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Sample records for nox reduction system

  1. Nox reduction system utilizing pulsed hydrocarbon injection

    DOEpatents

    Brusasco, Raymond M.; Penetrante, Bernardino M.; Vogtlin, George E.; Merritt, Bernard T.

    2001-01-01

    Hydrocarbon co-reductants, such as diesel fuel, are added by pulsed injection to internal combustion engine exhaust to reduce exhaust NO.sub.x to N.sub.2 in the presence of a catalyst. Exhaust NO.sub.x reduction of at least 50% in the emissions is achieved with the addition of less than 5% fuel as a source of the hydrocarbon co-reductants. By means of pulsing the hydrocarbon flow, the amount of pulsed hydrocarbon vapor (itself a pollutant) can be minimized relative to the amount of NO.sub.x species removed.

  2. Simultaneous reduction of particulate matter and NO(x) emissions using 4-way catalyzed filtration systems.

    PubMed

    Swanson, Jacob J; Watts, Winthrop F; Newman, Robert A; Ziebarth, Robin R; Kittelson, David B

    2013-05-01

    The next generation of diesel emission control devices includes 4-way catalyzed filtration systems (4WCFS) consisting of both NOx and diesel particulate matter (DPM) control. A methodology was developed to simultaneously evaluate the NOx and DPM control performance of miniature 4WCFS made from acicular mullite, an advanced ceramic material (ACM), that were challenged with diesel exhaust. The impact of catalyst loading and substrate porosity on catalytic performance of the NOx trap was evaluated. Simultaneously with NOx measurements, the real-time solid particle filtration performance of catalyst-coated standard and high porosity filters was determined for steady-state and regenerative conditions. The use of high porosity ACM 4-way catalyzed filtration systems reduced NOx by 99% and solid and total particulate matter by 95% when averaged over 10 regeneration cycles. A "regeneration cycle" refers to an oxidizing ("lean") exhaust condition followed by a reducing ("rich") exhaust condition resulting in NOx storage and NOx reduction (i.e., trap "regeneration"), respectively. Standard porosity ACM 4-way catalyzed filtration systems reduced NOx by 60-75% and exhibited 99.9% filtration efficiency. The rich/lean cycling used to regenerate the filter had almost no impact on solid particle filtration efficiency but impacted NOx control. Cycling resulted in the formation of very low concentrations of semivolatile nucleation mode particles for some 4WCFS formulations. Overall, 4WCFS show promise for significantly reducing diesel emissions into the atmosphere in a single control device.

  3. DEVELOPMENT OF HIGH ACTIVITY, CATALYTIC SYSTEMS FOR NOx REDUCTION

    SciTech Connect

    Unknown

    2001-12-01

    This project was directed at an investigation of catalytic NO{sub x} reduction on carbonaceous supports at low temperatures. The experimental work was conducted primarily in a packed bed reactor/gas flow system that was constructed for this work. The analytical techniques employed were mass spectrometry, NO{sub x} chemiluminescence, and gas chromatography. The experimental plan was focused on steady-state reactivity experiments, followed by temperature programmed desorption (TPD) of surface intermediates, and also selected temperature-programmed reaction (TPR) experiments. Both uncatalyzed and catalyzed (potassium-promoted) phenolic resin char, were investigated as well as the catalytic effect of additional CO in the gas phase.

  4. Numerical analysis of NOx reduction for compact design in marine urea-SCR system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Cheolyong; Sung, Yonmo; Choi, Gyung Min; Kim, Duck Jool

    2015-11-01

    In order to design a compact urea selective catalytic reduction system, numerical simulation was conducted by computational fluid dynamics tool. A swirl type static mixer and a mixing chamber were considered as mixing units in the system. It had great influence on flow characteristics and urea decomposition into ammonia. The mixer caused flow recirculation and high level of turbulence intensity, and the chamber increased residence time of urea-water-solution injected. Because of those effects, reaction rates of urea decomposition were enhanced in the region. When those mixing units were combined, it showed the maximum because the recirculation zone was significantly developed. NH3 conversion was maximized in the zone due to widely distributed turbulence intensity and high value of uniformity index. It caused improvement of NOx reduction efficiency of the system. It was possible to reduce 55% length of the chamber and connecting pipe without decrease of NOx reduction efficiency.

  5. UREA INFRASTRUCTURE FOR UREA SCR NOX REDUCTION

    SciTech Connect

    Bunting, Bruce G.

    2000-08-20

    Urea SCR is currently the only proven NOX aftertreatment for diesel engines - high NOX reduction possible - some SCR catalyst systems are robust against fuel sulfur - durability has been demonstrated - many systems in the field - long history in other markets - Major limitations to acceptance - distribution of urea solution to end user - ensuring that urea solution is added to vehicle.

  6. Design and testing of an independently controlled urea SCR retrofit system for the reduction of NOx emissions from marine diesels.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Derek R; Bedick, Clinton R; Clark, Nigel N; McKain, David L

    2009-05-15

    Diesel engine emissions for on-road, stationary and marine applications are regulated in the United States via standards set by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). A major component of diesel exhaust that is difficult to reduce is nitrogen oxides (NOx). Selective catalytic reduction (SCR) has been in use for many years for stationary applications, including external combustion boilers, and is promising for NOx abatement as a retrofit for mobile applications where diesel compression ignition engines are used. The research presented in this paper is the first phase of a program focused on the reduction of NOx by use of a stand-alone urea injection system, applicable to marine diesel engines typical of work boats (e.g., tugs). Most current urea SCR systems communicate with engine controls to predict NOx emissions based on signals such as torque and engine speed, however many marine engines in use still employ mechanical injection technology and lack electronic communication abilities. The system developed and discussed in this paper controls NOx emissions independentof engine operating parameters and measures NOx and exhaust flow using the following exhaust sensor inputs: absolute pressure, differential pressure, temperature, and NOx concentration. These sensor inputs were integrated into an independent controller and open loop architecture to estimate the necessary amount of urea needed, and the controller uses pulse width modulation (PWM) to power an automotive fuel injector for airless urea delivery. The system was tested in a transient test cell on a 350 hp engine certified at 4 g/bhp-hr of NOx, with a goal of reducing the engine out NOx levels by 50%. NOx reduction capabilities of 41-67% were shown on the non road transient cycle (NRTC) and ICOMIA E5 steady state cycles with system optimization during testing to minimize the dilute ammonia slip to cycle averages of 5-7 ppm. The goal of 50% reduction of NOx can be achieved dependent upon cycle. Further

  7. Plasma-Chemical Hybrid NOx Reduction System for Commercial Cogeneration Boiler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuroki, Tomoyuki; Fujishima, Hidekatsu; Okubo, Masaaki

    Operation tests of the smoke-tube boiler emission NOx treatment plant which consists of a plasma ozonizer using a pressure swing adsorption (PSA) oxygen generator and silent discharge for indirect NO oxidation and a Na2SO3 chemical scrubber are carried out for cogeneration boilers which uses a city gas and heavy oil as a fuel based on our proposed plasma-chemical hybrid NOx reduction principle. It is clear that amount of NO removed is almost same as the amount of corresponding O3 concentration to oxidize NO regardless of fuels and flow rates of flue gas. After the relation between oxidation-reduction potential (ORP) and the NOx removal efficiency is obtained, continuous operation tests of this plant are performed. For gas firing boiler emission, the NO complete removal and the decrease in NOx from 32 ppm to 3 ppm are achieved for 300 min by keeping -30 mV of ORP. For the treatment of heavy oil boiler emission, the decrease in NOx from 90 ppm to less than 25 ppm is maintained for 250 min. It is demonstrated that the high NOx removal performance can be maintained for a long time by keeping the optimum value of ORP.

  8. Evaluation of microbial reduction of Fe(III)EDTA in a chemical absorption-biological reduction integrated NOx removal system

    SciTech Connect

    Wei Li; Cheng-Zhi Wu; Shi-Han Zhang; Ke Shao; Yao Shi

    2007-01-15

    A chemical absorption-biological reduction integrated process can be used to remove nitrogen oxides (NOx) from flue gas. In such a process, nitric oxide (NO) can be effectively absorbed by the ferrous chelate of ethylenediaminetetraacetate (Fe(II)EDTA) to form Fe(II)EDTA-NO, which can be biologically regenerated by denitrifying bacteria. However, in the course of these processes, part of the Fe(II)EDTA is also oxidized to Fe(III)EDTA. The reduction of Fe(III)EDTA to Fe(II)EDTA depends on the activity of iron-reducing bacteria in the system. Therefore, the effectiveness of the system relies on how to effectively bioreduce Fe(III)EDTA and Fe(II)EDTA-NO in the system. In this paper, a strain identified as Escherichia coli FR-2 (iron-reducing bacterium) was used to investigate the reduction rate of Fe(III)EDTA. The experimental results indicate that Fe(II)EDTA-NO and Fe(II)EDTA in the system can inhibit both the FR-2 cell growth and thus affect the Fe(III)EDTA reduction. The FR-2 cell growth rate and Fe(III)EDTA reduction rate decreased with increasing Fe(II)EDTA-NO and Fe(II)EDTA concentration in the solution. When the concentration of Fe(II)EDTA-NO reached 3.7 mM, the FR-2 cell growth almost stopped. A mathematical model was developed to explain the cell growth and inhibition kinetics. The predicted results are close to the experimental data and provide a preliminary evaluation of the kinetics of the biologically mediated reactions necessary to regenerate the spent scrubber solution. 33 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. Selective catalytic reduction system and process for treating NOx emissions using a palladium and rhodium or ruthenium catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Sobolevskiy, Anatoly; Rossin, Joseph A.; Knapke, Michael J.

    2011-07-12

    A process for the catalytic reduction of nitrogen oxides (NOx) in a gas stream (29) in the presence of H.sub.2 is provided. The process comprises contacting the gas stream with a catalyst system (38) comprising zirconia-silica washcoat particles (41), a pre-sulfated zirconia binder (44), and a catalyst combination (40) comprising palladium and at least one of rhodium, ruthenium, or a mixture of ruthenium and rhodium.

  10. Ammonia-Free NOx Control System

    SciTech Connect

    Song Wu; Zhen Fan; Andrew H. Seltzer; Richard G. Herman

    2005-03-31

    Research is being conducted under United States Department of Energy (DOE) Contract DE-FC26-03NT41865 to develop a new technology to achieve very low levels of NOx emissions from pulverized coal fired boiler systems by employing a novel system level integration between the PC combustion process and the catalytic NOx reduction with CO present in the combustion flue gas. The combustor design and operating conditions will be optimized to achieve atypical flue gas conditions. This approach will not only suppress NOx generation during combustion but also further reduce NOx over a downstream catalytic reactor that does not require addition of an external reductant, such as ammonia.

  11. Ammonia-Free NOx Control System

    SciTech Connect

    Song Wu; Zhen Fan; Andrew H. Seltzer

    2005-06-30

    Research is being conducted under United States Department of Energy (DOE) Contract DEFC26-03NT41865 to develop a new technology to achieve very low levels of NOx emissions from pulverized coal fired boiler systems by employing a novel system level integration between the PC combustion process and the catalytic NOx reduction with CO present in the combustion flue gas. The combustor design and operating conditions will be optimized to achieve atypical flue gas conditions. This approach will not only suppress NOx generation during combustion but also further reduce NOx over a downstream catalytic reactor that does not require addition of an external reductant, such as ammonia.

  12. Development of High Activity, Coal-Derived, Promoted Catalytic Systems for NOx Reduction at Low Temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    J. M. Calo

    1998-05-01

    This project is directed at an investigation of catalytic NO{sub x} reduction mechanisms on coal-derived, activated carbon supports at low temperatures. Promoted carbon systems offer some potentially significant advantages for heterogeneous NO{sub x} reduction. These include: low cost; high activity at low temperatures, which minimizes carbon loss; oxygen resistance; and a support material which can be engineered with respect to porosity, transport and catalyst dispersion characteristics.

  13. DEVELOPMENT OF HIGH ACTIVITY, COAL-DERIVED, PROMOTED CATALYTIC SYSTEMS FOR NOx REDUCTION AT LOW TEMPERATURES

    SciTech Connect

    Joseph M. Calo

    2000-07-19

    This project is directed at an investigation of catalytic NO{sub x} reduction mechanisms on coal-derived, activated carbon supports at low temperatures. Promoted carbon systems offer some potentially significant advantages for heterogeneous NO{sub x} reduction. These include: low cost; high activity at low temperatures, which minimizes carbon loss; oxygen resistance; and a support material which can be engineered with respect to porosity, transport and catalyst dispersion characteristics. During the reporting period, the following has been accomplished: (1) A packed bed reactor/gas flow system has been tested and applied to performing NO-carbon reactivity studies. This system employs a Kin-Tek gas calibration/mixing system for varying NO and CO concentrations in the feed gas to the packed bed, a NO{sub x} chemiluminescence analyzer (ThermoElectron, Model 10), and a quadrupole mass spectrometer (Ametek). This system is used for both steady-state reactivity studies, as well as mechanistic studies on the effects of NO and CO in the gas phase on intermediate oxygen surface complex populations on the carbon substrates. (2) Reactivity studies of the NO-carbon system have been performed as a function of temperature and NO concentration. It was found that apparent activation energy in the ''high temperature'' regime of 180 {+-} 10 kJ/mol agrees well with corresponding values reported in the literature. At the low NO concentrations used, it was observed that the reaction is not strictly first order in NO. In addition, the influence of mass transfer limitations were noted at high temperatures and low NO concentrations. Plans for the next reporting period include applications of the packed bed reactor system to perform temperature programmed desorption studies of the reaction of the NO-carbon reaction, and to reactivity studies of the NO/CO reaction system.

  14. DEVELOPMENT OF HIGH ACTIVITY, COAL DERIVED, PROMOTED CATALYTIC SYSTEMS FOR NOx REDUCTION AT LOW TEMPERATURES

    SciTech Connect

    Joseph M. Calo

    1998-12-31

    This project is directed at an investigation of catalytic NO{sub x} reduction mechanisms on coal-derived, activated carbon supports at low temperatures. Promoted carbon systems offer some potentially significant advantages for heterogeneous NO{sub x} reduction. These include: low cost; high activity at low temperatures, which minimizes carbon loss; oxygen resistance; and a support material which can be engineered with respect to porosity, transport and catalyst dispersion characteristics. During the reporting period, the following has been accomplished: (1) A MS-TGA (mass spectrometric-thermogravimetric analysis) apparatus, which is one of the primary instruments that will be used in these studies, has been refurbished and modified to meet the requirements of this project. A NO{sub x} chemiluminescence analyzer (ThermoElectron, Model 10) has been added to the instrument to monitor NO{sub x} concentrations in the feed and product streams. Computer control and data acquisition system has been updated and modified to accommodate the requirements of the specific types of experiments planned. The diffusion pumps used to maintain vacuum for the mass spectrometer system have been replaced with turbomolecular pumps (Varian 300 HT). (2) A packed bed reactor/gas flow system has been assembled for performing reactivity studies. This system employs a Kin-Tek gas calibration/mixing system for varying NO and CO concentrations in the feed gas to the packed bed, a NO{sub x} chemiluminescence analyzer (ThermoElectron, Model 10), and a quadrupole mass spectrometer (Dycor). This system is required for steady-state reactivity studies, as well as mechanistic studies on the effects of NO and CO in the gas phase on intermediate oxygen surface complex populations on the carbon substrates. (3) Work has continued on the application of contrast matching, small angle neutron scattering to the characterization and development of char porosity. Contrast matching with perdeuterated toluene has

  15. DEVELOPMENT OF HIGH ACTIVITY, COAL-DERIVED, PROMOTED CATALYTIC SYSTEMS FOR NOx REDUCTION AT LOW TEMPERATURES

    SciTech Connect

    Joseph M. Calo

    2000-07-21

    This project is directed at an investigation of catalytic NO{sub x} reduction mechanisms on coal-derived, activated carbon supports at low temperatures. Promoted carbon systems offer some potentially significant advantages for heterogeneous NO{sub x} reduction. These include: low cost; high activity at low temperatures, which minimizes carbon loss; oxygen resistance; and a support material which can be engineered with respect to porosity, transport and catalyst dispersion characteristics. During the reporting period, the following has been accomplished: (1) Steady-state reactivity studies in the packed bed reactor were extended to the NO/CO-carbon reaction system as a function of temperature and NO and CO concentrations. It was found that the NO reaction rate increased in the presence of CO, and the apparent activation energy decreased to about 75 {+-} 8 kJ/mol. In addition, the influence of mass transfer limitations were noted at low NO and CO concentrations. (2) The packed bed reactor/gas flow system has been applied to performing post-reaction temperature programmed desorption (TPD) studies of intermediate surface complexes following steady-state reaction. It was found that the amount of CO-evolving intermediate surface complexes exceeded that of the N{sub 2}-evolving surface complexes, and that both increased with reaction temperature. The TPD spectra indicates that both types of complexes desorb late, suggesting that they have high desorption activation energies. Plans for the next reporting period include extending the temperature programmed desorption studies in the packed bed reactor system to the NO/CO reaction system, including exposure to just CO, as well as NO/CO mixtures.

  16. A new process for NOx reduction in combustion systems for the generation of energy from waste.

    PubMed

    Gohlke, Oliver; Weber, Toralf; Seguin, Philippe; Laborel, Yann

    2010-07-01

    In the EU, emissions from energy from waste plants are largely reduced by applying the Waste Incineration Directive with its limit of 200 mg/m3(s) for NO(x) emissions. The need for further improvement is reflected by new German legislation effective as of 27 January 2009, requiring 100 mg/m3(s). Other countries are expected to follow this example due to the national emission ceilings of the Gothenburg protocol and the concluding EU directive 2001/81/EC. On the other hand, an increase in energy efficiency will be encouraged by the EU Waste Framework Directive. This is why there is a need for new technologies that make it possible to reconcile both requirements: reduced emissions and increased energy efficiency. A new process combining the internal recirculation of flue gas with ammonia or urea injection in order to achieve less then 80 mg/m3(s) of NO(x) is described. Important additional features of the process are an R1 efficiency above the required 0.65 of the EU Waste Framework Directive even with standard steam parameters of 40 bar/380 degrees C as well as low ammonia slip in the flue gas at the boiler outlet of below 10 mg/m3(s).

  17. DEVELOPMENT OF HIGH ACTIVITY, COAL-DERIVED, PROMOTED CATALYTIC SYSTEMS FOR NOx REDUCTION AT LOW TEMPERATURES

    SciTech Connect

    Joseph M. Calo

    2000-07-24

    This project is directed at an investigation of catalytic NO{sub x} reduction mechanisms on coal-derived, activated carbon supports at low temperatures. Promoted carbon systems offer some potentially significant advantages for heterogeneous NO{sub x} reduction. These include: low cost; high activity at low temperatures, which minimizes carbon loss; oxygen resistance; and a support material which can be engineered with respect to porosity, transport and catalyst dispersion characteristics. During the reporting period, TPD studies were conducted following steady-state reaction in NO/CO mixtures in helium. From these studies, the following points have been concluded: (1) The total amount of CO and N{sub 2} evolved following reaction in NO increases with reaction temperature. The TPD spectra are skewed to high temperatures, indicating more stable surface complexes with high desorption activation energies. (2) The total amount of CO evolved following exposure of the char sample to CO at reaction temperatures decreases with reaction temperature, similar to chemisorption behavior. The CO TPD spectra are shifted to lower temperatures, indicating more labile oxygen surface complexes with lower desorption activation energies. (3) The total amount of CO evolved following reaction in NO/CO mixtures decreases with reaction temperature, while the evolved N{sub 2} still increases with reaction temperature. The CO TPD spectra appear more similar to those obtained following exposure to pure CO, while the N{sub 2} TPD spectra are more similar to those obtained followed reaction in just CO. Based on the preceding observations, a simple mechanism was formulated whereby two different types of surface complexes are formed by NO and CO; the former are more stable, and the latter more labile. This produces two parallel routes for the NO-carbon reaction: (a) the C(O) complexes formed directly by NO desorb as CO; and (b) The C(CO) complexes formed by CO, react with NO to produce CO{sub 2

  18. Ammonia-Free NOx Control System

    SciTech Connect

    Song Wu; Zhen Fan; Richard G. Herman

    2004-12-31

    Research is being conducted under United States Department of Energy (DOE) Contract DEFC26-03NT41865 to develop a new technology to achieve very low levels of NOx emissions from pulverized coal fired boiler systems by employing a novel system level integration between the PC combustion process and the catalytic NOx reduction with CO present in the combustion flue gas. The combustor design and operating conditions will be optimized to achieve atypical flue gas conditions. This approach will not only suppress NOx generation during combustion but also further reduce NOx over a downstream catalytic reactor that does not require addition of an external reductant, such as ammonia. This report describes the work performed during the October 1 to December 30, 2004 time period.

  19. Ammonia-Free NOx Control System

    SciTech Connect

    Song Wu; Zhen Fan; Andrew H. Seltzer; Richard G. Herman

    2004-09-30

    Research is being conducted under United States Department of Energy (DOE) Contract DEFC26-03NT41865 to develop a new technology to achieve very low levels of NOx emissions from pulverized coal fired boiler systems by employing a novel system level integration between the PC combustion process and the catalytic NOx reduction with CO present in the combustion flue gas. The combustor design and operating conditions will be optimized to achieve atypical flue gas conditions. This approach will not only suppress NOx generation during combustion but also further reduce NOx over a downstream catalytic reactor that does not require addition of an external reductant, such as ammonia. This report describes the work performed during the July 1 to September 30, 2004 time period.

  20. Ammonia-Free NOx Control System

    SciTech Connect

    Zhen Fan; Song Wu; Richard G. Herman

    2004-06-30

    Research is being conducted under United States Department of Energy (DOE) Contract DEFC26-03NT41865 to develop a new technology to achieve very low levels of NOx emissions from pulverized coal fired boiler systems by employing a novel system level integration between the PC combustion process and the catalytic NOx reduction with CO present in the combustion flue gas. The combustor design and operating conditions will be optimized to achieve atypical flue gas conditions. This approach will not only suppress NOx generation during combustion but also further reduce NOx over a downstream catalytic reactor that does not require addition of an external reductant, such as ammonia. This report describes the work performed during the April 1 to June 30, 2004 time period.

  1. Ammonia-Free NOx Control System

    SciTech Connect

    S. Wu; Z. Fan; R. Herman

    2004-03-31

    Research is being conducted under United States Department of Energy (DOE) Contract DEFC26-03NT41865 to develop a new technology to achieve very low levels of NOx emissions from pulverized coal fired boiler systems by employing a novel system level integration between the PC combustion process and the catalytic NOx reduction with CO present in the combustion flue gas. The combustor design and operating conditions will be optimized to achieve atypical flue gas conditions. This approach will not only suppress NOx generation during combustion but also further reduce NOx over a downstream catalytic reactor that does not require addition of an external reductant, such as ammonia. This report describes the work performed during the January 1 to March 31, 2004 time period.

  2. INDUSTRIAL BOILER RETROFIT FOR NOX CONTROL: COMBINED SELECTIVE NONCATALYTIC REDUCTION AND SELECTIVE CATALYTIC REDUCTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper describes retrofitting and testing a 590 kW (2 MBtu/hr), oil-fired, three-pass, fire-tube package boiler with a combined selective noncatalytic reduction (SNCR) and selective catalytic reduction (SCR) system. The system demonstrated 85% nitrogen oxides (NOx) reduction w...

  3. NOx reduction methods and apparatuses

    DOEpatents

    Tonkyn, Russell G.; Barlow, Stephan E.; Balmer, M. Lou; Maupin, Gary D.

    2004-10-26

    A NO.sub.x reduction method includes treating a first gas containing NO.sub.x, producing a second gas containing NO.sub.2, reducing a portion of the NO.sub.2 in the second gas to N.sub.2, and producing a third gas containing less NO.sub.x than the first gas, substantially all of the third gas NO.sub.x being NO. The method also includes treating the third gas, producing a fourth gas containing NO.sub.2, reducing a portion of the NO.sub.2 in the fourth gas to N.sub.2, and producing a fifth gas containing less NO.sub.x than the third gas, substantially all of the fifth gas NO.sub.x being NO. Treating the first and/or third gas can include treatment with a plasma. Reducing a portion of the NO.sub.2 in the second and/or fourth gas can include reducing with a catalyst. The method can further include controlling energy consumption of the plasmas independent of each other.

  4. Commercial introduction of the Advanced NOxTECH system

    SciTech Connect

    Sudduth, B.C.

    1997-12-31

    NOxTECH is BACT for diesel electric generators. Emissions of NO{sub x} are reduced 95% or more with substantial concurrent reductions in CO, particulates, and ROG`s. No engine modifications or other exhaust aftertreatments can remove all criteria pollutants as effectively as NOxTECH. The NOxTECH system reliably maintains NH{sub 3} slip below 2 ppm. Unlike other emissions controls, NOxTECH does not generate hazardous by-products. The Advanced NOxTECH system reduces the size, weight, and cost for BACT emissions reductions. Based on the operation of a 150 kW prototype, NOxTECH, Inc. is quoting commercial units for diesel electric generators. Advanced NOxTECH equipment costs about half as much as SCR systems, and NO{sub x} reduction can exceed 95% with guarantees for emissions compliance.

  5. DYNAMOMETER EVALUATION OF PLASMA-CATALYST FOR DIESEL NOX REDUCTION

    SciTech Connect

    Hoard, J; Schmieg, S; Brooks, D; Peden, C; Barlow, S; Tonkyn, R

    2003-08-24

    A three-stage plasma-catalyst system was developed and tested on an engine dynamometer. Previous laboratory testing suggested high NOx efficiency could be obtained. With hexene reductant added to the exhaust, over 90% NOx reduction was observed. However, with diesel or Fischer-Tropsch reductant the catalyst efficiency rapidly dropped off. Heating the catalyst in air removed brown deposit from the surface and restored conversion efficiency. Following the engine tests, the used catalysts were evaluated. BET surface area decreased, and TPD revealed significant storage. This storage appears to be partly unburned diesel fuel that can be removed by heating to around 250-300 C, and partly hydrocarbons bonded to the surface that remain in place until 450-500 C. Laboratory testing with propene reductant demonstrated that the catalyst regains efficiency slowly even when operating temperature does not exceed 300 C. This suggests that control strategies may be able to regenerate the catalyst by occasional moderate heating.

  6. Engine NOx reduction system

    SciTech Connect

    Berriman, L.P.; Zabsky, J.M.; Davis, J.W.; Hylton, W.H.

    1993-07-06

    Apparatus for use with an engine having a power-generating portion that burns a hydrocarbon fuel and air and produces hot exhaust gases is described, having a catalytic converter device that includes a catalyst for enhancing reactions of components of said exhaust gases, and having a conduit that couples said power-generating portion to said catalytic converter device, for reducing pollution in the exhaust, wherein said power-generating portion comprises a plurality of cylinders in which said fuel and air are burned, a mechanism for applying fuel and air to said cylinders, and a plurality of exhaust valves through which burned fuel and air is exhausted and which are connected to said upstream end of said conduit, said conduit including a manifold which is connected to a plurality of said exhaust valves and a downstream conduit portion which connects said manifold to said catalytic converter device, comprising: a device coupled to said conduit, which stores ammonia and injects it into said conduit at a location where the exhaust gases have a substantially maximum temperature, but which is devoid of open flames, to mix with said hot exhaust gases and pass with them along said conduit and then through said catalyst, said location being closer to said power-generating portion than to said catalytic converter and lying in said manifold.

  7. Continuous reduction of cyclic adsorbed and desorbed NO(x) in diesel emission using nonthermal plasma.

    PubMed

    Kuwahara, Takuya; Nakaguchi, Harunobu; Kuroki, Tomoyuki; Okubo, Masaaki

    2016-05-01

    Considering the recent stringent regulations governing diesel NO(x) emission, an aftertreatment system for the reduction of NO(x) in the exhaust gas has been proposed and studied. The proposed system is a hybrid method combining nonthermal plasma and NOx adsorbent. The system does not require precious metal catalysts or harmful chemicals such as urea and ammonia. In the present system, NO(x) in diesel emission is treated by adsorption and desorption by adsorbent as well as nonthermal plasma reduction. In addition, the remaining NO(x) in the adsorbent is desorbed again in the supplied air by residual heat. The desorbed NO(x) in air recirculates into the intake of the engine, and this process, i.e., exhaust gas components' recirculation (EGCR) achieves NO(x) reduction. Alternate utilization of two adsorption chambers in the system can achieve high-efficiency NO(x) removal continuously. An experiment with a stationary diesel engine for electric power generation demonstrates an energy efficiency of 154 g(NO2)/kWh for NO(x) removal and continuous NO(x) reduction of 70.3%. Considering the regulation against diesel emission in Japan, i.e., the new regulation to be imposed on vehicles of 3.5-7.5 ton since 2016, the present aftertreatment system fulfills the requirement with only 1.0% of engine power.

  8. Continuous reduction of cyclic adsorbed and desorbed NO(x) in diesel emission using nonthermal plasma.

    PubMed

    Kuwahara, Takuya; Nakaguchi, Harunobu; Kuroki, Tomoyuki; Okubo, Masaaki

    2016-05-01

    Considering the recent stringent regulations governing diesel NO(x) emission, an aftertreatment system for the reduction of NO(x) in the exhaust gas has been proposed and studied. The proposed system is a hybrid method combining nonthermal plasma and NOx adsorbent. The system does not require precious metal catalysts or harmful chemicals such as urea and ammonia. In the present system, NO(x) in diesel emission is treated by adsorption and desorption by adsorbent as well as nonthermal plasma reduction. In addition, the remaining NO(x) in the adsorbent is desorbed again in the supplied air by residual heat. The desorbed NO(x) in air recirculates into the intake of the engine, and this process, i.e., exhaust gas components' recirculation (EGCR) achieves NO(x) reduction. Alternate utilization of two adsorption chambers in the system can achieve high-efficiency NO(x) removal continuously. An experiment with a stationary diesel engine for electric power generation demonstrates an energy efficiency of 154 g(NO2)/kWh for NO(x) removal and continuous NO(x) reduction of 70.3%. Considering the regulation against diesel emission in Japan, i.e., the new regulation to be imposed on vehicles of 3.5-7.5 ton since 2016, the present aftertreatment system fulfills the requirement with only 1.0% of engine power. PMID:26844402

  9. Structure, Stability and Emissions of Lean Direct Injection Combustion, including a Novel Multi-Point LDI System for NOx Reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villalva Gomez, Rodrigo

    Experimental research on Lean Direct Injection (LDI) combustors for gas turbine applications is presented. LDI combustion is an alternative to lean premixed combustion which has the potential of equivalent reduction of oxides of nitrogen (NOx) emissions and of peak combustor exit temperatures, but without some drawbacks of premixed combustors, such as flashback and autoignition. Simultaneous observations of the velocity field and reaction zone of an LDI swirl-stabilized combustor with a mixing tube at atmospheric conditions, with the goal of studying the flame stabilization mechanism, are shown. The flame was consistently anchored at the shear layer formed by the high-speed reactants exiting the mixing tube and the low speed recirculation region. Individual image analysis of the location of the tip of the recirculation zone and tip of the reaction region confirmed previously observed trends, but showed that calculation of the distance between these two points for corresponding image pairs yields results no different than when calculated from random image pairs. This most likely indicates a lag in the anchoring of the flame to changes in the recirculation zone, coupled with significant stochastic variation. An alternate LDI approach, multi-point LDI (MLDI), is also tested experimentally. A single large fuel nozzle is replaced by multiple small fuel nozzles to improve atomization and reduce the total volume of the high-temperature, low velocity recirculation zones, reducing NOx formation. The combustor researched employs a novel staged approach to allow good performance across a wide range of conditions by using a combination of nozzle types optimized to various power settings. The combustor has three independent fuel circuits referenced as pilot, intermediate, and outer. Emissions measurements, OH* chemiluminescence imaging, and thermoacoustic instability studies were run in a pressurized combustion facility at pressures from 2.0 to 5.3 bar. Combustor performance

  10. Development of Optimal Catalyst Designs and Operating Strategies for Lean NOx Reduction in Coupled LNT-SCR Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Harold, Michael; Crocker, Mark; Balakotaiah, Vemuri; Luss, Dan; Choi, Jae-Soon; Dearth, Mark; McCabe, Bob; Theis, Joe

    2013-09-30

    Oxides of nitrogen in the form of nitric oxide (NO) and nitrogen dioxide (NO{sub 2}) commonly referred to as NO{sub x}, is one of the two chemical precursors that lead to ground-level ozone, a ubiquitous air pollutant in urban areas. A major source of NO{sub x} is generated by equipment and vehicles powered by diesel engines, which have a combustion exhaust that contains NO{sub x} in the presence of excess O{sub 2}. Catalytic abatement measures that are effective for gasoline-fueled engines such as the precious metal containing three-way catalytic converter (TWC) cannot be used to treat O2-laden exhaust containing NO{sub x}. Two catalytic technologies that have emerged as effective for NO{sub x} abatement are NO{sub x} storage and reduction (NSR) and selective catalytic reduction (SCR). NSR is similar to TWC but requires much larger quantities of expensive precious metals and sophisticated periodic switching operation, while SCR requires an on-board source of ammonia which serves as the chemical reductant of the NO{sub x}. The fact that NSR produces ammonia as a byproduct while SCR requires ammonia to work has led to interest in combining the two together to avoid the need for the cumbersome ammonia generation system. In this project a comprehensive study was carried out of the fundamental aspects and application feasibility of combined NSR/SCR. The project team, which included university, industry, and national lab researchers, investigated the kinetics and mechanistic features of the underlying chemistry in the lean NOx trap (LNT) wherein NSR was carried out, with particular focus on identifying the operating conditions such as temperature and catalytic properties which lead to the production of ammonia in the LNT. The performance features of SCR on both model and commercial catalysts focused on the synergy between the LNT and SCR converters in terms of utilizing the upstream-generated ammonia and alternative reductants such as propylene, representing the

  11. NOX REDUCTION FOR LEAN EXHAUST USING PLASMA ASSISTED CATALYSIS

    SciTech Connect

    Bhatt, B.

    2000-08-20

    Currently CARB estimates on road diesel vehicles contribute 50% of the NOX and 78% of the particulates being discharged from mobile sources. Diesel emissions obviously must be reduced if future air quality targets are to be met. A critical technological barrier exists because there are no commercial technologies available, which can reduce NOX from diesel (lean), exhaust containing 5-15% O2 concentration. One promising approach to reducing NOX and particulates from diesel exhaust is to use a combination of plasma with catalyst. Plasma can be generated thermally or non-thermally. Thermal plasma is formed by heating the system to an exceedingly high temperature (>2000 C). High temperature requirements for plasma makes thermal plasma inefficient and requires skillful thermal management and hence is considered impractical for mobile applications. Non-thermal plasma directs electrical energy into the creation of free electrons, which in turn react with gaseous species thus creating plasma. A combination of non-thermal plasma with catalysts can be referred to Plasma Assisted Catalysts or PAC. PAC technology has been demonstrated in stationary sources where non-thermal plasma catalysis is carried out in presence of NH3 as a reductant. In stationary applications NO is oxidized to HNO3 and then into ammonium nitrate where it is condensed and removed. This approach is impractical for mobile application because of the ammonia requirement and the ultimate mechanism by which NOX is removed. However, if a suitable catalyst can be found which can use onboard fuel as reductant then the technology holds a considerable promise. NOX REDUCTION FOR LEAN EXHAUST USING PLASMA ASSISTED CATALYSIS Ralph Slone, B. Bhatt and Victor Puchkarev NOXTECH INC. In addition to the development of an effective catalyst, a non-thermal plasma reactor needs be scaled and demonstrated along with a reliable and cost effective plasma power source and onboard HC source needs to be proven. Under the work

  12. Enhanced High Temperature Performance of NOx Reduction Catalyst Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Feng; Kim, Do Heui; Luo, Jinyong; Muntean, George G.; Peden, Charles HF; Howden, Ken; Currier, Neal; Kamasamudram, Krishna; Kumar, Ashok; Li, Junhui; Stafford, Randy; Yezerets, Aleksey; Castagnola, Mario; Chen, Hai Ying; Hess, Howard ..

    2012-12-31

    Two primary NOx after-treatment technologies have been recognized as the most promising approaches for meeting stringent NOx emission standards for diesel vehicles within the Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA’s) 2007/2010 mandated limits, NOx Storage Reduction (NSR) and NH3 selective catalytic reduction (SCR); both are, in fact being commercialized for this application. However, in looking forward to 2015 and beyond with expected more stringent regulations, the continued viability of the NSR technology for controlling NOx emissions from lean-burn engines such as diesels will require at least two specific, significant and inter-related improvements. First, it is important to reduce system costs by, for example, minimizing the precious metal content while maintaining, even improving, performance and long-term stability. A second critical need for future NSR systems, as well as for NH3 SCR, will be significantly improved higher and lower temperature performance and stability. Furthermore, these critically needed improvements will contribute significantly to minimizing the impacts to fuel economy of incorporating these after-treatment technologies on lean-burn vehicles. To meet these objectives will require, at a minimum an improved scientific understanding of the following things: i) the various roles for the precious and coinage metals used in these catalysts; ii) the mechanisms for these various roles; iii) the effects of high temperatures on the active metal performance in their various roles; iv) mechanisms for higher temperature NOx storage performance for modified and/or alternative storage materials; v) the interactions between the precious metals and the storage materials in both optimum NOx storage performance and long term stability; vi) the sulfur adsorption and regeneration mechanisms for NOx reduction materials; vii) materials degradation mechanisms in CHA-based NH3 SCR catalysts. The objective of this CRADA project between PNNL and Cummins, Inc

  13. Effect of reductive treatments on Pt behavior and NOx storage in lean NOx trap catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xianqin; Kim, Do Heui; Kwak, Ja Hun; Wang, Chong M.; Szanyi, Janos; Peden, Charles HF

    2011-10-01

    Lean NOx trap (LNT) catalysts represent a promising approach to meet increasingly stringent NOx emission regulations on diesel and other lean-burn engines. Pt material properties, including dispersion and particle size, are known to be important factors in determining NOx uptake performance, since Pt provides active sites for NO oxidation to NO2 necessary for storing NOx as nitrates, and for the reduction of nitrates to N2. In this work, the physicochemical properties of Pt in Pt-BaO/Al2O3 LNT catalysts, such as the Pt accessible surface area and particle size, were investigated by using various tools, such as irreversible volumetric H2 chemisorption, high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), and X-ray diffraction (XRD), following successive reductive treatments at elevated temperatures. NOx uptake activities were also measured to establish a relationship between the properties of Pt and NOx storage following identical high-temperature reductive treatments. We find that the reductive treatments of Pt-BaO/Al2O3 lean NOx trap catalysts at temperatures up to 500 ºC promote a significant increase in NOx uptake explained, in part, by an induced close interaction between Pt and BaO phases in the catalyst, thus enabling facilitation of the NOx storage process.

  14. Influence of Ceria on the NOx Storage/Reduction Behavior of Lean NOx Trap Catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Ji, Yaying; Choi, Jae-Soon; Toops, Todd J; Crocker, Dr. Mark; Naseri, Mojghan

    2008-01-01

    The effect of La2O3-stabilized ceria incorporation on the functioning of fully formulated lean NOx trap catalysts was investigated. Monolithic catalysts were prepared, corresponding to loadings of 0, 50 and 100 g CeO2/L, together with a catalyst containing 100 g/L of ceria-zirconia (Ce0.7Zr0.3O2). Loadings of the other main components (Pt, Rh and BaO) were held constant. Catalyst evaluation was performed on a bench flow reactor under simulated diesel exhaust conditions, employing NOx storage/reduction cycles. NOx storage efficiency in the temperature range 150-350 C was observed to increase with ceria loading, resulting in higher NOx conversion levels. At 150 C, high rich phase NOx slip was observed for all of the catalysts, resulting from an imbalance in the rates of nitrate decomposition and NOx reduction. Optimal NOx conversion was obtained in the range 250-350 C for all the catalysts, while at 450 C high rich phase NOx slip from the most highly loaded ceria-containing catalyst resulted in lower NOx conversion than for the ceria-free formulation. N2O was the major NOx reduction product at 150 C over all of the catalysts, although low NOx conversion levels limited the N2O yield. At higher temperatures N2 was the main product of NOx reduction, although NH3 formation was also observed. Selectivity to NH3 decreased with increasing ceria loading, indicating that NH3 is consumed by reaction with stored oxygen in the rear of the catalyst.

  15. SELECTIVE CATALYTIC REDUCTION OF DIESEL ENGINE NOX EMISSIONS USING ETHANOL AS A REDUCTANT

    SciTech Connect

    Kass, M; Thomas, J; Lewis, S; Storey, J; Domingo, N; Graves, R Panov, A

    2003-08-24

    NOx emissions from a heavy-duty diesel engine were reduced by more than 90% and 80% utilizing a full-scale ethanol-SCR system for space velocities of 21000/h and 57000/h respectively. These results were achieved for catalyst temperatures between 360 and 400 C and for C1:NOx ratios of 4-6. The SCR process appears to rapidly convert ethanol to acetaldehyde, which subsequently slipped past the catalyst at appreciable levels at a space velocity of 57000/h. Ammonia and N2O were produced during conversion; the concentrations of each were higher for the low space velocity condition. However, the concentration of N2O did not exceed 10 ppm. In contrast to other catalyst technologies, NOx reduction appeared to be enhanced by initial catalyst aging, with the presumed mechanism being sulfate accumulation within the catalyst. A concept for utilizing ethanol (distilled from an E-diesel fuel) as the SCR reductant was demonstrated.

  16. NOx reduction by electron beam-produced nitrogen atom injection

    DOEpatents

    Penetrante, Bernardino M.

    2002-01-01

    Deactivated atomic nitrogen generated by an electron beam from a gas stream containing more than 99% N.sub.2 is injected at low temperatures into an engine exhaust to reduce NOx emissions. High NOx reduction efficiency is achieved with compact electron beam devices without use of a catalyst.

  17. Maximize the benefit of SNCR: Combine SNCR with combustion optimization and achieve 50% NOx reduction from a low NOx burner baseline

    SciTech Connect

    Trego, P.; Schindler, E.

    2000-07-01

    PECO Energy Company operates one coal fired boiler at its Cromby Generating Facility. Cromby Unit 1 is a B and W front fired unit rated at 160 MW. The units boiler has been retrofitted with low NOx burners and overfire air ports. Due to NOx allowance pricing, PECO began evaluating options for reducing Cromby's NOx emissions. SNCR was evaluated at the best option for the plant even though the furnace exit temperatures and CO were high at practical injection locations. RJM Corporation, a Fuel Tech NOxOUT{trademark} Implementer, was selected to supply the system because of their extensive experience in solving combustion problems and applying NOxOUT SNCR systems on utility boilers. In order to reduce emissions during the 1999 NOx season, the deadline for an operational system was set at June 2nd. The project was issued on a fast track schedule starting February 2, 1999. The boiler was started up on June 2 on schedule after a six week maintenance outage. The project's 25% NOx reduction target was achieved after two weeks of combustion optimization. Combustion optimization was followed by NOxOUT A reagent injection system optimization which resulted in a 50% combined NOx reduction. Other benefits included a reduction in CO to less than 100 ppm and a 33% reduction in LOI.

  18. Lean Gasoline Engine Reductant Chemistry During Lean NOx Trap Regeneration

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Jae-Soon; Prikhodko, Vitaly Y; Partridge Jr, William P; Parks, II, James E; Norman, Kevin M; Huff, Shean P; Chambon, Paul H; Thomas, John F

    2010-01-01

    Lean NOx Trap (LNT) catalysts can effectively reduce NOx from lean engine exhaust. Significant research for LNTs in diesel engine applications has been performed and has led to commercialization of the technology. For lean gasoline engine applications, advanced direct injection engines have led to a renewed interest in the potential for lean gasoline vehicles and, thereby, a renewed demand for lean NOx control. To understand the gasoline-based reductant chemistry during regeneration, a BMW lean gasoline vehicle has been studied on a chassis dynamometer. Exhaust samples were collected and analyzed for key reductant species such as H2, CO, NH3, and hydrocarbons during transient drive cycles. The relation of the reductant species to LNT performance will be discussed. Furthermore, the challenges of NOx storage in the lean gasoline application are reviewed.

  19. Characteristics of NOx Removal Combining Dielectric Barrier Discharge Plasma with Selective Catalytic Reduction by C3H6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xing-Quan; Li, Yi; Chen, Wei; Lv, Guo-Hua; Huang, Jun; Zhu, Guo-Xian; Wang, Xiao-Qian; Zhang, Xian-Hui; Wang, Da-Cheng; Feng, Ke-Cheng; Yang, Si-Ze

    2010-08-01

    Characteristics of NOx removal combining dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma with selective catalytic reduction (SCR) by C3H6 were investigated under the conditions of high NOx concentration and high space velocity at various temperatures. Experiment results show that there were no obvious removal of NOx and NO in the only C3H6-SCR system and only DBD system individually. But the high NOx removal rate was achieved in C3H6-SCR cooperating with DBD plasma system. Especially NOx removal rate can reach up to 88.5% at 150 °C simulating diesel engine exhaust temperature. It can be seen that when discharge comes into being, the catalystic activity was enhanced with discharge strengthened, so that the NOx was almost completely removed. In the course of NOx removal, DBD played an important role in oxidizing NO to NO2 and activating C3H6 and catalysts to reduce NOx.

  20. NOx Emission Reduction by Oscillating Combustion

    SciTech Connect

    2005-09-01

    This project focuses on a new technology that reduces NOx emissions while increasing furnace efficiency for both air- and oxygen-fired furnaces. Oscillating combustion is a retrofit technology that involves the forced oscillation of the fuel flow rate to a furnace. These oscillations create successive, fuel-rich and fuel-lean zones within the furnace.

  1. AMMONIA-FREE NOx CONTROL SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Song Wu; Zhen Fan; Andrew H. Seltzer; Richard G. Herman

    2006-06-01

    This report describes a novel NOx control system that has the potential to drastically reduce cost, and enhance performance, operation and safety of power plant NOx control. The new system optimizes the burner and the furnace to achieve very low NOx levels and to provide an adequate amount of CO, and uses the CO for reducing NO both in-furnace and over a downstream AFSCR (ammonia-free selective catalytic reduction) reactor. The AF-SCR combines the advantages of the highly successful SCR technology for power plants and the TWC (three-way catalytic converter) widely used on automobiles. Like the SCR, it works in oxidizing environment of combustion flue gas and uses only base metal catalysts. Like the TWC, the AF-SCR removes NO and excess CO simultaneously without using any external reagent, such as ammonia. This new process has been studied in a development program jointed funded by the US Department of Energy and Foster Wheeler. The report outlines the experimental catalyst work performed on a bench-scale reactor, including test procedure, operating conditions, and results of various catalyst formulations. Several candidate catalysts, prepared with readily available transition metal oxides and common substrate materials, have shown over 80-90% removal for both NO and CO in oxidizing gas mixtures and at elevated temperatures. A detailed combustion study of a 400 MWe coal-fired boiler, applying computational fluid dynamics techniques to model boiler and burner design, has been carried out to investigate ways to optimize the combustion process for the lowest NOx formation and optimum CO/NO ratios. Results of this boiler and burner optimization work are reported. The paper further discusses catalyst scale-up considerations and the conceptual design of a 400 MWe size AF-SCR reactor, as well as economics analysis indicating large cost savings of the ammonia-free NOx control process over the current SCR technology.

  2. NOX REMOVAL WITH COMBINED SELECTIVE CATALYTIC REDUCTION AND SELECTIVE NONCATALYTIC REDUCTION: PILOT- SCALE TEST RESULTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pilot-scale tests were conducted to develop a combined nitrogen oxide (NOx) reduction technology using both selective catalytic reduction (SCR) and selective noncatalytic reduction (SNCR). A commercially available vanadium-and titatnium-based composite honeycomb catalyst and enh...

  3. Combining nonthermal plasma with perovskite-like catalyst for NOx storage and reduction.

    PubMed

    Peng, Han Hsuan; Pan, Kuan Lun; Yu, Sheng Jen; Yan, Shaw Yi; Chang, Moo Been

    2016-10-01

    A new NOx storage and reduction (NSR) system is developed for NOx removal by combining perovskite-like catalyst with nonthermal plasma technology. In this hybrid system, catalyst is mainly used for oxidizing NO to NO2 and storing them, while nonthermal plasma is applied as a desorption-reduction step for converting NOx into N2. An innovative catalyst with a high NOx storage capacity and good reduction performance is developed by successive impregnation. The catalysts prepared with various metal oxides were investigated for NOx storage capacity (NSC) and NOx conversion. Characterization of the catalysts prepared reveals that addition of cobalt (Co) and potassium (K) considerably increases the performance for NSC. Results also show that SrKMn0.8Co0.2O4 supported on BaO/Al2O3 has good NSC (209 μmol/gcatalyst) for the gas stream containing 500 ppm NO and 5 % O2 with N2 as carrier gas. For plasma reduction process, NOx conversion achieved with SrKMn0.8Co0.2O4/BaO/Al2O3 reaches 81 % with the applied voltage of 12 kV and frequency of 6 kHz in the absence of reducing agents. The results indicate that performance of plasma reduction process (81 %) is better than that of thermal reduction (64 %). Additionally, mixed gases including 1 % CO, 1 % H2 and 1 % CH4, and 2 % H2O(g) are simultaneously introduced into the system to investigate the effect on NSR with plasma system and results indicate that performance of NSR with plasma can be enhanced. Overall, the hybrid system is promising to be applied for removing NOx from gas streams. Graphical abstract ᅟ. PMID:27392625

  4. Combining nonthermal plasma with perovskite-like catalyst for NOx storage and reduction.

    PubMed

    Peng, Han Hsuan; Pan, Kuan Lun; Yu, Sheng Jen; Yan, Shaw Yi; Chang, Moo Been

    2016-10-01

    A new NOx storage and reduction (NSR) system is developed for NOx removal by combining perovskite-like catalyst with nonthermal plasma technology. In this hybrid system, catalyst is mainly used for oxidizing NO to NO2 and storing them, while nonthermal plasma is applied as a desorption-reduction step for converting NOx into N2. An innovative catalyst with a high NOx storage capacity and good reduction performance is developed by successive impregnation. The catalysts prepared with various metal oxides were investigated for NOx storage capacity (NSC) and NOx conversion. Characterization of the catalysts prepared reveals that addition of cobalt (Co) and potassium (K) considerably increases the performance for NSC. Results also show that SrKMn0.8Co0.2O4 supported on BaO/Al2O3 has good NSC (209 μmol/gcatalyst) for the gas stream containing 500 ppm NO and 5 % O2 with N2 as carrier gas. For plasma reduction process, NOx conversion achieved with SrKMn0.8Co0.2O4/BaO/Al2O3 reaches 81 % with the applied voltage of 12 kV and frequency of 6 kHz in the absence of reducing agents. The results indicate that performance of plasma reduction process (81 %) is better than that of thermal reduction (64 %). Additionally, mixed gases including 1 % CO, 1 % H2 and 1 % CH4, and 2 % H2O(g) are simultaneously introduced into the system to investigate the effect on NSR with plasma system and results indicate that performance of NSR with plasma can be enhanced. Overall, the hybrid system is promising to be applied for removing NOx from gas streams. Graphical abstract ᅟ.

  5. Nox Emission Reduction in Commercial Jets Through Water Injection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balepin, Vladimir; Ossello, Chris; Snyder, Chris

    2002-01-01

    This paper discusses a method of the nitrogen oxides (NOx) emission reduction through the injection of water in commercial turbofan engines during the takeoff and climbout cycles. In addition to emission reduction, this method can significantly reduce turbine temperature during the most demanding operational modes (takeoff and climbout) and increase engine reliability and life.

  6. Integrated diesel engine NOx reduction technology development

    SciTech Connect

    Hoelzer, J.; Zhu, J.; Savonen, C.L.; Kharas, K.C.C.; Bailey, O.H.; Miller, M.; Vuichard, J.

    1997-12-31

    The effectiveness of catalyst performance is a function of the inlet exhaust gas temperature, gas flow rate, concentration of NO{sub x} and oxygen, and reductant quantity and species. Given this interrelationship, it becomes immediately clear that an integrated development approach is necessary. Such an approach is taken in this project. As such, the system development path is directed by an engine-catalyst engineering team. Of the tools at the engine engineer`s disposal the real-time aspects of computer assisted subsystem modeling is valuable. It will continue to be the case as ever more subtle improvements are needed to meet competitive performance, durability, and emission challenges. A review of recent prototype engines has shown that considerable improvements to base diesel engine technology are being made. For example, HSDI NO{sub x} has been reduced by a factor of two within the past ten years. However, additional substantial NO{sub x}/PM reduction is still required for the future. A viable lean NO{sub x} catalyst would be an attractive solution to this end. The results of recent high and low temperature catalyst developments were presented. High temperature base metal catalysts have been formulated to produce very good conversion efficiency and good thermal stability, albeit at temperatures near the upper range of diesel engine operation. Low temperature noble metal catalysts have been developed to provide performance of promising 4-way control but need increased NO{sub x} reduction efficiency.

  7. Discovery of New NOx Reduction Catalysts for CIDI Engines Using Combinatorial Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Blint, Richard J

    2005-08-15

    This project for the discovery of new lean reduction NOx catalysts was initiated on August 16th, 2002 and is now into its fourth year. Several materials have already been identified as NOx reduction catalysts for possible future application. NOx reduction catalysts are a critical need in the North American vehicle market since these catalysts are needed to enable both diesels and lean gasoline engines to meet the 2007-2010 emission standards. Hydrocarbon selective catalytic reduction (SCR) is a preferred technology since it requires no infrastructure changes (as may be expected for urea SCR) and most likely has the simplest engine control strategy of the three proposed NOx reduction approaches. The use of fast throughput techniques and informatics greatly enhances the possibility of discovering new NOx reduction catalysts. Using fast throughput techniques this project has already screened over 3000 new materials and evaluates hundreds of new materials a month. Evaluating such a high number of new materials puts this approach into a very different paradigm than previous discovery approaches for new NOx reduction catalysts. With so much data on materials it is necessary to use statistical techniques to identify the potential catalysts and these statistical techniques are needed to optimize compositions of the multi-component materials that are identified under the program as possible new lean NOx catalysts. Several new materials have conversions in excess of 80% at temperatures above 300 C. That is more than twice the activity of previous HC SCR materials. These materials are candidates for emission control on heavy-duty systems (i.e.; over 8500 pounds gross weight). Tests of one of the downselected materials on an engine dynamometer show NOx reductions greater than 80% under some conditions even though the net NOx reductions on the HWFET and the US06 cycles were relatively low. The program is scheduled to continue until the end of the 2006 calendar year. Work in the

  8. 40 CFR 97.50 - NOX Allowance Tracking System accounts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false NOX Allowance Tracking System accounts... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS NOX Allowance Tracking System § 97.50 NOX Allowance Tracking System accounts. (a) Nature and function of...

  9. 40 CFR 96.50 - NOX Allowance Tracking System accounts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false NOX Allowance Tracking System accounts... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO 2 TRADING PROGRAMS FOR STATE IMPLEMENTATION PLANS NOX Allowance Tracking System § 96.50 NOX Allowance Tracking System accounts. (a) Nature...

  10. 40 CFR 96.50 - NOX Allowance Tracking System accounts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false NOX Allowance Tracking System accounts... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS FOR STATE IMPLEMENTATION PLANS NOX Allowance Tracking System § 96.50 NOX Allowance Tracking System accounts. (a) Nature...

  11. 40 CFR 96.50 - NOX Allowance Tracking System accounts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false NOX Allowance Tracking System accounts... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS FOR STATE IMPLEMENTATION PLANS NOX Allowance Tracking System § 96.50 NOX Allowance Tracking System accounts. (a) Nature...

  12. 40 CFR 97.50 - NOX Allowance Tracking System accounts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false NOX Allowance Tracking System accounts... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS NOX Allowance Tracking System § 97.50 NOX Allowance Tracking System accounts. (a) Nature and function of...

  13. 40 CFR 96.50 - NOX Allowance Tracking System accounts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false NOX Allowance Tracking System accounts... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS FOR STATE IMPLEMENTATION PLANS NOX Allowance Tracking System § 96.50 NOX Allowance Tracking System accounts. (a) Nature...

  14. 40 CFR 97.50 - NOX Allowance Tracking System accounts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false NOX Allowance Tracking System accounts... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS NOX Allowance Tracking System § 97.50 NOX Allowance Tracking System accounts. (a) Nature and function of...

  15. 40 CFR 97.50 - NOX Allowance Tracking System accounts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false NOX Allowance Tracking System accounts... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS NOX Allowance Tracking System § 97.50 NOX Allowance Tracking System accounts. (a) Nature and function of...

  16. 40 CFR 96.50 - NOX Allowance Tracking System accounts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false NOX Allowance Tracking System accounts... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS FOR STATE IMPLEMENTATION PLANS NOX Allowance Tracking System § 96.50 NOX Allowance Tracking System accounts. (a) Nature...

  17. 40 CFR 97.50 - NOX Allowance Tracking System accounts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false NOX Allowance Tracking System accounts... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS NOX Allowance Tracking System § 97.50 NOX Allowance Tracking System accounts. (a) Nature and function of...

  18. 40 CFR 96.52 - NOX Allowance Tracking System responsibilities of NOX authorized account representative.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false NOX Allowance Tracking System responsibilities of NOX authorized account representative. 96.52 Section 96.52 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX...

  19. 40 CFR 96.52 - NOX Allowance Tracking System responsibilities of NOX authorized account representative.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false NOX Allowance Tracking System responsibilities of NOX authorized account representative. 96.52 Section 96.52 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX...

  20. 40 CFR 96.52 - NOX Allowance Tracking System responsibilities of NOX authorized account representative.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false NOX Allowance Tracking System responsibilities of NOX authorized account representative. 96.52 Section 96.52 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX...

  1. 40 CFR 96.52 - NOX Allowance Tracking System responsibilities of NOX authorized account representative.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false NOX Allowance Tracking System responsibilities of NOX authorized account representative. 96.52 Section 96.52 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX...

  2. 40 CFR 96.52 - NOX Allowance Tracking System responsibilities of NOX authorized account representative.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false NOX Allowance Tracking System responsibilities of NOX authorized account representative. 96.52 Section 96.52 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX...

  3. COST OF SELECTIVE CATALYTIC REDUCTION (SCR) APPLICATION FOR NOX CONTROL ON COAL-FIRED BOILERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report provides a methodology for estimating budgetary costs associated with retrofit applications of selective catalytic reduction (SCR) technology on coal-fired boilers. SCR is a postcombustion nitrogen oxides (NOx) control technology capable of providing NOx reductions >90...

  4. Nox Reduction in a Fluidized Bed Reactor with Fe/ZSM-5 Catalyst and Propylene as Reductant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Terris; Bi, Xiaotao

    The performance of a fluidized bed catalytic reactor was investigated for NOx reduction using a Fe/ZSM-5 catalyst and propylene as the reducing agent. The effects of inlet NOx concentration, propylene to NOx molar ratio, flue gas oxygen concentration and fluidizing gas velocity on NOx conversion were studied using simulated flue gases. The results showed that the NOx conversion decreased with decreasing the inlet NOx concentration, and propylene to NOx molar ratio. The increase in flue gas oxygen concentration also imposed a significant negative impact. As the flue gas oxygen concentration increased, NOx reduction decreased while propylene conversion increased at a given propylene to NOx molar ratio, due to the oxidation of propylene in the presence of high oxygen concentration. The increase in fluidization gas velocity reduced the contact time between reactant and the catalyst particles due to the increased bubble size and bubble rise velocity. As a result, the NOx reduction decreased as the gas velocity increased.

  5. Selective catalytic reduction system and process for treating NOx emissions using a zinc or titanium promoted palladium-zirconium catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Sobolevskiy, Anatoly; Rossin, Joseph A.; Knapke, Michael J.

    2011-08-02

    A process and system (18) for reducing NO.sub.x in a gas using hydrogen as a reducing agent is provided. The process comprises contacting the gas stream (29) with a catalyst system (38) comprising sulfated zirconia washcoat particles (41), palladium, a pre-sulfated zirconia binder (44), and a promoter (45) comprising at least one of titanium, zinc, or a mixture thereof. The presence of zinc or titanium increases the resistance of the catalyst system to a sulfur and water-containing gas stream.

  6. NOx Reduction with Natural Gas for Lean Large-Bore Engine Applications Using Lean NOx Trap Aftertreatment

    SciTech Connect

    Parks, JE

    2005-02-11

    Large-bore natural gas engines are used for distributed energy and gas compression since natural gas fuel offers a convenient and reliable fuel source via the natural gas pipeline and distribution infrastructure. Lean engines enable better fuel efficiency and lower operating costs; however, NOx emissions from lean engines are difficult to control. Technologies that reduce NOx in lean exhaust are desired to enable broader use of efficient lean engines. Lean NOx trap catalysts have demonstrated greater than 90% NOx reduction in lean exhaust from engines operating with gasoline, diesel, and natural gas fuels. In addition to the clean nature of the technology, lean NOx traps reduce NOx with the fuel source of the engine thereby eliminating the requirement for storage and handling of secondary fuels or reducing agents. A study of lean NOx trap catalysts for lean natural gas engines is presented here. Testing was performed on a Cummins C8.3G (CG-280) engine on a motor dynamometer. Lean NOx trap catalysts were tested for NOx reduction performance under various engine operating conditions, and the utilization of natural gas as the reductant fuel source was characterized. Engine test results show that temperature greatly affects the catalytic processes involved, specifically methane oxidation and NOx storage on the lean NOx trap. Additional studies on a bench flow reactor demonstrate the effect of precious metal loading (a primary cost factor) on lean NOx trap performance at different temperatures. Results and issues related to the potential of the lean NOx trap technology for large-bore engine applications will be discussed.

  7. Two-stage Catalytic Reduction of NOx with Hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Umit S. Ozkan; Erik M. Holmgreen; Matthew M. Yung; Jonathan Halter; Joel Hiltner

    2005-12-21

    A two-stage system for the catalytic reduction of NO from lean-burn natural gas reciprocating engine exhaust is investigated. Each of the two stages uses a distinct catalyst. The first stage is oxidation of NO to NO{sub 2} and the second stage is reduction of NO{sub 2} to N{sub 2} with a hydrocarbon. The central idea is that since NO{sub 2} is a more easily reduced species than NO, it should be better able to compete with oxygen for the combustion reaction of hydrocarbon, which is a challenge in lean conditions. Early work focused on demonstrating that the N{sub 2} yield obtained when NO{sub 2} was reduced was greater than when NO was reduced. NO{sub 2} reduction catalysts were designed and silver supported on alumina (Ag/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) was found to be quite active, able to achieve 95% N{sub 2} yield in 10% O{sub 2} using propane as the reducing agent. The design of a catalyst for NO oxidation was also investigated, and a Co/TiO{sub 2} catalyst prepared by sol-gel was shown to have high activity for the reaction, able to reach equilibrium conversion of 80% at 300 C at GHSV of 50,000h{sup -1}. After it was shown that NO{sub 2} could be more easily reduced to N{sub 2} than NO, the focus shifted on developing a catalyst that could use methane as the reducing agent. The Ag/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst was tested and found to be inactive for NOx reduction with methane. Through iterative catalyst design, a palladium-based catalyst on a sulfated-zirconia support (Pd/SZ) was synthesized and shown to be able to selectively reduce NO{sub 2} in lean conditions using methane. Development of catalysts for the oxidation reaction also continued and higher activity, as well as stability in 10% water, was observed on a Co/ZrO{sub 2} catalyst, which reached equilibrium conversion of 94% at 250 C at the same GHSV. The Co/ZrO{sub 2} catalyst was also found to be extremely active for oxidation of CO, ethane, and propane, which could potential eliminate the need for any separate

  8. Nitrogen Release from a NOx Storage and Reduction Catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Tonkyn, Russell G.; Disselkamp, Robert S.; Peden, C. H.

    2006-04-30

    In a NOx storage and reduction (NSR) catalyst the release and reduction of NOx occurs over a very short period. The speed of the NOx release and reduction creates difficulties in analyzing the chemistry using normal analytical techniques, which are typically better suited to slower, steady state studies. We have investigated the time dependence of NO, NO2, NH3, N2O and N2 released by an NSR catalyst using a combination of FTIR and gas chromatographic techniques. Nitrogen was detected with the GC by using He rather than N2 as the background gas. The FTIR was used not only to monitor NO, NO2, NH3 and N2O, but also to establish cycle-to-cycle reproducibility. Under these conditions we used the GC to sample the effluent at multiple times over many lean-rich cycles. To the extent that the chemistry was truly periodic and reproducible, we obtained the time dependence of the release of nitrogen after the lean-to-rich transition. Similar information was obtained for O2, H2 and N2O. Combining the FTIR and GC data we obtained good cycle averaged nitrogen balances, indicating that all the major products were accounted for.

  9. METHANE de-NOX process as a NO{sub x} reduction technology for stoker boilers

    SciTech Connect

    Rabovitser, I.; Roberts, M.; Chan, I.; Loviska, T.; Morrow, R.; Bonner, T.; Hall, D.

    1996-12-31

    The most common NO{sub x} control technology utilized in stokers is selective noncatalytic reduction (SNCR) systems. The natural gas industry has developed the patented METHANE de-NOX reburning process for stokers to reduce NO{sub x} emissions to the levels set by current EPA regulations without increasing the levels of other undesirable emissions. In contrast to conventional reburning, where the reburn fuel is injected above the combustion zone to create a fuel-rich reburn zone, with METHANE de-NOX, natural gas is injected directly into the combustion zone above the grate; this results in a reduction of NO{sub x} formed in the coal bed and also limits its formation through decomposition of the NO{sub x} precursors to form molecular nitrogen rather than nitrogen oxides. The METHANE de-NOX process was field tested at the Olmsted County waste-to-energy facility in Rochester, Minnesota, and at an incineration plant in Japan. Compared to baseline levels, about 60% NO{sub x} reduction and an increase in boiler efficiency were achieved. IGT, Detroit Stoker Company, and Cogentrix are presently demonstrating the METHANE de-NOX technology on a coal-fired 390 MM Btu/h stoker boiler at a 240 MW cogeneration plant in Richmond, Virginia. Baseline tests were conducted which indicated that 50 to 60% NO{sub x} can be reduced by utilization of METHANE de-NOX.

  10. KINETICS AND MECHANISMS OF NOx - CHAR REDUCTION

    SciTech Connect

    Suuberg, E.M.

    1998-06-19

    This study was undertaken in order to improve understanding of several aspects of the NO-carbon reaction. This reaction is of practical importance in combustion systems, but its close examination also provides some fundamental insight into oxidizing gas-carbon reactions. As part of this study, a comprehensive literature review of earlier work on this reaction has been published (Aarna and Suuberg, Fuel, 1997, 76, 475-491). It has been thought for some time that the kinetics of the NO-carbon reaction are unusual, in that they often show a two-regime Arrhenius behavior. It has, however, turned out during this work that NO is not alone in this regard. In this laboratory, we also uncovered evidence of two kinetic regime behavior in CO{sub 2} gasification. In another laboratory, a former colleague has identified the same behavior in N{sub 2}O. The low temperature reaction regime always shows an activation energy which is lower than that in the high temperature regime, leaving little doubt that a shift in mechanism, as opposed to transport limitations, dictates the behavior. The activation energy of the low temperature regime of these reactions is typically less than 100 kJ/mol, and the activation energy of the high temperature regime is generally considerably in excess of this value. In this study, we have resolved some apparent inconsistencies in the explanation of the low temperature regime, whose rate has generally been ascribed to desorption-controlled processes. Part of the problem in characterization of the different temperature regimes is that they overlap to a high degree. It is difficult to probe the low temperature regime experimentally, because of slow relaxation of the surface oxides in that regime. Using careful experimental techniques, we were able to demonstrate that the low temperature regime is indeed characterized by zero order in NO, as it must be. A separate study is being carried out to model the behavior in this regime in NO and in other gases, and

  11. Generation and Reduction of NOx on Air-Fed Ozonizers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehara, Yoshiyasu; Amemiya, Yusuke; Yamamoto, Toshiaki

    A generation and reduction of NOx on air-fed ozonizers using a ferroelectric packed bed reactor have been experimentally investigated. The reactors packed with CaTiO3, SrTiO3 and BaTiO3 pellets are examined for ozone generation. An ac voltage is applied to the reactor to generate partial discharge. Ozone concentration and the different nitrogen oxides at downstream of the packed bed reactor were measured with UV absorption ozone monitor and a Fourier transform infrared spectroscope respectively. The dielectric constant of packed ferroelectric pellets influences the discharge characteristic, ozone and NOx generations are varied by the dielectric constant value. Focusing on a discharge pulse current and maximum discharge magnitude, the ferroelectric packed bed plasma reactors have been evaluated on nitrogen oxide and ozone generated concentrations.

  12. Radiative cooling in a flameholder for NOx reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breidenthal, Robert; Krichtafovitch, Igor; Karkow, Doug; Colannino, Joseph

    2014-11-01

    Recent experiments have revealed dramatic reductions in NOx emissions using a ceramic honeycomb as a flameholder. A jet of fuel entrains and mixes air before entering the honeycomb. The honeycomb is positioned at a distance away from the jet nozzle such that the mixed fluid arriving at the upstream edge of the honeycomb is combustible. Combustion occurs within the honeycomb, transferring heat to the ceramic walls, which glow red hot. According to a simple physical model, radiation and thermal conduction transport energy toward the upstream end of the honeycomb, thereby heating the incident cold reactants to maintain combustion. The radiation also transports energy downstream and away from the honeycomb, toward a thermal load. This is an attractive characteristic in boiler applications, for example. Furthermore, the hot combustion products in intimate thermal contact with the walls of the radiating honeycomb are rapidly cooled, consistent with the low NOx emissions. Preliminary experiments with different honeycomb configurations are in accord with this model.

  13. 40 CFR 97.52 - NOX Allowance Tracking System responsibilities of NOX authorized account representative.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false NOX Allowance Tracking System responsibilities of NOX authorized account representative. 97.52 Section 97.52 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND...

  14. 40 CFR 97.52 - NOX Allowance Tracking System responsibilities of NOX authorized account representative.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false NOX Allowance Tracking System responsibilities of NOX authorized account representative. 97.52 Section 97.52 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND...

  15. 40 CFR 97.52 - NOX Allowance Tracking System responsibilities of NOX authorized account representative.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false NOX Allowance Tracking System responsibilities of NOX authorized account representative. 97.52 Section 97.52 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND...

  16. 40 CFR 97.52 - NOX Allowance Tracking System responsibilities of NOX authorized account representative.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false NOX Allowance Tracking System responsibilities of NOX authorized account representative. 97.52 Section 97.52 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND...

  17. 40 CFR 97.52 - NOX Allowance Tracking System responsibilities of NOX authorized account representative.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false NOX Allowance Tracking System responsibilities of NOX authorized account representative. 97.52 Section 97.52 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND...

  18. Management of Southern California Edison`s NOx reduction program in a changing regulatory environment

    SciTech Connect

    Estrada, J.C.; Hoffman, D.R.; Johnson, L.W.; Kimoto, E.M.; Petrucelli, A.; Zamorano, D.

    1995-12-31

    The Southern California Edison Company (Edison) is a privately owned electric utility serving customers in a twelve county area of Southern California. Beginning in 1989, Edison initiated a major effort, within the Los Angeles air quality basin, to significantly reduce generating station emissions of the oxides of nitrogen (NOx). Since this program began, there have been numerous changes to the local, state and regional air quality regulations under which Edison operates. As a result, the program has evolved and expanded to include most of the fossil fuel generating units within the Edison service territory. Edison has attempted to meet these regulatory changes in the most cost effective manner. Using a variety of NOx control mechanisms, implemented throughout the period, Edison has taken a flexible approach to incorporating the latest technological developments. At the same time, lessons learned during each phase have been factored into succeeding phases of the program. Now that most of the NOx control devices have been installed and several years of operating experience have been gained, Edison would like to share that experience so that others might gain additional knowledge which may help in their NOx control programs. The major areas which will be addressed include (1) new developments, (2) contracting strategy, (3) project management and (4) an overview of operating experiences and results with Urea Injection (SNCR), Low NOx Burners (LNB), Flue Gas Recirculation and Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) systems.

  19. Multifunctional Low Pressure Turbine for Core Noise Reduction, Improved Efficiency, and NOx Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Chris; Shyam, Vikram; Rigby, David; Acosta, Waldo

    2013-01-01

    Determining the feasibility of the induced synthetic jet is key, and is still TBD. center dot Available LPT vane volume is sufficient for tens of resonators per span-wise hole spacing, so physically feasible. center dot Determination of acoustic attenuation requires accurate model of vane, resonator locations, flow field and incident waves. (TBD) center dot Determination of NOx reduction is also TBD.

  20. Simulation of catalytic oxidation and selective catalytic NOx reduction in lean-exhaust hybrid vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Zhiming; Daw, C Stuart; Chakravarthy, Veerathu K

    2012-01-01

    We utilize physically-based models for diesel exhaust catalytic oxidation and urea-based selective catalytic NOx reduction to study their impact on drive cycle performance of hypothetical light-duty diesel powered hybrid vehicles. The models have been implemented as highly flexible SIMULINK block modules that can be used to study multiple engine-aftertreatment system configurations. The parameters of the NOx reduction model have been adjusted to reflect the characteristics of Cu-zeolite catalysts, which are of widespread current interest. We demonstrate application of these models using the Powertrain System Analysis Toolkit (PSAT) software for vehicle simulations, along with a previously published methodology that accounts for emissions and temperature transients in the engine exhaust. Our results illustrate the potential impact of DOC and SCR interactions for lean hybrid electric and plug-in hybrid electric vehicles.

  1. Waste Coal Fines Reburn for NOx and Mercury Emission Reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Stephen Johnson; Chetan Chothani; Bernard Breen

    2008-04-30

    Injection of coal-water slurries (CWS) made with both waste coal and bituminous coal was tested for enhanced reduction of NO{sub x} and Hg emissions at the AES Beaver Valley plant near Monaca, PA. Under this project, Breen Energy Solutions (BES) conducted field experiments on the these emission reduction technologies by mixing coal fines and/or pulverized coal, urea and water to form slurry, then injecting the slurry in the upper furnace region of a coal-fired boiler. The main focus of this project was use of waste coal fines as the carbon source; however, testing was also conducted using pulverized coal in conjunction with or instead of waste coal fines for conversion efficiency and economic comparisons. The host site for this research and development project was Unit No.2 at AES Beaver Valley cogeneration station. Unit No.2 is a 35 MW Babcock & Wilcox (B&W) front-wall fired boiler that burns eastern bituminous coal. It has low NO{sub x} burners, overfire air ports and a urea-based selective non-catalytic reduction (SNCR) system for NO{sub x} control. The back-end clean-up system includes a rotating mechanical ash particulate removal and electrostatic precipitator (ESP) and wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) scrubber. Coal slurry injection was expected to help reduce NOx emissions in two ways: (1) Via fuel-lean reburning when the slurry is injected above the combustion zone. (2) Via enhanced SNCR reduction when urea is incorporated into the slurry. The mercury control process under research uses carbon/water slurry injection to produce reactive carbon in-situ in the upper furnace, promoting the oxidation of elemental mercury in flue gas from coal-fired power boilers. By controlling the water content of the slurry below the stoichiometric requirement for complete gasification, water activated carbon (WAC) can be generated in-situ in the upper furnace. As little as 1-2% coal/water slurry (heat input basis) can be injected and generate sufficient WAC for mercury

  2. High-Potential Electrocatalytic O2 Reduction with Nitroxyl / NOx Mediators: Implications for Fuel Cells and Aerobic Oxidation Catalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Gerken, James B.; Stahl, Shannon S.

    2015-07-15

    Efficient reduction of O2 to water is a central challenge in energy conversion and aerobic oxidation catalysis. In the present study, we investigate the electrochemical reduction of O2 with soluble organic nitroxyl and nitrogen oxide (NOx) mediators. When used alone, neither organic nitroxyls, such as TEMPO (2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-1-piperidinyl-N-oxyl), nor NOx species, such as sodium nitrite, are effective mediators of electrochemical O2 reduction. The combination of nitroxyl/NOx species, however, mediates sustained O2 reduction at electrochemical potentials of 0.19–0.33 V (vs. Fc/Fc+) in acetonitrile containing trifluoroacetic acid. Mechanistic analysis of the coupled redox reactions supports a process in which the nitrogen oxide catalyst drives aerobic oxidation of a nitroxyl mediator to an oxoammonium species, which then is reduced back to the nitroxyl at the cathode. The electrolysis potential is dictated by the oxoammonium/nitroxyl reduction potential. The high potentials observed with this ORR system benefit from the mechanism-based specificity for four-electron reduction of oxygen to water mediated by NOx species, together with kinetically efficient reduction of oxidized NOx species by TEMPO and other organic nitroxyls. This research was supported as part of the Center for Molecular Electrocatalysis, an Energy Frontier Research Center, funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences.

  3. System and method for diagnosing EGR performance using NOx sensor

    DOEpatents

    Mazur, Christopher John

    2003-12-23

    A method and system for diagnosing a condition of an EGR valve used in an engine system. The EGR valve controls the portion exhaust gases produced by such engine system and fed back to an intake of such engine system. The engine system includes a NOx sensor for measuring NOx in such exhaust. The method includes: determining a time rate of change in NOx measured by the NOx sensor; comparing the determined time rate of change in the measured NOx with a predetermined expected time rate of change in measured NOx; and determining the condition of the EGR valve as a function of such comparison. The method also includes: determining from NOx measured by the NOx sensor and engine operating conditions indications of instances when samples of such measured NOx are greater than an expected maximum NOx level for such engine condition and less than an expected minimum NOx level for such engine condition; and determining the condition of the EGR valve as a function of a statistical analysis of such indications. The method includes determining whether the NOx sensor is faulty and wherein the EGR condition determining includes determining whether the NOx sensor is faulty.

  4. REDUCTION OF NOx EMISSION FROM COAL COMBUSTION THROUGH OXYGEN ENRICHMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Western Research Institute

    2006-07-01

    BOC Process Gas Solutions and Western Research Institute (WRI) conducted a pilot-scale test program to evaluate the impact of oxygen enrichment on the emissions characteristics of pulverized coal. The combustion test facility (CTF) at WRI was used to assess the viability of the technique and determine the quantities of oxygen required for NOx reduction from coal fired boiler. In addition to the experimental work, a series of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations were made of the CTF under comparable conditions. A series of oxygen enrichment test was performed using the CTF. In these tests, oxygen was injected into one of the following streams: (1) the primary air (PA), (2) the secondary air (SA), and (3) the combined primary and secondary air. Emission data were collected from all tests, and compared with the corresponding data from the baseline cases. A key test parameter was the burner stoichiometry ratio. A series of CFD simulation models were devised to mimic the initial experiments in which secondary air was enriched with oxygen. The results from these models were compared against the experimental data. Experimental evidence indicated that oxygen enrichment does appear to be able to reduce NOx levels from coal combustion, especially when operated at low over fire air (OFA) levels. The reductions observed however are significantly smaller than that reported by others (7-8% vs. 25-50%), questioning the economic viability of the technique. This technique may find favor with fuels that are difficult to burn or stabilize at high OFA and produce excessive LOI. While CFD simulation appears to predict NO amounts in the correct order of magnitude and the correct trend with staging, it is sensitive to thermal conditions and an accurate thermal prediction is essential. Furthermore, without development, Fluent's fuel-NO model cannot account for a solution sensitive fuel-N distribution between volatiles and char and thus cannot predict the trends seen in the

  5. High-Potential Electrocatalytic O2 Reduction with Nitroxyl/NOx Mediators: Implications for Fuel Cells and Aerobic Oxidation Catalysis

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Efficient reduction of O2 to water is a central challenge in energy conversion and many aerobic oxidation reactions. Here, we show that the electrochemical oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) can be achieved at high potentials by using soluble organic nitroxyl and nitrogen oxide (NOx) mediators. When used alone, neither organic nitroxyls, such as 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-1-piperidinyl-N-oxyl (TEMPO), nor NOx species, such as sodium nitrite, are effective ORR mediators. The combination of nitroxyl/NOx species, however, mediates sustained O2 reduction with overpotentials as low as 300 mV in acetonitrile containing trifluoroacetic acid. Mechanistic analysis of the coupled redox reactions supports a process in which the nitrogen oxide catalyst drives aerobic oxidation of a nitroxyl mediator to an oxoammonium species, which then is reduced back to the nitroxyl at the cathode. The electrolysis potential is dictated by the oxoammonium/nitroxyl reduction potential. The overpotentials accessible with this ORR system are significantly lower than widely studied molecular metal-macrocycle ORR catalysts and benefit from the mechanism-based specificity for four-electron reduction of oxygen to water mediated by NOx species, together with kinetically efficient reduction of oxidized NOx species by TEMPO and other organic nitroxyls. PMID:27162977

  6. Advances in potassium catalyzed NOx reduction by carbon materials: An overview

    SciTech Connect

    Bueno-Lopez, A.; Garcia-Garcia, A.; Illan-Gomez, M.J.; Linares-Solano, A.; de Lecea, C.S.M.

    2007-06-15

    The research work conducted in our group concerning the study of the potassium-catalyzed NOx reduction by carbon materials is presented. The importance of the different variables affecting the NOx-carbon reactions is discussed, e.g. carbon porosity, coal rank, potassium loading, influence of the binder used, and effect of the gas composition. The catalyst loading is the main feature affecting the selectivity for NOx reduction against O{sub 2} combustion. The NOx reduction without important combustion in O{sub 2} occurs between 350 and 475{sup o}C in the presence of the catalyst. The presence of H{sub 2}O in the gas mixture enhances NOx reduction at low carbon conversions, but as the reaction proceeds, it decreases as the selectivity does. The presence of CO{sub 2} diminishes the activity and selectivity of the catalyst. SO{sub 2} completely inhibits the catalytic activity of potassium due to sulfate formation.

  7. Lean NOx reduction over Ag/alumina catalysts via ethanol-SCR using ethanol/gasoline blends

    DOE PAGES

    Gunnarsson, Fredrik; Pihl, Josh A.; Toops, Todd J.; Skoglundh, Magnus; Härelind, Hanna

    2016-09-04

    This paper focuses on the activity for lean NOx reduction over sol-gel synthesized silver alumina (Ag/Al2O3) catalysts, with and without platinum doping, using ethanol (EtOH), EtOH/C3H6 and EtOH/gasoline blends as reducing agents. The effect of ethanol concentration, both by varying the hydrocarbon-to-NOx ratio and by alternating the gasoline concentration in the EtOH/gasoline mixture, is investigated. High activity for NOx reduction is demonstrated for powder catalysts for EtOH and EtOH/C3H6 as well as for monolith coated catalysts (EtOH and EtOH/gasoline). The results show that pure Ag/Al2O3 catalysts display higher NOx reduction and lower light-off temperature as compared to the platinum dopedmore » samples. The 4 wt.% Ag/Al2O3 catalyst displays 100% reduction in the range 340–425 °C, with up to 37% selectivity towards NH3. These results are also supported by DRIFTS (Diffuse reflection infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy) experiments. Finally, the high ammonia formation could, in combination with an NH3-SCR catalyst, be utilized to construct a NOx reduction system with lower fuel penalty cf. stand alone HC-SCR. In addition, it would result in an overall decrease in CO2 emissions.« less

  8. Improved low NOx firing systems for pulverized coal combustion

    SciTech Connect

    McCarthy, K.; Laux, S.; Grusha, J.; Rosin, T.; Hausman, G.L.

    1999-07-01

    More stringent emission limits or the addition of post combustion NOx control create the need for improvements of NOx emissions from pulverized coal boilers. Many boilers retrofitted with Low NOx technology during Phase 1 and Phase 2 of the CAAA fail or marginally meet their requirements. Technical solutions range from addition of overfire air and state-of-the-art low NOx burners to low cost additions of combustion enhancements. Regardless of the combustion NOx control method used, stoichiometries local to the burners must be maintained at the designed values at all times to provide high NOx performance at low efficiency loss due to unburned fuel. This paper describes Foster Wheeler's approach to NOx emission improvements for existing low NOx firing systems. The technology to measure air and coal flow individually for each burner and to control the parameters for optimum combustion are presented and discussed. Field experience shows the installation and advantages of the technology.

  9. Diesel NO(x) aftertreatment by combined process using temperature swing adsorption, NO(x) reduction by nonthermal plasma, and NO(x) recirculation: improvement of the recirculation process.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Keiichiro; Kuwahara, Takuya; Kuroki, Tomoyuki; Okubo, Masaaki

    2012-09-15

    NO(x) emitted from a stationary diesel engine generator was treated with a hybrid system comprising NO(x) reduction by nonthermal plasma (NTP) and temperature swing adsorption (TSA) driven by engine waste heat. TSA produces a low-volume gas mixture of N(2) and highly concentrated NO(x), which is effectively reduced by NTP treatment. Improved treatment performance and efficiency are achieved by re-injecting the NTP-treated gas mixture into the engine intake. The system comprises two switchable adsorption chambers; the operation of this system was simulated by using a one-chamber system. The maximum energy efficiency for NO(x) treatment is 200 g(NO(2))/kWh. The respective contributions of NTP and injection of N(2) and NO(x) to the performance were theoretically analyzed. The analysis predicts that high energy efficiency and high NO(x)-removal efficiency can be simultaneously achieved with this system but miniaturization of the adsorption chambers will be a challenge.

  10. Diesel NO(x) aftertreatment by combined process using temperature swing adsorption, NO(x) reduction by nonthermal plasma, and NO(x) recirculation: improvement of the recirculation process.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Keiichiro; Kuwahara, Takuya; Kuroki, Tomoyuki; Okubo, Masaaki

    2012-09-15

    NO(x) emitted from a stationary diesel engine generator was treated with a hybrid system comprising NO(x) reduction by nonthermal plasma (NTP) and temperature swing adsorption (TSA) driven by engine waste heat. TSA produces a low-volume gas mixture of N(2) and highly concentrated NO(x), which is effectively reduced by NTP treatment. Improved treatment performance and efficiency are achieved by re-injecting the NTP-treated gas mixture into the engine intake. The system comprises two switchable adsorption chambers; the operation of this system was simulated by using a one-chamber system. The maximum energy efficiency for NO(x) treatment is 200 g(NO(2))/kWh. The respective contributions of NTP and injection of N(2) and NO(x) to the performance were theoretically analyzed. The analysis predicts that high energy efficiency and high NO(x)-removal efficiency can be simultaneously achieved with this system but miniaturization of the adsorption chambers will be a challenge. PMID:22771347

  11. Plasma-assisted combustion technology for NOx reduction in industrial burners.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dae Hoon; Kim, Kwan-Tae; Kang, Hee Seok; Song, Young-Hoon; Park, Jae Eon

    2013-10-01

    Stronger regulations on nitrogen oxide (NOx) production have recently promoted the creation of a diverse array of technologies for NOx reduction, particularly within the combustion process, where reduction is least expensive. In this paper, we discuss a new combustion technology that can reduce NOx emissions within industrial burners to single-digit parts per million levels without employing exhaust gas recirculation or other NOx reduction mechanisms. This new technology uses a simple modification of commercial burners, such that they are able to perform plasma-assisted staged combustion without altering the outer configuration of the commercial reference burner. We embedded the first-stage combustor within the head of the commercial reference burner, where it operated as a reformer that could host a partial oxidation process, producing hydrogen-rich reformate or synthesis gas product. The resulting hydrogen-rich flow then ignited and stabilized the combustion flame apart from the burner rim. Ultimately, the enhanced mixing and removal of hot spots with a widened flame area acted as the main mechanisms of NOx reduction. Because this plasma burner acted as a low NOx burner and was able to reduce NOx by more than half compared to the commercial reference burner, this methodology offers important cost-effective possibilities for NOx reduction in industrial applications.

  12. Excellent activity and selectivity of Cu-SSZ-13 in the selective catalytic reduction of NOx with NH3

    SciTech Connect

    Kwak, Ja Hun; Tonkyn, Russell G.; Kim, Do Heui; Szanyi, Janos; Peden, Charles HF

    2010-10-21

    Superior activity and selectivity of a Cu ion-exchanged SSZ-13 zeolite in the selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NOx with NH3 were observed, in comparison to Cu-beta and Cu-ZSM-5 zeolites. Cu-SSZ-13 was not only more active in the NOx SCR reaction over the entire temperature range studied (up to 550 °C), but also more selective toward nitrogen formation, resulting in significantly lower amounts of NOx by-products (i.e., NO2 and N2O) than the other two zeolites. In addition, Cu-SSZ-13 demonstrated the highest activity and N2 formation selectivity in the oxidation of NH3. The results of this study strongly suggest that Cu-SSZ-13 is a promising candidate as a catalyst for NOx SCR with great potential in after-treatment systems for either mobile or stationary sources.

  13. Generic NOx Control Intelligent System

    1997-03-24

    GNOCIS is a system of programs designed to perform on-line closed-loop optimization of utility boilers. The major components of the system include: GNREAD A program which resides on the host digital control system (DCS) that retrieves data from the DCS and then transmits the collected data to the GNOCIS host system. GNWRITE A program which resides on the host DCS that receives data from the GNOCIS host platform and then sends this information to themore » DCS. GNARCH A program which resides on the GNOCIS host platform that receives data from GNREAD or GNCTL and then archives this data on a periodic basis. GNCTL A program which resides on the GNOCIS host platform that receives data from GNREAD and then executes the optimizer/combustion model. GNDCS Configuration changes to the DCS which allows automatic implementation of the GNOCIS recommendations and closed-loop operation. Substantial safeguards and constraints are imbedded in this component to prevent adverse impact on unit operation.« less

  14. Generic NOx Control Intelligent System

    SciTech Connect

    Sorge, John

    1997-03-24

    GNOCIS is a system of programs designed to perform on-line closed-loop optimization of utility boilers. The major components of the system include: GNREAD A program which resides on the host digital control system (DCS) that retrieves data from the DCS and then transmits the collected data to the GNOCIS host system. GNWRITE A program which resides on the host DCS that receives data from the GNOCIS host platform and then sends this information to the DCS. GNARCH A program which resides on the GNOCIS host platform that receives data from GNREAD or GNCTL and then archives this data on a periodic basis. GNCTL A program which resides on the GNOCIS host platform that receives data from GNREAD and then executes the optimizer/combustion model. GNDCS Configuration changes to the DCS which allows automatic implementation of the GNOCIS recommendations and closed-loop operation. Substantial safeguards and constraints are imbedded in this component to prevent adverse impact on unit operation.

  15. Environmental Assessment for the Commercial Demonstration of the Low NOx Burner/Separated Over-Fire Air (LNB/SOFA) Integration System Emission Reduction Technology, Finney County, Kansas

    SciTech Connect

    n /a

    2003-03-11

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to provide partial funding to the Sunflower Electric Power Corporation (Sunflower), to demonstrate the commercial application of Low-NO{sub x} Burner/Separated Over-Fire Air (LNB/SOFA) integration system to achieve NO{sub x} emission reduction to the level of 0.15 to 0.22 pounds per million British thermal units (lb/MM Btu). The proposed project station is Sunflower's 360 MW coal-fired generation station, Holcomb Unit No. 1 (Holcomb Station). The station, fueled by coal from Wyoming's Powder River Basin, is located near Garden City, in Finney County, Kansas. The period of performance is expected to last approximately 2 years. The Holcomb Station, Sunflower LNB/SOFA integrated system would be modified in three distinct phases to demonstrate the synergistic effect of layering NO{sub x} control technologies. Once modified, the station would demonstrate that a unit equipped with an existing low-NO{sub x} burner system can be retrofitted with a new separated over-fire air (SOFA) system, coal flow measurement and control, and enhanced combustion monitoring to achieve about 45 percent reduction in nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) emissions. The proposed project would demonstrate a technology alternative to Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) systems. While SCR does generally achieve high reductions in NO{sub x} emissions (from about 0.8 lb/MM to 0.12 lb/MM Btu), it does so at higher capital and operating cost, requires the extensive use of critical construction labor, requires longer periods of unit outage for deployment, and generally requires longer periods of time to complete shakedown and full-scale operation. Cost of the proposed project technology would be on the order of 15-25 percent of that for SCR, with consequential benefits derived from reductions in construction manpower requirements and periods of power outages. This proposed technology demonstration would generally be applicable to boilers using opposed-wall burners

  16. Fundamental limits on gas-phase chemical reduction of NOx in a plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Penetrante, B.M.; Hsiao, M.C.; Merritt, B.T.; Vogtlin, G.E.

    1997-12-31

    In the plasma, the electrons do not react directly with the NOx molecules. The electrons collide mainly with the background gas molecules like N{sub 2}, O{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O. Electron impact on these molecules result partly in dissociation reactions that produce reactive species like N, O and OH. The NOx in the engine exhaust gas initially consist mostly of NO. The ground state nitrogen atom, N, is the only species that could lead to the chemical reduction of NO to N{sub 2}. The O radical oxidizes NO to NO{sub 2} leaving the same amount of NOx. The OH radical converts NO{sub 2} to nitric acid. Acid products in the plasma can easily get adsorbed on surfaces in the plasma reactor and in the pipes. When undetected, the absence of these oxidation products can often be mistaken for chemical reduction of NOx. In this paper the authors will examine the gas-phase chemical reduction of NOx. They will show that under the best conditions, the plasma can chemically reduce 1.6 grams of NOx per brake-horsepower-hour [g(NOx)/bhp-hr] when 5% of the engine output energy is delivered to the plasma.

  17. Importance of NOx control for peak ozone reduction in the Pearl River Delta region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ying; Lau, Alexis K. H.; Fung, Jimmy C. H.; Zheng, Junyu; Liu, Shawchen

    2013-08-01

    As major air pollutants and key precursors of several secondary air pollutants, nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions are regulated in many countries. However, NOx control increases ozone concentrations when the ozone formation regime is volatile organic compound (VOC) limited. Although many studies have shown that NOx regulation reduces ozone levels over the long term, it is still of concern that NOx regulation increases short-term ozone levels in metropolitan regions, where ozone formation is found to be predominantly VOC-limited. The Pearl River Delta (PRD) in China is such a region. Our modeling sensitivity study shows that while NOx reduction in the PRD region may raise the mean ozone concentration, it can also decrease peak ozone levels. Similar changes are observed in the NOx and ozone data of the PRD regional air quality monitoring network (2006-2012), lending further credence to our results. In the model, this NOx control effect is a result of the complicated spatial and diurnal variations of the ozone formation regime. In most of the PRD region, the formation regime is VOC-limited in the morning and becomes NOx-limited during peak ozone hours. Although some areas are always VOC-limited, their ozone concentrations are relatively low, and the ozone increases caused by NOx reduction generally do not cause higher ozone levels than the region's original ozone maxima. Several control scenarios are simulated to evaluate the effects of various possible control regulations. Our results show that in addition to VOC control, NOx control can be effective for reducing peak ozone concentrations in the PRD region.

  18. Agricultural Bio-Fueled Generation of Electricity and Development of Durable and Efficent NOx Reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Boyd, Rodney

    2007-08-08

    The objective of this project was to define the scope and cost of a technology research and development program that will demonstrate the feasibility of using an off-the-shelf, unmodified, large bore diesel powered generator in a grid-connected application, utilizing various blends of BioDiesel as fuel. Furthermore, the objective of project was to develop an emissions control device that uses a catalytic process and BioDiesel (without the presence of Ammonia or Urea)to reduce NOx and other pollutants present in a reciprocating engine exhaust stream with the goal of redefining the highest emission reduction efficiencies possible for a diesel reciprocating generator. Process: Caterpillar Power Generation adapted an off-the-shelf Diesel Generator to run on BioDiesel and various Petroleum Diesel/BioDiesel blends. EmeraChem developed and installed an exhaust gas cleanup system to reduce NOx, SOx, volatile organics, and particulates. The system design and function was optimized for emissions reduction with results in the 90-95% range;

  19. New Insights on NOX Enzymes in the Central Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Nayernia, Zeynab; Jaquet, Vincent

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: There is increasing evidence that the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the central nervous system (CNS) involves the NOX family of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidases. Controlled ROS generation appears necessary for optimal functioning of the CNS through fine-tuning of redox-sensitive signaling pathways, while overshooting ROS generation will lead to oxidative stress and CNS disease. Recent Advances: NOX enzymes are not only restricted to microglia (i.e. brain phagocytes) but also expressed in neurons, astrocytes, and the neurovascular system. NOX enzymes are involved in CNS development, neural stem cell biology, and the function of mature neurons. While NOX2 appears to be a major source of pathological oxidative stress in the CNS, other NOX isoforms might also be of importance, for example, NOX4 in stroke. Globally speaking, there is now convincing evidence for a role of NOX enzymes in various neurodegenerative diseases, cerebrovascular diseases, and psychosis-related disorders. Critical Issues: The relative importance of specific ROS sources (e.g., NOX enzymes vs. mitochondria; NOX2 vs. NOX4) in different pathological processes needs further investigation. The absence of specific inhibitors limits the possibility to investigate specific therapeutic strategies. The uncritical use of non-specific inhibitors (e.g., apocynin, diphenylene iodonium) and poorly validated antibodies may lead to misleading conclusions. Future Directions: Physiological and pathophysiological studies with cell-type-specific knock-out mice will be necessary to delineate the precise functions of NOX enzymes and their implications in pathomechanisms. The development of CNS-permeant, specific NOX inhibitors will be necessary to advance toward therapeutic applications. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 20: 2815–2837. PMID:24206089

  20. ULTRA LOW NOx INTEGRATED SYSTEM FOR NOx EMISSION CONTROL FROM COAL-FIRED BOILERS

    SciTech Connect

    Galen H. Richards; Charles Q. Maney; Richard W. Borio; Robert D. Lewis

    2002-12-30

    ALSTOM Power Inc.'s Power Plant Laboratories, working in concert with ALSTOM Power's Performance Projects Group, has teamed with the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE NETL) to conduct a comprehensive study to develop/evaluate low-cost, efficient NOx control technologies for retrofit to pulverized coal fired utility boilers. The objective of this project was to develop retrofit NOx control technology to achieve less than 0.15 lb/MMBtu NOx (for bituminous coals) and 0.10 lb/MMBtu NOx (for subbituminous coals) from existing pulverized coal fired utility boilers at a cost which is at least 25% less than SCR technology. Efficient control of NOx is seen as an important, enabling step in keeping coal as a viable part of the national energy mix in this century, and beyond. Presently 57% of U.S. electrical generation is coal based, and the Energy Information Agency projects that coal will maintain a lead in U.S. power generation over all other fuel sources for decades (EIA 1998 Energy Forecast). Yet, coal-based power is being strongly challenged by society's ever-increasing desire for an improved environment and the resultant improvement in health and safety. The needs of the electric-utility industry are to improve environmental performance, while simultaneously improving overall plant economics. This means that emissions control technology is needed with very low capital and operating costs. This project has responded to the industry's need for low NOx emissions by evaluating ideas that can be adapted to present pulverized coal fired systems, be they conventional or low NOx firing systems. The TFS 2000{trademark} firing system has been the ALSTOM Power Inc. commercial offering producing the lowest NOx emission levels. In this project, the TFS 2000{trademark} firing system served as a basis for comparison to other low NOx systems evaluated and was the foundation upon which refinements were made to further improve NOx emissions and

  1. Computer simulation as a NOx reduction design tool

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, G.; Higgins, B.S.

    2008-10-15

    Nalco Mobotec engineers were charged with reducing emissions on a utility boiler converted from burning oil to eastern bituminous coal using the company's Rotamix selective noncatalytic reduction (SNCR) system which injects urea into the furnace. A CFD simulation of the existing boiler was first conducted and then the furnace was simulated with the SNCR system added and the design was optimised. Operating and capital costs were minimised by optimal placement of 50 injector ports. 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. Novel fluidized bed reactor for integrated NOx adsorption-reduction with hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Terris T. Yang; Hsiaotao T. Bi

    2009-07-01

    In order to avoid the negative impact of excessive oxygen in the combustion flue gases on the selectivity of most hydrocarbon selective catalytic reduction (HC-SCR) catalysts, an integrated NOx adsorption-reduction process has been proposed in this study for the treatment of flue gases under lean burn conditions by decoupling the adsorption and reduction into two different zones. The hypothesis has been validated in a novel internal circulating fluidized bed (ICFB) reactor using Fe/ZSM-5 as the catalyst and propylene as the reducing agent. Effects of propylene to the NOx molar ratio, flue gas oxygen concentration, and gas velocity on NOx conversion were studied using simulated flue gases. The results showed that increasing the ratio of HC:NO improved the reduction performance of Fe/ZSM-5 in the ICFB reactor. NOx conversion decreased with an increasing flue gas flow velocity in the annulus U{sub A} but increased with an increasing reductant gas flow velocity in the draft tube U{sub D}. The NOx adsorption ratio decreased with increasing U{sub A}. In most cases, NOx conversion was higher than the adsorption ratio due to the relatively poor adsorption performance of the catalyst. Fe/ZSM-5 showed a promising reduction performance and a strong inhibiting ability on the negative impact of excessive O{sub 2} in the ICFB reactor, proving that such an ICFB reactor possessed the ability to overcome the negative impact of excessive O{sub 2} in the flue gas using Fe/ZSM-5 as the deNOx catalyst. 22 refs., 10 figs.

  3. NOx reduction Activity over Phosphate-supported Platinum Catalysts with Hydrogen under Oxygen-rich Condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itoh, M.; Takehara, M.; Saito, M.; Machida, K.

    2011-10-01

    The phosphate supported Pt catalysts (Pt/AlPO4, Pt/CePO4, Pt/CeP2O7, Pt/SnP2O7, Pt/TiP2O7, Pt/Zn3(PO4)2) were prepared by a conventional impregnation method to evaluate their selective catalytic reduction activity of NOx under excess oxygen condition. Among them, good NOx reduction activity was obtained on the Pt/AlPO4 catalyst. Specific adsorption species during the NOx reduction were checked by a diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectrum (DRIFTs) measurement to examine the reaction mechanism. Also NH3 temperature programmed desorption measurements were performed for all catalysts and their catalytic properties were discussed from the viewpoints of solid acidity.

  4. Lean NOx Reduction in Two Stages: Non-thermal Plasma Followed by Heterogeneous Catalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Tonkyn, Russell G.; Yoon, Ilsop S.; Barlow, Stephan E.; Panov, Alexander G.; Kolwaite, A; Balmer, Mari LOU.

    2000-10-16

    We present data in this paper showing that non-thermal plasma in combination with heterogeneous catalysis is a promising technique for the treatment of NOx in diesel exhaust. Using a commonly available zeolite catalyst, sodium Y, to treat synthetic diesel exhaust we report approximately 50% chemical reduction of NOx over a broad, representative temperature range. We have measured the overall efficiency as a function of the temperature and hydrocarbon concentration. The direct detection of N2 and N2O when the background gas is replaced by helium confirms that true chemical reduction is occurring.

  5. WO3/CeO2-ZrO2, a promising catalyst for selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NOx with NH3 in diesel exhaust.

    PubMed

    Li, Ye; Cheng, Hao; Li, Deyi; Qin, Yongsheng; Xie, Yuming; Wang, Shudong

    2008-03-28

    A WO3/CeO2-ZrO2 catalyst system was discovered for selective catalytic reduction of NOx with NH3; the catalyst (10 wt% WO3 loading) showed nearly 100% NOx conversion in a temperature range of 200-500 degrees C, at a space velocity of 90 000 h(-1) in a simulated diesel exhaust containing 550 ppm NOx (NO : NO2 feed ratio at 1.0), 10 vol% H2O and 10 vol% CO2; the catalyst also exhibited high temperature stability.

  6. In2O3/Al2O3 Catalysts for NOx Reduction in Lean Condition

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Paul W.; Ragle, Christie; Boyer, Carrie S.; Balmer, M Lou; Engelhard, Mark H. ); McCready, David E. )

    2002-01-01

    The lean NOx performance and catalytic properties of In2O3/Al2O3 catalysts were investigated. High lean NOx activity was observed when propene was used as a reductant in the presence of 9% O2 and 7% H2O at a space velocity of 30,000h-1. The optimum lean NOx activity of In2O3/Al2O3 catalysts was observed at a loading of 2.5 wt.% indium on -Al2O3 which was prepared by a sol-gel technique (230 m2/g). When propane was used as a reductant, the In2O3/Al2O3 catalyst did not promote NOx reduction compared to the alumina substrate. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and temperature programmed reduction (TPR) have been used to characterize a series of In2O3/Al2O3 catalysts to better understand the surface structure of indium oxide species on the alumina support. The XRD data indicated that crystalline In2O3 was present at In2O3 loadings > 5wt.% and the quantity of the crystalline phase increased as a function of indium loading. XPS results suggested that indium oxide existed as a well-dispersed phase up to 10wt.% indium. The well dispersed or reducible indium oxide species below 400 C in TPR experiments were assigned as the sites which activate propene to oxygenated hydrocarbons such as acetaldehyde and acrolein. Alumina sites readily utilize the oxygenated hydrocarbons to reduce NOx. Dual-function mechanism was proposed to explain NOx reduction over In2O3/Al2O3 catalysts.

  7. Optimal ozone reduction policy design using adjoint-based NOx marginal damage information.

    PubMed

    Mesbah, S Morteza; Hakami, Amir; Schott, Stephan

    2013-01-01

    Despite substantial reductions in nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions in the United States, the success of emission control programs in optimal ozone reduction is disputable because they do not consider the spatial and temporal differences in health and environmental damages caused by NOx emissions. This shortcoming in the current U.S. NOx control policy is explored, and various methodologies for identifying optimal NOx emission control strategies are evaluated. The proposed approach combines an optimization platform with an adjoint (or backward) sensitivity analysis model and is able to examine the environmental performance of the current cap-and-trade policy and two damage-based emissions-differentiated policies. Using the proposed methodology, a 2007 case study of 218 U.S. electricity generation units participating in the NOx trading program is examined. The results indicate that inclusion of damage information can significantly enhance public health performance of an economic instrument. The net benefit under the policy that minimizes the social cost (i.e., health costs plus abatement costs) is six times larger than that of an exchange rate cap-and-trade policy.

  8. INVESTIGATION OF SELECTIVE CATALYTIC REDUCTION IMPACT ON MERCURY SPECIATION UNDER SIMULATED NOX EMISSION CONTROL CONDITIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Selective catalytic reduction (SCR) technology is being increasingly applied for controlling emissions of nitrogen oxides (NOx) from coal-fired boilers. Some recent field and pilot studies suggest that the operation of SCR could affect the chemical form of mercury in the coal com...

  9. Reductions of NOx emissions from the Bowline Point generating station

    SciTech Connect

    O`Sullivan, R.C.; Conti, A.V.; Hersh, S.

    1996-12-31

    Improved combustion hardware, based upon the simultaneous optimization of oil atomizer and flame stabilizer technologies, has been retrofitted to oil and gas fired boilers to reduce NO{sub x} emissions, particulate matter emissions, and opacity, and to provide operational and performance benefits. This technology, known as REACH, can be applied to wall and tangential-fired boilers at a fraction of the cost of installing new burners. In combination with conventional NO{sub x} controls such as overfire air, flue gas recirculation, and low-NO{sub x} burners, REACH technology can provide an additional increment in NO{sub x} reduction; often valuable for meeting and maintaining regulatory compliance. This paper describes the results achieved when this technology was applied to the boilers at Orange and Rockland Utilities` Bowline Point Station to meet NYSDEC part 227 regulations for the emissions of nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}). Bowline Point Unit 1 is a 600 MWe tangentially fired boiler with no installed NO{sub x} control systems. Bowline Point No. 2 is a 600 MW opposed-wall fired boiler with overfire air and windbox flue gas recirculation capability.

  10. NOx storage and reduction in model lean NOx trap catalysts studied by in situ DRIFTS

    SciTech Connect

    Ji, Yaying; Toops, Todd J; Pihl, Josh A; Crocker, Mark

    2009-01-01

    NO{sub x} storage and reduction on a model Pt/BaO/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst was studied by means of in situ DRIFTS measurements. To examine the effect of ceria addition, experiments were also conducted using Pt/BaO/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} to which Pt/CeO{sub 2} was added as a physical mixture in a 74:26 weight ratio. For the former catalyst, DRIFT spectra acquired during NO/O{sub 2} and NO{sub 2}/O{sub 2} storage indicated the formation of nitrite at 200 C during the initial stages of adsorption, while increasing the adsorption temperature appeared to facilitate the oxidation of nitrite to nitrate. The ceria-containing catalyst afforded similar DRIFT spectra under these conditions, although the presence of cerium nitrates was observed at 200 and 300 C, consistent with NO{sub x} storage on the ceria phase. DRIFT spectra acquired during NO{sub x} reduction in CO and CO/H{sub 2} showed that Ba nitrate species remained on the surface of both catalysts at 450 C, whereas the use of H{sub 2}-only resulted in complete removal of stored NO{sub x}. The observation of Ba carbonates when CO was present suggests that the inferior reduction efficiency of CO may arise from the formation of a crust of BaCO{sub 3} on the Ba phase, which inhibits further NO{sub x} reduction. DRIFT spectra acquired during lean-rich cycling (6.5 min lean, 1.0 min rich) with CO/H{sub 2} as the rich phase reductants revealed that a significant concentration of nitrates remained on the catalysts at the end of the rich phase. This implies that a large fraction of nitrate is not decomposed during cycling and thus cannot participate in NO{sub x} abatement through storage and regeneration.

  11. Investigation of NOx Reduction by Low Temperature Oxidation Using Ozone Produced by Dielectric Barrier Discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stamate, Eugen; Irimiea, Cornelia; Salewski, Mirko

    2013-05-01

    NOx reduction by low temperature oxidation using ozone produced by a dielectric barrier discharge generator is investigated for different process parameters in a 6 m long reactor in serpentine arrangement using synthetic dry flue gas with NOx levels below 500 ppm, flows up to 50 slm and temperatures up to 80 °C. The role of different mixing schemes and the impact of a steep temperature gradient are also taken into consideration. The process chemistry is monitored by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, chemiluminescence and absorption spectroscopy. The kinetic mechanism during the mixing in a cross flow configuration is investigated using three-dimensional simulations.

  12. Reconciling NOx emissions reductions and ozone trends in the U.S., 2002-2006

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Wei; Cohan, Daniel S.; Napelenok, Sergey L.

    2013-05-01

    Dynamic evaluation seeks to assess the ability of photochemical models to replicate changes in air quality as emissions and other conditions change. When a model fails to replicate an observed change, a key challenge is to discern whether the discrepancy is caused by errors in meteorological simulations, errors in emission magnitudes and changes, or inaccurate responses of simulated pollutant concentrations to emission changes. In this study, the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model is applied to simulate the ozone (O3) change after the NOx SIP Call and mobile emission controls substantially reduced nitrogen oxides (NOx) emissions in the eastern U.S. from 2002 to 2006. For both modeled and observed O3, changes in episode average daily maximal 8-h O3 were highly correlated (R2 = 0.89) with changes in the 95th percentile, although the magnitudes of reductions increased nonlinearly at high percentile O3 concentrations. Observed downward changes in mean NOx (-11.6 to -2.5 ppb) and 8-h O3 (-10.4 to -4.7 ppb) concentrations in metropolitan areas in the NOx SIP Call region were under-predicted by 31%-64% and 26%-66%, respectively. The under-predicted O3 improvements in the NOx SIP Call region could not be explained by adjusting for temperature biases in the meteorological input, or by considering uncertainties in the chemical reaction rate constants. However, the under-prediction in O3 improvements could be alleviated by 5%-31% by constraining NOx emissions in each year based on observed NOx concentrations. This demonstrates the crucial need to accurately characterize changes in precursor emissions when dynamically evaluating a model's ability to simulate O3 responses to those changes.

  13. Study on Reaction Products in Plasma-Assisted Selective Catalytic Reduction of NOx

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshizawa, Hayato; Tochikubo, Fumiyoshi; Uchida, Satoshi; Watanabe, Tsuneo

    Since the gas discharge plasma easily converts NO to NO2, which can be reduced more actively in selective catalytic reduction with hydrocarbons (HC-SCR), the plasma-assisted HC-SCR is an effective method for NOx reduction from diesel engine exhaust gases. In this work, the relation between NOx removal and reaction products is investigated in plasma-assisted HC-SCR in simulated flue gas as parameters of gas composition, plasma specific energy and catalyst temperature. C2H4 is used as a hydrocarbon and commercially available Al2O3 is used as a catalyst. After the plasma treatment of simulated flue gas, HCHO and HCOOH were generated as by-products, while NO was effectively converted to NO2. These by-products were confirmed to be reactive at lower catalyst temperature than C2H4 in HC-SCR. The relation between NOx removal and reaction products suggests that HCHO and HCOOH contribute the effective NOx reduction at low catalyst temperature in plasma-assisted HC-SCR.

  14. Impact of sulfation and desulfation on NOx reduction using Cu-chabazite SCR catalysts

    DOE PAGES

    Brookshear, Daniel William; Nam, Jeong -Gil; Nguyen, Ke; Toops, Todd J.; Binder, Andrew J.

    2015-06-05

    This bench reactor study investigates the impact of gaseous sulfur on the NOx reduction activity of Cu-chabazite SCR (Cu-CHA) catalysts at SO2 concentrations representative of marine diesel engine exhaust. After two hours of 500 ppm SO2 exposure at 250 and 400 °C in the simulated diesel exhaust gases, the NOx reduction activity of the sulfated Cu-CHA SCR catalysts is severely degraded at evaluation temperatures below 250 °C; however, above 250 °C the impact of sulfur exposure is minimal. EPMA shows that sulfur is located throughout the washcoat and along the entire length of the sulfated samples. Interestingly, BET measurements revealmore » that the sulfated samples have a 20% decrease in surface area. Moreover, the sulfated samples show a decrease in NOx/nitrate absorption during NO exposure in a DRIFTS reactor which suggests that Cu sites in the catalyst are blocked by the presence of sulfur. SO2 exposure also results in an increase in NH3 storage capacity, possibly due to the formation of ammonium sulfate species in the sulfated samples. In all cases, lean thermal treatments as low as 500 °C reverse the effects of sulfur exposure and restore the NOx reduction activity of the Cu-CHA catalyst to that of the fresh condition.« less

  15. The selective catalytic reduction of NOx over Ag/Al2O3 with isobutanol as the reductant

    DOE PAGES

    Brookshear, Daniel William; Pihl, Josh A.; Toops, Todd J.; West, Brian H.; Prikhodko, Vitaly Y.

    2016-02-13

    Here, this study investigates the potential of isobutanol (iBuOH) as a reductant for the selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NOx over 2 wt% Ag/Al2O3 between 150 and 550 °C and gas hourly space velocities (GHSV) between 10,000 and 35,000 h-1. The feed gas consists of 500 ppm NO, 5% H2O, 10% O2, and 375-1500 ppm iBuOH (C1:N ratios of 3-12); additionally, blends of 24 and 48% iBuOH in gasoline are evaluated. Over 90% NOx conversion is achieved between 300 and 400 C using pure iBuOH, including a 40% peak selectivity towards NH3 that could be utilized in a dual HC/NH3more » SCR configuration. The iBuOH/gasoline blends are only able to achieve greater than 90% NOx conversion when operated at a GHSV of 10,000 h-1 and employing a C1:N ratio of 12. Iso-butyraldehyde and NO2 appear to function as intermediates in the iBuOH-SCR mechanism, which mirrors the mechanism observed for EtOH-SCR. In general, the performance of iBuOH in the SCR of NOx over a Ag/Al2O3 catalyst is comparable with that of EtOH, although EtOH/gasoline blends display higher NOx reduction than iBuOH/gasoline blends. The key parameter in employing alcohols in SCR appears to be the C-OH:N ratio rather than the C1:N ratio.« less

  16. Novel cerium-tungsten mixed oxide catalyst for the selective catalytic reduction of NO(x) with NH3.

    PubMed

    Shan, Wenpo; Liu, Fudong; He, Hong; Shi, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Changbin

    2011-07-28

    A novel Ce-W mixed oxide catalyst prepared by homogeneous precipitation method presented nearly 100% NO(x) conversion in a wide temperature range from 250 to 425 °C for the selective catalytic reduction of NO(x) with NH(3) under an extremely high GHSV of 500,000 h(-1).

  17. Emission reduction of NOx, PM, PM-carbon, and PAHs from a generator fuelled by biodieselhols.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Jen-Hsiung; Chen, Shui-Jen; Huang, Kuo-Lin; Lin, Wen-Yinn; Lee, Wen-Jhy; Chao, How-Ran; Lin, Chih-Chung; Hsieh, Lien-Te

    2014-06-15

    This investigation examines the particulate matter (PM), particulate carbon, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and nitrogen oxides (NOx) emitted from a generator fueled by petroleum diesel blended with waste-edible-oil-biodiesel and water-containing acetone. Experimental results show that using biodieselhols with water-containing (or pure) acetone as the fuel of generator, in comparison to using petroleum diesel, significantly reduces PM emission; roughly, this reduction increased as percentage of water-containing acetone increased. When the percentages of waste-edible-oil-biodiesel were ≤ 5 vol%, adding pure or water-containing acetone (1-3 vol%) to biodieselhols generated emission reductions of NOx, PM, particle-bound organic carbon (OC), total-PAHs, and total-BaPeq. Consequently, using water-containing acetone biodieselhols as an alternative generator fuel is feasible and helps recycle and reuse waste solvents containing water-containing acetone.

  18. Effects of gas compositions on NOx reduction by selective non-catalytic reduction with ammonia in a simulated cement precalciner atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Fan, Weiyi; Zhu, Tianle; Sun, Yifei; Lv, Dong

    2014-10-01

    The effects of gas compositions on NOx reduction and NH3 slip by selective non-catalytic reduction (SNCR) with NH3 were investigated in a simulated cement precalciner atmosphere. The results show that the presence of H2O improves NOx reduction and widens the reduction temperature window significantly. O2 is indispensable for reducing NOx. The optimum reduction temperature decreases and the temperature window widens to a lower temperature with the increase of O2 content. In addition, the increase of O2 content also results in a decrease of the maximum NOx reduction efficiency. The effect of SO2 on NOx reduction is negligible in the simulated precalciner atmosphere. To increase CO concentration makes NO reduction take place at relatively low temperatures. However, NH3 will tend to be oxidized into NO instead of reducing NO after entering the stream containing O2 at high temperatures if it is initially blended with a high concentration of CO in an oxygen-free environment. The increase of H2O, O2, SO2 or CO concentration is helpful to reduce NH3 slip in the temperature region below 900°C. These effects are resulted from the fact that the generation and consumption of O and OH radicals which are crucial to NO reduction and formation can be influenced by the four gas compositions. In industrial operation of SNCR for cement precalciner, these effects should be taken into account to increase NOx reduction efficiency and avoid NH3 slip.

  19. Effects of gas compositions on NOx reduction by selective non-catalytic reduction with ammonia in a simulated cement precalciner atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Fan, Weiyi; Zhu, Tianle; Sun, Yifei; Lv, Dong

    2014-10-01

    The effects of gas compositions on NOx reduction and NH3 slip by selective non-catalytic reduction (SNCR) with NH3 were investigated in a simulated cement precalciner atmosphere. The results show that the presence of H2O improves NOx reduction and widens the reduction temperature window significantly. O2 is indispensable for reducing NOx. The optimum reduction temperature decreases and the temperature window widens to a lower temperature with the increase of O2 content. In addition, the increase of O2 content also results in a decrease of the maximum NOx reduction efficiency. The effect of SO2 on NOx reduction is negligible in the simulated precalciner atmosphere. To increase CO concentration makes NO reduction take place at relatively low temperatures. However, NH3 will tend to be oxidized into NO instead of reducing NO after entering the stream containing O2 at high temperatures if it is initially blended with a high concentration of CO in an oxygen-free environment. The increase of H2O, O2, SO2 or CO concentration is helpful to reduce NH3 slip in the temperature region below 900°C. These effects are resulted from the fact that the generation and consumption of O and OH radicals which are crucial to NO reduction and formation can be influenced by the four gas compositions. In industrial operation of SNCR for cement precalciner, these effects should be taken into account to increase NOx reduction efficiency and avoid NH3 slip. PMID:25065808

  20. Chemiluminescence analyzer of NOx as a high-throughput screening tool in selective catalytic reduction of NO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Kwang Seok; Woo, Seong Ihl

    2011-10-01

    A chemiluminescence-based analyzer of NOx gas species has been applied for high-throughput screening of a library of catalytic materials. The applicability of the commercial NOx analyzer as a rapid screening tool was evaluated using selective catalytic reduction of NO gas. A library of 60 binary alloys composed of Pt and Co, Zr, La, Ce, Fe or W on Al2O3 substrate was tested for the efficiency of NOx removal using a home-built 64-channel parallel and sequential tubular reactor. The NOx concentrations measured by the NOx analyzer agreed well with the results obtained using micro gas chromatography for a reference catalyst consisting of 1 wt% Pt on γ-Al2O3. Most alloys showed high efficiency at 275 °C, which is typical of Pt-based catalysts for selective catalytic reduction of NO. The screening with NOx analyzer allowed to select Pt-Ce(X) (X=1-3) and Pt-Fe(2) as the optimal catalysts for NOx removal: 73% NOx conversion was achieved with the Pt-Fe(2) alloy, which was much better than the results for the reference catalyst and the other library alloys. This study demonstrates a sequential high-throughput method of practical evaluation of catalysts for the selective reduction of NO.

  1. Cu-SSZ-39, an active and hydrothermally stable catalyst for the selective catalytic reduction of NOx.

    PubMed

    Moliner, Manuel; Franch, Cristina; Palomares, Eduardo; Grill, Marie; Corma, Avelino

    2012-08-25

    A Cu-exchanged SSZ-39 zeolite has been synthesized and tested for the selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NOx. This material shows an excellent catalytic activity, and most importantly, an extraordinary hydrothermal stability.

  2. NOx Emission Reduction and its Effects on Ozone during the 2008 Olympic Games

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Qing; Wang, Yuhang; Zhao, Chun; Liu, Zhen; Gustafson, William I.; Shao, Min

    2011-07-15

    We applied a daily-assimilated inversion method to estimate NOx (NO+NO2) emissions for June-September 2007 and 2008 on the basis of the Aura Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) observations of nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and model simulations using the Regional chEmistry and trAnsport Model (REAM). Over urban Beijing, rural Beijing, and the Huabei Plain, OMI column NO2 reductions are approximately 45%, 33%, and 14%, respectively, while the corresponding anthropogenic NOx emission reductions are only 28%, 24%, and 6%, during the full emission control period (July 20 – Sep 20, 2008). The emission reduction began in early July and was in full force by July 20, corresponding to the scheduled implementation of emission controls over Beijing. The emissions did not appear to recover after the emission control period. Meteorological change from summer 2007 to 2008 is the main factor contributing to the column NO2 decreases not accounted for by the emission reduction. Model simulations suggest that the effect of emission reduction on ozone concentrations over Beijing is relatively minor using a standard VOC emission inventory in China. With an adjustment of the model emissions to reflect in situ observations of VOCs in Beijing, the model simulation suggests a larger effect of the emission reduction.

  3. Selective catalytic reduction operation with heavy fuel oil: NOx, NH3, and particle emissions.

    PubMed

    Lehtoranta, Kati; Vesala, Hannu; Koponen, Päivi; Korhonen, Satu

    2015-04-01

    To meet stringent NOx emission limits, selective catalytic reduction (SCR) is increasingly utilized in ships, likely also in combination with low-priced higher sulfur level fuels. In this study, the performance of SCR was studied by utilizing NOx, NH3, and particle measurements. Urea decomposition was studied with ammonia and isocyanic acid measurements and was found to be more effective with heavy fuel oil (HFO) than with light fuel oil. This is suggested to be explained by the metals found in HFO contributing to metal oxide particles catalyzing the hydrolysis reaction prior to SCR. At the exhaust temperature of 340 °C NOx reduction was 85-90%, while at lower temperatures the efficiency decreased. By increasing the catalyst loading, the low temperature behavior of the SCR was enhanced. The drawback of this, however, was the tendency of particle emissions (sulfate) to increase at higher temperatures with higher loaded catalysts. The particle size distribution results showed high amounts of nanoparticles (in 25-30 nm size), the formation of which SCR either increased or decreased. The findings of this work provide a better understanding of the usage of SCR in combination with a higher sulfur level fuel and also of ship particle emissions, which are a growing concern.

  4. SELECTIVE REDUCTION OF NOX IN OXYGEN RICH ENVIRONMENTS WITH PLASMA-ASSISTED CATALYSIS: CATALYST DEVELOPMENT AND MECHANISTIC STUDIES

    SciTech Connect

    Peden, C; Barlow, S; Hoard, J; Kwak, J; *Balmer-Millar, M; *Panov, A; Schmieg, S; Szanyi, J; Tonkyn, R

    2003-08-24

    The control of NOx (NO and NO2) emissions from so-called ''lean-burn'' vehicle engines remains a challenge. In recent years, there have been a number of reports that show that a plasma device combined with a catalyst can reduce as high as 90% or more of NOx in simulated diesel and other ''lean-burn'' exhaust. In the case of propylene containing simulated diesel exhaust, the beneficial role of a plasma treatment is now thought to be due to oxidation of NO to NO2, and the formation of partially oxidized hydrocarbons that are more active for the catalytic reduction of NO2 than propylene. Thus, the overall system can be most usefully described as hydrocarbon selective catalytic reduction (SCR) enhanced by 'reforming' the exhaust with a non-thermal plasma (NTP) device. For plasma-enhanced catalysis, both zeolite- and alumina-based materials have shown high activity, albeit in somewhat different temperature ranges, when preceded by an NTP reactor. This paper will briefly describe our research efforts aimed at optimizing the catalyst materials for NTP-catalysis devices based, in part, on our continuing studies of the NTP- and catalytic-reaction mechanisms. Various alkali- and alkaline earth-cation-exchanged Y zeolites have been prepared, their material properties characterized, and they have been tested as catalytic materials for NOx reduction in laboratory NTP-catalysis reactors. Interestingly, NO2 formed in the plasma and not subsequently removed over these catalysts, will back-convert to NO, albeit to varying extents depending upon the nature of the cation. Besides this comparative reactivity, we will also discuss selected synthesis strategies for enhancing the performance of these zeolite-based catalyst materials. A particularly important result from our mechanistic studies is the observation that aldehydes, formed during the plasma treatment of simulated diesel exhaust, are the important species for the reduction of NOx to N2. Indeed, acetaldehyde has been found to

  5. Effect of K loadings on nitrate formation/decomposition and on NOx storage performance of K-based NOx storage-reduction catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Do Heui; Mudiyanselage, Kumudu K.; Szanyi, Janos; Kwak, Ja Hun; Zhu, Haiyang; Peden, Charles HF

    2013-10-25

    We have investigated nitrate formation and decomposition processes, and measured NOx storage performance on Pt-K2O/Al2O3 catalysts as a function of potassium loading. After NO2 adsorption at room temperature, ionic and bidentate nitrates were observed by fourier transform infra-red (FTIR) spectroscopy. The ratio of the former to the latter species increased with increasing potassium loading up to 10 wt%, and then stayed almost constant with additional K, demonstrating a clear dependence of loading on the morphology of the K species. Although both K2O(10)/Al2O3 and K2O(20)/Al2O3 samples have similar nitrate species after NO2 adsorption, the latter has more thermally stable nitrate species as evidenced by FTIR and NO2 temperature programmed desorption (TPD) results. With regard to NOx storage performance, the temperature of maximum NOx uptake (Tmax) is 573 K up to a potassium loading of 10 wt%. As the potassium loading increases from 10 wt% to 20 wt%, Tmax shifted from 573 K to 723 K. Moreover, the amount of NO uptake (38 cm3 NOx/g catal) at Tmax increased more than three times, indicating that efficiency of K in storing NOx is enhanced significantly at higher temperature, in good agreement with the NO2 TPD and FTIR results. Thus, a combination of characterization and NOx storage performance results demonstrates an unexpected effect of potassium loading on nitrate formation and decomposition processes; results important for developing Pt-K2O/Al2O3 for potential applications as high temperature NOx storage-reduction catalysts.

  6. Commercial design development of amine enhanced fuel lean gas reburn (AEFLGR{trademark}) for NOx reduction in electric utility power boilers

    SciTech Connect

    Comparato, J.R.; Michels, W.F.; Xu, H.

    2000-07-01

    Amine enhanced Fuel Lean Gas REburn (AEFLGR{trademark}) offers a highly cost effective, easily retrofitted technology for NOx Reduction. A commercial installation was recently started on two 320 MW electric utility boilers firing bituminous coal. NOx reductions of 60% were achieved from baselines of approximately 1 lb/10{sup 6} Btu. In a recent test program on a 605 MW unit firing Powder River Basin coal greater than 55% reduction from a baseline of 0.44 lb/10{sup 6} Btu was demonstrated. Each required tuning to the specific operating conditions of these units. Modeling techniques and injector development provide a basis for the AEFLGR{trademark} design technology. The equipment systems are simple, similar in cost to SNCR systems. Typically the candidate application will have sufficient natural gas capacity, e.g., start-up fuel, to accommodate the gas requirement of 7--10% of total fuel heat input. The amine equipment is essentially an SNCR system. The FLGR{trademark} and SNCR systems when combined in effect double the reduction that can be achieved separately by either process. Consequently, NOx reduction can be greatly increased over that of the separate processes while maintaining a low cost per ton of reduction.

  7. Observations of the temperature dependent response of ozone to NOx reductions in the Sacramento, CA urban plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lafranchi, B. W.; Goldstein, A. H.; Cohen, R. C.

    2011-07-01

    Observations of NOx in the Sacramento, CA region show that mixing ratios decreased by 30 % between 2001 and 2008. Here we use an observation-based method to quantify net ozone (O3) production rates in the outflow from the Sacramento metropolitan region and examine the O3 decrease resulting from reductions in NOx emissions. This observational method does not rely on assumptions about detailed chemistry of ozone production, rather it is an independent means to verify and test these assumptions. We use an instantaneous steady-state model as well as a detailed 1-D plume model to aid in interpretation of the ozone production inferred from observations. In agreement with the models, the observations show that early in the plume, the NOx dependence for Ox (Ox = O3 + NO2) production is strongly coupled with temperature, suggesting that temperature-dependent biogenic VOC emissions and other temperature-related effects can drive Ox production between NOx-limited and NOx-suppressed regimes. As a result, NOx reductions were found to be most effective at higher temperatures over the 7 year period. We show that violations of the California 1-h O3 standard (90 ppb) in the region have been decreasing linearly with decreases in NOx (at a given temperature) and predict that reductions of NOx concentrations (and presumably emissions) by an additional 30 % (relative to 2007 levels) will eliminate violations of the state 1 h standard in the region. If current trends continue, a 30 % decrease in NOx is expected by 2012, and an end to violations of the 1 h standard in the Sacramento region appears to be imminent.

  8. Observations of the temperature dependent response of ozone to NOx reductions in the Sacramento, CA urban plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lafranchi, B. W.; Goldstein, A. H.; Cohen, R. C.

    2011-02-01

    Observations of NOx in the Sacramento, CA region show that mixing ratios decreased by 30% between 2001 and 2008. Here we use an observation-based method to quantify net ozone production rates in the outflow from the Sacramento metropolitan region and examine the O3 decrease resulting from reductions in NOx emissions. This observational method does not rely on assumptions about detailed chemistry of ozone production, rather it is an independent means to verify and test these assumptions. We use an instantaneous steady-state model as well as a detailed 1-D plume model to aid in interpretation of the ozone production inferred from observations. In agreement with the models, the observations show that early in the plume, the NOx dependence for Ox (Ox = O3 + NO2) production is strongly coupled with temperature, suggesting that temperature-dependent biogenic VOC emissions can drive Ox production between NOx-limited and NOx-suppressed regimes. As a result, NOx reductions were found to be most effective at higher temperatures over the 7 year period. We show that violations of the California 1-hour O3 standard (90 ppb) in the region have been decreasing linearly with decreases in NOx (at a given temperature) and predict that reductions of NOx concentrations (and presumably emissions) by an additional 30% (relative to 2007 levels) will eliminate violations of the state 1 h standard in the region. If current trends continue, a 30% decrease in NOx is expected by 2012, and an end to violations of the 1 h standard in the Sacramento region appears to be imminent.

  9. Don't NOx Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Mathis, J.D.; Lachowicz, Y.

    2005-07-01

    Modifications to boiler combustion systems allow Fayette Power Projects units 1 and 2 to meet new NOx emissions limits east of La Grange in Eastern Texas. The article describes modifications executed by Alstom in 2004 which attained an overall reduction in NOx emissions of almost 69%. 4 figs., 1 tab., 1 photo.

  10. ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION REPORT, NOX CONTROL TECHNOLOGIES, CATALYTICA COMBUSTION SYSTEMS, INC., XONON FLAMELESS COMBUSTION SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Environmental Technology Verification report discusses the technology and performance of the Xonon Cool Combustion System manufactured by Catalytica Energy Systems, Inc., formerly Catalytica Combustion Systems, Inc., to control NOx emissions from gas turbines that operate wit...

  11. Satellite-observed US power plant NOx emission reductions and their impact on air quality - article no. L22812

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, S.W.; Heckel, A.; McKeen, S.A.; Frost, G.J.; Hsie, E.Y.; Trainer, M.K.; Richter, A.; Burrows, J.P.; Peckham, S.E.; Grell, G.A.

    2006-11-29

    Nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions resulting from fossil fuel combustion lead to unhealthy levels of near-surface ozone (O{sub 3}). One of the largest U.S. sources, electric power generation, represented about 25% of the U.S. anthropogenic NOx emissions in 1999. Here we show that space-based instruments observed declining regional NOx levels between 1999 and 2005 in response to the recent implementation of pollution controls by utility companies in the eastern U.S. Satellite-retrieved summertime nitrogen dioxide (NO{sub 2}) columns and bottom-up emission estimates show larger decreases in the Ohio River Valley, where power plants dominate NOx emissions, than in the northeast U.S. urban corridor. Model simulations predict lower O{sub 3} across much of the eastern U.S. in response to these emission reductions.

  12. Role of reductants in CuZSM-5 catalyzed NOx reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Bhore, N.A.; Dwyer, F.G.; Marler, D.O.; McWilliams, J.P.

    1993-12-31

    The implementation of clean burn engines is limited by technology to efficiently remove nitrogen oxides from the net oxidizing exhaust composition. High NO{sub x} conversions require the preferential reaction of reductants (hydrogen, carbon monoxide, olefins and paraffins) with nitrogen oxides over that of combustion. This study examines the role of these reactions over CuZM-5 catalyst in a simulated lean burn engine exhaust. By careful addition of a known amount of individual reductant over fresh and aged catalysts, the authors find that propylene is the primary-reductant for NO{sub x} conversion; hydrogen and carbon monoxide are not. For stoichiometric-burn engines, carbon monoxide and hydrogen are known to be primary reductants on three-way catalysts. Other light olefins such as isobutylene and ethylene are also effective in NO{sub x} reduction. Paraffins are much less effective. The efficacy of olefin reductant decreases on aging.

  13. Closeout final report on a demonstration test and evaluation of the Cannon Low-NOx Digester System

    SciTech Connect

    1995-04-01

    Cannon Boiler Works Inc. has been investigating a system for removing NOx from the exhaust gases of furnaces, gas turbines, chemical reactors, incinerators, and boilers. Computer simulations, bench-scale and pilot plant tests have proved that the system is capable of removing substantially all of the NOx from natural gas fired equipment exhaust streams. Originally designated as the Cannon NOx Digester, it has recently been renamed the Low Temperature Oxidation (LTO) System for NOx and SOx Reduction. The principal elements in the system are a fan, heat exchanger, oxidation chamber, spray chamber acting as a gas/liquid absorber, demister, an ozone generator, liquid oxygen storage or dry air supply system for the ozonator, chemical storage and metering system for the caustic neutralizer, and a data acquisition and control system. Most of the ozone is consumed in converting NOx to N{sub 2}O{sub 5} which hydrates to nitric acid which is then scrubbed out of the gas as it passes through the absorber. CO also reacts with ozone to form CO{sub 2} which is subsequently scrubbed out with NaOH. A demonstration, planned for the Alta Dena Dairy located near Los Angeles and in violation of California`s air quality regulations for natural gas fired boilers, was started, delayed due to boiler modifications, and will be continued shortly with new funding. This paper describes the LTO process and presents results from the initial demonstration.

  14. Reduction of NOx and PM in marine diesel engine exhaust gas using microwave plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balachandran, W.; FInst, P.; Manivannan, N.; Beleca, R.; Abbod, M.

    2015-10-01

    Abatement of NOx and particulate matters (PM) of marine diesel exhaust gas using microwave (MW) non-thermal plasma is presented in this paper. NOx mainly consist of NO and less concentration of NO2 in a typical two stoke marine diesel engine and microwave plasma generation can completely remove NO. MW was generated using two 2kW microwave sources and a saw tooth passive electrode. Passive electrode was used to generate high electric field region within microwave environment where high energetic electrons (1-3eV) are produced for the generation of non-thermal plasma (NTP). 2kW gen-set diesel exhaust gas was used to test our pilot-scale MW plasma reactor. The experimental results show that almost 100% removal of NO is possible for the exhaust gas flow rate of 60l/s. It was also shown that MW can significantly remove soot particles (PM, 10nm to 365nm) entrained in the exhaust gas of 200kW marine diesel engine with 40% engine load and gas flow rate of 130l/s. MW without generating plasma showed reduction up to 50% reduction of PM and with the plasma up to 90% reduction. The major challenge in these experiments was that igniting the desired plasma and sustaining it with passive electrodes for longer period (10s of minutes) as it required fine tuning of electrode position, which was influenced by many factors such as gas flow rate, geometry of reactor and MW power.

  15. Reductions in particulate and NO(x) emissions by diesel engine parameter adjustments with HVO fuel.

    PubMed

    Happonen, Matti; Heikkilä, Juha; Murtonen, Timo; Lehto, Kalle; Sarjovaara, Teemu; Larmi, Martti; Keskinen, Jorma; Virtanen, Annele

    2012-06-01

    Hydrotreated vegetable oil (HVO) diesel fuel is a promising biofuel candidate that can complement or substitute traditional diesel fuel in engines. It has been already reported that by changing the fuel from conventional EN590 diesel to HVO decreases exhaust emissions. However, as the fuels have certain chemical and physical differences, it is clear that the full advantage of HVO cannot be realized unless the engine is optimized for the new fuel. In this article, we studied how much exhaust emissions can be reduced by adjusting engine parameters for HVO. The results indicate that, with all the studied loads (50%, 75%, and 100%), particulate mass and NO(x) can both be reduced over 25% by engine parameter adjustments. Further, the emission reduction was even higher when the target for adjusting engine parameters was to exclusively reduce either particulates or NO(x). In addition to particulate mass, different indicators of particulate emissions were also compared. These indicators included filter smoke number (FSN), total particle number, total particle surface area, and geometric mean diameter of the emitted particle size distribution. As a result of this comparison, a linear correlation between FSN and total particulate surface area at low FSN region was found.

  16. SNCR De-NOx within a moderate temperature range using urea-spiked hydrazine hydrate as reductant.

    PubMed

    Chen, H; Chen, D Z; Fan, S; Hong, L; Wang, D

    2016-10-01

    In this research, urea-spiked hydrazine hydrate solutions are used as reductants for the Selective Non-Catalytic Reduction (SNCR) De-NOx process below 650 °C. The urea concentration in the urea/hydrazine hydrate solutions is chosen through experimental and theoretical studies. To determine the mechanism of the De-NOx process, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) of the urea/hydrazine hydrate solutions and their thermal decomposition in air and nitrogen atmospheres were studied to understand their decomposition behaviours and redox characteristics. Then a plug flow reactor (PFR) model was adopted to simulate the De-NOx processes in a pilot scale tubular reactor, and the calculated De-NOx efficiency vs. temperature profiles were compared with experimental results to support the mechanism and choose the proper reductant and its reaction temperature. Both the experimental and calculated results show that when the urea is spiked into hydrazine hydrate solution to make the urea-N content approximately 16.7%-25% of the total N content in the solution, better De-NOx efficiencies can be obtained in the temperature range of 550-650 °C, under which NH3 is inactive in reducing NOx. And it is also proved that for these urea-spiked hydrazine hydrate solutions, the hydrazine decomposition through the pathway N2H4 + M = N2H3 + H + M is enhanced to provide radical H, which is active to reduce NO. Finally, the reaction routes for SNCR De-NOx process based on urea-spiked hydrazine hydrate at the proper temperature are proposed.

  17. SNCR De-NOx within a moderate temperature range using urea-spiked hydrazine hydrate as reductant.

    PubMed

    Chen, H; Chen, D Z; Fan, S; Hong, L; Wang, D

    2016-10-01

    In this research, urea-spiked hydrazine hydrate solutions are used as reductants for the Selective Non-Catalytic Reduction (SNCR) De-NOx process below 650 °C. The urea concentration in the urea/hydrazine hydrate solutions is chosen through experimental and theoretical studies. To determine the mechanism of the De-NOx process, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) of the urea/hydrazine hydrate solutions and their thermal decomposition in air and nitrogen atmospheres were studied to understand their decomposition behaviours and redox characteristics. Then a plug flow reactor (PFR) model was adopted to simulate the De-NOx processes in a pilot scale tubular reactor, and the calculated De-NOx efficiency vs. temperature profiles were compared with experimental results to support the mechanism and choose the proper reductant and its reaction temperature. Both the experimental and calculated results show that when the urea is spiked into hydrazine hydrate solution to make the urea-N content approximately 16.7%-25% of the total N content in the solution, better De-NOx efficiencies can be obtained in the temperature range of 550-650 °C, under which NH3 is inactive in reducing NOx. And it is also proved that for these urea-spiked hydrazine hydrate solutions, the hydrazine decomposition through the pathway N2H4 + M = N2H3 + H + M is enhanced to provide radical H, which is active to reduce NO. Finally, the reaction routes for SNCR De-NOx process based on urea-spiked hydrazine hydrate at the proper temperature are proposed. PMID:27427778

  18. Sulfation and Desulfation Behavior of Pt-BaO/MgO-Al2O3 NOx Storage Reduction Catalyst.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Soyeon; Kim, Do Heui

    2016-05-01

    The comparative study between Pt-BaO/Al2O3 and Pt-BaO/MgO-Al2O3 gives the information about the effect of MgO addition to Al2O3 support on the sulfation and desulfation behavior of Pt-BaO/MgO-Al2O3 NOx storage reduction catalyst. The sulfated two samples were analyzed by using element analysis (EA), X-ray diffraction (XRD), H2 temperature programmed reaction (H2 TPRX) and NOx uptake measurement. The amount of sulfur uptake on 2 wt% Pt-20 wt% BaO/Al2O3 and 2 wt% Pt-20 wt% BaO/MgO-Al2O3 are almost identical as 0.45 and 0.40 of S/Ba, respectively, which yields the drastic decrease in NOx uptake for both sulfated samples. However, after desulfa- tion with H2 at 600 degrees C, the residual sulfur amount on MgO-Al2O3 supported catalyst is three times larger than that on Al2O3 supported one, indicating that sulfur species formed on the former are more stable than those on the latter. It is also well corresponding to the H2 TPRX results where the main H2S peak from MgO-Al2O3 supported sample is observed at higher temperature than Al2O3 supported one, resulting in the lower NOx uptake activity of former sample than the latter one. Meanwhile, after desulfation of MgO-Al2O3 supported sample at 700 degrees C and 800 degrees C, the activity is recovered more significantly due to the removal of the large amount of sulfur while Al2O3 supported one decreases monotonically due to the sintering of Pt crystallite and the formation of BaAl2O4 phase. It is summarized that MgO-Al2O3 supported catalyst enhances the thermal stability of the catalyst, however, forms the stable sulfate species, which needs to be improved to develop the more sulfur resistant NSR catalyst system. PMID:27483765

  19. Sulfation and Desulfation Behavior of Pt-BaO/MgO-Al2O3 NOx Storage Reduction Catalyst.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Soyeon; Kim, Do Heui

    2016-05-01

    The comparative study between Pt-BaO/Al2O3 and Pt-BaO/MgO-Al2O3 gives the information about the effect of MgO addition to Al2O3 support on the sulfation and desulfation behavior of Pt-BaO/MgO-Al2O3 NOx storage reduction catalyst. The sulfated two samples were analyzed by using element analysis (EA), X-ray diffraction (XRD), H2 temperature programmed reaction (H2 TPRX) and NOx uptake measurement. The amount of sulfur uptake on 2 wt% Pt-20 wt% BaO/Al2O3 and 2 wt% Pt-20 wt% BaO/MgO-Al2O3 are almost identical as 0.45 and 0.40 of S/Ba, respectively, which yields the drastic decrease in NOx uptake for both sulfated samples. However, after desulfa- tion with H2 at 600 degrees C, the residual sulfur amount on MgO-Al2O3 supported catalyst is three times larger than that on Al2O3 supported one, indicating that sulfur species formed on the former are more stable than those on the latter. It is also well corresponding to the H2 TPRX results where the main H2S peak from MgO-Al2O3 supported sample is observed at higher temperature than Al2O3 supported one, resulting in the lower NOx uptake activity of former sample than the latter one. Meanwhile, after desulfation of MgO-Al2O3 supported sample at 700 degrees C and 800 degrees C, the activity is recovered more significantly due to the removal of the large amount of sulfur while Al2O3 supported one decreases monotonically due to the sintering of Pt crystallite and the formation of BaAl2O4 phase. It is summarized that MgO-Al2O3 supported catalyst enhances the thermal stability of the catalyst, however, forms the stable sulfate species, which needs to be improved to develop the more sulfur resistant NSR catalyst system.

  20. Estimates of ozone response to various combinations of NO(x) and VOC emission reductions in the eastern United States

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roselle, Shawn J.; Schere, Kenneth L.; Chu, Shao-Hang

    1994-01-01

    There is increasing recognition that controls on NO(x) emissions may be necessary, in addition to existing and future Volatile Organic Compounds (VOC) controls, for the abatement of ozone (O3) over portions of the United States. This study compares various combinations of anthropogenic NO(x) and VOC emission reductions through a series of model simulations. A total of 6 simulations were performed with the Regional Oxidant Model (ROM) for a 9-day period in July 1988. Each simulation reduced anthropogenic NO(x) and VOC emissions across-the-board by different amounts. Maximum O3 concentrations for the period were compared between the simulations. Comparison of the simulations suggests that: (1) NO(x) controls may be more effective than VOC controls in reducing peak O3 over most of the eastern United States; (2) VOC controls are most effective in urban areas having large sources of emissions; (3) NO(x) controls may increase O3 near large point sources; and (4) the benefit gained from increasing the amount of VOC controls may lessen as the amount of NO(x) control is increased. This paper has been reviewed in accordance with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's peer and administrative review policies and approved for presentation and publication. Mention of trade names or commercial products does not constitute endorsement or recommendation for use.

  1. Evaluation of Gas Reburning & Low NOx Burners on a Wall Fired Boiler Performance and Economics Report Gas Reburning-Low NOx Burner System Cherokee Station Unit 3 Public Service Company of Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    1998-07-01

    achieved at an average gas heat input of 18Y0. The performance goal of 70% reduction was met on many test runs, but at a higher reburn gas heat input. S02 emissions, based on coal replacement, were reduced by 18Y0. The performance goal of 70% reduction was met on many test runs, but at a higher reburn gas heat input. S02 emissions, based on coal replacement, were reduced by 18Y0. Toward the end of the program, a Second Generation gas injection system was installed. Higher injector gas pressures were used that eliminated the need for flue gas recirculation as used in the first generation design. The Second Generation GR resulted in similar NOX reduction performance as that for the First Generation. With an improvement in the LNB performance in combination with the new gas injection system , the reburn gas could be reduced to 12.5% of the total boiler heat input to achieve al 64?40 reduction in NO, emissions. In addition, the OFA injectors were modified to provide for better mixing to lower CO emissions.

  2. Experiment and mechanism investigation on advanced reburning for NOx reduction: influence of CO and temperature

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhi-hua; Zhou, Jun-hu; Zhang, Yan-wei; Lu, Zhi-min; Fan, Jian-ren; Cen, Ke-fa

    2005-01-01

    Pulverized coal reburning, ammonia injection and advanced reburning in a pilot scale drop tube furnace were investigated. Premix of petroleum gas, air and NH3 were burned in a porous gas burner to generate the needed flue gas. Four kinds of pulverized coal were fed as reburning fuel at constant rate of 1g/min. The coal reburning process parameters including 15%~25% reburn heat input, temperature range from 1100 °C to 1400 °C and also the carbon in fly ash, coal fineness, reburn zone stoichiometric ratio, etc. were investigated. On the condition of 25% reburn heat input, maximum of 47% NO reduction with Yanzhou coal was obtained by pure coal reburning. Optimal temperature for reburning is about 1300 °C and fuel-rich stoichiometric ratio is essential; coal fineness can slightly enhance the reburning ability. The temperature window for ammonia injection is about 700 °C~1100 °C. CO can improve the NH3 ability at lower temperature. During advanced reburning, 72.9% NO reduction was measured. To achieve more than 70% NO reduction, Selective Non-catalytic NOx Reduction (SNCR) should need NH3/NO stoichiometric ratio larger than 5, while advanced reburning only uses common dose of ammonia as in conventional SNCR technology. Mechanism study shows the oxidization of CO can improve the decomposition of H2O, which will rich the radical pools igniting the whole reactions at lower temperatures. PMID:15682503

  3. Elucidating N2O Formation during the Cyclic NOx Storage and Reduction Process Using CO as a Reductant.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jun; Wang, Xiuting; Zhu, Jinxin; Wang, Jianqiang; Shen, Meiqing

    2015-07-01

    The N2O formation pathway and effect of H2O on N2O formation during the NOx storage and reduction (NSR) process using CO as a reductant were investigated over a Pt-BaO/Al2O3 catalyst. The NSR activity measurements and transient in situ diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS) experiments were performed to evaluate N2O evolution and elucidate the N2O formation mechanism. N2O is formed in the lean, rich, and delay2 phases. In the lean phase, N2O formation is related to the reactions between surface isocyanate and gaseous NO/O2 and NO is more responsible for N2O formation than O2. Moreover, N2O production decreases with H2O because of the hydrolysis of isocyanate species. In the rich phase, the amount of N2O formation also decreases in the presence of H2O at a higher temperature because of the high reduction ability of H2 generated from the water-gas shift (WGS) reaction. During the delay2 phase, N2O is mainly formed by nitrite species reacting with Pt(0)-CO. Furthermore, the presence of H2O decreases the stability of nitrites and results in more N2O production at a low temperature.

  4. Lean NOx Trap Modeling in Vehicle Systems Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Zhiming; Chakravarthy, Veerathu K; Daw, C Stuart; Conklin, Jim

    2010-09-01

    A one-dimensional model for simulating lean NOx trap (LNT) performance is developed and validated using both steady state cycling data and transient data from FTP testing cycles. The model consists of the conservation equations for chemical species and energy in the bulk flow, energy of the solid walls, O2 storage and NOx storage (in the form of nitrites and nitrates). Nitrites and nitrates are formed by diffusion of NO and NO2, respectively, into sorbent particles (assumed to be hemi-spherical in shape) along with O2 and their formation rates are controlled by chemical kinetics as well as solid-phase diffusion rates of NOx species. The model also accounts for thermal aging and sulfation of LNTs. Empirical correlations are developed on the basis of published experimental data to capture these effects. These empirical correlations depend on total mileage for which the LNT has been in use, the mileage accumulated since the last desulfation event in addition to the freshly degreened catalyst characteristics. The model has been used in studies of vehicle systems (integration, performance etc.) including hybrid powertrain configurations. Since the engines in hybrid vehicles turn on and off multiple number of times during single drive cycles, the exhaust systems may encounter multiple cold start transients. Accurate modeling of catalyst warm-up and cooling is, therefore, very important to simulate LNT performance in such vehicles. For this purpose, the convective heat loss from the LNT to the ambient is modeled using a Nusselt number correlation that includes effects of both forced convection and natural convection (with later being important when vehicle is stationary). Using the model, the fuel penalty associated with operating LNTs on small diesel engine powered car during FTP drive cycles is estimated.

  5. DENSE PHASE REBURN COMBUSTION SYSTEM (DPRCS) DEMONSTRATION ON A 154 MWE TANGENTIAL FURNACE: ADDITIONAL AREA OF INTEREST-TO DEVELOP AND DEMONSTRATE AN IN-FURNACE MULTI-POLLUTANT REDUCTION TECHNOLOGY TO REDUCE NOx, SO2 & Hg

    SciTech Connect

    Allen C. Wiley; Steven Castagnero; Geoff Green; Kevin Davis; David White

    2004-03-01

    Semi-dense phase pneumatic delivery and injection of calcium and sodium sorbents, and microfine powdered coal, at various sidewall elevations of an online operating coal-fired power plant, was investigated for the express purpose of developing an in-furnace, economic multi-pollutant reduction methodology for NO{sub x}, SO{sub 2} & Hg. The 154 MWe tangentially-fired furnace that was selected for a full-scale demonstration, was recently retrofitted for NO{sub x} reduction with a high velocity rotating-opposed over-fire air system. The ROFA system, a Mobotec USA technology, has a proven track record of breaking up laminar flow along furnace walls, thereby enhancing the mix of all constituents of combustion. The knowledge gained from injecting sorbents and micronized coal into well mixed combustion gases with significant improvement in particulate retention time, should serve well the goals of an in-furnace multi-pollutant reduction technology; that of reducing back-end cleanup costs on a wide variety of pollutants, on a cost per ton basis, by first accomplishing significant in-furnace reductions of all pollutants.

  6. Application of hybrid coal reburning/SNCR processes for NOx reduction in a coal-fired boiler

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, W.J.; Zhou, Z.J.; Zhou, J.H.; Hongkun, L.V.; Liu, J.Z.; Cen, K.F.

    2009-07-01

    Boilers in Beijing Thermal Power Plant of Zhongdian Guohua Co. in China are coal-fired with natural circulation and tangential fired method, and the economical continuous rate is 410 ton per hour of steam. Hybrid coal reburning/SNCR technology was applied and it successfully reduced NOx to about 170 mg/Nm{sup 3} from about 540 mg/Nm{sup 3}, meanwhile ammonia slip was lower than 10 ppm at 450-210 t/h load and the total reduction efficiency was about 70%. Normal fineness pulverized coal from the bin was chosen as the reburning fuel and the nozzles of the upper primary air were retrofitted to be used as the reburning fuel nozzles. The reducing agent of SNCR was an urea solution, and it was injected by the four layer injectors after online dilution. At 410 t/h load, NOx emission was about 300 mg/Nm{sup 3} when the ratio of reburning fuel to the total fuel was 25.9%-33.4%. Controlling the oxygen content of the gas in the reversal chamber to less than 3.4% resulted in not only low NOx emission but also high combustion efficiency. Ammonia slip distribution in the down gas pass was uneven and ammonia slip was higher in the front of the down gas pass than in the rear of the down gas pass. NSR and NOx reduction were proportional to each other and usually resulted in more ammonia slip with reduction in NOx. About 100 mg/Nm{sup 3} NOx emission could be achieved with about 40 ppm NH{sub 3} slip at 300-450 t/h, and ammonia slip from the SNCR reactions could be used as reducing agent of SCR, which was favorable for the future SCR retrofit.

  7. NOx emissions from Euro IV busses with SCR systems associated with urban, suburban and freeway driving patterns.

    PubMed

    Fu, Mingliang; Ge, Yunshan; Wang, Xin; Tan, Jianwei; Yu, Linxiao; Liang, Bin

    2013-05-01

    NOx and particulate matter (PM) emissions from heavy-duty diesel vehicles (HDVs) have become the most important sources of pollutants affecting urban air quality in China. In recent years, a series of emission control strategies and diesel engine polices have been introduced that require advanced emission control technology. China and Europe mostly have used Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) with urea to meet the Euro IV diesel engine emission standard. In this study, two Euro IV busses with SCR were tested by using potable emission measurement system (PEMS) to assess NOx emissions associated with urban, suburban and freeway driving patterns. The results indicated that with the SCR system, the urea injection time for the entire driving period increased with higher vehicle speed. For freeway driving, the urea injection time covered 71%-83% of the driving period; the NOx emission factors from freeway driving were lower than those associated with urban and suburban driving. Unfortunately, the NOx emission factors were 2.6-2.8-, 2.3-2.7- and 2.2-2.3-fold higher than the Euro IV standard limits for urban, suburban and freeway driving, respectively; NOx emission factors (in g/km and g/(kW·h)) from the original vehicles (without SCR) were higher than their corresponding vehicles with SCR for suburban and freeway driving. Compared with the IVE model results, the measured NOx emission factors were 1.60-1.16-, 1.77-1.27-, 2.49-2.44-fold higher than the NOx predicted by the IVE model for urban and suburban driving, respectively. Thus, an adjustment of emission factors is needed to improve the estimation of Euro IV vehicle emissions in China.

  8. Final technical report on investigation of selective non-catalytic processes for in-situ reduction of NOx and CO emissions from marine gas turbines and diesel engines. Final technical report, 1 April 1994-31 March 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Bowman, C.T.; Hanson, R.K.

    1997-05-15

    The effectiveness of selective non-catalytic (SNCR) gas-phase reaction processes for NO(x) removal from combustion products at elevated pressures was investigated in a combined experimental and modeling research program. Calculations using existing chemical models for SNCR indicate that the temperature window for NO(x) removal by SNCR widens as pressure increases, resulting in NO(x) removal at higher temperatures than at ambient pressure. The calculations also show a significant reduction in the reaction time scale with increasing pressure. These observations suggest the possibility of utilizing SNCR for reducing NO(x) emissions from marine gas turbines and Diesel engines by direct injection of a reductant species into the combustion chamber, possibly as a fuel additive. Initial experiments were carried out at atmospheric pressure to allow comparison with previous measurements in order to verify the experimental approach. Following these validation tests, experiments were conducted at elevated pressures. Results from these tests, confirm the model predictions that the SNCR window for NO(x) removal widens as the pressure increases. In addition, a project was initiated, to develop compact, robust, solid-state microsensors for pollutant species for use in control systems for reduction of pollutant emissions. The sensor concept is based on integrated circuit fabrication technology that allows the integration of a metal-oxide sensor with associated electronic circuitry on a single chip. Initial efforts focused on development of a sensor for NO(x).

  9. Novel Mn-Ce-Ti mixed-oxide catalyst for the selective catalytic reduction of NOx with NH₃.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhiming; Zhu, Junzhi; Li, Junhua; Ma, Lingling; Woo, Seong Ihl

    2014-08-27

    Mn-Ce-Ti mixed-oxide catalyst prepared by the hydrothermal method was investigated for the selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NOx with NH3 in the presence of oxygen. It was found that the environmentally benign Mn-Ce-Ti catalyst exhibited excellent NH3-SCR activity and strong resistance against H2O and SO2 with a broad operation temperature window, which is very competitive for the practical application in controlling the NOx emission from diesel engines. On the basis of the catalyst characterization, the dual redox cycles (Mn(4+) + Ce(3+) ↔ Mn(3+) + Ce(4+), Mn(4+) + Ti(3+) ↔ Mn(3+) + Ti(4+)) and the amorphous structure play key roles for the high catalytic deNOx performance. Diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy studies showed that the synergetic effect between Mn and Ce contributes to the formation of reactive intermediate species, thus promoting the NH3-SCR to proceed.

  10. Characteristics of NOx removal combining dielectric barrier discharge plasma with selective catalytic reduction by C2H5OH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xing-Quan; Chen, Wei; Guo, Qi-Pei; Li, Yi; Lv, Guo-Hua; Sun, Xiu-Ping; Zhang, Xian-Hui; Feng, Ke-Cheng; Yang, Si-Ze

    2009-07-01

    With the assistance of dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma, selective catalytic reduction of NOx by ethanol over Ag/Al2O3 catalysts was studied. Experimental results show that NOx conversion was greatly enhanced due to the presence of DBD plasma at lower temperature. By varying the DBD voltages or power in 13 kHz frequency at different temperatures, NOx conversion was increased to 40.7% from 6.4% at 176 °C, even to 66.8% from 17.3% at 200 °C. NOx conversion could even be improved to 90% at temperature above 255 °C. It was proposed that nonthermal plasma generated by dielectric barrier discharge reactor was very effective for oxidizing NO to NO2 under excess O2 conditions, which possesses high reactivity with C2H5OH to yield CxHyNzO compound. By reacting with CxHyNzO compound and oxygen, NOx is converted to N2 at low temperatures.

  11. New operation strategy for driving the selectivity of NOx reduction to N2, NH3 or N2O during lean/rich cycling of a lean NOx trap catalyst

    DOE PAGES

    Mráček, David; Koci, Petr; Choi, Jae -Soon; Partridge, Jr., William P.

    2015-09-08

    Periodical regeneration of NOx storage catalyst (also known as lean NOx trap) by short rich pulses of CO, H2 and hydrocarbons is necessary for the reduction of nitrogen oxides adsorbed on the catalyst surface. Ideally, the stored NOx is converted into N2, but N2O and NH3 by-products can be formed as well, particularly at low-intermediate temperatures. The N2 and N2O products are formed concurrently in two peaks. The primary peaks appear immediately after the rich-phase inception, and tail off with the breakthrough of the reductant front accompanied by NH3 product. In addition, the secondary N2 and N2O peaks then appearmore » at the rich-to-lean transition as a result of reactions between surface-deposited reductants/intermediates (CO, HC, NH3, — NCO) and residual stored NOx under increasingly lean conditions.« less

  12. Promotional mechanism of propane on selective catalytic reduction of NOx by methane over In/H-BEA at low temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Hua; Jian, Yanfei; Yu, Yanke; Chen, Ningna; He, Chi; He, Cheng

    2016-12-01

    Effects of propane/methane ratios on NOx reduction by mixtures of methane and propane over In/H-BEA catalyst were investigated at temperatures ranging from 250 to 550 °C. The higher catalytic activity of In/H-BEA was exhibited for CH4-SCR at high temperatures above 450 °C, while the higher NOx conversion was achieved in C3H8-SCR at below 425 °C. A broadened temperature window and enhanced CO2 selectivity were achieved by combining of methane and propane as the co-reductant. The mixtures with propane/methane of 1/2 showed the most superior T50 (325 °C) and T90 (500 °C) temperatures for NOx reduction over In/H-BEA catalyst. For the promotion mechanism of propane on NO reduction by methane at low temperature, the formation of carbonaceous species (e.g. R-COOH) were enhanced by the activation of C3H8 on Brønsted acid sites at low temperature, and further promoted the generation of sbnd NCO species, which was a crucial determining step for NO reduction.

  13. Method to monitor HC-SCR catalyst NOx reduction performance for lean exhaust applications

    DOEpatents

    Viola, Michael B.; Schmieg, Steven J.; Sloane, Thompson M.; Hilden, David L.; Mulawa, Patricia A.; Lee, Jong H.; Cheng, Shi-Wai S.

    2012-05-29

    A method for initiating a regeneration mode in selective catalytic reduction device utilizing hydrocarbons as a reductant includes monitoring a temperature within the aftertreatment system, monitoring a fuel dosing rate to the selective catalytic reduction device, monitoring an initial conversion efficiency, selecting a determined equation to estimate changes in a conversion efficiency of the selective catalytic reduction device based upon the monitored temperature and the monitored fuel dosing rate, estimating changes in the conversion efficiency based upon the determined equation and the initial conversion efficiency, and initiating a regeneration mode for the selective catalytic reduction device based upon the estimated changes in conversion efficiency.

  14. Urea for SCR-based NOx Control Systems and Potential Impacts to Ground Water Resources

    SciTech Connect

    Layton, D.

    2002-01-03

    One of the key challenges facing manufacturers of diesel engines for light- and heavy-duty vehicles is the development of technologies for controlling emissions of nitrogen oxides, In this regard, selective catalytic reduction (SCR) systems represent control technology that can potentially achieve the NOx removal efficiencies required to meet new U.S. EPA standards. SCR systems rely on a bleed stream of urea solution into exhaust gases prior to catalytic reduction. While urea's role in this emission control technology is beneficial, in that it supports reduced NOx emissions, it can also be an environmental threat to ground water quality. This would occur if it is accidentally released to soils because once in that environmental medium, urea is subsequently converted to nitrate--which is regulated under the U.S. EPA's primary drinking water standards. Unfortunately, nitrate contamination of ground waters is already a significant problem across the U.S. Historically, the primary sources of nitrate in ground waters have been septic tanks and fertilizer applications. The basic concern over nitrate contamination is the potential health effects associated with drinking water containing elevated levels of nitrate. Specifically, consumption of nitrate-contaminated water can cause a blood disorder in infants known as methemoglobinemia.

  15. NOx removal from simulated flue gas by chemical absorption-biological reduction integrated approach in a biofilter

    SciTech Connect

    Shi-Han Zhang; Ling-Lin Cai; Xu-Hong Mi; Jin-Lin Jiang; Wei Li

    2008-05-15

    A chemical absorption-biological reduction integrated approach, which combines the advantages of both the chemical and biological technologies, is employed to achieve the removal of nitrogen monoxide (NO) from the simulated flue gas. The biological reduction of NO to nitrogen gas (N{sub 2}) and regeneration of the absorbent Fe(II)EDTA (EDTA:ethylenediaminetetraacetate) take place under thermophilic conditions (50 {+-} 0.5{sup o}C). The performance of a laboratory-scale biofilter was investigated for treating NOx gas in this study. Shock loading studies were performed to ascertain the response of the biofilter to fluctuations of inlet loading rates (0.48-28.68 g NO m{sup 3} h{sup -1}). A maximum elimination capacity (18.78 g NO m{sup 3} h{sup -1}) was achieved at a loading rate of 28.68 g NO m{sup 3} h{sup -1} and maintained 5 h operation at the steady state. Additionally, the effect of certain gaseous compounds (e.g., O{sub 2} and SO{sub 2}) on the NO removal was also investigated. A mathematical model was developed to describe the system performance. The model has been able to predict experimental results for different inlet NO concentrations. In summary, both theoretical prediction and experimental investigation confirm that biofilter can achieve high removal rate for NO in high inlet concentrations under both steady and transient states. 21 refs., 9 figs.

  16. Nox control for high nitric oxide concentration flows through combustion-driven reduction

    DOEpatents

    Yeh, James T.; Ekmann, James M.; Pennline, Henry W.; Drummond, Charles J.

    1989-01-01

    An improved method for removing nitrogen oxides from concentrated waste gas streams, in which nitrogen oxides are ignited with a carbonaceous material in the presence of substoichiometric quantities of a primary oxidant, such as air. Additionally, reductants may be ignited along with the nitrogen oxides, carbonaceous material and primary oxidant to achieve greater reduction of nitrogen oxides. A scrubber and regeneration system may also be included to generate a concentrated stream of nitrogen oxides from flue gases for reduction using this method.

  17. On the observed response of ozone to NOx and VOC reactivity reductions in San Joaquin Valley California 1995-present

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pusede, S. E.; Cohen, R. C.

    2012-09-01

    We describe the effects of nitrogen oxide (NOx) and organic reactivity reductions on the frequency of high ozone days in California's San Joaquin Valley. We use sixteen years of observations of ozone, nitrogen oxides, and temperature at sites upwind, within, and downwind of three cities to assess the probability of exceeding the California 8-h average ozone standard of 70.4 ppb at each location. The comprehensive data records in the region and the steep decreases in emissions over the last decade are sufficient to constrain the relative import of NOx and organic reactivity reductions on the frequency of violations. We show that high ozone has a large component that is due to local production, as the probability of exceeding the state standard is lowest for each city at the upwind site, increases in the city center, is highest at downwind locations, and then decreases at the receptor city to the south. We see that reductions in organic reactivity have been very effective in the central and northern regions of the San Joaquin but less so in the southern portion of the Valley. We find evidence for two distinct categories of reactivity sources: one source that has decreased and dominates at moderate temperatures, and a second source that dominates at high temperatures, particularly in the southern San Joaquin, and has not changed over the last twelve years. We show that NOx reductions are already effective or are poised to become so in the southern and central Valley, where violations are most frequent, as conditions in these regions have or are transitioning to NOx-limited chemistry when temperatures are hottest and high ozone most probable.

  18. On the observed response of ozone to NOx and VOC reactivity reductions in San Joaquin Valley California 1995-present

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pusede, S. E.; Cohen, R. C.

    2012-04-01

    We present a statistical approach to describe the effects of nitrogen oxide (NOx) and organic reactivity reductions on the frequency of high ozone days. We use sixteen years of observations of ozone, nitrogen oxides, and temperature at sites upwind, within, and downwind of three cities in California's San Joaquin Valley to assess the probability of exceeding of the California 8-h average ozone standard of 70.4 ppb at each location. We demonstrate that the comprehensive data records in the region and the steep decreases in emissions over the last decade are sufficient to constrain the relative import of NOx and organic reactivity reductions on the frequency of violations. We show that high ozone has a large component that is due to local production, as the probability of exceeding the state standard is lowest for each city at the upwind site, increases across the city center, is highest at downwind locations, and then decreases at the receptor city to the south. We see that reductions in organic reactivity have been very effective in the central and northern regions of the San Joaquin but not in the southern portion of the Valley. We find evidence for two distinct categories of reactivity sources: one source that has decreased and dominates at moderate temperatures, and a second source that dominates at high temperatures in the southern San Joaquin, which has not changed over the last twelve years. We show that NOx reductions are already effective or are poised to become so in the southern and central Valley, where violations are most frequent, as conditions in these regions have or are transitioning to NOx-limited chemistry when temperatures are hottest and high ozone most probable.

  19. Propulsion system noise reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feiler, C. E.; Heidelberg, L. J.; Karchmer, A. M.; Lansing, D. L.; Miller, B. A.; Rice, E. J.

    1975-01-01

    The progress in propulsion system noise reduction is reviewed. The noise technology areas discussed include: fan noise; advances in suppression including conventional acoustic treatment, high Mach number inlets, and wing shielding; engine core noise; flap noise from both under-the-wing and over-the-wing powered-lift systems; supersonic jet noise suppression; and the NASA program in noise prediction.

  20. A new approach for estimation of the effect of NOx emission reduction on roadside NO2 concentration in Tokyo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takekawa, Hideto; Chatani, Satoru; Ito, Akiyoshi

    2013-04-01

    The mean NO2/NOx ratios of vehicle emission, the mean duration time of NO reaction with O3 and background concentrations at the five most polluted roadside stations in Tokyo are estimated statistically using monitoring data at both roadside sites and urban background sites. These statistics are then used to categorize roadside NO2 into three components; NO2 emission from vehicles (primary NO2), oxidation of NO by O3 (secondary NO2) and background NO2 (BG NO2). Secondary NO2 and BG NO2 make a greater contribution to the high NO2 concentrations in spring and summer. On the other hand, BG NO2 contributes the dominant portion to high NO2 concentrations in winter. The effects of vehicle NOx emission reduction on the concentration of primary, secondary and BG NO2 are evaluated using an NO2 emission reduction scenario, an oxidation model proposed in this study and an air quality simulation, respectively. It is predicted that the shift to vehicles meeting the stringent emission regulation beginning in 2009 will lower the roadside NO2 concentration due mainly to the large decrease in secondary NO2. On the other hand, the reduction of NOx in vehicle emissions results in a smaller decrease in roadside NO2 in winter.

  1. Reduction of NOx emissions on oil firing at Bowline Point Unit No. 2

    SciTech Connect

    Conti, A.V.; Lucente, J.; O`Sullivan, R.C.; Schmidt, D.W.

    1995-12-31

    Improved combustion technology, based upon optimization of oil atomizer and flame stabilizer design, has been retrofitted to oil and oil/gas fired boilers to reduce NOx emissions, particulate matter emissions, opacity, and to provide operational and performance benefits. This technology, known as REACH, can be applied to wall and tangential-fired boilers at a fraction of the cost of installing new burners. The technology is also compatible with conventional NOx controls such as overfire air, flue gas recirculation, low-NOx burners, and can be combined with these controls to further reduce NOx Emissions. This paper describes the results achieved when this technology was applied to Orange and Rockland Utilities` Bowline Point Unit No. 2 to meet NYSDEC part 227 regulations for the emissions of nitrogen oxides (0.25 lbs/MBtu). Bowline Point No. 2 is a 600 MW opposed-wall fired boiler with overfire air and flue gas recirculation capability.

  2. Towards Ideal NOx and CO2 Emission Control Technology for Bio-Oils Combustion Energy System Using a Plasma-Chemical Hybrid Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okubo, M.; Fujishima, H.; Yamato, Y.; Kuroki, T.; Tanaka, A.; Otsuka, K.

    2013-03-01

    A pilot-scale low-emission boiler system consisting of a bio-fuel boiler and plasma-chemical hybrid NOx removal system is investigated. This system can achieve carbon neutrality because the bio-fuel boiler uses waste vegetable oil as one of the fuels. The plasma-chemical hybrid NOx removal system has two processes: NO oxidation by ozone produced from plasma ozonizers and NO2 removal using a Na2SO3 chemical scrubber. Test demonstrations of the system are carried out for mixed oils (mixture of A-heavy oil and waste vegetable oil). Stable combustion is achieved for the mixed oil (20 - 50% waste vegetable oil). Properties of flue gas—e.g., O2, CO2 and NOx—when firing mixed oils are nearly the same as those when firing heavy oil for an average flue gas flow rate of 1000 Nm3/h. NOx concentrations at the boiler outlet are 90 - 95 ppm. Furthermore, during a 300-min continuous operation when firing 20% mixed oil, NOx removal efficiency of more than 90% (less than 10 ppm NOx emission) is confirmed. In addition, the CO2 reduction when heavy oil is replaced with waste vegetable oil is estimated. The system comparison is described between the plasma-chemical hybrid NOx removal and the conventional technology.

  3. Is Nox4 a key regulator of the activated state of fibroblasts in systemic sclerosis?

    PubMed

    Böhm, Markus; Dosoki, Heba; Kerkhoff, Claus

    2014-09-01

    The family of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidases consists of phagocytic gp91(phox) and six-related isoforms. Recent evidence indicates that the NADPH oxidase isoform Nox4 controls vascular, renal and pulmonary injury. We propose that Nox4 is an intrinsic regulator of the activated state of dermal fibroblasts in systemic sclerosis (SSc). Profibrotic cytokines on the one hand and antifibrogenic factors such as α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone on the other hand may target Nox4 as an intracellular nodal point. Via increased or decreased generation of reactive oxygen species and/or hydrogen peroxide, Nox4 could orchestrate collagen synthesis, differentiation of dermal fibroblasts into a profibrotic myofibroblast phenotype and thus dermal fibrosis. Confirmation of this hypothesis will have important consequences in our understanding of the activated state of dermal fibroblasts in SSc. Based on the availability of clinically useful Nox4 inhibitors, novel antifibrotic therapies of SSc can be envisioned. PMID:25040787

  4. Innovative clean coal technology: 500 MW demonstration of advanced wall-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions from coal-fired boilers. Final report, Phases 1 - 3B

    SciTech Connect

    1998-01-01

    This report presents the results of a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT) project demonstrating advanced wall-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions from coal-fired boilers. The project was conducted at Georgia Power Company`s Plant Hammond Unit 4 located near Rome, Georgia. The technologies demonstrated at this site include Foster Wheeler Energy Corporation`s advanced overfire air system and Controlled Flow/Split Flame low NOx burner. The primary objective of the demonstration at Hammond Unit 4 was to determine the long-term effects of commercially available wall-fired low NOx combustion technologies on NOx emissions and boiler performance. Short-term tests of each technology were also performed to provide engineering information about emissions and performance trends. A target of achieving fifty percent NOx reduction using combustion modifications was established for the project. Short-term and long-term baseline testing was conducted in an {open_quotes}as-found{close_quotes} condition from November 1989 through March 1990. Following retrofit of the AOFA system during a four-week outage in spring 1990, the AOFA configuration was tested from August 1990 through March 1991. The FWEC CF/SF low NOx burners were then installed during a seven-week outage starting on March 8, 1991 and continuing to May 5, 1991. Following optimization of the LNBs and ancillary combustion equipment by FWEC personnel, LNB testing commenced during July 1991 and continued until January 1992. Testing in the LNB+AOFA configuration was completed during August 1993. This report provides documentation on the design criteria used in the performance of this project as it pertains to the scope involved with the low NOx burners and advanced overfire systems.

  5. In situ FT-IR studies on the mechanism of selective catalytic reduction of NOx by propene over SnO2/Al2O3 catalyst.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhiming; Woo, Seong Ihl; Lee, Won Su

    2006-12-28

    The mechanism of the selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NOx by propene over SnO2/Al2O3 catalyst in the presence of oxygen has been investigated using in situ Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy. In situ IR measurements indicate that acetate and formate, which are the derivatives of the partial oxidation of propene, play a crucial role in the formation of NCO by reacting with the reactive monodentate nitrate species. The resulting NCO species subsequently reacts with NOx to form N2. The presence of oxygen substantially contributes to the partial oxidation of propene and thus shows a promoting effect for the NOx reduction.

  6. Identification of the arsenic resistance on MoO3 doped CeO2/TiO2 catalyst for selective catalytic reduction of NOx with ammonia.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiang; Li, Xiansheng; Li, Junhua; Hao, Jiming

    2016-11-15

    Arsenic resistance on MoO3 doped CeO2/TiO2 catalysts for selective catalytic reduction of NOx with NH3 (NH3-SCR) is investigated. It is found that the activity loss of CeO2-MoO3/TiO2 caused by As oxide is obvious less than that of CeO2/TiO2 catalysts. The fresh and poisoned catalysts are compared and analyzed using XRD, Raman, XPS, H2-TPR and in situ DRIFTS. The results manifest that the introduction of arsenic oxide to CeO2/TiO2 catalyst not only weakens BET surface area, surface acid sites and adsorbed NOx species, but also destroy the redox circle of Ce(4+) to Ce(3+) because of interaction between Ce and As. When MoO3 is added into CeO2/TiO2 system, the main SCR reaction path are found to be changed from the reaction between coordinated NH3 and ad-NOx species to that between an amide and gaseous NO. Additionally, for CeO2-MoO3/TiO2 catalyst, As toxic effect on active sites CeO2 can be released because of stronger As-Mo interaction. Moreover, not only are the reactable Brønsted and Lewis acid sites partly restored, but the cycle of Ce(4+) to Ce(3+) can also be free to some extent.

  7. SLCP co-control approach in East Asia: Tropospheric ozone reduction strategy by simultaneous reduction of NOx/NMVOC and methane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akimoto, Hajime; Kurokawa, Jun`ichi; Sudo, Kengo; Nagashima, Tatsuya; Takemura, Toshihiko; Klimont, Zbigniew; Amann, Markus; Suzuki, Katsunori

    2015-12-01

    The emissions of NOx and CO2 in East Asia (Northeast and Southeast Asia) contribute more than 30% of the global total since 2008, and consequently the control of air pollutants and CO2 alleviating regional air pollution and global climate change is of great concern of not only in this region but also worldwide. In order to arrive at a rational view of the short-lived climate pollutants (SLCPs) co-control approach in East Asia, the effectiveness of the reduction of NOx/NMVOC and CH4 emissions for the reduction of tropospheric O3 has been evaluated by individual and simultaneous 50%-reduction of the emissions in Northeast Asia (NEA) using both a global chemical climate model (CHASER/SPRINTARS-MIROC), and a regional chemical transport model (WRF-CMAQ). The simultaneous reduction of NOx/NMVOC and CH4 emissions was found to reduce the regional concentration of surface O3 in NEA, and globally averaged net radiative forcing most effectively. Global mean RF and regional air quality change were also evaluated for the climate stabilization scenario ("450-ppm"), and climate stabilization with additional air pollution mitigation strengthened scenario ("450-ppm-cntr") developed in IIASA with the aid of GAINS model. In the 450 ppm-cntr scenario, emissions of NOx NMVOC, BC and OC were further reduced respectively, for East Asia from the emissions in 450 ppm. The improvement of air quality as well as the mitigation of climate change would grant to the basis of the SLCP co-control approach in East Asia.

  8. Preparation of highly active manganese oxides supported on functionalized MWNTs for low temperature NOx reduction with NH3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pourkhalil, Mahnaz; Moghaddam, Abdolsamad Zarringhalam; Rashidi, Alimorad; Towfighi, Jafar; Mortazavi, Yadollah

    2013-08-01

    Manganese oxide catalysts (MnOx) supported on functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes (FMWNTs) for low temperature selective catalytic reduction (LTSCR) of nitrogen oxides (NOx) with NH3 in the presence of excess O2 were prepared by the incipient wetness impregnation method. These catalysts were characterized by N2 adsorption, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), transmission electron microscope (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) and H2-temperature programmed reduction (H2-TPR) methods. The effects of reaction temperature, MnOx loading, calcination temperature and calcination time were investigated. The presence of surface nitrate species under moderate calcination conditions may play a favorable role in the LTSCR of NOx with NH3. Under the reaction conditions of 200 °C, 1 bar, NO = NH3 = 900 ppm, O2 = 5 vol%, GHSV = 30,000 h-1 and 12 wt% MnOx, NOx conversion and N2 selectivity were 97% and 99.5%, respectively. The SCR activity was reduced in the presence of 100 ppm SO2 and 2.5 vol% H2O from 97% to 92% within 6 h at 200 °C, however such an effect was shown to be reversible by exposing the catalyst to a helium flow for 2 h at 350 °C due to thermal decomposition of ammonium sulphate salts.

  9. Thermal Durability of Cu-CHA NH3-SCR Catalysts for Diesel NOx Reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Schmieg, Steven J.; Oh, Se H.; Kim, Chang H.; Brown, David B.; Lee, Jong H.; Peden, Charles HF; Kim, Do Heui

    2012-04-30

    Multiple catalytic functions (NOx conversion, NO and NH3 oxidation, NH3 storage) of a commercial Cu-zeolite urea/NH3-SCR catalyst were assessed in a laboratory fixed-bed flow reactor system after differing degrees of hydrothermal aging. Catalysts were characterized by using x-ray diffraction (XRD), 27Al solid state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) / energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectroscopy to develop an understanding of the degradation mechanisms during catalyst aging. The catalytic reaction measurements of laboratory-aged catalysts were performed, which allows us to obtain a universal curve for predicting the degree of catalyst performance deterioration as a function of time at each aging temperature. Results show that as the aging temperature becomes higher, the zeolite structure collapses in a shorter period of time after an induction period. The decrease in SCR performance was explained by zeolite structure destruction and/or Cu agglomeration, as detected by XRD/27Al NMR and by TEM/EDX, respectively. Destruction of the zeolite structure and agglomeration of the active phase also results in a decrease in the NO/NH3 oxidation activity and the NH3 storage capacity of the catalyst. Selected laboratory aging conditions (16 h at 800oC) compare well with a 135,000 mile vehicle-aged catalyst for both performance and characterization criteria.

  10. Will Euro 6 reduce the NOx emissions of new diesel cars? - Insights from on-road tests with Portable Emissions Measurement Systems (PEMS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, Martin; Bonnel, Pierre; Kühlwein, Jörg; Provenza, Alessio; Lambrecht, Udo; Alessandrini, Stefano; Carriero, Massimo; Colombo, Rinaldo; Forni, Fausto; Lanappe, Gaston; Le Lijour, Philippe; Manfredi, Urbano; Montigny, Francois; Sculati, Mirco

    2012-12-01

    The nitrogen dioxide (NO2) pollution in urban areas of Europe can be partially attributed to the increasing market penetration of diesel cars that show higher distance-specific nitrogen oxides (NOx) emissions than gasoline cars. The on-road NOx emissions of diesel cars, furthermore, appear to exceed substantially applicable emissions standards. This observation raises concerns that the introduction of more stringent Euro 6 emissions standards in 2014 may not adequately reduce the distance-specific on-road NOx emissions of new diesel cars. We address the existing concerns by analyzing the gaseous emissions of one novel Euro 6 diesel car and six Euro 4-5 diesel cars with Portable Emissions Measurement Systems (PEMS). We find that the average on-road NOx emissions of the Euro 6 car (0.21 ± 0.09 g per kilometer [g km-1]) are considerably lower than those of the Euro 4 cars (0.76 ± 0.12 g km-1) and the Euro 5 cars (0.71 ± 0.30 g km-1). The selective catalytic reduction (SCR) system of the Euro 6 diesel car is suitable to limit NOx emissions during real-world on-road driving. Still, all tested cars, including the Euro 6 diesel car, exceed their NOx emissions standards on the road by 260 ± 130%. This finding suggests that the current type-approval procedure does not adequately capture the on-road NOx emissions of diesel cars. By introducing a complementary emissions test procedure that covers a wide range of normal operating conditions, the European legislative authorities can address this problem and ensure that Euro 6 will indeed deliver an adequate reduction in the NOx emissions of new diesel cars.

  11. Experimental study on the inhibition of biological reduction of Fe(III)EDTA in NOx absorption solution*

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wei; Wu, Cheng-zhi; Zhang, Shi-han; Shi, Yao; Lei, Le-cheng

    2005-01-01

    Scrubbing of NOx from the gas phase with Fe(II)EDTA has been shown to be highly effective. A new biological method can be used to convert NO to N2 and regenerate the chelating agent Fe(II)EDTA for continuous NO absorption. The core of this biological regeneration is how to effectively simultaneous reduce Fe(III)EDTA and Fe(II)EDTA-NO, two mainly products in the ferrous chelate absorption solution. The biological reduction rate of Fe(III)EDTA plays a main role for the NOx removal efficiency. In this paper, a bacterial strain identified as Klebsiella Trevisan sp. was used to demonstrate an inhibition of Fe(III)EDTA reduction in the presence of Fe(II)EDTA-NO. The competitive inhibition experiments indicted that Fe(II)EDTA-NO inhibited not only the growth rate of the iron-reduction bacterial strain but also the Fe(III)EDTA reduction rate. Cell growth rate and Fe(III)EDTA reduction rate decreased with increasing Fe(II)EDTA-NO concentration in the solution. PMID:16187414

  12. Increased Use of Natural Gas for Power Generation in the U.S. and the Resulting Reductions in Emissions of CO2, NOx and SO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Gouw, J. A.; Parrish, D. D.; Trainer, M.

    2013-12-01

    Over the past decades, natural gas has increasingly replaced coal as a fuel for electrical power generation in the U.S. As a result, there have been significant reductions in the emissions of carbon dioxide (CO2), nitrogen oxides (NOx) and sulfur dioxide (SO2). Power plant emissions are continuously measured at the stack using continuous emissions monitoring systems (CEMS) required by the EPA. Previous studies using airborne measurements have shown these CEMS measurements to be accurate. Here, we use annual emissions since 1995 from all point sources included in the CEMS database to quantify the changes in CO2, NOx and SO2 emissions that have resulted from the changing use of fuels and technologies for power generation. In 1997, 83% of electrical power in the CEMS database was generated from coal-fired power plants. In 2012, the contribution from coal had decreased to 59%, and natural gas contributed 34% of the electrical power. Natural gas-fired power plants, in particular those equipped with combined cycle technology, emit less than 50% of CO2 per kWh produced compared to coal-fired plants. As a result of the increased use of natural gas, total CO2 emissions from U.S. power plants have decreased since 2008. In addition, natural gas-fired power plants emit less NOx and far less SO2 per kWh produced than coal-fired power plants. The increased use of natural gas has therefore led to significant emissions reductions of NOx and SO2 in addition to those obtained from the implementation of emissions control systems on coal-fired power plants. The increased use of natural gas for power generation has led to significant reductions in CO2 emissions as well as improvements in U.S. air quality. We will illustrate these points with examples from airborne measurements made using the NOAA WP-3D aircraft in the Southeastern U.S. in 2013 as part of the NOAA Southeast Nexus (SENEX) study. The emissions reductions from U.S. power plants due to the increased use of natural gas will

  13. Fe(II)EDTA-NO reduction by a newly isolated thermophilic Anoxybacillus sp. HA from a rotating drum biofilter for NOx removal.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jun; Li, Yan; Hao, Hong-hong; Zheng, Ji; Chen, Jian-meng

    2015-02-01

    The reduction of Fe(II)EDTA-NO is one of the core processes in BioDeNOx, an integrated physicochemical and biological technique for NOx removal from industrial flue gases. A newly isolated thermophilic Anoxybacillus sp. HA, identified by 16S rRNA sequence analysis, could simultaneously reduce Fe(II)EDTA-NO and Fe(III)EDTA. A maximum NO removal efficiency of 98.7% was achieved when 3mM Fe(II)EDTA-NO was used in the nutrient solution at 55°C. Results of this study strongly indicated that the biological oxidation of Fe(II)EDTA played an important role in the formation of Fe(III)EDTA in the anaerobic system. Fe(II)EDTA-NO was more competitive than Fe(III)EDTA as an electron acceptor, and the presence of Fe(III)EDTA slightly affected the reduction rate of Fe(II)EDTA-NO. At 55°C, the maximum microbial specific growth rate μmax reached the peak value of 0.022h(-1). The maximum NO removal efficiency was also measured (95.4%) under this temperature. Anoxybacillus sp. HA, which grew well at 50°C-60°C, is a potential microbial resource for Fe(II)EDTA-NO reduction at thermophilic temperatures.

  14. Engineering assessment of a low cost combined low-NOx burner-SCR system

    SciTech Connect

    Teixeira, D.P.; Muzio, L.J.; McVickar, M.A.

    1995-12-31

    As is well known, strict regulations governing the emissions of oxides of nitrogen from fossil-fired power plants have already been adopted in several US regions, for example southern California. In addition, other regions are considering adoption of regulations which will require major retrofits of NOx control technology as well. To date, compliance with these NOx regulations has often dictated the use of large, and expensive, SCR systems to achieve the necessary NOx levels. An alternative to these expensive SCR systems is the use of a technology strategy which combines several low cost systems to achieve the necessary degree of control. Many such {open_quotes}combined NOx control systems{close_quotes} are possible, including ones which incorporate SCR, SNCR, low-NOx burners, reburning, etc. This paper describes one attractive combined system which has the potential for low overall installed cost. This system consists of low-NOx burners and a {open_quotes}true in-duct SCR{close_quotes}. The design minimizes, or avoids the costly features of the SCR portion of the system (structural modifications, earthwork, foundations, draft system alterations, ductwork changes etc).

  15. Improving NO(x) cap-and-trade system with adjoint-based emission exchange rates.

    PubMed

    Mesbah, S Morteza; Hakami, Amir; Schott, Stephan

    2012-11-01

    Cap-and-trade programs have proven to be effective instruments for achieving environmental goals while incurring minimum cost. The nature of the pollutant, however, affects the design of these programs. NO(x), an ozone precursor, is a nonuniformly mixed pollutant with a short atmospheric lifetime. NO(x) cap-and-trade programs in the U.S. are successful in reducing total NO(x) emissions but may result in suboptimal environmental performance because location-specific ozone formation potentials are neglected. In this paper, the current NO(x) cap-and-trade system is contrasted to a hypothetical NO(x) trading policy with sensitivity-based exchange rates. Location-specific exchange rates, calculated through adjoint sensitivity analysis, are combined with constrained optimization for prediction of NO(x) emissions trading behavior and post-trade ozone concentrations. The current and proposed policies are examined in a case study for 218 coal-fired power plants that participated in the NO(x) Budget Trading Program in 2007. We find that better environmental performance at negligibly higher system-wide abatement cost can be achieved through inclusion of emission exchange rates. Exposure-based exchange rates result in better environmental performance than those based on concentrations. PMID:23050674

  16. Bauxite-supported Transition Metal Oxides: Promising Low-temperature and SO2-tolerant Catalysts for Selective Catalytic Reduction of NOx

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiuyun; Wu, Wen; Chen, Zhilin; Wang, Ruihu

    2015-01-01

    In order to develop low-temperature (below 200 °C) and SO2-tolerant catalysts for selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NOx, a series of cheap M/bauxite (M = Mn, Ni and Cu) catalysts were prepared using bauxite as a support. Their SCR performances are much superior to typical V2O5/TiO2, the addition of M into bauxite results in significant promotion of NOx removal efficiency, especially at low temperature. Among the catalysts, Cu/bauxite exhibits wide temperature window over 50–400 °C, strong resistance against SO2 and H2O as well as good regeneration ability in SCR of NOx. NOx conversion is more than 80% at 50–200 °C, and N2 selectivity is more than 98%. Cu/bauxite can serve as a promising catalyst in SCR of NOx. PMID:25988825

  17. Bauxite-supported Transition Metal Oxides: Promising Low-temperature and SO2-tolerant Catalysts for Selective Catalytic Reduction of NOx.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiuyun; Wu, Wen; Chen, Zhilin; Wang, Ruihu

    2015-05-19

    In order to develop low-temperature (below 200 °C) and SO2-tolerant catalysts for selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NOx, a series of cheap M/bauxite (M = Mn, Ni and Cu) catalysts were prepared using bauxite as a support. Their SCR performances are much superior to typical V2O5/TiO2, the addition of M into bauxite results in significant promotion of NOx removal efficiency, especially at low temperature. Among the catalysts, Cu/bauxite exhibits wide temperature window over 50-400 °C, strong resistance against SO2 and H2O as well as good regeneration ability in SCR of NOx. NOx conversion is more than 80% at 50-200 °C, and N2 selectivity is more than 98%. Cu/bauxite can serve as a promising catalyst in SCR of NOx.

  18. Electrolytic oxide reduction system

    DOEpatents

    Wiedmeyer, Stanley G; Barnes, Laurel A; Williamson, Mark A; Willit, James L; Berger, John F

    2015-04-28

    An electrolytic oxide reduction system according to a non-limiting embodiment of the present invention may include a plurality of anode assemblies, a plurality of cathode assemblies, and a lift system configured to engage the anode and cathode assemblies. The cathode assemblies may be alternately arranged with the anode assemblies such that each cathode assembly is flanked by two anode assemblies. The lift system may be configured to selectively engage the anode and cathode assemblies so as to allow the simultaneous lifting of any combination of the anode and cathode assemblies (whether adjacent or non-adjacent).

  19. Non-thermal plasma-assisted NOx reduction over Na-Y zeolites: The promotional effect of acid sites

    SciTech Connect

    Kwak, Ja Hun; Peden, Charles HF; Szanyi, Janos

    2006-06-01

    The effect of acid sites on the catalytic activities of a series of H+-modified Na-Y zeolites was investigated in the non-thermal plasma assisted NOx reduction reaction using a simulated diesel engine exhaust gas mixture. The acid sites were formed by NH4+ ion exchange and subsequent heat treatment of a NaY zeolite. The catalytic activities of these H+-modified NaY zeolites significantly increased with the number of acid sites. This NOx conversion increase was correlated with the decrease in the amount of unreacted NO2. The increase in the number of acid sites did not change the NO level, it stayed constant. Temperature programmed desorption following NO2 adsorption showed the appearance of a high temperature desorption peak at 453 K in addition to the main desorption feature of 343 K observed for the base Na-Y. The results of both the IR and TPD experiments revealed the formation of crotonaldehyde, resulting from condensation reaction of adsorbed acetaldehyde. Strong adsorptions of both NOx and hydrocarbon species are proposed to be responsible for the higher catalytic activity of H+-modified Na-Y zeolites in comparison to the base NaY material

  20. Regeneration of field-spent activated carbon catalysts for low-temperature selective catalytic reduction of NOx with NH3

    SciTech Connect

    Jeon, Jong Ki; Kim, Hyeonjoo; Park, Young-Kwon; Peden, Charles HF; Kim, Do Heui

    2011-10-15

    In the process of producing liquid crystal displays (LCD), the emitted NOx is removed over an activated carbon catalyst by using selective catalytic reduction (SCR) with NH3 at low temperature. However, the catalyst rapidly deactivates primarily due to the deposition of boron discharged from the process onto the catalyst. Therefore, this study is aimed at developing an optimal regeneration process to remove boron from field-spent carbon catalysts. The spent carbon catalysts were regenerated by washing with a surfactant followed by drying and calcination. The physicochemical properties before and after the regeneration were investigated by using elemental analysis, TG/DTG (thermogravimetric/differential thermogravimetric) analysis, N2 adsorption-desorption and NH3 TPD (temperature programmed desorption). Spent carbon catalysts demonstrated a drastic decrease in DeNOx activity mainly due to heavy deposition of boron. Boron was accumulated to depths of about 50 {mu}m inside the granule surface of the activated carbons, as evidenced by cross-sectional SEM-EDX analysis. However, catalyst activity and surface area were significantly recovered by removing boron in the regeneration process, and the highest NOx conversions were obtained after washing with a non-ionic surfactant in H2O at 70 C, followed by treatment with N2 at 550 C.

  1. Reduction on NOx emissions on urban areas by changing specific vehicle fleets: effects on NO2 and O3 concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goncalves, M.; Jimenez, P.; Baldasano, J.

    2007-12-01

    The largest amount of NOx emissions in urban areas comes from on-road traffic, which is the largest contributor to urban air pollution (Colvile et al., 2001). Currently different strategies are being tested in order to reduce its effects; many of them oriented to the reduction of the unitary vehicles emissions, by alternative fuels use (such as biofuels, natural gas or hydrogen) or introduction of new technologies (such as hybrid electric vehicles or fuel cells). Atmospheric modelling permits to predict their consequences on tropospheric chemistry (Vautard et al., 2007). Hence, this work assesses the changes on NO2 and O3 concentrations when substituting a 10 per cent of the urban private cars fleets by petrol hybrid electric cars (HEC) or by natural gas cars (NGC) in Madrid and Barcelona urban areas (Spain). These two cities are selected in order to highlight the different patterns of pollutants transport (inland vs. coastal city) and the different responses to emissions reductions. The results focus on a typical summertime episode of air pollution, by means of the Eulerian air quality model ARW- WRF/HERMES/CMAQ, applied with high resolution (1-hr, 1km2) since of the complexity of both areas under study. The detailed emissions scenarios are implemented in the HERMES traffic emissions module, based on the Copert III-EEA/EMEP-CORINAIR (Nztiachristos and Samaras, 2000) methodology. The HEC introduction reduces NOx emissions from on-road traffic in a 10.8 per cent and 8.2 per cent; and the NGC introduction in a 10.3 per cent and 7.8 per cent, for Madrid and Barcelona areas, respectively. The scenarios also affect the NMVOCs reduction (ranging from -3.1 to -6.9 per cent), influencing the tropospheric photochemistry through the NOx/NMVOCs ratio. The abatement of the NO photooxidation but also to the reduction on primary NO2 involves a decrease on NO2 levels centred on urban areas. For example, the NO2 24-hr average concentration in downtown areas reduces up to 8 per

  2. Activity and hydrothermal stability of CeO₂-ZrO₂-WO₃ for the selective catalytic reduction of NOx with NH₃.

    PubMed

    Song, Zhongxian; Ning, Ping; Zhang, Qiulin; Li, Hao; Zhang, Jinhui; Wang, Yancai; Liu, Xin; Huang, Zhenzhen

    2016-04-01

    A series of CeO2-ZrO2-WO3 (CZW) catalysts prepared by a hydrothermal synthesis method showed excellent catalytic activity for selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NO with NH3 over a wide temperature of 150-550°C. The effect of hydrothermal treatment of CZW catalysts on SCR activity was investigated in the presence of 10% H2O. The fresh catalyst showed above 90% NOx conversion at 201-459°C, which is applicable to diesel exhaust NOx purification (200-440°C). The SCR activity results indicated that hydrothermal aging decreased the SCR activity of CZW at low temperatures (below 300°C), while the activity was notably enhanced at high temperature (above 450°C). The aged CZW catalyst (hydrothermal aging at 700°C for 8 hr) showed almost 80% NOx conversion at 229-550°C, while the V2O5-WO3/TiO2 catalyst presented above 80% NOx conversion at 308-370°C. The effect of structural changes, acidity, and redox properties of CZW on the SCR activity was investigated. The results indicated that the excellent hydrothermal stability of CZW was mainly due to the CeO2-ZrO2 solid solution, amorphous WO3 phase and optimal acidity. In addition, the formation of WO3 clusters increased in size as the hydrothermal aging temperature increased, resulting in the collapse of structure, which could further affect the acidity and redox properties.

  3. Multi-stage selective catalytic reduction of NOx in lean burn engine exhaust

    SciTech Connect

    Penetrante, B.M.; Hsaio, M.C.; Merritt, B.T.; Vogtlin, G.E.

    1997-12-31

    Many studies suggest that the conversion of NO to NO{sub 2} is an important intermediate step in the selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NO{sub x} to N{sub 2}. Some effort has been devoted to separating the oxidative and reductive functions of the catalyst in a multi-stage system. This method works fine for systems that require hydrocarbon addition. The hydrocarbon has to be injected between the NO oxidation catalyst and the NO{sub 2} reduction catalyst; otherwise, the first-stage oxidation catalyst will also oxidize the hydrocarbon and decrease its effectiveness as a reductant. The multi-stage catalytic scheme is appropriate for diesel engine exhausts since they contain insufficient hydrocarbons for SCR, and the hydrocarbons can be added at the desired location. For lean-burn gasoline engine exhausts, the hydrocarbons already present in the exhausts will make it necessary to find an oxidation catalyst that can oxidize NO to NO{sub 2} but not oxidize the hydrocarbon. A plasma can also be used to oxidize NO to NO{sub 2}. Plasma oxidation has several advantages over catalytic oxidation. Plasma-assisted catalysis can work well for both diesel engine and lean-burn gasoline engine exhausts. This is because the plasma can oxidize NO in the presence of hydrocarbons without degrading the effectiveness of the hydrocarbon as a reductant for SCR. In the plasma, the hydrocarbon enhances the oxidation of NO, minimizes the electrical energy requirement, and prevents the oxidation of SO{sub 2}. This paper discusses the use of multi-stage systems for selective catalytic reduction of NO{sub x}. The multi-stage catalytic scheme is compared to the plasma-assisted catalytic scheme.

  4. A Portable Emissions Measurement System (PEMS) study of NOx and primary NO2 emissions from Euro 6 diesel passenger cars and comparison with COPERT emission factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Driscoll, Rosalind; ApSimon, Helen M.; Oxley, Tim; Molden, Nick; Stettler, Marc E. J.; Thiyagarajah, Aravinth

    2016-11-01

    Real world emissions of oxides of nitrogen (NOx) often greatly exceed those achieved in the laboratory based type approval process. In this paper the real world emissions from a substantial sample of the latest Euro 6 diesel passenger cars are presented with a focus on NOx and primary NO2. Portable Emissions Measurement System (PEMS) data is analysed from 39 Euro 6 diesel passenger cars over a test route comprised of urban and motorway sections. The sample includes vehicles installed with exhaust gas recirculation (EGR), lean NOx traps (LNT), or selective catalytic reduction (SCR). The results show wide variability in NOx emissions from 1 to 22 times the type approval limit. The average NOx emission, 0.36 (sd. 0.36) g km-1, is 4.5 times the Euro 6 limit. The average fraction primary NO2 (fNO2) is 44 (sd. 20) %. Higher emissions during the urban section of the route are attributed to an increased number of acceleration events. Comparisons between PEMS measurements and COPERT speed dependent emissions factors show PEMS measurements to be on average 1.6 times higher than COPERT estimates for NOx and 2.5 times for NO2. However, by removing the 5 most polluting vehicles average emissions were reduced considerably.

  5. NOx reduction in combustion with concentrated coal streams and oxygen injection

    DOEpatents

    Kobayashi, Hisashi; Bool, III, Lawrence E.; Snyder, William J.

    2004-03-02

    NOx formation in the combustion of solid hydrocarbonaceous fuel such as coal is reduced by obtaining, from the incoming feed stream of fuel solids and air, a stream having a ratio of fuel solids to air that is higher than that of the feed steam, and injecting the thus obtained stream and a small amount of oxygen to a burner where the fuel solids are combusted.

  6. A Synthetic Pseudo-Rh: NOx Reduction Activity and Electronic Structure of Pd-Ru Solid-solution Alloy Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Sato, Katsutoshi; Tomonaga, Hiroyuki; Yamamoto, Tomokazu; Matsumura, Syo; Zulkifli, Nor Diana Binti; Ishimoto, Takayoshi; Koyama, Michihisa; Kusada, Kohei; Kobayashi, Hirokazu; Kitagawa, Hiroshi; Nagaoka, Katsutoshi

    2016-06-24

    Rh is one of the most important noble metals for industrial applications. A major fraction of Rh is used as a catalyst for emission control in automotive catalytic converters because of its unparalleled activity toward NOx reduction. However, Rh is a rare and extremely expensive element; thus, the development of Rh alternative composed of abundant elements is desirable. Pd and Ru are located at the right and left of Rh in the periodic table, respectively, nevertheless this combination of elements is immiscible in the bulk state. Here, we report a Pd-Ru solid-solution-alloy nanoparticle (PdxRu1-x NP) catalyst exhibiting better NOx reduction activity than Rh. Theoretical calculations show that the electronic structure of Pd0.5Ru0.5 is similar to that of Rh, indicating that Pd0.5Ru0.5 can be regarded as a pseudo-Rh. Pd0.5Ru0.5 exhibits better activity than natural Rh, which implies promising applications not only for exhaust-gas cleaning but also for various chemical reactions.

  7. A Synthetic Pseudo-Rh: NOx Reduction Activity and Electronic Structure of Pd–Ru Solid-solution Alloy Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Katsutoshi; Tomonaga, Hiroyuki; Yamamoto, Tomokazu; Matsumura, Syo; Zulkifli, Nor Diana Binti; Ishimoto, Takayoshi; Koyama, Michihisa; Kusada, Kohei; Kobayashi, Hirokazu; Kitagawa, Hiroshi; Nagaoka, Katsutoshi

    2016-01-01

    Rh is one of the most important noble metals for industrial applications. A major fraction of Rh is used as a catalyst for emission control in automotive catalytic converters because of its unparalleled activity toward NOx reduction. However, Rh is a rare and extremely expensive element; thus, the development of Rh alternative composed of abundant elements is desirable. Pd and Ru are located at the right and left of Rh in the periodic table, respectively, nevertheless this combination of elements is immiscible in the bulk state. Here, we report a Pd–Ru solid-solution-alloy nanoparticle (PdxRu1-x NP) catalyst exhibiting better NOx reduction activity than Rh. Theoretical calculations show that the electronic structure of Pd0.5Ru0.5 is similar to that of Rh, indicating that Pd0.5Ru0.5 can be regarded as a pseudo-Rh. Pd0.5Ru0.5 exhibits better activity than natural Rh, which implies promising applications not only for exhaust-gas cleaning but also for various chemical reactions. PMID:27340099

  8. A Synthetic Pseudo-Rh: NOx Reduction Activity and Electronic Structure of Pd–Ru Solid-solution Alloy Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Katsutoshi; Tomonaga, Hiroyuki; Yamamoto, Tomokazu; Matsumura, Syo; Zulkifli, Nor Diana Binti; Ishimoto, Takayoshi; Koyama, Michihisa; Kusada, Kohei; Kobayashi, Hirokazu; Kitagawa, Hiroshi; Nagaoka, Katsutoshi

    2016-06-01

    Rh is one of the most important noble metals for industrial applications. A major fraction of Rh is used as a catalyst for emission control in automotive catalytic converters because of its unparalleled activity toward NOx reduction. However, Rh is a rare and extremely expensive element; thus, the development of Rh alternative composed of abundant elements is desirable. Pd and Ru are located at the right and left of Rh in the periodic table, respectively, nevertheless this combination of elements is immiscible in the bulk state. Here, we report a Pd–Ru solid-solution-alloy nanoparticle (PdxRu1-x NP) catalyst exhibiting better NOx reduction activity than Rh. Theoretical calculations show that the electronic structure of Pd0.5Ru0.5 is similar to that of Rh, indicating that Pd0.5Ru0.5 can be regarded as a pseudo-Rh. Pd0.5Ru0.5 exhibits better activity than natural Rh, which implies promising applications not only for exhaust-gas cleaning but also for various chemical reactions.

  9. A Synthetic Pseudo-Rh: NOx Reduction Activity and Electronic Structure of Pd-Ru Solid-solution Alloy Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Sato, Katsutoshi; Tomonaga, Hiroyuki; Yamamoto, Tomokazu; Matsumura, Syo; Zulkifli, Nor Diana Binti; Ishimoto, Takayoshi; Koyama, Michihisa; Kusada, Kohei; Kobayashi, Hirokazu; Kitagawa, Hiroshi; Nagaoka, Katsutoshi

    2016-01-01

    Rh is one of the most important noble metals for industrial applications. A major fraction of Rh is used as a catalyst for emission control in automotive catalytic converters because of its unparalleled activity toward NOx reduction. However, Rh is a rare and extremely expensive element; thus, the development of Rh alternative composed of abundant elements is desirable. Pd and Ru are located at the right and left of Rh in the periodic table, respectively, nevertheless this combination of elements is immiscible in the bulk state. Here, we report a Pd-Ru solid-solution-alloy nanoparticle (PdxRu1-x NP) catalyst exhibiting better NOx reduction activity than Rh. Theoretical calculations show that the electronic structure of Pd0.5Ru0.5 is similar to that of Rh, indicating that Pd0.5Ru0.5 can be regarded as a pseudo-Rh. Pd0.5Ru0.5 exhibits better activity than natural Rh, which implies promising applications not only for exhaust-gas cleaning but also for various chemical reactions. PMID:27340099

  10. NOx analyser interefence from alkenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloss, W. J.; Alam, M. S.; Lee, J. D.; Vazquez, M.; Munoz, A.; Rodenas, M.

    2012-04-01

    Nitrogen oxides (NO and NO2, collectively NOx) are critical intermediates in atmospheric chemistry. NOx abundance controls the levels of the primary atmospheric oxidants OH, NO3 and O3, and regulates the ozone production which results from the degradation of volatile organic compounds. NOx are also atmospheric pollutants in their own right, and NO2 is commonly included in air quality objectives and regulations. In addition to their role in controlling ozone formation, NOx levels affect the production of other pollutants such as the lachrymator PAN, and the nitrate component of secondary aerosol particles. Consequently, accurate measurement of nitrogen oxides in the atmosphere is of major importance for understanding our atmosphere. The most widely employed approach for the measurement of NOx is chemiluminescent detection of NO2* from the NO + O3 reaction, combined with NO2 reduction by either a heated catalyst or photoconvertor. The reaction between alkenes and ozone is also chemiluminescent; therefore alkenes may contribute to the measured NOx signal, depending upon the instrumental background subtraction cycle employed. This interference has been noted previously, and indeed the effect has been used to measure both alkenes and ozone in the atmosphere. Here we report the results of a systematic investigation of the response of a selection of NOx analysers, ranging from systems used for routine air quality monitoring to atmospheric research instrumentation, to a series of alkenes ranging from ethene to the biogenic monoterpenes, as a function of conditions (co-reactants, humidity). Experiments were performed in the European Photoreactor (EUPHORE) to ensure common calibration, a common sample for the monitors, and to unequivocally confirm the alkene (via FTIR) and NO2 (via DOAS) levels present. The instrument responses ranged from negligible levels up to 10 % depending upon the alkene present and conditions used. Such interferences may be of substantial importance

  11. Effect of manufacturing methods of AgCl/Al2O3 catalyst on selective catalytic reduction of NO(x).

    PubMed

    Kishida, Satoshi; Ju, Dong-Ying; Aritani, Hirofumi

    2011-01-01

    The AgCl/Al2O3 catalyst has potential for use in the selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NO(x). A compound hydrocarbon, following oxygenation is used as a type of reducing agent. In this experiment, the AgCl/Al2O3 catalyst was produced by four different methods, and the differences among their reduction catalysis of NO(x) were compared. Ethanol was used as a type of reducing agent. X-ray diffraction analysis was performed to study the crystalline structure and scanning electron microscope and transmission electron microscope (TEM) were applied to determine the microindentation. The results indicated that, in the range of 350-400 degrees C, there was no significant difference on the NO(x) reduction rate; however, there was dispersion at high and low temperature ranges. The size of the AgCl particles was about 20-100 nm.

  12. Identification of the arsenic resistance on MoO3 doped CeO2/TiO2 catalyst for selective catalytic reduction of NOx with ammonia.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiang; Li, Xiansheng; Li, Junhua; Hao, Jiming

    2016-11-15

    Arsenic resistance on MoO3 doped CeO2/TiO2 catalysts for selective catalytic reduction of NOx with NH3 (NH3-SCR) is investigated. It is found that the activity loss of CeO2-MoO3/TiO2 caused by As oxide is obvious less than that of CeO2/TiO2 catalysts. The fresh and poisoned catalysts are compared and analyzed using XRD, Raman, XPS, H2-TPR and in situ DRIFTS. The results manifest that the introduction of arsenic oxide to CeO2/TiO2 catalyst not only weakens BET surface area, surface acid sites and adsorbed NOx species, but also destroy the redox circle of Ce(4+) to Ce(3+) because of interaction between Ce and As. When MoO3 is added into CeO2/TiO2 system, the main SCR reaction path are found to be changed from the reaction between coordinated NH3 and ad-NOx species to that between an amide and gaseous NO. Additionally, for CeO2-MoO3/TiO2 catalyst, As toxic effect on active sites CeO2 can be released because of stronger As-Mo interaction. Moreover, not only are the reactable Brønsted and Lewis acid sites partly restored, but the cycle of Ce(4+) to Ce(3+) can also be free to some extent. PMID:27474851

  13. Enhanced High Temperature Performance of NOx Storage/Reduction (NSR) Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Do Heui; Muntean, George G.; Peden, Charles HF; Howden, Ken; Currier, Neal; Li, Junhui; Stafford, Randy; Yezerets, Aleksey; Chen, Hai Ying; Hess, Howard ..

    2012-02-08

    This annual report describes progress on a CRADA project aimed at developing a fundamental understanding of candidate next generation NSR materials for NOx after-treatment for light-duty lean-burn (including diesel) engines. Model catalysts that are based on literature formulations are the focus of the work being carried out at PNNL. In addition, the performance and stability of a realistic high temperature NSR catalyst, supplied by JM, is being studied in order to provide baseline data for the model catalysts that are, again, based on formulations described in the open literature.

  14. METHANE de-NOX FOR UTILITY PC BOILERS

    SciTech Connect

    Joseph Rabovitser

    2001-01-30

    The overall project objective is the development and validation of an innovative combustion system, based on a novel coal preheating concept prior to combustion, that can reduce NOx emissions to 0.15 lb/million Btu or less on utility pulverized coal (PC) boilers. This NOx reduction should be achieved without loss of boiler efficiency or operating stability, and at more than 25% lower levelized cost than state-of-the-art SCR technology. A further objective is to make this technology ready for full-scale commercial deployment by 2002-2003 in order to meet an anticipated market demand for NOx reduction technologies resulting from the EPA's NOx SIP call.

  15. NH3-TPD-MS study of Ce effect on the surface of Mn- or Fe-exchanged zeolites for selective catalytic reduction of NOx by ammonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanciulescu, M.; Bulsink, P.; Caravaggio, G.; Nossova, L.; Burich, R.

    2014-05-01

    The selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NOx with NH3 is considered to be a promising technique for the efficient reduction of highly detrimental NOx emitted from diesel engine vehicles to N2. This study was focused on a series of catalysts with ZSM-5 as support, prepared by Mn- or Fe-exchange followed by wet impregnation of Ce, or Fe or Mn. These catalysts were characterized by temperature-programmed desorption coupled with a mass spectrometer using ammonia (NH3-TPD-MS). Specifically, NH3-TPD-MS was used as a means of identifying the various strengths of acid sites and their relative abundance in an attempt to explain the effect of the catalyst surface acid sites on DeNOx activity. Acid sites with adsorption energies ranging from 47.0 to 75.6 kJ/mol were detected for all of the catalysts. For the same concentration of exchanged metal it was found that the DeNOx activity depends strongly on the type of metal. Furthermore, the acid site strength and distribution depend on the active metal and correlate with the observed DeNOx catalyst activity. Additionally, SEM metal mapping images confirmed the presence of well dispersed active metal on the surface of all catalysts. The catalysts with bimetallic active phase were stable and demonstrated high NOx conversion over a broad temperature range. Impregnation of metal-exchanged zeolites with Ce enhanced the low temperature NOx conversion. Observed differences of activity between the various catalysts of this study may be due to the formation of new ammonia activation sites. The ammonia desorption profile during the elevation of temperature was correlated to the DeNOx activity.

  16. Reductant injection and mixing system

    DOEpatents

    Reeves, Matt; Henry, Cary A.; Ruth, Michael J.

    2016-02-16

    A gaseous reductant injection and mixing system is described herein. The system includes an injector for injecting a gaseous reductant into an exhaust gas stream, and a mixer attached to a surface of the injector. The injector includes a plurality of apertures through which the gaseous reductant is injected into an exhaust gas stream. The mixer includes a plurality of fluid deflecting elements.

  17. Mechanism of propene poisoning on Fe-ZSM-5 for selective catalytic reduction of NO(x) with ammonia.

    PubMed

    Li, Junhua; Zhu, Ronghai; Cheng, Yisun; Lambert, Christine K; Yang, Ralph T

    2010-03-01

    Application of Fe-zeolites for urea-SCR of NO(x) in diesel engine is limited by catalyst deactivation with hydrocarbons. In this work, we investigated the effect of propene on the activity of Fe-ZSM-5 for selective catalytic reduction of NO(x) with ammonia (NH(3)-SCR), and proposed a deactivation mechanism of Fe(3+) active site blockage by propene residue. The NO conversion decreased in the presence of propene at various temperatures, while the effect was not significant when NO was replaced by NO(2) in the feed, especially at low temperatures (<300 degrees C). The surface area and pore volume were decreased due to carbonaceous deposition. The site blockage was mainly on Fe(3+) sites on which NO was to be oxidized to NO(2). The activity for NO oxidation to NO(2) was significantly inhibited on a propene poisoned catalyst below 400 degrees C. The adsorption of NH(3) on the Bronsted acid sites to form NH(4)(+) was not hindered even on the propene poisoned catalyst, and the amount of absorbed NH(3) was still abundant and enough to react with NO(2) to generate N(2). The hydrocarbon oxygenates such as formate, acetate, and containing nitrogen organic compounds were observed on catalyst surface, however, no graphitic carbonaceous deposit was formed.

  18. Impact of biogenic emissions on ozone and fine particles over Europe: Assessing the effect of temperature increase and the role of anthropogenic NOx emissions reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tagaris, Efthimios; Sotiropoulou, Rafaella-Eleni P.; Gounaris, Nikos; Andronopoulos, Spyros; Vlachogiannis, Diamando

    2014-05-01

    The role of biogenic emissions on ozone and PM2.5 levels over Europe is assessed for July 2006 using the CMAQ modeling system. Biogenic emissions are simulated to increase the daily maximum 8 hour ozone (Max8hrO3) mixing ratios and to decrease PM2.5 average concentrations over Europe. Since climate change will lead to higher temperatures increasing subsequently biogenic emissions, sensitivity analysis to temperature is performed. Higher temperatures suggest an average increase in Max8hrO3 mixing ratios over Europe by about 3% and an average decrease in PM2.5 concentrations by about 6%, related to a temperature increase by 3 K degrees. Temperature increases are simulated, also, to increase the organic part of PM2.5 and to decrease the inorganic one on average over Europe. In order to examine if abatement measures for anthropogenic emissions could offset ozone increases in a warmer environment and their effect on PM2.5 concentrations, simulation with a domain wide reduction of anthropogenic NOx emissions by 10% is performed. This is estimated to reduce Max8hrO3 mixing ratios on average over Europe, however, in VOCs limited areas there is an increase. The reduction in anthropogenic NOx emissions is simulated to reduce PM2.5 concentrations on average over Europe enhancing the reduction simulated in a warmer environment but further modifying PM2.5 component concentrations. This work was supported by the National Strategic Reference Framework (NSRF) 2007-2013 grand No 09SYN-31-667.

  19. OPTIMIZED FUEL INJECTOR DESIGN FOR MAXIMUM IN-FURNACE NOx REDUCTION AND MINIMUM UNBURNED CARBON

    SciTech Connect

    SAROFIM, A F; LISAUSKAS, R; RILEY, D; EDDINGS, E G; BROUWER, J; KLEWICKI, J P; DAVIS, K A; BOCKELIE, M J; HEAP, M P; PERSHING, D

    1998-01-01

    Reaction Engineering International (REI) has established a project team of experts to develop a technology for combustion systems which will minimize NO x emissions and minimize carbon in the fly ash. This much need technology will allow users to meet environmental compliance and produce a saleable by-product. This study is concerned with the NO x control technology of choice for pulverized coal fired boilers,"in-furnace NOx control," which includes: staged low-NOx burners, reburning, selective non-catalytic reduction (SNCR) and hybrid approaches (e.g., reburning with SNCR). The program has two primary objectives: 1) To improve the performance of "in-furnace" NOx control, processes. 2) To devise new, or improve existing, approaches for maximum "in-furnace" NOx control and minimum unburned carbon. The program involves: 1) fundamental studies at laboratory- and bench-scale to define NO reduction mechanisms in flames and reburning jets; 2) laboratory experiments and computer modeling to improve our two-phase mixing predictive capability; 3) evaluation of commercial low-NOx burner fuel injectors to develop improved designs, and 4) demonstration of coal injectors for reburning and low-NOx burners at commercial scale. The specific objectives of the two-phase program are to: 1 Conduct research to better understand the interaction of heterogeneous chemistry and two phase mixing on NO reduction processes in pulverized coal combustion. 2 Improve our ability to predict combusting coal jets by verifying two phase mixing models under conditions that simulate the near field of low-NOx burners. 3 Determine the limits on NO control by in-furnace NOx control technologies as a function of furnace design and coal type. 5 Develop and demonstrate improved coal injector designs for commercial low-NOx burners and coal reburning systems. 6 Modify the char burnout model in REI's coal

  20. Environmentally-benign catalysts for the selective catalytic reduction of NO(x) from diesel engines: structure-activity relationship and reaction mechanism aspects.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fudong; Yu, Yunbo; He, Hong

    2014-08-11

    Selective catalytic reduction of NOx using NH3 or hydrocarbons (NH3-SCR or HC-SCR) in oxygen-rich exhaust from diesel engines remains a major challenge in environmental catalysis. The development of highly efficient, stable and environmentally-benign catalysts for SCR processes is very important for practical use. In this feature article, the structure-activity relationship of vanadium-free catalysts in the NH3-SCR reaction is discussed in detail, including Fe-, Ce-based oxide catalysts and Fe-, Cu-based zeolite catalysts, which is beneficial for catalyst redesign and activity improvement. Based on our research, a comprehensive mechanism contributing to the performance of Ag/Al2O3 in HC-SCR is provided, giving a clue to the design of a catalytic system with high efficiency.

  1. Experiment and mechanism investigation on advanced reburning for NO(x) reduction: influence of CO and temperature.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhi-Hua; Zhou, Jun-Hu; Zhang, Yan-Wei; Lu, Zhi-Min; Fan, Jian-Ren; Cen, Ke-Fa

    2005-03-01

    Pulverized coal reburning, ammonia injection and advanced reburning in a pilot scale drop tube furnace were investigated. Premix of petroleum gas, air and NH3 were burned in a porous gas burner to generate the needed flue gas. Four kinds of pulverized coal were fed as reburning fuel at constant rate of 1g/min. The coal reburning process parameters including 15% approximately 25% reburn heat input, temperature range from 1100 degrees C to 1400 degrees C and also the carbon in fly ash, coal fineness, reburn zone stoichiometric ratio, etc. were investigated. On the condition of 25% reburn heat input, maximum of 47% NO reduction with Yanzhou coal was obtained by pure coal reburning. Optimal temperature for reburning is about 1300 degrees C and fuel-rich stoichiometric ratio is essential; coal fineness can slightly enhance the reburning ability. The temperature window for ammonia injection is about 700 degrees C approximately 1100 degrees C. CO can improve the NH3 ability at lower temperature. During advanced reburning, 72.9% NO reduction was measured. To achieve more than 70% NO reduction, Selective Non-catalytic NO(x) Reduction (SNCR) should need NH3/NO stoichiometric ratio larger than 5, while advanced reburning only uses common dose of ammonia as in conventional SNCR technology. Mechanism study shows the oxidization of CO can improve the decomposition of H2O, which will rich the radical pools igniting the whole reactions at lower temperatures.

  2. Experiment and mechanism investigation on advanced reburning for NO(x) reduction: influence of CO and temperature.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhi-Hua; Zhou, Jun-Hu; Zhang, Yan-Wei; Lu, Zhi-Min; Fan, Jian-Ren; Cen, Ke-Fa

    2005-03-01

    Pulverized coal reburning, ammonia injection and advanced reburning in a pilot scale drop tube furnace were investigated. Premix of petroleum gas, air and NH3 were burned in a porous gas burner to generate the needed flue gas. Four kinds of pulverized coal were fed as reburning fuel at constant rate of 1g/min. The coal reburning process parameters including 15% approximately 25% reburn heat input, temperature range from 1100 degrees C to 1400 degrees C and also the carbon in fly ash, coal fineness, reburn zone stoichiometric ratio, etc. were investigated. On the condition of 25% reburn heat input, maximum of 47% NO reduction with Yanzhou coal was obtained by pure coal reburning. Optimal temperature for reburning is about 1300 degrees C and fuel-rich stoichiometric ratio is essential; coal fineness can slightly enhance the reburning ability. The temperature window for ammonia injection is about 700 degrees C approximately 1100 degrees C. CO can improve the NH3 ability at lower temperature. During advanced reburning, 72.9% NO reduction was measured. To achieve more than 70% NO reduction, Selective Non-catalytic NO(x) Reduction (SNCR) should need NH3/NO stoichiometric ratio larger than 5, while advanced reburning only uses common dose of ammonia as in conventional SNCR technology. Mechanism study shows the oxidization of CO can improve the decomposition of H2O, which will rich the radical pools igniting the whole reactions at lower temperatures. PMID:15682503

  3. Significant Promotion Effect of Mo Additive on a Novel Ce-Zr Mixed Oxide Catalyst for the Selective Catalytic Reduction of NO(x) with NH3.

    PubMed

    Ding, Shipeng; Liu, Fudong; Shi, Xiaoyan; Liu, Kuo; Lian, Zhihua; Xie, Lijuan; He, Hong

    2015-05-13

    A novel Mo-promoted Ce-Zr mixed oxide catalyst prepared by a homogeneous precipitation method was used for the selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NO(x) with NH3. The optimal catalyst showed high NH3-SCR activity, SO2/H2O durability, and thermal stability under test conditions. The addition of Mo inhibited growth of the CeO2 particle size, improved the redox ability, and increased the amount of surface acidity, especially the Lewis acidity, all of which were favorable for the excellent NH3-SCR performance. It is believed that the catalyst is promising for the removal of NO(x) from diesel engine exhaust.

  4. Impact of NO(x) emissions reduction policy on hospitalizations for respiratory disease in New York State.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shao; Jones, Rena; Pantea, Cristian; Özkaynak, Halûk; Rao, S Trivikrama; Hwang, Syni-An; Garcia, Valerie C

    2013-01-01

    To date, only a limited number of studies have examined the impact of ambient pollutant policy on respiratory morbidities. This accountability study examined the effect of a regional pollution control policy, namely, the US Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) nitrogen oxides (NO(x)) Budget Trading Program (NBP), on respiratory health in New York State (NYS). Time-series analysis using generalized additive models was applied to assess changes in daily hospitalizations for respiratory diseases in NYS after the implementation of the NBP policy. Respiratory end points in the summers during the baseline period (1997-2000) were compared with those during the post-intervention period (2004-2006). Stratified analyses were also conducted to examine whether health impacts of the NBP differed by socio-demographic, regional, or clinical characteristics. Following the implementation of EPA's NBP policy, there were significant reductions in mean ozone levels (-2% to -9%) throughout NYS. After adjusting for time-varying variables, PM(2.5) concentration, and meteorological factors, significant post-intervention declines in respiratory admissions were observed in the Central (-10.18, 95% confidence interval (CI): -14.18, -6.01), Lower Hudson (-11.05, 95% CI: -16.54, -5.19), and New York City Metro regions (-5.71, 95% CI: -7.39, -4.00), consistent with wind trajectory patterns. Stratified analyses suggest that admissions for asthma, chronic airway obstruction, among those 5-17 years old, self-payers, Medicaid-covered, and rural residents declined the most post-NBP. This study suggests that the NO(x) control policy may have had a positive impact on both air pollution levels statewide and respiratory health in some NYS regions. However, the effect varied by disease subgroups, region, and socio-demographic characteristics. PMID:22829050

  5. AISI/DOE Technology Roadmap Program: Development of an O2-Enriched Furnace System for Reduced CO2 and NOx Emissions For the Steel Industry

    SciTech Connect

    Edward W. Grandmaison; David J. Poirier; Eric Boyd

    2003-01-20

    An oxygen-enriched furnace system for reduced CO2 and NOx emission has been developed. The furnace geometry, with a sidewall-mounted burner, was similar to configurations commonly encountered in a steel reheat furnace. The effect of stack oxygen concentration, oxygen enrichment level and air infiltration on fuel savings/CO2 reduction, NOx emissions and scale formation were investigated. The firing rate required to maintain the furnace temperature at 1100 C decreased linearly with increasing oxygen enrichment. At full oxygen enrichment a reduction of 40-45% in the firing rate was required to maintain furnace temperature. NOx emissions were relatively constant at oxygen enrichment levels below 60% and decreased concentration at all oxygen enrichment levels. Air infiltration also had an effect on NOx levels leading to emissions similar to those observed with no air infiltration but with similar stack oxygen concentrations. At high oxygen enrichment levels, there was a larger variation in the refractory surface-temperature on the roof and blind sidewall of the furnace. Scale habit, intactness, adhesion and oxidation rates were examined for five grades of steel over a range of stack oxygen concentrations and oxygen enrichment levels at 1100 degree C. The steel grade had the largest effect on scaling properties examined in this work. The stack oxygen concentration and the oxygen enrichment level had much smaller effects on the scaling properties.

  6. Recombinant Nox4 cytosolic domain produced by a cell or cell-free base systems exhibits constitutive diaphorase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, Minh Vu Chuong; Zhang, Leilei; Lhomme, Stanislas; Mouz, Nicolas

    2012-03-16

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A comparison of two bacterial cell and cell-free protein expression systems is presented. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Soluble and active truncated Nox4 proteins are produced. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nox4 has a constitutive diaphorase activity which is independent of cytosolic factors. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Isoform Nox4B is unable to initiate the first electronic transfer step. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Findings contribute to the understanding of the mechanism of Nox4 oxidase activity. -- Abstract: The membrane protein NADPH (nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate) oxidase Nox4 constitutively generates reactive oxygen species differing from other NADPH oxidases activity, particularly in Nox2 which needs a stimulus to be active. Although the precise mechanism of production of reactive oxygen species by Nox2 is well characterized, the electronic transfer throughout Nox4 remains unclear. Our study aims to investigate the initial electronic transfer step (diaphorase activity) of the cytosolic tail of Nox4. For this purpose, we developed two different approaches to produce soluble and active truncated Nox4 proteins. We synthesized soluble recombinant proteins either by in vitro translation or by bacteria induction. While proteins obtained by bacteria induction demonstrate an activity of 4.4 {+-} 1.7 nmol/min/nmol when measured against iodonitro tetrazolium chloride and 20.5 {+-} 2.8 nmol/min/nmol with cytochrome c, the soluble proteins produced by cell-free expression system exhibit a diaphorase activity with a turn-over of 26 {+-} 2.6 nmol/min/nmol when measured against iodonitro tetrazolium chloride and 48 {+-} 20.2 nmol/min/nmol with cytochrome c. Furthermore, the activity of the soluble proteins is constitutive and does not need any stimulus. We also show that the cytosolic tail of the isoform Nox4B lacking the first NADPH binding site is unable to demonstrate any diaphorase activity pointing out the

  7. PILOT-SCALE EVALUATION OF THE IMPACT OF SELECTIVE CATALYTIC REDUCTION FOR NOx ON MERCURY SPECIATION

    SciTech Connect

    Dennis L. Laudal; John H. Pavlish; Kevin C. Galbreath; Jeffrey S. Thompson; Gregory F. Weber; Everett Sondreal

    2000-12-01

    Full-scale tests in Europe and bench-scale tests in the United States have indicated that the catalyst, normally vanadium/titanium metal oxide, used in the selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NO{sub x}, may promote the formation of Hg{sup 2+} and/or particulate-bound mercury (Hg{sub p}). To investigate the impact of SCR on mercury speciation, pilot-scale screening tests were conducted at the Energy & Environmental Research Center. The primary research goal was to determine whether the catalyst or the injection of ammonia in a representative SCR system promotes the conversion of Hg{sup 0} to Hg{sup 2+} and/or Hg{sub p} and, if so, which coal types and parameters (e.g., rank and chemical composition) affect the degree of conversion. Four different coals, three eastern bituminous coals and a Powder River Basin (PRB) subbituminous coal, were tested. Three tests were conducted for each coal: (1) baseline, (2) NH{sub 3} injection, and (3) SCR of NO{sub x}. Speciated mercury, ammonia slip, SO{sub 3}, and chloride measurements were made to determine the effect the SCR reactor had on mercury speciation. It appears that the impact of SCR of NO{sub x} on mercury speciation is coal-dependent. Although there were several confounding factors such as temperature and ammonia concentrations in the flue gas, two of the eastern bituminous coals showed substantial increases in Hg{sub p} at the inlet to the ESP after passing through an SCR reactor. The PRB coal showed little if any change due to the presence of the SCR. Apparently, the effects of the SCR reactor are related to the chloride, sulfur and, possibly, the calcium content of the coal. It is clear that additional work needs to be done at the full-scale level.

  8. Fuel-Air Mixing Effect on Nox Emissions for a Lean Premixed-Prevaporized Combustion System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Chi-Ming; Chun, Kue S.; Locke, Randy J.

    1995-01-01

    The lean premixed-prevaporized (LPP) concept effectively meets low nitrogen oxides (NOx) emission requirements for combustors with the high inlet temperature and pressure typical of the High-Speed Civil Transport (HSCT). For the LPP system fuel-air mixture uniformity is probably the most important factor for low NOx emissions. Previous studies have suggested that the fuel-air mixture uniformity can be severely affected by changing the number and configuration of fuel injection points. Therefore, an experimental study was performed to determine how the number of fuel injection points and their arrangement affect NOx emissions from an LPP system. The NOx emissions were measured by a gas-sampling probe in a flame-tube rig at the following conditions: inlet temperature of 810 K (1000 F), rig pressure of 10 atm, reference velocity of 150 ft/s, and residence time near 0.005 s. Additionally, a focused Schlieren diagnostic technique coupled with a high speed camera was used to provide a qualitative description of the spatial flow field.

  9. Microgravity particle reduction system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandon, Vanessa; Joslin, Michelle; Mateo, Lili; Tubbs, Tracey

    1988-01-01

    The Controlled Ecological Life Support System (CELSS) project, sponsored by NASA, is assembling the knowledge required to design, construct, and operate a system which will grow and process higher plants in space for the consumption by crew members of a space station on a long term space mission. The problem of processing dry granular organic materials in microgravity is discussed. For the purpose of research and testing, wheat was chosen as the granular material to be ground into flour. Possible systems which were devised to transport wheat grains into the food processor, mill the wheat into flour, and transport the flour to the food preparation system are described. The systems were analyzed and compared and two satisfactory systems were chosen. Prototypes of the two preferred systems are to be fabricated next semester. They will be tested under simulated microgravity conditions and revised for maximum effectiveness.

  10. Plasma-assisted heterogeneous catalysis for NOx reduction in lean-burn engine exhaust

    SciTech Connect

    Penetrante, B.M.; Hsaio, M.C.; Merritt, B.T.; Vogtlin, G.E.; Wan, C.Z.; Rice, G.W.; Voss, K.E.

    1997-12-31

    This paper discusses the combination of a plasma with a catalyst to improve the reduction of NO{sub x} under lean-burn conditions. The authors have been investigating the effects of a plasma on the NO{sub x} reduction activity and temperature operating window of various catalytic materials. One of the goals is to develop a fundamental understanding of the interaction between the gas-phase plasma chemistry and the heterogeneous chemistry on the catalyst surface. The authors have observed that plasma assisted heterogeneous catalysis can facilitate NO{sub x} reduction under conditions that normally make it difficult for either the plasma or the catalyst to function by itself. By systematically varying the plasma electrode and catalyst configuration, they have been able to elucidate the process by which the plasma chemistry affects the chemical reduction of NO{sub x} on the catalyst surface. They have discovered that the main effect of the plasma is to induce the gas-phase oxidation of NO to NO{sub 21}. The reduction of NO{sub x} to N{sub 2} is then accomplished by heterogeneous reaction of O with activated hydrocarbons on the catalyst surface. The use of a plasma opens the opportunity for a new class of catalysts that are potentially more durable, more active, more selective and more sulfur-tolerant compared to conventional lean-NO{sub x} catalysts.

  11. COMPUTATIONAL MODELING AND EXPERIMENTAL STUDIES ON NOx REDUCTION UNDER PULVERIZED COAL COMBUSTION CONDITIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Subha K. Kumpaty; Kannikeswaran Subramanian; Victor P. Nokku; Tyrus L. Hodges; Adel Hassouneh; Ansumana Darboe; Sravan K. Kumpati

    1998-06-01

    In this work, both computer simulation and experimental studies were conducted to investigate several strategies for NO{sub x} reduction under pulverized coal combustion conditions with an aim to meet the stringent environmental standards for NO{sub x} control. Both computer predictions and reburning experiments yielded favorable results in terms of NO{sub x} control by reburning with a combination of methane and acetylene as well as non-selective catalytic reduction of NO{sub x} with ammonia following reburning with methane. The greatest reduction was achieved at the reburning stoichiometric ratio of 0.9; the reduction was very significant, as clearly shown in Chapters III and V. Both the experimental and computational results favored mixing gases: methane and acetylene (90% and 10% respectively) and methane and ammonia (98% and 2%) in order to get optimum reduction levels which can not be achieved by individual gases at any amounts. Also, the above gaseous compositions as reburning fuels seemed to have a larger window of stoichiometric ratio (SR2 < 0.9) as opposed to just methane (SR2=0.9) so as to reduce and keep NO{sub x} at low ppm levels. From the various computational runs, it has been observed that although there are several pathways that contribute to NO{sub x} reduction, the key pathway is NO {r_arrow} HCN {r_arrow} NH{sub 3} {r_arrow} N{sub 2} + H{sub 2}. With the trends established in this work, it is possible to scale the experimental results to real time industrial applications using computational calculations.

  12. NOx reduction by sulfur tolerant coronal-catalytic apparatus and method

    DOEpatents

    Mathur, V.K.; Breault, R.W.; McLarnon, C.R.; Medros, F.G.

    1993-08-31

    This invention presents an NO[sub x] environment effective reduction apparatus comprising a sulfur tolerant coronal-catalyst such as high dielectric coronal-catalysts like glass wool, ceramic-glass wool or zirconium glass wool and method of use. In one embodiment the invention comprises an NO[sub x] reduction apparatus of sulfur tolerant coronal-catalyst adapted and configured for hypercritical presentation to an NO[sub x] bearing gas stream at a minimum of at least about 75 watts/cubic meter.

  13. Argus NOx/SCR report

    SciTech Connect

    2005-05-15

    This document reports on NOx units at more than 350 coal and gas-fired power plants in the USA. Formerly known as the Argus SCR Report, the data are now expanded to include other forms of NOx control, including selective non-catalytic reduction (SNCR), low NOx burners and overfire air.

  14. Eco-friendly selection of ship emissions reduction strategies with emphasis on SOx and NOx emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seddiek, Ibrahim S.; Elgohary, Mohamed M.

    2014-09-01

    Increasing amounts of ships exhaust gases emitted worldwide forced the International Maritime Organization to issue some restricted maritime legislation for reducing the adverse environmental impacts arising from such emissions. Consequently, ships emission reduction became one of the technical and economical challenges that facing the ships, operators. The present paper addresses the different strategies that can be used to reduce those emissions, especially nitrogen oxides and sulfur oxides. The strategies included: applying reduction technologies onboard, using of alternative fuels, and follows one of fuel saving strategies. Using of selective catalytic reduction and sea water scrubbing appeared as the best reduction technologies onboard ships. Moreover, among the various proposed alternative fuels, natural gas, in its liquid state; has the priority to be used instead of conventional fuels. Applying one of those strategies is the matter of ship type and working area. As a numerical example, the proposed methods were investigated at a high-speed craft operating in the Red Sea area between Egypt and the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. The results obtained are very satisfactory from the point of view of environment and economic issues, and reflected the importance of applying those strategies

  15. NOx Emission Reduction by the Optimization of the Primary Air Distribution in the 235Mwe CFB Boiler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirek, P.; Czakiert, T.; Nowak, W.

    The article presents the results of experimental studies conducted on a large-scale 235 MWe CFB (Circulating Fluidized Bed) boiler, in which the primary air distribution system was modified. The modification was connected with the change of internal geometry of primary air channels as well as internal space of plenum chamber. The obtained results have shown, that the optimization of primary air flow has a great influence on the intensity of the combustion process and the temperature distribution along the height of combustion chamber. As a result, the NOx emission has been reduced by up to ten percent and the temperature profile in the combustion chamber has been revealed to be more uniform.

  16. Surface Tuning of La0.5Sr0.5CoO3 Perovskite Catalysts by Acetic Acid for NOx Storage and Reduction.

    PubMed

    Peng, Yue; Si, Wenzhe; Luo, Jinming; Su, Wenkang; Chang, Huazhen; Li, Junhua; Hao, Jiming; Crittenden, John

    2016-06-21

    Selective dissolution of perovskite A site (A of ABO3 structure) was performed on the La1 - xSrxCoO3 catalysts for the NOx storage and reduction (NSR) reaction. The surface area of the catalysts were enhanced using dilute HNO3 impregnation to dissolve Sr. Inactive SrCO3 was removed effectively within 6 h, and the catalyst preserved the perovskite framework after 24 h of treatment. The tuned catalysts exhibited higher NSR performance (both NOx storage and NO-to-NO2 oxidation) under lean-burn and fuel-rich cycles at 250 °C. Large amounts of NOx adsorption were due to the increase of nitrate/nitrite species bonding to the A site and the growth of newly formed monodentate nitrate species. Nitrate species were stored stably on the partial exposed Sr(2+) cations. These exposed Sr(2+) cations played an important role on the NOx reduction by C3H6. High NO-to-NO2 oxidation ability was due to the generation of oxygen defects and Co(2+)-Co(3+) redox couples, which resulted from B-site exsolution induced by A-site dissolution. Hence, our method is facile to modify the surface structures of perovskite catalysts and provides a new strategy to obtain highly active catalysts for the NSR reaction.

  17. One-pot hydrothermal synthesis of CuBi co-doped mesoporous zeolite Beta for the removal of NOx by selective catalytic reduction with ammonia.

    PubMed

    Xie, Zhiguo; Zhou, Xiaoxia; Wu, Huixia; Chen, Lisong; Zhao, Han; Liu, Yan; Pan, Linyu; Chen, Hangrong

    2016-01-01

    A series of CuBi co-doped mesoporous zeolite Beta (CuxBiy-mBeta) were prepared by a facile one-pot hydrothermal treatment approach and were characterized by XRD, N2 adsorption-desorption, TEM/SEM, XPS, H2-TPR, NH3-TPD and in situ DRIFTS. The catalysts CuxBiy-mBeta were applied to the removal of NOx by selective catalytic reduction with ammonia (NH3-SCR), especially the optimized Cu1Bi1-mBeta achieved the high efficiency for the removal of NOx and N2 selectivity, superior water and sulfur resistance as well as good durability. The excellent catalytic performance could be attributed to the acid sites of the support and the synergistic effect between copper and bismuth species. Moreover, in situ DRIFTS results showed that amides NH2 and NH4(+) generated from NH3 adsorption could be responsible for the high selective catalytic reduction of NOx to N2. In addition, a possible catalytic reaction mechanism on Cu1Bi1-mBeta for the removal of NOx by NH3-SCR was proposed for explaining this catalytic process. PMID:27445009

  18. Surface Tuning of La0.5Sr0.5CoO3 Perovskite Catalysts by Acetic Acid for NOx Storage and Reduction.

    PubMed

    Peng, Yue; Si, Wenzhe; Luo, Jinming; Su, Wenkang; Chang, Huazhen; Li, Junhua; Hao, Jiming; Crittenden, John

    2016-06-21

    Selective dissolution of perovskite A site (A of ABO3 structure) was performed on the La1 - xSrxCoO3 catalysts for the NOx storage and reduction (NSR) reaction. The surface area of the catalysts were enhanced using dilute HNO3 impregnation to dissolve Sr. Inactive SrCO3 was removed effectively within 6 h, and the catalyst preserved the perovskite framework after 24 h of treatment. The tuned catalysts exhibited higher NSR performance (both NOx storage and NO-to-NO2 oxidation) under lean-burn and fuel-rich cycles at 250 °C. Large amounts of NOx adsorption were due to the increase of nitrate/nitrite species bonding to the A site and the growth of newly formed monodentate nitrate species. Nitrate species were stored stably on the partial exposed Sr(2+) cations. These exposed Sr(2+) cations played an important role on the NOx reduction by C3H6. High NO-to-NO2 oxidation ability was due to the generation of oxygen defects and Co(2+)-Co(3+) redox couples, which resulted from B-site exsolution induced by A-site dissolution. Hence, our method is facile to modify the surface structures of perovskite catalysts and provides a new strategy to obtain highly active catalysts for the NSR reaction. PMID:27233105

  19. One-pot hydrothermal synthesis of CuBi co-doped mesoporous zeolite Beta for the removal of NOx by selective catalytic reduction with ammonia.

    PubMed

    Xie, Zhiguo; Zhou, Xiaoxia; Wu, Huixia; Chen, Lisong; Zhao, Han; Liu, Yan; Pan, Linyu; Chen, Hangrong

    2016-07-22

    A series of CuBi co-doped mesoporous zeolite Beta (CuxBiy-mBeta) were prepared by a facile one-pot hydrothermal treatment approach and were characterized by XRD, N2 adsorption-desorption, TEM/SEM, XPS, H2-TPR, NH3-TPD and in situ DRIFTS. The catalysts CuxBiy-mBeta were applied to the removal of NOx by selective catalytic reduction with ammonia (NH3-SCR), especially the optimized Cu1Bi1-mBeta achieved the high efficiency for the removal of NOx and N2 selectivity, superior water and sulfur resistance as well as good durability. The excellent catalytic performance could be attributed to the acid sites of the support and the synergistic effect between copper and bismuth species. Moreover, in situ DRIFTS results showed that amides NH2 and NH4(+) generated from NH3 adsorption could be responsible for the high selective catalytic reduction of NOx to N2. In addition, a possible catalytic reaction mechanism on Cu1Bi1-mBeta for the removal of NOx by NH3-SCR was proposed for explaining this catalytic process.

  20. One-pot hydrothermal synthesis of CuBi co-doped mesoporous zeolite Beta for the removal of NOx by selective catalytic reduction with ammonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Zhiguo; Zhou, Xiaoxia; Wu, Huixia; Chen, Lisong; Zhao, Han; Liu, Yan; Pan, Linyu; Chen, Hangrong

    2016-07-01

    A series of CuBi co-doped mesoporous zeolite Beta (CuxBiy-mBeta) were prepared by a facile one-pot hydrothermal treatment approach and were characterized by XRD, N2 adsorption-desorption, TEM/SEM, XPS, H2-TPR, NH3-TPD and in situ DRIFTS. The catalysts CuxBiy-mBeta were applied to the removal of NOx by selective catalytic reduction with ammonia (NH3-SCR), especially the optimized Cu1Bi1-mBeta achieved the high efficiency for the removal of NOx and N2 selectivity, superior water and sulfur resistance as well as good durability. The excellent catalytic performance could be attributed to the acid sites of the support and the synergistic effect between copper and bismuth species. Moreover, in situ DRIFTS results showed that amides NH2 and NH4+ generated from NH3 adsorption could be responsible for the high selective catalytic reduction of NOx to N2. In addition, a possible catalytic reaction mechanism on Cu1Bi1-mBeta for the removal of NOx by NH3-SCR was proposed for explaining this catalytic process.

  1. One-pot hydrothermal synthesis of CuBi co-doped mesoporous zeolite Beta for the removal of NOx by selective catalytic reduction with ammonia

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Zhiguo; Zhou, Xiaoxia; Wu, Huixia; Chen, Lisong; Zhao, Han; Liu, Yan; Pan, Linyu; Chen, Hangrong

    2016-01-01

    A series of CuBi co-doped mesoporous zeolite Beta (CuxBiy-mBeta) were prepared by a facile one-pot hydrothermal treatment approach and were characterized by XRD, N2 adsorption-desorption, TEM/SEM, XPS, H2-TPR, NH3-TPD and in situ DRIFTS. The catalysts CuxBiy-mBeta were applied to the removal of NOx by selective catalytic reduction with ammonia (NH3-SCR), especially the optimized Cu1Bi1-mBeta achieved the high efficiency for the removal of NOx and N2 selectivity, superior water and sulfur resistance as well as good durability. The excellent catalytic performance could be attributed to the acid sites of the support and the synergistic effect between copper and bismuth species. Moreover, in situ DRIFTS results showed that amides NH2 and NH4+ generated from NH3 adsorption could be responsible for the high selective catalytic reduction of NOx to N2. In addition, a possible catalytic reaction mechanism on Cu1Bi1-mBeta for the removal of NOx by NH3-SCR was proposed for explaining this catalytic process. PMID:27445009

  2. Development of a dry low NOx combustion system for the EGT typhoon

    SciTech Connect

    De Pietro, S.M.; Noden, R.M.; Hesse, H.; Hornsby, C.; Norster, E.R.

    1996-12-31

    This paper describes the development of an ultra low NOx (i.e. sub 10 ppm) combustion system from the successful design and high pressure rig test evaluation of a prototype combustor, to the installation of the system on a Gas Turbine in commercial operation. It includes a description of engine test bed development in Lincoln and preliminary field experience on the lead Typhoon DLN machine in Arnhem, Holland.

  3. Diesel engine NOx reduction through exhaust re-burning and ammonia injection

    SciTech Connect

    Broadmeadow, J.T.; Ibrahim, O.M.

    1995-12-31

    This paper presents a chemical equilibrium analysis of a combination of Re-burn Combustion and Selective Non-Catalytic Reduction (SNCR), using a minimization of Gibbs energy and Lagrangian multipliers. A re-burning combustion chamber designed to reduce emissions from bus diesel engines has been developed with a possible modification to the chamber including the injection of ammonia into the combustion process. This chemical equilibrium study is performed to provide the theoretical possibilities of such a process. The results will show that significant NO{sub x} reduction could be achieved, with higher concentrations of ammonia leading to better results. CO and HCs will experience an initial decrease in concentrations, but will reach a critical point after which concentrations will rise due to ammonia slip across the combustion process.

  4. Enhanced Activity of Nanocrystalline Zeolites for Selective Catalytic Reduction of NOx

    SciTech Connect

    Sarah C. Larson; Vicki H. Grassian

    2006-12-31

    Nanocrystalline zeolites with discrete crystal sizes of less than 100 nm have different properties relative to zeolites with larger crystal sizes. Nanocrystalline zeolites have improved mass transfer properties and very large internal and external surface areas that can be exploited for many different applications. The additional external surface active sites and the improved mass transfer properties of nanocrystalline zeolites offer significant advantages for selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalysis with ammonia as a reductant in coal-fired power plants relative to current zeolite based SCR catalysts. Nanocrystalline NaY was synthesized with a crystal size of 15-20 nm and was thoroughly characterized using x-ray diffraction, electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy, nitrogen adsorption isotherms and Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy. Copper ions were exchanged into nanocrystalline NaY to increase the catalytic activity. The reactions of nitrogen dioxides (NO{sub x}) and ammonia (NH{sub 3}) on nanocrystalline NaY and CuY were investigated using FT-IR spectroscopy. Significant conversion of NO{sub 2} was observed at room temperature in the presence of NH{sub 3} as monitored by FT-IR spectroscopy. Copper-exchanged nanocrystalline NaY was more active for NO{sub 2} reduction with NH{sub 3} relative to nanocrystalline NaY.

  5. [Deactivation by SO2 of transition metal oxides modified low-temperature SCR catalyst for NOx reduction with NH3].

    PubMed

    Shen, Bo-xiong; Liu, Ting; Yang, Ting-ting; Xiong, Li-xian; Wang, Jing

    2009-08-15

    MnOx-CeOx/ACF catalyst was prepared by impregnation method, which exhibited high activity for low-temperature selective catalytic reduction of NOx over the temperature range 110-230 degrees C. Experiments results indicated that the catalyst yielded 80% NO conversion at 150 degrees C and 90% at 230 degrees C. The Oxides of Fe,Cu and V were added to the catalysts based on MnOx-CeOx/ACF. The additions of these transition metal oxides had a negative effect on the activity of the catalysts. Compared with MnOx-CeOx/ACF and Cu and V modified catalysts, NO conversion for Fe-MnOx-CeOx/ACF catalyst leveled off at nearly 75% in the first 6 h in the presence of SO2. Two mechanisms of catalyst deactivation by SO2 were discovered by the methods of X-ray photoelectron spectrum (XPS) and Fourier transform infrared spectra (FTIR), indicating that the catalysts were covered by ammonium sulfates and the metal oxides, acting as active components, were also sulfated by SO2 to form metal sulfates.

  6. Observations of the Temperature Dependent Response of Ozone to NOx Reductions in an Urban Plume

    SciTech Connect

    LaFranchi, B W; Goldstein, A H; Cohen, R C

    2011-01-25

    Observations of NO{sub x} in the Sacramento, CA region show that mixing ratios decreased by 30% between 2001 and 2008. Here we use an observation-based method to quantify net ozone production rates in the outflow from the Sacramento metropolitan region and examine the O{sub 3} decrease resulting from reductions in NO{sub x} emissions. This observational method does not rely on assumptions about detailed chemistry of ozone production, rather it is an independent means to verify and test these assumptions. We use an instantaneous steady-state model as well as a detailed 1-D plume model to aid in interpretation of the ozone production inferred from observations. In agreement with the models, the observations show that early in the plume, the NO{sub x} dependence for O{sub x} (O{sub x} = O{sub 3}+NO{sub 2}) production is strongly coupled with temperature, suggesting that temperature dependent biogenic VOC emissions can drive O{sub x} production between NO{sub x}-limited and NO{sub x}-suppressed regimes. As a result, NO{sub x} reductions were found to be most effective at higher temperatures over the 7 year period. We show that violations of the California 1-hour O{sub 3} standard (90 ppb) in the region have been decreasing linearly with decreases in NO{sub x} (at a given temperature) and predict that reductions of NO{sub x} concentrations (and presumably emissions) by an additional 30% (relative to 2007 levels) will eliminate violations of the state 1 hour standard in the region. If current trends continue, a 30% decrease in NO{sub x} is expected by 2012, and an end to violations of the 1 hour standard in the Sacramento region appears to be imminent.

  7. Highly-basic large-pore zeolite catalysts for NOx reduction at low temperatures

    DOEpatents

    Penetrante, Bernardino M.; Brusasco, Raymond M.; Merritt, Bernard T.; Vogtlin, George E.

    2004-02-03

    A high-surface-area (greater than 600 m2/g), large-pore (pore size diameter greater than 6.5 angstroms), basic zeolite having a structure such as an alkali metal cation-exchanged Y-zeolite is employed to convert NO.sub.x contained in an oxygen-rich engine exhaust to N.sub.2 and O.sub.2. Preferably, the invention relates to a two-stage method and apparatus for NO.sub.x reduction in an oxygen-rich engine exhaust such as diesel engine exhaust that includes a plasma oxidative stage and a selective reduction stage. The first stage employs a non-thermal plasma treatment of NO.sub.x gases in an oxygen-rich exhaust and is intended to convert NO to NO.sub.2 in the presence of O.sub.2 and added hydrocarbons. The second stage employs a lean-NO.sub.x catalyst including the basic zeolite at relatively low temperatures to convert such NO.sub.2 to environmentally benign gases that include N.sub.2, CO.sub.2, and H.sub.2 O.

  8. DRIFT study on cerium-tungsten/titania catalyst for selective catalytic reduction of NOx with NH3.

    PubMed

    Chen, Liang; Li, Junhua; Ge, Maofa

    2010-12-15

    CeO(2)/TiO(2) and CeO(2)-WO(3)/TiO(2) catalysts prepared by impregnation method assisted with ultrasonic energy were investigated on the selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NO(x) (NO and NO(2)) by NH(3). The catalytic activity of 10% CeO(2)/TiO(2) (CeTi) was greatly enhanced by the addition of 6% WO(3) in the broad temperature range of 200-500 °C, the promotion mechanism was proposed on basis of the results of in situ diffuse reflectance infrared transform spectroscopy (DRIFT). When NH(3) was introduced into both catalysts preadsorbed with NO + O(2), SCR would not proceed except for the reaction between NO(2) and ammonia. For CeO(2)/TiO(2) catalysts, coordinated NH(3) linked to Lewis acid sites were the main adsorbed ammonia species. When NO + O(2) was introduced, all the ammonia species consumed rapidly, indicating that these species could react with NO(x) effectively. Two different reaction routes, L-H mechanism at low temperature (<200 °C) and E-R mechanism at high temperatures (>200 °C), were presented for SCR reaction over CeO(2)/TiO(2) catalyst. For CeO(2)-WO(3)/TiO(2) catalysts, the Lewis acid sites on Ce(4+) state could be converted to Brønsted acid sites due to the unsaturated coordination of Ce(n+) and W(n+) ions. When NO + O(2) was introduced, the reaction proceeded more quickly than that on CeO(2)/TiO(2). The reaction route mainly followed E-R mechanism in the temperature range investigated (150-350 °C) over CeO(2)-WO(3)/TiO(2) catalysts. Tungstation was beneficial for the formation of Ce(3+), which would influence the active sites of the catalyst and further change the mechanisms of SCR reaction. In this way, the cooperation of tungstation and the presence of Ce(3+) state resulted in the better activity of CeO(2)-WO(3)/TiO(2) compared to that of CeO(2)/TiO(2).

  9. Rocket pollution reduction system

    SciTech Connect

    Geisler, R.L.

    1994-01-04

    A system is provided for reducing the emissions of hydrochloric acid (HCl) from solid fuel rockets, especially during ground disposal. An aqueous solution of an alkali metal hydroxide is injected as a mist into the rocket chamber as the rocket fuel is burned. The reaction of the alkali metal with hydrogen chloride (HCl) produces a salt and thereby minimizes the presence of hydrochloric acid in the rocket exhaust. An injected neutralizing material which reduces hydrochloric acid, but which produces less thrust than an equal weight of rocket fuel, can be injected into an operating rocket which carries a payload high above the earth, with the injected material being injected only while the rocket is at a lower altitude when hydrochloric acid is most undesirable. The injected material can be produced by a small auxiliary rocket device whose exhaust is delivered directly to the main rocket chamber, and with the exhaust of the auxiliary rocket device including a high proportion of magnesium to react with the hydrochloric acid with minimal degradation of rocket performance. 4 figs.

  10. Reducing NO(x) emissions from a nitric acid plant of domestic petrochemical complex: enhanced conversion in conventional radial-flow reactor of selective catalytic reduction process.

    PubMed

    Abbasfard, Hamed; Hashemi, Seyed Hamid; Rahimpour, Mohammad Reza; Jokar, Seyyed Mohammad; Ghader, Sattar

    2013-01-01

    The nitric acid plant of a domestic petrochemical complex is designed to annually produce 56,400 metric tons (based on 100% nitric acid). In the present work, radial-flow spherical bed reactor (RFSBR) for selective catalytic reduction of nitric oxides (NO(x)) from the stack of this plant was modelled and compared with the conventional radial-flow reactor (CRFR). Moreover, the proficiency of a radial-flow (water or nitrogen) membrane reactor was also compared with the CRFR which was found to be inefficient at identical process conditions. In the RFSBR, the space between the two concentric spheres is filled by a catalyst. A mathematical model, including conservation of mass has been developed to investigate the performance of the configurations. The model was checked against the CRFR in a nitric acid plant located at the domestic petrochemical complex. A good agreement was observed between the modelling results and the plant data. The effects of some important parameters such as pressure and temperature on NO(x) conversion were analysed. Results show 14% decrease in NO(x) emission annually in RFSBR compared with the CRFR, which is beneficial for the prevention of NO(x) emission, global warming and acid rain.

  11. Reducing NO(x) emissions from a nitric acid plant of domestic petrochemical complex: enhanced conversion in conventional radial-flow reactor of selective catalytic reduction process.

    PubMed

    Abbasfard, Hamed; Hashemi, Seyed Hamid; Rahimpour, Mohammad Reza; Jokar, Seyyed Mohammad; Ghader, Sattar

    2013-01-01

    The nitric acid plant of a domestic petrochemical complex is designed to annually produce 56,400 metric tons (based on 100% nitric acid). In the present work, radial-flow spherical bed reactor (RFSBR) for selective catalytic reduction of nitric oxides (NO(x)) from the stack of this plant was modelled and compared with the conventional radial-flow reactor (CRFR). Moreover, the proficiency of a radial-flow (water or nitrogen) membrane reactor was also compared with the CRFR which was found to be inefficient at identical process conditions. In the RFSBR, the space between the two concentric spheres is filled by a catalyst. A mathematical model, including conservation of mass has been developed to investigate the performance of the configurations. The model was checked against the CRFR in a nitric acid plant located at the domestic petrochemical complex. A good agreement was observed between the modelling results and the plant data. The effects of some important parameters such as pressure and temperature on NO(x) conversion were analysed. Results show 14% decrease in NO(x) emission annually in RFSBR compared with the CRFR, which is beneficial for the prevention of NO(x) emission, global warming and acid rain. PMID:24527652

  12. Promotion effect of H2 on ethanol oxidation and NOx reduction with ethanol over Ag/Al2O3 catalyst.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yunbo; Li, Yi; Zhang, Xiuli; Deng, Hua; He, Hong; Li, Yuyang

    2015-01-01

    The catalytic partial oxidation of ethanol and selective catalytic reduction of NOx with ethanol (ethanol-SCR) over Ag/Al2O3 were studied using synchrotron vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) photoionization mass spectrometry (PIMS). The intermediates were identified by PIMS and their photoionization efficiency (PIE) spectra. The results indicate that H2 promotes the partial oxidation of ethanol to acetaldehyde over Ag/Al2O3, while the simultaneously occurring processes of dehydration and dehydrogenation were inhibited. H2 addition favors the formation of ammonia during ethanol-SCR over Ag/Al2O3, the occurrence of which creates an effective pathway for NOx reduction by direct reaction with NH3. Simultaneously, the enhancement of the formation of ammonia benefits its reaction with surface enolic species, resulting in producing -NCO species again, leading to enhancement of ethanol-SCR over Ag/Al2O3 by H2. Using VUV-PIMS, the reactive vinyloxy radical was observed in the gas phase during the NOx reduction by ethanol for the first time, particularly in the presence of H2. Identification of such a reaction occurring in the gas phase may be crucial for understanding the reaction pathway of HC-SCR over Ag/Al2O3. PMID:25485626

  13. Promotion effect of H2 on ethanol oxidation and NOx reduction with ethanol over Ag/Al2O3 catalyst.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yunbo; Li, Yi; Zhang, Xiuli; Deng, Hua; He, Hong; Li, Yuyang

    2015-01-01

    The catalytic partial oxidation of ethanol and selective catalytic reduction of NOx with ethanol (ethanol-SCR) over Ag/Al2O3 were studied using synchrotron vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) photoionization mass spectrometry (PIMS). The intermediates were identified by PIMS and their photoionization efficiency (PIE) spectra. The results indicate that H2 promotes the partial oxidation of ethanol to acetaldehyde over Ag/Al2O3, while the simultaneously occurring processes of dehydration and dehydrogenation were inhibited. H2 addition favors the formation of ammonia during ethanol-SCR over Ag/Al2O3, the occurrence of which creates an effective pathway for NOx reduction by direct reaction with NH3. Simultaneously, the enhancement of the formation of ammonia benefits its reaction with surface enolic species, resulting in producing -NCO species again, leading to enhancement of ethanol-SCR over Ag/Al2O3 by H2. Using VUV-PIMS, the reactive vinyloxy radical was observed in the gas phase during the NOx reduction by ethanol for the first time, particularly in the presence of H2. Identification of such a reaction occurring in the gas phase may be crucial for understanding the reaction pathway of HC-SCR over Ag/Al2O3.

  14. Metal/metal oxide doped oxide catalysts having high deNOx selectivity for lean NOx exhaust aftertreatment systems

    DOEpatents

    Park, Paul W.

    2004-03-16

    A lean NOx catalyst and method of preparing the same is disclosed. The lean NOx catalyst includes a ceramic substrate, an oxide support material, preferably .gamma.-alumina, deposited on the substrate and a metal promoter or dopant introduced into the oxide support material. The metal promoters or dopants are selected from the group consisting of indium, gallium, tin, silver, germanium, gold, nickel, cobalt, copper, iron, manganese, molybdenum, chromium, cerium, vanadium, oxides thereof, and combinations thereof. The .gamma.-alumina preferably has a pore volume of from about 0.5 to about 2.0 cc/g; a surface area of between about 80 to 350 m.sup.2 /g; an average pore size diameter of between about 3 to 30 nm; and an impurity level of less than or equal to 0.2 weight percent. In a preferred embodiment the .gamma.-alumina is prepared by a sol-gel method, with the metal doping of the .gamma.-alumina preferably accomplished using an incipient wetness impregnation technique.

  15. Plasma Catalysis for NOx Reduction from Light-Duty Diesel Vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    2005-12-15

    &D activities are closely coordinated with the relevant activities of the Fuel Technologies Sub-Program, also within the Office of FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies. Research is also being undertaken on hydrogen-fueled internal combustion engines to provide an interim hydrogen-based powertrain technology that promotes the longer-range FreedomCAR Partnership goal of transitioning to a hydrogen-fueled transportation system. Hydrogen engine technologies being developed have the potential to provide diesel-like engine efficiencies with near-zero emissions.

  16. EDRS: Electronography Data Reduction System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren-Smith, Rodney F.; Berry, David S.

    2015-12-01

    The Electronography Data Reduction System (EDRS) reduces and analyzes large format astronomical images and was written to be used from within ASPIC (ascl:1510.006). In its original form it specialized in the reduction of electronographic data but was built around a set of utility programs which were widely applicable to astronomical images from other sources. The programs align and calibrate images, handle lists of (X,Y) positions, apply linear geometrical transformations and do some stellar photometry. This package is now obsolete.

  17. Ammonia and NO/NOx measurement for DE-NOx applications

    SciTech Connect

    Kita, D.

    1996-10-01

    A number of critical environmental goals may be met by controlling nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions from combustion sources. These goals include responding to 1990 Clean Air Act Amendment requirements, reduction of human exposure to harmful concentrations of nitric oxide (NO) and nitrogen dioxide (NO{sub 2}), acid deposition control, and urban smog abatement. Technologies utilizing either heterogeneous or homogeneous reactions of NOx with ammonia (NH{sub 3}) are considered major control options. Crucial to the use of such technologies is the continuous measurement of NO/NOx and NH{sub 3} in order to access (and control) performance criteria such as NOx conversion efficiency and NH{sub 3} emissions (NH{sub 3} SLIP) .This paper describes a continuous emission sonitoring system for NO, NO{sub 2}, and NH{sub 3} based upon NO chemiluminescence as well as presenting preliminary field data.

  18. Pathway of FeEDTA transformation and its impact on performance of NOx removal in a chemical absorption-biological reduction integrated process.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Zhao, Jingkai; Zhang, Lei; Xia, Yinfeng; Liu, Nan; Li, Sujing; Zhang, Shihan

    2016-01-01

    A novel chemical absorption-biological reduction (CABR) integrated process, employing ferrous ethylenediaminetetraacetate (Fe(II)EDTA) as a solvent, is deemed as a potential option for NOx removal from the flue gas. Previous work showed that the Fe(II)EDTA concentration was critical for the NOx removal in the CABR process. In this work, the pathway of FeEDTA (Fe(III)/Fe(II)-EDTA) transformation was investigated to assess its impact on the NOx removal in a biofilter. Experimental results revealed that the FeEDTA transformation involved iron precipitation and EDTA degradation. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis confirmed the iron was precipitated in the form of Fe(OH)3. The iron mass balance analysis showed 44.2% of the added iron was precipitated. The EDTA degradation facilitated the iron precipitation. Besides chemical oxidation, EDTA biodegradation occurred in the biofilter. The addition of extra EDTA helped recover the iron from the precipitation. The transformation of FeEDTA did not retard the NO removal. In addition, EDTA rather than the iron concentration determined the NO removal efficiency.

  19. Pathway of FeEDTA transformation and its impact on performance of NOx removal in a chemical absorption-biological reduction integrated process

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wei; Zhao, Jingkai; Zhang, Lei; Xia, Yinfeng; Liu, Nan; Li, Sujing; Zhang, Shihan

    2016-01-01

    A novel chemical absorption-biological reduction (CABR) integrated process, employing ferrous ethylenediaminetetraacetate (Fe(II)EDTA) as a solvent, is deemed as a potential option for NOx removal from the flue gas. Previous work showed that the Fe(II)EDTA concentration was critical for the NOx removal in the CABR process. In this work, the pathway of FeEDTA (Fe(III)/Fe(II)-EDTA) transformation was investigated to assess its impact on the NOx removal in a biofilter. Experimental results revealed that the FeEDTA transformation involved iron precipitation and EDTA degradation. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis confirmed the iron was precipitated in the form of Fe(OH)3. The iron mass balance analysis showed 44.2% of the added iron was precipitated. The EDTA degradation facilitated the iron precipitation. Besides chemical oxidation, EDTA biodegradation occurred in the biofilter. The addition of extra EDTA helped recover the iron from the precipitation. The transformation of FeEDTA did not retard the NO removal. In addition, EDTA rather than the iron concentration determined the NO removal efficiency. PMID:26743930

  20. Activity of double wash-coat monolith catalyst with noble metals and zeolites in selective catalytic reduction of NO(x) with C3H6.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jung-Dae; Kim, Ki-Joong; Kim, Yong-Hwa; Jeon, Gyung-Soo; Choi, Young-Key; Ahn, Ho-Geun

    2008-10-01

    The selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NO(x) with C3H6 was studied in the presence of oxygen. The double wash-coat monolith catalysts for SCR comprised a lower layer of Au (or Pt)/Al2O3 and a upper layer of zeolites. The catalytic performance of the double wash-coated catalyst was remarkably improved to broaden the temperature window. The Au and Pt particles were dispersed uniformly on the monolith with particle sizes range of 3 approximately 5 nm and 5 approximately 10 nm, respectively. The catalyst binders used were colloidal silica, potassium silicate and tetraethyl orthosilicate, and the best catalyst activity was achieved with using colloidal silica as a binder. The zeolites used for the catalyst upper layer were MCM-41, FER, Y5.3-Zeolite and ZSM5, among which the NH4-ZSM5-coated catalyst showed the highest activity. The experimental results confirmed the promising potential of the double wash-coat, monolith catalyst for SCR of NO(x) with C3H6 due to the effective combination of noble metal monolith catalyst with zeolite for the removal of NO(x) by SCR with hydrocarbons.

  1. Enhanced Combustion Low NOx Pulverized Coal Burner

    SciTech Connect

    Ray Chamberland; Aku Raino; David Towle

    2006-09-30

    For more than two decades, ALSTOM Power Inc. (ALSTOM) has developed a range of low cost, in-furnace technologies for NOx emissions control for the domestic U.S. pulverized coal fired boiler market. This includes ALSTOM's internally developed TFS 2000 firing system, and various enhancements to it developed in concert with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). As of 2004, more than 200 units representing approximately 75,000 MWe of domestic coal fired capacity have been retrofit with ALSTOM low NOx technology. Best of class emissions range from 0.18 lb/MMBtu for bituminous coals to 0.10 lb/MMBtu for subbituminous coals, with typical levels at 0.24 lb/MMBtu and 0.13 lb/MMBtu, respectively. Despite these gains, NOx emissions limits in the U.S. continue to ratchet down for new and existing (retrofit) boiler equipment. If enacted, proposed Clear Skies legislation will, by 2008, require an average, effective, domestic NOx emissions rate of 0.16 lb/MMBtu, which number will be reduced to 0.13 lb/MMBtu by 2018. Such levels represent a 60% and 67% reduction, respectively, from the effective 2000 level of 0.40 lb/MMBtu. Low cost solutions to meet such regulations, and in particular those that can avoid the need for a costly selective catalytic reduction system (SCR), provide a strong incentive to continue to improve low NOx firing system technology to meet current and anticipated NOx control regulations. In light of these needs, ALSTOM, in cooperation with the DOE, is developing an enhanced combustion, low NOx pulverized coal burner which, when integrated with ALSTOM's state-of-the-art, globally air staged low NOx firing systems, will provide a means to achieve less than 0.15 lb/MMBtu NOx at less than 3/4 the cost of an SCR with low to no impact on balance of plant issues when firing a high volatile bituminous coal. Such coals can be more economic to fire than subbituminous or Powder River Basin (PRB) coals, but are more problematic from a NOx control standpoint as existing

  2. Structural dynamics system model reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, J. C.; Rose, T. L.; Wada, B. K.

    1987-01-01

    Loads analysis for structural dynamic systems is usually performed by finite element models. Because of the complexity of the structural system, the model contains large number of degree-of-freedom. The large model is necessary since details of the stress, loads and responses due to mission environments are computed. However, a simplified model is needed for other tasks such as pre-test analysis for modal testing, and control-structural interaction studies. A systematic method of model reduction for modal test analysis is presented. Perhaps it will be of some help in developing a simplified model for the control studies.

  3. Influences of O{sub 2} concentration on NO reduction and N{sub 2}O formation in thermal deNOx process

    SciTech Connect

    Zhi-Min, L.; Ji-Dong, L.

    2009-06-15

    Flow reactor experiment and chemical kinetic modeling were carried out to evaluate the influences of oxygen concentration on NO reduction and N{sub 2}O formation during thermal deNOx process for temperatures of 1073-1473 K. Increasing oxygen concentration in the reactant gas from 0.3 to 9.3% not only reduces the NO reduction potential and N{sub 2}O emission, but also lowers and widens the 'temperature window' for NO conversion and N{sub 2}O formation. Trace amount of impurity O{sub 2} leads to the lowest NO emission at a high temperature of 1373 K with low N{sub 2}O emission. Test reveals that high molar ratio NH{sub 3}/NO suppresses the reverse effect of oxygen and brings out high percentage of NO reduction at leaner environment. Chemical kinetic simulations using 4 detailed mechanisms display differing trends in the NO and N{sub 2}O dependence on O{sub 2} and temperature. Rota 2000 model gives the best description of our experiments, but some assumptions made in this mechanism are not fully realistic. This study provides new experimental data on the less noticed N{sub 2}O, and raises a question about the understanding of the detailed elementary chemistry on the thermal deNOx process. Further work is still required for reasonable kinetic explanations.

  4. NOx Adsorbers for Heavy Duty Truck Engines-Testing and Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Hakim, N; Hoelzer, J.; Liu, Y.

    2002-08-25

    This feasibility study of NOx adsorbers in heavy-duty diesel engines examined three configurations (dual-leg, single-leg and single-leg-bypass) in an integrated experimental setup, composed of a Detroit Diesel Class-8 truck engine, a catalyzed diesel particulate filter and the NOx absorber system. The setup also employed a reductant injection concept, sensors and advanced control strategies.

  5. JV Task 117 - Impact of Lignite Properties on Powerspan's NOx Oxidation System

    SciTech Connect

    Scott Tolbert; Steven Benson

    2008-02-29

    the U.S. Department of Energy. An electrocatalytic oxidation (ECO) reactor slipstream system was designed by Powerspan and the EERC. The slipstream system was installed by the EERC at Minnkota Power Cooperative's Milton R. Young Station Unit 1 downstream of the electrostatic precipitator where the flue gas temperature ranged from 300 to 350 F. The system was commissioned on July 3, 2007, operated for 107 days, and then winterized upon completion of the testing campaign. Operational performance of the system was monitored, and data were archived for postprocessing. A pair of electrodes were extracted and replaced on a biweekly basis. Each pair of electrodes was shipped to Powerspan to determine NO conversion efficiency in Powerspan's laboratory reactor. Tested electrodes were then shipped to the EERC for scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and x-ray microanalysis. Measurement of NO{sub x} conversion online in operating the slipstream system was not possible because the nitric and sulfuric acid production by the DBD reactor results in conditioning corrosion challenges in the sample extraction system and NO measurement technologies. The operational observations, performance results, and lab testing showed that the system was adversely affected by accumulation of the aerosol materials on the electrode. NO{sub x} conversion by ash-covered electrodes was significantly reduced; however, with electrodes that were rinsed with water, the NOx conversion efficiency recovered to nearly that of a new electrode. In addition, the visual appearance of the electrode after washing did not show evidence of a cloudy reacted surface but appeared similar to an unexposed electrode. Examination of the electrodes using SEM x-ray microanalysis showed significant elemental sodium, sulfur, calcium, potassium, and silica in the ash coating the electrodes. There was no evidence of the reaction of the sodium with the silica electrodes to produce sodium silicate layers. All SEM images showed a clearly

  6. OXYGEN ENHANCED COMBUSTION FOR NOx CONTROL

    SciTech Connect

    David R. Thompson; Lawrence E. Bool; Jack C. Chen

    2004-04-01

    concept offers substantial savings over SCR and is an economically attractive alternative to purchasing NOx credits or installing other conventional technologies. In conjunction with the development of oxygen based low NOx technology, Praxair also worked on developing the economically enhancing oxygen transport membrane (OTM) technology which is ideally suited for integration with combustion systems to achieve further significant cost reductions and efficiency improvements. This OTM oxygen production technology is based on ceramic mixed conductor membranes that operate at high temperatures and can be operated in a pressure driven mode to separate oxygen with infinite selectivity and high flux. An OTM material was selected and characterized. OTM elements were successfully fabricated. A single tube OTM reactor was designed and assembled. Testing of dense OTM elements was conducted with promising oxygen flux results of 100% of target flux. However, based on current natural gas prices and stand-alone air separation processes, ceramic membranes do not offer an economic advantage for this application. Under a different DOE-NETL Cooperative Agreement, Praxair is continuing to develop oxygen transport membranes for the Advanced Boiler where the economics appear more attractive.

  7. The Chemistry of the Thermal DeNOx Process: A Review of the Technology's Possible Application to control of NOx from Diesel Engines

    SciTech Connect

    Lyon, Richard

    2001-08-05

    This paper presents a review of the Thermal DeNOx process with respect to its application to control of NOx emissions from diesel engines. The chemistry of the process is discussed first in empirical and then theoretical terms. Based on this discussion the possibilities of applying the process to controlling NOx emissions from diesel engines is considered. Two options are examined, modifying the requirements of the chemistry of the Thermal DeNOx process to suit the conditions provided by diesel engines and modifying the engines to provide the conditions required by the process chemistry. While the former examination did not reveal any promising opportunities, the latter did. Turbocharged diesel engine systems in which the turbocharger is a net producer of power seem capable of providing the conditions necessary for NOx reduction via the Thermal DeNOx reaction.

  8. A superior catalyst with dual redox cycles for the selective reduction of NO(x) by ammonia.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhiming; Yi, Yang; Li, Junhua; Woo, Seong Ihl; Wang, Baoyi; Cao, Xingzhong; Li, Zhuoxin

    2013-09-11

    An environmentally benign Cu-Ce-Ti oxide catalyst exhibited excellent NH3-SCR activity, high N2 selectivity and strong resistance against H2O and SO2 with a broad operation temperature window. The dual redox cycles (Cu(2+) + Ce(3+) ↔ Cu(+) + Ce(4+), Cu(2+) + Ti(3+) ↔ Cu(+) + Ti(4+)) play key roles for the superior catalytic deNOx performance.

  9. Application of a New Selective Noncatalytic NO Reduction System to Diesel Exhaust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakanishi, Yasufumi; Gong, Joon Dugk; Yoshihara, Yoshinobu; Nishiwaki, Kazuie

    The chemical gas-phase reduction process used to reduce nitric oxide (NO) in diesel engine exhaust has been applied to a high-speed, light-duty diesel engine. The chemical gas-phase reduction process involves adding methylamine (CH3NH2) in water solution to the exhaust gas as an NO reduction agent. In this study, an experimental selective noncatalytic NO reduction system designed to be used with a diesel engine was applied to evaluate this technique for practical use. The NOx reduction ratio (RNOx) of methylamine processes with and without the installation of a particulate filter was investigated. Two different mixing chambers with different volumes and residence times (0.1s and 0.17s) were also tested. Longer residence times were required to achieve a given level of NOx reduction in unfiltered exhaust, suggesting that the presence of particulate matter inhibits NO reduction. For the standard residence time (0.1s), the process achieved 64% NO reduction in unfiltered diesel exhaust, which increased to 80% NO reduction when a particle filter was fitted to the system.

  10. Roles of Promoters in V2O5/TiO2 Catalysts for Selective Catalytic Reduction of NOx with NH3: Effect of Order of Impregnation.

    PubMed

    Youn, Seunghee; Song, Inhak; Kim, Do Heui

    2016-05-01

    Recently, various promoters for commercial selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalysts are used to improve DeNOx activity at low temperature. We aimed at finding the optimum condition to prepare V2O5/TiO2 catalyst by changing promoters (W, Ce, Zr and Mn), not only for improving SCR reactivity, but also for reducing N2O formation at high temperature. In addition, we changed the order of impregnation between promoter and vanadium precursors on TiO2 support and observed its effect on activity and N2O selectivity. We utilized various analytical techniques, such as N2 adsorption-desorption, X-ray Diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, UV-visible Diffuse Reflectance Spectroscopy (UV-vis DRS) and Temperature Programmed Reduction with hydrogen (H2-TPR) to investigate the physicochemical properties of V2O5/TiO2 catalysts. It was found that W and Ce added V2O5/TiO2 catalysts showed the most active DeNOx properties at low temperature. Additionally, the difference in impregnation order affected the SCR activity. The superiority of low temperature activity of the vanadium firstly added catalysts (W or Ce/V/TiO2) is attributed to the formation of more polymerized V2O5 on the sample. PMID:27483756

  11. Roles of Promoters in V2O5/TiO2 Catalysts for Selective Catalytic Reduction of NOx with NH3: Effect of Order of Impregnation.

    PubMed

    Youn, Seunghee; Song, Inhak; Kim, Do Heui

    2016-05-01

    Recently, various promoters for commercial selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalysts are used to improve DeNOx activity at low temperature. We aimed at finding the optimum condition to prepare V2O5/TiO2 catalyst by changing promoters (W, Ce, Zr and Mn), not only for improving SCR reactivity, but also for reducing N2O formation at high temperature. In addition, we changed the order of impregnation between promoter and vanadium precursors on TiO2 support and observed its effect on activity and N2O selectivity. We utilized various analytical techniques, such as N2 adsorption-desorption, X-ray Diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, UV-visible Diffuse Reflectance Spectroscopy (UV-vis DRS) and Temperature Programmed Reduction with hydrogen (H2-TPR) to investigate the physicochemical properties of V2O5/TiO2 catalysts. It was found that W and Ce added V2O5/TiO2 catalysts showed the most active DeNOx properties at low temperature. Additionally, the difference in impregnation order affected the SCR activity. The superiority of low temperature activity of the vanadium firstly added catalysts (W or Ce/V/TiO2) is attributed to the formation of more polymerized V2O5 on the sample.

  12. In situ DRIFTS studies on MnOx nanowires supported by activated semi-coke for low temperature selective catalytic reduction of NOx with NH3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yan; Zhang, Zuotai; Liu, Lili; Mi, Liang; Wang, Xidong

    2016-03-01

    To mitigate the threat of NOx on the environment, MnOx nanowires were fabricated on activated semi-coke (MnOx NW/ASC) for the first time. The prepared MnOx NW/ASC was used for the low temperature selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NOx with NH3, which achieved an efficiency of over 90% with a low loading content of 1.64 wt% at 150-210 °C. This high performance could be ascribed to synergistic effect between MnOx and ASC. Specifically, the large specific surface area and reducible property of ASC facilitated the dispersion of MnOx and the formation of Mn3+, respectively. Meanwhile, MnOx nanowires provided more redox sites and lattice oxygen species due to the coexistence of Mn3+ and Mn4+, which accelerated the catalytic cycle. The in situ DRIFTS studies revealed that ASC was conducive to the adsorption of NO and NH3. Most importantly, the existence of Mn3+ favored the formation of amide species and the subsequent reduction reaction. Furthermore, the Langmuir-Hinshelwood (L-H) route between coordinated NH3 and bidentate nitrate was predominating in the SCR process and responsible for the high catalytic activity at low temperature.

  13. THE ACID RAIN NOX PROGRAM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Between 350,000 and 400,000 tons of annual NOx emissions have been eliminated as a result of Phase I of the Acid Rain NOx Program. As expected. the utilities have chosen emissions averaging as the primary compliance option. This reflects that, in general, NO x reductions have ...

  14. Comprehensive Evaluation of a CO2-Capturing NOx-Free Repowering System with Utilization of Middle Pressure Steam in a Thermal Power Plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sik Pak, Pyong

    A CO2-capturing NOx-free H2O turbine power generation system is proposed in which middle pressure steam produced in a thermal power plant is utilized to increase generated power when demand for electricity is large. The proposed system can capture all the generated CO2 based on the oxygen combustion method and emits no NOx, so that it causes no urban and global environmental problems. A combined cycle power generation system with 200MW gas turbine power output is adopted as an example of a thermal power plant. It was assumed that 32 t/h of steam with 25kg/cm2 pressure produced at waste heat recovery boiler was utilized in the proposed system.It has been shown through simulation study that increase of power output by 11.8MW or 4.51% of the rated output is possible with no efficiency decrease. The amount of CO2 reduction is estimated to be 19600t/y.The unit cost of generated power is estimated to be 8.38yen/kWh, annual gross profit of the proposed system 271 million yen, depreciation year 4.87, and thus the proposed system is estimated to be economically feasible.

  15. On-road measurement of regulated pollutants from diesel and CNG buses with urea selective catalytic reduction systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Jiadong; Ge, Yunshan; Hao, Lijun; Tan, Jianwei; Li, Jiaqiang; Feng, Xiangyu

    2014-12-01

    In this study, emissions from 13 buses operated in Beijing, including two Euro-III diesel buses, four Euro-IV diesel buses, three Euro-V diesel buses and four Euro-V CNG buses, were characterized in real world conditions. All of the buses tested were fitted with selective catalytic reduction (SCR) systems except for the Euro-III diesel buses. A SEMTECH-DS was used for testing the gaseous pollutants, and an electric low pressure impactor (ELPI) was used for measuring of particle numbers and size distributions. A comparison was made based on emission performance of these buses by employing the VSP approach and fuel- based emissions factors. Diesel buses emitted less CO and THC but more NOx and PM pollutants than CNG buses. The NOx reduction efficiencies of the SCR systems for CNG buses were higher because of the high exhaust temperature and high NO2/NOx ratio, whereas the efficiencies for diesel buses were lower. This resulted in extremely low NOx emissions from CNG buses, but the high NO2/NOx ratio needs further study. Failures of urea injection in the SCR systems were detected in this research, which resulted in very high NOx emissions. The CNG buses also emitted smaller numbers of particles and less particle mass with the presence of oxidation catalysts. Diesel buses satisfying the Euro-V standard performed better than Euro-IV and Euro-III diesel buses in terms of emission performance, except for more nuclei mode particles. Most of time, the Euro-IV diesel buses show no advantages in CO and NOx emissions compared with the Euro-III diesel buses.

  16. Satellite NO2 retrievals suggest China has exceeded its NOx reduction goals from the twelfth Five-Year Plan

    PubMed Central

    de Foy, Benjamin; Lu, Zifeng; Streets, David G.

    2016-01-01

    China’s twelfth Five-Year Plan included pollution control measures with a goal of reducing national emissions of nitrogen oxides (NOx) by 10% by 2015 compared with 2010. Multiple linear regression analysis was used on 11-year time series of all nitrogen dioxide (NO2) pixels from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) over 18 NO2 hotspots in China. The regression analysis accounted for variations in meteorology, pixel resolution, seasonal effects, weekday variability and year-to-year variability. The NO2 trends suggested that there was an increase in NO2 columns in most areas from 2005 to around 2011 which was followed by a strong decrease continuing through 2015. The satellite results were in good agreement with the annual official NOx emission inventories which were available up until 2014. This shows the value of evaluating trends in emission inventories using satellite retrievals. It further shows that recent control strategies were effective in reducing emissions and that recent economic transformations in China may be having an effect on NO2 columns. Satellite information for 2015 suggests that emissions have continued to decrease since the latest inventories available and have surpassed the goals of the twelfth Five-Year Plan. PMID:27786278

  17. Source apportionment and health effect of NOx over the Pearl River Delta region in southern China.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xingcheng; Yao, Teng; Li, Ying; Fung, Jimmy C H; Lau, Alexis K H

    2016-05-01

    As one of the most notorious atmospheric pollutants, NOx not only promotes the formation of ozone but also has adverse health effects on humans. It is therefore of great importance to study the sources of NOx and its effects on human health. The Comprehensive Air Quality Model (CAMx) modeling system and ozone source apportionment technology (OSAT) were used to study the contribution of NOx from different emission sources over southern China. The results indicate that heavy duty diesel vehicles (HDDVs) and industrial point sources are the two major local NOx sources, accounting for 30.8% and 18.5% of local NOx sources, respectively. In Hong Kong, marine emissions contributed around 43.4% of local NOx in 2011. Regional transport is another important source of this pollutant, especially in February and November, and it can contribute over 30% of ambient NOx on average. Power plant point emission is an significant regional source in Zhuhai, Zhongshan and Foshan. The total emission sources are estimated to cause 2119 (0-4405) respiratory deaths and 991 (0-2281) lung cancer deaths due to long-term exposure to NOx in the Pearl River Delta region. Our results suggest that local governments should combine their efforts and vigorously promote further reduction of NOx emissions, especially for those sources that make a substantial contribution to NOx emissions and affect human health: HDDV, LDGV, industrial point sources and marine sources.

  18. Source apportionment and health effect of NOx over the Pearl River Delta region in southern China.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xingcheng; Yao, Teng; Li, Ying; Fung, Jimmy C H; Lau, Alexis K H

    2016-05-01

    As one of the most notorious atmospheric pollutants, NOx not only promotes the formation of ozone but also has adverse health effects on humans. It is therefore of great importance to study the sources of NOx and its effects on human health. The Comprehensive Air Quality Model (CAMx) modeling system and ozone source apportionment technology (OSAT) were used to study the contribution of NOx from different emission sources over southern China. The results indicate that heavy duty diesel vehicles (HDDVs) and industrial point sources are the two major local NOx sources, accounting for 30.8% and 18.5% of local NOx sources, respectively. In Hong Kong, marine emissions contributed around 43.4% of local NOx in 2011. Regional transport is another important source of this pollutant, especially in February and November, and it can contribute over 30% of ambient NOx on average. Power plant point emission is an significant regional source in Zhuhai, Zhongshan and Foshan. The total emission sources are estimated to cause 2119 (0-4405) respiratory deaths and 991 (0-2281) lung cancer deaths due to long-term exposure to NOx in the Pearl River Delta region. Our results suggest that local governments should combine their efforts and vigorously promote further reduction of NOx emissions, especially for those sources that make a substantial contribution to NOx emissions and affect human health: HDDV, LDGV, industrial point sources and marine sources. PMID:26845361

  19. HYBRID SELECTIVE NON-CATALYTIC REDUCTION (SNCR)/SELECTIVE CATALYTIC REDUCTION (SCR) DEMONSTRATION FOR THE REMOVAL OF NOx FROM BOILER FLUE GASES

    SciTech Connect

    Jerry B. Urbas

    1999-05-01

    The U. S. Department of Energy (DOE), Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), Pennsylvania Electric Energy Research Council, (PEERC), New York State Electric and Gas and GPU Generation, Inc. jointly funded a demonstration to determine the capabilities for Hybrid SNCR/SCR (Selective Non-Catalytic Reduction/Selective Catalytic Reduction) technology. The demonstration site was GPU Generation's Seward Unit No.5 (147MW) located in Seward Pennsylvania. The demonstration began in October of 1997 and ended in December 1998. DOE funding was provided through Grant No. DE-FG22-96PC96256 with T. J. Feeley as the Project Manager. EPRI funding was provided through agreements TC4599-001-26999 and TC4599-002-26999 with E. Hughes as the Project Manager. This project demonstrated the operation of the Hybrid SNCR/SCR NO{sub x} control process on a full-scale coal fired utility boiler. The hybrid technology was expected to provide a cost-effective method of reducing NO{sub x} while balancing capital and operation costs. An existing urea based SNCR system was modified with an expanded-duct catalyst to provide increased NO{sub x} reduction efficiency from the SNCR while producing increased ammonia slip levels to the catalyst. The catalyst was sized to reduce the ammonia slip to the air heaters to less than 2 ppm while providing equivalent NO{sub x} reductions. The project goals were to demonstrate hybrid technology is capable of achieving at least a 55% reduction in NO{sub x} emissions while maintaining less than 2ppm ammonia slip to the air heaters, maintain flyash marketability, verify the cost benefit and applicability of Hybrid post combustion technology, and reduce forced outages due to ammonium bisulfate (ABS) fouling of the air heaters. Early system limitations, due to gas temperature stratification, restricted the Hybrid NO{sub x} reduction capabilities to 48% with an ammonia slip of 6.1 mg/Nm{sup 3} (8 ppm) at the catalyst inlet. After resolving the stratification problem

  20. Kinetics and mechanisms of NOx - char reduction. Quarterly technical progress report, August 1, 1995--October 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Suuberg, E.M.; Lilly, W.D.; Aarna, I.

    1996-05-01

    The emission of nitrogen oxides from combustion of coal remains a problem of considerable interest, whether the concern is with acid rain, stratospheric ozone chemistry, or {open_quotes}greenhouse{close_quotes} gases. Whereas earlier the concern was focused mainly on NO (as a primary combustion product) and to a lesser extent NO{sub 2} (since it is mainly a secondary product of combustion), in recent years the emissions of N{sub 2}O have also captured considerable attention, particularly in the context of fluidized bed combustion, in which the problem appears to be most acute. The research community has only recently begun to take solid hold on the N{sub 2}O problem. This is in part because earlier estimates of the importance of N{sub 2}O in combustion processes were clouded by artifacts in sampling which have now been resolved. This project is concerned with the mechanism of reduction of both NO and N{sub 2}O by carbons. It was recognized some years ago that NO formed during fluidized bed coal combustion can be heterogeneously reduced in-situ by the carbonaceous solid intermediates of combustions. This has been recently supplemented by the knowledge that heterogeneous reaction with carbon can also play an important role in reducing emissions of N{sub 2}O, but that the NO-carbon reactions might also contribute to formation of N{sub 2}O. The precise role of carbon in N{sub 2}O reduction and formation has yet to be established, since in one case the authors of a recent study were compelled to comment that the basic knowledge of N{sub 2}O formation and reduction still has to be improved. The same can be said of the NO-carbon system.

  1. 40 CFR 97.53 - Recordation of NOX allowance allocations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Recordation of NOX allowance... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS NOX Allowance Tracking System § 97.53 Recordation of NOX allowance allocations. (a) The Administrator will record the...

  2. 40 CFR 97.53 - Recordation of NOX allowance allocations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Recordation of NOX allowance... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS NOX Allowance Tracking System § 97.53 Recordation of NOX allowance allocations. (a) The Administrator will record the...

  3. 40 CFR 96.53 - Recordation of NOX allowance allocations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Recordation of NOX allowance... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS FOR STATE IMPLEMENTATION PLANS NOX Allowance Tracking System § 96.53 Recordation of NOX allowance allocations. (a)...

  4. 40 CFR 96.53 - Recordation of NOX allowance allocations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Recordation of NOX allowance... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS FOR STATE IMPLEMENTATION PLANS NOX Allowance Tracking System § 96.53 Recordation of NOX allowance allocations. (a)...

  5. 40 CFR 97.53 - Recordation of NOX allowance allocations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Recordation of NOX allowance... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS NOX Allowance Tracking System § 97.53 Recordation of NOX allowance allocations. (a) The Administrator will record the...

  6. 40 CFR 97.53 - Recordation of NOX allowance allocations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Recordation of NOX allowance... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS NOX Allowance Tracking System § 97.53 Recordation of NOX allowance allocations. (a) The Administrator will record the...

  7. Enhanced Combustion Low NOx Pulverized Coal Burner

    SciTech Connect

    David Towle; Richard Donais; Todd Hellewell; Robert Lewis; Robert Schrecengost

    2007-06-30

    For more than two decades, Alstom Power Inc. (Alstom) has developed a range of low cost, infurnace technologies for NOx emissions control for the domestic U.S. pulverized coal fired boiler market. This includes Alstom's internally developed TFS 2000{trademark} firing system, and various enhancements to it developed in concert with the U.S. Department of Energy. As of the date of this report, more than 270 units representing approximately 80,000 MWe of domestic coal fired capacity have been retrofit with Alstom low NOx technology. Best of class emissions range from 0.18 lb/MMBtu for bituminous coal to 0.10 lb/MMBtu for subbituminous coal, with typical levels at 0.24 lb/MMBtu and 0.13 lb/MMBtu, respectively. Despite these gains, NOx emissions limits in the U.S. continue to ratchet down for new and existing boiler equipment. On March 10, 2005, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) announced the Clean Air Interstate Rule (CAIR). CAIR requires 25 Eastern states to reduce NOx emissions from the power generation sector by 1.7 million tons in 2009 and 2.0 million tons by 2015. Low cost solutions to meet such regulations, and in particular those that can avoid the need for a costly selective catalytic reduction system (SCR), provide a strong incentive to continue to improve low NOx firing system technology to meet current and anticipated NOx control regulations. The overall objective of the work is to develop an enhanced combustion, low NOx pulverized coal burner, which, when integrated with Alstom's state-of-the-art, globally air staged low NOx firing systems will provide a means to achieve: Less than 0.15 lb/MMBtu NOx emissions when firing a high volatile Eastern or Western bituminous coal, Less than 0.10 lb/MMBtu NOx emissions when firing a subbituminous coal, NOx reduction costs at least 25% lower than the costs of an SCR, Validation of the NOx control technology developed through large (15 MWt) pilot scale demonstration, and Documentation required for economic

  8. Effects of a combined Diesel particle filter-DeNOx system (DPN) on reactive nitrogen compounds emissions: a parameter study.

    PubMed

    Heeb, Norbert V; Haag, Regula; Seiler, Cornelia; Schmid, Peter; Zennegg, Markus; Wichser, Adrian; Ulrich, Andrea; Honegger, Peter; Zeyer, Kerstin; Emmenegger, Lukas; Zimmerli, Yan; Czerwinski, Jan; Kasper, Markus; Mayer, Andreas

    2012-12-18

    The impact of a combined diesel particle filter-deNO(x) system (DPN) on emissions of reactive nitrogen compounds (RNCs) was studied varying the urea feed factor (α), temperature, and residence time, which are key parameters of the deNO(x) process. The DPN consisted of a platinum-coated cordierite filter and a vanadia-based deNO(x) catalyst supporting selective catalytic reduction (SCR) chemistry. Ammonia (NH₃) is produced in situ from thermolysis of urea and hydrolysis of isocyanic acid (HNCO). HNCO and NH₃ are both toxic and highly reactive intermediates. The deNO(x) system was only part-time active in the ISO8178/4 C1cycle. Urea injection was stopped and restarted twice. Mean NO and NO₂ conversion efficiencies were 80%, 95%, 97% and 43%, 87%, 99%, respectively, for α = 0.8, 1.0, and 1.2. HNCO emissions increased from 0.028 g/h engine-out to 0.18, 0.25, and 0.26 g/h at α = 0.8, 1.0, and 1.2, whereas NH₃ emissions increased from <0.045 to 0.12, 1.82, and 12.8 g/h with maxima at highest temperatures and shortest residence times. Most HNCO is released at intermediate residence times (0.2-0.3 s) and temperatures (300-400 °C). Total RNC efficiencies are highest at α = 1.0, when comparable amounts of reduced and oxidized compounds are released. The DPN represents the most advanced system studied so far under the VERT protocol achieving high conversion efficiencies for particles, NO, NO₂, CO, and hydrocarbons. However, we observed a trade-off between deNO(x) efficiency and secondary emissions. Therefore, it is important to adopt such DPN technology to specific application conditions to take advantage of reduced NO(x) and particle emissions while avoiding NH₃ and HNCO slip.

  9. Constraints on Anthropogenic NOx Emissions from Geostationary Satellite Observations in a Regional Chemical Data Assimilation System: Evaluation Using Observing System Simulation Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, X.; Mizzi, A. P.; Anderson, J. L.; Fung, I. Y.; Cohen, R. C.

    2015-12-01

    Nitrogen oxides (NOx=NO+NO2) control the tropospheric ozone (O3) budget, the abundance of the hydroxyl radical (OH), the formation of organic and inorganic nitrate aerosol, and therefore affect air quality and climate. There remain significant uncertainties in the processes responsible for NOx emissions and subsequent mixing and chemical removal. NOx has a short lifetime and its emissions show high spatiotemporal variability at urban scale. Future geostationary satellite instruments including TEMPO, GEMS and Sentinel-4 will provide hourly time resolution and high spatial resolution observations providing maps of NO2 on diurnal and local scales. Here we determine the extent to which a TEMPO like instrument can quantify urban-scale NOx emissions using a regional data assimilation (DA) system comprising of a chemical transport model, WRF-Chem, a TEMPO simulator and the DART Ensemble Adjustment Kalman Filter. We generate synthetic TEMPO observations by sampling from a nature run on an urban scale domain. We consider the effect of albedo, surface pressure, solar and viewing angles and a priori NO2 profiles on the TEMPO NO2 averaging kernel to achieve scene-dependent instrument sensitivity. We estimate NOx emissions using DART in a state augmentation approach by including NOx emissions in the state vector being analyzed. The ensemble-based statistical estimation of error correlations between concentrations and emissions are critical as they determine the impact of assimilated observations. We describe observing system simulation experiments to explore the optimal approach in the ensemble-based DA system to estimate hourly-resolved NOx emissions from TEMPO NO2 observations. Several case studies will be presented examining the role of covariance localization length and chemical perturbations on the success of the approach.

  10. Selective catalytic reduction system and process using a pre-sulfated zirconia binder

    DOEpatents

    Sobolevskiy, Anatoly; Rossin, Joseph A.

    2010-06-29

    A selective catalytic reduction (SCR) process with a palladium catalyst for reducing NOx in a gas, using hydrogen as a reducing agent is provided. The process comprises contacting the gas stream with a catalyst system, the catalyst system comprising (ZrO.sub.2)SO.sub.4, palladium, and a pre-sulfated zirconia binder. The inclusion of a pre-sulfated zirconia binder substantially increases the durability of a Pd-based SCR catalyst system. A system for implementing the disclosed process is further provided.

  11. Effect of reduction treatment on copper modified activated carbons on NO(x) adsorption at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Levasseur, Benoit; Gonzalez-Lopez, Eugene; Rossin, Joseph A; Bandosz, Teresa J

    2011-05-01

    Activated carbon was impregnated with copper salt and then exposed to reductive environment using hydrazine hydrate or heat treatment under nitrogen at 925 °C. On the obtained samples, adsorption of NO(2) was carried out at dynamic conditions at ambient temperature. The adsorbents before and after exposure to nitrogen dioxide were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), thermal analysis, scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM-EDX), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), N(2)-sorption at -196 °C, and potentiometric titration. Copper loading improved the adsorption capacity of NO(2) as well as the retention of NO formed in the process of NO(2) reduction on the carbon surface. That improvement is linked to the presence of copper metal and its high dispersion on the surface. Even though both reduction methods lead to the reduction of copper, different reactions with the carbon surface take place. Heat treatment results in a significant percentage of metallic copper and a reduction of oxygen functional groups of the carbon matrix, whereas hydrazine, besides reduction of copper, leads to an incorporation of nitrogen. The results suggest that NO(2) mainly is converted to copper nitrates although the possibility to its reduction to N(2) is not ruled out. A high capacity on hydrazine treated samples is linked to the high dispersion of metallic copper on the surface of this carbon.

  12. A Comparative Study of N2O Formation during the Selective Catalytic Reduction of NOx with NH3 on Zeolite Supported Cu Catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Hai-Ying; Wei, Zhehao; Kollar, Marton; Gao, Feng; Wang, Yilin; Szanyi, Janos; Peden, Charles HF

    2015-09-01

    A comparative study was carried out on a small-pore CHA.Cu and a large-pore BEA.Cu zeolite catalyst to understand the lower N2O formation on small-pore zeolite supported Cu catalysts in the selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NOx with NH3. On both catalysts, the N2O yield increases with an increase in the NO2/NOx ratios of the feed gas, suggesting N2O formation via the decomposition of NH4NO3. Temperature-programmed desorption experiments reveal that NH4NO3 is more stable on CHA.Cu than on BEA.Cu. In situ FTIR spectra following stepwise (NO2 + O2) and (15NO + NH3 + O2) adsorption and reaction, and product distribution analysis using isotope-labelled reactants, unambiguously prove that surface nitrate groups are essential for the formation of NH4NO3. Furthermore, CHA.Cu is shown to be considerably less active than BEA.Cu in catalyzing NO oxidation and the subsequent formation of surface nitrate groups. Both factors, i.e., (1) the higher thermal stability of NH4NO3 on CHA.Cu, and (2) the lower activity for this catalyst to catalyze NO oxidation and the subsequent formation of surface nitrates, likely contribute to the higher SCR selectivity with less N2O formation on this catalyst as compared to BEA.Cu. The latter is determined as the primary reason since surface nitrates are the source that leads to the formation of NH4NO3 on the catalysts.

  13. NOx control buys to peak in `98

    SciTech Connect

    McIlvaine, R.W.

    1995-10-01

    Titles I and IV of the Clean Air Act provide the legislative framework for a huge NOx reduction program now in operation. This reduction will have a substantial effect in reducing ground-level ozone. A new McIlvaine report concludes that US utilities and industrial companies during the next 10 years will spend more than $800 million annually to meet CAA`s NOx-control regulations. Much of that investment will be for low-NOx burners, which minimize NOx formation. Many utilities and industrial boilers can be retrofitted with a new generation of burners; however, this technology achieves less than 50% NOx reduction. Post-combustion technologies, such as selective catalytic reduction and selective noncatalytic reduction, can reduce NOx as much as 90%. Therefore, plants needing greater NOx reduction will use post-combustion technologies, often in combination with low-NOx burners. The peak order year for NOx-control equipment will be 1998, primarily because Title IV of CAA requires utilities to comply by 2000. Many industrial sources also will be ordering equipment in 1998.

  14. Elementary steps of the catalytic NOx reduction with NH3: Cluster studies on adsorbate diffusion and dehydrogenation at vanadium oxide substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruber, M.; Hermann, K.

    2013-05-01

    We discuss the details of important steps of the selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NOx at model V2O5(010) substrate. First, diffusion processes at the substrate surface are considered where hydrogen and ammonium, NH4, are used as examples. Hydrogen diffusion, a prerequisite for water formation involving substrate oxygen, is described by diffusion paths between adjacent surface oxygen sites. Corresponding energy barriers are determined mainly by the flexibility and the amount of distortion of the oxygen atoms which participate in the O-H-O bridge formation at the transition state. Further, diffusion of sub-surface oxygen to fill surface oxygen vacancies of the V2O5(010) substrate has been considered and results in reactive surface sites which have not been discussed so far. NH4 diffusion at the V2O5(010) surface can be described as a combined tumbling and rotation process characterized by quite low diffusion barriers which make the adsorbate rather mobile. Finally, hydrogenation and dehydrogenation of different NHx species at the V2O5(010) substrate surface are studied where special emphasis is given to the influence of surface reduction simulated locally by oxygen vacancies. The results confirm experimental findings of the presence of both NH2 and NH4 species after ammonia adsorption at the V2O5(010) surface.

  15. Alkali metal poisoning of a CeO2-WO3 catalyst used in the selective catalytic reduction of NOx with NH3: an experimental and theoretical study.

    PubMed

    Peng, Yue; Li, Junhua; Chen, Liang; Chen, Jinghuan; Han, Jian; Zhang, He; Han, Wei

    2012-03-01

    The alkali metal-induced deactivation of a novel CeO(2)-WO(3) (CeW) catalyst used for selective catalytic reduction (SCR) was investigated. The CeW catalyst could resist greater amounts of alkali metals than V(2)O(5)-WO(3)/TiO(2). At the same molar concentration, the K-poisoned catalyst exhibited a greater loss in activity compared with the Na-poisoned catalyst below 200 °C. A combination of experimental and theoretical methods, including NH(3)-TPD, DRIFTS, H(2)-TPR, and density functional theory (DFT) calculations, were used to elucidate the mechanism of the alkali metal deactivation of the CeW catalyst in SCR reaction. Experiments results indicated that decreases in the reduction activity and the quantity of Brønsted acid sites rather than the acid strength were responsible for the catalyst deactivation. The DFT calculations revealed that Na and K could easily adsorb on the CeW (110) surface and that the surface oxygen could migrate to cover the active tungsten, and then inhibit the SCR of NO(x) with ammonia. Hot water washing is a convenient and effective method to regenerate alkali metal-poisoned CeW catalysts, and the catalytic activity could be recovered 90% of the fresh catalyst.

  16. Controlling NOx emission from industrial sources

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, R.K.; Nueffer, W.; Grano, D.; Khan, S.; Staudt, J.E.; Jozewicz, W.

    2005-07-01

    A number of regulatory actions focused on reducing NOx emissions from stationary combustion sources have been taken in the United States in the last decade. These actions include the Acid Rain NOx regulations, the Ozone Transport Commission's NOx Budget Program, and the NOx SIP Call rulemakings. In addition to these regulations, the recent Interstate Air Quality Rulemaking proposal and other bills in the Congress are focusing on additional reductions of NOx. Industrial combustion sources accounted for about 18016 of NOx emissions in the United States in 2000 and constituted the second largest emitting source category within stationary sources, only behind electric utility sources. Based on these data, reduction of NOx emissions from industrial combustion sources is an important consideration in efforts undertaken to address the environmental concerns associated with NOx. This paper discusses primary and secondary NOx control technologies applicable to various major categories of industrial sources. The sources considered in this paper include large boilers, furnaces and fired heaters, combustion turbines, large IC engines, and cement kilns. For each source category considered in this paper, primary NOx controls are discussed first, followed by a discussion of secondary NOx controls.

  17. Droplet size effects on NO/x/ formation in a one-dimensional monodisperse spray combustion system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarv, H.; Nizami, A. A.; Cernansky, N. P.

    1982-01-01

    A one-dimensional monodisperse aerosol spray combustion facility is described and experimental results of post flame NO/NO(x) emissions are presented. Four different hydrocarbon fuels were studied: isopropanol, methanol, n-heptane, and n-octane. The results indicate an optimum droplet size in the range of 48-58 microns for minimizing NO/NO(x) production for all of the test fuels. This NO(x) behavior is associated with droplet interactions and the transition from diffusive type of spray burning to that of a prevaporized and premixed case. Decreasing the droplet size results in a trend of increasing droplet interactions, which suppresses temperatures and reduces NO(x). This trend continues until prevaporization effects begin to dominate and the system tends towards the premixed limit. The occurrence of the minimum NO(x) point at different droplet diameters for the different fuels appears to be governed by the extent of prevaporization of the fuel in the spray, and is consistent with theoretical calculations based on each fuel's physical properties.

  18. Task 2.6 - Catalyst for Utilization of Methane in Selective Catalytic Reduction of NOx: Topical report, July 1, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1997-12-31

    Selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) in flue gas or engine exhaust gas with hydrocarbons as the reductant has great potential for less expense, less pollution, and easier operation than SCR with ammonia. Methane is the preferred reducing gas because of its low cost and low toxicity. Stable, low-cost catalysts for SCR with methane are required to demonstrate this technology for controlling NO{sub x} emissions. Several cobalt and nickel catalysts on synthetic clay and uranium oxide supports were investigated for their activities in reducing NO{sub x} with methane in the presence of air. The efficiency of the synthetic clay-supported nickel and cobalt catalysts for nitric oxide (NO) reduction with methane as the reducing gas was poor. The nickel oxide-uranium oxide catalyst, which was chosen for its high stability, was also ineffective. Results from the two-step experiments conducted at two temperatures produced some interesting information on the reactions of methane with the catalysts and the reactivity of the carbonaceous intermediate. The carbonaceous material formed from methane dissociation at 450{degrees}C not only reduces NO to N{sub 2}O at lower temperatures, but also prevents oxidation of NO to NO{sub 2}. Unfortunately, the carbonaceous forms that reduce the NO are not available for reactions at 400{degrees}C in the presence of oxygen. A two-step process employing this chemistry would be difficult because the catalyst would have to be cycled between the two temperatures. Also the desired reduction to nitrogen is not very efficient.

  19. Elementary steps of the catalytic NOx reduction with NH3: Cluster studies on reactant adsorption at vanadium oxide substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruber, M.; Hermann, K.

    2013-03-01

    Extended cluster models together with density-functional theory are used to evaluate geometric, energetic, and electronic properties of different adsorbate species that can occur at a vanadium oxide surface where the selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NO in the presence of ammonia proceeds. Here, we focus on atomic hydrogen, nitrogen, and oxygen, as well as molecular NO and NHx, x = 1, 4, adsorption at a model V2O5(010) surface. Binding sites, oxygen and vanadium, at both the perfect and reduced surface are considered where reduction is modeled by (sub-) surface oxygen vacancies. The reactants are found to bind overall more strongly at oxygen vacancy sites of the reduced surface where they stabilize in positions formerly occupied by the oxygen (substitutional adsorption) compared with weaker binding at the perfect surface. In particular, ammonia, which interacts only weakly with vanadium at the perfect surface, binds quite strongly near surface oxygen vacancies. In contrast, surface binding of the NH4 adsorbate species differs only little between the perfect and the reduced surface which is explained by the dominantly electrostatic nature of the adsorbate interaction. The theoretical results are consistent with experimental findings and confirm the importance of surface reduction for the reactant adsorption forming elementary steps of the SCR process.

  20. Chemical composition in mesoscale convective systems during AMMA and its impact on the NOx and O3 budget

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huntrieser, H.; Schlager, H.; Lichtenstern, M.; Roiger, A.; Stock, P.; Höller, H.; Schmidt, K.; Betz, H.-D.

    2010-05-01

    Deep convection is responsible for a rapid redistribution of trace gases between the boundary layer (BL) and the upper troposphere (UT). Large convective systems as mesoscale convective systems (MCS) very effectively contribute to this redistribution and change the oxidizing capacity in the UT over a wide area. Especially ozone (O3) plays an essential role in determining the oxidizing capacity of the atmosphere and contributes largely to the global greenhouse effect. The production of ozone is driven by the oxidation of carbon monoxide (CO) and volatile organic compounds (VOC) in presence of nitrogen oxide (NO) and sunlight. During the African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analysis (AMMA) Special Observation Period carried out in West Africa in July and August 2006, the DLR research aircraft Falcon probed several MCS originating over different vegetation types both north and south of the ITCZ. The outflow of the MCS was penetrated close to the convective core but also further away (~500 km). In the fresh outflow, mean NOx (=NO+NO2) mixing ratios between 0.3-0.4 nmol mol-1 were observed. A rapid entrainment of ambient air in the UT was observed and both CO and O3 mixing ratios soon reached ambient conditions. However, in the aged outflow NOx mixing ratios were still clearly enhanced above the background. The potential for ozone production in the UT was very different depending on the chemical composition in the BL and two different cases are presented. Mainly pollution from the BL (transported upward) but also some production by lightning contributed to enhance the NOx mixing ratios in the fresh outflow. The nitrogen mass flux in the MCS outflow was determined and combined with measurements from a smaller lightning location network (LINET) and with global lightning observations from LIS. A global contribution of ~1-2 Tg(N) a-1 was estimated to be produced by lightning if we assume that MCS over West Africa are typical global thunderstorms. Compared to results from

  1. Catalytic hydrolysis of urea with fly ash for generation of ammonia in a batch reactor for flue gas conditioning and NOx reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Sahu, J.N.; Gangadharan, P.; Patwardhan, A.V.; Meikap, B.C.

    2009-01-15

    Ammonia is a highly volatile noxious material with adverse physiological effects, which become intolerable even at very low concentrations and present substantial environmental and operating hazards and risk. Yet ammonia has long been known to be used for feedstock of flue gas conditioning and NOx reduction. Urea as the source of ammonia for the production of ammonia has the obvious advantages that no ammonia shipping, handling, and storage is required. The process of this invention minimizes the risks and hazards associated with the transport, storage, and use of anhydrous and aqueous ammonia. Yet no such rapid urea conversion process is available as per requirement of high conversion in shorter time, so here we study the catalytic hydrolysis of urea for fast conversion in a batch reactor. The catalyst used in this study is fly ash, a waste material originating in great amounts in combustion processes. A number of experiments were carried out in a batch reactor at different catalytic doses, temperatures, times, and at a constant concentration of urea solution 10% by weight, and equilibrium and kinetic studies have been made.

  2. WO3/CeO2/TiO2 Catalysts for Selective Catalytic Reduction of NO(x) by NH3: Effect of the Synthesis Method.

    PubMed

    Michalow-Mauke, Katarzyna A; Lu, Ye; Ferri, Davide; Graule, Thomas; Kowalski, Kazimierz; Elsener, Martin; Kröcher, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    WO3/CeO2/TiO2, CeO2/TiO2 and WO3/TiO2 catalysts were prepared by wet impregnation. CeO2/TiO2 and WO3/TiO2 showed activity towards the selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NO(x) by NH3, which was significantly improved by subsequent impregnation of CeO/TiO2 with WO3. Catalytic performance, NH3 oxidation and NH3 temperature programmed desorption of wet-impregnated WO3/CeO2/TiO2 were compared to those of a flame-made counterpart. The flame-made catalyst exhibits a peculiar arrangement of W-Ce-Ti-oxides that makes it very active for NH3-SCR. Catalysts prepared by wet impregnation with the aim to mimic the structure of the flame-made catalyst were not able to fully reproduce its activity. The differences in the catalytic performance between the investigated catalysts were related to their structural properties and the different interaction of the catalyst components.

  3. Enhanced catalytic activity over MIL-100(Fe) loaded ceria catalysts for the selective catalytic reduction of NOx with NH₃ at low temperature.

    PubMed

    Wang, Peng; Sun, Hong; Quan, Xie; Chen, Shuo

    2016-01-15

    The development of catalysts for selective catalytic reduction (SCR) reactions that are highly active at low temperatures and show good resistance to SO2 and H2O is still a challenge. In this study, we have designed and developed a high-performance SCR catalyst based on nano-sized ceria encapsulated inside the pores of MIL-100(Fe) that combines excellent catalytic power with a metal organic framework architecture synthesized by the impregnation method (IM). Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed the encapsulation of ceria in the cavities of MIL-100(Fe). The prepared IM-CeO2/MIL-100(Fe) catalyst shows improved catalytic activity both at low temperatures and throughout a wide temperature window. The temperature window for 90% NOx conversion ranges from 196 to 300°C. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and in situ diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFT) analysis indicated that the nano-sized ceria encapsulated inside MIL-100(Fe) promotes the production of chemisorbed oxygen on the catalyst surface, which greatly enhances the formation of the NO2 species responsible for fast SCR reactions.

  4. Effects of a combined Diesel particle filter-DeNOx system (DPN) on reactive nitrogen compounds emissions: a parameter study.

    PubMed

    Heeb, Norbert V; Haag, Regula; Seiler, Cornelia; Schmid, Peter; Zennegg, Markus; Wichser, Adrian; Ulrich, Andrea; Honegger, Peter; Zeyer, Kerstin; Emmenegger, Lukas; Zimmerli, Yan; Czerwinski, Jan; Kasper, Markus; Mayer, Andreas

    2012-12-18

    The impact of a combined diesel particle filter-deNO(x) system (DPN) on emissions of reactive nitrogen compounds (RNCs) was studied varying the urea feed factor (α), temperature, and residence time, which are key parameters of the deNO(x) process. The DPN consisted of a platinum-coated cordierite filter and a vanadia-based deNO(x) catalyst supporting selective catalytic reduction (SCR) chemistry. Ammonia (NH₃) is produced in situ from thermolysis of urea and hydrolysis of isocyanic acid (HNCO). HNCO and NH₃ are both toxic and highly reactive intermediates. The deNO(x) system was only part-time active in the ISO8178/4 C1cycle. Urea injection was stopped and restarted twice. Mean NO and NO₂ conversion efficiencies were 80%, 95%, 97% and 43%, 87%, 99%, respectively, for α = 0.8, 1.0, and 1.2. HNCO emissions increased from 0.028 g/h engine-out to 0.18, 0.25, and 0.26 g/h at α = 0.8, 1.0, and 1.2, whereas NH₃ emissions increased from <0.045 to 0.12, 1.82, and 12.8 g/h with maxima at highest temperatures and shortest residence times. Most HNCO is released at intermediate residence times (0.2-0.3 s) and temperatures (300-400 °C). Total RNC efficiencies are highest at α = 1.0, when comparable amounts of reduced and oxidized compounds are released. The DPN represents the most advanced system studied so far under the VERT protocol achieving high conversion efficiencies for particles, NO, NO₂, CO, and hydrocarbons. However, we observed a trade-off between deNO(x) efficiency and secondary emissions. Therefore, it is important to adopt such DPN technology to specific application conditions to take advantage of reduced NO(x) and particle emissions while avoiding NH₃ and HNCO slip. PMID:23214996

  5. Neural network boiler optimization of efficiency, emission, and reliability with TVA Kingston Unit 3 low NOx optimization test results

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, P.S.; Poston, J.M.; Schroech, K.A.; Hou, H.S.

    1995-12-31

    Boiler performance optimization includes the preservation of efficiency, emission, capacity, and reliability. Competitive pressures require cost reduction and environmental compliance. It is a challenge for utility personnel to balance these requirements often demand tradeoffs. The Clean Air Act Amendment requires utilities to reduce NOx emission. NOx emission reduction has often been accomplished by installation of new low NOx burners. Boiler tuning for NOx control can be used as an alternative to low NOx burner installation. Specifically in tangentially-fired boilers, boiler tuning can be very effective in NOx reduction. A PC-based computer software program was developed to assist the tuning process. This software, System Optimization Analysis Program (SOAP), is a neural network based code which uses the self-adaptation learning process, with an adaptive filter added for data noise control. SOAP can use historical data as the knowledge base and provides a fast optimal solution to adaptive control problems. SOAP was tested at TVA`s Kingston Unit 3 tangentially coal-fired furnace for NOx reduction. With a well-organized test plan, the optimized solution was reached with 16 tests at each test series load level. SOAP will be used for other plant equipment or system optimization, such as pulverizer performance, combustion system optimization, compared thermal performance design, and boiler tube leak detection and allocation.

  6. Laboratory test reactor for the investigation of liquid reducing agents in the selective catalytic reduction of NOx.

    PubMed

    Peitz, D; Bernhard, A; Elsener, M; Kröcher, O

    2011-08-01

    A test reactor was designed and built for investigating liquid reducing agents in the selective catalytic reduction (SCR) process in the laboratory. The design of the experimental setup is described in detail and its performance was evaluated. Using a glass nebulizer, liquid reducing agents were sprayed directly onto a catalyst positioned in a heated glass reactor with a length of 250 mm and an internal diameter of 20.4 mm or 40 mm. Model exhaust gases were mixed from individual gas components and were heated up to 450 °C in a heat exchanger before entering the reactor. The off-gas was analyzed using two complimentary techniques, a multi-component online FTIR gas analysis and a liquid quench gas absorption setup, to detect higher molecular compounds and aerosols. Due to the versatility of construction, processes not related to SCR, but involving three-phase reactions with gases, liquids and a catalyst, can also be investigated.

  7. Laboratory test reactor for the investigation of liquid reducing agents in the selective catalytic reduction of NOx

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peitz, D.; Bernhard, A.; Elsener, M.; Kröcher, O.

    2011-08-01

    A test reactor was designed and built for investigating liquid reducing agents in the selective catalytic reduction (SCR) process in the laboratory. The design of the experimental setup is described in detail and its performance was evaluated. Using a glass nebulizer, liquid reducing agents were sprayed directly onto a catalyst positioned in a heated glass reactor with a length of 250 mm and an internal diameter of 20.4 mm or 40 mm. Model exhaust gases were mixed from individual gas components and were heated up to 450 °C in a heat exchanger before entering the reactor. The off-gas was analyzed using two complimentary techniques, a multi-component online FTIR gas analysis and a liquid quench gas absorption setup, to detect higher molecular compounds and aerosols. Due to the versatility of construction, processes not related to SCR, but involving three-phase reactions with gases, liquids and a catalyst, can also be investigated.

  8. Treatment on Low NOx Concentration and DEP Collection with Barrier Discharge System Superposing TiO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takagi, Yasuhiro; Hosoi, Katsuhiko; Ehara, Yoshiyasu; Takahashi, Takeo; Ito, Tairo; Zukeran, Akinori; Kawada, Yoshihiro; Kono, Yoshihiro; Yasumoto, Koji

    The automobiles exhaust carbon particles and NOx into the air, and then gases accumulate in expressway tunnels. DC corona discharge is used widely in electrostatic precipitator (ESP). However, the ESP with DC corona discharge can little remove NOx. Therefore, we proposed a new barrier discharge type precharger to replace corona discharge type prechargers to remove NOx. When discharge is generated in the air, NOx necessarily is generated. Then, we need to grasp the lower limit NOx concentration to remove NOx from the gas. We focus attention on photocatalyst because it is effective in NOx removal. However, photocatalyst needs ultraviolet ray. Therefore, TiO2 is painted on barrier discharge electrodes, an ultraviolet ray included in discharge luminescence was irradiated to TiO2. Furthermore, the relationship between initial NOx concentration and removal characteristic is investigated in detail.

  9. Analog VLSI system for active drag reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, B.; Goodman, R.; Jiang, F.; Tai, Y.C.; Tung, S.; Ho, C.M.

    1996-10-01

    In today`s cost-conscious air transportation industry, fuel costs are a substantial economic concern. Drag reduction is an important way to reduce costs. Even a 5% reduction in drag translates into estimated savings of millions of dollars in fuel costs. Drawing inspiration from the structure of shark skin, the authors are building a system to reduce drag along a surface. Our analog VLSI system interfaces with microfabricated, constant-temperature shear stress sensors. It detects regions of high shear stress and outputs a control signal to activate a microactuator. We are in the process of verifying the actual drag reduction by controlling microactuators in wind tunnel experiments. We are encouraged that an approach similar to one that biology employs provides a very useful contribution to the problem of drag reduction. 9 refs., 21 figs.

  10. A study on the indirect urea dosing method in the Selective Catalytic Reduction system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brzeżański, M.; Sala, R.

    2016-09-01

    This article presents the results of studies on concept solution of dosing urea in a gas phase in a selective catalytic reduction system. The idea of the concept was to heat-up and evaporate the water urea solution before introducing it into the exhaust gas stream. The aim was to enhance the processes of urea converting into ammonia, what is the target reductant for nitrogen oxides treatment. The study was conducted on a medium-duty Euro 5 diesel engine with exhaust line consisting of DOC catalyst, DPF filter and an SCR system with a changeable setup allowing to dose the urea in liquid phase (regular solution) and to dose it in a gas phase (concept solution). The main criteria was to assess the effect of physical state of urea dosed on the NOx conversion ratio in the SCR catalyst. In order to compare both urea dosing methods a special test procedure was developed which consisted of six test steps covering a wide temperature range of exhaust gas generated at steady state engine operation condition. Tests were conducted for different urea dosing quantities defined by the a equivalence ratio. Based on the obtained results, a remarkable improvement in NOx reduction was found for gas urea application in comparison to the standard liquid urea dosing. Measured results indicate a high potential to increase an efficiency of the SCR catalyst by using a gas phase urea and provide the basis for further scientific research on this type of concept.

  11. NASA Glenn High Pressure Low NOx Emissions Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tacina, Kathleen M.; Wey, Changlie

    2008-01-01

    In collaboration with U.S. aircraft engine companies, NASA Glenn Research Center has contributed to the advancement of low emissions combustion systems. For the High Speed Research Program (HSR), a 90% reduction in nitrogen oxides (NOx) emissions (relative to the then-current state of the art) has been demonstrated in sector rig testing at General Electric Aircraft Engines (GEAE). For the Advanced Subsonic Technology Program (AST), a 50% reduction in NOx emissions relative to the 1996 International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) standards has been demonstrated in sector rigs at both GEAE and Pratt & Whitney (P&W). During the Ultra Efficient Engine Technology Program (UEET), a 70% reduction in NOx emissions, relative to the 1996 ICAO standards, was achieved in sector rig testing at Glenn in the world class Advanced Subsonic Combustion Rig (ASCR) and at contractor facilities. Low NOx combustor development continues under the Fundamental Aeronautics Program. To achieve these reductions, experimental and analytical research has been conducted to advance the understanding of emissions formation in combustion processes. Lean direct injection (LDI) concept development uses advanced laser-based non-intrusive diagnostics and analytical work to complement the emissions measurements and to provide guidance for concept improvement. This paper describes emissions results from flametube tests of a 9-injection-point LDI fuel/air mixer tested at inlet pressures up to 5500 kPa. Sample results from CFD and laser diagnostics are also discussed.

  12. Reduction of Subjective and Objective System Complexity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Michael D.

    2015-01-01

    Occam's razor is often used in science to define the minimum criteria to establish a physical or philosophical idea or relationship. Albert Einstein is attributed the saying "everything should be made as simple as possible, but not simpler". These heuristic ideas are based on a belief that there is a minimum state or set of states for a given system or phenomena. In looking at system complexity, these heuristics point us to an idea that complexity can be reduced to a minimum. How then, do we approach a reduction in complexity? Complexity has been described as a subjective concept and an objective measure of a system. Subjective complexity is based on human cognitive comprehension of the functions and inter relationships of a system. Subjective complexity is defined by the ability to fully comprehend the system. Simplifying complexity, in a subjective sense, is thus gaining a deeper understanding of the system. As Apple's Jonathon Ive has stated," It's not just minimalism or the absence of clutter. It involves digging through the depth of complexity. To be truly simple, you have to go really deep". Simplicity is not the absence of complexity but a deeper understanding of complexity. Subjective complexity, based on this human comprehension, cannot then be discerned from the sociological concept of ignorance. The inability to comprehend a system can be either a lack of knowledge, an inability to understand the intricacies of a system, or both. Reduction in this sense is based purely on a cognitive ability to understand the system and no system then may be truly complex. From this view, education and experience seem to be the keys to reduction or eliminating complexity. Objective complexity, is the measure of the systems functions and interrelationships which exist independent of human comprehension. Jonathon Ive's statement does not say that complexity is removed, only that the complexity is understood. From this standpoint, reduction of complexity can be approached

  13. Year-round N2O production by benthic NOx reduction in a monomictic south-alpine lake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freymond, C. V.; Wenk, C. B.; Frame, C. H.; Lehmann, M. F.

    2013-12-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is a potent greenhouse gas, generated through microbial nitrogen (N) turnover processes, such as nitrification, nitrifier denitrification, and denitrification. Previous studies quantifying natural sources have mainly focused on soils and the ocean, but the potential role of terrestrial water bodies in the global N2O budget has been widely neglected. Furthermore, the biogeochemical controls on the production rates and the microbial pathways that produce benthic N2O in lakes are essentially unknown. In this study, benthic N2O fluxes and the contributions of the microbial pathways that produce N2O were assessed using 15N label flow-through sediment incubations in the eutrophic, monomictic south basin of Lake Lugano in Switzerland. The sediments were a significant source of N2O throughout the year, with production rates ranging between 140 and 2605 nmol N2O h-1 m-2, and the highest observed rates coinciding with periods of water column stratification and stably anoxic conditions in the overlying bottom water. Nitrate (NO3-) reduction via denitrification was found to be the major N2O production pathway in the sediments under both oxygen-depleted and oxygen-replete conditions in the overlying water, while ammonium oxidation did not contribute significantly to the benthic N2O flux. A marked portion (up to 15%) of the total NO3- consumed by denitrification was reduced only to N2O, without complete denitrification to N2. These fluxes were highest when the bottom water had stabilized to a low-oxygen state, in contrast with the notion that stable anoxia is particularly conducive to complete denitrification without accumulation of N2O. This study provides evidence that lake sediments are a significant source of N2O to the overlying water and may produce large N2O fluxes to the atmosphere during seasonal mixing events.

  14. NOx reduction is the main pathway for benthic N2O production in a eutrophic, monomictic south-alpine lake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freymond, C. V.; Wenk, C. B.; Frame, C. H.; Lehmann, M. F.

    2013-03-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is a potent greenhouse gas, generated through microbial nitrogen (N) turnover processes, such as nitrification, nitrifier denitrification, and denitrification. Previous studies quantifying natural sources have mainly focused on soils and the ocean, but the potential role of terrestrial water bodies in the global N2O budget has been widely neglected. Furthermore, the biogeochemical controls on the production rates and the microbial pathways that produce benthic N2O in lakes are essentially unknown. In this study, benthic N2O fluxes and the contributions of the microbial pathways that produce N2O were assessed using 15N label flow-through sediment incubations in the eutrophic, monomictic south basin of Lake Lugano in Switzerland. The sediments were a significant source of N2O throughout the year, with production rates ranging between 140 and 2605 nmol N2O h-1 m-2, and the highest observed rates coinciding with periods of water column stratification and stably anoxic conditions in the overlying bottom water. Nitrate (NO3-) reduction via denitrification was found to be the major N2O production pathway in the sediments under both oxygen-depleted and oxygen-replete conditions in the overlying water, while ammonium oxidation did not significantly contribute to the benthic N2O flux. A significant portion (up to 15%) of the total NO3- consumed by denitrification was reduced only to N2O, without complete denitrification to N2. These fluxes were highest when the bottom water had completely stabilized to a low-oxygen state, in contrast with the notion that stable anoxia is particularly conducive to complete denitrification without accumulation of N2O. This study provides evidence that lake sediments are a~significant source of N2O to the overlying water and may produce large N2O fluxes to the atmosphere during seasonal mixing events.

  15. System Complexity Reduction via Feature Selection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deng, Houtao

    2011-01-01

    This dissertation transforms a set of system complexity reduction problems to feature selection problems. Three systems are considered: classification based on association rules, network structure learning, and time series classification. Furthermore, two variable importance measures are proposed to reduce the feature selection bias in tree…

  16. Reduce NOx and Improve Energy Efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    2005-05-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy's NOx and Energy Assessment Tool (NxEAT) is available at no charge to help the petroleum refining and chemicals industries develop a cost-effective, plant-wide strategy for NOx reduction and energy efficiency improvements.

  17. Discovery of Nigri/nox and Panto/pox site-specific recombinase systems facilitates advanced genome engineering.

    PubMed

    Karimova, Madina; Splith, Victoria; Karpinski, Janet; Pisabarro, M Teresa; Buchholz, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Precise genome engineering is instrumental for biomedical research and holds great promise for future therapeutic applications. Site-specific recombinases (SSRs) are valuable tools for genome engineering due to their exceptional ability to mediate precise excision, integration and inversion of genomic DNA in living systems. The ever-increasing complexity of genome manipulations and the desire to understand the DNA-binding specificity of these enzymes are driving efforts to identify novel SSR systems with unique properties. Here, we describe two novel tyrosine site-specific recombination systems designated Nigri/nox and Panto/pox. Nigri originates from Vibrio nigripulchritudo (plasmid VIBNI_pA) and recombines its target site nox with high efficiency and high target-site selectivity, without recombining target sites of the well established SSRs Cre, Dre, Vika and VCre. Panto, derived from Pantoea sp. aB, is less specific and in addition to its native target site, pox also recombines the target site for Dre recombinase, called rox. This relaxed specificity allowed the identification of residues that are involved in target site selectivity, thereby advancing our understanding of how SSRs recognize their respective DNA targets.

  18. Discovery of Nigri/nox and Panto/pox site-specific recombinase systems facilitates advanced genome engineering.

    PubMed

    Karimova, Madina; Splith, Victoria; Karpinski, Janet; Pisabarro, M Teresa; Buchholz, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Precise genome engineering is instrumental for biomedical research and holds great promise for future therapeutic applications. Site-specific recombinases (SSRs) are valuable tools for genome engineering due to their exceptional ability to mediate precise excision, integration and inversion of genomic DNA in living systems. The ever-increasing complexity of genome manipulations and the desire to understand the DNA-binding specificity of these enzymes are driving efforts to identify novel SSR systems with unique properties. Here, we describe two novel tyrosine site-specific recombination systems designated Nigri/nox and Panto/pox. Nigri originates from Vibrio nigripulchritudo (plasmid VIBNI_pA) and recombines its target site nox with high efficiency and high target-site selectivity, without recombining target sites of the well established SSRs Cre, Dre, Vika and VCre. Panto, derived from Pantoea sp. aB, is less specific and in addition to its native target site, pox also recombines the target site for Dre recombinase, called rox. This relaxed specificity allowed the identification of residues that are involved in target site selectivity, thereby advancing our understanding of how SSRs recognize their respective DNA targets. PMID:27444945

  19. Discovery of Nigri/nox and Panto/pox site-specific recombinase systems facilitates advanced genome engineering

    PubMed Central

    Karimova, Madina; Splith, Victoria; Karpinski, Janet; Pisabarro, M. Teresa; Buchholz, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Precise genome engineering is instrumental for biomedical research and holds great promise for future therapeutic applications. Site-specific recombinases (SSRs) are valuable tools for genome engineering due to their exceptional ability to mediate precise excision, integration and inversion of genomic DNA in living systems. The ever-increasing complexity of genome manipulations and the desire to understand the DNA-binding specificity of these enzymes are driving efforts to identify novel SSR systems with unique properties. Here, we describe two novel tyrosine site-specific recombination systems designated Nigri/nox and Panto/pox. Nigri originates from Vibrio nigripulchritudo (plasmid VIBNI_pA) and recombines its target site nox with high efficiency and high target-site selectivity, without recombining target sites of the well established SSRs Cre, Dre, Vika and VCre. Panto, derived from Pantoea sp. aB, is less specific and in addition to its native target site, pox also recombines the target site for Dre recombinase, called rox. This relaxed specificity allowed the identification of residues that are involved in target site selectivity, thereby advancing our understanding of how SSRs recognize their respective DNA targets. PMID:27444945

  20. Lagrangian reduction of generalized nonholonomic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cendra, Hernán; Ferraro, Sebastián; Grillo, Sergio

    2008-10-01

    In this paper we study the Lagrangian reduction of generalized nonholonomic systems (GNHS) with symmetry. We restrict ourselves to those GNHS, defined on a configuration space Q, with kinematic constraints given by a general submanifold CK⊂TQ, and variational constraints given by a distribution CV on Q. We develop a reduction procedure that is similar to that for nonholonomic systems satisfying d'Alembert's principle, i.e. with CK a distribution and CV=CK. Special care is taken in identifying the geometrical structures and mappings involved. We illustrate the general theory with an example.

  1. 40 CFR 90.319 - NOX converter check.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Provisions § 90.319 NOX converter check. (a) The efficiency of the converter used for the conversion of NO2... percent of the NO concentration). The NOX analyzer must be in the NO mode so that the span gas does not... the highest range which will give the reduction. (6) Switch the NO analyzer to the NOX mode...

  2. 40 CFR 90.319 - NOX converter check.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Provisions § 90.319 NOX converter check. (a) The efficiency of the converter used for the conversion of NO2... percent of the NO concentration). The NOX analyzer must be in the NO mode so that the span gas does not... the highest range which will give the reduction. (6) Switch the NO analyzer to the NOX mode...

  3. 40 CFR 90.319 - NOX converter check.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Provisions § 90.319 NOX converter check. (a) The efficiency of the converter used for the conversion of NO2... percent of the NO concentration). The NOX analyzer must be in the NO mode so that the span gas does not... the highest range which will give the reduction. (6) Switch the NO analyzer to the NOX mode...

  4. Integrated Dry NOx/SO2 Emissions Control System, A DOE Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    National Energy Technology Laboratory

    2001-10-01

    The goal of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Clean Coal Technology (CCT) Program is to furnish the energy marketplace with a number of advanced, more efficient, and environmentally responsible coal utilization technologies through demonstration projects. These projects seek to establish the commercial feasibility of the most promising advanced coal technologies that have developed beyond the proof-of-concept stage. This document serves as a DOE post-project assessment (PPA) of a project selected in CCT Round III, the Integrated Dry NO{sub x}/SO{sub 2} Emissions Control System (IDECS), as described in a Report to Congress (U.S. Department of Energy 1991). The desire to reduce emissions of nitrogen oxides (NO, nitric oxide, and NO{sub 2}, nitrogen dioxide, collectively referred to as NO{sub x}) and sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) by up to 70 percent at a minimum capital expenditure, while limiting waste production to dry solids that can be handled by conventional ash-removal equipment, prompted Public Service Company of Colorado (PSCC) to submit the proposal for the IDECS project. In March 1991, PSCC entered into a cooperative agreement with DOE to conduct the study. The project was sited at PSCC's Arapahoe Steam Electric Generating Station in Denver, Colorado. The purpose of this CCT project was to demonstrate the reduction of NO{sub x} and SO{sub 2} emissions by installing a combination of existing and emerging technologies, which were expected to work synergistically to reduce emissions. The technologies were low-NO{sub x} burners (LNBS), overfire air (OFA), and selective noncatalytic reduction (SNCR) for NO{sub x} reduction; and dry sorbent injection (DSI), both with and without flue-gas humidification (FGH), for SO{sub 2} reduction. DOE provided 50 percent of the total project funding of $26.2 million.

  5. Cryogenic Boil-Off Reduction System Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plachta, David W.; Johnson, Wesley L.; Feller, Jeffery

    2014-01-01

    The Cryogenic Boil-Off Reduction System was tested with LH2 and LOX in a vacuum chamber to simulate space vacuum and the temperatures of low Earth orbit. Testing was successful and results validated the scaling study model that predicts active cooling reduces upper stage cryogenic propulsion mass for loiter periods greater than 2 weeks.

  6. Intraocular pressure reduction and regulation system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baehr, E. F.; Burnett, J. E.; Felder, S. F.; Mcgannon, W. J.

    1979-01-01

    An intraocular pressure reduction and regulation system is described and data are presented covering performance in: (1) reducing intraocular pressure to a preselected value, (2) maintaining a set minimum intraocular pressure, and (3) reducing the dynamic increases in intraocular pressure resulting from external loads applied to the eye.

  7. Robotic system for glovebox size reduction

    SciTech Connect

    KWOK,KWAN S.; MCDONALD,MICHAEL J.

    2000-03-02

    The Intelligent Systems and Robotics Center (ISRC) at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) is developing technologies for glovebox size reduction in the DOE nuclear complex. A study was performed for Kaiser-Hill (KH) at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS) on the available technologies for size reducing the glovebox lines that require size reduction in place. Currently, the baseline approach to these glovebox lines is manual operations using conventional mechanical cutting methods. The study has been completed and resulted in a concept of the robotic system for in-situ size reduction. The concept makes use of commercially available robots that are used in the automotive industry. The commercially available industrial robots provide high reliability and availability that are required for environmental remediation in the DOE complex. Additionally, the costs of commercial robots are about one-fourth that of the custom made robots for environmental remediation. The reason for the lower costs and the higher reliability is that there are thousands of commercial robots made annually, whereas there are only a few custom robots made for environmental remediation every year. This paper will describe the engineering analysis approach used in the design of the robotic system for glovebox size reduction.

  8. Intelligent data reduction for autonomous power systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Floyd, Stephen A.

    1988-01-01

    Since 1984 Marshall Space Flight Center was actively engaged in research and development concerning autonomous power systems. Much of the work in this domain has dealt with the development and application of knowledge-based or expert systems to perform tasks previously accomplished only through intensive human involvement. One such task is the health status monitoring of electrical power systems. Such monitoring is a manpower intensive task which is vital to mission success. The Hubble Space Telescope testbed and its associated Nickel Cadmium Battery Expert System (NICBES) were designated as the system on which the initial proof of concept for intelligent power system monitoing will be established. The key function performed by an engineer engaged in system monitoring is to analyze the raw telemetry data and identify from the whole only those elements which can be considered significant. This function requires engineering expertise on the functionality of the system, the mode of operation and the efficient and effective reading of the telemetry data. Application of this expertise to extract the significant components of the data is referred to as data reduction. Such a function possesses characteristics which make it a prime candidate for the application of knowledge-based systems' technologies. Such applications are investigated and recommendations are offered for the development of intelligent data reduction systems.

  9. Advanced CO2 Removal and Reduction System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alptekin, Gokhan; Dubovik, Margarita; Copeland, Robert J.

    2011-01-01

    An advanced system for removing CO2 and H2O from cabin air, reducing the CO2, and returning the resulting O2 to the air is less massive than is a prior system that includes two assemblies . one for removal and one for reduction. Also, in this system, unlike in the prior system, there is no need to compress and temporarily store CO2. In this present system, removal and reduction take place within a single assembly, wherein removal is effected by use of an alkali sorbent and reduction is effected using a supply of H2 and Ru catalyst, by means of the Sabatier reaction, which is CO2 + 4H2 CH4 + O2. The assembly contains two fixed-bed reactors operating in alternation: At first, air is blown through the first bed, which absorbs CO2 and H2O. Once the first bed is saturated with CO2 and H2O, the flow of air is diverted through the second bed and the first bed is regenerated by supplying it with H2 for the Sabatier reaction. Initially, the H2 is heated to provide heat for the regeneration reaction, which is endothermic. In the later stages of regeneration, the Sabatier reaction, which is exothermic, supplies the heat for regeneration.

  10. Selective NOx Recirculation for Stationary Lean-Burn Natural Gas Engines

    SciTech Connect

    Nigel N. Clark

    2006-12-31

    Nitric oxide (NO) and nitrogen dioxide (NO2) generated by internal combustion (IC) engines are implicated in adverse environmental and health effects. Even though lean-burn natural gas engines have traditionally emitted lower oxides of nitrogen (NOx) emissions compared to their diesel counterparts, natural gas engines are being further challenged to reduce NOx emissions to 0.1 g/bhp-hr. The Selective NOx Recirculation (SNR) approach for NOx reduction involves cooling the engine exhaust gas and then adsorbing the NOx from the exhaust stream, followed by the periodic desorption of NOx. By sending the desorbed NOx back into the intake and through the engine, a percentage of the NOx can be decomposed during the combustion process. SNR technology has the support of the Department of Energy (DOE), under the Advanced Reciprocating Engine Systems (ARES) program to reduce NOx emissions to under 0.1 g/bhp-hr from stationary natural gas engines by 2010. The NO decomposition phenomenon was studied using two Cummins L10G natural gas fueled spark-ignited (SI) engines in three experimental campaigns. It was observed that the air/fuel ratio ({lambda}), injected NO quantity, added exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) percentage, and engine operating points affected NOx decomposition rates within the engine. Chemical kinetic model predictions using the software package CHEMKIN were performed to relate the experimental data with established rate and equilibrium models. The model was used to predict NO decomposition during lean-burn, stoichiometric burn, and slightly rich-burn cases with added EGR. NOx decomposition rates were estimated from the model to be from 35 to 42% for the lean-burn cases and from 50 to 70% for the rich-burn cases. The modeling results provided an insight as to how to maximize NOx decomposition rates for the experimental engine. Results from this experiment along with chemical kinetic modeling solutions prompted the investigation of rich-burn operating conditions

  11. Reduction of Fe(III)EDTA(-) in a NO(x) scrubbing solution by magnetic Fe3O4-chitosan microspheres immobilized mixed culture of iron-reducing bacteria.

    PubMed

    Jing, Guohua; Zhou, Jin; Zhou, Zuoming; Lin, Tianming

    2012-03-01

    Magnetic Fe(3)O(4)-chitosan microspheres were prepared by co-precipitating of Fe(2+) and Fe(3+) ions with NaOH in the presence of chitosan. The saturated magnetization of the resulting material was 20.0 emu/g. Then these magnetic microspheres were employed to immobilize iron-reducing bacteria to improve the biological reduction of Fe(III)EDTA(-), which was one of the key steps in nitrogen oxides (NO(x)) removal by the integrated chemical absorption-biological reduction process. The immobilized bacteria performed well on Fe(III)EDTA(-) reduction than free bacteria, even under unfavorable pH and temperatures. Furthermore, the effects of NO(2)(-), NO(3)(-), SO(3)(-), and S(2-), the potential inhibition compounds in the scrubber solution, on the reduction of Fe(III)EDTA(-) by the immobilized and free bacteria were also studied. PMID:22281145

  12. PVN adenovirus-siRNA injections silencing either NOX2 or NOX4 attenuate aldosterone/NaCl-induced hypertension in mice.

    PubMed

    Xue, Baojian; Beltz, Terry G; Johnson, Ralph F; Guo, Fang; Hay, Meredith; Johnson, Alan Kim

    2012-02-01

    Mineralocorticoid excess increases superoxide production by activating NADPH oxidase (NOX), and intracerebroventricular infusions of NADPH oxidase inhibitors attenuate aldosterone (Aldo)/salt-induced hypertension. It has been hypothesized that increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the brain may be a key mechanism in the development of hypertension. The present study investigated the brain regional specificity of NADPH oxidase and the role of NOX2 and NOX4 NADPH oxidase subunits in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN) in Aldo/salt-induced hypertension. PVN injections of adenoviral vectors expressing small interfering (si)RNA targeting NOX2 (AdsiRNA-NOX2) or NOX4 (AdsiRNA-NOX4) mRNAs were used to knock down NOX2 and NOX4 proteins. Three days later, delivery of Aldo (0.2 mg·kg(-1)·day(-1) sc) via osmotic pump commenced and 1% NaCl was provided in place of water. PVN injections of either AdsiRNA-NOX2 or AdsiRNA-NOX4 significantly attenuated the development of Aldo/NaCl-induced hypertension. In an additional study, Aldo/salt-induced hypertension was also significantly attenuated in NOX2 (genomic) knockout mice compared with wild-type controls. When animals from both functional studies underwent ganglionic blockade, there was a reduced fall in blood pressure in the NOX2 and NOX4 knockdown/knockout mice. Western blot analyses of the PVN of siRNA-NOX2- or siRNA-NOX4-injected mice confirmed a marked reduction in the expression of NOX2 or NOX4 protein. In cultured PVN neurons, silencing either NOX2 or NOX4 protein production by culturing PVN cells with siRNA-NOX2 or siRNA-NOX4 attenuated Aldo-induced ROS. These data indicate that both NOX2 and NOX4 in the PVN contribute to elevated sympathetic activity and the hypertensivogenic actions induced by mineralocorticoid excess. PMID:22140041

  13. 40 CFR 97.154 - Compliance with CAIR NOX emissions limitation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Compliance with CAIR NOX emissions... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS CAIR NOX Allowance Tracking System § 97.154 Compliance with CAIR NOX emissions limitation. (a) Allowance...

  14. 40 CFR 97.153 - Recordation of CAIR NOX allowance allocations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Recordation of CAIR NOX allowance... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS CAIR NOX Allowance Tracking System § 97.153 Recordation of CAIR NOX allowance allocations. (a) By September 30,...

  15. 40 CFR 96.154 - Compliance with CAIR NOX emissions limitation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Compliance with CAIR NOX emissions... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS FOR STATE IMPLEMENTATION PLANS CAIR NOX Allowance Tracking System § 96.154 Compliance with CAIR NOX emissions...

  16. 40 CFR 96.153 - Recordation of CAIR NOX allowance allocations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Recordation of CAIR NOX allowance... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS FOR STATE IMPLEMENTATION PLANS CAIR NOX Allowance Tracking System § 96.153 Recordation of CAIR NOX allowance...

  17. 40 CFR 97.354 - Compliance with CAIR NOX emissions limitation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Compliance with CAIR NOX emissions... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS CAIR NOX Ozone Season Allowance Tracking System § 97.354 Compliance with CAIR NOX emissions limitation....

  18. 40 CFR 96.354 - Compliance with CAIR NOX emissions limitation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Compliance with CAIR NOX emissions... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS FOR STATE IMPLEMENTATION PLANS CAIR NOX Ozone Season Allowance Tracking System § 96.354 Compliance with CAIR NOX...

  19. 40 CFR 97.153 - Recordation of CAIR NOX allowance allocations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Recordation of CAIR NOX allowance... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS CAIR NOX Allowance Tracking System § 97.153 Recordation of CAIR NOX allowance allocations. (a) By September 30,...

  20. 40 CFR 97.154 - Compliance with CAIR NOX emissions limitation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Compliance with CAIR NOX emissions... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS CAIR NOX Allowance Tracking System § 97.154 Compliance with CAIR NOX emissions limitation. (a) Allowance...

  1. 40 CFR 97.354 - Compliance with CAIR NOX emissions limitation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Compliance with CAIR NOX emissions... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS CAIR NOX Ozone Season Allowance Tracking System § 97.354 Compliance with CAIR NOX emissions limitation....

  2. 40 CFR 97.154 - Compliance with CAIR NOX emissions limitation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Compliance with CAIR NOX emissions... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS CAIR NOX Allowance Tracking System § 97.154 Compliance with CAIR NOX emissions limitation. (a) Allowance...

  3. 40 CFR 97.354 - Compliance with CAIR NOX emissions limitation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Compliance with CAIR NOX emissions... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS CAIR NOX Ozone Season Allowance Tracking System § 97.354 Compliance with CAIR NOX emissions limitation....

  4. 40 CFR 96.153 - Recordation of CAIR NOX allowance allocations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Recordation of CAIR NOX allowance... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS FOR STATE IMPLEMENTATION PLANS CAIR NOX Allowance Tracking System § 96.153 Recordation of CAIR NOX allowance...

  5. 40 CFR 96.154 - Compliance with CAIR NOX emissions limitation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Compliance with CAIR NOX emissions... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS FOR STATE IMPLEMENTATION PLANS CAIR NOX Allowance Tracking System § 96.154 Compliance with CAIR NOX emissions...

  6. 40 CFR 96.153 - Recordation of CAIR NOX allowance allocations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Recordation of CAIR NOX allowance... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS FOR STATE IMPLEMENTATION PLANS CAIR NOX Allowance Tracking System § 96.153 Recordation of CAIR NOX allowance...

  7. 40 CFR 97.153 - Recordation of CAIR NOX allowance allocations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Recordation of CAIR NOX allowance... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS CAIR NOX Allowance Tracking System § 97.153 Recordation of CAIR NOX allowance allocations. (a) By September 30,...

  8. 40 CFR 97.153 - Recordation of CAIR NOX allowance allocations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Recordation of CAIR NOX allowance... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS CAIR NOX Allowance Tracking System § 97.153 Recordation of CAIR NOX allowance allocations. (a) By September 30,...

  9. Incomplete Dirac reduction of constrained Hamiltonian systems

    SciTech Connect

    Chandre, C.

    2015-10-15

    First-class constraints constitute a potential obstacle to the computation of a Poisson bracket in Dirac’s theory of constrained Hamiltonian systems. Using the pseudoinverse instead of the inverse of the matrix defined by the Poisson brackets between the constraints, we show that a Dirac–Poisson bracket can be constructed, even if it corresponds to an incomplete reduction of the original Hamiltonian system. The uniqueness of Dirac brackets is discussed. The relevance of this procedure for infinite dimensional Hamiltonian systems is exemplified.

  10. Low absorption vitreous carbon reactors for operando XAS: a case study on Cu/Zeolites for selective catalytic reduction of NO(x) by NH3.

    PubMed

    Kispersky, Vincent F; Kropf, A Jeremy; Ribeiro, Fabio H; Miller, Jeffrey T

    2012-02-21

    We describe the use of vitreous carbon as an improved reactor material for an operando X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) plug-flow reactor. These tubes significantly broaden the operating range for operando experiments. Using selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NO(x) by NH(3) on Cu/Zeolites (SSZ-13, SAPO-34 and ZSM-5) as an example reaction, we illustrate the high-quality XAS data achievable with these reactors. The operando experiments showed that in Standard SCR conditions of 300 ppm NO, 300 ppm NH(3), 5% O(2), 5% H(2)O, 5% CO(2) and balance He at 200 °C, the Cu was a mixture of Cu(I) and Cu(II) oxidation states. XANES and EXAFS fitting found the percent of Cu(I) to be 15%, 45% and 65% for SSZ-13, SAPO-34 and ZSM-5, respectively. For Standard SCR, the catalytic rates per mole of Cu for Cu/SSZ-13 and Cu/SAPO-34 were about one third of the rate per mole of Cu on Cu/ZSM-5. Based on the apparent lack of correlation of rate with the presence of Cu(I), we propose that the reaction occurs via a redox cycle of Cu(I) and Cu(II). Cu(I) was not found in in situ SCR experiments on Cu/Zeolites under the same conditions, demonstrating a possible pitfall of in situ measurements. A Cu/SiO(2) catalyst, reduced in H(2) at 300 °C, was also used to demonstrate the reactor's operando capabilities using a bending magnet beamline. Analysis of the EXAFS data showed the Cu/SiO(2) catalyst to be in a partially reduced Cu metal-Cu(I) state. In addition to improvements in data quality, the reactors are superior in temperature, stability, strength and ease of use compared to previously proposed borosilicate glass, polyimide tubing, beryllium and capillary reactors. The solid carbon tubes are non-porous, machinable, can be operated at high pressure (tested at 25 bar), are inert, have high material purity and high X-ray transmittance. PMID:22158950

  11. Low absorption vitreous carbon reactors for operando XAS: a case study on Cu/Zeolites for selective catalytic reduction of NO(x) by NH3.

    PubMed

    Kispersky, Vincent F; Kropf, A Jeremy; Ribeiro, Fabio H; Miller, Jeffrey T

    2012-02-21

    We describe the use of vitreous carbon as an improved reactor material for an operando X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) plug-flow reactor. These tubes significantly broaden the operating range for operando experiments. Using selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NO(x) by NH(3) on Cu/Zeolites (SSZ-13, SAPO-34 and ZSM-5) as an example reaction, we illustrate the high-quality XAS data achievable with these reactors. The operando experiments showed that in Standard SCR conditions of 300 ppm NO, 300 ppm NH(3), 5% O(2), 5% H(2)O, 5% CO(2) and balance He at 200 °C, the Cu was a mixture of Cu(I) and Cu(II) oxidation states. XANES and EXAFS fitting found the percent of Cu(I) to be 15%, 45% and 65% for SSZ-13, SAPO-34 and ZSM-5, respectively. For Standard SCR, the catalytic rates per mole of Cu for Cu/SSZ-13 and Cu/SAPO-34 were about one third of the rate per mole of Cu on Cu/ZSM-5. Based on the apparent lack of correlation of rate with the presence of Cu(I), we propose that the reaction occurs via a redox cycle of Cu(I) and Cu(II). Cu(I) was not found in in situ SCR experiments on Cu/Zeolites under the same conditions, demonstrating a possible pitfall of in situ measurements. A Cu/SiO(2) catalyst, reduced in H(2) at 300 °C, was also used to demonstrate the reactor's operando capabilities using a bending magnet beamline. Analysis of the EXAFS data showed the Cu/SiO(2) catalyst to be in a partially reduced Cu metal-Cu(I) state. In addition to improvements in data quality, the reactors are superior in temperature, stability, strength and ease of use compared to previously proposed borosilicate glass, polyimide tubing, beryllium and capillary reactors. The solid carbon tubes are non-porous, machinable, can be operated at high pressure (tested at 25 bar), are inert, have high material purity and high X-ray transmittance.

  12. Discovery of Novel NOx Catalysts for CIDI Applications by High-throughput Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Blint, Richard J.

    2007-12-31

    DOE project DE-PS26-00NT40758 has developed very active, lean exhaust, NOx reduction catalysts that have been tested on the discovery system, laboratory reactors and engine dynamometer systems. The goal of this project is the development of effective, affordable NOx reduction catalysts for lean combustion engines in the US light duty vehicle market which can meet Tier II emission standards with hydrocarbons based reductants for reducing NOx. General Motors (prime contractor) along with subcontractors BASF (Engelhard) (a catalytic converter developer) and ACCELRYS (an informatics supplier) carried out this project which began in August of 2002. BASF (Engelhard) has run over 16,000 tests of 6100 possible catalytic materials on a high throughput discovery system suitable for automotive catalytic materials. Accelrys developed a new database informatics system which allowed material tracking and data mining. A program catalyst was identified and evaluated at all levels of the program. Dynamometer evaluations of the program catalyst both with and without additives show 92% NOx conversions on the HWFET, 76% on the US06, 60% on the cold FTP and 65% on the Set 13 heavy duty test using diesel fuel. Conversions of over 92% on the heavy duty FTP using ethanol as a second fluid reductant have been measured. These can be competitive with both of the alternative lean NOx reduction technologies presently in the market. Conversions of about 80% were measured on the EUDC for lean gasoline applications without using active dosing to adjust the C:N ratio for optimum NOx reduction at all points in the certification cycle. A feasibility analysis has been completed and demonstrates the advantages and disadvantages of the technology using these materials compared with other potential technologies. The teaming agreements among the partners contain no obstacles to commercialization of new technologies to any potential catalyst customers.

  13. Failure detection system risk reduction assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aguilar, Robert B. (Inventor); Huang, Zhaofeng (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A process includes determining a probability of a failure mode of a system being analyzed reaching a failure limit as a function of time to failure limit, determining a probability of a mitigation of the failure mode as a function of a time to failure limit, and quantifying a risk reduction based on the probability of the failure mode reaching the failure limit and the probability of the mitigation.

  14. Reduction of Fuel Consumption and Exhaust Pollutant Using Intelligent Transport Systems

    PubMed Central

    Nasir, Mostofa Kamal; Md Noor, Rafidah; Kalam, M. A.; Masum, B. M.

    2014-01-01

    Greenhouse gas emitted by the transport sector around the world is a serious issue of concern. To minimize such emission the automobile engineers have been working relentlessly. Researchers have been trying hard to switch fossil fuel to alternative fuels and attempting to various driving strategies to make traffic flow smooth and to reduce traffic congestion and emission of greenhouse gas. Automobile emits a massive amount of pollutants such as Carbon Monoxide (CO), hydrocarbons (HC), carbon dioxide (CO2), particulate matter (PM), and oxides of nitrogen (NOx). Intelligent transport system (ITS) technologies can be implemented to lower pollutant emissions and reduction of fuel consumption. This paper investigates the ITS techniques and technologies for the reduction of fuel consumption and minimization of the exhaust pollutant. It highlights the environmental impact of the ITS application to provide the state-of-art green solution. A case study also advocates that ITS technology reduces fuel consumption and exhaust pollutant in the urban environment. PMID:25032239

  15. Conceptual design of a data reduction system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    A telemetry data processing system was defined of the Data Reduction. Data reduction activities in support of the developmental flights of the Space Shuttle were used as references against which requirements are assessed in general terms. A conceptual system design believed to offer significant throughput for the anticipated types of data reduction activities is presented. The design identifies the use of a large, intermediate data store as a key element in a complex of high speed, single purpose processors, each of which performs predesignated, repetitive operations on either raw or partially processed data. The recommended approach to implement the design concept is to adopt an established interface standard and rely heavily on mature or promising technologies which are considered main stream of the integrated circuit industry. The design system concept, is believed to be implementable without reliance on exotic devices and/or operational procedures. Numerical methods were employed to examine the feasibility of digital discrimination of FDM composite signals, and of eliminating line frequency noises in data measurements.

  16. Nox regulation of smooth muscle contraction.

    PubMed

    Ritsick, Darren R; Edens, William A; Finnerty, Victoria; Lambeth, J David

    2007-07-01

    The catalytic subunit gp91phox (Nox2) of the NADPH oxidase of mammalian phagocytes is activated by microbes and immune mediators to produce large amounts of reactive oxygen species (ROS) which participate in microbial killing. Homologs of gp91phox, the Nox and Duox enzymes, were recently described in a range of organisms, including plants, vertebrates, and invertebrates such as Drosophila melanogaster. While their enzymology and cell biology are being extensively studied in many laboratories, little is known about in vivo functions of Noxes. Here, we establish and use an inducible system for RNAi to discover functions of dNox, an ortholog of human Nox5 in Drosophila. We report here that depletion of dNox in musculature causes retention of mature eggs within ovaries, leading to female sterility. In dNox-depleted ovaries and ovaries treated with a Nox inhibitor, muscular contractions induced by the neuropeptide proctolin are markedly inhibited. This functional defect results from a requirement for dNox-for the proctolin-induced calcium flux in Drosophila ovaries. Thus, these studies demonstrate a novel biological role for Nox-generated ROS in mediating agonist-induced calcium flux and smooth muscle contraction.

  17. NOx and N2O fluxes in a nitrogen-enriched European spruce forest soil under experimental long-term reduction of nitrogen depositions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eickenscheidt, Nadine; Brumme, Rainer

    2012-12-01

    European temperate forest soils have been exposed to elevated nitrogen (N) and acid depositions for decades. High nitrous oxide (N2O) and nitric oxide (NO) emissions have been reported from these forests. Since the 1980s, a decline in atmospheric deposition rates has been occurring. Our study addressed the question as to how N oxide fluxes and N turnover processes have changed in response to the declining N depositions in a N-enriched spruce stand (Picea abies (L.) Karst.). Studies were conducted at the Solling roof site under a control-roof with ambient depositions and under a reduced-N-input-roof where N and acid depositions have been reduced to a pre-industrial level for 16-17 years. Open dynamic and closed chamber methods were used to determine NOx and N2O fluxes, respectively, and in situ incubation studies were conducted to measure net N mineralisation. Under the reduced deposition roof, net nitrification and nitrate in soil solution were reduced to undetectable levels causing the soil to change from a net source for NOx (0.62 ± 0.24 kg N ha-1 yr-1) into a net sink (-0.33 ± 0.01 kg N ha-1 yr-1). The uptake of NOx was exclusively controlled by the NOx concentrations of the forest air. Reversal of N enrichment did not affect annual N2O fluxes (0.08 kg N ha-1 yr-1) due to restricted denitrification in the well-aerated organic layer, but the origin of nitrate for denitrification changed from mainly soil-borne N to exclusively deposited N. It was demonstrated that less than two decades of reduced N and acid depositions are sufficient to reduce the surplus N and NOx emissions of this soil.

  18. “Dynamic evaluation of the CMAQv5.0 modeling system: Assessing the model’s ability to simulate ozone changes due to NOx emission reductions”

    EPA Science Inventory

    Dynamic evaluation of the CMAQv5.0 modeling system during the NOx SIP Call time period indicates that the model underestimates the observed ozone decrease in eastern U.S. Utilizing novel cross simulations we are able to separately quantify the impact on ozone predictions stemmin...

  19. Preparation of zeolite supported TiO2, ZnO and ZrO2 and the study on their catalytic activity in NOx reduction and 1-pentanol dehydration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fatimah, Is

    2016-03-01

    Preparation of zeolite supported TiO2, ZnO and ZrO2 and their catalytic activity was studied. Activated natural zeolite from Indonesia was utilized for the preparation and catalytic activity test on NOx reduction by NH3 and also 1-pentanol dehydration were examined. Physicochemical characterization of materials was studied by x-ray diffraction (XRD) measurement, scanning electron microscope, solid acidity determination and also gas sorption analysis. The results confirmed that the preparation gives some improvements on physicochemical characters suitable for catalysis mechanism in those reactions. Solid acidity and specific surface area contributed significantly to the activity.

  20. Full-Scale Demonstration Low-NOx Cell Burner retrofit

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-05-24

    The overall objective of the Full-Scale Low-NOx Cell (LNC) Burner Retrofit project is to demonstrate the cost-effective reduction of NOx generated by a large, base-loaded (70% capacity factor or greater), coal-fired utility boiler. Specific objectives include: at least 50% NOx reduction over standard two-nozzle cell burners, without degradation of boiler performance or life; acquire and evaluate emission and boiler performance data before and after the retrofit to determine NOx reduction and impact on overall boiler performance; and demonstrate that the LNC burner retrofits are the most cost-effective alternative to emerging, or commercially- available NOx control technology for units equipped with cell burners. The focus of this demonstration is to determine maximum NOx reduction capabilities without adversely impacting plant performance, operation and maintenance.

  1. Core-melt source reduction system

    DOEpatents

    Forsberg, Charles W.; Beahm, Edward C.; Parker, George W.

    1995-01-01

    A core-melt source reduction system for ending the progression of a molten core during a core-melt accident and resulting in a stable solid cool matrix. The system includes alternating layers of a core debris absorbing material and a barrier material. The core debris absorbing material serves to react with and absorb the molten core such that containment overpressurization and/or failure does not occur. The barrier material slows the progression of the molten core debris through the system such that the molten core has sufficient time to react with the core absorbing material. The system includes a provision for cooling the glass/molten core mass after the reaction such that a stable solid cool matrix results.

  2. Core-melt source reduction system

    DOEpatents

    Forsberg, C.W.; Beahm, E.C.; Parker, G.W.

    1995-04-25

    A core-melt source reduction system for ending the progression of a molten core during a core-melt accident and resulting in a stable solid cool matrix. The system includes alternating layers of a core debris absorbing material and a barrier material. The core debris absorbing material serves to react with and absorb the molten core such that containment overpressurization and/or failure does not occur. The barrier material slows the progression of the molten core debris through the system such that the molten core has sufficient time to react with the core absorbing material. The system includes a provision for cooling the glass/molten core mass after the reaction such that a stable solid cool matrix results. 4 figs.

  3. Reducing NOx Emissions for a 600 MWe Down-Fired Pulverized-Coal Utility Boiler by Applying a Novel Combustion System.

    PubMed

    Ma, Lun; Fang, Qingyan; Lv, Dangzhen; Zhang, Cheng; Chen, Yiping; Chen, Gang; Duan, Xuenong; Wang, Xihuan

    2015-11-01

    A novel combustion system was applied to a 600 MWe Foster Wheeler (FW) down-fired pulverized-coal utility boiler to solve high NOx emissions, without causing an obvious increase in the carbon content of fly ash. The unit included moving fuel-lean nozzles from the arches to the front/rear walls and rearranging staged air as well as introducing separated overfire air (SOFA). Numerical simulations were carried out under the original and novel combustion systems to evaluate the performance of combustion and NOx emissions in the furnace. The simulated results were found to be in good agreement with the in situ measurements. The novel combustion system enlarged the recirculation zones below the arches, thereby strengthening the combustion stability considerably. The coal/air downward penetration depth was markedly extended, and the pulverized-coal travel path in the lower furnace significantly increased, which contributed to the burnout degree. The introduction of SOFA resulted in a low-oxygen and strong-reducing atmosphere in the lower furnace region to reduce NOx emissions evidently. The industrial measurements showed that NOx emissions at full load decreased significantly by 50%, from 1501 mg/m3 (O2 at 6%) to 751 mg/m3 (O2 at 6%). The carbon content in the fly ash increased only slightly, from 4.13 to 4.30%. PMID:26452156

  4. Reducing NOx Emissions for a 600 MWe Down-Fired Pulverized-Coal Utility Boiler by Applying a Novel Combustion System.

    PubMed

    Ma, Lun; Fang, Qingyan; Lv, Dangzhen; Zhang, Cheng; Chen, Yiping; Chen, Gang; Duan, Xuenong; Wang, Xihuan

    2015-11-01

    A novel combustion system was applied to a 600 MWe Foster Wheeler (FW) down-fired pulverized-coal utility boiler to solve high NOx emissions, without causing an obvious increase in the carbon content of fly ash. The unit included moving fuel-lean nozzles from the arches to the front/rear walls and rearranging staged air as well as introducing separated overfire air (SOFA). Numerical simulations were carried out under the original and novel combustion systems to evaluate the performance of combustion and NOx emissions in the furnace. The simulated results were found to be in good agreement with the in situ measurements. The novel combustion system enlarged the recirculation zones below the arches, thereby strengthening the combustion stability considerably. The coal/air downward penetration depth was markedly extended, and the pulverized-coal travel path in the lower furnace significantly increased, which contributed to the burnout degree. The introduction of SOFA resulted in a low-oxygen and strong-reducing atmosphere in the lower furnace region to reduce NOx emissions evidently. The industrial measurements showed that NOx emissions at full load decreased significantly by 50%, from 1501 mg/m3 (O2 at 6%) to 751 mg/m3 (O2 at 6%). The carbon content in the fly ash increased only slightly, from 4.13 to 4.30%.

  5. Active role of the support in NOx storage and reductioncatalytic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tek, Mustafa; Ustunel, Hande; Toffoli, Daniele

    2015-11-01

    We present first-principles density functional theory calculations of the adsorption properties of NO2 and SO2 on isolated (BaO)n (n = 1, 2, 4, 6, 8, 9) clusters as well as on small BaO clusters ((BaO)n with n = 1, 2, 4) supported on the anatase TiO2(0 0 1) surface. The TiO2 support influences binding indirectly by enhancing the electron donation from the BaO clusters to both chemisorbed NO2 and the support. This support-mediated increase in stability is not observed for SO2. We describe in detail and highlight the role played by TiO2 on the charge transfer mechanism, which can be used to control the catalytic properties of the active components of nitrogen storage and reduction catalytic systems. The relatively larger activity of the supported BaO clusters towards NO2 adsorption in comparison to SO2 could in principle offer protection against sulfur poisoning.

  6. Excellent performance of one-pot synthesized Cu-SSZ-13 catalyst for the selective catalytic reduction of NOx with NH3.

    PubMed

    Xie, Lijuan; Liu, Fudong; Ren, Limin; Shi, Xiaoyan; Xiao, Feng-Shou; He, Hong

    2014-01-01

    Cu-SSZ-13 samples prepared by a novel one-pot synthesis method achieved excellent NH3-SCR performance and high N2 selectivity from 150 to 550 °C after ion exchange treatments. The selected Cu3.8-SSZ-13 catalyst was highly resistant to large space velocity (800 000 h(-1)) and also maintained high NOx conversion in the presence of CO2, H2O, and C3H6 in the simulated diesel exhaust. Isolated Cu(2+) ions located in three different sites were responsible for its excellent NH3-SCR activity. Primary results suggest that the one-pot synthesized Cu-SSZ-13 catalyst is a promising candidate as an NH3-SCR catalyst for the NOx abatement from diesel vehicles.

  7. Excellent performance of one-pot synthesized Cu-SSZ-13 catalyst for the selective catalytic reduction of NOx with NH3.

    PubMed

    Xie, Lijuan; Liu, Fudong; Ren, Limin; Shi, Xiaoyan; Xiao, Feng-Shou; He, Hong

    2014-01-01

    Cu-SSZ-13 samples prepared by a novel one-pot synthesis method achieved excellent NH3-SCR performance and high N2 selectivity from 150 to 550 °C after ion exchange treatments. The selected Cu3.8-SSZ-13 catalyst was highly resistant to large space velocity (800 000 h(-1)) and also maintained high NOx conversion in the presence of CO2, H2O, and C3H6 in the simulated diesel exhaust. Isolated Cu(2+) ions located in three different sites were responsible for its excellent NH3-SCR activity. Primary results suggest that the one-pot synthesized Cu-SSZ-13 catalyst is a promising candidate as an NH3-SCR catalyst for the NOx abatement from diesel vehicles. PMID:24295053

  8. Depleted uranium plasma reduction system study

    SciTech Connect

    Rekemeyer, P.; Feizollahi, F.; Quapp, W.J.; Brown, B.W.

    1994-12-01

    A system life-cycle cost study was conducted of a preliminary design concept for a plasma reduction process for converting depleted uranium to uranium metal and anhydrous HF. The plasma-based process is expected to offer significant economic and environmental advantages over present technology. Depleted Uranium is currently stored in the form of solid UF{sub 6}, of which approximately 575,000 metric tons is stored at three locations in the U.S. The proposed system is preconceptual in nature, but includes all necessary processing equipment and facilities to perform the process. The study has identified total processing cost of approximately $3.00/kg of UF{sub 6} processed. Based on the results of this study, the development of a laboratory-scale system (1 kg/h throughput of UF6) is warranted. Further scaling of the process to pilot scale will be determined after laboratory testing is complete.

  9. Cryogenic Propellant Boil-Off Reduction System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plachta, D. W.; Christie, R. J.; Carlberg, E.; Feller, J. R.

    2008-03-01

    Lunar missions under consideration would benefit from incorporation of high specific impulse propellants such as LH2 and LO2, even with their accompanying boil-off losses necessary to maintain a steady tank pressure. This paper addresses a cryogenic propellant boil-off reduction system to minimize or eliminate boil-off. Concepts to do so were considered under the In-Space Cryogenic Propellant Depot Project. Specific to that was an investigation of cryocooler integration concepts for relatively large depot sized propellant tanks. One concept proved promising—it served to efficiently move heat to the cryocooler even over long distances via a compressed helium loop. The analyses and designs for this were incorporated into NASA Glenn Research Center's Cryogenic Analysis Tool. That design approach is explained and shown herein. Analysis shows that, when compared to passive only cryogenic storage, the boil-off reduction system begins to reduce system mass if durations are as low as 40 days for LH2, and 14 days for LO2. In addition, a method of cooling LH2 tanks is presented that precludes development issues associated with LH2 temperature cryocoolers.

  10. Mesoscale convective systems observed during AMMA and their impact on the NOx and O3 budget over West Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huntrieser, H.; Schlager, H.; Lichtenstern, M.; Stock, P.; Hamburger, T.; Höller, H.; Schmidt, K.; Betz, H.-D.; Ulanovsky, A.; Ravegnani, F.

    2011-03-01

    During the "African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analysis" (AMMA) field phase in August 2006, a variety of measurements focusing on deep convection were performed over West Africa. The German research aircraft Falcon based in Ouagadougou (Burkina Faso) investigated the chemical composition in the outflow of large mesoscale convective systems (MCS). Here we analyse two different types of MCS originating north and south of the intertropical convergence zone (ITCZ, ~10° N), respectively. In addition to the airborne trace gas measurements, stroke measurements from the Lightning Location Network (LINET), set up in Northern Benin, are analysed. The main focus of the present study is (1) to analyse the trace gas composition (CO, O3, NO, NOx, NOy, and HCHO) in the convective outflow as a function of distance from the convective core, (2) to investigate how different trace gas compositions in the boundary layer (BL) and ambient air may influence the O3 concentration in the convective outflow, and (3) to estimate the rate of lightning-produced nitrogen oxides per flash in selected thunderstorms and compare it to our previous results for the tropics. The MCS outflow was probed at different altitudes (~10-12 km) and distances from the convective core (<500 km). Trace gas signatures similar to the conditions in the MCS inflow region were observed in the outflow close to the convective core, due to efficient vertical transport. In the fresh MCS outflow, low O3 mixing ratios in the range of 35-40 nmol mol-1 were observed. Further downwind, O3 mixing ratios in the outflow rapidly increased with distance, due to mixing with the ambient O3-rich air. After 2-3 h, O3 mixing ratios in the range of ~65 nmol mol-1 were observed in the aged outflow. Within the fresh MCS outflow, mean NOx (=NO+NO2) mixing ratios were in the range of ~0.3-0.4 nmol mol-1 (peaks ~1 nmol mol-1) and only slightly enhanced compared to the background. Both lightning-produced NOx (LNOx) and NOx transported upward

  11. Mesoscale convective systems observed during AMMA and their impact on the NOx and O3 budget over West Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huntrieser, H.; Schlager, H.; Lichtenstern, M.; Stock, P.; Hamburger, T.; Höller, H.; Schmidt, K.; Betz, H.-D.; Ulanovsky, A.; Ravegnani, F.

    2010-10-01

    During the "African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analysis" (AMMA) field phase in August 2006, a variety of measurements focusing on deep convection were performed over West Africa. The German research aircraft Falcon based in Ouagadougou (Burkina Faso) investigated the chemical composition in the outflow of large mesoscale convective systems (MCS). Here we analyse two different types of MCS originating north and south of the intertropical convergence zone (ITCZ, ~10° N), respectively. In addition to the airborne trace gas measurements, stroke measurements from the Lightning Location Network (LINET), set up in Northern Benin, are analysed. The main focus of the present study is 1) to analyse the trace gas composition (CO, O3, NO, NOx, NOy, and HCHO) in the convective outflow as a function of distance from the convective core, 2) to investigate how different trace gas compositions in the boundary layer (BL) and ambient air may influence the O3 concentration in the convective outflow, and 3) to estimate the rate of lightning-produced nitrogen oxides per flash in selected thunderstorms and compare it to our previous results for the tropics. The MCS outflow was probed at different altitudes (~10-12 km) and distances from the convective core (<500 km). Trace gas signatures similar to the conditions in the MCS inflow region were observed in the outflow close to the convective core, due to efficient vertical transport. In the fresh MCS outflow, low O3 mixing ratios in the range of 35-40 nmol mol-1 were observed. Further downwind, O3 mixing ratios in the outflow rapidly increased with distance, due to mixing with the ambient O3-rich air. After 2-3 h, O3 mixing ratios in the range of ~65 nmol mol-1 were observed in the aged outflow. Within the fresh MCS outflow, mean NOx (=NO+NO2) mixing ratios were in the range of ~0.3-0.4 nmol mol-1 (peaks ~1 nmol mol-1) and only slightly enhanced compared to the background. Both lightning-produced NOx (LNOx) and NOx transported upward from

  12. NOx production in lightning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chameides, W. L.; Stedman, D. H.; Dickerson, R. R.; Rusch, D. W.; Cicerone, R. J.

    1977-01-01

    The rate of odd nitrogen (NOx) production by electrical discharge through air was theoretically and experimentally estimated to be about 60,000 trillion NOx molecules per joule. The theoretical treatment employed a cylindrical shock-wave solution to calculate the rate of NOx production in high temperature reactions. The limits obtained were experimentally verified by subjecting a regulated air flow to electrical discharges followed by a measurement of NOx production using chemiluminescence. These measurements also indicated that water vapor content has no detectable effect on the NOx production rate. The results imply that lightning is a significant source of NOx, producing about 30-40 megatons NOx-N per year and possibly accounting for as much as 50% of the total atmospheric NOx source.

  13. 40 CFR 75.71 - Specific provisions for monitoring NOX and heat input for the purpose of calculating NOX mass...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... and heat input for the purpose of calculating NOX mass emissions. 75.71 Section 75.71 Protection of... MONITORING NOX Mass Emissions Provisions § 75.71 Specific provisions for monitoring NOX and heat input for... and for a flow monitoring system and an O2 or CO2 diluent gas monitoring system to measure heat...

  14. 40 CFR 75.71 - Specific provisions for monitoring NOX and heat input for the purpose of calculating NOX mass...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... and heat input for the purpose of calculating NOX mass emissions. 75.71 Section 75.71 Protection of... MONITORING NOX Mass Emissions Provisions § 75.71 Specific provisions for monitoring NOX and heat input for... and for a flow monitoring system and an O2 or CO2 diluent gas monitoring system to measure heat...

  15. 40 CFR 75.71 - Specific provisions for monitoring NOX and heat input for the purpose of calculating NOX mass...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... and heat input for the purpose of calculating NOX mass emissions. 75.71 Section 75.71 Protection of... MONITORING NOX Mass Emissions Provisions § 75.71 Specific provisions for monitoring NOX and heat input for... and for a flow monitoring system and an O2 or CO2 diluent gas monitoring system to measure heat...

  16. The challenge to NOx emission control for heavy-duty diesel vehicles in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Y.; Zhang, S. J.; Li, M. L.; Ge, Y. S.; Shu, J. W.; Zhou, Y.; Xu, Y. Y.; Hu, J. N.; Liu, H.; Fu, L. X.; He, K. B.; Hao, J. M.

    2012-10-01

    China's new "Twelfth Five-Year Plan" set a target for total NOx emission reduction of 10% for the period of 2011-2015. Heavy-duty diesel vehicles (HDDVs) have been considered a major contributor to NOx emissions in China. Beijing initiated a comprehensive vehicle test program in 2008. This program included a sub-task for measuring on-road emission profiles of hundreds of HDDVs using portable emission measurement systems (PEMS). The major finding is that neither the on-road distance-specific (g km-1) nor brake-specific (g kWh-1) NOx emission factors for diesel buses and heavy-duty diesel trucks improved in most cases as emission standards became more stringent. For example, the average NOx emission factors for Euro II, Euro III and Euro IV buses are 11.3 ± 3.3 g km-1, 12.5 ± 1.3 g km-1, and 11.8 ± 2.0 g km-1, respectively. No statistically significant difference in NOx emission factors was observed between Euro II and III buses. Even for Euro IV buses equipped with SCR systems, the NOx emission factors are similar to Euro III buses. The data regarding real-time engine performance of Euro IV buses suggest the engine certification cycles did not reflect their real-world operating conditions. These new on-road test results indicate that previous estimates of total NOx emissions for HDDV fleet may be significantly underestimated. The new estimate in total NOx emissions for the Beijing HDDV fleet in 2009 is 37.0 Gg, an increase of 45% compared to the previous study. Further, we estimate that the total NOx emissions for the national HDDV fleet in 2009 are approximately 4.0 Tg, higher by 1.0 Tg (equivalent to 18% of total NOx emissions for vehicle fleet in 2009) than that estimated in the official report. This would also result in 4% increase in estimation of national anthropogenic NOx emissions. More effective control measures (such as promotion of CNG buses and a new in-use compliance testing program) are urged to secure the goal of total NOx mitigation for the HDDV

  17. LOW-CONCENTRATION NOX EMISSIONS MEASUREMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper gives results of a recent series of low-concentration nitrogen oxides (NOx) emission measurements, made by Midwest Research Institute (MRI) during U.S. EPA-sponsored Environmental Technology Verification (ETV) test of a NOx control system called Xonon (TM) Cool Combust...

  18. LOW NOX BURNER DEVELOPMENT

    SciTech Connect

    KRISHNA,C.R.; BUTCHER,T.

    2004-09-30

    The objective of the task is to develop concepts for ultra low NOx burners. One approach that has been tested previously uses internal recirculation of hot gases and the objective was to how to implement variable recirculation rates during burner operation. The second approach was to use fuel oil aerosolization (vaporization) and combustion in a porous medium in a manner similar to gas-fired radiant burners. This task is trying the second approach with the use of a somewhat novel, prototype system for aerosolization of the liquid fuel.

  19. Reduction of chlorofluorocarbon emissions from refrigeration systems

    SciTech Connect

    Cordova, A.; Kennicott, M.A.

    1992-09-01

    Recently enacted State and Federal legislation, (The Clean Air Act and Colorado Senate Bill 77), and the implementation of regulations for each, forbid the intentional release of ozone depleting chlorofluorocarbons(CFCs) from refrigeration and air conditioning systems to the atmosphere. In addition, an international agreement (The Montreal Protocol), calls for CFC manufacturing reductions, which began in 1991, and eventual discontinuation. The declining supply and resultant escalating costs of CFCs are additional driving forces toward conservation and reuse of present refrigerant resources. Rocky Flats Plant (RFP) currently has an estimated 42,000 pounds of CFCs in refrigeration and air conditioning systems. The purpose of this paper is to discuss steps being taken at RFP toward the abatement of CFC releases. The main thrust of our efforts is the use of a refrigerant management system, used to recover and recycle our current CFC stock. Additional methods of further reducing CFC emissions will also be discussed. These include the installation of state-of-the-art oil filtration systems on major chiller units, installation of spring-loaded pressure relief valves and the retrofitting of major chiller units to accept less harmful, alternative refrigerants.

  20. NOx emissions in China: historical trends and future perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, B.; Wang, S. X.; Xu, J. Y.; Fu, K.; Klimont, Z.; Hao, J. M.; He, K. B.; Cofala, J.; Amann, M.

    2013-06-01

    Nitrogen oxides (NOx) are key pollutants for the improvement of ambient air quality. Within this study we estimated the historical NOx emissions in China for the period 1995-2010, and calculated future NOx emissions every five years until 2030 under six emission scenarios. Driven by the fast growth of energy consumption, we estimate the NOx emissions in China increased rapidly from 11.0 Mt in 1995 to 26.1 Mt in 2010. Power plants, industry and transportation were major sources of NOx emissions, accounting for 28.4, 34.0, and 25.4% of the total NOx emissions in 2010, respectively. Two energy scenarios, a business as usual scenario (BAU) and an alternative policy scenario (PC), were developed to project future energy consumption. In 2030, total energy consumption is projected to increase by 64 and 27% from 2010 level respectively. Three sets of end-of-pipe pollution control measures, including baseline, progressive, and stringent control case, were developed for each energy scenario, thereby constituting six emission scenarios. By 2030, the total NOx emissions are projected to increase (compared to 2010) by 36% in the baseline while policy cases result in reduction up to 61% in the most ambitious case with stringent control measures. More than a third of the reduction achieved by 2030 between least and most ambitious scenario comes from power sector and more than half is distributed equally between industry and transportation sectors. Selective Catalytic Reduction dominates the NOx emission reductions in power plants, while life style changes, control measures for industrial boilers and cement production are major contributors to reductions in industry. Timely enforcement of legislation on heavy duty vehicles would contribute significantly to NOx emission reductions. About 30% of the NOx emission reduction in 2020, and 40% of the NOx emission reduction in 2030 could be treated as the ancillary benefit of energy conservation. Sensitivity analysis was conducted to

  1. NOx emissions in China: historical trends and future perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, B.; Wang, S. X.; Liu, H.; Xu, J. Y.; Fu, K.; Klimont, Z.; Hao, J. M.; He, K. B.; Cofala, J.; Amann, M.

    2013-10-01

    Nitrogen oxides (NOx) are key pollutants for the improvement of ambient air quality. Within this study we estimated the historical NOx emissions in China for the period 1995-2010, and calculated future NOx emissions every five years until 2030 under six emission scenarios. Driven by the fast growth of energy consumption, we estimate the NOx emissions in China increased rapidly from 11.0 Mt in 1995 to 26.1 Mt in 2010. Power plants, industry and transportation were major sources of NOx emissions, accounting for 28.4%, 34.0%, and 25.4% of the total NOx emissions in 2010, respectively. Two energy scenarios, a business as usual scenario (BAU) and an alternative policy scenario (PC), were developed to project future energy consumption. In 2030, total energy consumption is projected to increase by 64% and 27% from 2010 level respectively. Three sets of end-of-pipe pollution control measures, including baseline, progressive, and stringent control case, were developed for each energy scenario, thereby constituting six emission scenarios. By 2030, the total NOx emissions are projected to increase (compared to 2010) by 36% in the baseline while policy cases result in reduction up to 61% in the most ambitious case with stringent control measures. More than a third of the reduction achieved by 2030 between least and most ambitious scenario comes from power sector, and more than half is distributed equally between industry and transportation sectors. Selective catalytic reduction dominates the NOx emission reductions in power plants, while life style changes, control measures for industrial boilers and cement production are major contributors to reductions in industry. Timely enforcement of legislation on heavy-duty vehicles would contribute significantly to NOx emission reductions. About 30% of the NOx emission reduction in 2020 and 40% of the NOx emission reduction in 2030 could be treated as the ancillary benefit of energy conservation. Sensitivity analysis was conducted to

  2. Methods and systems for combustion dynamics reduction

    DOEpatents

    Kraemer, Gilbert Otto; Varatharajan, Balachandar; Srinivasan, Shiva; Lynch, John Joseph; Yilmaz, Ertan; Kim, Kwanwoo; Lacy, Benjamin; Crothers, Sarah; Singh, Kapil Kumar

    2009-08-25

    Methods and systems for combustion dynamics reduction are provided. A combustion chamber may include a first premixer and a second premixer. Each premixer may include at least one fuel injector, at least one air inlet duct, and at least one vane pack for at least partially mixing the air from the air inlet duct or ducts and fuel from the fuel injector or injectors. Each vane pack may include a plurality of fuel orifices through which at least a portion of the fuel and at least a portion of the air may pass. The vane pack or packs of the first premixer may be positioned at a first axial position and the vane pack or packs of the second premixer may be positioned at a second axial position axially staggered with respect to the first axial position.

  3. Promotional effect of Si-doped V2O5/TiO2 for selective catalytic reduction of NOx by NH3.

    PubMed

    Pan, Yanxiao; Zhao, Wei; Zhong, Qin; Cai, Wei; Li, Hongyu

    2013-08-01

    TiO2 supports doped with different amounts of Si were prepared by a sol-gel method, and 1 wt% vanadia (V2O5) loaded on Si-doped TiO2 was obtained by an impregnation method. The mole ratio of Si/Ti was 0.2, NOx conversion exceeds 94% at 300 degrees C and GHSV of 41,324 hr(-1), which is about 20% higher than pure V2O5/TiO2. The catalysts were characterized by XRD, BET, TEM, FT-IR, NH3-TPD, XPS, H2-TPR, Raman and in situ DRIFTS. The results of FT-IR and XPS indicated that Si was doped into the TiO2 lattice successfully and a solid solution was obtained. V2O5 active component could be dispersed well on the support with the increasing of surface area of the catalyst, which was confirmed by Raman and XRD results. Above all, the numbers of acid sites (especially the Brønsted-acid) and oxidation properties were enhanced for Si-doped V2O5/TiO2 catalysts, which improved the deNOx catalytic activity.

  4. Ultra Low NOx Catalytic Combustion for IGCC Power Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Shahrokh Etemad; Benjamin Baird; Sandeep Alavandi; William Pfefferle

    2008-03-31

    In order to meet DOE's goals of developing low-emissions coal-based power systems, PCI has further developed and adapted it's Rich-Catalytic Lean-burn (RCL{reg_sign}) catalytic reactor to a combustion system operating on syngas as a fuel. The technology offers ultra-low emissions without the cost of exhaust after-treatment, with high efficiency (avoidance of after-treatment losses and reduced diluent requirements), and with catalytically stabilized combustion which extends the lower Btu limit for syngas operation. Tests were performed in PCI's sub-scale high-pressure (10 atm) test rig, using a two-stage (catalytic then gas-phase) combustion process for syngas fuel. In this process, the first stage consists of a fuel-rich mixture reacting on a catalyst with final and excess combustion air used to cool the catalyst. The second stage is a gas-phase combustor, where the air used for cooling the catalyst mixes with the catalytic reactor effluent to provide for final gas-phase burnout and dilution to fuel-lean combustion products. During testing, operating with a simulated Tampa Electric's Polk Power Station syngas, the NOx emissions program goal of less than 0.03 lbs/MMBtu (6 ppm at 15% O{sub 2}) was met. NOx emissions were generally near 0.01 lbs/MMBtu (2 ppm at 15% O{sub 2}) (PCI's target) over a range on engine firing temperatures. In addition, low emissions were shown for alternative fuels including high hydrogen content refinery fuel gas and low BTU content Blast Furnace Gas (BFG). For the refinery fuel gas increased resistance to combustor flashback was achieved through preferential consumption of hydrogen in the catalytic bed. In the case of BFG, stable combustion for fuels as low as 88 BTU/ft{sup 3} was established and maintained without the need for using co-firing. This was achieved based on the upstream catalytic reaction delivering a hotter (and thus more reactive) product to the flame zone. The PCI catalytic reactor was also shown to be active in ammonia

  5. Use of SNCR as BACT for NOx control in boilers and municipal solid waste incinerators

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplan, M.

    1991-08-01

    The report presents an investigation into the present operational use of selective non-catalytic reduction (SNCR) as a method of NOx control in boilers and incinerators. Two patented forms of SNCR were researched; Exxon's Thermal DeNOx, which uses ammonia injection, and Fuel Tech's NOxOUT, which uses urea injection. A questionnaire was faxed to fifteen facilities in the United States that use ammonia injection systems, most of which are located in the Stockton, Delano and San Diego areas of EPA Region IX. No facilities were found in the United States that currently operate with NOxOUT or any other type of urea injection system. From the responses that were received, it can be concluded that SNCR is an effective and relatively inexpensive method of NOx control, achieving up to an 85 percent reduction efficiency with a capital cost ranging from $100,000 to $500,000 and a monthly cost of about $4,000 for ammonia and maintenance.

  6. Alternative control techniques document. NOx emissions from stationary gas turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Snyder, R.B.

    1993-01-01

    The Alternative Control Techniques document describes available control technologies for reducing NOx emissions levels from stationary combustion gas turbines. Information on the formation of NOx and uncontrolled NOx emissions from gas turbines is included. Water injection, steam injection, and low-NOx combustors, used independently or in combination with selective catalytic reduction (SCR), are discussed. Achievable controlled NOx emissions levels, costs and cost effectiveness, and environmental impacts are presented and applicability to new equipment as well as retrofit applications is discussed. The application of these technologies to gas turbines operating in offshore platform applications is included. Information on the use of alternate fuels, catalytic combustion, and selective noncatalytic reduction (SNCR) to reduce NOx emissions is also briefly presented.

  7. Nox and renal disease.

    PubMed

    Holterman, Chet E; Read, Naomi C; Kennedy, Chris R J

    2015-04-01

    Since the first demonstration of Nox enzyme expression in the kidney in the early 1990s and the subsequent identification of Nox4, or RENOX, a decade later, it has become apparent that the Nox family of reactive oxygen species (ROS) generating enzymes plays an integral role in the normal physiological function of the kidney. As our knowledge of Nox expression patterns and functions in various structures and specialized cell types within the kidney grows, so does the realization that Nox-derived oxidative stress contributes significantly to a wide variety of renal pathologies through their ability to modify lipids and proteins, damage DNA and activate transcriptional programmes. Diverse studies demonstrate key roles for Nox-derived ROS in kidney fibrosis, particularly in settings of chronic renal disease such as diabetic nephropathy. As the most abundant Nox family member in the kidney, much emphasis has been placed on the role of Nox4 in this setting. However, an ever growing body of work continues to uncover key roles for other Nox family members, not only in diabetic kidney disease, but in a diverse array of renal pathological conditions. The objective of the present review is to highlight the latest novel developments in renal Nox biology with an emphasis not only on diabetic nephropathy but many of the other renal disease contexts where oxidative stress is implicated.

  8. NOX4 regulates autophagy during energy deprivation.

    PubMed

    Sciarretta, Sebastiano; Volpe, Massimo; Sadoshima, Junichi

    2014-04-01

    NADPH oxidase is a cellular enzyme devoted to the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). NOX4 and NOX2 are the main isoforms of NADPH oxidase in the cardiovascular system. In our recent study, we demonstrated that NOX4, but not NOX2, is a critical mediator of the cardiomyocyte adaptive response to energy stress. NOX4 activity and protein levels are increased in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) but not in mitochondria of cardiomyocytes during the early phase of energy deprivation. NOX4-derived production of ROS in the ER is a critical event that activates autophagy through stimulation of the EIF2AK3/PERK-EIF2S1/eIF-2α-ATF4 pathway. NOX4-dependent autophagy is an important mechanism to preserve cellular energy and limit cell death in energy-deprived cardiomyocytes. Aside from elucidating a crucial physiological function of NOX4 during cellular energy stress, our study dissects a novel signaling mechanism that regulates autophagy under this condition.

  9. NOX4 regulates autophagy during energy deprivation

    PubMed Central

    Sciarretta, Sebastiano; Volpe, Massimo; Sadoshima, Junichi

    2014-01-01

    NADPH oxidase is a cellular enzyme devoted to the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). NOX4 and NOX2 are the main isoforms of NADPH oxidase in the cardiovascular system. In our recent study, we demonstrated that NOX4, but not NOX2, is a critical mediator of the cardiomyocyte adaptive response to energy stress. NOX4 activity and protein levels are increased in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) but not in mitochondria of cardiomyocytes during the early phase of energy deprivation. NOX4-derived production of ROS in the ER is a critical event that activates autophagy through stimulation of the EIF2AK3/PERK-EIF2S1/eIF-2α-ATF4 pathway. NOX4-dependent autophagy is an important mechanism to preserve cellular energy and limit cell death in energy-deprived cardiomyocytes. Aside from elucidating a crucial physiological function of NOX4 during cellular energy stress, our study dissects a novel signaling mechanism that regulates autophagy under this condition. PMID:24492492

  10. PHOTOCATALYTIC OXIDATION FOR NOx ABATEMENT: DEVELOPMENT OF A KINETIC EXPRESSION AND DESIGN TOOLS

    SciTech Connect

    Rajiv Srivastava; M. A. Ebadian

    2000-09-15

    The ''Nitrogen Oxides Emission Reduction Program'' and ''Ozone Non-Attainment Program'' in the 1990 Clean Air Act provide guidelines for controlling NOx (NO and NO{sub 2}) emissions in new and existing stationary sources. NOx emissions have local (air quality), regional (acid rain), and global (ozone production) consequences. This study aids in developing the photocatalyst technology that has potential for use in abatement of NOx. The objective of the proposed project is to apply the principles of chemical engineering fundamentals--reaction kinetics, transport phenomena and thermodynamics--in the process design for a system that will utilize a photocatalytic reactor to oxidize NOx to nitric acid (HNO{sub 3}). HNO{sub 3} can be more easily trapped than NOx on adsorbent surfaces or in water. The project dealt with the engineering aspect of the gas-solid heterogeneous oxidation of NOx. The experiments were conducted in a photocatalyst wash-coated glass flow tube reactor. A mathematical model was developed based on a rigorous description of the physical and chemical processes occurring in the reactor. The mathematical model took into account (1) intrinsic reaction kinetics (i.e., true reaction rates), (2) transport phenomena that deal with the mass transfer effects in the reactor, and (3) the geometry of the reactor. The experimental results were used for validation of the mathematical model that provides the basis for a versatile and reliable method for the purpose of design, scale-up and process control. The NOx abatement was successfully carried out in a flow tube reactor surrounded by black lights under the exploratory grant. Due to lack of funds, a comprehensive kinetic analysis for the photocatalytic reaction scheme could not be carried out. The initial experiments look very promising for use of photocatalysis for NOx abatement.

  11. Catalytic Combustion for Ultra-Low NOx Hydrogen Turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Etemad, Shahrokh; Baird, Benjamin; Alavandi, Sandeep

    2011-06-30

    Precision Combustion, Inc., (PCI) in close collaboration with Solar Turbines, Incorporated, has developed and demonstrated a combustion system for hydrogen fueled turbines that reduces NOx to low single digit level while maintaining or improving current levels of efficiency and eliminating emissions of carbon dioxide. Full scale Rich Catalytic Hydrogen (RCH1) injector was developed and successfully tested at Solar Turbines, Incorporated high pressure test facility demonstrating low single digit NOx emissions for hydrogen fuel in the range of 2200F-2750F. This development work was based on initial subscale development for faster turnaround and reduced cost. Subscale testing provided promising results for 42% and 52% H2 with NOx emissions of less than 2 ppm with improved flame stability. In addition, catalytic reactor element testing for substrate oxidation, thermal cyclic injector testing to simulate start-stop operation in a gas turbine environment, and steady state 15 atm. operation testing were performed successfully. The testing demonstrated stable and robust catalytic element component life for gas turbine conditions. The benefit of the catalytic hydrogen combustor technology includes capability of delivering near-zero NOx without costly post-combustion controls and without requirement for added sulfur control. In addition, reduced acoustics increase gas turbine component life. These advantages advances Department of Energy (DOE’s) objectives for achievement of low single digit NOx emissions, improvement in efficiency vs. postcombustion controls, fuel flexibility, a significant net reduction in Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) system net capital and operating costs, and a route to commercialization across the power generation field from micro turbines to industrial and utility turbines.

  12. The challenge to NOx emission control for heavy-duty diesel vehicles in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Y.; Zhang, S. J.; Li, M. L.; Ge, Y. S.; Shu, J. W.; Zhou, Y.; Xu, Y. Y.; Hu, J. N.; Liu, H.; Fu, L. X.; He, K. B.; Hao, J. M.

    2012-07-01

    China's new "Twelfth Five-Year Plan" set a target for total NOx emission reduction of 10% for the period of 2011-2015. Heavy-duty diesel vehicles (HDDVs) have been considered a major contributor to NOx emissions in China. Beijing initiated a comprehensive vehicle test program in 2008. This program included a sub-task for measuring on-road emission profiles of hundreds of HDDVs using portable emission measurement systems (PEMS). The major finding is that neither the on-road distance-specific (g km -1) nor brake-specific (g kW h-1) NOx emission factors for diesel buses and heavy-duty diesel trucks improved in most cases as emission standards became more stringent. For example, the average NOx emission factors for Euro II, Euro III and Euro IV buses are 11.3±3.3 g km-1, 12.5± 1.3 g km-1, and 11.8±2.0 g km-1, respectively. No statistically significant difference in NOx emission factors was observed between Euro II and III buses. Even for Euro IV buses equipped with SCR systems, the NOx emission factors are similar to Euro III buses. The data regarding real-time engine performance of Euro IV buses suggest the engine certification cycles did not reflect their real-world operating conditions. These new on-road test results indicate that previous estimates of total NOx emissions for HDDV fleet may be significantly underestimated. The new estimate in total NOx emissions for the Beijing HDDV fleet in 2009 is 37.0 Gg, an increase of 45% compared to the previous study. Further, we estimate that the total NOx emissions for the national HDDV fleet in 2009 are approximately 4.0 Tg, higher by 1.0 Tg (equivalent to 18% of total NOx emissions for vehicle fleet in 2009) than that estimated in the official report. This would also result in 4% increase in estimation of national anthropogenic NOx emissions. More effective control measures (such as promotion of CNG buses and a new in-use compliance testing program) are urged to secure the goal of total NOxmitigation for the HDDV fleet

  13. Nitrogen Isotope Composition of Thermally Produced NOx from Various Fossil-Fuel Combustion Sources.

    PubMed

    Walters, Wendell W; Tharp, Bruce D; Fang, Huan; Kozak, Brian J; Michalski, Greg

    2015-10-01

    The nitrogen stable isotope composition of NOx (δ(15)N-NOx) may be a useful indicator for NOx source partitioning, which would help constrain NOx source contributions in nitrogen deposition studies. However, there is large uncertainty in the δ(15)N-NOx values for anthropogenic sources other than on-road vehicles and coal-fired energy generating units. To this end, this study presents a broad analysis of δ(15)N-NOx from several fossil-fuel combustion sources that includes: airplanes, gasoline-powered vehicles not equipped with a three-way catalytic converter, lawn equipment, utility vehicles, urban buses, semitrucks, residential gas furnaces, and natural-gas-fired power plants. A relatively large range of δ(15)N-NOx values was measured from -28.1‰ to 8.5‰ for individual exhaust/flue samples that generally tended to be negative due to the kinetic isotope effect associated with thermal NOx production. A negative correlation between NOx concentrations and δ(15)N-NOx for fossil-fuel combustion sources equipped with selective catalytic reducers was observed, suggesting that the catalytic reduction of NOx increases δ(15)N-NOx values relative to the NOx produced through fossil-fuel combustion processes. Combining the δ(15)N-NOx measured in this study with previous published values, a δ(15)N-NOx regional and seasonal isoscape was constructed for the contiguous U.S., which demonstrates seasonal and regional importance of various NOx sources.

  14. Model Reduction for Control System Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Enns, D. F.

    1985-01-01

    An approach and a technique for effectively obtaining reduced order mathematical models of a given large order model for the purposes of synthesis, analysis and implementation of control systems is developed. This approach involves the use of an error criterion which is the H-infinity norm of a frequency weighted error between the full and reduced order models. The weightings are chosen to take into account the purpose for which the reduced order model is intended. A previously unknown error bound in the H-infinity norm for reduced order models obtained from internally balanced realizations was obtained. This motivated further development of the balancing technique to include the frequency dependent weightings. This resulted in the frequency weighted balanced realization and a new model reduction technique. Two approaches to designing reduced order controllers were developed. The first involves reducing the order of a high order controller with an appropriate weighting. The second involves linear quadratic Gaussian synthesis based on a reduced order model obtained with an appropriate weighting.

  15. Economical way to synthesize SSZ-13 with abundant ion-exchanged Cu+ for an extraordinary performance in selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NOx by ammonia.

    PubMed

    Chen, Biaohua; Xu, Ruinian; Zhang, Runduo; Liu, Ning

    2014-12-01

    In this study, an economical way for SSZ-13 preparation with the essentially cheap choline chloride as template has been attempted. The as-synthesized SSZ-13 zeolite after ion exchange by copper nitrate solution exhibited a superior SCR performance (over 95% NOx conversion across a broad range from 150 to 400 °C) to the traditional zeolite-based catalysts of Cu-Beta and Cu-ZSM-5. Furthermore, the opportune size of pore opening (∼3.8 Å) made Cu-SSZ-13 exhibiting the best selectivity to N2 as well as satisfactory tolerance toward SO2 and C3H6 poisonings. The characterization (XRD, XPS, XRF, and H2-TPR) of samples confirmed that Cu-SSZ-13 possessed the most abundant Cu cations among three investigated Cu-zeolites; furthermore, either on the surface or in the bulk the ratio of Cu(+)/Cu(2+) ions for Cu-SSZ-13 is also the highest. New finding was announced that CHA-type topology is in favor of the formation of copper cations, especially generating much more Cu(+) ions than the others, rather than CuO. The activity test of Cu(CuCl)-ZSM-5 (prepared by a solid-state ion-exchange method) clearly indicated that Cu(+) ions could make a major contribution to the low-temperature deNOx activity. The activity of protonic zeolites (H-SSZ-13, H-Beta, H-ZSM-5) revealed the topology effect on SCR performances. PMID:25365767

  16. Economical way to synthesize SSZ-13 with abundant ion-exchanged Cu+ for an extraordinary performance in selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NOx by ammonia.

    PubMed

    Chen, Biaohua; Xu, Ruinian; Zhang, Runduo; Liu, Ning

    2014-12-01

    In this study, an economical way for SSZ-13 preparation with the essentially cheap choline chloride as template has been attempted. The as-synthesized SSZ-13 zeolite after ion exchange by copper nitrate solution exhibited a superior SCR performance (over 95% NOx conversion across a broad range from 150 to 400 °C) to the traditional zeolite-based catalysts of Cu-Beta and Cu-ZSM-5. Furthermore, the opportune size of pore opening (∼3.8 Å) made Cu-SSZ-13 exhibiting the best selectivity to N2 as well as satisfactory tolerance toward SO2 and C3H6 poisonings. The characterization (XRD, XPS, XRF, and H2-TPR) of samples confirmed that Cu-SSZ-13 possessed the most abundant Cu cations among three investigated Cu-zeolites; furthermore, either on the surface or in the bulk the ratio of Cu(+)/Cu(2+) ions for Cu-SSZ-13 is also the highest. New finding was announced that CHA-type topology is in favor of the formation of copper cations, especially generating much more Cu(+) ions than the others, rather than CuO. The activity test of Cu(CuCl)-ZSM-5 (prepared by a solid-state ion-exchange method) clearly indicated that Cu(+) ions could make a major contribution to the low-temperature deNOx activity. The activity of protonic zeolites (H-SSZ-13, H-Beta, H-ZSM-5) revealed the topology effect on SCR performances.

  17. NOx Formation in a Premixed Syngas Flame

    SciTech Connect

    Yilmaz, S.L.; Givi, P.; Strakey, P.; Casleton, K.

    2006-11-01

    Reduction of NOx is a subject of significant current interest in stationary gas turbines. The objective of this study is to examine the effects of turbulence on non-thermal NOx formation in a syngas flame. This is archived by a detailed parametric study via PDF simulations of a partially stirred reactor and a dumped axisymmetric premixed flame. Several different detailed and reduced kinetics schemes are considered. The simulated results demonstrate the strong dependence of combustion process on turbulence. It is shown that the amount of NOx formation is significantly influenced by the inlet conditions. That is, the turbulence intensity can be tweaked to attain optimal ultra-low NOx emissions at a given temperature.

  18. Selective NOx Recirculation for Stationary Lean-Burn Natural Gas Engines

    SciTech Connect

    Nigel Clark; Gregory Thompson; Richard Atkinson; Richard Turton; Chamila Tissera; Emre Tatli; Andy Zimmerman

    2005-12-28

    address modeling and preliminary design of the heat exchanger, demister and NOx sorbent chamber suitable for a given engine. A simplified linear driving force model was developed to predict NOx adsorption into the sorbent material as cooled exhaust passes over fresh sorbent material. This aspect of the research will continue into 2006, and the benefits and challenges of SNR will be compared with those of competing systems, such as Selective Catalytic Reduction. Chemical kinetic modeling using the CHEMKIN software package was extended in 2005 to the case of slightly rich burn with EGR. Simulations were performed at 10%, 20%, 30% and 40% of the intake air replaced with EGR. NOx decomposition efficiency was calculated at the point in time where 98% of fuel was consumed, which is believed to be a conservative approach. The modeling data show that reductions of over 70% are possible using the ''98% fuel burned'' assumption.

  19. Catalysts, systems and methods to reduce NOX in an exhaust gas stream

    DOEpatents

    Castellano, Christopher R.; Moini, Ahmad; Koermer, Gerald S.; Furbeck, Howard

    2010-07-20

    Catalysts, systems and methods are described to reduce NO.sub.x emissions of an internal combustion engine. In one embodiment, an emissions treatment system for an exhaust stream is provided having an SCR catalyst comprising silver tungstate on an alumina support. The emissions treatment system may be used for the treatment of exhaust streams from diesel engines and lean burn gasoline engines. An emissions treatment system may further comprise an injection device operative to dispense a hydrocarbon reducing agent upstream of the catalyst.

  20. Dry low NOx combustion system with pre-mixed direct-injection secondary fuel nozzle

    DOEpatents

    Zuo, Baifang; Johnson, Thomas; Ziminsky, Willy; Khan, Abdul

    2013-12-17

    A combustion system includes a first combustion chamber and a second combustion chamber. The second combustion chamber is positioned downstream of the first combustion chamber. The combustion system also includes a pre-mixed, direct-injection secondary fuel nozzle. The pre-mixed, direct-injection secondary fuel nozzle extends through the first combustion chamber into the second combustion chamber.

  1. Netrin-1 Abrogates Ischemia Reperfusion-induced Cardiac Mitochondrial Dysfunction via Nitric Oxide-dependent Attenuation of NOX4 Activation and Recoupling of NOS

    PubMed Central

    Siu, Kin Lung; Lotz, Christopher; Ping, Peipei; Cai, Hua

    2014-01-01

    Despite an established role of mitochondrial dysfunction in cardiac ischemia reperfusion (I/R) injury, the upstream activators have remained incompletely defined. We have recently identified an innovative role of exogenously applied netrin-1 in cardioprotection, which is mediated by increased nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability. Here, we tested the hypothesis that this “pharmacological” treatment of netrin-1 preserves mitochondrial function via novel mechanisms that are NO dependent. Freshly isolated C57BL6 mouse hearts were perfused using a Langendorff system, and subjected to a 20 min global ischemia/60 min reperfusion, in the presence or absence of netrin-1. I/R induced marked increases in infarct size, total superoxide and hydrogen peroxide production, activity and protein abundance of NADPH oxidase (NOX) isoform 4 (NOX4), as well as impaired mitochondrial integrity and function, all of which were attenuated by netrin-1. This protective effect of netrin-1 is attributed to cGMP, a downstream effector of NO. The protein levels of NOX1 and NOX2 were however unaffected, and infarct size from NOX1 and NOX2 knockouts were not different from wild type animals. Scavenging of NO with PTIO reversed inhibitory effects of netrin-1 on NOX4, while NO donor attenuated NOX4 protein abundance. In vivo NOX4 RNAi, or sepiapterin perfusion, resulted in recoupling of NOS, decreased infarct size, and blockade of dysfunctional mitochondrial swelling and mitochondrial superoxide production. These data demonstrate that netrin-1 induces cardioprotection through inhibition of NOX4 activity, which leads to recoupling of NOS, augmented NO bioavailability, reduction in oxidative stress, and ultimately preservation of mitochondrial function. The NO-dependent NOX4 inhibition connects with our previously established pathway of DCC/ERK1/2/eNOS/NO/DCC feed-forward mechanism, to maintain NOS in the coupling state to attenuate oxidative stress to preserve mitochondrial function. These findings

  2. 40 CFR 96.354 - Compliance with CAIR NOX emissions limitation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... IMPLEMENTATION PLANS CAIR NOX Ozone Season Allowance Tracking System § 96.354 Compliance with CAIR NOX emissions limitation. (a) Allowance transfer deadline. The CAIR NOX Ozone Season allowances are available to be deducted for compliance with a source's CAIR NOX Ozone Season emissions limitation for a control period...

  3. 40 CFR 96.354 - Compliance with CAIR NOX emissions limitation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... IMPLEMENTATION PLANS CAIR NOX Ozone Season Allowance Tracking System § 96.354 Compliance with CAIR NOX emissions limitation. (a) Allowance transfer deadline. The CAIR NOX Ozone Season allowances are available to be deducted for compliance with a source's CAIR NOX Ozone Season emissions limitation for a control period...

  4. 40 CFR 97.353 - Recordation of CAIR NOX Ozone Season allowance allocations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Recordation of CAIR NOX Ozone Season... CAIR NOX Ozone Season Allowance Tracking System § 97.353 Recordation of CAIR NOX Ozone Season allowance allocations. (a) By September 30, 2007, the Administrator will record in the CAIR NOX Ozone Season...

  5. 40 CFR 97.353 - Recordation of CAIR NOX Ozone Season allowance allocations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Recordation of CAIR NOX Ozone Season... CAIR NOX Ozone Season Allowance Tracking System § 97.353 Recordation of CAIR NOX Ozone Season allowance allocations. (a) By September 30, 2007, the Administrator will record in the CAIR NOX Ozone Season...

  6. 40 CFR 97.353 - Recordation of CAIR NOX Ozone Season allowance allocations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Recordation of CAIR NOX Ozone Season... CAIR NOX Ozone Season Allowance Tracking System § 97.353 Recordation of CAIR NOX Ozone Season allowance allocations. (a) By September 30, 2007, the Administrator will record in the CAIR NOX Ozone Season...

  7. 40 CFR 97.353 - Recordation of CAIR NOX Ozone Season allowance allocations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Recordation of CAIR NOX Ozone Season... CAIR NOX Ozone Season Allowance Tracking System § 97.353 Recordation of CAIR NOX Ozone Season allowance allocations. (a) By September 30, 2007, the Administrator will record in the CAIR NOX Ozone Season...

  8. 40 CFR 97.353 - Recordation of CAIR NOX Ozone Season allowance allocations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Recordation of CAIR NOX Ozone Season... CAIR NOX Ozone Season Allowance Tracking System § 97.353 Recordation of CAIR NOX Ozone Season allowance allocations. (a) By September 30, 2007, the Administrator will record in the CAIR NOX Ozone Season...

  9. 40 CFR 96.154 - Compliance with CAIR NOX emissions limitation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... IMPLEMENTATION PLANS CAIR NOX Allowance Tracking System § 96.154 Compliance with CAIR NOX emissions limitation... affect the liability of the owners and operators of the CAIR NOX source or the CAIR NOX units at the... submissions. (1) The Administrator may review and conduct independent audits concerning any submission...

  10. 40 CFR 96.154 - Compliance with CAIR NOX emissions limitation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... IMPLEMENTATION PLANS CAIR NOX Allowance Tracking System § 96.154 Compliance with CAIR NOX emissions limitation... affect the liability of the owners and operators of the CAIR NOX source or the CAIR NOX units at the... submissions. (1) The Administrator may review and conduct independent audits concerning any submission...

  11. Combination of photocatalysis and HC/SCR for improved activity and durability of DeNOx catalysts.

    PubMed

    Heo, Iljeong; Kim, Mun Kyu; Sung, Samkyung; Nam, In-Sik; Cho, Byong K; Olson, Keith L; Li, Wei

    2013-04-16

    A photocatalytic HC/SCR system has been developed and its high deNOx performance (54.0-98.6% NOx conversion) at low temperatures (150-250 °C) demonstrated by using a representative diesel fuel hydrocarbon (dodecane) as the reductant over a hybrid SCR system of a photocatalytic reactor (PCR) and a dual-bed HC/SCR reactor. The PCR generates highly active oxidants such as O3 and NO2 from O2 and NO in the feed stream, followed by the subsequent formation of highly efficient reductants such as oxygenated hydrocarbon (OHC), NH3, and organo-nitrogen compounds. These reductants are the key components for enhancing the low temperature deNOx performance of the dual-bed HC/SCR system containing Ag/Al2O3 and CuCoY in the front and rear bed of the reactor, respectively. The OHCs are particularly effective for both NOx reduction and NH3 formation over the Ag/Al2O3 catalyst, while NH3 and organo-nitrogen compounds are effective for NOx reduction over the CuCoY catalyst. The hybrid HC/SCR system assisted by photocatalysis has shown an overall deNOx performance comparable to that of the NH3/SCR, demonstrating its potential as a promising alternative to the current urea/SCR and LNT technologies. Superior durability of HC/SCR catalysts against coking by HCs has also been demonstrated by a PCR-assisted regeneration scheme for deactivating catalysts.

  12. High Pressure Low NOx Emissions Research: Recent Progress at NASA Glenn Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chi-Ming, Lee; Tacina, Kathleen M.; Wey, Changlie

    2007-01-01

    In collaboration with U.S. aircraft engine companies, NASA Glenn Research Center has contributed to the advancement of low emissions combustion systems. For the High Speed Research Program (HSR), a 90% reduction in nitrogen oxides (NOx) emissions (relative to the then-current state of the art) has been demonstrated in sector rig testing at General Electric Aircraft Engines (GEAE). For the Advanced Subsonic Technology Program (AST), a 50% reduction in NOx emissions relative to the 1996 International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) standards has been at demonstrated in sector rigs at both GEAE and Pratt & Whitney (P&W). During the Ultra Efficient Engine Technology Program (UEET), a 70% reduction in NOx emissions, relative to the 1996 ICAO standards, was achieved in sector rig testing at Glenn in the world class Advanced Subsonic Combustion Rig (ASCR) and at contractor facilities. Low NOx combustor development continues under the Fundamental Aeronautics Program. To achieve these reductions, experimental and analytical research has been conducted to advance the understanding of emissions formation in combustion processes. Lean direct injection (LDI) concept development uses advanced laser-based non-intrusive diagnostics and analytical work to complement the emissions measurements and to provide guidance for concept improvement. This paper describes emissions results from flametube tests of a 9- injection-point LDI fuel/air mixer tested at inlet pressures up to 5500 kPa. Sample results from CFD and laser diagnostics are also discussed.

  13. Water Misting and Injection of Commercial Aircraft Engines to Reduce Airport NOx

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daggett, David L.; Hendricks, Robert C. (Technical Monitor)

    2004-01-01

    This report provides the first high level look at system design, airplane performance, maintenance, and cost implications of using water misting and water injection technology in aircraft engines for takeoff and climb-out NOx emissions reduction. With an engine compressor inlet water misting rate of 2.2 percent water-to-air ratio, a 47 percent NOx reduction was calculated. Combustor water injection could achieve greater reductions of about 85 percent, but with some performance penalties. For the water misting system on days above 59 F, a fuel efficiency benefit of about 3.5 percent would be experienced. Reductions of up to 436 F in turbine inlet temperature were also estimated, which could lead to increased hot section life. A 0.61 db noise reduction will occur. A nominal airplane weight penalty of less than 360 lb (no water) was estimated for a 305 passenger airplane. The airplane system cost is initially estimated at $40.92 per takeoff giving an attractive NOx emissions reduction cost/benefit ratio of about $1,663/ton.

  14. Measurement of air toxic emissions from a coal-fired boiler equipped with a tangentially-fired low NOx combustion system

    SciTech Connect

    Dismukes, E.B.; Clarkson, R.J.; Hardman, R.R.; Elia, G.G.

    1993-11-01

    This paper presents the results of measurements of chemical emissions from a coal-burning, tangentially-fired, utility boiler equipped with a hot-side electrostatic precipitator and a low NOx firing system. The tests were conducted in response to Title III of the 1990 Amendments to the Clean Air Act which lists 189 chemicals to be evaluated as {open_quotes}Air Toxics.{close_quotes} The project was jointly funded by the Electric Power Research Institute and the US Department of Energy under an existing Innovative Clean Coal Technology Cooperative Agreement managed by Southern Company Services. Field chemical emissions monitoring was conducted in two phases: a baseline {open_quotes}pre-low NOx burner{close_quotes} condition in September 1991 and in the LNCFS Level III low NOx firing condition in January 1992. In addition to stack emissions measurements of both organic and inorganic chemicals, plant material balance evaluations were performed to determine the efficiency of the hot-side ESP at controlling emissions of air toxics and to determine the fate of the target chemicals in various plant process streams.

  15. Device to lower NOx in a gas turbine engine combustion system

    SciTech Connect

    Laster, Walter R; Schilp, Reinhard; Wiebe, David J

    2015-02-24

    An emissions control system for a gas turbine engine including a flow-directing structure (24) that delivers combustion gases (22) from a burner (32) to a turbine. The emissions control system includes: a conduit (48) configured to establish fluid communication between compressed air (22) and the combustion gases within the flow-directing structure (24). The compressed air (22) is disposed at a location upstream of a combustor head-end and exhibits an intermediate static pressure less than a static pressure of the combustion gases within the combustor (14). During operation of the gas turbine engine a pressure difference between the intermediate static pressure and a static pressure of the combustion gases within the flow-directing structure (24) is effective to generate a fluid flow through the conduit (48).

  16. Emissions reductions strategies

    SciTech Connect

    Sirois, R.H.

    1996-12-31

    This paper consists of the series of viewgraphs used by the author during his presentation. They tabulate nitrogen oxide reduction techniques, technical evaluation of NOx control techniques, critical system design parameters for SNCR processes, major concerns for SCR retrofit applications, integrating technologies, sulfur dioxide control for a coal fired power plant, heavy metals on US EPA`s HAPs list, and mercury emissions. Other slides show flow charts of some of these processes, as well as diagrams of equipment.

  17. 40 CFR 91.319 - NOX converter check.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... converter check. (a) The efficiency of the converter used for the conversion of NO2 to NO is tested as given... of the NO concentration). The NOX analyzer must be in the NO mode so that the span gas does not pass..., then use the highest range which will give the reduction. (6) Switch the NO analyzer to the NOX...

  18. 40 CFR 91.319 - NOX converter check.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... converter check. (a) The efficiency of the converter used for the conversion of NO2 to NO is tested as given... of the NO concentration). The NOX analyzer must be in the NO mode so that the span gas does not pass..., then use the highest range which will give the reduction. (6) Switch the NO analyzer to the NOX...

  19. 40 CFR 91.319 - NOX converter check.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... converter check. (a) The efficiency of the converter used for the conversion of NO2 to NO is tested as given... of the NO concentration). The NOX analyzer must be in the NO mode so that the span gas does not pass..., then use the highest range which will give the reduction. (6) Switch the NO analyzer to the NOX...

  20. Reduction of Large Dynamical Systems by Minimization of Evolution Rate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Girimaji, Sharath S.

    1999-01-01

    Reduction of a large system of equations to a lower-dimensional system of similar dynamics is investigated. For dynamical systems with disparate timescales, a criterion for determining redundant dimensions and a general reduction method based on the minimization of evolution rate are proposed.

  1. Catalytic effects of minerals on NOx emission from coal combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Yao, M.Y.; Che, D.F.

    2007-07-01

    The catalytic effects of inherent mineral matters on NOx emissions from coal combustion have been investigated by a thermo-gravimetric analyzer (TGA) equipped with a gas analyzer. The effect of demineralization and the individual effect of Na, K, Ca, Mg, and Fe on the formation of NOx are studied as well as the combined catalytic effects of Ca + Na and Ca + Ti. Demineralization causes more Fuel-N to retain in the char, and reduction of NOx mostly. But the mechanistic effect on NOx formation varies from coal to coal. Ca and Mg promote NOx emission. Na, K, Fe suppress NOx formation to different extents. The effect of transition element Fe is the most obvious. The combination of Ca + Na and Ca + Ti can realize the simultaneous control of sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxides emissions.

  2. Bosch CO2 Reduction System Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, R. F.; King, C. D.; Keller, E. E.

    1976-01-01

    Development of a Bosch process CO2 reduction unit was continued, and, by means of hardware modifications, the performance was substantially improved. Benefits of the hardware upgrading were demonstrated by extensive unit operation and data acquisition in the laboratory. This work was accomplished on a cold seal configuration of the Bosch unit.

  3. Plasma-assisted catalytic storage reduction system

    DOEpatents

    Penetrante, Bernardino M.; Vogtlin, George E.; Merritt, Bernard T.; Brusasco, Raymond M.

    2002-01-01

    A two-stage method for NO.sub.x reduction in an oxygen-rich engine exhaust comprises a plasma oxidative stage and a storage reduction stage. The first stage employs a non-thermal plasma treatment of NO.sub.x gases in an oxygen-rich exhaust and is intended to convert NO to NO.sub.2 in the presence of O.sub.2 and hydrocarbons. The second stage employs a lean NO.sub.x trap to convert such NO.sub.2 to environmentally benign gases that include N.sub.2, CO.sub.2, and H.sub.2 O. By preconverting NO to NO.sub.2 in the first stage with a plasma, the efficiency of the second stage for NO.sub.x reduction is enhanced. For example, an internal combustion engine exhaust is connected by a pipe to a first chamber in which a non-thermal plasma converts NO to NO.sub.2 in the presence of O.sub.2 and hydrocarbons, such as propene. A flow of such hydrocarbons (C.sub.x H.sub.y) is input from usually a second pipe into at least a portion of the first chamber. The NO.sub.2 from the plasma treatment proceeds to a storage reduction catalyst (lean NO.sub.x trap) that converts NO.sub.2 to N.sub.2, CO.sub.2, and H.sub.2 O, and includes a nitrate-forming catalytic site. The hydrocarbons and NO.sub.x are simultaneously reduced while passing through the lean-NO.sub.x trap catalyst. The method allows for enhanced NO.sub.x reduction in vehicular engine exhausts, particularly those having relatively high sulfur contents.

  4. Plasma-assisted catalytic storage reduction system

    DOEpatents

    Penetrante, Bernardino M.; Vogtlin, George E.; Merritt, Bernard T.; Brusasco, Raymond M.

    2000-01-01

    A two-stage method for NO.sub.x reduction in an oxygen-rich engine exhaust comprises a plasma oxidative stage and a storage reduction stage. The first stage employs a non-thermal plasma treatment of NO.sub.x gases in an oxygen-rich exhaust and is intended to convert NO to NO.sub.2 in the presence of O.sub.2 and hydrocarbons. The second stage employs a lean NO.sub.x trap to convert such NO.sub.2 to environmentally benign gases that include N.sub.2, CO.sub.2, and H.sub.2 O. By preconverting NO to NO.sub.2 in the first stage with a plasma, the efficiency of the second stage for NO.sub.x reduction is enhanced. For example, an internal combustion engine exhaust is connected by a pipe to a first chamber in which a non-thermal plasma converts NO to NO.sub.2 in the presence of O.sub.2 and hydrocarbons, such as propene. A flow of such hydrocarbons (C.sub.x H.sub.y) is input from usually a second pipe into at least a portion of the first chamber. The NO.sub.2 from the plasma treatment proceeds to a storage reduction catalyst (lean NO.sub.x trap) that converts NO.sub.2 to N.sub.2, CO.sub.2, and H.sub.2 O, and includes a nitrate-forming catalytic site. The hydrocarbons and NO.sub.x are simultaneously reduced while passing through the lean-NO.sub.x trap catalyst. The method allows for enhanced NO.sub.x reduction in vehicular engine exhausts, particularly those having relatively high sulfur contents.

  5. Effect of B20 and Low Aromatic Diesel on Transit Bus NOx Emissions Over Driving Cycles with a Range of Kinetic Intensity

    SciTech Connect

    Lammert, M. P.; McCormick, R. L.; Sindler, P.; Williams, A.

    2012-10-01

    Oxides of nitrogen (NOx) emissions for transit buses for up to five different fuels and three standard transit duty cycles were compared to establish whether there is a real-world biodiesel NOx increase for transit bus duty cycles and engine calibrations. Six buses representing the majority of the current national transit fleet and including hybrid and selective catalyst reduction systems were tested on a heavy-duty chassis dynamometer with certification diesel, certification B20 blend, low aromatic (California Air Resources Board) diesel, low aromatic B20 blend, and B100 fuels over the Manhattan, Orange County and UDDS test cycles. Engine emissions certification level had the dominant effect on NOx; kinetic intensity was the secondary driving factor. The biodiesel effect on NOx emissions was not statistically significant for most buses and duty cycles for blends with certification diesel, except for a 2008 model year bus. CARB fuel had many more instances of a statistically significant effect of reducing NOx. SCR systems proved effective at reducing NOx to near the detection limit on all duty cycles and fuels, including B100. While offering a fuel economy benefit, a hybrid system significantly increased NOx emissions over a same year bus with a conventional drivetrain and the same engine.

  6. Modeling the effects of VOC/NOx emissions on ozone synthesis in the cascadia airshed of the Pacific Northwest.

    PubMed

    Barna, M; Lamb, B; Westberg, H

    2001-07-01

    A modeling system consisting of MM5, Calmet, and Calgrid was used to investigate the sensitivity of anthropogenic volatile organic compound (VOC) and oxides of nitrogen (NOx) reductions on ozone formation within the Cascadia airshed of the Pacific Northwest. An ozone episode that occurred on July 11-14, 1996, was evaluated. During this event, high ozone levels were recorded at monitors downwind of Seattle, WA, and Portland, OR, with one monitor exceeding the 1 hr/120 ppb National Ambient Air Quality Standard (at 148 ppb), and six monitors above the proposed 8 hr/80 ppb standard (at 82-130 ppb). For this particular case, significant emissions reductions, between 25 and 75%, would be required to decrease peak ozone concentrations to desired levels. Reductions in VOC emissions alone, or a combination of reduced VOC and NOx emissions, were generally found to be most effective; reducing NOx emissions alone resulted in increased ozone in the Seattle area. When only VOC emissions were curtailed, ozone reductions occurred in the immediate vicinity of densely populated areas, while NOx reductions resulted in more widespread ozone reductions. PMID:15658221

  7. An active noise reduction system for aircrew helmets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheeler, P. D.; Rawlinson, D.; Pelc, S. F.; Dorey, T. P.

    1978-01-01

    An active noise reduction system was developed for use in aircrew flying helmets in which the acoustic noise field inside the ear defender is detected using a miniature microphone and an antiphase signal is fed back to a communications telephone within the ear defender. Performance of the active noise reduction system in a laboratory trial simulating flight conditions is shown to be satisfactory.

  8. Insight into the mechanism of selective catalytic reduction of NO(x) by propene over the Cu/Ti(0.7)Zr(0.3)O2 catalyst by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and density functional theory calculations.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jie; Li, Xinyong; Zhao, Qidong; Hao, Ce; Zhang, Dongke

    2013-05-01

    The mechanism of selective catalytic reduction of NOx by propene (C3H6-SCR) over the Cu/Ti0.7Zr0.3O2 catalyst was studied by in situ Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Especially, the formation and transformation of cyanide (-CN species) during the reaction was discussed. According to FTIR results, the excellent performance of the Cu/Ti0.7Zr0.3O2 catalyst in C3H6-SCR was attributed to the coexistence of two parallel pathways to produce N2 by the isocyanate (-NCO species) and -CN species intermediates. Besides the hydrolysis of the -NCO species, the reaction between the -CN species and nitrates and/or NO2 was also a crucial pathway for the NO reduction. On the basis of the DFT calculations on the energy of possible intermediates and transition states at the B3LYP/6-311 G (d, p) level of theory, the reaction channel of -CN species in the SCR reaction was identified and the role of -CN species as a crucial intermediate to generate N2 was also confirmed from the thermodynamics view. In combination of the FTIR and DFT results, a modified mechanism with two parallel pathways to produce N2 by the reaction of -NCO and -CN species over the Cu/Ti0.7Zr0.3O2 catalyst was proposed.

  9. System and method for selective catalytic reduction of nitrogen oxides in combustion exhaust gases

    DOEpatents

    Sobolevskiy, Anatoly; Rossin, Joseph A

    2014-04-08

    A multi-stage selective catalytic reduction (SCR) unit (32) provides efficient reduction of NOx and other pollutants from about 50-550.degree. C. in a power plant (19). Hydrogen (24) and ammonia (29) are variably supplied to the SCR unit depending on temperature. An upstream portion (34) of the SCR unit catalyzes NOx+NH.sub.3 reactions above about 200.degree. C. A downstream portion (36) catalyzes NOx+H.sub.2 reactions below about 260.degree. C., and catalyzes oxidation of NH.sub.3, CO, and VOCs with oxygen in the exhaust above about 200.degree. C., efficiently removing NOx and other pollutants over a range of conditions with low slippage of NH.sub.3. An ammonia synthesis unit (28) may be connected to the SCR unit to provide NH.sub.3 as needed, avoiding transport and storage of ammonia or urea at the site. A carbonaceous gasification plant (18) on site may supply hydrogen and nitrogen to the ammonia synthesis unit, and hydrogen to the SCR unit.

  10. Quasi-steady state reduction for compartmental systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goeke, Alexandra; Lax, Christian

    2016-07-01

    We present a method to determine an asymptotic reduction (in the sense of Tikhonov and Fenichel) for singularly perturbed compartmental systems in the presence of slow transport. It turns out that the reduction can be derived from the individual interaction terms alone. We apply the result to spatially discretized reaction-diffusion systems and obtain (based on the reduced discretized systems) a heuristic to reduce reaction-diffusion systems in presence of slow diffusion.

  11. Maskless micro-ion-beam reduction lithography system

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo; Barletta, William A.; Patterson, David O.; Gough, Richard A.

    2005-05-03

    A maskless micro-ion-beam reduction lithography system is a system for projecting patterns onto a resist layer on a wafer with feature size down to below 100 nm. The MMRL system operates without a stencil mask. The patterns are generated by switching beamlets on and off from a two electrode blanking system or pattern generator. The pattern generator controllably extracts the beamlet pattern from an ion source and is followed by a beam reduction and acceleration column.

  12. Nitrogen stable isotope composition (δ15N) of vehicle-emitted NOx.

    PubMed

    Walters, Wendell W; Goodwin, Stanford R; Michalski, Greg

    2015-02-17

    The nitrogen stable isotope ratio of NOx (δ(15)N-NOx) has been proposed as a regional indicator for NOx source partitioning; however, knowledge of δ(15)N values from various NOx emission sources is limited. This study presents a detailed analysis of δ(15)N-NOx emitted from vehicle exhaust, the largest source of anthropogenic NOx. To accomplish this, NOx was collected from 26 different vehicles, including gasoline and diesel-powered engines, using a modification of a NOx collection method used by the United States Environmental Protection Agency, and δ(15)N-NOx was analyzed. The vehicles sampled in this study emitted δ(15)N-NOx values ranging from -19.1 to 9.8‰ that negatively correlated with the emitted NOx concentrations (8.5 to 286 ppm) and vehicle run time because of kinetic isotope fractionation effects associated with the catalytic reduction of NOx. A model for determining the mass-weighted δ(15)N-NOx from vehicle exhaust was constructed on the basis of average commute times, and the model estimates an average value of -2.5 ± 1.5‰, with slight regional variations. As technology improvements in catalytic converters reduce cold-start emissions in the future, it is likely to increase current δ(15)N-NOx values emitted from vehicles. PMID:25621737

  13. Nitrogen stable isotope composition (δ15N) of vehicle-emitted NOx.

    PubMed

    Walters, Wendell W; Goodwin, Stanford R; Michalski, Greg

    2015-02-17

    The nitrogen stable isotope ratio of NOx (δ(15)N-NOx) has been proposed as a regional indicator for NOx source partitioning; however, knowledge of δ(15)N values from various NOx emission sources is limited. This study presents a detailed analysis of δ(15)N-NOx emitted from vehicle exhaust, the largest source of anthropogenic NOx. To accomplish this, NOx was collected from 26 different vehicles, including gasoline and diesel-powered engines, using a modification of a NOx collection method used by the United States Environmental Protection Agency, and δ(15)N-NOx was analyzed. The vehicles sampled in this study emitted δ(15)N-NOx values ranging from -19.1 to 9.8‰ that negatively correlated with the emitted NOx concentrations (8.5 to 286 ppm) and vehicle run time because of kinetic isotope fractionation effects associated with the catalytic reduction of NOx. A model for determining the mass-weighted δ(15)N-NOx from vehicle exhaust was constructed on the basis of average commute times, and the model estimates an average value of -2.5 ± 1.5‰, with slight regional variations. As technology improvements in catalytic converters reduce cold-start emissions in the future, it is likely to increase current δ(15)N-NOx values emitted from vehicles.

  14. Characteristics of NOx emission from Chinese coal-fired power plants equipped with new technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Zizhen; Deng, Jianguo; Li, Zhen; Li, Qing; Zhao, Ping; Wang, Liguo; Sun, Yezhu; Zheng, Hongxian; Pan, Li; Zhao, Shun; Jiang, Jingkun; Wang, Shuxiao; Duan, Lei

    2016-04-01

    Coal combustion in coal-fired power plants is one of the important anthropogenic NOx sources, especially in China. Many policies and methods aiming at reducing pollutants, such as increasing installed capacity and installing air pollution control devices (APCDs), especially selective catalytic reduction (SCR) units, could alter NOx emission characteristics (NOx concentration, NO2/NOx ratio, and NOx emission factor). This study reported the NOx characteristics of eight new coal-fired power-generating units with different boiler patterns, installed capacities, operating loads, and coal types. The results showed that larger units produced less NOx, and anthracite combustion generated more NOx than bitumite and lignite combustion. During formation, the NOx emission factors varied from 1.81 to 6.14 g/kg, much lower than those of older units at similar scales. This implies that NOx emissions of current and future units could be overestimated if they are based on outdated emission factors. In addition, APCDs, especially SCR, greatly decreased NOx emissions, but increased NO2/NOx ratios. Regardless, the NO2/NOx ratios were lower than 5%, in accordance with the guidelines and supporting the current method for calculating NOx emissions from coal-fired power plants that ignore NO2.

  15. The relationship between plasma and salivary NOx.

    PubMed

    Clodfelter, William H; Basu, Swati; Bolden, Crystal; Dos Santos, Patricia C; King, S Bruce; Kim-Shapiro, Daniel B

    2015-05-01

    Several studies have shown that fasting plasma nitrite (NO2(-)) is an indicator of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (NOS) activity while plasma nitrate (NO3(-)) or the sum of NO2(-) and NO3(-) (NOx) does not reflect NOS function. Plasma NO2(-) can also be elevated through dietary NO3(-) where the NO3(-) is partially reduced to NO2(-) by oral bacteria and enters the plasma through the digestive system. NO3(-) is taken up from plasma by salivary glands and the cycle repeats itself. Thus, one may propose that salivary NO2(-) is an indicator of plasma NO2(-) and consequently of NO production. Many brands of nitric oxide (NO) saliva test strips have been developed that suggest that their product is indicative of circulatory NO availability. However, data supporting a relationship between salivary and plasma NO2(-) or NO bioavailability are lacking. Here we have measured basal salivary and plasma NO2(-) and NO3(-) to determine if any correlation exists between these in 13 adult volunteers. We found no significant correlation between basal salivary and plasma NO2(-). Also no correlation exists between salivary NO3(-) and plasma NO2(-). However, we did see a correlation between salivary NO3(-) and plasma NO3(-), and between salivary NO2(-) and plasma NO3(-). In a separate study, we compared the efficiency of salivary NO3(-) reduction with the efficacy of increasing plasma NO3(-) and NO2(-) after drinking beet juice, a high NO3(-)-containing beverage, in 10 adult volunteers. No significant correlation was observed between the ex vivo salivary reduction of NO3(-) to NO2(-) and plasma increases in NO3(-) or NO2(-). These results suggest that measures of salivary NO3(-), NO2(-) or NOx are not good indicators of endothelial function. In addition, the efficiency of saliva to reduce NO3(-) to NO2(-)ex-vivo does not demonstrate one's ability to increase plasma NO2(-) following consumption of dietary NO3(-).

  16. INVESTIGATION OF AMMONIA ADSORPTION ON FLY ASH DUE TO INSTALLATION OF SELECTIVE CATALYTIC REDUCTION SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    G.F. Brendel; J.E. Bonetti; R.F. Rathbone; R.N. Frey Jr.

    2000-11-01

    This report summarizes an investigation of the potential impacts associated with the utilization of selective catalytic reduction (SCR) systems at coal-fired power plants. The study was sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy Emission Control By-Products Consortium, Dominion Generation, the University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research and GAI Consultants, Inc. SCR systems are effective in reducing nitrogen oxides (NOx) emissions as required by the Clean Air Act (CAA) Amendments. However, there may be potential consequences associated with ammonia contamination of stack emissions and combustion by-products from these systems. Costs for air quality, landfill and pond environmental compliance may increase significantly and the marketability of ash may be seriously reduced, which, in turn, may also lead to increased disposal costs. The potential impacts to air, surface water, groundwater, ash disposal, ash utilization, health and safety, and environmental compliance can not be easily quantified based on the information presently available. The investigation included: (1) a review of information and data available from published and unpublished sources; (2) baseline ash characterization testing of ash samples produced from several central Appalachian high-volatile bituminous coals from plants that do not currently employ SCR systems in order to characterize the ash prior to ammonia exposure; (3) an investigation of ammonia release from fly ash, including leaching and thermal studies; and (4) an evaluation of the potential impacts on plant equipment, air quality, water quality, ash disposal operations, and ash marketing.

  17. Bosch CO2 Reduction System Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, R. F.; King, C. D.; Keller, E. E.

    1975-01-01

    Refinements in the design of a Bosch CO2 reduction unit for spacecraft O2 production are described. Sealing of the vacuum insulation jacket was simplified so that high vacuum and high insulation performance are easily maintained. The device includes a relatively simple concentric shell recuperative heat exchanger which operates at approximately 95% temperature effectiveness and helps lower power consumption. The influence of reactor temperature, pressure, and recycle gas composition on power consumption was investigated. In general, precise control is not required since power consumption is not very sensitive to moderate variations of these parameters near their optimum values. There are two process rate control modes which match flow rate to process demand. Catalyst conditioning, support, and packing pattern developments assure consistent starts, reduced energy consumption, and extended cartridge life. Operation levels for four or five men were maintained with overall power input values of 50 to 60 watts per man.

  18. NOx CONTROL OPTIONS AND INTEGRATION FOR US COAL FIRED BOILERS

    SciTech Connect

    Michael J. Bockelie

    2000-10-31

    This report summarizes the research that has been performed by Reaction Engineering International (REI) during the last three months on demonstrating and evaluating low NOx control strategies and their possible impact on boiler performance for firing US coals. The focus of our efforts during the last six months have been on: (1) Field Tests for RRI at the Conectiv BL England Station Unit No.1, a 130 MW cyclone fired boiler; (2) Extending our Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) based NOx model to accommodate the chemistry for Rich Reagent Injection (RRI) in cyclone fired boilers; (3) Applying the NOx model to evaluate RRI systems integrated into a boiler with Over Fired Air (OFA) and Selective Non-Catalytic Reduction (SNCR); (4) Field Tests of the REI Corrosion Probe at the Conectiv BL England Station Unit No.1; (5) Commence engineering study of ammonia adsorption mechanisms for Fly Ash; (6) Presentation of current program accomplishments and plans for future work to DoE staff members at NETL-FE (Pittsburgh); and (7) Presentation of preliminary field test results for RRI to EPRI CNCIG.

  19. Dimensionality reduction of dynamical systems with parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welshman, Ch.; Brooke, J.

    2013-01-01

    We describe a method for reproducing the dynamical behaviour observed in systems of very high dimension in a state space of much lower dimension. The method is designed for systems where the solution evolves onto an attractor of dimension m which is much lower than that of the state space of the full system, n. Whitney's embedding theorem guarantees that the attractor can be embedded in a space of dimension d = 2m+1. We describe how such methods can be extended to reproducing the vector field on the attractor so that the dynamics of a parameterized family of attractors can be explored in the low dimensional space Rd.

  20. Selective catalytic reduction system and process for control of NO.sub.x emissions in a sulfur-containing gas stream

    SciTech Connect

    Sobolevskiy, Anatoly

    2015-08-11

    An exhaust gas treatment process, apparatus, and system for reducing the concentration of NOx, CO and hydrocarbons in a gas stream, such as an exhaust stream (29), via selective catalytic reduction with ammonia is provided. The process, apparatus and system include a catalytic bed (32) having a reducing only catalyst portion (34) and a downstream reducing-plus-oxidizing portion (36). Each portion (34, 36) includes an amount of tungsten. The reducing-plus-oxidizing catalyst portion (36) advantageously includes a greater amount of tungsten than the reducing catalyst portion (36) to markedly limit ammonia salt formation.

  1. DEVELOPMENT AND DEMONSTRATION OF NOVEL LOW-NOx BURNERS IN THE STEEL INDUSTRY

    SciTech Connect

    Cygan, David

    2006-12-28

    -catalytic reduction. The FIR burner was previously demonstrated on firetube and watertube boilers, and these units are still operating at several industrial and commercial boiler sites in sizes ranging from 2.5 to 60 million Btu/h. This report covers the development of an innovative combustion system suitable for natural gas or coke-oven gas firing within the steel industry. The prototype FIR burner was evaluated on a 20 million Btu/h watertube boiler. Acceptable burner performance was obtained when firing natural gas and simulated coke-oven gas doped with ammonia. The laboratory data reveals a direct relationship between NOx formation and the ammonia concentration in the fuel. In addition, NOx formation increases as the primary stoichiometric ratio (PSR) increases. Representative ammonia concentrations, as documented in the steel industry, ranged from 200 to 500 vppm. When the laboratory burner/boiler was operated with 500 vppm ammonia in the fuel, NOx emissions ranged from 50 to 75 vppm. This, conservatively, is 75% less than state-of-the-art burner performance. When the burner is operated with 200 vppm ammonia in the fuel, the corresponding NOx emissions would range from 30 to 45 vppm, 84% less than present burner technology. During field evaluation on a 174 million Btu/h industrial prototype burner both natural gas and actual COG from on-site generation were tested. Despite the elevated hydrogen cyanide and ammonia content in the COG throughout the test program, the FIR burner showed an improvement over baseline emissions. At full load; 167 million Btu/h, NOx emissions were relatively low at 169 vppm. This represents a 30% reduction compared to baseline emissions not accounting for the higher hydrogen cyanide content in the COG. CO emissions remained below 20 vppm and were stable across the firing range. This represents a 68% reduction compared to baseline CO emissions. When firing natural gas, emissions were stable as firing rate increased over the range. At low fire; 45 million

  2. Turbine blade tip gap reduction system

    DOEpatents

    Diakunchak, Ihor S.

    2012-09-11

    A turbine blade sealing system for reducing a gap between a tip of a turbine blade and a stationary shroud of a turbine engine. The sealing system includes a plurality of flexible seal strips extending from a pressure side of a turbine blade generally orthogonal to the turbine blade. During operation of the turbine engine, the flexible seal strips flex radially outward extending towards the stationary shroud of the turbine engine, thereby reducing the leakage of air past the turbine blades and increasing the efficiency of the turbine engine.

  3. In situ DRIFTs investigation of the reaction mechanism over MnOx-MOy/Ce0.75Zr0.25O2 (M = Fe, Co, Ni, Cu) for the selective catalytic reduction of NOx with NH3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Hang; Zha, Kaiwen; Li, Hongrui; Shi, Liyi; Zhang, Dengsong

    2016-11-01

    A series of MnOx-MOy/Ce0.75Zr0.25O2 (M = Fe, Co, Ni, Cu) catalysts were synthesized by an impregnation method and used for selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NOx with NH3. The catalytic performances of various MnOx-MOy/Ce0.75Zr0.25O2 catalysts were studied. It was found that MnOx-FeOy/Ce0.75Zr0.25O2 catalyst showed excellent low-temperature activity and a broad temperature window. The catalysts were characterized by N2 adsorption/desorption, X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and in situ diffuse reflectance infrared transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS). Characterization of the catalyst confirmed the addition of iron oxide can enhance the NO oxidation ability of the catalyst which results in the outstanding low-temperature SCR activity. Meanwhile, iron oxides were well dispersed on catalyst surface which could avoid the agglomeration of active species, contributing to the strong interaction between active species and the support. More importantly, in situ DRIFTS results confirmed that bidentate nitrates are general active species on these catalysts, whereas the reactivity of gaseous NO2 and bridged nitrates got improved because of the addition of Fe.

  4. Influence of the addition of transition metals (Cr, Zr, Mo) on the properties of MnOx-FeOx catalysts for low-temperature selective catalytic reduction of NOx by Ammonia.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Changcheng; Zhang, Yaping; Wang, Xiaolei; Xu, Haitao; Sun, Keqin; Shen, Kai

    2013-02-15

    The co-precipitation and citric acid methods were employed to prepare MnO(x)-FeO(x) catalysts for the low-temperature selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NO(x) by ammonia. It was found that the Mn-Fe (CP) sample obtained from the co-precipitation method, which exhibited low crystalline of manganese oxides on the surface, high specific surface area and abundant acid sites at the surface, had better catalytic activity. The effects of doping different transition metals (Mo, Zr, Cr) in the Mn-Fe (CP) catalysts were further investigated. The study suggested that the addition of Cr can obviously reduce the take-off temperature of Mn-Fe catalyst to 90°C, while the impregnation of Zr and Mo raised that remarkably. The texture and micro-structure analysis revealed that for the Cr-doped Mn-Fe catalysts, the active components had better dispersion with less agglomeration and sintering and the largest BET surface specific area. In situ FTIR study indicated that the addition of Cr can increase significantly the surface acidity, especially, the Lewis acid sites, and promote the formation of the intermediate -NH(3)(+). H(2)-TPR results confirmed the better low-temperature redox properties of Mn-Fe-Cr.

  5. Model reduction of systems with localized nonlinearities.

    SciTech Connect

    Segalman, Daniel Joseph

    2006-03-01

    An LDRD funded approach to development of reduced order models for systems with local nonlinearities is presented. This method is particularly useful for problems of structural dynamics, but has potential application in other fields. The key elements of this approach are (1) employment of eigen modes of a reference linear system, (2) incorporation of basis functions with an appropriate discontinuity at the location of the nonlinearity. Galerkin solution using the above combination of basis functions appears to capture the dynamics of the system with a small basis set. For problems involving small amplitude dynamics, the addition of discontinuous (joint) modes appears to capture the nonlinear mechanics correctly while preserving the modal form of the predictions. For problems involving large amplitude dynamics of realistic joint models (macro-slip), the use of appropriate joint modes along with sufficient basis eigen modes to capture the frequencies of the system greatly enhances convergence, though the modal nature the result is lost. Also observed is that when joint modes are used in conjunction with a small number of elastic eigen modes in problems of macro-slip of realistic joint models, the resulting predictions are very similar to those of the full solution when seen through a low pass filter. This has significance both in terms of greatly reducing the number of degrees of freedom of the problem and in terms of facilitating the use of much larger time steps.

  6. Wear reduction systems liquid piston ring

    SciTech Connect

    Raymond, R.J.; Chen, T.N.; DiNanno, L.

    1990-09-01

    The overall objective of the program was to demonstrate the technical feasibility of achieving an acceptable wear rate for the cylinder liner, piston, and piston rings in a coal/water-slurry-fueled engine that utilized the concept of a liquid piston ring above the conventional piston rings and to identify technical barriers and required research and development. The study included analytical modeling of the system, a bench study of the fluid motion in the liquid piston ring, and a single-cylinder test rig for wear comparison. A system analysis made on the different variations of the liquid supply system showed the desirability of the once-through version from the standpoint of system simplicity. The dynamics of the liquid ring were modeled to determine the important design parameters that influence the pressure fluctuation in the liquid ring during a complete engine cycle and the integrity of the liquid ring. This analysis indicated the importance of controlling heat transfer to the liquid ring through piston and liner to avoid boiling the liquid. A conceptual piston design for minimizing heat transfer is presented in this report. Results showed that the liquid piston ring effectively reduced the solid particles on the wall by scrubbing, especially in the case where a surfactant was added to the water. The wear rates were reduced by a factor of 2 with the liquid ring. However, leakage of the contaminated liquid ring material past the top ring limited the effectiveness of the liquid ring concept. 8 refs., 33 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Demonstration of selective catalytic reduction (SCR) technology for the control of nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions from high-sulfur coal-fired boilers

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-11-01

    The objective of this project is to demonstrate and evaluate commercially available Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) catalysts from US, Japanese and European catalyst suppliers on a high-sulfur US coal-fired boiler. SCR is a post-combustion nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) control technology that involves injecting ammonia into the flue gas generated from coal combustion in an electric utility boiler. The flue gas containing ammonia is then passed through a reactor that contains a specialized catalyst. In the presence of the catalyst, the ammonia reacts with NO{sub x} to convert it to nitrogen and water vapor.

  8. NOx Control Options and Integration for US Coal Fired Boilers

    SciTech Connect

    Mike Bockelie; Marc Cremer; Kevin Davis; Martin Denison; Adel Sarofim; Connie Senior; Hong-Shig Shim; Dave Swenson; Bob Hurt; Eric Suuberg; Eric Eddings; Kevin Whitty; Larry Baxter; Calvin Bartholomew; William Hecker

    2006-06-30

    This is the Final Report for DOE Cooperative Agreement No: DE-FC26-00NT40753. The goal of the project was to develop cost-effective analysis tools and techniques for demonstrating and evaluating low-NOx control strategies and their possible impact on boiler performance for boilers firing US coals. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) provided co-funding for this program. This project included research on: (1) In furnace NOx control; (2) Impacts of combustion modifications on boiler operation; (3) Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) catalyst testing and (4) Ammonia adsorption/removal on fly ash. Important accomplishments were achieved in all aspects of the project. Rich Reagent Injection (RRI), an in-furnace NOx reduction strategy based on injecting urea or anhydrous ammonia into fuel rich regions in the lower furnace, was evaluated for cyclone-barrel and PC fired utility boilers. Field tests successfully demonstrated the ability of the RRI process to significantly reduce NOx emissions from a staged cyclone-fired furnace operating with overfire air. The field tests also verified the accuracy of the Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) modeling used to develop the RRI design and highlighted the importance of using CFD modeling to properly locate and configure the reagent injectors within the furnace. Low NOx firing conditions can adversely impact boiler operation due to increased waterwall wastage (corrosion) and increased soot production. A corrosion monitoring system that uses electrochemical noise (ECN) corrosion probes to monitor, on a real-time basis, high temperature corrosion events within the boiler was evaluated. Field tests were successfully conducted at two plants. The Ohio Coal Development Office provided financial assistance to perform the field tests. To investigate soot behavior, an advanced model to predict soot production and destruction was implemented into an existing reacting CFD modeling tool. Comparisons between experimental data collected

  9. Elementary steps of the catalytic NOx reduction with NH3: Cluster studies on reaction paths and energetics at vanadium oxide substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruber, M.; Hermann, K.

    2013-12-01

    We consider different reaction scenarios of the selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NO in the presence of ammonia at perfect as well as reduced vanadium oxide surfaces modeled by V2O5(010) without and with oxygen vacancies. Geometric and energetic details as well as reaction paths are evaluated using extended cluster models together with density-functional theory. Based on earlier work of adsorption, diffusion, and reaction of the different surface species participating in the SCR we confirm that at Brønsted acid sites (i.e., OH groups) of the perfect oxide surface nitrosamide, NH2NO, forms a stable intermediate. Here adsorption of NH3 results in NH4 surface species which reacts with gas phase NO to produce the intermediate. Nitrosamide is also found as intermediate of the SCR near Lewis acid sites of the reduced oxide surface (i.e., near oxygen vacancies). However, here the adsorbed NH3 species is dehydrogenated to surface NH2 before it reacts with gas phase NO to produce the intermediate. The calculations suggest that reaction barriers for the SCR are overall higher near Brønsted acid sites of the perfect surface compared with Lewis acid sites of the reduced surface, examined for the first time in this work. The theoretical results are consistent with experimental findings and confirm the importance of surface reduction for the SCR process.

  10. Integrated Removal of NOx with Carbon Monoxide as Reductant, and Capture of Mercury in a Low Temperature Selective Catalytic and Adsorptive Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Neville Pinto; Panagiotis Smirniotis; Stephen Thiel

    2010-08-31

    Coal will likely continue to be a dominant component of power generation in the foreseeable future. This project addresses the issue of environmental compliance for two important pollutants: NO{sub x} and mercury. Integration of emission control units is in principle possible through a Low Temperature Selective Catalytic and Adsorptive Reactor (LTSCAR) in which NO{sub x} removal is achieved in a traditional SCR mode but at low temperature, and, uniquely, using carbon monoxide as a reductant. The capture of mercury is integrated into the same process unit. Such an arrangement would reduce mercury removal costs significantly, and provide improved control for the ultimate disposal of mercury. The work completed in this project demonstrates that the use of CO as a reductant in LTSCR is technically feasible using supported manganese oxide catalysts, that the simultaneous warm-gas capture of elemental and oxidized mercury is technically feasible using both nanostructured chelating adsorbents and ceria-titania-based materials, and that integrated removal of mercury and NO{sub x} is technically feasible using ceria-titania-based materials.

  11. An engineering and economic evaluation of the methane de-NOX{sup SM} technology

    SciTech Connect

    Abbasi, H.A.; Khinkis, M.J.; Scherrer, R.

    1993-12-31

    The Institute of Gas Technology (IGT) and Ogden Martin Systems, Inc. (OMS) are conducting joint engineering and economic evaluation of IGT`s METHANE de-NOX{sup SM} technology for its application to new, as well as retrofit, municipal waste combustors (MWCs). It is anticipated that this new technology offers a technically and economically attractive alternative to existing selective noncatalytic reduction (SNCR) systems for new facilities, as well as in retrofit applications. Consequently, IGT and OMS are considering pursuing a long-term demonstration of this technology on an OMS MWC. The METHANE de-NOX approach was developed based on extensive full-scale MWC infurnace characterization and pilot-scale testing using simulated combustion products. The approach involves injection of natural gas, together with recirculated flue gases (for mixing), above the grate to provide oxygen-deficient combustion conditions that promote the destruction of NO{sub x} precursors, as well as NO{sub x}. Extensive pilot-scale testing, using both simulated combustion products and actual municipal waste (MW), showed that significant NO{sub x} reduction could be achieved. The results were used to define the key operating parameters for a field evaluation of the process. A full-scale METHANE de-NOX system was designed and retrofitted to a 100-ton/day Riley/Takuma mass burn system at the Olmsted County Waste-to-Energy facility for this field evaluation. The results of the field evaluation tests demonstrated the reduction of up to 60% in NO{sub x} emissions and up to 50% in CO emissions. Further benefits included a reduction of up to 50% in excess air requirements and boiler efficiency improvements. This paper describes the METHANE de-NOX technology and discusses the results to date of the IGT/OMS engineering and economic study. The focus is on the discussion of the benefits and drawbacks of this new technology in comparison with existing SNCR systems.

  12. NOx Control for Utility Boiler OTR Compliance

    SciTech Connect

    Hamid Farzan

    2003-12-31

    Under sponsorship of the Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), the Babcock and Wilcox Company (B and W), and Fuel Tech teamed together to investigate an integrated solution for NO{sub x} control. The system is comprised of B and W's DRB-4Z{trademark} ultra low-NO{sub x} pulverized coal (PC) burner technology and Fuel Tech's NOxOUT{reg_sign}, a urea-based selective non-catalytic reduction (SNCR) technology. Development of the low-NO{sub x} burner technology has been a focus in B and W's combustion program. The DRB-4Z{trademark} burner is B and W's newest low-NO{sub x} burner capable of achieving very low NO{sub x}. The burner is designed to reduce NO{sub x} by controlled mixing of the fuel and air. Based on data from several 500 to 600 MWe boilers firing PRB coal, NOx emissions levels of 0.15 to 0.20 lb/ 106 Btu have been achieved from the DRB-4Z{trademark} burners in combination with overfire air ports. Although NOx emissions from the DRB-4Z{trademark} burner are nearing the Ozone Transport Rule (OTR) level of 0.15 lb NO{sub x}/106 Btu, the utility boiler owners can still benefit from the addition of an SNCR and/or SCR system in order to comply with the stringent NO{sub x} emission levels facing them. Large-scale testing is planned in B and W's 100-million Btu/hr Clean Environment Development Facility (CEDF) that simulates the conditions of large coal-fired utility boilers. The objective of the project is to achieve a NO{sub x} level below 0.15 lb/106 Btu (with ammonia slip of less than 5 ppm) in the CEDF using PRB coal and B and W's DRB-4Z{trademark} low-NO{sub x} pulverized coal (PC) burner in combination with dual zone overfire air ports and Fuel Tech's NO{sub x}OUT{reg_sign}. During this period B and W prepared and submitted the project management plan and hazardous substance plan to DOE. The negotiation of a subcontract for Fuel Tech has been started.

  13. Compressor lubrication and noise reduction system

    SciTech Connect

    Bayyouk, J.A.; Waser, M.P.

    1988-06-14

    An oil lubrication and noise suppression system is described comprising: an oil sump: a crankshaft rotatable about an axis and defining a centrifugal oil pump: an oil pickup tube extending into the oil sump and secured to the crankshaft coaxial with the axis and rotatable with the crankshaft about the axis as a unit; and an impeller axially asymmetrically mounted on the pickup tube within the oil sump whereby upon rotation of the crankshaft, the oil pickup tube and the impeller as a unit causes the production of froth and the pumping of oil while preventing the formation of a stable vortex.

  14. Simultaneous NOx and hydrocarbon emissions control for lean-burn engines using low-temperature solid oxide fuel cell at open circuit.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ta-Jen; Hsu, Sheng-Hsiang; Wu, Chung-Ying

    2012-02-21

    The high fuel efficiency of lean-burn engines is associated with high temperature and excess oxygen during combustion and thus is associated with high-concentration NO(x) emission. This work reveals that very high concentration of NO(x) in the exhaust can be reduced and hydrocarbons (HCs) can be simultaneously oxidized using a low-temperature solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC). An SOFC unit is constructed with Ni-YSZ as the anode, YSZ as the electrolyte, and La(0.6)Sr(0.4)CoO(3) (LSC)-Ce(0.9)Gd(0.1)O(1.95) as the cathode, with or without adding vanadium to LSC. SOFC operation at 450 °C and open circuit can effectively treat NO(x) over the cathode at a very high concentration in the simulated exhaust. Higher NO(x) concentration up to 5000 ppm can result in a larger NO(x) to N(2) rate. Moreover, a higher oxygen concentration promotes NO conversion. Complete oxidation of HCs can be achieved by adding silver to the LSC current collecting layer. The SOFC-based emissions control system can treat NO(x) and HCs simultaneously, and can be operated without consuming the anode fuel (a reductant) at near the engine exhaust temperature to eliminate the need for reductant refilling and extra heating.

  15. A decision support system for emission reduction assessment: the OPERA LIFE+ project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carnevale, Claudio; Bianchessi, Nicola; Finzi, Giovanna; Pederzoli, Anna; Pisoni, Enrico; Volta, Marialuisa; Deserti, Marco; De Munari, Eriberto; Stortini, Michele; Veronesi, Paolo; Gianfreda, Roberta; Maffeis, Giuseppe; Blond, Nadege; Mark-Hummel, Lioba; Clappier, Alain; Perron, Gilles

    2013-04-01

    In last decades, air pollution modelling assumed a key role for the definition and evaluation of suitable emission control strategies, supporting Regional Decision Makers in the design of long-term plans for air quality improvement. This is a complex task, due to the non-linear chemical reactions and physical processes that bring to secondary pollution formation and accumulation, involving precursor emissions, namely VOC, NOx, NH3, primary PM and SO2. The problem is even more complex when constraining policy to a fixed budget. This paper presents the first results of the OPERA (Operational Procedure for Emission Reduction Assessment) LIFE+ project (2010-2013, www.operatool.eu) aiming to design and to implement an enhanced approach to identify efficient regional policies (1) complying with National and EU air quality standards, (2) with local emission and meteorological features, financial, technological and social constraints and (3) considering potential synergies with actions to reduce GHG emissions. The proposed methodology is based on a multi-objective (air quality, internal and external costs) optimization problem. The decision variables are the technical and non-technical emission abatement measures. Artificial neural networks, identified processing long-term 3D deterministic multi-phase modelling system simulation outputs, describe the nonlinear relations between the control variables (precursor emissions reduction) and the air quality indexes (AQIs), defining the air quality objective. The internal costs are due to emission reduction measures implementation, while the external costs assess the damage due to population pollution exposure. The methodology has been implemented in a software tool (RIAT+) and tested on two regional applications, Emilia Romagna (IT) and Alsace (FR).

  16. Cryogenic Boil-Off Reduction System Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plachta, David W.; Johnson, Wesley L.; Feller, Jeffrey R.

    2014-01-01

    Cryogenic propellants such as liquid hydrogen (LH2) and liquid oxygen (LO2) are a part of NASA's future space exploration due to the high specific impulse that can be achieved using engines suitable for moving 10's to 100's of metric tons of payload mass to destinations outside of low earth orbit. However, the low storage temperatures of LH2 and LO2 cause substantial boil-off losses for missions with durations greater than several days. The losses can be greatly reduced by incorporating high performance cryocooler technology to intercept heat load to the propellant tanks and by the integration of self-supporting multi-layer insulation. The active thermal control technology under development is the integration of the reverse turbo- Brayton cycle cryocooler to the propellant tank through a distributed cooling network of tubes coupled to a shield in the tank insulation and to the tank wall itself. Also, the self-supporting insulation technology was utilized under the shield to obtain needed tank applied LH2 performance. These elements were recently tested at NASA Glenn Research Center in a series of three tests, two that reduced LH2 boil-off and one to eliminate LO2 boil-off. This test series was conducted in a vacuum chamber that replicated the vacuum of space and the temperatures of low Earth orbit. The test results show that LH2 boil-off was reduced 60% by the cryocooler system operating at 90K and that robust LO2 zero boil-off storage, including full tank pressure control was achieved.

  17. Greenidge multi-pollutant project achieves emissions reduction goals

    SciTech Connect

    2008-07-01

    Performance testing at the Greenridge Multi-Pollutant Project has met or exceeded project goals, indicating that deep emission reduciton sin small, difficult-to-retrofit power plants can be achieved. The technology fitted at the 107 MWe AES Greenridge Unit 4 includes a hybrid selective non-catalytic reduction/selective catalytic reduction system for NOx control (NOxOUT CASCADE) and a Turbosorp circulating fluidized bed dry scrubber system for SO{sub 2}, mercury, SO{sub 3} HC and Hf control. 2 figs.

  18. The Cu-CHA deNOx Catalyst in Action: Temperature-Dependent NH3-Assisted Selective Catalytic Reduction Monitored by Operando XAS and XES.

    PubMed

    Lomachenko, Kirill A; Borfecchia, Elisa; Negri, Chiara; Berlier, Gloria; Lamberti, Carlo; Beato, Pablo; Falsig, Hanne; Bordiga, Silvia

    2016-09-21

    The small-pore Cu-CHA zeolite is today the object of intensive research efforts to rationalize its outstanding performance in the NH3-assisted selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of harmful nitrogen oxides and to unveil the SCR mechanism. Herein we exploit operando X-ray spectroscopies to monitor the Cu-CHA catalyst in action during NH3-SCR in the 150-400 °C range, targeting Cu oxidation state, mobility, and preferential N or O ligation as a function of reaction temperature. By combining operando XANES, EXAFS, and vtc-XES, we unambiguously identify two distinct regimes for the atomic-scale behavior of Cu active-sites. Low-temperature SCR, up to ∼200 °C, is characterized by balanced populations of Cu(I)/Cu(II) sites and dominated by mobile NH3-solvated Cu-species. From 250 °C upward, in correspondence to the steep increase in catalytic activity, the largely dominant Cu-species are framework-coordinated Cu(II) sites, likely representing the active sites for high-temperature SCR. PMID:27532483

  19. The Cu-CHA deNOx Catalyst in Action: Temperature-Dependent NH3-Assisted Selective Catalytic Reduction Monitored by Operando XAS and XES.

    PubMed

    Lomachenko, Kirill A; Borfecchia, Elisa; Negri, Chiara; Berlier, Gloria; Lamberti, Carlo; Beato, Pablo; Falsig, Hanne; Bordiga, Silvia

    2016-09-21

    The small-pore Cu-CHA zeolite is today the object of intensive research efforts to rationalize its outstanding performance in the NH3-assisted selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of harmful nitrogen oxides and to unveil the SCR mechanism. Herein we exploit operando X-ray spectroscopies to monitor the Cu-CHA catalyst in action during NH3-SCR in the 150-400 °C range, targeting Cu oxidation state, mobility, and preferential N or O ligation as a function of reaction temperature. By combining operando XANES, EXAFS, and vtc-XES, we unambiguously identify two distinct regimes for the atomic-scale behavior of Cu active-sites. Low-temperature SCR, up to ∼200 °C, is characterized by balanced populations of Cu(I)/Cu(II) sites and dominated by mobile NH3-solvated Cu-species. From 250 °C upward, in correspondence to the steep increase in catalytic activity, the largely dominant Cu-species are framework-coordinated Cu(II) sites, likely representing the active sites for high-temperature SCR.

  20. Eliminating air heater plugging and corrosion caused by SCR/SNCR systems for NOx control on coal-fired boilers

    SciTech Connect

    Guffre, J.

    2007-10-15

    In a typical coal-fired power plant the rotary regenerative air heater is responsible for 5-10% of the boiler's total efficiency. The three biggest threats to air heater performance deterioration are corrosion of the heat exchange surfaces, plugging, and air heater leakage through the seals. The article concentrates on the vastly increased level of corrosion and plugging issues associated with installing selective catalytic reduction (SCR) and selective non-catalytic reduction (SNCR) systems for controlling nitrogen oxide emissions. Some injected ammonia in the SCR process reacts with SO{sub 2} to form ammonium sulphate and bisulphate (ABS) which is deposited on the air heater element surfaces. This can be overcome by applying coatings, using corrosion-resistant steels, reconfiguring the air heaters to a two layer design, improving air heater blowers, improving technologies for removing ammonia 'slip' before it enters the air heater, and using new catalysts that reduce the oxidation of SO{sub 2} to SO{sub 3}. 4 figs.

  1. Lean NOx Trap Catalysis for Lean Natural Gas Engine Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Parks, II, James E; Storey, John Morse; Theiss, Timothy J; Ponnusamy, Senthil; Ferguson, Harley Douglas; Williams, Aaron M; Tassitano, James B

    2007-09-01

    efficiency and emissions of natural gas reciprocating engines are being pursued. Approaches include: stoichiometric engine operation with exhaust gas recirculation and three-way catalysis, advanced combustion modes such as homogeneous charge compression ignition, and extension of the lean combustion limit with advanced ignition concepts and/or hydrogen mixing. The research presented here addresses the technical approach of combining efficient lean spark-ignited natural gas combustion with low emissions obtained from a lean NOx trap catalyst aftertreatment system. This approach can be applied to current lean engine technology or advanced lean engines that may result from related efforts in lean limit extension. Furthermore, the lean NOx trap technology has synergy with hydrogen-assisted lean limit extension since hydrogen is produced from natural gas during the lean NOx trap catalyst system process. The approach is also applicable to other lean engines such as diesel engines, natural gas turbines, and lean gasoline engines; other research activities have focused on those applications. Some commercialization of the technology has occurred for automotive applications (both diesel and lean gasoline engine vehicles) and natural gas turbines for stationary power. The research here specifically addresses barriers to commercialization of the technology for large lean natural gas reciprocating engines for stationary power. The report presented here is a comprehensive collection of research conducted by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) on lean NOx trap catalysis for lean natural gas reciprocating engines. The research was performed in the Department of Energy's ARES program from 2003 to 2007 and covers several aspects of the technology. All studies were conducted at ORNL on a Cummins C8.3G+ natural gas engine chosen based on industry input to simulate large lean natural gas engines. Specific technical areas addressed by the research include: NOx reduction efficiency, partial

  2. 40 CFR 75.33 - Standard missing data procedures for SO2, NOX, and flow rate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... SO2, NOX, and flow rate. 75.33 Section 75.33 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY....33 Standard missing data procedures for SO2, NOX, and flow rate. (a) Following initial certification of the required SO2, NOX, and flow rate monitoring system(s) at a particular unit or stack...

  3. Order (n) DISCOS for multibody systems with gear reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chun, Hon M.; Turner, James D.; Frisch, Harold P.

    1990-01-01

    Recent developments in O(n) algorithms (where n is the number of bodies in the system) and parallel processing have drastically reduced the computer time needed to simulate systems involving many bodies. This paper presents a gear-reduction model for the O(n) version of DISCOS, a standard software package for simulation and analysis of flexible multibody systems. The gear-reduction model allows the accurate modeling of harmonic drives, which are commonly used in robot joints. The formulation has been implemented and validated with known results. The gear model can also be used for gear-train, rack-and-pinion, and screw joints.

  4. DEVELOPMENT OF A NOVEL RADIATIVELY/CONDUCTIVELY STABILIZED BURNER FOR SIGNIFICANT REDUCTION OF NOx EMISSIONS AND FOR ADVANCING THE MODELING AND UNDERSTANDING OF PULVERIZED COAL COMBUSTION AND EMISSIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Noam Lior; Stuart W. Churchill

    2003-10-01

    the Gordon Conference on Modern Development in Thermodynamics. The results obtained are very encouraging for the development of the RCSC as a commercial burner for significant reduction of NO{sub x} emissions, and highly warrants further study and development.

  5. METHANE de-NOX FOR UTILITY PC BOILERS

    SciTech Connect

    Joseph Rabovitser; Bruce Bryan; Serguei Nester; Stan Wohadlo

    2002-01-31

    The project seeks to develop and validate a new pulverized coal combustion system to reduce utility PC boiler NOx emissions to 0.15 lb per million Btu or less without post-combustion flue gas cleaning. Work during previous reporting periods completed the design, installation, shakedown and initial PRB coal testing of a 3-million Btu/h pilot system at BBP's Pilot-Scale Combustion Facility (PSCF) in Worcester, MA. Based on these results, modifications to the gas-fired preheat combustor and PC burner were defined, along with a modified testing plan and schedule. A revised subcontract was executed with BBP to reflect changes in the pilot testing program. Modeling activities were continued to develop and verify revised design approaches for both the Preheat gas combustor and PC burner. Reactivation of the pilot test system was then begun with BBP personnel. During the previous reporting period, reactivation of the pilot test system was completed with the modified Preheat gas combustor. Following shakedown of the modified gas combustor alone, a series of successful tests of the new combustor with PRB coal using the original PC burner were completed. NOx at the furnace exit was reduced significantly with the modified gas combustor, to as low as 150 ppm with only 36 ppm CO (both corrected to 3% O2). Concurrent with testing, GTI and BBP collaborated on development of two modified designs for the PC burner optimized to fire preheated char and pyrolysis products from the Preheat gas combustor. During the current reporting period, one of the two modified PC burner designs was fabricated and installed in the pilot test facility. Testing of the modified pilot system (modified gas combustor and modified PC burner) during the quarter included 38 tests with PRB coal. NOx reduction was significantly improved to levels as low as 60-100 ppmv with CO in the range of 35-112 ppmv without any furnace air staging.

  6. NOx formation in combustion of gaseous fuel in ejection burner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rimár, Miroslav; Kulikov, Andrii

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this work is to prepare model for researching of the formation in combustion of gaseous fuels. NOx formation is one of the main ecological problems nowadays as nitrogen oxides is one of main reasons of acid rains. The ANSYS model was designed according to the calculation to provide full combustion and good mixing of the fuel and air. The current model is appropriate to research NOx formation and the influence of the different principles of NOx reduction method. Applying of designed model should spare both time of calculations and research and also money as you do not need to measure the burner characteristics.

  7. Plaque reduction over time of an integrated oral hygiene system.

    PubMed

    Nunn, Martha E; Ruhlman, C Douglas; Mallatt, Philip R; Rodriguez, Sally M; Ortblad, Katherine M

    2004-10-01

    This article compares the efficacy of a prototype integrated system (the IntelliClean System from Sonicare and Crest) in the reduction of supragingival plaque to that of a manual toothbrush and conventional toothpaste. The integrated system was compared to a manual toothbrush with conventional toothpaste in a randomized, single-blinded, parallel, 4-week, controlled clinical trial with 100 subjects randomized to each treatment group. There was a low dropout rate, with 89 subjects in the manual toothbrush group (11% loss to follow-up) and 93 subjects in the integrated system group (7% loss to follow-up) completing the study. The Turesky modification of the Quigley and Hein Plaque Index was used to assess full-mouth plaque scores for each subject. Prebrushing plaque scores were obtained at baseline and at 4 weeks after 14 to 20 hours of plaque accumulation. A survey also was conducted at the conclusion of the study to determine the attitude toward the two oral hygiene systems. The integrated system was found to significantly reduce overall and interproximal prebrushing plaque scores over 4 weeks, both by 8.6%, demonstrating statistically significant superiority in overall plaque reduction (P = .002) and interproximal plaque reduction (P < .001) compared to the manual toothbrush with conventional toothpaste, which showed no significant reduction in either overall plaque or interproximal plaque. This study demonstrates that the IntelliClean System from Sonicare and Crest is superior to a manual toothbrush with conventional toothpaste in reducing overall plaque and interproximal plaque over time.

  8. MODELING COMPETITIVE ADSORPTION IN UREA-SCR CATALYSTS FOR EFFECTIVE LOW TEMPERATURE NOX CONTROL

    SciTech Connect

    Devarakonda, Maruthi N.; Tonkyn, Russell G.; Tran, Diana N.; Lee, Jong H.; Herling, Darrell R.

    2010-09-17

    Although the SCR technology exhibits higher NOx reduction efficiency over a wider range of temperatures among the lean NOx reduction technologies, further improvement in low-temperature performance is required to meet the future emission standards and to lower the system cost. In order to improve the catalyst technologies and optimize the system performance, it is critical to understand the reaction mechanisms and catalyst behaviors with respect to operating conditions. For example, it is well known that the ammonia coverage on catalyst surface is critical for NOx reduction efficiency. However, the level of ammonia storage is influenced by competitive adsorption by other species, such as H2O and NO2. Moreover, hydrocarbon species that slip through the upstream DOC during the cold-start period can also inhibit the SCR performance, especially at low temperatures. Therefore, a one-dimensional detailed kinetic model that can account for the effects of such competitive adsorption has been developed based on steady state surface isotherm tests on a commercial Fe-zeolite catalyst. The model is developed as a C language S-function and implemented in Matlab/Simulink environment. Rate kinetics of adsorption and desorption of each of the adsorbents are determined from individual adsorption tests and validated for a set of test conditions that had all the adsorbents in the feed gas.

  9. Nitrogen oxide reduction strategies for compression ignition engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, Elana M.

    2008-05-01

    increased NOx with reduction in the NO to NO2 conversion. This may indicate that the system was above the low temperature range for this conversion to occur. In the third set of experiments, a small amount of Methane was introduced into the system to study the impact on the cetane number of the fumigated fuel. On a brake specific power basis, the Methane addition reduced the NOx emissions more than with only DME, however the NO to NO2 conversion was lower. NOx emissions were further reduced by retarding the injection timing, but increased with increasing intake air temperature. Through the use of the intake air heating, it was observed that the ignition of the DME/Methane blend was advanced with a smaller LTHR and a higher HTHR. While NOx emissions increased with the increase in bulk cylinder temperature, only the NO emissions increased while NO2 remained constant. Gaseous emissions analysis showed that the heating caused greater conversion of the Methane and DME during combustion.

  10. NOx CONTROL OPTIONS AND INTEGRATION FOR US COAL FIRED BOILERS

    SciTech Connect

    Mike Bockelie; Marc Cremer; Kevin Davis; Connie Senior; Bob Hurt; Eric Eddings; Larry Baxter

    2001-10-10

    This is the fifth Quarterly Technical Report for DOE Cooperative Agreement No: DE-FC26-00NT40753. The goal of the project is to develop cost effective analysis tools and techniques for demonstrating and evaluating low NOx control strategies and their possible impact on boiler performance for firing US coals. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) is providing cofunding for this program. This program contains multiple tasks and good progress is being made on all fronts. Field tests for NOx reduction in a cyclone fired utility boiler due to using Rich Reagent Injection (RRI) have been started. CFD modeling studies have been started to evaluate the use of RRI for NOx reduction in a corner fired utility boiler using pulverized coal. Field tests of a corrosion monitor to measure waterwall wastage in a utility boiler have been completed. Computational studies to evaluate a soot model within a boiler simulation program are continuing. Research to evaluate SCR catalyst performance has started. A literature survey was completed. Experiments have been outlined and two flow reactor systems have been designed and are under construction. Commercial catalyst vendors have been contacted about supplying catalyst samples. Several sets of new experiments have been performed to investigate ammonia removal processes and mechanisms for fly ash. Work has focused on a promising class of processes in which ammonia is destroyed by strong oxidizing agents at ambient temperature during semi-dry processing (the use of moisture amounts less than 5 wt-%). Both ozone and an ozone/peroxide combination have been used to treat both basic and acidic ammonia-laden ashes.

  11. Nitrogen Isotope Composition of Thermally Produced NOx from Various Fossil-Fuel Combustion Sources.

    PubMed

    Walters, Wendell W; Tharp, Bruce D; Fang, Huan; Kozak, Brian J; Michalski, Greg

    2015-10-01

    The nitrogen stable isotope composition of NOx (δ(15)N-NOx) may be a useful indicator for NOx source partitioning, which would help constrain NOx source contributions in nitrogen deposition studies. However, there is large uncertainty in the δ(15)N-NOx values for anthropogenic sources other than on-road vehicles and coal-fired energy generating units. To this end, this study presents a broad analysis of δ(15)N-NOx from several fossil-fuel combustion sources that includes: airplanes, gasoline-powered vehicles not equipped with a three-way catalytic converter, lawn equipment, utility vehicles, urban buses, semitrucks, residential gas furnaces, and natural-gas-fired power plants. A relatively large range of δ(15)N-NOx values was measured from -28.1‰ to 8.5‰ for individual exhaust/flue samples that generally tended to be negative due to the kinetic isotope effect associated with thermal NOx production. A negative correlation between NOx concentrations and δ(15)N-NOx for fossil-fuel combustion sources equipped with selective catalytic reducers was observed, suggesting that the catalytic reduction of NOx increases δ(15)N-NOx values relative to the NOx produced through fossil-fuel combustion processes. Combining the δ(15)N-NOx measured in this study with previous published values, a δ(15)N-NOx regional and seasonal isoscape was constructed for the contiguous U.S., which demonstrates seasonal and regional importance of various NOx sources. PMID:26332865

  12. 40 CFR 89.317 - NOX converter check.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... oxides of nitrogen analyzer in the NO mode, record the concentration of NO indicated by the analyzer. (g.... Record this value. (j) Switch off the NOX generator but maintain gas flow through the system. The oxides of nitrogen analyzer will indicate the NOX in the NO+O2 mixture. Record this value. (k) Turn off...

  13. The DEEP-South: Scheduling and Data Reduction Software System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yim, Hong-Suh; Kim, Myung-Jin; Bae, Youngho; Moon, Hong-Kyu; Choi, Young-Jun; Roh, Dong-Goo; the DEEP-South Team

    2015-08-01

    The DEep Ecliptic Patrol of the Southern sky (DEEP-South), started in October 2012, is currently in test runs with the first Korea Microlensing Telescope Network (KMTNet) 1.6 m wide-field telescope located at CTIO in Chile. While the primary objective for the DEEP-South is physical characterization of small bodies in the Solar System, it is expected to discover a large number of such bodies, many of them previously unknown.An automatic observation planning and data reduction software subsystem called "The DEEP-South Scheduling and Data reduction System" (the DEEP-South SDS) is currently being designed and implemented for observation planning, data reduction and analysis of huge amount of data with minimum human interaction. The DEEP-South SDS consists of three software subsystems: the DEEP-South Scheduling System (DSS), the Local Data Reduction System (LDR), and the Main Data Reduction System (MDR). The DSS manages observation targets, makes decision on target priority and observation methods, schedules nightly observations, and archive data using the Database Management System (DBMS). The LDR is designed to detect moving objects from CCD images, while the MDR conducts photometry and reconstructs lightcurves. Based on analysis made at the LDR and the MDR, the DSS schedules follow-up observation to be conducted at other KMTNet stations. In the end of 2015, we expect the DEEP-South SDS to achieve a stable operation. We also have a plan to improve the SDS to accomplish finely tuned observation strategy and more efficient data reduction in 2016.

  14. Approximate Bisimulation-Based Reduction of Power System Dynamic Models

    SciTech Connect

    Stankovic, AM; Dukic, SD; Saric, AT

    2015-05-01

    In this paper we propose approximate bisimulation relations and functions for reduction of power system dynamic models in differential- algebraic (descriptor) form. The full-size dynamic model is obtained by linearization of the nonlinear transient stability model. We generalize theoretical results on approximate bisimulation relations and bisimulation functions, originally derived for a class of constrained linear systems, to linear systems in descriptor form. An algorithm for transient stability assessment is proposed and used to determine whether the power system is able to maintain the synchronism after a large disturbance. Two benchmark power systems are used to illustrate the proposed algorithm and to evaluate the applicability of approximate bisimulation relations and bisimulation functions for reduction of the power system dynamic models.

  15. DIESEL NOX CONTROL APPLICATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper gives results of a project to design, develop, and demonstrate a diesel engine nitrogen oxide (NOx) and particulate matter (PM) control package that will meet the U.S. Navy's emission control requirements. (NOTE: In 1994, EPA issued a Notice for Proposed Rule Making (NP...

  16. Investigation of NO(x) Removal from Small Engine Exhaust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akyurtlu, Ates; Akyurtlu, Jale F.

    1999-01-01

    Contribution of emissions from small engines to the air pollution is significant. Due to differences in operating conditions and economics, the pollution control systems designed for automobiles will be neither suitable nor economically feasible for use on small engines. The objective of this project was to find a catalyst for the removal of NOx from the exhaust of small engines which use a rich air to fuel ratio. The desired catalyst should be inexpensive so that the cost of the pollution control unit will be only a small fraction of the total equipment cost. The high cost of noble metals makes them too expensive for use as NOx catalyst for small engines. Catalytic reduction of NO can also be accomplished by base-metal oxide catalysts. The main disadvantage of base-metal catalysts is their deactivation by poisons and high temperatures. Requirements for the length of the life of the small engine exhaust catalysts are much less than those for automobile exhaust catalysts. Since there is no oxygen in the exhaust gases, reduction selectivity is not a problem. Also, the reducing exhaust gases might help prevent the harmful interactions of the catalyst with the support. For these reasons only the supported metal oxide catalysts were investigated in this project.

  17. Investigation of NOx Removal from Small Engine Exhaust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akyurtlu, Ates; Akyurtlu, Jale F.

    1999-01-01

    Contribution of emissions from small engines to the air pollution is significant. Due to differences in operating conditions and economics, the pollution control systems designed for automobiles will be neither suitable nor economically feasible for use on small engines. The objective of this project was to find a catalyst for the removal of NOx from the exhaust of small engines which use a rich air to fuel ratio. The desired catalyst should be inexpensive so that the cost of the pollution control unit will be only a small fraction of the total equipment cost. The high cost of noble metals makes them too expensive for use as NOx catalyst for small engines. Catalytic reduction of Nitrogen Oxide (NO) can also be accomplished by base-metal oxide catalysts. The main disadvantage of base-metal catalysts is their deactivation by poisons and high temperatures. Requirements for the length of the life of the small engine exhaust catalysts are much less than those for automobile exhaust catalysts. Since there is no oxygen in the exhaust gases, reduction selectivity is not a problem. Also, the reducing exhaust gases might help prevent the harmful interactions of the catalyst with the support. For these reasons only the supported metal oxide catalysts were investigated in this project.

  18. SOx-NOx-Rox Box{trademark} flue gas clean-up demonstration. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-09-01

    Babcock and Wilcox`s (B and W) SOx-NOx-Rox Box{trademark} process effectively removes SOx, NOx and particulate (Rox) from flue gas generated from coal-fired boilers in a single unit operation, a high temperature baghouse. The SNRB technology utilizes dry sorbent injection upstream of the baghouse for removal of SOx and ammonia injection upstream of a zeolitic selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalyst incorporated in the baghouse to reduce NOx emissions. Because the SOx and NOx removal processes require operation at elevated gas temperatures (800--900 F) for high removal efficiency, high-temperature fabric filter bags are used in the baghouse. The SNRB technology evolved from the bench and laboratory pilot scale to be successfully demonstrated at the 5-MWe field scale. This report represents the completion of Milestone M14 as specified in the Work Plan. B and W tested the SNRB pollution control system at a 5-MWe demonstration facility at Ohio Edison`s R.E. Burger Plant located near Shadyside, Ohio. The design and operation were influenced by the results from laboratory pilot testing at B and W`s Alliance Research Center. The intent was to demonstrate the commercial feasibility of the SNRB process. The SNRB facility treated a 30,000 ACFM flue gas slipstream from Boiler No. 8. Operation of the facility began in May 1992 and was completed in May 1993. About 2,300 hours of high-temperature operation were achieved. The main emissions control performance goals of: greater than 70% SO{sub 2} removal using a calcium-based sorbent; greater than 90% NOx removal with minimal ammonia slip; and particulate emissions in compliance with the New Source Performance Standards (NSPS) of 0.03 lb/million Btu were exceeded simultaneously in the demonstration program when the facility was operated at optimal conditions. Testing also showed significant reductions in emissions of some hazardous air pollutants.

  19. Ammonia Generation over TWC for Passive SCR NOX Control for Lean Gasoline Engines

    SciTech Connect

    Prikhodko, Vitaly Y; Parks, II, James E; Pihl, Josh A; Toops, Todd J

    2014-01-01

    A commercial three-way catalyst (TWC) was evaluated for ammonia (NH3) generation on a 2.0-liter BMW lean burn gasoline direct injection engine as a component in a passive ammonia selective catalytic reduction (SCR) system. The passive NH3 SCR system is a potential low cost approach for controlling nitrogen oxides (NOX) emissions from lean burn gasoline engines. In this system, NH3 is generated over a close-coupled TWC during periodic slightly rich engine operation and subsequently stored on an underfloor SCR catalyst. Upon switching to lean, NOX passes through the TWC and is reduced by the stored NH3 on the SCR catalyst. NH3 generation was evaluated at different air-fuel equivalence ratios at multiple engine speed and load conditions. Near complete conversion of NOX to NH3 was achieved at =0.96 for nearly all conditions studied. At the =0.96 condition, HC emissions were relatively minimal, but CO emissions were significant. Operation at AFRs richer than =0.96 did not provide more NH3 yield and led to higher HC and CO emissions. Results of the reductant conversion and consumption processes were used to calculate a representative fuel consumption of the engine operating with an ideal passive SCR system. The results show a 1-7% fuel economy benefit at various steady-state engine speed and load points relative to a stoichiometric engine operation.

  20. Potential of solar cooling systems for peak demand reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Pesaran, A A; Neymark, J

    1994-11-01

    We investigated the technical feasibility of solar cooling for peak demand reduction using a building energy simulation program (DOE2.1D). The system studied was an absorption cooling system with a thermal coefficient of performance of 0.8 driven by a solar collector system with an efficiency of 50% with no thermal storage. The analysis for three different climates showed that, on the day with peak cooling load, about 17% of the peak load could be met satisfactorily with the solar-assisted cooling system without any thermal storage. A performance availability analysis indicated that the solar cooling system should be designed for lower amounts of available solar resources that coincide with the hours during which peak demand reduction is required. The analysis indicated that in dry climates, direct-normal concentrating collectors work well for solar cooling; however, in humid climates, collectors that absorb diffuse radiation work better.

  1. Optimization of NOx emissions in Yangtze Delta Region using in-situ observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hengmao; Jiang, Fei; Jiang, Ziqiang; Liu, Jane; Chen, Jing Ming; Ju, Weimin

    2016-04-01

    Well quantified NOx emissions are essential for air quality forecasting and air pollution mitigation. The traditional "bottom-up" estimates of NOx emissions, using activity data and emission factors, are subject to large uncertainties, especially in China. Inverse modelling, often referred to as "top-down" approach, using atmospheric observations made from satellites and ground stations, provides an effective means to optimize bottom-up NOx emission inventory. The rapid expansion of air quality monitoring network in China offers an opportunity to constrain NOx emissions using in-situ ground measurements. We explore the potential of using NO2 observations from the air quality monitoring network to improve NOx emissions estimates in China. The four dimensional variational data assimilation (4DVAR) scheme in the Community Multi-scale Air Quality (CMAQ) adjoint model is implemented to infer NOx emissions in Yangtze Delta Region at 12 km resolution. The optimized NOx emissions are presented. The uncertainly reduction of estimates is analyzed and discussed.

  2. 40 CFR 76.6 - NOX emission limitations for Group 2 boilers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) ACID RAIN NITROGEN OXIDES EMISSION REDUCTION PROGRAM § 76.6 NOX emission limitations..., the date on which the unit is required to meet Acid Rain emission reduction requirements for SO2,...

  3. 40 CFR 76.6 - NOX emission limitations for Group 2 boilers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) ACID RAIN NITROGEN OXIDES EMISSION REDUCTION PROGRAM § 76.6 NOX emission limitations..., the date on which the unit is required to meet Acid Rain emission reduction requirements for SO2,...

  4. 40 CFR 76.6 - NOX emission limitations for Group 2 boilers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) ACID RAIN NITROGEN OXIDES EMISSION REDUCTION PROGRAM § 76.6 NOX emission limitations..., the date on which the unit is required to meet Acid Rain emission reduction requirements for SO2,...

  5. 40 CFR 76.6 - NOX emission limitations for Group 2 boilers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) ACID RAIN NITROGEN OXIDES EMISSION REDUCTION PROGRAM § 76.6 NOX emission limitations..., the date on which the unit is required to meet Acid Rain emission reduction requirements for SO2,...

  6. 40 CFR 76.6 - NOX emission limitations for Group 2 boilers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) ACID RAIN NITROGEN OXIDES EMISSION REDUCTION PROGRAM § 76.6 NOX emission limitations..., the date on which the unit is required to meet Acid Rain emission reduction requirements for SO2,...

  7. 40 CFR 96.353 - Recordation of CAIR NOX Ozone Season allowance allocations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Recordation of CAIR NOX Ozone Season... STATE IMPLEMENTATION PLANS CAIR NOX Ozone Season Allowance Tracking System § 96.353 Recordation of CAIR NOX Ozone Season allowance allocations. (a) By September 30, 2007, the Administrator will record...

  8. 40 CFR 96.353 - Recordation of CAIR NOX Ozone Season allowance allocations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Recordation of CAIR NOX Ozone Season... STATE IMPLEMENTATION PLANS CAIR NOX Ozone Season Allowance Tracking System § 96.353 Recordation of CAIR NOX Ozone Season allowance allocations. (a) By September 30, 2007, the Administrator will record...

  9. 40 CFR 96.353 - Recordation of CAIR NOX Ozone Season allowance allocations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Recordation of CAIR NOX Ozone Season... STATE IMPLEMENTATION PLANS CAIR NOX Ozone Season Allowance Tracking System § 96.353 Recordation of CAIR NOX Ozone Season allowance allocations. (a) By September 30, 2007, the Administrator will record...

  10. 40 CFR 96.353 - Recordation of CAIR NOX Ozone Season allowance allocations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Recordation of CAIR NOX Ozone Season... STATE IMPLEMENTATION PLANS CAIR NOX Ozone Season Allowance Tracking System § 96.353 Recordation of CAIR NOX Ozone Season allowance allocations. (a) By September 30, 2007, the Administrator will record...

  11. 40 CFR 96.353 - Recordation of CAIR NOX Ozone Season allowance allocations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Recordation of CAIR NOX Ozone Season... STATE IMPLEMENTATION PLANS CAIR NOX Ozone Season Allowance Tracking System § 96.353 Recordation of CAIR NOX Ozone Season allowance allocations. (a) By September 30, 2007, the Administrator will record...

  12. 40 CFR 75.12 - Specific provisions for monitoring NOX emission rate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Specific provisions for monitoring NOX... provisions for monitoring NOX emission rate. (a) Coal-fired units, gas-fired nonpeaking units or oil-fired... for a NOX continuous emission monitoring system (CEMS) for each affected coal-fired unit,...

  13. 40 CFR 75.12 - Specific provisions for monitoring NOX emission rate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Specific provisions for monitoring NOX... provisions for monitoring NOX emission rate. (a) Coal-fired units, gas-fired nonpeaking units or oil-fired... for a NOX continuous emission monitoring system (CEMS) for each affected coal-fired unit,...

  14. 40 CFR 75.12 - Specific provisions for monitoring NOX emission rate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Specific provisions for monitoring NOX... provisions for monitoring NOX emission rate. (a) Coal-fired units, gas-fired nonpeaking units or oil-fired... for a NOX continuous emission monitoring system (CEMS) for each affected coal-fired unit,...

  15. DIAL remotely sensed ethylene: featuring ozone-ethylene dynamics and correlation in presence of NOx

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gasmi, Taieb; Alonso, C. G.; Gonzalez Urena, Angel

    2003-12-01

    Ethylene has been monitored with a single-ended CO2-TEA laser-based DIAL system using a topographic target. The direct correlation between ozone concentration and ethylene/NOx ratio were demonstrated. Our work brings an additional confirmation of concurrent VOC/NOx and NOx-limited regimes in the generation of excess ozone.

  16. 40 CFR 96.354 - Compliance with CAIR NOX emissions limitation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... IMPLEMENTATION PLANS CAIR NOX Ozone Season Allowance Tracking System § 96.354 Compliance with CAIR NOX emissions... under paragraph (d)(1) of this section shall not affect the liability of the owners and operators of the... Administrator may review and conduct independent audits concerning any submission under the CAIR NOX...

  17. Extreme Cost Reductions with Multi-Megawatt Centralized Inverter Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Schwabe, Ulrich; Fishman, Oleg

    2015-03-20

    The objective of this project was to fully develop, demonstrate, and commercialize a new type of utility scale PV system. Based on patented technology, this includes the development of a truly centralized inverter system with capacities up to 100MW, and a high voltage, distributed harvesting approach. This system promises to greatly impact both the energy yield from large scale PV systems by reducing losses and increasing yield from mismatched arrays, as well as reduce overall system costs through very cost effective conversion and BOS cost reductions enabled by higher voltage operation.

  18. Balanced systems and structures - Reduction, assignment, and perturbations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gawronski, Wodek

    1992-01-01

    New results on properties of balanced linear systems and structures are presented. Balanced representation is defined for systems with poles at an imaginary axis or at the origin. Grammians do not exist in this case, but antigrammians are introduced which make balanced reduction possible. System grammians of specified properties are obtained by assigning the sensor and actuator configuration. The latter is determined using input-output assignment procedures introduced for general systems and specified to structures. A system is said to be uniformly balanced if all its Hankel singular values are equal.

  19. Slamf8 is a negative regulator of Nox2 activity in macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guoxing; Abadía-Molina, Ana C; Berger, Scott B; Romero, Xavier; O'Keeffe, Michael; Rojas-Barros, Domingo I.; Aleman, Marta; Liao, Gongxian; Maganto-García, Elena; Fresno, Manuel; Wang, Ninghai; Detre, Cynthia; Terhorst, Cox

    2012-01-01

    Slamf8 (CD353) is a cell surface receptor that is expressed upon activation of macrophages by interferon-gamma or bacteria. Here we report that a very high Nox2 activity enzyme was found in Slamf8−/− macrophages in response to E.coli or S.aureus, but also to phorbol myristate acetate. The elevated Nox2 activity in Slamf8−/− macrophages was also demonstrated in E.coli or S.aureus phagosomes by using a pH indicator system, and was further confirmed by a reduction of the enzyme activity after transfection of the receptor into Slamf8-deficient primary macrophages or RAW 264.7 cells. Upon exposure to bacteria and/or phorbol myristate acetate, PKC activity in Slamf8−/− macrophages is increased. This results in an enhanced phosphorylation of p40phox, one key component of the Nox2 enzyme complex, which in turn leads to greater Nox2 activity. Taken together, the data show that upon response to inflammation-associated stimuli the inducible receptor Slamf8 negatively regulates inflammatory responses. PMID:22593622

  20. Implications of diesel emissions control failures to emission factors and road transport NOx evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ntziachristos, Leonidas; Papadimitriou, Giannis; Ligterink, Norbert; Hausberger, Stefan

    2016-09-01

    Diesel NOx emissions have been at the forefront of research and regulation scrutiny as a result of failures of late vehicle technologies to deliver on-road emissions reductions. The current study aims at identifying the actual emissions levels of late light duty vehicle technologies, including Euro 5 and Euro 6 ones. Mean NOx emission factor levels used in the most popular EU vehicle emission models (COPERT, HBEFA and VERSIT+) are compared with latest emission information collected in the laboratory over real-world driving cycles and on the road using portable emissions measurement systems (PEMS). The comparison shows that Euro 5 passenger car (PC) emission factors well reflect on road levels and that recently revealed emissions control failures do not call for any significant corrections. However Euro 5 light commercial vehicles (LCVs) and Euro 6 PCs in the 2014-2016 period exhibit on road emission levels twice as high as used in current models. Moreover, measured levels vary a lot for Euro 6 vehicles. Scenarios for future evolution of Euro 6 emission factors, reflecting different degree of effectiveness of emissions control regulations, show that total NOx emissions from diesel Euro 6 PC and LCV may correspond from 49% up to 83% of total road transport emissions in 2050. Unless upcoming and long term regulations make sure that light duty diesel NOx emissions are effectively addressed, this will have significant implications in meeting future air quality and national emissions ceilings targets.

  1. EMISSIONS REDUCTION DATA FOR GRID-CONNECTED PHOTOVOLTAIC POWER SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study measured the pollutant emission reduction potential of 29 photovoltaic (PV) systems installed on residential and commercial building rooftops across the U.S. from 1993 through 1997. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and 21 electric power companies sponsor...

  2. NOx Emission Reduction by Oscillating combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Institute of Gas Technology

    2004-01-30

    High-temperature, natural gas-fired furnaces, especially those fired with preheated air, produce large quantities of NO{sub x} per ton of material processed. Regulations on emissions from industrial furnaces are becoming increasingly more stringent. In addition, competition is forcing operators to make their furnaces more productive and/or efficient. Switching from preheated air to industrial oxygen can increase efficiency and reduce NO{sub x}, but oxygen is significantly more costly than air and may not be compatible with the material being heated. What was needed, and what was developed during this project, is a technology that reduces NO{sub x} emissions while increasing furnace efficiency for both air- and oxy-fired furnaces. Oscillating combustion is a retrofit technology that involves the forced oscillation of the fuel flow rate to a furnace. These oscillations create successive, fuel-rich and fuel-lean zones within the furnace. Heat transfer from the flame to the load increases due to the more luminous fuel-rich zones, a longer overall flame length, and the breakup of the thermal boundary layer. The increased heat transfer shortens heat up times, thereby increasing furnace productivity, and reduces the heat going up the stack, thereby increasing efficiency. The fuel-rich and fuel-lean zones also produce substantially less NO{sub x} than firing at a constant excess air level. The longer flames and higher heat transfer rate reduces overall peak flame temperature and thus reduces additional NO{sub x} formation from the eventual mixing of the zones and burnout of combustibles from the rich zones. This project involved the development of hardware to implement oscillating combustion on an industrial scale, the laboratory testing of oscillating combustion on various types of industrial burners, and the field testing of oscillating combustion on several types of industrial furnace. Before laboratory testing began, a market study was conducted, based on the attributes of oscillating combustion and on the results of an earlier project at GTI and Air Liquide, to determine which applications for oscillating combustion would show the greatest probability for technical success and greatest probability for market acceptability. The market study indicated that furnaces in the steel, glass, and metal melting industries would perform well in both categories. These findings guided the selection of burners for laboratory testing and, with the results of the laboratory testing, guided the selection of field test sites.

  3. NOx Emission Reduction by Oscillating Combustion

    SciTech Connect

    John C. Wagner

    2004-03-31

    High-temperature, natural gas-fired furnaces, especially those fired with preheated air, produce large quantities of NO{sub x} per ton of material processed. Regulations on emissions from industrial furnaces are becoming increasingly more stringent. In addition, competition is forcing operators to make their furnaces more productive and/or efficient. Switching from preheated air to industrial oxygen can increase efficiency and reduce NO{sub x}, but oxygen is significantly more costly than air and may not be compatible with the material being heated. What was needed, and what was developed during this project, is a technology that reduces NO{sub x} emissions while increasing furnace efficiency for both air- and oxy-fired furnaces. Oscillating combustion is a retrofit technology that involves the forced oscillation of the fuel flow rate to a furnace. These oscillations create successive, fuel-rich and fuel-lean zones within the furnace. Heat transfer from the flame to the load increases due to the more luminous fuel-rich zones, a longer overall flame length, and the breakup of the thermal boundary layer. The increased heat transfer shortens heat up times, thereby increasing furnace productivity, and reduces the heat going up the stack, thereby increasing efficiency. The fuel-rich and fuel-lean zones also produce substantially less NO{sub x} than firing at a constant excess air level. The longer flames and higher heat transfer rate reduces overall peak flame temperature and thus reduces additional NO{sub x} formation from the eventual mixing of the zones and burnout of combustibles from the rich zones. This project involved the development of hardware to implement oscillating combustion on an industrial scale, the laboratory testing of oscillating combustion on various types of industrial burners, and the field testing of oscillating combustion on several types of industrial furnace. Before laboratory testing began, a market study was conducted, based on the attributes of oscillating combustion and on the results of an earlier project at GTI and Air Liquide, to determine which applications for oscillating combustion would show the greatest probability for technical success and greatest probability for market acceptability. The market study indicated that furnaces in the steel, glass, and metal melting industries would perform well in both categories. These findings guided the selection of burners for laboratory testing and, with the results of the laboratory testing, guided the selection of field test sites.

  4. Recursion Operators for CBC system with reductions. Geometric theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanovski, A.; Vilasi, G.

    2016-09-01

    We discuss some recent developments of the geometric theory of the Recursion Operators (Generating Operators) for Caudrey-Beals-Coifman systems (CBC systems) on semisimple Lie algebras. As is well known the essence of this interpretation is that the Recursion Operators could be considered as adjoint to Nijenhuis tensors on certain infinite-dimensional manifolds. In particular, we discuss the case when there are Zp reductions of Mikhailov type.

  5. Reduction techniques for network validation in systems biology.

    PubMed

    Ackermann, J; Einloft, J; Nöthen, J; Koch, I

    2012-12-21

    The rapidly increasing amount of experimental biological data enables the development of large and complex, often genome-scale models of molecular systems. The simulation and analysis of these computer models of metabolism, signal transduction, and gene regulation are standard applications in systems biology, but size and complexity of the networks limit the feasibility of many methods. Reduction of networks provides a hierarchical view of complex networks and gives insight knowledge into their coarse-grained structural properties. Although network reduction has been extensively studied in computer science, adaptation and exploration of these concepts are still lacking for the analysis of biochemical reaction systems. Using the Petri net formalism, we describe two local network structures, common transition pairs and minimal transition invariants. We apply these two structural elements for network reduction. The reduction preserves the CTI-property (covered by transition invariants), which is an important feature for completeness of biological models. We demonstrate this concept for a selection of metabolic networks including a benchmark network of Saccharomyces cerevisiae whose straightforward treatment is not yet feasible even on modern supercomputers. PMID:22982289

  6. An object-oriented data reduction system in Fortran

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, J.

    1992-01-01

    A data reduction system for the AAO two-degree field project is being developed using an object-oriented approach. Rather than use an object-oriented language (such as C++) the system is written in Fortran and makes extensive use of existing subroutine libraries provided by the UK Starlink project. Objects are created using the extensible N-dimensional Data Format (NDF) which itself is based on the Hierarchical Data System (HDS). The software consists of a class library, with each class corresponding to a Fortran subroutine with a standard calling sequence. The methods of the classes provide operations on NDF objects at a similar level of functionality to the applications of conventional data reduction systems. However, because they are provided as callable subroutines, they can be used as building blocks for more specialist applications. The class library is not dependent on a particular software environment thought it can be used effectively in ADAM applications. It can also be used from standalone Fortran programs. It is intended to develop a graphical user interface for use with the class library to form the 2dF data reduction system.

  7. NOx CONTROL OPTIONS AND INTEGRATION FOR US COAL FIRED BOILERS

    SciTech Connect

    Mike Bockelie; Marc Cremer; Kevin Davis; Connie Senior; Bob Hurt; Eric Eddings; Larry Baxter

    2002-07-28

    This is the eighth Quarterly Technical Report for DOE Cooperative Agreement No: DE-FC26-00NT40753. The goal of the project is to develop cost effective analysis tools and techniques for demonstrating and evaluating low NOx control strategies and their possible impact on boiler performance for firing US coals. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) is providing co-funding for this program. This program contains multiple tasks and good progress is being made on all fronts. CFD modeling studies of RRI in a full scale utility boiler have been performed that provide further insight into the NOx reduction process that occurs if the furnace is not adequately staged. In situ reactivity data indicate thus far that titania sulfates under SCR conditions but there is no indication of vanadia sulfation in agreement with some, but not most literature results. Additional analysis and advanced diagnostics are under way to confirm this result and determine its accuracy. Construction of a catalyst characterization reactor system is nearly complete, with a few remaining details discussed in this report. Shakedown testing of the SCR field reactor was completed at the University of Utah pilot-scale coal furnace. The CEM system has been ordered. Talks continued with American Electric Power about hosting a demonstration at their Rockport plant.

  8. Update on microkinetic modeling of lean NOx trap chemistry.

    SciTech Connect

    Larson, Richard S.; Daw, C. Stuart; Pihl, Josh A.; Choi, Jae-Soon; Chakravarthy, V, Kalyana

    2010-04-01

    Our previously developed microkinetic model for lean NOx trap (LNT) storage and regeneration has been updated to address some longstanding issues, in particular the formation of N2O during the regeneration phase at low temperatures. To this finalized mechanism has been added a relatively simple (12-step) scheme that accounts semi-quantitatively for the main features observed during sulfation and desulfation experiments, namely (a) the essentially complete trapping of SO2 at normal LNT operating temperatures, (b) the plug-like sulfation of both barium oxide (NOx storage) and cerium oxide (oxygen storage) sites, (c) the degradation of NOx storage behavior arising from sulfation, (d) the evolution of H2S and SO2 during high temperature desulfation (temperature programmed reduction) under H2, and (e) the complete restoration of NOx storage capacity achievable through the chosen desulfation procedure.

  9. Development of Low-NOx Emission DME (Dimethyl Ether) Combustor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, Ryosuke; Ishihara, Isao; Ozawa, Mamoru; Imahori, Keizo

    This study focuses on fundamental characteristics of DME (Dimethyl Ether) combustion, aiming at the development of low-NOx combustion. DME is one of the most promising new alternative fuels owing to its cleanness of the exhaust gas and wide applications. Combustion experiments using a diffusion burner were conducted for characterizing DME through the comparison with the results of LPG and 13A-city gas. Experimental results demonstrated a high potential of DME for a boiler and a gas-turbine fuel. DME has a wide stable-combustion range compared with those of the other fuels. In this study, the concept of the low-NOx combustion, referred to as the tube-nested combustion, was applied to the DME combustion. This tube-nested combustor consists of tube banks to cool the burning flame leading to NOx reduction. Then, the NOx emission of the DME combustion was successfully reduced to a level suitable for practical applications.

  10. Current status and future trends of SO2 and NOx pollution during the 12th FYP period in Guiyang city of China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Hezhong; Qiu, Peipei; Cheng, Ke; Gao, Jiajia; Lu, Long; Liu, Kaiyun; Liu, Xingang

    2013-04-01

    In order to investigate the future trends of SO2 and NOx pollution in Guiyang city of China, the MM5/CALMET/CALPUFF modeling system is applied to assess the effects of air pollution improvement that would result from reduction targets for SO2 and NOx emissions during the 12th Five-Year Plan (2011-2015). Three scenarios are established for the objective year 2015 based on the reference emissions in base year 2010. Scenario analysis and modeling results show that emissions are projected to increase by 26.5% for SO2 and 138.0% for NOx in 2015 Business-As-Usual (BAU) relative to base year 2010, respectively, which will lead to a substantial worsening tendency of SO2 and NOx pollution. In comparison, both the 2015 Policy Reduction (PR) and 2015 Intensive Policy Reduction (IPR) scenarios would contribute to improve the urban air quality. Under 2015 PR scenario, the maximum annual average concentration of SO2 and NOx will reduce by 54.9% and 31.7%, respectively, relative to the year 2010, with only 2.1% of all individual gridded receptors exceed the national air quality standard limits; while the maximum annual average concentrations of SO2 and NOx can reduce further under 2015 IPR scenario and comply well with standards limits. In view of the technical feasibility and cost-effectiveness, the emission reduction targets set in the 2015 PR scenario are regarded as more reasonable in order to further improve the air quality in Guiyang during the 12th FYP period and a series of comprehensive countermeasures should be effectively implemented.

  11. Comparative analysis on the effects of diesel particulate filter and selective catalytic reduction systems on a wide spectrum of chemical species emissions.

    PubMed

    Liu, Z Gerald; Berg, Devin R; Swor, Thaddeus A; Schauer, James J

    2008-08-15

    Two methods, diesel particulate filter (DPF) and selective catalytic reduction (SCR) systems,for controlling diesel emissions have become widely used, either independently or together, for meeting increasingly stringent emissions regulations worldwide. Each of these systems is designed for the reduction of primary pollutant emissions including particulate matter (PM) for DPF and nitrogen oxides (NOx) for SCR. However, there have been growing concerns regarding the secondary reactions that these aftertreatment systems may promote, involving unregulated species emissions. This study was performed to gain an understanding of the effects that these aftertreatment systems may have on the emission levels of a wide spectrum of chemical species found in diesel engine exhaust. Samples were extracted using a source dilution sampling system designed to collect exhaust samples representative of real-world emissions. Testing was conducted on a heavy-duty diesel engine with no aftertreatment devices to establish a baseline measurement and also on the same engine equipped first with a DPF system and then a SCR system. Each of the samples was analyzed for a wide variety of chemical species, including elemental and organic carbon, metals, ions, n-alkanes, aldehydes, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, in addition to the primary pollutants, due to the potential risks they pose to the environment and public health. The results show that the DPF and SCR systems were capable of substantially reducing PM and NOx emissions, respectively. Further, each of the systems significantly reduced the emission levels of the unregulated chemical species, while the notable formation of new chemical species was not observed. It is expected that a combination of the two systems in some future engine applications would reduce both primary and secondary emissions significantly.

  12. Constraining NOx emissions using satellite NO2 measurements during 2013 DISCOVER-AQ Texas campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souri, Amir Hossein; Choi, Yunsoo; Jeon, Wonbae; Li, Xiangshang; Pan, Shuai; Diao, Lijun; Westenbarger, David A.

    2016-04-01

    Reliable emission inventories are key to precisely model air pollutant concentrations. The relatively large reduction in NOx emissions that is well corroborated by satellite and in-situ observations over southeast Texas has resulted in discrepancies between observations and regional model simulations based on the National Emission Inventory (NEI) provided every three years in U.S. In this study, a Bayesian inversion of OMI tropospheric NO2 is conducted to update anthropogenic sources of NEI-2011 and soil-biogenic sources from BEIS3 (Biogenic Emission Inventory System version 3) over southeast Texas and west Louisiana during the 2013 DISCOVER-AQ Texas campaign. Results reveal that influences of the a priori profile used in OMI NO2 retrieval play a significant role in inconsistencies between model and satellite observations, which should be mitigated. A posteriori emissions are produced using the regional Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model associated with Decoupled Direct Method (DDM) sensitivity analysis. The inverse estimate suggests a reduction in area (44%), mobile (30%), and point sources (60%) in high NOx areas (ENOx> 0.2 mol/s), and an increase in soil (∼52%) and area emissions (37%) in low NOx regions (ENOx< 0.02 mol/s). The reductions in anthropogenic sources in high NOx regions are attributed to both uncertainty of the priori and emissions policies, while increases in area and soil-biogenic emissions more likely resulted from under-estimation of ships emissions, and the Yienger- Levy scheme used in BEIS respectively. In order to validate the accuracy of updated NOx emissions, CMAQ simulation was performed and results were evaluated with independent surface NO2 measurements. Comparing to surface monitoring sites, we find improvements (before and after inverse modeling) for MB (1.95, -0.30 ppbv), MAB (3.65, 2.60 ppbv), RMSE (6.13, 4.37 ppbv), correlation (0.68, 0.69), and IOA (0.76, 0.82). The largest improvement is seen for morning time surface

  13. Recent spectroscopic measurements of NOx in the lower stratosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldman, A.; Murcray, D. G.; Murcray, F. J.; Murcray, F. H.; Williams, W. J.; Coffey, M. T.; Mankin, W. G.

    1982-01-01

    High resolution (0.02 and 0.06 per cm) Fourier transform airborne systems were used for measurements of long path atmospheric absorption spectra, covering many of the NOx infrared bands. Atmospheric emission measurements with liquid helium cooled grating spectrometer systems at 0.5 per cm resolution were also carried out from different altitudes in the NOx bands region. Analysis of the absorption and emission spectra provides quantification of NOx in the lower stratosphere at different latitudes and seasons, as well as diurnal variability.

  14. A removable hybrid robot system for long bone fracture reduction.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tianmiao; Li, Changsheng; Hu, Lei; Tang, Peifu; Zhang, Lihai; Du, Hailong; Luan, Sheng; Wang, Lifeng; Tan, Yiming; Peng, Cheng

    2014-01-01

    In traditional long bone fracture reduction surgery, there are some drawbacks such as low accuracy, high radiation for surgeons and a risk of infection. To overcome these disadvantages, a removable hybrid robot system is developed, which integrates a removable series-parallel mechanism with a motor-double cylinder (MDC) driven mode. This paper describes the mechanism in detail, analyses the principle and the method of the fracture reduction, presents the surgical procedure, and verifies the reduction accuracy by experiments with bone models. The results are shown as follows. The mean deviations of the axial displacement and lateral displacement are 1.60mm and 1.26 mm respectively. The standard deviations are 0.69 mm and 0.30 mm. The mean deviations of the side angle and turn inward are 2.06° and 2.22° respectively. The standard deviations are 0.50° and 0.99°. This minimally invasive robot features high accuracy and zero radiation for surgeons, and is able to conduct fracture reduction for long bones.

  15. Computational investigation of carbon-in-ash levels for a wall-fired boiler after low-NOx combustion modifications

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, K.A.; Eddings, E.G.; Heap, M.P.; Facchiano, A.; Hardman, R.R.

    1998-12-31

    Many coal-fired boilers retrofitted with low NOX firing systems are experiencing significant operational difficulties due primarily to (1) increased carbon in the fly ash or (2) increased water wall wastage. This paper presents the results of a computational investigation of a wall-fired boiler that has recently been retrofitted with low NOx burners and overfire air. The focus of this paper is the effect of the retrofit on unburned carbon/NOx and the potential for applying operational and design modifications to minimize unburned carbon without adversely impacting NOx emissions. Although the magnitude of an increase in unburned carbon after a low NOx retrofit is system and coal dependent, it is often the case that reduction in emissions of nitrogen oxides is accompanied by a corresponding increase in the amount of unburned carbon in fly ash. Since low NOX firing systems increase the residence time of coal/char particles in a fuel rich environment, it might be expected that there is insufficient time under high temperature, oxidizing conditions to ensure complete carbon oxidation in a low NOx firing system. A relatively straight forward consideration of the effect of temperature and oxygen concentration on coal particle pyrolysis/oxidation can be used to provide a qualitative understanding of this effect. However, the complex flow patterns and highly nonlinear physical and chemical phenomena in a boiler make it difficult to predict carbon-in-ash (c-i-a) levels without the use of advanced computational tools. The sensitivity of c-i-a to burnout is pointed out in a figure for a coal with 10% ash. Although c-i-a changes slowly for low burnout, it changes very rapidly at the extent of burnout typical of a boiler. When the extent of burnout drops only slightly, from 99.5 to 99 percent for example, the c-i-a doubles, from 4 to 8%, which in many situations would be unacceptable. The importance of fuel efficiency and ash disposal/recycle emphasizes the need for

  16. Program documentation crew system vidar data reduction (CSVIDR) program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanwie, H. B.

    1976-01-01

    The Crew System Vidar Data Reduction (CSVIDR) program was written to process selected portions of data acquired from long term tests of space shuttle crew equipment. Data are recorded on a seven track computer compatible tape using the Vidar autodata eight processing system. The input tape is in a six bit binary coded decimal format. The 1110 hardware conversion option is used to convert all data from a BCD format to Fieldata since the majority of the data is output without further conversion. Data is retrieved from a character string, calibrated, tabulated, printed, and output on a fixed sample rate tape for use as input to a general purpose plot program.

  17. Nitrogen oxides from waste incineration: control by selective non-catalytic reduction.

    PubMed

    Zandaryaa, S; Gavasci, R; Lombardi, F; Fiore, A

    2001-01-01

    An experimental study of the selective non-catalytic reduction (SNCR) process was carried out to determine the efficiency of NOx removal and NH3 mass balance, the NOx reducing reagent used. Experimental tests were conducted on a full-scale SNCR system installed in a hospital waste incineration plant. Anhydrous NH3 was injected at the boiler entrance for NOx removal. Ammonia was analyzed after each flue-gas treatment unit in order to establish its mass balance and NH3 slip in the stack gas was monitored as well. The effective fraction of NH3 for the thermal NOx reduction was calculated from measured values of injected and residual NH3. Results show that a NOx reduction efficiency in the range of 46.7-76.7% is possible at a NH3/NO molar ratio of 0.9-1.5. The fraction of NH3 used in NOx removal was found to decrease with rising NH3/NO molar ratio. The NH3 slip in the stack gas was very low, below permitted limits, even at the higher NH3 dosages used. No direct correlation was found between the NH3/NO molar ratio and the NH3 slip in the stack gas since the major part of the residual NH3 was converted into ammonium salts in the dry scrubbing reactor and subsequently collected in the fabric filter. Moreover, another fraction of NH3 was dissolved in the scrubbing liquor.

  18. Modeling Species Inhibition of NO Oxidation in Urea-SCR Catalysts for Diesel Engine NOx Control

    SciTech Connect

    Devarakonda, Maruthi N.; Tonkyn, Russell G.; Tran, Diana N.; Lee, Jong H.; Herling, Darrell R.

    2011-04-20

    Urea-selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalysts are regarded as the leading NOx aftertreatment technology to meet the 2010 NOx emission standards for on-highway vehicles running on heavy-duty diesel engines. However, issues such as low NOx conversion at low temperature conditions still exist due to various factors, including incomplete urea thermolysis, inhibition of SCR reactions by hydrocarbons and H2O. We have observed a noticeable reduction in the standard SCR reaction efficiency at low temperature with increasing water content. We observed a similar effect when hydrocarbons are present in the stream. This effect is absent under fast SCR conditions where NO ~ NO2 in the feed gas. As a first step in understanding the effects of such inhibition on SCR reaction steps, kinetic models that predict the inhibition behavior of H2O and hydrocarbons on NO oxidation are presented in the paper. A one-dimensional SCR model was developed based on conservation of species equations and was coded as a C-language S-function and implemented in Matlab/Simulink environment. NO oxidation and NO2 dissociation kinetics were defined as a function of the respective adsorbate’s storage in the Fe-zeolite SCR catalyst. The corresponding kinetic models were then validated on temperature ramp tests that showed good match with the test data. Such inhibition models will improve the accuracy of model based control design for integrated DPF-SCR aftertreatment systems.

  19. LORENZ: a system for planning long-bone fracture reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birkfellner, Wolfgang; Burgstaller, Wolfgang; Wirth, Joachim; Baumann, Bernard; Jacob, Augustinus L.; Bieri, Kurt; Traud, Stefan; Strub, Michael; Regazzoni, Pietro; Messmer, Peter

    2003-05-01

    Long bone fractures belong to the most common injuries encountered in clinical routine trauma surgery. Preoperative assessment and decision making is usually based on standard 2D radiographs of the injured limb. Taking into account that a 3D - imaging modality such as computed tomography (CT) is not used for diagnosis in clinical routine, we have designed LORENZ, a fracture reduction planning tool based on such standard radiographs. Taking into account the considerable success of so-called image free navigation systems for total knee replacement in orthopaedic surgery, we assume that a similar tool for long bone fracture reposition should have considerable impact on computer-aided trauma surgery in a standard clinical routine setup. The case for long bone fracture reduction is, however, somewhat more complicated since not only scale independent angles indicating biomechanical measures such as varus and valgus are involved. Reduction path planning requires that the individual anatomy and the classification of the fracture is taken into account. In this paper, we present the basic ideas of this planning tool, it's current state, and the methodology chosen. LORENZ takes one or more conventional radiographs of the broken limb as input data. In addition, one or more x-rays of the opposite healthy bone are taken and mirrored if necessary. A most adequate CT model is being selected from a database; currently, this is achieved by using a scale space approach on the digitized x-ray images and comparing standard perspective renderings to these x-rays. After finding a CT-volume with a similar bone, a triangulated surface model is generated, and the surgeon can break the bone and arrange the fragments in 3D according to the x-ray images of the broken bone. Common osteosynthesis plates and implants can be loaded from CAD-datasets and are visualized as well. In addition, LORENZ renders virtual x-ray views of the fracture reduction process. The hybrid surface/voxel rendering

  20. Effectiveness of selective catalytic reduction systems on reducing gaseous emissions from an engine using diesel and biodiesel blends.

    PubMed

    Borillo, Guilherme C; Tadano, Yara S; Godoi, Ana F L; Santana, Simone S M; Weronka, Fernando M; Penteado Neto, Renato A; Rempel, Dennis; Yamamoto, Carlos I; Potgieter-Vermaak, Sanja; Potgieter, Johannes H; Godoi, Ricardo H M

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this investigation was to quantify organic and inorganic gas emissions from a four-cylinder diesel engine equipped with a urea selective catalytic reduction (SCR) system. Using a bench dynamometer, the emissions from the following mixtures were evaluated using a Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometer: low-sulfur diesel (LSD), ultralow-sulfur diesel (ULSD), and a blend of 20% soybean biodiesel and 80% ULSD (B20). For all studied fuels, the use of the SCR system yielded statistically significant (p < 0.05) lower NOx emissions. In the case of the LSD and ULSD fuels, the SCR system also significantly reduced emissions of compounds with high photochemical ozone creation potential, such as formaldehyde. However, for all tested fuels, the SCR system produced significantly (p < 0.05) higher emissions of N2O. In the case of LSD, the NH3 emissions were elevated, and in the case of ULSD and B20 fuels, the non-methane hydrocarbon (NMHC) and total hydrocarbon of diesel (HCD) emissions were significantly higher. PMID:25634131