial infections in dialysis access.

    PubMed

    Schweiger, Alexander; Trevino, Sergio; Marschall, Jonas

    2015-01-01

    Nosocomial infections in patients requiring renal replacement therapy have a high impact on morbidity and mortality. The most dangerous complication is bloodstream infection (BSI) associated with the vascular access, with a low BSI risk in arteriovenous fistulas or grafts and a comparatively high risk in central venous catheters. The single most important measure for preventing BSI is therefore the reduction of catheter use by means of early fistula formation. As this is not always feasible, prevention should focus on educational efforts, hand hygiene, surveillance of dialysis-associated events, and specific measures at and after the insertion of catheters. Core measures at the time of insertion include choosing the optimal site of insertion, the use of maximum sterile barrier precautions, adequate skin antisepsis, and the choice of catheter type; after insertion, access care needs to ensure hub disinfection and regular dressing changes. The application of antimicrobial locks is reserved for special situations. Evidence suggests that bundling a selection of the aforementioned measures can significantly reduce infection rates. The diagnosis of central line-associated BSI (CLABSI) is based on clinical signs and microbiological findings in blood cultures ideally drawn both peripherally and from the catheter. The prompt installation of empiric antibiotic treatment covering the most commonly encountered organisms is key regarding CLABSI treatment. Catheter removal is recommended in complicated cases or if cultures yield Staphylococcus aureus, enterococci, Pseudomonas or fungi. In other cases, guide wire exchange or catheter salvage strategies with antibiotic lock solutions may be acceptable alternatives. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  7. Prevention of nosocomial infections in the neonatal intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Adams-Chapman, Ira; Stoll, Barbara J

    2002-04-01

    Nosocomial infections are responsible for significant morbidity and late mortality among neonatal intensive care unit patients. The number of neonatal patients at risk for acquiring nosocomial infections is increasing because of the improved survival of very low birthweight infants and their need for invasive monitoring and supportive care. Effective strategies to prevent nosocomial infection must include continuous monitoring and surveillance of infection rates and distribution of pathogens; strategic nursery design and staffing; emphasis on handwashing compliance; minimizing central venous catheter use and contamination, and prudent use of antimicrobial agents. Educational programs and feedback to nursery personnel improve compliance with infection control programs.

  8. Association of malnutrition with nosocomial infection.

    PubMed

    Gorse, G J; Messner, R L; Stephens, N D

    1989-05-01

    To study the association of malnutrition with nosocomial infection in a general medical and surgical inpatient population, we retrospectively compared 45 patients with nosocomial infection to 45 uninfected control patients, matched using several nonnutritional variables known to predispose to nosocomial infection. Univariate and multivariate analyses were done. Poor nutritional score (derived from serum albumin, total lymphocyte count, and unintentional body weight loss), unintentional body weight loss, low serum albumin level at both time of admission and the first nosocomial infection, and worsening in the nutritional score and serum albumin from admission to the first nosocomial infection were associated with the development of nosocomial infection. Nutritional factors were more abnormal in subgroups of patients with nosocomial pneumonia, urinary tract infection, wound infection, and bacteremia than in controls. The findings suggest that further study of correlations between nutritional factors and nosocomial infections is needed.

  9. Epidemiology of nosocomial fungal infections.

    PubMed Central

    Fridkin, S K; Jarvis, W R

    1996-01-01

    This paper briefly reviews the current knowledge of the epidemiology and modes of transmission of nosocomial fungal infections and some of the therapeutic options for treating these diseases. In the mid-1980s, many institutions reported that fungi were common pathogens in nosocomial infections. Most, if not all, hospitals care for patients at risk for nosocomial fungal infections. The proportion in all nosocomial infections reportedly caused by Candida spp. increased from 2% in 1980 to 5% in 1986 to 1989. Numerous studies have identified common risk factors for acquiring these infections, most of which are very common among hospitalized patients; some factors act primarily by inducing immunosuppression (e.g., corticosteroids, chemotherapy, malnutrition, malignancy, and neutropenia), while others primarily provide a route of infection (e.g., extensive burns, indwelling catheter), and some act in combination. Non-albicans Candida spp., including fluconazole-resistant C. krusei and Torulopsis (C.) glabrata, have become more common pathogens. Newer molecular typing techniques can assist in the determination of a common source of infection caused by several fungal pathogens. Continued epidemiologic and laboratory research is needed to better characterize these pathogens and allow for improved diagnostic and therapeutic strategies. PMID:8894349

  10. [Advantages and limits of the surveillance of nosocomial infections from the microbiology laboratory: experience of Meaux hospital].

    PubMed

    Botterel, F; Faibis, F; Chevalier, C; Delisse, C; Fiacre, A; Dubois, A; Demachy, M C

    2004-10-01

    To estimate the incidence of nosocomial infections (NI) in our hospital and to increase healthcare professionals' awareness of hygiene, a prospective study was performed between January and December 2002 from the microbiology laboratory data. On 1334 suspicions of NI, corresponding to 1062 patients, sent to the hygiene correspondents in each medical care unit, the infection control team received 853 answers (64% of sendings) with 430 NI validated. The incidence rate of NI validated was 1.7 NI/1000 days of hospitalisation and 1.6 NI/100 inpatients. The NI were predominantly related to urinary tract (47%), bloodstream (14%), and lower respiratory tract (12%). Transmission of these informations to medical information department permitted a valorisation of additional 16,000 ISA points. This prospective study permitted to develop a network of hygiene correspondents in every medical care units. None of the medical care units was unharmed by NI but the exhaustive declaration of NI seems difficult to realise. This study permitted to point out some dysfunctionments in the management of invasive procedures and to improve these practices.

  11. New identification of outliers and ventilator-associated pneumonia rates from 2005 to 2007 within the German Nosocomial Infection Surveillance System.

    PubMed

    Meyer, E; Sohr, D; Gastmeier, P; Geffers, C

    2009-11-01

    This study presents data for ventilator use and ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) rates from the German hospital surveillance system for nosocomial infections (KISS: Krankenhaus Infektions Surveillance System). New Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) definitions became effective during 2005 and we describe the new method used by KISS to determine individual units with data at extreme ranges. The number of VAP cases per 1000 device-days was calculated and a new visual method, specifically funnel plots, was introduced to identify outliers. The VAP rate will be highly influenced by chance variability if only a few VAP cases are observed during a low number of ventilator-days. Funnel plots take this relationship between event rate and volume of cases into account. A total of 391 intensive care units (ICUs) reported surveillance data from 8 86 816 patients and included 6896 VAPs and 3 113 983 patient-days for the period January 2005 to December 2007. The mean VAP rate according to the new CDC definitions was 5.5 cases per 1000 ventilator-days (median: 4.4). The mean ventilator use in all ICUs was 35.7 (median: 29.3). Funnel plots identified 14.3% as outliers; 34 of them as high, and 22 as low, outliers. Since 2008, visual feedback to the KISS ICUs has been supplied by funnel plots. These are less prone to misinterpretation than histograms and they indicate when investigation is required for increasing VAP.

  12. Impact of revising the National Nosocomial Infection Surveillance System definition for catheter-related bloodstream infection in ICU: reproducibility of the National Healthcare Safety Network case definition in an Australian cohort of infection control professionals.

    PubMed

    Worth, Leon J; Brett, Judy; Bull, Ann L; McBryde, Emma S; Russo, Philip L; Richards, Michael J

    2009-10-01

    Effective and comparable surveillance for central venous catheter-related bloodstream infections (CLABSIs) in the intensive care unit requires a reproducible case definition that can be readily applied by infection control professionals. Using a questionnaire containing clinical cases, reproducibility of the National Nosocomial Infection Surveillance System (NNIS) surveillance definition for CLABSI was assessed in an Australian cohort of infection control professionals participating in the Victorian Hospital Acquired Infection Surveillance System (VICNISS). The same questionnaire was then used to evaluate the reproducibility of the National Healthcare Safety Network (NHSN) surveillance definition for CLABSI. Target hospitals were defined as large metropolitan (1A) or other large hospitals (non-1A), according to the Victorian Department of Human Services. Questionnaire responses of Centers for Disease Control and Prevention NHSN surveillance experts were used as gold standard comparator. Eighteen of 21 eligible VICNISS centers participated in the survey. Overall concordance with the gold standard was 57.1%, and agreement was highest for 1A hospitals (60.6%). The proportion of congruently classified cases varied according to NNIS criteria: criterion 1 (recognized pathogen), 52.8%; criterion 2a (skin contaminant in 2 or more blood cultures), 83.3%; criterion 2b (skin contaminant in 1 blood culture and appropriate antimicrobial therapy instituted), 58.3%; non-CLABSI cases, 51.4%. When survey questions regarding identification of cases of CLABSI criterion 2b were removed (consistent with the current NHSN definition), overall percentage concordance increased to 62.5% (72.2% for 1A centers). Further educational interventions are required to improve the discrimination of primary and secondary causes of bloodstream infection in Victorian intensive care units. Although reproducibility of the CLABSI case definition is relatively poor, adoption of the revised NHSN definition

  13. Vancomycin-resistant enterococci in Canada: results from the Canadian nosocomial infection surveillance program, 1999-2005.

    PubMed

    Ofner-Agostini, Marianna; Johnston, B Lynn; Simor, Andrew E; Embil, John; Matlow, Anne; Mulvey, Michael; Ormiston, Debbie; Conly, John

    2008-03-01

    Surveillance for vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) in sentinel Canadian hospitals has been conducted since 1999. From 1999 to 2005, the rate of VRE detection increased from 0.37 to 1.32 cases per 1,000 patients admitted, and the rate of VRE infection increased from 0.02 to 0.05 cases per 1,000 patients admitted. Thirty-three percent of all patients with VRE detected that were reported during 1999-2005 were identified in 2005, with increases seen in all regions of Canada. Although the incidence rate of VRE carriage in Canada is increasing, it remains very low.

  14. Epidemiology of four main nosocomial infections in Iran during March 2007 - March 2008 based on the findings of a routine surveillance system.

    PubMed

    Zahraei, Seyed Mohsen; Eshrati, Babak; Masoumi Asl, Hosein; Pezeshki, Zahra

    2012-12-01

    Annually, around six million patients are admitted to hospitals in Iran. Information about the prevalence of nosocomial infections (NIs) is necessary for both appropriate management and establishment of preventative measures in hospitals. This article is based on the findings of the Nosocomial Infection Surveillance System (NISS) which has been providing information on NIs in Iran since March 2007.  NISS covers 95 hospitals throughout Iran, each with over 200 beds. There are four main infections: urinary tract infection (UTI), surgical site infection (SSI), bloodstream infection (BSI) and pneumonia (PNEU) included in NISS. Reports are completed on forms that have been provided based on national guidelines. In all selected hospitals there is one designated nurse who conducts infection control activities and is trained in the detection and reporting of NIs based on NISS guidelines. During March 2007 - March 2008, a total of 1,879,356 patients were admitted to the selected hospitals. The total detected NIs were 10557 with a prevalence of 0.57%. Of these, UTI was the most prevalent infection (32.2%) and BSI was the least (16.3%). Based on gender, females had more UTI, whereas PNEU was the highest in males. Of reported NIs, 9% were detected in children less than five years of age and included BSI (45%), PNEU (20%), SSI (19%) and UTI (16%). There were 26% reported NIs in the age group over 65 years, of which the most prevalent infections were UTI (42%) followed by PNEU (31%), SSI (15%) and BSI (12%). NIs were most often detected in intensive care units (ICUs; 26.7%), followed by surgery wards (12.8%). In comparison with other studies and the World Health Organization (WHO) estimates, the rate of NIs appears to be less according to NISS. NISS has the capability to provide basic information for efficient management and control measures, in addition to indicating variations in NIs based on gender, age and location (hospital ward). In order to have a more realistic estimate

  15. Trends in the distribution and antimicrobial susceptibility of causative pathogens of device-associated infection in Korean intensive care units from 2006 to 2013: results from the Korean Nosocomial Infections Surveillance System (KONIS).

    PubMed

    Choi, J Y; Kwak, Y G; Yoo, H; Lee, S-O; Kim, H B; Han, S H; Choi, H J; Kim, H Y; Kim, S R; Kim, T H; Lee, H; Chun, H K; Kim, J-S; Eun, B W; Kim, D W; Koo, H-S; Cho, E-H; Lee, K

    2016-04-01

    For all countries, information on pathogens causing healthcare-associated infections is important in order to develop proper strategies for preventing and treating nosocomial infections. To assess the change in frequencies and antimicrobial resistance of pathogens causing device-associated infections (DAIs) in intensive care units (ICUs) in South Korea between July 2006 and June 2014. Data from the Korean Nosocomial Infections Surveillance System (KONIS) were analysed, including three major DAI types in ICUs. The frequency of Gram-negative bacteria gradually increased for central line-associated bloodstream infection (CLABSI) and ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) (from 24.6% to 32.6% and from 52.8% to 73.5%, respectively). By contrast, the frequency of Gram-positive bacteria decreased from 58.6% to 49.2% for CLABSI, and from 44.3% to 23.8% for VAP (P < 0.001). Staphylococcus aureus was the most frequent causative pathogen in CLABSI throughout the surveillance period, but for VAP was replaced as the most frequent pathogen by Acinetobacter baumannii as of 2010. Candida albicans was the most frequent pathogen for catheter-associated urinary tract infection. The meticillin resistance rate in S. aureus decreased from 95% to 90.2% (P < 0.001); amikacin resistance in Klebsiella pneumoniae and Escherichia coli decreased from 43.8% to 14.7% and from 15.0% to 1.8%, respectively (P < 0.001); imipenem resistance in A. baumannii increased from 52.9% to 89.8% (P < 0.001). The proportion of Gram-negative bacteria as nosocomial pathogens for CLABSI and VAP has increased. The prevalence of A. baumannii causing DAIs in Korean ICUs has increased rapidly, as has the rate of carbapenem resistance in these bacteria. Copyright © 2016 The Healthcare Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. [Medical responsibility and nosocomial infections].

    PubMed

    Scolan, V; Telmon, N; Rouge, J C; Rouge, D

    2000-04-01

    Modifications of the civil and administrative jurisprudence regarding nosocomial infections reflect the will to pay the patient for compensation for injury. The June 29, 1999 decree of the French Court of Cessation shows the transition from presumption of malpractice to obligation of safety. The authors describe those modifications, including the physician's and hospital liabilities, and assess their consequences, as proof of an external cause is now mandatory while proof of absence of malpractice is no longer sufficient.

  17. Ten-year surveillance of nosocomial bloodstream infections: trends of aetiology and antimicrobial resistance in a comprehensive cancer centre.

    PubMed

    Passerini, R; Ghezzi, Tl; Sandri, Mt; Radice, D; Biffi, R

    2011-01-01

    Bloodstream infections (BSIs) are one of the major life-threatening infectious conditions in cancer patients and are responsible for prolonged hospital stays, high healthcare costs and significant mortality. Several clinical trials have reported an improved survival in patients treated with appropriate empirical broad-spectrum antibiotic therapy. Early detection of pathogens and determination of their susceptibility are essential for the optimization of treatment. Variability between hospitals is substantial and requires the individual analysis of local trends. The aim of this study is to assess the local epidemiology of BSI in a single cancer centre over a 10-year period. Retrospective microbiological surveillance of all febrile/infective episodes occurring in oncological and surgical patients in a high-volume cancer centre between January 1999 and December 2008 were considered. Patients' data were collected, processed and analyzed using the epidemiological resource of the Virtuoso Plus software (Metafora Informatica Srl, Milano, Italy). Spearman's rank correlation coefficient, including the two-tailed test of significance, was used to investigate trends of incidence and rate of antibiotic resistance over the 10-year period. A total of 13,058 blood cultures (BCs) were performed in 2,976 patients. BCs were positive in 2,447 tests, representing 740 infective/febrile episodes: 358 (48%) in medical oncology and 382 (52%) in surgical wards. Gram-positives were responsible for the majority of episodes in oncological and surgical divisions (about 63% and 55%, respectively). Gram-positives were also the most common organism in non-catheter-related BSIs (CRBSIs) both in medical oncology (75%) and in surgical divisions (50%). Enterococci showed an increased resistance to levofloxacin, from 5.6% to 25.7% (p = 0.02) and to erythromycin, from 41.7% to 61.4%, (p = 0.05). Similarly, coagulase negative staphylococci (CoNS) developed resistance to levofloxacin and ciprofloxacin

  18. Nosocomial fungal infections: candidemia.

    PubMed

    Verduyn Lunel, F M; Meis, J F; Voss, A

    1999-07-01

    Candida species are frequently encountered as part of the human commensal flora. Colonization mostly precedes candidemia and is an independent risk factor for the development of candidemia. Genotyping methods showed the similarity between colonizing and infecting strains, thus making endogenous origin likely, though exogenous sources like total parenteral nutrition also have been described. Health care workers (HCWs) play an important role in the transmission of yeasts. Candida species are frequently isolated from the hands of HCWs and can be transmitted from hands to patients. Granulocytopenia and damage of the mucosal lining resulting from intensive chemotherapy due to cancer, the increasing use of broad spectrum antibiotics, and the use of intravenous catheters are other important risk factors for the development of candidemia. Candidemia is associated with a high mortality and prolonged hospitalization. Therefore, and because of the high frequency of dissemination, all candidemias should be treated. Amphotericin B was considered the standard drug for the systemic treatment of candidemia. Fluconazole has been shown to be an effective and safe alternative in non-neutropenic patients. 5-Fluorocytosine has been used in combination with amphotericin B in the treatment of deep-seated infections. Liposomal formulations of amphotericin B and other new antifungal drugs currently are under investigation. C. albicans is the most frequently isolated Candida species, although the proportion of infections caused by non-C. albicans species is increasing. Also, there are reports of development of resistance to amphotericin B. C. lusitaniae is known for primary resistance and the development of resistance to amphotericin B. Development of resistance to fluconazole is mainly seen in AIDS patients with recurrent oropharyngeal candidiasis who receive longer courses of therapy.

  19. [Nosocomial infections in intensive care units].

    PubMed

    Zaragoza, Rafael; Ramírez, Paula; López-Pueyo, María Jesús

    2014-05-01

    Nosocomial infections (NI) still have a high incidence in intensive care units (ICUs), and are becoming one of the most important problems in these units. It is well known that these infections are a major cause of morbidity and mortality in critically ill patients, and are associated with increases in the length of stay and excessive hospital costs. Based on the data from the ENVIN-UCI study, the rates and aetiology of the main nosocomial infections have been described, and include ventilator-associated pneumonia, urinary tract infection, and both primary and catheter related bloodstream infections, as well as the incidence of multidrug-resistant bacteria. A literature review on the impact of different nosocomial infections in critically ill patients is also presented. Infection control programs such as zero bacteraemia and pneumonia have been also analysed, and show a significant decrease in NI rates in ICUs.

  20. [Surgical site infection (SSI) surveillance].

    PubMed

    Harihara, Yasushi; Konishi, Toshiro

    2006-09-01

    Surgical site infections (SSI) are major complications after surgery. SSI leads to the longer hospital stay, higher costs and patients' dissatisfaction to the surgical treatment. SSI surveillance is not only an activity to investigate the incidence and causes of SSI but also an infection control activity to reduce SSI rates. The Japanese Society of Environmental Infections established the Japanese nosocomial infection surveillance UNIS) system and initiated SSI surveillance in Japan in 1999. The Japanese Ministry of Health and Welfare started a nation-wide SSI surveillance program in July 2002, and the SSI surveillance study group was founded in October 2002 to support the Ministry's SSI surveillance and to make activities aiming at a further spread and quality enhancement of SSI surveillance in Japan. Up to December 2004, 31, 436 cases from 50 institutions have been registered. SSI occurred in 2,346 cases (7.7%). With regard to surgical procedures, SSI rates are far much higher in gastrointestinal surgery than in other procedures. It is important for all Japanese surgeons to continue highly precise SSI surveillance and make efforts to reduce SSI rates, to provide safe medical practice of high-quality and adequate costs.

  1. [Nosocomial infections: definition, frequence and risk factors].

    PubMed

    Diouf, E; Bèye, M D; Diop, Ndoye M; Kane, O; Ka, Sall B

    2007-01-01

    Infection is nosocomial if it missed at the time patient admission in the health establishment. When infectious status of the patient on admission is unknown, infection is generally regarded as nosocomial if it appears after a time of at least 48 hours of hospitalization. For surgical site infection, the commonly allowed time is 30 days, or, in case of prosthesis or an implant, one year after surgical intervention. Nosocomial infections (NI) constitute major health care problem from their frequency, their cost, their gravity. Mortality related to NI can attempt 70% in certain units like intensive care units. Two ways of contamination are possible: the endogenous way is responsible of majority of hospital infections. The normally sterile sites are contaminated then colonized by the flora which is carrying the patient himself, with the favor of a rupture of the barriers of defense. The exogenic way is associated colonization, possibly followed by infection, of the patient by external bacteria, coming from others patients or from environment, transmitted in an indirect way (aerosols, manuportage, materials). Whatever its mode of transmission, apparition of nosocomial infection can be related to several supporting factors: age and pathology, certain treatments (antibiotic which unbalance patients' flora and select resistant bacteria, immunosuppressive treatments), invasive practices necessary to the patient treatment. The prevalence of nosocomial infections is higher in the intensive care units where certain studies bring back rates of 42.8% versus 12.1% in others services. The four sites of nosocomial infection most frequently concerned are: the respiratory site, urinary infections, bloodstream infections (Catheters related bloodstream infections in particular), and surgical sites infections. The relative proportion of these infections varies according to principal activity of the unity.

  2. Mortality among Patients with Nosocomial Infections in Tertiary Intensive Care Units of Sahloul Hospital, Sousse, Tunisia.

    PubMed

    Rejeb, Mohamed Ben; Sahli, Jihene; Chebil, Dhekra; Khefacha-Aissa, Selwa; Jaidane, Nadia; Kacem, Balsam; Hmouda, Houssem; Dhidah, Lamine; Said-Latiri, Houyem; Naija, Walid

    2016-03-01

    Nosocomial infections are public health issues that are associated with high mortality in intensive care units. This study aimed to determine nosocomial infection-associated mortality in Tunisian intensive care units and identify its risk factors. A prospective cohort study was carried out in intensive care units of a Tunisian University Hospital. The ICUs-wide active surveillance of nosocomial infections has been performed between 1 July 2010 and 30 June 2011. Data collection was based on Rea-Raisin protocol 2009 of "Institut National de Veille Sanitaire" (InVS, Saint Maurice - France). We used Kaplan Meier survival analysis and Cox Proportional Hazard regression to identify independent risk factors of nosocomial infection-associated mortality. Sixty-seven patients presented nosocomial infection in the end of the surveillance. The mean age of patients was 44.71 ± 21.2 years. Of them, 67.2% were male and 32.8% female. Nosocomial bacteremia was the most frequent infection (68.6%). Nosocomial infection-associated mortality rate was 35.8% (24/67). Bacteremia (Hazard Ratio (HR)) = 3.03, 95% Confidential Interval (95% CI): [1.23 - 7.45], P = 0.016) and trauma (HR = 3.6, 95% CI: [1.16 - 11.2], P = 0.026) were identified by Cox regression as independent risk factors for NI-associated mortality. Our rate was relatively high. We need to improve the care of trauma patients and intensify the fight against nosocomial infections especially bacteremia.

  3. Nosocomial urinary tract infections: A review.

    PubMed

    Iacovelli, Valerio; Gaziev, Gabriele; Topazio, Luca; Bove, Pierluigi; Vespasiani, Giuseppe; Finazzi Agrò, Enrico

    2014-01-01

    Nosocomial urinary tract infections are a common complication in healthcare systems worldwide. A review of the literature was performed in June 2014 using the Medical Literature Analysis and Retrieval System Online (MEDLINE) database, through either PubMed or Ovid as a search engine, to identify publications regarding nosocomial urinary tract infections (NUTIs) definition, epidemiology, etiology and treatment.According to current definitions, more than 30% of nosocomial infections are urinary tract infections (UTIs). A UTI is defined 'nosocomial' (NUTI) when it is acquired in any healthcare institution or, more generally, when it is related to patient management. The origin of nosocomial bacteria is endogenous (the patient's flora) in two thirds of the cases. Patients with indwelling urinary catheters, those undergoing urological surgery and manipulations, long-stay elderly male patients and patients with debilitating diseases are at high risk of developing NUTIs. All bacterial NUTIs should be treated, whether the patient is harboring a urinary catheter or not. The length of treatment depends on the infection site. There is abundance of important guidance which should be considered to reduce the risk of NUTIs (hand disinfection with instant hand sanitizer, wearing non-sterile gloves permanently, isolation of infected or colonized catheterized patients). Patients with asymptomatic bacteriuria can generally be treated initially with catheter removal or catheter exchange, and do not necessarily need antimicrobial therapy. Symptomatic patients should receive antibiotic therapy. Resistance of urinary pathogens to common antibiotics is currently a topic of concern.

  4. Epidemiological investigation of a case of nosocomial Legionnaires' disease in Taiwan: implications for routine environmental surveillance.

    PubMed

    Chien, S T; Hsueh, J C; Lin, H-H; Shih, H-Y; Lee, T-M; Ben, R-J; Chou, S-T; Fong, C-M; Lin, Y E; Tseng, L-R; Chiang, C-S

    2010-06-01

    An epidemiological investigation with Legionella and molecular subtyping was conducted to determine the source of a case of nosocomial Legionnaires' disease (LD) who was hospitalized in three hospitals within a month. Legionella pneumophila serogroup 3, an uncommon serogroup for infection, was isolated from the patient's sputum. Environmental surveillance revealed Legionella colonization in all three hospitals; the patient isolate matched the isolate from the first hospital by molecular typing. Culturing the hospital water supply for Legionella is a pro-active strategy for detection of nosocomial LD even in hospitals experiencing no previous cases.

  5. Computerization of a nosocomial infection system.

    PubMed

    Etersque, S; Carter, M J; Gordon, K R; Sutherland, J G

    1984-10-01

    This paper describes the implementation of a computerized nosocomial infection control system for a 500-bed tertiary-care teaching hospital. It is implemented on a minicomputer that uses the relational data base management system INGRES, which is marketed by Relational Technology, Inc. This system, which replaces a manual one that depended on "needle sort" data cards, is designed to provide for entry of infection data that have been collected onto abstracting forms; decision support in the prospective analysis of suspicious infection rates or trends; generation of monthly, on-demand, and annual infection rate reports; retrospective interrogation and analysis of infection data for rates and trends that may explain or clearly indicate the sources of in-hospital (nosocomial) infections; updating of infection records as additional infection-related data become available and known to the hospital's infection control team; and ad hoc analysis and comparisons between data on control and infected patients, both prospectively and retrospectively.

  6. Nosocomial pneumonia: epidemiology and infection control.

    PubMed

    Craven, D E; Steger, K A; Barat, L M; Duncan, R A

    1992-01-01

    Elderly, debilitated, or critically ill patients are at high risk for hospital acquired or nosocomial respiratory tract infection. Gram-negative bacilli, Staphyloccoccus aureus, and anaerobes colonizing the oropharynx are the most frequent etiologic agents. Colonization of the oropharynx may be related to the patient's age, underlying disease, nutritional status, prior exposure to antibiotics, supine position, and gastric colonization. Nosocomial pathogens may also be acquired from the hands of hospital personnel, contaminated equipment or fluids. The absence of sensitive and specific methods for accurate diagnosis remain a concern. Despite treatment with appropriate antimicrobial therapy, there is a high mortality and morbidity. Measures for the prevention of nosocomial pneumonia should include compliance with infection control principles, appropriate use of antibiotics, proper patient position, and removal of potential sources of cross colonization.

  7. [Nosocomial infections at a pediatric age].

    PubMed

    Zuccotti, G V; Gracchi, V; Sala, D; Salvini, F

    2002-01-01

    The overall incidence of nosocomial infections in children ranges from 2.3% to 12.6%. Even if there are great variations among data in literature, most authors agree that nosocomial infections are less frequent in children than in adults. Differences between these two populations concern anatomical sites of infection and microrganisms: in children, most frequent are gastrointestinal infections (10-35%), respiratory infections (5-30%) and bacteremia (10-23%); Gram positive bacteria account for 31-50% of infections, Gram negative for 23-35% and viruses for 22-27%. All these percentages change enormously depending on the type of department and child age. Because of increasing rates of resistance to antimicrobial agents, it is important to identify the main infectious agents and their sensibility, considering carefully when to give antibiotic therapy and what drug should be chosen.

  8. Biocidal textiles can help fight nosocomial infections.

    PubMed

    Borkow, Gadi; Gabbay, Jeffrey

    2008-01-01

    The rates of nosocomial infections, especially by those caused by antibiotic resistant bacteria, are increasing alarmingly over the globe. Although more rigorous infection control measures are being implemented, it is clear that the current modalities to reduce nosocomial infections are not sufficient. Textiles are an excellent substrate for bacterial growth under appropriate moisture and temperature conditions. Patients shed bacteria and contaminate their pyjamas and sheets. The temperature and humidity between the patients and the bed are appropriate conditions allowing for effective bacterial proliferation. Several studies have found that personnel in contact with contaminated textiles were the source of transmission of the micro-organisms to susceptible patients. Furthermore, it has been reported that bed making in hospitals releases large quantities of micro-organisms into the air, which contaminate the immediate and non-immediate surroundings. Contaminated textiles in hospitals can thus be an important source of microbes contributing to endogenous, indirect-contact, and aerosol transmission of nosocomial related pathogens. We hypothesize that the use of antimicrobial textiles, especially in those textiles that are in close contact with the patients, may significantly reduce bioburden in clinical settings and consequently reduce the risk of nosocomial infections. These textiles should possess broad spectrum biocidal properties. They should be safe for use and highly effective against antibiotic resistant micro-organisms, including those that are commonly involved in hospital-acquired infections, and they should not permit the development of resistant micro-organisms to the active compound.

  9. [Prevention of nosocomial infections and antibiotic resistance in nursing homes].

    PubMed

    Bleckwenn, Markus; Hammerschmidt, Judith; Rösing, Claudia; Klaschik, Manuela

    2017-06-14

    Nosocomial infections and multidrug-resistant organisms are an increasing problem in nursing homes worldwide; therefore, new approaches for infection control need to be developed. This article gives an overview of infections in nursing homes, their medical treatment and previous measures for infection prevention. The article is based on a selective literature search including the literature database PubMed. In particular, scientific studies on the prevalence of nosocomial infections in German nursing homes, publications for medical care in long-term care facilities in Europe and international studies for infection prevention were evaluated. The basis for an effective reduction of infections is the establishment of a surveillance system. All participating medical professionals provide feedback about local infections and resistance situations and the presence of risk factors, such as urinary catheters or chronic wounds. Only then can targeted antibiotic strategies be adapted and the effectiveness of preventive measures, such as hand disinfection is continuously reviewed. So far, in particular multimodal, multidisciplinary prevention projects were successful. These included frequent staff training, reduction of urinary catheters and a rational use of antibiotics. Most prevention models have been previously tested in hospitals. A possible applicability of the results to the infection prevention in long-term care facilities has so far hardly been studied. Accordingly, further studies on infection control in nursing homes are absolutely necessary.

  10. Antibiotic resistance in nosocomial respiratory infections.

    PubMed

    Denys, Gerald A; Relich, Ryan F

    2014-06-01

    Nosocomial respiratory infections are the most common acquired infections in patients with severe underlying conditions and are responsible for high morbidity and mortality in this patient population. Multidrug-resistant (MDR) pathogens are associated with hospital-acquired pneumonia (HAP) and ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP). This article describes the etiology, epidemiology, pathogenesis, diagnosis, and treatment of HAP and VAP associated with antibiotic-resistant bacterial pathogens. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Incidence, pathogens and resistance patterns of nosocomial infections at a rural hospital in Gabon

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Nosocomial infections pose substantial risk to patients receiving care in hospitals. In Africa, this problem is aggravated by inadequate infection control due to poor hygiene, resource and structural constraints, deficient surveillance data and lack of awareness regarding nosocomial infections. We carried out this study to determine the incidence and spectrum of nosocomial infections, pathogens and antibiotic resistance patterns in a tertiary regional hospital in Lambaréné, Gabon. Methods This prospective case study was carried out over a period of six months at the Albert Schweitzer Hospital, Lambaréné, Gabon. All patients admitted to the departments of surgery, gynecology/obstetrics and internal medicine were screened daily for signs and symptoms of hospital-acquired infections. Results A total of 2925 patients were screened out of which 46 nosocomial infections (1.6%) were diagnosed. These comprised 20 (44%) surgical-site infections, 12 (26%) urinary-tract infections, 9 (20%) bacteraemias and 5 (11%) other infections. High rates of nosocomial infections were found after hysterectomies (12%) and Caesarean sections (6%). Most frequent pathogens were Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli. Eight (40%) of 20 identified E. coli and Klebsiella spp. strains were ESBL-producing organisms. Conclusion The cumulative incidence of nosocomial infections in this study was low; however, the high rates of surgical site infections and multi-resistant pathogens necessitate urgent comprehensive interventions of infection control. PMID:24592922

  12. Incidence, pathogens and resistance patterns of nosocomial infections at a rural hospital in Gabon.

    PubMed

    Scherbaum, Micha; Kösters, Katrin; Mürbeth, Raymund Egid; Ngoa, Ulysse Ateba; Kremsner, Peter Gottfried; Lell, Bertrand; Alabi, Abraham

    2014-03-04

    Nosocomial infections pose substantial risk to patients receiving care in hospitals. In Africa, this problem is aggravated by inadequate infection control due to poor hygiene, resource and structural constraints, deficient surveillance data and lack of awareness regarding nosocomial infections. We carried out this study to determine the incidence and spectrum of nosocomial infections, pathogens and antibiotic resistance patterns in a tertiary regional hospital in Lambaréné, Gabon. This prospective case study was carried out over a period of six months at the Albert Schweitzer Hospital, Lambaréné, Gabon. All patients admitted to the departments of surgery, gynecology/obstetrics and internal medicine were screened daily for signs and symptoms of hospital-acquired infections. A total of 2925 patients were screened out of which 46 nosocomial infections (1.6%) were diagnosed. These comprised 20 (44%) surgical-site infections, 12 (26%) urinary-tract infections, 9 (20%) bacteraemias and 5 (11%) other infections. High rates of nosocomial infections were found after hysterectomies (12%) and Caesarean sections (6%). Most frequent pathogens were Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli. Eight (40%) of 20 identified E. coli and Klebsiella spp. strains were ESBL-producing organisms. The cumulative incidence of nosocomial infections in this study was low; however, the high rates of surgical site infections and multi-resistant pathogens necessitate urgent comprehensive interventions of infection control.

  13. [Antibibiotic resistance by nosocomial infections' causal agents].

    PubMed

    Salazar-Holguín, Héctor Daniel; Cisneros-Robledo, María Elena

    2016-01-01

    The antibibiotic resistance by nosocomial infections (NI) causal agents constitutes a seriously global problematic that involves the Mexican Institute of Social Security's Regional General Hospital 1 in Chihuahua, Mexico; although with special features that required to be specified and evaluated, in order to concrete an effective therapy. Observational, descriptive and prospective study; by means of active vigilance all along 2014 in order to detect the nosocomial infections, for epidemiologic study, culture and antibiogram to identify its causal agents and antibiotics resistance and sensitivity. Among 13527 hospital discharges, 1079 displayed NI (8 %), standed out: the related on vascular lines, of surgical site, pneumonia and urinal track; they added up two thirds of the total. We carried out culture and antibiogram about 300 of them (27.8 %); identifying 31 bacterian species, mainly seven of those (77.9 %): Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus and epidermidis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Acinetobacter baumannii, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Enterobacter cloacae; showing multiresistance to 34 tested antibiotics, except in seven with low or without resistance at all: vancomycin, teicoplanin, linezolid, quinupristin-dalfopristin, piperacilin-tazobactam, amikacin and carbapenems. When we contrasted those results with the recommendations in the clinical practice guides, it aroused several contradictions; so they must be taken with reserves and has to be tested in each hospital, by means of cultures and antibiograms in practically every case of nosocomial infection.

  14. Organization of nosocomial infection control measures and local networks for infectious disease control in middle-scale hospitals in Japan.

    PubMed

    Mori-Yoshikawa, Namiko; Ohmagari, Norio; Kirikae, Teruo

    2014-01-01

    The aims of this study were to assess nosocomial infection control measures at middle-scale hospitals throughout Japan. Of the 823 hospitals participating in this questionnaire-based survey, more than half of the middle-scale hospitals have implemented nosocomial infection control measures, including infection surveillance or infection control rounds, while acknowledging a shortage of infection control staff. These hospitals most frequently consulted public health centers to obtain information and advice. Improved nosocomial infection control in middle-scale hospitals requires sufficient staffing and a local network, with active participation by public health centers.

  15. [Intravenous catheters and nosocomial infection].

    PubMed

    Reingardiene, Dagmara

    2004-01-01

    Peripheral, especially central venous catheters, are used with increasing frequency in the intensive care unit and in general medical wards to administer intravenous fluids and blood products, drugs, parenteral nutrition, and to monitor hemodynamic status. Catheter infection is associated with increased morbidity, mortality, and duration of hospital stay. Risk factors in the development of catheter colonization and bloodstream infections include patient factors (increased risk associated with malignancy, neutropenia, and shock) and treatment-related factors (increased risk associated with total parenteral nutrition, intensive care unit admission for any reason, and endotracheal intubation). In this review article terms and definitions of catheter-related infections, pathophysiology and epidemiology of "catheter sepsis", factors determining risk of infection, catheter types and materials, insertion procedure, choice of insertion site, indwelling time, dressing and care of the insertion site, various preventive strategies and future developments, special situations and procedures, and treatment are discussed. Reducing catheter infections rates requires a multiple-strategy approach. Therefore, intensive care units and other locations where catheters are used should implement strict guidelines and protocols for catheter insertion, care, and maintenance.

  16. [Nosocomial urinary tract infection in adults].

    PubMed

    Hug, B L; Flückiger, U; Widmer, A F

    2006-11-01

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) is the most common infection in hospitalized adults. Nosocomial UTIs are mainly associated with the use of urinary catheters. Thus, the decision for catheterization should be made carefully and catheters removed in time. In order to prevent unnecessary antibiotic use in patients with urinary catheters correct diagnosis is crucial. Chinolones, broad-spectrum penicillins and third-generation cephalosporins are the mainstay of therapy. Comorbidities should be considered and potential obstructions of urinary flow removed. Economically important are the normally higher prices of i.v. antibiotics compared to oral use.

  17. Empiric Antibiotic Therapy of Nosocomial Bacterial Infections.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Pramod

    2016-01-01

    Broad-spectrum antibiotics are commonly used by physicians to treat various infections. The source of infection and causative organisms are not always apparent during the initial evaluation of the patient, and antibiotics are often given empirically to patients with suspected sepsis. Fear of attempting cephalosporins and carbapenems in penicillin-allergic septic patients may result in significant decrease in the spectrum of antimicrobial coverage. Empiric antibiotic therapy should sufficiently cover all the suspected pathogens, guided by the bacteriologic susceptibilities of the medical center. It is important to understand the major pharmacokinetic properties of antibacterial agents for proper use and to minimize the development of resistance. In several septic patients, negative cultures do not exclude active infection and positive cultures may not represent the actual infection. This article will review the important differences in the spectrum of commonly used antibiotics for nosocomial bacterial infections with a particular emphasis on culture-negative sepsis and colonization.

  18. Microbiological surveillance and antimicrobial stewardship minimise the need for ultrabroad-spectrum combination therapy for treatment of nosocomial infections in a trauma intensive care unit: an audit of an evidence-based empiric antimicrobial policy.

    PubMed

    Ramsamy, Yogandree; Muckart, David James Jackson; Han, Khine Swe Swe

    2013-03-15

    Nosocomial infections are a major cause of morbidity in the critically injured, and the incidence of resistant strains of bacteria is increasing. Management requires a strategy that achieves accurate empiric cover without antibiotic overuse - a goal that may be achieved by surveillance and antibiotic stewardship. With the aim of minimising the use of empirical ultrabroad-spectrum combination antimicrobial prescriptions and reducing bacterial resistance, the level I Trauma Intensive Care Unit (TICU) at Inkosi Albert Luthuli Central Hospital (IALCH) in Durban employs stewardship and an antimicrobial policy based on surveillance. This study was undertaken with three aims: (i) to describe the spectrum and sensitivities of nosocomial pathogens in a level I TICU; (ii) to ascertain, based on surveillance data, how frequently initial empiric choice of antimicrobials was correct; and (iii) to determine how frequently ultrabroad-spectrum antimicrobials were prescribed and were actually necessary. Over a 12-month period, all critically injured patients who underwent mechanical ventilation in the TICU were identified from a prospectively gathered database. Information regarding every specimen submitted to the National Health Laboratory Services (NHLS) situated at IALCH was extracted from the laboratory computer database. For each patient, bacterial isolates and antimicrobial susceptibility were identified using standard laboratory techniques. Empiric prescriptions for presumed nosocomial sepsis were identified from the hospital's computerised patient record system and compared with culture results. Acinetobacter species were regarded as colonisers and treatment not offered unless this was the sole isolate in the presence of signs of severe sepsis. Results. Of 227 patients, 106 (46.6%) had 136 culture-positive isolates with a total of 323 pathogens (201 Gram-negative, 119 Gram-positive, 3 Candida albicans). There were 19 species of Gram-negative pathogens, of which 56

  19. Epidemiology of nosocomial infections: About 70 cases.

    PubMed

    Hedfi, Mohamed; Khouni, Hassen; Massoudi, Youssra; Abdelhedi, Cherif; Sassi, Karim; Chouchen, Adnen

    2016-07-01

    Background - The infections associated with care (IAS) constitute a major public health problem by the morbi- mortality than they generate as well as by their cost to support. The prevention of these infections has become a priority for several years everywhere in the world and in the occurrence in Tunisia. Aim - The purpose of our study is to assess the prevalence of nosocomial infections as well as develop their microbiologic  profiles in the different departments of  the hospital of FSI  Marsa Tunisia and try to highlight the risk factors that can influence these infections Methods - It was a retrospective study about  patients with noscomila infection who were admitted in the different care unit of the Hospital of FSI  Marsa and this on a period of 6 years from 1 January 2009 to 31 December 2014 Results - We have identified seventy(70) patients having contracted a nososcomial infection during the period of study for 24600 hospital admission, with a prevalence rate of 0.28%. The unit of intensive care   had the highest prevalence rate (30%), followed by the general surgery unit (17.1%) and orthopaedics (15.7%). Four bacterial species accounted for almost ¾ of germs isolated: Pseudomonas aeruginosa (22.86%), Staphylococcus  ( 15.71%), Klebsiella pneumoniae (15,71 %) and Escherichia coli in 8.75% of the helth care associated infections. Conclusion - Nosocomial infections represent an important indicator of the quality of care. Serious efforts but simple, especially as regards the respect of the rules of aseptic and hand hygiene are effective to significantly reduce the occurrence of infections in hospital.

  20. Use of ribotyping in epidemiological surveillance of nosocomial outbreaks.

    PubMed Central

    Bingen, E H; Denamur, E; Elion, J

    1994-01-01

    Over the past few years, genotypic methods based on the study of bacterial DNA polymorphism have shown high discriminatory power for strain differentiation and superiority over most phenotypic methods commonly available in the clinical microbiology laboratory. Some of the methods used, however, required either a high level of technology and sophisticated equipment (e.g., pulsed-field gel electrophoresis) or species-specific reagents of restricted availability (randomly cloned DNA probes or gene-specific probes). Because ribotyping uses a universal probe (rRNA) and is a rather simple technology, particularly since the advent of nonradioactive labelling systems, it has been widely used for strain differentiation of most bacterial species involved in nosocomial outbreaks. In vitro and in vivo stability of the markers studied has been demonstrated. Although there may be limitation to this approach, ribotyping was found to be highly discriminative, particularly for typing members of the family Enterobacteriaceae, Pseudomonas cepacia, and Xanthomonas maltophilia. In many cases, it has improved the understanding of the mechanism of nosocomial acquisition of organisms by allowing a distinction between endogenous and exogenous infections. Among exogenous infections, it has distinguished between individual and epidemic strains, thus differentiating cross-infection from independent acquisition. Images PMID:7923052

  1. Planning strategies for nosocomial infection control.

    PubMed

    Lacanna, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    According to the American Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 99,000 deaths per year in the United States are caused or impacted on by multiple hospital-acquired infections (HAIs), which are roughly estimated to be around 1.7 million cases. In Europe, there are 25,000 deaths per year from the same cause, 17.000 of which are linked to nosocomial infections. Patient safety is a core issue in today's health care settings. There is a growing consensus, supported by scientific investigation, that the role of the built environment is central towards minimizing and controlling the level of such infections. The contribution of architectural solutions and planning choices becomes crucial at this stage. This paper outlines the most common measures to adopt at the architectural and planning level, to combat HAI, focusing on the most critical areas of the hospital: wards, intensive care units and operating theatres.

  2. Neonatal listeriosis followed by nosocomial infection.

    PubMed

    Dinic, M; Stankovic, S

    2013-01-01

    Neonatal listeriosis is widely reported, but this is the first case reported in Serbia. A newborn developed respiratory distress syndrome 2 hours after delivery and was admitted to the neonatal intensive care unit. Initial empirical therapy was inappropriate. Consequently, on the second day, the patient developed meningitis. Listeria monocytogenes was isolated from the tracheal aspirate, blood, periumbilical swab, and cerebrospinal fluid. After bacteriology results, the therapy was changed to ampicillin and meropenem. On day 11 of hospitalization, the patient developed nosocomial infection due to multidrug-resistant Stenotrophomonas maltophilia. Since therapeutic options were limited, the patient was treated with ciprofloxacin. After 26 days of hospitalization the patient showed complete recovery and was discharged with no apparent sequelae. This case showed the importance of bacteriological examination in cases of infections caused by uncommon organisms. Pediatricians should be aware of the neonatal infection caused by Stenotrophomonas maltophilia.

  3. Implementation problems of decision support system for nosocomial infection.

    PubMed

    Rems, M; Bohanec, M; Urh, B; Kramar, Z

    1997-01-01

    Decision support system for nosocomial infection therapy Ptah can reduce antibiotic misuse with data about bacteria resistance and antibiotic ineffectiveness. Resistance vectors in time series show epidemiological problems with resistant bacterias, named house-bacteria. Most important implementation factors are integrated hospital information system and doctors, nurses and managers interested in problems of nosocomial infection.

  4. Nosocomial infections in a cohort of extracorporeal life support patients.

    PubMed

    Conrick-Martin, Ian; O'Gorman, Joanne; Lenehan, Deirdre; Oshodi, Daniel; Scanlon, Nuala; O'Brien, Serena; Hannan, Margaret; Lynch, Maureen; Carton, Edmund

    2012-09-01

    To examine nosocomial infections in a cohort of patients receiving extracorporeal life support (ECLS) at our institution and to identify the types of infections, impact of prophylaxis, and any apparent risk factors for infection. In a retrospective cohort study, we examined the records of all patients who received ECLS at our institution between August 2009 and March 2011. A prospective, daily, multidisciplinary assessment of all microbiological issues in these patients was carried out, including assessment of microbiological culture positivity and clinical evidence of infection. The results of these assessments were analysed in relation to HELICS (Hospital in Europe Link for Infection Control through Surveillance) and CDC (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention) diagnostic criteria. The use of antimicrobials in these patients was also assessed, as well as the overall bloodstream infection rate in ICU patients. Seventeen patients received ECLS during the study period, with a total of 445 ECLS days. Of these patients, 13 received respiratory (venovenous) ECLS and four received cardiac (venoarterial) ECLS. There were 17 infections in the cohort: 11 ventilator-associated pneumonias; four bloodstream infections (likely all catheter related, yielding a rate of 9.0 infections/1000 ECLS days); one skin and soft tissue infection; and one urinary tract infection. The bloodstream infection rate in the ICU population as a whole was 9.30/1000 bed-days in 2009 and 7.21/1000 bed-days in 2010. Resistant organisms were identified in 3/17 infections: one methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, one multidrug-resistant strain of Pseudomonas and one extended-spectrum Β-lactamase-producing Escherichia coli. The median time to acquiring nosocomial infection was 25 days (interquartile range, 13-33 days). The first four ECLS patients received antibacterial (vancomycin) and antifungal (caspofungin) prophylaxis for the duration of ECLS, whereas the later cohort of 13 did not. In

  5. Nosocomial infections in a neonatal intensive care unit in South Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Dal-Bó, Karla; da Silva, Rosemeri Maurici; Sakae, Thiago Mamôru

    2012-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to describe the incidence and epidemiology of nosocomial infection in newborns who were admitted to a neonatal intensive care unit in a hospital in south Santa Catarina, Brazil. Methods A prospective cohort study was conducted for 1 year among 239 neonates who remained as in-patients 48 hours after admission. The criteria that were used to diagnose infection were in accordance with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the National Health Surveillance Agency. Results The incidence of nosocomial infection was 45.8%. The primary reasons for admission were primary bloodstream infection (80.7%) and pneumonia (6.7%). Coagulase-negative Staphylococcus was the most commonly identified agent in the blood cultures and in the hospital unit. Prematurity was the most prevalent reason for admission. The general mortality rate was 12.1%, and mortality from nosocomial infection was 33.8%. Conclusions The incidence of nosocomial infection in the hospital unit was higher than rates that have been reported in other national studies. The major types of nosocomial infection were primary bloodstream infection and pneumonia. PMID:23917937

  6. Causative agents of nosocomial bloodstream infections and their antimicrobial susceptibility patterns.

    PubMed

    Demirturk, Nese; Demiturk, Nese; Demirdal, Tuna

    2013-11-01

    The aim of this study was to retrospectively investigate nosocomial bloodstream infections (NBI) and their antimicrobial susceptibility patterns at Afyon Kocatepe University (AKU) Hospital, Turkey, from January 2006 to December 2011 and to determine the risk factors for nosocomial BSI. Subjects were aged > or = 18 years. The data were obtained from patient files. Five hundred seventy-nine nosocomial infections in 461 patients were included in the study. Eighty-four point six percent was primary and 15.4% were secondary infections. Gram-positive cocci were the most common organisms. When compared year by year there was an increasing trend in antibacterial resistant gram-negative bacilli. The most common infection risk factors were H2 histamine receptor blocker use and blood transfusions. Regular surveillance of BSI is important to monitor changes in the types of microorganisms and their resistance patterns.

  7. [Preventive measures and the strife against nosocomial infection].

    PubMed

    Kane, O; Bèye, M D; Diop, Ndoye M; Ndiaye, P I; Diouf, E; Sall, Ka B

    2007-01-01

    The nosocomial Infections are associated to an increase of the morbidity, of the mortality and costs. Their frequency stay on raised in our service of cares. Then it is recommended and broadly admitted what each hospital must dispose of a unity of nosocomial infections prevention and to dispose a staff specially vested in those duties. Of the fact the nosocomial infections frequency in reanimation, an imported part of the activity of this specialized staff will have to run out in services of intensive cares. The principal nosocomial infections feature observed is being directly or indirectly associated to engineerings of acting as invasives deputy used to palliate a vital lapse. Of a general manner, all sharp grave affection, as anything severe traumatism (accidental or surgical) drag a capacities reduction of defense against the infection, component so important factors of nosocomial infections installations. Preventive measures pass by the engineerings respect of hands hygiene, the harbour of clean conformable dress, the measures respect of isolation (septic or preventive), the cares grading, the upkeep of the hardware and the bedroom, the respect of the circuit of the linen salts and lastly the sorting and the losses management of activity of cares. For that it must a policy of strife against nosocomial infections with the placing in place of operational unities of hygiene in all hospitals and the redynamisation of the committee of strife against nosocomial infections already existed in different public establishments of health.

  8. Nosocomial infections in pediatric population and antibiotic resistance of the causative organisms in north of iran.

    PubMed

    Behzadnia, Salar; Davoudi, Alireza; Rezai, Mohammad Sadegh; Ahangarkani, Fatemeh

    2014-02-01

    Treatment of the nosocomial infections is complicated especially in children due to an increase in the antibiotic-resistant bacteria. The aim of this study was to survey the nosocomial infections in children and determine the antibiotic susceptibility of their causative organisms in teaching hospitals in the north of Iran. The investigation was designed as a retrospective cross-sectional study. The study population consisted of patients under 12 years old, which were hospitalized in three teaching hospitals in the north of Iran and had symptoms of nosocomial infections in 2012. The required data of patients were extracted and entered in the information forms. The collected data were analyzed using SPSS (ver. 16). Descriptive statistics and Fisher's exact tests (Monte Carlo) were used. Out of the total number of 34556 hospitalized patients in three teaching hospitals, 61 (0.17%) patients were children under 12 years old age with nosocomial infection from which 50.81% were girls and 49.18% were boys. Most of these patients (55.73%) were admitted to the burn unit. The most common type of nosocomial infection (49.18%) was wound infection. Pseudomonas spp. (36.84%) and Acinetobacter spp. (28.02%) were the most common bacteria isolated from the clinical specimens. All the Acinetobacter spp. were multidrug-resistant. All the gram negative and gram positive bacterial species in our study showed high resistance to antibiotics. The rate of nosocomial infections was low in our study because the detection of nosocomial infection was based on the clinical grounds in most cases and laboratory reports might contain false-negative results. These results provide useful information for future large scale surveillance in the context of prevention programs.

  9. [Secular trends in the etiology of nosocomial infection at a teaching hospital in Taiwan, 1981-1994].

    PubMed

    Chen, M L; Chen, Y C; Pan, H J; Chang, S C; Yang, L S; Ho, S W; Luh, K T; Hsieh, W C; Chuang, C Y

    1995-08-01

    Surveillance system of nosocomial infection was established in 1980 at the National Taiwan University Hospital (NTUH). To identify pathogens and the secular trends in the etiology of nosocomial infection from 1981 to 1994, the prospective, hospital-wide nosocomial surveillance data were analysed. During this period, 22,146 pathogens causing nosocomial infections were isolated. Gram-negative aerobic bacteria remained the major pathogens, but gram-positive cocci and fungi increased rapidly in the past 14 years. When the overall pathogen distribution is examined, Pseudomonas areuginosa was the most frequently isolated pathogen, but Candida albicans and other yeasts have taken the leading position since 1993. Staphylococcus aureus and coagulase-negative staphylococci also increase significantly in recent years. When the pathogens causing infection at the 4 major sites were examined. P. aeruginosa was the pathogen most often associated with respiratory tract and surgical wound infections. In blood stream and urinary tract infections, we observed Escherichia coli was replaced by C. albicans and other yeasts as a most common isolate in these years. In addition, C. albicans and other yeasts and methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) are emerging as major nosocomial pathogens at NTUH. C. albicans and other yeast increased from 1.8% in 1981 to 14.9% in 1994 in the overall nosocomial infection. The increase was found in the blood stream (2.1% to 16.2%) and urinary tract infections (5.4% to 24.7%). Of 1,742 nosocomial S. aureus isolates, the percentage of MRSA rose from 12.5% in 1981 to 55.2% in 1994. The high percentage of MRSA was observed at 4 major anatomic sites of infection. In summary, significant shifts in the pathogens of nosocomial infection have occurred in the past 14 years at NTUH, and the distribution of nosocomial pathogens was similar to those reported in the United States in recent years.

  10. An expert system for culture-based infection control surveillance.

    PubMed Central

    Kahn, M. G.; Steib, S. A.; Fraser, V. J.; Dunagan, W. C.

    1993-01-01

    Hospital-acquired infections represent a significant cause of prolonged inpatient days and additional hospital charges. We describe an expert system, called GERMWATCHER, which applies the Centers for Disease Control's National Nosocomial Infection Surveillance culture-based criteria for detecting nosocomial infections. GERMWATCHER has been deployed at Barnes Hospital, a large tertiary-care teaching hospital, since February 1993. We describe the Barnes Hospital infection control environment, the expert system design, and a predeployment performance evaluation. We then compare our system to other efforts in computer-based infection control. PMID:8130456

  11. Impact of routine surgical ward and intensive care unit admission surveillance cultures on hospital-wide nosocomial methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infections in a university hospital: an interrupted time-series analysis.

    PubMed

    Chaberny, Iris F; Schwab, Frank; Ziesing, Stefan; Suerbaum, Sebastian; Gastmeier, Petra

    2008-12-01

    To determine whether a routine admission screening in surgical wards and intensive care units (ICUs) was effective in reducing methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections-particularly nosocomial MRSA infections-for the whole hospital. The study used a single-centre prospective quasi-experimental design to evaluate the effect of the MRSA screening policy on the incidence density of MRSA-infected/nosocomial MRSA-infected patients/1000 patient-days (pd) in the whole hospital. The effect on incidence density was calculated by a segmented regression analysis of interrupted time series with 30 months prior to and 24 months after a 6 month implementation period. The MRSA screening policy had a highly significant hospital-wide effect on the incidence density of MRSA infections. It showed a significant change in both level [-0.163 MRSA-infected patients/1000 pd, 95% confidence interval (CI): -0.276 to -0.050] and slope (-0.01 MRSA-infected patients/1000 pd per month, 95% CI: -0.018 to -0.003) after the implementation of the MRSA screening policy. A decrease in the MRSA infections by 57% is a conservative estimate of the reduction between the last month before (0.417 MRSA-infected patients/1000 pd) and month 24 after the implementation of the MRSA screening policy (0.18 MRSA-infected patients/1000 pd). Equivalent results were found in the analysis of nosocomial MRSA-infected patients/1000 pd. This is the first hospital-wide study that investigates the impact of introducing admission screening in ICUs and non-ICUs as a single intervention to prevent MRSA infections performed with a time-series regression analysis. Admission screening is a potent tool in controlling the spread of MRSA infections in hospitals.

  12. Nosocomial infections in burn patients: etiology, antimicrobial resistance, means to control.

    PubMed

    Leseva, M; Arguirova, M; Nashev, D; Zamfirova, E; Hadzhyiski, O

    2013-03-31

    The aim of our study was to determine the etiology of nosocomial infections, their changes over a period of five years (2007-2011), and the measures for control of infections and antimicrobial resistance in the Burns Clinic of the N.I. Pirogov University Multi-Profile Hospital for Active Treatment and Emergency Medicine, Sofia, Bulgaria. The medical records for all the patients and the database of the "Clinical Microbiology and Surveillance of Infections" National Information System were reviewed and analyzed to identify the microbial pathogens isolated in our burns Clinic. The three most frequent nosocomial pathogens were S. aureus, A. baumannii and P. aeruginosa. In order to control effectively nosocomial infections, a system of anti-infective and anti- microbial resistance measures has been developed and routinely implemented in our Clinic since 2008. Since 2009, thanks to this system, there has been a significant decrease in the rates of multi-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strains. Although at present the incidence of the nosocomial infections in our burns clinic is lower than in neighboring countries, several important infection control issues still need to be solved. We mainly rely on updating and strengthening the existing anti-infective system in order to control the spread of multi-drug resistant organisms, such as A. baumannii, extended spectrum beta-lactamase-producing Enterobacteriaceae, and carbapenem-resistant P. aeruginosa.

  13. [Viral nosocomial infections: the problem of contemporary hospital management].

    PubMed

    Hermanowska-Szpakowicz, Teresa; Zajkowska, Joanna M; Pancewicz, Sławomir A; Kondrusik, Maciej; Grygorczuk, Sambor S

    2003-01-01

    The most frequent viral pathogens which are the cause of nosocomial infections were presented. Influenza and parainfluenza viruses as well as RS virus affect frequently respiratory tract. So called enteric viruses which are rotaviruses, adenoviruses, small round viruses, astroviruses, caliciviruses, corona viruses, Coxackie, ECHO may be the agents of disorders in digestive tract in the form of intoxications. Viruses of viral hepatitis B, C, D and HIV, CMV, EBV may be the source of nosocomial viral infections transmitted by blood (transfusions).

  14. A systematic review of nosocomial waterborne infections in neonates and mothers.

    PubMed

    Moffa, Michelle; Guo, Wilson; Li, Trudy; Cronk, Ryan; Abebe, Lydia S; Bartram, Jamie

    2017-08-09

    Water is an important, overlooked, and controllable source of nosocomial infection. Hospitalized neonates and their mothers are particularly vulnerable to nosocomial waterborne infections. Our objectives through this systematic review were to: investigate water sources, reservoirs, and transmission routes that lead to nosocomial waterborne infections in neonates and their mothers; establish patient risk factors; compile measures for controlling outbreaks and recommended strategies for prevention; and identify information gaps to improve guidelines for reporting future outbreaks. We searched PubMed, Web of Science, Embase, and clinicaltrials.gov. Peer-reviewed studies reporting contaminated water as a route of transmission to neonates and/or their mothers were included. Twenty-five studies were included. The most common contaminated water sources in healthcare facilities associated with infection transmission were tap water, sinks, and faucets. Low birthweights, preterm or premature birth, and underlying disease increased neonatal risk of infection. Effective control measures commonly included replacing or cleaning faucets and increased or alternative methods for hand disinfection, and recommendations for prevention of future infections highlighted the need for additional surveillance. The implementation of control measures and recommended prevention strategies by healthcare workers and managing authorities of healthcare facilities and improved reporting of future outbreaks may contribute to a reduction in the incidence of nosocomial waterborne infections in neonates and their mothers. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  15. An effective active surveillance method for controlling nosocomial MRSA transmission in a Japanese hospital.

    PubMed

    Ohkushi, Daisuke; Uehara, Yuki; Iwamoto, Akira; Misawa, Shigeki; Kondo, Shigemi; Shimizu, Kenichiro; Hori, Satoshi; Hiramatsu, Keiichi

    2013-10-01

    Hospital-wide active surveillance for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) targeted to adult patients with a history of MRSA carriage within the past 5 years was performed in Juntendo University Hospital (JUH) over a 2-year period. In the first year, MRSA screening culture was ordered by physicians in charge. In the second year, infection-control practitioners (ICPs) took samples for active surveillance culture. The average monthly transmission rate of MRSA in JUH was 0.35 per 1,000 bed-days in the first year and decreased significantly to 0.26 per 1,000 bed-days in the second year (P < 0.05). In the second year, more active commitment of ICPs to MRSA screening was effective in improving the performance rate of screening, shortening turn-around time of screening results, and decreasing transmission rate. Increasing compliance with active MRSA surveillance by involvement of ICPs, targeting patients with a previous history of MRSA carriage in the previous 5 years, was effective to control nosocomial MRSA transmission.

  16. [Epidemiology of Staphylococcus aureus nosocomial infections in a high-risk neonatal unit].

    PubMed

    Velazco, Elsa; Nieves, Beatriz; Araque, María; Calderas, Zoila

    2002-01-01

    Nosocomial infections are a significant cause of morbidity and mortality throughout the world. In developing countries it is difficult to carry out effective surveillance and control programs for this type of infection because of the cost in both human and material resources. These considerations prompted us to perform a prospective study to determine the epidemiologic and microbiologic characteristics of nosocomial infections due to Staphylococcus aureus in the High-risk Neonatal Unit (HRNU) of the Instituto Autónomo Hospital Universitario de Los Andes (IAHULA), during the period of November 1997 to October 1998. Among a total of 120 microorganisms, 24 (20%) strains of Staphylococcus aureus were isolated; 47% were recovered from blood and 33% from conjunctive samples. Among the cases of conjunctivitis, S. aureus was the only pathogen isolated in 42%. Twenty of the 24 Staphylococcus aureus strains (83%) were methicillin-resistant (MRSA). According to their resistance profiles, we established 12 groups of strains from neonates with nosocomial infections and 1 group of strains from the two carriers among the healthcare personnel detected by microbiological screening. The MeRGmR pattern was the most frequent. Plasmid analysis disclosed two profiles, each having a plasmid molecular weight over 23.130 bp. The MRSA strains isolated from the neonates and those isolated from the carriers showed the same plasmid profile. This suggests that the healthcare personnel may have acted as reservoirs of the MRSA strains found in neonates with nosocomial infection.

  17. Nosocomial Acinetobacter baumannii Infections and Changing Antibiotic Resistance.

    PubMed

    Necati Hakyemez, Ismail; Kucukbayrak, Abdulkadir; Tas, Tekin; Burcu Yikilgan, Aslihan; Akkaya, Akcan; Yasayacak, Aliye; Akdeniz, Hayrettin

    2013-09-01

    In the intensive care setting, Acinetobacter baumannii causes ventilator-associated pneumonia and other nosocomial infections that are difficult to treat. Objective of this study was to investigate nosocomial A. baumannii infections and its changing antibiotic resistance. A total of 56 patients diagnosed with A.baumannii infections between January 2009 and December 2011 were included in the study. Diagnosis for nosocomial infections was established according to the CDC (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention) criteria. Identification of the agents isolated was carried out using conventional methods and VITEK 2 automated system, while antibiotic sensitivity testing was performed through VITEK 2 AST-N090 automated system. The most common infection was nosocomial pneumonia by 43%, among which 46% were ventilator-associated pneumonia. Considering all years, the most effective antibiotics on the isolated strains were found as colistin, tigecycline, imipenem and meropenem. However resistance to imipenem and meropenem was observed to increase over years. The issue of increased resistance to antibiotics poses difficulty in treatment of A. baumannii infections which in turn increases the rate of mortality and cost. In order to prevent development of resistance, antibiotics must be used in an appropriate way in accompanied with proper guidance.

  18. World Wide Web resources on control of nosocomial infections.

    PubMed

    Siempos, Ilias I; Fragoulis, Konstantinos N; Falagas, Matthew E

    2007-01-01

    Nosocomial infections are a major worldwide cause of death and disability, infection control programs are effective in limiting these infections, especially those acquired in the intensive care unit. The development of the world wide web has provided health care professionals with immediate access to continuously updated information in the field of infection control. We sought to identify websites that contain information on nosocomial infection control by using popular internet search engines, such as Google, Yahoo and AltaVista, and by reviewing relevant publications identified in the PubMed and Current Contents databases. Only those sites that were English language, open access, and developed by a government, academic institution, or national or international scientific association were eligible for inclusion. From a vast number of internet sites initially identified, we selected 49 that provide information on infection control for inclusion in our list of practical and relevant internet resources. Several sites provide general information on infection control practices, whereas others focus on one or a few specific infection(s). We provide health care professionals with a timely and succinct list of open access internet resources that contain information regarding the prevention and control of nosocomial infections in order to help in the dissemination of relevant information and so contribute to the limitation of such hazards.

  19. An overview of nosocomial infections, including the role of the microbiology laboratory.

    PubMed Central

    Emori, T G; Gaynes, R P

    1993-01-01

    An estimated 2 million patients develop nosocomial infections in the United States annually. The increasing number of antimicrobial agent-resistant pathogens and high-risk patients in hospitals are challenges to progress in preventing and controlling these infections. While Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus remain the most common pathogens isolated overall from nosocomial infections, coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS), organisms previously considered contaminants in most cultures, are now the predominant pathogens in bloodstream infections. The growing number of antimicrobial agent-resistant organisms is troublesome, particularly vancomycin-resistant CoNS and Enterococcus spp. and Pseudomonas aeruginosa resistant to imipenem. The active involvement and cooperation of the microbiology laboratory are important to the infection control program, particularly in surveillance and the use of laboratory services for epidemiologic purposes. Surveillance is used to identify possible infection problems, monitor infection trends, and assess the quality of care in the hospital. It requires high-quality laboratory data that are timely and easily accessible. PMID:8269394

  20. Nosocomial Outbreak of Novel Arenavirus Infection, Southern Africa

    PubMed Central

    Paweska, Janusz T.; Sewlall, Nivesh H.; Ksiazek, Thomas G.; Blumberg, Lucille H.; Hale, Martin J.; Lipkin, W. Ian; Weyer, Jacqueline; Nichol, Stuart T.; Rollin, Pierre E.; McMullan, Laura K.; Paddock, Christopher D.; Briese, Thomas; Mnyaluza, Joy; Dinh, Thu-Ha; Mukonka, Victor; Ching, Pamela; Duse, Adriano; Richards, Guy; de Jong, Gillian; Cohen, Cheryl; Ikalafeng, Bridget; Mugero, Charles; Asomugha, Chika; Malotle, Mirriam M.; Nteo, Dorothy M.; Misiani, Eunice; Zaki, Sherif R.; Teams, Investigation

    2009-01-01

    A nosocomial outbreak of disease involving 5 patients, 4 of whom died, occurred in South Africa during September–October 2008. The first patient had been transferred from Zambia to South Africa for medical management. Three cases involved secondary spread of infection from the first patient, and 1 was a tertiary infection. A novel arenavirus was identified. The source of the first patient’s infection remains undetermined. PMID:19861052

  1. SMART approaches for reducing nosocomial infections in the ICU.

    PubMed

    Kollef, Marin

    2008-08-01

    Nosocomial infections are problematic in the ICU because of their frequency, morbidity, and mortality. The most common ICU infections are pneumonia, bloodstream infection, and urinary tract infection, most of which are device related. Surgical site infection is common in surgical ICUs, and Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea is occurring with increasing frequency. Prospective observational studies confirm that use of evidence-based guidelines can reduce the rate of these ICU infections, especially when simple tactics are bundled. To increase the likelihood of success, follow the specific, measurable, achievable, relevant, and time bound (SMART) approach. Choose specific objectives that precisely define and quantify desired outcomes, such as reducing the nosocomial ICU infection rate of an institution by 25%. To measure the objective, monitor staff adherence to tactics and infection rates, and provide feedback to ICU staff. Make objectives achievable and relevant by engaging stakeholders in the selection of specific tactics and steps for implementation. Nurses and other stakeholders can best identify the tactics that are achievable within their busy ICUs. Unburden the bedside provider by taking advantage of new technologies that reduce nosocomial infection rates. Objectives should also be relevant to the institution so that administrators provide adequate staffing and other resources. Appoint a team to champion the intervention and collaborate with administrators and ICU staff. Provide ongoing communication to reinforce educational tactics and fine-tune practices over time. Make objectives time bound; set dates for collecting baseline and periodic data, and a completion date for evaluating the success of the intervention.

  2. [Current status of nosocomial infections in the Lebanese Hospital Center, Beirut].

    PubMed

    Al-Hajje, A; Ezedine, M; Hammoud, H; Awada, S; Rachidi, S; Zein, S; Salameh, P

    2012-05-01

    Nosocomial infections are a significant problem and hospitals need to be aware of their nosocomial infection status. This retrospective study aimed to identify nosocomial bacterial infections in patients admitted to the Lebanese Hospital Center from January 2006 to January 2008 and determine the causative micro-organisms, the antibiotic sensitivity of the micro-organisms and evaluate the hospital treatment. In total 96 patients with nosocomial infection were included. Urinary infections were the commonest nosocomial infections (42%) followed by pulmonary infections (28%). Gram-negative bacteria were responsible for 89% of nosocomial infections and staphylococci for 7%, with Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa being the most common (46% and 26% respectively). The organisms were resistant to multiples antibiotics and 18% of the patients were treated with imipenem, 7% with vancomycin, 42% with third-generation cephalosporins and 24% with amikacin. Hospital hygiene measures and antibiotic prescription policies are required to fight nosocomial infections and reduce antibiotic resistance among organisms.

  3. International Nosocomial Infection Control Consortium report, data summary for 2002-2007, issued January 2008.

    PubMed

    Rosenthal, Victor D; Maki, Dennis G; Mehta, Ajita; Alvarez-Moreno, Carlos; Leblebicioglu, Hakan; Higuera, Francisco; Cuellar, Luis E; Madani, Naoufel; Mitrev, Zan; Dueñas, Lourdes; Navoa-Ng, Josephine Anne; Garcell, Humberto Guanche; Raka, Lul; Hidalgo, Rosalía Fernández; Medeiros, Eduardo A; Kanj, Souha S; Abubakar, Salisu; Nercelles, Patricio; Pratesi, Ricardo Diez

    2008-11-01

    We report the results of an International Nosocomial Infection Control Consortium (INICC) surveillance study from 2002 through 2007 in 98 intensive care units (ICUs) in Latin America, Asia, Africa, and Europe. During the 6-year study, using Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) National Nosocomial Infections Surveillance System (NNIS) definitions for device-associated health care-associated infection, we collected prospective data from 43,114 patients hospitalized in the Consortium's hospital ICUs for an aggregate of 272,279 days. Although device utilization in the INICC ICUs was remarkably similar to that reported from US ICUs in the CDC's National Healthcare Safety Network, rates of device-associated nosocomial infection were markedly higher in the ICUs of the INICC hospitals: the pooled rate of central line-associated bloodstream infections (CLABs) in the INICC ICUs, 9.2 per 1000 CL-days, is nearly 3-fold higher than the 2.4-5.3 per 1000 CL-days reported from comparable US ICUs, and the overall rate of ventilator-associated pneumonia was also far higher, 19.5 vs 1.1-3.6 per 1000 ventilator-days, as was the rate of catheter-associated urinary tract infection, 6.5 versus 3.4-5.2 per 1000 catheter-days. Most strikingly, the frequencies of resistance of Staphylococcus aureus isolates to methicillin (MRSA) (80.8% vs 48.1%), Enterobacter species to ceftriaxone (50.8% vs 17.8%), and Pseudomonas aeruginosa to fluoroquinolones (52.4% vs 29.1%) were also far higher in the Consortium's ICUs, and the crude unadjusted excess mortalities of device-related infections ranged from 14.3% (CLABs) to 27.5% (ventilator-associated pneumonia).

  4. [Changes in nosocomial infection control: new challenges and responsibilities for the infection control nurse].

    PubMed

    Freixas, Nuria; Sallés, Montserrat; García, Lola

    2009-05-01

    The complexity of surveillance, prevention, and control of nosocomial infections has increased over the last decades, owing to reductions in the length of hospital stay, health care practice outside of the hospital (home care, day hospital care, long-term care facilities, nursing homes), the increase in the number of elderly patients, new and emerging diseases, multidrug-resistant pathogens, and the administrative requirements for accreditation. In this setting, infection control nurses are progressively assuming new responsibilities in addition to infection control, such as ensuring the safety of the patient, guaranteeing health care quality, and other tasks. In the light of these changes, professional organizations of infection control personnel have voiced the opinion that staffing for infection control work should not be based solely on the number of hospital beds, but also on the complexity of the tasks involved, which should be defined according to standardized criteria and infection control indicators. In addition, the cost-benefit relationship of infection control programs should be demonstrated.

  5. Nosocomial infection in a pediatric intensive care unit in a developing country.

    PubMed

    Abramczyk, Marcelo L; Carvalho, Werther B; Carvalho, Eduardo S; Medeiros, Eduardo A S

    2003-12-01

    Determine the rate and outcome of nosocomial infection (NI) in pediatric intensive care unit patients in a developing country. Prospective cohort study using the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention definitions to diagnose nosocomial infection and NNISS (National Nosocomial Infection Surveillance System) methodology. São Paulo Hospital - Universidade Federal de São Paulo - Brazil, a 700-bed teaching hospital with an 8-bed pediatric intensive care unit. All 515 children consecutively admitted to the pediatric intensive care unit from April 1996 to October 1997. The NI incidence was 18.3% and the mean infection rate per 1,000 patient days was 46.1; the ventilator-associated pneumonia rate was 18.7 per 1,000 ventilator days; the central line-associated bloodstream infection rate was 10.2 per 1,000 central line days; and the urinary tract catheter-associated infection rate was 1.8 per 1,000 catheter days. Pneumonia was the most common NI (31.6%), followed by bloodstream infections (17.3%), and surgical site infection (17.3%). Gram-negative bacterias were the most common pathogens identified in the NIs (54.8%), followed by Gram-positive bacterias (23.8%), and yeasts. Pneumonia was the most common type of NI. A high incidence of ventilator-associated pneumonia and central line-associated bloodstream infections was found, whereas the urinary tract catheter-associated infection rate was low. Gram-negative bacterias were the most common etiologic agents identified in the unit, and yeasts were frequently found. Pediatric patients have characteristics of their own, with major differences when compared to the adult population.

  6. Postoperative nosocomial infections among children with congenital heart disease

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jian; Yuan, Yan; Li, Peiling; Wang, Tuanjie; Gao, Jun; Yao, Jinhua; Li, Shujun

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To study the pathogen distribution, antimicrobial susceptibility and risk factors of postoperative nosocomial infections among children with congenital heart disease. Methods: Three hundreds children with congenital heart disease admitted to our hospital to receive surgeries from February 2010 to February 2013 were selected. Results: A total of 120 children were tested as positive by sputum culture, with the infection rate of 40.0%. The top five most common pathogenic microorganisms included Staphylococcus epidermidis, Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Candida albicans. S. epidermidis, S. aureus and Enterococcus were highly resistant to penicillin, azithromycin and erythromycin, moderately susceptible to levofloxacin and cefazolin, and completely susceptible to vancomycin. Multivariate Logistic regression analysis showed that hospitalization stay length, combined use of antibiotics, systemic use of hormones, mechanical ventilation and catheter indwelling were the independent risk factors of postoperative nosocomial infections (P<0.05). Conclusion: Nosocomial infection, which was the most frequent postoperative complication of pediatric congenital heart disease, was predominantly induced by Gram-positive bacteria that were highly susceptible to cephalosporins and vancomycin. Particular attention should be paid to decrease relevant risk factors to improve the prognosis. PMID:24948978

  7. Can we bridge the definition diversity in healthcare-associated infection surveillance? From IT-supported surveillance to IT-supported infection prevention and control.

    PubMed

    Koller, Walter; Blacky, Alexander; Mandl, Harald; Rappelsberger, Andrea; Adlassnig, Klaus-Peter

    2013-01-01

    Expectations and requirements of the surveillance of healthcare-associated infections (HAIs) trigger a growing differentiation of HAI surveillance approaches. In an attempt to bridge this diversity of definitions and to serve the needs of different user groups, we have enhanced MONI (identification, monitoring, and reporting of nosocomial infections) not only to create better reports, but also to output overviews on complex clinical matters, as well as to generate alerts and reminders for the clinicians' bedside work.

  8. Hand hygiene for the prevention of nosocomial infections.

    PubMed

    Kampf, Günter; Löffler, Harald; Gastmeier, Petra

    2009-10-01

    The WHO regards hand hygiene as an essential tool for the prevention of nosocomial infection, but compliance in clinical practice is often low. The relevant scientific literature and national and international evidence-based recommendations (Robert Koch Institute [Germany], WHO) were evaluated. Hygienic hand disinfection has better antimicrobial efficacy than hand-washing and is the procedure of choice to be performed before and after manual contact with patients. The hands should be washed, rather than disinfected, only when they are visibly soiled. Skin irritation is quite common among healthcare workers and is mainly caused by water, soap, and prolonged wearing of gloves. Compliance can be improved by training, by placing hand-rub dispensers at the sites where they are needed, and by physicians setting a good example for others. Improved compliance in hand hygiene, with proper use of alcohol-based hand rubs, can reduce the nosocomial infection rate by as much as 40%.

  9. Epidemiology of nosocomial fungal infections in the National Center for Burns in Casablanca, Morocco

    PubMed Central

    Rafik, A.; Diouri, M.; Bahechar, N.; Chlihi, A.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Fungal infection is a leading cause of death in burns patients and incurs significant costs for burn units. Our aim was to determine epidemiology of these infections, and analyze risk factors in the burns intensive care unit of the National Center for Burns and Plastic Surgery at Ibn-Rochd University Hospital, Casablanca. It is a retrospective review of all patients admitted from 2011–2014 who developed cultures positive for fungal organisms. Criteria for nosocomial fungal infections were those of the Center for Disease Control in Atlanta (1988, revised 1992, 2004). Microbiological surveillance was carried out daily. Patient demographic data, % TBSA, type of infection, site(s), species and number of cultures, and risk factors for fungal infections were collected. Mean age of patients was 24.5 +/- 27.3 years; 63% were female. Mean % TBSA was 30.7 +/- 23.4%, and % FTSA was 21.7 +/- 20.1%. Injury due to flame was most common (82%), followed by scald (10%), contact (4%), electrical (3%) and chemical (1%). Incidence of nosocomial fungal infection was 10%. The fungal pathogen most frequently isolated was Candida albicans (65.7%), followed by other Candida species (18.6%). Aspergillus spp was present in 3.9% and was statistically associated with mortality (3.2%) and morbidity. In our study, risk factors for these infections were mostly degree of burn (mean TBSA = 30.7%) and prolonged broad-spectrum antibiotic therapy. These two factors were associated with a higher incidence of multiple positive cultures, and significantly increased mortality (21.6%). Amphotericin B and fluconazole were the most frequently used antifungal agents. Fungi are emerging as important nosocomial pathogens. The main clinical implications are thinking faster about fungi infections and being more careful with antibiotic prescriptions. PMID:28149227

  10. ICU ward design and nosocomial infection rates: a cross-sectional study in Germany.

    PubMed

    Stiller, A; Schröder, C; Gropmann, A; Schwab, F; Behnke, M; Geffers, C; Sunder, W; Holzhausen, J; Gastmeier, P

    2017-01-01

    There is increasing interest in the effects of hospital and ward design on multi-faceted infection control. Definitive evidence is rare and the state of knowledge about current ward design is lacking. To collect data on the current status of ward design for intensive care units (ICUs) and to analyse associations between particular design factors and nosocomial infection rates. In 2015, operational infrastructure data were collected via an online questionnaire from ICUs participating voluntarily in the German nosocomial infection surveillance system (KISS). A multi-variate analysis was subsequently undertaken with nosocomial infection rates from the KISS database from 2014 to 2015. In total, 534 ICUs submitted data about their operational infrastructure. Of these, 27.1% of beds were hosted in single-bed rooms with a median size of 18m(2) (interquartile range 15-21m(2)), and 73.5% of all ICU beds had a hand rub dispenser nearby. The authors were able to match 266 ICUs in the multi-variate analysis. ICUs with openable windows in patient rooms were associated with lower device-associated lower respiratory tract infections [odds ratio (OR) 0.73, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.58-0.90]. ICUs with >40% two-bed rooms were associated with lower primary bloodstream infection rates (OR 0.66, 95% CI 0.51-0.86). Only minor associations were found between design factors and ICU infection rates. Most were surrogates for other risk factors. Copyright © 2016 The Healthcare Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Epidemiology of nosocomial fungal infections in the National Center for Burns in Casablanca, Morocco.

    PubMed

    Rafik, A; Diouri, M; Bahechar, N; Chlihi, A

    2016-06-30

    Fungal infection is a leading cause of death in burns patients and incurs significant costs for burn units. Our aim was to determine epidemiology of these infections, and analyze risk factors in the burns intensive care unit of the National Center for Burns and Plastic Surgery at Ibn-Rochd University Hospital, Casablanca. It is a retrospective review of all patients admitted from 2011-2014 who developed cultures positive for fungal organisms. Criteria for nosocomial fungal infections were those of the Center for Disease Control in Atlanta (1988, revised 1992, 2004). Microbiological surveillance was carried out daily. Patient demographic data, % TBSA, type of infection, site(s), species and number of cultures, and risk factors for fungal infections were collected. Mean age of patients was 24.5 +/- 27.3 years; 63% were female. Mean % TBSA was 30.7 +/- 23.4%, and % FTSA was 21.7 +/- 20.1%. Injury due to flame was most common (82%), followed by scald (10%), contact (4%), electrical (3%) and chemical (1%). Incidence of nosocomial fungal infection was 10%. The fungal pathogen most frequently isolated was Candida albicans (65.7%), followed by other Candida species (18.6%). Aspergillus spp was present in 3.9% and was statistically associated with mortality (3.2%) and morbidity. In our study, risk factors for these infections were mostly degree of burn (mean TBSA = 30.7%) and prolonged broad-spectrum antibiotic therapy. These two factors were associated with a higher incidence of multiple positive cultures, and significantly increased mortality (21.6%). Amphotericin B and fluconazole were the most frequently used antifungal agents. Fungi are emerging as important nosocomial pathogens. The main clinical implications are thinking faster about fungi infections and being more careful with antibiotic prescriptions.

  12. Epidemiology and Microbiologic Characterization of Nosocomial Candidemia from a Brazilian National Surveillance Program

    PubMed Central

    Doi, André Mario; Pignatari, Antonio Carlos Campos; Edmond, Michael B.; Marra, Alexandre Rodrigues; Camargo, Luis Fernando Aranha; Siqueira, Ricardo Andreotti; da Mota, Vivian Pereira; Colombo, Arnaldo Lopes

    2016-01-01

    Candidemia is a growing problem in hospitals all over the world. Despite advances in the medical support of critically ill patients, candidiasis leads to prolonged hospitalization, and has a crude mortality rate around 50%. We conducted a multicenter surveillance study in 16 hospitals distributed across five regions of Brazil to assess the incidence, species distribution, antifungal susceptibility, and risk factors for bloodstream infections due to Candida species. From June 2007 to March 2010, we studied a total of 2,563 nosocomial bloodstream infection (nBSI) episodes. Candida spp. was the 7th most prevalent agent. Most of the patients were male, with a median age of 56 years. A total of 64 patients (46.7%) were in the ICU when candidemia occurred. Malignancies were the most common underlying condition (32%). The crude mortality rate of candidemia during the hospital admission was 72.2%. Non-albicans species of Candida accounted for 65.7% of the 137 yeast isolates. C. albicans (34.3%), Candida parapsilosis (24.1%), Candida tropicalis (15.3%) and Candida glabrata (10.2%) were the most prevalent species. Only 47 out of 137 Candida isolates were sent to the reference laboratory for antifungal susceptibility testing. All C. albicans, C. tropicalis and C. parapsilosis isolates were susceptible to the 5 antifungal drugs tested. Among 11 C. glabrata isolates, 36% were resistant to fluconazole, and 64% SDD. All of them were susceptible to anidulafungin and amphotericin B. We observed that C. glabrata is emerging as a major player among non-albicans Candida spp. and fluconazole resistance was primarily confined to C. glabrata and C. krusei strains. Candida resistance to echinocandins and amphotericin B remains rare in Brazil. Mortality rates remain increasingly higher than that observed in the Northern Hemisphere countries, emphasizing the need for improving local practices of clinical management of candidemia, including early diagnosis, source control and precise

  13. Epidemiology and Microbiologic Characterization of Nosocomial Candidemia from a Brazilian National Surveillance Program.

    PubMed

    Doi, André Mario; Pignatari, Antonio Carlos Campos; Edmond, Michael B; Marra, Alexandre Rodrigues; Camargo, Luis Fernando Aranha; Siqueira, Ricardo Andreotti; da Mota, Vivian Pereira; Colombo, Arnaldo Lopes

    2016-01-01

    Candidemia is a growing problem in hospitals all over the world. Despite advances in the medical support of critically ill patients, candidiasis leads to prolonged hospitalization, and has a crude mortality rate around 50%. We conducted a multicenter surveillance study in 16 hospitals distributed across five regions of Brazil to assess the incidence, species distribution, antifungal susceptibility, and risk factors for bloodstream infections due to Candida species. From June 2007 to March 2010, we studied a total of 2,563 nosocomial bloodstream infection (nBSI) episodes. Candida spp. was the 7th most prevalent agent. Most of the patients were male, with a median age of 56 years. A total of 64 patients (46.7%) were in the ICU when candidemia occurred. Malignancies were the most common underlying condition (32%). The crude mortality rate of candidemia during the hospital admission was 72.2%. Non-albicans species of Candida accounted for 65.7% of the 137 yeast isolates. C. albicans (34.3%), Candida parapsilosis (24.1%), Candida tropicalis (15.3%) and Candida glabrata (10.2%) were the most prevalent species. Only 47 out of 137 Candida isolates were sent to the reference laboratory for antifungal susceptibility testing. All C. albicans, C. tropicalis and C. parapsilosis isolates were susceptible to the 5 antifungal drugs tested. Among 11 C. glabrata isolates, 36% were resistant to fluconazole, and 64% SDD. All of them were susceptible to anidulafungin and amphotericin B. We observed that C. glabrata is emerging as a major player among non-albicans Candida spp. and fluconazole resistance was primarily confined to C. glabrata and C. krusei strains. Candida resistance to echinocandins and amphotericin B remains rare in Brazil. Mortality rates remain increasingly higher than that observed in the Northern Hemisphere countries, emphasizing the need for improving local practices of clinical management of candidemia, including early diagnosis, source control and precise

  14. Efficient surveillance for healthcare-associated infections spreading between hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Ciccolini, Mariano; Donker, Tjibbe; Grundmann, Hajo; Bonten, Marc J. M.; Woolhouse, Mark E. J.

    2014-01-01

    Early detection of new or novel variants of nosocomial pathogens is a public health priority. We show that, for healthcare-associated infections that spread between hospitals as a result of patient movements, it is possible to design an effective surveillance system based on a relatively small number of sentinel hospitals. We apply recently developed mathematical models to patient admission data from the national healthcare systems of England and The Netherlands. Relatively short detection times are achieved once 10–20% hospitals are recruited as sentinels and only modest reductions are seen as more hospitals are recruited thereafter. Using a heuristic optimization approach to sentinel selection, the same expected time to detection can be achieved by recruiting approximately half as many hospitals. Our study provides a robust evidence base to underpin the design of an efficient sentinel hospital surveillance system for novel nosocomial pathogens, delivering early detection times for reduced expenditure and effort. PMID:24469791

  15. Intestinal parasites may not cause nosocomial infections in psychiatric hospitals.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Huey-Shinn; Wang, Lian-Chen

    2005-03-01

    This study was conducted to determine whether nosocomial infections of intestinal parasites occur in psychiatric hospitals. Three fecal specimens were collected from each institutionalized patient in seven psychiatric hospitals of north Taiwan. Saline wet mounts were prepared to examine trophozoites, and the other parasite stages were detected using the formalin-ethyl acetate sedimentation technique. Hospital faculties were asked to complete a questionnaire on the demographic data, health status degree of disability, and recent occurrence of gastrointestinal distress of these patients. Of the 464 patients examined, 8.4% were found to be infected with one or more intestinal parasite species: 6.3% single infections, 1.5% double infections, and 0.6% triple infections. Significantly higher prevalences were found among the males, unmarried patients, those with lower education, institutionalized for more than 3 years, sent by social workers to the hospitals, with non-schizophrenic diseases, and with a higher degree of disability. However, only education, marriage, mode of hospitalization, and type of psychiatric disease were found to be significant determinants in a logistic regression model. The variation in prevalence related to demographic factors implies that nosocomial infections may not occur. The mode of hospitalization indicates that the patients may acquire the infections before hospitalization.

  16. Lack of impact of rapid identification of rotavirus-infected patients on nosocomial rotavirus infections.

    PubMed

    Dennehy, P H; Tente, W E; Fisher, D J; Veloudis, B A; Peter, G

    1989-05-01

    The efficacy of rapid identification of rotavirus-infected patients in the control of nosocomial rotavirus infections on an infant and young toddler ward by use of a rotavirus antigen detection test on stool from patients with diarrhea was evaluated by comparing the rate of nosocomial rotavirus infection in children during two separate 5-week periods in the winters of 1984 and 1986. In contrast to 1984 rapid rotavirus antigen testing by latex agglutination of stool from patients with diarrhea was instituted in 1986, in addition to testing for rotavirus by enzyme immunoassay, to determine whether use of rapid antigen testing resulted in an increased incidence of appropriate isolation and a decrease in nosocomial infections. In 1986 rapid identification of rotavirus resulted in an increase in hospitalization of rotavirus-infected patients in single bed rooms from 68% to 100% (P = 0.02, chi square test) but no significant increase in the use of enteric precautions for these patients. The total number of cases of nosocomial rotavirus infection in the two periods did not differ. In both periods 11 cases occurred; the nosocomial infection rate in 1984 was 18.9 cases/1000 days of exposure whereas in 1986 it was 20.2 cases/1000 days. These findings indicate that the use of rapid rotavirus antigen testing of patients with diarrhea is not of appreciable benefit in preventing the nosocomial spread of rotavirus to infants on the ward.

  17. International Nosocomial Infection Control Consortium (INICC) report, data summary for 2003-2008, issued June 2009.

    PubMed

    Rosenthal, Victor D; Maki, Dennis G; Jamulitrat, Silom; Medeiros, Eduardo A; Todi, Subhash Kumar; Gomez, David Yepes; Leblebicioglu, Hakan; Abu Khader, Ilham; Miranda Novales, María Guadalupe; Berba, Regina; Ramírez Wong, Fernando Martín; Barkat, Amina; Pino, Osiel Requejo; Dueñas, Lourdes; Mitrev, Zan; Bijie, Hu; Gurskis, Vaidotas; Kanj, S S; Mapp, Trudell; Hidalgo, Rosalía Fernández; Ben Jaballah, Nejla; Raka, Lul; Gikas, Achilleas; Ahmed, Altaf; Thu, Le Thi Anh; Guzmán Siritt, María Eugenia

    2010-03-01

    We report the results of the International Infection Control Consortium (INICC) surveillance study from January 2003 through December 2008 in 173 intensive care units (ICUs) in Latin America, Asia, Africa, and Europe. During the 6-year study, using Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) US National Healthcare Safety Network (NHSN; formerly the National Nosocomial Infection Surveillance system [NNIS]) definitions for device-associated health care-associated infection, we collected prospective data from 155,358 patients hospitalized in the consortium's hospital ICUs for an aggregate of 923,624 days. Although device utilization in the developing countries' ICUs was remarkably similar to that reported from US ICUs in the CDC's NHSN, rates of device-associated nosocomial infection were markedly higher in the ICUs of the INICC hospitals: the pooled rate of central venous catheter (CVC)-associated bloodstream infections (BSI) in the INICC ICUs, 7.6 per 1000 CVC-days, is nearly 3-fold higher than the 2.0 per 1000 CVC-days reported from comparable US ICUs, and the overall rate of ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) was also far higher, 13.6 versus 3.3 per 1000 ventilator-days, respectively, as was the rate of catheter-associated urinary tract infection (CAUTI), 6.3 versus 3.3 per 1000 catheter-days, respectively. Most strikingly, the frequencies of resistance of Staphylococcus aureus isolates to methicillin (MRSA) (84.1% vs 56.8%, respectively), Klebsiella pneumoniae to ceftazidime or ceftriaxone (76.1% vs 27.1%, respectively), Acinetobacter baumannii to imipenem (46.3% vs 29.2%, respectively), and Pseudomonas aeruginosa to piperacillin (78.0% vs 20.2%, respectively) were also far higher in the consortium's ICUs, and the crude unadjusted excess mortalities of device-related infections ranged from 23.6% (CVC-associated bloodstream infections) to 29.3% (VAP).

  18. Surveillance of prosthetic joint infections: international overview and new insights for hospital databases.

    PubMed

    Grammatico-Guillon, L; Rusch, E; Astagneau, P

    2015-02-01

    Since the US National Nosocomial Infections Surveillance System was implemented in the 1970s, several countries have developed their own surveillance systems, all including surgical site infection (SSI) as a major target. However, the performance of such systems needs to be evaluated further in terms of data quality and cost-effectiveness. The current article presents a literature overview of the main strategies used for SSI surveillance worldwide, focusing on hip and knee arthroplasty infections, and discusses new issues for further development of surveillance databases.

  19. [Nosocomial infections and quality of health care].

    PubMed

    Navarrete-Navarro, S; Rangel-Frausto, M S

    1999-01-01

    The main objective of a hospital-acquired infections control program is to decrease the risk of acquisition and the morbidity and costs associated. The organization of a team with technical and humanistic leadership is essential. Every infection control program must also develop strategies that allow: a) identification of the problems, b) to establish the importance of each one, c) to determine their causes, d) to develop solutions and e) the evaluation of the recommended solutions. The development of technical and humanistic abilities by the leader and the members of the team, and the use of the tools mentioned above have produced the only validate and highly effective program of quality improvement in the hospital.

  20. Nosocomial infection and its molecular mechanisms of antibiotic resistance.

    PubMed

    Xia, Jufeng; Gao, Jianjun; Tang, Wei

    2016-02-01

    Nosocomial infection is a kind of infection, which is spread in various hospital environments, and leads to many serious diseases (e.g. pneumonia, urinary tract infection, gastroenteritis, and puerperal fever), and causes higher mortality than community-acquired infection. Bacteria are predominant among all the nosocomial infection-associated pathogens, thus a large number of antibiotics, such as aminoglycosides, penicillins, cephalosporins, and carbapenems, are adopted in clinical treatment. However, in recent years antibiotic resistance quickly spreads worldwide and causes a critical threat to public health. The predominant bacteria include Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Escherichia coli, and Acinetobacter baumannii. In these bacteria, resistance emerged from antibiotic resistant genes and many of those can be exchanged between bacteria. With technical advances, molecular mechanisms of resistance have been gradually unveiled. In this review, recent advances in knowledge about mechanisms by which (i) bacteria hydrolyze antibiotics (e.g. extended spectrum β-lactamases, (ii) AmpC β-lactamases, carbapenemases), (iii) avoid antibiotic targeting (e.g. mutated vanA and mecA genes), (iv) prevent antibiotic permeation (e.g. porin deficiency), or (v) excrete intracellular antibiotics (e.g. active efflux pump) are summarized.

  1. [The current problems related to nosocomial infections and antibiotic resistance today].

    PubMed

    Tejkalová, Renata

    2017-01-01

    Nosocomial, also known as hospital acquired infections, are today considered to be an important indicator of the quality of health care in all health establishments. They involve an undesirable complication of the provided health care with a number of negative consequences, such as increased morbidity and mortality, longer time of hospitalization and higher costs. Their incidence at present is also related, among other things, to the broadening, sometimes invasive technical possibilities of diagnosing and therapy. Another issue in Czech hospitals consists in the growing resistance of some bacteria to antibiotics. In practice this means considerably limited possibilities of treatment. The contribution brings the current data about the state of bacterial resistance in Czech hospitals (European project EARS-Net - year 2015).Key words: bacterial resistance - European Antimicrobial Resistance Surveillance Network (EARS-Net) - health care related infections - hospital-acquired infections.

  2. Follow-up of nosocomial infections on nursing units: an approach to infection control.

    PubMed

    Loss, S L; Goodloe, S

    1986-07-01

    The infection control department at Niagara Falls Memorial Medical Center in Niagara Falls, New York, has developed an innovative approach to decreasing nosocomial infections. By following up on the infections that occur on nursing units, nurses actively work to prevent their occurrence. The approach utilizes nursing accountability, continuing staff education, and documentation, with positive results.

  3. International Nosocomial Infection Control Consortium (INICC) report, data summary of 36 countries, for 2004-2009.

    PubMed

    Rosenthal, Victor D; Bijie, Hu; Maki, Dennis G; Mehta, Yatin; Apisarnthanarak, Anucha; Medeiros, Eduardo A; Leblebicioglu, Hakan; Fisher, Dale; Álvarez-Moreno, Carlos; Khader, Ilham Abu; Del Rocío González Martínez, Marisela; Cuellar, Luis E; Navoa-Ng, Josephine Anne; Abouqal, Rédouane; Guanche Garcell, Humberto; Mitrev, Zan; Pirez García, María Catalina; Hamdi, Asma; Dueñas, Lourdes; Cancel, Elsie; Gurskis, Vaidotas; Rasslan, Ossama; Ahmed, Altaf; Kanj, Souha S; Ugalde, Olber Chavarría; Mapp, Trudell; Raka, Lul; Yuet Meng, Cheong; Thu, Le Thi Anh; Ghazal, Sameeh; Gikas, Achilleas; Narváez, Leonardo Pazmiño; Mejía, Nepomuceno; Hadjieva, Nassya; Gamar Elanbya, May Osman; Guzmán Siritt, María Eugenia; Jayatilleke, Kushlani

    2012-06-01

    The results of a surveillance study conducted by the International Nosocomial Infection Control Consortium (INICC) from January 2004 through December 2009 in 422 intensive care units (ICUs) of 36 countries in Latin America, Asia, Africa, and Europe are reported. During the 6-year study period, using Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) National Healthcare Safety Network (NHSN; formerly the National Nosocomial Infection Surveillance system [NNIS]) definitions for device-associated health care-associated infections, we gathered prospective data from 313,008 patients hospitalized in the consortium's ICUs for an aggregate of 2,194,897 ICU bed-days. Despite the fact that the use of devices in the developing countries' ICUs was remarkably similar to that reported in US ICUs in the CDC's NHSN, rates of device-associated nosocomial infection were significantly higher in the ICUs of the INICC hospitals; the pooled rate of central line-associated bloodstream infection in the INICC ICUs of 6.8 per 1,000 central line-days was more than 3-fold higher than the 2.0 per 1,000 central line-days reported in comparable US ICUs. The overall rate of ventilator-associated pneumonia also was far higher (15.8 vs 3.3 per 1,000 ventilator-days), as was the rate of catheter-associated urinary tract infection (6.3 vs. 3.3 per 1,000 catheter-days). Notably, the frequencies of resistance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates to imipenem (47.2% vs 23.0%), Klebsiella pneumoniae isolates to ceftazidime (76.3% vs 27.1%), Escherichia coli isolates to ceftazidime (66.7% vs 8.1%), Staphylococcus aureus isolates to methicillin (84.4% vs 56.8%), were also higher in the consortium's ICUs, and the crude unadjusted excess mortalities of device-related infections ranged from 7.3% (for catheter-associated urinary tract infection) to 15.2% (for ventilator-associated pneumonia).

  4. Superinfection during treatment of nosocomial infections with tigecycline.

    PubMed

    García-Cabrera, E; Jiménez-Mejías, M E; Gil Navarro, M V; Gómez-Gómez, M J; Ortiz-Leyba, C; Cordero, E; Pachón, J

    2010-07-01

    We performed a retrospective and observational study of 51 patients treated with tigecycline, as the treatment for nosocomial infections due to multidrug-resistant microorganisms, to evaluate the superinfection rate and their etiologies. Superinfections were diagnosed in 12 (23.5%) patients (seven due to Pseudomonas aeruginosa, 13.7%) and one patient had P. aeruginosa colonization. Five patients with superinfection died (41.6%), three due to superinfections and two to underlying diseases. The superinfection rate observed during tigecycline treatment is higher than that previously reported. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the most frequent agent, being the cause of 58.5% of all superinfections.

  5. Role and impact of carbapenem in nosocomial infections.

    PubMed

    Goulenok, T M; Majed, Kamel; Monchi, Mehran

    2011-01-01

    Although carbapenem antibiotics are one of the most effective agents in the treatment of nosocomial infections caused by Gram-negative bacteria, their use is threatened by the emergence of antibiotic resistance. The bacterial resistance to carbapenems parallels their increasing use and has dramatic clinical implications such as increase in mortality and cost of care. This article reviews recently published patents claiming for carbapenem antibacterial agents. New forms including crystalline forms with high oral bioavailability and modified spectrum including methicillin-resistant Staphylococci are some of new patents described in this review.

  6. Nosocomial infections in the ICU: Pens and spectacles as fomites.

    PubMed

    Murad, Haris Farooq; Inam Pal, Khowaja Mohammad

    2016-10-01

    Nosocomial infections are a major cause of morbidity and mortality. Non-medical objects known as fomites may have a role in their genesis. We investigated the significance of writing pens and spectacles as fomites. The study was conducted at Aga Khan University Hospital, Karachi, from July 2013 to September 2013. Cultures were taken from pens and/or spectacles of resident nurses, doctors and nursing assistants in intensive care unit (ICU). Organisms important in ICU nosocomial infections were targeted. Seven rounds of sampling over 3 weeks led to 55 pen and 5 spectacle samples. Growth was seen in 3(5.5%) pen samples and 1(20%) spectacle sample. Two (3.6%) pen cultures grew acinetobacter, 1)1.8%) grew candida and acinetobacter, and i spectacle culture grew vancomycin-resistant enterococcus faecium (VRE). Two out of the 4 (50%) personnel managing all ICU beds had growth. During the study, one or more ICU patients had infection with the same organisms. Pens and spectacles may be responsible for the spread of organisms like acinetobacter and VRE. Personnel managing multiple beds are more likely to carry contaminated fomites.

  7. Emergence of antibiotic resistance and prudent use of antibiotic therapy in nosocomially acquired urinary tract infections.

    PubMed

    Wagenlehner, F M E; Naber, K G

    2004-03-01

    Nosocomially acquired urinary tract infections (NAUTI) are common. The reported rates, however, depend very much on the definitions used and the number of investigations requested. In a prospective study on a surgical intensive care unit and adhering closely to the CDC criteria, NAUTI was diagnosed in about 17% of the patients. The urinary catheter associated UTI rate per 1000 catheter days was 14.5 much higher than otherwise reported. Whereas the rates of symptomatic NAUTI and other nosocomially acquired infections were similar, the main difference was found for asymptomatic UTI which depends very much on the effort to search for it systematically. In a prospective study on a urological ward it could be demonstrated that cross-transmission probably plays a much greater role than so far suggested. Continuous surveillance of the bacterial spectrum and resistance is necessary not only on a global but also on a local level. Selection of an appropriate agent for empirical antibacterial therapy can be better tailored if not only the total bacterial spectrum is considered but if all information already available during the identification process is used, such as Gram stain and other simple and rapid tests for stratification of the pathogens. Since in NAUTI usually some kind of biofilm infection is involved, the fluoroquinolones can be considered agents of choice. Only those substances with high antibacterial activity, good bioavailability and those that are mainly excreted by the kidneys should be chosen and they have to be administered at sufficiently high doses.

  8. Antibiotic resistance pattern of Enterococci isolates from nosocomial infections in a tertiary care hospital in Eastern India.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Atreyi; Pal, Nishith K; Sarkar, Soma; Gupta, Manideepa Sen

    2015-01-01

    Resistance to commonly used antibiotics by Enterococci causing nosocomial infections is of concern, which necessitates judicious, responsible and evidence-based use of antibiotics. The present study was conducted to review the prevalence and identify therapeutic options for nosocomial Enterococcal infections in our tertiary care hospital. Isolates identified by morphological and biochemical characteristics were tested for antibiotic susceptibility using Kirby-Bauer method. 153 of 2096 culture positive clinical samples comprised of 101 urine, 30 wound swab/pus, 13 blood and 09 high vaginal swab isolates were identified as Enterococcus faecalis (90.85%), Enterococcus faecium (8.50%) and Enterococcus gallinarum (0.65%). Enterococci accounted for 8.45%, 4.53%, 4.23%, 4.43% of urinary, wound swab or pus, blood, high vaginal swab isolates respectively, causing 7.3% of all nosocomial infections. Significant number of Enterococci isolated from nosocomial urinary tract infection (66.01%) and wound infections (19.6%) were multidrug resistant (MDR). Although all isolates were sensitive to vancomycin and linezolid, resistance to erythromycin (71.24%) and ciprofloxacin (49.67%) was frequently observed. High-level gentamicin resistance was observed in 43.88%, and 61.53% of E. faecalis and E. faecium isolates respectively. Minimal inhibitory concentration of vancomycin of all the isolates were ≤1 μg/ml. 7% of the Enterococcal isolates were MDR strains and vancomycin or linezolid were the only effective antibiotics. A combination of vancomycin and/or linezolid were effective against Enterococci causing nosocomial infections in our tertiary care facility, nevertheless continuous and frequent surveillance for resistance patterns are necessary for judicious and evidence based use of antibiotics.

  9. Antimicrobial resistance in pathogens causing nosocomial bloodstream infections in university hospitals in Egypt.

    PubMed

    Saied, Tamer; Elkholy, Amany; Hafez, Soad F; Basim, Hadia; Wasfy, Momtaz O; El-Shoubary, Waleed; Samir, Ahmed; Pimentel, Guillermo; Talaat, Maha

    2011-11-01

    Nosocomial bloodstream infections (BSIs) and antimicrobial resistance (AMR) are worldwide health care problems causing substantial patient morbidity and mortality. This study was conducted to identify bacterial pathogens isolated from nosocomial BSIs and determine their AMR patterns. An active surveillance program for BSIs was conducted in intensive care units in 3 large university hospitals in Egypt between September 1, 2006, and June 30, 2007. Infection prevention and control teams and link nurses in collaboration with intensive care physicians were looking actively to identify patients who acquired BSIs based on Centers for Disease Control and Prevention standard case definitions. Blood cultures were obtained from patients with suspected BSIs and processed to isolate bacteria and test their antimicrobial resistance. During the 10-month active surveillance period, a total of 600 pathogens were isolated from blood cultures of 1,575 patients (38%). Of these 600 isolates, 386 (66%) were gram-negative, 178 (30%) were gram-positive, and 24 (4%) were budding yeasts. The gram-negative organisms included 162 (27%) Klebsiella pneumoniae and 23 (3.8%) Escherichia coli. Extended-spectrum β-lactamase enzymes were detected in 79% of the K pneumoniae isolates and 39% of the E coli isolates. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus accounted for 60% of S aureus infections. High rates of β-lactamase resistance and methicillin-resistant S aureus were found in the 3 Egyptian university hospitals studied. This study highlights the need for strengthening infection prevention and control programs, monitoring AMR at each facility, and developing policies for antibiotic use. Published by Mosby, Inc.

  10. A framework for infection control surveillance using association rules.

    PubMed

    Ma, Lili; Tsui, Fu-Chiang; Hogan, William R; Wagner, Michael M; Ma, Haobo

    2003-01-01

    Surveillance of antibiotic resistance and nosocomial infections is one of the most important functions of a hospital infection control program. We employed the association rule method for automatically identifying new, unexpected, and potentially interesting patterns in hospital infection control. We hypothesized that mining for low-support, low-confidence rules would detect unexpected outbreaks caused by a small number of cases. To build a framework, we preprocessed the data and added new templates to eliminate uninteresting patterns. We applied our method to the culture data collected over 3 months from 10 hospitals in the UPMC Health System. We found that the new process and system are efficient and effective in identifying new, unexpected, and potentially interesting patterns in surveillance data. The clinical relevance and utility of this process await the results of prospective studies.

  11. Proactive infection control measures to prevent nosocomial transmission of vancomycin-resistant enterococci in Hong Kong.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Vincent Chi-Chung; Tai, Josepha Wai-Ming; Chen, Jonathan Hon-Kwan; So, Simon Yung-Chun; Ng, Wing-Chun; Hung, Ivan Fan-Ngan; Leung, Sally Sau-Man; Wong, Sally Cheuk-Ying; Chan, Tuen-Ching; Chan, Felix Hon-Wai; Ho, Pak-Leung; Yuen, Kwok-Yung

    2014-10-01

    The study describes a proactive infection control approach to prevent nosocomial transmission of vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) and tests if this approach is effective for controlling multiple-drug resistant organisms in a nonendemic setting. In response to the increasing prevalence of VRE in Hong Kong since 2011, we adopted a multifaceted assertive approach in our health care network. This included active surveillance culture, extensive contact tracing, directly observed hand hygiene in conscious patients before they received meals and medications, stringent hand hygiene and environmental cleanliness, and an immediate feedback antimicrobial stewardship program. We report the occurrence of VRE outbreaks in our hospital after institution of these measures and compared with the concurrent occurrence in other public hospitals in Hong Kong. Between July 1, 2011 and November 13, 2013, VRE was identified in 0.32% (50/15,851) of admission episodes by active surveillance culture. The risk of VRE carriage was three times higher in patients with a history of hospitalization outside our hospital networks in the past 3 months (0.56% vs. 0.17%; p = 0.001) compared with those who were not. Extensive contact tracing involving 3277 patient episodes was performed in the investigation for the 25 VRE index patients upon whom implementation of contact precautions was delayed (more than 48 hours of hospitalization). One episode of VRE outbreak was identified in our hospital network, compared with the 77 VRE outbreaks reported in the other hospital networks (controls) without these proactive infection control measures. Our multifaceted assertive proactive infection control approach can minimize the nosocomial transmission and outbreak of VRE in a nonendemic area. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. Nosocomial Bloodstream Infections in Brazilian Pediatric Patients: Microbiology, Epidemiology, and Clinical Features

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Carlos Alberto Pires; Marra, Alexandre R.; Camargo, Luis Fernando Aranha; Pignatari, Antônio Carlos Campos; Sukiennik, Teresa; Behar, Paulo Renato Petersen; Medeiros, Eduardo Alexandrino Servolo; Ribeiro, Julival; Girão, Evelyne; Correa, Luci; Guerra, Carla; Carneiro, Irna; Brites, Carlos; Reis, Marise; de Souza, Marta Antunes; Tranchesi, Regina; Barata, Cristina U.; Edmond, Michael B.

    2013-01-01

    Background Nosocomial bloodstream infections (nBSIs) are an important cause of morbidity and mortality and are the most frequent type of nosocomial infection in pediatric patients. Methods We identified the predominant pathogens and antimicrobial susceptibilities of nosocomial bloodstream isolates in pediatric patients (≤16 years of age) in the Brazilian Prospective Surveillance for nBSIs at 16 hospitals from 12 June 2007 to 31 March 2010 (Br SCOPE project). Results In our study a total of 2,563 cases of nBSI were reported by hospitals participating in the Br SCOPE project. Among these, 342 clinically significant episodes of BSI were identified in pediatric patients (≤16 years of age). Ninety-six percent of BSIs were monomicrobial. Gram-negative organisms caused 49.0% of these BSIs, Gram-positive organisms caused 42.6%, and fungi caused 8.4%. The most common pathogens were Coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS) (21.3%), Klebsiella spp. (15.7%), Staphylococcus aureus (10.6%), and Acinetobacter spp. (9.2%). The crude mortality was 21.6% (74 of 342). Forty-five percent of nBSIs occurred in a pediatric or neonatal intensive-care unit (ICU). The most frequent underlying conditions were malignancy, in 95 patients (27.8%). Among the potential factors predisposing patients to BSI, central venous catheters were the most frequent (66.4%). Methicillin resistance was detected in 37 S. aureus isolates (27.1%). Of the Klebsiella spp. isolates, 43.2% were resistant to ceftriaxone. Of the Acinetobacter spp. and Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates, 42.9% and 21.4%, respectively, were resistant to imipenem. Conclusions In our multicenter study, we found a high mortality and a large proportion of gram-negative bacilli with elevated levels of resistance in pediatric patients. PMID:23861860

  13. [Epidemic of nosocomial infection by rotavirus in a neonatology service].

    PubMed

    Bentama, I; Soussi, I; Ghanimi, Z; Riane, S; Tligui, H; Mdaghri Alaoui, A; Thimou Izgua, A

    2012-01-01

    The goal of work is to establish a clinical descriptive analysis of the epidemic of nosocomial rotavirus occurred in the Neonatal Unit of the Hospital's Child Rabat for a winter period. We systematically collected all the patients of the service right from the first case of rotavirus nosocomial infection. Patients with a stay of less than 48 hours of hospitalization were excluded. We have established operating sheets for all positive cases, with the term, birth weight, postnatal age and weight during the sampling, clinical symptoms, treatment, and the evolution. Out of the 36 cases analyzed (where 26 preterm and 10 term neonates), 12 samples were positive for rotavirus, so one third of patients. The patients with positive samples were in 75% symptomatic cases. The clinical signs were represented in term newborns with stool weight with stagnant fluid in 2 cases and weight loss in one case and in premature infants with mucous stools with abdominal distension in 2/3 of cases, and fluid and stool dehydration in 1/3 of cases. A very low rate of breastfeeding (17%) was noted among all newborns service in this epidemic. We performed the isolation of positive patients, with a strengthening of hygiene measures. In addition, infants were started on symptomatic treatment with careful clinical monitoring. Evolution was complicated by necrotizing enterocolitis in 3 cases of preterm infants.

  14. [Etiologic agents and risk factors in nosocomial urinary tract infections].

    PubMed

    Akkoyun, Seviç; Kuloğlu, Figen; Tokuç, Burcu

    2008-04-01

    Nosocomial urinary tract infection (NUSI) is one of the most common hospital acquired infections. In this study, we aimed to determine the risk factors, frequency and the bacterial etiology of NUSI in hospitalized patients at Trace University Hospital, Turkey. Between September 1st 2004 to March 1st 2005, 104 NUSI episodes from 91 adult patients (mean age; 60.8 +/- 16.1 years; 46 were female) were determined among 8704 patients admitted to the hospital. During the study period, cumulative incidence of NUSI was 1.04% and episode rate of NUSI was 1.19%. The most important risk factors for NUSI were detected as urinary catheterization (78.8%), antimicrobial therapy within the previous 15 days (60.6%), fecal incontinence (33.7%) and surgical operations [29.8% (42% of them were urological pertainings)]. In 37.8% of the episodes urinary catheterization was considered as performed unnecessarily. In 26% of the episodes another infection (pneumoniae, abdominal infection, wound infection) accompanied. The causative microorganisms were resistant to the antibiotics used for therapy in 93.6% of the episodes. A total of 118 microorganisms (14 were polymicrobial) have been isolated from the urine cultures. The most frequently isolated ones were Escherichia coil (n: 48; 40.8%), Candida spp. (n: 27; 23%), Enterococcus spp. (n: 13; 11%), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (n: 9; 7.6%), Klebsiella pneumoniae (n: 8; 6.8%) and Acinetobacter spp. (n: 5; 4.2%). The highest susceptibility rates of E. coli isolates were against imipenem and nitrofurantoin (100%) and amikacin (97.7%), the lowest susceptibility rates were against ampicillin (26.7%) and amoxycillin-clavulonate (44.4%). No glycopeptid resistance was detected for Enterococcus spp. while the susceptibility rates to penicilin and nitrofurantoin were 38.5% and 63.6%, respectively. Since the number of the other bacterial species was low (<10) their antimicrobial resistance rates were not evaluated. Extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL

  15. Construction-related nosocomial infections in patients in health care facilities. Decreasing the risk of Aspergillus, Legionella and other infections.

    PubMed

    2001-07-01

    Construction and renovation projects in health care facilities are a risk for certain patients, particularly those who are immunocompromised. A proactive approach must be taken to limit construction-related nosocomial infections. This requires having a multidisciplinary team, supported by administration, to plan and implement preventive measures throughout the duration of the construction project. The ICP should be an active team member in all phases of the project. The ICP plays a major role by providing education to personnel; ensuring that preventive measures are identified, initiated, and maintained; and carrying out surveillance for infections in patients. By ensuring that the appropriate preventive measures are in place and clear lines of communication exist among the personnel, patient safety will be enhanced.

  16. [Hospital management and the role of clinical microbiology laboratory for preventing nosocomial infection].

    PubMed

    Ichiyama, S

    1995-10-01

    Nosocomial infection is a serious issue in the hospital management. Countermeasures for this issue have been discussed from various points including clinical and laboratory medicine, nursing as well as hospital administration. This issue is of great importance to those of us medical practitioners, who engage in diagnosis and treatment of infectious diseases. The role of clinical microbiology laboratories for prevention of nosocomial infection includes performing epidemiological survey, giving information and education, and training and instruction to medical staff. In order to instruct and inspect the countermeasures against nosocomial infection, it is necessary to have a dedicated team in the hospital. We have organized an infection control team(ICT) to collect information and offer training and instruction regarding nosocomial infection. The ICT activities include 1) inspecting if the nosocomial infection control manual is followed correctly, 2) reporting the results of epidemiological survey regarding nosocomial infection, 3) offering the information regarding antimicrobial agents and disinfectants, 4) offering the information regarding the isolation of microorganisms in the hospital and their antimicrobial sensitivities, 5) cost calculation for nosocomial infection control.

  17. Detection of clinically relevant genotypes of vancomycin-resistant enterococci in nosocomial surveillance specimens by PCR.

    PubMed

    Jayaratne, P; Rutherford, C

    1999-06-01

    This study evaluated a PCR method for the rapid detection of clinically significant genotypes of vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) in nosocomial surveillance specimens. Detection of the vanA and vanB genes by multiplex PCR using 657 specimens that showed presumptive growth of VRE on bile esculin azide agar containing 6 mg of vancomycin/liter was compared to the conventional method. The diagnostic values for the PCR compared to the phenotypic method were as follows: 99.8% specificity, 95.4% sensitivity, 98.8% positive predictive value, and 99.3% negative predictive value. The average cost per test for PCR is $8.26, compared to $9.45 for the phenotypic method. The average turnaround time for detecting a VRE is 48 h for PCR, compared to 96 h for the conventional method.

  18. A nosocomial outbreak of fluoroquinolone-resistant salmonella infection.

    PubMed

    Olsen, S J; DeBess, E E; McGivern, T E; Marano, N; Eby, T; Mauvais, S; Balan, V K; Zirnstein, G; Cieslak, P R; Angulo, F J

    2001-05-24

    Infection with fluoroquinolone-resistant strains of salmonella is rare, as is nosocomial salmonella infection. We describe the first recognized outbreak of fluoroquinolone-resistant salmonella infections in the United States, which occurred in two nursing homes and one hospital in Oregon. We interviewed medical staff and reviewed patients' charts and death certificates. In Nursing Home A we conducted a case-control study. Patients were defined as residents of the nursing home from whom fluoroquinolone-resistant Salmonella enterica serotype Schwarzengrund was isolated between February 1996 and December 1998. Controls were residents with similar medical conditions whose cultures did not yield salmonella. We compared isolates using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and sequence analysis. We reviewed pharmacy records to compare the use of fluoroquinolone among several nursing homes. Eleven patients with fluoroquinolone-resistant salmonellosis were identified at two nursing homes. The index patient had been hospitalized in the Philippines and had probably acquired the infection there. Transmission was probably direct (from patient to patient) or through contact with contaminated surfaces. Treatment with fluoroquinolones during the six months before a culture was obtained was associated with a significant risk of salmonella infection (4 of 5 patients had taken fluoroquinolones, as compared with 2 of 13 controls; odds ratio, 22.0; 95 percent confidence interval, 1.06 to 1177). The patients were not significantly more likely than the controls to have taken other antibiotics. More fluoroquinolones were used at Nursing Home A than at similar nursing homes in Oregon. The isolates from the outbreak had similar patterns on pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and the same gyrA mutations. The isolates from the outbreak were also similar to the only previous isolate of fluoroquinolone-resistant salmonella in the United States, which came from a patient in New York who had been

  19. Nosocomial Infections in Intensive Care Unit: Pattern of Antibiotic-resistance in Iranian Community.

    PubMed

    Esfahani, Bahram Nasr; Basiri, Rozita; Mirhosseini, Seyed Mohammad Mahdy; Moghim, Sharareh; Dolatkhah, Shahaboddin

    2017-01-01

    Bacterial infections are responsible for great number of mortality in Intensive Care Unit (ICU). Knowledge about prevalence of bacterial infections and their antibiotic-resistance pattern would be a great step for their treatment and management. Data about nosocomial infections in ICUs of Alzahra Hospital (referral hospital in Isfahan, center of Iran) were gathered during the years 2007-2010. A questionnaire was fulfilled for any specific patient with nosocomial infection containing demographic data of patient and also characteristics of the infection. Out of all patients, 707 individuals (65.6%) were male and 370 (34.4%) were female. Our data revealed that Pseudomonas aeruginosa (13.9%), Klebsiella (11%), and Escherichia coli (6.4%) were the most prevalent bacterial infections. The most common sites of nosocomial infections in the ICU were respiratory system (399 cases, 37%), urinary system (230 cases, 21.4%), and blood (102 cases, 9.5%). The antibiotic-resistance of each bacteria in ICU ward was assessed and data were categorized in a table. There were less documentary about bacterial cultures in the year 2007 when compared with the next years. We found some differences (such as bacterial prevalence in ICU wards which caused nosocomial infections) in our local prevalence of nosocomial infections and also in their resistance pattern compared to other centers. Knowing about our data will help physicians to administer the most suitable antibiotics for treatment of nosocomial infections in our area.

  20. Antibiogram of nosocomial urinary tract infections in Felege Hiwot referral hospital, Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Melaku, S; Kibret, M; Abera, B; Gebre-Sellassie, S

    2012-06-01

    Nosocomial infections increase the cost of medical care, extend hospital stay and reflect on the morbidity and mortality of the admitted patients. Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are one of the most common nosocomial infections in humans. To determine the prevalence and antibiogram of nosocomial UITs from a referral hospital. A cross-sectional study was conducted on 1 254 patients from April to August 2010. Antimicrobial susceptibility tests were done using disc diffusion technique as per the standard of Kirby-Bauer method. Of the 1 254 patients, 118 (9.4%) developed nosocomial UTIs. Seventy three (61.9%) and 44 (37.1%) of the bacterial isolates were gram negative and gram positive, respectively. One patient had a mixed infection. E. coli, S.aureus and K. pneumonia were the most predominant isolates. Gender, catheterization and pre-operative antimicrobial prophylaxis and underlying diseases were significantly associated with the occurrence of nosocomial UTIs (p=0.001). Most bacterial isolates showed high resistance rates (>80%) to ampicillin, amoxicillin/clavulanic acid, chloramphenicol and cloxacillin. Catheterization and preoperative antibiotic prophylaxis were found to be the risk factors for nosocomial infection. Effective infection prevention measures should be in place to reduce the prevalence of nosocomial UTIs.

  1. Nosocomial infections and risk factors in the intensive care unit of a teaching and research hospital: A prospecive cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Ak, Oznur; Batirel, Ayse; Ozer, Serdar; Čolakoğlu, Serhan

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background To evaluate the incidence, risk factors and etiology of nosocomial infections (NIs) in the intensive care unit (ICU) of our hospital in order to improve our infection control policies. Material/Methods A 1-year prospective cohort study of nosocomial infection (NI) surveillance was conducted in our ICU in 2008. Results Out of 1134 patients hospitalized in the ICU for a period of 6257 days, 115 patients acquired a total of 135 NIs distributed as follows: 36.3% bacteremia, 30.4% ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP), 18.5% catheter-associated urinary tract infection, 7.4% central-line infection, 5.9% cutaneous infection, and 1.3% meningitis. The incidence rate of NI was 21.6 in 1000 patient-days, and the rate of NI was 25.6%. Length of ICU stay, central venous catheterisation, mechanical ventilation and tracheostomy were statistically significant risk factors for NI. Of all NI, 112 (83%) were microbiologically-confirmed and 68.8% of the isolates were Gram-negative, 27.6% were Gram-positive, and 3.6% were fungi. 23 (17%) were clinically-defined infections. The most frequently isolated organism was P. aeruginosa (25%), followed by S. aureus (21.4%), E. coli (18.7%) and A. baumannii (16.9%). Conclusions The bloodstream was the most common site and Gram-negatives were the most commonly reported causes of ICU infections. PMID:21525819

  2. Is automated electronic surveillance for healthcare-associated infections accurate in the burn unit?

    PubMed

    Venable, Amanda; Dissanaike, Sharmila

    2013-01-01

    As monitoring requirements for healthcare-acquired infection increase, an efficient and accurate method for surveillance has been sought. The authors evaluated the accuracy of electronic surveillance in multiple intensive care unit settings. Data from 500 intensive care unit patients were reviewed to determine the presence of central line-associated blood stream infection (CLABSI) and catheter-associated urinary tract infection (CAUTI). An electronic surveillance report was obtained to determine whether patients had a blood-line nosocomial infection marker or a urine nosocomial infection marker. Manual review was based on Centers for Disease Control and Prevention criteria. An infection preventionist then reviewed all discrepant cases and made a final determination, which was used as the gold standard. Sensitivity, specificity, false-positive rate, and false-negative rate were then calculated for electronic surveillance. In the burn population the sensitivity of electronic surveillance for CAUTI was 66.66%, specificity 96.5%, false-positive rate 3.44%, false-negative rate 33%; and for CLABSI the sensitivity was 100%, specificity 95%, false-positive rate 4.96%, false-negative rate 0%. In the nonburn population the sensitivity for CAUTI was 50%, specificity 97.9%, false-positive rate 2%, and false-negative rate 30%; and for CLABSI sensitivity was 60%, specificity 98.8%, false-positive rate 1%, and false-negative rate 60%. Burn centers may experience a higher false-positive rate for electronic surveillance of CLABSI and CAUTI than other critical care units.

  3. [Risk factors for nosocomial infection in a level III Neonatal Intensive Care Unit].

    PubMed

    García, Heladia; Torres-Gutiérrez, Javier; Peregrino-Bejarano, Leoncio; Cruz-Castañeda, Marco Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Nosocomial infections are a major and a frequent problem in neonatal intensive care units and increase morbidity, mortality, and costs. The objective of this study was to identify the risk factors associated with nosocomial infections in a neonatal intensive care unit. Nested case control study. Records from patients were registered: gestational age, sex, birth weight, central venous catheter and other devices, congenital malformations, surgeries, mechanical ventilation, steroid use, H2 blockers, length of stay in neonatal intensive care unit, type of infection, and etiological agent. We studied 188 cases with nosocomial infections and 192 controls without nosocomial infections. The most frequent infection was sepsis (34.8%) and coagulase negative Staphylococcus was the principal etiological agent (37.2%). The risk factors associated with nosocomial infection were central venous catheter (OR: 7.3; 95% CI: 2.3-22.8), duration of neonatal intensive care unit stay>14 days (OR: 3.4; 95% CI: 1.7-6.7), H2 blockers (OR: 2.3; 95% CI: 1.2-4.2), number of surgeries≥2 (OR: 3; 95% CI: 1.1-7.9) and mechanical ventilation>7 days (OR: 2.1; 95% CI: 1.1-4.2). Some risk factors associated to nosocomial infections in this study are similar to those found previously, with the exception of the number of surgeries that was not reported in previous studies.

  4. Secular trends in nosocomial bloodstream infections: antibiotic-resistant bacteria increase the total burden of infection.

    PubMed

    Ammerlaan, H S M; Harbarth, S; Buiting, A G M; Crook, D W; Fitzpatrick, F; Hanberger, H; Herwaldt, L A; van Keulen, P H J; Kluytmans, J A J W; Kola, A; Kuchenbecker, R S; Lingaas, E; Meessen, N; Morris-Downes, M M; Pottinger, J M; Rohner, P; dos Santos, R P; Seifert, H; Wisplinghoff, H; Ziesing, S; Walker, A S; Bonten, M J M

    2013-03-01

    It is unknown whether rising incidence rates of nosocomial bloodstream infections (BSIs) caused by antibiotic-resistant bacteria (ARB) replace antibiotic-susceptible bacteria (ASB), leaving the total BSI rate unaffected. We investigated temporal trends in annual incidence densities (events per 100 000 patient-days) of nosocomial BSIs caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), ARB other than MRSA, and ASB in 7 ARB-endemic and 7 ARB-nonendemic hospitals between 1998 and 2007. 33 130 nosocomial BSIs (14% caused by ARB) yielded 36 679 microorganisms. From 1998 to 2007, the MRSA incidence density increased from 0.2 to 0.7 (annual increase, 22%) in ARB-nonendemic hospitals, and from 3.1 to 11.7 (annual increase, 10%) in ARB-endemic hospitals (P = .2), increasing the incidence density difference between ARB-endemic and ARB-nonendemic hospitals from 2.9 to 11.0. The non-MRSA ARB incidence density increased from 2.8 to 4.1 (annual increase, 5%) in ARB-nonendemic hospitals, and from 1.5 to 17.4 (annual increase, 22%) in ARB-endemic hospitals (P < .001), changing the incidence density difference from -1.3 to 13.3. Trends in ASB incidence densities were similar in both groups (P = .7). With annual increases of 3.8% and 5.4% of all nosocomial BSIs in ARB-nonendemic and ARB-endemic hospitals, respectively (P < .001), the overall incidence density difference of 3.8 increased to 24.4. Increased nosocomial BSI rates due to ARB occur in addition to infections caused by ASB, increasing the total burden of disease. Hospitals with high ARB infection rates in 2005 had an excess burden of BSI of 20.6 per 100 000 patient-days in a 10-year period, mainly caused by infections with ARB.

  5. Factors associated with nosocomial surgical-site infections for craniotomy in Mexico City hospitals.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Arenas, Rosalinda; Rivera-García, Blanca Elsa; Grijalva-Otero, Israel; Juárez-Cedillo, Teresa; Martínez-García, María del Carmen; Rangel-Frausto, Sigfrido

    2010-01-01

    Nosocomial surgical-site infection (NSSI) after craniotomy is responsible for an increase in deaths and/or disabilities that affect quality of life. It is necessary to identify factors to be included in an index for their control. The aim of this study was to a) identify intrinsic and extrinsic factors associated with NSSI after craniotomy and b) obtain the infection risk attributed to both intrinsic and extrinsic factors as well as to compare their predictive capability with the NNISS (National Nosocomial Infection Surveillance System) index. A case-control study was conducted during a 2-year period in patients who underwent craniotomy in hospitals affiliated with the Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social. Patients were selected according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention criteria for NSSI. During the study period 737 craniotomies were performed, 41 of which presented with NSSI. Intrinsic factors associated with NSSI were the presence of chronic diseases (OR = 2.18) and craniotomy due to nontraumatic causes (OR = 1.87), whereas extrinsic factors were procedures performed during the late shift (OR = 2.6) and another surgery at the same surgical site (OR = 5.2). These factors comprised the index with intrinsic and extrinsic factors. Extrinsic factors were 1.7 times higher than intrinsic factors, in addition to having a larger area under the ROC curve (0.731). The risk obtained with the NNISS index for patients who had one factor was 1.5, whereas that for patients who had two or three factors was 4.7. In the studied population, patients who underwent a craniotomy with extrinsic factors showed a higher association with NSSI.

  6. Nontraumatic pneumocephalus due to nosocomial Enterobacter cloacae infection.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Chin-Chi; Wang, Jann-Yuan; Chien, Jung-Yien; Chen, Ya-Fang; Wu, Vin-Cent; Tsai, Ching-Wei; Hwang, Juey-Jen

    2010-01-01

    Nosocomial meningitis is rare, and routine cerebrospinal fluid study is seldom recommended for hospitalized patients with fever and acute delirium. We present a case of Enterobacter cloacae meningitis complicated with a nontraumatic pneumocephalus. Maintaining a high index of suspicion of nosocomial meningitis is crucial in patients with acute delirium and multiple underlying comorbid conditions.

  7. Bacillus cereus nosocomial infection from reused towels in Japan.

    PubMed

    Dohmae, S; Okubo, T; Higuchi, W; Takano, T; Isobe, H; Baranovich, T; Kobayashi, S; Uchiyama, M; Tanabe, Y; Itoh, M; Yamamoto, T

    2008-08-01

    It was noticed that there was an increase in Bacillus cereus nosocomial infections in the summer from 2000 to 2005. In 2005, five bloodstream infections occurred in five patients related to catheter use. The causative strains were distinct from each other and belonged to novel multilocus sequence types (ST): ST365, ST366, ST367 and ST368. Two ST365 strains from two patients were further distinguished by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. B. cereus contamination was observed with reused (dried and steamed) towels (>10(6)cfu/towel) and washing machines in hospital linen rooms. B. cereus strains from towels belonged to ST167, ST365, ST380 and ST382, and a proportion of these were the same, or similar, to strains from patients. All the hospital strains of B. cereus were distinct from those from food-poisoning strains (ST26, ST142, ST381). Ciprofloxacin resistance was observed only in hospital strains. Neither emetic toxin nor cytotoxin K gene, usually present in food poisoning strains, were found in the hospital strains, except for one patient isolate. The data suggest that specific B. cereus strains are circulating within a hospital, with genotypes, antibiotic susceptibilities and virulence gene patterns generally distinct from those of food poisoning, and that in Japan, towels are an important source of contamination, especially in summer.

  8. Nosocomial Infections among Pediatric Patients with Neoplastic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Oberdorfer, Peninnah; Pongwilairat, Natthida; Washington, Charles H.

    2009-01-01

    Background. Pediatric patients with neoplastic diseases are more likely to develop nosocomial infections (NIs). NIs may prolong their hospital stay, and increase morbidity and mortality. Objectives. The objectives of this study were to determine: (1) the incidence of NIs, (2) sites of NIs, (3) causal organisms, and (4) outcomes of NIs among pediatric patients with neoplastic diseases. Methods. This study was a prospective cohort study of pediatric patients with neoplastic diseases who were admitted to the Chiang Mai University Hospital, Thailand. Results. A total of 707 pediatric patients with neoplastic diseases were admitted. Forty-six episodes of NIs in 30 patients were reported (6.5 NIs/100 admission episodes and 7 NIs/1000 days of hospitalization). Patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia had the highest number of NIs (41.3%). The most common causal organisms were gram-negative bacteria (47.1%). Patients who had undergone invasive procedures were more likely to develop NIs than those who had not (P < .05). The mortality rate of patients with NIs was 19.6%. Conclusion. Pediatric patients with neoplastic diseases are more likely to develop NIs after having undergone invasive procedures. Pediatricians should be aware of this and strictly follow infection control guidelines in order to reduce morbidity and mortality rates related to NIs. PMID:20049342

  9. Nosocomial Infections among Pediatric Patients with Neoplastic Diseases.

    PubMed

    Oberdorfer, Peninnah; Pongwilairat, Natthida; Washington, Charles H

    2009-01-01

    Background. Pediatric patients with neoplastic diseases are more likely to develop nosocomial infections (NIs). NIs may prolong their hospital stay, and increase morbidity and mortality. Objectives. The objectives of this study were to determine: (1) the incidence of NIs, (2) sites of NIs, (3) causal organisms, and (4) outcomes of NIs among pediatric patients with neoplastic diseases. Methods. This study was a prospective cohort study of pediatric patients with neoplastic diseases who were admitted to the Chiang Mai University Hospital, Thailand. Results. A total of 707 pediatric patients with neoplastic diseases were admitted. Forty-six episodes of NIs in 30 patients were reported (6.5 NIs/100 admission episodes and 7 NIs/1000 days of hospitalization). Patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia had the highest number of NIs (41.3%). The most common causal organisms were gram-negative bacteria (47.1%). Patients who had undergone invasive procedures were more likely to develop NIs than those who had not (P < .05). The mortality rate of patients with NIs was 19.6%. Conclusion. Pediatric patients with neoplastic diseases are more likely to develop NIs after having undergone invasive procedures. Pediatricians should be aware of this and strictly follow infection control guidelines in order to reduce morbidity and mortality rates related to NIs.

  10. Nosocomial hepatitis A infection in a paediatric intensive care unit.

    PubMed Central

    Drusin, L M; Sohmer, M; Groshen, S L; Spiritos, M D; Senterfit, L B; Christenson, W N

    1987-01-01

    Seven members of staff in a paediatric intensive care unit and two of their relatives developed hepatitis A over a period of five days. A 13 year old boy who was incontinent of faeces prior to his death, was presumed to be the source of infection. Two hundred and sixty seven other members of staff underwent serological testing and were given prophylactic pooled gamma globulin. Twenty three per cent were immune before exposure. Of people born in the United States, those at highest risk of developing the disease are physicians, dentists, nurses and those under the age of 40. Of those born outside the United States, being white and under the age of 30 are the two main risk factors. Data from a questionnaire sent to 19 nurses at risk (six cases, 13 controls) suggested that sharing food with patients or their families, drinking coffee, sharing cigarettes and eating in the nurses' office in the intensive care unit were associated with an increased incidence of hepatitis. Nurses with three or four of these habits were at particular risk. The costs of screening and prophylaxis were US $64.72 per employee, while prophylaxis alone would have cost US $8.42 per employee. Assessing risk factors on the one hand and costs of prophylaxis on the other are important elements in the control of nosocomial infections. PMID:3632014

  11. Nosocomial bloodstream infections caused by Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae resistant to third-generation cephalosporins, Finland, 1999-2013: Trends, patient characteristics and mortality.

    PubMed

    Martelius, Timi; Jalava, Jari; Kärki, Tommi; Möttönen, Teemu; Ollgren, Jukka; Lyytikäinen, Outi

    2016-01-01

    Few systematically collected multi-centre surveillance data on nosocomial bloodstream infections (BSI) caused by extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) producing Escherichia coli or Klebsiella pneumoniae have been published. To evaluate trends, patient characteristics and mortality of such infections, nosocomial BSI data reported by the 4-17 hospitals participating in the prospective laboratory-based surveillance during 1999-2013 were analysed. Data were collected by local infection control nurses, patient-days were obtained from the hospital's administrative database, and dates of deaths from the population registry. Resistance to third-generation cephalosporins was further examined in the national reference laboratory. A total of 16 028 nosocomial BSIs were identified; 2217 (14%) were caused by E. coli and 661 (4%) by K. pneumoniae; 207 (7%) were non-susceptible to third-generation cephalosporins, with an increasing trend from 0% in 1999 to 17% in 2013. Patient characteristics did not differ significantly between BSIs caused by third-generation susceptible and resistant E. coli and K. pneumonia, but the case fatality tended to be higher. Most (88%) of the isolates reported as non-susceptible to third-generation cephalosporins had ESBL phenotype, CTX-M (79%) being the most common enzyme. A sharp increase in nosocomial BSIs caused by ESBL producing bacteria was observed. Identification of patients for screening pose a challenge, emphasising the role of infection control guidelines and antibiotic policy in prevention.

  12. Induction of human plasmablasts during infection with antibiotic-resistant nosocomial bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Band, Victor I.; Ibegbu, Chris; Kaur, Surinder Pal; Cagle, Stephanie M.; Trible, Ronald; Jones, Crystal L.; Wang, Yun F.; Kraft, Colleen S.; Ray, Susan M.; Wrammert, Jens; Weiss, David S.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Nosocomial pathogens such as Acinetobacter baumannii are a growing public health threat, due in part to their increasing resistance to antibiotics. Since some strains are resistant to all available antibiotics, novel therapies are urgently needed. Plasmablasts are short-lived B cells found in the blood that can be collected and harnessed to produce therapeutic antibodies. We set out to determine whether plasmablasts are induced during infection with A. baumannii and other nosocomial pathogens. Methods We obtained blood samples from patients infected with antibiotic-resistant nosocomial pathogens, and analysed their plasmablast response by flow cytometry. Results We observed a strong induction of plasmablasts in patients with antibiotic-resistant A. baumannii infection. Furthermore, plasmablasts were also induced in response to other drug-resistant nosocomial pathogens. Conclusions These data suggest that plasmablasts may be broadly harnessed to develop therapeutic antibodies to combat otherwise untreatable antibiotic-resistant infections. PMID:24583361

  13. A novel experience in the use of control charts for the detection of nosocomial infection outbreaks

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Isabel Cristina; Mingoti, Sueli Aparecida; Di Lorenzo Oliveira, Cláudia

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This study aims to compare different control charts to monitor the nosocomial infection rate per 1,000 patient-days. METHODS: The control charts considered in this study were the traditional Shewhart chart and a variation of this, the Cumulative Sum and Exponentially Weighted Moving Average charts. RESULTS: We evaluated 238 nosocomial infections that were registered in the intensive care unit and were detected by the Committee for Nosocomial Infection Control in a university hospital in Belo Horizonte, Brazil, in 2004 and 2005. The results showed that the traditional Shewhart chart was the most appropriate method for monitoring periods with large deviations, while the Exponentially Weighted Moving Average and Cumulative Sum charts were better for monitoring periods with smaller deviations of the mean infection rate. CONCLUSION: The ability to detect nosocomial outbreaks was improved by using the information provided by all three different control charts. PMID:22012038

  14. Pathway to Prevention of Nosocomial Clostridium difficile Infection.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, Ellie J C; Johnson, Stuart; Maziade, Pierre-Jean; McFarland, Lynne V; Trick, William; Dresser, Linda; Millette, Mathieu; Mazloum, Hadi; Low, Donald E

    2015-05-15

    To address the significant morbidity and mortality rates associated with nosocomial Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea (CDAD), a series of recommendations and a pathway to prevention were developed. An expert panel of infectious disease (ID) specialists participated in a modified Delphi process with specific objectives: (1) conduct a review for CDAD and prevention; (2) develop statements based upon panel members' opinions; (3) hold a panel meeting during the 2012 IDWeek; and (4) review the final recommendations and prevention pathway prior to submission for publication. The panel voted on (1) antibiotic stewardship (7 of 8 panelists); (2) reduction of other potentially modifiable risk factors (variable); (3) utilization of specific probiotics to prevent C. difficile overgrowth (8/8); (4) staff education regarding CDAD preventive measures (8/8); (5) appropriate hand hygiene for everyone (7/8); (6) environmental cleaning (8/8); (7) medical equipment disinfection (7/8); (8) early detection of CDAD in symptomatic patients (7/8); (9) usage of protective clothing/gloves (8/8); (10) proper measures during outbreak (8/8); and (11) surveillance to monitor efficacy data of preventive measures (8/8). The panel members agreed with 11 of 17 recommendations presented. The additional recommendations by the panel were proton pump inhibitor use as a risk factor and the use of adjunctive therapy with specific probiotic, as it was approved by Health Canada for the risk reduction of CDAD in hospitalized patients. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Prevalence of nosocomial infections in acute care hospitals in Catalonia (VINCat Program).

    PubMed

    Olona, Montserrat; Limón, Enric; Barcenilla, Fernando; Grau, Santiago; Gudiol, Francesc

    2012-06-01

    The first objective of the Catalonian Nosocomial Infection Surveillance Program (VINCat) is to monitor the prevalence (%) of patients with nosocomial infections (NI), patients undergoing urinary catheterization with closed circuit drainage (%) and patients undergoing antibiotic treatment (%). We present the results for the period 2008-2010. Comprehensive and point annual prevalence surveys were conducted that included conventionally hospitalized patients in acute care hospitals belonging to the VINCat Program. The number of participating hospitals was 46 (2008), 48 (2009) and 61 (2010), most belonging to the Network of Public Use Hospitals of Servei Català de la Salut. The results are presented globally and by hospital size (<200 beds, 200-500 beds, >500 beds). The prevalence of patients with active NI acquired during the current or the previous hospitalization (global NI/P%) was 7.6 (2008), 6.2 (2009) and 6.3 (2010). The prevalence of patients with active NI acquired during the current (actual NI/P%) was 6.2 (2008), 4.7 (2009) and 4.6 (2010).The results by hospital size shows that the variation occurred mainly in <200 beds hospitals. The proportion of closed circuit urinary catheterization use was 90.2%. The use of antibiotics varied between 34.6% and 37.6%, with no differences due to hospital size. The global prevalence of NI provides information on the burden of NI at the institutional and regional level. Between 17.3% and 26.9% of patients with NI at the time of the study had acquired it in a previous hospitalization at the same institution.

  16. Efficacy of an infection control programme in reducing nosocomial bloodstream infections in a Senegalese neonatal unit.

    PubMed

    Landre-Peigne, C; Ka, A S; Peigne, V; Bougere, J; Seye, M N; Imbert, P

    2011-10-01

    Neonatal nosocomial infections are public health threats in the developing world, and successful interventions are rarely reported. A before-and-after study was conducted in the neonatal unit of the Hôpital Principal de Dakar, Senegal to assess the efficacy of a multi-faceted hospital infection control programme implemented from March to May 2005. The interventions included clustering of nursing care, a simple algorithm for empirical therapy of suspected early-onset sepsis, minimal invasive care and promotion of early discharge of neonates. Data on nosocomial bloodstream infections, mortality, bacterial resistance and antibiotic use were collected before and after implementation of the infection control programme. One hundred and twenty-five infants were admitted immediately before the programme (Period 1, January-February 2005) and 148 infants were admitted immediately after the programme (Period 2, June-July 2005). The two groups of infants were comparable in terms of reason for admission and birth weight. After implementation of the infection control programme, the overall rate of nosocomial bloodstream infections decreased from 8.8% to 2.0% (P=0.01), and the rate of nosocomial bloodstream infections/patient-day decreased from 10.9 to 2.9/1000 patient-days (P=0.03). Overall mortality rates did not differ significantly. The proportion of neonates who received antimicrobial therapy for suspected early-onset sepsis decreased significantly from 100% to 51% of at-risk infants (P<0.001). The incidence of drug-resistant bacteria was significantly lower after implementation of the programme (79% vs 12%; P<0.001), and remained low one year later. In this neonatal unit, simple, low-cost and sustainable interventions led to the control of a high incidence of bacterial nosocomial bloodstream infections, and the efficacy of these interventions was long-lasting. Such interventions could be extended to other low-income countries. Copyright © 2011 The Healthcare Infection

  17. Fully Automated Surveillance of Healthcare-Associated Infections with MONI-ICU: A Breakthrough in Clinical Infection Surveillance.

    PubMed

    Blacky, A; Mandl, H; Adlassnig, K-P; Koller, W

    2011-01-01

    Expert surveillance of healthcare-associated infections (HCAIs) is a key parameter for good clinical practice, especially in intensive care medicine. Assessment of clinical entities such as HCAIs is a time-consuming task for highly trained experts. Such are neither available nor affordable in sufficient numbers for continuous surveillance services. Intelligent information technology (IT) tools are in urgent demand. MONI-ICU (monitoring of nosocomial infections in intensive care units (ICUs)) has been developed methodologically and practically in a stepwise manner and is a reliable surveillance IT tool for clinical experts. It uses information from the patient data management systems in the ICUs, the laboratory information system, and the administrative hospital information system of the Vienna General Hospital as well as medical expert knowledge on infection criteria applied in a multilevel approach which includes fuzzy logic rules. We describe the use of this system in clinical routine and compare the results generated automatically by MONI-ICU with those generated in parallel by trained surveillance staff using patient chart reviews and other available information ("gold standard"). A total of 99 ICU patient admissions representing 1007 patient days were analyzed. MONI-ICU identified correctly the presence of an HCAI condition in 28/31 cases (sensitivity, 90.3%) and their absence in 68/68 of the non-HCAI cases (specificity, 100%), the latter meaning that MONI-ICU produced no "false alarms". The 3 missed cases were due to correctable technical errors. The time taken for conventional surveillance at the 52 ward visits was 82.5 hours. MONI-ICU analysis of the same patient cases, including careful review of the generated results, required only 12.5 hours (15.2%). Provided structured and sufficient information on clinical findings is online available, MONI-ICU provides an almost real-time view of clinical indicators for HCAI - at the cost of almost no additional time

  18. [Nosocomial infections in long-term health care facilities].

    PubMed

    Serrano, Marcos; Barcenilla, Fernando; Limón, Enrique

    2014-03-01

    hospitals are not indicated. The epidemiological surveillance must adapt to clinical guidelines, with the registering of colonized and infected patients being mandatory, along with the coordination between health and social systems by applying global control programs. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. y Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  19. A systematic audit of economic evidence linking nosocomial infections and infection control interventions: 1990-2000.

    PubMed

    Stone, Patricia W; Larson, Elaine; Kawar, Lina Najib

    2002-05-01

    Nosocomial infections (NIs) are a serious patient safety issue. Infection control personnel are responsible for implementing interventions to reduce this risk. The purpose of this systematic review was to audit the published economic evidence of the attributable cost of NIs and interventions conducted by infection control professionals and to evaluate the methods used. Economic evaluation methodology and recommendations for standardization are reviewed. A search of MEDLINE and HealthSTAR with medical subject headings or text words "nosocomial infections," "infection control," or "hospital acquired infections" cross-referenced with "costs," "cost analysis," "economics," or "cost-effectiveness analysis" was conducted. Published review articles were also searched. Inclusion criteria included articles published between 1990 and 2000 that contained an abstract and original cost estimate and were written in English. Results were standardized into a common currency. Fifty-five studies were eligible. Approximately one quarter examined NIs in intensive care patients (n = 13). Most studies were conducted from the hospital perspective (n = 48). The costs attributable to bloodstream (mean = $38,703) and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infections (mean = $35,367) were the largest. Increased standardization and rigor are needed. Clinicians should partner with economists and policy analysts to expand and improve the economic evidence available to reduce hospital complications such as NI and other adverse patient/staff outcomes.

  20. [Study of the incidence and cost of nosocomial infections in general surgery].

    PubMed

    Ennigrou, S; Mokhtar, L; Ben Alaya, N; Dziri, C; Cherif, A; Najah, N; Ben Redjeb, S; Zouari, B

    2000-11-01

    Nosocomial infection incidence and its cost were study. We have identified 61 infected patients and 75 infectious episodes, is an incidence of 9.4% infected for 100 hospitalized by trimester. Operative site infections are the most frequent (60%), operative site infection (9.1%), inferior respiratory ways infections (2.2%). Incriminated germs are represented essentially by negative gram Bacillus (77.3%) with predominance of enterobacterias (59%). Invasive technique usage, surgery types and contamination classes have been identified as risk factors of nosocomial infection occurrence. The supplementary stay duration estimated by simple comparison between infected group and no-infected one is 9.3% days, responsible of an over cost of 336 TD by infected patient and 273 TD by infectious episode. The curative antibiotic costs have been estimated at 70 TD by infected patient being equivalent to two hospitalization days and to 57 TD by infectious episode.

  1. [Analysis of the nutritional status and nosocomial infection during chemoradiotherapy in advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma patients].

    PubMed

    Liu, Jie; Liao, Jianxuan; Yang, Qiao

    2014-02-01

    To analyze the nutritional status and nosocomial infection of nasopharyngeal carcinoma patients before and after the chemoradiotherapy treatment. An analysis was made for the nutritional and nosocomial infection status of 82 cases before and after chemoradiotherapy treatment. Statistically significant differences were revealed between indexes related with nutritional status such as body mass, hemoglobin, serum albumin before and after the treatment. Sixty-three patients occurred nosocomial infection. The infection rate was 76.83%. The main risk factor was oropharynx mucosal lesion and the rate is 92.68%. Isolates of 39 bacteria were found, of which Gram-negative organisms were 58.97%, Fungi were 30.77%, Gram-positive ones were 7.69%, Herpes zoster were 2.56%. Chemoradiotherapy has negative influence on nutritional status of patients. Medical personnel should pay attention to patients' nutritional status and do a good job of nutritional status monitoring, nutrition support, dieting guidance, reducing side effects, in order to improve the patient's tolerability and quality of life. The nosocomial infection rate of Gram-negative bacteria of oropharyngeal mucosal is the highest in patients with advanced nasopharyngeal cancer during chemoradiotherapy. It is very important for us to prevent and control nosocomial infection.

  2. Fact-finding Survey of Nosocomial Infection Control in Hospitals in Kathmandu, Nepal—A Basis for Improvement

    PubMed Central

    Ohara, Hiroshi; Pokhrel, Bharat M.; Dahal, Rajan K.; Mishra, Shyam K.; Kattel, Hari P.; Shrestha, Dharma L.; Haneishi, Yumiko; Sherchand, Jeevan B.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the actual conditions of nosocomial infection control in Kathmandu City, Nepal as a basis for the possible contribution to its improvement. The survey was conducted at 17 hospitals and the methods included a questionnaire, site visits and interviews. Nine hospitals had manuals on nosocomial infection control, and seven had an infection control committee (ICC). The number of hospitals that met the required amount of personal protective equipment preparation was as follows: gowns (13), gloves (13), surgical masks (12). Six hospitals had carried out in-service training over the past one year, but seven hospitals responded that no staff had been trained. Eight hospitals were conducting surveillance based on the results of bacteriological testing. The major problems included inadequate management of ICC, insufficient training opportunities for hospital staff, and lack of essential equipment. Moreover, increasing bacterial resistance to antibiotics was recognized as a growing issue. In comparison with the results conducted in 2003 targeting five governmental hospitals, a steady improvement was observed, but further improvements are needed in terms of the provision of high quality medical care. Particularly, dissemination of appropriate manuals, enhancement of basic techniques, and strengthening of the infection control system should be given priority. PMID:24155652

  3. Fact-finding Survey of Nosocomial Infection Control in Hospitals in Kathmandu, Nepal-A Basis for Improvement.

    PubMed

    Ohara, Hiroshi; Pokhrel, Bharat M; Dahal, Rajan K; Mishra, Shyam K; Kattel, Hari P; Shrestha, Dharma L; Haneishi, Yumiko; Sherchand, Jeevan B

    2013-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the actual conditions of nosocomial infection control in Kathmandu City, Nepal as a basis for the possible contribution to its improvement. The survey was conducted at 17 hospitals and the methods included a questionnaire, site visits and interviews. Nine hospitals had manuals on nosocomial infection control, and seven had an infection control committee (ICC). The number of hospitals that met the required amount of personal protective equipment preparation was as follows: gowns (13), gloves (13), surgical masks (12). Six hospitals had carried out in-service training over the past one year, but seven hospitals responded that no staff had been trained. Eight hospitals were conducting surveillance based on the results of bacteriological testing. The major problems included inadequate management of ICC, insufficient training opportunities for hospital staff, and lack of essential equipment. Moreover, increasing bacterial resistance to antibiotics was recognized as a growing issue. In comparison with the results conducted in 2003 targeting five governmental hospitals, a steady improvement was observed, but further improvements are needed in terms of the provision of high quality medical care. Particularly, dissemination of appropriate manuals, enhancement of basic techniques, and strengthening of the infection control system should be given priority.

  4. Evaluation of Nosocomial Infection in Patients at hematology-oncology ward of Dr. Sheikh children’s hospital

    PubMed Central

    Ghassemi, A; Farhangi, H; Badiee, Z; Banihashem, A; Mosaddegh, MR

    2015-01-01

    Background Infections in critical care unit are high, and they are serious hospital problems. Infections acquired during the hospital stay are generally called nosocomial infections, initially known as infections arising after 48 h of hospital admission. The mostfrequent nosocomial infections (urinary, respiratory, gastroenteritis and blood stream infection) were common in patients at hospital.The aim was to study, the current status of nosocomial infection, rate of infection among hospitalized children at hematology-oncology ward of Dr. Sheikh children’s hospital, Mashhad, Iran. Materials and Methods Data were collected from 200 patient's records presented with symptoms of nosocomial infection at hematology-oncology ward of Dr. Sheikh children’s hospital from March 2014 to September 2014. Descriptive statistics using percentage was calculated. Results Incidence of nosocomial infections inpatients athematology-oncology ward was 31% (62/200). Of which 69.35% (43/62) blood stream infection being the most frequent; followed by 30.64% (19/62) was urinary tract infection (UTI), and the most common blood culture isolate was been Staphylococcus epidermidis 18 (41.86%), andour study showed that large numbers ofnosocomial UTIs causing by Gram‑negative bacteria. Conclusion This study showed blood stream infection and UTI are the common nosocomial infections among patients athematology-oncology ward. Early recognition of infections and short term use of invasive devices along with proper infection control procedures can significantly decrease the incidence of nosocomial infections in patients. PMID:26985350

  5. Surveillance of surgical site infections: decade of experience at a Colombian tertiary care center.

    PubMed

    Arias, Cesar A; Quintero, Gustavo; Vanegas, Blanca E; Rico, Clara Luz; Patiño, Jose Felix

    2003-05-01

    A protocol for surveillance of surgical site infections (SSIs) was established in a tertiary care center in 1991 in Bogota, Colombia and followed for 10 years. Wounds were classified according to the Centers for Disease Control guidelines. The National Nosocomial Infection Surveillance and Study of the Efficacy of Nosocomial Infection Control scores for risk factors were included from June 1999. A total of 33027 surgical procedures were followed by the surveillance team. The overall infection rate was 2.6%. Most surgical procedures (70.6%) were classified as clean; 25.3%, 3.8%, and 0.26% were classified as clean/contaminated, contaminated, and dirty, respectively. Infection rates according to wound classification were 1.28%, 3.9%, 15.4%, and 38.4% for clean, clean/contaminated, contaminated, and dirty procedures, respectively. Escherichia coli and coagulase-negative staphylococci were the most frequently isolated microorganisms from SSI: 23.9% and 22.8% of isolates, respectively. A program of surveillance of SSIs has been successfully implemented in a country with limited resources and has maintained the infection rate within international standards.

  6. Prospective analysis of nosocomial infection rates, antibiotic use, and patterns of resistance in a burn population.

    PubMed

    Wibbenmeyer, Lucy; Danks, Roy; Faucher, Lee; Amelon, Marge; Latenser, Barbara; Kealey, G Patrick; Herwaldt, Loreen A

    2006-01-01

    Despite significant advances in burn care, infection remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality in burn patients. We sought to determine accurate infection rates, risk factors for infection, and the percentage of infections caused by resistant organisms. In addition, we attempted to identify interventions to decrease the use of antimicrobial drugs. Data were collected prospectively from 157 burn patients admitted to the University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine burn treatment center from October 2001 to October 2002. A research assistant reviewed the medical record for each patient identified by burn surgeons as being infected to determine whether these episodes met the infection control criteria for nosocomial infections. The infection control assessment agreed with the surgeon's assessment for 16.7% of the pneumonias, 70.0% of the burn wound infections, 57.1% of the urinary tract infections, and 70.0% of the bloodstream infections. By multiple logistic regression analysis, body surface area burned, comorbidities, and use of invasive devices were significantly related to acquisition of nosocomial infections as identified by both the burn surgeons and the infection control criteria. Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas were the most common resistant organisms identified. In our population, surgeons could decrease antimicrobial use by using explicit criteria for identifying patients with hospital-acquired infections, limiting perioperative prophylaxis to patients at highest risk of infection, and decreasing the incidence of nosocomial infection with reduced use of devices and strict adherence to aseptic technique.

  7. Nosocomial Infections Caused by Acinetobacter baumannii: Are We Losing the Battle?

    PubMed

    Protic, Dragana; Pejovic, Aleksa; Andjelkovic, Dragana; Djukanovic, Nina; Savic, Dragana; Piperac, Pavle; Markovic Denic, Ljiljana; Zdravkovic, Marija; Todorovic, Zoran

    2016-04-01

    The incidence of nosocomial infections caused by multi-drug- and extended-drug resistant strains of Acinetobacter is constantly increasing all over the world, with a high mortality rate. We analyzed the in-hospital data on the sensitivity of Acinetobacter baumannii isolates and correlated them with antibiotic treatment and clinical outcomes of nosocomial infections over a 17-mo period. Retrospective analysis was performed at the Clinical Center "Bezanijska kosa," Belgrade, Serbia. Microbiologic data (number and sensitivity of A. baumannii isolates) and clinical data (medical records of 41 randomly selected patients who developed nosocomial infection caused by A. baumannii) were matched. Acinetobacter baumannii, detected in 279 isolates and obtained from 19 patients (12% of all samples), was resistant to almost all antibiotics tested, including carbapenems, with the exception of colistin and tigecycline. It was obtained most often from the respiratory tract samples. Empiric treatment of the nosocomial infections (pneumonia in 75% of cases) involved cephalosporins, metronidazole, and carbapenems (80%, 66%, and 61% of patients, respectively), whereas tigecyclin and colistin were used primarily in targeted therapy (20% and 12% of patients, respectively). The mortality rate of patients treated empirically was significantly higher (p < 0.01), reaching 100% in the elderly. Nosocomial A. baumannii infections represent a significant clinical problem because of their high incidence, lack of susceptibility to the most commonly used antibiotics, and the often inappropriate treatment, which favors the development of multi-drug-resistant strains.

  8. [Water as a reservoir for nosocomial infections in health care facilities, prevention and control].

    PubMed

    Exner, M; Kramer, A; Kistemann, T; Gebel, J; Engelhart, S

    2007-03-01

    New epidemiological and microbiological investigations using molecular typing methods to link patient and environmental strains demonstrate a strong association between water-borne pathogens and nosocomial infections. Avoiding patient exposure to these pathogens results in a decreased incidence of water-borne nosocomial infections. There remains a tremendous potential to reduce hospital acquired infections previously viewed as inevitable and unavoidable through intervention and preventive measures. The characteristics of water application in health care facilities, the vulnerability of patients, the spectrum of relevant pathogens and their ecologic aspects, legal issues and important measures for prevention and control are discussed.

  9. Incidence and clinical implication of nosocomial infections associated with implantable biomaterials – catheters, ventilator-associated pneumonia, urinary tract infections

    PubMed Central

    Guggenbichler, Josef Peter; Assadian, Ojan; Boeswald, Michael; Kramer, Axel

    2012-01-01

    Health care associated infections, the fourth leading cause of disease in industrialised countries, are a major health issue. One part of this condition is based on the increasing insertion and implantation of prosthetic medical devices, since presence of a foreign body significantly reduces the number of bacteria required to produce infection. The most significant hospital-acquired infections, based on frequency and potential severity, are those related to procedures e.g. surgical site infections and medical devices, including urinary tract infection in catheterized patients, pneumonia in patients intubated on a ventilator and bacteraemia related to intravascular catheter use. At least half of all cases of nosocomial infections are associated with medical devices. Modern medical and surgical practices have increasingly utilized implantable medical devices of various kinds. Such devices may be utilized only short-time or intermittently, for months, years or permanently. They improve the therapeutic outcome, save human lives and greatly enhance the quality of life of these patients. However, plastic devices are easily colonized with bacteria and fungi, able to be colonized by microorganisms at a rate of up to 0.5 cm per hour. A thick biofilm is formed within 24 hours on the entire surface of these plastic devices once inoculated even with a small initial number of bacteria. The aim of the present work is to review the current literature on causes, frequency and preventive measures against infections associated with intravascular devices, catheter-related urinary tract infection, ventilator-associated infection, and infections of other implantable medical devices. Raising awareness for infection associated with implanted medical devices, teaching and training skills of staff, and establishment of surveillance systems monitoring device-related infection seem to be the principal strategies used to achieve reduction and prevention of such infections. The intelligent use

  10. Incidence and clinical implication of nosocomial infections associated with implantable biomaterials - catheters, ventilator-associated pneumonia, urinary tract infections.

    PubMed

    Guggenbichler, Josef Peter; Assadian, Ojan; Boeswald, Michael; Kramer, Axel

    2011-01-01

    Health care associated infections, the fourth leading cause of disease in industrialised countries, are a major health issue. One part of this condition is based on the increasing insertion and implantation of prosthetic medical devices, since presence of a foreign body significantly reduces the number of bacteria required to produce infection. The most significant hospital-acquired infections, based on frequency and potential severity, are those related to procedures e.g. surgical site infections and medical devices, including urinary tract infection in catheterized patients, pneumonia in patients intubated on a ventilator and bacteraemia related to intravascular catheter use. At least half of all cases of nosocomial infections are associated with medical devices.Modern medical and surgical practices have increasingly utilized implantable medical devices of various kinds. Such devices may be utilized only short-time or intermittently, for months, years or permanently. They improve the therapeutic outcome, save human lives and greatly enhance the quality of life of these patients. However, plastic devices are easily colonized with bacteria and fungi, able to be colonized by microorganisms at a rate of 0.5 cm per hour. A thick biofilm is formed within 24 hours on the entire surface of these plastic devices once inoculated even with a small initial number of bacteria.The aim of the present work is to review the current literature on causes, frequency and preventive measures against infections associated with intravascular devices, catheter-related urinary tract infection, ventilator-associated infection, and infections of other implantable medical devices. Raising awareness for infection associated with implanted medical devices, teaching and training skills of staff, and establishment of surveillance systems monitoring device-related infection seem to be the principal strategies used to achieve reduction and prevention of such infections. The intelligent use of

  11. Multicenter study in Colombia: Impact of a multidimensional International Nosocomial Infection Control Consortium (INICC) approach on central line-associated bloodstream infection rates.

    PubMed

    Álvarez-Moreno, Carlos A; Valderrama-Beltrán, Sandra L; Rosenthal, Víctor D; Mojica-Carreño, Beatriz E; Valderrama-Márquez, Ismael A; Matta-Cortés, Lorena; Gualtero-Trujillo, Sandra M; Rodríguez-Peña, Jazmín; Linares-Miranda, Claudia J; Gonzalez-Rubio, Ángela P; Vega-Galvis, María C; Riaño-Forero, Iván; Ariza-Ayala, Beatriz E; García-Laverde, Germán; Susmann, Otto; Mancera-Páez, Oscar; Olarte, Narda; Rendón-Campo, Luis F; Astudillo, Yamileth; Trullo-Escobar, María Del Socorro; Orellano, Pablo W

    2016-11-01

    The objective of this study was to analyze the impact of a multidimensional infection control approach and the use of the International Nosocomial Infection Control Consortium (INICC) Surveillance Online System on central line-associated bloodstream infection (CLABSI) rates from June 2003-April 2010. We conducted a prospective, before-after surveillance study of 2,564 patients hospitalized in 4 adult intensive care units (ICUs) and 424 patients in 2 pediatric ICUs of 4 hospitals in 2 cities of Colombia. During baseline, we performed outcome surveillance of CLABSI applying the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Healthcare Safety Network definitions. During intervention, we implemented the INICC multidimensional approach and the ISOS, which included a bundle of infection prevention practice interventions, education, outcome surveillance, process surveillance, feedback on CLABSI rates and consequences, and performance feedback of process surveillance. Bivariate and multivariate regression analyses were performed using a logistic regression model to estimate the effect of the intervention on the CLABSI rate. The baseline rate of 12.9 CLABSIs per 1,000 central line (CL) days, with 3,032 CL days and 39 CLABSIs, was reduced to 3.5 CLABSIs per 1,000 CL days, with 3,686 CL days and 13 CLABSIs, accounting for a 73% CLABSI rate reduction (relative risk, 0.27; 95% confidence interval, 0.14-0.52; P=.002). Implementing the INICC multidimensional infection control approach for CLABSI prevention was associated with a significant reduction in the CLABSI rate of ICUs of Colombia. Copyright © 2016 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Nosocomial infections from contaminated endoscopes: a flawed automated endoscope washer. An investigation using molecular epidemiology.

    PubMed

    Alvarado, C J; Stolz, S M; Maki, D G

    1991-09-16

    Approximately 1 year after purchase of one manufacturer's automated endoscope washing machine, we began to detect heavy contamination of upper gastrointestinal (UGI) endoscopes cultured after cleaning and disinfection in the washer. During the first 6 months of 1988, 77% of surveillance cultures (20-mL flush through the biopsy channel) were positive for gram-negative bacilli (median concentration, 10(5) cfu/mL), most frequently Pseudomonas aeruginosa serotype 10. During the first 19 months of use of the washer, nosocomial post-UGI endoscopy colonization or infections with P. aeruginosa increased 36%. Investigations show that endoscope contamination derives from a flaw in the design of the EW-10 washer: the detergent holding tank, inlet water hose, and air vents cannot be reliably disinfected and contain heavy biofilms that recontaminate the machine after it has been disinfected, as specified by the manufacturer, with glutaraldehyde. Only by rinsing machine-cleansed endoscopes with 70% alcohol followed by forced air drying has reliable disinfection been achieved. Since adaptation of terminal alcohol treatment and drying, post-UGI endoscopy colonization or infection by P. aeruginosa has declined threefold (p less than 0.001). Testing in other centers using the manufacturer's EW-10 or EW-20 washer has shown similar contamination. In three centers, including our own, postendoscopy infections by machine-associated type 10 P. aeruginosa have been confirmed by demonstrating concordance between isolates from contaminated machines or endoscopes and from infected patients by immunoblot of whole cell lysates and by pulsed-field electrophoresis of DraI endonuclease-digested genomic DNA. This problem reaffirms the vulnerability to microbial contamination of water-containing apparatus and equipment in patient care and points up the critical importance of engineering design to prevent contamination.

  13. A nosocomial epidemic model with infection of patients due to contaminated rooms.

    PubMed

    Browne, Cameron; Webb, Glenn F

    2015-08-01

    A model of epidemic bacterial infections in hospitals is developed. The model incorporates the infection of patients and the contamination of healthcare workers due to environmental causes. The model is analyzed with respect to the asymptotic behavior of solutions. The model is interpreted to provide insight for controlling these nosocomial epidemics.

  14. Impact of a surgical site infection (SSI) surveillance program in orthopedics and traumatology.

    PubMed

    Mabit, C; Marcheix, P S; Mounier, M; Dijoux, P; Pestourie, N; Bonnevialle, P; Bonnomet, F

    2012-10-01

    Surveillance of surgical site infections (SSI) is a priority. One of the fundamental principles for the surveillance of SSI is based on receiving effective field feedback (retro-information). The aim of this study was to report the results of a program of SSI surveillance and validate the hypothesis that there is a correlation between creating a SSI surveillance program and a reduction in SSI. The protocol was based on the weekly collection of surveillance data obtained directly from the different information systems in different departments. A delay of 3 months was established before extraction and analysis of data and information from the surgical teams. The NNIS index (National Nosocomial Infections Surveillance System) developed by the American surveillance system and the reduction of length of hospital stay index Journées d'hospitalisation évitées (JHE). Since the end of 2009, 7156 surgical procedures were evaluated (rate of inclusion 97.3%), and 84 SSI were registered with a significant decrease over time from 1.86% to 0.66%. A total of 418 days of hospitalization have been saved since the beginning of the surveillance system. Our surveillance system has three strong points: follow-up is continuous, specifically adapted to orthopedic traumatology and nearly exhaustive. The extraction of data directly from hospital information systems effectively improves the collection of data on surgical procedures. The implementation of a SSI surveillance protocol reduces SSI. Level III. Prospective study. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Surveillance of hospital-acquired infections in Australia--One Nation, Many States.

    PubMed

    Richards, Michael J; Russo, Phillip L

    2007-06-01

    Surveillance programmes for hospital-acquired infections differ amongst the Australian states. Victoria, New South Wales, Queensland and South Australia have recent substantial initiatives in development of statewide programmes. Whilst the definitions for surgical site infections (SSIs) and bloodstream infections (BSI) developed by the Australian Infection Control Association (AICA) do not differ from the US National Nosocomial Infection Surveillance (NNIS) programme definitions for SSI and intensive care unit (ICU) acquired central line-associated BSI, only two states use NNIS risk adjustment methods in reporting infection rates. Differences exist in the surgical procedures under surveillance, ICU surveillance, hospital-wide BSI surveillance, staff health immunization surveillance, process measures such us surgical antibiotic prophylaxis and small hospital programmes. Only in the area of antibiotic use surveillance has national consensus been reached. In Victoria, NNIS risk adjustment had limited usefulness in predicting SSIs, especially after coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery. Ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) surveillance had limited acceptance, and is not undertaken in other states. Regular reporting of surgical antibiotic prophylaxis data has been followed by improvement in choice of antibiotic in some procedures. The South Australian programme for the surveillance of multiresistant organisms (MROs) has documented substantial improvement in meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) morbidity over time coincident with the introduction of hand hygiene programmes and other measures. In Queensland, statewide monitoring of needlestick injuries is established. In Victoria, the small hospital programme concentrated on process measures, and in Queensland with a standardized investigation pathways for "signal" events. Data quality presented substantial challenges in small Victorian hospitals. Whilst state-based programmes have facilitated

  16. [Epidemiology of nosocomial infections in a neonatal intensive care unit].

    PubMed

    García, Heladia; Martínez-Muñoz, Angeles Nahima; Peregrino-Bejarano, Leoncio

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCCIÓN: el recién nacido hospitalizado en una unidad de cuidados intensivos tiene alto riesgo de desarrollar una infección nosocomial. El objetivo de este estudio fue registrar la incidencia y el tipo de infecciones nosocomiales, los microorganismos aislados y el perfil de susceptibilidad de estos en recién nacidos atendidos en una unidad de cuidados intensivos neonatales. MÉTODOS: se llevó a cabo un estudio descriptivo prospectivo longitudinal durante un año. De 113 recién nacidos que presentaron infección nosocomial, se registraron variables demográficas, uso de antibióticos antes del ingreso y de catéter venoso central, tipo de infección, microorganismo aislado y perfil de susceptibilidad.

  17. [Sensitivity to antibiotics of bacteria from nosocomial infections. Evolution in resuscitation services of military hospitals].

    PubMed

    Garrabé, E; Cavallo, J D; Brisou, P; Chapalain, J C; Coué, J C; Courrier, P; Granic, G; Hervé, V; Koeck, J L; Morillon, M; Claude, J D; Rouby, Y; Teyssou, R

    2000-09-23

    The aim of this study, conducted in the French Military hospitals, was to monitor the course of the antimicrobial sensibility of bacteria isolated from nosocomial infection in intensive care units. A prospective study has been conducted from January to December 1998 in all the intensive care units of the French Army. All the non-repetitive strains isolated from nosocomial infection were collected and sent to a reference centre. Antimicrobial susceptibility was determined by the agar dilution method. Beta-lactamase were identified by iso-electro-focalisation. Antibiotics choice and interpretative criteria were those of the "Comité Français de l'Antibiogramme de la Société Française de Microbiologie". A total of 849 strains are included in this study. Pseudomonas aeruginosa was the most frequently isolated bacterium (20%) followed by Escherichia coli (19%) Staphylococcus aureus (15%), coagulase-negative Staphylococci (CoNS) (11%) and Enterococci (7%). Imipenem was the most effective antibiotic against enterobacteriaceae (336 isolates; 100% susceptibility). Gentamicin (92%), amikacin (92%) third generation cephalosporins (83%), aztreonam (83%) and ciprofloxacin (78%) were also very effective. Resistance to III generation cephalosporins was correlated with an extended spectrum beta-lactamase (BLSE) in 36% of cases. This BLSE could be associated with an over production of the constitutive cephalosporinase. The most frequent species producing BLSE were Enterobacter aerogenes (75% of BLSE) and Klebsiella pneumoniae (17%). Among the 172 P. aeruginosa isolated, antimicrobial susceptibility were respectively: 71% for imipenem, 62%: tobramycin, 60%: amikacin 59%: ciprofloxacin 59% piperacillin + tazobactam, 55% piperacillin, 53%: ceftazidime and 44% for ticarcillin. Seventy per cent of the 96 CoNS and 50.2% of the 126 S. aureus isolated were resistant to methicillin. A strain of S. aureus and 2 CoNS strains had intermediate resistance to teicoplanin. Twenty per cent of

  18. Surgical site infections, International Nosocomial Infection Control Consortium (INICC) report, data summary of 30 countries, 2005-2010.

    PubMed

    Rosenthal, Victor D; Richtmann, Rosana; Singh, Sanjeev; Apisarnthanarak, Anucha; Kübler, Andrzej; Viet-Hung, Nguyen; Ramírez-Wong, Fernando M; Portillo-Gallo, Jorge H; Toscani, Jessica; Gikas, Achilleas; Dueñas, Lourdes; El-Kholy, Amani; Ghazal, Sameeh; Fisher, Dale; Mitrev, Zan; Gamar-Elanbya, May Osman; Kanj, Souha S; Arreza-Galapia, Yolanda; Leblebicioglu, Hakan; Hlinková, Soňa; Memon, Badaruddin A; Guanche-Garcell, Humberto; Gurskis, Vaidotas; Alvarez-Moreno, Carlos; Barkat, Amina; Mejía, Nepomuceno; Rojas-Bonilla, Magda; Ristic, Goran; Raka, Lul; Yuet-Meng, Cheong

    2013-06-01

     To report the results of a surveillance study on surgical site infections (SSIs) conducted by the International Nosocomial Infection Control Consortium (INICC).  Cohort prospective multinational multicenter surveillance study.  Eighty-two hospitals of 66 cities in 30 countries (Argentina, Brazil, Colombia, Cuba, Dominican Republic, Egypt, Greece, India, Kosovo, Lebanon, Lithuania, Macedonia, Malaysia, Mexico, Morocco, Pakistan, Panama, Peru, Philippines, Poland, Salvador, Saudi Arabia, Serbia, Singapore, Slovakia, Sudan, Thailand, Turkey, Uruguay, and Vietnam) from 4 continents (America, Asia, Africa, and Europe).  Patients undergoing surgical procedures (SPs) from January 2005 to December 2010.  Data were gathered and recorded from patients hospitalized in INICC member hospitals by using the methods and definitions of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention National Healthcare Safety Network (CDC-NHSN) for SSI. SPs were classified into 31 types according to International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, criteria.  We gathered data from 7,523 SSIs associated with 260,973 SPs. SSI rates were significantly higher for most SPs in INICC hospitals compared with CDC-NHSN data, including the rates of SSI after hip prosthesis (2.6% vs. 1.3%; relative risk [RR], 2.06 [95% confidence interval (CI), 1.8-2.4]; P < .001), coronary bypass with chest and donor incision (4.5% vs. 2.9%; RR, 1.52 [95% CI, 1.4-1.6]; [P < .001); abdominal hysterectomy (2.7% vs. 1.6%; RR, 1.66 [95% CI, 1.4-2.0]; P < .001); exploratory abdominal surgery (4.1% vs. 2.0%; RR, 2.05 [95% CI, 1.6-2.6]; P < .001); ventricular shunt, 12.9% vs. 5.6% (RR, 2.3 [95% CI, 1.9-2.6]; P < .001, and others.  SSI rates were higher for most SPs in INICC hospitals compared with CDC-NHSN data.

  19. Advances In Infection Surveillance and Clinical Decision Support With Fuzzy Sets and Fuzzy Logic.

    PubMed

    Koller, Walter; de Bruin, Jeroen S; Rappelsberger, Andrea; Adlassnig, Klaus-Peter

    2015-01-01

    By the use of extended intelligent information technology tools for fully automated healthcare-associated infection (HAI) surveillance, clinicians can be informed and alerted about the emergence of infection-related conditions in their patients. Moni--a system for monitoring nosocomial infections in intensive care units for adult and neonatal patients--employs knowledge bases that were written with extensive use of fuzzy sets and fuzzy logic, allowing the inherent un-sharpness of clinical terms and the inherent uncertainty of clinical conclusions to be a part of Moni's output. Thus, linguistic as well as propositional uncertainty became a part of Moni, which can now report retrospectively on HAIs according to traditional crisp HAI surveillance definitions, as well as support clinical bedside work by more complex crisp and fuzzy alerts and reminders. This improved approach can bridge the gap between classical retrospective surveillance of HAIs and ongoing prospective clinical-decision-oriented HAI support.

  20. [Mortality associated with nosocomial infection, occurring in a general hospital of Sumaré-SP, Brazil].

    PubMed

    Guimarães, Aline Caixeta; Donalisio, Maria Rita; Santiago, Thaiana Helena Roma; Freire, June Barreiros

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the socio-demographic profile, clinical procedures and etiology of nosocomial infection associated with deaths in the Hospital Estadual Sumaré, state of São Paulo, Brazil, from 2007 to 2008. The retrospective study of medical records (n = 133) revealed an average of 35 days of hospitalization. Most patients (97%) underwent some invasive procedure associated with nosocomial infection (p ≤ 0.05), including: 90 (67.7%) pneumonia, 62 (46.6%), urinary infections and 97 (73%) septicemia. Infection was the leading cause of death in 75 (56.4%) cases, with defined etiology in 110 (82.7%); 34 (30.9%) because of microorganisms that were multidrug-resistant. The most common was Staphylococcus aureus (25%), related to pneumonia and blood stream infection. The monitoring of hospital infection contributed to intervention at risk situation and death.

  1. Daily Bathing with Chlorhexidine and Its Effects on Nosocomial Infection Rates in Pediatric Oncology Patients.

    PubMed

    Raulji, Chittalsinh M; Clay, Kristin; Velasco, Cruz; Yu, Lolie C

    2015-01-01

    Infections remain a serious complication in pediatric oncology patients. To determine if daily bathing with Chlorhexidine gluconate can decrease the rate of nosocomial infection in pediatric oncology patients, we reviewed rates of infections in pediatric oncology patients over a 14-month span. Intervention group received daily bath with Chlorhexidine, while the control group did not receive daily bath. The results showed that daily bath with antiseptic chlorhexidine as daily prophylactic antiseptic topical wash leads to decreased infection density amongst the pediatric oncology patients, especially in patients older than 12 years of age. Furthermore, daily chlorhexidine bathing significantly reduced the rate of hospital acquired infection in patients older than 12 years of age. The findings of this study suggest that daily bathing with chlorhexidine may be an effective measure of reducing nosocomial infection in pediatric oncology patients.

  2. Photodynamic therapy as a novel antimicrobial strategy against biofilm-based nosocomial infections: study protocols.

    PubMed

    Giuliani, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    Hospital-acquired infections (HAIs), also known as nosocomial infections, are one of the most serious health-care issues currently influencing health-care costs. Among them, those sustained by microbial biofilm represent a major public health concern. Here, we describe the experimental protocols for microbial biofilm inactivation relying on antimicrobial photodynamic therapy (APDT) as a new strategy for the control of these kinds of infections.

  3. Seasonal prevalence of nosocomial Aeromonas hydrophila infection related to aeromonas in hospital water.

    PubMed

    Picard, B; Goullet, P

    1987-09-01

    A seasonal variation in nosocomial Aeromonas hydrophila infection was correlated with the number of aeromonas in the hospital water supply. The high summer prevalence of A. hydrophila infection coincided with periods when water counts from storage tanks were highest. The waterborne origin of these infections highlights the importance of maintaining clean water supplies, especially where storage tanks are used. Monitoring A. hydrophila in hospital water, particularly during the summer months, may prove helpful.

  4. Prevalence of nosocomial infections and anti-infective therapy in Benin: results of the first nationwide survey in 2012

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Data on nosocomial infections in hospitals in low-income countries are scarce and often inconsistent. The objectives of this study were to estimate the prevalence of nosocomial infections and antimicrobial drug use in Benin hospitals. Methods All hospitals were invited to participate in the first national point prevalence study conducted between 10–26 October 2012 using the protocol developed by the “Hospitals in Europe Link for Infection Control through Surveillance” (HELICS) project. Infection prevalence rates and the proportion of infected patients and exposure to antimicrobials were assessed. Results Overall, 87% (39/45) of hospitals participated. Of 3130 inpatients surveyed, 972 nosocomial infections were identified among 597 patients, representing an overall prevalence of infected patients of 19.1%. The most frequent infections were related to the urinary tract (48.2%), vascular catheter use (34.7%), and surgical site (24.7%). 64.6% of patients surveyed were treated with antibiotics, including a significant proportion (30%) of non-infected patients and a high proportion of self-medication (40.8%). Resistance of leading nosocomial pathogens to antimicrobials included methicillin-resistance (52.5%) among Staphylococcus aureus, vancomycin resistance among enterococci (67.5%), cefotaxime resistance among Escherichia coli (67.6%), and ceftazidime resistance among Acinetobacter baumannii (100%) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (68.2%). Conclusions Benin has high nosocomial infection rates and calls for the implementation of new national infection control policies. Patient safety education and training of all individuals involved in healthcare delivery will be critical to highlight awareness of the burden of disease. The high use of antimicrobials needs to be addressed, particularly their indiscriminate use in non-infected patients. PMID:24883183

  5. Induction of human plasmablasts during infection with antibiotic-resistant nosocomial bacteria.

    PubMed

    Band, Victor I; Ibegbu, Chris; Kaur, Surinder Pal; Cagle, Stephanie M; Trible, Ronald; Jones, Crystal L; Wang, Yun F; Kraft, Colleen S; Ray, Susan M; Wrammert, Jens; Weiss, David S

    2014-07-01

    Nosocomial pathogens such as Acinetobacter baumannii are a growing public health threat, due in part to their increasing resistance to antibiotics. Since some strains are resistant to all available antibiotics, novel therapies are urgently needed. Plasmablasts are short-lived B cells found in the blood that can be collected and harnessed to produce therapeutic antibodies. We set out to determine whether plasmablasts are induced during infection with A. baumannii and other nosocomial pathogens. We obtained blood samples from patients infected with antibiotic-resistant nosocomial pathogens, and analysed their plasmablast response by flow cytometry. We observed a strong induction of plasmablasts in patients with antibiotic-resistant A. baumannii infection. Furthermore, plasmablasts were also induced in response to other drug-resistant nosocomial pathogens. These data suggest that plasmablasts may be broadly harnessed to develop therapeutic antibodies to combat otherwise untreatable antibiotic-resistant infections. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Nosocomial Outbreak of Corynebacterium striatum Infection in Patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease▿

    PubMed Central

    Renom, Feliu; Garau, Margarita; Rubí, Mateu; Ramis, Ferran; Galmés, Antònia; Soriano, Joan B.

    2007-01-01

    We describe an unusual cluster of Corynebacterium striatum infections in 21 patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) admitted to a medium-size respiratory unit. Eleven isolates from eight patients occurred simultaneously within a month. C. striatum is a potentially pathogenic microorganism with the ability to produce nosocomial infectious outbreaks and respiratory colonization in patients with advanced COPD. PMID:17409213

  7. Use of temporary nursing staff and nosocomial infections in intensive care units.

    PubMed

    Bae, Sung-Heui; Brewer, Carol S; Kelly, Maureen; Spencer, Alexandra

    2015-04-01

    To examine the nature and prevalence of the use of temporary nursing staff in intensive care units and relationships between the use of temporary nursing staff and the occurrence of nosocomial infections (central line-associated blood stream infections and ventilator-associated pneumonia). Hiring temporary nurses raises controversial issues with respect to nurse staffing, care processes and patient outcomes, yet empirical findings regarding the use of temporary nurses are mixed. Whether adverse patient outcomes in intensive care units are related to the use of temporary nursing staff remains unexamined. A retrospective longitudinal design was used. Data were collected monthly from 12 intensive care units at six hospitals; 144 ICU-month data points were used for the analysis. Chi-square, anova and logit regression models were used to examine the research questions. The intensive care units used higher levels of temporary nursing staff, but the use of temporary nursing staff was not significantly associated with nosocomial infections. Nurses' perceptions regarding staffing and resource adequacy were significantly associated with nosocomial infections. No evidence was found to link the use of temporary nursing staff and nosocomial infections. Instead, nurses' perceptions of staffing adequacy were related to nosocomial infections. Given the greater use of temporary nursing staff in intensive care units, nurse managers in intensive care units need to monitor the levels of temporary nurse staffing and develop a systematic approach for hospitals to assist in these nurses' adjustment, which can reduce the burden of both temporary and permanent intensive care unit nurses. In addition to quantitative measures of nurse staffing, nurses' perceptions regarding staffing adequacy can be used to measure nurse staffing in relation to adverse patient outcomes. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Periprosthetic Infection following Primary Hip and Knee Arthroplasty: The Impact of Limiting the Postoperative Surveillance Period.

    PubMed

    Roth, Virginia R; Mitchell, Robyn; Vachon, Julie; Alexandre, Stéphanie; Amaratunga, Kanchana; Smith, Stephanie; Vearncombe, Mary; Davis, Ian; Mertz, Dominik; Henderson, Elizabeth; John, Michael; Johnston, Lynn; Lemieux, Camille; Pelude, Linda; Gravel, Denise

    2017-02-01

    BACKGROUND Hip and knee arthroplasty infections are associated with considerable healthcare costs. The merits of reducing the postoperative surveillance period from 1 year to 90 days have been debated. OBJECTIVES To report the first pan-Canadian hip and knee periprosthetic joint infection (PJI) rates and to describe the implications of a shorter (90-day) postoperative surveillance period. METHODS Prospective surveillance for infection following hip and knee arthroplasty was conducted by hospitals participating in the Canadian Nosocomial Infection Surveillance Program (CNISP) using standard surveillance definitions. RESULTS Overall hip and knee PJI rates were 1.64 and 1.52 per 100 procedures, respectively. Deep incisional and organ-space hip and knee PJI rates were 0.96 and 0.71, respectively. In total, 93% of hip PJIs and 92% of knee PJIs were identified within 90 days, with a median time to detection of 21 days. However, 11%-16% of deep incisional and organ-space infections were not detected within 90 days. This rate was reduced to 3%-4% at 180 days post procedure. Anaerobic and polymicrobial infections had the shortest median time from procedure to detection (17 and 18 days, respectively) compared with infections due to other microorganisms, including Staphylococcus aureus. CONCLUSIONS PJI rates were similar to those reported elsewhere, although differences in national surveillance systems limit direct comparisons. Our results suggest that a postoperative surveillance period of 90 days will detect the majority of PJIs; however, up to 16% of deep incisional and organ-space infections may be missed. Extending the surveillance period to 180 days could allow for a better estimate of disease burden. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2017;38:147-153.

  9. International Nosocomial Infection Control Consortium (INICC) report, data summary of 43 countries for 2007-2012. Device-associated module.

    PubMed

    Rosenthal, Víctor Daniel; Maki, Dennis George; Mehta, Yatin; Leblebicioglu, Hakan; Memish, Ziad Ahmed; Al-Mousa, Haifaa Hassan; Balkhy, Hanan; Hu, Bijie; Alvarez-Moreno, Carlos; Medeiros, Eduardo Alexandrino; Apisarnthanarak, Anucha; Raka, Lul; Cuellar, Luis E; Ahmed, Altaf; Navoa-Ng, Josephine Anne; El-Kholy, Amani Ali; Kanj, Souha Sami; Bat-Erdene, Ider; Duszynska, Wieslawa; Van Truong, Nguyen; Pazmino, Leonardo N; See-Lum, Lucy Chai; Fernández-Hidalgo, Rosalia; Di-Silvestre, Gabriela; Zand, Farid; Hlinkova, Sona; Belskiy, Vladislav; Al-Rahma, Hussain; Luque-Torres, Marco Tulio; Bayraktar, Nesil; Mitrev, Zan; Gurskis, Vaidotas; Fisher, Dale; Abu-Khader, Ilham Bulos; Berechid, Kamal; Rodríguez-Sánchez, Arnaldo; Horhat, Florin George; Requejo-Pino, Osiel; Hadjieva, Nassya; Ben-Jaballah, Nejla; García-Mayorca, Elías; Kushner-Dávalos, Luis; Pasic, Srdjan; Pedrozo-Ortiz, Luis E; Apostolopoulou, Eleni; Mejía, Nepomuceno; Gamar-Elanbya, May Osman; Jayatilleke, Kushlani; de Lourdes-Dueñas, Miriam; Aguirre-Avalos, Guadalupe

    2014-09-01

    We report the results of an International Nosocomial Infection Control Consortium (INICC) surveillance study from January 2007-December 2012 in 503 intensive care units (ICUs) in Latin America, Asia, Africa, and Europe. During the 6-year study using the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's (CDC) U.S. National Healthcare Safety Network (NHSN) definitions for device-associated health care-associated infection (DA-HAI), we collected prospective data from 605,310 patients hospitalized in the INICC's ICUs for an aggregate of 3,338,396 days. Although device utilization in the INICC's ICUs was similar to that reported from ICUs in the U.S. in the CDC's NHSN, rates of device-associated nosocomial infection were higher in the ICUs of the INICC hospitals: the pooled rate of central line-associated bloodstream infection in the INICC's ICUs, 4.9 per 1,000 central line days, is nearly 5-fold higher than the 0.9 per 1,000 central line days reported from comparable U.S. ICUs. The overall rate of ventilator-associated pneumonia was also higher (16.8 vs 1.1 per 1,000 ventilator days) as was the rate of catheter-associated urinary tract infection (5.5 vs 1.3 per 1,000 catheter days). Frequencies of resistance of Pseudomonas isolates to amikacin (42.8% vs 10%) and imipenem (42.4% vs 26.1%) and Klebsiella pneumoniae isolates to ceftazidime (71.2% vs 28.8%) and imipenem (19.6% vs 12.8%) were also higher in the INICC's ICUs compared with the ICUs of the CDC's NHSN.

  10. Epidemiological markers of Serratia marcescens isolates causing nosocomial infections in Spain (1981-1991).

    PubMed

    Boquete, T; Vindel, A; Martin-Bourgon, C; Azañedo, L; Sáez-Nieto, J A

    1996-12-01

    The distribution of epidemiological markers (serotyping and phage-typing) of Serratia marcescens isolates from nosocomial episodes (63 nosocomial cutbreaks with 475 isolates, and 1208 sporadic cases) received in our laboratory during the period 1981-1991 was studied. The records for 1683 isolates from Spanish hospitals have been analyzed. In relation with the sporadic cases, the predominant types were serotype O6 (13.4%) and serotype O14 (11.4%); polyagglutinable strains accounted for 15.6%; in outbreaks, type O14 is clearly predominant (27.4%). Phage-typing was a good secondary marker, with a 87.9% of typability; the number of lytic patterns was very high, extended patterns (six or more phages) being the most frequent. We have studied the characteristics of S. marcescens isolates causing infections in the nosocomial environment in Spain.

  11. Association of nosocomial infections with delayed cerebral ischemia in aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Foreman, Paul M; Chua, Michelle; Harrigan, Mark R; Fisher, Winfield S; Vyas, Nilesh A; Lipsky, Robert H; Walters, Beverly C; Tubbs, R Shane; Shoja, Mohammadali M; Griessenauer, Christoph J

    2016-12-01

    OBJECTIVE Delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI) is a recognized complication of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH) that contributes to poor outcome. This study seeks to determine the effect of nosocomial infection on the incidence of DCI and patient outcome. METHODS An exploratory analysis was performed on 156 patients with aSAH enrolled in the Cerebral Aneurysm Renin Angiotensin System study. Clinical and radiographic data were analyzed with univariate analysis to detect risk factors for the development of DCI and poor outcome. Multivariate logistic regression was performed to identify independent predictors of DCI. RESULTS One hundred fifty-three patients with aSAH were included. DCI was identified in 32 patients (20.9%). Nosocomial infection (odds ratio [OR] 3.5, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.09-11.2, p = 0.04), ventriculitis (OR 25.3, 95% CI 1.39-458.7, p = 0.03), aneurysm re-rupture (OR 7.55, 95% CI 1.02-55.7, p = 0.05), and clinical vasospasm (OR 43.4, 95% CI 13.1-143.4, p < 0.01) were independently associated with the development of DCI. Diagnosis of nosocomial infection preceded the diagnosis of DCI in 15 (71.4%) of 21 patients. Patients diagnosed with nosocomial infection experienced significantly worse outcomes as measured by the modified Rankin Scale score at discharge and 1 year (p < 0.01 and p = 0.03, respectively). CONCLUSIONS Nosocomial infection is independently associated with DCI. This association is hypothesized to be partly causative through the exacerbation of systemic inflammation leading to thrombosis and subsequent ischemia.

  12. Impact of International Nosocomial Infection Control Consortium (INICC) strategy on central line-associated bloodstream infection rates in the intensive care units of 15 developing countries.

    PubMed

    Rosenthal, Victor D; Maki, Dennis G; Rodrigues, Camila; Alvarez-Moreno, Carlos; Leblebicioglu, Hakan; Sobreyra-Oropeza, Martha; Berba, Regina; Madani, Naoufel; Medeiros, Eduardo A; Cuéllar, Luis E; Mitrev, Zan; Dueñas, Lourdes; Guanche-Garcell, Humberto; Mapp, Trudell; Kanj, Souha S; Fernández-Hidalgo, Rosalía

    2010-12-01

    The International Nosocomial Infection Control Consortium (INICC) was established in 15 developing countries to reduce infection rates in resource-limited hospitals by focusing on education and feedback of outcome surveillance (infection rates) and process surveillance (adherence to infection control measures). We report a time-sequence analysis of the effectiveness of this approach in reducing rates of central line-associated bloodstream infection (CLABSI) and associated deaths in 86 intensive care units with a minimum of 6-month INICC membership. Pooled CLABSI rates during the first 3 months (baseline) were compared with rates at 6-month intervals during the first 24 months in 53,719 patients (190,905 central line-days). Process surveillance results at baseline were compared with intervention period data. During the first 6 months, CLABSI incidence decreased by 33% (from 14.5 to 9.7 CLABSIs per 1,000 central line-days). Over the first 24 months there was a cumulative reduction from baseline of 54% (from 16.0 to 7.4 CLABSIs per 1,000 central line-days; relative risk, 0.46 [95% confidence interval, 0.33-0.63]; P < .001). The number of deaths in patients with CLABSI decreased by 58%. During the intervention period, hand hygiene adherence improved from 50% to 60% (P < .001); the percentage of intensive care units that used maximal sterile barriers at insertion increased from 45% to 85% (P < .001), that adopted chlorhexidine for antisepsis increased from 7% to 27% (P < .001), and that sought to remove unneeded catheters increased from 37% to 83% (P < .001); and the duration of central line placement decreased from 4.1 to 3.5 days (P < .001). Education, performance feedback, and outcome and process surveillance of CLABSI rates significantly improved infection control adherence, reducing the CLABSI incidence by 54% and the number of CLABSI-associated deaths by 58% in INICC hospitals during the first 2 years.

  13. Nosocomial infection control in healthcare settings: Protection against emerging infectious diseases.

    PubMed

    Fu, Chuanxi; Wang, Shengyong

    2016-04-12

    The Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) outbreak in Korea in 2015 may be attributable to poor nosocomial infection control procedures implemented. Strict infection control measures were taken in the hospital where an imported case with MERS was treated in southern China and 53 health care workers were confirmed to be MERS-CoV negative. Infection control in healthcare settings, in which patients with emerging infectious diseases such as MERS, Ebola virus disease, and the severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) are diagnosed and treated, are often imperfect. When it comes to emerging or unknown infectious diseases, before the imported case was finally identified or community transmission was reported, cases have often occurred in clusters in healthcare settings. Nosocomial infection control measures should be further strengthened among the workers and inpatients in designated healthcare settings that accommodate suspected cases suffering from emerging or unknown infectious diseases.

  14. [Investigation of the prevalence of nosocomial infection in a Tunisian regional hospital].

    PubMed

    Dridi, E; Chetoui, A; Zaoui, A

    2006-06-01

    control mechanism and insufficient surveillance of the prescriptions and the delivery of these antibiotics, which serves as an important factor which contributes to NI and the development of resistance to available treatment. The work attempts to underline the importance of such a study on NI for the development and improvement of the quality of care, most importantly because the occurrence of NI constitutes a public health problem, and this is related to both the high prevalence of NI and its human and economic costs. In spite of the deficiencies noted in the clinical diagnoses and most notably the microbiological diagnoses, nosocomial infections are present in our hospital with a prevalence of 13%.

  15. Nosocomial Infection in Adult Patients Undergoing Veno-Arterial Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Data on the frequency of nosocomial infections during extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) in adult populations remain scarce. We investigated the risk factors for nosocomial infections in adult patients undergoing venoarterial ECMO (VA-ECMO) support. From January 2011 to December 2015, a total of 259 patients underwent ECMO. Of these, patients aged 17 years or less and patients undergoing ECMO for less than 48 hours were excluded. Of these, 61 patients diagnosed with cardiogenic shock were evaluated. Mean patient age was 60.6 ± 14.3 years and 21 (34.4%) patients were female. The mean preoperative Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) score was 8.6 ± 2.2. The mean duration of ECMO support was 6.8 ± 7.4 days. The rates of successful ECMO weaning and survival to discharge were 44.3% and 31.1%, respectively. There were 18 nosocomial infections in 14 (23.0%) patients. These included respiratory tract infections in 9 cases and bloodstream infections in a further 9. In multivariate analysis, independent predictors of infection during ECMO were the preoperative creatinine level (hazard ratio [HR], 2.176; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.065–4.447; P = 0.033) and the duration of ECMO support (HR, 1.400; 95% CI, 1.081–1.815; P = 0.011). A higher preoperative creatinine level and an extended duration of ECMO support are risk factors for infection. Therefore, to avoid the development of nosocomial infections, strategies to shorten the length of ECMO support should be applied whenever possible. PMID:28244284

  16. Nosocomial Infection in Adult Patients Undergoing Veno-Arterial Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Gwan Sic; Lee, Kyo Seon; Park, Choung Kyu; Kang, Seung Ku; Kim, Do Wan; Oh, Sang Gi; Oh, Bong Suk; Jung, Yochun; Kim, Seok; Yun, Ju Sik; Song, Sang Yun; Na, Kook Joo; Jeong, In Seok; Ahn, Byoung Hee

    2017-04-01

    Data on the frequency of nosocomial infections during extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) in adult populations remain scarce. We investigated the risk factors for nosocomial infections in adult patients undergoing venoarterial ECMO (VA-ECMO) support. From January 2011 to December 2015, a total of 259 patients underwent ECMO. Of these, patients aged 17 years or less and patients undergoing ECMO for less than 48 hours were excluded. Of these, 61 patients diagnosed with cardiogenic shock were evaluated. Mean patient age was 60.6 ± 14.3 years and 21 (34.4%) patients were female. The mean preoperative Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) score was 8.6 ± 2.2. The mean duration of ECMO support was 6.8 ± 7.4 days. The rates of successful ECMO weaning and survival to discharge were 44.3% and 31.1%, respectively. There were 18 nosocomial infections in 14 (23.0%) patients. These included respiratory tract infections in 9 cases and bloodstream infections in a further 9. In multivariate analysis, independent predictors of infection during ECMO were the preoperative creatinine level (hazard ratio [HR], 2.176; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.065-4.447; P = 0.033) and the duration of ECMO support (HR, 1.400; 95% CI, 1.081-1.815; P = 0.011). A higher preoperative creatinine level and an extended duration of ECMO support are risk factors for infection. Therefore, to avoid the development of nosocomial infections, strategies to shorten the length of ECMO support should be applied whenever possible.

  17. Nosocomial infections in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infected and AIDS patients: major microorganisms and immunological profile

    PubMed Central

    Panis, C.; Matsuo, T.; Reiche, E.M.V.

    2009-01-01

    Antiretroviral therapy advances have proportioned to AIDS patients a survival increase. At the same time, the permanence of the seropositive people in the nosocomial environment becomes common not only by the adverse reactions caused by this therapy, but also by several opportunistic diseases that take them into and out of hospital environment. During the hospital permanence, the patients expose their impaired immune system to the nosocomial virulent microorganisms, and acquire destructive nosocomial infections that sometimes can be lethal. Among several hospital syndromes described, little is known about infections in immunocompromised patients and how their immune system is able to determine the course of the infection. The objective of this study was to describe the major microorganisms involved in the nosocomial infections of HIV-1 seropositive patients associated with their immunological status. The survey was carried out with the Hospital Infection Control Service records, from University Hospital, Londrina, Paraná, Southern of Brazil, during the period from July 2003 to July 2004. From all the cases studied (n=969), 24 patients (2.5%) had AIDS diagnosis and a half of them was women with the mean of CD4+ T cells counts of 158/mm3. The main topography of the infection was pulmonary (50.0%) and the main isolated microorganisms were Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli. A major incidence of infection was observed in patients with CD4+ T cells counts lower than 50/mm3. The study of the relationship between the impairment of the immune system and infectious agents could provide a better healthcare of people living with HIV/AIDS and advances into the nosocomial infection control systems. PMID:24031336

  18. Retrospective analysis of nosocomial infections in an Italian tertiary care hospital.

    PubMed

    Mancini, Alessio; Verdini, Daniele; La Vigna, Giorgio; Recanatini, Claudia; Lombardi, Francesca Elena; Barocci, Simone

    2016-07-01

    Nosocomial infections are one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality in hospitalized patients. Studies of their prevalence in single institutions can reveal trends over time and help to identify risk factors. The aim of this study was to investigate the nosocomial infections trend and identify the prevalence of predominant bacterial microorganisms and their drug resistance patterns in an Italian tertiary care hospital. Infections were classified according to the Centres for Disease Control and Prevention definitions. A retrospective study was carried out from March 2011 to June 2014, based on the bacterial isolate reports of a hospital located in Central Italy. During the 40-month study period, a total of 1547 isolates were obtained from 1046 hospitalized patients and tested for their antibiotic sensitivity. The most common isolates belonged to the Enterobacteriaceae family (61.7%), followed by Enterococcus species (12.4%), Pseudomonas species (10.7%) and S. aureus (10.0%). The incidence density rate of nosocomial infections was 7.4 per 1000 patient days, with a significant difference among the 3 annual infection rates (P<0.001). The highest infection prevalence rate was found in Internal Medicine Unit (41.3%), followed by Intensive Care Units (12.4%), Surgical Units (9.0%,) and Cardiology (7.1%).

  19. [Common antimicrobial-resistant bacteria in nosocomial infections in Taiwan and their prevention].

    PubMed

    Lin, Nien-Tsung

    2011-08-01

    Infections caused by antibiotic-resistant bacteria, especially multidrug-resistant strains (MDR) that cause difficulties in clinical treatment, have long been a problem of global concern. Drug-resistant strains of common nosocomial infections in Taiwan include Gram-positive coccal methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and vancomycin-resistant enterococci, and Gram-negative bacilli such as carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Klebsiella pneumoniae, among others. About 10 to 20% of Gram-negative bacteria that encode extended-spectrum β-lactamases are resistant to cephalosporin, a third generation antibiotic, and the fluoroquinolone-resistance rate has continued to increase in recent years. Despite the high mortality rate in patients with infections caused by MDR, the problem is still solvable by blocking or reducing MDR dissemination in addition to proper antibiotics use. Hand hygiene is the simplest, most effective measure for preventing nosocomial infections. However, healthcare workers' adherence to recommended hand hygiene practices is unacceptably low worldwide, making the promotion of hand hygiene a major challenge for infection control experts. Therefore, as a first step of preventing the spread of MDR bacteria, knowledge of hand hygiene and adherence to hand hygiene practices must be required of healthcare workers. Such should help reduce nosocomial infections significantly and upgrade healthcare quality.

  20. [Detection of nosocomial infections: a proposal of a protocol for a prospective study].

    PubMed

    Gallet, E; Le Coutour, X; Turrou, J; Noyer, V; Lechevalier, B; Charbonneau, P; Bazin, C

    1989-05-01

    If meant to be effective, the detection of nosocomial infections demands considering the means that should be used for a daily gathering of necessary complete information. An experiment led in a medical intensive care unit have suggested the elements of such a gathering work. This must be prospective and aimed to relate the frequency, more that the importance of nosocomial infections. It will be carried by a willing and specialized nurse, and will be limited to the necessary warning signs only. As a rule, the information linked to the infection causes will not be looked for. Finally, a special care will be given to ensure a good feedback to the clinician, which is the main purpose of that work. Yet, such an information gathering protocol has to be flexible, and it is even one of its survival conditions regarding the variety of means and requirements inherent of each department.

  1. Anti-infective antibodies: a novel tool to prevent and treat nosocomial diseases.

    PubMed

    Nagy, Eszter; Giefing, Carmen; von Gabain, Alexander

    2008-02-01

    The emergence of multidrug-resistant bacteria is a growing challenge for healthcare in the treatment of infectious diseases. In particular, nosocomial infections are getting out of control and reduce the likelihood to recover without, sometimes lethal, complications and long-term damage. Current antibiotics are unable to keep nosocomial infections in check and novel ones move only reluctantly forward and are expected to only delay the problem of multidrug resistance. Progress made in the identification of suitable pathogen targets, a better understanding of host-parasite interactions and the recent inclusion of monoclonal antibodies into the arsenal of novel therapies has provoked the interest to revitalize a historical concept of medicine to treat and prevent bacterial infections with antibodies.

  2. [The relationship between airborne colonization and nosocomial infections in intensive care units].

    PubMed

    Dürmaz, Gul; Kiremitçi, Abdurrahman; Akgün, Yurdanur; Oz, Yasemin; Kaşifoğlu, Nilgün; Aybey, Aşkin; Kiraz, Nuri

    2005-10-01

    The relationship between the airborne contaminants obtained from operating theatres and intensive care units and the colonizing and infecting microorganisms isolated from patients were investigated. Air samples were obtained with the biocollector air IDEAL (BioMerieux, France). During the study period (19 weeks), a total of 77 air samples and 870 clinical specimens (swabs from throat, nose, conjunctiva and skin) from 174 patients were collected weekly. Microorganisms were identified by using Vitek system (BioMerieux, France) and conventional methods. According to the criteria of Federal Standard 209E (FD 209E) on cleanrooms, the conventionally ventilated operating- and general surgery rooms, and the anesthesia intensive care unit have been ranked as less than class 3.5 and 3, respectively. The frequency of nosocomial infection related to air-colonization was higher in patients of anestesia intensive care unit (16.4%), than in those of general surgery intensive care unit (4.9%). In general surgery rooms and anesthesia intensive care unit, the most frequent air-colonization related nosocomial infections were surgical wound infections and bacteremia, respectively. The most frequently isolated microorganisms were methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and Acinetobacter baumannii. It can be concluded that, total number of airborne viable particles in the critical areas such as operating theatres and intensive care units, seems to be a significant risk factor for the development of nosocomial infections in immunocompromised patients.

  3. [Nosocomial infection in patients receiving a solid organ transplant or haematopoietic stem cell transplant].

    PubMed

    Moreno Camacho, Asunción; Ruiz Camps, Isabel

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial infections are the most common infections in solid organ transplant recipients. These infections occur mainly in the first month after transplantation and are hospital-acquired. Nosocomial infections cause significant morbidity and are the most common cause of mortality in this early period of transplantation. These infections are caused by multi-drug resistant (MDR) microorganisms, mainly Gram-negative enterobacteria, non-fermentative Gram-negative bacilli, enterococci, and staphylococci. The patients at risk of developing nosocomial bacterial infections are those previously colonized with MDR bacteria while on the transplant waiting list. Intravascular catheters, the urinary tract, the lungs, and surgical wounds are the most frequent sources of infection. Preventive measures are the same as those applied in non-immunocompromised, hospitalized patients except in patients at high risk for developing fungal infection. These patients need antifungal therapy during their hospitalization, and for preventing some bacterial infections in the early transplant period, patients need vaccinations on the waiting list according to the current recommendations. Although morbidity and mortality related to infectious diseases have decreased during the last few years in haematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients, they are still one of the most important complications in this population. Furthermore, as occurs in the general population, the incidence of nosocomial infections has increased during the different phases of transplantation. It is difficult to establish general preventive measures in these patients, as there are many risk factors conditioning these infections. Firstly, they undergo multiple antibiotic treatments and interventions; secondly, there is a wide variability in the degree of neutropenia and immunosuppression among patients, and finally they combine hospital and home stay during the transplant process. However, some simple measures could be

  4. The burden of nosocomial staphylococcus aureus bloodstream infection in South Korea: a prospective hospital-based nationwide study.

    PubMed

    Kim, Chung-Jong; Kim, Hong-Bin; Oh, Myoung-don; Kim, Yunhee; Kim, Arim; Oh, Sung-Hee; Song, Kyoung-Ho; Kim, Eu; Cho, Yong; Choi, Young; Park, Jinyong; Kim, Baek-Nam; Kim, Nam-Joong; Kim, Kye-Hyung; Lee, Eun; Jun, Jae-Bum; Kim, Young; Kiem, Sung; Choi, Hee; Choo, Eun; Sohn, Kyung-Mok; Lee, Shinwon; Chang, Hyun; Bang, Ji; Lee, Su; Lee, Jae; Park, Seong; Jeon, Min; Yun, Na

    2014-11-14

    We estimated the nationwide burden of nosocomial S. aureus bloodstream infection (SA-BSI), a major cause of nosocomial infection, in South Korea. To evaluate the nationwide incidence of nosocomial SA-BSI, cases of SA-BSI were prospectively collected from 22 hospitals with over 500 beds over 4?months. Data on patient-days were obtained from a national health insurance database containing the claims data for all healthcare facilities in South Korea. The additional cost of SA-BSI was estimated through a matched case?control study. The economic burden was calculated from the sum of the medical costs, the costs of caregiving and loss of productivity. Three hundred and thirty nine cases of nosocomial SA-BSI were included in the study: 254 cases of methicillin-resistant SA-BSI (MRSA-BSI) and 85 cases of methicillin-susceptible SA-BSI (MSSA-BSI). Death related to BSI occurred in 81 cases (31.9%) of MRSA-BSI and 12 cases (14.1%) of MSSA-BSI. The estimated incidence of nosocomial MRSA-BSI was 0.12/1,000 patient-days and that of nosocomial MSSA-BSI, 0.04/1,000 patient-days. The estimated annual cases of nosocomial BSI were 2,946 for MRSA and 986 for MSSA in South Korea. The additional economic burden per case of nosocomial SA-BSI was US $20,494 for MRSA-BSI and $6,914 for MSSA-BSI. Total additional annual cost of nosocomial SA-BSI was $67,192,559. In view of the burden of nosocomial SA-BSI, a national strategy for reducing nosocomial SA-BSI is urgently needed in South Korea.

  5. Nosocomial dermatitis caused by Dermanyssus gallinae.

    PubMed

    Bellanger, A P; Bories, C; Foulet, F; Bretagne, S; Botterel, F

    2008-03-01

    The mite Dermanyssus gallinae may cause pruritic dermatitis in humans. We describe a case of nosocomial infestation with D. gallinae from an abandoned pigeon nest suspended on the front wall of the Hôpital Henri Mondor near a window. Close surveillance and regular destruction of pigeon nests could prevent these incidents of infection in humans.

  6. [Antimicrobial resistance trends in pathogens isolated from nosocomial infections].

    PubMed

    Rincón-León, Héctor A; Navarro-Fuentes, Karla R

    2016-01-01

    Introducción: el tratamiento de las infecciones nosocomiales se dificulta por la tendencia al incremento de la resistencia a antimicrobianos de los gérmenes que las causan. El objetivo fue evaluar las tendencias en la resistencia de las bacterias de aislados de infección nosocomial. Métodos: estudio retrospectivo de 2009 a 2012 en un hospital de tercer nivel en Chiapas. Resultados: fueron obtenidos 1300 gérmenes, 62.3 % bacterias Gram negativas, 22.8 % Gram positivas y 14.9 % levaduras; Pseudomonas aeruginosa pasó del 47.1 al 60.5 % de resistencia a imipenem; Escherichia coli mostró un aumento en la resistencia a aztreonam, cefepime y ceftazidima; Acitenobacter baumannii incrementó su resistencia a amikacina, cefepime, ceftazidima y ciprofloxacino; Klebsiella pneumoniae disminuyó su resistencia a amikacina y piperacilina/tazobactam; la resistencia a vancomicina fue del 3.6 al 25.5 %. Conclusiones: predominaron los gérmenes Gram negativos y mostraron tendencias al incremento en la resistencia antimicrobiana. Hubo un aumento proporcional de la incidencia de infección por E. coli, Candida tropicalis y Staphylococcus haemolyticus. Es indispensable contar con planes y programas para el uso racional y basado en evidencia de antimicrobianos, así como la difusión y el apego a las guías de práctica clínica y la implementación de programas novedosos para la vigilancia y el control de las infecciones hospitalarias, las técnicas de aislamiento y los cuidados generales.

  7. Case-mix adjustment approach to benchmarking prevalence rates of nosocomial infection in hospitals in Cyprus and Greece.

    PubMed

    Kritsotakis, Evangelos I; Dimitriadis, Ioannis; Roumbelaki, Maria; Vounou, Emelia; Kontou, Maria; Papakyriakou, Panikos; Koliou-Mazeri, Maria; Varthalitis, Ioannis; Vrouchos, George; Troulakis, George; Gikas, Achilleas

    2008-08-01

    To examine the effect of heterogeneous case mix for a benchmarking analysis and interhospital comparison of the prevalence rates of nosocomial infection. Cross-sectional survey. Eleven hospitals located in Cyprus and in the region of Crete in Greece. The survey included all inpatients in the medical, surgical, pediatric, and gynecology-obstetrics wards, as well as those in intensive care units. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention criteria were used to define nosocomial infection. The information collected for all patients included demographic characteristics, primary admission diagnosis, Karnofsky functional status index, Charlson comorbidity index, McCabe-Jackson severity of illness classification, use of antibiotics, and prior exposures to medical and surgical risk factors. Outcome data were also recorded for all patients. Case mix-adjusted rates were calculated by using a multivariate logistic regression model for nosocomial infection risk and an indirect standardization method.Results. The overall prevalence rate of nosocomial infection was 7.0% (95% confidence interval, 5.9%-8.3%) among 1,832 screened patients. Significant variation in nosocomial infection rates was observed across hospitals (range, 2.2%-9.6%). Logistic regression analysis indicated that the mean predicted risk of nosocomial infection across hospitals ranged from 3.7% to 10.3%, suggesting considerable variation in patient risk. Case mix-adjusted rates ranged from 2.6% to 12.4%, and the relative ranking of hospitals was affected by case-mix adjustment in 8 cases (72.8%). Nosocomial infection was significantly and independently associated with mortality (adjusted odds ratio, 3.6 [95% confidence interval, 2.1-6.1]). The first attempt to rank the risk of nosocomial infection in these regions demonstrated the importance of accounting for heterogeneous case mix before attempting interhospital comparisons.

  8. Nosocomial Infections with IMP-19−Producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa Linked to Contaminated Sinks, France

    PubMed Central

    Amoureux, Lucie; Riedweg, Karena; Chapuis, Angélique; Bador, Julien; Siebor, Eliane; Péchinot, André; Chrétien, Marie-Lorraine; de Curraize, Claire

    2017-01-01

    We isolated IMP-19–producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa from 7 patients with nosocomial infections linked to contaminated sinks in France. We showed that blaIMP-19 was located on various class 1 integrons among 8 species of gram-negative bacilli detected in sinks: P. aeruginosa, Achromobacter xylosoxidans, A. aegrifaciens, P. putida, Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, P. mendocina, Comamonas testosteroni, and Sphingomonas sp. PMID:28098548

  9. Nosocomial Infection of Serratia marcescens May Induce a Protective Effect of Monkeys Exposed to Bacillus anthracis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-01-01

    African green monkeys (AGMs) had intravenous catheters implanted. One catheter was accidentally pulled out, leaving four AGMs with catheters and one...Five African green mon- keys (AGMs) had intravenous catheters implanted. One catheter was accidentally pulled out, leaving four AGMs with catheters and...JUN 2008 2. REPORT TYPE N/A 3. DATES COVERED - 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Nosocomial infection of Serratia marcescens may induce a protective

  10. Use of an artificial neural network to predict risk factors of nosocomial infection in lung cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jie; Pan, Qin-Shi; Hong, Wan-Dong; Pan, Jingye; Zhang, Wen-Hui; Xu, Gang; Wang, Yu-Min

    2014-01-01

    Statistical methods to analyze and predict the related risk factors of nosocomial infection in lung cancer patients are various, but the results are inconsistent. A total of 609 patients with lung cancer were enrolled to allow factor comparison using Student's t-test or the Mann-Whitney test or the Chi-square test. Variables that were significantly related to the presence of nosocomial infection were selected as candidates for input into the final ANN model. The area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve (AUC) was used to evaluate the performance of the artificial neural network (ANN) model and logistic regression (LR) model. The prevalence of nosocomial infection from lung cancer in this entire study population was 20.1% (165/609), nosocomial infections occurring in sputum specimens (85.5%), followed by blood (6.73%), urine (6.0%) and pleural effusions (1.82%). It was shown that long term hospitalization (≥ 22 days, P= 0.000), poor clinical stage (IIIb and IV stage, P=0.002), older age (≥ 61 year old, P=0.023), and use the hormones were linked to nosocomial infection and the ANN model consisted of these four factors .The artificial neural network model with variables consisting of age, clinical stage, time of hospitalization, and use of hormones should be useful for predicting nosocomial infection in lung cancer cases.

  11. Antimicrobial susceptibility pattern in nosocomial infections caused by Acinetobacter species in Asir Region, Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Abdalla, Nazar M; Osman, Amani A; Haimour, Waleed O; Sarhan, Mohammed A A; Mohammed, Mohammed N; Zyad, Eyhab M; Al-Ghtani, Abdalla M

    2013-03-15

    This study aimed at evaluating the sensitivity of antibiotics towards nosocomial infections caused by Acinetobacter species. The study took place during the period Dec. 2011- Dec. 2012 at Assir Central Hospital in collaboration with the department of microbiology, college of medicine, King Khalid University, Abha. A prospective study involving 150 patients presented with nosocomial infections due to Acinetobacter species detected by bacteriological tests; direct microscopy, culture in blood agar media, fermentation test in MacConkey media and MIC (minimum inhibitory concentration) for antibiotics sensitivity using Muller Hinton media and Chemical test using API 20. A 150 nosocomial infections in this study showed gram-negative coccobacilli, non motile, glucose-negative fermentor and oxidase negative. All isolates showed 100% sensitivity to: Imipramine, Meropenem, Colistin. From the rest of tested antibiotics the higher resistant ones were; Nitrofurantoin 87% and Cefoxitin 85%. The least resistant antibiotics; Imipenem 3% and Ticarcillin 7%. While variable resistance in the rest of tested antimicrobials. A 47 patients (31.3%) have used antibiotics prior to this study. The high rate of usage occurred in elder patients. The frequency of Acinetobacter calcoaceticus baumannii complex multi-drugs resistance ABCMDR is rising including almost all commonly used antibiotics. Only few antibiotics exert 100% sensitivity towards these bacteria.

  12. [Distribution and antibiotics resistance related to nosocomial pathogenic bacteria infection in patients after cardiac surgery].

    PubMed

    Dang, Hai-ming; Song, Yue; Cao, Jian; Wu, Li-song; Dong, Ran

    2013-05-01

    To investigate the clinical distribution and antibiotics resistance of nosocomial infection caused pathogenic bacteria in patients after cardiac surgery. Clinical data from 612 patients after cardiac surgery under microbiologically documented nosocomial infection was retrospectively analyzed from January 2007 to December 2012. Identification on related bacterial was performed in an automatic ATB Expression system while antimicrobial susceptibility was tested by Kirby-Bauer method. were analyzed by WHONET5.4. There were 697 strains of clinical pathogenic bacilli isolates identified and 421 (60.4%) of them were isolated from sputum while 185 (26.5%) were from blood. Acinetobacter spp. (124 strains, 17.8%), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (85 strains, 12.2%) and Klebsiella pneumoniae (50 strains, 7.2%) were the predominant Gram-negative bacilli while S. epidermidis (75 strains, 10.8%) was the predominant Gram-positive cocci. The predominant eumycete was Candida albicans (43 strains, 6.2%). from the susceptibility test showed that carbapenems, cefoperazone/sulbactam and piperacillin/tazobactam were the most active antibiotics. The detection of meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus (MRS) were 82.9% in S aureus and 95.9% in coagulase negative Staphylococcus. There was no Staphylococcus strains resistant to vancomycin found. Non-fermenting Gram-negative bacilli and Staphylococcus appeared the important pathogens in patients after cardiac surgery. Drug resistance to antibiotics was quite common. Prevention on nosocomial infection and rational use of antibiotics remained very important in reducing the amount of drug resistant strains.

  13. Risk factors and mortality for nosocomial bloodstream infections in elderly patients.

    PubMed

    Reunes, S; Rombaut, V; Vogelaers, D; Brusselaers, N; Lizy, C; Cankurtaran, M; Labeau, S; Petrovic, M; Blot, S

    2011-10-01

    To determine risk factors for nosocomial bloodstream infection (BSI) and associated mortality in geriatric patients in geriatric and internal medicine wards at a university hospital. Single-center retrospective (1992-2007), pairwise-matched (1:1-ratio) cohort study. Geriatric patients with nosocomial BSI were matched with controls without BSI on year of admission and length of hospitalization before onset of BSI. Demographic, microbiological, and clinical data are collected. One-hundred forty-two BSI occurred in 129 patients. Predominant microorganisms were Escherichia coli (23.2%), coagulase-negative Staphylococci (19.4%), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (8.4%), Staphylococcus aureus (7.1%), Klebsiella pneumoniae (5.8%) and Candida spp. (5.8%). Matching was successful for 109 cases. Compared to matched control subjects, cases were more frequently female, suffered more frequently from arthrosis, angina pectoris and pressure ulcers, had worse Activities of Daily Living-scores, had more often an intravenous or bladder catheter, and were more often bedridden. Logistic regression demonstrated presence of an intravenous catheter (odds ratio [OR] 7.5, 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.5-22.9) and being bedridden (OR 2.9, 95% CI 1.6-5.3) as independent risk factors for BSI. In univariate analysis nosocomial BSI was associated with increased mortality (22.0% vs. 11.0%; P=0.029). After adjustment for confounding co-variates, however, nosocomial BSI was not associated with mortality (hazard ratio 1.3, 95% CI 0.6-2.6). Being bedridden and increasing age were independent risk factors for death. Intravenous catheters and being bedridden are the main risk factors for nosocomial BSI. Although associated with higher mortality, this infectious complication seems not to be an independent risk factor for death in geriatric patients. Copyright © 2011 European Federation of Internal Medicine. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. [Ecological aspects and prophylaxis of Acinetobacter baumannii nosocomial infection].

    PubMed

    Boukadida, J

    2000-01-01

    Acinetobacter Baumannii is an aerobic strit gram negative bacteria cause of epidemic infection in intensive care units this bacteria is isolated from the patient and its environment. The detection of AB infection require the isolation of patients and decontamination of the material despite the virulence of the germ, these measures are necessary due to the rapid extension of epidemic in the absence of adequate means.

  15. [Nosocomial infection due to Trichosporon asahii in a critical burned patient].

    PubMed

    Tamayo Lomas, Luis; Domínguez-Gil González, Marta; Martín Luengo, Ana Isabel; Eiros Bouza, José María; Piqueras Pérez, José María

    2015-01-01

    Invasive fungal infection is an important cause of morbimortality in patients with severe burns. The advances in burn care therapy have considerably extended the survival of seriously burned patients, exposing them to infectious complications, notably fungal infections, with increased recognition of invasive infections caused by Candida species. However, some opportunistic fungi, like Trichosporon asahii, have emerged as important causes of nosocomial infection. A case of nosocomial infection due to T. asahii in a severely ill burned patient successfully treated with voriconazole is presented. The management of invasive fungal infections in burned patients, from diagnosis to selection of the therapeutic protocol, is often a challenge. Early diagnosis and treatment are associated with a better prognosis. In this case report, current treatment options are discussed, and a review of previously published cases is presented. Due to the difficulty in the diagnosis of invasive mycoses and their high associated mortality rates, it is advisable to keep a high degree of clinical suspicion of trichosporonosis in susceptible patients, including burned patients. The isolation of T. asahii in clinical specimens of this type of host must raise clinical alert, since it may precede an invasive infection. Copyright © 2014 Revista Iberoamericana de Micología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  16. [Impact factors analysis of standardized perioperative antibiotic application on nosocomial infection and drug-resistance bacteria].

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Xu, Yan-shan; Xu, Jing; Liu, Xue-yi; Li, Ya-jun

    2013-11-01

    To investigate the impact factors and clinical significance of standardized perioperative antibiotic application on nosocomial infection and drug-resistant bacteria strains in eye hospital. It was a retrospective series case study. The inpatients underwent ophthalmologic operation of one year before standardized application (from Sep. 2009 to Aug. 2010) and one year after standardized application (from Sep. 2010 to Aug. 2011) in Tianjin Eye Hospital were selected and the incidence rate of nosocomial infection and types of drug-resistant strains in these two years were analyzed. From Sep. 2009 to Aug. 2010, the prophylactic antibiotics application rate for type I incisional surgeries was 80.29% (12937/16 111), the nosocomial infection rate was 0.011% (2/17 563). From Sep. 2010 to Aug. 2011, the same values were 44.50% (7968/17 905) and 0.005% (1/19 441). There was a significant decrease of prophylactic antibiotics application comparing these two years (χ(2) = 4587.78, P < 0.05). However, there was no significant difference in nosocomial infection rate (χ(2) = 0.44, P > 0.05). Average antibiotics application rate for inpatient (type I-IV incisional surgeries) was 76.69% (13 469/17 563) from Sep. 2009 to Aug. 2010, and 49.40% (9604/19 441) from Sep. 2010 to Aug. 2011. There was a significant decrease over these two years (χ(2) = 2927.19, P < 0.05). The results of isolation and cultivation of bacteria in these two years showed that staphylococcus epidermidis predominated in gram-positive bacteria, pseudomonas aeruginosa predominated in gram-negative bacteria. Drug resistance rate of staphylococcus was 42.86% (33/77) from Sep. 2009 to Aug. 2010 and 39.19% (39/74) from Sep. 2010 to Aug. 2011. Drug resistance rate of pseudomonas aeruginosa was 2/11 from Sep. 2009 to Aug. 2010 and 2/13 from Sep. 2010 to Aug. 2011. There were no significant differences in drug resistance rate of staphylococcus and pseudomonas aeruginosa between these two years (χ(2) = 0.09, P > 0.05,

  17. Voriconazole in the management of nosocomial invasive fungal infections

    PubMed Central

    Pemán, Javier; Salavert, Miguel; Cantón, Emilia; Jarque, Isidro; Romá, Eva; Zaragoza, Rafael; Viudes, Ángel; Gobernado, Miguel

    2006-01-01

    Voriconazole is a new triazole developed for the treatment of life-threatening fungal infections. The drug is available for both oral and intravenous administration; the oral formulation has excellent bioavailability. The side-effect profile of voriconazole presents an acceptable safety and tolerability spectrum: transient visual disturbances, liver enzyme abnormalities, and skin rashes are the most frequently reported side effects but rarely lead to discontinuation. The potential for drug–drug interactions is high, because of its extensive hepatic metabolism. Careful attention to dosage is required, and serum levels and the effects of interacting drugs should be monitored. Review of 25 470 isolates of yeasts and 3216 isolates of filamentous fungi showed voriconazole to have broad-spectrum activity against pathogenic yeasts including intrinsically fluconazole-resistant isolates such as Candida krusei, dimorphic fungi, and opportunistic moulds like Aspergillus spp, amphotericin-B-resistant Aspergillus terreus, Fusarium spp, and Scedosporium apiospermum. It displays excellent clinical efficacy in patients with fluconazole-resistant and -susceptible Candida infections, invasive bone and central nervous system aspergillosis, and various refractory fungal infections. Voriconazole has been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration and by the European Medicines Agency for the treatment of invasive aspergillosis, serious infections caused by Fusarium and S. apiospermum, fluconazole-resistant invasive Candida infections, and candidemia in nonneutropenic patients. PMID:18360588

  18. Microbial Characteristics of Nosocomial Infections and Their Association with the Utilization of Hand Hygiene Products: A Hospital-Wide Analysis of 78,344 Cases.

    PubMed

    Liu, Song; Wang, Meng; Wang, Gefei; Wu, Xiuwen; Guan, Wenxian; Ren, Jianan

    Nosocomial infections are the main adverse events during health care delivery. Hand hygiene is the fundamental strategy for the prevention of nosocomial infections. Microbial characteristics of nosocomial infections in the Asia-Pacific region have not been investigated fully. Correlation between the use of hand hygiene products and the incidence of nosocomial infections is still unknown. This study investigates the microbial characteristics of nosocomial infections in the Asia-Pacific region and analyzes the association between the utilization of hand hygiene products and the incidence of nosocomial infections. A total of 78,344 patients were recruited from a major tertiary hospital in China. Microbial characteristics of major types of nosocomial infections were described. The association between the utilization of hand hygiene products and the incidence of nosocomial infections was analyzed using correlation and regression models. The overall incidence of nosocomial infections was 3.04%, in which the incidence of surgical site infection was 1%. Multi-drug resistance was found in 22.8% of all pathogens, in which multi-drug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus were 56.6% and 54.9%, respectively. The utilization of hand hygiene products (including hand sanitizer, soap and paper towel) was associated negatively with the incidence of surgical site infection in surgical departments and the incidence of nosocomial infections in non-intensive care unit (ICU) departments (especially in surgical departments). Regression analysis further identified that higher utilization of hand hygiene products correlated with decreased incidence of major types of nosocomial infections. Multi-drug-resistant organisms are emerging in Asia-Pacific health care facilities. Utilization of hand hygiene products is associated with the incidence of nosocomial infections.

  19. Reduced Responsiveness of Blood Leukocytes to Lipopolysaccharide Does not Predict Nosocomial Infections in Critically Ill Patients.

    PubMed

    van Vught, Lonneke A; Wiewel, Maryse A; Hoogendijk, Arie J; Scicluna, Brendon P; Belkasim-Bohoudi, Hakima; Horn, Janneke; Schultz, Marcus J; van der Poll, Tom

    2015-08-01

    Critically ill patients show signs of immune suppression, which is considered to increase vulnerability to nosocomial infections. Whole-blood stimulation is frequently used to test the function of the innate immune system. We here assessed the association between whole-blood leukocyte responsiveness to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and subsequent occurrence of nosocomial infections in critically ill patients admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU). All consecutive critically ill patients admitted to the ICU between April 2012 and June 2013 with two or more systemic inflammatory response syndrome criteria and an expected length of ICU stay of more than 24 h were enrolled. Age- and sex-matched healthy individuals were included as controls. Blood was drawn the first morning after ICU admission and stimulated ex vivo with 100 ng/mL ultrapure LPS for 3 h. Tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1β (IL-1β), and IL-6 were measured in supernatants. Seventy-three critically ill patients were included, of whom 10 developed an ICU-acquired infection. Compared with healthy subjects, whole-blood leukocytes of patients were less responsive to ex vivo stimulation with LPS, as reflected by strongly reduced tumor necrosis factor-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 levels in culture supernatants. Results were not different between patients who did and those who did not develop an ICU-acquired infection. The extent of reduced LPS responsiveness of blood leukocytes in critically ill patients on the first day after ICU admission does not relate to the subsequent development of ICU-acquired infections. These results argue against the use of whole-blood stimulation as a functional test applied early after ICU admission to predict nosocomial infection.

  20. Positive impact of infection prevention on the management of nosocomial outbreaks at an academic hospital.

    PubMed

    Dik, Jan-Willem H; Sinha, Bhanu; Lokate, Mariëtte; Lo-Ten-Foe, Jerome R; Dinkelacker, Ariane G; Postma, Maarten J; Friedrich, Alexander W

    2016-10-01

    Infection prevention (IP) measures are vital to prevent (nosocomial) outbreaks. Financial evaluations of these are scarce. An incremental cost analysis for an academic IP unit was performed. On a yearly basis, we evaluated: IP measures; costs thereof; numbers of patients at risk for causing nosocomial outbreaks; predicted outbreak patients; and actual outbreak patients. IP costs rose on average yearly with €150,000; however, more IP actions were undertaken. Numbers of patients colonized with high-risk microorganisms increased. The trend of actual outbreak patients remained stable. Predicted prevented outbreak patients saved costs, leading to a positive return on investment of 1.94. This study shows that investments in IP can prevent outbreak cases, thereby saving enough money to earn back these investments.

  1. Nosocomial Outbreak of Parechovirus 3 Infection among Newborns, Austria, 2014

    PubMed Central

    Diedrich, Sabine; Boettcher, Sindy; Richter, Susanne; Maritschnegg, Peter; Gangl, Dietmar; Fuchs, Simone; Grangl, Gernot; Resch, Bernhard; Urlesberger, Berndt

    2016-01-01

    In 2014, sepsis-like illness affected 9 full-term newborns in 1 hospital in Austria. Although results of initial microbiological testing were negative, electron microscopy identified picornavirus. Archived serum samples and feces obtained after discharge were positive by PCR for human parechovirus 3. This infection should be included in differential diagnoses of sepsis-like illness in newborns. PMID:27532333

  2. Handwashing: a simple, economical and effective method for preventing nosocomial infections in intensive care units.

    PubMed

    Akyol, A; Ulusoy, H; Ozen, I

    2006-04-01

    As most nosocomial infections are thought to be transmitted by the hands of healthcare workers, handwashing is considered to be the single most important intervention to prevent nosocomial infections. However, studies have shown that handwashing practices are poor, especially among medical personnel. This review gives an overview of handwashing in health care and in the community, including some aspects that have attracted little attention, such as hand drying and cultural issues determining hand hygiene behaviour. Hand hygiene is the most effective measure for interrupting the transmission of micro-organisms which cause infection, both in the community and in the healthcare setting. Using hand hygiene as a sole measure to reduce infection is unlikely to be successful when other factors in infection control, such as environmental hygiene, crowding, staffing levels and education, are inadequate. Hand hygiene must be part of an integrated approach to infection control. Compliance with hand hygiene recommendations is poor worldwide. While the techniques involved in hand hygiene are simple, the complex interdependence of factors that determine hand hygiene behaviour makes the study of hand hygiene complex. It is now recognized that improving compliance with hand hygiene recommendations depends on altering human behaviour. Input from behavioural and social sciences is essential when designing studies to investigate compliance. Interventions to increase compliance with hand hygiene practices must be appropriate for different cultural and social needs.

  3. [A survey on nosocomial tuberculosis infection control in hospitals in Osaka City].

    PubMed

    Shimouchi, Akira; Konishi, Shozaburo; Tanaka, Takashi

    2005-12-01

    To ascertain nosocomial tuberculosis (TB) infection control practice in hospitals in Osaka City. A questionnaire was distributed in the orientation meeting and collected at the occasion of medical inspection in all 196 hospitals in Osaka City in 2003. TB patients were diagnosed in about half of hospitals in the past 3 years. Basic TB infection control measures were taken in the majority of hospitals; such as chest X-ray screening for all inpatients, health check for employees, tuberculin skin test (TST) for newly employed staff, and nomination of a person in charge of TB infection control. Control measures were practiced more often in hospitals where TB patients were diagnosed, such as "fiberoptic bronchoscopy is to be conducted last in the working hours to avoid contamination of TB bacilli in a room," "TST (including two-step method) for all newly employed staff," "Staff wear N95 mask when they deal with TB patients/suspects," and the differences were statistically significant. It is necessary in hospitals in Osaka City to strengthen nosocomial TB infection control as TB patients were diagnosed in about half of hospitals in the past 3 years. Low cost infection control measures were undertaken more often among hospitals where TB patients were diagnosed. Introduction of high cost equipment or improvement of facilities should be considered in hospitals of high TB risk. Guidelines formulated based on analysis of the survey should facilitate all hospitals to introduce at least low cost effective tuberculosis infection control measures.

  4. Effectiveness of a multidimensional approach for prevention of ventilator-associated pneumonia in adult intensive care units from 14 developing countries of four continents: findings of the International Nosocomial Infection Control Consortium.

    PubMed

    Rosenthal, Victor D; Rodrigues, Camilla; Álvarez-Moreno, Carlos; Madani, Naoufel; Mitrev, Zan; Ye, Guxiang; Salomao, Reinaldo; Ulger, Fatma; Guanche-Garcell, Humberto; Kanj, Souha S; Cuéllar, Luis E; Higuera, Francisco; Mapp, Trudell; Fernández-Hidalgo, Rosalía

    2012-12-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the effect of the International Nosocomial Infection Control Consortium's multidimensional approach on the reduction of ventilator-associated pneumonia in patients hospitalized in intensive care units. A prospective active surveillance before-after study. The study was divided into two phases. During phase 1, the infection control team at each intensive care unit conducted active prospective surveillance of ventilator-associated pneumonia by applying the definitions of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention National Health Safety Network, and the methodology of International Nosocomial Infection Control Consortium. During phase 2, the multidimensional approach for ventilator-associated pneumonia was implemented at each intensive care unit, in addition to the active surveillance. Forty-four adult intensive care units in 38 hospitals, members of the International Nosocomial Infection Control Consortium, from 31 cities of the following 14 developing countries: Argentina, Brazil, China, Colombia, Costa Rica, Cuba, India, Lebanon, Macedonia, Mexico, Morocco, Panama, Peru, and Turkey. A total of 55,507 adult patients admitted to 44 intensive care units in 38 hospitals. The International Nosocomial Infection Control Consortium ventilator-associated pneumonia multidimensional approach included the following measures: 1) bundle of infection-control interventions; 2) education; 3) outcome surveillance; 4) process surveillance; 5) feedback of ventilator-associated pneumonia rates; and 6) performance feedback of infection-control practices. The ventilator-associated pneumonia rates obtained in phase 1 were compared with the rates obtained in phase 2. We performed a time-series analysis to analyze the impact of our intervention. During phase 1, we recorded 10,292 mechanical ventilator days, and during phase 2, with the implementation of the multidimensional approach, we recorded 127,374 mechanical ventilator days. The rate of

  5. A Nosocomial Cluster of Candida inconspicua Infections in Patients with Hematological Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    D’Antonio, Domenico; Violante, Beatrice; Mazzoni, Aldo; Bonfini, Tiziana; Capuani, M. Assunta; D’Aloia, Francesco; Iacone, Antonio; Schioppa, Francesco; Romano, Ferdinando

    1998-01-01

    Candida inconspicua was recovered from three patients with hematological malignancies. Two patients had intravenous-catheter-associated fungemia, whereas the third had fungal hepatitis. The three cases of infection occurred over a period of 1 month in patients staying in adjacent single rooms. In vitro susceptibility testing of fungal strains showed all isolates to be resistant to fluconazole, with MICs greater than 32 μg/ml. All of the strains had identical DNA restriction profiles and randomly amplified polymorphic DNA fingerprints. These data suggest a nosocomially acquired infection emanating from a common source within the hospital environment. PMID:9508314

  6. The regional commission for medical accidents and nosocomial infections set up by French law.

    PubMed

    Bartoli, C; Piercecchi-Marti, M D; Pelissier-Alicot, A L; Cianfarani, F; Leonetti, G

    2005-07-01

    The regional commission for conciliation and compensation for medical accidents, iatrogenic diseases and nosocomial infections (commission régionale de conciliation et d'indemnisation des accidents médicaux, affections iatrogènes et infections nosocomiales, CRCI) offers victims of such events the possibility of obtaining compensation without recourse to legal proceedings. We suggest various points of view about this commission set up by the French law no. 2002-303 of 4 March 2002: the composition, role and competence of the CRCI; the place of the expert's report; the opinion pronounced by the CRCI and its outcome, the compensation of victims and, finally, interaction with other procedures.

  7. Prevention of nosocomial infections in neonatal intensive care units.

    PubMed

    Manzoni, Paolo; De Luca, Daniele; Stronati, Mauro; Jacqz-Aigrain, Evelyne; Ruffinazzi, Giulia; Luparia, Martina; Tavella, Elena; Boano, Elena; Castagnola, Elio; Mostert, Michael; Farina, Daniele

    2013-02-01

    Neonatal sepsis causes a huge burden of morbidity and mortality and includes bloodstream, urine, cerebrospinal, peritoneal, and lung infections as well as infections starting from burns and wounds, or from any other usually sterile sites. It is associated with cytokine - and biomediator-induced disorders of respiratory, hemodynamic, and metabolic processes. Neonates in the neonatal intensive care unit feature many specific risk factors for bacterial and fungal sepsis. Loss of gut commensals such as Bifidobacteria and Lactobacilli spp., as occurs with prolonged antibiotic treatments, delayed enteral feeding, or nursing in incubators, translates into proliferation of pathogenic microflora and abnormal gut colonization. Prompt diagnosis and effective treatment do not protect septic neonates form the risk of late neurodevelopmental impairment in the survivors. Thus prevention of bacterial and fungal infection is crucial in these settings of unique patients. In this view, improving neonatal management is a key step, and this includes promotion of breast-feeding and hygiene measures, adoption of a cautious central venous catheter policy, enhancement of the enteric microbiota composition with the supplementation of probiotics, and medical stewardship concerning H2 blockers with restriction of their use. Additional measures may include the use of lactoferrin, fluconazole, and nystatin and specific measures to prevent ventilator associated pneumonia.

  8. Previous antibiotic exposure and evolution of antibiotic resistance in mechanically ventilated patients with nosocomial infections.

    PubMed

    Hui, Chun; Lin, Ming-Chih; Jao, Mei-Shin; Liu, Tu-Chen; Wu, Ren-Guang

    2013-10-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the impact of previous antibiotic exposure and the influence of time interval since exposure on the evolution of antibiotic-resistant infections. We retrospectively analyzed 167 mechanically ventilated patients with nosocomial infections over a 3-year period, with focus on infections in the bloodstream, urinary tract, lower respiratory tract, and surgical sites. Of 167 patients, 62% were confirmed as antibiotic resistant. The most common isolated pathogen was extended-spectrum β-lactamase Enterobacteriaceae (43.9%), followed by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (22.8%), and carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii (17.5%). Multivariate analysis revealed that the association between resistance and the time interval increased within 10 days (odds ratio [OR], 2.45; P=.133) and peaked at 11 to 20 days (OR, 7.17; P=.012). The data were categorized into 2 groups: when the time interval was more than 20 days, there was a 23.9% reduction in resistance rate compared with when the time interval was 20 days or less (OR, 0.36; P=.002). Although antibiotic exposure increased resistance rate in nosocomial infections, this association decreased as time interval increased. Antibiotic stewardship should consider the significance of time interval while investigating the evolution of subsequent antibiotic-resistant infections. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Are laptop ventilation-blowers a potential source of nosocomial infections for patients?

    PubMed Central

    Siegmund, Katja; Hübner, Nils; Heidecke, Claus-Dieter; Brandenburg, Ronny; Rackow, Kristian; Benkhai, Hicham; Schnaak, Volker; Below, Harald; Dornquast, Tina; Assadian, Ojan; Kramer, Axel

    2010-01-01

    Inadequately performed hand hygiene and non-disinfected surfaces are two reasons why the keys and mouse-buttons of laptops could be sources of microbial contamination resulting consequently in indirect transmission of potential pathogens and nosocomial infections. Until now the question has not been addressed whether the ventilation-blowers in laptops are actually responsible for the spreading of nosocomial pathogens. Therefore, an investigational experimental model was developed which was capable of differentiating between the microorganisms originating from the external surfaces of the laptop, and from those being blown out via the ventilation-blower duct. Culture samples were taken at the site of the external exhaust vent and temperature controls were collected through the use of a thermo-camera at the site of the blower exhaust vent as well as from surfaces which were directly exposed to the cooling ventilation air projected by the laptop. Control of 20 laptops yielded no evidence of microbial emission originating from the internal compartment following switching-on of the ventilation blower. Cultures obtained at the site of the blower exhaust vent also showed no evidence of nosocomial potential. High internal temperatures on the inner surfaces of the laptops (up to 73°C) as well as those documented at the site of the blower exhaust vent (up to 56°C) might be responsible for these findings. PMID:20941339

  10. Are laptop ventilation-blowers a potential source of nosocomial infections for patients?

    PubMed

    Siegmund, Katja; Hübner, Nils; Heidecke, Claus-Dieter; Brandenburg, Ronny; Rackow, Kristian; Benkhai, Hicham; Schnaak, Volker; Below, Harald; Dornquast, Tina; Assadian, Ojan; Kramer, Axel

    2010-09-21

    Inadequately performed hand hygiene and non-disinfected surfaces are two reasons why the keys and mouse-buttons of laptops could be sources of microbial contamination resulting consequently in indirect transmission of potential pathogens and nosocomial infections. Until now the question has not been addressed whether the ventilation-blowers in laptops are actually responsible for the spreading of nosocomial pathogens. Therefore, an investigational experimental model was developed which was capable of differentiating between the microorganisms originating from the external surfaces of the laptop, and from those being blown out via the ventilation-blower duct. Culture samples were taken at the site of the external exhaust vent and temperature controls were collected through the use of a thermo-camera at the site of the blower exhaust vent as well as from surfaces which were directly exposed to the cooling ventilation air projected by the laptop. Control of 20 laptops yielded no evidence of microbial emission originating from the internal compartment following switching-on of the ventilation blower. Cultures obtained at the site of the blower exhaust vent also showed no evidence of nosocomial potential. High internal temperatures on the inner surfaces of the laptops (up to 73°C) as well as those documented at the site of the blower exhaust vent (up to 56°C) might be responsible for these findings.

  11. Non-nosocomial healthcare-associated infective endocarditis in Taiwan: an underrecognized disease with poor outcome

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Non-nosocomial healthcare-associated infective endocarditis (NNHCA-IE) is a new category of IE of increasing importance. This study described the clinical and microbiological characteristics and outcome of NNHCA-IE in Taiwan. Methods A retrospective study was conducted of all patients with IE admitted to the Kaohsiung Veterans General Hospital in Kaohsiung, Taiwan over a five-year period from July 2004 to July 2009. The clinical and microbiological features of NNHCA-IE were compared to those of community-acquired and nosocomial IE. Predictors for in-hospital death were determined. Results Two-hundred episodes of confirmed IE occurred during the study period. These included 148 (74%) community-acquired, 30 (15%) non-nosocomial healthcare-associated, and 22 (11%) nosocomial healthcare-associated IE. Staphylococcus aureus was the most frequent pathogen. Patients with NNHCA-IE compared to community-acquired IE, were older (median age, 67 vs. 44, years, p < 0.001), had more MRSA (43.3% vs. 9.5%, p < 0.001), more comorbidity conditions (median Charlson comorbidity index [interquartile range], 4[2-6] vs. 0[0-1], p < 0.001), a higher in-hospital mortality (50.0% vs. 17.6%, p < 0.001) and were less frequently recognized by clinicians on admission (16.7% vs. 47.7%, p = 0.002). The overall in-hospital mortality rate for all patients with IE was 25%. Shock was the strongest risk factor for in-hospital death (odds ratio 7.8, 95% confidence interval 2.4-25.2, p < 0.001). Conclusions NNHCA-IE is underrecognized and carries a high mortality rate. Early recognition is crucial to provide optimal management and improve outcome. PMID:21849057

  12. A review of nosocomial Salmonella outbreaks: infection control interventions found effective.

    PubMed

    Lee, M B; Greig, J D

    2013-03-01

    To review nosocomial salmonellosis outbreaks to identify: mode of transmission; morbidity and mortality patterns; and recommendations for control and prevention. Documented nosocomial salmonellosis outbreaks in hospitals published from January 1995 to November 2011, written in the English language, were systematically reviewed. The study methodology incorporated steps from the PRISMA statement for a high quality review process. Computer-aided searches of Scopus, CAB Global Health and CINAHL(®), the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature were completed to identify relevant outbreak reports written in English. To validate the electronic search methodology, bibliographies and reference lists of relevant review articles were hand-searched. Public health and government websites were searched for nosocomial salmonellosis. Fifty-two relevant reports were identified. The most frequently reported routes of transmission were food 31/52 (59.6%) and person-to-person transmission 7/52 (13.5%). Actions taken during the outbreak to control transmission included improvements to: 1) infection control practices (41.8% of actions); isolation or cohorting patients, hand hygiene practices, and enhancing cleaning and disinfection in patient care areas; and 2) food handling practices (24.4% of actions); reviewing food preparation practices, enhancing cleaning and sanitation of the kitchen, and controlling food temperatures. Investigators made recommendations retrospectively in outbreak reports to provide direction to health centees but these recommendations were not statistically evaluated for effectiveness. More emphasis should be placed on improving food handling practices, such as training food workers, monitoring food temperatures, and not using raw foods of animal origin, to prevent nosocomial salmonellosis outbreaks in hospitals because almost 60% of the outbreaks were foodborne. Copyright © 2013 The Royal Institute of Public Health. All rights reserved.

  13. Opening Pandora's (tool) Box: health care construction and associated risk for nosocomial infection.

    PubMed

    Clair, Jeffrey D; Colatrella, Sandie

    2013-06-01

    There are approximately 5,700 hospitals in the United States, 3,000-4,000 that are antiquated or obsolescing. To meet increased service demands, remain financially viable; meet needs to upgrade aging infrastructure and incorporate medical and technology advancements, healthcare facilities are in a perpetual state of construction. Outbreaks of nosocomial infections have historically been documented in association with construction and renovation actives within health care facilities. For most healthy individuals, environmental exposures to etiological agents, results in no adverse effects but in immune-compromised patient, they are left susceptible to inadvertent exposures during construction to opportunistic bacteria, fungi and viruses. Evidence scientifically linking construction work and nosocomial infections as well as the efficacy and clinical relevance of infection control precautions is somewhat lacking but the empirical evidence and recommendations to support protective measures is steadily growing. Opening a "Pandora's Box" during construction can unleash unintended consequences therefore; it is imperative that a thorough, multidisciplinary approach towards an infection control plan is put clearly and firmly in place allowing health care construction projects to move forward with confidence that patient safety is the first specification.

  14. Does the architecture of hospital facilities influence nosocomial infection rates? A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Dettenkofer, M; Seegers, S; Antes, G; Motschall, E; Schumacher, M; Daschner, F D

    2004-01-01

    To review the evidence regarding the effects of interventions to improve hospital design and construction on the occurrence of nosocomial infections. Systematic review of experimental and non-experimental, architectural intervention studies in intensive care units (ICUs), surgical departments, isolation units, and hospitals in general. The studies dated from 1975, and were in English, French, German, Italian, and Spanish. Regardless of format, the studies were identified through seven medical databases, reference lists, and expert consultation. One hundred seventy-eight scientific articles were identified; however, none of these described a meta-analysis, systematic review, or randomized, controlled trial. Most of the articles were categorized at the lowest level of evidence (expert judgment or consensus statements). Only 17 described completed concurrent or historical cohort studies matching the inclusion criteria (ICUs, 9; surgical departments, 4; isolation units, 2; hospitals in general, 2). The interventions generally included a move to other premises or renovation. However, in many studies, the staff-to-patient ratio was also improved. Some studies showed lower infection rates after intervention, but this finding cannot be generalized because of confounding and frequently small study populations. The lack of stringent evidence linking hospital design and construction with the prevention of nosocomial infection is partly attributable to the multifactorial nature of these infections, and some improvement will be seen if basic conditions such as the availability of sufficient space, isolation capacity, and facilities for handwashing are met. However, to our knowledge, other factors, especially the improper hand hygiene of medical staff, have greater impact.

  15. Nosocomial Infections and Epidemiology of Antibiotic Resistance in Teaching Hospitals in South East of Iran.

    PubMed

    Rajabi, Mahboobeh; Abdar, Mohammad Esmaeili; Rafiei, Hossein; Aflatoonia, Mohammad Reza; Abdar, Zahra Esmaeili

    2015-06-25

    Antibiotic resistance as one of the most serious health threats worldwide leading to a high rate of morbidity and mortality. The aim of present study was to examine the prevalence of nosocomial infections (NIs) and pattern of antibiotic resistance in teaching hospitals in Iran. This cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted in a period of one year in three teaching hospitals and all patients with suspected NIs symptoms were chooses. Among these patients who showed antibiotic resistance were included in the study. The samples for clinical test in laboratory were obtained with using standard methods and aseptic technique by trained personnel. Antibiotic susceptibility testing was performed by Kirby-Bauer's disk diffusion method on Muller-Hinton agar (Hi Media, Mumbai, India) in accordance with the standards of the Clinical Laboratory Standards Institute. During one year study, 561 patients with nosocomial infections were recognized and among them 340 patients (60.6%) showed some level of antibiotic resistance. The most common cause of NIs in present study was Acinetobacter and the most type of infection was respiratory system infections (52.7%). The highest resistance rate was against Ciprofloxacin (61.8%) followed by Imipenem (50.3%). Rate of NIs and antibiotics resistance is high in Iranian hospital. So Iranian health ministry should provide guideline and suitable programs for prevention of NIs and antibiotic therapy in hospitals.

  16. Nosocomial Infections and Epidemiology of Antibiotic Resistance in Teaching Hospitals in South East of Iran

    PubMed Central

    Rajabi, Mahboobeh; Abdar, Mohammad Esmaeili; Rafiei, Hossein; Aflatoonia, Mohammad Reza; Abdar, Zahra Esmaeili

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Antibiotic resistance as one of the most serious health threats worldwide leading to a high rate of morbidity and mortality. The aim of present study was to examine the prevalence of nosocomial infections (NIs) and pattern of antibiotic resistance in teaching hospitals in Iran Methods: This cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted in a period of one year in three teaching hospitals and all patients with suspected NIs symptoms were chooses. Among these patients who showed antibiotic resistance were included in the study. The samples for clinical test in laboratory were obtained with using standard methods and aseptic technique by trained personnel. Antibiotic susceptibility testing was performed by Kirby-Bauer’s disk diffusion method on Muller-Hinton agar (Hi Media, Mumbai, India) in accordance with the standards of the Clinical Laboratory Standards Institute. Results: During one year study, 561 patients with nosocomial infections were recognized and among them 340 patients (60.6%) showed some level of antibiotic resistance. The most common cause of NIs in present study was Acinetobacter and the most type of infection was respiratory system infections (52.7%). The highest resistance rate was against Ciprofloxacin (61.8%) followed by Imipenem (50.3%). Conclusion: Rate of NIs and antibiotics resistance is high in Iranian hospital. So Iranian health ministry should provide guideline and suitable programs for prevention of NIs and antibiotic therapy in hospitals. PMID:26383222

  17. Nosocomial infections in acute leukemia: comparison between younger and elderly patients.

    PubMed

    Fanci, Rosa; Leoni, Franco; Longo, Giovanni

    2008-01-01

    The progressive decline in immune functions render elderly individuals more susceptible to infections than younger patients. To evaluate potential age-related differences in nosocomial infections between younger (<60 yr) and elderly (> or =60 yr) patients with acute leukemia, we retrospectively reviewed 161 consecutive febrile episodes. All neutropenic patients with an absolute neutrophil count (ANC) less than 500/microl were examined during the different phases of intensive chemotherapy and hospitalized until fever and neutropenia resolved. Fever was recorded in 66% of younger and in 64% of elderly patients and occurred respectively in 45% and in 51% during induction, in 32% and in 36% during consolidation, in 23% and in 13% during relapse/refractory treatment (P=0.01). A central venous catheter (CVC) was present in 68% and in 42% of patients (P=0.001). Febrile episodes during severe neutropenia with ANC <100/microl were recorded in 47% and in 22% respectively, during neutropenia with ANC >100/microl in 53% and in 78% respectively (P=0.002). No significant difference was documented in the overall incidence of infections, type of febrile episodes, nosocomial pattern, defervescence-time, median duration of antimicrobic therapy and in overall outcome. Elderly patients do not seem to be more susceptible to infections than younger ones, although the lower frequency of some risk factors must be taken into account.

  18. Molecular characterization of nosocomial Clostridium difficile infection in pediatric ward in Iran.

    PubMed

    Khoshdel, Abolfazl; Habibian, Roya; Parvin, Neda; Doosti, Abbas; Famouri, Fatemeh; Eshraghi, Ali; Hafizi, Massoud

    2015-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is recognized as a major cause of nosocomial acquired antibiotic-associated diarrhea and pseudomembranous colitis. It is a significant financial burden on modern healthcare resources. This study aimed to assess the molecular characterization of C. difficile strains isolated from children under 5 years old suffered from nosocomial diarrhea. One hundred diarrheic and 130 non-diarrheic fecal samples were collected from pediatrics less than 5 years old. Samples were cultured and C. difficile isolates were subjected to the PCR technique to study the distribution of ribotypes of C. difficile using P3 and P5 primers. Fifty-two out of 100 samples (52 %) were positive for C. difficile. The prevalence of bacterium in healthy children was 4.61 %. Total prevalence of C. difficile in diarrheic girls and boys were 48.9 and 54.7 %, respectively. Thirteen to twenty-four month age children had the highest prevalence of C. difficile. The most commonly detected ribotypes in the C. difficile isolates of Iranian pediatrics were RT027 (11.52 %), R1 (9.61 %) and R13 (7.68 %). The ribotypes of all of the six bacterial isolates of healthy children was not diagnosed. According to the presence of C. difficile and R27 ribotype, a continued genotype surveillance of this bacterium is necessary to monitor changes in the prevalence of certain strains and to identify the emergence of new strains that could affect future vaccine strategies.

  19. [Nosocomial Legionella pneumophila infection in a nephrology department].

    PubMed

    Gahrn-Hansen, B; Uldum, S A; Schmidt, J; Nielsen, B; Birkeland, S A; Jørgensen, K A

    1995-01-30

    During the autumn and winter of 1993-94 four cases of legionellosis were diagnosed in a Department of Nephrology. Three of the patients were kidney transplanted patients. Two of the patients died. The diagnosis was based on positive culture in two patients and by positive urinary antigen test in the other two patients. Serology was negative for all four patients. Legionella pneumophila was initially found in the cold and hot shower water, in ice-water from the ice machine, from the hot water tank and in the cold water inlet to the building. The isolate from patient no. one and isolates of serogroup 5 from the ice machine and the shower water had identical REA profiles, different from the profiles of the isolate from patient no. four. We concluded that at least one of the four patients was likely to have been infected from the water in the department, either by inhalation of contaminated aerosols from the shower or by aspiration of contaminated ice-water. Precautions were taken to reduce the number of Legionella in the shower- and ice-water. In addition, restrictions in the use of showers and ice-water from the ice machine were introduced.

  20. [Antimicrobial treatment of nosocomial intra-abdominal infections--new treatment options with tygecycline].

    PubMed

    Vyhnánek, F; Adámková, V; Duchác, V; Teplan, V; Jirásek, T

    2009-09-01

    Nosocomial, intra-abdominal infections are extremely serious conditions, considering possibilities for their early diagnosis, as well as for their effective therapy. Multiresistant bacteria (Enterobacteriacae producing extended-spectrum beta-lactamases - ESBL Escherichia coli, Klebsiella species, vancomycin-resistant enterococci [VRE], and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus [MRSA]) are frequently isolated as pathogens of these infections. Tygecycline is among the novel wide- spectrum antibiotics affecting multiresistant bacteria, which are being introduced in clinical practice. The aim of this study is to assess actual sensitivity of tygecycline to the commonest pathogens of intra-abdominal infections, generated in hospitalized surgical patients. Based on the sensitivity tests, tygecycline was indicated for targeted antibiotic therapy in intraabdominal infections. Sensitivity to tygecycline, aminopenicillins, fluorochinoloni and gentamycine was established for the following bacteria: Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumonie, Enterobacter cloacea, Proteus mirabilis. Sensitivity to oxacillin, clincamycine and tygecycline was tested in Staphylococcus aureus, and to fluorochinolini, gentamycine and tygecycline in Enterococcus faecalis, and to fluorochinoloni, gentamycine, ceftazidime and gentamycine in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Based on the sensitivity results, tygecycline was administered in two patients with postsurgical intra-abdominal infections caused by ESBL Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumonie. The initital dose of tygecycline was 100 mg i.v., followed by tygecycline 50 mg i.v. every 12 hours for 7 days. The isolated bacteria showed 98-100% sensitivity to tygecycline, except Psudomonas aeruginosa, where 100% resistance was demonstrated. Targeted antimicrobial medication with tygecycline proved effective in postoperative nosocomial intra-abdominal infections, the both concerned patients recovered. The choice of antimicrobial medication in nosocomial

  1. Incidence of nosocomial rotavirus infections, symptomatic and asymptomatic, in breast-fed and non-breast-fed infants.

    PubMed

    Gianino, P; Mastretta, E; Longo, P; Laccisaglia, A; Sartore, M; Russo, R; Mazzaccara, A

    2002-01-01

    Rotavirus is one of the most important aetiological agents of nosocomial infections in childhood. We studied the incidence of nosocomial rotavirus infections in 420 patients (age range 1-18 months) consecutively admitted from 1 December 1999 to 31 May 2000 to the infant ward of the Department of Paediatrics, University of Turin. We also evaluated the protective effect of breast feeding. Faecal specimens were collected from every child (whether developing diarrhoeic symptoms or not) and tested for rotavirus during hospitalization and 72 h after discharge. The incidence of rotavirus nosocomial infections was 27.7%. The incidence of symptomatic nosocomial infections was 16.8%, and the incidence of asymptomatic infections was 10.9%. The attack rate of the infections that occurred during hospitalization was 11.8%, while for those occurring after discharge, it was 15.9%. Rotavirus infection, on average, prolonged hospital stay from 5.2 to 6.4 days. 10.6% of breast-fed infants and 32.4% of non-breast-fed infants contracted rotavirus infection (P<0.005). None of the breast-fed infants who contracted rotavirus infection developed diarrhoeic symptoms.

  2. [Legal aspects of the health care institution liability for nosocomial infections].

    PubMed

    Garus-Pakowska, Anna; Szatko, Franciszek; Pakowski, Maciej

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, the basic concepts concerning the liability of health care institution for nosocomial infections are presented. The principles of ex contracto and ex delicto liabilities, as well as the concept of so-called anonymous guilt are discussed. The range of duties for both the health care institution and the employed medical personnel is indicated, the duties and the consequences of their non-fulfillment are systematized, and the obligatory jurisdiction concerning the functioning of prima facie evidence is considered. The author aimed at explaining the principles governing the civil liability of health care institutions and their employees.

  3. Multidrug resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from nosocomial respiratory and urinary infections in Aleppo, Syria.

    PubMed

    Mahfoud, Maysa; Al Najjar, Mona; Hamzeh, Abdul Rezzak

    2015-02-19

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa represents a serious clinical challenge due to its frequent involvement in nosocomial infections and its tendency towards multidrug resistance. This study uncovered antibiotic susceptibility patterns in 177 isolates from inpatients in three key hospitals in Aleppo, the largest city in Syria. Exceptionally low susceptibility to most routinely used antibiotics was uncovered; resistance to ciprofloxacin and gentamicin was 64.9% and 70.3%, respectively. Contrarily, susceptibility to colistin was the highest (89.1%). Multidrug resistance was rife, found at a rate of 53.67% among studied P. aeruginosa isolates.

  4. [Trial helplessness of defendant healthcare facilities in cases concerning nosocomial infections].

    PubMed

    Drzewiecki, Artur; Chowaniec, Czesław; Wajda-Drzewiecka, Katarzyna; Skowronek, Rafał

    2013-01-01

    The number of pecuniary cases involving patient claims due to nosocomial infections has been increasing for many years, and with it, the amount of adjudged compensations has also been increasing. In this situation, it is important for defendant healthcare facilities to implement a proper policy, both before the trial and during the court proceedings. Unfortunately, as a rule, defendant facilities commit a variety of errors, such as: wrong strategy, inability to cooperate on the part of those involved in the matter and improper preparation and usage of evidence. The result is that the risk of unfavorable assessment of the case increases significantly.

  5. Non Diphtheritic Corynebacteria: An Emerging Nosocomial Pathogen in Skin and Soft Tissue Infection

    PubMed Central

    Ravi, GS; Alex, Ann Mary; Mamatha, KR; Sunitha, L; Ramya, K Thangam

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Non-diphtheritic corynebacteria are normal inhabitants of skin and mucous membrane. When isolated from clinical specimens they are often considered as contaminants. Recent reports suggest their role as emerging nosocomial pathogens. Aim To speciate non-diphtheritic corynebacteria isolated from wound specimens, to correlate their clinical significance and to determine their invitro antimicrobial susceptibilities to 9 antimicrobial agents. Materials and Methods Twenty five non-diphtheritic corynebacteria from skin and soft tissue infections were selected for study. Isolates were identified by battery of tests and minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) was detected by Clinical & Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) described broth microdilution method. MIC was interpreted according CLSI and British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy (BSAC) guidelines. Results C. amycolatum was the predominant species (20%) followed by C. striatum (16%). Penicillin was least effective invitro followed by clindamycin and ciprofloxacin. Excellent activities were shown by vancomycin, linezolid and imipenem. Multidrug resistance was found in all the species. Conclusion Non-diphtheritic corynebacteria are potential nosocomial pathogens among acute/chronic complicated skin and soft tissue infection. Vancomycin or linezolid can be used empirically to treat such infections until the invitro susceptibility results are available. PMID:26816891

  6. [Long-term follow-up of nosocomial rotavirus infections at the Infectious Diseases Clinic of the Medical School Hospital in Plzen (1987-1994)].

    PubMed

    Pazdiora, P; Táborská, J; Svecová, M

    1996-09-01

    The authors evaluated in 1987-1994 the incidence of nosocomial rotavirus infections during hospitalization in 1718 junior children, 450 senior children and adults admitted with diarrhoeal diseases. Rotavirus infection was revealed in 6.2 and 1.3% of the patients resp. During hospitalization the rotaviruses were the most frequent causal agent of nosocomial infections. Hospital infection was contracted regardless of the initial diagnosis most frequently by patients aged 0-12 months. The majority of nosocomial rotavirus infections was associated with symptoms of diarrhoeal disease, on average symptomatic infections prolonged the hospitalization period by 4.2 days. The authors discuss the possibility to influence the incidence of these infections.

  7. Nosocomial infections and antibiotic resistance pattern in open-heart surgery patients at Imam Ali Hospital in Kermanshah, Iran.

    PubMed

    Heydarpour, Fatemeh; Rahmani, Youssef; Heydarpour, Behzad; Asadmobini, Atefeh

    2017-01-01

    Background: Patients undergoing open heart surgery have a relatively high risk of acquiring nosocomial infections. The development of antibiotic-resistant infections is associated with prolonged hospital stays and mortalities. Objectives: The present study was conducted to investigate nosocomial infections and the antibiotic resistance pattern in bacteria causing these infections in open heart surgery patients at Imam Ali Hospital in Kermanshah in the west of Iran over a 4-year period from March 2011 to March 2014. Materials and methods: The present cross-sectional study was conducted on 135 cases of nosocomial infection among open heart surgery patients. The demographic characteristics and the risk factors of each case of infection were recorded. The antibiotic susceptibility test was carried out using the Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) method based on the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) protocol. The data collected were then analyzed in SPSS-16. Results: Out of the 6,000 patients who underwent open heart surgery during this 4-year period at the selected hospital, nosocomial infections developed in 135 patients (2.25%), 59.3% of whom were female and 40.7% male. Surgery site infection (SSI), pneumonia (PNEU), urinary tract infection (UTI) and blood stream infection (BSI) affected 52.6%, 37%, 9.6% and 0.8% of the cases, respectively. E.coli, Klebsiella spp. and S. aureus were the most common bacteria causing the nosocomial infections. E. coli was most frequently resistant to imipenem (23.3%) Klebsiella spp. to gentamicin (38.5%) S. aureus to co-trimoxazole (54.2%). Conclusion: SSI had a high prevalence in this study. Further studies should therefore be conducted to examine the risk factors associated with SSI in open heart surgery. Various studies have shown that antibiotic resistance patterns are different in different regions. Finding a definitive treatment therefore requires an antibiogram.

  8. Clinical significance of coagulase-negative staphylococci isolates from nosocomial bloodstream infections.

    PubMed

    Asaad, Ahmed Morad; Ansar Qureshi, Mohamed; Mujeeb Hasan, Syed

    2016-01-01

    Identification of coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS) as nosocomial pathogens or contaminants is significant for microbiologists and clinicians. This study aimed to determine the frequency of isolation and antimicrobial resistance patterns of CoNS isolates from nosocomial bloodstream infections (BSIs) and to identify risk factors associated with true bacteremia caused by these emerging pathogens in a Saudi tertiary care hospital. All CoNS-positive cultures from inpatients were identified using the standard methods during a 10-month period. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing was done using the reference broth microdilution method. A total of 208 isolates were identified; of these 75 (32.2%) were considered infection associated, and 133 (67.8%) were considered contamination. S. epidermidis accounted for 34.7% of bacteremia cases, followed by S. hominis (21.3%), S. haemolyticus (16%), and S. saprophyticus (12%). Central venous catheters (p ≤ 0.0001), prior antibiotic therapy (p ≤ 0.0001), the occurrence of more than one positive blood culture (p ≤ 0.0001), and intensive care unit (ICU) admission (p = 0.007) were all independently associated with CoNS bacteremia. Overall, all isolates were highly resistant to penicillin (94.7%), oxacillin (90.7%), and erythromycin (85.3%). The rates of susceptibility to vancomycin, daptomycin, and teicoplanin were 98.7%, 98.7%, and 93.3%, respectively. Our results further highlight that accurate identification and susceptibility testing of CoNS isolates from nosocomial BSIs are crucial to minimize excessive antibiotic use and unnecessary catheter removal. In addition, daptomycin may be an efficient alternative therapeutic option for CoNS resistant to oxacillin and other commonly used antibiotics.

  9. Impact of the International Nosocomial Infection Control Consortium (INICC) multidimensional hand hygiene approach in three cities of Colombia.

    PubMed

    Barahona-Guzmán, Nayide; Rodríguez-Calderón, María Eugenia; Rosenthal, Victor D; Olarte, Narda; Villamil-Gómez, Wilmer; Rojas, Catherine; Rodríguez-Ferrer, Marena; Sarmiento-Villa, Guillermo; Lagares-Guzmán, Alfredo; Valderrama, Alberto; Menco, Antonio; Arrieta, Patrick; Dajud-Cassas, Luis Enrique; Mendoza, Mariela; Sabogal, Alejandra; Carvajal, Yulieth; Silva, Edwin

    2014-02-01

    To assess the feasibility and effectiveness of the International Nosocomial Infection Control Consortium (INICC) multidimensional hand hygiene (HH) approach in Colombia, and analyze predictors of poor HH compliance. An observational, prospective, interventional, before-and-after study was conducted from May 2003 through September 2010 in 10 intensive care units (ICUs) of six hospitals in three cities. The study was divided into two periods: a baseline and a follow-up period. Observations for HH compliance were done in each ICU during randomly selected 30-min periods. The multidimensional HH approach included: (1) administrative support, (2) supplies availability, (3) education and training, (4) reminders in the workplace, (5) process surveillance, and (6) performance feedback. A total of 13 187 opportunities for HH were observed. Overall HH compliance increased from 50% to 77% (relative risk 1.55, 95% confidence interval 1.43-1.68; p=0.0001). Multivariate and univariate analyses showed that several variables were significantly associated with poor HH compliance: males vs. females (67% vs. 77%; p=0.0001), physicians vs. nurses (59% vs. 78%; p<0.0001), and adult vs. pediatric ICUs (76% vs. 42%; p<0.001), among others. Adherence to HH was increased by 55% with the INICC approach. Programs targeted at improving HH in variables found to be predictors of poor compliance should be implemented. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  10. Analysis of nosocomial acquired Clostridium difficile infection in an Italian research and teaching hospital.

    PubMed

    Bertizzolo, L; Domeniconi, G; Fabio, G; Jacchetti, G; Serafino, S; Formica, S; Nobile, M; Castaldi, S

    2013-01-01

    Clostridium difficile (Cd) infection is a nosocomial plague which is correlated with several clinical and medical factors such as antibiotics intake. It is known that prevention is possible through infection control measures both clinical and epidemiological. We examined the data from a study about Cd infection in four internal medicine wards in a teaching and research hospital in the north part of Italy in a two years period. The wards are only slightly different in size, plan, structures, nursing staff and patient's characteristics but have a different room' organization, lay out and different level of continuous education programs for nursing personnel. We reported a high incidence of the infection and a non-significant difference between wards also looking to the different possibility-capacity of taking preventive measures and the different level of nursing staff continuous educational performance. The analysis of the data we obtained was the basis to write a protocol and to start a training course for the medical and nursing personnel of the four wards on the managing of patients infected with Cd infection. On March 2011 we started a one year longitudinal study about the Cd infections in the same wards with the purpose of evaluating the adherence to the protocol, monitoring the incidence of infection and studying the risk factors of the infected patients related to the proper use of the protocol on Cd.

  11. [Changes of pathogens for nosocomial infection of patients with hematological diseases].

    PubMed

    Wang, Ji-Jun; Hu, Kai; Wang, Zheng-Hui; Wang, Jing; Jing, Hong-Mei; Zhao, Wei; Liu, Yan; Chen, Yu-Ping; Ke, Xiao-Yan

    2010-08-01

    In order to investigate the distribution of nosocomial infection in patients with hematological diseases in our hospital, and to explore the changes of the pathogens isolated. The method of retrospective investigation and analysis was employed. 1164 strain pathogens were isolated from the patients with hematological diseases during the period of 1997-2009. The results showed that the Gram-positive cocci infection increased gradually during the 13 years, but has been stable in the last 4 years. The Gram-negative bacteria showed a trend decrease. The fungi increased during these years. The rates of infection with gram-positive cocci, gram-negative bacteria and fungus were 28.2%, 59.8% and 12.0% respectively. For the details, Escherichia coli infection rate was the highest: 12.1%, followed by Pseudomonas aeruginosa (9.1%), Enterobacter (8.4%), Klebsiella pneumoniae (7.4%), Staphylococcus epidermidis (6.3%) and Enterococci (6.6%). The distribution of G(+)- and G⁻ pathogens showed obvious change on end of 1990's and beginning of this century, but it was tending towards stability on recent years; the incidence of fungus was tending towards increase, which was related to wide application of strong broad-spectrum antibiotics. In conclusion, the patients with hematological diseases, as the high-risk group of nosocomial infection, should be monitored strictly. Infection is related to many factors, and the main factor is dysfunction of autoimmunity. The strategies should be explored to strengthen the immune protection and set up a reasonable scheme of antibiotics.

  12. Results from a four-year study on the prevalence of nosocomial infections in Franche-Comté: attempt to rank the risk of nosocomial infection.

    PubMed

    Floret, N; Bailly, P; Bertrand, X; Claude, B; Louis-Martinet, C; Picard, A; Tueffert, N; Talon, D

    2006-08-01

    The aim of this study was to rank the risk of nosocomial infection (NI) according to patient type by analysing the results of annual prevalence studies carried out in Franche-Comté from 2001 to 2004. Patients (N=14,905) were divided into four categories according to the number of endogenous risk factors (age, immunodepression, MacCabe score). The overall prevalence of infection was 6.1% and varied according to the category of patient from 1.93% (no risk factors) to 15.2% (three risk factors). The frequencies of NI related to an invasive procedure and to cross-contamination with multi-drug-resistant (MDR) bacteria were 30.9% and 12.3%, respectively; these percentages did not depend on the type of patient. The prevalence of NI decreased over time for patients with two or three risk factors, but was stable for patients with no risk factors. More than 40% of NIs were potentially avoidable (related to invasive procedures or involving cross-transmission of an MDR bacterium) regardless of the category of patient. This study suggests that at least 30% of NIs could be avoided.

  13. The establishment of a statewide surveillance program for hospital-acquired infections in large Victorian public hospitals: a report from the VICNISS Coordinating Centre.

    PubMed

    Russo, Philip L; Bull, Ann; Bennett, Noleen; Boardman, Claire; Burrell, Simon; Motley, Jane; Berry, Kylie; Friedman, N Deborah; Richards, Michael

    2006-09-01

    A 1998 survey of acute Victorian public hospitals (VPH) revealed that surveillance of hospital-acquired infections (HAI) was underdeveloped, definitions and methodology varied considerably, and results disseminated inconsistently. The survey identified the need for an effective surveillance system for HAI. To develop and support a standardized surveillance program for HAIs in large acute VPH and to provide risk-adjusted, procedure-specific, HAI rates. In 2002, the independent Victorian Nosocomial Infection Surveillance System (VICNISS) Coordinating Centre (VCC) was established to develop and support the standardized surveillance program. A multidisciplinary team was recruited. A communication strategy, surveillance manual, user groups, and Web site were developed. Formal education sessions were provided to participating infection control nurse consultants (ICCs). Surveillance activities were based on the US Centers for Diseases Control and Prevention's National Nosocomial Infection Surveillance System (NNIS) surgical site infection and intensive care unit (ICU) components. NNIS methods were modified to suit local needs. Data collection was paper based or through existing hospital software. An advisory committee of key stakeholders met every second month. The surveillance program was rolled out over 12 months to all 28 large adult VPH. Data on over 20,000 surgical procedures performed at participating sites between November 11, 2002, and December 31, 2004, were submitted. Thirteen hospitals contributed to the ICU surveillance activities. Following aggregation and analysis by the VCC, hospital- and state-level results were posted on the Web page for hospitals to review. A standardized approach for surveillance of HAI was established in a short time frame in over 28 VPH. VICNISS is a tool that will continue to provide participating hospitals with a basis for continuous quality improvement.

  14. Nosocomial infection caused by vancomycin-susceptible multidrug-resistant Enterococcus faecalis over a long period in a university hospital in Japan.

    PubMed

    Kudo, Michiaki; Nomura, Takahiro; Yomoda, Sachie; Tanimoto, Koichi; Tomita, Haruyoshi

    2014-11-01

    Compared with other developed countries, vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) are not widespread in clinical environments in Japan. There have been no VRE outbreaks and only a few VRE strains have sporadically been isolated in our university hospital in Gunma, Japan. To examine the drug susceptibility of Enterococcus faecalis and nosocomial infection caused by non-VRE strains, a retrospective surveillance was conducted in our university hospital. Molecular epidemiological analyses were performed on 1711 E. faecalis clinical isolates collected in our hospital over a 6-year period [1998-2003]. Of these isolates, 1241 (72.5%) were antibiotic resistant and 881 (51.5%) were resistant to two or more drugs. The incidence of multidrug resistant E. faecalis (MDR-Ef) isolates in the intensive care unit increased after enlargement and restructuring of the hospital. The major group of MDR-Ef strains consisted of 209 isolates (12.2%) resistant to the five drug combination tetracycline/erythromycin/kanamycin/streptomycin/gentamicin. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis analysis of the major MDR-Ef isolates showed that nosocomial infections have been caused by MDR-Ef over a long period (more than 3 years). Multilocus sequence typing showed that these strains were mainly grouped into ST16 (CC58) or ST64 (CC8). Mating experiments suggested that the drug resistances were encoded on two conjugative transposons (integrative conjugative elements), one encoded tetracycline-resistance and the other erythromycin/kanamycin/streptomycin/gentamicin-resistance. To our knowledge, this is the first report of nosocomial infection caused by vancomycin-susceptible MDR-Ef strains over a long period in Japan.

  15. Evaluation of Cellular Phones for Potential Risk of Nosocomial Infection amongst Dental Operators and Auxiliary Staff.

    PubMed

    Nasim, V S; Al-Hakami, Ahmed; Bijle, Mohammed Nadeem Ahmed; Al-Manea, Sulthan Ahmed; Al-Shehri, Mohammed Dahman; Al-Malki, Saleh Mohammed

    2015-04-01

    This study evaluates cellular phones for potential risk of nosocomial infection amongst dental operators and auxiliary staff in a dental school. Each participant's mobile phone was first cleaned with 70% isopropyl alcohol swab. Following the cleansing protocol, the partakers were asked to make a short phone call. The mobile phones were then washed aseptically by rotating damp cotton swabs with sterile normal saline. Bacterial growth was identified on sheep blood agar and McConkey's agar plates. Sabouraud dextrose agar media was used for fungi species. Descriptive statistics was established with the data statistically explored with SPSS version 17.0. About 50% of dental professionals had shown active bacterial and fungal growth in which 35% (n=35) were dental operators and 15% (n=15) were dental nurses. 53% Gram-positive organisms, 2% Gram-negative organisms, and 3% fungi were identified growths on cellular phones. Thus, it can be concluded that the cellular phones of dental operators as compared to auxiliaries can act as a potential source of nosocomial infection.

  16. Evaluation of Cellular Phones for Potential Risk of Nosocomial Infection amongst Dental Operators and Auxiliary Staff

    PubMed Central

    Nasim, V S; Al-Hakami, Ahmed; Bijle, Mohammed Nadeem Ahmed; Al-Manea, Sulthan Ahmed; Al-Shehri, Mohammed Dahman; Al-Malki, Saleh Mohammed

    2015-01-01

    Background: This study evaluates cellular phones for potential risk of nosocomial infection amongst dental operators and auxiliary staff in a dental school. Materials and Methods: Each participant’s mobile phone was first cleaned with 70% isopropyl alcohol swab. Following the cleansing protocol, the partakers were asked to make a short phone call. The mobile phones were then washed aseptically by rotating damp cotton swabs with sterile normal saline. Bacterial growth was identified on sheep blood agar and McConkey’s agar plates. Sabouraud dextrose agar media was used for fungi species. Descriptive statistics was established with the data statistically explored with SPSS version 17.0. Results: About 50% of dental professionals had shown active bacterial and fungal growth in which 35% (n=35) were dental operators and 15% (n=15) were dental nurses. 53% Gram-positive organisms, 2% Gram-negative organisms, and 3% fungi were identified growths on cellular phones. Conclusion: Thus, it can be concluded that the cellular phones of dental operators as compared to auxiliaries can act as a potential source of nosocomial infection. PMID:25954071

  17. Native Brazilian plants against nosocomial infections: a critical review on their potential and the antimicrobial methodology.

    PubMed

    H Moreno, Paulo Roberto; da Costa-Issa, Fabiana Inácio; Rajca-Ferreira, Agnieszka K; Pereira, Marcos A A; Kaneko, Telma M

    2013-01-01

    The growing incidences of drug-resistant pathogens have increased the attention on several medicinal plants and their metabolites for antimicrobial properties. These pathogens are the main cause of nosocomial infections which led to an increasing mortality among hospitalized patients. Taking into consideration those factors, this paper reviews the state-of-the-art of the research on antibacterial agents from native Brazilian plant species related to nosocomial infections as well as the current methods used in the investigations of the antimicrobial activity and points out the differences in techniques employed by the authors. The antimicrobial assays most frequently used were broth microdilution, agar diffusion, agar dilution and bioautography. The broth microdilution method should be the method of choice for testing new antimicrobial agents from plant extracts or isolated compounds due to its advantages. At the moment, only a small part of the rich Brazilian flora has been investigated for antimicrobial activity, mostly with unfractionated extracts presenting a weak or moderate antibacterial activity. The combination of crude extract with conventional antibiotics represents a largely unexploited new form of chemotherapy with novel and multiple mechanisms of action that can overcome microbial resistance that needs to be further investigated. The antibacterial activity of essential oil vapours might also be an interesting alternative treatment of hospital environment due to their ability in preventing biofilm formation. However, in both alternatives more studies should be done on their mode of action and toxicological effects in order to optimize their use.

  18. [Predictors of nosocomial infection in acute stroke. Relation with morbimortality and outcome].

    PubMed

    Ros, Lourdes; García, Miguel; Prat, Josep; González, Carmen; Gimeno, Concepción; Albert, Amparo; Pascual, José María

    2007-03-31

    Stroke is a very important cause of mortality and disability. This study has the objective of identifying predictor factors and the clinical consequences of nosocomial infection in acute stroke. We prospectively identified a consecutive cohort of patients who were admitted after an acute stroke. We used predefined diagnostic criteria by the World Health Organization and Sociedad Española de Neurología for stroke, and by Centers for Disease Control and Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica for infection. 258 patients with acute stroke were included. 102 (39.5%) had at least one nosocomial infection -45.5% women; age (standard deviation) 78.2 (9.7) years-. The mean hospital stay was 14.9 days (8.4) in infection patients and 8.4 days (5.6) in no infection patients (p < 0.001). 31 patients died and 22 (71%) had at least one cause of infection. Using logistic regression analysis, the dysphagia (odds ratio [OR] = 12.7; 95% confidence interval [CI], 5.3-30.1; p < 0.001) is the strongest and independent predictor of nosocomial infection. Others factors are crural motor affectation (OR = 4.5; 95% CI, 1.7-12.3; p = 0.003), urinary incontinence (OR = 2.9; 95% CI, 1.3-6.4; p = 0.009) and diabetes mellitus (OR = 2.3; 95% CI, 1.1-4.7; p = 0.03). Baseline imbalance National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) > 20 during the admission (OR = 17.3; 95% CI, 5.1-59.5; p < 0.001), mass effect diagnosticated on computerized axial tomography (OR = 4.4; 95% CI, 1.4-14; p = 0.012), poor neurological outcome during the first day (OR = 11.6; 95% CI, 3.6-37.2; p < 0.001), chest infection (OR = 5.7; 95% CI, 1.8-18.3; p = 0.003) and the hyperglucemia in admission (OR = 6; 95% CI, 1.5-25.6; p = 0.015) are the independient predictor factors that increased the likelihood for mortality in acute stroke. Baseline imbalance NIHSS > 20 (OR = 8.9; 95% CI, 2.7-29; p < 0.001), poor outcome neurological during the first day (OR = 8.1; 95% CI, 2.2-29.6%; p = 0

  19. Use of surveillance data to identify target populations for Staphylococcus aureus vaccines and prevent surgical site infections: A pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Gustin, Marie-Paule; Giard, Marine; Bénet, Thomas; Vanhems, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    The development of anti-staphylococcal vaccines is nowadays a priority to prevent surgical site infections (SSI). The objective of the present study was to identify a potential target population by assessing surveillance data on surgery patients for possible anti-staphylococcal vaccine administration. Individuals at high risk of SSI by Staphylococcus aureus (SA) were targeted by the French SSI Surveillance Network in south-eastern France between 2008 and 2011. Among 238,470 patients, those undergoing primary total hip replacement appeared to be an interesting and healthy enough population for anti-staphylococcal vaccine testing. These male patients, subjected to multiple procedures and with American Society of Anesthesiologists score >2, had a probability of SA SSI about 21 times higher than females with no severe systemic disease and no multiple procedures. Our study indicates that surveillance data on SSI might be an interesting epidemiological source for planning vaccine trials to prevent nosocomial infections. PMID:25668663

  20. Nosocomial pneumonia: lessons learned.

    PubMed

    Nair, Girish B; Niederman, Michael S

    2013-07-01

    Nosocomial pneumonia remains a significant cause of hospital-acquired infection, imposing substantial economic burden on the health care system worldwide. Various preventive strategies have been increasingly used to prevent the development of pneumonia. It is now recognized that patients with health care-associated pneumonia are a heterogeneous population and that not all are at risk for infection with nosocomial pneumonia pathogens, with some being infected with the same organisms as in community-acquired pneumonia. This review discusses the risk factors for nosocomial pneumonia, controversies in its diagnosis, and approaches to the treatment and prevention of nosocomial and health care-associated pneumonia.

  1. Risk factors and clinical outcomes for carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae nosocomial infections.

    PubMed

    Wang, Q; Zhang, Y; Yao, X; Xian, H; Liu, Y; Li, H; Chen, H; Wang, X; Wang, R; Zhao, C; Cao, B; Wang, H

    2016-10-01

    This study was aimed to determine the risk factors of Carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE) nosocomial infections and assess the clinical outcomes. A case-case-control design was used to compare two groups of case patients with control patients from March 2010 to November 2014 in China. Risk factors for the acquisition of CRE infections and clinical outcomes were analyzed by univariable and multivariable analysis. A total of 94 patients with CRE infections, 93 patients with Carbapenem-susceptible Enterobacteriaceae (CSE) infections, and 93 patients with organisms other than Enterobacteriaceae infections were enrolled in this study. Fifty-five isolates were detected as the carbapenemase gene. KPC-2 was the most common carbapenemase (65.5 %, 36/55), followed by NDM-1 (16.4 %, 9/55), IMP-4 (14.5 %, 8/55), NDM-5 (1.8 %, 1/55), and NDM-7 (1.8 %, 1/55). Multivariable analysis implicated previous use of third or fourth generation cephalosporins (odds ratio [OR], 4.557; 95 % confidence interval [CI], 1.971-10.539; P < 0.001) and carbapenems (OR, 4.058; 95 % CI, 1.753-9.397; P = 0.001) as independent risk factors associated with CRE infection. The in-hospital mortality of the CRE group was 57.4 %. In the population of CRE infection, presence of central venous catheters (OR, 4.464; 95 % CI, 1.332-14.925; P = 0.015) and receipt of immunosuppressors (OR, 7.246; 95 % CI, 1.217-43.478; P = 0.030) were independent risk factors for mortality. Appropriate definitive treatment (OR, 0.339; 95 % CI, 0.120-0.954; P = 0.040) was a protective factor for in-hospital death of CRE infection. Kaplan-Meier curves of the CRE group had the shortest survival time compared with the other two groups. Survival time of patients infected with Enterobacteriaceae with a high meropenem MIC (≥8 mg/L) was shorter than that of patients with a low meropenem MIC (2,4, and ≤ 1 mg/L). In conclusion, CRE nosocomial infections are associated with prior exposure

  2. Neonatal nosocomial bloodstream infections at a referral hospital in a middle-income country: burden, pathogens, antimicrobial resistance and mortality.

    PubMed

    Dramowski, Angela; Madide, Ayanda; Bekker, Adrie

    2015-08-01

    Data on nosocomial bloodstream infection (BSI) rates, pathogens, mortality and antimicrobial resistance in African neonates are limited. Nosocomial neonatal BSI at Tygerberg Hospital, Cape Town were retrospectively reviewed between 1 January 2009 and 31 December 2013. Laboratory and hospital data were used to determine BSI rates, pathogen profile, mortality and antimicrobial resistance in selected nosocomial pathogens. Of 6521 blood cultures taken over 5 years, 1145 (17.6%) were culture-positive, and 717 (62.6%) discrete nosocomial BSI episodes were identified. Nosocomial BSI rates remained unchanged over time (overall 3.9/1000 patient days, 95% CI 3.6-4.2, χ(2) for trend P = 0.23). Contamination rates were relatively high (5.1%, 95% CI 4.6-5.7%). Among BSI pathogens, Gram-negatives predominated (65% vs 31% Gram-positives and 4% fungal); Klebsiella pneumoniae (235, 30%), Staphylococcus aureus (112, 14%) and Enterococci (88, 11%) were most prevalent. Overall crude BSI mortality was 16% (112/717); Gram-negative BSI was significantly associated with mortality (P = 0.007). Mortality occurred mostly in neonates of very low (33/112, 29%) or extremely low (53/112, 47%) birthweight. Deaths attributed to nosocomial BSI declined significantly over time (χ(2) for trend P = 0.01). The prevalence of antibiotic-resistant pathogens was high: methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus 66%, multidrug-resistant A. baumanni 90% and extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing K. pneumoniae 73%. The burden of nosocomial neonatal BSI at this middle-income country referral neonatal unit is substantial and remained unchanged over the study period, although attributable mortality declined significantly. Nosocomial BSI pathogens exhibited high levels of antimicrobial resistance.

  3. High Variability in Nosocomial Clostridium difficile Infection Rates Across Hospitals After Colorectal Resection.

    PubMed

    Aquina, Christopher T; Probst, Christian P; Becerra, Adan Z; Hensley, Bradley J; Iannuzzi, James C; Noyes, Katia; Monson, John R T; Fleming, Fergal J

    2016-04-01

    Hospital-acquired Clostridium difficile infection is associated with adverse patient outcomes and high medical costs. The incidence and severity of C. difficile has been rising in both medical and surgical patients. Our aim was to assess risk factors and variation associated with the development of nosocomial C. difficile colitis among patients undergoing colorectal resection. This was a retrospective cohort study. The study included segmental colectomy and proctectomy cases in New York State from 2005 to 2013. The study cohort included 150,878 colorectal resections. Patients with a documented previous history of C. difficile infection or residence outside of New York State were excluded. A diagnosis of C. difficile colitis either during the index hospital stay or on readmission within 30 days was the main measure. C. difficile colitis occurred in 3323 patients (2.2%). Unadjusted C. difficile colitis rates ranged from 0% to 11.3% among surgeons and 0% to 6.8% among hospitals. After controlling for patient, surgeon, and hospital characteristics using mixed-effects multivariable analysis, significant unexplained variation in C. difficile rates remained present across hospitals but not surgeons. Patient factors explained only 24% of the total hospital-level variation, and known surgeon and hospital-level characteristics explained an additional 8% of the total hospital-level variation. Therefore, ≈70% of the hospital variation in C. difficile infection rates remained unexplained by captured patient, surgeon, and hospital factors. Furthermore, there was an ≈5-fold difference in adjusted C. difficile rates across hospitals. A limited set of hospital and surgeon characteristics was available. Colorectal surgery patients appear to be at high risk for C. difficile infection, and alarming variation in nosocomial C. difficile infection rates currently exists among hospitals after colorectal resection. Given the high morbidity and cost associated with C. difficile colitis

  4. Impact of a multidimensional infection control strategy on catheter-associated urinary tract infection rates in the adult intensive care units of 15 developing countries: findings of the International Nosocomial Infection Control Consortium (INICC).

    PubMed

    Rosenthal, V D; Todi, S K; Álvarez-Moreno, C; Pawar, M; Karlekar, A; Zeggwagh, A A; Mitrev, Z; Udwadia, F E; Navoa-Ng, J A; Chakravarthy, M; Salomao, R; Sahu, S; Dilek, A; Kanj, S S; Guanche-Garcell, H; Cuéllar, L E; Ersoz, G; Nevzat-Yalcin, A; Jaggi, N; Medeiros, E A; Ye, G; Akan, Ö A; Mapp, T; Castañeda-Sabogal, A; Matta-Cortés, L; Sirmatel, F; Olarte, N; Torres-Hernández, H; Barahona-Guzmán, N; Fernández-Hidalgo, R; Villamil-Gómez, W; Sztokhamer, D; Forciniti, S; Berba, R; Turgut, H; Bin, C; Yang, Y; Pérez-Serrato, I; Lastra, C E; Singh, S; Ozdemir, D; Ulusoy, S

    2012-10-01

    We aimed to evaluate the impact of a multidimensional infection control strategy for the reduction of the incidence of catheter-associated urinary tract infection (CAUTI) in patients hospitalized in adult intensive care units (AICUs) of hospitals which are members of the International Nosocomial Infection Control Consortium (INICC), from 40 cities of 15 developing countries: Argentina, Brazil, China, Colombia, Costa Rica, Cuba, India, Lebanon, Macedonia, Mexico, Morocco, Panama, Peru, Philippines, and Turkey. We conducted a prospective before-after surveillance study of CAUTI rates on 56,429 patients hospitalized in 57 AICUs, during 360,667 bed-days. The study was divided into the baseline period (Phase 1) and the intervention period (Phase 2). In Phase 1, active surveillance was performed. In Phase 2, we implemented a multidimensional infection control approach that included: (1) a bundle of preventive measures, (2) education, (3) outcome surveillance, (4) process surveillance, (5) feedback of CAUTI rates, and (6) feedback of performance. The rates of CAUTI obtained in Phase 1 were compared with the rates obtained in Phase 2, after interventions were implemented. We recorded 253,122 urinary catheter (UC)-days: 30,390 in Phase 1 and 222,732 in Phase 2. In Phase 1, before the intervention, the CAUTI rate was 7.86 per 1,000 UC-days, and in Phase 2, after intervention, the rate of CAUTI decreased to 4.95 per 1,000 UC-days [relative risk (RR) 0.63 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.55-0.72)], showing a 37% rate reduction. Our study showed that the implementation of a multidimensional infection control strategy is associated with a significant reduction in the CAUTI rate in AICUs from developing countries.

  5. Nosocomial infections in the medical ICU: a retrospective study highlighting their prevalence, microbiological profile and impact on ICU stay and mortality.

    PubMed

    Pradhan, Neeta P; Bhat, S M; Ghadage, D P

    2014-10-01

    1. To study the prevalence of nosocomial infections in the Medical ICU. 2. To determine common microorganisms causing nosocomial infections in the ICU and their antibiotic- sensitivity profile. 3. To study the impact of nosocomial infections on ICU stay and mortality. A retrospective 1 year analysis of nosocomial infections in the Medical ICU at Smt. Kashibai Navale Medical College and Hospital, Pune, between January and December 2011 was carried out. Prevalence of nosocomial infections was determined; sites of nosocomial infections and common causative microorganisms were identified; their antibiotic-sensitivity profiles were studied. The group of patients with nosocomial infections was matched with a control group drawn from the pool of patients without nosocomial infections; this matching was done with respect to age, gender and clinical diagnosis. Period of ICU stay and patient mortality rates in the two groups were analysed. A total of 366 ICU patient records were analysed. Of these, 32 patients were found-to have developed 35 nosocomial infections (9.6% prevalence), of which respiratory infections were the commonest (65.8%), followed by urinary infections (17.1%) and dual infections (urinary plus respiratory) (17.1%).The most frequently isolated microorganism causing respiratory infections was Acinetobacter (40.4%), 21% isolates of which were multidrug resistant; whereas the most frequently isolated microorganism causing urinary tract infections was Pseudomonas (38.4%). Average ICU stay in patients with and without nosocomial infections was 16.5 and 6.4 days respectively; whereas mortality in the two groups was 28.1% and 31.2% respectively. Overall ICU mortality was 19.9%. The nosocomial infection rate in our ICU was in keeping with the rate in many industrialised countries. The most common site of nosocomial infection was the respiratory tract, followed by the urinary tract. Acinetobacter was the commonest respiratory isolate, whereas Pseudomonas was the

  6. [THE SPECTRUM AND ANTIBIOTIC RESISTANCE OF AGENTS OF NOSOCOMIAL INFECTION OF OPERATION WOUNDS AND ORGANS OF URINARY EXCRETION SYSTEM IN SURGERY PATIENTS].

    PubMed

    Omarova, S M; Mollaeva, A M; Alieva, A I; Saidova, P C; Alieva, S F; Kasumova, A M

    2015-05-01

    In risk group of development of nosocomial infections related to medical care provision, prevailed weakened patients after various surgical interferences and cauterization. The nosocomial infections related to medical care provision develop up to 20% of patients of surgical profile (infections of soft tissues - 9.5%, intra-abdominal infections - 22% and infections of urinary tracts - 4.8%). The Gram-negative bacilli Enerobacteriaceae and Gram-negative nonfermenters.

  7. Age as a risk factor of nosocomial infection after hip fracture surgery.

    PubMed

    Cruz, Encarnacion; Cano, Juan Ramon; Benitez-Parejo, Nicolás; Rivas-Ruiz, Francisco; Perea-Milla, Emilio; Guerado, Enrique

    2010-01-01

    Surgery for the treatment of hip fractures is considered the gold standard even among nonagerians with a heavy comorbidity burden. Therefore, a study of an association between surgical complications and some variables in elderly individuals appears to be very important. We designed a transverse study in which we determined patient age at the time of development of a nosocomial infection (NI) in patients who underwent surgery to treat a hip fracture. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed by simple and multiple logistic regression. We found that age was a determinant in NI after surgical treatment for hip fracture. The older the patient was, the higher the risk of development of an NI after surgical treatment for hip fracture (operative hypothesis). However, the risk of infection changed depending on the treatment. No association with other variables was found.

  8. Bacteriocins active against multi-resistant gram negative bacteria implicated in nosocomial infections.

    PubMed

    Ghodhbane, Hanen; Elaidi, Sabrine; Sabatier, Jean-Marc; Achour, Sami; Benhmida, Jeannette; Regaya, Imed

    2015-01-01

    Multiresistant Gram-negative bacteria are the prime mover of nosocomial infections. Some are naturally resistant to antibiotics, their genetic makes them insensitive to certain families of antibiotics and they transmit these resistors to their offspring. Moreover, when bacteria are subjected to antibiotics, they eventually develop resistance against drugs to which they were previously sensitive. In recent years, many bacteriocins active against gram-negative bacteria have been identified proving their efficacy in treating infections. While further investigation remains necessary before the possibilities for bacteriocins in clinical practice can be described more fully, this review provides an overview of bacteriocins acting on the most common infectious gram negative bacteria (Klebsiella, Acinetobacter, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and E. coli).

  9. Nosocomial rotavirus infection: An up to date evaluation of European studies.

    PubMed

    Gervasi, G; Capanna, A; Mita, V; Zaratti, L; Franco, E

    2016-09-01

    Rotavirus (RV) is worldwide considered as the most important viral agent of acute gastroenteritis in children less than 5 y. Since 2006, the availability of anti-RV vaccines has deeply modified the incidence and economic burden of RV infection. In Europe, some countries have introduced an anti-RV vaccination program in the last 10 y. Although community acquired RV (CARV) disease is the most studied condition of RV infection, recently some authors have highlighted the importance of nosocomial RV (nRV) disease as an emerging public health issue. The aim of this review is to summarize the epidemiology of both CARV and nRV, in order to discuss the difficulty of a clear evaluation of the burden of the disease in absence of comparable data. In particular, we focused our attention to European studies regarding nRV in terms of divergences related to definition, report of incidence rate and methodological issues.

  10. Prediction of nosocomial infection acquisition in ventilated patients by nasal nitric oxide: proof-of-concept study.

    PubMed

    Tadié, Jean-Marc; Trinquart, Ludovic; Jannière-Nartey, Caroline; Guerot, Emmanuel; Louis, Bruno; Fagon, Jean-Yves; Diehl, Jean-Luc; Delclaux, Christophe

    2010-09-01

    The development of biomarkers able to predict the occurrence of nosocomial infection could help manage preventive strategies, especially in medical patients whose degree of acquired immunosuppression may be variable. We hypothesized that the NO fraction present in the airways (upper and lower) of critically ill patients under mechanical ventilation could constitute such a biomarker. We conducted an observational proof-of-concept study in a medical intensive care unit of a teaching hospital. Forty-five patients (26 men; 72 [25th-75th percentiles] years [56-82]; Simplified Acute Physiology Score II, 63 [50-81], 14 infected) under mechanical ventilation (>3 days) underwent on day 1 and day 3 of their stay: nasal and exhaled (partitioned in bronchial and alveolar sources) bedside NO measurements, determination of urine NO end products and plasma cytokine (IL-6, IL-10) concentrations, and Sequential Organ Failure Assessment score calculation. Nosocomial infection incidence was recorded during the 15 subsequent days. Fifteen patients (33%) acquired a nosocomial infection (16 infections, 15 ventilator-associated pneumonia and 1 bacteremia). Nasal NO was the only marker significantly different between patients with and without subsequent infection (day 1, 52 ppb [20-142] vs. 134 [84-203], P = 0.038; day 3, 98 ppb [22-140] vs. 225 [89-288], P = 0.006, respectively). Nasal NO fraction 148 ppb or less at day 3 had an 80% sensitivity, a 70% specificity, and an odds ratio of 2.7 (95% confidence interval, 1.9-3.8) to predict acquisition of nosocomial infection. Nonsurvivors had a higher IL-6 concentration on day 3 (P = 0.014), whereas their nasal NO fractions were not significantly different. Nasal NO seems to be a relatively sensitive and specific biomarker of subsequent nosocomial infection acquisition (at least for ventilator-associated pneumonia), which warrants confirmation in a multicenter trial.

  11. [Nosocomial risk factors of hepatitis C infection. A multicenter study in a hospital-based population].

    PubMed

    Maugat, S; Astagneau, P; Thibault, V; Desruennes, E; Baffoy, N; Desenclos, J-C; Brücker, G

    2003-06-01

    Drug abuse and blood transfusion are well known risk factors for hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. However, the route of transmission remains undetermined for 30% of HCV infections. The potential for nosocomial transmission of HCV in health care settings has been suggested but remains poorly estimated. The aim of the study was to assess the prevalence and to identify risk factors for hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection in hospitalized patients frequently exposed to invasive procedures. A multi-center sero-prevalence study was conducted in hospitalized patients who underwent invasive procedures in interventional radiology wards in 6 University hospitals in Paris between 1998 and 1999. Each patient presenting in the ward was consecutively interviewed by a medical investigator. Data were collected on a standardized questionnaire including items on socio-demographic characteristics, past exposure to intravenous drug use, blood transfusions, underlying diseases and type and number of previous invasive procedures. Before procedure, HCV antibody testing (ELISA) was performed in all patients after informed consent. In all HCV-positive patients, HCV viremia was detected using polymerase chain reaction. Overall, 91 of 944 (9.7%) patients were HCV-positive, of whom 90% had positive viremia and 10 were identified HCV positive by the screening. HCV prevalence decreased with age and ranged from 4.5% to 22% according to center. Logistic regression analysis showed that intravenous drug use, history of blood transfusions and endoscopy were found as independent risk factors for HCV infection (odds ratio [CI95%]: 77.3 [23.3-256.3], 4.7 [2.7-8.2] et 1.20 [1.01-1.44]). No other risk factor for nosocomial or iatrogenic transmission was identified. The results suggest that, except for blood transfusions, other healthcare-related procedures may partly explain HCV transmission. This emphasizes the need to reinforce compliance with standard precautions of hygiene.

  12. Surgical Site Infections Rates in More Than 13,000 Surgical Procedures in Three Cities in Peru: Findings of the International Nosocomial Infection Control Consortium.

    PubMed

    Ramírez-Wong, Fernando M; Atencio-Espinoza, Teodora; Rosenthal, Victor D; Ramirez, Eliza; Torres-Zegarra, Socorro L; Díaz Tavera, Zoila Rosa; Sarmiento López, Favio; Silva Astete, Nazario; Campos Guevara, Francisco; Bazan Mendoza, Carlos; Valencia Ramírez, Augusto; Soto Pastrana, Javier

    2015-10-01

    Surgical site infections (SSIs) are a threat to patient safety. However, there are not available data on SSI rates stratified by surgical procedure (SP) in Peru. From January 2005 to December 2010, a cohort prospective surveillance study on SSIs was conducted by the International Nosocomial Infection Control Consortium (INICC) in four hospitals in three cities of Peru. Data were recorded from hospitalized patients using the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention-National Healthcare Safety Network (CDC-NHSN) methods and definitions for SSI. Surgical procedures (SPs) were classified into 4 types, according to ICD-9 criteria. We recorded 352 SSIs, associated to 13,904 SPs (2.5%; CI, 2.3-2.8) SSI rates per type of SP were the following for this study's Peruvian hospitals, compared with rates of the INICC and CDC-NHSN reports, respectively: 2.9% for appendix surgery (vs. 2.9% vs. 1.4%); 2.8% for gallbladder surgery (vs. 2.5% vs. 0.6%); 2.2% for cesarean section (vs. 0.7% vs. 1.8%); 2.8% for vaginal hysterectomy (vs. 2.0% vs. 0.9%). Our SSIs rates were higher in all of the four analyzed types of SPs compared with CDC-NHSN, whereas compared with INICC, most rates were similar. This study represents an important advance in the knowledge of SSI epidemiology in Peru that will allow us to introduce targeted interventions.

  13. Nosocomial infection due to enterobacter cloacae in a tertiary care hospital in northern India.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, G; Ayyagari, A; Prasad, K N; Dhole, T N; Singh, S K

    1996-01-01

    A total of 151 Enterobacter cloacae strains isolated from clinical samples (n = 139) and the hospital environment (n = 12) at a tertiary care hospital in northern India during January to October 1993, were analysed. The maximum isolations were during May (n = 24), June (n = 23) and July (n = 22). Urinary tract infection (n = 56) was the most common complication of E. cloacea infection followed by wound infection (42), respiratory tract infection (23) and bacteraemia/septicaemia (18). The frequency of resistance to different drugs was ampicillin 77.4 per cent, cotrimoxazole 79.5 per cent, gentamicin 57.5 per cent, cefotaxime 47 per cent and ofloxacin 36 per cent. Sixty three (41.7%) strains exhibited resistance to multiple drugs. Environmental isolates from bed, hospital diet, hand swab and water from a leaking drain pipe in a ward showed the same resistance pattern. A single index strain could not be identified using phage and biotyping, indicating that a variety of strains were responsible for the nosocomial infection. Adoption of strict aseptic measures and repair of the pipe brought down the infection rate.

  14. [Sensitivity of nosocomial purulent-septic infection causative agents to disinfection agents and antibiotics].

    PubMed

    Sergevnin, V I; Kliukina, T V; Kliuchareva, N M; Volkova, E O; Kudriavtseva, L G

    2014-01-01

    Study the sensitivity of nosocomial purulent-septic infection (PSI) causative agents to disinfectants (DA) and antibiotics (AB). Sensitivity to DA and AB of 209 PSI causative agent strains isolated from patients and the environment of 2 obstetric and 3 surgical hospitals was studied in 2009-2011. Sensitivity to DA of 94 strains and to AB of 189 strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from patients with signs of PSI of reanimation and intensive therapy and surgical departments of a multi-field hospital was studied in 2012. Sensitivity to DA was determined on test-surfaces and in solution according to guidelines by V.V. Shkarin et al., 2010; sensitivity to AB - by disc-diffusion method. Among PSI causative agents resistant to DA the portion of poly-antibiotic resistant strains is higher than among microorganisms sensitive to DA, and among antibiotic resistant bacteria the number of strains resistant to DA is higher than among sensitive to antibiotics. The increase of resistance to DA and AB of P. aeruginosa strains is observed in parallel to the increase of volume of the antibacterial preparations used. The results obtained give evidence of the possibility of formation of combined (associated) resistance to DA and AB by nosocomial PSI causative agents against the background of increase of their consumption.

  15. A model for predicting nosocomial carbapenem-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae infection

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Duo; Xie, Zeqiang; Xin, Xuli; Xue, Wenying; Zhang, Man

    2016-01-01

    Mortality associated with infections due to carbapenem-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae (CR-KP) is high and the infections need to be predicted early. The risk factors for CR-KP infection are heterogeneous. The aim of the present study was to construct a model allowing for the early prediction of CR-KP infection. Nosocomial infections due to K. pneumoniae were evaluated retrospectively over a 2-year period. The case cohort consisted of 370 inpatients with CR-KP infection. For each case enrolled, two matched controls with no CR-KP infection during their hospitalization were randomly selected. Matching involved month of admission, ward, as well as interval days. The Vitek 2 system was used for identification of isolates and antimicrobial susceptibility testing. General linear model with logistic regression was used to identify possible risk factors. The predicted power of the model was expressed as the area under the receiver-operating characteristic curve. Age, male gender, with cardiovascular disease, hospital stay, recent admission to intensive care unit, indwelling urinary catheter, mechanical ventilation, recent β-lactam-β-lactamase inhibitors, fourth-generation cephalosporins and/or carbapenems therapy were independent risk factors for CR-KP infection. Models predicting CR-KP infection developed by cumulative risk factors exhibited good power, with areas under the receiver-operating characteristic curves of 0.902 [95% confidence interval (CI), 0.883–0.920; P<0.001] and 0.899 (95% CI, 0.877–0.921; P<0.001) after filtering by age (≥70 years). The Yonden index was at the maximum when the cumulative risk factors were ≥3 in the two prediction models. The results show that the prediction model developed in the present study might be useful for controlling infections caused by CR-KP strains. PMID:27699021

  16. Phylogenetic Analysis of Stenotrophomonas spp. Isolates Contributes to the Identification of Nosocomial and Community-Acquired Infections

    PubMed Central

    Cerezer, Vinicius Godoy; Pasternak, Jacyr; Franzolin, Marcia Regina; Moreira-Filho, Carlos Alberto

    2014-01-01

    Stenotrophomonas ssp. has a wide environmental distribution and is also found as an opportunistic pathogen, causing nosocomial or community-acquired infections. One species, S. maltophilia, presents multidrug resistance and has been associated with serious infections in pediatric and immunocompromised patients. Therefore, it is relevant to conduct resistance profile and phylogenetic studies in clinical isolates for identifying infection origins and isolates with augmented pathogenic potential. Here, multilocus sequence typing was performed for phylogenetic analysis of nosocomial isolates of Stenotrophomonas spp. and, environmental and clinical strains of S. maltophilia. Biochemical and multidrug resistance profiles of nosocomial and clinical strains were determined. The inferred phylogenetic profile showed high clonal variability, what correlates with the adaptability process of Stenotrophomonas to different habitats. Two clinical isolates subgroups of S. maltophilia sharing high phylogenetic homogeneity presented intergroup recombination, thus indicating the high permittivity to horizontal gene transfer, a mechanism involved in the acquisition of antibiotic resistance and expression of virulence factors. For most of the clinical strains, phylogenetic inference was made using only partial ppsA gene sequence. Therefore, the sequencing of just one specific fragment of this gene would allow, in many cases, determining whether the infection with S. maltophilia was nosocomial or community-acquired. PMID:24818127

  17. Correlation between levofloxacin consumption and the incidence of nosocomial infections due to fluoroquinolone-resistant Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hui-Hsiu; Liu, Hsin-Yi; Lin, Yi-Chun; Hsueh, Po-Ren; Lee, Yuarn-Jang

    2016-06-01

    The relationship between fluoroquinolone resistance in Escherichia coli isolates causing nosocomial infection and hospital antibiotic consumption were investigated. Restriction of levofloxacin use was implemented to control the incidence of fluoroquinolone-resistant E coli in the hospital. The study was conducted from January 2004 to December 2010. Antimicrobial agent consumption was obtained from the pharmacy computer system and presented as the defined daily doses per 1000 patient-days every 6 months. The incidence of fluoroquinolone-resistant E coli isolates causing nosocomial infections was obtained from the Department of Infection Control every 6 months. An antimicrobial stewardship program, restricting levofloxacain use, was implemented in July 2007. The incidence of fluoroquinolone-resistant E coli causing nosocomial infections was significantly correlated with fluoroquinolone usage (p = 0.005), but not with the use of third- or fourth-generation cephalosporins, piperacillin-tazobactam, or carbapenems. Parenteral (p = 0.002), oral (p = 0.018), and total levofloxacin (p = 0.001) use were significantly correlated with the extent of fluoroquinolone resistance. With a reduction of levofloxacin use, a decrease of the incidence of fluoroquinolone resistance in E coli isolates was observed. There is a significant correlation between levofloxacin use and the incidence of nosocomial fluoroquinolone-resistant E coli isolates. The incidence of fluoroquinolone-resistant E coli could be reduced by limiting levofloxacin consumption. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. Antimicrobial activities of bacteriocins E50-52 and B602 against MRSA and other nosocomial infections

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Our objective was to determine the antimicrobial activities of previously published bacteriocins E50-52 and B602 against methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and other prominent nosocomial bacterial infections. methods: Several Russian hospitals were enlisted into the study from 2003 ...

  19. Prospective surgical site infection surveillance in dogs.

    PubMed

    Turk, Ryen; Singh, Ameet; Weese, J Scott

    2015-01-01

    To 1) describe the incidence of surgical site infections (SSI) in dogs undergoing surgery at the Ontario Veterinary College Health Sciences Centre; 2) describe and compare procedure-specific SSI rates; and 3) identify factors associated with development of SSI. Prospective, cohort study Dogs (n = 846) undergoing surgery during 45 weeks (September 2010-July 2011). Follow-up telephone conversation with dog owners was performed 30 days postoperatively, with additional 1-year follow-up performed for cases with surgical implants. A standardized questionnaire was administered to detect and characterize SSI. SSI were identified in 26 (3.0%) dogs; 11 (42%) were classified as superficial SSI, whereas 13 were deep, and 2 were organ/space. Of the confirmed SSI, only 17 (65%) were documented in the medical records. Hypotension (P = .011), class of surgery (P = .029), and use of an implant (P = .001) increased the risk of SSI. Microbial cultures were submitted for 19 cases (73%) and of those, 74% were staphylococci. SSI can result in devastating consequences in dogs and understanding risk factors is critical to target prevention practices. Whereas some risk factors such as hypotension are modifiable, others such as class of surgery are not. When possible, active surveillance should be used as part of a hospital infection control program. © Copyright 2014 by The American College of Veterinary Surgeons.

  20. Detection of the KPC Gene in Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Acinetobacter baumannii during a PCR-Based Nosocomial Surveillance Study in Puerto Rico▿

    PubMed Central

    Robledo, Iraida E.; Aquino, Edna E.; Vázquez, Guillermo J.

    2011-01-01

    A 6-month, PCR-based, island-wide hospital surveillance study of beta-lactam resistance in Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Acinetobacter baumannii was conducted in Puerto Rico. Of 10,507 isolates, 1,239 (12%) unique, multi-beta-lactam-resistant isolates from all geographical regions were identified. The KPC gene was detected in 61 E. coli, 333 K. pneumoniae, 99 P. aeruginosa, and 41 A. baumannii isolates, indicating the widespread dissemination of the KPC gene in clinically significant nosocomial isolates. PMID:21444702

  1. An organizational climate intervention associated with increased handwashing and decreased nosocomial infections.

    PubMed

    Larson, E L; Early, E; Cloonan, P; Sugrue, S; Parides, M

    2000-01-01

    Handwashing practices are persistently suboptimal among healthcare professionals and are also stubbornly resistant to change. The purpose of this quasi-experimental intervention trial was to assess the impact of an intervention to change organizational culture on frequency of staff handwashing (as measured by counting devices inserted into soap dispensers on four critical care units) and nosocomial infections associated with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE). All staff in one of two hospitals in the mid-Atlantic region received an intervention with multiple components designed to change organizational culture; the second hospital served as a comparison. Over a period of 8 months, 860,567 soap dispensings were recorded, with significant improvements in the study hospital after 6 months of follow-up. Rates of MRSA were not significantly different between the two hospitals, but rates of VRE were significantly reduced in the intervention hospital during implementation.

  2. Role of Mental Disorders in Nosocomial Infections after Hip Fracture Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Guerado, Enrique; Cano, Juan Ramon; Cruz, Encarnacion; Benitez-Parejo, Nicolás; Perea-Milla, Emilio

    2010-01-01

    The association between mental disorders (MDs) and iatrogenic complications after hip fracture surgery has been poorly studied. Among iatrogenic complications, nosocomial infections (NIs) are a major factor in hip fracture surgery. The aim of this paper was to determine whether patients with a MD and a hip fracture develop more NIs after hip surgery than patients with no MD. We studied 912 patients who underwent surgery for a hip fracture (223 patients with a MD who underwent surgery for a hip fracture and 689 control patients without a MD who also underwent surgery for a hip fracture) and followed them after surgery. Univariable and multivariable analyses were performed using simple and multiple logistic regression analysis (confidence interval, crude and adjusted odds ratios, and P value). We found that MDs, gender, and comorbidities were not associated with a higher risk of developing a NI after surgery for a hip fracture. Only age increases the risk of a NI. PMID:20628560

  3. [Prevention of traditional Chinese medicine Gubiao Pixie prescription for nosocomial infection in elderly population].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wanxiang; Wang, Bochao; Li, Zhijun

    2017-05-01

    To observe the curative effect of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) Gubiao Pixie prescription on the prevention of nosocomial infection in elderly patients with susceptible factors. A prospective observational study was conducted. The elderly patients aged over 70 years admitted to the Department of Integrated TCM and Western Medicine of Tianjin First Center Hospital from March 2015 to March 2016 were enrolled. The patients were divided into experiment group and control group by random number table. The patients in control group were given conventional treatment without special intervention; and those in experimental group were given Gubiao Pixie prescription particles (prescription composition: Radix Astragali 30 g, Bran fried Rhizoma Atracylodis 20 g, Raidix Saposhnikoviae 12 g, Radix Scutellariae 10 g, Fructus Tsaoko 6 g) on the basis of conventional treatment. The Gubiao Pixie prescription particles were taken in warm water 300 mL, twice a day in morning and evening respectively, taking half an hour after meals, and were increased or decreased according to the disease condition. The changes in immune function parameters before and after treatment, as well as the incidence of nosocomial infection, the abnormal increase rate of body temperature, white blood cell (WBC), and C-reactive protein (CRP) after 10 days of treatment in the two groups were observed. A total of 110 elderly patients with susceptible factors during hospitalization were included. After the exclusion of vomiting, abdominal distension and failure to conform the trial requirements, hospitalization time less than 10 days of patients, a total of 100 patients were enrolled in the analysis finally, with 50 patients in control group and in experimental group respectively. There were no significant differences in immune function parameters including IgA, IgG, IgM before treatment between the two groups. After 10 days of treatment, the immune function parameters showed no significant improvement in

  4. Nutritional Status and Nosocomial Infections among Adult Elective Surgery Patients in a Mexican Tertiary Care Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-García, Judith; Gamiño-Iriarte, Astrid; Rodea-Montero, Edel Rafael

    2015-01-01

    Background Controversy exists as to whether obesity constitutes a risk-factor or a protective-factor for the development of nosocomial Infection (NI). According to the obesity-paradox, there is evidence that moderate obesity is a protective-factor. In Mexico few studies have focused on the nutritional status (NS) distribution in the hospital setting. Objectives The aim of this study was to estimate the distribution of NS and the prevalence of nosocomial infection NI among adult elective surgery (ES) patients and to compare the clinical and anthropometric characteristics and length of stays (LOS) between obese and non-obese patients and between patients with and without NI. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional study with a sample (n = 82) adult ES patients (21–59 years old) who were recruited from a tertiary-care hospital. The prevalences of each NS category and NI were estimated, the assessments were compared between groups (Mann-Whitney, Chi-squared or the Fisher's-exact-test), and the association between preoperative risk-factors and NI was evaluated using odds ratios. Results The distribution of subjects by NS category was: underweight (3.66%), normal-weight (28.05%), overweight (35.36%), and obese (32.93%). The prevalence of NI was 14.63%. The LOS was longer (p<0.001) for the patients who developed NI. The percentages of NI were: 33.3% in underweight, 18.52% in obese, 17.39% in normal-weight, and 6.90% in overweight patients. Conclusion The prevalence of overweight and obesity in adult ES patients is high. The highest prevalence of NI occurred in the underweight and obese patients. The presence of NI considerably increased the LOS, resulting in higher medical care costs. PMID:25803860

  5. Device-associated infection rates, mortality, length of stay and bacterial resistance in intensive care units in Ecuador: International Nosocomial Infection Control Consortium’s findings

    PubMed Central

    Salgado Yepez, Estuardo; Bovera, Maria M; Rosenthal, Victor D; González Flores, Hugo A; Pazmiño, Leonardo; Valencia, Francisco; Alquinga, Nelly; Ramirez, Vanessa; Jara, Edgar; Lascano, Miguel; Delgado, Veronica; Cevallos, Cristian; Santacruz, Gasdali; Pelaéz, Cristian; Zaruma, Celso; Barahona Pinto, Diego

    2017-01-01

    AIM To report the results of the International Nosocomial Infection Control Consortium (INICC) study conducted in Quito, Ecuador. METHODS A device-associated healthcare-acquired infection (DA-HAI) prospective surveillance study conducted from October 2013 to January 2015 in 2 adult intensive care units (ICUs) from 2 hospitals using the United States Centers for Disease Control/National Healthcare Safety Network (CDC/NHSN) definitions and INICC methods. RESULTS We followed 776 ICU patients for 4818 bed-days. The central line-associated bloodstream infection (CLABSI) rate was 6.5 per 1000 central line (CL)-days, the ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) rate was 44.3 per 1000 mechanical ventilator (MV)-days, and the catheter-associated urinary tract infection (CAUTI) rate was 5.7 per 1000 urinary catheter (UC)-days. CLABSI and CAUTI rates in our ICUs were similar to INICC rates [4.9 (CLABSI) and 5.3 (CAUTI)] and higher than NHSN rates [0.8 (CLABSI) and 1.3 (CAUTI)] - although device use ratios for CL and UC were higher than INICC and CDC/NSHN’s ratios. By contrast, despite the VAP rate was higher than INICC (16.5) and NHSN’s rates (1.1), MV DUR was lower in our ICUs. Resistance of A. baumannii to imipenem and meropenem was 75.0%, and of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to ciprofloxacin and piperacillin-tazobactam was higher than 72.7%, all them higher than CDC/NHSN rates. Excess length of stay was 7.4 d for patients with CLABSI, 4.8 for patients with VAP and 9.2 for patients CAUTI. Excess crude mortality in ICUs was 30.9% for CLABSI, 14.5% for VAP and 17.6% for CAUTI. CONCLUSION DA-HAI rates in our ICUs from Ecuador are higher than United States CDC/NSHN rates and similar to INICC international rates. PMID:28289522

  6. Multicenter prospective study on device-associated infection rates and bacterial resistance in intensive care units of Venezuela: International Nosocomial Infection Control Consortium (INICC) findings.

    PubMed

    Empaire, Gabriel D; Guzman Siritt, Maria E; Rosenthal, Victor D; Pérez, Fernando; Ruiz, Yvis; Díaz, Claudia; Di Silvestre, Gabriela; Salinas, Evelyn; Orozco, Nelva

    2017-01-01

    Device-associated healthcare-acquired infections (DA-HAI) pose a threat to patient safety in the intensive care unit (ICU). A DA-HAI surveillance study was conducted by the International Nosocomial Infection Control Consortium (INICC) in two adult medical/surgical ICUs at two hospitals in Caracas, Venezuela, in different periods from March 2008 to April 2015, using the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Healthcare Safety Network (CDC/NHSN) definitions and criteria, and INICC methods. We followed 1041 ICU patients for 4632 bed days. Central line-associated bloodstream infection (CLABSI) rate was 5.1 per 1000 central line days, ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) rate was 7.2 per 1000 mechanical ventilator days, and catheter-associated urinary tract infection (CAUTI) rate was 3.9 per 1000 urinary catheter days, all similar to or lower than INICC rates (4.9 [CLABSI]; 16.5 [VAP]; 5.3 [CAUTI]), and higher than CDC/NHSN rates (0.8 [CLABSI]; 1.1 [VAP]; and 1.3 [CAUTI]). Device utilization ratios were higher than INICC and CDC/NHSN rates, except for urinary catheter, which was similar to INICC. Extra length of stay was 8 days for patients with CLABSI, 9.6 for VAP and 5.7 days for CAUTI. Additional crude mortality was 3.0% for CLABSI, 4.4% for VAP, and 16.9% for CAUTI. DA-HAI rates in our ICUs are higher than CDC/NSHN's and similar to or lower than INICC international rates. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. All rights reserved.For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. The Risk Factors for Nosocomial Infection in Chinese Patients with Active Rheumatoid Arthritis in Shanghai

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Wei-Lin; Li, Zhuo-Ling; Xu, Zhen; Qu, Huan-Ru; Xue, Luan; Su, Xiao; Wei, Qiang-Hua; Wang, Hui; Li, Miao-Ying; Zhao, Fu-Tao; Jiang, Lin-Di; Zhang, Jiong; Wan, Wei-Guo; Dai, Min; Yang, Cheng-De; Guan, Jian-Long; Su, Li; Zhao, Dong-Bao; He, Dong-Yi; Xu, Hu-Ji; Zou, He-Jian; Bao, Chun-De

    2012-01-01

    Objective. To analyse the potential risk factors of nosocomial infections in patients with active rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Methods. A total of 2452 active RA patients at Hospitals in Shanghai between January 2009 and February 2011 were analyzed. Their demographic and clinical characteristics were compared with those without infection, and the potential risk factors were determined by logistic regression analysis. Results. Multivariate analysis indicated the gender (OR = 0.70, 95% CI 0.53–0.92), duration in hospital (OR = 1.03 , 95%CI 1.01–1.05), number of organs involved (OR = 0.82, 95%CI 0.72–0.92), number of disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs ((DMARDs) (OR = 1.22, 95%CI 1.061–1.40)), corticosteroid therapy (OR = 1.02, 95%CI 1.01–1.03), peripheral white blood cell counts ((WBC) (OR = 1.04, 95%CI 1.00–1.08)), levels of serum albumin (OR = 0.98, 95%CI 0.97–0.99), and C-reactive protein ((CRP) (OR = 1.03 , 95%CI 1.01–1.04)) that were significantly associated with the risk of infections. Conclusion. The female patients, longer hospital stay, more organs involved, more DMARDs, corticosteroid usage, high counts of WBC, lower serum albumin, and higher serum CRP were independent risk factors of infections in active RA patients. PMID:22548187

  8. The risk factors for nosocomial infection in chinese patients with active rheumatoid arthritis in shanghai.

    PubMed

    Xie, Wei-Lin; Li, Zhuo-Ling; Xu, Zhen; Qu, Huan-Ru; Xue, Luan; Su, Xiao; Wei, Qiang-Hua; Wang, Hui; Li, Miao-Ying; Zhao, Fu-Tao; Jiang, Lin-Di; Zhang, Jiong; Wan, Wei-Guo; Dai, Min; Yang, Cheng-De; Guan, Jian-Long; Su, Li; Zhao, Dong-Bao; He, Dong-Yi; Xu, Hu-Ji; Zou, He-Jian; Bao, Chun-De

    2012-01-01

    Objective. To analyse the potential risk factors of nosocomial infections in patients with active rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Methods. A total of 2452 active RA patients at Hospitals in Shanghai between January 2009 and February 2011 were analyzed. Their demographic and clinical characteristics were compared with those without infection, and the potential risk factors were determined by logistic regression analysis. Results. Multivariate analysis indicated the gender (OR = 0.70, 95% CI 0.53-0.92), duration in hospital (OR = 1.03 , 95%CI 1.01-1.05), number of organs involved (OR = 0.82, 95%CI 0.72-0.92), number of disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs ((DMARDs) (OR = 1.22, 95%CI 1.061-1.40)), corticosteroid therapy (OR = 1.02, 95%CI 1.01-1.03), peripheral white blood cell counts ((WBC) (OR = 1.04, 95%CI 1.00-1.08)), levels of serum albumin (OR = 0.98, 95%CI 0.97-0.99), and C-reactive protein ((CRP) (OR = 1.03 , 95%CI 1.01-1.04)) that were significantly associated with the risk of infections. Conclusion. The female patients, longer hospital stay, more organs involved, more DMARDs, corticosteroid usage, high counts of WBC, lower serum albumin, and higher serum CRP were independent risk factors of infections in active RA patients.

  9. Incidence and risk factors of nosocomial infections after cardiac surgery in Georgian population with congenital heart diseases.

    PubMed

    Lomtadze, M; Chkhaidze, M; Mgeladze, E; Metreveli, I; Tsintsadze, A

    2010-01-01

    Nosocomial infections still remain a serious problem in patients undergoing open heart surgery. The aim of the study was to determine the incidence, etiology and main risk factors of nosocomial infections (NI) following cardiac surgery in congenital heart diseases population. Retrospective case study was conducted. 387 patients with congenital heart disease (CHD), who underwent cardiac surgery from January 2007 to December 2008 were studied. The age of the most patients varied between 1 day to 15 years, 73 patients (18,8%) were older than 15 years. All 387 patients underwent cardiac surgery. The rate of NI was 16%. The most common infections were bloodstream infections (BSI) (7,75%) and respiratory tract infections (7%) respectively. The rate of NI was higher in patients under 1 year of age, after urgent surgery and urgent reoperation, long cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) and aortic cross-clamp time, also in patients with prolonged mechanical ventilation, massive haemotransfusion, with open heart bone after surgery, reintubation, hospitalization in another hospital during last three month. It was concluded that the most common nosocomial infection after cardiac surgery congenital heart diseases in Georgian population was blood stream infection. The main risk factors of NI in the same setting were age under 1 year, urgent surgery, urgent reoperation, long CPB and aortic cross-clamp time, long duration of mechanical ventilation, massive haemotransfusion, open heart bone after surgery, reintubation, hospitalization in another hospital during last three month.

  10. International Nosocomial Infection Control Consortium report, data summary of 50 countries for 2010-2015: Device-associated module.

    PubMed

    Rosenthal, Víctor Daniel; Al-Abdely, Hail M; El-Kholy, Amani Ali; AlKhawaja, Safa A Aziz; Leblebicioglu, Hakan; Mehta, Yatin; Rai, Vineya; Hung, Nguyen Viet; Kanj, Souha Sami; Salama, Mona Foda; Salgado-Yepez, Estuardo; Elahi, Naheed; Morfin Otero, Rayo; Apisarnthanarak, Anucha; De Carvalho, Braulio Matias; Ider, Bat Erdene; Fisher, Dale; Buenaflor, Maria Carmen S G; Petrov, Michael M; Quesada-Mora, Ana Marcela; Zand, Farid; Gurskis, Vaidotas; Anguseva, Tanja; Ikram, Aamer; Aguilar de Moros, Daisy; Duszynska, Wieslawa; Mejia, Nepomuceno; Horhat, Florin George; Belskiy, Vladislav; Mioljevic, Vesna; Di Silvestre, Gabriela; Furova, Katarina; Ramos-Ortiz, Gloria Y; Gamar Elanbya, May Osman; Satari, Hindra Irawan; Gupta, Umesh; Dendane, Tarek; Raka, Lul; Guanche-Garcell, Humberto; Hu, Bijie; Padgett, Denis; Jayatilleke, Kushlani; Ben Jaballah, Najla; Apostolopoulou, Eleni; Prudencio Leon, Walter Enrique; Sepulveda-Chavez, Alejandra; Telechea, Hector Miguel; Trotter, Andrew; Alvarez-Moreno, Carlos; Kushner-Davalos, Luis

    2016-12-01

    We report the results of International Nosocomial Infection Control Consortium (INICC) surveillance study from January 2010-December 2015 in 703 intensive care units (ICUs) in Latin America, Europe, Eastern Mediterranean, Southeast Asia, and Western Pacific. During the 6-year study period, using Centers for Disease Control and Prevention National Healthcare Safety Network (CDC-NHSN) definitions for device-associated health care-associated infection (DA-HAI), we collected prospective data from 861,284 patients hospitalized in INICC hospital ICUs for an aggregate of 3,506,562 days. Although device use in INICC ICUs was similar to that reported from CDC-NHSN ICUs, DA-HAI rates were higher in the INICC ICUs: in the INICC medical-surgical ICUs, the pooled rate of central line-associated bloodstream infection, 4.1 per 1,000 central line-days, was nearly 5-fold higher than the 0.8 per 1,000 central line-days reported from comparable US ICUs, the overall rate of ventilator-associated pneumonia was also higher, 13.1 versus 0.9 per 1,000 ventilator-days, as was the rate of catheter-associated urinary tract infection, 5.07 versus 1.7 per 1,000 catheter-days. From blood cultures samples, frequencies of resistance of Pseudomonas isolates to amikacin (29.87% vs 10%) and to imipenem (44.3% vs 26.1%), and of Klebsiella pneumoniae isolates to ceftazidime (73.2% vs 28.8%) and to imipenem (43.27% vs 12.8%) were also higher in the INICC ICUs compared with CDC-NHSN ICUs. Although DA-HAIs in INICC ICU patients continue to be higher than the rates reported in CDC-NSHN ICUs representing the developed world, we have observed a significant trend toward the reduction of DA-HAI rates in INICC ICUs as shown in each international report. It is INICC's main goal to continue facilitating education, training, and basic and cost-effective tools and resources, such as standardized forms and an online platform, to tackle this problem effectively and systematically. Copyright © 2016 Association for

  11. Nosocomial infections due to methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and vancomycin-resistant enterococcus: relationships with antibiotic use and cost drivers.

    PubMed

    Mauldin, Patrick D; Salgado, Cassandra D; Durkalski, Valerie L; Bosso, John A

    2008-03-01

    Increased incidence of nosocomial infections due to methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus (VRE) has been associated with the use of certain antibiotics and has resulted in increased morbidity, mortality, and costs of care. To describe relationships between vancomycin and linezolid use and incidence of these nosocomial infections over time and to determine factors associated with the increased costs of care (cost drivers) associated with affected patients. The association between institution-wide antibiotic use and the rate of nosocomial MRSA and VRE infections was assessed using segmented regression analysis for interrupted time series. The effect that patient characteristics and procedures, as well as certain antibiotic use, had on costs and length of stay of patients with MRSA or VRE nosocomial infection was also assessed and cost drivers for the 2 types of infections were compared. Our analysis included 206 patients who developed MRSA (n = 187) or VRE (n = 19) nosocomial infection. Although small numbers of VRE nosocomial infection may limit generalizations from our results, we found no significant relationship between vancomycin or linezolid use and the rate of either infection. While mean hospital costs were similar, cost drivers varied somewhat between infection types. The incidence of MRSA or VRE infections does not appear to be related to the use of vancomycin or linezolid. Costs of care are quite high in some affected patients and, while mean total hospital costs are similar, cost drivers appear to differ between the 2 infection types.

  12. Spa Typing of Staphylococcus aureus Strains Isolated From Clinical Specimens of Patients With Nosocomial Infections in Tehran, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Goudarzi, Mehdi; Fazeli, Maryam; Goudarzi, Hossein; Azad, Mehdi; Seyedjavadi, Sima Sadat

    2016-01-01

    Background The incidence of nosocomial Staphylococcus aureus infection is increasing annually and becoming a true global challenge. The pattern of Staphylococcus aureus protein A (spa) types in different geographic regions is diverse. Objectives This study determined the prevalence of methicillin-resistant S. aureus and different spa types in S. aureus clinical isolates. Materials and Methods During a six-month period, 90 S. aureus isolates were recovered from 320 clinical specimens. The in vitro susceptibility of various S. aureus isolates to 16 antibiotic discs was assessed using the Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion method. Molecular typing was carried out with S. aureus protein A typing via polymerase chain reaction. Results The frequency of methicillin-resistant S. aureus in our study was 88.9%. Twenty-three (25.5%) isolates were positive for panton-valentine leukocidin encoding genes. S. aureus presented a high resistance rate to ampicillin (100%) and penicillin (100%). No resistance was observed to vancomycin, teicoplanin, or linezolid. The rates of resistance to the majority of antibiotics tested varied between 23.3% and 82.2%. The rate of multidrug resistance among these clinical isolates was 93.3%. The 90 S. aureus isolates were classified into five S. aureus protein A types: t037 (33.3%), t030 (22.2%), t790 (16.7%), t969 (11.1%), and t044 (7.7%). Eight (8.9%) isolates were not typable using the S. aureus protein A typing method. Conclusions We report a high methicillin-resistant S. aureus rate in our hospital. Additionally, t030 and t037 were the predominant spa-types among hospital-associated S. aureus. Our findings emphasize the need for continuous surveillance to prevent the dissemination of multidrug resistance among different S. aureus protein A types in Iran. PMID:27679706

  13. Spa Typing of Staphylococcus aureus Strains Isolated From Clinical Specimens of Patients With Nosocomial Infections in Tehran, Iran.

    PubMed

    Goudarzi, Mehdi; Fazeli, Maryam; Goudarzi, Hossein; Azad, Mehdi; Seyedjavadi, Sima Sadat

    2016-07-01

    The incidence of nosocomial Staphylococcus aureus infection is increasing annually and becoming a true global challenge. The pattern of Staphylococcus aureus protein A (spa) types in different geographic regions is diverse. This study determined the prevalence of methicillin-resistant S. aureus and different spa types in S. aureus clinical isolates. During a six-month period, 90 S. aureus isolates were recovered from 320 clinical specimens. The in vitro susceptibility of various S. aureus isolates to 16 antibiotic discs was assessed using the Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion method. Molecular typing was carried out with S. aureus protein A typing via polymerase chain reaction. The frequency of methicillin-resistant S. aureus in our study was 88.9%. Twenty-three (25.5%) isolates were positive for panton-valentine leukocidin encoding genes. S. aureus presented a high resistance rate to ampicillin (100%) and penicillin (100%). No resistance was observed to vancomycin, teicoplanin, or linezolid. The rates of resistance to the majority of antibiotics tested varied between 23.3% and 82.2%. The rate of multidrug resistance among these clinical isolates was 93.3%. The 90 S. aureus isolates were classified into five S. aureus protein A types: t037 (33.3%), t030 (22.2%), t790 (16.7%), t969 (11.1%), and t044 (7.7%). Eight (8.9%) isolates were not typable using the S. aureus protein A typing method. We report a high methicillin-resistant S. aureus rate in our hospital. Additionally, t030 and t037 were the predominant spa-types among hospital-associated S. aureus. Our findings emphasize the need for continuous surveillance to prevent the dissemination of multidrug resistance among different S. aureus protein A types in Iran.

  14. Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever nosocomial infection in a immunosuppressed patient, Pakistan: case report and virological investigation.

    PubMed

    Hasan, Zahra; Mahmood, Faisal; Jamil, Bushra; Atkinson, Barry; Mohammed, Murtaza; Samreen, Azra; Altaf, Lamia; Moatter, Tariq; Hewson, Roger

    2013-03-01

    Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever (CCHF) is endemic in the Baluchistan province, Pakistan. Sporadic outbreaks of CCHF occur throughout the year especially in individuals in contact with infected livestock. Nosocomial transmission remains a risk due to difficulties in the diagnosis of CCHF and limited availability of facilities for the isolation of suspected patients. Rapid diagnosis of CCHF virus infection is required for early management of the disease and to prevent transmission. This study describes the case of a 43-year-old surgeon who contracted CCHF during a surgical procedure in Quetta, Baluchistan and who was transferred to a tertiary care facility at the Aga Khan University Hospital, Karachi within 1 week of contracting the infection. Diagnosis of CCHF was made using a rapid real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assay for CCHF viral RNA. The patient had chronic hepatitis B and hepatitis D infection for which he had previously received a liver transplant. He proceeded to develop classic hemorrhagic manifestations and succumbed to the infection 14 days post-onset of disease. There was no further nosocomial transmission of the CCHF during the hospital treatment of the surgeon. Early diagnosis of CCHF enables rapid engagement of appropriate isolation, barrier nursing and infection control measures thus preventing nosocomial transmission of the virus.

  15. Comparison of bactericidal effects of commonly used antiseptics against pathogens causing nosocomial infections. Part 2.

    PubMed

    Yasuda, T; Yoshimura, Y; Takada, H; Kawaguchi, S; Ito, M; Yamazaki, F; Iriyama, J; Ishigo, S; Asano, Y

    1997-01-01

    Opportunistic infections caused by gram-negative rods (GNR), conventionally regarded as organisms with low or no pathogenicity, and intractable infections caused by various resistant organisms pose a great problem now. In view of this, we determined the bactericidal effects of 5 commonly used disinfectants using as the test strains Xanthomonas maltophilia and Serratia marcescens, chosen among other GNR since they often cause nosocomial infections. Regarding the bactericidal activities against X. maltophilia and S. marcescens, both sensitive strains and resistant strains were killed within 20 s of exposure to povidone-iodine and sodium hypochlorite. With chlorhexidine, 1 strain each of both species was not killed within 10 min of exposure at a concentration of 0.2%. Both sensitive strains and resistant strains of X. maltophilia were killed within 20 s of exposure to benzalkonium at 0.02%, while a concentration of 0.1% was required for benzalkonium to kill S. marcescens within 20 s. With Tego-51, both sensitive strains and resistant strains of X. maltophilia were killed within 20 s at 0.02%, while 1 strain of S. marcescens was not killed within 20 s at a concentration of 0.1%. In the use of disinfectants, comparative bactericidal effects of various disinfectants against clinical isolates should be taken into consideration.

  16. Healthcare equipment as a source of nosocomial infection: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Schabrun, S; Chipchase, L

    2006-07-01

    Nosocomial infections (NIs) result in significant financial and individual costs, with large numbers of patients acquiring infections annually. Healthcare equipment has been identified as a likely source of these infections, and research indicates that up to one-third of all NIs may be prevented by adequate cleaning of equipment. Thus, this systematic review aimed to determine levels of contamination on healthcare equipment, to identify viable cleaning protocols and to establish the methodological quality of current evidence. Published and unpublished studies from January 1972 to December 2004 were identified in eight major databases. Methodological quality was evaluated using the hierarchy of evidence and a quantitative critical appraisal tool. Data were extracted and analysed using five major outcome measures. Fifty studies were identified investigating a range of healthcare equipment, of which 23 were included in the review. Methodological quality ranged from 6.5 to 9.5 out of 14 for observational studies and from 6.5 to 9.5 out of 15 for repeated measures studies. The included studies reported that 86.8% of all sampled equipment was contaminated, with 70% alcohol reducing the levels of contamination on equipment by 82.1%. Healthcare equipment is a significant source of NI. High levels of contamination are present on a wide range of healthcare equipment. However, the majority of contamination and hence any risk of acquiring a NI can be reduced substantially by regular cleaning of equipment with 70% alcohol. Further research is required into the role of community healthcare equipment in NI.

  17. The Immune Response against Acinetobacter baumannii, an Emerging Pathogen in Nosocomial Infections.

    PubMed

    García-Patiño, María Guadalupe; García-Contreras, Rodolfo; Licona-Limón, Paula

    2017-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is the etiologic agent of a wide range of nosocomial infections, including pneumonia, bacteremia, and skin infections. Over the last 45 years, an alarming increase in the antibiotic resistance of this opportunistic microorganism has been reported, a situation that hinders effective treatments. In order to develop effective therapies against A. baumannii it is crucial to understand the basis of host-bacterium interactions, especially those concerning the immune response of the host. Different innate immune cells such as monocytes, macrophages, dendritic cells, and natural killer cells have been identified as important effectors in the defense against A. baumannii; among them, neutrophils represent a key immune cell indispensable for the control of the infection. Several immune strategies to combat A. baumannii have been identified such as recognition of the bacteria by immune cells through pattern recognition receptors, specifically toll-like receptors, which trigger bactericidal mechanisms including oxidative burst and cytokine and chemokine production to amplify the immune response against the pathogen. However, a complete picture of the protective immune strategies activated by this bacteria and its potential therapeutic use remains to be determined and explored.

  18. Hospital costs associated with nosocomial infections in a pediatric intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Morillo-García, Áurea; Aldana-Espinal, Josefa M; Olry de Labry-Lima, Antonio; Valencia-Martín, Raquel; López-Márquez, Reyes; Loscertales-Abril, Mercedes; Conde-Herrera, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    To estimate the additional cost attributable to nosocomial infection (NI) in a pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) and related factors. A prospective cohort study was conducted in all children admitted to the PICU of a tertiary-care pediatric hospital between 2008 and 2009. Descriptive and bivariate analyses were conducted of total direct costs due to PICU stay and medical procedures in patients with and without NI. A log-linear regression model was performed to determine the factors associated with higher total cost. A total of 443 patients were studied and the prevalence of NI was 11.3%. The difference in the median total cost was €30,791.4 per patient between groups with and without NI. The median cost of PICU length of stay in patients with NI was almost eight times higher than the median cost of patients without NI. In patients with NI, the highest costs related to medical procedures were associated with antibiotics, enteral and parenteral feeding, and imaging tests. In the multivariate model, the factors associated with higher cost were infection, the performance of cardiovascular surgery, urgent admission, a higher pediatric risk mortality score, and the presence of immunosuppression. By contrast, older children and those with surgical admission generated lower cost. NI was associated with an increase in total cost, which implies that the prevention of these infections through specific interventions could be cost-effective and would help to increase the safety of healthcare systems. Copyright © 2014 SESPAS. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  19. Risk factors for nosocomial burn wound infection caused by multidrug resistant Acinetobacter baumannii.

    PubMed

    Tekin, Recep; Dal, Tuba; Bozkurt, Fatma; Deveci, Ozcan; Palanc, Ylmaz; Arslan, Eyüp; Selçuk, Caferi Tayyar; Hoşoğlu, Salih

    2014-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii infections in burn patients may lead to delays in wound healing, graft losses, and development of sepsis. Determining the risk factors for multidrug resistant A. baumannii (MDR-AB) infections is essential for infection control. In the present study, the authors aimed to evaluate risk factors for wound infections caused by A. baumannii in burn patients. The study was conducted at Dicle University Hospital Burn Center, from April 2011 to July 2012, to investigate the risk factors for MDR-AB infections. The data of both the case and control group patients and the result of wound cultures were recorded on a daily basis, on individual forms given for each patient, and analyzed. A total of 30 cases infected with MDR-AB, and 60 uninfected control patients, were included in the study. The mean age (±SD) was 7.7 ± 15.4 years in infected patients and 11.4 ± 16.5 years in uninfected patients. The mean total burn surface area was 13.5 ± 10.9% in uninfected patients and 34.7 ± 16.2% in infected patients. The mean total burn surface area, the abbreviated burn severity index, acute physiological and chronic health evaluation II score, day of admission to hospital, length of hospital stay, first excision day, prior usage of third-generation cephalosporins, and stay in intensive care unit of the infected patients were significantly higher (P < .001) than those of patients without infection. Univariate analysis found that high acute physiological and chronic health evaluation II score, first excision time of wound, invasive device usage, admission day to hospital, and prior usage of broad-spectrum antibiotics were risk factors for nosocomial infections. This study showed that multiple factors contribute to multidrug resistance in A. baumannii. A combination of an early diagnosis of wound infections, appropriate antimicrobial treatments, surgical debridement, and early wound closure may be effective in the management.

  20. Nosocomial Bloodstream Infection Due to Candida spp. in China: Species Distribution, Clinical Features, and Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Li, Ying; Du, Mingmei; Chen, Liang-An; Liu, Yunxi; Liang, Zhixin

    2016-08-01

    To investigate the distribution of Candida spp., predictors of mortality, and effects of therapeutic measures on outcomes of nosocomial bloodstream infection (BSI) due to Candida spp. This retrospective, population-based study enrolled adult patients with Candida nosocomial BSI from January 2010 to December 2014 in one tertiary care hospital. The demographics, comorbidities, species distribution, risk factors, and effects of antifungal treatment were assessed. In total, 190 episodes of Candida BSI were identified. The most prevalent species was C. albicans (38.9 %), followed by C. parapsilosis (23.2 %) and C. tropicalis (20.5 %). In vitro susceptibility testing showed that 88.9 % of Candida isolates were susceptible to fluconazole. The 30-day hospital mortality was 27.9 %, while the early mortality (within 7 days) was 16.3 %. In a multivariate regression analysis, the Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II score [odds ratio (OR) 1.23; 95 % confidence interval (CI) 1.080-1.390; P = 0.002] and severe sepsis or septic shock (OR 15.35; 95 % CI 2.391-98.502; P = 0.004) were independently correlated with early mortality. Severe sepsis or septic shock (OR 24.75; 95 % CI 5.099-120.162; P < 0.001) was an independent risk factor for 30-day mortality, while proven catheter-related candidemia (OR 0.16; 95 % CI 0.031-0.810; P = 0.027) was a positive factor for 30-day mortality. Early central venous catheter removal and adequate antifungal treatment were closely related to decreased mortality in patients with primary candidemia. The proportion of candidemia caused by C. albicans was lower than that caused by non-albicans species. The severity of illness influenced early mortality, and the origin of the central venous catheter remarkably affected 30-day mortality.

  1. Impact of a multidimensional infection control approach on central line-associated bloodstream infections rates in adult intensive care units of 8 cities of Turkey: findings of the International Nosocomial Infection Control Consortium (INICC)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Central line-associated bloodstream infections (CLABs) have long been associated with excess lengths of stay, increased hospital costs and mortality attributable to them. Different studies from developed countries have shown that practice bundles reduce the incidence of CLAB in intensive care units. However, the impact of the bundle strategy has not been systematically analyzed in the adult intensive care unit (ICU) setting in developing countries, such as Turkey. The aim of this study is to analyze the impact of the International Nosocomial Infection Control Consortium (INICC) multidimensional infection control approach to reduce the rates of CLAB in 13 ICUs of 13 INICC member hospitals from 8 cities of Turkey. Methods We conducted active, prospective surveillance before-after study to determine CLAB rates in a cohort of 4,017 adults hospitalized in ICUs. We applied the definitions of the CDC/NHSN and INICC surveillance methods. The study was divided into baseline and intervention periods. During baseline, active outcome surveillance of CLAB rates was performed. During intervention, the INICC multidimensional approach for CLAB reduction was implemented and included the following measures: 1- bundle of infection control interventions, 2- education, 3- outcome surveillance, 4- process surveillance, 5- feedback of CLAB rates, and 6- performance feedback on infection control practices. CLAB rates obtained in baseline were compared with CLAB rates obtained during intervention. Results During baseline, 3,129 central line (CL) days were recorded, and during intervention, we recorded 23,463 CL-days. We used random effects Poisson regression to account for clustering of CLAB rates within hospital across time periods. The baseline CLAB rate was 22.7 per 1000 CL days, which was decreased during the intervention period to 12.0 CLABs per 1000 CL days (IRR 0.613; 95% CI 0.43 – 0.87; P 0.007). This amounted to a 39% reduction in the incidence rate of CLAB

  2. Nosocomial transmission and infection control aspects of parasitic and ectoparasitic diseases. Part III. Ectoparasites/summary and conclusions.

    PubMed

    Lettau, L A

    1991-03-01

    As a rule, both the standard of hygiene and sanitation prevalent in hospitals in the United States and the rarity of parasitic diseases compared to viral, bacterial, and fungal infections, reduce the hazard of nosocomial acquisition of parasites to relatively trivial levels. However, abetted by the resultant low index of suspicion on the part of clinical staff, certain parasitic microorganisms may at times cause significant morbidity and even mortality in both normal and immunocompromised patients, as summarized in this review. Also, the nosocomial acquisition of parasites may be somewhat underappreciated because the incubation period for clinical illness may be days to weeks and thus a hospital-acquired infection may not be recognized as such, particularly if the parasite is endemic locally. Parasitic diseases have been a much more significant problem in certain special facilities, such as custodial institutions for the mentally ill or retarded, where crowding, poor environmental sanitation, and low levels of personal hygiene have in the past allowed the rapid dissemination and endemic occurrence of a large variety of parasitic infections. It is likely that nosocomial transmission of parasites may be an even greater problem in some hospitals in the tropics, where strict hygienic standards are costly or otherwise more difficult to maintain, and where often an increased proportion of the patient population harbors one or more parasites. However, the exact magnitude of the problem in tropical hospitals is also more difficult to determine because nosocomial acquisition of a parasitic infection may not be distinguished easily versus exogenous infection or reactivation of latent infection.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  3. Building a benchmark through active surveillance of intensive care unit-acquired infections: the Italian network SPIN-UTI.

    PubMed

    Agodi, A; Auxilia, F; Barchitta, M; Brusaferro, S; D'Alessandro, D; Montagna, M T; Orsi, G B; Pasquarella, C; Torregrossa, V; Suetens, C; Mura, I

    2010-03-01

    The Italian Nosocomial Infections Surveillance in Intensive Care Units (ICUs) (SPIN-UTI) project of the Italian Study Group of Hospital Hygiene (GISIO - SItI) was undertaken to ensure standardisation of definitions, data collection and reporting procedures using the Hospital in Europe Link for Infection Control through Surveillance (HELICS)-ICU benchmark. Before starting surveillance, participant ICUs met in order to involve the key stakeholders in the project through participation in planning. Four electronic data forms for web-based data collection were designed. The six-month patient-based prospective survey was undertaken from November 2006 to May 2007, preceded by a one-month surveillance pilot study to assess the overall feasibility of the programme and to determine the time needed and resources for participant hospitals. The SPIN-UTI project included 49 ICUs, 3053 patients with length of stay >2 days and 35 498 patient-days. The cumulative incidence of infections was 19.8 per 100 patients and the incidence density was 17.1 per 1000 patient-days. The most frequently encountered infection type was pneumonia, Pseudomonas aeruginosa being the most frequent infection-associated micro-organism, followed by Staphylococcus aureus and Acinetobacter baumannii. Site-specific infection rates for pneumonia, bloodstream infections, central venous catheter-related bloodstream infections and urinary tract infections, stratified according to patient risk factors, were below the 75th centile reported by the HELICS network benchmark. The SPIN-UTI project showed that introduction of ongoing surveillance should be possible in many Italian hospitals. The study provided the opportunity to participate in the HELICS project using benchmark data for comparison and for better understanding of factors influencing risks.

  4. The impact of Rotavirus mass vaccination on hospitalization rates, nosocomial Rotavirus gastroenteritis and secondary blood stream infections

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The aim of the study was to evaluate the effects of universal mass vaccination (UMV) against rotavirus (RV) on the hospitalization rates, nosocomial RV infections and RV-gastroenteritis (GE)-associated secondary blood stream infections (BSI). Methods The retrospective evaluation (2002–2009) by chart analysis included all clinically diagnosed and microbiologically confirmed RV-GE cases in a large tertiary care hospital in Austria. The pre-vaccination period (2002–2005) was compared with the recommended and early funded (2006–2007) and the funded (2008–2009) vaccination periods. Primary outcomes were RV-GE-associated hospitalizations, secondary outcomes nosocomial RV disease, secondary BSI and direct hospitalization costs for children and their accompanying persons. Results In 1,532 children with RV-GE, a significant reduction by 73.9% of hospitalized RV-GE cases per year could be observed between the pre-vaccination and the funded vaccination period, which was most pronounced in the age groups 0–11 months (by 87.8%), 6–10 years (by 84.2%) and 11–18 years (88.9%). In the funded vaccination period, a reduction by 71.9% of nosocomial RV-GE cases per year was found compared to the pre-vaccination period. Fatalities due to nosocomial RV-GE were only observed in the pre-vaccination period (3 cases). Direct costs of hospitalized, community-acquired RV-GE cases per year were reduced by 72.7% in the funded vaccination period. The reduction of direct costs for patients (by 86.9%) and accompanying persons (86.2%) was most pronounced in the age group 0–11 months. Conclusions UMV may have contributed to the significant decrease of RV-GE-associated hospitalizations, to a reduction in nosocomial RV infections and RV-associated morbidity due to secondary BSI and reduced direct hospitalization costs. The reduction in nosocomial cases is an important aspect considering severe disease courses in hospitalized patients with co-morbidities and death due to

  5. Surveillance of sexually transmitted infections in England and Wales.

    PubMed

    Hughes, G; Paine, T; Thomas, D

    2001-05-01

    Surveillance of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) in England and Wales has, in the past, relied principally on aggregated statistical data submitted by all genitourinary medicine clinics to the Communicable Disease Surveillance Centre, supplemented by various laboratory reporting systems. Although these systems provide comparatively robust surveillance data, they do not provide sufficient information on risk factors to target STI control and prevention programmes appropriately. Over recent years, substantial rises in STIs, the emergence of numerous outbreaks of STIs, and changes in gonococcal resistance patterns have necessitated the introduction of more sophisticated surveillance mechanisms. This article describes current STI surveillance systems in England and Wales, including new systems that have recently been introduced or are currently being developed to meet the need for enhanced STI surveillance data.

  6. Epidemiology of healthcare associated infections in Germany: Nearly 20 years of surveillance.

    PubMed

    Schröder, C; Schwab, F; Behnke, M; Breier, A-C; Maechler, F; Piening, B; Dettenkofer, M; Geffers, C; Gastmeier, P

    2015-10-01

    To describe the epidemiology of healthcare-associated infections (HAI) in hospitals participating in the German national nosocomial infections surveillance system (KISS). The epidemiology of HAI was described for the surveillance components for intensive care units (ITS-KISS), non-ICUs (STATIONS-KISS), very low birth weight infants (NEO-KISS) and surgical site infections (OP-KISS) in the period from 2006 to 2013. In addition, risk factor analyses were performed for the most important infections of ICU-KISS, NEO-KISS and OP-KISS. Data from a total of 3,454,778 ICU patients from 913 ICUs, 618,816 non-ICU patients from 142 non-ICU wards, 53,676 VLBW from 241 neonatal intensive care units (NICU) and 1,005,064 surgical patients from operative departments from 550 hospitals were used for analysis. Compared with baseline data, a significant reduction of primary bloodstream infections (PBSI) and lower respiratory tract infections (LRTI) was observed in ICUs with the maximum effect in year 5 (or longer participation) (incidence rate ratio 0.60 (CI95 0.50-0.72) and 0.61 (CI95 0.52-0.71) respectively). A significant reduction of PBSI and LRTI was also observed in NEO-KISS when comparing the baseline situation with the 5th year of participation (hazard ratio 0.70 (CI95 0.64-0.76) and 0.43 (CI95 0.35-0.52)). The effect was smaller in operative departments after the introduction of OP-KISS (OR 0.80; CI95 0.64-1.02 in year 5 or later for all procedure types combined). Due to the large database, it has not only been possible to confirm well-known risk factors for HAI, but also to identify some new interesting risk factors like seasonal and volume effects. Participating in a national surveillance system and using surveillance data for internal quality management leads to substantial reduction of HAI. In addition, a surveillance system can identify otherwise not recognized risk factors which should - if possible - be considered for infection control management and for risk

  7. Nosocomial infections in colo-rectal surgery of the old patient.

    PubMed

    Barbuscia, M; Melita, G; Trovato, M; Minniti, C; Lemma, G; Gorgone, S

    2005-01-01

    Every surgical act, especially in geriatric age, can be a relevant moment in the onset of nosocomial infections. This has a peculiar aspect in patient who undergo colo-rectal surgery, both in election and especially in emergency, in which the simple opening of intestines always involves a minimal contamination. In order to reduce the incidence of infections, and therefore the septic complications of this surgery, it is necessary to pay attention to the preparation of the surgical equipe, of the operating room, of the surgical instruments and, in election, to the careful preparation of the patient through a careful evaluation of the possible bio-umoral alterations, in order to correct them. The results of our experience allow us to say that the prevention of post-operatory sepsis find its main moment in the careful evaluation and eventual correction of the nutritional status, in the stimulation of the immune system, in the antibiotic prophylaxis both parenteral and topical, and, last but not least, in a correct surgical technique. All this is particularly important for patients affected by colo-rectal neoplastic and inflammatory diseases, for which the intestinal bacteria, more virulent in weak and fragile patients, often represent the source of contamination that can start a sepsis and then assume an important part in determining the final result of surgery.

  8. The ORION statement: guidelines for transparent reporting of outbreak reports and intervention studies of nosocomial infection.

    PubMed

    Stone, Sheldon P; Cooper, Ben S; Kibbler, Chris C; Cookson, Barry D; Roberts, Jenny A; Medley, Graham F; Duckworth, Georgia; Lai, Rosalind; Ebrahim, Shah; Brown, Erwin M; Wiffen, Phil J; Davey, Peter G

    2007-04-01

    The quality of research in hospital epidemiology (infection control) must be improved to be robust enough to influence policy and practice. In order to raise the standards of research and publication, a CONSORT equivalent for these largely quasi-experimental studies has been prepared by the authors of two relevant systematic reviews, following consultation with learned societies, editors of journals, and researchers. The ORION (Outbreak Reports and Intervention Studies Of Nosocomial infection) statement consists of a 22 item checklist, and a summary table. The emphasis is on transparency to improve the quality of reporting and on the use of appropriate statistical techniques. The statement has been endorsed by a number of professional special interest groups and societies. Like CONSORT, ORION should be considered a "work in progress", which requires ongoing dialogue for successful promotion and dissemination. The statement is therefore offered for further public discussion. Journals and research councils are strongly recommended to incorporate it into their submission and reviewing processes. Feedback to the authors is encouraged and the statement will be revised in 2 years.

  9. Risk factors for nosocomial infections in patients receiving extracorporeal membrane oxygenation supportive therapy.

    PubMed

    Sun, Geqin; Li, Binfei; Lan, Haili; Wang, Juan; Lu, Lanfei; Feng, Xueqin; Luo, Xihua; Yan, Haizhong; Mu, Yuejing

    2017-06-22

    The aim of this study was to analyze risk factors for nosocomial infection (NI) in patients receiving extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) support. Clinical NI data were collected from patients who received ECMO support therapy, and analyzed retrospectively. Among 75 ECMO patients, 20 were found to have developed NI (infection rate 26.7%); a total of 58 pathogens were isolated, including 43 strains of gram-negative bacteria (74.1%) and 15 strains of gram-positive bacteria (25.9%). Multi-drug resistant strains were highly concentrated and were mainly shown to be Acinetobacter baumannii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and coagulase-negative staphylococci. Incidence of NI was related to the duration of ECMO support therapy and the total length of hospital stay, and the differences were statistically significant (P<.05). A prolonged period of ECMO support extended the hospital stay, but it did not increase the mortality rate. However, an elevated level of lactic acid increased the mortality rate in this study population. ECMO-associated secondary NIs correlated significantly with the length of hospital stay and with the duration of ECMO support. Therefore, to reduce the incidence of ECMO-associated NIs, preventive strategies that aim to shorten the duration of ECMO support therapy and avoid lengthy hospitalization should be applied, wherever possible. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  10. Isolation and survey of antibiotic sensitivity in nosocomial infections in north Maharashtra region.

    PubMed

    Patil, Arun; Patil, Kavita; Pawar, Pankaj; Maheshwari, Vijay

    2013-07-01

    The present work was aimed to study the prevalence of the drug resistance among Gram positive and Gram negative organisms isolated from clinical samples obtained from various private nursing homes of Jalgaon city and surrounding areas in the state of Maharashtra. Different pathogenic organisms were isolated from one thousand seven hundred and ninety clinical samples obtained from various nursing homes of Jalgaon region of North Maharashtra, MS, India during the period of August, 2010 to July, 2011. Antibiotic sensitivity testing of isolated pathogenic organisms was done with fifty different antibiotics of 13 different groups by the disk diffusion technique using Mueller Hinton Agar Plates according to CLSI (formerly NCCLS) guidelines. Out of total samples analyzed 1171 samples showed the presence of infection while in 619 samples no growth of organisms was seen on culture medium. Microbial growth revealed presence of 11 different organisms (E. coli, Klebsiella spp., Proteus spp., Pseudomonas spp., Enterobacter spp., Salmonella spp., Acinetobater spp., Streptococccus spp., Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA and MSSA)) including Candida spp. Sensitivity profile of these organisms towards different antibiotics is reported here. The study resulted in generation of representative status of the antibiotic sensitivity pattern of commonly found organisms in nosocomial infections in the region. This could be useful for the clinicians to choose correct antibiotic and ensure the judicious use of the same for their patients.

  11. Hygiene training of food handlers in hospital settings: important factor in the prevention of nosocomial infections.

    PubMed

    Lazarević, Konstansa; Stojanović, Dusica; Bogdanović, Dragan; Dolićanin, Zana

    2013-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of food hygiene training of food handlers on sanitary-hygienic conditions in hospital kitchens, based on microbiological analysis of smears taken in hospital kitchens. The study was conducted in the 1995-2009 period at the Clinical Centre Nis, Serbia. The food hygiene training was conducted in February 2005, by an infection control officer. 1,076 smears in the central kitchen and 4,025 smears in distributive kitchens were taken from hands and work clothes, work surfaces, equipment, and kitchen utensils. Microbiological analysis of smears was carried out in an accredited laboratory of the Public Health Institute Nis (Serbia). A significantly lower percentage of smears with isolates of bacteria (p < 0.001) taken from hands and work clothes, work surfaces, equipment and kitchen utensils in the central and distributive kitchens was observed in the period following the food safety education programme (2005-2009). The most commonly isolated bacteria was: Enterobacter spp., Acinetobacter spp., Citrobacter spp., and E. coli. Our results confirmed that food hygiene training improved hygiene and is also an important component for the prevention of nosocomial infection.

  12. An electronic network for the surveillance of antimicrobial resistance in bacterial nosocomial isolates in Greece. The Greek Network for the Surveillance of Antimicrobial Resistance.

    PubMed Central

    Vatopoulos, A. C.; Kalapothaki, V.; Legakis, N. J.

    1999-01-01

    The present article reports an evaluation of the national electronic network for the continuous monitoring of antimicrobial resistance in Greece. The network employs a common electronic code and data format and uses WHONET software. Our four years' experience with the network confirms its practicality. A total of 22 hospitals in Greece are currently using the software, of which 19 participate in the network. Analysis of the information obtained has greatly helped in identifying the main factors responsible for the emergence of antimicrobial resistance in the participating hospitals. The data collected have also helped to identify priorities for further investigation of the genetic and molecular mechanisms responsible for the emergence of resistance and facilitated development of hospital-based empirical therapy of infections. In conclusion, the implementation of national networks for the surveillance of antimicrobial resistance should be regarded as a priority. PMID:10444883

  13. Evaluation of an intervention designed to decrease the rate of nosocomial methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infection by encouraging decreased fluoroquinolone use.

    PubMed

    Madaras-Kelly, Karl J; Remington, Richard E; Lewis, Pamela G; Stevens, Dennis L

    2006-02-01

    Society for Health Care Epidemiology guidelines recommend decreasing the use of fluoroquinolone antibiotics in institutions where methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is endemic. We evaluated whether an intervention to limit fluoroquinolone use was associated with a lower rate of nosocomial MRSA infection and summarized changes in antibiotic use, changes in other variables potentially correlated with a lower rate of MRSA infection, and rates of nosocomial infections due to other pathogens. Single-center quasi-experimental design. A time series of nosocomial MRSA infections was measured at monthly intervals from July 2001 through June of 2004; there were 80 MRSA infections recorded. Segmented regression analysis (ie, quasi-Poisson generalized linear models) was used to evaluate variables possibly associated with the nosocomial MRSA infection rate. An 87-bed Veterans Affairs teaching hospital with an extended-care facility. A physician-directed computer-generated intervention designed to limit the use of fluoroquinolone antibiotics was initiated, and institutional changes in antibiotic use and nosocomial MRSA infection rates were tracked. After the intervention, fluoroquinolone use decreased by approximately 34%, and levofloxacin use decreased by approximately 50%. Decreased fluoroquinolone use was offset by increased cephalosporin, piperacillin-tazobactam, and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole use. The nosocomial MRSA infection rate decreased from 1.37 to 0.63 episodes per 1,000 patient-days after the study intervention (P=.02). Coagulase-negative Staphylococcus and Enterococcus infection rates also decreased. However, the rate of infection with gram-negative organisms increased. The rate of MRSA infection was positively correlated with levofloxacin use (P=.01) and azithromycin use (P=.08), whereas it was negatively correlated with summer season (P=.05). In a subsequent model, the rate of MRSA infection was negatively correlated with the study intervention

  14. Clinical characteristics and therapeutic outcomes of nosocomial super-infection in adult bacterial meningitis.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chi-Ren; Chen, Shu-Fang; Lu, Cheng-Hsien; Chuang, Yao-Chung; Tsai, Nai-Wen; Chang, Chiung-Chih; Wang, Hung-Chen; Chien, Chun-Chih; Chang, Wen-Neng

    2011-05-18

    Super-infection in adult bacterial meningitis (ABM) is a condition wherein the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) grows new pathogen(s) during the therapeutic course of meningitis. It is an uncommon but clinically important condition rarely examined in literature. Twenty-seven episodes of super-infection states in 21 ABM patients collected in a 9.5-year study period (January 2001 to June 2010) were evaluated. The clinical characteristics, implicated pathogens, results of antimicrobial susceptibility tests, and therapeutic outcomes were analyzed. Twenty-one patients (13 men, 8 women) aged 25-73 years (median, 45 years) had post-neurosurgical state as the preceding event and nosocomial infection. The post-neurosurgical states included spontaneous intracranial hemorrhage (ICH) with craniectomy or craniotomy with extra-ventricular drainage (EVD) or ventriculo-peritoneal shunt (VPS) in 10 patients, traumatic ICH with craniectomy or craniotomy with EVD or VPS in 6 patients, hydrocephalus s/p VPS in 2 patients, and one patient each with cerebral infarct s/p craniectomy with EVD, meningeal metastasis s/p Omaya implant, and head injury. All 21 patients had EVD and/or VP shunt and/or Omaya implant during the whole course of ABM. Recurrent fever was the most common presentation and the implicated bacterial pathogens were protean, many of which were antibiotic resistant. Most patients required adjustment of antibiotics after the pathogens were identified but even with antimicrobial therapy, 33.3% (7/21) died. Morbidity was also high among survivors. Super-infection in ABM is usually seen in patients with preceding neurosurgical event, especially insertion of an external drainage device. Repeat CSF culture is mandatory for diagnostic confirmation because most of the implicated bacterial strains are non-susceptible to common antibiotics used. Unusual pathogens like anaerobic bacteria and fungi may also appear. Despite antimicrobial therapy, prognosis remains poor.

  15. Development of a surgical site infection (SSI) surveillance system, calculation of SSI rates and specification of important factors affecting SSI in a digestive organ surgical department.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Koji; Sawa, Akihiro; Akagi, Shinji; Kihira, Kenji

    2007-06-01

    We have developed an original system to conduct surgical site infection (SSI) surveillance. This system accumulates SSI surveillance information based on the National Nosocomial Infections Surveillance (NNIS) System and the Japanese Nosocomial Infections Surveillance (JNIS) System. The features of this system are as follows: easy input of data, high generality, data accuracy, SSI rate by operative procedure and risk index category (RIC) can be promptly calculated and compared with the current NNIS SSI rate, and the SSI rates and accumulated data can be exported electronically. Using this system, we monitored 798 patients in 24 operative procedure categories in the Digestive Organs Surgery Department of Mazda Hospital, Mazda Motor Corporation, from January 2004 through December 2005. The total number and rate of SSI were 47 and 5.89%, respectively. The SSI rates of 777 patients were calculated based on 15 operative procedure categories and Risk Index Categories (RIC). The highest SSI rate was observed in the rectum surgery of RIC 1 (30%), followed by the colon surgery of RIC3 (28.57%). About 30% of the isolated infecting bacteria were Enterococcus faecalis, Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Escherichia coli. Using quantification theory type 2, the American Society of Anesthesiology score (4.531), volume of hemorrhage under operation (3.075), wound classification (1.76), operation time (1.352), and history of diabetes (0.989) increased to higher ranks as factors for SSI. Therefore, we evaluated this system as a useful tool in safety control for operative procedures.

  16. Nosocomial viral infections: III. Guidelines for prevention and control of exanthematous viruses, gastroenteritis viruses, picornaviruses, and uncommonly seen viruses.

    PubMed

    Valenti, W M; Hruska, J F; Menegus, M A; Freeburn, M J

    1981-01-01

    This communication is the third in a four-part series on nosocomial viral infections from the Strong Memorial Hospital. This third article discusses guidelines for prevention and control of exanthematous viruses, gastroenteritis, viruses, adenoviruses and the picornaviruses other than rhinoviruses. Several uncommonly seen viruses, such as the virus of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease and Marburg, Ebola, and Lassa fever viruses, also are reviewed briefly.

  17. Survey of Clostridium difficile infection surveillance systems in Europe, 2011.

    PubMed

    Kola, Axel; Wiuff, Camilla; Akerlund, Thomas; van Benthem, Birgit H; Coignard, Bruno; Lyytikäinen, Outi; Weitzel-Kage, Doris; Suetens, Carl; Wilcox, Mark H; Kuijper, Ed J; Gastmeier, Petra

    2016-07-21

    To develop a European surveillance protocol for Clostridium difficile infection (CDI), existing national CDI surveillance systems were assessed in 2011. A web-based electronic form was provided for all national coordinators of the European CDI Surveillance Network (ECDIS-Net). Of 35 national coordinators approached, 33 from 31 European countries replied. Surveillance of CDI was in place in 14 of the 31 countries, comprising 18 different nationwide systems. Three of 14 countries with CDI surveillance used public health notification of cases as the route of reporting, and in another three, reporting was limited to public health notification of cases of severe CDI. The CDI definitions published by the European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases (ESCMID) and the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) were widely used, but there were differing definitions to distinguish between community- and healthcare-associated cases. All CDI surveillance systems except one reported annual national CDI rates (calculated as number of cases per patient-days). Only four surveillance systems regularly integrated microbiological data (typing and susceptibility testing results). Surveillance methods varied considerably between countries, which emphasises the need for a harmonised European protocol to allow consistent monitoring of the CDI epidemiology at European level. The results of this survey were used to develop a harmonised EU-wide hospital-based CDI surveillance protocol. This article is copyright of The Authors, 2016.

  18. Quality assessment of hospital discharge database for routine surveillance of hip and knee arthroplasty-related infections.

    PubMed

    Grammatico-Guillon, Leslie; Baron, Sabine; Gaborit, Christophe; Rusch, Emmanuel; Astagneau, Pascal

    2014-06-01

    Surgical site infection (SSI) surveillance represents a key method of nosocomial infection control programs worldwide. However, most SSI surveillance systems are considered to be poorly cost effective regarding human and economic resources required for data collection and patient follow up. This study aims to assess the efficacy of using hospital discharge databases (HDDs) as a routine surveillance system for detecting hip or knee arthroplasty-related infections (HKAIs). A case-control study was conducted among patients hospitalized in the Centre region of France between 2008 and 2010. HKAI cases were extracted from the HDD with various algorithms based on the International Classification of Diseases, Tenth Revision, and procedure codes. The control subjects were patients with hip or knee arthroplasty (HKA) without infection selected at random from the HDD during the study period. The gold standard was medical chart review. Sensitivity (Se), specificity (Spe), positive predictive value (PPV), and negative predictive value (NPV) were calculated to evaluate the efficacy of the surveillance system. Among 18,265 hospital stays for HKA, corresponding to 17,388 patients, medical reports were checked for 1,010 hospital stays (989 patients). We identified 530 cases in total (incidence rate, 1% [95% confidence interval (CI), 0.4%-1.6%), and 333 cases were detected by routine surveillance. As compared with 480 controls, Se was 98%, Spe was 71%, PPV was 63%, and NPV was 99%. Using a more specific case definition, based on a sample of 681 hospital stays, Se was 97%, Spe was 95%, PPV was 87%, and NPV was 98%. This study demonstrates the potential of HDD as a tool for routine SSI surveillance after low-risk surgery, under conditions of having an appropriate algorithm for selecting infections.

  19. Hepatitis B and C virus infection among hemodialysis patients in Yogyakarta, Indonesia: Prevalence and molecular evidence for nosocomial transmission.

    PubMed

    Rinonce, Hanggoro Tri; Yano, Yoshihiko; Utsumi, Takako; Heriyanto, Didik Setyo; Anggorowati, Nungki; Widasari, Dewiyani Indah; Lusida, Maria Inge; Soetjipto; Prasanto, Heru; Hotta, Hak; Hayashi, Yoshitake

    2013-08-01

    Hemodialysis patients are at an increased risk of acquiring hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. However, the prevalence of hepatitis viral infection and its genotype distribution among hemodialysis patients in Indonesia are unclear. In order to investigate these issues and the possibility of nosocomial transmission, 161 hemodialysis patients and 35 staff members at one of the hemodialysis unit in Yogyakarta, Indonesia, were tested for serological and virological markers of both viruses. HBV surface antigen (HBsAg) was detected in 18 patients (11.2%) and in two staff members (5.7%). Anti-HCV was detected in 130 patients (80.7%) but not in any staff members. Occult HBV and HCV infection were detected in 21 (14.7%) and 4 (12.9%) patients, respectively. The overall prevalence rates of HBV and HCV infection among patients were 24.2% and 83.2%, respectively. HCV infection was independently associated with hemodialysis duration and the number of blood transfusions. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that 23 of 39 tested HBV strains (59%) were genotype B, 11 (28.2%) were genotype C, and 5 (12.8%) were genotype A. HCV genotype 1a was dominant (95%) among 100 tested HCV strains. Nosocomial transmission was suspected because the genotype distribution differed from that of the general population in Indonesia, and because the viral genomes of several strains were identical. These findings suggest that HBV and HCV infection is common among hemodialysis patients in Yogyakarta, and probably occurs through nosocomial infection. Implementation of strict infection-control programs is necessary in hemodialysis units in Indonesia.

  20. Predictive value of oral colonization by Candida yeasts for the onset of a nosocomial infection in elderly hospitalized patients.

    PubMed

    Fanello, S; Bouchara, J P; Sauteron, M; Delbos, V; Parot, E; Marot-Leblond, A; Moalic, E; Le Flohicc, A M; Brangerd, B

    2006-02-01

    The incidence of nosocomial yeast infections has increased markedly in recent decades, especially among the elderly. The present study was therefore initiated not only to determine the predictive value of oral colonization by yeasts for the onset of a nosocomial Candida infection in elderly hospitalized patients (> 65 years), but also to clarify the factors that promote infection and to establish a relationship between the intensity of oral carriage and the onset of yeast infection. During this prospective cohort study, 256 patients (156 women and 100 men with a mean age of 83 +/- 8 years) were surveyed for yeast colonization or infection. Samples were collected every 4 days from day 0 to day 16 from four sites in the mouth, and intrinsic and extrinsic factors that might promote infection were recorded for each patient. Pulsed field gel electrophoresis was performed on Candida albicans isolates from all infected patients. Poor nutritional status was observed in 81 % of the patients and hyposalivation in 41 %. The colonization level was 67 % on day 0 (59 % C. albicans) and a heavy carriage of yeasts (> 50 c.f.u.) was observed for 51 % of the patients. The incidence of nosocomial colonization reached 6.9 % on day 4 (6.1 % on day 8 and 2.7 % on day 12), and that of nosocomial infection was 3.7 % on day 4 (6.8 % on day 8, 11.3 % on day 12 and 19.2 % on day 16). Of the 35 patients infected, 57 % were suffering from oral candidiasis. The principal risk factors for colonization were a dental prosthesis, poor oral hygiene and the use of antibiotics. The risk factors for infection, in addition to those already mentioned for colonization, were endocrine disease, poor nutritional status, prolonged hospitalization and high colony counts. Genotyping revealed person-to-person transmission in two patients. Thus, this study demonstrates a significant association between oral colonization and the onset of yeast infections in elderly hospitalized patients. Therefore, oral samples

  1. Nosocomial legionella pneumonia: demonstration of potable water as the source of infection.

    PubMed Central

    Ruf, B.; Schürmann, D.; Horbach, I.; Seidel, K.; Pohle, H. D.

    1988-01-01

    From January 1983 until December 1985, 35 cases of sporadic nosocomial legionella pneumonia, all caused by Legionella pneumophila, were diagnosed in a university hospital. L. pneumophila serogroup (SG) 1 was cultured from 12 of the 35 cases and compared to corresponding L. pneumophila SG 1 isolates from water outlets in the patients' immediate environment by subtyping with monoclonal antibodies. The corresponding environmental isolates were identical to 9 out of 12 (75%) of those from the cases. However, even in the remaining three cases identical subtypes were found distributed throughout the hospital water supply. From the hospital water supply four different subtypes of L. pneumophila SG 1 were isolated, three of which were implicated in legionella pneumonia. Of 453 water samples taken during the study 298 (65.8%) were positive for legionellae. Species of Legionella other than L. pneumophila have not been isolated. This may explain the exclusiveness of L. pneumophila as the legionella pneumonia-causing agent. Our results suggest that the water supply system was the source of infection. PMID:3215293

  2. [Investigation of SCCmec types and Panton-Valentine leukocidin in community-acquired and nosocomial Staphylococcus aureus strains: comparing skin and soft tissue infections to the other infections].

    PubMed

    Gülmez, Dolunay; Sancak, Banu; Ercis, Serpil; Karakaya, Jale; Hasçelik, Gülşen

    2012-07-01

    Infections due to methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) are important health care problems since they are usually multidrug resistant. Although MRSA is isolated especially from nosocomial infections, community-acquired MRSA infections are increasing. Methicillin resistance is due to the expression of mecA gene, which is located on SCCmec gene cassette. Different SCCmec types can be detected in hospital-acquired and community-acquired (CA-) MRSA strains. CA-MRSA strains might harbour Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL), an important virulence factor in skin and soft tissue infections. Strains carrying PVL has the ability to penetrate undamaged skin and cause more severe infections. The aim of this study was to detect SCCmec types and PVL gene in S.aureus strains isolated from skin and soft tissue infections and to compare with strains isolated from other infections in a university hospital in Ankara, Turkey. S.aureus strains isolated from skin and soft tissue infections (n= 285) and a control group consisting of 161 strains isolated from other infections (53 blood, 48 lower respiratory tract samples, 30 sterile body fluids, 30 genitourinary tract samples) chosen by stratification and random selection method, were included in the study. Among skin and soft tissue infection strains 46.7% were from the hospitalized patients and 48.4% of skin and soft tissue infection strains were from female patients. The mean age of the skin and soft tissue infection patients was 45.5 years. Among the control strains 60.9% were from the hospitalized patients and 41.6% of the control patients were female. The mean age of the control patients was 50.2 years. Strains were identified by the Phoenix system (Becton Dickinson, USA) and identification was confirmed by tube coagulase test. Methicillin resistance was determined by the Phoenix system which determines both oxacillin and cefoxitin minimum inhibitor concentrations and, confirmed by oxacillin agar screening and

  3. 75 FR 50770 - Healthcare Infection Control Practices Advisory Committee (HICPAC)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-17

    ... surveillance, prevention, and control of infections (e.g., nosocomial infections), antimicrobial resistance.... Materials for the call will be available on the HICPAC Web site, http://www.cdc.gov/hicpac , no later than...

  4. Surgical site infection after cardiac surgery: a simplified surveillance method.

    PubMed

    Lucet, Jean-Christophe

    2006-12-01

    We report the results of a 2-year, 7-center program of surveillance of deep sternal wound infection (DSWI) after cardiac surgery. DSWI was defined as the need for reoperation. Stratification data were abstracted from computerized files. The incidence of DSWI was 2.2% (198 of 8,816 cardiac surgery procedures). The risk factors identified were obesity, age, coronary artery bypass grafting, postoperative mechanical ventilation, and early surgical reexploration. The resource efficiency of this simplified surveillance method is discussed.

  5. Nosocomial urinary tract infections caused by extended-spectrum beta-lactamase uropathogens: Prevalence, pathogens, risk factors, and strategies for infection control

    PubMed Central

    Bouassida, Khaireddine; Jaidane, Mehdi; Bouallegue, Olfa; Tlili, Ghassen; Naija, Habiba; Mosbah, Ali Tahar

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Our goal was to investigate the prevalence and antibiogram pattern of extended spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) production among uropathogens using isolates from urine samples collected at the Department of Urology in the Sahloul Hospital, Tunisia We also aimed to identify the risk factors for nosocomial urinary tract infections (UTIs) in patients who underwent transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP) and the measures for infection control. Methods: Laboratory records of a five-year period from January 2004 to December 2008 were submitted for retrospective analysis to determine the incidence of ESBL infections. A total of 276 isolates were collected. A case-control study involving comparisons between two groups of patients who underwent TURP was performed to determine the risk factors for ESBL infection. Group 1, designated case subjects, included 51 patients with nosocomial UTI after TURP. Group 2, designated control subjects, consisted of 58 randomly selected patients who underwent TURP without nosocomial UTI in the same period. Factors suspected to be implicated in the emergence of ESBL infection were compared between the two groups in order to identify risk factors for infection. A univariate regression analysis was performed, followed by a multivariate one. Results: The annual prevalence of ESBL infection ranged from 1.3–2.5%. After performing univariate and multivariate regression analysis, the main risk factors for ESBL infections were identified as: use of antibiotics the year preceding the admission, duration of catheter use, and bladder washout (p=0.012, p=0.019, and p<0.001. Conclusions: Urologists have to perform a good hemostasis, especially in endoscopic resections, in order to avoid bladder irrigation and bladder washout and to reduce the time of bladder catheterization, which is a strong risk factor of nosocomial UTIs. PMID:27330585

  6. Nipah Virus Infection Outbreak with Nosocomial and Corpse-to-Human Transmission, Bangladesh

    PubMed Central

    Hossain, M. Jahangir; Gurley, Emily S.; Ameen, Kazi M.H.; Parveen, Shahana; Islam, M. Saiful; Faruque, Labib I.; Podder, Goutam; Banu, Sultana S.; Lo, Michael K.; Rollin, Pierre E.; Rota, Paul A.; Daszak, Peter; Rahman, Mahmudur; Luby, Stephen P.

    2013-01-01

    Active Nipah virus encephalitis surveillance identified an encephalitis cluster and sporadic cases in Faridpur, Bangladesh, in January 2010. We identified 16 case-patients; 14 of these patients died. For 1 case-patient, the only known exposure was hugging a deceased patient with a probable case, while another case-patient’s exposure involved preparing the same corpse for burial by removing oral secretions and anogenital excreta with a cloth and bare hands. Among 7 persons with confirmed sporadic cases, 6 died, including a physician who had physically examined encephalitis patients without gloves or a mask. Nipah virus–infected patients were more likely than community-based controls to report drinking raw date palm sap and to have had physical contact with an encephalitis patient (29% vs. 4%, matched odds ratio undefined). Efforts to prevent transmission should focus on reducing caregivers’ exposure to infected patients’ bodily secretions during care and traditional burial practices. PMID:23347678

  7. Surveillance study of species distribution, antifungal susceptibility and mortality of nosocomial candidemia in a tertiary care hospital in China

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Bloodstream infections due to Candida species cause significant morbidity and mortality, and the epidemiology of Candida infection is changing. Surveillance for candidemia is necessary to detect trends in species distribution and antifungal resistance. Methods The medical and electronic records of all patients who had candidemia at the authors’ hospital from 2009 to 2011 were reviewed for demographic data and clinical information, including the infecting Candida species, resistance to antifungals and survival, and the presence of risk factors associated with candidemia. Results A total of 133 distinct episodes of candidemia were identified over the study period. The annual incidence of candidemia ranged between 0.71 and 0.85 cases/1000 hospital discharges. The most frequent Candida species were C. tropicalis (28.6%), followed by C. albicans (23.3%) and C. parapsilosis (19.5%). The rates of susceptibility to antifungal agents were as followed: voriconazole (97.8%), itraconazole (69.5%), fluconazole (46.1%), ketoconazole (38.9%). Out of 131 evaluable patients, 34 (26.0%) died within 30 days from the onset of candidemia. C. tropicalis candidemia was associated with the highest mortality rate (44.7%). Regarding the crude mortality in the different units, patients in Hemato-Oncology ward had the highest mortality rate (66.7%), followed by patients in cardiovascular wards and ICU (57.1% and 25.6%, respectively). Predictors of 30-day mortality were identified by uni- and multivariate analyses. Complicated abdominal surgery, presence of central venous catheter (CVC), neutropenia, candidemia due to C. tropicalis and poor treatment with fluconazole were significantly associated with the 30-day mortality. Presence of CVC (odds ratio[OR] = 4.177; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.698 to 10.278; P = 0.002) was the only independent predictor for mortality in the multivariate analysis. Conclusion This report provides baseline data for future

  8. Nosocomial vs. community-acquired infective endocarditis in Greece: changing epidemiological profile and mortality risk.

    PubMed

    Giannitsioti, E; Skiadas, I; Antoniadou, A; Tsiodras, S; Kanavos, K; Triantafyllidi, H; Giamarellou, H

    2007-08-01

    Current epidemiological trends of infective endocarditis (IE) in Greece were investigated via a prospective cohort study of all cases of IE that fulfilled the Duke criteria during 2000-2004 in 14 tertiary and six general hospitals in the metropolitan area of Athens. Demographics, clinical data and outcome were compared for nosocomial IE (NIE) and community-acquired IE (CIE). NIE accounted for 42 (21.5%) and CIE for 153 (78.5%) of 195 cases. Intravenous drug use was associated exclusively with CIE, while co-morbidities (cardiovascular disease, diabetes mellitus, chronic renal failure requiring haemodialysis and malignancies) were more frequent in the NIE group (p <0.05). Prosthetic valve endocarditis (PVE) predominated in the NIE group (p 0.006), and >50% of NIE cases had a history of vascular intervention. Coagulase-negative staphylococci and enterococci were more frequent in cases of NIE than in cases of CIE (26.2% vs. 5.2%, p <0.01, and 30.9% vs. 16.3%, p 0.05, respectively). Enterococci accounted for 19.5% of total IE cases and were the leading cause of NIE. Staphylococcus aureus IE was hospital-acquired in only 11.9% of cases. In-hospital mortality was higher for NIE than for CIE (39.5% vs. 18.6%, p 0.02). Cardiac failure (New York Heart Association grade III-IV; OR 13.3, 95% CI 4.9-36.1, p <0.001) and prosthetic valve endocarditis (OR 3.7, 95% CI 1.3-10.6, p 0.01) were the most important predictors of mortality.

  9. [Effect of selective digestive decontamination on the nosocomial infection and multiresistant microorganisms incidence in critically ill patients].

    PubMed

    Parra Moreno, María Luisa; Arias Rivera, Susana; de la Cal López, Miguel Angel; Frutos Vivar, Fernando; Cerdá Cerdá, Enrique; García Hierro, Paloma; Negro Vega, Eva

    2002-03-23

    Ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) is a common complication in mechanically ventilated patients. Other infections related to the use of invasive devices, such urinary tract infections (UTI) and central venous catheter-related bloodstream infections are found in patients admitted in intensive care units (ICU). Selective digestive decontamination (SDD) is a set of manoeuvres (hygiene, topic digestive antimicrobials and short course of systemic antibiotics) aimed at decreasing the incidence of nosocomial infections, mainly VAP, in ICU. The objective of this study was to describe the impact of SDD in the rates of nosocomial infections in an 18-bed medical-surgical ICU. All patients admitted in the ICU from October 1998 to September 1999 with expected mechanical ventilation for at least 72 h or with an illness where SDD has proven to be efficacious. The infection rates during this period were compared with the infection rates of the period without SDD (October 1997 to September 1998). VAP rates decreased from 12.38 to 3.64 per 1000 days of mechanical ventilation (RR 0.3; CI 95%: 0.16 to 0.53). Urinary tract infection rates decreased form 7.70 to 4.51 per 1000 bladder-catheter days (RR 0.6. CI 95%: 0.37 to 0.93). Central venous catheter related bloodstream infections decreased from 5.92 to 2.73 per 1000 catheter days (RR: 0.5. CI 95%: 0.24 to 0.90). There was no emergence of resistant microorganims when SDD was used. SDD reduces infection rates in ICU without any significant adverse events.

  10. Comparison of the Pattern of Nosocomial Infection Between the Neonatal Intensive Care Units of Hospitals Kuala Terengganu and Universiti Sains Malaysia, Kelantan

    PubMed Central

    Wan Hanifah, WH; Lee, JKF; Quah, BS

    2000-01-01

    Nosocomial infection is a common problem in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) and a knowledge of the pattern of nosocomial infection will contribute greatly to the intensification of infection control measures and the development of antibiotic policies in the NICU. This study aims to compare the incidence and clinical characteristics of neonates with nosocomial infection in NICU of both Kuala Terengganu Hospital (HKT) and Universiti Sains Malaysia Hospital (HUSM). Neonates who had both clinical signs of sepsis and positive blood cultures, 48 hours after admission to NICU, from 1st January to 31st December 1998, in both hospitals were retrospectively studied. Among neonates admitted to NICU, 30 (5.4%) in HKT and 65 (3.6%) in HUSM had nosocomial infection (p = 0.07). The mean duration of hospitalisation was shorter (HUSM 37 days, HKT 49 days; p = 0.02), and the number of neonates with predisposing factors for infection is higher (HUSM 100%, HKT 73.3%; p < 0.001) in HUSM compared with HKT. There were no differences in gestation, mean age of onset of infection and mortality between both hospitals. The most common organism isolated from the blood in HKT was Klebsiella pneumoniae (33.3%), and in HUSM Klebsiella aerogenes (24.6%). Half of Klebsiella pneumoniae isolates were resistant to cephalosporins and aminoglycosides in HKT and a similar number of Klebsiella aerogenes isolates were resistant to piperacillin and aminoglycosides in HUSM. In conclusion nosocomial infection is a common problem in both hospitals. Except for more frequent predisposing factors for infection in HUSM, and a longer duration of hospital stay among neonates in HKT, the clinical characteristics of neonates with nosocomial infection in both hospitals were similar. PMID:22844213

  11. Epidemiology and risk factors for nosocomial bloodstream infections in solid organ transplants over a 10-year period.

    PubMed

    Berenger, B M; Doucette, K; Smith, S W

    2016-04-01

    Bloodstream infections (BSIs) are a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in solid organ transplantation (SOT). We sought to determine the types of nosocomial BSIs and risk factors for them in SOT. Prospectively collected databases of all SOT and nosocomial BSIs occurring at our institution for a 10-year period were reviewed. From 2003-2012, we observed 157 nosocomial BSI episodes in 2257 SOTs, the majority of which were caused by staphylococci and enterococci (67.5%). The most common sources of BSI were central line, organ space, respiratory, and gastrointestinal. Kidney transplant patients had the lowest risk of acquiring a BSI compared with other SOT types. Lung transplant patients were at increased risk of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus BSI and heart transplant patients were at increased risk of a Candida albicans BSI, when compared to other organ transplant types. When coagulase-negative Staphylococcus (CoNS) or C. albicans was isolated, the central line was most often the source. The implementation of central-line bundles during the study period correlated temporally with a decreased rate of CoNS BSI. Over the 10-year period, vancomycin-resistant enterococci became the most common enterococcal BSI. Donor-positive cytomegalovirus status was associated with an increased risk of BSI, when compared to donor-negative patients. This study demonstrates the common sources, risk factors, and causative organisms of BSI, which can guide empiric antibiotic choices, and highlights areas where preventative interventions could be targeted to prevent nosocomial BSI in SOT. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. [Outbreak of nosocomial urinary tract infections due to a multidrug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa].

    PubMed

    Boutiba-Ben Boubaker, I; Boukadida, J; Triki, O; Hannachi, N; Ben Redjeb, S

    2003-04-01

    An outbreak of a multidrug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa including imipenem resistance occurred in the urology intensive care unit at Charles Nicolle Hospital (Tunis). All isolates presented the same antibiotic resistance pattern and were only susceptible to colistin. The epidemic strain was detected in different sites of this unit. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis after enzymatic restriction using XbaI was performed in order to establish an epidemiologic link between these infections. Genotypic analysis showed two different patterns and the environmental source was identified in both cases. Although the same antibiotype was harbored by all the isolates, two outbreaks occurring in the same period were identified. The strengthening of hygiene measures allowed to stop the outbreak spreading. Since the hospital environment is the major source of Pseudomonas aeruginosa contamination, a continuous surveillance of the patients and the environmental sources is required for the implementation efficient control measures.

  13. A preliminary study for the development of indices and the current state of surgical site infections (SSIs) in Korea: the Korean Surgical Site Infection Surveillance (KOSSIS) program.

    PubMed

    Park, Sun Jin; Lee, Kil Yeon; Park, Ji Won; Lee, Jae Gil; Choi, Hee Jung; Chun, Hee Kyung; Kang, Jung Gu

    2015-03-01

    We aimed to develop an effective system for surgical site infection (SSI) surveillance and examine the current domestic state of SSIs for common abdominal surgeries in Korea. The Korean Surgical Site Infection Surveillance (KOSSIS) program was developed as an SSI surveillance system. A prospective multicenter study in nine university-affiliated or general hospitals was conducted for patients who underwent gastrectomy, cholecystectomy, appendectomy, colectomy, or proctectomy between August 16 and September 30 in 2012. Patients were monitored for up to 30 days by combining direct observation and a postdischarge surgeon survey. Data on SSIs were prospectively collected with KOSSIS secretarial support according to a common protocol. Operation-specific SSI rates were stratified according to risk factors and compared with data from the Korean Nosocomial Infections Surveillance System (KONIS) and National Healthcare Safety Network. A focus group interview was conducted with participating hospitals for feedback. A total of 1,088 operations were monitored: 207 gastrectomies, 318 cholecystectomies, 270 appendectomies, 197 colectomies, and 96 proctectomies. Operation-specific SSI rates determined by the KOSSIS program were substantially higher than those found in KONIS (7.73% [95% confidence interval, 4.5%-12.3%] vs. 3.4% for gastrectomies, 10.15% [95% confidence interval, 6.1%-15.2%] vs. 4.0% for colectomy, and 13.5% [95% confidence interval, 7.4%-22.0%] vs. 4.2% for proctectomy). Despite a short surveillance period and heterogenous group of hospitals, our results suggest that KOSSIS could be a useful program to enhance SSI surveillance in Korea.

  14. What can be gained from comprehensive disaggregate surveillance? The Avon Surveillance System for Sexually Transmitted Infections

    PubMed Central

    Slater, Wendi; Sadler, Katharine; Cassell, Jackie A; Horner, Paddy; Low, Nicola

    2007-01-01

    Objective To describe a new disaggregate surveillance system covering key diagnosed sexually transmitted infections in a UK locality. Methods The Avon System for Surveillance of Sexually Transmitted Infections (ASSIST) collects computerised person‐ and episode‐based information about laboratory‐diagnosed sexually transmitted infections from genitourinary medicine (GUM) clinics, the Avon Brook Clinic, and the Health Protection Agency and trust laboratories in primary care trusts in Avon. The features of the system are illustrated here, by describing chlamydia‐testing patterns according to the source of test, age and sex, and by mapping the distribution of chlamydia across Bristol, UK. Results Between 2000 and 2004, there were 821 685 records of tests for sexually transmitted infections, with 23 542 positive results. The proportion of tests and positive results for chlamydia and gonorrhoea sent from general practice increased over time. Most chlamydia tests in both GUM and non‐specialist settings were performed on women aged >25 years, but positivity rates were highest in women aged <25 years. The positivity rate remained stable between 2000 and 2004. Including data from all diagnostic settings, chlamydia rates were about twice as high as those estimated only from genitourinary clinic cases. Conclusions The ASSIST model could be a promising new tool for planning and measuring sexual health services in England if it can become sustainable and provide more timely data using fewer resources. Collecting denominator data and including infections diagnosed in primary care are essential for meaningful surveillance. PMID:17344247

  15. Early Expansion of Circulating Granulocytic Myeloid-derived Suppressor Cells Predicts Development of Nosocomial Infections in Patients with Sepsis.

    PubMed

    Uhel, Fabrice; Azzaoui, Imane; Grégoire, Murielle; Pangault, Céline; Dulong, Joelle; Tadié, Jean-Marc; Gacouin, Arnaud; Camus, Christophe; Cynober, Luc; Fest, Thierry; Le Tulzo, Yves; Roussel, Mikael; Tarte, Karin

    2017-08-01

    Sepsis induces a sustained immune dysfunction responsible for poor outcome and nosocomial infections. Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) described in cancer and inflammatory processes may be involved in sepsis-induced immune suppression, but their clinical impact remains poorly defined. To clarify phenotype, suppressive activity, origin, and clinical impact of MDSCs in patients with sepsis. Peripheral blood transcriptomic analysis was performed on 29 patients with sepsis and 15 healthy donors. A second cohort of 94 consecutive patients with sepsis, 11 severity-matched intensive care patients, and 67 healthy donors was prospectively enrolled for flow cytometry and functional experiments. Genes involved in MDSC suppressive functions, including S100A12, S100A9, MMP8, and ARG1, were up-regulated in the peripheral blood of patients with sepsis. CD14(pos)HLA-DR(low/neg) monocytic (M)-MDSCs were expanded in intensive care unit patients with and without sepsis and CD14(neg)CD15(pos) low-density granulocytes/granulocytic (G)-MDSCs were more specifically expanded in patients with sepsis (P < 0.001). Plasma levels of MDSC mediators S100A8/A9, S100A12, and arginase 1 were significantly increased. In vitro, CD14(pos)- and CD15(pos)-cell depletion increased T-cell proliferation in patients with sepsis. G-MDSCs, made of immature and mature granulocytes expressing high levels of degranulation markers, were specifically responsible for arginase 1 activity. High initial levels of G-MDSCs, arginase 1, and S100A12 but not M-MDSCs were associated with subsequent occurrence of nosocomial infections. M-MDSCs and G-MDSCs strongly contribute to T-cell dysfunction in patients with sepsis. More specifically, G-MDSCs producing arginase 1 are associated with a higher incidence of nosocomial infections and seem to be major actors of sepsis-induced immune suppression.

  16. [Five steps to decreasing nosocomial infections in large immature premature infants: A quasi-experimental study].

    PubMed

    García González, Ana; Leante Castellanos, José Luis; Fuentes Gutiérrez, Carmen; Lloreda García, José María; Fernández Fructuoso, José Ramón; Gómez Santos, Elisabet; García González, Verónica

    2017-07-01

    An evaluation is made of the impact of a series of five interventions on the incidence of hospital-related infections in a level iii neonatal unit. Quasi-experimental, pre-post intervention study, which included preterm infants weighing 1,500g at birth or delivered at <32 weeks gestation, admitted in the 12 months before and after the measures were implemented (January 2014). The measures consisted of: optimising hand washing, following a protocol for insertion and handling of central intravenous catheters, encouraging breastfeeding; applying a protocol for rational antibiotic use, and establishing a surveillance system for multi-resistant bacteria. The primary endpoint was to assess the incidence of hospital-acquired infections before and after implementing the interventions. Thirty-three matched patients were included in each period. There was an incidence of 8.7 and 2.7 hospital-related infections/1,000 hospital stay days in the pre- and post-intervention periods, respectively (P<.05). Additionally, patients in the treatment group showed a statistically-significant decrease in days on mechanical ventilation, use of blood products, and vasoactive drugs. The strategy, based on implementing five specific measures in a unit with a high rate of hospital-related infections, proved effective in reducing their incidence. This reduction could contribute to lowering the use of mechanical ventilation, blood products, and vasoactive drugs. Copyright © 2016 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  17. Treatment failure of nosocomial pertussis infection in a very-low-birth-weight neonate.

    PubMed

    Bonacorsi, Stéphane; Farnoux, Caroline; Bidet, Philippe; Caro, Valérie; Aizenfisz, Sophie; Benhayoun, Mounir; Aujard, Yannick; Guiso, Nicole; Bingen, Edouard

    2006-10-01

    We describe a case of nosocomial maternal transmission of Bordetella pertussis to a very-low-birth-weight (VLBW) neonate in whom treatment was unsuccessful. This case underscores the need for rapid and sensitive PCR diagnosis in VLBW neonates and in parents with clinical signs of pertussis and suggests that standard treatment may not be appropriate for VLBW neonates.

  18. Emergence of fluconazole-resistant strains of Blastoschizomyces capitatus causing nosocomial infections in cancer patients.

    PubMed Central

    D'Antonio, D; Mazzoni, A; Iacone, A; Violante, B; Capuani, M A; Schioppa, F; Romano, F

    1996-01-01

    Blastoschizomyces capitatus strains resistant to fluconazole were isolated in three cancer patients. All of the strains had identical genomic DNA restriction profiles. Our findings give evidence for the emergence of fluconazole-resistant B. capitatus and suggest a nosocomial acquisition emanating from a common source within the hospital environment. PMID:8904454

  19. Treatment Failure of Nosocomial Pertussis Infection in a Very-Low-Birth-Weight Neonate

    PubMed Central

    Bonacorsi, Stéphane; Farnoux, Caroline; Bidet, Philippe; Caro, Valérie; Aizenfisz, Sophie; Benhayoun, Mounir; Aujard, Yannick; Guiso, Nicole; Bingen, Edouard

    2006-01-01

    We describe a case of nosocomial maternal transmission of Bordetella pertussis to a very-low-birth-weight (VLBW) neonate in whom treatment was unsuccessful. This case underscores the need for rapid and sensitive PCR diagnosis in VLBW neonates and in parents with clinical signs of pertussis and suggests that standard treatment may not be appropriate for VLBW neonates. PMID:17021121

  20. [Nosocomial pneumonia].

    PubMed

    Díaz, Emili; Martín-Loeches, Ignacio; Vallés, Jordi

    2013-12-01

    The hospital acquired pneumonia (HAP) is one of the most common infections acquired among hospitalised patients. Within the HAP, the ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) is the most common nosocomial infection complication among patients with acute respiratory failure. The VAP and HAP are associated with increased mortality and increased hospital costs. The rise in HAP due to antibiotic-resistant bacteria also causes an increase in the incidence of inappropriate empirical antibiotic therapy, with an associated increased risk of hospital mortality. It is very important to know the most common organisms responsible for these infections in each hospital and each Intensive Care Unit, as well as their antimicrobial susceptibility patterns, in order to reduce the incidence of inappropriate antibiotic therapy and improve the prognosis of patients. Additionally, clinical strategies aimed at the prevention of HAP and VAP should be employed in hospital settings caring for patients at risk for these infections. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  1. Nurse staffing level and nosocomial infections: empirical evaluation of the case-crossover and case-time-control designs.

    PubMed

    Hugonnet, Stéphane; Villaveces, Andrés; Pittet, Didier

    2007-06-01

    The authors compared a case-crossover design, a case-time-control design, and a cohort design to evaluate the effect of nurse staffing level on the risk of nosocomial infections. They evaluated two strategies, conditional logistic regression and generalized estimating equation, to analyze the case-crossover study. The study was performed among critically ill patients in the medical intensive care unit of the University of Geneva Hospitals, Geneva, Switzerland. Of 366 patients who stayed more than 7 days in the intensive care unit between 1999 and 2002, 144 developed an infection. The main reasons for admission were infectious (35.3%), cardiovascular (32.5%), and pulmonary (19.7%) conditions. A comparison of the three study designs showed that lower nurse staffing was associated with an approximately 50% increased risk of nosocomial infections. All analyses yielded similar estimates, except that the point estimate obtained by the conditional logistic regression used in the case-crossover design was biased away from unity; the generalized estimating equation yielded unbiased results and is the most appropriate technique for case-crossover designs. The case-crossover methodology in hospital epidemiology is a promising alternative to traditional approaches, but selection of the referent periods is challenging.

  2. Urinary tract infection surveillance in residential aged care.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Susan; Gillespie, Elizabeth; Stuart, Rhonda L

    2017-08-22

    The aim of this research was to determine the prevalence of urinary tract infections (UTIs) in 2 aged care homes (ACHs) and examine the extent to which presumed UTIs met the 2012 McGeer infection surveillance definitions. Retrospective observational study. Two ACHs: a 30-bed facility and a 100-bed facility PARTICIPANTS: Residents of the 2 ACHs diagnosed with UTI. A retrospective review was conducted of UTIs clinically diagnosed at the 2 facilities over a 16-month period, utilizing surveillance and microbiologic data, resident progress notes, and medication charts. This data was reviewed to determine how many diagnosed UTIs met the revised McGeer definitions. Overall, 119 UTIs were diagnosed in 57 residents over 16 months. Only 7 of the diagnosed UTIs met the McGeer definitions. Forty-seven did not meet the clinical evidence, 17 did not meet the microbiologic evidence, and 48 did not meet either surveillance criteria. This study demonstrated the disparity between the clinical diagnosis of UTI and the surveillance definitions for UTI, and highlights the limitations of the McGeer definitions in those with cognitive or communication deficits. There is an urgent need for antimicrobial stewardship programs and education in the ACH setting. Copyright © 2017 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Antibiotic resistance patterns of Gram-negative and Gram-positive strains isolated from inpatients with nosocomial infections in a tertiary hospital in Beijing, China from 2011 to 2014.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiaoyan; Tong, Aihua; Wang, Di; Sun, Huijie; Chen, Ling; Dong, Mei

    2016-06-27

    This study was to evaluate the resistance of antimicrobial agents against pathogens from inpatients with nosocomial infection collected in Beijing, China, during 2011-2014. Measurement of minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) was carried out using the broth microdilution method with the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) guidelines as the indicator. A total of 5442 Gram-negative and 806 Gram-positive isolates were collected in this study in 2011-2014. Two carbapenem-resistant strains appeared among Escherichia coli (E. coli), while imipenem-resistant isolates increased in proportion from 0% to 8.2% among Klebsiella pneumonia (K. pneumonia) during 4 year. Acinetobacter baumannii (A. baumannii) revealed severe antibacterial resistance to most antimicrobial agents. In contrast, a decreasing trend on resistance had been observed among Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) especially after 2012, range from 1.8% for co-trimoxazole to 13.5% for piperacillin. The resistance of Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) also had the lowest resistant to linezolid and vancomycin (0.1%). In summary, antimicrobial-resistant nosocomial pathogens have gradually increased from 2011 to 2014, so improved surveillance of hospital-acquired infections and effective infection-control measures may be the best way to solve the present problem.

  4. Epidemiology, surveillance and control of Nipah virus infections in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Chua, K B

    2010-12-01

    The outbreak of Nipah virus, affecting pigs and pig-farm workers, was first noted in September 1998 in the north-western part of peninsular Malaysia. By March 1999, the outbreak had spread to other pig-farming areas of the country, inclusive of the neighbouring country, Singapore. A total of 283 human cases of viral encephalitis with 109 deaths were recorded in Malaysia from 29 September 1998 to December 1999. During the outbreak period, a number of surveillances under three broad groups; Surveillance in Human Health Sector, Surveillance in Animal Health Sector, and Surveillance for the Reservoir Hosts, were carried out to determine the prevalence, risk of virus infections and transmission in human and swine populations as well as the source and reservoir hosts of Nipah virus. Surveillance data showed that the virus spread rapidly among pigs within infected farms and transmission was attributed to direct contact with infective excretions and secretions. The spread of the virus among pig farms within and between states of peninsular Malaysia was due to movement of pigs. The transmission of the virus to humans was through close contact with infected pigs. Human to human transmission was considered a rare event though the Nipah virus could be isolated from saliva, urine, nasal and pharyngeal secretions of patients. Field investigations identified fruitbats of the Pteropid species as the natural reservoir hosts of the viruses. The outbreak was effectively brought under control following the discovery of the virus and institution of correct control measures through a combined effort of multi-ministerial and multidisciplinary teams working in close co-operation and collaboration with other international agencies.

  5. Impact of the International Nosocomial Infection Control Consortium (INICC) Multidimensional Hand Hygiene Approach, over 8 years, in 11 cities of Turkey

    PubMed Central

    Leblebicioglu, Hakan; Koksal, Iftihar; Akan, Özay Arıkan; Özgültekin, Asu; Kendirli, Tanil; Erben, Nurettin; Yalcin, Ata Nevzat; Ulusoy, Sercan; Sirmatel, Fatma; Ozdemir, Davut; Alp, Emine; Yıldızdaş, Dinçer; Esen, Saban; Ulger, Fatma; Dilek, Ahmet; Yilmaz, Hava; Yýlmaz, Gürdal; Kaya, Selçuk; Ulusoy, Hülya; Tulunay, Melek; Oral, Mehmet; Ünal, Necmettin; Turan, Güldem; Akgün, Nur; İnan, Asuman; Ince, Erdal; Karbuz, Adem; Çiftçi, Ergin; Taşyapar, Nevin; Güneş, Melek; Ozgunes, Ilhan; Usluer, Gaye; Turhan, Ozge; Gunay, Nurgul; Gumus, Eylul; Dursun, Oguz; Arda, Bilgin; Bacakoglu, Feza; Cengiz, Mustafa; Yilmaz, Leyla; Geyik, Mehmet Faruk; Şahin, Ahmet; Erdogan, Selvi; Kılıc, Aysegul Ulu; Horoz, Ozden Ozgur

    2014-01-01

    Aims: To evaluate the effectiveness of the International Nosocomial Infection Control Consortium (INICC) Multidimensional Hand Hygiene Approach in Turkey and analyse predictors of poor hand hygiene compliance. Design: An observational, prospective, interventional, before-and-after study was conducted from August 2003 to August 2011 in 12 intensive care units (ICU) of 12 hospitals in 11 cities. The study was divided into a baseline and a follow-up period and included random 30-minute observations for hand hygiene compliance in ICU. The hand hygiene approach included administrative support, supplies availability, education and training, reminders in the workplace, process surveillance, and performance feedback. Results: We observed 21,145 opportunities for hand hygiene. Overall hand hygiene compliance increased from 28.8% to 91% (95% CI 87.6–93.0, p 0.0001). Multivariate and univariate analyses showed that several variables were significantly associated with poor hand hygiene compliance: males vs. females (39% vs. 48%; 95% CI 0.79–0.84, p 0.0001), ancillary staff vs. physicians (35% vs. 46%, 95% CI 0.73–0.78, p 0.0001), and adult vs. pediatric ICUs (42% vs. 74%, 95% CI 0.54–0.60, p 0.0001). Conclusions: Adherence to hand hygiene was significantly increased with the INICC Hand Hygiene Approach. Specific programmes should be directed to improve hand hygiene in variables found to be predictors of poor hand hygiene compliance.

  6. Effect of topical treatment with skin barrier-enhancing emollients on nosocomial infections in preterm infants in Bangladesh: a randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Darmstadt, Gary L; Saha, Samir K; Ahmed, A S M Nawshad Uddin; Chowdhury, M A K Azad; Law, Paul A; Ahmed, Saifuddin; Alam, Muhammad Asif; Black, Robert E; Santosham, Mathuram

    Infections and complications of prematurity are main causes of neonatal mortality. Very low birthweight premature infants have compromised skin barrier function, and are at especially high risk for serious infections and mortality. Our aim was to ascertain whether topical application of emollients to enhance skin barrier function would prevent nosocomial infections in this population. We randomly assigned infants born before week 33 of gestation after admission to Dhaka Shishu Hospital, Bangladesh, to daily massage with sunflower seed oil (n=159) or Aquaphor (petrolatum, mineral oil, mineral wax, lanolin alcohol; n=157). We then compared incidence of nosocomial infections among infants in these two groups with an untreated control group (n=181) by an intention-to-treat analysis. 20 patients in the control group, and 22 in each of the treatment groups left the hospital early, but were included in the final analysis. Overall, infants treated with sunflower seed oil were 41% less likely to develop nosocomial infections than controls (adjusted incidence rate ratio [IRR] 0.59, 95% CI 0.37-0.96, p=0.032). Aquaphor did not significantly reduce the risk of infection (0.60, 0.35-1.03, p=0.065). No adverse events were seen. Our findings confirm that skin application of sunflower seed oil provides protection against nosocomial infections in preterm very low birthweight infants. The low cost, availability, simplicity, and effect of treatment make it an important intervention for very low birthweight infants admitted to hospital in developing countries.

  7. Prevalence of Extended-Spectrum Beta-Lactamase-Producing Klebsiella pneumoniae Isolates in Nosocomial and Community-Acquired Urinary Tract Infections

    PubMed Central

    Latifpour, Mohammad; Gholipour, Abolfazl; Damavandi, Mohammad Sadegh

    2016-01-01

    Background Klebsiella pneumoniae is a family member of Enterobacteriaceae. Isolates of K. pneumoniae produce enzymes that cause decomposition of third generation cephalosporins. These enzymes are known as extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL). Resistance of K. pneumoniae to beta-lactamase antibiotics is commonly mediated by beta-lactamase genes. Objectives The aim of this study was to identify the ESBL produced by K. pneumoniae isolates that cause community-acquired and nosocomial urinary tract infections within a one-year period (2013 to 2014) in Kashani and Hajar university hospitals of Shahrekord, Iran. Patients and Methods From 2013 to 2014, 150 strains of K. pneumoniae isolate from two different populations with nosocomial and community-acquired infections were collected. The strains were then investigated by double disk synergism and multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Results The study population of 150 patients with nosocomial and community-acquired infections were divided to two groups of 75 each. We found that 48 of the K. pneumoniae isolates in the patients with nosocomial infection and 39 isolates in those with community-acquired infections produced ESBL. The prevalence of TEM1, SHV1 and VEB1 in ESBL-producing isolates in nosocomial patients was 24%, 29.3% and 10.6%, and in community-acquired patients, 17.3%, 22.7% and 8%, respectively. Conclusions The prevalence of ESBL-producing K. pneumoniae isolate is of great concern; therefore, continuous investigation seems essential to monitor ESBL-producing bacteria in patients with nosocomial and community-acquired infections. PMID:27226874

  8. [Enhanced surveillance of initial cases of pandemic influenza (H1N1) 2009 infection in Spain, April-June 2009].

    PubMed

    Santa-Olalla Peralta, Patricia; Cortes García, Marta; Martínez Sánchez, Elena Vanessa; Nogareda Moreno, Francisco; Limia Sánchez, Aurora; Pachón Del Amo, Isabel; Sierra Moros, Maria José

    2010-01-01

    In April 2009, a new surveillance strategy for the detection of cases of pandemic influenza (H1N1) 2009 infection and for the implementation of appropriate control measures to contain its transmission was initiated in Spain. We describe the clinical and epidemiological characteristics of confirmed cases in Spain notified by the National Epidemiological Surveillance Network from April 24 to June 30, 2009. As part of the initial surveillance response to the pandemic, case-based clinical and epidemiological information was collected nationwide on cases under investigation for pandemic virus (H1N1) 2009 infection and their contacts. Of 717 confirmed cases, 91% were notified by 5 Autonomous Communities. As of June 15,49.1% of cases belonged to school outbreaks. No nosocomial outbreaks were detected. The median incubation period was 3 days. Eighty-eight percent of cases were under the age of 30 years, and 24.9% were imported. The most frequent symptoms were cough (92%) and fever (81.8%). The median duration of symptoms was 5 days. Thirteen cases required hospitalization and one died. During the first months of the pandemic, pandemic influenza cases experienced a mild illness similar to seasonal influenza, predominantly affecting children and young adults. By the end of June 2009, the detection of outbreaks in different settings indicated the diffusion of the pandemic virus into the community and the start of its circulation.

  9. Antibacterial and antioxidant activities of Musa sp. leaf extracts against multidrug resistant clinical pathogens causing nosocomial infection.

    PubMed

    Karuppiah, Ponmurugan; Mustaffa, Muhammed

    2013-09-01

    To investigate different Musa sp. leave extracts of hexane, ethyl acetate and methanol were evaluated for antibacterial activity against multi-drug resistant pathogens causing nosocomial infection by agar well diffusion method and also antioxidant activities. The four different Musa species leaves were extracted with hexane, ethyl acetate and methanol. Antibacterial susceptibility test, minimum inhibitory concentration and minimum inhibitory bacterial concentration were determined by agar well diffusion method. Total phenolic content and in vitro antioxidant activity was determined. All the Musa sp. extracts showed moderate antibacterial activities expect Musa paradisiaca with the inhibition zone ranging from 8.0 to 18.6 mm. Among four species ethyl acetate extracts of Musa paradisiaca showed highest activity against tested pathogens particularly E. coli, P. aeruginosa and Citrobacter sp. The minimum inhibitory concentrations were within the value of 15.63- 250 µg/mL and minimum bactericidal concentrations were ranging from 31.25- 250 µg/mL. Antioxidant activity of Musa acuminate exhibited maximum activity among other three Musa species. The present study concluded that among the different Musa species, Musa paradisiaca displayed efficient antibacterial activity followed by Musa acuminata against multi-drug resistant nosocomial infection causing pathogens. Further, an extensive study is needed to identify the bioactive compounds, mode of action and toxic effect in vivo of Musa sp.

  10. Isolation and characterization of quorum-sensing signalling molecules in Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates recovered from nosocomial infections.

    PubMed

    Lakshmana Gowda, Krishnappa; John, James; Marie, Mohammed A M; Sangeetha, Gopalkrishnan; Bindurani, Shanta Range

    2013-09-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is one of the most common pathogens in nosocomial infections. Many studies have documented the role of quorum-sensing (QS) systems in antibiotic tolerance of P. aeruginosa. N-acyl homoserine lactones (AHLs) serve as QS signalling molecules and can be a target for modulating bacterial pathogenicity. In this study, nosocomial isolates of P. aeruginosa were characterized for the presence of different types of QS signalling molecules. AHLs were solvent extracted and quantified by determination of β-galactosidase activity using the Escherichia coli MG4 reporter strain. Further characterization was performed by analytical thin layer chromatography coupled with detection using the Agrobacterium tumefaciens A136 biosensor strain. All P. aeruginosa isolates produced AHLs, but there were differences in the quantity and nature of AHLs. We identified AHLs belonging to C4-homoserine lactone (HSL), C6-HSL, C8-HSL, C10-HSL and C12-HSL. AHL profiling of P. aeruginosa isolates showed differences in the amounts and types of AHLs, suggesting differences in the virulence factors and the potential for infection. Our results may be investigated further using animal model systems.

  11. Nosocomial Plasmodium falciparum infections confirmed by molecular typing in Medellín, Colombia

    PubMed Central

    González, Lina; Ochoa, Jesus; Franco, Liliana; Arroyave, Marta; Restrepo, Eliana; Blair, Silvia; Maestre, Amanda

    2005-01-01

    Three cases of nosocomial malaria are reported from patients of the Internal Medicine Ward of a tertiary University teaching hospital in Medellin, Colombia. Epidemiological research, based on entomological captures, medical records review and interviews of nursery staff about patient care practices potentially involving contact with blood, were carried out. Molecular characterization of Plasmodium falciparum was based on the amplification of MSP1, MSP2 and GLURP genes. This method enabled confirmation of the same P. falciparum genotype in all three patients as well as in a fourth one (index case). The presence of nosocomial malaria was confirmed and it was concluded that the most likely source of transmission was through multi-dose preparations of heparin applied to heparin locks. PMID:15703072

  12. Do cost savings from reductions in nosocomial infections justify additional costs of single-bed rooms in intensive care units? A simulation case study.

    PubMed

    Sadatsafavi, Hessam; Niknejad, Bahar; Zadeh, Rana; Sadatsafavi, Mohsen

    2016-02-01

    Evidence shows that single-patient rooms can play an important role in preventing cross-transmission and reducing nosocomial infections in intensive care units (ICUs). This case study investigated whether cost savings from reductions in nosocomial infections justify the additional construction and operation costs of single-bed rooms in ICUs. We conducted deterministic and probabilistic return-on-investment analyses of converting the space occupied by open-bay rooms to single-bed rooms in an exemplary ICU. We used the findings of a study of an actual ICU in which the association between the locations of patients in single-bed vs open-bay rooms with infection risk was evaluated. Despite uncertainty in the estimates of costs, infection risks, and length of stay, the cost savings from the reduction of nosocomial infections in single-bed rooms in this case substantially outweighed additional construction and operation expenses. The mean value of internal rate of return over a 5-year analysis period was 56.18% (95% credible interval, 55.34%-57.02%). This case study shows that although single-patient rooms are more costly to build and operate, they can result in substantial savings compared with open-bay rooms by avoiding costs associated with nosocomial infections. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Are red blood cell transfusions associated with nosocomial infections in critically ill children?

    PubMed

    Naveda Romero, Omar E; Naveda Meléndez, Andrea F

    2016-08-01

    Aunque la transfusión de hemoderivados es una práctica común, los efectos sobre el sistema inmune no han sido bien estudiados. Para determinar la asociación entre transfusión de glóbulos rojos (TGR) e infecciones nosocomiales, se realizó un estudio de cohorte prospectivo con niños críticamente enfermos, seguidos hasta su fallecimiento, transferencia o egreso. Las infecciones nosocomiales se consideraron postransfusionales si ocurrieron dentro de los 14 días después de la TGR. Se incluyeron 162 niños, 35 adquirieron infección nosocomial (21,6%) y 49 recibieron TGR (30,2%). Los niños con infección nosocomial recibieron más frecuentemente TGR (48,5% vs. 14,9%; OR 5,4; IC 95%: 2,4-12,6; p 〈 0,0001) y presentaron mayor mortalidad (45,7% vs. 10,2%; OR 7,4; IC 95%: 3,1-18,2; p 〈 0,0001). En la regresión logística binaria, la TGR se mantuvo asociada independientemente a infección nosocomial (OR 4,2; IC 95%: 2,1-20,2; p = 0,049). Conclusión: La TGR se asoció a un incremento del riesgo de adquirir infecciones nosocomiales.

  14. Guidelines for prevention of nosocomial pneumonia. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

    PubMed

    1997-01-03

    This document updates and replaces CDC's previously published "Guideline for Prevention of Nosocomial Pneumonia" (Infect Control 1982;3:327-33, Respir Care 1983;28:221-32, and Am J Infect Control 1983;11:230-44). This revised guideline is designed to reduce the incidence of nosocomial pneumonia and is intended for use by personnel who are responsible for surveillance and control of infections in acute-care hospitals; the information may not be applicable in long-term-care facilities because of the unique characteristics of such settings. This revised guideline addresses common problems encountered by infection-control practitioners regarding the prevention and control of nosocomial pneumonia in U.S. hospitals. Sections on the prevention of bacterial pneumonia in mechanically ventilated and/or critically ill patients, care of respiratory-therapy devices, prevention of cross-contamination, and prevention of viral lower respiratory tract infections (e.g., respiratory syncytial virus [RSV] and influenza infections) have been expanded and updated. New sections on Legionnaires disease and pneumonia caused by Aspergillus sp. have been included. Lower respiratory tract infection caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis is not addressed in this document. Part I, "An Overview of the Prevention of Nosocomial Pneumonia, 1994, provides the background information for the consensus recommendations of the Hospital Infection Control Practices Advisory Committee (HICPAC) in Part II, Recommendations for Prevention of Nosocomial Pneumonia." Pneumonia is the second most common nosocomial infection in the United States and is associated with substantial morbidity and mortality. Most patients who have nosocomial pneumonia are infants, young children, and persons > 65 years of age; persons who have severe underlying disease, immunosuppression, depressed sensorium, and/or cardiopulmonary disease and persons who have had thoracoabdominal surgery. Although patients receiving mechanically

  15. Device-associated infection rates, bacterial resistance, length of stay, and mortality in Kuwait: International Nosocomial Infection Consortium findings.

    PubMed

    Al-Mousa, Haifaa Hassan; Omar, Abeer Aly; Rosenthal, Víctor Daniel; Salama, Mona Foda; Aly, Nasser Yehia; El-Dossoky Noweir, Mohammad; Rebello, Flavie Maria; Narciso, Dennis Malungcot; Sayed, Amani Fouad; Kurian, Anu; George, Sneha Mary; Mohamed, Amna Mostafa; Ramapurath, Ruby Jose; Varghese, Suga Thomas

    2016-04-01

    To report the results of the International Infection Control Consortium (INICC) study conducted in Kuwait from November 2013-March 2015. A device-associated health care-acquired infection (DA-HAI) prospective surveillance study in 7 adult, pediatric, and neonatal intensive care units (ICUs) using the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's (CDC's) National Healthcare Safety Network (NHSN) definitions and INICC methods. We followed 3,732 adult and pediatric patients for 21,611 bed days and 671 neonatal patients for 4,515 bed days. In the medical-surgical ICUs, the central line-associated bloodstream infection (CLABSI) rate was 3.5 per 1,000 central line days, the ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) rate was 4.0 per 1,000 mechanical ventilator days, and the catheter-associated urinary tract infection (CAUTI) rate was 3.3 per 1,000 urinary catheter days; all of them were lower than INICC rates (CLABSI: 4.9; VAP: 16.5; and CAUTI: 5.3) and higher than NHSN rates (CLABSI: 0.9; VAP: 1.1; and CAUTI: 1.2). Resistance of Staphylococcus aureus to oxacillin was 100%, resistance of Acinetobacter baumannii to imipenem and meropenem was 77.6%, and resistance of Klebsiella pneumoniae to imipenem and meropenem was 29.4%. Extra length of stay was 27.1 days for CLABSI, 22.2 days for VAP, and 19.2 days for CAUTI in adult and pediatric ICUs. Extra crude mortality was 19.9% for CLABSI, 30.9% for VAP, and 11.1% for CAUTI in adult and pediatric ICUs. DA-HAI rates in our ICUs are higher than the CDC-NSHN rates and lower than the INICC international rates. Copyright © 2016 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Characterization of an Unusual Strain of Proteus rettgeri Associated with an Outbreak of Nosocomial Urinary-Tract Infection

    PubMed Central

    Traub, W. H.; Craddock, M. E.; Raymond, E. A.; Fox, M.; McCall, C. E.

    1971-01-01

    An outbreak of nosocomial urinary-tract infection was caused by a strain of Proteus rettgeri that fermented lactose overnight and was resistant to all antimicrobial drugs tested. The nonmotile isolates shared an O (somatic) antigen that differed from those of wild-type P. rettgeri. The organisms proved markedly serum-sensitive. In rats, the isolates elicited an acute interstitial nephritis with associated transient bacteriuria. Attempts to transfer the lac+ trait and drug-resistance markers to recipient strains of Escherichia coli K-12 failed; exposure of the isolates to acridine orange yielded small numbers of non-lactose-fermenting variants which, however, were still as drug-resistant as before. Epidemiological studies failed to uncover the source of this unique strain and appeared to indicate exogenous spread of infection. PMID:4940869

  17. Bluetongue virus surveillance in a newly infected area.

    PubMed

    Giovannini, A; Calistri, P; Conte, A; Savini, L; Nannini, D; Patta, C; Santucci, U; Caporale, V

    2004-01-01

    The occurrence of bluetongue virus (BTV) in areas in which intensive animal production is practised and where there is extensive movement of animals may have a substantial impact on both animal trade and husbandry. This situation occurred in Italy after the detection of bluetongue (BT) in August 2000. In such situations, surveillance can be used to delineate with precision those areas in which the virus is circulating and, consequently, to enforce the appropriate animal movement restrictions. Furthermore, surveillance can provide the data required to assess the risk associated with animal movement and trade. A structured surveillance system for the detection of BTV has been in place in Italy since August 2001. The system is based on the periodical testing of unvaccinated sentinel cattle that are uniformly scattered throughout Italy in a grid of 400 km(2) cells. The initial number of sentinel sites and sentinel animals, together with the width of the restricted area generated by the finding of a single seroconversion in a sentinel animal, were based on conservative criteria. Animal movement was restricted in a 20 km radius buffer zone around any positive serological result. This buffer area extends about 1,257 km(2), equivalent to the area of three grid cells. After the commencement of the BT vaccination campaign in Italy, the sentinel surveillance system was the only way in which the effectiveness of vaccination and the incidence of infection in the non-immunised strata of ruminant animals could be estimated. Data collected over two years was used to assess the risks posed by the adoption of less conservative criteria for the delineation of infected areas and by the progressive relaxation of movement restrictions of vaccinated animals. In regard to the delineation of restricted areas, a new approach was tested and validated in the field, based on a Bayesian analysis of the positive and negative results obtained by the testing of sentinel animals from defined

  18. Surveillance studies: how can they help the management of infection?

    PubMed

    Masterton, R G

    2000-09-01

    The increase in antimicrobial resistance has led to predictions of doom in the international press and to depression in the medical community. It has focused attention upon measures for fighting resistance, foremost of which is susceptibility surveillance. Until recently, global efforts at surveillance have been largely uncoordinated and random. This scene is rapidly changing with the World Health Organization (WHO), among others, leading multidisciplinary, targeted initiatives. In terms of individual surveillance programmes, much has been learned about their design. The best of these, the Meropenem Yearly Susceptibility Test Information Collection (MYSTIC), SENTRY and the Alexander Project, involve well-defined patient and organism groups against key denominators, and use standardized, internationally recognized methods that are quality-controlled, explore susceptibility quantitatively and include investigation of resistance mechanisms. Results are rapidly returned to the user. Evidence shows that surveillance, when used to guide policies on antibiotic use and infection control, can be helpful in the fight to control the development and spread of resistance. Further work is required to demonstrate these benefits and quantify them fully.

  19. Surveillance studies: how can they help the management of infection?

    PubMed

    Masterton

    2000-08-01

    The increase in antimicrobial resistance has led to predictions of doom in the international press and to depression in the medical community. It has focused attention upon measures for fighting resistance, foremost of which is susceptibility surveillance. Until recently, global efforts at surveillance have been largely uncoordinated and random. This scene is rapidly changing with the World Health Organization (WHO), among others, leading multidisciplinary, targeted initiatives. In terms of individual surveillance programmes, much has been learned about their design. The best of these, the Meropenem Yearly Susceptibility Test Information Collection (MYSTIC), SENTRY and the Alexander Project, involve well-defined patient and organism groups against key denominators, and use standardized, internationally recognized methods that are quality-controlled, explore susceptibility quantitatively and include investigation of resistance mechanisms. Results are rapidly returned to the user. Evidence shows that surveillance, when used to guide policies on antibiotic use and infection control, can be helpful in the fight to control the development and spread of resistance. Further work is required to demonstrate these benefits and quantify them fully.

  20. The determination of carbapenem resistance in Escherichia coli and Pneumoniae isolates related to nosocomial infections and the evaluation of risk factors.

    PubMed

    Budak, S; Oncul, O; Aktas, Z; Acar, A; Ozyurt, M; Turhan, V; Erdem, H; Gorenek, L

    2014-01-01

    We aimed to investigate carbapenem resistance, resistance mechanisms, risk factors and epidemiological features of Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae strains isolated from related infections in intensive care unit (ICU) patients. Carbapenemase activity was determined by MHT, MBL Etest and enzyme extraction methods. Presence of extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) and carbapenemase-encoding genes were investigated by PCR and sequencing. Clonal relationship of the strains was investigated by pulse field gel-electrophoresis. Acquired AmpC and Qnr were investigated by PCR. Throughout this study, 1,657 patients, and 11,483 hospitalization days were followed by active surveillance in the ICU of our 1,000-bed training hospital. Out of 108 of 196 patients, 130 E. coli- and K. pneumoniae-related nosocomial infections were determined. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) levels of ertapenem were > or = 1 mg/1 in 14 K. pneumoniae and 2 E. coli strains. The highest MIC level of carbapenem was found in K. pneumoniae and E. coli strains of > or = 128 mg/l and 8 mg/l, respectively. In the carbapenem resistant strains, KPC and MBL activity were not found. On the other hand, 14 strains of K. pneumoniae and one strain of E. coli exhibited OXA-48 beta-lactamase activity. Fifty-seven percent of K. pneumoniae isolates produced OXA-48 orginating from two clones and remaining isolates originated from different clones. Thus carbapenem resistance was determined as 22% and 3% in K. pneumoniae and E. coli strains, respectively. Invasive devices, duration of total parenteral nutrition, duration of hospitalization, presence of transfusions, ESBL and multiple drug resistance were found to be risk factors for carbapenem resistance.

  1. Nosocomial infections and fever of unknown origin in pediatric hematology/oncology unit: a retrospective annual study.

    PubMed

    Al-Tonbary, Youssef A; Soliman, Othman E; Sarhan, Mohammed M; Hegazi, Moustafa A; El-Ashry, Rasha A; El-Sharkawy, Ashraf A; Salama, Osama S; Yahya, Raida

    2011-02-01

    pediatric hematology/oncology patients are faced with an increased risk of nosocomial infections (NIs) that vary in different populations and different institutions with considerable morbidity and mortality. This study was undertaken to assess the frequency and patterns of NIs in 1564 pediatric patients and to determine the prevalence of causative organisms and their antimicrobial sensitivity. a retrospective analysis was made in the patients admitted between January 2007 and January 2008 to the pediatric hematoloy/oncology unit of Mansoura University, Egypt. The 1564 patients showed 2084 admissions and 27 092 inpatient days. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention criteria were used as a standard definition for NI. the overall rate of NIs in all patients and neutropenic patients was 8.6 and 25.3 per 1000 patient-days respectively. The frequent sites of NIs were blood stream (42.7%), the respiratory system (25.3%), the urinary system (22.2%) and the central nervous system (9.8%), whereas nosocomial fever of unknown origin constituted 52.9% of cases. The incidence of NIs was significantly higher during neutropenic days (P<0.001). Gram-positive organisms represented 64.5% of pathogens (Staphylococci 71.5%, Streptococci 16%, and pneumococci 7%), and Gram-negative organisms represented 30% (E. coli 48.6%, Klebsiella 15.7%, Pseudomonas 35.7%, and C. albicans 5.5%). Positive cultures were more frequent in summer (July to September). Susceptibility of isolated organisms was relatively low (cefoperazone/sulbactam 49.9%, amikacin 35.9%, imipenem/cilastin 34.4%, cefoperazone 33.6%, and vancomycin 36.5%). Methicillin-resistant S. aureus, extended spectrum beta lactamase and vancomycin resistant enterococci represented 30%, 45% and 75% of isolated S. aureus, Gram-negative organisms and Enterococci, respectively. blood stream infection and fever of unknown origin are the most common nosocomial infections in pediatric hematology/oncology patients with a higher risk during

  2. Epidemiology and the prognosis of healthcare–associated infective endocarditis in China: the significance of non-nosocomial acquisition

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Feifei; Zhang, Bingyan; Yu, Jie; Shao, Lingyun; Zhou, Pu; Zhu, Liping; Chen, Shu; Zhang, Wenhong; Weng, Xinhua; Zhang, Jiming; Huang, Yuxian

    2015-01-01

    Limited research has been conducted on healthcare-associated infective endocarditis (HAIE), although it is of increasing importance. The aim of this study is to compare the epidemiology, clinical characteristics, and prognosis of community-acquired IE (CA-IE) with HAIE and non-nosocomial healthcare-associated IE (NNHCA-IE). A retrospective, consecutive case-series analysis was organized and performed during the 20-year study period in Huashan Hospital, Shanghai, China. A total of 154 patients were enrolled, including 126 (81.8%) who had CA-IE and 28 (18.2%) who had HAIE, among whom 20 (71.4%) had non-nosocomial IE. Patients with HAIE compared to patients with CA-IE had poorer clinical conditions (Charlson comorbidity index ≥2: 35.7% vs. 15.1%, P = 0.012; immunosuppressive therapy: 21.4% vs. 4.0%, P = 0.005), underwent more prosthetic valve replacement (35.7% vs. 7.1%, P <0.001), had less streptococcus infection (16.7% vs. 51.1%, P = 0.007) but more atypical bacterial infection (50.0% vs. 21.1%, P = 0.017) and poorer outcomes (17.9% vs. 4.0%, P = 0.019). It is noteworthy that the results were quite similar between the comparison of patients with NNHCA-IE and those with CA-IE. Overall, in-hospital mortality was 6.5%. The IE acquisition site and low serum albumin levels (odds ratio (OR): 0.8; P = 0.04) were significantly associated with an increased risk of mortality. Nosocomial IE patients had an 8.3-fold and NNHCA-IE patients had 6.5-fold increase in the risk of mortality compared to CA-IE patients. In conclusion, HAIE and NNHCA-IE have important epidemiological and prognostic implications. Because NNHCA-IE usually occurs in patients residing in the community, it is suggested that these patients should be identified and treated by the community primary care clinical staff as early as possible. PMID:26251828

  3. [Nosocomial bacteria: profiles of resistance].

    PubMed

    Sow, A I

    2005-01-01

    Nosocomial infections may be parasitic, mycosal or viral, but bacterial infections are more frequent. They are transmitted by hands or by oral route. This paper describes the main bacteria responsive of nosocomial infections, dominated by Staphylococcus, enterobacteria and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The author relates natural and savage profiles of these bacterias, characterized by multiresistance due to large use of antibiotics. Knowledge of natural resistance and verification of aquired resistance permit to well lead probabilist antibiotherapy.

  4. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus colonization or infection in Canada: National Surveillance and Changing Epidemiology, 1995-2007.

    PubMed

    Simor, Andrew E; Gilbert, Nicolas L; Gravel, Denise; Mulvey, Michael R; Bryce, Elizabeth; Loeb, Mark; Matlow, Anne; McGeer, Allison; Louie, Lisa; Campbell, Jennifer

    2010-04-01

    To determine the incidence and describe the changing epidemiology of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) colonization or infection in Canadian hospitals from 1995-2007. Forty-eight hospitals participating in the Canadian Nosocomial Infection Surveillance Program. Prospective, laboratory-based surveillance for incident cases of MRSA colonization or infection among hospitalized patients. Clinical and epidemiologic data were obtained by review of hospital records. Standard criteria were used to determine whether MRSA colonization or infection was present and whether the MRSA strain was healthcare associated or community associated. A representative subset of isolates was characterized by use of pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and staphylococcal cassette chromosome (SCC) mec typing. From 1995 to 2007, a total of 37,169 hospitalized patients were newly identified as either infected or colonized with MRSA, and the overall incidence of both MRSA colonization and MRSA infection increased from 0.65 to 11.04 cases per 10,000 patient-days (P < .001). Of these 37,169 patients, 11,828 (32%) had an MRSA infection, and infection rate increased from 0.36 to 3.43 cases per 10,000 patient-days. The proportion of community-associated MRSA strains increased from 6% to 23% (P < .001). The most common genotype (47% of isolates) was CMRSA-2 (USA100/800); in 2007, CMRSA-10 (USA300) was the second most common strain (27% of isolates), associated with SCCmec type IV. Patients with CMRSA-10 were predominantly from western Canada and were more likely to be children (odds ratio [OR], 10.0 [95% confidence interval {CI}, 7.4-13.4]) and to have infection (OR, 2.3 [95% CI, 1.9-2.7]), especially skin and/or soft tissue infection (OR, 5.9 [95% CI, 5.0-6.9]). The overall incidence of both MRSA colonization and MRSA infection increased 17-fold in Canadian hospitals from 1995 to 2007. There has also been a dramatic increase in cases of community-associated MRSA infection due to the

  5. Incidence, microbiological profile of nosocomial infections, and their antibiotic resistance patterns in a high volume Cardiac Surgical Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Sahu, Manoj Kumar; Siddharth, Bharat; Choudhury, Arin; Vishnubhatla, Sreenivas; Singh, Sarvesh Pal; Menon, Ramesh; Kapoor, Poonam Malhotra; Talwar, Sachin; Choudhary, Shiv; Airan, Balram

    2016-01-01

    Background: Nosocomial infections (NIs) in the postoperative period not only increase morbidity and mortality, but also impose a significant economic burden on the health care infrastructure. This retrospective study was undertaken to (a) evaluate the incidence, characteristics, risk factors and outcomes of NIs and (b) identify common microorganisms responsible for infection and their antibiotic resistance profile in our Cardiac Surgical Intensive Care Unit (CSICU). Patients and Methods: After ethics committee approval, the CSICU records of all patients who underwent cardiovascular surgery between January 2013 and December 2014 were reviewed retrospectively. The incidence of NI, distribution of NI sites, types of microorganisms and their antibiotic resistance, length of CSICU stay, and patient-outcome were determined. Results: Three hundred and nineteen of 6864 patients (4.6%) developed NI after cardiac surgery. Lower respiratory tract infections (LRTIs) accounted for most of the infections (44.2%) followed by surgical-site infection (SSI, 11.6%), bloodstream infection (BSI, 7.5%), urinary tract infection (UTI, 6.9%) and infections from combined sources (29.8%). Acinetobacter, Klebsiella, Escherichia coli, and Staphylococcus were the most frequent pathogens isolated in patients with LRTI, BSI, UTI, and SSI, respectively. The Gram-negative bacteria isolated from different sources were found to be highly resistant to commonly used antibiotics. Conclusion: The incidence of NI and sepsis-related mortality, in our CSICU, was 4.6% and 1.9%, respectively. Lower respiratory tract was the most common site of infection and Gram-negative bacilli, the most common pathogens after cardiac surgery. Antibiotic resistance was maximum with Acinetobacter spp. PMID:27052070

  6. Incidence, microbiological profile of nosocomial infections, and their antibiotic resistance patterns in a high volume Cardiac Surgical Intensive Care Unit.

    PubMed

    Sahu, Manoj Kumar; Siddharth, Bharat; Choudhury, Arin; Vishnubhatla, Sreenivas; Singh, Sarvesh Pal; Menon, Ramesh; Kapoor, Poonam Malhotra; Talwar, Sachin; Choudhary, Shiv; Airan, Balram

    2016-01-01

    Nosocomial infections (NIs) in the postoperative period not only increase morbidity and mortality, but also impose a significant economic burden on the health care infrastructure. This retrospective study was undertaken to (a) evaluate the incidence, characteristics, risk factors and outcomes of NIs and (b) identify common microorganisms responsible for infection and their antibiotic resistance profile in our Cardiac Surgical Intensive Care Unit (CSICU). After ethics committee approval, the CSICU records of all patients who underwent cardiovascular surgery between January 2013 and December 2014 were reviewed retrospectively. The incidence of NI, distribution of NI sites, types of microorganisms and their antibiotic resistance, length of CSICU stay, and patient-outcome were determined. Three hundred and nineteen of 6864 patients (4.6%) developed NI after cardiac surgery. Lower respiratory tract infections (LRTIs) accounted for most of the infections (44.2%) followed by surgical-site infection (SSI, 11.6%), bloodstream infection (BSI, 7.5%), urinary tract infection (UTI, 6.9%) and infections from combined sources (29.8%). Acinetobacter, Klebsiella, Escherichia coli, and Staphylococcus were the most frequent pathogens isolated in patients with LRTI, BSI, UTI, and SSI, respectively. The Gram-negative bacteria isolated from different sources were found to be highly resistant to commonly used antibiotics. The incidence of NI and sepsis-related mortality, in our CSICU, was 4.6% and 1.9%, respectively. Lower respiratory tract was the most common site of infection and Gram-negative bacilli, the most common pathogens after cardiac surgery. Antibiotic resistance was maximum with Acinetobacter spp.

  7. [Prevention and control of nosocomial and health-care facilities associated infections caused by species of Candida and other yeasts].

    PubMed

    Pemán, Javier; Zaragoza, Rafael; Salavert, Miguel

    2013-12-01

    Knowledge of the epidemiology of invasive fungal diseases caused by yeasts (Candida spp., especially) in health care settings allows the establishment of the levels necessary for its prevention. A first step is to identify groups of patients at high risk of nosocomial invasive fungal infections, establish accurate risk factors, observing the periods of greatest risk, and analyze the epidemiological profile in genera and species as well as the patterns of antifungal resistance. Secondly, mechanisms to avoid persistent exposure to potential fungal pathogens must be programed, protecting areas and recommending measures such as the control of the quality of the air and water, inside and outside the hospital, and other products or substances able to cause outbreaks. Finally, apart from the correct implementation of these measures, in selected patients at very high risk, the use of antifungal prophylaxis should be considered following the guidelines published.

  8. Cockroaches (Periplaneta americana and Blattella germanica) as potential vectors of the pathogenic bacteria found in nosocomial infections.

    PubMed

    Fakoorziba, M R; Eghbal, F; Hassanzadeh, J; Moemenbellah-Fard, M D

    2010-09-01

    Although it has been difficult to prove the direct involvement of cockroaches (i.e. insects of the order Blattaria) in the transmission of pathogenic agents to humans, such insects often carry microorganisms that are important in nosocomial infections, and their medical importance in the spread of bacteria cannot be ruled out. In houses and institutions with poor standards of hygiene, heavy infestations with cockroaches, such as the peridomestic American cockroach (Periplaneta americana L.) and the domestic German cockroach (Blattella germanica L.), can occur. In the present study, cockroaches (126 B. germanica and 69 P. americana) were collected from four buildings (three public training hospitals and one house) in central Tehran, Iran. Each insect was processed, under sterile conditions, so that the bacteria on its external surfaces and in its alimentary tract and faecal pellets could be isolated and identified. The oldest and largest of the three hospitals sampled (a 1400-bed unit built 80 years ago) appeared to be the one most heavily infested with cockroaches, and cockroaches from this hospital accounted for most (65.4%) of the isolates of medically important bacteria made during the study. No significant difference was found between the percentages of P. americana and B. germanica carrying medically important bacteria (96.8% v. 93.6%; P>0.05). At least 25 different species of medically important bacteria were isolated and identified, and at least 22 were Gramnegative. The genus of enteric bacteria most frequently isolated from both cockroach species, at all four collection sites, was Klebsiella. The cockroaches from each hospital were much more likely to be found contaminated with medically important bacteria than those from the house. The hospital cockroaches were also more likely to be carrying medically important bacteria internally than externally (84.3% v. 64.1%; P<0.05). The implications of these and other recent results, for the control of cockroaches

  9. Recommendations for the Empirical Treatment of Complicated Urinary Tract Infections Using Surveillance Data on Antimicrobial Resistance in the Netherlands

    PubMed Central

    Koningstein, Maike; van der Bij, Akke K.; de Kraker, Marlieke E. A.; Monen, Jos C.; Muilwijk, Jan; de Greeff, Sabine C.; Geerlings, Suzanne E.; van Hall, Maurine A. Leverstein-

    2014-01-01

    Background Complicated urinary tract infections (c-UTIs) are among the most common nosocomial infections and a substantial part of the antimicrobial agents used in hospitals is for the treatment of c-UTIs. Data from surveillance can be used to guide the empirical treatment choices of clinicians when treating c-UTIs. We therefore used nation-wide surveillance data to evaluate antimicrobial coverage of agents for the treatment of c-UTI in the Netherlands. Methods We included the first isolate per patient of urine samples of hospitalised patients collected by the Infectious Disease Surveillance Information System for Antibiotic Resistance (ISIS-AR) in 2012, and determined the probability of inadequate coverage for antimicrobial agents based on species distribution and susceptibility. Analyses were repeated for various patient groups and hospital settings. Results The most prevalent bacteria in 27,922 isolates of 23,357 patients were Escherichia coli (47%), Enterococcus spp. (14%), Proteus mirabilis (8%), and Klebsiella pneumoniae (7%). For all species combined, the probability of inadequate coverage was <5% for amoxicillin or amoxicillin-clavulanic acid combined with gentamicin and the carbapenems. When including gram-negative bacteria only, the probability of inadequate coverage was 4.0%, 2.7%, 2.3% and 1.7%, respectively, for amoxicillin, amoxicillin-clavulanic acid, a second or a third generation cephalosporin in combination with gentamicin, and the carbapenems (0.4%). There were only small variations in results among different patient groups and hospital settings. Conclusions When excluding Enterococcus spp., considered as less virulent, and the carbapenems, considered as last-resort drugs, empirical treatment for c-UTI with the best chance of adequate coverage are one of the studied beta-lactam-gentamicin combinations. This study demonstrates the applicability of routine surveillance data for up-to-date clinical practice guidelines on empirical antimicrobial

  10. Sentinel surveillance of HIV-1 infection in Tamilnadu, India.

    PubMed

    Solomon, S; Anuradha, S; Ganapathy, M; Jagadeeswari

    1994-01-01

    The objective was to determine the time trends in the prevalence of HIV infection and to evaluate appropriate preventive intervention in different population groups. Sentinel surveillance of HIV-1 infection by anonymous unlinked technique was carried out in Tamilnadu from December 1989 to March 1993. The sentinel population monitored were attendees of STD clinics, blood donors and antenatal mothers. The results of HIV seropositivity were compared for each 6-month period. During the study period there was 10-fold rise of HIV seropositivity among STD patients (1% to 10%), 2-fold rise among antenatal attendees (0.37% to 0.76%), and 3-fold rise in blood donors (0.24% to 0.72%). There was a steady increase in the incidence of HIV infection among those with high risk behaviour (STD attendees) as well as in the general population. This information is of value in planning and evaluation of preventive and control programmes in India.

  11. Quantitative evaluation of infection control models in the prevention of nosocomial transmission of SARS virus to healthcare workers: implication to nosocomial viral infection control for healthcare workers.

    PubMed

    Yen, Muh-Yong; Lu, Yun-Ching; Huang, Pi-Hsiang; Chen, Chen-Ming; Chen, Yee-Chun; Lin, Yusen E

    2010-07-01

    Healthcare workers (HCWs) are at high risk of acquiring emerging infections while caring for patients, as has been shown in the recent SARS and swine flu epidemics. Using SARS as an example, we determined the effectiveness of infection control measures (ICMs) by logistic regression and structural equation modelling (SEM), a quantitative methodology that can test a hypothetical model and validates causal relationships among ICMs. Logistic regression showed that installing hand wash stations in the emergency room (p = 0.012, odds ratio = 1.07) was the only ICM significantly associated with the protection of HCWs from acquiring the SARS virus. The structural equation modelling results showed that the most important contributing factor (highest proportion of effectiveness) was installation of a fever screening station outside the emergency department (51%). Other measures included traffic control in the emergency department (19%), availability of an outbreak standard operation protocol (12%), mandatory temperature screening (9%), establishing a hand washing setup at each hospital checkpoint (3%), adding simplified isolation rooms (3%), and a standardized patient transfer protocol (3%). Installation of fever screening stations outside of the hospital and implementing traffic control in the emergency department contributed to 70% of the effectiveness in the prevention of SARS transmission. Our approach can be applied to the evaluation of control measures for other epidemic infectious diseases, including swine flu and avian flu.

  12. Financial impact of nosocomial infections in the intensive care units of a charitable hospital in Minas Gerais, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Nangino, Glaucio de Oliveira; de Oliveira, Cláudio Dornas; Correia, Paulo César; Machado, Noelle de Melo; Dias, Ana Thereza Barbosa

    2012-01-01

    Objective Infections in intensive care units are often associated with a high morbidity and mortality in addition to high costs. An analysis of these aspects can assist in optimizing the allocation of relevant financial resources. Methods This retrospective study analyzed the hospital administration and quality in intensive care medical databases [Sistema de Gestão Hospitalar (SGH)] and RM Janus®. A cost analysis was performed by evaluating the medical products and materials used in direct medical care. The costs are reported in the Brazilian national currency (Real). The cost and length of stay analyses were performed for all the costs studied. The median was used to determine the costs involved. Costs were also adjusted by the patients' length of stay in the intensive care unit. Results In total, 974 individuals were analyzed, of which 51% were male, and the mean age was 57±18.24 years. There were 87 patients (8.9%) identified who had nosocomial infections associated with the intensive care unit. The median cost per admission and the length of stay for all the patients sampled were R$1.257,53 and 3 days, respectively. Compared to the patients without an infection, the patients with an infection had longer hospital stays (15 [11-25] versus 3 [2-6] days, p<0.01), increased costs per patient in the intensive care unit (median R$9.763,78 [5445.64 - 18,007.90] versus R$1.093,94 [416.14 - 2755.90], p<0.01) and increased costs per day of hospitalization in the intensive care unit (R$618,00 [407.81 - 838.69] versus R$359,00 [174.59 - 719.12], p<0.01). Conclusion Nosocomial infections associated with the intensive care unit were determinants of increased costs and longer hospital stays. However, the study design did not allow us to evaluate specific aspects of cause and effect. PMID:23917933

  13. Nosocomial sepsis: evaluation of the efficacy of preventive measures in a level-III neonatal intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Catarina Cardoso de; Pissarra da Silva, Susana Maria Saraiva; Flor de Lima Caldas de Oliveira, Filipa Silveira Dias; Guimarães Pereira Areias, Maria Hercília Ferreira

    2017-09-01

    To evaluate nosocomial infections preventive bundle, implemented in April 2010 in Centro Hospitalar de São João (CHSJ) Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) effectiveness. Newborns admitted to level-III NICU of CHSJ, between 1 April 2007 and 31 March 2013, with sepsis as discharge diagnosis, were selected and divided into two periods (Period 1 and 2, before and after new preventive bundle introduction). Data from the two periods were compared. Nosocomial sepsis incidence density decreased significantly from 8.6 to 4.8 per 1000 patient days from Period 1 to 2. Nosocomial infections preventive bundle implementation led to a significant decrease in central line-associated bloodstream infections (CLABSI) rates from 14.1 to 10.4 per 1000 catheter days. Nosocomial infections preventive bundle implemented revealed efficient in decreasing the incidence density of nosocomial sepsis. However, CLABSI rates remain high. Physicians should be alert to the need to adhere to strict infection control protocols and institute effective measures for nosocomial infection surveillance.

  14. Catheter-related urinary nosocomial infections in intensive care units: An epidemiologic study in North of Iran.

    PubMed

    Rezai, Mohammad Sadegh; Bagheri-Nesami, Masoumeh; Nikkhah, Attieh

    2017-01-01

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) is one of the most common infections in developing countries. The aim of this study was to investigate the incidence of nosocomial catheter- associated UTI and its related factors in hospitalized patients in intensive care units of hospitals affiliated to Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences, in 2014. This cross-sectional study was conducted on patients who were admitted in hospitals and urinary catheterization was performed for them. Beds of intensive care units were followed-up for the occurrence of catheter-associated UTI for 14 months. Data were analyzed using SPSS Version 16. Our results showed that of the 1409 patients (11648 catheter - days), the incidence of catheter-related UTI was 18.2% (among 256 individuals) equals to 21.987 per 1,000 catheter - days. E. coli was the most important cause of UTI. The results show that the history of the underlying disease, duration of catheterization and perineal washing were significantly associated with the incidence of UTIs. The findings of this study show a high incidence of UTIs caused by catheters in ICU. The incidence of this infection increased hospital length of stay and hospital cost. It seems that the necessary use of urinary catheters and its reduced duration use can be effective in decreasing this incidence.

  15. A vancomycin-heparin lock solution for prevention of nosocomial bloodstream infection in critically ill neonates with peripherally inserted central venous catheters: a prospective, randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Garland, Jeffery S; Alex, Colleen P; Henrickson, Kelly J; McAuliffe, Timothy L; Maki, Dennis G

    2005-08-01

    Critically ill neonates are at high risk for vascular catheter-related bloodstream infection (CRBSI), most often caused by coagulase-negative staphylococci. Most CRBSIs with long-term devices derive from intraluminal contaminants. The objective of this study was to ascertain the safety and the efficacy of a vancomycin-heparin lock solution for prevention of CRBSI. A prospective, randomized double-blind trial was conducted during 2000-2001 at a community hospital level III NICU. Very low birth weight and other critically ill neonates with a newly placed peripherally inserted central venous catheter were randomized to have the catheter locked 2 or 3 times daily for 20 or 60 minutes with heparinized normal saline (n = 43) or heparinized saline that contained vancomycin 25 microg/mL (n = 42). The origin of each nosocomial bloodstream infection (BSI) was studied by culturing skin, catheter hubs, and implanted catheter segments and blood cultures, demonstrating concordance by restriction-fragment DNA subtyping. Surveillance axillary and rectal cultures were performed to detect colonization by vancomycin-resistant organisms. The main outcome measures were (1) CRBSIs and (2) colonization or infection by vancomycin-resistant Gram-positive bacteria. Two (5%) of 42 infants in the vancomycin-lock group developed a CRBSI as compared with 13 (30%) of 43 in the control group (2.3 vs 17.8 per 1000 catheter days; relative risk: 0.13; 95% confidence interval: 0.01-0.57). No vancomycin-resistant enterococci or staphylococci were recovered from any cultures. Vancomycin could not be detected in the blood of infants who did not receive systemic vancomycin therapy. Twenty-six neonates (8 vancomycin-lock group, 18 control group) had at the end of a catheter-lock period asymptomatic hypoglycemia that resolved promptly when glucose-containing intravenous fluids were restarted. Prophylactic use of a vancomycin-heparin lock solution markedly reduced the incidence of CRBSI in high

  16. The Sustained Rotavirus Vaccination Impact on Nosocomial Infection, Duration of Hospital Stay, and Age: The RotaBIS Study (2005-2012).

    PubMed

    Standaert, Baudouin; Strens, Danielle; Li, Xiao; Schecroun, Nadia; Raes, Marc

    2016-12-01

    The benefits of rotavirus (RV) vaccination in developed countries have focused on reductions in mortality, hospitalization and medical visits, and herd protection. We investigated other aspects related to RV-induced nosocomial infection, duration of hospital stay, age shift, and sustained vaccine impact (VI) over time. RotaBIS (Rotavirus Belgian Impact Study; ClinicalTrials.gov identifier, NCT01563146) annually collects retrospective data on hospitalization linked to RV testing in children up to 5 years old from 11 pediatric wards located all over Belgium. Data from 2005 to 2012 have been split in pre- (2005-2006) and post-vaccination (2007-2012) period. Information was collected on age, gender, RV test result, nosocomial infection caused by RV and duration of hospital stay. Over the 6-year period after the introduction of the RV vaccine, an 85% reduction in nosocomial infections was observed (221 in 2005 to 33 in 2012, p < 0.001). A significant reduction of almost 2 days in average duration of hospital stay per event was observed overall (7.62 days in 2005 to 5.77 days in 2012, p < 0.001). The difference is mainly explained by the higher reduction in number of nosocomial infections. A pronounced age shift (+24%, p < 0.01) of RV nosocomial infection to infants ≤2 months old was observed, increasing with length of post-vaccination period. VI was maintained over the follow-up (±79% VI per birth cohort). A decrease was seen depending on age, 85% (95% CI 76-91%) in the youngest to 63% (95% CI 22-92%) in the oldest age group. The higher reduction in nosocomial infection may affect the overall average duration of hospital stay for RV infection. No change in VI by birth cohort, but a reduction by age group was observed. These findings could be important for decision-makers considering the introduction of universal mass RV vaccination programs. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier, NCT01563146. GlaxoSmithKline Biologicals SA (Rixensart, Belgium).

  17. Nosocomial infection by sequence type 357 multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii isolates in a neonatal intensive care unit in Daejeon, Korea.

    PubMed

    Sung, Ji Youn; Koo, Sun Hoe; Cho, Hye Hyun; Kwon, Kye Chul

    2013-07-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is an important microorganism responsible for a number of nosocomial outbreaks, in particular, in intensive care units (ICUs). We investigated a nosocomial infection caused by multidrug-resistant (MDR) A. baumannii in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) in Korea. A. baumannii isolates were characterized using Etest (AB Biodisk, Sweden), two multiplex PCR assays, and multilocus sequence typing (MLST) scheme. PCR and PCR mapping experiments were performed for detecting and characterizing the determinants of antimicrobial resistance. Eight strains isolated from an NICU belonged to European (EU) clone II and revealed only one sequence type (ST), namely, ST357. All the isolates were susceptible to imipenem but were resistant to amikacin, gentamicin, ceftazidime, cefepime, and ciprofloxacin. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of a nosocomial infection in an NICU in Korea caused by ST357 MDR/carbapenem-susceptible A. baumannii strains. This result demonstrates that nosocomial outbreaks of MDR/carbapenem-susceptible strains as well as MDR/carbapenem-resistant isolates may occur in NICUs.

  18. Demand for care and nosocomial infection rate during the first influenza AH1N1 2009 virus outbreak at a referral hospital in Mexico City.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Padilla, Rogelio; Fernández, Rosario; García-Sancho, Cecilia; Franco-Marina, Francisco; Mondragón, Edgar; Volkow, Patricia

    2011-01-01

    Comparison of routine hospital indicators (consults at the Emergency Room (ER) and hospital admissions) during the 2009 pandemic of the influenza AH1N1 virus at the national referral hospital for respiratory diseases in Mexico City. The outbreak was from April to mid-May 2009 and two control periods were used:2009 (before and after the outbreak),and during April-May from 2007 and 2008. During the outbreak total consultation at the ER increased six times compared with the 2007-2008 control period and 11 times compared with the 2009 control period. Pneumonia- or influenza-related ER consultations increased 23.2 and 15.3%, respectively. The rate of nosocomial infection during the outbreak was 13.6 and that of nosocomial pneumonia was 6 per/100 hospital discharges, a two-fold and three-fold increase compared to the control periods respectively. During the outbreak,mean severity of admitted patients increased,with a rise in in-hospital mortality and nosocomial infections rate, including nosocomial pneumonia.

  19. Immune surveillance of the CNS following infection and injury

    PubMed Central

    Russo, Matthew; McGavern, Dorian B.

    2015-01-01

    The central nervous system (CNS) contains a sophisticated neural network that must be constantly surveyed in order to detect and mitigate a diverse array of challenges. The innate and adaptive immune systems actively participate in this surveillance, which is critical for the maintenance of CNS homeostasis and can facilitate the resolution of infections, degeneration, and tissue damage. Infections and sterile injuries represent two common challenges imposed on the CNS that require a prompt immune response. While the inducers of these two challenges differ in origin, the resultant responses orchestrated by the CNS share some overlapping features. Here, we review how the CNS immunologically discriminates between pathogens and sterile injuries, mobilizes an immune reaction, and, ultimately, regulates local and peripherally-derived immune cells to provide a supportive milieu for tissue repair. PMID:26431941

  20. Implementing automated surveillance for tracking Clostridium difficile infection at multiple healthcare facilities.

    PubMed

    Dubberke, Erik R; Nyazee, Humaa A; Yokoe, Deborah S; Mayer, Jeanmarie; Stevenson, Kurt B; Mangino, Julie E; Khan, Yosef M; Fraser, Victoria J

    2012-03-01

    Automated surveillance using electronically available data has been found to be accurate and save time. An automated Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) surveillance algorithm was validated at 4 Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Epicenter hospitals. Electronic surveillance was highly sensitive, specific, and showed good to excellent agreement for hospital-onset; community-onset, study facility-associated; indeterminate; and recurrent CDI.

  1. Epidemiology, surveillance, and prevention of bloodstream infections in hemodialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Patel, Priti R; Kallen, Alexander J; Arduino, Matthew J

    2010-09-01

    Infections cause significant morbidity and mortality in patients undergoing hemodialysis. Bloodstream infections (BSIs) are particularly problematic, accounting for a substantial number of hospitalizations in these patients. Hospitalizations for BSI and other vascular access infections appear to have increased dramatically in hemodialysis patients since 1993. These infections frequently are related to central venous catheter (CVC) use for dialysis access. Regional initiatives that have shown successful decreases in catheter-related BSIs in hospitalized patients have generated interest in replicating this success in outpatient hemodialysis populations. Several interventions have been effective in preventing BSIs in the hemodialysis setting. Avoiding the use of CVCs in favor of access types with lower associated BSI risk is among the most important. When CVCs are used, adherence to evidence-based catheter insertion and maintenance practices can positively influence BSI rates. In addition, facility-level surveillance to detect BSIs and stimulate examination of vascular access use and care practices is essential to a comprehensive approach to prevention. This article describes the current epidemiology of BSIs in hemodialysis patients and effective prevention strategies to decrease the incidence of these devastating infections.

  2. Active bacterial core surveillance of the emerging infections program network.

    PubMed Central

    Schuchat, A.; Hilger, T.; Zell, E.; Farley, M. M.; Reingold, A.; Harrison, L.; Lefkowitz, L.; Danila, R.; Stefonek, K.; Barrett, N.; Morse, D.; Pinner, R.

    2001-01-01

    Active Bacterial Core surveillance (ABCs) is a collaboration between the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and several state health departments and universities participating in the Emerging Infections Program Network. ABCs conducts population-based active surveillance, collects isolates, and performs studies of invasive disease caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae, group A and group B Streptococcus, Neisseria meningitidis, and Haemophilus influenzae for a population of 17 to 30 million. These pathogens caused an estimated 97,000 invasive cases, resulting in 10,000 deaths in the United States in 1998. Incidence rates of these pathogens are described. During 1998, 25% of invasive pneumococcal infections in ABCs areas were not susceptible to penicillin, and 13.3% were not susceptible to three classes of antibiotics. In 1998, early-onset group B streptococcal disease had declined by 65% over the previous 6 years. More information on ABCs is available at www.cdc.gov/ncidod/dbmd/abcs. ABCs specimens will soon be available to researchers through an archive. PMID:11266299

  3. Surgical Site Infection Rates in Seven Cities in Vietnam: Findings of the International Nosocomial Infection Control Consortium.

    PubMed

    Viet Hung, Nguyen; Anh Thu, Truong; Rosenthal, Victor D; Tat Thanh, Do; Quoc Anh, Nguyen; Le Bao Tien, Nguyen; Ngo Quang, Nguyen

    2016-04-01

    Surgical site infections (SSIs) are the most common healthcare-associated infections (HAI) in lower-income countries. This is the first study to report the results of surveillance on SSI stratified by surgical procedure in seven Vietnamese cities. This was a prospective, active SSI surveillance study conducted from November 2008-December 2010 in seven hospitals using the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Healthcare Safety Network (CDC-NHSN) definitions and methods. Surgical procedures (SPs) were classified into 26 types according to the International Classification of Diseases Edition 9 criteria. We recorded 241 SSIs, associated with 4,413 SPs (relative risk [RR] 5.5%; 95% confidence interval [95% CI] 4.8-6.2). The highest SSI rates were found for limb amputation (25%), colon surgery (33%), and small bowel surgery (21%). Compared with CDC-NHSN SSI report, our SSI rates were higher for the following SPs: Limb amputation (25% vs. 1.3%; RR 20.0; p = 0.001); appendix surgery (8.8% vs. 3.5%; RR 2.54; 95% CI 1.3-5.1; p = 0.001); gallbladder surgery (13.7% vs. 1.7%; RR 7.76; 95% CI 1.9-32.1; p = 0.001); colon surgery (18.2% vs. 4.0%; RR 4.56; 95% CI 2.0-10.2; p = 0.001); open reduction of fracture (15.8% vs. 3.4%; RR 4.70, 95% CI 1.5-15.2; p = 0.004); gastric surgery (7.3% vs. 1.7%; RR 4.26; 95% CI 2.2-8.4, p = 0.001); kidney surgery (8.9% vs. 0.9%; RR 10.2; 95% CI 3.8-27.4; p = 0.001); prostate surgery (5.1% vs. 0.9%; RR 5.71; 95% CI 1.9-17.4; p = 0.001); small bowel surgery (20.8% vs. 6.7%; RR 3.07; 95% CI 1.7-5.6; p = 0.001); thyroid or parathyroid surgery (2.4% vs. 0.3%; RR 9.27; 95% CI 1.0-89.1; p = 0.019); and vaginal hysterectomy (14.3% vs. 1.2%; RR 12.3; 95% CI 1.7-88.4; p = 0.001). Our SSIs rates were significantly higher for 11 of the 26 types of SPs than for the CDC-NHSN. This study advances our knowledge of SSI epidemiology in Vietnam and will allow us to introduce targeted interventions.

  4. Suspected nosocomial infections with multi-drug resistant E. coli, including extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL)-producing strains, in an equine clinic.

    PubMed

    Walther, Birgit; Lübke-Becker, Antina; Stamm, Ivonne; Gehlen, Heidrun; Barton, Ann Kristin; Janssen, Traute; Wieler, Lothar H; Guenther, Sebastian

    2014-01-01

    Enterobacteriaceae such as Escherichia coli are common commensals as well as opportunistic and obligate pathogens. They cause a broad spectrum of infectious diseases in various hosts, including hospital-associated infections. In recent years, the rise of extended spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL)-producing E. coli in companion animals (dogs, cats and horses) has been striking. However, reports on nosocomial infections are mostly anecdotic. Here we report on the suspected nosocomial spread of both ESBL-producing and non-ESBL-producing multi-drug resistant E. coli isolates in three equine patients within an equine clinic. Unlike easy-to-clean hospitalization opportunities available for small animal settings like boxes and cages made of ceramic floor tiles or stainless steel, clinical settings for horses are challenging environments for infection control programs due to unavoidable extraneous material including at least hay and materials used for horse bedding. The development of practice-orientated recommendations is needed to improve the possibilities for infection control to prevent nosocomial infections with multi-drug resistant and other transmissible pathogens in equine clinical settings.

  5. Antibiotics-impregnated ventricular catheter versus systemic antibiotics for prevention of nosocomial CSF and non-CSF infections: a prospective randomised clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Wong, George K C; Ip, Margaret; Poon, Wai S; Mak, Christopher W K; Ng, Rebecca Y T

    2010-10-01

    In recent years, cranial ventricular catheters impregnated with antimicrobial agents have become available. Theoretically, they provide antibiotic prophylaxis locally without the associated complications of opportunistic nosocomial infections. This study aims to compare antibiotic impregnated catheters with conventional catheters coupled with systemic antibiotics. Patients undergoing emergency neurosurgical operations were recruited. Patients were randomly assigned to antibiotic impregnated catheters (Bactiseal, Codman, Johnson & Johnson, Raynham, MA, USA) or conventional catheters coupled with systemic antibiotics. 184 neurosurgical patients were enrolled between April 2004 and December 2008. Mean duration of ventricular catheter was 10 days for both groups. The proportion of patients with nosocomial infection was not significantly different: 57% (51/90) in the Bactiseal group and 51% (48/94) in the conventional group (OR 1.3, 0.7 to 2.2). There were also no differences in secondary outcome measures (CSF infection, intensive care unit stay, acute hospital stay and functional outcome) between the two groups. Antibiotic impregnated catheters are as effective as systemic antibiotics in the prevention of CSF infection and their corresponding nosocomial infection rates are not significantly different. The study is registered at http://www.ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT00286104).

  6. Enhancing Surveillance for Arboviral Infections in the Arizona Border Region

    PubMed Central

    McCotter, Orion; Vanskike, Frank; Ernst, Kacey; Komatsu, Ken; Margolis, Harold; Waterman, Stephen; Tippit, Laura; Tomashek, Kay; Wertheimer, Anne; Montiel, Sonia; Golenko, Catherine; Hunsperger, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    Objective To enhance arboviral surveillance and laboratory capacity to establish a surveillance baseline for the emerging threat of Dengue fever in the Arizona-Mexico border region. Introduction West Nile Virus (WNV) and dengue virus (DENV) are both arboviruses which are transmitted to humans by an infected mosquito bite during blood-meal feeding. The clinical presentations of non-neuroinvasive WNV and dengue fever are similar, and symptoms may include acute onset of high fever, headache, myalgia, arthralgia, nausea, vomiting, and often a maculopapular rash. More serious manifestations of these viruses include fatal encephalitis and meningitis in WNV patients and fatal hemorrhagic disease in dengue patients. Over the last decade, WNV has spread rapidly across North America, reaching Arizona in 2004, and has become a significant cause of human illness since that time. Even though dengue has been described as primarily a disease of the tropics and sub-tropical areas, there is a small but significant risk for dengue outbreaks in the continental United States as evidenced by surveillance efforts in Texas that identified local dengue transmission in 2005. In recent years, outbreaks of dengue have occurred in Mexico border states, most notably Sonora in 2010. That same year, Arizona had the highest incidence of WNV cases in the U.S. including number of neuroinvasive disease cases, total cases, and number of deaths per state. The emergence of DENV and WNV as important public health problems maybe have been due to non-effective mosquito control, global demographic changes (urbanization and population growth), increased air travel, and inadequate surveillance. Methods Vector mapping: Mapping techniques will be utilized to visually depict Aedes aegypti populations captured from previous seasonal public health environmental vector trapping programs. Laboratory capacity: Multi-state laboratory training by CDC Dengue Branch was held in October 2012. Surveillance: The WNV cases

  7. Healthcare-associated and nosocomial bacterial infections in cirrhosis: predictors and impact on outcome.

    PubMed

    Sargenti, Konstantina; Prytz, Hanne; Strand, Anna; Nilsson, Emma; Kalaitzakis, Evangelos

    2015-02-01

    Population-based data on the occurrence of healthcare-associated (HCA) and hospital-acquired (HA) bacterial infections in cirrhosis, their predictors, and their impact on outcome are limited. All patients with incident cirrhosis in 2001-2010 residing in an area of 600,000 inhabitants were retrospectively identified. All serious bacterial infections (resulting in or occurring during an inpatient hospital episode) during this period were registered. Acquisition type, site of infection, occurrence of infection-related acute-on-chronic liver failure (ACLF), acute kidney injury (AKI) and bacterial resistance were analysed. Patients were followed longitudinally until death, transplant or end of 2011. A total of 398 serious infections occurred in 241/633 (38%) patients. Forty-seven per cent were HCA and 21% HA. Proton pump inhibitor (PPI) use was more common in HA (80%) vs. HCA (64%) vs. community-acquired (44%) infections (P < 0.001). In regression analysis, decompensated status, use of antibiotics and PPIs at infection diagnosis were independent predictors of HCA/HA infections (P < 0.05). After adjustment for confounders, HCA/HA infections were significantly related to infection-related ACLF (P < 0.05), but not severe sepsis, AKI or infection-related mortality (P > 0.05). Antibiotic-resistant infections were more frequent among HA (17%) than HCA (6%) or community-acquired (8%) infections (P < 0.05). Antibiotic-resistant HCA/HA infections were independently related to severe sepsis (P < 0.05). In a population-based cirrhotic cohort, two-thirds of serious bacterial infections were HCA or HA. Decompensated liver disease, antibiotics and PPIs were predictors of serious HCA/HA infections, which were associated with the development of ACLF. Antibiotic resistance was frequent, especially in HA infections, and contributed to risk of severe sepsis. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. [Prevalence of nosocomial infections in a secondary care hospital in Mexico].

    PubMed

    Castañeda-Martínez, Fernando Cain; Valdespino-Padilla, María Guadalupe

    2015-01-01

    Introducción: las infecciones nosocomiales son un problema creciente, de gran repercusión social y económica que afecta a las instituciones hospitalarias. El objetivo de este trabajo fue determinar la prevalencia de infecciones nosocomiales en hospital de segundo nivel. Métodos: estudio transversal, observacional, se calculó un tamaño de muestra para una proporción, se incluyeron pacientes hospitalizados con más de 48 horas de internamiento; se obtiene estadística descriptiva y prueba de hipótesis utilizando prueba exacta de Fisher, se utilizó el software SPSS versión 18. Resultados: se encontró una prevalencia de 9.52 %, con una edad media de 46.59 años; 64.3 % de los pacientes fueron del sexo femenino, 35.7 % masculinos, la prevalencia por servicio fue de 16.27 % en Medicina Interna, y 12.5 % en Cirugía. Conclusiones: 10 de cada 100 pacientes hospitalizados presentan infección nosocomial, comportamiento muy similar a lo reportado en la literatura médica.

  9. Global Emerging Infection Surveillance and Response (GEIS)- Avian Influenza Pandemic Influenza (AI/PI) Program

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    surveillance, malaria resistance surveillance, diarrhea etiology and antimicrobial resistance surveillance, sexually transmitted illness surveillance, and...4 Body Respiratory Illness…………………………………………………………. 4 Acute Febrile Illness……………………………………………………….. 7 Malaria ...These pillars include respiratory illnesses, acute febrile illnesses, malaria , enterics, sexually transmitted infections and antimicrobial

  10. Managing skin and soft-tissue infection and nosocomial pneumonia caused by MRSA: a 2014 follow-up survey.

    PubMed

    Dryden, Matthew; Andrasevic, Arjana Tambic; Bassetti, Matteo; Bouza, Emilio; Chastre, Jean; Baguneid, Mo; Esposito, Silvano; Giamarellou, Helen; Gyssens, Inge; Nathwani, Dilip; Unal, Serhat; Voss, Andreas; Wilcox, Mark

    2015-04-24

    As a follow-up to our 2009 survey, in order to explore opinion and practice on the epidemiology and management of meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in Europe, we conducted a second survey to elicit current opinions on this topic, particularly around antibiotic choice, dose, duration and route of administration. We also aimed to further understand how the management of MRSA has evolved in Europe during the past 5 years. Members of an expert panel of infectious diseases specialists convened in London (UK) in January 2014 to identify and discuss key issues in the management of MRSA. Following this meeting, a survey was developed comprising 36 questions covering a wide range of topics on MRSA complicated skin and soft-tissue infection and nosocomial pneumonia management. The survey instrument, a web-based questionnaire, was sent to the International Society of Chemotherapy for distribution to registered European infection societies and their members. This article reports the survey results from the European respondents. At the time of the original survey, the epidemiology of MRSA varied significantly across Europe and there were differing views on best practice. The current findings suggest that the epidemiology of healthcare-associated MRSA in Europe is, if anything, even more polarised, whilst community-acquired MRSA has become much more common. However, there now appears to be a much greater knowledge of current treatment/management options, and antimicrobial stewardship has moved forward considerably in the 5 years since the last survey.

  11. A prediction tool for nosocomial multi-drug Resistant Gram-Negative Bacilli infections in critically ill patients - prospective observational study.

    PubMed

    Vasudevan, Anupama; Mukhopadhyay, Amartya; Li, Jialiang; Yuen, Eugene Goh Yu; Tambyah, Paul Ananth

    2014-11-25

    The widespread use of empiric broad spectrum antibiotics has contributed to the global increase of Resistant Gram-Negative Bacilli (RGNB) infections in intensive care units (ICU). The aim of this study was to develop a tool to predict nosocomial RGNB infections among ICU patients for targeted therapy. We conducted a prospective observational study from August'07 to December'11. All adult patients who were admitted and stayed for more than 24 hours at the medical and surgical ICU's were included. All patients who developed nosocomial RGNB infections 48 hours after ICU admission were identified. A prediction score was formulated by using independent risk factors obtained from logistic regression analysis. This was prospectively validated with a subsequent cohort of patients admitted to the ICUs during the following time period of January-September 2012. Seventy-six patients with nosocomial RGNB Infection (31bacteremia) were compared with 1398 patients with Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome (SIRS) without any gram negative bacterial infection/colonization admitted to the ICUs during the study period. The following independent risk factors were obtained by a multivariable logistic regression analysis - prior isolation of Gram negative organism (coeff: 1.1, 95% CI 0.5-1.7); Surgery during current admission (coeff: 0.69, 95% CI 0.2-1.2); prior Dialysis with end stage renal disease (coeff: 0.7, 95% CI 0.1-1.1); prior use of Carbapenems (coeff: 1.3, 95% CI 0.3-2.3) and Stay in the ICU for more than 5 days (coeff: 2.4, 95% CI 1.6-3.2). It was validated prospectively in a subsequent cohort (n = 408) and the area-under-the-curve (AUC) of the GSDCS score for predicting nosocomial ICU acquired RGNB infection and bacteremia was 0.77 (95% CI 0.68-0.89 and 0.78 (95% CI 0.69-0.89) respectively. The GSDCS (0-4.3) score clearly differentiated the low (0-1.3), medium (1.4-2.3) and high (2.4-4.3) risk patients, both for RGNB infection (p:0.003) and bacteremia (p:0

  12. Glove Contamination during Endodontic Treatment Is One of the Sources of Nosocomial Endodontic Propionibacterium acnes Infections.

    PubMed

    Niazi, Sadia Ambreen; Vincer, Louise; Mannocci, Francesco

    2016-08-01

    The opportunistic Propionibacterium acnes recovered frequently from failed endodontic treatments might be the result of nosocomial endodontic infections. The study was aimed to determine if gloves worn by dentists could be one of the sources of these nosocomial infections and to investigate the P. acnes phylotypes involved. The cultivable microbiota of gloves (n = 8) at 4 time points (T1, immediately after wearing gloves; T2, after access cavity preparation; T3, after taking a working length/master cone radiograph; and T4, before sealing the cavity) were identified using 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequencing. recA gene sequencing of P. acnes isolates was done. The phylogenetic relationship was determined using MEGA 6 (http://www.megasoftware.net/fixedbugs.html; Megasoftware, Tempe, AZ). Data distributions were compared using the Fisher exact test; means were compared using the Mann-Whitney U test in SPSSPC (version 21; IBM, Armonk, NY). The quantitative viable counts at T4 (aerobically [2.93 ± 0.57], anaerobically [3.35 ± 0.43]) were greater (P < .001) than at T1 [(aerobically [0.48 ± 0.73], anaerobically [0.66 ± 0.86]) and T2 (aerobically [1.80 ± 0.54], anaerobically [2.41 ± 0.71]). Eighty cultivable bacterial taxa (5 phyla) were identified. The most prevalent ones were P. acnes and Staphylococcus epidermidis (100%). recA gene sequencing (n = 88) revealed 2 phylogenetic lineages with type I split into type IA and type IB. Type II was prevalent on gloves. Contamination of the gloves was detected at the final stages of the treatment. P. acnes and S. epidermidis are the prevalent taxa on gloves and are opportunistic endodontic pathogens. Changing gloves frequently, after gaining access into the pulp space and also after taking the working length/master gutta-percha point radiographs, is likely to reduce the risk of root canal reinfection. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Resistance Pattern of Antibiotics in Patient Underwent Open Heart Surgery with Nosocomial Infection in North of Iran

    PubMed Central

    Davoudi, Alireza; Najafi, Narges; Alian, Shahriar; Tayebi, Atefe; Ahangarkani, Fatemeh; Rouhi, Samaneh; Heydari, Amirhosein

    2016-01-01

    Background: Patients who undergo cardiac surgery appear to be at increased risk for the development of Nosocomial infections (NIs). The development of antibiotic-resistant infections has been associated with significantly greater hospital mortality rates compared to similar infections caused by antibiotic-sensitive pathogens. Objectives: The purpose of this study is survey of Nis and antibiotic resistance patterns of causative bacteria among patients who underwent open heart surgery in the north of Iran during a 2-year period between September 2012 and September 2014. Methods: In this cross-sectional study we evaluated 187 patients that underwent open heart surgery with NIs. Demographic feature, clinical characteristics and risk factors of each infection were recorded. The antibiotic susceptibility test was performed using the Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) method according to the standard protocol of Clinical & Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI). Detection of Extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) producing bacteria was performed by the double-disk synergy (DDS) test; also Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus (MRSA) strains were identified by MRSA Screen Agar. The collected data were analyzed using the SPSS software (ver. 16) and, descriptive statistics were used. Results: Out Of total of 2253 hospitalized patients who underwent open heart surgery, 187(5.05%) patients had NIs. 51.9% of the patients were female. The rates of surgical site infection (SSI), respiratory tract infection, endocarditis, Urinary tract infection (UTI), blood Infection and mediastinitis were 27.80, 25.66%, 17.64, 17.11% 8.55% and 3.20% respectively. E.coli and S.aureus were the most causative agents of NIs. The rate of ESBL-producing bacteria was 14.28- 71.42% among enterobacteriaceae and the rate of MRSA was 54.2% among S.aureus strains. All isolated Acinetobacter.spp were Multi-drug resistance (MDR). Conclusions: We showed that the rate of NIs among these high-risk patients

  14. Resistance Pattern of Antibiotics in Patient Underwent Open Heart Surgery With Nosocomial Infection in North of Iran.

    PubMed

    Davoudi, Alireza; Najafi, Narges; Alian, Shahriar; Tayebi, Atefe; Ahangarkani, Fatemeh; Rouhi, Samaneh; Heydari, Amirhosein

    2015-08-06

    Patients who undergo cardiac surgery appear to be at increased risk for the development of Nosocomial infections (NIs). The development of antibiotic-resistant infections has been associated with significantly greater hospital mortality rates compared to similar infections caused by antibiotic-sensitive pathogens. The purpose of this study is survey of Nis and antibiotic resistance patterns of causative bacteria among patients who underwent open heart surgery in the north of Iran during a 2-year period between September 2012 and September 2014. In this cross-sectional study we evaluated 187 patients that underwent open heart surgery with NIs. Demographic feature, clinical characteristics and risk factors of each infection were recorded. The antibiotic susceptibility test was performed using the Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) method according to the standard protocol of Clinical & Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI). Detection of Extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) producing bacteria was performed by the double-disk synergy (DDS) test; also Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus (MRSA) strains were identified by MRSA Screen Agar. The collected data were analyzed using the SPSS software (ver. 16) and, descriptive statistics were used. Out Of total of 2253 hospitalized patients who underwent open heart surgery, 187(5.05%) patients had NIs. 51.9% of the patients were female. The rates of surgical site infection (SSI), respiratory tract infection, endocarditis, Urinary tract infection (UTI), blood Infection and mediastinitis were 27.80, 25.66%, 17.64, 17.11% 8.55% and 3.20% respectively. E.coli and S.aureus were the most causative agents of NIs. The rate of ESBL-producing bacteria was 14.28- 71.42% among enterobacteriaceae and the rate of MRSA was 54.2% among S.aureus strains. All isolated Acinetobacter.spp were Multi-drug resistance (MDR). We showed that the rate of NIs among these high-risk patients was in the average level. But the emergence of MRSA and

  15. Economics of infection control surveillance technology: cost-effective or just cost?

    PubMed

    Furuno, Jon P; Schweizer, Marin L; McGregor, Jessina C; Perencevich, Eli N

    2008-04-01

    Previous studies have suggested that informatics tools, such as automated alert and decision support systems, may increase the efficiency and quality of infection control surveillance. However, little is known about the cost-effectiveness of these tools. We focus on 2 types of economic analyses that have utility in assessing infection control interventions (cost-effectiveness analysis and business-case analysis) and review the available literature on the economics of computerized infection control surveillance systems. Previous studies on the effectiveness of computerized infection control surveillance have been limited to assessments of whether these tools increase the sensitivity and specificity of surveillance over traditional methods. Furthermore, we identified only 2 studies that assessed the costs associated with computerized infection control surveillance. Thus, it remains unknown whether computerized infection control surveillance systems are cost-effective and whether use of these systems improves patient outcomes. The existing data are insufficient to allow for a summary conclusion on the cost-effectiveness of infection control surveillance technology. All future studies of computerized infection control surveillance systems should aim to collect outcomes and economic data to inform decision making and assist hospitals with completing business-cases analyses.

  16. Attributable cost of a nosocomial infection in the intensive care unit: A prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Chacko, Binila; Thomas, Kurien; David, Thambu; Paul, Hema; Jeyaseelan, Lakshmanan; Peter, John Victor

    2017-01-01

    AIM To study the impact of hospital-acquired infections (HAIs) on cost and outcome from intensive care units (ICU) in India. METHODS Adult patients (> 18 years) admitted over 1-year, to a 24-bed medical critical care unit in India, were enrolled prospectively. Treatment cost and outcome data were collected. This cost data was merged with HAI data collected prospectively by the Hospital Infection Control Committee. Only infections occurring during ICU stay were included. The impact of HAI on treatment cost and mortality was assessed. RESULTS The mean (± SD) age of the cohort (n = 499) was 42.3 ± 16.5 years. Acute physiology and chronic health evaluation-II score was 13.9 (95%CI: 13.3-14.5); 86% were ventilated. ICU and hospital length of stay were 7.8 ± 5.5 and 13.9 ± 10 d respectively. Hospital mortality was 27.9%. During ICU stay, 76 (15.3%) patients developed an infection (ventilator-associated pneumonia 50; bloodstream infection 35; urinary tract infections 3), translating to 19.7 infections/1000 ICU days. When compared with those who did not develop an infection, an infection occurring during ICU stay was associated with significantly higher treatment cost [median (inter-quartile range, IQR) INR 92893 (USD 1523) (IQR 57168-140286) vs INR 180469 (USD 2958) (IQR 140030-237525); P < 0.001 and longer duration of ICU (6.7 ± 4.5 d vs 13.4 ± 7.0 d; P < 0.01) and hospital stay (12.4 ± 8.2 d vs 21.8 ± 13.9 d; P < 0.001)]. However ICU acquired infections did not impact hospital mortality (31.6% vs 27.2%; P = 0.49). CONCLUSION An infection acquired during ICU stay was associated with doubling of treatment cost and prolonged hospitalization but did not significantly increase mortality. PMID:28224111

  17. Encephalitis Surveillance through the Emerging Infections Program, 1997–2010

    PubMed Central

    Glaser, Carol A.

    2015-01-01

    Encephalitis is a devastating illness that commonly causes neurologic disability and has a case fatality rate >5% in the United States. An etiologic agent is identified in <50% of cases, making diagnosis challenging. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Emerging Infections Program (EIP) Encephalitis Project established syndromic surveillance for encephalitis in New York, California, and Tennessee, with the primary goal of increased identification of causative agents and secondary goals of improvements in treatment and outcome. The project represents the largest cohort of patients with encephalitis studied to date and has influenced case definition and diagnostic evaluation of this condition. Results of this project have provided insight into well-established causal pathogens and identified newer causes of infectious and autoimmune encephalitis. The recognition of a possible relationship between enterovirus D68 and acute flaccid paralysis with myelitis underscores the need for ongoing vigilance for emerging causes of neurologic disease. PMID:26295485

  18. Implementation of tuberculosis infection control measures in designated hospitals in Zhejiang Province, China: are we doing enough to prevent nosocomial tuberculosis infections?

    PubMed

    Chen, Bin; Liu, Min; Gu, Hua; Wang, Xiaomeng; Qiu, Wei; Shen, Jian; Jiang, Jianmin

    2016-03-03

    Tuberculosis (TB) infection control measures are very important to prevent nosocomial transmission and protect healthcare workers (HCWs) in hospitals. The TB infection control situation in TB treatment institutions in southeastern China has not been studied previously. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the implementation of TB infection control measures in TB-designated hospitals in Zhejiang Province, China. Cross-sectional survey using observation and interviews. All TB-designated hospitals (n=88) in Zhejiang Province, China in 2014. Managerial, administrative, environmental and personal infection control measures were assessed using descriptive analyses and univariate logistic regression analysis. The TB-designated hospitals treated a median of 3030 outpatients (IQR 764-7094) and 279 patients with confirmed TB (IQR 154-459) annually, and 160 patients with TB (IQR 79-426) were hospitalised in the TB wards. Most infection control measures were performed by the TB-designated hospitals. Measures including regular monitoring of TB infection control in high-risk areas (49%), shortening the wait times (42%), and providing a separate waiting area for patients with suspected TB (46%) were sometimes neglected. N95 respirators were available in 85 (97%) hospitals, although only 44 (50%) hospitals checked that they fit. Hospitals with more TB staff and higher admission rates of patients with TB were more likely to set a dedicated sputum collection area and to conduct annual respirator fit testing. TB infection control measures were generally implemented by the TB-designated hospitals. Measures including separation of suspected patients, regular monitoring of infection control practices, and regular fit testing of respirators should be strengthened. Infection measures for sputum collection and respirator fit testing should be improved in hospitals with lower admission rates of patients with TB. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to

  19. Implementation of tuberculosis infection control measures in designated hospitals in Zhejiang Province, China: are we doing enough to prevent nosocomial tuberculosis infections?

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Bin; Liu, Min; Gu, Hua; Wang, Xiaomeng; Qiu, Wei; Shen, Jian; Jiang, Jianmin

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Tuberculosis (TB) infection control measures are very important to prevent nosocomial transmission and protect healthcare workers (HCWs) in hospitals. The TB infection control situation in TB treatment institutions in southeastern China has not been studied previously. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the implementation of TB infection control measures in TB-designated hospitals in Zhejiang Province, China. Design Cross-sectional survey using observation and interviews. Setting All TB-designated hospitals (n=88) in Zhejiang Province, China in 2014. Primary and secondary outcome measures Managerial, administrative, environmental and personal infection control measures were assessed using descriptive analyses and univariate logistic regression analysis. Results The TB-designated hospitals treated a median of 3030 outpatients (IQR 764–7094) and 279 patients with confirmed TB (IQR 154–459) annually, and 160 patients with TB (IQR 79–426) were hospitalised in the TB wards. Most infection control measures were performed by the TB-designated hospitals. Measures including regular monitoring of TB infection control in high-risk areas (49%), shortening the wait times (42%), and providing a separate waiting area for patients with suspected TB (46%) were sometimes neglected. N95 respirators were available in 85 (97%) hospitals, although only 44 (50%) hospitals checked that they fit. Hospitals with more TB staff and higher admission rates of patients with TB were more likely to set a dedicated sputum collection area and to conduct annual respirator fit testing. Conclusions TB infection control measures were generally implemented by the TB-designated hospitals. Measures including separation of suspected patients, regular monitoring of infection control practices, and regular fit testing of respirators should be strengthened. Infection measures for sputum collection and respirator fit testing should be improved in hospitals with lower admission

  20. Antibiotic resistance and genotype of beta-lactamase producing Escherichia coli in nosocomial infections in Cotonou, Benin.

    PubMed

    Anago, Eugénie; Ayi-Fanou, Lucie; Akpovi, Casimir D; Hounkpe, Wilfried B; Agassounon-Djikpo Tchibozo, Micheline; Bankole, Honoré S; Sanni, Ambaliou

    2015-01-17

    Beta lactams are the most commonly used group of antimicrobials worldwide. The presence of extended-spectrum lactamases (ESBL) affects significantly the treatment of infections due to multidrug resistant strains of gram-negative bacilli. The aim of this study was to characterize the beta-lactamase resistance genes in Escherichia coli isolated from nosocomial infections in Cotonou, Benin. Escherichia coli strains were isolated from various biological samples such as urine, pus, vaginal swab, sperm, blood, spinal fluid and catheter. Isolated bacteria were submitted to eleven usual antibiotics, using disc diffusion method according to NCCLS criteria, for resistance analysis. Beta-lactamase production was determined by an acidimetric method with benzylpenicillin. Microbiological characterization of ESBL enzymes was done by double disc synergy test and the resistance genes TEM and SHV were screened by specific PCR. ESBL phenotype was detected in 29 isolates (35.5%). The most active antibiotic was imipenem (96.4% as susceptibility rate) followed by ceftriaxone (58.3%) and gentamicin (54.8%). High resistance rates were observed with amoxicillin (92.8%), ampicillin (94%) and trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole (85.7%). The genotype TEM was predominant in ESBL and non ESBL isolates with respectively 72.4% and 80%. SHV-type beta-lactamase genes occurred in 24.1% ESBL strains and in 18.1% of non ESBL isolates. This study revealed the presence of ESBL producing Eschericiha coli in Cotonou. It demonstrated also high resistance rate to antibiotics commonly used for infections treatment. Continuous monitoring and judicious antibiotic usage are required.

  1. Prevalence and risk factors for nosocomial infections in hospitals of the Veneto region, north-eastern Italy.

    PubMed

    Pellizzer, G; Mantoan, P; Timillero, L; Allegranzi, B; Fedeli, U; Schievano, E; Benedetti, P; Saia, M; Sax, H; Spolaore, P

    2008-03-01

    The study aimed to assess prevalence and risk factors for nosocomial infection (NI) in 21 hospitals of the Veneto Region (Italy). In May 2003, a one-week-period prevalence study of NI was carried out in 21 hospitals, representing 63% of all hospital beds for acute patients of the Veneto Region. Intensive care units represented 84% of all intensive care beds of the Region. Long term care, neonatal intensive care, burn, psychiatric and dermatology units were excluded. Overall, 6,352 patients were surveyed. The prevalence of NI was 7.6% (range 2.6%-17.7%), while 6.9% of patients (range 2.6%-15.5%) were affected by at least one NI. The prevalence of patients with NI in medical, surgical and intensive care areas was 6.6%, 5.0% and 25.8%, respectively. The sites most frequently affected were the following: urinary tract (28.4%), surgical site (20.3%), blood stream (19.3%), pulmonary and lower respiratory tract (17.6%). At multivariate analysis risk factors independently associated to NI were: Charlson index score >1, severity of underlying disease, exposure to antibiotics, surgical intervention, trauma at admission, presence of central venous catheter >24 h, urinary catheter, intubation, tracheostomy, and duration since admission >15 days. The study provided baseline data of NI in the Veneto Region hospitals. It showed that NI are frequent, and display a wide inter-hospital variability of rates. The highest prevalence has been reported in intensive care units. The unusual high frequency of blood stream infections and the relatively lower prevalence rate of surgical site infections highlighted the limits of prevalence studies.

  2. Nosocomial infections and resistance pattern of common bacterial isolates in an intensive care unit of a tertiary hospital in Nigeria: A 4-year review.

    PubMed

    Iliyasu, Garba; Daiyab, Farouq Muhammad; Tiamiyu, Abdulwasiu Bolaji; Abubakar, Salisu; Habib, Zaiyad Garba; Sarki, Adamu Muhammad; Habib, Abdulrazaq Garba

    2016-08-01

    Infection is a major determinant of clinical outcome among patients in the intensive care unit. However, these data are lacking in most developing countries; hence, we set out to describe the profile of nosocomial infection in one of the major tertiary hospitals in northern Nigeria. Case records of patients who were admitted into the intensive care unit over a 4-year period were retrospectively reviewed. A preformed questionnaire was administered, and data on clinical and microbiological profile of patients with documented infection were obtained. Eighty-our episodes of nosocomial infections were identified in 76 patients. Road traffic accident (29/76, 38.2%) was the leading cause of admission. The most common infections were skin and soft tissue infections (30/84, 35.7%) followed by urinary tract infection (23/84, 27.4%). The most frequent isolates were Staphylococcus aureus (35/84, 41.7%), Klebsiella pneumoniae (18/84, 21.4%), and Escherichia coli (13/84, 15.5%). High rate of resistance to cloxacillin (19/35, 54.3%) and cotrimoxazole (17/26, 65.4%) was noted among the S aureus isolates. All the Enterobacteriaceae isolates were susceptible to meropenem, whereas resistance rate to ceftriaxone was high (E coli, 55.6%; K pneumoniae, 71.4%; Proteus spp, 50%). Infection control practice and measures to curtail the emergence of antimicrobial resistance need to be improved. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. An evaluation of the sensitivity of acute flaccid paralysis surveillance for poliovirus infection in Australia

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background World Health Organization (WHO) targets for acute flaccid paralysis (AFP) surveillance, including the notification of a minimum rate of AFP among children, are used to assess the adequacy of AFP surveillance for the detection of poliovirus infection. Sensitive surveillance for poliovirus infection in both developed and developing countries is essential to support global disease eradication efforts. We applied recently developed methods for the quantitative evaluation of disease surveillance systems to evaluate the sensitivity of AFP surveillance for poliovirus infection in Australia. Methods A scenario tree model which accounted for administrative region, age, population immunity, the likelihood of AFP, and the probability of notification and stool sampling was used to assess the sensitivity of AFP surveillance for wild poliovirus infection among children aged less than 15 years in Australia. The analysis was based on historical surveillance data collected between 2000 and 2005. We used a surveillance time period of one month, and evaluated the ability of the surveillance system to detect poliovirus infection at a prevalence of 1 case per 100 000 persons and 1 case per million persons. Results There was considerable variation in the sensitivity of AFP surveillance for poliovirus infection among Australian States and Territories. The estimated median sensitivity of AFP surveillance in Australia among children aged less than 15 years was 8.2% per month at a prevalence of 1 case per 100,000 population, and 0.9% per month at a prevalence of 1 case per million population. The probability that Australia is free from poliovirus infection given negative surveillance findings following 5 years of continuous surveillance was 96.9% at a prevalence of 1 case per 100,000 persons and 56.5% at a prevalence of 1 case per million persons. Conclusion Given the ongoing risk of poliovirus importation prior to global eradication, long term surveillance is required to provide

  4. [Social marketing: applying commercial strategies to the prevention of nosocomial infections].

    PubMed

    Sax, Hugo; Longtin, Yves; Alvarez-Ceyssat, Raymonde; Bonfillon, Chantal; Cavallero, Sabrina; Dayer, Pierre; Ginet, Claude; Herrault, Pascale

    2009-04-01

    Although a large proportion of healthcare-associated infections are avoidable, healthcare workers do not always practice evidence-based preventive strategies. Marketing technologies might help to improve patient safety. This article presents the basic principles of marketing and its potential use to promote good infection control practices. The marketing mix (Product, Price, Place, and Promotion) should be taken into account to induce behaviour change. By placing the emphasis on the perceived "profits" for healthcare workers the approach might lose its moral aspect and gain in effectiveness. VigiGerme, a non-commercial registered trademark, applies social marketing techniques to infection control and prevention.

  5. Management of suspected nosocomial infection: an audit of 19 hospitalized patients with septicemia caused by Bacillus species.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, S; Suenaga, H; Naito, K; Sawazaki, M; Hiramatsu, T; Agata, N

    2000-10-01

    From April to August of 2000, Bacillus spp. were detected in the blood culture of 29 patients in a hospital in Japan. Of these patients, 19 had clinical signs of septicemia; positive culture in the remaining 10 patients was attributed to contamination with skin flora at the site of puncture. Of the 18 strains evaluated, 15 were Bacillus cereus, 2 were Bacillus subtilis, and one was Bacillus licheniformis. The only hospital death observed was that of a patient who had no clinical signs of septicemia at the time of blood sampling. That death is now considered attributable to the underlying neoplasm. The hospital committee for prevention of nosocomial infection concluded after a critical review of the patient records that the cause of septicemia in most cases had been contaminated intravenous lines. To control the situation, the committee recommended the use of a new skin disinfectant, and medical personnel were advised to avoid infusion pauses with interruption of intravenous lines and to replace the caps for the stopcocks with new ones each time the caps were removed. These measures were rigorously observed in addition to the conventional measures for preventing catheter sepsis, and the incidence of septicemia due to the Bacillus spp. declined dramatically thereafter.

  6. Nosocomial blood stream infections in patients treated with venovenous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation for acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kutleša, Marko; Santini, Marija; Krajinović, Vladimir; Papić, Neven; Novokmet, Anđa; Josipović Mraović, Renata; Baršić, Bruno

    2017-05-01

    The incidence of complication rates in patients treated with venovenous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (VV ECMO) remains substantial and impacts the results of any future trial dealing with ECMO efficacy. Of these complications blood stream infections (BSI) are less well studied. Our objective was to report influence of BSI in ARDS patients treated with VV ECMO. One-hundred adult patients with ARDS treated with VV ECMO at the tertiary care hospital in Zagreb, Croatia between the October of 2009 and the June of 2016 were prospectively included in the study. In 35% of patients an episode of the nosocomial BSI during VV ECMO treatment was detected. ECMO duration of more than 250 hours and significant bleeding episode independently increase the possibility of acquiring BSI during an ECMO run (odds ratio 3.189, 95% confidence limits 1.108-9.180 and odds ratio 3.378, 95% confidence limits 1.055-10.869 respectively). BSI occurrence had no effect on mortality. Our study found that BSI incidence increases with the duration of an ECMO run and bleeding complications with no effect on hospital mortality. Further studies of BSI in this risk group should address the problem of rapid diagnosis and appropriate antimicrobial therapy in an era of growing multiresistance.

  7. [Is resistance to disinfectants a mandatory feature of a hospital strain of causative agents of nosocomial purulent-septic infections?].

    PubMed

    Sergevnin, V I; Zueva, N G; Kliukina, T V; Volkova, E O

    2013-01-01

    Evaluate resistance to working solutions of disinfectants by Staphylococcus haemolyticus and Klebsiella pneumoniae isolated from newborns and hospital environment objects of obstetric hospital during registration of group purulent-septic infections (PSI). Analysis of 2 epidemic situations on PSI morbidity of newborns caused by S. haemolyticus and K. pneumoniae was carried out. Sensitivity to antibiotics of S. haemolyticus and K. pneumoniae strains isolated from newborns and hospital environment was studied by disc-diffusion method and genotyping of K. pneumoniae--by using polymerase chain reaction with universal primer M 13 (RAPD-PCR). Sensitivity of S. haemolyticus and K. pneumoniae to working solutions of disinfectants was determined on test-surfaces (glass, metal, plastic, wood, oilcloth). The detected identity of antibiotic phenotype of S. haemolyticus and K. pneumoniae strains as well as genotype of K. pneumoniae strains combined with registration of group PSI morbidity among newborns confirms that the circulating strains (clones) of the causative agents were hospital. S. haemolyticus and K. pneumoniae strains in most cases were sensitive to working solutions of disinfectants. Resistance of causative agents of nosocomial PSI to disinfectants is not an unconditional feature of a hospital strain, and concurrence of resistance profile of microorganisms to disinfectant preparations--a mandatory feature of the presence of epidemiologic connection between the diseased.

  8. Impact of a standardized hand hygiene program on the incidence of nosocomial infection in very low birth weight infants.

    PubMed

    Capretti, Maria Grazia; Sandri, Fabrizio; Tridapalli, Elisabetta; Galletti, Silvia; Petracci, Elisabetta; Faldella, Giacomo

    2008-08-01

    This study examined the effects of a standardized hand hygiene program on the rate of nosocomial infection (NI) in very low birth weight (VLBW) infants (birth weight < 1500 g) admitted to our neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). We compared the rate of NI in VLBW infants in 2 separate periods. In the first period, staff were encouraged to perform handwashing using a plain fluid detergent (0.5% triclosan). In the second period, a standardized hand hygiene program was implemented using antimicrobial soap (4% chlorhexidine gluconate) and alcohol-based hand rubs. NI after 72 hours of life was detected in 16 of the 85 VLBW infants in the first period and in 5 of the 80 VLBW infants in the second period. The rate of central venous catheter colonization was significantly lower in the second period (5.8%) than in the first period (16.6%). In our NICU, the incidence of NI in VLBW infants was significantly reduced after the introduction of a standardized handwashing protocol. In our experience, a proper hand hygiene program can save approximately 10 NI episodes/year, at a cost of $10,000 per episode. Therefore, improving hand hygiene practice is a cost-effective program in the NICU.

  9. Nosocomial bacteremia and catheter infection by Bacillus cereus in an immunocompetent patient.

    PubMed

    Hernaiz, C; Picardo, A; Alos, J I; Gomez-Garces, J L

    2003-09-01

    We present a case of Bacillus cereus bacteremia and catheter infection in an immunocompetent patient subjected to abdominal surgery, who recovered following central catheter removal and treatment with piperacillin/tazobactam.

  10. [Epidemiologic, clinical and microbiological characteristics of nosocomial urinary infection in the spinal cord lesioned patient].

    PubMed

    Hernández González, E; Zamora Pérez, F; Martínez Arroyo, M; Valdez Fernández, M; Alberti Amador, E

    2007-01-01

    Urinary infections constitute one of the main causes of intrahospitalary infections. At the Clinic for the attention of spinal cord injured (SCI) patients, we observed that these can be the causes of high incidence rates as a consequence of multiple risk factors associated with the neurogenic bladder as: vesical urethral reflux, vesicle lithiasis, diverticula and pseudodiverticula, urethral stenosis and permanent or intermittent catheterization. To describe forms of presentation of urinary tract infections (UTI) in spinal cord lesioned patients with neurogenic bladder as well as their microbiological behavior. We performed a descriptive, retrospective-type study on 28 patients in order to schedule a neurorestorative treatment for the affectation of the SCI for six months. They all received clinical, imaging test and bacteriologic assessment, that is, urocultures, uretheral and vaginal exudates to determine risk factors, forms of presentation of the infection, as well as associated complications and microbiological behavior. The most frequent forms of presentation of infections are: recurrent symptomatic bacteriuria, asymptomatic bacteriuria, bacterial urethritis, bacterial vaginosis and acute pyelonephrites. Most acute germs are: E. coli (for a 60% of isolation), followed by P. mirabilis (14%), K pneumoniae (10%), Staphylococcus sp. (4%), and other enterobacteria. Sensitiveness to aminoglycosides was kept high, where we observed a growing resistance to sulphas (>70%) and fluoroquinolones (>45%) as well as the frequent circulation of multirresistant microorganisms. Clinical peculiarities of urinary infections in the patient with neurogenic bladder, allow to perform more adequate strategies for treatment as to the clinical, microbiological and epidemiologic criteria.

  11. Weather parameters and nosocomial bloodstream infection: a case-referent study

    PubMed Central

    Caldeira, Silvia Maria; da Cunha, Antonio Ribeiro; Akazawa, Renata Tamie; Moreira, Rayana Gonçalves; de Souza, Lenice do Rosário; Fortaleza, Carlos Magno Castelo Branco

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate if temperature and humidity influenced the etiology of bloodstream infections in a hospital from 2005 to 2010. METHODS The study had a case-referent design. Individual cases of bloodstream infections caused by specific groups or pathogens were compared with several references. In the first analysis, average temperature and humidity values for the seven days preceding collection of blood cultures were compared with an overall “seven-days moving average” for the study period. The second analysis included only patients with bloodstream infections. Several logistic regression models were used to compare different pathogens and groups with respect to the immediate weather parameters, adjusting for demographics, time, and unit of admission. RESULTS Higher temperatures and humidity were related to the recovery of bacteria as a whole (versus fungi) and of gram-negative bacilli. In the multivariable models, temperature was positively associated with the recovery of gram-negative bacilli (OR = 1.14; 95%CI 1.10;1.19) or Acinetobacter baumannii (OR = 1.26; 95%CI 1.16;1.37), even after adjustment for demographic and admission data. An inverse association was identified for humidity. CONCLUSIONS The study documented the impact of temperature and humidity on the incidence and etiology of bloodstream infections. The results correspond with those from ecological studies, indicating a higher incidence of gram-negative bacilli during warm seasons. These findings should guide policies directed at preventing and controlling healthcare-associated infections. PMID:25830871

  12. Nosocomial transmission of hepatitis B virus infection through multiple-dose vials.

    PubMed

    Kidd-Ljunggren, K; Broman, E; Ekvall, H; Gustavsson, O

    1999-09-01

    The source of acute hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection in two women (55 and 72 years old) was investigated. They displayed no risk factors for acquiring HBV infection, other than treatment with local anaesthetic injections some months previously. The HBV strains were sequenced and showed distinct homology to strains seen in Swedish intravenous drug users (IVDU). Prior to these patients' acute infection, an outbreak of HBV had occurred among IVDU in the same county. Analysis of the HBV strains from six of these IVDUs showed their core promoter, precore and pre-S sequences (679 nucleotides) to be identical to those from the two patients. Cross-contamination between samples was excluded and the most likely source of infection was thought to be multiple-dose vials of local anaesthetic that had been contaminated with the HBV strain circulating among the IVDU population in the community. We believe that multiple-dose vials have no place in modern healthcare and recommend sequence homology analysis as an alternative or additional way to trace a source of HBV infection.

  13. Weather parameters and nosocomial bloodstream infection: a case-referent study.

    PubMed

    Caldeira, Silvia Maria; Cunha, Antonio Ribeiro da; Akazawa, Renata Tamie; Moreira, Rayana Gonçalves; Souza, Lenice do Rosário de; Fortaleza, Carlos Magno Castelo Branco

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate if temperature and humidity influenced the etiology of bloodstream infections in a hospital from 2005 to 2010. METHODS The study had a case-referent design. Individual cases of bloodstream infections caused by specific groups or pathogens were compared with several references. In the first analysis, average temperature and humidity values for the seven days preceding collection of blood cultures were compared with an overall "seven-days moving average" for the study period. The second analysis included only patients with bloodstream infections. Several logistic regression models were used to compare different pathogens and groups with respect to the immediate weather parameters, adjusting for demographics, time, and unit of admission. RESULTS Higher temperatures and humidity were related to the recovery of bacteria as a whole (versus fungi) and of gram-negative bacilli. In the multivariable models, temperature was positively associated with the recovery of gram-negative bacilli (OR = 1.14; 95%CI 1.10;1.19) or Acinetobacter baumannii (OR = 1.26; 95%CI 1.16;1.37), even after adjustment for demographic and admission data. An inverse association was identified for humidity. CONCLUSIONS The study documented the impact of temperature and humidity on the incidence and etiology of bloodstream infections. The results correspond with those from ecological studies, indicating a higher incidence of gram-negative bacilli during warm seasons. These findings should guide policies directed at preventing and controlling healthcare-associated infections.

  14. Incidence and prognosis of nosocomial infection after recovering of cardiac arrest in children.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Andrés; Solís, Ana; Cañete, Paloma; Del Castillo, Jimena; Urbano, Javier; Carrillo, Angel; López-Herce, Jesús

    2017-04-01

    to analyze the incidence of infection in children who have suffered an in-hospital cardiac arrest (CA) and the association with mortality. A retrospective unicenter observational study on a prospective database with children between one month and 16 years old, who have suffered an in-hospital CA was performed. Clinical, analytical and monitorization data, treatment, mortality and cause of death were recorded. 57 children were studied (57.6% males). Recovery of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) was achieved in 50 children (87.7%) and 32 (59.3%) survived. After ROSC, 28 patients (56% of those who achieved ROSC) were diagnosed of infection. There were not significant differences in mortality between patients infected (42.9%) and uninfected (27.3%) p=0.374. Only one died in consequence of a sepsis with multiorganic failure. The frequency of infection in children after recovering of a cardiac arrest is high. There were no statistically significant differences in mortality between patients with and without infection after ROSC. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Risk factors for nosocomial pneumonia: comparing adult critical-care populations.

    PubMed

    Cunnion, K M; Weber, D J; Broadhead, W E; Hanson, L C; Pieper, C F; Rutala, W A

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to examine risk factors for nosocomial pneumonia in the surgical and medical/respiratory intensive care unit (ICU) populations. In a public teaching hospital, all cases of nosocomial pneumonia in the surgical and medical/respiratory ICUs (n = 20, respectively) were identified by prospective surveillance during a 5-yr period from 1987-1991. Each group of ICU cases was compared with 40 ICU control patients who did not acquire pneumonia, and analyzed for 25 potential risk factors. Surgical ICU patients were found to have consistently higher rates of nosocomial pneumonia than medical ICU patients (RR = 2.2). The strongest predictor for nosocomial pneumonia in both the surgical and medical/respiratory ICU groups was found to be prolonged mechanical ventilation (> 1 d) resulting in a 12-fold increase in risk over nonventilated patients. APACHE III score was found to be predictive of nosocomial pneumonia in the surgical ICU population, but not in the medical/respiratory ICU population. We conclude that certain groups deserve special attention for infection control intervention. Surgical ICU patients with high APACHE scores and receiving prolonged mechanical ventilation may be at the greatest risk of acquiring nosocomial pneumonia of all hospitalized patients.

  16. Promises and pitfalls of recent advances in chemical means of preventing the spread of nosocomial infections by environmental surfaces.

    PubMed

    Sattar, Syed A

    2010-06-01

    Hard, nonporous environmental surfaces in health care settings are now receiving due recognition for their role in the spread of several types of nosocomial pathogens. The corresponding increase in the means to decontaminate such surfaces to interrupt the spread of infections is leading to the marketing of a plethora of products and procedures, including the "green" variety, with varying claims of microbicidal activity, human and environmental safety, and materials compatibility. Limitations of the existing methods to assess environmental surface disinfectants and the regulations that govern their premarket registration make objective evaluations difficult. Label claims of many such products also do not reflect the realities of field use along with a strong tendency to focus on the "bug de jour." Furthermore, whereas wiping is often an integral part of environmental surface decontamination, products meant for the purpose are rarely assessed with the physical effect of wiping incorporated. Many "green" products possess neither the spectrum of microbicidal activity nor the speed of action essential for use in health care settings. In general, "self-sanitizing" surfaces being marketed actively these days require greater scrutiny for field-relevant microbicidal activity as well as the potential to enhance microbicide resistance. The widening use of environmental surface disinfectants is also raising concerns on their human and environmental safety at many levels along with the realization that routine surface disinfection procedures in health care settings are frequently inadequate and possibly counterproductive. All this points to an urgent review of the basic procedures for assessing existing and new environmental surface disinfectants for their microbicidal activity, label claims, registration requirements, overall safety, and routine practices of environmental surface decontamination. (c) 2010 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc

  17. Temporal Patterns of Circulating Inflammation Biomarker Networks Differentiate Susceptibility to Nosocomial Infection Following Blunt Trauma in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Namas, Rami A.; Vodovotz, Yoram; Almahmoud, Khalid; Abdul-Malak, Othman; Zaaqoq, Akram; Namas, Rajaie; Mi, Qi; Barclay, Derek; Zuckerbraun, Brian; Peitzman, Andrew B.; Sperry, Jason; Billiar, Timothy R.

    2016-01-01

    Background Severe traumatic injury can lead to immune dysfunction that renders trauma patients susceptible to nosocomial infections (NI) and prolonged intensive care unit (ICU) stays. We hypothesized that early circulating biomarker patterns following trauma would correlate with sustained immune dysregulation associated with NI and remote organ failure. Methods In a cohort of 472 blunt trauma survivors studied over an 8-year period, 127 patients (27%) were diagnosed with NI versus 345 trauma patients without NI. To perform a pairwise, case-control study with 1:1 matching, 44 of the NI patients were compared with 44 no-NI trauma patients selected by matching patient demographics and injury characteristics. Plasma obtained upon admission and over time were assayed for 26 inflammatory mediators and analyzed for the presence of dynamic networks. Results Significant differences in ICU length of stay (LOS), hospital LOS, and days on mechanical ventilation were observed in the NI patients versus no-NI patients. Although NI was not detected until day 7, multiple mediators were significantly elevated within the first 24 hours in patients who developed NI. Circulating inflammation biomarkers exhibited 4 distinct dynamic patterns, of which 2 clearly distinguish patients destined to develop NI from those who did not. Mediator network connectivity analysis revealed a higher, coordinated degree of activation of both innate and lymphoid pathways in the NI patients over the initial 24 hours. Conclusions These studies implicate unique dynamic immune responses, reflected in circulating biomarkers that differentiate patients prone to persistent critical illness and infections following injury, independent of mechanism of injury, injury severity, age, or sex. PMID:25371118

  18. Short-term effect of antibiotic control policy on the usage patterns and cost of antimicrobials, mortality, nosocomial infection rates and antibacterial resistance.

    PubMed

    Arda, Bilgin; Sipahi, Oguz Resat; Yamazhan, Tansu; Tasbakan, Meltem; Pullukcu, Husnu; Tunger, Alper; Buke, Cagri; Ulusoy, Sercan

    2007-07-01

    In 2003 Turkish government released a new budget application instruction for regulating the usage of parenteral antibiotics inside and outside of the hospitals. In this study it was aimed to evaluate the effect of this instruction on the overall usage of restricted antibiotics, their cost, overall mortality, bacterial resistance patterns and nosocomial infection rates in intensive care units (ICUs) of our setting for March-October 2002 and March-October 2003 periods. Overall daily defined dose/1000 patients/day of restricted drugs decreased, whereas unrestricted drugs increased significantly after the instruction. The cost of all analysed drugs in 2003 period was 540,303USD (-19.6%) less than 2002 period. Nosocomial infection rates in ICUs decreased significantly (p<0.05). When all microbiologically confirmed nosocomial bacteremia cases during the study period were analysed, amoxycilline/clavulanate, ciprofloxacin, cefuroxime, cefotaxime, piperacilline/tazobactam resistance and ESBL rate in Klebsiella pneumoniae decreased significantly (p<0.05). Amikacin resistance in Escherichia coli and Acinetobacter baumannii increased significantly (p<0.05). Antibiotic control is one of the most important and significant ways to save money, and to prevent antibacterial resistance.

  19. Incremental cost of nosocomial bacteremia according to the focus of infection and antibiotic sensitivity of the causative microorganism in a university hospital

    PubMed Central

    Riu, Marta; Chiarello, Pietro; Terradas, Roser; Sala, Maria; Garcia-Alzorriz, Enric; Castells, Xavier; Grau, Santiago; Cots, Francesc

    2017-01-01

    Abstract To estimate the incremental cost of nosocomial bacteremia according to the causative focus and classified by the antibiotic sensitivity of the microorganism. Patients admitted to Hospital del Mar in Barcelona from 2005 to 2012 were included. We analyzed the total hospital costs of patients with nosocomial bacteremia caused by microorganisms with a high prevalence and, often, with multidrug-resistance. A control group was defined by selecting patients without bacteremia in the same diagnosis-related group. Our hospital has a cost accounting system (full-costing) that uses activity-based criteria to estimate per-patient costs. A logistic regression was fitted to estimate the probability of developing bacteremia (propensity score) and was used for propensity-score matching adjustment. This propensity score was included in an econometric model to adjust the incremental cost of patients with bacteremia with differentiation of the causative focus and antibiotic sensitivity. The mean incremental cost was estimated at €15,526. The lowest incremental cost corresponded to bacteremia caused by multidrug-sensitive urinary infection (€6786) and the highest to primary or unknown sources of bacteremia caused by multidrug-resistant microorganisms (€29,186). This is one of the first analyses to include all episodes of bacteremia produced during hospital stays in a single study. The study included accurate information about the focus and antibiotic sensitivity of the causative organism and actual hospital costs. It provides information that could be useful to improve, establish, and prioritize prevention strategies for nosocomial infections. PMID:28445264

  20. Genomic DNA fingerprinting by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis as an epidemiological marker for study of nosocomial infections caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed Central

    Ichiyama, S; Ohta, M; Shimokata, K; Kato, N; Takeuchi, J

    1991-01-01

    In this study, we have compared genomic DNA fingerprintings among isolates of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) by using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Chromosomal fragments digested with SmaI were most suitable for the PFGE separation. SmaI cut genomic DNA into 15 to 20 fragments whose sizes ranged from about 30 to 1,500 kb. Thirty-one distinctive fragment patterns were identified in 111 infecting and colonizing MRSA isolates from six different hospitals in Japan. On the basis of the genomic typing by PFGE, we performed an epidemiological investigation of an outbreak of nosocomial MRSA infections among inpatients in Nagoya University Hospital. Ten types of chromosomal digestion were identified in the 20 strains isolated from 18 infected patients and 1 from colonized hospital personnel. According to the restriction patterns, we found that four types of these strains had caused epidemic infections among 13 patients in the outbreak. Two types (types 1 and 4) of the strains were involved in the death of five patients. The other infections were sporadic. The clarity and polymorphism of the chromosomal digestion patterns enabled us to discriminate between isolates which could not be differentiated by antibiogram or plasmid analysis. Classification of the genomic DNA fingerprinting patterns by PFGE is therefore proposed as a useful method for investigating the source, transmission, and spread of nosocomial MRSA infections. Images PMID:1757534

  1. Evaluating Epidemiology and Improving Surveillance of Infections Associated with Health Care, United States.

    PubMed

    Magill, Shelley S; Dumyati, Ghinwa; Ray, Susan M; Fridkin, Scott K

    2015-09-01

    The Healthcare-Associated Infections Community Interface (HAIC), launched in 2009, is the newest major activity of the Emerging Infections Program. The HAIC activity addresses population- and laboratory-based surveillance for Clostridium difficile infections, candidemia, and multidrug-resistant gram-negative bacilli. Other activities include special projects: the multistate Healthcare-Associated Infections and Antimicrobial Use Prevalence Survey and projects that evaluate new approaches for improving surveillance. The HAIC activity has provided information about the epidemiology and adverse health outcomes of health care-associated infections and antimicrobial drug use in the United States and informs efforts to improve patient safety through prevention of these infections.

  2. Evaluating Epidemiology and Improving Surveillance of Infections Associated with Health Care, United States

    PubMed Central

    Dumyati, Ghinwa; Ray, Susan M.; Fridkin, Scott K.

    2015-01-01

    The Healthcare-Associated Infections Community Interface (HAIC), launched in 2009, is the newest major activity of the Emerging Infections Program. The HAIC activity addresses population- and laboratory-based surveillance for Clostridium difficile infections, candidemia, and multidrug-resistant gram-negative bacilli. Other activities include special projects: the multistate Healthcare-Associated Infections and Antimicrobial Use Prevalence Survey and projects that evaluate new approaches for improving surveillance. The HAIC activity has provided information about the epidemiology and adverse health outcomes of health care–associated infections and antimicrobial drug use in the United States and informs efforts to improve patient safety through prevention of these infections. PMID:26291035

  3. Nosocomial blood stream infection in intensive care units at Assiut University Hospitals (Upper Egypt) with special reference to extended spectrum β-lactamase producing organisms

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Shaaban H; Daef, Enas A; Badary, Mohammed S; Mahmoud, Mohammed A; Abd-Elsayed, Alaa A

    2009-01-01

    Aim This study investigated the nosocomial blood stream infection (BSI) in the adult ICUs in Assiut university hospitals to evaluate the rate of infection in different ICUs, causative microorganisms, antimicrobial resistance, outcome of infection, risk factors, prevalence of extended spectrum B-lactamase producing organisms and molecular typing of Klebsiella pneumoniae strains to highlight the role of environment as a potential source of nosocomial BSI. Methods This study was conducted over a period of 12 months from January 2006 to December 2006. All Patients admitted to the different adult ICUs were monitored daily by attending physicians for subsequent development of nosocomial BSI. Blood cultures were collected from suspected patients to detect the causative organisms. After antimicrobial susceptibility testing, detection of ESBLs was conducted among gram negative isolates. Klebsiella pneumoniae isolates were tested by PCR to determine the most common group of B-lactamase genes responsible for resistance. Klebsiella pneumoniae isolates from infected patients and those isolated from the environment were typed by RAPD technique to investigate the role of environment in transmission of infection. Results The study included 2095 patients who were admitted to different ICUs at Assiut University Hospitals from January 2006 to December 2006. Blood samples were collected from infected patients for blood cultures. The colonies were identified and antibiotic sensitivities were performed. This study showed that the rate of nosocomial BSI was 75 per 1000 ICU admissions with the highest percentages in Trauma ICU (17%). Out of 159 patients with primary bloodstream infection, 61 patients died representing a crude mortality rate of 38%. Analysis of the organisms causing BSI showed that Gram positive organisms were reported in 69.1% (n = 121); MRSA was the most prevalent (18.9%), followed by methicillin resistant coagulase negative Staphylococci (16%). Gram negative bacilli

  4. Resistance patterns of nosocomial urinary tract infections in urology departments: 8-year results of the global prevalence of infections in urology study.

    PubMed

    Tandogdu, Zafer; Cek, Mete; Wagenlehner, Florian; Naber, Kurt; Tenke, Peter; van Ostrum, Edgar; Johansen, Truls Bjerklund

    2014-06-01

    To present the worldwide antibiotic resistance rates of uropathogens reported in nosocomial urinary tract infections (NAUTI) during the period of 2003-2010. Data from the Global Prevalence Study of Infections in Urology from the period of 2003-2010 were analyzed to evaluate the resistance rates of pathogens causing NAUTI. The web-based application was used to record data of investigators from urology departments participating in the study every year during the days allocated in November. Each center was allowed to enter data on a single day of the study. The point prevalence data was used to find differences among geographic regions and years by utilizing multiple logistic regression analysis. A total of 19,756 patients were hospitalized during the study period, and in 1,866 of them, NAUTI was reported. Proof of infection was reported in 1,395 patients. Resistance rates of all antibiotics tested other than imipenem against the total bacterial spectrum were higher than 10 % in all regions. Resistance to almost all pathogens was lowest in North Europe, and there is no single year where an outbreak of resistance has been detected. The resistance rates of most of the uropathogens against the antibiotics tested did not show significant trends of increase or decrease with Asia exhibiting the highest rates in general. The only antibiotic tested with an overall resistance rate below 10 % was imipenem. Knowledge of regional and local resistance data and prudent use of antibiotics are necessary to optimize antibiotic therapy in urological patients with NAUTI.

  5. Enhancing best practices in ophthalmology for prevention of nosocomial epidemic keratoconjunctivitis infections.

    PubMed

    Alai, Nili

    2016-10-01

    Epidemic keratoconjunctivitis (EKC) outbreaks were reported as early as the 1940s in the United States. Nearly 80 years later, EKC remains a major eye health concern in the US and worldwide. Of particular concern is that a significant number of EKC cluster outbreaks in the US are healthcare acquired infections (HAIs) at ophthalmology offices. Therefore, immediate attention to enhancing best practices of standardization and universal precautions in ophthalmology is paramount.

  6. Organization and scope of surveillance of infections in Polish hospitals. Results of the project prohibit.

    PubMed

    Rózańska, Anna; Wójkowska-Mach, Jadwiga; Bulanda, Małgorzata; Heczko, Piotr B

    2014-01-01

    The paper presents results of a survey on organization of surveillance programs in Polish hospitals. Survey was performed by means of the standardized questionnaire in the year 2012. MATERIALAND METHOD: Completed questionnaires were obtained from 9 hospitals of different size and type: 3 small, 2 medium and 4 large, most of them public (6 hospitals). Questions concerning general organization of the infection control in hospitals were answered by infection control teams. Infection control team works in every hospital and the head of the team in 8 hospitals is a physician. In most hospitals number of epidemiological nurses per 100 beds range from 0.4 to 0.8. In every hospital surveillance comprises all the most important from epidemiological point of view forms of infections: surgical site infections, bloodstream infections, pneumonia, urinary tract infections, Clostridium difficile and MDRO surveillance - in all wards. Infection cases in 5 hospitals are documented by epidemiological nurse in collaboration with infection control physician or physician of the ward. In rest of the hospitals cases are documented by infection control physician. Feedback on infection rates to HCWs are given twice a year in most hospitals. In most of hospitals surveillance has been running for over 10 years. The results from this small group may suggest that the surveillance programs are complex and well organized. But, more detailed analysis and comparison with data reported in others countries (especially those concerning hand hygiene or number of microbiological tests) indicate the need of improvements in the field.

  7. First Description of the Extended Spectrum-Beta-Lactamase Gene blaCTX-M-109 in Salmonella Grumpensis Strains Isolated from Neonatal Nosocomial Infections in Dakar, Senegal

    PubMed Central

    Seck, Abdoulaye; Dia, Mouhamadou Lamine; Timbiné, Lassina Gadi; Niang, Aïssatou Ameth; Ndiaye, El Hadji Momar; Sonko, Mouhamadou Abdoulaye; Wane, Abdoul Aziz; Bercion, Raymond; Ndiaye, Ousmane; Cissé, Moussa Fafa; Gassama-Sow, Amy

    2016-01-01

    Nosocomial infections are very common in African hospitals, particularly in neonatal units. These infections are most often caused by bacteria such as Escherichia coli, Klebsiella spp and Staphylococcus spp. Salmonella strains are rarely involved in nosocomial infections. Here, we report the first description of S. Grumpensis in neonatal infections in Senegal. Seventeen Salmonella strains were isolated from hospitalized infants’ stool samples. The following resistance phenotype was described in strains: AMXRTICRCFR FOXRCFXRCTXRCAZRIMPSATMRNARNORRCIPRTMRGMRTERSXTR. All isolates were susceptible to imipenem, 15 out of 17 produced an extended spectrum ß-lactamase (ESBL). blaOXA-1, blaSHV-1, blaTEM-1, blaCTX-M1 genes were detected in strains 8, 13, 5 and 8, respectively. blaCTX-M1 sequencing revealed the presence of blaCTX-M-109. Thirteen of the 17 Salmonella Grumpensis strains were analyzed by PFGE. These 13 isolates belonged to a single pulsotype and were genotypically identical. This is the first report of neonatal S. Grumpensis infections in Senegal, and the first report of blaCTX-M-109 in the genus Salmonella. PMID:27355480

  8. Effect of sticky mat usage in control of nosocomial infection in Motahary Burn Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Dahmardehei, Mostafa; Alinejad, Faranak; Ansari, Fereshteh; Bahramian, Mahnaz; Barati, Mitra

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Infection is the most common cause of death among burnt patients and infection control decrease the rate of mortality. The use of sticky mat can control contamination by preventing the entrance microorganisms into the hospital wards. This study was designed to evaluate the sticky mats effect in reduction of microorganism’s entry by personnel shoes to burn intensive care unit (BICU). Materials and Methods: This is a simple cross sectional study. We tested outer soles of personnel’s shoes with swap and cultured them before and after sticky mat contact in the entrance of BICU. Results were analyzed with IBM SPSS version 22 software. McNemar and Wilcoxon Signed Ranks tests were used. Results: We analyzed 60 outer soles of the shoes before and after contact with sticky mats. Coagulase negative Staphylococci, Gram positive bacilli, Staphylococcus aureus, Aspergillus fumigatus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter baumannii were isolated before contact from 57 (95%), 32 (53%), 4 (6.7%) and 3 (5%) cases, respectively. Coagulase negative Staphylococci, Gram positive bacilli, Staphylococcus aureus, Aspergillus fumigatus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa were isolated after contact from 36 (60%), 30 (50%), 16 (26.6%), 2 (3.3%) and 3 (5%) cases, respectively. No Acinetobacter was isolated after contact with sticky mat. Total isolated colonies before and after contact with sticky mats were 2573 and 830, respectively. There were significant statistically differences between the colony counts of coagulase ngative staphylococci, Gram positive bacilli, and Staphylococci aureus before and after contact with sticky mats (P. < 0.001). Conclusion: Regarding to statistical analysis, the effect of mat in removing the microorganisms was 56%. It confirms the effectiveness of sticky mat controlling the infection and reducing the amount of hospital contamination. PMID:27928489

  9. Yeasts isolated from nosocomial urinary infections: antifungal susceptibility and biofilm production.

    PubMed

    de Freitas, Alessandra Ribeiro; Baeza, Lilian Cristiane; Faria, Maria Graciela Iecher; Dota, Kelen Fátima Dalben; Godoy Martínez, Patrício; Svidzinski, Terezinha Inez Estivalet

    2014-01-01

    Urinary Candida infections in the hospital environment are frequent and need to be better understood. To compare the results of antifungal susceptibility profiles of yeasts isolated from patients with urinary infections obtained by broth microdilution method (BM) and by disk diffusion (DD), and also evaluate the capacity of these yeasts to form biofilms. Only yeasts obtained from pure urine cultures with counts higher than 10(5) colony-forming units per milliliter, without bacteria development, of symptomatic patients were included. The isolates were identified by classical methods and the antifungal susceptibility tests were performed with the following drugs: amphotericin B, ketoconazole, fluconazole, itraconazole, voriconazole and caspofungin. The biofilm studies were carried out in polystyrene microtitration plates. Ninety-five yeasts isolates were analyzed, including 40 Candida albicans, 31 Candida glabrata, 24 Candida tropicalis. In general, the majority of the isolates were susceptible to the tested drugs but some resistance was observed, especially against fluconazole. Great variability in the antifungal susceptibility results was observed with the different tested drugs and a few discrepancies were observed between both methods. We suggest that in case of DD resistance this result should be confirmed by BM, the standard method. C. tropicalis isolates showed high biofilm production (91.7%) compared to C. albicans (82.5%) and C. glabrata (61.3%), with statistical significance (p=0.0129). Candiduria in critical patients requires major attention and a better control. The different susceptibility results obtained in this study showed the need to identify yeasts up to the species level, especially in patients with urinary tract infection. The development of techniques of antifungal susceptibility tests can help the clinicians in the empiric treatment of candiduria. Copyright © 2013 Revista Iberoamericana de Micología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights

  10. Fluoroquinolone resistance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates causing nosocomial infection is correlated with levofloxacin but not ciprofloxacin use.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yuarn-Jang; Liu, Hsin-Yi; Lin, Yi-Chun; Sun, Kuo-Lun; Chun, Chi-Li; Hsueh, Po-Ren

    2010-03-01

    This study investigated the correlation between fluoroquinolone (ciprofloxacin or levofloxacin) use and rates of fluoroquinolone resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates from patients with nosocomial infection at a medical centre in Taiwan. Antibiotic utilisation data were extracted on a monthly basis from the inpatient pharmacy computer system records from January 2003 to December 2008. Fluoroquinolone use was expressed as defined daily dose per 1000 patient-days and was correlated with rates of fluoroquinolone-resistant P. aeruginosa every 6 months. Regression analysis was performed to explore the relationship between ciprofloxacin and levofloxacin use (both parenteral and oral forms) and resistance of P. aeruginosa isolates. During the study period, the susceptibility of P. aeruginosa to fluoroquinolones decreased after increasing use of fluoroquinolones, and increased after decreasing use of levofloxacin. Parenteral levofloxacin use was significantly positively correlated with resistance of P. aeruginosa to ciprofloxacin (P=0.015) and fluoroquinolones (either ciprofloxacin or levofloxacin, P=0.014). Use of both parenteral and oral forms of levofloxacin was also significantly positively correlated with resistance of P. aeruginosa isolates to ciprofloxacin (P=0.029), levofloxacin (P=0.031) and fluoroquinolones (P=0.010). The total amount of ciprofloxacin (oral and parenteral) and parenteral ciprofloxacin use were negatively correlated with resistance of P. aeruginosa isolates to fluoroquinolones. However, the amounts of oral ciprofloxacin, parenteral levofloxacin, oral levofloxacin and total levofloxacin use were each positively correlated with resistance of P. aeruginosa to fluoroquinolones. Levofloxacin use was associated with increased resistance of P. aeruginosa to fluoroquinolones, whereas ciprofloxacin use did not have a significant impact on fluoroquinolone resistance rates. Copyright 2009 Elsevier B.V. and the International Society of Chemotherapy

  11. A Fatal Case of Multidrug Resistant Acinetobacter Necrotizing Fasciitis: The Changing Scary Face of Nosocomial Infection

    PubMed Central

    Niazi, Masooma

    2014-01-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis is an uncommon soft-tissue infection, associated with high morbidity and mortality. Early recognition and treatment are crucial for survival. Acinetobacter baumannii is rarely associated with necrotizing fasciitis. Wound infections due to A. baumannii have been described in association with severe trauma in soldiers. There are only sporadic reports of monomicrobial A. baumannii necrotizing fasciitis. We report a unique case of monomicrobial necrotizing fasciitis caused by multidrug resistant (MDR) A. baumannii, in absence of any preceding trauma, surgery, or any obvious breech in the continuity of skin or mucosa. A 48-year-old woman with history of HIV, asthma, hypertension, and tobacco and excocaine use presented with acute respiratory failure requiring mechanical ventilation. She was treated for pneumonia for 7 days and was successfully extubated. All septic work-up was negative. Two days later, she developed rapidly spreading nonblanching edema with bleb formation at the lateral aspect of right thigh. Emergent extensive debridement and fasciotomy were performed. Operative findings and histopathology were consistent with necrotizing fasciitis. Despite extensive debridement, she succumbed to septic shock in the next few hours. Blood, wound, and tissue cultures grew A. baumannii, sensitive only to amikacin and polymyxin. Histopathology was consistent with necrotizing fasciitis. PMID:25349748

  12. A fatal case of multidrug resistant acinetobacter necrotizing fasciitis: the changing scary face of nosocomial infection.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Nupur; Niazi, Masooma; Lvovsky, Dmitry

    2014-01-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis is an uncommon soft-tissue infection, associated with high morbidity and mortality. Early recognition and treatment are crucial for survival. Acinetobacter baumannii is rarely associated with necrotizing fasciitis. Wound infections due to A. baumannii have been described in association with severe trauma in soldiers. There are only sporadic reports of monomicrobial A. baumannii necrotizing fasciitis. We report a unique case of monomicrobial necrotizing fasciitis caused by multidrug resistant (MDR) A. baumannii, in absence of any preceding trauma, surgery, or any obvious breech in the continuity of skin or mucosa. A 48-year-old woman with history of HIV, asthma, hypertension, and tobacco and excocaine use presented with acute respiratory failure requiring mechanical ventilation. She was treated for pneumonia for 7 days and was successfully extubated. All septic work-up was negative. Two days later, she developed rapidly spreading nonblanching edema with bleb formation at the lateral aspect of right thigh. Emergent extensive debridement and fasciotomy were performed. Operative findings and histopathology were consistent with necrotizing fasciitis. Despite extensive debridement, she succumbed to septic shock in the next few hours. Blood, wound, and tissue cultures grew A. baumannii, sensitive only to amikacin and polymyxin. Histopathology was consistent with necrotizing fasciitis.

  13. Modeling Nosocomial Infections of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus with Environment Contamination().

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei; Ruan, Shigui

    2017-04-03

    In this work, we investigate the role of environmental contamination on the clinical epidemiology of antibiotic-resistant bacteria in hospitals. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a bacterium that causes infections in different parts of the body. It is tougher to treat than most strains of Staphylococcus aureus or staph, because it is resistant to some commonly used antibiotics. Both deterministic and stochastic models are constructed to describe the transmission characteristics of MRSA in hospital setting. The deterministic epidemic model includes five compartments: colonized and uncolonized patients, contaminated and uncontaminated health care workers (HCWs), and bacterial load in environment. The basic reproduction number R 0 is calculated, and its numerical and sensitivity analysis has been performed to study the asymptotic behavior of the model, and to help identify factors responsible for observed patterns of infections. A stochastic epidemic model with stochastic simulations is also presented to supply a comprehensive analysis of its behavior. Data collected from Beijing Tongren Hospital will be used in the numerical simulations of our model. The results can be used to provide theoretical guidance for designing efficient control measures, such as increasing the hand hygiene compliance of HCWs and disinfection rate of environment, and decreasing the transmission rate between environment and patients and HCWs.

  14. Novel use of antimicrobial hand sanitizer in treatment of nosocomial acinetobacter infection.

    PubMed

    Donahue, Meghan; Watson, Luke R; Torress-Cook, Alfonso; Watson, Paul A

    2009-01-01

    Colonization of wounds with multidrug-resistant organisms is a difficult orthopedic problem. Acinetobacter infections are especially difficult because they are resistant to all currently available antibiotics. We present the use of a novel skin sanitizer, Stay Byotrol Clean (Byotrol Inc, Spartanburg, South Carolina), to treat a multidrug-resistant wound infection. A 31-year-old T10 paraplegic man presented with chronic bilateral stage IV decubitus trochanteric ulcers. Cultures grew methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus. The ulcers were initially treated with irrigation and debridement and vancomycin, levaquin, and cefepime. After 4 months of aggressive treatment, the cultures continued to be positive for Escherichia coli and Acinetobacter baumannii. The patient was started on amikacin and tigecycline. Despite 1 additional month of aggressive wound care, debridements, and intravenous antibiotics, the cultures continued to grow A baumannii and Pseudomonas aerug. The A baumannii was resistant to all available antibiotics tested. The ulcers were then treated with daily application of Stay Byotrol Clean hand and skin sanitizer. Four days later, cultures were negative for any bacterial growth, with no A baumannii. After 1 week, the ulcers showed new granulation tissue with no visible necrotic tissue. After 3 months of treatment, the ulcers had healed. Stay Byotrol Clean is nonirritating and contains no iodine or alcohol. It is currently being used for decolonization of patients on admission to the hospital, however, there is great potential for its use in wound treatment, preoperative surgical sterilization, and orthopedic devices.

  15. Nosocomial klebsiella infection in a neonatal unit: identification of risk factors for gastrointestinal colonization.

    PubMed

    Mayhall, C G; Lamb, V A; Bitar, C M; Miller, K B; Furse, E Y; Kirkpatrick, B V; Markowitz, S M; Veazey, J M; Macrina, F L

    1980-01-01

    Sequential outbreaks of infection due to gentamicin-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae (GRKP) types 30 and 19 occurred in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) at the Medical College of Virginia in 1977 and 1978. The extensive epidemiologic investigation carried out included a case-control study, careful review of aseptic technique, and cultures from nursery staff and environment. The gastrointestinal (GI) tracts of the patients were the reservoirs for GRKP, and the epidemic strain was transmitted by hands of personnel. The case-control study showed a significant relationship between acquisition of GRKP by patients and oropharyngeal and GI instrumentation, including use of bag resuscitation, oropharyngeal suctioning, and use of nasogastric feeding tubes. The findings of the case-control study were supported by observation of the patient care techniques practiced by NICU staff. Institution of control measures based on results of the epidemiologic investigation of the first outbreak rapidly brought the second outbreak under control, even though cohorting or use of routine isolation was not possible. Whereas GI colonization and hand transmission have been described previously in outbreaks of K. pneumoniae infections in NICUs, this study is the first to document the mode of inoculation of patients' GI tracts by contaminated hands of personnel.

  16. Case vignettes to evaluate the accuracy of identifying healthcare-associated infections by surveillance persons.

    PubMed

    Schröder, C; Behnke, M; Gastmeier, P; Schwab, F; Geffers, C

    2015-08-01

    National surveillance systems depend on accurate and reproducible diagnosis of infections. To investigate the effect of accuracy of diagnosing healthcare-associated infections (HCAIs) on HCAI rates in a national healthcare-associated surveillance system. Data from the validation process from the intensive care unit (ICU) surveillance component of the German Krankenhaus Infektions Surveillance System (KISS; Hospital Infection Surveillance System) were used to calculate the accuracy of diagnosing HCAI for each individual surveillance person (SP) responsible for surveillance of HCAI in the ICU of his or her hospital. Multivariate analyses were performed to identify factors that were attributed to surveillance accuracy. A total of 189 SPs responsible for surveillance in 218 ICUs assessed 30 case vignettes. The chance of belonging to the group of SPs with high accuracy was increased by being a physician (odds ratio: 3.14; P = 0.02) and by being an external SP (odds ratio: 4.69; P ≤ 0.01). ICU HCAI rates depend on the sensitivity of the ICU's SP [incidence rate ratio (IRR): 1.28 (1.07, 1.53); P ≤ 0.01]. High sensitivity increases healthcare-associated urinary tract infection rates [IRR: 1.33 (1.02, 1.75); P = 0.03] and bloodstream infection rates [IRR: 1.33 (1.06, 1.68); P = 0.01]. High specificity was not a significant factor. In light of the link between sensitivity of diagnosing HCAI by case vignettes and the ICU HCAI rates, this validation method can be recommended for validation of other surveillance systems. Copyright © 2015 The Healthcare Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Molecular Identification of Aspergillus Species: Transplant Associated Infection Surveillance Network (TRANSNET)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A large aggregate collection of clinical isolates of aspergilli (n=218) from transplant patients with proven or probable Invasive Aspergillosis (IA) was available from the Transplant Associated Infection Surveillance Network (TRANSNET), a six-year prospective surveillance study. With the objective ...

  18. DNA analysis of nosocomial infection by Enterobacter aerogenes in three cases of septicaemia in Japan.

    PubMed

    Goshi, S; Taneike, I; Nakagawa, S; Kojio, S; Tamura, Y; Ohara, T; Ozaki, K; Tsukada, H; Aoki, Y; Asakura, H; Gejyo, F; Itoh, M; Yamamoto, T

    2002-07-01

    Ceftazidime-resistant Enterobacter aerogenes was isolated from blood cultures of three patients with fever. DNA analysis using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and ribosomal RNA gene restriction digest pattern analysis revealed that the strains were clonally similar to each other with a 79.3-96.0% homology. The same strain of E. aerogenes was isolated from a three-way stopcock connected to the indwelling catheter in one of the patients at a concentration of 45 cfu/mL. A similar strain was also isolated from the urine of one other patient on the same floor. The data suggest that E. aerogenes caused septicaemia via low bacterial contamination of a three-way stopcock in a peripheral drip intravenous infusion system in at least one patient, and that the outbreak of E. aerogenes infections was due to clonally-related strains.

  19. [Role of the hospital environment and equipment in the transmission of nosocomial infections].

    PubMed

    López-Cerero, Lorena

    2014-01-01

    The hospital environment is both a reservoir and source of infection for the hospital patient. Several areas around the patient should be considered: air, toilet water coming into contact with the patient, staff and medical devices, food, surfaces, and instruments contacting the patient's skin and mucosa, and sterile solutions. There are pathogens classically associated with each mode of transmission and environmental reservoir, but multi-resistant microorganisms have also been recently been associated with environmental acquisition. Protocols are currently available for the prevention of some classic environmental pathogens, as well as recommendations for the prevention of contamination in some procedures. However, these situations do not cover all forms of transmission, and most investigations of reservoirs or environmental sources are restricted to outbreak situations. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  20. Central line infections - hospitals

    MedlinePlus

    ... infection; CVC - infection; Central venous device - infection; Infection control - central line infection; Nosocomial infection - central line infection; Hospital acquired infection - central line infection; Patient safety - central ...

  1. Are healthcare workers' mobile phones a potential source of nosocomial infections? Review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Ulger, Fatma; Dilek, Ahmet; Esen, Saban; Sunbul, Mustafa; Leblebicioglu, Hakan

    2015-10-29

    Mobile communication devices help accelerate in-hospital flow of medical information, information sharing and querying, and contribute to communications in the event of emergencies through their application and access to wireless media technology. Healthcare-associated infections remain a leading and high-cost problem of global health systems despite improvements in modern therapies. The objective of this article was to review different studies on the relationship between mobile phones (MPs) and bacterial cross-contamination and report common findings. Thirty-nine studies published between 2005 and 2013 were reviewed. Of these, 19 (48.7%) identified coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS), and 26 (66.7%) identified Staphylococcus aureus; frequency of growth varied. The use of MPs by healthcare workers increases the risk of repetitive cyclic contamination between the hands and face (e.g., nose, ears, and lips), and differences in personal hygiene and behaviors can further contribute to the risks. MPs are rarely cleaned after handling. They may transmit microorganisms, including multiple resistant strains, after contact with patients, and can be a source of bacterial cross-contamination. To prevent bacterial contamination of MPs, hand-washing guidelines must be followed and technical standards for prevention strategies should be developed.

  2. The ORION statement: guidelines for transparent reporting of outbreak reports and intervention studies of nosocomial infection.

    PubMed

    Stone, S P; Cooper, B S; Kibbler, C C; Cookson, B D; Roberts, J A; Medley, G F; Duckworth, G; Lai, R; Ebrahim, S; Brown, E M; Wiffen, P J; Davey, P G

    2007-05-01

    The quality of research in hospital epidemiology (infection control) must be improved to be robust enough to influence policy and practice. In order to raise the standards of research and publication, a CONSORT equivalent for these largely quasi-experimental studies has been prepared by the authors of two relevant systematic reviews, following consultation with learned societies, editors of journals and researchers. It consists of a 22 item checklist, and a summary table. The emphasis is on transparency to improve the quality of reporting and on the use of appropriate statistical techniques. The statement has been endorsed by a number of professional special interest groups and societies. Like CONSORT, ORION should be considered a 'work in progress', which requires ongoing dialogue for successful promotion and dissemination. The statement is therefore offered for further public discussion. Journals and research councils are strongly recommended to incorporate it into their submission and reviewing processes. Feedback to the authors is encouraged and the statement will be revised in 2 years.

  3. Nosocomial infections by Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemase producing enterobacteria in a teaching hospital

    PubMed Central

    Seibert, Gabriela; Hörner, Rosmari; Meneghetti, Bettina Holzschuh; Righi, Roselene Alves; Forno, Nara Lucia Frasson Dal; Salla, Adenilde

    2014-01-01

    Objective To analyze the profile of patients with microorganisms resistant to carbapenems, and the prevalence of the enzyme Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemase in interobacteriaceae. Methods Retrospective descriptive study. From the isolation in bacteriological tests ordered by clinicians, we described the clinical and epidemiological characteristics of patients with enterobacteria resistants to carbapenems at a university hospital, between March and October 2013. Results We included 47 isolated patients in this study, all exhibiting resistance to carbapenems, including 9 patients who were confirmed as infected/colonized with K. pneumoniae carbapenemase. Isolation in tracheal aspirates (12; 25.5%) predominated. The resistance to ertapenem, meropenem, and imipenem was 91.5%, 83.0% and 80.0%, respectively. Aminoglycosides was the class of antimicrobials that showed the highest sensitivity, 91.5% being sensitive to amikacin and 57.4% to gentamicin. Conclusion The K. pneumoniae carbapenemase was an important agent in graun isotaling in hospital intection. The limited therapeutic options emphasize the need for rapid laboratory detection, as well as the implementation of measures to prevent and control the spread of these pathogens. PMID:25295446

  4. Associations of hospital characteristics with nosocomial pneumonia after cardiac surgery can impact on standardized infection rates.

    PubMed

    Sanagou, M; Leder, K; Cheng, A C; Pilcher, D; Reid, C M; Wolfe, R

    2016-04-01

    To identify hospital-level factors associated with post-cardiac surgical pneumonia for assessing their impact on standardized infection rates (SIRs), we studied 43 691 patients in a cardiac surgery registry (2001-2011) in 16 hospitals. In a logistic regression model for pneumonia following cardiac surgery, associations with hospital characteristics were quantified with adjustment for patient characteristics while allowing for clustering of patients by hospital. Pneumonia rates varied from 0·7% to 12·4% across hospitals. Seventy percent of variability in the pneumonia rate was attributable to differences in hospitals in their long-term rates with the remainder attributable to within-hospital differences in rates over time. After adjusting for patient characteristics, the pneumonia rate was found to be higher in hospitals with more registered nurses (RNs)/100 intensive-care unit (ICU) admissions [adjusted odds ratio (aOR) 1·2, P = 0·006] and more RNs/available ICU beds (aOR 1·4, P < 0·001). Other hospital characteristics had no significant association with pneumonia. SIRs calculated on the basis of patient characteristics alone differed substantially from the same rates calculated on the basis of patient characteristics and the hospital characteristic of RNs/100 ICU admissions. Since SIRs using patient case-mix information are important for comparing rates between hospitals, the additional allowance for hospital characteristics can impact significantly on how hospitals compare.

  5. Surveillance for hospitalized acute respiratory infection in Guatemala.

    PubMed

    Verani, Jennifer R; McCracken, John; Arvelo, Wences; Estevez, Alejandra; Lopez, Maria Renee; Reyes, Lissette; Moir, Juan Carlos; Bernart, Chris; Moscoso, Fabiola; Gray, Jennifer; Olsen, Sonja J; Lindblade, Kim A

    2013-01-01

    Acute respiratory infections (ARI) are an important cause of illness and death worldwide, yet data on the etiology of ARI and the population-level burden in developing countries are limited. Surveillance for ARI was conducted at two hospitals in Guatemala. Patients admitted with at least one sign of acute infection and one sign or symptom of respiratory illness met the criteria for a case of hospitalized ARI. Nasopharyngeal/oropharyngeal swabs were collected and tested by polymerase chain reaction for adenovirus, parainfluenza virus types 1,2 and 3, respiratory syncytial virus, influenza A and B viruses, human metapneumovirus, Chlamydia pneumioniae, and Mycoplasma pneumoniae. Urine specimens were tested for Streptococcus pneumoniae antigen. Blood culture and chest radiograph were done at the discretion of the treating physician. Between November 2007 and December 2011, 3,964 case-patients were enrolled. While cases occurred among all age groups, 2,396 (60.4%) cases occurred in children <5 years old and 463 (11.7%) among adults ≥65 years old. Viruses were found in 52.6% of all case-patients and 71.8% of those aged <1 year old; the most frequently detected was respiratory syncytial virus, affecting 26.4% of case-patients. Urine antigen testing for Streptococcus pneumoniae performed for case-patients ≥15 years old was positive in 15.1% of those tested. Among 2,364 (59.6%) of case-patients with a radiograph, 907 (40.0%) had findings suggestive of bacterial pneumonia. Overall, 230 (5.9%) case-patients died during the hospitalization. Using population denominators, the observed hospitalized ARI incidence was 128 cases per 100,000, with the highest rates seen among children <1 year old (1,703 per 100,000), followed by adults ≥65 years old (292 per 100,000). These data, which demonstrate a substantial burden of hospitalized ARI in Guatemala due to a variety of pathogens, can help guide public health policies aimed at reducing the burden of illness and death due to

  6. Resistance markers and genetic diversity in Acinetobacter baumannii strains recovered from nosocomial bloodstream infections.

    PubMed

    Martins, Hanoch S I; Bomfim, Maria Rosa Q; França, Rafaela O; Farias, Luiz M; Carvalho, Maria Auxiliadora R; Serufo, José Carlos; Santos, Simone G

    2014-01-28

    In this study, phenotypic and genotypic methods were used to detect metallo-β-lactamases, cephalosporinases and oxacillinases and to assess genetic diversity among 64 multiresistant Acinetobacter baumannii strains recovered from blood cultures in five different hospitals in Brazil from December 2008 to June 2009. High rates of resistance to imipenem (93.75%) and polymyxin B (39.06%) were observed using the disk diffusion (DD) method and by determining the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC). Using the disk approximation method, thirty-nine strains (60.9%) were phenotypically positive for class D enzymes, and 51 strains (79.6%) were positive for cephalosporinase (AmpC). Using the E-test, 60 strains (93.75%) were positive for metallo-β-lactamases (MβLs). All strains were positive for at least one of the 10 studied genes; 59 (92.1%) contained blaVIM-1, 79.6% contained blaAmpC, 93.7% contained blaOXA23 and 84.3% contained blaOXA51. Enterobacteria Repetitive Intergenic Consensus (ERIC)-PCR analysis revealed a predominance of certain clones that differed from each other. However, the same band pattern was observed in samples from the different hospitals studied, demonstrating correlation between the genotypic and phenotypic results. Thus, ERIC-PCR is an appropriate method for rapidly clustering genetically related isolates. These results suggest that defined clonal clusters are circulating within the studied hospitals. These results also show that the prevalence of MDR A. baumannii may vary among clones disseminated in specific hospitals, and they emphasize the importance of adhering to appropriate infection control measures.

  7. Prediction of equine risk of West Nile virus infection based on dead bird surveillance.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Rhonda Sue; Foppa, Ivo M

    2006-01-01

    Since the introduction of West Nile Virus (WNV) to the United States in 1999, the efficacy of dead bird surveillance for the prediction of human and veterinary WNV infection has been an issue of debate. We utilized South Carolina's Department of Health and Environmental Control surveillance data from 2003 to determine whether dead bird surveillance accurately predicts equine WNV infection on a county level. We adjusted for human population density as a potential confounder of an association between WNV-positive dead bird counts and mammalian WNV risk. We found a strong positive association between avian risk of WNV death and subsequent equine mortality due to WNV in South Carolina even after adjusting for human population density. Sensitivity of dead bird surveillance as a predictor of future equine WNV risk was far superior to mosquito surveillance (95% vs. 9.5%, respectively). A Poisson regression model of the equine WNV rate as a function of WNV-positive dead bird rate, adjusting for population density and taking into account effect modification by population density shows a good fit with the data. Unlike most previous studies, we control for potential confounding of the dead, WNVpositive bird-equine WNV infection association by human population density. Yet, the positive association between dead bird surveillance and equine WNV risk remains strong and statistically significant, indicating that dead bird surveillance remains a valuable tool of WNV surveillance.