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Sample records for nox trap catalysts

  1. Influence of Ceria on the NOx Storage/Reduction Behavior of Lean NOx Trap Catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Ji, Yaying; Choi, Jae-Soon; Toops, Todd J; Crocker, Dr. Mark; Naseri, Mojghan

    2008-01-01

    The effect of La2O3-stabilized ceria incorporation on the functioning of fully formulated lean NOx trap catalysts was investigated. Monolithic catalysts were prepared, corresponding to loadings of 0, 50 and 100 g CeO2/L, together with a catalyst containing 100 g/L of ceria-zirconia (Ce0.7Zr0.3O2). Loadings of the other main components (Pt, Rh and BaO) were held constant. Catalyst evaluation was performed on a bench flow reactor under simulated diesel exhaust conditions, employing NOx storage/reduction cycles. NOx storage efficiency in the temperature range 150-350 C was observed to increase with ceria loading, resulting in higher NOx conversion levels. At 150 C, high rich phase NOx slip was observed for all of the catalysts, resulting from an imbalance in the rates of nitrate decomposition and NOx reduction. Optimal NOx conversion was obtained in the range 250-350 C for all the catalysts, while at 450 C high rich phase NOx slip from the most highly loaded ceria-containing catalyst resulted in lower NOx conversion than for the ceria-free formulation. N2O was the major NOx reduction product at 150 C over all of the catalysts, although low NOx conversion levels limited the N2O yield. At higher temperatures N2 was the main product of NOx reduction, although NH3 formation was also observed. Selectivity to NH3 decreased with increasing ceria loading, indicating that NH3 is consumed by reaction with stored oxygen in the rear of the catalyst.

  2. Effect of reductive treatments on Pt behavior and NOx storage in lean NOx trap catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xianqin; Kim, Do Heui; Kwak, Ja Hun; Wang, Chong M.; Szanyi, Janos; Peden, Charles HF

    2011-10-01

    Lean NOx trap (LNT) catalysts represent a promising approach to meet increasingly stringent NOx emission regulations on diesel and other lean-burn engines. Pt material properties, including dispersion and particle size, are known to be important factors in determining NOx uptake performance, since Pt provides active sites for NO oxidation to NO2 necessary for storing NOx as nitrates, and for the reduction of nitrates to N2. In this work, the physicochemical properties of Pt in Pt-BaO/Al2O3 LNT catalysts, such as the Pt accessible surface area and particle size, were investigated by using various tools, such as irreversible volumetric H2 chemisorption, high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), and X-ray diffraction (XRD), following successive reductive treatments at elevated temperatures. NOx uptake activities were also measured to establish a relationship between the properties of Pt and NOx storage following identical high-temperature reductive treatments. We find that the reductive treatments of Pt-BaO/Al2O3 lean NOx trap catalysts at temperatures up to 500 ºC promote a significant increase in NOx uptake explained, in part, by an induced close interaction between Pt and BaO phases in the catalyst, thus enabling facilitation of the NOx storage process.

  3. Mitigation of Sulfur Effects on a Lean NOx Trap Catalyst by Sorbate Reapplication

    SciTech Connect

    Parks, II, James E

    2007-01-01

    Lean NOx trap catalysis has demonstrated the ability to reduce NOx emissions from lean natural gas reciprocating engines by >90%. The technology operates in a cyclic fashion where NOx is trapped on the catalyst during lean operation and released and reduced to N2 under rich exhaust conditions; the rich cleansing operation of the cycle is referred to as "regeneration" since the catalyst is reactivated for more NOx trapping. Natural gas combusted over partial oxidation catalysts in the exhaust can be used to obtain the rich exhaust conditions necessary for catalyst regeneration. Thus, the lean NOx trap technology is well suited for lean natural gas engine applications. One potential limitation of the lean NOx trap technology is sulfur poisoning. Sulfur compounds directly bond to the NOx trapping sites of the catalyst and render them ineffective; over time, the sulfur poisoning leads to degradation in overall NOx reduction performance. In order to mitigate the effects of sulfur poisoning, a process has been developed to restore catalyst activity after sulfur poisoning has occurred. The process is an aqueous-based wash process that removes the poisoned sorbate component of the catalyst. A new sorbate component is reapplied after removal of the poisoned sorbate. The process is low cost and does not involve reapplication of precious metal components of the catalyst. Experiments were conducted to investigate the feasibility of the washing process on a lean 8.3-liter natural gas engine on a dynamometer platform. The catalyst was rapidly sulfur poisoned with bottled SO2 gas; then, the catalyst sorbate was washed and reapplied and performance was re-evaluated. Results show that the sorbate reapplication process is effective at restoring lost performance due to sulfur poisoning. Specific details relative to the implementation of the process for large stationary natural gas engines will be discussed.

  4. Ammonia reactions with the stored oxygen in a commercial lean NOx trap catalyst

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Bartova, Sarka; Mracek, David; Koci, Petr; Marek, Milos; Choi, Jae -Soon

    2014-10-12

    Ammonia is an important intermediate of the NOx reduction in a NOx storage and reduction catalyst (aka lean NOx trap). NH3 formed under rich conditions in the reduced front part of the catalyst is transported by convection downstream to the unregenerated (still oxidized) zone of the catalyst, where it further reacts with the stored oxygen and NOx. In this paper, the kinetics and selectivity of NH3 reactions with the stored oxygen are studied in detail with a commercial Ba-based NOx storage catalyst containing platinum group metals (PGM), Ba and Ce oxides. Furthermore, steady-state NH3 decomposition, NH3 oxidation by O2 andmore » NO, and N2O decomposition are examined in light-off experiments. Periodic lean/rich cycling is measured first with O2 and NH3, and then with NOx + O2 and NH3 to discriminate between the NH3 reactions with the stored oxygen and the stored NOx. The reaction of NH3 with the stored O2 is highly selective towards N2, however a certain amount of NOx and N2O is also formed. The formed NOx by-product is efficiently adsorbed on the NOx storage sites such that the NOx is not detected at the reactor outlet except at high temperatures. The stored NOx reacts with NH3 feed in the next rich phase, contributing to the N2O formation. Water inhibits the reactions of NH3 with the stored oxygen. On the contrary, the presence of CO2 increases the NH3 consumption. Furthermore, CO2 is able to provide additional oxygen for NH3 oxidation, forming –CO in analogy to the reverse water gas shift reaction.« less

  5. Determination of the NOx loading of an automotive lean NOx trap by directly monitoring the electrical properties of the catalyst material itself.

    PubMed

    Fremerey, Peter; Reiss, Sebastian; Geupel, Andrea; Fischerauer, Gerhard; Moos, Ralf

    2011-01-01

    Recently, it has been shown that the degree of loading of several types of automotive exhaust aftertreatment devices can be directly monitored in situ and in a contactless way by a microwave-based method. The goal of this study was to clarify whether this method can also be applied to NOx storage and reduction catalysts (lean NOx traps) in order to obtain further knowledge about the reactions occurring in the catalyst and to compare the results with those obtained by wirebound NOx loading sensors. It is shown that both methods are able to detect the different catalyst loading states. However, the sensitivity of the microwave-based method turned out to be small compared to that previously observed for other exhaust aftertreatment devices. This may limit the practical applicability of the microwave-based NOx loading detection in lean NOx traps. PMID:22164074

  6. Determination of the NOx Loading of an Automotive Lean NOx Trap by Directly Monitoring the Electrical Properties of the Catalyst Material Itself

    PubMed Central

    Fremerey, Peter; Reiß, Sebastian; Geupel, Andrea; Fischerauer, Gerhard; Moos, Ralf

    2011-01-01

    Recently, it has been shown that the degree of loading of several types of automotive exhaust aftertreatment devices can be directly monitored in situ and in a contactless way by a microwave-based method. The goal of this study was to clarify whether this method can also be applied to NOx storage and reduction catalysts (lean NOx traps) in order to obtain further knowledge about the reactions occurring in the catalyst and to compare the results with those obtained by wirebound NOx loading sensors. It is shown that both methods are able to detect the different catalyst loading states. However, the sensitivity of the microwave-based method turned out to be small compared to that previously observed for other exhaust aftertreatment devices. This may limit the practical applicability of the microwave-based NOx loading detection in lean NOx traps. PMID:22164074

  7. Characteristics of Pt-K/MgAl2O4 lean NOx trap catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Do Heui; Mudiyanselage, Kumudu K.; Szanyi, Janos; Zhu, Haiyang; Kwak, Ja Hun; Peden, Charles HF

    2012-04-30

    We report the various characteristics of Pt-K/MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} lean NOx trap (LNT) catalysts including the effect of K loading on nitrate formation/decomposition, NOx storage activity and durability. Upon the adsorption of NO{sub 2} on K/MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} samples, potassium nitrates formed on Mg-related sites in MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} support are observed, in addition to the typical two potassium nitrates (ionic and bidentate) formed also on Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} supported sample. Based on NO{sub 2} TPD and FTIR results, the Mg-bound KNO{sub 3} thermally decompose at higher temperature than Al-bound KNO{sub 3}, implying its superior thermal stability. At a potassium loading of 5wt%, the temperature of maximum NOx uptake (T{sub max}) is 300 C. Increasing the potassium loading from 5wt% to 10 wt%, the T{sub max} gradually shifted from 300 C to 450 C, indicating the dependence of T{sub max} on the potassium loading. However, increase in potassium loading above 10 wt% only gives rise to the reduction in the overall NOx storage capacity. This work also underlines the obstacles these materials have prior to their practical application (e.g., durability and sulfur poisoning/ removal). This work provides fundamental understanding of Pt-K/MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4}-based lean NOx trap catalysts, which could be good candidates for high temperature LNT applications.

  8. NOx storage and reduction in model lean NOx trap catalysts studied by in situ DRIFTS

    SciTech Connect

    Ji, Yaying; Toops, Todd J; Pihl, Josh A; Crocker, Mark

    2009-01-01

    NO{sub x} storage and reduction on a model Pt/BaO/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst was studied by means of in situ DRIFTS measurements. To examine the effect of ceria addition, experiments were also conducted using Pt/BaO/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} to which Pt/CeO{sub 2} was added as a physical mixture in a 74:26 weight ratio. For the former catalyst, DRIFT spectra acquired during NO/O{sub 2} and NO{sub 2}/O{sub 2} storage indicated the formation of nitrite at 200 C during the initial stages of adsorption, while increasing the adsorption temperature appeared to facilitate the oxidation of nitrite to nitrate. The ceria-containing catalyst afforded similar DRIFT spectra under these conditions, although the presence of cerium nitrates was observed at 200 and 300 C, consistent with NO{sub x} storage on the ceria phase. DRIFT spectra acquired during NO{sub x} reduction in CO and CO/H{sub 2} showed that Ba nitrate species remained on the surface of both catalysts at 450 C, whereas the use of H{sub 2}-only resulted in complete removal of stored NO{sub x}. The observation of Ba carbonates when CO was present suggests that the inferior reduction efficiency of CO may arise from the formation of a crust of BaCO{sub 3} on the Ba phase, which inhibits further NO{sub x} reduction. DRIFT spectra acquired during lean-rich cycling (6.5 min lean, 1.0 min rich) with CO/H{sub 2} as the rich phase reductants revealed that a significant concentration of nitrates remained on the catalysts at the end of the rich phase. This implies that a large fraction of nitrate is not decomposed during cycling and thus cannot participate in NO{sub x} abatement through storage and regeneration.

  9. Excellent Sulfur Resistance of Pt/BaO/CeO2 Lean NOx Trap Catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Kwak, Ja Hun; Kim, Do Heui; Szanyi, Janos; Peden, Charles HF

    2008-10-21

    In this work, we investigated the NOx storage behavior of Pt-BaO/CeO2 catalysts, especially in the presence of SO2. High surface area CeO2 (~ 110 m2/g) with a rod like morphology was synthesized and used as a support. The Pt-BaO/CeO2 sample demonstrated slightly higher NOx conversion in the entire temperature range studied compared with Pt-BaO/γ-Al2O3. More importantly, this ceria-based catalyst showed higher sulfur tolerance than the alumina-based one. The time of complete NOx uptake was maintained even after exposing the sample to ~3 g/L of SO2. The same sulfur exposure, on the other hand, eliminated the complete NOx uptake time on the alumina-based NOx storage catalysts. TEM images show no evidence of either Pt sintering or BaS phase formation during reductive de-sulfation up to 600°C on the ceria based catalyst, while the same process over the alumina-based catalyst resulted in both a significant increase in the average Pt cluster size and the agglomeration of a newly-formed BaS phase into large crystallites. XPS results revealed the presence of about 5 times more residual sulfur after reductive de-sulfation at 600°C on the alumina based catalysts in comparison with the ceria-based ones. All of these results strongly support that, besides their superior intrinsic NOx uptake properties, ceria based catalysts have a) much higher sulfur tolerance and b) excellent resistance against Pt sintering when they are compared to the widely used alumina based catalysts.

  10. NOx Storage-Reduction Characteristics of Ba-Based Lean NOx Trap Catalysts Subjected to Simulated Road Aging

    SciTech Connect

    Ji, Yaying; Fisk, Courtney; Easterling, Vencon; Graham, Uschi; Poole, Adam; Crocker, Mark; Choi, Jae-Soon; Partridge Jr, William P; Wilson, Karen

    2010-01-01

    Although Lean NO{sub x} Trap (LNT) catalyst technology has made significant strides in recent years, the issue of LNT durability remains problematic. Following on from our previous research concerning the effect of ceria addition on LNT preformance, in this study we focus on the role of ceria in ameliorating the deterioration of Ba-based LNT catalysts during aging. Indeed, we have observed that spectacular improvements in LNT durability can be achieved through the incorporation of CeO{sub 2}-ZrO{sub 2} into the LNT formulation, and, to a lesser extent, La-stabilized ceria.

  11. Effect of Ceria on the Sulfation and Desulfation Characteristics of a Model Lean NOx Trap Catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Ji, Yaying; Toops, Todd J; Crocker, Mark

    2009-01-01

    The effect of ceria addition on the sulfation and desulfation characteristics of a model Ba-based lean NO{sub x} trap (LNT) catalyst was studied. According to DRIFTS and NO{sub x} storage capacity measurements, ceria is able to store sulfur during catalyst exposure to SO{sub 2}, thereby helping to limit sulfation of the main (Ba) NO{sub x} storage phase and maintain NO{sub x} storage capacity. Temperature programmed desulfation experiments revealed that desulfation of a model ceria-containing catalyst occurred in two stages, corresponding to sulfur elimination from the ceria phase at {approx}450 C, followed by sulfur loss from the Ba phase at {approx}650 C. Significantly, the ceria-containing catalyst displayed relatively lower sulfur evolution from the Ba phase than its non-ceria analog, confirming that the presence of ceria lessened the degree of sulfur accumulation on the Ba phase.

  12. Effects of Rapid High Temperature Cyclic Aging on a Fully-Formulated Lean NOx Trap Catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Ottinger, Nathan; Nguyen, Ke; Bunting, Bruce G; Toops, Todd J; Howe, Janet E

    2009-01-01

    In this study, high-temperature deactivation of a fully-formulated lean NOx trap (LNT) is investigated with an accelerated aging protocol where accelerated aging is accomplished by rapid temperature cycling and by higher temperatures. Thermal aging is carried out in a bench-flow reactor at nominal temperatures of 700, 800, 900, and 1000 C using an aging cycle consisting of a 130s lean-phase and a 50s rich-phase. After a prescribed number of lean/rich aging cycles, the NOx conversion of the aged LNT is evaluated at 200, 300, and 400 C. The NOx performance is obtained at a GHSV of 30,000 h-1 using an evaluation cycle consisting of a 60s lean-phase and 5s rich-phase. The effects of aging on the LNT washcoat are determined with EPMA, XRD, STEM/EDS, and BET. Aging at 700 and 800 C has a minimal effect on LNT performance and material properties. However, at aging temperatures of 900 and 1000 C reduction in surface area and sintering of PGM particles are observed and result in a drastic reduction in NOx conversion. Additionally, after aging at 900 C and 1000 C the NOx storage medium, BaCO3, is no longer visible in the XRD patterns, even though a Ba-phase identified by EPMA still exists in all aged samples. BaAl2O4 is not identified at any aging temperatures; possibly due to stabilization effects provided by washcoat additives present in this particular LNT.

  13. Effect of Aging on the NOx Storage and Regeneration Characteristics of Fully Formulated Lean NOx Trap Catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Ji, Yaying; Easterling, Vencon; Graham, Uschi; Fisk, Courtney; Crocker, Mark; Choi, Jae-Soon

    2011-01-01

    In order to elucidate the effect of washcoat composition on lean NO{sub x} trap (LNT) aging characteristics, fully formulated monolithic LNT catalysts containing varying amounts of Pt, Rh and BaO were subjected to accelerated aging on a bench reactor. Subsequent catalyst evaluation revealed that in all cases aging resulted in deterioration of the NO{sub x} conversion as a consequence of impaired NO{sub x} storage and NO{sub x} reduction functions, while increased selectivity to NH{sub 3} was observed in the temperature range 250--450 C. Elemental analysis, H{sub 2} chemisorption and TEM data revealed two main changes which account for the degradation in LNT performance. First, residual sulfur in the catalysts, associated with the Ba phase, decreased catalyst NO{sub x} storage capacity. Second, sintering of the precious metals in the washcoat occurred, resulting in decreased contact between the Pt and Ba, and hence in less efficient NO{sub x} spillover from Pt to Ba during NO{sub x} adsorption, as well as decreased rates of reductant spillover from Pt to Ba and reverse NO{sub x} spillover during catalyst regeneration. For the aged catalysts, halving the Pt loading from 100 to 50 g/ft{sup 3} was found to result in a significant decrease in overall NO{sub x} conversion, while for catalysts with the same 100 g/ft{sup 3} Pt loading, increasing the relative amount of Pt on the NO{sub x} storage components (BaO and La-stabilized CeO{sub 2}), as opposed to an Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} support material (where it was co-located with Rh), was found to be beneficial. The effect of Rh loading on aged catalyst performance was found to be marginal within the range studied (10--20 g/ft{sup 3}), as was the effect of BaO loading in the range 30--45 g/L.

  14. Effect of Ceria on the Storage and Regeneration Behavior of a Model Lean NOx Trap Catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Ji, Yaying; Toops, Todd J; Crocker, Dr. Mark

    2007-01-01

    In this study the effect of ceria addition on the performance of a model Ba-based lean NO{sub x} trap (LNT) catalyst was examined. The presence of ceria improved NO{sub x} storage capacity in the temperature range 200-400 C under both continuous lean and lean-rich cycling conditions. Temperature-programmed experiments showed that NO{sub x} stored in the ceria-containing catalyst was thermally less stable and more reactive to reduction with both H{sub 2} and CO as reductants, albeit at the expense of additional reductant consumed by reduction of the ceria. These findings demonstrate that the incorporation of ceria in LNTs not only improves NO{sub x} storage efficiency but also positively impacts LNT regeneration behavior.

  15. New operation strategy for driving the selectivity of NOx reduction to N2, NH3 or N2O during lean/rich cycling of a lean NOx trap catalyst

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Mráček, David; Koci, Petr; Choi, Jae -Soon; Partridge, Jr., William P.

    2015-09-08

    Periodical regeneration of NOx storage catalyst (also known as lean NOx trap) by short rich pulses of CO, H2 and hydrocarbons is necessary for the reduction of nitrogen oxides adsorbed on the catalyst surface. Ideally, the stored NOx is converted into N2, but N2O and NH3 by-products can be formed as well, particularly at low-intermediate temperatures. The N2 and N2O products are formed concurrently in two peaks. The primary peaks appear immediately after the rich-phase inception, and tail off with the breakthrough of the reductant front accompanied by NH3 product. In addition, the secondary N2 and N2O peaks then appearmore » at the rich-to-lean transition as a result of reactions between surface-deposited reductants/intermediates (CO, HC, NH3, — NCO) and residual stored NOx under increasingly lean conditions.« less

  16. Effects of Potassium loading and thermal aging on K/Pt/Al2O3 high-temperature lean NOx trap catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Jinyong; Gao, Feng; Kim, Do Heui; Peden, Charles HF

    2014-03-31

    The effects of K loading and thermal aging on the structural properties and high temperature performance of Pt/K/Al2O3 lean NOx trap (LNT) catalysts were investigated using in situ X-ray diffraction (XRD), temperature-programmed decomposition/desorption of NOx (NOx-TPD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), NO oxidation and NOx storage tests. In situ XRD results demonstrate that KNO3 becomes extremely mobile on the Al2O3 surface, and experiences complex transformations between orthorhombic and rhombohedral structures, accompanied by sintering, melting and thermal decomposition upon heating. NOx storage results show an optimum K loading around 10% for the best performance at high temperatures. At lower K loadings where the majority of KNO3 stays as a surface layer, the strong interaction between KNO3 and Al2O3 promotes KNO3 decomposition and deteriorates high-temperature performance. At K loadings higher than 10%, the performance drop is not caused by NOx diffusion limitations as for the case of barium-based LNTs, but rather from the blocking of Pt sites by K species, which adversely affects NO oxidation. Thermal aging at 800 ºC severely deactivates the Pt/K/Al2O3 catalysts due to Pt sintering. However, in the presence of potassium, some Pt remains in a dispersed and oxidized form. These Pt species interact strongly with K and, therefore, do not sinter. After a reduction treatment, these Pt species remain finely dispersed, contributing to a partial recovery of NOx storage performance.

  17. Effect of sulfur loading on the desulfation chemistry of a commercial lean NOx trap catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Do Heui; Yezerets, Aleksey; Li, Junhui; Currier, Neal; Chen, Haiying; Hess, Howard ..; Engelhard, Mark H.; Muntean, George G.; Peden, Charles HF

    2012-12-15

    We investigate the effects of initial sulfur loadings on the desulfation chemistry and the subsequent final activity of a commercial LNT catalyst. Identical total amounts of SO2 are applied to the samples, albeit with the frequency of desulfation varied. The results indicate that performance is better with less frequent desulfations. The greater the amount of sulfur deposited before desulfation, the more amount of SO2 evolution before H2S is observed during desulfation, which can be explained by two sequential reactions; initial conversion of sulfate to SO2, followed by the reduction of SO2 to H2S. After completing all sulfation/desulfation steps, the sample with only a single desulfation results in a fairly uniform sulfur distribution along the z-axis inside of the monolith. We expect that the results obtained in this study will provide useful information for optimizing regeneration strategies in vehicles that utilize the LNT technology.

  18. Carbonates-based noble metal-free lean NOx trap catalysts MOx-K2CO3/K2Ti8O17 (M = Ce, Fe, Cu, Co) with superior catalytic performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yuxia; You, Rui; Liu, Dongsheng; Liu, Cheng; Li, Xingang; Tian, Ye; Jiang, Zheng; Zhang, Shuo; Huang, Yuying; Zha, Yuqing; Meng, Ming

    2015-12-01

    A series of base metal-based lean NOx trap (LNT) catalysts MOx-K2CO3/K2Ti8O17 (M = Ce, Fe, Cu, Co) were synthesized by successive impregnations and employed for the storage and reduction of NOx in the emissions of lean-burn engines at 350 °C. The XRD and XANES/EXAFS results reveal that the active phases in the corresponding catalysts exist as CeO2, Fe2O3, CuO and Co3O4, respectively. Among all the catalysts, CoOx-K2CO3/K2Ti8O17 exhibits the best performance, which cannot only trap the NOx quickly and completely at lean condition, giving the highest storage capacity (3.32 mmol/g) reported so far, but also reduce the NOx at rich condition, showing a NOx reduction percentage as high as 99.0%. Meanwhile, this catalyst displays an ultralow NOx to N2O selectivity (0.3%) during NOx reduction. The excellent performance of CoOx-K2CO3/K2Ti8O17 results from its largest amount of surface active oxygen species as revealed by XPS, O2-TPD and NO-TPD. HRTEM, FT-IR and CO2-TPD results illustrate that several kinds of K species such as sbnd OK groups, K2O, surface carbonates and bulk or bulk-like carbonates coexist in the catalysts. Based upon the in situ DRIFTS results, the participation of K2CO3 in NOx storage is confirmed, and the predominant NOx storage species is revealed as bidentate nitrites formed via multiple kinetic pathways. The low cost and high catalytic performance of the CoOx-based LNT catalyst make it most promising for the substitution of noble metal-based LNT catalysts.

  19. NOx Reduction with Natural Gas for Lean Large-Bore Engine Applications Using Lean NOx Trap Aftertreatment

    SciTech Connect

    Parks, JE

    2005-02-11

    Large-bore natural gas engines are used for distributed energy and gas compression since natural gas fuel offers a convenient and reliable fuel source via the natural gas pipeline and distribution infrastructure. Lean engines enable better fuel efficiency and lower operating costs; however, NOx emissions from lean engines are difficult to control. Technologies that reduce NOx in lean exhaust are desired to enable broader use of efficient lean engines. Lean NOx trap catalysts have demonstrated greater than 90% NOx reduction in lean exhaust from engines operating with gasoline, diesel, and natural gas fuels. In addition to the clean nature of the technology, lean NOx traps reduce NOx with the fuel source of the engine thereby eliminating the requirement for storage and handling of secondary fuels or reducing agents. A study of lean NOx trap catalysts for lean natural gas engines is presented here. Testing was performed on a Cummins C8.3G (CG-280) engine on a motor dynamometer. Lean NOx trap catalysts were tested for NOx reduction performance under various engine operating conditions, and the utilization of natural gas as the reductant fuel source was characterized. Engine test results show that temperature greatly affects the catalytic processes involved, specifically methane oxidation and NOx storage on the lean NOx trap. Additional studies on a bench flow reactor demonstrate the effect of precious metal loading (a primary cost factor) on lean NOx trap performance at different temperatures. Results and issues related to the potential of the lean NOx trap technology for large-bore engine applications will be discussed.

  20. Characteristics of Desulfation Behavior for Pre-Sulfated Pt-BaO/CeO2 Lean NOx Trap Catalysts: The Role of the CeO2 Support

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Do Heui; Kwak, Ja Hun; Szanyi, Janos; Wang, Xianqin; Li, Guosheng; Hanson, Jonathan C.; Peden, Charles HF

    2009-12-17

    The desulfation of pre-sulfated Pt-BaO/CeO2 lean NOx trap catalysts was investigated by H2 TPRX (temperature programmed reaction), in-situ TR-XRD (time-resolved X-ray diffraction) and in-situ S K-edge XANES (X-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy) techniques. Compared with Pt-BaO/Al2O3 materials, the reductive treatment in H2 for a CeO2 supported sample up to 1073 K hardly removes any sulfur species. However, the results of in-situ TR-XRD measurements demonstrate that the quantity of a BaS phase formed on Pt-BaO/CeO2 is much smaller than that on Pt-BaO/Al2O3, implying that the formation of BaS crystallites, which occurs during the reduction from sulfate (SO42-) to sulfide (S2-), is significantly suppressed in the CeO2-supported catalyst. As the desulfation temperature increases under reducing conditions (in H2), the in-situ S XANES spectra show that, compared with alumina-supported samples, the reduction temperature for sulfates (S6+) decreases by about 150 K. Concomitantly, the formation of sulfur species with lower oxidation states (S2- - S4+) is enhanced. The step jump of S XANES spectra before and after desulfation are very similar, implying that the amount of sulfur-containing species removed during the reductive treatment is negligible, in agreement with the results of H2 TPRX. These results suggest that H2S produced by the reduction of BaSO4 is readily re-adsorbed on the ceria support to form ceria-sulfur complexes (e.g. CeS2). The high affinity of ceria for H2S, combined with the ease of reducibility of the ceria support gives rise to various oxidation states of sulfur after high temperature H2 treatments. Thus, the results of this study clearly show that the ceria support strongly affects the overall desulfation mechanism. The intrinsic role of the ceria support during desulfation, and its effect on the overall NOx storage processes are discussed on the basis of the characterization results obtained here.

  1. Lean Gasoline Engine Reductant Chemistry During Lean NOx Trap Regeneration

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Jae-Soon; Prikhodko, Vitaly Y; Partridge Jr, William P; Parks, II, James E; Norman, Kevin M; Huff, Shean P; Chambon, Paul H; Thomas, John F

    2010-01-01

    Lean NOx Trap (LNT) catalysts can effectively reduce NOx from lean engine exhaust. Significant research for LNTs in diesel engine applications has been performed and has led to commercialization of the technology. For lean gasoline engine applications, advanced direct injection engines have led to a renewed interest in the potential for lean gasoline vehicles and, thereby, a renewed demand for lean NOx control. To understand the gasoline-based reductant chemistry during regeneration, a BMW lean gasoline vehicle has been studied on a chassis dynamometer. Exhaust samples were collected and analyzed for key reductant species such as H2, CO, NH3, and hydrocarbons during transient drive cycles. The relation of the reductant species to LNT performance will be discussed. Furthermore, the challenges of NOx storage in the lean gasoline application are reviewed.

  2. Lean NOx Trap Catalysis for Lean Natural Gas Engine Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Parks, II, James E; Storey, John Morse; Theiss, Timothy J; Ponnusamy, Senthil; Ferguson, Harley Douglas; Williams, Aaron M; Tassitano, James B

    2007-09-01

    efficiency and emissions of natural gas reciprocating engines are being pursued. Approaches include: stoichiometric engine operation with exhaust gas recirculation and three-way catalysis, advanced combustion modes such as homogeneous charge compression ignition, and extension of the lean combustion limit with advanced ignition concepts and/or hydrogen mixing. The research presented here addresses the technical approach of combining efficient lean spark-ignited natural gas combustion with low emissions obtained from a lean NOx trap catalyst aftertreatment system. This approach can be applied to current lean engine technology or advanced lean engines that may result from related efforts in lean limit extension. Furthermore, the lean NOx trap technology has synergy with hydrogen-assisted lean limit extension since hydrogen is produced from natural gas during the lean NOx trap catalyst system process. The approach is also applicable to other lean engines such as diesel engines, natural gas turbines, and lean gasoline engines; other research activities have focused on those applications. Some commercialization of the technology has occurred for automotive applications (both diesel and lean gasoline engine vehicles) and natural gas turbines for stationary power. The research here specifically addresses barriers to commercialization of the technology for large lean natural gas reciprocating engines for stationary power. The report presented here is a comprehensive collection of research conducted by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) on lean NOx trap catalysis for lean natural gas reciprocating engines. The research was performed in the Department of Energy's ARES program from 2003 to 2007 and covers several aspects of the technology. All studies were conducted at ORNL on a Cummins C8.3G+ natural gas engine chosen based on industry input to simulate large lean natural gas engines. Specific technical areas addressed by the research include: NOx reduction efficiency, partial

  3. Spatiotemporal distribution of NOx storage and impact on NH3 and N2O selectivities during lean/rich cycling of a Ba-based lean NOx trap catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Jae-Soon; Partridge Jr, William P; Pihl, Josh A; Kim, Miyoung; Koci, Petr; Daw, C Stuart

    2012-01-01

    We summarize results from an investigation of the spatiotemporal distribution of NO{sub x} storage and intermediate gas species in determining the performance of a fully formulated, Ba-based, lean NO{sub x} trap catalyst under lean/rich cycling conditions. By experimentally resolving spatiotemporal profiles of gas composition, we found that stored NO{sub x} was significantly redistributed along the monolith axis during the rich phase of the cycle by release and subsequent downstream re-adsorption. Sulfur poisoning of upstream NO{sub x} storage sites caused the active NO{sub x}-storage zone to be displaced downstream. This axial displacement in turn influenced rich-phase NO{sub x} release and re-adsorption. As sulfur poisoning increased, NH3 slip at the catalyst exit also increased due to its formation closer to the catalyst outlet and decreased exposure to downstream oxidation by surface oxygen. N{sub 2}O formation was found to be associated with nitrate reduction rather than oxidation of NH3 by stored oxygen. We propose that the observed evolution of N{sub 2}O selectivity with sulfation can be explained by changes in the spatiotemporal distribution of NO{sub x} storage resulting in either increased or decreased number of precious-metal sites surrounded by nitrates.

  4. Lean NOx Trap Modeling in Vehicle Systems Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Zhiming; Chakravarthy, Veerathu K; Daw, C Stuart; Conklin, Jim

    2010-09-01

    A one-dimensional model for simulating lean NOx trap (LNT) performance is developed and validated using both steady state cycling data and transient data from FTP testing cycles. The model consists of the conservation equations for chemical species and energy in the bulk flow, energy of the solid walls, O2 storage and NOx storage (in the form of nitrites and nitrates). Nitrites and nitrates are formed by diffusion of NO and NO2, respectively, into sorbent particles (assumed to be hemi-spherical in shape) along with O2 and their formation rates are controlled by chemical kinetics as well as solid-phase diffusion rates of NOx species. The model also accounts for thermal aging and sulfation of LNTs. Empirical correlations are developed on the basis of published experimental data to capture these effects. These empirical correlations depend on total mileage for which the LNT has been in use, the mileage accumulated since the last desulfation event in addition to the freshly degreened catalyst characteristics. The model has been used in studies of vehicle systems (integration, performance etc.) including hybrid powertrain configurations. Since the engines in hybrid vehicles turn on and off multiple number of times during single drive cycles, the exhaust systems may encounter multiple cold start transients. Accurate modeling of catalyst warm-up and cooling is, therefore, very important to simulate LNT performance in such vehicles. For this purpose, the convective heat loss from the LNT to the ambient is modeled using a Nusselt number correlation that includes effects of both forced convection and natural convection (with later being important when vehicle is stationary). Using the model, the fuel penalty associated with operating LNTs on small diesel engine powered car during FTP drive cycles is estimated.

  5. Isothermal desulfation of pre-sulfated Pt-BaO/γ-Al2O3 lean NOx trap catalysts with H2: the effect of H2 concentration and the roles of CO2 and H2O

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Do Heui; Kwak, Ja Hun; Szanyi, Janos; Peden, Charles HF

    2012-01-12

    The desulfation mechanisms of pre-sulfated Pt-BaO/{gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} lean NOx trap catalysts were investigated under isothermal conditions (600 C) using H{sub 2} as the reductant. Sulfates were found to be reduced first with H{sub 2} to produce SO{sub 2}, followed by a reaction between SO{sub 2} and H{sub 2} to produce H{sub 2}S. Gas analysis during the rich pulse reveals that the sulfur removal efficiency is initially proportional to the H{sub 2} concentration. At constant H{sub 2} concentration the overall desulfation efficiency decreases in the order of H{sub 2}/CO{sub 2}/H{sub 2}O > H{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} > H{sub 2}/H{sub 2}O > H{sub 2}, as confirmed by XPS analysis of residual sulfur in the desulfated samples. H{sub 2}O limits the evolution of SO{sub 2} at an early stage of the rich pulse and enhances the production of H{sub 2}S in later stages of reduction. CO{sub 2} is involved in both the formation of COS and the production of H{sub 2}O (via the reverse water-gas shift reaction), therefore, resulting in an increased overall efficiency.

  6. Update on microkinetic modeling of lean NOx trap chemistry.

    SciTech Connect

    Larson, Richard S.; Daw, C. Stuart; Pihl, Josh A.; Choi, Jae-Soon; Chakravarthy, V, Kalyana

    2010-04-01

    Our previously developed microkinetic model for lean NOx trap (LNT) storage and regeneration has been updated to address some longstanding issues, in particular the formation of N2O during the regeneration phase at low temperatures. To this finalized mechanism has been added a relatively simple (12-step) scheme that accounts semi-quantitatively for the main features observed during sulfation and desulfation experiments, namely (a) the essentially complete trapping of SO2 at normal LNT operating temperatures, (b) the plug-like sulfation of both barium oxide (NOx storage) and cerium oxide (oxygen storage) sites, (c) the degradation of NOx storage behavior arising from sulfation, (d) the evolution of H2S and SO2 during high temperature desulfation (temperature programmed reduction) under H2, and (e) the complete restoration of NOx storage capacity achievable through the chosen desulfation procedure.

  7. Alkali- and Sulfur-Resistant Tungsten-Based Catalysts for NOx Emissions Control.

    PubMed

    Huang, Zhiwei; Li, Hao; Gao, Jiayi; Gu, Xiao; Zheng, Li; Hu, Pingping; Xin, Ying; Chen, Junxiao; Chen, Yaxin; Zhang, Zhaoliang; Chen, Jianmin; Tang, Xingfu

    2015-12-15

    The development of catalysts with simultaneous resistance to alkalis and sulfur poisoning is of great importance for efficiently controlling NOx emissions using the selective catalytic reduction of NOx with NH3 (SCR), because the conventional V2O5/WO3-TiO2 catalysts often suffer severe deactivation by alkalis. Here, we support V2O5 on a hexagonal WO3 (HWO) to develop a V2O5/HWO catalyst, which has exceptional resistance to alkali and sulfur poisoning in the SCR reactions. A 350 μmol g(-1) K(+) loading and the presence of 1,300 mg m(-3) SO2 do not almost influence the SCR activity of the V2O5/HWO catalyst, and under the same conditions, the conventional V2O5/WO3-TiO2 catalysts completely lost the SCR activity within 4 h. The strong resistance to alkali and sulfur poisoning of the V2O5/HWO catalysts mainly originates from the hexagonal structure of the HWO. The HWO allows the V2O5 to be highly dispersed on the external surfaces for catalyzing the SCR reactions and has the relatively smooth surfaces and the size-suitable tunnels specifically for alkalis' diffusion and trapping. This work provides a useful strategy to develop SCR catalysts with exceptional resistance to alkali and sulfur poisoning for controlling NOx emissions from the stationary source and the mobile source.

  8. DYNAMOMETER EVALUATION OF PLASMA-CATALYST FOR DIESEL NOX REDUCTION

    SciTech Connect

    Hoard, J; Schmieg, S; Brooks, D; Peden, C; Barlow, S; Tonkyn, R

    2003-08-24

    A three-stage plasma-catalyst system was developed and tested on an engine dynamometer. Previous laboratory testing suggested high NOx efficiency could be obtained. With hexene reductant added to the exhaust, over 90% NOx reduction was observed. However, with diesel or Fischer-Tropsch reductant the catalyst efficiency rapidly dropped off. Heating the catalyst in air removed brown deposit from the surface and restored conversion efficiency. Following the engine tests, the used catalysts were evaluated. BET surface area decreased, and TPD revealed significant storage. This storage appears to be partly unburned diesel fuel that can be removed by heating to around 250-300 C, and partly hydrocarbons bonded to the surface that remain in place until 450-500 C. Laboratory testing with propene reductant demonstrated that the catalyst regains efficiency slowly even when operating temperature does not exceed 300 C. This suggests that control strategies may be able to regenerate the catalyst by occasional moderate heating.

  9. Kinetic and Performance Studies of the Regeneration Phase of Model Pt/Ba/Rh NOx Traps for Design and Optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Michael Harold; Vemuri Balakotaiah

    2010-05-31

    In this project a combined experimental and theoretical approach was taken to advance our understanding of lean NOx trap (LNT) technology. Fundamental kinetics studies were carried out of model LNT catalysts containing variable loadings of precious metals (Pt, Rh), and storage components (BaO, CeO{sub 2}). The Temporal Analysis of Products (TAP) reactor provided transient data under well-characterized conditions for both powder and monolith catalysts, enabling the identification of key reaction pathways and estimation of the corresponding kinetic parameters. The performance of model NOx storage and reduction (NSR) monolith catalysts were evaluated in a bench scale NOx trap using synthetic exhaust, with attention placed on the effect of the pulse timing and composition on the instantaneous and cycle-averaged product distributions. From these experiments we formulated a global model that predicts the main spatio-temporal features of the LNT and a mechanistic-based microkinetic models that incorporates a detailed understanding of the chemistry and predicts more detailed selectivity features of the LNT. The NOx trap models were used to determine its ability to simulate bench-scale data and ultimately to evaluate alternative LNT designs and operating strategies. The four-year project led to the training of several doctoral students and the dissemination of the findings as 47 presentations in conferences, catalysis societies, and academic departments as well 23 manuscripts in peer-reviewed journals. A condensed review of NOx storage and reduction was published in an encyclopedia of technology.

  10. Enhanced High Temperature Performance of NOx Reduction Catalyst Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Feng; Kim, Do Heui; Luo, Jinyong; Muntean, George G.; Peden, Charles HF; Howden, Ken; Currier, Neal; Kamasamudram, Krishna; Kumar, Ashok; Li, Junhui; Stafford, Randy; Yezerets, Aleksey; Castagnola, Mario; Chen, Hai Ying; Hess, Howard ..

    2012-12-31

    Two primary NOx after-treatment technologies have been recognized as the most promising approaches for meeting stringent NOx emission standards for diesel vehicles within the Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA’s) 2007/2010 mandated limits, NOx Storage Reduction (NSR) and NH3 selective catalytic reduction (SCR); both are, in fact being commercialized for this application. However, in looking forward to 2015 and beyond with expected more stringent regulations, the continued viability of the NSR technology for controlling NOx emissions from lean-burn engines such as diesels will require at least two specific, significant and inter-related improvements. First, it is important to reduce system costs by, for example, minimizing the precious metal content while maintaining, even improving, performance and long-term stability. A second critical need for future NSR systems, as well as for NH3 SCR, will be significantly improved higher and lower temperature performance and stability. Furthermore, these critically needed improvements will contribute significantly to minimizing the impacts to fuel economy of incorporating these after-treatment technologies on lean-burn vehicles. To meet these objectives will require, at a minimum an improved scientific understanding of the following things: i) the various roles for the precious and coinage metals used in these catalysts; ii) the mechanisms for these various roles; iii) the effects of high temperatures on the active metal performance in their various roles; iv) mechanisms for higher temperature NOx storage performance for modified and/or alternative storage materials; v) the interactions between the precious metals and the storage materials in both optimum NOx storage performance and long term stability; vi) the sulfur adsorption and regeneration mechanisms for NOx reduction materials; vii) materials degradation mechanisms in CHA-based NH3 SCR catalysts. The objective of this CRADA project between PNNL and Cummins, Inc

  11. Congressionally Directed Project for Passive NOx Removal Catalysts Research

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, William

    2014-08-29

    The Recipient proposes to produce new scientific and technical knowledge and tools to enable the discovery and deployment of highly effective materials for the selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of nitrogen oxides (NOx) from lean combustion exhaust. A second goal is to demonstrate a closely coupled experimental and computational approach to heterogeneous catalysis research. These goals will be met through the completion of four primary technical objectives: First, an in-depth kinetic analysis will be performed on two prominent classes of NOx SCR catalysts, Fe- and Cu-exchanged beta and ZSM-5 zeolites, over a wide range of catalyst formulation and under identical, high conversion conditions as a function of gas phase composition. Second, the nanoscale structure and adsorption chemistry of these high temperature (HT) and low temperature (LT) catalysts will be determined using in situ and operando spectroscopy under the same reaction conditions. Third, first-principles molecular simulations will be used to model the metal-zeolite active sites, their adsorption chemistry, and key steps in catalytic function. Fourth, this information will be integrated into chemically detailed mechanistic and kinetic descriptions and models of the operation of these well- defined NOx SCR catalysts under practically relevant reaction conditions. The new knowledge and models that derive from this work will be published in the scientific literature.

  12. Hydrophobic Catalysts For Removal Of NOx From Flue Gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharma, Pramod K.; Hickey, Gregory S.; Voecks, Gerald E.

    1995-01-01

    Improved catalysts for removal of nitrogen oxides (NO and NO2) from combustion flue gases formulated as composites of vanadium pentoxide in carbon molecular sieves. Promotes highly efficient selective catalytic reduction of NOx at relatively low temperatures while not being adversely affected by presence of water vapor and sulfur oxide gases in flue gas. Apparatus utilizing catalyst of this type easily integrated into exhaust stream of power plant to remove nitrogen oxides, generated in combustion of fossil fuels and contribute to formation of acid rain and photochemical smog.

  13. Investigation of Aging Mechanisms in Lean NOx Traps

    SciTech Connect

    Mark Crocker

    2010-03-31

    Lean NO{sub x} traps (LNTs) represent a promising technology for the abatement of NO{sub x} under lean conditions. Although LNTs are starting to find commercial application, the issue of catalyst durability remains problematic. LNT susceptibility to sulfur poisoning is the single most important factor determining effective catalyst lifetime. The NO{sub x} storage element of the catalyst has a greater affinity for SO{sub 3} than it does for NO{sub 2}, and the resulting sulfate is more stable than the stored nitrate. Although this sulfate can be removed from the catalyst by means of high temperature treatment under rich conditions, the required conditions give rise to deactivation mechanisms such as precious metal sintering, total surface area loss, and solid state reactions between the various oxides present. The principle objective of this project was to improve understanding of the mechanisms of lean NO{sub x} trap aging, and to understand the effect of washcoat composition on catalyst aging characteristics. The approach utilized involved detailed characterization of model catalysts prior to and after aging, in tandem with measurement of catalyst performance in NO{sub x} storage and reduction. In this manner, NO{sub x} storage and reduction characteristics were correlated with the evolution of catalyst physico-chemical properties upon aging. Rather than using poorly characterized proprietary catalysts, or simple model catalysts of the Pt/BaO/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} type (representing the first generation of LNTs), Pt/Rh/BaO/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalysts were employed which also incorporated CeO{sub 2} or CeO{sub 2}-ZrO{sub 2}, representing a model system which more accurately reflects current LNT formulations. Catalysts were prepared in which the concentration of each of the main components was systematically varied: Pt (50, 75 or 100 g/ft{sup 3}), Rh (10 or 20 g/ft{sup 3}), BaO (15, 30 or 45 g/L), and either CeO{sub 2} (0, 50 or 100 g/L) or CeO{sub 2}-ZrO{sub 2} (0, 50

  14. Axial length effects on lean NOx trap performance

    SciTech Connect

    Prikhodko, Vitaly Y; Nguyen, Ke; Choi, Jae-Soon; Daw, C Stuart

    2009-01-01

    The effect of axial length on the NO{sub x} reduction performance of two different commercial Lean NO{sub x} Trap (LNT) monolithic catalysts was experimentally investigated in a bench flow reactor. The washcoat composition of one of the catalysts consisted of Pt and K on {gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}; whereas the other catalyst contained a complex mixture of Pt, Pd, Rh, Ba, Ce, Zr, Mg, Al and others. The NO{sub x} removal characteristics of cylindrical monolith segments of constant diameter (2.22 cm) and axial lengths of 2.54, 5.08 and 7.62 cm were evaluated using a simulated lean engine exhaust containing water and carbon dioxide at a constant space velocity of 30,000 h{sup -1}. No significant effects of length were observed when the catalysts were fully reduced with hydrogen between NO{sub x} capture phases. However when the catalysts were only partially regenerated NO{sub x} reduction efficiency increased with monolith length. Intra-catalyst H{sub 2} measurements at different axial locations indicated that at least some of the efficiency loss during partial regeneration occurred when back-mixed H{sub 2} was directly oxidized and became unavailable for nitrate reduction.

  15. Advantages of MgAlOx over gamma-Al2O3 as a support material for potassium-based high temperature lean NOx traps

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Jinyong; Gao, Feng; Karim, Ayman M.; Xu, Pinghong; Browning, Nigel D.; Peden, Charles HF

    2015-08-07

    MgAlOx mixed oxides were employed as supports for potassium-based lean NOx traps (LNTs) targeted for high temperature applications. Effects of support compositions, K/Pt loadings, thermal aging and catalyst regeneration on NOx storage capacity were systematically investigated. The catalysts were characterized by XRD, NOx-TPD, TEM, STEM-HAADF and in-situ XAFS. The results indicate that MgAlOx mixed oxides have significant advantages over conventional gamma-Al2O3-supports for LNT catalysts, in terms of high temperature NOx trapping capacity and thermal stability. First, as a basic support, MgAlOx stabilizes stored nitrates (in the form of KNO3) to much higher temperatures than mildly acidic gamma-Al2O3. Second, MgAlOx minimizes Pt sintering during thermal aging, which is not possible for gamma-Al2O3 supports. Notably, combined XRD, in-situ XAFS and STEM-HAADF results indicate that Pt species in the thermally aged Pt/MgAlOx samples are finely dispersed in the oxide matrix as isolated atoms. This strong metal-support interaction stabilizes Pt and minimizes the extent of sintering. However, such strong interactions result in Pt oxidation via coordination with the support so that NO oxidation activity can be adversely affected after aging which, in turn, decreases NOx trapping ability for these catalysts. Interestingly, a high-temperature reduction treatment regenerates essentially full NOx trapping performance. In fact, regenerated Pt/K/MgAlOx catalyst exhibits much better NOx trapping performance than fresh Pt/K/Al2O3 LNTs over the entire temperature range investigated here. In addition to thermal aging, Pt/K loading effects were systemically studied over the fresh samples. The results indicate that NOx trapping is kinetically limited at low temperatures, while thermodynamically limited at high temperatures. A simple conceptual model was developed to explain the Pt and K loading effects on NOx storage. An optimized K loading, which allows balancing between the

  16. Nitrogen Release from a NOx Storage and Reduction Catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Tonkyn, Russell G.; Disselkamp, Robert S.; Peden, C. H.

    2006-04-30

    In a NOx storage and reduction (NSR) catalyst the release and reduction of NOx occurs over a very short period. The speed of the NOx release and reduction creates difficulties in analyzing the chemistry using normal analytical techniques, which are typically better suited to slower, steady state studies. We have investigated the time dependence of NO, NO2, NH3, N2O and N2 released by an NSR catalyst using a combination of FTIR and gas chromatographic techniques. Nitrogen was detected with the GC by using He rather than N2 as the background gas. The FTIR was used not only to monitor NO, NO2, NH3 and N2O, but also to establish cycle-to-cycle reproducibility. Under these conditions we used the GC to sample the effluent at multiple times over many lean-rich cycles. To the extent that the chemistry was truly periodic and reproducible, we obtained the time dependence of the release of nitrogen after the lean-to-rich transition. Similar information was obtained for O2, H2 and N2O. Combining the FTIR and GC data we obtained good cycle averaged nitrogen balances, indicating that all the major products were accounted for.

  17. Diesel Fuel Sulfur Effects on the Performance of Lean NOx Catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, Shouxian

    2000-08-20

    Evaluate the effects of diesel fuel sulfur on the performance of low temperature and high temperature Lean-NOx Catalysts. Evaluate the effects of up to 250 hours of aging on the performance of the Lean-NOx Catalysts with different fuel sulfur contents.

  18. Effects of sulfation level on the desulfation behavior of pre-sulfated Pt BaO/Al2O3 lean NOx trap catalysts: a combined H2 Temperature-Programmed Reaction, in-situ sulfur K-edge X-ray Absorption Near-Edge Spectroscopy, X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy, and Time-Resolved X-ray Diffraction Study

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Do Heui; Szanyi, Janos; Kwak, Ja Hun; Wang, Xianqin; Hanson, Jonathan C.; Engelhard, Mark H.; Peden, Charles HF

    2009-04-03

    Desulfation by hydrogen of pre-sulfated Pt(2wt%) BaO(20wt%)/Al2O3 with various sulfur loading (S/Ba = 0.12, 0.31 and 0.62) were investigated by combining H2 temperature programmed reaction (TPRX), x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), in-situ sulfur K-edge x-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES), and synchrotron time-resolved x-ray diffraction (TR-XRD) techniques. We find that the amount of H2S desorbed during the desulfation in the H2 TPRX experiments is not proportional to the amount of initial sulfur loading. The results of both in-situ sulfur K-edge XANES and TR-XRD show that at low sulfur loadings, sulfates were transformed to a BaS phase and remained in the catalyst, rather than being removed as H2S. On the other hand, when the deposited sulfur level exceeded a certain threshold (at least S/Ba = 0.31) sulfates were reduced to form H2S, and the relative amount of the residual sulfide species in the catalyst was much less than at low sulfur loading. Unlike samples with high sulfur loading (e.g., S/Ba = 0.62), H2O did not promote the desulfation for the sample with S/Ba of 0.12, implying that the formed BaS species originating from the reduction of sulfates at low sulfur loading are more stable to hydrolysis. The results of this combined spectroscopy investigation provide clear evidence to show that sulfates at low sulfur loadings are less likely to be removed as H2S and have a greater tendency to be transformed to BaS on the material, leading to the conclusion that desulfation behavior of Pt BaO/Al2O3 lean NOx trap catalysts is markedly dependent on the sulfation levels.

  19. Toluene decomposition performance and NOx by-product formation during a DBD-catalyst process.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yufang; Liao, Xiaobin; Fu, Mingli; Huang, Haibao; Ye, Daiqi

    2015-02-01

    Characteristics of toluene decomposition and formation of nitrogen oxide (NOx) by-products were investigated in a dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) reactor with/without catalyst at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. Four kinds of metal oxides, i.e., manganese oxide (MnOx), iron oxide (FeOx), cobalt oxide (CoOx) and copper oxide (CuO), supported on Al2O3/nickel foam, were used as catalysts. It was found that introducing catalysts could improve toluene removal efficiency, promote decomposition of by-product ozone and enhance CO2 selectivity. In addition, NOx was suppressed with the decrease of specific energy density (SED) and the increase of humidity, gas flow rate and toluene concentration, or catalyst introduction. Among the four kinds of catalysts, the CuO catalyst showed the best performance in NOx suppression. The MnOx catalyst exhibited the lowest concentration of O3 and highest CO2 selectivity but the highest concentration of NOx. A possible pathway for NOx production in DBD was discussed. The contributions of oxygen active species and hydroxyl radicals are dominant in NOx suppression.

  20. Toluene decomposition performance and NOx by-product formation during a DBD-catalyst process.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yufang; Liao, Xiaobin; Fu, Mingli; Huang, Haibao; Ye, Daiqi

    2015-02-01

    Characteristics of toluene decomposition and formation of nitrogen oxide (NOx) by-products were investigated in a dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) reactor with/without catalyst at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. Four kinds of metal oxides, i.e., manganese oxide (MnOx), iron oxide (FeOx), cobalt oxide (CoOx) and copper oxide (CuO), supported on Al2O3/nickel foam, were used as catalysts. It was found that introducing catalysts could improve toluene removal efficiency, promote decomposition of by-product ozone and enhance CO2 selectivity. In addition, NOx was suppressed with the decrease of specific energy density (SED) and the increase of humidity, gas flow rate and toluene concentration, or catalyst introduction. Among the four kinds of catalysts, the CuO catalyst showed the best performance in NOx suppression. The MnOx catalyst exhibited the lowest concentration of O3 and highest CO2 selectivity but the highest concentration of NOx. A possible pathway for NOx production in DBD was discussed. The contributions of oxygen active species and hydroxyl radicals are dominant in NOx suppression. PMID:25662254

  1. Method of preparing doped oxide catalysts for lean NOx exhaust

    DOEpatents

    Park, Paul W.

    2004-03-09

    The lean NOx catalyst includes a substrate, an oxide support material, preferably .gamma.-alumina deposited on the substrate and a metal or metal oxide promoter or dopant introduced into the oxide support material. The metal promoters or dopants are selected from the group consisting of indium, gallium, tin, silver, germanium, gold, nickel, cobalt, copper, iron, manganese, molybdenum, chromium cerium, and vanadium, and oxides thereof, and any combinations thereof. The .gamma.-alumina preferably has a pore volume of from about 0.5 to about 2.0 cc/g; a surface area of between 80 and 350 m.sup.2 /g; an average pore size diameter of between about 3 to 30 nm; and an impurity level of less than or equal to about 0.2 weight percent. In a preferred embodiment the .gamma.-alumina is prepared by a sol-gel method, with the metal doping of the .gamma.-alumina preferably accomplished using an incipient wetness impregnation technique.

  2. Nox Reduction in a Fluidized Bed Reactor with Fe/ZSM-5 Catalyst and Propylene as Reductant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Terris; Bi, Xiaotao

    The performance of a fluidized bed catalytic reactor was investigated for NOx reduction using a Fe/ZSM-5 catalyst and propylene as the reducing agent. The effects of inlet NOx concentration, propylene to NOx molar ratio, flue gas oxygen concentration and fluidizing gas velocity on NOx conversion were studied using simulated flue gases. The results showed that the NOx conversion decreased with decreasing the inlet NOx concentration, and propylene to NOx molar ratio. The increase in flue gas oxygen concentration also imposed a significant negative impact. As the flue gas oxygen concentration increased, NOx reduction decreased while propylene conversion increased at a given propylene to NOx molar ratio, due to the oxidation of propylene in the presence of high oxygen concentration. The increase in fluidization gas velocity reduced the contact time between reactant and the catalyst particles due to the increased bubble size and bubble rise velocity. As a result, the NOx reduction decreased as the gas velocity increased.

  3. NOx Uptake Mechanism on Pt/BaO/Al2O3 Catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Kwak, Ja Hun; Kim, Do Heui; Szailer, Tamas; Peden, Charles HF; Szanyi, Janos

    2006-11-01

    The NOx adsorption mechanism on Pt/BaO/Al2O3 catalysts was investigated by performing NOx storage/reduction cycles, NO2 adsorption and NO + O2 adsorption on 2%Pt/(x)BaO/Al2O3 (x = 2, 8 and 20 wt%) catalysts. NOx uptake profiles on 2%Pt/20%BaO/Al2O3 at 523 K show complete uptake behavior for almost 5 min, and then the NOx level starts gradually increasing with time and it reaches 75% of the inlet NOx concentration after 30 min time-on-stream. Although this catalyst shows fairly high NOx conversion at 523 K, only ~ 2.4 wt% out of 20 wt% BaO is converted to Ba(NO3)2. Adsorption studies by using NO2 and NO + O2 suggest two different NOx adsorption mechanisms. The NO2 uptake profile on 2%Pt/20%BaO/Al2O3 shows the absence of a complete NOx uptake period at the beginning of adsorption and the overall NOx uptake is controlled by the gas-solid equilibrium between NO2 and BaO/Ba(NO3)2 phase. When we use NO + O2, complete initial NOx uptake occurs and the time it takes to convert ~ 4 % of BaO to Ba(NO3)2 is independent of the NO concentration. These NOx uptake characteristics suggest that the NO + O2 reaction on the surface of Pt particles produces NO2 that is subsequently transferred to the neighboring BaO phase by spill over. At the beginning of the NOx uptake, this spill-over process is very fast and so it is able to provide complete NOx storage. However, the NOx uptake by this mechanism slows down as BaO in the vicinity of Pt particles are converted to Ba(NO3)2. The formation of Ba(NO3)2 around the Pt particles results in the development of a diffusion barrier for NO2, and increases the probability of NO2 desorption and consequently, the beginning of NOx slip. As NOx uptake by NO2 spill-over mechanism slows down due to the diffusion barrier formation, the rate and extent of NO2 uptake are determined by the diffusion rate of nitrate ions into the BaO bulk, which, in turn, is determined by the gas phase NO2 concentration.

  4. Discovery of New NOx Reduction Catalysts for CIDI Engines Using Combinatorial Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Blint, Richard J

    2005-08-15

    This project for the discovery of new lean reduction NOx catalysts was initiated on August 16th, 2002 and is now into its fourth year. Several materials have already been identified as NOx reduction catalysts for possible future application. NOx reduction catalysts are a critical need in the North American vehicle market since these catalysts are needed to enable both diesels and lean gasoline engines to meet the 2007-2010 emission standards. Hydrocarbon selective catalytic reduction (SCR) is a preferred technology since it requires no infrastructure changes (as may be expected for urea SCR) and most likely has the simplest engine control strategy of the three proposed NOx reduction approaches. The use of fast throughput techniques and informatics greatly enhances the possibility of discovering new NOx reduction catalysts. Using fast throughput techniques this project has already screened over 3000 new materials and evaluates hundreds of new materials a month. Evaluating such a high number of new materials puts this approach into a very different paradigm than previous discovery approaches for new NOx reduction catalysts. With so much data on materials it is necessary to use statistical techniques to identify the potential catalysts and these statistical techniques are needed to optimize compositions of the multi-component materials that are identified under the program as possible new lean NOx catalysts. Several new materials have conversions in excess of 80% at temperatures above 300 C. That is more than twice the activity of previous HC SCR materials. These materials are candidates for emission control on heavy-duty systems (i.e.; over 8500 pounds gross weight). Tests of one of the downselected materials on an engine dynamometer show NOx reductions greater than 80% under some conditions even though the net NOx reductions on the HWFET and the US06 cycles were relatively low. The program is scheduled to continue until the end of the 2006 calendar year. Work in the

  5. Synthesis and characterization of catalysts produced from paper mill sludge. I. Determination Of NOx removal capability.

    PubMed

    Khalili, N R; Jain, H; Arastoopour, H

    2000-12-30

    Characteristics and catalytic properties of a series of carbon-based catalysts (CBCs) produced from paper mill sludge were evaluated. The major processes involved in the production of the catalysts were chemical activation, impregnation, pyrolysis, and post pyrolysis rinsing. The porous structure, catalytic activity and thermostability of the catalysts were tailored during the production stage by introducing hetero-atoms (zinc chloride, and ferric nitrate) in the carbon structure. Characterization of the produced CBCs included determination of the surface area, pore size, and pore size distribution (PSD) from standard N2-adsorption isotherm data. The extent of graphitization and the presence of metal crystals were identified from X-ray diffraction (XRD). The limit of the catalyst gasification was estimated from thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) conducted in an oxidized environment. The NOx reduction capability of the produced catalysts was evaluated in the presence of carbon monoxide using a fixed bed reactor. The reaction temperature ranged from 300 to 500 degrees C. It was shown that paper mill sludge is an excellent precursor for the production of CBCs with NOx removal capability of 66-94%. The catalytic capability of the produced CBCs varied according to the method of production, catalyst surface properties (surface area, pore structure, PSD), metal composition and reaction temperature. The highest NOx removal capacity was observed for the catalytic reactions carried out at 400 degrees C. The mesoporous catalyst produced with a Zn:Fe molar ratio of 1:0.5 exhibited the maximum NOx removal catalytic activity of 94%.

  6. Combining nonthermal plasma with perovskite-like catalyst for NOx storage and reduction.

    PubMed

    Peng, Han Hsuan; Pan, Kuan Lun; Yu, Sheng Jen; Yan, Shaw Yi; Chang, Moo Been

    2016-10-01

    A new NOx storage and reduction (NSR) system is developed for NOx removal by combining perovskite-like catalyst with nonthermal plasma technology. In this hybrid system, catalyst is mainly used for oxidizing NO to NO2 and storing them, while nonthermal plasma is applied as a desorption-reduction step for converting NOx into N2. An innovative catalyst with a high NOx storage capacity and good reduction performance is developed by successive impregnation. The catalysts prepared with various metal oxides were investigated for NOx storage capacity (NSC) and NOx conversion. Characterization of the catalysts prepared reveals that addition of cobalt (Co) and potassium (K) considerably increases the performance for NSC. Results also show that SrKMn0.8Co0.2O4 supported on BaO/Al2O3 has good NSC (209 μmol/gcatalyst) for the gas stream containing 500 ppm NO and 5 % O2 with N2 as carrier gas. For plasma reduction process, NOx conversion achieved with SrKMn0.8Co0.2O4/BaO/Al2O3 reaches 81 % with the applied voltage of 12 kV and frequency of 6 kHz in the absence of reducing agents. The results indicate that performance of plasma reduction process (81 %) is better than that of thermal reduction (64 %). Additionally, mixed gases including 1 % CO, 1 % H2 and 1 % CH4, and 2 % H2O(g) are simultaneously introduced into the system to investigate the effect on NSR with plasma system and results indicate that performance of NSR with plasma can be enhanced. Overall, the hybrid system is promising to be applied for removing NOx from gas streams. Graphical abstract ᅟ. PMID:27392625

  7. Combining nonthermal plasma with perovskite-like catalyst for NOx storage and reduction.

    PubMed

    Peng, Han Hsuan; Pan, Kuan Lun; Yu, Sheng Jen; Yan, Shaw Yi; Chang, Moo Been

    2016-10-01

    A new NOx storage and reduction (NSR) system is developed for NOx removal by combining perovskite-like catalyst with nonthermal plasma technology. In this hybrid system, catalyst is mainly used for oxidizing NO to NO2 and storing them, while nonthermal plasma is applied as a desorption-reduction step for converting NOx into N2. An innovative catalyst with a high NOx storage capacity and good reduction performance is developed by successive impregnation. The catalysts prepared with various metal oxides were investigated for NOx storage capacity (NSC) and NOx conversion. Characterization of the catalysts prepared reveals that addition of cobalt (Co) and potassium (K) considerably increases the performance for NSC. Results also show that SrKMn0.8Co0.2O4 supported on BaO/Al2O3 has good NSC (209 μmol/gcatalyst) for the gas stream containing 500 ppm NO and 5 % O2 with N2 as carrier gas. For plasma reduction process, NOx conversion achieved with SrKMn0.8Co0.2O4/BaO/Al2O3 reaches 81 % with the applied voltage of 12 kV and frequency of 6 kHz in the absence of reducing agents. The results indicate that performance of plasma reduction process (81 %) is better than that of thermal reduction (64 %). Additionally, mixed gases including 1 % CO, 1 % H2 and 1 % CH4, and 2 % H2O(g) are simultaneously introduced into the system to investigate the effect on NSR with plasma system and results indicate that performance of NSR with plasma can be enhanced. Overall, the hybrid system is promising to be applied for removing NOx from gas streams. Graphical abstract ᅟ.

  8. NOx reduction Activity over Phosphate-supported Platinum Catalysts with Hydrogen under Oxygen-rich Condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itoh, M.; Takehara, M.; Saito, M.; Machida, K.

    2011-10-01

    The phosphate supported Pt catalysts (Pt/AlPO4, Pt/CePO4, Pt/CeP2O7, Pt/SnP2O7, Pt/TiP2O7, Pt/Zn3(PO4)2) were prepared by a conventional impregnation method to evaluate their selective catalytic reduction activity of NOx under excess oxygen condition. Among them, good NOx reduction activity was obtained on the Pt/AlPO4 catalyst. Specific adsorption species during the NOx reduction were checked by a diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectrum (DRIFTs) measurement to examine the reaction mechanism. Also NH3 temperature programmed desorption measurements were performed for all catalysts and their catalytic properties were discussed from the viewpoints of solid acidity.

  9. In2O3/Al2O3 Catalysts for NOx Reduction in Lean Condition

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Paul W.; Ragle, Christie; Boyer, Carrie S.; Balmer, M Lou; Engelhard, Mark H. ); McCready, David E. )

    2002-01-01

    The lean NOx performance and catalytic properties of In2O3/Al2O3 catalysts were investigated. High lean NOx activity was observed when propene was used as a reductant in the presence of 9% O2 and 7% H2O at a space velocity of 30,000h-1. The optimum lean NOx activity of In2O3/Al2O3 catalysts was observed at a loading of 2.5 wt.% indium on -Al2O3 which was prepared by a sol-gel technique (230 m2/g). When propane was used as a reductant, the In2O3/Al2O3 catalyst did not promote NOx reduction compared to the alumina substrate. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and temperature programmed reduction (TPR) have been used to characterize a series of In2O3/Al2O3 catalysts to better understand the surface structure of indium oxide species on the alumina support. The XRD data indicated that crystalline In2O3 was present at In2O3 loadings > 5wt.% and the quantity of the crystalline phase increased as a function of indium loading. XPS results suggested that indium oxide existed as a well-dispersed phase up to 10wt.% indium. The well dispersed or reducible indium oxide species below 400 C in TPR experiments were assigned as the sites which activate propene to oxygenated hydrocarbons such as acetaldehyde and acrolein. Alumina sites readily utilize the oxygenated hydrocarbons to reduce NOx. Dual-function mechanism was proposed to explain NOx reduction over In2O3/Al2O3 catalysts.

  10. Discovery of Novel NOx Catalysts for CIDI Applications by High-throughput Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Blint, Richard J.

    2007-12-31

    DOE project DE-PS26-00NT40758 has developed very active, lean exhaust, NOx reduction catalysts that have been tested on the discovery system, laboratory reactors and engine dynamometer systems. The goal of this project is the development of effective, affordable NOx reduction catalysts for lean combustion engines in the US light duty vehicle market which can meet Tier II emission standards with hydrocarbons based reductants for reducing NOx. General Motors (prime contractor) along with subcontractors BASF (Engelhard) (a catalytic converter developer) and ACCELRYS (an informatics supplier) carried out this project which began in August of 2002. BASF (Engelhard) has run over 16,000 tests of 6100 possible catalytic materials on a high throughput discovery system suitable for automotive catalytic materials. Accelrys developed a new database informatics system which allowed material tracking and data mining. A program catalyst was identified and evaluated at all levels of the program. Dynamometer evaluations of the program catalyst both with and without additives show 92% NOx conversions on the HWFET, 76% on the US06, 60% on the cold FTP and 65% on the Set 13 heavy duty test using diesel fuel. Conversions of over 92% on the heavy duty FTP using ethanol as a second fluid reductant have been measured. These can be competitive with both of the alternative lean NOx reduction technologies presently in the market. Conversions of about 80% were measured on the EUDC for lean gasoline applications without using active dosing to adjust the C:N ratio for optimum NOx reduction at all points in the certification cycle. A feasibility analysis has been completed and demonstrates the advantages and disadvantages of the technology using these materials compared with other potential technologies. The teaming agreements among the partners contain no obstacles to commercialization of new technologies to any potential catalyst customers.

  11. Impact of sulfation and desulfation on NOx reduction using Cu-chabazite SCR catalysts

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Brookshear, Daniel William; Nam, Jeong -Gil; Nguyen, Ke; Toops, Todd J.; Binder, Andrew J.

    2015-06-05

    This bench reactor study investigates the impact of gaseous sulfur on the NOx reduction activity of Cu-chabazite SCR (Cu-CHA) catalysts at SO2 concentrations representative of marine diesel engine exhaust. After two hours of 500 ppm SO2 exposure at 250 and 400 °C in the simulated diesel exhaust gases, the NOx reduction activity of the sulfated Cu-CHA SCR catalysts is severely degraded at evaluation temperatures below 250 °C; however, above 250 °C the impact of sulfur exposure is minimal. EPMA shows that sulfur is located throughout the washcoat and along the entire length of the sulfated samples. Interestingly, BET measurements revealmore » that the sulfated samples have a 20% decrease in surface area. Moreover, the sulfated samples show a decrease in NOx/nitrate absorption during NO exposure in a DRIFTS reactor which suggests that Cu sites in the catalyst are blocked by the presence of sulfur. SO2 exposure also results in an increase in NH3 storage capacity, possibly due to the formation of ammonium sulfate species in the sulfated samples. In all cases, lean thermal treatments as low as 500 °C reverse the effects of sulfur exposure and restore the NOx reduction activity of the Cu-CHA catalyst to that of the fresh condition.« less

  12. Sulfur and temperature effects on the spatial distribution of reactions inside a lean NOx trap and resulting changes in global performance

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Jae-Soon; Partridge Jr, William P; Pihl, Josh A; Daw, C Stuart

    2008-01-01

    We experimentally studied the influence of temperature and sulfur loading on the axial distribution of reactions inside a commercial lean NOx trap (LNT) catalyst to better understand the global performance trends. Our measurements were made on a monolith core, bench-flow reactor under cycling conditions (60-s lean/5-s rich) at 200, 325, and 400 C with intra-catalyst and reactor-outlet gas speciation. Postmortem elemental and diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS) analyses of the catalyst also supplemented our gas species measurements. For the unsulfated catalyst, the NOx storage/reduction (NSR) reactions were localized in the front (upstream) portion of the monolith, whereas oxygen storage/reduction reactions were distributed more evenly along the entire catalyst length. As a result, two axially distinct reaction zones were developed inside the working catalyst: an upstream 'NSR zone' where both NOx and oxygen storage/reduction took place and a downstream oxygen storage capacity (OSC)-only zone where the NSR reactions did not penetrate. The NSR zone involved less than half the LNT at 325 and 400 C, but it included almost the entire length at 200 C. Sulfation poisoned both the NSR and OSC reactions beginning at the catalyst upstream edge, with the NSR degradation occurring more rapidly and distinctly than the OSC. As sulfation proceeded, a third zone (the sulfated zone) developed and the NSR zone moved downstream, with a concomitant decrease in both the OSC-only zone and global NOx conversion. The sulfation impact on NOx conversion was greatest at 200 C, when the NSR zone was largest. Ammonia selectivity increased with sulfation, which we attributed to a shortened OSC-only zone and resultantly reduced consumption of NH{sub 3}, slipping from the NSR zone, by downstream OSC. Lower temperatures also increased NH{sub 3} selectivity. Nitrous oxide selectivity also increased with decreasing temperature but showed little dependence on

  13. Metal/metal oxide doped oxide catalysts having high deNOx selectivity for lean NOx exhaust aftertreatment systems

    DOEpatents

    Park, Paul W.

    2004-03-16

    A lean NOx catalyst and method of preparing the same is disclosed. The lean NOx catalyst includes a ceramic substrate, an oxide support material, preferably .gamma.-alumina, deposited on the substrate and a metal promoter or dopant introduced into the oxide support material. The metal promoters or dopants are selected from the group consisting of indium, gallium, tin, silver, germanium, gold, nickel, cobalt, copper, iron, manganese, molybdenum, chromium, cerium, vanadium, oxides thereof, and combinations thereof. The .gamma.-alumina preferably has a pore volume of from about 0.5 to about 2.0 cc/g; a surface area of between about 80 to 350 m.sup.2 /g; an average pore size diameter of between about 3 to 30 nm; and an impurity level of less than or equal to 0.2 weight percent. In a preferred embodiment the .gamma.-alumina is prepared by a sol-gel method, with the metal doping of the .gamma.-alumina preferably accomplished using an incipient wetness impregnation technique.

  14. MODELING COMPETITIVE ADSORPTION IN UREA-SCR CATALYSTS FOR EFFECTIVE LOW TEMPERATURE NOX CONTROL

    SciTech Connect

    Devarakonda, Maruthi N.; Tonkyn, Russell G.; Tran, Diana N.; Lee, Jong H.; Herling, Darrell R.

    2010-09-17

    Although the SCR technology exhibits higher NOx reduction efficiency over a wider range of temperatures among the lean NOx reduction technologies, further improvement in low-temperature performance is required to meet the future emission standards and to lower the system cost. In order to improve the catalyst technologies and optimize the system performance, it is critical to understand the reaction mechanisms and catalyst behaviors with respect to operating conditions. For example, it is well known that the ammonia coverage on catalyst surface is critical for NOx reduction efficiency. However, the level of ammonia storage is influenced by competitive adsorption by other species, such as H2O and NO2. Moreover, hydrocarbon species that slip through the upstream DOC during the cold-start period can also inhibit the SCR performance, especially at low temperatures. Therefore, a one-dimensional detailed kinetic model that can account for the effects of such competitive adsorption has been developed based on steady state surface isotherm tests on a commercial Fe-zeolite catalyst. The model is developed as a C language S-function and implemented in Matlab/Simulink environment. Rate kinetics of adsorption and desorption of each of the adsorbents are determined from individual adsorption tests and validated for a set of test conditions that had all the adsorbents in the feed gas.

  15. Control of diesel soot and NOx emissions with a particulate trap and EGR.

    PubMed

    Liu, Rui-xiang; Gao, Xi-yan; Yang, De-sheng; Xu, Xiao-guang

    2005-01-01

    The exhaust gas recirculation (EGR), coupled with a high-collection efficiency particulate trap to simultaneously control smoke and NOx emissions from diesel engines were studied. This ceramic trap developed previously provided the soot cleaning efficiency of 99%, the regeneration efficiency reaches 80% and the ratio of success reaches 97%, which make EGR used in diesel possible. At the presence of EGR, opening of the regeneration control valve of the trap was over again optimized to compensate for the decrease of the oxygen concentration in the exhaust gas resulted from EGR. The results indicated the cleaning efficiency and regeneration performance of the trap were maintained at the same level except that the back pressure increased faster. A new EGR system was developed, which is based on a wide range oxygen (UEGO) sensor. Experiments were carried out under steady state conditions while maintaining the engine speed at 1600 r/min, setting the engine loads at 0%, 25%, 50%, 75% and 100% respectively. Throughout each test the EGR rate was kept at nine different settings and data were taken with the gas analyzer and UEGO sensor. Then, the EGR rate and engine load maps, which showed the tendencies of NOx, CO and HC emissions from diesel engine, were made using the measured data. Using the maps, the author set up the EGR regulation, the relationship between the optimal amounts of EGR flow and the equivalence ratio, sigma, where sigma = 14.5/AFR.

  16. Novel cerium-tungsten mixed oxide catalyst for the selective catalytic reduction of NO(x) with NH3.

    PubMed

    Shan, Wenpo; Liu, Fudong; He, Hong; Shi, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Changbin

    2011-07-28

    A novel Ce-W mixed oxide catalyst prepared by homogeneous precipitation method presented nearly 100% NO(x) conversion in a wide temperature range from 250 to 425 °C for the selective catalytic reduction of NO(x) with NH(3) under an extremely high GHSV of 500,000 h(-1).

  17. Thermal Durability of Cu-CHA NH3-SCR Catalysts for Diesel NOx Reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Schmieg, Steven J.; Oh, Se H.; Kim, Chang H.; Brown, David B.; Lee, Jong H.; Peden, Charles HF; Kim, Do Heui

    2012-04-30

    Multiple catalytic functions (NOx conversion, NO and NH3 oxidation, NH3 storage) of a commercial Cu-zeolite urea/NH3-SCR catalyst were assessed in a laboratory fixed-bed flow reactor system after differing degrees of hydrothermal aging. Catalysts were characterized by using x-ray diffraction (XRD), 27Al solid state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) / energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectroscopy to develop an understanding of the degradation mechanisms during catalyst aging. The catalytic reaction measurements of laboratory-aged catalysts were performed, which allows us to obtain a universal curve for predicting the degree of catalyst performance deterioration as a function of time at each aging temperature. Results show that as the aging temperature becomes higher, the zeolite structure collapses in a shorter period of time after an induction period. The decrease in SCR performance was explained by zeolite structure destruction and/or Cu agglomeration, as detected by XRD/27Al NMR and by TEM/EDX, respectively. Destruction of the zeolite structure and agglomeration of the active phase also results in a decrease in the NO/NH3 oxidation activity and the NH3 storage capacity of the catalyst. Selected laboratory aging conditions (16 h at 800oC) compare well with a 135,000 mile vehicle-aged catalyst for both performance and characterization criteria.

  18. Impact of oxidation catalysts on exhaust NO2/NOx ratio from lean-burn natural gas engines.

    PubMed

    Olsen, Daniel B; Kohls, Morgan; Arney, Gregg

    2010-07-01

    Oxides of nitrogen (NOx) emitted from internal combustion engines are composed primarily of nitric oxide (NO) and nitrogen dioxide (NO2). Exhaust from most combustion sources contains NOx composed primarily of NO. There are two important scenarios specific to lean-burn natural gas engines in which the NO2/NOx ratio can be significant: (1) when the engine is operated at ultralean conditions and (2) when an oxidation catalyst is used. Large NO2/NOx ratios may result in additional uncertainty in NOx emissions measurements because the most common technique (chemiluminescence) was developed for low NO2/NOx ratios. In this work, scenarios are explored in which the NO2/NOx ratio can be large. Additionally, three NOx measurement approaches are compared for exhaust with various NO2/NOx ratios. The three measurement approaches are chemiluminescence, chemical cell, and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy. A portable analyzer with chemical cell technology was found to be the most accurate for measuring exhaust NOx with large NO2/NOx ratios. PMID:20681434

  19. Impact of oxidation catalysts on exhaust NO2/NOx ratio from lean-burn natural gas engines.

    PubMed

    Olsen, Daniel B; Kohls, Morgan; Arney, Gregg

    2010-07-01

    Oxides of nitrogen (NOx) emitted from internal combustion engines are composed primarily of nitric oxide (NO) and nitrogen dioxide (NO2). Exhaust from most combustion sources contains NOx composed primarily of NO. There are two important scenarios specific to lean-burn natural gas engines in which the NO2/NOx ratio can be significant: (1) when the engine is operated at ultralean conditions and (2) when an oxidation catalyst is used. Large NO2/NOx ratios may result in additional uncertainty in NOx emissions measurements because the most common technique (chemiluminescence) was developed for low NO2/NOx ratios. In this work, scenarios are explored in which the NO2/NOx ratio can be large. Additionally, three NOx measurement approaches are compared for exhaust with various NO2/NOx ratios. The three measurement approaches are chemiluminescence, chemical cell, and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy. A portable analyzer with chemical cell technology was found to be the most accurate for measuring exhaust NOx with large NO2/NOx ratios.

  20. Superoxide Induces Neutrophil Extracellular Trap Formation in a TLR-4 and NOX-Dependent Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Al-Khafaji, Ahmed B; Tohme, Samer; Yazdani, Hamza Obaid; Miller, David; Huang, Hai; Tsung, Allan

    2016-01-01

    Neutrophils constitute the early innate immune response to perceived infectious and sterile threats. Neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) are a novel mechanism to counter pathogenic invasion and sequelae of ischemia, including cell death and oxidative stress. Superoxide is a radical intermediate of oxygen metabolism produced by parenchymal and nonparenchymal hepatic cells, and is a hallmark of oxidative stress after liver ischemia-reperfusion (I/R). While extracellular superoxide recruits neutrophils to the liver and initiates sterile inflammatory injury, it is unknown whether superoxide induces the formation of NETs. We hypothesize that superoxide induces NET formation through a signaling cascade involving Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR-4) and neutrophil NADPH oxidase (NOX). We treated neutrophils with extracellular superoxide and observed NET DNA release, histone H3 citrullination and increased levels of MPO-DNA complexes occurring in a TLR-4–dependent manner. Inhibition of superoxide generation by allopurinol and inhibition of NOX by diphenyleneiodonium prevented NET formation. When mice were subjected to warm liver I/R, we found significant NET formation associated with liver necrosis and increased serum ALT in TLR-4 WT but not TLR-4 KO mice. To reduce circulating superoxide, we pretreated mice undergoing I/R with allopurinol and N-acetylcysteine, which resulted in decreased NETs and ameliorated liver injury. Our study demonstrates a requirement for TLR-4 and NOX in superoxide-induced NETs, and suggests involvement of superoxide-induced NETs in pathophysiologic settings. PMID:27453505

  1. Lean NOx reduction over Ag/alumina catalysts via ethanol-SCR using ethanol/gasoline blends

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Gunnarsson, Fredrik; Pihl, Josh A.; Toops, Todd J.; Skoglundh, Magnus; Härelind, Hanna

    2016-09-04

    This paper focuses on the activity for lean NOx reduction over sol-gel synthesized silver alumina (Ag/Al2O3) catalysts, with and without platinum doping, using ethanol (EtOH), EtOH/C3H6 and EtOH/gasoline blends as reducing agents. The effect of ethanol concentration, both by varying the hydrocarbon-to-NOx ratio and by alternating the gasoline concentration in the EtOH/gasoline mixture, is investigated. High activity for NOx reduction is demonstrated for powder catalysts for EtOH and EtOH/C3H6 as well as for monolith coated catalysts (EtOH and EtOH/gasoline). The results show that pure Ag/Al2O3 catalysts display higher NOx reduction and lower light-off temperature as compared to the platinum dopedmore » samples. The 4 wt.% Ag/Al2O3 catalyst displays 100% reduction in the range 340–425 °C, with up to 37% selectivity towards NH3. These results are also supported by DRIFTS (Diffuse reflection infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy) experiments. Finally, the high ammonia formation could, in combination with an NH3-SCR catalyst, be utilized to construct a NOx reduction system with lower fuel penalty cf. stand alone HC-SCR. In addition, it would result in an overall decrease in CO2 emissions.« less

  2. Modeling Species Inhibition of NO oxidation in Urea-SCR Catalysts for Diesel Engine NOx Control

    SciTech Connect

    Devarakonda, Maruthi N.; Tonkyn, Russell G.; Tran, Diana N.; Lee, Jong H.; Herling, Darrell R.

    2010-09-15

    Urea-selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalysts are regarded as the leading NOx aftertreatment technology to meet the 2010 NOx emission standards for on-highway vehicles running on heavy-duty diesel engines. However, issues such as low NOx conversion at low temperature conditions still exist due to various factors, including incomplete urea thermolysis, inhibition of SCR reactions by hydrocarbons and H2O. We have observed a noticeable reduction in the standard SCR reaction efficiency at low temperature with increasing water content. We observed a similar effect when hydrocarbons are present in the stream. This effect is absent under fast SCR conditions where NO ~ NO2 in the feed gas. As a first step in understanding the effects of such inhibition on SCR reaction steps, kinetic models that predict the inhibition behavior of H2O and hydrocarbons on NO oxidation are presented in the paper. A one-dimensional SCR model was developed based on conservation of species equations and was coded as a C-language S-function and implemented in Matlab/Simulink environment. NO oxidation and NO2 dissociation kinetics were defined as a function of the respective adsorbate’s storage in the SCR catalyst. The corresponding kinetic models were then validated on temperature ramp tests that showed good match with the test data.

  3. Modeling Species Inhibition of NO Oxidation in Urea-SCR Catalysts for Diesel Engine NOx Control

    SciTech Connect

    Devarakonda, Maruthi N.; Tonkyn, Russell G.; Tran, Diana N.; Lee, Jong H.; Herling, Darrell R.

    2011-04-20

    Urea-selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalysts are regarded as the leading NOx aftertreatment technology to meet the 2010 NOx emission standards for on-highway vehicles running on heavy-duty diesel engines. However, issues such as low NOx conversion at low temperature conditions still exist due to various factors, including incomplete urea thermolysis, inhibition of SCR reactions by hydrocarbons and H2O. We have observed a noticeable reduction in the standard SCR reaction efficiency at low temperature with increasing water content. We observed a similar effect when hydrocarbons are present in the stream. This effect is absent under fast SCR conditions where NO ~ NO2 in the feed gas. As a first step in understanding the effects of such inhibition on SCR reaction steps, kinetic models that predict the inhibition behavior of H2O and hydrocarbons on NO oxidation are presented in the paper. A one-dimensional SCR model was developed based on conservation of species equations and was coded as a C-language S-function and implemented in Matlab/Simulink environment. NO oxidation and NO2 dissociation kinetics were defined as a function of the respective adsorbate’s storage in the Fe-zeolite SCR catalyst. The corresponding kinetic models were then validated on temperature ramp tests that showed good match with the test data. Such inhibition models will improve the accuracy of model based control design for integrated DPF-SCR aftertreatment systems.

  4. Effect of K loadings on nitrate formation/decomposition and on NOx storage performance of K-based NOx storage-reduction catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Do Heui; Mudiyanselage, Kumudu K.; Szanyi, Janos; Kwak, Ja Hun; Zhu, Haiyang; Peden, Charles HF

    2013-10-25

    We have investigated nitrate formation and decomposition processes, and measured NOx storage performance on Pt-K2O/Al2O3 catalysts as a function of potassium loading. After NO2 adsorption at room temperature, ionic and bidentate nitrates were observed by fourier transform infra-red (FTIR) spectroscopy. The ratio of the former to the latter species increased with increasing potassium loading up to 10 wt%, and then stayed almost constant with additional K, demonstrating a clear dependence of loading on the morphology of the K species. Although both K2O(10)/Al2O3 and K2O(20)/Al2O3 samples have similar nitrate species after NO2 adsorption, the latter has more thermally stable nitrate species as evidenced by FTIR and NO2 temperature programmed desorption (TPD) results. With regard to NOx storage performance, the temperature of maximum NOx uptake (Tmax) is 573 K up to a potassium loading of 10 wt%. As the potassium loading increases from 10 wt% to 20 wt%, Tmax shifted from 573 K to 723 K. Moreover, the amount of NO uptake (38 cm3 NOx/g catal) at Tmax increased more than three times, indicating that efficiency of K in storing NOx is enhanced significantly at higher temperature, in good agreement with the NO2 TPD and FTIR results. Thus, a combination of characterization and NOx storage performance results demonstrates an unexpected effect of potassium loading on nitrate formation and decomposition processes; results important for developing Pt-K2O/Al2O3 for potential applications as high temperature NOx storage-reduction catalysts.

  5. Removal of NO(x) at low temperature over mesoporous alpha-Mn2O3 catalyst.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Mi-Jin; Park, Sung Hoon; Kim, Ji Man; Jeon, Jong-Ki; Kim, Sang Chai; Kim, Do Heui; Park, Young-Kwon

    2014-03-01

    Low-temperature selective catalytic reduction was carried out over various kinds of manganese oxide (MnOx) catalysts. Mesoporous alpha-Mn2O3, commercial bulk Mn2O3, and Mn/SBA-15 were used as the catalyst. The NOx removal performances of the catalysts were compared. Three different amounts of Mn (5, 10, and 15 wt%) were impregnated on SBA-15 to synthesize Mn/SBA-15. The physical and chemical properties of the catalysts were examined by Brunauer-Emmett-Teller, X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and H2-temperature programmed reduction analyses. Of all catalysts examined, mesoporous alpha-Mn2O3 exhibited the highest low-temperature SCR de-NOx efficiency, reaching about 90% at 175 degrees C. This is attributed to strong reducing ability and high oxygen mobility of mesoporous alpha-Mn2O3 and well dispersed Mn2O3 in its mesoporous framework.

  6. Novel Mn-Ce-Ti mixed-oxide catalyst for the selective catalytic reduction of NOx with NH₃.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhiming; Zhu, Junzhi; Li, Junhua; Ma, Lingling; Woo, Seong Ihl

    2014-08-27

    Mn-Ce-Ti mixed-oxide catalyst prepared by the hydrothermal method was investigated for the selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NOx with NH3 in the presence of oxygen. It was found that the environmentally benign Mn-Ce-Ti catalyst exhibited excellent NH3-SCR activity and strong resistance against H2O and SO2 with a broad operation temperature window, which is very competitive for the practical application in controlling the NOx emission from diesel engines. On the basis of the catalyst characterization, the dual redox cycles (Mn(4+) + Ce(3+) ↔ Mn(3+) + Ce(4+), Mn(4+) + Ti(3+) ↔ Mn(3+) + Ti(4+)) and the amorphous structure play key roles for the high catalytic deNOx performance. Diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy studies showed that the synergetic effect between Mn and Ce contributes to the formation of reactive intermediate species, thus promoting the NH3-SCR to proceed.

  7. Development of Metal Substrate for Denox Catalysts and Particulate Trap

    SciTech Connect

    Pollard, Michael; Habeger, Craig; Frary, Megan; Haines, Scott; Fluharty, Amy; Dakhoul, Youssef; Carr, Michael; Park, Paul; Stefanick, Matthew; DaCosta, Herbert; Balmer-Millar, M Lou; Readey, Michael; McCluskey, Philip

    2005-12-31

    The objective of this project was to develop advanced metallic catalyst substrate materials and designs for use in off-highway applications. The new materials and designs will be used as catalyst substrates and diesel particulate traps. They will increase durability, reduce flow resistance, decrease time to light-off, and reduce cost relative to cordierite substrates. Metallic catalyst substrates are used extensively for diesel oxidation catalysts and have the potential to be used in other catalytic systems for diesel engines. Metallic substrates have many advantages over ceramic materials including improved durability and resistance to thermal shock and vibration. However, the cost is generally higher than cordierite. The most common foil material used for metallic substrates is FeCr Alloy, which is expensive and has temperature capabilities beyond what is necessary for diesel applications. The first task in the project was Identification and Testing of New Materials. In this task, several materials were analyzed to determine if a low cost substitute for FeCr Alloy was available or could be developed. Two materials were identified as having lower cost while showing no decrease in mechanical properties or oxidation resistance at the application temperatures. Also, the ability to fabricate these materials into a finished substrate was not compromised, and the ability to washcoat these materials was satisfactory. Therefore, both candidate materials were recommended for cost savings depending on which would be less expensive in production quantities. The second task dealt with the use of novel flow designs to improve the converter efficiency while possibly decreasing the size of the converter to reduce cost even more. A non-linear flow path was simulated to determine if there would be an increase in efficiency. From there, small samples were produced for bench testing. Bench tests showed that the use of non-linear channels significantly reduced the light

  8. Regeneration of field-spent activated carbon catalysts for low-temperature selective catalytic reduction of NOx with NH3

    SciTech Connect

    Jeon, Jong Ki; Kim, Hyeonjoo; Park, Young-Kwon; Peden, Charles HF; Kim, Do Heui

    2011-10-15

    In the process of producing liquid crystal displays (LCD), the emitted NOx is removed over an activated carbon catalyst by using selective catalytic reduction (SCR) with NH3 at low temperature. However, the catalyst rapidly deactivates primarily due to the deposition of boron discharged from the process onto the catalyst. Therefore, this study is aimed at developing an optimal regeneration process to remove boron from field-spent carbon catalysts. The spent carbon catalysts were regenerated by washing with a surfactant followed by drying and calcination. The physicochemical properties before and after the regeneration were investigated by using elemental analysis, TG/DTG (thermogravimetric/differential thermogravimetric) analysis, N2 adsorption-desorption and NH3 TPD (temperature programmed desorption). Spent carbon catalysts demonstrated a drastic decrease in DeNOx activity mainly due to heavy deposition of boron. Boron was accumulated to depths of about 50 {mu}m inside the granule surface of the activated carbons, as evidenced by cross-sectional SEM-EDX analysis. However, catalyst activity and surface area were significantly recovered by removing boron in the regeneration process, and the highest NOx conversions were obtained after washing with a non-ionic surfactant in H2O at 70 C, followed by treatment with N2 at 550 C.

  9. Selective catalytic reduction system and process for treating NOx emissions using a palladium and rhodium or ruthenium catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Sobolevskiy, Anatoly; Rossin, Joseph A.; Knapke, Michael J.

    2011-07-12

    A process for the catalytic reduction of nitrogen oxides (NOx) in a gas stream (29) in the presence of H.sub.2 is provided. The process comprises contacting the gas stream with a catalyst system (38) comprising zirconia-silica washcoat particles (41), a pre-sulfated zirconia binder (44), and a catalyst combination (40) comprising palladium and at least one of rhodium, ruthenium, or a mixture of ruthenium and rhodium.

  10. Combination of photocatalysis and HC/SCR for improved activity and durability of DeNOx catalysts.

    PubMed

    Heo, Iljeong; Kim, Mun Kyu; Sung, Samkyung; Nam, In-Sik; Cho, Byong K; Olson, Keith L; Li, Wei

    2013-04-16

    A photocatalytic HC/SCR system has been developed and its high deNOx performance (54.0-98.6% NOx conversion) at low temperatures (150-250 °C) demonstrated by using a representative diesel fuel hydrocarbon (dodecane) as the reductant over a hybrid SCR system of a photocatalytic reactor (PCR) and a dual-bed HC/SCR reactor. The PCR generates highly active oxidants such as O3 and NO2 from O2 and NO in the feed stream, followed by the subsequent formation of highly efficient reductants such as oxygenated hydrocarbon (OHC), NH3, and organo-nitrogen compounds. These reductants are the key components for enhancing the low temperature deNOx performance of the dual-bed HC/SCR system containing Ag/Al2O3 and CuCoY in the front and rear bed of the reactor, respectively. The OHCs are particularly effective for both NOx reduction and NH3 formation over the Ag/Al2O3 catalyst, while NH3 and organo-nitrogen compounds are effective for NOx reduction over the CuCoY catalyst. The hybrid HC/SCR system assisted by photocatalysis has shown an overall deNOx performance comparable to that of the NH3/SCR, demonstrating its potential as a promising alternative to the current urea/SCR and LNT technologies. Superior durability of HC/SCR catalysts against coking by HCs has also been demonstrated by a PCR-assisted regeneration scheme for deactivating catalysts.

  11. Bauxite-supported Transition Metal Oxides: Promising Low-temperature and SO2-tolerant Catalysts for Selective Catalytic Reduction of NOx

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiuyun; Wu, Wen; Chen, Zhilin; Wang, Ruihu

    2015-01-01

    In order to develop low-temperature (below 200 °C) and SO2-tolerant catalysts for selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NOx, a series of cheap M/bauxite (M = Mn, Ni and Cu) catalysts were prepared using bauxite as a support. Their SCR performances are much superior to typical V2O5/TiO2, the addition of M into bauxite results in significant promotion of NOx removal efficiency, especially at low temperature. Among the catalysts, Cu/bauxite exhibits wide temperature window over 50–400 °C, strong resistance against SO2 and H2O as well as good regeneration ability in SCR of NOx. NOx conversion is more than 80% at 50–200 °C, and N2 selectivity is more than 98%. Cu/bauxite can serve as a promising catalyst in SCR of NOx. PMID:25988825

  12. Bauxite-supported Transition Metal Oxides: Promising Low-temperature and SO2-tolerant Catalysts for Selective Catalytic Reduction of NOx.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiuyun; Wu, Wen; Chen, Zhilin; Wang, Ruihu

    2015-05-19

    In order to develop low-temperature (below 200 °C) and SO2-tolerant catalysts for selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NOx, a series of cheap M/bauxite (M = Mn, Ni and Cu) catalysts were prepared using bauxite as a support. Their SCR performances are much superior to typical V2O5/TiO2, the addition of M into bauxite results in significant promotion of NOx removal efficiency, especially at low temperature. Among the catalysts, Cu/bauxite exhibits wide temperature window over 50-400 °C, strong resistance against SO2 and H2O as well as good regeneration ability in SCR of NOx. NOx conversion is more than 80% at 50-200 °C, and N2 selectivity is more than 98%. Cu/bauxite can serve as a promising catalyst in SCR of NOx.

  13. WO3/CeO2-ZrO2, a promising catalyst for selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NOx with NH3 in diesel exhaust.

    PubMed

    Li, Ye; Cheng, Hao; Li, Deyi; Qin, Yongsheng; Xie, Yuming; Wang, Shudong

    2008-03-28

    A WO3/CeO2-ZrO2 catalyst system was discovered for selective catalytic reduction of NOx with NH3; the catalyst (10 wt% WO3 loading) showed nearly 100% NOx conversion in a temperature range of 200-500 degrees C, at a space velocity of 90 000 h(-1) in a simulated diesel exhaust containing 550 ppm NOx (NO : NO2 feed ratio at 1.0), 10 vol% H2O and 10 vol% CO2; the catalyst also exhibited high temperature stability.

  14. Development of Optimal Catalyst Designs and Operating Strategies for Lean NOx Reduction in Coupled LNT-SCR Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Harold, Michael; Crocker, Mark; Balakotaiah, Vemuri; Luss, Dan; Choi, Jae-Soon; Dearth, Mark; McCabe, Bob; Theis, Joe

    2013-09-30

    Oxides of nitrogen in the form of nitric oxide (NO) and nitrogen dioxide (NO{sub 2}) commonly referred to as NO{sub x}, is one of the two chemical precursors that lead to ground-level ozone, a ubiquitous air pollutant in urban areas. A major source of NO{sub x} is generated by equipment and vehicles powered by diesel engines, which have a combustion exhaust that contains NO{sub x} in the presence of excess O{sub 2}. Catalytic abatement measures that are effective for gasoline-fueled engines such as the precious metal containing three-way catalytic converter (TWC) cannot be used to treat O2-laden exhaust containing NO{sub x}. Two catalytic technologies that have emerged as effective for NO{sub x} abatement are NO{sub x} storage and reduction (NSR) and selective catalytic reduction (SCR). NSR is similar to TWC but requires much larger quantities of expensive precious metals and sophisticated periodic switching operation, while SCR requires an on-board source of ammonia which serves as the chemical reductant of the NO{sub x}. The fact that NSR produces ammonia as a byproduct while SCR requires ammonia to work has led to interest in combining the two together to avoid the need for the cumbersome ammonia generation system. In this project a comprehensive study was carried out of the fundamental aspects and application feasibility of combined NSR/SCR. The project team, which included university, industry, and national lab researchers, investigated the kinetics and mechanistic features of the underlying chemistry in the lean NOx trap (LNT) wherein NSR was carried out, with particular focus on identifying the operating conditions such as temperature and catalytic properties which lead to the production of ammonia in the LNT. The performance features of SCR on both model and commercial catalysts focused on the synergy between the LNT and SCR converters in terms of utilizing the upstream-generated ammonia and alternative reductants such as propylene, representing the

  15. Dynamics of N2 and N2O peaks during and after the regeneration of lean NOx trap

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Mráček, David; Koci, Petr; Marek, Milos; Choi, Jae-Soon; Pihl, Josh A.; Partridge, Jr., William P.

    2014-12-04

    We study the dynamics and selectivity of N2 and N2O formation during and after the regeneration of a commercial NOx storage catalyst containing Pt, Pd, Rh, Ba on Ce/Zr, Mg/Al and Al oxides was studied with high-speed FTIR and SpaciMS analyzers. The lean/rich cycling experiments (60 s/5 s and 60 s/3 s) were performed in the temperature range 200–400°C, using H2, CO, and C3H6 individually for the reduction of adsorbed NOx. Isotopically labeled 15NO was employed in combination with Ar carrier gas in order to quantify the N2 product by mass spectrometry. N2 and N2O products were formed concurrently. Themore » primary peaks appeared immediately after the rich-phase inception, and tailed off with breakthrough of the reductant front (accompanied by NH3 product). Secondary N2 and N2O peaks appeared at the rich-to-lean transition as a result of reactions between surface-deposited reductants/intermediates (CO, HC, NH3, -NCO) and residual stored NOx. At 200–300 °C, up to 30% of N2 and 50% of N2O products originated from the secondary peaks. The N2O/N2 selectivity ratio as well as the magnitude of secondary peaks decreased with temperature and duration of the rich phase. Among the three reductants, propene generated secondary N2 peak up to the highest temperature. Lastly the primary N2 peak exhibited a broadened shoulder aligned with movement of reduction front from the zone where both NOx and oxygen were stored to the NOx-free zone where only oxygen storage capacity was saturated. N2 formed in the NOx-free zone originated from reaction of NH3 with stored oxygen, while N2O formation in this zone was very low.« less

  16. Thermally stable single-atom platinum-on-ceria catalysts via atom trapping.

    PubMed

    Jones, John; Xiong, Haifeng; DeLaRiva, Andrew T; Peterson, Eric J; Pham, Hien; Challa, Sivakumar R; Qi, Gongshin; Oh, Se; Wiebenga, Michelle H; Pereira Hernández, Xavier Isidro; Wang, Yong; Datye, Abhaya K

    2016-07-01

    Catalysts based on single atoms of scarce precious metals can lead to more efficient use through enhanced reactivity and selectivity. However, single atoms on catalyst supports can be mobile and aggregate into nanoparticles when heated at elevated temperatures. High temperatures are detrimental to catalyst performance unless these mobile atoms can be trapped. We used ceria powders having similar surface areas but different exposed surface facets. When mixed with a platinum/aluminum oxide catalyst and aged in air at 800°C, the platinum transferred to the ceria and was trapped. Polyhedral ceria and nanorods were more effective than ceria cubes at anchoring the platinum. Performing synthesis at high temperatures ensures that only the most stable binding sites are occupied, yielding a sinter-resistant, atomically dispersed catalyst. PMID:27387946

  17. [Deactivation by SO2 of transition metal oxides modified low-temperature SCR catalyst for NOx reduction with NH3].

    PubMed

    Shen, Bo-xiong; Liu, Ting; Yang, Ting-ting; Xiong, Li-xian; Wang, Jing

    2009-08-15

    MnOx-CeOx/ACF catalyst was prepared by impregnation method, which exhibited high activity for low-temperature selective catalytic reduction of NOx over the temperature range 110-230 degrees C. Experiments results indicated that the catalyst yielded 80% NO conversion at 150 degrees C and 90% at 230 degrees C. The Oxides of Fe,Cu and V were added to the catalysts based on MnOx-CeOx/ACF. The additions of these transition metal oxides had a negative effect on the activity of the catalysts. Compared with MnOx-CeOx/ACF and Cu and V modified catalysts, NO conversion for Fe-MnOx-CeOx/ACF catalyst leveled off at nearly 75% in the first 6 h in the presence of SO2. Two mechanisms of catalyst deactivation by SO2 were discovered by the methods of X-ray photoelectron spectrum (XPS) and Fourier transform infrared spectra (FTIR), indicating that the catalysts were covered by ammonium sulfates and the metal oxides, acting as active components, were also sulfated by SO2 to form metal sulfates.

  18. A superior catalyst with dual redox cycles for the selective reduction of NO(x) by ammonia.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhiming; Yi, Yang; Li, Junhua; Woo, Seong Ihl; Wang, Baoyi; Cao, Xingzhong; Li, Zhuoxin

    2013-09-11

    An environmentally benign Cu-Ce-Ti oxide catalyst exhibited excellent NH3-SCR activity, high N2 selectivity and strong resistance against H2O and SO2 with a broad operation temperature window. The dual redox cycles (Cu(2+) + Ce(3+) ↔ Cu(+) + Ce(4+), Cu(2+) + Ti(3+) ↔ Cu(+) + Ti(4+)) play key roles for the superior catalytic deNOx performance.

  19. Simulation of lean NOx trap performance with microkinetic chemistry and without mass transfer.

    SciTech Connect

    Larson, Rich; Daw, C. Stuart; Pihl, Josh A.; Chakravarthy, V. Kalyana

    2011-08-01

    A microkinetic chemical reaction mechanism capable of describing both the storage and regeneration processes in a fully formulated lean NO{sub x} trap (LNT) is presented. The mechanism includes steps occurring on the precious metal, barium oxide (NO{sub x} storage), and cerium oxide (oxygen storage) sites of the catalyst. The complete reaction set is used in conjunction with a transient plug flow reactor code to simulate not only conventional storage/regeneration cycles with a CO/H{sub 2} reductant, but also steady flow temperature sweep experiments that were previously analyzed with just a precious metal mechanism and a steady state code. The results show that NO{sub x} storage is not negligible during some of the temperature ramps, necessitating a re-evaluation of the precious metal kinetic parameters. The parameters for the entire mechanism are inferred by finding the best overall fit to the complete set of experiments. Rigorous thermodynamic consistency is enforced for parallel reaction pathways and with respect to known data for all of the gas phase species involved. It is found that, with a few minor exceptions, all of the basic experimental observations can be reproduced with these purely kinetic simulations, i.e., without including mass-transfer limitations. In addition to accounting for normal cycling behavior, the final mechanism should provide a starting point for the description of further LNT phenomena such as desulfation and the role of alternative reductants.

  20. Simultaneous Removal of Particulates and NOx Using Catalyst Impregnated Fibrous Ceramic Filters

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, J.I.; Mun, S.H.; Kim, S.T.; Hong, M.S.; Lee, J.C.

    2002-09-19

    The research is focused on the development and commercialization of high efficiency, cost effective air pollution control system, which can replace in part air pollution control devices currently in use. In many industrial processes, hot exhaust gases are cooled down to recover heat and to remove air pollutants in exhaust gases. Conventional air pollution control devices such as bag filters, E.P. and adsorption towers withstand operating temperatures up to 300 C. Also, reheating is sometimes necessary to meet temperature windows for S.C.R. Since Oxidation reactions of acid gases such as SO{sub 2}, and HCl with lime are enhanced at high temperatures, catalyst impregnated ceramic filters can be candidate for efficient and cost effective air pollution control devices. As shown on Fig. 1., catalytic ceramic filters remove particulates on exterior surface of filters and acid gases are oxidized to salts reacting with limes injected in upstream ducts. Oxidation reactions are enhanced in the cake formed on exterior of filters. Finally, injected reducing gas such as NH{sub 3} react with NOx to form N{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O interior of filters in particulate-free environment. Operation and maintenance technology is similar to conventional bag filters except that systems are exposed to relatively high temperatures ranging 300-500 C.

  1. Simultaneous catalytic removal of NOx and diesel PM over La(0.9) K(0.1) CoO3 catalyst assisted by plasma.

    PubMed

    Pei, Mei-xiang; Lin, He; Shangguan, Wen-feng; Huang, Zhen

    2005-01-01

    The simultaneous removal of NOx and particulate matter (PM) from diesel exhaust is investigated over a mixed metal oxide catalyst of La(0.9) K(0.1) CoO3 loaded on gamma-Al2O3 spherules with the assistant of plasma. It was found that NOx was reduced by PM in oxygen rich atmosphere, the CO2 and N2 were produced in the same temperature window without considering the N2 formed by plasma decomposition. As a result, the temperature for the PM combustion decreases and the reduction efficiency of NOx to N2 increases during the plasma process, which indicated that the activity of the catalyst can be improved by plasma. The NOx is decomposed by plasma at both low temperature and high temperature. Therefore, the whole efficiency of NOx conversion is enhanced.

  2. Diesel particulate abatement via wall-flow traps based on perovskite catalysts.

    PubMed

    Fino, Debora; Russo, Nunzio; Saracco, Guido; Specchia, Vito

    2003-01-01

    It is probably redundant to stress how extensive are nowadays the attempts to reduce the diesel particulate emissions from automotive and stationary sources. The present paper looks into a technology relied on a catalytic trap based on a SiC wall-flow monolith lined with suitable catalysts for the sake of promoting a more complete and faster regeneration after particulate capture. All the major steps of the catalytic filter preparation are dealt with, including: the synthesis and choice of the proper catalyst and trap materials, the development of an in situ catalyst deposition technique, the bench testing of the derived catalytic wall-flow. The best catalyst selected was the perovskite La0.9K0.1Cr0.9O3-delta. The filtration efficiency and the pressure drop of the catalytic and non-catalytic monoliths were evaluated on a diesel engine bench under various operating conditions.

  3. Significant Promotion Effect of Mo Additive on a Novel Ce-Zr Mixed Oxide Catalyst for the Selective Catalytic Reduction of NO(x) with NH3.

    PubMed

    Ding, Shipeng; Liu, Fudong; Shi, Xiaoyan; Liu, Kuo; Lian, Zhihua; Xie, Lijuan; He, Hong

    2015-05-13

    A novel Mo-promoted Ce-Zr mixed oxide catalyst prepared by a homogeneous precipitation method was used for the selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NO(x) with NH3. The optimal catalyst showed high NH3-SCR activity, SO2/H2O durability, and thermal stability under test conditions. The addition of Mo inhibited growth of the CeO2 particle size, improved the redox ability, and increased the amount of surface acidity, especially the Lewis acidity, all of which were favorable for the excellent NH3-SCR performance. It is believed that the catalyst is promising for the removal of NO(x) from diesel engine exhaust.

  4. Understanding NOx SCR Mechanism and Activity on Cu/Chabazite Structures throughout the Catalyst Life Cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Ribeiro, Fabio; Delgass, Nick; Gounder, Rajmani; Schneider, William F.; Miller, Jeff; Yezerets, Aleksey; McEwen, Jean-Sabin; Peden, Charles HF; Howden, Ken

    2014-12-09

    Oxides of nitrogen (NOx) compounds contribute to acid rain and photochemical smog and have been linked to respiratory ailments. NOx emissions regulations continue to tighten, driving the need for high performance, robust control strategies. The goal of this project is to develop a deep, molecular level understanding of the function of Cu-SSZ-13 and Cu-SAPO-34 materials that catalyze the SCR of NOx with NH3.

  5. Sulfation and Desulfation Behavior of Pt-BaO/MgO-Al2O3 NOx Storage Reduction Catalyst.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Soyeon; Kim, Do Heui

    2016-05-01

    The comparative study between Pt-BaO/Al2O3 and Pt-BaO/MgO-Al2O3 gives the information about the effect of MgO addition to Al2O3 support on the sulfation and desulfation behavior of Pt-BaO/MgO-Al2O3 NOx storage reduction catalyst. The sulfated two samples were analyzed by using element analysis (EA), X-ray diffraction (XRD), H2 temperature programmed reaction (H2 TPRX) and NOx uptake measurement. The amount of sulfur uptake on 2 wt% Pt-20 wt% BaO/Al2O3 and 2 wt% Pt-20 wt% BaO/MgO-Al2O3 are almost identical as 0.45 and 0.40 of S/Ba, respectively, which yields the drastic decrease in NOx uptake for both sulfated samples. However, after desulfa- tion with H2 at 600 degrees C, the residual sulfur amount on MgO-Al2O3 supported catalyst is three times larger than that on Al2O3 supported one, indicating that sulfur species formed on the former are more stable than those on the latter. It is also well corresponding to the H2 TPRX results where the main H2S peak from MgO-Al2O3 supported sample is observed at higher temperature than Al2O3 supported one, resulting in the lower NOx uptake activity of former sample than the latter one. Meanwhile, after desulfation of MgO-Al2O3 supported sample at 700 degrees C and 800 degrees C, the activity is recovered more significantly due to the removal of the large amount of sulfur while Al2O3 supported one decreases monotonically due to the sintering of Pt crystallite and the formation of BaAl2O4 phase. It is summarized that MgO-Al2O3 supported catalyst enhances the thermal stability of the catalyst, however, forms the stable sulfate species, which needs to be improved to develop the more sulfur resistant NSR catalyst system. PMID:27483765

  6. SELECTIVE REDUCTION OF NOX IN OXYGEN RICH ENVIRONMENTS WITH PLASMA-ASSISTED CATALYSIS: CATALYST DEVELOPMENT AND MECHANISTIC STUDIES

    SciTech Connect

    Peden, C; Barlow, S; Hoard, J; Kwak, J; *Balmer-Millar, M; *Panov, A; Schmieg, S; Szanyi, J; Tonkyn, R

    2003-08-24

    The control of NOx (NO and NO2) emissions from so-called ''lean-burn'' vehicle engines remains a challenge. In recent years, there have been a number of reports that show that a plasma device combined with a catalyst can reduce as high as 90% or more of NOx in simulated diesel and other ''lean-burn'' exhaust. In the case of propylene containing simulated diesel exhaust, the beneficial role of a plasma treatment is now thought to be due to oxidation of NO to NO2, and the formation of partially oxidized hydrocarbons that are more active for the catalytic reduction of NO2 than propylene. Thus, the overall system can be most usefully described as hydrocarbon selective catalytic reduction (SCR) enhanced by 'reforming' the exhaust with a non-thermal plasma (NTP) device. For plasma-enhanced catalysis, both zeolite- and alumina-based materials have shown high activity, albeit in somewhat different temperature ranges, when preceded by an NTP reactor. This paper will briefly describe our research efforts aimed at optimizing the catalyst materials for NTP-catalysis devices based, in part, on our continuing studies of the NTP- and catalytic-reaction mechanisms. Various alkali- and alkaline earth-cation-exchanged Y zeolites have been prepared, their material properties characterized, and they have been tested as catalytic materials for NOx reduction in laboratory NTP-catalysis reactors. Interestingly, NO2 formed in the plasma and not subsequently removed over these catalysts, will back-convert to NO, albeit to varying extents depending upon the nature of the cation. Besides this comparative reactivity, we will also discuss selected synthesis strategies for enhancing the performance of these zeolite-based catalyst materials. A particularly important result from our mechanistic studies is the observation that aldehydes, formed during the plasma treatment of simulated diesel exhaust, are the important species for the reduction of NOx to N2. Indeed, acetaldehyde has been found to

  7. Sulfation and Desulfation Behavior of Pt-BaO/MgO-Al2O3 NOx Storage Reduction Catalyst.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Soyeon; Kim, Do Heui

    2016-05-01

    The comparative study between Pt-BaO/Al2O3 and Pt-BaO/MgO-Al2O3 gives the information about the effect of MgO addition to Al2O3 support on the sulfation and desulfation behavior of Pt-BaO/MgO-Al2O3 NOx storage reduction catalyst. The sulfated two samples were analyzed by using element analysis (EA), X-ray diffraction (XRD), H2 temperature programmed reaction (H2 TPRX) and NOx uptake measurement. The amount of sulfur uptake on 2 wt% Pt-20 wt% BaO/Al2O3 and 2 wt% Pt-20 wt% BaO/MgO-Al2O3 are almost identical as 0.45 and 0.40 of S/Ba, respectively, which yields the drastic decrease in NOx uptake for both sulfated samples. However, after desulfa- tion with H2 at 600 degrees C, the residual sulfur amount on MgO-Al2O3 supported catalyst is three times larger than that on Al2O3 supported one, indicating that sulfur species formed on the former are more stable than those on the latter. It is also well corresponding to the H2 TPRX results where the main H2S peak from MgO-Al2O3 supported sample is observed at higher temperature than Al2O3 supported one, resulting in the lower NOx uptake activity of former sample than the latter one. Meanwhile, after desulfation of MgO-Al2O3 supported sample at 700 degrees C and 800 degrees C, the activity is recovered more significantly due to the removal of the large amount of sulfur while Al2O3 supported one decreases monotonically due to the sintering of Pt crystallite and the formation of BaAl2O4 phase. It is summarized that MgO-Al2O3 supported catalyst enhances the thermal stability of the catalyst, however, forms the stable sulfate species, which needs to be improved to develop the more sulfur resistant NSR catalyst system.

  8. Understanding Automotive Exhaust Catalysts Using a Surface Science Approach: Model NOx Storage Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Szanyi, Janos; Yi, Cheol-Woo W.; Mudiyanselage, Kumudu K.; Kwak, Ja Hun

    2013-11-01

    The structure-reactivity relationships of model BaO-based NOx storage/reduction catalysts were investigated under well controlled experimental conditions using surface science analysis techniques. The reactivity of BaO toward NO2, CO2, and H2O was studied as a function of BaO layer thickness [0\\hBaO\\30 monolayer (ML)], sample temperature, reactant partial pressure, and the nature of the substrate the NOx storage material was deposited onto. Most of the efforts focused on understanding the mechanism of NO2 storage either on pure BaO, or on BaO exposed to CO2 or H2O prior to NO2 exposure. The interaction of NO2 with a pure BaO film results in the initial formation of nitrite/nitrate ion pairs by a cooperative adsorption mechanism predicted by prior theoretical calculations. The nitrites are then further oxidized to nitrates to produce a fully nitrated surface. The mechanism of NO2 uptake on thin BaO films (\\4 ML), BaO clusters (\\1 ML) and mixed BaO/Al2O3 layers are fundamentally different: in these systems initially nitrites are formed only, and then converted to nitrates at longer NO2 exposure times. These results clarify the contradicting mechanisms presented in prior studies in the literature. After the formation of a nitrate layer the further conversion of the underlying BaO is slow, and strongly depends on both the sample temperature and the NO2 partial pressure. At 300 K sample temperature amorphous Ba(NO3)2 forms that then can be converted to crystalline nitrates at elevated temperatures. The reaction between BaO and H2O is facile, a series of Ba(OH)2 phases form under the temperature and H2O partial pressure regimes studied. Both amorphous and crystalline Ba(OH)2 phases react with NO2, and initially form nitrites only that can be converted to nitrates. The NO2 adsorption capacities of BaO and Ba(OH)2 are identical, i.e., both of these phases can completely be converted to Ba(NO3)2. In contrast, the interaction of CO2 with pure BaO results in the formation

  9. Surface Tuning of La0.5Sr0.5CoO3 Perovskite Catalysts by Acetic Acid for NOx Storage and Reduction.

    PubMed

    Peng, Yue; Si, Wenzhe; Luo, Jinming; Su, Wenkang; Chang, Huazhen; Li, Junhua; Hao, Jiming; Crittenden, John

    2016-06-21

    Selective dissolution of perovskite A site (A of ABO3 structure) was performed on the La1 - xSrxCoO3 catalysts for the NOx storage and reduction (NSR) reaction. The surface area of the catalysts were enhanced using dilute HNO3 impregnation to dissolve Sr. Inactive SrCO3 was removed effectively within 6 h, and the catalyst preserved the perovskite framework after 24 h of treatment. The tuned catalysts exhibited higher NSR performance (both NOx storage and NO-to-NO2 oxidation) under lean-burn and fuel-rich cycles at 250 °C. Large amounts of NOx adsorption were due to the increase of nitrate/nitrite species bonding to the A site and the growth of newly formed monodentate nitrate species. Nitrate species were stored stably on the partial exposed Sr(2+) cations. These exposed Sr(2+) cations played an important role on the NOx reduction by C3H6. High NO-to-NO2 oxidation ability was due to the generation of oxygen defects and Co(2+)-Co(3+) redox couples, which resulted from B-site exsolution induced by A-site dissolution. Hence, our method is facile to modify the surface structures of perovskite catalysts and provides a new strategy to obtain highly active catalysts for the NSR reaction.

  10. Surface Tuning of La0.5Sr0.5CoO3 Perovskite Catalysts by Acetic Acid for NOx Storage and Reduction.

    PubMed

    Peng, Yue; Si, Wenzhe; Luo, Jinming; Su, Wenkang; Chang, Huazhen; Li, Junhua; Hao, Jiming; Crittenden, John

    2016-06-21

    Selective dissolution of perovskite A site (A of ABO3 structure) was performed on the La1 - xSrxCoO3 catalysts for the NOx storage and reduction (NSR) reaction. The surface area of the catalysts were enhanced using dilute HNO3 impregnation to dissolve Sr. Inactive SrCO3 was removed effectively within 6 h, and the catalyst preserved the perovskite framework after 24 h of treatment. The tuned catalysts exhibited higher NSR performance (both NOx storage and NO-to-NO2 oxidation) under lean-burn and fuel-rich cycles at 250 °C. Large amounts of NOx adsorption were due to the increase of nitrate/nitrite species bonding to the A site and the growth of newly formed monodentate nitrate species. Nitrate species were stored stably on the partial exposed Sr(2+) cations. These exposed Sr(2+) cations played an important role on the NOx reduction by C3H6. High NO-to-NO2 oxidation ability was due to the generation of oxygen defects and Co(2+)-Co(3+) redox couples, which resulted from B-site exsolution induced by A-site dissolution. Hence, our method is facile to modify the surface structures of perovskite catalysts and provides a new strategy to obtain highly active catalysts for the NSR reaction. PMID:27233105

  11. Activity of double wash-coat monolith catalyst with noble metals and zeolites in selective catalytic reduction of NO(x) with C3H6.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jung-Dae; Kim, Ki-Joong; Kim, Yong-Hwa; Jeon, Gyung-Soo; Choi, Young-Key; Ahn, Ho-Geun

    2008-10-01

    The selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NO(x) with C3H6 was studied in the presence of oxygen. The double wash-coat monolith catalysts for SCR comprised a lower layer of Au (or Pt)/Al2O3 and a upper layer of zeolites. The catalytic performance of the double wash-coated catalyst was remarkably improved to broaden the temperature window. The Au and Pt particles were dispersed uniformly on the monolith with particle sizes range of 3 approximately 5 nm and 5 approximately 10 nm, respectively. The catalyst binders used were colloidal silica, potassium silicate and tetraethyl orthosilicate, and the best catalyst activity was achieved with using colloidal silica as a binder. The zeolites used for the catalyst upper layer were MCM-41, FER, Y5.3-Zeolite and ZSM5, among which the NH4-ZSM5-coated catalyst showed the highest activity. The experimental results confirmed the promising potential of the double wash-coat, monolith catalyst for SCR of NO(x) with C3H6 due to the effective combination of noble metal monolith catalyst with zeolite for the removal of NO(x) by SCR with hydrocarbons.

  12. NOx abatement in the exhaust of lean-burn natural gas engines over Ag-supported γ-Al2O3 catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azizi, Y.; Kambolis, A.; Boréave, A.; Giroir-Fendler, A.; Retailleau-Mevel, L.; Guiot, B.; Marchand, O.; Walter, M.; Desse, M.-L.; Marchin, L.; Vernoux, P.

    2016-04-01

    A series of Ag catalysts supported on γ-Al2O3, including two different γ-Al2O3 supports and various Ag loadings (2-8 wt.%), was prepared, characterized (SEM, TEM, BET, physisorption, TPR, NH3-TPD) and tested for the selective catalytic reduction of NOx by CH4 for lean-burn natural gas engines exhausts. The catalysts containing 2 wt.% Ag supported on γ-Al2O3 were found to be most efficient for the NOx reduction into N2 with a maximal conversion of 23% at 650 °C. This activity was clearly linked with the ability of the catalyst to concomitantly produce CO, via the methane steam reforming, and NO2. The presence of small AgOx nanoparticles seems to be crucial for the methane activation and NOx reduction.

  13. In situ FT-IR studies on the mechanism of selective catalytic reduction of NOx by propene over SnO2/Al2O3 catalyst.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhiming; Woo, Seong Ihl; Lee, Won Su

    2006-12-28

    The mechanism of the selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NOx by propene over SnO2/Al2O3 catalyst in the presence of oxygen has been investigated using in situ Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy. In situ IR measurements indicate that acetate and formate, which are the derivatives of the partial oxidation of propene, play a crucial role in the formation of NCO by reacting with the reactive monodentate nitrate species. The resulting NCO species subsequently reacts with NOx to form N2. The presence of oxygen substantially contributes to the partial oxidation of propene and thus shows a promoting effect for the NOx reduction.

  14. DRIFT study on cerium-tungsten/titania catalyst for selective catalytic reduction of NOx with NH3.

    PubMed

    Chen, Liang; Li, Junhua; Ge, Maofa

    2010-12-15

    CeO(2)/TiO(2) and CeO(2)-WO(3)/TiO(2) catalysts prepared by impregnation method assisted with ultrasonic energy were investigated on the selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NO(x) (NO and NO(2)) by NH(3). The catalytic activity of 10% CeO(2)/TiO(2) (CeTi) was greatly enhanced by the addition of 6% WO(3) in the broad temperature range of 200-500 °C, the promotion mechanism was proposed on basis of the results of in situ diffuse reflectance infrared transform spectroscopy (DRIFT). When NH(3) was introduced into both catalysts preadsorbed with NO + O(2), SCR would not proceed except for the reaction between NO(2) and ammonia. For CeO(2)/TiO(2) catalysts, coordinated NH(3) linked to Lewis acid sites were the main adsorbed ammonia species. When NO + O(2) was introduced, all the ammonia species consumed rapidly, indicating that these species could react with NO(x) effectively. Two different reaction routes, L-H mechanism at low temperature (<200 °C) and E-R mechanism at high temperatures (>200 °C), were presented for SCR reaction over CeO(2)/TiO(2) catalyst. For CeO(2)-WO(3)/TiO(2) catalysts, the Lewis acid sites on Ce(4+) state could be converted to Brønsted acid sites due to the unsaturated coordination of Ce(n+) and W(n+) ions. When NO + O(2) was introduced, the reaction proceeded more quickly than that on CeO(2)/TiO(2). The reaction route mainly followed E-R mechanism in the temperature range investigated (150-350 °C) over CeO(2)-WO(3)/TiO(2) catalysts. Tungstation was beneficial for the formation of Ce(3+), which would influence the active sites of the catalyst and further change the mechanisms of SCR reaction. In this way, the cooperation of tungstation and the presence of Ce(3+) state resulted in the better activity of CeO(2)-WO(3)/TiO(2) compared to that of CeO(2)/TiO(2).

  15. Impacts of continuously regenerating trap and particle oxidation catalyst on the NO2 and particulate matter emissions emitted from diesel engine.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhihua; Ge, Yunshan; Tan, Jianwei; He, Chao; Shah, Asad Naeem; Ding, Yan; Yu, Linxiao; Zhao, Wei

    2012-01-01

    Two continuously regenerating diesel particulate filter (CRDPF) with different configurations and one particles oxidation catalyst (POC) were employed to perform experiments in a controlled laboratory setting to evaluate their effects on NO2, smoke and particle number emissions. The results showed that the application of the after-treatments increased the emission ratios of NO2/NOx significantly. The results of smoke emissions and particle number (PN) emissions indicated that both CRDPFs had sufficient capacity to remove more than 90% of total particulate matter (PM) and more than 97% of solid particles. However, the POC was able to remove the organic components of total PM, and only partially to remove the carbonaceous particles with size less than 30 nm. The negligible effects of POC on larger particles were observed due to its honeycomb structure leads to an inadequate residence time to oxidize the solid particles or trap them. The particles removal efficiencies of CRDPFs had high degree of correlations with the emission ratio of NO2/NOx. The PN emission results from two CRDPFs indicated that more NO2 generating in diesel oxidation catalyst section could obtain the higher removal efficiency of solid particles. However this also increased the risk of NO2 exposure in atmosphere.

  16. Impacts of continuously regenerating trap and particle oxidation catalyst on the NO2 and particulate matter emissions emitted from diesel engine.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhihua; Ge, Yunshan; Tan, Jianwei; He, Chao; Shah, Asad Naeem; Ding, Yan; Yu, Linxiao; Zhao, Wei

    2012-01-01

    Two continuously regenerating diesel particulate filter (CRDPF) with different configurations and one particles oxidation catalyst (POC) were employed to perform experiments in a controlled laboratory setting to evaluate their effects on NO2, smoke and particle number emissions. The results showed that the application of the after-treatments increased the emission ratios of NO2/NOx significantly. The results of smoke emissions and particle number (PN) emissions indicated that both CRDPFs had sufficient capacity to remove more than 90% of total particulate matter (PM) and more than 97% of solid particles. However, the POC was able to remove the organic components of total PM, and only partially to remove the carbonaceous particles with size less than 30 nm. The negligible effects of POC on larger particles were observed due to its honeycomb structure leads to an inadequate residence time to oxidize the solid particles or trap them. The particles removal efficiencies of CRDPFs had high degree of correlations with the emission ratio of NO2/NOx. The PN emission results from two CRDPFs indicated that more NO2 generating in diesel oxidation catalyst section could obtain the higher removal efficiency of solid particles. However this also increased the risk of NO2 exposure in atmosphere. PMID:22894096

  17. Oxidation of SO[sub 2] to SO[sub 3] over honeycomb DeNoxing catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Svachula, J.; Alemany, L.J.; Ferlazzo, N.; Forzatti, P.; Tronconi, E. ); Bregani, F. )

    1993-05-01

    A systematic study addressing the effects of the operating conditions (contact time, temperature), of feed composition (O[sub 2], SO[sub 2], H[sub 2]O, NH[sub 3], NO[sub x], NH[sub 3] + NO[sub x] concentrations), and of catalyst design parameters (wall thickness, V content) in the oxidation of SO[sub 2] to SO[sub 3] over honeycomb commercial-type DeNoxing catalysts is described. Data are presented which refer to transient behavior of the catalysts, indicating that long conditioning times are required associated with the buildup of surface sulfate species. The steady-state reaction rate is of variable order in SO[sub 2], the order increasing with SO[sub 2] concentration as long as this is below 200 ppm and then decreasing; it is asymptotically independent of oxygen, depressed by water, strongly inhibited by ammonia, and slightly enhanced by NO[sub x]. The apparent activation energy changes from [approximately]50 to [approximately]20 kcal/mol on increasing the reaction temperature. A redox steady-state kinetic model is presented which accommodates qualitatively all of the observed effects. Once properly modified the same model has the potential to explain also transient effects during conditioning of the catalyst.

  18. Effect of manufacturing methods of AgCl/Al2O3 catalyst on selective catalytic reduction of NO(x).

    PubMed

    Kishida, Satoshi; Ju, Dong-Ying; Aritani, Hirofumi

    2011-01-01

    The AgCl/Al2O3 catalyst has potential for use in the selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NO(x). A compound hydrocarbon, following oxygenation is used as a type of reducing agent. In this experiment, the AgCl/Al2O3 catalyst was produced by four different methods, and the differences among their reduction catalysis of NO(x) were compared. Ethanol was used as a type of reducing agent. X-ray diffraction analysis was performed to study the crystalline structure and scanning electron microscope and transmission electron microscope (TEM) were applied to determine the microindentation. The results indicated that, in the range of 350-400 degrees C, there was no significant difference on the NO(x) reduction rate; however, there was dispersion at high and low temperature ranges. The size of the AgCl particles was about 20-100 nm.

  19. Supported, Alkali-Promoted Cobalt Oxide Catalysts for NOx Removal from Coal Combustion Flue Gases

    SciTech Connect

    Morris D. Argyle

    2005-12-31

    A series of cobalt oxide catalysts supported on alumina ({gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) were synthesized with varying contents of cobalt and of added alkali metals, including lithium, sodium, potassium, rubidium, and cesium. Unsupported cobalt oxide catalysts and several cobalt oxide catalysts supported ceria (CeO{sub 2}) with varying contents of cobalt with added potassium were also prepared. The catalysts were characterized with UV-visible spectroscopy and were examined for NO{sub x} decomposition activity. The CoO{sub x}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalysts and particularly the CoO{sub x}/CeO{sub 2} catalysts show N{sub 2}O decomposition activity, but none of the catalysts (unsupported Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} or those supported on ceria or alumina) displayed significant, sustained NO decomposition activity. For the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-supported catalysts, N{sub 2}O decomposition activity was observed over a range of reaction temperatures beginning about 723 K, but significant (>50%) conversions of N{sub 2}O were observed only for reaction temperatures >900 K, which are too high for practical commercial use. However, the CeO{sub 2}-supported catalysts display N{sub 2}O decomposition rates similar to the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-supported catalysts at much lower reaction temperatures, with activity beginning at {approx}573 K. Conversions of >90% were achieved at 773 K for the best catalysts. Catalytic rates per cobalt atom increased with decreasing cobalt content, which corresponds to increasing edge energies obtained from the UV-visible spectra. The decrease in edge energies suggests that the size and dimensionality of the cobalt oxide surface domains increase with increasing cobalt oxide content. The rate data normalized per mass of catalyst that shows the activity of the CeO{sub 2}-supported catalysts increases with increasing cobalt oxide content. The combination of these data suggest that supported cobalt oxide species similar to bulk Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} are inherently more active than

  20. Active sites in Cu-SSZ-13 deNOx catalyst under reaction conditions: a XAS/XES perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lomachenko, Kirill A.; Borfecchia, Elisa; Bordiga, Silvia; Soldatov, Alexander V.; Beato, Pablo; Lamberti, Carlo

    2016-05-01

    Cu-SSZ-13 is a highly active catalyst for the NH3-assisted selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of the harmful nitrogen oxides (NOx, x=1, 2). Since the catalytically active sites for this reaction are mainly represented by isolated Cu ions incorporated into the zeolitic framework, element-selective studies of Cu local environment are crucial to fully understand the enhanced catalytic properties of this material. Herein, we highlight the recent advances in the characterization of the most abundant Cu-sites in Cu-SSZ-13 upon different reaction-relevant conditions made employing XAS and XES spectroscopies, complemented by computational analysis. A concise review of the most relevant literature is also presented.

  1. Identification of the arsenic resistance on MoO3 doped CeO2/TiO2 catalyst for selective catalytic reduction of NOx with ammonia.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiang; Li, Xiansheng; Li, Junhua; Hao, Jiming

    2016-11-15

    Arsenic resistance on MoO3 doped CeO2/TiO2 catalysts for selective catalytic reduction of NOx with NH3 (NH3-SCR) is investigated. It is found that the activity loss of CeO2-MoO3/TiO2 caused by As oxide is obvious less than that of CeO2/TiO2 catalysts. The fresh and poisoned catalysts are compared and analyzed using XRD, Raman, XPS, H2-TPR and in situ DRIFTS. The results manifest that the introduction of arsenic oxide to CeO2/TiO2 catalyst not only weakens BET surface area, surface acid sites and adsorbed NOx species, but also destroy the redox circle of Ce(4+) to Ce(3+) because of interaction between Ce and As. When MoO3 is added into CeO2/TiO2 system, the main SCR reaction path are found to be changed from the reaction between coordinated NH3 and ad-NOx species to that between an amide and gaseous NO. Additionally, for CeO2-MoO3/TiO2 catalyst, As toxic effect on active sites CeO2 can be released because of stronger As-Mo interaction. Moreover, not only are the reactable Brønsted and Lewis acid sites partly restored, but the cycle of Ce(4+) to Ce(3+) can also be free to some extent.

  2. Current Understanding of Cu-Exchanged Chabazite Molecular Sieves for Use as Commercial Diesel Engine DeNOx Catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Feng; Kwak, Ja Hun; Szanyi, Janos; Peden, Charles HF

    2013-11-03

    Selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NOx with ammonia using metal-exchanged molecular sieves with a chabazite (CHA) structure has recently been commercialized on diesel vehicles. One of the commercialized catalysts, i.e., Cu-SSZ-13, has received much attention for both practical and fundamental studies. For the latter, the particularly well-defined structure of this zeolite is allowing long-standing issues of the catalytically active site for SCR in metal-exchanged zeolites to be addressed. In this review, recent progress is summarized with a focus on two areas. First, the technical significance of Cu-SSZ-13 as compared to other Cu-ion exchanged zeolites (e.g., Cu-ZSM-5 and Cu-beta) is highlighted. Specifically, the much enhanced hydrothermal stability for Cu-SSZ-13 compared to other zeolite catalysts is addressed via performance measurements and catalyst characterization using several techniques. The enhanced stability of Cu-SSZ-13 is rationalized in terms of the unique small pore structure of this zeolite catalyst. Second, the fundamentals of the catalytically active center; i.e., the chemical nature and locations within the SSZ-13 framework are presented with an emphasis on understanding structure-function relationships. For the SCR reaction, traditional kinetic studies are complicated by intra-particle diffusion limitations. However, a major side reaction, nonselective ammonia oxidation by oxygen, does not suffer from mass-transfer limitations at relatively low temperatures due to significantly lower reaction rates. This allows structure-function relationships that are rather well understood in terms of Cu ion locations and redox properties. Finally, some aspects of the SCR reaction mechanism are addressed on the basis of in-situ spectroscopic studies.

  3. Excellent performance of one-pot synthesized Cu-SSZ-13 catalyst for the selective catalytic reduction of NOx with NH3.

    PubMed

    Xie, Lijuan; Liu, Fudong; Ren, Limin; Shi, Xiaoyan; Xiao, Feng-Shou; He, Hong

    2014-01-01

    Cu-SSZ-13 samples prepared by a novel one-pot synthesis method achieved excellent NH3-SCR performance and high N2 selectivity from 150 to 550 °C after ion exchange treatments. The selected Cu3.8-SSZ-13 catalyst was highly resistant to large space velocity (800 000 h(-1)) and also maintained high NOx conversion in the presence of CO2, H2O, and C3H6 in the simulated diesel exhaust. Isolated Cu(2+) ions located in three different sites were responsible for its excellent NH3-SCR activity. Primary results suggest that the one-pot synthesized Cu-SSZ-13 catalyst is a promising candidate as an NH3-SCR catalyst for the NOx abatement from diesel vehicles.

  4. Excellent performance of one-pot synthesized Cu-SSZ-13 catalyst for the selective catalytic reduction of NOx with NH3.

    PubMed

    Xie, Lijuan; Liu, Fudong; Ren, Limin; Shi, Xiaoyan; Xiao, Feng-Shou; He, Hong

    2014-01-01

    Cu-SSZ-13 samples prepared by a novel one-pot synthesis method achieved excellent NH3-SCR performance and high N2 selectivity from 150 to 550 °C after ion exchange treatments. The selected Cu3.8-SSZ-13 catalyst was highly resistant to large space velocity (800 000 h(-1)) and also maintained high NOx conversion in the presence of CO2, H2O, and C3H6 in the simulated diesel exhaust. Isolated Cu(2+) ions located in three different sites were responsible for its excellent NH3-SCR activity. Primary results suggest that the one-pot synthesized Cu-SSZ-13 catalyst is a promising candidate as an NH3-SCR catalyst for the NOx abatement from diesel vehicles. PMID:24295053

  5. Catalysts, systems and methods to reduce NOX in an exhaust gas stream

    DOEpatents

    Castellano, Christopher R.; Moini, Ahmad; Koermer, Gerald S.; Furbeck, Howard

    2010-07-20

    Catalysts, systems and methods are described to reduce NO.sub.x emissions of an internal combustion engine. In one embodiment, an emissions treatment system for an exhaust stream is provided having an SCR catalyst comprising silver tungstate on an alumina support. The emissions treatment system may be used for the treatment of exhaust streams from diesel engines and lean burn gasoline engines. An emissions treatment system may further comprise an injection device operative to dispense a hydrocarbon reducing agent upstream of the catalyst.

  6. Environmentally-benign catalysts for the selective catalytic reduction of NO(x) from diesel engines: structure-activity relationship and reaction mechanism aspects.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fudong; Yu, Yunbo; He, Hong

    2014-08-11

    Selective catalytic reduction of NOx using NH3 or hydrocarbons (NH3-SCR or HC-SCR) in oxygen-rich exhaust from diesel engines remains a major challenge in environmental catalysis. The development of highly efficient, stable and environmentally-benign catalysts for SCR processes is very important for practical use. In this feature article, the structure-activity relationship of vanadium-free catalysts in the NH3-SCR reaction is discussed in detail, including Fe-, Ce-based oxide catalysts and Fe-, Cu-based zeolite catalysts, which is beneficial for catalyst redesign and activity improvement. Based on our research, a comprehensive mechanism contributing to the performance of Ag/Al2O3 in HC-SCR is provided, giving a clue to the design of a catalytic system with high efficiency.

  7. Roles of Pt and BaO in the Sulfation of Pt/BaO/Al2O3 Lean NOx Trap Materials: Sulfur K-edge XANES and Pt LIII XAFS Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Do Heui; Kwak, Ja Hun; Szanyi, Janos; Cho, Sung June; Peden, Charles HF

    2008-02-28

    The roles of barium oxide and platinum during the sulfation of Pt-BaO/Al2O3 lean NOx trap catalysts were investigated by S K edge XANES (X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy) and Pt LIII XAFS (X-ray absorption fine structure). All of the samples studied (Al2O3, BaO/Al2O3, Pt/Al2O3 and Pt-BaO/Al2O3) were pre-sulfated prior to the X-ray absorption measurements. It was found that barium oxide itself has the ability to directly form barium sulfate even in the absence of Pt and gas phase oxygen. In the platinum-containing samples, the presence of Pt-O species plays an important role in the formation of sulfate species. Even if barium and aluminum sites are available for SO2 to form sulfate, for the case of the BaO(8)/Al2O3 sample, where the barium coverage is about 0.26 ML, S XANES spectroscopy results show that barium sulfates are preferentially produced over aluminum sulfates . When oxygen is absent from the gas phase, the sulfation route that involves Pt-O is eliminated after the initially present Pt-O species are completely consumed. In this case, formation of sulfates is suppressed unless barium oxide is also present. Pt LIII XAFS results show that the first coordination sphere around the Pt atoms in the Pt particles is dependent upon the redox nature of the gas mixture used during the sulfation process. Sulfation under reducing environments (e.g. SO2+H2) leads to formation of Pt-S bonds, while oxidizing conditions (e.g. SO2+O2) continue to show the presence of Pt-O bonds. In addition, the former condition was found to give rise to a higher degree of Pt sintering than the latter one. This result explains why samples sulfated under reducing conditions had lower NOx uptakes than those sulfated under oxidizing conditions. Therefore, our results provide needed information for the development of optimum practical operation conditions (e.g. sulfation or desulfation) for lean NOx trap catalysts that minimize deactivation by sulfur.

  8. Enhanced High- and Low-Temperature Performance of NOx Reduction Catalyst Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Feng; Muntean, George G.; Peden, Charles HF; Howden, Ken; Currier, Neal; Kamasamudram, Krishna; Kumar, Ashok; Li, Junhui; Luo, Jinyong; Stafford, Randy; Yezerets, Aleksey; Castagnola, Mario; Chen, Hai-Ying; Hess, Howard ..

    2014-12-09

    In this annual CRADA program report, we will briefly highlight results from our recent studies of the stability of candidate K-based high temperature NSR materials, and comparative studies of low temperature performance of SSZ-13 and SAPO-34 CHA catalysts; in particular, recent results comparing Fe- and Cu-based CHA materials.

  9. Effect of Unburned Methyl Esters on the NOx Conversion of Fe-Zeolite SCR Catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, A.; Ratcliff, M.; Pedersen, D.; McCormick, R.; Cavataio, G.; Ura, J.

    2010-03-01

    Engine and flow reactor experiments were conducted to determine the impact of biodiesel relative to ultra-low-sulfur diesel (ULSD) on inhibition of the selective catalytic reduction (SCR) reaction over an Fe-zeolite catalyst. Fe-zeolite SCR catalysts have the ability to adsorb and store unburned hydrocarbons (HC) at temperatures below 300 C. These stored HCs inhibit or block NO{sub x}-ammonia reaction sites at low temperatures. Although biodiesel is not a hydrocarbon, similar effects are anticipated for unburned biodiesel and its organic combustion products. Flow reactor experiments indicate that in the absence of exposure to HC or B100, NO{sub x} conversion begins at between 100 and 200 C. When exposure to unburned fuel occurs at higher temperatures (250-400 C), the catalyst is able to adsorb a greater mass of biodiesel than of ULSD. Experiments show that when the catalyst is masked with ULSD, NO{sub x} conversion is inhibited until it is heated to 400 C. However, when masked with biodiesel, NO{sub x} conversion is observed to begin at temperatures as low as 200 C. Engine test results also show low-temperature recovery from HC storage. Engine tests indicate that, overall, the SCR system has a faster recovery from HC masking with biodiesel. This is at least partially due to a reduction in exhaust HCs, and thus total HC exposure with biodiesel.

  10. EVALUATION OF SCR CATALYSTS FOR COMBINED CONTROL OF NOX AND MERCURY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report documents two-task, bench- and pilot-scale research on the effect of selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalysts on mercury speciation in Illinois and Powder River Basin (PRB) coal combustion flue gases. In task I, a bench-scale reactor was used to study the oxidatio...

  11. Deactivation mechanism of potassium on the V₂O₅/CeO₂ catalysts for SCR reaction: acidity, reducibility and adsorbed-NOx.

    PubMed

    Peng, Yue; Li, Junhua; Huang, Xu; Li, Xiang; Su, Wenkang; Sun, Xiaoxu; Wang, Dezhi; Hao, Jiming

    2014-04-15

    A series of V2O5/CeO2 catalysts with different potassium loadings were prepared to investigate alkali deactivations for selective catalytic reduction of NOx with NH3. An alkali poisoning mechanism could be attributed to surface acidity, reducibility, and NOx adsorption/desorption behaviors. The detailed factors are as follows: (1) decrease of surface acidity suppresses NH3 adsorption by strong bonding of alkali to vanadia (major factor); (2) low reducibility prohibits NH3 activation and NO oxidation by formation bonding of alkali to vanadia and ceria (important factor); (3) active NOx(-) species at low temperature diminish because of coverage of alkali on the surfaces (minor factor); and (4) stable, inactive nitrate species at high temperature increase by generating new basic sites (important factor).

  12. Simultaneous reduction of particulate matter and NO(x) emissions using 4-way catalyzed filtration systems.

    PubMed

    Swanson, Jacob J; Watts, Winthrop F; Newman, Robert A; Ziebarth, Robin R; Kittelson, David B

    2013-05-01

    The next generation of diesel emission control devices includes 4-way catalyzed filtration systems (4WCFS) consisting of both NOx and diesel particulate matter (DPM) control. A methodology was developed to simultaneously evaluate the NOx and DPM control performance of miniature 4WCFS made from acicular mullite, an advanced ceramic material (ACM), that were challenged with diesel exhaust. The impact of catalyst loading and substrate porosity on catalytic performance of the NOx trap was evaluated. Simultaneously with NOx measurements, the real-time solid particle filtration performance of catalyst-coated standard and high porosity filters was determined for steady-state and regenerative conditions. The use of high porosity ACM 4-way catalyzed filtration systems reduced NOx by 99% and solid and total particulate matter by 95% when averaged over 10 regeneration cycles. A "regeneration cycle" refers to an oxidizing ("lean") exhaust condition followed by a reducing ("rich") exhaust condition resulting in NOx storage and NOx reduction (i.e., trap "regeneration"), respectively. Standard porosity ACM 4-way catalyzed filtration systems reduced NOx by 60-75% and exhibited 99.9% filtration efficiency. The rich/lean cycling used to regenerate the filter had almost no impact on solid particle filtration efficiency but impacted NOx control. Cycling resulted in the formation of very low concentrations of semivolatile nucleation mode particles for some 4WCFS formulations. Overall, 4WCFS show promise for significantly reducing diesel emissions into the atmosphere in a single control device.

  13. Catalysts as Sensors—A Promising Novel Approach in Automotive Exhaust Gas Aftertreatment

    PubMed Central

    Moos, Ralf

    2010-01-01

    Sensors that detect directly and in situ the status of automotive exhaust gas catalysts by monitoring the electrical properties of the catalyst coating itself are overviewed. Examples included in this review are the in-situ determination of the electrical impedance of three-way catalysts based on ceria-zirconia solutions and of lean NOx traps of earth-alkaline based coatings, as well as approaches to determine the ammonia loading in Fe-SCR-zeolites with electrical ac measurements. Even more sophisticated approaches based on interactions with electromagnetic waves are also reviewed. For that purpose, metallic stick-like antennas are inserted into the exhaust pipe. The catalyst properties are measured in a contactless manner, directly indicating the catalyst status. The radio frequency probes gauge the oxygen loading degree of three-way catalysts, the NOx-loading of lean NOx traps, and the soot loading of Diesel particulate filters. PMID:22163575

  14. Roles of Promoters in V2O5/TiO2 Catalysts for Selective Catalytic Reduction of NOx with NH3: Effect of Order of Impregnation.

    PubMed

    Youn, Seunghee; Song, Inhak; Kim, Do Heui

    2016-05-01

    Recently, various promoters for commercial selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalysts are used to improve DeNOx activity at low temperature. We aimed at finding the optimum condition to prepare V2O5/TiO2 catalyst by changing promoters (W, Ce, Zr and Mn), not only for improving SCR reactivity, but also for reducing N2O formation at high temperature. In addition, we changed the order of impregnation between promoter and vanadium precursors on TiO2 support and observed its effect on activity and N2O selectivity. We utilized various analytical techniques, such as N2 adsorption-desorption, X-ray Diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, UV-visible Diffuse Reflectance Spectroscopy (UV-vis DRS) and Temperature Programmed Reduction with hydrogen (H2-TPR) to investigate the physicochemical properties of V2O5/TiO2 catalysts. It was found that W and Ce added V2O5/TiO2 catalysts showed the most active DeNOx properties at low temperature. Additionally, the difference in impregnation order affected the SCR activity. The superiority of low temperature activity of the vanadium firstly added catalysts (W or Ce/V/TiO2) is attributed to the formation of more polymerized V2O5 on the sample. PMID:27483756

  15. Roles of Promoters in V2O5/TiO2 Catalysts for Selective Catalytic Reduction of NOx with NH3: Effect of Order of Impregnation.

    PubMed

    Youn, Seunghee; Song, Inhak; Kim, Do Heui

    2016-05-01

    Recently, various promoters for commercial selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalysts are used to improve DeNOx activity at low temperature. We aimed at finding the optimum condition to prepare V2O5/TiO2 catalyst by changing promoters (W, Ce, Zr and Mn), not only for improving SCR reactivity, but also for reducing N2O formation at high temperature. In addition, we changed the order of impregnation between promoter and vanadium precursors on TiO2 support and observed its effect on activity and N2O selectivity. We utilized various analytical techniques, such as N2 adsorption-desorption, X-ray Diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, UV-visible Diffuse Reflectance Spectroscopy (UV-vis DRS) and Temperature Programmed Reduction with hydrogen (H2-TPR) to investigate the physicochemical properties of V2O5/TiO2 catalysts. It was found that W and Ce added V2O5/TiO2 catalysts showed the most active DeNOx properties at low temperature. Additionally, the difference in impregnation order affected the SCR activity. The superiority of low temperature activity of the vanadium firstly added catalysts (W or Ce/V/TiO2) is attributed to the formation of more polymerized V2O5 on the sample.

  16. Alkali metal poisoning of a CeO2-WO3 catalyst used in the selective catalytic reduction of NOx with NH3: an experimental and theoretical study.

    PubMed

    Peng, Yue; Li, Junhua; Chen, Liang; Chen, Jinghuan; Han, Jian; Zhang, He; Han, Wei

    2012-03-01

    The alkali metal-induced deactivation of a novel CeO(2)-WO(3) (CeW) catalyst used for selective catalytic reduction (SCR) was investigated. The CeW catalyst could resist greater amounts of alkali metals than V(2)O(5)-WO(3)/TiO(2). At the same molar concentration, the K-poisoned catalyst exhibited a greater loss in activity compared with the Na-poisoned catalyst below 200 °C. A combination of experimental and theoretical methods, including NH(3)-TPD, DRIFTS, H(2)-TPR, and density functional theory (DFT) calculations, were used to elucidate the mechanism of the alkali metal deactivation of the CeW catalyst in SCR reaction. Experiments results indicated that decreases in the reduction activity and the quantity of Brønsted acid sites rather than the acid strength were responsible for the catalyst deactivation. The DFT calculations revealed that Na and K could easily adsorb on the CeW (110) surface and that the surface oxygen could migrate to cover the active tungsten, and then inhibit the SCR of NO(x) with ammonia. Hot water washing is a convenient and effective method to regenerate alkali metal-poisoned CeW catalysts, and the catalytic activity could be recovered 90% of the fresh catalyst.

  17. Dosimeter-Type NOx Sensing Properties of KMnO4 and Its Electrical Conductivity during Temperature Programmed Desorption

    PubMed Central

    Groβ, Andrea; Kremling, Michael; Marr, Isabella; Kubinski, David J.; Visser, Jacobus H.; Tuller, Harry L.; Moos, Ralf

    2013-01-01

    An impedimetric NOx dosimeter based on the NOx sorption material KMnO4 is proposed. In addition to its application as a low level NOx dosimeter, KMnO4 shows potential as a precious metal free lean NOx trap material (LNT) for NOx storage catalysts (NSC) enabling electrical in-situ diagnostics. With this dosimeter, low levels of NO and NO2 exposure can be detected electrically as instantaneous values at 380 °C by progressive NOx accumulation in the KMnO4 based sensitive layer. The linear NOx sensing characteristics are recovered periodically by heating to 650 °C or switching to rich atmospheres. Further insight into the NOx sorption-dependent conductivity of the KMnO4-based material is obtained by the novel eTPD method that combines electrical characterization with classical temperature programmed desorption (TPD). The NOx loading amount increases proportionally to the NOx exposure time at sorption temperature. The cumulated NOx exposure, as well as the corresponding NOx loading state, can be detected linearly by electrical means in two modes: (1) time-continuously during the sorption interval including NOx concentration information from the signal derivative or (2) during the short-term thermal NOx release. PMID:23549366

  18. Identification of the arsenic resistance on MoO3 doped CeO2/TiO2 catalyst for selective catalytic reduction of NOx with ammonia.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiang; Li, Xiansheng; Li, Junhua; Hao, Jiming

    2016-11-15

    Arsenic resistance on MoO3 doped CeO2/TiO2 catalysts for selective catalytic reduction of NOx with NH3 (NH3-SCR) is investigated. It is found that the activity loss of CeO2-MoO3/TiO2 caused by As oxide is obvious less than that of CeO2/TiO2 catalysts. The fresh and poisoned catalysts are compared and analyzed using XRD, Raman, XPS, H2-TPR and in situ DRIFTS. The results manifest that the introduction of arsenic oxide to CeO2/TiO2 catalyst not only weakens BET surface area, surface acid sites and adsorbed NOx species, but also destroy the redox circle of Ce(4+) to Ce(3+) because of interaction between Ce and As. When MoO3 is added into CeO2/TiO2 system, the main SCR reaction path are found to be changed from the reaction between coordinated NH3 and ad-NOx species to that between an amide and gaseous NO. Additionally, for CeO2-MoO3/TiO2 catalyst, As toxic effect on active sites CeO2 can be released because of stronger As-Mo interaction. Moreover, not only are the reactable Brønsted and Lewis acid sites partly restored, but the cycle of Ce(4+) to Ce(3+) can also be free to some extent. PMID:27474851

  19. Oxidation of elemental mercury by modified spent TiO2-based SCR-DeNOx catalysts in simulated coal-fired flue gas.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lingkui; Li, Caiting; Zhang, Xunan; Zeng, Guangming; Zhang, Jie; Xie, Yin'e

    2016-01-01

    In order to reduce the costs, the recycle of spent TiO2-based SCR-DeNOx catalysts were employed as a potential catalytic support material for elemental mercury (Hg(0)) oxidation in simulated coal-fired flue gas. The catalytic mechanism for simultaneous removal of Hg(0) and NO was also investigated. The catalysts were characterized by Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET), scanning electron microscope (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) method. Results indicated that spent TiO2-based SCR-DeNOx catalyst supported Ce-Mn mixed oxides catalyst (CeMn/SCR1) was highly active for Hg(0) oxidation at low temperatures. The Ce1.00Mn/SCR1 performed the best catalytic activities, and approximately 92.80% mercury oxidation efficiency was obtained at 150 °C. The inhibition effect of NH3 on Hg(0) oxidation was confirmed in that NH3 consumed the surface oxygen. Moreover, H2O inhibited Hg(0) oxidation while SO2 had a promotional effect with the aid of O2. The XPS results illustrated that the surface oxygen was responsible for Hg(0) oxidation and NO conversion. Besides, the Hg(0) oxidation and NO conversion were thought to be aided by synergistic effect between the manganese and cerium oxides. PMID:26370819

  20. Oxidation of elemental mercury by modified spent TiO2-based SCR-DeNOx catalysts in simulated coal-fired flue gas.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lingkui; Li, Caiting; Zhang, Xunan; Zeng, Guangming; Zhang, Jie; Xie, Yin'e

    2016-01-01

    In order to reduce the costs, the recycle of spent TiO2-based SCR-DeNOx catalysts were employed as a potential catalytic support material for elemental mercury (Hg(0)) oxidation in simulated coal-fired flue gas. The catalytic mechanism for simultaneous removal of Hg(0) and NO was also investigated. The catalysts were characterized by Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET), scanning electron microscope (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) method. Results indicated that spent TiO2-based SCR-DeNOx catalyst supported Ce-Mn mixed oxides catalyst (CeMn/SCR1) was highly active for Hg(0) oxidation at low temperatures. The Ce1.00Mn/SCR1 performed the best catalytic activities, and approximately 92.80% mercury oxidation efficiency was obtained at 150 °C. The inhibition effect of NH3 on Hg(0) oxidation was confirmed in that NH3 consumed the surface oxygen. Moreover, H2O inhibited Hg(0) oxidation while SO2 had a promotional effect with the aid of O2. The XPS results illustrated that the surface oxygen was responsible for Hg(0) oxidation and NO conversion. Besides, the Hg(0) oxidation and NO conversion were thought to be aided by synergistic effect between the manganese and cerium oxides.

  1. A Comparative Study of N2O Formation during the Selective Catalytic Reduction of NOx with NH3 on Zeolite Supported Cu Catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Hai-Ying; Wei, Zhehao; Kollar, Marton; Gao, Feng; Wang, Yilin; Szanyi, Janos; Peden, Charles HF

    2015-09-01

    A comparative study was carried out on a small-pore CHA.Cu and a large-pore BEA.Cu zeolite catalyst to understand the lower N2O formation on small-pore zeolite supported Cu catalysts in the selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NOx with NH3. On both catalysts, the N2O yield increases with an increase in the NO2/NOx ratios of the feed gas, suggesting N2O formation via the decomposition of NH4NO3. Temperature-programmed desorption experiments reveal that NH4NO3 is more stable on CHA.Cu than on BEA.Cu. In situ FTIR spectra following stepwise (NO2 + O2) and (15NO + NH3 + O2) adsorption and reaction, and product distribution analysis using isotope-labelled reactants, unambiguously prove that surface nitrate groups are essential for the formation of NH4NO3. Furthermore, CHA.Cu is shown to be considerably less active than BEA.Cu in catalyzing NO oxidation and the subsequent formation of surface nitrate groups. Both factors, i.e., (1) the higher thermal stability of NH4NO3 on CHA.Cu, and (2) the lower activity for this catalyst to catalyze NO oxidation and the subsequent formation of surface nitrates, likely contribute to the higher SCR selectivity with less N2O formation on this catalyst as compared to BEA.Cu. The latter is determined as the primary reason since surface nitrates are the source that leads to the formation of NH4NO3 on the catalysts.

  2. Highly-basic large-pore zeolite catalysts for NOx reduction at low temperatures

    DOEpatents

    Penetrante, Bernardino M.; Brusasco, Raymond M.; Merritt, Bernard T.; Vogtlin, George E.

    2004-02-03

    A high-surface-area (greater than 600 m2/g), large-pore (pore size diameter greater than 6.5 angstroms), basic zeolite having a structure such as an alkali metal cation-exchanged Y-zeolite is employed to convert NO.sub.x contained in an oxygen-rich engine exhaust to N.sub.2 and O.sub.2. Preferably, the invention relates to a two-stage method and apparatus for NO.sub.x reduction in an oxygen-rich engine exhaust such as diesel engine exhaust that includes a plasma oxidative stage and a selective reduction stage. The first stage employs a non-thermal plasma treatment of NO.sub.x gases in an oxygen-rich exhaust and is intended to convert NO to NO.sub.2 in the presence of O.sub.2 and added hydrocarbons. The second stage employs a lean-NO.sub.x catalyst including the basic zeolite at relatively low temperatures to convert such NO.sub.2 to environmentally benign gases that include N.sub.2, CO.sub.2, and H.sub.2 O.

  3. WO3/CeO2/TiO2 Catalysts for Selective Catalytic Reduction of NO(x) by NH3: Effect of the Synthesis Method.

    PubMed

    Michalow-Mauke, Katarzyna A; Lu, Ye; Ferri, Davide; Graule, Thomas; Kowalski, Kazimierz; Elsener, Martin; Kröcher, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    WO3/CeO2/TiO2, CeO2/TiO2 and WO3/TiO2 catalysts were prepared by wet impregnation. CeO2/TiO2 and WO3/TiO2 showed activity towards the selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NO(x) by NH3, which was significantly improved by subsequent impregnation of CeO/TiO2 with WO3. Catalytic performance, NH3 oxidation and NH3 temperature programmed desorption of wet-impregnated WO3/CeO2/TiO2 were compared to those of a flame-made counterpart. The flame-made catalyst exhibits a peculiar arrangement of W-Ce-Ti-oxides that makes it very active for NH3-SCR. Catalysts prepared by wet impregnation with the aim to mimic the structure of the flame-made catalyst were not able to fully reproduce its activity. The differences in the catalytic performance between the investigated catalysts were related to their structural properties and the different interaction of the catalyst components.

  4. DeNOx Study in Diesel Engine Exhaust Using Barrier Discharge Corona Assisted by V2O5/TiO2 Catalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    B, S. Rajanikanth; V, Ravi

    2004-08-01

    A plasma-assisted catalytic reactor was used to remove nitrogen oxides (NOx) from diesel engine exhaust operated under different load conditions. Initial studies were focused on plasma reactor (a dielectric barrier discharge reactor) treatment of diesel exhaust at various temperatures. The nitric oxide (NO) removal efficiency was lowered when high temperature exhaust was treated using plasma reactor. Also, NO removal efficiency decreased when 45% load exhaust was treated. Studies were then made with plasma reactor combined with a catalytic reactor consisting of a selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalyst, V2O5/TiO2. Ammonia was used as a reducing agent for SCR process in a ratio of 1:1 to NOx. The studies were focused on temperatures of the SCR catalytic reactor below 200°C. The plasma-assisted catalytic reactor was operated well to remove NOx under no-load and load conditions. For an energy input of 96 J/l, the NOx removal efficiencies obtained under no-load and load conditions were 90% and 72% respectively at an exhaust temperature of 100°C.

  5. Cu-SSZ-39, an active and hydrothermally stable catalyst for the selective catalytic reduction of NOx.

    PubMed

    Moliner, Manuel; Franch, Cristina; Palomares, Eduardo; Grill, Marie; Corma, Avelino

    2012-08-25

    A Cu-exchanged SSZ-39 zeolite has been synthesized and tested for the selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NOx. This material shows an excellent catalytic activity, and most importantly, an extraordinary hydrothermal stability.

  6. Catalysts as sensors--a promising novel approach in automotive exhaust gas aftertreatment.

    PubMed

    Moos, Ralf

    2010-01-01

    Sensors that detect directly and in situ the status of automotive exhaust gas catalysts by monitoring the electrical properties of the catalyst coating itself are overviewed. Examples included in this review are the in-situ determination of the electrical impedance of three-way catalysts based on ceria-zirconia solutions and of lean NO(x) traps of earth-alkaline based coatings, as well as approaches to determine the ammonia loading in Fe-SCR-zeolites with electrical ac measurements. Even more sophisticated approaches based on interactions with electromagnetic waves are also reviewed. For that purpose, metallic stick-like antennas are inserted into the exhaust pipe. The catalyst properties are measured in a contactless manner, directly indicating the catalyst status. The radio frequency probes gauge the oxygen loading degree of three-way catalysts, the NO(x)-loading of lean NO(x) traps, and the soot loading of Diesel particulate filters. PMID:22163575

  7. Catalysts as sensors--a promising novel approach in automotive exhaust gas aftertreatment.

    PubMed

    Moos, Ralf

    2010-01-01

    Sensors that detect directly and in situ the status of automotive exhaust gas catalysts by monitoring the electrical properties of the catalyst coating itself are overviewed. Examples included in this review are the in-situ determination of the electrical impedance of three-way catalysts based on ceria-zirconia solutions and of lean NO(x) traps of earth-alkaline based coatings, as well as approaches to determine the ammonia loading in Fe-SCR-zeolites with electrical ac measurements. Even more sophisticated approaches based on interactions with electromagnetic waves are also reviewed. For that purpose, metallic stick-like antennas are inserted into the exhaust pipe. The catalyst properties are measured in a contactless manner, directly indicating the catalyst status. The radio frequency probes gauge the oxygen loading degree of three-way catalysts, the NO(x)-loading of lean NO(x) traps, and the soot loading of Diesel particulate filters.

  8. Enhanced catalytic activity over MIL-100(Fe) loaded ceria catalysts for the selective catalytic reduction of NOx with NH₃ at low temperature.

    PubMed

    Wang, Peng; Sun, Hong; Quan, Xie; Chen, Shuo

    2016-01-15

    The development of catalysts for selective catalytic reduction (SCR) reactions that are highly active at low temperatures and show good resistance to SO2 and H2O is still a challenge. In this study, we have designed and developed a high-performance SCR catalyst based on nano-sized ceria encapsulated inside the pores of MIL-100(Fe) that combines excellent catalytic power with a metal organic framework architecture synthesized by the impregnation method (IM). Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed the encapsulation of ceria in the cavities of MIL-100(Fe). The prepared IM-CeO2/MIL-100(Fe) catalyst shows improved catalytic activity both at low temperatures and throughout a wide temperature window. The temperature window for 90% NOx conversion ranges from 196 to 300°C. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and in situ diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFT) analysis indicated that the nano-sized ceria encapsulated inside MIL-100(Fe) promotes the production of chemisorbed oxygen on the catalyst surface, which greatly enhances the formation of the NO2 species responsible for fast SCR reactions.

  9. Neutron studies of nanostructured CuO-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} NOx removal catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Ozawa, Masakuni; Loong Chun-Keung

    1997-07-14

    Nanostructured powders of automotive catalytic system CuO0Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, targeted for nitrogen oxides (NOx) removal under lean-burn engine conditions, were investigated using neutron diffraction and small-angle neutron scattering. The crystal phases, structural transformations and microstructure of 10 mol% Cu-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} powders are characterized according to the heat-treatment conditions. These properties are correlated with the pore structure and NOx removal efficiency determined by nitrogen adsorption isotherm, electron spin resonance, and temperature programmed reaction measurements. The {gamma}-(Cu, Al){sub 2}O{sub 3} phase and the mass-fractal-like aggregate of particles (size {approx} 26 nm) at annealing temperatures below 900{degrees}C were found to be crucial to the high NOx removal performance. The transformation to bulk crystalline phases of {alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} + CuAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} spinel above {approximately}1050{degrees}C corresponds to a drastic drop of Nox removal efficiency. The usefulness of neutron-scattering techniques as well as their complementarity with other traditional methods of catalytic research are discussed.

  10. SSZ-52, a zeolite with an 18-layer aluminosilicate framework structure related to that of the DeNOx catalyst Cu-SSZ-13.

    PubMed

    Xie, Dan; McCusker, Lynne B; Baerlocher, Christian; Zones, Stacey I; Wan, Wei; Zou, Xiaodong

    2013-07-17

    A new zeolite (SSZ-52, |(C14H28N)6Na6(H2O)18|[Al12Si96O216]), related to the DeNOx catalyst Cu-SSZ-13 (CHA framework type), has been synthesized using an unusual polycyclic quaternary ammonium cation as the structure-directing agent. By combining X-ray powder diffraction (XPD), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and molecular modeling techniques, its porous aluminosilicate framework structure (R3m, a = 13.6373(1) Å, c = 44.7311(4) Å), which can be viewed as an 18-layer stacking sequence of hexagonally arranged (Si,Al)6O6 rings (6-rings), has been elucidated. The structure has a three-dimensional 8-ring channel system and is a member of the ABC-6 family of zeolites (those that can be described in terms of 6-ring stacking sequences) like SSZ-13, but it has cavities that are twice as large. The code SFW has been assigned to this new framework type. The large cavities contain pairs of the bulky organic cations. HRTEM and XPD simulations show that stacking faults do occur, but only at the 5-10% level. SSZ-52 has considerable potential as a catalyst in the areas of gas conversion and sequestration.

  11. SSZ-52, a zeolite with an 18-layer aluminosilicate framework structure related to that of the DeNOx catalyst Cu-SSZ-13.

    PubMed

    Xie, Dan; McCusker, Lynne B; Baerlocher, Christian; Zones, Stacey I; Wan, Wei; Zou, Xiaodong

    2013-07-17

    A new zeolite (SSZ-52, |(C14H28N)6Na6(H2O)18|[Al12Si96O216]), related to the DeNOx catalyst Cu-SSZ-13 (CHA framework type), has been synthesized using an unusual polycyclic quaternary ammonium cation as the structure-directing agent. By combining X-ray powder diffraction (XPD), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and molecular modeling techniques, its porous aluminosilicate framework structure (R3m, a = 13.6373(1) Å, c = 44.7311(4) Å), which can be viewed as an 18-layer stacking sequence of hexagonally arranged (Si,Al)6O6 rings (6-rings), has been elucidated. The structure has a three-dimensional 8-ring channel system and is a member of the ABC-6 family of zeolites (those that can be described in terms of 6-ring stacking sequences) like SSZ-13, but it has cavities that are twice as large. The code SFW has been assigned to this new framework type. The large cavities contain pairs of the bulky organic cations. HRTEM and XPD simulations show that stacking faults do occur, but only at the 5-10% level. SSZ-52 has considerable potential as a catalyst in the areas of gas conversion and sequestration. PMID:23782259

  12. DEVELOPMENT OF MULTI-TASK CATALYSTS FOR REMOVAL OF NOx AND TOXIC ORGANIC COMPOUNDS DURING COAL COMBUSTION

    SciTech Connect

    Panagiotis G. Smirniotis; Robert G. Jenkins

    2002-02-04

    The work performed during this project focused on the identification of materials capable of providing high activity and selectivity for the selective catalytic reduction of nitric oxide with ammonia. The material surface characteristics were correlated with the catalytic behavior of our catalysts to increase our understanding and to help improve the DeNO{sub x} efficiency. The catalysts employed in this study include mixed oxide composite powders (TiO{sub 2}-Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}, TiO{sub 2}-ZrO{sub 2}, TiO{sub 2}-WO{sub 3}, TiO{sub 2}-SiO{sub 2}, and TiO{sub 2}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) loaded with varying amounts of V{sub 2}O{sub 5}, along with 5 different commercial sources of TiO{sub 2}. V{sub 2}O{sub 5} was added to the commercial sources of TiO{sub 2} to achieve monolayer coverage. Since the valence state of vanadium in the precursor solution during the impregnation step significantly impacted catalytic performance, catalysts were synthesized from both V{sup +4} and V{sup +5} solutions explain this phenomenon. Specifically, the synthesis of catalysts from V{sup 5+} precursor solutions yields lower-performance catalysts compared to the case of V{sup 4+} under identical conditions. Aging the vanadium precursor solution, which is associated with the reduction of V{sup 5+} to V{sup 4+} (VO{sub 2}{sup +} {yields} VO{sup 2+}), prior to impregnation results in catalysts with excellent catalytic behavior under identical activation and operating conditions. This work also added vanadia to TiO{sub 2}-based supports with low crystallinity. These supports, which have traditionally performed poorly, are now able to function as effective SCR catalysts. Increasing the acidity of the support by incorporating oxides such as WO{sub 3} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} significantly improves the SCR activity and nitrogen selectivity. It was also found that the supports should be synthesized with the simultaneous precipitation of the corresponding precursors. The mixed oxide catalysts possess

  13. Task 2.6 - Catalyst for Utilization of Methane in Selective Catalytic Reduction of NOx: Topical report, July 1, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1997-12-31

    Selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) in flue gas or engine exhaust gas with hydrocarbons as the reductant has great potential for less expense, less pollution, and easier operation than SCR with ammonia. Methane is the preferred reducing gas because of its low cost and low toxicity. Stable, low-cost catalysts for SCR with methane are required to demonstrate this technology for controlling NO{sub x} emissions. Several cobalt and nickel catalysts on synthetic clay and uranium oxide supports were investigated for their activities in reducing NO{sub x} with methane in the presence of air. The efficiency of the synthetic clay-supported nickel and cobalt catalysts for nitric oxide (NO) reduction with methane as the reducing gas was poor. The nickel oxide-uranium oxide catalyst, which was chosen for its high stability, was also ineffective. Results from the two-step experiments conducted at two temperatures produced some interesting information on the reactions of methane with the catalysts and the reactivity of the carbonaceous intermediate. The carbonaceous material formed from methane dissociation at 450{degrees}C not only reduces NO to N{sub 2}O at lower temperatures, but also prevents oxidation of NO to NO{sub 2}. Unfortunately, the carbonaceous forms that reduce the NO are not available for reactions at 400{degrees}C in the presence of oxygen. A two-step process employing this chemistry would be difficult because the catalyst would have to be cycled between the two temperatures. Also the desired reduction to nitrogen is not very efficient.

  14. Selective catalytic reduction system and process for treating NOx emissions using a zinc or titanium promoted palladium-zirconium catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Sobolevskiy, Anatoly; Rossin, Joseph A.; Knapke, Michael J.

    2011-08-02

    A process and system (18) for reducing NO.sub.x in a gas using hydrogen as a reducing agent is provided. The process comprises contacting the gas stream (29) with a catalyst system (38) comprising sulfated zirconia washcoat particles (41), palladium, a pre-sulfated zirconia binder (44), and a promoter (45) comprising at least one of titanium, zinc, or a mixture thereof. The presence of zinc or titanium increases the resistance of the catalyst system to a sulfur and water-containing gas stream.

  15. Ammonia reactions with the stored oxygen in a commercial lean NOx trap catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Bartova, Sarka; Mracek, David; Koci, Petr; Marek, Milos; Choi, Jae -Soon

    2014-10-12

    Ammonia is an important intermediate of the NOx reduction in a NOx storage and reduction catalyst (aka lean NOx trap). NH3 formed under rich conditions in the reduced front part of the catalyst is transported by convection downstream to the unregenerated (still oxidized) zone of the catalyst, where it further reacts with the stored oxygen and NOx. In this paper, the kinetics and selectivity of NH3 reactions with the stored oxygen are studied in detail with a commercial Ba-based NOx storage catalyst containing platinum group metals (PGM), Ba and Ce oxides. Furthermore, steady-state NH3 decomposition, NH3 oxidation by O2 and NO, and N2O decomposition are examined in light-off experiments. Periodic lean/rich cycling is measured first with O2 and NH3, and then with NOx + O2 and NH3 to discriminate between the NH3 reactions with the stored oxygen and the stored NOx. The reaction of NH3 with the stored O2 is highly selective towards N2, however a certain amount of NOx and N2O is also formed. The formed NOx by-product is efficiently adsorbed on the NOx storage sites such that the NOx is not detected at the reactor outlet except at high temperatures. The stored NOx reacts with NH3 feed in the next rich phase, contributing to the N2O formation. Water inhibits the reactions of NH3 with the stored oxygen. On the contrary, the presence of CO2 increases the NH3 consumption. Furthermore, CO2 is able to provide additional oxygen for NH3 oxidation, forming –CO in analogy to the reverse water gas shift reaction.

  16. NOx Reduction on a Transition Metal-free γ-Al2O3 Catalyst Using Dimethylether (DME)

    SciTech Connect

    Ozensoy, Emrah; Herling, Darrell R.; Szanyi, Janos

    2008-07-15

    NO2 and dimethylether (DME) adsorption as well as DME and NO2 coadsorption on a transition metal-free γ-alumina catalyst were investigated via in-situ transmission Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (in-situ FTIR), residual gas analysis (RGA) and temperature programmed desorption (TPD) techniques. NO2 adsorption at room temperature leads to the formation of surface nitrates and nitrites. DME adsorption on the alumina surface at 300 K leads to molecularly adsorbed DME, molecularly adsorbed methanol and surface methoxides. Upon heating the DME-exposed alumina to 500-600 K the surface is dominated by methoxide groups. At higher temperatures methoxide groups are converted into formates. At T > 510 K formate decomposition takes place to form H2O(g) and CO(g). DME and NO2 coadsorption at 423 K do not indicate a significant reaction between DME and NO2. However, in similar experiments at 573 K, fast reaction occurs and the methoxides present at 573 K before the NO2 adsorption are converted into formates, simultaneously with the formation of isocyanates. Under these conditions, NCO can further be hydrolyzed into isocyanic acid or ammonia with the help of water which is generated during the formate formation, decomposition and/or NCO formation steps.

  17. Physico-Chemical Property and Catalytic Activity of a CeO2-Doped MnO(x)-TiO2 Catalyst with SO2 Resistance for Low-Temperature NH3-SCR of NO(x).

    PubMed

    Shin, Byeongkil; Chun, Ho Hwan; Cha, Jin-Sun; Shin, Min-Chul; Lee, Heesoo

    2016-05-01

    The effects of CeO2 addition on the catalytic activity and the SO2 resistance of CeO2-doped MnO(x)-TiO2 catalysts were investigated for the low-temperature selective catalytic reduction (SCR) with NH3 of NO(x) emissions in marine applications. The most active catalyst was obtained from 30 wt% CeO2-MnO(x)-TiO2 catalyst in the whole temperature range of 100-300 degrees C at a low gas hourly space velocity (GHSV) of 10,000 h(-)1, and its de-NO(x) efficiency was higher than 90% over 250 degrees C. The enhanced catalytic activity may contribute to the dispersion state and catalytic acidity on the catalyst surface, and the highly dispersed Mn and Ce on the nano-scaled TiO2 catalyst affects the increase of Lewis and Brønsted acid sites. A CeO2-rich additive on MnO(x)-TiO2 could provide stronger catalytic acid sites, associated with NH3 adsorption and the SCR performance. As the results of sulfur resistance in flue gas that contains SO2, the de-NO(x) efficiency of MnO(x)-TiO2 decreased by 15% over 200 degrees C, whereas that of 30 wt% ceria-doped catalyst increased by 14-21% over 150 degrees C. The high SO2 resistance of CeO2-MnO(x)-TiO2 catalysts that resulted from the addition of ceria suppressed the formation of Mn sulfate species, which led to deactivation on the surface of nano-catalyst. PMID:27483759

  18. Physico-Chemical Property and Catalytic Activity of a CeO2-Doped MnO(x)-TiO2 Catalyst with SO2 Resistance for Low-Temperature NH3-SCR of NO(x).

    PubMed

    Shin, Byeongkil; Chun, Ho Hwan; Cha, Jin-Sun; Shin, Min-Chul; Lee, Heesoo

    2016-05-01

    The effects of CeO2 addition on the catalytic activity and the SO2 resistance of CeO2-doped MnO(x)-TiO2 catalysts were investigated for the low-temperature selective catalytic reduction (SCR) with NH3 of NO(x) emissions in marine applications. The most active catalyst was obtained from 30 wt% CeO2-MnO(x)-TiO2 catalyst in the whole temperature range of 100-300 degrees C at a low gas hourly space velocity (GHSV) of 10,000 h(-)1, and its de-NO(x) efficiency was higher than 90% over 250 degrees C. The enhanced catalytic activity may contribute to the dispersion state and catalytic acidity on the catalyst surface, and the highly dispersed Mn and Ce on the nano-scaled TiO2 catalyst affects the increase of Lewis and Brønsted acid sites. A CeO2-rich additive on MnO(x)-TiO2 could provide stronger catalytic acid sites, associated with NH3 adsorption and the SCR performance. As the results of sulfur resistance in flue gas that contains SO2, the de-NO(x) efficiency of MnO(x)-TiO2 decreased by 15% over 200 degrees C, whereas that of 30 wt% ceria-doped catalyst increased by 14-21% over 150 degrees C. The high SO2 resistance of CeO2-MnO(x)-TiO2 catalysts that resulted from the addition of ceria suppressed the formation of Mn sulfate species, which led to deactivation on the surface of nano-catalyst.

  19. Design Strategies for CeO2-MoO3 Catalysts for DeNOx and Hg(0) Oxidation in the Presence of HCl: The Significance of the Surface Acid-Base Properties.

    PubMed

    Chang, Huazhen; Wu, Qingru; Zhang, Tao; Li, Mingguan; Sun, Xiaoxu; Li, Junhua; Duan, Lei; Hao, Jiming

    2015-10-20

    A series of CeMoOx catalysts with different surface Ce/Mo ratios was synthesized by a coprecipitation method via changing precipitation pH value. The surface basicity on selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalysts (CeMoOx and VMo/Ti) was characterized and correlated to the durability and activity of catalyst for simultaneous elimination of NOx and Hg(0). The pH value in the preparation process affected the surface concentrations of Ce and Mo, the Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) specific surface area, and the acid-base properties over the CeMoOx catalysts. The O 1s X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) spectra and CO2-temperature programmed desorption (TPD) suggested that the surface basicity increased as the pH value increased. The existence of strong basic sites contributed to the deactivation effect of HCl over the VMo/Ti and CeMoOx catalysts prepared at pH = 12. For the CeMoOx catalysts prepared at pH = 9 and 6, the appearance of surface molybdena species replaced the surface -OH, and the existence of appropriate medium-strength basic sites contributed to their resistance to HCl poisoning in the SCR reaction. Moreover, these sites facilitated the adsorption and activation of HCl and enhanced Hg(0) oxidation. On the other hand, the inhibitory effect of NH3 on Hg(0) oxidation was correlated with the competitive adsorption of NH3 and Hg(0) on acidic surface sites. Therefore, acidic surface sites may play an important role in Hg(0) adsorption. The characterization and balance of basicity and acidity of an SCR catalyst is believed to be helpful in preventing deactivation by acid gas in the SCR reaction and simultaneous Hg(0) oxidation.

  20. Design Strategies for CeO2-MoO3 Catalysts for DeNOx and Hg(0) Oxidation in the Presence of HCl: The Significance of the Surface Acid-Base Properties.

    PubMed

    Chang, Huazhen; Wu, Qingru; Zhang, Tao; Li, Mingguan; Sun, Xiaoxu; Li, Junhua; Duan, Lei; Hao, Jiming

    2015-10-20

    A series of CeMoOx catalysts with different surface Ce/Mo ratios was synthesized by a coprecipitation method via changing precipitation pH value. The surface basicity on selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalysts (CeMoOx and VMo/Ti) was characterized and correlated to the durability and activity of catalyst for simultaneous elimination of NOx and Hg(0). The pH value in the preparation process affected the surface concentrations of Ce and Mo, the Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) specific surface area, and the acid-base properties over the CeMoOx catalysts. The O 1s X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) spectra and CO2-temperature programmed desorption (TPD) suggested that the surface basicity increased as the pH value increased. The existence of strong basic sites contributed to the deactivation effect of HCl over the VMo/Ti and CeMoOx catalysts prepared at pH = 12. For the CeMoOx catalysts prepared at pH = 9 and 6, the appearance of surface molybdena species replaced the surface -OH, and the existence of appropriate medium-strength basic sites contributed to their resistance to HCl poisoning in the SCR reaction. Moreover, these sites facilitated the adsorption and activation of HCl and enhanced Hg(0) oxidation. On the other hand, the inhibitory effect of NH3 on Hg(0) oxidation was correlated with the competitive adsorption of NH3 and Hg(0) on acidic surface sites. Therefore, acidic surface sites may play an important role in Hg(0) adsorption. The characterization and balance of basicity and acidity of an SCR catalyst is believed to be helpful in preventing deactivation by acid gas in the SCR reaction and simultaneous Hg(0) oxidation. PMID:26421943

  1. UREA INFRASTRUCTURE FOR UREA SCR NOX REDUCTION

    SciTech Connect

    Bunting, Bruce G.

    2000-08-20

    Urea SCR is currently the only proven NOX aftertreatment for diesel engines - high NOX reduction possible - some SCR catalyst systems are robust against fuel sulfur - durability has been demonstrated - many systems in the field - long history in other markets - Major limitations to acceptance - distribution of urea solution to end user - ensuring that urea solution is added to vehicle.

  2. Influence of the addition of transition metals (Cr, Zr, Mo) on the properties of MnOx-FeOx catalysts for low-temperature selective catalytic reduction of NOx by Ammonia.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Changcheng; Zhang, Yaping; Wang, Xiaolei; Xu, Haitao; Sun, Keqin; Shen, Kai

    2013-02-15

    The co-precipitation and citric acid methods were employed to prepare MnO(x)-FeO(x) catalysts for the low-temperature selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NO(x) by ammonia. It was found that the Mn-Fe (CP) sample obtained from the co-precipitation method, which exhibited low crystalline of manganese oxides on the surface, high specific surface area and abundant acid sites at the surface, had better catalytic activity. The effects of doping different transition metals (Mo, Zr, Cr) in the Mn-Fe (CP) catalysts were further investigated. The study suggested that the addition of Cr can obviously reduce the take-off temperature of Mn-Fe catalyst to 90°C, while the impregnation of Zr and Mo raised that remarkably. The texture and micro-structure analysis revealed that for the Cr-doped Mn-Fe catalysts, the active components had better dispersion with less agglomeration and sintering and the largest BET surface specific area. In situ FTIR study indicated that the addition of Cr can increase significantly the surface acidity, especially, the Lewis acid sites, and promote the formation of the intermediate -NH(3)(+). H(2)-TPR results confirmed the better low-temperature redox properties of Mn-Fe-Cr.

  3. Insight into the mechanism of selective catalytic reduction of NO(x) by propene over the Cu/Ti(0.7)Zr(0.3)O2 catalyst by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and density functional theory calculations.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jie; Li, Xinyong; Zhao, Qidong; Hao, Ce; Zhang, Dongke

    2013-05-01

    The mechanism of selective catalytic reduction of NOx by propene (C3H6-SCR) over the Cu/Ti0.7Zr0.3O2 catalyst was studied by in situ Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Especially, the formation and transformation of cyanide (-CN species) during the reaction was discussed. According to FTIR results, the excellent performance of the Cu/Ti0.7Zr0.3O2 catalyst in C3H6-SCR was attributed to the coexistence of two parallel pathways to produce N2 by the isocyanate (-NCO species) and -CN species intermediates. Besides the hydrolysis of the -NCO species, the reaction between the -CN species and nitrates and/or NO2 was also a crucial pathway for the NO reduction. On the basis of the DFT calculations on the energy of possible intermediates and transition states at the B3LYP/6-311 G (d, p) level of theory, the reaction channel of -CN species in the SCR reaction was identified and the role of -CN species as a crucial intermediate to generate N2 was also confirmed from the thermodynamics view. In combination of the FTIR and DFT results, a modified mechanism with two parallel pathways to produce N2 by the reaction of -NCO and -CN species over the Cu/Ti0.7Zr0.3O2 catalyst was proposed.

  4. NOx analyser interefence from alkenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloss, W. J.; Alam, M. S.; Lee, J. D.; Vazquez, M.; Munoz, A.; Rodenas, M.

    2012-04-01

    Nitrogen oxides (NO and NO2, collectively NOx) are critical intermediates in atmospheric chemistry. NOx abundance controls the levels of the primary atmospheric oxidants OH, NO3 and O3, and regulates the ozone production which results from the degradation of volatile organic compounds. NOx are also atmospheric pollutants in their own right, and NO2 is commonly included in air quality objectives and regulations. In addition to their role in controlling ozone formation, NOx levels affect the production of other pollutants such as the lachrymator PAN, and the nitrate component of secondary aerosol particles. Consequently, accurate measurement of nitrogen oxides in the atmosphere is of major importance for understanding our atmosphere. The most widely employed approach for the measurement of NOx is chemiluminescent detection of NO2* from the NO + O3 reaction, combined with NO2 reduction by either a heated catalyst or photoconvertor. The reaction between alkenes and ozone is also chemiluminescent; therefore alkenes may contribute to the measured NOx signal, depending upon the instrumental background subtraction cycle employed. This interference has been noted previously, and indeed the effect has been used to measure both alkenes and ozone in the atmosphere. Here we report the results of a systematic investigation of the response of a selection of NOx analysers, ranging from systems used for routine air quality monitoring to atmospheric research instrumentation, to a series of alkenes ranging from ethene to the biogenic monoterpenes, as a function of conditions (co-reactants, humidity). Experiments were performed in the European Photoreactor (EUPHORE) to ensure common calibration, a common sample for the monitors, and to unequivocally confirm the alkene (via FTIR) and NO2 (via DOAS) levels present. The instrument responses ranged from negligible levels up to 10 % depending upon the alkene present and conditions used. Such interferences may be of substantial importance

  5. HERFD-XANES and XES as complementary operando tools for monitoring the structure of Cu-based zeolite catalysts during NOx-removal by ammonia SCR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Günter, T.; Doronkin, D. E.; Carvalho, H. W. P.; Casapu, M.; Grunwaldt, J.-D.

    2016-05-01

    In this article, we demonstrate the potential of hard X-ray techniques to characterize catalysts under working conditions. Operando high energy resolution fluorescence detected (HERFD) XANES and valence to core (vtc) X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) have been used in a spatially-resolved manner to study Cu-zeolite catalysts during the standard-SCR reaction and related model conditions. The results show a gradient in Cu oxidation state and coordination along the catalyst bed as the reactants are consumed. Vtc-XES gives complementary information on the direct adsorption of ammonia at the Cu sites. The structural information on the catalyst shows the suitability of X-ray techniques to understand catalytic reactions and to facilitate catalyst optimization.

  6. Promotion effect of H2 on ethanol oxidation and NOx reduction with ethanol over Ag/Al2O3 catalyst.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yunbo; Li, Yi; Zhang, Xiuli; Deng, Hua; He, Hong; Li, Yuyang

    2015-01-01

    The catalytic partial oxidation of ethanol and selective catalytic reduction of NOx with ethanol (ethanol-SCR) over Ag/Al2O3 were studied using synchrotron vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) photoionization mass spectrometry (PIMS). The intermediates were identified by PIMS and their photoionization efficiency (PIE) spectra. The results indicate that H2 promotes the partial oxidation of ethanol to acetaldehyde over Ag/Al2O3, while the simultaneously occurring processes of dehydration and dehydrogenation were inhibited. H2 addition favors the formation of ammonia during ethanol-SCR over Ag/Al2O3, the occurrence of which creates an effective pathway for NOx reduction by direct reaction with NH3. Simultaneously, the enhancement of the formation of ammonia benefits its reaction with surface enolic species, resulting in producing -NCO species again, leading to enhancement of ethanol-SCR over Ag/Al2O3 by H2. Using VUV-PIMS, the reactive vinyloxy radical was observed in the gas phase during the NOx reduction by ethanol for the first time, particularly in the presence of H2. Identification of such a reaction occurring in the gas phase may be crucial for understanding the reaction pathway of HC-SCR over Ag/Al2O3. PMID:25485626

  7. Promotion effect of H2 on ethanol oxidation and NOx reduction with ethanol over Ag/Al2O3 catalyst.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yunbo; Li, Yi; Zhang, Xiuli; Deng, Hua; He, Hong; Li, Yuyang

    2015-01-01

    The catalytic partial oxidation of ethanol and selective catalytic reduction of NOx with ethanol (ethanol-SCR) over Ag/Al2O3 were studied using synchrotron vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) photoionization mass spectrometry (PIMS). The intermediates were identified by PIMS and their photoionization efficiency (PIE) spectra. The results indicate that H2 promotes the partial oxidation of ethanol to acetaldehyde over Ag/Al2O3, while the simultaneously occurring processes of dehydration and dehydrogenation were inhibited. H2 addition favors the formation of ammonia during ethanol-SCR over Ag/Al2O3, the occurrence of which creates an effective pathway for NOx reduction by direct reaction with NH3. Simultaneously, the enhancement of the formation of ammonia benefits its reaction with surface enolic species, resulting in producing -NCO species again, leading to enhancement of ethanol-SCR over Ag/Al2O3 by H2. Using VUV-PIMS, the reactive vinyloxy radical was observed in the gas phase during the NOx reduction by ethanol for the first time, particularly in the presence of H2. Identification of such a reaction occurring in the gas phase may be crucial for understanding the reaction pathway of HC-SCR over Ag/Al2O3.

  8. Diesel Fuel Sulfur Effects on the Performance of Diesel Oxidation Catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Whitacre, Shawn D.

    2000-08-20

    Research focus: - Impact of sulfur on: Catalyst performance; Short term catalyst durability. This presentation summarizes results from fresh catalyst performance evaluations - WVU contracted to conduct DOC and Lean NOx catalyst testing for DECSE DECSE program. (experimental details discussed previously)

  9. Cold-Start Emissions Control in Hybrid Vehicles Equipped with a Passive Hydrocarbon and NOx Adsorber

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Zhiming; Kim, Miyoung; Choi, Jae-Soon; Daw, C Stuart; Parks, II, James E; Smith, David E

    2012-01-01

    We presents a study of the potential for using low-cost sorbent materials (i.e. Ag-Beta-zeolite and Fe-Mn-Zr transition metal oxides) to temporally trap hydrocarbons (HCs) and nitrogen oxides (NOx) emissions during cold-start periods in HEVs and PHEVs over transient driving cycles. The adsorption behavior of the candidate sorbent materials was characterized in our laboratory flow reactor experiments. The parameters were then used to develop a one-dimensional, transient device model which has been implemented in the Powertrain Systems Analysis Toolkit (PSAT) to simulate a passive HC and NOx absorber device. The results show that such an absorber can substantially reduce HC and NOx emissions by storing them when the 3-way catalyst is too cool to function and re-releasing them when the exhaust temperature rises. These improved emission controls do not involve any penalty in fuel consumption or require any change in engine operation. The cost of these sorbent materials is also much less than conventional 3-way catalysts.

  10. Selective catalytic reduction of NOx with NH3 over a Cu-SSZ-13 catalyst prepared by a solid state ion exchange method

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Di; Gao, Feng; Peden, Charles HF; Li, Junhui; Kamasamudram, Krishna; Epling, William S.

    2014-06-01

    A novel solid state method was developed to synthesize Cu-SSZ-13 catalysts with excellent NH3-SCR performance and durable hydrothermal stability. After the solid state ion exchange (SSIE) process, the SSZ framework structure and surface area was maintained. In-situ DRIFTS and NH3-TPD experiments provide evidence that isolated Cu ions were successfully exchanged into the pores, which are the active centers for the NH3-SCR reaction.

  11. NOx reduction by electron beam-produced nitrogen atom injection

    DOEpatents

    Penetrante, Bernardino M.

    2002-01-01

    Deactivated atomic nitrogen generated by an electron beam from a gas stream containing more than 99% N.sub.2 is injected at low temperatures into an engine exhaust to reduce NOx emissions. High NOx reduction efficiency is achieved with compact electron beam devices without use of a catalyst.

  12. AMMONIA-FREE NOx CONTROL SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Song Wu; Zhen Fan; Andrew H. Seltzer; Richard G. Herman

    2006-06-01

    This report describes a novel NOx control system that has the potential to drastically reduce cost, and enhance performance, operation and safety of power plant NOx control. The new system optimizes the burner and the furnace to achieve very low NOx levels and to provide an adequate amount of CO, and uses the CO for reducing NO both in-furnace and over a downstream AFSCR (ammonia-free selective catalytic reduction) reactor. The AF-SCR combines the advantages of the highly successful SCR technology for power plants and the TWC (three-way catalytic converter) widely used on automobiles. Like the SCR, it works in oxidizing environment of combustion flue gas and uses only base metal catalysts. Like the TWC, the AF-SCR removes NO and excess CO simultaneously without using any external reagent, such as ammonia. This new process has been studied in a development program jointed funded by the US Department of Energy and Foster Wheeler. The report outlines the experimental catalyst work performed on a bench-scale reactor, including test procedure, operating conditions, and results of various catalyst formulations. Several candidate catalysts, prepared with readily available transition metal oxides and common substrate materials, have shown over 80-90% removal for both NO and CO in oxidizing gas mixtures and at elevated temperatures. A detailed combustion study of a 400 MWe coal-fired boiler, applying computational fluid dynamics techniques to model boiler and burner design, has been carried out to investigate ways to optimize the combustion process for the lowest NOx formation and optimum CO/NO ratios. Results of this boiler and burner optimization work are reported. The paper further discusses catalyst scale-up considerations and the conceptual design of a 400 MWe size AF-SCR reactor, as well as economics analysis indicating large cost savings of the ammonia-free NOx control process over the current SCR technology.

  13. NOX2-dependent regulation of inflammation.

    PubMed

    Singel, Kelly L; Segal, Brahm H

    2016-04-01

    NADPH oxidase (NOX) isoforms together have multiple functions that are important for normal physiology and have been implicated in the pathogenesis of a broad range of diseases, including atherosclerosis, cancer and neurodegenerative diseases. The phagocyte NADPH oxidase (NOX2) is critical for antimicrobial host defence. Chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) is an inherited disorder of NOX2 characterized by severe life-threatening bacterial and fungal infections and by excessive inflammation, including Crohn's-like inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). NOX2 defends against microbes through the direct antimicrobial activity of reactive oxidants and through activation of granular proteases and generation of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs). NETosis involves the breakdown of cell membranes and extracellular release of chromatin and neutrophil granular constituents that target extracellular pathogens. Although the immediate effects of oxidant generation and NETosis are predicted to be injurious, NOX2, in several contexts, limits inflammation and injury by modulation of key signalling pathways that affect neutrophil accumulation and clearance. NOX2 also plays a role in antigen presentation and regulation of adaptive immunity. Specific NOX2-activated pathways such as nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), a transcriptional factor that induces antioxidative and cytoprotective responses, may be important therapeutic targets for CGD and, more broadly, diseases associated with excessive inflammation and injury.

  14. The Cu-CHA deNOx Catalyst in Action: Temperature-Dependent NH3-Assisted Selective Catalytic Reduction Monitored by Operando XAS and XES.

    PubMed

    Lomachenko, Kirill A; Borfecchia, Elisa; Negri, Chiara; Berlier, Gloria; Lamberti, Carlo; Beato, Pablo; Falsig, Hanne; Bordiga, Silvia

    2016-09-21

    The small-pore Cu-CHA zeolite is today the object of intensive research efforts to rationalize its outstanding performance in the NH3-assisted selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of harmful nitrogen oxides and to unveil the SCR mechanism. Herein we exploit operando X-ray spectroscopies to monitor the Cu-CHA catalyst in action during NH3-SCR in the 150-400 °C range, targeting Cu oxidation state, mobility, and preferential N or O ligation as a function of reaction temperature. By combining operando XANES, EXAFS, and vtc-XES, we unambiguously identify two distinct regimes for the atomic-scale behavior of Cu active-sites. Low-temperature SCR, up to ∼200 °C, is characterized by balanced populations of Cu(I)/Cu(II) sites and dominated by mobile NH3-solvated Cu-species. From 250 °C upward, in correspondence to the steep increase in catalytic activity, the largely dominant Cu-species are framework-coordinated Cu(II) sites, likely representing the active sites for high-temperature SCR. PMID:27532483

  15. The Cu-CHA deNOx Catalyst in Action: Temperature-Dependent NH3-Assisted Selective Catalytic Reduction Monitored by Operando XAS and XES.

    PubMed

    Lomachenko, Kirill A; Borfecchia, Elisa; Negri, Chiara; Berlier, Gloria; Lamberti, Carlo; Beato, Pablo; Falsig, Hanne; Bordiga, Silvia

    2016-09-21

    The small-pore Cu-CHA zeolite is today the object of intensive research efforts to rationalize its outstanding performance in the NH3-assisted selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of harmful nitrogen oxides and to unveil the SCR mechanism. Herein we exploit operando X-ray spectroscopies to monitor the Cu-CHA catalyst in action during NH3-SCR in the 150-400 °C range, targeting Cu oxidation state, mobility, and preferential N or O ligation as a function of reaction temperature. By combining operando XANES, EXAFS, and vtc-XES, we unambiguously identify two distinct regimes for the atomic-scale behavior of Cu active-sites. Low-temperature SCR, up to ∼200 °C, is characterized by balanced populations of Cu(I)/Cu(II) sites and dominated by mobile NH3-solvated Cu-species. From 250 °C upward, in correspondence to the steep increase in catalytic activity, the largely dominant Cu-species are framework-coordinated Cu(II) sites, likely representing the active sites for high-temperature SCR.

  16. Electron beam treatment of exhaust gas with high NOx concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Licki, Janusz; Chmielewski, Andrzej G.; Pawelec, Andrzej; Zimek, Zbigniew; Witman, Sylwia

    2014-05-01

    Simulated exhaust gases with a high NOx concentration, ranging from 200 to 1700 ppmv, were irradiated by an electron beam from an accelerator. In the first part of this study, only exhaust gases were treated. Low NOx removal efficiencies were obtained for high NOx concentrations, even with high irradiation doses applied. In the second part of study, gaseous ammonia or/and vapor ethanol were added to the exhaust gas before its inlet to the plasma reactor. These additions significantly enhanced the NOx removal efficiency. The synergistic effect of high SO2 concentration on NOx removal was observed. The combination of electron beam treatment with the introduction of the above additions and with the performance of irradiation under optimal parameters ensured high NOx removal efficiency without the application of a solid-state catalyst.

  17. NOx production in lightning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chameides, W. L.; Stedman, D. H.; Dickerson, R. R.; Rusch, D. W.; Cicerone, R. J.

    1977-01-01

    The rate of odd nitrogen (NOx) production by electrical discharge through air was theoretically and experimentally estimated to be about 60,000 trillion NOx molecules per joule. The theoretical treatment employed a cylindrical shock-wave solution to calculate the rate of NOx production in high temperature reactions. The limits obtained were experimentally verified by subjecting a regulated air flow to electrical discharges followed by a measurement of NOx production using chemiluminescence. These measurements also indicated that water vapor content has no detectable effect on the NOx production rate. The results imply that lightning is a significant source of NOx, producing about 30-40 megatons NOx-N per year and possibly accounting for as much as 50% of the total atmospheric NOx source.

  18. Research Approach for Aging and Evaluating Diesel Exhaust catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Wayne, Scott

    2000-08-20

    To determine the impact of diesel fuel sulfur levels on emissions control devices that could lower emissions of oxides of nitrogen (NOX) and particulate matter (PM) from on-highway trucks and buses in the 2002-2004 model years. West Virginia University is evaluating: - Diesel Oxidation Catalysts - Lean NOX Catalysts

  19. Characteristics of NOx Removal Combining Dielectric Barrier Discharge Plasma with Selective Catalytic Reduction by C3H6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xing-Quan; Li, Yi; Chen, Wei; Lv, Guo-Hua; Huang, Jun; Zhu, Guo-Xian; Wang, Xiao-Qian; Zhang, Xian-Hui; Wang, Da-Cheng; Feng, Ke-Cheng; Yang, Si-Ze

    2010-08-01

    Characteristics of NOx removal combining dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma with selective catalytic reduction (SCR) by C3H6 were investigated under the conditions of high NOx concentration and high space velocity at various temperatures. Experiment results show that there were no obvious removal of NOx and NO in the only C3H6-SCR system and only DBD system individually. But the high NOx removal rate was achieved in C3H6-SCR cooperating with DBD plasma system. Especially NOx removal rate can reach up to 88.5% at 150 °C simulating diesel engine exhaust temperature. It can be seen that when discharge comes into being, the catalystic activity was enhanced with discharge strengthened, so that the NOx was almost completely removed. In the course of NOx removal, DBD played an important role in oxidizing NO to NO2 and activating C3H6 and catalysts to reduce NOx.

  20. Nox and renal disease.

    PubMed

    Holterman, Chet E; Read, Naomi C; Kennedy, Chris R J

    2015-04-01

    Since the first demonstration of Nox enzyme expression in the kidney in the early 1990s and the subsequent identification of Nox4, or RENOX, a decade later, it has become apparent that the Nox family of reactive oxygen species (ROS) generating enzymes plays an integral role in the normal physiological function of the kidney. As our knowledge of Nox expression patterns and functions in various structures and specialized cell types within the kidney grows, so does the realization that Nox-derived oxidative stress contributes significantly to a wide variety of renal pathologies through their ability to modify lipids and proteins, damage DNA and activate transcriptional programmes. Diverse studies demonstrate key roles for Nox-derived ROS in kidney fibrosis, particularly in settings of chronic renal disease such as diabetic nephropathy. As the most abundant Nox family member in the kidney, much emphasis has been placed on the role of Nox4 in this setting. However, an ever growing body of work continues to uncover key roles for other Nox family members, not only in diabetic kidney disease, but in a diverse array of renal pathological conditions. The objective of the present review is to highlight the latest novel developments in renal Nox biology with an emphasis not only on diabetic nephropathy but many of the other renal disease contexts where oxidative stress is implicated.

  1. Ferroelectric Surface Chemistry: FIrst-principle study of NOx Decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakekhani, Arvin; Ismail-Beigi, Sohrab

    2012-02-01

    NOx molecules are critical and regulated air pollutants produced during automotive combustion. As part of a long-term effort to design viable catalysts for NOx decomposition that operate at higher temperatures and thus would allow for greater fuel efficiency, we are studying NOx chemistry on ferroelectric perovskite surfaces. Changing the direction of the ferroelectric polarization can modify surface properties and thus can lead to switchable surface chemistry. We will discuss our results for NO and NO2 on the polar (001) surfaces of PbTiO3 as function of ferroelectric polarization, surface stoichiometry, and various molecular or dissociated binding modes.

  2. Advances in potassium catalyzed NOx reduction by carbon materials: An overview

    SciTech Connect

    Bueno-Lopez, A.; Garcia-Garcia, A.; Illan-Gomez, M.J.; Linares-Solano, A.; de Lecea, C.S.M.

    2007-06-15

    The research work conducted in our group concerning the study of the potassium-catalyzed NOx reduction by carbon materials is presented. The importance of the different variables affecting the NOx-carbon reactions is discussed, e.g. carbon porosity, coal rank, potassium loading, influence of the binder used, and effect of the gas composition. The catalyst loading is the main feature affecting the selectivity for NOx reduction against O{sub 2} combustion. The NOx reduction without important combustion in O{sub 2} occurs between 350 and 475{sup o}C in the presence of the catalyst. The presence of H{sub 2}O in the gas mixture enhances NOx reduction at low carbon conversions, but as the reaction proceeds, it decreases as the selectivity does. The presence of CO{sub 2} diminishes the activity and selectivity of the catalyst. SO{sub 2} completely inhibits the catalytic activity of potassium due to sulfate formation.

  3. NOX REMOVAL WITH COMBINED SELECTIVE CATALYTIC REDUCTION AND SELECTIVE NONCATALYTIC REDUCTION: PILOT- SCALE TEST RESULTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pilot-scale tests were conducted to develop a combined nitrogen oxide (NOx) reduction technology using both selective catalytic reduction (SCR) and selective noncatalytic reduction (SNCR). A commercially available vanadium-and titatnium-based composite honeycomb catalyst and enh...

  4. Investigation of NO(x) Removal from Small Engine Exhaust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akyurtlu, Ates; Akyurtlu, Jale F.

    1999-01-01

    Contribution of emissions from small engines to the air pollution is significant. Due to differences in operating conditions and economics, the pollution control systems designed for automobiles will be neither suitable nor economically feasible for use on small engines. The objective of this project was to find a catalyst for the removal of NOx from the exhaust of small engines which use a rich air to fuel ratio. The desired catalyst should be inexpensive so that the cost of the pollution control unit will be only a small fraction of the total equipment cost. The high cost of noble metals makes them too expensive for use as NOx catalyst for small engines. Catalytic reduction of NO can also be accomplished by base-metal oxide catalysts. The main disadvantage of base-metal catalysts is their deactivation by poisons and high temperatures. Requirements for the length of the life of the small engine exhaust catalysts are much less than those for automobile exhaust catalysts. Since there is no oxygen in the exhaust gases, reduction selectivity is not a problem. Also, the reducing exhaust gases might help prevent the harmful interactions of the catalyst with the support. For these reasons only the supported metal oxide catalysts were investigated in this project.

  5. Investigation of NOx Removal from Small Engine Exhaust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akyurtlu, Ates; Akyurtlu, Jale F.

    1999-01-01

    Contribution of emissions from small engines to the air pollution is significant. Due to differences in operating conditions and economics, the pollution control systems designed for automobiles will be neither suitable nor economically feasible for use on small engines. The objective of this project was to find a catalyst for the removal of NOx from the exhaust of small engines which use a rich air to fuel ratio. The desired catalyst should be inexpensive so that the cost of the pollution control unit will be only a small fraction of the total equipment cost. The high cost of noble metals makes them too expensive for use as NOx catalyst for small engines. Catalytic reduction of Nitrogen Oxide (NO) can also be accomplished by base-metal oxide catalysts. The main disadvantage of base-metal catalysts is their deactivation by poisons and high temperatures. Requirements for the length of the life of the small engine exhaust catalysts are much less than those for automobile exhaust catalysts. Since there is no oxygen in the exhaust gases, reduction selectivity is not a problem. Also, the reducing exhaust gases might help prevent the harmful interactions of the catalyst with the support. For these reasons only the supported metal oxide catalysts were investigated in this project.

  6. SELECTIVE CATALYTIC REDUCTION OF DIESEL ENGINE NOX EMISSIONS USING ETHANOL AS A REDUCTANT

    SciTech Connect

    Kass, M; Thomas, J; Lewis, S; Storey, J; Domingo, N; Graves, R Panov, A

    2003-08-24

    NOx emissions from a heavy-duty diesel engine were reduced by more than 90% and 80% utilizing a full-scale ethanol-SCR system for space velocities of 21000/h and 57000/h respectively. These results were achieved for catalyst temperatures between 360 and 400 C and for C1:NOx ratios of 4-6. The SCR process appears to rapidly convert ethanol to acetaldehyde, which subsequently slipped past the catalyst at appreciable levels at a space velocity of 57000/h. Ammonia and N2O were produced during conversion; the concentrations of each were higher for the low space velocity condition. However, the concentration of N2O did not exceed 10 ppm. In contrast to other catalyst technologies, NOx reduction appeared to be enhanced by initial catalyst aging, with the presumed mechanism being sulfate accumulation within the catalyst. A concept for utilizing ethanol (distilled from an E-diesel fuel) as the SCR reductant was demonstrated.

  7. NOX REDUCTION FOR LEAN EXHAUST USING PLASMA ASSISTED CATALYSIS

    SciTech Connect

    Bhatt, B.

    2000-08-20

    Currently CARB estimates on road diesel vehicles contribute 50% of the NOX and 78% of the particulates being discharged from mobile sources. Diesel emissions obviously must be reduced if future air quality targets are to be met. A critical technological barrier exists because there are no commercial technologies available, which can reduce NOX from diesel (lean), exhaust containing 5-15% O2 concentration. One promising approach to reducing NOX and particulates from diesel exhaust is to use a combination of plasma with catalyst. Plasma can be generated thermally or non-thermally. Thermal plasma is formed by heating the system to an exceedingly high temperature (>2000 C). High temperature requirements for plasma makes thermal plasma inefficient and requires skillful thermal management and hence is considered impractical for mobile applications. Non-thermal plasma directs electrical energy into the creation of free electrons, which in turn react with gaseous species thus creating plasma. A combination of non-thermal plasma with catalysts can be referred to Plasma Assisted Catalysts or PAC. PAC technology has been demonstrated in stationary sources where non-thermal plasma catalysis is carried out in presence of NH3 as a reductant. In stationary applications NO is oxidized to HNO3 and then into ammonium nitrate where it is condensed and removed. This approach is impractical for mobile application because of the ammonia requirement and the ultimate mechanism by which NOX is removed. However, if a suitable catalyst can be found which can use onboard fuel as reductant then the technology holds a considerable promise. NOX REDUCTION FOR LEAN EXHAUST USING PLASMA ASSISTED CATALYSIS Ralph Slone, B. Bhatt and Victor Puchkarev NOXTECH INC. In addition to the development of an effective catalyst, a non-thermal plasma reactor needs be scaled and demonstrated along with a reliable and cost effective plasma power source and onboard HC source needs to be proven. Under the work

  8. Chemiluminescence analyzer of NOx as a high-throughput screening tool in selective catalytic reduction of NO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Kwang Seok; Woo, Seong Ihl

    2011-10-01

    A chemiluminescence-based analyzer of NOx gas species has been applied for high-throughput screening of a library of catalytic materials. The applicability of the commercial NOx analyzer as a rapid screening tool was evaluated using selective catalytic reduction of NO gas. A library of 60 binary alloys composed of Pt and Co, Zr, La, Ce, Fe or W on Al2O3 substrate was tested for the efficiency of NOx removal using a home-built 64-channel parallel and sequential tubular reactor. The NOx concentrations measured by the NOx analyzer agreed well with the results obtained using micro gas chromatography for a reference catalyst consisting of 1 wt% Pt on γ-Al2O3. Most alloys showed high efficiency at 275 °C, which is typical of Pt-based catalysts for selective catalytic reduction of NO. The screening with NOx analyzer allowed to select Pt-Ce(X) (X=1-3) and Pt-Fe(2) as the optimal catalysts for NOx removal: 73% NOx conversion was achieved with the Pt-Fe(2) alloy, which was much better than the results for the reference catalyst and the other library alloys. This study demonstrates a sequential high-throughput method of practical evaluation of catalysts for the selective reduction of NO.

  9. Reactions of NO2 with BaO/Pt(111) Model Catalysts: The Effects of BaO Film Thickness and NO2 Pressure on the Formation of Ba(NOx)2 Species

    SciTech Connect

    Mudiyanselage, Kumudu; Yi, Cheol-Woo; Szanyi, Janos

    2011-05-31

    The adsorption and reaction of NO2 on BaO (<1, ~3, and >20 monolayer equivalent (MLE))/Pt(111) model systems were studied with temperature programmed desorption (TPD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (IRAS) under ultra-high vacuum (UHV) as well as elevated pressure conditions. NO2 reacts with sub-monolayer BaO (<1 MLE) to form nitrites only, whereas the reaction of NO2 with BaO (~3 MLE)/Pt(111) produces mainly nitrites and a small amount of nitrates under UHV conditions (PNO2 ~ 1.0 × 10-9 Torr) at 300 K. In contrast, a thick BaO(>20 MLE) layer on Pt(111) reacts with NO2 to form nitrite-nitrate ion pairs under the same conditions. At elevated NO2 pressures (≥ 1.0 × 10-5 Torr), however, BaO layers at all these three coverages convert to amorphous barium nitrates at 300 K. Upon annealing to 500 K, these amorphous barium nitrate layers transform into crystalline phases. The thermal decomposition of the thus-formed Ba(NOx)2 species is also influenced by the coverage of BaO on the Pt(111) substrate: at low BaO coverages, these species decompose at significantly lower temperatures in comparison with those formed on thick BaO films due to the presence of Ba(NOx)2/Pt interface where the decomposition can proceed at lower temperatures. However, the thermal decomposition of the thick Ba(NO3)2 films follows that of bulk nitrates. Results obtained from these BaO/Pt(111) model systems under UHV and elevated pressure conditions clearly demonstrate that both the BaO film thickness and the applied NO2 pressure are critical in the Ba(NOx)2 formation and subsequent thermal decomposition processes.

  10. Continuous reduction of cyclic adsorbed and desorbed NO(x) in diesel emission using nonthermal plasma.

    PubMed

    Kuwahara, Takuya; Nakaguchi, Harunobu; Kuroki, Tomoyuki; Okubo, Masaaki

    2016-05-01

    Considering the recent stringent regulations governing diesel NO(x) emission, an aftertreatment system for the reduction of NO(x) in the exhaust gas has been proposed and studied. The proposed system is a hybrid method combining nonthermal plasma and NOx adsorbent. The system does not require precious metal catalysts or harmful chemicals such as urea and ammonia. In the present system, NO(x) in diesel emission is treated by adsorption and desorption by adsorbent as well as nonthermal plasma reduction. In addition, the remaining NO(x) in the adsorbent is desorbed again in the supplied air by residual heat. The desorbed NO(x) in air recirculates into the intake of the engine, and this process, i.e., exhaust gas components' recirculation (EGCR) achieves NO(x) reduction. Alternate utilization of two adsorption chambers in the system can achieve high-efficiency NO(x) removal continuously. An experiment with a stationary diesel engine for electric power generation demonstrates an energy efficiency of 154 g(NO2)/kWh for NO(x) removal and continuous NO(x) reduction of 70.3%. Considering the regulation against diesel emission in Japan, i.e., the new regulation to be imposed on vehicles of 3.5-7.5 ton since 2016, the present aftertreatment system fulfills the requirement with only 1.0% of engine power.

  11. Continuous reduction of cyclic adsorbed and desorbed NO(x) in diesel emission using nonthermal plasma.

    PubMed

    Kuwahara, Takuya; Nakaguchi, Harunobu; Kuroki, Tomoyuki; Okubo, Masaaki

    2016-05-01

    Considering the recent stringent regulations governing diesel NO(x) emission, an aftertreatment system for the reduction of NO(x) in the exhaust gas has been proposed and studied. The proposed system is a hybrid method combining nonthermal plasma and NOx adsorbent. The system does not require precious metal catalysts or harmful chemicals such as urea and ammonia. In the present system, NO(x) in diesel emission is treated by adsorption and desorption by adsorbent as well as nonthermal plasma reduction. In addition, the remaining NO(x) in the adsorbent is desorbed again in the supplied air by residual heat. The desorbed NO(x) in air recirculates into the intake of the engine, and this process, i.e., exhaust gas components' recirculation (EGCR) achieves NO(x) reduction. Alternate utilization of two adsorption chambers in the system can achieve high-efficiency NO(x) removal continuously. An experiment with a stationary diesel engine for electric power generation demonstrates an energy efficiency of 154 g(NO2)/kWh for NO(x) removal and continuous NO(x) reduction of 70.3%. Considering the regulation against diesel emission in Japan, i.e., the new regulation to be imposed on vehicles of 3.5-7.5 ton since 2016, the present aftertreatment system fulfills the requirement with only 1.0% of engine power. PMID:26844402

  12. Advanced Petroleum-Based Fuels - Diesel Emissions Project (APBF-DEC): 2,000-Hour Performance of a NOx Adsorber Catalyst and Diesel Particle Filter System for a Medium-Duty, Pick-Up Diesel Engine Platform; Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2007-03-01

    Presents the results of a 2,000-hour test of an emissions control system consisting of a nitrogen oxides adsorber catalyst in combination with a diesel particle filter, advanced fuels, and advanced engine controls in an SUV/pick-up truck vehicle platform.

  13. Comprehensive catalyst management

    SciTech Connect

    Pritchard, S.

    2007-05-15

    From January 2009, as SCR season expands from five months to year-round to meet new US Clean Air Interstate Rule standards, new catalyst strategies are increasingly important. Power plants will need a comprehensive management strategy that accounts for a wide range of old and new issues to achieve peak performance. An optimum plan is necessary for catalyst replacement or addition. SCR systems should be inspected and evaluated at least once a year. Levels of deactivation agents, most often arsenic and calcium oxide, need to match the particular coals used. Tools such as Cormetech's FIELD Guide are available to quantify the effect on catalyst life under various fuel-firing scenarios. Tests should be conducted to evaluate the NH{sub 3}/NOx distribution over time to maximise catalyst performance. The article gives a case study of catalyst management at the Tennessee Valley Authority Allen plant. Recent changes have created new variables to be considered in a catalyst management process, notably the expansion of the operating temperature range, mercury oxidation and SO{sub 3} emission limits. Cormetech has researched these areas. 5 figs., 2 photos.

  14. Argus NOx/SCR report

    SciTech Connect

    2005-05-15

    This document reports on NOx units at more than 350 coal and gas-fired power plants in the USA. Formerly known as the Argus SCR Report, the data are now expanded to include other forms of NOx control, including selective non-catalytic reduction (SNCR), low NOx burners and overfire air.

  15. Recent advances in automotive catalysis for NOx emission control by small-pore microporous materials.

    PubMed

    Beale, A M; Gao, F; Lezcano-Gonzalez, I; Peden, C H F; Szanyi, J

    2015-10-21

    The ever increasing demand to develop highly fuel efficient engines coincides with the need to minimize air pollution originating from the exhaust gases of internal combustion engines. Dramatically improved fuel efficiency can be achieved at air-to-fuel ratios much higher than stoichiometric. In the presence of oxygen in large excess, however, traditional three-way catalysts are unable to reduce NOx. Among the number of lean-NOx reduction technologies, selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NOx by NH3 over Cu- and Fe-ion exchanged zeolite catalysts has been extensively studied over the past 30+ years. Despite the significant advances in developing a viable practical zeolite-based catalyst for lean NOx reduction, the insufficient hydrothermal stabilities of the zeolite structures considered cast doubts about their real-world applicability. During the past decade renewed interest in zeolite-based lean NOx reduction was spurred by the discovery of the very high activity of Cu-SSZ-13 (and the isostructural Cu-SAPO-34) in the NH3-SCR of NOx. These new, small-pore zeolite-based catalysts not only exhibited very high NOx conversion and N2 selectivity, but also exhibited exceptionally high hydrothermal stability at high temperatures. In this review we summarize the key discoveries of the past ∼5 years that led to the introduction of these catalysts into practical applications. This review first briefly discusses the structure and preparation of the CHA structure-based zeolite catalysts, and then summarizes the key learnings of the rather extensive (but not complete) characterisation work. Then we summarize the key findings of reaction kinetic studies, and provide some mechanistic details emerging from these investigations. At the end of the review we highlight some of the issues that still need to be addressed in automotive exhaust control catalysis.

  16. Recent advances in automotive catalysis for NOx emission control by small-pore microporous materials.

    PubMed

    Beale, A M; Gao, F; Lezcano-Gonzalez, I; Peden, C H F; Szanyi, J

    2015-10-21

    The ever increasing demand to develop highly fuel efficient engines coincides with the need to minimize air pollution originating from the exhaust gases of internal combustion engines. Dramatically improved fuel efficiency can be achieved at air-to-fuel ratios much higher than stoichiometric. In the presence of oxygen in large excess, however, traditional three-way catalysts are unable to reduce NOx. Among the number of lean-NOx reduction technologies, selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NOx by NH3 over Cu- and Fe-ion exchanged zeolite catalysts has been extensively studied over the past 30+ years. Despite the significant advances in developing a viable practical zeolite-based catalyst for lean NOx reduction, the insufficient hydrothermal stabilities of the zeolite structures considered cast doubts about their real-world applicability. During the past decade renewed interest in zeolite-based lean NOx reduction was spurred by the discovery of the very high activity of Cu-SSZ-13 (and the isostructural Cu-SAPO-34) in the NH3-SCR of NOx. These new, small-pore zeolite-based catalysts not only exhibited very high NOx conversion and N2 selectivity, but also exhibited exceptionally high hydrothermal stability at high temperatures. In this review we summarize the key discoveries of the past ∼5 years that led to the introduction of these catalysts into practical applications. This review first briefly discusses the structure and preparation of the CHA structure-based zeolite catalysts, and then summarizes the key learnings of the rather extensive (but not complete) characterisation work. Then we summarize the key findings of reaction kinetic studies, and provide some mechanistic details emerging from these investigations. At the end of the review we highlight some of the issues that still need to be addressed in automotive exhaust control catalysis. PMID:25913215

  17. The Simplest Amino-borane H2 B=NH2 Trapped on a Rhodium Dimer: Pre-Catalysts for Amine-Borane Dehydropolymerization.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Amit; Beattie, Nicholas A; Pike, Sebastian D; Macgregor, Stuart A; Weller, Andrew S

    2016-06-01

    The μ-amino-borane complexes [Rh2 (L(R) )2 (μ-H)(μ-H2 B=NHR')][BAr(F) 4 ] (L(R) =R2 P(CH2 )3 PR2 ; R=Ph, (i) Pr; R'=H, Me) form by addition of H3 B⋅NMeR'H2 to [Rh(L(R) )(η(6) -C6 H5 F)][BAr(F) 4 ]. DFT calculations demonstrate that the amino-borane interacts with the Rh centers through strong Rh-H and Rh-B interactions. Mechanistic investigations show that these dimers can form by a boronium-mediated route, and are pre-catalysts for amine-borane dehydropolymerization, suggesting a possible role for bimetallic motifs in catalysis. PMID:27100775

  18. DIESEL NOX CONTROL APPLICATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper gives results of a project to design, develop, and demonstrate a diesel engine nitrogen oxide (NOx) and particulate matter (PM) control package that will meet the U.S. Navy's emission control requirements. (NOTE: In 1994, EPA issued a Notice for Proposed Rule Making (NP...

  19. Fischer-Tropsch-Type Production of Organic Materials in the Solar Nebula: Studies Using Graphite Catalysts and Measuring the Trapping of Noble Gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nuth, Joseph A., III; Ferguson, Frank T.; Lucas, Christopher; Kimura, Yuki; Hohenberg, Charles

    2009-01-01

    The formation of abundant carbonaceous material in meteorites is a long standing problem and an important factor in the debate on the potential for the origin of life in other stellar systems. The Fischer-Tropsch-type (FTT) catalytic reduction of CO by hydrogen was once the preferred model for production of organic materials in the primitive solar nebula. We have demonstrated that many grain surfaces can catalyze both FTT and HB-type reactions, including amorphous iron and magnesium silicates, pure silica smokes as well as several minerals. Graphite is not a particularly good FTT catalyst, especially compared to iron powder or to amorphous iron silicate. However, like other silicates that we have studied, it gets better with exposure to CO. N2 and H2 over time: e.g., after formation of a macromolecular carbonaceous layer on the surfaces of the underlying gains. While amorphous iron silicates required only 1 or 2 experimental runs to achieve steady state reaction rates, graphite only achieved steady state after 6 or more experiments. We will present results showing the catalytic action of graphite grains increasing with increasing number of experiments and will also discuss the nature of the final "graphite" grains aster completion of our experiments.

  20. Oxidation catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Ceyer, Sylvia T.; Lahr, David L.

    2010-11-09

    The present invention generally relates to catalyst systems and methods for oxidation of carbon monoxide. The invention involves catalyst compositions which may be advantageously altered by, for example, modification of the catalyst surface to enhance catalyst performance. Catalyst systems of the present invention may be capable of performing the oxidation of carbon monoxide at relatively lower temperatures (e.g., 200 K and below) and at relatively higher reaction rates than known catalysts. Additionally, catalyst systems disclosed herein may be substantially lower in cost than current commercial catalysts. Such catalyst systems may be useful in, for example, catalytic converters, fuel cells, sensors, and the like.

  1. COLD TRAPS

    DOEpatents

    Thompson, W.I.

    1958-09-30

    A cold trap is presented for removing a condensable component from a gas mixture by cooling. It consists of a shell, the exterior surface of which is chilled by a refrigerant, and conductive fins welded inside the shell to condense the gas, and distribute the condensate evenly throughout the length of the trap, so that the trap may function until it becomes completely filled with the condensed solid. The contents may then be removed as either a gas or as a liquid by heating the trap. This device has particuinr use as a means for removing uranium hexafluoride from the gaseous diffusion separation process during equipment breakdown and repair periods.

  2. Optical trapping

    PubMed Central

    Neuman, Keir C.; Block, Steven M.

    2006-01-01

    Since their invention just over 20 years ago, optical traps have emerged as a powerful tool with broad-reaching applications in biology and physics. Capabilities have evolved from simple manipulation to the application of calibrated forces on—and the measurement of nanometer-level displacements of—optically trapped objects. We review progress in the development of optical trapping apparatus, including instrument design considerations, position detection schemes and calibration techniques, with an emphasis on recent advances. We conclude with a brief summary of innovative optical trapping configurations and applications. PMID:16878180

  3. LOW NOX BURNER DEVELOPMENT

    SciTech Connect

    KRISHNA,C.R.; BUTCHER,T.

    2004-09-30

    The objective of the task is to develop concepts for ultra low NOx burners. One approach that has been tested previously uses internal recirculation of hot gases and the objective was to how to implement variable recirculation rates during burner operation. The second approach was to use fuel oil aerosolization (vaporization) and combustion in a porous medium in a manner similar to gas-fired radiant burners. This task is trying the second approach with the use of a somewhat novel, prototype system for aerosolization of the liquid fuel.

  4. Novel fluidized bed reactor for integrated NOx adsorption-reduction with hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Terris T. Yang; Hsiaotao T. Bi

    2009-07-01

    In order to avoid the negative impact of excessive oxygen in the combustion flue gases on the selectivity of most hydrocarbon selective catalytic reduction (HC-SCR) catalysts, an integrated NOx adsorption-reduction process has been proposed in this study for the treatment of flue gases under lean burn conditions by decoupling the adsorption and reduction into two different zones. The hypothesis has been validated in a novel internal circulating fluidized bed (ICFB) reactor using Fe/ZSM-5 as the catalyst and propylene as the reducing agent. Effects of propylene to the NOx molar ratio, flue gas oxygen concentration, and gas velocity on NOx conversion were studied using simulated flue gases. The results showed that increasing the ratio of HC:NO improved the reduction performance of Fe/ZSM-5 in the ICFB reactor. NOx conversion decreased with an increasing flue gas flow velocity in the annulus U{sub A} but increased with an increasing reductant gas flow velocity in the draft tube U{sub D}. The NOx adsorption ratio decreased with increasing U{sub A}. In most cases, NOx conversion was higher than the adsorption ratio due to the relatively poor adsorption performance of the catalyst. Fe/ZSM-5 showed a promising reduction performance and a strong inhibiting ability on the negative impact of excessive O{sub 2} in the ICFB reactor, proving that such an ICFB reactor possessed the ability to overcome the negative impact of excessive O{sub 2} in the flue gas using Fe/ZSM-5 as the deNOx catalyst. 22 refs., 10 figs.

  5. Kinetic and spectroscopic study of catalysts for water-gas shift and nitrogen oxide removal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kispersky, Vincent Frederick

    Nitrogen oxides (NOx) are formed in high temperature combustion processes such as in power generation and motor vehicles. Increasingly stringent regulation of these harmful emissions continues to drive interest in developing, understanding and studying new catalytic formulations for exhaust aftertreatment. For mobile sources, predominantly heavy duty diesel engines, selective catalytic reduction (SCR) with NH3 has become the principal means of NO x abatement. An alternative technology developed, but now surpassed by SCR, is NOx Storage Reduction (NSR) catalysis. Both technologies have been studied in our laboratory and are the basis for this dissertation. We studied seven different lean NOx trap (LNT) monolith formulations for NSR ranging from 0.6 to 6.2 wt.% Pt and 4 to 20 wt.% Ba loadings on γ-Al 2O3. The noble metal component of a LNT oxidizes NO to NO 2 aiding in the storage of NO2 on the alkaline earth component. Before the storage component saturates, a reductant such as H2 is introduced into the vehicular exhaust and the stored NOx is released and reduced to N2. Once the storage component is free of NOx, reductant flow is ceased and storage is begun anew. Our research focused on understanding the effects that CO2 and H2O have on the storage capacity of the LNT over short as well as extended periods of time. We found that for high Ba loadings, CO 2 had a consistently detrimental effect on the fast NOx storage capacity (NSC), defined as the amount of NOx the catalyst can store before 1% of the inlet NOx is measured in the reactor outlet. Over long NOx storage periods, CO2 continued to inhibit storage compared to the same catalyst in CO2 free conditions. On low loadings of Ba, however, the inhibition of CO2 was significantly reduced. We found that the loading dependent characteristics of the Ba phase affected the way in which CO2 adsorbed on the storage component, which greatly affected the stability of the species on lower Ba loadings. The less stable

  6. THE ACID RAIN NOX PROGRAM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Between 350,000 and 400,000 tons of annual NOx emissions have been eliminated as a result of Phase I of the Acid Rain NOx Program. As expected. the utilities have chosen emissions averaging as the primary compliance option. This reflects that, in general, NO x reductions have ...

  7. Don't NOx Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Mathis, J.D.; Lachowicz, Y.

    2005-07-01

    Modifications to boiler combustion systems allow Fayette Power Projects units 1 and 2 to meet new NOx emissions limits east of La Grange in Eastern Texas. The article describes modifications executed by Alstom in 2004 which attained an overall reduction in NOx emissions of almost 69%. 4 figs., 1 tab., 1 photo.

  8. NOx Control Options and Integration for US Coal Fired Boilers

    SciTech Connect

    Mike Bockelie; Marc Cremer; Kevin Davis; Martin Denison; Adel Sarofim; Connie Senior; Hong-Shig Shim; Dave Swenson; Bob Hurt; Eric Suuberg; Eric Eddings; Kevin Whitty; Larry Baxter; Calvin Bartholomew; William Hecker

    2006-06-30

    This is the Final Report for DOE Cooperative Agreement No: DE-FC26-00NT40753. The goal of the project was to develop cost-effective analysis tools and techniques for demonstrating and evaluating low-NOx control strategies and their possible impact on boiler performance for boilers firing US coals. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) provided co-funding for this program. This project included research on: (1) In furnace NOx control; (2) Impacts of combustion modifications on boiler operation; (3) Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) catalyst testing and (4) Ammonia adsorption/removal on fly ash. Important accomplishments were achieved in all aspects of the project. Rich Reagent Injection (RRI), an in-furnace NOx reduction strategy based on injecting urea or anhydrous ammonia into fuel rich regions in the lower furnace, was evaluated for cyclone-barrel and PC fired utility boilers. Field tests successfully demonstrated the ability of the RRI process to significantly reduce NOx emissions from a staged cyclone-fired furnace operating with overfire air. The field tests also verified the accuracy of the Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) modeling used to develop the RRI design and highlighted the importance of using CFD modeling to properly locate and configure the reagent injectors within the furnace. Low NOx firing conditions can adversely impact boiler operation due to increased waterwall wastage (corrosion) and increased soot production. A corrosion monitoring system that uses electrochemical noise (ECN) corrosion probes to monitor, on a real-time basis, high temperature corrosion events within the boiler was evaluated. Field tests were successfully conducted at two plants. The Ohio Coal Development Office provided financial assistance to perform the field tests. To investigate soot behavior, an advanced model to predict soot production and destruction was implemented into an existing reacting CFD modeling tool. Comparisons between experimental data collected

  9. NH3-TPD-MS study of Ce effect on the surface of Mn- or Fe-exchanged zeolites for selective catalytic reduction of NOx by ammonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanciulescu, M.; Bulsink, P.; Caravaggio, G.; Nossova, L.; Burich, R.

    2014-05-01

    The selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NOx with NH3 is considered to be a promising technique for the efficient reduction of highly detrimental NOx emitted from diesel engine vehicles to N2. This study was focused on a series of catalysts with ZSM-5 as support, prepared by Mn- or Fe-exchange followed by wet impregnation of Ce, or Fe or Mn. These catalysts were characterized by temperature-programmed desorption coupled with a mass spectrometer using ammonia (NH3-TPD-MS). Specifically, NH3-TPD-MS was used as a means of identifying the various strengths of acid sites and their relative abundance in an attempt to explain the effect of the catalyst surface acid sites on DeNOx activity. Acid sites with adsorption energies ranging from 47.0 to 75.6 kJ/mol were detected for all of the catalysts. For the same concentration of exchanged metal it was found that the DeNOx activity depends strongly on the type of metal. Furthermore, the acid site strength and distribution depend on the active metal and correlate with the observed DeNOx catalyst activity. Additionally, SEM metal mapping images confirmed the presence of well dispersed active metal on the surface of all catalysts. The catalysts with bimetallic active phase were stable and demonstrated high NOx conversion over a broad temperature range. Impregnation of metal-exchanged zeolites with Ce enhanced the low temperature NOx conversion. Observed differences of activity between the various catalysts of this study may be due to the formation of new ammonia activation sites. The ammonia desorption profile during the elevation of temperature was correlated to the DeNOx activity.

  10. Process of activation of a palladium catalyst system

    DOEpatents

    Sobolevskiy, Anatoly; Rossin, Joseph A.; Knapke, Michael J.

    2011-08-02

    Improved processes for activating a catalyst system used for the reduction of nitrogen oxides are provided. In one embodiment, the catalyst system is activated by passing an activation gas stream having an amount of each of oxygen, water vapor, nitrogen oxides, and hydrogen over the catalyst system and increasing a temperature of the catalyst system to a temperature of at least 180.degree. C. at a heating rate of from 1-20.degree./min. Use of activation processes described herein leads to a catalyst system with superior NOx reduction capabilities.

  11. Two-stage Catalytic Reduction of NOx with Hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Umit S. Ozkan; Erik M. Holmgreen; Matthew M. Yung; Jonathan Halter; Joel Hiltner

    2005-12-21

    A two-stage system for the catalytic reduction of NO from lean-burn natural gas reciprocating engine exhaust is investigated. Each of the two stages uses a distinct catalyst. The first stage is oxidation of NO to NO{sub 2} and the second stage is reduction of NO{sub 2} to N{sub 2} with a hydrocarbon. The central idea is that since NO{sub 2} is a more easily reduced species than NO, it should be better able to compete with oxygen for the combustion reaction of hydrocarbon, which is a challenge in lean conditions. Early work focused on demonstrating that the N{sub 2} yield obtained when NO{sub 2} was reduced was greater than when NO was reduced. NO{sub 2} reduction catalysts were designed and silver supported on alumina (Ag/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) was found to be quite active, able to achieve 95% N{sub 2} yield in 10% O{sub 2} using propane as the reducing agent. The design of a catalyst for NO oxidation was also investigated, and a Co/TiO{sub 2} catalyst prepared by sol-gel was shown to have high activity for the reaction, able to reach equilibrium conversion of 80% at 300 C at GHSV of 50,000h{sup -1}. After it was shown that NO{sub 2} could be more easily reduced to N{sub 2} than NO, the focus shifted on developing a catalyst that could use methane as the reducing agent. The Ag/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst was tested and found to be inactive for NOx reduction with methane. Through iterative catalyst design, a palladium-based catalyst on a sulfated-zirconia support (Pd/SZ) was synthesized and shown to be able to selectively reduce NO{sub 2} in lean conditions using methane. Development of catalysts for the oxidation reaction also continued and higher activity, as well as stability in 10% water, was observed on a Co/ZrO{sub 2} catalyst, which reached equilibrium conversion of 94% at 250 C at the same GHSV. The Co/ZrO{sub 2} catalyst was also found to be extremely active for oxidation of CO, ethane, and propane, which could potential eliminate the need for any separate

  12. New vanadium trap proven in commercial trials

    SciTech Connect

    Dougan, T.J. ); Alkemade, U.; Lakhanpal, B. ); Boock, L.T. )

    1994-09-26

    A vanadium trap technology called RV4+ has demonstrated in a variety of commercial fluid catalytic cracking (FCC) units its ability to reduce vanadium on equilibrium catalyst by more than 20%. Reducing vanadium loading increases microactivity and zeolite surface area retention, confirming that RV4+ protects zeolites from vanadium deactivation. Sulfur competition had prevented some previous traps from working commercially, but was not a factor with the new trap. The technology can save refiners millions of dollars per year in catalyst costs, or allow them to process feeds containing higher vanadium concentrations. The paper discusses vanadium traps, deactivation mechanism, history of traps, vanadium mobility, intraparticle mobility, interparticle mobility, measuring performance, commercial results, sulfur competition, and economic value.

  13. Catalysts for a cleaner environment

    SciTech Connect

    1995-09-01

    Pollution-abatement catalysts remain a challenging area for process development. That`s because the pollutants themselves often poison the catalysts, and the new catalytic processes are now required to capture pollutants from very dilute waste streams. A case in point in the US is how severely low-level emissions of halogenated hydrocarbons are regulated through Title III regulations on toxic compounds. While common oxidation catalysts may be quite effective at eliminating most VOC [volatile organic compound] emissions, the presence of halogenated hydrocarbons can adversely affect catalyst performance. Only recently have catalysts become available that will be effective at oxidizing the halogenated hydrocarbons. The items described below illustrate the variety and scope of recently introduced catalysts that have proved themselves by increasing yields and reducing emissions. The offerings include catalysts for: improving yield in the production of acrylic acid, ammonia, styrene, phthalic anhydride and alcohol; reducing the sulfur and aromatic content of fuels; curtailing byproduct production in fluid-catalytic cracking units; oxidizing emissions of chlorinated hydrocarbons; and reducing NOx in combustion gas using hydrogen or carbon monoxide.

  14. NOx Binding and Dissociation: Enhanced Ferroelectric Surface Chemistry by Catalytic Monolayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakekhani, Arvin; Ismail-Beigi, Sohrab

    2013-03-01

    NOx molecules are regulated air pollutants produced during automotive combustion. As part of an effort to design viable catalysts for NOx decomposition operating at higher temperatures that would allow for improved fuel efficiency, we examine NOx chemistry on ferroelectric perovskite surfaces. Changing the direction of ferroelectric polarization can modify surface electronic properties and may lead to switchable surface chemistry. Here, we describe our recent work on potentially enhanced surface chemistry using catalytic RuO2 monolayers on perovskite ferroelectric substrates. In addition to thermodynamic stabilization of the RuO2 layer, we present results on the polarization-dependent binding of NO, O2, N2, and atomic O and N. We present results showing that one key problem with current catalysts, involving the difficulty of releasing dissociation products (especially oxygen), can be ameliorated by this method. Primary support from Toyota Motor Engineering and Manufacturing, North America, Inc.

  15. Study on Reaction Products in Plasma-Assisted Selective Catalytic Reduction of NOx

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshizawa, Hayato; Tochikubo, Fumiyoshi; Uchida, Satoshi; Watanabe, Tsuneo

    Since the gas discharge plasma easily converts NO to NO2, which can be reduced more actively in selective catalytic reduction with hydrocarbons (HC-SCR), the plasma-assisted HC-SCR is an effective method for NOx reduction from diesel engine exhaust gases. In this work, the relation between NOx removal and reaction products is investigated in plasma-assisted HC-SCR in simulated flue gas as parameters of gas composition, plasma specific energy and catalyst temperature. C2H4 is used as a hydrocarbon and commercially available Al2O3 is used as a catalyst. After the plasma treatment of simulated flue gas, HCHO and HCOOH were generated as by-products, while NO was effectively converted to NO2. These by-products were confirmed to be reactive at lower catalyst temperature than C2H4 in HC-SCR. The relation between NOx removal and reaction products suggests that HCHO and HCOOH contribute the effective NOx reduction at low catalyst temperature in plasma-assisted HC-SCR.

  16. 40 CFR 97.12 - Changing NOX authorized account representative and alternate NOX authorized account...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Changing NOX authorized account representative and alternate NOX authorized account representative; changes in owners and operators. 97.12... (CONTINUED) FEDERAL NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS NOX Authorized...

  17. 40 CFR 97.12 - Changing NOX authorized account representative and alternate NOX authorized account...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Changing NOX authorized account representative and alternate NOX authorized account representative; changes in owners and operators. 97.12... (CONTINUED) FEDERAL NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS NOX Authorized...

  18. 40 CFR 97.12 - Changing NOX authorized account representative and alternate NOX authorized account...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Changing NOX authorized account representative and alternate NOX authorized account representative; changes in owners and operators. 97.12... (CONTINUED) FEDERAL NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS NOX Authorized...

  19. 40 CFR 97.12 - Changing NOX authorized account representative and alternate NOX authorized account...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Changing NOX authorized account representative and alternate NOX authorized account representative; changes in owners and operators. 97.12... (CONTINUED) FEDERAL NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS NOX Authorized...

  20. 40 CFR 52.2237 - NOX RACT and NOX conformity exemption.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false NOX RACT and NOX conformity exemption... RACT and NOX conformity exemption. Approval. EPA is approving the section 182(f) oxides of nitrogen (NOX) reasonably available control technology (RACT) and NOX conformity exemption request submitted...

  1. Method for reducing NOx during combustion of coal in a burner

    DOEpatents

    Zhou, Bing; Parasher, Sukesh; Hare, Jeffrey J.; Harding, N. Stanley; Black, Stephanie E.; Johnson, Kenneth R.

    2008-04-15

    An organically complexed nanocatalyst composition is applied to or mixed with coal prior to or upon introducing the coal into a coal burner in order to catalyze the removal of coal nitrogen from the coal and its conversion into nitrogen gas prior to combustion of the coal. This process leads to reduced NOx production during coal combustion. The nanocatalyst compositions include a nanoparticle catalyst that is made using a dispersing agent that can bond with the catalyst atoms. The dispersing agent forms stable, dispersed, nano-sized catalyst particles. The catalyst composition can be formed as a stable suspension to facilitate storage, transportation and application of the catalyst nanoparticles to a coal material. The catalyst composition can be applied before or after pulverizing the coal material or it may be injected directly into the coal burner together with pulverized coal.

  2. Noble metal ionic catalysts.

    PubMed

    Hegde, M S; Madras, Giridhar; Patil, K C

    2009-06-16

    Because of growing environmental concerns and increasingly stringent regulations governing auto emissions, new more efficient exhaust catalysts are needed to reduce the amount of pollutants released from internal combustion engines. To accomplish this goal, the major pollutants in exhaust-CO, NO(x), and unburned hydrocarbons-need to be fully converted to CO(2), N(2), and H(2)O. Most exhaust catalysts contain nanocrystalline noble metals (Pt, Pd, Rh) dispersed on oxide supports such as Al(2)O(3) or SiO(2) promoted by CeO(2). However, in conventional catalysts, only the surface atoms of the noble metal particles serve as adsorption sites, and even in 4-6 nm metal particles, only 1/4 to 1/5 of the total noble metal atoms are utilized for catalytic conversion. The complete dispersion of noble metals can be achieved only as ions within an oxide support. In this Account, we describe a novel solution to this dispersion problem: a new solution combustion method for synthesizing dispersed noble metal ionic catalysts. We have synthesized nanocrystalline, single-phase Ce(1-x)M(x)O(2-delta) and Ce(1-x-y)Ti(y)M(x)O(2-delta) (M = Pt, Pd, Rh; x = 0.01-0.02, delta approximately x, y = 0.15-0.25) oxides in fluorite structure. In these oxide catalysts, Pt(2+), Pd(2+), or Rh(3+) ions are substituted only to the extent of 1-2% of Ce(4+) ion. Lower-valent noble metal ion substitution in CeO(2) creates oxygen vacancies. Reducing molecules (CO, H(2), NH(3)) are adsorbed onto electron-deficient noble metal ions, while oxidizing (O(2), NO) molecules are absorbed onto electron-rich oxide ion vacancy sites. The rates of CO and hydrocarbon oxidation and NO(x) reduction (with >80% N(2) selectivity) are 15-30 times higher in the presence of these ionic catalysts than when the same amount of noble metal loaded on an oxide support is used. Catalysts with palladium ion dispersed in CeO(2) or Ce(1-x)Ti(x)O(2) were far superior to Pt or Rh ionic catalysts. Therefore, we have demonstrated that the

  3. Antihydrogen Trapped

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowe[1], Paul

    2011-05-01

    In 2010 the ALPHA collaboration succeeded in trapping antihydrogen atoms for the first time. Stored antihydrogen promises to be a unique tool for making high precision measurements of the structure of this first anti-atom. Achieving this milestone presented several substantial experimental challenges and this talk will describe how they were overcome. The unique design features of the ALPHA apparatus will be explained. These allow a high intensity positron source and an antiproton imaging detector similar to the one used in the ATHENA experiment to be combined with an innovative magnet design of the anti-atom trap. This seeks to minimise the perturbations to trapped charged particles which may cause particle loss and heating. The diagnostic techniques used to measure the diameter, number, density, and temperatures of both plasmas will be presented as will the methods developed to actively compress and cool of both plasma species to sizes and temperatures,, where trapping attempts with a reasonable chance of success can be tried. The results of the successful trapping experiments will be outlined as well as some subsequent experiments to improve the trapping rate and storage time.

  4. SOURCEBOOK: NOX CONTROL TECHNOLOGY DATA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report, a compilation of available information on the control of nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions from stationary sources, is provided to assist new source permitting activities by regulatory agencies. he sources covered are combustion turbines, internal combustion engines, non...

  5. Enhanced High Temperature Performance of NOx Storage/Reduction (NSR) Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Do Heui; Muntean, George G.; Peden, Charles HF; Howden, Ken; Currier, Neal; Li, Junhui; Stafford, Randy; Yezerets, Aleksey; Chen, Hai Ying; Hess, Howard ..

    2012-02-08

    This annual report describes progress on a CRADA project aimed at developing a fundamental understanding of candidate next generation NSR materials for NOx after-treatment for light-duty lean-burn (including diesel) engines. Model catalysts that are based on literature formulations are the focus of the work being carried out at PNNL. In addition, the performance and stability of a realistic high temperature NSR catalyst, supplied by JM, is being studied in order to provide baseline data for the model catalysts that are, again, based on formulations described in the open literature.

  6. Kinetic and spectroscopic study of catalysts for water-gas shift and nitrogen oxide removal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kispersky, Vincent Frederick

    Nitrogen oxides (NOx) are formed in high temperature combustion processes such as in power generation and motor vehicles. Increasingly stringent regulation of these harmful emissions continues to drive interest in developing, understanding and studying new catalytic formulations for exhaust aftertreatment. For mobile sources, predominantly heavy duty diesel engines, selective catalytic reduction (SCR) with NH3 has become the principal means of NO x abatement. An alternative technology developed, but now surpassed by SCR, is NOx Storage Reduction (NSR) catalysis. Both technologies have been studied in our laboratory and are the basis for this dissertation. We studied seven different lean NOx trap (LNT) monolith formulations for NSR ranging from 0.6 to 6.2 wt.% Pt and 4 to 20 wt.% Ba loadings on γ-Al 2O3. The noble metal component of a LNT oxidizes NO to NO 2 aiding in the storage of NO2 on the alkaline earth component. Before the storage component saturates, a reductant such as H2 is introduced into the vehicular exhaust and the stored NOx is released and reduced to N2. Once the storage component is free of NOx, reductant flow is ceased and storage is begun anew. Our research focused on understanding the effects that CO2 and H2O have on the storage capacity of the LNT over short as well as extended periods of time. We found that for high Ba loadings, CO 2 had a consistently detrimental effect on the fast NOx storage capacity (NSC), defined as the amount of NOx the catalyst can store before 1% of the inlet NOx is measured in the reactor outlet. Over long NOx storage periods, CO2 continued to inhibit storage compared to the same catalyst in CO2 free conditions. On low loadings of Ba, however, the inhibition of CO2 was significantly reduced. We found that the loading dependent characteristics of the Ba phase affected the way in which CO2 adsorbed on the storage component, which greatly affected the stability of the species on lower Ba loadings. The less stable

  7. 80 HP PLASMA ASSISTED CATALYST SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Slone, Ralph

    2001-08-05

    The US economy is linked to efficient heavy vehicle transportation and diesel remains the fuel of choice for mass transportation of goods and services. Diesel engines remain the most reliable and cost effective system for commerce. Recent deleterious effects of diesel exhaust on health and environment have led to an urgent need for cost effective technologies that would bring about reduction in NOx and PM. CARB estimates on-road diesel mobile source will contribute almost 50% NOx and 78% PM emissions by 2010. As a result recent Federal and State mandates have been adopted to reduce emissions from diesel exhaust to 1 Gm/bhp.-Hr of NOx and 0.05 Gm/bhp-hr of PM by the year 2007. The 2007 standard is to be achieved in a stepwise manner starting with the standards for 2002 namely 2 Gm/bhp-hr NOx and 0.1 Gm/bhp-hr of PM. 2002 standards are likely to be met by most engine manufacturer by some modified form of exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) system or by employing a sophisticated engine control system. Importance of cost effective technology requirement is further exaggerated by the fact that in recent years diesel engine production have increased dramatically see figure 1 and has out stripped the gasoline engine production almost 4:1 see figure 2. Currently gasoline engine employs a 3-way catalytic system for NOx and HC reduction and in order for the 3-way system to work the engine is run near stoichiometric air : fuel ratio so that exhaust has virtually no oxygen. This strategy has resulted in a poorer efficiency and hence less efficient utilization of our natural resources. By contrast diesel engine operate on a lean burn principals i.e. air rich and currently there are no commercial technologies available for treating NOx and PM. Technologies being considered for reducing NOx from lean burn (diesel) exhaust are; Lean NOx catalyst systems, NOx adsorber system, Selective Catalytic Reduction systems and plasma assisted catalyst system. Of all these technologies Plasma

  8. Engine NOx reduction system

    SciTech Connect

    Berriman, L.P.; Zabsky, J.M.; Davis, J.W.; Hylton, W.H.

    1993-07-06

    Apparatus for use with an engine having a power-generating portion that burns a hydrocarbon fuel and air and produces hot exhaust gases is described, having a catalytic converter device that includes a catalyst for enhancing reactions of components of said exhaust gases, and having a conduit that couples said power-generating portion to said catalytic converter device, for reducing pollution in the exhaust, wherein said power-generating portion comprises a plurality of cylinders in which said fuel and air are burned, a mechanism for applying fuel and air to said cylinders, and a plurality of exhaust valves through which burned fuel and air is exhausted and which are connected to said upstream end of said conduit, said conduit including a manifold which is connected to a plurality of said exhaust valves and a downstream conduit portion which connects said manifold to said catalytic converter device, comprising: a device coupled to said conduit, which stores ammonia and injects it into said conduit at a location where the exhaust gases have a substantially maximum temperature, but which is devoid of open flames, to mix with said hot exhaust gases and pass with them along said conduit and then through said catalyst, said location being closer to said power-generating portion than to said catalytic converter and lying in said manifold.

  9. Ultra Low NOx Catalytic Combustion for IGCC Power Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Shahrokh Etemad; Benjamin Baird; Sandeep Alavandi; William Pfefferle

    2008-03-31

    In order to meet DOE's goals of developing low-emissions coal-based power systems, PCI has further developed and adapted it's Rich-Catalytic Lean-burn (RCL{reg_sign}) catalytic reactor to a combustion system operating on syngas as a fuel. The technology offers ultra-low emissions without the cost of exhaust after-treatment, with high efficiency (avoidance of after-treatment losses and reduced diluent requirements), and with catalytically stabilized combustion which extends the lower Btu limit for syngas operation. Tests were performed in PCI's sub-scale high-pressure (10 atm) test rig, using a two-stage (catalytic then gas-phase) combustion process for syngas fuel. In this process, the first stage consists of a fuel-rich mixture reacting on a catalyst with final and excess combustion air used to cool the catalyst. The second stage is a gas-phase combustor, where the air used for cooling the catalyst mixes with the catalytic reactor effluent to provide for final gas-phase burnout and dilution to fuel-lean combustion products. During testing, operating with a simulated Tampa Electric's Polk Power Station syngas, the NOx emissions program goal of less than 0.03 lbs/MMBtu (6 ppm at 15% O{sub 2}) was met. NOx emissions were generally near 0.01 lbs/MMBtu (2 ppm at 15% O{sub 2}) (PCI's target) over a range on engine firing temperatures. In addition, low emissions were shown for alternative fuels including high hydrogen content refinery fuel gas and low BTU content Blast Furnace Gas (BFG). For the refinery fuel gas increased resistance to combustor flashback was achieved through preferential consumption of hydrogen in the catalytic bed. In the case of BFG, stable combustion for fuels as low as 88 BTU/ft{sup 3} was established and maintained without the need for using co-firing. This was achieved based on the upstream catalytic reaction delivering a hotter (and thus more reactive) product to the flame zone. The PCI catalytic reactor was also shown to be active in ammonia

  10. Trapped Antihydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robicheaux, Francis

    2012-03-01

    Atoms made of a particle and an antiparticle are unstable, usually surviving less than a microsecond. Antihydrogen, the bound state of an antiproton and a positron, is made entirely of antiparticles and is believed to be stable. It is this longevity that holds the promise of precision studies of matter-antimatter symmetry. Low energy (Kelvin scale) antihydrogen has been produced at CERN since 2002. I will describe the experiment which has recently succeeded in trapping antihydrogen in a cryogenic Penning trap for times up to approximately 15 minutes.

  11. NOx CONTROL OPTIONS AND INTEGRATION FOR US COAL FIRED BOILERS

    SciTech Connect

    Mike Bockelie; Marc Cremer; Kevin Davis; Connie Senior; Bob Hurt; Eric Eddings; Larry Baxter

    2001-10-10

    This is the fifth Quarterly Technical Report for DOE Cooperative Agreement No: DE-FC26-00NT40753. The goal of the project is to develop cost effective analysis tools and techniques for demonstrating and evaluating low NOx control strategies and their possible impact on boiler performance for firing US coals. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) is providing cofunding for this program. This program contains multiple tasks and good progress is being made on all fronts. Field tests for NOx reduction in a cyclone fired utility boiler due to using Rich Reagent Injection (RRI) have been started. CFD modeling studies have been started to evaluate the use of RRI for NOx reduction in a corner fired utility boiler using pulverized coal. Field tests of a corrosion monitor to measure waterwall wastage in a utility boiler have been completed. Computational studies to evaluate a soot model within a boiler simulation program are continuing. Research to evaluate SCR catalyst performance has started. A literature survey was completed. Experiments have been outlined and two flow reactor systems have been designed and are under construction. Commercial catalyst vendors have been contacted about supplying catalyst samples. Several sets of new experiments have been performed to investigate ammonia removal processes and mechanisms for fly ash. Work has focused on a promising class of processes in which ammonia is destroyed by strong oxidizing agents at ambient temperature during semi-dry processing (the use of moisture amounts less than 5 wt-%). Both ozone and an ozone/peroxide combination have been used to treat both basic and acidic ammonia-laden ashes.

  12. Recent advances in automotive catalysis for NOx emission control by small-pore microporous materials

    SciTech Connect

    Beale, Andrew M.; Gao, Feng; Lezcano-Gonzalez, Ines; Peden, Charles HF; Szanyi, Janos

    2015-10-05

    The ever increasing demand to develop highly fuel efficient engines coincides with the need to minimize air pollution originating from the exhaust gases of internal combustion engines. Dramatically improved fuel efficiency can be achieved at air-to-fuel ratios much higher than stoichiometric. In the presence of oxygen in large excess, however, traditional three-way catalysts are unable to reduce NOx. Among the number of lean-NOx reduction technologies, selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NOx by NH3 over Cu- and Fe-ion exchanged zeolite catalysts has been extensively studied over the past 30+ years. Despite the significant advances in developing a viable practical zeolite-based catalyst for lean NOx reduction, the insufficient hydrothermal stabilities of the zeolite structures considered cast doubts about their real-world applicability. During the past decade a renewed interest in zeolite-based lean NOx reduction was spurred by the discovery of the very high activity of Cu-SSZ-13 (and the isostructural Cu-SAPO-34) in the NH3 SCR of NOx. These new, small-pore zeolite-based catalysts not only exhibited very high NOx conversion and N2 selectivity, but also exhibited exceptional high hydrothermal stability at high temperatures. In this review we summarize the key discoveries of the past ~5 years that lead to the introduction of these catalysts into practical application. The review first briefly discusses the structure and preparation of the CHA structure-based zeolite catalysts, and then summarizes the key learnings of the rather extensive (but not complete) characterisation work. Then we summarize the key findings of reaction kinetics studies, and provide some mechanistic details emerging from these investigations. At the end of the review we highlight some of the issues that are still need to be addressed in automotive exhaust control catalysis. Funding A.M.B. and I.L.G. would like to thank EPSRC for funding. F.G., C.H.F.P. and J.Sz. gratefully acknowledge

  13. Nox NADPH Oxidases and the Endoplasmic Reticulum

    PubMed Central

    Araujo, Thaís L.S.; Abrahão, Thalita B.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Understanding isoform- and context-specific subcellular Nox reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase compartmentalization allows relevant functional inferences. This review addresses the interplay between Nox NADPH oxidases and the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), an increasingly evident player in redox pathophysiology given its role in redox protein folding and stress responses. Recent Advances: Catalytic/regulatory transmembrane subunits are synthesized in the ER and their processing includes folding, N-glycosylation, heme insertion, p22phox heterodimerization, as shown for phagocyte Nox2. Dual oxidase (Duox) maturation also involves the regulation by ER-resident Duoxa2. The ER is the activation site for some isoforms, typically Nox4, but potentially other isoforms. Such location influences redox/Nox-mediated calcium signaling regulation via ER targets, such as sarcoendoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase (SERCA). Growing evidence suggests that Noxes are integral signaling elements of the unfolded protein response during ER stress, with Nox4 playing a dual prosurvival/proapoptotic role in this setting, whereas Nox2 enhances proapoptotic signaling. ER chaperones such as protein disulfide isomerase (PDI) closely interact with Noxes. PDI supports growth factor-dependent Nox1 activation and mRNA expression, as well as migration in smooth muscle cells, and PDI overexpression induces acute spontaneous Nox activation. Critical Issues: Mechanisms of PDI effects include possible support of complex formation and RhoGTPase activation. In phagocytes, PDI supports phagocytosis, Nox activation, and redox-dependent interactions with p47phox. Together, the results implicate PDI as possible Nox organizer. Future Directions: We propose that convergence between Noxes and ER may have evolutive roots given ER-related functional contexts, which paved Nox evolution, namely calcium signaling and pathogen killing. Overall, the interplay between

  14. Lean NOx Reduction in Two Stages: Non-thermal Plasma Followed by Heterogeneous Catalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Tonkyn, Russell G.; Yoon, Ilsop S.; Barlow, Stephan E.; Panov, Alexander G.; Kolwaite, A; Balmer, Mari LOU.

    2000-10-16

    We present data in this paper showing that non-thermal plasma in combination with heterogeneous catalysis is a promising technique for the treatment of NOx in diesel exhaust. Using a commonly available zeolite catalyst, sodium Y, to treat synthetic diesel exhaust we report approximately 50% chemical reduction of NOx over a broad, representative temperature range. We have measured the overall efficiency as a function of the temperature and hydrocarbon concentration. The direct detection of N2 and N2O when the background gas is replaced by helium confirms that true chemical reduction is occurring.

  15. NOx adsorber and method of regenerating same

    DOEpatents

    Endicott, Dennis L.; Verkiel, Maarten; Driscoll, James J.

    2007-01-30

    New technologies, such as NOx adsorber catalytic converters, are being used to meet increasingly stringent regulations on undesirable emissions, including NOx emissions. NOx adsorbers must be periodically regenerated, which requires an increased fuel consumption. The present disclosure includes a method of regenerating a NOx adsorber within a NOx adsorber catalytic converter. At least one sensor positioned downstream from the NOx adsorber senses, in the downstream exhaust, at least one of NOx, nitrous oxide and ammonia concentrations a plurality of times during a regeneration phase. The sensor is in communication with an electronic control module that includes a regeneration monitoring algorithm operable to end the regeneration phase when a time rate of change of the at least one of NOx, nitrous oxide and ammonia concentrations is after an expected plateau region begins.

  16. 40 CFR 96.52 - NOX Allowance Tracking System responsibilities of NOX authorized account representative.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false NOX Allowance Tracking System responsibilities of NOX authorized account representative. 96.52 Section 96.52 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX...

  17. 40 CFR 96.188 - CAIR NOX allowance allocations to CAIR NOX opt-in units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false CAIR NOX allowance allocations to CAIR NOX opt-in units. 96.188 Section 96.188 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS...

  18. 40 CFR 96.188 - CAIR NOX allowance allocations to CAIR NOX opt-in units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false CAIR NOX allowance allocations to CAIR NOX opt-in units. 96.188 Section 96.188 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO 2 TRADING PROGRAMS...

  19. 40 CFR 97.188 - CAIR NOX allowance allocations to CAIR NOX opt-in units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false CAIR NOX allowance allocations to CAIR NOX opt-in units. 97.188 Section 97.188 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING...

  20. 40 CFR 96.52 - NOX Allowance Tracking System responsibilities of NOX authorized account representative.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false NOX Allowance Tracking System responsibilities of NOX authorized account representative. 96.52 Section 96.52 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX...

  1. 40 CFR 52.2237 - NOX RACT and NOX conformity exemption.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 5 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false NOX RACT and NOX conformity exemption... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) APPROVAL AND PROMULGATION OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS (CONTINUED) Tennessee § 52.2237 NOX RACT and NOX conformity exemption. Approval. EPA is approving the section 182(f) oxides of...

  2. 40 CFR 96.188 - CAIR NOX allowance allocations to CAIR NOX opt-in units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false CAIR NOX allowance allocations to CAIR NOX opt-in units. 96.188 Section 96.188 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS...

  3. 40 CFR 97.188 - CAIR NOX allowance allocations to CAIR NOX opt-in units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false CAIR NOX allowance allocations to CAIR NOX opt-in units. 97.188 Section 97.188 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING...

  4. 40 CFR 96.188 - CAIR NOX allowance allocations to CAIR NOX opt-in units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false CAIR NOX allowance allocations to CAIR NOX opt-in units. 96.188 Section 96.188 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS...

  5. 40 CFR 96.52 - NOX Allowance Tracking System responsibilities of NOX authorized account representative.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false NOX Allowance Tracking System responsibilities of NOX authorized account representative. 96.52 Section 96.52 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX...

  6. 40 CFR 52.2237 - NOX RACT and NOX conformity exemption.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 5 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false NOX RACT and NOX conformity exemption... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) APPROVAL AND PROMULGATION OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS (CONTINUED) Tennessee § 52.2237 NOX RACT and NOX conformity exemption. Approval. EPA is approving the section 182(f) oxides of...

  7. 40 CFR 97.188 - CAIR NOX allowance allocations to CAIR NOX opt-in units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false CAIR NOX allowance allocations to CAIR NOX opt-in units. 97.188 Section 97.188 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING...

  8. 40 CFR 97.188 - CAIR NOX allowance allocations to CAIR NOX opt-in units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false CAIR NOX allowance allocations to CAIR NOX opt-in units. 97.188 Section 97.188 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING...

  9. 40 CFR 96.52 - NOX Allowance Tracking System responsibilities of NOX authorized account representative.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false NOX Allowance Tracking System responsibilities of NOX authorized account representative. 96.52 Section 96.52 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX...

  10. 40 CFR 97.188 - CAIR NOX allowance allocations to CAIR NOX opt-in units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false CAIR NOX allowance allocations to CAIR NOX opt-in units. 97.188 Section 97.188 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING...

  11. 40 CFR 96.188 - CAIR NOX allowance allocations to CAIR NOX opt-in units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false CAIR NOX allowance allocations to CAIR NOX opt-in units. 96.188 Section 96.188 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS...

  12. 40 CFR 52.2237 - NOX RACT and NOX conformity exemption.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) APPROVAL AND PROMULGATION OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS (CONTINUED) Tennessee § 52.2237 NOX RACT and NOX conformity exemption. Approval. EPA is approving the section 182(f) oxides of nitrogen... 40 Protection of Environment 5 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false NOX RACT and NOX conformity...

  13. 40 CFR 96.52 - NOX Allowance Tracking System responsibilities of NOX authorized account representative.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false NOX Allowance Tracking System responsibilities of NOX authorized account representative. 96.52 Section 96.52 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX...

  14. 40 CFR 52.2237 - NOX RACT and NOX conformity exemption.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) APPROVAL AND PROMULGATION OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS (CONTINUED) Tennessee § 52.2237 NOX RACT and NOX conformity exemption. Approval. EPA is approving the section 182(f) oxides of nitrogen... 40 Protection of Environment 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false NOX RACT and NOX conformity...

  15. 40 CFR 97.11 - Alternate NOX authorized account representative.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Alternate NOX authorized account... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS NOX Authorized Account Representative for NOX Budget Sources § 97.11 Alternate NOX authorized...

  16. 40 CFR 97.60 - Submission of NOX allowance transfers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Submission of NOX allowance transfers... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS NOX Allowance Transfers § 97.60 Submission of NOX allowance transfers. The NOX authorized account representatives...

  17. 40 CFR 97.60 - Submission of NOX allowance transfers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Submission of NOX allowance transfers... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS NOX Allowance Transfers § 97.60 Submission of NOX allowance transfers. The NOX authorized account representatives...

  18. 40 CFR 96.60 - Submission of NOX allowance transfers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Submission of NOX allowance transfers... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO 2 TRADING PROGRAMS FOR STATE IMPLEMENTATION PLANS NOX Allowance Transfers § 96.60 Submission of NOX allowance transfers. The NOX...

  19. 40 CFR 97.60 - Submission of NOX allowance transfers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Submission of NOX allowance transfers... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS NOX Allowance Transfers § 97.60 Submission of NOX allowance transfers. The NOX authorized account representatives...

  20. 40 CFR 97.60 - Submission of NOX allowance transfers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Submission of NOX allowance transfers... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS NOX Allowance Transfers § 97.60 Submission of NOX allowance transfers. The NOX authorized account representatives...

  1. 40 CFR 96.60 - Submission of NOX allowance transfers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Submission of NOX allowance transfers... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS FOR STATE IMPLEMENTATION PLANS NOX Allowance Transfers § 96.60 Submission of NOX allowance transfers. The NOX...

  2. 40 CFR 96.60 - Submission of NOX allowance transfers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Submission of NOX allowance transfers... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS FOR STATE IMPLEMENTATION PLANS NOX Allowance Transfers § 96.60 Submission of NOX allowance transfers. The NOX...

  3. 40 CFR 97.11 - Alternate NOX authorized account representative.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Alternate NOX authorized account... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS NOX Authorized Account Representative for NOX Budget Sources § 97.11 Alternate NOX authorized...

  4. 40 CFR 97.11 - Alternate NOX authorized account representative.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Alternate NOX authorized account... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS NOX Authorized Account Representative for NOX Budget Sources § 97.11 Alternate NOX authorized...

  5. 40 CFR 97.11 - Alternate NOX authorized account representative.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Alternate NOX authorized account... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS NOX Authorized Account Representative for NOX Budget Sources § 97.11 Alternate NOX authorized...

  6. 40 CFR 96.60 - Submission of NOX allowance transfers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Submission of NOX allowance transfers... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS FOR STATE IMPLEMENTATION PLANS NOX Allowance Transfers § 96.60 Submission of NOX allowance transfers. The NOX...

  7. 40 CFR 97.53 - Recordation of NOX allowance allocations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) Serial numbers for allocated NO X allowances. When allocating NOX allowances to a NOX Budget unit and... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Recordation of NOX allowance... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS NOX...

  8. 40 CFR 97.60 - Submission of NOX allowance transfers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Submission of NOX allowance transfers... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS NOX Allowance Transfers § 97.60 Submission of NOX allowance transfers. The NOX authorized account representatives...

  9. 40 CFR 97.11 - Alternate NOX authorized account representative.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Alternate NOX authorized account... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS NOX Authorized Account Representative for NOX Budget Sources § 97.11 Alternate NOX authorized...

  10. 40 CFR 96.60 - Submission of NOX allowance transfers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Submission of NOX allowance transfers... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS FOR STATE IMPLEMENTATION PLANS NOX Allowance Transfers § 96.60 Submission of NOX allowance transfers. The NOX...

  11. NOx Control Options and Integration for US Coal Fired Boilers

    SciTech Connect

    Mike Bockelie; Kevin Davis; Temi Linjewile; Connie Senior; Eric Eddings; Kevin Whitty; Larry Baxter; Calvin Bartholomew; William Hecker; Stan Harding

    2003-06-30

    This is the twelfth Quarterly Technical Report for DOE Cooperative Agreement No: DE-FC26-00NT40753. The goal of the project is to develop cost effective analysis tools and techniques for demonstrating and evaluating low NOx control strategies and their possible impact on boiler performance for boilers firing US coals. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) is providing co-funding for this program. This program contains multiple tasks and good progress is being made on all fronts. During this quarter, a new effort was begun on the development of a corrosion management system for minimizing the impacts of low NOx combustion systems on waterwalls; a kickoff meeting was held at the host site, AEP's Gavin Plant, and work commenced on fabrication of the probes. FTIR experiments for SCR catalyst sulfation were finished at BYU and indicated no vanadium/vanadyl sulfate formation at reactor conditions. Improvements on the mass-spectrometer system at BYU have been made and work on the steady state reactor system shakedown neared completion. The slipstream reactor continued to operate at AEP's Rockport plant; at the end of the quarter, the catalysts had been exposed to flue gas for about 1000 hours. Some operational problems were addressed that enable the reactor to run without excessive downtime by the end of the quarter.

  12. Investigation of Mixed Oxide Catalysts for NO Oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Szanyi, Janos; Karim, Ayman M.; Pederson, Larry R.; Kwak, Ja Hun; Mei, Donghai; Tran, Diana N.; Herling, Darrell R.; Muntean, George G.; Peden, Charles HF; Howden, Ken; Qi, Gongshin; Li, Wei

    2014-12-09

    The oxidation of engine-generated NO to NO2 is an important step in the reduction of NOx in lean engine exhaust because NO2 is required for the performance of the LNT technology [2], and it enhances the activities of ammonia selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalysts [1]. In particular, for SCR catalysts an NO:NO2 ratio of 1:1 is most effective for NOx reduction, whereas for LNT catalysts, NO must be oxidized to NO2 before adsorption on the storage components. However, NO2 typically constitutes less than 10% of NOx in lean exhaust, so catalytic oxidation of NO is essential. Platinum has been found to be especially active for NO oxidation, and is widely used in DOC and LNT catalysts. However, because of the high cost and poor thermal durability of Pt-based catalysts, there is substantial interest in the development of alternatives. The objective of this project, in collaboration with partner General Motors, is to develop mixed metal oxide catalysts for NO oxidation, enabling lower precious metal usage in emission control systems. [1] M. Koebel, G. Madia, and M. Elsener, Catalysis Today 73, 239 (2002). [2] C. H. Kim, G. S. Qi, K. Dahlberg, and W. Li, Science 327, 1624 (2010).

  13. Bimetallic Catalysts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sinfelt, John H.

    1985-01-01

    Chemical reaction rates can be controlled by varying composition of miniscule clusters of metal atoms. These bimetallic catalysts have had major impact on petroleum refining, where work has involved heterogeneous catalysis (reacting molecules in a phase separate from catalyst.) Experimentation involving hydrocarbon reactions, catalytic…

  14. Effect of heterogeneous catalyst during combustion of diesel fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arefeen, Quamrul

    1999-11-01

    With the increase in number of vehicles using diesel engines, the contributions to environmental pollution made by diesel engines is also on the rise. Carbon monoxide, oxides of nitrogen and sulfur, hydrocarbons, and particulates are currently regulated as harmful emissions from diesel engines. Recent technologies to control harmful engine emissions have been almost exclusively directed towards gasoline engines. It is generally held that fuel quality will have to play an important role with all IC engines to meet future stringent regulations. The objective of the present study was to determine the effects of heterogeneous catalyst on combustion. Micron sized solid catalyst, suspended in a specific organic peroxide, has been found to promote better combustion by modifying kinetics and changing the thermodynamics of the reactions. The catalyst reduces emissions without dramatically changing the properties of the fuel. The characteristic parameters of a baseline fuel, and the same fuel with the additive, were analyzed. The dosage of additive used was found to be compatible with commercial diesel. Diesel vehicles were driven unloaded at normal road conditions during the experiments. Exhaust emissions were measured when the trucks were at static conditions and the engine running on idle and at 2000 rpm. The gaseous components in the exhaust, O2, CO2, CO, NO, NO2, NOx, SO2, and CxH y were monitored. Particulates were trapped on a pre-weighed glass filter. Some of the filters were sent to an independent laboratory for microscopic and elemental analysis of the collected debris. Zinc oxide/peroxide suspended in tert-butyl hydro peroxide were used as the heterogeneous fuel catalyst. This combination increased the cetane rating of a commercial diesel fuel from 45 to a level of 70 depending on treatment ratio. A treatment ratio of one ounce additive per 5 gallons of diesel increased cetane number by an average of 5 points. Road mileage with the additive increased by an average

  15. Three-Dimensional Composite Nanostructures for Lean NOx Emission Control

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Pu-Xian

    2013-07-31

    This final report to the Department of Energy (DOE) and National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) for DE-EE0000210 covers the period from October 1, 2009 to July 31, 2013. Under this project, DOE awarded UConn about $1,248,242 to conduct the research and development on a new class of 3D composite nanostructure based catalysts for lean NOx emission control. Much of the material presented here has already been submitted to DOE/NETL in quarterly technical reports. In this project, through a scalable solution process, we have successfully fabricated a new class of catalytic reactors, i.e., the composite nanostructure array (nano-array) based catalytic converters. These nanocatalysts, distinct from traditional powder washcoat based catalytic converters, directly integrate monolithic substrates together with nanostructures with well-defined size and shape during the scalable hydrothermal process. The new monolithic nanocatalysts are demonstrated to be able to save raw materials including Pt-group metals and support metal oxides by an order of magnitude, while perform well at various oxidation (e.g., CO oxidation and NO oxidation) and reduction reactions (H{sub 2} reduction of NOx) involved in the lean NOx emissions. The size, shape and arrangement of the composite nanostructures within the monolithic substrates are found to be the key in enabling the drastically reduced materials usage while maintaining the good catalytic reactivity in the enabled devices. The further understanding of the reaction kinetics associated with the unique mass transport and surface chemistry behind is needed for further optimizing the design and fabrication of good nanostructure array based catalytic converters. On the other hand, the high temperature stability, hydrothermal aging stability, as well as S-poisoning resistance have been investigated in this project on the nanocatalysts, which revealed promising results toward good chemical and mechanical robustness, as well as S

  16. Trapped antihydrogen.

    PubMed

    Andresen, G B; Ashkezari, M D; Baquero-Ruiz, M; Bertsche, W; Bowe, P D; Butler, E; Cesar, C L; Chapman, S; Charlton, M; Deller, A; Eriksson, S; Fajans, J; Friesen, T; Fujiwara, M C; Gill, D R; Gutierrez, A; Hangst, J S; Hardy, W N; Hayden, M E; Humphries, A J; Hydomako, R; Jenkins, M J; Jonsell, S; Jørgensen, L V; Kurchaninov, L; Madsen, N; Menary, S; Nolan, P; Olchanski, K; Olin, A; Povilus, A; Pusa, P; Robicheaux, F; Sarid, E; el Nasr, S Seif; Silveira, D M; So, C; Storey, J W; Thompson, R I; van der Werf, D P; Wurtele, J S; Yamazaki, Y

    2010-12-01

    Antimatter was first predicted in 1931, by Dirac. Work with high-energy antiparticles is now commonplace, and anti-electrons are used regularly in the medical technique of positron emission tomography scanning. Antihydrogen, the bound state of an antiproton and a positron, has been produced at low energies at CERN (the European Organization for Nuclear Research) since 2002. Antihydrogen is of interest for use in a precision test of nature's fundamental symmetries. The charge conjugation/parity/time reversal (CPT) theorem, a crucial part of the foundation of the standard model of elementary particles and interactions, demands that hydrogen and antihydrogen have the same spectrum. Given the current experimental precision of measurements on the hydrogen atom (about two parts in 10(14) for the frequency of the 1s-to-2s transition), subjecting antihydrogen to rigorous spectroscopic examination would constitute a compelling, model-independent test of CPT. Antihydrogen could also be used to study the gravitational behaviour of antimatter. However, so far experiments have produced antihydrogen that is not confined, precluding detailed study of its structure. Here we demonstrate trapping of antihydrogen atoms. From the interaction of about 10(7) antiprotons and 7 × 10(8) positrons, we observed 38 annihilation events consistent with the controlled release of trapped antihydrogen from our magnetic trap; the measured background is 1.4 ± 1.4 events. This result opens the door to precision measurements on anti-atoms, which can soon be subjected to the same techniques as developed for hydrogen. PMID:21085118

  17. Trapped antihydrogen.

    PubMed

    Andresen, G B; Ashkezari, M D; Baquero-Ruiz, M; Bertsche, W; Bowe, P D; Butler, E; Cesar, C L; Chapman, S; Charlton, M; Deller, A; Eriksson, S; Fajans, J; Friesen, T; Fujiwara, M C; Gill, D R; Gutierrez, A; Hangst, J S; Hardy, W N; Hayden, M E; Humphries, A J; Hydomako, R; Jenkins, M J; Jonsell, S; Jørgensen, L V; Kurchaninov, L; Madsen, N; Menary, S; Nolan, P; Olchanski, K; Olin, A; Povilus, A; Pusa, P; Robicheaux, F; Sarid, E; el Nasr, S Seif; Silveira, D M; So, C; Storey, J W; Thompson, R I; van der Werf, D P; Wurtele, J S; Yamazaki, Y

    2010-12-01

    Antimatter was first predicted in 1931, by Dirac. Work with high-energy antiparticles is now commonplace, and anti-electrons are used regularly in the medical technique of positron emission tomography scanning. Antihydrogen, the bound state of an antiproton and a positron, has been produced at low energies at CERN (the European Organization for Nuclear Research) since 2002. Antihydrogen is of interest for use in a precision test of nature's fundamental symmetries. The charge conjugation/parity/time reversal (CPT) theorem, a crucial part of the foundation of the standard model of elementary particles and interactions, demands that hydrogen and antihydrogen have the same spectrum. Given the current experimental precision of measurements on the hydrogen atom (about two parts in 10(14) for the frequency of the 1s-to-2s transition), subjecting antihydrogen to rigorous spectroscopic examination would constitute a compelling, model-independent test of CPT. Antihydrogen could also be used to study the gravitational behaviour of antimatter. However, so far experiments have produced antihydrogen that is not confined, precluding detailed study of its structure. Here we demonstrate trapping of antihydrogen atoms. From the interaction of about 10(7) antiprotons and 7 × 10(8) positrons, we observed 38 annihilation events consistent with the controlled release of trapped antihydrogen from our magnetic trap; the measured background is 1.4 ± 1.4 events. This result opens the door to precision measurements on anti-atoms, which can soon be subjected to the same techniques as developed for hydrogen.

  18. Method And Apparatus For Regenerating Nox Adsorbers

    DOEpatents

    Driscoll, J. Joshua; Endicott, Dennis L.; Faulkner, Stephen A.; Verkiel, Maarten

    2006-03-28

    Methods and apparatuses for regenerating a NOx adsorber coupled with an exhaust of an engine. An actuator drives a throttle valve to a first position when regeneration of the NOx adsorber is desired. The first position is a position that causes the regeneration of the NOx adsorber. An actuator drives the throttle valve to a second position while regeneration of the NOx adsorber is still desired. The second position being a position that is more open than the first position and operable to regenerate a NOx adsorber.

  19. Modified chemiluminescent NO analyzer accurately measures NOX

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Summers, R. L.

    1978-01-01

    Installation of molybdenum nitric oxide (NO)-to-higher oxides of nitrogen (NOx) converter in chemiluminescent gas analyzer and use of air purge allow accurate measurements of NOx in exhaust gases containing as much as thirty percent carbon monoxide (CO). Measurements using conventional analyzer are highly inaccurate for NOx if as little as five percent CO is present. In modified analyzer, molybdenum has high tolerance to CO, and air purge substantially quenches NOx destruction. In test, modified chemiluminescent analyzer accurately measured NO and NOx concentrations for over 4 months with no denegration in performance.

  20. Oxyhydrochlorination catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Taylor, Charles E.; Noceti, Richard P.

    1992-01-01

    An improved catalyst and method for the oxyhydrochlorination of methane is disclosed. The catalyst includes a pyrogenic porous support on which is layered as active material, cobalt chloride in major proportion, and minor proportions of an alkali metal chloride and of a rare earth chloride. On contact of the catalyst with a gas flow of methane, HCl and oxygen, more than 60% of the methane is converted and of that converted more than 40% occurs as monochloromethane. Advantageously, the monochloromethane can be used to produce gasoline boiling range hydrocarbons with the recycle of HCl for further reaction. This catalyst is also of value for the production of formic acid as are analogous catalysts with lead, silver or nickel chlorides substituted for the cobalt chloride.

  1. VACUUM TRAP

    DOEpatents

    Gordon, H.S.

    1959-09-15

    An improved adsorption vacuum trap for use in vacuum systems was designed. The distinguishing feature is the placement of a plurality of torsionally deformed metallic fins within a vacuum jacket extending from the walls to the central axis so that substantially all gas molecules pass through the jacket will impinge upon the fin surfaces. T fins are heated by direct metallic conduction, thereby ol taining a uniform temperature at the adeorbing surfaces so that essentially all of the condensible impurities from the evacuating gas are removed from the vacuum system.

  2. COLD TRAP

    DOEpatents

    Milleron, N.

    1963-03-12

    An improved linear-flow cold trap is designed for highvacuum applications such as mitigating back migration of diffusion pump oil moiecules. A central pot of liquid nitrogen is nested within and supported by a surrounding, vertical, helical coil of metai sheet, all enveloped by a larger, upright, cylindrical, vacuum vessel. The vertical interstices between successive turns of the coil afford lineal, axial, high-vacuum passages between open mouths at top and bottom of said vessel, while the coil, being cold by virtue of thermal contact of its innermost turn with the nitrogen pot, affords expansive proximate condensation surfaces. (AEC)

  3. Controlling NOx emission from industrial sources

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, R.K.; Nueffer, W.; Grano, D.; Khan, S.; Staudt, J.E.; Jozewicz, W.

    2005-07-01

    A number of regulatory actions focused on reducing NOx emissions from stationary combustion sources have been taken in the United States in the last decade. These actions include the Acid Rain NOx regulations, the Ozone Transport Commission's NOx Budget Program, and the NOx SIP Call rulemakings. In addition to these regulations, the recent Interstate Air Quality Rulemaking proposal and other bills in the Congress are focusing on additional reductions of NOx. Industrial combustion sources accounted for about 18016 of NOx emissions in the United States in 2000 and constituted the second largest emitting source category within stationary sources, only behind electric utility sources. Based on these data, reduction of NOx emissions from industrial combustion sources is an important consideration in efforts undertaken to address the environmental concerns associated with NOx. This paper discusses primary and secondary NOx control technologies applicable to various major categories of industrial sources. The sources considered in this paper include large boilers, furnaces and fired heaters, combustion turbines, large IC engines, and cement kilns. For each source category considered in this paper, primary NOx controls are discussed first, followed by a discussion of secondary NOx controls.

  4. PHOTOCATALYTIC OXIDATION FOR NOx ABATEMENT: DEVELOPMENT OF A KINETIC EXPRESSION AND DESIGN TOOLS

    SciTech Connect

    Rajiv Srivastava; M. A. Ebadian

    2000-09-15

    The ''Nitrogen Oxides Emission Reduction Program'' and ''Ozone Non-Attainment Program'' in the 1990 Clean Air Act provide guidelines for controlling NOx (NO and NO{sub 2}) emissions in new and existing stationary sources. NOx emissions have local (air quality), regional (acid rain), and global (ozone production) consequences. This study aids in developing the photocatalyst technology that has potential for use in abatement of NOx. The objective of the proposed project is to apply the principles of chemical engineering fundamentals--reaction kinetics, transport phenomena and thermodynamics--in the process design for a system that will utilize a photocatalytic reactor to oxidize NOx to nitric acid (HNO{sub 3}). HNO{sub 3} can be more easily trapped than NOx on adsorbent surfaces or in water. The project dealt with the engineering aspect of the gas-solid heterogeneous oxidation of NOx. The experiments were conducted in a photocatalyst wash-coated glass flow tube reactor. A mathematical model was developed based on a rigorous description of the physical and chemical processes occurring in the reactor. The mathematical model took into account (1) intrinsic reaction kinetics (i.e., true reaction rates), (2) transport phenomena that deal with the mass transfer effects in the reactor, and (3) the geometry of the reactor. The experimental results were used for validation of the mathematical model that provides the basis for a versatile and reliable method for the purpose of design, scale-up and process control. The NOx abatement was successfully carried out in a flow tube reactor surrounded by black lights under the exploratory grant. Due to lack of funds, a comprehensive kinetic analysis for the photocatalytic reaction scheme could not be carried out. The initial experiments look very promising for use of photocatalysis for NOx abatement.

  5. Excellent activity and selectivity of Cu-SSZ-13 in the selective catalytic reduction of NOx with NH3

    SciTech Connect

    Kwak, Ja Hun; Tonkyn, Russell G.; Kim, Do Heui; Szanyi, Janos; Peden, Charles HF

    2010-10-21

    Superior activity and selectivity of a Cu ion-exchanged SSZ-13 zeolite in the selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NOx with NH3 were observed, in comparison to Cu-beta and Cu-ZSM-5 zeolites. Cu-SSZ-13 was not only more active in the NOx SCR reaction over the entire temperature range studied (up to 550 °C), but also more selective toward nitrogen formation, resulting in significantly lower amounts of NOx by-products (i.e., NO2 and N2O) than the other two zeolites. In addition, Cu-SSZ-13 demonstrated the highest activity and N2 formation selectivity in the oxidation of NH3. The results of this study strongly suggest that Cu-SSZ-13 is a promising candidate as a catalyst for NOx SCR with great potential in after-treatment systems for either mobile or stationary sources.

  6. Recent Developments of Electrochemical Promotion of Catalysis in the Techniques of DeNOx

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Xiaolong; Yi, Honghong; Chen, Chen; Wang, Chuan

    2013-01-01

    Electrochemical promotion of catalysis reactions (EPOC) is one of the most significant discoveries in the field of catalytic and environmental protection. The work presented in this paper focuses on the aspects of reaction mechanism, influencing factors, and recent positive results. It has been shown with more than 80 different catalytic systems that the catalytic activity and selectivity of conductive catalysts deposited on solid electrolytes can be altered in the last 30 years. The active ingredient of catalyst can be activated by applying constant voltage or constant current to the catalysts/electrolyte interface. The effect of EPOC can improve greatly the conversion rate of NOx. And it can also improve the lifetime of catalyst by inhibiting its poisoning. PMID:23970835

  7. NOx Control Options and Integration for US Coal Fired Boilers

    SciTech Connect

    Mike Bockelie; Kevin Davis; Temi Linjewile; Connie Senior; Eric Eddings; Kevin Whitty; Larry Baxter; Calvin Bartholomew; William Hecker; Stan Harding; Robert Hurt

    2003-12-31

    This is the fourteenth Quarterly Technical Report for DOE Cooperative Agreement No: DEFC26-00NT40753. The goal of the project is to develop cost effective analysis tools and techniques for demonstrating and evaluating low NOx control strategies and their possible impact on boiler performance for boilers firing US coals. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) is providing co-funding for this program. Using the initial CFD baseline modeling of the Gavin Station and the plant corrosion maps, six boiler locations for the corrosion probes were identified and access ports have been installed. Preliminary corrosion data obtained appear consistent and believable. In situ, spectroscopic experiments at BYU reported in part last quarter were completed. New reactor tubes have been made for BYU's CCR that allow for testing smaller amounts of catalyst and thus increasing space velocity; monolith catalysts have been cut and a small reactor that can accommodate these pieces for testing is in its final stages of construction. A poisoning study on Ca-poisoned catalysts was begun this quarter. A possible site for a biomass co-firing test of the slipstream reactor was visited this quarter. The slipstream reactor at Rockport required repair and refurbishment, and will be re-started in the next quarter. This report describes the final results of an experimental project at Brown University on the fundamentals of ammonia / fly ash interactions with relevance to the operation of advanced NOx control technologies such as selective catalytic reduction. The Brown task focused on the measurement of ammonia adsorption isotherms on commercial fly ash samples subjected to a variety of treatments and on the chemistry of dry and semi-dry ammonia removal processes.

  8. Nox regulation of smooth muscle contraction.

    PubMed

    Ritsick, Darren R; Edens, William A; Finnerty, Victoria; Lambeth, J David

    2007-07-01

    The catalytic subunit gp91phox (Nox2) of the NADPH oxidase of mammalian phagocytes is activated by microbes and immune mediators to produce large amounts of reactive oxygen species (ROS) which participate in microbial killing. Homologs of gp91phox, the Nox and Duox enzymes, were recently described in a range of organisms, including plants, vertebrates, and invertebrates such as Drosophila melanogaster. While their enzymology and cell biology are being extensively studied in many laboratories, little is known about in vivo functions of Noxes. Here, we establish and use an inducible system for RNAi to discover functions of dNox, an ortholog of human Nox5 in Drosophila. We report here that depletion of dNox in musculature causes retention of mature eggs within ovaries, leading to female sterility. In dNox-depleted ovaries and ovaries treated with a Nox inhibitor, muscular contractions induced by the neuropeptide proctolin are markedly inhibited. This functional defect results from a requirement for dNox-for the proctolin-induced calcium flux in Drosophila ovaries. Thus, these studies demonstrate a novel biological role for Nox-generated ROS in mediating agonist-induced calcium flux and smooth muscle contraction.

  9. Photo-oxidation catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Pitts, J. Roland; Liu, Ping; Smith, R. Davis

    2009-07-14

    Photo-oxidation catalysts and methods for cleaning a metal-based catalyst are disclosed. An exemplary catalyst system implementing a photo-oxidation catalyst may comprise a metal-based catalyst, and a photo-oxidation catalyst for cleaning the metal-based catalyst in the presence of light. The exposure to light enables the photo-oxidation catalyst to substantially oxidize absorbed contaminants and reduce accumulation of the contaminants on the metal-based catalyst. Applications are also disclosed.

  10. New operation strategy for driving the selectivity of NOx reduction to N2, NH3 or N2O during lean/rich cycling of a lean NOx trap catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Mráček, David; Koci, Petr; Choi, Jae -Soon; Partridge, Jr., William P.

    2015-09-08

    Periodical regeneration of NOx storage catalyst (also known as lean NOx trap) by short rich pulses of CO, H2 and hydrocarbons is necessary for the reduction of nitrogen oxides adsorbed on the catalyst surface. Ideally, the stored NOx is converted into N2, but N2O and NH3 by-products can be formed as well, particularly at low-intermediate temperatures. The N2 and N2O products are formed concurrently in two peaks. The primary peaks appear immediately after the rich-phase inception, and tail off with the breakthrough of the reductant front accompanied by NH3 product. In addition, the secondary N2 and N2O peaks then appear at the rich-to-lean transition as a result of reactions between surface-deposited reductants/intermediates (CO, HC, NH3, — NCO) and residual stored NOx under increasingly lean conditions.

  11. Ammonia Generation over TWC for Passive SCR NOX Control for Lean Gasoline Engines

    SciTech Connect

    Prikhodko, Vitaly Y; Parks, II, James E; Pihl, Josh A; Toops, Todd J

    2014-01-01

    A commercial three-way catalyst (TWC) was evaluated for ammonia (NH3) generation on a 2.0-liter BMW lean burn gasoline direct injection engine as a component in a passive ammonia selective catalytic reduction (SCR) system. The passive NH3 SCR system is a potential low cost approach for controlling nitrogen oxides (NOX) emissions from lean burn gasoline engines. In this system, NH3 is generated over a close-coupled TWC during periodic slightly rich engine operation and subsequently stored on an underfloor SCR catalyst. Upon switching to lean, NOX passes through the TWC and is reduced by the stored NH3 on the SCR catalyst. NH3 generation was evaluated at different air-fuel equivalence ratios at multiple engine speed and load conditions. Near complete conversion of NOX to NH3 was achieved at =0.96 for nearly all conditions studied. At the =0.96 condition, HC emissions were relatively minimal, but CO emissions were significant. Operation at AFRs richer than =0.96 did not provide more NH3 yield and led to higher HC and CO emissions. Results of the reductant conversion and consumption processes were used to calculate a representative fuel consumption of the engine operating with an ideal passive SCR system. The results show a 1-7% fuel economy benefit at various steady-state engine speed and load points relative to a stoichiometric engine operation.

  12. 40 CFR 97.53 - Recordation of NOX allowance allocations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Recordation of NOX allowance... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS NOX Allowance Tracking System § 97.53 Recordation of NOX allowance allocations. (a) The Administrator will record the...

  13. 40 CFR 97.50 - NOX Allowance Tracking System accounts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false NOX Allowance Tracking System accounts... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS NOX Allowance Tracking System § 97.50 NOX Allowance Tracking System accounts. (a) Nature and function of...

  14. 40 CFR 96.25 - NOX Budget permit revisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false NOX Budget permit revisions. 96.25... (CONTINUED) NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS FOR STATE IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Permits § 96.25 NOX Budget permit revisions. (a) For a NOX Budget source with a title V operating...

  15. 40 CFR 96.11 - Alternate NOX authorized account representative.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Alternate NOX authorized account... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO 2 TRADING PROGRAMS FOR STATE IMPLEMENTATION PLANS NOX Authorized Account Representative for NOX Budget Sources § 96.11 Alternate...

  16. 40 CFR 97.53 - Recordation of NOX allowance allocations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Recordation of NOX allowance... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS NOX Allowance Tracking System § 97.53 Recordation of NOX allowance allocations. (a) The Administrator will record the...

  17. 40 CFR 97.142 - CAIR NOX allowance allocations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false CAIR NOX allowance allocations. 97.142... (CONTINUED) FEDERAL NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS CAIR NOX Allowance Allocations § 97.142 CAIR NOX allowance allocations. (a)(1) The baseline heat input (in mmBtu) used...

  18. 40 CFR 96.50 - NOX Allowance Tracking System accounts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false NOX Allowance Tracking System accounts... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO 2 TRADING PROGRAMS FOR STATE IMPLEMENTATION PLANS NOX Allowance Tracking System § 96.50 NOX Allowance Tracking System accounts. (a) Nature...

  19. 40 CFR 96.42 - NOX allowance allocations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false NOX allowance allocations. 96.42... (CONTINUED) NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS FOR STATE IMPLEMENTATION PLANS NOX Allowance Allocations § 96.42 NOX allowance allocations. (a)(1) The heat input (in mmBtu) used...

  20. 40 CFR 97.42 - NOX allowance allocations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false NOX allowance allocations. 97.42... (CONTINUED) FEDERAL NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS NOX Allowance Allocations § 97.42 NOX allowance allocations. (a)(1) The heat input (in mmBtu) used for calculating...

  1. 40 CFR 97.23 - NOX Budget permit contents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false NOX Budget permit contents. 97.23... (CONTINUED) FEDERAL NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS Permits § 97.23 NOX Budget permit contents. (a) Each NOX Budget permit will contain, in a format prescribed by the...

  2. 40 CFR 96.11 - Alternate NOX authorized account representative.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Alternate NOX authorized account... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS FOR STATE IMPLEMENTATION PLANS NOX Authorized Account Representative for NOX Budget Sources § 96.11 Alternate...

  3. 40 CFR 96.11 - Alternate NOX authorized account representative.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Alternate NOX authorized account... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS FOR STATE IMPLEMENTATION PLANS NOX Authorized Account Representative for NOX Budget Sources § 96.11 Alternate...

  4. 40 CFR 96.11 - Alternate NOX authorized account representative.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Alternate NOX authorized account... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS FOR STATE IMPLEMENTATION PLANS NOX Authorized Account Representative for NOX Budget Sources § 96.11 Alternate...

  5. 40 CFR 96.53 - Recordation of NOX allowance allocations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Recordation of NOX allowance... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS FOR STATE IMPLEMENTATION PLANS NOX Allowance Tracking System § 96.53 Recordation of NOX allowance allocations. (a)...

  6. 40 CFR 97.24 - NOX Budget permit revisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false NOX Budget permit revisions. 97.24... (CONTINUED) FEDERAL NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS Permits § 97.24 NOX Budget permit revisions. (a) For a NOX Budget source with a title V operating permit, except as...

  7. 40 CFR 96.53 - Recordation of NOX allowance allocations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Recordation of NOX allowance... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS FOR STATE IMPLEMENTATION PLANS NOX Allowance Tracking System § 96.53 Recordation of NOX allowance allocations. (a)...

  8. 40 CFR 96.50 - NOX Allowance Tracking System accounts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false NOX Allowance Tracking System accounts... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS FOR STATE IMPLEMENTATION PLANS NOX Allowance Tracking System § 96.50 NOX Allowance Tracking System accounts. (a) Nature...

  9. 40 CFR 96.23 - NOX Budget permit contents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false NOX Budget permit contents. 96.23... (CONTINUED) NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS FOR STATE IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Permits § 96.23 NOX Budget permit contents. (a) Each NOX Budget permit (including any draft or...

  10. 40 CFR 96.50 - NOX Allowance Tracking System accounts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false NOX Allowance Tracking System accounts... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS FOR STATE IMPLEMENTATION PLANS NOX Allowance Tracking System § 96.50 NOX Allowance Tracking System accounts. (a) Nature...

  11. 40 CFR 97.53 - Recordation of NOX allowance allocations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Recordation of NOX allowance... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS NOX Allowance Tracking System § 97.53 Recordation of NOX allowance allocations. (a) The Administrator will record the...

  12. 40 CFR 97.50 - NOX Allowance Tracking System accounts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false NOX Allowance Tracking System accounts... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS NOX Allowance Tracking System § 97.50 NOX Allowance Tracking System accounts. (a) Nature and function of...

  13. 40 CFR 97.53 - Recordation of NOX allowance allocations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Recordation of NOX allowance... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS NOX Allowance Tracking System § 97.53 Recordation of NOX allowance allocations. (a) The Administrator will record the...

  14. 40 CFR 96.50 - NOX Allowance Tracking System accounts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false NOX Allowance Tracking System accounts... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS FOR STATE IMPLEMENTATION PLANS NOX Allowance Tracking System § 96.50 NOX Allowance Tracking System accounts. (a) Nature...

  15. 40 CFR 96.142 - CAIR NOX allowance allocations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false CAIR NOX allowance allocations. 96.142... (CONTINUED) NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS FOR STATE IMPLEMENTATION PLANS CAIR NOX Allowance Allocations § 96.142 CAIR NOX allowance allocations. (a)(1) The baseline heat...

  16. 40 CFR 97.50 - NOX Allowance Tracking System accounts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false NOX Allowance Tracking System accounts... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS NOX Allowance Tracking System § 97.50 NOX Allowance Tracking System accounts. (a) Nature and function of...

  17. 40 CFR 97.50 - NOX Allowance Tracking System accounts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false NOX Allowance Tracking System accounts... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS NOX Allowance Tracking System § 97.50 NOX Allowance Tracking System accounts. (a) Nature and function of...

  18. 40 CFR 97.142 - CAIR NOX allowance allocations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false CAIR NOX allowance allocations. 97.142... (CONTINUED) FEDERAL NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS CAIR NOX Allowance Allocations § 97.142 CAIR NOX allowance allocations. (a)(1) The baseline heat input (in mmBtu) used...

  19. 40 CFR 96.42 - NOX allowance allocations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false NOX allowance allocations. 96.42... (CONTINUED) NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS FOR STATE IMPLEMENTATION PLANS NOX Allowance Allocations § 96.42 NOX allowance allocations. (a)(1) The heat input (in mmBtu) used...

  20. 40 CFR 96.42 - NOX allowance allocations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false NOX allowance allocations. 96.42... (CONTINUED) NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS FOR STATE IMPLEMENTATION PLANS NOX Allowance Allocations § 96.42 NOX allowance allocations. (a)(1) The heat input (in mmBtu) used...

  1. 40 CFR 97.24 - NOX Budget permit revisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false NOX Budget permit revisions. 97.24... (CONTINUED) FEDERAL NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS Permits § 97.24 NOX Budget permit revisions. (a) For a NOX Budget source with a title V operating permit, except as...

  2. 40 CFR 97.42 - NOX allowance allocations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false NOX allowance allocations. 97.42... (CONTINUED) FEDERAL NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS NOX Allowance Allocations § 97.42 NOX allowance allocations. (a)(1) The heat input (in mmBtu) used for calculating...

  3. 40 CFR 96.23 - NOX Budget permit contents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false NOX Budget permit contents. 96.23... (CONTINUED) NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS FOR STATE IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Permits § 96.23 NOX Budget permit contents. (a) Each NOX Budget permit (including any draft or...

  4. 40 CFR 96.23 - NOX Budget permit contents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false NOX Budget permit contents. 96.23... (CONTINUED) NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO 2 TRADING PROGRAMS FOR STATE IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Permits § 96.23 NOX Budget permit contents. (a) Each NOX Budget permit (including any draft or...

  5. 40 CFR 97.42 - NOX allowance allocations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false NOX allowance allocations. 97.42... (CONTINUED) FEDERAL NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS NOX Allowance Allocations § 97.42 NOX allowance allocations. (a)(1) The heat input (in mmBtu) used for calculating...

  6. 40 CFR 97.24 - NOX Budget permit revisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false NOX Budget permit revisions. 97.24... (CONTINUED) FEDERAL NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS Permits § 97.24 NOX Budget permit revisions. (a) For a NOX Budget source with a title V operating permit, except as...

  7. 40 CFR 96.42 - NOX allowance allocations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false NOX allowance allocations. 96.42... (CONTINUED) NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS FOR STATE IMPLEMENTATION PLANS NOX Allowance Allocations § 96.42 NOX allowance allocations. (a)(1) The heat input (in mmBtu) used...

  8. 40 CFR 96.42 - NOX allowance allocations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false NOX allowance allocations. 96.42... (CONTINUED) NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO 2 TRADING PROGRAMS FOR STATE IMPLEMENTATION PLANS NOX Allowance Allocations § 96.42 NOX allowance allocations. (a)(1) The heat input (in mmBtu) used...

  9. 40 CFR 96.23 - NOX Budget permit contents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false NOX Budget permit contents. 96.23... (CONTINUED) NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS FOR STATE IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Permits § 96.23 NOX Budget permit contents. (a) Each NOX Budget permit (including any draft or...

  10. 40 CFR 96.25 - NOX Budget permit revisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false NOX Budget permit revisions. 96.25... (CONTINUED) NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO 2 TRADING PROGRAMS FOR STATE IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Permits § 96.25 NOX Budget permit revisions. (a) For a NOX Budget source with a title V operating...

  11. 40 CFR 96.11 - Alternate NOX authorized account representative.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Alternate NOX authorized account... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS FOR STATE IMPLEMENTATION PLANS NOX Authorized Account Representative for NOX Budget Sources § 96.11 Alternate...

  12. 40 CFR 96.25 - NOX Budget permit revisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false NOX Budget permit revisions. 96.25... (CONTINUED) NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS FOR STATE IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Permits § 96.25 NOX Budget permit revisions. (a) For a NOX Budget source with a title V operating...

  13. 40 CFR 96.50 - NOX Allowance Tracking System accounts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false NOX Allowance Tracking System accounts... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS FOR STATE IMPLEMENTATION PLANS NOX Allowance Tracking System § 96.50 NOX Allowance Tracking System accounts. (a) Nature...

  14. 40 CFR 97.23 - NOX Budget permit contents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false NOX Budget permit contents. 97.23... (CONTINUED) FEDERAL NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS Permits § 97.23 NOX Budget permit contents. (a) Each NOX Budget permit will contain, in a format prescribed by the...

  15. 40 CFR 96.25 - NOX Budget permit revisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false NOX Budget permit revisions. 96.25... (CONTINUED) NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS FOR STATE IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Permits § 96.25 NOX Budget permit revisions. (a) For a NOX Budget source with a title V operating...

  16. 40 CFR 96.142 - CAIR NOX allowance allocations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false CAIR NOX allowance allocations. 96.142... (CONTINUED) NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS FOR STATE IMPLEMENTATION PLANS CAIR NOX Allowance Allocations § 96.142 CAIR NOX allowance allocations. (a)(1) The baseline heat...

  17. 40 CFR 97.42 - NOX allowance allocations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false NOX allowance allocations. 97.42... (CONTINUED) FEDERAL NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS NOX Allowance Allocations § 97.42 NOX allowance allocations. (a)(1) The heat input (in mmBtu) used for calculating...

  18. 40 CFR 96.25 - NOX Budget permit revisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false NOX Budget permit revisions. 96.25... (CONTINUED) NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS FOR STATE IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Permits § 96.25 NOX Budget permit revisions. (a) For a NOX Budget source with a title V operating...

  19. 40 CFR 97.50 - NOX Allowance Tracking System accounts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false NOX Allowance Tracking System accounts... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS NOX Allowance Tracking System § 97.50 NOX Allowance Tracking System accounts. (a) Nature and function of...

  20. 40 CFR 97.24 - NOX Budget permit revisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false NOX Budget permit revisions. 97.24... (CONTINUED) FEDERAL NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS Permits § 97.24 NOX Budget permit revisions. (a) For a NOX Budget source with a title V operating permit, except as...

  1. 40 CFR 97.23 - NOX Budget permit contents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false NOX Budget permit contents. 97.23... (CONTINUED) FEDERAL NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS Permits § 97.23 NOX Budget permit contents. (a) Each NOX Budget permit will contain, in a format prescribed by the...

  2. 40 CFR 97.388 - CAIR NOX Ozone Season allowance allocations to CAIR NOX Ozone Season opt-in units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false CAIR NOX Ozone Season allowance allocations to CAIR NOX Ozone Season opt-in units. 97.388 Section 97.388 Protection of Environment... NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS CAIR NOX Ozone Season Opt-in Units § 97.388 CAIR NOX Ozone...

  3. 40 CFR 97.388 - CAIR NOX Ozone Season allowance allocations to CAIR NOX Ozone Season opt-in units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false CAIR NOX Ozone Season allowance allocations to CAIR NOX Ozone Season opt-in units. 97.388 Section 97.388 Protection of Environment... NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS CAIR NOX Ozone Season Opt-in Units § 97.388 CAIR NOX Ozone...

  4. 40 CFR 97.388 - CAIR NOX Ozone Season allowance allocations to CAIR NOX Ozone Season opt-in units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false CAIR NOX Ozone Season allowance allocations to CAIR NOX Ozone Season opt-in units. 97.388 Section 97.388 Protection of Environment... NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS CAIR NOX Ozone Season Opt-in Units § 97.388 CAIR NOX Ozone...

  5. 40 CFR 97.388 - CAIR NOX Ozone Season allowance allocations to CAIR NOX Ozone Season opt-in units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false CAIR NOX Ozone Season allowance allocations to CAIR NOX Ozone Season opt-in units. 97.388 Section 97.388 Protection of Environment... NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS CAIR NOX Ozone Season Opt-in Units § 97.388 CAIR NOX Ozone...

  6. 40 CFR 97.388 - CAIR NOX Ozone Season allowance allocations to CAIR NOX Ozone Season opt-in units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false CAIR NOX Ozone Season allowance allocations to CAIR NOX Ozone Season opt-in units. 97.388 Section 97.388 Protection of Environment... NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS CAIR NOX Ozone Season Opt-in Units § 97.388 CAIR NOX Ozone...

  7. Ammonia-Free NOx Control System

    SciTech Connect

    Song Wu; Zhen Fan; Andrew H. Seltzer; Richard G. Herman

    2005-03-31

    Research is being conducted under United States Department of Energy (DOE) Contract DE-FC26-03NT41865 to develop a new technology to achieve very low levels of NOx emissions from pulverized coal fired boiler systems by employing a novel system level integration between the PC combustion process and the catalytic NOx reduction with CO present in the combustion flue gas. The combustor design and operating conditions will be optimized to achieve atypical flue gas conditions. This approach will not only suppress NOx generation during combustion but also further reduce NOx over a downstream catalytic reactor that does not require addition of an external reductant, such as ammonia.

  8. NOx control buys to peak in `98

    SciTech Connect

    McIlvaine, R.W.

    1995-10-01

    Titles I and IV of the Clean Air Act provide the legislative framework for a huge NOx reduction program now in operation. This reduction will have a substantial effect in reducing ground-level ozone. A new McIlvaine report concludes that US utilities and industrial companies during the next 10 years will spend more than $800 million annually to meet CAA`s NOx-control regulations. Much of that investment will be for low-NOx burners, which minimize NOx formation. Many utilities and industrial boilers can be retrofitted with a new generation of burners; however, this technology achieves less than 50% NOx reduction. Post-combustion technologies, such as selective catalytic reduction and selective noncatalytic reduction, can reduce NOx as much as 90%. Therefore, plants needing greater NOx reduction will use post-combustion technologies, often in combination with low-NOx burners. The peak order year for NOx-control equipment will be 1998, primarily because Title IV of CAA requires utilities to comply by 2000. Many industrial sources also will be ordering equipment in 1998.

  9. Ammonia-Free NOx Control System

    SciTech Connect

    Song Wu; Zhen Fan; Andrew H. Seltzer

    2005-06-30

    Research is being conducted under United States Department of Energy (DOE) Contract DEFC26-03NT41865 to develop a new technology to achieve very low levels of NOx emissions from pulverized coal fired boiler systems by employing a novel system level integration between the PC combustion process and the catalytic NOx reduction with CO present in the combustion flue gas. The combustor design and operating conditions will be optimized to achieve atypical flue gas conditions. This approach will not only suppress NOx generation during combustion but also further reduce NOx over a downstream catalytic reactor that does not require addition of an external reductant, such as ammonia.

  10. 40 CFR 97.52 - NOX Allowance Tracking System responsibilities of NOX authorized account representative.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false NOX Allowance Tracking System responsibilities of NOX authorized account representative. 97.52 Section 97.52 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND...

  11. 40 CFR 97.52 - NOX Allowance Tracking System responsibilities of NOX authorized account representative.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false NOX Allowance Tracking System responsibilities of NOX authorized account representative. 97.52 Section 97.52 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND...

  12. 40 CFR 97.52 - NOX Allowance Tracking System responsibilities of NOX authorized account representative.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false NOX Allowance Tracking System responsibilities of NOX authorized account representative. 97.52 Section 97.52 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND...

  13. 40 CFR 97.52 - NOX Allowance Tracking System responsibilities of NOX authorized account representative.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false NOX Allowance Tracking System responsibilities of NOX authorized account representative. 97.52 Section 97.52 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND...

  14. 40 CFR 97.12 - Changing NOX authorized account representative and alternate NOX authorized account...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Section 97.12 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS NOX Authorized Account... authorized account representative; changes in owners and operators. (a) Changing NO X authorized...

  15. 40 CFR 97.52 - NOX Allowance Tracking System responsibilities of NOX authorized account representative.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false NOX Allowance Tracking System responsibilities of NOX authorized account representative. 97.52 Section 97.52 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND...

  16. High-Potential Electrocatalytic O2 Reduction with Nitroxyl/NOx Mediators: Implications for Fuel Cells and Aerobic Oxidation Catalysis

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Efficient reduction of O2 to water is a central challenge in energy conversion and many aerobic oxidation reactions. Here, we show that the electrochemical oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) can be achieved at high potentials by using soluble organic nitroxyl and nitrogen oxide (NOx) mediators. When used alone, neither organic nitroxyls, such as 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-1-piperidinyl-N-oxyl (TEMPO), nor NOx species, such as sodium nitrite, are effective ORR mediators. The combination of nitroxyl/NOx species, however, mediates sustained O2 reduction with overpotentials as low as 300 mV in acetonitrile containing trifluoroacetic acid. Mechanistic analysis of the coupled redox reactions supports a process in which the nitrogen oxide catalyst drives aerobic oxidation of a nitroxyl mediator to an oxoammonium species, which then is reduced back to the nitroxyl at the cathode. The electrolysis potential is dictated by the oxoammonium/nitroxyl reduction potential. The overpotentials accessible with this ORR system are significantly lower than widely studied molecular metal-macrocycle ORR catalysts and benefit from the mechanism-based specificity for four-electron reduction of oxygen to water mediated by NOx species, together with kinetically efficient reduction of oxidized NOx species by TEMPO and other organic nitroxyls. PMID:27162977

  17. Combustion of hydrogen in an experimental trapped vortex combustor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Hui; Chen, Qin; Shao, Weiwei; Zhang, Yongliang; Wang, Yue; Xiao, Yunhan

    2009-09-01

    Combustion performances of pure hydrogen in an experimental trapped vortex combustor have been tested under different operating conditions. Pressure fluctuations, NOx emissions, OH distributions, and LBO (Lean Blow Out) were measured in the tests. Results indicate that the TVC test rig has successfully realized a double vortex construction in the cavity zone in a wide range of flow conditions. Hydrogen combustion in the test rig has achieved an excellent LBO performance and relatively low NOx emissions. Through comparison of dynamic pressure data, OH fluctuation images, and NOx emissions, the optimal operating condition has been found out to be Φp =0.4, fuel split =0.4, and primary air/fuel premixed.

  18. Combination of biodiesel-ethanol-diesel fuel blend and SCR catalyst assembly to reduce emissions from a heavy-duty diesel engine.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xiaoyan; Yu, Yunbo; He, Hong; Shuai, Shijin; Dong, Hongyi; Li, Rulong

    2008-01-01

    In this study, the efforts to reduce NOx and particulate matter (PM) emissions from a diesel engine using both ethanol-selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NOx over an Ag/Al2O3 catalyst and a biodiesel-ethanol-diesel fuel blend (BE-diesel) on an engine bench test are discussed. Compared with diesel fuel, use of BE-diesel increased PM emissions by 14% due to the increase in the soluble organic fraction (SOF) of PM, but it greatly reduced the Bosch smoke number by 60%-80% according to the results from 13-mode test of European Stationary Cycle (ESC) test. The SCR catalyst was effective in NOx reduction by ethanol, and the NOx conversion was approximately 73%. Total hydrocarbons (THC) and CO emissions increased significantly during the SCR of NOx process. Two diesel oxidation catalyst (DOC) assemblies were used after Ag/Al2O3 converter to remove CO and HC. Different oxidation catalyst showed opposite effect on PM emission. The PM composition analysis revealed that the net effect of oxidation catalyst on total PM was an integrative effect on SOF reduction and sulfate formation of PM. The engine bench test results indicated that the combination of BE-diesel and a SCR catalyst assembly could provide benefits for NOx and PM emissions control even without using diesel particle filters (DPFs).

  19. Simulating the Impact of Premixed Charge Compression Ignition on Light-Duty Diesel Fuel Economy and Emissions of Particulates and NOx

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Zhiming; Daw, C Stuart; Wagner, Robert M; Edwards, Kevin Dean; Smith, David E

    2013-01-01

    We utilize the Powertrain Systems Analysis Toolkit (PSAT) combined with transient engine and aftertreatment component models implemented in Matlab/Simulink to simulate the effect of premixed charge compression ignition (PCCI) on the fuel economy and emissions of light-duty diesel-powered conventional and hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs). Our simulated engine is capable of both conventional diesel combustion (CDC) and premixed charge compression ignition (PCCI) over real transient driving cycles. Our simulated aftertreatment train consists of a diesel oxidation catalyst (DOC), lean NOx trap (LNT), and catalyzed diesel particulate filter (DPF). The results demonstrate that, in the simulated conventional vehicle, PCCI can significantly reduce fuel consumption and emissions by reducing the need for LNT and DPF regeneration. However, the opportunity for PCCI operation in the simulated HEV is limited because the engine typically experiences higher loads and multiple stop-start transients that are outside the allowable PCCI operating range. Thus developing ways of extending the PCCI operating range combined with improved control strategies for engine and emissions control management will be especially important for realizing the potential benefits of PCCI in HEVs.

  20. NOx CONTROL OPTIONS AND INTEGRATION FOR US COAL FIRED BOILERS

    SciTech Connect

    Mike Bockelie; Marc Cremer; Kevin Davis; Connie Senior; Bob Hurt; Eric Eddings; Larry Baxter

    2002-07-28

    This is the eighth Quarterly Technical Report for DOE Cooperative Agreement No: DE-FC26-00NT40753. The goal of the project is to develop cost effective analysis tools and techniques for demonstrating and evaluating low NOx control strategies and their possible impact on boiler performance for firing US coals. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) is providing co-funding for this program. This program contains multiple tasks and good progress is being made on all fronts. CFD modeling studies of RRI in a full scale utility boiler have been performed that provide further insight into the NOx reduction process that occurs if the furnace is not adequately staged. In situ reactivity data indicate thus far that titania sulfates under SCR conditions but there is no indication of vanadia sulfation in agreement with some, but not most literature results. Additional analysis and advanced diagnostics are under way to confirm this result and determine its accuracy. Construction of a catalyst characterization reactor system is nearly complete, with a few remaining details discussed in this report. Shakedown testing of the SCR field reactor was completed at the University of Utah pilot-scale coal furnace. The CEM system has been ordered. Talks continued with American Electric Power about hosting a demonstration at their Rockport plant.

  1. LOW-CONCENTRATION NOX EMISSIONS MEASUREMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper gives results of a recent series of low-concentration nitrogen oxides (NOx) emission measurements, made by Midwest Research Institute (MRI) during U.S. EPA-sponsored Environmental Technology Verification (ETV) test of a NOx control system called Xonon (TM) Cool Combust...

  2. NOX4 regulates autophagy during energy deprivation.

    PubMed

    Sciarretta, Sebastiano; Volpe, Massimo; Sadoshima, Junichi

    2014-04-01

    NADPH oxidase is a cellular enzyme devoted to the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). NOX4 and NOX2 are the main isoforms of NADPH oxidase in the cardiovascular system. In our recent study, we demonstrated that NOX4, but not NOX2, is a critical mediator of the cardiomyocyte adaptive response to energy stress. NOX4 activity and protein levels are increased in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) but not in mitochondria of cardiomyocytes during the early phase of energy deprivation. NOX4-derived production of ROS in the ER is a critical event that activates autophagy through stimulation of the EIF2AK3/PERK-EIF2S1/eIF-2α-ATF4 pathway. NOX4-dependent autophagy is an important mechanism to preserve cellular energy and limit cell death in energy-deprived cardiomyocytes. Aside from elucidating a crucial physiological function of NOX4 during cellular energy stress, our study dissects a novel signaling mechanism that regulates autophagy under this condition.

  3. NOX4 regulates autophagy during energy deprivation

    PubMed Central

    Sciarretta, Sebastiano; Volpe, Massimo; Sadoshima, Junichi

    2014-01-01

    NADPH oxidase is a cellular enzyme devoted to the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). NOX4 and NOX2 are the main isoforms of NADPH oxidase in the cardiovascular system. In our recent study, we demonstrated that NOX4, but not NOX2, is a critical mediator of the cardiomyocyte adaptive response to energy stress. NOX4 activity and protein levels are increased in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) but not in mitochondria of cardiomyocytes during the early phase of energy deprivation. NOX4-derived production of ROS in the ER is a critical event that activates autophagy through stimulation of the EIF2AK3/PERK-EIF2S1/eIF-2α-ATF4 pathway. NOX4-dependent autophagy is an important mechanism to preserve cellular energy and limit cell death in energy-deprived cardiomyocytes. Aside from elucidating a crucial physiological function of NOX4 during cellular energy stress, our study dissects a novel signaling mechanism that regulates autophagy under this condition. PMID:24492492

  4. Reduce NOx and Improve Energy Efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    2005-05-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy's NOx and Energy Assessment Tool (NxEAT) is available at no charge to help the petroleum refining and chemicals industries develop a cost-effective, plant-wide strategy for NOx reduction and energy efficiency improvements.

  5. NOx CONTROL OPTIONS AND INTEGRATION FOR US COAL FIRED BOILERS

    SciTech Connect

    Mike Bockelie; Marc Cremer; Kevin Davis; Connie Senior; Bob Hurt; Eric Eddings; Larry Baxter

    2002-04-30

    This is the seventh Quarterly Technical Report for DOE Cooperative Agreement No: DE-FC26-00NT40753. The goal of the project is to develop cost effective analysis tools and techniques for demonstrating and evaluating low NOx control strategies and their possible impact on boiler performance for firing US coals. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) is providing co-funding for this program. This program contains multiple tasks and good progress is being made on all fronts. A series of field tests for RRI at the Ameren Sioux Unit No.1 have demonstrated that RRI can provide up to 30% NOx reduction over the use of over fire air in large scale (480MW) cyclone fired utility boilers. The field tests and modeling results are in good agreement. Final data analysis has been completed for tests performed at Eastlake Power Station of a real-time waterwall corrosion monitoring system. The tests demonstrated that corrosion could be measured accurately in real-time in normal boiler operations, and an assessment of waterwall wastage could be made without impacting boiler availability. Detailed measurements of soot volume fraction have been performed for a coal burner in a pilot scale test furnace. The measured values are in good agreement with the expected trends for soot generation and destruction. Catalysts from four commercial manufacturers have been ordered and one of the samples was received this quarter. Several in situ analyses of vanadium-based SCR catalyst systems were completed at BYU. Results to date indicate that the system produces results that represent improvements compared to literature examples of similar experiments. Construction of the catalyst characterization system (CCS) reactor is nearly complete, with a few remaining details discussed in this report. A literature review originally commissioned from other parties is being updated and will be made available under separate cover as part of this investigation. Fabrication of the multi-catalyst slipstream

  6. NOx CONTROL OPTIONS AND INTEGRATION FOR US COAL FIRED BOILERS

    SciTech Connect

    Mike Bockelie; Marc Cremer; Kevin Davis; Connie Senior; Bob Hurt; Eric Suuberg; Eric Eddings; Larry Baxter

    2002-01-31

    This is the sixth Quarterly Technical Report for DOE Cooperative Agreement No: DE-FC26-00NT40753. The goal of the project is to develop cost effective analysis tools and techniques for demonstrating and evaluating low NOx control strategies and their possible impact on boiler performance for firing US coals. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) is providing co-funding for this program. This program contains multiple tasks and good progress is being made on all fronts. Preliminary results from laboratory and field tests of a corrosion probe to predict waterwall wastage indicate good agreement between the electrochemical noise corrosion rates predicted by the probe and corrosion rates measured by a surface profilometer. Four commercial manufacturers agreed to provide catalyst samples to the program. BYU has prepared two V/Ti oxide catalysts (custom, powder form) containing commercially relevant concentrations of V oxide and one containing a W oxide promoter. Two pieces of experimental apparatus being built at BYU to carry out laboratory-scale investigations of SCR catalyst deactivation are nearly completed. A decision was made to carry out the testing at full-scale power plants using a slipstream of gas instead of at the University of Utah pilot-scale coal combustor as originally planned. Design of the multi-catalyst slipstream reactor was completed during this quarter. One utility has expressed interest in hosting a long-term test at one of their plants that co-fire wood with coal. Tests to study ammonia adsorption onto fly ash have clearly established that the only routes that can play a role in binding significant amounts of ammonia to the ash surface, under practical ammonia slip conditions, are those that must involve co-adsorbates.

  7. NOx CONTROL OPTIONS AND INTEGRATION FOR US COAL FIRED BOILERS

    SciTech Connect

    Mike Bockelie; Marc Cremer; Kevin Davis; Connie Senior; Bob Hurt; Eric Eddings; Larry Baxter

    2002-10-24

    This is the ninth Quarterly Technical Report for DOE Cooperative Agreement No: DE-FC26-00NT40753. The goal of the project is to develop cost effective analysis tools and techniques for demonstrating and evaluating low NOx control strategies and their possible impact on boiler performance for firing US coals. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) is providing cofunding for this program. This program contains multiple tasks and good progress is being made on all fronts. Various subsystems of BYU's Catalyst Characterization System (CCS) were upgraded this quarter. Work on the CCS hardware and software will continue in the coming quarter. A preliminary test matrix of poisoning experiments in the CCS has been drafted that will explore the effects of at least three poisons: sodium, potassium and calcium. During this quarter, we attempted to resolve discrepancies in previous in situ measurements of catalyst sulfation. Modifications were made to the XPS analysis procedure that allowed analyses of uncrushed samples. Although the XPS and FTIR results are now more consistent in that both indicate that the surface is sulfating (unlike the results reported last quarter), they disagree with respect to which species sulfates. The CEM system for the multi-catalyst slipstream reactor arrived this quarter. Minor modifications to the reactor and control system were completed. The reactor will be shipped to AEP Rockport plant next quarter for shakedown and installation. In a parallel effort, we have proposed to make mercury oxidation measurements across the catalysts at the start of the field test. Pending approval from DOE, we will begin the mercury measurements next quarter.

  8. Catalyst activator

    DOEpatents

    McAdon, Mark H.; Nickias, Peter N.; Marks, Tobin J.; Schwartz, David J.

    2001-01-01

    A catalyst activator particularly adapted for use in the activation of metal complexes of metals of Group 3-10 for polymerization of ethylenically unsaturated polymerizable monomers, especially olefins, comprising two Group 13 metal or metalloid atoms and a ligand structure including at least one bridging group connecting ligands on the two Group 13 metal or metalloid atoms.

  9. [NADPH oxidases, Nox: new isoenzymes family].

    PubMed

    Chuong Nguyen, Minh Vu; Lardy, Bernard; Paclet, Marie-Hélène; Rousset, Francis; Berthier, Sylvie; Baillet, Athan; Grange, Laurent; Gaudin, Philippe; Morel, Françoise

    2015-01-01

    NADPH oxidases, Nox, are a family of isoenzymes, composed of seven members, whose sole function is to produce reactive oxygen species (ROS). Although Nox catalyze the same enzymatic reaction, they acquired from a common ancestor during evolution, specificities related to their tissue expression, subcellular localization, activation mechanisms and regulation. Their functions could vary depending on the pathophysiological state of the tissues. Indeed, ROS are not only bactericidal weapons in phagocytes but also essential cellular signaling molecules and their overproduction is involved in chronic diseases and diseases of aging. The understanding of the mechanisms involved in the function of Nox and the emergence of Nox inhibitors, require a thorough knowledge of their nature and structure. The objectives of this review are to highlight, in a structure/function approach, the main similar and differentiated properties shared by the human Nox isoenzymes.

  10. Design and testing of an independently controlled urea SCR retrofit system for the reduction of NOx emissions from marine diesels.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Derek R; Bedick, Clinton R; Clark, Nigel N; McKain, David L

    2009-05-15

    research with control optimization, urea distribution and possible use of oxidation catalysts is recommended to improve the NOx reduction capabilities while minimizing ammonia slip.

  11. Activity and hydrothermal stability of CeO₂-ZrO₂-WO₃ for the selective catalytic reduction of NOx with NH₃.

    PubMed

    Song, Zhongxian; Ning, Ping; Zhang, Qiulin; Li, Hao; Zhang, Jinhui; Wang, Yancai; Liu, Xin; Huang, Zhenzhen

    2016-04-01

    A series of CeO2-ZrO2-WO3 (CZW) catalysts prepared by a hydrothermal synthesis method showed excellent catalytic activity for selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NO with NH3 over a wide temperature of 150-550°C. The effect of hydrothermal treatment of CZW catalysts on SCR activity was investigated in the presence of 10% H2O. The fresh catalyst showed above 90% NOx conversion at 201-459°C, which is applicable to diesel exhaust NOx purification (200-440°C). The SCR activity results indicated that hydrothermal aging decreased the SCR activity of CZW at low temperatures (below 300°C), while the activity was notably enhanced at high temperature (above 450°C). The aged CZW catalyst (hydrothermal aging at 700°C for 8 hr) showed almost 80% NOx conversion at 229-550°C, while the V2O5-WO3/TiO2 catalyst presented above 80% NOx conversion at 308-370°C. The effect of structural changes, acidity, and redox properties of CZW on the SCR activity was investigated. The results indicated that the excellent hydrothermal stability of CZW was mainly due to the CeO2-ZrO2 solid solution, amorphous WO3 phase and optimal acidity. In addition, the formation of WO3 clusters increased in size as the hydrothermal aging temperature increased, resulting in the collapse of structure, which could further affect the acidity and redox properties.

  12. Composite TiO2/clays materials for photocatalytic NOx oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todorova, N.; Giannakopoulou, T.; Karapati, S.; Petridis, D.; Vaimakis, T.; Trapalis, C.

    2014-11-01

    TiO2 photocatalyst received much attention for air purification applications especially for removal of air pollutants like NOx, VOCs etc. It has been established that the activity of the photocatalyst can be significantly enhanced by its immobilization onto suitable substrates like inorganic minerals, porous silica, hydroxyapatite, adsorbent materials like activated carbon, various co-catalysts such as semiconductors, graphene, reduced graphite oxide, etc. In the present work, photocatalytic composite materials consisted of mineral substrate and TiO2 in weight ratio 1:1 were manufactured and examined for oxidation and removal of nitric oxides NOx (NO and NO2). Commercial titania P25 (Evonik-Degussa) and urea-modified P25 were used as photocatalytically active components. Inorganic minerals, namely kunipia, talk and hydrotalcite were selected as supporting materials due to their layered structure and expected high NOx adsorption capability. Al3+ and Ca2+ intercalation was applied in order to improve the dispersion of TiO2 and its loading into the supporting matrix. The X-ray diffraction analysis and Scanning Electron Microscopy revealed the binary structure of the composites and homogeneous dispersion of the photocatalyst into the substrates. The photocatalytic behavior of the materials in NOx oxidation and removal was investigated under UV and visible light irradiation. The composite materials exhibited superior photocatalytic activity than the bare titania under both types of irradiation. Significant visible light activity was recorded for the composites containing urea-modified titania that was accredited to the N-doping of the semiconductor. Among the different substrates, the hydrotalcite caused highest increase in the NOx removal, while among the intercalation ions the Ca2+ was more efficient. The results were related to the improved dispersion of the TiO2 and the synergetic activity of the substrates as NOx adsorbers.

  13. Trapping polar molecules in an ac trap

    SciTech Connect

    Bethlem, Hendrick L.; Veldhoven, Jacqueline van; Schnell, Melanie; Meijer, Gerard

    2006-12-15

    Polar molecules in high-field seeking states cannot be trapped in static traps as Maxwell's equations do not allow a maximum of the electric field in free space. It is possible to generate an electric field that has a saddle point by superposing an inhomogeneous electric field to an homogeneous electric field. In such a field, molecules are focused along one direction, while being defocused along the other. By reversing the direction of the inhomogeneous electric field the focusing and defocusing directions are reversed. When the fields are being switched back and forth at the appropriate rate, this leads to a net focusing force in all directions. We describe possible electrode geometries for creating the desired fields and discuss their merits. Trapping of {sup 15}ND{sub 3} ammonia molecules in a cylindrically symmetric ac trap is demonstrated. We present measurements of the spatial distribution of the trapped cloud as a function of the settings of the trap and compare these to both a simple model assuming a linear force and to full three-dimensional simulations of the experiment. With the optimal settings, molecules within a phase-space volume of 270 mm{sup 3} (m/s){sup 3} remain trapped. This corresponds to a trap depth of about 5 mK and a trap volume of about 20 mm{sup 3}.

  14. Catalyst suppliers consolidate further, offer more catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Rhodes, A.K.

    1995-10-02

    The list of suppliers of catalysts to the petroleum refining industry has decreased by five since Oil and Gas Journal`s survey of refining catalysts and catalytic additives was last published. Despite the consolidation, the list of catalyst designations has grown to about 950 in this latest survey, compared to 820 listed in 1993. The table divides the catalysts by use and gives data on their primary differentiating characteristics, feedstock, products, form, bulk density,catalyst support, active agents, availability, and manufactures.

  15. NOx Direct Decomposition: Potentially Enhanced Thermodynamics and Kinetics on Chemically Modified Ferroelectric Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakekhani, Arvin; Ismail-Beigi, Sohrab

    2014-03-01

    NOx are regulated pollutants produced during automotive combustion. As part of an effort to design catalysts for NOx decomposition that operate in oxygen rich environment and permit greater fuel efficiency, we study chemistry of NOx on (001) ferroelectric surfaces. Changing the polarization at such surfaces modifies electronic properties and leads to switchable surface chemistry. Using first principles theory, our previous work has shown that addition of catalytic RuO2 monolayer on ferroelectric PbTiO3 surface makes direct decomposition of NO thermodynamically favorable for one polarization. Furthermore, the usual problem of blockage of catalytic sites by strong oxygen binding is overcome by flipping polarization that helps desorb the oxygen. We describe a thermodynamic cycle for direct NO decomposition followed by desorption of N2 and O2. We provide energy barriers and transition states for key steps of the cycle as well as describing their dependence on polarization direction. We end by pointing out how a switchable order parameter of substrate,in this case ferroelectric polarization, allows us to break away from some standard compromises for catalyst design(e.g. the Sabatier principle). This enlarges the set of potentially catalytic metals. Primary support from Toyota Motor Engineering and Manufacturing, North America, Inc.

  16. Selective catalytic reduction operation with heavy fuel oil: NOx, NH3, and particle emissions.

    PubMed

    Lehtoranta, Kati; Vesala, Hannu; Koponen, Päivi; Korhonen, Satu

    2015-04-01

    To meet stringent NOx emission limits, selective catalytic reduction (SCR) is increasingly utilized in ships, likely also in combination with low-priced higher sulfur level fuels. In this study, the performance of SCR was studied by utilizing NOx, NH3, and particle measurements. Urea decomposition was studied with ammonia and isocyanic acid measurements and was found to be more effective with heavy fuel oil (HFO) than with light fuel oil. This is suggested to be explained by the metals found in HFO contributing to metal oxide particles catalyzing the hydrolysis reaction prior to SCR. At the exhaust temperature of 340 °C NOx reduction was 85-90%, while at lower temperatures the efficiency decreased. By increasing the catalyst loading, the low temperature behavior of the SCR was enhanced. The drawback of this, however, was the tendency of particle emissions (sulfate) to increase at higher temperatures with higher loaded catalysts. The particle size distribution results showed high amounts of nanoparticles (in 25-30 nm size), the formation of which SCR either increased or decreased. The findings of this work provide a better understanding of the usage of SCR in combination with a higher sulfur level fuel and also of ship particle emissions, which are a growing concern.

  17. Modelling NOx emissions of single droplet combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moesl, Klaus G.; Schwing, Joachim E.; Sattelmayer, Thomas

    2012-02-01

    An approach for modelling and simulation of the generation of nitrogen oxide (NOx) in the gas phase surrounding single burning droplets is presented. Assuming spherical symmetry (no gravity, no forced convection), the governing equations are derived first. Then simplifications are introduced and it is proven that they are appropriate. The influences of the initial droplet diameter, the ambient conditions, and the droplet pre-vapourisation on NOx are investigated. The fuel of choice is n-decane (C10H22) as it resembles kerosene and diesel fuel best, and the complexity of the reaction mechanism is manageable. Combinations of C10H22 mechanisms and well-established NOx kinetics are evaluated in detail and validated for their applicability in the context of this work. The conducted simulations of droplet combustion in an atmosphere of hot exhaust gas show that NOx formation (by mass of fuel) increases linearly with the droplet diameter. There is a trade-off between available oxygen and ambient temperature. Increasing the equivalence ratio of the exhaust gas leads to higher NOx emissions in the very lean regime, but to lower emissions if the equivalence ratio exceeds 0.85. Pre-vapourisation of fuel at ambient conditions becomes beneficial with respect to NOx emissions only if the degree of vapourisation is above a minimum limit. If less fuel is vapourised before ignition, the NOx emissions remain almost unaffected.

  18. Plasma Aftertreatment for Simultaneous Control of NOx and Particulates

    SciTech Connect

    Penetrante, B.M.; Brusasco, R.M.; Merritt, B.T.; Pitz, W.J.; Vogtlin, G.E.

    1999-10-28

    Plasma reactors can be operated as a particulate trap or as a NO{sub x} converter. The soluble organic fraction (SOF) of the trapped particulates can be utilized for the oxidation of NO to NO{sub 2}. The NO{sub 2} can then be used to non-thermally oxidize the carbon fraction of the particulates. This paper examines the energy density required for oxidation of the SOF hydrocarbons and the fate of NO{sub 2} during the oxidation of the particulate carbon. The energy density required for complete oxidation of the SOF hydrocarbons is shown to be unacceptably large. The reaction of NO{sub 2} with carbon is shown to lead mainly to backconversion of NO{sub 2} to NO. These results suggest that the use of a catalyst in combination with the plasma will be required to efficiently reduce the NO{sub x} and oxidize the SOF hydrocarbons.

  19. NOx Control Options and Integration for US Coal Fired Boilers

    SciTech Connect

    Mike Bockelie; Kevin Davis; Temi Linjewile; Connie Senior; Eric Eddings; Kevin Whitty; Larry Baxter; Calvin Bartholomew; William Hecker; Stan Harding

    2004-03-31

    This is the fifteenth Quarterly Technical Report for DOE Cooperative Agreement No: DE-FC26-00NT40753. The goal of the project is to develop cost effective analysis tools and techniques for demonstrating and evaluating low NOx control strategies and their possible impact on boiler performance for boilers firing US coals. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) is providing co-funding for this program. At AEP's Gavin Plant, data from the corrosion probes showed that corrosion rate increased as boiler load was increased. During an outage at the plant, the drop in boiler load, sensor temperature and corrosion rate could all be seen clearly. Restarting the boiler saw a resumption of corrosion activity. This behavior is consistent with previous observations made at a 600MWe utility boiler. More data are currently being examined for magnitudes of corrosion rates and changes in boiler operating conditions. Considerable progress was made this quarter in BYU's laboratory study of catalyst deactivation. Surface sulfation appears to partially suppress NO adsorption when the catalyst is not exposed to NH3; NH3 displaces surface-adsorbed NO on SCR catalysts and surface sulfation increases the amount of adsorbed NH3, as confirmed by both spectroscopy and TPD experiments. However, there is no indication of changes in catalyst activity despite changes in the amount of adsorbed NH3. A monolith test reactor (MTR), completed this quarter, provided the first comparative data for one of the fresh and field-exposed monolith SCR catalysts yet developed in this project. Measurements of activity on one of the field-exposed commercial monolith catalysts do not show significant changes in catalyst activity (within experimental error) as compared to the fresh catalyst. The exposed surface of the sample contains large amounts of Ca and Na, neither of which is present in the fresh sample, even after removal of visibly obvious fouling deposits. However, these fouling compounds do not

  20. 40 CFR 97.82 - NOX authorized account representative.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false NOX authorized account representative... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS Individual Unit Opt-ins § 97.82 NOX authorized account representative. A unit for which an application for a...

  1. 40 CFR 96.82 - NOX authorized account representative.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false NOX authorized account representative... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS FOR STATE IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Individual Unit Opt-ins § 96.82 NOX authorized account representative. A unit for which...

  2. 40 CFR 96.82 - NOX authorized account representative.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false NOX authorized account representative... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO 2 TRADING PROGRAMS FOR STATE IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Individual Unit Opt-ins § 96.82 NOX authorized account representative. A unit for which...

  3. 40 CFR 97.82 - NOX authorized account representative.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false NOX authorized account representative... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS Individual Unit Opt-ins § 97.82 NOX authorized account representative. A unit for which an application for a...

  4. 40 CFR 96.82 - NOX authorized account representative.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false NOX authorized account representative... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS FOR STATE IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Individual Unit Opt-ins § 96.82 NOX authorized account representative. A unit for which...

  5. 40 CFR 96.82 - NOX authorized account representative.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false NOX authorized account representative... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS FOR STATE IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Individual Unit Opt-ins § 96.82 NOX authorized account representative. A unit for which...

  6. 40 CFR 97.82 - NOX authorized account representative.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false NOX authorized account representative... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS Individual Unit Opt-ins. § 97.82 NOX authorized account representative. A unit for which an application for a...

  7. 40 CFR 96.53 - Recordation of NOX allowance allocations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... allocated to an allocation set-aside. (c) Serial numbers for allocated NO X allowances. When allocating NOX... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Recordation of NOX allowance... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS FOR...

  8. 40 CFR 96.82 - NOX authorized account representative.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false NOX authorized account representative... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS FOR STATE IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Individual Unit Opt-ins § 96.82 NOX authorized account representative. A unit for which...

  9. 40 CFR 97.82 - NOX authorized account representative.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false NOX authorized account representative... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS Individual Unit Opt-ins § 97.82 NOX authorized account representative. A unit for which an application for a...

  10. 40 CFR 97.82 - NOX authorized account representative.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false NOX authorized account representative... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS Individual Unit Opt-ins. § 97.82 NOX authorized account representative. A unit for which an application for a...

  11. NOx Control Options and Integration for US Coal Fired Boilers

    SciTech Connect

    Mike Bockelie; Kevin Davis; Connie Senior; Darren Shino; Dave Swenson; Larry Baxter; Calvin Bartholomew; William Hecker; Stan Harding

    2004-12-31

    This is the eighteenth Quarterly Technical Report for DOE Cooperative Agreement No: DEFC26-00NT40753. The goal of the project is to develop cost effective analysis tools and techniques for demonstrating and evaluating low NOx control strategies and their possible impact on boiler performance for boilers firing US coals. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) is providing co-funding for this program. Safety equipment for ammonia for the SCR slipstream reactor at Plant Gadsden was installed. The slipstream reactor was started and operated for about 1400 hours during the last performance period. Laboratory analysis of exposed catalyst and investigations of the sulfation of fresh catalyst continued at BYU. Thicker end-caps for the ECN probes were designed and fabricated to prevent the warpage and failure that occurred at Gavin with the previous design. A refurbished ECN probe was successfully tested at the University of Utah combustion laboratory. Improvements were implemented to the software that controls the flow of cooling air to the ECN probes.

  12. 40 CFR 96.12 - Changing the NOX authorized account representative and the alternate NOX authorized account...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Changing the NOX authorized account representative and the alternate NOX authorized account representative; changes in the owners and operators. 96... (CONTINUED) NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS FOR STATE IMPLEMENTATION...

  13. 40 CFR 75.71 - Specific provisions for monitoring NOX and heat input for the purpose of calculating NOX mass...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... MONITORING NOX Mass Emissions Provisions § 75.71 Specific provisions for monitoring NOX and heat input for... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Specific provisions for monitoring NOX and heat input for the purpose of calculating NOX mass emissions. 75.71 Section 75.71 Protection...

  14. 40 CFR 96.12 - Changing the NOX authorized account representative and the alternate NOX authorized account...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Changing the NOX authorized account representative and the alternate NOX authorized account representative; changes in the owners and operators. 96... (CONTINUED) NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS FOR STATE IMPLEMENTATION...

  15. 40 CFR 75.71 - Specific provisions for monitoring NOX and heat input for the purpose of calculating NOX mass...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... and heat input for the purpose of calculating NOX mass emissions. 75.71 Section 75.71 Protection of... MONITORING NOX Mass Emissions Provisions § 75.71 Specific provisions for monitoring NOX and heat input for the purpose of calculating NOX mass emissions. (a) Coal-fired units. The owner or operator of a...

  16. Vortex combustor for low NOX emissions when burning lean premixed high hydrogen content fuel

    DOEpatents

    Steele, Robert C; Edmonds, Ryan G; Williams, Joseph T; Baldwin, Stephen P

    2012-11-20

    A trapped vortex combustor. The trapped vortex combustor is configured for receiving a lean premixed gaseous fuel and oxidant stream, where the fuel includes hydrogen gas. The trapped vortex combustor is configured to receive the lean premixed fuel and oxidant stream at a velocity which significantly exceeds combustion flame speed in a selected lean premixed fuel and oxidant mixture. The combustor is configured to operate at relatively high bulk fluid velocities while maintaining stable combustion, and low NOx emissions. The combustor is useful in gas turbines in a process of burning synfuels, as it offers the opportunity to avoid use of diluent gas to reduce combustion temperatures. The combustor also offers the possibility of avoiding the use of selected catalytic reaction units for removal of oxides of nitrogen from combustion gases exiting a gas turbine.

  17. Vortex combustor for low NOx emissions when burning lean premixed high hydrogen content fuel

    DOEpatents

    Steele, Robert C.; Edmonds, Ryan G.; Williams, Joseph T.; Baldwin, Stephen P.

    2009-10-20

    A trapped vortex combustor. The trapped vortex combustor is configured for receiving a lean premixed gaseous fuel and oxidant stream, where the fuel includes hydrogen gas. The trapped vortex combustor is configured to receive the lean premixed fuel and oxidant stream at a velocity which significantly exceeds combustion flame speed in a selected lean premixed fuel and oxidant mixture. The combustor is configured to operate at relatively high bulk fluid velocities while maintaining stable combustion, and low NOx emissions. The combustor is useful in gas turbines in a process of burning synfuels, as it offers the opportunity to avoid use of diluent gas to reduce combustion temperatures. The combustor also offers the possibility of avoiding the use of selected catalytic reaction units for removal of oxides of nitrogen from combustion gases exiting a gas turbine.

  18. Experimental Assessment of NOx Emissions from 73 Euro 6 Diesel Passenger Cars.

    PubMed

    Yang, Liuhanzi; Franco, Vicente; Mock, Peter; Kolke, Reinhard; Zhang, Shaojun; Wu, Ye; German, John

    2015-12-15

    Controlling nitrogen oxides (NOx) emissions from diesel passenger cars during real-world driving is one of the major technical challenges facing diesel auto manufacturers. Three main technologies are available for this purpose: exhaust gas recirculation (EGR), lean-burn NOx traps (LNT), and selective catalytic reduction (SCR). Seventy-three Euro 6 diesel passenger cars (8 EGR only, 40 LNT, and 25 SCR) were tested on a chassis dynamometer over both the European type-approval cycle (NEDC, cold engine start) and the more realistic Worldwide harmonized light-duty test cycle (WLTC version 2.0, hot start) between 2012 and 2015. Most vehicles met the legislative limit of 0.08 g/km of NOx over NEDC (average emission factors by technology: EGR-only 0.07 g/km, LNT 0.04 g/km, and SCR 0.05 g/km), but the average emission factors rose dramatically over WLTC (EGR-only 0.17 g/km, LNT 0.21 g/km, and SCR 0.13 g/km). Five LNT-equipped vehicles exhibited very poor performance over the WLTC, emitting 7-15 times the regulated limit. These results illustrate how diesel NOx emissions are not properly controlled under the current, NEDC-based homologation framework. The upcoming real-driving emissions (RDE) regulation, which mandates an additional on-road emissions test for EU type approvals, could be a step in the right direction to address this problem.

  19. Determination of intermediates and mechanism for soot combustion with NOx/O₂ on potassium-supported Mg-Al hydrotalcite mixed oxides by in situ FTIR.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhaoliang; Zhang, Yexin; Su, Qingyun; Wang, Zhongpeng; Li, Qian; Gao, Xiyan

    2010-11-01

    The soot combustion with NO(x) and/or O(2) on potassium-supported Mg-Al hydrotalcite mixed oxides under tight contact condition was studied using temperature-programmed oxidation (TPO), isothermal reaction and in situ FTIR techniques. The presence of NO(x) in O(2) favors the soot combustion at lower temperatures (<300 °C). However, a little suppression was observed at higher temperatures (>300 °C), which was accompanied by a substantial NO(x) reduction. The ketene (C═C═O) and isocyanate (NCO(-)) species were determined as the reaction intermediates. In NO(x) + O(2), NO(2) directly interacts with the free carbon sites (C═C*) through two parallel reactions: (1) NO(2) + C═C* → C═C═O + NO; (2) NO(2) + C═C* → NCO(-) + CO(2). The two reactions can proceed easily, which accounts for the promotion effect of NO(x) on soot combustion at lower temperatures. The further oxidation of NCO(-) by NO(2) or O(2) is responsible for the simultaneous reduction of NO(x). However, the reactions between NO(2) and C═C* are limited by the amount of free carbon sites, which can be provided by the oxidation of soot by O(2) at higher temperatures. The interaction of NO(x) and catalyst results in the formation of nitrates and nitrites, which poisoned the active K sites.

  20. Effect of B20 and Low Aromatic Diesel on Transit Bus NOx Emissions Over Driving Cycles with a Range of Kinetic Intensity

    SciTech Connect

    Lammert, M. P.; McCormick, R. L.; Sindler, P.; Williams, A.

    2012-10-01

    Oxides of nitrogen (NOx) emissions for transit buses for up to five different fuels and three standard transit duty cycles were compared to establish whether there is a real-world biodiesel NOx increase for transit bus duty cycles and engine calibrations. Six buses representing the majority of the current national transit fleet and including hybrid and selective catalyst reduction systems were tested on a heavy-duty chassis dynamometer with certification diesel, certification B20 blend, low aromatic (California Air Resources Board) diesel, low aromatic B20 blend, and B100 fuels over the Manhattan, Orange County and UDDS test cycles. Engine emissions certification level had the dominant effect on NOx; kinetic intensity was the secondary driving factor. The biodiesel effect on NOx emissions was not statistically significant for most buses and duty cycles for blends with certification diesel, except for a 2008 model year bus. CARB fuel had many more instances of a statistically significant effect of reducing NOx. SCR systems proved effective at reducing NOx to near the detection limit on all duty cycles and fuels, including B100. While offering a fuel economy benefit, a hybrid system significantly increased NOx emissions over a same year bus with a conventional drivetrain and the same engine.

  1. Ammonia-Free NOx Control System

    SciTech Connect

    Song Wu; Zhen Fan; Richard G. Herman

    2004-12-31

    Research is being conducted under United States Department of Energy (DOE) Contract DEFC26-03NT41865 to develop a new technology to achieve very low levels of NOx emissions from pulverized coal fired boiler systems by employing a novel system level integration between the PC combustion process and the catalytic NOx reduction with CO present in the combustion flue gas. The combustor design and operating conditions will be optimized to achieve atypical flue gas conditions. This approach will not only suppress NOx generation during combustion but also further reduce NOx over a downstream catalytic reactor that does not require addition of an external reductant, such as ammonia. This report describes the work performed during the October 1 to December 30, 2004 time period.

  2. Ammonia-Free NOx Control System

    SciTech Connect

    Song Wu; Zhen Fan; Andrew H. Seltzer; Richard G. Herman

    2004-09-30

    Research is being conducted under United States Department of Energy (DOE) Contract DEFC26-03NT41865 to develop a new technology to achieve very low levels of NOx emissions from pulverized coal fired boiler systems by employing a novel system level integration between the PC combustion process and the catalytic NOx reduction with CO present in the combustion flue gas. The combustor design and operating conditions will be optimized to achieve atypical flue gas conditions. This approach will not only suppress NOx generation during combustion but also further reduce NOx over a downstream catalytic reactor that does not require addition of an external reductant, such as ammonia. This report describes the work performed during the July 1 to September 30, 2004 time period.

  3. NOx Formation in a Premixed Syngas Flame

    SciTech Connect

    Yilmaz, S.L.; Givi, P.; Strakey, P.; Casleton, K.

    2006-11-01

    Reduction of NOx is a subject of significant current interest in stationary gas turbines. The objective of this study is to examine the effects of turbulence on non-thermal NOx formation in a syngas flame. This is archived by a detailed parametric study via PDF simulations of a partially stirred reactor and a dumped axisymmetric premixed flame. Several different detailed and reduced kinetics schemes are considered. The simulated results demonstrate the strong dependence of combustion process on turbulence. It is shown that the amount of NOx formation is significantly influenced by the inlet conditions. That is, the turbulence intensity can be tweaked to attain optimal ultra-low NOx emissions at a given temperature.

  4. Ammonia-Free NOx Control System

    SciTech Connect

    Zhen Fan; Song Wu; Richard G. Herman

    2004-06-30

    Research is being conducted under United States Department of Energy (DOE) Contract DEFC26-03NT41865 to develop a new technology to achieve very low levels of NOx emissions from pulverized coal fired boiler systems by employing a novel system level integration between the PC combustion process and the catalytic NOx reduction with CO present in the combustion flue gas. The combustor design and operating conditions will be optimized to achieve atypical flue gas conditions. This approach will not only suppress NOx generation during combustion but also further reduce NOx over a downstream catalytic reactor that does not require addition of an external reductant, such as ammonia. This report describes the work performed during the April 1 to June 30, 2004 time period.

  5. Ammonia-Free NOx Control System

    SciTech Connect

    S. Wu; Z. Fan; R. Herman

    2004-03-31

    Research is being conducted under United States Department of Energy (DOE) Contract DEFC26-03NT41865 to develop a new technology to achieve very low levels of NOx emissions from pulverized coal fired boiler systems by employing a novel system level integration between the PC combustion process and the catalytic NOx reduction with CO present in the combustion flue gas. The combustor design and operating conditions will be optimized to achieve atypical flue gas conditions. This approach will not only suppress NOx generation during combustion but also further reduce NOx over a downstream catalytic reactor that does not require addition of an external reductant, such as ammonia. This report describes the work performed during the January 1 to March 31, 2004 time period.

  6. Effect of NOx control processes on mercury speciation in utility flue gas.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Carl; Machalek, Tom; Miller, Scott; Dene, Chuck; Chang, Ramsay

    2002-08-01

    The speciation of Hg in coal-fired flue gas can be important in determining the ultimate Hg emissions as well as potential control options for the utility. The effects of NOx control processes, such as selective catalytic reduction (SCR) and selective non-catalytic reduction (SNCR), on Hg speciation are not well understood but may impact emissions of Hg. EPRI has investigated the reactions of Hg in flue gas at conditions expected for some NOx control processes. This paper describes the methodology used to investigate these reactions in actual flue gas at several power plants. Results have indicated that some commercial SCR catalysts are capable of oxidizing elemental Hg in flue gas obtained from the inlets of SCR or air heater units. Results are affected by various flue gas and operating parameters. The effect of flue gas composition, including the presence of NH3, has been evaluated. The influence of NH3 on fly ash Hg reactions also is being investigated.

  7. Simulation of catalytic oxidation and selective catalytic NOx reduction in lean-exhaust hybrid vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Zhiming; Daw, C Stuart; Chakravarthy, Veerathu K

    2012-01-01

    We utilize physically-based models for diesel exhaust catalytic oxidation and urea-based selective catalytic NOx reduction to study their impact on drive cycle performance of hypothetical light-duty diesel powered hybrid vehicles. The models have been implemented as highly flexible SIMULINK block modules that can be used to study multiple engine-aftertreatment system configurations. The parameters of the NOx reduction model have been adjusted to reflect the characteristics of Cu-zeolite catalysts, which are of widespread current interest. We demonstrate application of these models using the Powertrain System Analysis Toolkit (PSAT) software for vehicle simulations, along with a previously published methodology that accounts for emissions and temperature transients in the engine exhaust. Our results illustrate the potential impact of DOC and SCR interactions for lean hybrid electric and plug-in hybrid electric vehicles.

  8. Unchanged NADPH Oxidase Activity in Nox1-Nox2-Nox4 Triple Knockout Mice: What Do NADPH-Stimulated Chemiluminescence Assays Really Detect?

    PubMed

    Rezende, Flávia; Löwe, Oliver; Helfinger, Valeska; Prior, Kim-Kristin; Walter, Maria; Zukunft, Sven; Fleming, Ingrid; Weissmann, Norbert; Brandes, Ralf P; Schröder, Katrin

    2016-03-01

    NADPH oxidases of the Nox family are considered important sources of cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. This conclusion is, in part, based on the ability of NADPH to elicit a chemiluminescence signal in tissue/cell homogenates or membrane preparations in the presence of enhancers such as lucigenin, luminol, or L012. However, the ability of these particular assays to specifically detect Nox activity and Nox-derived ROS has not been proven. In this study, we demonstrate that combined knockout of the three main Nox enzymes of the mouse (Nox1-Nox2-Nox4 triple knockout) had no impact on NADPH-stimulated chemiluminescence signals in the aorta, heart, and kidney homogenates. In the NADPH-stimulated membrane assays, no effect of in vivo angiotensin II pretreatment or deletion of Nox enzymes was observed. In in vitro studies in HEK293 cells, the overexpression of Nox5 or Nox4 markedly increased ROS production in intact cells, whereas overexpression of Nox5 or Nox4 had no influence on the signal in membrane assays. In contrast, overexpression of nitric oxide synthase or cytochrome P450 enzymes resulted in an increased chemiluminescence signal in isolated membranes. On the basis of these observations, we propose the hypothesis that NADPH-stimulated chemiluminescence-based membrane assays, as currently used, do not reflect Nox activity. PMID:25906178

  9. Electrochemical NOx Sensor for Monitoring Diesel Emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Woo, L Y; Glass, R S

    2008-11-14

    % NO, balance NO{sub 2}. Since automotive exhaust sensors will probably be required to operate at temperatures > 600 C, NO is the dominant component in thermodynamic equilibrium and the target NOx species. Also, the use of upstream catalysts could further promote the conversion of NO{sub x} species to NO. Therefore, the focus of current work is to investigate the response to NO. Nevertheless, minimizing the sensitivity to a variety of competing species is important in order to obtain the accuracy necessary for achieving the emission limits. Mitigating the effect of interfering gases (e.g., O{sub 2}, water vapor, HCs, etc.) is an area of current study. For impedance metric NO{sub x} sensors, our previous work has demonstrated that the cross-sensitivity to O{sub 2} may be accounted for by comparing measurements at multiple frequencies. Other strategies for compensation are also being explored, including calibration using data from existing sensors located nearby. Our current work has made significant advances in terms of developing prototype sensors more suitable for commercialization. Also, dynamometer testing has provided real-world sensor performance data that will be useful in approaching potential suppliers to whom we can transfer the technology for commercialization. The advances are a direct result of understanding the sensing mechanisms responsible for impedance-based NO{sub x} sensing and the effect of materials choice and sensor design/geometry.

  10. Sorption vacuum trap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrington, A. E.; Caruso, A. J.

    1970-01-01

    Modified sorption trap for use in high vacuum systems contains provisions for online regeneration of sorbent material. Trap is so constructed that it has a number of encapsulated resistance heaters and a valving and pumping device for removing gases from heated sorbing material. Excessive downtime is eliminated with this trap.

  11. Correlating Engine NOx Emission with Biodiesel Composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeyaseelan, Thangaraja; Mehta, Pramod Shankar

    2016-06-01

    Biodiesel composition comprising of saturated and unsaturated fatty acid methyl esters has a significant influence on its properties and hence the engine performance and emission characteristics. This paper proposes a comprehensive approach for composition-property-NOx emission analysis for biodiesel fuels and highlights the pathways responsible for such a relationship. Finally, a procedure and a predictor equation are developed for the assessment of biodiesel NOx emission from its composition details.

  12. Effect of Hydrocarbon Emissions From PCCI-Type Combustion on the Performance of Selective Catalytic Reduction Catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Prikhodko, Vitaly Y; Pihl, Josh A; Lewis Sr, Samuel Arthur; Parks, II, James E

    2011-01-01

    Core samples cut from full size commercial Fe- and Cu-zeolite SCR catalysts were exposed to a slipstream of raw engine exhaust from a 1.9-liter 4-cylinder diesel engine operating in conventional and PCCI combustion modes. Subsequently, the NOx reduction performance of the exposed catalysts was evaluated on a laboratory bench-reactor fed with simulated exhaust. The Fe-zeolite NOx conversion efficiency was significantly degraded, especially at low temperatures (<250 C), after the catalyst was exposed to the engine exhaust. The degradation of the Fe-zeolite performance was similar for both combustion modes. The Cu-zeolite was much more resistant to HC fouling than the Fe-zeolite catalyst. In the case of the Cu-zeolite, PCCI exhaust had a more significant impact than the exhaust from conventional combustion on the NOx conversion efficiency. For all cases, the clean catalyst performance was recovered after heating to 600 C. GC-MS analysis of the HCs adsorbed to the catalyst surface provided insights into the observed NOx reduction performance trends.

  13. Effect of Hydrocarbon Emissions From PCCI-Type Combustion On The Performance of Selective Catalytic Reduction Catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Prikhodko, Vitaly Y; Pihl, Josh A; Lewis Sr, Samuel Arthur; Parks, II, James E

    2011-01-01

    Core samples cut from full size commercial Fe-and Cu-zeolite SCR catalysts were exposed to a slipstream of raw engine exhaust from a 1.9-liter 4-cylinder diesel engine operating in conventional and PCCI combustion modes. Subsequently, the NOx reduction performance of the exposed catalysts was evaluated on a laboratory bench- reactor fed with simulated exhaust. The Fe-zeolite NOx conversion efficiency was significantly degraded, especially at low temperatures (<250 C), after the catalyst was exposed to the engine exhaust. The degradation of the Fe-zeolite performance was similar for both combustion modes. The Cu-zeolite was much more resistant to HC fouling than the Fe-zeolite catalyst. In the case of the Cu-zeolite, PCCI exhaust had a more significant impact than the exhaust from conventional combustion on the NOx conversion efficiency. For all cases, the clean catalyst performance was recovered after heating to 600 C. GC-MS analysis of the HCs adsorbed to the catalyst surface provided insights into the observed NOx reduction performance trends.

  14. Mixed-phase oxide catalyst based on Mn-mullite (Sm, Gd)Mn2O5 for NO oxidation in diesel exhaust.

    PubMed

    Wang, Weichao; McCool, Geoffrey; Kapur, Neeti; Yuan, Guang; Shan, Bin; Nguyen, Matt; Graham, Uschi M; Davis, Burtron H; Jacobs, Gary; Cho, Kyeongjae; Hao, Xianghong

    2012-08-17

    Oxidation of nitric oxide (NO) for subsequent efficient reduction in selective catalytic reduction or lean NO(x) trap devices continues to be a challenge in diesel engines because of the low efficiency and high cost of the currently used platinum (Pt)-based catalysts. We show that mixed-phase oxide materials based on Mn-mullite (Sm, Gd)Mn(2)O(5) are an efficient substitute for the current commercial Pt-based catalysts. Under laboratory-simulated diesel exhaust conditions, this mixed-phase oxide material was superior to Pt in terms of cost, thermal durability, and catalytic activity for NO oxidation. This oxide material is active at temperatures as low as 120°C with conversion maxima of ~45% higher than that achieved with Pt. Density functional theory and diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy provide insights into the NO-to-NO(2) reaction mechanism on catalytically active Mn-Mn sites via the intermediate nitrate species.

  15. [Catalyst research]. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Ian P Rothwell; David R McMillin

    2005-03-14

    Research results are the areas of catalyst precursor synthesis, catalyst fluxionality, catalyst stability, polymerization of {alpha}-olefins as well as the chemistry of Group IV and Group V metal centers with aryloxide and arylsulfide ligands.

  16. BIFUNCTIONAL CATALYSTS FOR THE SELECTIVE CATALYTIC REDUCTION OF NO BY HYDROCARBONS

    SciTech Connect

    Neylon, M; Castagnola, M; Kropf, A.; Marshall, C

    2003-08-24

    Novel bifunctional catalysts combining two active phases, typically Cu-ZSM-5 and a modifier, were prepared and tested for the selective catalytic reduction of nitrogen oxides using propylene in order to overcome the hindering effects of water typically seen for single-phase catalysts such as Cu-ZSM-5. The catalysts were made by typical preparation techniques, but parameters could be varied to influence the catalyst. The physical characterization of the materials showed that the modification phase was added strictly to the external surface of the zeolite without hindering any internal surface area. Chemical characterization by temperature programmed reactions, DRIFTS and x-ray absorption spectroscopy indicated strong interaction between the two phases, primarily producing materials that exhibited lower reduction temperatures. Two improvements in NOx reduction activity (1000 ppm NO, 1000 ppm C3H6, 2% O2, 30,000 hr-1 GHSV) were seen for these catalysts compared with Cu- ZSM-5: a lower temperature of maximum NOx conversion activity (as low at 250 C), and an enhancement of activity when water was present in the system. The use of a second phase provides a way to further tune the properties of the catalyst in order to achieve mechanistic conditions necessary to maximize NOx remediation.

  17. OXYGEN ENHANCED COMBUSTION FOR NOx CONTROL

    SciTech Connect

    David R. Thompson; Lawrence E. Bool; Jack C. Chen

    2004-04-01

    Conventional wisdom says adding oxygen to a combustion system enhances product throughput, system efficiency, and, unless special care is taken, increases NOx emissions. This increase in NOx emissions is typically due to elevated flame temperatures associated with oxygen use leading to added thermal NOx formation. Innovative low flame temperature oxy-fuel burner designs have been developed and commercialized to minimize both thermal and fuel NOx formation for gas and oil fired industrial furnaces. To be effective these systems require close to 100% oxy-fuel combustion and the cost of oxygen is paid for by fuel savings and other benefits. For applications to coal-fired utility boilers at the current cost of oxygen, however, it is not economically feasible to use 100% oxygen for NOx control. In spite of this conventional wisdom, Praxair and its team members, in partnership with the US Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory, have developed a novel way to use oxygen to reduce NOx emissions without resorting to complete oxy-fuel conversion. In this concept oxygen is added to the combustion process to enhance operation of a low NOx combustion system. Only a small fraction of combustion air is replaced with oxygen in the process. By selectively adding oxygen to a low NOx combustion system it is possible to reduce NOx emissions from nitrogen-containing fuels, including pulverized coal, while improving combustion characteristics such as unburned carbon. A combination of experimental work and modeling was used to define how well oxygen enhanced combustion could reduce NOx emissions. The results of this work suggest that small amounts of oxygen replacement can reduce the NOx emissions as compared to the air-alone system. NOx emissions significantly below 0.15 lbs/MMBtu were measured. Oxygen addition was also shown to reduce carbon in ash. Comparison of the costs of using oxygen for NOx control against competing technologies, such as SCR, show that this

  18. Characterization of exhaust emissions from trap-equipped light-duty diesels. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, L.R.

    1989-01-01

    The objective of the project was to thoroughly characterize and quantify the criteria and toxic-pollutant emissions from two different types of trap-equipped light-duty diesel vehicles. These vehicles included a 1986 Mercedes-Benz 300 SDL, which utilizes a catalyzed trap system, and a prototype Volkswagen, which utilizes an additive trap system (organometallic iron additive). Exhaust emissions from the two vehicles were evaluated as to driving cycle, presence of traps, engine condition, trap condition and fuel aromatic content. In addition to the currently regulated emissions (HC, CO, NOx and particulate matter), a number of unregulated emissions were measured, including aldehydes, benzene, PAHs, metals and trace elements, and 1,3-butadiene. Particulate samples were also analyzed for mutagenic activity using the Ames test. In general, the vehicles produced lower hydrocarbon emissions, higher carbon monoxide emissions, and lower fuel economy when the traps were installed in the vehicles.

  19. Preparation of highly active manganese oxides supported on functionalized MWNTs for low temperature NOx reduction with NH3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pourkhalil, Mahnaz; Moghaddam, Abdolsamad Zarringhalam; Rashidi, Alimorad; Towfighi, Jafar; Mortazavi, Yadollah

    2013-08-01

    Manganese oxide catalysts (MnOx) supported on functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes (FMWNTs) for low temperature selective catalytic reduction (LTSCR) of nitrogen oxides (NOx) with NH3 in the presence of excess O2 were prepared by the incipient wetness impregnation method. These catalysts were characterized by N2 adsorption, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), transmission electron microscope (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) and H2-temperature programmed reduction (H2-TPR) methods. The effects of reaction temperature, MnOx loading, calcination temperature and calcination time were investigated. The presence of surface nitrate species under moderate calcination conditions may play a favorable role in the LTSCR of NOx with NH3. Under the reaction conditions of 200 °C, 1 bar, NO = NH3 = 900 ppm, O2 = 5 vol%, GHSV = 30,000 h-1 and 12 wt% MnOx, NOx conversion and N2 selectivity were 97% and 99.5%, respectively. The SCR activity was reduced in the presence of 100 ppm SO2 and 2.5 vol% H2O from 97% to 92% within 6 h at 200 °C, however such an effect was shown to be reversible by exposing the catalyst to a helium flow for 2 h at 350 °C due to thermal decomposition of ammonium sulphate salts.

  20. Characteristics of NOx removal combining dielectric barrier discharge plasma with selective catalytic reduction by C2H5OH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xing-Quan; Chen, Wei; Guo, Qi-Pei; Li, Yi; Lv, Guo-Hua; Sun, Xiu-Ping; Zhang, Xian-Hui; Feng, Ke-Cheng; Yang, Si-Ze

    2009-07-01

    With the assistance of dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma, selective catalytic reduction of NOx by ethanol over Ag/Al2O3 catalysts was studied. Experimental results show that NOx conversion was greatly enhanced due to the presence of DBD plasma at lower temperature. By varying the DBD voltages or power in 13 kHz frequency at different temperatures, NOx conversion was increased to 40.7% from 6.4% at 176 °C, even to 66.8% from 17.3% at 200 °C. NOx conversion could even be improved to 90% at temperature above 255 °C. It was proposed that nonthermal plasma generated by dielectric barrier discharge reactor was very effective for oxidizing NO to NO2 under excess O2 conditions, which possesses high reactivity with C2H5OH to yield CxHyNzO compound. By reacting with CxHyNzO compound and oxygen, NOx is converted to N2 at low temperatures.

  1. High-Potential Electrocatalytic O2 Reduction with Nitroxyl / NOx Mediators: Implications for Fuel Cells and Aerobic Oxidation Catalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Gerken, James B.; Stahl, Shannon S.

    2015-07-15

    Efficient reduction of O2 to water is a central challenge in energy conversion and aerobic oxidation catalysis. In the present study, we investigate the electrochemical reduction of O2 with soluble organic nitroxyl and nitrogen oxide (NOx) mediators. When used alone, neither organic nitroxyls, such as TEMPO (2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-1-piperidinyl-N-oxyl), nor NOx species, such as sodium nitrite, are effective mediators of electrochemical O2 reduction. The combination of nitroxyl/NOx species, however, mediates sustained O2 reduction at electrochemical potentials of 0.19–0.33 V (vs. Fc/Fc+) in acetonitrile containing trifluoroacetic acid. Mechanistic analysis of the coupled redox reactions supports a process in which the nitrogen oxide catalyst drives aerobic oxidation of a nitroxyl mediator to an oxoammonium species, which then is reduced back to the nitroxyl at the cathode. The electrolysis potential is dictated by the oxoammonium/nitroxyl reduction potential. The high potentials observed with this ORR system benefit from the mechanism-based specificity for four-electron reduction of oxygen to water mediated by NOx species, together with kinetically efficient reduction of oxidized NOx species by TEMPO and other organic nitroxyls. This research was supported as part of the Center for Molecular Electrocatalysis, an Energy Frontier Research Center, funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences.

  2. SOx-NOx-Rox Box{trademark} flue gas clean-up demonstration. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-09-01

    Babcock and Wilcox`s (B and W) SOx-NOx-Rox Box{trademark} process effectively removes SOx, NOx and particulate (Rox) from flue gas generated from coal-fired boilers in a single unit operation, a high temperature baghouse. The SNRB technology utilizes dry sorbent injection upstream of the baghouse for removal of SOx and ammonia injection upstream of a zeolitic selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalyst incorporated in the baghouse to reduce NOx emissions. Because the SOx and NOx removal processes require operation at elevated gas temperatures (800--900 F) for high removal efficiency, high-temperature fabric filter bags are used in the baghouse. The SNRB technology evolved from the bench and laboratory pilot scale to be successfully demonstrated at the 5-MWe field scale. This report represents the completion of Milestone M14 as specified in the Work Plan. B and W tested the SNRB pollution control system at a 5-MWe demonstration facility at Ohio Edison`s R.E. Burger Plant located near Shadyside, Ohio. The design and operation were influenced by the results from laboratory pilot testing at B and W`s Alliance Research Center. The intent was to demonstrate the commercial feasibility of the SNRB process. The SNRB facility treated a 30,000 ACFM flue gas slipstream from Boiler No. 8. Operation of the facility began in May 1992 and was completed in May 1993. About 2,300 hours of high-temperature operation were achieved. The main emissions control performance goals of: greater than 70% SO{sub 2} removal using a calcium-based sorbent; greater than 90% NOx removal with minimal ammonia slip; and particulate emissions in compliance with the New Source Performance Standards (NSPS) of 0.03 lb/million Btu were exceeded simultaneously in the demonstration program when the facility was operated at optimal conditions. Testing also showed significant reductions in emissions of some hazardous air pollutants.

  3. Enhanced Combustion Low NOx Pulverized Coal Burner

    SciTech Connect

    Ray Chamberland; Aku Raino; David Towle

    2006-09-30

    For more than two decades, ALSTOM Power Inc. (ALSTOM) has developed a range of low cost, in-furnace technologies for NOx emissions control for the domestic U.S. pulverized coal fired boiler market. This includes ALSTOM's internally developed TFS 2000 firing system, and various enhancements to it developed in concert with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). As of 2004, more than 200 units representing approximately 75,000 MWe of domestic coal fired capacity have been retrofit with ALSTOM low NOx technology. Best of class emissions range from 0.18 lb/MMBtu for bituminous coals to 0.10 lb/MMBtu for subbituminous coals, with typical levels at 0.24 lb/MMBtu and 0.13 lb/MMBtu, respectively. Despite these gains, NOx emissions limits in the U.S. continue to ratchet down for new and existing (retrofit) boiler equipment. If enacted, proposed Clear Skies legislation will, by 2008, require an average, effective, domestic NOx emissions rate of 0.16 lb/MMBtu, which number will be reduced to 0.13 lb/MMBtu by 2018. Such levels represent a 60% and 67% reduction, respectively, from the effective 2000 level of 0.40 lb/MMBtu. Low cost solutions to meet such regulations, and in particular those that can avoid the need for a costly selective catalytic reduction system (SCR), provide a strong incentive to continue to improve low NOx firing system technology to meet current and anticipated NOx control regulations. In light of these needs, ALSTOM, in cooperation with the DOE, is developing an enhanced combustion, low NOx pulverized coal burner which, when integrated with ALSTOM's state-of-the-art, globally air staged low NOx firing systems, will provide a means to achieve less than 0.15 lb/MMBtu NOx at less than 3/4 the cost of an SCR with low to no impact on balance of plant issues when firing a high volatile bituminous coal. Such coals can be more economic to fire than subbituminous or Powder River Basin (PRB) coals, but are more problematic from a NOx control standpoint as existing

  4. Reformer assisted lean NO.sub.x catalyst aftertreatment system and method

    DOEpatents

    Kalyanaraman, Mohan; Park, Paul W.; Ragle, Christie S.

    2010-06-29

    A method and apparatus for catalytically processing a gas stream passing therethrough to reduce the presence of NO.sub.x therein, wherein the apparatus includes a first catalyst composed of a silver-containing alumina that is adapted for catalytically processing the gas stream at a first temperature range, a second catalyst composed of a copper-containing zeolite located downstream from the first catalyst, wherein the second catalyst is adapted for catalytically processing the gas stream at a lower second temperature range relative to the first temperature range, a hydrocarbon compound for injection into the gas stream upstream of the first catalyst to provide a reductant, and a reformer for reforming a portion of the hydrocarbon compound into H.sub.2 and/or oxygenated hydrocarbon for injection into the gas stream upstream of the first catalyst. The second catalyst is adapted to facilitate the reaction of reducing NOx into N.sub.2, whereby the intermediates are produced via the first catalyst reacting with NOx and hydrocarbons.

  5. Reactive Oxygen Species Derived from NOX3 and NOX5 Drive Differentiation of Human Oligodendrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Accetta, Roberta; Damiano, Simona; Morano, Annalisa; Mondola, Paolo; Paternò, Roberto; Avvedimento, Enrico V.; Santillo, Mariarosaria

    2016-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are signaling molecules that mediate stress response, apoptosis, DNA damage, gene expression and differentiation. We report here that differentiation of oligodendrocytes (OLs), the myelin forming cells in the CNS, is driven by ROS. To dissect the OL differentiation pathway, we used the cell line MO3-13, which display the molecular and cellular features of OL precursors. These cells exposed 1–4 days to low levels of H2O2 or to the protein kinase C (PKC) activator, phorbol-12-Myristate-13-Acetate (PMA) increased the expression of specific OL differentiation markers: the specific nuclear factor Olig-2, and Myelin Basic Protein (MBP), which was processed and accumulated selectively in membranes. The induction of differentiation genes was associated with the activation of ERK1-2 and phosphorylation of the nuclear cAMP responsive element binding protein 1 (CREB). PKC mediates ROS-induced differentiation because PKC depletion or bis-indolyl-maleimide (BIM), a PKC inhibitor, reversed the induction of differentiation markers by H2O2. H2O2 and PMA increased the expression of membrane-bound NADPH oxidases, NOX3 and NOX5. Selective depletion of these proteins inhibited differentiation induced by PMA. Furthermore, NOX5 silencing down regulated NOX3 mRNA levels, suggesting that ROS produced by NOX5 up-regulate NOX3 expression. These data unravel an elaborate network of ROS-generating enzymes (NOX5 to NOX3) activated by PKC and necessary for differentiation of OLs. Furthermore, NOX3 and NOX5, as inducers of OL differentiation, represent novel targets for therapies of demyelinating diseases, including multiple sclerosis, associated with impairment of OL differentiation. PMID:27313511

  6. Reactive Oxygen Species Derived from NOX3 and NOX5 Drive Differentiation of Human Oligodendrocytes.

    PubMed

    Accetta, Roberta; Damiano, Simona; Morano, Annalisa; Mondola, Paolo; Paternò, Roberto; Avvedimento, Enrico V; Santillo, Mariarosaria

    2016-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are signaling molecules that mediate stress response, apoptosis, DNA damage, gene expression and differentiation. We report here that differentiation of oligodendrocytes (OLs), the myelin forming cells in the CNS, is driven by ROS. To dissect the OL differentiation pathway, we used the cell line MO3-13, which display the molecular and cellular features of OL precursors. These cells exposed 1-4 days to low levels of H2O2 or to the protein kinase C (PKC) activator, phorbol-12-Myristate-13-Acetate (PMA) increased the expression of specific OL differentiation markers: the specific nuclear factor Olig-2, and Myelin Basic Protein (MBP), which was processed and accumulated selectively in membranes. The induction of differentiation genes was associated with the activation of ERK1-2 and phosphorylation of the nuclear cAMP responsive element binding protein 1 (CREB). PKC mediates ROS-induced differentiation because PKC depletion or bis-indolyl-maleimide (BIM), a PKC inhibitor, reversed the induction of differentiation markers by H2O2. H2O2 and PMA increased the expression of membrane-bound NADPH oxidases, NOX3 and NOX5. Selective depletion of these proteins inhibited differentiation induced by PMA. Furthermore, NOX5 silencing down regulated NOX3 mRNA levels, suggesting that ROS produced by NOX5 up-regulate NOX3 expression. These data unravel an elaborate network of ROS-generating enzymes (NOX5 to NOX3) activated by PKC and necessary for differentiation of OLs. Furthermore, NOX3 and NOX5, as inducers of OL differentiation, represent novel targets for therapies of demyelinating diseases, including multiple sclerosis, associated with impairment of OL differentiation. PMID:27313511

  7. CARBON NANOTUBES AND NANO-Ce-Zr OXIDES SUPPORTED H3PW12O40 FOR EFFECTIVE ADSORPTION-DECOMPOSITION OF NOx

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Lin; Wang, Rui

    2012-01-01

    Surface-modified carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and nano-Ce-Zr mixed oxides (CZO) were prepared and employed initially as supports of H3PW12O40 (HPW) for NOx adsorption-decomposition. Both CNTs and nano-CZO are favorable supports for HPW. After loading with HPW, the NOx adsorption efficiency increases, especially for HPW/CZO in which the highest adsorption efficiency can achieve 98% at the HPW loading of 70%, much higher than that of single HPW. NOx adsorption efficiency can be influenced considerably by catalyst preparing conditions, in particularly, ethyl alcohol is superior to water as solvent for HPW loading onto CNTs; the -OH containing CNTs shows better promotion effect on the adsorption of NOx than that containing -COOH when using absolute ethyl alcohol as solvent; mechanical grinding method is superior to incipient impregnation method in loading HPW onto the support of CZO. For both catalysts of HPW/CNTs and HPW/CZO, with the increase of HPW loading, the NOx adsorption efficiency tends to reach a peak value before dropping down. Heated from 150°C to 450°C at a rate of 50°C/min, the adsorbed NO was found to decompose into N2, O2 and N2O, and yields of N2 being 21.8% and 27.3%, respectively for HPW/CNTs and HPW/CZO were obtained.

  8. Trap style influences wild pig behavior and trapping success

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, B.L.; Holtfreter, R.W.; Ditchkoff, S.S.; Grand, J.B.

    2011-01-01

    Despite the efforts of many natural resource professionals, wild pig (Sus scrofa) populations are expanding in many areas of the world. Although many creative techniques for controlling pig populations are being explored, trapping has been and still is themost commonly usedmethod of population control formany public and private land managers. We conducted an observational study to examine the efficiency of 2 frequently used trap styles: a small, portable box-style trap and a larger, semi-permanent, corral-style trap.We used game cameras to examine patterns of trap entry by wild pigs around each style of trap, and we conducted a trapping session to compare trapping success between trap styles. Adult female and juvenile wild pigs entered both styles of trap more readily than did adult males, and adult males seemed particularly averse to entering box traps. Less than 10% of adult male visits to box traps resulted in entries, easily the least percentage of any class at any style of trap. Adult females entered corral traps approximately 2.2 times more often per visit than box traps and re-entered corral traps >2 times more frequently. Juveniles entered and reentered both box and corral traps at similar rates. Overall (all-class) entry-per-visit rates at corral traps (0.71) were nearly double that of box traps (0.37). Subsequent trapping data supported these preliminary entry data; the capture rate for corral traps was >4 times that of box traps. Our data suggest that corral traps are temporally and economically superior to box traps with respect to efficiency; that is, corral traps effectively trap more pigs per trap night at a lower cost per pig than do box traps. ?? 2011 The Wildlife Society.

  9. Binding of sulfur oxides in regeneration of cracking catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Pervushina, M.N.; Aliev, R.R.

    1988-01-01

    Research was conducted on the binding of sulfur oxides and the reduction of sulfur oxide discharges to the atmosphere during catalytic cracking catalyst regeneration. A reactor was charged with the test catalyst and a trap filled with a hydrogen peroxide solution was installed at the reactor outlet. Sulfuric acid formed in the trap was titrated with a potassium hydroxide solution. The carbon oxides that were evolved were determined by absorption in ascarite. Redistribution of the sulfur from the regeneration zone to the reactor was assessed using microbead additives. The results established that a reduction in sulfur content depended on the quality of the additive.

  10. Ecological and evolutionary traps

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schlaepfer, Martin A.; Runge, M.C.; Sherman, P.W.

    2002-01-01

    Organisms often rely on environmental cues to make behavioral and life-history decisions. However, in environments that have been altered suddenly by humans, formerly reliable cues might no longer be associated with adaptive outcomes. In such cases, organisms can become 'trapped' by their evolutionary responses to the cues and experience reduced survival or reproduction. Ecological traps occur when organisms make poor habitat choices based on cues that correlated formerly with habitat quality. Ecological traps are part of a broader phenomenon, evolutionary traps, involving a dissociation between cues that organisms use to make any behavioral or life-history decision and outcomes normally associated with that decision. A trap can lead to extinction if a population falls below a critical size threshold before adaptation to the novel environment occurs. Conservation and management protocols must be designed in light of, rather than in spite of, the behavioral mechanisms and evolutionary history of populations and species to avoid 'trapping' them.

  11. Microfabricated ion trap array

    DOEpatents

    Blain, Matthew G.; Fleming, James G.

    2006-12-26

    A microfabricated ion trap array, comprising a plurality of ion traps having an inner radius of order one micron, can be fabricated using surface micromachining techniques and materials known to the integrated circuits manufacturing and microelectromechanical systems industries. Micromachining methods enable batch fabrication, reduced manufacturing costs, dimensional and positional precision, and monolithic integration of massive arrays of ion traps with microscale ion generation and detection devices. Massive arraying enables the microscale ion traps to retain the resolution, sensitivity, and mass range advantages necessary for high chemical selectivity. The reduced electrode voltage enables integration of the microfabricated ion trap array with on-chip circuit-based rf operation and detection electronics (i.e., cell phone electronics). Therefore, the full performance advantages of the microfabricated ion trap array can be realized in truly field portable, handheld microanalysis systems.

  12. Immunohistochemical localization of Nox in mouse circumvallate papillae.

    PubMed

    Kashiwabara, Yoshiaki; Ambe, Kimiharu; Nakagawa, Toshihiro; Watanabe, Hiroki

    2015-12-01

    Recently it has been reported that reactive oxygen species plays an important role in several physiological processes. Reactive oxygen species are generated by reactive oxygen-synthesizing enzymes (Nox). We immunohistochemically investigated expression and localization of the Nox family in a mouse circumvallate papillae. In the epithelium of the circumvallate papilla, Nox 1, 2, 3, and 4, Noxo1, and Noxa1 were expressed. In the circumvallate papilla, Nox2 was more weakly expressed in the lateral than in the upper part, and Nox3 was not expressed. In the taste buds, Nox 1, 2, 3, and 4, Noxo1, and Noxa1 were expressed; the Nox expression pattern varied with the cell type. In type II cells, Nox 1, 3, and 4, Noxo1, and Noxa1 were expressed. In type III cells, Nox2, besides Nox 1, 3, and 4, Noxo1, and Noxa1, were specifically expressed, unlike in other taste bud cells. In the mouse circumvallate papilla, Nox is always expressed, suggesting the generation of reactive oxygen species. Of note, all cells comprising taste buds expressed Nox, with each showing a specific Nox expression pattern.

  13. System and method for diagnosing EGR performance using NOx sensor

    DOEpatents

    Mazur, Christopher John

    2003-12-23

    A method and system for diagnosing a condition of an EGR valve used in an engine system. The EGR valve controls the portion exhaust gases produced by such engine system and fed back to an intake of such engine system. The engine system includes a NOx sensor for measuring NOx in such exhaust. The method includes: determining a time rate of change in NOx measured by the NOx sensor; comparing the determined time rate of change in the measured NOx with a predetermined expected time rate of change in measured NOx; and determining the condition of the EGR valve as a function of such comparison. The method also includes: determining from NOx measured by the NOx sensor and engine operating conditions indications of instances when samples of such measured NOx are greater than an expected maximum NOx level for such engine condition and less than an expected minimum NOx level for such engine condition; and determining the condition of the EGR valve as a function of a statistical analysis of such indications. The method includes determining whether the NOx sensor is faulty and wherein the EGR condition determining includes determining whether the NOx sensor is faulty.

  14. Application of solid ash based catalysts in heterogeneous catalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Shaobin Wang

    2008-10-01

    Solid wastes, fly ash, and bottom ash are generated from coal and biomass combustion. Fly ash is mainly composed of various metal oxides and possesses higher thermal stability. Utilization of fly ash for other industrial applications provides a cost-effective and environmentally friendly way of recycling this solid waste, significantly reducing its environmental effects. On the one hand, due to the higher stability of its major component, aluminosilicates, fly ash could be employed as catalyst support by impregnation of other active components for various reactions. On the other hand, other chemical compounds in fly ash such as Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} could also provide an active component making fly ash a catalyst for some reactions. In this paper, physicochemical properties of fly ash and its applications for heterogeneous catalysis as a catalyst support or catalyst in a variety of catalytic reactions were reviewed. Fly-ash-supported catalysts have shown good catalytic activities for H{sub 2} production, deSOx, deNOx, hydrocarbon oxidation, and hydrocracking, which are comparable to commercially used catalysts. As a catalyst itself, fly ash can also be effective for gas-phase oxidation of volatile organic compounds, aqueous-phase oxidation of organics, solid plastic pyrolysis, and solvent-free organic synthesis. 107 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Electrochemical catalyst recovery method

    DOEpatents

    Silva, Laura J.; Bray, Lane A.

    1995-01-01

    A method of recovering catalyst material from latent catalyst material solids includes: a) combining latent catalyst material solids with a liquid acid anolyte solution and a redox material which is soluble in the acid anolyte solution to form a mixture; b) electrochemically oxidizing the redox material within the mixture into a dissolved oxidant, the oxidant having a potential for oxidation which is effectively higher than that of the latent catalyst material; c) reacting the oxidant with the latent catalyst material to oxidize the latent catalyst material into at least one oxidized catalyst species which is soluble within the mixture and to reduce the oxidant back into dissolved redox material; and d) recovering catalyst material from the oxidized catalyst species of the mixture. The invention is expected to be particularly useful in recovering spent catalyst material from petroleum hydroprocessing reaction waste products having adhered sulfides, carbon, hydrocarbons, and undesired metals, and as well as in other industrial applications.

  16. Electrochemical catalyst recovery method

    DOEpatents

    Silva, L.J.; Bray, L.A.

    1995-05-30

    A method of recovering catalyst material from latent catalyst material solids includes: (a) combining latent catalyst material solids with a liquid acid anolyte solution and a redox material which is soluble in the acid anolyte solution to form a mixture; (b) electrochemically oxidizing the redox material within the mixture into a dissolved oxidant, the oxidant having a potential for oxidation which is effectively higher than that of the latent catalyst material; (c) reacting the oxidant with the latent catalyst material to oxidize the latent catalyst material into at least one oxidized catalyst species which is soluble within the mixture and to reduce the oxidant back into dissolved redox material; and (d) recovering catalyst material from the oxidized catalyst species of the mixture. The invention is expected to be particularly useful in recovering spent catalyst material from petroleum hydroprocessing reaction waste products having adhered sulfides, carbon, hydrocarbons, and undesired metals, and as well as in other industrial applications. 3 figs.

  17. Neutral atom traps.

    SciTech Connect

    Pack, Michael Vern

    2008-12-01

    This report describes progress in designing a neutral atom trap capable of trapping sub millikelvin atom in a magnetic trap and shuttling the atoms across the atom chip from a collection area to an optical cavity. The numerical simulation and atom chip design are discussed. Also, discussed are preliminary calculations of quantum noise sources in Kerr nonlinear optics measurements based on electromagnetically induced transparency. These types of measurements may be important for quantum nondemolition measurements at the few photon limit.

  18. Enhanced Combustion Low NOx Pulverized Coal Burner

    SciTech Connect

    David Towle; Richard Donais; Todd Hellewell; Robert Lewis; Robert Schrecengost

    2007-06-30

    For more than two decades, Alstom Power Inc. (Alstom) has developed a range of low cost, infurnace technologies for NOx emissions control for the domestic U.S. pulverized coal fired boiler market. This includes Alstom's internally developed TFS 2000{trademark} firing system, and various enhancements to it developed in concert with the U.S. Department of Energy. As of the date of this report, more than 270 units representing approximately 80,000 MWe of domestic coal fired capacity have been retrofit with Alstom low NOx technology. Best of class emissions range from 0.18 lb/MMBtu for bituminous coal to 0.10 lb/MMBtu for subbituminous coal, with typical levels at 0.24 lb/MMBtu and 0.13 lb/MMBtu, respectively. Despite these gains, NOx emissions limits in the U.S. continue to ratchet down for new and existing boiler equipment. On March 10, 2005, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) announced the Clean Air Interstate Rule (CAIR). CAIR requires 25 Eastern states to reduce NOx emissions from the power generation sector by 1.7 million tons in 2009 and 2.0 million tons by 2015. Low cost solutions to meet such regulations, and in particular those that can avoid the need for a costly selective catalytic reduction system (SCR), provide a strong incentive to continue to improve low NOx firing system technology to meet current and anticipated NOx control regulations. The overall objective of the work is to develop an enhanced combustion, low NOx pulverized coal burner, which, when integrated with Alstom's state-of-the-art, globally air staged low NOx firing systems will provide a means to achieve: Less than 0.15 lb/MMBtu NOx emissions when firing a high volatile Eastern or Western bituminous coal, Less than 0.10 lb/MMBtu NOx emissions when firing a subbituminous coal, NOx reduction costs at least 25% lower than the costs of an SCR, Validation of the NOx control technology developed through large (15 MWt) pilot scale demonstration, and Documentation required for economic

  19. Long-Life Catalyst

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    STC Catalysts, Inc. (SCi) manufactures a noble metal reducible oxide catalyst consisting primarily of platinum and tin dioxide deposited on a ceramic substrate. It is an ambient temperature oxidation catalyst that was developed primarily for Carbon Dioxide Lasers.The catalyst was developed by the NASA Langley Research Center for the Laser Atmospheric Wind Sounder Program (LAWS) which was intended to measure wind velocity on a global basis. There are a number of NASA owned patents covering various aspects of the catalyst.

  20. Low NOx heavy fuel combustor concept program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, D. J.; Kubasco, A. J.

    1982-01-01

    Three simulated coal gas fuels based on hydrogen and carbon monoxide were tested during an experimental evaluation with a rich lean can combustor: these were a simulated Winkler gas, Lurgi gas and Blue Water gas. All three were simulated by mixing together the necessary pure component species, to levels typical of fuel gases produced from coal. The Lurgi gas was also evaluated with ammonia addition. Fuel burning in a rich lean mode was emphasized. Only the Blue Water gas, however, could be operated in such fashion. This showed that the expected NOx signature form could be obtained, although the absolute values of NOx were above the 75 ppm goals for most operating conditions. Lean combustion produced very low NOx well below 75 ppm with the Winkler and Lurgi gases. In addition, these low levels were not significantly impacted by changes in operating conditions.

  1. 40 CFR 96.53 - Recordation of NOX allowance allocations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS FOR STATE... allocated to an allocation set-aside. (c) Serial numbers for allocated NO X allowances. When allocating...

  2. 40 CFR 96.53 - Recordation of NOX allowance allocations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO 2 TRADING PROGRAMS FOR STATE... allocated to an allocation set-aside. (c) Serial numbers for allocated NO X allowances. When allocating...

  3. Control of NOx Emissions from Stationary Combustion Sources

    EPA Science Inventory

    In general, NOx control technologies are categorized as being either primary control technologies or secondary control technologies. Primary control technologies reduce the formation of NOx in the primary combustion zone. In contrast, secondary control technologies destroy the NO...

  4. Improved low NOx firing systems for pulverized coal combustion

    SciTech Connect

    McCarthy, K.; Laux, S.; Grusha, J.; Rosin, T.; Hausman, G.L.

    1999-07-01

    More stringent emission limits or the addition of post combustion NOx control create the need for improvements of NOx emissions from pulverized coal boilers. Many boilers retrofitted with Low NOx technology during Phase 1 and Phase 2 of the CAAA fail or marginally meet their requirements. Technical solutions range from addition of overfire air and state-of-the-art low NOx burners to low cost additions of combustion enhancements. Regardless of the combustion NOx control method used, stoichiometries local to the burners must be maintained at the designed values at all times to provide high NOx performance at low efficiency loss due to unburned fuel. This paper describes Foster Wheeler's approach to NOx emission improvements for existing low NOx firing systems. The technology to measure air and coal flow individually for each burner and to control the parameters for optimum combustion are presented and discussed. Field experience shows the installation and advantages of the technology.

  5. Mechanism of propene poisoning on Fe-ZSM-5 for selective catalytic reduction of NO(x) with ammonia.

    PubMed

    Li, Junhua; Zhu, Ronghai; Cheng, Yisun; Lambert, Christine K; Yang, Ralph T

    2010-03-01

    Application of Fe-zeolites for urea-SCR of NO(x) in diesel engine is limited by catalyst deactivation with hydrocarbons. In this work, we investigated the effect of propene on the activity of Fe-ZSM-5 for selective catalytic reduction of NO(x) with ammonia (NH(3)-SCR), and proposed a deactivation mechanism of Fe(3+) active site blockage by propene residue. The NO conversion decreased in the presence of propene at various temperatures, while the effect was not significant when NO was replaced by NO(2) in the feed, especially at low temperatures (<300 degrees C). The surface area and pore volume were decreased due to carbonaceous deposition. The site blockage was mainly on Fe(3+) sites on which NO was to be oxidized to NO(2). The activity for NO oxidation to NO(2) was significantly inhibited on a propene poisoned catalyst below 400 degrees C. The adsorption of NH(3) on the Bronsted acid sites to form NH(4)(+) was not hindered even on the propene poisoned catalyst, and the amount of absorbed NH(3) was still abundant and enough to react with NO(2) to generate N(2). The hydrocarbon oxygenates such as formate, acetate, and containing nitrogen organic compounds were observed on catalyst surface, however, no graphitic carbonaceous deposit was formed.

  6. Modeling Species Inhibition and Competitive Adsorption in Urea-SCR Catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Devarakonda, Maruthi N.; Tonkyn, Russell G.; Lee, Jong H.

    2012-04-16

    Although the urea-SCR technology exhibits high NOx reduction efficiency over a wide range of temperatures among the lean NOx reduction technologies, further improvement in low-temperature performance is required to meet the future emission standards and to lower the system cost. In order to improve the catalyst technologies and optimize the system performance, it is critical to understand the reaction mechanisms and catalyst behaviors with respect to operating conditions. Urea-SCR catalysts exhibit poor NOx reduction performance at low temperature operating conditions (T < 150 C). We postulate that the poor performance is either due to NH3 storage inhibition by species like hydrocarbons or due to competitive adsorption between NH3 and other adsorbates such as H2O and hydrocarbons in the exhaust stream. In this paper we attempt to develop one-dimensional models to characterize inhibition and competitive adsorption in Fe-zeolite based urea-SCR catalysts based on bench reactor experiments. We further use the competitive adsorption (CA) model to develop a standard SCR model based on previously identified kinetics. Simulation results indicate that the CA model predicts catalyst outlet NO and NH3 concentrations with minimal root mean square error.

  7. Generation and Trapping of Ketenes in Flow

    PubMed Central

    Henry, Cyril; Bolien, David; Ibanescu, Bogdan; Bloodworth, Sally; Harrowven, David C; Zhang, Xunli; Craven, Andy; Sneddon, Helen F; Whitby, Richard J

    2015-01-01

    Ketenes were generated by the thermolysis of alkoxyalkynes under flow conditions, and then trapped with amines and alcohols to cleanly give amides and esters. For a 10 min reaction time, temperatures of 180, 160, and 140 °C were required for >95 % conversion of EtO, iPrO, and tBuO alkoxyalkynes, respectively. Variation of the temperature and flow rate with inline monitoring of the output by IR spectroscopy allowed the kinetic parameters for the conversion of 1-ethoxy-1-octyne to be easily estimated (Ea = 105.4 kJ/mol). Trapping of the in-situ-generated ketenes by alcohols to give esters required the addition of a tertiary amine catalyst to prevent competitive [2+2] addition of the ketene to the alkoxyalkyne precursor. PMID:26097406

  8. 40 CFR 97.41 - Timing requirements for NOX allowance allocations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Timing requirements for NOX allowance... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS NOX Allowance Allocations § 97.41 Timing requirements for NOX allowance allocations. (a) The NOX allowance...

  9. 40 CFR 97.41 - Timing requirements for NOX allowance allocations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Timing requirements for NOX allowance... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS NOX Allowance Allocations § 97.41 Timing requirements for NOX allowance allocations. (a) The NOX allowance...

  10. 40 CFR 97.41 - Timing requirements for NOX allowance allocations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Timing requirements for NOX allowance... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS NOX Allowance Allocations § 97.41 Timing requirements for NOX allowance allocations. (a) The NOX allowance...

  11. 40 CFR 97.41 - Timing requirements for NOX allowance allocations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Timing requirements for NOX allowance... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS NOX Allowance Allocations § 97.41 Timing requirements for NOX allowance allocations. (a) The NOX allowance...

  12. NOx reduction methods and apparatuses

    DOEpatents

    Tonkyn, Russell G.; Barlow, Stephan E.; Balmer, M. Lou; Maupin, Gary D.

    2004-10-26

    A NO.sub.x reduction method includes treating a first gas containing NO.sub.x, producing a second gas containing NO.sub.2, reducing a portion of the NO.sub.2 in the second gas to N.sub.2, and producing a third gas containing less NO.sub.x than the first gas, substantially all of the third gas NO.sub.x being NO. The method also includes treating the third gas, producing a fourth gas containing NO.sub.2, reducing a portion of the NO.sub.2 in the fourth gas to N.sub.2, and producing a fifth gas containing less NO.sub.x than the third gas, substantially all of the fifth gas NO.sub.x being NO. Treating the first and/or third gas can include treatment with a plasma. Reducing a portion of the NO.sub.2 in the second and/or fourth gas can include reducing with a catalyst. The method can further include controlling energy consumption of the plasmas independent of each other.

  13. Direct Measurements of NOx Produced by Lightning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, M.; Cooray, V.; Rakov, V. A.; Uman, M. A.; Liyanage, P.; Decarlo, B. A.; Jerauld, J.; Olsen, R. C.

    2006-12-01

    We present the first direct measurements of NOx generated by lightning. In July 2005, three negative lightning flashes were triggered using the rocket-and-wire technique at the International Center for Lightning Research and Testing (ICLRT) at Camp Blanding, Florida. The NOx produced by these three rocket- triggered flashes was measured, using the chemiluminescence method, by isolating a 3-cm long section of the lightning channel within a discharge chamber whose volume was 0.77 m3. We measured NOx individually for the first flash, which was triggered on July 15, and cumulatively for the other two flashes, which were triggered within about eleven minutes of each other on July 31. The July 15 flash contained only an initial- stage current and no return strokes. Each of the July 31 flashes contained an initial-stage current and either one or two return strokes. The initial-stage current in each case had a duration in the range from 260 to 360 ms, and one return stroke in each July 31 flash was followed by a continuing current whose duration was greater than 40 ms. The NOx production by the July 15 flash without return strokes (total charge transfer of 77 C) was 2.0×10^{22} molecules per meter of lightning channel, and that by the two July 31 flashes with return strokes (total charge transfer of 108 C) was 2.4×10^{22} molecules per meter. The NOx production per unit charge for these two measurements was similar: 2.6×1020 and 2.2×1020 molecules per meter per coulomb. It appears that the NOx production is primarily from long-duration, steady currents, as opposed to microsecond-scale impulsive return stroke currents. This observation implies that cloud discharges, which transfer, on average, larger charges than ground discharges, but do not contain return strokes (although they do contain typically shorter and presumably smaller amplitude microsecond-scale pulses) may be as effective as (or more effective than) cloud-to-ground discharges in producing NOx in the

  14. Possible Catalytic Effects of Ice Particles on the Production of NOx by Lightning Discharges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2010-01-01

    One mechanism by which NO(x) is produced in the atmosphere is heating in lightning discharge channels. Since most viable proposed electrification mechanisms involve ice crystals, it is reasonable to assume that lightning discharge channels frequently pass through fields of ice particles of various kinds. We address the question of whether ice crystals may serve as catalysts for the production of NO(x) by lightning discharges. If so, and if the effect is large, it would need to be taken into account in estimates of global NO(x) production by lightning. In this study, we make a series of plausible assumptions about the temperature and concentration of reactant species in the environment of discharges and we postulate a mechanism by which ice crystals are able to adsorb nitrogen atoms. We then compare production rates between uncatalyzed and catalytic reactions at 2000 K, 3000 K, and 4000 K. Catalyzed NO production rates are greater at 2000 K, whereas uncatalyzed production occurs most rapidly at 4000 K. 2010

  15. Simultaneous suppression of PCDD/F and NO(x) during municipal solid waste incineration.

    PubMed

    Lin, Xiaoqing; Yan, Mi; Dai, Ahui; Zhan, Mingxiu; Fu, Jianying; Li, Xiaodong; Chen, Tong; Lu, Shengyong; Buekens, Alfons; Yan, Jianhua

    2015-05-01

    Thiourea was tested as a dioxins inhibitor in a full-scale municipal solid waste incinerator with high capacity (34 t h(-1)). The suppressant, featuring a high S- and N-content, was converted into liquor and then injected (35 kg h(-1)) into the furnace (850 °C) through the inlets already used for Selective Non-Catalytic Reduction (SNCR) of flue gas NOx. The first results show that thiourea reduces the dioxins in flue gas by 55.8 wt.%, those in fly ash by 90.3 wt.% and the total dioxins emission factor by 91.0 wt.%. The concentration of PCDD/Fs was 0.08 ng TEQ Nm(-3), below the national standard of 0.1 ng TEQ Nm(-3). The weight average chlorination degree of dioxins decreases slightly after adding the inhibitor, indicating that it suppresses both the formation and the chlorination of dioxins. Analysis of fly ash by scanning electron microscope (SEM) suggests that the particle size becomes larger after adding the inhibitor. Further analysis using an energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS) reveals that the sulphur content in fly ash rises, but the chlorine content declines when adding thiourea. These results suggest that poisoning the metal catalyst and blocking the chlorination are probably responsible for suppression. NOx reduction attains 42.6 wt.%. These tests are paving the way for further industrial application and assist in controlling the future emissions of dioxins and NOx from MSWI.

  16. Simultaneous suppression of PCDD/F and NO(x) during municipal solid waste incineration.

    PubMed

    Lin, Xiaoqing; Yan, Mi; Dai, Ahui; Zhan, Mingxiu; Fu, Jianying; Li, Xiaodong; Chen, Tong; Lu, Shengyong; Buekens, Alfons; Yan, Jianhua

    2015-05-01

    Thiourea was tested as a dioxins inhibitor in a full-scale municipal solid waste incinerator with high capacity (34 t h(-1)). The suppressant, featuring a high S- and N-content, was converted into liquor and then injected (35 kg h(-1)) into the furnace (850 °C) through the inlets already used for Selective Non-Catalytic Reduction (SNCR) of flue gas NOx. The first results show that thiourea reduces the dioxins in flue gas by 55.8 wt.%, those in fly ash by 90.3 wt.% and the total dioxins emission factor by 91.0 wt.%. The concentration of PCDD/Fs was 0.08 ng TEQ Nm(-3), below the national standard of 0.1 ng TEQ Nm(-3). The weight average chlorination degree of dioxins decreases slightly after adding the inhibitor, indicating that it suppresses both the formation and the chlorination of dioxins. Analysis of fly ash by scanning electron microscope (SEM) suggests that the particle size becomes larger after adding the inhibitor. Further analysis using an energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS) reveals that the sulphur content in fly ash rises, but the chlorine content declines when adding thiourea. These results suggest that poisoning the metal catalyst and blocking the chlorination are probably responsible for suppression. NOx reduction attains 42.6 wt.%. These tests are paving the way for further industrial application and assist in controlling the future emissions of dioxins and NOx from MSWI. PMID:25720846

  17. 40 CFR 97.24 - NOX Budget permit revisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false NOX Budget permit revisions. 97.24 Section 97.24 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS Permits § 97.24...

  18. 40 CFR 97.23 - NOX Budget permit contents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false NOX Budget permit contents. 97.23 Section 97.23 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS Permits § 97.23...

  19. 40 CFR 89.317 - NOX converter check.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., the chemiluminescent oxides of nitrogen analyzer shall be checked for NO2 to NO converter efficiency... concentration of residual NO. (i) Switch the oxides of nitrogen analyzer to the NOX mode and measure total NOX... of the NOX generator to the sample inlet of the oxides of nitrogen analyzer which has been......

  20. 40 CFR 90.319 - NOX converter check.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Provisions § 90.319 NOX converter check. (a) The efficiency of the converter used for the conversion of NO2... percent of the NO concentration). The NOX analyzer must be in the NO mode so that the span gas does not... the highest range which will give the reduction. (6) Switch the NO analyzer to the NOX mode...

  1. 40 CFR 90.319 - NOX converter check.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Provisions § 90.319 NOX converter check. (a) The efficiency of the converter used for the conversion of NO2... percent of the NO concentration). The NOX analyzer must be in the NO mode so that the span gas does not... the highest range which will give the reduction. (6) Switch the NO analyzer to the NOX mode...

  2. 40 CFR 89.317 - NOX converter check.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., the chemiluminescent oxides of nitrogen analyzer shall be checked for NO2 to NO converter efficiency... concentration of residual NO. (i) Switch the oxides of nitrogen analyzer to the NOX mode and measure total NOX... of the NOX generator to the sample inlet of the oxides of nitrogen analyzer which has been......

  3. 40 CFR 90.319 - NOX converter check.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Provisions § 90.319 NOX converter check. (a) The efficiency of the converter used for the conversion of NO2... percent of the NO concentration). The NOX analyzer must be in the NO mode so that the span gas does not... the highest range which will give the reduction. (6) Switch the NO analyzer to the NOX mode...

  4. 40 CFR 97.42 - NOX allowance allocations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Allocations § 97.42 NOX allowance allocations. (a)(1) The heat input (in mmBtu) used for calculating NOX...'s heat input for the control periods in 1995 through 1998; or (B) For a unit under § 97.4(a)(2), the... control periods in 1996 through 1998, the average of the two highest amounts of the unit's heat input...

  5. 40 CFR 96.23 - NOX Budget permit contents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false NOX Budget permit contents. 96.23 Section 96.23 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS... Permits § 96.23 NOX Budget permit contents. (a) Each NOX Budget permit (including any draft or...

  6. Liquid metal cold trap

    DOEpatents

    Hundal, Rolv

    1976-01-01

    A cold trap assembly for removing impurities from a liquid metal being provided with a hole between the incoming impure liquid metal and purified outgoing liquid metal which acts as a continuous bleed means and thus prevents the accumulation of cover gases within the cold trap assembly.

  7. [Selective reduction of NO over indium catalysts prepared by different methods].

    PubMed

    Cui, Xiang-yu; Hao, Ji-ming; Fu, Lin-xin; Li, Jun-hua; Liu, Zhi-ming

    2006-02-01

    Alumina-supported indium catalysts with different metal loadings were prepared by various methods including impregnation, co-precipitation and sol-gel. Activity tests were carried out on the selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NO by propene in excess O2 over the catalysts. And the effects of oxygen concentration in reaction gas feed on catalytic activities were examined. The results show that In/Al2O3 catalysts possess high deNO2 activity, and the preparation methods have obvious effects on catalytic activities. The catalysts prepared by co-precipitation or sol-gel method exhibited high NO, conversion to N2 about 90%; the impregnation samples have poor activities, the highest conversion rate not exceeding 60%. The O2 concentration in gas feed has significant effects on the highest conversion rates of NOx reduction and the corresponding reaction temperatures. Along with the increasing of O2 concentration, the temperatures mentioned above declined. The introduction of water into the gas feed depressed greatly the deNO2 activities of In/Al2O3 catalysts. Compared to many other metals as active components of deNOx catalysts, indium has a prominent different behavior that the respective best metal loadings of the catalysts prepared by these three diverse preparation methods have little difference, being all around 1% to approximately 2%.

  8. Optical Trapping of Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Bergeron, Jarrah; Zehtabi-Oskuie, Ana; Ghaffari, Saeedeh; Pang, Yuanjie; Gordon, Reuven

    2013-01-01

    Optical trapping is a technique for immobilizing and manipulating small objects in a gentle way using light, and it has been widely applied in trapping and manipulating small biological particles. Ashkin and co-workers first demonstrated optical tweezers using a single focused beam1. The single beam trap can be described accurately using the perturbative gradient force formulation in the case of small Rayleigh regime particles1. In the perturbative regime, the optical power required for trapping a particle scales as the inverse fourth power of the particle size. High optical powers can damage dielectric particles and cause heating. For instance, trapped latex spheres of 109 nm in diameter were destroyed by a 15 mW beam in 25 sec1, which has serious implications for biological matter2,3. A self-induced back-action (SIBA) optical trapping was proposed to trap 50 nm polystyrene spheres in the non-perturbative regime4. In a non-perturbative regime, even a small particle with little permittivity contrast to the background can influence significantly the ambient electromagnetic field and induce a large optical force. As a particle enters an illuminated aperture, light transmission increases dramatically because of dielectric loading. If the particle attempts to leave the aperture, decreased transmission causes a change in momentum outwards from the hole and, by Newton's Third Law, results in a force on the particle inwards into the hole, trapping the particle. The light transmission can be monitored; hence, the trap can become a sensor. The SIBA trapping technique can be further improved by using a double-nanohole structure. The double-nanohole structure has been shown to give a strong local field enhancement5,6. Between the two sharp tips of the double-nanohole, a small particle can cause a large change in optical transmission, thereby inducing a large optical force. As a result, smaller nanoparticles can be trapped, such as 12 nm silicate spheres7 and 3.4 nm

  9. Nonlinear integrable ion traps

    SciTech Connect

    Nagaitsev, S.; Danilov, V.; /SNS Project, Oak Ridge

    2011-10-01

    Quadrupole ion traps can be transformed into nonlinear traps with integrable motion by adding special electrostatic potentials. This can be done with both stationary potentials (electrostatic plus a uniform magnetic field) and with time-dependent electric potentials. These potentials are chosen such that the single particle Hamilton-Jacobi equations of motion are separable in some coordinate systems. The electrostatic potentials have several free adjustable parameters allowing for a quadrupole trap to be transformed into, for example, a double-well or a toroidal-well system. The particle motion remains regular, non-chaotic, integrable in quadratures, and stable for a wide range of parameters. We present two examples of how to realize such a system in case of a time-independent (the Penning trap) as well as a time-dependent (the Paul trap) configuration.

  10. Trapping radioactive ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kluge, H.-J.; Blaum, K.

    2004-12-01

    Trapping devices for atomic and nuclear physics experiments with radioactive ions are becoming more and more important at accelerator facilities. While about ten years ago only one online Penning trap experiment existed, namely ISOLTRAP at ISOLDE/CERN, meanwhile almost every radioactive beam facility has installed or plans an ion trap setup. This article gives an overview on ion traps in the operation, construction or planing phase which will be used for fundamental studies with short-lived radioactive nuclides such as mass spectrometry, laser spectroscopy and nuclear decay spectroscopy. In addition, this article summarizes the use of gas cells and radiofrequency quadrupole (Paul) traps at different facilities as a versatile tool for ion beam manipulation like retardation, cooling, bunching, and cleaning.

  11. Optically programmable excitonic traps

    PubMed Central

    Alloing, Mathieu; Lemaître, Aristide; Galopin, Elisabeth; Dubin, François

    2013-01-01

    With atomic systems, optically programmed trapping potentials have led to remarkable progress in quantum optics and quantum information science. Programmable trapping potentials could have a similar impact on studies of semiconductor quasi-particles, particularly excitons. However, engineering such potentials inside a semiconductor heterostructure remains an outstanding challenge and optical techniques have not yet achieved a high degree of control. Here, we synthesize optically programmable trapping potentials for indirect excitons of bilayer heterostructures. Our approach relies on the injection and spatial patterning of charges trapped in a field-effect device. We thereby imprint in-situ and on-demand electrostatic traps into which we optically inject cold and dense ensembles of excitons. This technique creates new opportunities to improve state-of-the-art technologies for the study of collective quantum behavior of excitons and also for the functionalisation of emerging exciton-based opto-electronic circuits. PMID:23546532

  12. Ammonia and NO/NOx measurement for DE-NOx applications

    SciTech Connect

    Kita, D.

    1996-10-01

    A number of critical environmental goals may be met by controlling nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions from combustion sources. These goals include responding to 1990 Clean Air Act Amendment requirements, reduction of human exposure to harmful concentrations of nitric oxide (NO) and nitrogen dioxide (NO{sub 2}), acid deposition control, and urban smog abatement. Technologies utilizing either heterogeneous or homogeneous reactions of NOx with ammonia (NH{sub 3}) are considered major control options. Crucial to the use of such technologies is the continuous measurement of NO/NOx and NH{sub 3} in order to access (and control) performance criteria such as NOx conversion efficiency and NH{sub 3} emissions (NH{sub 3} SLIP) .This paper describes a continuous emission sonitoring system for NO, NO{sub 2}, and NH{sub 3} based upon NO chemiluminescence as well as presenting preliminary field data.

  13. A Portable Emissions Measurement System (PEMS) study of NOx and primary NO2 emissions from Euro 6 diesel passenger cars and comparison with COPERT emission factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Driscoll, Rosalind; ApSimon, Helen M.; Oxley, Tim; Molden, Nick; Stettler, Marc E. J.; Thiyagarajah, Aravinth

    2016-11-01

    Real world emissions of oxides of nitrogen (NOx) often greatly exceed those achieved in the laboratory based type approval process. In this paper the real world emissions from a substantial sample of the latest Euro 6 diesel passenger cars are presented with a focus on NOx and primary NO2. Portable Emissions Measurement System (PEMS) data is analysed from 39 Euro 6 diesel passenger cars over a test route comprised of urban and motorway sections. The sample includes vehicles installed with exhaust gas recirculation (EGR), lean NOx traps (LNT), or selective catalytic reduction (SCR). The results show wide variability in NOx emissions from 1 to 22 times the type approval limit. The average NOx emission, 0.36 (sd. 0.36) g km-1, is 4.5 times the Euro 6 limit. The average fraction primary NO2 (fNO2) is 44 (sd. 20) %. Higher emissions during the urban section of the route are attributed to an increased number of acceleration events. Comparisons between PEMS measurements and COPERT speed dependent emissions factors show PEMS measurements to be on average 1.6 times higher than COPERT estimates for NOx and 2.5 times for NO2. However, by removing the 5 most polluting vehicles average emissions were reduced considerably.

  14. NOx Emission Reduction by Oscillating Combustion

    SciTech Connect

    2005-09-01

    This project focuses on a new technology that reduces NOx emissions while increasing furnace efficiency for both air- and oxygen-fired furnaces. Oscillating combustion is a retrofit technology that involves the forced oscillation of the fuel flow rate to a furnace. These oscillations create successive, fuel-rich and fuel-lean zones within the furnace.

  15. Low NOx heavy fuel combustor concept program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, D. J.; Lecren, R. T.; Batakis, A. P.

    1981-01-01

    A total of twelve low NOx combustor configurations, embodying three different combustion concepts, were designed and fabricated as modular units. These configurations were evaluated experimentally for exhaust emission levels and for mechanical integrity. Emissions data were obtained in depth on two of the configurations.

  16. 40 CFR 96.388 - CAIR NOX Ozone Season allowance allocations to CAIR NOX Ozone Season opt-in units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false CAIR NOX Ozone Season allowance allocations to CAIR NOX Ozone Season opt-in units. 96.388 Section 96.388 Protection of Environment... SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS FOR STATE IMPLEMENTATION PLANS CAIR NOX Ozone Season Opt-in Units § 96.388...

  17. 40 CFR 96.388 - CAIR NOX Ozone Season allowance allocations to CAIR NOX Ozone Season opt-in units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false CAIR NOX Ozone Season allowance allocations to CAIR NOX Ozone Season opt-in units. 96.388 Section 96.388 Protection of Environment... SO 2 TRADING PROGRAMS FOR STATE IMPLEMENTATION PLANS CAIR NOX Ozone Season Opt-in Units § 96.388...

  18. 40 CFR 96.388 - CAIR NOX Ozone Season allowance allocations to CAIR NOX Ozone Season opt-in units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false CAIR NOX Ozone Season allowance allocations to CAIR NOX Ozone Season opt-in units. 96.388 Section 96.388 Protection of Environment... SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS FOR STATE IMPLEMENTATION PLANS CAIR NOX Ozone Season Opt-in Units § 96.388...

  19. 40 CFR 96.388 - CAIR NOX Ozone Season allowance allocations to CAIR NOX Ozone Season opt-in units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false CAIR NOX Ozone Season allowance allocations to CAIR NOX Ozone Season opt-in units. 96.388 Section 96.388 Protection of Environment... SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS FOR STATE IMPLEMENTATION PLANS CAIR NOX Ozone Season Opt-in Units § 96.388...

  20. 40 CFR 96.388 - CAIR NOX Ozone Season allowance allocations to CAIR NOX Ozone Season opt-in units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false CAIR NOX Ozone Season allowance allocations to CAIR NOX Ozone Season opt-in units. 96.388 Section 96.388 Protection of Environment... SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS FOR STATE IMPLEMENTATION PLANS CAIR NOX Ozone Season Opt-in Units § 96.388...

  1. 40 CFR 75.71 - Specific provisions for monitoring NOX and heat input for the purpose of calculating NOX mass...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... and heat input for the purpose of calculating NOX mass emissions. 75.71 Section 75.71 Protection of... MONITORING NOX Mass Emissions Provisions § 75.71 Specific provisions for monitoring NOX and heat input for... and for a flow monitoring system and an O2 or CO2 diluent gas monitoring system to measure heat...

  2. 40 CFR 75.71 - Specific provisions for monitoring NOX and heat input for the purpose of calculating NOX mass...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... and heat input for the purpose of calculating NOX mass emissions. 75.71 Section 75.71 Protection of... MONITORING NOX Mass Emissions Provisions § 75.71 Specific provisions for monitoring NOX and heat input for... and for a flow monitoring system and an O2 or CO2 diluent gas monitoring system to measure heat...

  3. 40 CFR 75.71 - Specific provisions for monitoring NOX and heat input for the purpose of calculating NOX mass...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... and heat input for the purpose of calculating NOX mass emissions. 75.71 Section 75.71 Protection of... MONITORING NOX Mass Emissions Provisions § 75.71 Specific provisions for monitoring NOX and heat input for... and for a flow monitoring system and an O2 or CO2 diluent gas monitoring system to measure heat...

  4. Role of Nox4 in murine models of kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Babelova, Andrea; Avaniadi, Despina; Jung, Oliver; Fork, Christian; Beckmann, Janet; Kosowski, Judith; Weissmann, Norbert; Anilkumar, Narayana; Shah, Ajay M; Schaefer, Liliana; Schröder, Katrin; Brandes, Ralf P

    2012-08-15

    Nox4 is a hydrogen peroxide-producing NADPH oxidase highly expressed in the kidney which has been linked to epithelial cell injury and diabetic-induced cellular dysfunction in cultured cells. The role of the enzyme for renal pathology in vivo, however, is unclear. To address this, three experimental animal models of renal injury (streptozotocin diabetes I, unilateral ureteral ligation (UUO), and 5/6 nephrectomy (5/6Nx)) were studied in either Nox4-inducible (Nox4(*/*)) or constitutive knockout (Nox4(-/-)) mice. Nox4 contributed more than 80% of diphenylene iodonium-sensitive H(2)O(2) formation of freshly isolated tubules determined by Amplex Red assay. In streptozotocin diabetes, acute deletion of Nox4 by tamoxifen-activated cre-recombinase increased albuminuria, whereas matrix deposition was similar between WT and Nox4(*/*) mice. Interestingly, renal Nox4 expression, mainly localized to tubular cells, decreased in the course of diabetes and this was not associated with a compensatory upregulation of Nox1 or Nox2. In the UUO model, renal expression of ICAM1, connective tissue growth factor, and fibronectin were higher in kidneys of Nox4(*/*) than control mice. Also in this model, levels of Nox4 decreased in the course of the disease. In the 5/6Nx model, which was performed in SV129 and SV129-Nox4(-/-) mice, no difference in the development of hypertension and albuminuria was found between the strains. Collectively, the first in vivo data of the kidney do not support the view that Nox4 is a main driver of renal disease. It rather appears that under specific conditions Nox4 may even slightly limit injury and disease progression.

  5. Kinetic Control of O2 Reactivity in H-NOX Domains.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yuhan; Benabbas, Abdelkrim; Zeng, Weiqiao; Muralidharan, Sandhya; Boon, Elizabeth M; Champion, Paul M

    2016-06-23

    Transient absorption, resonance Raman, and vibrational coherence spectroscopies are used to investigate the mechanisms of NO and O2 binding to WT Tt H-NOX and its P115A mutant. Vibrational coherence spectra of the oxy complexes provide clear evidence for the enhancement of an iron-histidine mode near 217 cm(-1) following photoexcitation, which indicates that O2 can be dissociated in these proteins. However, the quantum yield of O2 photolysis is low, particularly in the wild type (≲3%). Geminate recombination of O2 and NO in both of these proteins is very fast (∼1.4 × 10(11) s(-1)) and highly efficient. We show that the distal heme pocket of the H-NOX system forms an efficient trap that limits the O2 off-rate and determines the overall affinity. The distal pocket hydrogen bond, which appears to be stronger in the P115A mutant, may help retard the O2 ligand from escaping into the solvent following either photoinduced or thermal dissociation. This, along with a strengthening of the Fe-O2 bond that is correlated with the significant heme ruffing and saddling distortions, explains the unusually high O2 affinity of WT Tt H-NOX and the even higher affinity found in the P115A mutant.

  6. NOx Sensor for Direct Injection Emission Control

    SciTech Connect

    Betteridge, William J

    2006-02-28

    The Electricore/Delphi team continues to leverage the electrochemical planar sensor technology that has produced stoichiometric planar and wide range oxygen sensors as the basis for development of a NOx sensor. Zirconia cell technology with an integrated heater will provide the foundation for the sensor structure. Proven materials and packaging technology will help to ensure a cost-effective approach to the manufacture of this sensor. The electronics technique and interface is considered to be an area where new strategies need to be employed to produce higher S/N ratios of the NOx signal with emphasis on signal stability over time for robustness and durability Both continuous mode and pulse mode control techniques are being evaluated. Packaging the electronics requires careful design and circuit partitioning so that only the necessary signal conditioning electronics are coupled directly in the wiring harness, while the remainder is situated within the ECM for durability and costs reasons. This task continues to be on hold due to the limitation that the definition of the interface electronics was unavailable until very late in the project. The sense element is based on the amperometric method utilizing integrated alumina and zirconia ceramics. Precious metal electrodes are used to form the integrated heater, the cell electrodes and leads. Inside the actual sense cell structure, it is first necessary to separate NOx from the remaining oxygen constituents of the exhaust, without reducing the NOx. Once separated, the NOx will be measured using a measurement cell. Development or test coupons have been used to facilitate material selection and refinement, cell, diffusion barrier, and chamber development. The sense element currently requires elaborate interconnections. To facilitate a robust durable connection, mechanical and metallurgical connections are under investigation. Materials and process refinements continue to play an important role in the development of the

  7. Promotional mechanism of propane on selective catalytic reduction of NOx by methane over In/H-BEA at low temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Hua; Jian, Yanfei; Yu, Yanke; Chen, Ningna; He, Chi; He, Cheng

    2016-12-01

    Effects of propane/methane ratios on NOx reduction by mixtures of methane and propane over In/H-BEA catalyst were investigated at temperatures ranging from 250 to 550 °C. The higher catalytic activity of In/H-BEA was exhibited for CH4-SCR at high temperatures above 450 °C, while the higher NOx conversion was achieved in C3H8-SCR at below 425 °C. A broadened temperature window and enhanced CO2 selectivity were achieved by combining of methane and propane as the co-reductant. The mixtures with propane/methane of 1/2 showed the most superior T50 (325 °C) and T90 (500 °C) temperatures for NOx reduction over In/H-BEA catalyst. For the promotion mechanism of propane on NO reduction by methane at low temperature, the formation of carbonaceous species (e.g. R-COOH) were enhanced by the activation of C3H8 on Brønsted acid sites at low temperature, and further promoted the generation of sbnd NCO species, which was a crucial determining step for NO reduction.

  8. Stratigraphic traps 2

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    This volume contains studies of fields with traps that are mainly stratigraphic in nature. Structure plays a role in the traps of several fields, but overall, it is clear that the main trapping features with the group of fields in this volume are stratigraphic. The first six fields in this volume, Alabama Ferry, Rospo Mare, Walker Creek, Bindley, Lexington, and Newburg/South Westhope, have carbonate reservoirs. The latter two of these, Lexington and Newburg/South Westhope, also have sandstone reservoirs. The remaining fields, East Texas, East Clinton, Stockholm Southwest, Sorrento, Port Acres, and Lagoa Parda, have only sandstone reservoirs.

  9. Commercial introduction of the Advanced NOxTECH system

    SciTech Connect

    Sudduth, B.C.

    1997-12-31

    NOxTECH is BACT for diesel electric generators. Emissions of NO{sub x} are reduced 95% or more with substantial concurrent reductions in CO, particulates, and ROG`s. No engine modifications or other exhaust aftertreatments can remove all criteria pollutants as effectively as NOxTECH. The NOxTECH system reliably maintains NH{sub 3} slip below 2 ppm. Unlike other emissions controls, NOxTECH does not generate hazardous by-products. The Advanced NOxTECH system reduces the size, weight, and cost for BACT emissions reductions. Based on the operation of a 150 kW prototype, NOxTECH, Inc. is quoting commercial units for diesel electric generators. Advanced NOxTECH equipment costs about half as much as SCR systems, and NO{sub x} reduction can exceed 95% with guarantees for emissions compliance.

  10. Low Temperature Catalyst for NH3 Removal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monje, Oscar; Melendez, Orlando

    2013-01-01

    Air revitalization technologies maintain a safe atmosphere inside spacecraft by the removal of C02, ammonia (NH3), and trace contaminants. NH3 onboard the International Space Station (ISS) is produced by crew metabolism, payloads, or during an accidental release of thermal control refrigerant. Currently, the ISS relies on removing NH3 via humidity condensate and the crew wears hooded respirators during emergencies. A different approach to cabin NH3 removal is to use selective catalytic oxidation (SCO), which builds on thermal catalytic oxidation concepts that could be incorporated into the existing TCCS process equipment architecture on ISS. A low temperature platinum-based catalyst (LTP-Catalyst) developed at KSC was used for converting NH3 to H20 and N2 gas by SCO. The challenge of implementing SCO is to reduce formation of undesirable byproducts like NOx (N20 and NO). Gas mixture analysis was conducted using FTIR spectrometry in the Regenerable VOC Control System (RVCS) Testbed. The RVCS was modified by adding a 66 L semi-sealed chamber, and a custom NH3 generator. The effect of temperature on NH3 removal using the LTP-Catalyst was examined. A suitable temperature was found where NH3 removal did not produce toxic NO, (NO, N02) and N20 formation was reduced.

  11. The nature of the TRAP-Anti-TRAP complex.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Masahiro; Heddle, Jonathan G; Kikuchi, Kenichi; Unzai, Satoru; Akashi, Satoko; Park, Sam-Yong; Tame, Jeremy R H

    2009-02-17

    Tryptophan biosynthesis is subject to exquisite control in species of Bacillus and has become one of the best-studied model systems in gene regulation. The protein TRAP (trp RNA-binding attenuation protein) predominantly forms a ring-shaped 11-mer, which binds cognate RNA in the presence of tryptophan to suppress expression of the trp operon. TRAP is itself regulated by the protein Anti-TRAP, which binds to TRAP and prevents RNA binding. To date, the nature of this interaction has proved elusive. Here, we describe mass spectrometry and analytical centrifugation studies of the complex, and 2 crystal structures of the TRAP-Anti-TRAP complex. These crystal structures, both refined to 3.2-A resolution, show that Anti-TRAP binds to TRAP as a trimer, sterically blocking RNA binding. Mass spectrometry shows that 11-mer TRAP may bind up to 5 AT trimers, and an artificial 12-mer TRAP may bind 6. Both forms of TRAP make the same interactions with Anti-TRAP. Crystallization of wild-type TRAP with Anti-TRAP selectively pulls the 12-mer TRAP form out of solution, so the crystal structure of wild-type TRAP-Anti-TRAP complex reflects a minor species from a mixed population. PMID:19164760

  12. ULTRA LOW NOx INTEGRATED SYSTEM FOR NOx EMISSION CONTROL FROM COAL-FIRED BOILERS

    SciTech Connect

    Galen H. Richards; Charles Q. Maney; Richard W. Borio; Robert D. Lewis

    2002-12-30

    ALSTOM Power Inc.'s Power Plant Laboratories, working in concert with ALSTOM Power's Performance Projects Group, has teamed with the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE NETL) to conduct a comprehensive study to develop/evaluate low-cost, efficient NOx control technologies for retrofit to pulverized coal fired utility boilers. The objective of this project was to develop retrofit NOx control technology to achieve less than 0.15 lb/MMBtu NOx (for bituminous coals) and 0.10 lb/MMBtu NOx (for subbituminous coals) from existing pulverized coal fired utility boilers at a cost which is at least 25% less than SCR technology. Efficient control of NOx is seen as an important, enabling step in keeping coal as a viable part of the national energy mix in this century, and beyond. Presently 57% of U.S. electrical generation is coal based, and the Energy Information Agency projects that coal will maintain a lead in U.S. power generation over all other fuel sources for decades (EIA 1998 Energy Forecast). Yet, coal-based power is being strongly challenged by society's ever-increasing desire for an improved environment and the resultant improvement in health and safety. The needs of the electric-utility industry are to improve environmental performance, while simultaneously improving overall plant economics. This means that emissions control technology is needed with very low capital and operating costs. This project has responded to the industry's need for low NOx emissions by evaluating ideas that can be adapted to present pulverized coal fired systems, be they conventional or low NOx firing systems. The TFS 2000{trademark} firing system has been the ALSTOM Power Inc. commercial offering producing the lowest NOx emission levels. In this project, the TFS 2000{trademark} firing system served as a basis for comparison to other low NOx systems evaluated and was the foundation upon which refinements were made to further improve NOx emissions and

  13. Steam trap monitor

    DOEpatents

    Ryan, M.J.

    1987-05-04

    A steam trap monitor positioned downstream of a steam trap in a closed steam system includes a first sensor (a hot finger) for measuring the energy of condensate and a second sensor (a cold finger) for measuring the total energy of condensate and steam in the line. The hot finger includes one or more thermocouples for detecting condensate level and energy, while the cold finger contains a liquid with a lower boiling temperature than that of water. Vapor pressure from the liquid is used to do work such as displacing a piston or bellow in providing an indication of total energy (steam + condensate) of the system. Processing means coupled to and responsive to outputs from the hot and cold fingers subtracts the former from the latter to provide an indication of the presence of steam downstream from the trap indicating that the steam trap is malfunctioning. 2 figs.

  14. Trapping and Probing Antihydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Wurtele, Jonathan

    2013-03-27

    Precision spectroscopy of antihydrogen is a promising path to sensitive tests of CPT symmetry. The most direct route to achieve this goal is to create and probe antihydrogen in a magnetic minimum trap. Antihydrogen has been synthesized and trapped for 1000s at CERN by the ALPHA Collaboration. Some of the challenges associated with achieving these milestones will be discussed, including mixing cryogenic positron and antiproton plasmas to synthesize antihydrogen with kinetic energy less than the trap potential of .5K. Recent experiments in which hyperfine transitions were resonantly induced with microwaves will be presented. The opportunity for gravitational measurements in traps based on detailed studies of antihydrogen dynamics will be described. The talk will conclude with a discussion future antihydrogen research that will use a new experimental apparatus, ALPHA-I.

  15. Versatile electrostatic trap

    SciTech Connect

    Veldhoven, Jacqueline van; Bethlem, Hendrick L.; Schnell, Melanie; Meijer, Gerard

    2006-06-15

    A four electrode electrostatic trap geometry is demonstrated that can be used to combine a dipole, quadrupole, and hexapole field. A cold packet of {sup 15}ND{sub 3} molecules is confined in both a purely quadrupolar and hexapolar trapping field and additionally, a dipole field is added to a hexapole field to create either a double-well or a donut-shaped trapping field. The profile of the {sup 15}ND{sub 3} packet in each of these four trapping potentials is measured, and the dependence of the well-separation and barrier height of the double-well and donut potential on the hexapole and dipole term are discussed.

  16. Experimental Assessment of NOx Emissions from 73 Euro 6 Diesel Passenger Cars.

    PubMed

    Yang, Liuhanzi; Franco, Vicente; Mock, Peter; Kolke, Reinhard; Zhang, Shaojun; Wu, Ye; German, John

    2015-12-15

    Controlling nitrogen oxides (NOx) emissions from diesel passenger cars during real-world driving is one of the major technical challenges facing diesel auto manufacturers. Three main technologies are available for this purpose: exhaust gas recirculation (EGR), lean-burn NOx traps (LNT), and selective catalytic reduction (SCR). Seventy-three Euro 6 diesel passenger cars (8 EGR only, 40 LNT, and 25 SCR) were tested on a chassis dynamometer over both the European type-approval cycle (NEDC, cold engine start) and the more realistic Worldwide harmonized light-duty test cycle (WLTC version 2.0, hot start) between 2012 and 2015. Most vehicles met the legislative limit of 0.08 g/km of NOx over NEDC (average emission factors by technology: EGR-only 0.07 g/km, LNT 0.04 g/km, and SCR 0.05 g/km), but the average emission factors rose dramatically over WLTC (EGR-only 0.17 g/km, LNT 0.21 g/km, and SCR 0.13 g/km). Five LNT-equipped vehicles exhibited very poor performance over the WLTC, emitting 7-15 times the regulated limit. These results illustrate how diesel NOx emissions are not properly controlled under the current, NEDC-based homologation framework. The upcoming real-driving emissions (RDE) regulation, which mandates an additional on-road emissions test for EU type approvals, could be a step in the right direction to address this problem. PMID:26580818

  17. A highly efficient silver niobium alumina catalyst for the selective catalytic reduction of NO by n-decane.

    PubMed

    Petitto, Carolina; Mutin, Hubert P; Delahay, Gérard

    2011-10-14

    AgNb/Al(2)O(3) prepared by a nonhydrolytic sol-gel process is a highly efficient catalyst for NO(x) removal through selective catalytic reduction by hydrocarbons (HC-SCR). This result shows that the HC-SCR process remains a challenging method for lean engine DeNO(x).

  18. PVN adenovirus-siRNA injections silencing either NOX2 or NOX4 attenuate aldosterone/NaCl-induced hypertension in mice.

    PubMed

    Xue, Baojian; Beltz, Terry G; Johnson, Ralph F; Guo, Fang; Hay, Meredith; Johnson, Alan Kim

    2012-02-01

    Mineralocorticoid excess increases superoxide production by activating NADPH oxidase (NOX), and intracerebroventricular infusions of NADPH oxidase inhibitors attenuate aldosterone (Aldo)/salt-induced hypertension. It has been hypothesized that increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the brain may be a key mechanism in the development of hypertension. The present study investigated the brain regional specificity of NADPH oxidase and the role of NOX2 and NOX4 NADPH oxidase subunits in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN) in Aldo/salt-induced hypertension. PVN injections of adenoviral vectors expressing small interfering (si)RNA targeting NOX2 (AdsiRNA-NOX2) or NOX4 (AdsiRNA-NOX4) mRNAs were used to knock down NOX2 and NOX4 proteins. Three days later, delivery of Aldo (0.2 mg·kg(-1)·day(-1) sc) via osmotic pump commenced and 1% NaCl was provided in place of water. PVN injections of either AdsiRNA-NOX2 or AdsiRNA-NOX4 significantly attenuated the development of Aldo/NaCl-induced hypertension. In an additional study, Aldo/salt-induced hypertension was also significantly attenuated in NOX2 (genomic) knockout mice compared with wild-type controls. When animals from both functional studies underwent ganglionic blockade, there was a reduced fall in blood pressure in the NOX2 and NOX4 knockdown/knockout mice. Western blot analyses of the PVN of siRNA-NOX2- or siRNA-NOX4-injected mice confirmed a marked reduction in the expression of NOX2 or NOX4 protein. In cultured PVN neurons, silencing either NOX2 or NOX4 protein production by culturing PVN cells with siRNA-NOX2 or siRNA-NOX4 attenuated Aldo-induced ROS. These data indicate that both NOX2 and NOX4 in the PVN contribute to elevated sympathetic activity and the hypertensivogenic actions induced by mineralocorticoid excess. PMID:22140041

  19. Structural traps 5

    SciTech Connect

    Foster, N.H.; Beaumont, E.A.

    1991-01-01

    This book contains studies of oil and gas fields that are mainly structural in nature. Stratigraphy controls the extend of the reservoir in the traps of several fields, but overall, the main trapping features within the group of fields in this volume are structural. Fields covered in this volume include: Endicott Field, Point Arguello Field, West Puerto Chiquito Field, Dukhan Field, Sendji Field, Ruston Field, Raudhatain Field, Hassi Messaoud Field, Snapper Field, Tirrawarra Field, and Sacha Field.

  20. Significance of RuO2 modified SCR catalyst for elemental mercury oxidation in coal-fired flue gas.

    PubMed

    Yan, Naiqiang; Chen, Wanmiao; Chen, Jie; Qu, Zan; Guo, Yongfu; Yang, Shijian; Jia, Jinping

    2011-07-01

    Catalytic conversion of elemental mercury (Hg(0)) to its oxidized form has been considered as an effective way to enhance mercury removal from coal-fired power plants. In order to make good use of the existing selective catalytic reduction of NO(x) (SCR) catalysts as a cobenefit of Hg(0) conversion at lower level HCl in flue gas, various catalysts supported on titanium dioxide (TiO(2)) and commercial SCR catalysts were investigated at various cases. Among the tested catalysts, ruthenium oxides (RuO(2)) not only showed rather high catalytic activity on Hg(0) oxidation by itself, but also appeared to be well cooperative with the commercial SCR catalyst for Hg(0) conversion. In addition, the modified SCR catalyst with RuO(2) displayed an excellent tolerance to SO(2) and ammonia without any distinct negative effects on NO(x) reduction and SO(2) conversion. The demanded HCl concentration for Hg(0) oxidation can be reduced dramatically, and Hg(0) oxidation efficiency over RuO(2) doped SCR catalyst was over 90% even at about 5 ppm HCl in the simulated gases. Ru modified SCR catalyst shows a promising prospect for the cobenefit of mercury emission control.

  1. Oxidation catalysts comprising metal exchanged hexaaluminate wherein the metal is Sr, Pd, La, and/or Mn

    DOEpatents

    Wickham, David; Cook, Ronald

    2008-10-28

    The present invention provides metal-exchanged hexaaluminate catalysts that exhibit good catalytic activity and/or stability at high temperatures for extended periods with retention of activity as combustion catalysts, and more generally as oxidation catalysts, that make them eminently suitable for use in methane combustion, particularly for use in natural gas fired gas turbines. The hexaaluminate catalysts of this invention are of particular interest for methane combustion processes for minimization of the generation of undesired levels (less than about 10 ppm) of NOx species. Metal exchanged hexaaluminate oxidation catalysts are also useful for oxidation of volatile organic compounds (VOC), particularly hydrocarbons. Metal exchanged hexaaluminate oxidation catalysts are further useful for partial oxidation, particularly at high temperatures, of reduced species, particularly hydrocarbons (alkanes and alkenes).

  2. Microfabricated cylindrical ion trap

    DOEpatents

    Blain, Matthew G.

    2005-03-22

    A microscale cylindrical ion trap, having an inner radius of order one micron, can be fabricated using surface micromachining techniques and materials known to the integrated circuits manufacturing and microelectromechanical systems industries. Micromachining methods enable batch fabrication, reduced manufacturing costs, dimensional and positional precision, and monolithic integration of massive arrays of ion traps with microscale ion generation and detection devices. Massive arraying enables the microscale cylindrical ion trap to retain the resolution, sensitivity, and mass range advantages necessary for high chemical selectivity. The microscale CIT has a reduced ion mean free path, allowing operation at higher pressures with less expensive and less bulky vacuum pumping system, and with lower battery power than conventional- and miniature-sized ion traps. The reduced electrode voltage enables integration of the microscale cylindrical ion trap with on-chip integrated circuit-based rf operation and detection electronics (i.e., cell phone electronics). Therefore, the full performance advantages of microscale cylindrical ion traps can be realized in truly field portable, handheld microanalysis systems.

  3. The poisoning effect of potassium ions doped on MnOx/TiO2 catalysts for low-temperature selective catalytic reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Liangjing; Cui, Suping; Guo, Hongxia; Ma, Xiaoyu; Luo, Xiaogen

    2015-11-01

    The poisoning of alkali metal on MnOx/TiO2 catalysts used for selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NOx by NH3 was investigated. KNO3, KCl and K2SO4 were doped on MnOx/TiO2 catalysts by sol-gel method, respectively. The SCR activity of each catalyst was measured for the removal of NOx with NH3 in the temperature range 90-330 °C. The experimental results showed that catalyst with KNO3 have a stronger deactivation effect than other catalysts. The properties of the catalysts were characterized by XRD, BET, SEM, XPS, H2-TPR, NH3-TPD and in situ DRIFTS analyses. The characterized results indicated that KNO3, KCl and K2SO4 caused the similar decrease of specific surface area and pore volume, but the quantity of acid sites for KNO3-MnOx/TiO2 catalyst reduced sharply. The main reason for catalyst deactivation is attributed to two aspects: one was physical influences for the decrease of surface area and pore volume, another was chemical influences that the K+ ions decomposed by KNO3 neutralized Brønsted acid sites of catalyst and reduced their reducibility. The chemical influence played a leading role on the deactivation of catalysts.

  4. Catalyst by Design

    SciTech Connect

    Narula, Chaitanya Kumar; DeBusk, Melanie Moses

    2014-01-01

    The development of new catalytic materials is still dominated by trial and error methods. Although it has been successful, the empirical development of catalytic materials is time consuming and expensive with no guarantee of success. In our laboratories, we are developing a comprehensive catalysts by design that involves state-of-the-art first principle density functional theory calculations, experimental design of catalyst sites, and sub- ngstr m resolution imaging with an aberration-corrected electron microscope to characterize the microstructure. In this chapter, we focus on supported platinum cluster catalyst systems which are one of the most important industrial catalysts and attempt to demonstrate the feasibility of the catalyst by design concept.

  5. Singlet oxygen is essential for neutrophil extracellular trap formation.

    PubMed

    Nishinaka, Yoko; Arai, Toshiyuki; Adachi, Souichi; Takaori-Kondo, Akifumi; Yamashita, Kouhei

    2011-09-16

    Neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) that bind invading microbes are pivotal for innate host defense. There is a growing body of evidence for the significance of NETs in the pathogenesis of infectious and inflammatory diseases, but the mechanism of NET formation remains unclear. Previous observation in neutrophils of chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) patients, which defect NADPH oxidase (Nox) and fail to produce reactive oxygen species (ROS), revealed that ROS contributed to the formation of NETs. However, the active species were not identified. In this study, we discovered that singlet oxygen, one of the ROS, mediated Nox-dependent NET formation upon stimulation with phorbol myristate acetate. We also revealed that singlet oxygen itself could induce NET formation by a distinct system generating singlet oxygen with porfimer sodium (Photofrin) in CGD neutrophils, as well as healthy neutrophils. This was independent of Nox activation. These results show that singlet oxygen is essential for NET formation, and provide novel insights into the pathogenesis of infectious and inflammatory diseases.

  6. Correlation between Cu ion migration behaviour and deNOx activity in Cu-SSZ-13 for the standard NH3-SCR reaction.

    PubMed

    Beale, A M; Lezcano-Gonzalez, I; Slawinksi, W A; Wragg, D S

    2016-05-01

    Here we present the results of a synchrotron-based in situ, time-resolved PXRD study during activation of two Cu-SSZ-13 catalysts under O2/He and one during standard NH3-SCR reaction conditions to obtain insight into the behaviour of Cu ions. The results obtained indicate that deNOx activity is inexorably linked with occupancy of the zeolite 6r. PMID:27075517

  7. Correlation between Cu ion migration behaviour and deNOx activity in Cu-SSZ-13 for the standard NH3-SCR reaction.

    PubMed

    Beale, A M; Lezcano-Gonzalez, I; Slawinksi, W A; Wragg, D S

    2016-05-01

    Here we present the results of a synchrotron-based in situ, time-resolved PXRD study during activation of two Cu-SSZ-13 catalysts under O2/He and one during standard NH3-SCR reaction conditions to obtain insight into the behaviour of Cu ions. The results obtained indicate that deNOx activity is inexorably linked with occupancy of the zeolite 6r.

  8. System for reactivating catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Ginosar, Daniel M.; Thompson, David N.; Anderson, Raymond P.

    2010-03-02

    A method of reactivating a catalyst, such as a solid catalyst or a liquid catalyst is provided. The method comprises providing a catalyst that is at least partially deactivated by fouling agents. The catalyst is contacted with a fluid reactivating agent that is at or above a critical point of the fluid reactivating agent and is of sufficient density to dissolve impurities. The fluid reactivating agent reacts with at least one fouling agent, releasing the at least one fouling agent from the catalyst. The at least one fouling agent becomes dissolved in the fluid reactivating agent and is subsequently separated or removed from the fluid reactivating agent so that the fluid reactivating agent may be reused. A system for reactivating a catalyst is also disclosed.

  9. NOx emissions from a Central California dairy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasson, Alam S.; Ogunjemiyo, Segun O.; Trabue, Steven; Ashkan, Shawn; Scoggin, Kenwood; Steele, Julie; Olea, Catalina; Middala, Srikar; Vu, Kennedy; Scruggs, Austen; Addala, Laxmi R.; Nana, Lucien

    2013-05-01

    Concentrations of NOx (NO + NO2) were monitored downwind from a Central California dairy facility during 2011 and 2012. NOx concentrations at the dairy were significantly higher than the background levels during August 2011 primarily due to the presence of elevated NO, but were indistinguishable from background concentrations during January and April 2012. A Gaussian plume model (AERMOD) and a Lagrangian back trajectory model (Wind Trax) were used to estimate the flux of NO from the dairy during August 2011 with the assumption that emissions were primarily from animal feed. NO emissions from silage were also directly measured from feed to provide additional insight into the sources. Isolation flux chamber measurements imply an NO flux from the feed of about 1.3 × 10-3 g m-2 h-1, but these relatively low fluxes are inconsistent with the elevated NO concentrations observed during August 2011. This implies that either the flux chamber method grossly underestimates the true NO emissions from feed, or that most of the ambient NO measured at the dairy is from other sources. Emissions from farm machinery may account for the NO concentrations observed. Animal feed thus appears to be a small contributor to NOx emissions within Central California.

  10. Evaluation of different catalysts and development of a new catalyst for the reduction of CO2 to graphite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tschekalinskij, Alexander; Schindler, Matthias; Kretschmer, Wolfgang

    2016-02-01

    We present an evaluation of different catalysts, methods and parameters for the catalytic reduction of CO2 for 14C-AMS graphite targets for radiocarbon measurement at the Physical Institute of the University Erlangen-Nuremberg in Germany. Currently 10 μm iron powder is used as a catalyst to reduce carbon dioxide to graphite following our standard protocol. An optimal catalyst should provide a short reduction time, no additional fractionation effects, a good reduction yield, lack sintering and should not contain any amounts of both "dead" and "modern" carbon. Seven purchasable catalysts have been evaluated regarding this criteria. Further, the method using zinc and titanium hydride instead of hydrogen gas and the water-trap has been applied to our system and the effect of the water-trap temperature on the reduction time has been tested. A self-made catalyst was produced using aluminum oxide impregnated with iron nitrate. The results of this study indicate three good catalysts and show the success of the applied methods on standard samples like Ox II and Alfa graphite.

  11. Integrated diesel engine NOx reduction technology development

    SciTech Connect

    Hoelzer, J.; Zhu, J.; Savonen, C.L.; Kharas, K.C.C.; Bailey, O.H.; Miller, M.; Vuichard, J.

    1997-12-31

    The effectiveness of catalyst performance is a function of the inlet exhaust gas temperature, gas flow rate, concentration of NO{sub x} and oxygen, and reductant quantity and species. Given this interrelationship, it becomes immediately clear that an integrated development approach is necessary. Such an approach is taken in this project. As such, the system development path is directed by an engine-catalyst engineering team. Of the tools at the engine engineer`s disposal the real-time aspects of computer assisted subsystem modeling is valuable. It will continue to be the case as ever more subtle improvements are needed to meet competitive performance, durability, and emission challenges. A review of recent prototype engines has shown that considerable improvements to base diesel engine technology are being made. For example, HSDI NO{sub x} has been reduced by a factor of two within the past ten years. However, additional substantial NO{sub x}/PM reduction is still required for the future. A viable lean NO{sub x} catalyst would be an attractive solution to this end. The results of recent high and low temperature catalyst developments were presented. High temperature base metal catalysts have been formulated to produce very good conversion efficiency and good thermal stability, albeit at temperatures near the upper range of diesel engine operation. Low temperature noble metal catalysts have been developed to provide performance of promising 4-way control but need increased NO{sub x} reduction efficiency.

  12. Catalyst patterning for nanowire devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Jun (Inventor); Cassell, Alan M. (Inventor); Han, Jie (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    Nanowire devices may be provided that are based on carbon nanotubes or single-crystal semiconductor nanowires. The nanowire devices may be formed on a substrate. Catalyst sites may be formed on the substrate. The catalyst sites may be formed using lithography, thin metal layers that form individual catalyst sites when heated, collapsible porous catalyst-filled microscopic spheres, microscopic spheres that serve as masks for catalyst deposition, electrochemical deposition techniques, and catalyst inks. Nanowires may be grown from the catalyst sites.

  13. 40 CFR 97.160 - Submission of CAIR NOX allowance transfers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Submission of CAIR NOX allowance... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS CAIR NOX Allowance Transfers § 97.160 Submission of CAIR NOX allowance transfers. A CAIR authorized...

  14. 40 CFR 97.10 - Authorization and responsibilities of NOX authorized account representative.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... NOX authorized account representative. 97.10 Section 97.10 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS NOX Authorized Account Representative for NOX Budget Sources §...

  15. 40 CFR 97.423 - Recordation of TR NOX Annual allowance transfers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Recordation of TR NOX Annual allowance... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS TR NOX Annual Trading Program § 97.423 Recordation of TR NOX Annual allowance transfers. (a) Within 5 business...

  16. 40 CFR 97.160 - Submission of CAIR NOX allowance transfers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Submission of CAIR NOX allowance... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS CAIR NOX Allowance Transfers § 97.160 Submission of CAIR NOX allowance transfers. A CAIR authorized...

  17. 40 CFR 97.85 - NOX Budget opt-in permit contents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false NOX Budget opt-in permit contents. 97... (CONTINUED) FEDERAL NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS Individual Unit Opt-ins § 97.85 NOX Budget opt-in permit contents. (a) Each NOX Budget opt-in permit will contain all...

  18. 40 CFR 96.41 - Timing requirements for NOX allowance allocations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Timing requirements for NOX allowance... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS FOR STATE IMPLEMENTATION PLANS NOX Allowance Allocations § 96.41 Timing requirements for NOX allowance allocations. (a)...

  19. 40 CFR 96.85 - NOX Budget opt-in permit contents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false NOX Budget opt-in permit contents. 96... (CONTINUED) NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS FOR STATE IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Individual Unit Opt-ins § 96.85 NOX Budget opt-in permit contents. (a) Each NOX Budget opt-in...

  20. 40 CFR 97.20 - General NOX Budget Trading Program permit requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false General NOX Budget Trading Program... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS Permits § 97.20 General NOX Budget Trading Program permit requirements. (a) For each NOX Budget...