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Sample records for novelty locomotor response

  1. METHAMPHETAMINE TREATMENT CAUSES DELAYED DECREASE IN NOVELTY-INDUCED LOCOMOTOR ACTIVITY IN MICE

    PubMed Central

    Krasnova, Irina N.; Hodges, Amber B.; Ladenheim, Bruce; Rhoades, Raina; Phillip, Crystal G.; Ceseňa, Angela; Ivanova, Ekaterina; Hohmann, Christine F.; Cadet, Jean Lud

    2009-01-01

    Methamphetamine (METH) is a psychostimulant that causes damage to dopamine (DA) axons and to non-monoaminergic neurons in the brain. The aim of the present study was to investigate short- and long-term effects of neurotoxic METH treatment on novelty-induced locomotor activity in mice. Male BALB/c mice, 12–14 weeks old, were injected with saline or METH (i.p., 7.5 mg/kg × 4 times, every 2 hours). Behavior and neurotoxic effects were assessed at 10 days, 3 and 5 months following drug treatment. METH administration caused marked decreases in DA levels in the mouse striatum and cortex at 10 days post-drug. However, METH did not induce any changes in novelty-induced locomotor activity. At 3 and 5 months after treatment METH-exposed mice showed significant recovery of DA levels in the striatum and cortex. In contrast, these animals demonstrated significant decreases in locomotor activity at 5 months in comparison to aged-matched control mice. Further assessment of METH toxicity using TUNEL staining showed that the drug induced increased cell death in the striatum and cortex at 3 days after administration. Taken together, these data suggest that delayed deficits in novelty-induced locomotor activity observed in METH exposed animals are not due to neurodegeneration of DA terminals but to combined effects of METH and age-dependent dysfunction of non-DA intrinsic striatal and/or corticostriatal neurons. PMID:19559060

  2. Sex differences in the effects of social and physical environment on novelty-induced exploratory behavior and cocaine-stimulated locomotor activity in adolescent rats.

    PubMed

    Zakharova, Elena; Starosciak, Amy; Wade, Dean; Izenwasser, Sari

    2012-04-21

    Many factors influence the rewarding effects of drugs such as cocaine. The present study was done to determine whether social and environmental factors alter behavior in adolescent male and female rats. On postnatal day (PND) 23, rats were housed in one of several same-sex conditions. Both social (number of rats per cage) and environmental (availability of toys) factors were manipulated. Socially isolated rats were housed alone (1 rat/cage) in an environment that either was impoverished (with no toys; II) or enriched (with toys; IE). Standard housing for these studies was social and impoverished, which was 2 rats/cage with no toys (SI2). Other rats were housed 2/cage with toys (SE2), or 3/cage with (SE3) or without (SI3) toys. On PND 37, novelty-induced locomotor activity was measured for 30min. On PND 44-46, locomotor activity in response to an injection of 5mg/kg cocaine was measured for 60min each day. For male rats, only social conditions altered novelty-induced activity. Males housed in groups of three had the most activity, compared to pair-housed and isolated rats. For females, social and environmental enrichment interacted to alter novelty-induced activity. In contrast to males, isolated females had increased activity, compared to group-housed females. Further, isolated females in impoverished environments had more activity than isolated females in enriched environments and group-housed females in impoverished environments. The effect of environmental enrichment on cocaine-stimulated locomotor activity was altered depending upon the number of rats living in a cage for males. For females, only social conditions altered cocaine-stimulated behavior, with activity increasing with the number of rats in the cage, regardless of environmental enrichment. These data show that social and environmental enrichment differentially alter novelty-induced and cocaine-stimulated locomotor activity in adolescent male and female rats.

  3. Individual differences in novelty-seeking and behavioral responses to nicotine: a review of animal studies.

    PubMed

    Redolat, Rosa; Pérez-Martínez, Asunción; Carrasco, M Carmen; Mesa, Patricia

    2009-09-01

    Individual differences in the behavioral responses to a novel environment have been proposed as a research tool to predict responsiveness to other behavioral tasks, response to certain events and individual vulnerability to nicotine addiction. In rats and mice, novelty seeking (defined as enhanced specific exploration of novel situations) is a complex behavior confirmed by a large body of neurochemical, endocrinological and behavioral data. We review the main standardized procedures employed to measure the novelty seeking trait in rodents and the ontogeny of this behavior throughout the life-span taking into account that novelty seeking can be permanently modified as a consequence of particular early experiences, maternal care, and environmental enrichment. Studies in animal models suggest that individual differences in the sensitivity to nicotine depend on different variables such as basal locomotor activity of the experimental subjects, their response to novel environments (open-field, hole-board) and level of impulsivity. It is concluded that these basic findings contribute to a better understanding of smoking behavior and to the establishment of improved pharmacological treatments if individual differences are borne in mind.

  4. Picture Novelty Influences Response Selection and Inhibition: The Role of the In-Group Bias and Task-Difficulty

    PubMed Central

    Zinchenko, Artyom; Mahmud, Waich; Alam, Musrura Mefta; Kabir, Nadia; Al-Amin, Md. Mamun

    2016-01-01

    The human visual system prioritizes processing of novel information, leading to faster detection of novel stimuli. Novelty facilitates conflict resolution through the enhanced early perceptual processing. However, the role of novel information processing during the conflict-related response selection and inhibition remains unclear. Here, we used a face-gender classification version of the Simon task and manipulated task-difficulty and novelty of task-relevant information. The novel quality of stimuli was made task-irrelevant, and an in-group bias was tightly controlled by manipulation of a gender of picture stimuli. We found that the in-group bias modulated the role of novelty in executive control. Novel opposite-sex stimuli facilitated response inhibition only when the task was not demanding. By contrast, novelty enhanced response selection irrespective of the in-group factor when task-difficulty was increased. These findings support the in-group bias mechanism of visual processing, in cases when attentional resources are not limited by a demanding task. The results are further discussed along the lines of the attentional load theory and neural mechanisms of response-inhibition and locomotor activity. In conclusion, our data showed that processing of novel information may enhance executive control through facilitated response selection and inhibition. PMID:27788213

  5. Contrasting responses to novelty by wild and captive orangutans.

    PubMed

    Forss, Sofia I F; Schuppli, Caroline; Haiden, Dominique; Zweifel, Nicole; van Schaik, Carel P

    2015-10-01

    Several studies have suggested that wild primates tend to behave with caution toward novelty, whereas captive primates are thought to be less neophobic, more exploratory, and more innovative. However, few studies have systematically compared captive and wild individuals of the same species to document this "captivity effect" in greater detail. Here we report the responses of both wild and captive orangutans to the same novel items. Novel objects were presented to wild orangutans on multiple platforms placed in the canopy and equipped with motion-triggered video cameras. The same and different novel objects were also presented to orangutans in two different zoos. The results demonstrate extreme conservatism in both Bornean and Sumatran wild orangutans, who gradually approached the novel objects more closely as they became familiar, but avoided contact with them over many encounters spanning several months. Their zoo-living conspecifics, in contrast, showed an immediate neophilic response. Our results thus confirm the "captivity effect." To the various ecological explanations proposed before (reduced risk and increased time and energy balance for captive individuals relative to wild ones), we add the social information hypothesis, which claims that individuals confronted with novel items preferentially rely on social cues whenever possible. This caution toward novelty disappears when human caretakers become additional role models and can also be eroded when all experience with novelty is positive.

  6. Functional brain asymmetry in adult novelty response: on fluidity of neonatal novelty exposure effects.

    PubMed

    Tang, Akaysha C; Reeb-Sutherland, Bethany; Yang, Zhen

    2011-08-01

    Novelty and surprises differentially modify the left and right sides of the brain. Here we show that repeated brief exposures to the novelty of a non-home environment during infancy and early adulthood lead to long-lasting changes in adulthood in the global bi-lateralization organization of the brain as indexed by a transiently detectable right-sided orientating bias upon the initial encounter with the novel environment. Most surprisingly, we show that in the same individuals, the short-term effect of the combined neonatal and adulthood novelty exposures on functional brain asymmetry measured at young adulthood (5 months of age) is distinctively different from the long-term effect measured at late adulthood (15 months of age). These results suggest that long-lasting, cumulative effects of early life experience on brain and behavior organization are not necessarily permanent, but continue to unfold, presumably via interactions with a multitude of unmonitored intervening life events.

  7. Predisposition to self-administer amphetamine: the contribution of response to novelty and prior exposure to the drug.

    PubMed

    Pierre, P J; Vezina, P

    1997-02-01

    The present experiment examined the contribution of locomotor response to novelty and prior exposure to amphetamine to rats' predisposition to self-administer a low dose of the drug. Rats were screened for their locomotor response to a novel environment and divided into high (HR) or low (LR) responders based on whether their locomotor scores were above or below the median activity level of the subject sample. Animals were then pre-exposed to nine daily injections of either saline (1 ml/kg, i.p.) or amphetamine (1.5 mg/kg, i.p.). Starting 1 week after pre-exposure, animals in the four different groups (HR pre-exposed to saline or amphetamine; LR pre-exposed to saline or amphetamine) were given the opportunity, in each of ten daily sessions, to lever press for a low dose of amphetamine (10 micrograms/kg per infusion) in a two lever (active versus inactive) continuous reinforcement operant task. Initial lever press performance revealed no difference in active versus inactive lever pressing between amphetamine and saline pre-exposed animals. However, in agreement with previous reports, with successive test sessions amphetamine pre-exposed rats maintained higher levels of active versus inactive lever pressing for drug while saline pre-exposed rats showed a progressive decrease in the pressing of either lever. Interestingly, this enhanced active lever pressing was observed in HR but not LR rats pre-exposed to amphetamine. In addition, HR saline pre-exposed animals showed initial active versus inactive lever pressing equivalent to that of HR amphetamine pretreated rats but this enhanced responding for drug diminished over days and by the last day of self-administration was indistinguishable from that of LR animals having been pre-exposed either to amphetamine or saline. These findings confirm that prior exposure to amphetamine promotes the subsequent self-administration of the drug and suggest that response to novelty may be a predictor more closely linked to an animal

  8. Dual routes to cortical orienting responses: novelty detection and uncertainty reduction.

    PubMed

    Lange, Florian; Seer, Caroline; Finke, Mareike; Dengler, Reinhard; Kopp, Bruno

    2015-02-01

    Sokolov distinguished between reactive and proactive variants of the orienting response (OR). The Novelty P3 is considered as an electrophysiological signature of the reactive OR. Recent work suggests that the proactive OR is reflected in frontally distributed P3 activity elicited by uncertainty-reducing stimuli in task-switching paradigms. Here, we directly compare the electrophysiological signatures of reactive and proactive ORs. Participants completed a novelty oddball task and a task-switching procedure while the electroencephalogram was measured. Novel and uncertainty-reducing stimuli evoked prominent fronto-centrally distributed Novelty P3 and Uncertainty P3 waves, respectively. We found a substantial negative correlation between Novelty P3 and Uncertainty P3 across participants, suggesting that reactive and proactive ORs converge on a common neural pathway, but also that distinguishable routes to orienting exist. Moreover, response accuracy was associated with reduced Novelty-P3 and enhanced Uncertainty-P3 amplitudes. The relation between Novelty P3 and Uncertainty P3 might serve as an index of individual differences in distractibility and cognitive control.

  9. Blunted ventral striatal responses to anticipated rewards foreshadow problematic drug use in novelty-seeking adolescents.

    PubMed

    Büchel, Christian; Peters, Jan; Banaschewski, Tobias; Bokde, Arun L W; Bromberg, Uli; Conrod, Patricia J; Flor, Herta; Papadopoulos, Dimitri; Garavan, Hugh; Gowland, Penny; Heinz, Andreas; Walter, Henrik; Ittermann, Bernd; Mann, Karl; Martinot, Jean-Luc; Paillère-Martinot, Marie-Laure; Nees, Frauke; Paus, Tomas; Pausova, Zdenka; Poustka, Luise; Rietschel, Marcella; Robbins, Trevor W; Smolka, Michael N; Gallinat, Juergen; Schumann, Gunter; Knutson, Brian

    2017-02-21

    Novelty-seeking tendencies in adolescents may promote innovation as well as problematic impulsive behaviour, including drug abuse. Previous research has not clarified whether neural hyper- or hypo-responsiveness to anticipated rewards promotes vulnerability in these individuals. Here we use a longitudinal design to track 144 novelty-seeking adolescents at age 14 and 16 to determine whether neural activity in response to anticipated rewards predicts problematic drug use. We find that diminished BOLD activity in mesolimbic (ventral striatal and midbrain) and prefrontal cortical (dorsolateral prefrontal cortex) regions during reward anticipation at age 14 predicts problematic drug use at age 16. Lower psychometric conscientiousness and steeper discounting of future rewards at age 14 also predicts problematic drug use at age 16, but the neural responses independently predict more variance than psychometric measures. Together, these findings suggest that diminished neural responses to anticipated rewards in novelty-seeking adolescents may increase vulnerability to future problematic drug use.

  10. Blunted ventral striatal responses to anticipated rewards foreshadow problematic drug use in novelty-seeking adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Büchel, Christian; Peters, Jan; Banaschewski, Tobias; Bokde, Arun L. W.; Bromberg, Uli; Conrod, Patricia J.; Flor, Herta; Papadopoulos, Dimitri; Garavan, Hugh; Gowland, Penny; Heinz, Andreas; Walter, Henrik; Ittermann, Bernd; Mann, Karl; Martinot, Jean-Luc; Paillère-Martinot, Marie-Laure; Nees, Frauke; Paus, Tomas; Pausova, Zdenka; Poustka, Luise; Rietschel, Marcella; Robbins, Trevor W.; Smolka, Michael N.; Gallinat, Juergen; Schumann, Gunter; Knutson, Brian; Arroyo, Mercedes; Artiges, Eric; Aydin, Semiha; Bach, Christine; Barbot, Alexis; Barker, Gareth; Bruehl, Ruediger; Cattrell, Anna; Constant, Patrick; Crombag, Hans; Czech, Katharina; Dalley, Jeffrey; Decideur, Benjamin; Desrivieres, Sylvane; Fadai, Tahmine; Fauth-Buhler, Mira; Feng, Jianfeng; Filippi, Irinia; Frouin, Vincent; Fuchs, Birgit; Gemmeke, Isabel; Genauck, Alexander; Hanratty, Eanna; Heinrichs, Bert; Heym, Nadja; Hubner, Thomas; Ihlenfeld, Albrecht; Ing, Alex; Ireland, James; Jia, Tianye; Jones, Jennifer; Jurk, Sarah; Kaviani, Mehri; Klaassen, Arno; Kruschwitz, Johann; Lalanne, Christophe; Lanzerath, Dirk; Lathrop, Mark; Lawrence, Claire; Lemaitre, Hervé; Macare, Christine; Mallik, Catherine; Mar, Adam; Martinez-Medina, Lourdes; Mennigen, Eva; de Carvahlo, Fabiana Mesquita; Mignon, Xavier; Millenet, Sabina; Miranda, Ruben; Müller, Kathrin; Nymberg, Charlotte; Parchetka, Caroline; Pena-Oliver, Yolanda; Pentilla, Jani; Poline, Jean-Baptiste; Quinlan, Erin Burke; Rapp, Michael; Ripke, Stephan; Ripley, Tamzin; Robert, Gabriel; Rogers, John; Romanowski, Alexander; Ruggeri, Barbara; Schmäl, Christine; Schmidt, Dirk; Schneider, Sophia; Schubert, Florian; Schwartz, Yannick; Sommer, Wolfgang; Spanagel, Rainer; Speiser, Claudia; Spranger, Tade; Stedman, Alicia; Stephens, Dai; Strache, Nicole; Ströhle, Andreas; Struve, Maren; Subramaniam, Naresh; Theobald, David; Vetter, Nora; Vulser, Helene; Weiss, Katharina; Whelan, Robert; Williams, Steve; Xu, Bing; Yacubian, Juliana; Yu, Tao; Ziesch, Veronika

    2017-01-01

    Novelty-seeking tendencies in adolescents may promote innovation as well as problematic impulsive behaviour, including drug abuse. Previous research has not clarified whether neural hyper- or hypo-responsiveness to anticipated rewards promotes vulnerability in these individuals. Here we use a longitudinal design to track 144 novelty-seeking adolescents at age 14 and 16 to determine whether neural activity in response to anticipated rewards predicts problematic drug use. We find that diminished BOLD activity in mesolimbic (ventral striatal and midbrain) and prefrontal cortical (dorsolateral prefrontal cortex) regions during reward anticipation at age 14 predicts problematic drug use at age 16. Lower psychometric conscientiousness and steeper discounting of future rewards at age 14 also predicts problematic drug use at age 16, but the neural responses independently predict more variance than psychometric measures. Together, these findings suggest that diminished neural responses to anticipated rewards in novelty-seeking adolescents may increase vulnerability to future problematic drug use. PMID:28221370

  11. Happier, faster: Developmental changes in the effects of mood and novelty on responses.

    PubMed

    Schomaker, Judith; Rangel-Gomez, Mauricio; Meeter, Martijn

    2016-01-01

    Positive mood ameliorates several cognitive processes: It can enhance cognitive control, increase flexibility, and promote variety seeking in decision making. These effects of positive mood have been suggested to depend on frontostriatal dopamine, which is also associated with the detection of novelty. This suggests that positive mood could also affect novelty detection. In the present study, children and adults saw either a happy or a neutral movie to induce a positive or neutral mood. After that, they were shown novel and familiar images. On some trials a beep was presented over headphones either at the same time as the image or at a 200-ms stimulus onset asynchrony (SOA), and the task of the participant was to detect these auditory targets. Children were slower in responding than adults. Positive mood, however, speeded responses, especially in children, and induced facilitatory effects of novelty. These effects were consistent with increased arousal. Although effects of novelty were more consistent with an attentional response, in children who had watched a happy movie the novel images evoked a more liberal response criterion, suggestive of increased arousal. This suggests that mood and novelty may affect response behaviour stronger in children than in adults.

  12. The role of oxytocin in familiarization-habituation responses to social novelty

    PubMed Central

    Tops, Mattie; Huffmeijer, Renske; Linting, Mariëlle; Grewen, Karen M.; Light, Kathleen C.; Koole, Sander L.; Bakermans-Kranenburg, Marian J.; van IJzendoorn, Marinus H.

    2013-01-01

    Stress or arousal responses to novel social contexts ease off when individuals get familiar with the social context. In the present study we investigated whether oxytocin is involved in this process of familiarization-habituation as oxytocin is known to increase trust and decrease anxiety. Fifty-nine healthy female subjects took part in the same experimental procedure in two sessions separated by 4 weeks. In the first (novelty) session state trust scores were significantly positively correlated with salivary oxytocin levels while in the second (familiarity) session state trust scores were significantly negatively correlated with salivary oxytocin levels. In a path model oxytocin was associated with increased trust in the novelty session and trust was associated with decreased oxytocin levels in the familiarity session. The results are consistent with the idea that oxytocin decreases stress-to-novelty responses by promoting familiarization to novel social contexts. PMID:24151482

  13. Making Sense of Infant Familiarity and Novelty Responses to Words at Lexical Onset

    PubMed Central

    DePaolis, Rory A.; Keren-Portnoy, Tamar; Vihman, Marilyn

    2016-01-01

    This study suggests that familiarity and novelty preferences in infant experimental tasks can in some instances be interpreted together as a single indicator of language advance. We provide evidence to support this idea based on our use of the auditory headturn preference paradigm to record responses to words likely to be either familiar or unfamiliar to infants. Fifty-nine 10-month-old infants were tested. The task elicited mixed preferences: familiarity (longer average looks to the words likely to be familiar to the infants), novelty (longer average looks to the words likely to be unfamiliar) and no-preference (similar-length of looks to both type of words). The infants who exhibited either a familiarity or a novelty response were more advanced on independent indices of phonetic advance than the infants who showed no preference. In addition, infants exhibiting novelty responses were more lexically advanced than either the infants who exhibited familiarity or those who showed no-preference. The results provide partial support for Hunter and Ames’ (1988) developmental model of attention in infancy and suggest caution when interpreting studies indexed to chronological age. PMID:27242624

  14. Voluntary ethanol consumption changes anticipatory ultrasonic vocalizations but not novelty response.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Erik J; Jorgensen, Emily T; Sprick, Lukas S; Cain, Mary E

    2017-03-01

    Novelty and sensation seeking (NSS) and affective disorders are correlated with earlier ethanol (ETOH) consumption, and sustained drinking into adulthood. Understanding the NSS response and affective response before and after voluntary ETOH consumption could elucidate important individual differences promoting sustained ETOH consumption. This study determined that NSS and affective response to rewarding stimulation-measured by ultrasonic vocalizations (USVs)-change after adolescent ETOH voluntary drinking. Rats were tested for their NSS response using the inescapable novelty test. Then rats were tested for their affective response to a natural reward and USVs were measured. The natural reward was experimenter-induced play behavior. Rats were exposed to ETOH for 8 weeks using an intermittent two bottle paradigm. After 8 weeks of voluntary consumption, rats were retested for their response to NSS and affective response to natural reward. Results indicate that voluntary ETOH consumption did not change the response to novelty. Control and ETOH exposed rats decreased their novelty response equally after ETOH consumption, suggesting the decrease was due to age. Importantly, voluntary ETOH consumption changed affective USVs. Compared to water-drinking control rats, ETOH-consuming rats elicited greater anticipatory trill USVs to a natural reward-associated context during a post-drinking probe test. Tickle-induced trill USVs did not change differently between ETOH and control rats. These results provide evidence that voluntary intermittent ETOH exposure increases the anticipation of reward and may represent a form of incentive salience. We postulate these diverging effects could be due to differences in incentive salience or reward processing. Together, these results suggest that voluntary ETOH consumption changes the affective response to conditioned and unconditioned natural rewards and offers a behavioral mechanism for studying affective reward processing after ETOH

  15. Finding and Not Finding Rat Perirhinal Neuronal Responses to Novelty

    PubMed Central

    Muller, Robert U.; Brown, Malcolm W.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT There is much evidence that the perirhinal cortex of both rats and monkeys is important for judging the relative familiarity of visual stimuli. In monkeys many studies have found that a proportion of perirhinal neurons respond more to novel than familiar stimuli. There are fewer studies of perirhinal neuronal responses in rats, and those studies based on exploration of objects, have raised into question the encoding of stimulus familiarity by rat perirhinal neurons. For this reason, recordings of single neuronal activity were made from the perirhinal cortex of rats so as to compare responsiveness to novel and familiar stimuli in two different behavioral situations. The first situation was based upon that used in “paired viewing” experiments that have established rat perirhinal differences in immediate early gene expression for novel and familiar visual stimuli displayed on computer monitors. The second situation was similar to that used in the spontaneous object recognition test that has been widely used to establish the involvement of rat perirhinal cortex in familiarity discrimination. In the first condition 30 (25%) of 120 perirhinal neurons were visually responsive; of these responsive neurons 19 (63%) responded significantly differently to novel and familiar stimuli. In the second condition eight (53%) of 15 perirhinal neurons changed activity significantly in the vicinity of objects (had “object fields”); however, for none (0%) of these was there a significant activity change related to the familiarity of an object, an incidence significantly lower than for the first condition. Possible reasons for the difference are discussed. It is argued that the failure to find recognition‐related neuronal responses while exploring objects is related to its detectability by the measures used, rather than the absence of all such signals in perirhinal cortex. Indeed, as shown by the results, such signals are found when a different methodology is used.

  16. Neurochemical factors underlying individual differences in locomotor activity and anxiety-like behavioral responses in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Tran, Steven; Nowicki, Magda; Muraleetharan, Arrujyan; Chatterjee, Diptendu; Gerlai, Robert

    2016-02-04

    Variation among individuals may arise for several reasons, and may have diverse underlying mechanisms. Individual differences have been studied in a variety of species, but recently a new model organism has emerged in this field that offers both sophistication in phenotypical characterization and powerful mechanistic analysis. Recently, zebrafish, one of the favorites of geneticists, have been shown to exhibit consistent individual differences in baseline locomotor activity. In the current study, we further explore this finding and examine whether individual differences in locomotor activity correlate with anxiety-like behavioral measures and with levels of dopamine, serotonin and the metabolites of these neurotransmitters. In addition, we examine whether individual differences in locomotor activity are also associated with reactivity to the locomotor stimulant effects of and neurochemical responses to acute ethanol exposure (30min long, 1% v/v ethanol bath application). Principal component analyses revealed a strong association among anxiety-like responses, locomotor activity, serotonin and dopamine levels. Furthermore, ethanol exposure was found to abolish the locomotion-dependent anxiety-like behavioral and serotonergic responses suggesting that this drug also engages a common underlying pathway. Overall, our results provide support for an important role of the serotonergic system in mediating individual differences in anxiety-like responses and locomotor activity in zebrafish and for a minor modulatory role of the dopaminergic system.

  17. The pupillary response discriminates between subjective and objective familiarity and novelty.

    PubMed

    Kafkas, Alexandros; Montaldi, Daniela

    2015-10-01

    The pupil response discriminates between old and new stimuli, with old stimuli characterized by larger pupil dilation patterns than new stimuli. We sought to explore the cause of the pupil old/new effect and discount the effect of targetness, effort, recollection retrieval, and complexity of the recognition decision. Two experiments are reported in which the pupil response and the eye fixation patterns were measured, while participants identified novel and familiar object stimuli, in two separate tasks, emphasizing either novelty or familiarity detection. In Experiment 1, familiarity and novelty decisions were taken using a rating scale, while in Experiment 2 a simpler yes/no decision was used. In both experiments, we found that detection of target familiar stimuli resulted in greater pupil dilation than the detection of target novel stimuli, while the duration of the first fixation discriminated between familiar and novel stimuli as early as within 320 ms after stimulus onset. Importantly, the pupil response distinguished between the objective (during an earlier temporal component) and the subjective (during a later temporal component) status of the stimulus for misses and false alarms. In the light of previous findings, we suggest that the pupil and fixation old/new effects reflect the distinct neural and cognitive mechanisms involved in the familiarity and novelty decisions. The findings also have important implications for the use of pupil dilation and eye movement patterns to explore explicit and implicit memory processes.

  18. Effects of methylphenidate on responses to novelty in a teleost fish (Poecilia reticulata).

    PubMed

    De Serrano, Alex R; Fong, Charmaine; Rodd, F Helen

    2016-04-01

    Novelty seeking, the willingness to explore novel stimuli, can have important fitness consequences. The neurotransmitter dopamine has been linked to this behavior in studies on lab animals including rodents and fish; however, few studies have investigated this association in individuals from natural populations. Trinidadian guppies (Poecilia reticulata) show variation in willingness to explore novel objects and environments, and females tend to show a preference for novel males. In this study, we asked whether we could enhance interest in several types of novel stimuli in lab-reared, female Trinidadian guppies by administering methylphenidate hydrochloride, a stimulant known to increase dopamine levels. We scored their responses to three different types of novelty: novel environments, objects, and males. Treated females showed enhanced exploratory behavior: they traversed relatively more inner squares of the novel environment (open-field test); they spent more time inspecting a novel object; and they showed greater interest in the second male guppy to which they were exposed than control fish. We also found a positive association between our metrics of exploration in the open field and novel object tests. Our other assays suggest that these differences were not the result of increased activity or reduced levels of stress. Therefore, our results suggest that dopamine plays a role in the responsiveness of guppies to novelty; this opens the door to studies of behavioral mechanisms in natural populations.

  19. Evolutionary novelties.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Günter P; Lynch, Vincent J

    2010-01-26

    How novel traits arise in organisms has long been a major problem in biology. Indeed, the sharpest critiques of Darwin's theory of evolution by natural selection often centered on explaining how novel body parts arose. In his response to The Origin of Species, St. George J. Mivart challenged Darwin to explain the origin of evolutionary novelties such as the mammary gland, asking if it was "conceivable that the young of any animal was ever saved from destruction by accidentally sucking a drop of scarcely nutritious fluid from an accidentally hypertrophied cutaneous gland of its mother?" It is only now that modern molecular and genomic tools are being brought to bear on this question that we are finally in a position to answer Mivart's challenge and explain one of the most fundamental questions of biology: how does novelty arise in evolution?

  20. Effects of voluntary wheel running on heart rate, body temperature, and locomotor activity in response to acute and repeated stressor exposures in rats.

    PubMed

    Masini, Cher V; Nyhuis, Tara J; Sasse, Sarah K; Day, Heidi E W; Campeau, Serge

    2011-05-01

    Stress often negatively impacts physical and mental health but it has been suggested that voluntary physical activity may benefit health by reducing some of the effects of stress. The present experiments tested whether voluntary exercise can reduce heart rate, core body temperature and locomotor activity responses to acute (novelty or loud noise) or repeated stress (loud noise). After 6 weeks of running-wheel access, rats exposed to a novel environment had reduced heart rate, core body temperature, and locomotor activity responses compared to rats housed under sedentary conditions. In contrast, none of these measures were different between exercised and sedentary rats following acute 30-min noise exposures, at either 85 or 98 dB. Following 10 weeks of running-wheel access, both groups displayed significant habituation of all these responses to 10 consecutive daily 30-min presentations of 98 dB noise stress. However, the extent of habituation of all three responses was significantly enhanced in exercised compared to sedentary animals on the last exposure to noise. These results suggest that in physically active animals, under some conditions, acute responses to stress exposure may be reduced, and response habituation to repeated stress may be enhanced, which ultimately may reduce the negative and cumulative impact of stress.

  1. Food deprivation increases the low-dose locomotor stimulant response to ethanol in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Kliethermes, Christopher L

    2013-10-01

    Acute and chronic states of food deprivation result in increased sensitivity to a variety of natural reinforcers as well as to drugs of abuse. Food deprived animals show increased locomotor activity during periods of food deprivation, as well as increased locomotor stimulant responses to drugs of abuse, including cocaine, amphetamine, morphine, and ethanol, implying that drugs of abuse act in part on neural systems that underlie responses towards food. To determine whether this effect extends to an invertebrate, highly genetically tractable animal, the locomotor stimulant effects of low dose ethanol were assessed under a variety of feeding conditions in the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster. Food deprivation resulted in strain specific increases in ethanol-stimulated locomotor activity in most strains tested, although elevated baseline activity confounded interpretation in some strains. Experiments conducted with Canton S flies found that the effects of food deprivation on the locomotor stimulant response to ethanol increased with the duration of deprivation, and could be blocked by refeeding the flies with standard food or sucrose, but not yeast, immediately prior to the ethanol exposure. Life-span extending dietary depletion procedures or previous periods of food deprivation did not affect the response to ethanol, indicating that only animals in an acutely food deprived state are more sensitive to the stimulant effects of ethanol. These results suggest that increased sensitivity to the stimulant effects of some drugs of abuse might reflect an evolutionarily conserved neural mechanism that underlies behavioral responses to natural reinforcers and drugs of abuse. The identification of this mechanism, and the genes that underlie its development and function, will constitute a novel approach towards the study of alcohol abuse and dependence.

  2. Models of anxiety: responses of rats to novelty in an open space and an enclosed space.

    PubMed

    Ennaceur, A; Michalikova, S; Chazot, P L

    2006-07-15

    Exposure to novelty has been shown to induce anxiety responses in a variety of behavioural paradigms. The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether exposition of naïve rats to novelty would result in a comparable or a different pattern of responses in an open space versus enclosed space with or without the presence of an object in the centre of the field. Lewis and Wistar rats of both genders were used to illustrate and discuss the value and validity of these anxiety paradigms. We examined a wide range of measures, which cover several aspects of animals' responses. The results of this study revealed significant differences between the behaviour of animals in an open space and in the enclosed space. It also revealed significant differences in animal's responses to the presence and absence of an object in the open space and in the enclosed space. In the enclosed space, rats spent most of their time in the outer area with lower number of exits and avoided the object area except when there was an object, while in the open space rats displayed frequent short duration re-entries in the outer area and spent longer time in the object area in presence of an object. The time spent in the inner area (away from the outer area and the object area) was significantly longer and the number of faecal boli was significantly higher in the open space than in the enclosed space. In the present report, we will discuss the fundamental differences between enclosed space and open space models, and we will examine some methodological issues related to the current animal models of human behaviour in anxiety. In the enclosed space, animals can avoid the potential threat associated with the centre area of a box and chose the safety of walls and corners, whereas, in the open space animals have to avoid every parts of the field from which there was no safe escape. The response of animals to novelty in an open space model appears more relevant to anxiety than in an enclosed space

  3. Brain transcription factor gene expression, neurotransmitter levels, and novelty response behaviors: alterations during rat amphetamine withdrawal and following chronic injection stress.

    PubMed

    Persico, A M; Schindler, C W; Zaczek, R; Brannock, M T; Uhl, G R

    1995-03-01

    Transcription factors are known to act as gene expression regulators, possibly linking extracellular stimuli to long-term modifications at the neuronal level. Such modifications may potentially underlie chronic psychostimulant- and stress-induced behavioral alterations. This study illustrates how a 2 week, twice daily 7.5 mg/kg d-amphetamine or saline regimen alters rat brain regional expression of transcription factor genes, including c-fos, fos-B, jun-B, c-jun, and zif 268, and seeks potential correlations between those changes and alterations in neurotransmitter levels and behavioral novelty responses. Amphetamine withdrawal-induced decreases in transcription factor mRNA levels, assessed using Northern blot analysis, appear most prominent in prefrontal cortex, begin approximately 12 h after the last injection, and largely recover to control levels by 54 h. Prefrontal cortical and striatal dopamine content, assessed using HPLC, decrease and recover over a similar time course. Behavioral "stereotypy time" manifest by animals exposed to a novel environment, a measure sensitive to psychostimulant withdrawal, also decreases beginning 12 h after the last injection, is still significantly reduced at 54 h, and recovers at 72 h. Chronic saline injections are followed by a consistent decrease in transcription factor gene expression, observed 6 h after the last injection, followed by a "rebound" increase at 12 h. These changes are accompanied by dramatic, mostly biphasic alterations in prefrontal cortical biogenic amines and by a short-lived increase in striatal dopamine turnover. At the same time, rats display much longer-lasting decreases in locomotor responses when exposed to a novel environment, with recovery occurring only 54 h after the last injection. The delayed recovery of behavioral responses to novelty is consistent with potential involvement of changes in transcription factor-mediated gene expression in neurochemical mechanisms underlying psychostimulant

  4. Differential roles of GABAB1 subunit isoforms on locomotor responses to acute and repeated administration of cocaine.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, Laura H; Sweeney, Fabian F; Kaupmann, Klemens; O'Leary, Olivia F; Gassmann, Martin; Bettler, Bernhard; Cryan, John F

    2016-02-01

    GABAB receptors are crucial modulators of the behavioural effects of drug abuse, and agonists and positive allosteric modulators show promise as pharmacological strategies for anti-addiction therapeutics. GABAB receptors are functional heterodimers of GABAB1 and GABAB2 subunits. The predominant neuronal GABAB1 subunit isoforms are GABAB1a and GABAB1b. Selective ablation of these isoforms in mice revealed differential behavioural responses in fear, cognition and stress sensitivity. However, the influence of the two GABAB1 isoforms on responses to drugs of abuse is unclear. Therefore we examined the responses of GABAB1 subunit isoform null mice to cocaine in acute locomotor activity and conditioned place preference (CPP) paradigms. During habituation for the acute locomotor activity assay, GABAB1b(-/-) mice showed higher levels of locomotor activity relative to wild-type (WT) and GABAB1a(-/-) mice, in accordance with previous studies. Acute cocaine (10 mg/kg) increased locomotor activity in habituated mice of all three genotypes, with GABAB1a(-/-) mice showing sustained hyperlocomotor responses 30 min after cocaine relative to WT and GABAB1b(-/-) mice. No genotypes demonstrated a cocaine-induced place preference, however, GABAB1a(-/-) mice demonstrated enhanced locomotor sensitisation to chronic cocaine in the CPP paradigm in comparison to WT mice, whereas GABAB1b(-/-) mice failed to develop locomotor sensitisation, despite higher levels of basal locomotor activity. These findings indicate that GABAB1a and GABAB1b isoforms differentially regulate behavioural responses to cocaine, with deletion of GABAB1a enhancing cocaine-induced locomotor activity and deletion of GABAB1b protecting from cocaine-induced sensitisation.

  5. 5-HT1A Agonist Properties Contribute to a Robust Response to Vilazodone in the Novelty Suppressed Feeding Paradigm

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Garcia, Alvaro L.; Navarro-Sobrino, Míriam; Pilosof, Gila; Banerjee, Pradeep; Dranovsky, Alex

    2016-01-01

    Background: Differences in 5-HT1A receptor function have been implicated in vulnerability to depression and in response to treatment. Adding 5-HT1A partial agonists to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors has been touted as a strategy to increase their efficacy. Here we use the novelty suppressed feeding paradigm to compare the effects of vilazodone, a high-potency selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, with high affinity for 5-HT1A receptors to the reference selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor fluoxetine across several mouse strains that differ in their response to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors. Methods: To confirm 5-HT1A agonist activity, body temperature was measured after acute administration of vilazodone or fluoxetine, as administration of 5-HT1A agonists induces hypothermia. We next used 3 strains of mice to examine the effects of the drugs on latency in the novelty suppressed feeding, a paradigm generally sensitive to chronic but not acute effects of antidepressants. Results: Vilazodone induces robust hypothermia and blocks stress-induced hyperthermia in a 5-HT1A-dependent manner, consistent with agonist effects at 5-HT1A autoreceptors. In 129SvEv mice, vilazodone (10mg/kg/d) reduces the latency to eat in the novelty suppressed feeding test within 8 days, while no effect of fluoxetine (20mg/kg/d) was detected at that time. In contrast, both vilazodone and fluoxetine are effective at decreasing latency to eat in the novelty suppressed feeding paradigm in a strain with low autoreceptor levels. In mice with higher autoreceptor levels, no significant difference was detected between fluoxetine and vehicle (P=.8) or vilazodone and vehicle (P=.06). Conclusion: In mice, vilazodone may offer advantages in time of onset and efficacy over a reference selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor in the novelty suppressed feeding test. PMID:27352617

  6. Novelty Seeking, Harm Avoidance, and Cerebral Responses to Conflict Anticipation: An Exploratory Study

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Jianping; Hu, Sien; Maisano, Julianna R.; Chao, Herta H.; Zhang, Sheng; Li, Chiang-Shan R.

    2016-01-01

    Proactive control allows us to maneuver a changing environment and individuals are distinct in how they anticipate and approach such changes. Here, we examined how individual differences in personality traits influence cerebral responses to conflict anticipation, a critical process of proactive control. We explored this issue in an fMRI study of the stop signal task, in which the probability of stop signal – p(Stop) – was computed trial by trial with a Bayesian model. Higher p(Stop) is associated with prolonged go trial reaction time, indicating conflict anticipation and proactive control of motor response. Regional brain activations to conflict anticipation were correlated to novelty seeking (NS), harm avoidance (HA), reward dependence, as assessed by the Tridimensional Personality Questionnaire, with age and gender as covariates, in a whole-brain linear regression. Results showed that increased anticipation of the stop signal is associated with activations in the bilateral inferior parietal lobules (IPL), right lateral orbitofrontal cortex (lOFC), middle frontal gyrus (MFG), anterior pre-supplementary motor area (pre-SMA), and bilateral thalamus, with men showing greater activation in the IPL than women. NS correlated negatively to activity in the anterior pre-SMA, right IPL, and MFG/lOFC, and HA correlated negatively to activity in the thalamus during conflict anticipation. In addition, the negative association between NS and MFG/lOFC activity was significant in men but not in women. Thus, NS and HA traits are associated with reduced mobilization of cognitive control circuits when enhanced behavioral control is necessary. The findings from this exploratory study characterize the influence of NS and HA on proactive control and provide preliminary evidence for gender differences in these associations. PMID:27857686

  7. Machine learning methods predict locomotor response to MK-801 in mouse models of down syndrome.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Cao D; Costa, Alberto C S; Cios, Krzysztof J; Gardiner, Katheleen J

    2011-03-01

    Down syndrome (DS), caused by trisomy of human chromosome 21 (HSA21), is a common genetic cause of cognitive impairment. This disorder results from the overexpression of HSA21 genes and the resulting perturbations in many molecular pathways and cellular processes. Knowledge-based identification of targets for pharmacotherapies will require defining the most critical protein abnormalities among these many perturbations. Here the authors show that using the Ts65Dn and Ts1Cje mouse models of DS, which are trisomic for 88 and 69 reference protein coding genes, respectively, a simple linear Naïve Bayes classifier successfully predicts behavioral outcome (level of locomotor activity) in response to treatment with the N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist MK-801. Input to the Naïve Bayes method were simple protein profiles generated from cortex and output was locomotor activity binned into three levels: low, medium, and high. When Feature Selection was used with the Naïve Bayes method, levels of three HSA21 and two non-HSA21 protein features were identified as making the most significant contributions to activity level. Using these five features, accuracies of up to 88% in prediction of locomotor activity were achieved. These predictions depend not only on genotype-specific differences but also on within-genotype individual variation in levels of molecular and behavioral parameters. With judicious choice of pathways and components, a similar approach may be useful in analysis of more complex behaviors, including those associated with learning and memory, and may facilitate identification of novel targets for pharmacotherapeutics.

  8. Localization of the event-related potential novelty response as defined by principal components analysis.

    PubMed

    Dien, Joseph; Spencer, Kevin M; Donchin, Emanuel

    2003-10-01

    Recent research indicates that novel stimuli elicit at least two distinct components, the Novelty P3 and the P300. The P300 is thought to be elicited when a context updating mechanism is activated by a wide class of deviant events. The functional significance of the Novelty P3 is uncertain. Identification of the generator sources of the two components could provide additional information about their functional significance. Previous localization efforts have yielded conflicting results. The present report demonstrates that the use of principal components analysis (PCA) results in better convergence with knowledge about functional neuroanatomy than did previous localization efforts. The results are also more convincing than that obtained by two alternative methods, MUSIC-RAP and the Minimum Norm. Source modeling on 129-channel data with BESA and BrainVoyager suggests the P300 has sources in the temporal-parietal junction whereas the Novelty P3 has sources in the anterior cingulate.

  9. Exaggerated sympathetic and cardiovascular responses to stimulation of the mesencephalic locomotor region in spontaneously hypertensive rats

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Nan; Mitchell, Jere H.; Smith, Scott A.

    2015-01-01

    The sympathetic and pressor responses to exercise are exaggerated in hypertension. However, the underlying mechanisms causing this abnormality remain to be fully elucidated. Central command, a neural drive originating in higher brain centers, is known to activate cardiovascular and locomotor control circuits concomitantly. As such, it is a viable candidate for the generation of the augmented vascular response to exercise in this disease. We hypothesized that augmentations in central command function contribute to the heightened cardiovascular response to exercise in hypertension. To test this hypothesis, changes in renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA) and mean arterial pressure (MAP) in response to electrical stimulation of mesencephalic locomotor region (MLR; 20–50 μA in 10-μA steps evoking fictive locomotion), a putative component of the central command pathway, were examined in decerebrate, paralyzed normotensive Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) and spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). Tibial nerve discharge during MLR stimulation significantly increased in an intensity-dependent manner in both WKY and SHR but was not different between groups. Stimulation of the MLR evoked significantly larger increases in RSNA and MAP with increasing stimulation intensity in both groups. Importantly, the increases in sympathetic and pressor responses to this fictive locomotion were significantly greater in SHR compared with WKY across all stimulation intensities (e.g., at 50 μA, ΔRSNA: WKY 153±31%, SHR 287±42%; ΔMAP: WKY 87±9 mmHg, SHR 139±7 mmHg). These findings provide the first evidence that central command may be a critical contributor to the exaggerated rise in sympathetic activity and blood pressure during exercise in hypertension. PMID:26545711

  10. Exaggerated sympathetic and cardiovascular responses to stimulation of the mesencephalic locomotor region in spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Liang, Nan; Mitchell, Jere H; Smith, Scott A; Mizuno, Masaki

    2016-01-01

    The sympathetic and pressor responses to exercise are exaggerated in hypertension. However, the underlying mechanisms causing this abnormality remain to be fully elucidated. Central command, a neural drive originating in higher brain centers, is known to activate cardiovascular and locomotor control circuits concomitantly. As such, it is a viable candidate for the generation of the augmented vascular response to exercise in this disease. We hypothesized that augmentations in central command function contribute to the heightened cardiovascular response to exercise in hypertension. To test this hypothesis, changes in renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA) and mean arterial pressure (MAP) in response to electrical stimulation of mesencephalic locomotor region (MLR; 20-50 μA in 10-μA steps evoking fictive locomotion), a putative component of the central command pathway, were examined in decerebrate, paralyzed normotensive Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) and spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). Tibial nerve discharge during MLR stimulation significantly increased in an intensity-dependent manner in both WKY and SHR but was not different between groups. Stimulation of the MLR evoked significantly larger increases in RSNA and MAP with increasing stimulation intensity in both groups. Importantly, the increases in sympathetic and pressor responses to this fictive locomotion were significantly greater in SHR compared with WKY across all stimulation intensities (e.g., at 50 μA, ΔRSNA: WKY 153 ± 31%, SHR 287 ± 42%; ΔMAP: WKY 87 ± 9 mmHg, SHR 139 ± 7 mmHg). These findings provide the first evidence that central command may be a critical contributor to the exaggerated rise in sympathetic activity and blood pressure during exercise in hypertension.

  11. Electrophysiological Responses to Auditory Novelty in Temperamentally Different 9-Month-Old Infants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marshall, Peter J.; Reeb, Bethany C.; Fox, Nathan A.

    2009-01-01

    Behavioral reactivity to novel stimuli in the first half-year of life has been identified as a key aspect of early temperament and a significant precursor of approach and withdrawal tendencies to novelty in later infancy and early childhood. The current study examines the neural signatures of reactivity to novel auditory stimuli in 9-month-old…

  12. Adaptability: How Students' Responses to Uncertainty and Novelty Predict Their Academic and Non-Academic Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Andrew J.; Nejad, Harry G.; Colmar, Susan; Liem, Gregory Arief D.

    2013-01-01

    Adaptability is defined as appropriate cognitive, behavioral, and/or affective adjustment in the face of uncertainty and novelty. Building on prior measurement work demonstrating the psychometric properties of an adaptability construct, the present study investigates dispositional predictors (personality, implicit theories) of adaptability, and…

  13. Role of stress system disturbance and enhanced novelty response in spatial learning of NCAM-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Brandewiede, Joerg; Jakovcevski, Mira; Stork, Oliver; Schachner, Melitta

    2013-11-01

    The neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) plays a crucial role in stress-related brain function, emotional behavior and memory formation. In this study, we investigated the functions of the glucocorticoid and serotonergic systems in mice constitutively deficient for NCAM (NCAM-/- mice). Our data provide evidence for a hyperfunction of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, with enlarged adrenal glands and increased stress-induced corticosterone release, but reduced hippocampal glucocorticoid receptor expression in NCAM-/- mice when compared to NCAM+/+ mice. We also obtained evidence for a hypofunction of 5-HT1A autoreceptors as indicated by increased 8-0H-DPAT-induced hypothermia. These findings suggest a disturbance of both humoral and neural stress systems in NCAM-/- mice. Accordingly, we not only confirmed previously observed hyperarousal of NCAM-/- mice in various anxiety tests, but also observed an increased response to novelty exposure in these animals. Spatial learning deficits of the NCAM-/- mice in a Morris Water maze persisted, even when mice were pretrained to prevent effects of novelty or stress. We suggest that NCAM-mediated processes are involved in both novelty/stress-related emotional behavior and in cognitive function during spatial learning.

  14. Dose-dependent changes in the locomotor responses to methamphetamine in BALB/c mice: low doses induce hypolocomotion.

    PubMed

    Singh, Rana A K; Kosten, Therese A; Kinsey, Berma M; Shen, Xiaoyun; Lopez, Angel Y; Kosten, Thomas R; Orson, Frank M

    2012-12-01

    The overall goal of the present study was to determine the effects of different doses of (+)-methamphetamine (meth) on locomotor activity of Balb/C mice. Four experiments were designed to test a wide range of meth doses in BALB/c female mice. In Experiment 1, we examined locomotor activity induced by an acute administration of low doses of meth (0.01 and 0.03mg/kg) in a 90-min session. Experiment 2 was conducted to test higher meth doses (0.3-10mg/kg). In Experiment 3, separate sets of mice were pre-treated with various meth doses once or twice (one injection/week) prior to a locomotor challenge with a low meth dose. Finally, in Experiment 4, we tested whether locomotor activation would be affected by pretreatment with a low or moderate dose of meth one month prior to the low meth dose challenge. Results show that low doses of meth induce hypolocomotion whereas moderate to high doses induce hyperlocomotion. Prior exposure to either one moderate or high dose of meth or to two, low doses of meth attenuated the hypolocomotor effect of a low meth dose one week later. This effect was also attenuated in mice tested one month after administration of a moderate meth dose. These results show that low and high doses of meth can have opposing effects on locomotor activity. Further, prior exposure to the drug leads to tolerance, rather than sensitization, of the hypolocomotor response to low meth doses.

  15. Contagious risk taking: social information and context influence wild jackdaws' responses to novelty and risk.

    PubMed

    Greggor, Alison L; McIvor, Guillam E; Clayton, Nicola S; Thornton, Alex

    2016-06-10

    Although wild animals increasingly encounter human-produced food and objects, it is unknown how they learn to discriminate beneficial from dangerous novelty. Since social learning allows animals to capitalize on the risk-taking of others, and avoid endangering themselves, social learning should be used around novel and unpredictable stimuli. However, it is unclear whether animals use social cues equally around all types of novelty and at all times of year. We assessed whether wild, individually marked jackdaws-a highly neophobic, yet adaptable species-are equally influenced by social cues to consume novel, palatable foods and to approach a startling object. We conducted these tests across two seasons, and found that in both seasons observers were more likely to consume novel foods after seeing a demonstrator do so. In contrast, observers only followed the demonstrator in foraging next to the object during breeding season. Throughout the year more birds were wary of consuming novel foods than wary of approaching the object, potentially leading to jackdaws' greater reliance on social information about food. Jackdaws' dynamic social cue usage demonstrates the importance of context in predicting how social information is used around novelty, and potentially indicates the conditions that facilitate animals' adjustment to anthropogenic disturbance.

  16. Contagious risk taking: social information and context influence wild jackdaws’ responses to novelty and risk

    PubMed Central

    Greggor, Alison L.; McIvor, Guillam E.; Clayton, Nicola S.; Thornton, Alex

    2016-01-01

    Although wild animals increasingly encounter human-produced food and objects, it is unknown how they learn to discriminate beneficial from dangerous novelty. Since social learning allows animals to capitalize on the risk-taking of others, and avoid endangering themselves, social learning should be used around novel and unpredictable stimuli. However, it is unclear whether animals use social cues equally around all types of novelty and at all times of year. We assessed whether wild, individually marked jackdaws—a highly neophobic, yet adaptable species—are equally influenced by social cues to consume novel, palatable foods and to approach a startling object. We conducted these tests across two seasons, and found that in both seasons observers were more likely to consume novel foods after seeing a demonstrator do so. In contrast, observers only followed the demonstrator in foraging next to the object during breeding season. Throughout the year more birds were wary of consuming novel foods than wary of approaching the object, potentially leading to jackdaws’ greater reliance on social information about food. Jackdaws’ dynamic social cue usage demonstrates the importance of context in predicting how social information is used around novelty, and potentially indicates the conditions that facilitate animals’ adjustment to anthropogenic disturbance. PMID:27282438

  17. Does the age-related "anterior shift" of the P3 reflect an inability to habituate the novelty response?

    PubMed

    Alperin, Brittany R; Mott, Katherine K; Holcomb, Phillip J; Daffner, Kirk R

    2014-08-08

    Old adults often generate larger anterior neural responses than young adults when carrying out task requirements. A common finding in the ERP literature is an "anterior shift" of the P3b to targets. Utilizing principal component analysis (PCA), we recently demonstrated that rather than the P3b moving anteriorly, old adults generate a large P3a that temporally overlaps with their P3b. A dominant hypothesis for the age-related increase in anterior P3 is the failure to habituate the brain's novelty response to rare targets. We tested this hypothesis in young and old adults by comparing the amplitude of the PCA factor representing P3a to targets presented in the first versus last of eight blocks of a visual oddball task. If, unlike young adults, old adults are unable to habituate a novelty response, one would expect (1) the P3a amplitude to decrease between the first and last blocks for young, but not old subjects and (2) the difference in P3a amplitude between young and old subjects to be greater in the last than the first block. Our results indicate the amplitude of the P3a was larger in old adults than young adults. However, this effect was not modulated by block. These findings argue against the hypothesis that an age-related increase in the P3a to targets reflects an inability of old subjects to habituate a novelty response. An alternative hypothesis is that the augmented P3a indexes the increased utilization of frontal executive functions to provide compensatory scaffolding to carry out a task.

  18. Cardiovascular responses to locomotor activity and feeding in unrestrained three-toed sloths, Bradypus variegatus.

    PubMed

    Duarte, D P F; Jaguaribe, A M; Pedrosa, M A C; Clementino, A C C R; Barbosa, A A; Silva, A F V; Gilmore, D P; Da Costa, C P

    2004-10-01

    Heart rate (HR) and systolic (SBP), diastolic (DBP) and mean (MBP) blood pressure were recorded by biotelemetry in nine conscious unrestrained sloths for 1 min every 15 min over a 24-h period. The animals were allowed to freely move in an acoustically isolated and temperature-controlled (24 +/- 1 degree C) experimental room with light-dark cycle (12/12 h). Behavior was closely monitored through a unidirectional visor and classified as resting (sitting or suspended), feeding (chewing and swallowing embauba leaves, Cecropia adenops), or locomotor activity around the tree trunk or on the room floor. Locomotor activity caused statistically significant increases in SBP (+8%, from 121 +/- 22 to 131 +/- 18 mmHg), DBP (+7%, from 86 +/- 17 to 92 +/- 10 mmHg), MBP (+8%, from 97 +/- 19 to 105 +/- 12 mmHg), and HR (+14%, from 84 +/- 15 to 96 +/- 15 bpm) compared to resting values, indicating a possible major influence of the autonomic nervous system on the modulation of cardiac function during this behavior. During feeding, the increase in blood pressure was even higher (SBP +27%, from 119 +/- 21 to 151 +/- 21 mmHg; DBP +21%, from 85 +/- 16 to 103 +/- 15 mmHg; MBP +24%, from 96 +/- 17 to 119 +/- 17 mmHg), while HR remained at 14% (from 84 +/- 15 to 96 +/- 10 bpm) above resting values. The proportionally greater increase in blood pressure than in HR during feeding suggests an increase in peripheral vascular resistance as part of the overall response to this behavior.

  19. Conditioned place preference and locomotor activity in response to methylphenidate, amphetamine and cocaine in mice lacking dopamine D4 receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Thanos, P.K.; Thanos, P.K.; Bermeo, C.; Rubinstein, M.; Suchland, K.L.; Wang, G.-J.; Grandy, D.K.; Volkow, N.D.

    2010-05-01

    Methylphenidate (MP) and amphetamine (AMPH) are the most frequently prescribed medications for the treatment of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Both drugs are believed to derive their therapeutic benefit by virtue of their dopamine (DA)-enhancing effects, yet an explanation for the observation that some patients with ADHD respond well to one medication but not to the other remains elusive. The dopaminergic effects of MP and AMPH are also thought to underlie their reinforcing properties and ultimately their abuse. Polymorphisms in the human gene that codes for the DA D4 receptor (D4R) have been repeatedly associated with ADHD and may correlate with the therapeutic as well as the reinforcing effects of responses to these psychostimulant medications. Conditioned place preference (CPP) for MP, AMPH and cocaine were evaluated in wild-type (WT) mice and their genetically engineered littermates, congenic on the C57Bl/6J background, that completely lack D4Rs (knockout or KO). In addition, the locomotor activity in these mice during the conditioning phase of CPP was tested in the CPP chambers. D4 receptor KO and WT mice showed CPP and increased locomotor activity in response to each of the three psychostimulants tested. D4R differentially modulates the CPP responses to MP, AMPH and cocaine. While the D4R genotype affected CPP responses to MP (high dose only) and AMPH (low dose only) it had no effects on cocaine. Inasmuch as CPP is considered an indicator of sensitivity to reinforcing responses to drugs these data suggest a significant but limited role of D4Rs in modulating conditioning responses to MP and AMPH. In the locomotor test, D4 receptor KO mice displayed attenuated increases in AMPH-induced locomotor activity whereas responses to cocaine and MP did not differ. These results suggest distinct mechanisms for D4 receptor modulation of the reinforcing (perhaps via attenuating dopaminergic signalling) and locomotor properties of these stimulant drugs

  20. Genetic Determinants of Target and Novelty Related Event-related Potentials in the Auditory Oddball Response

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jingyu; Kiehl, Kent A.; Pearlson, Godfrey; Perrone-Bizzozero, Nora I.; Eichele, Tom; Calhoun, Vince D.

    2009-01-01

    Processing of novel and target stimuli in the auditory target detection or ‘oddball’ task encompasses the chronometry of perception, attention and working memory and is reflected in scalp recorded event-related potentials (ERPs). A variety of ERP components related to target and novelty processing have been described and extensively studied, and linked to deficits of cognitive processing. However, little is known about associations of genotypes with ERP endophenotypes. Here we sought to elucidate the genetic underpinnings of auditory oddball ERP components using a novel data analysis technique. A parallel independent component analysis of the electrophysiology and single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) data was used to extract relations between patterns of ERP components and SNP associations purely based on an analysis incorporating higher order statistics. The method allows for broader associations of genotypes with phenotypes than traditional hypothesis-driven univariate correlational analyses. We show that target detection and processing of novel stimuli are both associated with a shared cluster of genes linked to the adrenergic and dopaminergic pathways. These results provide evidence of genetic influences on normal patterns of ERP generation during auditory target detection and novelty processing at the SNP association level. PMID:19285141

  1. Comprehensive behavioral analysis of RNG105 (Caprin1) heterozygous mice: Reduced social interaction and attenuated response to novelty

    PubMed Central

    Ohashi, Rie; Takao, Keizo; Miyakawa, Tsuyoshi; Shiina, Nobuyuki

    2016-01-01

    RNG105 (also known as Caprin1) is a major RNA-binding protein in neuronal RNA granules, and is responsible for mRNA transport to dendrites and neuronal network formation. A recent study reported that a heterozygous mutation in the Rng105 gene was found in an autism spectrum disorder (ASD) patient, but it remains unclear whether there is a causal relation between RNG105 deficiency and ASD. Here, we subjected Rng105+/− mice to a comprehensive behavioral test battery, and revealed the influence of RNG105 deficiency on mouse behavior. Rng105+/− mice exhibited a reduced sociality in a home cage and a weak preference for social novelty. Consistently, the Rng105+/− mice also showed a weak preference for novel objects and novel place patterns. Furthermore, although the Rng105+/− mice exhibited normal memory acquisition, they tended to have relative difficulty in reversal learning in the spatial reference tasks. These findings suggest that the RNG105 heterozygous knockout leads to a reduction in sociality, response to novelty and flexibility in learning, which are implicated in ASD-like behavior. PMID:26865403

  2. Comprehensive behavioral analysis of RNG105 (Caprin1) heterozygous mice: Reduced social interaction and attenuated response to novelty.

    PubMed

    Ohashi, Rie; Takao, Keizo; Miyakawa, Tsuyoshi; Shiina, Nobuyuki

    2016-02-11

    RNG105 (also known as Caprin1) is a major RNA-binding protein in neuronal RNA granules, and is responsible for mRNA transport to dendrites and neuronal network formation. A recent study reported that a heterozygous mutation in the Rng105 gene was found in an autism spectrum disorder (ASD) patient, but it remains unclear whether there is a causal relation between RNG105 deficiency and ASD. Here, we subjected Rng105(+/-) mice to a comprehensive behavioral test battery, and revealed the influence of RNG105 deficiency on mouse behavior. Rng105(+/-) mice exhibited a reduced sociality in a home cage and a weak preference for social novelty. Consistently, the Rng105(+/-) mice also showed a weak preference for novel objects and novel place patterns. Furthermore, although the Rng105(+/-) mice exhibited normal memory acquisition, they tended to have relative difficulty in reversal learning in the spatial reference tasks. These findings suggest that the RNG105 heterozygous knockout leads to a reduction in sociality, response to novelty and flexibility in learning, which are implicated in ASD-like behavior.

  3. Reduced Anticipatory Locomotor Responses to Scheduled Meals in Ghrelin Receptor Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Blum, Ian D.; Patterson, Zack; Khazall, Rim; Lamont, Elaine Waddington; Sleeman, Mark W.; Horvath, Tamas L.; Abizaid, Alfonso

    2009-01-01

    Ghrelin, an orexigenic hormone produced by the stomach, is secreted in anticipation of scheduled meals and in correlation with anticipatory locomotor activity. We hypothesized that ghrelin is directly implicated in stimulating locomotor activity in anticipation of scheduled meals. To test this hypothesis, we observed 24 hr patterns of locomotor activity in mice with targeted mutations of the ghrelin receptor gene (GHSR KO) and wild-type littermates, all given access to food for four hours daily for 14 days. While WT and GHSR KO mice produced increases in anticipatory locomotor activity, anticipatory locomotor activity in GHSR KO mice was attenuated (p.< 0.05). These behavioral measures correlated with attenuated levels of Fos immunoreactivity in a number of hypothalamic nuclei from GHSR KO placed on the same restricted feeding schedule for seven days and sacrificed at ZT4. Interestingly, seven daily intraperitoeneal ghrelin injections mimicked hypothalamic Fos expression patterns to those seen in mice under restricted feeding schedules. These data suggest that ghrelin acts in the hypothalamus to augment locomotor activity in anticipation of scheduled meals. PMID:19666088

  4. Hemodynamic Response of the Supplementary Motor Area during Locomotor Tasks with Upright versus Horizontal Postures in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Obayashi, Shigeru; Nakajima, Katsumi; Hara, Yukihiro

    2016-01-01

    To understand cortical mechanisms related to truncal posture control during human locomotion, we investigated hemodynamic responses in the supplementary motor area (SMA) with quadrupedal and bipedal gaits using functional near-infrared spectroscopy in 10 healthy adults. The subjects performed three locomotor tasks where the degree of postural instability varied biomechanically, namely, hand-knee quadrupedal crawling (HKQuad task), upright quadrupedalism using bilateral Lofstrand crutches (UpQuad task), and typical upright bipedalism (UpBi task), on a treadmill. We measured the concentration of oxygenated hemoglobin (oxy-Hb) during the tasks. The oxy-Hb significantly decreased in the SMA during the HKQuad task, whereas it increased during the UpQuad task. No significant responses were observed during the UpBi task. Based on the degree of oxy-Hb responses, we ranked these locomotor tasks as UpQuad > UpBi > HKQuad. The order of the different tasks did not correspond with postural instability of the tasks. However, qualitative inspection of oxy-Hb time courses showed that oxy-Hb waveform patterns differed between upright posture tasks (peak-plateau-trough pattern for the UpQuad and UpBi tasks) and horizontal posture task (downhill pattern for the HKQuad task). Thus, the SMA may contribute to the control of truncal posture accompanying locomotor movements in humans. PMID:27413555

  5. Effects of fentanyl administration on locomotor response in horses with the G57C μ-opioid receptor polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Wetmore, Lois A; Pascoe, Peter J; Shilo-Benjamini, Yael; Lindsey, Jane C

    2016-08-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine the locomotor response to the administration of fentanyl in horses with and without the G57C polymorphism of the μ-opioid receptor. ANIMALS 20 horses of various breeds and ages (10 horses heterozygous for the G57C polymorphism and 10 age-, breed-, and sex-matched horses that did not have the G57C polymorphism). PROCEDURES The number of steps each horse took was counted over consecutive 2-minute periods for 20 minutes to determine a baseline value. The horse then received a bolus of fentanyl (20 μg/kg, IV), and the number of steps was again counted during consecutive 2-minute periods for 60 minutes. The mean baseline value was subtracted from each 2-minute period after fentanyl administration; step counts with negative values were assigned a value of 0. Data were analyzed by use of a repeated-measures ANOVA. RESULTS Data for 19 of 20 horses (10 horses with the G57C polymorphism and 9 control horses without the G57C polymorphism) were included in the analysis. Horses with the G57C polymorphism had a significant increase in locomotor activity, compared with results for horses without the polymorphism. There was a significant group-by-time interaction. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Horses heterozygous for the G57C polymorphism of the μ-opioid receptor had an increased locomotor response to fentanyl administration, compared with the response for horses without this polymorphism. The clinical impact of this finding should be investigated.

  6. Different locomotor sensitization responses to repeated cocaine injections are associated with differential phosphorylation of GluA1 in the dorsomedial striatum of adult rats.

    PubMed

    Kim, Myonghwan; Kim, Wonju; Baik, Ja-Hyun; Yoon, Bong-June

    2013-11-15

    Behavioral sensitization to psychostimulants reflects neural adaptation, which might share a common mechanism with drug addiction. Outbred male rats show different locomotor sensitization responses to cocaine, and cocaine also produces varied addictive progress in humans. We investigated whether differences in the induction of sensitization would affect the long-term persistence of sensitized locomotor activity, and we sought to determine the molecular basis for the variability in sensitization. Male Sprague-Dawley rats that showed sensitized locomotor responses over 5 consecutive daily cocaine injections (SENS) had significantly lower initial locomotor responses to the 1st cocaine exposure than did rats that did not show locomotor sensitization (NONS). Furthermore, rats that underwent 1 month of cocaine withdrawal after 5 repeated cocaine injections also exhibited sensitized or non-sensitized locomotor responses to a challenge injection of cocaine (SENS-C or NONS-C, respectively). This variability was also related to the initial responsiveness to cocaine. We examined the level of phosphorylation of the GluA1 subunit of α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropioniate receptor (AMPAR) in the dorsal striatum and found that there were significant differences between the sensitized rats and the non-sensitized rats. pGluA1-Ser831 was increased in the SENS rats during the induction of locomotor sensitization, and pGluA1-Ser845 was increased in the SENS-C rats during the expression of locomotor sensitization. These phosphorylation changes were observed in the dorsomedial striatum (DMS) of adult rats but not in the dorsolateral striatum (DLS) of adults. Our findings suggest that differential phosphorylation of AMPAR might be an important mechanism that contributes to the development of locomotor sensitization to cocaine in adult rats.

  7. Dynamics of goat distal hind limb muscle–tendon function in response to locomotor grade

    PubMed Central

    McGuigan, M. Polly; Yoo, Edwin; Lee, David V.; Biewener, Andrew A.

    2009-01-01

    Summary The functional roles of the lateral gastrocnemius (LG), medial gastrocnemius (MG) and superficial digital flexor (SDF) muscle–tendon units (MTUs) in domestic goats (N=6) were studied as a function of locomotor grade, testing the hypothesis that changes in distal limb muscle work would reflect changes in mechanical work requirements while goats walked or trotted on the level, 15 deg. decline and 15 deg. incline. As steep terrain-adapted animals, changes in muscle work output are expected to be particularly important for goats. In vivo muscle–tendon forces, fascicle length changes and muscle activation were recorded via tendon force buckles, sonomicrometry and electromyography to evaluate the work performance and elastic energy recovery of the three distal MTUs. These recordings confirmed that fascicle strain and force within goat distal hind limb muscles are adjusted in response to changes in mechanical work demand associated with locomotor grade. In general, muscle work was modulated most consistently by changes in fascicle strain, with increased net shortening (P<0.001) observed as goats switched from decline to level to incline locomotion. Peak muscle stresses increased as goats increased speed from a walk to a trot within each grade condition (P<0.05), and also increased significantly with grade (P<0.05 to P<0.01). Due to the increase in net fascicle shortening and muscle force, net muscle work per cycle also increased significantly (P<0.05 to P<0.005) as goats switched from decline to level to incline conditions (LG work: 20 mJ to 56 mJ to 209 mJ; MG work: –7 mJ to 34 mJ to 179 mJ; SDF work: –42 mJ to 14 mJ to 71 mJ, at a 2.5 ms–1 trot). Although muscle work was modulated in response to changes in grade, the amount of work produced by these three distal pennate muscles was small (being <3%) in comparison with the change in mechanical energy required of the limb as a whole. Elastic energy recovery in the SDF and gastrocnemius (GA) tendons was

  8. Loss of cocaine locomotor response in Pitx3-deficient mice lacking a nigrostriatal pathway.

    PubMed

    Beeler, Jeff A; Cao, Zhen Fang Huang; Kheirbek, Mazen A; Zhuang, Xiaoxi

    2009-04-01

    Both the dorsal and ventral striatum have been demonstrated to have a critical role in reinforcement learning and addiction. Dissecting the specific function of these striatal compartments and their associated nigrostriatal and mesoaccumbens dopamine pathways, however, has proved difficult. Previous studies using lesions to isolate the contribution of nigrostriatal and mesoaccumbens dopamine in mediating the locomotor and reinforcing effects of psychostimulant drugs have yielded inconsistent and inconclusive results. Using a naturally occurring mutant mouse line, aphakia, that lacks a nigrostriatal dopamine pathway but retains an intact mesoaccumbens pathway, we show that the locomotor activating effects of cocaine, including locomotor sensitization, are dependent on an intact nigrostriatal dopamine projection. In contrast, cocaine reinforcement, as measured by conditioned place preference and cocaine sensitization of sucrose preference, is intact in these mice. In light of the well-established role of the nucleus accumbens in mediating the effects of psychostimulants, these data suggest that the nigrostriatal pathway can act as a critical effector mechanism for the nucleus accumbens highlighting the importance of intrastriatal connectivity and providing insight into the functional architecture of the striatum.

  9. Adaptability: Conceptual and Empirical Perspectives on Responses to Change, Novelty and Uncertainty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Andrew J.; Nejad, Harry; Colmar, Susan; Liem, Gregory Arief D.

    2012-01-01

    Adaptability is proposed as individuals' capacity to constructively regulate psycho-behavioral functions in response to new, changing, and/or uncertain circumstances, conditions and situations. The present investigation explored the internal and external validity of an hypothesised adaptability scale. The sample comprised 2,731 high school…

  10. Reinstating the Novelty P3

    PubMed Central

    Barry, Robert J.; Steiner, Genevieve Z.; De Blasio, Frances M.

    2016-01-01

    P300 (or P3) is a major positive complex in the human event-related potential, occurring some 300 ms after stimulus onset, and long thought to be the cortical correlate of the Orienting Reflex, our automatic attention-grabbing response to a novel stimulus. The Novelty P3 was the third P3 subcomponent discovered (after P3a and P3b) and appeared promising in its sensitivity to stimulus novelty, the defining characteristic of the Orienting Reflex. But some 15 years later it was claimed to be indistinguishable from the previously-discovered P3a. This led to a decline in interest in the field and confused nomenclature, with some studies using “P3a” and “Novelty P3” interchangeably. However, recent similar studies have again reported three subcomponents of the P3. Further, using single-stimulus habituation paradigms, in addition to P3a and P3b, a later decrementing P3 subcomponent has been reported, and recently labelled “HabP3” to avoid contention. We report three studies to resolve this chaotic situation, arguing for identification of the late subcomponent following the P3a and P3b as the Novelty P3. Reinstatement of the Novelty P3 as the central index of the Orienting Reflex will have widespread impact in a range of theoretical, practical, and clinical areas involving novelty processing and attention. PMID:27510599

  11. Reinstating the Novelty P3.

    PubMed

    Barry, Robert J; Steiner, Genevieve Z; De Blasio, Frances M

    2016-08-11

    P300 (or P3) is a major positive complex in the human event-related potential, occurring some 300 ms after stimulus onset, and long thought to be the cortical correlate of the Orienting Reflex, our automatic attention-grabbing response to a novel stimulus. The Novelty P3 was the third P3 subcomponent discovered (after P3a and P3b) and appeared promising in its sensitivity to stimulus novelty, the defining characteristic of the Orienting Reflex. But some 15 years later it was claimed to be indistinguishable from the previously-discovered P3a. This led to a decline in interest in the field and confused nomenclature, with some studies using "P3a" and "Novelty P3" interchangeably. However, recent similar studies have again reported three subcomponents of the P3. Further, using single-stimulus habituation paradigms, in addition to P3a and P3b, a later decrementing P3 subcomponent has been reported, and recently labelled "HabP3" to avoid contention. We report three studies to resolve this chaotic situation, arguing for identification of the late subcomponent following the P3a and P3b as the Novelty P3. Reinstatement of the Novelty P3 as the central index of the Orienting Reflex will have widespread impact in a range of theoretical, practical, and clinical areas involving novelty processing and attention.

  12. Irreversible blockade of monoamine oxidases reveals the critical role of 5-HT transmission in locomotor response induced by nicotine in mice.

    PubMed

    Villégier, Anne-Sophie; Salomon, Lucas; Blanc, Gérard; Godeheu, Gérard; Glowinski, Jacques; Tassin, Jean-Pol

    2006-09-01

    Although nicotine is generally considered as the main compound responsible for addictive properties of tobacco, some experimental data indicate that nicotine does not exhibit all the characteristics of other substances of misuse such as psychostimulants and opiates. For example, nicotine generally fails to induce locomotor response in mice and self-administration of nicotine is difficult to obtain in rats. We have shown recently that a pretreatment with mixed irreversible monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs), such as tranylcypromine, triggers a locomotor response to nicotine in mice and induces a robust self-administration of nicotine in rats. We show here that when mice were pretreated with enhancers of extracellular levels of noradrenaline, dopamine or serotonin (D-amphetamine, GBR12783 or para-chloro-amphetamine, respectively) and injected with nicotine (1 mg/kg), only those animals pretreated with para-chloro-amphetamine exhibited a specific locomotor response to nicotine. These data indicate a critical role of serotonin in nicotine-induced locomotor activity in mice. This was further confirmed in microdialysis experiments showing that nicotine induces an increase in extracellular serotonin levels in the ventral striatum in mice pretreated with tranylcypromine. This effect of nicotine on extracellular serotonin levels was absent in mice lacking the beta2-subunit of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor. Our data suggest that mixed irreversible MAOIs contained in tobacco facilitate the effects of nicotine on serotonin release, thus allowing the locomotor and rewarding effects of nicotine.

  13. Computational classification of different wild-type zebrafish strains based on their variation in light-induced locomotor response.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yuan; Zhang, Gaonan; Jelfs, Beth; Carmer, Robert; Venkatraman, Prahatha; Ghadami, Mohammad; Brown, Skye A; Pang, Chi Pui; Leung, Yuk Fai; Chan, Rosa H M; Zhang, Mingzhi

    2016-02-01

    Zebrafish larvae display a rapid and characteristic swimming behaviour after abrupt light onset or offset. This light-induced locomotor response (LLR) has been widely used for behavioural research and drug screening. However, the locomotor responses have long been shown to be different between different wild-type (WT) strains. Thus, it is critical to define the differences in the WT LLR to facilitate accurate interpretation of behavioural data. In this investigation, we used support vector machine (SVM) models to classify LLR data collected from three WT strains: AB, TL and TLAB (a hybrid of AB and TL), during early embryogenesis, from 3 to 9 days post-fertilisation (dpf). We analysed both the complete dataset and a subset of the data during the first 30after light change. This initial period of activity is substantially driven by vision, and is also known as the visual motor response (VMR). The analyses have resulted in three major conclusions: First, the LLR is different between the three WT strains, and at different developmental stages. Second, the distinguishable information in the VMR is comparable to, if not better than, the full dataset for classification purposes. Third, the distinguishable information of WT strains in the light-onset response differs from that in the light-offset response. While the classification accuracies were higher for the light-offset than light-onset response when using the complete LLR dataset, a reverse trend was observed when using a shorter VMR dataset. Together, our results indicate that one should use caution when extrapolating interpretations of LLR/VMR obtained from one WT strain to another.

  14. Antecedents and consequences of drug abuse in rats selectively bred for high and low response to novelty.

    PubMed

    Flagel, Shelly B; Waselus, Maria; Clinton, Sarah M; Watson, Stanley J; Akil, Huda

    2014-01-01

    Human genetic and epidemiological studies provide evidence that only a subset of individuals who experiment with potentially addictive drugs become addicts. What renders some individuals susceptible to addiction remains to be determined, but most would agree that there is no single trait underlying the disorder. However, there is evidence in humans that addiction liability has a genetic component, and that certain personality characteristics related to temperament (e.g. the sensation-seeking trait) are associated with individual differences in addiction liability. Consequently, we have used a selective breeding strategy based on locomotor response to a novel environment to generate two lines of rats with distinct behavioral characteristics. We have found that the resulting phenotypes differ on a number of neurobehavioral dimensions relevant to addiction. Relative to bred low-responder (bLR) rats, bred high-responder (bHR) rats exhibit increased exploratory behavior, are more impulsive, more aggressive, seek stimuli associated with rewards, and show a greater tendency to relapse. We therefore utilize this unique animal model to parse the genetic, neural and environmental factors that contribute to addiction liability. Our work shows that the glucocorticoid receptor (GR), dopaminergic molecules, and members of the fibroblast growth factor family are among the neurotransmitters and neuromodulators that play a role in both the initial susceptibility to addiction as well as the altered neural responses that follow chronic drug exposure. Moreover, our findings suggest that the hippocampus plays a major role in mediating vulnerability to addiction. It is hoped that this work will emphasize the importance of personalized treatment strategies and identify novel therapeutic targets for humans suffering from addictive disorders. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'NIDA 40th Anniversary Issue'.

  15. Daily treadmill exercise attenuates cocaine cue-induced reinstatement and cocaine induced locomotor response but increases cocaine-primed reinstatement

    PubMed Central

    Thanos, Panayotis K.; Stamos, Joshua; Robison, Lisa S.; Heyman, Gary; Tucci, Andrew; Wang, Gene-Jack; Robinson, John K.; Anderson, Brenda J.; Volkow, Nora D.

    2013-01-01

    Exercise affects neuroplasticity and neurotransmission including dopamine (DA), which modulates drug-taking behavior. Previous research in rodents has shown that exercise may attenuate the rewarding effects of drugs of abuse. The present study examined the effects of high and low exercise on cocaine responses in male Wistar rats that had been trained to self-administer and were compared to a group of sedentary rats. High exercise rats (HE) ran daily on a treadmill for 2 h and low exercise (LE) ran daily for 1 h. After 6 weeks of this exercise regimen, rats were tested over 2 days for reinstatement (day 1: cue-induced reinstatement; day 2: cocaine-primed reinstatement). During cue-induced reinstatement, the sedentary rats showed the expected increase in active lever responses when compared to maintenance, whereas these increased responses were inhibited in the exercised rats (HE and LE). During cocaine-primed reinstatement, however, there was a significant increase in active lever presses when compared to maintenance only in the HE group. This data suggests that chronic exercise during abstinence attenuates the cue-induced reinstatement seen in the sedentary rats by 26% (LE) and 21% (HE). In contrast, only the high exercise rats exhibited sensitized cocaine-seeking behavior (active lever presses) following cocaine-primed reinstatement. Finally, while sedentary rats increased locomotor activity during cocaine-primed reinstatement over that seen with cocaine during maintenance, this was not observed in the exercised rats, suggesting that exercise may interfere with the sensitized locomotor response during cocaine reinstatement. PMID:23103403

  16. Maternal Accuracy and Behavior in Anticipating Children's Responses to Novelty: Relations to Fearful Temperament and Implications for Anxiety Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kiel, Elizabeth J.; Buss, Kristin A.

    2010-01-01

    Previous research has suggested that mothers' behaviors may serve as a mechanism in the development from toddler fearful temperament to childhood anxiety. The current study examined the maternal characteristic of accuracy in predicting toddlers' distress reactions to novelty in relation to temperament, parenting, and anxiety development.…

  17. Stability and variability of locomotor responses of laboratory rodents. III. Effect of environmental factors and lack of catecholamine receptor correlates.

    PubMed

    Vetulani, J; Marona-Lewicka, D; Michaluk, J; Popik, P

    1988-01-01

    The exploratory locomotor activity of rats differs between groups, and the results suggest the involvement of a seasonal factor. The body weight and the state of satiety do not appear to influence the locomotor activity. The individual activities of rats are correlated in subsequent tests only if the period between the tests is not long. The foehn wind changes the locomotor activity in the second test, depending on the animals' experience. No correlation between the native locomotor activity and cortical and striatal binding sites for [3H]prazosin and [3H]spiroperidol was found.

  18. Application of the Copenhagen Soccer Test in high-level women players - locomotor activities, physiological response and sprint performance.

    PubMed

    Bendiksen, Mads; Pettersen, Svein Arne; Ingebrigtsen, Jørgen; Randers, Morten B; Brito, João; Mohr, Magni; Bangsbo, Jens; Krustrup, Peter

    2013-12-01

    We evaluated the physiological response, sprint performance and technical ability in various phases of the Copenhagen Soccer Test for Women (CSTw) and investigated whether the locomotor activities of the CSTw were comparable to competitive match-play (CM). Physiological measurements and physical/technical assessments were performed during CSTw for eleven Norwegian high-level women soccer players. The activity pattern during CSTw and CM was monitored using the ZXY tracking system. No differences were observed between CSTw and CM with regards to total distance covered (10093±94 and 9674±191m), high intensity running (1278±67 and 1193±115m) or sprinting (422±55 and 372±46m) (p>.05). During CSTw, average HR was 85±2%HRmax with 35±2% playing time >90%HRmax. Blood lactate increased (p<.05) from 1.4±0.3mM at rest to an average of 4.7±0.5mM during CSTw, with no changes during the test. Blood glucose was 5.4±0.3mM at rest and remained unaltered during CSTw. Sprint performance (2×20m) decreased (p<.05) by 3% during CSTw (8.19±0.06-8.47±0.10s). In conclusion, the locomotor activities during CSTw were comparable to that of high-level competitive match-play. The physiological demands of the CSTw were high, with no changes in heart rate, blood lactate or technical performance during the test, but a lowered sprint performance towards the end of the test.

  19. Effects of feeding schedule on locomotor activity rhythms and stress response in sea bream.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, J A; López-Olmeda, J F; Blanco-Vives, B; Sánchez-Vázquez, F J

    2009-08-04

    Feeding cycles entrain biological rhythms, which enable animals to anticipate feeding times and so maximize food utilization and welfare. In this article, the effect of mealtime was investigated in two groups of sea bream (Sparus aurata): one group received a single daily meal at random times during the light period (random daytime feeding, RDF), whereas the other group received the meal during the light period but at the same time (scheduled daytime feeding, SDF). All the fish showed diurnal behavior, although the SDF group showed a lower percentage of diurnalism (84.4% vs. 79.5% in RDF and SDF respectively) and developed food anticipatory activity some hours before the mealtime. In addition, the mean daily locomotor activity of the RDF group was significantly higher than that of the SDF group (3132 vs. 2654 counts/day, respectively). Although the mean weight differed between both groups on day 30 (115.7 g and 125.6 g in RDF and SDF respectively), these differences had disappeared by day 60. Plasma cortisol and glucose significantly differed in both groups (cortisol: 71.8 vs. 8.7 ng/ml, glucose: 53.7 vs. 43.8 mg/dl in RDF and SDF, respectively), whereas lactate did not differ significantly. The results obtained suggest that altering the feeding time (scheduled vs. random) affects the behavior and physiology of sea bream, indicating that a single daily feeding cycle (compared to random) is beneficial for fish welfare because they can prepare themselves for the forthcoming feed.

  20. The Nicotine-Evoked Locomotor Response: A Behavioral Paradigm for Toxicity Screening in Zebrafish (Danio rerio) Embryos and Eleutheroembryos Exposed to Methylmercury

    PubMed Central

    Mora-Zamorano, Francisco X.; Svoboda, Kurt R.; Carvan, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    This study is an adaptation of the nicotine-evoked locomotor response (NLR) assay, which was originally utilized for phenotype-based neurotoxicity screening in zebrafish embryos. Zebrafish embryos do not exhibit spontaneous swimming until roughly 4 days post-fertilization (dpf), however, a robust swimming response can be induced as early as 36 hours post-fertilization (hpf) by means of acute nicotine exposure (30–240μM). Here, the NLR was tested as a tool for early detection of locomotor phenotypes in 36, 48 and 72 hpf mutant zebrafish embryos of the non-touch-responsive maco strain; this assay successfully discriminated mutant embryos from their non-mutant siblings. Then, methylmercury (MeHg) was used as a proof-of-concept neurotoxicant to test the effectiveness of the NLR assay as a screening tool in toxicology. The locomotor effects of MeHg were evaluated in 6 dpf wild type eleutheroembryos exposed to waterborne MeHg (0, 0.01, 0.03 and 0.1μM). Afterwards, the NLR assay was tested in 48 hpf embryos subjected to the same MeHg exposure regimes. Embryos exposed to 0.01 and 0.03μM of MeHg exhibited significant increases in locomotion in both scenarios. These findings suggest that similar locomotor phenotypes observed in free swimming fish can be detected as early as 48 hpf, when locomotion is induced with nicotine. PMID:27123921

  1. Assessment of Postflight Locomotor Performance Utilizing a Test of Functional Mobility: Strategic and Adaptive Responses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warren, L. E.; Mulavara, A. P.; Peters, B. T.; Cohen, H. S.; Richards, J. T.; Miller, C. A.; Brady, R.; Ruttley, T. M.; Bloomberg, J. J.

    2006-01-01

    Space flight induces adaptive modification in sensorimotor function, allowing crewmembers to operate in the unique microgravity environment. This adaptive state, however, is inappropriate for a terrestrial environment. During a re-adaptation period upon their return to Earth, crewmembers experience alterations in sensorimotor function, causing various disturbances in perception, spatial orientation, posture, gait, and eye-head coordination. Following long duration space flight, sensorimotor dysfunction would prevent or extend the time required to make an emergency egress from the vehicle; compromising crew safety and mission objectives. We are investigating two types of motor learning that may interact with each other and influence a crewmember's ability to re-adapt to Earth's gravity environment. In strategic learning, crewmembers make rapid modifications in their motor control strategy emphasizing error reduction. This type of learning may be critical during the first minutes and hours after landing. In adaptive learning, long-term plastic transformations occur, involving morphological changes and synaptic modification. In recent literature these two behavioral components have been associated with separate brain structures that control the execution of motor strategies: the strategic component was linked to the posterior parietal cortex and the adaptive component was linked to the cerebellum (Pisella, et al. 2004). The goal of this paper was to demonstrate the relative contributions of the strategic and adaptive components to the re-adaptation process in locomotor control after long duration space flight missions on the International Space Station (ISS). The Functional Mobility Test (FMT) was developed to assess crewmember s ability to ambulate postflight from an operational and functional perspective. Sixteen crewmembers were tested preflight (3 sessions) and postflight (days 1, 2, 4, 7, 25) following a long duration space flight (approx 6 months) on the ISS. We

  2. Young pigs exhibit differential exploratory behavior during novelty preference tasks in response to age, sex, and delay.

    PubMed

    Fleming, Stephen A; Dilger, Ryan N

    2017-03-15

    Novelty preference paradigms have been widely used to study recognition memory and its neural substrates. The piglet model continues to advance the study of neurodevelopment, and as such, tasks that use novelty preference will serve especially useful due to their translatable nature to humans. However, there has been little use of this behavioral paradigm in the pig, and previous studies using the novel object recognition paradigm in piglets have yielded inconsistent results. The current study was conducted to determine if piglets were capable of displaying a novelty preference. Herein a series of experiments were conducted using novel object recognition or location in 3- and 4-week-old piglets. In the novel object recognition task, piglets were able to discriminate between novel and sample objects after delays of 2min, 1h, 1 day, and 2 days (all P<0.039) at both ages. Performance was sex-dependent, as females could perform both 1- and 2-day delays (P<0.036) and males could perform the 2-day delay (P=0.008) but not the 1-day delay (P=0.347). Furthermore, 4-week-old piglets and females tended to exhibit greater exploratory behavior compared with males. Such performance did not extend to novel location recognition tasks, as piglets were only able to discriminate between novel and sample locations after a short delay (P>0.046). In conclusion, this study determined that piglets are able to perform the novel object and location recognition tasks at 3-to-4 weeks of age, however performance was dependent on sex, age, and delay.

  3. Maternal immune activation in late gestation enhances locomotor response to acute but not chronic amphetamine treatment in male mice offspring: role of the D1 receptor.

    PubMed

    Zager, Adriano; Mennecier, Gregory; Palermo-Neto, João

    2012-06-15

    Exposure to elevated levels of maternal cytokines can lead to functional abnormalities of the dopaminergic system in the adult offspring, including enhanced amphetamine (AMPH)-induced locomotion. Therefore, it seems reasonable to consider that offspring of challenged mothers would behave differently in models of addictive behavior, such as behavioral sensitization. Thus, we sought to evaluate the effects of prenatal exposure to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) on the locomotor response to acute and chronic AMPH treatment in male mice offspring. For this purpose, LPS (Escherichia coli 0127:B8; 120 μg/kg) was administered intraperitoneally to pregnant Swiss mice on gestational day 17. At adulthood, male offspring were studied under one of the following conditions: (1) locomotor response to acute AMPH treatment (2.5 or 5.0 mg/kg) in an open field test; (2) behavioral sensitization paradigm, which consists of a daily injection of AMPH (1.0 mg/kg) for 10 days and observation of locomotion in the open field on days 1, 5, 10 (development phase), 15 and 17 (expression phase). The LPS stimulated offspring showed enhancement of the locomotor-stimulant effect after an acute AMPH challenge in comparison to baseline and saline pre-treated mice. They also showed development of behavioral sensitization earlier than the saline pre-treated group, although no changes between saline and LPS pre-treated groups were observed on development or expression of locomotor behavioral sensitization to AMPH. Furthermore, there was up-regulation of D1 receptor protein level within striatum in the LPS-stimulated offspring which was strongly correlated with increased grooming behavior. Taken together, our results indicate that motor and dopaminergic alterations caused by maternal immune activation are restricted to the acute AMPH challenge, mostly due to up-regulation of the D1 receptor within the mesolimbic and nigrostriatal pathways, but no locomotor differences were observed for behavioral

  4. The effect of experimental epilepsy induced by injection of tetanus toxin into the amygdala of the rat on eating behaviour and response to novelty.

    PubMed

    Mellanby, J; Oliva, M; Peniket, A; Nicholls, B

    1999-04-01

    A minute dose of tetanus toxin injected into the amygdala of rats produced an apparently reversible epileptiform syndrome similar to that previously described after injection of the toxin into the hippocampus. During the active epilepsy the toxin-injected rats occasionally exhibited 'paroxysmal eating' and also sometimes ran round in circles attempting to bite their own tails. When presented with a novel but palatable food (chocolate buttons or harvest crunch) the toxin-injected rats showed less neophobia than their controls--they ate sooner and ate more. This was found both during the active epilepsy and several weeks later when they had recovered. A similar effect of amygdala injections was found in a second experiment, in which the effect was compared with that of toxin injection in the hippocampus. These rats were tested also on the playground maze on their approach response to a neutral novel object (in a familiar environment in the context of seven familiar objects). The amygdala rats did not show any increase in their novelty response; thus their reduction in neophobia was specific to an appetitive behaviour. In contrast, the hippocampally-injected rats did not exhibit a novelty response in the playground maze, but showed normal neophobia to a new food.

  5. Chronic cocaine or ethanol exposure during adolescence alters novelty-related behaviors in adulthood.

    PubMed

    Stansfield, Kirstie H; Kirstein, Cheryl L

    2007-04-01

    Adolescence is a time of high-risk behavior and increased exploration. This developmental period is marked by a greater probability to initiate drug use and is associated with an increased risk to develop addiction and adulthood dependency and drug use at this time is associated with an increased risk. Human adolescents are predisposed toward an increased likelihood of risk-taking behaviors [Zuckerman M. Sensation seeking and the endogenous deficit theory of drug abuse. NIDA Res Monogr 1986;74:59-70.], including drug use or initiation. In the present study, adolescent animals were exposed to twenty days of either saline (0.9% sodium chloride), cocaine (20 mg/kg) or ethanol (1 g/kg) i.p. followed by a fifteen-day washout period. All animals were tested as adults on several behavioral measures including locomotor activity induced by a novel environment, time spent in the center of an open field, novelty preference and novel object exploration. Animals exposed to cocaine during adolescence and tested as adults exhibited a greater locomotor response in a novel environment, spent less time in the center of the novel open field and spent less time with a novel object, results that are indicative of a stress or anxiogenic response to novelty or a novel situation. Adolescent animals chronically administered ethanol and tested as adults, unlike cocaine-exposed were not different from controls in a novel environment, indicated by locomotor activity or time spent with a novel object. However, ethanol-exposed animals approached the novel object more, suggesting that exposure to ethanol during development may result in less-inhibited behaviors during adulthood. The differences in adult behavioral responses after drug exposure during adolescence are likely due to differences in the mechanisms of action of the drugs and subsequent reward and/or stress responsivity. Future studies are needed to determine the neural substrates of these long lasting drug-induced changes.

  6. Novelty and Promotional Items

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Small novelty or promotional products, primarily used for outreach and educational purposes, must effectively convey a message, and their purchase will only be allowed if the item will contribute to the accomplishment of the Agency's mission.

  7. Novelty or Surprise?

    PubMed Central

    Barto, Andrew; Mirolli, Marco; Baldassarre, Gianluca

    2013-01-01

    Novelty and surprise play significant roles in animal behavior and in attempts to understand the neural mechanisms underlying it. They also play important roles in technology, where detecting observations that are novel or surprising is central to many applications, such as medical diagnosis, text processing, surveillance, and security. Theories of motivation, particularly of intrinsic motivation, place novelty and surprise among the primary factors that arouse interest, motivate exploratory or avoidance behavior, and drive learning. In many of these studies, novelty and surprise are not distinguished from one another: the words are used more-or-less interchangeably. However, while undeniably closely related, novelty and surprise are very different. The purpose of this article is first to highlight the differences between novelty and surprise and to discuss how they are related by presenting an extensive review of mathematical and computational proposals related to them, and then to explore the implications of this for understanding behavioral and neuroscience data. We argue that opportunities for improved understanding of behavior and its neural basis are likely being missed by failing to distinguish between novelty and surprise. PMID:24376428

  8. Central blockade of melanocortin receptors attenuates the metabolic and locomotor responses to peripheral interleukin-1beta administration.

    PubMed

    Whitaker, Keith W; Reyes, Teresa M

    2008-03-01

    Loss of appetite and cachexia is an obstacle in the treatment of chronic infection and cancer. Proinflammatory cytokines released from activated immune cells and acting in the central nervous system (CNS) are prime candidates for mediating these metabolic changes, potentially affecting both energy intake as well as energy expenditure. The effect of intravenous administration of two proinflammatory cytokines, interleukin (IL)-1beta (15 microg/kg) and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha (10 microg/kg), on food and water intake, locomotor activity, oxygen consumption (VO2), and respiratory exchange ratio (RER) was evaluated. The two cytokines elicited a comparable decrease in food intake and activated similar numbers of cells in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVH), a region that plays a critical role in the regulation of appetite and metabolism (determined via expression of the immediate early gene, c-fos). However, only IL-1beta reduced locomotion and RER, and increased VO2, while TNF-alpha was without effect. To examine the role of the melanocortins in mediating IL-1beta- induced metabolic changes, animals were pretreated centrally with a melanocortin receptor antagonist, HS014. Pretreatment with HS014 blocked the effect of IL-1beta on food intake and RER at later time points (beyond 8 h post injection), as well as the hypoactivity and increased metabolic rate. Further, HS014 blocked the induction of Fos-ir in the PVH. These data highlight the importance of the melanocortin system, particularly within the PVH, in mediating a broad range of metabolic responses to IL-1beta.

  9. Medial hypothalamic 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)1A receptors regulate neuroendocrine responses to stress and exploratory locomotor activity: application of recombinant adenovirus containing 5-HT1A sequences.

    PubMed

    Li, Qian; Holmes, Andrew; Ma, Li; Van de Kar, Louis D; Garcia, Francisca; Murphy, Dennis L

    2004-12-01

    Our previous studies found that serotonin transporter (SERT) knock-out mice showed increased sensitivity to minor stress and increased anxiety-like behavior but reduced locomotor activity. These mice also showed decreased density of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT1A) receptors in the hypothalamus, amygdala, and dorsal raphe. To evaluate the contribution of hypothalamic 5-HT1A receptors to these phenotypes of SERT knock-out mice, two studies were conducted. Recombinant adenoviruses containing 5-HT1A sense and antisense sequences (Ad-1AP-sense and Ad-1AP-antisense) were used to manipulate 5-HT1A receptors in the hypothalamus. The expression of the 5-HT1A genes is controlled by the 5-HT1A promoter, so that they are only expressed in 5-HT1A receptor-containing cells. (1) Injection of Ad-1AP-sense into the hypothalamus of SERT knock-out mice restored 5-HT1A receptors in the medial hypothalamus; this effect was accompanied by elimination of the exaggerated adrenocorticotropin responses to a saline injection (minor stress) and reduced locomotor activity but not by a change in increased exploratory anxiety-like behavior. (2) To further confirm the observation in SERT-/- mice, Ad-1AP-antisense was injected into the hypothalamus of normal mice. The density and the function of 5-HT1A receptors in the medial hypothalamus were significantly reduced in Ad-1AP-antisense-treated mice. Compared with the control group (injected with Ad-track), Ad-1A-antisense-treated mice showed a significant reduction in locomotor activity, but again no changes in exploratory anxiety-like behaviors, tested by elevated plus-maze and open-field tests. Thus, the present results demonstrate that medial hypothalamic 5-HT1A receptors regulate stress responses and locomotor activity but may not regulate exploratory anxiety-like behaviors.

  10. Novel technology for modulating locomotor activity as an operant response in the mouse: implications for neuroscience studies involving "exercise" in rodents.

    PubMed

    Fantegrossi, William E; Xiao, Wendy R; Zimmerman, Sarah M

    2013-01-30

    We have developed a novel, low-cost device designed to monitor and modulate locomotor activity in murine subjects. This technology has immediate application to the study of effects of physical exercise on various neurobiological endpoints, and will also likely be useful in the study of psychomotor sensitization and drug addiction. Here we demonstrate the capacity of these devices to establish locomotor activity as an operant response reinforced by food pellet presentations, and show that schedules of reinforcement can reliably control this behavior. Importantly, these data show that varying degrees of increased locomotor activity (in other words, "exercise") can be elicited and maintained in mice by manipulating the schedule of reinforcement. Our findings argue that the present technology might reduce the imposition of stress and motivational bias inherent in more traditional procedures for establishing exercise in laboratory rodents, while allowing for true random assignment to experimental groups. As interest in physical exercise as a modulating factor in numerous clinical conditions continues to grow, technologies like the one proposed here are likely to become critical in conducting future experiments along these lines.

  11. Novelty as a Reinforcer for Position Learning in Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Marian Monyok

    1974-01-01

    The stimulus-familiarization-effect (SFE) paradigm, a reaction-time (RT) task based on a response to novelty procedure, was modified to assess response for novelty, ie., a response-reinforcement sequence. The potential implications of attention for reinforcement theory and learning in general are discussed. (Author/CS)

  12. Locomotor response to exercise in relation to plasma lactate accumulation and heart rate in Andalusian and Anglo-Arabian horses.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, A; Santisteban, R; Rubio, M D; Riber, C; Agüera, E I; Castejón, F M

    1999-10-01

    To establish the effect of the locomotor pattern on heart rate (HR) and plasma lactate (LA), 28 horses, 18 Andalusian (AN) and 10 Anglo-Arabian (AA), aged 3-4 years, were studied. After a warm-up period, the horses performed a four-step test at 5, 6, 7 and 8 m/s, covering 1000 m at each velocity. HR was monitored, LA was analysed at rest and after each workload, and images were filmed. The locomotor parameters determined were stride duration (SD), frequency (SF) and length (SL), step and bipedal support durations, stance (restraint and propulsion) and swing phase durations, and stride vertical component. The HR and LA were significantly higher in the AN horses from velocities of 5 m/s. Similarly, the stride vertical component was higher in the AN horses at the trot and in the leading forelimbs at the gallop. Conversely, at all the galloping velocities, swing phase duration and stride length were longer in the AA horses. Significant correlations between HR, LA and locomotor pattern were only found in the AN horses. It was concluded that the greater stride vertical component in the AN horses limits SL and the cranial advancement of the hoof, with the result that reaching a longer SL triggers an increase in HR and LA. AA horses reach a balance between SL and SF, improving the efficiency of the gait.

  13. Resolution of a target-tracking optical novelty filter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Duncan T. H.; Cheng, Li-Jen

    1991-01-01

    The resolution of a target-tracking optical novelty filter is discussed in terms of the response time of the nonlinear medium, the speed of the target, and the resolution of the input device. Optical novelty filters using a faster nonlinear medium may have a higher output resolution. This is particularly true in the case of tracking high-speed targets. The potential of implementing high-resolution optical novelty filters using photorefractive GaAs is investigated experimentally.

  14. Neural responses in songbird forebrain reflect learning rates, acquired salience, and stimulus novelty after auditory discrimination training.

    PubMed

    Bell, Brittany A; Phan, Mimi L; Vicario, David S

    2015-03-01

    How do social interactions form and modulate the neural representations of specific complex signals? This question can be addressed in the songbird auditory system. Like humans, songbirds learn to vocalize by imitating tutors heard during development. These learned vocalizations are important in reproductive and social interactions and in individual recognition. As a model for the social reinforcement of particular songs, male zebra finches were trained to peck for a food reward in response to one song stimulus (GO) and to withhold responding for another (NoGO). After performance reached criterion, single and multiunit neural responses to both trained and novel stimuli were obtained from multiple electrodes inserted bilaterally into two songbird auditory processing areas [caudomedial mesopallium (CMM) and caudomedial nidopallium (NCM)] of awake, restrained birds. Neurons in these areas undergo stimulus-specific adaptation to repeated song stimuli, and responses to familiar stimuli adapt more slowly than to novel stimuli. The results show that auditory responses differed in NCM and CMM for trained (GO and NoGO) stimuli vs. novel song stimuli. When subjects were grouped by the number of training days required to reach criterion, fast learners showed larger neural responses and faster stimulus-specific adaptation to all stimuli than slow learners in both areas. Furthermore, responses in NCM of fast learners were more strongly left-lateralized than in slow learners. Thus auditory responses in these sensory areas not only encode stimulus familiarity, but also reflect behavioral reinforcement in our paradigm, and can potentially be modulated by social interactions.

  15. P2X7 receptors in body temperature, locomotor activity, and brain mRNA and lncRNA responses to sleep deprivation.

    PubMed

    Davis, Christopher J; Taishi, Ping; Honn, Kimberly A; Koberstein, John N; Krueger, James M

    2016-12-01

    The ionotropic purine type 2X7 receptor (P2X7R) is a nonspecific cation channel implicated in sleep regulation and brain cytokine release. Many endogenous rhythms covary with sleep, including locomotor activity and core body temperature. Furthermore, brain-hypothalamic cytokines and purines play a role in the regulation of these physiological parameters as well as sleep. We hypothesized that these parameters are also affected by the absence of the P2X7 receptor. Herein, we determine spontaneous expression of body temperature and locomotor activity in wild-type (WT) and P2X7R knockout (KO) mice and how they are affected by sleep deprivation (SD). We also compare hypothalamic, hippocampal, and cortical cytokine- and purine-related receptor and enzyme mRNA expressions before and after SD in WT and P2X7RKO mice. Next, in a hypothesis-generating survey of hypothalamic long noncoding (lnc) RNAs, we compare lncRNA expression levels between strains and after SD. During baseline conditions, P2X7RKO mice had attenuated temperature rhythms compared with WT mice, although locomotor activity patterns were similar in both strains. After 6 h of SD, body temperature and locomotion were enhanced to a greater extent in P2X7RKO mice than in WT mice during the initial 2-3 h after SD. Baseline mRNA levels of cortical TNF-α and P2X4R were higher in the KO mice than WT mice. In response to SD, the KO mice failed to increase hypothalamic adenosine deaminase and P2X4R mRNAs. Further, hypothalamic lncRNA expressions varied by strain, and with SD. Current data are consistent with a role for the P2X7R in thermoregulation and lncRNA involvement in purinergic signaling.

  16. Biomimetic novelty detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Lein W.; Szu, Harold

    2010-04-01

    In the crowded rain forest, how do animals locate camouflaged prey that resemble the environment, such as walking sticks? Birds will observe the suspected stick over a period of time to determine if its behavior matches that of a tree. If the stick's behavior exceeds normal tree behavior, such as moving faster than the other branches, the bird will determine that it is actually a walking stick and not a tree branch. Once this determination is made, they will prey on the insect. Studying this natural process of novelty detection, present in a variety of animals from birds to turkey vultures, can be beneficial for numerous human applications. The spatiotemporal novelty detector will be developed using self-referencing matched filters to go beyond auto-regression. This algorithm is more than the usual change detector for it will detect a novelty behavior that exceeds its predicted value based on past data, e.g. the bird who identifies a walking stick in the forest. A scalar model is presented; however, the application can be expanded to multiple modalities for more detailed applications. Some of these applications include gas pipeline leak detection, persistent surveillance, and the creation of a smart sensor web.

  17. Detection of novelty, but not memory of spatial habituation, is associated with an increase in phosphorylated cAMP response element-binding protein levels in the hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Winograd, Milena; Viola, Haydée

    2004-01-01

    There is a growing body of evidence showing that the formation of associative memories is associated with an increase in phosphorylated cAMP response element-binding protein (pCREB) levels. We recently reported increased pCREB levels in the rat hippocampus after an exploration to a novel environment. In the present work, we studied whether this increment in CREB activation is associated with the formation of memory of habituation to a novel environment or with the detection of novelty. Rats were submitted to consecutive open field sessions at 3-h intervals. Measurement of the hippocampal pCREB level, carried out 1 h after each training session, showed that (1) it did not increase when rats explored a familiar environment; (2) it did not increase after a reexposure that improves the memory of habituation; (3) it increased after a brief novel exploration unable to form memory of habituation; and (4) it increased in amnesic rats for spatial habituation. Taken as a whole, our results suggest that the elevated pCREB level after a single open field exploration is not associated with the memory formation of habituation. It is indeed associated with the detection of a novel environment.

  18. Differential effects of serotonin (5-HT)2 receptor-targeting ligands on locomotor responses to nicotine-repeated treatment.

    PubMed

    Zaniewska, Magdalena; McCreary, Andrew C; Wydra, Karolina; Filip, Małgorzata

    2010-07-01

    We verified the hypothesis that serotonin (5-HT)(2) receptors control the locomotor effects of nicotine (0.4 mg kg(-1)) in rats by using the 5-HT(2A) receptor antagonist M100907, the preferential 5-HT(2A) receptor agonist DOI, the 5-HT(2C) receptor antagonist SB 242084, and the 5-HT(2C) receptor agonists Ro 60-0175 and WAY 163909. Repeated pairings of a test environment with nicotine for 5 days, on Day 10 significantly augmented the locomotor activity following nicotine administration. Of the investigated 5-HT(2) receptor ligands, M100907 (2 mg kg(-1)) or DOI (1 mg kg(-1)) administered during the first 5 days in combination with nicotine attenuated or enhanced, respectively, the development of nicotine sensitization. Given acutely on Day 10, M100907 (2 mg kg(-1)), Ro 60-0175 (1 mg kg(-1)), and WAY 163909 (1.5 mg kg(-1)) decreased the expression of nicotine sensitization. In another set of experiments, where the nicotine challenge test was performed on Day 15 in animals treated repeatedly (Days: 1-5, 10) with nicotine, none of 5-HT(2) receptor ligands administered during the second withdrawal period (Days: 11-14) to nicotine-treated rats altered the sensitizing effect of nicotine given on Day 15. Our data indicate that 5-HT(2A) receptors (but not 5-HT(2C) receptors) play a permissive role in the sensitizing effects of nicotine, while stimulation of 5-HT(2A) receptors enhances the development of nicotine sensitization and activation of 5-HT(2C) receptors is essential for the expression of nicotine sensitization. Repeated treatment with the 5-HT(2) receptor ligands within the second nicotine withdrawal does not inhibit previously established sensitization.

  19. Combined Scopolamine and Ethanol Treatment Results in a Locomotor Stimulant Response Suggestive of Synergism That is Not Blocked by Dopamine Receptor Antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Scibelli, Angela C.; Phillips, Tamara J.

    2010-01-01

    Background Muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs) are well positioned to mediate ethanol’s stimulant effects. To investigate this possibility, we examined the effects of scopolamine, a receptor subtype nonselective mAChR antagonist, on ethanol-induced stimulation in genotypes highly sensitive to this effect of ethanol. We also investigated whether the dopamine D1-like receptor antagonist, SCH-23390 or the dopamine D2-like receptor antagonist, haloperidol, could block the extreme stimulant response found following co-administration of scopolamine and ethanol. Methods Scopolamine (0, 0.0625, 0.125, 0.25, or 0.5 mg/kg) was given 10 minutes prior to saline or ethanol (0.75 to 2 g/kg) to female FAST (Experiment I) or DBA/2J (Experiment II) mice that were then tested for locomotion for 30 minutes. In Experiments III and IV, respectively, SCH-23390 (0, 0.015, or 0.03 mg/kg) was given 10 minutes prior, and haloperidol (0, 0.08, or 0.16 mg/kg) was given 2 minutes prior, to scopolamine (0 or 0.5 mg/kg), followed 10 minutes later by saline or ethanol (1.5 g/kg) and female DBA/2J mice were tested for locomotion for 30 minutes. Results FAST and DBA/2J mice displayed a robust enhancement of the locomotor effects of ethanol following pretreatment with scopolamine that was suggestive of synergism. SCH-23390 had no effect on the response to the scopolamine + ethanol drug combination, nor did it attenuate ethanol- or scopolamine-induced locomotor activity. Haloperidol, while attenuating the effects of ethanol, was not able to block the effects of scopolamine or the robust response to the scopolamine-ethanol drug combination. Conclusions These results suggest that while muscarinic receptor antagonism robustly enhances acute locomotor stimulation to ethanol, dopamine receptors are not involved in the super-additive interaction of scopolamine and ethanol treatment. They also suggest that in addition to cautions regarding the use of alcohol when scopolamine is clinically

  20. Involvement of the TRPV1 channel in the modulation of spontaneous locomotor activity, physical performance and physical exercise-induced physiological responses.

    PubMed

    Hudson, A S R; Kunstetter, A C; Damasceno, W C; Wanner, S P

    2016-01-01

    Physical exercise triggers coordinated physiological responses to meet the augmented metabolic demand of contracting muscles. To provide adequate responses, the brain must receive sensory information about the physiological status of peripheral tissues and organs, such as changes in osmolality, temperature and pH. Most of the receptors involved in these afferent pathways express ion channels, including transient receptor potential (TRP) channels, which are usually activated by more than one type of stimulus and are therefore considered polymodal receptors. Among these TRP channels, the TRPV1 channel (transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 or capsaicin receptor) has well-documented functions in the modulation of pain sensation and thermoregulatory responses. However, the TRPV1 channel is also expressed in non-neural tissues, suggesting that this channel may perform a broad range of functions. In this review, we first present a brief overview of the available tools for studying the physiological roles of the TRPV1 channel. Then, we present the relationship between the TRPV1 channel and spontaneous locomotor activity, physical performance, and modulation of several physiological responses, including water and electrolyte balance, muscle hypertrophy, and metabolic, cardiovascular, gastrointestinal, and inflammatory responses. Altogether, the data presented herein indicate that the TPRV1 channel modulates many physiological functions other than nociception and thermoregulation. In addition, these data open new possibilities for investigating the role of this channel in the acute effects induced by a single bout of physical exercise and in the chronic effects induced by physical training.

  1. Involvement of the TRPV1 channel in the modulation of spontaneous locomotor activity, physical performance and physical exercise-induced physiological responses

    PubMed Central

    Hudson, A.S.R.; Kunstetter, A.C.; Damasceno, W.C.; Wanner, S.P.

    2016-01-01

    Physical exercise triggers coordinated physiological responses to meet the augmented metabolic demand of contracting muscles. To provide adequate responses, the brain must receive sensory information about the physiological status of peripheral tissues and organs, such as changes in osmolality, temperature and pH. Most of the receptors involved in these afferent pathways express ion channels, including transient receptor potential (TRP) channels, which are usually activated by more than one type of stimulus and are therefore considered polymodal receptors. Among these TRP channels, the TRPV1 channel (transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 or capsaicin receptor) has well-documented functions in the modulation of pain sensation and thermoregulatory responses. However, the TRPV1 channel is also expressed in non-neural tissues, suggesting that this channel may perform a broad range of functions. In this review, we first present a brief overview of the available tools for studying the physiological roles of the TRPV1 channel. Then, we present the relationship between the TRPV1 channel and spontaneous locomotor activity, physical performance, and modulation of several physiological responses, including water and electrolyte balance, muscle hypertrophy, and metabolic, cardiovascular, gastrointestinal, and inflammatory responses. Altogether, the data presented herein indicate that the TPRV1 channel modulates many physiological functions other than nociception and thermoregulation. In addition, these data open new possibilities for investigating the role of this channel in the acute effects induced by a single bout of physical exercise and in the chronic effects induced by physical training. PMID:27191606

  2. Novelty-Driven Cooperative Coevolution.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Jorge; Mariano, Pedro; Christensen, Anders Lyhne

    2015-12-14

    Cooperative coevolutionary algorithms (CCEAs) rely on multiple coevolving populations for the evolution of solutions composed of coadapted components. CCEAs enable, for instance, the evolution of cooperative multiagent systems composed of heterogeneous agents, where each agent is modelled as a component of the solution. Previous works have, however, shown that CCEAs are biased toward stability: the evolutionary process tends to converge prematurely to stable states instead of (near-)optimal solutions. In this study, we show how novelty search can be used to avoid the counterproductive attraction to stable states in coevolution. Novelty search is an evolutionary technique that drives evolution toward behavioural novelty and diversity rather than exclusively pursuing a static objective. We evaluate three novelty-based approaches that rely on, respectively (1) the novelty of the team as a whole, (2) the novelty of the agents' individual behaviour, and (3) the combination of the two. We compare the proposed approaches with traditional fitness-driven cooperative coevolution in three simulated multirobot tasks. Our results show that team-level novelty scoring is the most effective approach, significantly outperforming fitness-driven coevolution at multiple levels. Novelty-driven cooperative coevolution can substantially increase the potential of CCEAs while maintaining a computational complexity that scales well with the number of populations.

  3. The dynamics of correlated novelties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tria, F.; Loreto, V.; Servedio, V. D. P.; Strogatz, S. H.

    2014-07-01

    Novelties are a familiar part of daily life. They are also fundamental to the evolution of biological systems, human society, and technology. By opening new possibilities, one novelty can pave the way for others in a process that Kauffman has called ``expanding the adjacent possible''. The dynamics of correlated novelties, however, have yet to be quantified empirically or modeled mathematically. Here we propose a simple mathematical model that mimics the process of exploring a physical, biological, or conceptual space that enlarges whenever a novelty occurs. The model, a generalization of Polya's urn, predicts statistical laws for the rate at which novelties happen (Heaps' law) and for the probability distribution on the space explored (Zipf's law), as well as signatures of the process by which one novelty sets the stage for another. We test these predictions on four data sets of human activity: the edit events of Wikipedia pages, the emergence of tags in annotation systems, the sequence of words in texts, and listening to new songs in online music catalogues. By quantifying the dynamics of correlated novelties, our results provide a starting point for a deeper understanding of the adjacent possible and its role in biological, cultural, and technological evolution.

  4. The dynamics of correlated novelties

    PubMed Central

    Tria, F.; Loreto, V.; Servedio, V. D. P.; Strogatz, S. H.

    2014-01-01

    Novelties are a familiar part of daily life. They are also fundamental to the evolution of biological systems, human society, and technology. By opening new possibilities, one novelty can pave the way for others in a process that Kauffman has called “expanding the adjacent possible”. The dynamics of correlated novelties, however, have yet to be quantified empirically or modeled mathematically. Here we propose a simple mathematical model that mimics the process of exploring a physical, biological, or conceptual space that enlarges whenever a novelty occurs. The model, a generalization of Polya's urn, predicts statistical laws for the rate at which novelties happen (Heaps' law) and for the probability distribution on the space explored (Zipf's law), as well as signatures of the process by which one novelty sets the stage for another. We test these predictions on four data sets of human activity: the edit events of Wikipedia pages, the emergence of tags in annotation systems, the sequence of words in texts, and listening to new songs in online music catalogues. By quantifying the dynamics of correlated novelties, our results provide a starting point for a deeper understanding of the adjacent possible and its role in biological, cultural, and technological evolution. PMID:25080941

  5. Locomotor exercise in weightlessness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thornton, W.; Whitmore, H.

    1991-01-01

    The requirements for exercise in space by means of locomotion are established and addressed with prototype treadmills for use during long-duration spaceflight. The adaptation of the human body to microgravity is described in terms of 1-G locomotor biomechanics, the effects of reduced activity, and effective activity-replacement techniques. The treadmill is introduced as a complement to other techniques of force replacement with reference given to the angle required for exercise. A motor-driven unit is proposed that can operate at a variety of controlled speeds and equivalent grades. The treadmills permit locomotor exercise as required for long-duration space travel to sustain locomotor and cardiorespiratory capacity at a level consistent with postflight needs.

  6. THE CCK-SYSTEM UNDERPINS NOVELTY-SEEKING BEHAVIOR IN THE RAT: GENE EXPRESSION AND PHARMACOLOGICAL ANALYSES

    PubMed Central

    Ballaz, Santiago J.; Akil, Huda; Watson, Stanley J.

    2008-01-01

    Cholecystokinin (CCK) and its receptor CCK-2R have been shown to promote emotional responsivity and behavioral sensitization to psychostimulants in the rat. An animal model has been developed based on locomotor response to a novel inescapable environment. Animals exhibiting consistent differences in locomotor response to novelty have been termed as High and Low Responder rats (HR and LR respectively). This paradigm is deemed to model sensation-seeking, a personality trait closely associated with substance abuse. The present study provides genetic and pharmacological evidence that the CCK-ergic system modulates this behavior. Distinctive patterns of CCK-related gene expression in HR and LR animals occurred beyond the mesolimbic pathways. CCK gene expression was higher in hippocampus, amygdala, and prefrontal cortex, but lower in the ventral tegmental area of HR relative to LR rats. Levels of CCK-2R mRNA were more elevated in LR animals in some areas of the forebrain such as the prefrontal cortex, nucleus accumbens, and hippocampus. Additionally, CCK-2R blockade with the antagonist LY225.910 (0.5 mg/Kg) removed phenotype differences in sustained exploration of novel stimuli (i.e., a novel-object) in HR and LR rats exposed to an enriched open-field test series. Finally, CCK-2R blockade also altered M2 and 5-HT7 receptor gene expression in the mediodorsal thalamus (a strategic structure for corticothalamic trafficking) in a phenotype-dependent manner. Taken together, the findings reported here suggest that distinct CCK-ergic function may contribute to promoting individual differences in novelty-seeking behavior. PMID:18410964

  7. NOVELTY DETECTION UNDER CHANGING ENVIRONMENTAL CONDITIONS

    SciTech Connect

    H. SOHN; K. WORDER; C. R. FARRAR

    2001-04-01

    The primary objective of novelty detection is to examine a system's dynamic response to determine if the system significantly deviates from an initial baseline condition. In reality, the system is often subject to changing environmental and operation conditions that affect its dynamic characteristics. Such variations include changes in loading, boundary conditions, temperature, and moisture. Most damage diagnosis techniques, however, generally neglect the effects of these changing ambient conditions. Here, a novelty detection technique is developed explicitly taking into account these natural variations of the system in order to minimize false positive indications of true system changes. Auto-associative neural networks are employed to discriminate system changes of interest such as structural deterioration and damage from the natural variations of the system.

  8. Novelty, stimulus control, and operant variability

    PubMed Central

    Shahan, Timothy A.; Chase, Philip N.

    2002-01-01

    Although behavior analysis has been criticized for failure to account for response novelty, many common behavior-analytic concepts and processes (e.g., selectionism, the operant, reinforcement, and stimulus control) assume variability both in the environment and in behavior. The importance of the relation between variability and novelty, particularly for verbal behavior, is discussed, and concepts used to account for novel behavior are examined. Experimental findings also are reviewed that suggest that variability in behavior can come under discriminative control, and these findings are applied to describe novel instances of behavior that may arise during problem solving. We conclude that variations provided and selected by the terms of the three-term contingency are powerful means for understanding novel behavior. PMID:22478385

  9. An Evolutionarily Conserved Switch in Response to GABA Affects Development and Behavior of the Locomotor Circuit of Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Han, Bingjie; Bellemer, Andrew; Koelle, Michael R.

    2015-01-01

    The neurotransmitter gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is depolarizing in the developing vertebrate brain, but in older animals switches to hyperpolarizing and becomes the major inhibitory neurotransmitter in adults. We discovered a similar developmental switch in GABA response in Caenorhabditis elegans and have genetically analyzed its mechanism and function in a well-defined circuit. Worm GABA neurons innervate body wall muscles to control locomotion. Activation of GABAA receptors with their agonist muscimol in newly hatched first larval (L1) stage animals excites muscle contraction and thus is depolarizing. At the mid-L1 stage, as the GABAergic neurons rewire onto their mature muscle targets, muscimol shifts to relaxing muscles and thus has switched to hyperpolarizing. This muscimol response switch depends on chloride transporters in the muscles analogous to those that control GABA response in mammalian neurons: the chloride accumulator sodium-potassium-chloride-cotransporter-1 (NKCC-1) is required for the early depolarizing muscimol response, while the two chloride extruders potassium-chloride-cotransporter-2 (KCC-2) and anion-bicarbonate-transporter-1 (ABTS-1) are required for the later hyperpolarizing response. Using mutations that disrupt GABA signaling, we found that neural circuit development still proceeds to completion but with an ∼6-hr delay. Using optogenetic activation of GABAergic neurons, we found that endogenous GABAA signaling in early L1 animals, although presumably depolarizing, does not cause an excitatory response. Thus a developmental depolarizing-to-hyperpolarizing shift is an ancient conserved feature of GABA signaling, but existing theories for why this shift occurs appear inadequate to explain its function upon rigorous genetic analysis of a well-defined neural circuit. PMID:25644702

  10. Neonatal +-methamphetamine exposure in rats alters adult locomotor responses to dopamine D1 and D2 agonists and to a glutamate NMDA receptor antagonist, but not to serotonin agonists.

    PubMed

    Graham, Devon L; Amos-Kroohs, Robyn M; Braun, Amanda A; Grace, Curtis E; Schaefer, Tori L; Skelton, Matthew R; Williams, Michael T; Vorhees, Charles V

    2013-03-01

    Neonatal exposure to (+)-methamphetamine (Meth) results in long-term behavioural abnormalities but its developmental mechanisms are unknown. In a series of experiments, rats were treated from post-natal days (PD) 11-20 (stage that approximates human development from the second to third trimester) with Meth or saline and assessed using locomotor activity as the readout following pharmacological challenge doses with dopamine, serotonin and glutamate agonists or antagonists during adulthood. Exposure to Meth early in life resulted in an exaggerated adult locomotor hyperactivity response to the dopamine D1 agonist SKF-82958 at multiple doses, a high dose only under-response activating effect of the D2 agonist quinpirole, and an exaggerated under-response to the activating effect of the N-methyl-d-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptor antagonist, MK-801. No change in locomotor response was seen following challenge with the 5-HT releaser p-chloroamphetamine or the 5-HT2/3 receptor agonist, quipazine. These are the first data to show that PD 11-20 Meth exposure induces long-lasting alterations to dopamine D1, D2 and glutamate NMDA receptor function and may suggest how developmental Meth exposure leads to many of its long-term adverse effects.

  11. Contribution of impulsivity and novelty-seeking to the acquisition and maintenance of MDMA self-administration.

    PubMed

    Bird, Judith; Schenk, Susan

    2013-07-01

    It has been suggested that the response to novelty and impulsivity predict the latency to acquisition and maintenance of drug self-administration, respectively. The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between these two traits and (1) the latency to acquisition and (2) maintenance (drug-seeking) of 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) self -administration. Impulsivity, measured as premature responding on the five-choice serial reaction time task (5-CSRTT), and novelty-seeking, measured as the locomotor response in a novel environment, were measured prior to self-administration. Latency to acquisition was determined as the number of test sessions required to self-administer an initial criterion of 90 infusions of 1.0 mg/kg/infusion, as well as an additional 150 infusions of 0.5 mg/kg/infusion MDMA. For some rats, the ability of MDMA [0, 5.0 or 10.0 mg/kg, intraperitoneal (IP)] to produce drug-seeking was subsequently measured, and for others, impulsivity was again measured following self-administration. Novelty-seeking was not significantly correlated with either the acquisition or drug-seeking measures of MDMA self-administration. Impulsivity was not significantly correlated with the latency to acquire self-administration of MDMA, but was significantly and positively correlated with the magnitude of MDMA-produced drug-seeking. Furthermore, MDMA self-administration produced a number of notable, but transient, deficits in the 5-CSRTT; there was an increase in omission rate and a delayed increase in premature responses in particular. These findings suggest that impulsivity, but not sensation seeking, might be a risk factor for the development of compulsive drug-seeking following withdrawal from MDMA self-administration.

  12. A comparison of locomotor responses to some psychotropic drugs and cerebral receptors in the Acomys cahirinus and the laboratory mouse.

    PubMed

    Marona-Lewicka, D; Michaluk, J; Antkiewicz-Michaluk, L; Vetulani, J

    1987-01-01

    Comparative studies of the laboratory mouse and Acomys cahirinus have shown differences in their motor activity patterns and motor responses to morphine, apomorphine and clonidine. The two species also differed in respect of the density of cerebral alpha 2-adrenergic receptors, but no significant differences between other types of receptors (alpha 1-adrenergic, beta-adrenergic, opiate mu and delta, and spiroperidol binding sites) were found. It is suggested that the high excitability of the Acomys may be related to a deficit in the inhibitory noradrenergic transmission in the central nervous system.

  13. Auditory stimuli enhance MDMA-conditioned reward and MDMA-induced nucleus accumbens dopamine, serotonin and locomotor responses.

    PubMed

    Feduccia, Allison A; Duvauchelle, Christine L

    2008-10-22

    MDMA (3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine), also known as ecstasy, is a popular drug often taken in environments rich in audio and visual stimulation, such as clubs and dance parties. The present experiments were conducted to test the notion that auditory stimulation influences the rewarding effects of MDMA. In Experiment 1, a conditioned place preference (CPP) procedure was conducted in which rats received MDMA (1.5mg/kg, s.c.) in a distinctive environment accompanied by music (65-75dB), white noise (70dB), or no added sound. Animals were pretreated with saline on alternating days in an alternate environment. Results revealed CPP in animals exposed to white noise during MDMA trials. For Experiment 2, rats from Experiment 1 had access to operant levers that delivered intravenous MDMA (0.5mg/kg/inj) or saline (0.1ml) on alternate days in the presence or absence of the same types of auditory stimuli as previously experienced. After three each of MDMA and non-reinforced (saline) sessions, animals were tested for NAcc DA and 5-HT responses to MDMA (1.5mg/kg) or saline under the same stimulus conditions. Findings revealed that NAcc DA and 5-HT increased after an MDMA injection, and both DA and 5-HT were significantly highest in animals exposed to music during the test session. These results indicate that paired sensorial stimuli can engage the same systems activated during drug use and enhance neurochemical and behavioral responses to MDMA administration.

  14. Revisiting the Novelty Effect: When Familiarity, Not Novelty, Enhances Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poppenk, J.; Kohler, S.; Moscovitch, M.

    2010-01-01

    Reports of superior memory for novel relative to familiar material have figured prominently in recent theories of memory. However, such "novelty effects" are incongruous with long-standing observations that familiar items are remembered better. In 2 experiments, we explored whether this discrepancy was explained by differences in the…

  15. Optical Correlator Performs Novelty Filtering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Duncan Tsuen-Hsi; Chao, Tien-Hsin; Cheng, Li-Jen

    1994-01-01

    Experimental real-time optical correlator performs correlation and novelty filtering in photorefractive crystal. Crystal oriented enabling cross-polarization diffraction: together with polarizing beam splitter, increases signal-to-noise ratio. Laser and optical components expand, collimate, and divide laser beam.

  16. Higher locomotor response to cocaine in female (vs. male) rats selectively bred for high (HiS) and low (LoS) saccharin intake

    PubMed Central

    Carroll, Marilyn E.; Anderson, Marissa M.; Morgan, Andrew D.

    2013-01-01

    Rats selectively bred for high saccharin consumption (HiS) self-administer more oral ethanol and i.v. cocaine than those selectively bred for low saccharin consumption (LoS). Male and female drug-seeking-prone (HiS) and –resistant (LoS) rats were used in the present experiment to test the prediction that cocaine-induced locomotor activity and sensitization varied with sex and their selective breeding status (HiS and LoS). All rats were intermittently exposed over 2 weeks to pairs of sequential saline and cocaine injections, separated by 45 min. The first 5 pairs of injections, each separated by 2-3 days (10-12 days total), were given to examine the development of cocaine-induced locomotor activity and the development of locomotor sensitization, which was determined by comparing the effects of cocaine injection 1 with injection 6, which was given 2 weeks after the 5 pairs of intermittent injections. Results indicated that after the first injection pair (saline, cocaine) the HiS and LoS groups did not differ (saline vs. cocaine) in locomotor activity; however, after cocaine injections 1, 5 and 6, HiS females were more active than HiS males and LoS females. There were also significant phenotype differences (HiS > LoS) in locomotor activity after cocaine injections 5 and 6. There was only a weak sensitization effect in cocaine-induced locomotor activity in HiS females after cocaine injection 5 (compared to 1); however it was not present after injection 6 or in other groups. The lack of a strong sensitization effect under these temporal and dose conditions was inconsistent with previous reports. However, the results showing HiS > LoS and females > males on cocaine-induced activity measures are consistent with several measures of cocaine-seeking behavior (acquisition, maintenance, escalation, extinction, and reinstatement), and they suggest that cocaine-induced locomotor activity and sensitization are behavioral markers of drug-seeking phenotypes. PMID:17707494

  17. Altered object-in-place recognition memory, prepulse inhibition, and locomotor activity in the offspring of rats exposed to a viral mimetic during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Howland, J G; Cazakoff, B N; Zhang, Y

    2012-01-10

    Infection during pregnancy (i.e., prenatal infection) increases the risk of psychiatric illnesses such as schizophrenia and autism in the adult offspring. The present experiments examined the effects of prenatal immune challenge on behavior in three paradigms relevant to these disorders: prepulse inhibition (PPI) of the acoustic startle response, locomotor responses to an unfamiliar environment and the N-methyl-d-aspartate antagonist MK-801, and three forms of recognition memory. Pregnant Long-Evans rats were exposed to the viral mimetic polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid (PolyI:C; 4 mg/kg, i.v.) on gestational day 15. Offspring were tested for PPI and locomotor activity before puberty (postnatal days (PNDs)35 and 36) and during young adulthood (PNDs 56 and 57). Four prepulse-pulse intervals (30, 50, 80, and 140 ms) were employed in the PPI test. Recognition memory testing was performed using three different spontaneous novelty recognition tests (object, object location, and object-in-place recognition) after PND 60. Regardless of sex, offspring of PolyI:C-treated dams showed disrupted PPI at 50-, 80-, and 140-ms prepulse-pulse intervals. In the prepubescent rats, we observed prepulse facilitation for the 30-ms prepulse-pulse interval trials that was selectively retained in the adult PolyI:C-treated offspring. Locomotor responses to MK-801 were significantly reduced before puberty, whereas responses to an unfamiliar environment were increased in young adulthood. Both male and female PolyI:C-treated offspring showed intact object and object location recognition memory, whereas male PolyI:C-treated offspring displayed significantly impaired object-in-place recognition memory. Females were unable to perform the object-in-place test. The present results demonstrate that prenatal immune challenge during mid/late gestation disrupts PPI and locomotor behavior. In addition, the selective impairment of object-in-place recognition memory suggests tasks that depend on prefrontal

  18. Unraveling Effects of Novelty on Creativity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gillebaart, Marleen; Förster, Jens; Rotteveel, Mark; Jehle, Astrid C. M.

    2013-01-01

    Novelty is inherent to creative processes. A positive effect of novelty on creative task performance was therefore predicted. However, creativity can benefit from divergent, as well as convergent thinking. Subsequently, novelty may benefit creative performance when divergent thinking is required, but it could inhibit creative performance when…

  19. The rise of novelty in ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Radeloff, Volker C; Williams, John W; Bateman, Brooke L; Burke, Kevin D; Carter, Sarah K; Childress, Evan S; Cromwell, Kara J; Gratton, Claudio; Hasley, Andrew O; Kraemer, Benjamin M; Latzka, Alexander W; Marin-Spiotta, Erika; Meine, Curt D; Munoz, Samuel E; Neeson, Thomas M; Pidgeon, Anna M; Rissman, Adena R; Rivera, Ricardo J; Szymanski, Laura M; Usinowicz, Jacob

    2015-12-01

    Rapid and ongoing change creates novelty in ecosystems everywhere, both when comparing contemporary systems to their historical baselines, and predicted future systems to the present. However, the level of novelty varies greatly among places. Here we propose a formal and quantifiable definition of abiotic and biotic novelty in ecosystems, map abiotic novelty globally, and discuss the implications of novelty for the science of ecology and for biodiversity conservation. We define novelty as the degree of dissimilarity of a system, measured in one or more dimensions relative to a reference baseline, usually defined as either the present or a time window in the past. In this conceptualization, novelty varies in degree, it is multidimensional, can be measured, and requires a temporal and spatial reference. This definition moves beyond prior categorical definitions of novel ecosystems, and does not include human agency, self-perpetuation, or irreversibility as criteria. Our global assessment of novelty was based on abiotic factors (temperature, precipitation, and nitrogen deposition) plus human population, and shows that there are already large areas with high novelty today relative to the early 20th century, and that there will even be more such areas by 2050. Interestingly, the places that are most novel are often not the places where absolute changes are largest; highlighting that novelty is inherently different from change. For the ecological sciences, highly novel ecosystems present new opportunities to test ecological theories, but also challenge the predictive ability of ecological models and their validation. For biodiversity conservation, increasing novelty presents some opportunities, but largely challenges. Conservation action is necessary along the entire continuum of novelty, by redoubling efforts to protect areas where novelty is low, identifying conservation opportunities where novelty is high, developing flexible yet strong regulations and policies, and

  20. Polyploidy and novelty: Gottlieb's legacy

    PubMed Central

    Soltis, Pamela S.; Liu, Xiaoxian; Marchant, D. Blaine; Visger, Clayton J.; Soltis, Douglas E.

    2014-01-01

    Nearly four decades ago, Roose & Gottlieb (Roose & Gottlieb 1976 Evolution 30, 818–830. (doi:10.2307/2407821)) showed that the recently derived allotetraploids Tragopogon mirus and T. miscellus combined the allozyme profiles of their diploid parents (T. dubius and T. porrifolius, and T. dubius and T. pratensis, respectively). This classic paper addressed the link between genotype and biochemical phenotype and documented enzyme additivity in allopolyploids. Perhaps more important than their model of additivity, however, was their demonstration of novelty at the biochemical level. Enzyme multiplicity—the production of novel enzyme forms in the allopolyploids—can provide an extensive array of polymorphism for a polyploid individual and may explain, for example, the expanded ranges of polyploids relative to their diploid progenitors. In this paper, we extend the concept of evolutionary novelty in allopolyploids to a range of genetic and ecological features. We observe that the dynamic nature of polyploid genomes—with alterations in gene content, gene number, gene arrangement, gene expression and transposon activity—may generate sufficient novelty that every individual in a polyploid population or species may be unique. Whereas certain combinations of these features will undoubtedly be maladaptive, some unique combinations of newly generated variation may provide tremendous evolutionary potential and adaptive capabilities. PMID:24958924

  1. The anatomy and physiology of the locomotor system.

    PubMed

    Farley, Alistair; McLafferty, Ella; Hendry, Charles

    Mobilisation is one of the activities of living. The term locomotor system refers to those body tissues and organs responsible for movement. Nurses and healthcare workers should be familiar with the body structures that enable mobilisation to assist those in their care with this activity. This article outlines the structure and function of the locomotor system, including the skeleton, joints, muscles and muscle attachments. Two common bone disorders, osteoporosis and osteoarthritis, are also considered.

  2. Two separate, but interacting, neural systems for familiarity and novelty detection: a dual-route mechanism.

    PubMed

    Kafkas, Alexandros; Montaldi, Daniela

    2014-05-01

    It has long been assumed that familiarity- and novelty-related processes fall on a single continuum drawing on the same cognitive and neural mechanisms. The possibility that familiarity and novelty processing involve distinct neural networks was explored in a functional magnetic resonance imaging study (fMRI), in which familiarity and novelty judgments were made in contexts emphasizing either familiarity or novelty decisions. Parametrically modulated BOLD responses to familiarity and novelty strength were isolated in two separate, nonoverlapping brain networks. The novelty system involved brain regions along the ventral visual stream, the hippocampus, and the perirhinal and parahippocampal cortices. The familiarity system, on the other hand, involved the dorsomedial thalamic nucleus, and regions within the medial prefrontal cortex and the medial and lateral parietal cortex. Convergence of the two networks, treating familiarity and novelty as a single continuum was only found in a fronto-parietal network. Finally, the orbitomedial prefrontal cortex was found to be sensitive to reported strength/confidence, irrespective of stimulus' familiarity or novelty. This pattern of results suggests a dual-route mechanism supported by the existence of two distinct but interacting functional systems for familiarity and novelty. Overall, these findings challenge current assumptions regarding the neural systems that support the processing of novel and familiar information, and have important implications for research into the neural bases of recognition memory.

  3. Locomotor adaptations of some gelatinous zooplankton.

    PubMed

    Bone, Q

    1985-01-01

    Swimming behaviour and locomotor adaptations are described in chaetognaths, larvacean tunicates, some cnidaria, and thaliacean tunicates. The first two groups swim by oscillating a flattened tail, the others by jet propulsion. In chaetognaths, the locomotor muscle fibres are extensively coupled and relatively sparsely innervated, they exhibit compound spike-like potentials. The motoneurons controlling the rhythmic activity of the locomotor muscle lie in a ventral ganglion whose organization is briefly described. Rhythmic swimming bursts in larvaceans are similarly driven by a caudal ganglion near the base of the tail, but each caudal muscle cell is separately innervated by two sets of motor nerves, as well as being coupled to its neighbours. The external epithelium is excitable, and linked to the caudal ganglion by the axons of central cells. Mechanical stimulation of the epithelium evokes receptor potentials followed by action potentials and by bursts of rapid swimming. The trachyline medusa Aglantha and the small siphonophore Chelophyes also show rapid escape responses; in Aglantha these are driven by a specialized giant axon system lacking in other hydromedusae, and in Chelophyes. Slow swimming in Aglantha apparently involves a second nerve supply to the same muscle sheets used in rapid swimming, whereas in Chelophyes slow swimming results from the activity of the smaller posterior nectophore. Slow swimming in siphonophores is more economical than the rapid responses. In the hydrozoan medusa Polyorchis (as in Chelophyes) action potentials in the locomotor muscle sheet change in shape during swimming bursts, and their duration is related to the size of the medusa; they are not simply triggers of muscular contraction. The two groups of thaliacean tunicates are specialized differently. Doliolum is adapted for single rapid jet pulses (during which it achieves instantaneous velocities of 50 body lengths s-l), whilst salps are adapted for slow continuous swimming. The

  4. Rats classified as low or high cocaine locomotor responders: A unique model involving striatal dopamine transporters that predicts cocaine addiction-like behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Dorothy J.; Nelson, Anna M.; Mandt, Bruce H.; Larson, Gaynor A.; Rorabaugh, Jacki M.; Ng, Christopher M.C.; Barcomb, Kelsey M.; Richards, Toni L.; Allen, Richard M.; Zahniser, Nancy R.

    2013-01-01

    Individual differences are a hallmark of drug addiction. Here, we describe a rat model based on differential initial responsiveness to low dose cocaine. Despite similar brain cocaine levels, individual outbred Sprague-Dawley rats exhibit markedly different magnitudes of acute cocaine-induced locomotor activity and, thereby, can be classified as low or high cocaine responders (LCRs or HCRs). LCRs and HCRs differ in drug-induced, but not novelty-associated, hyperactivity. LCRs have higher basal numbers of striatal dopamine transporters (DATs) than HCRs and exhibit marginal cocaine inhibition of in vivo DAT activity and cocaine-induced increases in extracellular DA. Importantly, lower initial cocaine response predicts greater locomotor sensitization, conditioned place preference and greater motivation to self-administer cocaine following low dose acquisition. Further, outbred Long-Evans rats classified as LCRs, versus HCRs, are more sensitive to cocaine’s discriminative stimulus effects. Overall, results to date with the LCR/HCR model underscore the contribution of striatal DATs to individual differences in initial cocaine responsiveness and the value of assessing the influence of initial drug response on subsequent expression of addiction-like behaviors. PMID:23850581

  5. Novelty Seeking as a Phenotypic Marker of Adolescent Substance Use

    PubMed Central

    Bidwell, L Cinnamon; Knopik, Valerie S; Audrain-McGovern, Janet; Glynn, Tiffany R; Spillane, Nichea S; Ray, Lara A; Riggs, Nathaniel R; Guillot, Casey R; Pang, Raina D; Leventhal, Adam M

    2015-01-01

    Trait novelty seeking has been consistently implicated in substance use, yet the origins and mechanisms of novelty seeking in substance use proneness are unclear. We aimed to characterize novelty seeking as a phenotypic marker of substance use proneness in adolescence, a critical period for drug use experimentation. To this end, we parsed novelty seeking’s two constituent subdimensions – exploratory excitability (drive for novel experience) and impulsiveness (careless decision-making) – and explored the individual relations of these dimensions to: (1) the use of a variety of licit and illicit substances, (2) family history of substance use, and (3) subjective drug effects. Five hundred eighty five adolescents (mean age = 14.5 years) completed surveys of key variables. Results indicated that, when accounting for the covariation among exploratory excitability and impulsiveness, impulsiveness emerged as the more salient correlate of substance use and was independently associated with initiation of nearly all drug classes. Mediation analyses of the mechanisms of novelty seeking-related risk illustrated that impulsiveness mediated the association of family history of substance use with both initiation and past 30-day frequency of use. Both impulsiveness and exploratory excitability were associated with increased positive and negative subjective drug effects, and the analyses supported a significant indirect pathway from impulsiveness to a more frequent use via positive subjective effects. Although limited by a cross-sectional design, these findings suggest that impulsiveness-like aspects of the novelty seeking construct may represent a useful phenotypic marker for early substance use proneness that potentially (1) increases initiation risk, (2) has familial origins, and (3) promotes more frequent use by altering subjective drug response. PMID:26106262

  6. Hippocampal Networks Habituate as Novelty Accumulates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murty, Vishnu P.; Ballard, Ian C.; Macduffie, Katherine E.; Krebs, Ruth M.; Adcock, R. Alison

    2013-01-01

    Novelty detection, a critical computation within the medial temporal lobe (MTL) memory system, necessarily depends on prior experience. The current study used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in humans to investigate dynamic changes in MTL activation and functional connectivity as experience with novelty accumulates. fMRI data were…

  7. Two Components of Nocturnal Locomotor Suppression by Light

    PubMed Central

    Morin, Lawrence P.; Lituma, Pablo J.; Studholme, Keith M.

    2010-01-01

    In nocturnal rodents, millisecond light (“flash”) stimuli can induce both a large circadian rhythm phase shift and an associated state change from highly active to quiescence followed by behavioral sleep. Suppression of locomotion (“negative masking”) is an easily measured correlate of the state change. The present mouse studies used both flashes and longer light stimuli (“pulses”) to distinguish initiation from maintenance effects of light on locomotor suppression and to determine whether the locomotor suppression exhibits temporal integration as is thought to be characteristic of phase shift responses to pulse, but not flash, stimuli. In Expt. 1, locomotor suppression increased with irradiance (0.01–100 μW/cm2), in accordance with previous reports. It also increased with stimulus duration (3–3000 sec), but interpretation of this result is complicated by the ability of light to both initiate and maintain locomotor suppression. In Expt. 2, an irradiance response curve was determined using a stimulus series of 10 flashes, 2 msec each, with total flash energy varying from 0.0025 – 110.0 J/m2. This included a test for temporal integration in which the effects of two equal energy series of flashes were compared, but which differed in the number of flashes per series (10 vs 100). The 10 flash series more effectively elicited locomotor suppression than the 100 flash series, a result consistent with prior observations involving flash-induced phase shifts. In Expt. 3, exposure of mice to an 11 hr light stimulus yielded irradiance-dependent locomotor suppression that can be maintained for the entire stimulus duration by a 100 μW/cm2 stimulus. Light has the ability to initiate a time-limited (30–40 min) interval of locomotor suppression (initiation effect) that can be extended by additional light (maintenance effect). Temporal integration resembling that seen in phase shifting responses to light does not exist for either phase shift or locomotor

  8. Novelty preference in patients with developmental amnesia.

    PubMed

    Munoz, M; Chadwick, M; Perez-Hernandez, E; Vargha-Khadem, F; Mishkin, M

    2011-12-01

    To re-examine whether or not selective hippocampal damage reduces novelty preference in visual paired comparison (VPC), we presented two different versions of the task to a group of patients with developmental amnesia (DA), each of whom sustained this form of pathology early in life. Compared with normal control participants, the DA group showed a delay-dependent reduction in novelty preference on one version of the task and an overall reduction on both versions combined. Because VPC is widely considered to be a measure of incidental recognition, the results appear to support the view that the hippocampus contributes to recognition memory. A difficulty for this conclusion, however, is that according to one current view the hippocampal contribution to recognition is limited to task conditions that encourage recollection of an item in some associated context, and according to another current view, to recognition of an item with the high confidence judgment that reflects a strong memory. By contrast, VPC, throughout which the participant remains entirely uninstructed other than to view the stimuli, would seem to lack such task conditions and so would likely lead to recognition based on familiarity rather than recollection or, alternatively, weak memories rather than strong. However, before concluding that the VPC impairment therefore contradicts both current views regarding the role of the hippocampus in recognition memory, two possibilities that would resolve this issue need to be investigated. One is that some variable in VPC, such as the extended period of stimulus encoding during familiarization, overrides its incidental nature, and, because this condition promotes either recollection- or strength-based recognition, renders the task hippocampal-dependent. The other possibility is that VPC, rather than providing a measure of incidental recognition, actually assesses an implicit, information-gathering process modulated by habituation, for which the hippocampus is

  9. Cyclical parthenogenesis and viviparity in aphids as evolutionary novelties.

    PubMed

    Davis, Gregory K

    2012-09-01

    Evolutionary novelties represent challenges to biologists, particularly those who would like to understand the developmental and genetic changes responsible for their appearance. Most modern aphids possess two apparent evolutionary novelties: cyclical parthenogenesis (a life cycle with both sexual and asexual phases) and viviparity (internal development and live birth of progeny) in their asexual phase. Here I discuss the evolution of these apparent novelties from a developmental standpoint. Although a full understanding of the evolution of cyclical parthenogenesis and viviparity in aphids can seem a daunting task, these complex transitions can at least be broken down into a handful of steps. I argue that these should include the following: a differentiation of two developmentally distinct oocytes; de novo synthesis of centrosomes and modification of meiosis during asexual oogenesis; a loss or bypass of any cell cycle arrest and changes in key developmental events during viviparous oogenesis; and a change in how mothers specify the sexual vs. asexual fates of their progeny. Grappling with the nature of such steps and the order in which they occurred ought to increase our understanding and reduce the apparent novelty of complex evolutionary transitions.

  10. The role of mesoaccumbens--pallidal circuitry in novelty-induced behavioral activation.

    PubMed

    Hooks, M S; Kalivas, P W

    1995-02-01

    When exposed to an environment for the first time, rats express greater behavioral activation than rats which were previously habituated to that environment. The circuit containing the ventral tegmental area, nucleus accumbens and ventral pallidum is required for the expression of locomotor activity elicited by amphetamine-like psychostimulants. It was hypothesized that this circuit is necessary for the expression of novelty-induced motor activity. Dopamine is a neurotransmitter in the projection from the ventral tegmental area to the nucleus accumbens, while GABA is contained in the projections from the nucleus accumbens to the ventral pallidum and from the ventral pallidum back to the ventral tegmental area. Prior to exposing rats to a novel or habituated environment, they received a microinjection of either saline vehicle or one of the following drugs: fluphenazine (dopamine antagonist) into the nucleus accumbens, muscimol (GABAA agonist) into the ventral pallidum, or baclofen GABAB agonist) into the ventral tegmental area. Each of these pretreatments prevented novelty-induced motor activation without suppressing the activity of habituated animals. In contrast, when these microinjections were made into adjacent motor nuclei of the basal ganglia, including fluphenazine into the striatum, muscimol into the globus pallidus and baclofen into the substantia nigra, they were ineffective in blocking novelty-induced motor activity. These data indicate that the integrity of the circuit that contains the ventral tegmental area, nucleus accumbens and ventral pallidum is required for the manifestation of novelty-induced motor activity.

  11. Sex differences in locomotor effects of morphine in the rat

    PubMed Central

    Craft, Rebecca M.; Clark, James L.; Hart, Stephen P.; Pinckney, Megan K.

    2007-01-01

    Sex differences in reinforcing, analgesic and other effects of opioids have been demonstrated; however, the extent to which sex differences in motoric effects of opioids contribute to apparent sex differences in their primary effects is not known. The goal of this study was to compare the effects of the prototypic mu opioid agonist morphine on locomotor activity in male vs. female rats. Saline or morphine (1-10 mg/kg) was administered s.c. to adult Sprague-Dawley rats, which were placed into a photobeam apparatus for 3-5 hr to measure activity. Modulation of morphine's effects by gonadal hormones and by handling (either during the test session or for 4 days before the test session) were examined. Morphine initially suppressed and later increased locomotor activity in both sexes relative to their saline-injected controls, but males were more sensitive than females to the initial locomotor suppressant effect of morphine. Intermittent, brief handling during the 3-hr test session blunted morphine-induced locomotor activation in both sexes. Females in proestrus were the most sensitive to morphine's locomotor-stimulant effect, with females in estrus showing the least response to morphine. Gonadectomized (GDX) males with or without testosterone were equally sensitive to morphine's effects, whereas GDX females treated with estradiol showed a blunted response to morphine's effects, similar to intact females in estrus. Brief handling on each of 4 consecutive days pre-test attenuated morphine's locomotor suppressant effect in males but had no effect in females, thereby eliminating the sex difference. These data suggest that sex differences in morphine's effects on locomotor activity can be attributed to gonadal hormones in females, and to differential stress-induced modulation of morphine's effects in males vs. females. PMID:17217999

  12. Novelties that change carrying capacity.

    PubMed

    Erwin, Douglas H

    2012-09-01

    Comparative developmental studies have revealed a rich array of details about the patterns and processes of morphological change in animals and increasingly in plants. But, applying these insights to the study of major episodes of evolutionary innovation requires understanding how these novel morphologies become established and sufficiently abundant (either as individuals within a species or as a clade of species) to be preserved in the fossil record, and, in many cases, to influence ecological processes. Evolutionary novelties may: (1) disappear without changing the species; (2) be associated with the generation (through selection or drift) of a new species; and if the latter (3) may or may not become ecologically significant. Only the latter are commonly preserved in the fossil record. These alternatives mirror the distinction among historians of technology between innovation and invention. Here, I argue that specific sorts of evolutionary inventions drive ecological transformation, essentially constructing an environment for themselves and ancillary organisms through ecological spillover effects, increasing the "carrying capacity" of an ecosystem.

  13. Exendin-4 Decreases Amphetamine-induced Locomotor Activity

    PubMed Central

    Erreger, Kevin; Davis, Adeola R.; Poe, Amanda M.; Greig, Nigel H.; Stanwood, Gregg D.; Galli, Aurelio

    2012-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is released in response to nutrient ingestion and is a regulator of energy metabolism and consummatory behaviors through both peripheral and central mechanisms. The GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R) is widely distributed in the central nervous system, however little is known about how GLP-1Rs regulate ambulatory behavior. The abused psychostimulant amphetamine (AMPH) promotes behavioral locomotor activity primarily by inducing the release of the neurotransmitter dopamine. Here, we identify the GLP-1R agonist exendin-4 (Ex-4) as a modulator of behavioral activation by AMPH. We report that in rats a single acute administration of Ex-4 decreases both basal locomotor activity as well as AMPH-induced locomotor activity. Ex-4 did not induce behavioral responses reflecting anxiety or aversion. Our findings implicate GLP-1R signaling as a novel modulator of psychostimulant-induced behavior and therefore a potential therapeutic target for psychostimulant abuse. PMID:22465309

  14. Movement Exploration and Locomotor Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center on Educational Media and Materials for the Handicapped, Columbus, OH.

    Selected from the National Instructional Materials Information System (NIMIS)--a computer based on-line interactive retrieval system on special education materials--the bibliography covers 23 materials for teaching movement exploration and locomotor skills to handicapped students at all educational levels. Entries are presented in order of NIMIS…

  15. Novelty, coherence, and Mendeleev's periodic table.

    PubMed

    Schindler, Samuel

    2014-03-01

    Predictivism is the view that successful predictions of "novel" evidence carry more confirmational weight than accommodations of already known evidence. Novelty, in this context, has traditionally been conceived of as temporal novelty. However temporal predictivism has been criticized for lacking a rationale: why should the time order of theory and evidence matter? Instead, it has been proposed, novelty should be construed in terms of use-novelty, according to which evidence is novel if it was not used in the construction of a theory. Only if evidence is use-novel can it fully support the theory entailing it. As I point out in this paper, the writings of the most influential proponent of use-novelty contain a weaker and a stronger version of use-novelty. However both versions, I argue, are problematic. With regard to the appraisal of Mendeleev' periodic table, the most contentious historical case in the predictivism debate, I argue that temporal predictivism is indeed supported, although in ways not previously appreciated. On the basis of this case, I argue for a form of so-called symptomatic predictivism according to which temporally novel predictions carry more confirmational weight only insofar as they reveal the theory's presumed coherence of facts as real.

  16. Conceptualizing evolutionary novelty: moving beyond definitional debates.

    PubMed

    Brigandt, Ingo; Love, Alan C

    2012-09-01

    According to many biologists, explaining the evolution of morphological novelty and behavioral innovation are central endeavors in contemporary evolutionary biology. These endeavors are inherently multidisciplinary but also have involved a high degree of controversy. One key source of controversy is the definitional diversity associated with the concept of evolutionary novelty, which can lead to contradictory claims (a novel trait according to one definition is not a novel trait according to another). We argue that this diversity should be interpreted in light of a different epistemic role played by the concept of evolutionary novelty-the structuring of a problem space or setting of an explanatory agenda-rather than the concept's capacity to categorize traits as novel. This distinctive role is consistent with the definitional diversity and shows that the concept of novelty benefits ongoing investigation by focusing attention on answering different questions related to comprehending the origins of novelty. A review of recent theoretical and empirical work on evolutionary novelty confirms this interpretation.

  17. Quaternary naltrexone reverses radiogenic and morphine-induced locomotor hyperactivity

    SciTech Connect

    Mickley, G.A.; Stevens, K.E.; Galbraith, J.A.; White, G.A.; Gibbs, G.L.

    1984-04-01

    The present study attempted to determine the relative role of the peripheral and central nervous system in the production of morphine-induced or radiation-induced locomotor hyperactivity of the mouse. Toward this end, we used a quaternary derivative of an opiate antagonist (naltrexone methobromide), which presumably does not cross the blood-brain barrier. Quaternary naltrexone was used to challenge the stereotypic locomotor response observed in these mice after either an i.p. injection of morphine or exposure to 1500 rads /sup 60/Co. The quaternary derivative of naltrexone reversed the locomotor hyperactivity normally observed in the C57BL/6J mouse after an injection of morphine. It also significantly attenuated radiation-induced locomotion. The data reported here support the hypothesis of endorphin involvement in radiation-induced and radiogenic behaviors. However, these conclusions are contingent upon further research which more fully evaluates naltrexone methobromide's capacity to cross the blood-brain barrier.

  18. On the origins of novelty in development and evolution.

    PubMed

    Moczek, Armin P

    2008-05-01

    The origin of novel traits is what draws many to evolutionary biology, yet our understanding of the mechanisms that underlie the genesis of novelty remains limited. Here I review definitions of novelty including its relationship to homology. I then discuss how ontogenetic perspectives may allow us to move beyond current roadblocks in our understanding of the mechanics of innovation. Specifically, I explore the roles of canalization, plasticity and threshold responses during development in generating a reservoir of cryptic genetic variation free to drift and accumulate in natural populations. Environmental or genetic perturbations that exceed the buffering capacity of development can then release this variation, and, through evolution by genetic accommodation, result in rapid diversification, recurrence of lost phenotypes as well as the origins of novel features. I conclude that, in our quest to understand the nature of innovation, the nature of development deserves to take center stage.

  19. Strategies of locomotor collision avoidance.

    PubMed

    Basili, Patrizia; Sağlam, Murat; Kruse, Thibault; Huber, Markus; Kirsch, Alexandra; Glasauer, Stefan

    2013-03-01

    Collision avoidance during locomotion can be achieved by a variety of strategies. While in some situations only a single trajectory will successfully avoid impact, in many cases several different strategies are possible. Locomotor experiments in the presence of static boundary conditions have suggested that the choice of an appropriate trajectory is based on a maximum-smoothness strategy. Here we analyzed locomotor trajectories of subjects avoiding collision with another human crossing their path orthogonally. In such a case, changing walking direction while keeping speed or keeping walking direction while changing speed would be two extremes of solving the problem. Our participants clearly favored changing their walking speed while keeping the path on a straight line between start and goal. To interpret this result, we calculated the costs of the chosen trajectories in terms of a smoothness-maximization criterion and simulated the trajectories with a computational model. Data analysis together with model simulation showed that the experimentally chosen trajectory to avoid collision with a moving human is not the optimally smooth solution. However, even though the trajectory is not globally smooth, it was still locally smooth. Modeling further confirmed that, in presence of the moving human, there is always a trajectory that would be smoother but would deviate from the straight line. We therefore conclude that the maximum smoothness strategy previously suggested for static environments no longer holds for locomotor path planning and execution in dynamically changing environments such as the one tested here.

  20. Reward Motivation Accelerates the Onset of Neural Novelty Signals in Humans to 85 Milliseconds

    PubMed Central

    Bunzeck, Nico; Doeller, Christian F.; Fuentemilla, Lluis; Dolan, Raymond J.; Duzel, Emrah

    2009-01-01

    Summary The neural responses that distinguish novel from familiar items in recognition memory tasks are remarkably fast in both humans and nonhuman primates. In humans, the earliest onsets of neural novelty effects emerge at about ∼150–200 ms after stimulus onset [1–5]. However, in recognition memory studies with nonhuman primates, novelty effects can arise at as early as 70–80 ms [6, 7]. Here, we address the possibility that this large species difference in onset latencies is caused experimentally by the necessity of using reward reinforcement to motivate the detection of novel or familiar items in nonhuman primates but not in humans. Via magnetoencephalography in humans, we show in two experiments that the onset of neural novelty signals is accelerated from ∼200 ms to ∼85 ms if correct recognition memory for either novel or familiar items is rewarded. Importantly, this acceleration is independent of whether the detection of the novel or the familiar scenes is rewarded. Furthermore, this early novelty effect contributed to memory retrieval because neural reward responses, which were contingent upon novelty detection, followed ∼100 ms later. Thus, under the contextual influence of reward motivation, behaviorally relevant novelty signals emerge much faster than previously held possible in humans. PMID:19576774

  1. Acute restraint stress and corticosterone transiently disrupts novelty preference in an object recognition task.

    PubMed

    Vargas-López, Viviana; Torres-Berrio, Angélica; González-Martínez, Lina; Múnera, Alejandro; Lamprea, Marisol R

    2015-09-15

    The object recognition task is a procedure based on rodents' natural tendency to explore novel objects which is frequently used for memory testing. However, in some instances novelty preference is replaced by familiarity preference, raising questions regarding the validity of novelty preference as a pure recognition memory index. Acute stress- and corticosterone administration-induced novel object preference disruption has been frequently interpreted as memory impairment; however, it is still not clear whether such effect can be actually attributed to either mnemonic disruption or altered novelty seeking. Seventy-five adult male Wistar rats were trained in an object recognition task and subjected to either acute stress or corticosterone administration to evaluate the effect of stress or corticosterone on an object recognition task. Acute stress was induced by restraining movement for 1 or 4h, ending 30 min before the sample trial. Corticosterone was injected intraperitoneally 10 min before the test trial which was performed either 1 or 24h after the sample trial. Four-hour, but not 1-h, stress induced familiar object preference during the test trial performed 1h after the sample trial; however, acute stress had no effects on the test when performed 24h after sample trial. Systemic administration of corticosterone before the test trial performed either 1 or 24h after the sample trial also resulted in familiar object preference. However, neither acute stress nor corticosterone induced changes in locomotor behaviour. Taken together, such results suggested that acute stress probably does not induce memory retrieval impairment but, instead, induces an emotional arousing state which motivates novelty avoidance.

  2. Locomotor Expertise Predicts Infants' Perseverative Errors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berger, Sarah E.

    2010-01-01

    This research examined the development of inhibition in a locomotor context. In a within-subjects design, infants received high- and low-demand locomotor A-not-B tasks. In Experiment 1, walking 13-month-old infants followed an indirect path to a goal. In a control condition, infants took a direct route. In Experiment 2, crawling and walking…

  3. Integrated Locomotor Function Tests for Countermeasure Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bloomberg, J. J.; Mulavara, A. P.; Peters, B. T.; Cohen, H. S.; Landsness, E. C.; Black, F. O.

    2005-01-01

    Following spaceflight crewmembers experience locomotor dysfunction due to inflight adaptive alterations in sensorimotor function. Countermeasures designed to mitigate these postflight gait alterations need to be assessed with a new generation of tests that evaluate the interaction of various sensorimotor sub-systems central to locomotor control. The goal of the present study was to develop new functional tests of locomotor control that could be used to test the efficacy of countermeasures. These tests were designed to simultaneously examine the function of multiple sensorimotor systems underlying the control of locomotion and be operationally relevant to the astronaut population. Traditionally, gaze stabilization has been studied almost exclusively in seated subjects performing target acquisition tasks requiring only the involvement of coordinated eye-head movements. However, activities like walking involve full-body movement and require coordination between lower limbs and the eye-head-trunk complex to achieve stabilized gaze during locomotion. Therefore the first goal of this study was to determine how the multiple, interdependent, full-body sensorimotor gaze stabilization subsystems are functionally coordinated during locomotion. In an earlier study we investigated how alteration in gaze tasking changes full-body locomotor control strategies. Subjects walked on a treadmill and either focused on a central point target or read numeral characters. We measured: temporal parameters of gait, full body sagittal plane segmental kinematics of the head, trunk, thigh, shank and foot, accelerations along the vertical axis at the head and the shank, and the vertical forces acting on the support surface. In comparison to the point target fixation condition, the results of the number reading task showed that compensatory head pitch movements increased, peak head acceleration was reduced and knee flexion at heel-strike was increased. In a more recent study we investigated the

  4. Locomotor adaptation to a soleus EMG-controlled antagonistic exoskeleton.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Keith E; Kinnaird, Catherine R; Ferris, Daniel P

    2013-04-01

    Locomotor adaptation in humans is not well understood. To provide insight into the neural reorganization that occurs following a significant disruption to one's learned neuromuscular map relating a given motor command to its resulting muscular action, we tied the mechanical action of a robotic exoskeleton to the electromyography (EMG) profile of the soleus muscle during walking. The powered exoskeleton produced an ankle dorsiflexion torque proportional to soleus muscle recruitment thus limiting the soleus' plantar flexion torque capability. We hypothesized that neurologically intact subjects would alter muscle activation patterns in response to the antagonistic exoskeleton by decreasing soleus recruitment. Subjects practiced walking with the exoskeleton for two 30-min sessions. The initial response to the perturbation was to "fight" the resistive exoskeleton by increasing soleus activation. By the end of training, subjects had significantly reduced soleus recruitment resulting in a gait pattern with almost no ankle push-off. In addition, there was a trend for subjects to reduce gastrocnemius recruitment in proportion to the soleus even though only the soleus EMG was used to control the exoskeleton. The results from this study demonstrate the ability of the nervous system to recalibrate locomotor output in response to substantial changes in the mechanical output of the soleus muscle and associated sensory feedback. This study provides further evidence that the human locomotor system of intact individuals is highly flexible and able to adapt to achieve effective locomotion in response to a broad range of neuromuscular perturbations.

  5. Lipidomics and H218O labeling techniques reveal increased remodeling of DHA-containing membrane phospholipids associated with abnormal locomotor responses in α-tocopherol deficient zebrafish (danio rerio) embryos

    PubMed Central

    McDougall, Melissa Q.; Choi, Jaewoo; Stevens, Jan F.; Truong, Lisa; Tanguay, Robert L.; Traber, Maret G.

    2016-01-01

    We hypothesized that vitamin E (α-tocopherol) is required by the developing embryonic brain to prevent depletion of highly polyunsaturated fatty acids, especially docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22:6), the loss of which we predicted would underlie abnormal morphological and behavioral outcomes. Therefore, we fed adult 5D zebrafish (Danio rerio) defined diets without (E−) or with added α-tocopherol (E+, 500 mg RRR-α-tocopheryl acetate/kg diet) for a minimum of 80 days, and then spawned them to obtain E− and E+ embryos. The E− compared with E+ embryos were 82% less responsive (p<0.01) to a light/dark stimulus at 96 h post-fertilization (hpf), demonstrating impaired locomotor behavior, even in the absence of gross morphological defects. Evaluation of phospholipid (PL) and lysophospholipid (lyso-PL) composition using untargeted lipidomics in E− compared with E+ embryos at 24, 48, 72, and 120 hpf showed that four PLs and three lyso-PLs containing docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), including lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC 22:6, required for transport of DHA into the brain, p<0.001), were at lower concentrations in E− at all time-points. Additionally, H218O labeling experiments revealed enhanced turnover of LPC 22:6 (p<0.001) and three other DHA-containing PLs in the E− compared with the E+ embryos, suggesting that increased membrane remodeling is a result of PL depletion. Together, these data indicate that α-tocopherol deficiency in the zebrafish embryo causes the specific depletion and increased turnover of DHA-containing PL and lyso-PLs, which may compromise DHA delivery to the brain and thereby contribute to the functional impairments observed in E− embryos. PMID:26774753

  6. C57BL/6J MICE EXHIBIT REDUCED DOPAMINE D3 RECEPTOR-MEDIATED LOCOMOTOR-INHIBITORY FUNCTION RELATIVE TO DBA/2J MICE

    PubMed Central

    McNAMARA, R. K.; LEVANT, B.; TAYLOR, B.; AHLBRAND, R.; LIU, Y.; SULLIVAN, J. R.; STANFORD, K.; RICHTAND, N. M.

    2007-01-01

    Previous reports have identified greater sensitivity to the locomotor-stimulating, sensitizing, and reinforcing effects of amphetamine in inbred C57BL/6J mice relative to inbred DBA/2J mice. The dopamine D3 receptor (D3R) plays an inhibitory role in the regulation of rodent locomotor activity, and exerts inhibitory opposition to D1 receptor (D1R)-mediated signaling. Based on these observations, we investigated D3R expression and D3R-mediated locomotor-inhibitory function, as well as D1R binding and D1R-mediated locomotor-stimulating function, in C57BL/6J and DBA/2J mice. C57BL/6J mice exhibited lower D3R binding density (−32%) in the ventral striatum (nucleus accumbens/islands of Calleja), lower D3R mRNA expression (−26%) in the substantia nigra/ventral tegmentum, and greater D3R mRNA expression (+40%) in the hippocampus, relative to DBA/2J mice. There were no strain differences in DR3 mRNA expression in the ventral striatum or prefrontal cortex, nor were there differences in D1R binding in the ventral striatum. Behaviorally, C57BL/6J mice were less sensitive to the locomotor-inhibitory effect of the D3R agonist PD128907 (10 μg/kg), and more sensitive to the locomotor-stimulating effects of novelty, amphetamine (1 mg/kg), and the D1R-like agonist ±-1-phenyl-2,3,4,5-tetrahydro-(1H)-3-benzazepine-7,8,-diol hydrochloride (SKF38393) (5–20 mg/kg) than DBA/2J mice. While the selective D3R antagonist N-(4-[4-{2,3-dichlorphenyl}-1 piperazinyl]butyl)-2-fluorenylcarboxamide (NGB 2904) (0.01–1.0 mg/kg) augmented novelty-, amphetamine-, and SKF38393-induced locomotor activity in DBA/2J mice, it reduced novelty-induced locomotor activity in C57BL/6J mice. Collectively, these results demonstrate that C57BL/6J mice exhibit less D3R-mediated inhibitory function relative to DBA/2J mice, and suggest that reduced D3R-mediated inhibitory function may contribute to heightened sensitivity to the locomotor-stimulating effects of amphetamine in the C57BL/6J mouse strain

  7. Novelty detection for breast cancer image classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cichosz, Pawel; Jagodziński, Dariusz; Matysiewicz, Mateusz; Neumann, Łukasz; Nowak, Robert M.; Okuniewski, Rafał; Oleszkiewicz, Witold

    2016-09-01

    Using classification learning algorithms for medical applications may require not only refined model creation techniques and careful unbiased model evaluation, but also detecting the risk of misclassification at the time of model application. This is addressed by novelty detection, which identifies instances for which the training set is not sufficiently representative and for which it may be safer to restrain from classification and request a human expert diagnosis. The paper investigates two techniques for isolated instance identification, based on clustering and one-class support vector machines, which represent two different approaches to multidimensional outlier detection. The prediction quality for isolated instances in breast cancer image data is evaluated using the random forest algorithm and found to be substantially inferior to the prediction quality for non-isolated instances. Each of the two techniques is then used to create a novelty detection model which can be combined with a classification model and used at the time of prediction to detect instances for which the latter cannot be reliably applied. Novelty detection is demonstrated to improve random forest prediction quality and argued to deserve further investigation in medical applications.

  8. Novelty Detection in and Between Different Modalities

    SciTech Connect

    Veflingstad, Henning; Yildirim, Sule

    2008-01-21

    Our general aim is to reflect the advances in artificial intelligence and cognitive science fields to space exploration studies such that next generation space rovers can benefit from these advances. We believe next generation space rovers can benefit from the studies related to employing conceptual representations in generating structured thought. This way, rovers need not be equipped with all necessary steps of an action plan to execute in space exploration but they can autonomously form representations of their world and reason on them to make intelligent decision. As part of this approach, autonomous novelty detection is an important feature of next generation space rovers. This feature allows a rover to make further decisions about exploring a rock sample more closely or not and on its own. This way, a rover will use less of its time for communication between the earth and itself and more of its time for achieving its assigned tasks in space. In this paper, we propose an artificial neural network based novelty detection mechanism that next generation space rovers can employ as part of their intelligence. We also present an implementation of such a mechanism and present its reliability in detecting novelty.

  9. Goal-dependent modulation of declarative memory: neural correlates of temporal recency decisions and novelty detection.

    PubMed

    Dudukovic, Nicole M; Wagner, Anthony D

    2007-06-18

    Declarative memory allows an organism to discriminate between previously encountered and novel items, and to place past encounters in time. Numerous imaging studies have investigated the neural processes supporting item recognition, whereas few have examined retrieval of temporal information. In the present study, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) was conducted while subjects engaged in temporal recency and item novelty decisions. Subjects encountered three-alternative forced-choice retrieval trials, each consisting of two words from a preceding study phase and one novel word, and were instructed to either identify the novel item (Novelty trials) or the more recently presented study item (Recency trials). Relative to correct Novelty decisions, correct Recency decisions elicited greater activation in a network of left-lateralized regions, including frontopolar and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and intraparietal sulcus. A conjunction analysis revealed that these left-lateralized regions overlapped with those previously observed to be engaged during source recollection versus novelty detection, suggesting that during Recency trials subjects attempted to recollect event details. Consistent with this interpretation, correct Recency decisions activated posterior hippocampus and parahippocampal cortex, whereas incorrect Recency decisions elicited greater anterior cingulate activation. The magnitude of this latter effect positively correlated with activation in right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex. Finally, correct Novelty decisions activated the anterior medial temporal lobe to a greater extent than did correct Recency decisions, suggesting that medial temporal novelty responses are not obligatory but rather can be modulated by the goal-directed allocation of attention. Collectively, these findings advance understanding of how subjects strategically engage frontal and parietal mechanisms in the service of attempting to remember the temporal order of events

  10. Models of neural novelty detectors, with similarities to cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    Salu, Y

    1988-01-01

    A novelty detector is a functional unit, that indicates whether an incoming stimulus is familiar or novel. Novelty detection is prevalent in the central nervous system (CNS), and is involved in various activities. Its basic characteristics are discussed first. Then, models of neural novelty detectors are described, and tested and evaluated in simulations. The simulations have shown that one novelty detector, the bi-compartmental, simulates very closely the behavior of neural novelty detectors. This model is constructed in a way that resembles the observed architecture and function of area 17, and similar regions in the cortex. The first step in novelty detection is data retrieval. The proposed novelty detectors can utilize various compatible modes of data storage and retrieval, and one of those has been utilized in the simulations.

  11. Dynamics and plasticity of spinal locomotor circuits.

    PubMed

    El Manira, Abdeljabbar

    2014-12-01

    Spinal circuits generate coordinated locomotor movements. These hardwired circuits are supplemented with neuromodulation that provide the necessary flexibility for animals to move smoothly through their environment. This review will highlight some recent insights gained in understanding the functional dynamics and plasticity of the locomotor circuits. First the mechanisms governing the modulation of the speed of locomotion will be discussed. Second, advantages of the modular organization of the locomotor networks with multiple circuits engaged in a task-dependent manner will be examined. Finally, the neuromodulation and the resulting plasticity of the locomotor circuits will be summarized with an emphasis on endocannabinoids and nitric oxide. The intention is to extract general principles of organization and discuss some onto-genetic and phylogenetic divergences.

  12. Repeatability of locomotor performance and morphology-locomotor performance relationships.

    PubMed

    Conradsen, Cara; Walker, Jeffrey A; Perna, Catherine; McGuigan, Katrina

    2016-09-15

    There is good evidence that natural selection drives the evolution of locomotor performance, but the processes that generate the among-individual variation for selection to act on are relatively poorly understood. We measured prolonged swimming performance, Ucrit, and morphology in a large cohort (n=461) of wild-type zebrafish (Danio rerio) at ∼6 months and again at ∼9 months. Using mixed-model analyses to estimate repeatability as the intraclass correlation coefficient, we determined that Ucrit was significantly repeatable (r=0.55; 95% CI: 0.45-0.64). Performance differences between the sexes (males 12% faster than females) and changes with age (decreasing 0.07% per day) both contributed to variation in Ucrit and, therefore, the repeatability estimate. Accounting for mean differences between sexes within the model decreased the estimate of Ucrit repeatability to 21% below the naïve estimate, while fitting age in the models increased the estimate to 14% above the naïve estimate. Greater consideration of factors such as age and sex is therefore necessary for the interpretation of performance repeatability in wild populations. Body shape significantly predicted Ucrit in both sexes in both assays, with the morphology-performance relationship significantly repeatable at the population level. However, morphology was more strongly predicative of performance in older fish, suggesting a change in the contribution of morphology relative to other factors such as physiology and behaviour. The morphology-performance relationship changed with age to a greater extent in males than females.

  13. Apathy, Novelty Processing, and the P3 Potential in Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kaufman, David A. S.; Bowers, Dawn; Okun, Michael S.; Van Patten, Ryan; Perlstein, William M.

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) is characterized by deficits in goal-directed behavior as well as mood and motivational symptoms, including apathy, depression, and anxiety. The present study investigated novelty processing in PD, using event-related potentials (ERPs) to characterize electrophysiological reflections of visual novelty processing. Since apathy has been associated with decreased novelty processing (P3 potentials) in highly apathetic PD patients, we were particularly interested to see if this relationship exists in a sample of PD patients with heterogeneous levels of apathy. Non-demented patients with PD receiving dopaminergic treatment (n = 14) and healthy control participants (n = 12) completed a three-stimulus oddball task while EEG was recorded. Relative to controls, the PD patients exhibited reductions in centrofrontally distributed P3 potentials when viewing novel distracters during this task. Distracter-related P3 amplitudes evoked by novel distracters were strongly associated with apathy symptoms, even after controlling for the effects of depression, anxiety, and executive function. Executive dysfunction was also predictive of novelty-related P3 processing, yet this relationship was independent from that of apathy. These findings suggest that the brain’s electrophysiological response to novelty is closely related to both motivational and cognitive symptoms in PD, even for patients whose apathy symptoms are not excessive. These results have significant implications for our understanding of non-motor symptoms in this clinical population. PMID:27445962

  14. Apathy, Novelty Processing, and the P3 Potential in Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Kaufman, David A S; Bowers, Dawn; Okun, Michael S; Van Patten, Ryan; Perlstein, William M

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is characterized by deficits in goal-directed behavior as well as mood and motivational symptoms, including apathy, depression, and anxiety. The present study investigated novelty processing in PD, using event-related potentials (ERPs) to characterize electrophysiological reflections of visual novelty processing. Since apathy has been associated with decreased novelty processing (P3 potentials) in highly apathetic PD patients, we were particularly interested to see if this relationship exists in a sample of PD patients with heterogeneous levels of apathy. Non-demented patients with PD receiving dopaminergic treatment (n = 14) and healthy control participants (n = 12) completed a three-stimulus oddball task while EEG was recorded. Relative to controls, the PD patients exhibited reductions in centrofrontally distributed P3 potentials when viewing novel distracters during this task. Distracter-related P3 amplitudes evoked by novel distracters were strongly associated with apathy symptoms, even after controlling for the effects of depression, anxiety, and executive function. Executive dysfunction was also predictive of novelty-related P3 processing, yet this relationship was independent from that of apathy. These findings suggest that the brain's electrophysiological response to novelty is closely related to both motivational and cognitive symptoms in PD, even for patients whose apathy symptoms are not excessive. These results have significant implications for our understanding of non-motor symptoms in this clinical population.

  15. Visual Habituation and Preference for Novelty in Five-Week-Old Infants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunter, Michael A.; Ames, Elinor W.

    This study was designed to determine if the failure of previous investigations to find habituation and response to novelty in infants younger than 2 months of age was because the stimuli used were too complex or because a constant number of trials rather than an individual criterion of habituation was used. A total of 24 infants between 5 and 6…

  16. Organization of mammalian locomotor rhythm and pattern generation

    PubMed Central

    McCrea, David A.; Rybak, Ilya A.

    2008-01-01

    Central pattern generators (CPGs) located in the spinal cord produce the coordinated activation of flexor and extensor motoneurons during locomotion. Previously proposed architectures for the spinal locomotor CPG have included the classical half-center oscillator and the unit burst generator (UBG) comprised of multiple coupled oscillators. We have recently proposed another organization in which a two-level CPG has a common rhythm generator (RG) that controls the operation of the pattern formation (PF) circuitry responsible for motoneuron activation. These architectures are discussed in relation to recent data obtained during fictive locomotion in the decerebrate cat. The data show that the CPG can maintain the period and phase of locomotor oscillations both during spontaneous deletions of motoneuron activity and during sensory stimulation affecting motoneuron activity throughout the limb. The proposed two-level CPG organization has been investigated with a computational model which incorporates interactions between the CPG, spinal circuits and afferent inputs. The model includes interacting populations of spinal interneurons and motoneurons modeled in the Hodgkin-Huxley style. Our simulations demonstrate that a relatively simple CPG with separate RG and PF networks can realistically reproduce many experimental phenomena including spontaneous deletions of motoneuron activity and a variety of effects of afferent stimulation. The model suggests plausible explanations for a number of features of real CPG operation that would be difficult to explain in the framework of the classical single-level CPG organization. Some modeling predictions and directions for further studies of locomotor CPG organization are discussed. PMID:17936363

  17. Caffeine and amphetamine produce cross-sensitization to nicotine-induced locomotor activity in mice.

    PubMed

    Celik, Eylem; Uzbay, I Tayfun; Karakas, Sirel

    2006-01-01

    Sensitization development is linked to the addictive potential of the drugs. The same mechanisms might play a role in sensitization development to the different addictive drugs. The aim of the study was to investigate the development of cross-sensitization to caffeine and amphetamine in nicotine-induced locomotor sensitization in mice. Caffeine (2.5-20 mg/kg), amphetamine (1-16 mg/kg) or saline were injected to Swiss-Webster mice and locomotor activity was recorded for 30 min. Nicotine (0.5-2 mg/kg) or saline were injected to mice and locomotor activity was recorded for 30 min. Process was applied for 19 days, every other day (10 sessions). Caffeine (5 mg/kg), amphetamine (4 mg/kg) or saline were challenged to the different groups of nicotine-sensitized mice 2 days later on the last nicotine injection, and locomotor activity was recorded. Repetitive injections of nicotine (0.5-2 mg) produced locomotor sensitization in mice. After caffeine and amphetamine challenge injections, locomotor activity of the nicotine-sensitized mice was found to be significantly higher than saline-pretreated mice. Saline challenge did not produce any significant effect in nicotine- or saline-pretreated mice. Our results suggest that a cross-sensitization developed to both caffeine and amphetamine in nicotine-sensitized mice. In conclusion, similar central mechanisms may be responsible for the development of addiction to these substances.

  18. Acts of kindness and acts of novelty affect life satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Buchanan, Kathryn E; Bardi, Anat

    2010-01-01

    The present experiment was designed to establish the effects of acts of kindness and acts of novelty on life satisfaction. Participants aged 18-60 took part on a voluntary basis. They were randomly assigned to perform either acts of kindness, acts of novelty, or no acts on a daily basis for 10 days. Their life satisfaction was measured before and after the 10-day experiment. As expected, performing acts of kindness or acts of novelty resulted in an increase in life satisfaction.

  19. Locomotor expertise predicts infants' perseverative errors.

    PubMed

    Berger, Sarah E

    2010-03-01

    This research examined the development of inhibition in a locomotor context. In a within-subjects design, infants received high- and low-demand locomotor A-not-B tasks. In Experiment 1, walking 13-month-old infants followed an indirect path to a goal. In a control condition, infants took a direct route. In Experiment 2, crawling and walking 13-month-old infants crawled through a tunnel to reach a goal at the other end and received the same control condition as in Experiment 1. In both experiments, perseverative errors occurred more often in the high-demand condition than in the low-demand condition. Moreover, in Experiment 2, walkers perseverated more than crawlers, and extent of perseveration was related to infants' locomotor experience. In Experiment 3, the authors addressed a possible confound in Experiment 2 between locomotor expertise and locomotor posture. Novice crawlers perseverated in the difficult tunnels condition, behaving more like novice walkers than expert crawlers. As predicted by a cognitive capacity account of infant perseveration, overtaxed attentional resources resulted in a cognition-action trade-off. Experts who found the task less motorically effortful than novices had more cognitive resources available for problem solving.

  20. What is evolutionary novelty? Process versus character based definitions.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Tim; Müller, Gerd B

    2013-09-01

    With the rise of EvoDevo, the topic of evolutionary novelty has received renewed attention. Indeed, it has been argued that one of the major contributions of EvoDevo to evolutionary theory is the explanation of phenotypic novelty. Despite such assertions, dispute continues over what exactly a novelty is and whether the term applies to a unique type of evolutionary phenomenon or whether it merely has informal meaning. In a recent special issue of J. Exp. Zool. (Mol. Dev. Evol.) dedicated to novelty, a new definition was introduced, linking novelty exclusively with adaptation and developmental constraint. In our commentary, we discuss how defining novelty in this process oriented manner leads to heightened difficulties with the application of the term and the identification of novelties. At the same time it conceals important implications for evolutionary studies. In contrast, we argue for a character based definition that is independent from adaptive necessities and promotes the integration of evolutionary factors not included in the standard theory. The implications of approaching novelty in this manner take the issue beyond definitional debates.

  1. The Novelty Exploration Bonus and Its Attentional Modulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krebs, Ruth M.; Schott, Bjorn H.; Schutze, Hartmut; Duzel, Emrah

    2009-01-01

    We hypothesized that novel stimuli represent salient learning signals that can motivate "exploration" in search for potential rewards. In computational theories of reinforcement learning, this is referred to as the novelty "exploration bonus" for rewards. If true, stimulus novelty should enhance the reward anticipation signals in brain areas that…

  2. Redundancy and Novelty Mining in the Business Blogosphere

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsai, Flora S.; Chan, Kap Luk

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The paper aims to explore the performance of redundancy and novelty mining in the business blogosphere, which has not been studied before. Design/methodology/approach: Novelty mining techniques are implemented to single out novel information out of a massive set of text documents. This paper adopted the mixed metric approach which…

  3. Shifting gears in hippocampus: temporal dissociation between familiarity and novelty signatures in a single event.

    PubMed

    Ben-Yakov, Aya; Rubinson, Mica; Dudai, Yadin

    2014-09-24

    The hippocampus is known to be involved in encoding and retrieval of episodes. However, real-life experiences are expected to involve both encoding and retrieval, and it is unclear how the human hippocampus subserves both functions in the course of a single event. We presented participants with brief movie clips multiple times and examined the effect of familiarity on the hippocampal response at event onset versus event offset. Increased familiarity resulted in a decreased offset response, indicating that the offset response is a novelty-related signature. The magnitude of this offset response was correlated, across hippocampal voxels, with an independent measure of successful encoding, based on nonrepeated clips. This suggests that the attenuated offset response to familiar clips reflects reduced encoding. In addition, the posterior hippocampus exhibited an increased onset response to familiar events, switching from an online familiarity signal to an offline novelty signal during a single event. Moreover, participants with stronger memory exhibited increased reactivation of online activity during familiar events, in line with a retrieval signature. Our results reveal a spatiotemporal dissociation between novelty/encoding and familiarity/retrieval signatures, assumed to reflect different computational modes, in response to the same stimulus.

  4. Tree shrews (Tupaia belangeri) exhibit novelty preference in the novel location memory task with 24-h retention periods.

    PubMed

    Nair, Jayakrishnan; Topka, Marlene; Khani, Abbas; Isenschmid, Manuela; Rainer, Gregor

    2014-01-01

    Novelty preference is pervasive in mammalian species, and describes an inherent tendency to preferentially explore novelty. The novel location memory task studied here assesses the ability of animals to form accurate memories of a spatial configuration, consisting of several identical objects placed within an arena. Tree shrews were first familiarized with a particular object configuration during several sessions, and then an object was displaced during a test session. Tree shrews exhibited enhanced exploration when confronted with this novel configuration. The most reliable indicator associated with novelty preference was an enhancement in directed exploration towards the novel object, although we also observed a non-specific overall increase in exploration in one experiment. During the test session, we also observed an exploration of the location, which had previously been occupied by the displaced object, an effect termed empty quadrant. Our behavioral findings suggest multiple stages of spatial memory formation in tree shrews that are associated with various forms of behavioral responses to novelty. Reduced novelty preference has been linked to major depressive disorder in human patients. Given the established social conflict depression model in tree shrews, we anticipate that the study of the neural circuits of novelty preference and their malfunction during depression may have implications for understanding or treating depression in humans.

  5. Tree shrews (Tupaia belangeri) exhibit novelty preference in the novel location memory task with 24-h retention periods

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Jayakrishnan; Topka, Marlene; Khani, Abbas; Isenschmid, Manuela; Rainer, Gregor

    2014-01-01

    Novelty preference is pervasive in mammalian species, and describes an inherent tendency to preferentially explore novelty. The novel location memory task studied here assesses the ability of animals to form accurate memories of a spatial configuration, consisting of several identical objects placed within an arena. Tree shrews were first familiarized with a particular object configuration during several sessions, and then an object was displaced during a test session. Tree shrews exhibited enhanced exploration when confronted with this novel configuration. The most reliable indicator associated with novelty preference was an enhancement in directed exploration towards the novel object, although we also observed a non-specific overall increase in exploration in one experiment. During the test session, we also observed an exploration of the location, which had previously been occupied by the displaced object, an effect termed empty quadrant. Our behavioral findings suggest multiple stages of spatial memory formation in tree shrews that are associated with various forms of behavioral responses to novelty. Reduced novelty preference has been linked to major depressive disorder in human patients. Given the established social conflict depression model in tree shrews, we anticipate that the study of the neural circuits of novelty preference and their malfunction during depression may have implications for understanding or treating depression in humans. PMID:24782805

  6. Neuronal control of locomotor handedness in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Buchanan, Sean M; Kain, Jamey S; de Bivort, Benjamin L

    2015-05-26

    Genetically identical individuals display variability in their physiology, morphology, and behaviors, even when reared in essentially identical environments, but there is little mechanistic understanding of the basis of such variation. Here, we investigated whether Drosophila melanogaster displays individual-to-individual variation in locomotor behaviors. We developed a new high-throughout platform capable of measuring the exploratory behavior of hundreds of individual flies simultaneously. With this approach, we find that, during exploratory walking, individual flies exhibit significant bias in their left vs. right locomotor choices, with some flies being strongly left biased or right biased. This idiosyncrasy was present in all genotypes examined, including wild-derived populations and inbred isogenic laboratory strains. The biases of individual flies persist for their lifetime and are nonheritable: i.e., mating two left-biased individuals does not yield left-biased progeny. This locomotor handedness is uncorrelated with other asymmetries, such as the handedness of gut twisting, leg-length asymmetry, and wing-folding preference. Using transgenics and mutants, we find that the magnitude of locomotor handedness is under the control of columnar neurons within the central complex, a brain region implicated in motor planning and execution. When these neurons are silenced, exploratory laterality increases, with more extreme leftiness and rightiness. This observation intriguingly implies that the brain may be able to dynamically regulate behavioral individuality.

  7. Neuronal control of locomotor handedness in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Buchanan, Sean M.; Kain, Jamey S.; de Bivort, Benjamin L.

    2015-01-01

    Genetically identical individuals display variability in their physiology, morphology, and behaviors, even when reared in essentially identical environments, but there is little mechanistic understanding of the basis of such variation. Here, we investigated whether Drosophila melanogaster displays individual-to-individual variation in locomotor behaviors. We developed a new high-throughout platform capable of measuring the exploratory behavior of hundreds of individual flies simultaneously. With this approach, we find that, during exploratory walking, individual flies exhibit significant bias in their left vs. right locomotor choices, with some flies being strongly left biased or right biased. This idiosyncrasy was present in all genotypes examined, including wild-derived populations and inbred isogenic laboratory strains. The biases of individual flies persist for their lifetime and are nonheritable: i.e., mating two left-biased individuals does not yield left-biased progeny. This locomotor handedness is uncorrelated with other asymmetries, such as the handedness of gut twisting, leg-length asymmetry, and wing-folding preference. Using transgenics and mutants, we find that the magnitude of locomotor handedness is under the control of columnar neurons within the central complex, a brain region implicated in motor planning and execution. When these neurons are silenced, exploratory laterality increases, with more extreme leftiness and rightiness. This observation intriguingly implies that the brain may be able to dynamically regulate behavioral individuality. PMID:25953337

  8. Locomotor Experience Affects Self and Emotion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Uchiyama, Ichiro; Anderson, David I.; Campos, Joseph J.; Witherington, David; Frankel, Carl B.; Lejeune, Laure; Barbu-Roth, Marianne

    2008-01-01

    Two studies investigated the role of locomotor experience on visual proprioception in 8-month-old infants. "Visual proprioception" refers to the sense of self-motion induced in a static person by patterns of optic flow. A moving room apparatus permitted displacement of an entire enclosure (except for the floor) or the side walls and…

  9. Dopamine transporter regulates the enhancement of novelty processing by a negative emotional context.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Garcia, Manuel; Clemente, Immaculada; Domínguez-Borràs, Judith; Escera, Carles

    2010-04-01

    The dopaminergic (DA) system has been recently related the emotional modulation of cognitive processes. Moreover, patients with midbrain DA depletion, such as Parkinson's Disease (PD), have shown diminished reactivity during unpleasant events. Here, we examined the role of DA in the enhancement of novelty processing during negative emotion. Forty healthy volunteers were genotyped for the dopamine transporter (DAT) gene SLC6A3 or DAT1 and performed an auditory-visual distraction paradigm in negative and neutral emotional context conditions. 9R- individuals, associated to a lesser striatal DA display, failed to show increased distraction during negative emotion, but experienced an enhancement of the early phase of the novelty-P3 brain response, associated to the evaluation of novel events, in the negative relative to the neutral context. However, 9R+ individuals (associated to larger striatal DA display) showed larger distraction during negative emotion and larger amplitudes of the novelty-P3, irrespective of the condition. These results suggest a blunted reactivity to novelty during negative emotion in 9R- individuals due to a lesser DA display and stronger activation of the representation of novel events in the 9R+ group, due to a larger DA availability, thus reaching a ceiling effect in the neutral context condition with no further enhancement during negative emotion. The present results might help to understand the functional implications of dopamine in some neuropsychiatric disorders.

  10. SSUnique: Detecting Sequence Novelty in Microbiome Surveys.

    PubMed

    Lynch, Michael D J; Neufeld, Josh D

    2016-01-01

    High-throughput sequencing of small-subunit (SSU) rRNA genes has revolutionized understanding of microbial communities and facilitated investigations into ecological dynamics at unprecedented scales. Such extensive SSU rRNA gene sequence libraries, constructed from DNA extracts of environmental or host-associated samples, often contain a substantial proportion of unclassified sequences, many representing organisms with novel taxonomy (taxonomic "blind spots") and potentially unique ecology. Indeed, these novel taxonomic lineages are associated with so-called microbial "dark matter," which is the genomic potential of these lineages. Unfortunately, characterization beyond "unclassified" is challenging due to relatively short read lengths and large data set sizes. Here we demonstrate how mining of phylogenetically novel sequences from microbial ecosystems can be automated using SSUnique, a software pipeline that filters unclassified and/or rare operational taxonomic units (OTUs) from 16S rRNA gene sequence libraries by screening against consensus structural models for SSU rRNA. Phylogenetic position is inferred against a reference data set, and additional characterization of novel clades is also included, such as targeted probe/primer design and mining of assembled metagenomes for genomic context. We show how SSUnique reproduced a previous analysis of phylogenetic novelty from an Arctic tundra soil and demonstrate the recovery of highly novel clades from data sets associated with both the Earth Microbiome Project (EMP) and Human Microbiome Project (HMP). We anticipate that SSUnique will add to the expanding computational toolbox supporting high-throughput sequencing approaches for the study of microbial ecology and phylogeny. IMPORTANCE Extensive SSU rRNA gene sequence libraries, constructed from DNA extracts of environmental or host-associated samples, often contain many unclassified sequences, many representing organisms with novel taxonomy (taxonomic "blind spots

  11. SSUnique: Detecting Sequence Novelty in Microbiome Surveys

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT High-throughput sequencing of small-subunit (SSU) rRNA genes has revolutionized understanding of microbial communities and facilitated investigations into ecological dynamics at unprecedented scales. Such extensive SSU rRNA gene sequence libraries, constructed from DNA extracts of environmental or host-associated samples, often contain a substantial proportion of unclassified sequences, many representing organisms with novel taxonomy (taxonomic “blind spots”) and potentially unique ecology. Indeed, these novel taxonomic lineages are associated with so-called microbial “dark matter,” which is the genomic potential of these lineages. Unfortunately, characterization beyond “unclassified” is challenging due to relatively short read lengths and large data set sizes. Here we demonstrate how mining of phylogenetically novel sequences from microbial ecosystems can be automated using SSUnique, a software pipeline that filters unclassified and/or rare operational taxonomic units (OTUs) from 16S rRNA gene sequence libraries by screening against consensus structural models for SSU rRNA. Phylogenetic position is inferred against a reference data set, and additional characterization of novel clades is also included, such as targeted probe/primer design and mining of assembled metagenomes for genomic context. We show how SSUnique reproduced a previous analysis of phylogenetic novelty from an Arctic tundra soil and demonstrate the recovery of highly novel clades from data sets associated with both the Earth Microbiome Project (EMP) and Human Microbiome Project (HMP). We anticipate that SSUnique will add to the expanding computational toolbox supporting high-throughput sequencing approaches for the study of microbial ecology and phylogeny. IMPORTANCE Extensive SSU rRNA gene sequence libraries, constructed from DNA extracts of environmental or host-associated samples, often contain many unclassified sequences, many representing organisms with novel taxonomy

  12. Novelties on amoebiasis: a neglected tropical disease.

    PubMed

    Ximénez, Cecilia; Morán, Patricia; Rojas, Liliana; Valadez, Alicia; Gómez, Alejandro; Ramiro, Manuel; Cerritos, René; González, Enrique; Hernández, Eric; Oswaldo, Partida

    2011-04-01

    In accordance with the 1997 documents of the World Health Organization (WHO), amoebiasis is defined as the infection by the protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica with or without clinical manifestations. The only known natural host of E. histolytica is the human with the large intestine as major target organ. This parasite has a very simple life cycle in which the infective form is the cyst, considered a resistant form of parasite: The asymptomatic cyst passers and the intestinal amoebiasis patients are the transmitters; they excrete cysts in their feces, which can contaminate food and water sources. E. histolytica sensu stricto is the potentially pathogenic species and E. dispar is a commensal non-pathogenic Entamoeba. Both species are biochemical, immunological and genetically distinct. The knowledge of both species with different pathogenic phenotypes comes from a large scientific debate during the second half of the 20(th) century, which gave place to the rapid development of diagnostics technology based on molecular and immunological strategies. During the last ten years, knowledge of the new epidemiology of amoebiasis in different geographic endemic and non-endemic areas has been obtained by applying mostly molecular techniques. In the present work we highlight novelties on human infection and the disease that can help the general physician from both endemic and non-endemic countries in their medical practice, particularly, now that emigration is undoubtedly a global phenomenon that is modifying the previous geography of infectious diseases worldwide.

  13. Novelties on Amoebiasis: A Neglected Tropical Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ximénez, Cecilia; Morán, Patricia; Rojas, Liliana; Valadez, Alicia; Gómez, Alejandro; Ramiro, Manuel; Cerritos, René; González, Enrique; Hernández, Eric; Oswaldo, Partida

    2011-01-01

    In accordance with the 1997 documents of the World Health Organization (WHO), amoebiasis is defined as the infection by the protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica with or without clinical manifestations. The only known natural host of E. histolytica is the human with the large intestine as major target organ. This parasite has a very simple life cycle in which the infective form is the cyst, considered a resistant form of parasite: The asymptomatic cyst passers and the intestinal amoebiasis patients are the transmitters; they excrete cysts in their feces, which can contaminate food and water sources. E. histolytica sensu stricto is the potentially pathogenic species and E. dispar is a commensal non-pathogenic Entamoeba. Both species are biochemical, immunological and genetically distinct. The knowledge of both species with different pathogenic phenotypes comes from a large scientific debate during the second half of the 20th century, which gave place to the rapid development of diagnostics technology based on molecular and immunological strategies. During the last ten years, knowledge of the new epidemiology of amoebiasis in different geographic endemic and non-endemic areas has been obtained by applying mostly molecular techniques. In the present work we highlight novelties on human infection and the disease that can help the general physician from both endemic and non-endemic countries in their medical practice, particularly, now that emigration is undoubtedly a global phenomenon that is modifying the previous geography of infectious diseases worldwide. PMID:21731305

  14. Locomotor Muscle Fatigue Does Not Alter Oxygen Uptake Kinetics during High-Intensity Exercise

    PubMed Central

    Hopker, James G.; Caporaso, Giuseppe; Azzalin, Andrea; Carpenter, Roger; Marcora, Samuele M.

    2016-01-01

    The V˙O2 slow component (V˙O2sc) that develops during high-intensity aerobic exercise is thought to be strongly associated with locomotor muscle fatigue. We sought to experimentally test this hypothesis by pre-fatiguing the locomotor muscles used during subsequent high-intensity cycling exercise. Over two separate visits, eight healthy male participants were asked to either perform a non-metabolically stressful 100 intermittent drop-jumps protocol (pre-fatigue condition) or rest for 33 min (control condition) according to a random and counterbalanced order. Locomotor muscle fatigue was quantified with 6-s maximal sprints at a fixed pedaling cadence of 90 rev·min−1. Oxygen kinetics and other responses (heart rate, capillary blood lactate concentration and rating of perceived exertion, RPE) were measured during two subsequent bouts of 6 min cycling exercise at 50% of the delta between the lactate threshold and V˙O2max determined during a preliminary incremental exercise test. All tests were performed on the same cycle ergometer. Despite significant locomotor muscle fatigue (P = 0.03), the V˙O2sc was not significantly different between the pre-fatigue (464 ± 301 mL·min−1) and the control (556 ± 223 mL·min−1) condition (P = 0.50). Blood lactate response was not significantly different between conditions (P = 0.48) but RPE was significantly higher following the pre-fatiguing exercise protocol compared with the control condition (P < 0.01) suggesting higher muscle recruitment. These results demonstrate experimentally that locomotor muscle fatigue does not significantly alter the V˙O2 kinetic response to high intensity aerobic exercise, and challenge the hypothesis that the V˙O2sc is strongly associated with locomotor muscle fatigue. PMID:27790156

  15. The availability of novelty sweets within high school localities.

    PubMed

    Aljawad, A; Morgan, M Z; Rees, J S; Fairchild, R

    2016-06-10

    Background Reducing sugar consumption is a primary focus of current global public health policy. Achieving 5% of total energy from free sugars will be difficult acknowledging the concentration of free sugars in sugar sweetened beverages, confectionery and as hidden sugars in many savoury items. The expansion of the novelty sweet market in the UK has significant implications for children and young adults as they contribute to dental caries, dental erosion and obesity.Objective To identify the most available types of novelty sweets within the high school fringe in Cardiff, UK and to assess their price range and where and how they were displayed in shops.Subjects and methods Shops within a ten minute walking distance around five purposively selected high schools in the Cardiff aea representing different levels of deprivation were visited. Shops in Cardiff city centre and three supermarkets were also visited to identify the most commonly available novelty sweets.Results The ten most popular novelty sweets identified in these scoping visits were (in descending order): Brain Licker, Push Pop, Juicy Drop, Lickedy Lips, Big Baby Pop, Vimto candy spray, Toxic Waste, Tango candy spray, Brain Blasterz Bitz and Mega Mouth candy spray. Novelty sweets were located on low shelves which were accessible to all age-groups in 73% (14 out of 19) of the shops. Novelty sweets were displayed in the checkout area in 37% (seven out of 19) shops. The price of the top ten novelty sweets ranged from 39p to £1.Conclusion A wide range of acidic and sugary novelty sweets were easily accessible and priced within pocket money range. Those personnel involved in delivering dental and wider health education or health promotion need to be aware of recent developments in children's confectionery. The potential effects of these novelty sweets on both general and dental health require further investigation.

  16. Monitoring Locomotor Load in Soccer: Is Metabolic Power, Powerful?

    PubMed

    Buchheit, M; Manouvrier, C; Cassirame, J; Morin, J-B

    2015-12-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the validity and reliability of metabolic power (P) estimated from locomotor demands during soccer-specific drills. 14 highly-trained soccer players performed a soccer-specific circuit with the ball (3×1-min bouts, interspersed with 30-s passive recovery) on 2 different occasions. Locomotor activity was monitored with 4-Hz GPSs, while oxygen update (VO2) was collected with a portable gas analyzer. P was calculated using either net VO2 responses and traditional calorimetry principles (PVO2, W.kg(-1)) or locomotor demands (PGPS, W.kg(-1)). Distance covered into different speed, acceleration and P zones was recorded. While PGPS was 29±10% lower than PVO2 (d<- 3) during the exercise bouts, it was 85±7% lower (d<- 8) during recovery phases. The typical error between PGPS vs. PVO2 was moderate: 19.8%, 90% confidence limits: (18.4;21.6). The correlation between both estimates of P was small: 0.24 (0.14;0.33). Very large day-to-day variations were observed for acceleration, deceleration and > 20 W.kg(-1) distances (all CVs > 50%), while average Po2 and PGPS showed CVs < 10%. ICC ranged from very low- (acceleration and > 20 W.kg(-1) distances) to-very high (PVO2). PGPS largely underestimates the energy demands of soccer-specific drills, especially during the recovery phases. The poor reliability of PGPS >20 W.kg(-1) questions its value for monitoring purposes in soccer.

  17. Development of a Countermeasure to Mitigate Postflight Locomotor Dysfunction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bloomberg, J. J.; Mulavara, A. P.; Peters, B. T.; Cohen, H. S.; Richards, J. T.; Miller, C. A.; Brady, R.; Warren, L. E.; Ruttley, T. M.

    2006-01-01

    Astronauts returning from space flight experience locomotor dysfunction following their return to Earth. Our laboratory is currently developing a gait adaptability training program that is designed to facilitate recovery of locomotor function following a return to a gravitational environment. The training program exploits the ability of the sensorimotor system to generalize from exposure to multiple adaptive challenges during training so that the gait control system essentially learns to learn and therefore can reorganize more rapidly when faced with a novel adaptive challenge. Evidence for the potential efficacy of an adaptive generalization gait training program can be obtained from numerous studies in the motor learning literature which have demonstrated that systematically varying the conditions of training enhances the ability of the performer to learn and retain a novel motor task. These variable practice training approaches have been used in applied contexts to improve motor skills required in a number of different sports. The central nervous system (CNS) can produce voluntary movement in an almost infinite number of ways. For example, locomotion can be achieved with many different combinations of joint angles, muscle activation patterns and forces. The CNS can exploit these degrees of freedom to enhance motor response adaptability during periods of adaptive flux like that encountered during a change in gravitational environment. Ultimately, the functional goal of an adaptive generalization countermeasure is not necessarily to immediately return movement patterns back to normal. Rather the training regimen should facilitate the reorganization of available sensory and motor subsystems to achieve safe and effective locomotion as soon as possible after long duration space flight. Indeed, this approach has been proposed as a basic feature underlying effective neurological rehabilitation. We have previously confirmed that subjects participating in an adaptive

  18. Novelty, Stress, and Biological Roots in Human Market Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Sarapultsev, Alexey; Sarapultsev, Petr

    2014-01-01

    Although studies examining the biological roots of human behavior have been conducted since the seminal work Kahneman and Tversky, crises and panics have not disappeared. The frequent occurrence of various types of crises has led some economists to the conviction that financial markets occasionally praise irrational judgments and that market crashes cannot be avoided a priori (Sornette 2009; Smith 2004). From a biological point of view, human behaviors are essentially the same during crises accompanied by stock market crashes and during bubble growth when share prices exceed historic highs. During those periods, most market participants see something new for themselves, and this inevitably induces a stress response in them with accompanying changes in their endocrine profiles and motivations. The result is quantitative and qualitative changes in behavior (Zhukov 2007). An underestimation of the role of novelty as a stressor is the primary shortcoming of current approaches for market research. When developing a mathematical market model, it is necessary to account for the biologically determined diphasisms of human behavior in everyday low-stress conditions and in response to stressors. This is the only type of approach that will enable forecasts of market dynamics and investor behaviors under normal conditions as well as during bubbles and panics. PMID:25379268

  19. Novelty, stress, and biological roots in human market behavior.

    PubMed

    Sarapultsev, Alexey; Sarapultsev, Petr

    2014-03-01

    Although studies examining the biological roots of human behavior have been conducted since the seminal work Kahneman and Tversky, crises and panics have not disappeared. The frequent occurrence of various types of crises has led some economists to the conviction that financial markets occasionally praise irrational judgments and that market crashes cannot be avoided a priori (Sornette 2009; Smith 2004). From a biological point of view, human behaviors are essentially the same during crises accompanied by stock market crashes and during bubble growth when share prices exceed historic highs. During those periods, most market participants see something new for themselves, and this inevitably induces a stress response in them with accompanying changes in their endocrine profiles and motivations. The result is quantitative and qualitative changes in behavior (Zhukov 2007). An underestimation of the role of novelty as a stressor is the primary shortcoming of current approaches for market research. When developing a mathematical market model, it is necessary to account for the biologically determined diphasisms of human behavior in everyday low-stress conditions and in response to stressors. This is the only type of approach that will enable forecasts of market dynamics and investor behaviors under normal conditions as well as during bubbles and panics.

  20. Locomotor activity and tissue levels following acute ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Pyrethroids produce neurotoxicity that depends, in part, on the chemical structure. Common behavioral effects include locomotor activity changes and specific toxic syndromes (types I and II). In general these neurobehavioral effects correlate well with peak internal dose metrics. Products of cyhalothrin, a type II pyrethroid, include mixtures of isomers (e.g., λ-cyhalothrin) as well as enriched active isomers (e.g., γ-cyhalothrin). We measured acute changes in locomotor activity in adult male rats and directly correlated these changes to peak brain and plasma concentrations of λ- and γ-cyhalothrin using a within-subject design. One-hour locomotor activity studies were conducted 1.5 h after oral gavage dosing, and immediately thereafter plasma and brains were collected for analyzing tissue levels using LC/MS/MS methods. Both isomers produced dose-related decreases in activity counts, and the effective dose range for γ-cyhalothrin was lower than for λ-cyhalothrin. Doses calculated to decrease activity by 50% were 2-fold lower for the γ-isomer (1.29 mg/kg) compared to λ-cyhalothrin (2.65 mg/kg). Salivation, typical of type II pyrethroids, was also observed at lower doses of γ-cyhalothrin. Administered dose correlated well with brain and plasma concentrations, which furthermore showed good correlations with activity changes. Brain and plasma levels were tightly correlated across doses. While γ-cyhalothrin was 2-fold more potent based on administ

  1. Novelty, conditioning and attentional bias to sexual rewards.

    PubMed

    Banca, Paula; Morris, Laurel S; Mitchell, Simon; Harrison, Neil A; Potenza, Marc N; Voon, Valerie

    2016-01-01

    The Internet provides a large source of novel and rewarding stimuli, particularly with respect to sexually explicit materials. Novelty-seeking and cue-conditioning are fundamental processes underlying preference and approach behaviors implicated in disorders of addiction. Here we examine these processes in individuals with compulsive sexual behaviors (CSB), hypothesizing a greater preference for sexual novelty and stimuli conditioned to sexual rewards relative to healthy volunteers. Twenty-two CSB males and forty age-matched male volunteers were tested in two separate behavioral tasks focusing on preferences for novelty and conditioned stimuli. Twenty subjects from each group were also assessed in a third conditioning and extinction task using functional magnetic resonance imaging. CSB was associated with enhanced novelty preference for sexual, as compared to control images, and a generalized preference for cues conditioned to sexual and monetary versus neutral outcomes compared to healthy volunteers. CSB individuals also had greater dorsal cingulate habituation to repeated sexual versus monetary images with the degree of habituation correlating with enhanced preference for sexual novelty. Approach behaviors to sexually conditioned cues dissociable from novelty preference were associated with an early attentional bias to sexual images. This study shows that CSB individuals have a dysfunctional enhanced preference for sexual novelty possibly mediated by greater cingulate habituation along with a generalized enhancement of conditioning to rewards. We further emphasize a dissociable role for cue-conditioning and novelty preference on the early attentional bias for sexual cues. These findings have wider relevance as the Internet provides a broad range of novel and potentially rewarding stimuli.

  2. Novelty, conditioning and attentional bias to sexual rewards

    PubMed Central

    Banca, Paula; Morris, Laurel S.; Mitchell, Simon; Harrison, Neil A.; Potenza, Marc N.; Voon, Valerie

    2016-01-01

    The Internet provides a large source of novel and rewarding stimuli, particularly with respect to sexually explicit materials. Novelty-seeking and cue-conditioning are fundamental processes underlying preference and approach behaviors implicated in disorders of addiction. Here we examine these processes in individuals with compulsive sexual behaviors (CSB), hypothesizing a greater preference for sexual novelty and stimuli conditioned to sexual rewards relative to healthy volunteers. Twenty-two CSB males and forty age-matched male volunteers were tested in two separate behavioral tasks focusing on preferences for novelty and conditioned stimuli. Twenty subjects from each group were also assessed in a third conditioning and extinction task using functional magnetic resonance imaging. CSB was associated with enhanced novelty preference for sexual, as compared to control images, and a generalized preference for cues conditioned to sexual and monetary versus neutral outcomes compared to healthy volunteers. CSB individuals also had greater dorsal cingulate habituation to repeated sexual versus monetary images with the degree of habituation correlating with enhanced preference for sexual novelty. Approach behaviors to sexually conditioned cues dissociable from novelty preference were associated with an early attentional bias to sexual images. This study shows that CSB individuals have a dysfunctional enhanced preference for sexual novelty possibly mediated by greater cingulate habituation along with a generalized enhancement of conditioning to rewards. We further emphasize a dissociable role for cue-conditioning and novelty preference on the early attentional bias for sexual cues. These findings have wider relevance as the Internet provides a broad range of novel and potentially rewarding stimuli. PMID:26606725

  3. Effect of Environmental Conditions and Toxic Compounds on the Locomotor Activity of Pediculus humanus capitis (Phthiraptera: Pediculidae).

    PubMed

    Ortega-Insaurralde, I; Toloza, A C; Gonzalez-Audino, P; Mougabure-Cueto, G A; Alvarez-Costa, A; Roca-Acevedo, G; Picollo, M I

    2015-09-01

    In this work, we evaluated the effect of environmental variables such as temperature, humidity, and light on the locomotor activity of Pediculus humanus capitis. In addition, we used selected conditions of temperature, humidity, and light to study the effects of cypermethrin and N,N-diethyl-3-methylbenzamide (DEET) on the locomotor activity of head lice. Head lice increased their locomotor activity in an arena at 30°C compared with activity at 20°C. When we tested the influence of the humidity level, the locomotor activity of head lice showed no significant differences related to humidity level, both at 30°C and 20°C. Concerning light influence, we observed that the higher the intensity of light, the slower the movement of head lice. We also demonstrated that sublethal doses of toxics may alter locomotor activity in adults of head lice. Sublethal doses of cypermethrin induced hyperactivated responses in adult head lice. Sublethal doses of DEET evocated hypoactivated responses in head lice. The observation of stereotyped behavior in head lice elicited by toxic compounds proved that measuring locomotor activity in an experimental set-up where environmental conditions are controlled would be appropriate to evaluate compounds of biological importance, such as molecules involved in the host-parasite interaction and intraspecific relationships.

  4. Light pulse duration differentially regulates mouse locomotor suppression and phase shifts.

    PubMed

    Morin, Lawrence P; Studholme, Keith M

    2014-10-01

    Brief exposure of mice to nocturnal light causes circadian rhythm phase shifts, simultaneously inducing locomotor suppression, a drop in body temperature, and associated sleep. The exact nature of the relationship between these light-induced responses is uncertain, although locomotor suppression and phase shift magnitudes are related to stimulus irradiance. Whether stimulus duration has similar effects is less clear. Here, the relationship between stimulus duration and response magnitude was evaluated further using 100 µW/cm(2) white light-emitting diode pulses administered for 30, 300, 1200, or 3000 sec. The results show that, in general, shorter pulses yielded smaller responses and larger pulses yielded larger responses. However, the 300-sec pulse failed to augment locomotor suppression compared with the effect of a 30-sec pulse (44.7 ± 4.8 vs 40.6 ± 2.0 min) but simultaneously induced much larger phase shifts (1.28 ± 0.20 vs 0.52 ± 0.11 h). The larger phase shifts induced by the 300-sec stimulus did not differ from those induced by either the 1200- or 3000-sec pulses (1.43 ± 0.10 and 1.30 ± 0.17 h, respectively). The results demonstrate differential photic regulation of the two response types. Pulses ranging from 300 to 3000 sec produce equal phase shifts (present data); pulses ranging from 30 to 600 sec produce equal locomotor suppression levels. Greater suppression can occur additively in response to pulses of 1200 sec or more (present data), but this is not true for phase shifts. Nocturnal light appears to trigger a fixed duration event, locomotor suppression, or phase shift, with the latter followed by a light-refractory interval during which locomotor suppression can additively increase. The results also provide further support for the view that temporal integration of photic energy applies, at best, across a limited set of stimulus durations for both light-induced locomotor suppression/sleep and phase shift regulation.

  5. The GABAB agonist baclofen blocks the expression of sensitisation to the locomotor stimulant effect of amphetamine.

    PubMed

    Bartoletti, M; Gubellini, C; Ricci, F; Gaiardi, M

    2004-09-01

    The purpose of the present study was to test the possible influence of baclofen, a GABAB agonist, on the long-term sensitisation to amphetamine in rats. As expected, chronic amphetamine treatment (1.5 mg/kg i.p. daily for 10 days) led to an increased locomotor response to amphetamine (0.75 mg/kg i.p.), when the animals were challenged 20 days after the end of repeated treatment. Baclofen (2 mg/kg i.p.), administered before the test session, did not significantly modify the spontaneous locomotor activity of rats, but decreased the normal and, to a greater extent, the sensitised locomotor response to amphetamine; thus baclofen prevented the expression of sensitisation to amphetamine. Moreover a previous chronic treatment with baclofen (2 mg/kg i.p. daily for 10 days) attenuated the amphetamine-induced locomotor activity in sensitised, but not in control animals. This effect was observed 20 days after the last baclofen administration. In conclusion, the present results demonstrate that GABAB receptors play an important role in the expression of the sensitised behavioural response to amphetamine and further support a potential role of GABAB agonists in the treatment of psychostimulant addiction.

  6. Enhancing offspring hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) regulation via systematic novelty exposure: the influence of maternal HPA function.

    PubMed

    Dinces, Sarah M; Romeo, Russell D; McEwen, Bruce S; Tang, Akaysha C

    2014-01-01

    In the rat, repeated brief exposures to novelty early in life can induce long-lasting enhancements in adult cognitive, social, emotional, and neuroendocrine function. Family-to-family variations in these intervention effects on adult offspring are predicted by the mother's ability to mount a rapid corticosterone (CORT) response to the onset of an acute stressor. Here, in Long-Evans rats, we investigated whether neonatal and adulthood novelty exposure, each individually and in combination, can enhance offspring hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) regulation. Using a 2 × 2 within-litter design, one half of each litter were exposed to a relatively novel non-home environment for 3-min (Neo_Novel) daily during infancy (PND 1-21) and the other half of the litter remained in the home cage (Neo_Home); we further exposed half of these two groups to early adulthood (PND 54-63) novelty exposure in an open field and the remaining siblings stayed in their home cages. Two aspects of HPA regulation were assessed: the ability to maintain a low level of resting CORT (CORTB) and the ability to mount a large rapid CORT response (CORTE) to the onset of an acute stressor. Assessment of adult offspring's ability to regulate HPA regulation began at 370 days of age. We further investigated whether the novelty exposure effects on offspring HPA regulation are sensitive to the context of maternal HPA regulation by assessing maternal HPA regulation similarly beginning 7 days after her pups were weaned. We found that at the population level, rats receiving neonatal, but not early adulthood exposure or both, showed a greater rapid CORTE than their home-staying siblings. At the individual family level, these novelty effects are positively associated with maternal CORTE. These results suggest that early experience of novelty can enhance the offspring's ability to mount a rapid response to environmental challenge and the success of such early life intervention is critically dependent upon the

  7. Withdrawal from repeated treatment with amphetamine reduces novelty-seeking behavior and enhances environmental habituation in mice.

    PubMed

    Fukushiro, Daniela F; Mári-Kawamoto, Elisa; Aramini, Tatiana C F; Saito, Luis P; Costa, Jacqueline M; Josino, Fabiana S; Frussa-Filho, Roberto

    2011-11-01

    Anhedonia associated with a dysphoric state is an important feature of amphetamine withdrawal in humans. We aimed to investigate the effects of amphetamine withdrawal on two motivation-related behaviors in mice: novelty seeking and environmental habituation. Because anxiety can interfere with the behavioral outcome of other tasks, amphetamine-withdrawn mice were also evaluated in the elevated plus maze. Swiss male mice (three months old) were treated with 2.0mg/kg amphetamine for 13 days, every other day, in their home cages (a total of seven injections). Twenty-four hours after withdrawal from drug treatment, mice were tested in a free-choice novelty apparatus containing one familiar and one novel compartment or in the elevated plus maze. Novelty-seeking behavior was assessed by comparing the time spent in the novel compartment vs. the familiar compartment, whereas environmental habituation was concomitantly evaluated by the time-response curve of total locomotion (novel+familiar). Novelty seeking was decreased during amphetamine withdrawal, and this result was not associated with changes in the anxiety-like behavior of mice. Additionally, amphetamine withdrawal enhanced environmental habituation. The concomitant decrease in novelty seeking and the increase in environmental habituation seem to be related to amphetamine withdrawal-induced anhedonia. Thus, the model proposed here could be used as a tool for the study of mechanisms and potential treatment of the anhedonic behavioral consequences of psychostimulant withdrawal.

  8. Novelty and Inductive Generalization in Human Reinforcement Learning.

    PubMed

    Gershman, Samuel J; Niv, Yael

    2015-07-01

    In reinforcement learning (RL), a decision maker searching for the most rewarding option is often faced with the question: What is the value of an option that has never been tried before? One way to frame this question is as an inductive problem: How can I generalize my previous experience with one set of options to a novel option? We show how hierarchical Bayesian inference can be used to solve this problem, and we describe an equivalence between the Bayesian model and temporal difference learning algorithms that have been proposed as models of RL in humans and animals. According to our view, the search for the best option is guided by abstract knowledge about the relationships between different options in an environment, resulting in greater search efficiency compared to traditional RL algorithms previously applied to human cognition. In two behavioral experiments, we test several predictions of our model, providing evidence that humans learn and exploit structured inductive knowledge to make predictions about novel options. In light of this model, we suggest a new interpretation of dopaminergic responses to novelty.

  9. Novelty and Inductive Generalization in Human Reinforcement Learning

    PubMed Central

    Gershman, Samuel J.; Niv, Yael

    2015-01-01

    In reinforcement learning, a decision maker searching for the most rewarding option is often faced with the question: what is the value of an option that has never been tried before? One way to frame this question is as an inductive problem: how can I generalize my previous experience with one set of options to a novel option? We show how hierarchical Bayesian inference can be used to solve this problem, and describe an equivalence between the Bayesian model and temporal difference learning algorithms that have been proposed as models of reinforcement learning in humans and animals. According to our view, the search for the best option is guided by abstract knowledge about the relationships between different options in an environment, resulting in greater search efficiency compared to traditional reinforcement learning algorithms previously applied to human cognition. In two behavioral experiments, we test several predictions of our model, providing evidence that humans learn and exploit structured inductive knowledge to make predictions about novel options. In light of this model, we suggest a new interpretation of dopaminergic responses to novelty. PMID:25808176

  10. Novelty-seeking and avoidant coping strategies are associated with academic stress in Korean medical students.

    PubMed

    An, Hoyoung; Chung, Seockhoon; Park, Jangho; Kim, Seong-Yoon; Kim, Kyung Mo; Kim, Ki-Soo

    2012-12-30

    High levels of stress and depression in medical students is raising concern. In this study, we sought to identify coping strategies and other factors influencing academic stress in medical students. We enrolled 157 students from the University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Korea, in November, 2010. We used the Medical Stress Scale, Temperament and Character Inventory, Hamilton Depression Scale, Beck Depression Inventory, and Coping Response Inventory to assess psychological parameters. We used Pearson's correlation and linear regression analyses to analyze the data. Novelty-seeking, self-directedness, cooperativeness, coping strategy, and depression scale scores all correlated significantly with stress level. Linear regression analysis indicated that students who are novelty-seeking, likely to use avoidant coping strategies, and unlikely to use active-cognitive and active-behavioral strategies tend to have higher stress levels. Reduction of stress in medical students may be achieved through evaluation of coping strategies and personality features and use of interventions to promote active coping strategies.

  11. Damage location in an isotropic plate using a vector of novelty indices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mustapha, F.; Manson, G.; Worden, K.; Pierce, S. G.

    2007-05-01

    This paper presents a novel approach to detecting and localising structural defects based on a novelty detection method, outlier analysis (OA), and a multi-layer perceptron (MLP) neural network. In order to assess the effectiveness of the approach, a thin rectangular plate with isotropic behaviour was evaluated experimentally. The scope of this present work also comprises an investigation of the scattering effect of an ultrasonic guided wave on the tested plate under both damaged and undamaged conditions. The wave propagation is sequentially transmitted and captured by 8 PZT patches bonded on the plate, forming a sensor network on the tested isotropic rectangular structure. An in-house 8 channel multiplexer is incorporated in this small scale and low-cost 'structural health monitoring' (SHM) system to effectively swap the PZTs role from sensor to actuator and vice-versa. The 'real-time damage demonstrator' software is primarily developed to acquire and store the waveform responses. These sets of scattering waveform responses representing normal and damage conditions are transformed into a set of novelty indices that ultimately determine the true conditions of the tested structure. The acquired novelty indices representing the available sensor paths are used as the inputs for the neural network incorporating the MLP architecture to compute and predict the damage location in the x and y location on the tested isotopic plate.

  12. Influences of acute ethanol exposure on locomotor activities of zebrafish larvae under different illumination.

    PubMed

    Guo, Ning; Lin, Jia; Peng, Xiaolan; Chen, Haojun; Zhang, Yinglan; Liu, Xiuyun; Li, Qiang

    2015-11-01

    Larval zebrafish present unique opportunities to study the behavioral responses of a model organism to environmental challenges during early developmental stages. The purpose of the current study was to investigate the locomotor activities of AB strain zebrafish larvae at 5 and 7 days post-fertilization (dpf) in response to light changes under the influence of ethanol, and to explore potential neurological mechanisms that are involved in ethanol intoxication. AB strain zebrafish larvae at both 5 and 7 dpf were treated with ethanol at 0% (control), 0.1%, 0.25%, 0.5%, 1%, and 2% (v/v%). The locomotor activities of the larvae during alternating light-dark challenges, as well as the locomotor responses immediately following the light transitions, were investigated. The levels of various neurotransmitters were also measured in selected ethanol-treated groups. The larvae at 5 and 7 dpf demonstrated similar patterns of locomotor responses to ethanol treatment. Ethanol treatment at 1% increased the swimming distances of the zebrafish larvae in the dark periods, but had no effect on the swimming distances in the light periods. In contrast, ethanol treatment at 2% increased the swimming distances in the light periods, but did not potentiate the swimming activity in the dark periods, compared to controls. Differences in the levels of neurotransmitters that are involved in norepinephrine, dopamine, and serotonin pathways were also observed in groups with different ethanol treatments. These results indicated the behavioral studies concerning the ethanol effects on locomotor activities of zebrafish larvae could be carried out as early as 5 dpf. The 1% and 2% ethanol-treated zebrafish larvae modeled ethanol effects at different intoxication states, and the differences in neurotransmitter levels suggested the involvement of various neurotransmitter pathways in different ethanol intoxication states.

  13. Both novelty and expertise increase action observation network activity

    PubMed Central

    Liew, Sook-Lei; Sheng, Tong; Margetis, John L.; Aziz-Zadeh, Lisa

    2013-01-01

    Our experiences with others affect how we perceive their actions. In particular, activity in bilateral premotor and parietal cortices during action observation, collectively known as the action observation network (AON), is modulated by one's expertise with the observed actions or individuals. However, conflicting reports suggest that AON activity is greatest both for familiar and unfamiliar actions. The current study examines the effects of different types and amounts of experience (e.g., visual, interpersonal, personal) on AON activation. fMRI was used to scan 16 healthy participants without prior experience with individuals with amputations (novices), 11 experienced occupational therapists (OTs) who had varying amounts of experience with individuals with amputations, and one individual born with below-elbow residual limbs (participant CJ), as they viewed video clips of goal-matched actions performed by an individual with residual limbs and by an individual with hands. Participants were given increased visual exposure to actions performed by both effectors midway through the scanning procedure. Novices demonstrated a large AON response to the initial viewing of an individual with residual limbs compared to one with hands, but this signal was attenuated after they received visual exposure to both effectors. In contrast, OTs, who had moderate familiarity with residual limbs, demonstrated a lower AON response upon initial viewing—similar to novices after they received visual exposure. At the other extreme, CJ, who has extreme familiarity with residual limbs both visually and motorically, shows a largely increased left-lateralized AON response, exceeding that of novices and experienced OTs, when viewing the residual limb compared to hand actions. These results suggest that a nuanced model of AON engagement is needed to explain how cases of both extreme experience (CJ) and extreme novelty (novices) can result in the greatest AON activity. PMID:24062656

  14. Mephedrone interactions with cocaine: prior exposure to the 'bath salt' constituent enhances cocaine-induced locomotor activation in rats.

    PubMed

    Gregg, Ryan A; Tallarida, Christopher S; Reitz, Allen B; Rawls, Scott M

    2013-12-01

    Concurrent use of mephedrone (4-methylmethcathinone; MEPH) and established drugs of abuse is now commonplace, but knowledge about interactions between these drugs is sparse. The present study was designed to test the hypothesis that prior MEPH exposure enhances the locomotor-stimulant effects of cocaine and methamphetamine (METH). For cocaine experiments, rats pretreated with saline, cocaine (15 mg/kg), or MEPH (15 mg/kg) for 5 days were injected with cocaine after 10 days of drug absence. For METH experiments, rats pretreated with saline, METH (2 mg/kg), or MEPH (15 mg/kg) were injected with METH after 10 days of drug absence. Cocaine challenge produced greater locomotor activity after pretreatment with cocaine or MEPH than after pretreatment with saline. METH challenge produced greater locomotor activity after METH pretreatment than after saline pretreatment; however, locomotor activity in rats pretreated with MEPH or saline and then challenged with METH was not significantly different. The locomotor response to MEPH (15 mg/kg) was not significantly affected by pretreatment with cocaine (15 mg/kg) or METH (0.5, 2 mg/kg). The present demonstration that cocaine-induced locomotor activation is enhanced by prior MEPH exposure suggests that MEPH cross-sensitizes to cocaine and increases cocaine efficacy. Interestingly, MEPH cross-sensitization was not bidirectional and did not extend to METH, suggesting that the phenomenon is sensitive to specific psychostimulants.

  15. Modelling the locomotor energetics of extinct hominids.

    PubMed

    Kramer, P A

    1999-10-01

    Bipedality is the defining characteristic of Hominidae and, as such, an understanding of the adaptive significance and functional implications of bipedality is imperative to any study of human evolution. Hominid bipedality is, presumably, a solution to some problem for the early hominids, one that has much to do with energy expenditure. Until recently, however, little attention could be focused on the quantifiable energetic aspects of bipedality as a unique locomotor form within Primates because of the inability to measure empirically the energy expenditure of non-modern hominids. A recently published method provides a way of circumventing the empirical measurement dilemma by calculating energy expenditure directly from anatomical variables and movement profiles. Although the origins of bipedality remain clouded, two discernible forms of locomotor anatomy are present in the hominid fossil record: the australopithecine and modern configurations. The australopithecine form is best represented by AL 288-1, a partial skeleton of Australopithecus afarensis, and is characterized as having short legs and a wide pelvis. The modern form is represented by modern humans and has long legs and a narrow pelvis. Human walking is optimized to take advantage of the changing levels of potential and kinetic energy that occur as the body and limbs move through the stride cycle. Although this optimization minimizes energy expenditure, some energy is required to maintain motion. I quantify this energy by developing a dynamic model that uses kinematic equations to determine energy expenditure. By representing both configurations with such a model, I can compare their rates of energy expenditure. I find that the australopithecine configuration uses less energy than that of a modern human. Despite arguments presented in the anthropological literature, the shortness of the legs of AL 288-1 provides no evidence that she was burdened with a compromised or transitional locomotor anatomy

  16. The D₂ dopamine receptor and locomotor hyperactivity following bilateral vestibular deafferentation in the rat.

    PubMed

    Stiles, Lucy; Zheng, Yiwen; Darlington, Cynthia L; Smith, Paul F

    2012-02-01

    Rats and mice with bilateral vestibular loss exhibit dramatic locomotor hyperactivity and circling behaviours, which to date cannot be explained. Dysfunction of the striatal dopaminergic system is responsible for a number of known movement disorders and the D(2) dopamine receptor is known to be implicated. Therefore, it is possible that changes in striatal function are responsible for locomotor hyperactivity and circling following bilateral vestibular lesions. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of the D(2) receptor antagonist, eticlopride (0.02, 0.04 and 0.06mg/kg; s.c.), on locomotor behaviour in rats at 5 months following bilateral vestibular deafferentation (BVD), using an open field maze. The levels of the D(2) receptor protein in the striatum were measured at 1 and 6 months post-BVD using western blotting. BVD rats exhibited locomotor hyperactivity and circling, which eticlopride did not eliminate. However, BVD rats did exhibit a decreased response to the inhibitory effect of eticlopride compared to sham controls at the 0.02 mg/kg dose. There were no changes in the amount of the D(2) receptor in the striatum at 1 or 6 months post-BVD; however, D(2) receptor levels were significantly higher on the right side than the left in both sham and BVD animals. These results suggest that locomotor hyperactivity and circling behaviours following BVD are not due simply to changes in D(2) receptor protein expression in the striatum and that other neurophysiological changes in the brain account for these behaviours following BVD.

  17. Novelty and Innovation in the History of Life.

    PubMed

    Erwin, Douglas H

    2015-10-05

    The history of life as documented by the fossil record encompasses evolutionary diversifications at scales ranging from the Ediacaran-Cambrian explosion of animal life and the invasion of land by vascular plants, insects and vertebrates to the diversification of flowering plants over the past 100 million years and the radiation of horses. Morphological novelty and innovation has been a recurrent theme. The architects of the modern synthesis of evolutionary theory made three claims about evolutionary novelty and innovation: first, that all diversifications in the history of life represent adaptive radiations; second, that adaptive radiations are driven principally by ecological opportunity rather than by the supply of new morphological novelties, thus the primary questions about novelty and innovation focus on their ecological and evolutionary success; and third, that the rate of morphological divergence between taxa was more rapid early in the history of a clade but slowed over time as ecological opportunities declined. These claims have strongly influenced subsequent generations of evolutionary biologists, yet over the past two decades each has been challenged by data from the fossil record, by the results of comparative phylogenetic analyses and through insights from evolutionary developmental biology. Consequently a broader view of novelty and innovation is required. An outstanding issue for future work is identifying the circumstances associated with different styles of diversification and whether their frequency has changed through the history of life.

  18. Auditory deviance detection revisited: evidence for a hierarchical novelty system.

    PubMed

    Grimm, Sabine; Escera, Carles

    2012-07-01

    The fast detection of novel or deviant stimuli is a striking property of the auditory processing which reflects basic organizational principles of the auditory system and at the same time is of high practical significance. In human electrophysiology, deviance detection has been related to the occurrence of the mismatch negativity (MMN)--a component of the event-related potential (ERP) evoked 100 to 250 ms after the occurrence of a rare irregular sound. Recently, it has been shown in animal studies that a considerable portion of neurons in the auditory pathway exhibits a property called stimulus-specific adaptation enabling them to encode inter-sound relationships and to discharge at higher rates to rare changes in the acoustic stimulation. These neural responses have been linked to the deviant-evoked potential measured at the human scalp, but such responses occur at lower levels anatomically (e.g. the primary auditory cortex as well as the inferior colliculi) and are elicited earlier (20-30 ms after sound onset) in comparison to MMN. Further, they are not considerable enough in size to be interpreted as a direct neural correlate of the MMN. We review here a series of recent findings that provides a first step toward filling this gap between animal and human recordings by showing that comparably early modulations due to a sound's deviancy can be observed in humans, particularly in the middle-latency portion of the ERP within the first 50 ms after sound onset. The existence of those early indices of deviance detection preceding the well-studied MMN component strongly supports the idea that the encoding of regularities and the detection of violations is a basic principle of human auditory processing acting on multiple levels. This sustains the notion of a hierarchically organized novelty and deviance detection system in the human auditory system.

  19. Competition between novelty and cocaine conditioned reward is sensitive to drug dose and retention interval

    PubMed Central

    Reichel, Carmela M.; Bevins, Rick A.

    2010-01-01

    The following manuscript is the final accepted manuscript. It has not been subjected to the final copyediting, fact-checking, and proofreading required for formal publication. It is not the definitive, publisher-authenticated version. The American Psychological Association and its Council of Editors disclaim any responsibility or liabilities for errors or omissions of this manuscript version, any version derived from this manuscript by NIH, or other third parties. The published version is available at www.apa.org/pubs/journals/bne The conditioned rewarding effects of novelty compete with those of cocaine for control over choice behavior using a place-conditioning task. The purpose of the present study was to use multiple doses of cocaine to determine the extent of this competition and to determine whether novelty's impact on cocaine reward was maintained over an abstinence period. In Experiment 1, rats were conditioned with cocaine (7.5, 20, or 30 mg/kg, IP) to prefer one side of an unbiased place conditioning apparatus relative to the other. In a subsequent phase, all rats received alternating daily confinements to the previously cocaine-paired and unpaired sides of the apparatus. During this phase, half the rats had access to a novel object on their initially unpaired side; the remaining rats did not receive objects. The ability of novelty to compete with cocaine in a drug-free and cocaine-challenge test was sensitive to cocaine dose. In Experiment 2, a place preference was established with 10 mg/kg cocaine and testing occurred after 1, 14, or 28 day retention intervals. Findings indicate that choice behaviors mediated by cocaine conditioning are reduced with the passing of time. Taken together, competition between cocaine and novelty conditioned rewards are sensitive to drug dose and retention interval. PMID:20141289

  20. Voluntary and reactive recruitment of locomotor muscle synergies during perturbed walking.

    PubMed

    Chvatal, Stacie A; Ting, Lena H

    2012-08-29

    The modular control of muscles in groups, often referred to as muscle synergies, has been proposed to provide a motor repertoire of actions for the robust control of movement. However, it is not clear whether muscle synergies identified in one task are also recruited by different neural pathways subserving other motor behaviors. We tested the hypothesis that voluntary and reactive modifications to walking in humans result from the recruitment of locomotor muscle synergies. We recorded the activity of 16 muscles in the right leg as subjects walked a 7.5 m path at two different speeds. To elicit a second motor behavior, midway through the path we imposed ramp and hold translation perturbations of the support surface in each of four cardinal directions. Variations in the temporal recruitment of locomotor muscle synergies could account for cycle-by-cycle variations in muscle activity across strides. Locomotor muscle synergies were also recruited in atypical phases of gait, accounting for both anticipatory gait modifications before perturbations and reactive feedback responses to perturbations. Our findings are consistent with the idea that a common pool of spatially fixed locomotor muscle synergies can be recruited by different neural pathways, including the central pattern generator for walking, brainstem pathways for balance control, and cortical pathways mediating voluntary gait modifications. Together with electrophysiological studies, our work suggests that muscle synergies may provide a library of motor subtasks that can be flexibly recruited by parallel descending pathways to generate a variety of complex natural movements in the upper and lower limbs.

  1. Evaluation of unconditioned novelty-seeking and d-amphetamine-conditioned motivation in mice.

    PubMed

    Laviola, G; Adriani, W

    1998-04-01

    Following repeated association between psychostimulant drugs and a distinct environment, contextual cues acquire the ability to elicit a conditioned approach response. Further, both rats and mice have a natural drive to seek for the experience of novelty, and a previously unknown environment is able to elicit an unconditioned approach response. Both the experience of novelty and amphetamine (AMPH)-conditioned effects have been associated in rodents with the activation of brain meso-limbic dopaminergic pathways. This study assessed the relative strength of AMPH-conditioned and novelty-induced unconditioned motivations in mice. During the pretreatment period, mice were randomly assigned to three different treatment history groups, and received d-AMPH (0, 2, or 10 mg/kg i.p. once/day) injections for 3 days in the presence of a familiar environment. Following a 48-h washout from the last drug injection, animals were placed in the familiar and pretreatment-paired environment and challenged with either SAL (to evaluate conditioning) or a standard AMPH dose (2 mg/kg, to assess either acute drug effects or carryover influences of each animal's treatment history with the same drug). Following the opening of a partition, animals showed both a clear-cut preference for a novel environment as well as a marked novelty-induced hyperactivity. Interestingly, when mice were tested in a drug-free state in this free-choice paradigm, they expressed neither conditioning to the drug-associated environment nor carry-over effects on the novelty-induced hyperactivity profile. On the other hand, mice injected with AMPH showed a mixed profile, with AMPH 2 treatment history mice showing a conditioned preference for the familiar and drug-paired environment, whereas AMPH 10 animals preferred to spend more time in the novel compartment. Both AMPH doses were associated with an increased locomotion, whereas only the AMPH 10 dose resulted in a stereotyped behavioral syndrome, possibly reminiscent of

  2. Locomotor Behaviour of Blattella germanica Modified by DEET

    PubMed Central

    Sfara, Valeria; Mougabure-Cueto, Gastón A.; Zerba, Eduardo N.; Alzogaray, Raúl A.

    2013-01-01

    N,N-diethyl-3-methylbenzamide (DEET) is the active principle of most insect repellents used worldwide. However, its toxicity on insects has not been widely studied. The aim of this work is to study the effects of DEET on the locomotor activity of Blattella germanica. DEET has a dose-dependent repellent activity on B. germanica. Locomotor activity was significantly lower when insects were pre-exposed to 700 µg/cm2 of DEET for 20 or 30 minutes, but it did not change when pre-exposure was shorter. Locomotor activity of insects that were pre-exposed to 2.000 µg/cm2 of DEET for 10 minutes was significantly lower than the movement registered in controls. No differences were observed when insects were pre-exposed to lower concentrations of DEET. A 30-minute pre-exposure to 700 µg/cm2 of DEET caused a significant decrease in locomotor activity. Movement was totally recovered 24 h later. The locomotor activity measured during the exposure to different concentrations of DEET remained unchanged. Insects with decreased locomotor activity were repelled to the same extent than control insects by the same concentration of DEET. We demonstrated that the repellency and modification of locomotor activity elicited by DEET are non-associated phenomena. We also suggested that the reduction in locomotor activity indicates toxicity of DEET, probably to insect nervous system. PMID:24376701

  3. Locomotor behaviour of Blattella germanica modified by DEET.

    PubMed

    Sfara, Valeria; Mougabure-Cueto, Gastón A; Zerba, Eduardo N; Alzogaray, Raúl A

    2013-01-01

    N,N-diethyl-3-methylbenzamide (DEET) is the active principle of most insect repellents used worldwide. However, its toxicity on insects has not been widely studied. The aim of this work is to study the effects of DEET on the locomotor activity of Blattella germanica. DEET has a dose-dependent repellent activity on B. germanica. Locomotor activity was significantly lower when insects were pre-exposed to 700 µg/cm(2) of DEET for 20 or 30 minutes, but it did not change when pre-exposure was shorter. Locomotor activity of insects that were pre-exposed to 2.000 µg/cm(2) of DEET for 10 minutes was significantly lower than the movement registered in controls. No differences were observed when insects were pre-exposed to lower concentrations of DEET. A 30-minute pre-exposure to 700 µg/cm(2) of DEET caused a significant decrease in locomotor activity. Movement was totally recovered 24 h later. The locomotor activity measured during the exposure to different concentrations of DEET remained unchanged. Insects with decreased locomotor activity were repelled to the same extent than control insects by the same concentration of DEET. We demonstrated that the repellency and modification of locomotor activity elicited by DEET are non-associated phenomena. We also suggested that the reduction in locomotor activity indicates toxicity of DEET, probably to insect nervous system.

  4. Infants prefer the faces of strangers or mothers to morphed faces: an uncanny valley between social novelty and familiarity.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Yoshi-Taka; Okamoto, Yoko; Ida, Misako; Okanoya, Kazuo; Myowa-Yamakoshi, Masako

    2012-10-23

    The 'uncanny valley' response is a phenomenon involving the elicitation of a negative feeling and subsequent avoidant behaviour in human adults and infants as a result of viewing very realistic human-like robots or computer avatars. It is hypothesized that this uncanny feeling occurs because the realistic synthetic characters elicit the concept of 'human' but fail to satisfy it. Such violations of our normal expectations regarding social signals generate a feeling of unease. This conflict-induced uncanny valley between mutually exclusive categories (human and synthetic agent) raises a new question: could an uncanny feeling be elicited by other mutually exclusive categories, such as familiarity and novelty? Given that infants prefer both familiarity and novelty in social objects, we address this question as well as the associated developmental profile. Using the morphing technique and a preferential-looking paradigm, we demonstrated uncanny valley responses of infants to faces of mothers (i.e. familiarity) and strangers (i.e. novelty). Furthermore, this effect strengthened with the infant's age. We excluded the possibility that infants detect and avoid traces of morphing. This conclusion follows from our finding that the infants equally preferred strangers' faces and the morphed faces of two strangers. These results indicate that an uncanny valley between familiarity and novelty may accentuate the categorical perception of familiar and novel objects.

  5. Melatonin and locomotor activity in the fiddler crab Uca pugilator.

    PubMed

    Tilden, Andrea R; Shanahan, J Kearney; Khilji, Zahra S; Owen, Jeffrey G; Sterio, Thomas W; Thurston, Kristy T

    2003-05-01

    The influence of melatonin on locomotor activity levels was measured in the fiddler crab Uca pugilator. First, activity in untreated, laboratory-acclimated crabs was measured over 48 hours in a 12L:12D photoperiod; this study showed a nocturnal increase in activity. In eyestalk-ablated crabs, overall activity was significantly reduced, and no significant activity pattern occurred. Next, crabs were injected with melatonin or saline (controls) at various times during the 12L:12D photoperiod (0900h, 1200h, and twice at 2100h; each trial was separated by 3-4 days) and monitored for 3 hr post-injection. Control crabs had low activity during early photophase, high at mid-photophase, increasing activity during the first scotophase trial, and decreasing activity during the second scotophase trial. Melatonin had no significant influence on activity when injected during the early-photophase activity trough or early-scotophase activity decline, but significantly increased activity when injected during the mid-photophase activity peak and early-scotophase activity incline. Next, crabs were injected during an early scotophase activity trough and monitored throughout the twelve-hour scotophase. Melatonin did not increase activity until the mid-scotophase activity increase, approximately 6 hours later, showing that the pharmacological dosage persisted in the crabs' systems and had later effects during the incline and peak of activity but not the trough. Eyestalk-ablated crabs were injected with melatonin or saline during early photo- and scotophase. Melatonin significantly increased activity in the photophase but not the scotophase trial, indicating that the responsiveness to melatonin continues following eyestalk removal, but the timing may not match that of intact crabs. Melatonin may be involved in the transmission of environmental timing information from the eyestalks to locomotor centers in U. pugilator.

  6. A silent synapse-based mechanism for cocaine-induced locomotor sensitization.

    PubMed

    Brown, Travis E; Lee, Brian R; Mu, Ping; Ferguson, Deveroux; Dietz, David; Ohnishi, Yoshinori N; Lin, Ying; Suska, Anna; Ishikawa, Masago; Huang, Yanhua H; Shen, Haowei; Kalivas, Peter W; Sorg, Barbara A; Zukin, R Suzanne; Nestler, Eric J; Dong, Yan; Schlüter, Oliver M

    2011-06-01

    Locomotor sensitization is a common and robust behavioral alteration in rodents whereby following exposure to abused drugs such as cocaine, the animal becomes significantly more hyperactive in response to an acute drug challenge. Here, we further analyzed the role of cocaine-induced silent synapses in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) shell and their contribution to the development of locomotor sensitization. Using a combination of viral vector-mediated genetic manipulations, biochemistry, and electrophysiology in a locomotor sensitization paradigm with repeated, daily, noncontingent cocaine (15 mg/kg) injections, we show that dominant-negative cAMP-element binding protein (CREB) prevents cocaine-induced generation of silent synapses of young (30 d old) rats, whereas constitutively active CREB is sufficient to increase the number of NR2B-containing NMDA receptors (NMDARs) at synapses and to generate silent synapses. We further show that occupancy of CREB at the NR2B promoter increases and is causally related to the increase in synaptic NR2B levels. Blockade of NR2B-containing NMDARs by administration of the NR2B-selective antagonist Ro256981 directly into the NAc, under conditions that inhibit cocaine-induced silent synapses, prevents the development of cocaine-elicited locomotor sensitization. Our data are consistent with a cellular cascade whereby cocaine-induced activation of CREB promotes CREB-dependent transcription of NR2B and synaptic incorporation of NR2B-containing NMDARs, which generates new silent synapses within the NAc. We propose that cocaine-induced activation of CREB and generation of new silent synapses may serve as key cellular events mediating cocaine-induced locomotor sensitization. These findings provide a novel cellular mechanism that may contribute to cocaine-induced behavioral alterations.

  7. Locomotor training: experiencing the changing body.

    PubMed

    Hannold, Elizabeth M; Young, Mary Ellen; Rittman, Maude R; Bowden, Mark G; Behrman, Andrea L

    2006-01-01

    This study examined the experiences of persons with incomplete spinal cord injury who participated in loco-motor training (LT). LT is an emerging rehabilitation intervention for enhancing the recovery of walking in persons with central nervous system disorders. Multiple interviews and field observations provided data from eight participants, including four veterans. Findings indicate that experiences of bodily changes were prevalent among participants. Themes included (1) experiencing impaired or absent proprioception, (2) struggling for bodily control, and (3) experiencing emergent bodily sensations. Themes 1 and 2 reflected bodily disruption as a result of spinal cord injury and were challenging to participants as they attempted to reconnect the body and self through LT. Theme 3 reflected bodily sensations (burning, soreness) that were seen as positive signs of recovery and resulted in hope and motivation. Understanding how LT participants experience bodily changes may enable therapists to develop improved participant-centered intervention approaches.

  8. Secondary contact seeds phenotypic novelty in cichlid fishes.

    PubMed

    Nichols, Paul; Genner, Martin J; van Oosterhout, Cock; Smith, Alan; Parsons, Paul; Sungani, Harold; Swanstrom, Jennifer; Joyce, Domino A

    2015-01-07

    Theory proposes that genomic admixture between formerly reproductively isolated populations can generate phenotypic novelty for selection to act upon. Secondary contact may therefore be a significant promoter of phenotypic novelty that allows species to overcome environmental challenges and adapt to novel environments, including during adaptive radiation. To date, this has largely been considered from the perspective of interspecific hybridization at contact zones. However, it is also possible that this process occurs more commonly between natural populations of a single species, and thus its importance in adaptive evolution may have been underestimated. In this study, we tested the consequences of genomic introgression during apparent secondary contact between phenotypically similar lineages of the riverine cichlid fish Astatotilapia calliptera. We provide population genetic evidence of a secondary contact zone in the wild, and then demonstrate using mate-choice experiments that both lineages can reproduce together successfully in laboratory conditions. Finally, we show that genomically admixed individuals display extreme phenotypes not observed in the parental lineages. Collectively, the evidence shows that secondary contact can drive the evolution of phenotypic novelty, suggesting that pulses of secondary contact may repeatedly seed genetic novelty, which when coupled with ecological opportunity could promote rapid adaptive evolution in natural circumstances.

  9. THE INFLUENCE OF NOVELTY EFFECT UPON TEACHING MACHINE LEARNING.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    POPHAM, W. JAMES

    THE EXPERIMENT PROPOSED IN THIS STUDY WAS TO SUPPLY EVIDENCE RELEVANT TO THE QUESTION OF HOW MUCH INFLUENCE, IF ANY, A POSTULATED NOVELTY EFFECT WOULD HAVE UPON THE EFFECTIVENESS OF LEARNING IN A SELF-INSTRUCTIONAL SITUATION. THE HYPOTHESIS WAS--THERE WILL BE NO SIGNIFICANT DIFFERENCES IN ACHIEVEMENT OF TWO COMPARABLE GROUPS OF ELEMENTARY PUPILS…

  10. Secondary contact seeds phenotypic novelty in cichlid fishes

    PubMed Central

    Nichols, Paul; Genner, Martin J.; van Oosterhout, Cock; Smith, Alan; Parsons, Paul; Sungani, Harold; Swanstrom, Jennifer; Joyce, Domino A.

    2015-01-01

    Theory proposes that genomic admixture between formerly reproductively isolated populations can generate phenotypic novelty for selection to act upon. Secondary contact may therefore be a significant promoter of phenotypic novelty that allows species to overcome environmental challenges and adapt to novel environments, including during adaptive radiation. To date, this has largely been considered from the perspective of interspecific hybridization at contact zones. However, it is also possible that this process occurs more commonly between natural populations of a single species, and thus its importance in adaptive evolution may have been underestimated. In this study, we tested the consequences of genomic introgression during apparent secondary contact between phenotypically similar lineages of the riverine cichlid fish Astatotilapia calliptera. We provide population genetic evidence of a secondary contact zone in the wild, and then demonstrate using mate-choice experiments that both lineages can reproduce together successfully in laboratory conditions. Finally, we show that genomically admixed individuals display extreme phenotypes not observed in the parental lineages. Collectively, the evidence shows that secondary contact can drive the evolution of phenotypic novelty, suggesting that pulses of secondary contact may repeatedly seed genetic novelty, which when coupled with ecological opportunity could promote rapid adaptive evolution in natural circumstances. PMID:25392475

  11. Emergent Novelties in the Mentality of Dizygotic Twins.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bierschenk, Bernhard

    Scanator is an extremely valuable tool in the functional analysis of qualitative stability in text building behavior during writing. Scanator also allows for a detailed investigation of subtle changes emerging in the structural relations of emergent novelties. This study focused on the extension of the application of Scanator to one pair of…

  12. High novelty-seeking rats are resilient to negative physiological effects of the early life stress.

    PubMed

    Clinton, Sarah M; Watson, Stanley J; Akil, Huda

    2014-01-01

    Exposure to early life stress dramatically impacts adult behavior, physiology, and neuroendocrine function. Using rats bred for novelty-seeking differences and known to display divergent anxiety, depression, and stress vulnerability, we examined the interaction between early life adversity and genetic predisposition for high- versus low-emotional reactivity. Thus, bred Low Novelty Responder (bLR) rats, which naturally exhibit high anxiety- and depression-like behavior, and bred High Novelty Responder (bHR) rats, which show low anxiety/depression together with elevated aggression, impulsivity, and addictive behavior, were subjected to daily 3 h maternal separation (MS) stress postnatal days 1-14. We hypothesized that MS stress would differentially impact adult bHR/bLR behavior, physiology (stress-induced defecation), and neuroendocrine reactivity. While MS stress did not impact bHR and bLR anxiety-like behavior in the open field test and elevated plus maze, it exacerbated bLRs' already high physiological response to stress - stress-induced defecation. In both tests, MS bLR adult offspring showed exaggerated stress-induced defecation compared to bLR controls while bHR offspring were unaffected. MS also selectively impacted bLRs' (but not bHRs') neuroendocrine stress reactivity, producing an exaggerated corticosterone acute stress response in MS bLR versus control bLR rats. These findings highlight how genetic predisposition shapes individuals' response to early life stress. Future work will explore neural mechanisms underlying the distinct behavioral and neuroendocrine consequences of MS in bHR/bLR animals.

  13. Aesthetic Emotions and Aesthetic People: Openness Predicts Sensitivity to Novelty in the Experiences of Interest and Pleasure

    PubMed Central

    Fayn, Kirill; MacCann, Carolyn; Tiliopoulos, Niko; Silvia, Paul J.

    2015-01-01

    There is a stable relationship between the Openness/Intellect domain of personality and aesthetic engagement. However, neither of these are simple constructs and while the relationship exists, process based evidence explaining the relationship is still lacking. This research sought to clarify the relationship by evaluating the influence of the Openness and Intellect aspects on several different aesthetic emotions. Two studies looked at the between- and within-person differences in arousal and the emotions of interest, pleasure and confusion in response to visual art. The results suggest that Openness, as opposed to Intellect, was predictive of greater arousal, interest and pleasure, while both aspects explained less confusion. Differences in Openness were associated with within-person emotion appraisal contingencies, particularly greater novelty-interest and novelty-pleasure relationships. Those higher in Openness were particularly influenced by novelty in artworks. For pleasure this relationship suggested a different qualitative structure of appraisals. The appraisal of novelty is part of the experience of pleasure for those high in Openness, but not those low in Openness. This research supports the utility of studying Openness and Intellect as separate aspects of the broad domain and clarifies the relationship between Openness and aesthetic states in terms of within-person appraisal processes. PMID:26696940

  14. Aesthetic Emotions and Aesthetic People: Openness Predicts Sensitivity to Novelty in the Experiences of Interest and Pleasure.

    PubMed

    Fayn, Kirill; MacCann, Carolyn; Tiliopoulos, Niko; Silvia, Paul J

    2015-01-01

    There is a stable relationship between the Openness/Intellect domain of personality and aesthetic engagement. However, neither of these are simple constructs and while the relationship exists, process based evidence explaining the relationship is still lacking. This research sought to clarify the relationship by evaluating the influence of the Openness and Intellect aspects on several different aesthetic emotions. Two studies looked at the between- and within-person differences in arousal and the emotions of interest, pleasure and confusion in response to visual art. The results suggest that Openness, as opposed to Intellect, was predictive of greater arousal, interest and pleasure, while both aspects explained less confusion. Differences in Openness were associated with within-person emotion appraisal contingencies, particularly greater novelty-interest and novelty-pleasure relationships. Those higher in Openness were particularly influenced by novelty in artworks. For pleasure this relationship suggested a different qualitative structure of appraisals. The appraisal of novelty is part of the experience of pleasure for those high in Openness, but not those low in Openness. This research supports the utility of studying Openness and Intellect as separate aspects of the broad domain and clarifies the relationship between Openness and aesthetic states in terms of within-person appraisal processes.

  15. Nucleus accumbens cocaine-amphetamine regulated transcript mediates food intake during novelty conflict.

    PubMed

    Burghardt, P R; Krolewski, D M; Dykhuis, K E; Ching, J; Pinawin, A M; Britton, S L; Koch, L G; Watson, S J; Akil, H

    2016-05-01

    Obesity is a persistent and pervasive problem, particularly in industrialized nations. It has come to be appreciated that the metabolic health of an individual can influence brain function and subsequent behavioral patterns. To examine the relationship between metabolic phenotype and central systems that regulate behavior, we tested rats with divergent metabolic phenotypes (Low Capacity Runner: LCR vs. High Capacity Runner: HCR) for behavioral responses to the conflict between hunger and environmental novelty using the novelty suppressed feeding (NSF) paradigm. Additionally, we measured expression of mRNA, for peptides involved in energy management, in response to fasting. Following a 24-h fast, LCR rats showed lower latencies to begin eating in a novel environment compared to HCR rats. A 48-h fast equilibrated the latency to begin eating in the novel environment. A 24-h fast differentially affected expression of cocaine-amphetamine regulated transcript (CART) mRNA in the nucleus accumbens (NAc), where 24-h of fasting reduced CART mRNA in LCR rats. Bilateral microinjections of CART 55-102 peptide into the NAc increased the latency to begin eating in the NSF paradigm following a 24-h fast in LCR rats. These results indicate that metabolic phenotype influences how animals cope with the conflict between hunger and novelty, and that these differences are at least partially mediated by CART signaling in the NAc. For individuals with poor metabolic health who have to navigate food-rich and stressful environments, changes in central systems that mediate conflicting drives may feed into the rates of obesity and exacerbate the difficulty individuals have in maintaining weight loss.

  16. Evidence That GABA Mediates Dopaminergic and Serotonergic Pathways Associated with Locomotor Activity in Juvenile Chinook Salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clements, S.; Schreck, C.B.

    2004-01-01

    The authors examined the control of locomotor activity in juvenile salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) by manipulating 3 neurotransmitter systems-gamma-amino-n-butyric acid (GABA), dopamine, and serotonin-as well as the neuropeptide corticotropin releasing hormone (CRH). Intracerebroventricular (ICV) injections of CRH and the GABAAagonist muscimol stimulated locomotor activity. The effect of muscimol was attenuated by administration of a dopamine receptor antagonist, haloperidol. Conversely, the administration of a dopamine uptake inhibitor (4???,4??? -difluoro-3-alpha-[diphenylmethoxy] tropane hydrochloride [DUI]) potentiated the effect of muscimol. They found no evidence that CRH-induced hyperactivity is mediated by dopaminergic systems following concurrent injections of haloperidol or DUI with CRH. Administration of muscimol either had no effect or attenuated the locomotor response to concurrent injections of CRH and fluoxetine, whereas the GABAA antagonist bicuculline methiodide potentiated the effect of CRH and fluoxetine.

  17. Something Old, Something New: A Developmental Transition from Familiarity to Novelty Preferences with Hidden Objects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shinskey, Jeanne L.; Munakata, Yuko

    2010-01-01

    Novelty seeking is viewed as adaptive, and novelty preferences in infancy predict cognitive performance into adulthood. Yet 7-month-olds prefer familiar stimuli to novel ones when searching for hidden objects, in contrast to their strong novelty preferences with visible objects (Shinskey & Munakata, 2005). According to a graded representations…

  18. Evidence for a Role of Orexin/Hypocretin System in Vestibular Lesion-Induced Locomotor Abnormalities in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Leilei; Qi, Ruirui; Wang, Junqin; Zhou, Wei; Liu, Jiluo; Cai, Yiling

    2016-01-01

    Vestibular damage can induce locomotor abnormalities in both animals and humans. Rodents with bilateral vestibular loss showed vestibular deficits syndrome such as circling, opisthotonus as well as locomotor and exploratory hyperactivity. Previous studies have investigated the changes in the dopamine system after vestibular loss, but the results are inconsistent and inconclusive. Numerous evidences indicate that the orexin system is implicated in central motor control. We hypothesized that orexin may be potentially involved in vestibular loss-induced motor disorders. In this study, we examined the effects of arsanilate- or 3,3′-iminodipropionitrile (IDPN)-induced vestibular lesion (AVL or IVL) on the orexin-A (OXA) labeling in rat hypothalamus using immunohistochemistry. The vestibular lesion-induced locomotor abnormalities were recorded and verified using a histamine H4 receptor antagonist JNJ7777120 (20 mg/kg, i.p.). The effects of the orexin receptor type 1 antagonist SB334867 (16 μg, i.c.v.) on these behavior responses were also investigated. At 72 h post-AVL and IVL, animals exhibited vestibular deficit syndrome and locomotor hyperactivity in the home cages. These responses were significantly alleviated by JNJ7777120 which also eliminated AVL-induced increases in exploratory behavior in an open field. The numbers of OXA-labeled neurons in the hypothalamus were significantly increased in the AVL animals at 72 h post-AVL and in the IVL animals at 24, 48, and 72 h post-IVL. SB334867 significantly attenuated the vestibular deficit syndrome and locomotor hyperactivity at 72 h post-AVL and IVL. It also decreased exploratory behavior in the AVL animals. These results suggested that the alteration of OXA expression might contribute to locomotor abnormalities after acute vestibular lesion. The orexin receptors might be the potential therapeutic targets for vestibular disorders. PMID:27507932

  19. Semi-Supervised Eigenbasis Novelty Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagstaff, Kiri L.; Thompson, David R.

    2013-01-01

    Recent discoveries in high-time-resolution radio astronomy data have focused attention on a new class of events. Fast transients are rare pulses of radio frequency energy lasting from microseconds to seconds that might be produced by a variety of exotic astrophysical phenomena. For example, X-ray bursts, neutron stars, and active galactic nuclei are all possible sources of short-duration, transient radio signals. It is difficult to anticipate where such signals might appear, and they are most commonly discovered through analysis of high-time- resolution data that had been collected for other purposes. Transients are often faint and difficult to detect, so improved detection algorithms can directly benefit the science yield of all such commensal monitoring. A new detection algorithm learns a low-dimensional linear manifold for describing the normal data. High reconstruction error indicates a novel signal that does not match the patterns of normal data. One unsupervised portion of the manifold model adapts its representation in response to recent data. A second supervised portion of the model is made of a basis trained in advance using labeled examples of RFI; this prevents false positives due to these events. For a linear model, an orthonormalization operation is used to combine these bases prior to the anomaly detection decision. Another novel aspect of the approach lies in combining basis vectors learned in an unsupervised, online fashion from the data stream with supervised basis vectors learned in advance from known examples of false alarms. Adaptive, data-driven detection is achieved that is also informed by existing domain knowledge about signals that may be statistically anomalous, but are not interesting and should therefore be ignored. The method was evaluated using data from the Parkes Multibeam Survey. This data set was originally collected to search for pulsars, which are astronomical sources that emit radio pulses at regular periods. However, several

  20. Spinocerebellar ataxia type 13 mutant potassium channel alters neuronal excitability and causes locomotor deficits in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Issa, Fadi A; Mazzochi, Christopher; Mock, Allan F; Papazian, Diane M

    2011-05-04

    Whether changes in neuronal excitability can cause neurodegenerative disease in the absence of other factors such as protein aggregation is unknown. Mutations in the Kv3.3 voltage-gated K(+) channel cause spinocerebellar ataxia type 13 (SCA13), a human autosomal-dominant disease characterized by locomotor impairment and the death of cerebellar neurons. Kv3.3 channels facilitate repetitive, high-frequency firing of action potentials, suggesting that pathogenesis in SCA13 is triggered by changes in electrical activity in neurons. To investigate whether SCA13 mutations alter excitability in vivo, we expressed the human dominant-negative R420H mutant subunit in zebrafish. The disease-causing mutation specifically suppressed the excitability of Kv3.3-expressing, fast-spiking motor neurons during evoked firing and fictive swimming and, in parallel, decreased the precision and amplitude of the startle response. The dominant-negative effect of the mutant subunit on K(+) current amplitude was directly responsible for the reduced excitability and locomotor phenotype. Our data provide strong evidence that changes in excitability initiate pathogenesis in SCA13 and establish zebrafish as an excellent model system for investigating how changes in neuronal activity impair locomotor control and cause cell death.

  1. Locomotor training alters the behavior of flexor reflexes during walking in human spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Smith, Andrew C; Mummidisetty, Chaithanya K; Rymer, William Zev; Knikou, Maria

    2014-11-01

    In humans, a chronic spinal cord injury (SCI) impairs the excitability of pathways mediating early flexor reflexes and increases the excitability of late, long-lasting flexor reflexes. We hypothesized that in individuals with SCI, locomotor training will alter the behavior of these spinally mediated reflexes. Nine individuals who had either chronic clinically motor complete or incomplete SCI received an average of 44 locomotor training sessions. Flexor reflexes, elicited via sural nerve stimulation of the right or left leg, were recorded from the ipsilateral tibialis anterior (TA) muscle before and after body weight support (BWS)-assisted treadmill training. The modulation pattern of the ipsilateral TA responses following innocuous stimulation of the right foot was also recorded in 10 healthy subjects while they stepped at 25% BWS to investigate whether body unloading during walking affects the behavior of these responses. Healthy subjects did not receive treadmill training. We observed a phase-dependent modulation of early TA flexor reflexes in healthy subjects with reduced body weight during walking. The early TA flexor reflexes were increased at heel contact, progressively decreased during the stance phase, and then increased throughout the swing phase. In individuals with SCI, locomotor training induced the reappearance of early TA flexor reflexes and changed the amplitude of late TA flexor reflexes during walking. Both early and late TA flexor reflexes were modulated in a phase-dependent pattern after training. These new findings support the adaptive capability of the injured nervous system to return to a prelesion excitability and integration state.

  2. Insulin-Dependent Activation of MCH Neurons Impairs Locomotor Activity and Insulin Sensitivity in Obesity.

    PubMed

    Hausen, A Christine; Ruud, Johan; Jiang, Hong; Hess, Simon; Varbanov, Hristo; Kloppenburg, Peter; Brüning, Jens C

    2016-12-06

    Melanin-concentrating-hormone (MCH)-expressing neurons (MCH neurons) in the lateral hypothalamus (LH) are critical regulators of energy and glucose homeostasis. Here, we demonstrate that insulin increases the excitability of these neurons in control mice. In vivo, insulin promotes phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) signaling in MCH neurons, and cell-type-specific deletion of the insulin receptor (IR) abrogates this response. While lean mice lacking the IR in MCH neurons (IR(ΔMCH)) exhibit no detectable metabolic phenotype under normal diet feeding, they present with improved locomotor activity and insulin sensitivity under high-fat-diet-fed, obese conditions. Similarly, obesity promotes PI3 kinase signaling in these neurons, and this response is abrogated in IR(ΔMCH) mice. In turn, acute chemogenetic activation of MCH neurons impairs locomotor activity but not insulin sensitivity. Collectively, our experiments reveal an insulin-dependent activation of MCH neurons in obesity, which contributes via distinct mechanisms to the manifestation of impaired locomotor activity and insulin resistance.

  3. Dynamic Locomotor Capabilities Revealed by Early Dinosaur Trackmakers from Southern Africa

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Jeffrey A.; Marsicano, Claudia A.; Smith, Roger M. H.

    2009-01-01

    Background A new investigation of the sedimentology and ichnology of the Early Jurassic Moyeni tracksite in Lesotho, southern Africa has yielded new insights into the behavior and locomotor dynamics of early dinosaurs. Methodology/Principal Findings The tracksite is an ancient point bar preserving a heterogeneous substrate of varied consistency and inclination that includes a ripple-marked riverbed, a bar slope, and a stable algal-matted bar top surface. Several basal ornithischian dinosaurs and a single theropod dinosaur crossed its surface within days or perhaps weeks of one another, but responded to substrate heterogeneity differently. Whereas the theropod trackmaker accommodated sloping and slippery surfaces by gripping the substrate with its pedal claws, the basal ornithischian trackmakers adjusted to the terrain by changing between quadrupedal and bipedal stance, wide and narrow gauge limb support (abduction range = 31°), and plantigrade and digitigrade foot posture. Conclusions/Significance The locomotor adjustments coincide with changes in substrate consistency along the trackway and appear to reflect ‘real time’ responses to a complex terrain. It is proposed that these responses foreshadow important locomotor transformations characterizing the later evolution of the two main dinosaur lineages. Ornithischians, which shifted from bipedal to quadrupedal posture at least three times in their evolutionary history, are shown to have been capable of adopting both postures early in their evolutionary history. The substrate-gripping behavior demonstrated by the early theropod, in turn, is consistent with the hypothesized function of pedal claws in bird ancestors. PMID:19806213

  4. NOVELTY DETECTION USING AUTO-ASSOCIATIVE NEURAL NETWORK

    SciTech Connect

    H. SOHN; K. WORDEN; C. FARRAR

    2001-05-01

    The primary objective of novelty detection is to examine if a system significantly deviates from the initial baseline condition of the system. In reality, the system is often subject to changing environmental and operation conditions affecting its dynamic characteristics. Such variations include changes in loading, boundary conditions, temperature, and humidity. Most damage diagnosis techniques, however, generally neglect the effects of these changing ambient conditions. Here, a novelty detection technique is developed explicitly taking into account these natural variations of the system in order to minimize false positive indications of true system changes. Auto-associative neural networks are employed to discriminate system changes of interest such as structural deterioration and damage from the natural variations of the system.

  5. Reliability review of the remote tool delivery system locomotor

    SciTech Connect

    Chesser, J.B.

    1999-04-01

    The locomotor being built by RedZone Robotics is designed to serve as a remote tool delivery (RID) system for waste retrieval, tank cleaning, viewing, and inspection inside the high-level waste tanks 8D-1 and 8D-2 at West Valley Nuclear Services (WVNS). The RTD systm is to be deployed through a tank riser. The locomotor portion of the RTD system is designed to be inserted into the tank and is to be capable of moving around the tank by supporting itself and moving on the tank internal structural columns. The locomotor will serve as a mounting platform for a dexterous manipulator arm. The complete RTD system consists of the locomotor, dexterous manipulator arm, cameras, lights, cables, hoses, cable/hose management system, power supply, and operator control station.

  6. Locomotor sequence learning in visually guided walking.

    PubMed

    Choi, Julia T; Jensen, Peter; Nielsen, Jens Bo

    2016-04-01

    Voluntary limb modifications must be integrated with basic walking patterns during visually guided walking. In this study we tested whether voluntary gait modifications can become more automatic with practice. We challenged walking control by presenting visual stepping targets that instructed subjects to modify step length from one trial to the next. Our sequence learning paradigm is derived from the serial reaction-time (SRT) task that has been used in upper limb studies. Both random and ordered sequences of step lengths were used to measure sequence-specific and sequence-nonspecific learning during walking. In addition, we determined how age (i.e., healthy young adults vs. children) and biomechanical factors (i.e., walking speed) affected the rate and magnitude of locomotor sequence learning. The results showed that healthy young adults (age 24 ± 5 yr,n= 20) could learn a specific sequence of step lengths over 300 training steps. Younger children (age 6-10 yr,n= 8) had lower baseline performance, but their magnitude and rate of sequence learning were the same compared with those of older children (11-16 yr,n= 10) and healthy adults. In addition, learning capacity may be more limited at faster walking speeds. To our knowledge, this is the first study to demonstrate that spatial sequence learning can be integrated with a highly automatic task such as walking. These findings suggest that adults and children use implicit knowledge about the sequence to plan and execute leg movement during visually guided walking.

  7. The locomotor anatomy of Australopithecus afarensis.

    PubMed

    Stern, J T; Susman, R L

    1983-03-01

    The postcranial skeleton of Australopithecus afarensis from the Hadar Formation, Ethiopia, and the footprints from the Laetoli Beds of northern Tanzania, are analyzed with the goal of determining (1) the extent to which this ancient hominid practiced forms of locomotion other than terrestrial bipedality, and (2) whether or not the terrestrial bipedalism of A. afarensis was notably different from that of modern humans. It is demonstrated that A. afarensis possessed anatomic characteristics that indicate a significant adaptation for movement in the trees. Other structural features point to a mode of terrestrial bipedality that involved less extension at the hip and knee than occurs in modern humans, and only limited transfer of weight onto the medial part of the ball of the foot, but such conclusions remain more tentative than that asserting substantive arboreality. A comparison of the specimens representing smaller individuals, presumably female, to those of larger individuals, presumably male, suggests sexual differences in locomotor behavior linked to marked size dimorphism. The males were probably less arboreal and engaged more frequently in terrestrial bipedalism. In our opinion, A. afarensis from Hadar is very close to what can be called a "missing link." We speculate that earlier representatives of the A. afarensis lineage will present not a combination of arboreal and bipedal traits, but rather the anatomy of a generalized ape.

  8. An Investigation of the Effects of Maternal Separation and Novelty on Central Mechanisms Mediating Pituitary-Adrenal Activity in Infant Guinea Pigs (Cavia porcellus)

    PubMed Central

    Maken, Deborah S.; Weinberg, Joanne; Cool, David R.; Hennessy, Michael B.

    2016-01-01

    In mammalian species in which the young exhibit a strong filial attachment (e.g., monkeys, guinea pigs), numerous studies have shown that even brief separation from the attachment figure potently elevates circulating concentrations of glucocorticoids and adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH). However, effects of separation on central regulation of this stress response are not known. Therefore, we investigated central mechanisms mediating pituitary-adrenal activation during maternal separation and novelty exposure in guinea pig (Cavia porcellus) pups. Corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) mRNA expression in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN), and plasma cortisol and ACTH levels, were elevated only during separation in a novel environment. C-Fos activity was elevated in the medial amygdala (MeA) and reduced in the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BNST) during novelty exposure, regardless of separation. On the other hand, c-Fos activity was elevated in the PVN during separation, regardless of novelty exposure. These results demonstrate independent and combined effects of separation and novelty in regions of the guinea pig CNS that regulate pituitary-adrenal activity. Moreover, they suggest that a pathway from MeA to BNST to PVN mediates responses to novelty in the guinea pig pup, as in the adult rat, though inputs from other cell populations appear required to fully account for the HPA activity observed here. PMID:21038937

  9. MMN and novelty P3 in coma and other altered states of consciousness: a review.

    PubMed

    Morlet, Dominique; Fischer, Catherine

    2014-07-01

    In recent decades, there has been a growing interest in the assessment of patients in altered states of consciousness. There is a need for accurate and early prediction of awakening and recovery from coma. Neurophysiological assessment of coma was once restricted to brainstem auditory and primary cortex somatosensory evoked potentials elicited in the 30 ms range, which have both shown good predictive value for poor coma outcome only. In this paper, we review how passive auditory oddball paradigms including deviant and novel sounds have proved their efficiency in assessing brain function at a higher level, without requiring the patient's active involvement, thus providing an enhanced tool for the prediction of coma outcome. The presence of an MMN in response to deviant stimuli highlights preserved automatic sensory memory processes. Recorded during coma, MMN has shown high specificity as a predictor of recovery of consciousness. The presence of a novelty P3 in response to the subject's own first name presented as a novel (rare) stimulus has shown a good correlation with coma awakening. There is now a growing interest in the search for markers of consciousness, if there are any, in unresponsive patients (chronic vegetative or minimally conscious states). We discuss the different ERP patterns observed in these patients. The presence of novelty P3, including parietal components and possibly followed by a late parietal positivity, raises the possibility that some awareness processes are at work in these unresponsive patients.

  10. The importance of novelty: male-female interactions among blue-black grassquits in captivity.

    PubMed

    Dias, Raphael I; Oliveira, Rui F; Podos, Jeffrey; Macedo, Regina H

    2014-03-01

    Mate choice is a primary mechanism driving the evolution of sexually selected traits such as elaborate displays and ornaments. In a majority of taxa studied to date, females are seen to actively sample and evaluate multiple males, presumably to optimize mating opportunities. During this process females may encounter males both familiar and novel, a distinction that might influence how mate choice proceeds. Using a socially monogamous passerine, the blue-black grassquit (Volatinia jacarina), we studied how females respond to novel versus familiar ("paired") males, and how encounters with novel males influence subsequent interactions with their paired males. Additionally, we measured the hormonal response of males after visualizing their paired females interacting with novel males. We found that females were attentive to novel males irrespective of these males' phenotypic attributes, suggesting that in these interactions novelty is highly relevant. After exposure to novel males, females tended to respond aggressively towards their paired males; by contrast, the behaviour of males towards their paired females did not change. Moreover, we did not detect any hormonal responses of males to viewing their paired females interacting with novel males. Together these results suggest that the distinction between familiarity and novelty may hold special relevance for females in mate choice, a finding that bears upon our understanding of the evolution of extra-pair paternity and reproductive behaviour.

  11. Attenuated methamphetamine-induced locomotor sensitization in serotonin transporter knockout mice is restored by serotonin 1B receptor antagonist treatment.

    PubMed

    Igari, Moe; Shen, Hao-Wei; Hagino, Yoko; Fukushima, Setsu; Kasahara, Yoshiyuki; Lesch, Klaus-Peter; Murphy, Dennis L; Hall, Frank Scott; Uhl, George R; Ikeda, Kazutaka; Yaegashi, Nobuo; Sora, Ichiro

    2015-02-01

    Repeated administration of methamphetamine (METH) enhances acute locomotor responses to METH administered in the same context, a phenomenon termed as 'locomotor sensitization'. Although many of the acute effects of METH are mediated by its influences on the compartmentalization of dopamine, serotonin systems have also been suggested to influence the behavioral effects of METH in ways that are not fully understood. The present experiments examined serotonergic roles in METH-induced locomotor sensitization by assessing: (a) the effect of serotonin transporter (SERT; Slc6A4) knockout (KO) on METH-induced locomotor sensitization; (b) extracellular monoamine levels in METH-treated animals as determined by in-vivo microdialysis; and (c) effects of serotonin (5-HT) receptor antagonists on METH-induced behavioral sensitization, with focus on effects of the 5-HT1B receptor antagonist SB 216641 and a comparison with the 5-HT2 receptor antagonist ketanserin. Repeated METH administration failed to induce behavioral sensitization in homozygous SERT KO (SERT-/-) mice under conditions that produced substantial sensitization in wild-type or heterozygous SERT KO (SERT+/-) mice. The selective 5-HT1B antagonist receptor SB 216641 restored METH-induced locomotor sensitization in SERT-/- mice, whereas ketanserin was ineffective. METH-induced increases in extracellular 5-HT (5-HTex) levels were substantially reduced in SERT-/- mice, although SERT genotype had no effect on METH-induced increases in extracellular dopamine. These experiments demonstrate that 5-HT actions, including those at 5-HT1B receptors, contribute to METH-induced locomotor sensitization. Modulation of 5-HT1B receptors might aid therapeutic approaches to the sequelae of chronic METH use.

  12. Adaptive locomotor behavior in larval zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Portugues, Ruben; Engert, Florian

    2011-01-01

    In this study we report that larval zebrafish display adaptive locomotor output that can be driven by unexpected visual feedback. We develop a new assay that addresses visuomotor integration in restrained larval zebrafish. The assay involves a closed-loop environment in which the visual feedback a larva receives depends on its own motor output in a way that resembles freely swimming conditions. The experimenter can control the gain of this closed feedback loop, so that following a given motor output the larva experiences more or less visual feedback depending on whether the gain is high or low. We show that increases and decreases in this gain setting result in adaptive changes in behavior that lead to a generalized decrease or increase of motor output, respectively. Our behavioral analysis shows that both the duration and tail beat frequency of individual swim bouts can be modified, as well as the frequency with which bouts are elicited. These changes can be implemented rapidly, following an exposure to a new gain of just 175 ms. In addition, modifications in some behavioral parameters accumulate over tens of seconds and effects last for at least 30 s from trial to trial. These results suggest that larvae establish an internal representation of the visual feedback expected from a given motor output and that the behavioral modifications are driven by an error signal that arises from the discrepancy between this expectation and the actual visual feedback. The assay we develop presents a unique possibility for studying visuomotor integration using imaging techniques available in the larval zebrafish.

  13. Adaptive Locomotor Behavior in Larval Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Portugues, Ruben; Engert, Florian

    2011-01-01

    In this study we report that larval zebrafish display adaptive locomotor output that can be driven by unexpected visual feedback. We develop a new assay that addresses visuomotor integration in restrained larval zebrafish. The assay involves a closed-loop environment in which the visual feedback a larva receives depends on its own motor output in a way that resembles freely swimming conditions. The experimenter can control the gain of this closed feedback loop, so that following a given motor output the larva experiences more or less visual feedback depending on whether the gain is high or low. We show that increases and decreases in this gain setting result in adaptive changes in behavior that lead to a generalized decrease or increase of motor output, respectively. Our behavioral analysis shows that both the duration and tail beat frequency of individual swim bouts can be modified, as well as the frequency with which bouts are elicited. These changes can be implemented rapidly, following an exposure to a new gain of just 175 ms. In addition, modifications in some behavioral parameters accumulate over tens of seconds and effects last for at least 30 s from trial to trial. These results suggest that larvae establish an internal representation of the visual feedback expected from a given motor output and that the behavioral modifications are driven by an error signal that arises from the discrepancy between this expectation and the actual visual feedback. The assay we develop presents a unique possibility for studying visuomotor integration using imaging techniques available in the larval zebrafish. PMID:21909325

  14. Alterations in locomotor activity induced by radioprotective doses of 16,16-dimethyl prostaglandin E2

    SciTech Connect

    Landauer, M.R.; Walden, T.L.; Davis, H.D.; Dominitz, J.A.

    1987-01-01

    16,16-Dimethyl prostaglandin E2 (DiPGE2) is an effective radioprotectant when administered before irradiation. A notable side effect of this compound is sedation. In separate experiments, the dose-response determinations of the time course of locomotor activity and 30-day survival after 10 Gy gamma irradiation (LD100) were made. Adult male CD2F1 mice were injected subcutaneously with vehicle or DiPGE2 in doses ranging from 0.01 to 40 micrograms per mouse. A dose of 0.01 micrograms did not result in alterations in locomotor behaviour or enhance survival. Doses greater than 1 microgram produced ataxia and enhanced radiation survival in a dose-dependent fashion. Full recovery of locomotor activity did not occur until 6 and 30 hr after injection for the 10 microgram and 40 microgram groups, respectively. Radioprotection was observed when DiPGE2 was administered preirradiation but not postirradiation. Doses of 1 and 10 micrograms were maximally effective as a radioprotectant if injected 5 min prior to irradiation (80%-90% survival). A dose of 40 micrograms resulted in 100% survival when injected 5-30 min before irradiation. Therefore, increasing doses of DiPGE2 resulted in an enhanced effectiveness as a radioprotectant. However, the doses that were the most radioprotective were also the most debilitating to the animal.

  15. Impact of Tail Loss on the Behaviour and Locomotor Performance of Two Sympatric Lampropholis Skink Species

    PubMed Central

    Cromie, Gillian L.; Chapple, David G.

    2012-01-01

    Caudal autotomy is an anti-predator behaviour that is used by many lizard species. Although there is an immediate survival benefit, the subsequent absence of the tail may inhibit locomotor performance, alter activity and habitat use, and increase the individuals' susceptibility to future predation attempts. We used laboratory experiments to examine the impact of tail autotomy on locomotor performance, activity and basking site selection in two lizard species, the delicate skink (Lampropholis delicata) and garden skink (L. guichenoti), that occur sympatrically throughout southeastern Australia and are exposed to an identical suite of potential predators. Post-autotomy tail movement did not differ between the two Lampropholis species, although a positive relationship between the shed tail length and distance moved, but not the duration of movement, was observed. Tail autotomy resulted in a substantial decrease in sprint speed in both species (28–39%), although this impact was limited to the optimal performance temperature (30°C). Although L. delicata was more active than L. guichenoti, tail autotomy resulted in decreased activity in both species. Sheltered basking sites were preferred over open sites by both Lampropholis species, although this preference was stronger in L. delicata. Caudal autotomy did not alter the basking site preferences of either species. Thus, both Lampropholis species had similar behavioural responses to autotomy. Our study also indicates that the impact of tail loss on locomotor performance may be temperature-dependent and highlights that future studies should be conducted over a broad thermal range. PMID:22523555

  16. Removing sensory input disrupts spinal locomotor activity in the early postnatal period

    PubMed Central

    Acevedo, JeanMarie; Díaz-Ríos, Manuel

    2013-01-01

    Motor patterns driving rhythmic movements of our lower limbs during walking are generated by groups of neurons within the spinal cord, called central pattern generators (CPGs). After suffering a spinal cord injury (SCI), many descending fibers from our brain are severed or become nonfunctional which leaves the spinal CPG network without its initiating drive. Recent studies are focusing on the importance of maintaining sensory stimulation to the legs on SCI patients as a way to initiate and control the CPG locomotor network. We began assessing the role of sensory feedback to the locomotor CPG network by using a neonatal mouse spinal cord preparation were the lower limbs are still attached. Removing sensory feedback coming from the hindlimbs by way of a lower lumbar transection or by ventral root denervation revealed a positive correlation in the ability of sensory input deprivation to disrupt ongoing locomotor activity on older versus younger animals. The differences in the motor responses as a function of age could be correlated with the loss of excitatory activity from sensory afferents. Continued studies on this field could eventually provide key information that translates in the design of novel therapeutic strategies to treat patients that have suffered a SCI. PMID:24043359

  17. Neurotensin receptor antagonist administered during cocaine withdrawal decreases locomotor sensitization and conditioned place preference.

    PubMed

    Felszeghy, Klara; Espinosa, José Manuel; Scarna, Hélène; Bérod, Anne; Rostène, William; Pélaprat, Didier

    2007-12-01

    Chronic use of psychostimulants induces enduringly increased responsiveness to a subsequent psychostimulant injection and sensitivity to drug-associated cues, contributing to drug craving and relapse. Neurotensin (NT), a neuropeptide functionally linked to dopaminergic neurons, was suggested to participate in these phenomena. We and others have reported that SR 48692, an NT receptor antagonist, given in pre- or co-treatments with cocaine or amphetamine, alters some behavioral effects of these drugs in rats. However, its efficacy when applied following repeated cocaine administration remains unknown. We, therefore, evaluated the ability of SR 48692, administered after a cocaine regimen, to interfere with the expression of locomotor sensitization and conditioned place preference (CPP) in rats. We demonstrated that the expression of locomotor sensitization, induced by four cocaine injections (15 mg/kg, i.p.) every other day and a cocaine challenge 1 week later, was attenuated by a subsequent 2-week daily administration of SR 48692 (1 mg/kg, i.p.). Furthermore, the expression of cocaine-induced CPP was suppressed by a 10-day SR 48692 treatment started after the conditioning period (four 15 mg/kg cocaine injections every other day). Taken together, our data show that a chronic SR 48692 treatment given after a cocaine regimen partly reverses the expression of locomotor sensitization and CPP in the rat, suggesting that NT participates in the maintenance of these behaviors. Our results support the hypothesis that targeting neuromodulatory systems, such as the NT systems may offer new strategies in the treatment of drug addiction.

  18. The effect of early environmental manipulation on locomotor sensitivity and methamphetamine conditioned place preference reward.

    PubMed

    Hensleigh, E; Pritchard, L M

    2014-07-15

    Early life stress leads to several effects on neurological development, affecting health and well-being later in life. Instances of child abuse and neglect are associated with higher rates of depression, risk taking behavior, and an increased risk of drug abuse later in life. This study used repeated neonatal separation of rat pups as a model of early life stress. Rat pups were either handled and weighed as controls or separated for 180 min per day during postnatal days 2-8. In adulthood, male and female rats were tested for methamphetamine conditioned place preference reward and methamphetamine induced locomotor activity. Tissue samples were collected and mRNA was quantified for the norepinephrine transporter in the prefrontal cortex and the dopamine transporter in the nucleus accumbens. Results indicated rats given methamphetamine formed a conditioned place preference, but there was no effect of early separation or sex. Separated males showed heightened methamphetamine-induced locomotor activity, but there was no effect of early separation for females. Overall females were more active than males in response to both saline and methamphetamine. No differences in mRNA levels were observed across any conditions. These results suggest early neonatal separation affects methamphetamine-induced locomotor activity in a sex-dependent manner but has no effects on methamphetamine conditioned place preference.

  19. Perturbation schedule does not alter retention of a locomotor adaptation across days

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Sara J.

    2014-01-01

    Motor adaptation in response to gradual vs. abrupt perturbation schedules may involve different neural mechanisms, potentially leading to different levels of motor memory. However, no study has investigated whether perturbation schedules alter memory of a locomotor adaptation across days. We measured adaptation and retention (memory) of altered interlimb symmetry during walking in two groups of participants over 2 days. On day 1, participants adapted to either a single, large perturbation (abrupt schedule) or a series of small perturbations that increased in size over time (gradual schedule). Retention was examined on day 2. On day 1, initial swing time and foot placement symmetry error sizes differed between groups but overall adaptation magnitudes were similar. On day 2, participants in both groups showed similar retention, readaptation, and aftereffect sizes, although there were some trends for improved memory in the abrupt group. These results conflict with previous data but are consistent with newer studies reporting no behavioral differences following adaptation using abrupt vs. gradual schedules. Although memory levels were very similar between groups, we cannot rule out the possibility that the neural mechanisms underlying this memory storage differ. Overall, it appears that adaptation of locomotor patterns via abrupt and gradual perturbation schedules produces similar expression of locomotor memories across days. PMID:24647433

  20. Reduced locomotor activity and exploratory behavior in CC chemokine receptor 4 deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Ambrée, Oliver; Klassen, Irene; Förster, Irmgard; Arolt, Volker; Scheu, Stefanie; Alferink, Judith

    2016-11-01

    Chemokines and their receptors are key regulators of immune cell trafficking and activation. Recent findings suggest that they may also play pathophysiological roles in psychiatric diseases like depression and anxiety disorders. The CC chemokine receptor 4 (CCR4) and its two ligands, CCL17 and CCL22, are functionally involved in neuroinflammation as well as anti-infectious and autoimmune responses. However, their influence on behavior remains unknown. Here we characterized the functional role of the CCR4-CCL17 chemokine-receptor axis in the modulation of anxiety-related behavior, locomotor activity, and object exploration and recognition. Additionally, we investigated social exploration of CCR4 and CCL17 knockout mice and wild type (WT) controls. CCR4 knockout (CCR4(-/-)) mice exhibited fewer anxiety-related behaviors in the elevated plus-maze, diminished locomotor activity, exploratory behavior, and social exploration, while their recognition memory was not affected. In contrast, CCL17 deficient mice did not show an altered behavior compared to WT mice regarding locomotor activity, anxiety-related behavior, social exploration, and object recognition memory. In the dark-light and object recognition tests, CCL17(-/-) mice even covered longer distances than WT mice. These data demonstrate a mechanistic or developmental role of CCR4 in the regulation of locomotor and exploratory behaviors, whereas the ligand CCL17 appears not to be involved in the behaviors measured here. Thus, either CCL17 and the alternative ligand CCL22 may be redundant, or CCL22 is the main activator of CCR4 in these processes. Taken together, these findings contribute to the growing evidence regarding the involvement of chemokines and their receptors in the regulation of behavior.

  1. Obstacle avoidance locomotor tasks: adaptation, memory and skill transfer.

    PubMed

    Kloter, Evelyne; Dietz, Volker

    2012-05-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the neural basis of adaptation, memory and skill transfer during human stepping over obstacles. Whilst walking on a treadmill, subjects had to perform uni- and bilateral obstacle steps. Acoustic feedback information about foot clearance was provided. Non-noxious electrical stimuli were applied to the right tibial nerve during the mid-stance phase of the right leg, i.e. 'prior' to the right or 'during' the left leg swing over the obstacle. The electromyogram (EMG) responses evoked by these stimuli in arm and leg muscles are known to reflect the neural coordination during normal and obstacle steps. The leading and trailing legs rapidly adapted foot clearance during obstacle steps with small further changes when the same obstacle condition was repeated. This adaptation was associated with a corresponding decrease in arm and leg muscle reflex EMG responses. Arm (but not leg) muscle EMG responses were greater when the stimulus was applied 'during' obstacle crossing by the left leg leading compared with stimulation 'prior' to right leg swing over the obstacle. A corresponding difference existed in arm muscle background EMG. The results indicate that, firstly, the somatosensory information gained by the performance and adaptation of uni- and bilateral obstacle stepping becomes transferred to the trailing leg in a context-specific manner. Secondly, EMG activity in arm and leg muscles parallels biomechanical adaptation of foot clearance. Thirdly, a consistently high EMG activity in the arm muscles during swing over the obstacle is required for equilibrium control. Thus, such a precision locomotor task is achieved by a context-specific, coordinated activation of arm and leg muscles for performance and equilibrium control that includes adaptation, memory and skill transfer.

  2. Dimensions of integration in interdisciplinary explanations of the origin of evolutionary novelty.

    PubMed

    Love, Alan C; Lugar, Gary L

    2013-12-01

    Many philosophers of biology have embraced a version of pluralism in response to the failure of theory reduction but overlook how concepts, methods, and explanatory resources are in fact coordinated, such as in interdisciplinary research where the aim is to integrate different strands into an articulated whole. This is observable for the origin of evolutionary novelty-a complex problem that requires a synthesis of intellectual resources from different fields to arrive at robust answers to multiple allied questions. It is an apt locus for exploring new dimensions of explanatory integration because it necessitates coordination among historical and experimental disciplines (e.g., geology and molecular biology). These coordination issues are widespread for the origin of novel morphologies observed in the Cambrian Explosion. Despite an explicit commitment to an integrated, interdisciplinary explanation, some potential disciplinary contributors are excluded. Notable among these exclusions is the physics of ontogeny. We argue that two different dimensions of integration-data and standards-have been insufficiently distinguished. This distinction accounts for why physics-based explanatory contributions to the origin of novelty have been resisted: they do not integrate certain types of data and differ in how they conceptualize the standard of uniformitarianism in historical, causal explanations. Our analysis of these different dimensions of integration contributes to the development of more adequate and integrated explanatory frameworks.

  3. Possible role of acetylcholine in regulating spatial novelty effects on theta rhythm and grid cells.

    PubMed

    Barry, Caswell; Heys, James G; Hasselmo, Michael E

    2012-01-01

    Existing pharmacological and lesion data indicate that acetylcholine plays an important role in memory formation. For example, increased levels of acetylcholine in the hippocampal formation are known to be associated with successful encoding while disruption of the cholinergic system leads to impairments on a range of mnemonic tasks. However, cholinergic signaling from the medial septum also plays a central role in generating and pacing theta-band oscillations throughout the hippocampal formation. Recent experimental results suggest a potential link between these distinct phenomena. Environmental novelty, a condition associated with strong cholinergic drive, has been shown to induce an expansion in the firing pattern of entorhinal grid cells and a reduction in the frequency of theta measured from the LFP. Computational modeling suggests the spatial activity of grid cells is produced by interference between neuronal oscillators; scale being determined by theta-band oscillations impinging on entorhinal stellate cells, the frequency of which is modulated by acetylcholine. Here we propose that increased cholinergic signaling in response to environmental novelty triggers grid expansion by reducing the frequency of the oscillations. Furthermore, we argue that cholinergic induced grid expansion may enhance, or even induce, encoding by producing a mismatch between expanded grid cells and other spatial inputs to the hippocampus, such as boundary vector cells. Indeed, a further source of mismatch is likely to occur between grid cells of different native scales which may expand by different relative amounts.

  4. Behavioral cross-sensitization between DOCA-induced sodium appetite and cocaine-induced locomotor behavior.

    PubMed

    Acerbo, Martin J; Johnson, Alan Kim

    2011-05-01

    Behavioral sensitization involves increases in the magnitude of a response to a stimulus after repeated exposures to the same response initiator. Administration of psychomotor stimulants and the induction of appetitive motivational states associated with natural reinforcers like sugar and salt are among experimental manipulations producing behavioral sensitization. In rats, repeated administration of the mineralocorticoid agonist deoxycorticosterone acetate (DOCA) initially induces incremental increases in daily hypertonic saline consumption (i.e., sensitization of sodium appetite) in spite of the retention of sodium. The present studies investigated whether sodium appetite sensitization induced by DOCA shares mechanisms similar to those of psychomotor stimulant-induced sensitization, and whether there is evidence for reciprocal cross-sensitization. In Experiments 1 and 3, rats received control or cocaine treatments to induce locomotor sensitization. A week later DOCA (or vehicle) was administered to generate a sodium appetite. Animals pretreated with cocaine showed a greater sodium appetite. In Experiment 2, the order of the putative sensitizing treatments was reversed. Rats first received either a series of DOCA or vehicle treatments either with or without access to saline and were later tested for sensitization of the locomotor response to cocaine. Animals pretreated with DOCA without access to saline showed greater locomotor responses to cocaine than animals receiving vehicle treatments. Together these experiments indicate that treatments generating a sustained salt appetite and producing cocaine-induced psychomotor responses show reciprocal behavioral cross-sensitization. The underlying mechanisms accounting for this relationship may be the fact that psychostimulants and an unresolved craving for sodium can act as potent stressors.

  5. The mesencephalic locomotor region sends a bilateral glutamatergic drive to hindbrain reticulospinal neurons in a tetrapod

    PubMed Central

    Ryczko, Dimitri; Auclair, Francois; Cabelguen, Jean‐Marie

    2015-01-01

    In vertebrates, stimulation of the mesencephalic locomotor region (MLR) on one side evokes symmetrical locomotor movements on both sides. How this occurs was previously examined in detail in a swimmer using body undulations (lamprey), but in tetrapods the downstream projections from the MLR to brainstem neurons are not fully understood. Here we examined the brainstem circuits from the MLR to identified reticulospinal neurons in the salamander Notophthalmus viridescens. Using neural tracing, we show that the MLR sends bilateral projections to the middle reticular nucleus (mRN, rostral hindbrain) and the inferior reticular nucleus (iRN, caudal hindbrain). Ca2+ imaging coupled to electrophysiology in in vitro isolated brains revealed very similar responses in reticulospinal neurons on both sides to a unilateral MLR stimulation. As the strength of MLR stimulation was increased, the responses increased in size in reticulospinal neurons of the mRN and iRN, but the responses in the iRN were smaller. Bath‐application or local microinjections of glutamatergic antagonists markedly reduced reticulospinal neuron responses, indicating that the MLR sends glutamatergic inputs to reticulospinal neurons. In addition, reticulospinal cells responded to glutamate microinjections and the size of the responses paralleled the amount of glutamate microinjected. Immunofluorescence coupled with anatomical tracing confirmed the presence of glutamatergic projections from the MLR to reticulospinal neurons. Overall, we show that the brainstem circuits activated by the MLR in the salamander are organized similarly to those previously described in lampreys, indicating that the anatomo‐physiological features of the locomotor drive are well conserved in vertebrates. J. Comp. Neurol. 524:1361–1383, 2016. © 2015 The Authors The Journal of Comparative Neurology Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26470600

  6. Relationship between ethanol preference and sensation/novelty seeking.

    PubMed

    Manzo, Lidia; Gómez, Ma José; Callejas-Aguilera, José E; Donaire, Rocío; Sabariego, Marta; Fernández-Teruel, Alberto; Cañete, Antoni; Blázquez, Gloria; Papini, Mauricio R; Torres, Carmen

    2014-06-22

    High- and low-avoidance Roman inbred rat strains (RHA-I, RLA-I) were selected for extreme differences in two-way active avoidance. RHA-I rats also express less anxiety than RLA-I rats. This study compared male Roman rats in ethanol preference and sensation/novelty seeking. Rats were first exposed in counterbalanced order to the hole-board test (forced exposure to novelty) and the Y-maze and emergence tests (free choice between novel and familiar locations). Then, rats were tested in 24-h, two-bottle preference tests with water in one bottle and ethanol (2, 4, 6, 8, or 10% in successive days). Compared to RLA-I rats, RHA-I rats showed (1) higher frequency and time in head dipping, (2) higher activity, and (3) lower frequency of rearing and grooming in the hole-board test, and (4) remained in the novel arm longer in the Y-maze test. No strain differences were observed in the emergence test. RHA-I rats exhibited higher preference for and consumed more ethanol than RLA-I rats at all concentrations. However, both strains preferred ethanol over water for 2-4% concentrations, but water over ethanol for 6-10% concentrations. Factorial analysis with all the rats pooled identified a two-factor solution, one grouping preferred ethanol concentrations (2-4%) with head dipping and grooming in the hole board, and another factor grouping the nonpreferred ethanol concentrations (6-10%) with activity in the hole board and novel-arm time in the Y-maze test. These results show that preference for ethanol is associated with different aspects of behavior measured in sensation/novelty-seeking tests.

  7. Effects of stress and tranylcypromine on amphetamine-induced locomotor activity and GABA(B) receptor function in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Sands, S A; Reisman, S A; Enna, S J

    2003-01-17

    Modification in gamma-aminobutyric acid-B (GABA(B)) receptors may contribute to the symptoms of some neurological and psychiatric disorders and to the clinical response to psychotherapeutics. The present study was undertaken to determine whether chronic administration of tranylcypromine (TCP), an antidepressant, and chronic stress influence GABA(B) receptor function in rat brain. The results indicate that TCP treatment, but not stress, increases GABA(B) receptor activity in the cerebral cortex, as measured by baclofen-stimulated GTPgammaS binding. In addition, chronic administration of TCP enhances significantly the locomotor response to a single dose of amphetamine, an effect that is abolished by restraint stress. These results indicate that although TCP administration modifies brain GABA(B) receptor activity, which may contribute to the antidepressant response to this agent, this effect is unrelated to the interaction of stress and TCP treatment on the locomotor response to amphetamine.

  8. Prefrontal microRNA-221 Mediates Environmental Enrichment-Induced Increase of Locomotor Sensitivity to Nicotine

    PubMed Central

    Gomez, Adrian M.; Altomare, Diego; Sun, Wei-Lun; Midde, Narasimha M.; Ji, Hao; Shtutman, Michael; Turner, Jill R.; Creek, Kim E.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Environmental enrichment alters susceptibility in developing drug addiction. We have demonstrated that rats raised in an enriched condition are more sensitive than rats raised in an impoverished condition to nicotine-induced locomotor activity, and this is associated with alterations of phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 within the prefrontal cortex. This study determined the impact of microRNA-221 in the prefrontal cortex on phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 and the enriched environment-dependent behavioral changes in response to nicotine. Methods: A microRNA array was conducted to profile microRNA expression in the prefrontal cortex of enriched condition and impoverished condition rats in response to repeated nicotine (0.35mg/kg, s.c.) administration. microRNA-221 in the prefrontal cortex, nucleus accumbens, and striatum was further verified by quantitative real-time PCR. Lentiviral-mediated overexpression of microRNA-221 in PC12 cells and the medial prefrontal cortex was performed to determine the effects of microRNA-221 on nicotine-mediated phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2, phosphorylated cAMP-response element-binding protein, and locomotor activity. Results: microRNA-221 was profoundly upregulated in the prefrontal cortex but not in nucleus accumbens and striatum of enriched condition rats relative to impoverished condition rats following repeated administration of nicotine. Overexpression of lentiviral-microRNA-221 attenuated nicotine-induced increase in phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 in PC12 cells. Lentiviral-microRNA-221 overexpression in the medial prefrontal cortex further increased locomotor activity in impoverished condition but not in enriched condition rats in response to repeated nicotine administration. Accordingly, lentiviral-microRNA-221 attenuated nicotine-induced increases in phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 and

  9. Quantitative analysis of the evolution of novelty in cinema through crowdsourced keywords

    PubMed Central

    Sreenivasan, Sameet

    2013-01-01

    The generation of novelty is central to any creative endeavor. Novelty generation and the relationship between novelty and individual hedonic value have long been subjects of study in social psychology. However, few studies have utilized large-scale datasets to quantitatively investigate these issues. Here we consider the domain of American cinema and explore these questions using a database of films spanning a 70 year period. We use crowdsourced keywords from the Internet Movie Database as a window into the contents of films, and prescribe novelty scores for each film based on occurrence probabilities of individual keywords and keyword-pairs. These scores provide revealing insights into the dynamics of novelty in cinema. We investigate how novelty influences the revenue generated by a film, and find a relationship that resembles the Wundt-Berlyne curve. We also study the statistics of keyword occurrence and the aggregate distribution of keywords over a 100 year period. PMID:24067890

  10. Developing Sensorimotor Countermeasures to Mitigate Post-Flight Locomotor Dysfunction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bloomberg, J. J.; Mulavara, A. P.; Cohen, H.; Miller, C. A.; Richards, J. T.; Houser, J.; McDonald, P. V.; Seidler, R. D.; Merkle, L. A.; Stelmach, G. E.

    2001-01-01

    Following spaceflight, crewmembers experience postural and locomotor instability. The magnitude and duration of post-flight sensorimotor disturbances increase with longer duration exposure to microgravity. These post-flight postural and locomotor alterations can pose a risk to crew safety and to mission objectives if nominal or emergency vehicle egress is required immediately following long-duration spaceflight. Gait instabilities could prevent or extend the time required to make an emergency egress from the Orbiter, Crew Return Vehicle or a future Martian lander leading to compromised mission objectives. We propose a countermeasure that aids in maintaining functional locomotor performance. This includes retaining the ability to perform vehicular egress and meet early mission objectives soon after landing on a planetary surface.

  11. Perception--action coupling model for human locomotor pointing.

    PubMed

    de Rugy, A; Taga, G; Montagne, G; Buekers, M J; Laurent, M

    2002-08-01

    How do humans achieve the precise positioning of the feet during walking, for example, to reach the first step of a stairway? We addressed this question at the visuomotor integration level. Based on the optical specification of the required adaptation, a dynamical system model of the visuomotor control of human locomotor pointing was devised for the positioning of a foot on a visible target on the floor during walking. Visuomotor integration consists of directly linking optical information to a motor command that specifically modulates step length in accordance with the ongoing dynamics of locomotor pattern generation. The adaptation of locomotion emerges from a perception-action coupling type of control based on temporal information rather than on feedforward planning of movements. The proposed model reproduces experimental results obtained for human locomotor pointing.

  12. Altitudinal gradients, plant hybrid zones and evolutionary novelty.

    PubMed

    Abbott, Richard J; Brennan, Adrian C

    2014-08-05

    Altitudinal gradients are characterized by steep changes of the physical and biotic environment that present challenges to plant adaptation throughout large parts of the world. Hybrid zones may form where related species inhabit different neighbouring altitudes and can facilitate interspecific gene flow and potentially the breakdown of species barriers. Studies of such hybrid zones can reveal much about the genetic basis of adaptation to environmental differences stemming from changes in altitude and the maintenance of species divergence in the face of gene flow. Furthermore, owing to recombination and transgressive effects, such hybrid zones can be sources of evolutionary novelty. We document plant hybrid zones associated with altitudinal gradients and emphasize similarities and differences in their structure. We then focus on recent studies of a hybrid zone between two Senecio species that occur at high and low altitude on Mount Etna, Sicily, showing how adaptation to local environments and intrinsic selection against hybrids act to maintain it. Finally, we consider the potential of altitudinal hybrid zones for generating evolutionary novelty through adaptive introgression and hybrid speciation. Examples of homoploid hybrid species of Senecio and Pinus that originated from altitudinal hybrid zones are discussed.

  13. Pair housing induced feeding suppression: individual housing not novelty.

    PubMed

    Lopak, V; Eikelboom, R

    Male rats that are moved from individual to pair housing suppress their feeding for a few days [O'Connor R, Eikelboom R. The effects of changes in housing on feeding and wheel running. Physiol Behav 2000;68:361-371]. The present study explored whether the suppression was a result of the period of individual housing or the novelty of the other animal. Two groups of 16 rats were pair-housed and one group of rats was individually housed for 21 days. The individually housed rats were then pair-housed (IP group) and rats in one of the pair-housed groups were re-housed with novel partners (NP group), while rats in the other pair-housed group remained with the same partner (SP group). Feeding was suppressed only for rats in the IP group, suggesting that the novelty of the partner did not suppress feeding, but rather, the change from individual to pair housing did. Water consumption was also measured, but was unaffected by the re-housing manipulation.

  14. Sensitivity to tactile novelty in the terrestrial isopod, Porcellio scaber.

    PubMed

    Anselme, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    Invertebrates have been studied at biochemical, ecological, and behavioural levels, but current knowledge about the impact that learning may have on behaviour is rather sparse. The present study aimed to examine the sensitivity of isolated rough woodlice (Porcellio scaber, Latreille, 1804) to the tactile novelty of their environment. A simple way to test this issue was to refer to the place preference paradigm, traditionally used in vertebrates. In Experiment 1, woodlice were placed in a compartment for 30 min in order to assess their ability to develop habituation in the absence of reward. In Experiment 2, woodlice were exposed to a compartment for 20 min (habituation phase) and were then given free choice between that compartment and a novel compartment for 2 min (preference phase). Depending on test conditions, rewards (humidity and/or shelter) were present or absent in the familiar compartment. The familiar and novel compartments differed with respect to the texture of the floor. In Experiment 3, the floor texture was the same in the two compartments in order to control for a novelty effect. The main results indicate that woodlice exhibited increased locomotion time, increased distance travelled, and increased speed in the novel compartment compared to the familiar compartment. There was no preference for either compartment when the floor textures of both were identical.

  15. Altitudinal gradients, plant hybrid zones and evolutionary novelty

    PubMed Central

    Abbott, Richard J.; Brennan, Adrian C.

    2014-01-01

    Altitudinal gradients are characterized by steep changes of the physical and biotic environment that present challenges to plant adaptation throughout large parts of the world. Hybrid zones may form where related species inhabit different neighbouring altitudes and can facilitate interspecific gene flow and potentially the breakdown of species barriers. Studies of such hybrid zones can reveal much about the genetic basis of adaptation to environmental differences stemming from changes in altitude and the maintenance of species divergence in the face of gene flow. Furthermore, owing to recombination and transgressive effects, such hybrid zones can be sources of evolutionary novelty. We document plant hybrid zones associated with altitudinal gradients and emphasize similarities and differences in their structure. We then focus on recent studies of a hybrid zone between two Senecio species that occur at high and low altitude on Mount Etna, Sicily, showing how adaptation to local environments and intrinsic selection against hybrids act to maintain it. Finally, we consider the potential of altitudinal hybrid zones for generating evolutionary novelty through adaptive introgression and hybrid speciation. Examples of homoploid hybrid species of Senecio and Pinus that originated from altitudinal hybrid zones are discussed. PMID:24958920

  16. The Evolution of Novelty in Conserved Gene Families

    PubMed Central

    Markov, Gabriel V.; Sommer, Ralf J.

    2012-01-01

    One of the major aims of contemporary evolutionary biology is the understanding of the current pattern of biological diversity. This involves, first, the description of character distribution at various nodes of the phylogenetic tree of life and, second, the functional explanation of such changes. The analysis of character distribution is a powerful tool at both the morphological and molecular levels. Recent high-throughput sequencing approaches provide new opportunities to study the genetic architecture of organisms at the genome-wide level. In eukaryotes, one overarching finding is the absence of simple correlations of gene count and biological complexity. Instead, the domain architecture of proteins is becoming a central focus for large-scale evolutionary innovations. Here, we review examples of the evolution of novelty in conserved gene families in insects and nematodes. We highlight how in the absence of whole-genome duplications molecular novelty can arise, how members of gene families have diversified at distinct mechanistic levels, and how gene expression can be maintained in the context of multiple innovations in regulatory mechanisms. PMID:22779028

  17. The effects of locomotor-respiratory coupling on the pattern of breathing in horses.

    PubMed Central

    Lafortuna, C L; Reinach, E; Saibene, F

    1996-01-01

    1. To investigate the effect of locomotor activity on the pattern of breathing in quadrupeds, ventilatory response was studied in four healthy horses during horizontal and inclined (7%) treadmill exercise at different velocities (1.4-6.9 m s(-1)) and during chemical stimulation with a rebreathing method. Stride frequency (f(s)) and locomotor-respiratory coupling (LRC) were also simultaneously determined by means of video recordings synchronized with respiratory events. 2. Tidal volume (V(T)) was positively correlated with pulmonary ventilation (V(E)) but significantly different linear regression equations were found between the experimental conditions (P < 0.0001), since the chemical hyperventilation was mainly due to increases in V(T), whereas the major contribution to exercise hyperpnoea came from changes in respiratory frequency (f(R)). 3. The average f(R) at each exercise level was not significantly different from f(S), although there was not always a tight 1:1 LRC. At constant speeds, f(S) was independent of the treadmill slope and hence the greater V(E) during inclined exercise was due to increased V(T). 4. At any ventilatory level, the differences in breathing patterns between locomotion and rebreathing or locomotion at different slopes derived from different set points of the inspiratory off-switch mechanism. 5. The percentage of single breaths entrained with locomotor rhythm rose progressively and significantly with treadmill speed (P < 0.0001) up to a 1:1 LRC and was significantly affected by treadmill slope (P < 0.001). 6. A LRC of 1:1 was systematically observed at canter (10 out of 10 trials) and sometimes at trot (5 out of 14) and it entailed (i) a 4- to 5-fold reduction in both V(T) and f(R) variability, and (ii) a gait-specific phase locking of inspiratory onset during the locomotor cycle. 7. It is concluded that different patterns of breathing are employed during locomotion and rebreathing due to the interference between locomotor and respiratory

  18. Down-regulation of Decapping Protein 2 mediates chronic nicotine exposure-induced locomotor hyperactivity in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Ren, Jing; Sun, Jinghan; Zhang, Yunpeng; Liu, Tong; Ren, Qingzhong; Li, Yan; Guo, Aike

    2012-01-01

    Long-term tobacco use causes nicotine dependence via the regulation of a wide range of genes and is accompanied by various health problems. Studies in mammalian systems have revealed some key factors involved in the effects of nicotine, including nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs), dopamine and other neurotransmitters. Nevertheless, the signaling pathways that link nicotine-induced molecular and behavioral modifications remain elusive. Utilizing a chronic nicotine administration paradigm, we found that adult male fruit flies exhibited locomotor hyperactivity after three consecutive days of nicotine exposure, while nicotine-naive flies did not. Strikingly, this chronic nicotine-induced locomotor hyperactivity (cNILH) was abolished in Decapping Protein 2 or 1 (Dcp2 or Dcp1) -deficient flies, while only Dcp2-deficient flies exhibited higher basal levels of locomotor activity than controls. These results indicate that Dcp2 plays a critical role in the response to chronic nicotine exposure. Moreover, the messenger RNA (mRNA) level of Dcp2 in the fly head was suppressed by chronic nicotine treatment, and up-regulation of Dcp2 expression in the nervous system blocked cNILH. These results indicate that down-regulation of Dcp2 mediates chronic nicotine-exposure-induced locomotor hyperactivity in Drosophila. The decapping proteins play a major role in mRNA degradation; however, their function in the nervous system has rarely been investigated. Our findings reveal a significant role for the mRNA decapping pathway in developing locomotor hyperactivity in response to chronic nicotine exposure and identify Dcp2 as a potential candidate for future research on nicotine dependence.

  19. Nitric oxide-mediated modulation of the murine locomotor network.

    PubMed

    Foster, Joshua D; Dunford, Catherine; Sillar, Keith T; Miles, Gareth B

    2014-02-01

    Spinal motor control networks are regulated by neuromodulatory systems to allow adaptability of movements. The present study aimed to elucidate the role of nitric oxide (NO) in the modulation of mammalian spinal locomotor networks. This was investigated with isolated spinal cord preparations from neonatal mice in which rhythmic locomotor-related activity was induced pharmacologically. Bath application of the NO donor diethylamine NONOate (DEA/NO) decreased the frequency and modulated the amplitude of locomotor-related activity recorded from ventral roots. Removal of endogenous NO with coapplication of a NO scavenger (PTIO) and a nitric oxide synthase (NOS) blocker [nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (l-NAME)] increased the frequency and decreased the amplitude of locomotor-related activity. This demonstrates that endogenously derived NO can modulate both the timing and intensity of locomotor-related activity. The effects of DEA/NO were mimicked by the cGMP analog 8-bromo-cGMP. In addition, the soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC) inhibitor ODQ blocked the effects of DEA/NO on burst amplitude and frequency, although the frequency effect was only blocked at low concentrations of DEA/NO. This suggests that NO-mediated modulation involves cGMP-dependent pathways. Sources of NO were studied within the lumbar spinal cord during postnatal development (postnatal days 1-12) with NADPH-diaphorase staining. NOS-positive cells in the ventral horn exhibited a rostrocaudal gradient, with more cells in rostral segments. The number of NOS-positive cells was also found to increase during postnatal development. In summary, we have shown that NO, derived from sources within the mammalian spinal cord, modulates the output of spinal motor networks and is therefore likely to contribute to the fine-tuning of locomotor behavior.

  20. Influence of the Novelty-Seeking Endophenotype on the Rewarding Effects of Psychostimulant Drugs in Animal Models

    PubMed Central

    Carmen Arenas, M.; Aguilar, María A.; Montagud-Romero, Sandra; Mateos-García, Ana; Navarro-Francés, Concepción I.; Miñarro, José; Rodríguez-Arias, Marta

    2016-01-01

    Novelty seeking (NS), defined as a tendency to pursue novel and intense emotional sensations and experiences, is one of the most relevant individual factors predicting drug use among humans. High novelty seeking (HNS) individuals present an increased risk of drug use compared to low novelty seekers. The NS endophenotype may explain some of the differences observed among individuals exposed to drugs of abuse in adolescence. However, there is little research about the particular response of adolescents to drugs of abuse in function of this endophenotype, and the data that do exist are inconclusive. The present work reviews the literature regarding the influence of NS on psychostimulant reward, with particular focus on adolescent subjects. First, the different animal models of NS and the importance of this endophenotype in adolescence are discussed. Later, studies that have used the most common animal models of reward (self-administration, conditioned place preference paradigms) to evaluate how the NS trait influences the rewarding effects of psychostimulants are reviewed. Finally, possible explanations for the enhanced risk of developing substance dependence among HNS individuals are discussed. In conclusion, the studies referred to in this review show that the HNS trait is associated with: (1) increased initial sensitivity to the rewarding effects of psychostimulants, (2) a higher level of drug craving when the subject is exposed to the environmental cues associated with the drug, and (3) enhanced long-term vulnerability to relapse to drug consumption after prolonged abstinence. PMID:26391743

  1. Influence of the Novelty-Seeking Endophenotype on the Rewarding Effects of Psychostimulant Drugs in Animal Models.

    PubMed

    Arenas, M Carmen; Aguilar, María A; Montagud-Romero, Sandra; Mateos-García, Ana; Navarro-Francés, Concepción I; Miñarro, José; Rodríguez-Arias, Marta

    2016-01-01

    Novelty seeking (NS), defined as a tendency to pursue novel and intense emotional sensations and experiences, is one of the most relevant individual factors predicting drug use among humans. High novelty seeking (HNS) individuals present an increased risk of drug use compared to low novelty seekers. The NS endophenotype may explain some of the differences observed among individuals exposed to drugs of abuse in adolescence. However, there is little research about the particular response of adolescents to drugs of abuse in function of this endophenotype, and the data that do exist are inconclusive. The present work reviews the literature regarding the influence of NS on psychostimulant reward, with particular focus on adolescent subjects. First, the different animal models of NS and the importance of this endophenotype in adolescence are discussed. Later, studies that have used the most common animal models of reward (self-administration, conditioned place preference paradigms) to evaluate how the NS trait influences the rewarding effects of psychostimulants are reviewed. Finally, possible explanations for the enhanced risk of developing substance dependence among HNS individuals are discussed. In conclusion, the studies referred to in this review show that the HNS trait is associated with: (1) increased initial sensitivity to the rewarding effects of psychostimulants, (2) a higher level of drug craving when the subject is exposed to the environmental cues associated with the drug, and (3) enhanced long-term vulnerability to relapse to drug consumption after prolonged abstinence.

  2. Genotypic structure of a Drosophila population for adult locomotor activity

    SciTech Connect

    Grechanyi, G.V.; Korzun, V.M.

    1995-01-01

    Analysis of the variation of adult locomotor activity in four samples taken at different times from a natural population of Drosophila melanogaster showed that the total variation of this trait is relatively stable in time and has a substantial genetic component. Genotypic structure of the population for locomotor activity is characterized by the presence of large groups of genotypes with high and low values of this trait. A possible explanation for the presence of such groups in a population is cyclic density-dependent selection.

  3. Effects of changing housing conditions on mangabey behavior (Cercocebus atys): spatial density, housing quality, and novelty effects

    PubMed Central

    Crast, Jessica; Bloomsmith, Mollie A.; Jonesteller, Trina

    2015-01-01

    The separate influences of spatial density and housing quality on the behavior of captive animals are difficult to measure because the two factors are often intrinsically linked. Here, we recorded affiliative and agonistic behavior in adult sooty mangabeys in various housing situations, testing spatial density and housing quality changes separately (N=26 experienced spatial density changes; N=12 experienced housing quality changes). We varied spatial density by 50% while holding housing quality constant and we varied housing quality while holding spatial density constant (achieved by comparing two types of run-housing that varied in the amount of visual privacy and outdoor access). Each housing condition was one month in duration. Prior to collecting data in each housing condition, we evaluated the subjects’ initial responses to the change in housing environment during two-week novelty periods. Affiliative behavior did not change during the novelty periods. Agonistic behavior initially increased slightly when spatial density increased and it decreased significantly when spatial density decreased; it also decreased when subjects moved to housing that offered more visual privacy and outdoor space, indicating that the mangabeys were sensitive to these housing changes. After the novelty periods, affiliative behavior increased under higher spatial density, but remained unchanged across housing quality conditions; agonistic behavior remained unchanged across all conditions. Results suggest that a prolonged increase in spatial density led the mangabeys to adopt a tension-reduction coping strategy, in which the increase in affiliative behavior alleviates a presumed increase in social tension. Reducing visual privacy and choice did not affect the mangabeys’ behavior, post-novelty period. Thus, like many other primates, the mangabeys managed tension by flexibly adapting to changes in their housing environment in ways that reduce the risk of severe aggression. This study

  4. Fronto-limbic novelty processing in acute psychosis: disrupted relationship with memory performance and potential implications for delusions

    PubMed Central

    Schott, Björn H.; Voss, Martin; Wagner, Benjamin; Wüstenberg, Torsten; Düzel, Emrah; Behr, Joachim

    2015-01-01

    Recent concepts have highlighted the role of the hippocampus and adjacent medial temporal lobe (MTL) in positive symptoms like delusions in schizophrenia. In healthy individuals, the MTL is critically involved in the detection and encoding of novel information. Here, we aimed to investigate whether dysfunctional novelty processing by the MTL might constitute a potential neural mechanism contributing to the pathophysiology of delusions, using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in 16 unmedicated patients with paranoid schizophrenia and 20 age-matched healthy controls. All patients experienced positive symptoms at time of participation. Participants performed a visual target detection task with complex scene stimuli in which novel and familiar rare stimuli were presented randomly intermixed with a standard and a target picture. Presentation of novel relative to familiar images was associated with hippocampal activation in both patients and healthy controls, but only healthy controls showed a positive relationship between novelty-related hippocampal activation and recognition memory performance after 24 h. Patients, but not controls, showed a robust neural response in the orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) during presentation of novel stimuli. Functional connectivity analysis in the patients further revealed a novelty-related increase of functional connectivity of both the hippocampus and the OFC with the rostral anterior cingulate cortex (rACC) and the ventral striatum (VS). Notably, delusions correlated positively with the difference of the functional connectivity of the hippocampus vs. the OFC with the rACC. Taken together, our results suggest that alterations of fronto-limbic novelty processing may contribute to the pathophysiology of delusions in patients with acute psychosis. PMID:26082697

  5. Comparison of outliers and novelty detection to identify ionospheric TEC irregularities during geomagnetic storm and substorm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pattisahusiwa, Asis; Houw Liong, The; Purqon, Acep

    2016-08-01

    In this study, we compare two learning mechanisms: outliers and novelty detection in order to detect ionospheric TEC disturbance by November 2004 geomagnetic storm and January 2005 substorm. The mechanisms are applied by using v-SVR learning algorithm which is a regression version of SVM. Our results show that both mechanisms are quiet accurate in learning TEC data. However, novelty detection is more accurate than outliers detection in extracting anomalies related to geomagnetic events. The detected anomalies by outliers detection are mostly related to trend of data, while novelty detection are associated to geomagnetic events. Novelty detection also shows evidence of LSTID during geomagnetic events.

  6. Is it new? Personal and contextual influences on perceptions of novelty and creativity.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jing; Wang, Xiaoye May; Song, Lynda Jiwen; Wu, Junfeng

    2017-02-01

    Novelty recognition is the crucial starting point for extracting value from the ideas generated by others. In this paper we develop an associative evaluation account for how personal and contextual factors motivate individuals to perceive novelty and creativity. We report 4 studies that systematically tested hypotheses developed from this perspective. Study 1 (a laboratory experiment) showed that perceivers' regulatory focus, as an experimentally induced state, affected novelty perception. Study 2 (a field study) found that perceivers' promotion focus and prevention focus, measured as chronic traits, each interacted with normative level of novelty and creativity: perceivers who scored higher on promotion focus perceived more novelty (or creativity) in novel (or creative) targets than those who scored lower, whereas perceivers who scored higher on prevention focus perceived less novelty (or creativity) in novel (or creative) targets than those who scored lower. Study 3 (a field study) showed that organizational culture affected the perception of novelty and creativity. Study 4 (a laboratory experiment) found perceiver-by-idea-by-context 3-way interaction effects: for perceivers with prevention focus, the positive relation between normative level of novelty and novelty ratings was weakened in the loss-framing condition versus the gain-framing condition. We discuss implications of the findings for future research and management practice. (PsycINFO Database Record

  7. Profilin2 contributes to synaptic vesicle exocytosis, neuronal excitability, and novelty-seeking behavior

    PubMed Central

    Pilo Boyl, Pietro; Di Nardo, Alessia; Mulle, Christophe; Sassoè-Pognetto, Marco; Panzanelli, Patrizia; Mele, Andrea; Kneussel, Matthias; Costantini, Vivian; Perlas, Emerald; Massimi, Marzia; Vara, Hugo; Giustetto, Maurizio; Witke, Walter

    2007-01-01

    Profilins are actin binding proteins essential for regulating cytoskeletal dynamics, however, their function in the mammalian nervous system is unknown. Here, we provide evidence that in mouse brain profilin1 and profilin2 have distinct roles in regulating synaptic actin polymerization with profilin2 preferring a WAVE-complex-mediated pathway. Mice lacking profilin2 show a block in synaptic actin polymerization in response to depolarization, which is accompanied by increased synaptic excitability of glutamatergic neurons due to higher vesicle exocytosis. These alterations in neurotransmitter release correlate with a hyperactivation of the striatum and enhanced novelty-seeking behavior in profilin2 mutant mice. Our results highlight a novel, profilin2-dependent pathway, regulating synaptic physiology, neuronal excitability, and complex behavior. PMID:17541406

  8. Effects of caffeine and L-phenylisopropyladenosine on locomotor activity of mice

    SciTech Connect

    Buckholtz, N.S.; Middaugh, L.D.

    1987-10-01

    C57BL/6J and DBA/2J mice were used to determine if possible differences in the behavioral response to caffeine might be related to differences in A1 adenosine receptors. Caffeine stimulated locomotor activity of both strains, but the dose-response relationship and time course of drug action differed according to strain. Although their response to caffeine differed, the strains did not differ in response to the A1 adenosine agonist L-phenylisopropyladenosine (PIA) nor in the binding of the A1 agonist (/sup 3/H)N6-cyclohexyladenosine (CHA) in various brain regions. Thus, the behavioral differences in response to caffeine could not be accounted for by differences in adenosine binding. Of alternative mechanisms, strain differences in A2 receptors appear to be the most promising.

  9. Linking the evolution of body shape and locomotor biomechanics in bird-line archosaurs.

    PubMed

    Allen, Vivian; Bates, Karl T; Li, Zhiheng; Hutchinson, John R

    2013-05-02

    Locomotion in living birds (Neornithes) has two remarkable features: feather-assisted flight, and the use of unusually crouched hindlimbs for bipedal support and movement. When and how these defining functional traits evolved remains controversial. However, the advent of computer modelling approaches and the discoveries of exceptionally preserved key specimens now make it possible to use quantitative data on whole-body morphology to address the biomechanics underlying this issue. Here we use digital body reconstructions to quantify evolutionary trends in locomotor biomechanics (whole-body proportions and centre-of-mass position) across the clade Archosauria. We use three-dimensional digital reconstruction to estimate body shape from skeletal dimensions for 17 archosaurs along the ancestral bird line, including the exceptionally preserved, feathered taxa Microraptor, Archaeopteryx, Pengornis and Yixianornis, which represent key stages in the evolution of the avian body plan. Rather than a discrete transition from more-upright postures in the basal-most birds (Avialae) and their immediate outgroup deinonychosauria, our results support hypotheses of a gradual, stepwise acquisition of more-crouched limb postures across much of theropod evolution, although we find evidence of an accelerated change within the clade Maniraptora (birds and their closest relatives, such as deinonychosaurs). In addition, whereas reduction of the tail is widely accepted to be the primary morphological factor correlated with centre-of-mass position and, hence, evolution of hindlimb posture, we instead find that enlargement of the pectoral limb and several associated trends have a much stronger influence. Intriguingly, our support for the onset of accelerated morpho-functional trends within Maniraptora is closely correlated with the evolution of flight. Because we find that the evolution of enlarged forelimbs is strongly linked, via whole-body centre of mass, to hindlimb function during

  10. Dynamic "Range of Motion" Hindlimb Stretching Disrupts Locomotor Function in Rats with Moderate Subacute Spinal Cord Injuries.

    PubMed

    Keller, Anastasia; Rees, Kathlene; Prince, Daniella; Morehouse, Johnny; Shum-Siu, Alice; Magnuson, David

    2017-04-12

    Joint contractures and spasticity are two common secondary complications of a severe spinal cord injury (SCI), which can significantly reduce quality of life, and stretching is one of the top strategies for rehabilitation of these complications. We have previously shown that a daily static stretching protocol administered to rats at either acute or chronic time points after a moderate or moderate-severe T10 SCI significantly disrupts their hindlimb locomotor function. The objective of the current study was to examine the effects of dynamic range of motion (ROM) stretching on the locomotor function of rats with SCI as an alternative to static stretching. Starting at 6 weeks post-injury (T10 moderate contusion) eight adult Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to hindlimb stretching for 4 weeks. Our standard stretching protocol (six maneuvers to stretch the major hindlimb muscle groups) was modified from 1 min static stretch-and-hold at the end ROM of each stretch position to a dynamic 2 sec hold, 1 sec release rhythm repeated for a duration of 1 min. Four weeks of daily (5 days/week) dynamic stretching led to significant disruption of locomotor function as assessed by the Basso, Beattie, Bresnahan (BBB) Open Field Locomotor Scale and three-dimensional (3D) kinematic and gait analyses. In addition, we identified and analyzed an apparently novel hindlimb response to dynamic stretch that resembles human clonus. The results of the current study extend the observation of the stretching phenomenon to a new modality of stretching that is also commonly used in SCI rehabilitation. Although mechanisms and clinical relevance still need to be established, our findings continue to raise concerns that stretching as a therapy can potentially hinder aspects of locomotor recovery.

  11. Locomotor Experience and Use of Social Information Are Posture Specific

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adolph, Karen E.; Tamis-LeMonda, Catherine S.; Ishak, Shaziela; Karasik, Lana B.; Lobo, Sharon A.

    2008-01-01

    The authors examined the effects of locomotor experience on infants' perceptual judgments in a potentially risky situation--descending steep and shallow slopes--while manipulating social incentives to determine where perceptual judgments are most malleable. Twelve-month-old experienced crawlers and novice walkers were tested on an adjustable…

  12. Limits to human locomotor performance: phylogenetic origins and comparative perspectives.

    PubMed

    Dudley, R

    2001-09-01

    Studies of human exercise physiology have been conducted from a largely ahistorical perspective. This approach usefully elucidates proximate limits to locomotor performance, but ignores potential sources of biomechanical and physiological variation that derive from adaptation to ancestral environments. Phylogenetic reconstruction suggests that multiple hominoid lineages, including that leading to Homo sapiens, evolved in African highlands at altitudes of 1000-2000 m. The evolution of human locomotor physiology therefore occurred under conditions of hypobaric hypoxia. In contrast to present-day humans running on treadmills or exercising in otherwise rectilinear trajectories, ancestral patterns of hominid locomotion probably involved intermittent knuckle-walking over variable terrain, occasional bouts of arboreality and an evolving capacity for bipedalism. All such factors represent potential axes of locomotor variation at present unstudied in extant hominoid taxa. As with humans, hummingbirds evolved in mid-montane contexts but pose an extreme contrast with respect to body size, locomotor mode and metabolic capacity. Substantial biomechanical and physiological challenges are associated with flight in hypobaria. Nonetheless, hummingbird lineages demonstrate a progressive invasion of higher elevations and a remarkable tolerance to hypoxia during hovering. Upregulation of aerobic capacity and parallel resistance to hypoxia may represent coupled evolutionary adaptations to flight under high-altitude conditions.

  13. DRUG EFFECTS ON THE LOCOMOTOR ACTIVITY OF LARVAL ZEBRAFISH.

    EPA Science Inventory

    As part of an effort to develop a rapid in vivo screen for EPA’s prioritization of toxic chemicals, we have begun to characterize the locomotor activity of zebrafish (Danio rerio) larvae and the effects of prototype drugs. Zebrafish larvae (6-7 days post-fertilization) were indiv...

  14. Acute Neuroactive Drug Exposures alter Locomotor Activity in Larval Zebrafish

    EPA Science Inventory

    As part of the development of a rapid in vivo screen for prioritization of toxic chemicals, we have begun to characterize the locomotor activity of zebrafish (Danio rerio) larvae by assessing the acute effects of prototypic drugs that act on the central nervous system. Initially,...

  15. Unraveling a locomotor network, many neurons at a time.

    PubMed

    Brownstone, Robert M; Stifani, Nicolas

    2015-04-08

    In this issue of Neuron, Bruno et al. (2015) use large-scale recordings in Aplysia, and apply novel dimensionality-reduction techniques to define dynamical building blocks involved in locomotor behavior. These techniques open new avenues to the study of neuronal networks.

  16. Active Gaze, Visual Look-Ahead, and Locomotor Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilkie, Richard M.; Wann, John P.; Allison, Robert S.

    2008-01-01

    The authors examined observers steering through a series of obstacles to determine the role of active gaze in shaping locomotor trajectories. Participants sat on a bicycle trainer integrated with a large field-of-view simulator and steered through a series of slalom gates. Steering behavior was determined by examining the passing distance through…

  17. A Model of Locomotor-Respiratory Coupling in Quadrupeds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giuliodori,, Mauricio J.; Lujan, Heidi L.; Briggs, Whitney S.; DiCarlo, Stephen E.

    2009-01-01

    Locomotion and respiration are not independent phenomena in running mammals because locomotion and respiration both rely on cyclic movements of the ribs, sternum, and associated musculature. Thus, constraints are imposed on locomotor and respiratory function by virtue of their linkage. Specifically, locomotion imposes mechanical constraints on…

  18. Acute neuroactive drug exposures alter locomotor activity in larval zebrafish

    EPA Science Inventory

    In an effort to develop a rapid in vivo screen for EPA's prioritization of toxic chemicals, we are characterizing the locomotor activity of zebrafish (Danio rerio) larvae after exposure to prototypic drugs that act on the central nervous system. MPTP (1-methyl-4phenyl- 1 ,2,3,6-...

  19. Neonatal olfactory bulbectomy enhances locomotor activity, exploratory behavior and binding of NMDA receptors in pre-pubertal rats.

    PubMed

    Flores, G; Ibañez-Sandoval, O; Silva-Gómez, A B; Camacho-Abrego, I; Rodríguez-Moreno, A; Morales-Medina, J C

    2014-02-14

    In this study, we investigated the effect of neonatal olfactory bulbectomy (nOBX) on behavioral paradigms related to olfaction such as exploratory behavior, locomotor activity in a novel environment and social interaction. We also studied the effect of nOBX on the activity of the N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) subtype of glutamate receptors during development. The behavioral effects of nOBX (postnatal day 7, PD7) were investigated in pre- (PD30) and post-pubertal (PD60) Wistar rats. NMDA receptor activity was measured with [(125)I]MK-801 in the brain regions associated with the olfactory circuitry. A significant increase in the novelty-induced locomotion was seen in the pre-pubertal nOBX rats. Although the locomotor effect was less marked than in pre-pubertal rats, the nOBX rats tested post-pubertally failed to habituate to the novel situation as quickly as the sham- and normal- controls. Pre-pubertally, the head-dipping behavior was enhanced in nOBX rats compared with sham-operated and normal controls, while normal exploratory behavior was observed between groups in adulthood. In contrast, social interaction was increased in post-pubertal animals that underwent nOBX. Both pre- and post-pubertal nOBX rats recovered olfaction. Interestingly, pre-pubertal rats showed a significant increase in the [(125)I]MK-801 binding in the piriform cortex, dorsal hippocampus, inner and outer layers of the frontal cortex and outer layer of the cingulate cortex. At post-pubertal age, no significant differences in [(125)I]MK-801 binding were observed between groups at any of the brain regions analyzed. These results suggest that nOBX produces pre-pubertal behavioral disturbances and NMDA receptor changes that are transitory with recovery of olfaction early in adulthood.

  20. Chemical Structural Novelty: On-Targets and Off-Targets

    PubMed Central

    Yera, Emmanuel R.; Cleves, Ann. E.; Jain, Ajay N.

    2011-01-01

    Drug structures may be quantitatively compared based on 2D topological structural considerations and based on 3D characteristics directly related to binding. A framework for combining multiple similarity computations is presented along with its systematic application to 358 drugs with overlapping pharmacology. Given a new molecule along with a set of molecules sharing some biological effect, a single score based on comparison to the known set is produced, reflecting either 2D similarity, 3D similarity, or their combination. For prediction of primary targets, the benefit of 3D over 2D was relatively small, but for prediction of off-targets, the added benefit was large. In addition to assessing prediction, the relationship between chemical similarity and pharmacological novelty was studied. Drug pairs that shared high 3D similarity but low 2D similarity (i.e. a novel scaffold) were shown to be much more likely to exhibit pharmacologically relevant differences in terms of specific protein target modulation. PMID:21916467

  1. Activation of Neurotensin Receptor Type 1 Attenuates Locomotor Activity

    PubMed Central

    Vadnie, Chelsea A.; Hinton, David J.; Choi, Sun; Choi, YuBin; Ruby, Christina L.; Oliveros, Alfredo; Prieto, Miguel L.; Park, Jun Hyun; Choi, Doo-Sup

    2014-01-01

    Intracerebroventricular administration of neurotensin (NT) suppresses locomotor activity. However, the brain regions that mediate the locomotor depressant effect of NT and receptor subtype-specific mechanisms involved are unclear. Using a brain-penetrating, selective NT receptor type 1 (NTS1) agonist PD149163, we investigated the effect of systemic and brain region-specific NTS1 activation on locomotor activity. Systemic administration of PD149163 attenuated the locomotor activity of C57BL/6J mice both in a novel environment and in their homecage. However, mice developed tolerance to the hypolocomotor effect of PD149163 (0.1 mg/kg, i.p.). Since NTS1 is known to modulate dopaminergic signaling, we examined whether PD149163 blocks dopamine receptor-mediated hyperactivity. Pretreatment with PD149163 (0.1 or 0.05 mg/kg, i.p.) inhibited D2R agonist bromocriptine (8 mg/kg, i.p.)-mediated hyperactivity. D1R agonist SKF81297 (8 mg/kg, i.p.)-induced hyperlocomotion was only inhibited by 0.1 mg/kg of PD149163. Since the nucleus accumbens (NAc) and medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) have been implicated in the behavioral effects of NT, we examined whether microinjection of PD149163 into these regions reduces locomotion. Microinjection of PD149163 (2 pmol) into the NAc, but not the mPFC suppressed locomotor activity. In summary, our results indicate that systemic and intra-NAc activation of NTS1 is sufficient to reduce locomotion and NTS1 activation inhibits D2R-mediated hyperactivity. Our study will be helpful to identify pharmacological factors and a possible therapeutic window for NTS1-targeted therapies for movement disorders. PMID:24929110

  2. Interpreting locomotor biomechanics from the morphology of human footprints.

    PubMed

    Hatala, Kevin G; Wunderlich, Roshna E; Dingwall, Heather L; Richmond, Brian G

    2016-01-01

    Fossil hominin footprints offer unique direct windows to the locomotor behaviors of our ancestors. These data could allow a clearer understanding of the evolution of human locomotion by circumventing issues associated with indirect interpretations of habitual locomotor patterns from fossil skeletal material. However, before we can use fossil hominin footprints to understand better the evolution of human locomotion, we must first develop an understanding of how locomotor biomechanics are preserved in, and can be inferred from, footprint morphologies. In this experimental study, 41 habitually barefoot modern humans created footprints under controlled conditions in which variables related to locomotor biomechanics could be quantified. Measurements of regional topography (depth) were taken from 3D models of those footprints, and principal components analysis was used to identify orthogonal axes that described the largest proportions of topographic variance within the human experimental sample. Linear mixed effects models were used to quantify the influences of biomechanical variables on the first five principal axes of footprint topographic variation, thus providing new information on the biomechanical variables most evidently expressed in the morphology of human footprints. The footprint's overall depth was considered as a confounding variable, since biomechanics may be linked to the extent to which a substrate deforms. Three of five axes showed statistically significant relationships with variables related to both locomotor biomechanics and substrate displacement; one axis was influenced only by biomechanics and another only by the overall depth of the footprint. Principal axes of footprint morphological variation were significantly related to gait type (walking or running), kinematics of the hip and ankle joints and the distribution of pressure beneath the foot. These results provide the first quantitative framework for developing hypotheses regarding the

  3. Liquid crystal TV-based white light optical tracking novelty filter.

    PubMed

    Li, Y; Kostrzewski, A; Kim, D H; Eichmann, G

    1989-11-15

    A compact white light optical tracking novelty filter is demonstrated. Based on the use of two inexpensive liquid crystal televisions, a filtered and collimated white light source, digital delay, and video recorder, this portable white light device performs two major image comparison operations, a real time image subtraction and novelty tracking operations. Some preliminary experimental results are presented.

  4. Predatory Odor Disrupts Social Novelty Preference in Long-Evans Rats

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Matthew J.; Layton, William B.

    2012-01-01

    The present study examined the effects of predatory odor (cat urine) on social novelty preference in Long-Evans rats. Adult male subjects encountered a juvenile conspecific at training, were exposed to either clean cat litter (control) or litter soiled with cat urine (predatory odor), and were tested for social novelty preference. While the…

  5. The time course of novelty processing in sensation seeking: an ERP study.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Ya; Xu, Jing; Jin, Yuan; Sheng, Wenbin; Ma, Ying; Zhang, Xiaoyu; Shen, Huijuan

    2010-05-01

    Novelty processing is critical for human survival in a rapidly changing environment. However, how and when the orientation attention reflected by novelty processing is modulated by personality elements such as sensation seeking is still opened. The present study investigated the time course of novelty processing in sensation seeking by recording the event-related potentials (ERPs) in a visual novelty oddball task. High and low sensation seekers performed a visual oddball task, in which participants were instructed to detect an inverted triangle (target) and ignore both upright triangle (standard) and unrepeated line drawings of pseudo-objects deviant from participants' long-term memory (novelty). While there were no group differences in ERPs to standard and target stimuli, ERPs to novel stimuli showed a strong modulation by sensation seeking trait. The low sensation seekers, compared with the high sensation seekers, exhibited an increased N2 to novel stimuli at frontal sites. Moreover, the Pd3 component reflecting purely novelty processing was enhanced and less habituated in the high sensation seeking participants. The current findings implicated that low sensation seekers showed sensitivity to novelty detection, whereas high sensation seekers displayed stronger and more sustained novelty appraisal.

  6. Spatial learning impairment induced by chronic stress is related to individual differences in novelty reactivity: search for neurobiological correlates.

    PubMed

    Touyarot, K; Venero, C; Sandi, C

    2004-02-01

    Although chronic stress has been reported to induce deleterious effects on hippocampal structure and function, the possible existence of individual differences in the vulnerability to develop stress-induced cognitive alterations was hypothesized. This study was designed to evaluate (i) whether individual variability in behavioural reactivity to novelty could be related to a differential vulnerability to show spatial learning deficits after chronic stress in young adult rats, and (ii) to what extent, could individual differences in stress-induced cognitive alterations be related to alterations in specific neurobiological substrates. Four month-old Wistar male rats were classified according to their locomotor reactivity to a novel environment, as either low (LR) or highly (HR) reactive, and then either submitted to psychosocial stress for 21-days (consisting of the daily cohabitation of each young adult rat with a new middle-aged rat) or left undisturbed. The results showed that psychosocial stress induced a marked deficit in spatial learning in the water maze in HR, but not in LR, rats. Then, a second experiment investigated the possible differential expression of corticosteroid receptors (MR and GR) and cell adhesion molecules (NCAM and L1) in the hippocampus of HR and LR rats, both under basal conditions and after exposure to chronic social stress. Although chronic stress induced a reduction on the hippocampal expression of MRs and the NCAM-140 isoform, the levels of these molecules did not differ between stressed rats with and without spatial learning impairments; i.e., between HR- and LR-stressed rats, respectively. Nevertheless, it should be noted that the reduction of the hippocampal expression of NCAM-140 induced by psychosocial stress was particularly marked in HR stressed rats. However, the expression of GRs, NCAM-120 and NCAM-180 isoforms, and L1, was not affected by stress, regardless of the reactivity of the animals. Therefore, although we failed to find

  7. Low-dose effect of ethanol on locomotor activity induced by activation of the mesolimbic system.

    PubMed

    Milton, G V; Randall, P K; Erickson, C K

    1995-06-01

    Four experiments were designed to study the ability of 0.5 g/kg ethanol (EtOH) intraperitoneally to modify locomotor activity induced by drugs that interact with different sites in the mesolimbic system (MLS) of male Sprague-Dawley rats. Locomotor activity was measured in a doughnut-shaped circular arena after various treatments. EtOH alone did not alter locomotor activity in any of the experiments. Amphetamine (AMP, intraperitoneally or intraaccumbens) increased locomotor activity in a dose-dependent manner, and the presence of EtOH attenuated AMP-induced locomotor activity. Bilateral infusion of GABAA antagonist picrotoxin (PIC) into the ventral tegmental area also increased locomotor activity in a dose-dependent manner, and the presence of EtOH attenuated PIC-induced locomotor activity. On the other hand, the interaction between bilateral infusion of mu-receptor agonist Tyr-D-Ala-Gly-NMe-Phe-Gly-ol (DAGO) and EtOH on locomotor activity is complex. The highest dose of DAGO that significantly increased locomotor activity was not affected by the presence of EtOH. But, with lower doses of DAGO that either had no effect or a small increase in locomotor activity, the combination of EtOH and DAGO increased and attenuated locomotor activity, respectively. Results from this study support our hypothesis that a low dose of EtOH that does not modify behavior can interact with neurotransmitter systems in the brain and modify drug-induced locomotor activity. Modification of this drug-induced locomotor activity by a low dose of EtOH is dependent on the rate of ongoing locomotor behavior induced by drug and the neurotransmitter substrate that the drug modified to induce locomotor behavior.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  8. Relationship between parameters of bacteriorhodopsin film and behavior of optical novelty filters.

    PubMed

    Chen, Guiying; Zhang, Chunping; Guo, Zongxia; Xu, Tang; Liang, Xin; Wang, Xinyu; Tian, Jianguo; Song, Q Wang

    2005-10-20

    To continue our earlier research on novelty filters in a system of incoherent light [Opt. Lett. 30,81 (2005)], we discuss the relationship between parameters of a bacteriorhodopsin film and the quality of a novelty filter image. For both fixed and moving velocities of the input image, differences in the novelty filter's image as a function of thickness, lifetime of the M state, and molecular concentration are displayed, and the optimal ranges of parameters of the bR film that correspond to the entire novelty filter image and obvious gray-level differences in the image are given. The method can be used to design high-quality novelty filter images in incoherent light systems.

  9. Product design and apparent usability. The influence of novelty in product appearance.

    PubMed

    Mugge, Ruth; Schoormans, Jan P L

    2012-11-01

    This research enhances our understanding of the relationship between aesthetics and usability by investigating the effects of novelty in product appearance on the apparent usability of a product. In two experimental studies using washing machines and digital cameras as stimuli, we systematically manipulated the level of novelty (low vs. high) in the product appearance by changing the product's color or shape. Participants were presented with one of these product appearances and a list of the product's technical specifications. Next, participants indicated how difficult or easy they expected the usage of the product to be. Our findings demonstrate that because people associate a high level of novelty with technological advancement, novelty in a product appearance negatively affects their expectations of a product's usability at the point of sale. Furthermore, novices are more likely to use the level of novelty as a cue for a product's apparent usability than experts.

  10. Age-dependent cyclic locomotor activity in the cricket, Gryllus bimaculatus, and the effect of adipokinetic hormone on locomotion and excitability.

    PubMed

    Fassold, Katharina; El-Damanhouri, Hassan I H; Lorenz, Matthias W

    2010-04-01

    Excitability and locomotor activity of male and female last instar larvae and adults of the two-spotted cricket are measured under crowded conditions, allowing the animals to interact with conspecifics during observations. Male and female last instar larvae display age-dependent cyclic patterns of activity with maxima during early to mid scotophase and minima during early photophase. A period of low locomotor activity without time of day-dependent cyclic changes starts 1 day before the final moult and lasts until 1 day after the moult. Then, both excitability and locomotor activity increase and become cyclic again within 2 or 3 days. The cyclic changes gradually dampen in adult females older than 6 days and finally cease. When injected into photophase larvae and adults, adipokinetic hormone (AKH) increases excitability and locomotor activity in a dose-dependent manner, whereas it has no such effect when injected into scotophase animals. Other behaviours (jumping, hind wing trembling) that mostly occur in scotophase crickets are also increased by injecting AKH into photophase crickets. We argue that AKH could be responsible for linking the endogenous clock output with the cyclic changes in locomotor activity. Furthermore, AKH may serve to synchronise metabolism and behaviour to optimise larval development and reproduction.

  11. Comparison of the MK-801-induced increase in non-rewarded appetitive responding with dopamine agonists and locomotor activity in rats.

    PubMed

    Davis-MacNevin, Parnell L; Dekraker, Jordan; LaDouceur, Liane; Holahan, Matthew R

    2013-09-01

    Systemic administration of the noncompetitive N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA)- receptor antagonist, MK-801, has been proposed to model cognitive deficits similar to those seen in patients with schizophrenia. Evidence has shown that MK-801 increases the probability of operant responding during extinction, possibly modeling perseveration, as would be seen in patients with schizophrenia. This MK-801-induced behavioral perseveration is reversed by dopamine receptor antagonism. To further explore the role of dopamine in this behavioral change, the current study sought to determine if the MK-801-induced increase in non-rewarded operant responding could be mimicked by dopamine agonism and determine how it was related to locomotor activity. Male Long Evans rats were treated systemically with MK-801, cocaine, GBR12909 or apomorphine (APO) and given a single trial operant extinction session, followed by a separate assessment of locomotor activity. Both MK-801 (0.05 mg/kg) and cocaine (10 mg/kg) significantly increased responding during the extinction session and both increased horizontal locomotor activity. No dose of GBR-12909 (5, 10 or 20 mg/kg) was found to effect non-rewarded operant responding or locomotor activity. APO (0.05, 0.5, 2 or 5 mg/kg) treatment produced a dose-dependent decrease in both operant responding and locomotor activity. These results suggest the possibility that, rather than a primary influence of increased dopamine concentration on elevating bar-pressing responses during extinction, other neurotransmitter systems may be involved.

  12. Analysis of Indonesian Spice Essential Oil Compounds That Inhibit Locomotor Activity in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Muchtaridi; Diantini, Adjeng; Subarnas, Anas

    2011-01-01

    Some fragrance components of spices used for cooking are known to have an effect on human behavior. The aim of this investigation was to examine the effect of the essential oils of basil (Ocimum formacitratum L.) leaves, lemongrass (Cymbopogon citrates L.) herbs, ki lemo (Litsea cubeba L.) bark, and laja gowah (Alpinia malaccencis Roxb.) rhizomes on locomotor activity in mice and identify the active component(s) that might be responsible for the activity. The effect of the essential oils was studied by a wheel cage method and the active compounds of the essential oils were identified by GC/MS analysis. The essential oils were administered by inhalation at doses of 0.1, 0.3, and 0.5 mL/cage. The results showed that the four essential oils had inhibitory effects on locomotor activity in mice. Inhalation of the essential oils of basil leaves, lemongrass herbs, ki lemo bark, and laja gowah rhizomes showed the highest inhibitory activity at doses of 0.5 (57.64%), 0.1 (55.72%), 0.5 (60.75%), and 0.1 mL/cage (47.09%), respectively. The major volatile compounds 1,8-cineole, α-terpineol, 4-terpineol, citronelol, citronelal, and methyl cinnamate were identified in blood plasma of mice after inhalation of the four oils. These compounds had a significant inhibitory effect on locomotion after inhalation. The volatile compounds of essential oils identified in the blood plasma may correlate with the locomotor-inhibiting properties of the oil when administered by inhalation.

  13. An In Vitro Spinal Cord–Hindlimb Preparation for Studying Behaviorally Relevant Rat Locomotor Function

    PubMed Central

    Hayes, Heather Brant; Chang, Young-Hui; Hochman, Shawn

    2009-01-01

    Although the spinal cord contains the pattern-generating circuitry for producing locomotion, sensory feedback reinforces and refines the spatiotemporal features of motor output to match environmental demands. In vitro preparations, such as the isolated rodent spinal cord, offer many advantages for investigating locomotor circuitry, but they lack the natural afferent feedback provided by ongoing locomotor movements. We developed a novel preparation consisting of an isolated in vitro neonatal rat spinal cord oriented dorsal-up with intact hindlimbs free to step on a custom-built treadmill. This preparation combines the neural accessibility of in vitro preparations with the modulatory influence of sensory feedback from physiological hindlimb movement. Locomotion induced by N-methyl d-aspartate and serotonin showed kinematics similar to that of normal adult rat locomotion. Changing orientation and ground interaction (dorsal-up locomotion vs ventral-up air-stepping) resulted in significant kinematic and electromyographic changes that were comparable to those reported under similar mechanical conditions in vivo. We then used two mechanosensory perturbations to demonstrate the influence of sensory feedback on in vitro motor output patterns. First, swing assistive forces induced more regular, robust muscle activation patterns. Second, altering treadmill speed induced corresponding changes in stride frequency, confirming that changes in sensory feedback can alter stride timing in vitro. In summary, intact hindlimbs in vitro can generate behaviorally appropriate locomotor kinematics and responses to sensory perturbations. Future studies combining the neural and chemical accessibility of the in vitro spinal cord with the influence of behaviorally appropriate hindlimb movements will provide further insight into the operation of spinal motor pattern-generating circuits. PMID:19073815

  14. Levo-tetrahydropalmatine attenuates the development and expression of methamphetamine-induced locomotor sensitization and the accompanying activation of ERK in the nucleus accumbens and caudate putamen in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhao, N; Chen, Y; Zhu, J; Wang, L; Cao, G; Dang, Y; Yan, C; Wang, J; Chen, T

    2014-01-31

    Levo-tetrahydropalmatine (l-THP) is an alkaloid purified from corydalis and has been used in many traditional Chinese herbal preparations for its analgesic, sedative, and hypnotic properties. Previous studies indicated that l-THP has modest antagonist activity against dopamine receptors and thus it might have potential therapeutic effects on drug addiction. However, whether and how l-THP contributes to methamphetamine (METH)-induced locomotor sensitization remains unclear. Therefore, the current study aims to examine the roles of l-THP in the development and expression of METH-induced locomotor sensitization as well as the accompanying extracellular-regulated kinase (ERK) activation in the nucleus accumbens (NAc), caudate putamen (CPu) and prefrontal cortex (PFc) in mice. We found that moderate doses of METH (0.5 and 2 mg/kg) induced hyper-locomotor activity in mice on all METH injection days whereas high dose of METH (5 mg/kg)-treated mice displayed only acute locomotor response to METH and severe stereotyped behaviors on the first day after drug injection. Interestingly, only 2 mg/kg dose of METH-induced locomotor sensitization which was accompanied by the activation of ERK1/2 in the NAc and CPu in mice. Although l-THP (5 and 10 mg/kg) per se did not induce obvious changes in locomotor activities in mice, its co-administration with METH could significantly attenuate acute METH-induced hyper-locomotor activity, the development and expression of METH-induced locomotor sensitization, and the accompanying ERK1/2 activation in the NAc and CPu. These results suggest that l-THP has potential therapeutic effect on METH-induced locomotor sensitization, and the underlying molecular mechanism might be related to its inhibitory effect on ERK1/2 phosphorylation in the NAc and CPu.

  15. Development of a Countermeasure to Enhance Postflight Locomotor Adaptability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bloomberg, Jacob J.

    2006-01-01

    Astronauts returning from space flight experience locomotor dysfunction following their return to Earth. Our laboratory is currently developing a gait adaptability training program that is designed to facilitate recovery of locomotor function following a return to a gravitational environment. The training program exploits the ability of the sensorimotor system to generalize from exposure to multiple adaptive challenges during training so that the gait control system essentially learns to learn and therefore can reorganize more rapidly when faced with a novel adaptive challenge. We have previously confirmed that subjects participating in adaptive generalization training programs using a variety of visuomotor distortions can enhance their ability to adapt to a novel sensorimotor environment. Importantly, this increased adaptability was retained even one month after completion of the training period. Adaptive generalization has been observed in a variety of other tasks requiring sensorimotor transformations including manual control tasks and reaching (Bock et al., 2001, Seidler, 2003) and obstacle avoidance during walking (Lam and Dietz, 2004). Taken together, the evidence suggests that a training regimen exposing crewmembers to variation in locomotor conditions, with repeated transitions among states, may enhance their ability to learn how to reassemble appropriate locomotor patterns upon return from microgravity. We believe exposure to this type of training will extend crewmembers locomotor behavioral repertoires, facilitating the return of functional mobility after long duration space flight. Our proposed training protocol will compel subjects to develop new behavioral solutions under varying sensorimotor demands. Over time subjects will learn to create appropriate locomotor solution more rapidly enabling acquisition of mobility sooner after long-duration space flight. Our laboratory is currently developing adaptive generalization training procedures and the

  16. Distinct sets of locomotor modules control the speed and modes of human locomotion

    PubMed Central

    Yokoyama, Hikaru; Ogawa, Tetsuya; Kawashima, Noritaka; Shinya, Masahiro; Nakazawa, Kimitaka

    2016-01-01

    Although recent vertebrate studies have revealed that different spinal networks are recruited in locomotor mode- and speed-dependent manners, it is unknown whether humans share similar neural mechanisms. Here, we tested whether speed- and mode-dependence in the recruitment of human locomotor networks exists or not by statistically extracting locomotor networks. From electromyographic activity during walking and running over a wide speed range, locomotor modules generating basic patterns of muscle activities were extracted using non-negative matrix factorization. The results showed that the number of modules changed depending on the modes and speeds. Different combinations of modules were extracted during walking and running, and at different speeds even during the same locomotor mode. These results strongly suggest that, in humans, different spinal locomotor networks are recruited while walking and running, and even in the same locomotor mode different networks are probably recruited at different speeds. PMID:27805015

  17. Human spinal locomotor control is based on flexibly organized burst generators.

    PubMed

    Danner, Simon M; Hofstoetter, Ursula S; Freundl, Brigitta; Binder, Heinrich; Mayr, Winfried; Rattay, Frank; Minassian, Karen

    2015-03-01

    Constant drive provided to the human lumbar spinal cord by epidural electrical stimulation can cause local neural circuits to generate rhythmic motor outputs to lower limb muscles in people paralysed by spinal cord injury. Epidural spinal cord stimulation thus allows the study of spinal rhythm and pattern generating circuits without their configuration by volitional motor tasks or task-specific peripheral feedback. To reveal spinal locomotor control principles, we studied the repertoire of rhythmic patterns that can be generated by the functionally isolated human lumbar spinal cord, detected as electromyographic activity from the legs, and investigated basic temporal components shared across these patterns. Ten subjects with chronic, motor-complete spinal cord injury were studied. Surface electromyographic responses to lumbar spinal cord stimulation were collected from quadriceps, hamstrings, tibialis anterior, and triceps surae in the supine position. From these data, 10-s segments of rhythmic activity present in the four muscle groups of one limb were extracted. Such samples were found in seven subjects. Physiologically adequate cycle durations and relative extension- and flexion-phase durations similar to those needed for locomotion were generated. The multi-muscle activation patterns exhibited a variety of coactivation, mixed-synergy and locomotor-like configurations. Statistical decomposition of the electromyographic data across subjects, muscles and samples of rhythmic patterns identified three common temporal components, i.e. basic or shared activation patterns. Two of these basic patterns controlled muscles to contract either synchronously or alternatingly during extension- and flexion-like phases. The third basic pattern contributed to the observed muscle activities independently from these extensor- and flexor-related basic patterns. Each bifunctional muscle group was able to express both extensor- and flexor-patterns, with variable ratios across the

  18. Effects of cocaine on norepinephrine stimulated phosphoinositide hydrolysis and locomotor activity in rat

    SciTech Connect

    Mosaddeghi, M.

    1989-01-01

    The function of {alpha}{sub 1}-adrenoceptors was determined by stimulating cortical tissue slices, which were pre-labeled with ({sup 3}H)inositol, with norepinephrine (NE) in the presence of 8 mM LiCl. Results of in vitro studies showed that cocaine 10 {mu}M potentiated maximal NE-stimulated PI hydrolysis by 30%. In addition, the EC{sub 50} was decreased from 3.93 {plus minus} 0.42 to 1.91 {plus minus} 0.31 {mu}M NE. Concentrations of 0.1-100 {mu}M and 0.1-10 {mu}M cocaine enhanced PI hydrolysis stimulated by 0.3 and 3 {mu}M NE, respectively. The concentration-effect curves for NE-stimulated PI hydrolysis were shifted to the right 100-fold in the presence of 0.1 {mu}M prazosin. Cocaine (10 {mu}M) did not potentiate NE-stimulated PI hydrolysis in the presence of 0.1 {mu}M prazosin. ({sup 3}H)Prazosin saturation and NE ({sup 3}H)prazosin competition binding studies using crude membrane preparations showed that 10 {mu}M cocaine did not alter binding parameters B{sub max}, K{sub d}, Hill slope, and IC{sub 50}. Together, these results implied that cocaine in vitro potentiated NE-stimulated PI hydrolysis by blocking NE reuptake. For in vivo studies, the locomotor activity was determined after an acute or chronic injections of either cocaine or saline. Cocaine or saline-treated rats were killed after measurement of the locomotor activity, and NE-stimulated PI hydrolysis was measured. Acute administration of cocaine 3.2-42 mg/kg (i.p.) produced an inverted U shaped dose-response curve on locomotor activity. The peak increase in locomotor activity was at 32 mg/kg cocaine. A dose of 42 mg/kg cocaine produced a significant depression of maximal NE-stimulated PI hydrolysis.

  19. Conditioned place preference and locomotor sensitization after repeated administration of cocaine or methamphetamine in rats treated with epidermal growth factor during the neonatal period.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Makoto; Malta, Romulo S; Nagano, Tadasato; Nawa, Hiroyuki

    2004-10-01

    Epidermal growth factor (EGF) and its structurally related proteins are involved in the developmental regulation of various brain neurons, including midbrain dopaminergic neurons. We recently reported EGF and EGF-receptor abnormalities in both the brain tissues and blood of schizophrenic patients. Administration of EGF to neonatal rats transiently increases tyrosine hydroxylase expression and subsequently results in behavioral abnormalities in prepulse inhibition of acoustic startle, locomotor activity, and social interaction after development. The enhanced locomotor and stereotypic responses of the neonatally EGF-treated rats are considered to be an animal model for positive schizophrenia symptoms. In the present study, we investigated psychostimulant sensitivity of neonatally EGF-treated rats. At the adult stage, EGF-treated rats were challenged with cocaine (15 mg/kg) or methamphetamine (1 mg/kg), and conditioned place preference and locomotor activity were examined. The rats that received EGF during the neonatal period had significantly higher conditioned place preference for where cocaine or methamphetamine was administered than controls. The neonatal EGF treatment enhanced behavioral response to methamphetamine and behavioral sensitization to cocaine at the adult stage. Drug-naive controls gradually increased locomotor responses to cocaine during their daily injections, whereas EGF-treated rats exhibited a larger increase in cocaine responses. These results indicate that overactivation of the EGF receptors (ErbB1) during the neonatal period influences future sensitivity to psychostimulants. Our findings indicate a potential link between EGF-receptor activation and drug addiction.

  20. Individual differences in cocaine-induced locomotor activity of male Sprague-Dawley rats are not explained by plasma corticosterone levels.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Anna M; Kleschen, Melissa J; Zahniser, Nancy R

    2010-05-26

    Humans differ in their initial response to, and subsequent abuse of, addictive drugs like cocaine. Rodents also exhibit marked individual differences in responsiveness to cocaine. Previously, we classified male Sprague-Dawley rats as either low or high cocaine responders (LCRs or HCRs, respectively), based on their acute low-dose cocaine-induced locomotor activity, and found that with repeated drug exposure LCRs exhibit greater cocaine locomotor sensitization, reward and reinforcement than HCRs. Differential cocaine-induced increases in striatal dopamine help to explain the LCR/HCR phenotypes. Differential levels of stress and/or anxiety could also contribute but have not been explored. Here we measured open-field activity and plasma corticosterone levels both pre- and post-cocaine treatment in LCRs, HCRs, and saline-treated controls. The three groups did not differ in baseline locomotor activity or corticosterone levels. Importantly, LCR/HCR differences in corticosterone levels were also not observed following acute cocaine (10mg/kg, i.p.), when cocaine induced approximately 3.5-fold greater locomotor activity in HCRs than LCRs. Additionally, there were no LCR/HCR differences in plasma corticosterone levels following 5 days of once-daily cocaine, during which time LCRs developed locomotor sensitization such that their cocaine-induced locomotor activity no longer differed from that of HCRs. Likewise, there were no group activity differences in any of four concentric zones within the open-field chamber. In summary, neither plasma corticosterone levels nor thigmotaxis-type anxiety appears to be a factor that contributes to the observed cocaine-induced LCR/HCR behavioral differences.

  1. The peacock train does not handicap cursorial locomotor performance

    PubMed Central

    Thavarajah, Nathan K.; Tickle, Peter G.; Nudds, Robert L.; Codd, Jonathan R.

    2016-01-01

    Exaggerated traits, like the peacock train, are recognized as classic examples of sexual selection. The evolution of sexual traits is often considered paradoxical as, although they enhance reproductive success, they are widely presumed to hinder movement and survival. Many exaggerated traits represent an additional mechanical load that must be carried by the animal and therefore may influence the metabolic cost of locomotion and constrain locomotor performance. Here we conducted respirometry experiments on peacocks and demonstrate that the exaggerated sexually selected train does not compromise locomotor performance in terms of the metabolic cost of locomotion and its kinematics. Indeed, peacocks with trains had a lower absolute and mass specific metabolic cost of locomotion. Our findings suggest that adaptations that mitigate any costs associated with exaggerated morphology are central in the evolution of sexually selected traits. PMID:27805067

  2. Multi-terrain locomotor interactions in flying snakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeaton, Isaac; Baumgardner, Grant; Ross, Shane; Socha, John

    Arboreal snakes of the genus Chrysopelea are the only known snakes to glide. To execute aerial locomotion, a snake uses one of several stereotyped jumps from a tree into the air, while simultaneously flattening its body into an aerodynamically favorable shape. Large amplitude traveling waves are propagated posteriorly during the stable glide, while landing involves body wrapping, passive body compression, and energy absorption through compliance in the landing substrate to dissipate the accumulated kinetic energy from the glide. In all of these locomotor events, from interacting with cylindrical branches, falling through the air, grasping compliant tree branches and leaves, to landing on solid ground, snakes appropriate the same body morphology and perhaps the same basic neural mechanisms. Here we discuss our use of computational models and animal experiments to understand how flying snakes interact with and locomote on and through multiple media, potentially providing principles for legless locomotor designs. Supported by NSF 1351322.

  3. Repertoires of Spike Avalanches Are Modulated by Behavior and Novelty

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro, Tiago L.; Ribeiro, Sidarta; Copelli, Mauro

    2016-01-01

    Neuronal avalanches measured as consecutive bouts of thresholded field potentials represent a statistical signature that the brain operates near a critical point. In theory, criticality optimizes stimulus sensitivity, information transmission, computational capability and mnemonic repertoires size. Field potential avalanches recorded via multielectrode arrays from cortical slice cultures are repeatable spatiotemporal activity patterns. It remains unclear whether avalanches of action potentials observed in forebrain regions of freely-behaving rats also form recursive repertoires, and whether these have any behavioral relevance. Here, we show that spike avalanches, recorded from hippocampus (HP) and sensory neocortex of freely-behaving rats, constitute distinct families of recursive spatiotemporal patterns. A significant number of those patterns were specific to a behavioral state. Although avalanches produced during sleep were mostly similar to others that occurred during waking, the repertoire of patterns recruited during sleep differed significantly from that of waking. More importantly, exposure to novel objects increased the rate at which new patterns arose, also leading to changes in post-exposure repertoires, which were significantly different from those before the exposure. A significant number of families occurred exclusively during periods of whisker contact with objects, but few were associated with specific objects. Altogether, the results provide original evidence linking behavior and criticality at the spike level: spike avalanches form repertoires that emerge in waking, recur during sleep, are diversified by novelty and contribute to object representation. PMID:27047341

  4. Stability of auditory discrimination and novelty processing in physiological aging.

    PubMed

    Raggi, Alberto; Tasca, Domenica; Rundo, Francesco; Ferri, Raffaele

    2013-01-01

    Complex higher-order cognitive functions and their possible changes with aging are mandatory objectives of cognitive neuroscience. Event-related potentials (ERPs) allow investigators to probe the earliest stages of information processing. N100, Mismatch negativity (MMN) and P3a are auditory ERP components that reflect automatic sensory discrimination. The aim of the present study was to determine if N100, MMN and P3a parameters are stable in healthy aged subjects, compared to those of normal young adults. Normal young adults and older participants were assessed using standardized cognitive functional instruments and their ERPs were obtained with an auditory stimulation at two different interstimulus intervals, during a passive paradigm. All individuals were within the normal range on cognitive tests. No significant differences were found for any ERP parameters obtained from the two age groups. This study shows that aging is characterized by a stability of the auditory discrimination and novelty processing. This is important for the arrangement of normative for the detection of subtle preclinical changes due to abnormal brain aging.

  5. Stability of Auditory Discrimination and Novelty Processing in Physiological Aging

    PubMed Central

    Raggi, Alberto; Tasca, Domenica; Rundo, Francesco; Ferri, Raffaele

    2013-01-01

    Complex higher-order cognitive functions and their possible changes with aging are mandatory objectives of cognitive neuroscience. Event-related potentials (ERPs) allow investigators to probe the earliest stages of information processing. N100, Mismatch negativity (MMN) and P3a are auditory ERP components that reflect automatic sensory discrimination. The aim of the present study was to determine if N100, MMN and P3a parameters are stable in healthy aged subjects, compared to those of normal young adults. Normal young adults and older participants were assessed using standardized cognitive functional instruments and their ERPs were obtained with an auditory stimulation at two different interstimulus intervals, during a passive paradigm. All individuals were within the normal range on cognitive tests. No significant differences were found for any ERP parameters obtained from the two age groups. This study shows that aging is characterized by a stability of the auditory discrimination and novelty processing. This is important for the arrangement of normative for the detection of subtle preclinical changes due to abnormal brain aging. PMID:23242351

  6. Repertoires of Spike Avalanches Are Modulated by Behavior and Novelty.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Tiago L; Ribeiro, Sidarta; Copelli, Mauro

    2016-01-01

    Neuronal avalanches measured as consecutive bouts of thresholded field potentials represent a statistical signature that the brain operates near a critical point. In theory, criticality optimizes stimulus sensitivity, information transmission, computational capability and mnemonic repertoires size. Field potential avalanches recorded via multielectrode arrays from cortical slice cultures are repeatable spatiotemporal activity patterns. It remains unclear whether avalanches of action potentials observed in forebrain regions of freely-behaving rats also form recursive repertoires, and whether these have any behavioral relevance. Here, we show that spike avalanches, recorded from hippocampus (HP) and sensory neocortex of freely-behaving rats, constitute distinct families of recursive spatiotemporal patterns. A significant number of those patterns were specific to a behavioral state. Although avalanches produced during sleep were mostly similar to others that occurred during waking, the repertoire of patterns recruited during sleep differed significantly from that of waking. More importantly, exposure to novel objects increased the rate at which new patterns arose, also leading to changes in post-exposure repertoires, which were significantly different from those before the exposure. A significant number of families occurred exclusively during periods of whisker contact with objects, but few were associated with specific objects. Altogether, the results provide original evidence linking behavior and criticality at the spike level: spike avalanches form repertoires that emerge in waking, recur during sleep, are diversified by novelty and contribute to object representation.

  7. Is there still room for novelty, in histochemical papers?

    PubMed

    Pellicciari, Carlo

    2016-12-16

    Histochemistry continues to be widely applied in biomedical research, being nowadays mostly addressed to detect and locate single molecules or molecular complexes inside cells and tissues, and to relate structural organization and function at the high resolution of the more advanced microscopical techniques. In the attempt to see whether histochemical novelties may be found in the recent literature, the articles published in the European Journal of Histochemistry in the period 2014-2016 have been reviewed. In the majority of the published papers, standardized methods have been preferred by scientists to make their results reliably comparable with the data in the literature, but  many papers (approximately one fourth of the published articles) described novel histochemical methods and procedures.  It is worth noting that there is a growing interest for minimally-invasive in vivo techniques (magnetic resonance imaging, autofluorescence spectroscopy) which may parallel conventional  histochemical analyses to obtain information not only on the morphological features of living organs and tissues, but also on their functional, biophysical and molecular characteristics. Thanks to this unceasing methodological refinement, histochemistry will continue to provide innovative applications in the biomedical field.

  8. Chronic nicotine alters cannabinoid-mediated locomotor activity and receptor density in periadolescent but not adult male rats

    PubMed Central

    Werling, Linda L.; Reed, Stephanie Collins; Wade, Dean; Izenwasser, Sari

    2009-01-01

    A significant number of youths use cigarettes, and more than half of the youths who smoke daily also use illicit drugs. The focus of these studies is on how exposure to nicotine affects subsequent responses to both nicotine and cannabinoids in adolescents compared with adults. We have shown previously that chronic treatment with nicotine produces sensitization to its locomotor-activating effects in female and adult rats but not male adolescent rats. To better understand the effects of nicotine on adolescent and adult rats, rats were injected with nicotine or saline for 7 days and, on day 8, either challenged with delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ9-THC) or the cannabinoid agonist CP 55,940 and tested for locomotor activity, or the brains were removed for quantitative autoradiography studies of the cannabinoid1 receptor. A separate group of rats was treated with nicotine plus the cannabinoid antagonist AM 251 and then challenged with CP 55,940. In adolescent male rats, nicotine administration led to sensitization to the locomotor-decreasing effects of both Δ9-THC and CP 55,940, but in adult male rats, the response to either drug was unchanged compared to controls. The effect of nicotine on CP 55,940-mediated locomotor activity was blocked by co-administration of AM 251 with the nicotine. Further, cannabinoid receptor density was increased in the prelimbic prefrontal cortex, ventral tegmental area, and select regions of the hippocampus in adolescent male rats pretreated with nicotine compared to vehicle-treated controls. There were no significant changes in cannabinoid receptor binding, however, in any of the brain regions examined in adult males pretreated with nicotine. The prelimbic prefrontal cortex and the hippocampus have been shown previously to be involved in stimulant reinforcement; thus it is possible that these changes contribute to the unique behavioral effects of chronic nicotine and subsequent drug administration in adolescents compared with adults. PMID

  9. Locomotor Experience and Use of Social Information Are Posture Specific

    PubMed Central

    Adolph, Karen E.; Tamis-LeMonda, Catherine S.; Ishak, Shaziela; Karasik, Lana B.; Lobo, Sharon A.

    2015-01-01

    The authors examined the effects of locomotor experience on infants’ perceptual judgments in a potentially risky situation—descending steep and shallow slopes—while manipulating social incentives to determine where perceptual judgments are most malleable. Twelve-month-old experienced crawlers and novice walkers were tested on an adjustable sloping walkway as their mothers encouraged and discouraged descent. A psychophysical procedure was used to estimate infants’ ability to crawl/walk down slopes, followed by test trials in which mothers encouraged and discouraged infants to crawl/walk down. Both locomotor experience and social incentives affected perceptual judgments. In the encourage condition, crawlers only attempted safe slopes within their abilities, but walkers repeatedly attempted impossibly risky slopes, replicating previous work. The discourage condition showed where judgments are most malleable. When mothers provided negative social incentives, crawlers occasionally avoided safe slopes, and walkers occasionally avoided the most extreme 50° increment, although they attempted to walk on more than half the trials. Findings indicate that both locomotor experience and social incentives play key roles in adaptive responding, but the benefits are specific to the posture that infants use for balance and locomotion. PMID:18999332

  10. Locomotor experience and use of social information are posture specific.

    PubMed

    Adolph, Karen E; Tamis-LeMonda, Catherine S; Ishak, Shaziela; Karasik, Lana B; Lobo, Sharon A

    2008-11-01

    The authors examined the effects of locomotor experience on infants' perceptual judgments in a potentially risky situation--descending steep and shallow slopes--while manipulating social incentives to determine where perceptual judgments are most malleable. Twelve-month-old experienced crawlers and novice walkers were tested on an adjustable sloping walkway as their mothers encouraged and discouraged descent. A psychophysical procedure was used to estimate infants' ability to crawl/walk down slopes, followed by test trials in which mothers encouraged and discouraged infants to crawl/walk down. Both locomotor experience and social incentives affected perceptual judgments. In the encourage condition, crawlers only attempted safe slopes within their abilities, but walkers repeatedly attempted impossibly risky slopes, replicating previous work. The discourage condition showed where judgments are most malleable. When mothers provided negative social incentives, crawlers occasionally avoided safe slopes, and walkers occasionally avoided the most extreme 50 degrees increment, although they attempted to walk on more than half the trials. Findings indicate that both locomotor experience and social incentives play key roles in adaptive responding, but the benefits are specific to the posture that infants use for balance and locomotion.

  11. Fluctuation-Driven Neural Dynamics Reproduce Drosophila Locomotor Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Cruchet, Steeve; Gustafson, Kyle; Benton, Richard; Floreano, Dario

    2015-01-01

    The neural mechanisms determining the timing of even simple actions, such as when to walk or rest, are largely mysterious. One intriguing, but untested, hypothesis posits a role for ongoing activity fluctuations in neurons of central action selection circuits that drive animal behavior from moment to moment. To examine how fluctuating activity can contribute to action timing, we paired high-resolution measurements of freely walking Drosophila melanogaster with data-driven neural network modeling and dynamical systems analysis. We generated fluctuation-driven network models whose outputs—locomotor bouts—matched those measured from sensory-deprived Drosophila. From these models, we identified those that could also reproduce a second, unrelated dataset: the complex time-course of odor-evoked walking for genetically diverse Drosophila strains. Dynamical models that best reproduced both Drosophila basal and odor-evoked locomotor patterns exhibited specific characteristics. First, ongoing fluctuations were required. In a stochastic resonance-like manner, these fluctuations allowed neural activity to escape stable equilibria and to exceed a threshold for locomotion. Second, odor-induced shifts of equilibria in these models caused a depression in locomotor frequency following olfactory stimulation. Our models predict that activity fluctuations in action selection circuits cause behavioral output to more closely match sensory drive and may therefore enhance navigation in complex sensory environments. Together these data reveal how simple neural dynamics, when coupled with activity fluctuations, can give rise to complex patterns of animal behavior. PMID:26600381

  12. Sigma ligand S14905 and locomotor activity in mice.

    PubMed

    Hascoet, M; Bourin, M; Payeur, R; Lombet, A; Peglion, J L

    1995-12-01

    The binding and locomotor profile of a new sigma ligand, S14905, (isobutyl-N-(1-indan-2yl-piperid-4-yl)N-methyl carbamate, furamate) was studied. The binding data revealed that S14905 has a high affinity for sigma receptors and very low affinity for both dopamine D1 and D2 receptors. We have demonstrated that this sigma ligand prevents the locomotor stimulation induced by morphine (32 and 64 mg/kg), cocaine (16 mg/kg), amphetamine (4 mg/kg) and adrafinil (32 mg/kg) at doses lower than those required to depress spontaneous locomotor activity. The antagonism observed in the present study seems to be more specific of morphine induced hyperlocomotion. The high affinity of this compound for sigma receptors makes it a good choice to study the role of this receptor in the CNS. In addition, S14905 does not directly block dopamine receptors but may modulate them in some manner, and would thus warrant further study as a potential atypical antipsychotic agent, and an antagonist for the hyperactivity induced by opiate drug.

  13. AB296. SPR-23 Aberrant bladder reflexes can drive hind limb locomotor activity following complete suprasacral spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Inouye, Brian M.; Brooks, Jillene M.; Degoski, Danielle J.; Hughes, Francis M.; Purves, J. Todd; Fraser, Matthew O.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Many rats with chronic suprasacral spinal cord injury (SCI) demonstrate hind limb locomotor activity (HLLA) in response to external crede or high pressure contractions during cystometry. We propose that this aberrant, pressure-driven bladder reflex pathway may be harnessed to facilitate walking in SCI patients. As a first step in exploring this possibility, we examined the relationship between intravesical pressure (IVP) and HLLA in chronic suprasacral SCI rats. Methods Female rats (4 weeks post-SCI at T9-10, n=16) were anesthetized with isoflurane and fitted with transvesical catheters and right quadriceps EMG electrodes to monitor bladder and hind limb locomotor activities, respectively. The animals were mounted in Ballman restraint cages to which they had been previously acclimated. The catheter was connected to a pressure transducer, an infusion pump, and a saline-filled reservoir mounted on a metered vertical pole (pressure clamp). After 30 min of recovery from anesthesia, the bladder was filled at 0.1 mL/min with saline to verify bladder-to-bladder reflex activity for 30 min. IVP was then increased in an interrupted stepwise fashion from 0–120 cmH2O at 10 cmH2O increments. Each step consisted of five minutes: 3 minutes at the new pressure followed by 2 minutes at 0 cmH2O. IVP and the number of HLLA events (as defined by rhythmic EMG discharges of 3–10 cycles/event) were recorded for each pressure step. This process was repeated for two more trials for each rat to assess the durability of the reflex. Data were analyzed using ANOVA with repeated measures both within and across pressure escalation trials. P<0.05 was considered significant. Results ANOVA revealed that locomotor events increased with increasing IVP and decreased with the number of escalation trials (P<0.0001 for both effects). The increase in the number of locomotor events with increasing IVP appeared to plateau at ~50–60 cmH2O (P<0.05 for all). The average of the maximal number of

  14. Locomotor problems of supersonic aviation and astronautics.

    PubMed

    Remes, P

    1989-04-01

    Modern high-speed aviation and space flight are fraught with many problems and require a high standard of health and fitness. Those responsible for the health of pilots must appreciate the importance of early diagnosis even before symptoms appear. This is particularly true in terms of preventing spinal injuries where even a single Schmorl's node may make a pilot unfit for high-speed flying. Spinal fractures are frequent during emergency ejection and landing. Helicopter crews are particularly prone to spinal disc degeneration due to vibration. By effective lowering of vibration by changes in the seats, a reduction in such lesions is possible. The osteoporosis and muscle atrophy occurring among astronauts subjected to prolonged weightlessness can be prevented by regular physical exercises.

  15. Decreased aggressive and locomotor behaviors in Betta splendens after exposure to fluoxetine.

    PubMed

    Kohlert, Jess G; Mangan, Brian P; Kodra, Christine; Drako, Linsay; Long, Emily; Simpson, Holly

    2012-02-01

    The failure of sewage treatment plants to remove pharmaceuticals such as fluoxetine from waste water has become a concern given that these products are being detected in the surface waters of many countries of the world. The effects of fluoxetine in sub-lethal doses on the neural systems and behaviors of aquatic life are worthy of investigation. This study investigated the effects of sub-lethal amounts fluoxetine dissolved in water on the aggressive and locomotor behaviors of 44 male Betta splendens. Fish treated with 705 microg/l of fluoxetine and 350 microg/l of fluoxetine generally demonstrated significant decreases in locomotion and number of aggressive attacks compared to 0 microg/l of fluoxetine (controls) on Days 11 and 19 of drug exposure and persisted for at least 13 days after removal of fluoxetine. Consistent with decreases in the number of aggressive attacks, there was a significant increase in aggression-response time to a perceived intruder for treated males on Days 11 and 19 and persisted for 6 days following removal of fluoxetine. However, the differences in aggressive and locomotor behaviors seen in the fluoxetine-treated groups were indistinguishable from controls three weeks following drug removal.

  16. Baclofen blocks the development of sensitization to the locomotor stimulant effect of amphetamine.

    PubMed

    Bartoletti, M; Gubellini, C; Ricci, F; Gaiardi, M

    2005-11-01

    The GABAB agonist baclofen (BCF) has recently been reported to block the expression of sensitization to the locomotor effect of amphetamine (AMPH), and to reverse it after repeated administration. The present study was undertaken to investigate whether baclofen could also prevent the development of sensitization to the psychostimulant. Chronic AMPH treatment (1.5 mg/kg i.p. for 10 days) led to an increased locomotor response to AMPH (1.5 mg/kg) when the animals were challenged 3 and 30 days after the end of repeated treatment. Chronic co-administration of BCF (2 mg/kg, i.p.) and AMPH blocked the development of sensitization to the stimulant effect of AMPH. An ancillary experiment excluded that a 'state-dependency' hypothesis could account for the effect of baclofen. Furthermore, a previous repeated treatment with baclofen alone had no influence either on the acute AMPH effect or on the subsequent development of sensitization to AMPH. In conclusion, the results confirm that GABAB receptors play an important role in the acquisition of AMPH behavioural sensitization and further support a potential use of GABAB agonists in the treatment of psychostimulant addiction.

  17. Training as an influential factor on the locomotor pattern in Andalusian horses.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, A; Santisteban, R; Rubio, M D; Vivo, R; Agüera, E I; Escribano, B M; Castejón, F M

    1997-10-01

    The physiological and metabolic adaptations to exercise of the Andalusian horse seem to differ slightly from those found in other breeds. The authors studied the locomotor adaptation of 18 Andalusian horses to a training programme in relation to anaerobic energy metabolism, efficacy of the training programme, and changes associated with the onset of fatigue. They also tried to find out if these changes had become diminished by training. Several locomotor variables during trotting and galloping were determined and plasma lactate concentrations were measured before training and after two training periods of different lengths. While trotting after training, an increase in the duration of the restraint phase, a reduction in the propulsion phase and a decrease in the duration and length of step were observed. During galloping, training caused a reduction in stride length but an increase in stride frequency. Significant correlations were obtained between stride duration, frequency and length of step and lactate concentrations. The training might have caused a shift in metabolism from anaerobic to aerobic predominance. This reduction was coupled with a decrease in stride duration, in response to a shorter stance phase duration and an increase in stride frequency. A reduction in the fatigue level was not observed. The study concludes that this training programme was not sufficient for improving the physical capacity of Andalusian horses.

  18. Effects of Neurotensin-2 Receptor Deletion on Sensorimotor Gating and Locomotor Activity

    PubMed Central

    Feifel, David; Pang, Zheng; Shilling, Paul D.; Melendez, Gilia; Schreiber, Rudy; Button, Donald

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY Endogenous neurotensin (NT) has been implicated in brain processes relevant to schizophrenia as well as the therapeutic effects of antipsychotic drugs (APDs) used to treat this disorder. Converging evidence suggests that NT1 receptors mediate the antipsychotic-like effects of NT, such as prepulse inhibition (PPI) elevation. However, the role of NT2 receptors in these effects is not known. To investigate the contribution of NT2 receptors to the regulation of PPI, we measured baseline PPI and acoustic startle response (ASR), in male and female wild type (WT) and NT2 knockout (KO) mice. For comparison, we also measured locomotor activity. Baseline PPI was significantly elevated in both male (P < 0.01) and female (P < 0.01) NT2 KO compared to WT mice, while ASR was significantly decreased in KO mice of both genders (P < 0.01). In contrast, female but not male KO mice exhibited significantly less baseline ambulations (P < 0.05). These data support the regulation of baseline PPI, ASR and locomotor activity by endogenous NT acting at the NT2 receptor. Further studies investigating the role of NT2 receptors in the modulation of APD-like effects are warranted. PMID:20399236

  19. Effects of spatial memory on morphine CPP and locomotor sensitization in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiaolin; Sun, Wei; Li, Xinwang; Tan, Shuping; Zhang, Xiangyang

    2015-10-01

    Drug addiction is associated with memory processes. We simultaneously measured conditioned place preference (CPP) and locomotor sensitization to investigate the influence of spatial memory retrieval on morphine reward and psychomotor excitement. According to their performance in space probe trial involving the Morris water maze mice were assigned to high (including morphine and saline subgroups, H-Mor and H-Sal) and low spatial memory retrieval ability groups (L-Mor and L-Sal). Morphine (10mg/kg) produced significant CPP in L-Mor and H-Mor mice, although, L-Mor mice showed a significantly greater response to morphine. During the development period of behavior sensitization, no significant group-by-day interaction was found. However, locomotor activities of L-Mor mice were also significantly higher than H-Mor mice during the expression period of behavior sensitization. Our findings suggested that the spatial memory retrieval ability of mice influences morphine CPP, as well as behavioral sensitization. Thus, spatial memory might be implicated in drug addiction.

  20. Sensory-evoked perturbations of locomotor activity by sparse sensory input: a computational study

    PubMed Central

    Brownstone, Robert M.

    2015-01-01

    Sensory inputs from muscle, cutaneous, and joint afferents project to the spinal cord, where they are able to affect ongoing locomotor activity. Activation of sensory input can initiate or prolong bouts of locomotor activity depending on the identity of the sensory afferent activated and the timing of the activation within the locomotor cycle. However, the mechanisms by which afferent activity modifies locomotor rhythm and the distribution of sensory afferents to the spinal locomotor networks have not been determined. Considering the many sources of sensory inputs to the spinal cord, determining this distribution would provide insights into how sensory inputs are integrated to adjust ongoing locomotor activity. We asked whether a sparsely distributed set of sensory inputs could modify ongoing locomotor activity. To address this question, several computational models of locomotor central pattern generators (CPGs) that were mechanistically diverse and generated locomotor-like rhythmic activity were developed. We show that sensory inputs restricted to a small subset of the network neurons can perturb locomotor activity in the same manner as seen experimentally. Furthermore, we show that an architecture with sparse sensory input improves the capacity to gate sensory information by selectively modulating sensory channels. These data demonstrate that sensory input to rhythm-generating networks need not be extensively distributed. PMID:25673740

  1. Protective effects of chronic mild stress during adolescence in the low-novelty responder rat.

    PubMed

    Rana, Samir; Nam, Hyungwoo; Glover, Matthew E; Akil, Huda; Watson, Stanley J; Clinton, Sarah M; Kerman, Ilan A

    2016-01-01

    Stress-elicited behavioral and physiologic responses vary widely across individuals and depend on a combination of environmental and genetic factors. Adolescence is an important developmental period when neural circuits that guide emotional behavior and stress reactivity are still maturing. A critical question is whether stress exposure elicits contrasting effects when it occurs during adolescence versus adulthood. We previously found that Sprague-Dawley rats selectively bred for low-behavioral response to novelty (bred Low Responders; bLRs) are particularly sensitive to chronic unpredictable mild stress (CMS) exposure in adulthood, which exacerbates their typically high levels of spontaneous depressive- and anxiety-like behavior. Given developmental processes known to occur during adolescence, we sought to determine whether the impact of CMS on bLR rats is equivalent when they are exposed to it during adolescence as compared with adulthood. Young bLR rats were either exposed to CMS or control condition from postnatal days 35-60. As adults, we found that CMS-exposed bLRs maintained high levels of sucrose preference and exhibited increased social exploration along with decreased immobility on the forced swim test compared with bLR controls. These data indicate a protective effect of CMS exposure during adolescence in bLR rats.

  2. Predictability and novelty in literal language comprehension: an ERP study.

    PubMed

    Davenport, Tristan; Coulson, Seana

    2011-10-18

    Linguists have suggested that one mechanism for the creative extension of meaning in language involves mapping, or constructing correspondences between conceptual domains. For example, the sentence, "The clever boys used a cardboard box as a boat," sets up a novel mapping between the concepts cardboard box and boat, while "His main method of transportation is a boat," relies on a more conventional mapping between method of transportation and boat. To examine the electrophysiological signature of this mapping process, electroencephalogram (EEG) was recorded from the scalp as healthy adults read three sorts of sentences: low-cloze (unpredictable) conventional ("His main method of transportation is a boat,"), low-cloze novel mapp'ing ("The clever boys used a cardboard box as a boat,"), and high-cloze (predictable) conventional ("The only way to get around Venice is to navigate the canals in a boat,"). Event-related brain potentials (ERPs) were time-locked to sentence final words. The novel and conventional conditions were matched for cloze probability (a measure of predictability based on the sentence context), lexical association between the sentence frame and the final word (using latent semantic analysis), and other factors known to influence ERPs to language stimuli. The high-cloze conventional control condition was included to compare the effects of mapping conventionality to those of predictability. The N400 component of the ERPs was affected by predictability but not by conventionality. By contrast, a late positivity was affected both by the predictability of sentence final words, being larger for words in low-cloze contexts that made target words difficult to predict, and by novelty, as words in the novel condition elicited a larger positivity 700-900ms than the same words in the (cloze-matched) conventional condition.

  3. Nicotine-induced place conditioning and locomotor activity in an adolescent animal model of attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).

    PubMed

    Watterson, Elizabeth; Daniels, Carter W; Watterson, Lucas R; Mazur, Gabriel J; Brackney, Ryan J; Olive, M Foster; Sanabria, Federico

    2015-09-15

    Attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a risk factor for tobacco use and dependence. This study examines the responsiveness to nicotine of an adolescent model of ADHD, the spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR). The conditioned place preference (CPP) procedure was used to assess nicotine-induced locomotion and conditioned reward in SHR and the Wistar Kyoto (WKY) control strain over a range of nicotine doses (0.0, 0.1, 0.3 and 0.6 mg/kg). Prior to conditioning, SHRs were more active and less biased toward one side of the CPP chamber than WKY rats. Following conditioning, SHRs developed CPP to the highest dose of nicotine (0.6 mg/kg), whereas WKYs did not develop CPP to any nicotine dose tested. During conditioning, SHRs displayed greater locomotor activity in the nicotine-paired compartment than in the saline-paired compartment across conditioning trials. SHRs that received nicotine (0.1, 0.3, 0.6 mg/kg) in the nicotine-paired compartment showed an increase in locomotor activity between conditioning trials. Nicotine did not significantly affect WKY locomotor activity. These findings suggest that the SHR strain is a suitable model for studying ADHD-related nicotine use and dependence, but highlights potential limitations of the WKY control strain and the CPP procedure for modeling ADHD-related nicotine reward.

  4. Editorial: Optics Letters continues to thrive, will require novelty and impact statement at submission.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xi-Cheng

    2016-04-15

    Optics Letters will begin to require authors to provide a novelty and impact statement at submission to aid in the peer review process. Also, some important metrics, including the journal's submissions, turnaround times, and Impact Factor, are shared.

  5. Acetylcholine from the mesopontine tegmental nuclei differentially affects methamphetamine induced locomotor activity and neurotransmitter levels in the mesolimbic pathway

    PubMed Central

    Dobbs, Lauren K.; Mark, Gregory P.

    2012-01-01

    Methamphetamine (MA) increases dopamine (DA) levels within the mesolimbic pathway and acetylcholine (ACh), a neurotransmitter known to increase DA cell firing and release and mediate reinforcement, within the ventral tegmental area (VTA). The laterodorsal tegmental (LDT) and pedunculopontine tegmental (PPT) nuclei provide cholinergic input to the VTA; however, the contribution of LDT- and PPT-derived ACh to MA-induced DA and ACh levels and locomotor activation remains unknown. The first experiment examined the role of LDT-derived ACh in MA locomotor activation by reversibly inhibiting these neurons with bilateral intra-LDT microinjections of the M2 receptor agonist oxotremorine (OXO). Male C57BL/6 J mice were given a bilateral 0.1 µl OXO (0, 1, or 10 nM/side) microinjection immediately prior to IP saline or MA (2 mg/kg). The highest OXO concentration significantly inhibited both saline-and MA-primed locomotor activity. In a second set of experiments we characterized the individual contributions of ACh originating in the LDT or pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus (PPT) to MA-induced levels of ACh and DA by administering intra-LDT or PPT OXO and performing in vivo microdialysis in the VTA and NAc. Intra-LDT OXO dose-dependently attenuated the MA-induced increase in ACh within the VTA but had no effect on DA in NAc. Intra-PPT OXO had no effect on ACh or DA levels within the VTA or NAc, respectively. We conclude that LDT, but not PPT, ACh is important in locomotor behavior and the cholinergic, but not dopaminergic, response to systemic MA. PMID:21945297

  6. Suppression of Locomotor Activity in Female C57Bl/6J Mice Treated with Interleukin-1β: Investigating a Method for the Study of Fatigue in Laboratory Animals

    PubMed Central

    Bonsall, David R.; Kim, Hyunji; Tocci, Catherine; Ndiaye, Awa; Petronzio, Abbey; McKay-Corkum, Grace; Molyneux, Penny C.; Scammell, Thomas E.; Harrington, Mary E.

    2015-01-01

    Fatigue is a disabling symptom in patients with multiple sclerosis and Parkinson’s Disease, and is also common in patients with traumatic brain injury, cancer, and inflammatory disorders. Little is known about the neurobiology of fatigue, in part due to the lack of an approach to induce fatigue in laboratory animals. Fatigue is a common response to systemic challenge by pathogens, a response in part mediated through action of the pro-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β). We investigated the behavioral responses of mice to IL-1β. Female C57Bl/6J mice of 3 ages were administered IL-1β at various doses i.p. Interleukin-1β reduced locomotor activity, and sensitivity increased with age. Further experiments were conducted with middle-aged females. Centrally administered IL-1β dose-dependently reduced locomotor activity. Using doses of IL-1β that caused suppression of locomotor activity, we measured minimal signs of sickness, such as hyperthermia, pain or anhedonia (as measured with abdominal temperature probes, pre-treatment with the analgesic buprenorphine and through sucrose preference, respectively), all of which are responses commonly reported with higher doses. We found that middle-aged orexin-/- mice showed equivalent effects of IL-1β on locomotor activity as seen in wild-type controls, suggesting that orexins are not necessary for IL-1β -induced reductions in wheel-running. Given that the availability and success of therapeutic treatments for fatigue is currently limited, we examined the effectiveness of two potential clinical treatments, modafinil and methylphenidate. We found that these treatments were variably successful in restoring locomotor activity after IL-1β administration. This provides one step toward development of a satisfactory animal model of the multidimensional experience of fatigue, a model that could allow us to determine possible pathways through which inflammation induces fatigue, and could lead to novel treatments for

  7. Association of novelty-related behaviors and intravenous cocaine self-administration in Diversity Outbred mice

    PubMed Central

    Dickson, Price E.; Ndukum, Juliet; Wilcox, Troy; Clark, James; Roy, Brittany; Zhang, Lifeng; Li, Yun; Lin, Da-Ting; Chesler, Elissa J.

    2016-01-01

    Rationale Preference for and reaction to novelty are strongly associated with addiction to cocaine and other drugs. However, the genetic variants and molecular mechanisms underlying these phenomena remain largely unknown. Although the relationship between novelty- and addiction-related traits has been observed in rats, studies in mice have failed to demonstrate this association. New, genetically diverse, high-precision mouse populations including Diversity Outbred (DO) mice provide an opportunity to assess an expanded range of behavioral variation enabling detection of associations of novelty- and addiction-related traits in mice. Methods To examine the relationship between novelty- and addiction-related traits, male and female DO mice were tested on open field exploration, hole board exploration, and novelty preference followed by intravenous cocaine self-administration (IVSA; ten 2-hour sessions of fixed-ratio 1 and one 6-hour session of progressive ratio). Results We observed high variation of cocaine IVSA in DO mice with 43% reaching and 57% not reaching conventional acquisition criteria. As a group, mice that did not reach these criteria still demonstrated significant lever discrimination. Mice experiencing catheter occlusion or other technical issues (n = 17) were excluded from analysis. Novelty-related behaviors were positively associated with cocaine IVSA. Multivariate analysis of associations among novelty- and addiction-related traits revealed a large degree of shared variance (45%). Conclusions Covariation among cocaine IVSA and novelty-related phenotypes in DO mice indicates that this relationship is amenable to genetic dissection. The high genetic precision and phenotypic diversity in the DO may facilitate discovery of previously undetectable mechanisms underlying predisposition to develop addiction disorders. PMID:25238945

  8. Degradation of mouse locomotor pattern in the absence of proprioceptive sensory feedback.

    PubMed

    Akay, Turgay; Tourtellotte, Warren G; Arber, Silvia; Jessell, Thomas M

    2014-11-25

    Mammalian locomotor programs are thought to be directed by the actions of spinal interneuron circuits collectively referred to as "central pattern generators." The contribution of proprioceptive sensory feedback to the coordination of locomotor activity remains less clear. We have analyzed changes in mouse locomotor pattern under conditions in which proprioceptive feedback is attenuated genetically and biomechanically. We find that locomotor pattern degrades upon elimination of proprioceptive feedback from muscle spindles and Golgi tendon organs. The degradation of locomotor pattern is manifest as the loss of interjoint coordination and alternation of flexor and extensor muscles. Group Ia/II sensory feedback from muscle spindles has a predominant influence in patterning the activity of flexor muscles, whereas the redundant activities of group Ia/II and group Ib afferents appear to determine the pattern of extensor muscle firing. These findings establish a role for proprioceptive feedback in the control of fundamental aspects of mammalian locomotor behavior.

  9. Rapid Sensitization of Physiological, Neuronal, and Locomotor Effects of Nicotine: Critical Role of Peripheral Drug Actions

    PubMed Central

    Lenoir, Magalie; Tang, Jeremy S.; Woods, Amina S.

    2013-01-01

    Repeated exposure to nicotine and other psychostimulant drugs produces persistent increases in their psychomotor and physiological effects (sensitization), a phenomenon related to the drugs' reinforcing properties and abuse potential. Here we examined the role of peripheral actions of nicotine in nicotine-induced sensitization of centrally mediated physiological parameters (brain, muscle, and skin temperatures), cortical and VTA EEG, neck EMG activity, and locomotion in freely moving rats. Repeated injections of intravenous nicotine (30 μg/kg) induced sensitization of the drug's effects on all these measures. In contrast, repeated injections of the peripherally acting analog of nicotine, nicotine pyrrolidine methiodide (nicotinePM, 30 μg/kg, i.v.) resulted in habituation (tolerance) of the same physiological, neuronal, and behavioral measures. However, after repeated nicotine exposure, acute nicotinePM injections induced nicotine-like physiological responses: powerful cortical and VTA EEG desynchronization, EMG activation, a large brain temperature increase, but weaker hyperlocomotion. Additionally, both the acute locomotor response to nicotine and nicotine-induced locomotor sensitization were attenuated by blockade of peripheral nicotinic receptors by hexamethonium (3 mg/kg, i.v.). These data suggest that the peripheral actions of nicotine, which precede its direct central actions, serve as a conditioned interoceptive cue capable of eliciting nicotine-like physiological and neural responses after repeated nicotine exposure. Thus, by providing a neural signal to the CNS that is repeatedly paired with the direct central effects of nicotine, the drug's peripheral actions play a critical role in the development of nicotine-induced physiological, neural, and behavioral sensitization. PMID:23761889

  10. Effects of chronic and acute methylphenidate hydrochloride (Ritalin) administration on locomotor activity, ultrasonic vocalizations, and neuromotor development in 3- to 11-day-old CD-1 mouse pups.

    PubMed

    Penner, M R; McFadyen, M P; Carrey, N; Brown, R E

    2001-11-01

    The present study examined the effects of chronic and acute treatment with methylphenidate hydrochloride (Ritalin) on isolation-induced ultrasonic vocalizations, spontaneous locomotor activity, and neuromotor coordination in 3- to 11-day-old CD-1 mouse pups. In Experiment 1, 3- to 11-day-old pups received daily injections of saline, 5 mg/kg or 20 mg/kg of methylphenidate hydrochloride, or no injection and were tested on postnatal Days 3, 5, 7, 9, and 11. Both doses of methylphenidate resulted in significant increases in locomotor activity at all ages, but had no significant effect on body weight, neuromotor development, or emission of ultrasonic vocalizations. In Experiment 2, pups were given a single dose of methylphenidate (5 or 20 mg/kg), saline, or no injection on one of postnatal Days 5, 7, 9, or 11. This acute methylphenidate treatment increased locomotor activity, but had no significant effects on ultrasonic vocalizations or neuromotor coordination. These results indicate that short-term, chronic methylphenidate treatment elevates locomotor responses, but has no immediate effects on anxietylike responses or on the development of neuromotor behavior of CD-1 mice in the first 11 days of life.

  11. On the relation between conceptual priming, neural priming, and novelty assessment.

    PubMed

    Habib, R

    2001-07-01

    A consistently reported finding in functional neuroimaging studies which compare processing of new information to processing of old information is a reduction in blood flow, and hence neural activity, associated with the old condition. This deactivation has been labeled neural priming. Some investigators have hypothesized that neural priming is the physiological mechanism underlying conceptual priming--a facilitation in the semantic processing of repeated information. Others, however, have hypothesized that neural priming reflects novelty assessment--a mechanism which minimizes the probability that redundant information will be stored in long-term memory. In this paper, the conceptual priming and novelty assessment hypotheses are compared and contrasted in order to ask, and tentatively answer, the question: Are conceptual priming and novelty assessment cognitively and neurophysiologically distinct? Based on a review of the literature, it is suggested that whereas novelty assessment and conceptual priming are distinct cognitive entities, they cannot be presently separated neurophysiologically. That is, some novelty assessment deactivations may in fact reflect priming, and some priming deactivations may in fact reflect novelty assessment.

  12. The Generation of Variation and The Developmental Basis for Evolutionary Novelty

    PubMed Central

    Hallgrímsson, Benedikt; Jamniczky, Heather A.; Young, Nathan M.; Rolian, Campbell; Schmidt-Ott, Urs; Marcucio, Ralph S.

    2013-01-01

    Organisms exhibit an incredible diversity of form, a fact that makes the evolution of novelty seemingly self-evident. However, despite the “obvious” case for novelty, defining this concept in evolutionary terms is highly problematic, so much so that some have suggested discarding it altogether. Approaches to this problem tend to take either an adaptation or development-based perspective, but we argue here that an exclusive focus on either of these misses the original intent of the novelty concept and undermines its practical utility. We instead propose that for a feature to be novel it must have evolved both by a transition between adaptive peaks on the fitness landscape and that this transition must have overcome a previous developmental constraint. This definition focuses novelty on the explanation of apparently difficult or low probability evolutionary transitions and highlights how the integration of developmental and functional considerations is necessary to evolutionary explanation. It further reinforces that novelty is a central concern not just of evolutionary developmental biology (i.e., “evo-devo”) but of evolutionary biology more generally. We explore this definition of novelty in light of four examples that range from the obvious to subtle. PMID:22649039

  13. Hippocampal Src kinase is required for novelty-induced enhancement of contextual fear extinction.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bing; Liang, Ri-Chu; Liu, Zheng-Shan; Luo, Bing; Ding, Ya; Chen, Zi-Xiang; Liao, Yong-Shi; Wang, Xiao-Guang

    2016-04-15

    Exposure to a novel environment enhances the extinction of contextual fear through the "tagging-and-capture" process. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms of novelty-induced enhancement of fear extinction are still unclear. NMDA receptor activity was recently revealed to be required for the enhancement of fear extinction caused by exposure to novelty. Src family kinases (SFKs) act as a molecular hub for regulation of NMDA receptors. We hypothesized that SFKs might be involved in novelty-induced enhancement of fear extinction. We found that the enhancement of fear extinction induced by novelty exposure is accompanied by Src kinase phosphorylation and activation in a restricted time window. Furthermore, intrahippocampal infusion of SFKs inhibitor PP2 inhibits Src kinase phosphorylation and activation, attenuates the activation of NR2B-containing NMDA receptors, and thereby reverses the enhancement of fear extinction induced by novelty exposure. These results suggested that Src kinase may serve as a behavioral tag in the procedural enhancement of fear extinction by novelty exposure.

  14. Hippocampus duality: Memory and novelty detection are subserved by distinct mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Barbeau, Emmanuel J; Chauvel, Patrick; Moulin, Christopher J A; Regis, Jean; Liégeois-Chauvel, Catherine

    2017-04-01

    The hippocampus plays a pivotal role both in novelty detection and in long-term memory. The physiological mechanisms underlying these behaviors have yet to be understood in humans. We recorded intracerebral evoked potentials within the hippocampus of epileptic patients (n = 10) during both memory and novelty detection tasks (targets in oddball tasks). We found that memory and detection tasks elicited late local field potentials in the hippocampus during the same period, but of opposite polarity (negative during novelty detection tasks, positive during memory tasks, ∼260-600 ms poststimulus onset, P < 0.05). Critically, these potentials had maximal amplitude on the same contact in the hippocampus for each patient. This pattern did not depend on the task as different types of memory and novelty detection tasks were used. It did not depend on the novelty of the stimulus or the difficulty of the task either. Two different hypotheses are discussed to account for this result: it is either due to the activation of CA1 pyramidal neurons by two different pathways such as the monosynaptic and trisynaptic entorhinal-hippocampus pathways, or to the activation of different neuronal populations, that is, differing either functionally (e.g., novelty/familiarity neurons) or located in different regions of the hippocampus (e.g., CA1/subiculum). In either case, these activities may integrate the activity of two distinct large-scale networks implementing externally or internally oriented, mutually exclusive, brain states. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Locomotor function in the early stage of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Carpinella, Ilaria; Crenna, Paolo; Calabrese, Elena; Rabuffetti, Marco; Mazzoleni, Paolo; Nemni, Raffaello; Ferrarin, Maurizio

    2007-12-01

    The cardinal motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease (PD) have been widely investigated with particular reference to abnormalities of steady-state walking. The great majority of studies, however are related to severe forms of PD patients (phases > = 3 of Hoehn and Yahr scale), where locomotor abnormalities are clearly manifested. Goal of the present study was to quantitatively describe locomotor symptoms in subjects with mild PD. Accordingly, a multitask protocol involving instrumental analysis of steady-state linear walking, initiation of gait, and turning while walking was applied to a group of patients with idiopathic PD in their early clinical stage (phases 1 and 2 of Hoehn and Yahr scale), as well as in age-matched elderly controls. Kinematic, kinetic, and myoelectric measures were obtained by optoelectronic motion analysis, force platform, and telemetric electromyography. Results in PD patients showed a tendency to bradykinetic gait, with reduction of walking speed and cadence. Impairments of gait initiation consisted in reduction of the backward shift of the center of pressure (CoP) and prolongation of the stepping phase. Alterations of the turning task were more consistent and included delayed reorientation of the head toward the new direction, altered head-upper trunk rotational strategy, and adoption of a greater number of steps to complete the turning. It is concluded that patients in the early stage of PD reveal mild alterations of steady-state linear walking and more significant anomalies in the transitional conditions, especially during changes in the travel direction. Quantitative analysis of nonstationary locomotor tasks might be a potentially useful starting point for further studies on the pathophysiology of PD.

  16. Locomotor energetics and leg length in hominid bipedality.

    PubMed

    Kramer, P A; Eck, G G

    2000-05-01

    Because bipedality is the quintessential characteristic of Hominidae, researchers have compared ancient forms of bipedality with modern human gait since the first clear evidence of bipedal australopithecines was unearthed over 70 years ago. Several researchers have suggested that the australopithecine form of bipedality was transitional between the quadrupedality of the African apes and modern human bipedality and, consequently, inefficient. Other researchers have maintained that australopithecine bipedality was identical to that of Homo. But is it reasonable to require that all forms of hominid bipedality must be the same in order to be optimized? Most attempts to evaluate the locomotor effectiveness of the australopithecines have, unfortunately, assumed that the locomotor anatomy of modern humans is the exemplar of consummate bipedality. Modern human anatomy is, however, the product of selective pressures present in the particular milieu in which Homo arose and it is not necessarily the only, or even the most efficient, bipedal solution possible. In this report, we investigate the locomotion of Australopithecus afarensis, as represented by AL 288-1, using standard mechanical analyses. The osteological anatomy of AL 288-1 and movement profiles derived from modern humans are applied to a dynamic model of a biped, which predicts the mechanical power required by AL 288-1 to walk at various velocities. This same procedure is used with the anatomy of a composite modern woman and a comparison made. We find that AL 288-1 expends less energy than the composite woman when locomoting at walking speeds. This energetic advantage comes, however, at a price: the preferred transition speed (from a walk to a run) of AL 288-1 was lower than that of the composite woman. Consequently, the maximum daily range of AL 288-1 may well have been substantially smaller than that of modern people. The locomotor anatomy of A. afarensis may have been optimized for a particular ecological niche

  17. Habitual Short Sleep Impacts Frontal Switch Mechanism in Attention to Novelty

    PubMed Central

    Gumenyuk, Valentina; Roth, Thomas; Korzyukov, Oleg; Jefferson, Catherine; Bowyer, Susan; Drake, Christopher L.

    2011-01-01

    Study Objectives: Reduced time in bed relative to biological sleep need is common. The impact of habitual short sleep on auditory attention has not been studied to date. In the current study, we utilized novelty oddball tasks to evaluate the effect of habitual short sleep on brain function underlying attention control processes measured by the mismatch negativity (MMN, index of pre-attentive stage), P3a (attention-dependent), and P3b (memory-dependent) event related brain potentials (ERPs). An extended time in bed in a separate study was used to evaluate the possible reversal of the impairments of these processes in habitual short sleepers. Methods: Ten self-defined short sleepers (total sleep time [TST] ≤ 6h) and 9 normal-sleeping subjects with TST 7-8 h, participated. ERPs were recorded via a 64-channel EEG system. Two test conditions: “ignore” and “attend” were implemented. The ERPs were analyzed and compared between groups on the 2 task conditions and frontal/central/parietal electrodes by 3-factor ANOVA. Sleep diary data were compared between groups by t-test. Sleep was recorded by the Zeo sleep monitoring system for a week in both habitual and extended sleep conditions at home. Results: The main findings of the present study show that short sleeping individuals had deficiency in activity of the MMN and P3a brain responses over frontal areas compared to normal-sleeping subjects. The P3b amplitude was increased over frontal areas and decreased over parietal with respect to the control group. Extension of time in bed for one week increased TST (from 5.7 h to 7.4 h), and concomitantly MMN amplitude increased from −0.1μV up to −1.25 μV over frontal areas. Conclusions: Reduced time in bed is associated with deficiency of the neuronal process associated with change detection, which may recover after one week of sleep extension, whereas attention-dependent neural processes do not normalize after this period of time in habitually short sleeping

  18. Predictive Measures of Locomotor Performance on an Unstable Walking Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bloomberg, J. J.; Peters, B. T.; Mulavara, A. P.; Caldwell, E. E.; Batson, C. D.; De Dios, Y. E.; Gadd, N. E.; Goel, R.; Wood, S. J.; Cohen, H. S.; Oddsson, L. I.; Seidler, R. D.

    2016-01-01

    Locomotion requires integration of visual, vestibular, and somatosensory information to produce the appropriate motor output to control movement. The degree to which these sensory inputs are weighted and reorganized in discordant sensory environments varies by individual and may be predictive of the ability to adapt to novel environments. The goals of this project are to: 1) develop a set of predictive measures capable of identifying individual differences in sensorimotor adaptability, and 2) use this information to inform the design of training countermeasures designed to enhance the ability of astronauts to adapt to gravitational transitions improving balance and locomotor performance after a Mars landing and enhancing egress capability after a landing on Earth.

  19. Locomotor Dysfunction after Spaceflight: Characterization and Countermeasure Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mulavara, A. P.; Cohen, H. S.; Peters, B. T.; Miller, C. A.; Brady, R.; Bloomberg, Jacob J.

    2007-01-01

    Astronauts returning from space flight show disturbances in locomotor control manifested by changes in various sub-systems including head-trunk coordination, dynamic visual acuity, lower limb muscle activation patterning and kinematics (Glasauer, et al., 1995; Bloomberg, et al., 1997; McDonald, et al., 1996; 1997; Layne, et al., 1997; 1998, 2001, 2004; Newman, et al., 1997; Bloomberg and Mulavara, 2003). These post flight changes in locomotor performance, due to neural adaptation to the microgravity conditions of space flight, affect the ability of crewmembers especially after a long duration mission to egress their vehicle and perform extravehicular activities soon after landing on Earth or following a landing on the surface of the Moon or Mars. At present, no operational training intervention is available pre- or in- flight to mitigate post flight locomotor disturbances. Our laboratory is currently developing a gait adaptability training program that is designed to facilitate recovery of locomotor function following a return to a gravitational environment. The training program exploits the ability of the sensorimotor system to generalize from exposure to multiple adaptive challenges during training so that the gait control system essentially "learns to learn" and therefore can reorganize more rapidly when faced with a novel adaptive challenge. Ultimately, the functional goal of an adaptive generalization countermeasure is not necessarily to immediately return movement patterns back to "normal". Rather the training regimen should facilitate the reorganization of available sensorimotor sub-systems to achieve safe and effective locomotion as soon as possible after space flight. We have previously confirmed that subjects participating in adaptive generalization training programs, using a variety of visuomotor distortions and different motor tasks from throwing to negotiating an obstacle course as the dependent measure, can learn to enhance their ability to adapt to a

  20. Modular functional organisation of the axial locomotor system in salamanders.

    PubMed

    Cabelguen, Jean-Marie; Charrier, Vanessa; Mathou, Alexia

    2014-02-01

    Most investigations on tetrapod locomotion have been concerned with limb movements. However, there is compelling evidence that the axial musculoskeletal system contributes to important functions during locomotion. Adult salamanders offer a remarkable opportunity to examine these functions because these amphibians use axial undulations to propel themselves in both aquatic and terrestrial environments. In this article, we review the currently available biological data on axial functions during various locomotor modes in salamanders. We also present data showing the modular organisation of the neural networks that generate axial synergies during locomotion. The functional implication of this modular organisation is discussed.

  1. Scaling Behavior of Human Locomotor Activity Amplitude: Association with Bipolar Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Indic, Premananda; Salvatore, Paola; Maggini, Carlo; Ghidini, Stefano; Ferraro, Gabriella; Baldessarini, Ross J.; Murray, Greg

    2011-01-01

    Scale invariance is a feature of complex biological systems, and abnormality of multi-scale behaviour may serve as an indicator of pathology. The hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) is a major node in central neural networks responsible for regulating multi-scale behaviour in measures of human locomotor activity. SCN also is implicated in the pathophysiology of bipolar disorder (BD) or manic-depressive illness, a severe, episodic disorder of mood, cognition and behaviour. Here, we investigated scaling behaviour in actigraphically recorded human motility data for potential indicators of BD, particularly its manic phase. A proposed index of scaling behaviour (Vulnerability Index [VI]) derived from such data distinguished between: [i] healthy subjects at high versus low risk of mood disorders; [ii] currently clinically stable BD patients versus matched controls; and [iii] among clinical states in BD patients. PMID:21655197

  2. Hip bone trabecular architecture shows uniquely distinctive locomotor behaviour in South African australopithecines.

    PubMed

    Macchiarelli, R; Bondioli, L; Galichon, V; Tobias, P V

    1999-02-01

    Cancellous bone retains structural and behavioural properties which are time and strain-rate dependent. As the orientation of the trabeculae (trajectories) follows the direction of the principal strains imposed by daily loadings, habitual postural and locomotor behaviours are responsible for a variety of trabecular architectures and site-specific textural arrangements of the pelvic cancellous network. With respect to the great ape condition, the human trabecular pattern is characterized by a distinctive ilioischial bundle, an undivided sacropubic bundle, and a full diagonal crossing (approximately 100 degrees) over the acetabulum between the ilioischial and the sacropubic bundles. Advanced digital image processing (DIP) of hip bone radiographs has revealed that adolescent and adult South African australopithecines retained an incompletely developed human-like trabecular pattern associated with gait-related features that are unique among the extant primates.

  3. The physiology of perception in human temporal lobe is specialized for contextual novelty

    PubMed Central

    Hermes, Dora; Witthoft, Nathan; Rao, Rajesh P. N.; Ojemann, Jeffrey G.

    2015-01-01

    The human ventral temporal cortex has regions that are known to selectively process certain categories of visual inputs; they are specialized for the content (“faces,” “places,” “tools”) and not the form (“line,” “patch”) of the image being seen. In our study, human patients with implanted electrocorticography (ECoG) electrode arrays were shown sequences of simple face and house pictures. We quantified neuronal population activity, finding robust face-selective sites on the fusiform gyrus and house-selective sites on the lingual/parahippocampal gyri. The magnitude and timing of single trials were compared between novel (“house-face”) and repeated (“face-face”) stimulus-type responses. More than half of the category-selective sites showed significantly greater total activity for novel stimulus class. Approximately half of the face-selective sites (and none of the house-selective sites) showed significantly faster latency to peak (∼50 ms) for novel stimulus class. This establishes subregions within category-selective areas that are differentially tuned to novelty in sequential context, where novel stimuli are processed faster in some regions, and with increased activity in others. PMID:25972581

  4. Scientists versus regulators: precaution, novelty & regulatory oversight as predictors of perceived risks of engineered nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Beaudrie, Christian E H; Satterfield, Terre; Kandlikar, Milind; Harthorn, Barbara H

    2014-01-01

    Engineered nanoscale materials (ENMs) present a difficult challenge for risk assessors and regulators. Continuing uncertainty about the potential risks of ENMs means that expert opinion will play an important role in the design of policies to minimize harmful implications while supporting innovation. This research aims to shed light on the views of 'nano experts' to understand which nanomaterials or applications are regarded as more risky than others, to characterize the differences in risk perceptions between expert groups, and to evaluate the factors that drive these perceptions. Our analysis draws from a web-survey (N = 404) of three groups of US and Canadian experts: nano-scientists and engineers, nano-environmental health and safety scientists, and regulatory scientists and decision-makers. Significant differences in risk perceptions were found across expert groups; differences found to be driven by underlying attitudes and perceptions characteristic of each group. Nano-scientists and engineers at the upstream end of the nanomaterial life cycle perceived the lowest levels of risk, while those who are responsible for assessing and regulating risks at the downstream end perceived the greatest risk. Perceived novelty of nanomaterial risks, differing preferences for regulation (i.e. the use of precaution versus voluntary or market-based approaches), and perceptions of the risk of technologies in general predicted variation in experts' judgments of nanotechnology risks. Our findings underscore the importance of involving a diverse selection of experts, particularly those with expertise at different stages along the nanomaterial lifecycle, during policy development.

  5. Identification of multisegmental nociceptive afferents that modulate locomotor circuits in the neonatal mouse spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Mandadi, Sravan; Hong, Peter; Tran, Michelle A; Bráz, Joao M; Colarusso, Pina; Basbaum, Allan I; Whelan, Patrick J

    2013-08-15

    Compared to proprioceptive afferent collateral projections, less is known about the anatomical, neurochemical, and functional basis of nociceptive collateral projections modulating lumbar central pattern generators (CPG). Quick response times are critical to ensure rapid escape from aversive stimuli. Furthermore, sensitization of nociceptive afferent pathways can contribute to a pathological activation of motor circuits. We investigated the extent and role of collaterals of capsaicin-sensitive nociceptive sacrocaudal afferent (nSCA) nerves that directly ascend several spinal segments in Lissauer's tract and the dorsal column and regulate motor activity. Anterograde tracing demonstrated direct multisegmental projections of the sacral dorsal root 4 (S4) afferent collaterals in Lissauer's tract and in the dorsal column. Subsets of the traced S4 afferent collaterals expressed transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1), which transduces a nociceptive response to capsaicin. Electrophysiological data revealed that S4 dorsal root stimulation could evoke regular rhythmic bursting activity, and our data suggested that capsaicin-sensitive collaterals contribute to CPG activation across multiple segments. Capsaicin's effect on S4-evoked locomotor activity was potent until the lumbar 5 (L5) segments, and diminished in rostral segments. Using calcium imaging we found elevated calcium transients within Lissauer's tract and dorsal column at L5 segments when compared to the calcium transients only within the dorsal column at the lumbar 2 (L2) segments, which were desensitized by capsaicin. We conclude that lumbar locomotor networks in the neonatal mouse spinal cord are targets for modulation by direct multisegmental nSCA, subsets of which express TRPV1 in Lissauer's tract and the dorsal column. J. Comp. Neurol. 521:2870-2887, 2013. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Locomotor-Like Leg Movements Evoked by Rhythmic Arm Movements in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Sylos-Labini, Francesca; Ivanenko, Yuri P.; MacLellan, Michael J.; Cappellini, Germana; Poppele, Richard E.; Lacquaniti, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    Motion of the upper limbs is often coupled to that of the lower limbs in human bipedal locomotion. It is unclear, however, whether the functional coupling between upper and lower limbs is bi-directional, i.e. whether arm movements can affect the lumbosacral locomotor circuitry. Here we tested the effects of voluntary rhythmic arm movements on the lower limbs. Participants lay horizontally on their side with each leg suspended in an unloading exoskeleton. They moved their arms on an overhead treadmill as if they walked on their hands. Hand-walking in the antero-posterior direction resulted in significant locomotor-like movements of the legs in 58% of the participants. We further investigated quantitatively the responses in a subset of the responsive subjects. We found that the electromyographic (EMG) activity of proximal leg muscles was modulated over each cycle with a timing similar to that of normal locomotion. The frequency of kinematic and EMG oscillations in the legs typically differed from that of arm oscillations. The effect of hand-walking was direction specific since medio-lateral arm movements did not evoke appreciably leg air-stepping. Using externally imposed trunk movements and biomechanical modelling, we ruled out that the leg movements associated with hand-walking were mainly due to the mechanical transmission of trunk oscillations. EMG activity in hamstring muscles associated with hand-walking often continued when the leg movements were transiently blocked by the experimenter or following the termination of arm movements. The present results reinforce the idea that there exists a functional neural coupling between arm and legs. PMID:24608249

  7. Personality modulation of (un)conscious processing: Novelty Seeking and performance following supraliminal and subliminal reward cues.

    PubMed

    Bustin, Gaëlle M; Quoidbach, Jordi; Hansenne, Michel; Capa, Rémi L

    2012-06-01

    This study provides evidence that personality traits associated with responsiveness to conscious reward cues also influence responsiveness to unconscious reward cues. Participants with low and high levels of Novelty Seeking (NS) performed updating tasks in which they could either gain 1 euro or 5 cents. Gains were presented either supraliminally or subliminally at the beginning of each trial. Results showed that low NS participants performed better in the high-reward than in the low-reward condition, whereas high NS participants' performance did not differ between reward conditions. Interestingly, we found that low NS participants performed significantly better when rewards were presented unconsciously, whereas high NS participants' performance did not differ whether reward cues were presented subliminally or supraliminally. Our findings highlight the necessity of taking personality into account in unconscious cognition research. They also suggest that individual differences might determine whether implicit and explicit motives have similar or complementary influences.

  8. Differential deviant probability effects on two hierarchical levels of the auditory novelty system.

    PubMed

    López-Caballero, Fran; Zarnowiec, Katarzyna; Escera, Carles

    2016-10-01

    Deviance detection is a key functional property of the auditory system that allows pre-attentive discrimination of incoming stimuli not conforming to a rule extracted from the ongoing constant stimulation, thereby proving that regularities in the auditory scene have been encoded in the auditory system. Using simple-feature stimulus deviations, regularity encoding and deviance detection have been reported in brain responses at multiple latencies of the human Auditory Evoked Potential (AEP), such as the Mismatch Negativity (MMN; peaking at 100-250ms from stimulus onset) and Middle-Latency Responses (MLR; peaking at 12-50ms). More complex levels of regularity violations, however, are only indexed by AEPs generated at higher stages of the auditory system, suggesting a hierarchical organization in the encoding of auditory regularities. The aim of the current study is to further characterize the auditory hierarchy of novelty responses, by assessing the sensitivity of MLR components to deviant probability manipulations. MMNs and MLRs were recorded in 24 healthy participants, using an oddball location paradigm with three different deviant probabilities (5%, 10% and 20%), and a reversed-standard (91.5%). We analyzed differences in the MLRs elicited to each of the deviant stimuli and the reversed-standard, as well as within deviant stimuli. Our results confirmed deviance detection at the level of both MLRs and MMN, but significant differences for deviant probabilities were found only for the MMN. These results suggest a functional dissociation between regularity encoding, already present at early stages of auditory processing, and the encoding of the probability with which this regularity is disrupted, which is only processed at higher stages of the auditory hierarchy.

  9. Separating acoustic deviance from novelty during the first year of life: a review of event-related potential evidence

    PubMed Central

    Kushnerenko, Elena V.; Van den Bergh, Bea R. H.; Winkler, István

    2013-01-01

    Orienting to salient events in the environment is a first step in the development of attention in young infants. Electrophysiological studies have indicated that in newborns and young infants, sounds with widely distributed spectral energy, such as noise and various environmental sounds, as well as sounds widely deviating from their context elicit an event-related potential (ERP) similar to the adult P3a response. We discuss how the maturation of event-related potentials parallels the process of the development of passive auditory attention during the first year of life. Behavioral studies have indicated that the neonatal orientation to high-energy stimuli gradually changes to attending to genuine novelty and other significant events by approximately 9 months of age. In accordance with these changes, in newborns, the ERP response to large acoustic deviance is dramatically larger than that to small and moderate deviations. This ERP difference, however, rapidly decreases within first months of life and the differentiation of the ERP response to genuine novelty from that to spectrally rich but repeatedly presented sounds commences during the same period. The relative decrease of the response amplitudes elicited by high-energy stimuli may reflect development of an inhibitory brain network suppressing the processing of uninformative stimuli. Based on data obtained from healthy full-term and pre-term infants as well as from infants at risk for various developmental problems, we suggest that the electrophysiological indices of the processing of acoustic and contextual deviance may be indicative of the functioning of auditory attention, a crucial prerequisite of learning and language development. PMID:24046757

  10. Locomotor stimulant and discriminative stimulus effects of 'bath salt' cathinones.

    PubMed

    Gatch, Michael B; Taylor, Cynthia M; Forster, Michael J

    2013-09-01

    A number of psychostimulant-like cathinone compounds are being sold as 'legal' alternatives to methamphetamine or cocaine. The purpose of these experiments was to determine whether cathinone compounds stimulate motor activity and have discriminative stimulus effects similar to those of cocaine and/or methamphetamine. 3,4-Methylenedioxypyrovalerone (MDPV), methylone, mephedrone, naphyrone, flephedrone, and butylone were tested for locomotor stimulant effects in mice and subsequently for substitution in rats trained to discriminate cocaine (10 mg/kg, intraperitoneally) or methamphetamine (1 mg/kg, intraperitoneally) from saline. All compounds fully substituted for the discriminative stimulus effects of cocaine and methamphetamine. Several commonly marketed cathinones produce discriminative stimulus effects comparable with those of cocaine and methamphetamine, which suggests that these compounds are likely to have similar abuse liabilities. MDPV and naphyrone produced locomotor stimulant effects that lasted much longer than those of cocaine or methamphetamine and therefore may be of particular concern, particularly because MDPV is one of the most commonly found substances associated with emergency room visits because of adverse effects of taking 'bath salts'.

  11. Expression of the snoRNA host gene gas5 in the hippocampus is upregulated by age and psychogenic stress and correlates with reduced novelty-induced behavior in C57BL/6 mice.

    PubMed

    Meier, Ingo; Fellini, Laetitia; Jakovcevski, Mira; Schachner, Melitta; Morellini, Fabio

    2010-09-01

    The growth arrest specific 5 (gas5) is a noncoding protein gene that hosts small nucleolar RNAs. Based on the observation that gas5 RNA level in the brain is highest in the hippocampus and remarkably enhanced in aged mice, we tested the hypothesis that gas5 is involved in functions controlled by the hippocampus and known to be affected by age, such as spatial learning and novelty-induced behaviors. We show that aged (22-month-old) C57BL/6 male mice have spatial-learning impairments, reduced novelty-induced exploration, and enhanced gas5 RNA levels in the hippocampus compared to young (3-month-old) mice. At both ages, levels of gas5 RNA in the hippocampus negatively correlated with novelty-induced exploration in the open field and elevated-plus maze tests. No correlations were found between gas5 RNA levels in the hippocampus and performance in the water maze test. The expression of gas5 RNA in the rest of the brain did not correlate with any behavioral parameter analyzed. Because variations in novelty-induced behaviors could be caused by stressfull experiences, we analyzed whether gas5 RNA levels in the hippocampus are regulated by acute stressors. We found that gas5 RNA levels in the hippocampus were upregulated by 50% 24 h after a psychogenic stressor (60-min olfactory contact with a rat) but were unchanged after exposure to an unfamiliar environment or after acquisition of new spatial information in a one-trial learning task. The present results suggest that strong psychogenic stressors upregulate gas5 RNA in the hippocampus, which in turn affects novelty-induced responses controlled by this region. We hypothesize that long-life exposure to stressors causes an age-dependent increase in hippocampal gas5 RNA levels, which could be responsible for age-related reduced novelty-induced behaviors, thus suggesting a new mechanism by which ageing and stress affect hippocampal function.

  12. Short-term Cortical Plasticity Associated With Feedback-Error Learning After Locomotor Training in a Patient With Incomplete Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Peters, Sue; Borich, Michael R.; Boyd, Lara A.; Lam, Tania

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose For rehabilitation strategies to be effective, training should be based on principles of motor learning, such as feedback-error learning, that facilitate adaptive processes in the nervous system by inducing errors and recalibration of sensory and motor systems. This case report suggests that locomotor resistance training can enhance somatosensory and corticospinal excitability and modulate resting-state brain functional connectivity in a patient with motor-incomplete spinal cord injury (SCI). Case Description The short-term cortical plasticity of a 31-year-old man who had sustained an incomplete SCI 9.5 years previously was explored in response to body-weight–supported treadmill training with velocity-dependent resistance applied with a robotic gait orthosis. The following neurophysiological and neuroimaging measures were recorded before and after training. Sensory evoked potentials were elicited by electrical stimulation of the tibial nerve and recorded from the somatosensory cortex. Motor evoked potentials were generated with transcranial magnetic stimulation applied over the tibialis anterior muscle representation in the primary motor cortex. Resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging was performed to evaluate short-term changes in patterns of brain activity associated with locomotor training. Outcomes Somatosensory excitability and corticospinal excitability were observed to increase after locomotor resistance training. Motor evoked potentials increased (particularly at higher stimulation intensities), and seed-based resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging analyses revealed increased functional connectivity strength in the motor cortex associated with the less affected side after training. Discussion The observations suggest evidence of short-term cortical plasticity in 3 complementary neurophysiological measures after one session of locomotor resistance training. Future investigation in a sample of people with

  13. Locomotor function after long-duration space flight: effects and motor learning during recovery.

    PubMed

    Mulavara, Ajitkumar P; Feiveson, Alan H; Fiedler, James; Cohen, Helen; Peters, Brian T; Miller, Chris; Brady, Rachel; Bloomberg, Jacob J

    2010-05-01

    Astronauts returning from space flight and performing Earth-bound activities must rapidly transition from the microgravity-adapted sensorimotor state to that of Earth's gravity. The goal of the current study was to assess locomotor dysfunction and recovery of function after long-duration space flight using a test of functional mobility. Eighteen International Space Station crewmembers experiencing an average flight duration of 185 days performed the functional mobility test (FMT) pre-flight and post-flight. To perform the FMT, subjects walked at a self selected pace through an obstacle course consisting of several pylons and obstacles set up on a base of 10-cm-thick, medium-density foam for a total of six trials per test session. The primary outcome measure was the time to complete the course (TCC, in seconds). To assess the long-term recovery trend of locomotor function after return from space flight, a multilevel exponential recovery model was fitted to the log-transformed TCC data. All crewmembers exhibited altered locomotor function after space flight, with a median 48% increase in the TCC. From the fitted model we calculated that a typical subject would recover to 95% of his/her pre-flight level at approximately 15 days post-flight. In addition, to assess the early motor learning responses after returning from space flight, we modeled performance over the six trials during the first post-flight session by a similar multilevel exponential relation. We found a significant positive correlation between measures of long-term recovery and early motor learning (P < 0.001) obtained from the respective models. We concluded that two types of recovery processes influence an astronaut's ability to re-adapt to Earth's gravity environment. Early motor learning helps astronauts make rapid modifications in their motor control strategies during the first hours after landing. Further, this early motor learning appears to reinforce the adaptive realignment, facilitating re

  14. Locomotor function of the pectoral girdle 'muscular sling' in trotting dogs.

    PubMed

    Carrier, David R; Deban, Stephen M; Fischbein, Timna

    2006-06-01

    In therian mammals, gravitational and locomotor forces are transferred between the forelimb and trunk primarily, or entirely, through the muscles that connect the limb and trunk. Our understanding of this force transmission is based on analyses of shoulder anatomy and on a handful of descriptive electromyographic studies. To improve our understanding, we manipulated the locomotor forces of trotting dogs and monitored the resulting change in recruitment of five extrinsic muscles of the forelimb: m. serratus ventralis thoracis, m. serratus ventralis cervicis, m. pectoralis superficialis transversus, the anterior portion of the m. pectoralis profundus, and m. rhomboideus thoracis. Locomotor forces were modified as the dogs trotted at constant speed on a motorized treadmill by (1) adding mass to the trunk, (2) inclining the treadmill so that the dogs ran up and down hill, (3) adding mass to the wrists and (4) applying horizontally directed force to the trunk through a leash. These experiments indicate that the thoracic portion of the serratus ventralis muscle is the main antigravity muscle of the shoulder during trotting in dogs. Its activity increased when we added mass to the trunk and also when we ran the subjects downhill. In contrast, the cervical portion of the serratus ventralis did not show a consistent increase in activity in response to added mass. Instead, its activity increased when we ran the subjects up hill and added mass to their wrists, suggesting that it functions to stabilize the fulcrum of the forelimb in the cranial-caudal direction during active retraction of the forelimb. The thoracic portion of the rhomboideus muscle also appears to provide this cranial-caudal stabilization during active retraction of the forelimb. The force manipulations indicate that the transverse pectoralis muscle acts to both protract and retract the forelimb, depending on the position of the limb. In contrast, the anterior portion of the pectoralis profundus muscle acts as

  15. Olfactory bulbectomy modifies photic entrainment and circadian rhythms of body temperature and locomotor activity in a nocturnal primate.

    PubMed

    Perret, Martine; Aujard, Fabienne; Séguy, Maud; Schilling, Alain

    2003-10-01

    Studies on rodents have emphasized that removal of the olfactory bulbs modulates circadian rhythmicity. Using telemetric recordings of both body temperature (Tb) and locomotor activity (LA) in a male nocturnal primate, the gray mouse lemur, the authors investigated the effects of olfactory bulbectomy on (1) the circadian periods of Tb and LA in constant dim light condition, and (2) photic re-entrainment rates of circadian rhythms following 6-h phase shifts of entrained light-dark cycle (LD 12:12). Under free-running condition, bulbectomized males had significantly shorter circadian periods of Tb and LA rhythms than those of control males. However, the profiles of Tb rhythms, characterized by a phase of hypothermia at the beginning of the subjective day, and Tb parameters were not modified by olfactory bulbectomy. Under a light-dark cycle, olfactory bulbectomy significantly modified the expression of daily hypothermia, especially by an increase in the latency to reach minimal daily Tb, suggesting a delayed response to induction of daily hypothermia by light onset. Reentrainment rates following both a 6-h phase advance and a 6-h phase delay of entrained LD were also delayed in bulbectomized males. Olfactory bulbectomy led to significant fragmentation of locomotor activity and increased locomotor activity levels during the resting period. The shortening of circadian periods in bulbectomized males could partly explain the delayed responses to photic stimuli since in control males, the longer the circadian period, the better the response to light entrainment. This experiment shows for the 1st time that olfactory bulbs can markedly modify the circadian system in a primate.

  16. Locomotor Tests Predict Community Mobility in Children and Youth with Cerebral Palsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferland, Chantale; Moffet, Helene; Maltais, Desiree

    2012-01-01

    Ambulatory children and youth with cerebral palsy have limitations in locomotor capacities and in community mobility. The ability of three locomotor tests to predict community mobility in this population (N = 49, 27 boys, 6-16 years old) was examined. The tests were a level ground walking test, the 6-min-Walk-Test (6MWT), and two tests of advanced…

  17. White - cGMP Interaction Promotes Fast Locomotor Recovery from Anoxia in Adult Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Increasing evidence indicates that the white (w) gene in Drosophila possesses extra-retinal functions in addition to its classical role in eye pigmentation. We have previously shown that w+ promotes fast and consistent locomotor recovery from anoxia, but how w+ modulates locomotor recovery is largely unknown. Here we show that in the absence of w+, several PDE mutants, especially cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP)-specific PDE mutants, display wildtype-like fast locomotor recovery from anoxia, and that during the night time, locomotor recovery was light-sensitive in white-eyed mutant w1118, and light-insensitive in PDE mutants under w1118 background. Data indicate the involvement of cGMP in the modulation of recovery timing and presumably, light-evoked cGMP fluctuation is associated with light sensitivity of locomotor recovery. This was further supported by the observations that w-RNAi-induced delay of locomotor recovery was completely eliminated by upregulation of cGMP through multiple approaches, including PDE mutation, simultaneous overexpression of an atypical soluble guanylyl cyclase Gyc88E, or sildenafil feeding. Lastly, prolonged sildenafil feeding promoted fast locomotor recovery from anoxia in w1118. Taken together, these data suggest that a White-cGMP interaction modulates the timing of locomotor recovery from anoxia. PMID:28060942

  18. Treadmill training promotes spinal changes leading to locomotor recovery after partial spinal cord injury in cats.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Marina; Delivet-Mongrain, Hugo; Rossignol, Serge

    2013-06-01

    After a spinal hemisection at thoracic level in cats, the paretic hindlimb progressively recovers locomotion without treadmill training but asymmetries between hindlimbs persist for several weeks and can be seen even after a further complete spinal transection at T13. To promote optimal locomotor recovery after hemisection, such asymmetrical changes need to be corrected. In the present study we determined if the locomotor deficits induced by a spinal hemisection can be corrected by locomotor training and, if so, whether the spinal stepping after the complete spinal cord transection is also more symmetrical. This would indicate that locomotor training in the hemisected period induces efficient changes in the spinal cord itself. Sixteen adult cats were first submitted to a spinal hemisection at T10. One group received 3 wk of treadmill training, whereas the second group did not. Detailed kinematic and electromyographic analyses showed that a 3-wk period of locomotor training was sufficient to improve the quality and symmetry of walking of the hindlimbs. Moreover, after the complete spinal lesion was performed, all the trained cats reexpressed bilateral and symmetrical hindlimb locomotion within 24 h. By contrast, the locomotor pattern of the untrained cats remained asymmetrical, and the hindlimb on the side of the hemisection was still deficient. This study highlights the beneficial role of locomotor training in facilitating bilateral and symmetrical functional plastic changes within the spinal circuitry and in promoting locomotor recovery after an incomplete spinal cord injury.

  19. Boosting-Based Optimization as a Generic Framework for Novelty and Fraud Detection in Complex Strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavrishchaka, Valeriy V.; Kovbasinskaya, Maria; Monina, Maria

    2008-11-01

    Novelty detection is a very desirable additional feature of any practical classification or forecasting system. Novelty and rare patterns detection is the main objective in such applications as fault/abnormality discovery in complex technical and biological systems, fraud detection and risk management in financial and insurance industry. Although many interdisciplinary approaches for rare event modeling and novelty detection have been proposed, significant data incompleteness due to the nature of the problem makes it difficult to find a universal solution. Even more challenging and much less formalized problem is novelty detection in complex strategies and models where practical performance criteria are usually multi-objective and the best state-of-the-art solution is often not known due to the complexity of the task and/or proprietary nature of the application area. For example, it is much more difficult to detect a series of small insider trading or other illegal transactions mixed with valid operations and distributed over long time period according to a well-designed strategy than a single, large fraudulent transaction. Recently proposed boosting-based optimization was shown to be an effective generic tool for the discovery of stable multi-component strategies/models from the existing parsimonious base strategies/models in financial and other applications. Here we outline how the same framework can be used for novelty and fraud detection in complex strategies and models.

  20. Novelty Seeking and Drug Addiction in Humans and Animals: From Behavior to Molecules.

    PubMed

    Wingo, Taylor; Nesil, Tanseli; Choi, Jung-Seok; Li, Ming D

    2016-09-01

    Global treatment of drug addiction costs society billions of dollars annually, but current psychopharmacological therapies have not been successful at desired rates. The increasing number of individuals suffering from substance abuse has turned attention to what makes some people more vulnerable to drug addiction than others. One personality trait that stands out as a contributing factor is novelty seeking. Novelty seeking, affected by both genetic and environmental factors, is defined as the tendency to desire novel stimuli and environments. It can be measured in humans through questionnaires and in rodents using behavioral tasks. On the behavioral level, both human and rodent studies demonstrate that high novelty seeking can predict the initiation of drug use and a transition to compulsive drug use and create a propensity to relapse. These predictions are valid for several drugs of abuse, such as alcohol, nicotine, cocaine, amphetamine, and opiates. On the molecular level, both novelty seeking and addiction are modulated by the central reward system in the brain. Dopamine is the primary neurotransmitter involved in the overlapping neural substrates of both parameters. In sum, the novelty-seeking trait can be valuable for predicting individual vulnerability to drug addiction and for generating successful treatment for patients with substance abuse disorders.

  1. Abnormal striatal circuitry and intensified novelty seeking among adolescents who abuse methamphetamine and cannabis.

    PubMed

    Churchwell, John C; Carey, Paul D; Ferrett, Helen L; Stein, Dan J; Yurgelun-Todd, Deborah A

    2012-01-01

    It has been hypothesized that changes in striatal-mediated dopamine modulation during adolescence may increase the risk for initiating substance abuse as a result of its fundamental role in arbitrating reward sensitivity and motivation during learning and decision making. However, substance abuse during adolescence may also significantly modify striatal structure and function and concomitantly alter reward sensitivity and action control while this brain region is undergoing remodeling. In the present investigation, to assess the relationship of methamphetamine (Meth) or Meth and cannabis (CA) abuse to regional striatal morphology, we acquired structural magnetic resonance images, using a 3T Siemens Trio scanner, from three groups of adolescents composed of healthy controls (n = 10), Meth abusers (n = 9) and combined Meth and CA abusers (Meth+CA, n = 8). We also assessed novelty seeking using the novelty seeking subscale of Cloninger's Tridimensional Character Inventory. The results indicate that adolescent Meth+CA abusers have increased regional striatal volume and show intensified novelty seeking in contrast to the controls. The degree of Meth exposure was also positively correlated with regional striatal volume and novelty seeking in both the Meth and Meth+CA users. These preliminary findings support theories that propose a role for the striatum in adolescent substance abuse and further indicate that novelty seeking may be related to the initiation of, or sustained, drug use.

  2. Interaction of chronic reatine depletion and muscle unloading effects on postural and locomotor muscles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, Gregory R.; Haddad, Fadia; Baldwin, Kenneth M.

    1994-01-01

    In this study, creatine depletion was induced separately and in combination with non-weight-bearing activity to determine if the response to lowering this metabolite would counter the MHC transitions expected from non-weight-bearing. Creatine depletion was induced by feeding rats a diet supplemented with the creatine analogue beta-guanidinopropionic acid (beta-GPA). Animals were fed a diet containing the creatine analogue for 68 days. Hindlimb non-weight-bearing in BS and NS animals was accomplished by tail suspension for the final 30 days of this period. Beta-GPA feeding lowered the creatine content of muscles sampled by 65%. Creatine depletion resulted in a 16% increase in citrate synthase activity in the soleus (SOL) and a 24% increase in the plantaris (PLN). In two postural muscles, the SOL and vastus intermedius (VI), tail suspension resulted in large decreases in the type I MHC expression and increases in type IIx and IIb MHCs. In two locomotor muscles, the PLN and medial gastrocnemius, type I MHC declined and type IIb increased with suspension. Creatine depletion did not prevent the suspension-induced decline in type I MHC in any of these muscles. The increase in type IIb MHC was either prevented or reduced by creatine depletion before and during suspension in the SOL, VI, and PLN. Creatine depletion alone resulted in small increases in type I and IIa MHCs in the two locomotor muscles, but it had no effect on the MHC profile of the postural muscles studied. These results indicate that the mechanical signal generated by the hindlimb non-weight-bearing state dominated over the metabolic stimulus of creatine depletion with respect to the primary adaptation involving a reduction in type I MHC.

  3. Adult Female Rats Altered Diurnal Locomotor Activity Pattern Following Chronic Methylphenidate Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Trinh, T.; Kohllepin, S; Yang, P.B.; Burau, K.D.; Dafny, N.

    2014-01-01

    Methylphenidate (MPD) is one of the most prescribed pharmacological agents and also used as cognitive enhancement and for recreational purposes. The objective of this study was to investigate the repetitive dose-response effects of MPD on rhythm locomotor activity pattern of female WKY rats and compare to prior study done on male. The hypothesis is that change in the circadian activity pattern indicates a long-lasting effect of the drug. Four animal groups (saline control, 0.6, 2.5, and 10.0 mg/kg MPD dose groups) were housed in a sound-controlled room at 12:12 light/dark cycle. All received saline injections on experimental day 1 (ED 1). On EDs 2-7, the control group received saline injection; the other groups received 0.6, 2.5, or 10.0 mg/kg MPD, respectively. On ED 8-10, injections were withheld. On ED 11, each group received the same dose as EDs 2-7. Hourly histograms and cosine statistical analyses calculating the acrophase (ϕ), amplitude (A), and MESOR (M) were applied to assess the 24-hour circadian activity pattern. The 0.6 and 2.5 mg/kg MPD groups exhibited significant (p<0.05) change in their circadian activity pattern on ED 11. The 10.0 mg/kg MPD group exhibited tolerance on ED 11 and also a significant change in activity pattern on ED 8 compared to ED 1, consistent with withdrawal behavior (p<0.007). In conclusion, chronic MPD administration alters circadian locomotor activity of adult female WKY rats and confirms that chronic MPD use elicits long lasting effects PMID:23893293

  4. Development and neuromodulation of spinal locomotor networks in the metamorphosing frog.

    PubMed

    Rauscent, Aude; Le Ray, Didier; Cabirol-Pol, Marie-Jeanne; Sillar, Keith T; Simmers, John; Combes, Denis

    2006-01-01

    limb locomotor circuitry. In summary, during Xenopus metamorphosis the network responsible for limb movements is progressively segregated from an axial precursor, and supra- and intra-spinal modulatory inputs are likely to play crucial roles in both its functional flexibility and maturation.

  5. Body size and the small branch niche: using marsupial ontogeny to model primate locomotor evolution.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, Liza J; Young, Jesse W; VandeBerg, John L

    2014-03-01

    Recently proposed ancestral locomotor and morphological 'stages' leading to the evolution of primates have emphasized small body size, and a transition from a clawed non-grasping stage, to a clawed, grasping stage with clawless opposable hallux, to a fully-nailed primate with grasping extremities. This evolutionary transition was presumably associated with frequent use of the small branch niche. To model elements of these evolutionary transitions, we investigate how body size, substrate size, substrate orientation and grasping morphology interact to influence quadrupedal kinematics within and between ontogenetic samples of two small-bodied marsupials, one arboreal (Petaurus breviceps) and the other mainly terrestrial (Monodelphis domestica). Longitudinal morphometric and kinematic data were collected from four juvenile P. breviceps (33-75 g) and two juvenile M. domestica (18-95 g) walking across poles of three diameters (2.5, 1.0, and 0.5 cm) and three orientations (horizontal, 30° incline, 30° decline). The two species responded similarly to some substrate conditions, but diverged in response to others. Kinematic divergence between the two species reflects Monodelphis' relatively shorter digits, reduced grasping ability and greater need for stabilizing mechanisms on narrow substrates. At a given relative body size or pole orientation, Monodelphis used higher limb duty factors, more limbs in support per stride, lower limb phases, and in some conditions, faster speeds compared with Petaurus. Interspecific differences were the least distinct on declined poles, highlighting the particular challenge of this substrate condition, even for arboreally adapted species. Small-bodied, arboreal primate ancestors would likely have employed the kinematic mechanisms common to our model taxa, but those with enhanced grasping adaptations would most likely not have required the increased level of stabilizing mechanisms exhibited by Monodelphis. Thus, using these two species

  6. Training Enhances Both Locomotor and Cognitive Adaptability to a Novel Sensory Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bloomberg, J. J.; Peters, B. T.; Mulavara, A. P.; Brady, R. A.; Batson, C. D.; Ploutz-Snyder, R. J.; Cohen, H. S.

    2010-01-01

    During adaptation to novel gravitational environments, sensorimotor disturbances have the potential to disrupt the ability of astronauts to perform required mission tasks. The goal of this project is to develop a sensorimotor adaptability (SA) training program to facilitate rapid adaptation. We have developed a unique training system comprised of a treadmill placed on a motion-base facing a virtual visual scene that provides an unstable walking surface combined with incongruent visual flow designed to enhance sensorimotor adaptability. The goal of our present study was to determine if SA training improved both the locomotor and cognitive responses to a novel sensory environment and to quantify the extent to which training would be retained. Methods: Twenty subjects (10 training, 10 control) completed three, 30-minute training sessions during which they walked on the treadmill while receiving discordant support surface and visual input. Control subjects walked on the treadmill but did not receive any support surface or visual alterations. To determine the efficacy of training all subjects performed the Transfer Test upon completion of training. For this test, subjects were exposed to novel visual flow and support surface movement, not previously experienced during training. The Transfer Test was performed 20 minutes, 1 week, 1, 3 and 6 months after the final training session. Stride frequency, auditory reaction time, and heart rate data were collected as measures of postural stability, cognitive effort and anxiety, respectively. Results: Using mixed effects regression methods we determined that subjects who received SA training showed less alterations in stride frequency, auditory reaction time and heart rate compared to controls. Conclusion: Subjects who received SA training improved performance across a number of modalities including enhanced locomotor function, increased multi-tasking capability and reduced anxiety during adaptation to novel discordant sensory

  7. Effects of reduced plantar cutaneous afferent feedback on locomotor adjustments in dynamic stability during perturbed walking.

    PubMed

    Höhne, Angela; Stark, Christian; Brüggemann, Gert-Peter; Arampatzis, Adamantios

    2011-08-11

    This study examined the effects of reduced plantar cutaneous afferent feedback on predictive and feedback adaptive locomotor adjustments in dynamic stability during perturbed walking. Twenty-two matched participants divided between an experimental-group and a control-group performed a gait protocol, which included surface alterations to one covered exchangeable gangway-element (hard/soft). In the experimental-group, cutaneous sensation in both foot soles was reduced to the level of sensory peripheral neuropathy by means of intradermal injections of an anaesthetic solution, without affecting foot proprioception or muscles. The gait protocol consisted of baseline trials on a uniformly hard surface and an adaptation phase consisting of nineteen trials incorporating a soft gangway-element, interspersed with three trials using the hard surface-element (2nd, 8th and 19th). Dynamic stability was assessed by quantifying the margin of stability (MS), which was calculated as the difference between the base of support (BS) and the extrapolated centre of mass (CM). The horizontal velocity of the CM and its vertical projection in the anterior-posterior direction and the eigenfrequency of an inverted pendulum determine the extrapolated-CM. Both groups increased the BS at the recovery step in response to the first unexpected perturbation. These feedback corrections were used more extensively in the experimental-group, which led to a higher MS compared to the control-group, i.e. a more stable body-position. In the adaptation phase the MS returned to baseline similarly in both groups. In the trial on the hard surface directly after the first perturbation, both groups increased the MS at touchdown of the disturbed leg compared to baseline trials, indicating rapid predictive adjustments irrespective of plantar cutaneous input. Our findings demonstrate that the locomotor adaptational potential does not decrease due to the loss of plantar sensation.

  8. Relative shortening velocity in locomotor muscles: turkey ankle extensors operate at low V/V(max).

    PubMed

    Gabaldón, Annette M; Nelson, Frank E; Roberts, Thomas J

    2008-01-01

    The force-velocity properties of skeletal muscle have an important influence on locomotor performance. All skeletal muscles produce less force the faster they shorten and typically develop maximal power at velocities of approximately 30% of maximum shortening velocity (V(max)). We used direct measurements of muscle mechanical function in two ankle extensor muscles of wild turkeys to test the hypothesis that during level running muscles operate at velocities that favor force rather than power. Sonomicrometer measurements of muscle length, tendon strain-gauge measurements of muscle force, and bipolar electromyographs were taken as animals ran over a range of speeds and inclines. These measurements were integrated with previously measured values of muscle V(max) for these muscles to calculate relative shortening velocity (V/V(max)). At all speeds for level running the V/V(max) values of the lateral gastrocnemius and the peroneus longus were low (<0.05), corresponding to the region of the force-velocity relationship where the muscles were capable of producing 90% of peak isometric force but only 35% of peak isotonic power. V/V(max) increased in response to the demand for mechanical power with increases in running incline and decreased to negative values to absorb energy during downhill running. Measurements of integrated electromyograph activity indicated that the volume of muscle required to produce a given force increased from level to uphill running. This observation is consistent with the idea that V/V(max) is an important determinant of locomotor cost because it affects the volume of muscle that must be recruited to support body weight.

  9. Neurotensin and bombesin, a relationship between their effects on body temperature and locomotor activity?

    PubMed

    van Wimersma Greidanus, T B; Schijff, J A; Noteboom, J L; Spit, M C; Bruins, L; van Zummeren, B M; Rinkel, G J

    1984-08-01

    Neurotensin and bombesin have been tested for their effects on body temperature and locomotor activity in an open field. Both peptides induce hypothermia and suppress ambulation and rearing. The time curves of the hypothermic effects of both peptides appear to be rather similar, although bombesin is a more potent hypothermic agent than neurotensin. The time curves of the effects on locomotor activity appear to be quite different. The suppressive effect of neurotensin on locomotor activity is relatively short lasting and reaches its maximum at approximately 32 minutes. The effect of bombesin follows a different time curve and shows two peaks, suggesting that two different mechanisms are involved in the suppressive action of bombesin on locomotor activity. Calculation of the correlation coefficients between the effects of neurotensin and of bombesin on body temperature and on locomotor activity (ambulation) suggest that a causal relationship between these two effects is not likely, in particular for neurotensin.

  10. Locomotor Trajectories of Stroke Patients during Oriented Gait and Turning

    PubMed Central

    Van Hamme, Angele; Bensmail, Djamel

    2016-01-01

    Background The Timed Up and Go (TUG) test is widely used to assess locomotion in patients with stroke and is considered to predict the risk of falls. The analysis of locomotor trajectories during the TUG appears pertinent in stroke patients. The aims of this study were i) to analyze locomotor trajectories in patients with stroke during the walking and turning sub-tasks of the TUG, and to compare them with healthy subjects, ii) to determine whether trajectory parameters provide additional information to that provided by the conventional measure (performance time), iii) to compare the trajectory parameters of fallers and non-fallers with stroke and of patients with right and left hemisphere stroke, and iv) to evaluate correlations between trajectory parameters and Berg Balance Scale scores. Methods 29 patients with stroke (mean age 54.2±12.2 years, 18 men, 8 fallers) and 25 healthy subjects (mean age 51.6±8.7 years, 11 men) underwent three-dimensional analysis of the TUG. The trajectory of the center of mass was analyzed by calculation of the global trajectory length, Hausdorff distance and Dynamic Time Warping. The parameters were compared with a reference trajectory during the total task and each sub-task (Go, Turn, Return) of the TUG. Results Values of trajectory parameters were significantly higher for the stroke group during the total TUG and the Go and Turn sub-tasks (p<0.05). Moreover, logistic regression indicated that these parameters better discriminated stroke patients and healthy subjects than the conventional timed performance during the Go sub-task. In addition, fallers were distinguished by higher Dynamic Time Warping during the Go (p<0.05). There were no differences between patients with right and left hemisphere stroke. Discussion and Conclusion The trajectories of the stroke patients were longer and more deviated during the turn and the preceding phase. Trajectory parameters provided additional information to timed performance of this locomotor

  11. The auditory novelty system: an attempt to integrate human and animal research.

    PubMed

    Escera, Carles; Malmierca, Manuel S

    2014-02-01

    In this account, we attempt to integrate two parallel, but thus far, separate lines of research on auditory novelty detection: (1) human studies of EEG recordings of the mismatch negativity (MMN), and (2) animal studies of single-neuron recordings of stimulus-specific adaptation (SSA). The studies demonstrating the existence of novelty neurons showing SSA at different levels along the auditory pathway's hierarchy, together with the recent results showing human auditory-evoked potential correlates of deviance detection at very short latencies, that is, at 20-40 ms from change onset, support the view that novelty detection is a key principle that governs the functional organization of the auditory system. Furthermore, the generation of the MMN recorded from the human scalp seems to involve a cascade of neuronal processing that occurs at different successive levels of the auditory system's hierarchy.

  12. The neural basis of novelty and appropriateness in processing of creative chunk decomposition.

    PubMed

    Huang, Furong; Fan, Jin; Luo, Jing

    2015-06-01

    Novelty and appropriateness have been recognized as the fundamental features of creative thinking. However, the brain mechanisms underlying these features remain largely unknown. In this study, we used event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to dissociate these mechanisms in a revised creative chunk decomposition task in which participants were required to perform different types of chunk decomposition that systematically varied in novelty and appropriateness. We found that novelty processing involved functional areas for procedural memory (caudate), mental rewarding (substantia nigra, SN), and visual-spatial processing, whereas appropriateness processing was mediated by areas for declarative memory (hippocampus), emotional arousal (amygdala), and orthography recognition. These results indicate that non-declarative and declarative memory systems may jointly contribute to the two fundamental features of creative thinking.

  13. A self-novelty manipulation of self-focused attention for internet and laboratory experiments.

    PubMed

    Silvia, Paul J; Eichstaedt, Jan

    2004-05-01

    Conventional manipulations of self-focused attention are poorly suited for Internet experiments and for group-based administration. The authors present a self-novelty manipulation that effectively induces self-awareness for such contexts. In the high self-focus condition, people write about how they differ from their family and friends and from people in general. In the control conditions, people write about neutral topics or do no writing. Three experiments using different measures of self-focus (the situational self-awareness scale, a pronoun selection task, and the private self-consciousness scale) showed that the self-novelty manipulation significantly increased self-focused attention. This effect appeared in Internet-based experiments (Experiment 1) and in laboratory experiments with groups (Experiments 2 and 3). The self-novelty manipulation appears promising for self-awareness research conducted outside of conventional laboratory contexts.

  14. Zebrafish locomotor capacity and brain acetylcholinesterase activity is altered by Aphanizomenon flos-aquae DC-1 aphantoxins.

    PubMed

    Zhang, De Lu; Hu, Chun Xiang; Li, Dun Hai; Liu, Yong Ding

    2013-08-15

    Aphanizomenon flos-aquae (A. flos-aquae) is a source of neurotoxins known as aphantoxins or paralytic shellfish poisons (PSPs) that present a major threat to the environment and to human health. Generally, altered neurological function is reflected in behavior. Although the molecular mechanism of action of PSPs is well known, its neurobehavioral effects on adult zebrafish and its relationship with altered neurological functions are poorly understood. Aphantoxins purified from a natural isolate of A. flos-aquae DC-1 were analyzed by HPLC. The major analogs found in the toxins were the gonyautoxins 1 and 5 (GTX1 and GTX5; 34.04% and 21.28%, respectively) and the neosaxitoxin (neoSTX, 12.77%). Zebrafish (Danio rerio) were intraperitoneally injected with 5.3 and 7.61 μg STXeq/kg (low and high dose, respectively) of A. flos-aquae DC-1 aphantoxins. The swimming activity was investigated by observation combined with video at 6 timepoints from 1 to 24 h post-exposure. Both aphantoxin doses were associated with delayed touch responses, reduced head-tail locomotory abilities, inflexible turning of head, and a tailward-shifted center of gravity. The normal S-pattern (or undulating) locomotor trajectory was replaced by a mechanical motor pattern of swinging the head after wagging the tail. Finally, these fish principally distributed at the top and/or bottom water of the aquarium, and showed a clear polarized distribution pattern at 12 h post-exposure. Further analysis of neurological function demonstrated that both aphantoxin doses inhibited brain acetylcholinesterase activity. All these changes were dose- and time-dependent. These results demonstrate that aphantoxins can alter locomotor capacity, touch responses and distribution patterns by damaging the cholinergic system of zebrafish, and suggest that zebrafish locomotor behavior and acetylcholinesterase can be used as indicators for investigating aphantoxins and blooms in nature.

  15. Stereoselective Effects of Abused "Bath Salt" Constituent 3,4-Methylenedioxypyrovalerone in Mice: Drug Discrimination, Locomotor Activity, and Thermoregulation.

    PubMed

    Gannon, Brenda M; Williamson, Adrian; Suzuki, Masaki; Rice, Kenner C; Fantegrossi, William E

    2016-03-01

    3,4-Methylenedioxypyrovalerone (MDPV) is a common constituent of illicit "bath salts" products. MDPV is a chiral molecule, but the contribution of each enantiomer to in vivo effects in mice has not been determined. To address this, mice were trained to discriminate 10 mg/kg cocaine from saline, and substitutions with racemic MDPV, S(+)-MDPV, and R(-)-MDPV were performed. Other mice were implanted with telemetry probes to monitor core temperature and locomotor responses elicited by racemic MDPV, S(+)-MDPV, and R(-)-MDPV under a warm (28°C) or cool (20°C) ambient temperature. Mice reliably discriminated the cocaine training dose from saline, and each form of MDPV fully substituted for cocaine, although marked potency differences were observed such that S(+)-MDPV was most potent, racemic MDPV was less potent than the S(+) enantiomer, and R(-)-MDPV was least potent. At both ambient temperatures, locomotor stimulant effects were observed after doses of S(+)-MDPV and racemic MDPV, but R(-)-MDPV did not elicit locomotor stimulant effects at any tested dose. Interestingly, significant increases in maximum core body temperature were only observed after administration of racemic MDPV in the warm ambient environment; neither MDPV enantiomer altered core temperature at any dose tested, at either ambient temperature. These studies suggest that all three forms of MDPV induce biologic effects, but R(-)-MDPV is less potent than S(+)-MDPV and racemic MDPV. Taken together, these data suggest that the S(+)-MDPV enantiomer is likely responsible for the majority of the biologic effects of the racemate and should be targeted in therapeutic efforts against MDPV overdose and abuse.

  16. Forelimb kinematics and motor patterns of swimming loggerhead sea turtles (Caretta caretta): are motor patterns conserved in the evolution of new locomotor strategies?

    PubMed

    Rivera, Angela R V; Wyneken, Jeanette; Blob, Richard W

    2011-10-01

    Novel functions in animals may evolve through changes in morphology, muscle activity or a combination of both. The idea that new functions or behavior can arise solely through changes in structure, without concurrent changes in the patterns of muscle activity that control movement of those structures, has been formalized as the neuromotor conservation hypothesis. In vertebrate locomotor systems, evidence for neuromotor conservation is found across evolutionary transitions in the behavior of terrestrial species, and in evolutionary transitions from terrestrial species to flying species. However, evolutionary transitions in the locomotion of aquatic species have received little comparable study to determine whether changes in morphology and muscle function were coordinated through the evolution of new locomotor behavior. To evaluate the potential for neuromotor conservation in an ancient aquatic system, we quantified forelimb kinematics and muscle activity during swimming in the loggerhead sea turtle, Caretta caretta. Loggerhead forelimbs are hypertrophied into wing-like flippers that produce thrust via dorsoventral forelimb flapping. We compared kinematic and motor patterns from loggerheads with previous data from the red-eared slider, Trachemys scripta, a generalized freshwater species exhibiting unspecialized forelimb morphology and anteroposterior rowing motions during swimming. For some forelimb muscles, comparisons between C. caretta and T. scripta support neuromotor conservation; for example, the coracobrachialis and the latissimus dorsi show similar activation patterns. However, other muscles (deltoideus, pectoralis and triceps) do not show neuromotor conservation; for example, the deltoideus changes dramatically from a limb protractor/elevator in sliders to a joint stabilizer in loggerheads. Thus, during the evolution of flapping in sea turtles, drastic restructuring of the forelimb was accompanied by both conservation and evolutionary novelty in limb motor

  17. Cool running: locomotor performance at low body temperature in mammals

    PubMed Central

    Rojas, A. Daniella; Körtner, Gerhard; Geiser, Fritz

    2012-01-01

    Mammalian torpor saves enormous amounts of energy, but a widely assumed cost of torpor is immobility and therefore vulnerability to predators. Contrary to this assumption, some small marsupial mammals in the wild move while torpid at low body temperatures to basking sites, thereby minimizing energy expenditure during arousal. Hence, we quantified how mammalian locomotor performance is affected by body temperature. The three small marsupial species tested, known to use torpor and basking in the wild, could move while torpid at body temperatures as low as 14.8–17.9°C. Speed was a sigmoid function of body temperature, but body temperature effects on running speed were greater than those in an ectothermic lizard used for comparison. We provide the first quantitative data of movement at low body temperature in mammals, which have survival implications for wild heterothermic mammals, as directional movement at low body temperature permits both basking and predator avoidance. PMID:22675136

  18. Cool running: locomotor performance at low body temperature in mammals.

    PubMed

    Rojas, A Daniella; Körtner, Gerhard; Geiser, Fritz

    2012-10-23

    Mammalian torpor saves enormous amounts of energy, but a widely assumed cost of torpor is immobility and therefore vulnerability to predators. Contrary to this assumption, some small marsupial mammals in the wild move while torpid at low body temperatures to basking sites, thereby minimizing energy expenditure during arousal. Hence, we quantified how mammalian locomotor performance is affected by body temperature. The three small marsupial species tested, known to use torpor and basking in the wild, could move while torpid at body temperatures as low as 14.8-17.9°C. Speed was a sigmoid function of body temperature, but body temperature effects on running speed were greater than those in an ectothermic lizard used for comparison. We provide the first quantitative data of movement at low body temperature in mammals, which have survival implications for wild heterothermic mammals, as directional movement at low body temperature permits both basking and predator avoidance.

  19. Age-Related Differences in Locomotor Strategies During Adaptive Walking.

    PubMed

    Lowry, Kristin A; Sebastian, Katherine; Perera, Subashan; Van Swearingen, Jessie; Smiley-Oyen, Ann L

    2016-11-21

    Simultaneous control of lower limb stepping movements and trunk motion is important for skilled walking; adapting gait to environmental constraints requires frequent alternations in stepping and trunk motion. These alterations provide a window into the locomotor strategies adopted by the walker. The authors examined gait strategies in young and healthy older adults when manipulating step width. Anteroposterior (AP) and mediolateral (ML) smoothness (quantified by harmonic ratios) and stepping consistency (quantified by gait variability) were analyzed during narrow and wide walking while controlling cadence to preferred pace. Results indicated older adults preserved ML smoothness at the expense of AP smoothness, shortened their steps, and exhibited reduced stepping consistency. The authors conclude that older adults prioritized ML control over forward progression during adaptive walking challenges.

  20. Tarsier-like locomotor specializations in the Oligocene primate Afrotarsius

    PubMed Central

    Rasmussen, D. Tab; Conroy, Glenn C.; Simons, Elwyn L.

    1998-01-01

    Tarsiers and extinct tarsier-like primates have played a central role in views of primate phylogeny and evolution for more than a century. Because of the importance of tarsiers in so many primatological problems, there has been particular interest in questions about the origin of tarsier specializations and the biogeography of early tarsioid radiations. We report on a new fossil of rare Afrotarsius that shows near identity to modern Tarsius in unique specializations of the leg, which provides information about the locomotor behavior and clarifies the phylogenetic position of this previously controversial primate. These specializations constitute evidence that Afrotarsius is a tarsiid, closely related to extant Tarsius; hence, it is now excluded from being a generalized sister taxon to Anthropoidea. PMID:9843978

  1. Suprachiasmatic vasopressin and the circadian regulation of voluntary locomotor behavior.

    PubMed

    Cormier, Holly C; Della-Maggiore, Valeria; Karatsoreos, Ilia N; Koletar, Margaret M; Ralph, Martin R

    2015-01-01

    A role for arginine vasopressin in the circadian regulation of voluntary locomotor behavior (wheel running activity) was investigated in the golden hamster, Mesocricetus auratus. Spontaneous nocturnal running was suppressed in a dose-dependent manner by systemic injections of vasopressin, and also in a concentration-dependent manner by microinjections directly into the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus. Pre-injections of a vasopressin V1 receptor antagonist into the nucleus reduced the suppression of behavior by vasopressin. Ethogram analyses revealed that peripheral drug injections predominantly increased grooming, flank marking, and sleep-related behaviors. Central injections did not induce sleep, but increased grooming and periods of 'quiet vigilance' (awake but not moving). Nocturnal behavioral profiles following either peripheral or central injections were similar to those shown by untreated animals in the hour prior to the onset of nocturnal wheel running. Site control vasopressin injections into the medial preoptic area or periaqueductal gray increased flank marking and grooming, but had no significant effect on locomotion, suggesting behavioral specificity of a vasopressin target near the suprachiasmatic nucleus. Both peripheral and central administration increased FOS-like immunoreactivity in the retinorecipient core of the suprachiasmatic nucleus. The distribution of FOS-positive cells overlapped the calbindin subregion, but was more extensive, and most calbindin-positive cells did not co-express FOS. We propose a model of temporal behavioral regulation wherein voluntary behavior, such as nocturnal locomotor activity, is inhibited by the activity of neurons in the suprachiasmatic ventrolateral core that project to the posterior hypothalamus and are driven by rhythmic vasopressin input from the dorsomedial shell.

  2. What does autonomic arousal tell us about locomotor learning?

    PubMed

    Green, D A; Bunday, K L; Bowen, J; Carter, T; Bronstein, A M

    2010-09-29

    Walking onto a stationary sled previously experienced as moving induces locomotor aftereffects (LAE, or "broken escalator phenomenon"). This particular form of aftereffect can develop after a single adaptation trial and occurs despite subjects being fully aware that the sled will not move. Here, we investigate whether such strong LAE expression may relate to arousal or fear related to instability during the gait adaptation process. Forty healthy subjects were allocated to three sled velocity groups; SLOW (0.6 m/s), MEDIUM (1.3 m/s), or FAST (2.0 m/s). Subjects walked onto the stationary sled for five trials (BEFORE), then onto the moving sled for 15 trials (adaptation or MOVING trials) and, finally, again onto the stationary sled for five trials (AFTER). Explicit warning regarding sled status was given. Trunk position, foot-sled contact timing, autonomic markers (electrodermal activity [EDA], ECG, respiratory movements) in addition to self-reported task-related confidence and state/trait anxiety were recorded. Trunk sway, EDA, and R-R interval shortening were greatest during the first MOVING trial (MOVING_1), progressively attenuating during subsequent MOVING trials. A LAE, recorded as increased gait velocity and trunk sway during AFTER_1, occurred in both MEDIUM and FAST sled velocity groups. The amplitude of forward trunk sway in AFTER_1 (an indicator of aftereffect magnitude) was related to EDA during the final adaptation trial (MOVING_15). AFTER_1 gait velocity (also an indicator of aftereffect magnitude) was related to MOVING_1 trunk sway. Hence, gait velocity and trunk sway components of the LAE are differentially related to kinematic and autonomic parameters during the early and late adaptation phase. The finding that EDA is a predictor of LAE expression indicates that autonomic arousal or fear-based mechanisms can promote locomotor learning. This could in turn explain some unusual characteristics of this LAE, namely its resistance to explicit knowledge and

  3. Pelvic Breadth and Locomotor Kinematics in Human Evolution.

    PubMed

    Gruss, Laura Tobias; Gruss, Richard; Schmitt, Daniel

    2017-04-01

    A broad pelvis is characteristic of most, if not all, pre-modern hominins. In at least some early australopithecines, most notably the female Australopithecus afarensis specimen known as "Lucy," it is very broad and coupled with very short lower limbs. In 1991, Rak suggested that Lucy's pelvic anatomy improved locomotor efficiency by increasing stride length through rotation of the wide pelvis in the axial plane. Compared to lengthening strides by increasing flexion and extension at the hips, this mechanism could avoid potentially costly excessive vertical oscillations of the body's center of mass (COM). Here, we test this hypothesis. We examined 3D kinematics of walking at various speeds in 26 adult subjects to address the following questions: Do individuals with wider pelves take longer strides, and do they use a smaller degree of hip flexion and extension? Is pelvic rotation greater in individuals with shorter legs, and those with narrower pelves? Our results support Rak's hypothesis. Subjects with wider pelves do take longer strides for a given velocity, and for a given stride length they flex and extend their hips less, suggesting a smoother pathway of the COM. Individuals with shorter legs do use more pelvic rotation when walking, but pelvic breadth was not related to pelvic rotation. These results suggest that a broad pelvis could benefit any bipedal hominin, but especially a short-legged australopithecine such as Lucy, by improving locomotor efficiency, particularly when carrying an infant or traveling in a foraging group with individuals of varying sizes. Anat Rec, 300:739-751, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Immature Spinal Locomotor Output in Children with Cerebral Palsy

    PubMed Central

    Cappellini, Germana; Ivanenko, Yury P.; Martino, Giovanni; MacLellan, Michael J.; Sacco, Annalisa; Morelli, Daniela; Lacquaniti, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Detailed descriptions of gait impairments have been reported in cerebral palsy (CP), but it is still unclear how maturation of the spinal motoneuron output is affected. Spatiotemporal alpha-motoneuron activation during walking can be assessed by mapping the electromyographic activity profiles from several, simultaneously recorded muscles onto the anatomical rostrocaudal location of the motoneuron pools in the spinal cord, and by means of factor analysis of the muscle activity profiles. Here, we analyzed gait kinematics and EMG activity of 11 pairs of bilateral muscles with lumbosacral innervation in 35 children with CP (19 diplegic, 16 hemiplegic, 2–12 years) and 33 typically developing (TD) children (1–12 years). TD children showed a progressive reduction of EMG burst durations and a gradual reorganization of the spatiotemporal motoneuron output with increasing age. By contrast, children with CP showed very limited age-related changes of EMG durations and motoneuron output, as well as of limb intersegmental coordination and foot trajectory control (on both sides for diplegic children and the affected side for hemiplegic children). Factorization of the EMG signals revealed a comparable structure of the motor output in children with CP and TD children, but significantly wider temporal activation patterns in children with CP, resembling the patterns of much younger TD infants. A similar picture emerged when considering the spatiotemporal maps of alpha-motoneuron activation. Overall, the results are consistent with the idea that early injuries to developing motor regions of the brain substantially affect the maturation of the spinal locomotor output and consequently the future locomotor behavior. PMID:27826251

  5. Novel locomotor muscle design in extreme deep-diving whales.

    PubMed

    Velten, B P; Dillaman, R M; Kinsey, S T; McLellan, W A; Pabst, D A

    2013-05-15

    Most marine mammals are hypothesized to routinely dive within their aerobic dive limit (ADL). Mammals that regularly perform deep, long-duration dives have locomotor muscles with elevated myoglobin concentrations that are composed of predominantly large, slow-twitch (Type I) fibers with low mitochondrial volume densities (V(mt)). These features contribute to extending ADL by increasing oxygen stores and decreasing metabolic rate. Recent tagging studies, however, have challenged the view that two groups of extreme deep-diving cetaceans dive within their ADLs. Beaked whales (including Ziphius cavirostris and Mesoplodon densirostris) routinely perform the deepest and longest average dives of any air-breathing vertebrate, and short-finned pilot whales (Globicephala macrorhynchus) perform high-speed sprints at depth. We investigated the locomotor muscle morphology and estimated total body oxygen stores of several species within these two groups of cetaceans to determine whether they (1) shared muscle design features with other deep divers and (2) performed dives within their calculated ADLs. Muscle of both cetaceans displayed high myoglobin concentrations and large fibers, as predicted, but novel fiber profiles for diving mammals. Beaked whales possessed a sprinter's fiber-type profile, composed of ~80% fast-twitch (Type II) fibers with low V(mt). Approximately one-third of the muscle fibers of short-finned pilot whales were slow-twitch, oxidative, glycolytic fibers, a rare fiber type for any mammal. The muscle morphology of beaked whales likely decreases the energetic cost of diving, while that of short-finned pilot whales supports high activity events. Calculated ADLs indicate that, at low metabolic rates, both beaked and short-finned pilot whales carry sufficient onboard oxygen to aerobically support their dives.

  6. Shared Leadership Improves Team Novelty: The Mechanism and Its Boundary Condition.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiaomin; Jie, Yuan; Wang, Yilu; Xue, Gang; Liu, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Previous research has revealed the significant impact of shared leadership on team creativity, yet the mechanism underlying this relationship has rarely been investigated. The current research examined how shared leadership influenced team creativity (novelty and usefulness) across 3 studies using both long-term project teams and temporal task teams in the laboratory. The results showed that shared leadership enhanced the novelty dimension of team creativity by improving constructive controversy. Furthermore, team goal orientation moderated this effect. The indirect effect of constructive controversy holds for teams with learning goal orientation but not for those with performance goal orientation. Such patterns were not found in the usefulness dimension of team creativity.

  7. Narp knockout mice show normal reactivity to novelty but attenuated recovery from neophobia.

    PubMed

    Blouin, Ashley M; Lee, Jongah J; Tao, Bo; Smith, Dani R; Johnson, Alexander W; Baraban, Jay M; Reti, Irving M

    2013-11-15

    Narp knockout (KO) mice demonstrate cognitive inflexibility and addictive behavior, which are associated with abnormal reactivity to a novel stimulus. To assess reactivity to novelty, we tested Narp KO and wild-type (WT) mice on a neophobia procedure. Both Narp KO and WT mice showed a similar decrease in consumption upon initial exposure to a novel flavor, but Narp KO mice did not increase consumption with subsequent exposures to the novel flavor like the WT mice. Therefore, Narp KO mice do not have abnormal reactivity to novelty but show deficits in adapting behavior to reflect the updated value of a stimulus.

  8. Novelty detection technique with SLV for identification of core properties in honeycombs and cellular solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scarpa, Fabrizio; Manson, Graeme; Ruzzene, M.

    2003-08-01

    This paper presents a Novelty-based detection technique to identify core material properties of honeycombs and cellular structures. A numerical model (FE) representing full scale and/or reduced size of the cellular solid is used to generate transmissibilities between topological points at cells in different locations, with a statistical Gaussian distribution of the core material property target variable. The numerical set of transmissibilities is then used in a Novelty detection framework to find Euclidean and Mahalanobis distances from analogous data from a point excitation experimental test carried out with SLV.

  9. Shared Leadership Improves Team Novelty: The Mechanism and Its Boundary Condition

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xiaomin; Jie, Yuan; Wang, Yilu; Xue, Gang; Liu, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Previous research has revealed the significant impact of shared leadership on team creativity, yet the mechanism underlying this relationship has rarely been investigated. The current research examined how shared leadership influenced team creativity (novelty and usefulness) across 3 studies using both long-term project teams and temporal task teams in the laboratory. The results showed that shared leadership enhanced the novelty dimension of team creativity by improving constructive controversy. Furthermore, team goal orientation moderated this effect. The indirect effect of constructive controversy holds for teams with learning goal orientation but not for those with performance goal orientation. Such patterns were not found in the usefulness dimension of team creativity. PMID:28066289

  10. Stress affects theta activity in limbic networks and impairs novelty-induced exploration and familiarization

    PubMed Central

    Jacinto, Luis R.; Reis, Joana S.; Dias, Nuno S.; Cerqueira, João J.; Correia, José H.; Sousa, Nuno

    2013-01-01

    Exposure to a novel environment triggers the response of several brain areas that regulate emotional behaviors. Here, we studied theta oscillations within the hippocampus (HPC)-amygdala (AMY)-medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) network in exploration of a novel environment and subsequent familiarization through repeated exposures to that same environment; in addition, we assessed how concomitant stress exposure could disrupt this activity and impair both behavioral processes. Local field potentials (LFP) were simultaneously recorded from dorsal and ventral hippocampus (dHPC and vHPC, respectively), basolateral amygdala (BLA) and mPFC in freely behaving rats while they were exposed to a novel environment, then repeatedly re-exposed over the course of 3 weeks to that same environment and, finally, on re-exposure to a novel unfamiliar environment. A longitudinal analysis of theta activity within this circuit revealed a reduction of vHPC and BLA theta power and vHPC-BLA theta coherence through familiarization which was correlated with a return to normal exploratory behavior in control rats. In contrast, a persistent over-activation of the same brain regions was observed in stressed rats that displayed impairments in novel exploration and familiarization processes. Importantly, we show that stress also affected intra-hippocampal synchrony and heightened the coherence between vHPC and BLA. In summary, we demonstrate that modulatory theta activity in the aforementioned circuit, namely in the vHPC and BLA, is correlated with the expression of anxiety in novelty-induced exploration and familiarization in both normal and pathological conditions. PMID:24137113

  11. Cognitive and emotional processing in high novelty seeking associated with the L-DRD4 genotype.

    PubMed

    Roussos, Panos; Giakoumaki, Stella G; Bitsios, Panos

    2009-06-01

    The personality trait of novelty seeking (NS) has been associated with the long variant of the dopamine D4 receptor (L-DRD4) VNTR polymorphism. This is the first study to examine the influence of L-DRD4 polymorphism on some of the cognitive (i.e. decision making) and emotional underpinnings of the NS phenotype. One hundred and eighteen healthy males grouped in a L-DRD4 (n=24) and a S-DRD4 (n=94) group, completed multimodal assessment for personality, planning for problem solving and decision making. Two age-matched L-DRD4 and S-DRD4 sub-samples (n=17 each) entered and completed emotional processing using startle modulation by affective pictures. ANOVAs showed that L-DRD4 individuals had higher NS, made more risky choices and won less money in the decision making task, but had intact planning for problem solving. They also had reduced startle reactivity and late startle modulation by both pleasant and unpleasant pictures. Early, attentional startle modulation by the affective pictures was intact. NS correlated negatively with startle reactivity and performance in the emotional decision task. These results suggest that the L-DRD4 polymorphism is associated with high NS and risk taking, under-reactivity to unconditioned aversive stimuli, constricted emotional responses but preserved attentional processing of emotional stimuli and efficient problem solving. These results extend animal evidence on DRD4-mediated control of decision making and emotional processing to humans. The proposed role of the NS phenotype in human evolution and in disorders of impulsivity is discussed under the light of the present findings.

  12. Scientists versus Regulators: Precaution, Novelty & Regulatory Oversight as Predictors of Perceived Risks of Engineered Nanomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Beaudrie, Christian E. H.; Satterfield, Terre; Kandlikar, Milind; Harthorn, Barbara H.

    2014-01-01

    Engineered nanoscale materials (ENMs) present a difficult challenge for risk assessors and regulators. Continuing uncertainty about the potential risks of ENMs means that expert opinion will play an important role in the design of policies to minimize harmful implications while supporting innovation. This research aims to shed light on the views of ‘nano experts’ to understand which nanomaterials or applications are regarded as more risky than others, to characterize the differences in risk perceptions between expert groups, and to evaluate the factors that drive these perceptions. Our analysis draws from a web-survey (N = 404) of three groups of US and Canadian experts: nano-scientists and engineers, nano-environmental health and safety scientists, and regulatory scientists and decision-makers. Significant differences in risk perceptions were found across expert groups; differences found to be driven by underlying attitudes and perceptions characteristic of each group. Nano-scientists and engineers at the upstream end of the nanomaterial life cycle perceived the lowest levels of risk, while those who are responsible for assessing and regulating risks at the downstream end perceived the greatest risk. Perceived novelty of nanomaterial risks, differing preferences for regulation (i.e. the use of precaution versus voluntary or market-based approaches), and perceptions of the risk of technologies in general predicted variation in experts' judgments of nanotechnology risks. Our findings underscore the importance of involving a diverse selection of experts, particularly those with expertise at different stages along the nanomaterial lifecycle, during policy development. PMID:25222742

  13. Gradual training reduces practice difficulty while preserving motor learning of a novel locomotor task.

    PubMed

    Sawers, Andrew; Hahn, Michael E

    2013-08-01

    Motor learning strategies that increase practice difficulty and the size of movement errors are thought to facilitate motor learning. In contrast to this, gradual training minimizes movement errors and reduces practice difficulty by incrementally introducing task requirements, yet remains as effective as sudden training and its large movement errors for learning novel reaching tasks. While attractive as a locomotor rehabilitation strategy, it remains unknown whether the efficacy of gradual training extends to learning locomotor tasks and their unique requirements. The influence of gradual vs. sudden training on learning a locomotor task, asymmetric split belt treadmill walking, was examined by assessing whole body sagittal plane kinematics during 24 hour retention and transfer performance following either gradual or sudden training. Despite less difficult and less specific practice for the gradual cohort on day 1, gradual training resulted in equivalent motor learning of the novel locomotor task as sudden training when assessed by retention and transfer a day later. This suggests that large movement errors and increased practice difficulty may not be necessary for learning novel locomotor tasks. Further, gradual training may present a viable locomotor rehabilitation strategy avoiding large movement errors that could limit or impair improvements in locomotor performance.

  14. Evaluation of the interaction of mu and kappa opioid agonists on locomotor behavior in the horse.

    PubMed Central

    Mama, K R; Pascoe, P J; Steffey, E P

    1993-01-01

    This study was designed to determine the interactive effects of mu and kappa opioid agonists on locomotor behavior in the horse. Three doses of a mu agonist, fentanyl (5, 10, 20 micrograms/kg) and a kappa agonist U50,488H (30, 60, 120 micrograms/kg) were administered in a random order to six horses. Locomotor activity was measured using a two minute footstep count. Each dose of U50,488H was then combined with 20 micrograms/kg of fentanyl to determine the interactive effects of the drugs on locomotor activity. A significant increase in locomotor activity was seen with 20 micrograms/kg of fentanyl and all the drug combinations. The combination of U50,488H with fentanyl resulted in an earlier onset of locomotor activity. At the highest doses of the combination (U50,488H 120 micrograms/kg, fentanyl 20 micrograms/kg), the duration of locomotor activity was significantly increased when compared to the other doses. We conclude that locomotor activity is maintained or enhanced in horses when a receptor specific kappa agonist is combined with a mu receptor agonist. PMID:8490803

  15. Locomotor recovery after spinal cord contusion injury in rats is improved by spontaneous exercise.

    PubMed

    Van Meeteren, Nico L U; Eggers, Ruben; Lankhorst, Alex J; Gispen, Willem Hendrik; Hamers, Frank P T

    2003-10-01

    We have recently shown that enriched environment (EE) housing significantly enhances locomotor recovery following spinal cord contusion injury (SCI) in rats. As the type and intensity of locomotor training with EE housing are rather poorly characterized, we decided to compare the effectiveness of EE housing with that of voluntary wheel running, the latter of which is both well characterized and easily quantified. Female Wistar rats were made familiar with three types of housing conditions, social housing (nine together) in an EE (EHC), individual housing in a running wheel cage (RUN, n = 8), and standard housing two together (CON, n = 10). Subsequently, a 12.5 gcm SCI at Th8 was produced and animals were randomly divided over the three housing conditions. Locomotor function was measured regularly, once a week by means of the BBB score, BBB sub score, TLH test, Gridwalk test, and CatWalk test. In the RUN group, daily distance covered was also measured. Locomotor recovery in the EHC and the RUN groups was equal and significantly better than in the CON group. The extent of recovery at 8 weeks post injury in the RUN group did not correlate with distance covered. We conclude that locomotor training needs to exceed a given threshold in order to be effective in enhancing locomotor recovery in this experimental model, but that once this threshold is exceeded no further improvement occurs, and that the specificity of locomotor training plays little role.

  16. Increased locomotor activity induced by heroin in mice: pharmacokinetic demonstration of heroin acting as a prodrug for the mediator 6-monoacetylmorphine in vivo.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Jannike Mørch; Ripel, Ase; Boix, Fernando; Normann, Per Trygve; Mørland, Jørg

    2009-10-01

    We investigated the relative importance of heroin and its metabolites in eliciting a behavioral response in mice by studying the relationship between concentrations of heroin, 6-monoacetylmorphine (6MAM), and morphine in brain tissue and the effects on locomotor activity. Low doses (subcutaneous) of heroin (< or =5 micromol/kg) or 6MAM (< or =15 micromol/kg) made the mice run significantly more than mice given equimolar doses of morphine. There were no differences in the response between heroin and 6MAM, although we observed a shift to the left of the dose-response curve for the maximal response of heroin. The behavioral responses were abolished by pretreatment with 1 mg/kg naltrexone. Heroin was detected in brain tissue after injection, but the levels were low and its presence too short-lived to be responsible for the behavioral response observed. The concentration of 6MAM in brain tissue increased shortly after administration of both heroin and 6MAM and the concentration changes during the first hour roughly reflected the changes in locomotor activity. Both the maximal and the total concentration of 6MAM were higher after administration of heroin than after administration of 6MAM itself. The morphine concentration increased slowly after injection and could not explain the immediate behavioral response. In summary, the locomotor activity response after injection of heroin was mediated by 6MAM, which increased shortly after administration. Heroin acted as an effective prodrug. The concentration of morphine was too low to stimulate the immediate response observed but might have an effect on the later part of the heroin-induced behavioral response curve.

  17. Melatonin treatment during the incubation of sensitization attenuates methamphetamine-induced locomotor sensitization and MeCP2 expression.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jintao; Zhu, Dexiao; Zhang, Jing; Li, Guibao; Liu, Zengxun; Sun, Jinhao

    2016-02-04

    Behavior sensitization is a long-lasting enhancement of locomotor activity after exposure to psychostimulants. Incubation of sensitization is a phenomenon of remarkable augmentation of locomotor response after withdrawal and reflects certain aspects of compulsive drug craving. However, the mechanisms underlying these phenomena remain elusive. Here we pay special attention to the incubation of sensitization and suppose that the intervention of this procedure will finally decrease the expression of sensitization. Melatonin is an endogenous hormone secreted mainly by the pineal gland. It is effective in treating sleep disorder, which turns out to be one of the major withdrawal symptoms of methamphetamine (MA) addiction. Furthermore, melatonin can also protect neuronal cells against MA-induced neurotoxicity. In the present experiment, we treated mice with low dose (10mg/kg) of melatonin for 14 consecutive days during the incubation of sensitization. We found that melatonin significantly attenuated the expression of sensitization. In contrast, the vehicle treated mice showed prominent enhancement of locomotor activity after incubation. MeCP2 expression was also elevated in the vehicle treated mice and melatonin attenuated its expression. Surprisingly, correlation analysis suggested significant correlation between MeCP2 expression in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) and locomotion in both saline control and vehicle treated mice, but not in melatonin treated ones. MA also induced MeCP2 over-expression in PC12 cells. However, melatonin failed to reduce MeCP2 expression in vitro. Our results suggest that melatonin treatment during the incubation of sensitization attenuates MA-induced expression of sensitization and decreases MeCP2 expression in vivo.

  18. Electrophysiological characterization of V2a interneurons and their locomotor-related activity in the neonatal mouse spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Guisheng; Droho, Steven; Crone, Steven A; Dietz, Shelby; Kwan, Alex C; Webb, Watt W; Sharma, Kamal; Harris-Warrick, Ronald M

    2010-01-06

    The V2a class of Chx10-expressing interneurons has been implicated in frequency-dependent control of left-right phase during locomotion in the mouse. We have used the Chx10::CFP mouse line to further investigate the properties and locomotion-related activity of V2a interneurons in the isolated neonatal spinal cord. V2a interneurons can be divided into three classes, based on their tonic, phasic, or delayed-onset responses to step depolarization. Electrical coupling is found only between neurons of same class and helps to synchronize neuronal activity within the class. Serotonin (5-HT) excites isolated tonic V2a interneurons by depolarizing the neurons and increasing their membrane input resistance, with no significant effects on action potential properties, a mechanism distinct from 5-HT excitation of commissural interneurons. During NMDA-/5-HT-induced locomotor-like activity, patch-clamp recordings and two-photon calcium imaging experiments show that approximately half of V2a interneurons fire rhythmically with ventral root-recorded motor activity; the rhythmic V2a interneurons fired during one half of the cycle, in phase with either the ipsilateral or the contralateral L2 ventral root bursts. The percentage of rhythmically firing V2a interneurons increases during higher-frequency fictive locomotion, and they become significantly more rhythmic in their firing during the locomotor cycle; this may help to explain the frequency-dependent shift in left-right coupling in Chx10::DTA mice, which lack these neurons. Our results together with data from the accompanying paper (Dougherty and Kiehn, 2009) reinforce earlier proposals that the V2a interneurons are components of the hindlimb central pattern generator, helping to organize left-right locomotor coordination in the neonatal mouse spinal cord.

  19. Effect of age and severity of cognitive dysfunction on spontaneous activity in pet dogs - part 1: locomotor and exploratory behaviour.

    PubMed

    Rosado, B; González-Martínez, A; Pesini, P; García-Belenguer, S; Palacio, J; Villegas, A; Suárez, M-L; Santamarina, G; Sarasa, M

    2012-11-01

    Age-related cognitive dysfunction syndrome (CDS) has been reported in dogs and it is considered a natural model for Alzheimer's disease in humans. Changes in spontaneous activity (including locomotor and exploratory behaviour) and social responsiveness have been related to the age and cognitive status of kennel-reared Beagle dogs. The aim of this study was to assess the influence of age and severity of CDS on locomotor and exploratory behaviour of privately owned dogs. This is the first part of a two-part report on spontaneous activity in pet dogs. An open-field (OF) test and a curiosity test were administered at baseline and 6 months later to young (1-4 years, n=9), middle-aged (5-8 years, n=9), cognitively unimpaired aged (≥ 9 years, n=31), and cognitively impaired aged ( ≥ 9 years, n=36) animals. Classification of cognitive status was carried out using an owner-based observational questionnaire, and in the cognitively impaired group, the dogs were categorised as having either mild or severe cognitive impairment. Dogs were recorded during sessions in the testing room and the video-recordings were subsequently analysed. The severity of CDS (but not age) influenced locomotion and exploratory behaviour so that the more severe the impairment, the higher the locomotor activity and frequency of corner-directed (aimless) behaviours, and the lower the frequency of door-aimed activities. Curiosity directed toward novel stimuli exhibited an age-dependent decline although severely affected animals displayed more sniffing episodes directed towards the objects. OF activity did not change after 6 months. Testing aged pet dogs for spontaneous behaviour might help to better characterise cognitively affected individuals.

  20. Diurnal changes in the synthesis of the neurosteroid 7alpha-hydroxypregnenolone stimulating locomotor activity in newts.

    PubMed

    Koyama, Teppei; Haraguchi, Shogo; Vaudry, Hubert; Tsutsui, Kazuyoshi

    2009-04-01

    We recently identified 7alpha-hydroxypregnenolone as a novel amphibian neurosteroid stimulating locomotor activity in newts. Because male newts show marked diurnal changes in locomotor activity, we hypothesized that 7alpha-hydroxypregnenolone may be a key factor for the induction of diurnal changes in locomotor activity in male newts. In this study, we found diurnal changes in 7alpha-hydroxypregnenolone synthesis in the brain of male newts, which paralleled locomotor activity. Interestingly, the production of 7alpha-hydroxypregnenolone in the male newt brain increased during the dark phase when locomotor activity of males was high.

  1. Emergence patterns of novelty in European vegetation assemblages over the past 15 000 years.

    PubMed

    Finsinger, Walter; Giesecke, Thomas; Brewer, Simon; Leydet, Michelle

    2017-03-01

    Plant communities are not stable over time and biological novelty is predicted to emerge due to climate change, the introduction of exotic species and land-use change. However, the rate at which this novelty may arise over longer time periods has so far received little attention. We reconstruct the emergence of novelty in Europe for a set of baseline conditions over the past 15 000 years to assess past rates of emergence and investigate underlying causes. The emergence of novelty is baseline specific and, during the early-Holocene, was mitigated by the rapid spread of plant taxa. Although novelty generally increases as a function of time, climate and human-induced landscape changes contributed to a non-linear post-glacial trajectory of novelty with jumps corresponding to periods of rapid changes. Emergence of novelty accelerated during the past 1000 years. Historical cultural landscapes experienced a faster novelty development due to the contribution from anthropogenic land-cover changes.

  2. 40 CFR 405.80 - Applicability; description of the ice cream, frozen desserts, novelties and other dairy desserts...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... cream, frozen desserts, novelties and other dairy desserts subcategory. 405.80 Section 405.80 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS DAIRY PRODUCTS PROCESSING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Ice Cream, Frozen Desserts, Novelties and Other Dairy...

  3. A Behavioral Study of Distraction by Vibrotactile Novelty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parmentier, Fabrice B. R.; Ljungberg, Jessica K.; Elsley, Jane V.; Lindkvist, Markus

    2011-01-01

    Past research has demonstrated that the occurrence of unexpected task-irrelevant changes in the auditory or visual sensory channels captured attention in an obligatory fashion, hindering behavioral performance in ongoing auditory or visual categorization tasks and generating orientation and re-orientation electrophysiological responses. We report…

  4. A Framework for Evaluation and Optimization of Relevance and Novelty-Based Retrieval

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lad, Abhimanyu

    2011-01-01

    There has been growing interest in building and optimizing retrieval systems with respect to relevance and novelty of information, which together more realistically reflect the usefulness of a system as perceived by the user. How to combine these criteria into a single metric that can be used to measure as well as optimize retrieval systems is an…

  5. Autonomous visual exploration creates developmental change in familiarity and novelty seeking behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Perone, Sammy; Spencer, John P.

    2013-01-01

    What motivates children to radically transform themselves during early development? We addressed this question in the domain of infant visual exploration. Over the first year, infants' exploration shifts from familiarity to novelty seeking. This shift is delayed in preterm relative to term infants and is stable within individuals over the course of the first year. Laboratory tasks have shed light on the nature of this familiarity-to-novelty shift, but it is not clear what motivates the infant to change her exploratory style. We probed this by letting a Dynamic Neural Field (DNF) model of visual exploration develop itself via accumulating experience in a virtual world. We then situated it in a canonical laboratory task. Much like infants, the model exhibited a familiarity-to-novelty shift. When we manipulated the initial conditions of the model, the model's performance was developmentally delayed much like preterm infants. This delay was overcome by enhancing the model's experience during development. We also found that the model's performance was stable at the level of the individual. Our simulations indicate that novelty seeking emerges with no explicit motivational source via the accumulation of visual experience within a complex, dynamical exploratory system. PMID:24065948

  6. Large-scale coding sequence change underlies the evolution of postdevelopmental novelty in honey bees.

    PubMed

    Jasper, William Cameron; Linksvayer, Timothy A; Atallah, Joel; Friedman, Daniel; Chiu, Joanna C; Johnson, Brian R

    2015-02-01

    Whether coding or regulatory sequence change is more important to the evolution of phenotypic novelty is one of biology's major unresolved questions. The field of evo-devo has shown that in early development changes to regulatory regions are the dominant mode of genetic change, but whether this extends to the evolution of novel phenotypes in the adult organism is unclear. Here, we conduct ten RNA-Seq experiments across both novel and conserved tissues in the honey bee to determine to what extent postdevelopmental novelty is based on changes to the coding regions of genes. We make several discoveries. First, we show that with respect to novel physiological functions in the adult animal, positively selected tissue-specific genes of high expression underlie novelty by conferring specialized cellular functions. Such genes are often, but not always taxonomically restricted genes (TRGs). We further show that positively selected genes, whether TRGs or conserved genes, are the least connected genes within gene expression networks. Overall, this work suggests that the evo-devo paradigm is limited, and that the evolution of novelty, postdevelopment, follows additional rules. Specifically, evo-devo stresses that high network connectedness (repeated use of the same gene in many contexts) constrains coding sequence change as it would lead to negative pleiotropic effects. Here, we show that in the adult animal, the converse is true: Genes with low network connectedness (TRGs and tissue-specific conserved genes) underlie novel phenotypes by rapidly changing coding sequence to perform new-specialized functions.

  7. Field Biology Experiences of Undergraduate Students: The Impact of Novelty Space

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cotton, Debby R. E.; Cotton, Peter A.

    2009-01-01

    Fieldwork is generally considered an essential aspect of teaching and learning about biology, at both school and university level. However, previous research suggests that the novelty of being in an unfamiliar field environment can negatively, as well as positively, impact on the student experience and learning. This research uses the framework of…

  8. Why Science is Needed in the Third Millennium: the Fundamental Novelty of this Year

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zichichi, Antonino

    2014-07-01

    THE FUNDAMENTAL NOVELTY OF THIS YEAR is the presence, here with us, of the President of the Senate of the Italian Republic, H.E. Senator Pietro Grasso. He is a great friend of Science since many decades. He has followed our work and he is now in a position to allow the Great Alliance between Science and Political Power to become a reality.

  9. Context Matters: Multiple Novelty Tests Reveal Different Aspects of Shyness-Boldness in Farmed American Mink (Neovison vison).

    PubMed

    Noer, Christina Lehmkuhl; Needham, Esther Kjær; Wiese, Ann-Sophie; Balsby, Thorsten Johannes Skovbjerg; Dabelsteen, Torben

    2015-01-01

    Animal personality research is receiving increasing interest from related fields, such as evolutionary personality psychology. By merging the conceptual understanding of personality, the contributions to both fields of research may be enhanced. In this study, we investigate animal personality based on the definition of personality traits as underlying dispositional factors, which are not directly measurable, but which predispose individuals to react through different behavioural patterns. We investigated the shyness-boldness continuum reflected in the consistency of inter-individual variation in behavioural responses towards novelty in 47 farmed American mink (Neovison vison), which were raised in identical housing conditions. Different stages of approach behaviour towards novelty, and how these related within and across contexts, were explored. Our experimental design contained four tests: two novel object tests (non-social contexts) and two novel animated stimuli tests (social contexts). Our results showed consistency in shyness measures across multiple tests, indicating the existence of personality in farmed American mink. It was found that consistency in shyness measures differs across non-social and social contexts, as well as across the various stages in the approach towards novel objects, revealing that different aspects of shyness exist in the farmed American mink. To our knowledge this is the first study to reveal aspects of the shyness-boldness continuum in the American mink. Since the mink were raised in identical housing conditions, inherited factors may have been important in shaping the consistent inter-individual variation. Body weight and sex had no effect on the personality of the mink. Altogether, our results suggest that the shyness-boldness continuum cannot be explained by a simple underlying dispositional factor, but instead encompasses a broader term of hesitating behaviour that might comprise several different personality traits.

  10. Context Matters: Multiple Novelty Tests Reveal Different Aspects of Shyness-Boldness in Farmed American Mink (Neovison vison)

    PubMed Central

    Noer, Christina Lehmkuhl; Needham, Esther Kjær; Wiese, Ann-Sophie; Balsby, Thorsten Johannes Skovbjerg; Dabelsteen, Torben

    2015-01-01

    Animal personality research is receiving increasing interest from related fields, such as evolutionary personality psychology. By merging the conceptual understanding of personality, the contributions to both fields of research may be enhanced. In this study, we investigate animal personality based on the definition of personality traits as underlying dispositional factors, which are not directly measurable, but which predispose individuals to react through different behavioural patterns. We investigated the shyness-boldness continuum reflected in the consistency of inter-individual variation in behavioural responses towards novelty in 47 farmed American mink (Neovison vison), which were raised in identical housing conditions. Different stages of approach behaviour towards novelty, and how these related within and across contexts, were explored. Our experimental design contained four tests: two novel object tests (non-social contexts) and two novel animated stimuli tests (social contexts). Our results showed consistency in shyness measures across multiple tests, indicating the existence of personality in farmed American mink. It was found that consistency in shyness measures differs across non-social and social contexts, as well as across the various stages in the approach towards novel objects, revealing that different aspects of shyness exist in the farmed American mink. To our knowledge this is the first study to reveal aspects of the shyness-boldness continuum in the American mink. Since the mink were raised in identical housing conditions, inherited factors may have been important in shaping the consistent inter-individual variation. Body weight and sex had no effect on the personality of the mink. Altogether, our results suggest that the shyness-boldness continuum cannot be explained by a simple underlying dispositional factor, but instead encompasses a broader term of hesitating behaviour that might comprise several different personality traits. PMID

  11. Electrophysiological analysis of the role of novelty in the von Restorff effect

    PubMed Central

    Rangel-Gomez, Mauricio; Meeter, Martijn

    2013-01-01

    Items that are distinctive with respect to their context tend to be recalled better than nondistinctive items, a finding known as the von Restorff effect. The goal of this study was to elucidate the role of novelty in this effect. In two experiments, participants performed a dual task in which they had to study words presented visually while to-be ignored sounds were played over earphones. Sounds could be either standard or novel, and words could be presented in standard or novel font. Sounds were presented either simultaneously with the words (Experiment 1) or preceding them (Experiment 2). Electrophysiological correlates of novelty processing, the N2b and P3a ERP components, were recorded while the words were studied. It was seen that cued recall was better for words presented in novel fonts than for words in a standard font (the von Restorff effect). Words presented while novel sounds were played were remembered worse (Experiment 1) or equally well (Experiment 2) than those combined with standard sounds. Words presented in novel fonts elicited enhanced N2b, P3a, P3b, and N400 components; however, none of these components were specifically larger for subsequently recalled novel-font words. A larger N2b was found for recalled than for nonrecalled words, but this effect was not specific for words presented in novel font. We hypothesized that if novelty was beneficial for memory processing, the N2–P3 complex would be more enhanced for novel words that were later recalled than for those not recalled. The data showed otherwise. This suggests that novelty processing, as indexed by the N2–P3 novelty components, is not the main cause of the von Restorff effect. PMID:23531713

  12. Behavioral Distraction by Auditory Novelty Is Not Only about Novelty: The Role of the Distracter's Informational Value

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parmentier, Fabrice B. R.; Elsley, Jane V.; Ljungberg, Jessica K.

    2010-01-01

    Unexpected events often distract us. In the laboratory, novel auditory stimuli have been shown to capture attention away from a focal visual task and yield specific electrophysiological responses as well as a behavioral cost to performance. Distraction is thought to follow ineluctably from the sound's low probability of occurrence or, put more…

  13. Dopamine is differentially involved in the locomotor hyperactivity produced by manipulations of opioid, GABA and glutamate receptors in the median raphe nucleus.

    PubMed

    Shim, Insop; Stratford, Thomas R; Wirtshafter, David

    2014-03-15

    The median raphe nucleus (MR) has been shown to exert a powerful influence on behavioral arousal and marked locomotor hyperactivity can be produced by intra-MR injections of a variety of drugs including GABAA and GABAB agonists, excitatory amino acid antagonists, and μ- and δ-opioid agonists. Other studies have indicated that the MR exerts an inhibitory influence on ascending dopamine systems, suggesting that MR induced alterations in activity may be mediated through changes in dopaminergic transmission. In the present study, we explored this possibility by examining whether systemic administration of the preferential D2 dopamine antagonist haloperidol is able to antagonize the hyperactivity produced by intra-MR injections of various drugs. We found that haloperidol completely blocked the locomotor response to intra-MR injections of the μ-opioid receptor agonist DAMGO and the δ-opioid receptor agonist DPDPE. In marked contrast, at doses which abolished the locomotor response to systemic amphetamine, haloperidol had no effect on the hyperactivity induced by intra-MR injections of GABAA agonist muscimol, the GABAB agonist baclofen, or the kainate/quisqualate antagonist pBB-PZDA, even though it suppressed baseline activity in these same animals. These results indicate that there must be at least two mechanisms capable of influencing behavioral arousal within the MR region, one of which is dependent on D2 dopamine receptors and the other is not.

  14. Locomotor activity and tissue levels following acute administration of lambda- and gamma-cyhalothrin in rats

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pyrethroids produce neurotoxicity that depends, in part, on the chemical structure. Common behavioral effects include locomotor activity changes and specific toxic syndromes (types I and II). In general these neurobehavioral effects correlate well with peak internal dose metric...

  15. Locomotor activity and zonation of upper shore arthropods in a sandy beach of north central Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaramillo, E.; Contreras, H.; Duarte, C.; Avellanal, M. H.

    2003-10-01

    The tenebrionid beetle Phalerisida maculata Kulzer, the talitrid amphipod Orchestoidea tuberculata Nicolet and the oniscid isopod Tylos spinulosus Dana are semi-terrestrial burrowing species, which coexist on sandy beaches of north central Chile (28-30°S). During the night, these scavengers emerge to make downshore migrations. Given the similarity in niches of these three species (all are known to include macroalgal detritus in their diet) and their relatively high abundance on that beaches, there is the potential for some degree of interaction, both inter- and intraspecific. Field studies were carried out to examine zonation of these burrowing organisms and eventual time and/or space partitioning of locomotor activity during night hours. Locomotor activity on the beach surface was analyzed over 12 h periods during spring and neap tides of September and December 2000, and March 2001. Scavengers moving over the beach surface were captured using pitfall traps buried with their rims flush with the beach surface along a transect extended from the foot of the dunes to the highest levels reached by the swashes. Every 1 h the captured animals in the traps were collected. Locomotor activity was also studied in the laboratory with chambers equipped with infrared recording systems (actographs). Data downloaded from the actographs were graphed to obtain a display of locomotor activity per 15 min interval during the course of the 7 day experiments. Results show space partitioning of burrowed organisms and time partitioning in the locomotor activity of O. tuberculata, T. spinulosus and P. maculata over the beach surface. Circular statistics showed that usually the activity peaks of O. tuberculata were more different from those of P. maculata and T. spinulosus than those of the last two species when compared with each other. Intraspecific differences were also found in the surface locomotor activity, primarily between juveniles and adults of O. tuberculata. Interseasonal

  16. Muscle spindle feedback directs locomotor recovery and circuit reorganization after spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Takeoka, Aya; Vollenweider, Isabel; Courtine, Grégoire; Arber, Silvia

    2014-12-18

    Spinal cord injuries alter motor function by disconnecting neural circuits above and below the lesion, rendering sensory inputs a primary source of direct external drive to neuronal networks caudal to the injury. Here, we studied mice lacking functional muscle spindle feedback to determine the role of this sensory channel in gait control and locomotor recovery after spinal cord injury. High-resolution kinematic analysis of intact mutant mice revealed proficient execution in basic locomotor tasks but poor performance in a precision task. After injury, wild-type mice spontaneously recovered basic locomotor function, whereas mice with deficient muscle spindle feedback failed to regain control over the hindlimb on the lesioned side. Virus-mediated tracing demonstrated that mutant mice exhibit defective rearrangements of descending circuits projecting to deprived spinal segments during recovery. Our findings reveal an essential role for muscle spindle feedback in directing basic locomotor recovery and facilitating circuit reorganization after spinal cord injury.

  17. Prenatal Iron Deficiency in Guinea Pigs Increases Locomotor Activity but Does Not Influence Learning and Memory.

    PubMed

    Fiset, Catherine; Rioux, France M; Surette, Marc E; Fiset, Sylvain

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the current study was to determine whether prenatal iron deficiency induced during gestation in guinea pigs affected locomotor activity and learning and memory processes in the progeny. Dams were fed either iron-deficient anemic or iron-sufficient diets throughout gestation and lactation. After weaning, all pups were fed an iron-sufficient diet. On postnatal day 24 and 40, the pups' locomotor activity was observed within an open-field test, and from postnatal day 25 to 40, their learning and memory processes were assessed within a Morris Water Maze. The behavioural and cognitive tests revealed that the iron deficient pup group had increased locomotor activity, but solely on postnatal day 40, and that there were no group differences in the Morris Water Maze. In the general discussion, we propose that prenatal iron deficiency induces an increase in nervousness due to anxiety in the progeny, which, in the current study, resulted in an increase of locomotor activity.

  18. Differential effects of propranolol on conditioned hyperactivity and locomotor sensitization induced by morphine in rats.

    PubMed

    Wei, Shuguang; Li, Xinwang

    2014-01-21

    According to memory reconsolidation theory, when long-term memory is reactivated by relevant clues, the memory traces become labile, which can be altered by pharmacological manipulations. Accumulating evidence reveals that memory related to drug abuse can be erased by disrupting reconsolidation process. We used an animal model that could simultaneously measure conditioned hyperactivity and locomotor sensitization induced by morphine. β-Adrenoceptor antagonist propranolol or saline were administered following conditioned stimuli (CS) or a small dose of morphine reactivation. The results showed that the conditioned hyperactivity could be disrupted by propranolol treatment following CS reactivation. However, the expression of locomotor sensitization could not be disrupted by propranolol administration following CS or morphine reactivation. Furthermore, morphine injection and propranolol intervention enhanced the locomotor sensitization effect. These data suggest that blocking the reconsolidation process can disrupt the conditioned hyperactivity induced by environmental cues associated with morphine treatment, but not morphine-induced locomotor sensitization.

  19. Limitations imposed by wearing armour on Medieval soldiers' locomotor performance.

    PubMed

    Askew, Graham N; Formenti, Federico; Minetti, Alberto E

    2012-02-22

    In Medieval Europe, soldiers wore steel plate armour for protection during warfare. Armour design reflected a trade-off between protection and mobility it offered the wearer. By the fifteenth century, a typical suit of field armour weighed between 30 and 50 kg and was distributed over the entire body. How much wearing armour affected Medieval soldiers' locomotor energetics and biomechanics is unknown. We investigated the mechanics and the energetic cost of locomotion in armour, and determined the effects on physical performance. We found that the net cost of locomotion (C(met)) during armoured walking and running is much more energetically expensive than unloaded locomotion. C(met) for locomotion in armour was 2.1-2.3 times higher for walking, and 1.9 times higher for running when compared with C(met) for unloaded locomotion at the same speed. An important component of the increased energy use results from the extra force that must be generated to support the additional mass. However, the energetic cost of locomotion in armour was also much higher than equivalent trunk loading. This additional cost is mostly explained by the increased energy required to swing the limbs and impaired breathing. Our findings can predict age-associated decline in Medieval soldiers' physical performance, and have potential implications in understanding the outcomes of past European military battles.

  20. Inbreeding affects locomotor activity in Drosophila melanogaster at different ages.

    PubMed

    Manenti, Tommaso; Pertoldi, Cino; Moghadam, Neda Nasiri; Nasiri, Neda; Schou, Mads Fristrup; Kjærsgaard, Anders; Cavicchi, Sandro; Loeschcke, Volker

    2015-01-01

    The ability to move is essential for many behavioural traits closely related to fitness. Here we studied the effect of inbreeding on locomotor activity (LA) of Drosophila melanogaster at different ages under both dark and light regimes. We expected to find a decreased LA in inbred lines compared to control lines. We also predicted an increased differentiation between lines due to inbreeding. LA was higher in the dark compared to the light regime for both inbred and outbred control lines. As expected, inbreeding increased phenotypic variance in LA, with some inbred lines showing higher and some lower LA than control lines. Moreover, age per se did not affect LA neither in control nor in inbred lines, while we found a strong line by age interaction between inbred lines. Interestingly, inbreeding changed the daily activity pattern of the flies: these patterns were consistent across all control lines but were lost in some inbred lines. The departure in the daily pattern of LA in inbred lines may contribute to the inbreeding depression observed in inbred natural populations.

  1. Remote Control of Respiratory Neural Network by Spinal Locomotor Generators

    PubMed Central

    Le Gal, Jean-Patrick; Juvin, Laurent; Cardoit, Laura; Thoby-Brisson, Muriel; Morin, Didier

    2014-01-01

    During exercise and locomotion, breathing rate rapidly increases to meet the suddenly enhanced oxygen demand. The extent to which direct central interactions between the spinal networks controlling locomotion and the brainstem networks controlling breathing are involved in this rhythm modulation remains unknown. Here, we show that in isolated neonatal rat brainstem-spinal cord preparations, the increase in respiratory rate observed during fictive locomotion is associated with an increase in the excitability of pre-inspiratory neurons of the parafacial respiratory group (pFRG/Pre-I). In addition, this locomotion-induced respiratory rhythm modulation is prevented both by bilateral lesion of the pFRG region and by blockade of neurokinin 1 receptors in the brainstem. Thus, our results assign pFRG/Pre-I neurons a new role as elements of a previously undescribed pathway involved in the functional interaction between respiratory and locomotor networks, an interaction that also involves a substance P-dependent modulating mechanism requiring the activation of neurokinin 1 receptors. This neurogenic mechanism may take an active part in the increased respiratory rhythmicity produced at the onset and during episodes of locomotion in mammals. PMID:24586951

  2. Evolving Hox Activity Profiles Govern Diversity in Locomotor Systems

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Heekyung; Mazzoni, Esteban O.; Soshnikova, Natalia; Hanley, Olivia; Venkatesh, Byrappa; Duboule, Denis; Dasen, Jeremy S.

    2014-01-01

    Summary The emergence of limb-driven locomotor behaviors was a key event in the evolution of vertebrates and fostered the transition from aquatic to terrestrial life. We show that the generation of limb-projecting lateral motor column (LMC) neurons in mice relies on a transcriptional autoregulatory module initiated via transient activity of multiple genes within the HoxA and HoxC clusters. Repression of this module at thoracic levels restricts expression of LMC determinants, thus dictating LMC position relative to the limbs. This suppression is mediated by a key regulatory domain that is specifically found in the Hoxc9 proteins of appendage-bearing vertebrates. The profile of Hoxc9 expression inversely correlates with LMC position in land vertebrates, and likely accounts for the absence of LMC neurons in limbless species such as snakes. Thus, modulation of both Hoxc9 protein function and Hoxc9 gene expression likely contributed to evolutionary transitions between undulatory and ambulatory motor circuit connectivity programs. PMID:24746670

  3. Locomotor head movements and semicircular canal morphology in primates

    PubMed Central

    Malinzak, Michael D.; Kay, Richard F.; Hullar, Timothy E.

    2012-01-01

    Animal locomotion causes head rotations, which are detected by the semicircular canals of the inner ear. Morphologic features of the canals influence rotational sensitivity, and so it is hypothesized that locomotion and canal morphology are functionally related. Most prior research has compared subjective assessments of animal “agility” with a single determinant of rotational sensitivity: the mean canal radius of curvature (R). In fact, the paired variables of R and body mass are correlated with agility and have been used to infer locomotion in extinct species. To refine models of canal functional morphology and to improve locomotor inferences for extinct species, we compare 3D vector measurements of head rotation during locomotion with 3D vector measures of canal sensitivity. Contrary to the predictions of conventional models that are based upon R, we find that axes of rapid head rotation are not aligned with axes of either high or low sensitivity. Instead, animals with fast head rotations have similar sensitivities in all directions, which they achieve by orienting the three canals of each ear orthogonally (i.e., along planes at 90° angles to one another). The extent to which the canal configuration approaches orthogonality is correlated with rotational head speed independent of body mass and phylogeny, whereas R is not. PMID:23045679

  4. Sex differences in Siberian hamster ultradian locomotor rhythms

    PubMed Central

    Prendergast, Brian J.; Stevenson, Tyler J.; Zucker, Irving

    2014-01-01

    Sex differences in ultradian activity rhythms (URs) and circadian rhythms (CRs) were assessed in Siberian hamsters kept in long day (LD) or short day (SD) photoperiods for 40 weeks. For both sexes URs of locomotor activity were more prevalent, greater in amplitude and more robust in SDs. The UR period was longer in females than males in both day lengths. The reproductive system underwent regression and body mass declined during the initial 10 weeks of SD treatment, and in both sexes these traits spontaneously reverted to the LD phenotype at or before 40 weeks in SD, reflecting the development of neuroendocrine refractoriness to SD patterns of melatonin secretion. Hamsters of both sexes, however, continued to display SD-like URs at the 40 weeks time point. CRs were less prevalent and the waveform less robust and lower in amplitude in SDs than LDs; the SD circadian waveform also did not revert to the long-day phenotype after 40 weeks of SD treatment. Short day lengths enhanced ultradian and diminished circadian rhythms in both sexes. Day length controls several UR characteristics via gonadal steroid and melatonin-independent mechanisms. Sex differences in ultradian timing may contribute to sex diphenisms in rhythms of sleep, food intake and exercise. PMID:23333554

  5. Locomotor behavior of fish hatched from embryos exposed to flight conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleerekoper, H.

    1978-01-01

    Embryos of Fundulus heteroclitus in various stages of development were exposed to space flight conditions aboard Apollo spacecraft and Cosmos satellites. The objective of the study was to ascertain whether fish hatched from these embryos displayed locomotor behavior different from that of control fish of the same age. An electronic monitoring technique was used to record behavior. Results indicate no change in locomotor behavior in fish on Apollo Spacecraft, but inexplicable significant changes were noted in fish aboard Cosmos Satellites.

  6. Sex-related effects of agmatine on caffeine-induced locomotor activity in Swiss Webster mice.

    PubMed

    Uzbay, Tayfun; Kose, Akin; Kayir, Hakan; Ulusoy, Gokhan; Celik, Turgay

    2010-03-25

    In mammalian brain, agmatine is an endogenous amine that is synthesized through the decarboxylation of l-arginine by arginine decarboxylase. It has been proposed as a new neurotransmitter and/or neuromodulator. It was shown that agmatine had some beneficial effects in animal models of opioid and alcohol addiction. Locomotor stimulant properties of drugs such as ethanol, caffeine, nicotine and amphetamine have been linked to their addictive properties. The present study investigates the effects of agmatine on caffeine-induced locomotor activity both in male and female mice. Adult Swiss Webster mice were used in the study. Locomotor activity was measured for 30min immediately following caffeine (2.5, 5, 10 and 20mg/kg, i.p.) or saline treatments. Agmatine (5, 10 and 20mg/kg, i.p.) were injected 20min before caffeine (2.5 and 5mg/kg, i.p.) administration. In both sexes, agmatine (5-20mg/kg) were also tested for ability to depress or stimulate locomotor activity in the absence of caffeine. Caffeine (5mg/kg) induced a significant increase in locomotor activity of both male and female mice. There was no significant difference in the locomotor-activating effects of caffeine between male and female mice. Agmatine blocked the caffeine (5mg/kg)-induced locomotor stimulation dose dependently in male but not female mice. Agmatine had not any effect on the lower dose (2.5mg/kg) of caffeine in both sexes. These results suggest that agmatine has sex-related inhibitory effects on caffeine-induced locomotor activity in Swiss Webster mice, and male mice are more sensitive than the females to the effect of agmatine.

  7. Effect of locomotor training in completely spinalized cats previously submitted to a spinal hemisection.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Marina; Delivet-Mongrain, Hugo; Leblond, Hugues; Rossignol, Serge

    2012-08-08

    After a spinal hemisection in cats, locomotor plasticity occurring at the spinal level can be revealed by performing, several weeks later, a complete spinalization below the first hemisection. Using this paradigm, we recently demonstrated that the hemisection induces durable changes in the symmetry of locomotor kinematics that persist after spinalization. Can this asymmetry be changed again in the spinal state by interventions such as treadmill locomotor training started within a few days after the spinalization? We performed, in 9 adult cats, a spinal hemisection at thoracic level 10 and then a complete spinalization at T13, 3 weeks later. Cats were not treadmill trained during the hemispinal period. After spinalization, 5 of 9 cats were not trained and served as control while 4 of 9 cats were trained on the treadmill for 20 min, 5 d a week for 3 weeks. Using detailed kinematic analyses, we showed that, without training, the asymmetrical state of locomotion induced by the hemisection was retained durably after the subsequent spinalization. By contrast, training cats after spinalization induced a reversal of the left/right asymmetries, suggesting that new plastic changes occurred within the spinal cord through locomotor training. Moreover, training was shown to improve the kinematic parameters and the performance of the hindlimb on the previously hemisected side. These results indicate that spinal locomotor circuits, previously modified by past experience such as required for adaptation to the hemisection, can remarkably respond to subsequent locomotor training and improve bilateral locomotor kinematics, clearly showing the benefits of locomotor training in the spinal state.

  8. Anatomical and electrophysiological plasticity of locomotor networks following spinal transection in the salamander.

    PubMed

    Cabelguen, Jean-Marie; Chevallier, Stéphanie; Amontieva-Potapova, Ianina; Philippe, Céline

    2013-08-01

    Recovery of locomotor behavior following spinal cord injury can occur spontaneously in some vertebrates, such as fish, urodele amphibians, and certain reptiles. This review provides an overview of the current status of our knowledge on the anatomical and electrophysiological changes occurring within the spinal cord that lead to, or are associated with the re-expression of locomotion in spinally-transected salamanders. A better understanding of these processes will help to devise strategies for restoring locomotor function in mammals, including humans.

  9. Effects of temperature and temperature-steps on circadian locomotor rhythmicity in the blow fly Calliphora vicina.

    PubMed

    Saunders, D S.; Hong, S -F.

    2000-03-01

    The free-running period (in darkness) of the locomotor activity rhythm in adult blow flies (Calliphora vicina) was temperature-compensated between 15 and 25 degrees C, showing Q(10) values between 0.98 and 1.04. Single steps-up (20 to 25 degrees C) or steps-down (20 to 15 degrees C) in temperature caused stable phase shifts of the activity rhythm, giving rise to temperature-step phase response curves (PRCs) with both advances and delays. Phase advances, however, were dominant for steps-up, and phase delays for steps-down; the two PRCs were almost "mirror images" of each other. Following protocols introduced by Zimmerman et al. [(1968) Temperature compensation of the circadian oscillation in Drosophila pseudoobscura and its entrainment by temperature cycles, Journal of Insect Physiology, 14, 669-684] for the rhythm of pupal eclosion in Drosophila pseudoobscura, the steps-up and steps-down PRCs for C. vicina were used to compute a theoretical PRC for a 6 h low temperature pulse, and from this a theoretical steady-state phase relationship of the locomotor activity rhythm to a train of such pulses making up a temperature cycle (18 h at 20 degrees and 6 h at 15 degrees C).

  10. Do constraints associated with the locomotor habitat drive the evolution of forelimb shape? A case study in musteloid carnivorans.

    PubMed

    Fabre, Anne-Claire; Cornette, Raphael; Goswami, Anjali; Peigné, Stéphane

    2015-06-01

    Convergence in morphology can result from evolutionary adaptations in species living in environments with similar selective pressures. Here, we investigate whether the shape of the forelimb long bones has converged in environments imposing similar functional constraints, using musteloid carnivores as a model. The limbs of quadrupeds are subjected to many factors that may influence their shape. They need to support body mass without collapsing or breaking, yet at the same time resist the stresses and strains induced by locomotion. This likely imposes strong constraints on their morphology. Our geometric morphometric analyses show that locomotion, body mass and phylogeny all influence the shape of the forelimb. Furthermore, we find a remarkable convergence between: (i) aquatic and semi-fossorial species, both displaying a robust forelimb, with a shape that improves stability and load transfer in response to the physical resistance imposed by the locomotor environment; and (ii) aquatic and arboreal/semi-arboreal species, with both groups displaying a broad capitulum. This augments the degree of pronation/supination, an important feature for climbing as well as grasping and manipulation ability, behaviors common to aquatic and arboreal species. In summary, our results highlight how musteloids with different locomotor ecologies show differences in the anatomy of their forelimb bones. Yet, functional demands for limb movement through dense media also result in convergence in forelimb long-bone shape between diverse groups, for example, otters and badgers.

  11. Transplantation of Human Skin-Derived Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Improves Locomotor Recovery After Spinal Cord Injury in Rats.

    PubMed

    Melo, Fernanda Rosene; Bressan, Raul Bardini; Forner, Stefânia; Martini, Alessandra Cadete; Rode, Michele; Delben, Priscilla Barros; Rae, Giles Alexander; Figueiredo, Claudia Pinto; Trentin, Andrea Gonçalves

    2016-08-10

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a devastating neurologic disorder with significant impacts on quality of life, life expectancy, and economic burden. Although there are no fully restorative treatments yet available, several animal and small-scale clinical studies have highlighted the therapeutic potential of cellular interventions for SCI. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs)-which are conventionally isolated from the bone marrow-recently emerged as promising candidates for treating SCI and have been shown to provide trophic support, ameliorate inflammatory responses, and reduce cell death following the mechanical trauma. Here we evaluated the human skin as an alternative source of adult MSCs suitable for autologous cell transplantation strategies for SCI. We showed that human skin-derived MSCs (hSD-MSCs) express a range of neural markers under standard culture conditions and are able to survive and respond to neurogenic stimulation in vitro. In addition, using histological analysis and behavioral assessment, we demonstrated as a proof-of-principle that hSD-MSC transplantation reduces the severity of tissue loss and facilitates locomotor recovery in a rat model of SCI. Altogether, the study provides further characterization of skin-derived MSC cultures and indicates that the human skin may represent an attractive source for cell-based therapies for SCI and other neurological disorders. Further investigation is needed to elucidate the mechanisms by which hSD-MSCs elicit tissue repair and/or locomotor recovery.

  12. Differential Toxicity of Carbon Nanomaterials in Drosophila: Larval Dietary Uptake Is Benign, but Adult Exposure Causes Locomotor Impairment and Mortality

    PubMed Central

    LIU, XINYUAN; VINSON, DANIEL; ABT, DAWN; HURT, ROBERT H.; RAND, DAVID M.

    2011-01-01

    Rapid growth in nanomaterial manufacturing is raising concerns about potential adverse effects on the environment. Nanoparticle contact with intact organisms in the wild may lead to different biological responses than those observed in laboratory cell-based toxicity assays. In nature, the scale and chemistry of nanoparticles coupled with the surface properties, texture, and behaviors of the organisms will influence biologically significant exposure and ultimate toxicity. We used larval and adult Drosophila melanogaster to study the effects of carbon nanomaterial exposure under several different scenarios. Dietary uptake of fullerene C60, carbon black (CB), or single-walled or multiwalled nanotubes (SWNTs, MWNTs) delivered through the food to the larval stage had no detectable effect on egg to adult survivorship, despite evidence that the nanomaterials are taken up and become sequestered in tissue. However, when these same nanocarbons were exposed in dry form to adults, some materials (CB, SWNTs) adhered extensively to fly surfaces, overwhelmed natural grooming mechanisms, and led to impaired locomotor function and mortality. Others (C60, MWNT arrays) adhered weakly, could be removed by grooming, and did not reduce locomotor function or survivorship. Evidence is presented that these differences are primarily due to differences in nanomaterial superstructure, or aggregation state, and that the combination of adhesion and grooming can lead to active fly borne nanoparticle transport. PMID:19746737

  13. Individual Differences in Novelty Seeking Predict Subsequent Vulnerability to Social Defeat through a Differential Epigenetic Regulation of Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor Expression

    PubMed Central

    Duclot, Florian

    2013-01-01

    Some personality traits, including novelty seeking, are good predictors of vulnerability to stress-related mood disorders in both humans and rodents. While high-novelty-seeking rats [high responders (HRs)] are vulnerable to the induction of depressive-like symptoms by social defeat stress, low-novelty-seeking rats [low responders (LRs)] are not. Here, we show that such individual differences are critically regulated by hippocampal BDNF. While LR animals exhibited an increase in BDNF levels following social defeat, HR individuals did not. This difference in hippocampal BDNF expression promoted the vulnerability of HR and the resilience of LR rats. Indeed, preventing activation of BDNF signaling by infusing the BDNF scavenger TrkB-Fc into the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus of LR rats led to social defeat-induced social avoidance, whereas its activation in HR rats by the TrkB agonist 7,8-dihydroxyflavone promoted social approach. Along with the changes in BDNF expression following defeat, we report in LR animals a downregulation of the inactive BDNF receptor TrkB.T1, associated with an activation of CREB through Akt-mediated signaling, but not MSK1-mediated signaling. In HR animals, none of these molecules were affected by social defeat. Importantly, the BDNF upregulation involved an epigenetically controlled transcription of bdnf exon VI, associated with a coherent regulation of relevant epigenetic factors. Altogether, our data support the importance of hippocampal BDNF regulation in response to stressful events. Moreover, we identify a specific and adaptive regulation of bdnf exon VI in the hippocampus as a critical regulator of stress resilience, and strengthen the importance of epigenetic factors in mediating stress-induced adaptive and maladaptive responses in different individuals. PMID:23825410

  14. Spontaneous novelty seeking and amphetamine-induced conditioning and sensitization in adult mice: evidence of dissociation as a function of age at weaning.

    PubMed

    Adriani, Walter; Laviola, Giovanni

    2002-08-01

    Individual differences in coping with novelty and in the response to psychoactive drugs have been related to early life events, such as the age of weaning. Outbred CD-1 mice underwent a precocious (postnatal day (pnd) 15, Wean-15 group), regular (pnd 21, Wean-21 group), or delayed (pnd 27, Wean-27 group) weaning, and were tested as adults (pnd > 60). In Experiment 1, animals underwent a treatment history with d-amphetamine (AMPH 0, 1, or 5 mg/kg once/day for three days) in a familiar environment. On testing day, mice were challenged with SAL or a standard 1 mg/kg AMPH dose (to evaluate acute drug effects and sensitization), and placed in the familiar environment. As expected, regular Wean-21 animals showed an AMPH-induced hyperactivity and a profile of conditioned locomotion, whereas the same dosage failed to induce any change in Wean-15 and Wean-27 groups. Levels of spontaneous novelty seeking were particularly elevated for Wean-27 mice, when compared with the other weaning groups. In Experiment 2, pairing of AMPH administration (0, 1, 2, 3.3, or 5 mg/kg once/day for three days) with a distinct environment produced a classical conditioned place preference. The magnitude of the preference profile was significantly more marked for Wean-15 mice, when compared with the other two weaning groups. Both experiments also provided evidence that the development of sensitization was particularly evident in Wean-27 mice. In summary, delayed weaning was associated in adult mice with both elevated levels of novelty seeking and increased sensitization to drug effects. Conversely, animals weaned precociously were much more responsive to AMPH-induced incentive conditioning. These results appear relevant to the issue of early experiences as possible risk factors for a number of psychiatric disorders in humans, including the abuse of drugs.

  15. Relating ranging ecology, limb length, and locomotor economy in terrestrial animals.

    PubMed

    Pontzer, Herman

    2012-03-07

    Ecomorphological analyses have identified a number of important evolutionary trends in vertebrate limb design, but the relationships between daily travel distance, locomotor ecology, and limb length in terrestrial animals remain poorly understood. In this paper I model the net rate of energy intake as a function of foraging efficiency, and thus of locomotor economy; improved economy leads to greater net energy intake. However, the relationship between locomotor economy and net intake is highly dependent on foraging efficiency; only species with low foraging efficiencies experience strong selection pressure for improved locomotor economy and increased limb length. Examining 237 terrestrial species, I find that nearly all taxa obtain sufficiently high foraging efficiencies that selection for further increases in economy is weak. Thus selection pressures for increased economy and limb length among living terrestrial animals may be relatively weak and similar in magnitude across ecologically diverse species. The Economy Selection Pressure model for locomotor economy may be useful in investigating the evolution of limb design in early terrestrial taxa and the coevolution of foraging ecology and locomotor anatomy in lineages with low foraging efficiencies.

  16. Treadmill exercise facilitates recovery of locomotor function through axonal regeneration following spinal cord injury in rats

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Sun-Young; Seo, Tae-Beom; Kim, Dae-Young

    2016-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) disrupts both axonal pathways and segmental spinal cord circuity, resulting in permanent neurological deficits. Physical exercise is known to increase the expression of neurotrophins for improving the injured spinal cord. In the present study, we investigated the effects of treadmill exercise on locomotor function in relation with brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) expression after SCI. The rats were divided into five groups: control group, sham operation group, sham operation and exercise group, SCI group, and SCI and exercise group. The laminectomy was performed at the T9–T10 level. The exposed dorsal surface of the spinal cord received contusion injury (10 g × 25 mm) using the impactor. Treadmill exercise was performed 6 days per a week for 6 weeks. In order to evaluate the locomotor function of animals, Basso-Beattie-Bresnahan (BBB) locomotor scale was conducted once a week for 6 weeks. We examined BDNF expression and axonal sprouting in the injury site of the spinal cord using Western blot analysis and immunofluorescence staining. SCI induced loss of locomotor function with decreased BDNF expression in the injury site. Treadmill exercise increased the score of BBB locomotor scale and reduced cavity formation in the injury site. BDNF expression and axonal sprouting within the trabecula were further facilitated by treadmill exercise in SCI-exposed rats. The present study provides the evidence that treadmill exercise may facilitate recovery of locomotor function through axonal regeneration via BDNF expression following SCI. PMID:27656624

  17. Effects of sex pheromones and sexual maturation on locomotor activity in female sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Walaszczyk, Erin J.; Johnson, Nicholas S.; Steibel, Juan Pedro; Li, Weiming

    2013-01-01

    Synchronization of male and female locomotor rhythmicity can play a vital role in ensuring reproductive success. Several physiological and environmental factors alter these locomotor rhythms. As sea lamprey, Petromyzon marinus, progress through their life cycle, their locomotor activity rhythm changes multiple times. The goal of this study was to elucidate the activity patterns of adult female sea lamprey during the sexual maturation process and discern the interactions of these patterns with exposure to male pheromones. During these stages, preovulated and ovulated adult females are exposed to sex pheromone compounds, which are released by spermiated males and attract ovulated females to the nest for spawning. The locomotor behavior of adult females was monitored in a natural stream with a passive integrated tag responder system as they matured, and they were exposed to a sex pheromone treatment (spermiated male washings) or a control (prespermiated male washings). Results showed that, dependent on the hour of day, male sex pheromone compounds reduce total activity (p < 0.05) and cause increases in activity during several daytime hours in preovulated and ovulated females. These results are one of the first examples of how sex pheromones modulate a locomotor rhythm in a vertebrate, and they suggest that the interaction between maturity stage and sex pheromone exposure contributes to the differential locomotor rhythms found in adult female sea lamprey. This phenomenon may contribute to the reproductive synchrony of mature adults, thus increasing reproductive success in this species.

  18. The orbitofrontal cortex: novelty, deviation from expectation, and memory.

    PubMed

    Petrides, Michael

    2007-12-01

    The orbitofrontal cortex is strongly connected with limbic areas of the medial temporal lobe that are critically involved in the establishment of declarative memories (entorhinal and perirhinal cortex and the hippocampal region) as well as the amygdala and the hypothalamus that are involved in emotional and motivational states. The present article reviews evidence regarding the role of the orbitofrontal cortex in the processing of novel information, breaches of expectation, and memory. Functional neuroimaging evidence is provided that there is a difference between the anterior and posterior orbitofrontal cortex in such processing. Exposure to novel information gives rise to a selective increase of activity in the granular anterior part of the orbitofrontal cortex (area 11) and this activity increases when subjects attempt to encode this information in memory. If the stimuli violate expectations (e.g., inspection of graffiti-like stimuli in the context of other regular stimuli) or are unpleasant (i.e., exposure to the sounds of car crashes), there is increased response in the posteromedial agranular/dysgranular area 13 of the orbitofrontal region. The anatomic data provide a framework within which to understand these functional neuroimaging findings.

  19. The scaling of locomotor performance in predator-prey encounters: from fish to killer whales.

    PubMed

    Domenici, P

    2001-12-01

    During predator-prey encounters, a high locomotor performance in unsteady manoeuvres (i.e. acceleration, turning) is desirable for both predators and prey. While speed increases with size in fish and other aquatic vertebrates in continuous swimming, the speed achieved within a given time, a relevant parameter in predator-prey encounters, is size independent. In addition, most parameters indicating high performance in unsteady swimming decrease with size. Both theoretical considerations and data on acceleration suggest a decrease with body size. Small turning radii and high turning rates are indices of maneuverability in space and in time, respectively. Maneuverability decreases with body length, as minimum turning radii and maximum turning rates increase and decrease with body length, respectively. In addition, the scaling of linear performance in fish locomotion may be modulated by turning behaviour, which is an essential component of the escape response. In angelfish, for example, the speed of large fish is inversely related to their turning angle, i.e. fish escaping at large turning angles show lower speed than fish escaping at small turning angles. The scaling of unsteady locomotor performance makes it difficult for large aquatic vertebrates to capture elusive prey by using whole-body attacks, since the overall maneuverability and acceleration of small prey is likely to be superior to that of large predators. Feeding strategies in vertebrate predators can be related to the predator-prey length ratios. At prey-predator ratios higher than approximately 10(-2), vertebrate predators are particulate feeders, while at smaller ratios, they tend to be filter feeders. At intermediate ratios, large aquatic predators may use a variety of feeding methods that aid, or do not involve, whole body attacks. Among these are bubble curtains used by humpback whales to trap fish schools, and tail-slapping of fish by delphinids. Tail slapping by killer whales is discussed as an

  20. Multisensory enhancement of electromotor responses to a single moving object.

    PubMed

    Pluta, Scott R; Kawasaki, Masashi

    2008-09-01

    Weakly electric fish possess three cutaneous sensory organs structured in arrays with overlapping receptive fields. Theoretically, these tuberous electrosensory, ampullary electrosensory and mechanosensory lateral line receptors receive spatiotemporally congruent stimulation in the presence of a moving object. The current study is the first to quantify the magnitude of multisensory enhancement across these mechanosensory and electrosensory systems during moving-object recognition. We used the novelty response of a pulse-type weakly electric fish to quantitatively compare multisensory responses to their component unisensory responses. Principally, we discovered that multisensory novelty responses are significantly larger than their arithmetically summed component unisensory responses. Additionally, multimodal stimulation yielded a significant increase in novelty response amplitude, probability and the rate of a high-frequency burst, known as a ;scallop'. Supralinear multisensory enhancement of the novelty response may signify an augmentation of perception driven by the ecological significance of multimodal stimuli. Scalloping may function as a sensory scan aimed at rapidly facilitating the electrolocation of novel stimuli.

  1. Effect of 1 GeV/n Fe particles on cocaine-stimulated locomotor activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vazquez, M.; Bruneus, M.; Gatley, J.; Russell, S.; Billups, A.

    Space travel beyond the Earth's protective magnetic field (for example, to Mars) will involve exposure of astronauts to irradiation by high-energy nuclei such as 56Fe (HZE radiation), which are a component of galactic cosmic rays. These particles have high linear energy transfer (LET) and are expected to irreversibly damage cells they traverse. Our working hypothesis is that long-term behavioral alterations are induced after exposure of the brain to 1 GeV/n iron particles with fluences of 1 to 8 particles/cell targets. Previous studies support this notion but are not definitive, especially with regard to long-term effects. Using the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) we expose C57 mice to 1 GeV/n 56Fe radiation (head only) at doses of 0, 15, 30, 60, 120 and 240 cGy. There were originally 19 mice per group. The ability of cocaine to increase locomotor activity in 16 of these animals in response to an intraperitoneal injection of cocaine has been measured so far at 1, 4, 8, 12, 16, 20, 24 and 28 weeks. Cocaine-stimulated locomotor activity was chosen in part because it is a behavioral assay with which we have considerable experience. More importantly, the ability to respond to cocaine is a complex behavior involving many neurotransmitter systems and brain circuits. Therefore, the probability of alteration of this behavior by HZE particles was considered high. However, the central circuit is the nigrostriatal dopamine system, in which dopamine is released in striatum from nerve terminals whose cell bodies are located in the substantia nigra. Cocaine activates behavior by blocking dopamine transporters on striatal nerve terminals and therefore elevating the concentration of dopamine in the synapse. Dopamine activates receptors on striatal GABAergic cells that project via other brain regions to the thalamus. Activation of the motor cortex by glutamatergic projections from the thalamus leads ultimately to increased locomotion. The experimental paradigm involves

  2. Hepatic mTORC1 controls locomotor activity, body temperature, and lipid metabolism through FGF21.

    PubMed

    Cornu, Marion; Oppliger, Wolfgang; Albert, Verena; Robitaille, Aaron M; Trapani, Francesca; Quagliata, Luca; Fuhrer, Tobias; Sauer, Uwe; Terracciano, Luigi; Hall, Michael N

    2014-08-12

    The liver is a key metabolic organ that controls whole-body physiology in response to nutrient availability. Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a nutrient-activated kinase and central controller of growth and metabolism that is negatively regulated by the tumor suppressor tuberous sclerosis complex 1 (TSC1). To investigate the role of hepatic mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) in whole-body physiology, we generated liver-specific Tsc1 (L-Tsc1 KO) knockout mice. L-Tsc1 KO mice displayed reduced locomotor activity, body temperature, and hepatic triglyceride content in a rapamycin-sensitive manner. Ectopic activation of mTORC1 also caused depletion of hepatic and plasma glutamine, leading to peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator-1α (PGC-1α)-dependent fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21) expression in the liver. Injection of glutamine or knockdown of PGC-1α or FGF21 in the liver suppressed the behavioral and metabolic defects due to mTORC1 activation. Thus, mTORC1 in the liver controls whole-body physiology through PGC-1α and FGF21. Finally, mTORC1 signaling correlated with FGF21 expression in human liver tumors, suggesting that treatment of glutamine-addicted cancers with mTOR inhibitors might have beneficial effects at both the tumor and whole-body level.

  3. Hepatic mTORC1 controls locomotor activity, body temperature, and lipid metabolism through FGF21

    PubMed Central

    Cornu, Marion; Oppliger, Wolfgang; Albert, Verena; Robitaille, Aaron M.; Trapani, Francesca; Quagliata, Luca; Fuhrer, Tobias; Sauer, Uwe; Terracciano, Luigi; Hall, Michael N.

    2014-01-01

    The liver is a key metabolic organ that controls whole-body physiology in response to nutrient availability. Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a nutrient-activated kinase and central controller of growth and metabolism that is negatively regulated by the tumor suppressor tuberous sclerosis complex 1 (TSC1). To investigate the role of hepatic mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) in whole-body physiology, we generated liver-specific Tsc1 (L-Tsc1 KO) knockout mice. L-Tsc1 KO mice displayed reduced locomotor activity, body temperature, and hepatic triglyceride content in a rapamycin-sensitive manner. Ectopic activation of mTORC1 also caused depletion of hepatic and plasma glutamine, leading to peroxisome proliferator–activated receptor γ coactivator-1α (PGC-1α)–dependent fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21) expression in the liver. Injection of glutamine or knockdown of PGC-1α or FGF21 in the liver suppressed the behavioral and metabolic defects due to mTORC1 activation. Thus, mTORC1 in the liver controls whole-body physiology through PGC-1α and FGF21. Finally, mTORC1 signaling correlated with FGF21 expression in human liver tumors, suggesting that treatment of glutamine-addicted cancers with mTOR inhibitors might have beneficial effects at both the tumor and whole-body level. PMID:25082895

  4. Three-axis optical force plate for studies in small animal locomotor mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Hsieh, S. Tonia

    2006-05-15

    The use of force plates to measure whole-body locomotor mechanics is a well-established technique. However, commercially available force plates are not sensitive enough for use on small-bodied vertebrates or invertebrates. The standard design for single- and multiple-axis, high-sensitivity force plates built by individual research groups uses semiconductor foil strain gauges to measure deflections; yet foil strain gauges are highly temperature and position sensitive, resulting in a drifting base line and nonlinear responses. I present here a design for a three-axis optical force plate that was successfully calibrated to measure forces as small as 1.5 mN and is capable of determining the position of center of pressure with a mean error of 0.07 cm along the X axis and 0.13 cm along the Y axis. Using optical sensors instead of foil strain gauges to measure deflection, this force plate is not subject to temperature-related drift and is more robust against slight positioning inaccuracies. This force plate was used to measure forces produced by amphibious fishes weighing less than 2 g as they jumped off the force platform.

  5. Locomotor adaptation and aftereffects in patients with reduced somatosensory input due to peripheral neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Bunday, Karen L; Bronstein, Adolfo M

    2009-12-01

    We studied 12 peripheral neuropathy patients (PNP) and 13 age-matched controls with the "broken escalator" paradigm to see how somatosensory loss affects gait adaptation and the release and recovery ("braking") of the forward trunk overshoot observed during this locomotor aftereffect. Trunk displacement, foot contact signals, and leg electromyograms (EMGs) were recorded while subjects walked onto a stationary sled (BEFORE trials), onto the moving sled (MOVING or adaptation trials), and again onto the stationary sled (AFTER trials). PNP were unsteady during the MOVING trials, but this progressively improved, indicating some adaptation. During the after trials, 77% of control subjects displayed a trunk overshoot aftereffect but over half of the PNP (58%) did not. The PNP without a trunk aftereffect adapted to the MOVING trials by increasing distance traveled; subsequently this was expressed as increased distance traveled during the aftereffect rather than as a trunk overshoot. This clear separation in consequent aftereffects was not seen in the normal controls suggesting that, as a result of somatosensory loss, some PNP use distinctive strategies to negotiate the moving sled, in turn resulting in a distinct aftereffects. In addition, PNP displayed earlier than normal anticipatory leg EMG activity during the first after trial. Although proprioceptive inputs are not critical for the emergence or termination of the aftereffect, somatosensory loss induces profound changes in motor adaptation and anticipation. Our study has found individual differences in adaptive motor performance, indicative that PNP adopt different feed-forward gait compensatory strategies in response to peripheral sensory loss.

  6. Locomotor Dysfunction after Long-Duration Space Flight and Development of Countermeasures to Facilitate Faster Recovery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mulavara, A. P.; Wood, S. J.; Cohen, H. S.; Bloomberg, J. J.

    2012-01-01

    Exposure to the microgravity conditions of space flight induces adaptive modification in sensorimotor function allowing astronauts to operate in this unique environment. This adaptive state, however, is inappropriate for a 1-g environment. Consequently astronauts must spend time readapting to Earth s gravity following their return to Earth. During this readaptation period, alterations in sensorimotor function cause various disturbances in astronaut gait during postflight walking. They often rely more on vision for postural and gait stability and many report the need for greater cognitive supervision of motor actions that previous to space flight were fully automated. Over the last several years our laboratory has investigated postflight astronaut locomotion with the aim of better understanding how adaptive changes in underlying sensorimotor mechanisms contribute to postflight gait dysfunction. Exposure to the microgravity conditions of space flight induces adaptive modification in the control of vestibularly-mediated reflexive head movement during locomotion after space flight. Furthermore, during motor learning, adaptive transitions are composed of two main mechanisms: strategic and plastic. Strategic mechanisms represent immediate and transitory modifications in control to deal with changes in the prevailing environment that, if prolonged, induce plastic mechanisms designed to automate new behavioral responses. The goal of the present study was to examine the contributions of sensorimotor subsystems such as the vestibular and body load sensing (BLS) somatosensory influences on head movement control during locomotion after long-duration space flight. Further we present data on the two motor learning processes during readaptation of locomotor function after long-duration space flight.

  7. Is there a relation between novelty seeking, striatal dopamine release and frontal cortical thickness?

    PubMed Central

    Cox, Sylvia M.; Casey, Kevin F.; Boileau, Isabelle; Cherkasova, Mariya; Larcher, Kevin; Dagher, Alain; Benkelfat, Chawki; Leyton, Marco

    2017-01-01

    Background Novelty-seeking (NS) and impulsive personality traits have been proposed to reflect an interplay between fronto-cortical and limbic systems, including the limbic striatum (LS). Although neuroimaging studies have provided some evidence for this, most are comprised of small samples and many report surprisingly large effects given the challenges of trying to relate a snapshot of brain function or structure to an entity as complex as personality. The current work tested a priori hypotheses about associations between striatal dopamine (DA) release, cortical thickness (CT), and NS in a large sample of healthy adults. Methods Fifty-two healthy adults (45M/7F; age: 23.8±4.93) underwent two positron emission tomography scans with [11C]raclopride (specific for striatal DA D2/3 receptors) with or without amphetamine (0.3 mg/kg, p.o.). Structural magnetic resonance image scans were acquired, as were Tridimensional Personality Questionnaire data. Amphetamine-induced changes in [11C]raclopride binding potential values (ΔBPND) were examined in the limbic, sensorimotor (SMS) and associative (AST) striatum. CT measures, adjusted for whole brain volume, were extracted from the dorsolateral sensorimotor and ventromedial/limbic cortices. Results BPND values were lower in the amphetamine vs. no-drug sessions, with the largest effect in the LS. When comparing low vs. high LS ΔBPND groups (median split), higher NS2 (impulsiveness) scores were found in the high ΔBPND group. Partial correlations (age and gender as covariates) yielded a negative relation between ASTS ΔBPND and sensorimotor CT; trends for inverse associations existed between ΔBPND values in other striatal regions and frontal CT. In other words, the greater the amphetamine-induced striatal DA response, the thinner the frontal cortex. Conclusions These data expand upon previously reported associations between striatal DA release in the LS and both NS related impulsiveness and CT in the largest sample reported

  8. General and Specific Strategies Used to Facilitate Locomotor Maneuvers

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Mengnan; Matsubara, Jesse H.; Gordon, Keith E.

    2015-01-01

    People make anticipatory changes in gait patterns prior to initiating a rapid change of direction. How they prepare will change based on their knowledge of the maneuver. To investigate specific and general strategies used to facilitate locomotor maneuvers, we manipulated subjects’ ability to anticipate the direction of an upcoming lateral “lane-change” maneuver. To examine specific anticipatory adjustments, we observed the four steps immediately preceding a maneuver that subjects were instructed to perform at a known time in a known direction. We hypothesized that to facilitate a specific change of direction, subjects would proactively decrease margin of stability in the future direction of travel. Our results support this hypothesis: subjects significantly decreased lateral margin of stability by 69% on the side ipsilateral to the maneuver during only the step immediately preceding the maneuver. This gait adaptation may have improved energetic efficiency and simplified the control of the maneuver. To examine general anticipatory adjustments, we observed the two steps immediately preceding the instant when subjects received information about the direction of the maneuver. When the maneuver direction was unknown, we hypothesized that subjects would make general anticipatory adjustments that would improve their ability to actively initiate a maneuver in multiple directions. This second hypothesis was partially supported as subjects increased step width and stance phase hip flexion during these anticipatory steps. These modifications may have improved subjects’ ability to generate forces in multiple directions and maintain equilibrium during the onset and execution of the rapid maneuver. However, adapting these general anticipatory strategies likely incurred an additional energetic cost. PMID:26167931

  9. The GBN-dialogue model of outgroup-negative rumor transmission: group membership, belief, and novelty.

    PubMed

    Brooks, Bernard P; DiFonzo, Nicholas; Ross, David S

    2013-04-01

    A two-step agent-based mathematical model of negative rumor spread in the context of conflicting groups is presented. The GBN-Dialogue model builds on rumor theory, focuses on person-to-person interaction characteristics,and is dynamical. The model first estimates the probability of rumor transmission between two persons based on their transmission motivation (which is a function of their Group (G) memberships), the strengths of their belief (B) in the rumor, and the Novelty (N) of the rumor for each person. Psychological and sociological research informs this Transmission Probability Function. In the second step, belief levels and rumor novelty of each participant change as a result of rumor transmission and time; literature on attitude change guides these updating functions. Empirical support is presented by comparing rumor transmission literature with results of Monte Carlo simulations on different network topologies. The validity of the model's assumptions is addressed by comparison with simpler and more complex alternatives.

  10. NOvelty-related motivation of anticipation and exploration by dopamine (NOMAD): implications for healthy aging.

    PubMed

    Düzel, Emrah; Bunzeck, Nico; Guitart-Masip, Marc; Düzel, Sandra

    2010-04-01

    Studies in humans and animals show that dopaminergic neuromodulation originating from the substantia nigra/ventral tegmental area (SN/VTA) of the midbrain enhances hippocampal synaptic plasticity for novel events and has a motivationally energizing effect on actions through striatal mechanisms. In this review, we discuss how these mechanisms of dopaminergic neuromodulation connect to the behavioural and functional consequences that age-related structural degeneration of the SN/VTA exerts on declarative memory. We propose a framework called 'NOvelty-related Motivation of Anticipation and exploration by Dopamine' (NOMAD) which captures existing links between novelty, dopamine, long-term memory, plasticity, energization and their relation to aging. We propose that maximizing the use of this mechanism by maintaining mobility and exploration of novel environments could be a potential mechanism to slow age-related decline of memory.

  11. On the path to genetic novelties: insights from programmed DNA elimination and RNA splicing.

    PubMed

    Catania, Francesco; Schmitz, Jürgen

    2015-01-01

    Understanding how genetic novelties arise is a central goal of evolutionary biology. To this end, programmed DNA elimination and RNA splicing deserve special consideration. While programmed DNA elimination reshapes genomes by eliminating chromatin during organismal development, RNA splicing rearranges genetic messages by removing intronic regions during transcription. Small RNAs help to mediate this class of sequence reorganization, which is not error-free. It is this imperfection that makes programmed DNA elimination and RNA splicing excellent candidates for generating evolutionary novelties. Leveraging a number of these two processes' mechanistic and evolutionary properties, which have been uncovered over the past years, we present recently proposed models and empirical evidence for how splicing can shape the structure of protein-coding genes in eukaryotes. We also chronicle a number of intriguing similarities between the processes of programmed DNA elimination and RNA splicing, and highlight the role that the variation in the population-genetic environment may play in shaping their target sequences.

  12. Developmentally stable sex-dependent modulation of turning asymmetry by neonatal novelty exposure.

    PubMed

    Akers, Katherine G; Reeb, Bethany C; Tang, Akaysha C

    2004-12-06

    In rats, early life stimulation can enhance learning and memory and induce parallel changes in brain asymmetry. Despite persistent interest in human brain asymmetry, relatively little is known in animal models about developmental stability of early-experience effects on asymmetry and how early-experience may affect males and females differently in asymmetry measures across developmental stages. We exposed male and female neonatal rats to a novel cage for 3min per day during the first 3 weeks of life and measured spontaneous turning behavior at juvenility (7 weeks of age) and adulthood (7 months of age). We found that (1) the effects of such neonatal novelty exposure on turning bias are developmentally stable, and (2) neonatal novelty exposure differentially modulates turning bias in males and females. We briefly discuss implications of these findings in terms of the role of brain asymmetry in modulating cognitive and emotional development.

  13. Differences in Monoamine Oxidase Activity in the Brain of Wistar and August Rats with High and Low Locomotor Activity: A Cytochemical Study.

    PubMed

    Sergutina, A V; Rakhmanova, V I

    2016-06-01

    Monoamine oxidase activity was quantitatively assessed by cytochemical method in brain structures (layers III and V of the sensorimotor cortex, caudate nucleus, nucleus accumbens, hippocampal CA3 field) of rats of August line and Wistar population with high and low locomotor activity in the open fi eld test. Monoamine oxidase activity (substrate tryptamine) predominated in the nucleus accumbens of Wistar rats with high motor activity in comparison with rats with low locomotor activity. In August rats, enzyme activity (substrates tryptamine and serotonin) predominated in the hippocampus of animals with high motor activity. Comparison of August rats with low locomotor activity and Wistar rats with high motor activity (i.e. animals demonstrating maximum differences in motor function) revealed significantly higher activity of the enzyme (substrates tryptamine and serotonin) in the hippocampus of Wistar rats. The study demonstrates clear-cut morphochemical specificity of monoaminergic metabolism based on the differences in the cytochemical parameter "monoamine oxidase activity", in the studied brain structures, responsible for the formation and realization of goal-directed behavior in Wistar and August rats.

  14. Feather pecking in domestic fowl is genetically related to locomotor activity levels: implications for a hyperactivity disorder model of feather pecking.

    PubMed

    Kjaer, Joergen B

    2009-09-01

    Feather pecking is a major welfare problem in egg production. Genetic lines differing in the level of feather pecking have been developed by genetic selection. In two experiments correlated responses in locomotor activity were investigated. Firstly, general locomotor activity was estimated using electronic transponders. A total of 325 pullets from three lines: an unselected control line (CON), a line selected for low levels of feather pecking (LFP) and a line selected for high levels of feather pecking (HFP) during 6 generations, were reared in mixed line groups and activity was recorded from 13 to 17 weeks of age using antennas placed in the litter. Locomotor activity was significantly higher in the HFP and significantly lower in the LFP compared to the CON line (lsmeans 0.72 vs. 0.62 vs. 0.57 records per hen per h for HFP, CON and LFP respectively). In a second experiment locomotion was recorded in 40 chickens from the LFP and the HFP line at 5 weeks of age during day time from 09.00 to 16.00 h using a very precise computer facilitated tracking system. Distance travelled was found to be significantly higher in the high feather pecking line compared to the low feather pecking line (lsmeans 122 vs. 99 m per hour in HFP and LFP respectively). These results are discussed in relation to the ontogeny of feather pecking and a hyperactivity disorder model of feather pecking is suggested.

  15. Development of a home cage locomotor tracking system capable of detecting the stimulant and sedative properties of drugs in rats.

    PubMed

    Dunne, Fergal; O'Halloran, Ambrose; Kelly, John P

    2007-10-01

    The advent of automated locomotor activity methodologies has been extremely useful in removing the subjectivity and bias out of measuring this parameter in rodents. However, many of these behavioural studies are still conducted in novel environments, rather than in ones that the animals are familiar with, such as their home cage. The purpose of the present series of experiments was to develop an automated home cage tracking (HCT) profile using EthoVision software and assessing the acute effects of stimulant (amphetamine and methamphetamine, 0-5 mg/kg, sc) and sedative (diazepam, 0-20 mg/kg, sc and chlordiazepoxide, 0-50 mg/kg sc) drugs in this apparatus. Young adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were used, and the home cage locomotor activity was recorded for 11-60 min following administration (n=4 per group). For amphetamine and methamphetamine, a dose-dependent increase in home cage activity was evident for both drugs, with a plateau, followed by reduction at higher doses. Methamphetamine was more potent, whereas amphetamine produced greater maximal responses. Both diazepam and chlordiazepoxide dose-dependently reduced locomotor activity, with diazepam exhibiting a greater potency and having stronger sedative effects than chlordiazepoxide. Three doses of each drug were selected at the 31-40 min time period following administration, and compared to open field responses. Diazepam, chlordiazepoxide and amphetamine did not produce significant changes in the open field, whilst methamphetamine produced a significant increase in the 2.5 mg/kg group. In conclusion, these studies have successfully developed a sensitive HCT methodology that has been validated using drugs with stimulant and sedative properties in the same test conditions, with relatively small numbers of animals required to produce statistically significant results. It has proven superior to the open field investigations in allowing dose-response effects to be observed over a relatively short observation period

  16. Individual Differences in Ethanol Locomotor Sensitization Are Associated with Dopamine D1 Receptor Intra-Cellular Signaling of DARPP-32 in the Nucleus Accumbens

    PubMed Central

    Abrahao, Karina Possa; Oliveira Goeldner, Francine; Souza-Formigoni, Maria Lucia Oliveira

    2014-01-01

    In mice there are clear individual differences in the development of behavioral sensitization to ethanol, a progressive potentiation of its psychomotor stimulant effect. Variability in the behavioral responses to ethanol has been associated with alcohol preference. Here we investigated if the functional hyperresponsiveness of D1 receptors observed in ethanol sensitized mice leads to an increased activation of DARPP-32, a central regulatory protein in medium spiny neurons, in the nucleus accumbens - a brain region known to play a role in drug reinforcement. Swiss Webster mice received ethanol (2.2 g/kg/day) or saline i.p. administrations for 21 days and were weekly evaluated regarding their locomotor activity. From those treated with ethanol, the 33% with the highest levels of locomotor activity were classified as “sensitized” and the 33% with the lowest levels as "non-sensitized”. The latter presented similar locomotor levels to those of saline-treated mice. Different subgroups of mice received intra-accumbens administrations of saline and, 48 h later, SKF-38393, D1 receptor agonist 0.1 or 1 µg/side. Indeed, sensitized mice presented functional hyperresponsiveness of D1 receptors in the accumbens. Two weeks following the ethanol treatment, other subgroups received systemic saline or SKF 10 mg/kg, 20 min before the euthanasia. The nucleus accumbens were dissected for the Western Blot analyses of total DARPP-32 and phospho-Thr34-DARPP-32 expression. D1 receptor activation induced higher phospho-Thr34-DARPP-32 expression in sensitized mice than in non-sensitized or saline. The functionally hyperresponsiveness of D1 receptors in the nucleus accumbens is associated with an increased phospho-Thr34-DARPP-32 expression after D1 receptor activation. These data suggest that an enduring increase in the sensitivity of the dopamine D1 receptor intracellular pathway sensitivity represents a neurobiological correlate associated with the development of locomotor

  17. The Role of Social Novelty in Risk Seeking and Exploratory Behavior: Implications for Addictions

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Simon; Gao, Jennifer; Hallett, Mark; Voon, Valerie

    2016-01-01

    Novelty preference or sensation seeking is associated with disorders of addiction and predicts rodent compulsive drug use and adolescent binge drinking in humans. Novelty has also been shown to influence choice in the context of uncertainty and reward processing. Here we introduce a novel or familiar neutral face stimuli and investigate its influence on risk-taking choices in healthy volunteers. We focus on behavioural outcomes and imaging correlates to the prime that might predict risk seeking. We hypothesized that subjects would be more risk seeking following a novel relative to familiar stimulus. We adapted a risk-taking task involving acceptance or rejection of a 50:50 choice of gain or loss that was preceded by a familiar (pre-test familiarization) or novel face prime. Neutral expression faces of males and females were used as primes. Twenty-four subjects were first tested behaviourally and then 18 scanned using a different variant of the same task under functional MRI. We show enhanced risk taking to both gain and loss anticipation following novel relative to familiar images and particularly for the low gain condition. Greater risk taking behaviour and self-reported exploratory behaviours was predicted by greater right ventral putaminal activity to novel versus familiar contexts. Social novelty appears to have a contextually enhancing effect on augmenting risky choices possibly mediated via ventral putaminal dopaminergic activity. Our findings link the observation that novelty preference and sensation seeking are important traits predicting the initiation and maintenance of risky behaviours, including substance and behavioural addictions. PMID:27427940

  18. Dynamic behavioural changes in the Spontaneously Hyperactive Rat: 2. Control by novelty.

    PubMed

    Williams, Jonathan; Sagvolden, Geir; Taylor, Eric; Sagvolden, Terje

    2009-03-17

    An important aspect of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is its temporary amelioration by novelty and by stimulant medication. Extant learning-based accounts of ADHD are unable to account for the temporary amelioration effect. One possible mechanism is a drive for novelty. Computational simulations have previously shown that such a drive can result from a "dopamine appetite". Empirical demonstration of such a process requires, as a first step, the development of standard criteria for identifying drive-based, versus learning-based, changes in behaviour. Using a variable-interval reinforcement schedule, we looked over a range of timescales for behavioural changes showing putative characteristics of drives, namely: low information content, unidirectionality, saturability, spontaneous reversibility in less than a day, and cycle stability. SHR lacks normal down-regulation of responding when the schedule becomes sparser. SHR appears to be re-learning the schedule length during the days of each calendar week. SHR hyperactivity is specific to the operant and develops gradually over the first five minutes of each session. Empirical within-session results were replicated by a simple simulation containing two interacting reward systems, one for water and the other for stimulation (including novelty). To summarise, enhanced sensation-seeking (or a subtype of it, novelty-seeking) provides the best available account of changes in SHR activity within sessions, though not of changes over longer timecourses. Sensation-seeking appears to be associated with low anxiety in the SHR. SHR propensity to display multiple influences on their behaviour makes them ideal for further pharmacological, genetic, and behavioural investigation.

  19. Memory effects of sleep, emotional valence, arousal and novelty in children.

    PubMed

    Vermeulen, Marije C M; van der Heijden, Kristiaan B; Benjamins, Jeroen S; Swaab, Hanna; van Someren, Eus J W

    2017-03-02

    Effectiveness of memory consolidation is determined by multiple factors, including sleep after learning, emotional valence, arousal and novelty. Few studies investigated how the effect of sleep compares with (and interacts with) these other factors, of which virtually none are in children. The present study did so by repeated assessment of declarative memory in 386 children (45% boys) aged 9-11 years through an online word-pair task. Children were randomly assigned to either a morning or evening learning session of 30 unrelated word-pairs with positive, neutral or negative valenced cues and neutral targets. After immediately assessing baseline recognition, delayed recognition was recorded either 12 or 24 h later, resulting in four different assessment schedules. One week later, the procedure was repeated with exactly the same word-pairs to evaluate whether effects differed for relearning versus original novel learning. Mixed-effect logistic regression models were used to evaluate how the probability of correct recognition was affected by sleep, valence, arousal, novelty and their interactions. Both immediate and delayed recognition were worse for pairs with negatively valenced or less arousing cue words. Relearning improved immediate and delayed word-pair recognition. In contrast to these effects, sleep did not affect recognition, nor did sleep moderate the effects of arousal, valence and novelty. The findings suggest a robust inclination of children to specifically forget the pairing of words to negatively valenced cue words. In agreement with a recent meta-analysis, children seem to depend less on sleep for the consolidation of information than has been reported for adults, irrespective of the emotional valence, arousal and novelty of word-pairs.

  20. Grooming Behavior in American Cockroach is Affected by Novelty and Odor

    PubMed Central

    Zhukovskaya, Marianna I.

    2014-01-01

    The main features of grooming behavior are amazingly similar among arthropods and land vertebrates and serve the same needs. A particular pattern of cleaning movements in cockroaches shows cephalo-caudal progression. Grooming sequences become longer after adaptation to the new setting. Novelty related changes in grooming are recognized as a form of displacement behavior. Statistical analysis of behavior revealed that antennal grooming in American cockroach, Periplaneta americana L., was significantly enhanced in the presence of odor. PMID:25401135

  1. Striatal and midbrain connectivity with the hippocampus selectively boosts memory for contextual novelty.

    PubMed

    Kafkas, Alexandros; Montaldi, Daniela

    2015-11-01

    The role of contextual expectation in processing familiar and novel stimuli was investigated in a series of experiments combining eye tracking, functional magnetic resonance imaging, and behavioral methods. An experimental paradigm emphasizing either familiarity or novelty detection at retrieval was used. The detection of unexpected familiar and novel stimuli, which were characterized by lower probability, engaged activity in midbrain and striatal structures. Specifically, detecting unexpected novel stimuli, relative to expected novel stimuli, produced greater activity in the substantia nigra/ventral tegmental area (SN/VTA), whereas the detection of unexpected familiar, relative to expected, familiar stimuli, elicited activity in the striatum/globus pallidus (GP). An effective connectivity analysis showed greater functional coupling between these two seed areas (GP and SN/VTA) and the hippocampus, for unexpected than for expected stimuli. Within this network of midbrain/striatal-hippocampal interactions two pathways are apparent; the direct SN-hippocampal pathway sensitive to unexpected novelty and the perirhinal-GP-hippocampal pathway sensitive to unexpected familiarity. In addition, increased eye fixations and pupil dilations also accompanied the detection of unexpected relative to expected familiar and novel stimuli, reflecting autonomic activity triggered by the functioning of these two pathways. Finally, subsequent memory for unexpected, relative to expected, familiar, and novel stimuli was characterized by enhanced recollection, but not familiarity, accuracy. Taken together, these findings suggest that a hippocampal-midbrain network, characterized by two distinct pathways, mediates encoding facilitation and most critically, that this facilitation is driven by contextual novelty, rather than by the absolute novelty of a stimulus. This contextually sensitive neural mechanism appears to elicit increased exploratory behavior, leading subsequently to greater

  2. The Cyborg Astrobiologist: matching of prior textures by image compression for geological mapping and novelty detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGuire, P. C.; Bonnici, A.; Bruner, K. R.; Gross, C.; Ormö, J.; Smosna, R. A.; Walter, S.; Wendt, L.

    2014-07-01

    We describe an image-comparison technique of Heidemann and Ritter (2008a, b), which uses image compression, and is capable of: (i) detecting novel textures in a series of images, as well as of: (ii) alerting the user to the similarity of a new image to a previously observed texture. This image-comparison technique has been implemented and tested using our Astrobiology Phone-cam system, which employs Bluetooth communication to send images to a local laptop server in the field for the image-compression analysis. We tested the system in a field site displaying a heterogeneous suite of sandstones, limestones, mudstones and coal beds. Some of the rocks are partly covered with lichen. The image-matching procedure of this system performed very well with data obtained through our field test, grouping all images of yellow lichens together and grouping all images of a coal bed together, and giving 91% accuracy for similarity detection. Such similarity detection could be employed to make maps of different geological units. The novelty-detection performance of our system was also rather good (64% accuracy). Such novelty detection may become valuable in searching for new geological units, which could be of astrobiological interest. The current system is not directly intended for mapping and novelty detection of a second field site based on image-compression analysis of an image database from a first field site, although our current system could be further developed towards this end. Furthermore, the image-comparison technique is an unsupervised technique that is not capable of directly classifying an image as containing a particular geological feature; labelling of such geological features is done post facto by human geologists associated with this study, for the purpose of analysing the system's performance. By providing more advanced capabilities for similarity detection and novelty detection, this image-compression technique could be useful in giving more scientific autonomy

  3. Grooming behavior in American cockroach is affected by novelty and odor.

    PubMed

    Zhukovskaya, Marianna I

    2014-01-01

    The main features of grooming behavior are amazingly similar among arthropods and land vertebrates and serve the same needs. A particular pattern of cleaning movements in cockroaches shows cephalo-caudal progression. Grooming sequences become longer after adaptation to the new setting. Novelty related changes in grooming are recognized as a form of displacement behavior. Statistical analysis of behavior revealed that antennal grooming in American cockroach, Periplaneta americana L., was significantly enhanced in the presence of odor.

  4. Large-scale phenotyping links adult hippocampal neurogenesis to the reaction to novelty.

    PubMed

    van Dijk, R Maarten; Lazic, Stanley E; Slomianka, Lutz; Wolfer, David P; Amrein, Irmgard

    2016-05-01

    The discovery of adult-born neurons in the hippocampus has triggered a wide range of studies that link the new neurons to various behavioral functions. However, the role of new neurons in behavior is still equivocal. Conflicting results may be due to the difficulty in manipulating neurogenesis without off-target effects as well as the statistical approach used, which fail to account for neurogenesis-independent effects of experimental manipulations on behavior. In this study, we apply a more comprehensive statistical and conceptual approach. Instead of between-group analyses, we consider the within-group relationships between neurogenesis and behavior (ANCOVA and mediation analysis) in a large-scale experiment, in which distinct age- (3 and 5 months) and strain- (DBA and C57) related differences in basal levels of neurogenesis in mice are compared with a large number (∼1,500) of behavioral read outs. The analysis failed to detect any association between anxiety and motor impulsivity with neurogenesis. However, within-group adult hippocampal neurogenesis is associated with the reaction to novelty. Specifically, more neurogenesis is associated with a longer latency to explore and a lower frequency of exploratory actions, overall indicative of a phenotype where animals with more neurogenesis were slower to explore a novel environment. This effect is observed in 5-months-old, but not in 3-months-old mice of both strains. An association between the reaction to novelty and adult neurogenesis can have a major impact on results from previous studies using classical behavioral experiments, in which animals are tested in a--for the animal--novel experimental set-up. The neurogenesis-novelty association found here is also a necessary link in the relation that has been suggested to exist between neurogenesis and psychiatric disorders marked by a failure to cope with novelty.

  5. Sequence diversity and novelty of natural assemblages of picoeukaryotes from the Indian Ocean

    PubMed Central

    Massana, Ramon; Pernice, Massimo; Bunge, John A; Campo, Javier del

    2011-01-01

    Despite the ecological importance of marine pico-size eukaryotes, the study of their in situ diversity using molecular tools started just a few years ago. These studies have revealed that marine picoeukaryotes are very diverse and include many novel taxa. However, the amount and structure of their phylogenetic diversity and the extent of their sequence novelty still remains poorly known, as a systematic analysis has been seldom attempted. In this study, we use a coherent and carefully curated data set of 500 published 18S ribosomal DNA sequences to quantify the diversity and novelty patterns of picoeukaryotes in the Indian Ocean. Our phylogenetic tree showed many distant lineages. We grouped sequences in OTUs (operational taxonomic units) at discrete values delineated by pair-wise Jukes–Cantor (JC) distances and tree patristic distances. At a distance of 0.01, the number of OTUs observed (237/242; using JC or patristic distances, respectively) was half the number of sequences analyzed, indicating the existence of microdiverse clusters of highly related sequences. At this distance level, we estimated 600–800 OTUs using several statistical methods. The number of OTUs observed was still substantial at higher distances (39/82 at 0.20 distance) suggesting a large diversity at high-taxonomic ranks. Most sequences were related to marine clones from other sites and many were distant to cultured organisms, highlighting the huge culturing gap within protists. The novelty analysis indicated the putative presence of pseudogenes and of truly novel high-rank phylogenetic lineages. The identified diversity and novelty patterns among marine picoeukaryotes are of great importance for understanding and interpreting their ecology and evolution. PMID:20631807

  6. [Involvement of stress-induced hippocampal synaptic potentiation in the novelty acquisition].

    PubMed

    Liu, Na; Xing, Hua; Jiang, Shan-Xiang

    2011-04-25

    To study the influence of behavioral stress on hippocampal spatial learning and memory, we used the freely moving rats that had undergone chronic implantation of a recording electrode in the hippocampus CA1 region and a bipolar stimulating electrode in the ipsilateral Schaffer collateral-commissural pathway. The field excitatory postsynaptic potentials (fEPSPs) were recorded in the absence of exogenous induction of high-frequency stimulation (HFS) or low-frequency stimulation (LFS) and reflected the effect of stress on the hippocampal spatial learning. And we also investigated the change of hippocampal synaptic plasticity when rats were re-exposed to the same environment at 24 h after novelty acquisition. We found that exploration of a novel environment induced the hippocampal synaptic depression in the rats with stress-adaption, whereas exposure to the novel environment induced the hippocampal synaptic potentiation in the behavioral stress rats. Furthermore, re-exposure to the same environment no longer elicited the hippocampal synaptic potentiation or depression at 24 h after the first novel acquisition in the behavioral stress rats. These results demonstrate that behavioral stress induces the hippocampal synaptic potentiation under novelty acquisition and further damages the hippocampal spatial learning and memory. However, the stress can be adapted by re-exposure to the novelty and thus does not further damage the hippocampal spatial learning and memory.

  7. The Cyborg Astrobiologist: Image Compression for Geological Mapping and Novelty Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGuire, P. C.; Bonnici, A.; Bruner, K. R.; Gross, C.; Ormö, J.; Smosna, R. A.; Walter, S.; Wendt, L.

    2013-09-01

    We describe an image-comparison technique of Heidemann and Ritter [4,5] that uses image compression, and is capable of: (i) detecting novel textures in a series of images, as well as of: (ii) alerting the user to the similarity of a new image to a previously-observed texture. This image-comparison technique has been implemented and tested using our Astrobiology Phone-cam system, which employs Bluetooth communication to send images to a local laptop server in the field for the image-compression analysis. We tested the system in a field site displaying a heterogeneous suite of sandstones, limestones, mudstones and coalbeds. Some of the rocks are partly covered with lichen. The image-matching procedure of this system performed very well with data obtained through our field test, grouping all images of yellow lichens together and grouping all images of a coal bed together, and giving a 91% accuracy for similarity detection. Such similarity detection could be employed to make maps of different geological units. The novelty-detection performance of our system was also rather good (a 64% accuracy). Such novelty detection may become valuable in searching for new geological units, which could be of astrobiological interest. By providing more advanced capabilities for similarity detection and novelty detection, this image-compression technique could be useful in giving more scientific autonomy to robotic planetary rovers, and in assisting human astronauts in their geological exploration.

  8. Pupil size signals novelty and predicts later retrieval success for declarative memories of natural scenes.

    PubMed

    Naber, Marnix; Frässle, Stefan; Rutishauser, Ueli; Einhäuser, Wolfgang

    2013-02-08

    Declarative memories of personal experiences are a key factor in defining oneself as an individual, which becomes particularly evident when this capability is impaired. Assessing the physiological mechanisms of human declarative memory is typically restricted to patients with specific lesions and requires invasive brain access or functional imaging. We investigated whether the pupil, an accessible physiological measure, can be utilized to probe memories for complex natural visual scenes. During memory encoding, scenes that were later remembered elicited a stronger pupil constriction compared to scenes that were later forgotten. Thus, pupil size predicts success or failure of memory formation. In contrast, novel scenes elicited stronger pupil constriction than familiar scenes during retrieval. When viewing previously memorized scenes, those that were forgotten (misjudged as novel) still elicited stronger pupil constrictions than those correctly judged as familiar. Furthermore, pupil constriction was influenced more strongly if images were judged with high confidence. Thus, we propose that pupil constriction can serve as a marker of novelty. Since stimulus novelty modulates the efficacy of memory formation, our pupil measurements during learning indicate that the later forgotten images were perceived as less novel than the later remembered pictures. Taken together, our data provide evidence that pupil constriction is a physiological correlate of a neural novelty signal during formation and retrieval of declarative memories for complex, natural scenes.

  9. Deep Recurrent Neural Network-Based Autoencoders for Acoustic Novelty Detection

    PubMed Central

    Vesperini, Fabio; Schuller, Björn

    2017-01-01

    In the emerging field of acoustic novelty detection, most research efforts are devoted to probabilistic approaches such as mixture models or state-space models. Only recent studies introduced (pseudo-)generative models for acoustic novelty detection with recurrent neural networks in the form of an autoencoder. In these approaches, auditory spectral features of the next short term frame are predicted from the previous frames by means of Long-Short Term Memory recurrent denoising autoencoders. The reconstruction error between the input and the output of the autoencoder is used as activation signal to detect novel events. There is no evidence of studies focused on comparing previous efforts to automatically recognize novel events from audio signals and giving a broad and in depth evaluation of recurrent neural network-based autoencoders. The present contribution aims to consistently evaluate our recent novel approaches to fill this white spot in the literature and provide insight by extensive evaluations carried out on three databases: A3Novelty, PASCAL CHiME, and PROMETHEUS. Besides providing an extensive analysis of novel and state-of-the-art methods, the article shows how RNN-based autoencoders outperform statistical approaches up to an absolute improvement of 16.4% average F-measure over the three databases. PMID:28182121

  10. Neurophysiological markers of novelty processing are modulated by COMT and DRD4 genotypes.

    PubMed

    Marco-Pallarés, Josep; Nager, Wido; Krämer, Ulrike M; Cunillera, Toni; Càmara, Estela; Cucurell, David; Schüle, Rebecca; Schöls, Ludger; Rodriguez-Fornells, Antoni; Münte, Thomas F

    2010-11-15

    Humans are faced with the dilemma to maintain a stable cognitive set on the one hand and to be able to redirect and switch attention to novel stimuli of potential importance. The dopaminergic system has been implicated in the balance between these two antagonistic constraints and in particular in novelty processing. Here we studied the impact of two polymorphisms affecting dopaminergic functioning (COMT Val108/158Met and DRD4 SNP -521) on neurophysiological correlates of novelty processing. Recording event-related potentials (ERPs) and oscillatory activity in a modified oddball task that featured infrequent but task-irrelevant novel sounds in addition to frequent standard and rare target tones, we examined participants homozygous for the Met or Val variant of COMT as well as homozygous for the C or T variant of DRD4. We found effects mainly on the P3a component to novel stimuli. A greater P3a amplitude was found for the COMT-ValVal group relative to MetMet. There was a tendency for DRD4-TT participants to show greater P3a amplitude and shorter P3a latency. Finally, DRD4-TT and COMT-ValVal participants showed the greatest increase of theta-power to novel stimuli. By contrast, the P3b component to target stimuli showed little influence of the studied polymorphism. Individual differences in dopaminergic genes explain part of the interindividual variance in the neural correlates of novelty but not target processing.

  11. Novelty vs. Familiarity Principles in Preference Decisions: Task-Context of Past Experience Matters.

    PubMed

    Liao, Hsin-I; Yeh, Su-Ling; Shimojo, Shinsuke

    2011-01-01

    Our preferences are shaped by past experience in many ways, but a systematic understanding of the factors is yet to be achieved. For example, studies of the mere exposure effect show that experience with an item leads to increased liking (familiarity preference), but the exact opposite tendency is found in other studies utilizing dishabituation (novelty preference). Recently, it has been found that image category affects whether familiarity or novelty preference emerges from repeated stimulus exposure (Park et al., 2010). Faces elicited familiarity preference, but natural scenes elicited novelty preference. In their task, preference judgments were made throughout all exposures, raising the question of whether the task-context during exposure was involved. We adapt their paradigm, testing if passive exposure or objective judgment task-contexts lead to different results. Results showed that after passive viewing, familiar faces were preferred, but no preference bias in either direction was found with natural scenes, or with geometric figures (control). After exposure during the objective judgment task, familiar faces were preferred, novel natural scenes were preferred, and no preference bias was found with geometric figures. The overall results replicate the segregation of preference biases across object categories and suggest that the preference for familiar faces and novel natural scenes are modulated by task-context memory at different processing levels or selection involvement. Possible underlying mechanisms of the two types of preferences are discussed.

  12. Can hibernators sense and evade fires? Olfactory acuity and locomotor performance during deep torpor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowack, Julia; Delesalle, Marine; Stawski, Clare; Geiser, Fritz

    2016-10-01

    Increased habitat fragmentation, global warming and other human activities have caused a rise in the frequency of wildfires worldwide. To reduce the risks of uncontrollable fires, prescribed burns are generally conducted during the colder months of the year, a time when in many mammals torpor is expressed regularly. Torpor is crucial for energy conservation, but the low body temperatures ( T b) are associated with a decreased responsiveness and torpid animals might therefore face an increased mortality risk during fires. We tested whether hibernators in deep torpor (a) can respond to the smell of smoke and (b) can climb to avoid fires at T bs below normothermic levels. Our data show that torpid eastern pygmy-possums ( Cercartetus nanus) are able to detect smoke and also can climb. All males aroused from torpor when the smoke stimulus was presented at an ambient temperature ( T a) of 15 °C ( T b ˜18 °C), whereas females only raised their heads. The responses were less pronounced at T a 10 °C. The first coordinated movement of possums along a branch was observed at a mean T b of 15.6 °C, and animals were even able to climb their prehensile tail when they reached a mean T b of 24.4 °C. Our study shows that hibernators can sense smoke and move at low T b. However, our data also illustrate that at T b ≤13 °C, C. nanus show decreased responsiveness and locomotor performance and highlight that prescribed burns during winter should be avoided on very cold days to allow torpid animals enough time to respond.

  13. The evolution of jumping in frogs: morphological evidence for the basal anuran locomotor condition and the radiation of locomotor systems in crown group anurans.

    PubMed

    Reilly, Stephen M; Jorgensen, Michael E

    2011-02-01

    Our understanding of the evolution of frog locomotion follows from the work of Emerson in which anurans are proposed to possess one of three different iliosacral configurations: 1) a lateral-bending system found in walking and hopping frogs; 2) a fore-aft sliding mechanism found in several locomotor modes; and 3) a sagittal-hinge-type pelvis posited to be related to long-distance jumping performance. The most basal living (Ascaphus) and fossil (Prosalirus) frogs are described as sagittal-hinge pelvic types, and it has been proposed that long-distance jumping with a sagittal-hinge pelvis arose early in frog evolution. We revisited osteological traits of the pelvic region to conduct a phylogenetic analysis of the relationships between pelvic systems and locomotor modes in frogs. Using two of Emerson's diagnostic traits from the sacrum and ilium and two new traits from the urostyle, we resampled the taxa originally studied by Emerson and key paleotaxa and conducted an analysis of ancestral-character state evolution in relation to locomoto