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Sample records for nowell gm taylor

  1. Sense of Community, a Theory Not a Value: A Response to Nowell and Boyd

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McMillan, David W.

    2011-01-01

    This is a response to the Nowell and Boyd (2010) article printed in this journal titled: Viewing Community as Responsibility as Well as Resource: Deconstructing the Theoretical Roots of Psychological Sense of Community. In that article, they argued that the McMillan theory of Sense of Community is a simplistic, needs-based theory that excludes…

  2. Taylor Business Institute, Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barber, Jerry

    The Office of the State Comptroller in New York audited the records and procedures used in administering the Tuition Assistance Program (TAP) at Taylor Business Institute (Taylor) for the academic years 1995-96 through 1997-98. Taylor, located in Manhattan, offers both degree programs and diploma programs in Accounting, Business Management,…

  3. Taylor-Made Libraries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lonergan, David

    2011-01-01

    Frederick Winslow Taylor (1856-1915) was an efficiency expert whose concerns were less about avoiding worker fatigue and more about increasing profit margins by any means necessary. Taylor was devoted to finding the One Best Way to carry out a task and then training workers to do that task unvaryingly; attempts by employees to improve their own…

  4. GM Risk Assessment.

    PubMed

    Sparrow, Penny A C

    2009-01-01

    GM risk assessments play an important role in the decision-making process surrounding the regulation, notification and permission to handle Genetically Modified Organisms (GMOs). Ultimately the role of a GM risk assessment will be to ensure the safe handling and containment of the GMO; and to assess any potential impacts on the environment and human health. A risk assessment should answer all 'what if' scenarios, based on scientific evidence. This chapter sets out to provide researchers with helpful guidance notes on producing their own GM risk assessment. While reference will be made to UK and EU regulations, the underlying principles and points to consider are generic to most countries. PMID:19009454

  5. GM Risk Assessment.

    PubMed

    Sparrow, Penny A C

    2009-01-01

    GM risk assessments play an important role in the decision-making process surrounding the regulation, notification and permission to handle Genetically Modified Organisms (GMOs). Ultimately the role of a GM risk assessment will be to ensure the safe handling and containment of the GMO; and to assess any potential impacts on the environment and human health. A risk assessment should answer all 'what if' scenarios, based on scientific evidence. This chapter sets out to provide researchers with helpful guidance notes on producing their own GM risk assessment. While reference will be made to UK and EU regulations, the underlying principles and points to consider are generic to most countries.

  6. GM Risk Assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sparrow, Penny A. C.

    GM risk assessments play an important role in the decision-making process surrounding the regulation, notification and permission to handle Genetically Modified Organisms (GMOs). Ultimately the role of a GM risk assessment will be to ensure the safe handling and containment of the GMO; and to assess any potential impacts on the environment and human health. A risk assessment should answer all ‘what if’ scenarios, based on scientific evidence.

  7. Baker & Taylor's George Coe

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fialkoff, Francine

    2009-01-01

    In his 30 years as a library wholesaler, first as VP and general manager of Brodart Books, Library, and School Automation divisions and since 2000 as president of the Library & Education division of Baker & Taylor (B&T), George Coe has been instrumental in a whole host of innovations. They go way beyond the selection, processing, and delivery of…

  8. Reply to Taylor.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanovich, Keith E.; West, Richard F.

    1994-01-01

    Responds to Denny Taylor's critique in the same issue of an article by Richard F. West, Keith E. Stanovich, and H. R. Mitchell entitled "Reading in the Real World and Its Correlates," published in an earlier issue of "Reading Research Quarterly." (HB)

  9. Will GM animals follow the GM plant fate?

    PubMed

    Vàzquez-Salat, Núria; Houdebine, Louis-Marie

    2013-02-01

    Despite being both Genetically Modified Organisms (GMOs), GM plants and GM animals share few similarities outside the laboratory premises. Whilst GM plants were soon embraced by industry and became a commercial success, only recently have GM animals reached the market. However, an area where GM animals are likely to follow the GM plant path is on their potential to cause social unrest. One of the major flaws of the 90s GMO crisis was the underestimation of the influence that different players can have in the adoption of new biotechnological applications. In this article we describe the unique evolution of GM animals in two of the most important fields: the pharmaceutical and the breeding sectors. For our analysis, we have subdivided the production chain into three governance domains: Science, Market and Public. We describe the influence and interaction of each of these domains as a vehicle for predicting the future adoptability of GM animals and to highlight conflicting areas. PMID:22987246

  10. Will GM animals follow the GM plant fate?

    PubMed

    Vàzquez-Salat, Núria; Houdebine, Louis-Marie

    2013-02-01

    Despite being both Genetically Modified Organisms (GMOs), GM plants and GM animals share few similarities outside the laboratory premises. Whilst GM plants were soon embraced by industry and became a commercial success, only recently have GM animals reached the market. However, an area where GM animals are likely to follow the GM plant path is on their potential to cause social unrest. One of the major flaws of the 90s GMO crisis was the underestimation of the influence that different players can have in the adoption of new biotechnological applications. In this article we describe the unique evolution of GM animals in two of the most important fields: the pharmaceutical and the breeding sectors. For our analysis, we have subdivided the production chain into three governance domains: Science, Market and Public. We describe the influence and interaction of each of these domains as a vehicle for predicting the future adoptability of GM animals and to highlight conflicting areas.

  11. GM1 and GM2 gangliosides: recent developments.

    PubMed

    Bisel, Blaine; Pavone, Francesco S; Calamai, Martino

    2014-03-01

    GM1 and GM2 gangliosides are important components of the cell membrane and play an integral role in cell signaling and metabolism. In this conceptual overview, we discuss recent developments in our understanding of the basic biological functions of GM1 and GM2 and their involvement in several diseases. In addition to a well-established spectrum of disorders known as gangliosidoses, such as Tay-Sachs disease, more and more evidence points at an involvement of GM1 in Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases. New emerging methodologies spanning from single-molecule imaging in vivo to simulations in silico have complemented standard studies based on ganglioside extraction. PMID:25372744

  12. Can GM sorghum impact Africa?

    PubMed

    Botha, Gerda M; Viljoen, Christopher D

    2008-02-01

    It is said that genetic modification (GM) of grain sorghum has the potential to alleviate hunger in Africa. To this end, millions of dollars have been committed to developing GM sorghum. Current developments in the genetic engineering of sorghum are similar to efforts to improve cassava and other traditional African crops, as well as rice in Asia. On closer analysis, GM sorghum is faced with the same limitations as 'Golden Rice' (GM rice) in the context of combating vitamin A deficiency (VAD) efficiently and sustainably. Thus, it is questionable whether the cost of developing GM sorghum can be justified when compared to the cost of investing in sustainable agricultural practice in Africa.

  13. GM risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Sparrow, P A C

    2010-03-01

    GM risk assessments (GMRAs) play an important role in the decision-making process surrounding the regulation, notification and permission to handle Genetically Modified Organisms (GMOs). Ultimately the role of each GMRA will be able to ensure the safe handling and containment of the GMO; and to asses any potential impacts on the environment and human health. A risk assessment should answer all "what if" scenarios, based on scientific evidence. This article sets out to provide researchers with helpful guidance notes on producing their own GMRA. While reference is made to UK and EU regulations, the underlying principles and points to consider are generic to most countries.

  14. Risk Management of GM Crops

    EPA Science Inventory

    Driven by biofuel demand, a significant increase in GM corn acreage is anticipated for the 2007 growing season with future planted GM corn acreage approaching 80% of the corn crop by 2009. As demand increases, grower non-compliance with mandated planting requirements is likely to...

  15. Moving beyond the GM Debate

    PubMed Central

    Leyser, Ottoline

    2014-01-01

    Once again, there are calls to reopen the debate on genetically modified (GM) crops. I find these calls frustrating and unnecessarily decisive. In my opinion the GM debate, on both sides, continues to hamper the urgent need to address the diverse and pressing challenges of global food security and environmental sustainability. The destructive power of the debate comes from its conflation of unrelated issues, coupled with deeply rooted misconceptions of the nature of agriculture. PMID:24914954

  16. Overview of Rayleigh-Taylor instability

    SciTech Connect

    Sharp, D.H.

    1983-01-01

    The aim of this talk is to survey Rayleigh-Taylor instability, describing the phenomenology that occurs at a Taylor unstable interface, and reviewing attempts to understand these phenomena quantitatively.

  17. Rotating Rayleigh-Taylor turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boffetta, G.; Mazzino, A.; Musacchio, S.

    2016-09-01

    The turbulent Rayleigh-Taylor system in a rotating reference frame is investigated by direct numerical simulations within the Oberbeck-Boussinesq approximation. On the basis of theoretical arguments, supported by our simulations, we show that the Rossby number decreases in time, and therefore the Coriolis force becomes more important as the system evolves and produces many effects on Rayleigh-Taylor turbulence. We find that rotation reduces the intensity of turbulent velocity fluctuations and therefore the growth rate of the temperature mixing layer. Moreover, in the presence of rotation the conversion of potential energy into turbulent kinetic energy is found to be less effective, and the efficiency of the heat transfer is reduced. Finally, during the evolution of the mixing layer we observe the development of a cyclone-anticyclone asymmetry.

  18. Acceptability of GM foods among Pakistani consumers.

    PubMed

    Ali, Akhter; Rahut, Dil Bahadur; Imtiaz, Muhammad

    2016-04-01

    In Pakistan majority of the consumers do not have information about genetically modified (GM) foods. In developing countries particularly in Pakistan few studies have focused on consumers' acceptability about GM foods. Using comprehensive primary dataset collected from 320 consumers in 2013 from Pakistan, this study analyzes the determinants of consumers' acceptability of GM foods. The data was analyzed by employing the bivariate probit model and censored least absolute deviation (CLAD) models. The empirical results indicated that urban consumers are more aware of GM foods compared to rural consumers. The acceptance of GM foods was more among females' consumers as compared to male consumers. In addition, the older consumers were more willing to accept GM food compared to young consumers. The acceptability of GM foods was also higher among wealthier households. Low price is the key factor leading to the acceptability of GM foods. The acceptability of the GM foods also reduces the risks among Pakistani consumers.

  19. Acceptability of GM foods among Pakistani consumers.

    PubMed

    Ali, Akhter; Rahut, Dil Bahadur; Imtiaz, Muhammad

    2016-04-01

    In Pakistan majority of the consumers do not have information about genetically modified (GM) foods. In developing countries particularly in Pakistan few studies have focused on consumers' acceptability about GM foods. Using comprehensive primary dataset collected from 320 consumers in 2013 from Pakistan, this study analyzes the determinants of consumers' acceptability of GM foods. The data was analyzed by employing the bivariate probit model and censored least absolute deviation (CLAD) models. The empirical results indicated that urban consumers are more aware of GM foods compared to rural consumers. The acceptance of GM foods was more among females' consumers as compared to male consumers. In addition, the older consumers were more willing to accept GM food compared to young consumers. The acceptability of GM foods was also higher among wealthier households. Low price is the key factor leading to the acceptability of GM foods. The acceptability of the GM foods also reduces the risks among Pakistani consumers. PMID:27494790

  20. Genetics Home Reference: GM3 synthase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... GM3 synthase deficiency is characterized by recurrent seizures (epilepsy) and problems with brain development. Within the first ... diagnosis or management of GM3 synthase deficiency: American Epilepsy Society: Find a Doctor Clinic for Special Children ( ...

  1. Ionic emission from Taylor cones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro Reina, Sergio

    Electrified Taylor cones have been seen as an efficient way to generate thrust for space propulsion. Especially the pure ionic regime (PIR) combines a very high specific impulse (thrust per unit mass) and efficiency, which is very important to reduce fuel transportation costs. The PIR has been primarily based on electrosprays of liquid metals [Swatik and Hendricks 1968, Swatik 1969]. However, emissions dominated by or containing exclusively ions have also been observed from nonmetallic purely ionic substances, initially sulfuric acid [Perel et al. 1969], and more recently room temperature molten salts referred to as ionic liquids (ILs) [Romero-Sanz et al. 2003]. The recent use of the liquid metal ion source (LMIS) with ILs, becoming this "new" source to be known as ionic liquid ion source (ILIS) [Lozano and Martinez-Sanchez 2005], has shown important differences on the emission from Taylor cones with the traditional hollow capillary. This new source seems to be more flexible than the capillary [Paulo, Sergio, carlos], although its low emission level (low thrust) is an important drawback from the space propulsion point of view. Throughout the thesis I have studied some aspects of the ionic emission from ionic liquid Taylor cones and the influence of the properties of the liquids and the characteristic of source on the emission. I have unraveled the reason why ILIS emits such low currents (˜200 nA) and found a way to solve this problem increasing the current up to capillary levels (˜1000 nA) [Castro and Fernandez de la Mora 2009]. I have also tried to reduce ion evaporation while reducing the emitted droplet size in order to increase the thrust generated while keeping the efficiency relatively high and I have measured the energy of evaporation of several cations composing ionic liquids, mandatory step to understand ionic evaporation.

  2. Bursting the Taylor cone bubble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Zhao; Truscott, Tadd

    2014-11-01

    A soap bubble fixed on a surface and placed in an electric field will take on the shape of a cone rather than constant curvature (dome) when the electrical field is not present. The phenomenon was introduced by J. Zeleny (1917) and studied extensively by C.T. Wilson & G.I. Taylor (1925). We revisit the Taylor cone problem by studying the deformation and bursting of soap bubbles in a point charge electric field. A single bubble takes on the shape of a cone in the electric field and a high-speed camera equipped with a micro-lens is used to observe the unsteady dynamics at the tip. Rupture occurs as a very small piece of the tip is torn away from the bubble toward the point charge. Based on experiments, a theoretical model is developed that predicts when rupture should occur. This study may help in the design of foam-removal techniques in engineering and provide a better understanding of an electrified air-liquid interface.

  3. 33 CFR 117.335 - Taylor Creek.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Taylor Creek. 117.335 Section 117.335 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Florida § 117.335 Taylor Creek. The draw of US441 bridge, mile...

  4. 33 CFR 117.987 - Taylor Bayou.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Taylor Bayou. 117.987 Section 117.987 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Texas § 117.987 Taylor Bayou. The draws of the Union...

  5. Spectral stability of Taylor's vortex array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, S. P.; Tobak, M.

    1986-01-01

    In a global sense it is shown that the two-dimensional Taylor vortex array, an exact solution of the Navier-Stokes equation, is absolutely and monotonically stable with respect to infinitesimal disturbances of all discrete frequencies as long as the viscosity is positive. It is suggested that the Taylor vortex array may also be stable with respect to finite amplitude disturbances.

  6. Taylorism and the Logic of Learning Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stoller, Aaron

    2015-01-01

    This essay examines the shared philosophical foundations of Fredrick W. Taylor's scientific management principles and the contemporary learning outcomes movement (LOM). It analyses the shared philosophical ground between the focal point of Taylor's system--"the task"--and the conceptualization and deployment of "learning…

  7. 33 CFR 117.987 - Taylor Bayou.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Taylor Bayou. 117.987 Section 117.987 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Texas § 117.987 Taylor Bayou. The draws of the Union...

  8. 33 CFR 117.987 - Taylor Bayou.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Taylor Bayou. 117.987 Section 117.987 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Texas § 117.987 Taylor Bayou. The draws of the Union...

  9. 33 CFR 117.987 - Taylor Bayou.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Taylor Bayou. 117.987 Section 117.987 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Texas § 117.987 Taylor Bayou. The draws of the Union...

  10. 33 CFR 117.987 - Taylor Bayou.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Taylor Bayou. 117.987 Section 117.987 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Texas § 117.987 Taylor Bayou. The draws of the Union...

  11. Douglas Taylor School: Rooted in Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rourke, James; Boone, Elizabeth

    2009-01-01

    Inspiring students to become teachers and community leaders is a goal of Douglas Taylor School's leadership team. A feeling of continuity and connection are important to the school, which opened in the 19th century. Housed in a beautiful old school building in Chicago's South Side, Douglas Taylor School contains grades preK-8. To maintain the…

  12. Membrane lipids regulate ganglioside GM2 catabolism and GM2 activator protein activity[S

    PubMed Central

    Anheuser, Susi; Breiden, Bernadette; Schwarzmann, Günter; Sandhoff, Konrad

    2015-01-01

    Ganglioside GM2 is the major lysosomal storage compound of Tay-Sachs disease. It also accumulates in Niemann-Pick disease types A and B with primary storage of SM and with cholesterol in type C. Reconstitution of GM2 catabolism with β-hexosaminidase A and GM2 activator protein (GM2AP) at uncharged liposomal surfaces carrying GM2 as substrate generated only a physiologically irrelevant catabolic rate, even at pH 4.2. However, incorporation of anionic phospholipids into the GM2 carrying liposomes stimulated GM2 hydrolysis more than 10-fold, while the incorporation of plasma membrane stabilizing lipids (SM and cholesterol) generated a strong inhibition of GM2 hydrolysis, even in the presence of anionic phospholipids. Mobilization of membrane lipids by GM2AP was also inhibited in the presence of cholesterol or SM, as revealed by surface plasmon resonance studies. These lipids also reduced the interliposomal transfer rate of 2-NBD-GM1 by GM2AP, as observed in assays using Förster resonance energy transfer. Our data raise major concerns about the usage of recombinant His-tagged GM2AP compared with untagged protein. The former binds more strongly to anionic GM2-carrying liposomal surfaces, increases GM2 hydrolysis, and accelerates intermembrane transfer of 2-NBD-GM1, but does not mobilize membrane lipids. PMID:26175473

  13. Membrane lipids regulate ganglioside GM2 catabolism and GM2 activator protein activity.

    PubMed

    Anheuser, Susi; Breiden, Bernadette; Schwarzmann, Günter; Sandhoff, Konrad

    2015-09-01

    Ganglioside GM2 is the major lysosomal storage compound of Tay-Sachs disease. It also accumulates in Niemann-Pick disease types A and B with primary storage of SM and with cholesterol in type C. Reconstitution of GM2 catabolism with β-hexosaminidase A and GM2 activator protein (GM2AP) at uncharged liposomal surfaces carrying GM2 as substrate generated only a physiologically irrelevant catabolic rate, even at pH 4.2. However, incorporation of anionic phospholipids into the GM2 carrying liposomes stimulated GM2 hydrolysis more than 10-fold, while the incorporation of plasma membrane stabilizing lipids (SM and cholesterol) generated a strong inhibition of GM2 hydrolysis, even in the presence of anionic phospholipids. Mobilization of membrane lipids by GM2AP was also inhibited in the presence of cholesterol or SM, as revealed by surface plasmon resonance studies. These lipids also reduced the interliposomal transfer rate of 2-NBD-GM1 by GM2AP, as observed in assays using Förster resonance energy transfer. Our data raise major concerns about the usage of recombinant His-tagged GM2AP compared with untagged protein. The former binds more strongly to anionic GM2-carrying liposomal surfaces, increases GM2 hydrolysis, and accelerates intermembrane transfer of 2-NBD-GM1, but does not mobilize membrane lipids. PMID:26175473

  14. Membrane lipids regulate ganglioside GM2 catabolism and GM2 activator protein activity.

    PubMed

    Anheuser, Susi; Breiden, Bernadette; Schwarzmann, Günter; Sandhoff, Konrad

    2015-09-01

    Ganglioside GM2 is the major lysosomal storage compound of Tay-Sachs disease. It also accumulates in Niemann-Pick disease types A and B with primary storage of SM and with cholesterol in type C. Reconstitution of GM2 catabolism with β-hexosaminidase A and GM2 activator protein (GM2AP) at uncharged liposomal surfaces carrying GM2 as substrate generated only a physiologically irrelevant catabolic rate, even at pH 4.2. However, incorporation of anionic phospholipids into the GM2 carrying liposomes stimulated GM2 hydrolysis more than 10-fold, while the incorporation of plasma membrane stabilizing lipids (SM and cholesterol) generated a strong inhibition of GM2 hydrolysis, even in the presence of anionic phospholipids. Mobilization of membrane lipids by GM2AP was also inhibited in the presence of cholesterol or SM, as revealed by surface plasmon resonance studies. These lipids also reduced the interliposomal transfer rate of 2-NBD-GM1 by GM2AP, as observed in assays using Förster resonance energy transfer. Our data raise major concerns about the usage of recombinant His-tagged GM2AP compared with untagged protein. The former binds more strongly to anionic GM2-carrying liposomal surfaces, increases GM2 hydrolysis, and accelerates intermembrane transfer of 2-NBD-GM1, but does not mobilize membrane lipids.

  15. Taylor instability in rhyolite lava flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baum, B. A.; Krantz, W. B.; Fink, J. H.; Dickinson, R. E.

    1989-01-01

    A refined Taylor instability model is developed to describe the surface morphology of rhyolite lava flows. The effect of the downslope flow of the lava on the structures resulting from the Taylor instability mechanism is considered. Squire's (1933) transformation is developed for this flow in order to extend the results to three-dimensional modes. This permits assessing why ridges thought to arise from the Taylor instability mechanism are preferentially oriented transverse to the direction of lava flow. Measured diapir and ridge spacings for the Little and Big Glass Mountain rhyolite flows in northern California are used in conjunction with the model in order to explore the implications of the Taylor instability for flow emplacement. The model suggests additional lava flow features that can be measured in order to test whether the Taylor instability mechanism has influenced the flows surface morphology.

  16. Taylor impact of glass bars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, Natalie; Bourne, Neil; Field, John

    1997-07-01

    Brar and Bless pioneeered the use of plate impact upon bars as a technique for investigating the 1D stress loading of glass. We wish to extend this technique by applying VISAR and embedded stress gauge measurements to a symmetrical version of the test. In this configuration two rods impact one upon the other in a symmetrical version of the Taylor test geometry in which the impact is perfectly rigid in the centre of mass frame. Previous work in the laboratory has characterised the three glass types (float, borosilicate and a high density lead glass). These experiments will identify the 1D stress failure mechanisms from high-speed photography and the stress and particle velocity histories will be interpreted in the light of these results. The differences in response of the three glasses will be highlighted.

  17. RADIATIVE RAYLEIGH-TAYLOR INSTABILITIES

    SciTech Connect

    Jacquet, Emmanuel; Krumholz, Mark R. E-mail: krumholz@ucolick.org

    2011-04-01

    We perform analytic linear stability analyses of an interface separating two stratified media threaded by a radiation flux, a configuration relevant in several astrophysical contexts. We develop a general framework for analyzing such systems and obtain exact stability conditions in several limiting cases. In the optically thin, isothermal regime, where the discontinuity is chemical in nature (e.g., at the boundary of a radiation pressure-driven H II region), radiation acts as part of an effective gravitational field, and instability arises if the effective gravity per unit volume toward the interface overcomes that away from it. In the optically thick 'adiabatic' regime where the total (gas plus radiation) specific entropy of a Lagrangian fluid element is conserved, for example at the edge of radiation pressure-driven bubble around a young massive star, we show that radiation acts like a modified equation of state and derive a generalized version of the classical Rayleigh-Taylor stability condition.

  18. Nonideal Rayleigh–Taylor mixing

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Hyunkyung; Iwerks, Justin; Glimm, James; Sharp, David H.

    2010-01-01

    Rayleigh–Taylor mixing is a classical hydrodynamic instability that occurs when a light fluid pushes against a heavy fluid. The two main sources of nonideal behavior in Rayleigh–Taylor (RT) mixing are regularizations (physical and numerical), which produce deviations from a pure Euler equation, scale invariant formulation, and nonideal (i.e., experimental) initial conditions. The Kolmogorov theory of turbulence predicts stirring at all length scales for the Euler fluid equations without regularization. We interpret mathematical theories of existence and nonuniqueness in this context, and we provide numerical evidence for dependence of the RT mixing rate on nonideal regularizations; in other words, indeterminacy when modeled by Euler equations. Operationally, indeterminacy shows up as nonunique solutions for RT mixing, parametrized by Schmidt and Prandtl numbers, in the large Reynolds number (Euler equation) limit. Verification and validation evidence is presented for the large eddy simulation algorithm used here. Mesh convergence depends on breaking the nonuniqueness with explicit use of the laminar Schmidt and Prandtl numbers and their turbulent counterparts, defined in terms of subgrid scale models. The dependence of the mixing rate on the Schmidt and Prandtl numbers and other physical parameters will be illustrated. We demonstrate numerically the influence of initial conditions on the mixing rate. Both the dominant short wavelength initial conditions and long wavelength perturbations are observed to play a role. By examination of two classes of experiments, we observe the absence of a single universal explanation, with long and short wavelength initial conditions, and the various physical and numerical regularizations contributing in different proportions in these two different contexts. PMID:20615983

  19. Nonideal Rayleigh-Taylor mixing

    SciTech Connect

    Sharp, David Howland; Lin, Hyun K; Iwerks, Justin G; Gliman, James G

    2009-01-01

    Rayleigh-Taylor mixing is a classical hydrodynamic Instability, which occurs when a light fluid pushes against a heavy fluid. The two main sources of nonideal behavior in Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) mixing are regularizations (physical and numerical) which produce deviations from a pure Euler equation, scale Invariant formulation, and non Ideal (i.e. experimental) initial conditions. The Kolmogorov theory of turbulence predicts stirring at all length scales for the Euler fluid equations without regularization. We Interpret mathematical theories of existence and non-uniqueness in this context, and we provide numerical evidence for dependence of the RT mixing rate on nonideal regularizations, in other words indeterminacy when modeled by Euler equations. Operationally, indeterminacy shows up as non unique solutions for RT mixing, parametrized by Schmidt and Prandtl numbers, In the large Reynolds number (Euler equation) limit. Verification and validation evidence is presented for the large eddy simulation algorithm used here. Mesh convergence depends on breaking the nonuniqueness with explicit use of the laminar Schmidt and PrandtJ numbers and their turbulent counterparts, defined in terms of subgrid scale models. The dependence of the mixing rate on the Schmidt and Prandtl numbers and other physical parameters will be illustrated. We demonstrate numerically the influence of initial conditions on the mixing rate. Both the dominant short wavelength Initial conditions and long wavelength perturbations are observed to playa role. By examination of two classes of experiments, we observe the absence of a single universal explanation, with long and short wavelength initial conditions, and the various physical and numerical regularizations contributing In different proportions In these two different contexts.

  20. Nonideal Rayleigh-Taylor Mixing

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, H.; Glimm, J.; Iwerks, J.; Sharp, D.H.

    2010-08-01

    Rayleigh-Taylor mixing is a classical hydrodynamic instability that occurs when a light fluid pushes against a heavy fluid. The two main sources of nonideal behavior in Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) mixing are regularizations (physical and numerical), which produce deviations from a pure Euler equation, scale invariant formulation, and nonideal (i.e., experimental) initial conditions. The Kolmogorov theory of turbulence predicts stirring at all length scales for the Euler fluid equations without regularization. We interpret mathematical theories of existence and nonuniqueness in this context, and we provide numerical evidence for dependence of the RT mixing rate on nonideal regularizations; in other words, indeterminacy when modeled by Euler equations. Operationally, indeterminacy shows up as nonunique solutions for RT mixing, parametrized by Schmidt and Prandtl numbers, in the large Reynolds number (Euler equation) limit. Verification and validation evidence is presented for the large eddy simulation algorithm used here. Mesh convergence depends on breaking the nonuniqueness with explicit use of the laminar Schmidt and Prandtl numbers and their turbulent counterparts, defined in terms of subgrid scale models. The dependence of the mixing rate on the Schmidt and Prandtl numbers and other physical parameters will be illustrated. We demonstrate numerically the influence of initial conditions on the mixing rate. Both the dominant short wavelength initial conditions and long wavelength perturbations are observed to play a role. By examination of two classes of experiments, we observe the absence of a single universal explanation, with long and short wavelength initial conditions, and the various physical and numerical regularizations contributing in different proportions in these two different contexts.

  1. Genetically Modified (GM) Foods and Ethical Eating.

    PubMed

    Dizon, Francis; Costa, Sarah; Rock, Cheryl; Harris, Amanda; Husk, Cierra; Mei, Jenny

    2016-02-01

    The ability to manipulate and customize the genetic code of living organisms has brought forth the production of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) and consumption of genetically modified (GM) foods. The potential for GM foods to improve the efficiency of food production, increase customer satisfaction, and provide potential health benefits has contributed to the rapid incorporation of GM foods into the American diet. However, GM foods and GMOs are also a topic of ethical debate. The use of GM foods and GM technology is surrounded by ethical concerns and situational judgment, and should ideally adhere to the ethical standards placed upon food and nutrition professionals, such as: beneficence, nonmaleficence, justice and autonomy. The future of GM foods involves many aspects and trends, including enhanced nutritional value in foods, strict labeling laws, and potential beneficial economic conditions in developing nations. This paper briefly reviews the origin and background of GM foods, while delving thoroughly into 3 areas: (1) GMO labeling, (2) ethical concerns, and (3) health and industry applications. This paper also examines the relationship between the various applications of GM foods and their corresponding ethical issues. Ethical concerns were evaluated in the context of the code of ethics developed by the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics (AND) that govern the work of food and nutrition professionals. Overall, there is a need to stay vigilant about the many ethical implications of producing and consuming GM foods and GMOs. PMID:26709962

  2. Genetically Modified (GM) Foods and Ethical Eating.

    PubMed

    Dizon, Francis; Costa, Sarah; Rock, Cheryl; Harris, Amanda; Husk, Cierra; Mei, Jenny

    2016-02-01

    The ability to manipulate and customize the genetic code of living organisms has brought forth the production of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) and consumption of genetically modified (GM) foods. The potential for GM foods to improve the efficiency of food production, increase customer satisfaction, and provide potential health benefits has contributed to the rapid incorporation of GM foods into the American diet. However, GM foods and GMOs are also a topic of ethical debate. The use of GM foods and GM technology is surrounded by ethical concerns and situational judgment, and should ideally adhere to the ethical standards placed upon food and nutrition professionals, such as: beneficence, nonmaleficence, justice and autonomy. The future of GM foods involves many aspects and trends, including enhanced nutritional value in foods, strict labeling laws, and potential beneficial economic conditions in developing nations. This paper briefly reviews the origin and background of GM foods, while delving thoroughly into 3 areas: (1) GMO labeling, (2) ethical concerns, and (3) health and industry applications. This paper also examines the relationship between the various applications of GM foods and their corresponding ethical issues. Ethical concerns were evaluated in the context of the code of ethics developed by the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics (AND) that govern the work of food and nutrition professionals. Overall, there is a need to stay vigilant about the many ethical implications of producing and consuming GM foods and GMOs.

  3. The world of "GM-free".

    PubMed

    Moses, Vivian; Brookes, Graham

    2013-01-01

    The rapid global development of agricultural production systems using seeds derived from genetic modification (GM) has been paralleled by the growth of attempts to keep at least a part of the world's agriculture and food as free from GM-crops and their products as possible. The ideal for some proponents of such "GM-free" activity would be a total absence, usually styled "zero content"; others, perhaps more realistically, opt for a definition usually not precisely defined that allows for minimal trace levels of GM material. The reasons for wanting "GM-free" agriculture and its products are varied; they include philosophical and religious beliefs, concern for human (and animal) health--and for "the environment"-as well as commercial and political interests. With such a variety of motivations, and in the absence of legal rulings, the definitions of "GM-free" vary according to inclination and circumstances. Whatever the precise meaning, the maintenance of a "GM-free" product stream in a world where GM crop production is widespread requires the establishment of identity preservation and segregation systems in which traceability and testing are cornerstones. Inevitably these have cost implications for the supply chain and/or the ultimate consumer. In a number of countries different forms of "GM-free" labels exist for some products; the style of such labels is variable with schemes and labels typically voluntary or privately organized. In more recent years, some governments have begun to regularize the definition and meaning of "GM-free." We conclude our analysis by exploring consumer reactions both to "GM-free" and to "GM-free" labels, and ask who ultimately benefits from preserving a product stream substantially or entirely devoid of GM-content. PMID:24401659

  4. The world of "GM-free".

    PubMed

    Moses, Vivian; Brookes, Graham

    2013-01-01

    The rapid global development of agricultural production systems using seeds derived from genetic modification (GM) has been paralleled by the growth of attempts to keep at least a part of the world's agriculture and food as free from GM-crops and their products as possible. The ideal for some proponents of such "GM-free" activity would be a total absence, usually styled "zero content"; others, perhaps more realistically, opt for a definition usually not precisely defined that allows for minimal trace levels of GM material. The reasons for wanting "GM-free" agriculture and its products are varied; they include philosophical and religious beliefs, concern for human (and animal) health--and for "the environment"-as well as commercial and political interests. With such a variety of motivations, and in the absence of legal rulings, the definitions of "GM-free" vary according to inclination and circumstances. Whatever the precise meaning, the maintenance of a "GM-free" product stream in a world where GM crop production is widespread requires the establishment of identity preservation and segregation systems in which traceability and testing are cornerstones. Inevitably these have cost implications for the supply chain and/or the ultimate consumer. In a number of countries different forms of "GM-free" labels exist for some products; the style of such labels is variable with schemes and labels typically voluntary or privately organized. In more recent years, some governments have begun to regularize the definition and meaning of "GM-free." We conclude our analysis by exploring consumer reactions both to "GM-free" and to "GM-free" labels, and ask who ultimately benefits from preserving a product stream substantially or entirely devoid of GM-content.

  5. Economic impact of GM crops

    PubMed Central

    Brookes, Graham; Barfoot, Peter

    2014-01-01

    A key part of any assessment of the global value of crop biotechnology in agriculture is an examination of its economic impact at the farm level. This paper follows earlier annual studies which examined economic impacts on yields, key costs of production, direct farm income and effects, and impacts on the production base of the four main crops of soybeans, corn, cotton and canola. The commercialization of genetically modified (GM) crops has continued to occur at a rapid rate, with important changes in both the overall level of adoption and impact occurring in 2012. This annual updated analysis shows that there have been very significant net economic benefits at the farm level amounting to $18.8 billion in 2012 and $116.6 billion for the 17-year period (in nominal terms). These economic gains have been divided roughly 50% each to farmers in developed and developing countries. GM technology have also made important contributions to increasing global production levels of the four main crops, having added 122 million tonnes and 230 million tonnes respectively, to the global production of soybeans and maize since the introduction of the technology in the mid-1990s. PMID:24637520

  6. Shape of Taylor bubbles in vertical tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Nigmatulin, T.R.; Bonetto, F.J.

    1997-12-01

    The shape of a Taylor bubble in a vertical downward slug flow in a pipe is studied. The phase distribution in the Taylor bubble region is investigated by still pictures and video film. The shape of the Taylor bubble is reported for different condition. These experimental results consists of the position of the interface x(r) obtained using image processing and represents the new view to the shape of the Taylor Bubble and gives some light on the basic phenomena for the hydrodynamics of the two-phase slug flow. Slug flow is one of the most common and complex flow patterns in two-phase flow. Slug flow exists over a broad range of gas and liquid flow rates and is encountered in a wide variety of industrial applications like gas wells and process vaporizers. It also occurs during certain stages of emergency core cooling of a nuclear reactor.

  7. Woltjer-Taylor State Without Taylor's Conjecture - Plasma Relaxation at all Wavelengths

    SciTech Connect

    Qin, Hong; Liu, Wandong; Li, Hong; Squire, Jonathan

    2012-10-10

    In astrophysical and laboratory plasmas, it has been discovered that plasmas relax towards the well-known Woltjer-Taylor state specified by ∇ x B = αB for a constant α . To explain how such a relaxed state is reached, Taylor developed his famous relaxation theory based on the conjecture that the relaxation is dominated by short wavelength fluctuations. However, there is no conclusive experimental and numerical evidence to support Taylor's conjecture. A new theory is developed, which predicts that the system will evolve towards the Woltjer-Taylor state for an arbitrary fluctuation spectrum.

  8. Rayleigh--Taylor spike evaporation

    SciTech Connect

    Schappert, G. T.; Batha, S. H.; Klare, K. A.; Hollowell, D. E.; Mason, R. J.

    2001-09-01

    Laser-based experiments have shown that Rayleigh--Taylor (RT) growth in thin, perturbed copper foils leads to a phase dominated by narrow spikes between thin bubbles. These experiments were well modeled and diagnosed until this '' spike'' phase, but not into this spike phase. Experiments were designed, modeled, and performed on the OMEGA laser [T. R. Boehly, D. L. Brown, R. S. Craxton , Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)] to study the late-time spike phase. To simulate the conditions and evolution of late time RT, a copper target was fabricated consisting of a series of thin ridges (spikes in cross section) 150 {mu}m apart on a thin flat copper backing. The target was placed on the side of a scale-1.2 hohlraum with the ridges pointing into the hohlraum, which was heated to 190 eV. Side-on radiography imaged the evolution of the ridges and flat copper backing into the typical RT bubble and spike structure including the '' mushroom-like feet'' on the tips of the spikes. RAGE computer models [R. M. Baltrusaitis, M. L. Gittings, R. P. Weaver, R. F. Benjamin, and J. M. Budzinski, Phys. Fluids 8, 2471 (1996)] show the formation of the '' mushrooms,'' as well as how the backing material converges to lengthen the spike. The computer predictions of evolving spike and bubble lengths match measurements fairly well for the thicker backing targets but not for the thinner backings.

  9. Taylor impact of glass rods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willmott, G. R.; Radford, D. D.

    2005-05-01

    The deformation and fracture behavior of soda-lime and borosilicate glass rods was examined during classic and symmetric Taylor impact experiments for impact pressures to 4 and 10GPa, respectively. High-speed photography and piezoresistive gauges were used to measure the failure front velocities in both glasses, and for impact pressures below ˜2GPa the failure front velocity increases rapidly with increasing pressure. As the pressure was increased above ˜3GPa, the failure front velocities asymptotically approached maximum values between the longitudinal and shear wave velocities of each material; at ˜4GPa, the average failure front velocities were 4.7±0.5 and 4.6±0.5mmμs-1 for the soda-lime and borosilicate specimens, respectively. The observed mechanism of failure in these experiments involved continuous pressure-dependent nucleation and growth of microcracks behind the incident wave. As the impact pressure was increased, there was a decrease in the time to failure. The density of cracks within the failed region was material dependent, with the more open-structured borosilicate glass showing a larger fracture density.

  10. Taylor impact of glass rods

    SciTech Connect

    Willmott, G.R.; Radford, D.D.

    2005-05-01

    The deformation and fracture behavior of soda-lime and borosilicate glass rods was examined during classic and symmetric Taylor impact experiments for impact pressures to 4 and 10 GPa, respectively. High-speed photography and piezoresistive gauges were used to measure the failure front velocities in both glasses, and for impact pressures below {approx}2 GPa the failure front velocity increases rapidly with increasing pressure. As the pressure was increased above {approx}3 GPa, the failure front velocities asymptotically approached maximum values between the longitudinal and shear wave velocities of each material; at {approx}4 GPa, the average failure front velocities were 4.7{+-}0.5 and 4.6{+-}0.5 mm {mu}s{sup -1} for the soda-lime and borosilicate specimens, respectively. The observed mechanism of failure in these experiments involved continuous pressure-dependent nucleation and growth of microcracks behind the incident wave. As the impact pressure was increased, there was a decrease in the time to failure. The density of cracks within the failed region was material dependent, with the more open-structured borosilicate glass showing a larger fracture density.

  11. Investigating GM Risk Perceptions: A Survey of Anti-GM and Environmental Campaign Group Members

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Clare; Moran, Dominic

    2006-01-01

    This study investigates how members of anti-GM campaign groups and environment groups perceive the risks and benefits of genetically modified (GM) technology in food and agriculture. The study targeted these groups as the most risk-averse sector of society when considering GM technology. Survey respondents were asked to rank the current and future…

  12. Rayleigh-Taylor mixing in supernova experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swisher, N. C.; Kuranz, C. C.; Arnett, D.; Hurricane, O.; Remington, B. A.; Robey, H. F.; Abarzhi, S. I.

    2015-10-01

    We report a scrupulous analysis of data in supernova experiments that are conducted at high power laser facilities in order to study core-collapse supernova SN1987A. Parameters of the experimental system are properly scaled to investigate the interaction of a blast-wave with helium-hydrogen interface, and the induced Rayleigh-Taylor instability and Rayleigh-Taylor mixing of the denser and lighter fluids with time-dependent acceleration. We analyze all available experimental images of the Rayleigh-Taylor flow in supernova experiments and measure delicate features of the interfacial dynamics. A new scaling is identified for calibration of experimental data to enable their accurate analysis and comparisons. By properly accounting for the imprint of the experimental conditions, the data set size and statistics are substantially increased. New theoretical solutions are reported to describe asymptotic dynamics of Rayleigh-Taylor flow with time-dependent acceleration by applying theoretical analysis that considers symmetries and momentum transport. Good qualitative and quantitative agreement is achieved of the experimental data with the theory and simulations. Our study indicates that in supernova experiments Rayleigh-Taylor flow is in the mixing regime, the interface amplitude contributes substantially to the characteristic length scale for energy dissipation; Rayleigh-Taylor mixing keeps order.

  13. MRI in Taylor-Dean flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefani, Frank; Gerbeth, Gunter

    2004-11-01

    The magnetorotational instability (MRI) can destabilize hydrodynamically stable flows which are characterized by an angular momentum that is increasing with the radius and by an angular velocity that is decreasing with radius. Its astrophysical importance comes from the fact that the Kepler flow with Ω(r) ~ r-3/2 exactly such a behaviour. In order to investigate MRI in a laboratory experiment, the Taylor-Couette flow with Ω(r) = A + Br2 with A > 0 has been proposed as a substitute for the Kepler flow. In this paper we consider the Taylor-Dean flow as another example of a flow profile which can exhibit the necessary radial dependence. Taylor-Dean flows are a combination of the traditional Taylor-Couette flow with an additional flow that is produced by an azimuthal force. Special focus is laid on the case that the Taylor-Couette part of the flow is a rigid body rotation and the magnitude of the Dean flow is adjusted in such a way that in the outer part of the flow the conditions for MRI are fulfilled. Based on the dispersion relation derived by Ji, Kageyama and Goodman, in combination with some preliminary global instability analysis, we give some first estimates for the physical parameters of a Taylor-Dean MRI experiment with liquid sodium.

  14. Rayleigh-Taylor mixing in supernova experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Swisher, N. C.; Abarzhi, S. I.; Kuranz, C. C.; Arnett, D.; Hurricane, O.; Remington, B. A.; Robey, H. F.

    2015-10-15

    We report a scrupulous analysis of data in supernova experiments that are conducted at high power laser facilities in order to study core-collapse supernova SN1987A. Parameters of the experimental system are properly scaled to investigate the interaction of a blast-wave with helium-hydrogen interface, and the induced Rayleigh-Taylor instability and Rayleigh-Taylor mixing of the denser and lighter fluids with time-dependent acceleration. We analyze all available experimental images of the Rayleigh-Taylor flow in supernova experiments and measure delicate features of the interfacial dynamics. A new scaling is identified for calibration of experimental data to enable their accurate analysis and comparisons. By properly accounting for the imprint of the experimental conditions, the data set size and statistics are substantially increased. New theoretical solutions are reported to describe asymptotic dynamics of Rayleigh-Taylor flow with time-dependent acceleration by applying theoretical analysis that considers symmetries and momentum transport. Good qualitative and quantitative agreement is achieved of the experimental data with the theory and simulations. Our study indicates that in supernova experiments Rayleigh-Taylor flow is in the mixing regime, the interface amplitude contributes substantially to the characteristic length scale for energy dissipation; Rayleigh-Taylor mixing keeps order.

  15. Direct numerical simulations of type Ia supernovae flames II: The Rayleigh-Taylor instability

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, J.B.; Day, M.S.; Rendleman, C.A.; Woosley, S.E.; Zingale, M.

    2004-01-12

    A Type Ia supernova explosion likely begins as a nuclear runaway near the center of a carbon-oxygen white dwarf. The outward propagating flame is unstable to the Landau-Darrieus, Rayleigh-Taylor, and Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities, which serve to accelerate it to a large fraction of the speed of sound. We investigate the Rayleigh-Taylor unstable flame at the transition from the flamelet regime to the distributed-burning regime, around densities of 10e7 gm/cc, through detailed, fully resolved simulations. A low Mach number, adaptive mesh hydrodynamics code is used to achieve the necessary resolution and long time scales. As the density is varied, we see a fundamental change in the character of the burning--at the low end of the density range the Rayleigh-Taylor instability dominates the burning, whereas at the high end the burning suppresses the instability. In all cases, significant acceleration of the flame is observed, limited only by the size of the domain we are able to study. We discuss the implications of these results on the potential for a deflagration to detonation transition.

  16. A spherical Taylor-Couette dynamo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcotte, Florence; Gissinger, Christophe

    2016-04-01

    We present a new scenario for magnetic field amplification in the planetary interiors where an electrically conducting fluid is confined in a differentially rotating, spherical shell (spherical Couette flow) with thin aspect-ratio. When the angular momentum sufficiently decreases outwards, a primary hydrodynamic instability is widely known to develop in the equatorial region, characterized by pairs of counter-rotating, axisymmetric toroidal vortices (Taylor vortices) similar to those observed in cylindrical Couette flow. We characterize the subcritical dynamo bifurcation due to this spherical Taylor-Couette flow and study its evolution as the flow successively breaks into wavy and turbulent Taylor vortices for increasing Reynolds number. We show that the critical magnetic Reynolds number seems to reach a constant value as the Reynolds number is gradually increased. The role of global rotation on the dynamo threshold and the implications for planetary interiors are finally discussed.

  17. GM crops: science, politics and communication.

    PubMed

    Arntzen, Charles J; Coghlan, Andy; Johnson, Brian; Peacock, Jim; Rodemeyer, Michael

    2003-10-01

    As the public debate in Europe about genetically modified (GM) crops heats up and the trade row between the United States and the European Union over GM food escalates, what better time to examine the issues with an international group of experts (Box 1). Their views are diverse, but they all agree that we need more impartial communication, less propaganda and an effective regulatory regime that is based on a careful case-by-case consideration of GM technology. It seems that GM crops are here to stay, so let us hope that these requirements are met and that the developing nations that perhaps have the most to gain from this technology can start to reap its benefits.

  18. Taylorism in a post-modern age?

    PubMed

    Freemantle, N

    1995-02-01

    F.W. Taylor made an early and important contribution to the organisation of work in an industrial society. His ideas, or versions of his ideas, are once again receiving attention. Some commentators even describe a new or neo Taylorism (Pollitt, 1990). This paper argues that the only theoretical justification for the re-introduction of Taylorist strategies in the workplace is found in the notion of the post-modern world; where rationality is replaced by a ritual of signs and work becomes part of that ritual; where form replaces rationale, and strategies for work are governed by processes of survival in the remnants of modernity.

  19. Targeting GM-CSF in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Avci, Ali Berkant; Feist, Eugen; Burmester, Gerd-Rüdiger

    2016-01-01

    Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is well-known as a haemopoietic growth factor. However, it is also essential in regulating functions of mature myeloid cells such as macrophages. Preclinical studies and observations of flares of arthritis in patients following GM-CSF treatment supported its important contribution to the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). As the most advanced compound, mavrilimumab, a monoclonal antibody against GM-CSF receptor, has already completed phase II trials with a long term of follow-up period of 74 weeks. During this exposure period, an acceptable sustained safety and tolerability profile has been observed addressing the concerns of development of cytopenias or pulmonary alveolar proteinosis. Of note, a rapid and sustained efficacy and normalisation of acute phase reactants were consistently shown in studies both targeting GM-CSF and its receptor. Its tumour necrosis factor (TNF) independent mode of action with concurrent blockade of GM-CSF as well as IL-17 signalling reported from preclinical studies supports the assumption that it can be a useful biologic and an alternative agent in TNF inhibitor resistant patients with RA. Therefore, subsequent studies are warranted to investigate the safety and efficacy of GM-CSF blocking agents in different subgroups of RA. PMID:27586802

  20. Cathedral house & crocker fence, Taylor Street east and north ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Cathedral house & crocker fence, Taylor Street east and north elevations, perspective view from the northeast - Grace Cathedral, George William Gibbs Memorial Hall, 1051 Taylor Street, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  1. 20. TURNTABLE WITH CABLE CAR BAY & TAYLOR: View ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    20. TURNTABLE WITH CABLE CAR - BAY & TAYLOR: View to northwest of the Bay and Taylor turntable. The gripman and conductor are turning the car around. - San Francisco Cable Railway, Washington & Mason Streets, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  2. Nonlinear stability of Taylor's vortex array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, S. P.; Tobak, M.

    1987-01-01

    It is proved that the two-dimensional Taylor vortex array, which is an exact unsteady solution of the Navier-Stokes equation, is globally and asymptotically stable in the mean with respect to three-dimensional periodic disturbances. A time-dependent bound on the decay rate of the kinetic energy of disturbances is obtained.

  3. Application of Taylor's series to trajectory propagation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stanford, R. H.; Berryman, K. W.; Breckheimer, P. J.

    1986-01-01

    This paper describes the propagation of trajectories by the application of the preprocessor ATOMCC which uses Taylor's series to solve initial value problems in ordinary differential equations. Comparison of the results obtained with those from other methods are presented. The current studies indicate that the ATOMCC preprocessor is an easy, yet fast and accurate method for generating trajectories.

  4. Neo-Taylorism in Educational Administration?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gronn, Peter C.

    1982-01-01

    Reviews eight recent observational studies of school administrators and criticizes the studies' use of "time and motion" assumptions drawn from Frederick Winslow Taylor's ideas. Outlines an alternate approach based on "thick" description of administrators' work, including their talk, as exemplified in James Boswell's biography of Samuel Johnson.…

  5. Cusp formation in drops inside Taylor cones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marin, Alvaro G.; Loscertales, Ignacio G.; Barrero, Antonio

    2005-11-01

    Here, we report the formation of cusp in insulating drops inside compound Taylor cones. The action of the electrical shear stress acting on the outer interface, which is transmitted by viscous forces inside the Taylor cone, tends to deform the drop of insulating liquid placed inside. For appropriate values of the capillary number, the insulating drop develops a steady cusp angle which depends on both the capillary number and the conducting to insulating viscosity ratio. A self-similar analysis has been developed to qualitatively describe the flow inside these compounds Taylor cones. Any perturbation of the cusp gives rise to an intermittent emission of tiny droplets; this effect may recall the tip-streaming observed by G.I. Taylor in his four-roll mill device. This emission can be stabilized by an appropriate control of the injected flow rate of the insulating liquid. When the capillary number increases, the cusped interface turns into a spout which flows coated by the conducting liquid forming the electrified coaxial jet which has been successfully employed for the production of nanocapsules, coaxial nanofibers and nanotubes (Science 295, n. 5560, 1695, 2002; JACS 126, 5376, 2004).

  6. Strategies for coexistence of GM and non-GM soy from import to feed processing.

    PubMed

    Gryson, Nicolas; Eeckhout, Mia; Trouillier, Aurélie; Le Bail, Marianne; Soler, Louis-Georges

    2009-01-01

    Regulations 1829/2003/CE and 1830/2003/CE have allowed the placing on the European market of GM products in food and feed chains, and have defined their rules of traceability and labeling. For some supply chains, like for soy and its derived products that are used in the production of feed, manufacturers have to face both non-GM and GM production, although there are no labeling requirements for animal products derived from animals fed with GMOs. This study presents the strategies of stakeholders involved in the feed production chain to maintain concurrent production of compound feed with GM and non-GM soy products, by dealing with the coexistence between those two crops. The stakeholders include importers, traders, soy processors, feed processors and retailers. The study shows that many tools are in place to ensure and maintain the current coexistence. However, a profound harmonization of procedures and methods at a European level should be encouraged. PMID:20028618

  7. Regulating coexistence of GM and non-GM crops without jeopardizing economic incentives.

    PubMed

    Demont, Matty; Devos, Yann

    2008-07-01

    The ongoing debate about the coexistence of genetically modified (GM) and non-GM crops in the European Union (EU) mainly focuses on preventive measures needed to keep the adventitious presence of GM material in non-GM products below established tolerance thresholds, as well as on issues covering questions of liability and the duty to redress the incurred economic harm once adventitious mixing in non-GM products has occurred. By contrast, the interplay between the economic incentives and costs of coexistence has attracted little attention. The current overemphasis on the technical aspects and cost of coexistence over its economic incentives might lead EU policy-makers to adopt too stringent and rigid regulations on coexistence. Therefore, we argue for flexible coexistence regulations that explicitly take into account the economic incentives for coexistence. Our arguments provide a timely and important framework for EU policy-makers, who are currently struggling to implement coherent coexistence regulations in all member states.

  8. GmWRKY27 interacts with GmMYB174 to reduce expression of GmNAC29 for stress tolerance in soybean plants.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fang; Chen, Hao-Wei; Li, Qing-Tian; Wei, Wei; Li, Wei; Zhang, Wan-Ke; Ma, Biao; Bi, Ying-Dong; Lai, Yong-Cai; Liu, Xin-Lei; Man, Wei-Qun; Zhang, Jin-Song; Chen, Shou-Yi

    2015-07-01

    Soybean (Glycine max) is an important crop for oil and protein resources worldwide. The molecular mechanism of the abiotic stress response in soybean is largely unclear. We previously identified multiple stress-responsive WRKY genes from soybean. Here, we further characterized the roles of one of these genes, GmWRKY27, in abiotic stress tolerance using a transgenic hairy root assay. GmWRKY27 expression was increased by various abiotic stresses. Over-expression and RNAi analysis demonstrated that GmWRKY27 improves salt and drought tolerance in transgenic soybean hairy roots. Measurement of physiological parameters, including reactive oxygen species and proline contents, supported this conclusion. GmWRKY27 inhibits expression of a downstream gene GmNAC29 by binding to the W-boxes in its promoter region. The GmNAC29 is a negative factor of stress tolerance as indicated by the performance of transgenic hairy roots under stress. GmWRKY27 interacts with GmMYB174, which also suppresses GmNAC29 expression and enhances drought stress tolerance. The GmWRKY27 and GmMYB174 may have evolved to bind to neighbouring cis elements in the GmNAC29 promoter to co-reduce promoter activity and gene expression. Our study discloses a valuable mechanism in soybean for regulation of the stress response by two associated transcription factors. Manipulation of these genes should facilitate improvements in stress tolerance in soybean and other crops.

  9. CTH simulation of PBX-9501 Taylor tests /

    SciTech Connect

    Koby, Joseph R.

    2011-09-01

    During March-May 2011, multiple Taylor impact tests were conducted at LANL, examining the behavior of PBXN-9 and PBX-9501 under rapid loading. Subsequently, a computational hydrodynamics code (CTH) model was developed to mimic the deformation behavior observed in these impact tests with PBX-9501 would likely initiate upon impact. Also examined was whether an inert slud behind the explosive would lead to initiation at lower, more easily attainable velocities. The simplified model used here showed a minimum velocity for ignition of 530 m/s which was unchanged by the addition of a plastic slud behind the sample. The use of a lead slug did lower the minimum velocity to 460 m/s. These values are likely more qualitative at this point because multiple simplifications are currently used in the materials properties and test geometry. The results do show that this approach is capable of determining ignition due to Taylor impact.

  10. PEOPLE IN PHYSICS: Interview with Charles Taylor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pople, Conducted by Stephen

    1996-07-01

    Charles Taylor started his university teaching career at UMIST in 1948. In 1965 he became Professor and Head of the Department of Physics at University College, Cardiff. He was a Vice-President of the Institute of Physics from 1970 to 1975, and Professor of Experimental Physics at the Royal Institution from 1977 until 1989. Over the years, Professor Taylor has delighted audiences of all ages with his demonstration lectures, including the Royal Institution Christmas Lectures televised in 1971 and 1989. In 1986 he became the first recipient of the Royal Society's Michael Faraday Award for contributions to the public understanding of science. His many books include Exploring Music, The Art and Science of the Lecture Demonstration, and also the Oxford Children's Book of Science, co-written with interviewer Stephen Pople.

  11. GM-CSF and phorbol esters modulate GM-CSF receptor expression by independent mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Brizzi, M F; Arduino, C; Avanzi, G C; Bussolino, F; Pegoraro, L

    1991-07-01

    Human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) (0.1 nM) down-modulates its receptor in IL-3/GM-CSF dependent M-07e cells, in KG-1 cells and normal granulocytes, whereas phorbol esters 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) (2 nM) down-modulates the GM-CSF receptor in M-07e cells and granulocytes but not in KG-1 cells. As data analysis shows by nonlinear regression, the decreased binding ability depends on a reduction of the binding sites with no significant change of their dissociation constant. To gain insight into the mechanisms involved in the GM-CSF receptor regulation, we investigated the role of protein kinase C (PKC). GM-CSF, unlike TPA, was unable to activate PKC in all the cells studied. Moreover, unlike TPA, GM-CSF was still able to down-modulate its receptor in cells where PKC was inhibited by 1-(5-isoquinolonesulphonyl)-2-methylpiperazine (H7) and staurosporine or in cells where PKC was exhausted by prolonged incubation with 1 microM TPA. Finally, the receptor re-expression rate was accelerated by protein kinases inhibitors. These results, taken together, indicate the presence of a PKC-dependent and -independent down-modulation mechanism and a negative role of the endogeneous protein kinases in GM-CSF receptor re-expression.

  12. Stability of compressible Taylor-Couette flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kao, Kai-Hsiung; Chow, Chuen-Yen

    1991-01-01

    Compressible stability equations are solved using the spectral collocation method in an attempt to study the effects of temperature difference and compressibility on the stability of Taylor-Couette flow. It is found that the Chebyshev collocation spectral method yields highly accurate results using fewer grid points for solving stability problems. Comparisons are made between the result obtained by assuming small Mach number with a uniform temperature distribution and that based on fully incompressible analysis.

  13. New trends in Taylor series based applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kocina, Filip; Šátek, Václav; Veigend, Petr; Nečasová, Gabriela; Valenta, Václav; Kunovský, Jiří

    2016-06-01

    The paper deals with the solution of large system of linear ODEs when minimal comunication among parallel processors is required. The Modern Taylor Series Method (MTSM) is used. The MTSM allows using a higher order during the computation that means a larger integration step size while keeping desired accuracy. As an example of complex systems we can take the Telegraph Equation Model. Symbolic and numeric solutions are compared when harmonic input signal is used.

  14. Subcritical equilibria in Taylor-Couette flow.

    PubMed

    Deguchi, Kengo; Meseguer, Alvaro; Mellibovsky, Fernando

    2014-05-01

    Nonlinear equilibrium states characterized by strongly localized vortex pairs are calculated in the linearly stable parameter region of counterrotating Taylor-Couette flow. These subcritical states are rotating waves whose region of existence is consistent with the critical threshold for relaminarization observed in experiments. For sufficiently rapid outer cylinder rotation the solutions extend beyond the static inner cylinder case to corotation, thus exceeding, for the first time, the boundary defined by the inviscid Rayleigh's stability criterion.

  15. Fluctuation scaling, Taylor's law, and crime.

    PubMed

    Hanley, Quentin S; Khatun, Suniya; Yosef, Amal; Dyer, Rachel-May

    2014-01-01

    Fluctuation scaling relationships have been observed in a wide range of processes ranging from internet router traffic to measles cases. Taylor's law is one such scaling relationship and has been widely applied in ecology to understand communities including trees, birds, human populations, and insects. We show that monthly crime reports in the UK show complex fluctuation scaling which can be approximated by Taylor's law relationships corresponding to local policing neighborhoods and larger regional and countrywide scales. Regression models applied to local scale data from Derbyshire and Nottinghamshire found that different categories of crime exhibited different scaling exponents with no significant difference between the two regions. On this scale, violence reports were close to a Poisson distribution (α = 1.057 ± 0.026) while burglary exhibited a greater exponent (α = 1.292 ± 0.029) indicative of temporal clustering. These two regions exhibited significantly different pre-exponential factors for the categories of anti-social behavior and burglary indicating that local variations in crime reports can be assessed using fluctuation scaling methods. At regional and countrywide scales, all categories exhibited scaling behavior indicative of temporal clustering evidenced by Taylor's law exponents from 1.43 ± 0.12 (Drugs) to 2.094 ± 0081 (Other Crimes). Investigating crime behavior via fluctuation scaling gives insight beyond that of raw numbers and is unique in reporting on all processes contributing to the observed variance and is either robust to or exhibits signs of many types of data manipulation.

  16. Monitoring Biopolymer Degradation by Taylor Dispersion Analysis.

    PubMed

    Chamieh, Joseph; Biron, Jean Philippe; Cipelletti, Luca; Cottet, Hervé

    2015-12-14

    This work aims at demonstrating the interest of modern Taylor dispersion analysis (TDA), performed in narrow internal diameter capillary, for monitoring biopolymer degradations. Hydrolytic and enzymatic degradations of dendrigraft poly-l-lysine taken as model compounds have been performed and monitored by TDA at different degradation times. Different approaches for the data processing of the taylorgrams are compared, including simple integration of the taylorgram, curve fitting with a finite number of Gaussian peaks, cumulant-like method and Constrained Regularized Linear Inversion approach. Valuable information on the kinetics of the enzymatic/hydrolytic degradation reactions and on the degradation process can be obtained by TDA. PMID:26633075

  17. Rayleigh-Taylor instability in binary condensates

    SciTech Connect

    Gautam, S.; Angom, D.

    2010-05-15

    We propose a well-controlled experimental scheme to initiate and examine the Rayleigh-Taylor instability in two-species Bose-Einstein condensates. We identify the {sup 85}Rb-{sup 87}Rb mixture as an excellent candidate to observe experimentally. The instability is initiated by tuning the {sup 85}Rb-{sup 85}Rb interaction through a magnetic Feshbach resonance. We show that the observable signature of the instability is the damping of the radial oscillations. We also propose a semianalytic scheme to determine the stationary state of binary condensates with the Thomas-Fermi approximation for axisymmetric traps.

  18. Hydrodynamical Dispersion in Taylor-Couette Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piva, M.; Calvo, A.; Aguirre, A.; Callegari, G.; Gabbanelli, S.; Rosen, M.; Wesfreid, J. E.

    1997-04-01

    In this article we study the mass tracer dispersion in organized flows. For this purpose we performed experiments in the flow arising from the Taylor-Couette hydrodynamic instability combined with axial flow. The tracer evolution is followed by means of optical measurements of the concentration. In this way transmission curves are obtained. We compare these curves with the solutions of the Gaussian models of mass diffusion and with phenomenological models including tracer trapping in the cells. This comparison gives us physical parameters related to the typical time and distances involved in the diffusive behaviour of tracers in the regions with recirculations and trapping.

  19. Safety of GM crops: compositional analysis.

    PubMed

    Brune, Philip D; Culler, Angela Hendrickson; Ridley, William P; Walker, Kate

    2013-09-01

    The compositional analysis of genetically modified (GM) crops has continued to be an important part of the overall evaluation in the safety assessment program for these materials. The variety and complexity of genetically engineered traits and modes of action that will be used in GM crops in the near future, as well as our expanded knowledge of compositional variability and factors that can affect composition, raise questions about compositional analysis and how it should be applied to evaluate the safety of traits. The International Life Sciences Institute (ILSI), a nonprofit foundation whose mission is to provide science that improves public health and well-being by fostering collaboration among experts from academia, government, and industry, convened a workshop in September 2012 to examine these and related questions, and a series of papers has been assembled to describe the outcomes of that meeting.

  20. Epistemological depth in a GM crops controversy.

    PubMed

    Hicks, Daniel J

    2015-04-01

    This paper examines the scientific controversy over the yields of genetically modified [GM] crops as a case study in epistemologically deep disagreements. Appeals to "the evidence" are inadequate to resolve such disagreements; not because the interlocutors have radically different metaphysical views (as in cases of incommensurability), but instead because they assume rival epistemological frameworks and so have incompatible views about what kinds of research methods and claims count as evidence. Specifically, I show that, in the yield debate, proponents and opponents of GM crops cite two different sets of claims as evidence, which correspond to two rival epistemological frameworks, classical experimental epistemology and Nancy Cartwright's evidence for use. I go on to argue that, even if both sides of the debate accepted Cartwright's view, they might still disagree over what counts as evidence, because evidence for use ties standards of evidence to what is sometimes called the "context of application."

  1. Temperature oscillation suppression of GM cryocooler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okidono, K.; Oota, T.; Kurihara, H.; Sumida, T.; Nishioka, T.; Kato, H.; Matsumura, M.; Sasaki, O.

    2012-12-01

    GM cryocooler is a convenient refrigerator to achieve low temperatures about 4 K, while it is not suitable for precise measurements because of the large temperature oscillation of typically about 0.3 K. To resolve this problem, we have developed an adapter (He-pot) with a simple structure as possible. From the thermodynamic consideration, both heat capacity and thermal conductance should be large in order to reduce the temperature oscillation without compromising cooling power. Optimal structure of the He-pot is a copper cylinder filled with high pressure He-gas at room temperature. This can reduce the temperature oscillation to less than 10 mK below a certain temperature TH without compromising cooling power. TH are 3.8 and 4.5 for filled He-gas pressures of 90 and 60 atm, respectively. By using this He-pot, GM cryocooler can be applied to such as precise physical property measurements and THz detection.

  2. 76 FR 76689 - Cibola National Forest, Mount Taylor Ranger District, NM, Mount Taylor Combined Exploratory Drilling

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-08

    ... exploratory uranium drilling on the Cibola National Forest, Mount Taylor Ranger District. There are two areas identified for exploration; the Bajillos project area is approximately 2,894 acres and is located in T. 12 N, R. 8 W, Sections 6, 7, & 8 and T. 12 N, R. 9 W, Sections 1, 12, & . The Endy project area...

  3. Development of Compact 2K GM Cryocoolers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Mingyao; Bao, Qian; Tsuchiya, Akihiro; Li, Rui

    A compact 2K Gifford-McMahon (GM) cryocooler has been developed for cooling electronic devices, such as Superconducting Single Photo Detectors (SSPD). The heat exchangers, regenerators are optimized with the numerical simulation method developed for 4K GM cryocoolers. After optimizing, the cylinder length is reduced by 85 mm compared with a commercial 0.1W 4K GM cryocooler. With no load on the second stage, a temperature of about 2.1 K has been achieved. With 1 W and 20 mW heat load, the temperature is 44.4 K at the first stage and 2.23 K at the second stage with an input power of about 1.1 kW. And also, it is found that the temperature oscillation decreases as the average temperature decreases. A temperature oscillation of about ±20 mK has been achieved. The object of the project, target specification, and a summary of experiment results will also be introduced in this paper.

  4. 1541nm GmAPD LADAR system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kutteruf, Mary R.; Lebow, Paul

    2014-06-01

    The single photon sensitivity of Geiger-mode avalanche photo diodes (GmAPDs) has facilitated the development of LADAR systems that operate at longer stand-off distances, require lower laser pulse powers and are capable of imaging through a partial obscuration. In this paper, we describe a GmAPD LADAR system which operates at the eye-safe wavelength of 1541 nm. The longer wavelength should enhance system covertness and improve haze penetration compared to systems using 1064 nm lasers. The system is comprised of a COTS 1541 nm erbium fiber laser producing 4 ns pulses at 80 kHz to 450 kHz and a COTS camera with a focal plane of 32x32 InGaAs GmAPDs band-gap optimized for 1550 nm. Laboratory characterization methodology and results are discussed. We show that accurate modeling of the system response, allows us to achieve a depth resolution which is limited by the width of the camera's time bin (.25 ns or 1.5 inches) rather than by the duration of the laser pulse (4 ns or 2 ft.). In the presence of obscuration, the depth discrimination is degraded to 6 inches but is still significantly better than that dictated by the laser pulse duration. We conclude with a discussion of future work.

  5. Comparative characterization of GmSPX members reveals that GmSPX3 is involved in phosphate homeostasis in soybean

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Zhufang; Tian, Jiang; Liao, Hong

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims Proteins containing the SPX (SYG1/Pho81/XPR1) domain are vital components in the phosphorus (P) signalling pathway, and regulate phosphate (Pi) homeostasis in plants. However, the characteristics and functions of GmSPX members in soybean (Glycine max) remain largely unknown. Methods BLAST searching revealed nine GmSPX members in the soybean genome. Subsequently, expression patterns of GmSPX members were investigated in various tissues of soybean grown in nutrient solution or sand culture through quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) analysis. Sub-cellular localization of GmSPX was examined via transient expression of 35S:GmSPX-GFP in epidermal cells of onion (Allium cepa). Finally, soybean transgenic composite plants were generated to study GmSPX3 functions. Key Results Nine GmSPX members were identified, which were classified into three groups based on phylogenetic analysis. Diverse responses of GmSPX members to deficiencies of nutrients (nitrogen, phosphorus, potassium and iron) or inoculation of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi and rhizobia were observed in soybean. In addition, variations of sub-cellular localization of GmSPX members were found. Among them, GmSPX3, GmSPX7 and GmSPX8 were localized in the nuclei, and the other GmSPX members were confined to the nuclei and cytoplasm. The nuclear-localized and Pi starvation responsive-gene, GmSPX3, was functionally analysed in soybean transgenic composite plants. Overexpression of GmSPX3 led to increased P concentrations in both shoots and roots in the high-P treatment, and increased transcription of seven Pi starvation-responsive genes in soybean hairy roots. Conclusions Taken together, the results suggest that GmSPX3 is a positive regulator in the P signalling network, and controls Pi homeostasis in soybean. PMID:25074550

  6. Immunocytochemical localization of the immunoglobulin factors Gm(a), Gm(b) and Inv(a) in human lymphoid tissue

    PubMed Central

    Curtain, C. C.; Baumgarten, A.

    1966-01-01

    Fluorescent antibodies to the human immunoglobulin allelic characters Gm(a) and Gm(b) were found to be localized in different plasma cells in the red pulp of the spleen and the medullary cords of the lymph nodes of heterozygous Gm(a+ b+) individuals. Approximately 45 per cent of the cells, which were subsequently shown to contain immunoglobulin after bleaching the section and restaining with fluorescent anti-whole human immunoglobulin, reacted with the fluorescent anti-Gm(a), 25 per cent with the fluorescent anti-Gm(b) and 30 per cent did not react at all. Sections already labelled with the fluorescein anti-Gm(a) and rhodamine anti-Gm(b) upon staining with fluorescein anti-Inv(a) showed approximately 60 per cent of all cells with mixed fluorescence and 25 per cent previously unlabelled cells fluorescing with the Inv(a) label only. In Gm(a+ b+ x+) individuals Gm(a) and Gm(x) seemed to be localized in the same plasma cells. However, in the germinal centres of the lymph nodes and the white pulp of the spleen Gm(a), Gm(b) and Inv(a) appeared to be contained in the same cells. ImagesFIG. 1FIG. 2FIG. 3 PMID:4161805

  7. Axially localized states in Taylor Couette flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, Jose M.; Marques, Francisco

    2014-11-01

    We present numerical simulations of the flow in a Taylor Couette system with the inner cylinder rotating and aspect ratio Γ restricted to 0 . 86 <Γ/N < 0 . 95 , being N the number of Taylor vortices. For these values a complex experimental bifurcation scenario has been reported. The transition from wavy vortex flow (WVF) to a very low frequency mode VLF happens via an axisymmetric eigenfunction. The VLF plays an essential role in the dynamics, leading to chaos through a two-tori period-doubling route. This chaotic regime vanishes with further increase in Re and gives rise to a new flow regime ALS characterized by the existence of large jet oscillations localized in some pairs of vortices. The aim of this numerical study is to extend the available information on ALS by means of a detailed exploration of the parameter space in which it occurs. Frequency analysis from time series simultaneously recorded at several points of the domain has been applied to identify the different transitions taking place. The VLF occurs in a wide range of control parameters and its interaction with the axially localized states is crucial is most transitions, either between different ALS or to the chaotic regime. Spanish Ministry of Education and Science Grants (with FEDER funds) FIS2013-40880 and BES-2010-041542.

  8. A cosmological Slavnov-Taylor identity

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, Hael; Holman, R.; Vardanyan, Tereza E-mail: rh4a@andrew.cmu.edu

    2014-12-01

    We develop a method for treating the consistency relations of inflation that includes the full time-evolution of the state. This approach relies only on the symmetries of the inflationary setting, in particular a residual conformal symmetry in the spatial part of the metric, along with general properties which hold for any quantum field theory. As a result, the consistency relations that emerge, which are essentially the Slavnov-Taylor identities associated with this residual conformal symmetry, apply very generally: they are true of the full Green's functions, hold largely independently of the particular inflationary model, and can be used for arbitrary states. We illustrate these techniques by showing the form assumed by the standard consistency relation between the two and three-point functions for the primordial scalar fluctuations when they are in a Bunch-Davies state. But because we have included the full evolution of the state, this approach works for a general initial state as well and does not need to have assumed that inflation began in the Bunch-Davies state. We explain how the Slavnov-Taylor identity is modified for these more general states.

  9. Saffman-Taylor fingers with kinetic undercooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardiner, Bennett P. J.; McCue, Scott W.; Dallaston, Michael C.; Moroney, Timothy J.

    2015-02-01

    The mathematical model of a steadily propagating Saffman-Taylor finger in a Hele-Shaw channel has applications to two-dimensional interacting streamer discharges which are aligned in a periodic array. In the streamer context, the relevant regularization on the interface is not provided by surface tension but instead has been postulated to involve a mechanism equivalent to kinetic undercooling, which acts to penalize high velocities and prevent blow-up of the unregularized solution. Previous asymptotic results for the Hele-Shaw finger problem with kinetic undercooling suggest that for a given value of the kinetic undercooling parameter, there is a discrete set of possible finger shapes, each analytic at the nose and occupying a different fraction of the channel width. In the limit in which the kinetic undercooling parameter vanishes, the fraction for each family approaches 1 /2 , suggesting that this "selection" of 1 /2 by kinetic undercooling is qualitatively similar to the well-known analog with surface tension. We treat the numerical problem of computing these Saffman-Taylor fingers with kinetic undercooling, which turns out to be more subtle than the analog with surface tension, since kinetic undercooling permits finger shapes which are corner-free but not analytic. We provide numerical evidence for the selection mechanism by setting up a problem with both kinetic undercooling and surface tension and numerically taking the limit that the surface tension vanishes.

  10. DSM-5 and ADHD - an interview with Eric Taylor.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Eric

    2013-01-01

    In this podcast we talk to Prof Eric Taylor about the changes to the diagnosis of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) in DSM-5 and how these changes will affect clinical practice. The podcast for this interview is available at: http://www.biomedcentral.com/sites/2999/download/Taylor.mp3.

  11. Animating Nested Taylor Polynomials to Approximate a Function

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mazzone, Eric F.; Piper, Bruce R.

    2010-01-01

    The way that Taylor polynomials approximate functions can be demonstrated by moving the center point while keeping the degree fixed. These animations are particularly nice when the Taylor polynomials do not intersect and form a nested family. We prove a result that shows when this nesting occurs. The animations can be shown in class or…

  12. G.I. Taylor and the Trinity Test

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deakin, Michael A. B.

    2011-01-01

    The story is often told of the calculation by G.I. Taylor of the yield of the first ever atomic bomb exploded in New Mexico in 1945. It has indeed become a staple of the classroom whenever dimensional analysis is taught. However, while it is true that Taylor succeeded in calculating this figure at a time when it was still classified, most versions…

  13. 76 FR 18378 - Amendment of Class E Airspace; Taylor, AZ

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-04

    ... names to Taylor Airport, and Show Low Regional Airport, respectively. Additionally, the geographic... amend controlled airspace at Taylor, AZ (76 FR 3570). Interested parties were invited to participate in this rulemaking effort by submitting written comments on the proposal to the FAA. No comments...

  14. 15. TURNTABLE RECONSTRUCTION BAY & TAYLOR: Photocopy of January ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. TURNTABLE RECONSTRUCTION - BAY & TAYLOR: Photocopy of January 1941 photograph taken during reconstruction of the Bay and Taylor turntable. View to the south. The 'spider' that carries the actual turntable is in place in the pit. - San Francisco Cable Railway, Washington & Mason Streets, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  15. 78 FR 12307 - Taylor, G. Tom; Notice of Filing

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-22

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Taylor, G. Tom; Notice of Filing Take notice that on February 14, 2013, G. Tom Taylor filed an application to hold interlocking positions pursuant to section 305(b) of...

  16. Role of Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities on prompt striation evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sperling, J. L.

    1982-12-01

    It is suggested that a Rayleigh-Taylor instability driven by ion inertia is a source of additional growth for prompt striations following the saturation of the seed, kinetic, loss cone instability. The destabilization of Rayleigh-Taylor modes on the prompt striation scale size is seen as implying a simultaneous excitation of large scale size Rayleigh-Taylor modes. The long-term influence of prompt striations on large scale fluid turbulence and on the outer scale of the power spectral density may be minimal. The kinetic loss cone and Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities are treated in an asymptotic sense, with the kinetic loss cone instability being driven by an ion loss cone distribution function and possibly a density gradient and the Rayleigh-Taylor instability (the result of a simultaneous density gradient and an electric polarization drift).

  17. Impact of GM crops on biodiversity.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, Janet E

    2011-01-01

    The potential impact of GM crops on biodiversity has been a topic of interest both in general as well as specifically in the context of the Convention on Biological Diversity. Agricultural biodiversity has been defined at levels from genes to ecosystems that are involved or impacted by agricultural production (www.cbd.int/agro/whatis.shtml). After fifteen years of commercial cultivation, a substantial body of literature now exists addressing the potential impacts of GM crops on the environment. This review takes a biodiversity lens to this literature, considering the impacts at three levels: the crop, farm and landscape scales. Within that framework, this review covers potential impacts of the introduction of genetically engineered crops on: crop diversity, biodiversity of wild relatives, non-target soil organisms, weeds, land use, non-target above-ground organisms, and area-wide pest suppression. The emphasis of the review is peer-reviewed literature that presents direct measures of impacts on biodiversity. In addition, possible impacts of changes in management practises such as tillage and pesticide use are also discussed to complement the literature on direct measures. The focus of the review is on technologies that have been commercialized somewhere in the world, while results may emanate from non-adopting countries and regions. Overall, the review finds that currently commercialized GM crops have reduced the impacts of agriculture on biodiversity, through enhanced adoption of conservation tillage practices, reduction of insecticide use and use of more environmentally benign herbicides and increasing yields to alleviate pressure to convert additional land into agricultural use.

  18. Solution structure of pyoverdin GM-II.

    PubMed

    Mohn, G; Koehl, P; Budzikiewicz, H; Lefèvre, J F

    1994-03-15

    The three-dimensional structure in solution of ferri-pyoverdin GM-II isolated from the culture medium of Pseudomonas fluorescens was determined by application of NMR methods to the Ga3+ analogue. Distance geometry calculations were performed with FILMAN using interproton distances and coupling constants as constraints. Further conformational analysis was carried out by energy minimization with MM2 and AMBER. Back-calculation of the NOESY spectra shows that the resulting structures are in agreement with the experimental data. PMID:8130197

  19. Anelastic Rayleigh–Taylor mixing layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, N.; Gauthier, S.

    2016-07-01

    Anelastic Rayleigh–Taylor mixing layers for miscible fluids are investigated with a recently built model (Schneider and Gauthier 2015 J. Eng. Math. 92 55–71). Four Chebyshev–Fourier–Fourier direct numerical simulations are analyzed. They use different values for the compressibility parameters: Atwood number (the dimensionless difference of the heavy and light fluid densities) and stratification (accounts for the vertical variation of density due to gravity). For intermediate Atwood numbers and finite stratification, compressibility effects quickly occurs. As a result only nonlinear behaviours are reached. The influence of the compressibility parameters on the growth speed of the RTI is discussed. The 0.1—Atwood number/0.4—stratification configuration reaches a turbulent regime. This turbulent mixing layer is analyzed with statistical tools such as moments, PDFs, anisotropy indicators and spectra.

  20. Anelastic Rayleigh-Taylor mixing layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, N.; Gauthier, S.

    2016-07-01

    Anelastic Rayleigh-Taylor mixing layers for miscible fluids are investigated with a recently built model (Schneider and Gauthier 2015 J. Eng. Math. 92 55-71). Four Chebyshev-Fourier-Fourier direct numerical simulations are analyzed. They use different values for the compressibility parameters: Atwood number (the dimensionless difference of the heavy and light fluid densities) and stratification (accounts for the vertical variation of density due to gravity). For intermediate Atwood numbers and finite stratification, compressibility effects quickly occurs. As a result only nonlinear behaviours are reached. The influence of the compressibility parameters on the growth speed of the RTI is discussed. The 0.1—Atwood number/0.4—stratification configuration reaches a turbulent regime. This turbulent mixing layer is analyzed with statistical tools such as moments, PDFs, anisotropy indicators and spectra.

  1. Classical Rayleigh Taylor experiments on Nova

    SciTech Connect

    Budil, K.S.; Remington, B.A.; Peyser, T.A.

    1995-07-01

    The evolution of the Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability in a compressible medium was investigated both at an accelerating embedded interface and at the ablation front in a new series of experiments on Nova. The x-ray drive generated in a hohlraum ablatively accelerated a planar target consisting of a doped plastic pusher which was in some cases backed by a higher density titanium payload. Both target types were diagnosed by face-on and side-on radiography. Experiments have been done with a variety of wavelengths and initial amplitudes. In the case where the perturbed RT-unstable embedded interface is isolated from the ablation front, short wavelength perturbations are observed to grow strongly. When the perturbation is at the ablation front, the short wavelengths are observed to be severely stabilized.

  2. Aluminum Rayleigh Taylor Strength Measurements and Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Lindquist, M J; Cavallo, R M; Lorenz, K T; Pollaine, S M; Remington, B A; Raevsky, V A

    2007-01-10

    A traditional approach to the study of material strength has been revitalized at the Russian Federal Nuclear Center (VNIIEF). Rayleigh Taylor strength experiments have long been utilized to measure the material response of metals at high pressure and strain rates. A modulated (sinusoidal or sawtooth perturbation) surface is shocklessly (quasi-isentropically) accelerated by a high explosive (HE) driver, and radiography is used to measure the perturbation amplitude as a function of time. The Aluminum T-6061 targets are designed with several sets of two-dimensional sawtooth perturbations machined on the loading surface. The HE driver was designed to reach peak pressures in the range of 200 to 300 kbar and strain rates in the range of 10{sup 4} - 10{sup 6} s{sup -1}. The standard constitutive strength models, Steinberg-Guinan (SG) [1], Steinberg-Lund (SL) [2], Preston-Tonks-Wallace (PTW) [3], Johnson-Cooke (JC) [4], and Mechanical Threshold Stress (MTS) [5], have been calibrated by traditional techniques: (Hopkinson-Bar, Taylor impact, flyer plate/shock-driven experiments). The VNIIEF experimental series accesses a strain rate regime not attainable using traditional methods. We have performed a detailed numerical study with a two-dimensional Arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian hydrodynamics computer code containing several constitutive strength models to predict the perturbation growth. Results show that the capabilities of the computational methodology predict the amplitude growth to within 5 percent of the measured data, thus validating both the code and the strength models under the given conditions and setting the stage for credible future design work using different materials.

  3. Glycosphingolipid GM3 is Indispensable for Dengue Virus Genome Replication

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kezhen; Wang, Juanjuan; Sun, Ta; Bian, Gang; Pan, Wen; Feng, Tingting; Wang, Penghua; Li, Yunsen; Dai, Jianfeng

    2016-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) causes the most prevalent arthropod-borne viral disease of humans worldwide. Glycosphingolipids (GSLs) are involved in virus infection by regulating various steps of viral-host interaction. However, the distinct role of GSLs during DENV infection remains unclear. In this study, we used mouse melanoma B16 cells and their GSL-deficient mutant counterpart GM95 cells to study the influence of GSLs on DENV infection. Surprisingly, GM95 cells were highly resistant to DENV infection compared with B16 cells. Pretreatment of B16 cells with synthetase inhibitor of GM3, the most abundant GSLs in B16 cells, or silencing GM3 synthetase T3GAL5, significantly inhibited DENV infection. DENV attachment and endocytosis were not impaired in GM95 cells, but DENV genome replication was obviously inhibited in GM95 cells compared to B16 cells. Furthermore, GM3 was colocalized with DENV viral replication complex on endoplasmic reticulum (ER) inside the B16 cells. Finally, GM3 synthetase inhibitor significantly reduced the mortality rate of suckling mice that challenged with DENV by impairing the viral replication in mouse brain. Taken together, these data indicated that GM3 was not required for DENV attachment and endocytosis, however, essential for viral genome replication. Targeting GM3 could be a novel strategy to inhibit DENV infection. PMID:27313500

  4. The GM1 and GM2 Gangliosidoses: Natural History and Progress toward Therapy.

    PubMed

    Regier, Debra S; Proia, Richard L; D'Azzo, Alessandra; Tifft, Cynthia J

    2016-06-01

    The gangliosidoses are lysosomal storage disorders caused by accumulation of GM1 or GM2 gangliosides. GM1 gangliosidosis has both central nervous system and systemic findings; while, GM2 gangliosidosis is restricted primarily to the central nervous system. Both disorders have autosomal recessive modes of inheritance and a continuum of clinical presentations from a severe infantile form to a milder, chronic adult form. Both are devastating diseases without cure or specific treatment however, with the use of supportive aggressive medical management, the lifespan and quality of life has been extended for both diseases. Naturally occurring and engineered animal models that mimic the human diseases have enhanced our understanding of the pathogenesis of disease progression. Some models have shown significant improvement in symptoms and lifespan with enzyme replacement, substrate reduction, and anti-inflammatory treatments alone or in combination. More recently gene therapy has shown impressive results in large and small animal models. Treatment with FDA-approved glucose analogs to reduce the amount of ganglioside substrate is used as off-label treatments for some patients. Therapies also under clinical development include small molecule chaperones and gene therapy. PMID:27491214

  5. Functional analysis of structurally related soybean GmWRKY58 and GmWRKY76 in plant growth and development.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yan; Chi, Yingjun; Wang, Ze; Zhou, Yuan; Fan, Baofang; Chen, Zhixiang

    2016-08-01

    WRKY transcription factors constitute a large protein superfamily with a predominant role in plant stress responses. In this study we report that two structurally related soybean WRKY proteins, GmWRKY58 and GmWRKY76, play a critical role in plant growth and flowering. GmWRKY58 and GmWRKY76 are both Group III WRKY proteins with a C2HC zinc finger domain and are close homologs of AtWRKY70 and AtWRKY54, two well-characterized Arabidopsis WRKY proteins with an important role in plant responses to biotic and abiotic stresses. GmWRKY58 and GmWRKY76 are both localized to the nucleus, recognize the TTGACC W-box sequence with a high specificity, and function as transcriptional activators in both yeast and plant cells. Expression of GmWRKY58 and GmWRKY76 was detected at low levels in roots, stem, leaves, flowers, and pods. Expression of the two genes in leaves increased substantially during the first 4 weeks after germination but steadily declined thereafter with increased age. To determine their biological functions, transgenic Arabidopsis plants were generated overexpressing GmWRKY58 or GmWRKY76 Unlike AtWRKY70 and AtWRKY54, overexpression of GmWRKY58 or GmWRKY76 had no effect on disease resistance and only small effects on abiotic stress tolerance of the transgenic plants. Significantly, transgenic Arabidopsis plants overexpressing GmWRKY58 or GmWRKY76 flowered substantially earlier than control plants and this early flowering phenotype was associated with increased expression of several flowering-promoting genes, some of which are enriched in W-box sequences in their promoters recognized by GmWRKY58 and GmWRKY76. In addition, virus-induced silencing of GmWRKY58 and GmWRKY76 in soybean resulted in stunted plants with reduced leaf expansion and terminated stem growth. These results provide strong evidence for functional divergence among close structural homologs of WRKY proteins from different plant species. PMID:27335454

  6. Functional analysis of structurally related soybean GmWRKY58 and GmWRKY76 in plant growth and development.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yan; Chi, Yingjun; Wang, Ze; Zhou, Yuan; Fan, Baofang; Chen, Zhixiang

    2016-08-01

    WRKY transcription factors constitute a large protein superfamily with a predominant role in plant stress responses. In this study we report that two structurally related soybean WRKY proteins, GmWRKY58 and GmWRKY76, play a critical role in plant growth and flowering. GmWRKY58 and GmWRKY76 are both Group III WRKY proteins with a C2HC zinc finger domain and are close homologs of AtWRKY70 and AtWRKY54, two well-characterized Arabidopsis WRKY proteins with an important role in plant responses to biotic and abiotic stresses. GmWRKY58 and GmWRKY76 are both localized to the nucleus, recognize the TTGACC W-box sequence with a high specificity, and function as transcriptional activators in both yeast and plant cells. Expression of GmWRKY58 and GmWRKY76 was detected at low levels in roots, stem, leaves, flowers, and pods. Expression of the two genes in leaves increased substantially during the first 4 weeks after germination but steadily declined thereafter with increased age. To determine their biological functions, transgenic Arabidopsis plants were generated overexpressing GmWRKY58 or GmWRKY76 Unlike AtWRKY70 and AtWRKY54, overexpression of GmWRKY58 or GmWRKY76 had no effect on disease resistance and only small effects on abiotic stress tolerance of the transgenic plants. Significantly, transgenic Arabidopsis plants overexpressing GmWRKY58 or GmWRKY76 flowered substantially earlier than control plants and this early flowering phenotype was associated with increased expression of several flowering-promoting genes, some of which are enriched in W-box sequences in their promoters recognized by GmWRKY58 and GmWRKY76. In addition, virus-induced silencing of GmWRKY58 and GmWRKY76 in soybean resulted in stunted plants with reduced leaf expansion and terminated stem growth. These results provide strong evidence for functional divergence among close structural homologs of WRKY proteins from different plant species.

  7. Functional analysis of structurally related soybean GmWRKY58 and GmWRKY76 in plant growth and development

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yan; Chi, Yingjun; Wang, Ze; Zhou, Yuan; Fan, Baofang; Chen, Zhixiang

    2016-01-01

    WRKY transcription factors constitute a large protein superfamily with a predominant role in plant stress responses. In this study we report that two structurally related soybean WRKY proteins, GmWRKY58 and GmWRKY76, play a critical role in plant growth and flowering. GmWRKY58 and GmWRKY76 are both Group III WRKY proteins with a C2HC zinc finger domain and are close homologs of AtWRKY70 and AtWRKY54, two well-characterized Arabidopsis WRKY proteins with an important role in plant responses to biotic and abiotic stresses. GmWRKY58 and GmWRKY76 are both localized to the nucleus, recognize the TTGACC W-box sequence with a high specificity, and function as transcriptional activators in both yeast and plant cells. Expression of GmWRKY58 and GmWRKY76 was detected at low levels in roots, stem, leaves, flowers, and pods. Expression of the two genes in leaves increased substantially during the first 4 weeks after germination but steadily declined thereafter with increased age. To determine their biological functions, transgenic Arabidopsis plants were generated overexpressing GmWRKY58 or GmWRKY76. Unlike AtWRKY70 and AtWRKY54, overexpression of GmWRKY58 or GmWRKY76 had no effect on disease resistance and only small effects on abiotic stress tolerance of the transgenic plants. Significantly, transgenic Arabidopsis plants overexpressing GmWRKY58 or GmWRKY76 flowered substantially earlier than control plants and this early flowering phenotype was associated with increased expression of several flowering-promoting genes, some of which are enriched in W-box sequences in their promoters recognized by GmWRKY58 and GmWRKY76. In addition, virus-induced silencing of GmWRKY58 and GmWRKY76 in soybean resulted in stunted plants with reduced leaf expansion and terminated stem growth. These results provide strong evidence for functional divergence among close structural homologs of WRKY proteins from different plant species. PMID:27335454

  8. Extensive Analysis of GmFTL and GmCOL Expression in Northern Soybean Cultivars in Field Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Jinlong; Lu, Mingyang; Chen, Fulu; Liu, Linpo; Xi, Zhang-Ying; Bachmair, Andreas; Chen, Qingshan; Fu, Yong-Fu

    2015-01-01

    The FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT) gene is a highly conserved florigen gene among flowering plants. Soybean genome encodes six homologs of FT, which display flowering activity in Arabidopsis thaliana. However, their contributions to flowering time in different soybean cultivars, especially in field conditions, are unclear. We employed six soybean cultivars with different maturities to extensively investigate expression patterns of GmFTLs (Glycine max FT-like) and GmCOLs (Glycine max CO-like) in the field conditions. The results show that GmFTL3 is an FT homolog with the highest transcript abundance in soybean, but other GmFTLs may also contribute to flower induction with different extents, because they have more or less similar expression patterns in developmental-, leaf-, and circadian-specific modes. And four GmCOL genes (GmCOL1/2/5/13) may confer to the expression of GmFTL genes. Artificial manipulation of GmFTL expression by transgenic strategy (overexpression and RNAi) results in a distinct change in soybean flowering time, indicating that GmFTLs not only impact on the control of flowering time, but have potential applications in the manipulation of photoperiodic adaptation in soybean. Additionally, transgenic plants show that GmFTLs play a role in formation of the first flowers and in vegetative growth. PMID:26371882

  9. Pivotal Roles of GM-CSF in Autoimmunity and Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Shiomi, Aoi; Usui, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    Granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is a hematopoietic growth factor, which stimulates the proliferation of granulocytes and macrophages from bone marrow precursor cells. In autoimmune and inflammatory diseases, Th17 cells have been considered as strong inducers of tissue inflammation. However, recent evidence indicates that GM-CSF has prominent proinflammatory functions and that this growth factor (not IL-17) is critical for the pathogenicity of CD4+ T cells. Therefore, the mechanism of GM-CSF-producing CD4+ T cell differentiation and the role of GM-CSF in the development of autoimmune and inflammatory diseases are gaining increasing attention. This review summarizes the latest knowledge of GM-CSF and its relationship with autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. The potential therapies targeting GM-CSF as well as their possible side effects have also been addressed in this review. PMID:25838639

  10. Immunoglobulin G heavy chain (Gm) allotypes in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, J P; Goust, J M; Salier, J P; Fudenberg, H H

    1981-01-01

    Serum samples from 70 Caucasian patients with multiple sclerosis were typed for nine Gm markers. Significant association was found with the Gm 1,17;21 phenotype, and the relative risk for individuals with this phenotype was calculated at 3.6. The data indicate that Caucasians positive for Gm 1,17;21 are almost four times more likely to develop multiple sclerosis than those without this phenotype. PMID:6787085

  11. Immunoglobulin G heavy chain (Gm) allotypes in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Pandey, J P; Goust, J M; Salier, J P; Fudenberg, H H

    1981-06-01

    Serum samples from 70 Caucasian patients with multiple sclerosis were typed for nine Gm markers. Significant association was found with the Gm 1,17;21 phenotype, and the relative risk for individuals with this phenotype was calculated at 3.6. The data indicate that Caucasians positive for Gm 1,17;21 are almost four times more likely to develop multiple sclerosis than those without this phenotype. PMID:6787085

  12. Taylor dispersion of colloidal particles in narrow channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sané, Jimaan; Padding, Johan T.; Louis, Ard A.

    2015-09-01

    We use a mesoscopic particle-based simulation technique to study the classic convection-diffusion problem of Taylor dispersion for colloidal discs in confined flow. When the disc diameter becomes non-negligible compared to the diameter of the pipe, there are important corrections to the original Taylor picture. For example, the colloids can flow more rapidly than the underlying fluid, and their Taylor dispersion coefficient is decreased. For narrow pipes, there are also further hydrodynamic wall effects. The long-time tails in the velocity autocorrelation functions are altered by the Poiseuille flow.

  13. Characterization of pathogenic human monoclonal autoantibodies against GM-CSF

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yanni; Thomson, Christy A.; Allan, Lenka L.; Jackson, Linda M.; Olson, Melanie; Hercus, Timothy R.; Nero, Tracy L.; Turner, Amanda; Parker, Michael W.; Lopez, Angel L.; Waddell, Thomas K.; Anderson, Gary P.; Hamilton, John A.; Schrader, John W.

    2013-01-01

    The origin of pathogenic autoantibodies remains unknown. Idiopathic pulmonary alveolar proteinosis is caused by autoantibodies against granulocyte–macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF). We generated 19 monoclonal autoantibodies against GM-CSF from six patients with idiopathic pulmonary alveolar proteinosis. The autoantibodies used multiple V genes, excluding preferred V-gene use as an etiology, and targeted at least four nonoverlapping epitopes on GM-CSF, suggesting that GM-CSF is driving the autoantibodies and not a B-cell epitope on a pathogen cross-reacting with GM-CSF. The number of somatic mutations in the autoantibodies suggests that the memory B cells have been helped by T cells and re-entered germinal centers. All autoantibodies neutralized GM-CSF bioactivity, with general correlations to affinity and off-rate. The binding of certain autoantibodies was changed by point mutations in GM-CSF that reduced binding to the GM-CSF receptor. Those monoclonal autoantibodies that potently neutralize GM-CSF may be useful in treating inflammatory disease, such as rheumatoid arthritis and multiple sclerosis, cancer, and pain. PMID:23620516

  14. Safety risks for animals fed genetic modified (GM) plants.

    PubMed

    Bertoni, G; Marsan, P Ajmone

    2005-08-01

    GM plants are widely grown all over the world, but many constraints still tend to discourage their use in Europe. Potential risks suggested to be associated with the use of GM are unexpected gene effects, allergenic potential, antibiotic resistance, gene flow. GM feed safety is presently evaluated by adopting the concept of GM substantial equivalence, by comparison with non-GM isogenic crops. Comparison is based on a wide spectrum of chemical components and on livestock performance. From the available experimental data, currently utilized GM plants appear safe and show no effects on animals or animal products. Hence, although they potentially exist, safety risks caused by the use of GM plants appear to be so low as be negligible in comparison with their potential benefits, if appropriately designed. GM plants represent a valuable option for future breeding, to increase yield while reducing the use of pesticides, improve plant adaptation to unfavourable environments, and produce better quality crops, also from a nutritional point of view. Nonetheless, GM crops are novel foods and the assessment of their safety using a scientific sound approach seems essential to protect the environment, as well as the health of humans and livestock.

  15. Forecasting the Feasibility of Implementing Isolation Perimeters Between GM and non-GM Maize Fields Under Agricultural Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devos, Yann; Cougnon, Mathias; Thas, Olivier; De Clercq, Eva M.; Cordemans, Karl; Reheul, Dirk

    2008-10-01

    Although spatially isolating genetically modified (GM) maize fields from non-GM maize fields is a robust on-farm strategy to keep the adventitious presence of GM material in the harvests of neighboring non-GM maize fields due to cross-fertilizations below established labeling thresholds (and thus to ensure the spatial co-existence between maize cropping systems), the practical implementation of isolation perimeters attracted little research efforts. In this study, the feasibility of implementing isolation perimeters around GM maize fields is investigated. Using Geographic Information System datasets and Monte Carlo simulations, various scenarios differing in shares and spatial distributions of GM maize were tested for various isolation perimeters in six agricultural areas in Flanders. Factors that affect the feasibility of implementing isolation perimeters are discussed.

  16. GM2 gangliosidosis in British Jacob sheep.

    PubMed

    Wessels, M E; Holmes, J P; Jeffrey, M; Jackson, M; Mackintosh, A; Kolodny, E H; Zeng, B J; Wang, C B; Scholes, S F E

    2014-01-01

    GM2 gangliosidosis (Tay-Sachs disease) was diagnosed in 6- to 8-month-old pedigree Jacob lambs from two unrelated flocks presenting clinically with progressive neurological dysfunction of 10 day's to 8 week's duration. Clinical signs included hindlimb ataxia and weakness, recumbency and proprioceptive defects. Histopathological examination of the nervous system identified extensive neuronal cytoplasmic accumulation of material that stained with periodic acid--Schiff and Luxol fast blue. Electron microscopy identified membranous cytoplasmic bodies within the nervous system. Serum biochemistry detected a marked decrease in hexosaminidase A activity in the one lamb tested, when compared with the concentration in age matched controls and genetic analysis identified a mutation in the sheep hexa allele G444R consistent with Tay-Sachs disease in Jacob sheep in North America. The identification of Tay-Sachs disease in British Jacob sheep supports previous evidence that the mutation in North American Jacob sheep originated from imported UK stock. PMID:24309906

  17. TALE nucleases and next generation GM crops.

    PubMed

    Mahfouz, Magdy M; Li, Lixin

    2011-01-01

    Site-specific and adaptable DNA binding domains are essential modules to develop genome engineering technologies for crop improvement. Transcription activator-like effectors (TALEs) proteins are used to provide a highly specific and adaptable DNA binding modules. TALE chimeric nucleases (TALENs) were used to generate site-specific double strand breaks (DSBs) in vitro and in yeast, Caenorhabditis elegans, mammalian and plant cells. The genomic DSBs can be generated at predefined and user-selected loci and repaired by either the non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) or homology dependent repair (HDR). Thus, TALENs can be used to achieve site-specific gene addition, stacking, deletion or inactivation. TALE-based genome engineering tools should be powerful to develop new agricultural biotechnology approaches for crop improvement. Here, we discuss the recent research and the potential applications of TALENs to accelerate the generation of genomic variants through targeted mutagenesis and to produce a non-transgenic GM crops with the desired phenotype.

  18. The New Taylorism: Hacking at the Philosophy of the University's End

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodman, Robin Truth

    2012-01-01

    This article looks at the critical writings of Mark C. Taylor. It suggests that Mark C. Taylor is rewriting a global imaginary devoid of the kind of citizenship that Henry Giroux claims as the basis for public education. Instead, Taylor wants to see the university take shape as profit-generating. According to Taylor, in lieu of learning to take…

  19. 2. Historic American Buildings Survey Everitt K. Taylor, Photographer September ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Historic American Buildings Survey Everitt K. Taylor, Photographer September 15, 1936 EXTERIOR - EAST ELEVATION FROM OLD PRINT IN POSSESSION OF OWNER - Governor's House, 149 Kearny Avenue, Perth Amboy, Middlesex County, NJ

  20. 1. Historic American Buildings Survey Everitt K. Taylor, Photographer September ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Historic American Buildings Survey Everitt K. Taylor, Photographer September 15, 1936 EXTERIOR - GENERAL VIEW EAST ELEVATION FROM OLD PRINT IN POSSESSION OF OWNER - Governor's House, 149 Kearny Avenue, Perth Amboy, Middlesex County, NJ

  1. ChuckTaylor: Principal Investigator, Game Changing Development Program

    NASA Video Gallery

    Charles (Chuck) Taylor is the Principal Investigator in the Space Technology's Game Changing Development Program for 3 major projects:Solar Electric Propulsion, Ride The Light (RTL), and Space Powe...

  2. Experimental determination of the effective Taylor dispersivity in a fracture

    SciTech Connect

    Gilardi, J.R.

    1984-06-01

    The applicability and accuracy of the approximation for Taylor Dispersion was experimentally determined for the diffusion of a chemical tracer in flow through a fracture. 12 refs., 16 figs., 10 tabs. (ACR)

  3. Taylor impact tests and simulations of plastic bonded explosives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clements, Brad E.; Thompson, Darla; Luscher, D. J.; DeLuca, Racci; Brown, Geoffrey

    2012-03-01

    Taylor impact tests were conducted on plastic bonded explosives PBX 9501 and PBXN-9 for impact velocities between 80 and 214 m/s. High-speed photography was used to image the impact event at a rate of one frame for every 25 μs. For early times, PBXN-9 showed large-deformation mushrooming of the explosive cylinders, followed by fragmentation by an amount proportional to the impact speed, was observed at all velocities. PBX 9501 appeared to be more brittle than PBXN-9, the latter demonstrated a more viscoelastic response. The post-shot fragments were collected and particle size distributions were obtained. The constitutive model ViscoSCRAM was then used to model the Taylor experiments using the finite element code ABAQUS. Prior to the Taylor simulations, ViscoSCRAM was parameterized for the two explosives using uniaxial stress-strain data. Simulating Taylor impact tests validates the model in situations undergoing extreme damage and fragmentation.

  4. McMurdo LTER: streamflow measurements in Taylor Valley

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McKnight, D.; House, H.; Von Guerard, P.

    1994-01-01

    Has established a stream gaging network for the three major lake basins in Taylor Valley. These data are critical for determining nutrient budgets for the lake ecosystems and for understanding physical factors controlling microbial mats in the streams.

  5. 5. Photocopy of painting by Frank H. Taylor showing the ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. Photocopy of painting by Frank H. Taylor showing the south part of the square, looking west. Painting, early 20th century - Washington Square Area Study, Sixth, Seventh, Walnut & Locust Streets, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  6. Rayleigh-Taylor instability simulations with CRASH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, C.-C.; Fryxell, B.; Drake, R. P.

    2012-03-01

    CRASH is a code package developed for the predictive study of radiative shocks. It is based on the BATSRUS MHD code used extensively for space-weather research. We desire to extend the applications of this code to the study of hydrodynamically unstable systems. We report here the results of Rayleigh-Taylor instability (RTI) simulations with CRASH, as a necessary step toward the study of such systems. Our goal, motivated by the previous comparison of simulations and experiment, is to be able to simulate the magnetic RTI with self-generated magnetic fields produced by the Biermann Battery effect. Here we show results for hydrodynamic RTI, comparing the effects of different solvers and numerical parameters. We find that the early-time behavior converges to the analytical result of the linear theory. We observe that the late-time morphology is sensitive to the numerical scheme and limiter beta. At low-resolution limit, the growth of RTI is highly dependent on the setup and resolution, which we attribute to the large numerical viscosity at low resolution.

  7. Rayleigh-Taylor mixing in supernova experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swisher, Nora; Kuranz, Carolyn; Arnett, David; Hurricane, Omar; Remington, Bruce; Robey, Harry; Abarzhi, Snezhana

    2015-11-01

    We report a scrupulous analysis of data in supernova experiments that are conducted at high power laser facilities in order to study core-collapse supernova SN1987A. Parameters of the experimental system are properly scaled to investigate the interaction of a blast-wave with helium-hydrogen interface, and the induced Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) mixing of the denser and lighter fluids with time-dependent acceleration. We analyze all available experimental images of RT flow in supernova experiments, and measure delicate features of the interfacial dynamics. A new scaling is identified for calibration of experimental data to enable their accurate analysis and comparisons. By proper accounting for the imprint of the experimental conditions, the data set size and statistics are substantially increased. New theoretical solutions are identified to describe asymptotic dynamics of RT flow with time-dependent acceleration by applying theoretical analysis. Good qualitative and quantitative agreement is achieved of the experimental data with the theory and simulations. Our study indicates that in supernova experiments, the RT flow is in the mixing regime, the interface amplitude contributes substantially to the characteristic length scale for energy dissipation; the mixing flow may keep order. Support of the National Science Foundation is warmly appreciated.

  8. Janet Taylor Spence (1923-2015).

    PubMed

    Deaux, Kay

    2016-01-01

    The long and remarkable life of Janet Taylor Spence, the sixth woman to serve as president of the American Psychological Association (APA), ended on March 16, 2015, after a short illness. Janet's 1978 book, Masculinity & Femininity, coauthored with Robert Helmreich, was a major contribution to our understanding of the complex relationships between personal attributes, self-esteem, and attitudes toward women, as well their links to both achievement motivation and parental characteristics. Janet's interest in achievement motivation was an extension of her gender work, as she attempted to learn more about the ways in which presumed differences in achievement motivation might be related to the key dimensions of instrumentality and expressiveness. Janet's election to the presidency of the APA was the culmination of a long and broad involvement in the organization. She served on the Board of Directors from 1976 to 1978, and again in 1983 to 1984 during her presidential term. Earlier she served on the Board of Scientific Affairs and edited Contemporary Psychology in the 1970s. Janet was a fellow in four divisions (3, 8, 12, and 35), and in 2004 she received the APA Gold Medal Award for Life Achievement in the Science of Psychology. PMID:26766767

  9. Numerical Simulation of Taylor Cone-Jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toledo, Ronne

    The Taylor cone-jet is a particular type of electrohydrodynamic phenomenon where electrostatic stresses and surface tension effects shape the interface of the jet in a peculiar conical shape. A thin jet is issued from the cone apex that further breaks up into a fine aerosol. Due to its monodispersive properties, this fine aerosol has found a number of applications, ranging from mass spectrometry, colloidal space propulsion, combustion, nano-fabrication, coating/painting, and many others. In this study, a general non-dimensional analysis is performed to derive the governing equations and boundary conditions. In accordance with the observations of Gamero-Castano (2010), noting that droplet electric potential is insensitive to the flow rate conditions, a particular set of characteristic parameters is proposed, based on the terminal jet diameter. In order to solve the non-dimensional set of governing equations and boundary conditions, a numerical method combining the Boundary Element Method and the Finite Volume Method is developed. Results of electric current have shown good agreement with numerical and experimental data available in the literature. The main feature of the algorithm developed is related to the decoupling of the electrostatic from the hydrodynamic problem, allowing us to accurately prescribe the far field electric potential boundary conditions away from the hydrodynamic computational domain used to solve the hydrodynamics of the transition region near the cone apex.

  10. Slavnov-Taylor identities for primordial perturbations

    SciTech Connect

    Berezhiani, Lasha; Khoury, Justin E-mail: jkhoury@sas.upenn.edu

    2014-02-01

    Correlation functions of adiabatic modes in cosmology are constrained by an infinite number of consistency relations, which relate N + 1-point correlation functions with a soft-momentum scalar or tensor mode to a symmetry transformation on N-point correlation functions of hard-momentum modes. They constrain, at each order n, the q{sup n} behavior of the soft limits. In this paper we show that all consistency relations derive from a single, master identity, which follows from the Slavnov-Taylor identity for spatial diffeomorphisms. This master identity is valid at any value of q and therefore goes beyond the soft limit. By differentiating it n times with respect to the soft momentum, we recover the consistency relations at each q order. Our approach underscores the role of spatial diffeomorphism invariance at the root of cosmological consistency relations. It also offers new insights on the necessary conditions for their validity: a physical contribution to the vertex functional must satisfy certain analyticity properties in the soft limit in order for the consistency relations to hold. For standard inflationary models, this is equivalent to requiring that mode functions have constant growing-mode solutions. For more exotic models in which modes do not ''freeze'' in the usual sense, the analyticity requirement offers an unambiguous criterion.

  11. Janet Taylor Spence (1923-2015).

    PubMed

    Deaux, Kay

    2016-01-01

    The long and remarkable life of Janet Taylor Spence, the sixth woman to serve as president of the American Psychological Association (APA), ended on March 16, 2015, after a short illness. Janet's 1978 book, Masculinity & Femininity, coauthored with Robert Helmreich, was a major contribution to our understanding of the complex relationships between personal attributes, self-esteem, and attitudes toward women, as well their links to both achievement motivation and parental characteristics. Janet's interest in achievement motivation was an extension of her gender work, as she attempted to learn more about the ways in which presumed differences in achievement motivation might be related to the key dimensions of instrumentality and expressiveness. Janet's election to the presidency of the APA was the culmination of a long and broad involvement in the organization. She served on the Board of Directors from 1976 to 1978, and again in 1983 to 1984 during her presidential term. Earlier she served on the Board of Scientific Affairs and edited Contemporary Psychology in the 1970s. Janet was a fellow in four divisions (3, 8, 12, and 35), and in 2004 she received the APA Gold Medal Award for Life Achievement in the Science of Psychology.

  12. Observation of the Taylor instability in a dusty plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Pacha, K. A.; Heinrich, J. R.; Kim, S.-H.; Merlino, R. L.

    2012-01-15

    Observations of the Taylor instability in a laboratory dusty plasma are presented. The dust cloud, formed in a dc argon glow-discharge plasma, is stratified into regions of high and low dust densities. The instability was triggered by a spontaneous intrusion of the low density dust fluid into the high density dust fluid at the interface. The instability in the dust fluid was phenomenologically similar to the hydrodynamic Taylor instability that occurs when a light fluid is accelerated into a heavy fluid.

  13. Suppression of Rayleigh Taylor instability in strongly coupled plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Das, Amita; Kaw, Predhiman

    2014-06-15

    The Rayleigh Taylor instability in a strongly coupled plasma medium has been investigated using the equations of generalized hydrodynamics. It is demonstrated that the visco-elasticity of the strongly coupled medium due to strong inter particle correlations leads to a suppression of the Rayleigh Taylor instability unless certain threshold conditions are met. The relevance of these results to experiments on laser compression of matter to high densities including those related to inertial confinement fusion using lasers has also been shown.

  14. Shear-thinning-induced chaos in taylor-couette flow

    PubMed

    Ashrafi; Khayat

    2000-02-01

    The effect of weak shear thinning on the stability of the Taylor-Couette flow is explored for a Carreau-Bird fluid in the narrow-gap limit. The Galerkin projection method is used to derive a low-order dynamical system from the conservation of mass and momentum equations. In comparison with the Newtonian system, the present equations include additional nonlinear coupling in the velocity components through the viscosity. It is found that the critical Taylor number, corresponding to the loss of stability of the base (Couette) flow, becomes lower as the shear-thinning effect increases. That is, shear thinning tends to precipitate the onset of Taylor vortex flow. Similar to Newtonian fluids, there is an exchange of stability between the Couette and Taylor vortex flows, which coincides with the onset of a supercritical bifurcation. However, unlike the Newtonian model, the Taylor vortex cellular structure loses its stability in turn as the Taylor number reaches a critical value. At this point, a Hopf bifurcation emerges, which exists only for shear-thinning fluids. PMID:11046426

  15. Jupiter's great red spot revisited. [validity of Taylor column theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hide, R.

    1972-01-01

    On the original Taylor column theory of Jupiter's Great Red Spot, the fixed latitude of the Spot is taken to imply that the Taylor column in Jupiter's atmosphere is associated with a disturbance such as a topographic feature of the surface Q underlying the atmosphere. The alternative suggestion that the Taylor column is produced by a solid raft floating at depth in the atmosphere is somewhat easier to reconcile with the approximately 10s difference between the respective rotation periods P sub S and P sub R of the Red Spot and of the radio sources, but it does not account so readily for the fixed latitude of the Spot unless it can be shown that the raft is in stable equilibrium under the north-south components of the dynamical forces, including wind effects, acting upon it. A slight wavering of the upper end of the Taylor column relative to the lower end could account at least in part for the most rapid variations in P sub S, but the slow large-amplitude variations in P sub S must reflect changes in the longitudinal motion of either the surface Q or of the raft. By generalizing the Proudman-Taylor theorem to the case of a non-homogeneous fluid it is shown that the Taylor column theory does not imply very special and therefore unlikely horizontal and vertical temperature variations in Jupiter's atmosphere, thus refuting a widely-held belief to the contrary.

  16. The Life and Legacy of G. I. Taylor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batchelor, G. K.

    1996-07-01

    G.I. Taylor, one of the most distinguished physical scientists of this century, used his deep insight and originality to increase our understanding of phenomena such as the turbulent flow of fluids. His interest in the science of fluid flow was not confined to theory; he was one of the early pioneers of aeronautics, and designed a new type of anchor that was inspired by his passion for sailing. Taylor spent most of his working life in the Cavendish Laboratory in Cambridge, where he investigated the mechanics of fluid and solid materials; his discoveries and ideas have had application throughout mechanical, civil, and chemical engineering, meteorology, oceanography and materials science. He was also a noted research leader, and his group in Cambridge became one of the most productive centers for the study of fluid mechanics. How was Taylor able to be innovative in so many different ways? This interesting and unusual biography helps answer that question. Professor Batchelor, himself a student and close collaborator of Taylor, is ideally placed to describe Taylor's life, achievements and background. He does so without introducing any mathematical details, making this book enjoyable reading for a wide range of people--and especially those whose own interests have brought them into contact with the legacy of Taylor.

  17. Integrating insect-resistant GM Crops in pest management systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In 2006, GM cotton and maize with insect resistance were grown on 12.1 and 20.1 million hectares in 9 and 13 countries, respectively. These insect resistant GM crops produce various Cry toxins from Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) and provide highly selective and effective control of lepidopteran and col...

  18. 33 CFR 207.170d - Taylor Creek, navigation lock (S-193) across the entrance to Taylor Creek at Lake Okeechobee...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Taylor Creek, navigation lock (S-193) across the entrance to Taylor Creek at Lake Okeechobee, Okeechobee, Fla.; use, administration..., DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE NAVIGATION REGULATIONS § 207.170d Taylor Creek, navigation...

  19. Metabolomic plasticity in GM and non-GM potato leaves in response to aphid herbivory and virus infection.

    PubMed

    Plischke, Andreas; Choi, Young Hae; Brakefield, Paul M; Klinkhamer, Peter G L; Bruinsma, Maaike

    2012-02-15

    An important aspect of ecological safety of genetically modified (GM) plants is the evaluation of unintended effects on plant-insect interactions. These interactions are to a large extent influenced by the chemical composition of plants. This study uses NMR-based metabolomics to establish a baseline of chemical variation to which differences between a GM potato line and its parent cultivar are compared. The effects of leaf age, virus infection, and aphid herbivory on plant metabolomes were studied. The metabolome of the GM line differed from its parent only in young leaves of noninfected plants. This effect was small when compared to the baseline. Consistently, aphid performance on excised leaves was influenced by leaf age, while no difference in performance was found between GM and non-GM plants. The metabolomic baseline approach is concluded to be a useful tool in ecological safety assessment.

  20. GM foods: is there a way forward?

    PubMed

    Jones, Huw D

    2015-08-01

    There are many quality targets in cereals that could generate step-change improvements in nutritional or food-processing characteristics. For instance, levels of acrylamide, soluble and insoluble fibre, antioxidants, allergens and intolerance factors in food are, to a large extent, determined by the genetics of the raw materials used. However, improvements to these traits pose significant challenges to plant breeders. For some traits, this is because the underlying genetic and biochemical basis of the traits is not fully understood but for others, there is simply a lack of natural genetic variation in commercially useful germplasm. One strategy to overcome the latter hindrance is to use wide crosses with more exotic germplasm; however, this can bring other difficulties such as yield loss and linkage drag of deleterious alleles. As DNA sequencing becomes cheaper and faster, it drives the research fields of reverse genetics and functional genomics which in turn will enable the incorporation of desirable traits into crop varieties via molecular breeding and biotechnology. I will discuss the evolution of these techniques from conventional genetic modification to more recent developments in targeted gene editing and the potential of biotechnology to complement conventional breeding methods. I will also discuss the role of risk assessment and regulation in the commercialisation of GM crops.

  1. GM foods: is there a way forward?

    PubMed

    Jones, Huw D

    2015-08-01

    There are many quality targets in cereals that could generate step-change improvements in nutritional or food-processing characteristics. For instance, levels of acrylamide, soluble and insoluble fibre, antioxidants, allergens and intolerance factors in food are, to a large extent, determined by the genetics of the raw materials used. However, improvements to these traits pose significant challenges to plant breeders. For some traits, this is because the underlying genetic and biochemical basis of the traits is not fully understood but for others, there is simply a lack of natural genetic variation in commercially useful germplasm. One strategy to overcome the latter hindrance is to use wide crosses with more exotic germplasm; however, this can bring other difficulties such as yield loss and linkage drag of deleterious alleles. As DNA sequencing becomes cheaper and faster, it drives the research fields of reverse genetics and functional genomics which in turn will enable the incorporation of desirable traits into crop varieties via molecular breeding and biotechnology. I will discuss the evolution of these techniques from conventional genetic modification to more recent developments in targeted gene editing and the potential of biotechnology to complement conventional breeding methods. I will also discuss the role of risk assessment and regulation in the commercialisation of GM crops. PMID:26186672

  2. Optimization of GM(1,1) power model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Dang; Sun, Yu-ling; Song, Bo

    2013-10-01

    GM (1,1) power model is the expansion of traditional GM (1,1) model and Grey Verhulst model. Compared with the traditional models, GM (1,1) power model has the following advantage: The power exponent in the model which best matches the actual data values can be found by certain technology. So, GM (1,1) power model can reflect nonlinear features of the data, simulate and forecast with high accuracy. It's very important to determine the best power exponent during the modeling process. In this paper, according to the GM(1,1) power model of albino equation is Bernoulli equation, through variable substitution, turning it into the GM(1,1) model of the linear albino equation form, and then through the grey differential equation properly built, established GM(1,1) power model, and parameters with pattern search method solution. Finally, we illustrate the effectiveness of the new methods with the example of simulating and forecasting the promotion rates from senior secondary schools to higher education in China.

  3. Taylor line swimming in microchannels and cubic lattices of obstacles.

    PubMed

    Münch, Jan L; Alizadehrad, Davod; Babu, Sujin B; Stark, Holger

    2016-09-21

    Microorganisms naturally move in microstructured fluids. Using the simulation method of multi-particle collision dynamics, we study in two dimensions an undulatory Taylor line swimming in a microchannel and in a cubic lattice of obstacles, which represent simple forms of a microstructured environment. In the microchannel the Taylor line swims at an acute angle along a channel wall with a clearly enhanced swimming speed due to hydrodynamic interactions with the bounding wall. While in a dilute obstacle lattice swimming speed is also enhanced, a dense obstacle lattice gives rise to geometric swimming. This new type of swimming is characterized by a drastically increased swimming speed. Since the Taylor line has to fit into the free space of the obstacle lattice, the swimming speed is close to the phase velocity of the bending wave traveling along the Taylor line. While adjusting its swimming motion within the lattice, the Taylor line chooses a specific swimming direction, which we classify by a lattice vector. When plotting the swimming velocity versus the magnitude of the lattice vector, all our data collapse on a single master curve. Finally, we also report more complex trajectories within the obstacle lattice. PMID:27510576

  4. Crash simulation of rayleigh-taylor, richtmyer-meshkov, and magnetic rayleigh-taylor instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, Jason Chuan-Chih

    The research discussed in this thesis was motivated by the supernova Rayleigh-Taylor (SNRT) experiments conducted in 2009. Originally designed as laboratory astrophysics experiments relevant to the Rayleigh-Taylor Instability (RTI) at the He-H interface during supernova explosion, these experiments exhibited unusual late-time morphology development, characterized by the lack of mushroom caps and uniform width of the spikes. In response, a "Magnetic Straitjacket" hypothesis was proposed to explain the discrepancy, based on the Biermann Battery mechanism. In order to test this hypothesis, we used the Center for Radiative Shock Hydrodynamics (CRASH) code developed for a sufficiently similar problem and with the necessary capabilities. We validated this alternative usage of the CRASH code with simulations of pure hydrodynamic RTI and Richtmyer-Meshkov Instability (RMI) and identified the suitable combinations of numerical schemes and parameters. For the RTI, we compared the results of simulations to the analytical solution for the early time behavior, examined the late-time morphology, and tested the low-resolution limit for the RTI simulations using CRASH. For the RMI, we modeled Collins and Jacobs' experiment and compared the results of CRASH simulations to the experimental observations as well as to the simulation results of several other code packages. Finally, we modeled the original SNRT experiments with magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) and Biermann battery effect. Unfortunately, the results were inconclusive due to insufficiently resolved simulations, limited by the explicit time integration of the magnetic diffusion. Furthermore, pilot runs with higher resolution indicated that simulations that fully resolve the gradients necessary to calculate the Biermann battery effect may be susceptible to the development of extraneous small-wavelength instabilities. Developments of implicit time integration of the magnetic diffusion and possibly new numerical schemes are

  5. Linear stability of compressible Taylor-Couette flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kao, Kai-Hsiung; Chow, Chuen-Yen

    1992-01-01

    A temporal stability analysis of compressible Taylor-Couette flow is presented. The viscous flow studied in this paper is contained between two concentric cylinders of infinite length, which are rotating with different angular velocities and are kept at different surface temperatures. The effects of differential rotation and temperature difference on the stability of Taylor-Couette flow are contrasted for a range of Mach numbers ranging from incompressible to Mach 3.0. The relative motion of the cylinders dramatically affects the characteristics of the Couette flow at the onset of instability. The flow is stabilized or destabilized depending upon the temperature ratio and speeds of the two cylinders. Independent of Mach number and temperature ratio, increasing Reynolds number generally promotes a destabilizing effect, indicating the inviscid nature of the Taylor-Couette flow.

  6. On Using Taylor's Hypothesis for Three-Dimensional Mixing Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LeBoeuf, Richard L.; Mehta, Rabindra D.

    1995-01-01

    In the present study, errors in using Taylor's hypothesis to transform measurements obtained in a temporal (or phase) frame onto a spatial one were evaluated. For the first time, phase-averaged ('real') spanwise and streamwise vorticity data measured on a three-dimensional grid were compared directly to those obtained using Taylor's hypothesis. The results show that even the qualitative features of the spanwise and streamwise vorticity distributions given by the two techniques can be very different. This is particularly true in the region of the spanwise roller pairing. The phase-averaged spanwise and streamwise peak vorticity levels given by Taylor's hypothesis are typically lower (by up to 40%) compared to the real measurements.

  7. PREFACE: The 15th International Couette-Taylor Worskhop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mutabazi, Innocent; Crumeyrolle, Olivier

    2008-07-01

    The 15th International Couette-Taylor Worskhop (ICTW15) was held in Le Havre, France from 9-12 July 2007. This regular international conference started in 1979 in Leeds, UK when the research interest in simple models of fluid flows was revitalized by systematic investigation of Rayleigh-Bénard convection and the Couette-Taylor flow. These two flow systems are good prototypes for the study of the transition to chaos and turbulence in closed flows. The workshop themes have been expanded from the original Couette-Taylor flow to include other centrifugal instabilities (Dean, Görtler, Taylor-Dean), spherical Couette flows, thermal convection instabilities, MHD, nonlinear dynamics and chaos, transition to turbulence, development of numerical and experimental techniques. The impressive longevity of the ICTW is due to the close interaction and fertile exchanges between international research groups from different disciplines: Physics and Astrophysics, Applied Mathematics, Mechanical Engineering, Chemical Engineering. The present workshop was attended by 100 participants, the program included over 83 contributions with 4 plenary lectures, 68 oral communications and 17 posters. The topics include, besides the classical Couette-Taylor flows, the centrifugal flows with longitudinal vortices, the shear flows, the thermal convection in curved geometries, the spherical Couette-Taylor flow, the geophysical flows, the magneto-hydrodynamic effects including the dynamo effect, the complex flows (viscoelasticity, immiscible fluids, bubbles and migration). Selected papers have been processed through the peer review system and are published in this issue of the Journal of Physics: Conference Series. The Workshop has been sponsored by Le Havre University, the Region Council of Haute-Normandie, Le Havre City Council, CNRS (ST2I, GdR-DYCOEC), and the European Space Agency through GEOFLOW program. The French Ministry of Defense (DGA), the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, the Ministry of

  8. Risk, regulation and biotechnology: the case of GM crops.

    PubMed

    Smyth, Stuart J; Phillips, Peter W B

    2014-07-01

    The global regulation of products of biotechnology is increasingly divided. Regulatory decisions for genetically modified (GM) crops in North America are predictable and efficient, with numerous countries in Latin and South America, Australia and Asia following this lead. While it might have been possible to argue that Europe's regulations were at one time based on real concerns about minimizing risks and ensuring health and safety, it is increasingly apparent that the entire European Union (EU) regulatory system for GM crops and foods is now driven by political agendas. Countries within the EU are at odds with each other as some have commercial production of GM crops, while others refuse to even develop regulations that could provide for the commercial release of GM crops. This divide in regulatory decision-making is affecting international grain trade, creating challenges for feeding an increasing global population. PMID:25437235

  9. Risk, regulation and biotechnology: The case of GM crops

    PubMed Central

    Smyth, Stuart J; Phillips, Peter WB

    2014-01-01

    The global regulation of products of biotechnology is increasingly divided. Regulatory decisions for genetically modified (GM) crops in North America are predictable and efficient, with numerous countries in Latin and South America, Australia and Asia following this lead. While it might have been possible to argue that Europe's regulations were at one time based on real concerns about minimizing risks and ensuring health and safety, it is increasingly apparent that the entire European Union (EU) regulatory system for GM crops and foods is now driven by political agendas. Countries within the EU are at odds with each other as some have commercial production of GM crops, while others refuse to even develop regulations that could provide for the commercial release of GM crops. This divide in regulatory decision-making is affecting international grain trade, creating challenges for feeding an increasing global population. PMID:25437235

  10. Applying a weed risk assessment approach to GM crops.

    PubMed

    Keese, Paul K; Robold, Andrea V; Myers, Ruth C; Weisman, Sarah; Smith, Joe

    2014-12-01

    Current approaches to environmental risk assessment of genetically modified (GM) plants are modelled on chemical risk assessment methods, which have a strong focus on toxicity. There are additional types of harms posed by plants that have been extensively studied by weed scientists and incorporated into weed risk assessment methods. Weed risk assessment uses robust, validated methods that are widely applied to regulatory decision-making about potentially problematic plants. They are designed to encompass a broad variety of plant forms and traits in different environments, and can provide reliable conclusions even with limited data. The knowledge and experience that underpin weed risk assessment can be harnessed for environmental risk assessment of GM plants. A case study illustrates the application of the Australian post-border weed risk assessment approach to a representative GM plant. This approach is a valuable tool to identify potential risks from GM plants.

  11. Ecological Compatibility of GM Crops and Biological Control

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Insect-resistant and herbicide-tolerant genetically modified (GM) crops pervade many modern cropping systems, and present challenges and opportunities for developing biologically-based pest management programs. Interactions between biological control agents (insect predators, parasitoids, and pathog...

  12. What is Local Mode (LM)? Global Mode (GM)? Calibration Mode?

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-12-08

    ... measurement in Global Mode (GM), Local Mode (LM), and Calibration. Global Mode is the normal acquisition with pole to pole coverage ... targets approximately 300 km in length Calibration Implemented bi-monthly Spectralon solar ...

  13. Risk, regulation and biotechnology: the case of GM crops.

    PubMed

    Smyth, Stuart J; Phillips, Peter W B

    2014-07-01

    The global regulation of products of biotechnology is increasingly divided. Regulatory decisions for genetically modified (GM) crops in North America are predictable and efficient, with numerous countries in Latin and South America, Australia and Asia following this lead. While it might have been possible to argue that Europe's regulations were at one time based on real concerns about minimizing risks and ensuring health and safety, it is increasingly apparent that the entire European Union (EU) regulatory system for GM crops and foods is now driven by political agendas. Countries within the EU are at odds with each other as some have commercial production of GM crops, while others refuse to even develop regulations that could provide for the commercial release of GM crops. This divide in regulatory decision-making is affecting international grain trade, creating challenges for feeding an increasing global population.

  14. Exploitation of molecular profiling techniques for GM food safety assessment.

    PubMed

    Kuiper, Harry A; Kok, Esther J; Engel, Karl-Heinz

    2003-04-01

    Several strategies have been developed to identify unintended alterations in the composition of genetically modified (GM) food crops that may occur as a result of the genetic modification process. These include comparative chemical analysis of single compounds in GM food crops and their conventional non-GM counterparts, and profiling methods such as DNA/RNA microarray technologies, proteomics and metabolite profiling. The potential of profiling methods is obvious, but further exploration of specificity, sensitivity and validation is needed. Moreover, the successful application of profiling techniques to the safety evaluation of GM foods will require linked databases to be built that contain information on variations in profiles associated with differences in developmental stages and environmental conditions.

  15. Narrow fingers in the Saffman-Taylor instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Couder, Y.; Gerard, N.; Rabaud, M.

    1986-12-01

    Saffman-Taylor fingers with a relative width much smaller than the classical limit lambda = 0.5 are found when a small isolated bubble is located at their tip. These solutions are members of a family found by Saffman and Taylor (1958) neglecting superficial tension. Recent theories have shown that when capillary forces are taken into account an unphysical cusplike singularity would appear at the tip of all the fingers with lambda less than 0.5. Conversely, here the replacement of the tip by a small bubble makes these solutions possible. At large velocity these fingers show dendritic instability.

  16. G.I. Taylor and the Trinity test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deakin, Michael A. B.

    2011-12-01

    The story is often told of the calculation by G.I. Taylor of the yield of the first ever atomic bomb exploded in New Mexico in 1945. It has indeed become a staple of the classroom whenever dimensional analysis is taught. However, while it is true that Taylor succeeded in calculating this figure at a time when it was still classified, most versions of the story are quite inaccurate historically. The reality is more complex than the usual accounts have it. This article sets out to disentangle fact from fiction.

  17. Rapid Calculation of Spacecraft Trajectories Using Efficient Taylor Series Integration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, James R.; Martini, Michael C.

    2011-01-01

    A variable-order, variable-step Taylor series integration algorithm was implemented in NASA Glenn's SNAP (Spacecraft N-body Analysis Program) code. SNAP is a high-fidelity trajectory propagation program that can propagate the trajectory of a spacecraft about virtually any body in the solar system. The Taylor series algorithm's very high order accuracy and excellent stability properties lead to large reductions in computer time relative to the code's existing 8th order Runge-Kutta scheme. Head-to-head comparison on near-Earth, lunar, Mars, and Europa missions showed that Taylor series integration is 15.8 times faster than Runge- Kutta on average, and is more accurate. These speedups were obtained for calculations involving central body, other body, thrust, and drag forces. Similar speedups have been obtained for calculations that include J2 spherical harmonic for central body gravitation. The algorithm includes a step size selection method that directly calculates the step size and never requires a repeat step. High-order Taylor series integration algorithms have been shown to provide major reductions in computer time over conventional integration methods in numerous scientific applications. The objective here was to directly implement Taylor series integration in an existing trajectory analysis code and demonstrate that large reductions in computer time (order of magnitude) could be achieved while simultaneously maintaining high accuracy. This software greatly accelerates the calculation of spacecraft trajectories. At each time level, the spacecraft position, velocity, and mass are expanded in a high-order Taylor series whose coefficients are obtained through efficient differentiation arithmetic. This makes it possible to take very large time steps at minimal cost, resulting in large savings in computer time. The Taylor series algorithm is implemented primarily through three subroutines: (1) a driver routine that automatically introduces auxiliary variables and

  18. Student understanding of Taylor series expansions in statistical mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Trevor I.; Thompson, John R.; Mountcastle, Donald B.

    2013-12-01

    One goal of physics instruction is to have students learn to make physical meaning of specific mathematical expressions, concepts, and procedures in different physical settings. As part of research investigating student learning in statistical physics, we are developing curriculum materials that guide students through a derivation of the Boltzmann factor using a Taylor series expansion of entropy. Using results from written surveys, classroom observations, and both individual think-aloud and teaching interviews, we present evidence that many students can recognize and interpret series expansions, but they often lack fluency in creating and using a Taylor series appropriately, despite previous exposures in both calculus and physics courses.

  19. Cell kinetics of GM-CFC in the steady state

    SciTech Connect

    Hagan, M.P.; MacVittie, T.J.; Dodgen, D.P.

    1985-07-01

    The kinetics of cell turnover for myeloid/monocyte cells that form colonies in agar (GM-CFC) were measured through the progressive increase in their sensitivity to 313-nm light during a period of cell labeling with BrdCyd. Two components of cell killing with distinctly separate labeling kinetics revealed both the presence of two generations within the GM-CFC compartment and the properties of the kinetics of the precursors of the GM-CFC. These precursors of the GM-CFC were not assayable in a routine GM-CFC assay when pregnant mouse uterus extract and mouse L-cell-conditioned medium were used to stimulate colony formation but were revealed by the labeling kinetics of the assayable GM-CFC. Further, these precursor cells appeared to enter the assayable GM-CFC population from a noncycling state. This was evidenced by the failure of the majority of these cells to incorporate BrdCyd during five days of infusion. The half-time for cell turnover within this precursor compartment was measured to be approximately 5.5 days. Further, these normally noncycling cells proliferated rapidly in response to endotoxin. High-proliferative-potential colony-forming cells (HPP-CFC) were tested as a candidate for this precursor population. The results of the determination of the kinetics for these cells showed that the HPP-CFC exist largely in a Go state, existing at an average rate of once every four days. The slow turnover time for these cells and their response to endotoxin challenge are consistent with a close relationship between the HPP-CFC and the Go pool of cells that is the direct precursor of the GM-CFC.

  20. Differential uPAR recruitment in caveolar-lipid rafts by GM1 and GM3 gangliosides regulates endothelial progenitor cells angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Margheri, Francesca; Papucci, Laura; Schiavone, Nicola; D'Agostino, Riccardo; Trigari, Silvana; Serratì, Simona; Laurenzana, Anna; Biagioni, Alessio; Luciani, Cristina; Chillà, Anastasia; Andreucci, Elena; Del Rosso, Tommaso; Margheri, Giancarlo; Del Rosso, Mario; Fibbi, Gabriella

    2015-01-01

    Gangliosides and the urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) tipically partition in specialized membrane microdomains called lipid-rafts. uPAR becomes functionally important in fostering angiogenesis in endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) upon recruitment in caveolar-lipid rafts. Moreover, cell membrane enrichment with exogenous GM1 ganglioside is pro-angiogenic and opposite to the activity of GM3 ganglioside. On these basis, we first checked the interaction of uPAR with membrane models enriched with GM1 or GM3, relying on the adoption of solid-supported mobile bilayer lipid membranes with raft-like composition formed onto solid hydrophilic surfaces, and evaluated by surface plasmon resonance (SPR) the extent of uPAR recruitment. We estimated the apparent dissociation constants of uPAR-GM1/GM3 complexes. These preliminary observations, indicating that uPAR binds preferentially to GM1-enriched biomimetic membranes, were validated by identifying a pro-angiogenic activity of GM1-enriched EPCs, based on GM1-dependent uPAR recruitment in caveolar rafts. We have observed that addition of GM1 to EPCs culture medium promotes matrigel invasion and capillary morphogenesis, as opposed to the anti-angiogenesis activity of GM3. Moreover, GM1 also stimulates MAPKinases signalling pathways, typically associated with an angiogenesis program. Caveolar-raft isolation and Western blotting of uPAR showed that GM1 promotes caveolar-raft partitioning of uPAR, as opposed to control and GM3-challenged EPCs. By confocal microscopy, we have shown that in EPCs uPAR is present on the surface in at least three compartments, respectively, associated to GM1, GM3 and caveolar rafts. Following GM1 exogenous addition, the GM3 compartment is depleted of uPAR which is recruited within caveolar rafts thereby triggering angiogenesis. PMID:25313007

  1. Differential uPAR recruitment in caveolar-lipid rafts by GM1 and GM3 gangliosides regulates endothelial progenitor cells angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Margheri, Francesca; Papucci, Laura; Schiavone, Nicola; D'Agostino, Riccardo; Trigari, Silvana; Serratì, Simona; Laurenzana, Anna; Biagioni, Alessio; Luciani, Cristina; Chillà, Anastasia; Andreucci, Elena; Del Rosso, Tommaso; Margheri, Giancarlo; Del Rosso, Mario; Fibbi, Gabriella

    2015-01-01

    Gangliosides and the urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) tipically partition in specialized membrane microdomains called lipid-rafts. uPAR becomes functionally important in fostering angiogenesis in endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) upon recruitment in caveolar-lipid rafts. Moreover, cell membrane enrichment with exogenous GM1 ganglioside is pro-angiogenic and opposite to the activity of GM3 ganglioside. On these basis, we first checked the interaction of uPAR with membrane models enriched with GM1 or GM3, relying on the adoption of solid-supported mobile bilayer lipid membranes with raft-like composition formed onto solid hydrophilic surfaces, and evaluated by surface plasmon resonance (SPR) the extent of uPAR recruitment. We estimated the apparent dissociation constants of uPAR-GM1/GM3 complexes. These preliminary observations, indicating that uPAR binds preferentially to GM1-enriched biomimetic membranes, were validated by identifying a pro-angiogenic activity of GM1-enriched EPCs, based on GM1-dependent uPAR recruitment in caveolar rafts. We have observed that addition of GM1 to EPCs culture medium promotes matrigel invasion and capillary morphogenesis, as opposed to the anti-angiogenesis activity of GM3. Moreover, GM1 also stimulates MAPKinases signalling pathways, typically associated with an angiogenesis program. Caveolar-raft isolation and Western blotting of uPAR showed that GM1 promotes caveolar-raft partitioning of uPAR, as opposed to control and GM3-challenged EPCs. By confocal microscopy, we have shown that in EPCs uPAR is present on the surface in at least three compartments, respectively, associated to GM1, GM3 and caveolar rafts. Following GM1 exogenous addition, the GM3 compartment is depleted of uPAR which is recruited within caveolar rafts thereby triggering angiogenesis. PMID:25313007

  2. Differential uPAR recruitment in caveolar-lipid rafts by GM1 and GM3 gangliosides regulates endothelial progenitor cells angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Margheri, Francesca; Papucci, Laura; Schiavone, Nicola; D'Agostino, Riccardo; Trigari, Silvana; Serratì, Simona; Laurenzana, Anna; Biagioni, Alessio; Luciani, Cristina; Chillà, Anastasia; Andreucci, Elena; Del Rosso, Tommaso; Margheri, Giancarlo; Del Rosso, Mario; Fibbi, Gabriella

    2015-01-01

    Gangliosides and the urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) tipically partition in specialized membrane microdomains called lipid-rafts. uPAR becomes functionally important in fostering angiogenesis in endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) upon recruitment in caveolar-lipid rafts. Moreover, cell membrane enrichment with exogenous GM1 ganglioside is pro-angiogenic and opposite to the activity of GM3 ganglioside. On these basis, we first checked the interaction of uPAR with membrane models enriched with GM1 or GM3, relying on the adoption of solid-supported mobile bilayer lipid membranes with raft-like composition formed onto solid hydrophilic surfaces, and evaluated by surface plasmon resonance (SPR) the extent of uPAR recruitment. We estimated the apparent dissociation constants of uPAR-GM1/GM3 complexes. These preliminary observations, indicating that uPAR binds preferentially to GM1-enriched biomimetic membranes, were validated by identifying a pro-angiogenic activity of GM1-enriched EPCs, based on GM1-dependent uPAR recruitment in caveolar rafts. We have observed that addition of GM1 to EPCs culture medium promotes matrigel invasion and capillary morphogenesis, as opposed to the anti-angiogenesis activity of GM3. Moreover, GM1 also stimulates MAPKinases signalling pathways, typically associated with an angiogenesis program. Caveolar-raft isolation and Western blotting of uPAR showed that GM1 promotes caveolar-raft partitioning of uPAR, as opposed to control and GM3-challenged EPCs. By confocal microscopy, we have shown that in EPCs uPAR is present on the surface in at least three compartments, respectively, associated to GM1, GM3 and caveolar rafts. Following GM1 exogenous addition, the GM3 compartment is depleted of uPAR which is recruited within caveolar rafts thereby triggering angiogenesis.

  3. Payload Specialist Taylor Wang performs repairs on Drop Dynamics Module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    Payload Specialist Taylor G. Wang performs a repair task on the Drop Dynamics Module (DDM) in the science module aboard the orbiter Challenger. Fellow crew members Dr. William E. Thornton (facing camera) and Don Lind are at the right of the frame.

  4. Some observations of a sheared Rayleigh-Taylor/Benard instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humphrey, J. A. C.; Marcus, D. L.

    1987-01-01

    An account is provided of preliminary flow visualization observations made in an unstably stratified flow with shear superimposed. The structures observed appear to be the superposition of a Rayleigh-Taylor/Benard instability and a Kelvin-Helmholtz instability. Aside from its intrinsic fundamental value, the study of these structures is of special interest to theoreticians developing nonlinear stability calculation methodologies.

  5. Evaluation of five fracture models in Taylor impact fracture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wei; Xiao, Xin-Ke; Wei, Gang; Guo, Zitao

    2012-03-01

    Taylor impact test presented in a previous study on a commercial high strength and super hard aluminum alloy 7A04-T6 are numerically evaluated using the finite element code ABAQUS/Explicit. In the present study, the influence of fracture criterion in numerical simulations of the deformation and fracture behavior of Taylor rod has been studied. Included in the paper are a modified version of Johnson-Cook, the Cockcroft-Latham(C-L), the constant fracture strain, the maximum shear stress and the maximum principle stress fracture models. Model constants for each criterion are calibrated from material tests. The modified version of Johnson-Cook fracture criterion with the stress triaxiality cut off idea is found to give good prediction of the Taylor impact fracture behavior. However, this study will also show that the C-L fracture criterion where only one simple material test is required for calibration is found to give reasonable predictions. Unfortunately, the other three criteria are not able to repeat the experimentally obtained fracture behavior. The study indicates that the stress triaxiality cut off idea is necessary to predict the Taylor impact fracture.

  6. Evaluation of Five Fracture Models in Taylor Impact Fracture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wei; Xiao, Xinke; Wei, Gang; Guo, Zitao

    2011-06-01

    Taylor impact test presented in a previous study on a commercial high strength and super hard aluminum alloy 7A04-T6 are numerically evaluated using the finite element code ABAQUS/Explicit. In the present study, the influence of fracture criterion in numerical simulations of the deformation and fracture behavior of Taylor rod has been studied. Included in the paper are a modified version of Johnson-Cook, the Cockcroft-Latham(C-L), the constant fracture strain, the maximum shear stress and the maximum principle stress fracture models. Model constants for each criterion are calibrated from material tests. The modified version of Johnson-Cook fracture criterion with the stress triaxiality cut off idea is found to give good prediction of the Taylor impact fracture behavior. However, this study will also show that the C-L fracture criterion where only one simple material test is required for calibration, is found to give reasonable predictions. Unfortunately, the other three criteria are not able to repeat the experimentally obtained fracture behavior. The study indicates that the stress triaxiality cut off idea is necessary to predict the Taylor impact fracture. The National Natural Science Foundation of China (No.: 11072072).

  7. 9. PHOTOCOPY OF DRAWING BY J. E. TAYLOR, SHOWING SOUTH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. PHOTOCOPY OF DRAWING BY J. E. TAYLOR, SHOWING SOUTH FRONT, LEGEND READS: 'BELLE GROVE HOUSE GENERAL SHERIDANS HD QTS AT CEDAR CREEK - GEN'L N. G. WRIGHT IN TEMPORARY COMMAND GORDONS TROOPS SWEEPING THE 19th CORPS BEFORE IT BY THE HOME AT DAWN - DEATH OF CAPT PHIL BIER' - Belle Grove, State Route 727, Middletown, Frederick County, VA

  8. 13. INTERIOR VIEW WITH JOHNNY TAYLOR HAND LEVELING FRESHLY DEPOSITED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. INTERIOR VIEW WITH JOHNNY TAYLOR HAND LEVELING FRESHLY DEPOSITED SAND INTO A FLASK PRIOR TO COMPRESSION BY THE MOLDING MACHINE INSIDE GREY IRON UNIT NO. 1. - Stockham Pipe & Fittings Company, Grey Iron Foundry, 4000 Tenth Avenue North, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  9. Rayleigh-Taylor instability experiments in a cylindrically convergent geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Goodwin, B.; Weir, S.

    1995-08-25

    Due to the sensitivity of Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities to initial conditions and due to the difficulty of forming well controlled cylindrical or spherical fluid interfaces, Rayleigh-Taylor experiments are often performed with simple, planar interfaces. Rayleigh-Taylor instability phenomena of practical interest, however, (e.g., underwater explosions, supernova core collapses, and inertial confinement fusion capsule implosions) are typically associated with cylindrical or spherical interfaces in which convergent flow effects have an important influence on the dynamics of instability growth. Recently, Meshkov et.al. have developed a novel technique for studying Rayleigh-Taylor instability growth in a cylindrically convergent geometry. Their experiments utilized low-strength gelatin rings which are imploded by a detonating gas mixture of oxygen and acetylene. Since the gelatin itself has sufficient strength to resist significant deformation by gravity, no membranes are needed to define the ring shape. This experimental technique is attractive because it offers a high degree of control over the interfacial geometry and over the material`s strength and rigidity, which can be varied by adjusting the gelatin concentration. Finally, since both the gelatin and the explosive product gases are transparent, optical diagnostics can be used.

  10. Frank Bursley Taylor - Forgotten Pioneer of Continental Drift.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Black, George W., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    Frank B. Taylor was an American geologist who specialized in the glacial geology of the Great Lakes. This article discusses his work on the Continental Drift theory, which preceeded the work of Alfred Wegener by a year and a half. (MA)

  11. Positive Health Psychology: An Interview with Shelley Taylor.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rich, Grant Jewell

    2000-01-01

    Presents an interview with Shelley Taylor, a professor of Psychology at the University of California in Los Angles (California). Addresses topics such as how she became interested in psychology, the importance of health psychology in the curriculum, the ideal training for students in health psychology, and her work with "positive illusions." (CMK)

  12. Traveling waves in a magnetized Taylor-Couette flow

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Wei; Ji Hantao; Goodman, Jeremy

    2007-07-15

    We investigate numerically a traveling wave pattern observed in experimental magnetized Taylor-Couette flow at low magnetic Reynolds number. By accurately modeling viscous and magnetic boundaries in all directions, we reproduce the experimentally measured wave patterns and their amplitudes. Contrary to previous claims, the waves are shown to be transiently amplified disturbances launched by viscous boundary layers, rather than globally unstable magnetorotational modes.

  13. The dynamics of a steady Taylor cone electrospray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Martin; Rutgers, Maarten A.

    1998-11-01

    A liquid drop at the tip of a needle will become conical if a high voltage is supplied to the needle. This is known as a Zeleny^1-Taylor^2 cone. Due to the finite conductivity of most liquids, a thin liquid jet will emerge from the cone tip. This jet can be thinner than 1 micrometer and move with speeds in excess of 10 m/s! The jet breaks up due to a Rayleigh instability into a stream of monodisperse droplets. The particles themselves carry charge and can cause the droplet stream to break up into a diverging conical spray. De La Mora^3 has calculated the relation between the liquid and spray cone angles, but less in known about the dynamics with which the droplets move from the initial jet into the final electrospray cone. We have observed electrosprayed droplets in a regime where the Taylor cone oscillates axisymmetrically, leading to an interrupted spray. By periodically driving the volume of the Taylor cone, and illuminating the spray stroboscopically at the same frequency, we can essentially `freeze' the evolution of a packet of droplets in the spray cone. We clearly observe the disintegration of the initial jet of droplets into a growing spherical cloud. The expanding clouds can be inscribed in the cone of an uninterrupted electrospray. ^1J. Zeleny, Phys. Rev. 3:69, (1914), ^2G.I. Taylor, J. Fluid Mech. 2:1, (1965) ^3J.F. De La Mora, J. Fluid Mech. 243:561, (1992)

  14. Rayleigh Taylor instability of viscoelastic drops at high Weber numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joseph, D. D.; Beavers, G. S.; Funada, T.

    2002-02-01

    Movies of the breakup of viscous and viscoelastic drops in the high-speed airstream behind a shock wave in a shock tube have been reported by Joseph, Belanger & Beavers (1999). They performed a Rayleigh Taylor stability analysis for the initial breakup of a drop of Newtonian liquid and found that the most unstable Rayleigh Taylor wave fits nearly perfectly with waves measured on enhanced images of drops from the movies, but the effects of viscosity cannot be neglected. Here we construct a Rayleigh Taylor stability analysis for an Oldroyd-B fluid using measured data for acceleration, density, viscosity and relaxation time [lambda]1. The most unstable wave is a sensitive function of the retardation time [lambda]2 which fits experiments when [lambda]2/[lambda]1 = O(10-3). The growth rates for the most unstable wave are much larger than for the comparable viscous drop, which agrees with the surprising fact that the breakup times for viscoelastic drops are shorter. We construct an approximate analysis of Rayleigh Taylor instability based on viscoelastic potential flow which gives rise to nearly the same dispersion relation as the unapproximated analysis.

  15. 14. INTERIOR VIEW WITH JOHNNY TAYLOR REMOVING A MOLD HALF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. INTERIOR VIEW WITH JOHNNY TAYLOR REMOVING A MOLD HALF FROM THE PATTERN ON THE MOLDING MACHINE, REVEALING THE CAVITY THAT WILL BE FILLED WITH MOLTEN IRON AFTER IT IS ASSEMBLED WITH THE OTHER MOLD HALF INSIDE GREY IRON UNIT NO. 1. - Stockham Pipe & Fittings Company, Grey Iron Foundry, 4000 Tenth Avenue North, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  16. Pentagon After Action Reports: The Jack Taylor Debate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abbott, Stan

    In requesting after action reports--Pentagon-prepared summaries of interviews between reporters and Pentagon officials--investigative reporter Jack Taylor both aroused Pentagon opposition and created a rift between the Pentagon press corps and outside reporters. To investigate whether the full-time Pentagon press corps was reporting as…

  17. Using Taylor Expansions to Prepare Students for Calculus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lutzer, Carl V.

    2011-01-01

    We propose an alternative to the standard introduction to the derivative. Instead of using limits of difference quotients, students develop Taylor expansions of polynomials. This alternative allows students to develop many of the central ideas about the derivative at an intuitive level, using only skills and concepts from precalculus, and…

  18. Constantly evolving safety assessment protocols for GM foods.

    PubMed

    Sesikeran, B; Vasanthi, Siruguri

    2008-01-01

    he introduction of GM foods has led to the evolution of a food safety assessment paradigm that establishes safety of the GM food relative to its conventional counterpart. The GM foods currently approved and marketed in several countries have undergone extensive safety testing under a structured safety assessment framework evolved by international organizations like FAO, WHO, Codex and OECD. The major elements of safety assessment include molecular characterization of inserted genes and stability of the trait, toxicity and allergenicity potential of the expressed substances, compositional analysis, potential for gene transfer to gut microflora and unintentional effects of the genetic modification. As more number and type of food crops are being brought under the genetic modification regime, the adequacy of existing safety assessment protocols for establishing safety of these foods has been questioned. Such crops comprise GM crops with higher agronomic vigour, nutritional or health benefit/ by modification of plant metabolic pathways and those expressing bioactive substances and pharmaceuticals. The safety assessment challenges of these foods are the potential of the methods to detect unintentional effects with higher sensitivity and rigor. Development of databases on food compositions, toxicants and allergens is currently seen as an important aid to development of safety protocols. With the changing global trends in genetic modification technology future challenge would be to develop GM crops with minimum amount of inserted foreign DNA so as to reduce the burden of complex safety assessments while ensuring safety and utility of the technology.

  19. Regulatory control of genetically modified (GM) foods: likely developments.

    PubMed

    Schilter, Benoît; Constable, Anne

    2002-02-28

    The placing of genetically modified (GM) crops on the European market requires a regulatory approval supported by a thorough safety evaluation. This approach has been applied to all GM crops presently on the market. Despite this stringent process there has been an increasing public concern about the impact of GM foods on human health and the environment. In this context, regulatory control may develop in several directions. One response to the public concern is to strengthen the data requirements for the risk assessment process. Several avenues have been proposed. They include the application of technologies such as proteomics and metabolomics to assess unintended changes, and the development of predictive methods to evaluate allergenicity. Obligations for post-launch surveillance have appeared in regulations. Criteria are required to define when and why such approaches are necessary. Significant challenges including feasibility and validation of the methods, and safety relevance of the data generated will have to be addressed before any general application of these new approaches. Effective monitoring requires the ability to identify the presence of GM products and trace their origin. Traceability and labeling are therefore important developments in the GM food regulatory arena. Both require the development of reliable analytical detection tools.

  20. [Molecular pathogenesis and therapeutic approach of GM2 gangliosidosis].

    PubMed

    Tsuji, Daisuke

    2013-01-01

    Tay-Sachs and Sandhoff diseases (GM2 gangliosidoses) are autosomal recessive lysosomal storage diseases caused by gene mutations in HEXA and HEXB, each encoding human lysosomal β-hexosaminidase α-subunits and β-subunits, respectively. In Tay-Sachs disease, excessive accumulation of GM2 ganglioside (GM2), mainly in the central nervous system, is caused by a deficiency of the HexA isozyme (αβ heterodimer), resulting in progressive neurologic disorders. In Sandhoff disease, combined deficiencies of HexA and HexB (ββ homodimer) cause not only the accumulation of GM2 but also of oligosaccharides carrying terminal N-acetylhexosamine residues (GlcNAc-oligosaccharides), resulting in systemic manifestations including hepatosplenomegaly as well as neurologic symptoms. Hence there is little clinically effective treatment for these GM2 gangliosidoses. Recent studies on the molecular pathogenesis in Sandhoff disease patients and disease model mice have shown the involvement of microglial activation and chemokine induction in neuroinflammation and neurodegeneration in this disease. Experimental and therapeutic approaches, including recombinant enzyme replacement, have been performed using Sandhoff disease model mice, suggesting the future application of novel techniques to treat GM2 gangliosidoses (Hex deficiencies), including Sandhoff disease as well as Tay-Sachs disease. In this study, we isolated astrocytes and microglia from the neonatal brain of Sandhoff disease model mice and demonstrated abnormalities of glial cells. Moreover, we demonstrated the therapeutic effect of an intracerebroventricular administration of novel recombinant human HexA carrying a high content of M6P residue in Sandhoff disease model mice.

  1. [Molecular pathogenesis and therapeutic approach of GM2 gangliosidosis].

    PubMed

    Tsuji, Daisuke

    2013-01-01

    Tay-Sachs and Sandhoff diseases (GM2 gangliosidoses) are autosomal recessive lysosomal storage diseases caused by gene mutations in HEXA and HEXB, each encoding human lysosomal β-hexosaminidase α-subunits and β-subunits, respectively. In Tay-Sachs disease, excessive accumulation of GM2 ganglioside (GM2), mainly in the central nervous system, is caused by a deficiency of the HexA isozyme (αβ heterodimer), resulting in progressive neurologic disorders. In Sandhoff disease, combined deficiencies of HexA and HexB (ββ homodimer) cause not only the accumulation of GM2 but also of oligosaccharides carrying terminal N-acetylhexosamine residues (GlcNAc-oligosaccharides), resulting in systemic manifestations including hepatosplenomegaly as well as neurologic symptoms. Hence there is little clinically effective treatment for these GM2 gangliosidoses. Recent studies on the molecular pathogenesis in Sandhoff disease patients and disease model mice have shown the involvement of microglial activation and chemokine induction in neuroinflammation and neurodegeneration in this disease. Experimental and therapeutic approaches, including recombinant enzyme replacement, have been performed using Sandhoff disease model mice, suggesting the future application of novel techniques to treat GM2 gangliosidoses (Hex deficiencies), including Sandhoff disease as well as Tay-Sachs disease. In this study, we isolated astrocytes and microglia from the neonatal brain of Sandhoff disease model mice and demonstrated abnormalities of glial cells. Moreover, we demonstrated the therapeutic effect of an intracerebroventricular administration of novel recombinant human HexA carrying a high content of M6P residue in Sandhoff disease model mice. PMID:23370522

  2. GM crops and the rat digestive tract: a critical review.

    PubMed

    Zdziarski, I M; Edwards, J W; Carman, J A; Haynes, J I

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this review is to examine the relationship between genetically modified (GM) crops and health, based on histopathological investigations of the digestive tract in rats. We reviewed published long-term feeding studies of crops containing one or more of three specific traits: herbicide tolerance via the EPSPS gene and insect resistance via cry1Ab or cry3Bb1 genes. These genes are commonly found in commercialised GM crops. Our search found 21 studies for nine (19%) out of the 47 crops approved for human and/or animal consumption. We could find no studies on the other 38 (81%) approved crops. Fourteen out of the 21 studies (67%) were general health assessments of the GM crop on rat health. Most of these studies (76%) were performed after the crop had been approved for human and/or animal consumption, with half of these being published at least nine years after approval. Our review also discovered an inconsistency in methodology and a lack of defined criteria for outcomes that would be considered toxicologically or pathologically significant. In addition, there was a lack of transparency in the methods and results, which made comparisons between the studies difficult. The evidence reviewed here demonstrates an incomplete picture regarding the toxicity (and safety) of GM products consumed by humans and animals. Therefore, each GM product should be assessed on merit, with appropriate studies performed to indicate the level of safety associated with them. Detailed guidelines should be developed which will allow for the generation of comparable and reproducible studies. This will establish a foundation for evidence-based guidelines, to better determine if GM food is safe for human and animal consumption.

  3. Psychoanalysis, creativity, and hope: forward edge strivings in the life and work of choreographer Paul Taylor.

    PubMed

    Press, Carol M

    2005-01-01

    Psychoanalysis and creativity are not interchangeable enterprises; however, both creativity and psychoanalysis promise the hope of transformation. But hope may be fragile. Healthy aspects of self may hide and diminish hope to protect it against invasion from toxic pathological patterns. Hope may be rekindled by an empathically responsive environment and the reengagement of healthy forward edge strivings. Psychoanalysis illustrates creativity as a conduit for hope. Modern dance choreographer Paul Taylor's 1988 autobiography, Private Domain, describes Taylor's hope and strivings through creative engagement. Unfortunately, when Taylor's body inevitably falters after years of performing, he is unprepared psychologically to cope successfully. Taylor's sense of self begins to fragment and his forward edge strivings to decay. Eventually, Taylor collapses on stage from drug addiction and illness; his performing career crashes to an end. Taylor must search for his forward edge strivings with hope. Psychoanalysis illuminates Taylor's journey to find hope, motivation, meaningful intention, and transformation through creativity and dance-making. PMID:15953780

  4. Recent development status of compact 2 K GM cryocoolers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Q.; Xu, M. Y.; Tsuchiya, A.; Li, R.

    2015-12-01

    To meet the growing demand for a compact cooling solution for superconducting electronic devices, we developed a two-stage 2 K GM cryocooler and a cryostat system, which can reach 46.3 K / 2.2 K on the first and second stages under no-load conditions. Nevertheless, with several innovative technologies applied, the total length of the expander cylinder is reduced to under 70% of the smallest conventional 4 K GM cryocooler. In this paper we will present the design method, including material selection and structure design with detailed explanation, which has been confirmed by both simulation and experiment.

  5. Generalized shrunken type-GM estimator and its application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, C. Z.; Du, Y. L.

    2014-03-01

    The parameter estimation problem in linear model is considered when multicollinearity and outliers exist simultaneously. A class of new robust biased estimator, Generalized Shrunken Type-GM Estimation, with their calculated methods are established by combination of GM estimator and biased estimator include Ridge estimate, Principal components estimate and Liu estimate and so on. A numerical example shows that the most attractive advantage of these new estimators is that they can not only overcome the multicollinearity of coefficient matrix and outliers but also have the ability to control the influence of leverage points.

  6. Measurements of small radius ratio turbulent Taylor-Couette flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Veen, Roeland; Huisman, Sander; Merbold, Sebastian; Sun, Chao; Harlander, Uwe; Egbers, Christoph; Lohse, Detlef

    2014-11-01

    In Taylor-Couette flows, the radius ratio (η =ri /ro) is one of the key parameters of the system. For small η, the asymmetry of the inner and outer boundary layer becomes more important, affecting the general flow structure and boundary layer characteristics. Using high-resolution particle image velocimetry we measure flow profiles, local transport, and statistical properties of the flow for a radius ratio of 0.5 and a Reynolds number of up to 4 .104 . By measuring flow profiles at varying heights, roll structures are characterized for two different rotation ratios of the inner and outer cylinder. In addition, we systematically vary the rotation ratio and the Reynolds number. These results exemplify how curvature affects flow in strongly turbulent Taylor-Couette Flow.

  7. Multiple states in highly turbulent Taylor-Couette flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huisman, Sander G.; van der Veen, Roeland C. A.; Sun, Chao; Lohse, Detlef

    2014-05-01

    The ubiquity of turbulent flows in nature and technology makes it of utmost importance to fundamentally understand turbulence. Kolmogorov’s 1941 paradigm suggests that for strongly turbulent flows with many degrees of freedom and large fluctuations, there would only be one turbulent state as the large fluctuations would explore the entire higher dimensional phase space. Here we report the first conclusive evidence of multiple turbulent states for large Reynolds number, Re(106) (Taylor number Ta(1012)) Taylor-Couette flow in the regime of ultimate turbulence, by probing the phase space spanned by the rotation rates of the inner and outer cylinder. The manifestation of multiple turbulent states is exemplified by providing combined global torque- and local-velocity measurements. This result verifies the notion that bifurcations can occur in high-dimensional flows (that is, very large Re) and questions Kolmogorov’s paradigm.

  8. Multiple states in highly turbulent Taylor-Couette flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huisman, Sander; van der Veen, Roeland; Sun, Chao; Lohse, Detlef

    2014-11-01

    The ubiquity of turbulent flows in nature and technology makes it of utmost importance to fundamentally understand turbulence. Kolmogorov's 1941 paradigm suggests that for strongly turbulent flows with many degrees of freedom and its large fluctuations, there would only be one turbulent state as the large fluctuations would explore the entire higher-dimensional phase space. Here we report the first conclusive evidence of multiple turbulent states for large Reynolds number Re = O (106) (Taylor number Ta = O (1012) Taylor-Couette flow in the regime of ultimate turbulence, by probing the phase space spanned by the rotation rates of the inner and outer cylinder. The manifestation of multiple turbulent states is exemplified by providing combined global torque and local velocity measurements. This result verifies the notion that bifurcations can occur in high-dimensional flows (i.e. very large Re) and questions Kolmogorov's paradigm.

  9. A Taylor weak-statement algorithm for hyperbolic conservation laws

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, A. J.; Kim, J. W.

    1987-01-01

    Finite element analysis, applied to computational fluid dynamics (CFD) problem classes, presents a formal procedure for establishing the ingredients of a discrete approximation numerical solution algorithm. A classical Galerkin weak-statement formulation, formed on a Taylor series extension of the conservation law system, is developed herein that embeds a set of parameters eligible for constraint according to specification of suitable norms. The derived family of Taylor weak statements is shown to contain, as special cases, over one dozen independently derived CFD algorithms published over the past several decades for the high speed flow problem class. A theoretical analysis is completed that facilitates direct qualitative comparisons. Numerical results for definitive linear and nonlinear test problems permit direct quantitative performance comparisons.

  10. Singularities in water waves and Rayleigh-Taylor instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tanveer, S.

    1991-01-01

    Singularities in inviscid two-dimensional finite-amplitude water waves and inviscid Rayleigh-Taylor instability are discussed. For the deep water gravity waves of permanent form, through a combination of analytical and numerical methods, results describing the precise form, number, and location of singularities in the unphysical domain as the wave height is increased are presented. It is shown how the information on the singularity in the unphysical region has the same form as for deep water waves. However, associated with such a singularity is a series of image singularities at increasing distances from the physical plane with possibly different behavior. Furthermore, for the Rayleigh-Taylor problem of motion of fluid over a vacuum and for the unsteady water wave problem, integro-differential equations valid in the unphysical region are derived, and how these equations can give information on the nature of singularities for arbitrary initial conditions is shown.

  11. Stability of the Taylor--Culick receding rim: surprising observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lhuissier, Henri; Villermaux, Emmanuel

    2008-11-01

    When punctured, a uniform liquid sheet is known, since Taylor and Culick, to recess at a constant speed balancing surface tension and inertia. For planar soap films, this steady solution holds until the initially smooth receding rim is violently destabilized, exhibiting deep indentations from which droplets are ejected. A surprising new three dimensional mechanism explaining this destabilization and resulting wavelength has been evidenced : because of the shear between the still outer medium and the receding liquid, the film flaps through a Kelvin--Helmholtz instability, itself inducing an acceleration perpendicular to the film, which intensifies with the flapping amplitude. To this acceleration is associated a classical Rayleigh--Taylor mechanism, promoting the rim indentations. The same mechanism holds for a punctured round bubble, for which the relevant acceleration is the Culick velocity squared divided by the bubble radius. The bearing of this phenomenon on aerosols formation in Nature will be underlined.

  12. Taylor vortices in annular spherical flow at large aspect ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loukopoulos, Vassilios C.; Karahalios, George T.

    2004-07-01

    Motivated by recent theoretical and experimental work, we numerically investigate spherical Couette flow with a view to obtaining for the first time Taylor vortices at large aspect ratios σ such as 0.38, 0.42, and 0.48. It is found that Taylor vortices can exist, stable or time-dependent, in a range of Reynolds numbers [Re1, Re2] and their formation depends on the aspect ratio, on the imposition of various rotationary conditions on the boundaries, on the history of the flow and on the rate at which energy is transferred into the fluid to its final value. With increasing σ the range [Re1, Re2] manifests a clear tendency to shorten.

  13. General theory of Taylor dispersion phenomena. Part 3. Surface transport

    SciTech Connect

    Dill, L.H.; Brenner, H.

    1982-01-01

    An asymptotic theory of Brownian tracer particle transport phenomena within a bulk fluid, as augmented by surface transport, is presented in the context of generalized Taylor dispersion theory. The analysis expands upon prior work, which was limited to transport wholly within a continuous phase, so as to now include surface adsorption, diffusion, and convection of the tracer along a continuous surface bounding the continuous fluid phase.

  14. Large growth Rayleigh-Taylor experiments on Nova

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remington, B. A.; Haan, S. W.; Glendinning, S. G.; Kilkenny, J. D.; Munro, D. H.; Wallace, R. J.

    1991-01-01

    Large growth Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) experiments have been conducted by pulse-shaped radiative acceleration of fluorosilicone foils with 50 micron wavelength initial surface perturbations. Foils with very small amplitude initial perturbations grow exponentially for much longer, and show growth factors of up to 60. From comparisons with 2-dimensional computer simulations, we estimate that the growth rate is approximately 60 percent of classical, the reduction attributed to ablative and gradient scale length stabilization.

  15. Large growth Rayleigh-Taylor experiments on Nova

    SciTech Connect

    Remington, B.A.; Haan, S.W.; Glendinning, S.G.; Kilkenny, J.D.; Munro, D.H.; Wallace, R.J.

    1991-01-22

    Large growth Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) experiments have been conducted by pulse-shaped radiative acceleration of fluorosilicone foils with 50 {mu}m wavelength initial surface perturbations. Foils with very small amplitude initial perturbations grow exponentially for much longer, and show growth factors of up to 60. From comparisons with 2-dimensional computer simulations, we estimate that the growth rate is approximately 60% of classical, the reduction attributed to ablative and gradient scale length stabilization.

  16. Nonlinear diffusion model for Rayleigh-Taylor mixing.

    PubMed

    Boffetta, G; De Lillo, F; Musacchio, S

    2010-01-22

    The complex evolution of turbulent mixing in Rayleigh-Taylor convection is studied in terms of eddy diffusivity models for the mean temperature profile. It is found that a nonlinear model, derived within the general framework of Prandtl mixing theory, reproduces accurately the evolution of turbulent profiles obtained from numerical simulations. Our model allows us to give very precise predictions for the turbulent heat flux and for the Nusselt number in the ultimate state regime of thermal convection.

  17. Rayleigh-Taylor instability in an equal mass plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Adak, Ashish; Ghosh, Samiran; Chakrabarti, Nikhil

    2014-09-15

    The Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability in an inhomogeneous pair-ion plasma has been analyzed. Considering two fluid model for two species of ions (positive and negative), we obtain the possibility of the existence of RT instability. The growth rate of the RT instability as usual depends on gravity and density gradient scale length. The results are discussed in context of pair-ion plasma experiments.

  18. Numerical study of a Taylor bubble rising in stagnant liquids.

    PubMed

    Kang, Chang-Wei; Quan, Shaoping; Lou, Jing

    2010-06-01

    The dynamics of a Taylor bubble rising in stagnant liquids is numerically investigated using a front tracking coupled with finite difference method. Parametric studies on the dynamics of the rising Taylor bubble including the final shape, the Reynolds number (Re(T)), the Weber number (We(T)), the Froude number (Fr), the thin liquid film thickness (w/D), and the wake length (l(w)/D) are carried out. The effects of density ratio (η), viscosity ratio (λ), Eötvös number (Eo), and Archimedes number (Ar) are examined. The simulations demonstrate that the density ratio and the viscosity ratio under consideration have minimal effect on the dynamics of the Taylor bubble. Eötvös number and Archimedes number influence the elongation of the tail and the wake structures, where higher Eo and Ar result in longer wake. To explain the sudden extension of the tail, a Weber number (We(l)) based on local curvature and velocity is evaluated and a critical We(l) is detected around unity. The onset of flow separation at the wake occurs in between Ar=2×10(3) and Ar=1×10(4), which corresponds to Re(T) between 13.39 and 32.55. Archimedes number also drastically affects the final shape of Taylor bubble, the terminal velocity, the thickness of thin liquid film, as well as the wall shear stress. It is found that w/D=0.32 Ar(-0.1).

  19. Viscous Rayleigh-Taylor instability in spherical geometry

    DOE PAGES

    Mikaelian, Karnig O.

    2016-02-08

    We consider viscous fluids in spherical geometry, a lighter fluid supporting a heavier one. Chandrasekhar [Q. J. Mech. Appl. Math. 8, 1 (1955)] analyzed this unstable configuration providing the equations needed to find, numerically, the exact growth rates for the ensuing Rayleigh-Taylor instability. He also derived an analytic but approximate solution. We point out a weakness in his approximate dispersion relation (DR) and offer one that is to some extent improved.

  20. Rayleigh-Taylor vortices in a pair-ion plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Adak, Ashish Khan, Manoranjan

    2015-04-15

    The Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) vortices and the analytical solution of three-mode coupling in pair-ion plasmas are investigated. It is shown that the E×B convection of polarization drift is responsible for the saturation of growing RT instability and as a result the localized dipole vortex structures are formed. The shear flow generation due to the destruction of vortex structures is discussed by the Fourier mode analysis.

  1. Taylor's Theorem: The Elusive "c" Is Not So Elusive

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kreminski, Richard

    2010-01-01

    For a suitably nice, real-valued function "f" defined on an open interval containing [a,b], f(b) can be expressed as p[subscript n](b) (the nth Taylor polynomial of f centered at a) plus an error term of the (Lagrange) form f[superscript (n+1)](c)(b-a)[superscript (n+1)]/(n+1)! for some c in (a,b). This article is for those who think that not…

  2. Rayleigh-Taylor instability in dusty plasma experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Avinash, K.; Sen, A.

    2015-08-15

    The stability of a stratified dust cloud levitated in an anodic plasma is studied in the weakly and strongly coupled dust regimes. It is shown that the cloud is predominantly unstable to a Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability driven by a component of the ambient gravity in a direction opposite to the direction of dust density stratification in the cloud. The elasticity of the strongly coupled dust is shown to set a threshold for the RT instability, which is consistent with experimental observations.

  3. Rayleigh-Taylor instability in dusty plasma experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avinash, K.; Sen, A.

    2015-08-01

    The stability of a stratified dust cloud levitated in an anodic plasma is studied in the weakly and strongly coupled dust regimes. It is shown that the cloud is predominantly unstable to a Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability driven by a component of the ambient gravity in a direction opposite to the direction of dust density stratification in the cloud. The elasticity of the strongly coupled dust is shown to set a threshold for the RT instability, which is consistent with experimental observations.

  4. Discrete families of Saffman-Taylor fingers with exotic shapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardiner, Bennett P. J.; McCue, Scott W.; Moroney, Timothy J.

    The mathematical problem of determining the shape of a steadily propagating Saffman-Taylor finger in a rectangular Hele-Shaw cell is known to have a countably infinite number of solutions for each fixed surface tension value. For sufficiently large surface tension values, we find that fingers on higher solution branches are non-convex. The tips of the fingers have increasingly exotic shapes as the branch number increases.

  5. Effect of a chimeric anti-ganglioside GM2 antibody on ganglioside GM2-expressing human solid tumors in vivo.

    PubMed

    Fukumoto, H; Nishio, K; Ohta, S; Hanai, N; Fukuoka, K; Ohe, Y; Sugihara, K; Kodama, T; Saijo, N

    1999-08-27

    Ganglioside GM2 is expressed on the surface of neuroblastoma and glioblastoma cells, and may also be detected on lung cancer cells. We reported previously that anti-ganglioside GM2 antibody exhibited strong in vitro anti-tumor activity against adriamycin-resistant cancer cells, which overexpressed ganglioside GM2. In the present study, we examined the in vivo anti-tumor effect of the chimeric anti-ganglioside GM2 antibody, KM966, against human lung and breast carcinoma cells, SBC-3 and MCF-7, and respective adriamycin-resistant clones, SBC-3/ADM and AdrR MCF-7 in BALB/c nu/nu mice. Ratios of tumor volume (T/C) between KM966-treated group and control group were 0.01 for SBC-3, 0.00 for SBC-3/ADM, 0.85 for MCF-7 and 0.34 for AdrR MCF-7 cells, respectively. Nude mice, which were pretreated with anti-asialo GM1 antibody to remove natural killer cells, were transplanted with 4 x 10(7) of SBC-3 and SBC-3/ADM subcutaneously. Seven days later, when tumors had grown to a diameter of over 8 mm, mice began to receive intravenous treatment of 120 microgram/mouse KM966 daily. Fourteen daily treatments induced regression to less than 4-mm diameter in 4/5 SBC-3 tumors and 5/5 of SBC-3/ADM tumors. All SBC-3/ADM tumors disappeared completely, suggesting that KM966 exerts a strong in vivo anti-tumor effect on ganglioside GM2-expressing cancer cells. In KM966-treated mice, the surface of the tumor cells stained positive with anti-human IgG. In addition, numerous leukocytes had infiltrated into the tumor mass. Antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) of KM966 against tumor cells was examined in vitro by (51)Cr-release assay and revealed that KM966 induces ADCC activity against ganglioside GM2-expressing tumors. Our results suggest that immunotherapy using KM966 may be useful for the treatment of ganglioside GM2-expressing solid tumors.

  6. Dynamic response of reverse Taylor impact based on DIC technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jiancheng; Pi, Aiguo; Wu, Haijun; Huang, Fenglei

    2015-09-01

    Reverse ballistic impact test, which can obtain the response data of rod/projectile more comprehensive and quantitative than forward impact test, was widely used for the measurement of material dynamic and structure response. Based on the DIC technology and traditional optical measurement (high-speed camera measurement), the Taylor experiment of reverse ballistic with different length-diameter ratio and different impact velocities were carried out by 57 mm compression-shear type light-gas gun, which provides the instantaneous response data of the Taylor rod in microsecond level. Then, the transient structural deformation of the specimen and the characteristics of plastic wave propagation were analysed by DIC technology and compared with traditional optical measurement. Applying the theory of reverse Taylor impact deformation and combining with the simulation results by LS-DYNA, the rules of structure deformation and plastic wave propagation were obtained. The method above can be applied for the structure response of penetrator under the condition of reverse ballistic penetration.

  7. The effect of crossflow on Taylor vortices: A model problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Otto, S. R.; Bassom, Andrew P.

    1993-01-01

    A number of practically relevant problems involving the impulsive motion or the rapid rotation of bodies immersed in fluid are susceptible to vortex-like instability modes. Depending upon the configuration of any particular problem the stability properties of any high-wavenumber vortices can take on one of two distinct forms. One of these is akin to the structure of Gortler vortices in boundary layer flows while the other is similar to the situation for classical Taylor vortices. Both the Gortler and Taylor problems have been extensively studied when crossflow effects are excluded from the underlying base flows. Recently, studies were made concerning the influence of crossflow on Gortler modes and a linearized stability analysis is used to examine crossflow properties for the Taylor mode. This work allows us to identify the most unstable vortex as the crossflow component increases and it is shown how, like the Gortler case, only a very small crossflow component is required in order to completely stabilize the flow. Our investigation forms the basis for an extension to the nonlinear problem and is of potential applicability to a range of pertinent flows.

  8. Taylor bubbles at high viscosity ratios: experiments and numerical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hewakandamby, Buddhika; Hasan, Abbas; Azzopardi, Barry; Xie, Zhihua; Pain, Chris; Matar, Omar

    2015-11-01

    The Taylor bubble is a single long bubble which nearly fills the entire cross section of a liquid-filled circular tube, often occurring in gas-liquid slug flows in many industrial applications, particularly oil and gas production. The objective of this study is to investigate the fluid dynamics of three-dimensional Taylor bubble rising in highly viscous silicone oil in a vertical pipe. An adaptive unstructured mesh modelling framework is adopted here which can modify and adapt anisotropic unstructured meshes to better represent the underlying physics of bubble rising and reduce computational effort without sacrificing accuracy. The numerical framework consists of a mixed control volume and finite element formulation, a `volume of fluid'-type method for the interface-capturing based on a compressive control volume advection method, and a force-balanced algorithm for the surface tension implementation. Experimental results for the Taylor bubble shape and rise velocity are presented, together with numerical results for the dynamics of the bubbles. A comparison of the simulation predictions with experimental data available in the literature is also presented to demonstrate the capabilities of our numerical method. EPSRC Programme Grant, MEMPHIS, EP/K0039761/1.

  9. Numerical study of Taylor bubbles with adaptive unstructured meshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Zhihua; Pavlidis, Dimitrios; Percival, James; Pain, Chris; Matar, Omar; Hasan, Abbas; Azzopardi, Barry

    2014-11-01

    The Taylor bubble is a single long bubble which nearly fills the entire cross section of a liquid-filled circular tube. This type of bubble flow regime often occurs in gas-liquid slug flows in many industrial applications, including oil-and-gas production, chemical and nuclear reactors, and heat exchangers. The objective of this study is to investigate the fluid dynamics of Taylor bubbles rising in a vertical pipe filled with oils of extremely high viscosity (mimicking the ``heavy oils'' found in the oil-and-gas industry). A modelling and simulation framework is presented here which can modify and adapt anisotropic unstructured meshes to better represent the underlying physics of bubble rise and reduce the computational effort without sacrificing accuracy. The numerical framework consists of a mixed control-volume and finite-element formulation, a ``volume of fluid''-type method for the interface capturing based on a compressive control volume advection method, and a force-balanced algorithm for the surface tension implementation. Numerical examples of some benchmark tests and the dynamics of Taylor bubbles are presented to show the capability of this method. EPSRC Programme Grant, MEMPHIS, EP/K0039761/1.

  10. Dynamical study of the three dimensional Saffman-Taylor problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicoli, Matteo; Henry, Hervé.; Plapp, Mathis

    2011-11-01

    The mathematical generalization of the Saffman-Taylor problem to three spatial dimensions is straightforward but, nevertheless, it has not been widely studied. Recently, Levine and Tu [Phys. Rev. A 45, 1044 (1992)] solved numerically the problem in the axisymmetric tube geometry finding several solution branches which merge for positive values of the rescaled surface tension parameter γ (of the order of 10-3). Unlike the two dimensional case, it seems that for this geometry does not exists any axisymmetric solution below this threshold. We have developed a phase-field model of two viscous flows to investigate the dynamics of the 3D Saffman-Taylor problem in the regime of small γ . Full three dimensional simulations in a channel with square section and two dimensional axisymmetric simulations in the tube geometry show that the growing finger undergoes a Plateau-Rayleigh instability leading to pinch-off at the finger tail. Through the linear stability analysis of the tube solution in the axisymmetric geometry, we show that the solutions found by Levine and Tu are unstable for any value of γ . Our phase-field model reproduces accurately this linear prediction and allows to study the influence of the finger tip on the pinch-off velocity. Moreover, we observe that the interface between the two fluids undergoes a tip splitting instability for γ < 6 . 5 ×10-3 , spoiling the stability of the Saffman-Taylor finger.

  11. High-Reynolds Number Taylor-Couette Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grossmann, Siegfried; Lohse, Detlef; Sun, Chao

    2016-01-01

    Taylor-Couette flow, the flow between two coaxial co- or counter-rotating cylinders, is one of the paradigmatic systems in the physics of fluids. The (dimensionless) control parameters are the Reynolds numbers of the inner and outer cylinders, the ratio of the cylinder radii, and the aspect ratio. One key response of the system is the torque required to retain constant angular velocities, which can be connected to the angular velocity transport through the gap. Whereas the low-Reynolds number regime was well explored in the 1980s and 1990s of the past century, in the fully turbulent regime major research activity developed only in the past decade. In this article, we review this recent progress in our understanding of fully developed Taylor-Couette turbulence from the experimental, numerical, and theoretical points of view. We focus on the parameter dependence of the global torque and on the local flow organization, including velocity profiles and boundary layers. Next, we discuss transitions between different (turbulent) flow states. We also elaborate on the relevance of this system for astrophysical disks (quasi-Keplerian flows). The review ends with a list of challenges for future research on turbulent Taylor-Couette flow.

  12. Solving ODE Initial Value Problems With Implicit Taylor Series Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, James R.

    2000-01-01

    In this paper we introduce a new class of numerical methods for integrating ODE initial value problems. Specifically, we propose an extension of the Taylor series method which significantly improves its accuracy and stability while also increasing its range of applicability. To advance the solution from t (sub n) to t (sub n+1), we expand a series about the intermediate point t (sub n+mu):=t (sub n) + mu h, where h is the stepsize and mu is an arbitrary parameter called an expansion coefficient. We show that, in general, a Taylor series of degree k has exactly k expansion coefficients which raise its order of accuracy. The accuracy is raised by one order if k is odd, and by two orders if k is even. In addition, if k is three or greater, local extrapolation can be used to raise the accuracy two additional orders. We also examine stability for the problem y'= lambda y, Re (lambda) less than 0, and identify several A-stable schemes. Numerical results are presented for both fixed and variable stepsizes. It is shown that implicit Taylor series methods provide an effective integration tool for most problems, including stiff systems and ODE's with a singular point.

  13. Taylor Impact Tests and Simulations on PBX 9501

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clements, Brad; Thompson, Darla G.; Luscher, D. J.; Deluca, Racci

    2011-06-01

    Taylor impact tests have been conducted previously on plastic bonded explosives (PBXs) to characterize the stress state of these materials as they impact smooth and flat steel anvil surfaces at speeds of ~100m/s (i.e. Christopher, et al, 11th Detonation Symposium). In 2003, C. Liu and R. Ellis (unpublished, Los Alamos National Laboratory) performed Taylor tests on PBX 9501 up to speeds of 115 m/s, capturing impact images. In the work presented here, we have extended these tests to velocities of 200 m/s using a composite-lined gun barrel and no specimen sabot. Specimen images are used to validate the thermo-mechanical constitutive model ViscoSCRAM. ViscoSCRAM has been parameterized for PBX 9501 in uniaxial stress configurations. Simulating Taylor impact experiments tests the model in situations undergoing extreme damage. In addition, experimental variations to specimen confinement and friction are introduced in an attempt to establish ignition thresholds in this velocity regime.

  14. Turbulence structure in a Taylor-Couette apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Fehrenbacher, Noah; Aldredge, Ralph C.; Morgan, Joshua T.

    2007-10-15

    Turbulence measurements were made in a Taylor-Couette apparatus as a basis for future flame propagation studies. Results of the present study extend that of earlier work by more complete characterization of the featureless turbulence regime generated by the Taylor-Couette apparatus. Laser Doppler Velocimetry was used to measure Reynolds stresses, integral and micro time scales and power spectra over a wide range of turbulence intensities typically encountered by turbulent pre-mixed hydrocarbon-air flames. Measurements of radial velocity intensities are consistent with earlier axial and circumferential velocity measurements that indicated a linear relationship between turbulence intensity and the Reynolds number based on the average cylinder rotation speed and wall separation distance. Measured integral and micro time scales and approximated integral length scales were all found to decrease with the Reynolds number, possibly associated with a confinement of the largest scales (of the order of the cylinder wall separation distance). Regions of transverse isotropy were discovered in axial-radial cross correlations for average cylinder Reynolds numbers less than 6000 and are predicted to exist also for circumferential cross correlations at higher average Reynolds numbers, greater than 6000. Power spectra for the independent directions of velocity fluctuation exhibited -5/3 slopes, suggesting that the flow also has some additional isotropic characteristics and demonstrating the role of the Taylor-Couette apparatus as a novel means for generating turbulence for flame propagation studies. (author)

  15. Taylor--Couette--Poiseuille flow with a permeable inner cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tilton, Nils; Martinand, Denis; Serre, Eric; Lueptow, Richard

    2010-11-01

    We consider laminar Taylor--Couette--Poiseuille flow between an outer, fixed, impermeable cylinder and a concentric, inner, rotating, permeable cylinder with radial suction. Due to centrifugal instabilities the steady flow transitions to Taylor vortex flow. This system is used in filtration because the vortices wash contaminants away from the permeable cylinder. The coupling between the axial pressure drop driving the annular Poiseuille flow, and the transmembrane pressure driving the suction induces axial variations of the velocity field of the subcritical flow, which can evolve from suction to injection (cross flow reversal) or consume the whole axial flow (axial flow exhaustion). Moreover, the stability of this flow departs from that of Taylor--Couette flow. We propose an asymptotic solution to the subcritical flow assuming slow axial variations of the velocity and pressure fields. The transmembrane suction and pressure are coupled through Darcy's law. This solution is then used as a base flow to study the appearance of instabilities in the form of global modes. The analytical results for the subcritical and supercritical flows are then compared with dedicated 3-D spectral direct numerical simulations implementing Darcy's law on the inner cylinder.

  16. Controlling Transition in Taylor-Couette Flow with Spatial Forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aboelkassem, Yasser; Staples, Anne

    2009-11-01

    The linear stability of the flow in the (narrow) annular gap between two infinitely long cylinders, driven by an axisymmetric sinusoidal perturbation to the radius of the inner cylinder in the axial direction is analyzed. A closed-form solution for the basic flow in the system is derived. Experiments and computational investigations of this system have given differing results. In the seminal experiment performed by Ikeda and Maxworthy (Phys. Rev. E, 1994), the perturbation was found to have no effect on the first stability boundary. In subsequent theoretical investigations, authors have concluded that circular flow cannot exist in the modified system, and that the basic flow is Taylor Vortex Flow. In this study, we find that while the perturbation seems to always be destabilizing, circular flow does indeed exist in the system, in agreement with experimental observations. For small to moderate forcing amplitudes, the critical Taylor number for the first transition is only reduced slightly, by an amount that depends on the forcing amplitude and wavelength. The reduction in the first critical Taylor number is speculated to lie within the margin of error in the experiments performed by Ikeda and Maxworthy.

  17. Ultraviolet disinfection: similitude in Taylor-Couette and channel flow.

    PubMed

    Forney, L J; Goodridge, C F; Pierson, J A

    2003-11-01

    The inactivation data for Escherichia coli are recorded for the three reactor geometries of Taylor-Couette flow and flow between either concentric cylinders or a square channel. All of the data are shown to be correlated with the assumption of plug flow. In particular, the effects of nonuniform radiation levels are accounted for by integration across the fluid channel as done previously. However, a new correction factor is introduced that is shown to be inversely proportional to the laminar, velocity boundary thickness to account for the effects of a concentration boundary layer of surviving pathogen. It has also been demonstrated that the common problems of nonuniform radiation levels and concentration boundary layer effects in UV reactors are largely eliminated with the use of Taylor-Couette flow. Moreover, the repetitive exposure of fluid parcels to a small number of lamps in the rotating Taylor-Couette flow decreases maintainance requirements compared to the hydrodynamic equivalent of cross-flow over a tube bank or lamp array. Over a 3-log reduction in the inactivation of E. coli was demonstrated compared to a conventional channel with the same radiation dosage. Moreover, greater than a 2-log reduction was evident compared to flow through concentric cylinders.

  18. Taylor impact tests on PBX composites: imaging and analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graff Thompson, Daria; DeLuca, Racci; Archuleta, Jose; Brown, Geoff W.; Koby, Joseph

    2014-05-01

    A series of Taylor impact tests were performed on three plastic bonded explosive (PBX) formulations: PBX 9501, PBXN-9 and HPP (propellant). The first two formulations are HMX-based, and all three have been characterized quasi-statically in tension and compression. The Taylor impact tests use a 500 psi gas gun to launch PBX projectiles (approximately 30 grams, 16 mm diameter, 76 mm long), velocities as high as 215 m/s, at a steel anvil. Tests were performed remotely and no sign of ignition/reaction have been observed to date. Highspeed imaging was used to capture the impact of the specimen onto anvil surface. Side-view contour images have been analyzed using dynamic stress equations from the literature, and additionally, front-view images have been used to estimate a tensile strain failure criterion for initial specimen fracture. Post-test sieve analysis of specimen debris correlates fragmentation with projectile velocity, and these data show interesting differences between composites. Along with other quasi-static and dynamic measurements, Taylor impact images and fragmentation data provide a useful metric for the calibration or evaluation of intermediate-rate model predictions of PBX constituitive response and failure/fragmentation. Intermediate-rate tests involving other impact configurations are being considered.

  19. Public Acceptance of Plant Biotechnology and GM Crops

    PubMed Central

    Lucht, Jan M.

    2015-01-01

    A wide gap exists between the rapid acceptance of genetically modified (GM) crops for cultivation by farmers in many countries and in the global markets for food and feed, and the often-limited acceptance by consumers. This review contrasts the advances of practical applications of agricultural biotechnology with the divergent paths—also affecting the development of virus resistant transgenic crops—of political and regulatory frameworks for GM crops and food in different parts of the world. These have also shaped the different opinions of consumers. Important factors influencing consumer’s attitudes are the perception of risks and benefits, knowledge and trust, and personal values. Recent political and societal developments show a hardening of the negative environment for agricultural biotechnology in Europe, a growing discussion—including calls for labeling of GM food—in the USA, and a careful development in China towards a possible authorization of GM rice that takes the societal discussions into account. New breeding techniques address some consumers’ concerns with transgenic crops, but it is not clear yet how consumers’ attitudes towards them will develop. Discussions about agriculture would be more productive, if they would focus less on technologies, but on common aims and underlying values. PMID:26264020

  20. Exploiting the lactose-GM3 interaction for drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Murthy, Raghavendra Vasudeva; Bavireddi, Harikrishna; Gade, Madhuri; Kikkeri, Raghavendra

    2015-05-01

    Protein-protein and protein-carbohydrate interactions as a means to target the cell surface for therapeutic applications have been extensively investigated. However, carbohydrate-carbohydrate interactions (CCIs) have largely been overlooked. Here, we investigate the concept of CCI-mediated drug delivery. Lactose-functionalized β-cyclodextrin (L-β-CD) hosting doxorubicin (Dox) was evaluated for site-specific delivery to cancer cells via interaction with GM3 , a cell-surface carbohydrate. The host-guest complex was evaluated in B16 melanoma cells, which express exceptionally high levels of GM3 , and acute monocytic leukemia (THP-1) and mouse fibroblast (NIH-3T3) cells, which lack GM3 on the cell surface. Doxorubicin (Dox) was delivered more efficiently into B16 cells compared with NIH-3T3 and THP-1 cells. In B16 cells pretreated with sialidase or sodium periodate, thus preventing CCI formation, drug uptake was significantly decreased. Taken together, the results of these studies strongly support CCI-mediated uptake via the GM3 -lactose interaction as the mechanism of controlled drug delivery.

  1. Public Acceptance of Plant Biotechnology and GM Crops.

    PubMed

    Lucht, Jan M

    2015-08-01

    A wide gap exists between the rapid acceptance of genetically modified (GM) crops for cultivation by farmers in many countries and in the global markets for food and feed, and the often-limited acceptance by consumers. This review contrasts the advances of practical applications of agricultural biotechnology with the divergent paths-also affecting the development of virus resistant transgenic crops-of political and regulatory frameworks for GM crops and food in different parts of the world. These have also shaped the different opinions of consumers. Important factors influencing consumer's attitudes are the perception of risks and benefits, knowledge and trust, and personal values. Recent political and societal developments show a hardening of the negative environment for agricultural biotechnology in Europe, a growing discussion-including calls for labeling of GM food-in the USA, and a careful development in China towards a possible authorization of GM rice that takes the societal discussions into account. New breeding techniques address some consumers' concerns with transgenic crops, but it is not clear yet how consumers' attitudes towards them will develop. Discussions about agriculture would be more productive, if they would focus less on technologies, but on common aims and underlying values. PMID:26264020

  2. The Unusual Photometric Variability of the PMS Star GM Cep

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semkov, E. H.; Ibryamov, S. I.; Peneva, S. P.; Milanov, T. R.; Stoyanov, K. A.; Stateva, I. K.; Kjurkchieva, D. P.; Dimitrov, D. P.; Radeva, V. S.

    2015-03-01

    Results from UBVRI photometric observations of the pre-main sequence star GM Cep obtained in the period 2011 April-2014 August are reported in the paper. Presented data are a continuation of our photometric monitoring of the star started in 2008. GM Cep is located in the field of the young open cluster Trumpler 37 and over the past years it has been an object of intense photometric and spectral studies. The star shows a strong photometric variability interpreted as a possible outburst from EXor type in previous studies. Our photometric data for a period of over six years show a large amplitude variability (ΔV ~ 2.3 mag) and several deep minimums in brightness are observed. The analysis of the collected multicolour photometric data show the typical of UX Ori variables a colour reversal during the minimums in brightness. The observed decreases in brightness have a different shape, and evidences of periodicity are not detected. At the same time, high amplitude rapid variations in brightness typical for the classical T Tauri stars also present on the light curve of GM Cep. The spectrum of GM Cep shows the typical of classical T Tauri stars wide Hα emission line and absorption lines of some metals. We calculate the outer radius of the Hα emitting region as 10.4 ± 0.5 R⊙ and the accretion rate as 1.8 × 10- 7 M⊙ yr- 1.

  3. Pathology of GM2 gangliosidosis in Jacob sheep.

    PubMed

    Porter, B F; Lewis, B C; Edwards, J F; Alroy, J; Zeng, B J; Torres, P A; Bretzlaff, K N; Kolodny, E H

    2011-07-01

    The G(M2) gangliosidoses are a group of lysosomal storage diseases caused by defects in the genes coding for the enzyme hexosaminidase or the G(M2) activator protein. Four Jacob sheep from the same farm were examined over a 3-year period for a progressive neurologic disease. Two lambs were 6-month-old intact males and 2 were 8-month-old females. Clinical findings included ataxia in all 4 limbs, proprioceptive deficits, and cortical blindness. At necropsy, the nervous system appeared grossly normal. Histologically, most neurons within the brain, spinal cord, and peripheral ganglia were enlarged, and the cytoplasm was distended by foamy to granular material that stained positively with Luxol fast blue and Sudan black B stains. Other neuropathologic findings included widespread astrocytosis, microgliosis, and scattered spheroids. Electron microscopy revealed membranous cytoplasmic bodies within the cytoplasm of neurons. Biochemical and molecular genetic studies confirmed the diagnosis of G(M2) gangliosidosis. This form of G(M2) gangliosidosis in Jacob sheep is very similar to human Tay-Sachs disease and is potentially a useful animal model. PMID:21123862

  4. NMR-Metabolic Methodology in the Study of GM Foods

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The 1H NMR methodology used in the study of genetically modified (GM) foodstuff is discussed. The study of transgenic lettuce (Lactuca sativa cv "Luxor") over-expressing the KNAT1 gene from Arabidopsis is presented as a novel study-case. The 1H NMR metabolic profiling was carried out. Twenty-two wat...

  5. Effects of GM crops on non-target organisms

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Crop genetically engineered to provide resistance to specific groups of insect pests have been adopted by millions of growers throughout the world. GM crops have become important tools in crop production and protection in many countries and contribute significantly to overall IPM programs. There, ...

  6. Public Acceptance of Plant Biotechnology and GM Crops.

    PubMed

    Lucht, Jan M

    2015-07-30

    A wide gap exists between the rapid acceptance of genetically modified (GM) crops for cultivation by farmers in many countries and in the global markets for food and feed, and the often-limited acceptance by consumers. This review contrasts the advances of practical applications of agricultural biotechnology with the divergent paths-also affecting the development of virus resistant transgenic crops-of political and regulatory frameworks for GM crops and food in different parts of the world. These have also shaped the different opinions of consumers. Important factors influencing consumer's attitudes are the perception of risks and benefits, knowledge and trust, and personal values. Recent political and societal developments show a hardening of the negative environment for agricultural biotechnology in Europe, a growing discussion-including calls for labeling of GM food-in the USA, and a careful development in China towards a possible authorization of GM rice that takes the societal discussions into account. New breeding techniques address some consumers' concerns with transgenic crops, but it is not clear yet how consumers' attitudes towards them will develop. Discussions about agriculture would be more productive, if they would focus less on technologies, but on common aims and underlying values.

  7. Reconnaissance study of the Taylor Mountains pluton, southwestern Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hudson, Travis L.; Miller, Marti L.; Klimasauskas, Edward P.; Layer, Paul W.

    2010-01-01

    The Taylor Mountains pluton is a Late Cretaceous to early Tertiary (median age 65 + or ? 2 Ma) epizonal, composite biotite granite stock located about 235 km (145 mi) northeast of Dillingham in southwestern Alaska. This 30 km2 (12 mi2) pluton has sharp and discordant contacts with hornfels that developed in Upper Cretaceous clastic sedimentary rocks of the Kuskokwim Group. The three intrusive phases in the Taylor Mountains pluton, in order of emplacement, are (1) porphyritic granite containing large K-feldspar phenocrysts in a coarse-grained groundmass, (2) porphyritic granite containing large K-feldspar and smaller, but still coarse, plagioclase, quartz, and biotite phenocrysts in a fine-grained groundmass, and (3) fine-grained, leucocratic, equigranular granite. The porphyritic granites have different emplacement histories, but similar compositions; averages are 69.43 percent SiO2, 1.62 percent CaO, 5.23 percent FeO+MgO, 3.11 percent Na2O, and 4.50 percent K2O. The fine-grained, equigranular granite is distinctly felsic compared to porphyritic granite; it averages 75.3 percent SiO2, 0.49 percent CaO, 1.52 percent FeO+MgO, 3.31 percent Na2O, and 4.87 percent K2O. Many trace elements including Ni, Cr, Sc, V, Ba, Sr, Zr, Y, Nb, La, Ce, Th, and Nd are strongly depleted in fine-grained equigranular granite. Trace elements are not highly enriched in any of the granites. Known hydrothermal alteration is limited to one tourmaline-quartz replacement zone in porphyritic granite. Mineral deposits in the Taylor Mountains area are primarily placer gold (plus wolframite, cassiterite, and cinnabar); sources for these likely include scattered veins in hornfels peripheral to the Taylor Mountain pluton. The granite magmas that formed the Taylor Mountains pluton are thought to represent melted continental crust that possibly formed in response to high heat flow in the waning stage of Late Cretaceous subduction beneath interior Alaska.

  8. Lo/Ld phase coexistence modulation induced by GM1.

    PubMed

    Puff, Nicolas; Watanabe, Chiho; Seigneuret, Michel; Angelova, Miglena I; Staneva, Galya

    2014-08-01

    Lipid rafts are assumed to undergo biologically important size-modulations from nanorafts to microrafts. Due to the complexity of cellular membranes, model systems become important tools, especially for the investigation of the factors affecting "raft-like" Lo domain size and the search for Lo nanodomains as precursors in Lo microdomain formation. Because lipid compositional change is the primary mechanism by which a cell can alter membrane phase behavior, we studied the effect of the ganglioside GM1 concentration on the Lo/Ld lateral phase separation in PC/SM/Chol/GM1 bilayers. GM1 above 1mol % abolishes the formation of the micrometer-scale Lo domains observed in GUVs. However, the apparently homogeneous phase observed in optical microscopy corresponds in fact, within a certain temperature range, to a Lo/Ld lateral phase separation taking place below the optical resolution. This nanoscale phase separation is revealed by fluorescence spectroscopy, including C12NBD-PC self-quenching and Laurdan GP measurements, and is supported by Gaussian spectral decomposition analysis. The temperature of formation of nanoscale Lo phase domains over an Ld phase is determined, and is shifted to higher values when the GM1 content increases. A "morphological" phase diagram could be made, and it displays three regions corresponding respectively to Lo/Ld micrometric phase separation, Lo/Ld nanometric phase separation, and a homogeneous Ld phase. We therefore show that a lipid only-based mechanism is able to control the existence and the sizes of phase-separated membrane domains. GM1 could act on the line tension, "arresting" domain growth and thereby stabilizing Lo nanodomains. PMID:24835016

  9. Characterization of human lymphoid cell lines GM9947 and GM9948 as intra- and interlaboratory reference standards for DNA typing

    SciTech Connect

    Fregeau, C.J.; Elliott, J.C.; Fourney, R.M.

    1995-07-20

    The incorporation of reference DNA is crucial to the validation of any DNA typing protocol. Currently, reference DNA standards are restricted to molecular size DNA ladders and/or tumor cell line DNA. Either of these, however, presents some limitations. We have rigorously characterized two Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-immortalized human lymphoid cell lines-GM9947 (female) and GM9948 (male)-to determine their suitability as alternative in-line standards for three widely employed allele profiling strategies. Twenty-one highly polymorphic VNTR-based allelic systems (7 RFLPs, 2 AmpFLPs, and 12 STRs) distributed over 12 chromosomes were scrutinized along with 3 gender-based discriminatory systems. The genetic stability of each locus was confirmed over a period of 225 in vitro population doublings. Allele size estimates and degree of informativeness for each of the 21 VNTR systems were compiled. The reproducibility of allele scoring by traditional RFLP analyses, using both cell lines as reference standards, was also verified by an interlaboratory validation study involving 13 analysts from two geographically distinct forensic laboratories. Taken together, our data indicate that GM9947 and GM9948 genomic DNAs could be adopted as reliable reference standards for DNA typing. 82 refs., 3 figs., 8 tabs.

  10. Comparative antitumor effect among GM-CSF, IL-12 and GM-CSF+IL-12 genetically modified tumor cell vaccines.

    PubMed

    Miguel, A; Herrero, M J; Sendra, L; Botella, R; Algás, R; Sánchez, M; Aliño, S F

    2013-10-01

    Genetically modified cells have been shown to be one of the most effective cancer vaccine strategies. An evaluation is made of the efficacy of both preventive and therapeutic antitumor vaccines against murine melanoma, using C57BL/6 mice and irradiated B16 tumor cells expressing granulocyte and macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), interleukin-12 (IL-12) or both. Tumor was transplanted by the injection of wild-type B16 cells. Tumor growth and survival were measured to evaluate the efficacy of vaccination. Specific humoral response and immunoglobulin G (IgG) switch were evaluated measuring total IgG and IgG1 and IgG2a subtypes against tumor membrane proteins of B16 cells. In preventive vaccination, all treated groups showed delayed tumor growth. In addition, the group vaccinated to express only GM-CSF achieved 100% animal survival (P<0.005). Vaccination with GM-CSF+IL-12-producing B16 cells yielded lesser results (60% survival, P<0.005). Furthermore, all surviving animals remained disease-free after second tumor implantation 1 year later. The therapeutic vaccination strategies resulted in significantly delayed tumor growth, mainly using B16 cells producing GM-CSF+IL-12 cytokines, with 70% tumor growth inhibition (P<0.001)-although none of the animals reached overall survival. The results obtained suggest that the GM-CSF+IL-12 combination only increases the efficacy of therapeutic vaccines. No differences in classical regulatory T cells were found among the different groups.

  11. Loss of GM-CSF signalling in non-haematopoietic cells increases NSAID ileal injury

    PubMed Central

    Han, Xiaonan; Gilbert, Shila; Groschwitz, Katherine; Hogan, Simon; Jurickova, Ingrid; Trapnell, Bruce; Samson, Charles; Gully, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    Background Administration of granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) relieves symptoms in Crohn's disease (CD). It has been reported that reduced GM-CSF bioactivity is associated with more aggressive ileal behaviour and that GM-CSF-null mice exhibit ileal barrier dysfunction and develop a transmural ileitis following exposure to non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). STAT5 signalling is central to GM-CSF action. It was therefore hypothesised that GM-CSF signalling in non-haematopoietic cells is required for ileal homeostasis. Methods Bone marrow (BM) chimeras were generated by reconstituting irradiated GM-CSF receptor (gm-csfr) β chain or GM-CSF (gm-csf) deficient mice with wild type BM (WTBM→GMRKO and WTBM→GMKO). Intestinal barrier function and the response to NSAID-induced ileal injury were examined. Expression of gm-csf, gm-csfr or stat5 in Caco-2 and HT-29 intestinal epithelial cell (IEC) lines was knocked down and the effect of GM-CSF signalling on IEC survival and proliferation was determined. Results Elevated levels of GM-CSF autoantibodies in ileal CD were found to be associated with dysregulation of IEC survival and proliferation. GM-CSF receptor-deficient mice and WTBM→GMRKO chimeras exhibited ileal hyperpermeability. NSAID exposure induced a transmural ileitis in GM-CSF receptor-deficient mice and WTBM→GMRKO chimeras. Transplantation of wild type BM into GM-CSF-deficient mice prevented NSAID ileal injury and restored ileal barrier function. Ileal crypt IEC proliferation was reduced in WTBM→GMRKO chimeras, while STAT5 activation in ileal IEC following NSAID exposure was abrogated in WTBM→GMRKO chimeras. Following knock down of gm-csf, gm-csfr α or β chain or stat5a/b expression in Caco-2 cells, basal proliferation was suppressed. GM-CSF normalised proliferation of Caco-2 cells exposed to NSAID, which was blocked by stat5a/b RNA interference. Conclusions Loss of GM-CSF signalling in non-haematopoietic cells

  12. [On the determination of Gm(1) in hard dental tissue (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Heuschkel, H J; Lieske, W

    1979-01-01

    Tests for the presence of Gm(1) substance were made on a total of 104 human teeth. In about 90 percent of the cases examined, it was possible to observe agreement between the serum and the Gm(1) substance. Lack of eluted dental material and a high degree of affection with caries were found to have adverse effects upon Gm(1) typification. Detection of the Gm(1) substance is another important characteristic in forensic identification. PMID:158914

  13. 5 CFR 531.242 - Setting pay upon loss of GM status.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Setting pay upon loss of GM status. 531... Setting pay upon loss of GM status. (a) On loss of status as a GM employee under § 531.241 (except as... be set as provided in § 531.215. A GM employee's off-step GS rate at the grade before demotion is...

  14. High Speed Solution of Spacecraft Trajectory Problems Using Taylor Series Integration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, James R.; Martini, Michael C.

    2008-01-01

    Taylor series integration is implemented in a spacecraft trajectory analysis code-the Spacecraft N-body Analysis Program (SNAP) - and compared with the code s existing eighth-order Runge-Kutta Fehlberg time integration scheme. Nine trajectory problems, including near Earth, lunar, Mars and Europa missions, are analyzed. Head-to-head comparison at five different error tolerances shows that, on average, Taylor series is faster than Runge-Kutta Fehlberg by a factor of 15.8. Results further show that Taylor series has superior convergence properties. Taylor series integration proves that it can provide rapid, highly accurate solutions to spacecraft trajectory problems.

  15. Optimal Taylor-Couette flow: radius ratio dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostilla-Mónico, Rodolfo; Huisman, Sander G.; Jannink, Tim J. G.; Van Gils, Dennis P. M.; Verzicco, Roberto; Grossmann, Siegfried; Sun, Chao; Lohse, Detlef

    2014-05-01

    Taylor-Couette flow with independently rotating inner (i) and outer (o) cylinders is explored numerically and experimentally to determine the effects of the radius ratio {\\eta} on the system response. Numerical simulations reach Reynolds numbers of up to Re_i=9.5 x 10^3 and Re_o=5x10^3, corresponding to Taylor numbers of up to Ta=10^8 for four different radius ratios {\\eta}=r_i/r_o between 0.5 and 0.909. The experiments, performed in the Twente Turbulent Taylor-Couette (T^3C) setup, reach Reynolds numbers of up to Re_i=2x10^6$ and Re_o=1.5x10^6, corresponding to Ta=5x10^{12} for {\\eta}=0.714-0.909. Effective scaling laws for the torque J^{\\omega}(Ta) are found, which for sufficiently large driving Ta are independent of the radius ratio {\\eta}. As previously reported for {\\eta}=0.714, optimum transport at a non-zero Rossby number Ro=r_i|{\\omega}_i-{\\omega}_o|/[2(r_o-r_i){\\omega}_o] is found in both experiments and numerics. Ro_opt is found to depend on the radius ratio and the driving of the system. At a driving in the range between {Ta\\sim3\\cdot10^8} and {Ta\\sim10^{10}}, Ro_opt saturates to an asymptotic {\\eta}-dependent value. Theoretical predictions for the asymptotic value of Ro_{opt} are compared to the experimental results, and found to differ notably. Furthermore, the local angular velocity profiles from experiments and numerics are compared, and a link between a flat bulk profile and optimum transport for all radius ratios is reported.

  16. Rayleigh-Taylor instability with finite current relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silveira, F. E. M.; Orlandi, H. I.

    2016-04-01

    In this work, we explore the influence of perturbative wavelengths, shorter than those usually considered, on the growth rate of the Rayleigh-Taylor modes. Therefore, we adopt an extended form of Ohm's law which includes a finite relaxation time of the current density due to inertial effects of charged species in the plasma. The restoring force density that acts upon charged species close to the mode rational surface takes into account a new term which is usually neglected with respect to the motional electromotive force. We find that the width of the resistive layer can be interpreted in terms of the "height" of free fall in a constant gravitational field, in the Alfvén time interval. We also show that the charged species must fall "down" in the constant gravitational field in order that the static state of equilibrium of the system becomes unstable to the linear perturbation. Through the principle of conservation of energy, we find a general formula which gives the growth rate γ of the Rayleigh-Taylor modes. When the new term becomes negligible with respect to the motional electromotive force, we recover the standard result of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability, which establishes that γ scales with the plasma resistivity η as γ ˜ η 1 / 3 . However, in the opposite limiting situation, we find that γ does not depend any longer on the plasma resistivity and scales now with the electron number density n e as γ ˜ ne - 1 / 2 . Further developments of our theory may contribute to improve our understanding on the excitation mechanisms of resistive plasma instabilities by transient phenomena such as shock waves.

  17. 5 CFR 531.245 - Computing locality rates and special rates for GM employees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Computing locality rates and special... Gm Employees § 531.245 Computing locality rates and special rates for GM employees. Locality rates and special rates are computed for GM employees in the same manner as locality rates and special...

  18. 5 CFR 531.245 - Computing locality rates and special rates for GM employees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Computing locality rates and special... Gm Employees § 531.245 Computing locality rates and special rates for GM employees. Locality rates and special rates are computed for GM employees in the same manner as locality rates and special...

  19. Attitudes of European farmers towards GM crop adoption.

    PubMed

    Areal, Francisco J; Riesgo, Laura; Rodríguez-Cerezo, Emilio

    2011-12-01

    This article analyses European Union (EU) farmers' attitudes towards adoption of genetically modified crops by identifying and classifying groups of farmers. Cluster analysis provided two groups of farmers allowing us to classify farmers into potential adopters or rejecters of genetically modified herbicide-tolerant (GMHT) crops. Results showed that economic issues such as the guarantee of a higher income and the reduction of weed control costs are the most encouraging reasons for potential adopters and rejecters of GMHT crops. This article also examines how putting in place measures to ensure coexistence between GM and non-GM crops may influence farmers' attitudes towards GMHT crop adoption. Results show that the implementation of a coexistence policy would have a negative impact on farmers' attitudes on adoption and consequently may hamper GMHT adoption in the EU. PMID:21923717

  20. A GM cryocooler with cold helium circulation for remote cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chao; Brown, Ethan

    2014-01-01

    A GM cryocooler with new cold helium circulation system has been developed at Cryomech. A set of check valves connects to the cold heat exchanger to convert a small portion of AC oscillating flow in the cold head to a DC gas flow for circulating cold helium in the remote loop. A cold finger, which is used for remote cooling, is connected to the check valves through a pair of 5 m long vacuum insulated flexible lines. The GM cryocooler, Cryomech model AL125 having 120 W at 80 K, is employed in the testing. The cold finger can provide 50 W at 81 K for the power input of 4.1 kW and 70.5 W at 81.8 K for the power input of 6 kW. This simple and low cost design is very attractive for some applications in the near future.

  1. Experimental Investigation of Compact 2 K GM Cryocoolers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Qian; Tsuchiya, Akihiro; Xu, Mingyao; Li, Rui

    On the basis of a conventional 4K Gifford-McMahon (GM) cryocooler, we developed a new 2 K GM crycooler, which can provide considerable cooling capacity and yet being highly compact in physical size. A series of experiments were conductedto confirm and show the cooling characteristic and cooling capability of this new cryocooler. Under no-load condition, the lowest temperature reached about 2.1K on the secondstageand the temperature oscillation displacement was less than ±20mK. Even under a thermal-load of 1 W/20 mW, temperature reached 44.4 K on the first stage and 2.23 K on the second stage. Detailed cooling load-map and cool-down curve will also be introduced in this paper.

  2. Large growth Rayleigh-Taylor experiments using shaped laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remington, B. A.; Haan, S. W.; Glendinning, S. G.; Kilkenny, J. D.; Munro, D. H.; Wallace, R. J.

    1991-12-01

    Larege growth Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) experiments have been conducted by pulse-shaped radiative acceleration of planar fluorosilicone foils with 50-μm wavelength initial surface perturbations. Foils with large-amplitude initial perturbation quickly enter the nonlinear RT regime, and show little growth. Foils with very-small-amplitude initial perturbations grow exponentially for longer, and show much larger growth factors. From comparisons with two-dimensional computer simulations, we deduce that the observed growth is about 60% of that expected for classical RT growth.

  3. Large growth Rayleigh-Taylor experiments using shaped laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Remington, B.A.; Haan, S.W.; Glendinning, S.G.; Kilkenny, J.D.; Munro, D.H.; Wallace, R.J. )

    1991-12-02

    Larege growth Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) experiments have been conducted by pulse-shaped radiative acceleration of planar fluorosilicone foils with 50-{mu}m wavelength initial surface perturbations. Foils with large-amplitude initial perturbation quickly enter the nonlinear RT regime, and show little growth. Foils with very-small-amplitude initial perturbations grow exponentially for longer, and show much larger growth factors. From comparisons with two-dimensional computer simulations, we deduce that the observed growth is about 60% of that expected for classical RT growth.

  4. On Taylor-Series Approximations of Residual Stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pruett, C. David

    1999-01-01

    Although subgrid-scale models of similarity type are insufficiently dissipative for practical applications to large-eddy simulation, in recently published a priori analyses, they perform remarkably well in the sense of correlating highly against exact residual stresses. Here, Taylor-series expansions of residual stress are exploited to explain the observed behavior and "success" of similarity models. Until very recently, little attention has been given to issues related to the convergence of such expansions. Here, we re-express the convergence criterion of Vasilyev [J. Comput. Phys., 146 (1998)] in terms of the transfer function and the wavenumber cutoff of the grid filter.

  5. Taylor's experiment in a periodically sheared particulate suspension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souzy, Mathieu; Pham, Phong; Metzger, Bloen

    2016-08-01

    We revisit Taylor's experiment investigating the evolution of a blob of dye in a periodically sheared suspension of non-Brownian particles. Above a critical strain amplitude, particulate suspensions are subject to phase transition where reversibility is lost and particles fail to return to their original positions. We investigate the effect of this transition on the dispersion of a blob of dye. Beyond the critical strain, the dispersion of the blob is found to increase significantly. The dispersion coefficient of the blob of dye is measured and compared to the self-diffusivity coefficient of the particles.

  6. Bubble Counts for Rayleigh-Taylor Instability Using Image Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, P L; Gezahegne, A G; Cook, A W; Cabot, W H; Kamath, C

    2007-01-24

    We describe the use of image analysis to count bubbles in 3-D, large-scale, LES [1] and DNS [2] of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability. We analyze these massive datasets by first converting the 3-D data to 2-D, then counting the bubbles in the 2-D data. Our plots for the bubble count indicate there are four distinct regimes in the process of the mixing of the two fluids. We also show that our results are relatively insensitive to the choice of parameters in our analysis algorithms.

  7. Theoretical and Experimental Studies of Magneto-Rayleigh-Taylor Instabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Lau, Yue Ying; Gilgenbach, Ronald

    2013-07-07

    Magneto-Rayleigh-Taylor instability (MRT) is important to magnetized target fusion, wire-array z-pinches, and equation-of-state studies using flyer plates or isentropic compression. It is also important to the study of the crab nebula. The investigators performed MRT experiments on thin foils, driven by the mega-ampere linear transformer driver (LTD) facility completed in their laboratory. This is the first 1-MA LTD in the USA. Initial experiments on the seeding of MRT were performed. Also completed was an analytic study of MRT for a finite plasma slab with arbitrary magnetic fields tangential to the interfaces. The effects of magnetic shear and feedthrough were analyzed.

  8. 1. Photographic copy of architectural plan for Building 4505, Taylor ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Photographic copy of architectural plan for Building 4505, Taylor & Barnes, Architects & Engineers, 803 W. Third Street, Los Angeles California, O.C.E. Office of Civil Engineer Job No. A(9-10), Military Construction: Materiel Command Flight Test Base, Muroc, California, Hangar and Auxiliary Buildings: Hangar Type P-A, Floor Plan & Roof Plan, Sheet No. 16, March 1944. Reproduced from the holdings of the National Archives, Pacific Southwest Region - Edwards Air Force Base, North Base, Hangar, End of North Base Road, Boron, Kern County, CA

  9. Photographic copy of architectural drawings for Building 4315: Taylor & ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photographic copy of architectural drawings for Building 4315: Taylor & Barnes, Architects & Engineers, 803 W. Third Street, Los Angeles California, O.C.E. Office of Civil Engineer Job No. Muroc ESA 210-50 and 210-44, Military Construction: Muroc Flight Test Base, Muroc, California, Utility Yard & Shops: Carpenter & Paint Shop, Utility Shop & Lavatory, Plan & Elevations, Sheet No. 4 of 8, May 1945. Reproduced from the holdings of the National Archives, Pacific Southwest Region - Edwards Air Force Base, North Base, Utility & Paint Shop, Second & E Streets, Boron, Kern County, CA

  10. 2. Photographic copy of architectural elevations for Building 4505, Taylor ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Photographic copy of architectural elevations for Building 4505, Taylor & Barnes, Architects & Engineers, 803 W. Third Street, Los Angeles California, O.C.E. Office of Civil Engineer Job No. A(9-10), Military Construction: Materiel Command Flight Test Base, Muroc, California, Hangar and Auxiliary Buildings: Hangar Type P-A, Exterior Elevations, Sheet No. 18, March 1944. Reproduced from the holdings of the National Archives, Pacific Southwest Region - Edwards Air Force Base, North Base, Hangar, End of North Base Road, Boron, Kern County, CA

  11. Nonlinear evolution of the unmagnetized ion Rayleigh--Taylor instability

    SciTech Connect

    Hassam, A.B.; Huba, J.D. )

    1990-09-01

    The nonlinear evolution of the unmagnetized ion Rayleigh--Taylor instability is investigated. A nonlinear state corresponding to localized clumps of high-density plasma is obtained analytically. The characteristic scale size of the clumps is given by {Delta}{similar to}{ital D}({ital gL}{sub {ital n}}){sup {minus}1/2}, where {ital g} is the gravitational acceleration, {ital L}{sub {ital n}} is the density gradient scale length, and {ital D} is a diffusion coefficient associated with the short-scale dissipation processes in the system. It is shown numerically that this nonlinear state may be both accessible and stable.

  12. Deformity correction in Haiti with the Taylor Spatial Frame.

    PubMed

    Alexis, Francel; Herzenberg, John E; Nelson, Scott C

    2015-01-01

    The Taylor Spatial Frame (TSF) is an external-fixator that corrects deformities in 6 axes, and can successfully manage disorders involving multiplanar deformities. In the developing-world, orthopaedic surgeons are often faced with deformities from neglected trauma and birth defects more severe than those typically seen in developed-countries. This article evaluates the applicability of TSF in the challenging medical environment of Haiti. At Haiti Adventist Hospital, the authors treated 80 cases using the TSF with a minimum follow-up of 1-year. Good results were observed in 99% of the cases (79 out of 80), approaching similar outcomes than those described in literature.

  13. Simulating Hamiltonian dynamics with a truncated Taylor series.

    PubMed

    Berry, Dominic W; Childs, Andrew M; Cleve, Richard; Kothari, Robin; Somma, Rolando D

    2015-03-01

    We describe a simple, efficient method for simulating Hamiltonian dynamics on a quantum computer by approximating the truncated Taylor series of the evolution operator. Our method can simulate the time evolution of a wide variety of physical systems. As in another recent algorithm, the cost of our method depends only logarithmically on the inverse of the desired precision, which is optimal. However, we simplify the algorithm and its analysis by using a method for implementing linear combinations of unitary operations together with a robust form of oblivious amplitude amplification. PMID:25793789

  14. Nonlinear Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities in fast Z pinches

    SciTech Connect

    Miles, Aaron R.

    2009-03-15

    A simplified analytic model is presented to describe the implosion of a plasma column by an azimuthal magnetic field of sufficient magnitude to drive a strong shock wave into the plasma. This model is employed together with buoyancy-drag-based models of nonlinear single-mode and turbulent multimode Rayleigh-Taylor growth to investigate the mixing process in such fast Z pinches. These models give predictions that characterize limitations the instability can impose on the implosion in terms of maximum convergence ratios attainable for an axially coherent pinch. Both the implosion and instability models are validated with results from high-resolution numerical simulations.

  15. Plant sciences. Will GM rapeseed cut the mustard?

    PubMed

    Heritage, John

    2003-10-17

    Genetic modification can render crops resistant to herbicides, providing them with a growth advantage so that they can outcompete weeds. However, there are concerns about the possibility that transgenes could flow from GM crops into wild plant populations. In his Perspective, Heritage discusses these important issues in terms of a new report (Wilkinson et al.) that provides a nationwide assessment in the UK of the ability of the conventional crop, oilseed rape (Brassica napus), to form hybrids with its wild relatives.

  16. The BRAG and GM2003 Models for Glass Dissolution

    SciTech Connect

    Aertsens, Marc

    2007-07-01

    The GM2003 model extends the r(t) glass dissolution model with water diffusion through the diffusion layer. Boron and alkali diffusion through the diffusion layer is described by introducing a retention factor K{sub d,i} between boron/alkali and water in the diffusion layer. Introducing a boron/alkali diffusion coefficient, the BRAG model describes boron/alkali diffusion in the diffusion layer as well. It is shown that both models are consistent with each other and an expression is derived for the boron/alkali diffusion coefficient (BRAG) as a function of both parameters of GM2003: the retention factor K{sub d,i} and the water diffusion coefficient D{sub H{sub 2}}{sub O} in the diffusion layer. From dissolution data only, it is possible to fit the value for the boron/alkali diffusion coefficient in the diffusion layer but due to correlations the individual values of both parameters K{sub d,i} and DH{sub 2}O of GM2003 cannot be determined. From theoretical considerations follows that the K{sub d,i} value for boron/alkali should be slightly larger than 0.1 kg/liter. A user friendly code for the BRAG model allows automatic fits of glass dissolution data in water. (authors)

  17. Large growth, planar Rayleigh-Taylor experiments on Nova

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remington, B. A.; Haan, S. W.; Glendinning, S. G.; Kilkenny, J. D.; Munro, D. H.; Wallace, R. J.

    1992-04-01

    A set of indirect-drive experiments to study large growth Rayleigh-Taylor instability using shaped laser pulses at the Nova laser facility has been conducted. Planar foils of fluorosilicone were accelerated by x-ray ablation. The foil trajectory was measured using edge-on radiography. In separate experiments using face-on radiography, contrast in optical depth was measured as a function of time, from which the evolution of 50 μm wavelength initially sinusoidal surface perturbations was deduced. Holding other parameters fixed, the amplitude of the initial perturbation was varied by up to a factor of 30 in separate shots. The foils with the smallest initial perturbation exhibited growth factors of 75 in contrast. Foils with large initial amplitude perturbation gave growth factors of 6 or less, and displayed the ``bubble-and-spike'' shape characteristic of the nonlinear Rayleigh-Taylor instability. Comparisons of two-dimensional computer simulations with both the measured foil trajectory and the perturbation growth show good agreement, provided that a suitable opacity model is chosen. In the linear regime the observed growth rates are 60%-75% of classical, the reduction attributed primarily to ablative stabilization. The observed onset of harmonic generation, signaling the transition into the nonlinear regime, is well predicted by third-order theory.

  18. Large growth, planar Rayleigh--Taylor experiments on Nova

    SciTech Connect

    Remington, B.A.; Haan, S.W.; Glendinning, S.G.; Kilkenny, J.D.; Munro, D.H.; Wallace, R.J. )

    1992-04-01

    A set of indirect-drive experiments to study large growth Rayleigh--Taylor instability using shaped laser pulses at the Nova laser facility has been conducted. Planar foils of fluorosilicone were accelerated by x-ray ablation. The foil trajectory was measured using edge-on radiography. In separate experiments using face-on radiography, contrast in optical depth was measured as a function of time, from which the evolution of 50 {mu}m wavelength initially sinusoidal surface perturbations was deduced. Holding other parameters fixed, the amplitude of the initial perturbation was varied by up to a factor of 30 in separate shots. The foils with the smallest initial perturbation exhibited growth factors of 75 in contrast. Foils with large initial amplitude perturbation gave growth factors of 6 or less, and displayed the bubble-and-spike'' shape characteristic of the nonlinear Rayleigh--Taylor instability. Comparisons of two-dimensional computer simulations with both the measured foil trajectory and the perturbation growth show good agreement, provided that a suitable opacity model is chosen. In the linear regime the observed growth rates are 60%--75% of classical, the reduction attributed primarily to ablative stabilization. The observed onset of harmonic generation, signaling the transition into the nonlinear regime, is well predicted by third-order theory.

  19. Asymmetric bursting of Taylor bubble in inclined tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rana, Basanta Kumar; Das, Arup Kumar; Das, Prasanta Kumar

    2016-08-01

    In the present study, experiments have been reported to explain the phenomenon of approach and collapse of an asymmetric Taylor bubble at free surface inside an inclined tube. Four different tube inclinations with horizontal (30°, 45°, 60° and 75°) and two different fluids (water and silicon oil) are considered for the experiment. Using high speed imaging, we have investigated the approach, puncture, and subsequent liquid drainage for re-establishment of the free surface. The present study covers all the aspects in the collapse of an asymmetric Taylor bubble through the generation of two films, i.e., a cap film which lies on top of the bubble and an asymmetric annular film along the tube wall. Retraction of the cap film is studied in detail and its velocity has been predicted successfully for different inclinations and fluids. Film drainage formulation considering azimuthal variation is proposed which also describes the experimental observations well. In addition, extrapolation of drainage velocity pattern beyond the experimental observation limit provides insight into the total collapse time of bubbles at different inclinations and fluids.

  20. On spatial pattern of concentration distribution for Taylor dispersion process.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zi; Fu, Xudong; Wang, Guangqian

    2016-01-01

    Taylor dispersion is a key concept in many fields. In the present paper, we characterize the pattern of the complete spatial concentration distribution for laminar tube flow; the obtained simple description is shown to represent the nature of Taylor dispersion. Importantly, we find that during the approach to the longitudinal normality of the transverse mean concentration at the time scale of R(2)/D (R is the tube radius and D is the molecular diffusivity), the solute concentration becomes uniformly distributed across a family of invariant curved transverse surfaces instead of the flat cross-sections in the traditional view. The family of curved surfaces is analytically determined, and a transformation is devised for the previously obtained analytical solution to discuss the decay of the concentration difference across the curved surfaces. The approach to a uniform concentration across the flat cross-sections to the same degree (~3% by concentration difference percentage), achieved at a time-scale of 100 R(2)/D, is shown to be the natural consequence of the longitudinal separation of the concentration contours on the curved surfaces. PMID:26867803

  1. Transition to turbulence in Taylor-Couette ferrofluidic flow.

    PubMed

    Altmeyer, Sebastian; Do, Younghae; Lai, Ying-Cheng

    2015-06-12

    It is known that in classical fluids turbulence typically occurs at high Reynolds numbers. But can turbulence occur at low Reynolds numbers? Here we investigate the transition to turbulence in the classic Taylor-Couette system in which the rotating fluids are manufactured ferrofluids with magnetized nanoparticles embedded in liquid carriers. We find that, in the presence of a magnetic field transverse to the symmetry axis of the system, turbulence can occur at Reynolds numbers that are at least one order of magnitude smaller than those in conventional fluids. This is established by extensive computational ferrohydrodynamics through a detailed investigation of transitions in the flow structure, and characterization of behaviors of physical quantities such as the energy, the wave number, and the angular momentum through the bifurcations. A finding is that, as the magnetic field is increased, onset of turbulence can be determined accurately and reliably. Our results imply that experimental investigation of turbulence may be feasible by using ferrofluids. Our study of transition to and evolution of turbulence in the Taylor-Couette ferrofluidic flow system provides insights into the challenging problem of turbulence control.

  2. Non-linear characteristics of Rayleigh-Taylor instable perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Zhengfeng; Luo, Jisheng

    2008-04-01

    The direct numerical simulation method is adopted to study the non-linear characteristics of Rayleigh-Taylor instable perturbations at the ablation front of a 200 μm planar CH ablation target. In the simulation, the classical electrical thermal conductivity is included, and NND difference scheme is used. The linear growth rates obtained from the simulation agree with the Takabe formula. The amplitude distribution of the density perturbation at the ablation front is obtained for the linear growth case. The non-linear characteristics of Rayleigh-Taylor instable perturbations are analyzed and the numerical results show that the amplitude distributions of the compulsive harmonics are very different from that of the fundamental perturbation. The characteristics of the amplitude distributions of the harmonics and their fast growth explain why spikes occur at the ablation front. The numerical results also show that non-linear effects have relations with the phase differences of double mode initial perturbations, and different phase differences lead to varied spikes.

  3. Taylor Impact Tests on PBX Composites: Imaging and Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Darla; Deluca, Racci

    2013-06-01

    A series of Taylor impact tests were performed on three plastic bonded explosive (PBX) formulations: PBX 9501, PBXN-9 and HPP (propellant). The first two formulations are HMX-based, and all three have been characterized quasi-statically in tension and compression. The Taylor impact tests use a 500 psi gas gun to launch PBX projectiles (approximately 30 grams, 16 mm diameter, 76 mm long) at velocities as high as 215 m/s. Tests were performed remotely and no sign of ignition/reaction have been observed to date. High-speed imaging was used to capture the impact of the specimen onto the surface of a steel anvil. Side-view contour images have been analyzed using dynamic stress equations from the literature, and additionally, front-view images have been used to estimate a tensile strain failure criterion for initial specimen fracture. Post-test sieve analysis of specimen debris correlates fragmentation with projectile velocity, and these data show interesting differences between composites. Along with other quasi-static and dynamic measurements, these impact images and fragmentation data provide a useful metric for the calibration or evaluation of intermediate-rate model predictions of PBX constituitive response and failure/fragmentation. Intermediate-rate tests involving other impact configurations are being considered.

  4. Rayleigh-Taylor instability of viscous fluids with phase change.

    PubMed

    Kim, Byoung Jae; Kim, Kyung Doo

    2016-04-01

    Film boiling on a horizontal surface is a typical example of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability. During the film boiling, phase changes take place at the interface, and thus heat and mass transfer must be taken into consideration in the stability analysis. Moreover, since the vapor layer is not quite thick, a viscous flow must be analyzed. Existing studies assumed equal kinematic viscosities of two fluids, and/or considered thin viscous fluids. The purpose of this study is to derive the analytical dispersion relation of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability for more general conditions. The two fluids have different properties. The thickness of the vapor layer is finite, but the liquid layer is thick enough to be nearly semi-infinite in view of perturbation. Initially, the vapor is in equilibrium with the liquid at the interface, and the direction of heat transfer is from the vapor side to the liquid side. In this case, the phase change has a stabilizing effect on the growth rate of the interface. When the vapor layer is thin, there is a coupled effect of the vapor viscosity, phase change, and vapor thickness on the critical wave number. For the other limit of a thick vapor, both the liquid and vapor viscosities influence the critical wave number. Finally, the most unstable wavelength is investigated. When the vapor layer is thin, the most unstable wavelength is not affected by phase change. When the vapor layer is thick, however, it increases with the increasing rate of phase change. PMID:27176406

  5. The Inhibition of the Rayleigh-Taylor Instability by Rotation

    PubMed Central

    Baldwin, Kyle A.; Scase, Matthew M.; Hill, Richard J. A.

    2015-01-01

    It is well-established that the Coriolis force that acts on fluid in a rotating system can act to stabilise otherwise unstable flows. Chandrasekhar considered theoretically the effect of the Coriolis force on the Rayleigh-Taylor instability, which occurs at the interface between a dense fluid lying on top of a lighter fluid under gravity, concluding that rotation alone could not stabilise this system indefinitely. Recent numerical work suggests that rotation may, nevertheless, slow the growth of the instability. Experimental verification of these results using standard techniques is problematic, owing to the practical difficulty in establishing the initial conditions. Here, we present a new experimental technique for studying the Rayleigh-Taylor instability under rotation that side-steps the problems encountered with standard techniques by using a strong magnetic field to destabilize an otherwise stable system. We find that rotation about an axis normal to the interface acts to retard the growth rate of the instability and stabilise long wavelength modes; the scale of the observed structures decreases with increasing rotation rate, asymptoting to a minimum wavelength controlled by viscosity. We present a critical rotation rate, dependent on Atwood number and the aspect ratio of the system, for stabilising the most unstable mode. PMID:26130005

  6. The Inhibition of the Rayleigh-Taylor Instability by Rotation.

    PubMed

    Baldwin, Kyle A; Scase, Matthew M; Hill, Richard J A

    2015-01-01

    It is well-established that the Coriolis force that acts on fluid in a rotating system can act to stabilise otherwise unstable flows. Chandrasekhar considered theoretically the effect of the Coriolis force on the Rayleigh-Taylor instability, which occurs at the interface between a dense fluid lying on top of a lighter fluid under gravity, concluding that rotation alone could not stabilise this system indefinitely. Recent numerical work suggests that rotation may, nevertheless, slow the growth of the instability. Experimental verification of these results using standard techniques is problematic, owing to the practical difficulty in establishing the initial conditions. Here, we present a new experimental technique for studying the Rayleigh-Taylor instability under rotation that side-steps the problems encountered with standard techniques by using a strong magnetic field to destabilize an otherwise stable system. We find that rotation about an axis normal to the interface acts to retard the growth rate of the instability and stabilise long wavelength modes; the scale of the observed structures decreases with increasing rotation rate, asymptoting to a minimum wavelength controlled by viscosity. We present a critical rotation rate, dependent on Atwood number and the aspect ratio of the system, for stabilising the most unstable mode. PMID:26130005

  7. Experimental Study of Rayleigh-Taylor Instability Using Paramagnetic Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsiklashvili, Vladimer; Likhachev, Oleg; Jacobs, Jeffry

    2009-11-01

    Experiments that take advantage of the properties of paramagnetic liquids are used to study Rayleigh-Taylor instability. A gravitationally unstable combination of a paramagnetic salt solution and a nonmagnetic solution is initially stabilized by a magnetic field gradient that is produced by the contoured pole-caps of a large electromagnet. Rayleigh-Taylor instability originates with the rapid removal of current from the electromagnet, which results in the heavy liquid falling into the light liquid due to gravity and, thus, mixing with it. The mixing zone is visualized by back-lit photography and is recorded with a digital video camera. For visualization purposes, a blue-green dye is added to the magnetic fluid. The mixing rate of the two liquids is determined from an averaged dye concentration across the mixing layer by means of the Beer-Lambert law. After removal of the suspending magnetic field, the initially flat interface between the two liquids develops a random surface pattern with the dominant length scale well approximated by the fastest growing wavelength in accordance with the viscous linear stability theory. Several combinations of paramagnetic and nonmagnetic solutions have been considered during the course of the research. A functional dependence of the mixing layer growth constant, α, on the properties of the liquids is a primary subject of the present study.

  8. Transition to turbulence in Taylor-Couette ferrofluidic flow

    PubMed Central

    Altmeyer, Sebastian; Do, Younghae; Lai, Ying-Cheng

    2015-01-01

    It is known that in classical fluids turbulence typically occurs at high Reynolds numbers. But can turbulence occur at low Reynolds numbers? Here we investigate the transition to turbulence in the classic Taylor-Couette system in which the rotating fluids are manufactured ferrofluids with magnetized nanoparticles embedded in liquid carriers. We find that, in the presence of a magnetic field transverse to the symmetry axis of the system, turbulence can occur at Reynolds numbers that are at least one order of magnitude smaller than those in conventional fluids. This is established by extensive computational ferrohydrodynamics through a detailed investigation of transitions in the flow structure, and characterization of behaviors of physical quantities such as the energy, the wave number, and the angular momentum through the bifurcations. A finding is that, as the magnetic field is increased, onset of turbulence can be determined accurately and reliably. Our results imply that experimental investigation of turbulence may be feasible by using ferrofluids. Our study of transition to and evolution of turbulence in the Taylor-Couette ferrofluidic flow system provides insights into the challenging problem of turbulence control. PMID:26065572

  9. A novel control strategy for a Taylor-Couette flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouabdallah, A.; Oualli, H.; Mekadem, M.; Boukrif, M.; Saad, S.; Gad-El-Hak, M.

    2015-11-01

    Advancing transition is desired in applications where heat, mass, or momentum transfer needs to be augmented. On the other hand, delaying transition is imperative in crystal growth devices, where all instabilities are to be avoided in order to prevent the appearance of geometrical irregularities in the resulting crystal. The hydrodynamic stability of a viscous flow in a closed, fully filled Taylor-Couette system is considered in the present numerical study. The fluid evolves in an annular cavity between the rotating inner cylinder and the outer fixed one. The base flow is axis-symmetric with two counter-rotating vortices each wavelength. The Taylor number varies in the range of 0-50. Numerical simulations are implemented on a finite-volume CFD code. The control strategy involves a pulsatile motion superimposed separately on the inner and outer cylinder's cross-section, with maximum amplitude of, respectively, 5% and 15% of the radius. The frequency varies in the range of 0-100 Hz. The objective is to localize the transition and to assess the flow's response to the imposed boundary motions. Substantial advancement of transition is found when the inner cylinder's cross-section is varied, while this transition is delayed when the outer cylinder's cross-section is pulsating.

  10. Rayleigh-Taylor instability of viscous fluids with phase change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Byoung Jae; Kim, Kyung Doo

    2016-04-01

    Film boiling on a horizontal surface is a typical example of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability. During the film boiling, phase changes take place at the interface, and thus heat and mass transfer must be taken into consideration in the stability analysis. Moreover, since the vapor layer is not quite thick, a viscous flow must be analyzed. Existing studies assumed equal kinematic viscosities of two fluids, and/or considered thin viscous fluids. The purpose of this study is to derive the analytical dispersion relation of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability for more general conditions. The two fluids have different properties. The thickness of the vapor layer is finite, but the liquid layer is thick enough to be nearly semi-infinite in view of perturbation. Initially, the vapor is in equilibrium with the liquid at the interface, and the direction of heat transfer is from the vapor side to the liquid side. In this case, the phase change has a stabilizing effect on the growth rate of the interface. When the vapor layer is thin, there is a coupled effect of the vapor viscosity, phase change, and vapor thickness on the critical wave number. For the other limit of a thick vapor, both the liquid and vapor viscosities influence the critical wave number. Finally, the most unstable wavelength is investigated. When the vapor layer is thin, the most unstable wavelength is not affected by phase change. When the vapor layer is thick, however, it increases with the increasing rate of phase change.

  11. Transition to turbulence in Taylor-Couette ferrofluidic flow.

    PubMed

    Altmeyer, Sebastian; Do, Younghae; Lai, Ying-Cheng

    2015-01-01

    It is known that in classical fluids turbulence typically occurs at high Reynolds numbers. But can turbulence occur at low Reynolds numbers? Here we investigate the transition to turbulence in the classic Taylor-Couette system in which the rotating fluids are manufactured ferrofluids with magnetized nanoparticles embedded in liquid carriers. We find that, in the presence of a magnetic field transverse to the symmetry axis of the system, turbulence can occur at Reynolds numbers that are at least one order of magnitude smaller than those in conventional fluids. This is established by extensive computational ferrohydrodynamics through a detailed investigation of transitions in the flow structure, and characterization of behaviors of physical quantities such as the energy, the wave number, and the angular momentum through the bifurcations. A finding is that, as the magnetic field is increased, onset of turbulence can be determined accurately and reliably. Our results imply that experimental investigation of turbulence may be feasible by using ferrofluids. Our study of transition to and evolution of turbulence in the Taylor-Couette ferrofluidic flow system provides insights into the challenging problem of turbulence control. PMID:26065572

  12. Taylor-Fourier spectra to study fractional order systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbé, Kurt; Lauwers, Lieve; Gonzales Fuentes, Lee

    2016-06-01

    In measurement science mathematical models are often used as an indirect measurement of physical properties which are mapped to measurands through the mathematical model. Dynamical systems describing a physical process with a dominant diffusion or dispersion phenomenon requires a large dimensional model due to its long memory. Ignoring a dominant difussion or dispersion component acts as a confounder which may introduce a bias in the estimated quantities of interest. For linear systems it has been observed that fractional order models outperform classical rational forms in terms of the number of parameters for the same fitting error. However it is not straightforward to deal with a fractional order system or long memory effects without prior knowledge. Since the parametric modeling of a fractional system is very involved, we put forward the question whether fractional insight can be gathered in a non-parametric way. In this paper we show that classical Fourier basis leading to the frequency response function lacks fractional insight. To circumvent this problem, we introduce a fractional Taylor-Fourier basis to obtain non-parametric insight in the fractional system. This analysis proposes a novel type of spectrum to visualize the spectral content of a fractional system: Taylor-Fourier spectrum. This spectrum is fully measurement driven which can be used as a first to explore the fractional dynamics of a measured diffusion or dispersion system.

  13. Lyso-GM2 ganglioside: a possible biomarker of Tay-Sachs disease and Sandhoff disease.

    PubMed

    Kodama, Takashi; Togawa, Tadayasu; Tsukimura, Takahiro; Kawashima, Ikuo; Matsuoka, Kazuhiko; Kitakaze, Keisuke; Tsuji, Daisuke; Itoh, Kohji; Ishida, Yo-Ichi; Suzuki, Minoru; Suzuki, Toshihiro; Sakuraba, Hitoshi

    2011-01-01

    To find a new biomarker of Tay-Sachs disease and Sandhoff disease. The lyso-GM2 ganglioside (lyso-GM2) levels in the brain and plasma in Sandhoff mice were measured by means of high performance liquid chromatography and the effect of a modified hexosaminidase (Hex) B exhibiting Hex A-like activity was examined. Then, the lyso-GM2 concentrations in human plasma samples were determined. The lyso-GM2 levels in the brain and plasma in Sandhoff mice were apparently increased compared with those in wild-type mice, and they decreased on intracerebroventricular administration of the modified Hex B. The lyso-GM2 levels in plasma of patients with Tay-Sachs disease and Sandhoff disease were increased, and the increase in lyso-GM2 was associated with a decrease in Hex A activity. Lyso-GM2 is expected to be a potential biomarker of Tay-Sachs disease and Sandhoff disease.

  14. Measurement of coefficients of the Ginzburg-Landau equation for patterns of Taylor spirals.

    PubMed

    Goharzadeh, Afshin; Mutabazi, Innocent

    2010-07-01

    Patterns of Taylor spirals observed in the counter-rotating Couette-Taylor system are described by complex Ginzburg-Landau equations (CGLE) and have been investigated using spatiotemporal diagrams and complex demodulation technique. We have determined the real coefficients of the CGLE and their variations versus the control parameters, i.e., the rotation frequency of cylinders.

  15. Taylor-Made Education: The Influence of the Efficiency Movement on the Testing of Reading Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, JoBeth

    Much of what has developed in the testing of reading harkens back to the days of the "Cult of Efficiency" movement in education that can be largely attributed to Frederick Winslow Taylor. Taylor spent most of his productive years studying time and motion in an attempt to streamline industrial production so that people could work as quickly and…

  16. A litmus test for exploitation: James Stacey Taylor's stakes and kidneys.

    PubMed

    Kuntz, J R

    2009-12-01

    James Stacy Taylor advances a thorough argument for the legalization of markets in current (live) human kidneys. The market is seemly the most abhorrent type of market, a market where the least well-off sell part of their body to the most well off. Though rigorously defended overall, his arguments concerning exploitation are thin. I examine a number of prominent bioethicists' account of exploitation: most importantly, Ruth Sample's exploitation as degradation. I do so in the context of Taylor's argument, with the aim of buttressing Taylor's position that a regulated kidney market is morally allowable. I argue that Sample fails to provide normative grounds consistent with her claim that exploitation is wrong. I then reformulate her account for consistency and plausibility. Still, this seemingly more plausible view does not show that Taylor's regulated kidney market is prohibitively exploitative of impoverished persons. I tack into place one more piece of support for Taylor's conclusion. (wc. 148).

  17. The numerical solution of ordinary differential equations by the Taylor series method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silver, A. H.; Sullivan, E.

    1973-01-01

    A programming implementation of the Taylor series method is presented for solving ordinary differential equations. The compiler is written in PL/1, and the target language is FORTRAN IV. The reduction of a differential system to rational form is described along with the procedures required for automatic numerical integration. The Taylor method is compared with two other methods for a number of differential equations. Algorithms using the Taylor method to find the zeroes of a given differential equation and to evaluate partial derivatives are presented. An annotated listing of the PL/1 program which performs the reduction and code generation is given. Listings of the FORTRAN routines used by the Taylor series method are included along with a compilation of all the recurrence formulas used to generate the Taylor coefficients for non-rational functions.

  18. rhGM-CSF vs placebo following rhGM-CSF-mobilized PBPC transplantation: a phase III double-blind randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Legros, M; Fleury, J; Bay, J O; Choufi, B; Basile, M; Condat, P; Glenat, C; Communal, Y; Tavernier, F; Bons, J M; Chollet, P; Plagne, R; Chassagne, J

    1997-02-01

    In this placebo-controlled randomized trial we evaluated the hematological and clinical effects of r-Hu GM-CSF after high-dose chemotherapy (HDC) followed by GM-CSF-mobilized PBPC transplantation. Fifty patients with poor prognosis malignancies were randomized in a double-blind study to receive either GM-CSF or placebo after HDC followed by PBPC rescue. For all patients, PBPCs were recruited using a combination of VP-16 (300 mg/m2 on days 1 and 2), cytoxan (3 g/m2 on days 3 and 4) and GM-CSF (5 micrograms/kg from day 5). No differences were demonstrated between the two groups in median time to neutrophil or platelet recoveries. There was no significant difference between the GM-CSF group and the placebo group in the median duration of post-transplant hospitalization, in the number of days of antibiotic treatment, in the number of infections and in red blood cell or platelet transfusion requirements. There was a significant difference with an advantage for the placebo group in the mean duration of febrile days (P = 0.01). We conclude that the administration of GM-CSF in patients transplanted with GM-CSF-mobilized PBPC is not associated with a clinical benefit in term of tempo of engraftment, numbers of documented infections, transfusion requirements and mucositis grading.

  19. The soybean GmDi19-5 interacts with GmLEA3.1 and increases sensitivity of transgenic plants to abiotic stresses

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Zhi-Juan; Cui, Xiao-Yu; Cui, Xi-Yan; Chen, Ming; Yang, Guang-Xiao; Ma, You-Zhi; He, Guang-Yuan; Xu, Zhao-Shi

    2015-01-01

    Drought-induced (Di19) proteins played important roles in plant growth, development, and abiotic stress responses. In the present study, a total of seven Di19 genes were identified in soybean. Each soybean Di19 gene showed specific responses to salt, drought, oxidative, and ABA stresses based on expression profiles. With a relatively higher transcript level among Di19 members under four stress treatments, GmDi19-5 was selected for detailed analysis. Inhibitor assays revealed that ABA inhibitor (Fluridone) or H2O2 inhibitor (DMTU) was involved in the drought- or salt-induced transcription of GmDi19-5. The GUS activity driven by the GmDi19-5 promoter was induced by salt, PEG, ABA, and MV treatments and tended to be accumulated in the vascular bundles and young leaves. A subcellular localization assay showed that GmDi19-5 protein localized in the nucleus. Further investigation showed that GmDi19-5 protein was involved in the interaction with GmLEA3.1. Overexpression of GmDi19-5 increased sensitivity of transgenic Arabidopsis plants to salt, drought, oxidative, and ABA stresses and regulated expression of several ABA/stress-associated genes. This present investigation showed that GmDi19-5 functioned as a negative factor under abiotic stresses and was involved in ABA and SOS signaling pathway by altering transcription of stress-associated genes. PMID:25852726

  20. Synthesis and characterization of N-parinaroyl analogs of ganglioside GM3 and de-N-acetyl GM3. Interactions with the EGF receptor kinase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Song, W.; Welti, R.; Hafner-Strauss, S.; Rintoul, D. A.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1993-01-01

    A specific plasma membrane glycosphingolipid, known as ganglioside GM3, can regulate the intrinsic tyrosyl kinase activity of the epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor; this modulation is not associated with alterations in hormone binding to the receptor. GM3 inhibits EGF receptor tyrosyl kinase activity in detergent micelles, in plasma membrane vesicles, and in whole cells. In addition, immunoaffinity-purified EGF receptor preparations contain ganglioside GM3 (Hanai et al. (1988) J. Biol. Chem. 263, 10915-10921), implying that the glycosphingolipid is intimately associated with the receptor kinase in cell membranes. Both the nature of this association and the molecular mechanism of kinase inhibition remain to be elucidated. In this report, we describe the synthesis of a fluorescent analog of ganglioside GM3, in which the native fatty acid was replaced with trans-parinaric acid. This glycosphingolipid inhibited the receptor kinase activity in a manner similar to that of the native ganglioside. A modified fluorescent glycosphingolipid, N-trans-parinaroyl de-N-acetyl ganglioside GM3, was also prepared. This analog, like the nonfluorescent de-N-acetyl ganglioside GM3, had no effect on receptor kinase activity. Results from tryptophan fluorescence quenching and steady-state anisotropy measurements in membranes containing these fluorescent probes and the human EGF receptor were consistent with the notion that GM3, but not de-N-acetyl GM3, interacts specifically with the receptor in intact membranes.

  1. Preferential accumulation of bubbles in Couette-Taylor flow patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Climent, Eric; Simonnet, Marie; Magnaudet, Jacques

    2007-08-01

    We investigate the migration of bubbles in several flow patterns occurring within the gap between a rotating inner cylinder and a concentric fixed outer cylinder. The time-dependent evolution of the two-phase flow is predicted through three-dimensional Euler-Lagrange simulations. Lagrangian tracking of spherical bubbles is coupled with direct numerical simulation of the Navier-Stokes equations. We assume that bubbles do not influence the background flow (one-way coupling simulations). The force balance on each bubble takes into account buoyancy, added-mass, viscous drag, and shear-induced lift forces. For increasing velocities of the rotating inner cylinder, the flow in the fluid gap evolves from the purely azimuthal steady Couette flow to Taylor toroidal vortices and eventually a wavy vortex flow. The migration of bubbles is highly dependent on the balance between buoyancy and centripetal forces (mostly due to the centripetal pressure gradient) directed toward the inner cylinder and the vortex cores. Depending on the rotation rate of the inner cylinder, bubbles tend to accumulate alternatively along the inner wall, inside the core of Taylor vortices or at particular locations within the wavy vortices. A stability analysis of the fixed points associated with bubble trajectories provides a clear understanding of their migration and preferential accumulation. The location of the accumulation points is parameterized by two dimensionless parameters expressing the balance of buoyancy, centripetal attraction toward the inner rotating cylinder, and entrapment in Taylor vortices. A complete phase diagram summarizing the various regimes of bubble migration is built. Several experimental conditions considered by Djéridi, Gabillet, and Billard [Phys. Fluids 16, 128 (2004)] are reproduced; the numerical results reveal a very good agreement with the experiments. When the rotation rate is increased further, the numerical results indicate the formation of oscillating bubble

  2. GM as a route for delivery of sustainable crop protection.

    PubMed

    Bruce, Toby J A

    2012-01-01

    Modern agriculture, with its vast monocultures of lush fertilized crops, provides an ideal environment for adapted pests, weeds, and diseases. This vulnerability has implications for food security: when new pesticide-resistant pest biotypes evolve they can devastate crops. Even with existing crop protection measures, approximately one-third yield losses occur globally. Given the projected increase in demand for food (70% by 2050 according to the UN), sustainable ways of preventing these losses are needed. Development of resistant crop cultivars can make an important contribution. However, traditional crop breeding programmes are limited by the time taken to move resistance traits into elite crop genetic backgrounds and the limited gene pools in which to search for novel resistance. Furthermore, resistance based on single genes does not protect against the full spectrum of pests, weeds, and diseases, and is more likely to break down as pests evolve counter-resistance. Although not necessarily a panacea, GM (genetic modification) techniques greatly facilitate transfer of genes and thus provide a route to overcome these constraints. Effective resistance traits can be precisely and conveniently moved into mainstream crop cultivars. Resistance genes can be stacked to make it harder for pests to evolve counter-resistance and to provide multiple resistances to different attackers. GM-based crop protection could substantially reduce the need for farmers to apply pesticides to their crops and would make agricultural production more efficient in terms of resources used (land, energy, water). These benefits merit consideration by environmentalists willing to keep an open mind on the GM debate.

  3. A Review of GM-CSF Therapy in Sepsis.

    PubMed

    Mathias, Brittany; Szpila, Benjamin E; Moore, Frederick A; Efron, Philip A; Moldawer, Lyle L

    2015-12-01

    Determine what clinical role, if any, GM-CSF may have in the clinical treatment of sepsis in the adult patient. Advancements in the management of sepsis have led to significant decreases in early mortality; however, sepsis remains a significant source of long-term mortality and disability which places strain on healthcare resources with a substantial growing economic impact. Historically, early multiple organ failure (MOF) and death in patients with severe sepsis was thought to result from an exaggerated proinflammatory response called the systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS). Numerous prospective randomized controlled trials (PRCTs) tested therapies aimed at decreasing the organ injury associated with an exaggerated inflammatory response. With few exceptions, the results from these PRCTs have been disappointing, and currently no specific therapeutic agent is approved to counteract the early SIRS response in patients with severe sepsis. It has long been recognized that there is a delayed immunosuppressive state that contributes to long-term morbidity. However, recent findings now support a concurrent proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory response present throughout sepsis. Multiple immunomodulating agents have been studied to combat the immunosuppressive phase of sepsis with the goal of decreasing secondary infection, reducing organ dysfunction, decreasing ICU stays, and improving survival. Granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF), a myelopoietic growth factor currently used in patients with neutropenia secondary to chemotherapy-induced myelosuppression, has been studied as a potential immune-activating agent. The applicability of GM-CSF as a standard therapy for generalized sepsis is still largely understudied; however, small-scale studies available have demonstrated some improved recovery from infection, decreased hospital length of stay, decreased days requiring mechanical ventilation, and decreased medical costs. PMID:26683913

  4. A Review of GM-CSF Therapy in Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Mathias, Brittany; Szpila, Benjamin E.; Moore, Frederick A.; Efron, Philip A.; Moldawer, Lyle L.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Determine what clinical role, if any, GM-CSF may have in the clinical treatment of sepsis in the adult patient. Advancements in the management of sepsis have led to significant decreases in early mortality; however, sepsis remains a significant source of long-term mortality and disability which places strain on healthcare resources with a substantial growing economic impact. Historically, early multiple organ failure (MOF) and death in patients with severe sepsis was thought to result from an exaggerated proinflammatory response called the systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS). Numerous prospective randomized controlled trials (PRCTs) tested therapies aimed at decreasing the organ injury associated with an exaggerated inflammatory response. With few exceptions, the results from these PRCTs have been disappointing, and currently no specific therapeutic agent is approved to counteract the early SIRS response in patients with severe sepsis. It has long been recognized that there is a delayed immunosuppressive state that contributes to long-term morbidity. However, recent findings now support a concurrent proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory response present throughout sepsis. Multiple immunomodulating agents have been studied to combat the immunosuppressive phase of sepsis with the goal of decreasing secondary infection, reducing organ dysfunction, decreasing ICU stays, and improving survival. Granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF), a myelopoietic growth factor currently used in patients with neutropenia secondary to chemotherapy-induced myelosuppression, has been studied as a potential immune-activating agent. The applicability of GM-CSF as a standard therapy for generalized sepsis is still largely understudied; however, small-scale studies available have demonstrated some improved recovery from infection, decreased hospital length of stay, decreased days requiring mechanical ventilation, and decreased medical costs. PMID

  5. GM crops and foods: what do consumers want to know?

    PubMed

    McHughen, Alan

    2013-01-01

    Agricultural biotechnology--GMOs--has a huge positive impact on farming and farmers but remains controversial among the skeptical public. Curious but anxious consumers, driven by scare stories and pseudo-science provided by anti-GMO activists, seek accurate and authoritative answers to their questions. Here, I address a sample of such queries directed to me from the public, including the ubiquitous "Is it safe?" and also discuss some of the shameful tactics used by anti-GM activists in the public debate to garner support at the cost of inciting unnecessary anxiety among the public. PMID:24051491

  6. GM crops and foods: what do consumers want to know?

    PubMed

    McHughen, Alan

    2013-01-01

    Agricultural biotechnology--GMOs--has a huge positive impact on farming and farmers but remains controversial among the skeptical public. Curious but anxious consumers, driven by scare stories and pseudo-science provided by anti-GMO activists, seek accurate and authoritative answers to their questions. Here, I address a sample of such queries directed to me from the public, including the ubiquitous "Is it safe?" and also discuss some of the shameful tactics used by anti-GM activists in the public debate to garner support at the cost of inciting unnecessary anxiety among the public.

  7. Late onset GM2 gangliosidosis mimicking spinal muscular atrophy.

    PubMed

    Jamrozik, Z; Lugowska, A; Gołębiowski, M; Królicki, L; Mączewska, J; Kuźma-Kozakiewicz, M

    2013-09-25

    A case of late onset GM2 gangliosidodis with spinal muscular atrophy phenotype followed by cerebellar and extrapyramidal symptoms is presented. Genetic analysis revealed compound heterozygous mutation in exon 10 of the HEXA gene. Patient has normal intelligence and emotional reactivity. Neuroimaging tests of the brain showed only cerebellar atrophy consistent with MR spectroscopy (MRS) abnormalities. (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (18)F-FDG PET/CT of the brain revealed glucose hypometabolism in cerebellum and in temporal and occipital lobes bilaterally. PMID:23820084

  8. Increased Expression of Simple Ganglioside Species GM2 and GM3 Detected by MALDI Imaging Mass Spectrometry in a Combined Rat Model of Aβ Toxicity and Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Caughlin, Sarah; Hepburn, Jeffrey D.; Park, Dae Hee; Jurcic, Kristina; Yeung, Ken K.-C.; Cechetto, David F.; Whitehead, Shawn N.

    2015-01-01

    The aging brain is often characterized by the presence of multiple comorbidities resulting in synergistic damaging effects in the brain as demonstrated through the interaction of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and stroke. Gangliosides, a family of membrane lipids enriched in the central nervous system, may have a mechanistic role in mediating the brain’s response to injury as their expression is altered in a number of disease and injury states. Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization (MALDI) Imaging Mass Spectrometry (IMS) was used to study the expression of A-series ganglioside species GD1a, GM1, GM2, and GM3 to determine alteration of their expression profiles in the presence of beta-amyloid (Aβ) toxicity in addition to ischemic injury. To model a stroke, rats received a unilateral striatal injection of endothelin-1 (ET-1) (stroke alone group). To model Aβ toxicity, rats received intracerebralventricular (icv) injections of the toxic 25-35 fragment of the Aβ peptide (Aβ alone group). To model the combination of Aβ toxicity with stroke, rats received both the unilateral ET-1 injection and the bilateral icv injections of Aβ₂₅₋₃₅ (combined Aβ/ET-1 group). By 3 d, a significant increase in the simple ganglioside species GM2 was observed in the ischemic brain region of rats who received a stroke (ET-1), with or without Aβ. By 21 d, GM2 levels only remained elevated in the combined Aβ/ET-1 group. GM3 levels however demonstrated a different pattern of expression. By 3 d GM3 was elevated in the ischemic brain region only in the combined Aβ/ET-1 group. By 21 d, GM3 was elevated in the ischemic brain region in both stroke alone and Aβ/ET-1 groups. Overall, results indicate that the accumulation of simple ganglioside species GM2 and GM3 may be indicative of a mechanism of interaction between AD and stroke. PMID:26086081

  9. Experiments of periodic forcing of Saffman-Taylor fingers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torralba, M.; Ortín, J.; Hernández-Machado, A.; Poiré, E. Corvera

    2008-03-01

    We report on an experimental study of long normal Saffman-Taylor fingers subject to periodic forcing. The sides of the finger develop a low amplitude, long wavelength instability. We discuss the finger response in stationary and nonstationary situations, as well as the dynamics towards the stationary states. The response frequency of the instability increases with forcing frequency at low forcing frequencies, while, remarkably, it becomes independent of forcing frequency at large forcing frequencies. This implies a process of wavelength selection. These observations are in good agreement with previous numerical results reported in [Ledesma-Aguilar , Phys. Rev. E 71, 016312 (2005)]. We also study the average value of the finger width, and its fluctuations, as a function of forcing frequency. The average finger width is always smaller than the width of the steady-state finger. Fluctuations have a nonmonotonic behavior with a maximum at a particular frequency.

  10. High Reynolds number decay of turbulent Taylor-Couette flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verschoof, Ruben A.; Huisman, Sander G.; van der Veen, Roeland C. A.; Sun, Chao; Lohse, Detlef

    2015-11-01

    We study the decay of high-Reynolds number turbulence in a Taylor-Couette facility for pure inner cylinder rotation. The rotation of the inner cylinder (Rei = 2 ×106) is suddenly decelerated as fast as possible, thus removing the energy input within seconds. Local velocity measurements show that the decay in this wall-bounded inhomogeneous flow is faster than observed for homogeneous isotropic turbulent flows, due to the strong viscous drag applied by the inner and outer cylinder surfaces. We found that the decay over time can be described with the differential equation Re . (t) =cf (Re)Re2 , where the effects of the walls are included through the friction coefficient. A self-similar behavior of the azimuthal velocity is found: its normalized velocity profile as a function of the radius collapses over time during the decay process.

  11. Logarithmic Boundary Layers in Strong Taylor-Couette Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lohse, Detlef; Huisman, Sander; Ostilla, Rodolfo; Scharnowski, Sven; Cierpka, Christian; Kähler, Christian; Verzicco, Roberto; Sun, Chao; Grossmann, Siegfried

    2013-11-01

    We provide direct measurements of boundary layer profiles in highly turbulent Taylor-Couette flow up to Re = 2 ×106 using high-resolution particle image velocimetry and particle tracking velocimetry, complemented by DNS data on the same system up to Re =105 . We find that the mean azimuthal velocity profile at the inner and outer cylinder can be fitted by the von Kármán log law, but with corrections due to the curvature of the cylinder, which we theoretically account for, based on the Navier-Stokes equation and a closure assumption for the turbulent diffusivity. In particular, we study how these corrections depend on the cylinder radius ratio and show that they are different for the boundary layers at the inner and at the outer cylinder.

  12. Logarithmic Boundary Layers in Strong Taylor-Couette Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huisman, Sander G.; Scharnowski, Sven; Cierpka, Christian; Kähler, Christian J.; Lohse, Detlef; Sun, Chao

    2013-06-01

    We provide direct measurements of the boundary layer properties in highly turbulent Taylor-Couette flow up to Re=2×106 (Ta=6.2×1012) using high-resolution particle image velocimetry and particle tracking velocimetry. We find that the mean azimuthal velocity profile at the inner and outer cylinder can be fitted by the von Kármán log law u+=1/κln⁡y++B. The von Kármán constant κ is found to depend on the driving strength Ta and for large Ta asymptotically approaches κ≈0.40. The variance profiles of the local azimuthal velocity have a universal peak around y+≈12 and collapse when rescaled with the driving velocity (and not with the friction velocity), displaying a log dependence of y+ as also found for channel and pipe flows.

  13. Taylor's law and body size in exploited marine ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Joel E; Plank, Michael J; Law, Richard

    2012-12-01

    Taylor's law (TL), which states that variance in population density is related to mean density via a power law, and density-mass allometry, which states that mean density is related to body mass via a power law, are two of the most widely observed patterns in ecology. Combining these two laws predicts that the variance in density is related to body mass via a power law (variance-mass allometry). Marine size spectra are known to exhibit density-mass allometry, but variance-mass allometry has not been investigated. We show that variance and body mass in unexploited size spectrum models are related by a power law, and that this leads to TL with an exponent slightly <2. These simulated relationships are disrupted less by balanced harvesting, in which fishing effort is spread across a wide range of body sizes, than by size-at-entry fishing, in which only fish above a certain size may legally be caught.

  14. Magnetic Rayleigh-Taylor Instability with Biermann Battery Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, Chuan-Chih (Jason); Fryxell, Bruce; Drake, R.; van der Holst, Bart

    2011-10-01

    Recently, unexpected morphology has been observed in high-energy Rayleigh-Taylor experiments. In these experiments with 3D initial perturbations, the spikes lack the mushroom cap observed in 2D or low-energy counterparts. It is suspected that magnetic field generated by Biermann battery may be responsible for this unusual morphology. In order to estimate the magnitude of the magnetic field due to Biermann battery effect under the experimental circumstances, we performed preliminary simulations using CRASH and its recent implementation of Biermann battery term. Although limited by the lack of corresponding dissipation term, we are able to obtain the upper limit of the magnetic field present in the experiment. We will discuss its implication in the context of the plausibility of the Biermann battery hypothesis. Work supported by the Predictive Sciences Academic Alliances Program in USDOE NNSA-ASC (grant DE-FC52-08NA28616), and by the University of Michigan.

  15. Numerical study of spherical Taylor-Couette flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, R.-J.

    1989-01-01

    A new technique to simulate Taylor vortices in a spherical gap between a rotating inner sphere and a stationary outer one has been developed and tested. Paths leading to zero-, one-, and two-vortex flows are designed heuristically. Fictitious symmetric boundaries near the equator are imposed, and the choice of the location of the fictitious boundaries is determined by either one- or two-vortex flow being stimulated. The imposition of one or two fictitious boundaries during the initial calculation generates the state suitable for one-or two-vortex flow to exist. After removing the fictitious boundaries, the flow settles down into its own attractor. Using this method, the three steady flow modes can be simulated by using a half domain. The technique can converge to desired flows very fast, and its results show excellent agreement with experimental ones.

  16. Symmetry and stability in Taylor-Couette flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golubitsky, M.; Stewart, I.

    1986-01-01

    The flow of a fluid between concentric rotating cylinders (the Taylor problem) is studied by exploiting the symmetries of the system. The Navier-Stokes equations, linearized about Couette flow, possess two zero and four purely imaginary eigenvalues at a suitable value of the speed of rotation of the outer cylinder. There is thus a reduced bifurcation equation on a six-dimensonal space which can be shown to commute with an action of the symmetry group 0(2) x S0(2). The group structure is used to analyze this bifurcation equation in the simplest (nondegenerate) case, and to compute the stabilities of solutions. In particular, when the outer cylinder is counterrotated, transitions which seem to agree with recent experiments of Andereck, Liu, and Swinney (1984) are obtained. It is also possible to obtain the 'main sequence' in this model. This sequence is normally observed in experiments when the outer cylinder is held fixed.

  17. The cylindrical magnetic Rayleigh-Taylor instability for viscous fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Chambers, K.; Forbes, L. K.

    2012-10-15

    This paper considers a cylindrical Rayleigh-Taylor instability, in which a heavy fluid surrounds a light fluid, and gravity is directed radially inwards. A massive object is located at the centre of the light fluid, and it behaves like a line dipole both for fluid flow and magnetic field strength. The initially circular interface between the two conducting fluids evolves into plumes, dependent on the magnetic and fluid dipole strengths and the nature of the initial disturbance to the interface. A spectral method is presented to solve the time-dependent interface shapes, and results are presented and discussed. Bipolar solutions are possible, and these are of particular relevance to astrophysics. The solutions obtained resemble structures of some HII regions and nebulae.

  18. Qualitative and quantitative features of Rayleigh-Taylor mixing dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramaprabhu, Praveen; Karkhanis, Varad; Lawrie, Andrew; Bhowmick, Aklant; Abarzhi, Snezhana; RTI Collaboration

    2015-11-01

    We consider dynamics of Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) flow in a large aspect ratio three-dimensional domain with square symmetry in the plane for fluids with contrasting densities. In order to quantify the interface evolution from a small amplitude single-mode initial perturbation to advanced stage of RT mixing, we apply numerical simulations using the MOBILE code, theoretical analyses, including group theory and momentum model, as well as parameters describing the interplay between acceleration and turbulence. We find: In RT flow, the fluid motion is intense near the interface and is negligible far from the interface. At late times the growth rates of RT bubbles and spikes may increase without a corresponding increase of length-scales in the direction normal to acceleration. The parameters describing the interplay between acceleration and turbulence in RT mixing are shown to scale well with the flow Reynolds number and Froude number.

  19. Nonlinear saturation amplitude of cylindrical Rayleigh—Taylor instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wan-Hai; Yu, Chang-Ping; Ye, Wen-Hua; Wang, Li-Feng

    2014-09-01

    The nonlinear saturation amplitude (NSA) of the fundamental mode in the classical Rayleigh—Taylor instability with a cylindrical geometry for an arbitrary Atwood number is analytically investigated by considering the nonlinear corrections up to the third order. The analytic results indicate that the effects of the initial radius of the interface (r0) and the Atwood number (A) play an important role in the NSA of the fundamental mode. The NSA of the fundamental mode first increases gently and then decreases quickly with increasing A. For a given A, the smaller the r0/λ (λ is the perturbation wavelength), the larger the NSA of the fundamental mode. When r0/λ is large enough (r0 ≫ λ), the NSA of the fundamental mode is reduced to the prediction in the previous literatures within the framework of the third-order perturbation theory.

  20. Shercliff layers in strongly magnetic cylindrical Taylor-Couette flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hollerbach, Rainer; Hulot, Deborah

    2016-07-01

    We numerically compute the axisymmetric Taylor-Couette flow in the presence of axially periodic magnetic fields, with Hartmann numbers up to Ha2 =107. The geometry of the field singles out special field lines on which Shercliff layers form. These are simple shear layers for insulating boundaries, versus super-rotating or counter-rotating layers for conducting boundaries. Some field configurations have previously studied spherical analogs, but fundamentally new configurations also exist, having no spherical analogs. Finally, we explore the influence of azimuthal fields Bϕ ∼r-1eˆϕ on these layers, and show that the flow is suppressed for conducting boundaries, but enhanced for insulating boundaries. xml:lang="fr"

  1. Taylor dispersion in equilibrium gradient focusing at steady state.

    PubMed

    Ivory, Cornelius F

    2015-03-01

    An analytic expression is presented for the effective dispersion coefficient in the case where a solute is focused in a parabolic flow against a linear gradient in a restoring force. This expression was derived by employing a minor variation on the method of moments used by Aris in his development of the dispersion coefficients for a time-dependent, isocratic system. In the present case, dispersion is controlled by two dimensionless groups, a Peclet number which is proportional to the parabolic component of the flow, and a gradient number which is proportional to the slope of the restoring force. These results confirm that the Aris-Taylor expression for the dispersion coefficient should not be applied in cases where a solute is focused to a stationary steady state.

  2. Collisional effects on Rayleigh-Taylor-induced magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Manuel, M. J.-E.; Flaig, M.; Plewa, T.; Li, C. K.; Séguin, F. H.; Frenje, J. A.; Casey, D. T.; Petrasso, R. D.; Hu, S. X.; Betti, R.; Hager, J.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Smalyuk, V.

    2015-05-15

    Magnetic-field generation from the Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability was predicted more than 30 years ago, though experimental measurements of this phenomenon have only occurred in the past few years. These pioneering observations demonstrated that collisional effects are important to B-field evolution. To produce fields of a measurable strength, high-intensity lasers irradiate solid targets to generate the nonaligned temperature and density gradients required for B-field generation. The ablation process naturally generates an unstable system where RT-induced magnetic fields form. Field strengths inferred from monoenergetic-proton radiographs indicate that in the ablation region diffusive effects caused by finite plasma resistivity are not negligible. Results from the first proof-of-existence experiments are reviewed and the role of collisional effects on B-field evolution is discussed in detail.

  3. Plasma transport driven by the Rayleigh-Taylor instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, X.; Delamere, P. A.; Otto, A.

    2016-06-01

    Two important differences between the giant magnetospheres (i.e., Jupiter's and Saturn's magnetospheres) and the terrestrial magnetosphere are the internal plasma sources and the fast planetary rotation. Thus, there must be a radially outward flow to transport the plasma to avoid infinite accumulation of plasma. This radial outflow also carries the magnetic flux away from the inner magnetosphere due to the frozen-in condition. As such, there also must be a radial inward flow to refill the magnetic flux in the inner magnetosphere. Due to the similarity between Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability and the centrifugal instability, we use a three-dimensional RT instability to demonstrate that an interchange instability can form a convection flow pattern, locally twisting the magnetic flux, consequently forming a pair of high-latitude reconnection sites. This process exchanges a part of the flux tube, thereby transporting the plasma radially outward without requiring significant latitudinal convection of magnetic flux in the ionosphere.

  4. Size invariance of the granular Rayleigh-Taylor instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinningland, Jan Ludvig; Johnsen, Øistein; Flekkøy, Eirik G.; Toussaint, Renaud; Måløy, Knut Jørgen

    2010-04-01

    The size scaling behavior of the granular Rayleigh-Taylor instability [J. L. Vinningland , Phys. Rev. Lett. 99, 048001 (2007)] is investigated experimentally, numerically, and theoretically. An upper layer of grains displaces a lower gap of air by organizing into dense fingers of falling grains separated by rising bubbles of air. The dependence of these structures on the system and grain sizes is investigated. A spatial measurement of the finger structures is obtained by the Fourier power spectrum of the wave number k . As the size of the grains increases the wave number decreases accordingly which leaves the dimensionless product of wave number and grain diameter, dk , invariant. A theoretical interpretation of the invariance, based on the scaling properties of the model equations, suggests a gradual breakdown of the invariance for grains smaller than ˜70μm or greater than ˜570μm in diameter.

  5. The magnetic Rayleigh-Taylor instability in astrophysical discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contopoulos, I.; Kazanas, D.; Papadopoulos, D. B.

    2016-10-01

    This is our first study of the magnetic Rayleigh-Taylor instability at the inner edge of an astrophysical disc around a central back hole. We derive the equations governing small-amplitude oscillations in general relativistic ideal magnetodydrodynamics and obtain a criterion for the onset of the instability. We suggest that static disc configurations where magnetic field is held by the disc material are unstable around a Schwarzschild black hole. On the other hand, we find that such configurations are stabilized by the space-time rotation around a Kerr black hole. We obtain a crude estimate of the maximum amount of poloidal magnetic flux that can be accumulated around the centre, and suggest that it is proportional to the black hole spin. Finally, we discuss the astrophysical implications of our result for the theoretical and observational estimations of the black hole jet power.

  6. A novel technique for performing symmetric Taylor impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walley, S. M.; Taylor, N. E.; Williamson, D. M.; Jardine, A. P.

    2015-09-01

    A novel spring tensioned wire cradle arrangement has been developed to hold the target rod lightly but firmly in place when performing rod-on-rod (symmetric Taylor) impact in a vacuum. In addition, a soft capture system has been designed and used to decelerate both rods while reducing the chance of them colliding a second time. High-speed photography was used to obtain the profile of a pure aluminium target rod as a function of time. Photon Doppler Velocimetry (PDV) was also deployed to record the velocity of the rear of the target rod as a function of time. Voiding in the interior of recovered rods was investigated non-destructively using X-ray tomography. The data provides comprehensive validation information for predictive constitutive models.

  7. Subcritical Transition and Spiral Turbulence in Taylor-Couette Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burin, M. J.; Czarnocki, C. J.; Dapron, T.; McDonald, K. R.

    2010-11-01

    We present measurements characterizing the transition to turbulence in Taylor-Couette flow for a fully cyclonic regime, i.e. with only the outer cylinder rotating. Under this arrangement the flow is linearly-stable and the shear-driven transition to turbulence is understood to be both `catastrophic' and spatiotemporally intermittent. En route to a fully turbulent state, we observe a regime featuring co-extant laminar/turbulent domains known as spiral turbulence. To better understand this regime, and the transition in general, we have obtained velocimetry data (via LDV) and angular momentum transport estimates (via torque), in addition to flow visualization. These observations are discussed with respect to similar transition phenomena in planar and counter-rotating Couette flows. By utilizing three different inner cylinder radii within the apparatus, we also demonstrate the sensitivity of the subcritical transition scenario to annular gap width.

  8. Recent advances in the turbulent Rayleigh-Taylor instability

    SciTech Connect

    Dimonte, Guy; Ramaprabhu, P.; Youngs, D.L.; Andrews, M.J.; Rosner, R.

    2005-05-15

    In the turbulent Rayleigh-Taylor instability, the light fluid penetrates the heavy fluid as bubbles with a diameter D{sub b} and amplitude h{sub b} that grow self-similarly D{sub b}{proportional_to}h{sub b}{approx}{alpha}{sub b}A gt{sup 2} where A is Atwood number, g is acceleration, and t is time. Experiments measure an acceleration constant {alpha}{sub b}{approx}0.04-0.08 whereas the highest resolution three-dimensional numerical simulations obtain {alpha}{sub b}{approx}0.02-0.03 with idealized initial conditions. This paper reconciles this apparent discrepancy with new simulations that quantify the importance of initial conditions on {alpha}{sub b}. The results compare favorably with experiments and a model based on self-similar bubble dynamics.

  9. Viscous Rayleigh-Taylor instability in spherical geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikaelian, Karnig O.

    2016-02-01

    We consider viscous fluids in spherical geometry, a lighter fluid supporting a heavier one. Chandrasekhar [Q. J. Mech. Appl. Math. 8, 1 (1955), 10.1093/qjmam/8.1.1] analyzed this unstable configuration providing the equations needed to find, numerically, the exact growth rates for the ensuing Rayleigh-Taylor instability. He also derived an analytic but approximate solution. We point out a weakness in his approximate dispersion relation (DR) and offer a somewhat improved one. A third DR, based on transforming a planar DR into a spherical one, suffers no unphysical predictions and compares reasonably well with the exact work of Chandrasekhar and a more recent numerical analysis of the problem [Terrones and Carrara, Phys. Fluids 27, 054105 (2015), 10.1063/1.4921648].

  10. Recovering network topologies via Taylor expansion and compressive sensing

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Guangjun; Liu, Juan E-mail: liujuanjp@163.com; Wu, Xiaoqun E-mail: liujuanjp@163.com; Lu, Jun-an; Guo, Chi

    2015-04-15

    Gaining knowledge of the intrinsic topology of a complex dynamical network is the precondition to understand its evolutionary mechanisms and to control its dynamical and functional behaviors. In this article, a general framework is developed to recover topologies of complex networks with completely unknown node dynamics based on Taylor expansion and compressive sensing. Numerical simulations illustrate the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed method. Moreover, this method is found to have good robustness to weak stochastic perturbations. Finally, the impact of two major factors on the topology identification performance is evaluated. This method provides a natural and direct point to reconstruct network topologies from measurable data, which is likely to have potential applicability in a wide range of fields.

  11. Linear analysis of incompressible Rayleigh-Taylor instability in solids.

    PubMed

    Piriz, A R; Cela, J J López; Tahir, N A

    2009-10-01

    The study of the linear stage of the incompressible Rayleigh-Taylor instability in elastic-plastic solids is performed by considering thick plates under a constant acceleration that is also uniform except for a small sinusoidal ripple in the horizontal plane. The analysis is carried out by using an analytical model based on the Newton second law and it is complemented with extensive two-dimensional numerical simulations. The conditions for marginal stability that determine the instability threshold are derived. Besides, the boundary for the transition from the elastic to the plastic regime is obtained and it is demonstrated that such a transition is not a sufficient condition for instability. The model yields complete analytical solutions for the perturbation amplitude evolution and reveals the main physical process that governs the instability. The theory is in general agreement with the numerical simulations and provides useful quantitative results. Implications for high-energy-density-physics experiments are also discussed.

  12. Linear analysis of incompressible Rayleigh-Taylor instability in solids

    SciTech Connect

    Piriz, A. R.; Lopez Cela, J. J.; Tahir, N. A.

    2009-10-15

    The study of the linear stage of the incompressible Rayleigh-Taylor instability in elastic-plastic solids is performed by considering thick plates under a constant acceleration that is also uniform except for a small sinusoidal ripple in the horizontal plane. The analysis is carried out by using an analytical model based on the Newton second law and it is complemented with extensive two-dimensional numerical simulations. The conditions for marginal stability that determine the instability threshold are derived. Besides, the boundary for the transition from the elastic to the plastic regime is obtained and it is demonstrated that such a transition is not a sufficient condition for instability. The model yields complete analytical solutions for the perturbation amplitude evolution and reveals the main physical process that governs the instability. The theory is in general agreement with the numerical simulations and provides useful quantitative results. Implications for high-energy-density-physics experiments are also discussed.

  13. Recovering network topologies via Taylor expansion and compressive sensing.

    PubMed

    Li, Guangjun; Wu, Xiaoqun; Liu, Juan; Lu, Jun-an; Guo, Chi

    2015-04-01

    Gaining knowledge of the intrinsic topology of a complex dynamical network is the precondition to understand its evolutionary mechanisms and to control its dynamical and functional behaviors. In this article, a general framework is developed to recover topologies of complex networks with completely unknown node dynamics based on Taylor expansion and compressive sensing. Numerical simulations illustrate the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed method. Moreover, this method is found to have good robustness to weak stochastic perturbations. Finally, the impact of two major factors on the topology identification performance is evaluated. This method provides a natural and direct point to reconstruct network topologies from measurable data, which is likely to have potential applicability in a wide range of fields.

  14. Soybean GmDREBL Increases Lipid Content in Seeds of Transgenic Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yu-Qin; Lu, Xiang; Zhao, Fei-Yi; Li, Qing-Tian; Niu, Su-Ling; Wei, Wei; Zhang, Wan-Ke; Ma, Biao; Chen, Shou-Yi; Zhang, Jin-Song

    2016-01-01

    A DREB-type transcription factor gene GmDREBL has been characterized for its functions in oil accumulation in seeds. The gene is specifically expressed in soybean seeds. The GmDREBL is localized in nucleus and has transcriptional activation ability. Overexpression of GmDREBL increased the fatty acid content in the seeds of transgenic Arabidopsis plants. GmDREBL can bind to the promoter region of WRI1 to activate its expression. Several other genes in the fatty acid biosynthesis pathway were also enhanced in the GmDREBL-transgenic plants. The GmDREBL can be up-regulated by GmABI3 and GmABI5. Additionally, overexpression of GmDREBL significantly promoted seed size in transgenic plants compared to that of WT plants. Expression of the DREBL is at higher level on the average in cultivated soybeans than that in wild soybeans. The promoter of the DREBL may have been subjected to selection during soybean domestication. Our results demonstrate that GmDREBL participates in the regulation of fatty acid accumulation by controlling the expression of WRI1 and its downstream genes, and manipulation of the gene may increase the oil contents in soybean plants. Our study provides novel insights into the function of DREB-type transcription factors in oil accumulation in addition to their roles in stress response. PMID:27694917

  15. Genome sequences of two closely related strains of Escherichia coli K-12 GM4792.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan-Cong; Zhang, Yan; Zhu, Bi-Ru; Zhang, Bo-Wen; Ni, Chuan; Zhang, Da-Yong; Huang, Ying; Pang, Erli; Lin, Kui

    2015-01-01

    Escherichia coli lab strains K-12 GM4792 Lac(+) and GM4792 Lac(-) carry opposite lactose markers, which are useful for distinguishing evolved lines as they produce different colored colonies. The two closely related strains are chosen as ancestors for our ongoing studies of experimental evolution. Here, we describe the genome sequences, annotation, and features of GM4792 Lac(+) and GM4792 Lac(-). GM4792 Lac(+) has a 4,622,342-bp long chromosome with 4,061 protein-coding genes and 83 RNA genes. Similarly, the genome of GM4792 Lac(-) consists of a 4,621,656-bp chromosome containing 4,043 protein-coding genes and 74 RNA genes. Genome comparison analysis reveals that the differences between GM4792 Lac(+) and GM4792 Lac(-) are minimal and limited to only the targeted lac region. Moreover, a previous study on competitive experimentation indicates the two strains are identical or nearly identical in survivability except for lactose utilization in a nitrogen-limited environment. Therefore, at both a genetic and a phenotypic level, GM4792 Lac(+) and GM4792 Lac(-), with opposite neutral markers, are ideal systems for future experimental evolution studies.

  16. [Application of DNA extraction kit, 'GM quicker' for detection of genetically modified soybeans].

    PubMed

    Sato, Noriko; Sugiura, Yoshitsugu; Tanaka, Toshitsugu

    2012-01-01

    Several DNA extraction methods have been officially introduced to detect genetically modified soybeans, but the choice of DNA extraction kits depend on the nature of the samples, such as grains or processed foods. To overcome this disadvantage, we examined whether the GM quicker kit is available for both grains and processed foods. We compared GM quicker with four approved DNA extraction kits in respect of DNA purity, copy numbers of lectin gene, and working time. We found that the DNA quality of GM quicker was superior to that of the other kits for grains, and the procedure was faster. However, in the case of processed foods, GM quicker was not superior to the other kits. We therefore investigated an unapproved GM quicker 3 kit, which is available for DNA extraction from processed foods, such as tofu and boiled soybeans. The GM quicker 3 kit provided good DNA quality from both grains and processed foods, so we made a minor modification of the GM quicker-based protocol that was suitable for processed foods, using GM quicker and its reagents. The modified method enhanced the performance of GM quicker with processed foods. We believe that GM quicker with the modified protocol is an excellent tool to obtain high-quality DNA from grains and processed foods for detection of genetically modified soybeans.

  17. Genome sequences of two closely related strains of Escherichia coli K-12 GM4792.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan-Cong; Zhang, Yan; Zhu, Bi-Ru; Zhang, Bo-Wen; Ni, Chuan; Zhang, Da-Yong; Huang, Ying; Pang, Erli; Lin, Kui

    2015-01-01

    Escherichia coli lab strains K-12 GM4792 Lac(+) and GM4792 Lac(-) carry opposite lactose markers, which are useful for distinguishing evolved lines as they produce different colored colonies. The two closely related strains are chosen as ancestors for our ongoing studies of experimental evolution. Here, we describe the genome sequences, annotation, and features of GM4792 Lac(+) and GM4792 Lac(-). GM4792 Lac(+) has a 4,622,342-bp long chromosome with 4,061 protein-coding genes and 83 RNA genes. Similarly, the genome of GM4792 Lac(-) consists of a 4,621,656-bp chromosome containing 4,043 protein-coding genes and 74 RNA genes. Genome comparison analysis reveals that the differences between GM4792 Lac(+) and GM4792 Lac(-) are minimal and limited to only the targeted lac region. Moreover, a previous study on competitive experimentation indicates the two strains are identical or nearly identical in survivability except for lactose utilization in a nitrogen-limited environment. Therefore, at both a genetic and a phenotypic level, GM4792 Lac(+) and GM4792 Lac(-), with opposite neutral markers, are ideal systems for future experimental evolution studies. PMID:26664654

  18. Cylindrical Taylor states conserving total absolute magnetic helicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Low, B. C.; Fang, F.

    2014-09-01

    The Taylor state of a three-dimensional (3D) magnetic field in an upright cylindrical domain V is derived from first principles as an extremum of the total magnetic energy subject to a conserved, total absolute helicity Habs. This new helicity [Low, Phys. Plasmas 18, 052901 (2011)] is distinct from the well known classical total helicity and relative total helicity in common use to describe wholly-contained and anchored fields, respectively. A given field B, tangential along the cylindrical side of V, may be represented as a unique linear superposition of two flux systems, an axially extended system along V and a strictly transverse system carrying information on field-circulation. This specialized Chandrasekhar-Kendall representation defines Habs and permits a neat formulation of the boundary-value problem (BVP) for the Taylor state as a constant-α force-free field, treating 3D wholly-contained and anchored fields on the same conceptual basis. In this formulation, the governing equation is a scalar integro-partial differential equation (PDE). A family of series solutions for an anchored field is presented as an illustration of this class of BVPs. Past treatments of the constant-α field in 3D cylindrical geometry are based on a scalar Helmholtz PDE as the governing equation, with issues of inconsistency in the published field solutions discussed over time in the journal literature. The constant-α force-free equation reduces to a scalar Helmholtz PDE only as special cases of the 3D integro-PDE derived here. In contrast, the constant-α force-free equation and the scalar Helmholtz PDE are absolutely equivalent in the spherical domain as discussed in Appendix. This theoretical study is motivated by the investigation of the Sun's corona but the results are also relevant to laboratory plasmas.

  19. Animal models of GM2 gangliosidosis: utility and limitations.

    PubMed

    Lawson, Cheryl A; Martin, Douglas R

    2016-01-01

    GM2 gangliosidosis, a subset of lysosomal storage disorders, is caused by a deficiency of the glycohydrolase, β-N-acetylhexosaminidase, and includes the closely related Tay-Sachs and Sandhoff diseases. The enzyme deficiency prevents the normal, stepwise degradation of ganglioside, which accumulates unchecked within the cellular lysosome, particularly in neurons. As a result, individuals with GM2 gangliosidosis experience progressive neurological diseases including motor deficits, progressive weakness and hypotonia, decreased responsiveness, vision deterioration, and seizures. Mice and cats are well-established animal models for Sandhoff disease, whereas Jacob sheep are the only known laboratory animal model of Tay-Sachs disease to exhibit clinical symptoms. Since the human diseases are relatively rare, animal models are indispensable tools for further study of pathogenesis and for development of potential treatments. Though no effective treatments for gangliosidoses currently exist, animal models have been used to test promising experimental therapies. Herein, the utility and limitations of gangliosidosis animal models and how they have contributed to the development of potential new treatments are described.

  20. Development of a large cooling capacity single stage GM cryocooler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, K.

    2014-09-01

    Sumitomo Heavy Industries, Ltd. (SHI) has developed 4 K Gifford-McMahon (GM) cryocoolers for various cryogenic fields including Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) systems. However, for the purpose of cooling high temperature superconductor (HTS) devices, the needs for cryocoolers with a large cooling capacity in the range of 20-30 K has been rapidly increasing. Recently, SHI developed a large cooling capacity single-stage GM cryocooler, for HTS applications. A typical cooling capacity is 46/52 W at 20 K or 85/96 W at 30 K with 6.9/7.9 kW input power at 50/60 Hz. The cooling capacity degradation caused by inclination is within 24%. And also, a low mechanical vibration and a low acoustic noise have been achieved because the displacer is driven by a motor instead of a pneumatic force. In addition, the cryocooler does not contain lead as a regenerator material, so it complies with restriction of hazardous substances (RoHS) directive.

  1. Animal models of GM2 gangliosidosis: utility and limitations

    PubMed Central

    Lawson, Cheryl A; Martin, Douglas R

    2016-01-01

    GM2 gangliosidosis, a subset of lysosomal storage disorders, is caused by a deficiency of the glycohydrolase, β-N-acetylhexosaminidase, and includes the closely related Tay–Sachs and Sandhoff diseases. The enzyme deficiency prevents the normal, stepwise degradation of ganglioside, which accumulates unchecked within the cellular lysosome, particularly in neurons. As a result, individuals with GM2 gangliosidosis experience progressive neurological diseases including motor deficits, progressive weakness and hypotonia, decreased responsiveness, vision deterioration, and seizures. Mice and cats are well-established animal models for Sandhoff disease, whereas Jacob sheep are the only known laboratory animal model of Tay–Sachs disease to exhibit clinical symptoms. Since the human diseases are relatively rare, animal models are indispensable tools for further study of pathogenesis and for development of potential treatments. Though no effective treatments for gangliosidoses currently exist, animal models have been used to test promising experimental therapies. Herein, the utility and limitations of gangliosidosis animal models and how they have contributed to the development of potential new treatments are described. PMID:27499644

  2. GM2 gangliosidosis in an adult pet rabbit.

    PubMed

    Rickmeyer, T; Schöniger, S; Petermann, A; Harzer, K; Kustermann-Kuhn, B; Fuhrmann, H; Schoon, H-A

    2013-02-01

    A 1.5-year-old neutered male rabbit was presented with chronic nasal discharge and ataxia. Rapid progression of neurological signs was noted subsequent to general anaesthesia and the rabbit was humanely destroyed due to the poor prognosis. At necropsy examination there were no gross changes affecting the brain or spinal cord. Microscopical examination revealed that the perikarya of numerous neurons in the brain and spinal cord were distended by the intracytoplasmic accumulation of pale, finely granular to vacuolar material. Transmission electron microscopy showed this to be composed of concentric membranous cytoplasmic bodies. Thin layer chromatography revealed elevation of GM2 ganglioside in the brain of this rabbit compared with that of an unaffected control rabbit. Enzymatically, there was markedly reduced activity of tissue β-hexosaminidase A in brain and liver tissue from the rabbit. This was a result of an almost complete absence of the enzymatic activity of the α-subunit of that enzyme. These findings are consistent with sphingolipidosis comparable with human GM2 gangliosidosis variant B1.

  3. Animal models of GM2 gangliosidosis: utility and limitations.

    PubMed

    Lawson, Cheryl A; Martin, Douglas R

    2016-01-01

    GM2 gangliosidosis, a subset of lysosomal storage disorders, is caused by a deficiency of the glycohydrolase, β-N-acetylhexosaminidase, and includes the closely related Tay-Sachs and Sandhoff diseases. The enzyme deficiency prevents the normal, stepwise degradation of ganglioside, which accumulates unchecked within the cellular lysosome, particularly in neurons. As a result, individuals with GM2 gangliosidosis experience progressive neurological diseases including motor deficits, progressive weakness and hypotonia, decreased responsiveness, vision deterioration, and seizures. Mice and cats are well-established animal models for Sandhoff disease, whereas Jacob sheep are the only known laboratory animal model of Tay-Sachs disease to exhibit clinical symptoms. Since the human diseases are relatively rare, animal models are indispensable tools for further study of pathogenesis and for development of potential treatments. Though no effective treatments for gangliosidoses currently exist, animal models have been used to test promising experimental therapies. Herein, the utility and limitations of gangliosidosis animal models and how they have contributed to the development of potential new treatments are described. PMID:27499644

  4. High-throughput imaging method for direct assessment of GM1 ganglioside levels in mammalian cells

    PubMed Central

    Acosta, Walter; Martin, Reid; Radin, David N.; Cramer, Carole L.

    2016-01-01

    GM1-gangliosidosis is an inherited autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations in the gene GLB1, which encodes acid β-galactosidase (β-gal). The lack of activity in this lysosomal enzyme leads to accumulation of GM1 gangliosides (GM1) in cells. We have developed a high-content-imaging method to assess GM1 levels in fibroblasts that can be used to evaluate substrate reduction in treated GLB1−/− cells [1]. This assay allows fluorescent quantification in a multi-well system which generates unbiased and statistically significant data. Fluorescently labeled Cholera Toxin B subunit (CTXB), which specifically binds to GM1 gangliosides, was used to detect in situ GM1 levels in a fixed monolayer of fibroblasts. This sensitive, rapid, and inexpensive method facilitates in vitro drug screening in a format that allows a high number of replicates using low working volumes. PMID:26958633

  5. Comparative Analysis of Two Industries for Validating Green Manufacturing (GM) Framework: An Indian Scenario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rehman, Minhaj Ahemad Abdul; Shrivastava, Rakesh Lakshmikumar; Shrivastava, Rashmi Rakesh

    2016-07-01

    Green Manufacturing (GM) deals with manufacturing practices that reduces or eliminates the adverse environmental impact during any of its phases. It emphasizes the use of processes that do not contaminate the environment or hurt consumers, employees, or other stakeholders. This paper presents the comparative analysis of two Indian industries representing different sectors for validating GM framework. It also highlights the road map of the companies for achieving performance improvement through GM implementation and its impact on organisational performance. The case studies helps in evaluating the companies GM implementation and overall business performance. For this, a developed diagnostic instrument in the form of questionnaire was administered amongst employees in the companies respectively and their responses were analysed. In order to have a better understanding of the impact of GM implementation, the information about overall business performance was obtained over the last 3 years. The diagnostic instrument developed here may be used by manufacturing organisations to prioritise their management efforts to assess and implement GM.

  6. A high detection probability method for Gm-APD photon counting laser radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zi-jing; Zhao, Yuan; Zhang, Yong; Wu, Long; Su, Jian-zhong

    2013-08-01

    Since Geiger mode Avalanche Photodiode (GmAPD) device was applied in laser radar system, the performance of system has been enhanced due to the ultra-high sensitivity of GmAPD, even responding a single photon. However, the background noise makes ultra-high sensitive GmAPD produce false alarms, which severely impacts on the detection of laser radar system based on Gm-APD and becomes an urgent problem which needs to be solved. To address this problem, a few times accumulated two-GmAPDs strategy is proposed in this paper. Finally, an experimental measurement is made under the background noise in sunny day. The results show a few times accumulated two- GmAPDs strategy can improve the detection probability and reduce the false alarm probability, and obtain a clear 3D image of target.

  7. Tanzanian farmers' knowledge and attitudes to GM biotechnology and the potential use of GM crops to provide improved levels of food security. A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Genetically Modified (GM) crops have been championed as one possible method to improve food security and individual nutritional status in sub Saharan Africa. Understanding and acceptability of GM crop technology to farmers and consumers have not been assessed. We developed a qualitative research study involving farmers as both producers and consumers to gauge the understanding of GM crop technology, its acceptability, and identifying issues of concern. Methods Nineteen individual interviews (10 male and 9 female) and five mixed gender focus group discussions with local farmers were conducted in 3 regions in Tanzania. Analysis took place concurrently with data collection. Following initial interviews, subsequent questions were adjusted based on emerging themes. Results Understanding, awareness and knowledge of GM crop technology and terminology and its potential risks and benefits was very poor in all regions. Receptivity to the potential use of GM crops was, however, high. Respondents focused on the potential benefits of GM crops rather than any potential longer term health risks. A number of factors, most significantly field trial data, would influence farmers' decisions regarding the introduction of GM crop varieties into their farming practice. Understanding of the potential improved health provision possible by changes in agricultural practice and food-related decision making, and the health benefits of a diet containing essential vitamins, minerals and micronutrients is also poor in these communities. Conclusion This study forms a basis from which further research work can be undertaken. It is important to continue to assess opinions and attitudes of farmers and consumers in sub Saharan Africa towards potential use of GM technologies whilst highlighting the importance of the relationship between agriculture, health and development. This will allow people in the region to make accurate, informed decisions about whether they believe use of GM

  8. GmCOL1a and GmCOL1b Function as Flowering Repressors in Soybean Under Long-Day Conditions.

    PubMed

    Cao, Dong; Li, Ying; Lu, Sijia; Wang, Jialin; Nan, Haiyang; Li, Xiaoming; Shi, Danning; Fang, Chao; Zhai, Hong; Yuan, Xiaohui; Anai, Toyoaki; Xia, Zhengjun; Liu, Baohui; Kong, Fanjiang

    2015-12-01

    CONSTANS (CO) has a central role in the photoperiod response mechanism in Arabidopsis. However, the functions of legume CO genes in controlling flowering remain unknown. Here, we analyze the expression patterns of E1, E2 and GmCOL1a/1b using near-isogenic lines (NILs), and we further analyze flowering-related genes in gmcol1b mutants and GmCOL1a-overexpressing plants. Our data showed that both E3 and E4 up-regulate E1 expression, with the effect of E3 on E1 being greater than the effect of E4 on E1. E2 was up-regulated by E3 and E4 but down-regulated by E1. GmCOL1a/1b were up-regulated by E1, E2, E3 and E4. Although the spatial and temporal patterns of GmCOL1a/1b expression were more similar to those of AtCOL2 than to those of AtCO, gmcol1b mutants flowered earlier than wild-type plants under long-day (LD) conditions, and the overexpression of GmCOL1a caused late flowering under LD or natural conditions. In addition, GmFT2a/5a, E1 and E2 were down-regulated in GmCOL1a-overexpressing plants under LD conditions. Because E1/2 influences the expression of GmCOL1a, and vice versa, we conclude that these genes may function as part of a negative feedback loop, and GmCOL1a/b genes may serve as suppressors in photoperiodic flowering in soybean under LD conditions. PMID:26508522

  9. Ganglioside GM1 mimicry in Campylobacter strains from sporadic infections in the United States.

    PubMed

    Nachamkin, I; Ung, H; Moran, A P; Yoo, D; Prendergast, M M; Nicholson, M A; Sheikh, K; Ho, T; Asbury, A K; McKhann, G M; Griffin, J W

    1999-05-01

    To determine whether GM1-like epitopes in Campylobacter species are specific to O serotypes associated with Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) or whether they are frequent among random Campylobacter isolates causing enteritis, 275 random enteritis-associated isolates of Campylobacter jejuni were analyzed. To determine whether GM1-like epitopes in Campylobacter species are specific to O serotypes associated with Guillan-Barre syndrome (GBS) or whether they are frequent among random Campylobacter isolates causing enteritis, 275 enteritis-associated isolates, randomly collected in the United States, were analyzed using a cholera-toxin binding assay [corrected]. Overall, 26.2% of the isolates were positive for the GM1-like epitope. Of the 36 different O serotypes in the sample, 21 (58.3%) contained no strains positive for GM1, whereas in 6 serotypes (16.7%), >50% of isolates were positive for GM1. GBS-associated serotypes were more likely to contain strains positive for GM1 than were non-GBS-associated serotypes (37.8% vs. 15.1%, P=.0116). The results suggest that humans are frequently exposed to strains exhibiting GM1-like mimicry and, while certain serotypes may be more likely to possess GM1-like epitopes, the presence of GM1-like epitopes on Campylobacter strains does not itself trigger GBS.

  10. GM crops in Ethiopia: a realistic way to increase agricultural performance?

    PubMed

    Azadi, Hossein; Talsma, Nanda; Ho, Peter; Zarafshani, Kiumars

    2011-01-01

    Much has been published on the application of genetically modified (GM) crops in Africa, but agricultural performance has hardly been addressed. This paper discusses the main consequences of GM crops on agricultural performance in Ethiopia. Three main criteria of performance - productivity, equitability and sustainability - are evaluated in the context of the Ethiopian agricultural sector. We conclude that the application of GM crops can improve the agricultural productivity and sustainability, whereas equitability cannot be stimulated and might even exacerbate the gap between socioeconomic classes. Before introducing GM crops to Ethiopian agriculture, regulatory issues should be addressed, public research should be fostered, and more ex ante values and socioeconomic studies should be included.

  11. Soybean GmMYB73 promotes lipid accumulation in transgenic plants

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Soybean is one of the most important oil crops. The regulatory genes involved in oil accumulation are largely unclear. We initiated studies to identify genes that regulate this process. Results One MYB-type gene GmMYB73 was found to display differential expression in soybean seeds of different developing stages by microarray analysis and was further investigated for its functions in lipid accumulation. GmMYB73 is a small protein with single MYB repeat and has similarity to CPC-like MYB proteins from Arabidopsis. GmMYB73 interacted with GL3 and EGL3, and then suppressed GL2, a negative regulator of oil accumulation. GmMYB73 overexpression enhanced lipid contents in both seeds and leaves of transgenic Arabidopsis plants. Seed length and thousand-seed weight were also promoted. GmMYB73 introduction into the Arabidopsis try cpc double mutant rescued the total lipids, seed size and thousand-seed weight. GmMYB73 also elevated lipid levels in seeds and leaves of transgenic Lotus, and in transgenic hairy roots of soybean plants. GmMYB73 promoted PLDα1 expression, whose promoter can be bound and inhibited by GL2. PLDα1 mutation reduced triacylglycerol levels mildly in seeds but significantly in leaves of Arabidopsis plants. Conclusions GmMYB73 may reduce GL2, and then release GL2-inhibited PLDα1 expression for lipid accumulation. Manipulation of GmMYB73 may potentially improve oil production in legume crop plants. PMID:24655684

  12. Ablation front rayleigh taylor dispersion curve in indirect drive

    SciTech Connect

    Budil, K S; Lasinski, B; Edwards, M J; Wan, A S; Remington, B A; Weber, S V; Glendinning, S G; Suter, L; Stry, P

    2000-11-17

    The Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability, which occurs when a lower-density fluid accelerates a higher-density layer, is common in nature. At an ablation front a sharp reduction in the growth rate of the instability at short wave-lengths can occur, in marked contrast to the classical case where growth rates are highest at the shortest wavelengths. Theoretical and numerical investigations of the ablative RT instability are numerous and differ considerably on the level of stabilization expected. We present here the results of a series of laser experiments designed to probe the roll-over and cutoff region of the ablation-front RT dispersion curve in indirect drive. Aluminum foils with imposed sinusoidal perturbations ranging in wavelength from 10 to 70 pm were ablatively accelerated with a radiation drive generated in a gold cylindrical hohlraum. A strong shock wave compresses the package followed by an {approx}2 ns period of roughly constant acceleration and the experiment is diagnosed via face-on radiography. Perturbations with wavelengths {ge} 20 {micro}m experienced substantial growth during the acceleration phase while shorter wavelengths showed a sharp drop off in overall growth. These experimental results compared favorably to calculations with a 2-D radiation-hydrodynamics code, however, the growth is significantly affected by the rippled shock launched by the drive. We performed numerical simulations to elucidate the influence of the rippled shock wave on the eventual growth of the perturbations, allowing comparisons to the analytic model developed by Betti et al. This combination of experiments, simulations and analytic modeling illustrates the qualitative simplicity yet quantitative complexity of the compressible RT instability. We have measured the Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) dispersion curve for a radiatively-driven sample in a series of experiments on the Nova laser facility. Planar aluminum foils were ablatively-accelerated and the subsequent perturbation growth

  13. An efficient helium circulation system with small GM cryocoolers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeda, Tsunehiro; Okamoto, Masayoshi; Atsuda, Kazuhiro; Kobayashi, Akihiro; Owaki, Takashi; Katagiri, Keishi

    2008-01-01

    We developed a helium circulating system that re-liquefies all the evaporating helium gas and consumes far less power than conventional systems, because warm helium gas at about 40 K collected high above the surface of the liquid helium in the Dewar is used to keep the Dewar cold, and because cold helium gas just above the liquid helium surface is collected and re-liquefied while still cold. A special transfer tube with multi-concentric pipes was developed to make the system operate efficiently. The system can produce up to 35.5 l/D of liquid helium from the evaporated helium using two 1.5 W@4.2 K GM cryocoolers.

  14. Interethnic genetic differentiation: GM polymorphism in eastern Senegal.

    PubMed Central

    Blanc, M; Sanchez-Mazas, A; Van Blyenburgh, N H; Sevin, A; Pison, G; Langaney, A

    1990-01-01

    Analysis of GM polymorphism has been performed on 1,806 individuals representing three sympatric ethnic groups--Bedik, Fulani, and Mandenkalu--of eastern Senegal. Haplotype frequencies estimated by maximum likelihood have been used to compute common genetic pools between the three samples and a number of other sub-Saharan African populations. Despite extreme linguistic and sociocultural differentiations and very high levels of endogamy, especially in the Bedik and Niokholo Mandenkalu, the three populations share about 90%-95% of their haplotype frequencies in a system which commonly provides strong genetic differentiations. This supports the view that, despite its importance at a large continental scale level, as it is discussed for a set of populations from many regions of sub-Saharan Africa, sociocultural differentiation usually has little effect on local genetic diversity. PMID:2105642

  15. Diagnosing Lysosomal Storage Disorders: The GM2 Gangliosidoses.

    PubMed

    Hall, Patricia; Minnich, Sara; Teigen, Claire; Raymond, Kimiyo

    2014-01-01

    The GM2 gangliosidoses are a group of autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disorders caused by defective β-hexosaminidase. There are three clinical conditions in this group: Tay-Sachs disease (TSD), Sandhoff disease (SD), and hexosaminidase activator deficiency. The three conditions are clinically indistinguishable. TSD and SD have been identified with infantile, juvenile, and adult onset forms. The activator deficiency is only known to present with infantile onset. Diagnosis of TSD and SD is based on decreased hexosaminidase activity and a change in the percentage of activity between isoforms. There are no biochemical tests currently available for activator deficiency. This unit provides a detailed procedure for identifying TSD and SD in affected individuals and carriers from leukocyte samples, the most robust sample type available. PMID:25271840

  16. Ethical arguments relevant to the use of GM crops.

    PubMed

    Weale, Albert

    2010-11-30

    The Nuffield Council on Bioethics (NCOB) has published two reports (1999 and 2004) on the social and ethical issues involved in the use of genetically modified crops. This presentation summarises their core ethical arguments. Five sets of ethical concerns have been raised about GM crops: potential harm to human health; potential damage to the environment; negative impact on traditional farming practice; excessive corporate dominance; and the 'unnaturalness' of the technology. The NCOB examined these claims in the light of the principle of general human welfare, the maintenance of human rights and the principle of justice. It concluded in relation to the issue of 'unnaturalness' that GM modification did not differ to such an extent from conventional breeding that it is in itself morally objectionable. In making an assessment of possible costs, benefits and risks, it was necessary to proceed on a case-by-case basis. However, the potential to bring about significant benefits in developing countries (improved nutrition, enhanced pest resistance, increased yields and new products) meant that there was an ethical obligation to explore these potential benefits responsibly, to contribute to the reduction of poverty, and improve food security and profitable agriculture in developing countries. NCOB held that these conclusions were consistent with any practical precautionary approach. In particular, in applying a precautionary approach the risks associated with the status quo need to be considered, as well as any risks inherent in the technology. These ethical requirements have implications for the governance of the technology, in particular mechanisms for enabling small-scale farmers to express their preferences for traits selected by plant breeders and mechanisms for the diffusion of risk-based evaluations.

  17. Ethical arguments relevant to the use of GM crops.

    PubMed

    Weale, Albert

    2010-11-30

    The Nuffield Council on Bioethics (NCOB) has published two reports (1999 and 2004) on the social and ethical issues involved in the use of genetically modified crops. This presentation summarises their core ethical arguments. Five sets of ethical concerns have been raised about GM crops: potential harm to human health; potential damage to the environment; negative impact on traditional farming practice; excessive corporate dominance; and the 'unnaturalness' of the technology. The NCOB examined these claims in the light of the principle of general human welfare, the maintenance of human rights and the principle of justice. It concluded in relation to the issue of 'unnaturalness' that GM modification did not differ to such an extent from conventional breeding that it is in itself morally objectionable. In making an assessment of possible costs, benefits and risks, it was necessary to proceed on a case-by-case basis. However, the potential to bring about significant benefits in developing countries (improved nutrition, enhanced pest resistance, increased yields and new products) meant that there was an ethical obligation to explore these potential benefits responsibly, to contribute to the reduction of poverty, and improve food security and profitable agriculture in developing countries. NCOB held that these conclusions were consistent with any practical precautionary approach. In particular, in applying a precautionary approach the risks associated with the status quo need to be considered, as well as any risks inherent in the technology. These ethical requirements have implications for the governance of the technology, in particular mechanisms for enabling small-scale farmers to express their preferences for traits selected by plant breeders and mechanisms for the diffusion of risk-based evaluations. PMID:20850572

  18. GM1 gangliosidosis (type 1) in a cat.

    PubMed Central

    Barker, C G; Blakemore, W F; Dell, A; Palmer, A C; Tiller, P R; Winchester, B G

    1986-01-01

    A kitten with clinical and morphological symptoms of a neurovisceral lysosomal-storage disease has been shown to have a marked deficiency of acidic beta-D-galactosidase in the brain, kidney and spleen. Chromatography on concanavalin A-Sepharose and inhibition studies with 2,5-dihydroxymethyl-3,4-dihydroxypyrrolidine, a selective inhibitor of the neutral broad-specificity beta-D-galactosidase, have shown that the residual beta-D-galactosidase at pH 4.0 in the tissues of the affected cat is due to the neutral beta-D-galactosidase and that there is a complete deficiency of the acidic (lysosomal) beta-D-galactosidase. There is marked accumulation in all tissues and excretion in the urine of neutral oligosaccharides. Analysis of these oligosaccharides by fast-atom-bombardment mass spectrometry and g.l.c. suggests that they arise from the incomplete catabolism of N-glycans of glycoproteins. The ganglioside content of all the tissues is elevated, and it has been shown by t.l.c. that the concentration of a ganglioside fraction with a mobility similar to that of GM1 ganglioside is particularly increased. There is also some evidence of accumulation of glycosaminoglycans in the brain. The clinical symptoms, the complete deficiency of acidic beta-D-galactosidase and the storage products in visceral organs all suggest that this is a case of feline GM1-type gangliosidosis comparable with the severe infantile (Type 1) form of the disease in humans. Images Fig. 3. PMID:3091002

  19. Rayleigh Taylor instability of two superposed compressible fluids in un-magnetized plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, P. K.; Tiwari, A.; Argal, S.; Chhajlani, R. K.

    2014-09-01

    The linear Rayleigh Taylor instability of two superposed compressible Newtonian fluids is discussed with the effect of surface tension which can play important roles in space plasma. As in both the superposed Newtonian fluids, the system is stable for potentially stable case and unstable for potentially unstable case in the present problem also. The equations of the problem are solved by normal mode method and a dispersion relation is obtained for such a system. The behaviour of growth rate is examined in the presence of surface tension and it is found that the surface tension has stabilizing influence on the Rayleigh Taylor instability of two superposed compressible fluids. Numerical analysis is performed to show the effect of sound velocity and surface tension on the growth rate of Rayleigh Taylor instability. It is found that both parameters have stabilizing influence on the growth rate of Rayleigh Taylor instability.

  20. A Numerical and Graphical Approach to Taylor Polynomials Using an Electronic Spreadsheet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Timmons, Todd

    1991-01-01

    Described is an instructional method that makes use of an electronic spreadsheet for the numerical and graphical introduction of the fundamentals of Taylor polynomials. Included is a demonstration spreadsheet using the expansion polynomial to evaluate the cosine function. (JJK)

  1. Employing Taylor and Heisenberg subfilter viscosities to simulate turbulent statistics in LES models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degrazia, G. A.; Rizza, U.; Puhales, F. S.; Welter, G. S.; Acevedo, O. C.; Maldaner, S.

    2012-02-01

    A turbulent subfilter viscosity for Large Eddy Simulation (LES) based on the Taylor statistical diffusion theory is proposed. This viscosity is described in terms of a velocity variance and a time scale, both associated to the inertial subrange. This new subfilter viscosity contains a cutoff wavenumber kc, presenting an identical form (differing by a constant) to the Heisenberg subfilter viscosity. Therefore, both subfilter viscosities are described in terms of a sharp division between large and small wavenumbers of a turbulent flow and, henceforth, Taylor and Heisenberg subfilter viscosities are in agreement with the sharp Fourier filtering operation, frequently employed in LES models. Turbulent statistics of different orders, generated from atmospheric boundary layer simulations employing both Taylor and Heisenberg subfilter viscosities have been compared with observations and results provided by other simulations. The comparison shows that the LES model utilizing the approaches of Taylor and Heisenberg reproduces these turbulent statistics correctly in different vertical regions of a planetary convective boundary layer (CBL).

  2. Characteristic time scales of mixing, mass transfer and biomass growth in a Taylor vortex algal photobioreactor.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xi; Kong, Bo; Vigil, R Dennis

    2015-12-01

    Recently it has been demonstrated that algal biomass yield can be enhanced using fluid flow patterns known as Taylor vortices. It has been suggested that these growth rate improvements can be attributed to improved light delivery as a result of rapid transport of microorganisms between light and dark regions of the reactor. However, Taylor vortices also strongly impact fluid mixing and interphase (gas-liquid) mass transport, and these in turn may also explain improvements in biomass productivity. To identify the growth-limiting factor in a Taylor vortex algal photobioreactor, experiments were performed to determine characteristic time scales for mixing and mass transfer. By comparing these results with the characteristic time scale for biomass growth, it is shown that algal growth rate in Taylor vortex reactors is not limited by fluid mixing or interphase mass transfer, and therefore the observed biomass productivity improvements are likely attributable to improved light utilization efficiency.

  3. Numerical study of eccentric Couette Taylor flows and effect of eccentricity on flow patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shu, C.; Wang, L.; Chew, Y. T.; Zhao, N.

    2004-10-01

    In this study, the differential quadrature (DQ) method was used to simulate the eccentric Couette Taylor vortex flow in an annulus between two eccentric cylinders with rotating inner cylinder and stationary outer cylinder. An approach combining the SIMPLE (semi-implicit method for pressure-linked equations) and DQ discretization on a non-staggered mesh was proposed to solve the time-dependent, three-dimensional incompressible Navier Stokes equations in the primitive variable form. The eccentric steady Couette Taylor flow patterns were obtained from the solution of three-dimensional Navier Stokes equations. The reported numerical results for steady Couette flow were compared with those from Chou [1], and San and Szeri [2]. Very good agreement was achieved. For steady eccentric Taylor vortex flow, detailed flow patterns were obtained and analyzed. The effect of eccentricity on the eccentric Taylor vortex flow pattern was also studied.

  4. A model of mixing and transport in wavy Taylor-Couette flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudolph, Matthias; Shinbrot, Troy; Lueptow, Richard M.

    1998-10-01

    Wavy Taylor vortex flow was simulated by developing a stream function model of the velocity vector field in a radial-axial plane that mimics an experimentally obtained velocity field. The simulation neglects the azimuthal component of velocity but provides estimates of the mixing and axial transport properties of wavy vortex flow in the axial-radial plane at higher Taylor numbers ( Ta) and larger gap widths than previous models. Based on the estimated Lyapunov numbers, the particle paths appear to be chaotic for wavy vortex flow in the range 131 ≤ Ta ≤ 253. The axial particle transport increases with the Taylor number in this range, most likely due to increased axial transport of fluid between vortices. The mixing within vortices is also enhanced with increasing Taylor number as a result of increased stretching and folding within a vortex.

  5. Condensing and Fluidizing Effects of Ganglioside GM1 on Phospholipid Films

    PubMed Central

    Frey, Shelli L.; Chi, Eva Y.; Arratia, Cristóbal; Majewski, Jaroslaw; Kjaer, Kristian; Lee, Ka Yee C.

    2008-01-01

    Mixed monolayers of the ganglioside GM1 and the lipid dipalmitoylphosphatidlycholine (DPPC) at air-water and solid-air interfaces were investigated using various biophysical techniques to ascertain the location and phase behavior of the ganglioside molecules in a mixed membrane. The effects induced by GM1 on the mean molecular area of the binary mixtures and the phase behavior of DPPC were followed for GM1 concentrations ranging from 5 to 70 mol %. Surface pressure isotherms and fluorescence microscopy imaging of domain formation indicate that at low concentrations of GM1 (<25 mol %), the monolayer becomes continually more condensed than DPPC upon further addition of ganglioside. At higher GM1 concentrations (>25 mol %), the mixed monolayer becomes more expanded or fluid-like. After deposition onto a solid substrate, atomic force microscopy imaging of these lipid monolayers showed that GM1 and DPPC pack cooperatively in the condensed phase domain to form geometrically packed complexes that are more ordered than either individual component as evidenced by a more extended total height of the complex arising from a well-packed hydrocarbon tail region. Grazing incidence x-ray diffraction on the DPPC/GM1 binary mixture provides evidence that ordering can emerge when two otherwise fluid components are mixed together. The addition of GM1 to DPPC gives rise to a unit cell that differs from that of a pure DPPC monolayer. To determine the region of the GM1 molecule that interacts with the DPPC molecule and causes condensation and subsequent expansion of the monolayer, surface pressure isotherms were obtained with molecules modeling the backbone or headgroup portions of the GM1 molecule. The observed concentration-dependent condensing and fluidizing effects are specific to the rigid, sugar headgroup portion of the GM1 molecule. PMID:18192361

  6. Modeling of Nova indirect drive Rayleigh--Taylor experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, S.V.; Remington, B.A.; Haan, S.W.; Wilson, B.G.; Nash, J.K. )

    1994-11-01

    The growth due to the Rayleigh--Taylor (RT) instability of single-wavelength surface perturbations on planar foils of brominated CH [CH(Br)] and fluorosilicone (FS) was measured. The foils were accelerated by x-ray ablation with temporally shaped drive pulses. A range of initial amplitudes ([ital a][sub 0]) and wavelengths ([lambda]) have been used. This paper focuses upon foils with small [ital a][sub 0]/[lambda], which exhibit substantial growth in the linear regime, and are most sensitive to the calculated growth rate. The CH(Br) foils exhibit slower RT perturbation growth because opacity differences result in a larger ablation velocity and a longer density scale length than for FS. Tabulated opacities from detailed atomic models, OPAL [Astrophys. J. [bold 397], 717 (1992)] and super transition array (STA) [Phys. Rev. A [bold 40], 3183 (1989)] were employed. Unlike previous simulations which employed the average atom (XSN) opacity treatment, parameter adjustments to fit experimental data no longer appear necessary. Nonlocal thermodynamic equilibrium (NLTE) effects do not appear to be important. Other variables which may affect the modeling, such as changes of the equation of state and radiation drive spectrum, were also examined. The current calculational model, which incorporates physically justified choices for these calculational ingredients, agrees with the Nova single wavelength RT perturbation growth data.

  7. GRAVITATIONALLY UNSTABLE FLAMES: RAYLEIGH-TAYLOR STRETCHING VERSUS TURBULENT WRINKLING

    SciTech Connect

    Hicks, E. P.; Rosner, R.

    2013-07-10

    In this paper, we provide support for the Rayleigh-Taylor-(RT)-based subgrid model used in full-star simulations of deflagrations in Type Ia supernovae explosions. We use the results of a parameter study of two-dimensional direct numerical simulations of an RT unstable model flame to distinguish between the two main types of subgrid models (RT or turbulence dominated) in the flamelet regime. First, we give scalings for the turbulent flame speed, the Reynolds number, the viscous scale, and the size of the burning region as the non-dimensional gravity (G) is varied. The flame speed is well predicted by an RT-based flame speed model. Next, the above scalings are used to calculate the Karlovitz number (Ka) and to discuss appropriate combustion regimes. No transition to thin reaction zones is seen at Ka = 1, although such a transition is expected by turbulence-dominated subgrid models. Finally, we confirm a basic physical premise of the RT subgrid model, namely, that the flame is fractal, and thus self-similar. By modeling the turbulent flame speed, we demonstrate that it is affected more by large-scale RT stretching than by small-scale turbulent wrinkling. In this way, the RT instability controls the flame directly from the large scales. Overall, these results support the RT subgrid model.

  8. Magneto-Rayleigh-Taylor instability in solid media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Y. B.; Piriz, A. R.

    2014-07-01

    A linear analysis of the magneto-Rayleigh-Taylor instability at the interface between a Newtonian fluid and an elastic-plastic solid is performed by considering a uniform magnetic B →, parallel to the interface, which has diffused into the fluid but not into the solid. It is found that the magnetic field attributes elastic properties to the viscous fluid which enhance the stability region by stabilizing all the perturbation wavelengths shorter than λ 0 ∝ B 2 for any initial perturbation amplitude. Longer wavelengths are stabilized by the mechanical properties of the solid provided that the initial perturbation wavelength is smaller than a threshold value determined by the yield strength and the shear modulus of the solid. Beyond this threshold, the amplitude grows initially with a growth rate reduced by the solid strength properties. However, such properties do not affect the asymptotic growth rate which is only determined by the magnetic field and the fluid viscosity. The described physical situation intends to resemble some of the features present in recent experiments involving the magnetic shockless acceleration of flyers plates.

  9. Non-equilibrium Thermodynamics of Rayleigh-Taylor Instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sengupta, Tapan K.; Sengupta, Aditi; Sengupta, Soumyo; Bhole, Ashish; Shruti, K. S.

    2016-04-01

    Here, the fundamental problem of Rayleigh-Taylor instability (RTI) is studied by direct numerical simulation (DNS), where the two air masses at different temperatures, kept apart initially by a non-conducting horizontal interface in a 2D box, are allowed to mix. Upon removal of the partition, mixing is controlled by RTI, apart from mutual mass, momentum, and energy transfer. To accentuate the instability, the top chamber is filled with the heavier (lower temperature) air, which rests atop the chamber containing lighter air. The partition is positioned initially at mid-height of the box. As the fluid dynamical system considered is completely isolated from outside, the DNS results obtained without using Boussinesq approximation will enable one to study non-equilibrium thermodynamics of a finite reservoir undergoing strong irreversible processes. The barrier is removed impulsively, triggering baroclinic instability by non-alignment of density, and pressure gradient by ambient disturbances via the sharp discontinuity at the interface. Adopted DNS method has dispersion relation preservation properties with neutral stability and does not require any external initial perturbations. The complete inhomogeneous problem with non-periodic, no-slip boundary conditions is studied by solving compressible Navier-Stokes equation, without the Boussinesq approximation. This is important as the temperature difference between the two air masses considered is high enough (Δ T = 70 K) to invalidate Boussinesq approximation. We discuss non-equilibrium thermodynamical aspects of RTI with the help of numerical results for density, vorticity, entropy, energy, and enstrophy.

  10. Rayleigh-Taylor instability at ionization fronts: perturbation analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricotti, Massimo

    2014-01-01

    The linear growth rate of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability (RTI) at ionization fronts is investigated via perturbation analysis in the limit of incompressible fluids. In agreement with previous numerical studies, it is found that absorption of ionizing radiation inside the H II region due to hydrogen recombinations suppresses the growth of instabilities. In the limit of a large density contrast at the ionization front, the RTI growth rate has the simple analytical solution n=-ν _rec+(ν _rec^2+gk)^{1/2}, where νrec is the hydrogen recombination rate inside the H II region, k is the perturbation's wavenumber and g is the effective acceleration in the frame of reference of the front. Therefore, the growth of surface perturbations with wavelengths λ ≫ λ _cr ≡ 2π g/ν _rec^2 is suppressed by a factor ˜(λcr/4λ)1/2 with respect to the non-radiative incompressible RTI. Implications on stellar and black hole feedback are briefly discussed.

  11. RAYLEIGH–TAYLOR UNSTABLE FLAMES—FAST OR FASTER?

    SciTech Connect

    Hicks, E. P.

    2015-04-20

    Rayleigh–Taylor (RT) unstable flames play a key role in the explosions of supernovae Ia. However, the dynamics of these flames are still not well understood. RT unstable flames are affected by both the RT instability of the flame front and by RT-generated turbulence. The coexistence of these factors complicates the choice of flame speed subgrid models for full-star Type Ia simulations. Both processes can stretch and wrinkle the flame surface, increasing its area and, therefore, the burning rate. In past research, subgrid models have been based on either the RT instability or turbulence setting the flame speed. We evaluate both models, checking their assumptions and their ability to correctly predict the turbulent flame speed. Specifically, we analyze a large parameter study of 3D direct numerical simulations of RT unstable model flames. This study varies both the simulation domain width and the gravity in order to probe a wide range of flame behaviors. We show that RT unstable flames are different from traditional turbulent flames: they are thinner rather than thicker when turbulence is stronger. We also show that none of the several different types of turbulent flame speed models accurately predicts measured flame speeds. In addition, we find that the RT flame speed model only correctly predicts the measured flame speed in a certain parameter regime. Finally, we propose that the formation of cusps may be the factor causing the flame to propagate more quickly than predicted by the RT model.

  12. Towards Fully Diagnosed Ablative Rayleigh-Taylor Instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azechi, Hiroshi

    2002-11-01

    The Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability with material ablation through the unstable interface is the key physics that determines the success or failure of inertial fusion energy. The ablative RT instability has also general resemblance to hydrodynamic instabilities occurring in Type Ia supernovae and in interstellar clouds, such as the Eagle Nebula. In the laser fusion community, it is generally accepted that the Bodner-Takabe formula [1] with significant improvement by Betti [2] may predict correct dispersion relation of the growth rates of the ablative RT instability. However, there still exist theoretical uncertainties due to the different treatment of electron transport from the laser absorption region to the ablation region. The difference in the electron transport is most pronounced at short wavelength perturbation that is below spatial resolution of most x-ray imagers. The direct effect of the transport is the ablation density profile, which measurement is also a formidable task with conventional diagnostic techniques. We will present our RT growth as well as the ablation density measurements based on recently developed novel techniques of high spatial resolution: moir interferometry, penumbral imaging, and Fresnel-phase-zone-plate imaging. [1] S. Bodner, Phys. Rev. Lett. 33, 761 (1974); H. Takabe et al., Phys. Fluids 28, 3676 (1985). [2] R. Betti et al., Phys. Plasmas 5, 1446 (1998).

  13. Rayleigh-Taylor stabilization by material strength at Mbar pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Park, H; Lorenz, K T; Cavallo, R M; Pollaine, S M; Prisbrey, S T; Remington, B A; Rudd, R E; Becker, R C; Bernier, J V

    2009-05-27

    Studies of solid-state material dynamics at high pressures ({approx}1 Mbar) and ultrahigh strain rates (>10{sup 6} s{sup -1}) are performed using a unique laser based, quasi-isentropic high-pressure acceleration platform. Vanadium foils with pre-imposed sinusoidal ripples are accelerated in the solid state with this ramped high pressure drive. This causes Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability growth at the interface, where the rate of growth is sensitive to the solid-state material properties. The RT growth history is measured by face-on radiography using synchronized laser-driven x-ray backlighters at the Omega Laser. The experimental results are compared with 2D hydrodynamics simulations utilizing constitutive models of high pressure material strength. We find that the vanadium strength increases by a factor of 3.5-4 at peak pressure, compared to its ambient (undriven) strength. Both pressure hardening and strain rate hardening are the suggested cause for this increase in strength. An analysis treating strength as an effective lattice viscosity finds that a viscosity of {approx}400 poise is required to reproduce our RT data.

  14. Rayleigh-Taylor Instability in non-premixed reacting flames.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Attal, Nitesh; Ramaprabhu, Praveen

    2015-11-01

    The Rayleigh-Taylor instability (RTI) occurs at a perturbed interface between fluids of different densities when a light fluid pushes a heavier fluid. The mixing driven by RTI affects several physical phenomena, such as Inertial Confinement Fusion, Supernovae detonation, centrifugal combustors and liquid rocket engines. The RTI in such flows is often coupled with chemical/nuclear reactions that may form complex density stratifications in the form of flames or ablative layers. We investigate such a non-premixed fuel-air interface subject to a constant acceleration and developing under the influence of chemical reactions using high-resolution, Navier-Stokes simulations. The H2 fuel is diluted with N2 to vary the density difference across the interface in thermal equilibrium (at 1000K). The intervening layer between fuel and air is subject to exothermic combustion reactions to form a flame. Following combustion, initially unstable fuel-air interfaces at an Atwood number (At) <0.5, transform into stable (fuel-flame) and unstable (flame-air) interfaces. We report on interfaces (At = 0.2 and 0.6) with single wavelength, sinusoidal perturbations and a broadband spectrum of multimode perturbations.

  15. On Taylor dispersion in liquid-cooled electronics applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tilley, B. S.

    2013-11-01

    We are interested in extending classical asymptotic approaches to allow for the spatial pattern wavenumber to vary on the macroscale variables and to find how changes in microstructure geometry affect macroscopic properties and transport. To this end, we consider here the thermal transport of a coolant through nonuniformly spaced laminates, as a simple model for heat sinks in electronics. Power is continuously being generated by the laminates, and the local rates of heat transport depend on convection, fluid inertia, buoyancy and Taylor dispersion in the coolant and conduction within both the fluid and the laminates. We find a coupled system of partial differential equations that describe the local microscale temperature and deviations from the Darcy pressure. Microscale values of all of these quantities are known in terms of the solutions to these effective eqautions. We are especially interested in geometries in the laminate spacing which allow for better thermal transport by the coolant for a prescribed power distribution. The choice of the channel geometries depend on the ability to transfer heat from the device to the enviornment, the orientation of the device with respect to gravity, and the available power needed to drive the fluid motion. This work is supported by a grant from the Air Force Office of Scientific Research, (Award No. FA9550-11-1-0197).

  16. Regimes of the magnetized Rayleigh{endash}Taylor instability

    SciTech Connect

    Winske, D.

    1996-11-01

    Hybrid simulations with kinetic ions and massless fluid electrons are used to investigate the linear and nonlinear behavior of the magnetized Rayleigh{endash}Taylor instability in slab geometry with the plasma subject to a constant gravity. Three regimes are found, which are determined by the magnitude of the complex frequency {omega}={omega}{sub {ital r}}+{ital i}{gamma}. For {vert_bar}{omega}{vert_bar}{lt}{Omega}{sub {ital i}}({Omega}{sub {ital i}}= ion gyrofrequency), one finds the typical behavior of the usual fluid regime, namely the development of {open_quote}{open_quote}mushroom-head{close_quote}{close_quote} spikes and bubbles in the density and a strongly convoluted boundary between the plasma and magnetic field, where the initial gradient is not relaxed much. A second regime, where {vert_bar}{omega}{vert_bar}{approximately}0.1{Omega}{sub {ital i}}, is characterized by the importance of the Hall term. Linearly, the developing flute modes are more finger-like and tilted along the interface; nonlinearly, clump-like structures form, leading to a significant broadening of the interface. The third regime is characterized by unmagnetized ion behavior, with {vert_bar}{omega}{vert_bar}{approximately}{Omega}{sub {ital i}}. Density clumps, rather than flutes, form in the linear stage, while nonlinearly, longer-wavelength modes that resemble those in fluid regime dominate. Finite Larmor radius stabilization of short-wavelength modes is observed in each regime. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  17. Nonaxisymmetric linear instability of cylindrical magnetohydrodynamic Taylor-Couette flow.

    PubMed

    Child, Adam; Kersalé, Evy; Hollerbach, Rainer

    2015-09-01

    We consider the nonaxisymmetric modes of instability present in Taylor-Couette flow under the application of helical magnetic fields, mainly for magnetic Prandtl numbers close to the inductionless limit, and conduct a full examination of marginal stability in the resulting parameter space. We allow for the azimuthal magnetic field to be generated by a combination of currents in the inner cylinder and fluid itself and introduce a parameter governing the relation between the strength of these currents. A set of governing eigenvalue equations for the nonaxisymmetric modes of instability are derived and solved by spectral collocation with Chebyshev polynomials over the relevant parameter space, with the resulting instabilities examined in detail. We find that by altering the azimuthal magnetic field profiles the azimuthal magnetorotational instability, nonaxisymmetric helical magnetorotational instability, and Tayler instability yield interesting dynamics, such as different preferred mode types and modes with azimuthal wave number m>1. Finally, a comparison is given to the recent WKB analysis performed by Kirillov et al. [Kirillov, Stefani, and Fukumoto, J. Fluid Mech. 760, 591 (2014)JFLSA70022-112010.1017/jfm.2014.614] and its validity in the linear regime.

  18. Direct Numerical Simulations of Immiscible Rayleigh-Taylor Instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhaorui; Livescu, Daniel

    2015-11-01

    Accurate simulations of multi-mode immiscible Rayleigh-Taylor instability (RTI) are presented with the recently developed generalized Cahn-Hilliard Navier-Stokes (GCHNS) equations method. In immiscible turbulent flows, besides the viscous cut-off scale, there are two additional characteristic length scales, which also affect the flow. One is the so-called ``cut-off'' length scale caused by the presence of surface tension and the other is the physical interface thickness. While in some practical applications the interface thickness can be large, in many other cases this thickness approaches the molecular scales. Accurate results can be obtained for these cases if the interface thickness is maintained smaller than all the cut-off scales of the flow, but still much larger than the molecular scales (e.g. mean free path). Our study shows that, as long as the scale-separation (e.g. the ratio of Kolmogorov scale to the interface thickness) is above a certain value (4 to 6 for the RTI problem considered in this study), the numerical results are fully converged with respect to the interface thickness. The results are used to study the physics of multi-mode immiscible RTI and contrasted to those obtained for the miscible case.

  19. An Instability in Stratified Taylor-Couette Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swinney, Harry

    2015-11-01

    In the late 1950s Russell Donnelly began conducting experiments at the University of Chicago on flow between concentric rotating cylinders, and his experiments together with complementary theory by his collaborator S. Chandrasekhar did much to rekindle interest in the flow instability discovered and studied by G.I. Taylor (1923). The present study concerns an instability in a concentric cylinder system containing a fluid with an axial density gradient. In 2005 Dubrulle et al. suggested that a `stratorotational instability' (SRI) in this system could provide insight into instability and angular momentum transport in astrophysical accretion disks. In 2007 the stratorotational instability was observed in experiments by Le Bars and Le Gal. We have conducted an experiment on the SRI in a concentric cylinder system (radius ratio η = 0 . 876) with buoyancy frequency N / 2 π = 0.25, 0.50, or 0.75 Hz. For N = 0.75 Hz we observe the SRI onset to occur for Ωouter /Ωinner > η , contrary to the prediction of Shalybkov and Rüdiger. Research conducted with Bruce Rodenborn and Ruy Ibanez.

  20. Rayleigh-Taylor Unstable Flames -- Fast or Faster?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hicks, E. P.

    2015-04-01

    Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) unstable flames play a key role in the explosions of supernovae Ia. However, the dynamics of these flames are still not well understood. RT unstable flames are affected by both the RT instability of the flame front and by RT-generated turbulence. The coexistence of these factors complicates the choice of flame speed subgrid models for full-star Type Ia simulations. Both processes can stretch and wrinkle the flame surface, increasing its area and, therefore, the burning rate. In past research, subgrid models have been based on either the RT instability or turbulence setting the flame speed. We evaluate both models, checking their assumptions and their ability to correctly predict the turbulent flame speed. Specifically, we analyze a large parameter study of 3D direct numerical simulations of RT unstable model flames. This study varies both the simulation domain width and the gravity in order to probe a wide range of flame behaviors. We show that RT unstable flames are different from traditional turbulent flames: they are thinner rather than thicker when turbulence is stronger. We also show that none of the several different types of turbulent flame speed models accurately predicts measured flame speeds. In addition, we find that the RT flame speed model only correctly predicts the measured flame speed in a certain parameter regime. Finally, we propose that the formation of cusps may be the factor causing the flame to propagate more quickly than predicted by the RT model.

  1. DSMC Simulations of the Rayleigh-Taylor Instability in Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallis, Michael; Koehler, Timothy; Torczynski, John; Plimpton, Steven

    2015-11-01

    The Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method of molecular gas dynamics is applied to simulate the Rayleigh-Taylor instability (RTI) in atmospheric-pressure monatomic gases (e.g., argon and helium). The computational domain is a 1 mm × 4 mm rectangle divided into 50-nm square cells. Each cell is populated with 1000 computational molecules, and time steps of 0.1 ns are used. Simulations are performed to quantify the growth of a single-mode perturbation on the interface as a function of the Atwood number and the gravitational acceleration. The DSMC results qualitatively reproduce all observed features of the RTI and are in reasonable quantitative agreement with existing theoretical and empirical models. Consistent with previous work in this field, the DSMC simulations indicate that the growth of the RTI follows a universal behavior. For cases with multiple-mode perturbations, the numbers of bubble-spike pairs that eventually appear are found to be in agreement with theoretical results for the most unstable wavelength. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  2. Helical magnetorotational instability in magnetized Taylor-Couette flow

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Wei; Ji Hantao; Goodman, Jeremy; Herron, Isom

    2006-11-15

    Hollerbach and Ruediger have reported a new type of magnetorotational instability (MRI) in magnetized Taylor-Couette flow in the presence of combined axial and azimuthal magnetic fields. The salient advantage of this 'helical' MRI (HMRI) is that marginal instability occurs at arbitrarily low magnetic Reynolds and Lundquist numbers, suggesting that HMRI might be easier to realize than standard MRI (axial field only), and that it might be relevant to cooler astrophysical disks, especially those around protostars, which may be quite resistive. We confirm previous results for marginal stability and calculate HMRI growth rates. We show that in the resistive limit, HMRI is a weakly destabilized inertial oscillation propagating in a unique direction along the axis. But we report other features of HMRI that make it less attractive for experiments and for resistive astrophysical disks. Large axial currents are required. More fundamentally, instability of highly resistive flow is peculiar to infinitely long or periodic cylinders: finite cylinders with insulating endcaps are shown to be stable in this limit, at least if viscosity is neglected. Also, Keplerian rotation profiles are stable in the resistive limit regardless of axial boundary conditions. Nevertheless, the addition of a toroidal field lowers thresholds for instability even in finite cylinders.

  3. Spontaneous layer formation dynamics in stratified Taylor-Couette flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leclercq, Colin; Partridge, Jamie L.; Augier, Pierre; Caulfield, C. P.; Linden, Paul F.; Dalziel, Stuart B.; MUST Collaboration

    2015-11-01

    The spontaneous formation of horizontal layers is a common feature of strongly and stably stratified flows and plays a major role in the dynamics of geophysical flows. However, little is known about the physical mechanism setting the depth of the layers spontaneously emerging in ``stratified Taylor-Couette flow'' in the annulus between a rotating inner cylinder and a fixed outer cylinder, initially filled with stably, axially and linearly stratified fluid. Using linear stability analysis, direct numerical simulations and experiments, we investigate the relative importance of primary linear instability and secondary nonlinear processes in the transient dynamics leading to the experimentally and numerically observed step-like density profile in this flow. We explore the effects of the particular form of the spin-up of the inner cylinder and initial conditions on the transient dynamics and nonlinear attractor of the flow. By better understanding the dynamics of layer formation, we are able to identify the approriate scaling laws relating layer depth to rotation rate, initial stratification, gap width and radius ratio. EPSRC programme grant EP/K034529/1.

  4. Rayleigh-Taylor Instability Growth Control in HIF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hisatomi, Yuya; Kawata, Shigeo; Koseki, Shunsuke; Kurosaki, Tatsuya; Ogoyski, Alexander; Barada, Daisuke

    2010-11-01

    Uniformity of heavy ion beam (HIB) illumination is one of key issues in HIB inertial confinement fusion (HIF): deviation from fuel implosion symmetry should be less than a few percent in order to compress a fuel sufficiently and release fusion energy effectively. In this paper a new mitigation method of the Rayleigh-Taylor (R-T) instability growth is presented in order to make a HIF target robust against a non-uniform implosion. In this study a new mitigation method of the R-T instability growth is proposed based on an oscillating perturbed acceleration, which can be realized by a rotating or oscillating HIB illumination onto a fuel pellet. The R-T instability analyses and fluid simulations demonstrate that the oscillating acceleration reduces the R-T instability growth significantly. In this paper a baseline steady acceleration g is perturbed by a perturbed oscillating acceleration g1, which is spatially non-uniform and oscillates in time (g >> g1 ). An example result shows 84% reduction of the R-T instability growth.

  5. Mechanism of Bursting Taylor Bubbles at Free Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Rana, Basanta K; Das, Arup K; Das, Prasanta K

    2015-09-15

    Collapse of a Taylor bubble inside a pipe at the free surface of a liquid is studied experimentally using speed imaging camera and illumination and subsequent image analysis. Three different fluids, water, glycerin, and silicone oil, are employed in the experiments. For all conditions studied herein, the bubble punctures at the free surface to form two thin films, i.e., one covering the cross-section of the tube near the free surface and one along the tube wall in the vertical direction. Surface tension acts to collapse the first film, which widens the punctured hole in the outward radial direction, thereby feeding the liquid in the vertical film. After the shrinking of the radial film, gravity causes the collapse of the vertical film, which generates a tiny jet of liquid at the end of collapse. Experiments with different fluids show a drastic change in shape and thickness of the vertical film that leads to higher drainage time. Analysis of time scale for the drainage of the horizontal film exhibits a favorable match with experiments. Finally, evolution of the vertical film is analyzed using a simple hydrodynamic model to estimate the order magnitude of time taken to collapse, which compares well with processed image data from experiments. PMID:26301827

  6. Weakly nonlinear analysis of the Saffman-Taylor problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miranda, Jose A.

    The Saffman-Taylor viscous fingering instability occurs when a less viscous fluid displaces a more viscous one between narrowly spaced parallel plates in a Hele-Shaw cell. Experiments in radial and rectangular flow geometries form finger-like patterns, in which fingers of different lengths compete, spread and split. Our weakly nonlinear analysis of the instability predicts these phenomena, which are beyond the scope of linear stability theory. Finger competition arises through enhanced growth of sub-harmonic perturbations, while spreading and splitting occur through the growth of harmonic modes. Nonlinear mode-coupling enhances the growth of these specific perturbations with appropriate relative phases, as we demonstrate through a symmetry analysis of the mode coupling equations. We extend our mode coupling theory to include the situation in which one of the fluids is a ferrofluid and a magnetic field is applied normal to the Hele-Shaw cell. Our analysis indicates that the onset of interface symmetry breaking observed in experiments involving ferrofluids depends on viscosity contrast, not on the applied magnetic field. We also show how magnetic fields lead to finger tip-splitting.

  7. Magneto-Rayleigh-Taylor instability in solid media

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Y. B.; Piriz, A. R.

    2014-07-15

    A linear analysis of the magneto-Rayleigh-Taylor instability at the interface between a Newtonian fluid and an elastic-plastic solid is performed by considering a uniform magnetic B{sup →}, parallel to the interface, which has diffused into the fluid but not into the solid. It is found that the magnetic field attributes elastic properties to the viscous fluid which enhance the stability region by stabilizing all the perturbation wavelengths shorter than λ{sub 0}∝B{sup 2} for any initial perturbation amplitude. Longer wavelengths are stabilized by the mechanical properties of the solid provided that the initial perturbation wavelength is smaller than a threshold value determined by the yield strength and the shear modulus of the solid. Beyond this threshold, the amplitude grows initially with a growth rate reduced by the solid strength properties. However, such properties do not affect the asymptotic growth rate which is only determined by the magnetic field and the fluid viscosity. The described physical situation intends to resemble some of the features present in recent experiments involving the magnetic shockless acceleration of flyers plates.

  8. On the modeling of the Taylor cylinder impact test for orthotropic textured materials: Calculations and experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Maudlin, P.J.; Bingert, J.F.; House, J.W.

    1997-04-01

    Taylor impact tests using specimens cut from a rolled plate of Ta were conducted. The Ta was well-characterized in terms of flow stress and crystallographic texture. A piece-wise yield surface was interrogated from this orthotropic texture, and used in EPIC-95 3D simulations of the Taylor test. Good agreement was realized between the calculations and the post-test geometries in terms of major and minor side profiles and impact-interface footprints.

  9. Experimental and numerical analysis of Al6063 duralumin using Taylor impact test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruszka, L.; Anaszewicz, Ł.; Janiszewski, J.; Grązka, M.

    2012-08-01

    The paper presents results of experimental and numerical analysis of dynamic behaviour Al6063 duralumin. Dynamical experiments were made using Taylor impact test. Experimental results at next step of study were used in numerical analyses of dynamic yield stress of tested material and model parameters of the Johnson-Cook constitutive equation. The main aim of this analysis is to find out dynamical properties of Al6063 duralumin tested in Taylor impact test.

  10. A Taylor-Galerkin finite element algorithm for transient nonlinear thermal-structural analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thornton, Earl A.; Dechaumphai, Pramote

    1985-01-01

    A Taylor-Galerkin finite element solution algorithm for transient nonlinear thermal-structural analysis of large, complex structural problems subjected to rapidly applied thermal-structural loads is described. The two-step Taylor-Galerkin algorithm is an application of an algorithm recently developed for problems in compressible fluid dynamics. The element integrals that appear in the algorithm can be evaluated in closed form for two and three dimensional elements.

  11. Transition to two-dimensionality in magnetohydrodynamic turbulent Taylor-Couette flow.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yurong; Tao, Jianjun; Zikanov, Oleg

    2014-03-01

    Transition from a Taylor-Couette turbulent flow to a completely two-dimensional axisymmetric turbulent state is realized numerically by increasing gradually the strength of the azimuthal magnetic field produced by electric current flowing through the axial rod. With the increase of the Hartmann number, the Taylor-vortex-like structures shrink, move closer to the inner cylinder, and turn into unsteady but perfect tori at sufficiently high Hartmann numbers.

  12. Comparative Proteomic Analysis of Two Varieties of Genetically Modified (GM) Embrapa 5.1 Common Bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) and Their Non-GM Counterparts.

    PubMed

    Balsamo, Geisi M; Valentim-Neto, Pedro A; Mello, Carla S; Arisi, Ana C M

    2015-12-01

    The genetically modified (GM) common bean event Embrapa 5.1 was commercially approved in Brazil in 2011; it is resistant to golden mosaic virus infection. In the present work grain proteome profiles of two Embrapa 5.1 common bean varieties, Pérola and Pontal, and their non-GM counterparts were compared by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) followed by mass spectrometry (MS). Analyses detected 23 spots differentially accumulated between GM Pérola and non-GM Pérola and 21 spots between GM Pontal and non-GM Pontal, although they were not the same proteins in Pérola and Pontal varieties, indicating that the variability observed may not be due to the genetic transformation. Among them, eight proteins were identified in Pérola varieties, and four proteins were identified in Pontal. Moreover, we applied principal component analysis (PCA) on 2-DE data, and variation between varieties was explained in the first two principal components. This work provides a first 2-DE-MS/MS-based analysis of Embrapa 5.1 common bean grains.

  13. Comparative Proteomic Analysis of Two Varieties of Genetically Modified (GM) Embrapa 5.1 Common Bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) and Their Non-GM Counterparts.

    PubMed

    Balsamo, Geisi M; Valentim-Neto, Pedro A; Mello, Carla S; Arisi, Ana C M

    2015-12-01

    The genetically modified (GM) common bean event Embrapa 5.1 was commercially approved in Brazil in 2011; it is resistant to golden mosaic virus infection. In the present work grain proteome profiles of two Embrapa 5.1 common bean varieties, Pérola and Pontal, and their non-GM counterparts were compared by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) followed by mass spectrometry (MS). Analyses detected 23 spots differentially accumulated between GM Pérola and non-GM Pérola and 21 spots between GM Pontal and non-GM Pontal, although they were not the same proteins in Pérola and Pontal varieties, indicating that the variability observed may not be due to the genetic transformation. Among them, eight proteins were identified in Pérola varieties, and four proteins were identified in Pontal. Moreover, we applied principal component analysis (PCA) on 2-DE data, and variation between varieties was explained in the first two principal components. This work provides a first 2-DE-MS/MS-based analysis of Embrapa 5.1 common bean grains. PMID:26575080

  14. Taylor Dispersion Analysis as a promising tool for assessment of peptide-peptide interactions.

    PubMed

    Høgstedt, Ulrich B; Schwach, Grégoire; van de Weert, Marco; Østergaard, Jesper

    2016-10-10

    Protein-protein and peptide-peptide (self-)interactions are of key importance in understanding the physiochemical behavior of proteins and peptides in solution. However, due to the small size of peptide molecules, characterization of these interactions is more challenging than for proteins. In this work, we show that protein-protein and peptide-peptide interactions can advantageously be investigated by measurement of the diffusion coefficient using Taylor Dispersion Analysis. Through comparison to Dynamic Light Scattering it was shown that Taylor Dispersion Analysis is well suited for the characterization of protein-protein interactions of solutions of α-lactalbumin and human serum albumin. The peptide-peptide interactions of three selected peptides were then investigated in a concentration range spanning from 0.5mg/ml up to 80mg/ml using Taylor Dispersion Analysis. The peptide-peptide interactions determination indicated that multibody interactions significantly affect the PPIs at concentration levels above 25mg/ml for the two charged peptides. Relative viscosity measurements, performed using the capillary based setup applied for Taylor Dispersion Analysis, showed that the viscosity of the peptide solutions increased with concentration. Our results indicate that a viscosity difference between run buffer and sample in Taylor Dispersion Analysis may result in overestimation of the measured diffusion coefficient. Thus, Taylor Dispersion Analysis provides a practical, but as yet primarily qualitative, approach to assessment of the colloidal stability of both peptide and protein formulations.

  15. Distribution of glacial deposits, soils, and permafrost in Taylor Valley, Antarctica

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bockheim, J.G.; Prentice, M.L.; McLeod, M.

    2008-01-01

    We provide a map of lower and central Taylor Valley, Antarctica, that shows deposits from Taylor Glacier, local alpine glaciers, and grounded ice in the Ross Embayment. From our electronic database, which includes 153 sites from the coast 50 km upvalley to Pearse Valley, we show the distribution of permafrost type and soil subgroups according to Soil Taxonomy. Soils in eastern Taylor Valley are of late Pleistocene age, cryoturbated due to the presence of ground ice or ice-cemented permafrost within 70 cm of the surface, and classified as Glacic and Typic Haploturbels. In central Taylor Valley, soils are dominantly Typic Anhyorthels of mid-Pleistocene age that have dry-frozen permafrost within the upper 70 cm. Salt-enriched soils (Salic Anhyorthels and Petrosalic Anhyorthels) are of limited extent in Taylor Valley and occur primarily on drifts of early Pleistocene and Pliocene age. Soils are less developed in Taylor Valley than in nearby Wright Valley, because of lesser salt input from atmospheric deposition and salt weathering. Ice-cemented permafrost is ubiquitous on Ross Sea, pre-Ross Sea, and Bonney drifts that occur within 28 km of the McMurdo coast. In contrast, dry-frozen permafrost is prevalent on older (???115 ky) surfaces to the west. ?? 2008 Regents of the University of Colorado.

  16. Temperature, size, and depth of the magma reservoir for the Taylor Creek Rhyolite, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Duffield, W.A.; du Bray, E.A.

    1990-01-01

    The 55 km3 mid-Tertiary Taylor Creek Rhyolite in southwestern New Mexico consists of 20 lava domes and flows. This rhyolite is metaluminous to weakly peraluminous. Compositional zonation in feldspar phenocrysts is very minor and nonsystematic. The compositions of each feldspar species vary little throughout the suite of analyzed samples. This chemical homogeneity of phenocrysts reflects similar whole-rock homogeneity and suggests that the lavas were tapped from a single large reservoir of magma. Ages of sanidine phenocrysts determined using 40Ar/39Ar indicate that the Taylor Creek Rhyolite lavas were emplaced during a period of less than 0.42 my. and possibly less than 0.13 m.y., which is consistent with the single-reservoir scenario. Two-feldspar geothermometry suggests that Taylor Creek Rhyolite phenocrysts crystallized at about 775??C, at an assumed pressure of 2 kbar. Fe-Ti-oxide geothermometry suggests phenocryst growth at about 800??C. Experimental studies suggest that quartz and potassium-feldspar crystals that grow from H2O-undersaturated granitic magmas should exhibit resorption texture, a texture ubiquitous to Taylor Creek Rhyolite quartz and sanidine phenocrysts. We tentatively conclude that the Taylor Creek Rhyolite magma was H2O undersaturated and subliquidus at an unspecified pressure greater than 0.5 kbar during phenocryst growth and that Taylor Creek Rhyolite pyroclastic deposits formed because volatile saturation developed during the ascent of magma to sites of eruption. -from Authors

  17. The stability of Taylor bubbles in large-diameter tubes: Linear theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abubakar, Habib; Matar, Omar

    2015-11-01

    Taylor bubbles are a characteristic feature of the slug flow regime in gas-liquid pipe flows. With increasing pipe diameter, previous experimental observations have shown that at sufficiently large diameter (> 0.1 m), the slug flow regime, and hence Taylor bubbles, are not observed in gas-liquid flows in vertical pipes. Numerical simulations of a Taylor bubble rising in a quiescent liquid (see companion talk at this APS/DFD conference) have also shown that the wake of Taylor bubbles rising in a riser of such sizes is turbulent and has great impact on the stability of the subsequent, trailing bubbles. In view of these observations, a linear stability analysis is carried out to establish the stability conditions for a Taylor bubble rising in a turbulent flowing liquid. The stability of an axisymmetric Taylor bubble to a small-amplitude, three dimensional, perturbation is studied and the dimensionless flow parameters of the liquid investigated include the Froude number, the inverse viscosity number, and the Eotvos numbers. Nigerian Government scholarship (for HA).

  18. Consumer choice: Linking consumer intentions to actual purchase of GM labeled food products.

    PubMed

    Sleenhoff, Susanne; Osseweijer, Patricia

    2013-01-01

    With a mandatory labeling scheme for GM food in Europe since 2004 measuring actual consumer choice in practice has become possible. Anticipating Europeans negative attitude toward GM food, the labeling was enforced to allow consumers to make an informed choice. We studied consumers actual purchase behavior of GM food products and compared this with their attitude and behavioral intention for buying GM food. We found that despite a majority of consumers voicing a negative attitude toward GM food over 50% of our European respondents stated that they did not actively avoid the purchase of GM food and 6% actually purchased one of the few available GM labeled food products in the period between September 2006 and October 2007. Our results imply that a voiced negative attitude of consumers in responses to questionnaires about their intentions is not a reliable guide for what they actually do in supermarkets. We conclude that the assumption of a negative attitude with regard to GM food is at least in part construed. PMID:24051512

  19. Safety assessment of GM plants: An updated review of the scientific literature.

    PubMed

    Domingo, José L

    2016-09-01

    In a wide revision of the literature conducted in 2000, I noted that the information in scientific journals on the safety of genetically modified (GM) foods in general, and GM plants in particular, was scarce. Of course, it was not sufficient to guarantee that the consumption of these products should not mean risks for the health of the consumers. Because of the scientific interest in GM organisms (GMOs), as well as the great concern that the consumption of GM foods/plants has raised in a number of countries, I conducted two subsequent revisions (2007 and 2011) on the adverse/toxic effects of GM plants. In the present review, I have updated the information on the potential adverse health effects of GM plants consumed as food and/or feed. With only a few exceptions, the reported studies in the last six years show rather similar conclusions; that is to say, the assessed GM soybeans, rice, corn/maize and wheat would be as safe as the parental species of these plants. However, in spite of the notable increase in the available information, studies on the long-term health effects of GM plants, including tests of mutagenicity, teratogenicity and carcinogenicity seem to be still clearly necessary. PMID:27317828

  20. Combined influences of Gm and HLA phenotypes upon multiple sclerosis susceptibility and severity.

    PubMed Central

    Salier, J P; Sesboüé, R; Martin-Mondière, C; Daveau, M; Cesaro, P; Cavelier, B; Coquerel, A; Legrand, L; Goust, J M; Degos, J D

    1986-01-01

    In some Caucasian populations, multiple sclerosis (MS) susceptibility has been independently related to given alleles of HLA or Gm systems that respectively code for major histocompatibility complex class I and II antigens or immunoglobulin G heavy chains. Whether given combinations of alleles at both series of loci simultaneously influence MS susceptibility and/or severity was investigated by comparing 147 French MS patients and 226 geographically-matched healthy controls. The G2m(-23)/HLA-B35 phenotype and G1m(-1)/HLA-B7(-)/HLA-DR2 phenotype were respectively associated with significant protection against (relative risk = 0.05) and susceptibility to (relative risk = 4.3) MS. When considering MS severity, the presence of HLA-B7 antigen correlated with a more severe disease in Gm1/Gm3 heterozygous patients, but not in Gm3/Gm3 homozygous patients. Conversely, an HLA-B12-associated milder disease was restricted to Gm3/Gm3 homozygotes. These results demonstrate the combined influence on MS of genetic loci that are unlinked but immune response-associated. Combined Gm and HLA typing is very likely able to serve as a prognostic indicator in this disease. PMID:3461005

  1. Combined influences of Gm and HLA phenotypes upon multiple sclerosis susceptibility and severity.

    PubMed

    Salier, J P; Sesboüé, R; Martin-Mondière, C; Daveau, M; Cesaro, P; Cavelier, B; Coquerel, A; Legrand, L; Goust, J M; Degos, J D

    1986-08-01

    In some Caucasian populations, multiple sclerosis (MS) susceptibility has been independently related to given alleles of HLA or Gm systems that respectively code for major histocompatibility complex class I and II antigens or immunoglobulin G heavy chains. Whether given combinations of alleles at both series of loci simultaneously influence MS susceptibility and/or severity was investigated by comparing 147 French MS patients and 226 geographically-matched healthy controls. The G2m(-23)/HLA-B35 phenotype and G1m(-1)/HLA-B7(-)/HLA-DR2 phenotype were respectively associated with significant protection against (relative risk = 0.05) and susceptibility to (relative risk = 4.3) MS. When considering MS severity, the presence of HLA-B7 antigen correlated with a more severe disease in Gm1/Gm3 heterozygous patients, but not in Gm3/Gm3 homozygous patients. Conversely, an HLA-B12-associated milder disease was restricted to Gm3/Gm3 homozygotes. These results demonstrate the combined influence on MS of genetic loci that are unlinked but immune response-associated. Combined Gm and HLA typing is very likely able to serve as a prognostic indicator in this disease. PMID:3461005

  2. Gene model 129 (Gm129) encodes a novel transcriptional repressor that modulates circadian gene expression.

    PubMed

    Annayev, Yunus; Adar, Sheera; Chiou, Yi-Ying; Lieb, Jason D; Sancar, Aziz; Ye, Rui

    2014-02-21

    The mammalian circadian clock is a molecular oscillator composed of a feedback loop that involves transcriptional activators CLOCK and BMAL1, and repressors Cryptochrome (CRY) and Period (PER). Here we show that a direct CLOCK·BMAL1 target gene, Gm129, is a novel regulator of the feedback loop. ChIP analysis revealed that the CLOCK·BMAL1·CRY1 complex strongly occupies the promoter region of Gm129. Both mRNA and protein levels of GM129 exhibit high amplitude circadian oscillations in mouse liver, and Gm129 gene encodes a nuclear-localized protein that directly interacts with BMAL1 and represses CLOCK·BMAL1 activity. In vitro and in vivo protein-DNA interaction results demonstrate that, like CRY1, GM129 functions as a repressor by binding to the CLOCK·BMAL1 complex on DNA. Although Gm129(-/-) or Cry1(-/-) Gm129(-/-) mice retain a robust circadian rhythm, the peaks of Nr1d1 and Dbp mRNAs in liver exhibit a significant phase delay compared with control. Our results suggest that, in addition to CRYs and PERs, the GM129 protein contributes to the transcriptional feedback loop by modulating CLOCK·BMAL1 activity as a transcriptional repressor.

  3. GM1-ganglioside-induced Abeta assembly on synaptic membranes of cultured neurons.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Naoki; Fukata, Yuko; Fukata, Masaki; Yanagisawa, Katsuhiko

    2007-05-01

    The cell-surface expression of GM1 ganglioside was studied using various cultured cells, including brain-derived endothelial cells, astrocytes, neuroblastoma cells (SH-SY5Y), and pheochromocytoma cells (PC12). GM1 ganglioside was detected only on the surface of native and nerve-growth-factor (NGF)-treated PC12 cells. We investigated whether GM1 ganglioside on the surface of these cells is sufficiently potent to induce the assembly of an exogenous soluble amyloid beta-protein (Abeta). A marked Abeta assembly was observed in the culture of NGF-treated PC12 cells. Notably, immunocytochemical study revealed that, despite the ubiquitous surface expression of GM1 ganglioside throughout cell bodies and neurites, Abeta assembly initially occurred at the terminals of SNAP25-immunopositive neurites. Abeta assembly in the culture was completely suppressed by the coincubation of Abeta with the subunit B of cholera toxin, a natural ligand for GM1 ganglioside, or 4396C, a monoclonal antibody specific to GM1-ganglioside-bound Abeta (GAbeta). In primary neuronal cultures, Abeta assembly initially occurred at synaptophysin-positive sites. These results suggest that the cell-surface expression of GM1 ganglioside is strictly cell-type-specific, and that expression of GM1 ganglioside on synaptic membranes is unique in terms of its high potency to induce Abeta assembly through the generation of GAbeta, which is an endogenous seed for Abeta assembly in Alzheimer brain.

  4. Biotech/GM crops in horticulture: plum cv. HoneySweet resistant to plum pox virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Commercialization of Biotech crops started in 1995. By 2011, genetically modified (GM) crops were grown world-wide on 160 million ha. Only 114.507 ha of GM crops were grown in Europe, of that, 114.490 ha were Bt maize and 17 ha were potato for industrial starch production. Currently, developing c...

  5. Safety assessment of GM plants: An updated review of the scientific literature.

    PubMed

    Domingo, José L

    2016-09-01

    In a wide revision of the literature conducted in 2000, I noted that the information in scientific journals on the safety of genetically modified (GM) foods in general, and GM plants in particular, was scarce. Of course, it was not sufficient to guarantee that the consumption of these products should not mean risks for the health of the consumers. Because of the scientific interest in GM organisms (GMOs), as well as the great concern that the consumption of GM foods/plants has raised in a number of countries, I conducted two subsequent revisions (2007 and 2011) on the adverse/toxic effects of GM plants. In the present review, I have updated the information on the potential adverse health effects of GM plants consumed as food and/or feed. With only a few exceptions, the reported studies in the last six years show rather similar conclusions; that is to say, the assessed GM soybeans, rice, corn/maize and wheat would be as safe as the parental species of these plants. However, in spite of the notable increase in the available information, studies on the long-term health effects of GM plants, including tests of mutagenicity, teratogenicity and carcinogenicity seem to be still clearly necessary.

  6. Arabidopsis KLU homologue GmCYP78A72 regulates seed size in soybean.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Baotian; Dai, Aihua; Wei, Haichao; Yang, Suxin; Wang, Baoshan; Jiang, Ning; Feng, Xianzhong

    2016-01-01

    Soybean (Glycine max) is one of the most important crops in the world, and its yield is largely determined by grain weight and grain size. However, the genes that regulate soybean seed size have not been identified. CYP78A, which is highly conserved within terrestrial plants, regulates organ development. In Arabidopsis, AtCYP78A5/KLU has been shown to determine seed size. In the present study, soybean CYP78A72 (GmCYP78A72), one of the orthologs of KLU, was over-expressed in both Arabidopsis and soybean to examine its function in plant development. GmCYP78A72 heterologous expression in Arabidopsis resulted in enlarged sepals, petals, seeds and carpel. Over-expression of GmCYP78A72 in soybean resulted in increased pea size, which is an extremely desirable trait for enhancing productivity. Moreover, knock-down of GmCYP78A72 does not reduce grain size. However, silencing of GmCYP78A57, GmCYP78A70 and GmCYP78A72 genes in triplet reduces the seed size significantly indicating functional redundancy of these three GmCYP78A genes. In conclusion, we investigated the role of CYP78A in soybean seed regulation, and our strategy can be effectively used to engineer large seed traits in soybean varieties as well as other crops.

  7. Neutralization and clearance of GM-CSF by autoantibodies in pulmonary alveolar proteinosis.

    PubMed

    Piccoli, Luca; Campo, Ilaria; Fregni, Chiara Silacci; Rodriguez, Blanca Maria Fernandez; Minola, Andrea; Sallusto, Federica; Luisetti, Maurizio; Corti, Davide; Lanzavecchia, Antonio

    2015-06-16

    Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP) is a severe autoimmune disease caused by autoantibodies that neutralize GM-CSF resulting in impaired function of alveolar macrophages. In this study, we characterize 21 GM-CSF autoantibodies from PAP patients and find that somatic mutations critically determine their specificity for the self-antigen. Individual antibodies only partially neutralize GM-CSF activity using an in vitro bioassay, depending on the experimental conditions, while, when injected in mice together with human GM-CSF, they lead to the accumulation of a large pool of circulating GM-CSF that remains partially bioavailable. In contrast, a combination of three non-cross-competing antibodies completely neutralizes GM-CSF activity in vitro by sequestering the cytokine in high-molecular-weight complexes, and in vivo promotes the rapid degradation of GM-CSF-containing immune complexes in an Fc-dependent manner. Taken together, these findings provide a plausible explanation for the severe phenotype of PAP patients and for the safety of treatments based on single anti-GM-CSF monoclonal antibodies.

  8. Neutralization and clearance of GM-CSF by autoantibodies in pulmonary alveolar proteinosis

    PubMed Central

    Piccoli, Luca; Campo, Ilaria; Fregni, Chiara Silacci; Rodriguez, Blanca Maria Fernandez; Minola, Andrea; Sallusto, Federica; Luisetti, Maurizio; Corti, Davide; Lanzavecchia, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP) is a severe autoimmune disease caused by autoantibodies that neutralize GM-CSF resulting in impaired function of alveolar macrophages. In this study, we characterize 21 GM-CSF autoantibodies from PAP patients and find that somatic mutations critically determine their specificity for the self-antigen. Individual antibodies only partially neutralize GM-CSF activity using an in vitro bioassay, depending on the experimental conditions, while, when injected in mice together with human GM-CSF, they lead to the accumulation of a large pool of circulating GM-CSF that remains partially bioavailable. In contrast, a combination of three non-cross-competing antibodies completely neutralizes GM-CSF activity in vitro by sequestering the cytokine in high-molecular-weight complexes, and in vivo promotes the rapid degradation of GM-CSF-containing immune complexes in an Fc-dependent manner. Taken together, these findings provide a plausible explanation for the severe phenotype of PAP patients and for the safety of treatments based on single anti-GM-CSF monoclonal antibodies. PMID:26077231

  9. RNAi-based GM plants: food for thought for risk assessors.

    PubMed

    Ramon, Matthew; Devos, Yann; Lanzoni, Anna; Liu, Yi; Gomes, Ana; Gennaro, Andrea; Waigmann, Elisabeth

    2014-12-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is an emerging technology that offers new opportunities for the generation of new traits in genetically modified (GM) plants. Potential risks associated with RNAi-based GM plants and issues specific to their risk assessment were discussed during an international scientific workshop (June 2014) organized by the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA). Selected key outcomes of the workshop are reported here.

  10. LONG-DISTANCE GM POLLEN MOVEMENT OF CREEPING BENTGRASS USING MODELED WIND TRAJECTORY ANALYSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The importance of understanding the role of atmospheric conditions in pollen dispersal has grown in recent years with increased field-testing of genetically modified (GM) crop plants. An atmospheric model was used to characterize wind trajectories at 10 m and 100 m above GM polle...

  11. Development of Membrane-Bound GM-CSF and IL-18 as an Effective Tumor Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Ta-Chun; Chuang, Chih-Hung; Kao, Chien-Han; Hsieh, Yuan-Chin; Cheng, Kuang-Hung; Wang, Jaw-Yuan; Cheng, Chiu-Min; Chen, Chien-Shu; Cheng, Tian-Lu

    2015-01-01

    The development of effective adjuvant is the key factor to boost the immunogenicity of tumor cells as a tumor vaccine. In this study, we expressed membrane-bound granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and interleukin-18 (IL-18) as adjuvants in tumor cells to stimulate immune response. B7 transmembrane domain fused GM-CSF and IL-18 was successfully expressed in the cell membrane and stimulated mouse splenocyte proliferation. Co-expression of GM-CSF and IL-18 reduced tumorigenesis (P<0.05) and enhanced tumor protective efficacy (P<0.05) significantly in comparison with GM-CSF alone. These results indicated that the combination of GM-CSF andIL-18 will enhance the immunogenicity of a cell-based anti-tumor vaccine. This membrane-bound approach can be applied to other cytokines for the development of novel vaccine strategies. PMID:26186692

  12. Improvement of the immune efficacy of carbohydrate vaccines by chemical modification on the GM3 antigen.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xiu-Jing; Yang, Fan; Zheng, Mingwei; Huo, Chang-Xin; Zhang, Ye; Ye, Xin-Shan

    2015-06-14

    Tumor cells often display aberrant levels and patterns of cell surface glycosylation, which provides a potential opportunity to develop carbohydrate-based anticancer vaccines for cancer immunotherapy. However, one of the most addressed challenges in this field is the low efficiency of the carbohydrate vaccination due to poor immunogenicity of carbohydrate antigens. In this article, a number of structure-modified GM3 antigen analogues were designed and chemically synthesized. The modified GM3 antigens were conjugated to protein carriers for vaccination. The vaccination results on mice show that the modification on the GM3 antigen could improve the efficiency of the vaccination, and in particular, two glycoconjugates (3-KLH and 8-KLH) elicited higher titers of anti-GM3 antibodies than the unmodified GM3-protein conjugate (2-KLH) did.

  13. "It just goes against the grain." Public understandings of genetically modified (GM) food in the UK.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Alison

    2002-07-01

    This paper reports on one aspect of qualitative research on public understandings of food risks, focusing on lay understandings of genetically modified (GM) food in the UK context. A range of theoretical, conceptual, and empirical literature on food, risk, and the public understanding of science are reviewed. The fieldwork methods are outlined and empirical data from a range of lay groups are presented. Major themes include: varying "technical" knowledge of science, the relationship between knowledge and acceptance of genetic modification, the uncertainty of scientific knowledge, genetic modification as inappropriate scientific intervention in "nature", the acceptability of animal and human applications of genetic modification, the appropriate boundaries of scientific innovation, the necessity for GM foods, the uncertainty of risks in GM food, fatalism about avoiding risks, and trust in "experts" to manage potential risks in GM food. Key discussion points relating to a sociological understanding of public attitudes to GM food are raised and some policy implications are highlighted.

  14. GM-CSF augments the immunosuppressive capacity of neonatal spleen cells in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Morrissey, P.J.; Ireland, R. )

    1991-09-01

    Addition of exogenous granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) to cultures of adult murine spleen cells with sheep red blood cells (SRBC) results in an augmented plaque forming cell (PFC) response. The influence of GM-CSF on the ability of neonatal spleen cells to suppress the anti-SRBC plaque forming response of adult spleen cells was tested by adding GM-CSF to cultures of neonatal and adult spleen cells. The suppressive capacity of the neonatal spleen cells was augmented by exogenous GM-CSF. The augmented suppression of the neonatal spleen cells was dependent on a G-10 adherent population since the addition of GM-CSF to cultures containing G-10 passed neonatal spleen cells resulted in an augmented PFC response and not suppression. Neonatal splenic glass adherent cells were also capable of suppressing the response. Neonatal spleen cells or purified neonatal glass adherent spleen cells cultured in the presence of GM-CSF had markedly increased levels of PGE2 in the culture supernatant. Neonatal spleen cells cultured with GM-CSF had increased numbers of morphologically identifiable macrophages after 48 hr of culture. Both irradiation and G-10 passage of the neonatal spleen diminished the numbers of macrophages formed in response to GM-CSF, and both of these manipulations resulted in reversal of suppression in response to GM-CSF. Thus, the augmented suppressive capacity of neonatal spleen cells in response to GM-CSF is probably mediated by its ability to drive monocyte to macrophage differentiation as well as increase the suppressive capacity of the existing neonatal splenic macrophages by increasing their production of PGE2.

  15. A novel human model of the neurodegenerative disease GM1 gangliosidosis using induced pluripotent stem cells demonstrates inflammasome activation.

    PubMed

    Son, Mi-Young; Kwak, Jae Eun; Seol, Binna; Lee, Da Yong; Jeon, Hyejin; Cho, Yee Sook

    2015-09-01

    GM1 gangliosidosis (GM1) is an inherited neurodegenerative disorder caused by mutations in the lysosomal β-galactosidase (β-gal) gene. Insufficient β-gal activity leads to abnormal accumulation of GM1 gangliosides in tissues, particularly in the central nervous system, resulting in progressive neurodegeneration. Here, we report an in vitro human GM1 model, based on induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) technology. Neural progenitor cells differentiated from GM1 patient-derived iPSCs (GM1-NPCs) recapitulated the biochemical and molecular phenotypes of GM1, including defective β-gal activity and increased lysosomes. Importantly, the characterization of GM1-NPCs established that GM1 is significantly associated with the activation of inflammasomes, which play a critical role in the pathogenesis of various neurodegenerative diseases. Specific inflammasome inhibitors potently alleviated the disease-related phenotypes of GM1-NPCs in vitro and in vivo. Our data demonstrate that GM1-NPCs are a valuable in vitro human GM1 model and suggest that inflammasome activation is a novel target pathway for GM1 drug development.

  16. Very-high-growth-factor Planar Ablative Rayleigh Taylor Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, D K; Braun, D G; Glendinning, S G; Edwards, M J; Milovich, J L; Sorce, C M; Collins, G W; Haan, S W; Page, R H

    2006-10-30

    The Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability is an important factor in bounding the performance envelope of ignition targets. This paper describes an experiment for ablative RT instability that for the first time achieves growth factors close to those expected to occur in ignition targets at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The large growth allows small seed perturbations to be detected and can be used to place an upper bound on perturbation growth at the ablation front resulting from microstructure in the preferred Be ablator. The experiments were performed on the Omega laser using a halfraum 1.2 mm long by 2 mm diameter with a 75% laser entrance hole. The halfraum was filled with {approx} 1 atm of neopentane to delay gold plasma from closing the diagnostic line of sight down the axis of the halfraum. The ablator was mounted at the base of the halfraum, and was accelerated by a two stepped X-ray pulse consisting of an early time section {approx} 100 eV to emulate the NIF foot followed by an approximately constant {approx} 150 eV drive sustained over an additional 5-7ns. It is this long pulse duration and late time observation that distinguishes the present work from previous experiments, and is responsible for the large growth that is achieved. The growth of a 2D sinusoidal perturbation machined on the drive side of the ablator was measured using face-on radiography. The diagnostic view remained open until {approx} 11 ns with maximum growth factors measured to be {approx} 200. The trajectory of the ablator was measured using streaked backlit radiography. The design and analysis of the experiments is described, and implications for experiments on ignition target ablators are discussed.

  17. Rayleigh-Taylor Instability Evolution in Ablatively Driven Cylindrical Implosions^*,**

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsing, W. W.

    1996-11-01

    The Rayleigh-Taylor instability is an important limitation in ICF capsule designs. Significant work both theoretically and experimentally has been done to demonstrate the stabilizing effects due to material flow through the unstable region. The experimental verification has been done predominantly in planar geometry. Convergent geometry introduces effects not present in planar geometry such as shell thickening and accelerationless growth of modal amplitudes (e.g. Bell-Plesset growth). Amplitude thresholds for the nonlinear regime are reduced, since the wavelength of a mode m decreases with convergence λ ~ r/m, where r is the radius. We have investigated convergent effects using an imploding cylinder driven by x-ray ablation on the NOVA laser. By doping sections of the cylinder with high-Z materials, in conjunction with x-ray backlighting, we have measured the growth and feedthrough of the perturbations from the ablation front to the inner surface of the cylinder for various initial modes and amplitudes from early time through stagnation. Mode coupling of illumination asymmetries with material perturbations is observed, as well as phase reversal of the perturbations from near the ablation front to the inner surface of the cylinder. Imaging is performed with an x-ray pinhole camera coupled to a gated microchannel plate detector. In collaboration with C. W. Barnes, J. B. Beck, N. Hoffman (LANL), D. Galmiche, A. Richard (CEA/L-V), J. Edwards, P. Graham, B. Thomas (AWE). ^**This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by the Los Alamos National Laboratory under Contract No. W-7405-ENG-36.

  18. Boundary selection of stable wavenumbers in Taylor-vortex flow.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linek, Marcus; Ahlers, Guenter

    1996-11-01

    Non-rotating rigid ends in Taylor-vortex flow (TVF) with a rotating inner and stationary outer cylinder produce large-amplitude Ekman vortices which pin the phase of the pattern. The band of stable wavenumbers is then limited by a bulk instability, namely the Eckhaus instability. For small ɛ, this leads to a stable wavenumber band of order ɛ ^1/2 where ɛ ≡ (f - f_c)/fc with f the inner-cylinder speed and fc the value of f for the onset of TVF. When one of the ends of a vertical TVF system has a free surface, the vortex amplitude adjacent to this surface is considerably reduced and the phase pinning is weaker. Experimentally we find that this can lead to a different instability mechanism consisting of losses or gains of vortices at the free boundary. This mechanism yields a more narrow wavenumber band of order ɛ, as predicted by Cross et al.^1 Specifically we find that TVF is stable for wavenumbers k over the range λ- ɛ < (k - k_c)/kc < λ+ ɛ where kc is the value of k at onset. We find that λ - ~= - 0.55 and λ + ~= 0.70 in a system with a radius ratio η = 0.75. A detailed calculation of λ_+,- would be most interesting. Supported by NSF Grant No. DMR94-19168, and by the Deutsche Agentur für Raumfahrtangelegenheiten (DARA).l ^1 M.C. Cross, P.G. Daniels, P.C. Hohenberg, and E.D. Siggia, J. Fluid Mech.127, 155 (1983).

  19. Sample and population exponents of generalized Taylor's law.

    PubMed

    Giometto, Andrea; Formentin, Marco; Rinaldo, Andrea; Cohen, Joel E; Maritan, Amos

    2015-06-23

    Taylor's law (TL) states that the variance V of a nonnegative random variable is a power function of its mean M; i.e., V = aM(b). TL has been verified extensively in ecology, where it applies to population abundance, physics, and other natural sciences. Its ubiquitous empirical verification suggests a context-independent mechanism. Sample exponents b measured empirically via the scaling of sample mean and variance typically cluster around the value b = 2. Some theoretical models of population growth, however, predict a broad range of values for the population exponent b pertaining to the mean and variance of population density, depending on details of the growth process. Is the widely reported sample exponent b ≃ 2 the result of ecological processes or could it be a statistical artifact? Here, we apply large deviations theory and finite-sample arguments to show exactly that in a broad class of growth models the sample exponent is b ≃ 2 regardless of the underlying population exponent. We derive a generalized TL in terms of sample and population exponents b(jk) for the scaling of the kth vs. the jth cumulants. The sample exponent b(jk) depends predictably on the number of samples and for finite samples we obtain b(jk) ≃ k = j asymptotically in time, a prediction that we verify in two empirical examples. Thus, the sample exponent b ≃ 2 may indeed be a statistical artifact and not dependent on population dynamics under conditions that we specify exactly. Given the broad class of models investigated, our results apply to many fields where TL is used although inadequately understood.

  20. Imaging the Photoevaporating Disk and Radio Jet of GM Aur

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macías, Enrique; Anglada, Guillem; Osorio, Mayra; Calvet, Nuria; Torrelles, José M.; Gómez, José F.; Espaillat, Catherine; Lizano, Susana; Rodríguez, Luis F.; Carrasco-González, Carlos; Zapata, Luis

    2016-09-01

    Photoevaporation is probably the main agent for gas dispersal during the last stages of protoplanetary disk evolution. However, the overall mass-loss rate in the photoevaporative wind and its driving mechanism are still not well understood. Here we report multi-configuration Very Large Array observations at 0.7, 3, and 5 cm toward the transitional disk of GM Aur. Our radio continuum observations allow us to image and spatially resolve, for the first time, the three main components at work in this stage of the disk evolution: the disk of dust, the ionized radio jet perpendicular to it, and the photoevaporative wind arising from the disk. The mass-loss rate inferred from the flux density of the radio jet is consistent with the ratio between ejection and accretion rates found in younger objects, suggesting that transitional disks can power collimated ejections of material apparently following the same physical mechanisms as much younger protostars. Our results indicate that extreme-UV (EUV) radiation is the main ionizing mechanism of the photoevaporative wind traced by the free-free emission. The required low EUV photon luminosity of ˜6 × 1040 s-1 would produce a photoevaporation rate of only {\\dot{M}}w,{EUV}≃ 1.3× {10}-10 {M}⊙ yr-1. Therefore, other mechanisms are required to disperse the disk in the timescale imposed by observations.

  1. GM=tc^3 Cosmology and the Moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riofrio, Louise

    2010-10-01

    Relativity suggests an expanding cosmology of scale R = ct, where t is age of the Universe. Gravitation would then require that c be further related to t by: GM = tc^3. Where G and M are mass and gravitational constant, this simple expression predicts data from the microwave background, including 4.507034% baryonic matter and a stable density φ= 1 . The non-linear increase in Type 1a supernova redshifts may be precisely predicted without repulsive energies. (Riofrio, 2004) Prediction of a changing c may be tested with modern lanterns and the distant hilltop of the Moon. Our Lunar Laser Ranging Experiment has measured the Moon's semimajor axis increasing at 3.82 ± .07 cm/yr, anomalously high. The Mansfield sediment (Bills, Ray 2000) measures lunar recession at 2.9 ± 0.6 cm/yr. More recent work accurately measures a recession rate of 2.88 ± 0.05 cm/yr. LLRE differs from independent experiments by 10 σ. If the speed of laser light were decaying, the Moon's apparent distance is predicted to increase by 0.935 cm/yr. An anomaly in the Moon's orbit is precisely accounted for. This interesting result may have importance for cosmology, shedding light on puzzles of ``dark energy.'' In Planck units, this may be summarised as: M = R = t.

  2. Lunar Orbit Anomaly and GM=tc^3 Cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riofrio, Louise

    2011-03-01

    Studies of the Moon at Johnson Space Center have confirmed a large anomaly in lunar orbital distance, with possible applications to Relativity. Our Lunar Laser Ranging Experiment has reported the Moon's semimajor axis increasing at 3.82 ± .07 cm/yr, anomalously high. If the Moon were gaining angular momentum at this rate, it would have coincided with Earth less than 2 Gyr ago. The Mansfield sediment (Bills, Ray 2000) measures lunar recession at 2.9 ± 0.6 cm/yr. Additional observations independently measure a recession rate of 2.82 ± .08 cm/yr. LLRE differs from independent experiments by 10 sigma. A cosmology where speed of light c is related to time t by GM=tc^3 has been suggested to predict the redshifts of Type Ia supernovae, and a 4.507034% proportion of baryonic matter (Riofrio 2004). If c were changing in the amount predicted, lunar orbital distance would appear to increase by an additional 0.935 cm/yr. An anomaly in the lunar orbit may be precisely accounted for, shedding light on puzzles of "dark energy." In Planck units this may be summarised as M=R=t.

  3. GM crops, the environment and sustainable food production.

    PubMed

    Raven, Peter H

    2014-12-01

    Today, over 7.1 billion people rely on the earth's resources for sustenance, and nearly a billion people are malnourished, their minds and bodies unable to develop properly. Globally, population is expected to rise to more than 9 billion by 2050. Given the combined pressures of human population growth, the rapidly growing desire for increased levels of consumption, and the continued use of inappropriate technologies, it is not surprising that humans are driving organisms to extinction at an unprecedented rate. Many aspects of the sustainable functioning of the natural world are breaking down in the face of human-induced pressures including our individual and collective levels of consumption and our widespread and stubborn use of destructive technologies. Clearly, agriculture must undergo a redesign and be better and more effectively managed so as to contribute as well as possible to feeding people, while at the same time we strive to lessen the tragic loss of biodiversity and damage to all of its productive systems that the world is experiencing. For GM crops to be part of the solution, biosafety assessments should not be overly politically-driven or a burdensome impedance to delivering this technology broadly. Biosafety scientists and policy makers need to recognize the undeniable truth that inappropriate actions resulting in indecision also have negative consequences. It is no longer acceptable to delay the use of any strategy that is safe and will help us achieve the ability to feed the world's people.

  4. Rayleigh-Taylor instability and mushroom-pattern formation in a two-component Bose-Einstein condensate

    SciTech Connect

    Sasaki, Kazuki; Suzuki, Naoya; Saito, Hiroki; Akamatsu, Daisuke

    2009-12-15

    The Rayleigh-Taylor instability at the interface in an immiscible two-component Bose-Einstein condensate is investigated using the mean field and Bogoliubov theories. Rayleigh-Taylor fingers are found to grow from the interface and mushroom patterns are formed. Quantized vortex rings and vortex lines are then generated around the mushrooms. The Rayleigh-Taylor instability and mushroom-pattern formation can be observed in a trapped system.

  5. Ganglioside GM2 mediates migration of tumor cells by interacting with integrin and modulating the downstream signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Kundu, Manjari; Mahata, Barun; Banerjee, Avisek; Chakraborty, Sohini; Debnath, Shibjyoti; Ray, Sougata Sinha; Ghosh, Zhumur; Biswas, Kaushik

    2016-07-01

    The definitive role of ganglioside GM2 in mediating tumor-induced growth and progression is still unknown. Here we report a novel role of ganglioside GM2 in mediating tumor cell migration and uncovered its mechanism. Data shows differential expression levels of GM2-synthase as well as GM2 in different human cancer cells. siRNA mediated knockdown of GM2-synthase in CCF52, A549 and SK-RC-26B cells resulted in significant inhibition of tumor cell migration as well as invasion in vitro without affecting cellular proliferation. Over-expression of GM2-synthase in low-GM2 expressing SK-RC-45 cells resulted in a consequent increase in migration thus confirming the potential role GM2 and its downstream partners play in tumor cell migration and motility. Further, treatment of SK-RC-45 cells with exogenous GM2 resulted in a dramatic increase in migratory and invasive capacity with no change in proliferative capacity, thereby confirming the role of GM2 in tumorigenesis specifically by mediating tumor migration and invasion. Gene expression profiling of GM2-synthase silenced cells revealed altered expression of several genes involved in cell migration primarily those controlling the integrin mediated signaling. GM2-synthase knockdown resulted in decreased phosphorylation of FAK, Src as well as Erk, while over-expression and/or exogenous GM2 treatment caused increased FAK and Erk phosphorylation respectively. Again, GM2 mediated invasion and Erk phosphorylation is blocked in integrin knockdown SK-RC-45 cells, thus confirming that GM2 mediated migration and phosphorylation of Erk is integrin dependent. Finally, confocal microscopy suggested co-localization while co-immunoprecipitation and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) confirmed direct interaction of membrane bound ganglioside, GM2 with the integrin receptor. PMID:27066976

  6. Ganglioside GM2 mediates migration of tumor cells by interacting with integrin and modulating the downstream signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Kundu, Manjari; Mahata, Barun; Banerjee, Avisek; Chakraborty, Sohini; Debnath, Shibjyoti; Ray, Sougata Sinha; Ghosh, Zhumur; Biswas, Kaushik

    2016-07-01

    The definitive role of ganglioside GM2 in mediating tumor-induced growth and progression is still unknown. Here we report a novel role of ganglioside GM2 in mediating tumor cell migration and uncovered its mechanism. Data shows differential expression levels of GM2-synthase as well as GM2 in different human cancer cells. siRNA mediated knockdown of GM2-synthase in CCF52, A549 and SK-RC-26B cells resulted in significant inhibition of tumor cell migration as well as invasion in vitro without affecting cellular proliferation. Over-expression of GM2-synthase in low-GM2 expressing SK-RC-45 cells resulted in a consequent increase in migration thus confirming the potential role GM2 and its downstream partners play in tumor cell migration and motility. Further, treatment of SK-RC-45 cells with exogenous GM2 resulted in a dramatic increase in migratory and invasive capacity with no change in proliferative capacity, thereby confirming the role of GM2 in tumorigenesis specifically by mediating tumor migration and invasion. Gene expression profiling of GM2-synthase silenced cells revealed altered expression of several genes involved in cell migration primarily those controlling the integrin mediated signaling. GM2-synthase knockdown resulted in decreased phosphorylation of FAK, Src as well as Erk, while over-expression and/or exogenous GM2 treatment caused increased FAK and Erk phosphorylation respectively. Again, GM2 mediated invasion and Erk phosphorylation is blocked in integrin knockdown SK-RC-45 cells, thus confirming that GM2 mediated migration and phosphorylation of Erk is integrin dependent. Finally, confocal microscopy suggested co-localization while co-immunoprecipitation and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) confirmed direct interaction of membrane bound ganglioside, GM2 with the integrin receptor.

  7. Gm allotypes and HLA in rheumatoid arthritis patients with circulating antibodies to native type II collagen.

    PubMed Central

    Sanders, P A; Grennan, D M; Klimiuk, P S; Clague, R B; deLange, G G; Collins, I; Dyer, P A

    1987-01-01

    HLA antigens and immunoglobulin heavy chain allotypes (Gm) were determined in 166 unrelated patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), 44 of whom had circulating antibodies to native type II collagen. Collagen antibody positive patients showed an association with HLA-DR3 and DR7 (68% compared with 39% of collagen antibody negative RA, p less than 0.005), and with the Gm phenotype, Gm(zafngb). This contrasted with the collagen antibody negative RA patients where there was an association with HLA-DR4 and, in DR4 positive disease only, with the Gm allotype, G1m(x). The Gm(zafngb) phenotype was found in 26% of DR3 or DR7 positive patients overall and only 9% of RA patients negative for these DR antigens (p less than 0.005), suggesting an interaction between HLA-DR3/7 and Gm(zafngb). The differing Gm associations for collagen antibody positive and negative RA provide further evidence for genetic heterogeneity in susceptibility to RA. PMID:3496057

  8. Radioimmune assay of ganglioside GM/sub 1/ synthase using cholera toxin

    SciTech Connect

    Honke, K.; Taniguchi, N.; Makita, A.

    1986-01-01

    A radioimmune assay for uridine 5'-diphosphate-galactose (UDP-Gal):GM/sub 2/ galactosyltransferase, which synthesizes GM/sub 1/, has been developed utilizing cholera toxin. This assay is more sensitive and simpler than previously used assays. Radioactive nucleotide substrate and GM/sub 2/ were incubated with an enzyme sample, and a radiolabeled product, GM/sub 1/, was reacted with cholera toxin. The GM/sub 1/-cholera toxin complex was further reacted with anti-cholera toxin and Staphylococcus aureus cell suspension. The resulting complex was transferred onto a nitrocellulose membrane and quantitated by liquid scintillation counting. This assay was found to be sensitive for the detection of 100 pmol of the reaction product, GM/sub 1/. With this assay method, some properties of the crude enzyme extracts from rat liver were studied. The enzyme had a pH optimum of 6.5-7.0 and required Mn/sup 2 +/. The K/sub m/ values for UDP-Gal and GM/sub 2/ were 0.12 mM and 6 ..mu..M, respectively.

  9. Genetically modified food in the news: media representations of the GM debate in the UK.

    PubMed

    Augoustinos, Martha; Crabb, Shona; Shepherd, Richard

    2010-01-01

    This paper analyses a corpus of articles on GM crops and food which appeared in six UK newspapers in the first three months of 2004, the year following the GM Nation? debate (2003). Using the methods of critical discourse analysis we focus on how specific and pervasive representations of the major stakeholders in the national debate on GM--the British public, the British government, the science of GM, and biotechnology companies--served significant rhetorical functions in the controversy. Of particular significance was the pervasive representation of the British public as uniformly opposed to GM crops and food which served rhetorically to position the British government as undemocratic and as being beholden to powerful political and economic interests. Of significance also in our analysis, is how the science of GM farming itself became a highly contested arena. In short, our analysis demonstrates how the GM debate was represented in the newsprint media as a "battleground" of competing interests. We conclude by considering the possible implications of this representation given the increasing emphasis placed on the importance of deliberative and inclusive forms of science policy decision-making.

  10. Stimulatory versus suppressive effects of GM-CSF on tumor progression in multiple cancer types

    PubMed Central

    Hong, In-Sun

    2016-01-01

    Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF, also called CSF-2) is best known for its critical role in immune modulation and hematopoiesis. A large body of experimental evidence indicates that GM-CSF, which is frequently upregulated in multiple types of human cancers, effectively marks cancer cells with a ‘danger flag' for the immune system. In this context, most studies have focused on its function as an immunomodulator, namely its ability to stimulate dendritic cell (DC) maturation and monocyte/macrophage activity. However, recent studies have suggested that GM-CSF also promotes immune-independent tumor progression by supporting tumor microenvironments and stimulating tumor growth and metastasis. Although some studies have suggested that GM-CSF has inhibitory effects on tumor growth and metastasis, an even greater number of studies show that GM-CSF exerts stimulatory effects on tumor progression. In this review, we summarize a number of findings to provide the currently available information regarding the anticancer immune response of GM-CSG. We then discuss the potential roles of GM-CSF in the progression of multiple types of cancer to provide insights into some of the complexities of its clinical applications. PMID:27364892

  11. GM130 regulates epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition and invasion of gastric cancer cells via snail

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jianquan; Yang, Chun; Guo, Shujun; Wu, Yonggang

    2015-01-01

    Gastric cancer is one of the most common causes of digestive tract tumor. Despite of recent advances in surgical techniques and development of adjuvant therapy, the underlying mechanisms of gastric cancer remain poorly understood and relevant insight into novel treatment strategies using gene target remains incomplete. Recently, several studies report that epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a crucial process for the invasion and metastasis of epithelial tumors; however, the molecular mechanisms underlying this transition are unknown. As a cis-Golgi matrix protein, GM130 plays an important role in cell cycle progression and transport of protein in the secretory pathway. In this study, we found that GM130 expression has a positive correlation with the pathological differentiation and tumor node metastasis (TNM) stage of gastric cancer. High GM130 expression levels also predict shorter overall survival of gastric cancer patients. RNA interference-mediated knockdown of GM130 expression increased epithelial marker (E-cadherin) and decreased mesenchymal marker (N-cadherin and vimentin) expression in gastric cancer cells, suppressing cell invasion, and tumor formation. Furthermore, we found that GM130 upregulated expression of the key EMT regulator Snail (SNAI1), which mediated EMT activation and cell invasion by GM130. Taken together, our study indicates GM130 may be a promising therapeutic biomarker for gastric cancer. PMID:26617790

  12. GM130 regulates epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition and invasion of gastric cancer cells via snail.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jianquan; Yang, Chun; Guo, Shujun; Wu, Yonggang

    2015-01-01

    Gastric cancer is one of the most common causes of digestive tract tumor. Despite of recent advances in surgical techniques and development of adjuvant therapy, the underlying mechanisms of gastric cancer remain poorly understood and relevant insight into novel treatment strategies using gene target remains incomplete. Recently, several studies report that epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a crucial process for the invasion and metastasis of epithelial tumors; however, the molecular mechanisms underlying this transition are unknown. As a cis-Golgi matrix protein, GM130 plays an important role in cell cycle progression and transport of protein in the secretory pathway. In this study, we found that GM130 expression has a positive correlation with the pathological differentiation and tumor node metastasis (TNM) stage of gastric cancer. High GM130 expression levels also predict shorter overall survival of gastric cancer patients. RNA interference-mediated knockdown of GM130 expression increased epithelial marker (E-cadherin) and decreased mesenchymal marker (N-cadherin and vimentin) expression in gastric cancer cells, suppressing cell invasion, and tumor formation. Furthermore, we found that GM130 upregulated expression of the key EMT regulator Snail (SNAI1), which mediated EMT activation and cell invasion by GM130. Taken together, our study indicates GM130 may be a promising therapeutic biomarker for gastric cancer. PMID:26617790

  13. Effects of Methylprednisolone And Ganglioside GM-1 on a Spinal Lesion: A Functional Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, Márcio Oliveira Penna; de Barros Filho, Tarcisio Eloy Pessoa; Tebet, Marcos Antonio

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVES The pharmacological effects of methylprednisolone (MP) and ganglioside GM-1 on spinal injuries have been thoroughly investigated, but only a few studies have evaluated the interaction between these two drugs. METHODS Twenty-four Wistar rats were subjected to contusive injury of the spinal cord produced by the NYU system. These animals were divided into four groups: group I was injected with MP; group II was injected with GM-1; group III was injected with MP together with GM-1; and group control received physiological serum. The animals were evaluated with regard to their recovery of locomotive function by means of the BBB test on the second, seventh and fourteenth days after receiving the contusive injury to the spinal cord. They were sacrificed on the fourteenth day. RESULTS This study demonstrated that the MP and GM-1 groups presented functional results that were better than those of the control group, although the enhanced recovery of group II (GM-1) relative to the control group was not statistically significant (p>0.05). The most notable recovery of locomotive function was observed in the group that received MP alone (p<0.05). The group that received MP together with GM-1 presented results that were better than those of the control group (p<0.05). CONCLUSION Administration of methylprednisolone alone or with GM-1 was shown to be effective for recovery of locomotive function. Combined administration of these drugs resulted in better outcomes than administration of methylprednisolone alone. PMID:18568249

  14. Development of New Cooling System Using Gm/jt Cryocoolers for the SKS Magnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoki, K.; Haruyama, T.; Makida, Y.; Araoka, O.; Kasami, K.; Takahashi, T.; Nagae, T.; Kakiguchi, Y.; Sekimoto, M.; Tosaka, T.; Miyazaki, H.; Kuriyama, T.; Ono, M.; Orikasa, T.; Tsuchihashi, T.; Hirata, Y.

    2008-03-01

    We plan to develop a new improved cooling system for the Superconducting Kaon Spectrometer (SKS) magnet and transfer the magnet to the K1.8 beamline of the Hadron Hall of the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC) for further use in nuclear physics experiments. To replace the present 300 W cryogenic system, we will adopt a new cooling method that uses 4 K Gifford-McMahon/Joule-Thomson (GM/JT) cryocoolers. In order to decide a practical design for the new liquid helium reservoir of the magnet, which will be equipped with GM/JT cryocoolers, cooling tests on a GM/JT cryocooler were performed from February to March 2007. We constructed a new cooling test stand with a GM/JT cryocooler and measured the cooling capacities under several thermal shield temperatures with or without a baffle, which helped prevent convection. Based on the test results, we have finally decided to adopt three GM/JT cryocoolers for the new SKS along with a baffle and an additional dedicated GM cooler to cool the thermal shield of the GM/JT ports.

  15. Responses to GM food content in context with food integrity issues: results from Australian population surveys.

    PubMed

    Mohr, Philip; Golley, Sinéad

    2016-01-25

    This study examined community responses to use of genetically modified (GM) content in food in the context of responses to familiar food additives by testing an empirically and theoretically derived model of the predictors of responses to both GM content and food integrity issues generally. A nationwide sample of 849 adults, selected at random from the Australian Electoral Roll, responded to a postal Food and Health Survey. Structural equation modelling analyses confirmed that ratings of general concern about food integrity (related to the presence of preservatives and other additives) strongly predicted negativity towards GM content. Concern about food integrity was, in turn, predicted by environmental concern and health engagement. In addition, both concern about food integrity generally and responses to GM content specifically were weakly predicted by attitudes to benefits of science and an intuitive (i.e., emotionally-based) reasoning style. Data from a follow-up survey conducted under the same conditions (N=1184) revealed that ratings of concern were significantly lower for use of genetic engineering in food than for four other common food integrity issues examined. Whereas the question of community responses to GM is often treated as a special issue, these findings support the conclusion that responses to the concept of GM content in food in Australia are substantially a specific instance of a general sensitivity towards the integrity of the food supply. They indicate that the origins of responses to GM content may be largely indistinguishable from those of general responses to preservatives and other common food additives.

  16. Lyso-GM2 ganglioside: a possible biomarker of Tay-Sachs disease and Sandhoff disease.

    PubMed

    Kodama, Takashi; Togawa, Tadayasu; Tsukimura, Takahiro; Kawashima, Ikuo; Matsuoka, Kazuhiko; Kitakaze, Keisuke; Tsuji, Daisuke; Itoh, Kohji; Ishida, Yo-Ichi; Suzuki, Minoru; Suzuki, Toshihiro; Sakuraba, Hitoshi

    2011-01-01

    To find a new biomarker of Tay-Sachs disease and Sandhoff disease. The lyso-GM2 ganglioside (lyso-GM2) levels in the brain and plasma in Sandhoff mice were measured by means of high performance liquid chromatography and the effect of a modified hexosaminidase (Hex) B exhibiting Hex A-like activity was examined. Then, the lyso-GM2 concentrations in human plasma samples were determined. The lyso-GM2 levels in the brain and plasma in Sandhoff mice were apparently increased compared with those in wild-type mice, and they decreased on intracerebroventricular administration of the modified Hex B. The lyso-GM2 levels in plasma of patients with Tay-Sachs disease and Sandhoff disease were increased, and the increase in lyso-GM2 was associated with a decrease in Hex A activity. Lyso-GM2 is expected to be a potential biomarker of Tay-Sachs disease and Sandhoff disease. PMID:22205997

  17. Taylor O(h³) Discretization of ZNN Models for Dynamic Equality-Constrained Quadratic Programming With Application to Manipulators.

    PubMed

    Liao, Bolin; Zhang, Yunong; Jin, Long

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, a new Taylor-type numerical differentiation formula is first presented to discretize the continuous-time Zhang neural network (ZNN), and obtain higher computational accuracy. Based on the Taylor-type formula, two Taylor-type discrete-time ZNN models (termed Taylor-type discrete-time ZNNK and Taylor-type discrete-time ZNNU models) are then proposed and discussed to perform online dynamic equality-constrained quadratic programming. For comparison, Euler-type discrete-time ZNN models (called Euler-type discrete-time ZNNK and Euler-type discrete-time ZNNU models) and Newton iteration, with interesting links being found, are also presented. It is proved herein that the steady-state residual errors of the proposed Taylor-type discrete-time ZNN models, Euler-type discrete-time ZNN models, and Newton iteration have the patterns of O(h(3)), O(h(2)), and O(h), respectively, with h denoting the sampling gap. Numerical experiments, including the application examples, are carried out, of which the results further substantiate the theoretical findings and the efficacy of Taylor-type discrete-time ZNN models. Finally, the comparisons with Taylor-type discrete-time derivative model and other Lagrange-type discrete-time ZNN models for dynamic equality-constrained quadratic programming substantiate the superiority of the proposed Taylor-type discrete-time ZNN models once again.

  18. MafB antagonizes phenotypic alteration induced by GM-CSF in microglia

    SciTech Connect

    Koshida, Ryusuke Oishi, Hisashi Hamada, Michito; Takahashi, Satoru

    2015-07-17

    Microglia are tissue-resident macrophages which are distributed throughout the central nervous system (CNS). Recent studies suggest that microglia are a unique myeloid population distinct from peripheral macrophages in terms of origin and gene expression signature. Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), a pleiotropic cytokine regulating myeloid development, has been shown to stimulate proliferation and alter phenotype of microglia in vitro. However, how its signaling is modulated in microglia is poorly characterized. MafB, a bZip transcriptional factor, is highly expressed in monocyte-macrophage lineage cells including microglia, although its role in microglia is largely unknown. We investigated the crosstalk between GM-CSF signaling and MafB by analyzing primary microglia. We found that Mafb-deficient microglia grew more rapidly than wild-type microglia in response to GM-CSF. Moreover, the expression of genes associated with microglial differentiation was more downregulated in Mafb-deficient microglia cultured with GM-CSF. Notably, such differences between the genotypes were not observed in the presence of M-CSF. In addition, we found that Mafb-deficient microglia cultured with GM-CSF barely extended their membrane protrusions, probably due to abnormal activation of RhoA, a key regulator of cytoskeletal remodeling. Altogether, our study reveals that MafB is a negative regulator of GM-CSF signaling in microglia. These findings could provide new insight into the modulation of cytokine signaling by transcription factors in microglia. - Highlights: • GM-CSF alters the phenotype of microglia in vitro more potently than M-CSF. • Transcription factor MafB antagonizes the effect of GM-CSF on microglia in vitro. • MafB deficiency leads to RhoA activation in microglia in response to GM-CSF. • We show for the first time the function of MafB in microglia.

  19. Response to issues on GM agriculture in Africa: Are transgenic crops safe?

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The controversies surrounding transgenic crops, often called Genetically Modified Organisms (GMOs), call for a need to raise the level of public awareness of Genetic Modification (GM) technology in Africa. This should be accomplished by educating the public about the potential benefits and risks that may be associated with this new technology. In the last 15 years, GM crop producing countries have benefited from adoption of this new technology in the form of improved crop productivity, food security, and quality of life. The increased income to resource-poor farmers is a key benefit at the individual level especially as most countries using this technology are in the developing world, including three African countries (South Africa, Burkina Faso and Egypt). Despite clear benefits to countries and farmers who grow GMOs, many people are concerned about suspected potential risks associated with GMOs. This sparks debate as to whether GM technology should be adopted or not. Given the concerns regarding the safety of GMO products, thorough scientific investigation of safe application of GMOs is required. The objective of this paper is to respond to the issues of GM agriculture in Africa and some of the issues surrounding the adoption of GM crops between developed and developing countries. In this article, I analyse relevant papers relating to the adoption of GM technology particularly in developing countries including the few African countries that have adopted GM crops. The issues discussed span a wide range including: safety; potential benefits and risks; disputes between the United States of America (USA) and the European Union (EU) over adoption of GM crops with a focus on Africa continent. This article is concluded by summarising the issues raised and how GM technology can be adopted for agricultural development in Africa. PMID:21981823

  20. Response to issues on GM agriculture in Africa: Are transgenic crops safe?

    PubMed

    Adenle, Ademola A

    2011-10-08

    The controversies surrounding transgenic crops, often called Genetically Modified Organisms (GMOs), call for a need to raise the level of public awareness of Genetic Modification (GM) technology in Africa. This should be accomplished by educating the public about the potential benefits and risks that may be associated with this new technology. In the last 15 years, GM crop producing countries have benefited from adoption of this new technology in the form of improved crop productivity, food security, and quality of life. The increased income to resource-poor farmers is a key benefit at the individual level especially as most countries using this technology are in the developing world, including three African countries (South Africa, Burkina Faso and Egypt). Despite clear benefits to countries and farmers who grow GMOs, many people are concerned about suspected potential risks associated with GMOs. This sparks debate as to whether GM technology should be adopted or not. Given the concerns regarding the safety of GMO products, thorough scientific investigation of safe application of GMOs is required. The objective of this paper is to respond to the issues of GM agriculture in Africa and some of the issues surrounding the adoption of GM crops between developed and developing countries. In this article, I analyse relevant papers relating to the adoption of GM technology particularly in developing countries including the few African countries that have adopted GM crops. The issues discussed span a wide range including: safety; potential benefits and risks; disputes between the United States of America (USA) and the European Union (EU) over adoption of GM crops with a focus on Africa continent. This article is concluded by summarising the issues raised and how GM technology can be adopted for agricultural development in Africa.

  1. Reconnaissance and deep-drill site selection on Taylor Dome, Antarctica

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grootes, Pieter M.; Waddington, Edwin D.

    1993-01-01

    Taylor Dome is a small ice dome near the head of Taylor Valley, Southern Victoria Land. The location of the dome, just west of the Transantarctic Mountains, is expected to make the composition of the accumulating snow sensitive to changes in the extent of the Ross Ice Shelf. Thus, it is linked to the discharge of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet but protected against direct influences of glacial-interglacial sea-level rise. The record of past climatic and environmental changes in the ice provides a valuable complement to the radiocarbon-dated proxy record of climate derived from perched deltas, strandlines, and moraines that have been obtained in the nearby Dry Valleys. We carried out a reconnaissance of the Taylor Dome area over the past two field seasons to determine the most favorable location to obtain a deep core to bedrock. A stake network has been established with an 80-km line roughly along the crest of Taylor Dome, and 40-km lines parallel to it and offset by 10 km. These lines have been surveyed 1990/91, and the positions of 9 grid points have been determined with geoceivers. A higher density stake network was placed and surveyed around the most likely drill area in the second year. Ground-based radar soundings in both years provided details on bedrock topography and internal layering of the ice in the drill area. An airborne radar survey in January 1992, completed the radar coverage of the Taylor Dome field area.

  2. Bubbly drag reduction in a vertical Couette-Taylor system with superimposed axial flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maryami, R.; Farahat, S.; Javad poor, M.; Shafiei Mayam, M. H.

    2014-10-01

    The effect of axial flow on bubbly drag reduction has been experimentally investigated in a vertical Couette-Taylor flow system. The water flow is combined from circumferential and axial flow. Flow condition is fully turbulence and Taylor vortices have appeared in the annulus gap. The shear stress modification in the simultaneous presence of air bubbles and axial flow in the system has been studied by measuring torque acting on the inner cylinder. The results show that axial flow improves the effect of bubbles on drag reduction by damping Taylor vortices and increasing upward velocity of bubbles. In this case, drag reduction of more than 25% has been achieved, which corresponds to lower tested {{\\operatorname{Re}}_{\\omega }} and this amount is gradually decreased with increasing {{\\operatorname{Re}}_{\\omega }} in each {{\\operatorname{Re}}_{a}} and {{Q}_{a}}. Increasing {{Q}_{a}} causes drag reduction enhancement which could be due to the effect of bubbles on flow density reduction, flow fluctuations and Taylor vortices. Moreover, it is observed that skin friction is affected by axial flow solely and by increasing its volume rates, drag reduction reaches 11%. It is concluded that when bubbles and axial flow are simultaneously applied into the Couette-Taylor flow, the amount of achieved drag reduction is more than when they are separately applied.

  3. Ameliorating GM (1, 1) Model Based on the Structure of the Area under Trapezium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Cuifeng

    According to the research on the structure of background value in the GM(1,1) model, the structure method of background value, a exact formula about the background value of χ (1)(t) in the region [k,k + 1],which is used when establishing GM(1,1), is established by integrating χ (1)(t) from k to k + 1 .The modeling precision and prediction precision of the ameliorating background value can be advanced. Moreover, the application area of GM(1,1) model can be enlarged. At last, the model of Chinese per-power is set up. Simulation examples show the effectiveness of the proposed approach.

  4. Recovery from Experimental Parkinsonism in Primates with GM1 Ganglioside Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, J. S.; Pope, Anne; Simpson, Kimberly; Taggart, James; Smith, M. G.; Distefano, L.

    1992-05-01

    A parkinsonian syndrome can be produced in nonhuman primates by administration of the neurotoxin 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP). Parkinsonian-like symptoms induced acutely by MPTP were ameliorated after treatment with GM1 ganglioside, a substance shown to have neurotrophic effects on the damaged dopamine system in rodents. Treatment with GM1 ganglioside also increased striatal dopamine and metabolite levels and enhanced the dopaminergic innervation of the striatum as demonstrated by tyrosine hydroxylase immunohistochemistry. These results suggest that GM1 ganglioside may hold promise as a therapeutic agent for the treatment of Parkinson's disease.

  5. Bifurcations and dynamo action in a Taylor Green flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubrulle, B.; Blaineau, P.; Mafra Lopes, O.; Daviaud, F.; Laval, J.-P.; Dolganov, R.

    2007-08-01

    We report successive bifurcations in direct numerical simulations (DNSs) of a Taylor-Green flow, in both a hydro- and a magneto-hydrodynamic case. Hydrodynamic bifurcations occur in between different metastable states with different dynamo action, and are triggered by the numerical noise. The various states encountered range from stationary to chaotic or turbulent through possible oscillatory states. The corresponding sequence of bifurcations is reminiscent of the sequence obtained in the von Karman (VK) flow, at aspect ratio Γ=2 (Nore et al 2003 J. Fluid Mech. 477 51). We then use kinematic simulations to compute the dynamo thresholds of the different metastable states. A more detailed study of the turbulent state reveals the existence of two windows of dynamo action. Stochastic numerical simulations are then used to mimic the influence of turbulence on the dynamo threshold of the turbulent state. We show that the dynamo threshold is increased (respectively decreased) by the presence of large scale (resp. small scale) turbulent velocity fluctuations. Finally, DNSs of the magneto-hydrodynamic equations are used to explore the linear and nonlinear stage of the dynamo instability. In the linear stage, we show that the magnetic field favours the bifurcation from the basic state directly towards the turbulent or chaotic stable state. The magnetic field can also temporarily stabilize a metastable state, resulting in cycles of dynamo action, with different Lyapunov exponents. The critical magnetic Reynolds number for dynamo action is found to increase strongly with the Reynolds number. Finally, we provide a preliminary study of the saturation regime above the dynamo threshold. At large magnetic Prandtl number, we have observed two main types of saturations, in agreement with an analytical prediction of Leprovost and Dubrulle (2005 Eur. Phys. J. B 44 395): (i) intermittent dynamo, with vanishing most probable value of the magnetic energy; (ii) dynamo with non vanishing

  6. Comparison of drought stress response and gene expression between a GM maize variety and a near-isogenic non-GM variety.

    PubMed

    Gullì, Mariolina; Salvatori, Elisabetta; Fusaro, Lina; Pellacani, Claudia; Manes, Fausto; Marmiroli, Nelson

    2015-01-01

    Maize MON810, grown and commercialised worldwide, is the only cultivated GM event in the EU. Maize MON810, variety DKC6575, and the corresponding near-isogenic line Tietar were studied in different growth conditions, to compare their behaviour in response to drought. Main photosynthetic parameters were significantly affected by drought stress in both GM and non-GM varieties to a similar extent. Though DKC6575 (GM) had a greater sensitivity in the early phase of stress response as compared with Tietar (non-GM), after six days of stress they behaved similarly, and both varieties recovered from stress damage. Profiling gene expression in water deficit regimes and in a generalised drought stress condition showed an up-regulation of many stress-responsive genes, but a greater number of differentially expressed genes was observed in Tietar, with genes belonging to transcription factor families and genes encoding heat shock proteins, late embryogenesis abundant proteins and detoxification enzymes. Since induction of these genes have been indicated from the literature as typical of stress responses, their activation in Tietar rather than in DKC6575 may be reminiscent of a more efficient response to drought. DKC6575 was also analysed for the expression of the transgene CryIAb (encoding the delta-endotoxin insecticidal protein) in water deficit conditions. In all the experiments, the CryIAb transcript was not influenced by drought stress, but was expressed at a constant level. This suggests that though possessing a different pattern of sensitivity to stress, the GM variety maintains the same expression level for the transgene. PMID:25692547

  7. Comparison of Drought Stress Response and Gene Expression between a GM Maize Variety and a Near-Isogenic Non-GM Variety

    PubMed Central

    Gullì, Mariolina; Salvatori, Elisabetta; Fusaro, Lina; Pellacani, Claudia; Manes, Fausto; Marmiroli, Nelson

    2015-01-01

    Maize MON810, grown and commercialised worldwide, is the only cultivated GM event in the EU. Maize MON810, variety DKC6575, and the corresponding near-isogenic line Tietar were studied in different growth conditions, to compare their behaviour in response to drought. Main photosynthetic parameters were significantly affected by drought stress in both GM and non-GM varieties to a similar extent. Though DKC6575 (GM) had a greater sensitivity in the early phase of stress response as compared with Tietar (non-GM), after six days of stress they behaved similarly, and both varieties recovered from stress damage. Profiling gene expression in water deficit regimes and in a generalised drought stress condition showed an up-regulation of many stress-responsive genes, but a greater number of differentially expressed genes was observed in Tietar, with genes belonging to transcription factor families and genes encoding heat shock proteins, late embryogenesis abundant proteins and detoxification enzymes. Since induction of these genes have been indicated from the literature as typical of stress responses, their activation in Tietar rather than in DKC6575 may be reminiscent of a more efficient response to drought. DKC6575 was also analysed for the expression of the transgene CryIAb (encoding the delta-endotoxin insecticidal protein) in water deficit conditions. In all the experiments, the CryIAb transcript was not influenced by drought stress, but was expressed at a constant level. This suggests that though possessing a different pattern of sensitivity to stress, the GM variety maintains the same expression level for the transgene. PMID:25692547

  8. Short-time Lyapunov exponent analysis and the transition to chaos in Taylor-Couette flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vastano, John A.; Moser, Robert D.

    1991-01-01

    The physical mechanism driving the weakly chaotic Taylor-Couette flow is investigated using the short-time Liapunov exponent analysis. In this procedure, the transition from quasi-periodicity to chaos is studied using direct numerical 3D simulations of axially periodic Taylor-Couette flow, and a partial Liapunov exponent spectrum for the flow is computed by simultaneously advancing the full solution and a set of perturbations. It is shown that the short-time Liapunov exponent analysis yields more information on the exponents and dimension than that obtained from the common Liapunov exponent calculations. Results show that the chaotic state studied here is caused by a Kelvin-Helmholtz-type instability of the outflow boundary jet of Taylor vortices.

  9. Exploring the phase space of multiple states in highly turbulent Taylor-Couette flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Veen, Roeland C. A.; Huisman, Sander G.; Dung, On-Yu; Tang, Ho L.; Sun, Chao; Lohse, Detlef

    2016-06-01

    We investigate the existence of multiple turbulent states in highly turbulent Taylor-Couette flow in the range of Ta =1011 to 9 ×1012 by measuring the global torques and the local velocities while probing the phase space spanned by the rotation rates of the inner and outer cylinders. The multiple states are found to be very robust and are expected to persist beyond Ta =1013 . The rotation ratio is the parameter that most strongly controls the transitions between the flow states; the transitional values only weakly depend on the Taylor number. However, complex paths in the phase space are necessary to unlock the full region of multiple states. By mapping the flow structures for various rotation ratios in a Taylor-Couette setup with an equal radius ratio but a larger aspect ratio than before, multiple states are again observed. Here they are characterized by even richer roll structure phenomena, including an antisymmetrical roll state.

  10. THE VIOLATION OF THE TAYLOR HYPOTHESIS IN MEASUREMENTS OF SOLAR WIND TURBULENCE

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, K. G.; Howes, G. G.; TenBarge, J. M.

    2014-08-01

    Motivated by the upcoming Solar Orbiter and Solar Probe Plus missions, qualitative and quantitative predictions are made for the effects of the violation of the Taylor hypothesis on the magnetic energy frequency spectrum measured in the near-Sun environment. The synthetic spacecraft data method is used to predict observational signatures of the violation for critically balanced Alfvénic turbulence or parallel fast/whistler turbulence. The violation of the Taylor hypothesis can occur in the slow flow regime, leading to a shift of the entire spectrum to higher frequencies, or in the dispersive regime, in which the dissipation range spectrum flattens at high frequencies. It is found that Alfvénic turbulence will not significantly violate the Taylor hypothesis, but whistler turbulence will. The flattening of the frequency spectrum is therefore a key observational signature for fast/whistler turbulence.

  11. On the use of modified Taylor diagrams to compare ionospheric assimilation models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elvidge, S.; Angling, M. J.; Nava, B.

    2014-09-01

    This paper describes the construction and use of "modified Taylor diagrams" and the comparison of three real-time assimilative ionospheric models. The paper expands on the work by McNamara et al. (2013) and serves as an addendum to that work. Modified Taylor diagrams provide an easy way of visualizing and comparing statistical information about a number of models, and for multiple parameters, simultaneously. Using modified Taylor diagrams has led to new conclusions about the models tested in McNamara et al. (2013); also, the comparison of the data ingestion version of NeQuick is included. It is shown that the modified NeQuick model performs comparably with the data assimilation models from McNamara et al. (2013) and in multiple cases also shows considerable improvement, such as in hmF2 at the Hermanus Digisonde station.

  12. Large-scale analysis of unconfined self-similar Rayleigh-Taylor turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soulard, Olivier; Griffond, Jérôme; Gréa, Benoît-Joseph

    2015-09-01

    The large-scale properties of unconfined Rayleigh-Taylor turbulence are investigated using an eddy-damped quasi-normal markovianized approximation. Within this framework, turbulent spectra are shown to undergo at late times and at large scales, an evolution dominated by non-linear backscattering processes. As a result, the analysis predicts that large scale initial conditions are eventually forgotten: there is no large scale invariant and no equivalent of a principle of permanence of large eddies. Additional properties of Rayleigh-Taylor large scales are also discussed. In particular, their scaling and anisotropy are examined, with an emphasis put on the combined influence of buoyancy production and non-linearities. The different assumptions and predictions of this work are verified by performing an implicit large eddy simulation of a Rayleigh-Taylor configuration.

  13. Large eddy simulation of Rayleigh-Taylor instability using the arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian method

    SciTech Connect

    Darlington, R

    1999-12-01

    This research addresses the application of a large eddy simulation (LES) to Arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian (ALE) simulations of Rayleigh-Taylor instability. First, ALE simulations of simplified Rayleigh-Taylor instability are studied. The advantages of ALE over Eulerian simulations are shown. Next, the behavior of the LES is examined in a more complicated ALE simulation of Rayleigh-Taylor instability. The effects of eddy viscosity and stochastic backscatter are examined. The LES is also coupled with ALE to increase grid resolution in areas where it is needed. Finally, the methods studied above are applied to two sets of experimental simulations. In these simulations, ALE allows the mesh to follow expanding experimental targets, while LES can be used to mimic the effect of unresolved instability modes.

  14. Revisiting Taylor Dispersion: Differential enhancement of rotational and translational diffusion under oscillatory shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leahy, Brian; Ong, Desmond; Cheng, Xiang; Cohen, Itai

    2013-03-01

    The idea of Taylor dispersion - enhancement of translational diffusion under shear - has found applications in fields from pharmacology to chemical engineering. Here, in a combination of experiment and simulations, we study the translational and rotational diffusion of colloidal dimers under triangle-wave oscillatory shear. We find that the rotational diffusion is enhanced, in addition to the enhanced translational diffusion. This ``rotational Taylor dispersion'' depends strongly on the strain rate (Peclet number), aspect ratio, and the shear strain, in contradistinction to translational Taylor dispersion in a shear flow, which depends only weakly on strain rate and aspect ratio. This separate tunability of translations and orientations promises important applications in mixing and self-assembly of solutions of anisometric colloids. We discuss the corresponding effect on the structure and rheology of denser suspensions of rod-like particles. B. L. acknowledges supported by the Department of Defense (DoD) through the National Defense Science & Engineering Graduate Fellowship (NDSEG) Program.

  15. Nonuniform deformations in polycrystals and aspects of the validity of the Taylor model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harren, S. V.; Asaro, R. J.

    F ULL SOLUTIONS to mixed rate boundary value problems over polycrystalline domains are performed via the finite element method. In order to make these finite element calculations feasible, an idealized two-dimensional crystal structure is studied. These boundary value problems rigorously satisfy the averaging theorems of Hill (Proc. R. Soc.A326, 131, 1972) so that well defined Taylor model analogue problems may be identified and solved. Comparisons between the finite element solutions and their corresponding Taylor model analogues yield a quantitative assessment of the Taylor model's validity with respect to its predictions of texture development and global stress-strain response. The finite element calculations also provide physical insight into the mechanisms contributing to the development of nonuniform and localized deformations in polycrystals.

  16. Saffman-Taylor fingering with lateral injection with applications to imbibition coarsening dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lagree, Bertrand; Zaleski, Stephane; Bondino, Igor; Josserand, Christophe; Popinet, Stephane

    2013-11-01

    We report 2D simulations of Saffman-Taylor fingering motivated by the analysis of experiments on the imbibition of porous media in square slab geometries. We use a Volume-of-Fluid (VOF) method to model a two-phase Darcy flow with a sharp interface between the two fluids. The Gerris code which allows efficient parallel computations with quad-tree mesh refinement is used. It is tested for accuracy and precision using several levels of refinement and comparing to reference simulations in the literature. A fingering pattern is observed after lateral injection of a less viscous fluid into a region filled with a more viscous one. Large fractal-like clusters are observed allowing the measurements of several scaling exponents which are compared to the known Diffusion-Limited-Aggregation (DLA) and Saffman-Taylor scalings. An interesting effect is the transition from a transient cylindrical DLA pattern to a small number then a single Saffman Taylor finger.

  17. A modified Taylor rule for dealing with demand shocks and uncertain potential macroeconomic output

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarez-Ramirez, Jose; Ibarra-Valdez, Carlos; Fernandez-Anaya, Guillermo; Villarreal, Francisco

    2008-02-01

    A critical issue for central banks in modern economies is the inflation stabilization about a prescribed level. The best-known simple instrumental rule to guide monetary policy to control inflation is the Taylor rule, where the instrument (e.g., a short interest rate) responds to changes in the inflation and the output gaps. The objective of this paper is to introduce some modifications to the Taylor rule in order to improve its robustness with respect to uncertainties about potential output and unanticipated shocks. To this end, departing from feedback control theory, the Taylor rule is equipped with an adaptive control scheme to reject the adverse effects of shocks and to estimate the deviations of the potential output. It is shown that the proposed adaptation procedure is equivalent to a classical integral feedback controller whose characteristics and implementation issues are well understood in practical control engineering. Singular perturbation methods are used to establish the stability properties of the resulting control system.

  18. The application of taylor weighting, digital phase shifters, and digital attenuators to phased-array antennas.

    SciTech Connect

    Brock, Billy C.

    2008-03-01

    Application of Taylor weighting (taper) to an antenna aperture can achieve low peak sidelobes, but combining the Taylor weighting with quantized attenuators and phase shifters at each radiating element will impact the performance of a phased-array antenna. An examination of array performance is undertaken from the simple point of view of the characteristics of the array factor. Design rules and guidelines for determining the Taylor-weighting parameters, the number of bits required for the digital phase shifter, and the dynamic range and number of bits required for the digital attenuator are developed. For a radar application, when each element is fed directly from a transmit/receive module, the total power radiated by the array will be reduced as a result of the taper. Consequently, the issue of whether to apply the taper on both transmit and receive configurations, or only on the receive configuration is examined with respect to two-way sidelobe performance.

  19. Synthesis and biological evaluation of several dephosphonated analogues of CMP-Neu5Ac as inhibitors of GM3-synthase.

    PubMed

    Rota, Paola; Cirillo, Federica; Piccoli, Marco; Gregorio, Antonio; Tettamanti, Guido; Allevi, Pietro; Anastasia, Luigi

    2015-10-01

    Previous studies demonstrated that reducing the GM3 content in myoblasts increased the cell resistance to hypoxic stress, suggesting that a pharmacological inhibition of the GM3 synthesis could be instrumental for the development of new treatments for ischemic diseases. Herein, the synthesis of several dephosphonated CMP-Neu5Ac congeners and their anti-GM3-synthase activity is reported. Biological activity testes revealed that some inhibitors almost completely blocked the GM3-synthase activity in vitro and reduced the GM3 content in living embryonic kidney 293A cells, eventually activating the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling cascade.

  20. Latent immunoglobulin G (Gm) allotypes: occurrence in the cerebrospinal fluid in some neuropathological states.

    PubMed

    Salier, J P; Goust, J M; Link, H; Pandey, J P; Daveau, M; Fudenberg, H H

    1983-08-01

    Gm allotypes were detected and quantitated by radioimmunoassay (RIA) in paired serum and CSF samples from patients suffering from various neurological diseases. Of 115 patients with neurological disorders (65 MS and 50 others), seven subjects displayed one or two allotypes in their CSF which were absent in serum. The Gm phenotype in the patient's serum allowed us to infer the genotype without the need of familial data. A comparison of the regression curves obtained in RIA from the unexpected allotype in CSF and the counterpart in a normal serum pool argued for an identity of the Gm antigen carried by both inhibitory molecules. The unexpected allotype(s) in CSF can be considered as the product of a latent Gm gene which may be activated by either immune perturbations due to the disease per se or some particular immune regulations in the central nervous system. PMID:6619556

  1. Sialidase-mediated depletion of GM2 ganglioside in Tay-Sachs neuroglia cells.

    PubMed

    Igdoura, S A; Mertineit, C; Trasler, J M; Gravel, R A

    1999-06-01

    Tay-Sachs disease is a severe, inherited disease of the nervous system caused by accumulation of the brain lipid GM2 ganglioside. Mouse models of Tay-Sachs disease have revealed a metabolic bypass of the genetic defect based on the more potent activity of the enzyme sialidase towards GM2. To determine whether increasing the level of sialidase would produce a similar effect in human Tay-Sachs cells, we introduced a human sialidase cDNA into neuroglia cells derived from a Tay-Sachs fetus and demonstrated a dramatic reduction in the accumulated GM2. This outcome confirmed the reversibility of GM2 accumulation and opens the way to pharmacological induction or activation of sialidase for the treatment of human Tay-Sachs disease.

  2. Africa's inevitable walk to genetically modified (GM) crops: opportunities and challenges for commercialization.

    PubMed

    Okeno, James A; Wolt, Jeffrey D; Misra, Manjit K; Rodriguez, Lulu

    2013-01-25

    High relative poverty levels in Africa are attributed to the continent's under performing agriculture. Drought, low-yielding crop varieties, pests and diseases, poor soils, low fertilizer use, limited irrigation and lack of modern technologies are among the problems that plague African agriculture. Genetically modified (GM) crops may possess attributes that can help overcome some of these constraints, but have yet to be fully embraced in the mix of technology solutions for African agriculture. Cognizant of this, South Africa, Burkina Faso and Egypt are steadily growing GM crops on a commercial scale. Countries like Kenya, Nigeria, and Uganda are increasingly field-testing these crops with the view to commercialize them. These countries show strong government support for GM technology. Progress by these first adopter nations provides an insight as to how GM crops are increasingly being viewed as one of the ways in which the continent can invigorate the agriculture sector and achieve food security. PMID:22985799

  3. Flow cytometry measurement of GM-CSF receptors in acute leukemic blasts, and normal hemopoietic cells.

    PubMed

    Lanza, F; Castagnari, B; Rigolin, G; Moretti, S; Latorraca, A; Ferrari, L; Bardi, A; Castoldi, G

    1997-10-01

    A quantitative analysis of expression levels of GM-CSF receptors was performed by flow cytometry in different disease categories, ie AML (n = 72), ALL (n = 18), and MDS (n = 12), as well as 12 healthy volunteers, using three different unconjugated GM-CSF/R monoclonal antibodies (McAbs) (HGM-CSFR (CD116), M5D12, 4B5F5), and appropriate standards. By using the reference HGM-CSFR McAb, in healthy subjects we found detectable levels of GM-CSF/R on blood monocytes (mean MESF (molecules of equivalent soluble fluorochrome)/cell: 36.1 x 10[3]), neutrophils (mean MESF/cell: 7.4 x 10[3]), bone marrow (BM) myelo-monocytic precursors (MESF range for the myeloid component, ie promyelocytes, myelocytes, metamyelocytes: 11.7-40.5 x 10[3], and for the monocytic lineage: 25.7-69.2 x 10[3]), and in two distinct subsets of BM CD34+ progenitor cells (GM-CSF/R dim: 2.5 x 10[3] MESF/cell, GM-CSF/R bright (10% of the total number of CD34 cells: 22.0 x 10[3] MESF/cell). In these subjects, there was no correlation between the expression levels of GM-CSF/R and CFU (CFU-GM, CFU-GEMM, BFU-E) colony production. Among the AML samples, M5D12 McAb was positive in 33%, 4B5F5 McAb in 90%, and HGM-CSF/R McAb in 78% of the cases examined (range of MESF/cell for the HGM-CSFR McAb: 0.9 x 10[3]-106.7 x 10[3]). The highest MESF values were seen in the M5 FAB subvariety (mean: 39.4 x 10[3]), where all the patients tested (n = 20) showed a strong positivity for the HGM-CSFR McAb. On the contrary, all ALL samples were GM-CSF/R negative except in two patients, who displayed a dim GM-CSF/R positivity (My+ALL: 1.3 x 10[3] MESF/cell; pro-B ALL: 1.0 x 10[3] MESF/cell). In most (>70%) M1 FAB subtypes, GM-CSF/R+ blasts co-expressed CD34low, HLA-DRhigh, CD33, CD38 antigens, and had little or no capacity to form CFU-GM colonies. GM-CSF/R+ blasts from the M5 FAB category were also positive for CD14, CD11c, CD33 and CD87. Furthermore, the number of GM-CSF/R expressed by leukemic cells from five out of 72 (7%) AML

  4. Africa's inevitable walk to genetically modified (GM) crops: opportunities and challenges for commercialization.

    PubMed

    Okeno, James A; Wolt, Jeffrey D; Misra, Manjit K; Rodriguez, Lulu

    2013-01-25

    High relative poverty levels in Africa are attributed to the continent's under performing agriculture. Drought, low-yielding crop varieties, pests and diseases, poor soils, low fertilizer use, limited irrigation and lack of modern technologies are among the problems that plague African agriculture. Genetically modified (GM) crops may possess attributes that can help overcome some of these constraints, but have yet to be fully embraced in the mix of technology solutions for African agriculture. Cognizant of this, South Africa, Burkina Faso and Egypt are steadily growing GM crops on a commercial scale. Countries like Kenya, Nigeria, and Uganda are increasingly field-testing these crops with the view to commercialize them. These countries show strong government support for GM technology. Progress by these first adopter nations provides an insight as to how GM crops are increasingly being viewed as one of the ways in which the continent can invigorate the agriculture sector and achieve food security.

  5. MECHANISMS UNDERLYING THE MICRON-SCALE SEGREGATION OF STEROLS AND GM1 IN LIVE MAMMALIAN SPERM

    PubMed Central

    Selvaraj, Vimal; Asano, Atsushi; Buttke, Danielle E.; Sengupta, Prabuddha; Weiss, Robert S.; Travis, Alexander J.

    2009-01-01

    We demonstrate for the first time that a stable, micron-scale segregation of focal enrichments of sterols exists at physiological temperature in the plasma membrane of live murine and human sperm. These enrichments of sterols represent microheterogeneities within this membrane domain overlying the acrosome. Previously, we showed that cholera toxin subunit B (CTB), which binds the glycosphingolipid, GM1, localizes to this same domain in live sperm. Interestingly, the GM1 undergoes an unexplained redistribution upon cell death. We now demonstrate that GM1 is also enriched in the acrosome, an exocytotic vesicle. Transfer of lipids between this and the plasma membrane occurs at cell death, increasing GM1 in the plasma membrane without apparent release of acrosomal contents. This finding provides corroborative support for an emerging model of regulated exocytosis in which membrane communications might occur without triggering the “acrosome reaction.” Comparison of the dynamics of CTB-bound endogenous GM1 and exogenous BODIPY-GM1 in live murine sperm demonstrate that the sub-acrosomal ring functions as a specialized diffusion barrier segregating specific lipids within the sperm head plasma membrane. Our data show significant differences between endogenous lipids and exogenous lipid probes in terms of lateral diffusion. Based on these studies, we propose a hierarchical model to explain the segregation of this sterol- and GM1-enriched domain in live sperm, which is positioned to regulate sperm fertilization competence and mediate interactions with the oocyte. Moreover, our data suggest potential origins of sub-types of membrane raft microdomains enriched in sterols and/or GM1 that can be separated biochemically. PMID:19012288

  6. Comprehensive Analysis of the Soybean (Glycine max) GmLAX Auxin Transporter Gene Family

    PubMed Central

    Chai, Chenglin; Wang, Yongqin; Valliyodan, Babu; Nguyen, Henry T.

    2016-01-01

    The phytohormone auxin plays a critical role in regulation of plant growth and development as well as plant responses to abiotic stresses. This is mainly achieved through its uneven distribution in plant via a polar auxin transport process. Auxin transporters are major players in polar auxin transport. The AUXIN RESISTENT 1/LIKE AUX1 (AUX/LAX) auxin influx carriers belong to the amino acid permease family of proton-driven transporters and function in the uptake of indole-3-acetic acid (IAA). In this study, genome-wide comprehensive analysis of the soybean AUX/LAX (GmLAX) gene family, including phylogenic relationships, chromosome localization, and gene structure, was carried out. A total of 15 GmLAX genes, including seven duplicated gene pairs, were identified in the soybean genome. They were distributed on 10 chromosomes. Despite their higher percentage identities at the protein level, GmLAXs exhibited versatile tissue-specific expression patterns, indicating coordinated functioning during plant growth and development. Most GmLAXs were responsive to drought and dehydration stresses and auxin and abscisic acid (ABA) stimuli, in a tissue- and/or time point- sensitive mode. Several GmLAX members were involved in responding to salt stress. Sequence analysis revealed that promoters of GmLAXs contained different combinations of stress-related cis-regulatory elements. These studies suggest that the soybean GmLAXs were under control of a very complex regulatory network, responding to various internal and external signals. This study helps to identity candidate GmLAXs for further analysis of their roles in soybean development and adaption to adverse environments. PMID:27014306

  7. Development of a dry linear compressor for GM and pulse tube cryocoolers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoehne, J.

    2015-12-01

    Pressure Wave Systems GmbH has developed a dry compressor for GM and pulse tube cryocoolers. The concept is based on hydraulically driven metal bellows in which the Helium working gas is compressed. The system is operated in the region of 1 kW of electrical input power and has been successfully tested with a SHI RDK-101D GM cryocooler cold head. Set-up, performance and reliability of the compressor system will be discussed.

  8. The current state of GMO governance: are we ready for GM animals?

    PubMed

    Vàzquez-Salat, Núria; Salter, Brian; Smets, Greet; Houdebine, Louis-Marie

    2012-01-01

    Given the history of GMO conflict and debate, the GM animal future is dependent on the response of the regulatory landscape and its associated range of interest groups at national, regional and international levels. Focusing on the EU and the USA, this article examines the likely form of that multi-level response, the increased role of cultural values, the contribution of new and existing interest groups and the consequent implications for the commercialization of both green and red GM animal biotechnology.

  9. Low-Q2 measurements of the proton form factor ratio μpGE/GM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ron, G.; Zhan, X.; Glister, J.; Lee, B.; Allada, K.; Armstrong, W.; Arrington, J.; Beck, A.; Benmokhtar, F.; Berman, B. L.; Boeglin, W.; Brash, E.; Camsonne, A.; Calarco, J.; Chen, J. P.; Choi, Seonho; Chudakov, E.; Coman, L.; Craver, B.; Cusanno, F.; Dumas, J.; Dutta, C.; Feuerbach, R.; Freyberger, A.; Frullani, S.; Garibaldi, F.; Gilman, R.; Hansen, O.; Higinbotham, D. W.; Holmstrom, T.; Hyde, C. E.; Ibrahim, H.; Ilieva, Y.; de Jager, C. W.; Jiang, X.; Jones, M.; Kelleher, A.; Khrosinkova, E.; Kuchina, E.; Kumbartzki, G.; Lerose, J. J.; Lindgren, R.; Markowitz, P.; Beck, S. May-Tal; McCullough, E.; Meziane, M.; Meziani, Z.-E.; Michaels, R.; Moffit, B.; Norum, B. E.; Oh, Y.; Olson, M.; Paolone, M.; Paschke, K.; Perdrisat, C. F.; Piasetzky, E.; Potokar, M.; Pomatsalyuk, R.; Pomerantz, I.; Puckett, A. J. R.; Punjabi, V.; Qian, X.; Qiang, Y.; Ransome, R.; Reyhan, M.; Roche, J.; Rousseau, Y.; Saha, A.; Sarty, A. J.; Sawatzky, B.; Schulte, E.; Shabestari, M.; Shahinyan, A.; Shneor, R.; Širca, S.; Slifer, K.; Solvignon, P.; Song, J.; Sparks, R.; Subedi, R.; Strauch, S.; Urciuoli, G. M.; Wang, K.; Wojtsekhowski, B.; Yan, X.; Yao, H.; Zhu, X.

    2011-11-01

    We present an updated extraction of the proton electromagnetic form factor ratio, μpGE/GM, at low Q2. The form factors are sensitive to the spatial distribution of the proton, and precise measurements can be used to constrain models of the proton. An improved selection of the elastic events and reduced background contributions yielded a small systematic reduction in the ratio μpGE/GM compared to the original analysis.

  10. Performance Improvement of a Single Stage GM Cryocooler at 25 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, C.; Gifford, P. E.

    2008-03-01

    To meet the cooling demand of some HTS devices, Cryomech, Inc. has redesigned and improved a single stage GM cryocooler to have a maximum capacity at 25K. The losses in a rotary valve and a low temperature regenerator have been reduced. The improved GM cryocooler provides a cooling capacity of 109 W at 25 K with an input power of 10.4 kW while running with the 50Hz electrical source.

  11. Comprehensive Analysis of the Soybean (Glycine max) GmLAX Auxin Transporter Gene Family.

    PubMed

    Chai, Chenglin; Wang, Yongqin; Valliyodan, Babu; Nguyen, Henry T

    2016-01-01

    The phytohormone auxin plays a critical role in regulation of plant growth and development as well as plant responses to abiotic stresses. This is mainly achieved through its uneven distribution in plant via a polar auxin transport process. Auxin transporters are major players in polar auxin transport. The AUXIN RESISTENT 1/LIKE AUX1 (AUX/LAX) auxin influx carriers belong to the amino acid permease family of proton-driven transporters and function in the uptake of indole-3-acetic acid (IAA). In this study, genome-wide comprehensive analysis of the soybean AUX/LAX (GmLAX) gene family, including phylogenic relationships, chromosome localization, and gene structure, was carried out. A total of 15 GmLAX genes, including seven duplicated gene pairs, were identified in the soybean genome. They were distributed on 10 chromosomes. Despite their higher percentage identities at the protein level, GmLAXs exhibited versatile tissue-specific expression patterns, indicating coordinated functioning during plant growth and development. Most GmLAXs were responsive to drought and dehydration stresses and auxin and abscisic acid (ABA) stimuli, in a tissue- and/or time point- sensitive mode. Several GmLAX members were involved in responding to salt stress. Sequence analysis revealed that promoters of GmLAXs contained different combinations of stress-related cis-regulatory elements. These studies suggest that the soybean GmLAXs were under control of a very complex regulatory network, responding to various internal and external signals. This study helps to identity candidate GmLAXs for further analysis of their roles in soybean development and adaption to adverse environments. PMID:27014306

  12. Taylor Series Trajectory Calculations Including Oblateness Effects and Variable Atmospheric Density

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, James R.

    2011-01-01

    Taylor series integration is implemented in NASA Glenn's Spacecraft N-body Analysis Program, and compared head-to-head with the code's existing 8th- order Runge-Kutta Fehlberg time integration scheme. This paper focuses on trajectory problems that include oblateness and/or variable atmospheric density. Taylor series is shown to be significantly faster and more accurate for oblateness problems up through a 4x4 field, with speedups ranging from a factor of 2 to 13. For problems with variable atmospheric density, speedups average 24 for atmospheric density alone, and average 1.6 to 8.2 when density and oblateness are combined.

  13. Spinal anesthesia using Taylor's approach helps avoid general anesthesia in short stature asthmatic patient.

    PubMed

    Patil, Amarjeet Dnyandeo; Bapat, Manasi; Patil, Sunita A; Gogna, Roshan Lal

    2015-01-01

    The case history of a 35-year-old female patient with short stature is presented. She was posted for rectopexy in view of rectal prolapse. She was a known case of bronchial asthma. She had crowding of intervertebral spaces, which made administration of spinal anesthesia via the normal route very difficult. Taylor's approach for administration of the same was tried and proved successful, thus saving the patient from receiving general anesthesia in the presence of bronchial asthma, for a perineal surgery. The possible cause for the difficulty in administration of spinal anesthesia and the Taylor's approach are discussed, and reports of similar cases reviewed. PMID:26543472

  14. Dimensional Analysis of Taylor-Couette Flow with Hourglass Geometry in both Laminar and Turbulent Regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowalski, Adam; Olsen, Thomas; Wiener, Richard

    2006-11-01

    Previously we have presented preliminary measurements indicating that the irregular generation of new Taylor Vortex Pairs in laminar Taylor-Couette flow with hourglass geometry could be characterized as low dimensional chaos and in the corresponding case of turbulent flow the chaotic dimension was higher. We now present data from far more extended time series of the periods between vortex formation, confirming and extending our original results. We present confirmation of our computational methodology in other systems. T. Olsen, R. Bjorge, & R. Wiener, Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 47-10, 76 (2002). T. Olsen, B. Tomlin, R. Bjorge, & R. Wiener, Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 48-10, 111 (2003)

  15. Spinal anesthesia using Taylor's approach helps avoid general anesthesia in short stature asthmatic patient

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Amarjeet Dnyandeo; Bapat, Manasi; Patil, Sunita A.; Gogna, Roshan Lal

    2015-01-01

    The case history of a 35-year-old female patient with short stature is presented. She was posted for rectopexy in view of rectal prolapse. She was a known case of bronchial asthma. She had crowding of intervertebral spaces, which made administration of spinal anesthesia via the normal route very difficult. Taylor's approach for administration of the same was tried and proved successful, thus saving the patient from receiving general anesthesia in the presence of bronchial asthma, for a perineal surgery. The possible cause for the difficulty in administration of spinal anesthesia and the Taylor's approach are discussed, and reports of similar cases reviewed. PMID:26543472

  16. The Taylor Impact and Large Strain Response of Poly(Ether-Etherketone) (PEEK)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rae, Philip J.; Brown, Eric N.

    2006-07-01

    Taylor impacts experiments were conducted on PEEK at velocities between 150 & 360 m s-1. The material was found to respond in a ductile manner and exhibit a color change later found to be associated with large compressive strains in PEEK, irrespective of strain-rate. No changes in molecular weight were detected as a result of high-strain rate or large strain deformation. Melting has been shown not to be responsible for the ductile deformation and limited tearing response of PEEK subject to Taylor impact.

  17. Modeling gene flow distribution within conventional fields and development of a simplified sampling method to quantify adventitious GM contents in maize.

    PubMed

    Melé, Enric; Nadal, Anna; Messeguer, Joaquima; Melé-Messeguer, Marina; Palaudelmàs, Montserrat; Peñas, Gisela; Piferrer, Xavier; Capellades, Gemma; Serra, Joan; Pla, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Genetically modified (GM) crops have been commercially grown for two decades. GM maize is one of 3 species with the highest acreage and specific events. Many countries established a mandatory labeling of products containing GM material, with thresholds for adventitious presence, to support consumers' freedom of choice. In consequence, coexistence systems need to be introduced to facilitate commercial culture of GM and non-GM crops in the same agricultural area. On modeling adventitious GM cross-pollination distribution within maize fields, we deduced a simple equation to estimate overall GM contents (%GM) of conventional fields, irrespective of its shape and size, and with no previous information on possible GM pollen donor fields. A sampling strategy was designed and experimentally validated in 19 agricultural fields. With 9 samples, %GM quantification requires just one analytical GM determination while identification of the pollen source needs 9 additional analyses. A decision support tool is provided. PMID:26596213

  18. Modeling gene flow distribution within conventional fields and development of a simplified sampling method to quantify adventitious GM contents in maize

    PubMed Central

    Melé, Enric; Nadal, Anna; Messeguer, Joaquima; Melé-Messeguer, Marina; Palaudelmàs, Montserrat; Peñas, Gisela; Piferrer, Xavier; Capellades, Gemma; Serra, Joan; Pla, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Genetically modified (GM) crops have been commercially grown for two decades. GM maize is one of 3 species with the highest acreage and specific events. Many countries established a mandatory labeling of products containing GM material, with thresholds for adventitious presence, to support consumers’ freedom of choice. In consequence, coexistence systems need to be introduced to facilitate commercial culture of GM and non-GM crops in the same agricultural area. On modeling adventitious GM cross-pollination distribution within maize fields, we deduced a simple equation to estimate overall GM contents (%GM) of conventional fields, irrespective of its shape and size, and with no previous information on possible GM pollen donor fields. A sampling strategy was designed and experimentally validated in 19 agricultural fields. With 9 samples, %GM quantification requires just one analytical GM determination while identification of the pollen source needs 9 additional analyses. A decision support tool is provided. PMID:26596213

  19. Health effect of agricultural pesticide use in China: implications for the development of GM crops

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chao; Hu, Ruifa; Huang, Jikun; Huang, Xusheng; Shi, Guanming; Li, Yifan; Yin, Yanhong; Chen, Zhaohui

    2016-01-01

    It is notable that the adoption of GM glyphosate-tolerant crops increases glyphosate use but reduces non-glyphosate herbicide use; and adoption of GM insect-resistant crops significantly reduces insecticide use. While the health hazard of pesticide use has been well documented, little literature evaluates the health effects of different pesticides related to GM crops in an integrated framework. This study aims to associate the uses of different pesticides related to GM crops with the blood chemistry panel and peripheral nerve conduction of Chinese farmers. Pesticides used by farmers were recorded and classified as glyphosate, non-glyphosate herbicides, chemical lepidopteran insecticides, biological lepidopteran insecticides, non-lepidopteran insecticides and fungicides. The multivariate regression results show that none of the examined 35 health indicators was associated with glyphosate use, while the use of non-glyphosate herbicides was likely to induce renal dysfunction and decrease of serum folic acid. The use of chemical lepidopteran insecticides might be associated with hepatic dysfunction, serum glucose elevation, inflammation and even severe nerve damage. In this context, if GM crops are adopted, the alterations in pesticide use may benefit farmer health in China and globe, which has positive implications for the development of GM crops. PMID:27721390

  20. Milk-derived GM(3) and GD(3) differentially inhibit dendritic cell maturation and effector functionalities.

    PubMed

    Brønnum, H; Seested, T; Hellgren, L I; Brix, S; Frøkiaer, H

    2005-06-01

    Gangliosides are complex glycosphingolipids, which exert immune-modulating effects on various cell types. Ganglioside GD(3) and GM(3) are the predominant gangliosides of human breast milk but during the early phase of lactation, the content of GD(3) decreases while GM(3) increases. The biological value of gangliosides in breast milk has yet to be elucidated but when milk is ingested, dietary gangliosides might conceptually affect immune cells, such as dendritic cells (DCs). In this study, we address the in vitro effect of GD(3) and GM(3) on DC effector functionalities. Treatment of bone marrow-derived DCs with GD(3) before lipopolysaccharide-induced maturation decreased the production of interleukin-6 (IL-6), IL-10, IL-12 and tumor necrosis factor-alpha as well as reduced the alloreactivity in mixed leucocyte reaction (MLR). In contrast, only IL-10 and IL-12 productions were significantly inhibited by GM(3,) and the potency of DCs to activate CD4(+) cells in MLR was unaffected by GM(3). However, both gangliosides suppressed expression of CD40, CD80, CD86 and major histocompatibility complex class II on DCs. Because GD(3) overall inhibits DC functionalities more than GM(3), the immune modulating effect of the ganglioside fraction of breast milk might be more prominent in the commencement of lactation during which the milk contains the most GD(3). PMID:15963050

  1. Expression and functional analysis of Gm114, a putative mammalian ortholog of Drosophila bam

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Hao; Ross, Andrea; Capel, Blanche

    2008-01-01

    In the testis, the continuous production of sperm is maintained by a small population of stem cells called germ line stem cells (GSCs) in Drosophila, or spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs) in mammals. This stem cell population can self-renew or produce daughter cells that differentiate into mature sperm. In Drosophila, BMP signals inhibit GSC differentiation by blocking transcription of the gene, bag of marbles (bam). Once bam is activated, germ cells initiate differentiation. We identified a novel gene in mouse, Gm114, that shows homology to Drosophila bam. In male germ cells, expression of Gm114 begins at 12.5–13.5 days post coitum (dpc), the stage in mice when germ cells cease proliferation and begin differentiation into prospermatogonia. In adult testis, Gm114 is highly expressed in differentiated spermatocytes and spermatids but not in undifferentiated spermatogonia, strongly suggesting that, similar to Bam, GM114 plays an important role in mammalian germ line stem cell self-renewal and differentiation. Interestingly, deletion of the majority of the GM114 protein does not affect mouse viability or fertility. This suggests that either there is a function for the remaining N-terminal of GM114, or that there are alternative mechanisms in the mammalian system that control germ cell differentiation. PMID:18423593

  2. Protease-resistant modified human β-hexosaminidase B ameliorates symptoms in GM2 gangliosidosis model

    PubMed Central

    Mizutani, Yasumichi; Sugiyama, Eiji; Tasaki, Chikako; Tsuji, Daisuke; Maita, Nobuo; Hirokawa, Takatsugu; Asanuma, Daisuke; Kamiya, Mako; Sato, Kohei; Setou, Mitsutoshi; Urano, Yasuteru; Togawa, Tadayasu; Otaka, Akira; Sakuraba, Hitoshi

    2016-01-01

    GM2 gangliosidoses, including Tay-Sachs and Sandhoff diseases, are neurodegenerative lysosomal storage diseases that are caused by deficiency of β-hexosaminidase A, which comprises an αβ heterodimer. There are no effective treatments for these diseases; however, various strategies aimed at restoring β-hexosaminidase A have been explored. Here, we produced a modified human hexosaminidase subunit β (HexB), which we have termed mod2B, composed of homodimeric β subunits that contain amino acid sequences from the α subunit that confer GM2 ganglioside–degrading activity and protease resistance. We also developed fluorescent probes that allow visualization of endocytosis of mod2B via mannose 6-phosphate receptors and delivery of mod2B to lysosomes in GM2 gangliosidosis models. In addition, we applied imaging mass spectrometry to monitor efficacy of this approach in Sandhoff disease model mice. Following i.c.v. administration, mod2B was widely distributed and reduced accumulation of GM2, asialo-GM2, and bis(monoacylglycero)phosphate in brain regions including the hypothalamus, hippocampus, and cerebellum. Moreover, mod2B administration markedly improved motor dysfunction and a prolonged lifespan in Sandhoff disease mice. Together, the results of our study indicate that mod2B has potential for intracerebrospinal fluid enzyme replacement therapy and should be further explored as a gene therapy for GM2 gangliosidoses. PMID:27018595

  3. Structural basis of GM1 ganglioside recognition by simian virus 40.

    PubMed

    Neu, Ursula; Woellner, Karin; Gauglitz, Guenter; Stehle, Thilo

    2008-04-01

    Simian virus 40 (SV40) has been a paradigm for understanding attachment and entry of nonenveloped viruses, viral DNA replication, and virus assembly, as well as for endocytosis pathways associated with caveolin and cholesterol. We find by glycan array screening that SV40 recognizes its ganglioside receptor GM1 with a quite narrow specificity, but isothermal titration calorimetry shows that individual binding sites have a relatively low affinity, with a millimolar dissociation constant. The high-resolution crystal structure of recombinantly produced SV40 capsid protein, VP1, in complex with the carbohydrate portion of GM1, reveals that the receptor is bound in a shallow solvent-exposed groove at the outer surface of the capsid. Through a complex network of interactions, VP1 recognizes a conformation of GM1 that is the dominant one in solution. Analysis of contacts provides a structural basis for the observed specificity and suggests binding mechanisms for additional physiologically relevant GM1 variants. Comparison with murine Polyomavirus (Polyoma) receptor complexes reveals that SV40 uses a different mechanism of sialic acid binding, which has implications for receptor binding of human polyomaviruses. The SV40-GM1 complex reveals a parallel to cholera toxin, which uses a similar cell entry pathway and binds GM1 in the same conformation.

  4. Recombinant rabies virus expressing dog GM-CSF is an efficacious oral rabies vaccine for dogs.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ming; Wang, Lei; Zhou, Songqin; Wang, Zhao; Ruan, Juncheng; Tang, Lijun; Jia, Ziming; Cui, Min; Zhao, Ling; Fu, Zhen F

    2015-11-17

    Developing efficacious oral rabies vaccines is an important step to increase immunization coverage for stray dogs, which are not accessible for parenteral vaccination. Our previous studies have demonstrated that recombinant rabies virus (RABV) expressing cytokines/chemokines induces robust protective immune responses after oral immunization in mice by recruiting and activating dendritic cells (DCs) and B cells. To develop an effective oral rabies vaccine for dogs, a recombinant attenuated RABV expressing dog GM-CSF, designated as LBNSE-dGM-CSF was constructed and used for oral vaccination in a dog model. Significantly more DCs or B cells were activated in the peripheral blood of dogs vaccinated orally with LBNSE-dGM-CSF than those vaccinated with the parent virus LBNSE, particularly at 3 days post immunization (dpi). As a result, significantly higher levels of virus neutralizing antibodies (VNAs) were detected in dogs immunized with LBNSE-dGM-CSF than with the parent virus. All the immunized dogs were protected against a lethal challenge with 4500 MICLD50 of wild-type RABV SXTYD01. LBNSE-dGM-CSF was found to replicate mainly in the tonsils after oral vaccination as detected by nested RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry. Taken together, our results indicate that LBNSE-dGM-CSF could be a promising oral rabies vaccine candidate for dogs.

  5. GmCLC1 Confers Enhanced Salt Tolerance through Regulating Chloride Accumulation in Soybean

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Peipei; Wang, Longchao; Liu, Ailin; Yu, Bingjun; Lam, Hon-Ming

    2016-01-01

    The family of chloride channel proteins that mediate Cl- transportation play vital roles in plant nutrient supply, cellular action potential and turgor pressure adjustment, stomatal movement, hormone signal recognition and transduction, Cl- homeostasis, and abiotic and biotic stress tolerance. The anionic toxicity, mainly caused by chloride ions (Cl-), on plants under salt stress remains poorly understood. In this work, we investigated the function of soybean Cl-/H+ antiporter GmCLC1 under salt stress in transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana, soybean, and yeast. We found that GmCLC1 enhanced salt tolerance in transgenic A. thaliana by reducing the Cl- accumulation in shoots and hence released the negative impact of salt stress on plant growth. Overexpression of GmCLC1 in the hairy roots of soybean sequestered more Cl- in their roots and transferred less Cl- to their shoots, leading to lower relative electrolyte leakage values in the roots and leaves. When either the soybean GmCLC1 or the yeast chloride transporter gene, GEF1, was transformed into the yeast gef1 mutant, and then treated with different chloride salts (MnCl2, KCl, NaCl), enhanced survival rate was observed. The result indicates that GmCLC1 and GEF1 exerted similar effects on alleviating the stress of diverse chloride salts on the yeast gef1 mutant. Together, this work suggests a protective function of GmCLC1 under Cl- stress. PMID:27504114

  6. GM trees with increased resistance to herbivores: trait efficiency and their potential to promote tree growth

    PubMed Central

    Hjältén, Joakim; Axelsson, E. Petter

    2015-01-01

    Climate change, as well as a more intensive forestry, is expected to increase the risk of damage by pests and pathogens on trees, which can already be a severe problem in tree plantations. Recent development of biotechnology theoretically allows for resistance enhancement that could help reduce these risks but we still lack a comprehensive understanding of benefits and tradeoffs with pest resistant GM (genetically modified) trees. We synthesized the current knowledge on the effectiveness of GM forest trees with increased resistance to herbivores. There is ample evidence that induction of exogenous Bacillus thuringiensis genes reduce performance of target pests whereas upregulation of endogenous resistance traits e.g., phenolics, generates variable results. Our review identified very few studies estimating the realized benefits in tree growth of GM trees in the field. This is concerning as the realized benefit with insect resistant GM plants seems to be context-dependent and likely manifested only if herbivore pressure is sufficiently high. Future studies of secondary pest species and resistance evolution in pest to GM trees should be prioritized. But most importantly we need more long-term field tests to evaluate the benefits and risks with pest resistant GM trees. PMID:25983736

  7. GM-CSF primes cardiac inflammation in a mouse model of Kawasaki disease.

    PubMed

    Stock, Angus T; Hansen, Jacinta A; Sleeman, Matthew A; McKenzie, Brent S; Wicks, Ian P

    2016-09-19

    Kawasaki disease (KD) is the leading cause of pediatric heart disease in developed countries. KD patients develop cardiac inflammation, characterized by an early infiltrate of neutrophils and monocytes that precipitates coronary arteritis. Although the early inflammatory processes are linked to cardiac pathology, the factors that regulate cardiac inflammation and immune cell recruitment to the heart remain obscure. In this study, using a mouse model of KD (induced by a cell wall Candida albicans water-soluble fraction [CAWS]), we identify an essential role for granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) in orchestrating these events. GM-CSF is rapidly produced by cardiac fibroblasts after CAWS challenge, precipitating cardiac inflammation. Mechanistically, GM-CSF acts upon the local macrophage compartment, driving the expression of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, whereas therapeutically, GM-CSF blockade markedly reduces cardiac disease. Our findings describe a novel role for GM-CSF as an essential initiating cytokine in cardiac inflammation and implicate GM-CSF as a potential target for therapeutic intervention in KD.

  8. GmCLC1 Confers Enhanced Salt Tolerance through Regulating Chloride Accumulation in Soybean.

    PubMed

    Wei, Peipei; Wang, Longchao; Liu, Ailin; Yu, Bingjun; Lam, Hon-Ming

    2016-01-01

    The family of chloride channel proteins that mediate Cl(-) transportation play vital roles in plant nutrient supply, cellular action potential and turgor pressure adjustment, stomatal movement, hormone signal recognition and transduction, Cl(-) homeostasis, and abiotic and biotic stress tolerance. The anionic toxicity, mainly caused by chloride ions (Cl(-)), on plants under salt stress remains poorly understood. In this work, we investigated the function of soybean Cl(-)/H(+) antiporter GmCLC1 under salt stress in transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana, soybean, and yeast. We found that GmCLC1 enhanced salt tolerance in transgenic A. thaliana by reducing the Cl(-) accumulation in shoots and hence released the negative impact of salt stress on plant growth. Overexpression of GmCLC1 in the hairy roots of soybean sequestered more Cl(-) in their roots and transferred less Cl(-) to their shoots, leading to lower relative electrolyte leakage values in the roots and leaves. When either the soybean GmCLC1 or the yeast chloride transporter gene, GEF1, was transformed into the yeast gef1 mutant, and then treated with different chloride salts (MnCl2, KCl, NaCl), enhanced survival rate was observed. The result indicates that GmCLC1 and GEF1 exerted similar effects on alleviating the stress of diverse chloride salts on the yeast gef1 mutant. Together, this work suggests a protective function of GmCLC1 under Cl(-) stress. PMID:27504114

  9. Recombinant rabies virus expressing dog GM-CSF is an efficacious oral rabies vaccine for dogs.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ming; Wang, Lei; Zhou, Songqin; Wang, Zhao; Ruan, Juncheng; Tang, Lijun; Jia, Ziming; Cui, Min; Zhao, Ling; Fu, Zhen F

    2015-11-17

    Developing efficacious oral rabies vaccines is an important step to increase immunization coverage for stray dogs, which are not accessible for parenteral vaccination. Our previous studies have demonstrated that recombinant rabies virus (RABV) expressing cytokines/chemokines induces robust protective immune responses after oral immunization in mice by recruiting and activating dendritic cells (DCs) and B cells. To develop an effective oral rabies vaccine for dogs, a recombinant attenuated RABV expressing dog GM-CSF, designated as LBNSE-dGM-CSF was constructed and used for oral vaccination in a dog model. Significantly more DCs or B cells were activated in the peripheral blood of dogs vaccinated orally with LBNSE-dGM-CSF than those vaccinated with the parent virus LBNSE, particularly at 3 days post immunization (dpi). As a result, significantly higher levels of virus neutralizing antibodies (VNAs) were detected in dogs immunized with LBNSE-dGM-CSF than with the parent virus. All the immunized dogs were protected against a lethal challenge with 4500 MICLD50 of wild-type RABV SXTYD01. LBNSE-dGM-CSF was found to replicate mainly in the tonsils after oral vaccination as detected by nested RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry. Taken together, our results indicate that LBNSE-dGM-CSF could be a promising oral rabies vaccine candidate for dogs. PMID:26436700

  10. MafB antagonizes phenotypic alteration induced by GM-CSF in microglia.

    PubMed

    Koshida, Ryusuke; Oishi, Hisashi; Hamada, Michito; Takahashi, Satoru

    Microglia are tissue-resident macrophages which are distributed throughout the central nervous system (CNS). Recent studies suggest that microglia are a unique myeloid population distinct from peripheral macrophages in terms of origin and gene expression signature. Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), a pleiotropic cytokine regulating myeloid development, has been shown to stimulate proliferation and alter phenotype of microglia in vitro. However, how its signaling is modulated in microglia is poorly characterized. MafB, a bZip transcriptional factor, is highly expressed in monocyte-macrophage lineage cells including microglia, although its role in microglia is largely unknown. We investigated the crosstalk between GM-CSF signaling and MafB by analyzing primary microglia. We found that Mafb-deficient microglia grew more rapidly than wild-type microglia in response to GM-CSF. Moreover, the expression of genes associated with microglial differentiation was more downregulated in Mafb-deficient microglia cultured with GM-CSF. Notably, such differences between the genotypes were not observed in the presence of M-CSF. In addition, we found that Mafb-deficient microglia cultured with GM-CSF barely extended their membrane protrusions, probably due to abnormal activation of RhoA, a key regulator of cytoskeletal remodeling. Altogether, our study reveals that MafB is a negative regulator of GM-CSF signaling in microglia. These findings could provide new insight into the modulation of cytokine signaling by transcription factors in microglia.

  11. Protease-resistant modified human β-hexosaminidase B ameliorates symptoms in GM2 gangliosidosis model.

    PubMed

    Kitakaze, Keisuke; Mizutani, Yasumichi; Sugiyama, Eiji; Tasaki, Chikako; Tsuji, Daisuke; Maita, Nobuo; Hirokawa, Takatsugu; Asanuma, Daisuke; Kamiya, Mako; Sato, Kohei; Setou, Mitsutoshi; Urano, Yasuteru; Togawa, Tadayasu; Otaka, Akira; Sakuraba, Hitoshi; Itoh, Kohji

    2016-05-01

    GM2 gangliosidoses, including Tay-Sachs and Sandhoff diseases, are neurodegenerative lysosomal storage diseases that are caused by deficiency of β-hexosaminidase A, which comprises an αβ heterodimer. There are no effective treatments for these diseases; however, various strategies aimed at restoring β-hexosaminidase A have been explored. Here, we produced a modified human hexosaminidase subunit β (HexB), which we have termed mod2B, composed of homodimeric β subunits that contain amino acid sequences from the α subunit that confer GM2 ganglioside-degrading activity and protease resistance. We also developed fluorescent probes that allow visualization of endocytosis of mod2B via mannose 6-phosphate receptors and delivery of mod2B to lysosomes in GM2 gangliosidosis models. In addition, we applied imaging mass spectrometry to monitor efficacy of this approach in Sandhoff disease model mice. Following i.c.v. administration, mod2B was widely distributed and reduced accumulation of GM2, asialo-GM2, and bis(monoacylglycero)phosphate in brain regions including the hypothalamus, hippocampus, and cerebellum. Moreover, mod2B administration markedly improved motor dysfunction and a prolonged lifespan in Sandhoff disease mice. Together, the results of our study indicate that mod2B has potential for intracerebrospinal fluid enzyme replacement therapy and should be further explored as a gene therapy for GM2 gangliosidoses. PMID:27018595

  12. Can science give us the tools for recognizing possible health risks of GM food?

    PubMed

    Pusztai, Arpad

    2002-01-01

    Nearly ten years after the introduction of GM foodcrops there are still only a handful of published studies about their safety. Independent studies are even fewer, moreover, no peer-reviewed publications exist in which the results of clinical investigations on the possible effects of GM food on human health are described. Even though the evaluation of the safety or possible toxicity of GM foodstuffs is more difficult than that of drugs or food additives, this scarcity of data and the lack of a scientific database is curious particularly as descriptions of the results of chemical, nutritional and biological testing in some early (unpublished) studies or some more recent publications demonstrate the feasibility of carrying out proper and scientifically valid health risk assessment on GM foods. In this review, after critically examining some of the basic principles, past results and possible novel methods of future health safety assessment of GM foodstuffs, the conclusion appears to be that as the tools for the recognition and indeed for the elimination of the risks GM foods may present for us are available or can be developed, it is the will and the funding for such work that needs to be found.

  13. In silico binding analysis of Withanolides with the Human GM-CSFR.

    PubMed

    Praveen Kumar, Posa Krishnamoorthy; Sivanandham, Muthukumaran; Damodharan, Lavanya

    2016-07-01

    Experimental studies have shown that Withanolides are group of pharmacologically active compounds (steroidal lactones), immunomodulatory agents mainly present in the leaves and roots of Withania somnifera plant. The present study is about virtual screening of Withanolide compounds to check for drug likeness by Lipinski's rule five and the screened compounds are allowed to binding with the human GM-CSFR, an immunomodulatory cytokine receptor expressed on dendritic cells. The binding pocket sites, the internal energy, the hydrogen bond interactions and the interacting amino acid residues of the human GM-CSFR with Withanolides were analyzed through molecular docking method. Among the Withanolides docked with human GM-CSFR, which is responsible for DCs survival, proliferation and differentiation, Withanolide A was identified to be a lead compound by binding with α subunit of GM-CSFR exhibiting a maximum Dock score of 28.07 and internal binding energy of -12.8 Kcal/mol. Levamisole as a standard immunomodulatory agent has shown maximum dock score of 28.639 and internal binding energy of -1.864 Kcal/mol. Withanolide A and Levamisole was docked with similar binding site amino acid, ARG302 of GM-CSFR. In addition, Withanolide A was also binding with LEU246 of GM-CSFR, as binding aminoacids predicted from PDBSUM. PMID:27393453

  14. Changing Course: Thurgood Marshall College Fund President Johnny Taylor Seeks New Partnerships and Avenues of Support for Public HBCUs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stuart, Reginald

    2011-01-01

    When veteran educator Dr. N. Joyce Payne handed the reins of the organization she founded, the Thurgood Marshall College Fund, to entertainment lawyer and board member Johnny Taylor, Taylor began pursuing a remake of the prestigious group that has turned it on its head in just a matter of months. Today, with just more than a year of leading the…

  15. 75 FR 42281 - Continuation of the National Emergency With Respect To the Former Liberian Regime of Charles Taylor

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-21

    ... 19, 2010. [FR Doc. 2010-17989 Filed 7-20-10; 8:45 am] Billing code 3195-W0-P ... Liberian Regime of Charles Taylor On July 22, 2004, by Executive Order 13348, the President declared a... connected to the former Liberian regime of Charles Taylor, pursuant to the International Emergency...

  16. 78 FR 43751 - Continuation of the National Emergency With Respect to the Former Liberian Regime of Charles Taylor

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-19

    ... Register and transmitted to the Congress. (Presidential Sig.) THE WHITE HOUSE, July 17, 2013. [FR Doc. 2013... Liberian Regime of Charles Taylor On July 22, 2004, by Executive Order 13348, the President declared a national emergency with respect to the former Liberian regime of Charles Taylor pursuant to...

  17. 76 FR 43799 - Continuation of the National Emergency With Respect to the Former Liberian Regime of Charles Taylor

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-21

    ....) THE WHITE HOUSE, July 20, 2011. [FR Doc. 2011-18703 Filed 7-20-11; 2:00 pm] Billing code 3195-W1-P ... With Respect to the Former Liberian Regime of Charles Taylor #0; #0; #0; Presidential Documents #0; #0... Respect to the Former Liberian Regime of Charles Taylor On July 22, 2004, by Executive Order 13348,...

  18. 3 CFR - Continuation of the National Emergency With Respect to the Former Liberian Regime of Charles Taylor

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 3 The President 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Continuation of the National Emergency With Respect to the Former Liberian Regime of Charles Taylor Presidential Documents Other Presidential Documents Notice of July 19, 2010 Continuation of the National Emergency With Respect to the Former Liberian Regime of Charles Taylor On July 22, 2004,...

  19. New Insights on Non-Enzymatic Oxidation of Ganglioside GM1 Using Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Couto, Daniela; Melo, Tânia; Maciel, Elisabete; Campos, Ana; Alves, Eliana; Guedes, Sofia; Domingues, M. Rosário M.; Domingues, Pedro

    2016-08-01

    Gangliosides are acidic glycosphingolipids that are present in cell membranes and lipid raft domains, being particularly abundant in central nervous systems. They participate in modulating cell membrane properties, cell-cell recognition, cell regulation, and signaling. Disturbance in ganglioside metabolism has been correlated with the development of diseases, such as neurodegenerative diseases, and in inflammation. Both conditions are associated with an increased production of reactive oxidation species (ROS) that can induce changes in the structure of biomolecules, including lipids, leading to the loss or modification of their function. Oxidized phospholipids are usually involved in chronic diseases and inflammation. However, knowledge regarding oxidation of gangliosides is scarce. In order to evaluate the effect of ROS in gangliosides, an in vitro biomimetic model system was used to study the susceptibility of GM1 (Neu5Acα2-3(Galβ1-3GalNAcβ1-4)Galβ1-4Glcβ1Cer) to undergo oxidative modifications. Oxidation of GM1 under Fenton reaction conditions was monitored using high resolution electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) and tandem mass spectrometry (ESI-MS/MS). Upon oxidation, GM1 underwent oxidative cleavages in the carbohydrate chain, leading to the formation of other gangliosides GM2 (GalNAcβ1-4Gal(Neu5Acα2-3)1-4Glcβ1Cer), GM3 (Neu5Acα2-3Galβ1-4Glcβ1Cer), asialo-GM1 (Galβ1-3GalNAcβ1-4Galβ1-4Glcβ1Cer), asialo-GM2 (GalNAcβ1-4Galβ1-4Glcβ1Cer), of the small glycolipids lactosylceramide (LacCer), glucosylceramide (GlcCer), and of ceramide (Cer). In addition, oxygenated GM1 and GM2 (as keto and hydroxy derivatives), glycans, oxidized glycans, and oxidized ceramides were also identified. Nonenzymatic oxidation of GM1 under oxidative stress contributes to the generation of other gangliosides that may participate in the imbalance of gangliosides metabolism in vivo, through uncontrolled enzymatic pathways and, consequently, play some role in

  20. Biologic Effects of Anti-Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor (GM-CSF) Antibody Formation in Patients Treated with GM-CSF (Sargramostim) as Adjuvant Therapy of Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Spitler, Lynn E.; Cao, Huynh; Piironen, Timo; Whiteside, Theresa L.; Weber, Robert W.; Cruickshank, Scott

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES We investigated the development of binding and neutralizing antibodies to GM-CSF in patients receiving prolonged therapy with GM-CSF as adjuvant therapy of melanoma and the impact of these antibodies on biologic effects. METHODS Fifty-three patients with high-risk melanoma which had been surgically excised were treated with GM-CSF, 125 µg/m2 daily for 14 days every 28 days for 1 year following surgical resection of disease. Serum samples for antibodies to GM-CSF were measured before treatment and on Study Days 155 and 351. Blood draws for testing biologic effects were keyed to GM-CSF administration: Days 0 (before), 15 (after 14 days on GM-CSF), 29 (after 14 days off GM-CSF), 155, and 351 (after 14 days on GM-CSF in the 6th and 13th cycle of treatment). RESULTS Of 53 patients enrolled, 43 were evaluable for the development of anti-GM-CSF antibodies. Of these, 93% developed binding antibodies and 42% developed both binding and neutralizing antibodies. The increase in the white blood cell (WBC) count, percent eosinophils, or neopterin levels engendered by GM-CSF administration, was abrogated or markedly decreased in patients with neutralizing antibodies but not in patients who developed only binding antibodies. CONCLUSIONS Ninety-three percent of patients with melanoma treated with GM-CSF as adjuvant therapy develop antibodies to GM-CSF. In those with neutralizing antibodies, a diminution of the biologic effects of GM-CSF was observed. The development of neutralizing antibodies might also abrogate the potential clinical benefit of this treatment and should be considered in the design of future clinical trials. PMID:25286079

  1. Galleria mellonella native and analogue peptides Gm1 and ΔGm1. II) anti-bacterial and anti-endotoxic effects.

    PubMed

    Correa, Wilmar; Manrique-Moreno, Marcela; Behrends, Jochen; Patiño, Edwin; Marella, Chakravarthy; Peláez-Jaramillo, Carlos; Garidel, Patrick; Gutsmann, Thomas; Brandenburg, Klaus; Heinbockel, Lena

    2014-10-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are important components of the innate immune system of animals, plants, fungi and bacteria and are recently under discussion as promising alternatives to conventional antibiotics. We have investigated two cecropin-like synthetic peptides, Gm1, which corresponds to the natural overall uncharged Galleria mellonella native peptide and ΔGm1, a modified overall positively charged Gm1 variant. We have analysed these peptides for their potential to inhibit the endotoxin-induced secretion of tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) from human mononuclear cells. Furthermore, in a conventional microbiological assay, the ability of these peptides to inhibit the growth of the rough mutant bacteria Salmonella enterica Minnesota R60 and the polymyxin B-resistant Proteus mirabilis R45 was investigated and atomic force microscopy (AFM) measurements were performed to characterize the morphology of the bacteria treated by the two peptides. We have also studied their cytotoxic properties in a haemolysis assay to clarify potential toxic effects. Our data revealed for both peptides minor anti-inflammatory (anti-endotoxin) activity, but demonstrated antimicrobial activity with differences depending on the endotoxin composition of the respective bacteria. In accordance with the antimicrobial assay, AFM data revealed a stronger morphology change of the R45 bacteria than for the R60. Furthermore, Gm1 had a stronger effect on the bacteria than ΔGm1, leading to a different morphology regarding indentations and coalescing of bacterial structures. The findings verify the biophysical measurements with the peptides on model systems. Both peptides lack any haemolytic activity up to an amount of 100μg/ml, making them suitable as new anti-infective agents.

  2. Subscales to the Taylor Manifest Anxiety Scale in Three Chronically Ill Populations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Peter N.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Examines factors of anxiety in the Taylor Manifest Anxiety Scale in 150 asthma, tuberculosis, and chronic pain patients. Key cluster analysis revealed five clusters: restlessness, embarrassment, sensitivity, physiological anxiety, and self-confidence. Embarrassment is fairly dependent on the other factors. (JAC)

  3. Applications of Taylor-Galerkin finite element method to compressible internal flow problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sohn, Jeong L.; Kim, Yongmo; Chung, T. J.

    1989-01-01

    A two-step Taylor-Galerkin finite element method with Lapidus' artificial viscosity scheme is applied to several test cases for internal compressible inviscid flow problems. Investigations for the effect of supersonic/subsonic inlet and outlet boundary conditions on computational results are particularly emphasized.

  4. A depositional model for the Taylor coal bed, Martin and Johnson counties, eastern Kentucky

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Andrews, W.M.; Hower, J.C.; Ferm, J.C.; Evans, S.D.; Sirek, N.S.; Warrell, M.; Eble, C.F.

    1996-01-01

    This study investigated the Taylor coal bed in Johnson and Martin counties, eastern Kentucky, using field and petrographic techniques to develop a depositional model of the coal bed. Petrography and chemistry of the coal bed were examined. Multiple benches of the Taylor coal bed were correlated over a 10 km distance. Three sites were studied in detail. The coal at the western and eastern sites were relatively thin and split by thick clastic partings. The coal at the central site was the thickest and unsplit. Two major clastic partings are included in the coal bed. Each represents a separate and distinct fluvial splay. The Taylor is interpreted to have developed on a coastal plain with periodic flooding from nearby, structurally-controlled fluvial systems. Doming is unlikely due to the petrographic and chemical trends, which are inconsistent with modern Indonesian models. The depositional history and structural and stratigraphic setting suggest contemporaneous structural influence on thickness and quality of the Taylor coal bed in this area.

  5. The Taylor spectrum and transversality for a Heisenberg algebra of operators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dosi, Anar A.

    2010-05-01

    A problem on noncommutative holomorphic functional calculus is considered for a Banach module over a finite-dimensional nilpotent Lie algebra. As the main result, the transversality property of algebras of noncommutative holomorphic functions with respect to the Taylor spectrum is established for a family of bounded linear operators generating a Heisenberg algebra. Bibliography: 25 titles.

  6. Application of Morse Theory to Analysis of Rayleigh-Taylor Topology

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, P L; Bremer, P T; Cabot, W H; Cook, A W; Laney, D E; Mascarenhas, A A; Pascucci, V

    2007-01-24

    We present a novel Morse Theory approach for the analysis of the complex topology of the Rayleigh-Taylor mixing layer. We automatically extract bubble structures at multiple scales and identify the resolution of interest. Quantitative analysis of bubble counts over time highlights distinct mixing trends for a high-resolution Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) [1].

  7. Effect of resistivity on the Rayleigh-Taylor instability in an accelerated plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Castillo, J.L. ); Huerta, M.A. )

    1993-11-01

    We study the Rayleigh-Taylor instability in finite-conductivity accelerated plasma arcs of the type found in electromagnetic rail launchers. For a plasma of length [ital l], acceleration [ital a], and thermal speed [ital v][sub [ital T

  8. Taylor Approximations to Logistic IRT Models and Their Use in Adaptive Testing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Veerkamp, Wim J. J.

    2000-01-01

    Showed how Taylor approximation can be used to generate a linear approximation to a logistic item characteristic curve and a linear ability estimator. Demonstrated how, for a specific simulation, this could result in the special case of a Robbins-Monro item selection procedure for adaptive testing. (SLD)

  9. Magnetic-field generation by the ablative nonlinear Rayleigh–Taylor instability

    SciTech Connect

    Nilson, P. M.; Gao, L.; Igumenshchev, I. V.; Fiksel, G.; Yan, R.; Davies, J. R.; Martinez, D.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Haines, M. G.; Blackman, E. G.; Froula, D. H.; Betti, R.; Meyerhofer, D. D.

    2015-04-01

    Experiments reporting magnetic-field generation by the ablative nonlinear Rayleigh–Taylor (RT) instability are reviewed. The experiments show how large-scale magnetic fields can, under certain circumstances, emerge and persist in strongly driven laboratory and astrophysical flows at drive pressures exceeding one million times atmospheric pressure.

  10. 78 FR 61451 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Determination of Endangered Status for the Taylor...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-03

    ... On October 11, 2012 (77 FR 61938), we published a proposed rule to list the Taylor's checkerspot... species may be found in the proposed rule, which was published October 11, 2012 (77 FR 61938). Previous... horned lark as candidates for listing in our 2001 candidate notice of review (CNOR) (66 FR 54808;...

  11. Life Review in the Novels of Molly Keane, Elizabeth Bowen, and Peter Taylor.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wyatt-Brown, A. M.

    Gerontologists have studied the role of memory and reminiscence in later life to see if life review leads to increased satisfaction in old age. Novelists offer some concrete examples of the varying ways that this review can affect the self-esteem of aging persons. Molly Keane, Elizabeth Bowen, and Peter Taylor all agree that late middle age…

  12. The Taylor spectrum and transversality for a Heisenberg algebra of operators

    SciTech Connect

    Dosi, Anar A

    2010-05-11

    A problem on noncommutative holomorphic functional calculus is considered for a Banach module over a finite-dimensional nilpotent Lie algebra. As the main result, the transversality property of algebras of noncommutative holomorphic functions with respect to the Taylor spectrum is established for a family of bounded linear operators generating a Heisenberg algebra. Bibliography: 25 titles.

  13. Ethics, organ donation and tax: a reply to Quigley and Taylor.

    PubMed

    Lippert-Rasmussen, Kasper; Petersen, Thomas Søbirk

    2012-08-01

    A national opt-out system of post-mortem donation of scarce organs is preferable to an opt-in system. Unfortunately, the former system is not always feasible, and so in a recent JME article we canvassed the possibility of offering people a tax break for opting-in as a way of increasing the number of organs available for donation under an opt-in regime. Muireann Quigley and James Stacey Taylor criticize our proposal. Roughly, Quigley argues that our proposal is costly and, hence, is unlikely to be implemented, while Taylor contests our response to a Titmuss-style objection to our scheme. In response to Quigley, we note that our proposal's main attraction lies in gains not reflected in the figures presented by Quigley and that the mere fact that it is costly does not imply that it is unfeasible. In response to Taylor, we offer some textual evidence in support of our interpretation of Taylor and responds to his favoured interpretation of the Titmuss-style objection that many people seem to want to donate to charities even if they can deduct their donations from their income tax. Finally, we show why our views do not commit us to endorsing a free organ-market. PMID:22661457

  14. A Taylor-Galerkin finite element algorithm for transient nonlinear thermal-structural analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thornton, E. A.; Dechaumphai, P.

    1986-01-01

    A Taylor-Galerkin finite element method for solving large, nonlinear thermal-structural problems is presented. The algorithm is formulated for coupled transient and uncoupled quasistatic thermal-structural problems. Vectorizing strategies ensure computational efficiency. Two applications demonstrate the validity of the approach for analyzing transient and quasistatic thermal-structural problems.

  15. 33 CFR 207.185 - Taylors Bayou, Tex., Beaumont Navigation District Lock; use, administration, and navigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Taylors Bayou, Tex., Beaumont Navigation District Lock; use, administration, and navigation. 207.185 Section 207.185 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE NAVIGATION...

  16. 33 CFR 207.185 - Taylors Bayou, Tex., Beaumont Navigation District Lock; use, administration, and navigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Taylors Bayou, Tex., Beaumont Navigation District Lock; use, administration, and navigation. 207.185 Section 207.185 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE NAVIGATION...

  17. 33 CFR 207.185 - Taylors Bayou, Tex., Beaumont Navigation District Lock; use, administration, and navigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Taylors Bayou, Tex., Beaumont Navigation District Lock; use, administration, and navigation. 207.185 Section 207.185 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE NAVIGATION...

  18. 33 CFR 207.185 - Taylors Bayou, Tex., Beaumont Navigation District Lock; use, administration, and navigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Taylors Bayou, Tex., Beaumont Navigation District Lock; use, administration, and navigation. 207.185 Section 207.185 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE NAVIGATION...

  19. 33 CFR 207.185 - Taylors Bayou, Tex., Beaumont Navigation District Lock; use, administration, and navigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Taylors Bayou, Tex., Beaumont Navigation District Lock; use, administration, and navigation. 207.185 Section 207.185 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE NAVIGATION...

  20. The Robert Taylor Boys and Girls Club of Chicago. Practitioner Perspectives: Bulletin from the Field.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coleman, Patrick J.; Lahey, Elizabeth; Orlando, Kristine

    The Robert Taylor Boys and Girls Club of Chicago is located in this country's largest public housing development, serving over 1,500 predominantly African American members. It offers a brightly-colored building in a dilapidated, deprived area. It provides a clean, warm, safe haven for children to play, build strong bodies, get help with homework,…