Science.gov

Sample records for novaya zemlya archipelago

  1. Benthic fauna of Blagopoluchiya Bay (Novaya Zemlya Archipelago, Kara Sea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Udalov, A. A.; Vedenin, A. A.; Simakov, M. I.

    2016-09-01

    The benthic fauna was studied in the Blagopoluchiya Bay (Kara Sea, Novaya Zemlya Archipelago) during an expedition of the R/V Professor Shtokman in autumn 2013. The inner basin of the bay, with depths of around 150 m, is separated from the outer slope of Novaya Zemlya by a shoal 30 m in depth. Six macrobenthic communities were described at nine stations (25 bottom grab samples) taken along a transect from the inner part of the bay to the outer part of the slope. The depths, position on the transect axis and sediment types were the major factors influencing the distribution of the communities. The benthic abundance and biomass in the inner and outer parts of the bay did not differ significantly. The diversity of macrobenthic organisms (α-diversity as the number of species in the sample and β-diversity as the rate of increase in species number in the area) was lower in the inner part of the bay. The intertidal zone (littoral) has been described. The littoral fauna was very poor; it comprised only the amphipods Gammarus setosus inhabiting the near-surface area.

  2. Radioecological investigations on the Northern Novaya Zemlya Archipelago

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miroshnikov, A. Yu.; Laverov, N. P.; Chernov, R. A.; Kudikov, A. V.; Ysacheva, A. A.; Semenkov, I. N.; Aliev, R. A.; Asadulin, E. E.; Gavrilo, M. V.

    2017-01-01

    Multidisciplinary investigations carried out in the Cape Zhelaniya area and on the Severny ice dome of Severny Island in the Novaya Zemlya Archipelago during cruise 63 of the R/V Akademik Mstislav Keldysh in September 2015 included a study of the environmental radiation level. The landscape‒geochemical and radiation‒glaciological data show that the Severny ice dome serves as a secondary source of radionuclides on the surface of the ice sheet; this source originated from past nuclear weapons testing in the atmosphere over the Severnaya Zemlya test site. Some samples taken from the periglacial zone near the edge of the Severny ice dome yielded specific activity levels of radioactive cesium of 450-650 Bq/kg. The study of ice cores obtained by shallow (up to 5.4 m) drilling of three boreholes revealed no significant activity values. At the same time, glaciological investigations made it possible to obtain the first data on the previously unexamined glacier, which indicate that the radioactively contaminated layer is located at a depth of 15‒20 m at the boundary of the glacier alimentation zone. No similar investigations had been conducted earlier either by Russian or international scientific teams.

  3. Paleomagnetism of the Upper Carboniferous and Upper Permian sedimentary rocks from Novaya Zemlya Archipelago

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abashev, Victor V.; Mikhaltsov, Nikolay E.; Vernikovsky, Valery A.; Metelkin, Dmitry V.; Matushkin, Nikolay Yu.; Doubrovine, Pavel V.

    2016-04-01

    Here we present the first paleomagnetic directions and paleomagnetic poles for Upper Permian and Upper Carboniferous sedimentary rocks (sandstones and limestones) of the Novaya Zemlya Archipelago in the Russian High Arctic region. The paleomagnetic directions were obtained through detailed thermal and alternating field demagnetization experiments, using the principal component analysis of demagnetization data. A positive fold test and a positive reversal test indicate that the isolated paleomagnetic directions correspond to the primary magnetization components. Magnetic remanence carriers were characterized through rock-magnetic analyses, including measurements of temperature dependence of low-field magnetic susceptibility, magnetic hysteresis curves, and first-order reversal curves (FORC). We will describe the rock-magnetic properties of different lithological units and discuss their implications for the stability of natural remanent magnetization (NRM) and the veracity of paleomagnetic record. The tectonics implications of the new paleomagnetic data for the evolution of the Barents-Kara continental margin and the Novaya Zemlya Archipelago will be also discussed. The paleomagnetic poles differ slightly from the corresponding section of the APWP for Baltica, which is probably due to inclination shallowing effect or the tectonic features of the region. The study was supported by Russian Science Foundation grant 14-37-00030, the SIU project HNPla-2013/10049 (HEAT) and by Ministry of Education and Science of the Russian Federation grant 5.515.2014/K.

  4. Geocryological Structure and Glaciers Novaya Zemlya archipelago in the context of global climate processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kholmiansky, Mikhail; Anokhin, Vladimir

    2015-04-01

    reaches 480 m. Observations of the authors of the glaciers of Novaya Zemlya (Hammer and Sickle, Rose et al.), Carried out in the monitor mode, the last 15 years show an intensive retreat from the shoreline inland archipelago and sharply higher flow of silt-pelitic material kut bays. Lithological changes the picture of the bottom of the bays, which causes certain biogenic transformation of ecosystems.

  5. Novaya Zemlya effect and sunsets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Werf, Siebren Y.; Können, Günther P.; Lehn, Waldemar H.

    2003-01-01

    Systematics of the Novaya Zemlya (NZ) effect are discussed in the context of sunsets. We distinguish full mirages, exhibiting oscillatory light paths and their onsets, the subcritical mirages. Ray-tracing examples and sequences of solar images are shown. We discuss two historical observations by Fridtjof Nansen and by Vivian Fuchs, and we report a recent South Pole observation of the NZ effect for the Moon.

  6. Fluorescence of dissolved organic matter as a marker for distribution of desalinated waters in the Kara Sea and bays of Novaya Zemlya archipelago

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drozdova, A. N.; Patsaeva, S. V.; Khundzhua, D. A.

    2017-01-01

    The optical properties and distribution of dissolved organic matter in the surface waters of the Kara Sea and bays of Novaya Zemlya archipelago were studied during the 63th cruise of the R/V Akademik Mstislav Keldysh. The fluorescence of dissolved organic matter has been studied over wide excitation (230-550 nm) and emission (240-650 nm) wavelength ranges. Based on the results of fluorescence measurements, we propose a simple technique for estimating the relative content of humic compounds entering the Kara Sea shelf region with Ob and Yenisei river runoff. We have found that the blue shift parameters of the DOM fluorescence are Δ270-310 = 28 ± 2 nm and Δ355-310 = 29 ± 2 nm. The highest contents of humic compounds in surface waters were measured on the transect across the desalinated layer of the Kara Sea, near the continental slope on the transect along the St. Anna Trough, and in the area of Sedova, Oga and Tsivol'ki bays. Traces of labile terrigenous organic matter were found in the region of the Voronin Trough, in the bays of the Severny Island of Novaya Zemlya, as well as in some freshwater reservoirs and ice samples of the archipelago. We established a conservative distribution of dissolved organic matter, whose content in water varied from 1.25 to 8.55 mg/L.

  7. Macrobenthos of the Novaya Zemlya Trough

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galkin, S. V.; Savilova, T. A.; Moskalev, L. I.; Kucheruk, N. V.

    2010-12-01

    During the 54th cruise of the R/V Akademik Mstislav Keldysh the macrobenthos of the Novaya Zemlya Trough was studied using a Sigsby trawl along the submeridional transect near 75°30'N latitude at a depth range from 68 to 362 m. In total, 140 species of bottom animals were found. The relative role of the taxons was assessed using three indices: the number, biomass, and energy flow. Similarity indices were used for the comparison of the samples. The new material greatly contributes to the data on the composition of the fauna and the structure of the communities of the studied region. It was revealed that small scyphozoid polyps and sipunculoids play an important role in the trough's community. The presence of the community dominated by Ophiocten sericeum (with the important role of small bivalves) was revealed for the first time not only at the eastern by also at the western slope of the Novaya Zemlya Trough. The sharpest changes in the composition and structure of the bottom community were confined to the zone of the transition from the trough floor to the slope. These changes are determined by the specificity of the macrorelief (of the floor and slope), the composition of the ground (soft brown silts abound in rhizopods and dense gray silts with an admixture of pebbles), and possibly by the hydrodynamic processes near the bottom.

  8. Phytoplankton bloom along the coast of Novaya Zemlya, Russia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    North of the western Russian mainland lies the island archipelago of Novaya Zemlya. The northern island is glacier covered and is the site of ongoing research into the effects of the North Atlantic Oscillation and climate change on the glaciers. The archipelago is situated in the Arctic Ocean, between the Barents Sea to the west and the Kara Sea to the east. In this true-color MODIS image, the blue-green swirls in the waters of the Barents Sea on the western coast could indicate a bloom of phytoplankton, or they could be highly reflective glacial silt resulting from run off. The Barents Sea is named for Dutch explorer Willem Barents, who is 1596 attempted to sail to Asia via the North Pole. Barents and his crew were caught in sea ice at north of the northern cape of Novaya Zemlya in August and were forced to winter on the island, building a house out of the wood from their ship. Not just a historic and climatological research site, the islands are also home to a Russian nuclear test facility.

  9. Novaya Zemlya effect: analysis of an observation.

    PubMed

    Lehn, W H; German, B A

    1981-06-15

    The Novaya Zemlya effect, historically identified with the premature rebirth of the sun during the polar night, is a long range optical ducting phenomenon in the lower atmosphere. An occurrence of the effect was observed at Tuktoyaktuk, Canada (69 degrees 26'N, 133 degrees 02'W) on 16 May 1979, when the minimum solar altitude was - 1 degrees 34'. The sun's image remained above the horizon, within a gray horizontal band, and assumed the various expected shapes, ranging from a bright rectangle filling the band, to three flat suns stacked one over the other, to several thin vertically separated strips. A model for the corresponding atmospheric conditions was identified by matching the observations with images calculated from a computer simulation study.

  10. Novaya Zemlya bora and polar cyclones in spaceborne SAR and optical imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, A. Yu.

    2016-12-01

    Mesoscale meteorological phenomena, such as Novaya Zemlya bora and polar cyclones, have been studied based on the respective signatures in synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images of the sea surface using remote sensing methods. The local bora covers both coastal and open-sea zones of the Barents Sea to the west of Novaya Zemlya and can lead to catastrophic consequences in coastal waters of the archipelago. Another interesting and hardly predictable phenomenon is polar cyclones. The development of especially intensive and catastrophic polar cyclones can be traced using multisensor and multispectral imagery. It has been shown that the application of spaceborne SARs and optical sensors enables real time detection, forecast, and monitoring of Novaya Zemlya bora and polar cyclones in the Barents Sea, giving ground for their detail research.

  11. A dendrochronological analysis of driftwood in the Northern Dvina delta and on northern Novaya Zemlya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johansen, Stein

    2001-09-01

    Analysis of the wood anatomy of modern driftwood logs deposited by the Northern Dvina River, Russia, reveals nearly identical amounts of Picea and Pinus in contrast to the driftwood deposits in the European Arctic, which are dominated by Pinus. Two Picea and two Pinus driftwood chronologies that were constructed could be cross-dated with several chronologies available from the drainage area of the Northern Dvina as well as with driftwood chronologies from Jan Mayen in the Greenland Sea or the Barents Sea coast of north Norway. The degree of cross dating indicates that two major source areas are represented among the driftwood logs examined, i.e., the lower part of the Pinega drainage basin and the eastern central part of the province of Archangel. The origin suggested corresponds with the development of the important logging areas. Driftwood pine and spruce logs from northern Novaya Zemlya cross-dated with chronologies from northwest Russia and the Lower Angara region reveal a transport of ice-rafted wood between the Barents Sea and the northern Kara Sea. Two dispersal routes of driftwood from northwest Russia to locations in the Barents Sea and the Norwegian and Greenland Sea are proposed, via a counter-clockwise circulation in the Barents Sea and via export of drift ice to the Arctic Ocean north of Novaya Zemlya.

  12. The 16 August 1997 Novaya Zemlya seismic event as viewed from GSN stations KEV and KBS

    SciTech Connect

    Hartse, H.E.

    1997-11-01

    Using current and historic seismic records from Global Seismic Network stations KEV and KBS, the authors find that S minus P arrival time comparisons between nuclear explosions and the 16 August 1997 seismic event (m{sub b} {approx} 3.6) from near Novaya Zemlya clearly indicate that (relative to KEV) the 16 August event occurred at least 80 km east of the Russian test site. Including S minus P arrival times from KBS constrains the location to beneath the Kara Sea and in good agreement with previously reported locations, over 100 km southeast of the test site. From an analysis of P{sub n}/S{sub n} waveform ratios at frequencies above 4 Hz, they find that the 16 August event falls within the population of regional earthquakes and is distinctly separated from Novaya Zemlya and other northern Eurasian nuclear explosion populations. Thus, given its location and waveform characteristics, they conclude the 16 August event was an earthquake. The 16 August event was not detected at teleseismic distances, and thus, this event provides a good example of the regional detection, location, and identification efforts that will be required to monitor the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty below m{sub b} {approx} 4.

  13. The Novaya Zemlya Bora over the Eastern Barents Sea Studied from Space Using Sentinel-1 SAR Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, Andrei; Terleeva, Nadezda

    2016-08-01

    By methods of remote sensing, the mesoscale meteorological phenomenon, known as Novaya Zemlya bora, downslope windstorms, which leaves pronounced footprints on the synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images of the sea surface, is investigated. In the winter seasons the Kara Sea is typically ice covered, while the Barents Sea has very low ice concentrations. Weather data indicate that during December - February the windiest conditions occur with monthly mean wind speeds of 10- 15 m/s mainly having southeasterly direction. Although a number of authors have referred to these high speed winds as a bora, there has been no systematic study of this phenomenon. Regular images from Sentinel-1A allow taking a look on this phenomenon from space and restoring extent, strength and duration of the Novaya Zemlya bora.

  14. Sedimentation and mixing rates of radionuclides in Barents Sea sediments off Novaya Zemlya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, J. N.; Ellis, K. M.; Naes, K.; Dahle, S.; Matishov, D.

    Radionuclide measurements have been conducted on sediment cores collected in 1992 in the south-eastern region of the Barents Sea, known as the Pechora Sea. Cesium-137 and 239,24OPu activities in surface sediments are generally less than 30 Bq/kg, with the highest levels being measured in sediments off the southwestern coastline of the island of Novaya Zemlya. High correlations between both 137Cs and 239,24OPu and the concentration of fine (< 63 μm) particles in surface sediments indicate that much of the variance in radionuclide concentrations throughout the Pechora Sea can be explained by particle size fractionation. However, elevated activities of 137Cs (138 Bq/kg), 60Co (92 Bq/kg), 241Am (433 Bq/kg), and especially 239,24OPu (8.47 × 103 Bq/kg) were measured in one surface sediment sample from the fjord of Chernaya Bay on the southern coast of Novaya Zemlya. The source of radioactive contamination is two underwater nuclear tests conducted in Chernaya Bay in 1955 and 1957. The 238Pu /239,240Vu activity ratio of 0.0245 in Chernaya Bay is equivalent to values measured in global fallout. The 240Pu /239Pu atom ratio (0.0304), measured by mass spectrometry, is much lower than values (0.18) typical of global fallout, but is consistent with ratios measured for fallout from the early (1951-1955) series of weapons tests at the Nevada Test Site. The timing of the Chernaya Bay source term, estimated from the 241Am /241Pu ratio, is consistent with the timing of the 1955 and 1957 underwater nuclear tests. Relatively low initial yields of 241Pu ( 241Pu /239Pu atom ratio = 0.00 123) in these tests have resulted in relatively low 241Am /239,240Pu activity ratios (0.05) in recent sediments in Chernaya Bay. Radionuclide tracer profiles in cores from the Pechora Sea can be simulated using a two-layer biodiffusion model with rapid, near-homogeneous mixing in the surface mixed layer and reduced mixing in the deep layer. Lead-210 profiles are consistent with a wide range of

  15. Multi-decadal retreat of Novaya Zemlya outlet glaciers, in response to climatic forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carr, Rachel; Bell, Heather

    2016-04-01

    Arctic ice masses have rapidly lost ice from the mid-1990s, through a combination of negative surface mass balance and accelerated ice discharge from marine-terminating outlet glaciers. In the past decade, substantial mass deficits have been identified on Novaya Zemlya (NVZ), Russian High Arctic, and its outlet glaciers have retreated dramatically, likely due to declining sea ice concentrations. However, little is known about longer-term glacier behaviour on NVZ, and its potential impact on overall mass balance. Here we greatly extend the available record of retreat and assess multi-decadal glacier response to forcing between 1976 and 2014 using remotely sensed data. Following at least 25 years of gradual recession, retreat rates accelerated substantially from circa. 2000 and again from 2011 onwards. The rate and temporal pattern of retreat were strongly dependant on terminus type: marine-terminating outlets receded an order of magnitude faster than land- or lagoon-terminating glaciers and land-based termini showed limited change in retreat rate over time. Furthermore, retreat was markedly higher on the Barents Sea coast than the Kara Sea. Comparison with forcing data shows that accelerated retreat from 2011 onwards coincided with exceptionally low sea ice concentration and duration between 2011 and 2013. This suggests that sea ice is an important controlling factor, which agrees with shorter-term studies on NVZ. Although air temperature information is more limited on NVZ, data from both meteorological stations and reanalysis highlight 2011 and 2012 as two of the warmest years during the period 1950 to 2014. The limited response of land-terminating outlets suggests that air temperatures do not cause retreat directly, via melting or enhanced basal lubrication, but may have an indirect influence through melting of sea ice or hydro fracture.

  16. Yields of Soviet underground nuclear explosions at Novaya Zemlya, 1964-1976, from seismic body and surface waves

    PubMed Central

    Sykes, Lynn R.; Wiggins, Graham C.

    1986-01-01

    Surface and body wave magnitudes are determined for 15 U.S.S.R. underground nuclear weapons tests conducted at Novaya Zemlya between 1964 and 1976 and are used to estimate yields. These events include the largest underground explosions detonated by the Soviet Union. A histogram of body wave magnitude (mb) values indicates a clustering of explosions at a few specific yields. The most pronounced cluster consists of six explosions of yield near 500 kilotons. Several of these seem to be tests of warheads for major strategic systems that became operational in the late 1970s. The largest Soviet underground explosion is estimated to have a yield of 3500 ± 600 kilotons, somewhat smaller than the yield of the largest U.S. underground test. A preliminary estimation of the significance of tectonic release is made by measuring the amplitude of Love waves. The bias in mb for Novaya Zemlya relative to the Nevada test site is about 0.35, nearly identical to that of the eastern Kazakhstan test site relative to Nevada. PMID:16593645

  17. Elemental composition of zooplankton in the Kara Sea and the bays on the eastern side of Novaya Zemlya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobus, N. V.

    2016-11-01

    The chemical composition of zooplankton in the Kara Sea Basin has been studied. Independent samplings of the open sea and the Blagopoluchie and Tsivol'ki bays of Novaya Zemlya testify to the similarity of the distribution pattern of all the studied elements. The chemical composition of samples is predominated by organic carbon (49.5 ± 4.8% of dry weight). The other most important constituent elements are Na, P, S, K, Mg, and Ca. Their average total concentrations are 4.82 ± 0.1%. From an analysis of the composition of major and trace elements of zooplankton in the Kara Sea and the bays of Novaya Zemlya, three groups of elements have been specified: with similar (Corg, K, S, P, Al, Ti, Sc, Cd, Se, Cs, and Rb), lower (Na, Ca, Mg, Fe, Mn, Zn, Sr, Ba, B, Cu, Pb, Cr, Ni, V, Co, Sb, Mo, Ag, Be, Ga, and Hg), and higher (Li, As, and U) contents compared to their mean concentrations in ocean zooplankton.

  18. Surface Elevation Changes and Velocities from Remote-Sensing Data at Vil'kitskogo, Inostranzeva and Bunge Glaciers on the Novaya Zemlya Icefield in the Russian High Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melkonian, A. K.; Willis, M. J.; Pritchard, M. E.; Stewart, A.

    2013-12-01

    The Northern Ice Cap of Novaya Zemlya is the largest (22,000 km2) and most rapidly changing ice cap in the Russian High Arctic, accounting for 80% of the region's estimated 0.025 mm/yr contribution to sea level rise between 2003-2009 (Moholdt et al., 2012). We use several remote sensing instruments to extend this time series forward and instead of computing a regional average, we seek a detailed glacier-by-glacier inventory of elevation and velocity changes. Here, we focus on three glaciers along the Barents Sea coast of the ice cap: Vil'kitskogo, Inostranzeva and Bunge, all of which experienced area reduction at an average rate of roughly 1 sq. km/yr from 1990 to 2000 (Kouraev, Legrésy and Remy, 2006). Our estimates of the current surface elevation change rates (dh/dt) and velocities at these glaciers will allow us to determine the connections between thinning, dynamics and the documented climatic changes -- 2004-2009 mean summer temperatures in Novaya Zemlya were anomalously high, +0.50×0.28C greater than mean summer temperatures from 1980-2009 (Moholdt et al., 2012), while Meng (2013) found that melt duration increased by 1.3 days/yr from 1996 to 2011. Based on warming and increased melt in the region, we expect to find a seasonally-related increase in velocity. Comparing acceleration (or the lack thereof) with thinning rates and combining both with existing bathymetry to calculate flux will enable us to estimate the contribution of dynamics to mass change at these glaciers relative to melt. We estimate dh/dt by applying a weighted linear regression to time series of ASTER DEMs acquired between 2003/07/29 to 2013/07/27 and Russian cartographic DEMs issued in 1970/71. Glacier velocities are calculated using automated normalized cross correlation, or 'pixel-tracking', applied to ASTER image pairs from 2003 to 2013. We supplement our ASTER time series with velocities and DEMs from very high-resolution (0.5-2 m/pixel) imagery acquired by QuickBird, WorldView and

  19. Ice flow velocity, elevation change and discharge variation in Novaya Zemlya using SAR and Landsat offset-tracking and radar altimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Z.; Lee, H.; Ahn, Y.; Tseng, K. H.; Erkin, A.

    2015-12-01

    Discharge is one of the most important parameters for describing the dynamic status of glaciers. In recent years, observations from satellite sensors and in-situ stations have been combined to provide this critical data. However, over the regions with little or no in-situ data, such as Novaya Zemlya, satellite remote sensing technique becomes the only option. Without the in-situ ice thickness data, the absolute glacier discharge could not be obtained. An alternative way would be to combine the ice velocity and elevation change to estimate the discharge change. In order to obtain the ice flow velocity, Landsat 7 ETM+ and SAR offset-tracking of eight L-band ALOS PALSAR data are performed for these fast-moving glaciers spanning from 2007 to 2010. Envisat RA-2 radar altimetry data are used to estimate glacier elevation changes from 2002 to 2010 using collinear method (Lee et al., RSE, 2013) over eight different locations. All of the altimetry time series reveal decreasing elevation changes until year 2007, and then increasing elevation changes. This change in trends also agrees with the mass change time series obtained from GRACE. Snow depth and temperature anomalies from ERA-interim are also examined to explain change in mass variation rates. However, since all of the Envisat altimetry stations are located upstream of the glaciers, we attempt to extrapolate Envisat-derived elevation changes along the glacier streams with an aid of ICESat altimetry that passes exactly along the glacier stream. Estimated discharge changes along the glacier stream will be compared with an existing approach using ice thickness derived from ice flow velocity.

  20. Main results of the 2012 joint Norwegian-Russian expedition to the dumping sites of the nuclear submarine K-27 and solid radioactive waste in Stepovogo Fjord, Novaya Zemlya.

    PubMed

    Gwynn, Justin P; Nikitin, Aleksander; Shershakov, Viacheslav; Heldal, Hilde Elise; Lind, Bjørn; Teien, Hans-Christian; Lind, Ole Christian; Sidhu, Rajdeep Singh; Bakke, Gunnar; Kazennov, Alexey; Grishin, Denis; Fedorova, Anastasia; Blinova, Oxana; Sværen, Ingrid; Lee Liebig, Penny; Salbu, Brit; Wendell, Cato Christian; Strålberg, Elisabeth; Valetova, Nailja; Petrenko, Galina; Katrich, Ivan; Logoyda, Igor; Osvath, Iolanda; Levy, Isabelle; Bartocci, Jean; Pham, Mai Khanh; Sam, Adam; Nies, Hartmut; Rudjord, Anne Liv

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports the main results of the 2012 joint Norwegian-Russian expedition to investigate the radioecological situation of the Stepovogo Fjord on the eastern coast of Novaya Zemlya, where the nuclear submarine K-27 and solid radioactive waste was dumped. Based on in situ gamma measurements and the analysis of seawater and sediment samples taken around the submarine, there was no indication of any leakage from the reactor units of K-27. With regard to the radioecological status of Stepovogo Fjord, activity concentrations of all radionuclides in seawater, sediment and biota in 2012 were in general lower than reported from the previous investigations in the 1990s. However in 2012, the activity concentrations of (137)Cs and, to a lesser extent, those of (90)Sr remained elevated in bottom water from the inner part of Stepovogo Fjord compared with surface water and the outer part of Stepovogo Fjord. Deviations from expected (238)Pu/(239,240)Pu activity ratios and (240)Pu/(239)Pu atom ratios in some sediment samples from the inner part of Stepovogo Fjord observed in this study and earlier studies may indicate the possibility of leakages from dumped waste from different nuclear sources. Although the current environmental levels of radionuclides in Stepovogo Fjord are not of immediate cause for concern, further monitoring of the situation is warranted.

  1. Multivariate Seismic Calibration for the Novaya Zemlya Test Site

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-09-30

    every multivariate magnitude combination. A classical confidence interval is presented to estimate future yields, based on estimates of the unknown...multivariate calibration parameters. A test of TTBT compliance and a definition of the F-number, based on the confidence interval , are also provided. F

  2. The Taimyr Peninsula and the Severnaya Zemlya archipelago, Arctic Russia: a synthesis of glacial history and palaeo-environmental change during the Last Glacial cycle (MIS 5e-2)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Möller, Per; Alexanderson, Helena; Funder, Svend; Hjort, Christian

    2015-01-01

    We here suggest a glacial and climate history of the Taimyr Peninsula and Severnaya Zemlya archipelago in arctic Siberia for the last about 150 000 years (ka). Primarily it is based on results from seven field seasons between 1996 and 2012, to a large extent already published in papers referred to in the text - and on data presented by Russian workers from the 1930s to our days and by German colleagues working there since the 1990s. Although glaciations even up here often started in the local mountains, their culminations in this region invariably seems to have centred on the shallow Kara Sea continental shelf - most likely due to expanding marine ice-shelves grounding there, as a combined effect of thickening ice and eustatically lowered sea-levels. The most extensive glaciation so far identified in this region (named the Taz glaciation) took place during Marine Isotope Stage 6 (MIS 6), i.e. being an equivalent to the late Saale/Illinoian glaciations. It reached c. 400 km southeast of the Kara Sea coast, across and well beyond the Byrranga Mountain range and ended c. 130 ka. It was followed by the MIS 5e (Karginsky/Eemian) interglacial, with an extensive marine transgression to 140 m above present sea level - facilitated by strong isostatic downloading during the preceding glaciation. During the latest (Zyryankan/Weichselian/Wisconsinan) glacial cycle followed a series of major glacial advances. The earliest and most extensive, culminating c. 110-100 ka (MIS 5d-5e), also reached south of the Byrranga mountains and its post-glacial marine limit there was c. 100 m a.s.l. The later glacial phases (around 70-60 ka and 20 ka) terminated at the North Taimyr Ice Marginal Zone (NTZ), along or some distance inland from the present northwest coast of Taimyr. They dammed glacial lakes, which caused the Taimyr River to flow southwards where to-day it flows northwards into the Kara Sea. The c. 20 ka glacial phase, contemporary with the maximum (LGM) glaciation in NW Europe

  3. The outflow of radionuclides from Novaya Zemlya bays--modeling and monitoring strategies.

    PubMed

    Harms, I H; Povinec, P P

    1999-09-30

    Hydrodynamic model results are used to evaluate possible monitoring strategies for a continuous survey of underwater dump sites. The Hamburg Shelf Ocean Model (HAMSOM) is applied to Abrosimov Bay and forced with realistic, transient wind fields and air temperatures. The three-dimensional circulation model is coupled to a dynamic-thermodynamic ice model that accounts for surface heat fluxes, fractional ice cover and ice thickness. Model results show significant variations in the bay circulation due to a pronounced seasonality in the wind forcing and the ice cover. The circulation is weakest in early summer when wind speeds are low and the ice still covers most parts of the bay. In autumn, circulation and flushing of the bay is most enhanced, due to increasing wind speeds and the absence of an ice cover. Dispersion scenarios were carried out assuming a leakage at dumped objects. During most of the year the obtained tracer concentrations in the bay are higher in the upper layers than close to the bottom, indicating an outflow at the surface and a compensatory inflow below. This general pattern is only reversed during spring and early summer, when the wind directions change. Since ice problems make it almost impossible to monitor surface waters or even the whole water column in a shallow bay, the only way to install a monitoring system, is at the bottom of the bay, as close as possible to dumped objects. Data transmission via satellite or radio could be realized from a small station located on the bay's edge.

  4. Mineral composition of soils and bottom sediments in bays of Novaya Zemlya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krupskaya, V. V.; Miroshnikov, A. Yu.; Dorzhieva, O. V.; Zakusin, S. V.; Semenkov, I. N.; Usacheva, A. A.

    2017-01-01

    We have analyzed the specific features of the mineralogical composition of bottom sediments of Blagopoluchiya, Tsivol'ki, and Abrosimov bays and soils on Cape Zhelaniya and the coasts of Abrosimov and Stepovoi bays. The data were obtained during two scientific expeditions of the R/V Professor Shtokman in 2014 (cruise 128) and R/V Akademik Mstislav Keldysh in 2015 (cruise 63). These investigations revealed patterns in the transportation of terrigenous material in the coastal zone of the bays: a decrease in the share of nonclay minerals and an increase in that of clay minerals with distance from shore. The increase in kaolinite and smectite content in soil horizons is related to biochemical weathering, while illite is mainly formed as a result of physical weathering.

  5. Outlet glacier response to the 2012 collapse of the Matusevich Ice Shelf, Severnaya Zemlya, Russian Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willis, Michael J.; Melkonian, Andrew K.; Pritchard, Matthew E.

    2015-10-01

    The Matusevich Ice Shelf (MIS), located within the Severnaya Zemlya Archipelago in the Russian Arctic, rapidly broke apart between 10 August and 7 September 2012. We examine the response of the outlet glaciers that fed the MIS from local ice caps to the removal of the ice shelf. We use spaceborne laser altimetry and multiple optically derived digital elevation models to track ice surface elevation change rates (dh/dt) between 1984 and 2014. Glacier speeds are measured by pixel-tracking from optical and RADAR imagery between 2010 and 2014 and interferometric synthetic aperture radar in 1995 to compare precollapse and postcollapse velocities. We find that the three main outlet glaciers that fed the MIS are thinning an order of magnitude more rapidly than most of the rest of Severnaya Zemyla, based upon ICESat data from 2003 to 2009. Recent, 2012 to 2014 thinning rates are three to four times faster than the 30 year average thinning rate, calculated between 1984 and 2014. The springtime speeds of the largest outlet glacier (Issledovateley) have increased more than 200% at the terminus between April 2010 and April 2014. To date, changes in surface elevation (dh/dt) and velocity at the outlet glaciers near MIS are smaller than glacier responses to ice shelf collapse in Antarctica. It is possible that the MIS was already very weak prior to the 2012 collapse and unable to support back stress. Further observations are required to assess whether the thinning and nonmelt season glacier speeds are continuing to accelerate.

  6. Lithology and minerageny of black shale of the Taimyr-Severnaya Zemlya region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mozoleva, Irina

    2014-05-01

    In the Taimyr Peninsula and Severnaya Zemlya Archipelago, black shale deposits are widespread - subaqueous fine-grained, often thin-bedded, dark-coloured rocks of clayey, carbonate, silica or mixed composition, significantly enriched (1-18%) with organic matter (OM). Two large age intervals of accumulation are distinguished: Riphean and Early-Middle Paleozoic (with maxima in the Ordovician and Silurian). Black shale Riphean complexes are spread in the northern part of the Taimyr Peninsula, where they build up a strip 100-150 km wide along the coast from the Gulf of Minin to the Gulf of Thaddeus and on Bolshevik Isl. Two types of black shale deposits are distinguished (Zabiyaka, 1972; Kabankov, 1980). The first type - predominantly siliciclastic deposits. Represented by cyclical alternation of flyschoid and turbidite types of terrigenous deposits with carbonaceous shale members. Deposits are unevenly enriched in OM in the form of filamentous, lenticular, lumpy accumulations and are often accompanied by pyrite. OM content to 2.5%, rarely to 6%. The second type - carbonate-terrigenous-clayey deposits. Represented by intensely displaced metamorphosed sandstone, siltstone, and mudstone interbedded with marble and limestone. Carbonaceous deposits are intensively. OM content 0.66-2.3%. OM is distributed unevenly, often localized along fractures. Black shale complexes of Middle-Lower Paleozoic age include deposits from the Lower Cambrian to Lower Carboniferous (Sobolevskaya et al., 1979; Lazarenko, 1980). On October Revolution Isl., the Lower Cambrian-Lower Ordovician deposits are spread. In Taimyr, black shale complexes build up a relatively narrow, about 75-100 km, strip stretching in sublatitudinal direction, limited by regional faults (Main Taimyr in the north, Pyasina-Faddey in the south). Deposits are represented by a wide range of lithological genetic rock types. Carbonate-argillaceous rocks with terrigenous material admixture and siliceous-terrigenous with a small

  7. Hydrochemical features of the Kara Sea aquatic area in summer 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makkaveev, P. N.; Polukhin, A. A.; Kostyleva, A. V.; Protsenko, E. A.; Stepanova, S. V.; Yakubov, Sh. Kh.

    2017-01-01

    During cruise 65 of the R/V Akademik Mstislav Keldysh in the Kara Sea, three transects were executed: one eastwards from the Novaya Zemlya Archipelago and two in the St. Anna and Voronin troughs. It was noted that the continental runoff affected the entire surveyed aquatic area, even at the northern extremity of the Novaya Zemlya Archipelago. The transect along the St. Anna Trough showed the presence of a slope frontal zone overlaid at the surface by a desalinated layer. The Voronin Trough was characterized by sliding of slope waters. The hydrochemical parameters show that the surveys were carried out during a recession of biological activity of the waters and that the peak bloom was over by that time. The hydrochemical structure of waters conformed to early autumn conditions, but before the beginning of intense cooling of surface waters.

  8. Canary Island Archipelago

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    This nearly vertical view of the Canary Archipelago (28.5N, 16.5W) shows five of the seven islands: Grand Canary, Tenerife, Gomera, Hierro and La Palma. The largest island in view is Tenerife. Island cloud wakes evident in this photo are the result of southerly winds giving rise to cloud banks on the lee side especially on Tenerife which has the highest volcanic peaks. Island water wakes and internal waves are also evident but not as apparent.

  9. Alexander Archipelago, Southeastern Alaska

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    West of British Columbia, Canada, and south of the Yukon Territory, the southeastern coastline of Alaska trails off into the islands of the Alexander Archipelago. The area is rugged and contains many long, U-shaped, glaciated valleys, many of which terminate at tidewater. The Alexander Archipelago is home to Glacier Bay National Park. The large bay that has two forks on its northern end is Glacier Bay itself. The eastern fork is Muir inlet, into which runs the Muir glacier, named for the famous Scottish-born naturalist John Muir. Glacier Bay opens up into the Icy Strait. The large, solid white area to the west is Brady Icefield, which terminates at the southern end in Brady's Glacier. To locate more interesting features from Glacier Bay National Park, take a look at the park service map. As recently as two hundred years ago, a massive ice field extended into Icy Strait and filled the Glacier Bay. Since that time, the area has experienced rapid deglaciation, with many large glaciers retreating 40, 60, even 80 km. While temperatures have increased in the region, it is still unclear whether the rapid recession is part of the natural cycle of tidewater glaciers or is an indicator of longer-term climate change. For more on Glacier Bay and climate change, read an online paper by Dr. Dorothy Hall, a MODIS Associate Science Team Member. Credit: Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

  10. Leaching of radionuclides from furfural-based polymers used to solidify reactor compartments and components disposed of in the Arctic Kara Sea

    SciTech Connect

    HEISER,J.H.; SIVINTSEV,Y.; ALEXANDROV,V.P.; DYER,R.S.

    1999-09-01

    Within the course of operating its nuclear navy, the former Soviet Union (FSU) disposed of reactor vessels and spent nuclear fuel (SNF) in three fjords on the east coast of Novaya Zemlya and in the open Kara Sea within the Novaya Zemlya Trough during the period 1965 to 1988. The dumping consisted of 16 reactors, six of which contained SNF and one special container that held ca. 60% of the damaged SNF and the screening assembly from the No. 2 reactor of the atomic icebreaker Lenin. At the time, the FSU considered dumping of decommissioned nuclear submarines with damaged cores in the bays of and near by the Novaya Zemlya archipelago in the Arctic Kara Sea to be acceptable. To provide an additional level of safety, a group of Russian scientists embarked upon a course of research to develop a solidification agent that would provide an ecologically safe barrier. The barrier material would prevent direct contact of seawater with the SNF and the resultant leaching and release of radionuclides. The solidification agent was to be introduced by flooding the reactors vessels and inner cavities. Once introduced the agent would harden and form an impermeable barrier. This report describes the sample preparation of several ``Furfurol'' compositions and their leach testing using cesium 137 as tracer.

  11. Island of Hawaii, Hawaiian Archipelago

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    This single photo covers almost all of the big island of Hawaii (19.5N, 155.5E) in the Hawaiian Archipelago. The active Kilauea Volcano and lava flow is under clouds and hardly visible at the lower right edge but the Mauna Loa volcano crater and its older lava flow is at the bottom center. The Kona Coast, that produces the only coffee grown in the United States, is to the left. Mauna Kea is the extinct volcano and lava flow in the right center.

  12. The mystery of Bunge Land (New Siberian Archipelago): implications for its formation based on palaeoenvironmental records, geomorphology, and remote sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schirrmeister, Lutz; Grosse, Guido; Kunitsky, Viktor V.; Fuchs, Margret C.; Krbetschek, Matthias; Andreev, Andrei A.; Herzschuh, Ulrike; Babyi, Olga; Siegert, Christine; Meyer, Hanno; Derevyagin, Alexander Y.; Wetterich, Sebastian

    2010-12-01

    Multiproxy datasets (geocryology, geochronology, sedimentology, palaeo-ecology) from permafrost exposures were used together with land surface information based on satellite imagery and thematic maps in order to reconstruct the Lateglacial to Holocene landscape and environmental dynamics of Bunge Land (Zemlya Bunge). This area of little relief, situated in the New Siberian Archipelago, connects the geomorphologically well-structured islands of Kotel'ny and Fadeevsky. A buried thermokarst landscape was found in the northwest region of the Bunge Land low terrace sand plain, whereas the Bunge Land high terrace seems to be an exposed residue of a similar late Quaternary thermokarst landscape. That is confirmed especially by radiocarbon accelerator mass spectrometry and optically stimulated luminescence age determinations, and by pollen analyses. Palaeogeographically, the late Pleistocene periglacial landscape and sedimentation of Bunge Land was closely connected to Kotel'ny and Fadeevsky; only later on seismotectonical block movements resulted in reshaping parts of Bunge Land. The Bunge Land low terrace area first subsided and the original landscape there was destroyed by marine inundation, followed by marine sedimentation. Subsequent block heave of the low terrace region exposed a vast sheet of marine sands which is continuously surficially reworked by aeolian processes, while the original alluvial plain landscape in the high terrace area was preserved and started degrading only by early Holocene thermokarst development. The studied exposures contain one of the northernmost (74.88°N) environmental records for the late Pleistocene-Holocene transition in the Eurasian Arctic.

  13. Cossidae of the Socotra Archipelago (Yemen)

    PubMed Central

    Borth, Robert; Ivinskis, Povilas; Saldaitis, Aidas; Yakovlev, Roman

    2011-01-01

    Abstract The faunistic composition of the family Cossidae (Lepidoptera) of the Socotra Archipelago is revised. Five species are recognized, including two new species (Mormogystia brandstetteri and Meharia hackeri), and dubious identifications and records are discussed. Adults and genitalia are illustrated and bionomic details, DNA barcodes and a synonymic checklist for Socotran cossids are provided. A review of their distribution reveals that at least 80 percent of Socotra’s cossids are unique to the archipelago, which is renowned for its endemism. A checklist listing all the species from generas Meharia, Mormogystia, Aethalopteryx, Azygophleps, as well as the synonymy and distribution is provided. PMID:21998527

  14. Plant Conservation Challenges in the Bahama Archipelago

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Technical Abstract The Bahamian archipelago has a rich flora with 89 endemic species. An international symposium held at Nassau in October 2012 to celebrate the 30th anniversary of the publication of the “Flora of the Bahama Archipelago” provided a forum to discuss plant conservation issues on these...

  15. Shear Wave Splitting Beneath the Galapagos Archipelago

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fontaine, F. R.; Burkett, P. G.; Hooft, E. E.; Toomey, D. R.; Solomon, S. C.; Silver, P. G.

    2004-12-01

    We report measurements of teleseismic shear wave splitting in the Galápagos Archipelago. The inferred lateral variations in azimuthal anisotropy allow us to examine the dynamics of an evolving hotspot-ridge system. The data are from SKS and SKKS phases, as well as S waves from deep sources, recorded by a relatively dense network of 10 portable broadband seismometers deployed from 1999 to 2003 for the IGUANA (Imaging Galápagos Upwelling and Neotectonics of the Archipelago) experiment and from the GSN broadband station in Santa Cruz (PAYG). We find a delay time between fast and slow shear waves of 0.4 to 0.9 s and fast polarization directions of N85-90° E beneath five stations at the leading and southern edge of the archipelago. Despite clear seismic signals, we did not find any anisotropy at the six stations located in the interior of the archipelago. For those stations that show shear wave splitting, there is an increase in the delay time toward the expected location of the Galápagos hotspot at the western edge of the archipelago. With the exception of Española, fast polarization directions (N85-90° E) are close to the current direction of absolute plate motion of the overlying Nazca plate (N91° E). The lack of azimuthal anisotropy in the interior of the archipelago is interpreted as an absence of strongly oriented mantle fabric beneath these stations. The apparent isotropy in this dynamic region, where we expect considerable mantle strain, is surprising. It is not likely that the olivine a-axis is oriented vertically beneath the interior of the archipelago as the Galápagos plume is thought to lie at the western edge. It is also unlikely that there are two layers of perpendicularly-oriented anisotropy which are solely confined to the center of the archipelago. However, there appears to be some correlation between the region of apparent isotropy and a zone of anomalously low upper mantle velocities imaged beneath Santiago and Marchena from surface waves by

  16. Modeled Population Connectivity across the Hawaiian Archipelago.

    PubMed

    Wren, Johanna L K; Kobayashi, Donald R; Jia, Yanli; Toonen, Robert J

    2016-01-01

    We present the first comprehensive estimate of connectivity of passive pelagic particles released from coral reef habitat throughout the Hawaiian Archipelago. Potential connectivity is calculated using a Lagrangian particle transport model coupled offline with currents generated by an oceanographic circulation model, MITgcm. The connectivity matrices show a surprising degree of self-recruitment and directional dispersal towards the northwest, from the Main Hawaiian Islands (MHI) to the northwestern Hawaiian Islands (NWHI). We identify three predicted connectivity breaks in the archipelago, that is, areas in the mid and northern part of the archipelago that have limited connections with surrounding islands and reefs. Predicted regions of limited connectivity generally match observed patterns of genetic structure reported for coral reef species in the uninhabited NWHI, but multiple genetic breaks observed in the inhabited MHI are not explained by passive dispersal. The better congruence in our modeling results based on physical transport of passive particles in the low-lying atolls of the uninhabited NWHI, but not in the anthropogenically impacted high islands of the MHI begs the question: what ultimately controls connectivity in this system?

  17. Modeled Population Connectivity across the Hawaiian Archipelago

    PubMed Central

    Wren, Johanna L. K.; Kobayashi, Donald R.; Jia, Yanli; Toonen, Robert J.

    2016-01-01

    We present the first comprehensive estimate of connectivity of passive pelagic particles released from coral reef habitat throughout the Hawaiian Archipelago. Potential connectivity is calculated using a Lagrangian particle transport model coupled offline with currents generated by an oceanographic circulation model, MITgcm. The connectivity matrices show a surprising degree of self-recruitment and directional dispersal towards the northwest, from the Main Hawaiian Islands (MHI) to the northwestern Hawaiian Islands (NWHI). We identify three predicted connectivity breaks in the archipelago, that is, areas in the mid and northern part of the archipelago that have limited connections with surrounding islands and reefs. Predicted regions of limited connectivity generally match observed patterns of genetic structure reported for coral reef species in the uninhabited NWHI, but multiple genetic breaks observed in the inhabited MHI are not explained by passive dispersal. The better congruence in our modeling results based on physical transport of passive particles in the low-lying atolls of the uninhabited NWHI, but not in the anthropogenically impacted high islands of the MHI begs the question: what ultimately controls connectivity in this system? PMID:27930680

  18. Seroprevalence of Toxoplasma gondii in seabirds from Abrolhos Archipelago, Brazil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Toxoplasma gondii is a coccidian parasite that infects almost all warm-blooded animals, including birds. Abrolhos is an archipelago of five islands, located in the Atlantic Ocean, 56 nautical kilometers from the south coast of the state of Bahia, northeastern Brazil. Part of this archipelago is a Na...

  19. Tongue of the ocean, Bahamas Archipelago

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    A portion of the tongue of the ocean (24.0N, 77.0W), and the Bahamas Bank, Bahamas Archipelago. The light blue region is the shalow sea bottom where the Bahama Bank is no more than 30 ft. deep. At the contact between light and dark blue, an underwater shear cliff drops over a mile in depth. The wavey lines of various shades of blue are caused by the differential coral growth relative to the warm/cool water transfer in and out of the tongue.

  20. Ice Mass Changes in the Russian High Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willis, M. J.; Melkonian, A. K.; Pritchard, M. E.; Golos, E. M.

    2012-12-01

    The ~2000 glaciers and icecaps on the islands of the Russian High Arctic cover a total area of about 55,600 km2. Infrequent studies have indicated that these glaciers have lost a total of ~100 km3 of ice, equivalent to about 0.3 mm of sea level, since 1960. Recent GRACE observations suggest that the Severnaya Zemlya Archipelago and Franz Josef Archipelago are approximately in balance, while the "Main Ice Sheet" of the Novaya Zemlya archipelago is losing mass at a small rate. This glacier complex, on the northern island of the archipelago is the largest ice mass in Europe (23,800 km2) and the third largest polar ice masses on the planet after the Antarctic and Greenland Ice sheets. The glaciers, ice caps and icefields of the Russian High Arctic are a major reservoir of fresh water and under climate scenarios that involve warming, a potentially increasing source of mass for sea level rise. We examine the response of the glaciers of the Russian High Arctic to recent, pronounced atmospheric warming. Digitized topographic maps, ASTER Digital Elevation Models (DEMs), cloud free ICESat returns and several DEMs calculated from recent high-resolution imagery pairs are used to provide a time-series and maps of ice surface elevation change rates between the mid-1980s' and 2012 for the "Main Ice Sheet" on Novaya Zemlya and the Franz Josef Land Archipelago. DEMs are co-registered to a common horizontal base and corrected for biases due to varying reference frames and datums. Elevation change rates are calculated on a pixel-by-pixel basis and are integrated over each ice complex to provide volume change rates. Volume rates are converted to mass rates assuming an ice density of 900 kg/m3. Glacier speeds are derived from pairs of ASTER images between 2000 and 2012 and from higher resolution imagery between 2010 and 2012. Cloudy conditions often hamper our ability to make good pairs and problems occur when there are no bedrock outcrops, which are typically used to check for

  1. Nematodes from terrestrial and freshwater habitats in the Arctic.

    PubMed

    Holovachov, Oleksandr

    2014-01-01

    WE PRESENT AN UPDATED LIST OF TERRESTRIAL AND FRESHWATER NEMATODES FROM ALL REGIONS OF THE ARCTIC, FOR WHICH RECORDS OF PROPERLY IDENTIFIED NEMATODE SPECIES ARE AVAILABLE: Svalbard, Jan Mayen, Iceland, Greenland, Nunavut, Northwest territories, Alaska, Lena River estuary, Taymyr and Severnaya Zemlya and Novaya Zemlya. The list includes 391 species belonging to 146 genera, 54 families and 10 orders of the phylum Nematoda.

  2. Species-area relation for birds of the Solomon Archipelago.

    PubMed

    Diamond, J M; Mayr, E

    1976-01-01

    Accurate values of number of breeding bird species have been obtained for 50 islands of the Solomon Archipelago. From information about species altitudinal distributions on each island, the values are apportioned into number of montane species (S(mt)) and of species present at sea-level (S(low)). S(low) increases linearly with the logarithm of island area A over a million-fold range of areas (correlation coefficient 0.99) and with a comparatively low slope, while the log S-log A relation is markedly curved. With increasing isolation of an archipelago, the species-area relation decreases in slope and may shift in form from a power function to an exponential. Comparison of Pacific archipelagoes at different distances from the colonization source of New Guinea shows that the decrease in slope is due to increasing intra-archipelago immigration rates, arising from overrepresentation of the most vagile inter-archipelago immigrants in more distant archipelagoes. When colonists are sorted into sets correlated with their dispersal abilities, the slope of the species-area relation for the most vagile set is close to zero, but for the least vagile set is close to the value predicted by Preston for "isolated universes."

  3. Historical tsunami in the Azores archipelago (Portugal)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrade, C.; Borges, P.; Freitas, M. C.

    2006-08-01

    Because of its exposed northern mid-Atlantic location, morphology and plate-tectonics setting, the Azores Archipelago is highly vulnerable to tsunami hazards associated with landslides and seismic or volcanic triggers, local or distal. Critical examination of available data - written accounts and geologic evidence - indicates that, since the settlement of the archipelago in the 15th century, at least 23 tsunami have struck Azorean coastal zones. Most of the recorded tsunami are generated by earthquakes. The highest known run-up (11-15 m) was recorded on 1 November 1755 at Terceira Island, corresponding to an event of intensity VII-VIII (damaging-heavily damaging) on the Papadopolous-Imamura scale. To date, eruptive activity, while relatively frequent in the Azores, does not appear to have generated destructive tsunami. However, this apparent paucity of volcanogenic tsunami in the historical record may be misleading because of limited instrumental and documentary data, and small source-volumes released during historical eruptions. The latter are in contrast with the geological record of massive pyroclastic flows and caldera explosions with potential to generate high-magnitude tsunami, predating settlement. In addition, limited evidence suggests that submarine landslides from unstable volcano flanks may have also triggered some damaging tsunamigenic floods that perhaps were erroneously attributed to intense storms. The lack of destructive tsunami since the mid-18th century has led to governmental complacency and public disinterest in the Azores, as demonstrated by the fact that existing emergency regulations concerning seismic events in the Azores Autonomous Region make no mention of tsunami and their attendant hazards. We suspect that the coastal fringe of the Azores may well preserve a sedimentary record of some past tsunamigenic flooding events. Geological field studies must be accelerated to expand the existing database to include prehistoric events

  4. Some features of the technogenic pollution of the Kara Sea, with the example of the sunken nuclear submarine K-27

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dmitrievskiy, N. N.; Nikiforov, S. L.; Lobkovsky, L. I.; Ananiev, R. A.

    2015-11-01

    This article discusses the results of offshore operations undertaken during a cruise of the R/V Professor Shtokman (2013) during an expedition in the fjord Stepovoi of the Novaya Zemlya Archipelago k]where the nuclear submarine (NPS) K-27 was scuttled in 1981 k]An echo sounding of her hull showed signs of water destratification k]which may be caused by turbulence from gas or heat flows outgoing from the hull k]According to the hypothesis of the author k]the presence of the reactors and radioactive nuclear fuel remnants may lead to the continued heating of the inner cavities of the submarine and k]as a consequence k]to constant heat flow from its surface k]which is an obvious danger k]including risks associated with plans to refloat and transport the submarine for the further dismantlement.

  5. Hydrogeology of the Azores volcanic archipelago (Portugal)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruz, J.; Coutinho, R.; Antunes, P.; Freire, P.

    2009-04-01

    The archipelago of the Azores is made of nine islands of volcanic origin located in the North Atlantic Ocean, with an area of 2333 km2 and approximately 237500 inhabitants, which are 98% dependant from groundwater sources for their water consumption. Therefore, groundwater is a resource that plays a vital role as drinking water source and as ecosystem support matrix. Nevertheless, besides the environmental, social and economical value of groundwater, this resource is subject to an increase pressure and in several islands water quality deterioration is shown by monitoring data. This pressure is also shown by the 42.7% increase expected for domestic use until the year 2020 at the Azores, with higher groundwater abstraction. The Azores climate can be considered as marine temperate, which is reflected by the low thermal amplitude and high precipitation. A well-established difference between a dry season and a colder and wet season occurs, as from October to March about 75% of the annual precipitation is registered. The average annual precipitation at the Azores is 1930 mm, exceeding by far the average annual actual evapotranspiration, which is 581 mm. Recharge rates range from 8.5% to 62.1%, and the highest values are observed at Pico, Terceira, Faial, São Miguel and Graciosa islands, especially in areas where the terrain is covered by recent basaltic lava flows and the soil cover is sparse. Groundwater resources estimates point to a total volume of about 1600x106 m3/yr. Values above the recharge median, equal to 101.3x106 m3/yr. were estimated for the São Miguel, São Jorge, Terceira and Flores islands. Despite differences in the islands growth, as a result of successive volcanic eruptions of various types, groundwater occurrence can be described in function of two main aquifers systems: (1) the basal aquifer system, which corresponds to fresh-water lenses floating on underlying salt water, and (2) perched-water bodies, which are usually drained by springs spread in

  6. Glacier surface melt characterization and trend analysis (1992-2011) in the Russian High Arctic from combined resolution-enhanced scatterometer and passive microwave data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, M.; Ramage, J. M.; Semmens, K. A.

    2012-12-01

    Global warming has been pronounced in the remote glacierized archipelagoes (Severnaya Zemlya, Novaya Zemlya and Franz Josef Land) of the Russian High Arctic (RHA) and its effect on the low altitude, high latitude small ice caps needs examination. The timing and spatial variability of snow melt onset, duration and intensity are key factors influencing mass balance and the ice marginal hydrological system as well as important indicators of glacial response to anthropogenic and natural forcings. Characterization and trend analysis of RHA glacier melt behaviors provide insight about assessing the mass loss rate under recent Arctic climate change. However, due to the harsh environment, long term records of glaciological data for RHA are limited, necessitating the application of remotely sensed data to accomplish the research. The high sensitivity to liquid water and the ability to penetrate non-precipitating clouds enables microwave remote sensing to detect glacier surface melt. The appearance of melt water in snow dramatically decreases the returned scatterometer radar signal from active microwave sensors and sharply augments passive microwave emission. Based on this feature, we combined resolution-enhanced ERS-1/2 C-band (1992-2000), QuickSCAT Ku-band (2000-2009), ASCAT C-band (2009-2011) scatterometer data and SSMI 37 GHz (1995-2007) vertically polarized passive microwave products from Brigham Young University and analyzed glacier surface melt trends from 1992 to 2011 with a spatial resolution downscaled to 4.45km. We concatenated scatterometer derived melt behaviors by overlapping years and refined the results based on passive microwave data. Cross-validation shows that melt timing to be consistent between the active and passive sensors. Trend analysis (α < 0.005) reveals that the average glacier surface melt onset date occurs earlier by approximately 0.85 days/year in Severnaya Zemlya which outpaced the mean advancing rate in the pan-Arctic. Surrounded by ocean

  7. Professional Development through Collaborative Inquiry for an Art Education Archipelago

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gates, Leslie

    2010-01-01

    The culture of isolation in schools leaves many art educators feeling that they are, in a sense, islands. Working from the idea of an island, I use the geographic metaphor of an archipelago as a means to understand the tensions between isolation and collaboration related to professional development for art educators. In this article, I describe…

  8. Estimates of Canadian Arctic Archipelago runoff from observed hydrometric data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spence, Christopher; Burke, Amanda

    2008-12-01

    SummarySmall basin studies in the remote Canadian Arctic Archipelago have revealed the general nature of runoff processes and the annual rhythms and magnitude of streamflow in the region, but widespread monitoring of hydrological cycle components is absent. The result is that an understanding of large scale freshwater fluxes from the Arctic Archipelago does not exist. Such understanding is important for sound domestic water management decisions and international obligations to quantify Canada's freshwater supply to the oceans. The study summarized by this paper, initiated under the auspices of the International Polar Year, extrapolated observed streamflow attributes across the Arctic Archipelago using statistical regionalization tools. The paucity of hydrometric data necessitated the construction of a dataset, which was limited to the period from 1972 to 1994. Reliable estimates of mean May-October freshwater flux were possible from ˜70% of the Archipelago and these total ˜190 km 3. Maximum daily runoff can be up to 13% of the total annual flux from some catchments. Flows were highest from southern Baffin Island, decreasing westward. The scarcity of data compelled an error analysis that showed average confidence intervals around constructed and regionalized data of ±123% and ±63%, respectively. Dataset construction errors were inversely related to basin area. There was no spatial pattern to the dataset construction errors, but regionalization error tended to be higher in the west. It will be argued that our community has little to no idea of the current freshwater flux from the Arctic Archipelago, or if it is changing. Much work is needed to improve these estimates, including establishing a sustainable, effective and efficient monitoring and research program of high arctic freshwater systems that can build upon the legacy of the International Polar Year.

  9. Ice core from Akademii Nauk ice cap, Severnaya Zemlya (Russian Arctic), dated with a Nye model modified for a growing glacier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritzsche, Diedrich; Opel, Thomas; Meyer, Hanno

    2010-05-01

    From 1999 to 2001 a 724 m deep ice core has been drilled from surface to bedrock close to summit of the Akademii Nauk ice cap, Severnaya Zemlya (Russian Arctic), within a joint German-Russian project. The analysis of stable water isotopes and major ion concentration in high resolution were used for reconstruction of past climate and environmental changes. The upper 304 m of the core were dated by counting annual stable isotope cycles considering radioactive (1986, 1963) and volcanic events (1956, 1912, 1783, 1259) as reference horizons. The resulting depth-age relationship and the corresponding annual-layer thickness imply that the ice cap was not in dynamic steady state but had been growing until recent times. That does not comply with requirements of a standard Nye or Dansgaard-Johnson flow model approach. To take into account the peculiarities of Akademii Nauk ice cap a Nye model was modified by adding a growing term according to the found relationship between annual layer thickness and depth. Using the volcanoes identified an average increase of altitude of about 0.08 m w.e. per year was calculated since AD 1259. The model enables us to reconstruct the altitude changes of the ice cap with time and to consider an altitude effect to correct the stable isotope values and to explain decreasing sea-salt ion data. Using the suggested model annual layer thickness can be decompressed to accumulation rates at the altitude where the precipitation was originally deposited. The model can also be used for dating deeper parts of ice core where volcanoes are not identified up to now. Applying this model, the ice core has an age of about 2 500 years, much less than claimed for an older core from Akademii Nauk ice cap. Consequently, the ice cap is much younger and only of Late Holocene age, as also assumed for most Arctic ice caps and glaciers outside Greenland. However, the lowest part of Akademii Nauk ice cap is probably a remnant of an older ice cap stage.

  10. Pelagic microplastics around an archipelago of the Equatorial Atlantic.

    PubMed

    Ivar do Sul, Juliana A; Costa, Monica F; Barletta, Mário; Cysneiros, Francisco José A

    2013-10-15

    Plastic marine debris is presently widely recognised as an important environmental pollutant. Such debris is reported in every habitat of the oceans, from urban tourist beaches to remote islands and from the ocean surface to submarine canyons, and is found buried and deposited on sandy and cobble beaches. Plastic marine debris varies from micrometres to several metres in length and is potentially ingested by animals of every level of the marine food web. Here, we show that synthetic polymers are present in subsurface plankton samples around Saint Peter and Saint Paul Archipelago in the Equatorial Atlantic Ocean. To explain the distribution of microplastics around the Archipelago, we proposed a generalised linear model (GLM) that suggests the existence of an outward gradient of mean plastic-particle densities. Plastic items can be autochthonous or transported over large oceanic distances. One probable source is the small but persistent fishing fleet using the area.

  11. Predicting Coral Recruitment in Palau’s Complex Reef Archipelago

    PubMed Central

    Golbuu, Yimnang; Wolanski, Eric; Idechong, Jacques Wasai; Victor, Steven; Isechal, Adelle Lukes; Oldiais, Noelle Wenty; Idip, David; Richmond, Robert H.; van Woesik, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Reproduction and recruitment are key processes that replenish marine populations. Here we use the Palau archipelago, in the western Pacific Ocean, as a case study to examine scales of connectivity and to determine whether an oceanographic model, incorporating the complex reef architecture, is a useful predictor of coral recruitment. We tested the hypothesis that the reefs with the highest retention also had the highest densities of juvenile coral density from 80 field sites. Field comparisons showed a significant correlation between the densities of juvenile Acropora colonies and total larval recruitment derived from the model (i.e., calculated as the sum of the densities of larvae that self-seeded and recruited from the other reefs in the archipelago). Long-distance larval imports may be too infrequent to sustain coral populations, but are critical for recovery in times of extreme local stress. PMID:23209842

  12. Contribution to the Pteridophyte Flora of Langkawi Archipelago, Peninsular Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    Maideen, Haja; Damanhuri, Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    The pteridophyte flora of Langkawi Archipelago consists of 130 species, 1 subspecies and 12 varieties in 68 genera and 27 families. This value represents 22.1% of the 647 taxa at the species level and below reported for Peninsular Malaysia. Of the 143 recorded taxa of pteridophytes at the species level and below, 8 species in 2 genera and 2 families are lycophytes and the other 135 taxa in 66 genera and 25 families are monilophytes or ferns. PMID:26868714

  13. Sea otter population declines in the Aleutian Archipelago

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Doroff, Angela; Estes, James A.; Tinker, M. Tim; Burn, Douglas M.; Evans, Thomas J.

    2003-01-01

    Sea otter (Enhydra lutris) populations were exploited to near extinction and began to recover after the cessation of commercial hunting in 1911. Remnant colonies of sea otters in the Aleutian archipelago were among the first to recover; they continued to increase through the 1980s but declined abruptly during the 1990s. We conducted an aerial survey of the Aleutian archipelago in 2000 and compared results with similar surveys conducted in 1965 and 1992. The number of sea otters counted decreased by 75% between 1965 and 2000; 88% for islands at equilibrial density in 1965. The population decline likely began in the mid-1980s and declined at a rate of 17.5%/year in the 1990s. The minimal population estimate was 8,742 sea otters in 2000. The population declined to a uniformly low density in the archipelago, suggesting a common and geographically widespread cause. These data are in general agreement with the hypothesis of increased predation on sea otters. These data chronicle one of the most widespread and precipitous population declines for a mammalian carnivore in recorded history.

  14. Recent ice cap snowmelt in Russian High Arctic and anti-correlation with late summer sea ice extent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Meng; Ramage, Joan; Semmens, Kathryn; Obleitner, Friedrich

    2014-04-01

    Glacier surface melt dynamics throughout Novaya Zemlya (NovZ) and Severnaya Zemlya (SevZ) serve as a good indicator of ice mass ablation and regional climate change in the Russian High Arctic. Here we report trends of surface melt onset date (MOD) and total melt days (TMD) by combining multiple resolution-enhanced active and passive microwave satellite datasets and analyze the TMD correlations with local temperature and regional sea ice extent. The glacier surface snowpack on SevZ melted significantly earlier (-7.3 days/decade) from 1992 to 2012 and significantly longer (7.7 days/decade) from 1995 to 2011. NovZ experienced large interannual variability in MOD, but its annual mean TMD increased. The snowpack melt on NovZ is more sensitive to temperature fluctuations than SevZ in recent decades. After ruling out the regional temperature influence using partial correlation analysis, the TMD on both archipelagoes is statistically anti-correlated with regional late summer sea ice extent, linking land ice snowmelt dynamics to regional sea ice extent variations.

  15. To the knowledge of cuckoo wasps (Hymenoptera: Chrysididae) of the Balearic Archipelago, Spain.

    PubMed

    Strumia, Franco; Gayubo, Severiano Fernández

    2013-01-01

    The Chrysididae of the Balearic Archipelago were studied by operating four Malaise traps in the Mallorca and Menorca Islands. Traps captured 98 individuals belonging to 19 species. Including all available data from literature, the number of species in this archipelago rise to 34. Hedychridium balearicum Strumia, sp. nov (Mallorca) is described and key to the Hedychridium monochroum species-group is given. Extrapolation from available data suggests the presence of about 58 to 107 Chrysididae species in the Balearic Archipelago.

  16. New records of mosquito species for different islands of the Ryukyu Archipelago, Japan.

    PubMed

    Toma, Takako; Miyagi, Ichiro; Tamashiro, Mikako; Higa, Yukiko

    2011-06-01

    During an 11-year study period (1999-2010) on the islands of the Ryukyu Archipelago, Japan, 20 mosquito species were identified. The results revealed new records of species hitherto not reported on these islands. This contribution updates the mosquito fauna of the various islands of the Ryukyu Archipelago.

  17. 'Redefining health care': medical homes or archipelagos to navigate?

    PubMed

    Enthoven, Alain C; Crosson, Francis J; Shortell, Stephen M

    2007-01-01

    This paper provides an analysis of the structure of the health care delivery system, emphasizing physician group practices. The authors argue for comprehensive integrated delivery systems (IDSs). The jumping-off point for their analysis is the recently published Redefining Health Care: Creating Value-Based Competition on Results, by Michael Porter and Elizabeth Teisberg. The authors focus on the book's core idea that competitors should be freestanding integrated practice units (or "islands in archipelagos") versus IDSs (or "medical homes"). In any case, the authors contend that this issue should be resolved by competition to attract and serve informed, cost-conscious, responsible consumers on a level playing field.

  18. The scale insects (Hemiptera: Coccoidea) of the Maltese Archipelago.

    PubMed

    Mifsud, David; Mazzeo, Gaetana; Russo, Agatino; Watson, Gillian W

    2014-09-25

    Past works on scale insects (Hemiptera: Coccoidea) from the Maltese Archipelago are reviewed. Based on the literature and contemporary collections, a total of 93 species of scale insects belonging to 12 scale insect families are here reported (Aclerdidae 1 species; Asterolecaniidae 4; Coccidae 17; Diaspididae 46; Eriococcidae 5; Kermesidae 1; Margarodidae 1; Micrococcidae 1; Monophlebidae 2; Pseudoccocidae 11; Putoidae 2 and Rhizoecidae 2). Of these, 17 species represent new distribution records. Ten species are excluded from the scale insect fauna of the Maltese Islands. Of the 93 species present, only 29 (31.18%) are probably indigenous and the rest (68.82%) represent established introductions from elsewhere. More than 65% of the indigenous species are typical Mediterranean in distribution, with a few species having a mainly European chorotype. A quarter of the established aliens originate from Eurasia, followed by an East Asian/ Oriental component (20.31%); European (14.06%); Neotropical (14.06%); cryptogenic (14.06%); African (7.81%) and Australasian (4.70%). Movement of live fruit trees and ornamental plants into the Maltese Archipelago from nearby countries is probably the main route for entry of alien scale insects into the country. Some possible future introductions are discussed.

  19. New vascular plant records for the Canadian Arctic Archipelago

    PubMed Central

    Gillespie, Lynn J.; Saarela, Jeffery M.; Sokoloff, Paul C.; Bull, Roger D.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The Canadian Arctic Archipelago is a vast region of approximately 1,420,000 km2, with a flora characterized by low species diversity, low endemicity, and little influence by alien species. New records of vascular plant species are documented here based on recent fieldwork on Victoria and Baffin Islands; additional records based on recent literature sources are mentioned. This paper serves as an update to the 2007 publication Flora of the Canadian Arctic Archipelago, and brings the total number of vascular plants for the region to 375 species and infraspecific taxa, an increase of 7.7%. Three families (Amaranthaceae, Juncaginaceae, Pteridaceae) and seven genera (Cherleria L., Cryptogramma R. Br., Platanthera Rich., Sabulina Rchb., Suaeda Forssk. ex J.F. Gmel., Triglochin L., Utricularia L.) are added to the flora, and one genus is deleted (Minuartia L.). Five species are first records for Nunavut (Arenaria longipedunculata Hultén, Cryptogramma stelleri (S.G. Gmel.) Prantl, Puccinellia banksiensis Consaul, Saxifraga eschscholtzii Sternb., Utricularia ochroleuca R.W. Hartm.) PMID:26311505

  20. Seasonal and distributional patterns of seabirds along the Aleutian Archipelago

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Renner, M.; Hunt, G.L.; Piatt, J.F.; Byrd, G.V.

    2008-01-01

    The Aleutian Archipelago is of global importance to seabirds during the northern summer, but little is known about seabird use of these waters during winter. We compare summer and winter abundances of seabirds around 3 islands: Buldir in the western, Kasatochi in the central, and Aiktak in the eastern Aleutians. The density of combined seabird biomass in nearshore marine waters was higher in summer than in winter at Buldir and Kasatochi, but was higher in winter at Aiktak, despite the departure of abundant migratory species. Comparing foraging guilds, we found that only piscivores increased at the western and central sites in winter, whereas at the eastern site several planktivorous species increased as well. The only planktivore remaining in winter at the central and western sites in densities comparable to summer densities was whiskered auklet Aethia pygmaea. Crested auklet Aethia cristatella and thick-billed murre Uria lomvia showed the greatest proportional winter increase at the eastern site. The seasonal patterns of the seabird communities suggest a winter breakdown of the copepod-based food web in the central and western parts of the archipelago, and a system that remains rich in euphausiids in the eastern Aleutians. We suggest that in winter crested auklets take the trophic role that short-tailed shearwaters Puffinus tenuirostris occupy during summer. We hypothesize that advection of euphausiids in the Aleutian North Slope Current is important for supporting the high biomass of planktivores that occupy the Unimak Pass region on a year-round basis. ?? Inter-Research 2008.

  1. Temporal analysis of remotely sensed turbidity in a coastal archipelago

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suominen, Tapio; Tolvanen, Harri

    2016-07-01

    A topographically fragmental archipelago with dynamic waters set the preconditions for assessing coherent remotely sensed information. We generated a turbidity dataset for an archipelago coast in the Baltic Sea from MERIS data (FSG L1b), using CoastColour L1P, L2R and L2W processors. We excluded land and mixed pixels by masking the imagery with accurate (1:10 000) shoreline data. Using temporal linear averaging (TLA), we produced satellite-imagery datasets applicable to temporal composites for the summer seasons of three years. The turbidity assessments and temporally averaged data were compared to in situ observations obtained with coastal monitoring programs. The ability of TLA to estimate missing pixel values was further assessed by cross-validation with the leave-one-out method. The correspondence between L2W turbidity and in situ observations was good (r = 0.89), and even after applying TLA the correspondence remained acceptable (r = 0.78). The datasets revealed spatially divergent temporal water characteristics, which may be relevant to the management, design of monitoring and habitat models. Monitoring observations may be spatially biased if the temporal succession of water properties is not taken into account in coastal areas with anisotropic dispersion of waters and asynchronous annual cycles. Accordingly, areas of varying turbidity may offer a different habitat for aquatic biota than areas of static turbidity, even though they may appear similar if water properties are measured for short annual periods.

  2. [Vegetation landscape health assessment in Changshan Archipelago, North Yellow Sea].

    PubMed

    Suo, An-ning; Sun, Yong-guang; Li, Bin-yong; Lin, Yong; Zhang, Yong-hua

    2015-04-01

    Island vegetation is an important component of island ecosystem. Multi-targets of island ecosystem health integrated with landscape ecology theory were employed to construct the index system for island vegetation health assessment in terms of landscape vigor, landscape stressing intensity and landscape stability. The Changshan Archipelago in the North Yellow Sea was chosen as a case to apply the island vegetation health assessment index system. The results showed that the overall vegetation health status in Changshan Archipelago was good and had a big island variation. The vegetation health index for Haiyang Island and Zhangzi Island was above 0.80, belonging to first eco-health level area, whereas that for Dachangshan Island, Xiaochangshan Island and Dawangjia Island ranged from 0.70 to 0.80, which could be categorized as the second eco-health level area. Guanglu Island and Shichen Island could be termed as the third eco-health level area with the vegetation health index below 0.70. The distance of island to mainland, area of island together with industrial structure were the main driving forces for the variation of vegetation landscape heath between different islands.

  3. New vascular plant records for the Canadian Arctic Archipelago.

    PubMed

    Gillespie, Lynn J; Saarela, Jeffery M; Sokoloff, Paul C; Bull, Roger D

    2015-01-01

    The Canadian Arctic Archipelago is a vast region of approximately 1,420,000 km(2), with a flora characterized by low species diversity, low endemicity, and little influence by alien species. New records of vascular plant species are documented here based on recent fieldwork on Victoria and Baffin Islands; additional records based on recent literature sources are mentioned. This paper serves as an update to the 2007 publication Flora of the Canadian Arctic Archipelago, and brings the total number of vascular plants for the region to 375 species and infraspecific taxa, an increase of 7.7%. Three families (Amaranthaceae, Juncaginaceae, Pteridaceae) and seven genera (Cherleria L., Cryptogramma R. Br., Platanthera Rich., Sabulina Rchb., Suaeda Forssk. ex J.F. Gmel., Triglochin L., Utricularia L.) are added to the flora, and one genus is deleted (Minuartia L.). Five species are first records for Nunavut (Arenarialongipedunculata Hultén, Cryptogrammastelleri (S.G. Gmel.) Prantl, Puccinelliabanksiensis Consaul, Saxifragaeschscholtzii Sternb., Utriculariaochroleuca R.W. Hartm.).

  4. Seismic Hazard Maps for the Maltese Archipelago: Preliminary Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Amico, S.; Panzera, F.; Galea, P. M.

    2013-12-01

    The Maltese islands form an archipelago of three major islands lying in the Sicily channel at about 140 km south of Sicily and 300 km north of Libya. So far very few investigations have been carried out on seismicity around the Maltese islands and no maps of seismic hazard for the archipelago are available. Assessing the seismic hazard for the region is currently of prime interest for the near-future development of industrial and touristic facilities as well as for urban expansion. A culture of seismic risk awareness has never really been developed in the country, and the public perception is that the islands are relatively safe, and that any earthquake phenomena are mild and infrequent. However, the Archipelago has been struck by several moderate/large events. Although recent constructions of a certain structural and strategic importance have been built according to high engineering standards, the same probably cannot be said for all residential buildings, many higher than 3 storeys, which have mushroomed rapidly in recent years. Such buildings are mostly of unreinforced masonry, with heavy concrete floor slabs, which are known to be highly vulnerable to even moderate ground shaking. We can surely state that in this context planning and design should be based on available national hazard maps. Unfortunately, these kinds of maps are not available for the Maltese islands. In this paper we attempt to compute a first and preliminary probabilistic seismic hazard assessment of the Maltese islands in terms of Peak Ground Acceleration (PGA) and Spectral Acceleration (SA) at different periods. Seismic hazard has been computed using the Esteva-Cornell (1968) approach which is the most widely utilized probabilistic method. It is a zone-dependent approach: seismotectonic and geological data are used coupled with earthquake catalogues to identify seismogenic zones within which earthquakes occur at certain rates. Therefore the earthquake catalogues can be reduced to the

  5. Paleomagnetic Study of Azores Archipelago: Volcano-Tectonic Implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, P. F.; Henry, B.; Marques, F. O.; Madureira, P.; Miranda, J. M. A.; Lourenco, N. V.; Madeira, J.; Hildenbrand, A.; Nunes, J. C.; Roxerová, Z.

    2014-12-01

    Oceanic islands are by nature unstable volcanic buildings generally marked by rapid growth that alternates with destruction due to a variety of mass-wasting processes, including giant sector collapses, vertical caldera subsidence, fault generation/propagation, shallow landslides and coastal erosion. Due to its diverse volcanic and tectonic frameworks, the Azores archipelago represents an excellent case study for geophysical and geological proposes. Main results of a paleomagnetic study, conducted on oriented samples from approximately 60 accessible lava piles of three islands of Azores archipelago central group (Faial, Pico and Terceira islands) and covering as much as possible spatially and temporally these islands are: i) The paleomagnetic polarity is in close agreement with the radiometric results known for these islands; ii) Onshore volcanic activity began during the Matuyama geochron for Faial and during Brunhes for Terceira and Pico; iii) The mean ChRMs from Terceira and Pico islands result in a paleomagnetic pole similar to the ones retrieved from the studies of Johnson et al (1998) and Silva et al (2012), from S. Miguel and S. Jorge islands (other islands of Azores archipelago), respectively; iv) ChRMs from Faial show an elliptical distribution perpendicular to the WNW-ESE grabben that is the major structure of the island, suggesting tilting towards SSW of the southern wall and towards NNE of the northern one. The presence of listric faults plunging towards the middle of the grabben and aligned along the N110º azimuth could explain the elliptical distribution of paleomagnetic directions. This study is a contribution for the research project REGENA (PTDC/GEO-FIQ/3648/2012). References Johnson, C.L., Wijbrans, J.R., Constable, C.G., Gee, J., Staudigel, H., Tauxe, L., Forjaz, V.-H., Salgueiro, M., 1998. 40Ar/39Ar ages and paleomagnetism of S. Miguel lavas,Azores, Earth planet. Sci. Lett., 160, 637-649. Silva, PF; Henry, B; Marques, FO; Hildenbrand, A

  6. The coastal fishes and fisheries of the Socotra Archipelago, Yemen.

    PubMed

    Zajonz, Uwe; Lavergne, Edouard; Klaus, Rebecca; Krupp, Friedhelm; Aideed, Moteah Sheikh; Saeed, Fouad Naseeb

    2016-04-30

    The Socotra Archipelago is situated in the Gulf of Aden where tropical and "pseudo-temperate" conditions combine to create a unique marine ecosystem. The diversity, ecology, productivity and fisheries of the coastal fish assemblages are still relatively understudied and no update of the scientific knowledge existed. The islands support unique coastal and coral-associated fish assemblages in spite of the limited biogenic reef frameworks. Fish diversity is the highest among comparable Arabian eco-regions, and fish biomass productivity high too by Indian Ocean standards. The production of the once traditionally-managed small-scale fishery is severely declining and whether it is sustainable nowadays is extremely doubtful. At a time when Yemen is torn apart by a severe political and humanitarian crisis it is timely to review and update the current state of knowledge for scientists and managers, and thereby ease access to existing information, facilitating follow-on studies and evidence-based conservation and fisheries management.

  7. Dispersal has inhibited avian diversification in Australasian archipelagoes

    PubMed Central

    Weeks, Brian C.; Claramunt, Santiago

    2014-01-01

    Different models of speciation predict contrasting patterns in the relationship between the dispersal ability of lineages and their diversification rates. This relationship is expected to be negative in isolation-limited models and positive in founder-event models. In addition, the combination of negative and positive effects of dispersal on speciation can result in higher diversification rates at intermediate levels of dispersal ability. Using molecular phylogenies to estimate diversification rates, and wing morphology to estimate dispersal ability, we analysed the influence of dispersal on diversification in the avifauna of Australasian archipelagoes. Contrary to expectations given the fragmented nature of island systems, the relationship between dispersal ability and diversification rate was monotonically negative. While multiple mechanisms could generate this pattern, they all share a phase of range expansion that is decoupled from speciation. PMID:25100701

  8. Environmental contaminants in bald eagle eggs from the Aleutian archipelago.

    PubMed

    Anthony, Robert G; Miles, A Keith; Ricca, Mark A; Estes, James A

    2007-09-01

    We collected 136 fresh and unhatched eggs from bald eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) nests and assessed productivity on eight islands in the Aleutian archipelago, 2000 to 2002. Egg contents were analyzed for a broad spectrum of organochlorine (OC) contaminants, mercury (Hg), and stable isotopes of carbon (delta13C) and nitrogen (delta15N). Concentrations of polychlorinated biphenyls (SigmaPCBs), p,p'-dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (DDE), and Hg in bald eagle eggs were elevated throughout the archipelago, but the patterns of distribution differed among the various contaminants. Total PCBs were highest in areas of past military activities on Adak and Amchitka Islands, indicating local point sources of these compounds. Concentrations of DDE and Hg were higher on Amchitka Island, which was subjected to much military activity during World War II and the middle of the 20th century. Concentrations of SigmaPCBs also were elevated on islands with little history of military activity (e.g., Amlia, Tanaga, Buldir), suggesting non-point sources of PCBs in addition to point sources. Concentrations of DDE and Hg were highest in eagle eggs from the most western Aleutian Islands (e.g., Buldir, Kiska) and decreased eastward along the Aleutian chain. This east-to-west increase suggested a Eurasian source of contamination, possibly through global transport and atmospheric distillation and/or from migratory seabirds. Eggshell thickness and productivity of bald eagles were normal and indicative of healthy populations because concentrations of most contaminants were below threshold levels for effects on reproduction. Contrary to our predictions, contaminant concentrations were not correlated with stable isotopes of carbon (delta13C) or nitrogen (delta15N) in eggs. These latter findings indicate that contaminant concentrations were influenced more by point sources and geographic location than trophic status of eagles among the different islands.

  9. Environmental contaminants in bald eagle eggs from the Aleutian archipelago

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Anthony, R.G.; Miles, A.K.; Ricca, M.A.; Estes, J.A.

    2007-01-01

    We collected 136 fresh and unhatched eggs from bald eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) nests and assessed productivity on eight islands in the Aleutian archipelago, 2000 to 2002. Egg contents were analyzed for a broad spectrum of organochlorine (OC) contaminants, mercury (Hg), and stable isotopes of carbon (??13C) and nitrogen (??15N). Concentrations of polychlorinated biphenyls (??PCBs), p,p???- dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (DDE), and Hg in bald eagle eggs were elevated throughout the archipelago, but the patterns of distribution differed among the various contaminants. Total PCBs were highest in areas of past military activities on Adak and Amchitka Islands, indicating local point sources of these compounds. Concentrations of DDE and Hg were higher on Amchitka Island, which was subjected to much military activity during World War II and the middle of the 20th century. Concentrations of ??PCBs also were elevated on islands with little history of military activity (e.g., Amlia, Tanaga, Buldir), suggesting non-point sources of PCBs in addition to point sources. Concentrations of DDE and Hg were highest in eagle eggs from the most western Aleutian Islands (e.g., Buldir, Kiska) and decreased eastward along the Aleutian chain. This east-to-west increase suggested a Eurasian source of contamination, possibly through global transport and atmospheric distillation and/or from migratory seabirds. Eggshell thickness and productivity of bald eagles were normal and indicative of healthy populations because concentrations of most contaminants were below threshold levels for effects on reproduction. Contrary to our predictions, contaminant concentrations were not correlated with stable isotopes of carbon (??13C) or nitrogen (??15N) in eggs. These latter findings indicate that contaminant concentrations were influenced more by point sources and geographic location than trophic status of eagles among the different islands. ?? 2007 SETAC.

  10. Detailed temperature mapping-Warming characterizes archipelago zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veneranta, L.; Vanhatalo, J.; Urho, L.

    2016-12-01

    Rapidly warming shallow archipelago areas have the best energetic options for high ecological production. We analyzed and visualized the spring and summer temperature development in the Finnish coastal areas of the Northern Baltic Sea. Typical for the Baltic is a high annual periodicity and variability in water temperatures. The maximum difference between a single day average temperatures across the study area was 28.3 °C. During wintertime the littoral water temperature can decrease below zero in outer archipelago or open water areas when the protective ice cover is not present and the lowest observed value was -0.5 °C. The depth and exposition are the most important variables explaining the coastal temperature gradients from the innermost to the outermost areas in springtime when water is heated by increasing solar radiation. Temperature differs more within coastal area than between the basins. Water temperature sum was highest in innermost areas, lowest in open water areas and the variation in daily averages was highest in the middle region. At the end of the warming period, the difference in surface water temperatures between the innermost and outermost areas had diminished at the time when the cooling began in August-September. These clear temperature gradients enabled us use the cumulative water temperature to classify the coastal zones in a biologically sensible manner into five regions. Our study shows a novel approach to study detailed spatial variations in water temperatures. The results can further be used, for example, to model and predict the spatial distribution of aquatic biota and to determine appropriate spatio-temporal designs for aquatic biota surveys. The new spatial knowledge of temperature regions will also help the evaluation of possible causes of larger scale climatological changes in a biological context including productivity.

  11. Elevation changes of ice caps in the Canadian Arctic Archipelago

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdalati, W.; Krabill, W.; Frederick, E.; Manizade, S.; Martin, C.; Sonntag, J.; Swift, R.; Thomas, R.; Yungel, J.; Koerner, R.

    2004-12-01

    Precise repeat airborne laser surveys were conducted over the major ice caps in the Canadian Arctic Archipelago in the spring of 1995 and 2000 in order to measure elevation changes in the region. Our measurements reveal thinning at lower elevations (below 1600 m) on most of the ice caps and glaciers but either very little change or thickening at higher elevations in the ice cap accumulation zones. Recent increases in precipitation in the area can account for the slight thickening where it was observed but not for the thinning at lower elevations. For the northern ice caps on the Queen Elizabeth Islands, thinning was generally <0.5 m yr-1, which is consistent with what would be expected from the warm temperature anomalies in the region for the 5 year period between surveys, and appears to be a continuation of a trend that began in the mid-1980s. Farther south, however, on the Barnes and Penny ice caps on Baffin Island, this thinning was much more pronounced at over 1 m yr-1 in the lower elevations. Here temperature anomalies were very small, and the thinning at low elevations far exceeds any associated enhanced ablation. The observations on Barnes, and perhaps Penny, are consistent with the idea that the observed thinning is part of a much longer term deglaciation, as has been previously suggested for Barnes ice cap. On the basis of the regional relationships between elevation and elevation change in our data, the 1995-2000 mass balance for the archipelago is estimated to be -25 km3 yr-1 of ice, which corresponds to a sea level increase of 0.064 mm yr-1. This places it among the more significant sources of eustatic sea level rise, though not as substantial as the Greenland ice sheet, Alaskan glaciers, or the Patagonian ice fields.

  12. The Galapagos archipelago: A natural laboratory to examine sharp hydroclimatic, geologic and anthropogenic gradients

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Percy, Madelyn; Schmitt, Sarah; Riveros-Iregui, Diego; Mirus, Benjamin B.

    2016-01-01

    Poor understanding of the water cycle in tropical ecosystems has the potential to exacerbate water shortages and water crises in the region. We suggest that the Galápagos Islands provide an excellent proxy to regions across the tropics as a result of sharp hydroclimatic, anthropogenic, and pedohydrologic gradients across the archipelago. Hydroclimatic and pedohydrologic gradients are found across different elevations on single islands, as well as across the archipelago, whereas anthropogenic gradients reflect land use and land cover change across islands as population and growth in tourism have affected individual islands differently. This article highlights specific opportunities to further examine our understanding of the interactions between water and critical zone processes in tropical ecosystems, making connections between the Galápagos archipelago and much of the understudied tropics. The Galápagos archipelago offers a natural laboratory through which we can examine current threats to freshwater security as well as the dynamics of coupled natural and human systems.

  13. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in mussel and fish from the Finnish Archipelago Sea

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-09-01

    Marine organisms are known to adsorb and accumulate PAH's from water. Mussels due to their widespread distribution in coastal waters have been studied in many laboratory and field experiments for their responses to PAH exposures. The occurrence of PAH's has been studied also in fish. This report presents preliminary data for the PAH content in blue mussel and fish from the Finnish Archipelago Sea. Mussel and fish samples were collected from the Finnish Archipelago Sea during 1978-1979.

  14. Vegetation and Climate history of Franz Jozef Land Archipelago in the Late Holocene according pollen data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nosevich, Ekaterina; Anisimov, Michail; Sapelko, Tatyana

    2015-04-01

    The archipelago Franz-Josef Land is situated in the Arctic Ocean (80°40' N, 54°50'E). It is one of the important areas for arctic research due to organization of Russian Arctic National Park there. Therefore, an interest to the environmental history of this territory grows up and any new data might have a high value. However, geographical remoteness of the archipelago is the reason why there are not much work has been done up to date. .A focus of our researches is vegetation and climate reconstruction during the Late Holocene history according pollen data. In frame of studying of the Franz Josef Land during complex expedition of Russian Arctic National Park on the islands geomorphological and botanical researches was occurred. Nowadays the typical island of archipelago presents the ice cap and glacier-free marine terraces of 35 m high at maximum, where solifluction and permafrost are developed. The archipelago has a maritime Arctic climate. Vegetation of archipelago Franz-Josef Land presents the northern type of Polar Desert. It includes 57 species of vascular plants (Poaceae, Juncaceae, Caryophyllaceae, Brassicaceae, Saxifragaceae etc). We studied the peat core from the southern part of Majbel Island, in the archipelago Franz Josef Land. More than a half of the island is covered by glacier. The core was sampled at the inner margin of ice-free high marine terrace, near the southern slope of bedrock hill. We received preliminary pollen data and radiocarbon data 3010±80 C14 y.a. at the bottom. The pollen concentration is low, but we manage to make some reconstructions of vegetation and climate. For correct interpretation of our results, we used surface samples from different islands of archipelago (Jackson, Hooker, Greely, Alexsandra land, Yeva-Liv, Appolonov, Georg land, Kane, Bell). Subrecent spectra include species presented in flora of region, but also those which are not founded at this region in this time.

  15. Early Carboniferous (Visean) lacustrine oil shale in Canadian Arctic archipelago

    SciTech Connect

    Davies, G.R.; Nassichuk, W.W.

    1988-01-01

    The Lower Carboniferous (Visean) Emma Fiord Formation in the Canadian Arctic Archipelago is an oil shale of lacustrine origin composed of black carbonaceous shale, siltstone, and marlstone with interbedded sandstone, conglomerate, and oolitic and algal limestones. At Kleybolte Peninsula on Ellesmere Island, the Emma Fiord Formation was deposited on the tectonically active northwestern rim of the Sverdrup basin; it is now thermally overmature and well beyond the dry gas zone of organic maturation (vitrinite reflectance approx. = 5.0). In contrast, the Emma Fiord sequence on Grinnell Peninsula, Devon Island, near the southern edge of the Sverdrup basin, is immature to marginally mature (vitrinite reflectance = 0.26-0.44) and is composed predominantly of liptinite-rich oil shale. These kerogen-rich rocks contain a high volume of microcrystalline calcite and compositionally are marlstones. The Emma Fiord oil shales were deposited in lakes formed immediately prior to or possibly synchronous with the initiation of rifting in the Sverdrup basin. Syntectonic red-bed conglomerates derived from uplifted horst blocks directly overlie the Emma Fiord rocks. A few beds of conglomerate and sandstone in the upper part of the Emma Fiord Formation possibly record the onset of faulting. The formation closely resembles contemporaneous sequences in northern Alaska, Yukon Territory, Greenland, and Spitsbergen. Clearly, similar tectonic and paleoclimatic factors influenced sedimentation over this area in the Early Carboniferous, with the Sverdrup basin locations lying within 10/sup 0/-15/sup 0/ of the paleoequator. 11 figures, 2 tables.

  16. Two new stingrays (Chondrichthyes: Dasyatidae) from the eastern Indonesian Archipelago.

    PubMed

    Last, Peter R; White, William T

    2013-01-01

    Two new stingrays, Dasyatis longicauda sp. nov. and Himanturajavaensis sp. nov., are described from material collected in the eastern Indonesian Archipelago. These species, which are both relatively small stingrays (both probably smaller than 40 cm DW), have been confused with closest relatives in the region. Dasyatis longicauda sp. nov., known from West Papua, differs from its congener, the Australian endemic D. fluviorum, in having a slightly lower vertebral count, lower pectoral-radial count, a longer tail, larger and less numerous thorns along the mid-disc and tail, as well as a different CO1 Barcode. Himantura javaensis sp. nov., known only from southern Java (near Cilacap), belongs to a complex of small whiprays which also includes another Indonesian species, H. walga. Apart from major differences in squamation and a different CO1 Barcode, Himantura javaensis is more brownish in coloration, has more vertebrae, a longer tail, smaller eye and orbit, more posteriorly positioned sting, shorter adult claspers, shorter pelvic fin, and differs in various measurements around the head.

  17. Air-sea coupling in the Hawaiian Archipelago

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souza, J. M.; Powell, B.; Mattheus, D.

    2014-12-01

    A coupled numerical model is used to investigate the ocean-atmosphere interaction in the lee of the Hawaiian archipelago. The wind curl generated by the island blocking of the trade winds is known to give rise to ocean eddies; however, the impact of the sea surface temperature (SST) and velocity fronts associated with these eddies on the atmosphere is less understood. The main coupling mechanisms are: (i) changes in the near-surface stability and surface stress, (ii) vertical transfer of momentum from higher atmospheric levels to the ocean surface due to an increase of the turbulence in the boundary layer, (iii) secondary circulations associated with perturbations in the surface atmospheric pressure over the SST fronts, and (iv) the impact of the oceanic eddy currents on the net momentum transferred between the atmosphere and the ocean. To assess the relative contribution from each process, a coupled simulation between the Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS) and the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) models is conducted for the main Hawaiian Islands. The impact of the coupling, the perturbation of the mean wind pattern, and the different spatial scales involved in the air-sea exchanges of momentum and heat are explored.

  18. Cause and risk of catastrophic eruptions in the Japanese Archipelago

    PubMed Central

    TATSUMI, Yoshiyuki; SUZUKI-KAMATA, Keiko

    2014-01-01

    The Japanese Archipelago is characterized by active volcanism with variable eruption styles. The magnitude (M)-frequency relationships of catastrophic caldera-forming eruptions (M ≥ 7) are statistically different from those of smaller eruptions (M ≤ 5.7), suggesting that different mechanisms control these eruptions. We also find that volcanoes prone to catastrophic eruptions are located in regions of low crustal strain rate (<0.5 × 108/y) and propose, as one possible mechanism, that the viscous silicic melts that cause such eruptions can be readily segregated from the partially molten lower crust and form a large magma reservoir in such a tectonic regime. Finally we show that there is a ∼1% probability of a catastrophic eruption in the next 100 years based on the eruption records for the last 120 ky. More than 110 million people live in an area at risk of being covered by tephra >20 cm thick, which would severely disrupt every day life, from such an eruption on Kyushu Island, SW Japan. PMID:25391319

  19. Assessment of Satellite Precipitation Products in the Philippine Archipelago

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramos, M. D.; Tendencia, E.; Espana, K.; Sabido, J.; Bagtasa, G.

    2016-06-01

    Precipitation is the most important weather parameter in the Philippines. Made up of more than 7100 islands, the Philippine archipelago is an agricultural country that depends on rain-fed crops. Located in the western rim of the North West Pacific Ocean, this tropical island country is very vulnerable to tropical cyclones that lead to severe flooding events. Recently, satellite-based precipitation estimates have improved significantly and can serve as alternatives to ground-based observations. These data can be used to fill data gaps not only for climatic studies, but can also be utilized for disaster risk reduction and management activities. This study characterized the statistical errors of daily precipitation from four satellite-based rainfall products from (1) the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM), (2) the CPC Morphing technique (CMORPH) of NOAA and (3) the Global Satellite Mapping of Precipitation (GSMAP) and (4) Precipitation Estimation from Remotely Sensed information using Artificial Neural Networks (PERSIANN). Precipitation data were compared to 52 synoptic weather stations located all over the Philippines. Results show GSMAP to have over all lower bias and CMORPH with lowest Mean Absolute Error (MAE) and Root Mean Square Error (RMSE). In addition, a dichotomous rainfall test reveals GSMAP and CMORPH have low Proportion Correct (PC) for convective and stratiform rainclouds, respectively. TRMM consistently showed high PC for almost all raincloud types. Moreover, all four satellite precipitation showed high Correct Negatives (CN) values for the north-western part of the country during the North-East monsoon and spring monsoonal transition periods.

  20. Historical ecology of the Raja Ampat Archipelago, Papua Province, Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Palomares, Maria Lourdes D; Heymans, Johanna J; Pauly, Daniel

    2007-01-01

    This work presents a review of the status of marine resources of the Raja Ampat Archipelago, Papua Province, Indonesia, based on narratives of early European expeditions in various museums and libraries in Europe, Canada, and local archives in Papua. More than 500 pertinent documents on the study area were identified and located in various European museums and at the University of British Columbia library. About half of these were scanned (25,000 pages), which yielded the equivalent of 900 pages of text (or 4% of the total number of pages scanned) with observations on abundance and impact of the human population on the marine ecosystem within 2 degrees North and 2 degrees South between 127 degrees and 132 degrees East. In general, these observations, which spanned the period from 1810 to the present, suggest a decrease in the perceived occurrences of turtles, fish, and invertebrates; perceived abundance of turtles, fish, and algae; percieved subsistence exploitation of marine resources; and an increase in perceived commercial exploitation of marine resources. We conclude with a discussion of the problems and potential of contents analysis, and its use in the historical reconstruction of broad biodiversity trends.

  1. A finite volume model simulation for the Broughton Archipelago, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foreman, M. G. G.; Czajko, P.; Stucchi, D. J.; Guo, M.

    A finite volume circulation model is applied to the Broughton Archipelago region of British Columbia, Canada and used to simulate the three-dimensional velocity, temperature, and salinity fields that are required by a companion model for sea lice behaviour, development, and transport. The absence of a high resolution atmospheric model necessitated the installation of nine weather stations throughout the region and the development of a simple data assimilation technique that accounts for topographic steering in interpolating/extrapolating the measured winds to the entire model domain. The circulation model is run for the period of March 13-April 3, 2008 and correlation coefficients between observed and model currents, comparisons between model and observed tidal harmonics, and root mean square differences between observed and model temperatures and salinities all showed generally good agreement. The importance of wind forcing in the near-surface circulation, differences between this simulation and one computed with another model, the effects of bathymetric smoothing on channel velocities, further improvements necessary for this model to accurately simulate conditions in May and June, and the implication of near-surface current patterns at a critical location in the 'migration corridor' of wild juvenile salmon, are also discussed.

  2. Acoustic habitat of an oceanic archipelago in the Southwestern Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bittencourt, Lis; Barbosa, Mariana; Secchi, Eduardo; Lailson-Brito, José; Azevedo, Alexandre

    2016-09-01

    Underwater soundscapes can be highly variable, and in natural conditions are often dominated by biological signals and physical features of the environment. Few studies, however, focused on oceanic islands soundscapes. Islands in the middle of ocean basins can provide a good example of how untouched marine soundscapes are. Autonomous acoustic recordings were carried out in two different seasons in Trindade-Martin Vaz Archipelago, Southwestern Atlantic, providing nearly continuous data for both periods. Sound levels varied daily and between seasons. During summer, higher frequencies were noisier than lower frequencies, with snapping shrimp being the dominating sound source. During winter, lower frequencies were noisier than higher frequencies due to humpback whale constant singing. Biological signal detection had a marked temporal pattern, playing an important role in the soundscape. Over 1000 humpback whale sounds were detected hourly during winter. Fish vocalizations were detected mostly during night time during both summer and winter. The results show an acoustic habitat dominated by biological sound sources and highlight the importance of the island to humpback whales in winter.

  3. Chapter 19: Geology and petroleum potential of the east Barents Sea Basins and Admiralty Arch

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Klett, T.R.; Pitman, J.K.

    2011-01-01

    The US Geological Survey (USGS) recently assessed the potential for undiscovered oil and gas resources of the East Barents Basins and Novaya Zemlya Basins and Admiralty Arch Provinces as part of the USGS Circum-Arctic Resource Appraisal. These two provinces are located NE of Scandinavia and the northwestern Russian Federation, on the Barents Sea Shelf between Novaya Zemlya to the east and the Barents Platform to the west. Three assessment units (AUs) were defined in the East Barents Basins for this study - Kolguyev Terrace Assessment Unit (AU), South Barents Basin and Ludlov Saddle AU, and North Barents Basin AU. A fourth, defined as Novaya Zemlya Basins and Admiralty Arch AU, is coincident with the Novaya Zemlya basins and Admiralty Arch Province. These AUs, all lying north of the Arctic Circle, were assessed for undiscovered, technically recoverable resources resulting in total estimated mean volumes of approximately 7.4 billion barrels of crude oil, 318 trillion cubic feet of natural gas and 1.4 billion barrels of natural gas liquids. ?? 2011 The Geological Society of London.

  4. Strong changes in lipoproteins and autoantibodies of blood serum of the Tundra Nency population as a result of environmental radiation on the territory they inhabit.

    PubMed

    Korovkina, E S; Tuzikov, F V; Tuzikova, N A; Osipova, L P; Buneva, V N; Nevinsky, G A

    2004-10-01

    As a result of large-scale nuclear tests on the Novaya Zemlya test site (1955-62) the Tundra Nentsy population of Yamal-Nentsy autonomous region (YNAR) fell under the constant influence of incorporated radioactive isotopes (137Cs and 90Sr). Therefore, it is very important to analyze a possible spectrum of diseases of Tundra Nentsy population.

  5. JPRS Report, Arms Control.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    Pavlov evidently does not think of the return that "defense" may generate in five years, as his task is to rob the enterprises now to somehow bring... Ivan Bentsa, followed by report from USSR Defense Ministry by Viktor Litovkin: "Novaya Zemlya Prepares For Nuclear Explosions"] [Text] New plans for

  6. Comparative phylogeography of oceanic archipelagos: Hotspots for inferences of evolutionary process

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, Kerry L.; Gillespie, Rosemary G.

    2016-01-01

    Remote island archipelagos offer superb opportunities to study the evolution of community assembly because of their relatively young and simple communities where speciation contributes to the origin and evolution of community structure. There is great potential for common phylogeographic patterns among remote archipelagos that originate through hotspot volcanism, particularly when the islands formed are spatially isolated and linearly arranged. The progression rule is characterized by a phylogeographic concordance between island age and lineage age in a species radiation. Progression is most likely to arise when a species radiation begins on an older island before the emergence of younger islands of a hotspot archipelago. In the simplest form of progression, colonization of younger islands as they emerge and offer appropriate habitat, is coincident with cladogenesis. In this paper, we review recent discoveries of the progression rule on seven hotspot archipelagos. We then discuss advantages that progression offers to the study of community assembly, and insights that community dynamics may offer toward understanding the evolution of progression. We describe results from two compelling cases of progression where the mosaic genome may offer insights into contrasting demographic histories that shed light on mechanisms of speciation and progression on remote archipelagos. PMID:27432948

  7. Geochemistry of Isla Santa Cruz, Galapagos Archipelago, Ecuador

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, E. L.; Schwartz, D. M.; Van Kirk, R.; Harpp, K.

    2012-12-01

    The geochemistry of Galapagos volcanoes extends to more depleted signatures than most hotspots, and do not appear to follow a classical tholeiitic to alkalic evolutionary sequence (i.e., Hawaiian Islands). Thus far, no such predictable sequence has been identified for Galapagos volcanoes. Isla Santa Cruz is one of the oldest volcanoes in the archipelago. Bow (1979) identified 3 volcanic stages: the Platform Series, the Shield Series, and the Shield-Modifying stage. The Platform Series defines a liquid line of descent that differs from the one shared by the Shield and Shield-Modifying units, which are genetically related to each other. Within the Shield and Shield-Modifying lavas, K2O/TiO2 ratios reveal three distinct compositional sub-groups: 1) a MORB-like, low-K suite (<0.10); 2) a tholeiitic suite (0.10-0.25); and 3) an alkaline suite (>0.25). These 3 sub-groups are geographically distributed across the island; the low-K suite is only in the north, whereas the alkaline suite constitutes the center highlands and the tholeiitic suite is on the eastern and northern flanks. Variations in La/Sm and Sm/Yb indicate that the magmas supplying the Shield and Shield-Modifying units were generated over a wide range of melting conditions: the alkaline suite melts were generated at the greatest depths and from the smallest melt fraction of the three suites, whereas the low-K suite originates from shallower, greater extents of melting; the tholeiitic lavas were generated at depths intermediate between the other 2 sub-groups. None of the lavas from Santa Cruz resemble material erupted at Fernandina volcano, the presumed center of the plume; radiogenic isotope ratios from previous research indicate that all Santa Cruz lavas are significantly more depleted than western Galapagos lavas. The ~1.2 Ma Platform Series is the most enriched of the Santa Cruz units. The Shield and Shield-Modifying lavas are all shifted towards more depleted signatures, approaching those of MORB, in terms

  8. The peopling of Madeira Archipelago (Portugal) according to HLA genes.

    PubMed

    Arnaiz-Villena, A; Reguera, R; Ferri, A; Barbolla, L; Abd-El-Fatah-Khalil, S; Bakhtiyarova, N; Millan, P; Moscoso, J; Mafalda, A; Serrano-Vela, J I

    2009-02-01

    The Madeira-Porto Santo Archipelago was officially colonized in 1420 by Portuguese settlers. Its importance in Columbus' information for the American discovery and for slave traffic across the Atlantic is unquestionable. Thus, a complex peopling may have given rise to a present-day high admixture of ethnicities according to HLA genes. A sample of 173 healthy unrelated Madeirans was analysed and compared with 6986 HLA chromosomes from other worldwide populations. Genetic distances, neighbour-joining dendrograms and correspondence analyses were used for comparisons. Southern European, North African (including Canary Islands), Jewish and Mediterranean typical HLA alleles were found and genetic distances from Madeirans to these populations were the closest ones. In addition A*24-B*65-DRB1*0102-DQB1*0501 and A*68-B*08-DRB1*0301-DQB1*0201 haplotypes were newly found in Madeira and not found in any other population. Jewish-Armenian-Middle East haplotype (A*33-B*65-DRB1*0102-DQB1*0501) is one of the most common haplotypes; this haplotype is also present in Spaniards and North Africans. Quantitatively, Portuguese, North Africans (Algerians), Spaniards and Canary Islanders (in this order) are the most important parental populations to Madeirans. Results are discussed on the basis of the recorded historical peopling which does not show a noticeable African gene input in present-day Madeiran population according to our data; one of the closest related populations found is the Canary Islanders, suggesting that Guanche (Canary Islands first inhabitants) slaves gene flow is still noticed at present, both in Madeira and in Canary Islands populations.

  9. Soils of the Galindez Island, Argentine archipelago, Western Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abakumov, Evgeny; Parnikoza, Ivan

    2015-04-01

    Antarctic Peninsula is a part of Antarctica which is characterized by increased soil diversity, caused by specific of parent materials and diversity of non-vascular and vascular plants. Soils of Galindez Island have been investigated during the 18-th Ukranian Antarctic Expedition 2013/14. This Island situated in Argentine archipelago (coastal part of Antarctic Peninsula). Soils of Galindez Island presented by following types: Leptosols, Lithosols, Histic Lithosols and Leptosols and some Gleyic soils, located in lowlands and coastal parts. An average solum profile thickness is 3-19 cm which result from the small depth of debris's, underplayed by massive crystallic rocks. The permafrost layer is located within the massive rock, but not in coarse friable parent material. The soils with bird influence are widely spread both in coastal and central part of Island. In the coastal parts we can find typical Ornithosols in the penguin rockeries areas. The main aim of our investigation was characterization of soils formed under vegetation, exactly under Deschampsia antarctica Desv. localities. Argentine Islands is the central part of D. antarctica spreading area in region of Antarctic peninsula. Probably, these islands colonized by hairgrass mainly due to ornitogenic activity. So, coastal population appearance related with Larus dominicanus nest areas and feeding activity. Thus, we found typical post ornithogenic soils here. This kind of soils we also observed in population of hairgrass of Galindez mainland where it was connected with the other Antarctic bird - Catharacta maccormicki activity. Thus, the soil diversity and soil geochemistry of the Galindez Island are closely related to the activity of birds. The spatial pattern of soils, their chemistry and organic matter quality is discussed in relation with distribution of bird nesting and feeding activity.

  10. Elevation Changes of Ice Caps in the Canadian Arctic Archipelago

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdalati, W.; Krabill, W.; Frederick, E.; Manizade, S.; Martin, C.; Sonntag, J.; Swift, R.; Thomas, R.; Yungel, J.; Koerner, R.

    2004-01-01

    Precise repeat airborne laser surveys were conducted over the major ice caps in the Canadian Arctic Archipelago in the spring of 1995 and 2000 in order to measure elevation changes in the region. Our measurements reveal thinning at lower elevations (below 1600 m) on most of the ice caps and glaciers, but either very little change or thickening at higher elevations in the ice cap accumulation zones. Recent increases in precipitation in the area can account for the slight thickening where it was observed, but not for the thinning at lower elevations. For the northern ice caps on the Queen Elizabeth Islands, thinning was generally less than 0.5 m/yr , which is consistent with what would be expected from the warm temperature anomalies in the region for the 5-year period between surveys and appears to be a continuation of a trend that began in the mid 1980s. Further south, however, on the Barnes and Penny ice caps on Baffin Island, this thinning was much more pronounced at over 1 m/yr in the lower elevations. Here temperature anomalies were very small, and the thinning at low elevations far exceeds any associated enhanced ablation. The observations on Barnes, and perhaps Penny are consistent with the idea that the observed thinning is part of a much longer term deglaciation, as has been previously suggested for Barnes Ice Cap. Based on the regional relationships between elevation and elevation-change in our data, the 1995-2000 mass balance for the region is estimated to be 25 cu km/yr of ice, which corresponds to a sea level increase of 0.064 mm/ yr . This places it among the more significant sources of eustatic sea level rise, though not as substantial as Greenland ice sheet, Alaskan glaciers, or the Patagonian ice fields.

  11. Viticultural zoning of Graciosa island of the Azores archipelago - Portugal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madruga, João; Reis, Francisco; Felipe, João; Azevedo, Eduardo; Pinheiro, Jorge

    2016-04-01

    The management and sustainability of the traditional vineyards of the Azores settled on lava field terrains is strongly affected by practical limitations of mechanization and high demand on man labor imposed by the typical micro parcel structure of the vineyards. In a recent macrozoning approach study Madruga et al (2015) showed that besides the traditional vineyards there are significant areas in some of the Azores islands whose soils, climate and physiographic characteristics indicate a potential for the development of new vineyard areas offering conditions for better management and sustainability. The objective of this study was to conduct a detailed viticultural zoning at the level of the small mapscale (smaller than 1:25,000), for the island of Graciosa where, besides the traditional lava field terroir, there are also some localized experiences of grapevine production over normal soils, offering thus some comparative information on this type of production conditions. The zoning approach for the present study was based in a geographic information system (GIS) analysis incorporating factors related to climate and topography which was then combined with the soil mapping units fulfilling the suitable criteria concerning the soil properties taken as the most relevant for viticulture, being the result a map of homogeneous environmental units. The climatic zoning examined the direct quantitative variables (precipitation, temperature, evaporation) in relation to climate index, bioclimatic and viticultural specific values. Topography (elevation, slope, aspect, orientation) was analyzed based on the tridimensional models of the islands in GIS to include the best slopes for the mechanization of the vineyard cultural operations (0-15%). Soils were analyzed based on data and soil map units as defined in the soil surveys of the Azores archipelago. The soil properties taken for the analysis and definition of the potential vineyard areas were drainage, water holding capacity

  12. Risk Factors of Typhoid Infection in the Indonesian Archipelago

    PubMed Central

    Alba, Sandra; Bakker, Mirjam I.; Hatta, Mochammad; Scheelbeek, Pauline F. D.; Dwiyanti, Ressy; Usman, Romi; Sultan, Andi R.; Sabir, Muhammad; Tandirogang, Nataniel; Amir, Masyhudi; Yasir, Yadi; Pastoor, Rob; van Beers, Stella; Smits, Henk L.

    2016-01-01

    Background Knowledge of risk factors and their relative importance in different settings is essential to develop effective health education material for the prevention of typhoid. In this study, we examine the effect of household level and individual behavioural risk factors on the risk of typhoid in three Indonesian islands (Sulawesi, Kalimantan and Papua) in the Eastern Indonesian archipelago encompassing rural, peri-urban and urban areas. Methods We enrolled 933 patients above 10 years of age in a health facility-based case-control study between June 2010 and June 2011. Individuals suspected of typhoid were tested using the typhoid IgM lateral flow assay for the serodiagnosis of typhoid fever followed by blood culture testing. Cases and controls were defined post-recruitment: cases were individuals with a culture or serology positive result (n = 449); controls were individuals negative to both serology and culture, with or without a diagnosis other than typhoid (n = 484). Logistic regression was used to examine the effect of household level and individual level behavioural risk factors and we calculated the population attributable fraction (PAF) of removing each risk significant independent behavioural risk factor. Results Washing hands at critical moments of the day and washing hands with soap were strong independent protective factors for typhoid (OR = 0.38 95% CI 0.25 to 0.58 for each unit increase in hand washing frequency score with values between 0 = Never and 3 = Always; OR = 3.16 95% CI = 2.09 to 4.79 comparing washing hands with soap sometimes/never vs. often). These effects were independent of levels of access to water and sanitation. Up to two thirds of cases could be prevented by compliance to these practices (hand washing PAF = 66.8 95% CI 61.4 to 71.5; use of soap PAF = 61.9 95%CI 56.7 to 66.5). Eating food out in food stalls or restaurant was an important risk factor (OR = 6.9 95%CI 4.41 to 10.8 for every unit increase in frequency score

  13. Tsunami hazard assessment for the Azores archipelago: a historical review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabral, Nuno; Ferreira, Teresa; Queiroz, Maria Gabriela

    2010-05-01

    The Azores islands due to its complex geographical and geodynamic setting are exposed to tsunamigenic events associated to different triggering mechanisms, local or distant. Since the settlement of the Azores, in the fifteenth century, there are several documents that relate coastal areas flooding episodes with unusually high waves which caused death and destruction. This work had as main objective the characterization of the different events that can be associated with tsunamigenic phenomena, registered in the archipelago. With this aim, it was collected diverse documentation like chronics, manuscripts, newspaper articles and magazines, scientific publications, and international databases available online. From all the studied tsunami events it was identified the occurrence of some teletsunamis, among which the most relevant was triggered by the 1st November 1755 Lisbon earthquake, with an epicenter SW of Portugal, which killed 6 people in Terceira island. It is also noted the teletsunami generated by the 1761 earthquake, located in the same region as the latest, and the one generated in 1929 by an earthquake-triggered submarine landslide in the Grand Banks of Newfoundland. From the local events, originated in the Azores, the most significant were the tsunamis triggered by 1757 and 1980 earthquakes, both associated with the Terceira Rift dynamics. In the first case the waves may also be due to earthquake-triggered. With respect to tsunamis triggered by sea cliffs landslides it is important to mention the 1847 Quebrada Nova and the 1980 Rocha Alta events, both located in the Flores Island. The 1847 event is the deadliest tsunami recorded in Azores since 10 people died in Flores and Corvo islands in result of the propagated wave. The developed studies improve knowledge of the tsunami sources that affected the Azores during its history, also revealing the importance of awareness about this natural phenomenon. The obtained results showed that the tsunami hazard in the

  14. Is the Hawaiian Archipelago dominantly Loa-trend?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weis, D.; Harrison, L.; Garcia, M. O.; Rhodes, M. M.

    2015-12-01

    Hawaiian volcanoes are distributed en echelon on the islands along two chains, the Loa and Kea trends, that are geographically and geochemically distinct1,2. These geochemical differences may be attributed to source zoning (concentric or bilateral) of the Hawaiian mantle plume (HMP) or to variations in pressure and temperature of melting. Most of these models assume a degree of independence of the two trends that is perhaps not realistic. To explore the isotopic characteristics of two "Kea"-trend volcanoes with transitional signatures, we analyzed 11 samples of Kohala shield-stage tholeiitic lavas and three from Haleakala for high-precision Pb-Nd-Sr-Hf isotopes. These samples are transitional in all isotopic systems between Loa and Kea compositions and cross-over the Pb-Pb boundary3. Minor cross-overs had been documented in Mauna Kea4, Kilauea5, and W Molokai6 basalts. A bilateral or concentric view of the HMP is thus too simplistic. Statistical analysis of the MC-ICP-MS or triple-spike shield tholeiite data (n>600) and the existence of three Pb-Pb trends originating from average Loa indicate that Loa is the dominant mantle source composition on the archipelago. Isotopically, four geochemical groups are identified: Kea (Mauna Kea, Kilauea), average Loa (Mauna Loa, Hualalai, Kauai, Waianae, W. Molokai, Loihi), enriched Loa (Koolau Makapuu, Lanai, Kahoolawe) and transitional Kea (E. Molokai, W. Maui, Haleakala, Kohala). The implications are: 1) HMP source components refresh and grade into and out of existence on a smaller timescale than previously thought; 2) the Kea trend is also heterogeneous; and 3) vertical heterogeneity of the plume is important on a regional scale as well as at the scale of individual volcanoes6. 1Jackson et al., 1972, GSA Bull. 83, 1-17. 2Weis et al., 2011, Nat. Geosci., 4, 831-838. 3Abouchami et al., 2005, Nature, 434, 851-856. 4Eisele et al., 2003, G-cubed, 4, 5, 32 pages. 5Marske et al., 2007, EPSL, 259, 34-50. 6Xu et al., 2014, GCA, 132

  15. Megachile timberlakei Cockerell (Hymenoptera: Megachilidae): Yet another adventive bee species to the Galapagos Archipelago

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Galapagos Archipelago has been thought to be extremely depauperate in bees, with only one species known, Xylocopa darwini. Recently a second species, Anthidium vigintiduopunctatum, was detected. Here we document a third species, Megachile timberlakei. We provide floral records as well as a dia...

  16. Creole-based Trilingual Education in the Caribbean Archipelago of San Andres, Providence and Santa Catalina.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morren, Ronald C.

    2002-01-01

    Depicts the impetus and drive behind the development of a primary trilingual education curriculum for the Western Caribbean Archipelago of San Andre, Providence, and Santa Catalina. Based on outcomes in other multilingual education projects, hypothesizes positive academic gains in all areas at a cost benefit to the national government. (Author/VWL)

  17. Identification of metapopulation dynamics among Northern Goshawks of the Alexander Archipelago, Alaska, and Coastal British Columbia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sonsthagen, Sarah A.; McClaren, Erica L.; Doyle, Frank I.; Titus, K.; Sage, George K.; Wilson, Robert E.; Gust, Judy R.; Talbot, Sandra L.

    2012-01-01

    Northern Goshawks occupying the Alexander Archipelago, Alaska, and coastal British Columbia nest primarily in old-growth and mature forest, which results in spatial heterogeneity in the distribution of individuals across the landscape. We used microsatellite and mitochondrial data to infer genetic structure, gene flow, and fluctuations in population demography through evolutionary time. Patterns in the genetic signatures were used to assess predictions associated with the three population models: panmixia, metapopulation, and isolated populations. Population genetic structure was observed along with asymmetry in gene flow estimates that changed directionality at different temporal scales, consistent with metapopulation model predictions. Therefore, Northern Goshawk assemblages located in the Alexander Archipelago and coastal British Columbia interact through a metapopulation framework, though they may not fit the classic model of a metapopulation. Long-term population sources (coastal mainland British Columbia) and sinks (Revillagigedo and Vancouver islands) were identified. However, there was no trend through evolutionary time in the directionality of dispersal among the remaining assemblages, suggestive of a rescue-effect dynamic. Admiralty, Douglas, and Chichagof island complex appears to be an evolutionarily recent source population in the Alexander Archipelago. In addition, Kupreanof island complex and Kispiox Forest District populations have high dispersal rates to populations in close geographic proximity and potentially serve as local source populations. Metapopulation dynamics occurring in the Alexander Archipelago and coastal British Columbia by Northern Goshawks highlight the importance of both occupied and unoccupied habitats to long-term population persistence of goshawks in this region.

  18. Tropical Instability Wave Interactions within the Galápagos Archipelago.

    EPA Science Inventory

    In the boreal fall of 2005, the effects of tropical instability waves (TIW) appear as oscillations within the sea surface temperature (SST), meridional current (Vy), and thermocline (20°C) in the eastern equatorial Pacific. Within the Galápagos Archipelago, a strong 3-wave succes...

  19. Anthidium vigintiduopunctatum Friese (Hymenoptera: Megachilidae): The elusive "dwarf bee" of the Galapagos Archipelago

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The endemic large carpenter bee, Xylocopa darwini Cockerell, was the only known bee pollinator to the Galapagos Archipelago but as early as 1964 locals also spoke of the "dwarf bee of Floreana". We report the presence of the wool carder bee, Anthidium vigintiduopunctatum Friese, on the island of Fl...

  20. Dissemination of antibiotic resistant Enterococcus spp. and Escherichia coli from wild birds of Azores Archipelago.

    PubMed

    Santos, Tiago; Silva, Nuno; Igrejas, Gilberto; Rodrigues, Pedro; Micael, Joana; Rodrigues, Tiago; Resendes, Roberto; Gonçalves, Alexandre; Marinho, Catarina; Gonçalves, David; Cunha, Regina; Poeta, Patrícia

    2013-12-01

    Antibiotic-resistant is profoundly important to human and animal health, but the environmental reservoirs of resistance determinants are poorly understood, in particular in wild environments in remote Archipelagos. Moreover, the prevalence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria in wild bird populations is rather unknown. In the present study, we used the Azores Islands as a model study for antimicrobial resistance in a remote Archipelago, and examined the antibiotic resistance profile in enterococci and Escherichia coli recovered from faecal samples of wild birds collected in this Archipelago. A total of 138 enterococci and 115 E. coli isolates were analyzed for resistance to antimicrobial agents. Of the enterococcal isolates, Enterococcus faecalis was the most prevalent detected species (59 isolates), followed by Enterococcus faecium (40 isolates), Enterococcus durans (27 isolates) and Enterococcus hirae (12 isolates). The enterococci strains showed high percentages of resistance to tetracycline (32.6%), to ciprofloxacin (19.6%) and to erythromycin (11.6%). Lower level of resistance (<10%) was detected for ampicillin, chloramphenicol and teicoplanin. One vancomycin-resistant E. faecalis isolate was detected and harbored the vanA resistant gene. Resistance genes detected included tet(M) and/or tet(L), ermB in all tetracycline and erythromycin-resistant isolates. Resistance in E. coli isolates was detected for ampicillin, tetracycline, sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim, streptomycin, and tobramycin. The blaTEM, aadA, aadA5, strA, strB, tet(A) and/or tet(B), and the intI genes were found in all ampicillin, streptomycin, tetracycline, and sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim-resistant isolates respectively. The data shown in this study are essential to improve knowledge about the dissemination of resistant strains through wild birds from remote archipelagos such as the Azores Archipelago and the possible implications involved in transferring these resistances either to other animals

  1. Multi Hazard Assessment: The Azores Archipelagos (PT) case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aifantopoulou, Dorothea; Boni, Giorgio; Cenci, Luca; Kaskara, Maria; Kontoes, Haris; Papoutsis, Ioannis; Paralikidis, Sideris; Psichogyiou, Christina; Solomos, Stavros; Squicciarino, Giuseppe; Tsouni, Alexia; Xerekakis, Themos

    2016-04-01

    The COPERNICUS EMS Risk & Recovery Mapping (RRM) activity offers services to support efficient design and implementation of mitigation measures and recovery planning based on EO data exploitation. The Azores Archipelagos case was realized in the context of the FWC 259811 Copernicus EMS RRM, and provides potential impact information for a number of natural disasters. The analysis identified population and assets at risk (infrastructures and environment). The risk assessment was based on hazard and vulnerability of structural elements, road network characteristics, etc. Integration of different hazards and risks was accounted in establishing the necessary first response/ first aid infrastructure. EO data (Pleiades and WV-2), were used to establish a detailed background information, common for the assessment of the whole of the risks. A qualitative Flood hazard level was established, through a "Flood Susceptibility Index" that accounts for upstream drainage area and local slope along the drainage network (Manfreda et al. 2014). Indicators, representing different vulnerability typologies, were accounted for. The risk was established through intersecting hazard and vulnerability (risk- specific lookup table). Probabilistic seismic hazards maps (PGA) were obtained by applying the Cornell (1968) methodology as implemented in CRISIS2007 (Ordaz et al. 2007). The approach relied on the identification of potential sources, the assessment of earthquake recurrence and magnitude distribution, the selection of ground motion model, and the mathematical model to calculate seismic hazard. Lava eruption areas and a volcanic activity related coefficient were established through available historical data. Lava flow paths and their convergence were estimated through applying a cellular, automata based, Lava Flow Hazard numerical model (Gestur Leó Gislason, 2013). The Landslide Hazard Index of NGI (Norwegian Geotechnical Institute) for heavy rainfall (100 year extreme monthly rainfall

  2. Redescription of Bradya typica Boeck, 1873 (Copepoda: Harpacticoida: Ectinosomatidae) with the first description of the male

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seifried, Sybille; Veit-Köhler, Gritta

    2010-03-01

    Bradya typica Boeck, 1873 is described from samples collected in the course of a colonisation experiment in Kongsfjorden, Spitsbergen (2003-2005). The male of B. typica, the type-species of the genus is described for the first time. B. typica can be distinguished from its congeners by its caudal rami (1.4 times longer than wide) and by its P5 (exopod longer than wide, inner terminal seta of exopod longest, inner seta of baseoendopod longer than outer one and surface seta rigid and curved). Variability within the species is rather small as only the length of some setae is slightly different. B. cladiofera Lang, 1965, B. congenera Sars, 1920, B. minutiseta Soyer, 1973 and B. pugiochaeta Arlt, 1983 are closely related to B. typica. Some details of the morphology, such as the body ornamentation and the longer hair-like pinnules on the spines of the swimming legs, are very difficult to observe even with maximum magnification. With certainty, B. typica is distributed near the Norwegian coast (Oslo Fjord to Trondheim Fjord), the Swedish coast (Skagerak to Öresund), around Spitsbergen and around the polar islands north of Grinnelland (Canadian Arctic Archipelago near Baffin Bay). Records of B. typica from the Kara Sea (near Novaya Zemlya), near Franz Joseph Land, Iceland, Greenland, the British Isles and from deep waters of the North Sea have to be confirmed.

  3. Colonization of the Hawaiian Archipelago via Johnston Atoll: a characterization of oceanographic transport corridors for pelagic larvae using computer simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Donald R.

    2006-08-01

    Larval transport between Johnston Atoll and the Hawaiian Archipelago was examined using computer simulation and high-resolution ocean current data. The effects of pelagic larval duration and spawning seasonality on long-distance transport and local retention were examined using a Lagrangian, individual-based approach. Retention around Johnston Atoll appeared to be low, and there appeared to be seasonal effects on both retention and dispersal. Potential larval transport corridors between Johnston Atoll and the Hawaiian Archipelago were charted. One corridor connects Johnston Atoll with the middle portion of the Hawaiian Archipelago in the vicinity of French Frigate Shoals. Another corridor connects Johnston Atoll with the lower inhabited islands in the vicinity of Kauai. Transport appears to be related to the subtropical countercurrent and the Hawaiian Lee countercurrent, both located to the west of the archipelago and flowing to the east. A new analytical tool, termed CONREC-IRC is presented for the quantification of spatial patterns.

  4. Timing and number of colonizations but not diversification rates affect diversity patterns in hemosporidian lineages on a remote oceanic archipelago.

    PubMed

    Cornuault, Josselin; Warren, Ben H; Bertrand, Joris A M; Milá, Borja; Thébaud, Christophe; Heeb, Philipp

    2013-12-01

    Parasite diversity on remote oceanic archipelagos is determined by the number and timing of colonizations and by in situ diversification rate. In this study, we compare intra-archipelago diversity of two hemosporidian parasite genera, Plasmodium and Leucocytozoon, infecting birds of the Mascarene archipelago. Despite the generally higher vagility of Plasmodium parasites, we report a diversity of Plasmodium cytochrome b haplotypes in the archipelago much lower than that of Leucocytozoon. Using phylogenetic data, we find that this difference in diversity is consistent with differences in the timing and number of colonizations, while rates of diversification do not vary significantly between the two genera. The prominence of immigration history in explaining current diversity patterns highlights the importance of historical contingencies in driving disparate biogeographic patterns in potentially harmful blood parasites infecting island birds.

  5. On the issue of the Precambrian basement of the Arctic shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vernikovsky, Valery A.; Korago, Evgeny A.; Proskurnin, Vasily F.; Sobolev, Nikolay N.

    2015-04-01

    Many researchers of the geological structures of the Russian Arctic concluded that the basements of the terranes composing the Arctic shelf and continental slopes have a Precambrian age. It is assumed that these terranes are actually fragments of the ancient Arctida paleocontinent [Zonenshain, Natapov, 1987] that broke up as a result of rifting and its separate plates and terranes either were overlain by continental margins sediments or included in the fold belts in the periphery of the ocean. In the western part of the Russian Arctic, a Grenvillian and Mesoproterozoic basement was demonstrated for Svalbard, Novaya Zemlya and Taimyr Peninsula, and at least a Neoproterozoic basement was established for structures in the basement of Severnaya Zemlya archipelago. In the eastern part of the Russian Arctic, such proofs were almost nonexistent. In recent years, new information was obtained concerning the continental nature and Precambrian age of the basement crust of the New Siberian Islands and De Long archipelagos as well as probably the Mendeleev Ridge. For the New Siberian Islands and De Long archipelagos, a whole series of geochronological evidence was obtained in addition to geological data (horizontally bedding Early Paleozoic passive continental margin sediments (Cambrian, Ordovician) at Bennett Island). In magmatic and tuffaceous-sedimentary rocks of Henrietta and Zhokhov islands we discovered zircons that had formed from magmatic crystallization in the Late Neoproterozoic. New U-Pb data for zircons from rocks of these islands do not contradict isotopic dating obtained earlier by other methods - Ar/Ar and Sm/Nd in different laboratories. Considering different closure temperatures for isotopic systems, these new results complement each other. On the islands of the eastern sector of the Russian Arctic, a Neoproterozoic complex of rocks is most certainly established in the basement of the mesozoides of Vrangel Island. Here were discovered metamorphosed volcanics

  6. The blowflies of the Madeira Archipelago: species diversity, distribution and identification (Diptera, Calliphoridae s. l.)

    PubMed Central

    Prado e Castro, Catarina; Szpila, Krzysztof; Martínez-Sánchez, Anabel; Rego; Silva, Isamberto; Serrano, Artur R.M.; Boieiro, Mário

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Knowledge on the taxonomic diversity and distribution of blowflies from the Madeira Archipelago is updated. New and interesting findings are reported for poorly studied islands and islets of this archipelago, together with a brief analysis of the diversity of Macaronesian Calliphoridae s. l. Seven blowfly species were collected during this study, including the first records of Calliphora vicina Robineau-Desvoidy, 1830, Chrysomya albiceps (Wiedemann, 1819), Lucilia sericata (Meigen, 1826), Pollenia rudis (Fabricius, 1794) and Stomorhina lunata (Fabricius, 1805) from Porto Santo, and of Calliphora vicina, Lucilia sericata and Stomorhina lunata from Desertas Islands. The presence of Calliphora loewi Enderlein, 1903 in Madeira Laurisilva forest is discussed and its first instar larva is redescribed, revealing important differences in relation to its original description. An identification key to the adult Madeiran blowflies is provided for the first time. PMID:27917052

  7. Bald Eagles consume Emperor Geese during late-winter in the Aleutian Archipelago

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ricca, Mark A.; Anthony, Robert G.; Williams, Jeffrey C.

    2004-01-01

    Emperor Geese (Chen canagica) are a species of concern because their population has declined rapidly since the mid-1960s and continues to remain below management objectives (Petersen et al. 1994). Emperor Geese are restricted primarily to Alaska and exhibit an east-west migration pattern, whereby most birds begin breeding on the Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta by mid-May, stage on the Alaska Peninsula by late September, and migrate westward to winter in the Aleutian Archipelago from late November to mid-April (Eisenhauer and Kirkpatrick 1977, Petersen et al. 1994). Demographic and movement studies have been conducted on breeding grounds and stagmg areas (e.g., Schmutz et al. 1994, 1997); however, the winter ecology of Emperor Geese is poorly understood due in part to the extremely remote nature of the Aleutian Archipelago (Petersen et al. 1994). 

  8. Bacillus shackletonii sp. nov., from volcanic soil on Candlemas Island, South Sandwich archipelago.

    PubMed

    Logan, Niall A; Lebbe, Liesbeth; Verhelst, An; Goris, Johan; Forsyth, Gillian; Rodríguez-Díaz, Marina; Heyndrickx, Marc; De Vos, Paul

    2004-03-01

    A sample of mossy soil taken from the eastern lava flow of northern Candlemas Island, South Sandwich archipelago, yielded six isolates of aerobic, endospore-forming bacteria. Miniaturized routine phenotypic tests and other observations, amplified rDNA restriction analysis and SDS-PAGE analysis suggested that the strains represent a novel taxon. 16S rDNA sequence comparisons support the proposal of a novel species, Bacillus shackletonii sp. nov., the type strain of which is LMG 18435(T) (=CIP 107762(T)).

  9. Phylogeography of the prehensile-tailed skink Corucia zebrata on the Solomon Archipelago

    PubMed Central

    Hagen, Ingerid J; Donnellan, Stephen C; Bull, C Michael

    2012-01-01

    The biogeography of islands is often strongly influenced by prior geological events. Corucia zebrata (Squamata: Scincidae) is endemic to the geologically complex Solomon Archipelago in Northern Melanesia. We examined the level of divergence for different island populations of C. zebrata and discussed these patterns in light of Pleistocene land bridges, island isolation, and island age. Corucia zebrata was sampled from 14 locations across the Solomon Archipelago and sequenced at two mitochondrial genes (ND2 and ND4; 1697 bp in total) and four nuclear loci (rhodopsin, an unknown intron, AKAP9, and PTPN12). Measures of genetic divergence, analyses of genetic variation, and Bayesian phylogenetic inference were used and the data assessed in light of geological information. Populations of C. zebrata on separate islands were found to be genetically different from each other, with reciprocal monophyly on mitochondrial DNA. Populations on islands previously connected by Pleistocene land bridges were marginally less divergent from each other than from populations on other nearby but isolated islands. There are indications that C. zebrata has radiated across the eastern islands of the archipelago within the last 1–4 million years. Nuclear loci were not sufficiently informative to yield further information about the phylogeography of C. zebrata on the Solomon Archipelago. Analyses of the mitochondrial data suggest that dispersal between islands has been very limited and that there are barriers to gene flow within the major islands. Islands that have been isolated during the Pleistocene glacial cycles are somewhat divergent in their mitochondrial genotypes, however, isolation by distance (IBD) and recent colonization of isolated but geologically younger islands appear to have had stronger effects on the phylogeography of C. zebrata than the Pleistocene glacial cycles. This contrasts with patterns reported for avian taxa, and highlights the fact that biogeographic regions for

  10. Characterization and Modeling of the Philippine Archipelago Dynamics Using the ROMS 4DVAR Data Assimilation System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-30

    assimilation (Moore et al., 2011a,b,c; Powell et al. 2008; Muccino et al., 2008; Di Lorenzo et al., 2007), ensemble prediction, adaptive sampling, circulation...ROMS adjoint and variational data assimilation) at Scripps Institute of Oceanography, E. Di Lorenzo (Southern California predictability) at Georgia...a Hindcast/Forecast Model for the Philippine Archipelago, oceanography, 20(1), 58-69, doi:10.5670/oceanog.2011.04. Di Lorenzo , E., A.M. Moore, H. G

  11. Rabies in an Arctic fox on the Svalbard archipelago, Norway, January 2011.

    PubMed

    Orpetveit, I; Ytrehus, B; Vikoren, T; Handeland, K; Mjos, A; Nissen, S; Blystad, H; Lund, A

    2011-02-17

    We report a case of rabies in an Arctic fox. In January 2011 a fox attacked dogs belonging to a meteorological station in the Svalbard archipelago, Norway. Rabies virus was detected in the fox's brain post-mortem. The dogs had been vaccinated against rabies and their antibody levels were protective. Post-exposure prophylaxis was administered to staff at the station. Rabies vaccination is recommended for inhabitants and visitors to the Arctic who may be in contact with wild animals.

  12. New insights on the petrology of submarine volcanics from the Western Pontine Archipelago (Tyrrhenian Sea, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conte, A. M.; Perinelli, C.; Bianchini, G.; Natali, C.; Martorelli, E.; Chiocci, F. L.

    2016-11-01

    The Pontine Islands form a volcanic archipelago in the Tyrrhenian Sea. It consists of two edifices, the islands of Ponza, Palmarola and Zannone and the islands of Ventotene and Santo Stefano, respectively. The Archipelago developed during two main volcanic cycles in the Plio-Pleistocene: 1) the Pliocene episode erupted subalkaline, silica-rich volcanic units, which constitute the dominant products in the western edifice (Ponza and Zannone Islands); 2) the Pleistocene episode erupted more alkaline products, represented by evolved rocks (trachytes to peralkaline rhyolites) in the islands of Ponza and Palmarola and by basic to intermediate rocks in the eastern edifice (Ventotene and Santo Stefano Islands). In this paper we present new geochemical and petrological data from submarine rock samples collected in two oceanographic cruises and a scuba diving survey. The main result is the recovery of relatively undifferentiated lithotypes that provide further insights on the magmatic spectrum existing in the Pontine Archipelago, allowing modelling of the whole suite of rocks by fractional crystallization processes. New major and trace element data and thermodynamic constrains (by the software PELE) indicate the existence of three distinct evolutionary trends corresponding to a HK calcalkaline series in the Pliocene, followed by a transitional and then by a shoshonite series in the Pleistocene. In particular, the transitional series, so far overlooked in the literature, is required in order to explain the genesis of several peralkaline felsic rocks recognized in the Archipelago. On the whole, the new geochemical data i) confirm the orogenic signature of the suites, ii) allow to rule out an anatectic origin for both subalkaline and peralkaline rhyolites and iii) indicate highly heterogeneous mantle sources, due to crustal components variously recycled in the mantle via subduction.

  13. Mid-recent human occupation and resource exploitation in the bismarck archipelago.

    PubMed

    White, J P; Downie, J E; Ambrose, W R

    1978-02-24

    Human settlement of the Bismarck Archipelago occurred by 6000 to 7500 years ago. Early inhabitants of New Ireland drew on widely dispersed stone sources, including obsidian from Talasea (New Britain), whereas those after about 3000 years ago used either stone from more local sources or obsidian from Lou Island (Admiralty Islands group) or Talasea. The dates and resource changes support a gradualist model of Melanesian settlement.

  14. Sharply increased mass loss from glaciers and ice caps in the Canadian Arctic Archipelago.

    PubMed

    Gardner, Alex S; Moholdt, Geir; Wouters, Bert; Wolken, Gabriel J; Burgess, David O; Sharp, Martin J; Cogley, J Graham; Braun, Carsten; Labine, Claude

    2011-05-19

    Mountain glaciers and ice caps are contributing significantly to present rates of sea level rise and will continue to do so over the next century and beyond. The Canadian Arctic Archipelago, located off the northwestern shore of Greenland, contains one-third of the global volume of land ice outside the ice sheets, but its contribution to sea-level change remains largely unknown. Here we show that the Canadian Arctic Archipelago has recently lost 61 ± 7 gigatonnes per year (Gt yr(-1)) of ice, contributing 0.17 ± 0.02 mm yr(-1) to sea-level rise. Our estimates are of regional mass changes for the ice caps and glaciers of the Canadian Arctic Archipelago referring to the years 2004 to 2009 and are based on three independent approaches: surface mass-budget modelling plus an estimate of ice discharge (SMB+D), repeat satellite laser altimetry (ICESat) and repeat satellite gravimetry (GRACE). All three approaches show consistent and large mass-loss estimates. Between the periods 2004-2006 and 2007-2009, the rate of mass loss sharply increased from 31 ± 8 Gt yr(-1) to 92 ± 12 Gt yr(-1) in direct response to warmer summer temperatures, to which rates of ice loss are highly sensitive (64 ± 14 Gt yr(-1) per 1 K increase). The duration of the study is too short to establish a long-term trend, but for 2007-2009, the increase in the rate of mass loss makes the Canadian Arctic Archipelago the single largest contributor to eustatic sea-level rise outside Greenland and Antarctica.

  15. [Taxonomy and distribution of the hermatypic corals (Scleractinia) of the Revillagigedo Archipelago, Mexico].

    PubMed

    Ketchum, J T; Reyes Bonilla, H

    2001-01-01

    In spite of some recent detailed accounts about the scleractinian corals of the Archipiélago de Revillagigedo, taxonomic work on this fauna has been sparse. Consequently, solid taxonomic background is needed, especially to support further studies at community level. During five field trips (between 1990 and 1995) collections were made at different depths on three of the archipelago islands: Socorro, Clarión and San Benedicto. A total of 250 specimens were collected. Coral identifications were made using co-occurrence methods concomitant with their descriptions, diagnosis and illustrations from a number of publications, and with morphological analysis. Coral distributions were taken from literature. Twenty-two species of zooxanthellate scleractinian corals are described, with their local and world-wide geographic distribution, and each illustrated with macro and microphotographs. Keys to the genera and species of the archipelago are also included. Porites and Pocillopora exhibit the highest species richness with a great intraspecific variation, as well as a number of morphological convergences within and between species which form species complexes, and several new species and morphs. Clarion, the oldest and most isolated island of the archipelago, harbors a number of coral morphs that are probable new species. More than half of the species found at the Revillagigedos are distributed exclusively on oceanic islands of the eastern Pacific and close to one third exist only at this archipelago. The Revillagigedos have strong faunal similarities and share a number of endemics with Clipperton Atoll, all of which support the idea that these islands constitute a separate biogeographic subregion within the eastern Pacific. Lastly, the present document substantiates the hypothesis that the Revillagigedos are important stepping-stone islands for the migration of in-shore marine species from the Central to the eastern Pacific.

  16. The black flies (Diptera: Simuliidae) of the Lesser Sunda Archipelago, Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Takaoka, Hiroyuki; Sofian-Azirun, Mohd; Ya'cob, Zubaidah; Chen, Chee Dhang; Lau, Koon Weng; Low, Van Lun; Suana, I Wayan

    2017-05-01

    Surveys of pupae and larvae of black flies were carried out in Bali, Lombok, Sumbawa and Flores in the Lesser Sunda Archipelago, Indonesia, where 10 species were known. A total of 14 simuliid species including four new species and five new records of the genus Simulium were collected, bringing the number of species from the Lesser Sunda Archipelago to 19. They are classified into four subgenera: two in Nevermannia, nine in Gomphostilbia, seven in Simulium and one in Wallacellum. One of four new species, Simulium (Simulium) baliense, is described based on females, males, pupae and larvae from Bali and Lombok. This new species, which is placed in the Simulium striatum species-group of the subgenus Simulium, is closely related to S. (S.) argyrocinctum De Meijere from Java and Sumatra, but it is distinguished from the latter species by the smaller number of the male enlarged upper-eye facets and larval abdomen lacking dorsal pairs of conical protuberances. The distribution record of S. (S.) upikae Takaoka & Davies from Flores is corrected as that of S. (S.) eximium De Meijere. Some aberrant characters of the pupal gill filaments of S. (G.) atratum De Meijere, S. (G.) floresense Takaoka, Hadi & Sigit and S. (G.) sunapii Takaoka, Sofian-Azirun & Suana are illustrated. Characteristics of the fauna of black flies in this archipelago are briefly noted. Keys to all 19 species are provided for females, males, pupae and larvae.

  17. Human genetic diversity in the Japanese Archipelago: dual structure and beyond.

    PubMed

    Jinam, Timothy A; Kanzawa-Kiriyama, Hideaki; Saitou, Naruya

    2015-01-01

    The Japanese Archipelago stretches approximately 3,000 kilometers from Hokkaido in the north to the Ryukyu Islands in the south, and has seen human activity since at least 30 thousand years ago (KYA). The Jomon period from 16 to 3 KYA is associated with cord-marked pottery and the people at that time, who were hunter-gatherers, occupied a range of locations across the Japanese Archipelago. The Yayoi period from 3 to 1.7 KYA saw the introduction of migrants from the Asian Continent who brought rice agriculture to the archipelago. The dual-structure model, which is based on craniofacial measurements, proposes that admixture between the Jomon and Yayoi people resulted in current-day Japanese. Subsequent genetic studies using uniparental and autosomal markers in current-day and ancient human samples are widely in support of the dual-structure model. These genetic data have also unveiled the uniqueness of the indigenous Ainu and Ryukyuan people while further demonstrating the genetic substructure within the Mainland Japanese.

  18. Tectonic development of the Indonesian archipelago and its bearing on the occurrence of hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Simanjuntak, T.O. )

    1994-07-01

    The present geological and tectonic configuration of the Indonesian archipelago may represent a typical triple junction plate convergence, which has developed since Neogene times due to the northward-moving Indo-Australian plate, the westward-moving Pacific plate, and the south-southeastward-moving Eurasian Craton. The occurrence of a number of microcontinents in eastern Indonesia makes the geology and tectonics of the region more complex. The archipelago is one of the most complicated regions from the plate tectonics point of view. The geological evolution of the Indonesian archipelago is recorded by the occurrence of both tectonic convergence and tectonic divergence. Various types of plate convergences include a Cordilleran type subduction, which has been reoccurring since Paleozoic until present times in western Indonesia; a Neogene Tethyan type collision in the Banda region; and a double-arc collision in northern Maluku, central Indonesia. Tectonic divergence, which was preceded by rifting due to thermal doming and magma rise in the northern margins of the Australian Craton and followed by the detachment and west-northwestward displacement of continental fragments in Mesozoic, gave rise to the development of the microcontinents in eastern Indonesia.

  19. Climate change influenced female population sizes through time across the Indonesian archipelago.

    PubMed

    Guillot, Elsa G; Tumonggor, Meryanne K; Lansing, J Stephen; Sudoyo, Herawati; Cox, Murray P

    2013-01-01

    Lying at the crossroads of Asia and the Pacific world, the Indonesian archipelago hosts one of the world's richest accumulations of cultural, linguistic, and genetic variation. While the role of human migration into and around the archipelago is now known in some detail, other aspects of Indonesia's complex history are less understood. Here, we focus on population size changes from the first settlement of Indonesia nearly 50 kya up to the historic era. We reconstructed the past effective population sizes of Indonesian women using mitochondrial DNA sequences from 2,104 individuals in 55 village communities on four islands spanning the Indonesian archipelago (Bali, Flores, Sumba, and Timor). We found little evidence for large fluctuations in effective population size. Most communities grew slowly during the late Pleistocene, peaked 15-20 kya, and subsequently declined slowly into the Holocene. This unexpected pattern may reflect population declines caused by the flooding of lowland hunter/gatherer habitat during sea-level rises following the last glacial maximum.

  20. High prevalence of toxoplasmosis in free-range chicken of the Fernando de Noronha Archipelago, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Magalhães, Fernando Jorge Rodrigues; da Silva, José Givanildo; Ribeiro-Andrade, Müller; Pinheiro, José Wilton; Aparecido Mota, Rinaldo

    2016-07-01

    The present study aimed to determine the prevalence of toxoplasmosis in free-range chickens of the Fernando de Noronha Archipelago, Brazil and to identify risk factors associated with Toxoplasma gondii infection. Blood samples were collected from all the adult chickens raised in the Archipelago and screened by Indirect Fluorescent Antibody Test (430 samples, in total). Univariate analysis (Chi-square) and logistic regression were used to investigate the relationship between various variables possibly predictive of an increased likelihood of T. gondii infection. The overall prevalence of T. gondii infection in chickens of the Fernando de Noronha Archipelago was 88.4% (380/430; 84.6%-91.0%; 95% CI), ranging from 57.1% to 100.0% among the studied properties. The risk factors associated with T. gondii infection were the number of domestic cats in the properties (p=0.022), the presence of feral cats (p=0.006) and the presence of an open water source (p=0.046). Domestic and feral cats should be prevented from accessing the water and food supplied to chickens.

  1. Patterns of diversification in islands: A comparative study across three gecko genera in the Socotra Archipelago.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Porta, Joan; Morales, Hernán E; Gómez-Díaz, Elena; Sindaco, Roberto; Carranza, Salvador

    2016-05-01

    In this study we used the complete fauna of geckos of the Socotra Archipelago to test whether the three gecko genera co-occurring in the islands (Pristurus, Hemidactylus and Haemodracon) produced similar outcomes of morphological and climatic diversification. To test this, we produced a time-calibrated tree of 346 geckos including all 16 endemic species of the archipelago and 26 potential close-relatives in the continent. Our dating estimates revealed that most of the diversity of geckos in the archipelago was the consequence of in situ diversification. However not all genera shared similar patterns of diversification. While in Hemidactylus and Haemodracon this involved great differences in body size and low levels of climatic diversification (mostly involving sympatric distributions), an opposite pattern appeared in Pristurus in which most of the diversification involved shifts in climatic envelopes (mostly involving allopatric and parapatric distributions) but almost no size differentiation. Consistently with this, Pristurus was the only genus in which rates of size diversification in islands were substantially lower than in the continent. This illustrates how different groups can greatly differ in their patterns of intra-island diversification and highlights the importance of taxon-dependent factors at determining different patterns of diversification in the same insular context.

  2. Nest-density distribution patterns in a yellow-legged gull archipelago colony

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidal, Eric; Roche, Philip; Bonnet, Véronique; Tatoni, Thierry

    2001-12-01

    The nest density distribution of yellow-legged gulls Larus cachinnans was investigated on the large Marseille archipelago colony (south-east France) which houses c. 18 000 breeding pairs. The study was performed at two investigation scales, including both mean nesting density on the nine study islands and density distribution within 171 sampling plots. The mean nesting density on each island was negatively correlated with island surface area and with the distance from the initial colony location (south-east end of the archipelago). No significant correlation was found with the other island parameters analysed (maximum elevation, shape index and distance from continent). A partial least squares regression performed between denstiy data from 171 500 m 2 sampling plots and environmental variables showed that the mostly explaining factors were island isolation and percentage of rocks in the plots (positive correlation), and distance of the island from the south-east end of the archipelago, island area, distance from plot to seaside and percentage of stone in the plots (negative correlation). Thus in our case, vegetation parameters (cover and height) were not influencial factors in nest density distribution.

  3. [Distribution characteristics of benthic algae in intertidal zone of Ma' an Archipelago of Zhejiang Province].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shou-Yu; Liang, Jun; Wang, Zhen-Hua; Wang, Kai

    2008-10-01

    Based on the survey of benthic algae in the intertidal zone of Ma' an Archipelago from March to July 2007, the algal species composition, distribution, and temperature feature were studied. The dominant algal species in the study area were preliminarily analyzed by using similarity indices (S(c)) and index of relative importance (IRI(c)). A total of 31 species sampled in sublittoral area were identified, among which, 7 species of 5 genera belonged to Chlorophyta, 8 species of 5 genera belonged to Phaeophyta, and 16 species of 14 genera belonged to Rhodophyta. Topical and selective distribution species influenced by wave and tide were identified in the intertidal zone. Ulva pertusa and Sargassum thunbergii were found in all survey area. Rhodophyta was the dominant species, with the occurring frequency being up to 61.1%, and Chlorophyta showed quite uniformed horizontal distribution. In addition, 81% of sampled species were from low-tide zone, and some were extended from mid-tide zone to low-tide zone. The composition comparability between mid-tide and low-tide species was 0.47, and the convergence effect in mid-tide and low-tide zone was higher than that in high-tide and mid-tide zone. The sublittoral area of Ma' an Archipelago showed obvious vertical zoning character, with temperate species being absolute abundant, and the warm-water species dominant. The marine floral texture of Ma' an Archipelago belongs to warm temperate-subtropical transitional marine flora.

  4. Evolution at a different pace: distinctive phylogenetic patterns of cone snails from two ancient oceanic archipelagos.

    PubMed

    Cunha, Regina L; Lima, Fernando P; Tenorio, Manuel J; Ramos, Ana A; Castilho, Rita; Williams, Suzanne T

    2014-11-01

    Ancient oceanic archipelagos of similar geological age are expected to accrue comparable numbers of endemic lineages with identical life history strategies, especially if the islands exhibit analogous habitats. We tested this hypothesis using marine snails of the genus Conus from the Atlantic archipelagos of Cape Verde and Canary Islands. Together with Azores and Madeira, these archipelagos comprise the Macaronesia biogeographic region and differ remarkably in the diversity of this group. More than 50 endemic Conus species have been described from Cape Verde, whereas prior to this study, only two nonendemic species, including a putative species complex, were thought to occur in the Canary Islands. We combined molecular phylogenetic data and geometric morphometrics with bathymetric and paleoclimatic reconstructions to understand the contrasting diversification patterns found in these regions. Our results suggest that species diversity is even lower than previously thought in the Canary Islands, with the putative species complex corresponding to a single species, Conus guanche. One explanation for the enormous disparity in Conus diversity is that the amount of available habitat may differ, or may have differed in the past due to eustatic (global) sea level changes. Historical bathymetric data, however, indicated that sea level fluctuations since the Miocene have had a similar impact on the available habitat area in both Cape Verde and Canary archipelagos and therefore do not explain this disparity. We suggest that recurrent gene flow between the Canary Islands and West Africa, habitat losses due to intense volcanic activity in combination with unsuccessful colonization of new Conus species from more diverse regions, were all determinant in shaping diversity patterns within the Canarian archipelago. Worldwide Conus species diversity follows the well-established pattern of latitudinal increase of species richness from the poles towards the tropics. However, the eastern

  5. Modeling nutrient retention in the coastal zone of an eutrophic sea - a model study in the Stockholm Archipelago, Sweden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almroth-Rosell, Elin; Edman, Moa; Eilola, Kari; Meier, Markus; Sahlberg, Jörgen

    2016-04-01

    This study shows that the Stockholm archipelago works as a filter for nutrients that enters the coastal zone from land. The filter capacity is high, but not effective enough to take care of all the nutrients that the system receives. At least 65 % and 72 % of the phosphorus (P) and nitrogen (N), respectively, is retained. The multi-basin one dimensional Swedish Coastal zone Model (SCM) that was used is based on the Swedish Coastal and Ocean Biogeochemical model (SCOBI) coupled to the equation solver PROgram for Boundary layers in the Environment (PROBE). An evaluation of model results showed that the nutrient, salinity and temperature dynamics in the SCM model are of good quality. To analyse the results the Stockholm archipelago was divided into three sub-areas: the inner, the intermediate and the outer archipelago. The analysis showed that the highest total amounts of P and N are retained in the outer archipelago where the surface area is largest. The area weighted retention of P and N, however, is highest in the smaller inner archipelago and decreases towards the open sea. A major part of the retention is permanent. For P sediment burial is the only permanent retention mechanism, but for N almost 92 % of the permanent retention is caused by benthic denitrification, less than 8 % by burial, while pelagic denitrification is below 1%. A reduction of the land load of nutrients (P reduced with 13 % and N with 20%) resulted in increased retention capacity of N and P and lowered the transport of N out from the archipelago. About 15 years after the reduction P is imported into the archipelago instead of being exported.

  6. Spatial features of glacier changes in the Barents-Kara Sector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharov, A. I.; Schöner, W.; Pail, R.

    2009-04-01

    In the 1950s, the total area of glaciers occupying separate islands and archipelagos of the Barents and Kara seas exceeded 92,300 km² (Atlas of the Arctic 1985). The overall glacier volume reached 20,140 km³ and the average ice thickness was given as 218 m. Our recent remote sensing studies and mass-balance estimates using spaceborne ASTER and LANDSAT imagery, ERS and JERS radar interferometric mosaics, and ICESat altimetry data revealed that, in the 2000s, the areal extent and volume of Barents-Kara glaciation amounted to 86,200±200 km² and 19,330±20 km³, respectively. The annual loss of land ice influenced by severe climate change in longitudinal direction was determined at approx. 8 km³/a in Svalbard, 4 km³/a both in the Franz Josef Land and Novaya Zemlya archipelagos, and less than 0.3 km³/a in Severnaya Zemlya over the past 50 years. The average ice thickness of remaining glaciation increased to 224 m. This fact was explained by rapid disintegration of thinner glacier margins and essential accumulation of snow at higher glacier elevations. Both effects were clearly visible in the series of satellite image maps of glacier elevation changes generated within the framework of the INTEGRAL, SMARAGD and ICEAGE research projects. These maps can be accessed at http://joanneum.dib.at/integral or smaragd (cd results). The largest negative elevation changes were typically detected in the seaward basins of fast-flowing outlet glaciers, both at their fronts and tops. Ablation processes were stronger manifested on southern slopes of ice caps, while the accumulation of snow was generally higher on northern slopes so that main ice divides "shifted" to the north. The largest positive elevation changes (about 100 m) were found in the central part of the study region in the accumulation areas of the biggest ice caps, such as Northern Ice Cap in Novaya Zemlya, Tyndall and Windy ice domes in Franz Josef Land, and Kvitoyjokulen at Kvitøya. The sides of these glaciers

  7. Toward a Theory of Island Pedogeography: Testing the driving forces for pedological assemblages in archipelagos of different origins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibáñez, Juan-José; Effland, William R.

    2011-12-01

    The Theory of Island Biogeography has been based on biodiversity studies and used as a powerful predictive tool. Currently pedogeography does not have a similar theoretical construct. Although island biodiversity and biological assemblages have been topics of widespread interest in biogeography, ecology and conservation biology, soil scientists have conducted few studies of pedodiversity and pedological assemblages in archipelagos. Several studies have demonstrated that pedodiversity and biodiversity patterns have striking similarities in very disparate environments and at different scales, thus it is possible to test for a similar construct of island pedogeography. We analyze similarities and differences in the pedosphere for three archipelagos with different origins: (i) oceanic-intra-plate chains islands (Hawaiian Islands), (ii) oceanic-intra-plate cluster islands (Canary Islands), (iii) non-marine land-bridge islands with volcanism associated with plate boundary conditions (Aegean Islands) and (iv) as a comparison, islands in a nonplate boundary setting (the British Isles). In the Canary Islands, we also compiled selected biological, physiographical, geological and climatic data for further analysis of pedodiversity, climatic diversity, geodiversity and biodiversity. Our pedogeographic analysis of the three archipelagos indicates archipelagos of varying origins contain different soil assemblages with plate tectonics as the main driving force. The similarities between pedodiversity and biodiversity are more remarkable than the differences. We tested the hypothesis that soil taxa distributions on island chains can be modelled as a power function similar to the species-area relationship (SAR) proposed by McArthur and Wilson for archipelagos. The SAR functional relationship has been widely corroborated in other biodiversity studies. The same patterns were obtained for pedodiversity and biodiversity in the British Isles, and after that in the Aegean Archipelago. In

  8. Multiple, independent colonizations of the Hawaiian Archipelago by the family Dolichopodidae (Diptera)

    PubMed Central

    Goodman, Kari Roesch; Evenhuis, Neal; Bartošová-Sojková, Pavla

    2016-01-01

    The family Dolichopodidae forms two of the four largest evolutionary radiations in the Hawaiian Islands across all flies: Campsicnemus (183 spp) and the Eurynogaster complex (66 spp). They also include a small radiation of Conchopus (6 spp). A handful of other dolichopodid species are native to the islands in singleton lineages or small radiations. This study provides a phylogenetic perspective on the colonization history of the dolichopodid fauna in the islands. We generated a multi-gene data set including representatives from 11 of the 14 endemic Hawaiian dolichopodid genera to examine the history of colonization to the islands, and analyzed it using Bayesian and maximum likelihood phylogenetic methods. We used a subset of the data that included Conchopus and the eight genera comprising the Eurynogaster complex to estimate the first phylogenetic hypothesis for these endemic groups, then used Beast to estimate their age of arrival to the archipelago. The Eurynogaster complex, Campsicnemus and Conchopus are clearly the result of independent colonizations. The results strongly support the Eurynogaster complex as a monophyletic group, and also supports the monophyly of 4 of the 8 described genera within the complex (Adachia, Arciellia, Uropachys and Eurynogaster). Members of the family Dolichopodidae have been dispersing over vast distances to colonize the Hawaiian Archipelago for millions of years, leading to multiple independent evolutionary diversification events. The Eurynogaster complex arrived in the Hawaiian Archipelago 11.8 Ma, well before the arrival of Campsicnemus (4.5 Ma), and the even more recent Conchopus (1.8 Ma). Data presented here demonstrate that the Hawaiian Dolichopodidae both disperse and diversify easily, a rare combination that lays the groundwork for field studies on the reproductive isolating mechanisms and ecological partitioning of this group. PMID:27896033

  9. Biogeographic discordance of molecular phylogenetic and phenotypic variation in a continental archipelago radiation of land snails

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In island archipelagos, where islands have experienced repeated periods of fragmentation and connection through cyclic changes in sea level, complex among-island distributions might reflect historical distributional changes or local evolution. We test the relative importance of these mechanisms in an endemic radiation of Rhagada land snails in the Dampier Archipelago, a continental archipelago off the coast of Western Australia, where ten morphospecies have complex, overlapping distributions. Results We obtained partial mtDNA sequence (COI) for 1015 snails collected from 213 locations across 30 Islands, and used Bayesian phylogenetic analysis and Analysis of Molecular Variance (AMOVA) to determine whether geography or the morphological taxonomy best explains the pattern of molecular evolution. Rather than forming distinct monophyletic groups, as would be expected if they had single, independent origins, all of the widely distributed morphospecies were polyphyletic, distributed among several well-supported clades, each of which included several morphospecies. Each mitochondrial clade had a clear, cohesive geographic distribution, together forming a series of parapatric replacements separated by narrow contact zones. AMOVA revealed further incongruence between mtDNA diversity and morphological variation within clades, as the taxonomic hypothesis always explained a low or non-significant proportion of the molecular variation. In contrast, the pattern of mtDNA evolution closely reflected contemporary and historical marine barriers. Conclusions Despite opportunities for distributional changes during periods when the islands were connected, there is no evidence that dispersal has contributed to the geographic variation of shell form at the broad scale. Based on an estimate of dispersal made previously for Rhagada, we conclude that the periods of connection have been too short in duration to allow for extensive overland dispersal or deep mitochondrial

  10. The lost Adventure Archipelago (Sicilian Channel, Mediterranean Sea): Morpho-bathymetry and Late Quaternary palaeogeographic evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Civile, Dario; Lodolo, Emanuele; Zecchin, Massimo; Ben-Avraham, Zvi; Baradello, Luca; Accettella, Daniela; Cova, Andrea; Caffau, Mauro

    2015-02-01

    The rise in sea level following the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) radically altered pre-existing geography, pushing back the former shorelines. The effect of this eustatic change was particularly intense and dramatic in flat lands and shelves, such as the Sicilian Channel. High-resolution bathymetric maps and Chirp seismic profiles analyzed in this study show that the Sicilian Channel, now lying at depths rarely exceeding 150 m, has emerged several times during its geological history. The last emergence was during the Early Holocene, when kilometre-sized islands punctuated the north-western sector of the Sicilian Channel, the Adventure Plateau, forming a broad archipelago. Many of these islands, now located in water ranging in depth from - 10 to - 40 m, are composed of highly deformed Neogene sedimentary rocks (Talbot, Ante-Talbot, Nereo, and Pantelleria Vecchia banks), while others represent submarine Pleistocene volcanic edifices (Galatea, Anfitrite and Tetide banks). Sedimentary cover in all of these banks is virtually absent. High-resolution seismic profiles allowed the identification of post-LGM morphological markers associated with the marine transgression, some of which are characterized by melt water-pulses, as demonstrated by the presence of specific and distinct erosional features. Combining swath bathymetric data with the seismic profiles, we have generated two palaeogeographic maps of the former Adventure Archipelago at two specific time frames: (1) at the end of the Younger Dryas stadial (11,500 yr B.P., corresponding to a former sea level of - 60 m), and (2) at the end of the melt-water pulse 1B (11,200 yr B.P., corresponding to a former sea level of - 42 m). Maps clearly show that in just 300 years the geography of the archipelago has changed dramatically, so much so that some islands have disappeared and some have decreased by more than 80% of their pre-Younger Dryas size.

  11. Life on the Edge: Holocene Tephra Stratigraphy of Tanginak Anchorage, Sitkalidak Island, Kodiak Archipelago, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahrt, E.; Bourgeois, J.; Fitzhugh, J. B.

    2004-12-01

    Geologic hazards associated with volcanism in the North Pacific have profound if usually temporary effects on the environment and human populations. Ash falls associated with these events are often preserved across large areas providing time specific markers. In the past century, volcanic activity and its effects in the North Pacific have been recorded, but much of the Holocene volcanic record in the Alaskan region is still being investigated. The Kodiak Archipelago, while not volcanic itself, is located near both Aleutian and Alaskan peninsula volcanoes. However, little has been published about the Holocene tephrochronology of the Kodiak region. This study focuses on the area around Tanginak Spring Site (KOD481). Located on Sitkalidak Island it is the earliest known human occupation in the Kodiak archipelago. We are documenting Holocene environmental changes on Sitkalidak Island and relating these changes to the archaeological record. As part of this work, we will establish a local tephrochronology using stratigraphy and geochemistry which will allow us to better correlate sedimentary changes across large areas as well as study human interaction with ashfall events. Herein we report a preliminary tephrochronology in peat excavations on Sitkalidak Island dating back to the earliest Holocene. Dates are radiocarbon years BP on peat directly below tephra. Marker tephra present in our reference sections are Katmai 1912, light gray (historic?), medium gray (3370), medium gray (3720), beige 1 (4340), apricot (5390), beige 3 (6790), black (9280), and white (11,520). Geochemical and petrographic analysis will help to determine with which volcanic events these tephra are associated. Establishing a local tephrochronology is important not only for local correlation but also to ascertain the tephra stratigraphy of the Kodiak Archipelago and beyond. The frequency of tephra in Tanginak Anchorage sections suggests that tephra will be a very useful stratigraphic tool in this

  12. Plant speciation in continental island floras as exemplified by Nigella in the Aegean Archipelago.

    PubMed

    Comes, Hans Peter; Tribsch, Andreas; Bittkau, Christiane

    2008-09-27

    Continental shelf island systems, created by rising sea levels, provide a premier setting for studying the effects of geographical isolation on non-adaptive radiation and allopatric speciation brought about by genetic drift. The Aegean Archipelago forms a highly fragmented complex of mostly continental shelf islands that have become disconnected from each other and the mainland in relatively recent geological times (ca <5.2 Ma). These ecologically fairly homogenous islands thus provide a suitable biogeographic context for assessing the relative influences of past range fragmentation, colonization, gene flow and drift on taxon diversification. Indeed, recent molecular biogeographic studies on the Aegean Nigella arvensis complex, combining phylogenetic, phylogeographic and population level approaches, exemplify the importance of allopatry and genetic drift coupled with restricted gene flow in driving plant speciation in this continental archipelago at different temporal and spatial scales. While the recent (Late Pleistocene) radiation of Aegean Nigella, as well as possible instances of incipient speciation (in the Cyclades), is shown to be strongly conditioned by (palaeo)geographic factors (including changes in sea level), shifts in breeding system (selfing) and associated isolating mechanisms have also contributed to this radiation. By contrast, founder event speciation has probably played only a minor role, perhaps reflecting a migratory situation typical for continental archipelagos characterized by niche pre-emption because of a long established resident flora. Overall, surveys of neutral molecular markers in Aegean Nigella have so far revealed population genetic processes that conform remarkably well to predictions raised by genetic drift theory. The challenge is now to gain more direct insights into the relative importance of the role of genetic drift, as opposed to natural selection, in the phenotypic and reproductive divergence among these Aegean plant

  13. Seismicity Pattern Changes before the M = 4.8 Aeolian Archipelago (Italy) Earthquake of August 16, 2010

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the seismicity patterns associated with an M = 4.8 earthquake recorded in the Aeolian Archipelago on 16, August, 2010, by means of the region-time-length (RTL) algorithm. This earthquake triggered landslides at Lipari; a rock fall on the flanks of the Vulcano, Lipari, and Salina islands, and some damages to the village of Lipari. The RTL algorithm is widely used for investigating precursory seismicity changes before large and moderate earthquakes. We examined both the spatial and temporal characteristics of seismicity changes in the Aeolian Archipelago region before the M = 4.8 earthquake. The results obtained reveal 6-7 months of seismic quiescence which started about 15 months before the earthquake. The spatial distribution shows an extensive area characterized by seismic quiescence that suggests a relationship between quiescence and the Aeolian Archipelago regional tectonics. PMID:24511288

  14. Seismicity pattern changes before the M = 4.8 Aeolian Archipelago (Italy) earthquake of August 16, 2010.

    PubMed

    Gambino, Salvatore; Laudani, Antonino; Mangiagli, Salvatore

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the seismicity patterns associated with an M = 4.8 earthquake recorded in the Aeolian Archipelago on 16, August, 2010, by means of the region-time-length (RTL) algorithm. This earthquake triggered landslides at Lipari; a rock fall on the flanks of the Vulcano, Lipari, and Salina islands, and some damages to the village of Lipari. The RTL algorithm is widely used for investigating precursory seismicity changes before large and moderate earthquakes. We examined both the spatial and temporal characteristics of seismicity changes in the Aeolian Archipelago region before the M = 4.8 earthquake. The results obtained reveal 6-7 months of seismic quiescence which started about 15 months before the earthquake. The spatial distribution shows an extensive area characterized by seismic quiescence that suggests a relationship between quiescence and the Aeolian Archipelago regional tectonics.

  15. An Integrated Bathymetric and Topographic Digital Terrain Model of the Canadian Arctic Archipelago

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alm, G.; Macnab, R.; Jakobsson, M.; Kleman, J.; McCracken, M.

    2002-12-01

    Currently, the International Bathymetric Chart of the Arctic Ocean (IBCAO) [Jakobsson et al. 2000], contains the most up-to-date digital bathymetric model of the entire Canadian Arctic Archipelago. IBCAO is a seamless bathymetric/topographic Digital Terrain Model (DTM) that incorporates three primary data sets: all available bathymetric data at the time of compilation; the US Geological Survey GTOPO30 topographic data; and the World Vector Shoreline for coastline representation. The horizontal grid cell size is 2.5 x 2.5 km on a Polar Stereographic projection, which is adequate for regional visualization and analysis, but which may not be sufficient for certain geoscientific and oceanographic applications. However, the database that was constructed during the IBCAO project holds bathymetric data of a high quality throughout most of the Canadian Arctic Archipelago, justifying a compilation resolution that is better than 2.5 x 2.5 km. This data is primarily from historical hydrographic surveys that were carried out by the Canadian Hydrographic Survey (CHS). The construction of a higher resolution bathymetry/topography DTM of the Canadian Arctic Archipelago (complete with an error estimation of interpolated grid cells) requires a consideration of historical metadata which contains detailed descriptions of horizontal and vertical datums, positioning systems, and the depth sounding systems that were deployed during individual surveys. A significant portion of this metadata does not exist in digital form; it was not available during the IBCAO compilation, although due to the relatively low resolution of the original DTM (2.5 x 2.5 km), its absence was considered a lesser problem. We have performed "data detective" work and have extracted some of the more crucial metadata from CHS archives and are thus able to present a preliminary version of a seamless Digital Terrain Model of the Canadian Arctic Archipelago. This represents a significant improvement over the original

  16. Aerosol chemistry above an extended archipelago of the eastern Mediterranean basin during strong northern winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Athanasopoulou, E.; Protonotariou, A. P.; Bossioli, E.; Dandou, A.; Tombrou, M.; Allan, J. D.; Coe, H.; Mihalopoulos, N.; Kalogiros, J.; Bacak, A.; Sciare, J.; Biskos, G.

    2015-07-01

    Detailed aerosol chemical predictions by a comprehensive model system (i.e. PMCAMx, WRF, GEOS-CHEM), along with airborne and ground-based observations, are presented and analysed over a wide domain covering the Aegean Archipelago. The studied period is 10 successive days in 2011, characterized by strong northern winds, which is the most frequently prevailing synoptic pattern during summer. The submicron aerosol load in the lower troposphere above the archipelago is homogenously enriched in sulfate (average modelled and measured submicron sulfate of 5.5 and 5.8 μg m-3, respectively), followed by organics (2.3 and 4.4 μg m-3) and ammonium (1.5 and 1.7 μg m-3). Aerosol concentrations smoothly decline aloft, reaching lower values (< 1 μg m-3) above 4.2 km altitude. The evaluation criteria rate the model results for sulfate, ammonium, chloride, elemental carbon, organic carbon and total PM10 mass concentrations as "good", indicating a satisfactory representation of the aerosol chemistry and precursors. Higher model discrepancies are confined to the highest (e.g. peak sulfate values) and lowest ends (e.g. nitrate) of the airborne aerosol mass size distribution, as well as in airborne organic aerosol concentrations (model underestimation ca. 50 %). The latter is most likely related to the intense fire activity at the eastern Balkan area and the Black Sea coastline, which is not represented in the current model application. The investigation of the effect of local variables on model performance revealed that the best agreement between predictions and observations occurs during high winds from the northeast, as well as for the area confined above the archipelago and up to 2.2 km altitude. The atmospheric ageing of biogenic particles is suggested to be activated in the aerosol chemistry module, when treating organics in a sufficient nitrogen and sulfate-rich environment, such as that over the Aegean basin. More than 70 % of the predicted aerosol mass over the Aegean

  17. New Paleomagnetic Data for the Franz Josef Land Archipelago and their Tectonic Consequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abashev, V.; Mikhaltsov, N.

    2014-12-01

    On the base of field work on the Franz Josef Land archipelago (FJL) in 2010 and 2011 the new paleomagnetic data are obtained from the Jurassic-Early Cretaceous magmatic complexes. Main focus of this work was concentrated on the Early-Jurassic basalts widely represented on the Hooker island [1]. Together with the previous data [2] statistically reasonable paleomagnetic pole for the age boundary of 190 million years for the FJL is received (PLat.=62.4; PLon.=140.2; dp/dm=5.5/5.0; N=13). Paleomagnetic data allow to assume that the position of the FJL relative to the Europe in the Early Jurassic significantly differs from the present one. But to the Early Cretaceous it reached relative position very close to the presently observed [2]. We suggest that at least during Early-Middle Jurassic there was rifting processes between the North Barentz terrane (FJL and (may be) Svalbard) and the other part of the European tectonic domain. This rift was accompanied by shifting of the FLJ to the north-eastward on about 500 km. Also obtained paleomagnetic data agree with a hypothesis assuming that the FJL was passing over the Icelandic-Siberian hot spot during Jurassic-Cretaceous time: main paleolatitudes correspond to the Island's present latitude and the paleolatitude of the Siberian trapps. Paleomagnetic study of FJL has a reconnaissance character and cannot lead to any ultimate deductions as the data is obviously not enough. And further work on the basaltic covers of the archipelago seems to be very promising. Research was supported by grant RFBR 13-05-00177. 1. Karyakin Yu.V., Shipilov E.V. Geochemical Specialization and the 40Ar/39Ar Age of Basaltoid Magmatism in the Aleksandra Land, Northbrook, Hooker, and Hayes Island (Franz Josef Land Archipelago) // Doklady Akademii Nauk, 2009, Vol.425, No.2, P. 213-217 (in Russian). 2. Bragin V.Yu., Karyakin Yu.V., Mikhaltsov N.E. The Franz Josef Land archipelago: reconnaissance paleomagnetic data // Large igneous provinces of Asia

  18. Occurrences of whale shark (Rhincodon typus Smith, 1828) in the Saint Peter and Saint Paul archipelago, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Hazin, F H V; Vaske Júnior, T; Oliveira, P G; Macena, B C L; Carvalho, F

    2008-05-01

    The Saint Peter and Saint Paul Archipelago in the central tropical Atlantic, is an important ground of whale sharks that are commonly sighted throughout the year close to the fishing boats in the adjacencies of the islands. In sightings reported between February 2000 and November 2005, the lengths of the individuals ranged between 1.8 to 14.0 m. The causes of these concentrations in the archipelago are still unclear, once there are no upwellings and plankton concentrations for feeding, and no reproductive activities were reported. Nevertheless, they could be associated to the spawning period of the abundant flying fishes, mainly in the first semester, when sightings were more frequent.

  19. MERCURY CONCENTRATIONS OF A RESIDENT FRESHWATER FORAGE FISH AT ADAK ISLAND, ALEUTIAN ARCHIPELAGO, ALASKA

    PubMed Central

    Kenney, Leah A.; von Hippel, Frank A.; Willacker, James J.; O’Hara, Todd M.

    2015-01-01

    The Aleutian Archipelago is an isolated arc of over 300 volcanic islands stretching 1,600 km across the interface of the Bering Sea and North Pacific Ocean. Although remote, some Aleutian Islands were heavily impacted by military activities from World War II until recently and were exposed to anthropogenic contaminants, including mercury (Hg). Mercury is also delivered to these islands via global atmospheric transport, prevailing ocean currents, and biotransport by migratory species. Mercury contamination of freshwater ecosystems is poorly understood in this region. Total Hg (THg) concentrations were measured in threespine stickleback fish (Gasterosteus aculeatus) collected from eight lakes at Adak Island, an island in the center of the archipelago with a long military history. Mean THg concentrations for fish whole-body homogenates for all lakes ranged from 0.314 to 0.560 mg/kg dry weight. Stickleback collected from seabird-associated lakes had significantly higher concentrations of THg compared to non-seabird lakes, including all military lakes. The δ13C stable isotope ratios of stickleback collected from seabird lakes suggest an input of marine-derived nutrients and/or marine-derived Hg. PMID:22912068

  20. Copepod distribution and production in a Mid-Atlantic Ridge archipelago.

    PubMed

    Melo, Pedro A M C; Melo Júnior, Mauro DE; Macêdo, Silvio J DE; Araujo, Moacyr; Neumann-Leitão, Sigrid

    2014-11-11

    The Saint Peter and Saint Paul Archipelago (SPSPA) are located close to the Equator in the Atlantic Ocean. The aim of this study was to assess the spatial variations in the copepod community abundance, and the biomass and production patterns of the three most abundant calanoid species in the SPSPA. Plankton samples were collected with a 300 µm mesh size net along four transects (north, east, south and west of the SPSPA), with four stations plotted in each transect. All transects exhibited a tendency toward a decrease in copepod density with increasing distance from the SPSPA, statistically proved in the North. Density varied from 3.33 to 182.18 ind.m-3, and differences were also found between the first perimeter (first circular distance band) and the others. The total biomass varied from 15.25 to 524.50 10-3 mg C m-3 and production from 1.19 to 22.04 10-3 mg C m-3d-1. The biomass and production of Undinula vulgaris (Dana, 1849), Acrocalanus longicornis Giesbrecht, 1888 and Calocalanus pavo (Dana, 1849) showed differences between some transects. A trend of declining biodiversity and production with increasing distance from archipelago was observed, suggesting that even small features like the SPSPA can affect the copepod community in tropical oligotrophic oceanic areas.

  1. The Melithaeidae (Cnidaria: Octocorallia) of the Ryukyu Archipelago: molecular and morphological examinations.

    PubMed

    Aguilar-Hurtado, Catalina; Nonaka, Masanori; Reimer, James D

    2012-07-01

    The family Melithaeidae (Octocorallia: Alcyonacea) is distributed in the West Pacific, Indian Ocean and the Red Sea. They are most abundant in warmer waters but can also be found in temperate waters. At present six genera are assigned to this family (Melithaea, Mopsella, Clathraria, Acabaria, Wrightella and Asperaxis), however overlapping characteristics make this group's taxonomic identification difficult and their relationships unclear. There are only a few reports from the Ryukyu Archipelago in southern Japan of melithaeids and most other octocorals, despite the islands being an area of high octocoral diversity. To help resolve the taxonomic confusion in this family, samples from various Ryukyu Archipelago locations were collected and DNA sequences of nuclear 28S ribosomal DNA and mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase I (COI) were obtained. Additionally, SEM micrographs of the sclerites of specimens were taken to further confirm the molecular results. Three strongly supported clades were recovered from the COI and 28S rDNA analyses, corresponding to Melithaea, Acabaria, and Mopsella, and in most cases clades were clearly related with the sclerite shape reported for each genus. These results show clearly that molecular differences are present between the three genera, and also demonstrates the strong need of other molecular markers for resolving intra-generic phylogenies. Our results provide baseline data for future studies of this octocoral family, not only on taxonomy, but also with regards to their distribution in the Ryukyu Islands.

  2. Progressive migration and anagenesis in Drimys confertifolia of the Juan Fernández Archipelago, Chile.

    PubMed

    López-Sepúlveda, Patricio; Takayama, Koji; Greimler, Josef; Crawford, Daniel J; Peñailillo, Patricio; Baeza, Marcelo; Ruiz, Eduardo; Kohl, Gudrun; Tremetsberger, Karin; Gatica, Alejandro; Letelier, Luis; Novoa, Patricio; Novak, Johannes; Stuessy, Tod F

    2015-01-01

    A common mode of speciation in oceanic islands is by anagenesis, wherein an immigrant arrives and through time transforms by mutation, recombination, and drift into a morphologically and genetically distinct species, with the new species accumulating a high level of genetic diversity. We investigate speciation in Drimys confertifolia, endemic to the two major islands of the Juan Fernández Archipelago, Chile, to determine genetic consequences of anagenesis, to examine relationships among populations of D. confertifolia and the continental species D. winteri and D. andina, and to test probable migration routes between the major islands. Population genetic analyses were conducted using AFLPs and nuclear microsatellites of 421 individuals from 42 populations from the Juan Fernández islands and the continent. Drimys confertifolia shows a wide genetic variation within populations on both islands, and values of genetic diversity within populations are similar to those found within populations of the continental progenitor. The genetic results are compatible with the hypothesis of high levels of genetic variation accumulating within anagenetically derived species in oceanic islands, and with the concept of little or no geographical partitioning of this variation over the landscape. Analysis of the probability of migration within the archipelago confirms colonization from the older island, Robinson Crusoe, to the younger island Alejandro Selkirk.

  3. Coral reef destruction of Small island in 44 years and destructive fishing in Spermonde Archipelago, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nurdin, Nurjannah; Komatsu, Teruhisa; Rani, Chair; Supriadi; Fakhriyyah, Sitti; Agus

    2016-11-01

    Coral reefs are among the most diverse and threatened ecosystems on the planet. The most commonly stated for developing coral reef remote sensing techniques is to asses and or to monitor the status of these ecosystems. The study site was selected one of small island in inner zone Spermonde archipelago, Indonesia. We used Landsat MSS, Landsat TM, Landsat ETM, and Landsat OLI data to examine changes in the coral reefs of inner zone island in the Spermonde Archipelago from 1972 to 2016. The image processing are gap fills, atmospheric correction, geometric corrections, image composites, water column corrections, unsupervised classifications, and reclassification. Some of component change detection procedure was applied to define change. The results showed significant changes in 44 years. Disturbed coral reefs are typically characterized by loss of coral cover by increase in the abundance of dead corals and rubble. Local factors such as destructive fishing is direct destruction of inner zone island. While the impact of local threats may be reduced through management action, global threats to coral reefs are likely to increase in severity in the coming years.

  4. [Marine environment of Nanri Archipelago, Fujian Province in summer: diagnosis and assessment].

    PubMed

    Luo, Dong-Lian

    2011-02-01

    Based on the ecological investigation data in September and October 2007, the status of the marine ecological environment of Nanri Archipelago, Fujian Province in summer was diagnosed and assessed from the aspects of sea water quality, nutrient structure and levels, and biodiversity. The comprehensive quality index method was used for the assessment of the marine ecological environment, and the rationality of the assessment obtained from different indices was also discussed. The sea water pH, dissolved oxygen (DO), chemical oxygen demand (COD), and Pb, Cd, Hg, and As concentrations were all within the limit values of the Grade II standard of Sea Water Quality Standard (GB 3097-1997), while the phosphate concentration at 71% stations, inorganic nitrogen at 14% stations, and oil concentration at 7% stations were all above the Grade II standard of Sea Water Quality Standard. Overall, the seawater quality was of better grade, nutrient structure was characterized by N-limited, most of the sea water was at a state of eutrophication, and the diversity index of plankton was at mildly polluted or unpolluted level. The comprehensive quality index indicated that the seawater quality of the Nanri Archipelago was relatively fine. There existed definite differences in the assessment results by using different diagnosis methods, and hence, a relatively objective assessment about marine environmental quality and health status could only be made when the chemical and biological indicators were comprehensively used.

  5. Whistle characteristics of the spinner dolphin population in the Comoros Archipelago.

    PubMed

    Bonato, M; Papale, E; Pingitore, G; Ricca, S; Attoumane, A; Ouledi, A; Giacoma, C

    2015-11-01

    Observed variations in dolphin acoustic signals may be associated with behavior, social composition, and local differences in habitat features. This study aims at characterizing whistles emitted by the spinner dolphin population occurring in the waters of the main island of the Archipelago of Comoros (Mozambique Channel, Indian Ocean) and to assess factors possibly influencing the acoustic structure of signals. All parameters examined on 953 whistles significantly differed in relation to environmental conditions, group size, and behavior. By mixed model analysis, it was found that only habitat characteristics play a role in the variation of frequency parameters, and exerted on the acoustic structure of whistles stronger influence than socio-behavioral factors. Spinner dolphins occurring in the Comoros archipelago use higher frequencies and show longer signal duration compared to those from the Pacific and the Atlantic. Results suggest that frequency parameters are distinctive of the local population and reflect the habitat use of the species in the area. In conclusion, acoustic measurements may be crucial elements to be included in monitoring programs to identify local peculiarities of dolphins' populations.

  6. Archipelagos of the Anthropocene: rapid and extensive differentiation of native terrestrial vertebrates in a single metropolis.

    PubMed

    Littleford-Colquhoun, Bethan L; Clemente, Christofer; Whiting, Martin J; Ortiz-Barrientos, Daniel; Frère, Celine H

    2017-01-31

    Some of the best evidence for rapid evolutionary change comes from studies of archipelagos and oceanic islands. City parks are analogous systems as they create geographically isolated green spaces that differ in size, structure, and complexity. Very little, however, is known about whether city parks in single urban centres drive selection and result in the diversification of native species. Here, we provide evidence for the rapid genetic and morphological differentiation of a native lizard (Intellagama lesueurii) at four geographically close yet unconnected parks within one city. Year of establishment of each city park varied from 1855 (oldest) to 2001 (youngest) equating to a generation time range of 32 to three generations. Genetic divergence among city park populations was large despite the small pairwise geographic distances (< 5km) and found to be two to three times higher for microsatellites and three to 33 times higher for mtDNA relative to non-urban populations. Patterns of morphological differentiation were also found to be most extensive among the four city park populations. In contrast to non-urban populations, city park populations showed significant differentiation in relative body size, relative head and limb morphology and relative forelimb and hindlimb length. Crucially, we show that these patterns of differentiation are unlikely to have been caused by founder events and/or drift alone. Our results suggest that city park 'archipelagos' could represent theatres for rapid evolution that may, in time, favour adaptive diversification. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  7. Copepod distribution and production in a Mid-Atlantic Ridge archipelago.

    PubMed

    Melo, Pedro A M C; De Melo Júnior, Mauro; De Macêdo, Silvio J; Araujo, Moacyr; Neumann-Leitão, Sigrid

    2014-12-01

    The Saint Peter and Saint Paul Archipelago (SPSPA) are located close to the Equator in the Atlantic Ocean. The aim of this study was to assess the spatial variations in the copepod community abundance, and the biomass and production patterns of the three most abundant calanoid species in the SPSPA. Plankton samples were collected with a 300 µm mesh size net along four transects (north, east, south and west of the SPSPA), with four stations plotted in each transect. All transects exhibited a tendency toward a decrease in copepod density with increasing distance from the SPSPA, statistically proved in the North. Density varied from 3.33 to 182.18 ind.m-3, and differences were also found between the first perimeter (first circular distance band) and the others. The total biomass varied from 15.25 to 524.50 10-3 mg C m-3 and production from 1.19 to 22.04 10-3 mg C m-3d-1. The biomass and production of Undinula vulgaris (Dana, 1849), Acrocalanus longicornis Giesbrecht, 1888 and Calocalanus pavo (Dana, 1849) showed differences between some transects. A trend of declining biodiversity and production with increasing distance from archipelago was observed, suggesting that even small features like the SPSPA can affect the copepod community in tropical oligotrophic oceanic areas.

  8. Possible refugia in the Alexander Archipelago of southeastern Alaska during the late Wisconsin glaciation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carrara, P.E.; Ager, T.A.; Baichtal, J.F.

    2007-01-01

    The interpretation of the extent of late Wisconsin glaciation in southeastern Alaska has varied between geologists and biologists. Maps and reports of the region prepared by geologists commonly indicated that late Wisconsin ice extended as a large uniform front west to the edge of the continental shelf. However, the distribution of plants and animals in the region has led many biologists to suggest that there may have been ice-free areas that served as refugia during the late Wisconsin. Based on analyses of aerial photographs, topographic maps, and bathymetric charts, in conjunction with a review of previous literature and reconnaissance fieldwork throughout the region, this study presents data supporting a limited ice extent in the Alexander Archipelago during the late Wisconsin and identifies possible ice-free areas that may have served as refugia. These areas include (1) the Fairweather Ground, (2) the Herbert Graves Island area, (3) the western coast of southern Baranof Island and adjacent continental shelf, (4) Coronation Island and the adjacent continental shelf, (5) the Warren Island area, (6) the continental shelf from west of Heceta Island to Forrester Island in the south, (7) parts of the west coast of southern Dall Island, and (8) lowland areas in southern Prince of Wales Island. The identification of these possible refugia has bearing on the recolonization of the Alexander Archipelago, as they could have served as centers of biotic dispersal upon regional deglaciation and as stepping stones for early humans with a maritime tradition entering the western hemisphere from Asia. ?? 2007 NRC Canada.

  9. Mesozooplankton distribution in the Spermonde Archipelago (Indonesia, Sulawesi) with special reference to the Calanoida (Copepoda)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornils, Astrid; Schulz, Jan; Schmitt, Petra; Lanuru, Mahatma; Richter, Claudio; Schnack-Schiel, Sigrid B.

    2010-12-01

    In September 2005 the mesozooplankton distribution, taxonomic composition and community structure were studied on four cross-shelf and one coastal transects in the Spermonde Archipelago off Makassar (SW Sulawesi). A total of 47 higher taxonomic groups and 89 calanoid copepod species were identified. Copepods outnumbered the other mesozooplankton taxa with 29 to 69%, increasing in importance towards the offshore stations. Appendicularians ranked second (16-24%) followed at the offshore stations by chaetognaths (4.5%) and, at shelf and coastal stations by echinoderm pluteus larvae (11-15%). Within the calanoids, species of the family Paracalanidae, especially Paracalanus cf. parvus, were dominant at all stations. Other abundant families were Temoridae (6.5-17%), Acartiidae (7.2%) and Pontellidae (6.2%) at shelf and coastal stations while Clausocalanidae (8.7%) and Calanidae (6.7) were more abundant at offshore stations. To investigate the mesozooplankton distribution the 25 stations were grouped into 3 geographical zones based on their topographical and hydrographical differences (coastal, shelf and offshore zone). Some higher zooplankton taxa and about half of the calanoid species occurred only in one or two categories. In general the abundant taxa were spread throughout the Archipelago. To investigate their distribution the abundance data were subjected to a multivariate discriminant function analysis (MDFA). The results revealed that the composition of the mesozooplankton community changed from the coastal zone with a high abundance of meroplankton and neritic copepod species to an offshore community with a higher abundance of holoplanktonic organisms and oceanic copepod species.

  10. [Helminth fauna of the bank vole myodes glareolus (Schreber, 1780) in the Kizhi Archipelago].

    PubMed

    Bugmyrin, S V; Korosov, A V; Bespyatova, L A; Ieshko, E P

    2015-01-01

    The present study was aimed to examine the specific features of the helminth fauna in insular populations of the bank vole (Myodes glareolus) in the north of the species range. The material was collected in and nearby the Kizhi Archipelago (Lake Onega, 62°1' N 35°12' E) during August 1997, 2005-2007, 2012 and 2013. Small mammals were trapped on 23 islands (varying from 2 to 15,000 ha) and on the mainland. Helminthological met- hods were applied to examine 301 specimens of M glareolus. Fourteen helminth species were found: trematodes--Skrjabinoplagiorchis vigisi; cestodes--Paranoplocephala omphalodes, P. gracilis, Catenotaenia henttoneni, Taenia mustelae, Cladotaenia globife- ra, Spirometra erinacei; nematodes--Trichocephalus muris, Aonchotheca murissylvatici, Hepaticola hepatica, Heligmosomum mixtum, Heligmosomoides glareoli, Longistriata minuta, Syphacia petrusewiczi. The parasites S. vigisi, S. erinaci, H. hepatica and T. muris were identified in the bank vole in Karelia for the first time. Significant differences were detected between the helminth faunas of local insular populations of the bank vole. A distinctive feature of all small islands was that samples from them lacked the widespread pa- rasitic nematode Heligmosomum mixtum. The studies have confirmed the general trends observed in the parasite fauna of most isolated populations of small mammals: a poorer species diversity and high infestation rates with certain species of parasites. The Kizhi Archipelago is characterized by the specific high abundance of regionally rare parasite species (H hepatica, A. murissylvatici), and by the absence of common parasites (H. mixtum, H. glareoli).

  11. Modelling population persistence on islands: mammal introductions in the New Zealand archipelago.

    PubMed

    Duncan, Richard P; Forsyth, David M

    2006-12-07

    Islands are likely to differ in their susceptibility to colonization or invasion due to variation in factors that affect population persistence, including island area, climatic severity and habitat modification. We tested the importance of these factors in explaining the persistence of 164 introductions of six mammal species to 85 islands in the New Zealand archipelago using survival analysis and model selection techniques. As predicted by the theory of stochastic population growth, extinction risk was the greatest in the period immediately following introduction, declining rapidly to low probability by ca 25 years. This suggests that initially small populations were at greatest risk of extinction and that populations which survived for 25 years were likely to persist subsequently for much longer. Islands in the New Zealand archipelago become colder and windier with increasing latitude, and the probability of mammal populations persisting on islands declined steeply with increasing latitude. Hence, our results suggest that climatic suitability was an important determinant of the outcome of these invasions. The form of the relationship between latitude and persistence probability differed among species, emphasizing that the outcome of colonization attempts is species-environment specific.

  12. Mercury concentrations of a resident freshwater forage fish at Adak Island, Aleutian Archipelago, Alaska.

    PubMed

    Kenney, Leah A; von Hippel, Frank A; Willacker, James J; O'Hara, Todd M

    2012-11-01

    The Aleutian Archipelago is an isolated arc of over 300 volcanic islands stretching 1,600 km across the interface of the Bering Sea and North Pacific Ocean. Although remote, some Aleutian Islands were heavily impacted by military activities from World War II until recently and were exposed to anthropogenic contaminants, including mercury (Hg). Mercury is also delivered to these islands via global atmospheric transport, prevailing ocean currents, and biotransport by migratory species. Mercury contamination of freshwater ecosystems is poorly understood in this region. Total Hg (THg) concentrations were measured in threespine stickleback fish (Gasterosteus aculeatus) collected from eight lakes at Adak Island, an island in the center of the archipelago with a long military history. Mean THg concentrations for fish whole-body homogenates for all lakes ranged from 0.314 to 0.560 mg/kg dry weight. Stickleback collected from seabird-associated lakes had significantly higher concentrations of THg compared to non-seabird lakes, including all military lakes. The δ(13)C stable isotope ratios of stickleback collected from seabird lakes suggest an input of marine-derived nutrients and/or marine-derived Hg.

  13. Phylogeography of Japanese horse chestnut (Aesculus turbinata) in the Japanese Archipelago based on chloroplast DNA haplotypes.

    PubMed

    Sugahara, Kanako; Kaneko, Yuko; Ito, Satoshi; Yamanaka, Keisuke; Sakio, Hitoshi; Hoshizaki, Kazuhiko; Suzuki, Wajiro; Yamanaka, Norikazu; Setoguchi, Hiroaki

    2011-01-01

    Japanese horse chestnut (Aesculus turbinata: Hippocastanaceae) is one of the typical woody plants that grow in temperate riparian forests in the Japanese Archipelago. To analyze the phylogeography of this plant in the Japanese Archipelago, we determined cpDNA haplotypes for 337 samples from 55 populations covering the entire distribution range. Based on 1,313 bp of two spacers, we determined ten haplotypes that are distinguished from adjacent haplotypes by one or two steps. Most of the populations had a single haplotype, suggesting low diversity. Spatial analysis of molecular variance suggested three obvious phylogeographic structures in western Japan, where Japanese horse chestnut is scattered and isolated in mountainous areas. Conversely, no clear phylogeographic structure was observed from the northern to the southern limit of this species, including eastern Japan, where this plant is more common. Rare and private haplotypes were also found in southwestern Japan, where Japanese horse chestnuts are distributed sparsely. These findings imply that western Japan might have maintained a relatively large habitat for A. turbinata during the Quaternary climatic oscillations, while northerly regions could not.

  14. Ecosystem implications of conserving endemic versus eradicating introduced large herbivores in the Galapagos Archipelago

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bastille-Rousseau, Guillaume; Gibbs, James P.; Campbell, Karl; Yackulic, Charles B.; Blake, Stephen

    2017-01-01

    Restoration of damaged ecosystems through invasive species removal and native species conservation is an increasingly common practice in biodiversity conservation. Estimating the degree of ecosystem response attributable specifically to eradication of exotic herbivores versus restoration of native herbivores is often difficult and is complicated by concurrent temporal changes in other factors, especially climate. We investigated the interactive impacts of native mega-herbivores (giant tortoises) and the eradication of large alien herbivores (goats) on vegetation productivity across the Galapagos Archipelago. We examined archipelago-wide patterns of Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) as a proxy for vegetation productivity between 2001 and 2015 and evaluated how goat and historical and current tortoise occurrence influenced productivity. We used a breakpoint analysis to detect change in trends in productivity from five targeted areas following goat eradication. We found a positive association between tortoise occurrence and vegetation productivity and a negative association with goat occurrence. We also documented an increase in plant productivity following goat removal with recovery higher in moister regions than in arid region, potentially indicating an alternate stable state has been created in the latter. Climate variation also contributed to the detected improvement in productivity following goat eradication, sometimes obscuring the effect of eradication but more usually magnifying it by up to 300%. Our work offers perspectives regarding the effectiveness and outcomes of eradicating introduced herbivores and re-introducing native herbivores, and the merits of staging them simultaneously in order to restore critical ecosystem processes such as vegetation productivity.

  15. Three-Dimensional Finite Difference Modeling of Surface Wave Propagation Across the Barents Shelf

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-10-01

    crust in the vicinity of Spitsbergen and Franz Josef Land. For propagation paths to Europe, Greenland, and North America the surface waves must... Franz Josef Land, to the southwest by the Kola and Kanin Peninsulas, and to the south by the Pechora Basin. Novaya Zemlya is considered an extension...reduced sedimentary cover. Similarly, the Svalbard platform and regions around Spitsbergen and Franz Josef Land to the north are continental crust (40 kin

  16. Navy Tactical Applications Guide. Volume 8. Weather Analysis and Forecast Applications. Part 1. Arctic: Greenland/Norwegian/Barents Seas. Meteorological Satellite Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-09-01

    Novaya Zemlya. Faint cloud plumes are evident extending westward from the polynya southwest of the Franz Josef Land island group. Using these and other...and should have been positioned further north. By using the polynya cloud plume indications in Fig. ID-3a, which indicate northeasterly flow in...Svalbard and Franz Josef Land. The presence of a cloud plume from the polynya south of Kvitoya verifies open water in that region. A final view of the

  17. The Physical Basis for the Lg/P Discriminant: Signal Characteristics and Modeling

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-11-01

    limited to a few source areas (viz. the Nevada Test Site (NTS) in the United States, the former Soviet test sites in eastern Kazakhstan and at Novaya...Zemlya, and the Chinese test site at Lop Nor). In addition, the data included several PNE explosions in the former Soviet Union recorded at a single...the former Soviet test sites , and at intermediate and far-regional distances from the Lop Nor explosions. For comparison, earthquakes and other source

  18. Changes in driftwood delivery to the Canadian Arctic Archipelago: The hypothesis of postglacial oscillations of the transpolar drift

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dyke, A.S.; England, J.; Reimnitz, E.; Jette, H.

    1997-01-01

    Driftwood appears to be absent in the Beaufort Gyre but abundant in parts of the Transpolar Drift (TPD), which crosses the Arctic Ocean from the Chukchi Sea to the vicinity of northeastern Greenland. Nearly 300 radiocarbon dates on Holocene driftwood from the Canadian Arctic Archipelago reveal two regions with contrasting histories of driftwood incursion: the region accessible to wood brought into Baffin Bay by the West Greenland Current and the rest of the archipelago, which receives wood from the Arctic Ocean. We hypothesize that when the TPD was deflected westward along northern Greenland, wood was delivered widely to the Canadian Arctic Archipelago; when the TPD exited entirely through Fram Strait via the East Greenland Current, little or no wood was delivered to most of the archipelago, but some continued into Baffin Bay via the West Greenland Current. A split TPD delivered wood to both regions. The regional driftwood incursion histories exhibit multiple maxima and minima that can be explained by this hypothesis. The Larix to Picea ratio of wood arriving in the Canadian Arctic Archipelago has also changed through time. This may indicate varying contributions from Russian versus North American sources, which in turn may indicate variable mixing of wood en route. The inferred discharge paths of the TPD were apparently stable for intervals ranging from several millennia to centuries or perhaps only decades. The last major switch broadly correlates with the onset of Neoglaciation. Variations in the path and strength of the TPD may have important oceanographic and climatic consequences downstream in the North Atlantic Ocean.

  19. Population dynamics of intertidal oribatid mites (Acari: Cryptostigmata) from the subtropical archipelago of Bermuda.

    PubMed

    Pfingstl, Tobias

    2013-10-01

    The population dynamics of the three intertidal oribatid species, Alismobates inexpectatus, Fortuynia atlantica and Carinozetes bermudensis, have been studied on the archipelago of Bermuda over the course of a year. All three species are univoltine, showing a clear seasonal demographic pattern, with reproduction from spring to late autumn and a complete standstill of egg production in winter. A seasonal shift in sex ratio could also be observed in all three species and is supposed to be based on sex-dependent mortality. The subtropical climate of Bermuda allows longer reproductive periods than shown in other intertidal or edaphic temperate species and temperature is supposed to be the main factor influencing the demography of these intertidal dwelling mites. Although all three Bermudian species exhibit the same basic seasonal demographic pattern, there are slight temporal shifts in population dynamics, presumably caused by local microclimatic differences among the populations. Larviparity, shown in other littoral oribatid mites, is clearly absent in the present species.

  20. Holocene reef evolution in a macrotidal setting: Buccaneer Archipelago, Kimberley Bioregion, Northwest Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solihuddin, Tubagus; O'Leary, Michael J.; Blakeway, David; Parnum, Iain; Kordi, Moataz; Collins, Lindsay B.

    2016-09-01

    This study uses information derived from cores to describe the Holocene accretion history of coral reefs in the macrotidal (up to 11 m tidal range) Buccaneer Archipelago of the southern Kimberley coast, Western Australia. The internal architecture of all cored reefs is broadly similar, constituting well-preserved detrital coral fragments, predominantly branching Acropora, in a poorly sorted sandy mud matrix. However, once the reefs reach sea level, they diverge into two types: low intertidal reefs that maintain their detrital character and develop relatively narrow, horizontal or gently sloping reef flats at approximately mean low water spring, and high intertidal reefs that develop broad coralline algal-dominated reef flats at elevations between mean low water neap and mean high water neap. The high intertidal reefs develop where strong, ebb-dominated, tidal asymmetry retains seawater over the low tide and allows continued accretion. Both reef types are ultimately constrained by sea level but differ in elevation by 3-4 m.

  1. Sea ice conditions and melt season duration variability within the Canadian Arctic Archipelago: 1979-2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howell, Stephen E. L.; Duguay, Claude R.; Markus, Thorsten

    2009-05-01

    Sea ice conditions and melt season duration within the Canadian Arctic Archipelago (CAA) were investigated from 1979-2008. The CAA is exhibiting statistically significant decreases in average September total sea ice area at -8.7% decade-1. The melt season duration within the CAA is increasing significantly at 7 days decade-1. 2008 represented the longest melt season duration within the CAA over the satellite record at 129 days. Average September multi-year ice (MYI) area is decreasing at -6.4% decade-1 but has yet to reach statistical significance as a result of increasing MYI dynamic import from the Arctic Ocean. Results also find that the Western Parry Channel (WPC) region of the Northwest Passage (NWP) will continue to be susceptible to MYI as the transition to a summer-time sea ice free Arctic continues. The processes responsible for the temporary clearing of the WPC region of the NWP in 2007 were also identified.

  2. Biology of Anopheles saperoi, an Endemic Species in Okinawajima, the Ryukyu Archipelago, Japan.

    PubMed

    Mannen, Kosuke; Toma, Takako; Minakawa, Noboru; Higa, Yukiko; Miyagi, Ichiro

    2016-03-01

    Biological studies of Anopheles saperoi were conducted using larval and adult mosquito collections in the northern part of Okinawajima of the Ryukyu Archipelago from June 2009 to July 2010. Anopheles saperoi was the most collected species in the northern Okinawajima, except Motobu Peninsula, where it was not collected. The southern distribution of An. saperoi was Sugita Stream, Nago City. Anopheles saperoi was collected throughout the year with reproduction (gonotrophic cycle) observed year-round. Immature densities varied for Hinna and Yona streams, and were negatively affected by precipitation patterns. Human attraction activity of females varied for by study area and collection time and was positively affected by temperature, but negatively by heavy rainfall. The greatest female human attraction activity was observed during 3:00-5:00 p.m., with peak at twilight. Parity rates varied from 23.1% to 83.3% throughout the year.

  3. A new species of Gnathia (Isopoda: Cymothoida: Gnathiidae) from Okinawajima Island, Ryukyu Archipelago, southwestern Japan.

    PubMed

    Ota, Yuzo; Tanaka, Katsuhiko; Hirose, Euichi

    2007-12-01

    Gnathia limicola sp. nov. is described from Okinawajima Island, Ryukyu Archipelago, southwestern Japan. Burrows of this species were found in a small intertidal creek bank on a muddy tidal flat near mangrove trees. Adult males differ from those of other Gnathia species in the following features: (1) fine setae cover peduncle articles 1 and 2 of antenna 1, peduncle articles 1-3 of antenna 2, and the erisma of the mandibles; (2) the ventral frontal border of the cephalon is medianly notched, and the lateral parts extend beyond the dorsal frontal border; and (3) the penes are fused into a thin rectangular blade directed posteriorly. Adult females and praniza larvae were also distinguished morphologically from other Gnathia species. Based on field and laboratory observations, the mating behavior of this species appears similar to that of Paragnathia formica (Hesse, 1862), which inhabits salt marshes in Europe and North Africa.

  4. Prognathodes basabei, a new species of butterflyfish (Perciformes, Chaetodontidae) from the Hawaiian Archipelago

    PubMed Central

    Pyle, Richard L.; Kosaki, Randall K.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract A new species of the butterflyfish genus Prognathodes is described from specimens collected at a depth of 55–61 m off Pearl and Hermes Atoll, Northwestern Hawaiian Islands. This species has been observed by mixed-gas divers and from submersibles at depths ranging from 45–187 m throughout the Hawaiian Archipelago, with shallower sightings in the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands and deeper in the Main Hawaiian Islands. It is similar to Prognathodes guezei (Maugé and Bauchot 1976) from the western Indian Ocean, and at least one other undescribed species of Prognathodes from Palau, differing from these species in the number of soft dorsal-fin rays, size of head, and body depth. There are also differences in the life color, and a substantial genetic difference from the Palauan species (d » .08 in mtDNA cytochrome oxidase I). PMID:27667937

  5. Ticks on passerines from the Archipelago of the Azores as hosts of borreliae and rickettsiae.

    PubMed

    Literak, Ivan; Norte, Ana Claudia; Núncio, Maria Sofia; de Carvalho, Isabel Lopes; Ogrzewalska, Maria; Nováková, Markéta; Martins, Thiago F; Sychra, Oldrich; Resendes, Roberto; Rodrígues, Pedro

    2015-07-01

    We examined the presence of borreliae and rickettsiae bacteria in ticks from wild passerine birds on three islands of the Archipelago of the Azores, the westernmost region of Palearctic. A total of 266 birds belonging to eight species from seven families were examined on São Miguel, Santa Maria and Graciosa islands in 2013. Ticks collected from these birds consisted of 55 Ixodes frontalis (22 larvae, 32 nymphs, 1 adult female) and 16 Haemaphysalis punctata nymphs. Turdus merula and Erithacus rubecula were the birds most infested with both tick species. Three T. merula in Santa Maria were infested with 4 I. frontalis infected with Borrelia turdi. No rickettsiae were found in the ticks. We report for the first time the presence of I. frontalis and B. turdi on the Azores islands and we showed that the spatial distribution reaches further west than previously thought.

  6. Description of female pupa and larva of Ficalbia ichiromiyagii from Iriomote Island, Ryukyu Archipelago, Japan.

    PubMed

    Higa, Yukiko; Toma, Takako; Miyagi, Ichiro

    2012-12-01

    We describe and illustrate for the 1st time the pupa and larva of adult female Ficalbia ichiromiyagii based on specimens collected from a swamp forest in Otomi, Iriomote Island, Ryukyu Archipelago, Japan. The pupa has a trumpet that is 6.25 times its breadth at halfway, with a long meatal cleft line; setae 6-I, II considerably long, usually single or bifid; median caudal seta absent; and paddle edge serrated only on the outer apical half. The larva is characterized by dark pigmentation of the head and siphon, seta I-C elongate and spiniform, usually with a short lateral spine on the inner basal side and siphon with 1 pecten spine and conspicuous seta 1-S at the base. The immature stages were found only in undisturbed jungle swamps with dense vegetation.

  7. [Malaria in the islands of the Comoro archipelago. Historical and geophysical aspects. Epidemiologic considerations].

    PubMed

    Julvez, J; Blanchy, S

    1988-01-01

    Located on the maritime road to India, important harbour during slavery period, Comoro Archipelago was therefore free of malaria in the XVIIth century in spite of the presence of infected persons. In the XIXth century, malaria became endemic in Mayotte, Mohéli and Anjouan but only at the beginning of the XXth century in Grande Comore. The origin of vectors and main parasite, P. falciparum, are african. After quite a "natural" evolution, the situation is the same in these islands (continual high transmission) except Mayotte where a malaria programme is performed since 1976. But the historical differences, island by island, in the outbreak of malaria suggest various ecological balance which would be underlined by antimalarial activities.

  8. Pearl oysters Pinctada margaritifera grazing on natural plankton in Ahe atoll lagoon (Tuamotu Archipelago, French Polynesia).

    PubMed

    Fournier, Jonathan; Dupuy, Christine; Bouvy, Marc; Couraudon-Réale, Marine; Charpy, Loïc; Pouvreau, Stephane; Le Moullac, Gilles; Le Pennec, Marcel; Cochard, Jean-Claude

    2012-01-01

    In atoll lagoons of French Polynesia, growth and reproduction of pearl oysters are mainly driven by plankton concentration. However, the actual diet of black-lip pearl oysters Pinctada margaritifera in these lagoons is poorly known. To fill this gap, we used the flow through chamber method to measure clearance rates of P. margaritifera in Ahe atoll lagoon (Tuamotu Archipelago, French Polynesia). We found: (i) that pearl oysters cleared plankton at a rate that was positively related to plankton biovolume, (ii) that nanoflagellates were the main source of carbon for the pearl oysters, and (iii) that the quantity and origin of carbon filtrated by pearl oysters was highly dependent on the concentration and composition of plankton. These results provide essential elements for the comprehension of growth and reproduction variability of pearl oysters in atoll lagoons of French Polynesia.

  9. Crustal deformation study in the Canary Archipelago by the analysis of GPS observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martín, Adriana; Sevilla, Miguel; Zurutuza, Joaquín

    2014-06-01

    The Canary Archipelago is an active volcanic region located in the African plate, at 100 Km of the northwest coast of Africa. The Complutense University of Madrid, Institute of Astronomy and Geodesy (CSIC-UCM) and University of Jaén, established a GPS Network in this region and carried out six observations campaigns from 2002 to 2009. The focus of thiswork is processing and analyzing these observations to study the geodynamic behavior of the stations of this network. The data have been computed with the Bernese GPS Software Version 5.0 obtaining individual solutions of coordinates for each session and campaign, the coordinate velocities of the stations and the time series of baselines formed between them. Results show consistency of station velocities compared to behaviour of areas permanent stations and baselines stability. No deformations could be detected.

  10. Fishery of the Green Jack Caranx caballus (Osteichytes: Carangidae) in Las Perlas Archipelago, Pacific Panama.

    PubMed

    Mair, James M; Cipriani, Roberto; Guzman, Hector M; Usan, David

    2012-09-01

    Green Jacks, Caranx caballus, are distributed along the Eastern Pacific coast. In Panama, C. caballus was heavily fished around Las Perlas Archipelago to sustain local markets until 2007, when the archipelago was declared a marine protected area. This first study in Panama, analyzed a sample of 4 990 individuals from Las Perlas, obtained monthly from June 2005 to June 2006, from landings at the central fish market. Average total length was 36.1 +/- 6.4cm and optimum length 38.9cm. Approximately 68% of fish lengths were within +/-10% of the optimal length but only six (15%) were considered mega-spawners. The von Bertalanffy parameters describe a long-lived and fast growing species, while mortality rates revealed that C. caballus is under high fishing pressure. Standard length at which half of the population is mature was 38.8cm, and the size at which individuals matured massively, 33cm. Only 10-13% of the fish were immature. C. caballus reproduces two to three times per year, with peaks in December, April, and probably September, and recruits to the population at least twice per year. Catch per unit effort (CPUE) was best predicted by minimum annual values of the Multivariate ENSO/LNSO Index (MEI) (R2=0.54). Results show that C. caballus in Pacific Panama is overfished. We recommend the raising of the minimum capture/landing size of this species in order to increase the proportion of mega-spawners in the population and guarantee the sustainability of this resource.

  11. The terrestrial reptile fauna of the Abrolhos Archipelago: species list and ecological aspects.

    PubMed

    Rocha, C F D; Dutra, G F; Vrcibradic, D; Menezes, V A

    2002-05-01

    We have studied the terrestrial reptile fauna of the Abrolhos Archipelago (a group of five islands located ca. 70 km off the southern coast of the State of Bahia, Brazil) and analyze here some of its ecological aspects such as diet, thermal ecology, activity, and some reproductive parameters. Three lizards comprise the archipelago's terrestrial reptile fauna: Tropidurus torquatus (Tropiduridae), Mabuya agilis (Scincidae), and Hemidactylus mabouia (Gekkonidae). The first two are diurnal and the latter is crepuscular/nocturnal (initiating activity at ca. 17:30). The activity period of T. torquatus extended from 5:30 to 18:30 h. Mean field body temperatures of active T. torquatus, M. agilis, and H. mabouia were, respectively, 34.0 +/- 3.7 degrees C (range 23.8-38.0 degrees C; N = 75), 34.5 +/- 2.2 degrees C (range 30.8-37.0 degrees C; N = 6), and 26.3 +/- 1.1 degrees C (range 24.8-28.0 degrees C; N = 8). The predominant prey items in the diet of T. torquatus were ants, coleopterans, and hemipterans. In the diet of M. agilis, coleopterans were the most frequent prey items. For H. mabouia, the most important dietary items were orthopterans. Clutch size of T. torquatus averaged 4.1 +/- 1.1 (range 2-6; N = 15) and was significantly related to female size (R2 = 0.618; p = 0.001; N = 15). Clutch size for H. mabouia was fixed (two) and mean litter size of the viviparous M. agilis was 3.3 +/- 0.6 (range 3-4; N = 3). Tropidurus torquatus and H. mabouia deposit their eggs under rocks in the study area, with the former burying them but not the latter; in both species, more than one female often oviposit under the same rock.

  12. A comprehensive investigation of mesophotic coral ecosystems in the Hawaiian Archipelago.

    PubMed

    Pyle, Richard L; Boland, Raymond; Bolick, Holly; Bowen, Brian W; Bradley, Christina J; Kane, Corinne; Kosaki, Randall K; Langston, Ross; Longenecker, Ken; Montgomery, Anthony; Parrish, Frank A; Popp, Brian N; Rooney, John; Smith, Celia M; Wagner, Daniel; Spalding, Heather L

    2016-01-01

    Although the existence of coral-reef habitats at depths to 165 m in tropical regions has been known for decades, the richness, diversity, and ecological importance of mesophotic coral ecosystems (MCEs) has only recently become widely acknowledged. During an interdisciplinary effort spanning more than two decades, we characterized the most expansive MCEs ever recorded, with vast macroalgal communities and areas of 100% coral cover between depths of 50-90 m extending for tens of km(2) in the Hawaiian Archipelago. We used a variety of sensors and techniques to establish geophysical characteristics. Biodiversity patterns were established from visual and video observations and collected specimens obtained from submersible, remotely operated vehicles and mixed-gas SCUBA and rebreather dives. Population dynamics based on age, growth and fecundity estimates of selected fish species were obtained from laser-videogrammetry, specimens, and otolith preparations. Trophic dynamics were determined using carbon and nitrogen stable isotopic analyses on more than 750 reef fishes. MCEs are associated with clear water and suitable substrate. In comparison to shallow reefs in the Hawaiian Archipelago, inhabitants of MCEs have lower total diversity, harbor new and unique species, and have higher rates of endemism in fishes. Fish species present in shallow and mesophotic depths have similar population and trophic (except benthic invertivores) structures and high genetic connectivity with lower fecundity at mesophotic depths. MCEs in Hawai'i are widespread but associated with specific geophysical characteristics. High genetic, ecological and trophic connectivity establish the potential for MCEs to serve as refugia for some species, but our results question the premise that MCEs are more resilient than shallow reefs. We found that endemism within MCEs increases with depth, and our results do not support suggestions of a global faunal break at 60 m. Our findings enhance the scientific

  13. Living on the edge: Conservation genetics of seven thermophilous plant species in a High Arctic archipelago.

    PubMed

    Birkeland, Siri; Elisabeth Borgen Skjetne, Idunn; Krag Brysting, Anne; Elven, Reidar; Greve Alsos, Inger

    2017-01-20

    Small, isolated, and/or peripheral populations are expected to harbour low levels of genetic variation and may therefore have reduced adaptability to environmental change, including climate warming. In the Arctic, global warming has already caused vegetation change across the region and is acting as a significant stressor on Arctic biodiversity. Many of the rare plants in the Arctic are relicts from early Holocene warm periods, but their ability to benefit from the current warming is dependent on the viability of their populations. We therefore examined Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism (AFLP) data from regional red listed vascular plant species in the High Arctic archipelago of Svalbard and reference populations from the main distribution area of: 1) Botrychium lunaria, 2) Carex capillaris ssp. fuscidula, 3) Comastoma tenellum, 4) Kobresia simpliciuscula ssp. subholarctica, 5) Ranunculus wilanderi, 6) Sibbaldia procumbens and 7) Tofieldia pusilla In addition, we gathered population size data in Svalbard. The Svalbard populations had low genetic diversity and distinctiveness and few or no private markers compared to populations outside the archipelago. This is similar to observations in other rare species in Svalbard and the genetic depletion may be due to an initial founder effect and/or a genetic bottleneck caused by late Holocene cooling. There seems to be limited gene flow from other areas and the Svalbard populations should therefore be considered as demographically independent management units. Overall, these management units have small and/or few populations and are therefore prone to stochastic events which may further increase vulnerability to inbreeding depression, loss of genetic variation, and reduced evolutionary potential. Our results support theory predicting lower levels of genetic diversity in small, isolated and/or peripheral populations and may be of importance for management of other rare plant species in the Arctic.

  14. Climate change impacts on wildlife in a High Arctic archipelago - Svalbard, Norway.

    PubMed

    Descamps, Sébastien; Aars, Jon; Fuglei, Eva; Kovacs, Kit M; Lydersen, Christian; Pavlova, Olga; Pedersen, Åshild Ø; Ravolainen, Virve; Strøm, Hallvard

    2017-02-01

    The Arctic is warming more rapidly than other region on the planet, and the northern Barents Sea, including the Svalbard Archipelago, is experiencing the fastest temperature increases within the circumpolar Arctic, along with the highest rate of sea ice loss. These physical changes are affecting a broad array of resident Arctic organisms as well as some migrants that occupy the region seasonally. Herein, evidence of climate change impacts on terrestrial and marine wildlife in Svalbard is reviewed, with a focus on bird and mammal species. In the terrestrial ecosystem, increased winter air temperatures and concomitant increases in the frequency of 'rain-on-snow' events are one of the most important facets of climate change with respect to impacts on flora and fauna. Winter rain creates ice that blocks access to food for herbivores and synchronizes the population dynamics of the herbivore-predator guild. In the marine ecosystem, increases in sea temperature and reductions in sea ice are influencing the entire food web. These changes are affecting the foraging and breeding ecology of most marine birds and mammals and are associated with an increase in abundance of several temperate fish, seabird and marine mammal species. Our review indicates that even though a few species are benefiting from a warming climate, most Arctic endemic species in Svalbard are experiencing negative consequences induced by the warming environment. Our review emphasizes the tight relationships between the marine and terrestrial ecosystems in this High Arctic archipelago. Detecting changes in trophic relationships within and between these ecosystems requires long-term (multidecadal) demographic, population- and ecosystem-based monitoring, the results of which are necessary to set appropriate conservation priorities in relation to climate warming.

  15. An Invasive Fish and the Time-Lagged Spread of Its Parasite across the Hawaiian Archipelago

    PubMed Central

    Gaither, Michelle R.; Aeby, Greta; Vignon, Matthias; Meguro, Yu-ichiro; Rigby, Mark; Runyon, Christina; Toonen, Robert J.; Wood, Chelsea L.; Bowen, Brian W.

    2013-01-01

    Efforts to limit the impact of invasive species are frustrated by the cryptogenic status of a large proportion of those species. Half a century ago, the state of Hawai'i introduced the Bluestripe Snapper, Lutjanus kasmira, to O'ahu for fisheries enhancement. Today, this species shares an intestinal nematode parasite, Spirocamallanus istiblenni, with native Hawaiian fishes, raising the possibility that the introduced fish carried a parasite that has since spread to naïve local hosts. Here, we employ a multidisciplinary approach, combining molecular, historical, and ecological data to confirm the alien status of S. istiblenni in Hawai'i. Using molecular sequence data we show that S. istiblenni from Hawai'i are genetically affiliated with source populations in French Polynesia, and not parasites at a geographically intermediate location in the Line Islands. S. istiblenni from Hawai'i are a genetic subset of the more diverse source populations, indicating a bottleneck at introduction. Ecological surveys indicate that the parasite has found suitable intermediate hosts in Hawai'i, which are required for the completion of its life cycle, and that the parasite is twice as prevalent in Hawaiian Bluestripe Snappers as in source populations. While the introduced snapper has spread across the entire 2600 km archipelago to Kure Atoll, the introduced parasite has spread only half that distance. However, the parasite faces no apparent impediments to invading the entire archipelago, with unknown implications for naïve indigenous Hawaiian fishes and the protected Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument. PMID:23468894

  16. An invasive fish and the time-lagged spread of its parasite across the Hawaiian archipelago.

    PubMed

    Gaither, Michelle R; Aeby, Greta; Vignon, Matthias; Meguro, Yu-ichiro; Rigby, Mark; Runyon, Christina; Toonen, Robert J; Wood, Chelsea L; Bowen, Brian W

    2013-01-01

    Efforts to limit the impact of invasive species are frustrated by the cryptogenic status of a large proportion of those species. Half a century ago, the state of Hawai'i introduced the Bluestripe Snapper, Lutjanus kasmira, to O'ahu for fisheries enhancement. Today, this species shares an intestinal nematode parasite, Spirocamallanus istiblenni, with native Hawaiian fishes, raising the possibility that the introduced fish carried a parasite that has since spread to naïve local hosts. Here, we employ a multidisciplinary approach, combining molecular, historical, and ecological data to confirm the alien status of S. istiblenni in Hawai'i. Using molecular sequence data we show that S. istiblenni from Hawai'i are genetically affiliated with source populations in French Polynesia, and not parasites at a geographically intermediate location in the Line Islands. S. istiblenni from Hawai'i are a genetic subset of the more diverse source populations, indicating a bottleneck at introduction. Ecological surveys indicate that the parasite has found suitable intermediate hosts in Hawai'i, which are required for the completion of its life cycle, and that the parasite is twice as prevalent in Hawaiian Bluestripe Snappers as in source populations. While the introduced snapper has spread across the entire 2600 km archipelago to Kure Atoll, the introduced parasite has spread only half that distance. However, the parasite faces no apparent impediments to invading the entire archipelago, with unknown implications for naïve indigenous Hawaiian fishes and the protected Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument.

  17. Benthic Habitat Mapping and Biodiversity Analysis in the Primeiras and Segundas Archipelago Reserve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teixeira, L.; Nilsson, M.; Hedley, J.; Shapiro, A.

    2015-04-01

    The Primeiras and Segundas Archipelago Reserve is a recently established marine protected area, the largest in Africa, located in the waters of Northern Mozambique. This protected area is of significant local economic importance and global ecological relevance, containing the southernmost coral reefs in Eastern Africa. However, information related to the marine ecosystem, notably benthic habitat is very scarce. Twelve atolls were mapped in the region using object-based image classification of very-high resolution satellite imagery (IKONOS, Quickbird, and WorldView-2). Geographically referenced data on benthic cover and depth were gathered in the course of three fieldwork expeditions covering a total of four atolls and two shallow reef structures in the Segundas Archipelago. The resulting map allows the estimation of three distinct types of coral cover (field, patches, spurs and grooves); the differentiation of sand, rubble and rock substrate; and the detection of seagrass and brown macroalgae, identifying up to 24 benthic habitats. Average overall accuracy was above 50%. The high variability of the optical properties on the reef systems, in large due to the connectivity with the mainland via plumes, while interesting from an ecological perspective increases the challenges for remote sensing of bottom cover. New information indicates the presence of deep benthic cover extending from the atolls, suggesting the need for further research on Coastal Eastern African corals, namely on their resilience and connectivity, and supporting current knowledge of the existence of an almost continuous coral reef from Kenya to Mozambique. Coral and fish biodiversity data have been analysed together with the satellite-derived maps. Results support the local perception that ecosystems are in decline and uncover new information about biodiversity's spatial patterns. Our work provides a detailed depiction of marine habitats that may aid the management of the protected area, namely in

  18. High-resolution modelling of 3D hydrodynamics in coastal archipelagos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miettunen, Elina; Tuomi, Laura; Ropponen, Janne; Lignell, Risto

    2016-04-01

    Dynamics of the coastal seas are affected by eutrophication, over-fishing, coastal construction and climate change. To enable the sustainable development of these areas, monitoring and modelling of the state of the sea are needed. The Archipelago Sea, located in the northern part of the semi-enclosed and brackish water Baltic Sea, is one of the most complex coastal areas with over 40 000 small islands and islets. It is also very vulnerable area already heavily stressed with eutrophication. Applicable modelling tools are needed to support the decision making and to provide sufficiently reliable information on the effects of the planned actions on the state of the coastal waters. We used 3D hydrodynamic model COHERENS to model the Archipelago Sea area with high spatial resolution of 0.25 nmi. Boundary conditions for this limited area were provided from coarser resolution, 2 nmi, Baltic Sea grid. In order to evaluate the performance of the high-resolution coastal model implementation a comprehensive measurement dataset was gathered, including hydrographic data from three intensive monitoring stations and several more rarely visited monitoring or research stations. The hydrodynamic model was able to simulate the surface temperature and salinity fields and their seasonal variation with good accuracy in this complex area. The sharp depth gradients typical for this area provided some challenges to the modelling. There was some over mixing and related to too strong vertical currents in the steep slopes of the deeper fault lines. Also the water exchange between the more open sea and coastal areas through narrow channels between the islands is not sufficiently well reproduced with the current resolution, leading to too high bottom temperatures.

  19. A comprehensive investigation of mesophotic coral ecosystems in the Hawaiian Archipelago

    PubMed Central

    Boland, Raymond; Bolick, Holly; Bowen, Brian W.; Bradley, Christina J.; Kane, Corinne; Kosaki, Randall K.; Langston, Ross; Longenecker, Ken; Montgomery, Anthony; Parrish, Frank A.; Popp, Brian N.; Smith, Celia M.; Wagner, Daniel; Spalding, Heather L.

    2016-01-01

    Although the existence of coral-reef habitats at depths to 165 m in tropical regions has been known for decades, the richness, diversity, and ecological importance of mesophotic coral ecosystems (MCEs) has only recently become widely acknowledged. During an interdisciplinary effort spanning more than two decades, we characterized the most expansive MCEs ever recorded, with vast macroalgal communities and areas of 100% coral cover between depths of 50–90 m extending for tens of km2 in the Hawaiian Archipelago. We used a variety of sensors and techniques to establish geophysical characteristics. Biodiversity patterns were established from visual and video observations and collected specimens obtained from submersible, remotely operated vehicles and mixed-gas SCUBA and rebreather dives. Population dynamics based on age, growth and fecundity estimates of selected fish species were obtained from laser-videogrammetry, specimens, and otolith preparations. Trophic dynamics were determined using carbon and nitrogen stable isotopic analyses on more than 750 reef fishes. MCEs are associated with clear water and suitable substrate. In comparison to shallow reefs in the Hawaiian Archipelago, inhabitants of MCEs have lower total diversity, harbor new and unique species, and have higher rates of endemism in fishes. Fish species present in shallow and mesophotic depths have similar population and trophic (except benthic invertivores) structures and high genetic connectivity with lower fecundity at mesophotic depths. MCEs in Hawai‘i are widespread but associated with specific geophysical characteristics. High genetic, ecological and trophic connectivity establish the potential for MCEs to serve as refugia for some species, but our results question the premise that MCEs are more resilient than shallow reefs. We found that endemism within MCEs increases with depth, and our results do not support suggestions of a global faunal break at 60 m. Our findings enhance the scientific

  20. Unexpectedly high radioactivity burdens in ice-rafted sediments from the Canadian Arctic Archipelago.

    PubMed

    Cota, Glenn F; Cooper, Lee W; Darby, Dennis A; Larsen, I L

    2006-07-31

    Unexpectedly high specific activities of (137)Cs (1800-2000 Bq kg(-1) dry weight) have been detected in fine-grained sediments entrained in multi-year sea ice floes grounded in Resolute Bay near the center of the Northwest Passage through the Canadian Arctic Archipelago. These results are remarkable because: (1) the specific activities are about two orders of magnitude higher than average specific activities detected in previous studies of sea ice rafted sediments from the Arctic Ocean, (2) two independent observations of these unexpectedly high specific activities were made several years apart, (3) the sampling site is on the opposite side of the Arctic basin from potential radioactive sources such as disposal and weapons testing sites of the former Soviet Union and nuclear fuel reprocessing sites in western Europe, and (4) the closest compositional match to known geologic source regions is Banks Island, on the western edge of the Arctic Archipelago, although a smaller number of grains from one of the two samples were mineralogically matched to sediments in the Laptev Sea. Consequently, the sediments are probably not from a single distinct source and were likely mixed during sea ice transport. Coupled with previous observations of higher radionuclide specific activities in some sea ice rafted sediments relative to bottom sediments, these new observations indicate that comparatively high as well as variable radioactive contaminant burdens in ice rafted sediments must be common and geographically independent of proximity to known contaminant sources. The mechanisms that would facilitate these unexpected high radionuclide burdens in sea ice are not known and require additional study, as well as investigations of the implications for the transport and fate of contaminants in Arctic sea ice.

  1. Reproductive response to nitrogen and phosphorus fertilization along the Hawaiian archipelago's natural soil fertility gradient.

    PubMed

    DiManno, Nicole M; Ostertag, Rebecca

    2016-01-01

    Nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) are the most important nutrients involved in plant reproduction and typically the most limiting in terrestrial ecosystems. The natural soil fertility gradient of the Hawaiian archipelago, in which younger islands are N limited and older islands are P limited, provides a model system to examine questions regarding allocation of nutrients. Using fertilized plots (+N or +P) at the extreme sites of the Hawaiian archipelago, vegetative productivity (e.g., net primary productivity, growth, and litterfall) and foliar nutrient responses have previously been studied for the dominant canopy tree, Metrosideros polymorpha. Here, we investigated whether the reproductive response of M. polymorpha mirrors the previously found vegetative productivity and foliar nutrient responses, by quantifying: (1) inflorescence and seed productivity, and (2) nutrient concentration of reproductive structures. Fertilization with N and P did not significantly affect the productivity of inflorescences or seeds, or seed viability at either site. However, nutrient concentrations increased after fertilization; %P increased in inflorescences in the +P treatment at the P-limited site. Seeds and inflorescences generally contained higher nutrient concentrations than leaves at both sites. Unlike foliar data, reproductive strategies of M. polymorpha differed depending on soil nutrient limitation with emphasis on quality (higher seed viability/greater nutrient concentrations) at the P-limited site. We suggest that in response to P additions M. polymorpha employs a nutrient conservation strategy for its inflorescences and an investment strategy for its seeds. Examining N and P simultaneously challenges a basic assumption that reproductive allocation follows a similar pattern to the often measured aboveground productivity.

  2. Health Beliefs and Perceptions of Trachoma in Communities on the Bijagos Archipelago of Guinea Bissau

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Katie; Hutchins, Harry; Baio, Aramata; Cassama, Eunice; Nabicassa, Meno; Bailey, Robin; Last, Anna R.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose: The World Health Organization aims to eliminate blinding trachoma by 2020 using the SAFE strategy: Surgery for trichiasis, Antibiotics, Facial cleanliness and Environmental improvement. Trachoma is hyperendemic on the remote Bijagos Archipelago of Guinea-Bissau, West Africa. Sociocultural factors remain unexplored here, despite their potential impact on disease control, particularly through the “F” and “E” aspects. By examining these, we aim to illuminate this population's unreported health beliefs, hygiene behaviors and disease perceptions. This understanding will help to optimize future public health interventions, and guide the distribution of limited healthcare resources. Methods: Two unmatched interview series were conducted 1 year apart on Bubaque Island in the Bijagos Archipelago; one in rural villages using purposive snowball sampling, the other in a semi-urban settlement, using random-cluster sampling. Interviews were conducted and recorded in Kriolu, the local dialect, by a supervised local field assistant before translation into English for conventional content analysis. Results: Trachoma was unheard of in either series, despite ongoing local trachoma research. A heterogeneous range of disease etiology and preventative measures were suggested, but the importance of hygiene was more widely reported by semi-urban interviewees. Although western medicine was well regarded, traditional practices continued, particularly in the rural populations. Conclusions: Differences in knowledge, beliefs and behaviors were apparent between the two series. Despite widespread rudimentary knowledge of disease prevention, targeted education might benefit both communities, particularly basic hygiene education for rural communities. Healthcare access should also be improved for rural populations. The impact of these measures could be assessed by future fieldwork. PMID:26158577

  3. Defining Boundaries for Ecosystem-Based Management: A Multispecies Case Study of Marine Connectivity across the Hawaiian Archipelago

    PubMed Central

    Toonen, Robert J.; Andrews, Kimberly R.; Baums, Iliana B.; Bird, Christopher E.; Concepcion, Gregory T.; Daly-Engel, Toby S.; Eble, Jeff A.; Faucci, Anuschka; Gaither, Michelle R.; Iacchei, Matthew; Puritz, Jonathan B.; Schultz, Jennifer K.; Skillings, Derek J.; Timmers, Molly A.; Bowen, Brian W.

    2014-01-01

    Determining the geographic scale at which to apply ecosystem-based management (EBM) has proven to be an obstacle for many marine conservation programs. Generalizations based on geographic proximity, taxonomy, or life history characteristics provide little predictive power in determining overall patterns of connectivity, and therefore offer little in terms of delineating boundaries for marine spatial management areas. Here, we provide a case study of 27 taxonomically and ecologically diverse species (including reef fishes, marine mammals, gastropods, echinoderms, cnidarians, crustaceans, and an elasmobranch) that reveal four concordant barriers to dispersal within the Hawaiian Archipelago which are not detected in single-species exemplar studies. We contend that this multispecies approach to determine concordant patterns of connectivity is an objective and logical way in which to define the minimum number of management units and that EBM in the Hawaiian Archipelago requires at least five spatially managed regions. PMID:25505913

  4. De-facto marine protection from a Navy bombing range: Farallon De Medinilla, Mariana Archipelago, 1997 to 2012.

    PubMed

    Smith, Stephen H; Marx, Donald E

    2016-01-15

    Fourteen surveys were conducted at Farallon De Medinilla (a U.S. Department of Defense bombing range in the Mariana Archipelago) between 1997 and 2012; annual surveys were conducted from 1999 through 2012. There was no evidence that the condition of the biological resources assessed had changed, or been adversely impacted to a significant degree by the training activities being conducted there. Restricted access has resulted in a de-facto preserve effect and outweighs minor negative impacts from training. The health, abundance and biomass of fishes, corals and other marine resources are comparable to or superior to those in similar habitats at other locations within the Mariana Archipelago. Our research suggests that the greatest threat to FDM's marine resources is from fishermen, not military training activities.

  5. Ice mass loss in Greenland, the Gulf of Alaska, and the Canadian Archipelago: Seasonal cycles and decadal trends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harig, Christopher; Simons, Frederik J.

    2016-04-01

    Over the past several decades mountain glaciers and ice caps have been significant contributors to sea level rise. Here we estimate the ice mass changes in the Canadian Archipelago, the Gulf of Alaska, and Greenland since 2003 by analyzing time-varying gravimetry data from the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment. Prior to 2013, interannual ice mass variability in the Gulf of Alaska and in regions around Greenland remains within the average estimated over the whole data span. Beginning in summer 2013, ice mass in regions around Greenland departs positively from its long-term trend. Over Greenland this anomaly reached almost 500 Gt through the end of 2014. Overall, long-term ice mass loss from Greenland and the Canadian Archipelago continues to accelerate, while losses around the Gulf of Alaska region continue but remain steady with no significant acceleration.

  6. Bionomics of the mud lobster-hole mosquito Aedes (Geoskusea) baisasi in the mangrove swamps of the Ryukyu Archipelago, Japan.

    PubMed

    Toma, Takako; Miyagi, Ichiro; Tamashiro, Mikako; Higa, Yukiko; Okudo, Haruo; Okazawa, Takao

    2011-09-01

    The bionomics of the mud lobster-hole mosquito Aedes (Geoskusea) baisasi in the Ryukyu Archipelago, Japan, was studied in the field and in the laboratory. The studies included the natural habitat, seasonal appearance, flight activity, mating behavior, resistance of eggs to desiccation, and breeding periods of the immature stages of this species. The burrow systems made by the mud lobster Thalassina anomala were excellent as breeding and resting habitats for both the immature and adult stages of the mosquito.

  7. Description of a sexually dimorphic oribatid mite (Arachnida: Acari: Oribatida) from canopy habitats of the Ryukyu Archipelago, southwestern Japan.

    PubMed

    Karasawa, Shigenori; Behan-Pelletier, Valerie

    2007-10-01

    A new species in the monotypic genus Symbioribates, S. aokii sp. nov., is described on the basis of adult material collected from canopy habitats and wind traps in the Ryukyu Archipelago, southwestern Japan. Symbioribates aokii sp. nov. expresses different dimorphism in the octotaxic system from that of the type species, S. papuensis Aoki, 1966. The characteristics of this genus and its relationships to others of the superfamily Oripodoidea are discussed and a revised diagnosis of the family is given.

  8. Paraliparis hawaiiensis, a new species of snailfish (Scorpaeniformes: Liparidae) and the first described from the Hawaiian Archipelago.

    PubMed

    Stein, D L; Drazen, J C

    2014-05-01

    Paraliparis hawaiiensis n.sp. is described from the north-western Hawaiian Islands from two specimens collected at 2196 and 3055 m. It differs from other North Pacific Ocean species in its chin pore arrangement, tooth pattern and body proportions. Although liparid specimens have previously been collected from Hawaii, they were undescribed and are now lost. Therefore, this is the first liparid species described from the archipelago. In situ photographs of Hawaiian snailfishes are also shown and discussed here.

  9. Public health implications of an outbreak of rabies in arctic foxes and reindeer in the Svalbard archipelago, Norway, September 2011.

    PubMed

    Macdonald, E; Handeland, K; Blystad, H; Bergsaker, M; Fladberg, M; Gjerset, B; Nilsen, O; Os, H; Sandbu, S; Stokke, E; Vold, L; Ørpetveit, I; Gaup Amot, H; Tveiten, O

    2011-10-06

    Between 16 September and 5 October 2011 rabies was diagnosed in two arctic foxes and eight reindeer in the Svalbard archipelago, in Norway. This outbreak occurs at the end of the reindeer hunting season and poses an increased risk to many people that were involved in the hunt. As of 28 September 2011, 280 people had received post-exposure prophylaxis. No human cases of rabies have occurred.

  10. Exploring the new long-term (150 years) precipitation dataset in Azores archipelago

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández, Armand; Trigo, Ricardo M.; Kutiel, Haim; Valente, Maria A.; Sigró, Javier

    2015-04-01

    Within the scope of the two major international projects of long-term reanalysis for the 20th century coordinated by NOAA (Compo et al. 2011) and ECMWF (Hersbach et al. 2013) the IDL Institute from the University of Lisbon has digitized a large number of long-term stations records from Portugal and former Portuguese Colonies (Stickler et al. 2014). Recently we have finished the digitization of all precipitation values from Ponta Delgada (capital of the Azores archipelago) obtaining an uninterrupted precipitation monthly time series since 1864 and additionally an almost complete corresponding daily precipitation series, with the exception of some years (1864/1872; 1878/1879; 1888/1905; 1931; 1936 and 1938) for which only monthly values are available. Here, we present an annually, seasonally and daily resolution study of the rainfall regime in Ponta Delgada for the last 150 years and the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) influence over this precipitation regime. The distribution of precipitation presents an evident seasonal pattern, with a strong difference between the 'rainy season' (November/March) and the 'dry season' (June/August) with very little rainfall. April/May and September/October correspond to the transitional seasons. The mean annual rainfall in Ponta Delgada is approximately 910 mm and is accumulated (on average) in about 120 rainy days. The precipitation regime in Azores archipelago reveals large inter-annual and intra-annual variability and both have increased considerably in the last decades. The entire studied period (1865-2012) shows an increase in the rainfall conditions between a drier earlier period (1865-1938) and a wetter recent period (1939-2012). At daily resolution, we have used an approach based on different characteristics of rain spells (consecutive days with rainfall accumulation) that has been proved to be satisfactory for the analysis of the different parameters related to the rainfall regime (Kutiel and Trigo, 2014). This approach

  11. Prediction and verification of possible reef-fish spawning aggregation sites in Los Roques Archipelago National Park, Venezuela.

    PubMed

    Boomhower, J; Romero, M; Posada, J; Kobara, S; Heyman, W

    2010-09-01

    This study attempts to predict and verify possible spawning aggregation sites and times in the Los Roques Archipelago National Park, Venezuela, based on physical reef characteristics and the knowledge of experienced local fishermen. Three possible aggregation sites were selected for monitoring based on satellite images, low-cost bathymetric mapping and interviews with experienced local fishermen. Abundances and sizes of 18 species that are known to form reproductive aggregations were monitored at these sites using underwater visual census for 7 days after each full moon from February to August, 2007. While spawning events were not observed, possible indirect evidence of spawning aggregations was found for Lutjanus analis at Cayo Sal and Boca de Sebastopol, Lutjanus apodus at Cayo Sal, Lutjanus cyanopterus at Cayo Sal and Piedra La Guasa and Epinephelus guttatus at Bajo California and Cayo de Agua. Additionally, indirect evidence was identified for the past existence of a spawning aggregation of Epinephelus striatus in the northern part of the archipelago, which may have been eliminated by overfishing c.15 years ago. Bathymetric mapping showed that the shelf edge at sites monitored in this study was shallower than at spawning aggregation sites in other parts of the Caribbean, and that sites were not proximal to deep water. While this study does not prove the existence or locations of spawning aggregations of reef fishes in the archipelago, it does add insight to a growing understanding of generalities in the relationship between seafloor characteristics and the locations of transient reef-fish spawning aggregations in the Caribbean.

  12. Experimental constraints on the origin and evolution of mildly alkalic basalts from the Kerguelen Archipelago, Southeast Indian Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scoates, James S.; Lo Cascio, Mauro; Weis, Dominique; Lindsley, Donald H.

    2006-05-01

    This experimental study examines the role of clinopyroxene fractionation on major element trends and alkalinity variations in mildly alkalic basalts from the Kerguelen Archipelago, Southeast Indian Ocean. Equilibrium crystallization experiments were carried out on a natural basalt (MgO=5 wt.%, alkalinity index=0.10) over a range of pressures (0 1.43 GPa) and water contents (nominally dry to hydrous, 1.2 wt.% H2O) under relatively oxidizing conditions (Δlog FMQ=+1 to +2) at 0 GPa and relatively reducing conditions (Δlog FMQ=0 to 2) at all higher pressures. The hydrous experiments at 0.93 GPa closely reproduce most of the compositional variations in the 24 25 Ma mildly alkalic lavas from the archipelago, which supports a major role for high-Al clinopyroxene fractionation (5 9 wt.% Al2O3) at pressures corresponding to the base of the Northern Kerguelen Plateau (15 20 km). However, clinopyroxene fractionation at depth fails to produce important changes in the alkalinity of the residual melts. The transition from tholeiitic to mildly alkalic basalts on the Kerguelen Archipelago thus reflects primarily changes in melting conditions (lower extents of partial melting at higher pressures), which is related to crustal and lithospheric thickening as distance from the Southeast Indian Ridge increased over time from 43 to 24 Ma.

  13. Genetic diversity of Japanese encephalitis virus isolates obtained from the Indonesian archipelago between 1974 and 1987.

    PubMed

    Schuh, Amy J; Guzman, Hilda; Tesh, Robert B; Barrett, Alan D T

    2013-07-01

    Five genotypes (GI-V) of Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) have been identified, all of which have distinct geographical distributions and epidemiologies. It is thought that JEV originated in the Indonesia-Malaysia region from an ancestral virus. From that ancestral virus GV diverged, followed by GIV, GIII, GII, and GI. Genotype IV appears to be confined to the Indonesia-Malaysia region, as GIV has been isolated in Indonesia from mosquitoes only, while GV has been isolated on three occasions only from a human in Malaysia and mosquitoes in China and South Korea. In contrast, GI-III viruses have been isolated throughout Asia and Australasia from a variety of hosts. Prior to this study only 13 JEV isolates collected from the Indonesian archipelago had been studied genetically. Therefore the sequences of the envelope (E) gene of 24 additional Indonesian JEV isolates, collected throughout the archipelago between 1974 and 1987, were determined and a series of molecular adaptation analyses were performed. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that over a 14-year time span three genotypes of JEV circulated throughout Indonesia, and a statistically significant association between the year of virus collection and genotype was revealed: isolates collected between 1974 and 1980 belonged to GII, isolates collected between 1980 and 1981 belonged to GIV, and isolates collected in 1987 belonged to GIII. Interestingly, three of the GII Indonesian isolates grouped with an isolate that was collected during the JE outbreak that occurred in Australia in 1995, two of the GIII Indonesian isolates were closely related to a Japanese isolate collected 40 years previously, and two Javanese GIV isolates possessed six amino acid substitutions within the E protein when compared to a previously sequenced GIV isolate collected in Flores. Several amino acids within the E protein of the Indonesian isolates were found to be under directional evolution and/or co-evolution. Conceivably, the tropical climate

  14. Genetic Diversity of Japanese Encephalitis Virus Isolates Obtained from the Indonesian Archipelago Between 1974 and 1987

    PubMed Central

    Schuh, Amy J.; Guzman, Hilda; Tesh, Robert B.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Five genotypes (GI–V) of Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) have been identified, all of which have distinct geographical distributions and epidemiologies. It is thought that JEV originated in the Indonesia-Malaysia region from an ancestral virus. From that ancestral virus GV diverged, followed by GIV, GIII, GII, and GI. Genotype IV appears to be confined to the Indonesia-Malaysia region, as GIV has been isolated in Indonesia from mosquitoes only, while GV has been isolated on three occasions only from a human in Malaysia and mosquitoes in China and South Korea. In contrast, GI–III viruses have been isolated throughout Asia and Australasia from a variety of hosts. Prior to this study only 13 JEV isolates collected from the Indonesian archipelago had been studied genetically. Therefore the sequences of the envelope (E) gene of 24 additional Indonesian JEV isolates, collected throughout the archipelago between 1974 and 1987, were determined and a series of molecular adaptation analyses were performed. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that over a 14-year time span three genotypes of JEV circulated throughout Indonesia, and a statistically significant association between the year of virus collection and genotype was revealed: isolates collected between 1974 and 1980 belonged to GII, isolates collected between 1980 and 1981 belonged to GIV, and isolates collected in 1987 belonged to GIII. Interestingly, three of the GII Indonesian isolates grouped with an isolate that was collected during the JE outbreak that occurred in Australia in 1995, two of the GIII Indonesian isolates were closely related to a Japanese isolate collected 40 years previously, and two Javanese GIV isolates possessed six amino acid substitutions within the E protein when compared to a previously sequenced GIV isolate collected in Flores. Several amino acids within the E protein of the Indonesian isolates were found to be under directional evolution and/or co-evolution. Conceivably, the

  15. In-Situ Estimates of tidal mixing in the Indonesian archipelago from multidisciplinary data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch-Larrouy, Ariane; Atmadipoera, Agus; van Beek, Pieter; Madec, Gurvan; Aucan, Jerome; Lyard, Florent; Grelet, Jacques; Souhaut, Marc

    2015-04-01

    The Indonesian Mixing program (INDOMIX) was designed to quantify the very strong mixing that transforms Pacific waters into homohaline Indonesian Waters in the Indonesian archipelago. The turbulent dissipation rates and associated mixing were estimated and analyzed using a multidisciplinary approach that combines physical and geochemical observations: 1) direct measurements of the dissipation using a microstructure profiler, 2) use of density-based fine-scale methods, and 3) study of the vertical distribution of natural radionuclides (radium isotopes and actinium-227). Data were collected at five contrasting stations within the Indonesian archipelago. Strong instabilities, inversions of the density profiles and a very strong water mass transformation were observed. A wide range of values is obtained for dissipation within [10-10, 10-4] W.kg-1 with spots of higher dissipation in the ocean interior correlated with a strong internal tide signal. Both Fine-scale and micro-scale methods allow us to identify very strong dissipation energy levels above the straits, ranging within [10-7, 10-4] W.kg-1, in contrast to lower values at stations far from generation sites. However, the dissipation in the interior water column for the station located in the center of Halmahera [10-9, 10-8] W.kg-1 is stronger than for the Banda station [10-11, 10-10] W.kg-1, which is further away from generation sites. The three approaches agree relatively well and provide Kz values ranging between 5 10-4 and 5 10-1 m2.s-1, except in the Banda Sea where values are similar to the ones found in the open ocean (10-6 m2.s-1). Kz values mainly increase toward the bottom, where stratification decreases. Surface mixing, at the base of the mixed layer is found to be still very strong with values within [10-4, 10-3 m2.s-1]. These results confirm the results of modelling studies, in which hypothesis of intensified subsurface mixing were made, a mixing that strongly modifies the whole tropical mean state and

  16. Height Connections and Land Uplift Rates in West-Estonian Archipelago

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jürgenson, H.; Liibusk, A.; Kall, T.

    2012-04-01

    Land uplift rates are largest in the western part of Estonia. The uplift is due to post-glacial rebound. In 2001-2011, the Estonian national high-precision levelling network was completely renewed and levelled. This was the third precise levelling campaign in the re-gion. The first one had taken place before the Second World War and the second one in the 1950s. The Estonian mainland was connected with the two largest islands (Saaremaa and Hiiumaa) in the west-Estonian archipelago using the water level monitoring (hydrody-namic levelling) method. Three pairs of automatic tide gauges were installed on opposite coasts of each waterway. The tide gauges were equipped with piezoresistive pressure sen-sors. This represented the first use of such kind of equipment in Estonia. The hydrodynamic levelling series span up to two calendar years. Nevertheless, the obtained hydrodynamic levelling results need to be additionally verified using alternative geodetic methods. The obtained results were compared with the previous high-precision levelling data from the 1960s and 1970s. As well, the new Estonian gravimetric geoid model and the GPS survey were used for GPS-levelling. All the three methods were analyzed, and the preliminary results coincided within a 1-2 cm margin. Additionally, the tide gauges on the mainland and on both islands were connected using high-precision levelling. In this manner, three hydrodynamic and three digital levelling height differences formed a closed loop with the length of 250 km. The closing error of the loop was less than 1 cm. Finally, the Fennoscandian post-glacial rebound was determined from repeated levelling as well as from repeated GPS survey. The time span between the two campaigns of the first-order GPS survey was almost 13 years. According to new calculations, the relative land uplift rates within the study area reached up to +2 mm/year. This is an area with a rela-tively small amount of input data for the Nordic models. In addition, a

  17. Integrating paleoecology and genetics of bird populations in two sky island archipelagos

    PubMed Central

    McCormack, John E; Bowen, Bonnie S; Smith, Thomas B

    2008-01-01

    Background Genetic tests of paleoecological hypotheses have been rare, partly because recent genetic divergence is difficult to detect and time. According to fossil plant data, continuous woodland in the southwestern USA and northern Mexico became fragmented during the last 10,000 years, as warming caused cool-adapted species to retreat to high elevations. Most genetic studies of resulting 'sky islands' have either failed to detect recent divergence or have found discordant evidence for ancient divergence. We test this paleoecological hypothesis for the region with intraspecific mitochondrial DNA and microsatellite data from sky-island populations of a sedentary bird, the Mexican jay (Aphelocoma ultramarina). We predicted that populations on different sky islands would share common, ancestral alleles that existed during the last glaciation, but that populations on each sky island, owing to their isolation, would contain unique variants of postglacial origin. We also predicted that divergence times estimated from corrected genetic distance and a coalescence model would post-date the last glacial maximum. Results Our results provide multiple independent lines of support for postglacial divergence, with the predicted pattern of shared and unique mitochondrial DNA haplotypes appearing in two independent sky-island archipelagos, and most estimates of divergence time based on corrected genetic distance post-dating the last glacial maximum. Likewise, an isolation model based on multilocus gene coalescence indicated postglacial divergence of five pairs of sky islands. In contrast to their similar recent histories, the two archipelagos had dissimilar historical patterns in that sky islands in Arizona showed evidence for older divergence, suggesting different responses to the last glaciation. Conclusion This study is one of the first to provide explicit support from genetic data for a postglacial divergence scenario predicted by one of the best paleoecological records in the

  18. Features of shoreline displacement in the Holocene of Franz josef Land Archipelago

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barliaev, A.; Anisimov, M.

    2014-12-01

    Changes in the global sea level after the LGM caused the significant alteration in relation of land and sea in Arctic. The rise of the sea level in Arctic was accompanied with present tectonic processes. Marine terraces are formed with the combination of eustatic sea level fluctuations and glacioisostatic uplift of the territory with the significant role of complicated tectonic block movements. There are nearly about 150 radiocarbon ages data for Franz-Josef Land archipelago now. The represented conclusions are a generalization of the published data and results of our field researches with series of new radiocarbon dates. We managed to collect valuable factual material during the Russian Arctic National Park expedition in 2012. The distinctions of post-glacial rise of different islands and peculiarities of Holocene deglaciation were identified with the help of marine terraces analysis. The altitude of the terraces with the same age on different islands exceeds 15 meters in some cases. However, analysis of the data suggests that the continuous series of raised beaches from 35 m a.s.l. formed during the last 10000 years. It is impossible to build up an univocal model of emergence isobases with the existing data. Alexandra Land Island was the special object of this investigation. The large beach ridge from Lunar Ice Cap to Kropotkina Ice Cap divides the island on two parts. The northern one is covered with marine sediments, whereas the southern - with glaciofluvial sediments with negligible areas of marine sediments. The difference between the terraces' ages of Alexandra Land on the Dezhneva Bay shore and the northern shore of island suggests that: 1) In the early Holocene the rate of the transgression exceeded the tectonic uplift of the territory; 2) Formation of the large central beach ridge occurred near 6700 years ago, the maximum marine limit in the Alexandra Land Island; 3) The rate of the tectonic rise of the territory exceeded the eustatic sea level rise in

  19. Phylogeographic Analyses of Submesophotic Snappers Etelis coruscans and Etelis “marshi” (Family Lutjanidae) Reveal Concordant Genetic Structure across the Hawaiian Archipelago

    PubMed Central

    Andrews, Kimberly R.; Moriwake, Virginia N.; Wilcox, Christie; Grau, E. Gordon; Kelley, Christopher; Pyle, Richard L.; Bowen, Brian W.

    2014-01-01

    The Hawaiian Archipelago has become a natural laboratory for understanding genetic connectivity in marine organisms as a result of the large number of population genetics studies that have been conducted across this island chain for a wide taxonomic range of organisms. However, population genetic studies have been conducted for only two species occurring in the mesophotic or submesophotic zones (30+m) in this archipelago. To gain a greater understanding of genetic connectivity in these deepwater habitats, we investigated the genetic structure of two submesophotic fish species (occurring ∼200–360 m) in this archipelago. We surveyed 16 locations across the archipelago for submesophotic snappers Etelis coruscans (N = 787) and E. “marshi” (formerly E. carbunculus; N = 770) with 436–490 bp of mtDNA cytochrome b and 10–11 microsatellite loci. Phylogeographic analyses reveal no geographic structuring of mtDNA lineages and recent coalescence times that are typical of shallow reef fauna. Population genetic analyses reveal no overall structure across most of the archipelago, a pattern also typical of dispersive shallow fishes. However some sites in the mid-archipelago (Raita Bank to French Frigate Shoals) had significant population differentiation. This pattern of no structure between ends of the Hawaiian range, and significant structure in the middle, was previously observed in a submesophotic snapper (Pristipomoides filamentosus) and a submesophotic grouper (Hyporthodus quernus). Three of these four species also have elevated genetic diversity in the mid-archipelago. Biophysical larval dispersal models from previous studies indicate that this elevated diversity may result from larval supplement from Johnston Atoll, ∼800 km southwest of Hawaii. In this case the boundaries of stocks for fishery management cannot be defined simply in terms of geography, and fishery management in Hawaii may need to incorporate external larval supply into management plans

  20. Descriptions of two azooxanthellate Palythoa species (Subclass Hexacorallia, Order Zoantharia) from the Ryukyu Archipelago, southern Japan

    PubMed Central

    Irei, Yuka; Sinniger, Frederic; Reimer, James Davis

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Two new species of zoantharians (Hexacorallia, Zoantharia, Sphenopidae), Palythoa mizigama sp. n. and Palythoa umbrosa sp. n., are described from the Ryukyu Archipelago, southern Japan. Unlike almost all other known Palythoa spp., both species are azooxanthellate and inhabit low-light environments such as floors or sides of caves, crevasses, or hollows of shallow coral reefs. The two species were initially considered to be the same species from their similar habitat environments and highly similar morphological features. However, phylogenetic analyses of nuclear internal transcribed spacer (ITS) ribosomal DNA, mitochondrial 16S ribosomal DNA, and cytochrome oxidase subunit I (COI) sequences revealed that these two species have a genetically distant relationship within the genus Palythoa. Morphological characteristics, including polyp size, tentacle number, external/internal coloration, and types and sizes of cnidae were examined in this study. As a result, only tentacle coloration was found to be useful for the morphological distinction between the two species. Palythoa mizigama possesses white tentacles with black horizontal stripes while Palythoa umbrosa possesses white tentacles without any stripe patterns. Considering their distant phylogenetic relationship, it can be assumed that their unique yet similar morphological and ecological characteristics developed independently in each species as an example of parallel evolution. PMID:25685008

  1. Genome-wide SNP analysis explains coral diversity and recovery in the Ryukyu Archipelago

    PubMed Central

    Shinzato, Chuya; Mungpakdee, Sutada; Arakaki, Nana; Satoh, Noriyuki

    2015-01-01

    Following a global coral bleaching event in 1998, Acropora corals surrounding most of Okinawa island (OI) were devastated, although they are now gradually recovering. In contrast, the Kerama Islands (KIs) only 30 km west of OI, have continuously hosted a great variety of healthy corals. Taking advantage of the decoded Acropora digitifera genome and using genome-wide SNP analyses, we clarified Acropora population structure in the southern Ryukyu Archipelago (sRA). Despite small genetic distances, we identified distinct clusters corresponding to specific island groups, suggesting infrequent long-distance dispersal within the sRA. Although the KIs were believed to supply coral larvae to OI, admixture analyses showed that such dispersal is much more limited than previously realized, indicating independent recovery of OI coral populations and the necessity of local conservation efforts for each region. We detected strong historical migration from the Yaeyama Islands (YIs) to OI, and suggest that the YIs are the original source of OI corals. In addition, migration edges to the KIs suggest that they are a historical sink population in the sRA, resulting in high diversity. This population genomics study provides the highest resolution data to date regarding coral population structure and history. PMID:26656261

  2. Natural trace element enrichment in fishes from a volcanic and tectonically active region (Azores archipelago)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raimundo, Joana; Vale, Carlos; Caetano, Miguel; Giacomello, Eva; Anes, Bárbara; Menezes, Gui M.

    2013-12-01

    Seamounts, in general, are thought to support high biodiversity and special biological communities. They have been targeted by commercial fishing for demersal and pelagic fish species due to the occurrence of large aggregations in mid- and deep-water. Specimens of Phycis phycis, Helicolenus dactylopterus, Pontinus kuhlii, Beryx splendens, Beryx decadactylus, Etmopterus pusillus, Mora moro, Pagellus bogaraveo, Deania profundorum, Scomber colias and Trachurus picturatus were collected at the Condor seamount and on the slopes of Faial and Pico islands of Azores archipelago. Concentrations of V, Cr, Mn, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Se, Cd and Pb were determined in muscle and liver of each individual. Values of the 11 trace elements in the two tissues of the benthopelagic and benthic specimens, from the two surveyed areas, presented a significant inter-specific variation. In general, levels were lower in muscle than in liver, and negative relations between weight and Co, Mn, Zn, As, Cd and Pb concentrations in muscle and liver of three species were found. Pagellus bogaraveo, S. colias and T. picturatus presented enhanced elemental concentrations in liver, particularly of Cd. The extremely high storage of this potentially toxic element suggests a response to high uptake of Cd and the existence of an additional natural source of Cd to the environment.

  3. Immediate replacement of fishing with dairying by the earliest farmers of the northeast Atlantic archipelagos

    PubMed Central

    Cramp, Lucy J. E.; Jones, Jennifer; Sheridan, Alison; Smyth, Jessica; Whelton, Helen; Mulville, Jacqui; Sharples, Niall; Evershed, Richard P.

    2014-01-01

    The appearance of farming, from its inception in the Near East around 12 000 years ago, finally reached the northwestern extremes of Europe by the fourth millennium BC or shortly thereafter. Various models have been invoked to explain the Neolithization of northern Europe; however, resolving these different scenarios has proved problematic due to poor faunal preservation and the lack of specificity achievable for commonly applied proxies. Here, we present new multi-proxy evidence, which qualitatively and quantitatively maps subsistence change in the northeast Atlantic archipelagos from the Late Mesolithic into the Neolithic and beyond. A model involving significant retention of hunter–gatherer–fisher influences was tested against one of the dominant adoptions of farming using a novel suite of lipid biomarkers, including dihydroxy fatty acids, ω-(o-alkylphenyl)alkanoic acids and stable carbon isotope signatures of individual fatty acids preserved in cooking vessels. These new findings, together with archaeozoological and human skeletal collagen bulk stable carbon isotope proxies, unequivocally confirm rejection of marine resources by early farmers coinciding with the adoption of intensive dairy farming. This pattern of Neolithization contrasts markedly to that occurring contemporaneously in the Baltic, suggesting that geographically distinct ecological and cultural influences dictated the evolution of subsistence practices at this critical phase of European prehistory. PMID:24523264

  4. Gender and population history: sex bias revealed by studying genetic admixture of Ngazidja population (Comoro Archipelago).

    PubMed

    Gourjon, Géraud; Boëtsch, Gilles; Degioanni, Anna

    2011-04-01

    The peopling of Comoro Archipelago is defined by successive waves of migration from three main areas: the East African Coast (Bantu-speaking populations), the Persia and Arabian Peninsula, and Southeast Asia (especially Indonesia). It follows an apparent classic trihybrid admixture model. To better understand the Comorian population admixture dynamics, we analyzed the contributions of these three historical parental components to its genetic pool. To enhance accuracy and reliability, we used both classical and molecular markers. Samples consist of published data: blood group frequencies, 14 KIR genes, 19 mitochondrial DNA SNPs (to highlight female migrations), 14 Y chromosome SNPs (male migrations). We revealed distinct admixture patterns for autosomal and uniparental markers. KIR gene frequencies had never been used to estimate admixture rates, this being a first assessment of their informative power in admixture studies. To avoid major methodological and statistical bias, we determined admixture coefficients through nine well-tried estimators and their associated software programs (ADMIX95, ADMIX, admix 2.0, LEA, LEADMIX, and Mistura). Results from mtDNA and Y chromosome markers point to an important sex-bias in the admixture event. The original Bantu gene pool received a predominant male-mediated contribution from the Arabian Peninsula and Persia, and a female-mediated contribution from Southeast Asia. Admixture rates estimated from autosomal KIR gene markers point also to an unexpected elevated Austronesian contribution.

  5. Ichthyophonus in Puget Sound rockfish from the San Juan Islands archipelago and Puget Sound, Washington, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Halos, D.; Hart, S.A.; Hershberger, P.; Kocan, R.

    2005-01-01

    In vitro explant cultures identified Ichthyophonus in 10.9% of 302 Puget Sound rockfish Sebastes emphaeus sampled from five sites in the San Juan Islands archipelago and Puget Sound, Washington, in 2003. None of the infected fish exhibited visible lesions and only a single fish was histologically positive. Significantly more females were infected (12.4%) than males (6.8%), and while infected males were only detected at two of the five sites, infected females were identified at all sites, with no significant differences in infection prevalence. Genomic sequences of Ichthyophonus isolates obtained from Puget Sound rockfish, Pacific herring Clupea pallasii, and Yukon River Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha were identical in both the A and B regions of the small subunit 18S ribosomal DNA but were different from Ichthyophonus sequences previously isolated from four different species of rockfish from the northeastern Pacific Ocean. Ichthyophonus in Puget Sound rockfish may not have been previously detected because the infection is subclinical in this species and earlier investigators did not utilize in vitro techniques for diagnosis of ichthyophoniasis. However, since clinical ichthyophoniasis has recently been identified in several other species of northeast Pacific rockfishes, it is hypothesized that this either is an emerging disease resulting from changing marine conditions or the result of introduction by infected southern species that appear during periodic El Nin??o events. ?? Copyright by the American Fisheries Society 2005.

  6. Clutch size in the tropical scincid lizard Emoia sanfordi, a species endemic to the Vanuatu Archipelago.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Alison Madeline; Eckstut, Mallory Elizabeth; Klein, Elaine Renee; Austin, Christopher Cowell

    2008-08-01

    The majority of species in the scincid genus Emoia (Squamata: Scincidae) have a fixed clutch size of two eggs per clutch and produce between two and four clutches per year. One lineage within Emoia, the Emoia samoensis species group, consists of 13 species occurring in Melanesia and the islands of the southwestern Pacific Ocean, and exhibits variation in clutch size, with previously reported clutch sizes of two to five eggs. Little is known about reproduction in several members of this lineage including Emoia sanfordi, a large-bodied lizard endemic to the archipelago of Vanuatu in the South Pacific. We analyzed reproduction and clutch size in E. sanfordi females and discovered that there is a substantial amount of intraspecific variation, with clutch size ranging from two to seven eggs, with a modal clutch size of five eggs. Females were reproductively active throughout the study period of June through October and appear to be laying multiple clutches. The variation in clutch size seen in E. sanfordi is congruent with the variation previously reported within other closely related species.

  7. Antioxidant Capacity, Cytotoxicity and Antimycobacterial Activity of Madeira Archipelago Endemic Helichrysum Dietary and Medicinal Plants.

    PubMed

    Gouveia-Figueira, Sandra C; Gouveia, Carla A; Carvalho, Maria J; Rodrigues, Ana I; Nording, Malin L; Castilho, Paula C

    2014-10-31

    The potential bioactivity of dietary and medicinal endemic Helichrysum plants from Madeira Archipelago was explored, for the first time, in order to supply new information for the general consumer. In vitro antioxidant properties were investigated using DPPH, ABTS(•+), FRAP and β-Carotene assays, and the total phenolic content (TPC) and total flavonoid content (TFC) were also determined. Although the results generally showed a large variation among the three analyzed plants, the methanolic extracts showed the highest antioxidant capacity. Exception is made for H. devium n-hexane extract that showed good radical scavenger capacity associated to compounds with good reducing properties. In the Artemia salina toxicity assay and antimycobaterial activity, H. devium was the most potent plant with the lowest LD50 at 216.7 ± 10.4 and MIC ≤ 50 μg·mL(-1). Chemometric evaluation (Principal Component Analysis-PCA) showed close interdependence between the ABTS, TPC and TFC methods and allowed to group H. devium samples.

  8. Antioxidant Capacity, Cytotoxicity and Antimycobacterial Activity of Madeira Archipelago Endemic Helichrysum Dietary and Medicinal Plants

    PubMed Central

    Gouveia-Figueira, Sandra C.; Gouveia, Carla A.; Carvalho, Maria J.; Rodrigues, Ana I.; Nording, Malin L.; Castilho, Paula C.

    2014-01-01

    The potential bioactivity of dietary and medicinal endemic Helichrysum plants from Madeira Archipelago was explored, for the first time, in order to supply new information for the general consumer. In vitro antioxidant properties were investigated using DPPH, ABTS•+, FRAP and β-Carotene assays, and the total phenolic content (TPC) and total flavonoid content (TFC) were also determined. Although the results generally showed a large variation among the three analyzed plants, the methanolic extracts showed the highest antioxidant capacity. Exception is made for H. devium n-hexane extract that showed good radical scavenger capacity associated to compounds with good reducing properties. In the Artemia salina toxicity assay and antimycobaterial activity, H. devium was the most potent plant with the lowest LD50 at 216.7 ± 10.4 and MIC ≤ 50 μg·mL−1. Chemometric evaluation (Principal Component Analysis—PCA) showed close interdependence between the ABTS, TPC and TFC methods and allowed to group H. devium samples. PMID:26785236

  9. Testing the island effect on phenotypic diversification: insights from the Hemidactylus geckos of the Socotra Archipelago

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Porta, Joan; Šmíd, Jiří; Sol, Daniel; Fasola, Mauro; Carranza, Salvador

    2016-04-01

    Island colonization is often assumed to trigger extreme levels of phenotypic diversification. Yet, empirical evidence suggests that it does not always so. In this study we test this hypothesis using a completely sampled mainland-island system, the arid clade of Hemidactylus, a group of geckos mainly distributed across Africa, Arabia and the Socotra Archipelago. To such purpose, we generated a new molecular phylogeny of the group on which we mapped body size and head proportions. We then explored whether island and continental taxa shared the same morphospace and differed in their disparities and tempos of evolution. Insular species produced the most extreme sizes of the radiation, involving accelerated rates of evolution and higher disparities compared with most (but not all) of the continental groups. In contrast, head proportions exhibited constant evolutionary rates across the radiation and similar disparities in islands compared with the continent. These results, although generally consistent with the notion that islands promote high morphological disparity, reveal at the same time a complex scenario in which different traits may experience different evolutionary patterns in the same mainland-island system and continental groups do not always present low levels of morphological diversification compared to insular groups.

  10. Morphological and genetic diversity of Briareum (Anthozoa: Octocorallia) from the Ryukyu Archipelago, Japan.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Yu; Reimer, James Davis

    2014-10-01

    The primary problem hindering the study of octocorals is the disordered situation regarding their taxonomy, chiefly caused by insufficient knowledge of valid morphological taxonomic characters. Briareum is an octocoral genus found in the Atlantic and Pacific in shallow tropical and subtropical waters, and occurs in both encrusting and branching colony forms. Their simple morphology and morphological plasticity have hindered taxonomic understanding of this genus. In this study three morphologically distinct types (= type-1, -2, and -3) of Briareum from the Ryukyu Archipelago and their genetic diversity were examined. Colony, anthostele morphology, and sclerite length were examined for each type. Four molecular markers (mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1, mitochondrial mismatch repair gene, nuclear 18S ribosomal DNA, internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2)) were used to evaluate molecular phylogenetic status of these variations. Although one morphological type ("deep" small colonies, = type-3) showed small differences in nuclear ITS2 sequences compared to the other two types, the remaining types had identical sequences for all molecular markers examined. The results suggest extremely low genetic diversity despite highly variable morphology of Briareum species in Okinawa. Nevertheless, considering the distribution patterns and discontinuous morphology of type-3 compared to the other two morphotypes, genetic isolation of type-3 is plausible. In Briareum, small variances in nuclear ITS2 sequences of type-3 may have much more importance than in molecular phylogenies of other octocorals. Further phylogenetic investigations and comparison with Briareum specimens from other regions are necessary to conclusively taxonomically identify the three types.

  11. Blood meal identification and feeding habits of uranotaenia species collected in the ryukyu archipelago.

    PubMed

    Toma, Takako; Miyagi, Ichiro; Tamashiro, Mikako

    2014-09-01

    To know the blood meal in the stomach of Uranotaenia species, blood-fed mosquitoes were collected by 4 methods at different sites in the mountain forest of 3 islands, Amamioshima, Okinawajima, and Iriomotejima in the Ryukyu Archipelago, Japan from 2005 to 2012. One hundred twenty-four blood-fed Uranotaenia mosquitoes of 7 species (Ur. jacksoni, nivipleura, ohamai, yaeyamana, annandalei, lateralis, and macfarlanei) were collected. The collection rates are 0.26, 0.6, 0.31, and 0.66 by black light trap, black light blue with dry ice trap, frog call trap, and sweeping net, respectively. The blood meals of 107 females (86.3%) were successfully identified by a polymerase chain reaction-based method. All Uranotaenia species fed on cold-blooded animals, especially amphibians (99.1%), and notably on frogs. They would feed readily on available frogs in a given region having no close connection with the breeding (calling) season of each frog. They also fed on reptiles (0.9%), but not on warm-blooded animals.

  12. Two new species of diplosoma (Ascidiacea: Didemnidae) bearing prokaryotic algae prochloron from Okinawajima (Ryukyu Archipelago, Japan).

    PubMed

    Oka, Atsushi T; Suetsugu, Mayu; Hirose, Euichi

    2005-03-01

    Two new species of didemnid ascidians, Diplosoma ooru sp. nov. and Diplosoma simileguwa sp. nov., are described from coral reefs on Okinawajima (Ryukyu Archipelago, Japan). These two species form green colonies, having a symbiotic association with a prokaryotic alga Prochloron sp. The former species was found at the reef edges in the subtidal zone and the latter was found in a shallow reef lagoon. In these species, the colonies are thinner and the zooids are smaller than those of any other Prochloron-bearing Diplosoma species so far described. Moreover, each of the present new species has a unique combination of stigmatic numbers: 5 stigmata in the first and third rows, 6 in the second row, and 4 in the fourth in D. ooru; 4 stigmata in the first and third rows, 5 in the second row, and 3 in the fourth in D. simileguwa. In both of the new species, the retractor muscle emerges from the underside of the thorax. Larval morphology of D. ooru is also described.

  13. Genome-wide SNP analysis explains coral diversity and recovery in the Ryukyu Archipelago.

    PubMed

    Shinzato, Chuya; Mungpakdee, Sutada; Arakaki, Nana; Satoh, Noriyuki

    2015-12-10

    Following a global coral bleaching event in 1998, Acropora corals surrounding most of Okinawa island (OI) were devastated, although they are now gradually recovering. In contrast, the Kerama Islands (KIs) only 30 km west of OI, have continuously hosted a great variety of healthy corals. Taking advantage of the decoded Acropora digitifera genome and using genome-wide SNP analyses, we clarified Acropora population structure in the southern Ryukyu Archipelago (sRA). Despite small genetic distances, we identified distinct clusters corresponding to specific island groups, suggesting infrequent long-distance dispersal within the sRA. Although the KIs were believed to supply coral larvae to OI, admixture analyses showed that such dispersal is much more limited than previously realized, indicating independent recovery of OI coral populations and the necessity of local conservation efforts for each region. We detected strong historical migration from the Yaeyama Islands (YIs) to OI, and suggest that the YIs are the original source of OI corals. In addition, migration edges to the KIs suggest that they are a historical sink population in the sRA, resulting in high diversity. This population genomics study provides the highest resolution data to date regarding coral population structure and history.

  14. Immediate replacement of fishing with dairying by the earliest farmers of the Northeast Atlantic archipelagos.

    PubMed

    Cramp, Lucy J E; Jones, Jennifer; Sheridan, Alison; Smyth, Jessica; Whelton, Helen; Mulville, Jacqui; Sharples, Niall; Evershed, Richard P

    2014-04-07

    The appearance of farming, from its inception in the Near East around 12 000 years ago, finally reached the northwestern extremes of Europe by the fourth millennium BC or shortly thereafter. Various models have been invoked to explain the Neolithization of northern Europe; however, resolving these different scenarios has proved problematic due to poor faunal preservation and the lack of specificity achievable for commonly applied proxies. Here, we present new multi-proxy evidence, which qualitatively and quantitatively maps subsistence change in the northeast Atlantic archipelagos from the Late Mesolithic into the Neolithic and beyond. A model involving significant retention of hunter-gatherer-fisher influences was tested against one of the dominant adoptions of farming using a novel suite of lipid biomarkers, including dihydroxy fatty acids, ω-(o-alkylphenyl)alkanoic acids and stable carbon isotope signatures of individual fatty acids preserved in cooking vessels. These new findings, together with archaeozoological and human skeletal collagen bulk stable carbon isotope proxies, unequivocally confirm rejection of marine resources by early farmers coinciding with the adoption of intensive dairy farming. This pattern of Neolithization contrasts markedly to that occurring contemporaneously in the Baltic, suggesting that geographically distinct ecological and cultural influences dictated the evolution of subsistence practices at this critical phase of European prehistory.

  15. Identifying multiple coral reef regimes and their drivers across the Hawaiian archipelago

    PubMed Central

    Jouffray, Jean-Baptiste; Nyström, Magnus; Norström, Albert V.; Williams, Ivor D.; Wedding, Lisa M.; Kittinger, John N.; Williams, Gareth J.

    2015-01-01

    Loss of coral reef resilience can lead to dramatic changes in benthic structure, often called regime shifts, which significantly alter ecosystem processes and functioning. In the face of global change and increasing direct human impacts, there is an urgent need to anticipate and prevent undesirable regime shifts and, conversely, to reverse shifts in already degraded reef systems. Such challenges require a better understanding of the human and natural drivers that support or undermine different reef regimes. The Hawaiian archipelago extends across a wide gradient of natural and anthropogenic conditions and provides us a unique opportunity to investigate the relationships between multiple reef regimes, their dynamics and potential drivers. We applied a combination of exploratory ordination methods and inferential statistics to one of the most comprehensive coral reef datasets available in order to detect, visualize and define potential multiple ecosystem regimes. This study demonstrates the existence of three distinct reef regimes dominated by hard corals, turf algae or macroalgae. Results from boosted regression trees show nonlinear patterns among predictors that help to explain the occurrence of these regimes, and highlight herbivore biomass as the key driver in addition to effluent, latitude and depth.

  16. Testing the island effect on phenotypic diversification: insights from the Hemidactylus geckos of the Socotra Archipelago

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Porta, Joan; Šmíd, Jiří; Sol, Daniel; Fasola, Mauro; Carranza, Salvador

    2016-01-01

    Island colonization is often assumed to trigger extreme levels of phenotypic diversification. Yet, empirical evidence suggests that it does not always so. In this study we test this hypothesis using a completely sampled mainland-island system, the arid clade of Hemidactylus, a group of geckos mainly distributed across Africa, Arabia and the Socotra Archipelago. To such purpose, we generated a new molecular phylogeny of the group on which we mapped body size and head proportions. We then explored whether island and continental taxa shared the same morphospace and differed in their disparities and tempos of evolution. Insular species produced the most extreme sizes of the radiation, involving accelerated rates of evolution and higher disparities compared with most (but not all) of the continental groups. In contrast, head proportions exhibited constant evolutionary rates across the radiation and similar disparities in islands compared with the continent. These results, although generally consistent with the notion that islands promote high morphological disparity, reveal at the same time a complex scenario in which different traits may experience different evolutionary patterns in the same mainland-island system and continental groups do not always present low levels of morphological diversification compared to insular groups. PMID:27071837

  17. Population dynamics of the mushroom coral Heliofungia actiniformis in the Spermonde Archipelago, South Sulawesi, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knittweis, L.; Jompa, J.; Richter, C.; Wolff, M.

    2009-09-01

    The fungiid Heliofungia actiniformis is one of the most popular coral species in the Indonesian aquarium trade, yet information on the biology of this species is limited. H. actiniformis growth rates, population size-frequency distributions and the seasonality of recruitment rates were measured at three replicate sites in the Spermonde Archipelago, South Sulawesi. Growth and population models were applied to estimate coral ages, mortality rates and the size of maximum yield. Growth decreased linearly with polyp size. High numbers of attached polyps budded from clusters of stalks attached to the reef, with each cluster originating from the settlement of a sexually produced larva. Neither the settlement of sexual recruits, nor their asexual budding, showed seasonality. The overall population structure reflected the high mortality rates of young, attached polyps ( Z = 0.5-0.6 yr-1), and the much lower mortalities of free-living individuals ( Z = 0.05-0.08 yr-1). There were no statistically significant differences in overall mortality rates and the age-frequency distributions of polyps aged 0-15 years between the sites. Differences in the abundance of large H. actiniformis polyps at the three replicate sites were correlated with percent cover of coral rubble. The application of the Beverton and Holt model revealed the highest biomass per H. actiniformis recruit was 12 cm, corresponding to a polyp age of 20 years.

  18. Coral recruitment and potential recovery of eutrophied and blast fishing impacted reefs in Spermonde Archipelago, Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Sawall, Yvonne; Jompa, Jamaluddin; Litaay, Magdalena; Maddusila, Andi; Richter, Claudio

    2013-09-15

    Coral recruitment was assessed in highly diverse and economically important Spermonde Archipelago, a reef system subjected to land-based sources of siltation/pollution and destructive fishing, over a period of 2 years. Recruitment on settlement tiles reached up to 705 spat m(-2) yr(-1) and was strongest in the dry season (July-October), except off-shore, where larvae settled earlier. Pocilloporidae dominated near-shore, while a more diverse community of Acroporidae, Poritidae and others settled in the less polluted mid-shelf and off-shore reefs. Non-coral fouling community appeared to hardly influence initial coral settlement on the tiles, although, this does not necessarily infer low coral post-settlement mortality, which may be enhanced at the near- and off-shore reefs as indicated by increased abundances of potential space competitors on natural substrate. Blast fishing showed no local reduction in coral recruitment and live hard coral cover increased in oligotrophic reefs, indicating potential for coral recovery, if managed effectively.

  19. Environmental Factors Affecting Large-Bodied Coral Reef Fish Assemblages in the Mariana Archipelago

    PubMed Central

    Richards, Benjamin L.; Williams, Ivor D.; Vetter, Oliver J.; Williams, Gareth J.

    2012-01-01

    Large-bodied reef fishes represent an economically and ecologically important segment of the coral reef fish assemblage. Many of these individuals supply the bulk of the reproductive output for their population and have a disproportionate effect on their environment (e.g. as apex predators or bioeroding herbivores). Large-bodied reef fishes also tend to be at greatest risk of overfishing, and their loss can result in a myriad of either cascading (direct) or indirect trophic and other effects. While many studies have investigated habitat characteristics affecting populations of small-bodied reef fishes, few have explored the relationship between large-bodied species and their environment. Here, we describe the distribution of the large-bodied reef fishes in the Mariana Archipelago with an emphasis on the environmental factors associated with their distribution. Of the factors considered in this study, a negative association with human population density showed the highest relative influence on the distribution of large-bodied reef fishes; however, depth, water temperature, and distance to deep water also were important. These findings provide new information on the ecology of large-bodied reef fishes can inform discussions concerning essential fish habitat and ecosystem-based management for these species and highlight important knowledge gaps worthy of additional research. PMID:22384014

  20. Epidemiological survey of zoonotic helminths in feral cats in Gran Canaria island (Macaronesian archipelago-Spain).

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Ponce, Eligia; González, Jorge F; Conde de Felipe, Magnolia; Hernández, Julia N; Raduan Jaber, J

    2016-09-01

    The presence of zoonotic parasites in feral cats have been widely considered all over the world. In Gran Canaria (Macaronesian archipelago, Canary Islands, Spain) the number of feral cats has grown out of control in urban and rural areas. 48 of Felis catus captured in different Gran Canaria areas were studied. Animals were necropsied and several organs were systematically examined in order to collect and identify macroscopic parasites. In addition, coprological tests were done in 28 cats. There were no statistically significant differences in the prevalence rate among sex, age or capture area, showing an overall prevalence of helminths of 77.1%. The most common tapeworms were Dipylidium caninum (64.6%) and Taenia taeniaeformis (31.3%), followed by the nematodes Toxocara cati (20.8%), Ancylostoma tubaeforme (18.8%), Aelurostrongylusabstrusus (10.4%) and Trichuris vulpis (2.08%). We also find several eggs of Alaria alata in the small intestine of one cat (2.08%), being the first description of this trematode in cats in the Canary Islands. Aproximatelly, 40% of the studied cats harboured more than one parasite. High rates of zoonotic species found in these animals suggest the need of controling parasitic infections and preventive measures against them.

  1. Summertime community structure of intertidal macrobenthos in Changdao Archipelago, Shandong Province, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaochen; Li, Xinzheng; Li, Baoquan; Wang, Hongfa

    2009-09-01

    The community structure of intertidal macrobenthos in Changdao Archipelago (north of Shandong Peninsula, between Bohai Bay and the northern Yellow Sea) was examined based on samples collected from 14 stations in five transects in June 2007. Three stations corresponding to high, medium and low tidal areas were set up for each transect. A total of 68 macrobenthic species were found in the research region, most of which belonged to Mollusca and Crustacea. The average abundance and biomass of the macrobenthos was 1 383 ind./m2 and 372.41 g/m2, respectively. The use of an arbitrary similarity level of 20% resulted in identification of five groups among the 14 stations in the research region. There were remarkable differences in the biomass, abundance and Shannon-Wiener diversity index of the different sediments. Specifically, the order of biomass was rocky shores > gravel > mud-sand > coarse sand > stiff mud, while the order of abundance was rocky shores > coarse sand > mud-sand > gravel > stiff mud, and that of the diversity index was mud-sand > gravel > stiff mud > rocky shores > coarse sand. The above results revealed that the sediment type was the most important factor affecting the structure of the macrobenthic community of the intertidal zone.

  2. Persistent organic pollutants (POPs) in killer whales (Orcinus orca) from the Crozet Archipelago, southern Indian Ocean.

    PubMed

    Noël, Marie; Barrett-Lennard, Lance; Guinet, Christophe; Dangerfield, Neil; Ross, Peter S

    2009-10-01

    Persistent organic pollutants (POPs), including polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs), and dibenzofurans (PCDFs), are ubiquitous environmental contaminants of which significant concentrations are reported in upper trophic level animals. In 1998, we collected blubber biopsy samples (n=11) from killer whales (Orcinus orca) inhabiting the coastal waters around Possession Island, Crozet Archipelago, southern Indian Ocean, for contaminant analyses. Despite inhabiting an isolated region far removed from industrial activities, these killer whales can presently be considered among the most PCB-contaminated cetaceans in the southern hemisphere, with concentrations ranging from 4.4 to 20.5mg/kg lipid weight (lw). PCDD levels ranged from below the detection limit (5 ng/kg) to 77.1 ng/kg lw and PCDF levels from below the detection limit (7 ng/kg) to 36.1 ng/kg lw. Over 70% of our study animals had PCB concentrations which exceeded a 1.3mg/kg PCB threshold established for endocrine disruption and immunotoxicity in free-ranging harbour seals, suggesting that organic contaminants cannot be ruled out as an additional threat to this declining population.

  3. [Changes in fish communities of coral reefs at Sabana-Camagüey Archipelago, Cuba].

    PubMed

    Claro, Rodolfo; Cantelar, Karel; Amargós, Fabián Pina; García-Arteaga, Juan P

    2007-06-01

    A comparison of fish community structure in the Sabana-Camagüey Archipelago (1988-1989 and 2000) using visual census surveys (eight belt transects 2x50 m in each site) suggests a notable decrease on species richness, and a two thirds reduction in fish density and biomass on coral reefs. This decrease in fish populations may be related to the alarming decrease of scleractinian coral cover, and an enormous proliferation of algae, which currently covers 70-80% of the hard substrate, impeding the recovery of corals and other benthic organisms. High coral mortalities occurred between the study periods, which correlate with the high temperatures caused by the ENSO events of 1995, 1997 and 1998. These events caused massive bleaching of corals and subsequent algae overgrowth. Evidence of nutrient enrichment from the inner lagoons and overfishing are also present. Collectively, these effects have provoked a marked degradation of reef habitats. These changes appear to have affected the availability of refuges and food for fishes, and may be constraining individual growth potential and population size.

  4. Exposure to viral and bacterial pathogens among Soay sheep (Ovis aries) of the St Kilda archipelago.

    PubMed

    Graham, A L; Nussey, D H; Lloyd-Smith, J O; Longbottom, D; Maley, M; Pemberton, J M; Pilkington, J G; Prager, K C; Smith, L; Watt, K A; Wilson, K; McNEILLY, T N; Brülisauer, F

    2016-07-01

    We assessed evidence of exposure to viruses and bacteria in an unmanaged and long-isolated population of Soay sheep (Ovis aries) inhabiting Hirta, in the St Kilda archipelago, 65 km west of Benbecula in the Outer Hebrides of Scotland. The sheep harbour many metazoan and protozoan parasites but their exposure to viral and bacterial pathogens is unknown. We tested for herpes viral DNA in leucocytes and found that 21 of 42 tested sheep were infected with ovine herpesvirus 2 (OHV-2). We also tested 750 plasma samples collected between 1997 and 2010 for evidence of exposure to seven other viral and bacterial agents common in domestic Scottish sheep. We found evidence of exposure to Leptospira spp., with overall seroprevalence of 6·5%. However, serological evidence indicated that the population had not been exposed to border disease, parainfluenza, maedi-visna, or orf viruses, nor to Chlamydia abortus. Some sheep tested positive for antibodies against Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) but, in the absence of retrospective faecal samples, the presence of this infection could not be confirmed. The roles of importation, the pathogen-host interaction, nematode co-infection and local transmission warrant future investigation, to elucidate the transmission ecology and fitness effects of the few viral and bacterial pathogens on Hirta.

  5. Historical change of mercury pollution in remote Yongle archipelago, South China Sea.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaodong; Xu, Liqiang; Chen, Qianqian; Sun, Liguang; Wang, Yuhong; Yan, Hong; Liu, Yi; Luo, Yuhan; Huang, Jing

    2012-04-01

    We collected three ornithogenic coral sand sedimentary profiles from Jinyin Island, Jinqing Island and Guangjin Island of Yongle archipelago, South China Sea and reconstructed the deposition flux of anthropogenic Hg over the past 700 years in the study area. On the whole, the anthropogenic Hg flux is relatively low; it remained at a low level before the Industrial Revolution with a small peak at about 1450-1550 AD, which may record the enhanced metallurgy activity in Ming Dynasty of China. During the 20th century, the deposition flux of anthropogenic Hg increased rapidly, but two troughs occurred during the periods around 1940s and 1970s, corresponding to the economic depression caused by World War II, Civil War in China (1945-1949), and the Culture Revolution (1966-1976) in China. Since the 1970s the deposition flux of anthropogenic Hg has been persistently increasing, apparently the result of fast economic development in East and Southeast Asia countries around South China Sea.

  6. Tropical storm off Myanmar coast sweeps reefs in Ritchie's Archipelago, Andaman.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, P; Grinson-George; Vikas, N; Titus-Immanuel, Titus; Goutham-Bharathi, M P; Anand, A; Kumar, K Vinod; Kumar, S Senthil

    2013-06-01

    The reefs in some islands of Andaman and Nicobar suffered severe damage following a tropical storm in the Bay of Bengal off Myanmar coast during 13-17 March 2011. Surveys were conducted at eight sites in Andaman, of which five were located in the Ritchie's Archipelago where maximum wind speeds of 11 m s(-1) was observed; and three around Port Blair which lay on the leeward side of the storm and had not experienced wind speeds of more than 9 m s(-1). Corals in the shallow inshore reefs were broken and dislodged by the thrust of the waves. Significant damage in the deeper regions and offshore reefs were caused by the settlement of debris and sand brought down from the shallower regions. The fragile branching corals (Acropora sp.) were reduced to rubbles and the larger boulder corals (Porites sp.) were toppled over or scarred by falling debris. The reefs on the windward side and directly in the path of the storm winds were the worst affected. The investigation exposes the vulnerability of the reefs in Andaman to the oceanographic features which generally remain unnoticed unless the damage is caused to the coastal habitats.

  7. AN ADAPTIVE RADIATION OF FROGS IN A SOUTHEAST ASIAN ISLAND ARCHIPELAGO

    PubMed Central

    Blackburn, David C; Siler, Cameron D; Diesmos, Arvin C; McGuire, Jimmy A; Cannatella, David C; Brown, Rafe M

    2013-01-01

    Living amphibians exhibit a diversity of ecologies, life histories, and species-rich lineages that offers opportunities for studies of adaptive radiation. We characterize a diverse clade of frogs (Kaloula, Microhylidae) in the Philippine island archipelago as an example of an adaptive radiation into three primary habitat specialists or ecotypes. We use a novel phylogenetic estimate for this clade to evaluate the tempo of lineage accumulation and morphological diversification. Because species-level phylogenetic estimates for Philippine Kaloula are lacking, we employ dense population sampling to determine the appropriate evolutionary lineages for diversification analyses. We explicitly take phylogenetic uncertainty into account when calculating diversification and disparification statistics and fitting models of diversification. Following dispersal to the Philippines from Southeast Asia, Kaloula radiated rapidly into several well-supported clades. Morphological variation within Kaloula is partly explained by ecotype and accumulated at high levels during this radiation, including within ecotypes. We pinpoint an axis of morphospace related directly to climbing and digging behaviors and find patterns of phenotypic evolution suggestive of ecological opportunity with partitioning into distinct habitat specialists. We conclude by discussing the components of phenotypic diversity that are likely important in amphibian adaptive radiations. PMID:24033172

  8. Integrating terrestrial and marine archives of Late Wisconsinan ice stream dynamics in the Canadian Arctic Archipelago

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lakeman, Thomas; Blasco, Steve; MacLean, Brian; Bennett, Robbie; England, John; Hughes Clarke, John; Covill, Bob; Patton, Eric

    2014-05-01

    During Late Wisconsinan glaciation the northern Laurentide and Innuitian ice sheets converged over the Canadian Arctic Archipelago. This ice sheet complex included several major ice streams, which constituted important dynamical components. Discharging into the Beaufort Sea and Baffin Bay, these ice streams were a primary control on ice sheet mass balance and ice age sedimentation on adjacent continental margins, including the Arctic Ocean basin. This study presents a new compilation of multibeam echosounder data, sub-bottom profiler data, radiocarbon ages, and marine sediment cores acquired primarily during regional surveys with the CCGS Amundsen. These data characterize the nature and thickness of seafloor sediments in Parry Channel (and many of its connecting channels) and Amundsen Gulf. When combined with the results of terrestrial geomorphological mapping of the adjacent islands, this dataset constrains the maximum extent, chronology, and behaviour of former ice streams in M'Clure Strait, Viscount Melville Sound, Lancaster Sound, and Amundsen Gulf. Importantly, these data highlight complex patterns of past ice stream flow during regional deglaciation. These results contribute to a better understanding of the causal mechanisms that occasioned retreat of the terrestrial and marine sectors of the Laurentide and Innuitian ice sheets. As well, this study helps to quantify past iceberg fluxes to the Arctic Ocean, which has implications for assessing past climate, and the origin of ice-rafted sediment and deep iceberg scours in the Arctic Ocean basin.

  9. A new species of Agelas from the Zanzibar Archipelago, western Indian Ocean (Porifera, Demospongiae)

    PubMed Central

    Manconi, Renata; Pronzato, Roberto; Perino, Erica

    2016-01-01

    Abstract A new sponge species (Demospongiae: Agelasida: Agelasidae) is described from the eastern coast of Unguja Island in the Zanzibar Archipelago. Agelas sansibarica sp. n. is compared to all other Agelas species described so far. The new species differs from its congeners mainly in its three categories of verticillate spicules (acanthostyles, acanthostrongyles, and acanthoxeas) and their sizes. Acanthostrongyles, well represented in the spicular complement, are an exclusive trait of the new species widening the morphological range of the genus. Summarizing on spicular complement and spicular morphotraits of 36 species belonging to the genus Agelas: i) 32 species show only acanthostyles from Indo-Pacific (n = 14), Atlantic (n = 17), and Mediterranean (n = 1); ii) three Indo-Pacific species show acanthostyles and acanthoxeas; iii) one species Agelas sansibarica sp. n. from the western Indian Ocean is characterised by the unique trait of three categories of verticillate spicules (acanthostyles, acanthostrongyles and acanthoxeas). A key for the Indo-Pacific species is supplied together with short descriptions, illustrations, and geographic range; literature on chemical bioprospecting of the genus Agelas is also provided. PMID:26877669

  10. Imaging rapidly deforming ocean island volcanoes in the western Galápagos archipelago, Ecuador

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tepp, Gabrielle; Ebinger, Cynthia J.; Ruiz, Mario; Belachew, Manahloh

    2014-01-01

    Using local body wave arrival-time tomography methods to determine 3-D seismic velocity structure, we imaged the plumbing system of Sierra Negra Volcano, Galápagos. This hot spot volcanic chain includes some of the fastest deforming volcanoes in the world, making this an ideal location to study shield volcano plumbing systems. We inverted P and S wave arrivals recorded on a 15-station temporary array between July 2009 and June 2011 using an a priori 1-D velocity model constrained by offshore refraction studies. With local seismicity from nearby volcanoes as well as the ring fault system, the model resolution is good between depths of 3 and 15.5 km. The propagation of S waves throughout this volume argues against any large high-melt accumulations, although a shallow melt sill may exist above 5 km. We image a broad low-velocity region (>25 km laterally) below Sierra Negra at depths ~8-15 km. No large, regional velocity increase is found within the limits of good resolution, suggesting that crust is thicker than 15 km beneath the western Galápagos archipelago. Our results are consistent with crustal accretion of mafic cumulates from a large-volume magma chamber that may span the boundary between preplume and accreted crust. The similarity between our results and those of Hawaii leave open the possibility that the crust has also been thickened by under-plating.

  11. Macrozooplankton of the Arctic - The Kara Sea in relation to environmental conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dvoretsky, Vladimir G.; Dvoretsky, Alexander G.

    2017-03-01

    The distribution, abundance, biomass and diversity of macrozooplankton were studied in relation to hydrological conditions in the Kara Sea during July-September 2012. Multivariate analysis of macrozooplankton density data identified a clear division between the community structure of the deepwater, shelf and estuarine zones. The first assemblage along the Novaya Zemlya Archipelago in the western part of the Kara Sea was characterized by high total abundance/biomass (80,450 ind. m-2/16.9 g dry mass m-2) and was dominated by Calanus glacialis, C. hyperboreus, C. finmarchicus and Metridia longa. The second assemblage in the central part of the Kara Sea was similar in species composition but differed in term of abundance and biomass (15,300 ind. m-2/2.7 g DM m-2). The lowest abundance/biomass (2130 ind. m-2/0.3 g DM m-2) was measured in the third assemblage, the Ob Shallow region, which was characterized by the presence of estuarine taxa and was heavily influenced by freshwater discharge. Parasagitta elegans, Mertensia ovum, Aglantha digitale, Aeginopsis laurentii, Dimophyes arctica and Clione limacina were present mainly as young stages suggesting reproduction of these species in July-August. Canonical correspondence analysis revealed that hydrological factors (salinity and temperature) and geographical variables (latitude, longitude and depth) were the main predictors of macrozooplankton community structures in the Kara Sea. Comparison of our data with other regions in the Arctic demonstrated similarity in the taxonomic composition and density of major large-bodied groups (i.e. amphipods, krill, medusae, pteropods, chaetognaths).

  12. Modis LST as an Index of Summer Melt Conditions over Arctic Ice Caps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geai, M. E.; Sharp, M. J.

    2011-12-01

    Despite the large area of glacier ice in the Arctic, very few in situ mass balance and air temperature measurements exist over Arctic ice caps. There is therefore a need to develop proxy records of summer melt conditions on these ice caps in order to identify spatial patterns and temporal trends in surface mass balance across the region. Analysis of Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) derived land surface temperatures (LST) may provide a method to evaluate melt and climate trends over Arctic ice caps for the last decade. MODIS LST data were used to derive the seasonal mean of 8-day average values of daytime clear-sky surface temperature over 30 Arctic ice caps for each melt season from 2000 to 2010. LST was retrieved for a specified area within each individual ice cap, defined as the largest contiguous area of ice and snow within that ice cap. The melt season was defined as the period between the 10-year mean of melt onset and freeze-up dates derived from QuikScat. Given the potential biases introduced by the facts that a) LST data are available only for clear sky days and b) cloudiness likely varies substantially across the Arctic glaciated regions, there is a need to verify LST measurements against known changes in air temperature across all these regions. NCEP/NCAR R1 Reanalysis temperatures provide a single consistent dataset with which to evaluate air temperature trends. Ice caps in Alaska, the Canadian Arctic Archipelago (CAA) and Greenland display a common shift toward strong positive anomalies in the 2000's (0.45 to 1.2°C). The Iceland and Svalbard ice caps show weaker positive air temperature anomalies in the same period (0.38 to 0.4°C), while the Novaya Zemlya, Severnaya Zemlya and Franz Josef Land ice caps (Russia) display negative anomalies (-0.10 to -0.25°C). LST track the NCEP air temperature records at 700 hPa in the CAA (r2 0.6 to 0.96) and northern Svalbard (r2 0.6 to 0.76) only. This talk will explore whether the observed

  13. Recent mass balance of Arctic glaciers derived from repeat-track ICESat altimetry (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moholdt, G.; Nuth, C.; Hagen, J. M.; Wolken, G. J.; Gardner, A.

    2010-12-01

    The Arctic region is more affected by climate change than the lower latitudes. Glaciers and ice caps are sensitive indicators of climate change, and there is a high demand for more accurate quantifications of glacier changes in the Arctic. ICESat laser altimetry has been a popular tool for assessing recent elevation changes of the Greenland ice sheet. Other high Arctic glaciers have an equally dense coverage of ICESat tracks, but the quantity and quality of elevation comparisons are degraded due to smaller glacier sizes and steeper slopes. A methodological study at the Svalbard archipelago in the Norwegian Arctic has shown that it is feasible to obtain reasonable elevation change estimates from repeat-track ICESat altimetry (Moholdt et al., 2010). The best results were achieved using all available ICESat data in a joint analysis where surface slope and elevation change were estimated for homogeneous planes that were fitted to the data along each track. The good performance of the plane method implies that it can also be used in other Arctic regions of similar characteristics where accurate DEMs are typically not available. We present 2003-2009 elevation change rates for the Norwegian Arctic (Svalbard), the Russian Arctic (Novaya Zemlya, Severnaya Zemlya and Franz Josefs Land) and the Canadian Arctic (Queen Elizabeth Islands and Baffin Island). The glaciers and ice caps of these regions cover a total area of ~230 000 km2 which is about 30% of the world-wide glacier cover outside of the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets. Most regions experience strong thinning at low elevations, while the pattern at higher elevations varies from slight thinning to slight thickening. There are also examples of local anomalous elevation changes due to unstable glacier dynamics, e.g. glacier surging. Hypsometric calculations are performed to calculate regional volume changes on a bi-annual time scale and over the entire ICESat period (2003-2009). Short-term variations in firn layer

  14. Facies, Stratigraphic and Depositional Model of the Sediments in the Abrolhos Archipelago (Bahia, BRAZIL)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matte, R. R.; Zambonato, E. E.

    2012-04-01

    Located in the Mucuri Basin on the continental shelf of southern Bahia state, northeast Brazil, about 70 km from the city of Caravelas,the Abrolhos archipelago is made up of five islands; Santa Barbara, Redonda, Siriba, Guarita and Sueste. The exhumed sediments in the Abrolhos archipelago are a rare record of the turbidite systems which fill the Brazilian Atlantic Basin, and are probably an unprecedented example of a plataform turbidite system (Dr. Mutti, personal communication). Despite the limited area, the outcrops display a wide facies variation produced by different depositional processes, and also allow for the observation of the layer geometries. Associated with such sedimentary rocks, the Abrolhos Volcanic Complex belongs stratigraphically to the Abrolhos Formation. These igneous rocks were dated by the Ar / Ar method, with ages ranging from 60 to 40 My, placing such Volcanic Complex between the Paleocene and Eocene. The sedimentary section is best exposed in the Santa Barbara and Redonda islands and altogether it is 70 m thick. The measured vertical sections show a good stratigraphic correlation between the rocks of the western portion of the first island and those of Redonda Island. However, there is no correlation between the eastern and western portions of Santa Barbara Island, since they are very likely interrupted by the igneous intrusion and possibly by faulting. The sedimentary stack consists of deposits with alternated regressive and transgressive episodes interpreted as high frequency sequences. The coarse facies, sandstones and conglomerates, with abrupt or erosive bases record regressive phases. On the other hand, finer sandstones and siltstones facies, which are partly bioturbated, correspond to phases of a little sediment supply. In the central and eastern portions of Santa Barbara Island, there is a trend of progradational stacking, while both in the western portion of Santa Barbara and in Redonda islands an agradational trend is observed

  15. Living and dead benthic foraminiferal assemblages from bathyal environment in the Pontine Archipelago (Tyrrhenian Sea, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Bella, Letizia; Frezza, Virgilio; Ingrassia, Michela; Latino Chiocci, Francesco; Martorelli, Eleonora

    2016-04-01

    The western Pontine Archipelago (Tyrrhenian Sea, Italy), located about 30 km away from the Italian Peninsula, is composed of three volcanic islands (Ponza, Palmarola and Zannone). Sedimentological and micropaleontological characterization of the infralittoral and circalittoral zones in the Pontine Archipelago was already been studied, whereas it is lacking for deeper environments. The present study shows the preliminary micropaleontological results carried out on samples collected in the bathyal zone (at 500 mwd) in the Ventotene basin. Sediment samples, high resolution multibeam bathymetry, biological and video data were acquired in order to characterise both the morphological and biological features of study area, during the research cruise "BOLLE 2014" carried out on June 2014 aboard to the R/V Urania. Sediment samples were collected with a multi-corer, that allowed sampling of the upper decimetre of the sediments column. Successively, each core was sliced horizontally every 1 cm from the top to the bottom. For micropaleontological analyses, all samples were stained with Rose Bengal to distinguish living and dead assemblages. For each interval of the core all living specimens and 200 dead benthic foraminifera were classified and counted. Diversity index (α-Fisher, Shannon indices) and Faunal Density (specimens/gr) were calculated to define the structure of the assemblage. A variable number of living benthic foraminifera (Rose Bengal-stained) were found in all core-intervals (7-155 tests), with the Faunal Density ranging from 3 to 82 specimens/gr. A total of 77 species are recognised from living benthic foraminiferal assemblages, with a range of 4-31 species found in each core-interval. The α-Fisher index ranges between 3.88 and 43.45, whereas Shannon index shows a more limited variability (1.28-2.92). Among the living foraminifera, calcareous imperforate tests are very abundant, with percentages ranging between 33.3 and 100%; perforate species are subordinate

  16. Ciguatera fish poisoning: Incidence, health costs and risk perception on Moorea Island (Society archipelago, French Polynesia).

    PubMed

    Morin, Ewen; Gatti, Clémence; Bambridge, Tamatoa; Chinain, Mireille

    2016-12-01

    Ciguatera Fish Poisoning (CFP) is a non-bacterial seafood poisoning well characterized in the remote archipelagos of French Polynesia, yet poorly documented in the Society archipelago, most notably on Moorea, the second most populated island in French Polynesia, which counts a high proportion of fishermen fishing on a regular basis. To address this knowledge gap, a holistic study of the ciguatera issue was conducted on Moorea. First, ciguatera risk was analysed in terms of incidence rate, fish species most commonly involved and risk stratification in Moorea lagoon based on 2007-2013 epidemiological data. A mean incidence rate of 8 cases per 10,000 inhabitants for the study period and an average under-reporting rate of 54% were found. Taking into account hospitalization and medication fees, and loss of productive days, the health-related costs due to CFP were estimated to be USD $1613 and $749 for each reported and unreported case, respectively, with an overall cost of USD $241,847 for the study period. Comparison of the present status of CFP on Moorea with a risk map established in the late 1970's showed that the spatial distribution of the risk has stayed relatively stable in time, with the north shore of the island remaining the most prone to ciguatera. Evaluation of the current knowledge on CFP among different populations groups, i.e. fishermen, residents and visitors, was also conducted through direct and indirect interviews. About half of the fishermen interviewed were actually able to identify risky fishing areas. While, overall, the CFP risk perception in the fishing community of Moorea seemed accurate, although not scientifically complete, it was sufficient for the safe practice of their fishing activities. This may be due in part to adaptive responses adopted by 36% of the fishermen interviewed, such as the avoidance of either high-risk fishing sites or toxic species. At the residents and visitors' level, the study points out a striking lack of awareness

  17. Estimates of tidal mixing in the Indonesian archipelago from multidisciplinary INDOMIX in-situ data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch-Larrouy, Ariane; Atmadipoera, Agus; van Beek, Pieter; Madec, Gurvan; Aucan, Jérôme; Lyard, Florent; Grelet, Jacques; Souhaut, Marc

    2015-12-01

    The Indonesian Mixing program (INDOMIX) was designed to quantify the very strong mixing that transforms Pacific waters into isohaline Indonesian Waters in the Indonesian archipelago. The turbulent dissipation rates and associated mixing were estimated and analyzed using a multidisciplinary approach that combines physical and geochemical in-situ observations: (1) direct measurements of the dissipation using a microstructure profiler, (2) use of density-based fine-scale methods applied to CTD and XCTD data, and (3) study of the vertical distribution of natural radionuclides (radium isotopes and actinium-227). Data were collected at five contrasting stations within the Indonesian archipelago, found above energetic straits or in relatively quiescent large basins. Strong instabilities, inversions of the density profiles and a very strong water mass transformation were observed. A wide range of dissipation values were obtained (between [10-10, 10-4] W kg-1) with spots of higher dissipation in the ocean interior correlated with a strong internal tide signal. Both the fine-scale and micro-scale methods allow us to identify very strong energy dissipation levels above the straits, ranging between [10-7, 10-4] W kg-1, in contrast to lower values at stations further away from the generation sites. The dissipation for the station located in the center of the Halmahera Sea ([10-9, 10-8] W kg-1) is stronger than for the Banda station ([10-11, 10-10] W kg-1), which is even further away from the generation sites. The three approaches agree relatively well and provide vertical eddy diffusivities values ranging between 5×10-4 and 5×10-1 m2 s-1, except in the Banda Sea where values are similar to the ones found in the open ocean (10-6 m2 s-1). CTD and XCTD profilers (deployed between stations) give estimates of dissipation all along the transit. It is found that enhanced mixing occurs preferentially above rough topography, such as in the Ombai Strait, the Halmahera Sea's northern

  18. Temporal variation in fish mercury concentrations within lakes from the western Aleutian Archipelago, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kenney, Leah A.; Eagles-Smith, Collin A.; Ackerman, Joshua T.; von Hippel, Frank A.

    2014-01-01

    We assessed temporal variation in mercury (Hg) concentrations of threespine stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus) from Agattu Island, Aleutian Archipelago, Alaska. Total Hg concentrations in whole-bodied stickleback were measured at two-week intervals from two sites in each of two lakes from June 1 to August 10, 2011 during the time period when lakes were ice-free. Across all sites and sampling events, stickleback Hg concentrations ranged from 0.37–1.07 µg/g dry weight (dw), with a mean (± SE) of 0.55±0.01 µg/g dw. Mean fish Hg concentrations declined by 9% during the study period, from 0.57±0.01 µg/g dw in early June to 0.52±0.01 µg/g dw in mid-August. Mean fish Hg concentrations were 6% higher in Loon Lake (0.56±0.01 µg/g dw) than in Lake 696 (0.53±0.01 µg/g dw), and 4% higher in males (0.56±0.01 µg/g dw) than in females (0.54±0.01 µg/g dw). Loon Lake was distinguished from Lake 696 by the presence of piscivorous waterbirds during the breeding season. Mercury concentrations in stickleback from Agattu Island were higher than would be expected for an area without known point sources of Hg pollution, and high enough to be of concern to the health of piscivorous wildlife.

  19. Summertime sources of dimethyl sulfide in the Canadian Arctic Archipelago and Baffin Bay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mungall, E. L.; Croft, B.; Lizotte, M.; Thomas, J. L.; Murphy, J. G.; Levasseur, M.; Martin, R. V.; Wentzell, J. J. B.; Liggio, J.; Abbatt, J. P. D.

    2015-12-01

    Dimethyl sulfide (DMS) plays a major role in the global sulfur cycle. In addition, its atmospheric oxidation products contribute to the formation and growth of atmospheric aerosol particles, thereby influencing cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) populations and thus cloud formation. The pristine summertime Arctic atmosphere is a CCN-limited regime, and is thus very susceptible to the influence of DMS. However, atmospheric DMS mixing ratios have only rarely been measured in the summertime Arctic. During July-August 2014, we conducted the first high time resolution (10 Hz) DMS mixing ratio measurements for the Eastern Canadian Archipelago and Baffin Bay as one component of the Network on Climate and Aerosols: Addressing Key Uncertainties in Remote Canadian Environments (NETCARE). DMS mixing ratios ranged from below the detection limit of 4 to 1155 pptv (median 186 pptv). A set of transfer velocity parameterizations from the literature coupled with our atmospheric and coincident seawater DMS measurements yielded air-sea DMS flux estimates ranging from 0.02-12 μmol m-2 d-1, the first published for this region in summer. Airmass trajectory analysis using FLEXPART-WRF and chemical transport modeling using GEOS-Chem indicated that local sources (Lancaster Sound and Baffin Bay) were the dominant contributors to the DMS measured along the 21 day ship track, with episodic transport from the Hudson Bay System. After adjusting GEOS-Chem oceanic DMS values in the region to match measurements, GEOS-Chem reproduced the major features of the measured time series, but remained biased low overall (median 67 pptv). We investigated non-marine sources that might contribute to this bias, such as DMS emissions from lakes, biomass burning, melt ponds and coastal tundra. While the local marine sources of DMS dominated overall, our results suggest that non-local and possibly non-marine sources episodically contributed strongly to the observed summertime Arctic DMS mixing ratios.

  20. Cytogeography of Ixeris nakazonei (Asteraceae, Lactuceae) in the Ryukyu Archipelago of Japan and Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Denda, Tetsuo; Yokota, Masatsugu

    2004-02-01

    The cytogeographical structures of Ixeris nakazonei, a putative hybrid between I. debilis (6x) and I. repens (2x), were investigated in the Ryukyu Archipelago and Taiwan. In the Ryukyus, I. debilis occurs on Miyakojima Island of the southern Ryukyus and northward, while I. repens occurs on all islands except for Iriomotejima and Yonagunijima Islands. I. nakazonei, comprises six polyploid cytotypes, 3x, 4x, 5x, 6x, 7x and 8x, based on x=8. Four cytotypes from 3x to 6x occur in the central Ryukyus, while four cytotypes from 5x to 8x occur in the southern Ryukyus. The higher polyploids of I. nakazonei tend to be distributed in the more southerly area. Tetraploids of I. nakazonei always co-occur with I. debilis and I. repens, supporting the hybrid origin of this cytotype. Considering the chromosome number, octoploids, which predominate in the southern Ryukyus and Taiwan, may have derived directly from hybridization between I. debilis and I. repens. Odd-numbered polyploids of I. nakazonei, 3x, 5x and 7x, are relatively rare. Their chromosome numbers indicate that triploids and heptaploids are hybrids between the tetraploid of I. nakazonei and I. repens, and between the octoploid of I. nakazonei and I. debilis, respectively. Pentaploids of I. nakazonei in the central and southern Ryukyus are, respectively, hybrids between the tetraploid of I. nakazonei and I. debilis and between the octoploid of I. nakazonei and I. repens, indicating that pentaploids of I. nakazonei have at least two independent origins.

  1. Archaeological implications of a widespread 13th Century tephra marker across the central Indonesian Archipelago

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alloway, Brent V.; Andreastuti, Supriyati; Setiawan, Ruly; Miksic, John; Hua, Quan

    2017-01-01

    Despite the occurrence of exceptionally large eruptions in the Indonesian Archipelago in recent historic times (i.e. Krakatoa 1883, Tambora 1815), no historic tephra beds have been widely identified in the terrestrial realm that could facilitate the correlation of equivalent aged sequences and/or archaeological remains. This study has identified one such tephra bed of 13th Century age that can be correlated throughout central-east Java and now can be unequivocally correlated with the Samalas 1257 A.D. tephra recently described from Lombok. The occurrence of this historic tephra marker extending ≥650 km west from its eruptive source provides the first opportunity to effect inter-regional correlation over large swathes of central Indonesia. It remains entirely conceivable that in the aftermath of this exceptionally large eruptive event there was considerable westward disruption to subsistence agriculture and trade, food shortages and famine, dislocation of affected populations and socio-political unrest on a scale that equalled or exceeded the catastrophic effects documented from the more recent Tambora 1815 A.D. eruption. Indeed the effects of this mid-13th Century eruption can be registered globally in a variety of records from Antarctica, Europe, Middle East and the Americas. Unfortunately, archaeological evidence indicating such disruption in mid-13th Century Indonesia is yet to be deciphered from the so-far sparse accounts and inscriptions of that time. However, this paucity of evidence does not diminish the utility of this widespread tephra bed as a unique chronostratigraphic marker for archaeological studies across large areas of central Indonesia.

  2. Towards Stochastic Optimization-Based Electric Vehicle Penetration in a Novel Archipelago Microgrid.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qingyu; An, Dou; Yu, Wei; Tan, Zhengan; Yang, Xinyu

    2016-06-17

    Due to the advantage of avoiding upstream disturbance and voltage fluctuation from a power transmission system, Islanded Micro-Grids (IMG) have attracted much attention. In this paper, we first propose a novel self-sufficient Cyber-Physical System (CPS) supported by Internet of Things (IoT) techniques, namely "archipelago micro-grid (MG)", which integrates the power grid and sensor networks to make the grid operation effective and is comprised of multiple MGs while disconnected with the utility grid. The Electric Vehicles (EVs) are used to replace a portion of Conventional Vehicles (CVs) to reduce CO 2 emission and operation cost. Nonetheless, the intermittent nature and uncertainty of Renewable Energy Sources (RESs) remain a challenging issue in managing energy resources in the system. To address these issues, we formalize the optimal EV penetration problem as a two-stage Stochastic Optimal Penetration (SOP) model, which aims to minimize the emission and operation cost in the system. Uncertainties coming from RESs (e.g., wind, solar, and load demand) are considered in the stochastic model and random parameters to represent those uncertainties are captured by the Monte Carlo-based method. To enable the reasonable deployment of EVs in each MGs, we develop two scheduling schemes, namely Unlimited Coordinated Scheme (UCS) and Limited Coordinated Scheme (LCS), respectively. An extensive simulation study based on a modified 9 bus system with three MGs has been carried out to show the effectiveness of our proposed schemes. The evaluation data indicates that our proposed strategy can reduce both the environmental pollution created by CO 2 emissions and operation costs in UCS and LCS.

  3. Towards Stochastic Optimization-Based Electric Vehicle Penetration in a Novel Archipelago Microgrid

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Qingyu; An, Dou; Yu, Wei; Tan, Zhengan; Yang, Xinyu

    2016-01-01

    Due to the advantage of avoiding upstream disturbance and voltage fluctuation from a power transmission system, Islanded Micro-Grids (IMG) have attracted much attention. In this paper, we first propose a novel self-sufficient Cyber-Physical System (CPS) supported by Internet of Things (IoT) techniques, namely “archipelago micro-grid (MG)”, which integrates the power grid and sensor networks to make the grid operation effective and is comprised of multiple MGs while disconnected with the utility grid. The Electric Vehicles (EVs) are used to replace a portion of Conventional Vehicles (CVs) to reduce CO2 emission and operation cost. Nonetheless, the intermittent nature and uncertainty of Renewable Energy Sources (RESs) remain a challenging issue in managing energy resources in the system. To address these issues, we formalize the optimal EV penetration problem as a two-stage Stochastic Optimal Penetration (SOP) model, which aims to minimize the emission and operation cost in the system. Uncertainties coming from RESs (e.g., wind, solar, and load demand) are considered in the stochastic model and random parameters to represent those uncertainties are captured by the Monte Carlo-based method. To enable the reasonable deployment of EVs in each MGs, we develop two scheduling schemes, namely Unlimited Coordinated Scheme (UCS) and Limited Coordinated Scheme (LCS), respectively. An extensive simulation study based on a modified 9 bus system with three MGs has been carried out to show the effectiveness of our proposed schemes. The evaluation data indicates that our proposed strategy can reduce both the environmental pollution created by CO2 emissions and operation costs in UCS and LCS. PMID:27322281

  4. Diagenetic history of lower Pliocene rhodoliths of the Azores Archipelago (NE Atlantic): Application of cathodoluminescence techniques.

    PubMed

    Rebelo, A C; Meireles, R P; Barbin, V; Neto, A I; Melo, C; Ávila, S P

    2016-01-01

    The diagenetic history of calcareous fossils is required for their application as palaeoenvironmental indicators. In this study, cathodoluminescence-microscopy (CL microscopy) and back scatter electron image-energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (BSE-EDS microscopy) were applied to Pliocene rhodoliths from the Azores Archipelago (NE Atlantic) in order to gain additional insight regarding the trace element content distribution throughout the algae thalli, and to ascertain palaeoenvironmental interpretations. Two types of luminescence were obtained: (1) high and (2) low luminescence. Rhodoliths with high luminescence are related with high concentrations of Mn(2+) in seawater and low luminescence rhodoliths are related with low concentrations of Mn(2+) in seawater. When the rhodoliths were deposited at about 4.0-4.5 Ma, the shoreline configuration of Santa Maria Island was much different than today. The influence of volcanic activity due to the extrusion of lavas and associated products and/or the presence of active shallow-water hydrothermal vents, was reflected in the sea water chemistry, with penecontemporaneous palaeoshores of the island featuring a high sea water concentration of Mn(2+), which mirrored on the rhodolith Mn(2+) high concentration. By contrast, rhodoliths located about 2.8 and 2.9 km from the shore, in areas with low seawater Mn(2+) concentration, had low luminescence, reflecting the low Mn(2+) concentration in seawater. Rhodoliths chemical data and the geological history of the island proved to be congruent with the palaeogeographical reconstruction of Santa Maria Island at the time of the formation of the rhodoliths.

  5. Patterns of coral disease across the Hawaiian Archipelago: Relating disease to environment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Aeby, G.S.; Williams, G.J.; Franklin, E.C.; Kenyon, J.; Cox, E.F.; Coles, S.; Work, T.M.

    2011-01-01

    In Hawaii, coral reefs occur across a gradient of biological (host abundance), climatic (sea surface temperature anomalies) and anthropogenic conditions from the human-impacted reefs of the main Hawaiian Islands (MHI) to the pristine reefs of the northwestern Hawaiian Islands (NWHI). Coral disease surveys were conducted at 142 sites from across the Archipelago and disease patterns examined. Twelve diseases were recorded from three coral genera (Porites, Montipora, Acropora) with Porites having the highest prevalence. Porites growth anomalies (PorGAs) were significantly more prevalent within and indicative of reefs in the MHI and Porites trematodiasis (PorTrm) was significantly more prevalent within and indicative of reefs in the NWHI. Porites tissue loss syndrome (PorTLS) was also important in driving regional differences but that relationship was less clear. These results highlight the importance of understanding disease ecology when interpreting patterns of disease occurrence. PorTrm is caused by a parasitic flatworm that utilizes multiple hosts during its life cycle (fish, mollusk and coral). All three hosts must be present for the disease to occur and higher host abundance leads to higher disease prevalence. Thus, a high prevalence of PorTrm on Hawaiian reefs would be an indicator of a healthy coral reef ecosystem. In contrast, the high occurrence of PorGAs within the MHI suggests that PorGAs are related, directly or indirectly, to some environmental co-factor associated with increased human population sizes. Focusing on the three indicator diseases (PorGAs, PorTrm, PorTLS) we used statistical modeling to examine the underlying associations between disease prevalence and 14 different predictor variables (biotic and abiotic). All three diseases showed positive associations with host abundance and negative associations with thermal stress. The association with human population density differed among disease states with PorGAs showing a positive and PorTrm showing

  6. Macrophytobenthic flora of the Abrolhos Archipelago and the Sebastião Gomes Reef, Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torrano-Silva, Beatriz N.; Oliveira, Eurico C.

    2013-11-01

    The Abrolhos Bank, located on the coast of Bahia, Brazil, harbors the largest coral reef system in the South Atlantic. This area has attracted the attention of biologists because of its peculiar mushroom-shaped structures, locally known as "chapeirões", and endemic species of corals and other organisms. The macrophytobenthos compartment plays an important ecological role in the functioning of the bank, and some reports on the presence of seaweeds and seagrasses have been published; however, the data are fragmentary, and a more detailed survey of the macrophytobenthos compartment is lacking. Here we consolidate the information available and add new data obtained from two expeditions focused on seaweed and seagrass diversity from two sectors of the bank: the islands of the Abrolhos archipelago (AA) and the Sebastião Gomes Reef (SG). These sites were selected for their contrasting characteristics. Specifically, SG (15 km off the mouth of the Caravelas River) is subjected to a broader range of anthropogenic impacts and to input of terrigenous sediments, while the AA (54 km offshore) is surrounded by calcareous biogenic sediments, has clearer water and is less affected by human activities. Macrophytobenthic species richness on both reference areas is larger than previously thought. Considering previous records, there are 164 species of macrophytes in AA and 111 species in SG, of which 59 and 74 species are first records for each respective location. The higher species richness at the AA may result from a higher habitat complexity and lower turbidity, but a potential negative effect of enhanced human impacts at SG cannot be ruled out. Considering that macroalgae are relevant components of the benthic community, as producers and structurer organisms, the data presented herein provide a reliable baseline for future environmental studies, and thus may contribute to improve management policies within the unique ecosystem of Abrolhos.

  7. Pelagic seabird surveys in the Tuamotu and Gambier Archipelagos, French Polynesia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vanderwerf, Eric A.; Pierce, Ray J.; Gill, Verena A.; Wragg, Graham; Raust, Philippe; Tibbitts, T. Lee

    2006-01-01

    We conducted pelagic seabird surveys in the Gambier and Tuamotu Archipelagos in the southeastern Pacific Ocean totaling 40 hours during 7-27 March 2003 and 22.5 hours during 22-27 July 2001. We used a 300-m-wide strip transect to estimate seabird density, and we estimated relative abundance of birds at all distances. In 2001, we observed a total of 326 birds of 18 species. The mean relative abundance of all birds was 14.3 ?? 3.1/h. Red-footed Booby Sula sula was the most abundant species (5.6/h), followed by White Tern Gygis alba (3.4/h), and Great Crested or Swift Tern Sterna bergii (1.2/h). In 2003, we observed a total of 1463 birds of 25 species. The mean relative abundance of all birds was 36.6 ?? 11.4/h and the mean density of all birds was 4.14 ?? 0.72/km2. Brown Noddy Anous stolidus was the most abundant species (17.6/h, 1.5/km2), followed by White Tern (8.4/h, 1.3/km2), and Red-footed Booby (4.6/h, 0.8/km2). Several globally or locally rare species were observed infrequently, including Phoenix Petrel Pterodroma alba (0.1/h, 0.03/km2). Distribution of birds was uneven, with long periods of no birds punctuated by occasional feeding flocks. In 2003, species diversity was related to length of observation period, with more species observed on longer segments (r2 = 0.58, F1.5 = 6.03, P = 0.05). Although the duration and extent of our surveys were limited, these data are valuable because little published information is available on pelagic seabirds in southeastern Polynesia.

  8. RESEARCH PAPERS : Evidence for the Blake event in volcanic rocks from Lipari (Aeolian Archipelago)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanella, Elena; Laurenzi, Marinella A.

    1998-01-01

    Palaeomagnetic and geochronological measurements have been carried out on the late Pleistocene basaltic-andesitic unit of Monte Chirica-Costa Rasa, on the island of Lipari (Aeolian Archipelago). The lava flow sequence is about 10 m thick and has been sampled in detail. Magnetic properties are rather uniform; Curie temperatures of 540° to 580°C, and the saturation IRM reached at applied values of 0.1 T point to titanomagnetite as the main magnetization carrier. Thermal and AF demagnetization have shown the presence of secondary magnetization components. These were removed mostly at 450°-500°C or 20-30 mT, indicating a highly stable ChRM with directions from transitional to reverse. Where a ChRM could not be isolated by application of the demagnetization techniques, the converging remagnetization circles method gave a mean ChRM value fully comparable with that obtained from other methods. 40Ar/39Ar determinations were performed on two lava flows, in the lower and upper parts of the sequence. The former shows a transitional ChRM direction and a whole-rock age of 157+/-12 ka, the latter a reverse direction, a whole-rock age of 143+/-17 ka and a ground-mass age of 128+/-23 ka. The radiometric data and the reconstructed stratigraphy, which indicate ages of 150+/-10 ka and 104+/-3.5 ka, respectively, for the volcanic units at the bottom and top of the Monte Chirica-Costa Rasa unit, suggest that the reverse directions recorded in Lipari are related to the Blake event.

  9. New Ulvaceae (Ulvophyceae, Chlorophyta) from mesophotic ecosystems across the Hawaiian Archipelago.

    PubMed

    Spalding, Heather L; Conklin, Kimberly Y; Smith, Celia M; O'Kelly, Charles J; Sherwood, Alison R

    2016-02-01

    Ulvalean algae (Chlorophyta) are most commonly described from intertidal and shallow subtidal marine environments worldwide, but are less well known from mesophotic environments. Their morphological simplicity and phenotypic plasticity make accurate species determinations difficult, even at the generic level. Here, we describe the mesophotic Ulvales species composition from 13 locations across 2,300 km of the Hawaiian Archipelago. Twenty-eight representative Ulvales specimens from 64 to 125 m depths were collected using technical diving, submersibles, and remotely operated vehicles. Morphological and molecular characters suggest that mesophotic Ulvales in Hawaiian waters form unique communities comprising four species within the genera Ulva and Umbraulva, each with discrete geographic and/or depth-related distributional patterns. Three genetically distinct taxa are supported by both plastid (rbcL and tufA) and nuclear (ITS1) markers, and are presented here as new species: Umbraulva kaloakulau, Ulva ohiohilulu, and Ulva iliohaha. We also propose a new Umbraulva species (Umbraulva kuaweuweu), which is closely related to subtidal records from New Zealand and Australia, but not formally described. To our knowledge, these are the first marine species descriptions from Hawai'i resulting from the collaboration of traditional Hawaiian nomenclature specialists, cultural practitioners and scientists. The difficulty of finding reliable diagnostic morphological characters for these species reflects a common problem worldwide of achieving accurate identification of ulvalean taxa using solely morphological criteria. Mesophotic Ulvales appear to be distinct from shallow-water populations in Hawai'i, but their degree of similarity to mesophotic floras in other locations in the Pacific remains unknown.

  10. Indirect food web interactions: Sea otters and kelp forest fishes in the Aleutian archipelago

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reisewitz, S.E.; Estes, J.A.; Simenstad, C.A.

    2006-01-01

    Although trophic cascades - the effect of apex predators on progressively lower trophic level species through top-down forcing - have been demonstrated in diverse ecosystems, the broader potential influences of trophic cascades on other species and ecosystem processes are not well studied. We used the overexploitation, recovery and subsequent collapse of sea otter (Enhydra lutris) populations in the Aleutian archipelago to explore if and how the abundance and diet of kelp forest fishes are influenced by a trophic cascade linking sea otters with sea urchins and fleshy macroalgae. We measured the abundance of sea urchins (biomass density), kelp (numerical density) and fish (Catch per unit effort) at four islands in the mid-1980s (when otters were abundant at two of the islands and rare at the two others) and in 2000 (after otters had become rare at all four islands). Our fish studies focused on rock greenling (Hexagrammos lagocephalus), the numerically dominant species in this region. In the mid-1980s, the two islands with high-density otter populations supported dense kelp forests, relatively few urchins, and abundant rock greenling whereas the opposite pattern (abundant urchins, sparse kelp forests, and relatively few rock greenling) occurred at islands where otters were rare. In the 2000, the abundances of urchins, kelp and greenling were grossly unchanged at islands where otters were initially rare but had shifted to the characteristic pattern of otter-free systems at islands where otters were initially abundant. Significant changes in greenling diet occurred between the mid-1980s and the 2000 although the reasons for these changes were difficult to assess because of strong island-specific effects. Whereas urchin-dominated communities supported more diverse fish assemblages than kelp-dominated communities, this was not a simple effect of the otter-induced trophic cascade because all islands supported more diverse fish assemblages in 2000 than in the mid-1980s

  11. Indirect food web interactions: sea otters and kelp forest fishes in the Aleutian archipelago.

    PubMed

    Reisewitz, Shauna E; Estes, James A; Simenstad, Charles A

    2006-01-01

    Although trophic cascades-the effect of apex predators on progressively lower trophic level species through top-down forcing-have been demonstrated in diverse ecosystems, the broader potential influences of trophic cascades on other species and ecosystem processes are not well studied. We used the overexploitation, recovery and subsequent collapse of sea otter (Enhydra lutris) populations in the Aleutian archipelago to explore if and how the abundance and diet of kelp forest fishes are influenced by a trophic cascade linking sea otters with sea urchins and fleshy macroalgae. We measured the abundance of sea urchins (biomass density), kelp (numerical density) and fish (Catch per unit effort) at four islands in the mid-1980s (when otters were abundant at two of the islands and rare at the two others) and in 2000 (after otters had become rare at all four islands). Our fish studies focused on rock greenling (Hexagrammos lagocephalus), the numerically dominant species in this region. In the mid-1980s, the two islands with high-density otter populations supported dense kelp forests, relatively few urchins, and abundant rock greenling whereas the opposite pattern (abundant urchins, sparse kelp forests, and relatively few rock greenling) occurred at islands where otters were rare. In the 2000, the abundances of urchins, kelp and greenling were grossly unchanged at islands where otters were initially rare but had shifted to the characteristic pattern of otter-free systems at islands where otters were initially abundant. Significant changes in greenling diet occurred between the mid-1980s and the 2000 although the reasons for these changes were difficult to assess because of strong island-specific effects. Whereas urchin-dominated communities supported more diverse fish assemblages than kelp-dominated communities, this was not a simple effect of the otter-induced trophic cascade because all islands supported more diverse fish assemblages in 2000 than in the mid-1980s.

  12. Late Pliocene and Quaternary Eurasian locust infestations in the Canary Archipelago

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Meco, J.; Muhs, D.R.; Fontugne, M.; Ramos, A.J.; Lomoschitz, A.; Patterson, D.

    2011-01-01

    The Canary Archipelago has long been a sensitive location to record climate changes of the past. Interbedded with its basalt lavas are marine deposits from the principal Pleistocene interglacials, as well as aeolian sands with intercalated palaeosols. The palaeosols contain African dust and innumerable relict egg pods of a temperate-region locust (cf. Dociostaurus maroccanusThunberg 1815). New ecological and stratigraphical information reveals the geological history of locust plagues (or infestations) and their palaeoclimatic significance. Here, we show that the first arrival of the plagues to the Canary Islands from Africa took place near the end of the Pliocene, ca. 3Ma, and reappeared with immense strength during the middle Late Pleistocene preceding MIS (marine isotope stage) 11 (ca. 420ka), MIS 5.5 (ca. 125ka) and probably during other warm interglacials of the late Middle Pleistocene and the Late Pleistocene. During the Early Holocene, locust plagues may have coincided with a brief cool period in the current interglacial. Climatically, locust plagues on the Canaries are a link in the chain of full-glacial arid-cold climate (calcareous dunes), early interglacial arid-sub-humid climate (African dust inputs and locust plagues), peak interglacial warm-humid climate (marine deposits with Senegalese fauna), transitional arid-temperate climate (pedogenic calcretes), and again full-glacial arid-cold climate (calcareous dunes) oscillations. During the principal interglacials of the Pleistocene, the Canary Islands recorded the migrations of warm Senegalese marine faunas to the north, crossing latitudes in the Euro-African Atlantic. However, this northward marine faunal migration was preceded in the terrestrial realm by interglacial infestations of locusts. ??? Locust plagues, Canary Islands, Late Pliocene, Pleistocene, Holocene, palaeoclimatology. ?? 2010 The Authors, Lethaia ?? 2010 The Lethaia Foundation.

  13. Landfast ice thickness in the Canadian Arctic Archipelago from observations and models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howell, Stephen E. L.; Laliberté, Frédéric; Kwok, Ron; Derksen, Chris; King, Joshua

    2016-07-01

    Observed and modelled landfast ice thickness variability and trends spanning more than 5 decades within the Canadian Arctic Archipelago (CAA) are summarized. The observed sites (Cambridge Bay, Resolute, Eureka and Alert) represent some of the Arctic's longest records of landfast ice thickness. Observed end-of-winter (maximum) trends of landfast ice thickness (1957-2014) were statistically significant at Cambridge Bay (-4.31 ± 1.4 cm decade-1), Eureka (-4.65 ± 1.7 cm decade-1) and Alert (-4.44 ± 1.6 cm -1) but not at Resolute. Over the 50+-year record, the ice thinned by ˜ 0.24-0.26 m at Cambridge Bay, Eureka and Alert with essentially negligible change at Resolute. Although statistically significant warming in spring and fall was present at all sites, only low correlations between temperature and maximum ice thickness were present; snow depth was found to be more strongly associated with the negative ice thickness trends. Comparison with multi-model simulations from Coupled Model Intercomparison project phase 5 (CMIP5), Ocean Reanalysis Intercomparison (ORA-IP) and Pan-Arctic Ice-Ocean Modeling and Assimilation System (PIOMAS) show that although a subset of current generation models have a "reasonable" climatological representation of landfast ice thickness and distribution within the CAA, trends are unrealistic and far exceed observations by up to 2 orders of magnitude. ORA-IP models were found to have positive correlations between temperature and ice thickness over the CAA, a feature that is inconsistent with both observations and coupled models from CMIP5.

  14. Multiscaling statistics of high frequency global solar radiation data in the Guadeloupean Archipelago

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calif, R.; Schmitt, F. G.; Huang, Y.; Soubdhan, T.

    2013-12-01

    The part of the solar power production from photovoltaiccs systems is constantly increasing in the electric grids. Solar energy converter devices such as photovoltaic cells are very sensitive to instantaneous solar radiation fluctuations. Thus rapid variation of solar radiation due to changes in the local meteorological condition can induce large amplitude fluctuations of the produced electrical power and reduce the overall efficiency of the system. When large amount of photovoltaic electricity is send into a weak or small electricity network such as island network, the electric grid security can be in jeopardy due to these power fluctuations. The integration of this energy into the electrical network remains a major challenge, due to the high variability of solar radiation in time and space. To palliate these difficulties, it is essential to identify the characteristic of these fluctuations in order to anticipate the eventuality of power shortage or power surge. A good knowledge of the intermittency of global solar radiation is crucial for selecting the location of a solar power plant and predicting the generation of electricity. This work presents a multifractal analysis study of 367 daily global solar radiation sequences measured with a sampling rate of 1 Hz over one year at Guadeloupean Archipelago (French West Indies) located at 16o15'N latitude and 60o30'W longitude. The mean power spectrum computed follows a power law behaviour close to the Kolmogorov spectrum. The intermittent and multifractal properties of global solar radiation data are investigated using several methods. Under this basis, a characterization for each day using three multifractal parameters is proposed.

  15. The volcanic-subvolcanic rocks of the fernando de noronha archipelago, southern atlantic ocean: Mineral chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopes, Rosana Peporine; Ulbrich, Mabel N. Costas; Ulbrich, Horstpeter

    2014-12-01

    Fernando de Noronha archipelago presents an older Remédios Formation with subvolcanic intrusions, belonging to two different alkaline series, the sodic (undersaturated: basanites, tephrites, essexites, tephriphonolites, phonolites), and potassic ones (mildly undersaturated to silicic, with alkali basalts, basaltic trachyandesites, trachyandesites, trachytes), and lamprophyres. The upper Quixaba Formation presents nephelinite flows and basanites. A third minor unit, São José, is constituted by basanites carrying mantle xenoliths. Magnesian olivines occur in the Remédios basanites and alkali basalts, and in nephelinites. Melilites are present as groundmass grains in melilite melanephelinites (MEM). Clinopyroxenes (cpx) are mostly salites to titaniferous salites (Remédios sodic series), grading into aegirines in the differentiated aphyric phonolites. Cpx in the lamprophyres show disequilibrium textures. In the Quixaba flows, cpx are salites, enriched in Mg (especially in MEM). Amphiboles, remarkably, are common in tephriphonolites and phonolites and in basaltic trachyandesites, sometimes with disequilibrum zoning textures, and a conspicuous phase in lamprophyres. Dark micas are present as groundmass plates in MEM, OLM and PYM (olivine and pyroxene melanephelinites), with compositional variety (enriched in Ti, Ba, Sr) depending on the composition of the parent rock; BaO can be as high as 16-19%. Feldspars crystallize as calcic plagioclases, sanidines and anorthoclases, depending on the rock types, as phenocrysts and in groundmass, both in Quixaba and Remédios rocks; they are absent in nephelinites. Nephelines are found in Remédios sodic series types and Quixaba rocks. Haüyne and noseane are rarely observed in Remédios rocks.

  16. Vector Surveillance for Dengue Virus Detection in the Archipelago of Fernando de Noronha, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Barbosa, P P; Guedes, D R D; Melo-Santos, M A V; Cordeiro, M T; Acioli, R V; Batista, C A V; Gonçalves, L S M; Souza, M F M; Araújo, Y V; Magalhães, F J R; Regis, L; Ayres, C F J

    2016-05-01

    Aedes aegypti (L.) has become an efficient vector of important arboviruses due to its anthropophilic and domiciliary behaviors. Since the 1980s, dengue affects thousands of people every year in Brazil; in Fernando de Noronha (FN), a touristic archipelago, dengue cases have occurred since 2001. Once Ae. aegypti populations are well established in the inhabited areas of FN, the threat of dengue or another arbovirus epidemic is continuously imminent. This study aimed to monitor the DENV serotypes in mosquito samples collected in FN, where at least one resident was clinically diagnosed as dengue patient. Entomological surveillance was conducted in 2011 and 2012. Mosquitoes were sorted by sex and location and were stored in pools. DENV detection was performed using polymerase chain reaction with reverse transcription (RT-PCR) and the Platelia Dengue NS1 Ag. RNA integrity was checked by RT-PCR using rpL8 primers, and the minimum infection rate (MIR) was calculated. In total, 339 pools were analyzed, and only one was positive (DENV-1) by Multiplex RT-PCR (MIR = 1.53). When considering only pools with RNA integrity, the MIR was 2.92. Using the Platelia kit, the MIR was 9.18 (considering all the pools) and 17.54 (only 140 pools with RNA integrity). Our results showed the importance of a constant entomological surveillance in that area, the need to improve storage and transportation protocols, and an endogenous control in the RT-PCR to avoid false-negative results. Finally, our study indicated that the NS1-Ag detection was the most sensitive method and should be used routinely for DENV surveillance in mosquitoes if the serotype identification is not required.

  17. Terrestrial invasion of pomatiopsid gastropods in the heavy-snow region of the Japanese Archipelago

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Gastropod mollusks are one of the most successful animals that have diversified in the fully terrestrial habitat. They have evolved terrestrial taxa in more than nine lineages, most of which originated during the Paleozoic or Mesozoic. The rissooidean gastropod family Pomatiopsidae is one of the few groups that have evolved fully terrestrial taxa during the late Cenozoic. The pomatiopsine diversity is particularly high in the Japanese Archipelago and the terrestrial taxa occur only in this region. In this study, we conducted thorough samplings of Japanese pomatiopsid species and performed molecular phylogenetic analyses to explore the patterns of diversification and terrestrial invasion. Results Molecular phylogenetic analyses revealed that Japanese Pomatiopsinae derived from multiple colonization of the Eurasian Continent and that subsequent habitat shifts from aquatic to terrestrial life occurred at least twice within two Japanese endemic lineages. Each lineage comprises amphibious and terrestrial species, both of which are confined to the mountains in heavy-snow regions facing the Japan Sea. The estimated divergence time suggested that diversification of these terrestrial lineages started in the Late Miocene, when active orogenesis of the Japanese landmass and establishment of snowy conditions began. Conclusions The terrestrial invasion of Japanese Pomatiopsinae occurred at least twice beside the mountain streamlets of heavy-snow regions, which is considered the first case of this event in the area. Because snow coverage maintains stable temperatures and high humidity on the ground surface, heavy-snow conditions may have paved the way for these organisms from freshwater to land via mountain streamlets by preventing winter desiccation in mountain valleys. The fact that the terrestrialization of Pomatiopsidae occurred only in year-round wet environments, but not in seasonally dried regions, provides new insight into ancient molluscan terrestrialization

  18. Temporal Variation in Fish Mercury Concentrations within Lakes from the Western Aleutian Archipelago, Alaska

    PubMed Central

    Kenney, Leah A.; Eagles-Smith, Collin A.; Ackerman, Joshua T.; von Hippel, Frank A.

    2014-01-01

    We assessed temporal variation in mercury (Hg) concentrations of threespine stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus) from Agattu Island, Aleutian Archipelago, Alaska. Total Hg concentrations in whole-bodied stickleback were measured at two-week intervals from two sites in each of two lakes from June 1 to August 10, 2011 during the time period when lakes were ice-free. Across all sites and sampling events, stickleback Hg concentrations ranged from 0.37–1.07 µg/g dry weight (dw), with a mean (± SE) of 0.55±0.01 µg/g dw. Mean fish Hg concentrations declined by 9% during the study period, from 0.57±0.01 µg/g dw in early June to 0.52±0.01 µg/g dw in mid-August. Mean fish Hg concentrations were 6% higher in Loon Lake (0.56±0.01 µg/g dw) than in Lake 696 (0.53±0.01 µg/g dw), and 4% higher in males (0.56±0.01 µg/g dw) than in females (0.54±0.01 µg/g dw). Loon Lake was distinguished from Lake 696 by the presence of piscivorous waterbirds during the breeding season. Mercury concentrations in stickleback from Agattu Island were higher than would be expected for an area without known point sources of Hg pollution, and high enough to be of concern to the health of piscivorous wildlife. PMID:25029042

  19. Petrology of ultramafic xenoliths in Cenozoic alkaline rocks of northern Madagascar (Nosy Be Archipelago)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rocco, Ivana; Lustrino, Michele; Zanetti, Alberto; Morra, Vincenzo; Melluso, Leone

    2013-01-01

    Late Miocene basanites of Nosy Be and Nosy Sakatia islands (Nosy Be Archipelago, northern Madagascar) carry spinel-facies anhydrous ultramafic xenoliths (lherzolites, harzburgites and wehrlites). Geothermobarometric estimates indicate that these xenoliths derive from shallow mantle depths of 35-40 km, with those from Nosy Be island showing equilibration T (averages in the range of 945-985 °C) lower than the Nosy Sakatia analogues (averages ranging from 1010 to 1110 °C). One Nosy Sakatia mantle xenolith exhibits relatively fertile lherzolite composition, with trace and major element mineral chemistry consistent with a residual character after low degrees (1-2%) of mafic melt extraction. We interpret this composition as that resembling a depleted mantle (DM)-like lithospheric composition before metasomatic overprints. The other lherzolites and harzburgites display petrochemical characters consistent with variable extent of partial melting (up to 18%), associated with pronounced metasomatic overprints caused by migrating melts, as highlighted by enrichments in highly incompatible trace elements (e.g. light rare earth elements, LREE and Sr), together with the abundant occurrence of wehrlitic lithologies. The variability of petrochemical features points to different styles of metasomatism and metasomatic agents. The estimated composition of the parental melts of wehrlites matches that of host basanites. The combination of this evidence with the petrographic features, characterized by coarse-granular to porphyroclastic textures and by the presence of olivine without kink-banding, suggests that wehrlites are veins or pockets of high pressure cumulates within the mantle peridotite. The same melts also metasomatized via porous-flow percolation some lherzolites and harzburgites. Distinctly, a group of lherzolites and harzburgites was metasomatized by a different alkaline melt having markedly lower incompatible trace element contents. Late infiltration of metasomatic fluids

  20. Stress response of two coral species in the Kavaratti atoll of the Lakshadweep Archipelago, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harithsa, Shashank; Raghukumar, Chandralata; Dalal, S. G.

    2005-11-01

    Frequent occurrences of coral bleaching and the ensuing damage to coral reefs have generated interest in documenting stress responses that precede bleaching. The objective of this study was to assess and compare physiological changes in healthy, semi-bleached and totally bleached colonies of two coral species, Porites lutea and Acropora formosa, during a natural bleaching event in the Lakshadweep Archipelago in the Arabian Sea to determine the traits that will be useful in the diagnosis of coral health. In April 2002, three “health conditions” were observed as “appearing healthy,” “semi-bleached” and “bleached” specimens for two dominant and co-occurring coral species in these islands. Changes in the pigment composition, zooxanthellae density (ZD), mitotic index (MI) of zooxanthellae, RNA/DNA ratios and protein profile in the two coral species showing different levels of bleaching in the field were compared to address the hypothesis of no difference in health condition between species and bleaching status. The loss in chlorophyll (chl) a, chl c and ZD in the transitional stage of semi-bleaching in the branched coral A. formosa was 80, 75 and 80%, respectively. The losses were much less in the massive coral P. lutea, being 20, 50 and 25%, respectively. The decrease in zooxanthellar density and chl a was accompanied by an increased MI of zooxanthellae and RNA/DNA ratios in both the species. There was an increase in accumulation of lipofuscin granules in partially bleached P. lutea tissue, which is an indication of cellular senescence. Multivariate statistical analyses showed that colonies of P. lutea ranked in different health conditions differed significantly in chl a, chl c, ZD, RNA/DNA ratios, and protein concentrations, whereas in A. formosa chl a, chl c, chl a/ c, phaeopigments and MI contributed to the variance between health conditions.

  1. Population Abundance of the Endangered Galapagos Sea Lion Zalophus wollebaeki in the Southeastern Galapagos Archipelago.

    PubMed

    Riofrío-Lazo, Marjorie; Arreguín-Sánchez, Francisco; Páez-Rosas, Diego

    2017-01-01

    There is great concern regarding the population status of the endangered Galapagos sea lion (GSL) because it has drastically decreased over the last 30 years. We determined the population size and growth trend of the GSL in the Galapagos southeastern region (SER) at three population levels based on the available census data: 1) SER (2011-2015), including 13 rookeries on the four islands San Cristóbal (SC), Española, Floreana, and Santa Fe, comprising 58% of the archipelago's population; 2) SC (2011-2015), including five rookeries, comprising 52% of the SER population; and 3) El Malecón (2005-2015), the largest rookery on SC and in the SER (43% of the population on SC and 22% in the SER). We also analyzed the influence of environmental variability on pup abundance in these rookeries. The current GSL population size in the SER, after applying correction factors to the counts, is estimated at approximately 2300-4100 individuals and has declined at an average annual rate (ʎ) of 8.7% over the last five years. A similar trend was determined for SC but at ʎ = 1.4% during the same period. For El Malecón, a count-based population viability analysis using a diffusion approximation approach showed that the population increased from 2005 to 2015 at ʎ = 2%. The interannual variability in pup abundance was associated with anomalies in sea surface temperature linked to oceanographic-atmospheric events, which impact the abundance and availability of prey, and ultimately may determine the population's reproductive success. Since rookeries in the SER had different population trends, management actions should be implemented based on their specific conditions, giving priority to rookeries such as El Malecón, which, despite showing a slightly increasing population trend, still faces a high risk of extinction due to anthropogenic disturbances and environmental variability that may affect its growth and survival.

  2. Comparative phylogeography of tenebrionid beetles in the Aegean archipelago: the effect of dispersal ability and habitat preference.

    PubMed

    Papadopoulou, Anna; Anastasiou, Ioannis; Keskin, Bekir; Vogler, Alfried P

    2009-06-01

    Comparative phylogeographical studies in island archipelagos can reveal lineage-specific differential responses to the geological and climatic history. We analysed patterns of genetic diversity in six codistributed lineages of darkling beetles (Tenebrionidae) in the central Aegean archipelago which differ in wing development and habitat preferences. A total of 600 specimens from 30 islands and eight adjacent mainland regions were sequenced for mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase I and nuclear Muscular protein 20. Individual gene genealogies were assessed for the presence of groups that obey an independent coalescent process using a mixed Yule coalescent model. The six focal taxa differed greatly in the number of coalescent groups and depth of lineage subdivision, which was closely mirrored by the degree of geographical structuring. The most severe subdivision at both mitochondrial DNA and nuclear DNA level was found in flightless lineages associated with presumed stable compact-soil habitats (phrygana, maquis), in contrast to sand-obligate lineages inhabiting ephemeral coastal areas that displayed greater homogeneity across the archipelago. A winged lineage, although associated with stable habitats, showed no significant phylogenetic or geographical structuring. Patterns of nucleotide diversity and local genetic differentiation, as measured using PhiST and hierarchical AMOVA, were consistent with high levels of ongoing gene flow in the winged taxon; frequent local extinction and island recolonisation for flightless sand-obligate taxa; and very low gene flow and geographical structure largely defined by the palaeogeographical history of the region in flightless compact-soil taxa. These results show that differences in dispersal rate, mediated by habitat persistence, greatly influence the levels of phylogeographical subdivision in lineages that are otherwise subjected to the same geological events and palaeoclimatic changes.

  3. Diversity and Distribution of Symbiodinium Associated with Seven Common Coral Species in the Chagos Archipelago, Central Indian Ocean

    PubMed Central

    Obura, David; Sheppard, Charles R. C.; Visram, Shakil; Chen, Chaolun Allen

    2012-01-01

    The Chagos Archipelago designated as a no-take marine protected area in 2010, lying about 500 km south of the Maldives in the Indian Ocean, has a high conservation priority, particularly because of its fast recovery from the ocean-wide massive coral mortality following the 1998 coral bleaching event. The aims of this study were to examine Symbiodinium diversity and distribution associated with scleractinian corals in five atolls of the Chagos Archipelago, spread over 10,000 km 2. Symbiodinium clade diversity in 262 samples of seven common coral species, Acropora muricata, Isopora palifera, Pocillopora damicornis, P. verrucosa, P. eydouxi, Seriatopora hystrix, and Stylophora pistillata were determined using PCR-SSCP of the ribosomal internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1), PCR-DDGE of ITS2, and phylogenetic analyses. The results indicated that Symbiodinium in clade C were the dominant symbiont group in the seven coral species. Our analysis revealed types of Symbiodinium clade C specific to coral species. Types C1 and C3 (with C3z and C3i variants) were dominant in Acroporidae and C1 and C1c were the dominant types in Pocilloporidae. We also found 2 novel ITS2 types in S. hystrix and 1 novel ITS2 type of Symbiodinium in A. muricata. Some colonies of A. muricata and I. palifera were also associated with Symbiodinium A1. These results suggest that corals in the Chagos Archipelago host different assemblages of Symbiodinium types then their conspecifics from other locations in the Indian Ocean; and that future research will show whether these patterns in Symbiodinium genotypes may be due to local adaptation to specific conditions in the Chagos. PMID:22567113

  4. A Complex Evolutionary History in a Remote Archipelago: Phylogeography and Morphometrics of the Hawaiian Endemic Ligia Isopods

    PubMed Central

    Santamaria, Carlos A.; Mateos, Mariana; Taiti, Stefano; DeWitt, Thomas J.; Hurtado, Luis A.

    2013-01-01

    Compared to the striking diversification and levels of endemism observed in many terrestrial groups within the Hawaiian Archipelago, marine invertebrates exhibit remarkably lower rates of endemism and diversification. Supralittoral invertebrates restricted to specific coastal patchy habitats, however, have the potential for high levels of allopatric diversification. This is the case of Ligia isopods endemic to the Hawaiian Archipelago, which most likely arose from a rocky supralittoral ancestor that colonized the archipelago via rafting, and diversified into rocky supralittoral and inland lineages. A previous study on populations of this isopod from Oʻahu and Kauaʻi revealed high levels of allopatric differentiation, and suggested inter-island historical dispersal events have been rare. To gain a better understanding on the diversity and evolution of this group, we expanded prior phylogeographic work by incorporating populations from unsampled main Hawaiian Islands (Maui, Molokaʻi, Lanaʻi, and Hawaiʻi), increasing the number of gene markers (four mitochondrial and two nuclear genes), and conducting Maximum likelihood and Bayesian phylogenetic analyses. Our study revealed new lineages and expanded the distribution range of several lineages. The phylogeographic patterns of Ligia in the study area are complex, with Hawaiʻi, Oʻahu, and the Maui-Nui islands sharing major lineages, implying multiple inter-island historical dispersal events. In contrast, the oldest and most geographically distant of the major islands (Kauaʻi) shares no lineages with the other islands. Our results did not support the monophyly of all the supralittoral lineages (currently grouped into L. hawaiensis), or the monophyly of the terrestrial lineages (currently grouped into L. perkinsi), implying more than one evolutionary transition between coastal and inland forms. Geometric-morphometric analyses of three supralittoral clades revealed significant body shape differences among them. A

  5. Applying Fishers' ecological knowledge to construct past and future lobster stocks in the Juan Fernández Archipelago, Chile.

    PubMed

    Eddy, Tyler D; Gardner, Jonathan P A; Pérez-Matus, Alejandro

    2010-11-05

    Over-exploited fisheries are a common feature of the modern world and a range of solutions including area closures (marine reserves; MRs), effort reduction, gear changes, ecosystem-based management, incentives and co-management have been suggested as techniques to rebuild over-fished populations. Historic accounts of lobster (Jasus frontalis) on the Chilean Juan Fernández Archipelago indicate a high abundance at all depths (intertidal to approximately 165 m), but presently lobsters are found almost exclusively in deeper regions of their natural distribution. Fishers' ecological knowledge (FEK) tells a story of serial depletion in lobster abundance at fishing grounds located closest to the fishing port with an associated decline in catch per unit effort (CPUE) throughout recent history. We have re-constructed baselines of lobster biomass throughout human history on the archipelago using historic data, the fishery catch record and FEK to permit examination of the potential effects of MRs, effort reduction and co-management (stewardship of catch) to restore stocks. We employed a bioeconomic model using FEK, fishery catch and effort data, underwater survey information, predicted population growth and response to MR protection (no-take) to explore different management strategies and their trade-offs to restore stocks and improve catches. Our findings indicate that increased stewardship of catch coupled with 30% area closure (MR) provides the best option to reconstruct historic baselines. Based on model predictions, continued exploitation under the current management scheme is highly influenced by annual fluctuations and unsustainable. We propose a community-based co-management program to implement a MR in order to rebuild the lobster population while also providing conservation protection for marine species endemic to the Archipelago.

  6. Phylogenetic study of sponge associated bacteria from the Lakshadweep archipelago and the antimicrobial activities of their secondary metabolites.

    PubMed

    Gopi, M; Ajith Kumar, T T; Balagurunathan, R; Vinoth, R; Dhaneesh, K V; Rajasekaran, R; Balasubramanian, T

    2012-02-01

    Marine ecosystem of the Lakshadweep archipelago is unique and known to have a very high degree of biodiversity with a number of endemic flora and fauna. The present study focuses to isolate the endosymbiotic microorganism from sponges and its effectiveness against marine ornamental fish pathogens. The sponges were collected from Agatti island of Lakshadweep archipelago and identified as Clathria procera, Sigmadocia fibulata and Dysidea granulosa. In which, 15 different types of bacteria were isolated and screened against marine ornamental fish pathogens (A. hydrophila, Vibrio alginolyticus, V. harveyii, V. parahaemolyticus and Pseudomonas fluorescens). The strain S25 was found as potential bacteria based on their antimicrobial activity against the fish pathogens. Molecular identification of the potential strain (S25) of the 16S rRNA gene showed 99% identity with Acinetobacter sp. The sequenced 16 s rRNA gene with 1,081 bp in length was submitted in NCBI Genbank and Accession was obtained (GenBank Accession number HM004071). The strain exhibited high similarity (99%) with the 16S rRNA gene of Acinetobacter calcoaceticus from GenBank database. Crude extract obtained with acetone and ethyl acetate from extracellular products of S25 showed significant antimicrobial activity by disc diffusion assay using 1,500 μg/ml of crude extract. Extracellular metobolite of A. calcoaceticus was extracted by shake flask method and the crude extract was partially purified by thin layer chromatography. Partially purified crude extract showed significant inhibition zone of antimicrobial activity (A. hydrophila, V. alginolyticus, V. parahaemolyticus) and less similar activity against V. harveyii and P. fluorescens. This is the first report on A. calcoaceticus isolated from sponges of Lakshadweep archipelago and the studies are underway to characterize and purify the antimicrobial compounds of the potential bacteria.

  7. The response of benthic meiofauna to hydrothermal emissions in the Pontine Archipelago, Tyrrhenian Sea (central Mediterranean Basin)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Bella, Letizia; Ingrassia, Michela; Frezza, Virgilio; Chiocci, Francesco Latino; Martorelli, Eleonora

    2016-12-01

    Recent investigations highlighted the occurrence of a giant depression related to hydrothermal activity off the Pontine Archipelago (central Mediterranean Sea, Italy). The new record of a giant seeping depression (Zannone Giant Pockmark, ZGP) in shallow-water provides the opportunity to study fluid vent impact on meiobenthic communities. The micropaleontological analyses on living (Rose Bengal stained) and dead assemblages recorded inside and outside the Zannone Giant Pockmark, allow to highlight changes in the structure and composition of the foraminiferal community that suggest variations of fluid emissions in different sectors of the study area. Inside the ZGP, under the direct influence of venting activity, a very peculiar living foraminiferal assemblage is found. It consists of agglutinated species (Spiculosiphon oceana, Jaculella acuta, Deuterammina rotaliformis) never found or very rare in the Mediterranean Sea. On the contrary dead assemblage testifies the changes on foraminiferal assemblages under carbonate dissolution process. Outside the pockmark in the nearby area of ZGP, the integrated meiofaunal and geochemical data suggest a transitional condition between vent influenced sedimentation and the typical carbonate sedimentation recorded in the rest of the Pontine Archipelago. In particular a possible spread of the venting activity in the northern and southern sectors of the study area, towards the edge of the Zannone insular shelf, is inferred. The impact of fluid emissions on foraminiferal assemblages can be summarized in the following observations: reduced biodiversity, increase of agglutinated species with predominant siliceous component in the test structure, limited distribution of living specimens inside the sediment, disappearance of porcelaneous taxa and presence of carbonate loss tests. As the result, the venting activity is likely to be the main environmental driver on the meiofaunal distribution. We also report, at the emission sites in the

  8. Colonization and diversification of aquatic insects on three Macaronesian archipelagos using 59 nuclear loci derived from a draft genome.

    PubMed

    Rutschmann, Sereina; Detering, Harald; Simon, Sabrina; Funk, David H; Gattolliat, Jean-Luc; Hughes, Samantha J; Raposeiro, Pedro M; DeSalle, Rob; Sartori, Michel; Monaghan, Michael T

    2017-02-01

    The study of processes driving diversification requires a fully sampled and well resolved phylogeny, although a lack of phylogenetic markers remains a limitation for many non-model groups. Multilocus approaches to the study of recent diversification provide a powerful means to study the evolutionary process, but their application remains restricted because multiple unlinked loci with suitable variation for phylogenetic or coalescent analysis are not available for most non-model taxa. Here we identify novel, putative single-copy nuclear DNA (nDNA) phylogenetic markers to study the colonization and diversification of an aquatic insect species complex, Cloeon dipterum L. 1761 (Ephemeroptera: Baetidae), in Macaronesia. Whole-genome sequencing data from one member of the species complex were used to identify 59 nDNA loci (32,213 base pairs), followed by Sanger sequencing of 29 individuals sampled from 13 islands of three Macaronesian archipelagos. Multispecies coalescent analyses established six putative species. Three island species formed a monophyletic clade, with one species occurring on the Azores, Europe and North America. Ancestral state reconstruction indicated at least two colonization events from the mainland (to the Canaries, respectively Azores) and one within the archipelago (between Madeira and the Canaries). Random subsets of the 59 loci showed a positive linear relationship between number of loci and node support. In contrast, node support in the multispecies coalescent tree was negatively correlated with mean number of phylogenetically informative sites per locus, suggesting a complex relationship between tree resolution and marker variability. Our approach highlights the value of combining genomics, coalescent-based phylogeography, species delimitation, and phylogenetic reconstruction to resolve recent diversification events in an archipelago species complex.

  9. Applying Fishers' Ecological Knowledge to Construct Past and Future Lobster Stocks in the Juan Fernández Archipelago, Chile

    PubMed Central

    Eddy, Tyler D.; Gardner, Jonathan P. A.; Pérez-Matus, Alejandro

    2010-01-01

    Over-exploited fisheries are a common feature of the modern world and a range of solutions including area closures (marine reserves; MRs), effort reduction, gear changes, ecosystem-based management, incentives and co-management have been suggested as techniques to rebuild over-fished populations. Historic accounts of lobster (Jasus frontalis) on the Chilean Juan Fernández Archipelago indicate a high abundance at all depths (intertidal to approximately 165 m), but presently lobsters are found almost exclusively in deeper regions of their natural distribution. Fishers' ecological knowledge (FEK) tells a story of serial depletion in lobster abundance at fishing grounds located closest to the fishing port with an associated decline in catch per unit effort (CPUE) throughout recent history. We have re-constructed baselines of lobster biomass throughout human history on the archipelago using historic data, the fishery catch record and FEK to permit examination of the potential effects of MRs, effort reduction and co-management (stewardship of catch) to restore stocks. We employed a bioeconomic model using FEK, fishery catch and effort data, underwater survey information, predicted population growth and response to MR protection (no-take) to explore different management strategies and their trade-offs to restore stocks and improve catches. Our findings indicate that increased stewardship of catch coupled with 30% area closure (MR) provides the best option to reconstruct historic baselines. Based on model predictions, continued exploitation under the current management scheme is highly influenced by annual fluctuations and unsustainable. We propose a community-based co-management program to implement a MR in order to rebuild the lobster population while also providing conservation protection for marine species endemic to the Archipelago. PMID:21079761

  10. Development of microsatellite markers in Robinsonia (Asteraceae) an endemic genus of the Juan Fernández Archipelago, Chile.

    PubMed

    Takayama, Koji; López Sepúlveda, Patricio; Kohl, Gudrun; Novak, Johannes; Stuessy, Tod F

    2013-03-01

    Ten microsatellite markers were developed for Robinsonia (Asteraceae), a genus endemic to the Juan Fernández Archipelago, Chile. Polymorphisms of these markers were tested using one population each of R. evenia, R. gayana, and R. gracilis. The number of alleles for these markers ranged from 2 to 17 per locus, and expected heterozygosity ranged from 0 to 0.847 by population. A significant deviation from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium was observed in zero to two markers in each population, and no significant linkage disequilibrium between markers was detected. The markers reported here would be useful for evolutionary studies and conservation strategies in Robinsonia.

  11. On three endemic species of the linyphiid spider genus Canariphantes Wunderlich, 1992 (Araneae, Linyphiidae) from the Azores archipelago.

    PubMed

    Crespo, Luís Carlos; Bosmans, Robert; Cardoso, Pedro; Borges, Paulo A V

    2014-07-28

    We describe Canariphantes junipericola n. sp. and C. relictus n. sp., new single-island endemic linyphiid spiders from the islands of Flores and Santa Maria (Azorean archipelago, Macaronesia), respectively. The female of the first species was incorrectly assigned to Canariphantes acoreensis (Wunderlich, 1992), a species occurring in four islands in the Central Group of Azores (Faial, Pico, São Jorge and Terceira). The latter species is transferred to Canariphantes, its male redescribed and the female genitalia described for the first time. We discuss the systematic affinities of these new species and comment on their conservation status. 

  12. Assessment of island beach erosion due to sea level rise: the case of the Aegean archipelago (Eastern Mediterranean)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monioudi, Isavela N.; Velegrakis, Adonis F.; Chatzipavlis, Antonis E.; Rigos, Anastasios; Karambas, Theophanis; Vousdoukas, Michalis I.; Hasiotis, Thomas; Koukourouvli, Nikoletta; Peduzzi, Pascal; Manoutsoglou, Eva; Poulos, Serafim E.; Collins, Michael B.

    2017-03-01

    The present contribution constitutes the first comprehensive attempt to (a) record the spatial characteristics of the beaches of the Aegean archipelago (Greece), a critical resource for both the local and national economy, and (b) provide a rapid assessment of the impacts of the long-term and episodic sea level rise (SLR) under different scenarios. Spatial information and other attributes (e.g., presence of coastal protection works and backshore development) of the beaches of the 58 largest islands of the archipelago were obtained on the basis of remote-sensed images available on the web. Ranges of SLR-induced beach retreats under different morphological, sedimentological and hydrodynamic forcing, and SLR scenarios were estimated using suitable ensembles of cross-shore (1-D) morphodynamic models. These ranges, combined with empirically derived estimations of wave run-up induced flooding, were then compared with the recorded maximum beach widths to provide ranges of retreat/erosion and flooding at the archipelago scale. The spatial information shows that the Aegean pocket beaches may be particularly vulnerable to mean sea level rise (MSLR) and episodic SLRs due to (i) their narrow widths (about 59 % of the beaches have maximum widths < 20 m), (ii) their limited terrestrial sediment supply, (iii) the substantial coastal development and (iv) the limited existing coastal protection. Modeling results indeed project severe impacts under mean and episodic SLRs, which by 2100 could be devastating. For example, under MSLR of 0.5 m - representative concentration pathway (RCP) 4.5 of the Fifth Assessment Report (AR5) of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate change (IPCC) - a storm-induced sea level rise of 0.6 m is projected to result in a complete erosion of between 31 and 88 % of all beaches (29-87 % of beaches are currently fronting coastal infrastructure and assets), at least temporarily. Our results suggest a very considerable risk which will require significant

  13. An assessment of the record in compositional variations from mantle source to magmatism at East Island, Crozet archipelago

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyzen, C. M.; Marzoli, A.; Bellieni, G.

    2013-12-01

    The Crozet archipelago, located midway between Madagascar and Antarctica, constitutes the emerged part of the easternmost bank of the Crozet plateau, which lies upon upper Cretaceous oceanic seafloor derived from the Southeast Indian Ridge. It forms an elongated chain of five islands and islets, divided into two groups: an older eastern island group (< 9 Ma) composed by large-scale volcanic landmasses (i.e. East and Possession islands) and a younger western one (< 5.5 Ma) with pint-sized islands. The whole region exhibits some of the most typical gravimetric, seismic and bathymetric characteristics associated with upwelling hotter than average mantle including: a geoid high, a topographic swell, a deep low-velocity zone (up to 2350 km), an anomalous heat flow and a thickened crust (10-16.5 km). Most of these features are exacerbated by the near stationary absolute motion of the Antarctic plate. However, since thirty years, the chemical composition of Crozet archipelago magmas has beneficiated from little interest compared to that of other Earth's hotspots. Because of the occurrence of both a thick and old lithosphere and of a near stagnant absolute plate motion, new data from the Crozet archipelago magmatic record will provide new critical perspective on oceanic island building processes. The data presented here are based on a basaltic suite of ~ 25 samples collected by a 'Terres Australes et Antarctiques Francaises' expedition in 1969 from the northern part of East Island. Our alkali basalts from the Crozet archipelago are distinct from other oceanic within-plate magmatic rocks in showing ubiquitous large depletions in LILE with respect to other incompatible elements, although these rocks constitute one of the most incompatible-element-enriched suites among Earth's oceanic island basalts (OIB). The similarity of their trace element ratios and parallelism of their rare earth element patterns indicate: (1) a mantle source homogeneity over at least 1 Ma; (2) an

  14. Distribution and source apportionment of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in surface sediments from Zhoushan Archipelago and Xiangshan Harbor, East China Sea.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoyan; Xu, Huanzhi; Zhou, Yongdong; Wu, Changwen; Kanchanopas-Barnette, Praparsiri

    2015-12-30

    Zhoushan Archipelago and the adjacent Xiangshan Harbor are important commercial, tourism, fishing, and mariculture areas. Considering the concern on the effects of anthropogenic activities on the environment, the level and source apportionment of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in surface sediments were investigated. The sum of 16 PAH (∑16 PAH) concentrations in the Zhoushan Archipelago ranged from 3.67 to 31.30 ng g(-1) d.w., with a mean of 15.01 ± 1.21 ng g(-1) d.w., and that in Xiangshan Harbor varied from 11.58 to 481.44 ng g(-1) d.w., with a mean of 62.52 ± 32.85 ng g(-1) d.w. Diagnostic ratios and factor analysis were performed to identify PAH sources. Results show that PAHs have mixed origins (i.e., traffic-related sources, coal combustion, petrogenic sources, and biomass burning), with pyrolytic-related pollution as the dominant source. This study provided a baseline to promote environmental protection and pollution episode monitoring in the East China Sea.

  15. Multisensor and multitemporal data from Landsat images to detect damage to coral reefs, small islands in the Spermonde archipelago, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nurdin, Nurjannah; Komatsu, Teruhisa; Agus; Akbar AS, M.; Djalil, Abdul Rasyid; Amri, Khairul

    2015-06-01

    Coral reefs are important because of their high biodiversity and their key role in the tropical marine biosphere. Furthermore, coral reefs are very valuable as a socioeconomic resource as they make important contributions to the gross domestic product of many countries. Thus, it is very important to monitor dynamic spatial distributions of coral reefs and related habitats dominated by coral rubble, dead coral, and bleached corals. Despite these natural and socio-economic advantages, many factors are threatening coral reefs. The study site was selected in Spermonde archipelago, South Sulawesi, Indonesia because this area is included in the Coral Triangle, recognized as the epicenter of coral diversity and a priority for conservation. Images of Landsat MSS, Landsat TM, Landsat ETM, Landsat ETM+, and Landsat 8 data were used to examine changes in the coral reefs of Suranti Island in the Spermonde Archipelago during forty one years from 1972 to 2013. The image processing includes gap fills, atmospheric corrections, geometric corrections, image composites, water column corrections, unsupervised classifications, and reclassifications. Fill Gap processing was done on Landsat ETM+ SLC-off. Subsequently, a multi-component change detection procedure was applied to define changes. Shallow water bottom types classification was divided into live coral, rubble and sand habitats, dead coral with algae, rubble, and sand. Preliminary results showed significant changes during the period 1972-2013 as well as changes in coral reefs, likely explained partly by destructive fishing practices.

  16. Zonation and spatial distribution of littoral fish communities from the southwestern Finnish coast (Archipelago and Bothnian Sea, Northern Baltic Sea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vahteri, Petri; O'Brien, Kevin; Vuorinen, Ilppo

    2009-03-01

    The aim of our study was to test whether the distribution of littoral fish assemblages would reflect both their immediate environment with reference to local underwater vegetation, including larger scale geographic archipelagial zonation. A total of 62 locations were sampled using beach seine and underwater video along the southwestern Finnish coastline in summer 2001. At all locations, water temperature, water transparency and benthic vegetation patterns (depth ranges of plant species or taxa) were recorded. Using correspondence analysis, our results showed a clear division of the Archipelago Sea into three separate zones based on littoral fish species assemblages. Overall, fish assemblages formed three distinct site groups, being dominated by pike and cyprinids, by percids and gobies, or by gasterosteids, and showed clear inner, middle and outer archipelago zones respectively, within the study area. Our results suggest that while vegetation in the study sites was diverse, it failed to express the zonation reflected by the littoral fish assemblages, which showed a definite zonation pattern which broadly reflected previous reports using both physical and biological parameters. We interpret our results to show that littoral vegetation is better in expressing small-scale differences between study sites, while littoral fish communities are more robust in detecting changes over a larger geographical scale.

  17. Conservation genetics of the Philippine tarsier: cryptic genetic variation restructures conservation priorities for an island archipelago primate.

    PubMed

    Brown, Rafe M; Weghorst, Jennifer A; Olson, Karen V; Duya, Mariano R M; Barley, Anthony J; Duya, Melizar V; Shekelle, Myron; Neri-Arboleda, Irene; Esselstyn, Jacob A; Dominy, Nathaniel J; Ong, Perry S; Moritz, Gillian L; Luczon, Adrian; Diesmos, Mae Lowe L; Diesmos, Arvin C; Siler, Cameron D

    2014-01-01

    Establishment of conservation priorities for primates is a particular concern in the island archipelagos of Southeast Asia, where rates of habitat destruction are among the highest in the world. Conservation programs require knowledge of taxonomic diversity to ensure success. The Philippine tarsier is a flagship species that promotes environmental awareness and a thriving ecotourism economy in the Philippines. However, assessment of its conservation status has been impeded by taxonomic uncertainty, a paucity of field studies, and a lack of vouchered specimens and genetic samples available for study in biodiversity repositories. Consequently, conservation priorities are unclear. In this study we use mitochondrial and nuclear DNA to empirically infer geographic partitioning of genetic variation and to identify evolutionarily distinct lineages for conservation action. The distribution of Philippine tarsier genetic diversity is neither congruent with expectations based on biogeographical patterns documented in other Philippine vertebrates, nor does it agree with the most recent Philippine tarsier taxonomic arrangement. We identify three principal evolutionary lineages that do not correspond to the currently recognized subspecies, highlight the discovery of a novel cryptic and range-restricted subcenter of genetic variation in an unanticipated part of the archipelago, and identify additional geographically structured genetic variation that should be the focus of future studies and conservation action. Conservation of this flagship species necessitates establishment of protected areas and targeted conservation programs within the range of each genetically distinct variant of the Philippine tarsier.

  18. The Madeira Archipelago As a Significant Source of Marine-Derived Actinomycete Diversity with Anticancer and Antimicrobial Potential.

    PubMed

    Prieto-Davó, Alejandra; Dias, Tiago; Gomes, Sofia E; Rodrigues, Sara; Parera-Valadez, Yessica; Borralho, Pedro M; Pereira, Florbela; Rodrigues, Cecilia M P; Santos-Sanches, Ilda; Gaudêncio, Susana P

    2016-01-01

    Marine-derived actinomycetes have demonstrated an ability to produce novel compounds with medically relevant biological activity. Studying the diversity and biogeographical patterns of marine actinomycetes offers an opportunity to identify genera that are under environmental pressures, which may drive adaptations that yield specific biosynthetic capabilities. The present study describes research efforts to explore regions of the Atlantic Ocean, specifically around the Madeira Archipelago, where knowledge of the indigenous actinomycete diversity is scarce. A total of 400 actinomycetes were isolated, sequenced, and screened for antimicrobial and anticancer activities. The three most abundant genera identified were Streptomyces, Actinomadura, and Micromonospora. Phylogenetic analyses of the marine OTUs isolated indicated that the Madeira Archipelago is a new source of actinomycetes adapted to life in the ocean. Phylogenetic differences between offshore (>100 m from shore) and nearshore (< 100 m from shore) populations illustrates the importance of sampling offshore in order to isolate new and diverse bacterial strains. Novel phylotypes from chemically rich marine actinomycete groups like MAR4 and the genus Salinispora were isolated. Anticancer and antimicrobial assays identified Streptomyces, Micromonospora, and Salinispora as the most biologically active genera. This study illustrates the importance of bioprospecting efforts at unexplored regions of the ocean to recover bacterial strains with the potential to produce novel and interesting chemistry.

  19. Extent of Mangrove Nursery Habitats Determines the Geographic Distribution of a Coral Reef Fish in a South-Pacific Archipelago

    PubMed Central

    Paillon, Christelle; Wantiez, Laurent; Kulbicki, Michel; Labonne, Maylis; Vigliola, Laurent

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the drivers of species' geographic distribution has fundamental implications for the management of biodiversity. For coral reef fishes, mangroves have long been recognized as important nursery habitats sustaining biodiversity in the Western Atlantic but there is still debate about their role in the Indo-Pacific. Here, we combined LA-ICP-MS otolith microchemistry, underwater visual censuses (UVC) and mangrove cartography to estimate the importance of mangroves for the Indo-Pacific coral reef fish Lutjanus fulviflamma in the archipelago of New Caledonia. Otolith elemental compositions allowed high discrimination of mangroves and reefs with 83.8% and 98.7% correct classification, respectively. Reefs were characterized by higher concentrations of Rb and Sr and mangroves by higher concentrations of Ba, Cr, Mn and Sn. All adult L. fulviflamma collected on reefs presented a mangrove signature during their juvenile stage with 85% inhabiting mangrove for their entire juvenile life (about 1 year). The analysis of 2942 UVC revealed that the species was absent from isolated islands of the New Caledonian archipelago where mangroves were absent. Furthermore, strong positive correlations existed between the abundance of L. fulviflamma and the area of mangrove (r = 0.84 for occurrence, 0.93 for density and 0.89 for biomass). These results indicate that mangrove forest is an obligatory juvenile habitat for L. fulviflamma in New Caledonia and emphasize the potential importance of mangroves for Indo-Pacific coral reef fishes. PMID:25140697

  20. Conservation Genetics of the Philippine Tarsier: Cryptic Genetic Variation Restructures Conservation Priorities for an Island Archipelago Primate

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Rafe M.; Weghorst, Jennifer A.; Olson, Karen V.; Duya, Mariano R. M.; Barley, Anthony J.; Duya, Melizar V.; Shekelle, Myron; Neri-Arboleda, Irene; Esselstyn, Jacob A.; Dominy, Nathaniel J.; Ong, Perry S.; Moritz, Gillian L.; Luczon, Adrian; Diesmos, Mae Lowe L.; Diesmos, Arvin C.; Siler, Cameron D.

    2014-01-01

    Establishment of conservation priorities for primates is a particular concern in the island archipelagos of Southeast Asia, where rates of habitat destruction are among the highest in the world. Conservation programs require knowledge of taxonomic diversity to ensure success. The Philippine tarsier is a flagship species that promotes environmental awareness and a thriving ecotourism economy in the Philippines. However, assessment of its conservation status has been impeded by taxonomic uncertainty, a paucity of field studies, and a lack of vouchered specimens and genetic samples available for study in biodiversity repositories. Consequently, conservation priorities are unclear. In this study we use mitochondrial and nuclear DNA to empirically infer geographic partitioning of genetic variation and to identify evolutionarily distinct lineages for conservation action. The distribution of Philippine tarsier genetic diversity is neither congruent with expectations based on biogeographical patterns documented in other Philippine vertebrates, nor does it agree with the most recent Philippine tarsier taxonomic arrangement. We identify three principal evolutionary lineages that do not correspond to the currently recognized subspecies, highlight the discovery of a novel cryptic and range-restricted subcenter of genetic variation in an unanticipated part of the archipelago, and identify additional geographically structured genetic variation that should be the focus of future studies and conservation action. Conservation of this flagship species necessitates establishment of protected areas and targeted conservation programs within the range of each genetically distinct variant of the Philippine tarsier. PMID:25136854

  1. The Madeira Archipelago As a Significant Source of Marine-Derived Actinomycete Diversity with Anticancer and Antimicrobial Potential

    PubMed Central

    Prieto-Davó, Alejandra; Dias, Tiago; Gomes, Sofia E.; Rodrigues, Sara; Parera-Valadez, Yessica; Borralho, Pedro M.; Pereira, Florbela; Rodrigues, Cecilia M. P.; Santos-Sanches, Ilda; Gaudêncio, Susana P.

    2016-01-01

    Marine-derived actinomycetes have demonstrated an ability to produce novel compounds with medically relevant biological activity. Studying the diversity and biogeographical patterns of marine actinomycetes offers an opportunity to identify genera that are under environmental pressures, which may drive adaptations that yield specific biosynthetic capabilities. The present study describes research efforts to explore regions of the Atlantic Ocean, specifically around the Madeira Archipelago, where knowledge of the indigenous actinomycete diversity is scarce. A total of 400 actinomycetes were isolated, sequenced, and screened for antimicrobial and anticancer activities. The three most abundant genera identified were Streptomyces, Actinomadura, and Micromonospora. Phylogenetic analyses of the marine OTUs isolated indicated that the Madeira Archipelago is a new source of actinomycetes adapted to life in the ocean. Phylogenetic differences between offshore (>100 m from shore) and nearshore (< 100 m from shore) populations illustrates the importance of sampling offshore in order to isolate new and diverse bacterial strains. Novel phylotypes from chemically rich marine actinomycete groups like MAR4 and the genus Salinispora were isolated. Anticancer and antimicrobial assays identified Streptomyces, Micromonospora, and Salinispora as the most biologically active genera. This study illustrates the importance of bioprospecting efforts at unexplored regions of the ocean to recover bacterial strains with the potential to produce novel and interesting chemistry. PMID:27774089

  2. Population Genetic Structure of the Deep-Sea Precious Coral Corallium secundum from the Hawaiian Archipelago Based on Microsatellites.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baco-Taylor, A.

    2006-12-01

    Deep-sea precious corals (Gerardia sp., Corallium lauuense, and Corallium secundum) on the Islands and seamounts of the Hawaiian Archipelago have supported an extremely profitable fishery, yet little is known about the life history and dispersal of the exploited species. Recent studies indicate significant genetic structure between shallow-water coral populations, including several species capable of long distance dispersal. If significant genetic structure exists in seamount and Island populations of precious corals, this could suggest that the elimination (through overharvesting) of a bed of precious corals would result in loss of overall genetic diversity in the species. Here I discuss results based on microsatellite studies of the precious coral, Corallium secundum, from 11 sites in the Hawaiian Archipelago collected between 1998 and 2004, and compare the population genetic structure and dispersal capabilities of Corallium secundum to the results for Corallium lauuense. Microsatellite studies of Corallium lauuense indicated significant heterozygote deficiency in most populations, suggesting recruitment in most populations is from local sources with only occasional long-distance dispersal events. Also, two populations appear to be significantly isolated from other populations of Corallium lauuense and may be separate stocks. In contrast, Corallium secundum populations have little heterozygote deficiency and separate into 3 distinct regions. In addition to having fisheries management implications for these corals, the results of these studies also have implications for the management and protection of seamount fauna.

  3. Magmatic activity at Islas Marias Archipelago, Gulf of California: Oceanic lithosphere with gabbroic sills versus Jurassic-Cretaceous arc components.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaaf, P. E. G.; Solis-Pichardo, G.; Hernandez-Trevino, T.; Villanueva, D.; Arrieta, G. F.; Rochin, H.; Rodriguez, L. F.; Bohnel, H.; Weber, B.

    2015-12-01

    Islas Marias Archipelago consists of four islands located in the mouth of the Gulf of California. Lithologically three of them (Maria Madre, San Juanito, and Maria Cleofas) are quite similar with a 165-170 Ma metamorphic basement, 75-85 Ma intrusive and extrusive rocks, and a sedimentary sandstone cover, which according to its foraminiferous content recorded multiple uplift and subsidence events related to the opening of the Gulf. However, these units are absent on Maria Magdalena island which is positioned between the other islands. Here, instead, oceanic lithosphere with pillow lavas and gabbroic sills, intercalated with sandstones form the dominant outcrops. Their geochemical and isotopic characteristics are similar to N-MORB with epsilon Nd values around +10 and 87Sr/86Sr of 0.70290. The gabbros are not older than 22 Ma. Magdalena island was obviously uplifted separately from the other islands of the archipelago, probably along a now hidden transform fault system along the East Pacific Rise. Metamorphic and igneous rocks of the other islands can be correlated to lithologically similar units in the Los Cabos Block, Baja California, or to the continental margin units in Sinaloa, Nayarit and Jalisco states when looking at their geochemical and geochronological signatures. Paleomagnetic studies on 35 sampling sites from all 4 islands give evidence for relatively small scale tectonic movements.

  4. Spatio-temporal variation in the diet of Cory's shearwater Calonectris diomedea in the Azores archipelago, northeast Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neves, Verónica; Nolf, Dirk; Clarke, Malcolm

    2012-12-01

    The diet of Cory's shearwater Calonectris diomedea in the Azores was studied in four islands of the archipelago over four breeding seasons, using stomach flushings from 959 birds. Fish were identified from flesh, otoliths and vertebrae and cephalopods from flesh and lower beaks. The frequency of occurrence of prey taxa, and the numerical frequency of fish and cephalopods, showed marked variations both spatially, across the breeding cycle and between years. Overall, cephalopods from 37 species representing 17 families and fish from 33 species representing 18 families were identified, representing over 70 prey species and trebling what was previously known. Histioteuthidae, Ommastrephidae and Cranchiidae were the only cephalopod families present every year and represented two thirds of the cephalopods' consumption by number. Blue jack mackerel Trachurus picturatus was the most abundant prey species present in 1998 and 2002 but was absent in 1999 and 2000, representing on average 57.2% of prey by number in the years it occurred. Apart from blue jack mackerel, most fish species were present in very low numbers with the exception of Cubiceps gracilis, Scomberesox saurus and Maurolicus muellerii. Diaphus adenomus, was recorded for the first time for the Azores archipelago.

  5. Phylogeny of the island archipelago frog genus Sanguirana: Another endemic Philippine radiation that diversified 'Out-of-Palawan'.

    PubMed

    Brown, Rafe M; Su, Yong-Chao; Barger, Brenna; Siler, Cameron D; Sanguila, Marites B; Diesmos, Arvin C; Blackburn, David C

    2016-01-01

    Recent higher-level frog phylogenetic analyses have included a few members of the endemic Philippine frog genus Sanguirana. Although the monophyly of the group has never been disputed, the recent phylogenetically-supported inclusion of the Palawan Wood Frog (Sanguirana sanguinea) in this clade was highly unexpected. In addition, species boundaries and relationships remain unclear and new species continue to be discovered. We estimate the phylogeny for this endemic Philippine genus using two mitochondrial gene regions and six nuclear loci and complete sampling for all known species. We use a time-calibrated Bayesian estimate of phylogeny and model-testing approach to biogeographic inference to infer ancestral areas and probable means of diversification. These analyses identify Sanguirana as an additional clade for which the 'Out-of-Palawan' biogeographic scenario is unambiguously preferred. This study lends additional support to recent work suggesting that a substantial portion of Philippine vertebrate megadiversity originated via colonization of the archipelago from the Palawan microcontinent, with subsequent invasion of oceanic islands (e.g., range expansion over Huxley's Modification of Wallace's Line), numerous instances of overwater dispersal, and geographic radiation across the archipelago.

  6. Biotic paleothermometry constrains on Arctic plates reconstructions: Carboniferous and Permian (Zhokhov Island, De-Longa Group Islands, New Siberian Archipelago)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davydov, Vladimir I.

    2016-09-01

    A warm-water fauna and flora from a Carboniferous limestone xenolith that was captured during penetration of deep intraplate Cenozoic basalts through a Paleozoic carbonate platform have been found on Zhokhov Island, New Siberian Archipelago (NSA). This limestone xenolith contains a very high taxonomic diversity of Moscovian (Middle Pennsylvanian) tropical foraminifera and calcareous algae. As this warm-water biota never occurs north of the forbiddance line, i.e., 30-35°N/S, this fauna and algal flora constrain the paleogeography and interpretation of the paleotectonics in the region. Thus, the location of the most of the New Siberian Archipelago islands at that time must have been within tropics or subtropics. Analyses of the existing data on fusulinid distribution within the Arctic region indicate that Zhokhov and Wrangel Islands were still a part of Alaska-Chukotka composite terrane as late as in the Artinskian. Both fusulinid and detrital zircon provenance data suggest that the Chukotka microplate, NSA, and Wrangel Island probably were close to Arctic Alaska until Triassic time. The fusulinids from the Mankomen Formation and other formations in Wrangelia show a strong affinity with the Uralo-Franklinian province regions including the Sverdrup Basin, Spitsbergen, Barents Sea, and Timan-Pechora and the northern-central Urals rather than with northern Panthalassa.

  7. Extent of mangrove nursery habitats determines the geographic distribution of a coral reef fish in a South-Pacific archipelago.

    PubMed

    Paillon, Christelle; Wantiez, Laurent; Kulbicki, Michel; Labonne, Maylis; Vigliola, Laurent

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the drivers of species' geographic distribution has fundamental implications for the management of biodiversity. For coral reef fishes, mangroves have long been recognized as important nursery habitats sustaining biodiversity in the Western Atlantic but there is still debate about their role in the Indo-Pacific. Here, we combined LA-ICP-MS otolith microchemistry, underwater visual censuses (UVC) and mangrove cartography to estimate the importance of mangroves for the Indo-Pacific coral reef fish Lutjanus fulviflamma in the archipelago of New Caledonia. Otolith elemental compositions allowed high discrimination of mangroves and reefs with 83.8% and 98.7% correct classification, respectively. Reefs were characterized by higher concentrations of Rb and Sr and mangroves by higher concentrations of Ba, Cr, Mn and Sn. All adult L. fulviflamma collected on reefs presented a mangrove signature during their juvenile stage with 85% inhabiting mangrove for their entire juvenile life (about 1 year). The analysis of 2942 UVC revealed that the species was absent from isolated islands of the New Caledonian archipelago where mangroves were absent. Furthermore, strong positive correlations existed between the abundance of L. fulviflamma and the area of mangrove (r = 0.84 for occurrence, 0.93 for density and 0.89 for biomass). These results indicate that mangrove forest is an obligatory juvenile habitat for L. fulviflamma in New Caledonia and emphasize the potential importance of mangroves for Indo-Pacific coral reef fishes.

  8. [Hurricane Paloma's effects on seagrasses along Jardines de la Reina Archipelago, Cuba].

    PubMed

    Guimarais, Mayrene; Zúñiga, Adán; Pina, Fabián; Matos, Felipe

    2013-09-01

    Seagrasses are one of the most important coastal ecosystems since they promote organic matter flow, nutrient cycling, food availability and refuge. Until now, reports on damages caused by storms and hurricanes on seagrass beds are uncommon and highly variable. The seagrass meadows of the East end of Jardines de la Reina archipelago were surveyed from Nov. 29th to Dec. 5th of 2008, in order to determinate the effects from the passing of Hurricane Paloma: a category three storm on the Saffir-Simpsom scale. A rapid field assessment of the affected areas was carried out using the manta tow technique. In six sites, seagrass was quantitatively evaluated using a 15cm diameter core (four sampling units per site) and shoot density was calculated. Remote sensing techniques were used to estimate seagrass cover. To estimate the percentage of affected areas, a Region of Interest (ROI) was first created over a Landsat image. The percentage of seagrass affected within the ROI was estimated through direct georeferentiation of the contours of the damaged area and with a comparison to the total seagrass extension. To find possible explanations for damages, a false colour image was created using the near infrared band, to highlight the differences between emerged and submerged zones. The direction of winds was estimated using ArcGis 9.2 creating circular buffers, from the centre of the hurricane and generating lines tangent to the buffers. Seagrass in the region was dominated by the angiosperm Thalassia testudinum. Regional mean density was 1 321 +/- 721 shoots/m2, a value regarded as high for the Caribbean area. Seagrass meadows were partly affected by sediment accumulation on the shoots of T. testudinum and uprooting rhizomes. The 7.6 km2 disturbed area represented 1% of the total seagrass area. Other sites, closer to the centre of the hurricane, did not show any damages on the marine vegetation. The keys location with respect to the hurricane track was the most likely cause of the

  9. Suboxic dolomite formation linked to the sedimentary Mn cycle, Archipelago Los Roques, Venezuela

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrash, D.; Lalonde, S.; Gonzalez, G.; Gingras, M.; Konhauser, K.

    2013-12-01

    The preferential formation of Ca-rich dolomite precursors in modern peritidal environments has been associated with the degradation of buried microbial mats, with complexation of Ca and Mg cations by extracellular polysaccharides, and alkalinity generation, mostly through bacterial sulfate reduction. However, it remains unclear why Ca-dolomite would not occur in suboxic sediments where bacterial Mn(IV) and/or Fe(III) reduction are important sources of alkalinity, and the role, if any, of Fe- and Mn-recycling in its diagenetic stabilization to more stoichiometric dolomite is unknown. In a shoaling-upward parasequence in the Archipelago Los Roques, Venezuela, an abundance of Ca-dolomite coincides with a relative decrease in bulk-sediment iron concentrations. These sediments were analyzed with multiple analytical tools, including EPMA, ICP-MS, synchrotron-based XRF, XRD, and spatially resolved XANES. Results demonstrate that the distribution of spheroidal aggregates of nanometer-scale Ca-rich dolomite rhombohedra is linked with interstitial elemental sulfur and manganese accumulations, with Mn occurring in several oxidation states (Fig. 1). Based on our observations at this novel dolomite-forming site, we suggest that in peritidal settings the burial of metal-reactive microbial mats act as a barrier capable of concentrating dissolved reactive species that promote greater sediment residence times in suboxic (manganic) zones, where the recycling of Mn not only plays an important role in the remineralization of organic matter, but also sustains elevated alkalinity and dissolved pore water sulfide concentrations. The last two effects have been previously suggested to promote Mg dehydration, the major kinetic barrier to dolomite nucleation. Figure 1. Normalized Mn K-edge merged spectra of a 5 x 5 μm analytical area bearing dolomite cements. A: The K-edge exhibits two main features at about 6554 and 6558 eV. B: Intermediate Mn (III) is identified by the positive slope of

  10. Seafloor features delineate Late Wisconsinan ice stream configurations in eastern Parry Channel, Canadian Arctic Archipelago

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacLean, B.; Blasco, S.; Bennett, R.; Lakeman, T.; Pieńkowski, A. J.; Furze, M. F. A.; Hughes Clarke, J.; Patton, E.

    2017-03-01

    Multibeam imagery and 3.5 kHz sub-bottom profiles acquired from CCGS Amundsen between 2003 and 2013 by ArcticNet and the Ocean Mapping Group at the University of New Brunswick provide information on seafloor features, geology, bathymetry and morphology in eastern Parry Channel and the adjoining large channels in the Canadian Arctic Archipelago. Together these include Peel Sound, Barrow Strait, Lancaster Sound, Wellington Channel, Prince Regent Inlet, Admiralty Inlet and Navy Board Inlet. Those data are in part complemented by high resolution single channel seismic reflection profiles acquired by the Geological Survey of Canada in the 1970s and 1980s and by sediment cores that provide chronological and depositional information. The occurrence and pattern of streamlined mega-scale ridge and groove lineations (MSGLs) indicate that these waterways were occupied by glacial ice streams in the past. Chronological information from marine and adjoining terrestrial areas suggests a long history of glacial events ranging in time from Early Pleistocene to Late Wisconsinan. Seafloor morphology and MSGL trends together with terrestrial ice flow patterns indicate that ice streams flowed into Barrow Strait from Peel Sound and Wellington Channel, and ice streams in Prince Regent, Admiralty and Navy Board inlets flowed northward into and eastward along Lancaster Sound. Recession of the ice stream westward along Parry Channel occurred ∼16 cal ka BP to 10.8 cal ka BP. Thick ice-contact sediments deposited by a late ice advance from Prince Regent Inlet constitute the seabed across a large area of western Lancaster Sound. Timing for that late ice advance appears to be bracketed between the 11.5 cal ka BP lift-off of the eastern Parry ice stream north of Prince Leopold Island and the ∼10.0 cal ka BP deglaciation of Prince Regent Inlet. Seafloor morphology and lineation trends suggest that ice delivered by the ice stream in Peel Sound was the westernmost tributary to the ice stream

  11. Preliminary results of teleseismic double-difference relocation of earthquakes around Indonesian archipelago region

    SciTech Connect

    Nugraha, Andri Dian Widiyantoro, Sri; Shiddiqi, Hasbi Ash; Ramdhan, Mohamad; Wandono,; Sutiyono,; Handayani, Titi; Nugroho, Hendro

    2015-04-24

    Indonesian archipelago region is located in active tectonic setting and high seismicity zone. During the last decade, Indonesian was experienced with destructive major earthquakes causing damage and victims. The information of precise earthquake location parameters are very important in partular for earthquake early warning to the society and for advance seismic studies. In this study, we attempted to improve hypocenter location compiled by BMKG for time periods of April, 2009 up to June, 2014 for about 22,000 earthquake events around Indonesian region. For the firts time, we applied teleseismic double-difference relocation algorithm (teletomoDD) to improve hypocenter region in Indonesia region combining regional and teleseismic stations. Hypocenter relocation was performed utilizing local, regional, and teleseismic P-wave arrival time data. Our relocation result show that travel-time RMS errors were greatly reduced compared to the BMKG catalog. Seismicity at shallower depth (less than 50 km) shows significantly improvement especially in depth, and refined shallow geological structures, e.g. trench and major strike slip faults. Clustered seismicity is also detected beneath volcanic region, and probably related volcano activities and also major faults nearby. In the Sunda arc region, seismicity at shallower depth centered at two major distributions parallel to the trench strike direction, i.e. around fore-arc and in mainland that related to major fault, e.g. the Sumatran fault, and volcanic fronts. Below Central Java region, relocated hypocenter result showed double seismic zone pattern. A seismic gap is detected around the Sunda-Banda transition zone where transition between oceanic subduction to continental crust collision of Australian plate occurs. In Eastern Indonesia region, shallow earthquakes are observed related to major strike slip faults, e.g. Sorong and Palu-Koro fault, volcanism, and shallow part of subduction and collision zones. We also compare our

  12. Quaternary tectonic stability of the Bahamian archipelago: evidence from fossil coral reefs and flank margin caves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carew, James L.; Mylroie, John E.

    Throughout the islands of the Bahamian archipelago fossil coral reefs are found from current sea level up to a maximum elevation of +4 m. {234U}/{230Th} radiometric dates obtained from in situ corals from these reefs, by both alpha-count and mass-spectrometric techniques, indicates that they were all formed during Oxygen Isotope Substage 5e (ca. 125,000 years ago). Those data are consistent with a maximum sea-level highstand of +6 m during Substage 5e, and either no vertical motion of the Bahamas, or possible isostatic subsidence of up to 2 m during the past 120,000 years. No older in situ fossil corals, or other subtidal deposits, have been found subaerially exposed anywhere in the Bahamas. That finding suggests that late Quaternary (at least the past 300,000 years) isostatic subsidence has occurred at a rate of 1-2 m per hundred thousand years, and/or no pre-5e highstands were above modern sea level. An independent corroboration of the conclusions drawn about sea level amplitude and tectonic stability of the Bahamas from the coral reef data is available from examination of abundant flank margin caves (horizontal, phreatic dissolution caves) found above modern sea level throughout the Bahamas. These horizontally extensive air-filled caves have dissolutional ceilings with elevations that are restricted to +1 to +7 m, which is consistent with formation at the margin of a thin freshwater lens elevated by a past +6 m sea-level highstand. The restricted cave elevations, and the lack of stalagmites in these caves that are older than 100,000 years, are also consistent with cave formation during Substage 5e, and possible subsequent isostatic subsidence of a few metres. The subsurface geology of the southeastern Bahamas contains a long-term record (millions of years) that has been attributed to past tectonic activity along the North American/Caribbean plate boundary. While that record suggests differential subsidence across the Bahamas in the Tertiary Period, the data from

  13. Sources of Dimethyl Sulfide in the Canadian Arctic Archipelago and Baffin Bay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mungall, E. L.; Croft, B.; Lizotte, M.; Thomas, J. L.; Murphy, J. G.; Levasseur, M.; Martin, R.; Wentzell, J. J. B.; Liggio, J.; Abbatt, J.

    2015-12-01

    Dimethyl sulfide plays a major role in the global sulfur cycle, meaning that it is important to the formation of sulfate aerosol and thus to cloud condensation nuclei populations and cloud formation. The summertime Arctic atmosphere sometimes resides in a cloud condensation nuclei limited regime, making it very susceptible to changes in their number. Despite the interest generated by this situation, dimethyl sulfide has only rarely been measured in the summertime Arctic. This work presents the first high time resolution (10 Hz) DMS mixing ratio measurements for the Eastern Canadian Archipelago and Baffin Bay in summer performed on an icebreaker cruise as one component of the Network on Climate and Aerosols: Addressing Key Uncertainties in Remote Canadian Environments (NETCARE). Measured mixing ratios ranged from below the detection limit of 4 pptv to 1155 pptv with a median value of 186 pptv. We used transfer velocity parameterizations from the literature to generate the first flux estimates for this region in summer, which ranged from 0.02-12 μmol m-2 d-1. DMS has a lifetime against OH oxidation of 1-2 days, allowing both local sources and transport to play roles in its atmospheric mixing ratio. Through air mass trajectory analysis using FLEXPART-WRF and chemical transport modeling using GEOS-Chem, we have identified the relative contributions of local sources (Lancaster Sound and Baffin Bay) as well as transport from further afield (the Hudson Bay System and the Beaufort Sea) and find that the local sources dominate. GEOS-Chem is able to reproduce the major features of the measured time series, but is biased low overall (median 72 pptv). We discuss non-marine sources that could account for this low bias and estimate the possible contributions to DMS mixing ratios from lakes, biomass burning, melt ponds and coastal tundra. Our results show that local marine sources of DMS dominate the summer Arctic atmosphere, but that non-local and possibly non

  14. Islas Marias Archipelago, Mexico. A Missing Piece to Reconstruct the Paleoposition of Baja California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaaf, P. E.; Pompa, V.; Hernandez, T.; Weber, B.; Solis, G.; Villanueva, D.; Perez-Venzor, J.

    2011-12-01

    Paleopositions for southern Baja California peninsula have yielded controversial models over the past 30 years. Mainly based on paleomagnetic data many hypotheses place Baja at lower paleolatitudes in front of southern Mexico or Central America with subsequent northward translations. Other models suggest minor, if any, northward displacements with respect to continental Mexico combined with clockwise rotations. Lithological, geochemical, and geochronological similarities for southern Baja California and Puerto Vallarta (western Mexico Pacific margin) igneous rocks seem to confirm the latter model. To further prove this model we have mapped and collected rocks from Maria Madre, the largest island of the Islas Marias archipelago, located in the mouth of the Gulf of California. In an area of only 145 square kilometers, metamorphic basements rocks (ortho and migmatitic gneisses), highly deformed metasediments, granitoids, acid to intermediate volcanic sequences, and a cover with gently folded marine sediments are exposed. The basement complex with gneisses and metasediments, including garnet-bearing paragneiss and calc silicates, as well as the granodioritic-tonalitic intrusives display an extraordinary accordance with similar units observed in the Los Cabos Block (LCB) of Baja California Sur. Furthermore, U-Pb zircon ages of 162 and 170 Ma for the basement gneisses and of 80 Ma for the granitoids have been reported also from the LCB. Additionally, upper Cretaceous intrusive ages are well known from the Puerto Vallarta batholith in Jalisco and Nayarit, mainland Mexico. Geochemical and isotopic data as well as Nd model ages confirm a magmatic consanguinity of LCB, Islas Marias, and Puerto Vallarta granitoids. The volcanic units of Maria Madre Island include ignimbrites and effusive dacitic-rhyolithic rocks, which can be correlated to the Sierra Madre Occidental province and the Comundú Formation of Baja California. Age determinations are under work to confirm this

  15. The First Paleomagnetic data from the Cambrian basalts of Henrietta Island (De Long Archipelago, Arctic Ocean)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metelkin, D. V.; Zhdanova, A.; Vernikovskiy, V. A.; Matushkin, N. Y.

    2015-12-01

    Henrietta Island in De Long archipelago (East-Siberian sea) still remains poorly studied geologically but last investigations show that its volcano-sedimentary sequences can help reconstruct tectonic evolution of East Russian Arctic in Early Paleozoic stage. The deposits lying on Precambrian basements are deformed to varying degrees and intruded by mafic dykes.The study was carried out on two basaltic lava flows whose 40Ar/39Ar age is 520.6±9.5 Ma. Previously the age of these basalts was assumed Cretaceous. According to available data the underlaying sediments contain zircons with Cambrian and Ordovician ages but all boundaries between these basalts and other strata are tectonic. So we suppose the age of basalts as Middle Cambrian but more precise geochronological data are required. All magnetic measurements were performed at the Laboratory of Geodynamics and Paleomagnetism of Institute of Petroleum Geology and Geophysics (Novosibirsk). Basalt samples has relatively high magnetic susceptibility values varying from 5x10-4 to 180x10-4SI units. NRM values range is from 3 to 170 mA/m. Petromagnetic parameters including also coercive characteristics point at the good potentially preserving primary magnetization. Stepwise thermal demagnetization permits to isolate characteristic components of magnetization and calculate mean directions in two lava flows: 1. Ds=294.3°, Is=29.1°, K=81.1, α95=5.1; 2. Ds=301.0°, Is=28.3°, K=34.4, α95=7.9). The mean paleomagnetic pole has coordinates: Plat=20.9°, Plong = 42.6°, dp/dm=14.3/7.9. Paleolatitude was defined as 15.3° but the question of the hemisphere for De Long Islands is open yet. In case of south hemisphere in Middle Cambrian according to available paleomagnetic data De Long islands could be placed close to Taimyr margin of Siberia and in case of northern hemisphere they may be located near south (in present-day coordinates) margin of Siberia. The work was supported by grant RFBR 14-05-31399 and Russian Research Fund

  16. Paleomagnetism of Jurassic-Cretaceous basalts from the Franz Josef Land Archipelago: tectonic implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abashev, Victor; Mikhaltsov, Nikolay; Vernikovsky, Valery

    2015-04-01

    New paleomagnetic data were obtained from a total of 158 oriented samples collected from the Jurassic magmatic complexes exposed on the Franz Joseph Land Archipelago (FJL). The field work was conducted during 2011 field season. Present study was focused on the tholeiitic basaltic lava flows that crop out on the Hooker Island. The samples were subjected to a detailed step-wise thermal demagnetization in temperatures up to 600 deg C or alternating field demagnetization with maximum filed up to 140 mT. Natural remanent magnetization (NRM) was measured with a 2G cryogenic magnetometer or a JR-6A spin-magnetometer housed in a magnetically shielded room at the Institute of Petroleum Geology and Geophysics, Siberian Branch of Russian Academy of Sciences. The main NRM carriers in the FJL samples are titanomagnetites with varying Ti-content. Magnetic remanence was unblocked in temperatures of 350-400 deg C. Some samples are characterized by unblocking temperatures of 560 deg C. The new paleomagnetic data were combined with those previously obtained from the early Cretaceous volcanics exposed on the FJL. A new mean paleomagnetic direction for the Jurassic rocks was calculated as D=78.3 deg, I=74.7 deg, a95=3.1 deg, k=194.3, N=13. A corresponding paleomagnetic pole is now located at Plat=62.1 deg; Plon=136.5 deg, A95=5.5 deg, K=63.6. New results suggest that the JFL occupied a significantly different position from that of the present day. However, in early Cretaceous the JFL was already located close to its present day position. We propose a rifting event between the North Barentz terrane (FJL and possibly Svalbard) and the counterpart of European tectonic domain. The rifting occurred during Early-Middle Jurassic. This event was accompanied by a significant shift of the FJL to the north-east for approximately 500 km. New results are in good agreement with a hypothesis that the FJL was passing over the Icelandic-Siberian hot spot during the Jurassic-Cretaceous time

  17. Preliminary results of teleseismic double-difference relocation of earthquakes around Indonesian archipelago region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nugraha, Andri Dian; Shiddiqi, Hasbi Ash; Widiyantoro, Sri; Ramdhan, Mohamad; Wandono, Sutiyono, Handayani, Titi; Nugroho, Hendro

    2015-04-01

    Indonesian archipelago region is located in active tectonic setting and high seismicity zone. During the last decade, Indonesian was experienced with destructive major earthquakes causing damage and victims. The information of precise earthquake location parameters are very important in partular for earthquake early warning to the society and for advance seismic studies. In this study, we attempted to improve hypocenter location compiled by BMKG for time periods of April, 2009 up to June, 2014 for about 22,000 earthquake events around Indonesian region. For the firts time, we applied teleseismic double-difference relocation algorithm (teletomoDD) to improve hypocenter region in Indonesia region combining regional and teleseismic stations. Hypocenter relocation was performed utilizing local, regional, and teleseismic P-wave arrival time data. Our relocation result show that travel-time RMS errors were greatly reduced compared to the BMKG catalog. Seismicity at shallower depth (less than 50 km) shows significantly improvement especially in depth, and refined shallow geological structures, e.g. trench and major strike slip faults. Clustered seismicity is also detected beneath volcanic region, and probably related volcano activities and also major faults nearby. In the Sunda arc region, seismicity at shallower depth centered at two major distributions parallel to the trench strike direction, i.e. around fore-arc and in mainland that related to major fault, e.g. the Sumatran fault, and volcanic fronts. Below Central Java region, relocated hypocenter result showed double seismic zone pattern. A seismic gap is detected around the Sunda-Banda transition zone where transition between oceanic subduction to continental crust collision of Australian plate occurs. In Eastern Indonesia region, shallow earthquakes are observed related to major strike slip faults, e.g. Sorong and Palu-Koro fault, volcanism, and shallow part of subduction and collision zones. We also compare our

  18. Archipelago colonization by ecologically dissimilar amphibians: evaluating the expectation of common evolutionary history of geographical diffusion in co-distributed rainforest tree frogs in islands of Southeast Asia.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Paulette; Su, Yong-Chao; Siler, Cameron D; Barley, Anthony J; Sanguila, Marites B; Diesmos, Arvin C; Brown, Rafe M

    2014-03-01

    Widespread, co-distributed species with limited relative dispersal abilities represent compelling focal taxa for comparative phylogeography. Forest vertebrates in island archipelagos often exhibit pronounced population structure resulting from limited dispersal abilities or capacity to overcome marine barriers to dispersal. The exceptionally diverse Old World tree frogs of the family Rhacophoridae have colonized the forested island archipelagos of Southeast Asia on multiple occasions, entering the islands of Indonesia and the Philippines via a "stepping stone" mode of dispersal along elongate island chains, separated by a series of marine channels. Here we evaluate the prediction that two tightly co-distributed Philippine rhacophorids colonized the archipelago during concomitant timescales and in the same, linear, "island-hopping" progression. We use a new multilocus dataset, utilize dense genetic sampling from the eastern arc of the Philippines, and we take a model-based phylogeographic approach to examining the two species for similar topological patterns of diversification, genetic structure, and timescales of diversification. Our results support some common mechanistic predictions (a general south-to-north polarity of colonization) but not others (timescale for colonization and manner and degree of lineage diversification), suggesting differing biogeographic scenarios of geographical diffusion through the archipelago and unique and idiosyncratic ecological capacities and evolutionary histories of each species.

  19. Scalable, chromatography-free synthesis of alkyl-tethered pyrene-based materials. Application to first-generation "archipelago model" asphaltene compounds.

    PubMed

    Diner, Colin; Scott, David E; Tykwinski, Rik R; Gray, Murray R; Stryker, Jeffrey M

    2015-02-06

    In this paper, we report a highly efficient, scalable approach to the total synthesis of conformationally unrestricted, electronically isolated arrays of alkyl-tethered polycyclic aromatic chromophores. This new class of modular molecules consists of polycyclic aromatic "islands" comprising significant structural fragments present in unrefined heavy petroleum, tethered together by short saturated alkyl chains, as represented in the "archipelago model" of asphaltene structure. The most highly branched archipelago compounds reported here share an architecture with first-generation dendrimeric constructs, making the convergent, chromatography-free synthesis described herein particularly attractive for further extensions in scope and applications to materials chemistry. The syntheses are efficient, selective, and readily adaptable to a multigram scale, requiring only inexpensive, "earth-abundant" transition-metal catalysts for cross-coupling reactions and extraction and fractional crystallization for purification. This approach avoids typical limitations in cost, scale, and operational practicality. All of the archipelago compounds and synthetic intermediates have been fully characterized spectroscopically and analytically. The solid-state structure of one archipelago model compound has been determined by X-ray crystallography.

  20. The Causality Study of External Environment Analysis (EEA), Internal Environment Analysis (IEA), Strategy Implementation on Study Program Performance at Vocational High School (VHS) in Nias Archipelago, Indonesia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waruwu, Binahati; Sitompul, Harun; Manullang, Belferik

    2016-01-01

    The purposes of this study are to find out the significant effect of: (1) EEA on strategy implementation, (2) IEA on strategy implementation, (3) EEA on study program performance, (4) IEA on study program performance, and (5) strategy implementation on study program performance of Vocational High School (VHS) in Nias Archipelago. The population of…

  1. Phylogeography and historical demography of the anadromous fish Leucopsarion petersii in relation to geological history and oceanography around the Japanese Archipelago.

    PubMed

    Kokita, Tomoyuki; Nohara, Kenji

    2011-01-01

    Phylogeographical patterns of marine and diadromous organisms are often influenced by dynamic ocean histories. For example, the marine realm around the Japanese Archipelago is an interesting area for phylogeographical research because of the wide variation in the environments driven by repeated shifts in sea level in the Quaternary. We analysed mitochondrial cyt b gene and nuclear myh6 gene sequences for individuals collected from throughout the range of the anadromous fish Leucopsarion petersii to assess the lineage divergence, phylogeographical pattern and historical demography in relation to geological history and oceanographic features around the archipelago. Leucopsarion petersii has two major lineages (the Japan Sea and Pacific Ocean lineages), which diverged during the late-early to middle Pleistocene. Geographical distributions of the two lineages were closely related to the pathways of the two warm currents, the Tsushima Current and the Kuroshio Current, that flow past the archipelago. Evidence of introgressive hybridization between these lineages was found at two secondary contact zones. Demographic tests suggested that the Japan Sea and Pacific Ocean lineages carried the genetic signal of different historical demographic processes, and these signals are probably associated with differences in habitat stability during recent glacial periods. The Japan Sea lineage has a larger body-size and more vertebrae, probably in relation to severe habitat conditions through Pleistocene climatic oscillations. Thus, the two lineages have long independent evolutionary histories, and the phylogeographical structure and demography of this species have been influenced both by historical events and the present-day oceanography around the Japanese Archipelago.

  2. Modern processes controlling the sea bed sediment formation in Barents Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balanyuk, I.; Dmitrievsky, A.; Shapovalov, S.; Chaikina, O.; Akivis, T.

    2009-04-01

    The Barents Sea is one of the key regions for understanding of the postglacial history of the climate and circulation of the World Ocean. There are the limits of warm North Atlantic waters penetration to the Arctic and a zone of interaction between Atlantic and Arctic waters. The Barents Se's limits are the deep Norwegian Sea in the West, the Spitsbergen Island and the Franz Josef Land and the deep Nansen trough in the North, the Novaya Zemlya archipelago in the East and the North shore of Europe in the South. An analysis of Eurasian-Arctic continental margin shows correspondence between the rift systems of the shelf with those of the ocean. This relation can be observed in the central Arctic region. All the rift systems underlying the sediment basin are expressed in the sea bed relief as spacious and extensive graben valleys burnished by lobes. Two transverse trenches cross both shelf and continental slope, namely the Medvezhinsky trench between Norway and Spitsbergen in the West and the Franz Victoria trench between Spitsbergen and the Franz Josef Land in the North. The Barents and the Kara Seas are connected by the Kara Gate Strait and wide transverse trough of Saint Anna in the North-West. The recent assessment of the eolian solid sediment supply to the Barents Sea is about 0.904 tons. The Barents Sea as a whole should be considered as "starving" in terms of its feeding with solid sediment matter. Observations show the considerable part of the sea bottom to be free of Holocene sediment cover. The more ancient Quaternary units or bedrock can be seen at the bottom surface. This phenomenon is the most typical for arches of relatively shallow elevations. Thick accumulations of new sediments are connected with fjords. The amount of sea ice delivered from the Barents Sea to the Arctic Ocean is 35 km3 a year. This value should be added by iceberg delivery from the North island of Novaya Zemlya, the Franz Josef Land, the Spitsbergen Island and North Norway but most of

  3. Crustal structure beneath the Galápagos Archipelago from ambient noise tomography and its implications for plume-lithosphere interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villagómez, Darwin R.; Toomey, Douglas R.; Hooft, Emilie E. E.; Solomon, Sean C.

    2011-04-01

    To constrain the seismic velocity structure of the crust beneath the Galápagos Archipelago, we conducted a tomographic study using high-frequency Rayleigh waves obtained from cross correlations of ambient noise. We analyzed waves with periods between 5 and 8.5 s, sensitive to shear wave velocity (VS) structure between about 3 and 10 km depth, after accounting for the effect of water depth. Crustal velocities are up to 25% lower than those of very young crust at the East Pacific Rise and are comparable to those of Hawaii. We attribute the lower than normal velocities to the combined effect of heating and the presence of melt in the crust above the Galápagos plume as well as the construction of a highly porous volcanic platform emplaced atop preexisting oceanic crust. On average, VS between 3 and 10 km depth beneath the western archipelago is up to 15% lower than beneath the eastern archipelago. We attribute the west-to-east velocity increase to a decrease in porosity of the volcanic platform and to cooling of the crust after its passage above the Galápagos plume. The results of this study, in combination with previous work, indicate that many of the unusual aspects of the Galápagos Archipelago are the result of variations in the thickness and internal structure of the chemical and thermal lithospheres. Our findings indicate that observed variations in the flexural response to loading observed in the Galápagos cannot be explained by the current thermal state of the lithosphere. Instead, the flexural response likely represents varying elastic strength at the time of loading. We also propose that the northwest and northeast trending alignments of volcanic centers found throughout the archipelago (the Darwinian lineations) may be associated with preexisting zones of weakness in the lithosphere formed during earlier episodes of ridge jumping and ridge propagation that were later reactivated by stresses generated by plume-lithosphere interactions.

  4. Consequences of climatic change, sea level rise and society evolution on the Kerkennah archipelago coast and sabkha

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucile, Etienne; Gérard, Beltrando; Abdelkarim, Daoud

    2015-04-01

    Interaction between human activities, climate evolution and sea level can be summarised in a system where every element impacts the others. In the Kerkennah archipelago (Tunisia), recent observations have shown that the climate has become more arid, that the sea level is rising and that the society is modernizing at least since 1970. In our work we tried to understand the relations between the elements of the socio-ecosystem of Kerkennah to identify potential causes of the coastline movements and sabkhas extension (low and salty areas). Using photointerpretation (topographic map, Spot 5 image, aerial photographs) and remote sensing (2 landsat TM5 images), we detected and evaluated the movements of the coastline and of the sabkhas limits. Field data have also been added and all information has been used together in a GIS showing a significant retreat of the coastline (maximum of 41.2±6m in 47years) and an increase in the surface of sabkhas (+18%) between 1963 and 2010. The same dataset has been reanalysed at a much finer spatial scale to correlate observed changes to human pressure. This showed that coast erosion rates are more important where the coastline is partially artificialized or just after the end of a dam or a rockfill. Advances to the sea observed on some portions of the coast are always linked to human infrastructures. We conclude that the climatic change and the sea level rise increased the physical vulnerability of the archipelago and that the human installations near the coast amplify this vulnerability. Similarly, the extension of sabkha surfaces is global and most likely due to a natural perturbation of the seasonal cycle in the sabkhas by the sea level rise and by the stronger aridity in summer. However, discrepancies exist between individual areas and can be explained by the presence of active fault and/or by the evolution of agricultural practices. Indeed, frequent periods of drought and the political will for development of the Kerkennah

  5. Seismicity of Barentsburg area at the Spitsbergen Archipelago: overlapping the tectonic and technogenic sources ?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kremenetskaya, E.; Asming, V.; Vinogradov, A.

    2003-04-01

    The Western Spitsbergen Island (WSI) is located at a passive margin of the Barents shelf platform, close to the North Atlantic spreading zone marked by the Knipovich Ridge at the ocean bottom. Sublateral transform faults intersect a continental slope and provide a segmentation of uplifted over sea level block of continental crust. As a result, the Spitsbergen Archipelago is divided on small "lands" and islands by deep fiords and straights (for example, the Isfiord and Van Mijen fiord in WSI). A scope of seismic data for the last 40 years shows that earthquakes locates along the Knipovich Ridge in the ocean, and along interplate transform faults in the platform margin. In the WSI the earthquakes are concentrated in two narrow belts: Van Mijen Fiord - Heer Land and Horsund Fiord - Hamber Baystributed. A frequency of seismic events here vary of 5 to 15 ones per day, in contrast to "a quiet areas" out of the belts where the frequency use to be less in many times. The most strong earthquake with magnitude 6.0 was recorded in the Heer Land at 18 January, 1976. The Russian settlement and coal mines Barentsburg is situated within the "quiet area" of 40 km to the North from the Van Mijen seismic belt. In this area the earthquakes with local magnitude ML > 2.0 never been recorded, but underground mining operations at depth of 300-600 meters below surface associate with rock bursts. Due to evaluate a seismic hazard and clarify relationships between natural and human induced seismicity, the digital 3-component seismic station GBV 316B was installed in Barentsburg by the Kola Regional Seismological Centre (KRSC), and recording of weak seismic emission was performed in co-operation with NORSAR during a period since 01/12/2000 till 19/04/2001. Within the term a mining activity was stable till 25/03/2001, and in period from 26 March till 19 April the mines were idle. Totally of 541 seismic events were detected in the reference area 5x6 km, and only the largest one with ML of 3

  6. A 400-year record of black carbon flux in the Xisha archipelago, South China Sea and its implication.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaodong; Xu, Liqiang; Sun, Liguang; Liu, Fei; Wang, Yuhong; Yan, Hong; Liu, Yi; Luo, Yuhan; Huang, Jing

    2011-10-01

    We reconstructed the first long-term (∼ 400 years) records of black carbon (BC) deposition flux from three ornithogenic sediment profiles, which were collected from three remote, isolated islets of the Xisha archipelago, South China Sea. The significant correlations between black carbon, organic matter and excess (210)Pb suggested that black carbon was mainly derived from atmospheric deposition, and further enriched by plant-derived organic matter in sediments. During the past 400 years, the BC flux remained relatively low before the onset of 20th century; it started to increase from approximately 1900 AD, and peaked around the 1970s. In the recent 30 years, the BC flux seemed to display decreasing trend, very likely due to the change of energy structure and development of pollution control techniques. In comparison with marginal sea regions that are greatly impacted by anthropogenic activities, these pristine Xisha islands were not significantly influenced by black carbon of anthropogenic origin.

  7. Two new genera of the pharyngodonidae (Nematoda: Oxyuroidea) found in rhacophorid frogs of the Ryukyu Archipelago, Japan.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Hideo

    2005-02-01

    Okinawandros goldbergi n. gen., n. sp. and Ataronema sekii n. gen., n. sp. (Nematoda: Pharyngodonidae) are described from rhacophorid frogs of the Ryukyu Archipelago, Japan. Okinawandros n. gen. resembles Batracholandros Freitas et Ibañez, 1965 and Synodontisia Petter, Vassiliades et Troncy, 1972 but is readily distinguished from the former in lacking laterally situated genital papillae and by having anteriorly directed vagina and from the latter by having operculated eggs and lacking a spicule. Ataronema n. gen. most closely resembles Parathelandros Baylis, 1930 but is readily distinguished because the posterior pair of caudal papillae is not rosette shaped and the eggs are not operculated. Morphological notes of Pharyngodon polypedatis Yamaguti, 1941 are included.

  8. A new genus and species of hatschekiid copepod (Siphonostomatoida) from groupers (Actinopterygii: Serranidae) collected off the Ryukyu Archipelago, Japan.

    PubMed

    Uyeno, Daisuke

    2013-01-01

    A new genus and species of copepod, Mihbaicola sakamakii n. g., n. sp., belonging to the siphonostomatoid family Hatschekiidae, is described based on the females collected from inside the tissue of the branchiostegal membrane in three species of the groupers, Epinephelus fasciatus (Forsskål) (type-host), E. merra Bloch and Cephalopholis leopardus (Lacépède), collected off Okinawa-jima Island and Iriomote-jima Island, Ryukyu Archipelago, North Pacific Ocean. The new genus can be distinguished from other hatschekiid genera by a combination of the following characters in the female: the head is composed of the cephalosome and the pedigerous somite; the cephalothorax is expanded into a pair of posteroventral lobes carrying leg 1; legs 1 and 2 are biramous and composed of the protopod and both rami are 2-segmented; leg 3 is absent; and leg 4 is represented by a rounded lobe with a chitinous pointed apical process.

  9. One-century decline of mollusk diversity as consequence of accumulative anthropogenic disturbance in a tropical estuary (Cuban Archipelago).

    PubMed

    Armenteros, Maickel; Díaz-Asencio, Misael; Fernández-Garcés, Raúl; Hernández, Carlos Alonso; Helguera-Pedraza, Yusmila; Bolaños-Alvarez, Yoelvis; Agraz-Hernández, Claudia; Sanchez-Cabeza, Joan-Albert

    2016-12-15

    In order to infer changes in sediments and mollusk assemblages for the last century, we used biogeochemical data from two (210)Pb dated cores collected in Sagua La Grande estuary, Cuban Archipelago. We found evidences of cumulative anthropogenic disturbance during the last century, causing considerable depletion of mollusk assemblage diversity and enhancement of the dominance of deposit feeding species. The sequence of impacts assessed was i) eutrophication due to nutrient releases from urban settlements, ii) habitat alteration due to water channeling and damming, and iii) mercury pollution. These successive impacts caused a steady diversity depletion from ca. 70 mollusk species in 1900 to less than five in 2010. Only two species persisted in the estuary: Nuculana acuta and Finella dubia. Hurricanes did not impact the molluscan fauna in the long term. The effects of the anthropogenic impacts suggest that the resilience of this estuarine system is compromised.

  10. Plastic litter in sediments from a marine area likely to become protected (Aeolian Archipelago's islands, Tyrrhenian sea).

    PubMed

    Fastelli, Paolo; Blašković, Andrea; Bernardi, Giulia; Romeo, Teresa; Čižmek, Hrvoje; Andaloro, Franco; Russo, Giovanni F; Guerranti, Cristiana; Renzi, Monia

    2016-12-15

    This research aims to define for the first time levels and patterns of different litter groups (macro, meso and microplastics) in sediments from a marine area designed for the institution of a new marine protected area (Aeolian Archipelago, Italy). Microplastics resulted the principal group and found in all samples analyzed, with shape and colours variable between different sampling sites. MPs levels measured in this study are similar to values recorded in harbour sites and lower than reported in Adriatic Sea, while macroplastics levels are notably lower than in harbor sites. Sediment grain-size and island extent resulted not significant in determining levels and distribution of plastic debris among islands. In the future, following the establishment of the MPA in the study area, these basic data will be useful to check for potential protective effects on the levels and distribution of plastic debris.

  11. Map of glacial limits and possible refugia in the southern Alexander Archipelago, Alaska, during the late Wisconsin glaciation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carrara, Paul E.; Ager, Thomas A.; Baichtal, James F.; VanSistine, D. Paco

    2003-01-01

    During the late Wisconsin glaciation (circa 26,000-13,000 carbon-14 yr BP) the Cordilleran glacier complex formed vast ice fields and large glaciers along the crest of the Coast Mountains. As these glaciers flowed west to the Pacific Ocean, they were joined by local glaciers originating on the higher reaches of the Alexander Archipelago (Mann and Hamiltion, 1995). This extensive volume of ice was channeled into deep troughs (present-day fiords) that formed major outlet glaciers, such as the glaciers that occupied Chatham Strait and Dixon Entrance. In several places along the coast, deep glacially scoured submarine troughs indicate that glaciers reached to the edge of the continental shelf. For instance, the glacier that extended into the Dixon Entrance trough is known to have extended to the edge of the continental shelf. Its retreat began sometime after 16,000-15,000 carbon-14 yr BP (Barrie and Conway, 1999).

  12. Karyological study of Amphisbaena ridleyi (Squamata, Amphisbaenidae), an endemic species of the Archipelago of Fernando de Noronha, Pernambuco, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    The karyotype of Amphisbaena ridleyi, an endemic species of the archipelago of Fernando de Noronha, in State of Pernambuco, Brazil, is described after conventional staining, Ag-NOR impregnation and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with a telomeric probe. The diploid number is 46, with nine pairs of macrochromosomes (three metacentrics, four subtelocentrics and two acrocentrics) and 14 pairs of microchromosomes. The Ag-NOR is located in the telomeric region of the long arm of metacentric chromosome 2 and FISH revealed signals only in the telomeric region of all chromosomes. Further cytogenetic data on other amphisbaenians as well as a robust phylogenetic hypothesis of this clade is needed in order to understand the evolutionary changes on amphisbaenian karyotypes. PMID:21637605

  13. Seven new species of the genus Xestoleberis (Ostracoda: Podocopida: Cytheroidea) from the Fiji Archipelago.

    PubMed

    Chand, Prerna; Kamiya, Takahiro

    2016-12-18

    The genus Xestoleberis has a global distribution, and although they are predominant in shallow marine environments adapted to both sediment and algal habitats, only two species of this genus, Xestoleberis curta (Brady, 1866) and Xestoleberis variegata Brady, 1880, have previously been reported from the Fiji archipelago. Herein we report seven new species of the genus Xestoleberis from intertidal environments of fringing reef flats of the Fiji Islands: Xestoleberis becca n. sp., Xestoleberis concava n. sp., Xestoleberis gracilariaii n. sp., Xestoleberis marcula n. sp., Xestoleberis natuvuensis n. sp., Xestoleberis penna n. sp. and Xestoleberis petrosa n. sp. With the exception of X. becca n. sp., Xestoleberis species show restricted distribution within Fijian waters. The possible causes for their distribution patterns are suggested to be physical barriers imposed by the fast flowing Bligh Water currents, and islands separated by deep ocean waters.

  14. Expanding the Kachemak: surplus production and the development of multi-season storage in Alaska's Kodiak Archipelago.

    PubMed

    Steffian, Amy F; Saltonstall, Patrick G; Kopperl, Robert E

    2006-01-01

    Surplus production is a hallmark of Alaska's prehistoric coastal societies. Over the millennia, foragers procured greater quantities of resources with increasing efficiency, developing economies dependent upon storage and institutionalized exchange. In the central Gulf of Alaska, notable evidence of surplus production comes from the late phase of the Kachemak tradition. Since de Laguna's pioneering studies, archaeologists have noted that intensified fishing, storage, and exchange typify this tradition. However, few have investigated the roots of these behaviors. When, how, and why did foragers begin producing well beyond immediate needs? This paper explores archaeological evidence for surplus production in the Kodiak Archipelago, focusing on patterns in land use, technology, and exchange preserved in Ocean Bay II and Early Kachemak assemblages from the Chiniak Bay region. It suggests that surplus production for the purposes of seasonal food storage began in the Early Kachemak, and accelerated in the Late Kachemak as population levels climbed.

  15. A new species of insular Rock Gecko (Genus Cnemaspis Strauch, 1887) from the Bidong Archipelago, Terengganu, Peninsular Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Grismer, L Lee; Wood, Perry L; Ahmad, Amirrudin B; Sumarli, Alexandra S-I; Vazquez, Jessika J; Ismail, Lukman H B; Nance, Ronald; Mohd-Amin, Muhammad Afif B; Othman, Mohamad N A B; Rizaijessika, Syed A; Kuss, Maria; Murdoch, Matthew; Cobos, Anthony

    2014-01-24

    A new insular species Cnemaspis bidongensis sp. nov. (Squamata: Gekkonidae), is described from Pulau Bidong, Terengganu, Peninsular Malaysia and bears a unique suite of morphological and color pattern characters that differentiate it from all other congeners. Cnemaspis bidongensis sp. nov. is the sister species to C. kendallii (Gray) and represents the fifth insular endemic species of Cnemaspis on archipelagos along the east coast of Peninsular Malaysia. This species survived massive deforestation of the small island of Bidong (260 ha) from the mid 1970s to the early 1990s when the island served as a Vietnamese refugee camp and harbored as many as 40,000 people at one time. We hypothesize that this species' generalized lifestyle contributed to its survival, allowing it to seek refuge in rocky microhabitats.

  16. Zoobotryon verticillatum Della Chiaje, 1822 (Bryozoa), a new occurrence in the archipelago of the Azores (North-Eastern Atlantic).

    PubMed

    Amat, Jaen Nieto; Tempera, Fernando

    2009-05-01

    The new occurrence of the bryozoan Zoobotryon verticillatum Della Chiaje, 1822 is herein recorded in multiple places throughout Azores archipelago. Where introduced, this species has caused important ecological and economical damage and therefore is regarded as invasive. In the Azores, no detrimental effects have yet been noted. The species is so far restricted to marinas (Horta, Faial Island; Vila Franca do Campo, São Miguel Island) and a natural coastal pool located near a secondary harbour (Lajes do Pico, Pico Island). A total of 29 colonies were counted during a specific survey conducted in August 2008 in the marina of Horta. The distribution of the species throughout the eastern and central island groups denotes a wide dispersion area and offers control or eradication measures a low probability of success together with the lack of harbour management practices that could effectively prevent the arrival, settlement and dispersal of non-native species transported by human-assisted means.

  17. Brachiopods from off the San Bernardo Archipelago (Colombian Caribbean), with comments on specific synonymies in Tichosina Cooper, 1977.

    PubMed

    Rojas, Alexis; Gracia, Adriana; Patarroyo, Pedro

    2015-01-23

    Colombian brachiopod faunas have not been studied extensively. Only three brachiopod species have been reported from the Colombian Caribbean Sea so far, namely Argyrotheca barrettiana (Davidson, 1866), Terebratulina latifrons Dall, 1920, and the cosmopolitan Platidia anomioides (Scacchi & Philippi, 1844). In this work, brachiopods collected from deep-water environments (90-250 m) off the San Bernardo Archipelago, collected during the MARCORAL cruise, are examined. The studied material consists of four species, two of which are new records for Colombia: Terebratulina cailleti Crosse, 1865 and Tichosina plicata Cooper, 1977. The genus Tichosina belongs to the family Terebratulidae and comprises twenty extant species occurring across the Caribbean. Based on a revision of published descriptions and illustrations, we synonymize Tichosina bullisi Cooper, 1977 and Tichosina dubia Cooper, 1977 with Tichosina plicata Cooper, 1977. Remarkably, apart from reports from southern Guiana, T. plicata is restricted to the margins of the Caribbean plate. 

  18. Habitat filtering not dispersal limitation shapes oceanic island floras: species assembly of the Galápagos archipelago.

    PubMed

    Carvajal-Endara, Sofía; Hendry, Andrew P; Emery, Nancy C; Davies, T Jonathan

    2017-04-01

    Remote locations, such as oceanic islands, typically harbour relatively few species, some of which go on to generate endemic radiations. Species colonising these locations tend to be a non-random subset from source communities, which is thought to reflect dispersal limitation. However, non-random colonisation could also result from habitat filtering, whereby only a few continental species can become established. We evaluate the imprints of these processes on the Galápagos flora by analysing a comprehensive regional phylogeny for ~ 39 000 species alongside information on dispersal strategies and climatic suitability. We found that habitat filtering was more important than dispersal limitation in determining species composition. This finding may help explain why adaptive radiation is common on oceanic archipelagoes - because colonising species can be relatively poor dispersers with specific niche requirements. We suggest that the standard assumption that plant communities in remote locations are primarily shaped by dispersal limitation deserves reconsideration.

  19. Biology of Grapsus grapsus (L innaeus, 1758) (Brachyura, Grapsidae) in the Saint Peter and Saint Paul Archipelago, Equatorial Atlantic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freire, A. S.; Pinheiro, M. A. A.; Karam-Silva, H.; Teschima, M. M.

    2011-09-01

    Eleven expeditions were undertaken to the Saint Peter and Saint Paul Archipelago to study the reproductive biology of Grapsus grapsus, providing additional information on limb mutilation and carapace colour. MATURE software was used to estimate morphological maturity, while gonadal analyses were conducted to estimate physiological maturity. The puberty moult took place at larger size in males (51.4 mm of carapace length) than in females (33.8 mm), while physiological maturity occurred at a similar size in males (38.4 mm) and in females (33.4 mm). Above 50 mm, the proportion of red males increased in the population, indicating that functional maturity is also related to colour pattern. Small habitat and high local population density contributed to the high rate of cannibalism. The low diversity of food items, absence of predators of large crabs and high geographic isolation are the determinants of unique behavioural and biological characteristics observed in the G. grapsus population.

  20. A diverse assemblage of reef corals thriving in a dynamic intertidal reef setting (Bonaparte Archipelago, Kimberley, Australia).

    PubMed

    Richards, Zoe T; Garcia, Rodrigo A; Wallace, Carden C; Rosser, Natalie L; Muir, Paul R

    2015-01-01

    The susceptibility of reef-building corals to climatic anomalies is well documented and a cause of great concern for the future of coral reefs. Reef corals are normally considered to tolerate only a narrow range of climatic conditions with only a small number of species considered heat-tolerant. Occasionally however, corals can be seen thriving in unusually harsh reef settings and these are cause for some optimism about the future of coral reefs. Here we document for the first time a diverse assemblage of 225 species of hard corals occurring in the intertidal zone of the Bonaparte Archipelago, north western Australia. We compare the environmental conditions at our study site (tidal regime, SST and level of turbidity) with those experienced at four other more typical tropical reef locations with similar levels of diversity. Physical extremes in the Bonaparte Archipelago include tidal oscillations of up to 8 m, long subaerial exposure times (>3.5 hrs), prolonged exposure to high SST and fluctuating turbidity levels. We conclude the timing of low tide in the coolest parts of the day ameliorates the severity of subaerial exposure, and the combination of strong currents and a naturally high sediment regime helps to offset light and heat stress. The low level of anthropogenic impact and proximity to the Indo-west Pacific centre of diversity are likely to further promote resistance and resilience in this community. This assemblage provides an indication of what corals may have existed in other nearshore locations in the past prior to widespread coastal development, eutrophication, coral predator and disease outbreaks and coral bleaching events. Our results call for a re-evaluation of what conditions are optimal for coral survival, and the Bonaparte intertidal community presents an ideal model system for exploring how species resilience is conferred in the absence of confounding factors such as pollution.

  1. Diversity, relationships, and biogeography of the lambeosaurine dinosaurs from the European Archipelago, with description of the New Aralosaurin Canardia garonnensis.

    PubMed

    Prieto-Márquez, Albert; Dalla Vecchia, Fabio M; Gaete, Rodrigo; Galobart, Angel

    2013-01-01

    We provide a thorough re-evaluation of the taxonomic diversity, phylogenetic relationships, and historical biogeography of the lambeosaurine hadrosaurids from the European Archipelago. Previously published occurrences of European Lambeosaurinae are reviewed and new specimens collected from upper Maastrichtian strata of the south-central Pyrenees are described. No support is found for the recognition of European saurolophines in the available hadrosaurid materials recovered so far from this area. A new genus and species of basal lambeosaurine, Canardia garonnensis, is described on the basis of cranial and appendicular elements collected from upper Maastrichtian strata of southern France. C. garonnensis differs from all other hadrosaurids, except Aralosaurus tuberiferus, in having maxilla with prominent subrectangular rostrodorsal flange; it differs from A. tuberiferus in a few maxillary and prefrontal characters. Together with A. tuberiferus, C. garonnensis integrates the newly recognized tribe Aralosaurini. Inference of lambeosaurine interrelationships via maximum parsimony analysis indicates that the other three known European lambeosaurines are representatives of two additional subclades (tribes) of these hadrosaurids: Tsintaosaurini (Pararhabdodon isonensis) and Lambeosaurini (the Arenysaurus ardevoli-Blasisaurus canudoi clade). The tribes Aralosaurini, Tsintaosaurini, Lambeosaurini, and Parasaurolophini are formally defined and diagnosed for the first time. Three event-based quantitative methods of ancestral range reconstruction were implemented to infer the historical biogeography of European lambeosaurines: Dispersal-Vicariance Analysis, Bayesian Binary MCMC, and Dispersal-Extinction-Cladogenesis. The results of these analyses, coupled with the absence of pre-Maastrichtian lambeosaurines in the Mesozoic vertebrate fossil record of Europe, favor the hypothesis that aralosaurins and tsintaosaurins were Asian immigrants that reached the Ibero-Armorican island

  2. Phylogeography and adaptation genetics of stickleback from the Haida Gwaii archipelago revealed using genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphism genotyping

    PubMed Central

    Deagle, Bruce E; Jones, Felicity C; Absher, Devin M; Kingsley, David M; Reimchen, Thomas E

    2013-01-01

    Threespine stickleback populations are model systems for studying adaptive evolution and the underlying genetics. In lakes on the Haida Gwaii archipelago (off western Canada), stickleback have undergone a remarkable local radiation and show phenotypic diversity matching that seen throughout the species distribution. To provide a historical context for this radiation, we surveyed genetic variation at >1000 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) loci in stickleback from over 100 populations. SNPs included markers evenly distributed throughout genome and candidate SNPs tagging adaptive genomic regions. Based on evenly distributed SNPs, the phylogeographic pattern differs substantially from the disjunct pattern previously observed between two highly divergent mtDNA lineages. The SNP tree instead shows extensive within watershed population clustering and different watersheds separated by short branches deep in the tree. These data are consistent with separate colonizations of most watersheds, despite underlying genetic connections between some independent drainages. This supports previous suppositions that morphological diversity observed between watersheds has been shaped independently, with populations exhibiting complete loss of lateral plates and giant size each occurring in several distinct clades. Throughout the archipelago, we see repeated selection of SNPs tagging candidate freshwater adaptive variants at several genomic regions differentiated between marine–freshwater populations on a global scale (e.g. EDA, Na/K ATPase). In estuarine sites, both marine and freshwater allelic variants were commonly detected. We also found typically marine alleles present in a few freshwater lakes, especially those with completely plated morphology. These results provide a general model for postglacial colonization of freshwater habitat by sticklebacks and illustrate the tremendous potential of genome-wide SNP data sets hold for resolving patterns and processes underlying recent

  3. A Diverse Assemblage of Reef Corals Thriving in a Dynamic Intertidal Reef Setting (Bonaparte Archipelago, Kimberley, Australia)

    PubMed Central

    Richards, Zoe T.; Garcia, Rodrigo A.; Wallace, Carden C.; Rosser, Natalie L.; Muir, Paul R.

    2015-01-01

    The susceptibility of reef-building corals to climatic anomalies is well documented and a cause of great concern for the future of coral reefs. Reef corals are normally considered to tolerate only a narrow range of climatic conditions with only a small number of species considered heat-tolerant. Occasionally however, corals can be seen thriving in unusually harsh reef settings and these are cause for some optimism about the future of coral reefs. Here we document for the first time a diverse assemblage of 225 species of hard corals occurring in the intertidal zone of the Bonaparte Archipelago, north western Australia. We compare the environmental conditions at our study site (tidal regime, SST and level of turbidity) with those experienced at four other more typical tropical reef locations with similar levels of diversity. Physical extremes in the Bonaparte Archipelago include tidal oscillations of up to 8 m, long subaerial exposure times (>3.5 hrs), prolonged exposure to high SST and fluctuating turbidity levels. We conclude the timing of low tide in the coolest parts of the day ameliorates the severity of subaerial exposure, and the combination of strong currents and a naturally high sediment regime helps to offset light and heat stress. The low level of anthropogenic impact and proximity to the Indo-west Pacific centre of diversity are likely to further promote resistance and resilience in this community. This assemblage provides an indication of what corals may have existed in other nearshore locations in the past prior to widespread coastal development, eutrophication, coral predator and disease outbreaks and coral bleaching events. Our results call for a re-evaluation of what conditions are optimal for coral survival, and the Bonaparte intertidal community presents an ideal model system for exploring how species resilience is conferred in the absence of confounding factors such as pollution. PMID:25714443

  4. Influence of a flood event on salinity and nutrients in the Changshan Archipelago area (Northern Yellow Sea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Guangtao; Zhao, Zengxia; Liu, Changhua; Liu, Qun; Ren, Jianming

    2012-09-01

    River discharge can deliver nutrients to the coastal zone and change the hydrologic properties of the water column. Soon after a flash flood from the Yalu River (Northeast China) in August 2010, we investigated the salinity and nutrient concentrations, as well as other environmental conditions in the Changshan Archipelago area, located approximately 100 km west of the river mouth in the northern Yellow Sea. Diluted water was mainly observed in the upper layers shallower than 15 m, with surface salinity between 18.13 and 30.44 in the eastern study area and between 28.16 and 29.72 in the western area. Surface salinity showed a significant negative correlation with concentrations of dissolved nutrients ( P < 0.05), but not with that of Chlorophyll- a (Chl- a), dissolved oxygen (DO), particulate materials or pH. The average concentrations of nitrite, nitrate, and silicic acid decreased from the surface layer to bottom layer and were significantly higher in the east area than in the west area ( P < 0.05). In contrast, average ammonium and phosphate concentrations were highest in the bottom layer of both areas, with no significant spatial differences. DO varied between 6.06 and 8.25 mg L-1 in the surface layer, and was significantly higher in the eastern area than in the western area in the surface and middle layers. Chl- a concentration was constantly below 4.09 μg L-1. Our work demonstrated the strong influences of Yalu River on proportions of various nutrient components in the Changshan Archipelago area. Silicic acid and total inorganic nitrogen levels were significantly elevated comparing to phosphate in the eastern area. Such changes can potentially induce phosphate limit to phytoplankton growth.

  5. Diversity, Relationships, and Biogeography of the Lambeosaurine Dinosaurs from the European Archipelago, with Description of the New Aralosaurin Canardia garonnensis

    PubMed Central

    Prieto-Márquez, Albert; Dalla Vecchia, Fabio M.; Gaete, Rodrigo; Galobart, Àngel

    2013-01-01

    We provide a thorough re-evaluation of the taxonomic diversity, phylogenetic relationships, and historical biogeography of the lambeosaurine hadrosaurids from the European Archipelago. Previously published occurrences of European Lambeosaurinae are reviewed and new specimens collected from upper Maastrichtian strata of the south-central Pyrenees are described. No support is found for the recognition of European saurolophines in the available hadrosaurid materials recovered so far from this area. A new genus and species of basal lambeosaurine, Canardia garonnensis, is described on the basis of cranial and appendicular elements collected from upper Maastrichtian strata of southern France. C. garonnensis differs from all other hadrosaurids, except Aralosaurus tuberiferus, in having maxilla with prominent subrectangular rostrodorsal flange; it differs from A. tuberiferus in a few maxillary and prefrontal characters. Together with A. tuberiferus, C. garonnensis integrates the newly recognized tribe Aralosaurini. Inference of lambeosaurine interrelationships via maximum parsimony analysis indicates that the other three known European lambeosaurines are representatives of two additional subclades (tribes) of these hadrosaurids: Tsintaosaurini (Pararhabdodon isonensis) and Lambeosaurini (the Arenysaurus ardevoli-Blasisaurus canudoi clade). The tribes Aralosaurini, Tsintaosaurini, Lambeosaurini, and Parasaurolophini are formally defined and diagnosed for the first time. Three event-based quantitative methods of ancestral range reconstruction were implemented to infer the historical biogeography of European lambeosaurines: Dispersal-Vicariance Analysis, Bayesian Binary MCMC, and Dispersal-Extinction-Cladogenesis. The results of these analyses, coupled with the absence of pre-Maastrichtian lambeosaurines in the Mesozoic vertebrate fossil record of Europe, favor the hypothesis that aralosaurins and tsintaosaurins were Asian immigrants that reached the Ibero-Armorican island

  6. An enigmatic crocodyliform tooth from the bauxites of western Hungary suggests hidden mesoeucrocodylian diversity in the Early Cretaceous European archipelago

    PubMed Central

    Rabi, Márton; Makádi, László

    2015-01-01

    Background. The Cretaceous of southern Europe was characterized by an archipelago setting with faunas of mixed composition of endemic, Laurasian and Gondwanan elements. However, little is known about the relative timing of these faunal influences. The Lower Cretaceous of East-Central Europe holds a great promise for understanding the biogeographic history of Cretaceous European biotas because of the former proximity of the area to Gondwana (as part of the Apulian microcontinent). However, East-Central European vertebrates are typically poorly known from this time period. Here, we report on a ziphodont crocodyliform tooth discovered in the Lower Cretaceous (Albian) Alsópere Bauxite Formation of Olaszfalu, western Hungary. Methods. The morphology of the tooth is described and compared with that of other similar Cretaceous crocodyliforms. Results. Based on the triangular, slightly distally curved, constricted and labiolingually flattened crown, the small, subequal-sized true serrations on the carinae mesially and distally, the longitudinal fluting labially, and the extended shelves along the carinae lingually the tooth is most similar to some peirosaurid, non-baurusuchian sebecosuchian, and uruguaysuchid notosuchians. In addition, the paralligatorid Wannchampsus also possesses similar anterior teeth, thus the Hungarian tooth is referred here to Mesoeucrocodylia indet. Discussion. Supposing a notosuchian affinity, this tooth is the earliest occurrence of the group in Europe and one of the earliest in Laurasia. In case of a paralligatorid relationship the Hungarian tooth would represent their first European record, further expanding their cosmopolitan distribution. In any case, the ziphodont tooth from the Albian bauxite deposit of western Hungary belongs to a group still unknown from the Early Cretaceous European archipelago and therefore implies a hidden diversity of crocodyliforms in the area. PMID:26339542

  7. The 2009-2010 eruption of Gaua volcano (Vanuatu archipelago): Eruptive dynamics and unsuspected strong halogens source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bani, Philipson; Boudon, Georges; Balcone-Boissard, Hélène; Delmelle, Pierre; Quiniou, Thomas; Lefèvre, Jérôme; Bule, Esline Garaebiti; Hiroshi, Shinohara; Lardy, Michel

    2016-08-01

    Gaua, a little known volcano in the northern part of Vanuatu archipelago, went through a long term eruptive activity between September 2009 and July 2010. The eruption started by a phreatic to phreatomagmatic activity which progressively shifted into a magmatic discharge. The first eruptive phase involved the hydrothermal system in place. The latter was likely influenced by seawater seepage, leading to the formation of anhydrite. Magma involved hereafter this opening phase is of basaltic andesite and basaltic trachyandesite composition (high K calc-alkaline series), typical of the northern part of the Vanuatu archipelago. The 2009-2010 activity discharged at least 184 kt of SO2 and a significant amount of halogens (72 kt Cl and 217 kt F). Such halogen releases indicate that Gaua is a strong source of halogens into the atmosphere. High and sustained amount of F discharges are known to induce health issues and should not be ignored on Gaua island. During this eruption the quiescent and voluminous Lake Letas was slightly affected by the eruption. Nevertheless the hydrothermal discharge point into the lake, situated on the southeastern part of Mt. Garet appeared to be relatively active. At this particular location rock forming elements, leached out from volcanic rock by acid fluids released by the new intrusion of magma, were discharged along with anions into Lake Letas. This release has triggered localized chemistry changes in the lake. We speculate that this discharge has also disturbed the bottom water in a limited perimeter, remobilizing reduced Fe to the surface and subsequently triggering the change in the water color by Fe oxidation.

  8. Ultra-refractory mantle within oceanic plateau: Petrology of the spinel harzburgites from Lac Michèle, Kerguelen Archipelago

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wasilewski, Benjamin; Doucet, Luc S.; Moine, Bertrand; Beunon, Hugues; Delpech, Guillaume; Mattielli, Nadine; Debaille, Vinciane; Delacour, Adélie; Grégoire, Michel; Guillaume, Damien; Cottin, Jean-Yves

    2017-02-01

    The study presents major and trace element compositions of whole-rocks and minerals of 24 spinel harzburgite xenoliths from the Lac Michèle locality in the northern part of the Kerguelen Archipelago (South Indian Ocean). The samples are modally homogeneous and large enough to provide representative whole-rock samples. Their Mg# are high (0.91 to 0.93) and they have 16-29 wt.% orthopyroxene (opx) and low clinopyroxene contents (0.1-2.8 wt.%). They display a wide range of serpentinisation, which result in LOI contents ranging from 0 to 3.5 wt.%. The spinel-bearing harzburgites from Lac Michèle are the most refractory peridotites identified so far among peridotite xenoliths available on the Kerguelen Archipelago and within the oceanic lithosphere. By contrast with most of the peridotite xenoliths from Kerguelen, they have been more preserved from post-formation processes such as metasomatic processes. The major and trace element compositions of the least serpentinised spinel harzburgites indicate an origin by 30% of polybaric decompression fractional melting between 5GPa and ≤ 1 GPa. Thus, the spinel harzburgites from Lac Michèle, situated at the top of the Kerguelen lithospheric mantle, are residues of melting that took place over a broad range of depth and mostly in the garnet stability field. Our results, in comparison with published data on mantle xenoliths worldwide, show that spinel harzburgites from Lac Michèle have major and modal compositions that fall in the range of cratonic peridotites rather than abyssal peridotites, oceanic island peridotites, subduction zones peridotites and off-cratonic peridotites. This indicates (i) they formed in similar condition as for the ancient continental lithospheric mantle or (ii) they are fragment of ancient continental lithospheric mantle incorporated in the Kerguelen plateau. Group II spinel harzburgites from Lac Michèle.

  9. Metabolism of free-living and particle-associated prokaryotes: Consequences for carbon flux around a Southern Ocean archipelago

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schapira, Mathilde; McQuaid, Christopher D.; Froneman, Pierre W.

    2012-02-01

    The sub-Antarctic Prince Edward archipelago lies in the path of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current, giving the islands a distinct upstream/downstream axis. Here we examined the possibility of an Island Mass Effect on the prokaryotic community, comparing prokaryotic metabolism in the upstream, inter-island and downstream regions of the islands. Abundance and flow cytometric community structure, heterotrophic production (PHP) and respiration rates (R-ETS) were investigated separately for the particle-associated (PA) and free-living (FL) prokaryote communities. Temperature, salinity structure and low chlorophyll a concentrations (< 0.4 μg l- 1) suggested a flow-through hydrological regime prevailed during the study. FL and PA abundances and PHP did not vary significantly over the study area. In contrast, FL and PA R-ETS decreased significantly along the upstream to downstream axis. This decrease in R-ETS resulted in high prokaryotic growth efficiencies (PGE) downstream of the islands. This suggests higher carbon sequestration efficiency downstream than upstream of the islands. No significant differences were observed between FL and PA-PGE downstream. In contrast, PA-PGE was significantly higher than FL-PGE at most upstream stations, suggesting quite different carbon utilisation by free-living and particle-associated prokaryotes with potentially important implications for overall carbon flux around the Archipelago. These findings provide new insights into the metabolic and functional roles of the two prokaryotic fractions within pelagic ecosystems. In particular, the observation that carbon consumption on particles is higher than would be expected from estimates of bulk PGE has important implications for our understanding of carbon cycling in the ocean.

  10. Spatial variability in the structure of intertidal crab and gastropod assemblages within the Seychelles Archipelago (Indian Ocean)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smale, Dan A.; Barnes, David K. A.; Barnes, Richard S. K.; Smith, David J.; Suggett, David J.

    2012-04-01

    Tropical nearshore ecosystems represent global hotspots of marine biodiversity and endemism but are often poorly understood and impacted by human activities. The Seychelles Archipelago (Western Indian Ocean) sustains a wealth of marine life, much of which is threatened by rapid development associated with tourism and climate change. Six marine parks exist within the Archipelago, but their biodiversity value and ecological health are poorly known, especially with regards to non-fish and coral species. Here we investigate spatial patterns of littoral biodiversity on 6 islands, 5 of which were granitic and within marine parks, including the first surveys of Curieuse and Ile Cocos. Our surveys formed a nested sampling design, to facilitate an examination of variability in species richness, faunal abundance, taxonomic distinctness and assemblage composition at multiple spatial scales, from islands (> 100 s km) to quadrats (metres). We identified (mostly to species) and enumerated two target taxa, brachyuran decapod crustaceans and gastropod molluscs, and recorded over 8300 individuals belonging to over 150 species. Crabs and gastropods exhibited different patterns of spatial variability, as crab assemblages were generally more distinct between islands, while gastropod assemblages were markedly variable at the smallest spatial scales of 'patch' and 'quadrat'. Intertidal biodiversity was greatest on Curieuse Island and least at Desroches, the latter was being the only coral atoll we surveyed and thereby differing in its geological and ecological context. We discuss likely drivers of these biodiversity patterns and highlight urgently-needed research directions. Our assessment of the status of poorly-known invertebrate assemblages across the Seychelles will complement more extensive surveys of coral and fish assemblages and, in doing so, provide a useful baseline for monitoring the effects of key stressors in the region, such as coastal development and climate change.

  11. An enigmatic crocodyliform tooth from the bauxites of western Hungary suggests hidden mesoeucrocodylian diversity in the Early Cretaceous European archipelago.

    PubMed

    Ősi, Attila; Rabi, Márton; Makádi, László

    2015-01-01

    Background. The Cretaceous of southern Europe was characterized by an archipelago setting with faunas of mixed composition of endemic, Laurasian and Gondwanan elements. However, little is known about the relative timing of these faunal influences. The Lower Cretaceous of East-Central Europe holds a great promise for understanding the biogeographic history of Cretaceous European biotas because of the former proximity of the area to Gondwana (as part of the Apulian microcontinent). However, East-Central European vertebrates are typically poorly known from this time period. Here, we report on a ziphodont crocodyliform tooth discovered in the Lower Cretaceous (Albian) Alsópere Bauxite Formation of Olaszfalu, western Hungary. Methods. The morphology of the tooth is described and compared with that of other similar Cretaceous crocodyliforms. Results. Based on the triangular, slightly distally curved, constricted and labiolingually flattened crown, the small, subequal-sized true serrations on the carinae mesially and distally, the longitudinal fluting labially, and the extended shelves along the carinae lingually the tooth is most similar to some peirosaurid, non-baurusuchian sebecosuchian, and uruguaysuchid notosuchians. In addition, the paralligatorid Wannchampsus also possesses similar anterior teeth, thus the Hungarian tooth is referred here to Mesoeucrocodylia indet. Discussion. Supposing a notosuchian affinity, this tooth is the earliest occurrence of the group in Europe and one of the earliest in Laurasia. In case of a paralligatorid relationship the Hungarian tooth would represent their first European record, further expanding their cosmopolitan distribution. In any case, the ziphodont tooth from the Albian bauxite deposit of western Hungary belongs to a group still unknown from the Early Cretaceous European archipelago and therefore implies a hidden diversity of crocodyliforms in the area.

  12. Long-term occupancy trends in a data-poor dugong population in the Andaman and Nicobar archipelago.

    PubMed

    D'Souza, Elrika; Patankar, Vardhan; Arthur, Rohan; Alcoverro, Teresa; Kelkar, Nachiket

    2013-01-01

    Prioritizing efforts for conserving rare and threatened species with limited past data and lacking population estimates is predicated on robust assessments of their occupancy rates. This is particularly challenging for elusive, long-lived and wide-ranging marine mammals. In this paper we estimate trends in long-term (over 50 years) occupancy, persistence and extinction of a vulnerable and data-poor dugong (Dugong dugon) population across multiple seagrass meadows in the Andaman and Nicobar archipelago (India). For this we use hierarchical Bayesian dynamic occupancy models accounting for false negatives (detection probability<1), persistence and extinction, to two datasets: a) fragmentary long-term occurrence records from multiple sources (1959-2004, n = 40 locations), and b) systematic detection/non-detection data from current surveys (2010-2012, n = 57). Dugong occupancy across the archipelago declined by 60% (from 0.45 to 0.18) over the last 20 years and present distribution was largely restricted to sheltered bays and channels with seagrass meadows dominated by Halophila and Halodule sp. Dugongs were not found in patchy meadows with low seagrass cover. In general, seagrass habitat availability was not limiting for dugong occupancy, suggesting that anthropogenic factors such as entanglement in gillnets and direct hunting may have led to local extinction of dugongs from locations where extensive seagrass meadows still thrive. Effective management of these remnant dugong populations will require a multi-pronged approach, involving 1) protection of areas where dugongs still persist, 2) monitoring of seagrass habitats that dugongs could recolonize, 3) reducing gillnet use in areas used by dugongs, and 4) engaging with indigenous/settler communities to reduce impacts of hunting.

  13. Long-Term Occupancy Trends in a Data-Poor Dugong Population in the Andaman and Nicobar Archipelago

    PubMed Central

    D’Souza, Elrika; Patankar, Vardhan; Arthur, Rohan; Alcoverro, Teresa; Kelkar, Nachiket

    2013-01-01

    Prioritizing efforts for conserving rare and threatened species with limited past data and lacking population estimates is predicated on robust assessments of their occupancy rates. This is particularly challenging for elusive, long-lived and wide-ranging marine mammals. In this paper we estimate trends in long-term (over 50years) occupancy, persistence and extinction of a vulnerable and data-poor dugong (Dugong dugon) population across multiple seagrass meadows in the Andaman and Nicobar archipelago (India). For this we use hierarchical Bayesian dynamic occupancy models accounting for false negatives (detection probability<1), persistence and extinction, to two datasets: a) fragmentary long-term occurrence records from multiple sources (1959–2004, n = 40 locations), and b) systematic detection/non-detection data from current surveys (2010–2012, n = 57). Dugong occupancy across the archipelago declined by 60% (from 0.45 to 0.18) over the last 20 years and present distribution was largely restricted to sheltered bays and channels with seagrass meadows dominated by Halophila and Halodule sp. Dugongs were not found in patchy meadows with low seagrass cover. In general, seagrass habitat availability was not limiting for dugong occupancy, suggesting that anthropogenic factors such as entanglement in gillnets and direct hunting may have led to local extinction of dugongs from locations where extensive seagrass meadows still thrive. Effective management of these remnant dugong populations will require a multi-pronged approach, involving 1) protection of areas where dugongs still persist, 2) monitoring of seagrass habitats that dugongs could recolonize, 3) reducing gillnet use in areas used by dugongs, and 4) engaging with indigenous/settler communities to reduce impacts of hunting. PMID:24143180

  14. Island shadow effects and the wave climate of the Western Tuamotu Archipelago (French Polynesia) inferred from altimetry and numerical model data.

    PubMed

    Andréfouët, Serge; Ardhuin, Fabrice; Queffeulou, Pierre; Le Gendre, Romain

    2012-01-01

    To implement a numerical model of atoll lagoon circulation, we characterized first the significant wave height (Hs) regime of the Western Tuamotu Archipelago and the local attenuation due to the protection offered by large atolls in the south Tuamotu. Altimetry satellite data and a WAVEWATCH III two-way nested wave model at 5 km resolution from 2000 to 2010 were used. Correlation between altimetry and model was high (0.88) over the period. According to the wave model, the archipelago inner seas experienced attenuated Hs year-long with a yearly average Hs around 1.3m vs a minimum of 1.6m elsewhere. The island shadow effect is especially significant in the austral winter. In contrast with southern atolls, Western Tuamotu experienced only few days per year of Hs larger than 2.5m generated by very high Hs southern swell, transient western local storms, strong easterly winds, and during the passage of distant hurricanes.

  15. Multiple colonizations lead to cryptic biodiversity in an island ecosystem: comparative phylogeography of anchialine shrimp species in the Ryukyu Archipelago, Japan.

    PubMed

    Weese, David A; Fujita, Yoshihisa; Santos, Scott R

    2013-09-01

    Archipelagos of the Indo-West Pacific are considered to be among the richest in the world in biodiversity, and phylogeographic studies generally support either the center of origin or the center of accumulation hypothesis to explain this pattern. To differentiate between these competing hypotheses for organisms from the Indo-West Pacific anchialine ecosystem, defined as coastal bodies of mixohaline water fluctuating with the tides but having no direct oceanic connections, we investigated the genetic variation, population structure, and evolutionary history of three caridean shrimp species (Antecaridina lauensis, Halocaridinides trigonophthalma, and Metabetaeus minutus) in the Ryukyu Archipelago, Japan. We used two mitochondrial genes--cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI) and large ribosomal subunit (16S-rDNA)--complemented with genetic examination of available specimens from the same or closely related species from the Indian and Pacific Oceans. In the Ryukyus, each species encompassed 2-3 divergent (9.52%-19.2% COI p-distance) lineages, each having significant population structure and varying geographic distributions. Phylogenetically, the A. lauensis and M. minutus lineages in the Ryukyus were more closely related to ones from outside the archipelago than to one another. These results, when interpreted in the context of Pacific oceanographic currents and geologic history of the Ryukyus, imply multiple colonizations of the archipelago by the three species, consistent with the center of accumulation hypothesis. While this study contributes toward understanding the biodiversity, ecology, and evolution of organisms in the Ryukyus and the Indo-West Pacific, it also has potential utility in establishing conservation strategies for anchialine fauna of the Pacific Basin in general.

  16. Vertical and Horizontal Genetic Connectivity in Chromis verater, an Endemic Damselfish Found on Shallow and Mesophotic Reefs in the Hawaiian Archipelago and Adjacent Johnston Atoll

    PubMed Central

    Tenggardjaja, Kimberly A.; Bowen, Brian W.; Bernardi, Giacomo

    2014-01-01

    Understanding vertical and horizontal connectivity is a major priority in research on mesophotic coral ecosystems (30–150 m). However, horizontal connectivity has been the focus of few studies, and data on vertical connectivity are limited to sessile benthic mesophotic organisms. Here we present patterns of vertical and horizontal connectivity in the Hawaiian Islands-Johnston Atoll endemic threespot damselfish, Chromis verater, based on 319 shallow specimens and 153 deep specimens. The mtDNA markers cytochrome b and control region were sequenced to analyze genetic structure: 1) between shallow (<30 m) and mesophotic (30–150 m) populations and 2) across the species' geographic range. Additionally, the nuclear markers rhodopsin and internal transcribed spacer 2 of ribosomal DNA were sequenced to assess connectivity between shallow and mesophotic populations. There was no significant genetic differentiation by depth, indicating high levels of vertical connectivity between shallow and deep aggregates of C. verater. Consequently, shallow and deep samples were combined by location for analyses of horizontal connectivity. We detected low but significant population structure across the Hawaiian Archipelago (overall cytochrome b: ΦST = 0.009, P = 0.020; control region: ΦST = 0.012, P = 0.009) and a larger break between the archipelago and Johnston Atoll (cytochrome b: ΦST = 0.068, P<0.001; control region: ΦST = 0.116, P<0.001). The population structure within the archipelago was driven by samples from the island of Hawaii at the southeast end of the chain and Lisianski in the middle of the archipelago. The lack of vertical genetic structure supports the refugia hypothesis that deep reefs may constitute a population reservoir for species depleted in shallow reef habitats. These findings represent the first connectivity study on a mobile organism that spans shallow and mesophotic depths and provide a reference point for future connectivity

  17. Vertical and horizontal genetic connectivity in Chromis verater, an endemic damselfish found on shallow and mesophotic reefs in the Hawaiian Archipelago and adjacent Johnston Atoll.

    PubMed

    Tenggardjaja, Kimberly A; Bowen, Brian W; Bernardi, Giacomo

    2014-01-01

    Understanding vertical and horizontal connectivity is a major priority in research on mesophotic coral ecosystems (30-150 m). However, horizontal connectivity has been the focus of few studies, and data on vertical connectivity are limited to sessile benthic mesophotic organisms. Here we present patterns of vertical and horizontal connectivity in the Hawaiian Islands-Johnston Atoll endemic threespot damselfish, Chromis verater, based on 319 shallow specimens and 153 deep specimens. The mtDNA markers cytochrome b and control region were sequenced to analyze genetic structure: 1) between shallow (< 30 m) and mesophotic (30-150 m) populations and 2) across the species' geographic range. Additionally, the nuclear markers rhodopsin and internal transcribed spacer 2 of ribosomal DNA were sequenced to assess connectivity between shallow and mesophotic populations. There was no significant genetic differentiation by depth, indicating high levels of vertical connectivity between shallow and deep aggregates of C. verater. Consequently, shallow and deep samples were combined by location for analyses of horizontal connectivity. We detected low but significant population structure across the Hawaiian Archipelago (overall cytochrome b: ΦST = 0.009, P = 0.020; control region: ΦST = 0.012, P = 0.009) and a larger break between the archipelago and Johnston Atoll (cytochrome b: ΦST = 0.068, P < 0.001; control region: ΦST = 0.116, P < 0.001). The population structure within the archipelago was driven by samples from the island of Hawaii at the southeast end of the chain and Lisianski in the middle of the archipelago. The lack of vertical genetic structure supports the refugia hypothesis that deep reefs may constitute a population reservoir for species depleted in shallow reef habitats. These findings represent the first connectivity study on a mobile organism that spans shallow and mesophotic depths and provide a reference point for future connectivity studies on mesophotic

  18. Geological history and oceanography of the Indo-Malay Archipelago shape the genetic population structure in the false clown anemonefish (Amphiprion ocellaris).

    PubMed

    Timm, Janne; Kochzius, Marc

    2008-09-01

    Like many fishes on coral reefs, the false clown anemonefish, Amphiprion ocellaris, has a life history with two different phases: adults are strongly site attached, whereas larvae are planktonic. Therefore, the larvae have the potential to disperse, but the degree of dispersal potential depends primarily on the period of the larval stage, which is only 8-12 days in A. ocellaris. In this study, we investigated the genetic population structure and gene flow in A. ocellaris across the Indo-Malay Archipelago by analysing a fragment of the mitochondrial control region. Population genetic analysis, using AMOVA, revealed a significant and high overall phi(ST)-value of 0.241 (P < 0.001), clearly showing limited gene flow. Haplotype network analysis detected eight distinct clades corresponding mainly to different geographical areas, which were most probably separated during sea level low stands in the Pleistocene. The distribution of the clades among the different populations indicated slow partial re-mixing mainly in the central region of the archipelago. Major surface currents seem to facilitate larval dispersal, indicated by higher connectivity along major surface currents in the region (e.g. Indonesian Throughflow). Four main groups were found by the hierarchical AMOVA within the archipelago. These different genetic lineages should be managed and protected as separate ornamental fishery stocks and resource contributing to the genetic diversity of the area. Regarding the high diversity and the differentiation among areas within the Indo-Malay Archipelago of A. ocellaris populations, the centre-of-origin theory is supported to be the main mechanism by which the high biodiversity evolved in this area.

  19. New species of Rissoidae (Mollusca, Gastropoda) from the Archipelago of the Azores (northeast Atlantic) with an updated regional checklist for the family

    PubMed Central

    Cordeiro, Ricardo; Ávila, Sérgio P.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Four new species of shallow-water marine gastropods belonging to the family Rissoidae are described from the Archipelago of the Azores: Setia alexandrae sp. n., Setia ermelindoi sp. n., Setia netoae sp. n., and Manzonia martinsi sp. n. These novelties increase the regional rissoid fauna to 39 species, of which 29 live in shallow-water habitats. A list of the species of Rissoidae from the Azores is presented based on data from the literature and new material examined. PMID:25685020

  20. 40Ar/39Ar geochronology of the Fernando de Noronha Archipelago and implications for the origin of alkaline volcanism in the NE Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perlingeiro, Gabriela; Vasconcelos, Paulo M.; Knesel, Kurt M.; Thiede, David S.; Cordani, Umberto G.

    2013-01-01

    The Fernando de Noronha archipelago, centered ~ 250 km off the northeastern coast of Brazil, is comprised of a diverse suite of alkaline volcanic rocks commonly associated with a mantle-plume origin. Although previous K-Ar determinations divide the three main volcanic formations of the archipelago (Remédios, Quixaba and São José formations) into two age groups, a few ages conflicting with the stratigraphic framework were suspected to suffer from excess argon. To evaluate the presence or absence of excess Ar and to improve the geochronological database for the archipelago, we have dated, by the laser incremental-heating 40Ar/39Ar method, the exact same hand specimens previously dated by K-Ar. The 22 samples studied here yield plateau ages for at least one of the two grains analyzed and none of the specimens contain significant excess Ar. Our results derive a chronostratigraphic sequence for the archipelago that is consistent with the earlier K-Ar determinations. The main discrepancy is related to some basanitic rocks of São José formation, interpreted as the youngest eruptive products which are in fact coeval with the oldest subareal volcanic activity at Fernando de Noronha. Our revised eruptive chronology defines a hiatus of nearly 3 Ma separating an older period of volcanism between 12.5 ± 0.1 and 9.0 ± 0.1 Ma comprising the Remédios and São José formations and a younger episode forming the Quixaba formation between 6.2 ± 0.1 and 1.3 ± 0.1 Ma. Moreover, these results confirm that much of the activity at Fernando de Noronha was contemporaneous with alkaline volcanism well onshore in northeastern Brazil, supporting the suggestion that this hotspot may be a product of small-scale, plate-driven convection in the upper mantle.

  1. An upper mantle seismic discontinuity beneath the Galápagos Archipelago and its implications for studies of the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byrnes, Joseph S.; Hooft, Emilie E. E.; Toomey, Douglas R.; Villagómez, Darwin R.; Geist, Dennis J.; Solomon, Sean C.

    2015-04-01

    An upper mantle seismic discontinuity (the Gutenberg or G discontinuity), at which shear wave velocity decreases with depth, has been mapped from S-to-p conversions in radial receiver functions recorded across the Galápagos Archipelago. The mean depth of the discontinuity is 91 ± 8 km beneath the southeastern archipelago and 72 ± 5 km beneath surrounding regions. The discontinuity appears deeper beneath the portion of the Nazca plate that we infer passed over the Galápagos mantle plume than elsewhere in the region. We equate the depth of the G discontinuity to the maximum depth extent of anhydrous melting, which forms an overlying layer of dehydrated and depleted mantle. We attribute areas of shallow discontinuity depth to the formation of the dehydrated layer near the Galápagos Spreading Center and areas of greater discontinuity depth to its modification over a mantle plume with an excess temperature of 115 ± 30°C. The G discontinuity lies within a high-seismic-velocity anomaly that we conclude forms by partial dehydration and a gradual but steady increase in seismic velocity with decreasing depth after upwelling mantle first encounters the solidus for volatile-bearing mantle material. At the depth of the solidus for anhydrous mantle material, removal of remaining water creates a sharp decrease in velocity with depth; this discontinuity may also mark a site of melt accumulation. Results from seismic imaging, the compositions of Galápagos lavas, and rare-earth-element concentrations across the archipelago require that mantle upwelling and partial melting occur over a broad region within the dehydrated and depleted layer. We conclude that the G discontinuity beneath the archipelago does not mark the boundary between rigid lithosphere and convecting asthenosphere.

  2. Abundance and Distribution of Sperm Whales in the Canary Islands: Can Sperm Whales in the Archipelago Sustain the Current Level of Ship-Strike Mortalities?

    PubMed Central

    Fais, Andrea; Lewis, Tim P.; Zitterbart, Daniel P.; Álvarez, Omar; Tejedor, Ana; Aguilar Soto, Natacha

    2016-01-01

    Sperm whales are present in the Canary Islands year-round, suggesting that the archipelago is an important area for this species in the North Atlantic. However, the area experiences one of the highest reported rates of sperm whale ship-strike in the world. Here we investigate if the number of sperm whales found in the archipelago can sustain the current rate of ship-strike mortality. The results of this study may also have implications for offshore areas where concentrations of sperm whales may coincide with high densities of ship traffic, but where ship-strikes may be undocumented. The absolute abundance of sperm whales in an area of 52933 km2, covering the territorial waters of the Canary Islands, was estimated from 2668 km of acoustic line-transect survey using Distance sampling analysis. Data on sperm whale diving and acoustic behaviour, obtained from bio-logging, were used to calculate g(0) = 0.92, this is less than one because of occasional extended periods when whales do not echolocate. This resulted in an absolute abundance estimate of 224 sperm whales (95% log-normal CI 120–418) within the survey area. The recruitment capability of this number of whales, some 2.5 whales per year, is likely to be exceeded by the current ship-strike mortality rate. Furthermore, we found areas of higher whale density within the archipelago, many coincident with those previously described, suggesting that these are important habitats for females and immature animals inhabiting the archipelago. Some of these areas are crossed by active shipping lanes increasing the risk of ship-strikes. Given the philopatry in female sperm whales, replacement of impacted whales might be limited. Therefore, the application of mitigation measures to reduce the ship-strike mortality rate seems essential for the conservation of sperm whales in the Canary Islands. PMID:26999791

  3. Archipelago-wide island restoration in the Galápagos Islands: reducing costs of invasive mammal eradication programs and reinvasion risk.

    PubMed

    Carrion, Victor; Donlan, C Josh; Campbell, Karl J; Lavoie, Christian; Cruz, Felipe

    2011-05-11

    Invasive alien mammals are the major driver of biodiversity loss and ecosystem degradation on islands. Over the past three decades, invasive mammal eradication from islands has become one of society's most powerful tools for preventing extinction of insular endemics and restoring insular ecosystems. As practitioners tackle larger islands for restoration, three factors will heavily influence success and outcomes: the degree of local support, the ability to mitigate for non-target impacts, and the ability to eradicate non-native species more cost-effectively. Investments in removing invasive species, however, must be weighed against the risk of reintroduction. One way to reduce reintroduction risks is to eradicate the target invasive species from an entire archipelago, and thus eliminate readily available sources. We illustrate the costs and benefits of this approach with the efforts to remove invasive goats from the Galápagos Islands. Project Isabela, the world's largest island restoration effort to date, removed >140,000 goats from >500,000 ha for a cost of US$10.5 million. Leveraging the capacity built during Project Isabela, and given that goat reintroductions have been common over the past decade, we implemented an archipelago-wide goat eradication strategy. Feral goats remain on three islands in the archipelago, and removal efforts are underway. Efforts on the Galápagos Islands demonstrate that for some species, island size is no longer the limiting factor with respect to eradication. Rather, bureaucratic processes, financing, political will, and stakeholder approval appear to be the new challenges. Eradication efforts have delivered a suite of biodiversity benefits that are in the process of revealing themselves. The costs of rectifying intentional reintroductions are high in terms of financial and human resources. Reducing the archipelago-wide goat density to low levels is a technical approach to reducing reintroduction risk in the short-term, and is being

  4. Abundance and Distribution of Sperm Whales in the Canary Islands: Can Sperm Whales in the Archipelago Sustain the Current Level of Ship-Strike Mortalities?

    PubMed

    Fais, Andrea; Lewis, Tim P; Zitterbart, Daniel P; Álvarez, Omar; Tejedor, Ana; Aguilar Soto, Natacha

    2016-01-01

    Sperm whales are present in the Canary Islands year-round, suggesting that the archipelago is an important area for this species in the North Atlantic. However, the area experiences one of the highest reported rates of sperm whale ship-strike in the world. Here we investigate if the number of sperm whales found in the archipelago can sustain the current rate of ship-strike mortality. The results of this study may also have implications for offshore areas where concentrations of sperm whales may coincide with high densities of ship traffic, but where ship-strikes may be undocumented. The absolute abundance of sperm whales in an area of 52933 km2, covering the territorial waters of the Canary Islands, was estimated from 2668 km of acoustic line-transect survey using Distance sampling analysis. Data on sperm whale diving and acoustic behaviour, obtained from bio-logging, were used to calculate g(0) = 0.92, this is less than one because of occasional extended periods when whales do not echolocate. This resulted in an absolute abundance estimate of 224 sperm whales (95% log-normal CI 120-418) within the survey area. The recruitment capability of this number of whales, some 2.5 whales per year, is likely to be exceeded by the current ship-strike mortality rate. Furthermore, we found areas of higher whale density within the archipelago, many coincident with those previously described, suggesting that these are important habitats for females and immature animals inhabiting the archipelago. Some of these areas are crossed by active shipping lanes increasing the risk of ship-strikes. Given the philopatry in female sperm whales, replacement of impacted whales might be limited. Therefore, the application of mitigation measures to reduce the ship-strike mortality rate seems essential for the conservation of sperm whales in the Canary Islands.

  5. The Geochemistry of Pinta, Marchena, and Genovesa Islands and the Surrounding Seafloor in the Galápagos Archipelago

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlitzer, W.; Harpp, K. S.; Kurz, M. D.; Geist, D.; Mittelstaedt, E. L.; Fornari, D. J.; R/v Melville Mv1007 Flamingo Cruise Scientific Party

    2010-12-01

    The central Galápagos Archipelago differs from many other ocean island chains in that it is underlain by a 500 x 200 km platform. An appendage of the platform extends ~50 km NW toward the GSC and includes Pinta, Marchena, and Genovesa Islands, despite the easterly motion of the Nazca Plate. The flanks of these islands were surveyed by EM122 and MR1 sidescan sonar and dredged at 7 locations during the 2010 R/V Melville MV1007 cruise. The volcanoes that make up the islands are close enough that they nearly coalesce. They have elongate bathymetric footprints, with a submarine ridge that extends ~30 km north of Pinta toward the 90°50’W GSC transform fault, between Marchena and Genovesa, and ~45 km to the NE of Genovesa. A strikingly flat-topped shoal, which may be a drowned island, extends ~30 km SE from Marchena. An intriguing aspect of this platform appendage is that most of the isotopic and trace element compositional range of the region is observed. Pinta has the lowest ɛNd value in the Galápagos, lower than the plume component sampled at Fernandina, and lavas from N Pinta Ridge exhibit levels of enrichment similar to Pinta’s lavas. Genovesa volcano, only 150 km to the east, is constituted of lavas that are mostly indistinguishable from MORB and exhibit the most depleted signatures in the archipelago. Marchena, the southern shoal, and submarine lavas from ridges that extend toward Pinta, are built of lavas that have trace element compositions that are mixtures of Pinta and Genovesa compositions. Lavas become progressively depleted from W to E across the appendage. New 3He/4He values range from 6.5 to 9.5 Ra, with the highest value between Genovesa and Marchena. Despite plume-like trace element and Nd isotopic signatures at Pinta, 3He/4He values are lower than typical MORB (6.5-6.7 Ra). One hypothesis is that the mostly degassed plume mixes with greater amounts of upper mantle as it flows east, yielding the observed compositional gradient. Alternatively, a

  6. Extensive lake sediment coring survey on Sub-Antarctic Indian Ocean Kerguelen Archipelago (French Austral and Antarctic Lands)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnaud, Fabien; Fanget, Bernard; Malet, Emmanuel; Poulenard, Jérôme; Støren, Eivind; Leloup, Anouk; Bakke, Jostein; Sabatier, Pierre

    2016-04-01

    Recent paleo-studies revealed climatic southern high latitude climate evolution patterns that are crucial to understand the global climate evolution(1,2). Among others the strength and north-south shifts of westerlies wind appeared to be a key parameter(3). However, virtually no lands are located south of the 45th South parallel between Southern Georgia (60°W) and New Zealand (170°E) precluding the establishment of paleoclimate records of past westerlies dynamics. Located around 50°S and 70°E, lost in the middle of the sub-Antarctic Indian Ocean, Kerguelen archipelago is a major, geomorphologically complex, land-mass that is covered by hundreds lakes of various sizes. It hence offers a unique opportunity to reconstruct past climate and environment dynamics in a region where virtually nothing is known about it, except the remarkable recent reconstructions based on a Lateglacial peatbog sequence(4). During the 2014-2015 austral summer, a French-Norwegian team led the very first extensive lake sediment coring survey on Kerguelen Archipelago under the umbrella of the PALAS program supported by the French Polar Institute (IPEV). Two main areas were investigated: i) the southwest of the mainland, so-called Golfe du Morbihan, where glaciers are currently absent and ii) the northernmost Kerguelen mainland peninsula so-called Loranchet, where cirque glaciers are still present. This double-target strategy aims at reconstructing various independent indirect records of precipitation (glacier advance, flood dynamics) and wind speed (marine spray chemical species, wind-borne terrigenous input) to tackle the Holocene climate variability. Despite particularly harsh climate conditions and difficult logistics matters, we were able to core 6 lake sediment sites: 5 in Golfe du Morbihan and one in Loranchet peninsula. Among them two sequences taken in the 4km-long Lake Armor using a UWITEC re-entry piston coring system by 20 and 100m water-depth (6 and 7m-long, respectively). One

  7. Multiple invasions of the Ryukyu Archipelago by Oriental frogs of the subgenus Odorrana with phylogenetic reassessment of the related subgenera of the genus Rana.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Masafumi; Shimada, Tomohiko; Ota, Hidetoshi; Tanaka-Ueno, Tomoko

    2005-12-01

    The genus Rana, notably diversified in Oriental regions from China to Southeast Asia, includes a group of cascade frogs assigned to subgenera Odorrana and Eburana. Among them, R. ishikawae and the R. narina complex represent the northernmost members occurring from Taiwan to the Ryukyu Archipelago of Japan. Relationships of these frogs with the continental members, as well as the history of their invasions to islands, have been unclear. The taxonomic status of Odorrana and related genera varies among authors and no phylogenetic reassessment has been done. Using partial sequences of mitochondrial 12S and 16S rRNA genes, we estimated phylogenetic relationships among 17 species of the section Hylarana including Odorrana and Eburana, and related species from the Ryukyus, Taiwan, China, Thailand, Malaysia, and Indonesia. We estimate that (1) Odorrana is monophyletic and encompasses species of Eburana and R. hosii, which is now placed in Chalcorana, (2) the ancestor of R. ishikawae separated from other Rana in the middle to late Miocene prior to its entry to the Ryukyu Archipelago, (3) the ancestor of the R. narina complex later diversified in continental Asia, and invaded the Ryukyu Archipelago through Taiwan, (4) the R. narina complex attained its current distribution within the Ryukyus through niche segregations, and (5) vicariance of R. hosii between Malay Peninsula and Borneo occurred much later than the divergence events in the R. narina complex. Current subgeneric classification of Rana, at least of Southeast Asian members, requires full reassessment in the light of phylogenetic relationships.

  8. Anisakis species (Nematoda: Anisakidae) of Dwarf Sperm Whale Kogia sima (Owen, 1866) stranded off the Pacific coast of southern Philippine archipelago.

    PubMed

    Quiazon, Karl Marx A; Santos, Mudjekeewis D; Yoshinaga, Tomoyoshi

    2013-10-18

    Anisakid nematodes in the Pacific region of the Philippine archipelago still remain unexplored. This study was carried out to identify anisakid species from one of their final hosts, the Kogiid whale (Dwarf Sperm Whale, Kogia sima) stranded off the southern part (Davao Gulf) of the Philippine archipelago. Anisakid worms were initially identified morphologically using light and scanning electron microscopy, whereas identification to species level was carried out molecularly using PCR-RFLP and sequencing of the ITS (ITS1-5.8s rRNA-ITS2) and mtDNA cox2 regions. Parasitological study revealed new geographical records for the presence of two Anisakis species (A. brevispiculata and A. typica) and two unknown Anisakis species that are genetically close, at mtDNA cox2 region, to A. paggiae and A. ziphidarum. Based on the molecular data on both genes, the current findings suggest possible occurrence of local variations or sibling species of A. paggiae and A. ziphidarum in the region. Given that Anisakis species have not been reported in the Philippine archipelago, their presence in the Dwarf Sperm Whale inhabiting this region indicates high possibility of Anisakis infections in the marine fishes, cephalopods and other intermediate hosts within the Philippine waters.

  9. Microsatellite and mitochondrial markers reveal strong gene flow barriers for Anopheles farauti in the Solomon Archipelago: implications for malaria vector control.

    PubMed

    Ambrose, Luke; Cooper, Robert D; Russell, Tanya L; Burkot, Thomas R; Lobo, Neil F; Collins, Frank H; Hii, Jeffrey; Beebe, Nigel W

    2014-03-01

    Anopheles farauti is the primary malaria vector throughout the coastal regions of the Southwest Pacific. A shift in peak biting time from late to early in the night occurred following widespread indoor residue spraying of dichlorodiphenyltrichloro-ethane (DDT) and has persisted in some island populations despite the intervention ending decades ago. We used mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase I (COI) sequence data and 12 newly developed microsatellite markers to assess the population genetic structure of this malaria vector in the Solomon Archipelago. With geographically distinct differences in peak A. farauti night biting time observed in the Solomon Archipelago, we tested the hypothesis that strong barriers to gene flow exist in this region. Significant and often large fixation index (FST) values were found between different island populations for the mitochondrial and nuclear markers, suggesting highly restricted gene flow between islands. Some discordance in the location and strength of genetic breaks was observed between the mitochondrial and microsatellite markers. Since early night biting A. farauti individuals occur naturally in all populations, the strong gene flow barriers that we have identified in the Solomon Archipelago lend weight to the hypothesis that the shifts in peak biting time from late to early night have appeared independently in these disconnected island populations. For this reason, we suggest that insecticide impregnated bed nets and indoor residue spraying are unlikely to be effective as control tools against A. farauti occurring elsewhere, and if used, will probably result in peak biting time behavioural shifts similar to that observed in the Solomon Islands.

  10. Phylogeography, Interaction Patterns and the Evolution of Host Choice in Drosophila-Parasitoid Systems in Ryukyu Archipelago and Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Novković, Biljana; Kimura, Masahito T

    2015-01-01

    Island biotas provide a great opportunity to study not only the phylogeographic patterns of a group of species, but also to explore the differentiation in their coevolutionary interactions. Drosophila and their parasitoids are exemplary systems for studying complex interaction patterns. However, there is a lack of studies combining interaction-based and molecular marker-based methods. We applied an integrated approach combining phylogeography, interaction, and host-choice behavior studies, with the aim to understand how coevolutionary interactions evolve in Drosophila-parasitoid island populations. The study focused on the three most abundant Drosophila species in Ryukyu archipelago and Taiwan: D. albomicans, D. bipectinata, and D. takahashii, and the Drosophila-parasitoid Leptopilina ryukyuensis. We determined mitochondrial COI haplotypes for samples representing five island populations of Drosophila and four island populations of L. ryukyuensis. We additionally sequenced parts of the autosomal Gpdh for Drosophila samples, and the ITS2 for parasitoid samples. Phylogenetic and coalescent analyses were used to test for demographic events and to place them in a temporal framework. Geographical differences in Drosophila-parasitoid interactions were studied in host-acceptance, host-suitability, and host-choice experiments. All four species showed species-specific phylogeographic patterns. A general trend of the haplotype diversity increasing towards the south was observed. D. albomicans showed very high COI haplotype diversity, and had the most phylogeographically structured populations, with differentiation into the northern and the southern population-group, divided by the Kerama gap. Differentiation in host suitability was observed only between highly structured populations of D. albomicans, possibly facilitated by restricted gene flow. Differentiation in host-acceptance in D. takahashii, and host-acceptance and host-choice in L. ryukyuensis was found, despite there

  11. High Connectivity in the Deepwater Snapper Pristipomoides filamentosus (Lutjanidae) across the Indo-Pacific with Isolation of the Hawaiian Archipelago

    PubMed Central

    Gaither, Michelle R.; Jones, Shelley A.; Kelley, Christopher; Newman, Stephen J.; Sorenson, Laurie; Bowen, Brian W.

    2011-01-01

    In the tropical Indo-Pacific, most phylogeographic studies have focused on the shallow-water taxa that inhabit reefs to approximately 30 m depth. Little is known about the large predatory fishes, primarily snappers (subfamily Etelinae) and groupers (subfamily Epinephelinae) that occur at 100–400 m. These long-lived, slow-growing species support fisheries across the Indo-Pacific, yet no comprehensive genetic surveys within this group have been conducted. Here we contribute the first range-wide survey of a deepwater Indo-Pacific snapper, Pristipomoides filamentosus, with special focus on Hawai'i. We applied mtDNA cytochrome b and 11 microsatellite loci to 26 samples (N = 1,222) collected across 17,000 km from Hawai'i to the western Indian Ocean. Results indicate that P. filamentosus is a highly dispersive species with low but significant population structure (mtDNA ΦST = 0.029, microsatellite FST = 0.029) due entirely to the isolation of Hawai'i. No population structure was detected across 14,000 km of the Indo-Pacific from Tonga in the Central Pacific to the Seychelles in the western Indian Ocean, a pattern rarely observed in reef species. Despite a long pelagic phase (60–180 days), interisland dispersal as adults, and extensive gene flow across the Indo-Pacific, P. filamentosus is unable to maintain population connectivity with Hawai'i. Coalescent analyses indicate that P. filamentosus may have colonized Hawai'i 26 K–52 K y ago against prevailing currents, with dispersal away from Hawai'i dominating migration estimates. P. filamentosus harbors low genetic diversity in Hawai'i, a common pattern in marine fishes, and our data indicate a single archipelago-wide stock. However, like the Hawaiian Grouper, Hyporthodus quernus, this snapper had several significant pairwise comparisons (FST) clustered around the middle of the archipelago (St. Rogatien, Brooks Banks, Gardner) indicating that this region may be isolated or (more likely) receives input from

  12. Structure, composition and age of the small islands of Santa Luzia, Branco and Raso (Cape Verde Archipelago)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ancochea, Eumenio; Huertas, María José; Hernán, Francisco; Brändle, José Luis; Alonso, Mar

    2015-09-01

    The northern alignment of Cape Verde Archipelago contains three small islands in its central sector: Santa Luzia, Branco and Raso on which there is very scarce geological, petrological or geochronological information available. The three islands along with the island of São Vicente arise on a continuous underwater relief less than 50 m deep and about 70 km long that formed from separate volcanic edifices. The southernmost island, Raso is formed by accumulation of several tens of lava flows and some remaining strombolian cones. An erosion surface covered by sediments allows the separation of two different episodes of growth: the lower one older than 2 Ma, and the upper one between 0.9 and 1.2 Ma. The smaller island of Branco is the remnant of a large stratovolcano about 6 km in radius, 1000 m of altitude and between 5 and 6 Ma in age. Santa Luzia, the northernmost and largest island of this particular group is essentially a remaining rift zone between 4 and 7 Ma old, at least 600 m high, about 10 km long and 7 km wide. The SE extreme of the island is occupied by rocks of an older partially submarine stage of growth which, also include gabbroic intrusions crossed by a dense network of dikes whose age may be estimated in 8 Ma or more. On the contrary, the NW end shows the only remains of late post-erosion activity that is of much less volumetric importance and it has been dated between 0.8 and 1.4 Ma. The three islands as a whole are formed by moderately or strongly alkaline, basic and ultrabasic rocks similar to those found in the neighboring island of São Vicente. Ultraalkaline rocks only appear in Raso and differentiate types as trachyandesites and phonolites are exclusively found in Santa Luzia. The similar age found for the main stages of growth recorded in the mentioned four islands and, even more, in the other two islands: Santo Antão and São Nicolau situated at the end of the Barlovento alignment, are not easily comprehensible with evolution models

  13. The Toboggan Sun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidson, Wayne P. S.; van der Werf, Siebren Y.

    2005-09-01

    Special variants of the Novaya Zemlya effect may arise from localized temperature inversions that follow the height profile of hills or mountains. Rather than following its natural path, the rising or setting Sun may, under such circumstances, appear to slide along a distant mountain slope. We found early observations of this effect in the literature by Willem Barents (1597) and by Captain Scott and H. G. Ponting (1911). We show recent photographic material of the effect and present ray-tracing calculations to explain its essentials.

  14. Atmospheric refraction: a history

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehn, Waldemar H.; van der Werf, Siebren

    2005-09-01

    We trace the history of atmospheric refraction from the ancient Greeks up to the time of Kepler. The concept that the atmosphere could refract light entered Western science in the second century B.C. Ptolemy, 300 years later, produced the first clearly defined atmospheric model, containing air of uniform density up to a sharp upper transition to the ether, at which the refraction occurred. Alhazen and Witelo transmitted his knowledge to medieval Europe. The first accurate measurements were made by Tycho Brahe in the 16th century. Finally, Kepler, who was aware of unusually strong refractions, used the Ptolemaic model to explain the first documented and recognized mirage (the Novaya Zemlya effect).

  15. Atmospheric refraction: a history.

    PubMed

    Lehn, Waldemar H; van der Werf, Siebren

    2005-09-20

    We trace the history of atmospheric refraction from the ancient Greeks up to the time of Kepler. The concept that the atmosphere could refract light entered Western science in the second century B.C. Ptolemy, 300 years later, produced the first clearly defined atmospheric model, containing air of uniform density up to a sharp upper transition to the ether, at which the refraction occurred. Alhazen and Witelo transmitted his knowledge to medieval Europe. The first accurate measurements were made by Tycho Brahe in the 16th century. Finally, Kepler, who was aware of unusually strong refractions, used the Ptolemaic model to explain the first documented and recognized mirage (the Novaya Zemlya effect).

  16. Male hatchling production in sea turtles from one of the world's largest marine protected areas, the Chagos Archipelago.

    PubMed

    Esteban, Nicole; Laloë, Jacques-Olivier; Mortimer, Jeanne A; Guzman, Antenor N; Hays, Graeme C

    2016-02-02

    Sand temperatures at nest depths and implications for hatchling sex ratios of hawksbill turtles (Eretmochelys imbricata) and green turtles (Chelonia mydas) nesting in the Chagos Archipelago, Indian Ocean are reported and compared to similar measurements at rookeries in the Atlantic and Caribbean. During 2012-2014, temperature loggers were buried at depths and in beach zones representative of turtle nesting sites. Data collected for 12,546 days revealed seasonal and spatial patterns of sand temperature. Depth effects were minimal, perhaps modulated by shade from vegetation. Coolest and warmest temperatures were recorded in the sites heavily shaded in vegetation during the austral winter and in sites partially shaded in vegetation during summer respectively. Overall, sand temperatures were relatively cool during the nesting seasons of both species which would likely produce fairly balanced hatchling sex ratios of 53% and 63% male hatchlings, respectively, for hawksbill and green turtles. This result contrasts with the predominantly high female skew reported for offspring at most rookeries around the globe and highlights how local beach characteristics can drive incubation temperatures. Our evidence suggests that sites characterized by heavy shade associated with intact natural vegetation are likely to provide conditions suitable for male hatchling production in a warming world.

  17. Estimation of mercury background values in sediment and biota of the Bijagós archipelago, Guinea-Bissau.

    PubMed

    Coelho, J P; Monteiro, R J R; Catry, T; Lourenço, P M; Catry, P; Regalla, A; Catry, I; Figueira, P; Pereira, E; Vale, C; P Granadeiro, José

    2016-10-15

    This work evaluates the mercury (Hg) contamination status (sediments and biota) of the Bijagós archipelago, off the coast of Guinea-Bissau. Sediments exhibited very low concentrations (<1-12ngg(-1)), pointing to negligible sources of anthropogenic Hg in the region. Nevertheless, Hg is well correlated to the fine fraction, aluminium, and loss on ignition, indicating the effect of grain size and organic matter content on the presence of Hg in sediments. Mercury in the bivalves Tagelus adansoni and Senilia senilis did not vary considerably among sites, ranging within narrow intervals (0.09-0.12 and 0.12-0.14μgg(-1) (dry weight), respectively). Divergent substrate preferences/feeding tactics may justify slight differences between species. The value 11ngg(-1) is proposed as the sediment background concentration for this West-African coastal region, and concentrations within the interval 8-10ngg(-1) (wet weight) may be considered as reference range for S. senilis and T. adansoni in future monitoring studies.

  18. Impact factors identification of spatial heterogeneity of herbaceous plant diversity on five southern islands of Miaodao Archipelago in North China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chi, Yuan; Shi, Honghua; Wang, Xiaoli; Qin, Xuebo; Zheng, Wei; Peng, Shitao

    2016-09-01

    Herbaceous plants are widely distributed on islands and where they exhibit spatial heterogeneity. Accurately identifying the impact factors that drive spatial heterogeneity can reveal typical island biodiversity patterns. Five southern islands in the Miaodao Archipelago, North China were studied herein. The spatial distribution of herbaceous plant diversity on these islands was analyzed, and the impact factors and their degree of impact on spatial heterogeneity were identified using CCA ordination and ANOVA. The results reveal 114 herbaceous plant species, belonging to 94 genera from 34 families in the 50 plots sampled. The total species numbers on different islands were significantly positively correlated with island area, and the average α diversity was correlated with human activities, while the β diversity among islands was more affected by island area than mutual distances. Spatial heterogeneity within islands indicated that the diversities were generally high in areas with higher altitude, slope, total nitrogen, total carbon, and canopy density, and lower moisture content, pH, total phosphorus, total potassium, and aspect. Among the environmental factors, pH, canopy density, total K, total P, moisture content, altitude, and slope had significant gross effects, but only canopy density exhibited a significant net effect. Terrain affected diversity by restricting plantation, plantation in turn influenced soil properties and the two together affected diversity. Therefore, plantation was ultimately the fundamental driving factor for spatial heterogeneity in herbaceous plant diversity on the five islands.

  19. On Blaps Fabricius, 1775 (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae) from Western Kazakhstan with description of a new species from Tyuleniy Archipelago (Caspian Sea).

    PubMed

    Chigray, Ivan A; Abdurakhmanov, Gayirbeg M; Nabozhenko, Maxim; Shapovalov, Andrey M

    2016-10-02

    A new species of darkling beetles Blaps caspica sp. n. from Western Kazakhstan Kulaly Island (Tyuleniy Archipelago, Caspian Sea) is described. This new taxon belongs to the 6th group of the 2nd section according to Seidlitz's classification and is most similar to Blaps kadyrbekovi G. Medvedev, 2004, B. lethifera Marsham, 1802 and B. parvicollis Zoubkoff, 1829. Blaps caspica sp. n. differs from B. kadyrbekovi by the presence of a hair tuft between male abdominal ventrites 1 and 2, from B. parvicollis by having narrow acute short spurs on the mesotibiae, the structure of the gastral spicula, ovipositor and female genital tubes, from B. lethifera by the slender elliptic body, punctated (not granulated) epipleura and the structure of the female genital tubes. Images, an identification key and local distribution are given for ten Western Kazakhstan species of the genus Blaps Fabricius, 1775.

  20. Effect of lipid extraction on analyses of stable carbon and stable nitrogen isotopes in coastal organisms of the Aleutian archipelago

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ricca, M.A.; Miles, A.K.; Anthony, R.G.; Deng, X.; Hung, S.S.O.

    2007-01-01

    We tested whether extracting lipids reduced confounding variation in ??13C and ??15N values by analyzing paired lipid-extracted (LE) and non-lipid-extracted (NLE) samples of bald eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus (L., 1766)) whole eggs, muscle tissue from nine seabird and one terrestrial bird species, muscle tissue from four marine fish species, and blue mussels (Mytilus edulis L., 1758) collected from the Aleutian archipelago, Alaska. Lipid extraction significantly increased ??13C by an average of 2.0??? in whole eggs, 0.8??? in avian muscle, 0.2??? in fish muscle, and 0.6??? in blue mussels. Lower ??13C values in NLE samples covaried positively with lipid content across all sample types. Lower ??13C values in NLE samples were not correlated with lipid content within bald eagle eggs and blue mussels, but covaried positively with percent lipid in avian and fish muscles. Neither lipid extraction nor percent lipid significantly changed ??15N values for any sample type. Lower ??13C values in most NLE avian and fish muscle tissues should not confound interpretation of pelagic versus nearshore sources of primary production, but lipid extraction may be necessary when highly precise estimates of ??13C are needed. Lipid extraction may not be necessary when only ??15N is of interest. ?? 2007 NRC.

  1. Oil residues in Baltic sediment, mussel and fish. II. Study of the Finnish Archipelago 1979-81

    SciTech Connect

    Paasivirta, J.; Kaariainen, H.; Lahtipera, M.; Pellinen, J.; Sinkkonen, S.

    1982-01-01

    Aliphatic hydrocarbons and non-polar aromatic compounds have been analyzed after a spill of crude oil at Baltic Sea 1979 from drifting weathered oil glumps, sediment and sediment trap samples and bivalves at five areas of the Finnish Archipelago Sea. Mytilus and flounder muscles and flounder livers were analyzed 1980 and 1981 from three of the previous five areas. The glumps were shown to be weathered crude oil. Sediment trap samples on the visibly contaminated area contained higher amounts of oil residues and in different ratios than the bottom sediments at the same areas. Extra local aliphatic hydrocarbon pollution was detected from the sediment traps at the reference area. Bivalves contained high amounts of oil residues at visibly polluted but in some visibly non-polluted areas also 1979. Any significant decontamination was not detected at summer 1979 but next year the Mytilus samples contained only traces if any and 1981 no detectable levels of aromatic oil residues. Aliphatic hydrocarbon residues in flounders showed no regional differences and no significant change of levels between 1980 and 1981. In contrary, the aromatic oil residues decreased to the non-detectable level in flounder muscles and to a significantly lower level in flounder livers 1981 related to 1980. Linear correlations of the analysis results are discussed.

  2. Sediment characteristics and microbiological contamination of beach sand - A case-study in the archipelago of Madeira.

    PubMed

    Abreu, Roberto; Figueira, Celso; Romão, Daniela; Brandão, João; Freitas, M Conceição; Andrade, César; Calado, Graça; Ferreira, Carmen; Campos, Ana; Prada, Susana

    2016-12-15

    Beach sand can harbour pathogenic and opportunistic microorganisms, as well as faecal indicator bacteria that influence directly the bathing water quality. Pathogenic and opportunistic microorganisms often raise concern of exposure during beach related recreational activities. In this work, three different types of sandy beaches (natural basaltic, natural calcareous and artificial calcareous) of the Archipelago of Madeira (Portugal) were sampled for bacterial and fungal contaminants and grain size distribution, during four years (2010-2013). Following an extreme weather event in 2010, the faecal indicator bacteria levels spiked, returning to base levels shortly thereafter. The same phenomenon occurred with fungi, where potentially pathogenic fungi were the dominant group. Yeast-like fungi and dermatophytes were, however, mainly associated to months of higher usage by recreational users. Statistical analysis showed higher contamination of sediment in artificial beaches compared to natural beaches and granulometry and chemical composition of sand did not influence in the microbial loads. Instead, bather density and the influence of coastal protection structures needed to maintain the volume of artificial beach sand regarding the removal potential of wave induced currents are obvious influencing factors.

  3. Male hatchling production in sea turtles from one of the world’s largest marine protected areas, the Chagos Archipelago

    PubMed Central

    Esteban, Nicole; Laloë, Jacques-Olivier; Mortimer, Jeanne A.; Guzman, Antenor N.; Hays, Graeme C.

    2016-01-01

    Sand temperatures at nest depths and implications for hatchling sex ratios of hawksbill turtles (Eretmochelys imbricata) and green turtles (Chelonia mydas) nesting in the Chagos Archipelago, Indian Ocean are reported and compared to similar measurements at rookeries in the Atlantic and Caribbean. During 2012–2014, temperature loggers were buried at depths and in beach zones representative of turtle nesting sites. Data collected for 12,546 days revealed seasonal and spatial patterns of sand temperature. Depth effects were minimal, perhaps modulated by shade from vegetation. Coolest and warmest temperatures were recorded in the sites heavily shaded in vegetation during the austral winter and in sites partially shaded in vegetation during summer respectively. Overall, sand temperatures were relatively cool during the nesting seasons of both species which would likely produce fairly balanced hatchling sex ratios of 53% and 63% male hatchlings, respectively, for hawksbill and green turtles. This result contrasts with the predominantly high female skew reported for offspring at most rookeries around the globe and highlights how local beach characteristics can drive incubation temperatures. Our evidence suggests that sites characterized by heavy shade associated with intact natural vegetation are likely to provide conditions suitable for male hatchling production in a warming world. PMID:26832230

  4. Historical processes and contemporary ocean currents drive genetic structure in the seagrass Thalassia hemprichii in the Indo-Australian Archipelago.

    PubMed

    Hernawan, Udhi E; van Dijk, Kor-Jent; Kendrick, Gary A; Feng, Ming; Biffin, Edward; Lavery, Paul S; McMahon, Kathryn

    2017-02-01

    Understanding spatial patterns of gene flow and genetic structure is essential for the conservation of marine ecosystems. Contemporary ocean currents and historical isolation due to Pleistocene sea level fluctuations have been predicted to influence the genetic structure in marine populations. In the Indo-Australian Archipelago (IAA), the world's hotspot of marine biodiversity, seagrasses are a vital component but population genetic information is very limited. Here, we reconstructed the phylogeography of the seagrass Thalassia hemprichii in the IAA based on single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and then characterized the genetic structure based on a panel of 16 microsatellite markers. We further examined the relative importance of historical isolation and contemporary ocean currents in driving the patterns of genetic structure. Results from SNPs revealed three population groups: eastern Indonesia, western Indonesia (Sunda Shelf) and Indian Ocean; while the microsatellites supported five population groups (eastern Indonesia, Sunda Shelf, Lesser Sunda, Western Australia and Indian Ocean). Both SNPs and microsatellites showed asymmetrical gene flow among population groups with a trend of southwestward migration from eastern Indonesia. Genetic diversity was generally higher in eastern Indonesia and decreased southwestward. The pattern of genetic structure and connectivity is attributed partly to the Pleistocene sea level fluctuations modified to a smaller level by contemporary ocean currents.

  5. Male hatchling production in sea turtles from one of the world’s largest marine protected areas, the Chagos Archipelago

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esteban, Nicole; Laloë, Jacques-Olivier; Mortimer, Jeanne A.; Guzman, Antenor N.; Hays, Graeme C.

    2016-02-01

    Sand temperatures at nest depths and implications for hatchling sex ratios of hawksbill turtles (Eretmochelys imbricata) and green turtles (Chelonia mydas) nesting in the Chagos Archipelago, Indian Ocean are reported and compared to similar measurements at rookeries in the Atlantic and Caribbean. During 2012–2014, temperature loggers were buried at depths and in beach zones representative of turtle nesting sites. Data collected for 12,546 days revealed seasonal and spatial patterns of sand temperature. Depth effects were minimal, perhaps modulated by shade from vegetation. Coolest and warmest temperatures were recorded in the sites heavily shaded in vegetation during the austral winter and in sites partially shaded in vegetation during summer respectively. Overall, sand temperatures were relatively cool during the nesting seasons of both species which would likely produce fairly balanced hatchling sex ratios of 53% and 63% male hatchlings, respectively, for hawksbill and green turtles. This result contrasts with the predominantly high female skew reported for offspring at most rookeries around the globe and highlights how local beach characteristics can drive incubation temperatures. Our evidence suggests that sites characterized by heavy shade associated with intact natural vegetation are likely to provide conditions suitable for male hatchling production in a warming world.

  6. Persistent organic pollutants in marine biota of São Pedro and São Paulo Archipelago, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Dias, Patrick S; Cipro, Caio V Z; Taniguchi, Satie; Montone, Rosalinda C

    2013-09-15

    Remote islands, such as the São Pedro and São Paulo Archipelago (SPSPA), Brazil, are pristine areas. However, these locations are not exempt from the arrival of anthropogenic agents, such as persistent organic pollutants (POPs). The present study aimed to determine the occurrence and distribution of POPs in the marine biota of the SPSPA. Sample extractions were performed using a microwave-assisted method. The predominant compounds were PCBs and DDTs, which respectively had mean wet weight concentrations of 62.23 and 9.23 ng g(-1) in the tropical two-wing flying fish (Exocoetus volitans), 78.66 and 6.81 ng g(-1) in the brown booby (Sula leucogaster) and 43.40 and 3.03 ng g(-1) in the red rock crab (Grapsus grapsus). Low levels of contaminants suggest a relative degree of isolation. Occurrence and distribution profiles of PCBs support long-range atmospheric transport as the main source of contamination and demonstrate the ubiquity of these pollutants in the marine environment.

  7. Species differentiation on a dynamic landscape: shifts in metapopulation genetic structure using the chronology of the Hawaiian Archipelago

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Roderick, George K.; Croucher, Peter J.P.; Vandergast, Amy G.; Gillespie, Rosemary G.

    2012-01-01

    Species formation during adaptive radiation often occurs in the context of a changing environment. The establishment and arrangement of populations, in space and time, sets up ecological and genetic processes that dictate the rate and pattern of differentiation. Here, we focus on how a dynamic habitat can affect genetic structure, and ultimately, differentiation among populations. We make use of the chronology and geographical history provided by the Hawaiian archipelago to examine the initial stages of population establishment and genetic divergence. We use data from a set of 6 spider lineages that differ in habitat affinities, some preferring low elevation habitats with a longer history of connection, others being more specialized for high elevation and/or wet forest, some with more general habitat affinities. We show that habitat preferences associated with lineages are important in ecological and genetic structuring. Lineages that have more restricted habitat preferences are subject to repeated episodes of isolation and fragmentation as a result of lava flows and vegetation succession. The initial dynamic set up by the landscape translates over time into discrete lineages. Further work is needed to understand how genetic changes interact with a changing set of ecological interactions amongst a shifting mosaic of landscapes to achieve species formation.

  8. Bathymetric segregation of sea urchins on reefs of the Canarian Archipelago: Role of flow-induced forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuya, F.; Cisneros-Aguirre, J.; Ortega-Borges, L.; Haroun, R. J.

    2007-07-01

    We examined whether adults of three species of sea urchins species ( Diadema antillarum, Arbacia lixula, and Paracentrotus lividus) exhibit a consistent depth-dependent partitioning pattern on rocky reefs of the Canarian Archipelago (eastern Atlantic). Hydrodynamic experiments were carried out to quantify the resistance to flow-induced dislodgement in these three species. We tested the model that different morphology can result in habitat partitioning among these sea urchins. Abundances of D. antillarum increased with depth. In contrast, A. lixula and P. lividus showed the opposite zonation pattern, coexisting in high abundances in the shallowest depths (<5 m), and occurring in low densities in the deepest part of reefs (>7 m). Both A. lixula and P. lividus had greater adhesion-surface to body-height ratios than D. antillarum. Similarly, A. lixula and P. lividus showed a greater ability to resist flow-induced dislodgement compared with D. antillarum. The mean "velocity of dislodgement" was ˜300% and 50% greater for A. lixula and P. lividus, respectively, relative to D. antillarum, for any particular size. As a result, A. lixula and P. lividus are better fitted to life in high-flow environments than D. antillarum. We conclude that the risk of dislodgement by water motion likely play a relevant role in the vertical distribution patterns of these sea urchins in the eastern Atlantic.

  9. Mixed carbonate and volcaniclastic slope facies in a middle to upper Miocene archipelago, Las Negras and Rodalquilar areas, southeastern Spain

    SciTech Connect

    Franseen, E.K. )

    1990-05-01

    The Las Negras and Rodalquilar areas contain excellent exposures of middle to upper Miocene carbonate and volcaniclastic deposits that fringe earlier formed Neogene volcanic substrates in an archipelago setting. The Miocene sedimentary sequence consists of three depositional sequences composed of reworked volcanic rocks and reef crest to distal slope strata that display 100-200 m of relief over 0.5-2.0 km. The entire sequence is truncated by a regional subaerial unconformity. The lower two depositional sequences are composed predominantly of shallow-dipping, normal marine, distal to proximal slope wackestones and packstones. The two sequences are separated by a megabreccia composed of Tarbellastreaea and Porites blocks and volcaniclastic sandstones and conglomerates. The reef blocks likely developed as upslope patch reefs, and, with the volcaniclastics, were eroded and transported via mass movements and tractive currents to a distal slope position. The upper (third) depositional sequence consists predominantly of foreslope strata of a Porites-dominated fringing reef complex. The base of this sequence is characterized by a megabreccia of Porites reef blocks, shallow-marine packstones, or volcaniclastic conglomerates. Five volcaniclastic wedges, interpreted as fan delta deposits, alternate with prograding carbonate foreslope deposits likely as a response to high frequency relative sea level fluctuations during a new sea level fall. The apparent correlatability of similar deposition sequences throughout the region indicates the importance of sequence development from allogenic processes, including glacio-eustatic sea level fluctuations and tectonism associated with the isolation of the Mediterranean Sea during the latest Miocene.

  10. First record of black band disease in the Hawaiian archipelago: response, outbreak, status, virulence, and a method of treatment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Aeby, Greta S.; Work, Thierry M.; Runyon, Christina M.; Shore-Maggio, Amanda; Ushijima, Blake; Videau, Patrick; Beurmann, Silvia; Callahan, Sean M.

    2015-01-01

    A high number of coral colonies, Montipora spp., with progressive tissue loss were reported from the north shore of Kaua‘i by a member of the Eyes of the Reef volunteer reporting network. The disease has a distinct lesion (semi-circular pattern of tissue loss with an adjacent dark band) that was first observed in Hanalei Bay, Kaua‘i in 2004. The disease, initially termedMontipora banded tissue loss, appeared grossly similar to black band disease (BBD), which affects corals worldwide. Following the initial report, a rapid response was initiated as outlined in Hawai‘i’s rapid response contingency plan to determine outbreak status and investigate the disease. Our study identified the three dominant bacterial constituents indicative of BBD (filamentous cyanobacteria, sulfate-reducing bacteria, sulfide-oxidizing bacteria) in coral disease lesions from Kaua‘i, which provided the first evidence of BBD in the Hawaiian archipelago. A rapid survey at the alleged outbreak site found disease to affect 6-7% of the montiporids, which is higher than a prior prevalence of less than 1% measured on Kaua‘i in 2004, indicative of an epizootic. Tagged colonies with BBD had an average rate of tissue loss of 5.7 cm2/day over a two-month period. Treatment of diseased colonies with a double band of marine epoxy, mixed with chlorine powder, effectively reduced colony mortality. Within two months, treated colonies lost an average of 30% less tissue compared to untreated controls.

  11. Comparing the information content of coral reef geomorphological and biological habitat maps, Amirantes Archipelago (Seychelles), Western Indian Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamylton, S.; Andréfouët, S.; Spencer, T.

    2012-10-01

    Increasing the use of geomorphological map products in marine spatial planning has the potential to greatly enhance return on mapping investment as they are commonly two orders of magnitude cheaper to produce than biologically-focussed maps of benthic communities and shallow substrates. The efficacy of geomorphological maps derived from remotely sensed imagery as surrogates for habitat diversity is explored by comparing two map sets of the platform reefs and atolls of the Amirantes Archipelago (Seychelles), Western Indian Ocean. One mapping campaign utilised Compact Airborne Spectrographic Imagery (19 wavebands, 1 m spatial resolution) to classify 11 islands and associated reefs into 25 biological habitat classes while the other campaign used Landsat 7 + ETM imagery (7 bands, 30 m spatial resolution) to generate maps of 14 geomorphic classes. The maps were compared across a range of characteristics, including habitat richness (number of classes mapped), diversity (Shannon-Weiner statistic) and thematic content (Cramer's V statistic). Between maps, a strong relationship was revealed for habitat richness (R2 = 0.76), a moderate relationship for class diversity and evenness (R2 = 0.63) and a variable relationship for thematic content, dependent on site complexity (V range 0.43-0.93). Geomorphic maps emerged as robust predictors of the habitat richness in the Amirantes. Such maps therefore demonstrate high potential value for informing coastal management activities and conservation planning by drawing on information beyond their own thematic content and thus maximizing the return on mapping investment.

  12. [Reef fishes community structure in 4 atolls of the San Andrés - Providencia Archipelago (Southwestern Caribbean)].

    PubMed

    Mejía, L S; Garzón-Ferreira, J

    2000-12-01

    In 1994 and 1995, 131 visual censuses of reef fishes were made using the stationary sampling method in Courtown, Albuquerque, Serrana and Roncador, four atolls of the Archipelago of San Andrés and Old Providence in the Southwestern Caribbean. Fish species and their abundances were recorded in four geomorphologic zones: lagoon, windward barrier reef, windward terrace and forereef terrace. A total of 98 species were censused; the most abundant were Chromis cyanea (14%), Clepticus parra (14%) and Stegastes partitus (10%). The most abundant families were Pomacentridae (37%), Labridae (28%) and Scaridae (10%). Analysis of similarities showed that differences between zones were greater than differences between atolls, but lagoon and forereef terrace were not significantly different. Cluster and ordination analysis confirmed these results; in addition, the ordination analysis placed the groups according to depth and wave-exposure gradients, suggesting that these two physical variables were responsibles for the clustering. Differences in equitability and species richness appear also due to these variables. Inverse analysis showed in each group few characteristic species, then the differences between zones were due specially to dominance of some species. The dominant trophic categories were planktivorous and herbivorous that were significantly different between zones. In shallow zones (shallow lagoonal patch reefs) and high wave-exposed zones (winward barrier reef) dominated herbivorous fishes, while in deeper zones (terraces and deep lagoonal patch reefs) planktivorous were more abundant.

  13. Using ecological function to develop recovery criteria for depleted species: sea otters and kelp forests in the Aleutian archipelago

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Estes, James A.; Tinker, M. Tim; Bodkin, James L.

    2010-01-01

    Recovery criteria for depleted species or populations normally are based on demographic measures, the goal being to maintain enough individuals over a sufficiently large area to assure a socially tolerable risk of future extinction. Such demographically based recovery criteria may be insufficient to restore the functional roles of strongly interacting species. We explored the idea of developing a recovery criterion for sea otters (Enhydra lutris) in the Aleutian archipelago on the basis of their keystone role in kelp forest ecosystems. We surveyed sea otters and rocky reef habitats at 34 island-time combinations. The system nearly always existed in either a kelp-dominated or deforested phase state, which was predictable from sea otter density. We used a resampling analysis of these data to show that the phase state at any particular island can be determined at 95% probability of correct classification with information from as few as six sites. When sea otter population status (and thus the phase state of the kelp forest) was allowed to vary randomly among islands, just 15 islands had to be sampled to estimate the true proportion that were kelp dominated (within 10%) with 90% confidence. We conclude that kelp forest phase state is a more appropriate, sensitive, and cost-effective measure of sea otter recovery than the more traditional demographically based metrics, and we suggest that similar approaches have broad potential utility in establishing recovery criteria for depleted populations of other functionally important species.

  14. Patterns of growth and body condition in sea otters from the Aleutian archipelago before and after the recent population decline

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Laidre, K.L.; Estes, J.A.; Tinker, M.T.; Bodkin, J.; Monson, D.; Schneider, K.

    2006-01-01

    3In addition to larger asymptotic values for mass and length, the rate of growth towards asymptotic values was more rapid in the 1990s than in the 1960s/70s: sea otters reached 95% of asymptotic body mass and body length 1–2 years earlier in the 1990s.4Body condition (as measured by the log mass/log length ratio) was significantly greater in males than in females. There was also an increasing trend from the 1960s/70s through 2004 despite much year-to-year variation.5Population age structures differed significantly between the 1960s/70s and the 1990s with the latter distribution skewed toward younger age classes (indicating an altered lxfunction) suggesting almost complete relaxation of age-dependent mortality patterns (i.e. those typical of food-limited populations).6This study spanned a period of time over which the population status of sea otters in the Aleutian archipelago declined precipitously from levels at or near equilibrium densities at some islands in the 1960s/70s to < 5% of estimated carrying capacity by the late 1990s. The results of this study indicate an improved overall health of sea otters over the period of decline and suggest that limited nutritional resources were not the cause of the observed reduced population abundance. Our findings are consistent with the hypothesis that the decline was caused by increased killer whale predation.

  15. Using ecological function to develop recovery criteria for depleted species: sea otters and kelp forests in the Aleutian archipelago.

    PubMed

    Estes, James A; Tinker, M Tim; Bodkin, James L

    2010-06-01

    Recovery criteria for depleted species or populations normally are based on demographic measures, the goal being to maintain enough individuals over a sufficiently large area to assure a socially tolerable risk of future extinction. Such demographically based recovery criteria may be insufficient to restore the functional roles of strongly interacting species. We explored the idea of developing a recovery criterion for sea otters (Enhydra lutris) in the Aleutian archipelago on the basis of their keystone role in kelp forest ecosystems. We surveyed sea otters and rocky reef habitats at 34 island-time combinations. The system nearly always existed in either a kelp-dominated or deforested phase state, which was predictable from sea otter density. We used a resampling analysis of these data to show that the phase state at any particular island can be determined at 95% probability of correct classification with information from as few as six sites. When sea otter population status (and thus the phase state of the kelp forest) was allowed to vary randomly among islands, just 15 islands had to be sampled to estimate the true proportion that were kelp dominated (within 10%) with 90% confidence. We conclude that kelp forest phase state is a more appropriate, sensitive, and cost-effective measure of sea otter recovery than the more traditional demographically based metrics, and we suggest that similar approaches have broad potential utility in establishing recovery criteria for depleted populations of other functionally important species.

  16. First Record of Black Band Disease in the Hawaiian Archipelago: Response, Outbreak Status, Virulence, and a Method of Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Aeby, Greta S.; Work, Thierry M.; Runyon, Christina M.; Shore-Maggio, Amanda; Ushijima, Blake; Videau, Patrick; Beurmann, Silvia; Callahan, Sean M.

    2015-01-01

    A high number of coral colonies, Montipora spp., with progressive tissue loss were reported from the north shore of Kaua‘i by a member of the Eyes of the Reef volunteer reporting network. The disease has a distinct lesion (semi-circular pattern of tissue loss with an adjacent dark band) that was first observed in Hanalei Bay, Kaua‘i in 2004. The disease, initially termed Montipora banded tissue loss, appeared grossly similar to black band disease (BBD), which affects corals worldwide. Following the initial report, a rapid response was initiated as outlined in Hawai‘i’s rapid response contingency plan to determine outbreak status and investigate the disease. Our study identified the three dominant bacterial constituents indicative of BBD (filamentous cyanobacteria, sulfate-reducing bacteria, sulfide-oxidizing bacteria) in coral disease lesions from Kaua‘i, which provided the first evidence of BBD in the Hawaiian archipelago. A rapid survey at the alleged outbreak site found disease to affect 6-7% of the montiporids, which is higher than a prior prevalence of less than 1% measured on Kaua‘i in 2004, indicative of an epizootic. Tagged colonies with BBD had an average rate of tissue loss of 5.7 cm2/day over a two-month period. Treatment of diseased colonies with a double band of marine epoxy, mixed with chlorine powder, effectively reduced colony mortality. Within two months, treated colonies lost an average of 30% less tissue compared to untreated controls. PMID:25774800

  17. The structure and diversity of freshwater diatom assemblages from Franz Josef Land Archipelago: a northern outpost for freshwater diatoms

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, Paul B.; Ballesteros, Enric; Gavrilo, Maria; Friedlander, Alan M.; Sala, Enric

    2016-01-01

    We examined diatom assemblages from 18 stream and pond samples in the Franz Josef Land Archipelago (FJL), the most northern land of Eurasia. More than 216 taxa were observed, revealing a rich circumpolar diatom flora, including many undescribed taxa. Widely distributed taxa were the most abundant by cell densities, while circumpolar taxa were the most species rich. Stream and pond habitats hosted different assemblages, and varied along a pH gradient. Diatoma tenuis was the most abundant and ubiquitous taxon. However, several circumpolar taxa such as Chamaepinnularia gandrupii, Cymbella botellus, Psammothidium sp. and Humidophila laevissima were also found in relatively high abundances. Aerophilic taxa were an important component of FJL diatom assemblages (Humidophila spp., Caloneis spp. and Pinnularia spp.), reflecting the large and extreme seasonal changes in Arctic conditions. We predict a decrease in the abundance of circumpolar taxa, an increase in local (α-) freshwater diatom diversity, but a decrease in regional diversity (circumpolar homogenization) as a result of current warming trends and to a lesser extent the increasing human footprint in the region. PMID:26925329

  18. Species-distance relation for birds of the Solomon Archipelago, and the paradox of the great speciators

    PubMed Central

    Diamond, Jared M.; Gilpin, Michael E.; Mayr, Ernst

    1976-01-01

    For scattered remote islands and for likely forms of immigration and extinction curves, the equilibrium theory of island biogeography leads to the prediction [unk]2 log S/[unk]A[unk]D > 0, where S is the number of species on an island, A island area, and D island distance from the colonization source. This prediction is confirmed for birds of the Solomon Archipelago. Bird species can be classified into three types according to how distance affects their distributions: non-water-crossers, which are stopped completely (usually for psychological reasons) by water gaps of even 1 mile; short-distance colonists, successful at colonizing close but not remote islands; and long-distance colonists, successful at colonizing remote as well as close islands. Almost all of the “great speciators”, the species for whose inter-island geographic variation the Solomons are famous, prove to be short-distance colonists. Lack's interpretation of the decrease in S with D is shown to rest on incorrect assumptions. PMID:16592328

  19. Madrean Archipelago Ecoregion: Chapter 28 in Status and trends of land change in the Western United States--1973 to 2000

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ruhlman, Jana; Gass, Leila; Middleton, Barry

    2012-01-01

    The Madrean Archipelago Ecoregion (Omernik, 1987; U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, 1997), also known as the “Madrean Sky Islands” or “Sky Islands,” covers an area of approximately 40,536 km2 (15,651 mi2) in southeastern Arizona and southwestern New Mexico (fig. 1). The ecoregion is bounded on the west by the Sonoran Basin and Range Ecoregion, on the east by the Chihuahuan Deserts Ecoregion, and on the north by the Arizona/New Mexico Mountains Ecoregion. This area of basin-and-range topography is one of the most biologically diverse in the world (Koprowski, 2005; Skroch, 2008). Although the mountains in the ecoregion bridge the Rocky Mountains to the north and the Sierra Madre Occidental in Mexico to the south (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, 1997), the lower elevations act as a barrier to species dispersal. Nevertheless, the geographic convergence of these two major continental mountain ranges, as well as of the Chihuahuan Desert to the east and the Sonoran Desert to the west, forms the foundation for ecological interactions found nowhere else on Earth (Skroch, 2008).

  20. Isolation by environment in White-breasted Nuthatches (Sitta carolinensis) of the Madrean Archipelago sky islands: a landscape genomics approach.

    PubMed

    Manthey, Joseph D; Moyle, Robert G

    2015-07-01

    Understanding landscape processes driving patterns of population genetic differentiation and diversity has been a long-standing focus of ecology and evolutionary biology. Gene flow may be reduced by historical, ecological or geographic factors, resulting in patterns of isolation by distance (IBD) or isolation by environment (IBE). Although IBE has been found in many natural systems, most studies investigating patterns of IBD and IBE in nature have used anonymous neutral genetic markers, precluding inference of selection mechanisms or identification of genes potentially under selection. Using landscape genomics, the simultaneous study of genomic and ecological landscapes, we investigated the processes driving population genetic patterns of White-breasted Nuthatches (Sitta carolinensis) in sky islands (montane forest habitat islands) of the Madrean Archipelago. Using more than 4000 single nucleotide polymorphisms and multiple tests to investigate the relationship between genetic differentiation and geographic or ecological distance, we identified IBE, and a lack of IBD, among sky island populations of S. carolinensis. Using three tests to identify selection, we found 79 loci putatively under selection; of these, seven matched CDS regions in the Zebra Finch. The loci under selection were highly associated with climate extremes (maximum temperature of warmest month and minimum precipitation of driest month). These results provide evidence for IBE - disentangled from IBD - in sky island vertebrates and identify potential adaptive genetic variation.

  1. Spatial variation patterns of subtidal seaweed assemblages along a subtropical oceanic archipelago: Thermal gradient vs herbivore pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sangil, Carlos; Sansón, Marta; Afonso-Carrillo, Julio

    2011-10-01

    The structure and composition of subtidal rocky seaweed assemblages were studied at 69 sites on the Canary Islands (northeastern Atlantic). This group of islands are situated at the southern boundary of the warm temperate region and adjacent to the cold waters from the northwest African coastal upwelling, which creates a difference of almost 2 °C in surface seawater temperature from the eastern to the western islands. This thermal variation allows an examination of the transition between the warm temperate and the tropical regions along this longitudinal gradient together with the hypothesised Fucales-dominated assemblages towards the eastern islands in contrast to the Dictyotales-dominated assemblages towards the western ones. Environmental and biological parameters were considered in order to investigate which were the main factors explaining spatial variation along the gradient in a multi-scaled approach. Although seventy-nine macroalgae were identified, 87.63% of the total mean cover was due to six taxa ( Lobophora variegata, nongeniculate corallines, Canistrocarpus cervicornis, Jania adhaerens, Cystoseira abies-marina and Pseudolithoderma adriaticum). At a large scale, sea urchin density explained the highest variation in seaweed assemblages (26.94%), and its pattern of distribution across the islands. The expected pattern of distribution according to the upwelling distance only occurred in restricted areas of the Canarian Archipelago in absence of herbivore pressure and habitat degradation. Spatial variations within islands (medium scale) were mainly related to wave exposure, while at a small scale these were mostly due to the degree of sedimentation.

  2. Spectral response of the coral rubble, living corals, and dead corals: study case on the Spermonde Archipelago, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nurdin, Nurjannah; Komatsu, Teruhisa; Yamano, Hiroya; Arafat, Gulam; Rani, Chair; Akbar AS, M.

    2012-10-01

    Coral reefs play important ecological services such as providing foods, biodiversity, nutrient recycling etc. for human society. On the other hand, they are threatened by human impacts such as illegal fishing and environmental changes such as rises of sea water temperature and sea level due to global warming. Thus, it is very important to monitor dynamic spatial distributions of coral reefs and related habitats such as coral rubble, dead coral, bleached corals, seagrass, etc. Hyperspectral data, in particular, offer high potential for characterizing and mapping coral reefs because of their capability to identify individual reef components based on their detailed spectral response. We studied the optical properties by measuring in situ spectra of living corals, dead coral and coral rubble covered with algae. Study site was selected in Spermonde archipelago, South Sulawesi, Indonesia because this area is included in the highest diversity of corals in the world named as Coral Triangle, which is recognized as the global centre of marine biodiversity and a global priority for conservation. Correlation analysis and cluster analysis support that there are distinct differences in reflectance spectra among categories. Common spectral characteristic of living corals, dead corals and coral rubble covered with algae was a reflectance minimum at 674 nm. Healthy corals, dead coral covered with algae and coral rubble covered with algae showed high similarity of spectral reflectance. It is estimated that this is due to photsynthetic pigments.

  3. Mesophotic reef fish assemblages of the remote St. Peter and St. Paul's Archipelago, Mid-Atlantic Ridge, Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosa, Marcos Rogerio; Alves, Aline Cristina; Medeiros, Diego Valverde; Coni, Ericka Oliveira Cavalcanti; Ferreira, Camilo Moitinho; Ferreira, Beatrice Padovani; de Souza Rosa, Ricardo; Amado-Filho, Gilberto Menezes; Pereira-Filho, Guilherme Henrique; de Moura, Rodrigo Leão; Thompson, Fabiano Lopes; Sumida, Paulo Yukio Gomes; Francini-Filho, Ronaldo Bastos

    2016-03-01

    Mesophotic reef fish assemblages (30-90 m depth) of the small and remote St. Peter and St. Paul's Archipelago (SPSPA), Mid-Atlantic Ridge, Brazil, were characterized using remotely operated vehicles. Ordination analyses identified distinct fish assemblages in the upper (30-50 m) and lower (50-90 m) mesophotic zones, the former characterized by high abundances of species that are also abundant at euphotic reefs ( Caranx lugubris, Melichthys niger, Stegastes sanctipauli and Chromis multilineata) and the latter dominated by two mesophotic specialists ( Prognathodes obliquus and Chromis enchrysura). Planktivores dominated fish assemblages, particularly in the upper mesophotic zone, possibly due to a greater availability of zooplankton coming from the colder Equatorial Undercurrent in mesophotic depths of the SPSPA. Turf algae, fleshy macroalgae and scleractinian corals dominated benthic assemblages between 30 and 40 m depth, while bryozoans, black corals and sponges dominated between 40 and 90 m depth. Canonical correspondence analysis explained 74 % of the relationship between environmental characteristics (depth, benthic cover and complexity) and structure of fish assemblages, with depth as the most important independent variable. Juveniles of Bodianus insularis and adults of P. obliquus and C. enchrysura were clearly associated with branching black corals ( Tanacetipathes spp.), suggesting that black corals play key ecological roles in lower mesophotic reefs of the SPSPA. Results from this study add to the global database about mesophotic reef ecosystems (MREs) and provide a baseline for future evaluations of possible anthropogenic and natural disturbances on MREs of the SPSPA.

  4. Ancient Stone Tidal Weirs in Penghu Archipelago: Distribution, Category, Structure and Function, a Google Earth and GIS Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, L.; Wang, X. Y.; Liu, J.; Guo, H. D.

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study was to give a comprehensive archaeological investigation for Penghu's stone tidal weirs (STWs) based on both Google Earth and GIS. Firstly, this study uses GoogleEarth Pro tools to clip a GeoEye-1 image (acquisition date: 22/07/2013) and a WorldView-2 image (acquisition date: 25/01/2014) for Chipei Island and Husi Island, respectively, and save them at a "premium resolution" of 4800 dpi. More, using 15 m panchromatic orthorectified Landsat images as a base, two clips were geo-referenced in ENVI 5.1 with minimal root mean square error. Furthermore, the STWs were manual extracted from the two GoogleEarth images in ArcGIS 10.1. Category and size statistics are presented; construction structure and weir function are discussed. Lastly, by using GIS analyses, STWs characteristics of intertidal flats across Penghu archipelago have been mapped and related to key geographical environmental variables. From spring to summer of 2015 our research team conducted investigations into Penghu's STWs based on different seasons and time periods of GoogleEarth historic images. Our results showed that, distributed amongst Penghu's coastline, there are 503 STWs. Compared with the official survey results (around 592 STWs), the counts are similar but the GoogleEarth-based method is more time-saving and efficient.

  5. Unexpectedly High Levels of Cryptic Diversity Uncovered by a Complete DNA Barcoding of Reptiles of the Socotra Archipelago

    PubMed Central

    Simó-Riudalbas, Marc; Sindaco, Roberto; Santos, Xavier; Fasola, Mauro; Llorente, Gustavo; Razzetti, Edoardo; Carranza, Salvador

    2016-01-01

    Few DNA barcoding studies of squamate reptiles have been conducted. Due to the significance of the Socotra Archipelago (a UNESCO Natural World Heritage site and a biodiversity hotspot) and the conservation interest of its reptile fauna (94% endemics), we performed the most comprehensive DNA barcoding study on an island group to date to test its applicability to specimen identification and species discovery. Reptiles constitute Socotra’s most important vertebrate fauna, yet their taxonomy remains under-studied. We successfully DNA-barcoded 380 individuals of all 31 presently recognized species. The specimen identification success rate is moderate to high, and almost all species presented local barcoding gaps. The unexpected high levels of intra-specific variability found within some species suggest cryptic diversity. Species richness may be under-estimated by 13.8–54.4%. This has implications in the species’ ranges and conservation status that should be considered for conservation planning. Other phylogenetic studies using mitochondrial and nuclear markers are congruent with our results. We conclude that, despite its reduced length (663 base pairs), cytochrome c oxidase 1, COI, is very useful for specimen identification and for detecting intra-specific diversity, and has a good phylogenetic signal. We recommend DNA barcoding to be applied to other biodiversity hotspots for quickly and cost-efficiently flagging species discovery, preferentially incorporated into an integrative taxonomic framework. PMID:26930572

  6. The structure and diversity of freshwater diatom assemblages from Franz Josef Land Archipelago: a northern outpost for freshwater diatoms.

    PubMed

    Pla-Rabés, Sergi; Hamilton, Paul B; Ballesteros, Enric; Gavrilo, Maria; Friedlander, Alan M; Sala, Enric

    2016-01-01

    We examined diatom assemblages from 18 stream and pond samples in the Franz Josef Land Archipelago (FJL), the most northern land of Eurasia. More than 216 taxa were observed, revealing a rich circumpolar diatom flora, including many undescribed taxa. Widely distributed taxa were the most abundant by cell densities, while circumpolar taxa were the most species rich. Stream and pond habitats hosted different assemblages, and varied along a pH gradient. Diatoma tenuis was the most abundant and ubiquitous taxon. However, several circumpolar taxa such as Chamaepinnularia gandrupii, Cymbella botellus, Psammothidium sp. and Humidophila laevissima were also found in relatively high abundances. Aerophilic taxa were an important component of FJL diatom assemblages (Humidophila spp., Caloneis spp. and Pinnularia spp.), reflecting the large and extreme seasonal changes in Arctic conditions. We predict a decrease in the abundance of circumpolar taxa, an increase in local (α-) freshwater diatom diversity, but a decrease in regional diversity (circumpolar homogenization) as a result of current warming trends and to a lesser extent the increasing human footprint in the region.

  7. Unexpectedly High Levels of Cryptic Diversity Uncovered by a Complete DNA Barcoding of Reptiles of the Socotra Archipelago.

    PubMed

    Vasconcelos, Raquel; Montero-Mendieta, Santiago; Simó-Riudalbas, Marc; Sindaco, Roberto; Santos, Xavier; Fasola, Mauro; Llorente, Gustavo; Razzetti, Edoardo; Carranza, Salvador

    2016-01-01

    Few DNA barcoding studies of squamate reptiles have been conducted. Due to the significance of the Socotra Archipelago (a UNESCO Natural World Heritage site and a biodiversity hotspot) and the conservation interest of its reptile fauna (94% endemics), we performed the most comprehensive DNA barcoding study on an island group to date to test its applicability to specimen identification and species discovery. Reptiles constitute Socotra's most important vertebrate fauna, yet their taxonomy remains under-studied. We successfully DNA-barcoded 380 individuals of all 31 presently recognized species. The specimen identification success rate is moderate to high, and almost all species presented local barcoding gaps. The unexpected high levels of intra-specific variability found within some species suggest cryptic diversity. Species richness may be under-estimated by 13.8-54.4%. This has implications in the species' ranges and conservation status that should be considered for conservation planning. Other phylogenetic studies using mitochondrial and nuclear markers are congruent with our results. We conclude that, despite its reduced length (663 base pairs), cytochrome c oxidase 1, COI, is very useful for specimen identification and for detecting intra-specific diversity, and has a good phylogenetic signal. We recommend DNA barcoding to be applied to other biodiversity hotspots for quickly and cost-efficiently flagging species discovery, preferentially incorporated into an integrative taxonomic framework.

  8. Organic matter pools, C turnover and meiofaunal biodiversity in the sediments of the western Spitsbergen deep continental margin, Svalbard Archipelago

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pusceddu, A.; Carugati, L.; Gambi, C.; Mienert, J.; Petani, B.; Sanchez-Vidal, A.; Canals, M.; Heussner, S.; Danovaro, R.

    2016-01-01

    We investigated organic matter (OM) quantity, nutritional quality and degradation rates, as well as abundance and biodiversity of meiofauna and nematodes along the deep continental margin off Spitsbergen, in the Svalbard Archipelago. Sediment samples were collected in July 2010 and 2011 along a bathymetric gradient between 600 m and 2000 m depth, and total mass flux measured at the same depths from July 2010 to July 2011. In both sampling periods sedimentary OM contents and C degradation rates increased significantly with water depth, whereas OM nutritional quality was generally higher at shallower depths, with the unique exception at 600 m depth in 2010. Meiofaunal abundance and biomass (largely dominated by nematodes) showed the highest values at intermediate depths (ca 1500 m) in both sampling periods. The richness of meiofaunal higher taxa and nematode species richness did not vary significantly with water depth in both sampling periods. We suggest here that patterns in OM quantity, C degradation rates, and meiofauna community composition in 2011 were likely influenced by the intensification of the warm West Spitsbergen Current (WSC). We hypothesize that the intensity of the WSC inflow to the Arctic Ocean could have an important role on benthic biodiversity and functioning of deep-sea Arctic ecosystems.

  9. Periglacial Landscape Stabilization Following Rapid Permafrost Degradation by Thermo-erosion, Bylot Island, Nunavut, Canadian Arctic Archipelago

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortier, D.; Godin, E.; Perreault, N.; Levesque, E.

    2010-12-01

    and the subsequent colonization of stabilized slopes by vegetation changed the thermal properties of the soil which resulted in a thinning of the active layer and ground ice aggradation in the upper part of the permafrost. These negative feedback effects contributed to permafrost recovery and ground ice aggradation. The latent heat of this ice-rich zone will act as a buffer to global warming and contributes to the long-term stability of the gullies in the new periglacial landscape. Fortier, D., Allard, M. 2004. Late Holocene Syngenetic Ice-wedge Polygons Development, Bylot Island, Canadian Arctic Archipelago. Canadian Journal of Earth Sciences, 41: 997-1012. Fortier, D., Allard, M., Shur, Y. 2007. Observation of Rapid Drainage System Development by Thermal Erosion of Ice Wedges on Bylot Island, Canadian Arctic Archipelago. Permafrost and Periglacial Processes, 18: 229-243. Godin, E., Fortier, D. (in press) Geomorphology of thermo-erosion gullies - case study from Bylot Island, Nunavut, Canada. Proceedings 6th Canadian Permafrost Conference and 63rd Canadian Geotechnical Conference, Calgary, October 2010.

  10. Volcano-tectonic framework of a linear volcanic ridge (Faial-Pico ridge, Azores Archipelago) assessed by paleomagnetic studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, Pedro; Henry, Bernard; Lopes, Ana; Marques, Fernando; Madureira, Pedro; Hildenbrand, Anthony; Madeira, José; Nunes, João; Roxerová, Zuzana

    2016-04-01

    The morphology of volcanic oceanic islands results from the alternation between constructive and destructive episodes. In this study directional analyses obtained from paleomagnetic studies are used as a tool to achieve relative rotations related with destructive processes intra the Pico-Faial linear volcanic ridge (Azores archipelago; North Atlantic). A total of 45 lava flows and one dyke were sampled preferable along lava piles though to record volcano-tectonic movements. The respective paleomagnetic results are able to show important rotations within the two islands that resemble the onshore signature of this ridge. Paleomagnetic directions retrieved here mostly show elliptical distribution of ChRM's sub-perpendicular to volcanic ridge. Such distribution agrees with the development of listric faults plunging towards the axis of the volcanic ridge at Faial Island and towards offshore at the Topo complex of Pico Island. In Faial Island, the "collapse" related to the magma chamber decompression was accommodated by brittle deformation with listric faults plunging toward the core of the formed graben. On Pico Island, this collapse was probably of less importance and simply accommodated by a local tilting. Listric faults then should have been developed, in the opposite direction (compared to Faial Island case) relatively to the collapsed area, to compensate a relative local uplift. Accordingly paleomagnetic studies appear as key data to retrieve intra-islands deformations due to the volcano-tectonic balance responsible for the construction and destruction of such unstable buildings. This important tool to address georisks and natural hazards remains poorly explored and need to be strongly developed. The author wish to acknowledge MEGAHAZARDS (PTDC/CTE-GIX/108149/2008) and REGENA (PTDC/GEO-FIQ/3648/2012) projects for its major contribution without which this work wouldn't be possible. Publication supported by project FCT UID/GEO/50019/2013 - Instituto Dom Luiz.

  11. Definition of a methodology for the management of geological heritage. An application to the Azores archipelago (Portugal)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lima, Eva; Nunes, João; Brilha, José; Calado, Helena

    2013-04-01

    The conservation of the geological heritage requires the support of appropriate policies, which should be the result of the integration of nature conservation, environmental and land-use planning, and environmental education perspectives. There are several papers about inventory methodologies for geological heritage and its scientific, educational and tourism uses (e.g. Cendrero, 2000, Lago et al., 2000; Brilha, 2005; Carcavilla et al., 2007). However, management methodologies for geological heritage are still poorly developed. They should be included in environmental and land-use planning and nature conservation policies, in order to support a holistic approach to natural heritage. This gap is explained by the fact that geoconservation is a new geoscience still needed of more basic scientific research, like any other geoscience (Henriques et al., 2011). It is necessary to establish protocols and mechanisms for the conservation and management of geological heritage. This is a complex type of management because it needs to address not only the fragile natural features to preserve but also legal, economic, cultural, educational and recreational aspects. In addition, a management methodology should ensure the geosites conservation, the local development and the dissemination of the geological heritage (Carcavilla et al., 2007). This work is part of a PhD project aiming to contribute to fill this gap that exists in the geoconservation domain, specifically in terms of establishing an appropriate methodology for the management of geological heritage, taking into account the natural diversity of geosites and the variety of natural and anthropic threats. The proposed methodology will be applied to the geological heritage of the Azores archipelago, which management acquires particular importance and urgency after the decision of the Regional Government to create the Azores Geopark and its application to the European and Global Geoparks Networks. Acknowledgment This work is

  12. Four new bat species (Rhinolophus hildebrandtii complex) reflect Plio-Pleistocene divergence of dwarfs and giants across an Afromontane archipelago.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Peter J; Stoffberg, Samantha; Monadjem, Ara; Schoeman, Martinus Corrie; Bayliss, Julian; Cotterill, Fenton P D

    2012-01-01

    Gigantism and dwarfism evolve in vertebrates restricted to islands. We describe four new species in the Rhinolophus hildebrandtii species-complex of horseshoe bats, whose evolution has entailed adaptive shifts in body size. We postulate that vicissitudes of palaeoenvironments resulted in gigantism and dwarfism in habitat islands fragmented across eastern and southern Africa. Mitochondrial and nuclear DNA sequences recovered two clades of R. hildebrandtii senso lato which are paraphyletic with respect to a third lineage (R. eloquens). Lineages differ by 7.7 to 9.0% in cytochrome b sequences. Clade 1 includes R. hildebrandtii sensu stricto from the east African highlands and three additional vicariants that speciated across an Afromontane archipelago through the Plio-Pleistocene, extending from the Kenyan Highlands through the Eastern Arc, northern Mozambique and the Zambezi Escarpment to the eastern Great Escarpment of South Africa. Clade 2 comprises one species confined to lowland savanna habitats (Mozambique and Zimbabwe). A third clade comprises R. eloquens from East Africa. Speciation within Clade 1 is associated with fixed differences in echolocation call frequency, and cranial shape and size in populations isolated since the late Pliocene (ca 3.74 Mya). Relative to the intermediate-sized savanna population (Clade 2), these island-populations within Clade 1 are characterised by either gigantism (South African eastern Great Escarpment and Mts Mabu and Inago in Mozambique) or dwarfism (Lutope-Ngolangola Gorge, Zimbabwe and Soutpansberg Mountains, South Africa). Sympatry between divergent clades (Clade 1 and Clade 2) at Lutope-Ngolangola Gorge (NW Zimbabwe) is attributed to recent range expansions. We propose an "Allometric Speciation Hypothesis", which attributes the evolution of this species complex of bats to divergence in constant frequency (CF) sonar calls. The origin of species-specific peak frequencies (overall range = 32 to 46 kHz) represents the

  13. A modern analog for carbonate source-to-sink sedimentary systems: the Glorieuses archipelago and adjacent basin (SW Indian Ocean)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jorry, S.; Jouet, G.; Prat, S.; Courgeon, S.; Le Roy, P.; Camoin, G.; Caline, B.

    2014-12-01

    This study presents the geomorphological and sedimentological analysis of a modern carbonate source-to-sink system located north of Madagascar (SW Indian Ocean). The sedimentary system is composed of an isolated carbonate platform sited on top of a seamount rising steeply from the seabed located at 3000 m water depth. The slope of the seamount is incised by canyons, and meandering channels occur above lobbed sedimentary bodies at the foot of the slope. The dataset consists of dredges, sediment piston cores, swath bathymetry and seismic (sparker and 2D high-resolution) lines collected from inner platform (less than 5 m deep) to the adjacent deep sedimentary basin. Particle size analysis and composition of carbonate grains are used to characterize the distribution and heterogeneity of sands accumulated on the archipelago. Main results show that composition of carbonate sediments is dominated by segments of Halimeda, large benthic foraminifera, coral debris, molluscs, echinoderms, bryozoans and sponges. According to the shape and the position of sandwaves and intertidal sandbars developed in the back-barrier reef, the present organization of these well-sorted fine-sand accumulations appears to be strongly influenced by flood tidal currents. Seismic lines acquired from semi-enclosed to open lagoon demonstrate that most of the sediment is exported and accumulated along the leeward margin of the platform, which is connected to a canyon network incising the outer slope. Following the concept of highstand shedding of carbonate platforms (Schlager et al., 1994), excess sediment is exported by plumes and gravity flows to the adjacent deep sea where it feeds a carbonate deep-sea fan. Combined observations from platform to basin allow to explain how the Glorieuses carbonate source to sink system has evolved under the influence of climate and of relative sea-level changes since the last interglacial.

  14. Sources of organochlorine contaminants and mercury in seabirds from the Aleutian archipelago of Alaska: inferences from spatial and trophic variation.

    PubMed

    Ricca, Mark A; Keith Miles, A; Anthony, Robert G

    2008-11-15

    Persistent organochlorine compounds and mercury (Hg) have been detected in numerous coastal organisms of the Aleutian archipelago of Alaska, yet sources of these contaminants are unclear. We collected glaucous-winged gulls, northern fulmars, and tufted puffins along a natural longitudinal gradient across the western and central Aleutian Islands (Buldir, Kiska, Amchitka, Adak), and an additional 8 seabird species representing different foraging and migratory guilds from Buldir Island to evaluate: 1) point source input from former military installations, 2) westward increases in contaminant concentrations suggestive of distant source input, and 3) effects of trophic status (delta15N) and carbon source (delta13C) on contaminant accumulation. Concentrations of Sigma polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and most chlorinated pesticides in glaucous-winged gulls consistently exhibited a 'U'-shaped pattern of high levels at Buldir and the east side of Adak and low levels at Kiska and Amchitka. In contrast, concentrations of Sigma PCBs and chlorinated pesticides in northern fulmars and tufted puffins did not differ among islands. Hg concentrations increased westward in glaucous-winged gulls and were highest in northern fulmars from Buldir. Among species collected only at Buldir, Hg was notably elevated in pelagic cormorants, and relatively high Sigma PCBs were detected in black-legged kittiwakes. Concentrations of Sigma PCBs, dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (p,p' DDE), and Hg were positively correlated with delta15N across all seabird species, indicating biomagnification across trophic levels. The east side of Adak Island (a former military installation) was a likely point source of Sigma PCBs and p,p' DDE, particularly in glaucous-winged gulls. In contrast, elevated levels of these contaminants and Hg, along with PCB congener and chlorinated pesticide compositional patterns detected at Buldir Island indicated exposure from distant sources influenced by a combination of

  15. Geography, deer, and host biodiversity shape the pattern of Lyme disease emergence in the Thousand Islands Archipelago of Ontario, Canada.

    PubMed

    Werden, Lisa; Barker, Ian K; Bowman, Jeff; Gonzales, Emily K; Leighton, Patrick A; Lindsay, L Robbin; Jardine, Claire M

    2014-01-01

    In the Thousand Islands region of eastern Ontario, Canada, Lyme disease is emerging as a serious health risk. The factors that influence Lyme disease risk, as measured by the number of blacklegged tick (Ixodes scapularis) vectors infected with Borrelia burgdorferi, are complex and vary across eastern North America. Despite study sites in the Thousand Islands being in close geographic proximity, host communities differed and both the abundance of ticks and the prevalence of B. burgdorferi infection in them varied among sites. Using this archipelago in a natural experiment, we examined the relative importance of various biotic and abiotic factors, including air temperature, vegetation, and host communities on Lyme disease risk in this zone of recent invasion. Deer abundance and temperature at ground level were positively associated with tick abundance, whereas the number of ticks in the environment, the prevalence of B. burgdorferi infection, and the number of infected nymphs all decreased with increasing distance from the United States, the presumed source of this new endemic population of ticks. Higher species richness was associated with a lower number of infected nymphs. However, the relative abundance of Peromyscus leucopus was an important factor in modulating the effects of species richness such that high biodiversity did not always reduce the number of nymphs or the prevalence of B. burgdorferi infection. Our study is one of the first to consider the interaction between the relative abundance of small mammal hosts and species richness in the analysis of the effects of biodiversity on disease risk, providing validation for theoretical models showing both dilution and amplification effects. Insights into the B. burgdorferi transmission cycle in this zone of recent invasion will also help in devising management strategies as this important vector-borne disease expands its range in North America.

  16. Evaluation of seafood toxicity in the Australes archipelago (French Polynesia) using the neuroblastoma cell-based assay.

    PubMed

    Pawlowiez, Ralph; Darius, Hélène Taiana; Cruchet, Philippe; Rossi, Fanny; Caillaud, Amandine; Laurent, Dominique; Chinain, Mireille

    2013-01-01

    Ciguatera fish poisoning (CFP), a disease caused by consuming fish that have accumulated ciguatoxins (CTXs) in their tissue, is regarded as the most prevalent form of intoxication in French Polynesia. Recently, the Australes, one of the least affected archipelago until the early 1980s, has shown a dramatic increase in its incidence rates in 2009 with unusual CFP cases. In the present work, potential health hazards associated with the proliferation of various marine phytoplankton species and the consumption of fish and marine invertebrates highly popular among local population were assessed in three Australes islands: Raivavae, Rurutu and Rapa. Extracts from the marine dinoflagellates Gambierdiscus, Ostreospis and mat-forming cyanobacteria as well as fish, giant clams and sea urchin samples were examined for the presence of CTXs and palytoxin (PLTX) by using the neuroblastoma cell-based assay (CBA-N2a). Cytotoxic responses observed with both standards (Pacific CTX-3C and PLTX) and targeted marine products indicate that CBA-N2a is a robust screening tool, with high sensitivity and good repeatability and reproducibility. In Rurutu and Raivavae islands, our main findings concern the presence of CTX-like compounds in giant clams and sea urchins, suggesting a second bio-accumulation route for CFP toxins in the ciguatera food chain. In Rapa, the potential CFP risk from Gambierdiscus bloom and fish was confirmed for the first time, with levels of CTXs found above the consumer advisory level of 0.01 ng Pacific CTX-1B g(-1) of flesh in three fish samples. However, despite the presence of trace level of PLTX in Ostreopsis natural assemblages of Rapa, no sign of PLTX accumulation is yet observed in tested fish samples. Because this multi-toxinic context is likely to emerge in most French Polynesian islands, CBA-N2a shows great potential for future applications in the algal- and toxin-based field monitoring programmes currently on hand locally.

  17. Sources of organochlorine contaminants and mercury in seabirds from the Aleutian archipelago of Alaska: Inferences from spatial and trophic variation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ricca, Mark A.; Miles, A. Keith; Anthony, Robert G.

    2008-01-01

    Persistent organochlorine compounds and mercury (Hg) have been detected in numerous coastal organisms of the Aleutian archipelago of Alaska, yet sources of these contaminants are unclear. We collected glaucous-winged gulls, northern fulmars, and tufted puffins along a natural longitudinal gradient across the western and central Aleutian Islands (Buldir, Kiska, Amchitka, Adak), and an additional 8 seabird species representing different foraging and migratory guilds from Buldir Island to evaluate: 1) point source input from former military installations, 2) westward increases in contaminant concentrations suggestive of distant source input, and 3) effects of trophic status (δ15N) and carbon source (δ13C) on contaminant accumulation. Concentrations of Σ polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and most chlorinated pesticides in glaucous-winged gulls consistently exhibited a ‘U’-shaped pattern of high levels at Buldir and the east side of Adak and low levels at Kiska and Amchitka. In contrast, concentrations of Σ PCBs and chlorinated pesticides in northern fulmars and tufted puffins did not differ among islands. Hg concentrations increased westward in glaucous-winged gulls and were highest in northern fulmars from Buldir. Among species collected only at Buldir, Hg was notably elevated in pelagic cormorants, and relatively high Σ PCBs were detected in black-legged kittiwakes. Concentrations of Σ PCBs, dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (p,p′ DDE), and Hg were positively correlated with δ15N across all seabird species, indicating biomagnification across trophic levels. The east side of Adak Island (a former military installation) was a likely point source of Σ PCBs and p,p′ DDE, particularly in glaucous-winged gulls. In contrast, elevated levels of these contaminants and Hg, along with PCB congener and chlorinated pesticide compositional patterns detected at Buldir Island indicated exposure from distant sources influenced by a combination of atmospheric

  18. Sea lice infestations on juvenile chum and pink salmon in the Broughton Archipelago, Canada, from 2003 to 2012.

    PubMed

    Patanasatienkul, Thitiwan; Sanchez, Javier; Rees, Erin E; Krkosek, Martin; Jones, Simon R M; Revie, Crawford W

    2013-07-22

    Juvenile pink salmon Oncorhynchus gorbuscha and chum salmon O. keta were sampled by beach or purse seine to assess levels of sea lice infestation in the Knight Inlet and Broughton Archipelago regions of coastal British Columbia, Canada, during the months of March to July from 2003 to 2012. Beach seine data were analyzed for sea lice infestation that was described in terms of prevalence, abundance, intensity, and intensity per unit length. The median annual prevalence for chum was 30%, ranging from 14% (in 2008 and 2009) to 73% (in 2004), while for pink salmon, the median was 27% and ranged from 10% (in 2011) to 68% (in 2004). Annual abundance varied from 0.2 to 5 sea lice per fish with a median of 0.47 for chum and from 0.1 to 3 lice (median 0.42) for pink salmon. Annual infestation followed broadly similar trends for both chum and pink salmon. However, the abundance and intensity of Lepeophtheirus salmonis and Caligus clemensi, the 2 main sea lice species of interest, were significantly greater on chum than on pink salmon in around half of the years studied. Logistic regression with random effect was used to model prevalence of sea lice infestation for the combined beach and purse seine data. The model suggested inter-annual variation as well as a spatial clustering effect on the prevalence of sea lice infestation in both chum and pink salmon. Fish length had an effect on prevalence, although the nature of this effect differed according to host species.

  19. Periodic behavior of soil CO2 emissions in diffuse degassing areas of the Azores archipelago: Application to seismovolcanic monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viveiros, Fátima; Vandemeulebrouck, Jean; Rinaldi, Antonio P.; Ferreira, Teresa; Silva, Catarina; Cruz, José V.

    2014-10-01

    Time series of soil CO2 efflux recorded in the Azores archipelago volcanic-hydrothermal areas feature daily and seasonal variations. The recorded CO2 efflux values were lower during summer than in the winter season. The diurnal CO2 efflux values were higher at dawn and lower in the early afternoon, contrary to that observed in biogenic environments. CO2 efflux cycles correlated well with the environmental variables, such as air temperature, wind speed, and barometric pressure, which also showed low- and high-frequency periodicities. Several simulations were performed here using the Transport of Unsaturated Groundwater and Heat 2 (TOUGH2) geothermal simulator to complement the study of Rinaldi et al. (2012). The effects of the water table depth, air temperature perturbation amplitude, and soil thermal gradient contributed to an explanation of the contrasts observed in the diurnal (S1) and semidiurnal (S2) soil CO2 efflux peaks for the different monitoring sites and seasons. Filtering techniques (multivariate regression analysis and fast Fourier transform filters) were also applied to the recorded time series to remove effects of external variables on the soil CO2 efflux. The resulting time series (the residuals) correspond to the best approach to the deep-seated (volcanic/hydrothermal) CO2 emissions and thus should be used in seismovolcanic monitoring programs. Even if no evident correlation can be established yet between the soil CO2 residuals and seismicity over the monitored time, a seismic swarm that occurred around the end of 2008 might have triggered some deviations from the observed daily cycles.

  20. Coral reef habitats mapping of Spermonde Archipelago using remote sensing compared with in situ survey of fish abundance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawayama, Shuhei; Komatsu, Teruhisa; Nurdin, Nurjannah

    2012-10-01

    Coral reefs worldwide are now facing so great threat due to various impacts that their monitoring is urgently required for conservation and management. To understand status of coral reef ecosystem and find out indicator fish species for health of ecosystem, mapping seabed habitats with remote sensing and in situ visual survey of fish assemblage by snorkeling were conducted in coral reefs in Spermonde Archipelago, Indonesia. ALOS AVNIR-2 multi-band imagery on 14 October 2010 was analyzed to map four habitats: live coral, dead coral, seagrass and sand-rubble. Groundtruth data were obtained using towed video camera and sidescan sonar in May and June 2011. Depth-Invariant indices (DI-indices) based on ratios of radiance values between bands were applied as a water column correction. Overall classification accuracy in Tau-coefficient of mapping with the DI-indices (0.66) didn't differ significantly (p<0.05) from that with the radiance values (0.63). Concerning visual fish survey, 12 fish groups were identified and numbers of individuals belonging to each group were counted along a transect of approximately 100m at 18 sites. We calculated Spearman's rank correlation between abundance (Ind. /100m) of every fish group along a transect and the ratio of each habitat area mapped with DI-indices inside the circle with 50m-diameter which includes the fish transect. We detected significant correlations between abundance of five fish groups and specific habitats, especially butterflyfish and live coral. This result corresponds to the past reports that butterflyfish was a good indicator of healthy corals, suggesting meaningfulness of studying relationships between fish abundance and spatial distribution of habitats in larger scale.

  1. Populations of exopolysaccharide-producing cyanobacteria and diatoms in the mucilaginous benthic aggregates of the Tyrrhenian Sea (Tuscan Archipelago).

    PubMed

    De Philippis, Roberto; Faraloni, Cecilia; Sili, Claudio; Vincenzini, Massimo

    2005-12-15

    The microalgal community of benthic mucilages sampled in various sites of the Tuscan Archipelago during the period May 1999-July 2002, was always dominated by diatoms. Synedra, Licmophora and Navicula were the most frequently found genera, their presence having been observed within all the period under study; other ten genera of diatoms were found in the benthic mucilages, but their presence was dependent on the month and the year of observation. As concerns the cyanobacterial community, the filamentous genera Leptolyngbya, Lyngbya and Rivularia were the most frequently found, independently on the period and the year of samplings, while other genera, namely Oscillatoria, Symploca, Aphanocapsa and Gloeocapsa, were less frequently observed. During the period under study, the highest number of different genera of diatoms and cyanobacteria in the mucilaginous aggregates was observed during summer periods, particularly in June and July. The microscopic observation of the samples demonstrated that only diatoms belonging to the genera Navicula, Amphora, Cylindrotheca and Pseudo-nitzschia possessed outermost polysaccharidic investments, the cells of the other genera being devoid of sheaths or capsules. On the other side, all the observed cyanobacteria, with the exception of Oscillatoria strains, were characterized by the presence of outermost polysaccharidic investments, most frequently in the form of sheaths. However, when the microalgal and cyanobacterial isolates were cultured under laboratory conditions, the release of polysaccharidic material into the culture medium was observed only in a few cases and always in very small amounts. The observations done on the natural samples and the results obtained with the cultures of the microalgae and cyanobacteria isolated from the benthic aggregates suggest that only diatoms have given some contribution to the formation of the polysaccharidic material constituting the matrix of the mucilages, whereas the role of cyanobacteria

  2. Early Jurassic tectonism occurred within the Basu metamorphic complex, eastern central Tibet: Implications for an archipelago-accretion orogenic model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hua-Qi; Xu, Zhi-Qin; Webb, A. Alexander G.; Li, Tian-Fu; Ma, Shi-Wei; Huang, Xue-Meng

    2017-04-01

    The Basu metamorphic complex, surrounded by ophiolitic melanges and intruded by a large volume of undeformed granitoid rocks along the eastern segment of the Bangong-Nujiang suture, holds one of the keys to understanding the pre-Cenozoic tectonic evolution of central Tibet. Zircon U-Pb dating of rocks from the Basu metamorphic complex reveals that meta-igneous rocks yield Early Paleozoic crystallization ages of 500-492 Ma and an Early Jurassic metamorphic age of 173 Ma, and that undeformed granitoid rocks yield crystallization ages of approximately 186-174 Ma. Whole rock geochemical and zircon Lu-Hf isotopic data indicate that the undeformed granitoid rocks originated mainly from partial melting of ancient crustal sources, which may reflect a collisional orogenic setting. 40Ar/39Ar dating of biotite from a sillimanite-garnet-biotite paragneiss shows cooling to 300 ± 50 °C at 165 Ma. These data indicate significant Early Jurassic tectonism, during which most of the Basu metamorphic complex was formed. Furthermore, the age data resemble those of the Amdo metamorphic complex located approximately 500 km to the west along the Bangong-Nujiang suture. Together, these complexes may represent a ;destroyed or unrecognized; block, i.e., the Amdo-Tongka block, which may be the eastern extension of the South Qiangtang terrane. Based on the tectonic outlines of the multiple ophiolitic zones and magmatic belts, we suggest a new archipelago-accretion model that attributes the Early Jurassic tectonism to an arc-continent/micro-continent collision. This model further enables the reconstruction of the eastern Tethyan Ocean and the orogenic processes of central Tibet during the Mesozoic.

  3. Composition and Predictive Functional Analysis of Bacterial Communities in Seawater, Sediment and Sponges in the Spermonde Archipelago, Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Cleary, Daniel F R; de Voogd, Nicole J; Polónia, Ana R M; Freitas, Rossana; Gomes, Newton C M

    2015-11-01

    In this study, we used a 16S rRNA gene barcoded pyrosequencing approach to sample bacterial communities from six biotopes, namely, seawater, sediment and four sponge species (Stylissa carteri, Stylissa massa, Xestospongia testudinaria and Hyrtios erectus) inhabiting coral reefs of the Spermonde Archipelago, South Sulawesi, Indonesia. Samples were collected along a pronounced onshore to offshore environmental gradient. Our goals were to (1) compare higher taxon abundance among biotopes, (2) test to what extent variation in bacterial composition can be explained by the biotope versus environment, (3) identify dominant (>300 sequences) bacterial operational taxonomic units (OTUs) and their closest known relatives and (4) assign putative functions to the sponge bacterial communities using a recently developed predictive metagenomic approach. We observed marked differences in bacterial composition and the relative abundance of the most abundant phyla, classes and orders among sponge species, seawater and sediment. Although all biotopes housed compositionally distinct bacterial communities, there were three prominent clusters. These included (1) both Stylissa species and seawater, (2) X. testudinaria and H. erectus and (3) sediment. Bacterial communities sampled from the same biotope, but different environments (based on proximity to the coast) were much more similar than bacterial communities from different biotopes in the same environment. The biotope thus appears to be a much more important structuring force than the surrounding environment. There were concomitant differences in the predicted counts of KEGG orthologs (KOs) suggesting that bacterial communities housed in different sponge species, sediment and seawater perform distinct functions. In particular, the bacterial communities of both Stylissa species were predicted to be enriched for KOs related to chemotaxis, nitrification and denitrification whereas bacterial communities in X. testudinaria and H. erectus

  4. Four New Bat Species (Rhinolophus hildebrandtii Complex) Reflect Plio-Pleistocene Divergence of Dwarfs and Giants across an Afromontane Archipelago

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Peter J.; Stoffberg, Samantha; Monadjem, Ara; Schoeman, Martinus Corrie; Bayliss, Julian; Cotterill, Fenton P. D.

    2012-01-01

    Gigantism and dwarfism evolve in vertebrates restricted to islands. We describe four new species in the Rhinolophus hildebrandtii species-complex of horseshoe bats, whose evolution has entailed adaptive shifts in body size. We postulate that vicissitudes of palaeoenvironments resulted in gigantism and dwarfism in habitat islands fragmented across eastern and southern Africa. Mitochondrial and nuclear DNA sequences recovered two clades of R. hildebrandtii senso lato which are paraphyletic with respect to a third lineage (R. eloquens). Lineages differ by 7.7 to 9.0% in cytochrome b sequences. Clade 1 includes R. hildebrandtii sensu stricto from the east African highlands and three additional vicariants that speciated across an Afromontane archipelago through the Plio-Pleistocene, extending from the Kenyan Highlands through the Eastern Arc, northern Mozambique and the Zambezi Escarpment to the eastern Great Escarpment of South Africa. Clade 2 comprises one species confined to lowland savanna habitats (Mozambique and Zimbabwe). A third clade comprises R. eloquens from East Africa. Speciation within Clade 1 is associated with fixed differences in echolocation call frequency, and cranial shape and size in populations isolated since the late Pliocene (ca 3.74 Mya). Relative to the intermediate-sized savanna population (Clade 2), these island-populations within Clade 1 are characterised by either gigantism (South African eastern Great Escarpment and Mts Mabu and Inago in Mozambique) or dwarfism (Lutope-Ngolangola Gorge, Zimbabwe and Soutpansberg Mountains, South Africa). Sympatry between divergent clades (Clade 1 and Clade 2) at Lutope-Ngolangola Gorge (NW Zimbabwe) is attributed to recent range expansions. We propose an “Allometric Speciation Hypothesis”, which attributes the evolution of this species complex of bats to divergence in constant frequency (CF) sonar calls. The origin of species-specific peak frequencies (overall range = 32 to 46 kHz) represents the

  5. High prevalence of obligate coral-dwelling decapods on dead corals in the Chagos Archipelago, central Indian Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Head, Catherine E. I.; Bonsall, Michael B.; Koldewey, Heather; Pratchett, Morgan S.; Speight, Martin; Rogers, Alex D.

    2015-09-01

    Small and cryptic organisms that live within the interstices of reef habitats contribute greatly to coral reef biodiversity, but are poorly studied. Many species of cryptofauna have seemingly obligate associations with live coral and are therefore considered to be very vulnerable to coral mortality. Here we report the unanticipated prevalence of obligate coral-dwelling decapod crustaceans on dead colonies of branching corals in the Chagos Archipelago (British Indian Ocean Territory) in the central Indian Ocean. A total of 205 obligate coral-dwelling decapods, including Trapezia crabs, were recorded from 43 (out of 54) dead coral colonies of Acropora and Pocillopora collected across five different atolls. Trapezia individuals found on dead corals were mainly juveniles, and the few adults were almost exclusively male. Among the shrimps (Pontoniinae), however, it was predominantly adult females found on dead corals. Obligate coral-dwelling species that typically occur only on live Pocillopora hosts (e.g., Trapezia spp.) were recorded on dead Acropora. These findings suggests that these obligate coral-dwelling decapods are not simply persisting on coral hosts that have died, but may be explicitly recruiting to or moving to dead coral hosts at certain stages in their life cycle. Variation in the abundance of live coral among sites had no affect on the presence or abundance of obligate coral-dwelling decapods on dead corals. This study shows that habitat associations of obligate coral-dwelling organisms, and their reliance on different habitat types, are complex and further work is required to establish their vulnerability to widespread habitat degradation on coral reefs.

  6. Carboniferous rifted arcs leading to an archipelago of multiple arcs in the Beishan-Tianshan orogenic collages (NW China)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Zhonghua; Xiao, Wenjiao; Windley, Brian F.; Zhang, Ji'en; Zhang, Zhiyong; Song, Dongfang

    2016-12-01

    The Beishan and East Tianshan Orogenic Collages in the southernmost Central Asian Orogenic Belt (CAOB) record the final stages of evolution of the Paleo-Asian Ocean. These collages and their constituent arcs have an important significance for resolving current controversies regarding their tectonic setting and age, consequent accretionary history of the southern CAOB, and the closure time of the Paleo-Asian Ocean. In this paper, we present our work on the southern Mazongshan arc and the northern Hongyanjing Basin in the Beishan Orogenic Collage (BOC), and our comparison with the Bogda arc and associated basins in the East Tianshan Orogenic Collage. Field relationships indicate that the Pochengshan fault defines the boundary between the arc and basin in the BOC. Volcanic rocks including basalts and rhyolites in the Mazongshan arc have bimodal calc-alkaline characteristics, an enrichment in large ion lithophile elements such as Rb, Ba, and Pb and depletion in high field-strength elements (e.g., Nb and Ta), which were probably developed in a subduction-related tectonic setting. We suggest that these bimodal calc-alkaline volcanic rocks formed in rifted arcs instead of post-orogenic rifts with mantle plume inputs. By making detailed geochemical comparisons between the Mazongshan arc and the Bogda arc to the west, we further propose that they are similar and both formed in arc rifts, and helped generate a Carboniferous archipelago of multiple arcs in the southern Paleo-Asian Ocean. These data and ideas enable us to postulate a new model for the tectonic evolution of the southern CAOB.

  7. Mass balance of the Canadian Arctic Archipelago using a combination of remote sensing and climate modeling techniques.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciraci, E.; Velicogna, I.; Rignot, E. J.; Mouginot, J.; van den Broeke, M. R.

    2014-12-01

    The Canadian Arctic Archipelago (CAA) hosts some of the largest glaciers and ice caps (GIC) outside Greenland and Antarctica and contains one-third of the global volume of land ice outside the ice sheets. Recent observations from satellite and airborne data indicate a large mass loss in that region. Here, we use time series of time-variable gravity from the NASA/DLR GRACE mission using a mascon approach to update the ice mass balance of this region till present. We find a mass loss of 73 Gt/year for April 2003 - December 2013. The mass loss per unit area is disproportionally large compared to that of the entire Greenland Ice Sheet. At the basin scale, we examine laser altimetry records from NASA's ICESat-1 (2003-2009) and Operation IceBridge's Airborne Topographic Mapper (ATM) to delineate areas of thinning and compare the results with surface mass balance (SMB) output products from the Regional Atmospheric and Climate Model (RACMO). We detect the signature of enhanced thinning along some of the CAA fast moving glaciers. Finally, we assemble a reference map of ice velocity from satellite radar interferometry, which we combine with existing ice thickness data to assess the mass flux and state of mass balance of the largest, fast-moving glaciers. Ice velocity from different years (1996 - 2006 - 2013) is used to construct time series of mass loss from the mass budget method. Combining these different sets of information, we address the issue of the partitioning of the mass loss between changes in SMB (essentially melt) and changes in ice dynamics (acceleration of glacier flow) to provide insights about the cause of the CAA change in mass balance in the last decades.

  8. Biological and physical processes influencing sea ice, under-ice algae, and dimethylsulfoniopropionate during spring in the Canadian Arctic Archipelago

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galindo, V.; Levasseur, M.; Mundy, C. J.; Gosselin, M.; Tremblay, J.-É.; Scarratt, M.; Gratton, Y.; Papakiriakou, T.; Poulin, M.; Lizotte, M.

    2014-06-01

    This study presents temporal variations in concentrations of chlorophyll a (Chl a), particulate and dissolved dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSPp and DMSPd) in the sea ice and underlying water column in the Canadian Arctic Archipelago during the spring of 2010 and 2011. During both years, bottom ice Chl a, DMSPp and DMSPd concentrations were high (up to 1328 µg L-1, 15,082 nmol L-1, and 6110 nmol L-1, respectively) in May and decreased thereafter. The release of bottom ice algae and DMSPp in the water column was gradual in 2010 and rapid (8 days) in 2011. Bottom brine drainage during the presnowmelt period in 2010 and a rapid loss of the snow cover in 2011 coinciding with rain events explain most of the difference between the 2 years. During both years, less than 13% of the DMSPd lost from the ice was detected in the water column, suggesting a rapid microbial consumption. An under-ice diatom bloom developed in both years. In 2010, the bloom was dominated by centric diatoms while in 2011 pennates dominated, likely reflecting seeding by ice algae following the faster snowmelt progression induced by rainfall events in 2011. Both under-ice blooms were associated with high DMSPp concentrations (up to 185 nmol L-1), but pennate diatoms showed DMSPp/Chl a ratios twice higher than centrics. These results highlight the key role of snowmelt and precipitation on the temporal pattern of ice-DMSP release to the water column and on the timing, taxonomic composition, and DMSP content of phytoplankton under-ice blooms in the Arctic.

  9. Re-colonization by common eiders Somateria mollissima in the Aleutian Archipelago following removal of introduced arctic foxes Vulpes lagopus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Petersen, Margaret R.; Sonsthagen, Sarah A.; Sexson, Matthew G.

    2015-01-01

    Islands provide refuges for populations of many species where they find safety from predators, but the introduction of predators frequently results in elimination or dramatic reductions in island-dwelling organisms. When predators are removed, re-colonization for some species occurs naturally, and inter-island phylogeographic relationships and current movement patterns can illuminate processes of colonization. We studied a case of re-colonization of common eiders Somateria mollissima following removal of introduced arctic foxes Vulpes lagopus in the Aleutian Archipelago, Alaska. We expected common eiders to resume nesting on islands cleared of foxes and to re-colonize from nearby islets, islands, and island groups. We thus expected common eiders to show limited genetic structure indicative of extensive mixing among island populations. Satellite telemetry was used to record current movement patterns of female common eiders from six islands across three island groups. We collected genetic data from these and other nesting common eiders at 14 microsatellite loci and the mitochondrial DNA control region to examine population genetic structure, historical fluctuations in population demography, and gene flow. Our results suggest recent interchange among islands. Analysis of microsatellite data supports satellite telemetry data of increased dispersal of common eiders to nearby areas and little between island groups. Although evidence from mtDNA is suggestive of female dispersal among island groups, gene flow is insufficient to account for recolonization and rapid population growth. Instead, near-by remnant populations of common eiders contributed substantially to population expansion, without which re-colonization would have likely occurred at a much lower rate. Genetic and morphometric data of common eiders within one island group two and three decades after re-colonization suggests reduced movement of eiders among islands and little movement between island groups after

  10. Geography, Deer, and Host Biodiversity Shape the Pattern of Lyme Disease Emergence in the Thousand Islands Archipelago of Ontario, Canada

    PubMed Central

    Werden, Lisa; Barker, Ian K.; Bowman, Jeff; Gonzales, Emily K.; Leighton, Patrick A.; Lindsay, L. Robbin; Jardine, Claire M.

    2014-01-01

    In the Thousand Islands region of eastern Ontario, Canada, Lyme disease is emerging as a serious health risk. The factors that influence Lyme disease risk, as measured by the number of blacklegged tick (Ixodes scapularis) vectors infected with Borrelia burgdorferi, are complex and vary across eastern North America. Despite study sites in the Thousand Islands being in close geographic proximity, host communities differed and both the abundance of ticks and the prevalence of B. burgdorferi infection in them varied among sites. Using this archipelago in a natural experiment, we examined the relative importance of various biotic and abiotic factors, including air temperature, vegetation, and host communities on Lyme disease risk in this zone of recent invasion. Deer abundance and temperature at ground level were positively associated with tick abundance, whereas the number of ticks in the environment, the prevalence of B. burgdorferi infection, and the number of infected nymphs all decreased with increasing distance from the United States, the presumed source of this new endemic population of ticks. Higher species richness was associated with a lower number of infected nymphs. However, the relative abundance of Peromyscus leucopus was an important factor in modulating the effects of species richness such that high biodiversity did not always reduce the number of nymphs or the prevalence of B. burgdorferi infection. Our study is one of the first to consider the interaction between the relative abundance of small mammal hosts and species richness in the analysis of the effects of biodiversity on disease risk, providing validation for theoretical models showing both dilution and amplification effects. Insights into the B. burgdorferi transmission cycle in this zone of recent invasion will also help in devising management strategies as this important vector-borne disease expands its range in North America. PMID:24416435

  11. Contrasting response to Pleistocene climate change by ground-living and arboreal Mandarina snails from the oceanic Hahajima archipelago.

    PubMed

    Davison, Angus; Chiba, Satoshi

    2008-10-27

    While the genetic impact of Pleistocene climate change on temperate species has been well characterized, especially in Europe and North America, an effect on the diversification of species on oceanic islands has been less well studied. This is perhaps a surprising observation given the traditional and continuing contribution of island species (e.g. Darwin's finches, Partula snails, Lord Howe Island palms) to understand speciation. Here, we combine mitochondrial and microsatellite data from the ground-living and arboreal Mandarina snails of the oceanic, subtropical Hahajima archipelago (Ogasawara, colloquially 'Galápagos of the Orient') to enable a comparative approach to understand the impact of the Pleistocene glaciations on their phylogeography. Prior work suggested that several narrowly divergent, ground-living species pairs of Mandarina populations on the outlying islands, as well as the low-lying southern and central parts of Hahajima, probably underwent bottlenecks and subsequent expansions during the recent Pleistocene. Here, the most striking finding is that largely arboreal species have deeply divergent, geographically restricted mitochondrial lineages, in contrast to a census size that is at least an order of magnitude lower than ground-living snails. As populations of both types are highly polymorphic at microsatellite loci, the systematic difference at the mitochondrial locus probably indicates a contrasting effect of the Pleistocene climate cycles on the two groups. We speculate that this may have partly come about owing to a reduced efficacy of natural selection on the more greatly structured populations of arboreal snails. If so, then a prediction is that the genome of other snails, or other species with limited mobility, will show a similar response to the Pleistocene climate cycles.

  12. Receiver function imaging of lithospheric structure and the onset of melting beneath the Galápagos Archipelago

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rychert, Catherine A.; Harmon, Nicholas; Ebinger, Cynthia

    2014-02-01

    The Galápagos Archipelago represents an opportunity to investigate the properties of young oceanic lithosphere, the effects of a hotspot anomaly on lithospheric thickness, and melting dynamics in a hotspot-ridge interaction. Here we use data recorded by the SIGNET array and permanent station PAYG on the Islands Santa Cruz and Isabela, respectively. We used P-to-S (Ps) and S-to-P (Sp) receiver functions to constrain crust and mantle structure. A simultaneous deconvolution method was used to constrain 1-D structure and also for the modeling of robust features. A migrated extended multitaper method was used to investigate 3-D structural variations. Ps images a velocity increase with depth at 11±7 km, probably the base of the pre-plume crust, or old Moho. Sp imaging and modeling images a second, deeper velocity increase at 37±7 km depth. A velocity decrease with depth is imaged on average at 75±12 km likely associated with the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary. This discontinuity is imaged deeper, 82 km, in the southwest and shallower, 66 km, in the northeast near the spreading ridge. Although the trend is consistent with lithospheric thickening with age, the thickness is much larger than predicted by conductive cooling models of 0-10 My oceanic lithosphere. We infer a compositional contribution to velocity variations. Finally, a velocity increase with depth is imaged at ˜125 to 145±15 km depth that is likely associated with the onset of melting. The discontinuity is imaged deeper in 3 sectors of the Galápagos platform-ridge region, all coincident with the slowest surface wave shear velocity anomalies in the upper 100 km. One is located in the southwest in a hypothesized plume location. The other two are to the northwest and northeast, possibly illuminating multiple plume diversions related to complex plume-ridge interactions.

  13. Distribution of Thelastomatoid Nematodes (Nematoda: Oxyurida) in Endemic and Introduced Cockroaches on the Galápagos Island Archipelago, Ecuador.

    PubMed

    Sinnott, Devinn; Carreno, Ramon A; Herrera, Henri

    2015-08-01

    The thelastomatoid pinworm fauna (Nematoda: Oxyurida: Thelastomatoidea) was surveyed in 3 endemic species and 6 introduced species of cockroach hosts (Insecta: Blattaria) in the Galápagos Islands, Ecuador. A total of 658 host specimens were examined from preserved collections that had been collected between 1966 and 2003 from 7 islands in the archipelago. Eight species of pinworms were identified from these cockroach hosts, including the dominant species Cephalobellus ovumglutinosus and a Severianoia sp. as well as Leidynema appendiculata, Hammerschmidtiella diesingi, an unidentified Cephalobellus species resembling Cephalobellus magalhaesi, an unidentified Protrellus species closely resembling Protrellus shamimi, and an undescribed Blattophila sp. Five new host records are identified for C. ovumglutinosus including the endemic Galápagos cockroaches Chorisoneura carpenteri, Ischnoptera snodgrassii, and Ischnoptera santacruzensis. These endemics were also infected with an undescribed Blatticola sp. Other species recorded resemble known pinworms from other hosts around the world. Prevalence between islands and between host species was variable, but total prevalence for individual pinworm species was consistently low (<10%). A single host specimen examined was infected with more than 1 pinworm species; otherwise only a single species was observed in each infected host. At least 1 introduced pinworm species carried to the islands via invasive cockroach hosts was present in endemic host species, but several globally widespread introduced pinworm species were absent from endemic cockroaches. Santa Cruz was inhabited by the greatest number of pinworm species, likely due to a higher rate of invasive host introduction. This survey, the first from this region, showed that the distribution and transmission of pinworms in the Galápagos Islands is complex and may provide future models of invertebrate dispersal and speciation in an ecosystem already rich with examples of

  14. The admixture structure and genetic variation of the archipelago of Cape Verde and its implications for admixture mapping studies.

    PubMed

    Beleza, Sandra; Campos, Joana; Lopes, Jailson; Araújo, Isabel Inês; Hoppfer Almada, Ana; Correia e Silva, António; Parra, Esteban J; Rocha, Jorge

    2012-01-01

    Recently admixed populations offer unique opportunities for studying human history and for elucidating the genetic basis of complex traits that differ in prevalence between human populations. Historical records, classical protein markers, and preliminary genetic data indicate that the Cape Verde islands in West Africa are highly admixed and primarily descended from European males and African females. However, little is known about the variation in admixture levels, admixture dynamics and genetic diversity across the islands, or about the potential of Cape Verde for admixture mapping studies. We have performed a detailed analysis of phenotypic and genetic variation in Cape Verde based on objective skin color measurements, socio-economic status (SES) evaluations and data for 50 autosomal, 34 X-chromosome, and 21 non-recombinant Y-chromosome (NRY) markers in 845 individuals from six islands of the archipelago. We find extensive genetic admixture between European and African ancestral populations (mean West African ancestry = 0.57, sd = 0.08), with individual African ancestry proportions varying considerably among the islands. African ancestry proportions calculated with X and Y-chromosome markers confirm that the pattern of admixture has been sex-biased. The high-resolution NRY-STRs reveal additional patterns of variation among the islands that are most consistent with differentiation after admixture. The differences in the autosomal admixture proportions are clearly evident in the skin color distribution across the islands (Pearson r = 0.54, P-value<2e-16). Despite this strong correlation, there are significant interactions between SES and skin color that are independent of the relationship between skin color and genetic ancestry. The observed distributions of admixture, genetic variation and skin color and the relationship of skin color with SES relate to historical and social events taking place during the settlement history of Cape Verde, and have implications for

  15. Philopatry drives genetic differentiation in an island archipelago: comparative population genetics of Galapagos Nazca boobies (Sula granti) and great frigatebirds (Fregata minor)

    PubMed Central

    Levin, Iris I; Parker, Patricia G

    2012-01-01

    Seabirds are considered highly mobile, able to fly great distances with few apparent barriers to dispersal. However, it is often the case that seabird populations exhibit strong population genetic structure despite their potential vagility. Here we show that Galapagos Nazca booby (Sula granti) populations are substantially differentiated, even within the small geographic scale of this archipelago. On the other hand, Galapagos great frigatebird (Fregata minor) populations do not show any genetic structure. We characterized the genetic differentiation by sampling five colonies of both species in the Galapagos archipelago and analyzing eight microsatellite loci and three mitochondrial genes. Using an F-statistic approach on the multilocus data, we found significant differentiation between nearly all island pairs of Nazca booby populations and a Bayesian clustering analysis provided support for three distinct genetic clusters. Mitochondrial DNA showed less differentiation of Nazca booby colonies; only Nazca boobies from the island of Darwin were significantly differentiated from individuals throughout the rest of the archipelago. Great frigatebird populations showed little to no evidence for genetic differentiation at the same scale. Only two island pairs (Darwin – Wolf, N. Seymour – Wolf) were significantly differentiated using the multilocus data, and only two island pairs had statistically significant φST values (N. Seymour – Darwin, N. Seymour – Wolf) according to the mitochondrial data. There was no significant pattern of isolation by distance for either species calculated using both markers. Seven of the ten Nazca booby migration rates calculated between island pairs were in the south or southeast to north or northwest direction. The population differentiation found among Galapagos Nazca booby colonies, but not great frigatebird colonies, is most likely due to differences in natal and breeding philopatry. PMID:23170212

  16. Redescription of Symphurus diabolicus, a poorly-known, deep-sea tonguefish (Pleuronectiformes: Cynoglossidae) from the Galápagos Archipelago.

    PubMed

    Munroe, T A; McCosker, J E

    2001-07-01

    Symphurus diabolicus, previously known only from the holotype collected in 501 m west of Isla San Cristobal (Chatham Island), Galápagos Archipelago, is re-described based on the holotype (112.6 mm SL) and 19 additional specimens (61.1-123.5 mm SL) recently collected from deep waters around the Galápagos Archipelago. Symphurus diabolicus is characterized by: an elongate body; narrow head with pointed snout; 1-3-2 ID pattern; 106-110 dorsal-fin rays; 89-96 anal-fin rays; 12 caudal-fin rays; 57-59 total vertebrae; 5 hypurals; extremely small scales; no pupillary operculum; large, prominent eyes, with migrated eye near dorsal margin of head; relatively short postorbital head length; relatively long snout and predorsal lengths; black peritoneum visible through abdominal wall on both sides of body; uniform olive green to dark brown ocular-side coloration with series of prominent, darker brown, elliptical to rectangular, blotches (not usually forming crossbands) along body at bases of dorsal and anal fins; and uniformly whitish or light yellow blind side. Symphurus diabolicus appears to be endemic to the Galápagos Archipelago, and is relatively common (captured at 16 different localities) at depths of 308 to 757 m (observed as shallow as 245 m) in this region. Examination of this expanded series of specimens confirms the validity of S. diabolicus and provides characters to distinguish it from S. microlepis Garman, a similar species known only from the holotype taken at approximately 530 m off Pacific Panama.

  17. Environmental factors controlling the distribution of rhodoliths: An integrated study based on seafloor sampling, ROV and side scan sonar data, offshore the W-Pontine Archipelago

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sañé, E.; Chiocci, F. L.; Basso, D.; Martorelli, E.

    2016-10-01

    The effects of different environmental factors controlling the distribution of different morphologies, sizes and growth forms of rhodoliths in the western Pontine Archipelago have been studied. The analysis of 231 grab samples has been integrated with 68 remotely operated vehicle (ROV) videos (22 h) and a high resolution (<1 m) side scan sonar mosaic of the seafloor surrounding the Archipelago, covering an area of approximately 460 km2. Living rhodoliths were collected in approximately 10% of the grab samples and observed in approximately 30% of the ROV dives. The combination of sediment sampling, video surveys and acoustic facies mapping suggested that the presence of rhodoliths can be associated to the dishomogeneous high backscatter sonar facies and high backscatter facies. Both pralines and unattached branches were found to be the most abundant morphological groups (50% and 41% of samples, respectively), whereas boxwork rhodoliths were less common, accounting only for less than 10% of the total number of samples. Pralines and boxwork rhodoliths were almost equally distributed among large (28%), medium (36%) and small sizes (36%). Pralines generally presented a fruticose growth form (49% of pralines) even if pralines with encrusting-warty (36% of pralines) or lumpy (15% of pralines) growth forms were also present. Morphologies, sizes and growth forms vary mainly along the depth gradient. Large rhodoliths with a boxwork morphology are abundant at depth, whereas unattached branches and, in general, rhodoliths with a high protuberance degree are abundant in shallow waters. The exposure to storm waves and bottom currents related to geostrofic circulation could explain the absence of rhodoliths off the eastern side of the three islands forming the Archipelago.

  18. Philopatry drives genetic differentiation in an island archipelago: comparative population genetics of Galapagos Nazca boobies (Sula granti) and great frigatebirds (Fregata minor).

    PubMed

    Levin, Iris I; Parker, Patricia G

    2012-11-01

    Seabirds are considered highly mobile, able to fly great distances with few apparent barriers to dispersal. However, it is often the case that seabird populations exhibit strong population genetic structure despite their potential vagility. Here we show that Galapagos Nazca booby (Sula granti) populations are substantially differentiated, even within the small geographic scale of this archipelago. On the other hand, Galapagos great frigatebird (Fregata minor) populations do not show any genetic structure. We characterized the genetic differentiation by sampling five colonies of both species in the Galapagos archipelago and analyzing eight microsatellite loci and three mitochondrial genes. Using an F-statistic approach on the multilocus data, we found significant differentiation between nearly all island pairs of Nazca booby populations and a Bayesian clustering analysis provided support for three distinct genetic clusters. Mitochondrial DNA showed less differentiation of Nazca booby colonies; only Nazca boobies from the island of Darwin were significantly differentiated from individuals throughout the rest of the archipelago. Great frigatebird populations showed little to no evidence for genetic differentiation at the same scale. Only two island pairs (Darwin - Wolf, N. Seymour - Wolf) were significantly differentiated using the multilocus data, and only two island pairs had statistically significant φ(ST) values (N. Seymour - Darwin, N. Seymour - Wolf) according to the mitochondrial data. There was no significant pattern of isolation by distance for either species calculated using both markers. Seven of the ten Nazca booby migration rates calculated between island pairs were in the south or southeast to north or northwest direction. The population differentiation found among Galapagos Nazca booby colonies, but not great frigatebird colonies, is most likely due to differences in natal and breeding philopatry.

  19. A multiplex PCR-based molecular identification of five morphologically related, medically important subgenus Stegomyia mosquitoes from the genus Aedes (Diptera: Culicidae) found in the Ryukyu Archipelago, Japan.

    PubMed

    Higa, Yukiko; Toma, Takako; Tsuda, Yoshio; Miyagi, Ichiro

    2010-09-01

    Internal transcribed spacer regions of ribosomal DNA were sequenced, and new species-specific primers were designed to simplify the molecular identification of five morphologically related subgenus Stegomyia mosquito species--Aedes aegypti, Ae. albopictus, Ae. riversi, Ae. flavopictus, and Ae. daitensis--found in the Ryukyu Archipelago, Japan. Each newly designed primer was able to amplify a species-specific fragment with a different size. Conditions for multiplex PCR were optimized to identify all five species in a single PCR. This method is a convenient tool for entomological field surveys, particularly in arbovirus endemic/epidemic areas where some of these species coexist.

  20. A stunning new species of Jamides Hübner, 1819 (Lepidoptera, Lycaenidae), with notes on sympatric congeners from the Bismarck Archipelago, Papua New Guinea

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Chris J.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Jamides vasilia sp. n., from montane West New Britain Province, Papua New Guinea, is described and illustrated. The new species is strongly divergent from other known Jamides Hübner, 1819 in possessing a high antenna-forewing length ratio, long androconia on the hindwing upperside and a strongly convex forewing inner margin in the male. It is compared by external structures, male genitalia and mtDNA sequence data to putative related species in the cyta group of Jamides. Notes on various Jamides taxa from the Bismarck Archipelago are also provided, with Jamides pseudosias (Rothschild, 1915) and Jamides reverdini (Fruhstorfer, 1915) recorded from New Britain for the first time. PMID:27110161

  1. First Harvestman Record for the Juan Fernández Archipelago, Chile, with Morphological Notes on Acropsopilio chilensis (Opiliones: Caddidae: Acroposopilioninae).

    PubMed

    Pérez-González, Abel; Ramírez, Martín J; Soto, Eduardo M; Pizarro-Araya, Jaime

    2014-08-15

    Acropsopilio chilensis Silvestri, 1904 (Eupnoi: Caddidae: Acropsopilioninae), is recorded for Robinson Crusoe Island, Chile. This is the first harvestman species recorded for the Juan Fernández Archipelago and also the first extra-continental record for this species. During the comparison with continental co-specific specimens, some previously unknown, remarkable morphological characteristics were discovered, among them: the absence of ovipositor seminal receptacles and tracheal system, small and probably imperforate spiracles and the presence of a subdistal spiny structure, maybe a stylus, in the major branch of the penis. 

  2. Horizontal and vertical distribution of freshwater in the Arctic Ocean deduced from historical hydrochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawai, M. Y.; Tanaka, N.; Pivovarov, S.; Timokhov, L.

    2004-12-01

    Historical data (1935-2002) of two chemical tracers, oxygen isotope ratio and alkalinity, are combined and freshwater sources of sea ice meltwater (SIM), and other freshwater (OF) are distinguished from each pair of two conservative elements, salinity-oxygen isotope and salinity-alkalinity. The OF consists of mainly river runoff, with addition of precipitation and salinity deficit of inflowing Pacific water. Results give at first startling pictures of both horizontal and vertical distributions of freshwaters from the two designated sources almost throughout the Arctic Ocean. River water sources in Canada Basin: Distribution of OF at the 10 depth shows that river water from the Russian shelf seas flows out of the shelf between the Mendeleyev and the Lomonosov Ridges and exits thorough western part of the Fram Strait. Part of this freshwater enters into the Canadian Basin, where water contains large amount of OF but small fraction of American river water. This may suggest that river water from American continent should exit from the basin relatively fast though the Canadian Archipelago. Vertical mixing of fresh water: The atmospheric cooling and brine rejection during winter converts fresh surface water into denser water with high OF and negative SIM signals. High inventories of both OF and negative SIM, which implies mixing with brine, are found in the Canadian Basin, Baffin Bay and east of Novaya Zemlya in the Kara Sea. These signals in the Kara Sea and the Baffin Bay show occurrence of deep convection in winter, whereas those in the Canadian Basin come from adjacent shallow shelves. In the Canadian Basin, negative SIM distribution is well corresponding to the low temperature layer between surface and Atlantic origin waters. This layer characterized by nutrient maximum with a salinity of about 33.1 and is found to form from the water having salinity of 31-32. Our analysis advocates the importance of shelf water from the East Siberian Sea on formation of water mass

  3. Circumpolar polynya regions and ice production in the Arctic: results from MODIS thermal infrared imagery from 2002/2003 to 2014/2015 with a regional focus on the Laptev Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preußer, Andreas; Heinemann, Günther; Willmes, Sascha; Paul, Stephan

    2016-12-01

    High-resolution MODIS thermal infrared satellite data are used to infer spatial and temporal characteristics of 17 prominent coastal polynya regions over the entire Arctic basin. Thin-ice thickness (TIT) distributions (≤ 20 cm) are calculated from MODIS ice-surface temperatures, combined with ECMWF ERA-Interim atmospheric reanalysis data in an energy balance model for 13 winter seasons (2002/2003 to 2014/2015; November to March). From all available MODIS swath data, daily thin-ice thickness composites are computed in order to derive quantities such as polynya area and total thermodynamic (i.e., potential) ice production. A gap-filling approach is applied to account for cloud and data gaps in the MODIS composites. All polynya regions combined cover an average thin-ice area of 226.6 ± 36.1 × 103 km2 in winter. This allows for an average total winter-accumulated ice production of about 1811 ± 293 km3, whereby the Kara Sea region, the North Water polynya (both 15 %), polynyas on the western side of Novaya Zemlya (20 %), as well as scattered smaller polynyas in the Canadian Arctic Archipelago (all combined 12 %) are the main contributors. Other well-known sites of polynya formation (Laptev Sea, Chukchi Sea) show smaller contributions and range between 2 and 5 %. We notice distinct differences to earlier studies on pan-Arctic polynya characteristics, originating in some part from the use of high-resolution MODIS data, as the capability to resolve small-scale (> 2 km) polynyas and also large leads are increased. Despite the short record of 13 winter seasons, positive trends in ice production are detected for several regions of the eastern Arctic (most significantly in the Laptev Sea region with an increase of 6.8 km3 yr-1) and the North Water polynya, while other polynyas in the western Arctic show a more pronounced variability with varying trends. We emphasize the role of the Laptev Sea polynyas as being a major influence on Transpolar Drift characteristics through

  4. Fatty acid profile of plasma, muscle and adipose tissues in Chilota lambs grazing on two different low quality pasture types in Chiloé Archipelago (Chile).

    PubMed

    Gallardo, Maria A; Dannenberger, Dirk; Rivero, Jordana; Pulido, Ruben; Nuernberg, Karin

    2014-11-01

    There is no information about the effect of different pasture types on tissue fatty acid profiles of a native rustic lamb breed of the Chiloe Archipelago, the Chilota. Eight Chilota lambs were grazed on a 'Calafatal' pasture (CP), a typical secondary succession of Chiloé Archipelago (Chile) and eight Chilota lambs were located to graze on naturalized pasture (NP) of Chiloé. Botanical, chemical and lipid composition of the two types of pastures and of different lamb tissues (muscle, subcutaneous - and tail adipose tissues) and plasma were performed. Both pasture types induced high n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) and CLAcis-9,trans-11 proportions in Chilota meat. Thus, in muscle, Chilota lambs grazing CP showed higher sum PUFA, sum n-6 PUFA proportion and n-6/n-3 PUFA ratio compared with Chilota lambs grazing NP. In tail fats of Chilota lambs grazing CP significantly higher proportions of 18:3n-3, sum saturated fatty acids, sum PUFA, n-3 and n-6 PUFA were detected compared with Chilota lambs grazing NP. Feeding of different pasture types (CP vs. NP) caused significant differences in fatty acid composition of muscle and the two fat depots in Chilota lambs, but also point to tissue-specific responses of de novo synthesized fatty acid deposition in the tissues.

  5. Genetic variation and gene flow of broadcast spawning and planula brooding coral, Goniastrea aspera (Scleractinia) in the Ryukyu Archipelago, southern Japan.

    PubMed

    Nishikawa, Akira; Sakai, Kazuhiko

    2003-08-01

    The scleractinian coral Goniastrea aspera (Verrill) undergoes both broadcast spawning and planulae brooding in the Ryukyu Archipelago of southern Japan. Genetic variation and gene flow in G. aspera were studied using allozyme electrophoresis. We tested the hypothesis that gene flow is determined by the competency period of the planulae. We also assessed the relative contributions of sexual and asexual reproduction to recruitment. For the five staining systems surveyed, G. aspera encoded five polymorphic loci and one monomorphic locus. The genotype frequencies in each population significantly differed from the expected Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (HWE), indicating that the local populations of G. aspera are not fully panmictic. The high ratio of the observed number of genotypes to the number of individuals (0.90 +/- 0.07, mean NG:N +/- SD) and the observed to expected genotypic diversity (0.84 +/- 0.11, mean GO:GE +/- SD) suggested that each population is likely maintained by sexual reproduction. The genetic differentiation (FST) and value of average number of migrants per generation (Nem) among and within regions ranged from 0.025 to 0.104 and 2.2 to 9.6, respectively. Comparisons with other species demonstrated that larva survival rates also influence gene flow. In addition, gene flow on distant reefs by planulae originating from spawning might prevent divergence by planulae originating from brooding for short-distant dispersal among and within populations of G. aspera in the Ryukyu Archipelago.

  6. Biogeography and origin of Lilium longiflorum and L. formosanum (Liliaceae) endemic to the Ryukyu Archipelago and Taiwan as determined by allozyme diversity.

    PubMed

    Hiramatsu, M; Ii, K; Okubo, H; Huang, K L; Huang, C W

    2001-07-01

    Allozyme diversity on 13 isozyme loci was investigated for two bulbous species, Lilium longiflorum and L. formosanum, endemic to the subtropical archipelago of continental origin located in East Asia. Degrees of allozyme variability and divergence for L. longiflorum were very high for insular endemic species, indicating relatively longtime persistence of the present widespread distribution across many islands in this phenotypically little-changed species. Lilium formosanum exhibited rather lower variability and divergence than did L. longiflorum and was genetically close to the southern peripheral populations of L. longiflorum with 0.978 as its highest genetic identity value. Combined with other biological and insular geohistorical information, our results suggest that L. longiflorum was established around the end of the Pliocene when the current distribution area was still a continuous part of the ancient Asian continent, and L. formosanum was derived from southern populations of L. longiflorum around the late Pleistocene when the mainland of Taiwan was completely separated from the adjacent islands and the main continent. Depauperization of allozyme variability in some L. longiflorum populations was found on islands with lower altitudes. This reflects bottleneck effects after the complete or almost complete submergence of such low islands during the archipelago's development.

  7. Historical Relationships among Wild Boar Populations of the Ryukyu Archipelago and Other Eurasian regions, as Inferred from Mitochondrial Cytochrome b Gene Sequences.

    PubMed

    Yoshikawa, Saka; Mimura, Makiko; Watanabe, Shin; Lin, Liang-Kong; Ota, Hidetoshi; Mizoguchi, Yasushi

    2016-10-01

    The Ryukyu wild boar (Sus scrofa riukiuanus) is an endemic, morphologically defined subspecies of the Eurasian wild boar (S. scrofa) found on five islands of the Ryukyu Archipelago (a group of small islands stretching from mainland Japan to Taiwan). Two hypothetical scenarios have been proposed regarding the origin of the current Ryukyu wild boar populations: 1) natural dispersal and 2) transportation and subsequent release by prehistoric humans. To test these two hypotheses, we compared the mitochondrial cytochrome b gene sequence (1140 base pairs) in 352 individual wild boar samples that included representatives of all five insular populations of the Ryukyu wild boar and populations of other conspecific subspecies in insular East and Southeast Asia and the Eurasian Continent. A total of 68 haplotypes were recognized, of which 12 were unique to the Ryukyu wild boar populations. The results of Bayesian phylogenetic analyses supported monophyly of the five Ryukyu populations (posterior probability value of 92), confirming the validity of the subspecies as a natural group. Coalescent analysis estimated the divergence times between the Ryukyu wild boar and the other conspecific subspecies as 144-465 thousand years ago (Kya), with a 95% HPD (highest posterior density) range of 51-837 Kya, and with no significant migration. Taking the broadly accepted date of initial human migration to the Ryukyus (no earlier than 50 Kya) into consideration, our results strongly suggest that the ancestral form of the Ryukyu wild boar first entered the Ryukyu Archipelago by natural dispersal prior to the arrival of prehistoric humans.

  8. Palaeo-islands as refugia and sources of genetic diversity within volcanic archipelagos: the case of the widespread endemic Canarina canariensis (Campanulaceae).

    PubMed

    Mairal, M; Sanmartín, I; Aldasoro, J J; Culshaw, V; Manolopoulou, I; Alarcón, M

    2015-08-01

    Geographical isolation by oceanic barriers and climatic stability has been postulated as some of the main factors driving diversification within volcanic archipelagos. However, few studies have focused on the effect that catastrophic volcanic events have had on patterns of within-island differentiation in geological time. This study employed data from the chloroplast (cpDNA haplotypes) and the nuclear (AFLPs) genomes to examine the patterns of genetic variation in Canarina canariensis, an iconic plant species associated with the endemic laurel forest of the Canary Islands. We found a strong geographical population structure, with a first divergence around 0.8 Ma that has Tenerife as its central axis and divides Canarian populations into eastern and western clades. Genetic diversity was greatest in the geologically stable 'palaeo-islands' of Anaga, Teno and Roque del Conde; these areas were also inferred as the ancestral location of migrant alleles towards other disturbed areas within Tenerife or the nearby islands using a Bayesian approach to phylogeographical clustering. Oceanic barriers, in contrast, appear to have played a lesser role in structuring genetic variation, with intra-island levels of genetic diversity larger than those between-islands. We argue that volcanic eruptions and landslides after the merging of the palaeo-islands 3.5 Ma played key roles in generating genetic boundaries within Tenerife, with the palaeo-islands acting as refugia against extinction, and as cradles and sources of genetic diversity to other areas within the archipelago.

  9. The reproductive biology of the rainbow runner, Elagatis bipinnulata (Quoy & Gaimard, 1825) caught in the São Pedro and São Paulo Archipelago.

    PubMed

    Pinheiro, P B; Hazin, F H V; Travassos, P; Oliveira, P G V; Carvalho, F; Rêgo, M G

    2011-02-01

    The rainbow runner, Elagatis bipinnulata, which belongs to the Carangidae family, has a circumtropical distribution. It is found throughout the Atlantic Ocean, from Massachusetts (USA) to Bahia (Brazil). The reproductive biology of the rainbow runner was studied, using specimens captured off the São Pedro and São Paulo Archipelago. From July 1999 to November 2003, a total of 352 fishes were analysed (201 females and 151 males). Fork length (FL) was measured and specimens were gutted for gonads collection. In the laboratory, gonads length, width and weight were measured, and sexes identified macroscopically. Through histological analysis, five different maturation stages were identified for females: immature, maturing, mature, spent and resting. A predominance of maturing and mature females was observed from January to May. The highest gonad index (GI) values were also observed during this period, ranging from 7.7 to 55. Mean sexual maturity size (L50) for females was estimated at 64.6 cm (FL). In the studied area the species exhibited total spawning, with two synchronous groups. Testicles were histologically very similar making them impossible to differentiate sexual maturation stages. Considerable variation was observed in the male gonads weight, hampering the assessment of size at maturity. However, GI values for males were also higher from January to May. These results suggest that the spawning period of the rainbow runner in the São Pedro and São Paulo Archipelago occurs during the first semester of the year.

  10. Experimental analysis of the effects of consumer exclusion on recruitment and succession of a coral reef system along a water quality gradient in the Spermonde Archipelago, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plass-Johnson, Jeremiah G.; Heiden, Jasmin P.; Abu, Nur; Lukman, Muhammad; Teichberg, Mirta

    2016-03-01

    The composition of coral reef benthic communities is strongly affected by variation in water quality and consumer abundance and composition. This is particularly evident in highly populated coastal regions where humans depend on coral reef resources and where terrestrial run-off can change the chemical composition of the water. We tested the effects of grazing pressure and ambient water conditions along an established eutrophication gradient on the recruitment and successional development of benthic communities of the Spermonde Archipelago, Indonesia, through caging experiments with settlement tiles. Within 1 month, benthic community composition of the closest reef to land, near the city of Makassar, was significantly different from other sites further offshore, driven primarily by differences in recruitment of invertebrates or turf algae. In contrast to other caging experiments, consumer exclusion had no effect after 3 months, suggesting that larger, mobile consumers had little effect on the benthic communities of these reefs at all sites. Despite conditions that usually favour macroalgal development, this group was rarely observed on recruitment tiles even after 4 months of consumer exclusion. Furthermore, tiles from both the caged and open treatments retained high proportions of open space indicating the possible role of small-sized or non-fish consumers that were not excluded from the experiment. These results indicate that, unlike many other studies, benthic consumers in the Spermonde Archipelago had little effect on the recruitment and early succession of the reef habitat and that unexamined biota such as mesograzers may be significant in degraded systems.

  11. Isolation and molecular characterization of Chikungunya virus from the Andaman and Nicobar archipelago, India: evidence of an East, Central, and South African genotype.

    PubMed

    Muruganandam, N; Chaaithanya, I K; Senthil, G S; Shriram, A N; Bhattacharya, D; Jeevabharathi, G S; Sudeep, A B; Pradeepkumar, N; Vijayachari, P

    2011-12-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is an Alphavirus belonging to the family Togaviridae. In 2006, CHIKV infection struck the Andaman and Nicobar archipelago, with an attack rate of 60%. There were more than 10 cases with acute flaccid paralysis simulating the Guillian Barre Syndrome. The majority of the patients presented severe joint pain. The cause for such an explosive nature of the outbreak with increased morbidity was not known. The isolation of CHIKV was attempted and succeeded from nine subjects presenting clinical symptoms of Chikungunya fever. The cDNA of all the isolates was sequenced for partial E1 and nsP1 genes. Sequences were aligned based on the double locus sequence typing concept. The phylogenetic analysis shows that sequences of Andaman isolates grouped with the East, Central, and South African genotype of virus isolates from India, Sri Lanka, and Réunion. The genetic distance between Andaman isolates and the Réunion isolates was very small. The phylogenetic analysis confirmed the origin of the isolates responsible for the first ever confirmed CHIKV outbreak in these islands to be the East, Central, and South African genotype. In this manuscript, we discuss the involvement of the East, Central, and South African strain with the Chikungunya fever outbreak in this archipelago and double locus sequence typing as a first time approach.

  12. Cause-specific temporal and spatial trends in green sea turtle strandings in the Hawaiian Archipelago (1982-2003)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chaloupka, Milani; Work, Thierry M.; Balazs, George H.; Murakawa, Shawn K. K.; Morris, Robert

    2008-01-01

    We investigated cause-specific temporal and spatial trends in sea turtle strandings in the Hawaiian Archipelago. Five species of sea turtle were recorded in 3,861 strandings over a 22-year period (1982-2003). Green turtles comprised 97% of these strandings with size and gender composition reflecting the demographic structure of the resident green turtle population and relative green turtle abundance in Hawaiian waters. The cause of strandings was determined by necropsy based on a complete gross external and internal examination. Totally 75% of the 3,732 green turtle strandings were from Oahu where strandings occur year-round. The most common known cause of the green turtle strandings was the tumour-forming disease, fibropapillomatosis (28%) followed by hook-and-line fishing gear-induced trauma (7%), gillnet fishing gear-induced trauma (5%), boat strike (2.5%), and shark attack (2.7%). Miscellaneous causes comprised 5.4% of strandings whereas 49% of green turtle strandings could not be attributed to any known cause. Green turtle strandings attributable to boat strike were more likely from Kauai and Oahu while fibropapilloma strandings were more likely from Oahu and Maui. Hook-and-line gear strandings were more likely from Oahu due to higher per capita inshore fishing effort. The specific mortality rate (conditional probability) for fibropapillomatosis was 88%, 69% for gillnet gear and 52% for hook-and-line gear. The probability of a dead green turtle stranding increased from 1982 but levelled off by the mid-1990s. The declining mortality risk was because the prevalence and severity of fibropapillomatosis has decreased recently and so has the mortality risk attributable to gillnet gear. Despite exposure to disease and inshore fishing gears, the Hawaiian green turtle stock continues to recover following protection since the late 1970s. Nevertheless, measures to reduce incidental capture of sea turtles in coastal Hawaiian fisheries would be prudent, especially since

  13. A basic radial dike swarm of Boa Vista (Cape Verde Archipelago); its significance in the evolution of the island

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ancochea, Eumenio; Hernán, Francisco; Huertas, María José; Brändle, José Luis

    2012-10-01

    A basic radial dike swarm unrelated to other basic units of Boa Vista (Cape Verde Archipelago) has been localized and characterized in the central sector of the island. According to new radiometric data three main stages in the evolution of Boa Vista are distinguished: the earlier (the Old Volcanic Complex: 17-16 Ma) is equivalent to the shield building stage of Hawaii and the later (the Recent Volcanics (8-4 Ma) is in some aspects comparable to the post-erosional stage. An important intermediate essentially felsic stage (the Trachytic-Phonolitic Complex: 14.3-12.8 Ma) followed the basaltic shield stage. This felsic stage has equivalents in some other oceanic islands as the Canary Islands, specially Gran Canaria, Tenerife, and La Gomera. The central sector of Boa Vista is also occupied by the Felsic Subvolcanic Complex, a unit consisting of phonolitic breccias, syenites and monzonites that represent the Trachytic-Phonolitic Complex hypabyssal roots. The felsic rocks as a whole constitute half of the total amount of igneous rocks on the island making up Boa Vista, the island with the highest percentage of felsic rocks in the Central Atlantic Ocean. More than 200 dikes of the basic radial swarm intruding the Felsic Subvolcanic Complex have been measured. The intensity of the multiple dike injection is sometimes rather high, roughly a dike every 5 m. The individual dikes have an observable mean length of about 300 m. The composition of these dikes is always foiditic (nephelinites, melilitites, and limburgites), slightly different in composition (more alkaline and richer in incompatible elements) to the other basic units of the island (the Old Volcanic Complex and the Recent Volcanics). The radial dikes converge in an area located NW of the geometrical center of Boa Vista, a zone where the hypothetical center of the Old Volcanic Complex and the Trachytic-Phonolitic Complex edifices must also have been situated. The ages obtained from the dikes (between 14.8 and 11.5 Ma

  14. Baseline trace metals in Patella caerulea in a central Tyrrhenian ecosystem (Pontine Islands archipelago and Lazio region coastal sites, Italy).

    PubMed

    Conti, Marcelo Enrique; Mele, Giustino; Finoia, Maria Grazia

    2017-02-18

    In this study, we tested the aptitude of the gastropod mollusk Patella caerulea as biomonitor of elemental pollution in seawater of a central Tyrrhenian ecosystem (Pontine Islands archipelago and Lazio region coastal sites, Italy). Concentrations of Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb, and Zn were measured in 120 individuals collected in six strategic locations in two sampling campaigns during 2011 and 2012. Samples of surrounding seawater were also collected in the same sites and tested for the same metals in order to obtain the respective concentration factors (CFs). Then, we analyzed the evolution of contamination in the selected sites and compared our results with the baseline levels (control charts) previously established for Tyrrhenian seas (Conti et al. Environ Sci Pollut R 22:3640-3651,2015). With this purpose, we defined six new variables (one for each metal) and then we applied multivariate statistics, i.e., cluster analysis and discriminant analysis on the principal component analysis factors in order to obtain more reliable results. Patella resulted to be a strong bioaccumulator of Cd (CFs = 8990) and a good accumulator of Cr, Pb, and Zn. The levels of the majority of metals (i.e., Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb, and Zn) in Patella decreased in the range from -13.06% of Zn to -42.51% of Ni in Fiumicino harbor, Anzio beach, and Ponza Harbor from 2011 to 2012. In general, the metal levels in these marine areas are low and within the previously established baseline ranges for Tyrrhenian Sea (control charts). Here, we found a not univocal trend of metal bioaccumulation patterns between the two sampling campaigns (2011-2012) in the selected sites. No one site resulted to be clearly more contaminated than another (i.e., harbor sites as expected). For instance, for Cd, we detected a relevant increase of its levels (+118%) in the harbors and Anzio beach sites from 2011 to 2012; however, they remained at lower levels of the lower limit (Q 2.5) of the control chart. Higher Pb levels with

  15. Spatial Patterns in the Distribution, Diversity and Abundance of Benthic Foraminifera around Moorea (Society Archipelago, French Polynesia)

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Coral reefs are now subject to global threats and influences from numerous anthropogenic sources. Foraminifera, a group of unicellular shelled organisms, are excellent indicators of water quality and reef health. Thus we studied a set of samples taken in 1992 to provide a foraminiferal baseline for future studies of environmental change. Our study provides the first island-wide analysis of shallow benthic foraminifera from around Moorea (Society Archipelago). We analyzed the composition, species richness, patterns of distribution and abundance of unstained foraminiferal assemblages from bays, fringing reefs, nearshore and back- and fore-reef environments. A total of 380 taxa of foraminifera were recorded, a number that almost doubles previous species counts. Spatial patterns of foraminiferal assemblages are characterized by numerical abundances of individual taxa, cluster groups and gradients of species richness, as documented by cluster, Fisher α, ternary plot and Principal Component Analyses (PCA). The inner bay inlets are dominated by stress-tolerant, mostly thin-shelled taxa of Bolivina, Bolivinella, Nonionoides, Elongobula, and Ammonia preferring low-oxygen and/or nutrient-rich habitats influenced by coastal factors such as fresh-water runoff and overhanging mangroves. The larger symbiont-bearing foraminifera (Borelis, Amphistegina, Heterostegina, Peneroplis) generally live in the oligotrophic, well-lit back- and fore-reef environments. Amphisteginids and peneroplids were among the few taxa found in the bay environments, probably due to their preferences for phytal substrates and tolerance to moderate levels of eutrophication. The fringing reef environments along the outer bay are characterized by Borelis schlumbergeri, Heterostegina depressa, Textularia spp. and various miliolids which represent a hotspot of diversity within the complex reef-lagoon system of Moorea. The high foraminiferal Fisher α and species richness diversity in outer bay fringing reefs

  16. Systematic revision of Platanthera in the Azorean archipelago: not one but three species, including arguably Europe’s rarest orchid

    PubMed Central

    Rudall, Paula J.; Moura, Mónica

    2013-01-01

    Background and Aims. The Macaronesian islands represent an excellent crucible for exploring speciation. This dominantly phenotypic study complements a separate genotypic study, together designed to identify and circumscribe Platanthera species (butterfly-orchids) on the Azores, and to determine their geographic origin(s) and underlying speciation mechanism(s). Methods. 216 individuals of Platanthera from 30 Azorean localities spanning all nine Azorean islands were measured for 38 morphological characters, supported by light and scanning electron microscopy of selected flowers. They are compared through detailed multivariate and univariate analyses with four widespread continental European relatives in the P. bifolia-chlorantha aggregate, represented by 154 plants from 25 populations, and with the highly misleading original taxonomic descriptions. Physiographic and ecological data were also recorded for each study population. Key Results. Despite limited genetic divergence, detailed phenotypic survey reveals not one or two but three discrete endemic species of Platanthera that are readily distinguished using several characters, most floral: P. pollostantha (newly named, formerly P. micrantha) occupies the widest range of habitats and altitudes and occurs on all nine islands; P. micrantha (formerly P. azorica) occurs on eight islands but is restricted to small, scattered populations in laurisilva scrub; the true P. azorica appears confined to a single volcanigenic ridge on the central island of São Jorge. Conclusions. Although hybridity seems low, the excess of phenotypic over genotypic divergence suggests comparatively recent speciation. The most probable of several credible scenarios is that Azorean Platantheras represent a single migration to the archipelago of airborne seed from ancestral population(s) located in southwest Europe rather than North America, originating from within the P. bifolia-chlorantha aggregate. We hypothesise that an initial anagenetic

  17. Description of the atmospheric circulation in the boundary layer over a tropical island: Case study of Guadeloupe Archipelago

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plocoste, Thomas; Dorville, Jean-François; Jacoby-Koaly, Sandra; Roussas, André

    2016-04-01

    Over past two decades the use of atmospheric sounding methods as Sodars, Lidar equipped drones increased sharply. Compare to weather balloon, these modern methods allow measure of profile at constant heights during long period. There are few studies using this type of equipment in tropical climates and lesser on small island. Wind regime on island of diameter less than 50 km are mostly considered as oceanic. Many author consider that thermal effect are negligible in land. But recent observations and simulations show importance of the thermal circulation at small- and meso- scales particularly in atmospheric pollution process. Up to 2009 no wind profile data were available continuously to study atmospheric circulation in Guadeloupe Archipelago (GA) which is one of the islands of the Lesser Antilles Arc. In first approximation wind was evaluated based on measures done at the most upwind island of the GA for many application as wind power and atmospheric pollution. From 2009 to 2012 a measurement campaign of the Atmospheric Boundary Layer (ABL) have been performed by the University of Antilles (UA) in GA. To assess effects of dynamic of ABL on air quality in sub urban area, particularly during the sunset and sunrise, UA monitored two sites with a weather station and a doppler sodar (REMTECH PAO). Both sites are close to the sea with one in a coastal area and the other in an open landfill surrounded by densely populated building and a mangrove swamp. Thermal and chemical measurements with a portable mass spectrometer were made in the vicinity of the landfill and showed the existence of urban heat islands. This study presents the first Doppler Sodar long measurements campaign in GA. Statistical analysis of the three year of doppler sodar data (i.e. wind components and its fluctuations) allow to identified and characterized the complex circulations on the two sites in the ABL between 25 and 500m above the sea level. Orographic and thermal effects due to urban area were

  18. Patterns of growth and body condition in sea otters from the Aleutian archipelago before and after the recent population decline.

    PubMed

    Laidre, K L; Estes, J A; Tinker, M T; Bodkin, J; Monson, D; Schneider, K

    2006-07-01

    1. Growth models for body mass and length were fitted to data collected from 1842 sea otters Enhydra lutris shot or live-captured throughout south-west Alaska between 1967 and 2004. Growth curves were constructed for each of two main year groups: 1967-71 when the population was at or near carrying capacity and 1992-97 when the population was in steep decline. Analyses of data collected from animals caught during 2004, when the population density was very low, were precluded by a small sample size and consequently only examined incidentally to the main growth curves. 2. Growth curves demonstrated a significant increase in body mass and body length at age in the 1990s. Asymptotic values of body mass were 12-18% higher in the 1990s than in the 1960s/70s, and asymptotic values for body length were 10-11% higher between the same periods. Data collected in 2004 suggest a continued increase in body size, with nearly all data points for mass and length falling significantly above the 1990s growth curves. 3. In addition to larger asymptotic values for mass and length, the rate of growth towards asymptotic values was more rapid in the 1990s than in the 1960s/70s: sea otters reached 95% of asymptotic body mass and body length 1-2 years earlier in the 1990s. 4. Body condition (as measured by the log mass/log length ratio) was significantly greater in males than in females. There was also an increasing trend from the 1960s/70s through 2004 despite much year-to-year variation. 5. Population age structures differed significantly between the 1960s/70s and the 1990s with the latter distribution skewed toward younger age classes (indicating an altered lx function) suggesting almost complete relaxation of age-dependent mortality patterns (i.e. those typical of food-limited populations). 6. This study spanned a period of time over which the population status of sea otters in the Aleutian archipelago declined precipitously from levels at or near equilibrium densities at some islands in

  19. The Oxidation State of Fe in Glasses from the Galapagos Archipelago: Variable Oxygen Fugacity as a Function of Mantle Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, M. E.; Kelley, K. A.; Cottrell, E.; Saal, A. E.; Kurz, M. D.

    2015-12-01

    The oxidation state of the mantle plays an intrinsic role in the magmatic evolution of the Earth. Here we present new μ-XANES measurements of Fe3+/ΣFe ratios (a proxy for ƒO2) in a suite of submarine glasses from the Galapagos Archipelago. Using previously presented major, trace, and volatile elements and isotopic data for 4 groups of glass that come from distinct mantle sources (depleted upper mantle, 2 recycled, and a primitive mantle source) we show that Fe3+/ΣFe ratios vary both with the influence of shallow level processes and with variations in mantle source. Fe3+/ΣFe ratios increase with differentiation (i.e. decreasing MgO), but show a large variation at a given MgO. Progressive degassing of sulfur accompanies decreasing Fe3+/ΣFe ratios, while assimilation of hydrothermally altered crust (as indicated by increasing Sr/Sr*) is shown to increase Fe3+/ΣFe ratios. After taking these processes into account, there is still variability in the Fe3+/ΣFe ratios of the isotopically distinct sample suites studied, yielding a magmatic ƒO2 that ranges from ΔQFM = +0.16 to +0.74 (error < 0.5 log units) and showing that oxidation state varies as a function of mantle source composition in the Galapagos hotspot system. After correcting back to a common MgO content = 8.0 wt%, the trace element depleted group similar to MORB (ITD), and the group similar to Pinta (WD = high Th/La, Δ7/4, Δ8/4 ratios) show Fe3+/ΣFe ratios within the range of MORB (average ITD = 0.162 ± 0.003 and WD = 0.164 ± 0.006). Another trace element enriched group similar to Sierra Negra and Cerro Azul (ITE = enriched Sr and Pb isotopes) shows evidence of mixing between oxidized and reduced sources (ITE oxidized end-member = 0.177). This suggests that mantle sources in the Galapagos that are thought to contain recycled components (i.e., WD and ITE groups) have distinct oxidation states. The high 3He/4He Fernandina samples (HHe group) are shown to be the most oxidized (ave. 0.175 ± 0

  20. A survey of the coccidian parasites of reptiles from islands of the Galápagos Archipelago: 1990-1994.

    PubMed

    Couch, L; Stone, P A; Duszynski, D W; Snell, H L; Snell, H M

    1996-06-01

    From 1990 through 1994, fecal samples were collected and examined for coccidian parasites from 26 giant land tortoises Geochelone nigra, from 715 lava lizards Tropidurus spp., from 139 land iguanas Conolophus subcristatus, and from 128 marine iguanas Amblyrhynchus cristatus, all of which inhabit various islands in the Galápagos Archipelago. None of the samples from A. cristatus or from C. subcristatus was infected with coccidia. Only 1 of 26 (4%) G. nigra was infected with a single Eimeria species that we describe here as new. A total of 262 of 715 (37%) individuals representing 3 species of Tropidurus discharged oocysts of 1-3 different coccidian species; these included 2 previously described species Eimeria tropidura and Isospora insularius, and an eimerian that we describe here as new. Additionally, 104 fecal samples from Tropidurus spp. were from 51 animals recaptured in either 2 or 3 yr; 21 had no infections in any year, 15 were infected at least once, 14 were infected in 2 yr, and only 1 was infected during 3 yr. No animal was recaptured and sampled during each of the 4 yr of this study. Of the 262 infected individuals, 30 (12%) had multiple coccidial infections at the time of collection (eimerian and isosporan, or 2 eimerians). Where determination of the sexes was possible in the lava lizards, there was no difference in prevalence rates between males (39%) and females (41%). Sporulated oocysts of the new eimerian from Tropidurus are ellipsoidal, 27.1 x 15.6 (25-31 x 14-18) microns, with a polar body, but without a micropyle or oocyst residuum; they contain ellipsoidal sporocysts, 11.8 x 6.7 (10-14 x 6-8) microns, without Stieda, sub-, or parastieda bodies, but with a sporocyst residuum. Sporulated oocysts of the new eimerian from G. nigra are ellipsoidal to ovoidal, 21.6 x 18.1 (18-25 x 16-20) microns, with a large polar body, but without a micropyle or oocyst residuum; they contain ellipsoidal sporocysts 10.7 x 7.0 (8-12 x 5-8) microns, with Stieda body

  1. Breeding and moulting locations and migration patterns of the Atlantic population of Steller's eiders Polysticta stelleri as determined from satellite telemetry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Petersen, M.R.; Bustnes, J.O.; Systad, G.H.

    2006-01-01

    This study was designed to determine the spring, summer, autumn, and early winter distribution, migration routes, and timing of migration of the Atlantic population of Steller's eiders Polysticta stelleri. Satellite transmitters were implanted in 20 eiders captured in April 2001 at Vads??, Norway, and their locations were determined from 5 May 2001 to 6 February 2002. Regions where birds concentrated from spring until returning to wintering areas included coastal waters from western Finnmark, Norway, to the eastern Taymyr Peninsula, Russia. Novaya Zemlya, Russia, particularly the Mollera Bay region, was used extensively during spring staging, moult, and autumn staging; regions of the Kola, Kanin, and Gydanskiy peninsulas, Russia, were used extensively during spring and moult migrations. Steller's eiders migrated across the Barents and Kara seas and along the Kara Sea and Kola Peninsula coastal waters to nesting, moulting, and wintering areas. The majority of marked eiders (9 of 15) were flightless in near-shore waters along the west side of Novaya Zemlya. Eiders were also flightless in northern Norway and along the Kanin and at Kola Peninsula coasts. We compare and contrast natural history characteristics of the Atlantic and Pacific populations and discuss evolutionary and ecological factors influencing their distribution. © Journal of Avian Biology.

  2. High-frequency array studies of long-range Lg propagation and the causes of Lg blockage and attenuation in the Eurasian continental craton. Volume 2. Final report, 29 Sep 89-30 Jan 91

    SciTech Connect

    Baumgardt, D.R.

    1991-03-21

    An investigation was conducted of the nature of Lg propagation from the Soviet test site at Novaya Zemlya as recorded by array sensors to the south, including the new regional arrays ARCESS and NORESS, and the teleseismic Graefenburg array, located near the recently installed GERESS regional array. This study is important because of the recently announced intention of the Soviet Union to shift their underground nuclear testing activities from the test site near Semipalatinsk to Novaya Zemlya. A second study follows up earlier ones of long range Lg propagation from nuclear explosions in the continental platform and shield regions of the USSR; the present study gives geological interpretations of the efficiency of Lg propagation. The overall conclusion of these studies is that heterogeneity in the upper earth crust, sometimes referred to as the granitic layer, seems to be the primary factor in blockage of Lg. Whenever a large part of the granitic layer is replaced in a confined region as in a basin, by lower velocity sediments, such that there is a large velocity contrast between the basin sediments and the surrounding granitic rocks, Lg waves appear to be trapped in the basin and are attenuated by repeated reverberations in the basin. As a result, Lg waves are delayed, diverted, scattered, and blocked, such that their recorded amplitudes are much reduced compared with what is expected from anelastic attenuation. Effects of Lg blockages need to be taken into account whenever Lg amplitudes are used for yield estimation and event identification.

  3. Dragons in the mist: three new species of Pseudocalotes Fitzinger (Squamata: Agamidae) from the sky island archipelago of Peninsular Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Grismer, L Lee; Quah, Evan S H; Wood, Perry L Jr; Anuar, Shahrul; Muin, Abdul; Davis, Hayden R; Murdoch, Matthew L; Grismer, Jesse L; Cota, Michael; Cobos, Anthony J

    2016-07-07

    An integrative taxonomic analysis is used to delimit and describe three new species of Pseudocalotoes from the sky island archipelago of the Banjaran (=mountain range) Titiwangsa of Peninsular Malaysia. Pseudocalotes drogon sp. nov., from Fraser's Hill, Pahang is basal to the sister species P. larutensis from Bukit Larut, Perak in the Banjaran Bintang and the new species P. rhaegal sp. nov. from Cameron Highlands, Pahang. Pseudocalotes drogon sp. nov. is differentiated from all other species of Psuedocalotes by having the combination of a flat rostrum; seven postrostrals; an interparietal; 11 circumorbitals; five canthals; 7-10 superciliaries; one scale between the rostral and nasal; nine supralabials; eight infralabials; 10 postnasal-suborbital scales; four postmentals; five or six sublabials; five or six chinshields; 47 smooth, wide, gular scales; weak transverse gular and antehumeral folds; two enlarged scales between the ear and eye; enlarged upper and lower posttemporals; a single enlarged supratympanic; no enlarged postrictals; three large scales bordering the dorsal margin of the ear opening; large pretympanic scales; eight scales in the nuchal crest not separated by a gap; enlarged vertebral scales extending to the tip of the tail; keeled and non-plate-like scales on flanks; 51 midbody scales; midventrals smaller than dorsals; 19 subdigital lamellae on the fourth finger; 23 subdigital lamellae on the fourth toe; preaxial scales on third toe enlarged and spinose; subdigital lamellae not unicarinate; HW/HL 0.52; HL/SVL 0.31; no elbow or knee patches; and a male dewlap color of lime-green bearing a central yellow spot. Pseudocalotes rhaegal sp. nov. is differentiated from all other Psuedocalotes by having the combination of a convex rostrum; 6-8 postrostrals; an interparietal; nine or 10 circumorbitals; five canthals; 7-10 superciliaries; one or two scales between the rostral and nasal scales; eight or nine supralabials; seven or eight infralabials; 11 or 12

  4. A population genetic assessment of coral recovery on highly disturbed reefs of the Keppel Island archipelago in the southern Great Barrier Reef.

    PubMed

    van Oppen, Madeleine J H; Lukoschek, Vimoksalehi; Berkelmans, Ray; Peplow, Lesa M; Jones, Alison M

    2015-01-01

    Coral reefs surrounding the islands lying close to the coast are unique to the Great Barrier Reef (GBR) in that they are frequently exposed to disturbance events including floods caused by cyclonic rainfall, strong winds and occasional periods of prolonged above-average temperatures during summer. In one such group of islands in the southern GBR, the Keppel Island archipelago, climate-driven disturbances frequently result in major coral mortality. Whilst these island reefs have clearly survived such dramatic disturbances in the past, the consequences of extreme mortality events may include the loss of genetic diversity, and hence adaptive potential, and a reduction in fitness due to inbreeding, especially if new recruitment from external sources is limited. Here we examined the level of isolation of the Keppel Island group as well as patterns of gene flow within the Keppel Islands using 10 microsatellite markers in nine populations of the coral, Acropora millepora. Bayesian cluster analysis and assignment tests indicated gene flow is restricted, but not absent, between the outer and inner Keppel Island groups, and that extensive gene flow exists within each of these island groups. Comparison of the Keppel Island data with results from a previous GBR-wide study that included a single Keppel Island population, confirmed that A. millepora in the Keppel Islands is genetically distinct from populations elsewhere on the GBR, with exception of the nearby inshore High Peak Reef just north of the Keppel Islands. We compared patterns of genetic diversity in the Keppel Island populations with those from other GBR populations and found them to be slightly, but significantly lower, consistent with the archipelago being geographically isolated, but there was no evidence for recent bottlenecks or deviation from mutation-drift equilibrium. A high incidence of private alleles in the Keppel Islands, particularly in the outer islands, supports their relative isolation and contributes

  5. Polarimetric C-/X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar Observations of Melting Sea Ice in the Canadian Arctic Archipelago

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casey, J. A.; Beckers, J. F.; Brossier, E.; Haas, C.

    2013-12-01

    Operational ice information services rely heavily on space-borne synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data for the production of ice charts to meet their mandate of providing timely and accurate sea ice information to support safe and efficient marine operations. During the summer melt period, the usefulness of SAR data for sea ice monitoring is limited by the presence of wet snow and melt ponds on the ice surface, which can mask the signature of the underlying ice. This is a critical concern for ice services whose clients (e.g. commercial shipping, cruise tourism, resource exploration and extraction) are most active at this time of year when sea ice is at its minimum extent, concentration and thickness. As a result, there is a need to further quantify the loss of ice information in SAR data during the melt season and to identify what information can still be retrieved about ice surface conditions and melt pond evolution at this time of year. To date the majority of studies have been limited to analysis of single-polarization C-band SAR data. This study will investigate the potential complimentary and unique sea ice information that polarimetric C- and X-band SAR data can provide to supplement the information available from traditional single co-polarized C-band SAR data. A time-series of polarimetric C- and X-band SAR data was acquired over Jones Sound in the Canadian Arctic Archipelago, in the vicinity of the Grise Fiord, Nunavut. Five RADARSAT-2 Wide Fine Quad-pol images and 11 TerraSAR-X StripMap dual-pol (HH/VV) images were acquired. The time-series begins at the onset of melt in early June and extends through advanced melt conditions in late July. Over this period several ponding and drainage events and two snowfall events occurred. Field observations of sea ice properties were collected using an Ice Mass Balance (IMB) buoy, hourly photos from a time-lapse camera deployed on a coastal cliff, and manual in situ measurements of snow thickness and melt pond depth

  6. A little island with significant groundwater resources: hydrogeological and hydrogeochemical features of the Pianosa aquifer (Tuscan Archipelago, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giannecchini, R.; Doveri, M.; Mussi, M.; Nicotra, I.; Puccinelli, A.

    2012-12-01

    The Pianosa Island is one of the seven islands of the Tuscan Archipelago, particularly known for its typical flat morphological structure. It is formed by Neogenic-Quaternary sedimentary rocks, mainly represented by superficial calcarenite and underlying marl and clayey marl. Despite the small extension of the island (just 10,2 km2 wide, coastal perimeter of approximately 18 km, maximum altitude of 29 m a.s.l.) and poor rainfall amount (the annual average is 480,7 mm in 1951-2002 period), the Pianosa aquifer is characterized by significant groundwater resources, which supported the presence of approximately 2,000 people at the end of Eighties. Nevertheless, the groundwater overexploitation and the land use (agricultural activity and cattle-breeding, associated to the local penal settlement activity) caused important sea-water intrusion and pollution phenomena. An improvement of such situation occurs since 1998, owing to the closing of the penal settlement and its activities. This pilot research intends to describe the hydrogeological and hydrogeochemical features of the Pianosa Island aquifer system and the groundwater quality several years after the penal settlement closing. The results of a multidisciplinary approach (hydrogeological, geochemical, isotopic) show that the groundwater recharge and circulation are substantially controlled by the hydro-structural conditions. The flat and permeable superficial calcarenite allows a high infiltration rate. The water table flow direction is generally W-E, in accordance with the dip direction of the stratigraphic contact between the calcarenite and the underlying impermeable marly-clayey rocks. However, the latter present conglomerate and sandstone intercalations, sometimes in contact (by angular unconformity) with the calcarenite, determining a general continuity in groundwater circulation, which is phreatic in the calcarenite, and confined in the conglomerate and sandstone horizons. A piezometric depression with values

  7. Two new species of photosymbiotic ascidians of the genus Diplosoma from the Ryukyu Archipelago, with partial sequences of the COI gene.

    PubMed

    Hirose, Euichi; Oka, Atsushi T; Hirose, Mamiko

    2009-05-01

    Two new species of Diplosoma are described from coral reefs in the Ryukyu Archipelago, Japan: D. watanabei sp. nov. and D. gumavirens sp. nov. Colonies of both species are green due to algal symbionts of Prochloron, which are distributed in the common cloacal cavity. Both species are characterized by the point of emergence of the retractor muscle and a unique combination of stigma numbers among the four rows of the branchial sac. There are three adhesive papillae in the embryos of D. watanabei, as in most ascidian embryos and larvae, whereas the pre-hatching embryos of D. gumavirens sp. nov. posses 12-16 adhesive papillae. Partial sequences of the cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI) gene discriminated the new species from each other and from congeners.

  8. Peltogasterella sensuru n. sp. (Crustacea: Cirripedia: Rhizocephala) from off Okinawa Island (Ryukyu Archipelago, Japan) with remarks on its single brood externae.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Ryuta; Hirose, Mamiko; Hirose, Euichi

    2015-09-01

    Peltogasterella sensuru n. sp. infests Pagurixus hermit crabs inhabiting rocky shores off Okinawa Island (Ryukyu Archipelago, Japan). This species is clearly distinguishable from Peltogasterella gracilis (Boschma, 1927): the stalk emerges from the middle part of the externa in the present species and P. sulcata (Lilljeborg, 1859), while the stalk in P. gracilis emerges from the posterior end of the externae. The new species differs from P. sulcata based on the morphology of the mantle aperture. Peltogasterella sensuru n. sp. repeatedly produces single brood externae that have not been previously observed in species belonging to the suborder Kentrogonida Delage, 1884. We also determined partial sequences of the COI gene and 16S rRNA gene of the new species for use as molecular markers for species identification.

  9. Geodynamics of the Barents-Kara margin in the Mesozoic inferred from paleomagnetic data on rocks from the Franz Josef Land Archipelago

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikhaltsov, N. E.; Karyakin, Yu. V.; Abashev, V. V.; Bragin, V. Yu.; Vernikovsky, V. A.; Travin, A. V.

    2016-12-01

    New data on paleomagnetism and isotope geochronology of Jurassic and Early Cretaceous basic igneous rocks on Franz Josef Land Archipelago (FJL) represented by flows and dikes are discussed. The first paleomagnetic data obtained for these rocks offer the opportunity to suggest a model of spatial changes in the FJL block position during the Jurassic‒Cretaceous. In the Early Jurassic, the block occupied a different position relative to Europe from the modern one. It was displaced in the northeasterly direction by a distance of approximately 500 km and rotated clockwise by about 40° relative to its modern position. By the Early Cretaceous, the FJL block occupied a position close to the present-day one avoiding subsequent substantial relative displacements. The data obtained are of principal significance for reconstructing the geodynamic evolution of Arctic structures in the Mesozoic and contribute greatly to the base of paleomagnetic data for the Arctic region, development of which is now in progress.

  10. An integrated chemical-biological study using caged mussels (Mytilus trossulus) along a pollution gradient in the Archipelago Sea (SW Finland, Baltic Sea).

    PubMed

    Lehtonen, Kari K; Turja, Raisa; Budzinski, Hélène; Devier, Marie-Hélène

    2016-08-01

    Mussels (Mytilus trossulus) were caged along a known pollution gradient in the inner Archipelago Sea (northern Baltic Sea) and retrieved after 71 and 121 d for the measurement of selected chemical contaminants in tissues and biological endpoints including biochemical biomarkers and growth. Additional samples were collected during the growth season from a native mussel population at an alleged reference site. Elevated concentrations of numerous contaminants (e.g., PAH) were observed in spring, apparently due to the loss of tissue mass during the winter, while also the levels of many biomarkers (e.g., glutathione S-transferase activity) were elevated. Spatial and temporal changes in the accumulation of contaminants and biological parameters were observed with some of them (e.g., growth) linked to seasonal changes in environmental factors. The results underline the importance of understanding the effects of seasonal natural factors on the growth dynamics and general condition of mussels when assessing tissue concentrations of contaminants and biological effects.

  11. Role of the Deep Mantle in Generating EM-I in Ocean Island Basalts: Insight from the Kerguelen Archipelago (Indian Ocean) (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weis, D.

    2013-12-01

    The Kerguelen Plume is responsible for one of the longest (both in length and time) hotspot tracks on Earth, starting at ~120 Ma with the formation of the Rajmahal Traps in India. The tectonic setting evolved from continental break-up at ~120 Ma, to a position above the Southeast Indian Ridge (SEIR) at ~40 Ma, to a purely oceanic environment today. The Cretaceous record of volcanism on the Central and Southern Kerguelen Plateau shows interaction of mantle plume-derived magmas with continental-related material (<<10%), whereas the >5000 km-long Ninetyeast Ridge (82-38 Ma) lacks any evidence of such shallow contamination. Upper mantle components (depleted, SEIR-type) participated in the formation of the submarine Northern Kerguelen Plateau (~34 Ma). The Kerguelen Archipelago is covered (>80%) by flood basalts erupted between 30 and 24 Ma. With decreasing age and increasing distance from the SEIR, the compositions evolved from tholeiitic in the northwest, to transitional in the central part of the archipelago, and to alkaline in the Southeast Province. The transition from tholeiitic to mildly alkalic compositions primarily reflects changes in melting conditions (lower extents of partial melting at higher pressures), associated with crust and lithosphere thickening as the distance from the SEIR increased. High-precision Pb-Sr-Nd-Hf isotopic data reveal that the archipelago flood basalts were derived from melting of an enriched component (EM-I) in the plume source, without any trace of continental contamination during eruption. The enriched component dominates the chemistry of the alkalic basalts (25-24 Ma), whereas the older (28-26 Ma) tholeiitic-transitional basalts contain a higher proportion of a depleted-SEIR component. In binary isotope plots, Kerguelen compositions form subparallel trends that are distinctly more enriched than those from Hawaii. Seismic data shows the presence of two large-low-shear-velocity-provinces (LLSVP) in the deep mantle, one centred in

  12. Phytochemical analysis of non-volatile fraction of Artemisia caerulescens subsp. densiflora (Viv.) (Asteraceae), an endemic species of La Maddalena Archipelago (Sardinia--Italy).

    PubMed

    Ornano, Luigi; Venditti, Alessandro; Donno, Yuri; Sanna, Cinzia; Ballero, Mauro; Bianco, Armandodoriano

    2016-01-01

    Artemisia caerulescens subsp. densiflora Viv. is a rare endemic species from Corsica and Sardinia. We studied a sample collected from Razzoli, an island of the La Maddalena Archipelago. The polar secondary metabolites content of this species was investigated for the first time in this study showing the presence of sesquiterpenoids, flavonoids, caffeoylquinic acids and a coumarin, with the presence of several compounds already recognised in this genus. The metabolites composition was analysed in two different phenological stages, post blooming and flowering. During the blooming stage, the plant showed a molecular pattern mainly represented by sesquiterpenes and sterols with a minor amount of phenolics, while in flowering stage the molecular pattern was more rich in flavonoids and phenylpropanoids.

  13. Dominant petroleum hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria in the Archipelago Sea in South-West Finland (Baltic Sea) belong to different taxonomic groups than hydrocarbon degraders in the oceans.

    PubMed

    Reunamo, Anna; Riemann, Lasse; Leskinen, Piia; Jørgensen, Kirsten S

    2013-07-15

    The natural petroleum hydrocarbon degrading capacity of the Archipelago Sea water in S-W Finland was studied in a microcosm experiment. Pristine and previously oil exposed sites were examined. Bacterial community fingerprinting was performed using terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) and samples from selected microcosms were sequenced. The abundance of PAH degradation genes was measured by quantitative PCR. Bacterial communities in diesel exposed microcosms diverged from control microcosms during the experiment. Gram positive PAH degradation genes dominated at both sites in situ, whereas gram negative PAH degrading genes became enriched in diesel microcosms. The dominant bacterial groups after a 14 days of diesel exposure were different depending on the sampling site, belonging to the class Actinobacteria (32%) at a pristine site and Betaproteobacteria (52%) at a previously oil exposed site. The hydrocarbon degrading bacteria in the Baltic Sea differ from those in the oceans, where most hydrocarbon degraders belong to Gammaproteobacteria.

  14. High resolution satellite microwave record of Russian High Arctic snowmelt timing, duration, and relation to late summer sea ice extent (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramage, J. M.; Zhao, M.; Semmens, K. A.; Obleitner, F.

    2013-12-01

    Passive and active microwave observations provide a decadal record of snowmelt timing, duration, and characteristics even in clouds and darkness. Nominal Equal-Area Scalable Earth Grid (EASE-Grid) resolutions are coarse, creating a challenge in heterogeneous environments such as coastlines, mountains, or glacier margins. For remote, topographically complex, arctic regions, there are major advantages to be gained by developing these long records into higher resolution gridded and intercalibrated datasets for characterizing and understanding the snow melt record consistently. New reprocessing efforts at the National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC) will extend the passive microwave record back to the earliest Special Sensor Microwave Imager (SSM/I) data and the preceding Scanning Multi-channel Microwave Radiometer (SMMR) record, providing a record from 1978 - present (35 years). Resulting enhanced-resolution Earth Science Data Records (ESDR) will be key to a wide variety of longterm analyses of snow properties that will improve the ability to understand regions such as the icecaps in the Russian High Arctic. Glacier surface melt dynamics throughout Novaya Zemlya (NovZ) and Severnaya Zemlya (SevZ) serves as a good indicator of ice mass ablation and regional climate change in the Russian High Arctic. We present the most recent two decade record (1992-2012) of the icecap melt relationship to regional temperature and sea ice extent using enhanced resolution data for active sensors Advanced Microwave Instrument (AMI), Quick Scatterometer (QuikSCAT), and Advanced Scatterometer (ASCAT) and passive sensors Special Sensor Microwave Imager (SSM/I) and Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer for EOS (AMSR-E) processed by the Brigham Young University - Microwave Earth Remote Sensing (BYU - MERS) Laboratory. Nominal enhanced resolutions are ~4.5 and 8.9 km. We report trends of surface melt onset date (MOD) and total melt days (TMD) by combining multiple resolution-enhanced active

  15. Reefs and islands of the Chagos Archipelago, Indian Ocean: why it is the world’s largest no-take marine protected area

    PubMed Central

    SHEPPARD, C. R. C.; ATEWEBERHAN, M.; BOWEN, B. W.; CARR, P.; CHEN, C. A.; CLUBBE, C.; CRAIG, M. T.; EBINGHAUS, R.; EBLE, J.; FITZSIMMONS, N.; GAITHER, M. R.; GAN, C-H.; GOLLOCK, M.; GUZMAN, N.; GRAHAM, N. A. J.; HARRIS, A.; JONES, R.; KESHAVMURTHY, S.; KOLDEWEY, H.; LUNDIN, C. G.; MORTIMER, J. A.; OBURA, D.; PFEIFFER, M.; PRICE, A. R. G.; PURKIS, S.; RAINES, P.; READMAN, J. W.; RIEGL, B.; ROGERS, A.; SCHLEYER, M.; SEAWARD, M. R. D; SHEPPARD, A. L. S.; TAMELANDER, J.; TURNER, J. R.; VISRAM, S.; VOGLER, C.; VOGT, S.; WOLSCHKE, H.; YANG, J. M-C.; YANG, S-Y.; YESSON, C.

    2014-01-01

    The Chagos Archipelago was designated a no-take marine protected area (MPA) in 2010; it covers 550 000 km2, with more than 60 000 km2 shallow limestone platform and reefs. This has doubled the global cover of such MPAs.It contains 25–50% of the Indian Ocean reef area remaining in excellent condition, as well as the world’s largest contiguous undamaged reef area. It has suffered from warming episodes, but after the most severe mortality event of 1998, coral cover was restored after 10 years.Coral reef fishes are orders of magnitude more abundant than in other Indian Ocean locations, regardless of whether the latter are fished or protected.Coral diseases are extremely low, and no invasive marine species are known.Genetically, Chagos marine species are part of the Western Indian Ocean, and Chagos serves as a ‘stepping-stone’ in the ocean.The no-take MPA extends to the 200 nm boundary, and. includes 86 unfished seamounts and 243 deep knolls as well as encompassing important pelagic species.On the larger islands, native plants, coconut crabs, bird and turtle colonies were largely destroyed in plantation times, but several smaller islands are in relatively undamaged state.There are now 10 ‘important bird areas’, coconut crab density is high and numbers of green and hawksbill turtles are recovering.Diego Garcia atoll contains a military facility; this atoll contains one Ramsar site and several ‘strict nature reserves’. Pollutant monitoring shows it to be the least polluted inhabited atoll in the world. Today, strict environmental regulations are enforced.Shoreline erosion is significant in many places. Its economic cost in the inhabited part of Diego Garcia is very high, but all islands are vulnerable.Chagos is ideally situated for several monitoring programmes, and use is increasingly being made of the archipelago for this purpose. PMID:25505830

  16. Habitat and water quality variables as predictors of community composition in an Indonesian coral reef: a multi-taxon study in the Spermonde Archipelago.

    PubMed

    Polónia, Ana Rita Moura; Cleary, Daniel Francis Richard; de Voogd, Nicole Joy; Renema, Willem; Hoeksema, Bert W; Martins, Ana; Gomes, Newton Carlos Marcial

    2015-12-15

    Assemblages of corals, sponges, foraminifera, sediment bacteria and sediment archaea were assessed at two depths in the Spermonde Archipelago. Our goal was to assess to what extent variation in composition could be explained by habitat and water quality variables. The habitat variables consisted of depth, substrate type and scleractinian coral cover while water quality variables were derived from ocean color satellite imagery, including the colored dissolved organic matter index (CDOM), chlorophyll-a (Chlor-a) and remote sensing reflectance at 645n m (Rrs_645). Together, habitat and water quality variables explained from 31% (sediment bacteria) to 80% (forams) of the variation in composition. The variation in composition of corals, sponges, forams and sediment archaea was primarily related to habitat variables, while the variation in composition of sediment bacteria was primarily related to water quality variables. Habitat and water quality variables explained similar amounts of variation in the composition of corals and sediment bacteria. CDOM (sponges, sediment bacteria and sediment archaea), Chlor-a (corals and forams) and Rrs_645 (sponges and forams) proved significant predictors of variation in composition for the studied taxa. In addition to water quality variables, all taxa responded to a range of habitat variables including depth and the percentage cover of various benthic life forms including coral cover variables, rubble and sand. Sand cover was the most important habitat variable for corals, sponges, sediment bacteria and sediment archaea. Coral life forms including the cover of branching and tabular corals were important habitat variables for sponges and forams. These results show marked differences in how various taxa respond to variation in habitat and water quality in the Spermonde Archipelago. Moreover, our results indicate that variables estimated from ocean color satellite imagery proved to be better predictors of variation in marine community

  17. Limited connectivity and a phylogeographic break characterize populations of the pink anemonefish, Amphiprion perideraion, in the Indo-Malay Archipelago: inferences from a mitochondrial and microsatellite loci

    PubMed Central

    Dohna, Tina A; Timm, Janne; Hamid, Lemia; Kochzius, Marc

    2015-01-01

    To enhance the understanding of larval dispersal in marine organisms, species with a sedentary adult stage and a pelagic larval phase of known duration constitute ideal candidates, because inferences can be made about the role of larval dispersal in population connectivity. Members of the immensely diverse marine fauna of the Indo-Malay Archipelago are of particular importance in this respect, as biodiversity conservation is becoming a large concern in this region. In this study, the genetic population structure of the pink anemonefish, Amphiprion perideraion, is analyzed by applying 10 microsatellite loci as well as sequences of the mitochondrial control region to also allow for a direct comparison of marker-derived results. Both marker systems detected a strong overall genetic structure (ΦST = 0.096, P < 0.0001; mean Dest = 0.17; FST = 0.015, P < 0.0001) and best supported regional groupings (ΦCT = 0.199 P < 0.0001; FCT = 0.018, P < 0.001) that suggested a differentiation of the Java Sea population from the rest of the archipelago. Differentiation of a New Guinea group was confirmed by both markers, but disagreed over the affinity of populations from west New Guinea. Mitochondrial data suggest higher connectivity among populations with fewer signals of regional substructure than microsatellite data. Considering the homogenizing effect of only a few migrants per generation on genetic differentiation between populations, marker-specific results have important implications for conservation efforts concerning this and similar species. PMID:25937914

  18. A regional approach to plant DNA barcoding provides high species resolution of sedges (Carex and Kobresia, Cyperaceae) in the Canadian Arctic Archipelago.

    PubMed

    Clerc-Blain, Jessica L E; Starr, Julian R; Bull, Roger D; Saarela, Jeffery M

    2010-01-01

    Previous research on barcoding sedges (Carex) suggested that basic searches within a global barcoding database would probably not resolve more than 60% of the world's some 2000 species. In this study, we take an alternative approach and explore the performance of plant DNA barcoding in the Carex lineage from an explicitly regional perspective. We characterize the utility of a subset of the proposed protein-coding and noncoding plastid barcoding regions (matK, rpoB, rpoC1, rbcL, atpF-atpH, psbK-psbI) for distinguishing species of Carex and Kobresia in the Canadian Arctic Archipelago, a clearly defined eco-geographical region representing 1% of the Earth's landmass. Our results show that matK resolves the greatest number of species of any single-locus (95%), and when combined in a two-locus barcode, it provides 100% species resolution in all but one combination (matK + atpFH) during unweighted pair-group method with arithmetic mean averages (UPGMA) analyses. Noncoding regions were equally or more variable than matK, but as single markers they resolve substantially fewer taxa than matK alone. When difficulties with sequencing and alignment due to microstructural variation in noncoding regions are also considered, our results support other studies in suggesting that protein-coding regions are more practical as barcoding markers. Plastid DNA barcodes are an effective identification tool for species of Carex and Kobresia in the Canadian Arctic Archipelago, a region where the number of co-existing closely related species is limited. We suggest that if a regional approach to plant DNA barcoding was applied on a global scale, it could provide a solution to the generally poor species resolution seen in previous barcoding studies.

  19. Reefs and islands of the Chagos Archipelago, Indian Ocean: why it is the world's largest no-take marine protected area.

    PubMed

    Sheppard, C R C; Ateweberhan, M; Bowen, B W; Carr, P; Chen, C A; Clubbe, C; Craig, M T; Ebinghaus, R; Eble, J; Fitzsimmons, N; Gaither, M R; Gan, C-H; Gollock, M; Guzman, N; Graham, N A J; Harris, A; Jones, R; Keshavmurthy, S; Koldewey, H; Lundin, C G; Mortimer, J A; Obura, D; Pfeiffer, M; Price, A R G; Purkis, S; Raines, P; Readman, J W; Riegl, B; Rogers, A; Schleyer, M; Seaward, M R D; Sheppard, A L S; Tamelander, J; Turner, J R; Visram, S; Vogler, C; Vogt, S; Wolschke, H; Yang, J M-C; Yang, S-Y; Yesson, C

    2012-03-01

    The Chagos Archipelago was designated a no-take marine protected area (MPA) in 2010; it covers 550 000 km(2), with more than 60 000 km(2) shallow limestone platform and reefs. This has doubled the global cover of such MPAs.It contains 25-50% of the Indian Ocean reef area remaining in excellent condition, as well as the world's largest contiguous undamaged reef area. It has suffered from warming episodes, but after the most severe mortality event of 1998, coral cover was restored after 10 years.Coral reef fishes are orders of magnitude more abundant than in other Indian Ocean locations, regardless of whether the latter are fished or protected.Coral diseases are extremely low, and no invasive marine species are known.Genetically, Chagos marine species are part of the Western Indian Ocean, and Chagos serves as a 'stepping-stone' in the ocean.The no-take MPA extends to the 200 nm boundary, and. includes 86 unfished seamounts and 243 deep knolls as well as encompassing important pelagic species.On the larger islands, native plants, coconut crabs, bird and turtle colonies were largely destroyed in plantation times, but several smaller islands are in relatively undamaged state.There are now 10 'important bird areas', coconut crab density is high and numbers of green and hawksbill turtles are recovering.Diego Garcia atoll contains a military facility; this atoll contains one Ramsar site and several 'strict nature reserves'. Pollutant monitoring shows it to be the least polluted inhabited atoll in the world. Today, strict environmental regulations are enforced.Shoreline erosion is significant in many places. Its economic cost in the inhabited part of Diego Garcia is very high, but all islands are vulnerable.Chagos is ideally situated for several monitoring programmes, and use is increasingly being made of the archipelago for this purpose.

  20. Investigation into the cytotoxicity and mutagenicity of the Marajó Archipelago waters using Plagioscion squamosissimus (Perciformes: Sciaenidae) as a bioindicator.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Carlos Alberto Machado da; Pessoa, Carla Mariana Ferreira; Rodrigues, Claudia Antonia Campos; Pinheiro, Raul Henrique da Silva; Costa, Edmar Tavares da; Guimarães, Adriana Costa; Burbano, Rommel Rodríguez

    2016-10-01

    Maintaining water quality within tolerable limits is a basic need of the riverside communities in the Amazon. Using endemic aquatic organisms as biological models is useful for monitoring the environment. In this study, potential cytotoxic and genotoxic damages in Plagioscion squamosissimus (commonly known as silver croaker) from the Marajó Archipelago were evaluated using a flow cytometry assay and a survey of micronuclei (MN) frequency as well as other nuclear abnormalities (NA). P. squamosissimus specimens were collected at four locations in the Marajó Archipelago. Blood samples from these fish were used in the flow cytometry assay and piscine micronucleus test, and the resulting data were analyzed using analysis of variance (ANOVA). We did not observe a difference in the erythrocyte cell cycle distribution among the samples (P=0.9992), which suggests the absence of cytotoxic agent-induced apoptosis. The piscine micronucleus test exhibited differences in the samples from São Sebastião da Boa Vista (SSBV), and those from Anajás produced the highest mutagenicity indices. The MN frequencies were low for all groups, but the groups exhibited significantly different frequencies (P=0.0033). Reniform nuclei, nuclei with extensions, and lobed nuclei were combined and considered NA. The frequency differences for these NA were significant among sampling sites (P <0.0001). This report is the first to use flow cytometry in fish to evaluate cytotoxic agent-induced apoptosis. The micronucleus test results indicate the presence of pollutants that can change the genetic material of the fish studied. We also demonstrate that the Amazonian fish P. squamosissimus is important not only as a comestible species but also as an adequate model for biomonitoring in aquatic environments.

  1. The 1998-2001 submarine lava balloon eruption at the Serreta ridge (Azores archipelago): Constraints from volcanic facies architecture, isotope geochemistry and magnetic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madureira, Pedro; Rosa, Carlos; Marques, Ana Filipa; Silva, Pedro; Moreira, Manuel; Hamelin, Cédric; Relvas, Jorge; Lourenço, Nuno; Conceição, Patrícia; Pinto de Abreu, Manuel; Barriga, Fernando J. A. S.

    2017-01-01

    The most recent submarine eruption observed offshore the Azores archipelago occurred between 1998 and 2001 along the submarine Serreta ridge (SSR), 4-5 nautical miles WNW of Terceira Island. This submarine eruption delivered abundant basaltic lava balloons floating at the sea surface and significantly changed the bathymetry around the eruption area. Our work combines bathymetry, volcanic facies cartography, petrography, rock magnetism and geochemistry in order to (1) track the possible vent source at seabed, (2) better constrain the Azores magma source(s) sampled through the Serreta submarine volcanic event, and (3) interpret the data within the small-scale mantle source heterogeneity framework that has been demonstrated for the Azores archipelago. Lava balloons sampled at sea surface display a radiogenic signature, which is also correlated with relatively primitive (low) 4He/3He isotopic ratios. Conversely, SSR lavas are characterized by significantly lower radiogenic 87Sr/86Sr, 206Pb/204Pb and 208Pb/204Pb ratios than the lava balloons and the onshore lavas from the Terceira Island. SSR lavas are primitive, but incompatible trace-enriched. Apparent decoupling between the enriched incompatible trace element abundances and depleted radiogenic isotope ratios is best explained by binary mixing of a depleted MORB source and a HIMU­type component into magma batches that evolved by similar shallower processes in their travel to the surface. The collected data suggest that the freshest samples collected in the SSR may correspond to volcanic products of an unnoticed and more recent eruption than the 1998-2001 episode.

  2. Reed beds may facilitate transfer of tributyltin from aquatic to terrestrial ecosystems through insect vectors in the Archipelago Sea, SW Finland.

    PubMed

    Lilley, Thomas M; Meierjohann, Axel; Ruokolainen, Lasse; Peltonen, Jani; Vesterinen, Eero; Kronberg, Leif; Nikinmaa, Mikko

    2012-08-01

    Due to their adsorptive behavior, organotin compounds (OTCs), such as tributyltin (TBT), are accumulated in aquatic sediments. They resist biodegradation and, despite a ban in 2008, are a potential source for future exposure. Sediment OTCs have mostly been measured from sites of known high concentrations such as ports, shipping lanes, and marine dredging waste sites. The possible flow of OTCs from marine to terrestrial ecosystems, however, has not been studied. In the present study, the authors assessed whether sediments in common reed beds (Phragmites australis) accumulate TBT and whether chironomid (Diptera: Chironomidae) communities developing in reed-bed sediments act as vectors in the transfer of TBT from aquatic to terrestrial ecosystems in the Airisto channel, Archipelago Sea. The authors also investigated whether distance from the only known source and depth and TBT concentration of the adjacent shipping lane affect reed-bed concentrations. Thirty-six sites along the Airisto channel were sampled at 2-km intervals with triplicate samples from reed beds and the adjacent shipping lane for sediment and seven reed-bed sites for chironomids, and these were analyzed with an solid phase extraction liquid chromatography tamdem mass spectrometry method. The closer to the source the sample site was, the higher the measured TBT concentrations were; and the deeper the shipping lane, the lower the concentration of TBT in reed-bed sediments. The chironomid TBT concentrations correlated with reed-bed sediment TBT concentrations and showed evidence of accumulation. Therefore, TBT may be transferred, through the food web, from aquatic to terrestrial ecosystems relatively close to a source through ecosystem boundaries, such as common reed beds, which are areas of high insect biomass production in the Archipelago Sea.

  3. Formation and evolution of a metasomatized lithospheric root at the motionless Antarctic plate: the case of East Island, Crozet Archipelago (Indian Ocean)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyzen, Christine; Marzoli, Andrea; Bellieni, Giuliano; Levresse, Gilles

    2016-04-01

    Sitting atop the nearly stagnant Antarctic plate (ca. 6.46 mm/yr), the Crozet archipelago midway between Madagascar and Antarctica constitutes a region of unusually shallow (1543-1756 m below sea level) and thickened oceanic crust (10-16.5 km), high geoid height, and deep low-velocity zone, which may reflect the surface expression of a mantle plume. Here, we present new major and trace element data for Quaternary sub-aerial alkali basalts from East Island, the easterly and oldest island (ca. 9 Ma) of the Crozet archipelago. Crystallization at uppermost mantle depth and phenocryst accumulation have strongly affected their parental magma compositions. Their trace element patterns show a large negative K anomaly relative to Ta-La, moderate depletions in Rb and Ba wit