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Sample records for nuclear dynamics iii

  1. Extended Deterrence, Nuclear Proliferation, and START III

    SciTech Connect

    Speed, R.D.

    2000-06-20

    Early in the Cold War, the United States adopted a policy of ''extended nuclear deterrence'' to protect its allies by threatening a nuclear strike against any state that attacks these allies. This threat can (in principle) be used to try to deter an enemy attack using conventional weapons or one using nuclear, chemical, or biological weapons. The credibility of a nuclear threat has long been subject to debate and is dependent on many complex geopolitical factors, not the least of which is the military capabilities of the opposing sides. The ending of the Cold War has led to a significant decrease in the number of strategic nuclear weapons deployed by the United States and Russia. START II, which was recently ratified by the Russian Duma, will (if implemented) reduce the number deployed strategic nuclear weapons on each side to 3500, compared to a level of over 11,000 at the end of the Cold War in 1991. The tentative limit established by Presidents Clinton and Yeltsin for START III would reduce the strategic force level to 2000-2500. However, the Russians (along with a number of arms control advocates) now argue that the level should be reduced even further--to 1500 warheads or less. The conventional view is that ''deep cuts'' in nuclear weapons are necessary to discourage nuclear proliferation. Thus, as part of the bargain to get the non-nuclear states to agree to the renewal of the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty, the United States pledged to work towards greater reductions in strategic forces. Without movement in the direction of deep cuts, it is thought by many analysts that some countries may decide to build their own nuclear weapons. Indeed, this was part of the rationale India used to justify its own nuclear weapons program. However, there is also some concern that deep cuts (to 1500 or lower) in the U.S. strategic nuclear arsenal could have the opposite effect. The fear is that such cuts might undermine extended deterrence and cause a crisis in confidence

  2. Gd(iii) and Mn(ii) complexes for dynamic nuclear polarization: small molecular chelate polarizing agents and applications with site-directed spin labeling of proteins.

    PubMed

    Kaushik, Monu; Bahrenberg, Thorsten; Can, Thach V; Caporini, Marc A; Silvers, Robert; Heiliger, Jörg; Smith, Albert A; Schwalbe, Harald; Griffin, Robert G; Corzilius, Björn

    2016-10-21

    We investigate complexes of two paramagnetic metal ions Gd(3+) and Mn(2+) to serve as polarizing agents for solid-state dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) of (1)H, (13)C, and (15)N at magnetic fields of 5, 9.4, and 14.1 T. Both ions are half-integer high-spin systems with a zero-field splitting and therefore exhibit a broadening of the mS = -1/2 ↔ +1/2 central transition which scales inversely with the external field strength. We investigate experimentally the influence of the chelator molecule, strong hyperfine coupling to the metal nucleus, and deuteration of the bulk matrix on DNP properties. At small Gd-DOTA concentrations the narrow central transition allows us to polarize nuclei with small gyromagnetic ratio such as (13)C and even (15)N via the solid effect. We demonstrate that enhancements observed are limited by the available microwave power and that large enhancement factors of >100 (for (1)H) and on the order of 1000 (for (13)C) can be achieved in the saturation limit even at 80 K. At larger Gd(iii) concentrations (≥10 mM) where dipolar couplings between two neighboring Gd(3+) complexes become substantial a transition towards cross effect as dominating DNP mechanism is observed. Furthermore, the slow spin-diffusion between (13)C and (15)N, respectively, allows for temporally resolved observation of enhanced polarization spreading from nuclei close to the paramagnetic ion towards nuclei further removed. Subsequently, we present preliminary DNP experiments on ubiquitin by site-directed spin-labeling with Gd(3+) chelator tags. The results hold promise towards applications of such paramagnetically labeled proteins for DNP applications in biophysical chemistry and/or structural biology.

  3. PREFACE: Nuclear Physics in Astrophysics III

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bemmerer, D.; Grosse, E.; Junghans, A. R.; Schwengner, R.; Wagner, A.

    2008-01-01

    The Europhysics Conference `Nuclear Physics in Astrophysics III' (NPA3) took place from 26 31 March 2007 in Dresden, Germany, hosted by Forschungszentrum Dresden-Rossendorf. The present special issue of Journal of Physics G: Nuclear and Particle Physics contains all peer-reviewed contributions to the proceedings of this conference. NPA3 is the third conference in the Nuclear Physics in Astrophysics series of conferences devoted to the interplay between nuclear physics and astrophysics. The first and second editions of the series were held in 2002 and 2005 in Debrecen, Hungary. NPA3 has been organized under the auspices of the Nuclear Physics Board of the European Physical Society as its XXI Divisional Conference. The conference marks the 50th anniversary of the landmark paper B2FH published in 1957 by E M Burbidge, G R Burbidge, W A Fowler and F Hoyle. A public lecture by Claus Rolfs (Ruhr-Universität Bochum, Germany) commemorated the progress achieved since 1957. NPA3 aimed to bring together experimental and theoretical nuclear physicists, astrophysicists and astronomers to address the important part played by nuclear physics in current astrophysical problems. A total of 130 participants from 71 institutions in 26 countries attended the conference, presenting 33 invited and 38 contributed talks and 25 posters on six subject areas. The astrophysical motivation and the nuclear tools employed to address it are highlighted by the titles of the subject areas: Big Bang Nucleosynthesis Stellar Nucleosynthesis and Low Cross Section Measurement Explosive Nucleosynthesis and Nuclear Astrophysics with Photons Nuclei far from Stability and Radioactive Ion Beams Dense Matter in Neutron Stars and Relativistic Nuclear Collisions Neutrinos in Nuclear Astrophysics The presentations and discussions proved that Nuclear Astrophysics is a truly interdisciplinary subject. The remarkable progress in astronomical observations achieved in recent years is matched by advances in

  4. Friction in nuclear dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Swiatecki, W.J.

    1985-03-01

    The problem of dissipation in nuclear dynamics is related to the breaking down of nuclear symmetries and the transition from ordered to chaotic nucleonic motions. In the two extreme idealizations of the perfectly Ordered Regime and the fully Chaotic Regime, the nucleus should behave as an elastic solid or an overdamped fluid, respectively. In the intermediate regime a complicated visco-elastic behaviour is expected. The discussion is illustrated by a simple estimate of the frequency of the giant quadrupole resonance in the Ordered Regime and by applications of the wall and window dissipation formulae in the Chaotic Regime. 51 refs.

  5. Nuclear pulse. III - Playing a wild card

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broad, W. J.

    1981-06-01

    Implications of the phenomenon of electromagnetic pulse (EMP), a high-voltage by-product of nuclear explosions in space which could render useless unprotected communications equipment and power grids over a wide area, for the feasibility of conducting a limited nuclear war by the United States are discussed. Arguments on the one hand that the effects of EMP demand direct investigation and should be protected against by the hardening of U.S. military communications are summarized and contrasted with those on the other hand which assert that the presence of EMP, as well as other exotic nuclear effects, would, despite any attempts at hardening, make it impossible to maintain the precision of command and control necessary for a limited nuclear action against Soviet military targets. Uncertainties about Soviet intentions in regard to the use of EMP as a weapon are also pointed out.

  6. THz Dynamic Nuclear Polarization NMR

    PubMed Central

    Nanni, Emilio A.; Barnes, Alexander B.; Griffin, Robert G.; Temkin, Richard J.

    2013-01-01

    Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) increases the sensitivity of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy by using high frequency microwaves to transfer the polarization of the electrons to the nuclear spins. The enhancement in NMR sensitivity can amount to a factor of well above 100, enabling faster data acquisition and greatly improved NMR measurements. With the increasing magnetic fields (up to 23 T) used in NMR research, the required frequency for DNP falls into the THz band (140–600 GHz). Gyrotrons have been developed to meet the demanding specifications for DNP NMR, including power levels of tens of watts; frequency stability of a few megahertz; and power stability of 1% over runs that last for several days to weeks. Continuous gyrotron frequency tuning of over 1 GHz has also been demonstrated. The complete DNP NMR system must include a low loss transmission line; an optimized antenna; and a holder for efficient coupling of the THz radiation to the sample. This paper describes the DNP NMR process and illustrates the THz systems needed for this demanding spectroscopic application. THz DNP NMR is a rapidly developing, exciting area of THz science and technology. PMID:24639915

  7. Assembly dynamics of PML nuclear bodies in living cells.

    PubMed

    Brand, Peter; Lenser, Thorsten; Hemmerich, Peter

    2010-03-05

    The mammalian cell nucleus contains a variety of organelles or nuclear bodies which contribute to key nuclear functions. Promyelocytic leukemia nuclear bodies (PML NBs) are involved in the regulation of apoptosis, antiviral responses, the DNA damage response and chromatin structure, but their precise biochemical function in these nuclear pathways is unknown. One strategy to tackle this problem is to assess the biophysical properties of the component parts of these macromolecular assemblies in living cells. In this study we determined PML NB assembly dynamics by live cell imaging, combined with mathematical modeling. For the first time, dynamics of PML body formation were measured in cells lacking endogenous PML. We show that all six human nuclear PML isoforms are able to form nuclear bodies in PML negative cells. All isoforms exhibit individual exchange rates at NBs in PML positive cells but PML I, II, III and IV are static at nuclear bodies in PML negative cells, suggesting that these isoforms require additional protein partners for efficient exchange. PML V turns over at PML Nbs very slowly supporting the idea of a structural function for this isoform. We also demonstrate that SUMOylation of PML at Lysine positions K160 and/or K490 are required for nuclear body formation in vivo.We propose a model in which the isoform specific residence times of PML provide both, structural stability to function as a scaffold and flexibility to attract specific nuclear proteins for efficient biochemical reactions at the surface of nuclear bodies.MCS code: 92C37.

  8. Pion scattering and nuclear dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, M.B.

    1988-01-01

    A phenomenological optical-model analysis of pion elastic scattering and single- and double-charge-exchange scattering to isobaric-analog states is reviewed. Interpretation of the optical-model parameters is briefly discussed, and several applications and extensions are considered. The applications include the study of various nuclear properties, including neutron deformation and surface-fluctuation contributions to the density. One promising extension for the near future would be to develop a microscopic approach based on powerful momentum-space methods brought to existence over the last decade. In this, the lowest-order optical potential as well as specific higher-order pieces would be worked out in terms of microscopic pion-nucleon and delta-nucleon interactions that can be determined within modern meson-theoretical frameworks. A second extension, of a more phenomenological nature, would use coupled-channel methods and shell-model wave functions to study dynamical nuclear correlations in pion double charge exchange. 35 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Dynamical Aspects of Nuclear Fission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kliman, J.; Itkis, M. G.; Gmuca, Š.

    2008-11-01

    Fission dynamics. Dependence of scission-neutron yield on light-fragment mass for [symbol]=1/2 [et al.]. Dynamics of capture quasifission and fusion-fission competition / L. Stuttgé ... [et al.] -- Fission-fission. The processes of fusion-fission and quasi-fission of superheavy nuclei / M. G. Itkis ... [et al.]. Fission and quasifission in the reactions [symbol]Ca+[symbol]Pb and [symbol]Ni+[symbol]W / G. N. Knyazheva ... [et al.]. Mass-energy characteristics of reactions [symbol]Fe+[symbol][symbol][symbol]266Hs and [symbol]Mg+[symbol]Cm[symbol][symbol]Hs at Coulomb barrier / L. Krupa ... [et al.]. Fusion of heavy ions at extreme sub-barrier energies / Ş. Mişicu and H. Esbensen. Fusion and fission dynamics of heavy nuclear system / V. Zagrebaev and W. Greiner. Time-dependent potential energy for fusion and fission processes / A. V. Karpov ... [et al.] -- Superheavy elements. Advances in the understanding of structure and production mechanisms for superheavy elements / W. Greiner and V. Zagrebaev. Fission barriers of heaviest nuclei / A. Sobiczewski ... [et al.]. Possibility of synthesizing doubly magic superheavy nuclei / Y Aritomo ... [et al.]. Synthesis of superheavy nuclei in [symbol]Ca-induced reactions / V. K. Utyonkov ... [et al.] -- Fragmentation. Production of neutron-rich nuclei in the nucleus-nucleus collisions around the Fermi energy / M. Veselský. Signals of enlarged core in [symbol]Al / Y. G. Ma ... [et al.] -- Exotic modes. New insight into the fission process from experiments with relativistic heavy-ion beams / K.-H. Schmidt ... [et al.]. New results for the intensity of bimodal fission in binary and ternary spontaneous fission of [symbol]Cf / C. Goodin ... [et al.]. Rare fission modes: study of multi-cluster decays of actinide nuclei / D. V. Kamanin ... [et al.]. Energy distribution of ternary [symbol]-particles in [symbol]Cf(sf) / M. Mutterer ... [et al.]. Preliminary results of experiment aimed at searching for collinear cluster tripartition of

  10. Carrier dynamics in III-nitride semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Kai

    In the past decade, III-nitride semiconductors had a considerable impact in solid state lighting and high speed high power electronics. As technology develops, high Al content III-nitride semiconductors lead the edge of research. It opens the door to many applications especially portable ones: from homeland security, bio-analytical, medical diagnostic, air and water disinfection, sterilization, chemical sensing systems, non-line-of-sight (NLOS) communications, to high-density optical data storage. In this thesis, we first study GaN epilayers, as well as more complicate high Al content AlGaN/AlGaN MQW structures used as active media for deep UV LEDs. We theoretically study the photoluminescence (PL) dynamics in high quality GaN epilayers by establishing a new decay model. In our model, surface recombination, diffusion, and re-absorption are taken into account. Our model is in excellent agreement with experimental data obtained by time-resolved PL. Our results show that the carrier diffusion and surface recombination play key roles in the PL decay. For high Al content AlGaN/AlGaN MQW structures, we first present the investigation of built-in electric fields in AlxGa1-xN/Al yGa1-yN MQWs embedded into p-i-n structure by using photoluminescence experiments. By comparison of the Stark shifts induced by the p-i-n structure and by photo-excited free carrier screening, we evaluate the intrinsic electric field induced by piezoelectric and spontaneous polarizations. Furthermore we investigate carrier dynamics in sets of identically grown Al0.35Ga0.65N/Al 0.49Ga0.51N MQW structures with well widths varying from 1.65 to 5.0 nm by TR-PL and LITG techniques. We observed screening of the built-in electric field by free non-equilibrium carriers and localization governed PL kinetics at different decay stages. A decrease of carrier lifetime with increasing well width is observed and attributed to the carrier localization occurring due to well width fluctuations of the quantum well

  11. Order, chaos and nuclear dynamics: An introduction

    SciTech Connect

    Swiatecki, W.J.

    1990-08-01

    This is an introductory lecture illustrating by simple examples the anticipated effect on collective nuclear dynamics of a transition from order to chaos in the motions of nucleons inside an idealized nucleus. The destruction of order is paralleled by a transition from a rubber-like to a honey-like behaviour of the independent-particle nuclear model. 10 refs., 6 figs.

  12. Protein-water dynamics in antifreeze protein III activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yao; Bäumer, Alexander; Meister, Konrad; Bischak, Connor G.; DeVries, Arthur L.; Leitner, David M.; Havenith, Martina

    2016-03-01

    We combine Terahertz absorption spectroscopy (THz) and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to investigate the underlying molecular mechanism for the antifreeze activity of one class of antifreeze protein, antifreeze protein type III (AFP-III) with a focus on the collective water hydrogen bond dynamics near the protein. After summarizing our previous work on AFPs, we present a new investigation of the effects of cosolutes on protein antifreeze activity by adding sodium citrate to the protein solution of AFP-III. Our results reveal that for AFP-III, unlike some other AFPs, the addition of the osmolyte sodium citrate does not affect the hydrogen bond dynamics at the protein surface significantly, as indicated by concentration dependent THz measurements. The present data, in combination with our previous THz measurements and molecular simulations, confirm that while long-range solvent perturbation is a necessary condition for the antifreeze activity of AFP-III, the local binding affinity determines the size of the hysteresis.

  13. Spastin and ESCRT-III coordinate mitotic spindle disassembly and nuclear envelope sealing.

    PubMed

    Vietri, Marina; Schink, Kay O; Campsteijn, Coen; Wegner, Catherine Sem; Schultz, Sebastian W; Christ, Liliane; Thoresen, Sigrid B; Brech, Andreas; Raiborg, Camilla; Stenmark, Harald

    2015-06-11

    At the onset of metazoan cell division the nuclear envelope breaks down to enable capture of chromosomes by the microtubule-containing spindle apparatus. During anaphase, when chromosomes have separated, the nuclear envelope is reassembled around the forming daughter nuclei. How the nuclear envelope is sealed, and how this is coordinated with spindle disassembly, is largely unknown. Here we show that endosomal sorting complex required for transport (ESCRT)-III, previously found to promote membrane constriction and sealing during receptor sorting, virus budding, cytokinesis and plasma membrane repair, is transiently recruited to the reassembling nuclear envelope during late anaphase. ESCRT-III and its regulatory AAA (ATPase associated with diverse cellular activities) ATPase VPS4 are specifically recruited by the ESCRT-III-like protein CHMP7 to sites where the reforming nuclear envelope engulfs spindle microtubules. Subsequent association of another ESCRT-III-like protein, IST1, directly recruits the AAA ATPase spastin to sever microtubules. Disrupting spastin function impairs spindle disassembly and results in extended localization of ESCRT-III at the nuclear envelope. Interference with ESCRT-III functions in anaphase is accompanied by delayed microtubule disassembly, compromised nuclear integrity and the appearance of DNA damage foci in subsequent interphase. We propose that ESCRT-III, VPS4 and spastin cooperate to coordinate nuclear envelope sealing and spindle disassembly at nuclear envelope-microtubule intersection sites during mitotic exit to ensure nuclear integrity and genome safeguarding, with a striking mechanistic parallel to cytokinetic abscission.

  14. The sapphire backscattering monochromator at the Dynamics beamline P01 of PETRA III

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexeev, P.; Asadchikov, V.; Bessas, D.; Butashin, A.; Deryabin, A.; Dill, F.-U.; Ehnes, A.; Herlitschke, M.; Hermann, R. P.; Jafari, A.; Prokhorov, I.; Roshchin, B.; Röhlsberger, R.; Schlage, K.; Sergueev, I.; Siemens, A.; Wille, H.-C.

    2016-12-01

    We report on a high resolution sapphire backscattering monochromator installed at the Dynamics beamline P01 of PETRA III. The device enables nuclear resonance scattering experiments on Mössbauer isotopes with transition energies between 20 and 60 keV with sub-meV to meV resolution. In a first performance test with 119Sn nuclear resonance at a X-ray energy of 23.88 keV an energy resolution of 1.34 meV was achieved. The device extends the field of nuclear resonance scattering at the PETRA III synchrotron light source to many further isotopes like 151Eu, 149Sm, 161Dy, 125Te and 121Sb.

  15. The sapphire backscattering monochromator at the Dynamics beamline P01 of PETRA III

    DOE PAGES

    Alexeev, P.; Asadchikov, V.; Bessas, D.; ...

    2016-02-23

    Here, we report on a high resolution sapphire backscattering monochromator installed at the Dynamics beamline P01 of PETRA III. The device enables nuclear resonance scattering experiments on M ossbauer isotopes with transition energies between 20 and 60 keV with sub-meV to meV resolution. In a first performance test with 119Sn nuclear resonance at a X-ray energy of 23.88 keV an energy resolution of 1.34 meV was achieved. Moreover, the device extends the field of nuclear resonance scattering at the PETRA III synchrotron light source to many further isotopes like 151Eu, 149Sm, 161Dy, 125Te and 121Sb.

  16. The sapphire backscattering monochromator at the Dynamics beamline P01 of PETRA III

    SciTech Connect

    Alexeev, P.; Asadchikov, V.; Bessas, D.; Butashin, A.; Deryabin, A.; Dill, F. -U.; Ehnes, A.; Herlitschke, M.; Hermann, R. P.; Jafari, A.; Prokhorov, I.; Roshchin, B.; Röhlsberger, R.; Schlage, K.; Sergueev, I.; Siemens, A.; Wille, H. -C.

    2016-02-23

    Here, we report on a high resolution sapphire backscattering monochromator installed at the Dynamics beamline P01 of PETRA III. The device enables nuclear resonance scattering experiments on M ossbauer isotopes with transition energies between 20 and 60 keV with sub-meV to meV resolution. In a first performance test with 119Sn nuclear resonance at a X-ray energy of 23.88 keV an energy resolution of 1.34 meV was achieved. Moreover, the device extends the field of nuclear resonance scattering at the PETRA III synchrotron light source to many further isotopes like 151Eu, 149Sm, 161Dy, 125Te and 121Sb.

  17. Dynamics of a nuclear invasion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roper, Marcus; Simonin, Anna; Glass, N. Louise

    2009-11-01

    Filamentous fungi grow as a network of continuous interconnected tubes, containing nuclei that move freely through a shared cytoplasm. Wild fungi are frequently chimerical: two nuclei from the same physiological individual may be genetically different. Such internal diversity can arise either from spontaneous mutations during nuclear division, or by nuclear exchange when two individuals fuse, sharing their resources and organelles to become a single individual. This diversity is thought to be essential to adaptation in plant pathogens, allowing, for instance, an invading fungus to present many different genetic identities against its host's immune response. However, it is clear that the presence of multiple genetic lineages within the same physiological individual can also pose challenges - lineages that are present in growing hyphal tips will multiply preferentially. Nuclei must therefore be kept well mixed across a growing front. By applying models developed to describe mixing of fluids in microfluidic reactors to experimental observations of lineage mixing in a growing Neurospora crassa colony, we show how this mixing is achieved. In particular we analyze the individual contributions from interdigitation of hyphae and from nuclear transport.

  18. 10 CFR 76.117 - Special nuclear material of low strategic significance-Category III.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Special nuclear material of low strategic significance-Category III. 76.117 Section 76.117 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) CERTIFICATION OF GASEOUS DIFFUSION PLANTS Safeguards and Security § 76.117 Special nuclear material of low...

  19. 10 CFR 76.117 - Special nuclear material of low strategic significance-Category III.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Special nuclear material of low strategic significance-Category III. 76.117 Section 76.117 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) CERTIFICATION OF GASEOUS DIFFUSION PLANTS Safeguards and Security § 76.117 Special nuclear material of low...

  20. 10 CFR 76.117 - Special nuclear material of low strategic significance-Category III.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Special nuclear material of low strategic significance-Category III. 76.117 Section 76.117 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) CERTIFICATION OF GASEOUS DIFFUSION PLANTS Safeguards and Security § 76.117 Special nuclear material of low...

  1. 10 CFR 76.117 - Special nuclear material of low strategic significance-Category III.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Special nuclear material of low strategic significance-Category III. 76.117 Section 76.117 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) CERTIFICATION OF GASEOUS DIFFUSION PLANTS Safeguards and Security § 76.117 Special nuclear material of low...

  2. 10 CFR 76.117 - Special nuclear material of low strategic significance-Category III.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Special nuclear material of low strategic significance-Category III. 76.117 Section 76.117 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) CERTIFICATION OF GASEOUS DIFFUSION PLANTS Safeguards and Security § 76.117 Special nuclear material of low...

  3. The nuclear magnetic resonance spectra of bisphthalocyaninatolanthanide (III). Interim report

    SciTech Connect

    Tsutsui, M.; Kasuga, K.

    1980-06-01

    The NMR spectra of bisphthalocyaninatolanthanide (III) complexes (La, Nd, Sm, and Eu) have been examined. An effect of a macrocyclic-ring current and induced shift caused by lanthanide (III) ions were discussed.

  4. Alpha Radiolysis of Nuclear Solvent Extraction Ligands Used for An(III) and Ln(III) Separations

    SciTech Connect

    Mezyk, Stephen P.; Mincher, Bruce J.; Nilsson, Mikael

    2016-08-01

    This document is the final report for the Nuclear Energy Universities Program (NEUP) grant 10-910 (DE-AC07-05ID14517) “Alpha Radiolysis of Nuclear Solvent Extraction Ligands used for An(III) and Ln(III) Separations”. The goal of this work was to obtain a quantitative understanding of the impacts of both low Linear Energy Transfer (LET, gamma-rays) and high LET (alpha particles) radiation chemistry occurring in future large-scale separations processes. This quantitative understanding of the major radiation effects on diluents and ligands is essential for optimal process implementation, and could result in significant cost savings in the future.

  5. Nuclear dynamics of K¯ bound states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mareš, J.; Friedman, E.; Gal, A.

    2006-07-01

    nuclear bound states were generated dynamically within a relativistic mean field (RMF) model. Substantial polarization of the core nucleus was found for light nuclei. The behavior of the dynamically calculated width ΓK¯ as function of the K¯ binding energy was studied. A lower limit of ΓK¯ ˜ 35 - 45 MeV for 1s K¯ nuclear states in light nuclei such as 12C was placed on the width expected for deep binding in the range B K¯ ˜ 100 - 200 MeV.

  6. Nuclear quantum dynamics in dense hydrogen

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Dongdong; Sun, Huayang; Dai, Jiayu; Chen, Wenbo; Zhao, Zengxiu; Hou, Yong; Zeng, Jiaolong; Yuan, Jianmin

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear dynamics in dense hydrogen, which is determined by the key physics of large-angle scattering or many-body collisions between particles, is crucial for the dynamics of planet's evolution and hydrodynamical processes in inertial confinement confusion. Here, using improved ab initio path-integral molecular dynamics simulations, we investigated the nuclear quantum dynamics regarding transport behaviors of dense hydrogen up to the temperatures of 1 eV. With the inclusion of nuclear quantum effects (NQEs), the ionic diffusions are largely higher than the classical treatment by the magnitude from 20% to 146% as the temperature is decreased from 1 eV to 0.3 eV at 10 g/cm3, meanwhile, electrical and thermal conductivities are significantly lowered. In particular, the ionic diffusion is found much larger than that without NQEs even when both the ionic distributions are the same at 1 eV. The significant quantum delocalization of ions introduces remarkably different scattering cross section between protons compared with classical particle treatments, which explains the large difference of transport properties induced by NQEs. The Stokes-Einstein relation, Wiedemann-Franz law, and isotope effects are re-examined, showing different behaviors in nuclear quantum dynamics. PMID:24968754

  7. Nuclear Dynamics of Heterochromatin Repair.

    PubMed

    Amaral, Nuno; Ryu, Taehyun; Li, Xiao; Chiolo, Irene

    2017-02-01

    Repairing double-strand breaks (DSBs) is particularly challenging in pericentromeric heterochromatin, where the abundance of repeated sequences exacerbates the risk of ectopic recombination and chromosome rearrangements. Recent studies in Drosophila cells revealed that faithful homologous recombination (HR) repair of heterochromatic DSBs relies on the relocalization of DSBs to the nuclear periphery before Rad51 recruitment. We summarize here the exciting progress in understanding this pathway, including conserved responses in mammalian cells and surprising similarities with mechanisms in yeast that deal with DSBs in distinct sites that are difficult to repair, including other repeated sequences. We will also point out some of the most important open questions in the field and emerging evidence suggesting that deregulating these pathways might have dramatic consequences for human health.

  8. The Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectra of Bisphthalocyaninatolanthanide (III).

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-06-01

    examined. An effect of a macrocyclic -ring current and an induced shift caused by lanthanide (III) ions were discussed. INTRODUCTION NMR studies of...reported some NMR results of lithium, zinc, 2 and uranyl phthalocyanines. Lanthanide complexes such as acethylacetonato- lanthanide (III) and its...University, College Station, TX 77843 (Received , 1980) The NHR spectra of bisphthalocyaninatolanthanide(III) complexes (La, Nd, Sm, and Eu) have been

  9. Fluid dynamical description of relativistic nuclear collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nix, J. R.; Strottman, D.

    1982-01-01

    On the basis of both a conventional relativistic nuclear fluid dynamic model and a two fluid generalization that takes into account the interpenetration of the target and projectile upon contact, collisions between heavy nuclei moving at relativistic speeds are calculated. This is done by solving the relevant equations of motion numerically in three spatial dimensions by use of particle in cell finite difference computing techniques. The effect of incorporating a density isomer, or quasistable state, in the nuclear equation of state at three times normal nuclear density, and the effect of doubling the nuclear compressibility coefficient are studied. For the reaction 20Ne + 238U at a laboratory bombarding energy per nucleon of 393 MeV, the calculated distributions in energy and angle of outgoing charged particles are compared with recent experimental data both integrated over all impact parameters and for nearly central collisions.

  10. Cluster dynamics transcending chemical dynamics toward nuclear fusion

    PubMed Central

    Heidenreich, Andreas; Jortner, Joshua; Last, Isidore

    2006-01-01

    Ultrafast cluster dynamics encompasses femtosecond nuclear dynamics, attosecond electron dynamics, and electron-nuclear dynamics in ultraintense laser fields (peak intensities 1015–1020 W·cm−2). Extreme cluster multielectron ionization produces highly charged cluster ions, e.g., (C4+(D+)4)n and (D+I22+)n at IM = 1018 W·cm−2, that undergo Coulomb explosion (CE) with the production of high-energy (5 keV to 1 MeV) ions, which can trigger nuclear reactions in an assembly of exploding clusters. The laser intensity and the cluster size dependence of the dynamics and energetics of CE of (D2)n, (HT)n, (CD4)n, (DI)n, (CD3I)n, and (CH3I)n clusters were explored by electrostatic models and molecular dynamics simulations, quantifying energetic driving effects, and kinematic run-over effects. The optimization of table-top dd nuclear fusion driven by CE of deuterium containing heteroclusters is realized for light-heavy heteroclusters of the largest size, which allows for the prevalence of cluster vertical ionization at the highest intensity of the laser field. We demonstrate a 7-orders-of-magnitude enhancement of the yield of dd nuclear fusion driven by CE of light-heavy heteroclusters as compared with (D2)n clusters of the same size. Prospective applications for the attainment of table-top nucleosynthesis reactions, e.g., 12C(P,γ)13N driven by CE of (CH3I)n clusters, were explored. PMID:16740666

  11. Cluster dynamics transcending chemical dynamics toward nuclear fusion.

    PubMed

    Heidenreich, Andreas; Jortner, Joshua; Last, Isidore

    2006-07-11

    Ultrafast cluster dynamics encompasses femtosecond nuclear dynamics, attosecond electron dynamics, and electron-nuclear dynamics in ultraintense laser fields (peak intensities 10(15)-10(20) W.cm(-2)). Extreme cluster multielectron ionization produces highly charged cluster ions, e.g., (C(4+)(D(+))(4))(n) and (D(+)I(22+))(n) at I(M) = 10(18) W.cm(-2), that undergo Coulomb explosion (CE) with the production of high-energy (5 keV to 1 MeV) ions, which can trigger nuclear reactions in an assembly of exploding clusters. The laser intensity and the cluster size dependence of the dynamics and energetics of CE of (D(2))(n), (HT)(n), (CD(4))(n), (DI)(n), (CD(3)I)(n), and (CH(3)I)(n) clusters were explored by electrostatic models and molecular dynamics simulations, quantifying energetic driving effects, and kinematic run-over effects. The optimization of table-top dd nuclear fusion driven by CE of deuterium containing heteroclusters is realized for light-heavy heteroclusters of the largest size, which allows for the prevalence of cluster vertical ionization at the highest intensity of the laser field. We demonstrate a 7-orders-of-magnitude enhancement of the yield of dd nuclear fusion driven by CE of light-heavy heteroclusters as compared with (D(2))(n) clusters of the same size. Prospective applications for the attainment of table-top nucleosynthesis reactions, e.g., (12)C(P,gamma)(13)N driven by CE of (CH(3)I)(n) clusters, were explored.

  12. Nuclear quests for supernova dynamics and nucleosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Langanke, K.; Martinez-Pinedo, G.

    2011-10-28

    Nuclear physics plays a crucial role in various aspects of core collapse supernovae. The collapse dynamics is strongly influenced by electron captures. Using modern many-body theory improved capture rates have been derived recently with the important result that the process is dominated by capture on nuclei until neutrino trapping is achieved. Following the core bounce the ejected matter is the site of interesting nucleosynthesis. The early ejecta are proton-rich and give rise to the recently discovered {nu}p-process. Later ejecta might be neutron-rich and can be one site of the r-process. The manuscript discusses recent progress in describing nuclear input relevant for the supernova dynamics and nucleosynthesis.

  13. Nuclear dynamical diffraction using synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Dennis Eugene

    1993-05-01

    The scattering of synchrotron radiation by nuclei is extensively explored in this thesis. From the multipole electric field expansion resulting from time-dependent nonrelativistic perturbation theory, a dynamical scattering theory is constructed. This theory is shown, in the many particle limit, to be equivalent to the semi-classical approach where a quantum mechanical scattering amplitude is used in the Maxwell inhomogeneous wave equation. The Moessbauer specimen whose low-lying energy levels were probed is a ferromagnetic lattice of 57Fe embedded in a yttrium iron garnet (YIG) crystal matrix. The hyperfine fields in YIG thin films were studied at low and room temperature using time-resolved quantum beat spectroscopy. Nuclear hyperfine structure quantum beats were measured using a fast plastic scintillator coincidence photodetector and associated electronics having a time resolution of 2.5 nsec. The variation of the quantum beat patterns near the Bragg [0 0 2] diffraction peak gave a Lamb-Moessbauer factor of 8.2±0.4. Exploring characteristic dynamical features in the higher order YIG [0 0 10] reflection revealed that one of the YIG crystals had bifurcated into two different layers. The dynamics of nuclear superradiance was explored. This phenomenon includes the radiative speedup exhibited by a collective state of particles, and, in striking concurrence, resonance frequency shifts. A speedup of a factor of 4 in the total decay rate and a beat frequency shift of 11/2 natural resonance linewidths were observed. Nuclear resonance scattering was also found to be a useful way of performing angular interferometry experiments, and it was used to observe the phase shift of a rotated quantum state. On the whole, nuclear dynamical diffraction theory has superbly explained many of the fascinating features of resonant magnetic dipole radiation scattered by a lattice of nuclei.

  14. Ultrafast electronic dynamics driven by nuclear motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vendrell, Oriol

    2016-05-01

    The transfer of electrical charge on a microscopic scale plays a fundamental role in chemistry, in biology, and in technological applications. In this contribution, we will discuss situations in which nuclear motion plays a central role in driving the electronic dynamics of photo-excited or photo-ionized molecular systems. In particular, we will explore theoretically the ultrafast transfer of a double electron hole between the functional groups of glycine after K-shell ionization and subsequent Auger decay. Although a large energy gap of about 15 eV initially exists between the two electronic states involved and coherent electronic dynamics play no role in the hole transfer, we will illustrate how the double hole can be transferred within 3 to 4 fs between both functional ends of the glycine molecule driven solely by specific nuclear displacements and non-Born-Oppenheimer effects. This finding challenges the common wisdom that nuclear dynamics of the molecular skeleton are unimportant for charge transfer processes at the few-femtosecond time scale and shows that they can even play a prominent role. We thank the Hamburg Centre for Ultrafast Imaging and the Volkswagen Foundation for financial support.

  15. Classical Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Nuclear Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Devanathan, Ram; Krack, Matthias; Bertolus, Marjorie

    2015-10-10

    Molecular dynamics simulation is well suited to study primary damage production by irradiation, defect interactions with fission gas atoms, gas bubble nucleation, grain boundary effects on defect and gas bubble evolution in nuclear fuel, and the resulting changes in thermo-mechanical properties. In these simulations, the forces on the ions are dictated by interaction potentials generated by fitting properties of interest to experimental data. The results obtained from the present generation of potentials are qualitatively similar, but quantitatively different. There is a need to refine existing potentials to provide a better representation of the performance of polycrystalline fuel under a variety of operating conditions, and to develop models that are equipped to handle deviations from stoichiometry. In addition to providing insights into fundamental mechanisms governing the behaviour of nuclear fuel, MD simulations can also provide parameters that can be used as inputs for mesoscale models.

  16. Human DNA ligase III recognizes DNA ends by dynamic switching between two DNA-bound states.

    PubMed

    Cotner-Gohara, Elizabeth; Kim, In-Kwon; Hammel, Michal; Tainer, John A; Tomkinson, Alan E; Ellenberger, Tom

    2010-07-27

    Human DNA ligase III has essential functions in nuclear and mitochondrial DNA replication and repair and contains a PARP-like zinc finger (ZnF) that increases the extent of DNA nick joining and intermolecular DNA ligation, yet the bases for ligase III specificity and structural variation among human ligases are not understood. Here combined crystal structure and small-angle X-ray scattering results reveal dynamic switching between two nick-binding components of ligase III: the ZnF-DNA binding domain (DBD) forms a crescent-shaped surface used for DNA end recognition which switches to a ring formed by the nucleotidyl transferase (NTase) and OB-fold (OBD) domains for catalysis. Structural and mutational analyses indicate that high flexibility and distinct DNA binding domain features in ligase III assist both nick sensing and the transition from nick sensing by the ZnF to nick joining by the catalytic core. The collective results support a "jackknife model" in which the ZnF loads ligase III onto nicked DNA and conformational changes deliver DNA into the active site. This work has implications for the biological specificity of DNA ligases and functions of PARP-like zinc fingers.

  17. Human DNA Ligase III Recognizes DNA Ends by Dynamic Switching between Two DNA-Bound States

    SciTech Connect

    Cotner-Gohara, Elizabeth; Kim, In-Kwon; Hammel, Michal; Tainer, John A.; Tomkinson, Alan E.; Ellenberger, Tom

    2010-09-13

    Human DNA ligase III has essential functions in nuclear and mitochondrial DNA replication and repair and contains a PARP-like zinc finger (ZnF) that increases the extent of DNA nick joining and intermolecular DNA ligation, yet the bases for ligase III specificity and structural variation among human ligases are not understood. Here combined crystal structure and small-angle X-ray scattering results reveal dynamic switching between two nick-binding components of ligase III: the ZnF-DNA binding domain (DBD) forms a crescent-shaped surface used for DNA end recognition which switches to a ring formed by the nucleotidyl transferase (NTase) and OB-fold (OBD) domains for catalysis. Structural and mutational analyses indicate that high flexibility and distinct DNA binding domain features in ligase III assist both nick sensing and the transition from nick sensing by the ZnF to nick joining by the catalytic core. The collective results support a 'jackknife model' in which the ZnF loads ligase III onto nicked DNA and conformational changes deliver DNA into the active site. This work has implications for the biological specificity of DNA ligases and functions of PARP-like zinc fingers.

  18. Threedimensional dynamics of nuclear decay modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirea, M.; Poenaru, D. N.; Greiner, W.

    1994-03-01

    We study nondissipative fission dynamics in a wide range of mass asymmetry, covering three groups of nuclear decay modes: cluster radioactivities; alpha-decay and cold fission. The WKB action integral is calculated by using the Werner-Wheeler inertia tensor and the deformation energy within Yukawa-plus-exponential model extended to binary systems with different charge densities. The optimum dynamical trajectory in a threedimensional deformation space (elongation, necking-in and mass-asymmetry) is determined by solving a nonlinear system of differential equations. This new method is illustrated for three decay modes of234U: α-decay, Mg-radioactivity and cold fission with100Zr as a light fragment.

  19. Dynamic Nuclear Spin Resonance in n-GaAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y. S.; Reuter, D.; Wieck, A. D.; Bacher, G.

    2011-10-01

    The dynamics of optically detected nuclear magnetic resonance is studied in n-GaAs via time-resolved Kerr rotation using an on-chip microcoil for rf field generation. Both optically allowed and optically forbidden NMR are observed with a dynamics controlled by the interplay between dynamic nuclear polarization via hyperfine interaction with optically generated spin-polarized electrons and nuclear spin depolarization due to magnetic resonance absorption. Comparing the characteristic nuclear spin relaxation rate obtained in experiment with master equation simulations, the underlying nuclear spin depolarization mechanism for each resonance is extracted.

  20. Dynamics of Nuclear Regions of Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Richard H.

    1996-01-01

    Current research carried out with the help of the ASEE-NASA Summer Faculty Program, at NASA-Ames, is concentrated on the dynamics of nuclear regions of galaxies. From a dynamical point of view a galaxy is a collection of around 10(sup 11) stars like our Sun, each of which moves in the summed gravitational field of all the remaining stars. Thus galaxy dynamics becomes a self-consistent n-body problem with forces given by Newtonian gravitation. Strong nonlinearity in the gravitational force and the inherent nonlinearity of self-consistent problems both argue for a numerical approach. The technique of numerical experiments consis of constructing an environment in the computer that is as close as possible to the physical conditions in a real galaxy and then carrying out experiments much like laboratory experiments in physics or engineering, in this environment. Computationally, an experiment is an initial value problem, and a good deal of thought and effort goes into the design of the starting conditions that serve as initial values. Experiments are run at Ames because all the 'equipment' is in place-the programs, the necessary computational power, and good facilities for post-run analysis. Our goal for this research program is to study the nuclear regions in detail and this means replacing most of the galaxy by a suitable boundary condition to allow the full capability of numerical experiments to be brought to bear on a small region perhaps 1/1000 of the linear dimensions of an entire galaxy. This is an extremely delicate numerical problem, one in which some small feature overlook, can easily lead to a collapse or blow-up of the entire system. All particles attract each other in gravitational problems, and the 1/r(sup 2) force is: (1) nonlinear; (2) strong at short range; (3) long-range, and (4) unscreened at any distance.

  1. Membrane Binding by CHMP7 Coordinates ESCRT-III-Dependent Nuclear Envelope Reformation.

    PubMed

    Olmos, Yolanda; Perdrix-Rosell, Anna; Carlton, Jeremy G

    2016-10-10

    In addition to its role in membrane abscission during cytokinesis, viral budding, endosomal sorting, and plasma membrane repair [1], the endosomal sorting complex required for transport-III (ESCRT-III) machinery has recently been shown to seal holes in the reforming nuclear envelope (NE) during mitotic exit [2, 3]. ESCRT-III also acts during interphase to repair the NE upon migration-induced rupture [4, 5], highlighting its key role as an orchestrator of membrane integrity at this organelle. While NE localization of ESCRT-III is dependent upon the ESCRT-III component CHMP7 [3], it is unclear how this complex is able to engage nuclear membranes. Here we show that the N terminus of CHMP7 acts as a novel membrane-binding module. This membrane-binding ability allows CHMP7 to bind to the ER, an organelle continuous with the NE, and it provides a platform to direct NE recruitment of ESCRT-III during mitotic exit. CHMP7's N terminus comprises tandem Winged-Helix domains [6], and, by using homology modeling and structure-function analysis, we identify point mutations that disrupt membrane binding and prevent both ER localization of CHMP7 and its subsequent enrichment at the reforming NE. These mutations also prevent assembly of downstream ESCRT-III components at the reforming NE and proper establishment of post-mitotic nucleo-cytoplasmic compartmentalization. These data identify a novel membrane-binding activity within an ESCRT-III subunit that is essential for post-mitotic nuclear regeneration.

  2. [Fundamental bases of digital information processing in nuclear cardiology (III)].

    PubMed

    Cuarón, A; González, C; García Moreira, C

    1984-01-01

    This article describes the transformation of the gamma-camera images into digital form. The incidence of a gamma photon on the detector, produces two voltage pulses, which are proportional to the coordinates of the incidence points, and a digital pulse, indicative of the occurrence of the event. The coordinate pulses passes through a analog-digital converter, that is activated by the pulse. The result is the appearance of a digital number at the out-put of the converter, which is proportional to the voltage at its in-put. This number, is stored on the accumulation memory of the system, either on a list mode or on a matrix mode. Static images can be stored on a single matrix. Dynamic data can be stored on a series of matrixes, each representing a different period of acquisition. It is also possible to capture information on a series of matrixes syncronized with the electrocardiogram of the patient. In this instance, each matrix represents a distinct period of the cardiac cycle. Data stored on the memory, can be used to process and display images and quantitative histograms on a video screen. In order to do that, it is necessary to translate the digital data on the memory to voltage levels, and to transform these on light levels on the screen. This, is achieved through a digital analog converter. The reading of the digital memory must be syncronic with the electronic scanning of the video screen.

  3. RAVEN. Dynamic Event Tree Approach Level III Milestone

    SciTech Connect

    Alfonsi, Andrea; Rabiti, Cristian; Mandelli, Diego; Cogliati, Joshua; Kinoshita, Robert

    2014-07-01

    Conventional Event-Tree (ET) based methodologies are extensively used as tools to perform reliability and safety assessment of complex and critical engineering systems. One of the disadvantages of these methods is that timing/sequencing of events and system dynamics are not explicitly accounted for in the analysis. In order to overcome these limitations several techniques, also know as Dynamic Probabilistic Risk Assessment (DPRA), have been developed. Monte-Carlo (MC) and Dynamic Event Tree (DET) are two of the most widely used D-PRA methodologies to perform safety assessment of Nuclear Power Plants (NPP). In the past two years, the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has developed its own tool to perform Dynamic PRA: RAVEN (Reactor Analysis and Virtual control ENvironment). RAVEN has been designed to perform two main tasks: 1) control logic driver for the new Thermo-Hydraulic code RELAP-7 and 2) post-processing tool. In the first task, RAVEN acts as a deterministic controller in which the set of control logic laws (user defined) monitors the RELAP-7 simulation and controls the activation of specific systems. Moreover, the control logic infrastructure is used to model stochastic events, such as components failures, and perform uncertainty propagation. Such stochastic modeling is deployed using both MC and DET algorithms. In the second task, RAVEN processes the large amount of data generated by RELAP-7 using data-mining based algorithms. This report focuses on the analysis of dynamic stochastic systems using the newly developed RAVEN DET capability. As an example, a DPRA analysis, using DET, of a simplified pressurized water reactor for a Station Black-Out (SBO) scenario is presented.

  4. RAVEN: Dynamic Event Tree Approach Level III Milestone

    SciTech Connect

    Andrea Alfonsi; Cristian Rabiti; Diego Mandelli; Joshua Cogliati; Robert Kinoshita

    2013-07-01

    Conventional Event-Tree (ET) based methodologies are extensively used as tools to perform reliability and safety assessment of complex and critical engineering systems. One of the disadvantages of these methods is that timing/sequencing of events and system dynamics are not explicitly accounted for in the analysis. In order to overcome these limitations several techniques, also know as Dynamic Probabilistic Risk Assessment (DPRA), have been developed. Monte-Carlo (MC) and Dynamic Event Tree (DET) are two of the most widely used D-PRA methodologies to perform safety assessment of Nuclear Power Plants (NPP). In the past two years, the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has developed its own tool to perform Dynamic PRA: RAVEN (Reactor Analysis and Virtual control ENvironment). RAVEN has been designed to perform two main tasks: 1) control logic driver for the new Thermo-Hydraulic code RELAP-7 and 2) post-processing tool. In the first task, RAVEN acts as a deterministic controller in which the set of control logic laws (user defined) monitors the RELAP-7 simulation and controls the activation of specific systems. Moreover, the control logic infrastructure is used to model stochastic events, such as components failures, and perform uncertainty propagation. Such stochastic modeling is deployed using both MC and DET algorithms. In the second task, RAVEN processes the large amount of data generated by RELAP-7 using data-mining based algorithms. This report focuses on the analysis of dynamic stochastic systems using the newly developed RAVEN DET capability. As an example, a DPRA analysis, using DET, of a simplified pressurized water reactor for a Station Black-Out (SBO) scenario is presented.

  5. Microtesla MRI with dynamic nuclear polarization

    PubMed Central

    Zotev, Vadim S.; Owens, Tuba; Matlashov, Andrei N.; Savukov, Igor M.; Gomez, John J.; Espy, Michelle A.

    2010-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging at microtesla fields is a promising imaging method that combines the pre-polarization technique and broadband signal reception by superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) sensors to enable in vivo MRI at microtesla-range magnetic fields similar in strength to the Earth magnetic field. Despite significant advances in recent years, the potential of microtesla MRI for biomedical imaging is limited by its insufficient signal-to-noise ratio due to a relatively low sample polarization. Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) is a widely used approach that allows polarization enhancement by two-four orders of magnitude without an increase in the polarizing field strength. In this work, the first implementation of microtesla MRI with Overhauser DNP and SQUID signal detection is described. The first measurements of carbon-13 NMR spectra at microtesla fields are also reported. The experiments were performed at the measurement field of 96 microtesla, corresponding to Larmor frequency of 4 kHz for protons and 1 kHz for carbon-13. The Overhauser DNP was carried out at 3.5 –5.7 mT field using rf irradiation at 120 MHz. Objects for imaging included water phantoms and a cactus plant. Aqueous solutions of metabolically relevant sodium bicarbonate, pyruvate, alanine, and lactate, labeled with carbon-13, were used for NMR studies. All the samples were doped with TEMPO free radicals. The Overhauser DNP enabled nuclear polarization enhancement by factor as high as −95 for protons and as high as −200 for carbon-13, corresponding to thermal polarizations at 0.33 T and 1.1 T fields, respectively. These results demonstrate that SQUID-based microtesla MRI can be naturally combined with Overhauser DNP in one system, and that its signal-to-noise performance is greatly improved in this case. They also suggest that microtesla MRI can become an efficient tool for in vivo imaging of hyperpolarized carbon-13, produced by the low-temperature dissolution DNP

  6. Structure, dynamics and function of nuclear pore complexes

    PubMed Central

    D’Angelo, M. A.; Hetzer, M. W.

    2009-01-01

    Nuclear pore complexes are large aqueous channels that penetrate the nuclear envelope, connecting the nuclear interior with the cytoplasm. Until recently, these macromolecular complexes were viewed as static structures whose only function was to control the molecular trafficking between the two compartments. It has now become evident that this simplistic scenario is inaccurate and that nuclear pore complexes are highly dynamic multiprotein assemblies involved in diverse cellular processes ranging from the organization of the cytoskeleton to gene expression. In this review, we will discuss the most recent developments in the nuclear pore complex field, focusing in the assembly, disassembly, maintenance and function of this macromolecular structure. PMID:18786826

  7. Dynamic nuclear polarization at high magnetic fields

    PubMed Central

    Maly, Thorsten; Debelouchina, Galia T.; Bajaj, Vikram S.; Hu, Kan-Nian; Joo, Chan-Gyu; Mak–Jurkauskas, Melody L.; Sirigiri, Jagadishwar R.; van der Wel, Patrick C. A.; Herzfeld, Judith; Temkin, Richard J.; Griffin, Robert G.

    2009-01-01

    Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) is a method that permits NMR signal intensities of solids and liquids to be enhanced significantly, and is therefore potentially an important tool in structural and mechanistic studies of biologically relevant molecules. During a DNP experiment, the large polarization of an exogeneous or endogeneous unpaired electron is transferred to the nuclei of interest (I) by microwave (μw) irradiation of the sample. The maximum theoretical enhancement achievable is given by the gyromagnetic ratios (γe/γl), being ∼660 for protons. In the early 1950s, the DNP phenomenon was demonstrated experimentally, and intensively investigated in the following four decades, primarily at low magnetic fields. This review focuses on recent developments in the field of DNP with a special emphasis on work done at high magnetic fields (≥5 T), the regime where contemporary NMR experiments are performed. After a brief historical survey, we present a review of the classical continuous wave (cw) DNP mechanisms—the Overhauser effect, the solid effect, the cross effect, and thermal mixing. A special section is devoted to the theory of coherent polarization transfer mechanisms, since they are potentially more efficient at high fields than classical polarization schemes. The implementation of DNP at high magnetic fields has required the development and improvement of new and existing instrumentation. Therefore, we also review some recent developments in μw and probe technology, followed by an overview of DNP applications in biological solids and liquids. Finally, we outline some possible areas for future developments. PMID:18266416

  8. Nuclear fuel: a new market dynamic

    SciTech Connect

    Kee, Edward D.

    2007-12-15

    After almost 20 years of low nuclear fuel prices, buyers have come to expect that these low and stable nuclear fuel prices will continue. This conventional wisdom may not reflect the significant changes and higher prices that growing demand, and the end of secondary sources of uranium and enrichment, will bring. (author)

  9. The spin-temperature theory of dynamic nuclear polarization and nuclear spin-lattice relaxation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byvik, C. E.; Wollan, D. S.

    1974-01-01

    A detailed derivation of the equations governing dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) and nuclear spin lattice relaxation by use of the spin temperature theory has been carried to second order in a perturbation expansion of the density matrix. Nuclear spin diffusion in the rapid diffusion limit and the effects of the coupling of the electron dipole-dipole reservoir (EDDR) with the nuclear spins are incorporated. The complete expression for the dynamic nuclear polarization has been derived and then examined in detail for the limit of well resolved solid effect transitions. Exactly at the solid effect transition peaks, the conventional solid-effect DNP results are obtained, but with EDDR effects on the nuclear relaxation and DNP leakage factor included. Explicit EDDR contributions to DNP are discussed, and a new DNP effect is predicted.

  10. Measurements of nuclear spin dynamics by spin-noise spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Ryzhov, I. I.; Poltavtsev, S. V.; Kozlov, G. G.; Zapasskii, V. S.; Kavokin, K. V.; Glazov, M. M.; Vladimirova, M.; Scalbert, D.; Cronenberger, S.; Lemaître, A.; Bloch, J.

    2015-06-15

    We exploit the potential of the spin noise spectroscopy (SNS) for studies of nuclear spin dynamics in n-GaAs. The SNS experiments were performed on bulk n-type GaAs layers embedded into a high-finesse microcavity at negative detuning. In our experiments, nuclear spin polarisation initially prepared by optical pumping is monitored in real time via a shift of the peak position in the electron spin noise spectrum. We demonstrate that this shift is a direct measure of the Overhauser field acting on the electron spin. The dynamics of nuclear spin is shown to be strongly dependent on the electron concentration.

  11. BOLD VENTURE COMPUTATION SYSTEM for nuclear reactor core analysis, Version III

    SciTech Connect

    Vondy, D.R.; Fowler, T.B.; Cunningham, G.W. III.

    1981-06-01

    This report is a condensed documentation for VERSION III of the BOLD VENTURE COMPUTATION SYSTEM for nuclear reactor core analysis. An experienced analyst should be able to use this system routinely for solving problems by referring to this document. Individual reports must be referenced for details. This report covers basic input instructions and describes recent extensions to the modules as well as to the interface data file specifications. Some application considerations are discussed and an elaborate sample problem is used as an instruction aid. Instructions for creating the system on IBM computers are also given.

  12. Theory of dynamic nuclear polarization and feedback in quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Economou, Sophia E.; Barnes, Edwin

    2014-04-01

    An electron confined in a quantum dot interacts with its local nuclear spin environment through the hyperfine contact interaction. This interaction combined with external control and relaxation or measurement of the electron spin allows for the generation of dynamic nuclear polarization. The quantum nature of the nuclear bath, along with the interplay of coherent external fields and incoherent dynamics in these systems renders a wealth of intriguing phenomena seen in recent experiments such as electron Zeeman frequency focusing, hysteresis, and line dragging. We develop in detail a fully quantum, self-consistent theory that can be applied to such experiments and that moreover has predictive power. Our theory uses the operator sum representation formalism in order to incorporate the incoherent dynamics caused by the additional, Markovian bath, which in self-assembled dots is the vacuum field responsible for electron-hole optical recombination. The beauty of this formalism is that it reduces the complexity of the problem by encoding the joint dynamics of the external coherent and incoherent driving in an effective dynamical map that only acts on the electron spin subspace. This, together with the separation of time scales in the problem, allows for a tractable and analytically solvable formalism. The key role of entanglement between the electron spin and the nuclear spins in the formation of dynamic nuclear polarization naturally follows from our solution. We demonstrate the theory in detail for an optical pulsed experiment and present an in-depth discussion and physical explanation of our results.

  13. Developing polarizable potential for molecular dynamics of Cm(III)-carbonate complexes in liquid water.

    PubMed

    Spezia, Riccardo; Jeanvoine, Yannick; Vuilleumier, Rodolphe

    2014-08-01

    In this work we have developed a polarizable potential to study Cm(III) forming complexes with carbonate anions in liquid water. The potential was developed by employing an extension of the procedure that we used to study the hydration of lanthanoids(III) and actinoids(III). Force field performances were benchmarked against DFT results obtained by both geometry optimization and Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics. With this polarizable potential, we run extended molecular dynamics simulations in liquid water from which we were able to identify structural and dynamical properties of such systems. In particular, water exchange dynamics were analyzed in detail. We obtained an average of three water molecules in the first shell of Cm(III) that show a relatively fast exchange dynamic (faster than for bare ions). Summarizing these results, we were able to draw an analogy to the results from the lanthanoid(III) series. In particular, it seems that Cm(III) behaves more like Nd(III) than Gd(III), as one would expect based on the recent hydration results and on f orbital occupancy.

  14. Altered nuclear dynamics in MDX myofibers.

    PubMed

    Iyer, Shama R; Shah, Sameer B; Valencia, Ana P; Schneider, Martin F; Hernández-Ochoa, Erick O; Stains, Joseph P; Blemker, Silvia S; Lovering, Richard M

    2017-03-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a genetic disorder in which the absence of dystrophin leads to progressive muscle degeneration and weakness. Although the genetic basis is known, the pathophysiology of dystrophic skeletal muscle remains unclear. We examined nuclear movement in wild-type (WT) and muscular dystrophy mouse model for DMD (MDX) (dystrophin-null) mouse myofibers. We also examined expression of proteins in the linkers of nucleoskeleton and cytoskeleton (LINC) complex, as well as nuclear transcriptional activity via histone H3 acetylation and polyadenylate-binding nuclear protein-1. Because movement of nuclei is not only LINC dependent but also microtubule dependent, we analyzed microtubule density and organization in WT and MDX myofibers, including the application of a unique 3D tool to assess microtubule core structure. Nuclei in MDX myofibers were more mobile than in WT myofibers for both distance traveled and velocity. MDX muscle shows reduced expression and labeling intensity of nesprin-1, a LINC protein that attaches the nucleus to the microtubule and actin cytoskeleton. MDX nuclei also showed altered transcriptional activity. Previous studies established that microtubule structure at the cortex is disrupted in MDX myofibers; our analyses extend these findings by showing that microtubule structure in the core is also disrupted. In addition, we studied malformed MDX myofibers to better understand the role of altered myofiber morphology vs. microtubule architecture in the underlying susceptibility to injury seen in dystrophic muscles. We incorporated morphological and microtubule architectural concepts into a simplified finite element mathematical model of myofiber mechanics, which suggests a greater contribution of myofiber morphology than microtubule structure to muscle biomechanical performance.NEW & NOTEWORTHY Microtubules provide the means for nuclear movement but show altered organization in the muscular dystrophy mouse model (MDX

  15. Towards a self-consistent dynamical nuclear model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roca-Maza, X.; Niu, Y. F.; Colò, G.; Bortignon, P. F.

    2017-04-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) is a powerful and accurate tool, exploited in nuclear physics to investigate the ground-state and some of the collective properties of nuclei along the whole nuclear chart. Models based on DFT are not, however, suitable for the description of single-particle dynamics in nuclei. Following the field theoretical approach by A Bohr and B R Mottelson to describe nuclear interactions between single-particle and vibrational degrees of freedom, we have taken important steps towards the building of a microscopic dynamic nuclear model. In connection with this, one important issue that needs to be better understood is the renormalization of the effective interaction in the particle-vibration approach. One possible way to renormalize the interaction is by the so-called subtraction method. In this contribution, we will implement the subtraction method in our model for the first time and study its consequences.

  16. Dynamic Nuclear Polarization of β-Cyclodextrin Macromolecules.

    PubMed

    Caracciolo, Filippo; Carretta, Pietro; Filibian, Marta; Melone, Lucio

    2017-03-30

    (1)H dynamic nuclear polarization and nuclear spin-lattice relaxation rates have been studied in amorphous complexes of β-cyclodextrins doped with different concentrations of the TEMPO radical. Nuclear polarization increased up to 10% in the optimal case, with a behavior of the buildup rate (1/TPOL) and of the nuclear spin-lattice relaxation rate (1/T1n) consistent with a thermal mixing regime. The temperature dependence of 1/T1n and its increase with the radical concentration indicate a relaxation process arising from the modulation of the electron-nucleus coupling by the glassy dynamics. The high-temperature relaxation is driven by molecular motions, and 1/T1n was studied at room temperature in liquid solutions for dilution levels close to the ones typically used for in vivo studies.

  17. Dynamical cooling of nuclear spins in double quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Rudner, M S; Levitov, L S

    2010-07-09

    Electrons trapped in quantum dots can exhibit quantum-coherent spin dynamics over long timescales. These timescales are limited by the coupling of electron spins to the disordered nuclear spin background, which is a major source of noise and dephasing in such systems. We propose a scheme for controlling and suppressing fluctuations of nuclear spin polarization in double quantum dots, which uses nuclear spin pumping in the spin-blockade regime. We show that nuclear spin polarization fluctuations can be suppressed when electronic levels in the two dots are properly positioned near resonance. The proposed mechanism is analogous to that of optical Doppler cooling. The Overhauser shift due to fluctuations of nuclear polarization brings electron levels in and out of resonance, creating internal feedback to suppress fluctuations. Estimates indicate that a better than 10-fold reduction of fluctuations is possible.

  18. Conformational Dynamics of DNA Repair by Escherichia coli Endonuclease III*

    PubMed Central

    Kuznetsov, Nikita A.; Kladova, Olga A.; Kuznetsova, Alexandra A.; Ishchenko, Alexander A.; Saparbaev, Murat K.; Zharkov, Dmitry O.; Fedorova, Olga S.

    2015-01-01

    Escherichia coli endonuclease III (Endo III or Nth) is a DNA glycosylase with a broad substrate specificity for oxidized or reduced pyrimidine bases. Endo III possesses two types of activities: N-glycosylase (hydrolysis of the N-glycosidic bond) and AP lyase (elimination of the 3′-phosphate of the AP-site). We report a pre-steady-state kinetic analysis of structural rearrangements of the DNA substrates and uncleavable ligands during their interaction with Endo III. Oligonucleotide duplexes containing 5,6-dihydrouracil, a natural abasic site, its tetrahydrofuran analog, and undamaged duplexes carried fluorescent DNA base analogs 2-aminopurine and 1,3-diaza-2-oxophenoxazine as environment-sensitive reporter groups. The results suggest that Endo III induces several fast sequential conformational changes in DNA during binding, lesion recognition, and adjustment to a catalytically competent conformation. A comparison of two fluorophores allowed us to distinguish between the events occurring in the damaged and undamaged DNA strand. Combining our data with the available structures of Endo III, we conclude that this glycosylase uses a multistep mechanism of damage recognition, which likely involves Gln41 and Leu81 as DNA lesion sensors. PMID:25869130

  19. Dynamic Systems Analysis Report for Nuclear Fuel Recycle

    SciTech Connect

    Brent Dixon; Sonny Kim; David Shropshire; Steven Piet; Gretchen Matthern; Bill Halsey

    2008-12-01

    This report examines the time-dependent dynamics of transitioning from the current United States (U.S.) nuclear fuel cycle where used nuclear fuel is disposed in a repository to a closed fuel cycle where the used fuel is recycled and only fission products and waste are disposed. The report is intended to help inform policy developers, decision makers, and program managers of system-level options and constraints as they guide the formulation and implementation of advanced fuel cycle development and demonstration efforts and move toward deployment of nuclear fuel recycling infrastructure.

  20. Proliferating cell nuclear antigen, p53 and micro vessel density: Grade II vs. Grade III astrocytoma.

    PubMed

    Malhan, Priya; Husain, Nuzhat; Bhalla, Shalini; Gupta, Rakesh K; Husain, Mazhar

    2010-01-01

    Histological classification and grading are prime procedures in the management of patients with astrocytoma, providing vital data for therapeutic decision making and prognostication. However, it has limitations in assessing biological tumor behavior. This can be overcome by using newer immunohistochemical techniques. This study was carried out to compare proliferative indices using proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), extent of p53 expression and micro vessel morphometric parameters in patients with low grade and anaplastic astrocytoma. Twenty-five patients, each of grade II and grade III astrocytoma were evaluated using monoclonal antibodies to PCNA, p53 protein and factor VIII related antigen. PCNA, p53-labeling indices were calculated along with micro vessel morphometric analysis using Biovis Image plus Software. Patients with grade III astrocytoma had higher PCNA and p53 labeling indices as compared with grade II astrocytoma (29.14 plus/minus 9.87% vs. 16.84 plus/minus 6.57%, p 0.001; 18.18 plus/minus 6.14% vs. 6.14 plus/minus 7.23%, p 0.001, respectively). Micro vessel percentage area of patients with grade III astrocytoma was also (4.26 plus/minus 3.70 vs. 1.05 plus/minus 0.56, p 0.001), higher along with other micro vessel morphometric parameters. Discordance between histology and one or more IHC parameters was seen in 5/25 (20%) of patients with grade III astrocytoma and 9/25 (36%) of patients with grade II disease. PCNA and p53 labeling indices were positively correlated with Pearson's correlation, p less than 0.001 for both). Increased proliferative fraction, genetic alterations and neovascularization mark biological aggressiveness in astrocytoma. Immunohistochemical evaluation scores over meet the challenge of accurate prognostication of this potentially fatal malignancy.

  1. Neutron detection of the Triga Mark III reactor, using nuclear track methodology

    SciTech Connect

    Espinosa, G. Golzarri, J. I.; Raya-Arredondo, R.; Cruz-Galindo, S.; Sajo-Bohus, L.

    2015-07-23

    Nuclear Track Methodology (NTM), based on the neutron-proton interaction is one often employed alternative for neutron detection. In this paper we apply NTM to determine the Triga Mark III reactor operating power and neutron flux. The facility nuclear core, loaded with 85 Highly Enriched Uranium as fuel with control rods in a demineralized water pool, provide a neutron flux around 2 × 10{sup 12} n cm{sup −2} s{sup −1}, at the irradiation channel TO-2. The neutron field is measured at this channel, using Landauer{sup ®} PADC as neutron detection material, covered by 3 mm Plexiglas{sup ®} as converter. After exposure, plastic detectors were chemically etched to make observable the formed latent tracks induced by proton recoils. The track density was determined by a custom made Digital Image Analysis System. The resulting average nuclear track density shows a direct proportionality response for reactor power in the range 0.1-7 kW. We indicate several advantages of the technique including the possibility to calibrate the neutron flux density measured at low reactor power.

  2. Fluctuations and symmetry energy in nuclear fragmentation dynamics.

    PubMed

    Colonna, M

    2013-01-25

    Within a dynamical description of nuclear fragmentation, based on the liquid-gas phase transition scenario, we explore the relation between neutron-proton density fluctuations and nuclear symmetry energy. We show that, along the fragmentation path, isovector fluctuations follow the evolution of the local density and approach an equilibrium value connected to the local symmetry energy. Higher-density regions are characterized by smaller average asymmetry and narrower isotopic distributions. This dynamical analysis points out that fragment final state isospin fluctuations can probe the symmetry energy of the density domains from which fragments originate.

  3. Nuclear dynamical deformation induced hetero- and euchromatin positioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Awazu, Akinori

    2015-09-01

    We studied the role of active deformation dynamics in cell nuclei in chromatin positioning. Model chains containing two types of regions, with high (euchromatic) or low (heterochromatic) mobility, were confined in a pulsating container simulating a nucleus showing dynamic deformations. Brownian dynamic simulations show that the positioning of low mobility regions changes from sites near the periphery to the center if the affinity between these regions and the container periphery disappears. The former and latter positionings are similar to the "conventional" and "inverted" chromatin positionings in nuclei of normal differentiated cells and cells lacking Lamin-related proteins. Additionally, nuclear dynamical deformation played essential roles in "inverted" chromatin positioning.

  4. Magnetic-field cycling instrumentation for dynamic nuclear polarization-nuclear magnetic resonance using photoexcited triplets.

    PubMed

    Kagawa, Akinori; Negoro, Makoto; Takeda, Kazuyuki; Kitagawa, Masahiro

    2009-04-01

    To advance static solid-state NMR with hyperpolarized nuclear spins, a system has been developed enabling dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) using electron spins in the photoexcited triplet state with X-band microwave apparatus, followed by static solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments using the polarized nuclear-spin system with a goniometer. In order to perform the DNP and NMR procedures in different magnetic fields, the DNP system and the NMR system are spatially separated, between which the sample can be shuttled while its orientation is controlled in a reproducible fashion. We demonstrate that the system developed in this work is operational for solid-state NMR with hyperpolarized nuclear-spin systems in static organic materials, and also discuss the application of our system.

  5. Nuclear Reactions and Stellar Evolution: Unified Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Bauer, W.; Strother, T.

    2007-10-26

    Motivated by the success of kinetic theory in the description of observables in intermediate and high energy heavy ion collisions, we use kinetic theory to model the dynamics of collapsing iron cores in type II supernova explosions. The algorithms employed to model the collapse, some preliminary results and predictions, and the future of the code are discussed.

  6. Electron-Nuclear Dynamics of Molecular Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-04-18

    approach with a completely general form of trial function yields the time - dependent Schr ~ dinger equation . Restricting the...dynamical equations approximating the time - dependent SchrOdinger equation . These equations govern the time evolution of the relevant state vector parameters... equations that apprximate the Apuit 18, 1994 time - dependent Schradinger equation and govern the time evolution of

  7. Role of class III phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase during programmed nuclear death of Tetrahymena thermophila.

    PubMed

    Akematsu, Takahiko; Fukuda, Yasuhiro; Attiq, Rizwan; Pearlman, Ronald E

    2014-02-01

    Programmed nuclear death (PND) in the ciliate protozoan Tetrahymena thermophila is a novel type of autophagy that occurs during conjugation, in which only the parental somatic macronucleus is destined to die and is then eliminated from the progeny cytoplasm. Other coexisting nuclei, however, such as new micro- and macronuclei are unaffected. PND starts with condensation in the nucleus followed by apoptotic DNA fragmentation, lysosomal acidification, and final resorption. Because of the peculiarity in the process and the absence of some ATG genes in this organism, the mechanism of PND has remained unclear. In this study, we focus on the role of class III phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PtdIns3K, corresponding to yeast Vps34) in order to identify central regulators of PND. We identified the sole Tetrahymena thermophila ortholog (TtVPS34) to yeast Vps34 and human PIK3C3 (the catalytic subunit of PtdIns3K), through phylogenetic analysis, and generated the gene knockdown mutant for functional analysis. Loss of TtVPS34 activity prevents autophagosome formation on the parental macronucleus, and this nucleus escapes from the lysosomal pathway. In turn, DNA fragmentation and final resorption of the nucleus are drastically impaired. These phenotypes are similar to the situation in the ATG8Δ mutants of Tetrahymena, implying an inextricable link between TtVPS34 and TtATG8s in controlling PND as well as general macroautophagy. On the other hand, TtVPS34 does not appear responsible for the nuclear condensation and does not affect the progeny nuclear development. These results demonstrate that TtVPS34 is critically involved in the nuclear degradation events of PND in autophagosome formation rather than with an involvement in commitment to the death program.

  8. Dynamic Simulation and Optimization of Nuclear Hydrogen Production Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Paul I. Barton; Mujid S. Kaximi; Georgios Bollas; Patricio Ramirez Munoz

    2009-07-31

    This project is part of a research effort to design a hydrogen plant and its interface with a nuclear reactor. This project developed a dynamic modeling, simulation and optimization environment for nuclear hydrogen production systems. A hybrid discrete/continuous model captures both the continuous dynamics of the nuclear plant, the hydrogen plant, and their interface, along with discrete events such as major upsets. This hybrid model makes us of accurate thermodynamic sub-models for the description of phase and reaction equilibria in the thermochemical reactor. Use of the detailed thermodynamic models will allow researchers to examine the process in detail and have confidence in the accurary of the property package they use.

  9. Molecular interferometer to decode attosecond electron–nuclear dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Palacios, Alicia; González-Castrillo, Alberto; Martín, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the coupled electronic and nuclear dynamics in molecules by using pump–probe schemes requires not only the use of short enough laser pulses but also wavelengths and intensities that do not modify the intrinsic behavior of the system. In this respect, extreme UV pulses of few-femtosecond and attosecond durations have been recognized as the ideal tool because their short wavelengths ensure a negligible distortion of the molecular potential. In this work, we propose the use of two twin extreme UV pulses to create a molecular interferometer from direct and sequential two-photon ionization processes that leave the molecule in the same final state. We theoretically demonstrate that such a scheme allows for a complete identification of both electronic and nuclear phases in the wave packet generated by the pump pulse. We also show that although total ionization yields reveal entangled electronic and nuclear dynamics in the bound states, doubly differential yields (differential in both electronic and nuclear energies) exhibit in addition the dynamics of autoionization, i.e., of electron correlation in the ionization continuum. Visualization of such dynamics is possible by varying the time delay between the pump and the probe pulses. PMID:24591647

  10. System dynamics: An introduction & applications to the nuclear industry

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, K.F.; Golay, M.W.

    1997-03-01

    The field of nuclear technology has been developing for over 50 years and has moved from the laboratory into a very large commercial industry. The growth in the underlying science and engineering has been remarkable both in its breadth and depth. The ability to design, analyze, and understand the behavior of nuclear plants is firmly established. There remain many challenging technical problems, but success of the industry is not contingent upon solving those technical problems. Rather, the success of the industry will be determined by a wider array of concerns than pure technology. For instance, nuclear plants in the future will have to compete economically against efficient, versatile, and reliable fossil technologies. In addition, potential users must be assured that the indirect costs, such as those of environmental effects and waste disposal, are acceptable. Finally, public perceptions about risks must somehow be allayed, if not resolved. The objective of this paper is to provide an introduction to a tool that may be useful to the industry in addressing the types of issues suggested above. The tool discussed is system dynamics. It has been used with considerable success in many other fields in ways that are similar to the needs of the nuclear field. In the second section of the paper the authors provide some background on the system dynamics method and illustrate how system dynamics models are constructed. In section 3 they discuss two applications in the nuclear field, the first relating to construction of nuclear plants and the second in the operation of a nuclear utility in the social/political environment of today in the United States. They conclude with some summary comments.

  11. Optically induced dynamic nuclear spin polarisation in diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheuer, Jochen; Schwartz, Ilai; Chen, Qiong; Schulze-Sünninghausen, David; Carl, Patrick; Höfer, Peter; Retzker, Alexander; Sumiya, Hitoshi; Isoya, Junichi; Luy, Burkhard; Plenio, Martin B.; Naydenov, Boris; Jelezko, Fedor

    2016-01-01

    The sensitivity of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) depends strongly on nuclear spin polarisation and, motivated by this observation, dynamical nuclear spin polarisation has recently been applied to enhance MRI protocols (Kurhanewicz et al 2011 Neoplasia 13 81). Nuclear spins associated with the 13C carbon isotope (nuclear spin I = 1/2) in diamond possess uniquely long spin lattice relaxation times (Reynhardt and High 2011 Prog. Nucl. Magn. Reson. Spectrosc. 38 37). If they are present in diamond nanocrystals, especially when strongly polarised, they form a promising contrast agent for MRI. Current schemes for achieving nuclear polarisation, however, require cryogenic temperatures. Here we demonstrate an efficient scheme that realises optically induced 13C nuclear spin hyperpolarisation in diamond at room temperature and low ambient magnetic field. Optical pumping of a nitrogen-vacancy centre creates a continuously renewable electron spin polarisation which can be transferred to surrounding 13C nuclear spins. Importantly for future applications we also realise polarisation protocols that are robust against an unknown misalignment between magnetic field and crystal axis.

  12. Neutron-Proton equilibration in dynamically deformed nuclear systems.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez Manso, Alis; McIntosh, A. B.; Jedele, A.; Yennello, S. J.

    2017-01-01

    Understanding the nuclear Equation of State (nEoS) is fundamental for describing nuclear reaction dynamics, understanding the origin of the elements and characterizing the structure of neutron stars. The density dependence of the asymmetry energy still represents the largest uncertainty in the nEoS. We demonstrate a new time-sensitive method for studying reaction dynamics that may allow new types of constraints on the asymmetry energy. We study neutron-proton equilibration in dynamically deformed nuclear systems by investigating the correlations between the largest fragments produced in collisions of 70Zn +70Zn, 64Zn +64Zn, 64Ni +64Ni and 70Zn +64Zn at 35 MeV per nucleon measured at the Cyclotron Institute at Texas A&M University. The extent of equilibration is investigated using the rotation angle as a clock. The equilibration follows an exponential trend with consistent rate constants across a wide variety of reaction partners and systems, indicating the equilibration follows first order kinetics. The statistical and dynamical components are separated on average; the equilibration curve for the purely dynamical is consistent with the overall equilibration curve, indicating the robustness of the method to statistical contamination.

  13. Time-dependent density-functional description of nuclear dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakatsukasa, Takashi; Matsuyanagi, Kenichi; Matsuo, Masayuki; Yabana, Kazuhiro

    2016-10-01

    The basic concepts and recent developments in the time-dependent density-functional theory (TDDFT) for describing nuclear dynamics at low energy are presented. The symmetry breaking is inherent in nuclear energy density functionals, which provides a practical description of important correlations at the ground state. Properties of elementary modes of excitation are strongly influenced by the symmetry breaking and can be studied with TDDFT. In particular, a number of recent developments in the linear response calculation have demonstrated their usefulness in the description of collective modes of excitation in nuclei. Unrestricted real-time calculations have also become available in recent years, with new developments for quantitative description of nuclear collision phenomena. There are, however, limitations in the real-time approach; for instance, it cannot describe the many-body quantum tunneling. Thus, the quantum fluctuations associated with slow collective motions are explicitly treated assuming that time evolution of densities is determined by a few collective coordinates and momenta. The concept of collective submanifold is introduced in the phase space associated with the TDDFT and used to quantize the collective dynamics. Selected applications are presented to demonstrate the usefulness and quality of the new approaches. Finally, conceptual differences between nuclear and electronic TDDFT are discussed, with some recent applications to studies of electron dynamics in the linear response and under a strong laser field.

  14. Molecular chaperone-mediated nuclear protein dynamics.

    PubMed

    Echtenkamp, Frank J; Freeman, Brian C

    2014-05-01

    Homeostasis requires effective action of numerous biological pathways including those working along a genome. The variety of processes functioning in the nucleus is considerable, yet the number of employed factors eclipses this total. Ideally, individual components assemble into distinct complexes and serially operate along a pathway to perform work. Adding to the complexity is a multitude of fluctuating internal and external signals that must be monitored to initiate, continue or halt individual activities. While cooperative interactions between proteins of the same process provide a mechanism for rapid and precise assembly, the inherent stability of such organized structures interferes with the proper timing of biological events. Further prolonging the longevity of biological complexes are crowding effects resulting from the high concentration of intracellular macromolecules. Hence, accessory proteins are required to destabilize the various assemblies to efficiently transition between structures, avoid off-pathway competitive interactions, and to terminate pathway activity. We suggest that molecular chaperones have evolved, in part, to manage these challenges by fostering a general and continuous dynamic protein environment within the nucleus.

  15. Nuclear dynamics in metastatic cells studied by quantitative phase imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceballos, Silvia; Kandel, Mikhail; Sridharan, Shamira; Monroy, Freddy; Popescu, Gabriel

    2015-03-01

    We used a new quantitative high spatiotemporal resolution phase imaging tool to explore the nuclear structure and dynamics of individual cells. We used a novel analysis tool to quantify the diffusion outside and inside the nucleus of live cells. We also obtained information about the nuclear spatio temporal mass density in metastatic cells. The results indicate that in the cytoplasm, the intracellular transport is mainly active (direct, deterministic), while inside the nucleus it is both active and passive (diffusive, random). We calculated the standard deviation of velocities in active transport and the diffusion coefficient for passive transport.

  16. Dynamic nuclear polarisation via the integrated solid effect I: theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henstra, A.; Wenckebach, W. Th.

    2014-07-01

    In the hyperpolarisation method known as dynamic nuclear polarisation (DNP), a small amount of unpaired electron spins is added to the sample containing the nuclear spins and the polarisation of these unpaired electron spins is transferred to the nuclear spins by means of a microwave field. Traditional DNP uses weak continuous wave (CW) microwave fields, so perturbation methods can be used to calculate the polarisation transfer. A much faster transfer of the electron spin polarisation is obtained with the integrated solid effect (ISE) which uses strong pulsed microwave fields. As in nuclear orientation via electron spin locking, the polarisation transfer is coherent, similar to the coherence transfer between nuclear spins. This paper presents a theoretical approach to calculate this polarisation transfer. ISE is successfully used for a fast polarisation transfer from short-lived photo-excited triplet states to the surrounding nuclear spins in molecular crystals. These triplet states are strongly aligned in the photo-excitation process and do not require the low temperatures and strong magnetic fields needed to polarise the electron spins in traditional DNP. In the following paper, the theory is applied to the system naphthalene-h8 doped with pentacene-d14 which provides the photo-excited triplet states, and compared with experimental results.

  17. Nuclear structure and dynamics with density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stetcu, Ionel

    2015-10-01

    Even in the absence of ab initio methods capable of tackling heavy nuclei without restrictions, one can obtain an ab initio description of ground-state properties by means of the density functional theory (DFT), and its extension to superfluid systems in its local variant, the superfluid local density approximation (SLDA). Information about the properties of excited states can be obtained in the same framework by using an extension to the time-dependent (TD) phenomena. Unlike other approaches in which the nuclear structure information is used as a separate input into reaction models, the TD approach treats on the same footing the nuclear structure and dynamics, and is well suited to provide more reliable description for a large number of processes involving heavy nuclei, from the nuclear response to electroweak probes, to nuclear reactions, such as neutron-induced reactions, or nuclear fusion and fission. Such processes, sometimes part of integrated nuclear systems, have important applications in astrophysics, energy production, global security, etc. In this talk, I will present the simulation of a simple reaction, that is the Coulomb excitation of a 238U nucleus, and discuss the application of the TD-DFT formalism to the description of induced fission. I gratefully acknowledge partial support of the U.S. Department of Energy through an Early Career Award of the LANL/LDRD Program.

  18. Sharp transitions in nuclear dynamics: Limits to collectivity and stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colonna, M.; Di Toro, M.; Latora, V.; Smerzi, A.

    Two limiting cases of nuclear dynamics are analysed in details: the disappearing of giant collective motions in hot nuclei and the nuclear disassembly in violent heavy ion collisions. It is shown that sharp transitions occur in the dynamical behaviour of finite nuclei. For collective vibration built on excited states we get a dramatic increase of the widths due to the enhancement of two body collisions with increasing temperature. The case of hot Giant Dipole Resonances (GDR) is discussed. As a consequence of the competition with neutron evaporation we get a sharp quenching of giant photon emission. Pre-equilibrium effects on the GDR formation are also accounted for. Limiting temperatures for the observation of GDR γ-decays are deduced for various nuclei, ranging from 6.0 to 3.5 MeV with increasing mass number. A detailed study of the onset of a new multifragmentation mechanism in violent heavy ion collisions around 50 MeV/u beam energy for symmetric partners is performed. It is shown that the nuclear system enters a dynamical instability region and fragments are directly produced from the growing of fluctuations. An hybrid model is developped just coupling average informations on the system entering the critical region to a statistical multifragmentration decay picture. Some hints towards a fully dynamical description of fragment production are finally discussed.

  19. Controlling the Excited-State Dynamics of Nuclear Spin Isomers Using the Dynamic Stark Effect.

    PubMed

    Waldl, Maria; Oppel, Markus; González, Leticia

    2016-07-14

    Stark control of chemical reactions uses intense laser pulses to distort the potential energy surfaces of a molecule, thus opening new chemical pathways. We use the concept of Stark shifts to convert a local minimum into a local maximum of the potential energy surface, triggering constructive and destructive wave-packet interferences, which then induce different dynamics on nuclear spin isomers in the electronically excited state of a quinodimethane derivative. Model quantum-dynamical simulations on reduced dimensionality using optimized ultrashort laser pulses demonstrate a difference of the excited-state dynamics of two sets of nuclear spin isomers, which ultimately can be used to discriminate between these isomers.

  20. Molecular Dynamics of Nuclear Pasta in Neutron Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briggs, Christian; da Silva Schneider, Andre

    2014-09-01

    During a core collapse supernova, a massive star undergoes rapid contraction followed by a massive explosion on the order of a hundred trillion trillion nuclear bombs in less than a second. While most matter is expelled at high speeds, what remains can form a neutron star. The bulk of a neutron star does not contain separate nuclei but is itself a single nucleus of radius ~10 km. In the crust of a neutron star, density is low enough that some matter exists as distinct nuclei arranged into crystalline lattice dominated by electromagnetic forces. Between the crust and core lies an interesting interface where matter is neither a single nucleus nor separate nuclei. It exists in a frustrated phase; competition between electromagnetic and strong nuclear forces causes exotic shapes to emerge, referred to as nuclear pasta. We use Molecular Dynamics (MD) to simulate nuclear pasta, with densities between nuclear saturation density and approximately one-tenth saturation density. Using MD particle trajectories, we compute the static structure factor S(q) and dynamical response function to describe both electron-pasta and neutrino-pasta scattering. We relate the structure and properties of nuclear pasta phases to features in S(q). Finally, one can integrate over S(q) to determine transport properties such as the electrical and thermal conductivity. This may help provide a better understanding of X-ray observations of neutron stars. During a core collapse supernova, a massive star undergoes rapid contraction followed by a massive explosion on the order of a hundred trillion trillion nuclear bombs in less than a second. While most matter is expelled at high speeds, what remains can form a neutron star. The bulk of a neutron star does not contain separate nuclei but is itself a single nucleus of radius ~10 km. In the crust of a neutron star, density is low enough that some matter exists as distinct nuclei arranged into crystalline lattice dominated by electromagnetic forces

  1. Pasta Elasticity: Molecular dynamics simulations of nuclear pasta deformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caplan, M. E.; Horowitz, C. J.; Berry, D. K.

    2015-04-01

    Nuclear pasta is expected in the inner crust of neutron stars at densities near the nuclear saturation density. In this work, the elastic properties of pasta are calculated from large scale molecular dynamics simulations by deforming the simulation volume. Our model uses a semi-classical two-nucleon potential that reproduces nuclear saturation. We report the shear modulus and breaking strain of a variety of pasta phases for different temperatures, densities, and proton fractions. The presence of pasta in neutron stars could have significant effects on crustal oscillations and could be inferred from observations of soft-gamma repeaters. Additionally, these elastic parameters will enable us to improve estimates of the maximum size and lifetime of ``mountains'' on the crust, which could efficiently radiate gravitational waves.

  2. A dynamical systems model for nuclear power plant risk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hess, Stephen Michael

    The recent transition to an open access generation marketplace has forced nuclear plant operators to become much more cost conscious and focused on plant performance. Coincidentally, the regulatory perspective also is in a state of transition from a command and control framework to one that is risk-informed and performance-based. Due to these structural changes in the economics and regulatory system associated with commercial nuclear power plant operation, there is an increased need for plant management to explicitly manage nuclear safety risk. Application of probabilistic risk assessment techniques to model plant hardware has provided a significant contribution to understanding the potential initiating events and equipment failures that can lead to core damage accidents. Application of the lessons learned from these analyses has supported improved plant operation and safety over the previous decade. However, this analytical approach has not been nearly as successful in addressing the impact of plant processes and management effectiveness on the risks of plant operation. Thus, the research described in this dissertation presents a different approach to address this issue. Here we propose a dynamical model that describes the interaction of important plant processes among themselves and their overall impact on nuclear safety risk. We first provide a review of the techniques that are applied in a conventional probabilistic risk assessment of commercially operating nuclear power plants and summarize the typical results obtained. The limitations of the conventional approach and the status of research previously performed to address these limitations also are presented. Next, we present the case for the application of an alternative approach using dynamical systems theory. This includes a discussion of previous applications of dynamical models to study other important socio-economic issues. Next, we review the analytical techniques that are applicable to analysis of

  3. Quantum nuclear dynamics in the photophysics of diamondoids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patrick, Christopher E.; Giustino, Feliciano

    2013-06-01

    The unusual electronic properties of diamondoids, the nanoscale relatives of diamond, make them attractive for applications ranging from drug delivery to field emission displays. Identifying the fundamental origin of these properties has proven highly challenging, with even the most advanced quantum many-body calculations unable to reproduce measurements of a quantity as ubiquitous as the optical gap. Here, by combining first-principles calculations and Importance Sampling Monte Carlo methods, we show that the quantum dynamics of carbon nuclei is key to understanding the electronic and optical properties of diamondoids. Quantum nuclear effects dramatically modify the absorption lineshapes and renormalize the optical gaps. These findings allow us to formulate a complete theory of optical absorption in diamondoids, and establish the universal role of quantum nuclear dynamics in nanodiamond across the length scales.

  4. Dynamic model for simulating the acceptance problem of nuclear energy

    SciTech Connect

    Seifritz, W.; Mennig, J.

    1987-01-01

    Nonlinear dynamics are attaining greater interest in different fields of application. Since the early 1980s, these methods have been applied intensively to a variety of very different general problems, such as the description of political and economic processes as well as the symbiotic behavior in the flora and fauna. The authors have tried to apply these mathematical methods to the dynamic behavior inherent in the problem of the acceptance of nuclear energy. The model, which simplifies the real situation, is two-dimensional and describes the symbiosis of two individuals: the capacity of nuclear power plants P and their acceptance A by the public. It is clear that in reality the acceptance problem depends on a series of other variables as well. However, it is believed that our investigations reveal some universal properties inherent to our socioeconomic system: nonlinearity and dissipative processes.

  5. PREFACE: 30th Winter Workshop on Nuclear Dynamics (WWND2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellwied, Rene; Geurts, Frank; Timmins, Anthony

    2014-09-01

    These are the proceedings of the 30th Winter Workshop on Nuclear Dynamics, which was held in Galveston, Texas, in April 2014. As in previous years, the unique character of this conference series has allowed us to bring together nuclear scientists with very different interests to discuss recent progress and scientific achievements. Out of the 67 contributions at WWND 2014 we have selected these 34 manuscripts. The topics capture the range of theoretical and experimental advances in our field. On the experimental side we saw very exciting results from the RHIC beam energy scan program and the p-p, p-Pb and Pb-Pb runs at the highest collision energies at the LHC. On the theory side the system size dependence of the experimental measurements led to a detailed evaluation of the initial conditions and plasma propagation using a wide variety of phenomenological approaches. These results were complemented by the most recent continuum extrapolated data from lattice in order to model the complete evolution of the relativistic heavy ion system. These proceedings of the 30th Winter Workshop on Nuclear Dynamics again provide a snapshot of the status of the field. The articles, many of which were written by some of the most promising young scientists in the field, are documenting the excitement and achievements that are characteristic for modern day nuclear science. Rene Bellwied (University of Houston) Frank Geurts (Rice University) Anthony Timmins (University of Houston)

  6. Static and dynamic high power, space nuclear electric generating systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wetch, J. R.; Begg, L. L.; Koester, J. K.

    1985-01-01

    Space nuclear electric generating systems concepts have been assessed for their potential in satisfying future spacecraft high power (several megawatt) requirements. Conceptual designs have been prepared for reactor power systems using the most promising static (thermionic) and the most promising dynamic conversion processes. Component and system layouts, along with system mass and envelope requirements have been made. Key development problems have been identified and the impact of the conversion process selection upon thermal management and upon system and vehicle configuration is addressed.

  7. Stochastic Mean-Field Dynamics For Nuclear Collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Ayik, Sakir

    2008-11-11

    We discuss a stochastic approach to improve description of nuclear dynamics beyond the mean-field approximation at low energies. For small amplitude fluctuations, this approach gives a result for the dispersion of a one-body observable that is identical to the result obtained previously through a variational approach. Furthermore, it incorporates one-body dissipation and fluctuation mechanisms in accordance with quantal fluctuation-dissipation relation.

  8. Dynamic Oligomerization of Integrase Orchestrates HIV Nuclear Entry

    PubMed Central

    Borrenberghs, Doortje; Dirix, Lieve; De Wit, Flore; Rocha, Susana; Blokken, Jolien; De Houwer, Stéphanie; Gijsbers, Rik; Christ, Frauke; Hofkens, Johan; Hendrix, Jelle; Debyser, Zeger

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear entry is a selective, dynamic process granting the HIV-1 pre-integration complex (PIC) access to the chromatin. Classical analysis of nuclear entry of heterogeneous viral particles only yields averaged information. We now have employed single-virus fluorescence methods to follow the fate of single viral pre-integration complexes (PICs) during infection by visualizing HIV-1 integrase (IN). Nuclear entry is associated with a reduction in the number of IN molecules in the complexes while the interaction with LEDGF/p75 enhances IN oligomerization in the nucleus. Addition of LEDGINs, small molecule inhibitors of the IN-LEDGF/p75 interaction, during virus production, prematurely stabilizes a higher-order IN multimeric state, resulting in stable IN multimers resistant to a reduction in IN content and defective for nuclear entry. This suggests that a stringent size restriction determines nuclear pore entry. Taken together, this work demonstrates the power of single-virus imaging providing crucial insights in HIV replication and enabling mechanism-of-action studies. PMID:27830755

  9. Insights into nuclear dynamics using live-cell imaging approaches.

    PubMed

    Bigley, Rachel B; Payumo, Alexander Y; Alexander, Jeffrey M; Huang, Guo N

    2017-03-01

    The nucleus contains the genetic blueprint of the cell and myriad interactions within this subcellular structure are required for gene regulation. In the current scientific era, characterization of these gene regulatory networks through biochemical techniques coupled with systems-wide 'omic' approaches has become commonplace. However, these strategies are limited because they represent a mere snapshot of the cellular state. To obtain a holistic understanding of nuclear dynamics, relevant molecules must be studied in their native contexts in living systems. Live-cell imaging approaches are capable of providing quantitative assessment of the dynamics of gene regulatory interactions within the nucleus. We survey recent insights into what live-cell imaging approaches have provided the field of nuclear dynamics. In this review, we focus on interactions of DNA with other DNA loci, proteins, RNA, and the nuclear envelope. WIREs Syst Biol Med 2017, 9:e1372. doi: 10.1002/wsbm.1372 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website.

  10. Dynamical Green's function and an exact optical potential for electron-molecule scattering including nuclear dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brand, Joachim; Cederbaum, Lorenz S.; Meyer, Hans-Dieter

    1999-10-01

    We derive a rigorous optical potential for electron-molecule scattering including the effects of nuclear dynamics by extending the common many-body Green's function approach to optical potentials beyond the fixed-nuclei limit for molecular targets. Our formalism treats the projectile electron and the nuclear motion of the target molecule on the same footing whereby the dynamical optical potential rigorously accounts for the complex many-body nature of the scattering target. One central result of the present work is that the common fixed-nuclei optical potential is a valid adiabatic approximation to the dynamical optical potential even when projectile and nuclear motion are (nonadiabatically) coupled as long as the scattering energy is well below the electronic excitation thresholds of the target. For extremely low projectile velocities, however, when the cross sections are most sensitive to the scattering potential, we expect the influences of the nuclear dynamics on the optical potential to become relevant. For these cases, a systematic way to improve the adiabatic approximation to the dynamical optical potential is presented that yields nonlocal operators with respect to the nuclear coordinates.

  11. Dynamic nuclear polarization in a magnetic resonance force microscope experiment.

    PubMed

    Issac, Corinne E; Gleave, Christine M; Nasr, Paméla T; Nguyen, Hoang L; Curley, Elizabeth A; Yoder, Jonilyn L; Moore, Eric W; Chen, Lei; Marohn, John A

    2016-04-07

    We report achieving enhanced nuclear magnetization in a magnetic resonance force microscope experiment at 0.6 tesla and 4.2 kelvin using the dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) effect. In our experiments a microwire coplanar waveguide delivered radiowaves to excite nuclear spins and microwaves to excite electron spins in a 250 nm thick nitroxide-doped polystyrene sample. Both electron and proton spin resonance were observed as a change in the mechanical resonance frequency of a nearby cantilever having a micron-scale nickel tip. NMR signal, not observable from Curie-law magnetization at 0.6 T, became observable when microwave irradiation was applied to saturate the electron spins. The resulting NMR signal's size, buildup time, dependence on microwave power, and dependence on irradiation frequency was consistent with a transfer of magnetization from electron spins to nuclear spins. Due to the presence of an inhomogeneous magnetic field introduced by the cantilever's magnetic tip, the electron spins in the sample were saturated in a microwave-resonant slice 10's of nm thick. The spatial distribution of the nuclear polarization enhancement factor ε was mapped by varying the frequency of the applied radiowaves. The observed enhancement factor was zero for spins in the center of the resonant slice, was ε = +10 to +20 for spins proximal to the magnet, and was ε = -10 to -20 for spins distal to the magnet. We show that this bipolar nuclear magnetization profile is consistent with cross-effect DNP in a ∼10(5) T m(-1) magnetic field gradient. Potential challenges associated with generating and using DNP-enhanced nuclear magnetization in a nanometer-resolution magnetic resonance imaging experiment are elucidated and discussed.

  12. nuclear bound states in a dynamical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mareš, J.; Friedman, E.; Gal, A.

    2006-05-01

    A comprehensive data base of K-atom level shifts and widths is re-analyzed in order to study the density dependence of the K¯-nuclear optical potential. Significant departure from a tρ form is found only for ρ(r)/ρ ≲ 0.2 and extrapolation to nuclear-matter density ρ yields an attractive potential, about 170 MeV deep. Partial restoration of chiral symmetry compatible with pionic atoms and low-energy pion-nuclear data plays no role at the relevant low-density regime, but this effect is not ruled out at densities of order ρ and beyond. K¯-nuclear bound states are generated across the periodic table self consistently, using a relativistic mean-field model Lagrangian which couples the K¯ to the scalar and vector meson fields mediating the nuclear interactions. The reduced phase space available for K¯ absorption from these bound states is taken into account by adding an energy-dependent imaginary term which underlies the corresponding K¯-nuclear level widths, with a strength required by fits to the atomic data. Substantial polarization of the core nucleus is found for light nuclei, and the binding energies and widths calculated in this dynamical model differ appreciably from those calculated for a static nucleus. A wide range of binding energies is spanned by varying the K¯ couplings to the meson fields. Our calculations provide a lower limit of Γ=50±10 MeV on the width of nuclear bound states for K¯-binding energy in the range B˜100-200 MeV. Comments are made on the interpretation of the FINUDA experiment at DAΦNE which claimed evidence for deeply bound Kpp states in light nuclei.

  13. Dynamics of hot and dense nuclear and partonic matter

    SciTech Connect

    Bratkovskaya, E. L.; Cassing, W.; Linnyk, O.; Konchakovski, V. P.; Voronyuk, V.; Ozvenchuk, V.

    2012-06-15

    The dynamics of hot and dense nuclear matter is discussed from the microscopic transport point of view. The basic concepts of the Hadron-String-Dynamical transport model (HSD)-derived from Kadanoff-Baym equations in phase phase-are presented as well as 'highlights' of HSD results for different observables in heavy-ion collisions from 100 A MeV (SIS) to 21 A TeV(RHIC) energies. Furthermore, a novel extension of the HSD model for the description of the partonic phase-the Parton-Hadron-String-Dynamics (PHSD) approach-is introduced. PHSD includes a nontrivial partonic equation of state-in line with lattice QCD-as well as covariant transition rates from partonic to hadronic degrees of freedom. The sensitivity of hadronic observables to the partonic phase is demonstrated for relativistic heavy-ion collisions from the FAIR/NICA up to the RHIC energy regime.

  14. Structure and dynamics of the fibronectin-III domains of Aplysia californica cell adhesion molecules.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Catherine M; Muzard, Julien; Brooks, Bernard R; Lee, Gil U; Buchete, Nicolae-Viorel

    2015-04-21

    Due to their homophilic and heterophilic binding properties, cell adhesion molecules (CAMs) such as integrin, cadherin and the immunoglobulin superfamily CAMs are of primary importance in cell-cell and cell-substrate interactions, signalling pathways and other crucial biological processes. We study the molecular structures and conformational dynamics of the two fibronectin type III (Fn-III) extracellular domains of the Aplysia californica CAM (apCAM) protein, by constructing and probing an atomically-detailed structural model based on apCAM's homology with other CAMs. The stability and dynamic properties of the Fn-III domains, individually and in tandem, are probed and analysed using all-atom explicit-solvent molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and normal mode analysis of their corresponding elastic network models. The refined structural model of the Fn-III tandem of apCAM reveals a specific pattern of amino acid interactions that controls the stability of the β-sheet rich structure and could affect apCAM's response to physical or chemical changes of its environment. It also exposes the important role of several specific charged residues in modulating the structural properties of the linker segment connecting the two Fn-III domains, as well as of the inter-domain interface.

  15. Quantitative Analysis of Lens Nuclear Density Using Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) with a Liquid Optics Interface: Correlation between OCT Images and LOCS III Grading

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jin Hyoung

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To quantify whole lens and nuclear lens densities using anterior-segment optical coherence tomography (OCT) with a liquid optics interface and evaluate their correlation with Lens Opacities Classification System III (LOCS III) lens grading and corrected distance visual acuity (BCVA). Methods. OCT images of the whole lens and lens nucleus of eyes with age-related nuclear cataract were analyzed using ImageJ software. The lens grade and nuclear density were represented in pixel intensity units (PIU) and correlations between PIU, BCVA, and LOCS III were assessed. Results. Forty-seven eyes were analyzed. The mean whole lens and lens nuclear densities were 26.99 ± 5.23 and 19.43 ± 6.15 PIU, respectively. A positive linear correlation was observed between lens opacities (R2 = 0.187, p < 0.01) and nuclear density (R2 = 0.316, p < 0.01) obtained from OCT images and LOCS III. Preoperative BCVA and LOCS III were also positively correlated (R2 = 0.454, p < 0.01). Conclusions. Whole lens and lens nuclear densities obtained from OCT correlated with LOCS III. Nuclear density showed a higher positive correlation with LOCS III than whole lens density. OCT with a liquid optics interface is a potential quantitative method for lens grading and can aid in monitoring and managing age-related cataracts. PMID:27651952

  16. ESCRT-III and Vps4: a dynamic multipurpose tool for membrane budding and scission.

    PubMed

    Alonso Y Adell, Manuel; Migliano, Simona M; Teis, David

    2016-09-01

    Complex molecular machineries bud, scission and repair cellular membranes. Components of the multi-subunit endosomal sorting complex required for transport (ESCRT) machinery are enlisted when multivesicular bodies are generated, extracellular vesicles are formed, the plasma membrane needs to be repaired, enveloped viruses bud out of host cells, defective nuclear pores have to be cleared, the nuclear envelope must be resealed after mitosis and for final midbody abscission during cytokinesis. While some ESCRT components are only required for specific processes, the assembly of ESCRT-III polymers on target membranes and the action of the AAA-ATPase Vps4 are mandatory for every process. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge of structural and functional features of ESCRT-III/Vps4 assemblies in the growing pantheon of ESCRT-dependent pathways. We describe specific recruitment processes for ESCRT-III to different membranes, which could be useful to selectively inhibit ESCRT function during specific processes, while not affecting other ESCRT-dependent processes. Finally, we speculate how ESCRT-III and Vps4 might function together and highlight how the characterization of their precise spatiotemporal organization will improve our understanding of ESCRT-mediated membrane budding and scission in vivo.

  17. Mechanism of dynamic nuclear polarization in high magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrar, C. T.; Hall, D. A.; Gerfen, G. J.; Inati, S. J.; Griffin, R. G.

    2001-03-01

    Solid-state NMR signal enhancements of about two orders of magnitude (100-400) have been observed in dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) experiments performed at high magnetic field (5 T) and low temperature (10 K) using the nitroxide radical 4-amino TEMPO as the source of electron polarization. Since the breadth of the 4-amino TEMPO EPR spectrum is large compared to the nuclear Larmor frequency, it has been assumed that thermal mixing (TM) is the dominate mechanism by which polarization is transferred from electron to nuclear spins. However, theoretical explanations of TM generally assume a homogeneously broadened EPR line and, since the 4-amino TEMPO line at 5 T is inhomogeneously broadened, they do not explain the observed DNP enhancements. Accordingly, we have developed a treatment of DNP that explicitly uses electron-electron cross-relaxation to mediate electron-nuclear polarization transfer. The process proceeds via spin flip-flops between pairs of electronic spin packets whose Zeeman temperatures differ from one another. To confirm the essential features of the model we have studied the field dependence of electron-electron double resonance (ELDOR) data and DNP enhancement data. Both are well simulated using a simple model of electron cross-relaxation in the inhomogeneously broadened 4-amino TEMPO EPR line.

  18. Hanford spent nuclear fuel project recommended path forward, volume III: Alternatives and path forward evaluation supporting documentation

    SciTech Connect

    Fulton, J.C.

    1994-10-01

    Volume I of the Hanford Spent Nuclear Fuel Project - Recommended Path Forward constitutes an aggressive series of projects to construct and operate systems and facilities to safely retrieve, package, transport, process, and store K Basins fuel and sludge. Volume II provided a comparative evaluation of four Alternatives for the Path Forward and an evaluation for the Recommended Path Forward. Although Volume II contained extensive appendices, six supporting documents have been compiled in Volume III to provide additional background for Volume II.

  19. Survey of Dynamic Simulation Programs for Nuclear Fuel Reprocessing

    SciTech Connect

    Troy J. Tranter; Daryl R. Haefner

    2008-06-01

    The absence of any industrial scale nuclear fuel reprocessing in the U.S. has precluded the necessary driver for developing the advanced simulation capability now prevalent in so many other industries. Modeling programs to simulate the dynamic behavior of nuclear fuel separations and processing were originally developed to support the US government’s mission of weapons production and defense fuel recovery. Consequently there has been little effort is the US devoted towards improving this specific process simulation capability during the last two or three decades. More recent work has been focused on elucidating chemical thermodynamics and developing better models of predicting equilibrium in actinide solvent extraction systems. These equilibrium models have been used to augment flowsheet development and testing primarily at laboratory scales. The development of more robust and complete process models has not kept pace with the vast improvements in computational power and user interface and is significantly behind simulation capability in other chemical processing and separation fields.

  20. Nuclear magnetic resonance probes of membrane biophysics: Structure and dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leftin, Avigdor

    The phospholipid membrane is a self-assembled, dynamic molecular system that may exist alone in association with only water, or in complex systems comprised of multiple lipid types and proteins. In this dissertation the intra- and inter-molecular forces responsible for the atomistic, molecular and collective equilibrium structure and dynamics are studied by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR). The multinuclear NMR measurements and various experimental techniques are able to provide data that enable the characterization of the hierarchical spatio-temporal organization of the phospholipid membrane. The experimental and theoretical studies conducted target membrane interactions ranging from model systems composed of only water and lipids, to multiple component domain forming membranes that are in association with peripheral and trans-membrane proteins. These measurements consisit of frequency spectrum lineshapes and nuclear-spin relaxation rates obtained using 2H NMR, 13C NMR, 31P NMR and 1H NMR. The changes of these experimental observables are interpreted within a statistical thermodynamic framework that allows the membrane structure, activation energies, and correlation times of motion to be determined. The cases presented demonstrate how fundamental principles of NMR spectroscopy may be applied to a host of membranes, leading to the biophysical characterization of membrane structure and dynamics.

  1. New Versions of Terahertz Radiation Sources for Dynamic Nuclear Polarization in Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bratman, V. L.; Kalynov, Yu. K.; Makhalov, P. B.; Fedotov, A. E.

    2014-01-01

    Dynamic nuclear polarization in strong-field nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy requires terahertz radiation with moderate power levels. Nowadays, conventional gyrotrons are used almost exclusively to generate such radiation. In this review paper, we consider alternative variants of electronic microwave oscillators which require much weaker magnetic fields for their operation, namely, large-orbit gyrotrons operated at high cyclotron-frequency harmonics and Čerenkov-type devices, such as a backward-wave oscillator and a klystron frequency multiplier with tubular electron beams. Additionally, we consider the possibility to use the magnetic field created directly by the solenoid of an NMR spectrometer for operation of both the gyrotron and the backward-wave oscillator. Location of the oscillator in the spectrometer magnet makes it superfluous to use an additional superconducting magnet creating a strong field, significantly reduces the length of the radiation transmission line, and, in the case of Čerenkov-type devices, allows one to increase considerably the output-signal power. According to our calculations, all the electronic devices considered are capable of ensuring the power required for dynamic nuclear polarization (10 W or more) at a frequency of 260 GHz, whereas the gyrotrons, including their versions proposed in this paper, remain a single option at higher frequencies.

  2. Nonadiabatic quantum molecular dynamics with hopping. III. Photoinduced excitation and relaxation of organic molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, M.; Handt, J.; Schmidt, R.

    2014-07-01

    Photoinduced excitation and relaxation of organic molecules (C2H4 and CH2NH2+) are investigated by means of nonadiabatic quantum molecular dynamics with hopping (NA-QMD-H), developed recently [Fischer, Handt, and Schmidt, paper I of this series, Phys. Rev. A 90, 012525 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevA.90.012525]. This method is first applied to molecules assumed to be initially ad hoc excited to an electronic surface. Special attention is drawn to elaborate the role of electron-nuclear correlations, i.e., of quantum effects in the nuclear dynamics. It is found that they are essential for a realistic description of the long-time behavior of the electronic relaxation process, but only of minor importance to portray the short-time scenario of the nuclear dynamics. Migration of a hydrogen atom, however, is identified as a quantum effect in the nuclear motion. Results obtained with explicit inclusion of an fs-laser field are presented as well. It is shown that the laser-induced excitation process generally leads to qualitatively different gross features of the relaxation dynamics, as compared to the field-free case. Nevertheless, the nuclear wave packet contains all subtleties of the cis-trans isomerization mechanism as observed without a laser field.

  3. Solvation of Co(III)-cysteinato complexes in water: a DFT-based molecular dynamics study.

    PubMed

    Spezia, Riccardo; Bresson, Carole; Den Auwer, Christophe; Gaigeot, Marie-Pierre

    2008-05-22

    Structural, dynamical, and vibrational properties of complexes made of metal cobalt(III) coordinated to different amounts of cysteine molecules were investigated with DFT-based Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics (CPMD) simulations in liquid water solution. The systems are composed of Co(III):3Cys and Co(III):2Cys immersed in liquid water which are modeled by about 110 explicit water molecules, thus one of the biggest molecular systems studied with ab initio molecular simulations so far. In such a way, we were able to investigate structural and dynamical properties of a model of a typical metal binding site used by several proteins. Cobalt, mainly a toxicological agent, can replace the natural binding metal and thus modify the biochemical activity. The structure of the surrounding solvent around the metal-ligands complexes is reported in detail, as well as the metal-ligands coordination bonds, using radial distribution functions and electronic analyses with Mayer bond orders. Structures of the Cocysteine complexes are found in very good agreement with EXAFS experimental data, stressing the importance of considering the surrounding solvent in the modeling. A vibrational analysis is also conducted and compared to experiment, which strengthens the reliability of the solvent interactions with the Cocysteine complexes from our molecular dynamics simulations, as well as the dynamics of the systems. From this preliminary analysis, we could suggest a vibrational fingerprint able to distinguish Co(III):2Cys from Co(III):3Cys. Our simulations also show the importance of considering a quantum explicit solvent, as solute-to-solvent proton transfer events have been observed.

  4. Computational fluid dynamics studies of nuclear rocket performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stubbs, Robert M.; Kim, Suk C.; Benson, Thomas J.

    1994-01-01

    A CFD analysis of a low pressure nuclear rocket concept is presented with the use of an advanced chemical kinetics, Navier-Stokes code. The computations describe the flow field in detail, including gas dynamic, thermodynamic and chemical properties, as well as global performance quantities such as specific impulse. Computational studies of several rocket nozzle shapes are conducted in an attempt to maximize hydrogen recombination. These Navier-Stokes calculations, which include real gas and viscous effects, predict lower performance values than have been reported heretofore.

  5. Nuclear Hybrid Energy System Modeling: RELAP5 Dynamic Coupling Capabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Piyush Sabharwall; Nolan Anderson; Haihua Zhao; Shannon Bragg-Sitton; George Mesina

    2012-09-01

    The nuclear hybrid energy systems (NHES) research team is currently developing a dynamic simulation of an integrated hybrid energy system. A detailed simulation of proposed NHES architectures will allow initial computational demonstration of a tightly coupled NHES to identify key reactor subsystem requirements, identify candidate reactor technologies for a hybrid system, and identify key challenges to operation of the coupled system. This work will provide a baseline for later coupling of design-specific reactor models through industry collaboration. The modeling capability addressed in this report focuses on the reactor subsystem simulation.

  6. Nuclear spin dynamics in double quantum dots: Multistability, dynamical polarization, criticality, and entanglement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuetz, M. J. A.; Kessler, E. M.; Vandersypen, L. M. K.; Cirac, J. I.; Giedke, G.

    2014-05-01

    We theoretically study the nuclear spin dynamics driven by electron transport and hyperfine interaction in an electrically defined double quantum dot in the Pauli-blockade regime. We derive a master-equation-based framework and show that the coupled electron-nuclear system displays an instability towards the buildup of large nuclear spin polarization gradients in the two quantum dots. In the presence of such inhomogeneous magnetic fields, a quantum interference effect in the collective hyperfine coupling results in sizable nuclear spin entanglement between the two quantum dots in the steady state of the evolution. We investigate this effect using analytical and numerical techniques, and demonstrate its robustness under various types of imperfections.

  7. Design (and) principles of nuclear dynamics in Stockholm

    PubMed Central

    Shav-Tal, Yaron; Lammerding, Jan

    2015-01-01

    The structural organization of the nucleus and its content has drawn increasing interest in recent years, as it is has become evident that the spatial and temporal arrangement of the genome and associated structures plays a crucial role in transcriptional regulation and numerous other functions. Shining light on the dynamic nature of this organization, along with the processes controlling it, were the topics of the Wenner-Gren Foundations international symposium "Nuclear Dynamics: Design (and) Principles." The meeting, organized by Piorgiogio Percipalle, Maria Vartiainen, Neus Visa, and Ann-Kristin Östlund-Farrants, brought over 60 participants, including 20 international speakers, to Stockholm, Sweden from August 19–22, 2015 to share the latest developments in the field. Given the unpublished nature of many of the talks, we have focused on covering the discussed topics and highlighting the latest trends in this exciting and rapidly evolving field. PMID:26730816

  8. Analysis of nuclear thermal propulsion systems using computational fluid dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stubbs, Robert M.; Kim, Suk C.; Papp, John L.

    1993-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analyses of nuclear rockets with relatively low chamber pressures were carried out to assess the merits of using such low pressures to take advantage of hydrogen dissociation and recombination. The computations, using a Navier-Stokes code with chemical kinetics, describe the flow field in detail, including gas dynamics, thermodynamic and chemical properties, and provide global performance quantities such as specific impulse and thrust. Parametric studies were performed varying chamber temperature, chamber pressure and nozzle size. Chamber temperature was varied between 2700 K and 3600 K, and chamber pressure between 0.1 atm. and 10 atm. Performance advantages associated with lower chamber pressures are shown to occur at the higher chamber temperatures. Viscous losses are greater at lower chamber pressures and can be decreased in larger nozzles where the boundary layer is a smaller fraction of the flow field.

  9. Calculation of Cross Sections in Electron-Nuclear Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabrera-Trujillo, R.; Sabin, John R.; Deumens, E.; Öhrn, Y.

    In this work, we present an overview of the study of total and differential cross section calculations within the electron-nuclear dynamics (END). END is a method to solve the time-dependent Schrödinger equation in a non-adiabatic approach to direct dynamics. The method takes advantage of a coherent state representation of the molecular wave function. A quantum-mechanical Lagrangian formulation is employed to approximate the Schrödinger equation, via the time-dependent variational principle, to a set of coupled first-order differential equations in time for the END. We obtain the final wave function for the system allowing the determination of collisional properties of interest, as for example, deflection functions, charge exchange probabilities and amplitudes, and differential cross sections. We discuss the use and selection of basis sets for both the electronic description of the colliding systems as well as for their importance in the description of electron capture. As quantum effects are important in many cases and lacking for classical nuclei, we discuss the Schiff methodology and its advantages over other traditional methods for including semiclassical corrections. Time-lapse rendering of the dynamics of the participating electrons and atomic nuclei provides for a detailed view of dynamical and reactive processes. Comparison to experimental and other theoretical results is provided where appropriate data are available.

  10. Quantum mechanical theory of dynamic nuclear polarization in solid dielectrics

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Kan-Nian; Debelouchina, Galia T.; Smith, Albert A.; Griffin, Robert G.

    2011-01-01

    Microwave driven dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) is a process in which the large polarization present in an electron spin reservoir is transferred to nuclei, thereby enhancing NMR signal intensities. In solid dielectrics there are three mechanisms that mediate this transfer—the solid effect (SE), the cross effect (CE), and thermal mixing (TM). Historically these mechanisms have been discussed theoretically using thermodynamic parameters and average spin interactions. However, the SE and the CE can also be modeled quantum mechanically with a system consisting of a small number of spins and the results provide a foundation for the calculations involving TM. In the case of the SE, a single electron–nuclear spin pair is sufficient to explain the polarization mechanism, while the CE requires participation of two electrons and a nuclear spin, and can be used to understand the improved DNP enhancements observed using biradical polarizing agents. Calculations establish the relations among the electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) frequencies and the microwave irradiation frequency that must be satisfied for polarization transfer via the SE or the CE. In particular, if δ, Δ < ω0I, where δ and Δ are the homogeneous linewidth and inhomogeneous breadth of the EPR spectrum, respectively, we verify that the SE occurs when ωM = ω0S ± ω0I, where ωM, ω0S and ω0I are, respectively, the microwave, and the EPR and NMR frequencies. Alternatively, when Δ > ω0I > δ, the CE dominates the polarization transfer. This two-electron process is optimized when ω0S1−ω0S2=ω0I and ωM∼ω0S1 orω0S2, where ω0S1 and ω0S2 are the EPR Larmor frequencies of the two electrons. Using these matching conditions, we calculate the evolution of the density operator from electron Zeeman order to nuclear Zeeman order for both the SE and the CE. The results provide insights into the influence of the microwave irradiation field, the

  11. Solid effect in magic angle spinning dynamic nuclear polarization

    PubMed Central

    Corzilius, Björn; Smith, Albert A.; Griffin, Robert G.

    2012-01-01

    For over five decades, the solid effect (SE) has been heavily utilized as a mechanism for performing dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP). Nevertheless, it has not found widespread application in contemporary, high magnetic field DNP experiments because SE enhancements display an \\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{upgreek} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\setlength{\\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \\begin{document} \\begin{equation*}\\omega _0 ^{ - 2}\\end{equation*} \\end{document}ω0−2 field dependence. In particular, for nominally forbidden zero and double quantum SE transitions to be partially allowed, it is necessary for mixing of adjacent nuclear spin states to occur, and this leads to the observed field dependence. However, recently we have improved our instrumentation and report here an enhancement of ɛ = 91 obtained with the organic radical trityl (OX063) in magic angle spinning experiments performed at 5 T and 80 K. This is a factor of 6-7 higher than previous values in the literature under similar conditions. Because the solid effect depends strongly on the microwave field strength, we attribute this large enhancement to larger microwave field strengths inside the sample volume, achieved with more efficient coupling of the gyrotron to the sample chamber. In addition, we develop a theoretical model to explain the dependence of the buildup rate of enhanced nuclear polarization and the steady-state enhancement on the microwave power. Buildup times and enhancements were measured as a function of 1H concentration for both trityl and Gd-DOTA. Comparison of the results indicates that for trityl the initial polarization step is the slower, rate-determining step. However, for Gd-DOTA the spread of nuclear polarization via homonuclear 1H spin diffusion is rate-limiting. Finally, we discuss the applicability of the solid effect at fields > 5 T and the requirements

  12. Homometallic Dy(III) Complexes of Varying Nuclearity from 2 to 21: Synthesis, Structure, and Magnetism.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Sourav; Das, Sourav; Acharya, Joydev; Kumar, Vierandra; van Leusen, Jan; Kögerler, Paul; Herrera, Juan Manuel; Colacio, Enrique; Chandrasekhar, Vadapalli

    2017-04-11

    The synthesis, structure, and magnetic properties of four Dy(III) coordination compounds isolated as [Dy2 (LH2 )2 (μ2 -η(1) :η(1) -Piv)]Cl⋅2 MeOH⋅H2 O (1), [Dy4 (LH)2 (μ3 -OH)2 (Piv)4 (MeOH)2 ]⋅4 MeOH⋅2 H2 O (2), [Dy6 (LH2 )3 (tfa)3 (O3 PtBu)(Cl)3 ]Cl4 ⋅15.5 H2 O⋅4 MeOH⋅5 CHCl3 (3) and [Dy21 (L)7 (LH)7 (tfa)7 ]Cl7 ⋅15 H2 O⋅7 MeOH⋅12 CHCl3 (4) are reported (Piv=pivalate, tfa=1,1,1-trifluoroacetylacetone, O3 PtBu=tert-butylphosphonate). Among these, 3 displays an equilateral triangle topology with a side length of 9.541 Å and a rare pentagonal-bipyramidal Dy(3+) environment, whereas complex 4 exhibits a single-stranded nanowheel structure with the highest nuclearity known for a homometallic lanthanide cluster structure. A tentative model of the dc magnetic susceptibility and the low-temperature magnetization of compounds 1 and 2 indicates that the former exhibits weak ferromagnetic intramolecular exchange interaction between the Dy(3+) ions, whereas in the latter both intramolecular ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic magnetic exchange interactions are present. Compounds 1, 3, and 4 exhibit frequency-dependent ac signals below 15 K at zero bias field, but without exhibiting any maximum above 2 K at frequencies up to 1400 Hz. The observed slow relaxation of the magnetization suggests that these compounds could exhibit single molecule magnet (SMM) behavior with either a thermal energy barrier for the reversal of the magnetization that is not high enough to block the magnetization above 2 K, or there exists quantum tunneling of the magnetization (QTM).

  13. Lutetium(iii) aqua ion: On the dynamical structure of the heaviest lanthanoid hydration complex.

    PubMed

    Sessa, Francesco; Spezia, Riccardo; D'Angelo, Paola

    2016-05-28

    The structure and dynamics of the lutetium(iii) ion in aqueous solution have been investigated by means of a polarizable force field molecular dynamics (MD). An 8-fold square antiprism (SAP) geometry has been found to be the dominant configuration of the lutetium(iii) aqua ion. Nevertheless, a low percentage of 9-fold complexes arranged in a tricapped trigonal prism (TTP) geometry has been also detected. Dynamic properties have been explored by carrying out six independent MD simulations for each of four different temperatures: 277 K, 298 K, 423 K, 632 K. The mean residence time of water molecules in the first hydration shell at room temperature has been found to increase as compared to the central elements of the lanthanoid series in agreement with previous experimental findings. Water exchange kinetic rate constants at each temperature and activation parameters of the process have been determined from the MD simulations. The obtained structural and dynamical results suggest that the water exchange process for the lutetium(iii) aqua ion proceeds with an associative mechanism, in which the SAP hydration complex undergoes temporary structural changes passing through a 9-fold TTP intermediate. Such results are consistent with the water exchange mechanism proposed for heavy lanthanoid atoms.

  14. Lutetium(iii) aqua ion: On the dynamical structure of the heaviest lanthanoid hydration complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sessa, Francesco; Spezia, Riccardo; D'Angelo, Paola

    2016-05-01

    The structure and dynamics of the lutetium(iii) ion in aqueous solution have been investigated by means of a polarizable force field molecular dynamics (MD). An 8-fold square antiprism (SAP) geometry has been found to be the dominant configuration of the lutetium(iii) aqua ion. Nevertheless, a low percentage of 9-fold complexes arranged in a tricapped trigonal prism (TTP) geometry has been also detected. Dynamic properties have been explored by carrying out six independent MD simulations for each of four different temperatures: 277 K, 298 K, 423 K, 632 K. The mean residence time of water molecules in the first hydration shell at room temperature has been found to increase as compared to the central elements of the lanthanoid series in agreement with previous experimental findings. Water exchange kinetic rate constants at each temperature and activation parameters of the process have been determined from the MD simulations. The obtained structural and dynamical results suggest that the water exchange process for the lutetium(iii) aqua ion proceeds with an associative mechanism, in which the SAP hydration complex undergoes temporary structural changes passing through a 9-fold TTP intermediate. Such results are consistent with the water exchange mechanism proposed for heavy lanthanoid atoms.

  15. Electrochemical Gold(III) Sensor with High Sensitivity and Tunable Dynamic Range.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yao; Lai, Rebecca Y

    2016-02-16

    We report the design and fabrication of a sensitive, specific, and selective electrochemical ion (E-ION) sensor for detection of Au(III). The signaling mechanism is based on the interactions between Au(III) and adenine; formation of these complexes rigidifies the methylene blue (MB)-modified oligoadenine probes, resulting in a concentration-dependent reduction in the MB signal. The dynamic range of the sensor can be tuned by simply changing the length of the DNA probe (six (A6) or 12 (A12) adenines). Independent of the probe length, both sensors have demonstrated to be sensitive, with a limits of detection of 50 and 20 nM for the A6 and A12 sensors, respectively. With further optimization, this sensing strategy may offer a promising approach for analyzing Au(III).

  16. Maritime Dynamic Traffic Generator. Volume III: Density Data on World Maps

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-06-01

    AD-A012 498 MARITIME DYNAMIC TR/\\FFIC GENERATOR. VOLUME III: DENSITY DATA ON WORLD MAPS Franklin D. MacKenzie Transportation Systems Center Cambridqe... Transportation Systems Center i]. ContractorGrant No. Kendall Square (Camhridge MA 02142 13. Type of Report and Period Covered 12. Sponsorini"Agency Name and... Transportation • Systems Center to define and analyze requirements for navigation and communica .. ..... .. tion services throtgh a satellite for commercial

  17. NMR and molecular dynamics studies of the conformational epitope of the type III group B Streptococcus capsular polysaccharide and derivatives.

    PubMed

    Brisson, J R; Uhrinova, S; Woods, R J; van der Zwan, M; Jarrell, H C; Paoletti, L C; Kasper, D L; Jennings, H J

    1997-03-18

    The conformational epitope of the type III group B Streptococcus capsular polysaccharide (GBSP III) exhibits unique properties which can be ascribed to the presence of sialic acid in its structure and the requirement for an extended binding site. By means of NMR and molecular dynamics studies on GBSP III and its fragments, the extended epitope of GBSP III was further defined. The influence of sialic acid on the conformational properties of GBSP III was examined by performing conformational analysis on desialylated GBSP III, which is identical to the polysaccharide of Streptococcus pneumoniae type 14, and also on oxidized and reduced GBSP III. Conformational changes were gauged by 1H and 13C chemical shift analysis, NOE, 1D selective TOCSY-NOESY experiments, J(HH) and J(CH) variations, and NOE of OH resonances. Changes in mobility were examined by 13C T1 and T2 measurements. Unrestrained molecular dynamics simulations with explicit water using the AMBER force field and the GLYCAM parameter set were used to assess static and dynamic conformational models, simulate the observable NMR parameters and calculate helical parameters. GBSP III was found to be capable of forming extended helices. Hence, the length dependence of the conformational epitope could be explained by its location on extended helices within the random coil structure of GBSP III. The interaction of sialic acid with the backbone of the PS was also found to be important in defining the conformational epitope of GBSP III.

  18. Mechanisms of dynamic nuclear polarization in insulating solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Can, T. V.; Ni, Q. Z.; Griffin, R. G.

    2015-04-01

    Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) is a technique used to enhance signal intensities in NMR experiments by transferring the high polarization of electrons to their surrounding nuclei. The past decade has witnessed a renaissance in the development of DNP, especially at high magnetic fields, and its application in several areas including biophysics, chemistry, structural biology and materials science. Recent technical and theoretical advances have expanded our understanding of established experiments: for example, the cross effect DNP in samples spinning at the magic angle. Furthermore, new experiments suggest that our understanding of the Overhauser effect and its applicability to insulating solids needs to be re-examined. In this article, we summarize important results of the past few years and provide quantum mechanical explanations underlying these results. We also discuss future directions of DNP and current limitations, including the problem of resolution in protein spectra recorded at 80-100 K.

  19. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and its potential for nuclear applications

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, D.P.; Wei, T.Y.C.; Rock, D.T.; Rizwan-Uddin; Brewster, R.A.; Jonnavithula, S.

    1999-11-01

    The purpose of this paper is to examine the use of these advanced models, methods and computing environments for nuclear applications to determine if the industry can expect to derive the same benefit as other industries, such as the automotive and the aerospace industries. As an example, the authors will examine the use of modern computational fluid dynamics (CFD) capability for subchannel analysis, which is an important part of the analysis technology used by utilities to ensure safe and economical design and operation of reactors. In the current deregulated environment, it is possible that by use of these enhanced techniques, the thermal and electrical output of current reactors may be increased without any increase in cost and at no compromise in safety.

  20. Mechanisms of Dynamic Nuclear Polarization in Insulating Solids

    PubMed Central

    Can, T.V.; Ni, Q.Z.; Griffin, R.G.

    2015-01-01

    Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) is a technique used to enhance signal intensities in NMR experiments by transferring the high polarization of electrons to their surrounding nuclei. The past decade has witnessed a renaissance in the development of DNP, especially at high magnetic fields, and its application in several areas including biophysics, chemistry, structural biology and materials science. Recent technical and theoretical advances have expanded our understanding of established experiments: for example, the cross effect DNP in samples spinning at the magic angle. Furthermore, new experiments suggest that our understanding of the Overhauser effect and its applicability to insulating solids needs to be re-examined. In this article, we summarize important results of the past few years and provide quantum mechanical explanations underlying these results. We also discuss future directions of DNP and current limitations, including the problem of resolution in protein spectra recorded at 80–100 K. PMID:25797002

  1. A new sample environment for cryogenic nuclear resonance scattering experiments on single crystals and microsamples at P01, PETRA III

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rackwitz, Sergej; Faus, Isabelle; Schmitz, Markus; Kelm, Harald; Krüger, Hans-Jörg; Andersson, K. Kristoffer; Hersleth, Hans-Petter; Achterhold, Klaus; Schlage, Kai; Wille, Hans-Christian; Schünemann, Volker; Wolny, Juliusz A.

    2014-04-01

    In order to carry out orientation dependent nuclear resonance scattering (NRS) experiments on small single crystals of e.g. iron proteins and/or chemical complexes but also on surfaces and other micrometer-sized samples a 2-circle goniometer including sample positioning optics has been installed at beamline P01, PETRA III, DESY, Hamburg. This sample environment is now available for all users of this beamline. Sample cooling is performed with a cryogenic gas stream which allows NRS measurements in the temperature range from 80 up to 400 K. In a first test this new sample environment has been used in order to investigate the orientation dependence of the nuclear inelastic scattering (NIS) signature of (i) a dinuclear iron(II) spin crossover (SCO) system and (ii) a hydrogen peroxide treated metmyoglobin single crystal.

  2. Theoretical aspects of Magic Angle Spinning - Dynamic Nuclear Polarization.

    PubMed

    Mentink-Vigier, Frederic; Akbey, Ümit; Oschkinat, Hartmut; Vega, Shimon; Feintuch, Akiva

    2015-09-01

    Magic Angle Spinning (MAS) combined with Dynamic Nuclear Polarization (DNP) has been proven in recent years to be a very powerful method for increasing solid-state NMR signals. Since the advent of biradicals such as TOTAPOL to increase the nuclear polarization new classes of radicals, with larger molecular weight and/or different spin properties have been developed. These have led to unprecedented signal gain, with varying results for different experimental parameters, in particular the microwave irradiation strength, the static field, and the spinning frequency. Recently it has been demonstrated that sample spinning imposes DNP enhancement processes that differ from the active DNP mechanism in static samples as upon sample spinning the DNP enhancements are the results of energy level anticrossings occurring periodically during each rotor cycle. In this work we present experimental results with regards to the MAS frequency dependence of the DNP enhancement profiles of four nitroxide-based radicals at two different sets of temperature, 110 and 160K. In fact, different magnitudes of reduction in enhancement are observed with increasing spinning frequency. Our simulation code for calculating MAS-DNP powder enhancements of small model spin systems has been improved to extend our studies of the influence of the interaction and relaxation parameters on powder enhancements. To achieve a better understanding we simulated the spin dynamics of a single three-spin system {ea-eb-n} during its steady state rotor periods and used the Landau-Zener formula to characterize the influence of the different anti-crossings on the polarizations of the system and their necessary action for reaching steady state conditions together with spin relaxation processes. Based on these model calculations we demonstrate that the maximum steady state nuclear polarization cannot become larger than the maximum polarization difference between the two electrons during the steady state rotor cycle. This

  3. Coupled electron-nuclear wavepacket dynamics in potassium dimers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, Hendrike; Bayer, Tim; Sarpe, Cristian; Siemering, Robert; de Vivie-Riedle, Regina; Baumert, Thomas; Wollenhaupt, Matthias

    2014-06-01

    Recently we have demonstrated control of valence-bond excitation of a molecule due to the interplay of the induced charge oscillation with the precisely tailored phase of the driving laser field (Bayer et al 2013 Phys. Rev. Lett. 110 123003). In this contribution we describe in more detail the two-colour experiment—a control pulse sequence followed by an ionizing probe pulse of a different wavelength. We provide details on the quantum dynamics simulations carried out to reproduce and to analyse the experimental results. The procedure for averaging over the focal intensity distribution in the interaction region and the method for orientation averaging, which are both crucial for the reproduction of our strong-field measurements, are also described in detail. The analysis of the temporal evolution of the expectation values of the wavepackets on the relevant potentials, the induced energetic shifts in the molecule and the modulation in the charge oscillation provides further insights into the interplay of the coupled nuclear-electron dynamics. Because the measured photoelectron spectra reveal the population of the target states we describe the quantum mechanical approach to calculate the photoelectron spectra and rationalize the results using Mulliken's difference potential method.

  4. Solvent-dependent absorption and electronic relaxation dynamics of iron (III) tetra-4-N-methylpyridylporphine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Lenzi J.; Knappenberger, Kenneth L.

    2017-03-01

    Solvent-dependent excited-state relaxation dynamics of iron (III) tetra-4-N-methylpyridylporphine (FeTMPyP) were investigated using steady-state and femtosecond spectroscopies. Soret absorption for water-dispersed FeTMPyP consisted of two spectrally broad components centered at 3.12 eV and 2.92 eV, corresponding to π → π∗ and charge-transfer (C-T) transitions. The C-T transition exhibited inverse-dielectric-dependent energy shifts. Following 400-nm excitation, dynamics proceeded by femtosecond internal conversion from the initially prepared π∗ state to the C-T state, followed by solvent-dependent C-T relaxation. The C-T energy shifts and relaxation rates exhibited correlated dielectric dependences. C-T absorption energy and relaxation dynamics of FeTMPyP are sensitive indicators of surrounding dielectric environments.

  5. Mitochondrial Dynamics Tracking with Two-Photon Phosphorescent Terpyridyl Iridium(III) Complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Huaiyi; Zhang, Pingyu; Qiu, Kangqiang; Huang, Juanjuan; Chen, Yu; Ji, Liangnian; Chao, Hui

    2016-02-01

    Mitochondrial dynamics, including fission and fusion, control the morphology and function of mitochondria, and disruption of mitochondrial dynamics leads to Parkinson’s disease, Alzheimer’s disease, metabolic diseases, and cancers. Currently, many types of commercial mitochondria probes are available, but high excitation energy and low photo-stability render them unsuitable for tracking mitochondrial dynamics in living cells. Therefore, mitochondrial targeting agents that exhibit superior anti-photo-bleaching ability, deep tissue penetration and intrinsically high three-dimensional resolutions are urgently needed. Two-photon-excited compounds that use low-energy near-infrared excitation lasers have emerged as non-invasive tools for cell imaging. In this work, terpyridyl cyclometalated Ir(III) complexes (Ir1-Ir3) are demonstrated as one- and two-photon phosphorescent probes for real-time imaging and tracking of mitochondrial morphology changes in living cells.

  6. Mitochondrial Dynamics Tracking with Two-Photon Phosphorescent Terpyridyl Iridium(III) Complexes.

    PubMed

    Huang, Huaiyi; Zhang, Pingyu; Qiu, Kangqiang; Huang, Juanjuan; Chen, Yu; Ji, Liangnian; Chao, Hui

    2016-02-11

    Mitochondrial dynamics, including fission and fusion, control the morphology and function of mitochondria, and disruption of mitochondrial dynamics leads to Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease, metabolic diseases, and cancers. Currently, many types of commercial mitochondria probes are available, but high excitation energy and low photo-stability render them unsuitable for tracking mitochondrial dynamics in living cells. Therefore, mitochondrial targeting agents that exhibit superior anti-photo-bleaching ability, deep tissue penetration and intrinsically high three-dimensional resolutions are urgently needed. Two-photon-excited compounds that use low-energy near-infrared excitation lasers have emerged as non-invasive tools for cell imaging. In this work, terpyridyl cyclometalated Ir(III) complexes (Ir1-Ir3) are demonstrated as one- and two-photon phosphorescent probes for real-time imaging and tracking of mitochondrial morphology changes in living cells.

  7. Mitochondrial Dynamics Tracking with Two-Photon Phosphorescent Terpyridyl Iridium(III) Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Huaiyi; Zhang, Pingyu; Qiu, Kangqiang; Huang, Juanjuan; Chen, Yu; Ji, Liangnian; Chao, Hui

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial dynamics, including fission and fusion, control the morphology and function of mitochondria, and disruption of mitochondrial dynamics leads to Parkinson’s disease, Alzheimer’s disease, metabolic diseases, and cancers. Currently, many types of commercial mitochondria probes are available, but high excitation energy and low photo-stability render them unsuitable for tracking mitochondrial dynamics in living cells. Therefore, mitochondrial targeting agents that exhibit superior anti-photo-bleaching ability, deep tissue penetration and intrinsically high three-dimensional resolutions are urgently needed. Two-photon-excited compounds that use low-energy near-infrared excitation lasers have emerged as non-invasive tools for cell imaging. In this work, terpyridyl cyclometalated Ir(III) complexes (Ir1-Ir3) are demonstrated as one- and two-photon phosphorescent probes for real-time imaging and tracking of mitochondrial morphology changes in living cells. PMID:26864567

  8. Dynamic nuclear-polarization studies of paramagnetic species in solution

    SciTech Connect

    Glad, W.E.

    1982-07-01

    Dynamic Nuclear Polarization (DNP) was used to measure the electron spin lattice relaxation times, T/sub 1/, of transition metal ions in aqueous solution. Saturation which is induced in the electron spin system is transferred to the solvent proton spins by dipole-dipole interactions. The change in the polarization of the proton spins is much larger than it is in the electron spins. The change in proton polarization is easily measured by proton Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR). In one experimental arrangement the sample solution was continuously flowed through a microwave cavity to the NMR coil. The NMR was observed with a continuous wave NMR spectrometer. In a second arrangement the whole sample tube was moved from within the microwave cavity to the NMR coil in less than 40 ms by a blast of compressed air. The NMR was then observed with a pulse-Fourier-transform spectrometer. With the second arrangement a mean-square microwave magnetic field at the sample of more than 10 G/sup 2/ is obtainable with 14 W of microwave power. Measurements of DNP at 9 GHz were made on aqueous solutions of VO/sup 2 +/, Mn/sup 2 +/, Cr(CN)/sub 6//sup 3 -/, Cu/sup 2 +/ and Cu(ethylenediamine)/sub 2/(H/sub 2/0)/sub 2//sup 2 +/ ions from 3 to 60/sup 0/C. It was also possible to observe DNP on resolved proton resonances from mixed water-acetonitrile solutions of VO/sup 2 +/ and Cr(CN)/sub 6//sup 3 -/ ions.

  9. Linking Microbial Dynamics and Physicochemical Processes in High-temperature Acidic Fe(III)- Mineralizing Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inskeep, W.

    2014-12-01

    Microbial activity is responsible for the mineralization of Fe(III)-oxides in high-temperature chemotrophic communities that flourish within oxygenated zones of low pH (2.5 - 4) geothermal outflow channels (Yellowstone National Park, WY). High-temperature Fe(II)-oxidizing communities contain several lineages of Archaea, and are excellent model systems for studying microbial interactions and spatiotemporal dynamics across geochemical gradients. We hypothesize that acidic Fe(III)-oxide mats form as a result of constant interaction among primary colonizers including Hydrogenobaculum spp. (Aquificales) and Metallosphaera spp. (Sulfolobales), and subsequent colonization by archaeal heterotrophs, which vary in abundance as a function of oxygen, pH and temperature. We are integrating a complementary suite of geochemical, stable isotope, genomic, proteomic and modeling analyses to study the role of microorganisms in Fe(III)-oxide mat development, and to elucidate the primary microbial interactions that are coupled with key abiotic events. Curated de novo assemblies of major phylotypes are being used to analyze additional -omics datasets from these microbial mats. Hydrogenobaculum spp. (Aquificales) are the dominant bacterial population(s) present, and predominate during early mat development (< 30 d). Other Sulfolobales populations known to oxidize Fe(II) and fix carbon dioxide (e.g., Metallosphaera spp.) represent a secondary stage of mat development (e.g., 14 - 30 d). Hydrogenobaculum filaments appear to promote the nucleation and subsequent mineralization of Fe(III)-oxides, which likely affect the growth and turnover rates of these organisms. Other heterotrophs colonize Fe(III)-oxide mats during succession (> 30 d), including novel lineages of Archaea and representatives within the Crenarchaeota, Euryarchaeota, Thaumarchaeota and Nanoarchaeota. In situ oxygen consumption rates show that steep gradients occur within the top 1 mm of mat surface, and which correlate with

  10. The dynamic nature of the nuclear envelope: lessons from closed mitosis.

    PubMed

    Arnone, James T; Walters, Alison D; Cohen-Fix, Orna

    2013-01-01

    In eukaryotes, chromosomes are encased by a dynamic nuclear envelope. In contrast to metazoans, where the nuclear envelope disassembles during mitosis, many fungi including budding yeast undergo "closed mitosis," where the nuclear envelope remains intact throughout the cell cycle. Consequently, during closed mitosis the nuclear envelope must expand to accommodate chromosome segregation to the two daughter cells. A recent study by Witkin et al. in budding yeast showed that if progression through mitosis is delayed, for example due to checkpoint activation, the nuclear envelope continues to expand despite the block to chromosome segregation. Moreover, this expansion occurs at a specific region of the nuclear envelope- adjacent to the nucleolus- forming an extension referred to as a "flare." These observations raise questions regarding the regulation of nuclear envelope expansion both in budding yeast and in higher eukaryotes, the mechanisms confining mitotic nuclear envelope expansion to a particular region and the possible consequences of failing to regulate nuclear envelope expansion during the cell cycle.

  11. Nuclear magnetic resonance studies of macroscopic morphology and dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Barrall, Geoffrey Alden

    1995-09-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance techniques are traditionally used to study molecular level structure and dynamics with a noted exception in medically applied NMR imaging (MRI). In this work, new experimental methods and theory are presented relevant to the study of macroscopic morphology and dynamics using NMR field gradient techniques and solid state two-dimensional exchange NMR. The goal in this work is not to take some particular system and study it in great detail, rather it is to show the utility of a number of new and novel techniques using ideal systems primarily as a proof of principle. By taking advantage of the analogy between NMR imaging and diffraction, one may simplify the experiments necessary for characterizing the statistical properties of the sample morphology. For a sample composed of many small features, e.g. a porous medium, the NMR diffraction techniques take advantage of both the narrow spatial range and spatial isotropy of the sample`s density autocorrelation function to obtain high resolution structural information in considerably less time than that required by conventional NMR imaging approaches. The time savings of the technique indicates that NMR diffraction is capable of finer spatial resolution than conventional NMR imaging techniques. Radio frequency NMR imaging with a coaxial resonator represents the first use of cylindrically symmetric field gradients in imaging. The apparatus as built has achieved resolution at the micron level for water samples, and has the potential to be very useful in the imaging of circularly symmetric systems. The study of displacement probability densities in flow through a random porous medium has revealed the presence of features related to the interconnectedness of the void volumes. The pulsed gradient techniques used have proven successful at measuring flow properties for time and length scales considerably shorter than those studied by more conventional techniques.

  12. Dissolution Dynamic Nuclear Polarization capability study with fluid path.

    PubMed

    Malinowski, Ronja M; Lipsø, Kasper W; Lerche, Mathilde H; Ardenkjær-Larsen, Jan H

    2016-11-01

    Signal enhancement by hyperpolarization is a way of overcoming the low sensitivity in magnetic resonance; MRI in particular. One of the most well-known methods, dissolution Dynamic Nuclear Polarization, has been used clinically in cancer patients. One way of ensuring a low bioburden of the hyperpolarized product is by use of a closed fluid path that constitutes a barrier to contamination. The fluid path can be filled with the pharmaceuticals, i.e. imaging agent and solvents, in a clean room, and then stored or immediately used at the polarizer. In this study, we present a method of filling the fluid path that allows it to be reused. The filling method has been investigated in terms of reproducibility at two extrema, high dose for patient use and low dose for rodent studies, using [1-13C]pyruvate as example. We demonstrate that the filling method allows high reproducibility of six quality control parameters with standard deviations 3-10 times smaller than the acceptance criteria intervals in clinical studies.

  13. Dissolution Dynamic Nuclear Polarization capability study with fluid path

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malinowski, Ronja M.; Lipsø, Kasper W.; Lerche, Mathilde H.; Ardenkjær-Larsen, Jan H.

    2016-11-01

    Signal enhancement by hyperpolarization is a way of overcoming the low sensitivity in magnetic resonance; MRI in particular. One of the most well-known methods, dissolution Dynamic Nuclear Polarization, has been used clinically in cancer patients. One way of ensuring a low bioburden of the hyperpolarized product is by use of a closed fluid path that constitutes a barrier to contamination. The fluid path can be filled with the pharmaceuticals, i.e. imaging agent and solvents, in a clean room, and then stored or immediately used at the polarizer. In this study, we present a method of filling the fluid path that allows it to be reused. The filling method has been investigated in terms of reproducibility at two extrema, high dose for patient use and low dose for rodent studies, using [1-13C]pyruvate as example. We demonstrate that the filling method allows high reproducibility of six quality control parameters with standard deviations 3-10 times smaller than the acceptance criteria intervals in clinical studies.

  14. VISION -- A Dynamic Model of the Nuclear Fuel Cycle

    SciTech Connect

    J. J. Jacobson; A. M. Yacout; S. J. Piet; D. E. Shropshire; G. E. Matthern

    2006-02-01

    The Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative’s (AFCI) fundamental objective is to provide technology options that – if implemented – would enable long-term growth of nuclear power while improving sustainability and energy security. The AFCI organization structure consists of four areas; Systems Analysis, Fuels, Separations and Transmutations. The Systems Analysis Working Group is tasked with bridging the program technical areas and providing the models, tools, and analyses required to assess the feasibility of design and deploy¬ment options and inform key decision makers. An integral part of the Systems Analysis tool set is the development of a system level model that can be used to examine the implications of the different mixes of reactors, implications of fuel reprocessing, impact of deployment technologies, as well as potential “exit” or “off ramp” approaches to phase out technologies, waste management issues and long-term repository needs. The Verifiable Fuel Cycle Simulation Model (VISION) is a computer-based simulation model that allows performing dynamic simulations of fuel cycles to quantify infrastructure requirements and identify key trade-offs between alternatives. VISION is intended to serve as a broad systems analysis and study tool applicable to work conducted as part of the AFCI (including costs estimates) and Generation IV reactor development studies.

  15. Information flow and protein dynamics: the interplay between nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Pastor, Nina; Amero, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Proteins participate in information pathways in cells, both as links in the chain of signals, and as the ultimate effectors. Upon ligand binding, proteins undergo conformation and motion changes, which can be sensed by the following link in the chain of information. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations represent powerful tools for examining the time-dependent function of biological molecules. The recent advances in NMR and the availability of faster computers have opened the door to more detailed analyses of structure, dynamics, and interactions. Here we briefly describe the recent applications that allow NMR spectroscopy and MD simulations to offer unique insight into the basic motions that underlie information transfer within and between cells.

  16. Information flow and protein dynamics: the interplay between nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and molecular dynamics simulations

    PubMed Central

    Pastor, Nina; Amero, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Proteins participate in information pathways in cells, both as links in the chain of signals, and as the ultimate effectors. Upon ligand binding, proteins undergo conformation and motion changes, which can be sensed by the following link in the chain of information. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations represent powerful tools for examining the time-dependent function of biological molecules. The recent advances in NMR and the availability of faster computers have opened the door to more detailed analyses of structure, dynamics, and interactions. Here we briefly describe the recent applications that allow NMR spectroscopy and MD simulations to offer unique insight into the basic motions that underlie information transfer within and between cells. PMID:25999971

  17. Final report. Conceptual studies nuclear energy center Lake Hartwell, S. C. , Phase III

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-01-01

    This document summarizes a conceptual study on the feasibility and practicality of developing a nuclear energy center (NEC) at a specific site in the SSEB region. The site selected for this conceptual study is at Lake Hartwell, South Carolina. The conceptual NEC at Lake Hartwell consists of twelve nuclear electric generating units, arranged on the site in four clusters of three units each, known as triads. The nominal distance between triads was selected as 2-1/2 miles. Each unit was assumed to be a 1250 MW(e). The total electric output of 15,000 MWe would be transmitted to five major utilities in South Carolina, North Carolina, and Georgia. The basic finding was that the concept of a NEC on the Lake Hartwell site is feasible, but further analysis of institutional issues and possible legislation would be required.

  18. Real-time tracking mitochondrial dynamic remodeling with two-photon phosphorescent iridium (III) complexes.

    PubMed

    Huang, Huaiyi; Yang, Liang; Zhang, Pingyu; Qiu, Kangqiang; Huang, Juanjuan; Chen, Yu; Diao, JiaJie; Liu, Jiankang; Ji, Liangnian; Long, Jiangang; Chao, Hui

    2016-03-01

    Mitochondrial fission and fusion control the shape, size, number, and function of mitochondria in the cells of organisms from yeast to mammals. The disruption of mitochondrial fission and fusion is involved in severe human diseases such as Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease, metabolic diseases, and cancers. Agents that can real-time track the mitochondrial dynamics are of great importance. However, the short excitation wavelengths and rapidly photo-bleaching properties of commercial mitochondrial dyes render them unsuitable for tracking mitochondrial dynamics. Thus, mitochondrial targeting agents that exhibit superior photo-stability under continual light irradiation, deep tissue penetration and at intrinsically high three-dimensional resolutions are urgently needed. Two-photon-excited compounds employ low-energy near-infrared light and have emerged as a non-invasive tool for real-time cell imaging. Here, cyclometalated Ir(III) complexes (Ir1-Ir5) are demonstrated as one- and two-photon phosphorescent probes for the real-time imaging and tracking of mitochondrial fission and fusion. The results indicate that Ir2 is well suited for two-photon phosphorescent tracking of mitochondrial fission and fusion in living cells and in Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans). This study provides a practical use for mitochondrial targeting two-photon phosphorescent Ir(III) complexes.

  19. Dynamic nuclear polarization polarizer for sterile use intent.

    PubMed

    Ardenkjaer-Larsen, Jan H; Leach, Andrew M; Clarke, Neil; Urbahn, John; Anderson, Denise; Skloss, Timothy W

    2011-10-01

    A novel polarizer based on the dissolution-dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) method has been designed, built and tested. The polarizer differs from those previously described by being designed with sterile use intent and being compatible with clinical use. The main features are: (1) an integral, disposable fluid path containing all pharmaceuticals constituting a sterile barrier, (2) a closed-cycle cryogenic system designed to eliminate consumption of liquid cryogens and (3) multi-sample polarization to increase throughput. The fluid path consists of a vial with the agent to be polarized, a pair of concentric inlet and outlet tubes connected to a syringe with dissolution medium and a receiver, respectively. The fluid path can operate at up to 400 K and 2.0 MPa and generates volumes as high as 100 mL. An inline filter removes the amount of electron paramagnetic agent in the final product by more than 100-fold in the case of [1-(13)C]pyruvate. The system uses a sorption pump in conjunction with a conventional cryocooler. The system operates through cycles of pumping to low temperature and regeneration of the sorption pump. The magnet accommodates four samples at the same time. A temperature of less than 1 K was achieved for 68 h (no sample heat loads) with a liquid helium volume of 2.4 L. The regeneration of the liquid helium could be achieved in less than 10 h, and the transition to cold (< 1.2 K) was achieved in less than 90 min. A solid state polarization of 36 ± 4% for [1-(13)C]pyruvic acid was obtained with only 10 mW of microwave power. The loading of a sample adds less than 50 J of heat to the helium bath by introducing the sample over 15 min. The heat load imposed on the helium bath during dissolution was less than 70 J. The measured liquid state polarization was 18 ± 2%.

  20. Overhauser dynamic nuclear polarization amplification of NMR flow imaging.

    PubMed

    Lingwood, Mark D; Sederman, Andrew J; Mantle, Mick D; Gladden, Lynn F; Han, Songi

    2012-03-01

    We describe the first study comparing the ability of phase shift velocity imaging and Overhauser dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP)-enhanced imaging to generate contrast for visualizing the flow of water. Prepolarization of water by the Overhauser DNP mechanism is performed in the 0.35T fringe field of an unshielded 2.0T non-clinical MRI magnet, followed by the rapid transfer of polarization-enhanced water to the 2.0T imaging location. This technique, previously named remotely enhanced liquids for image contrast (RELIC), produces a continuous flow of hyperpolarized water and gives up to an -8.2-fold enhanced signal within the image with respect to thermally polarized signal at 2.0T. Using flow through a cylindrical expansion phantom as a model system, spin-echo intensity images with DNP are compared to 3D phase shift velocity images to illustrate the complementary information available from the two techniques. The spin-echo intensity images enhanced with DNP show that the levels of enhancement provide an estimate of the transient propagation of flow, while the phase shift velocity images quantitatively measure the velocity of each imaging voxel. Phase shift velocity images acquired with and without DNP show that DNP weights velocity values towards those of the inflowing (DNP-enhanced) water, while velocity images without DNP more accurately reflect the average steady-state velocity of each voxel. We conclude that imaging with DNP prepolarized water better captures the transient path of water shortly after injection, while phase shift velocity imaging is best for quantifying the steady-state flow of water throughout the entire phantom.

  1. Redshift evolution of the dynamical properties of massive galaxies from SDSS-III/BOSS

    SciTech Connect

    Beifiori, Alessandra; Saglia, Roberto P.; Bender, Ralf; Senger, Robert; Thomas, Daniel; Maraston, Claudia; Steele, Oliver; Masters, Karen L.; Pforr, Janine; Tojeiro, Rita; Johansson, Jonas; Nichol, Robert C.; Chen, Yan-Mei; Wake, David; Bolton, Adam; Brownstein, Joel R.; Leauthaud, Alexie; Schneider, Donald P.; Skibba, Ramin; Pan, Kaike; and others

    2014-07-10

    We study the redshift evolution of the dynamical properties of ∼180, 000 massive galaxies from SDSS-III/BOSS combined with a local early-type galaxy sample from SDSS-II in the redshift range 0.1 ≤ z ≤ 0.6. The typical stellar mass of this sample is M{sub *} ∼2 × 10{sup 11} M{sub ☉}. We analyze the evolution of the galaxy parameters effective radius, stellar velocity dispersion, and the dynamical to stellar mass ratio with redshift. As the effective radii of BOSS galaxies at these redshifts are not well resolved in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) imaging we calibrate the SDSS size measurements with Hubble Space Telescope/COSMOS photometry for a sub-sample of galaxies. We further apply a correction for progenitor bias to build a sample which consists of a coeval, passively evolving population. Systematic errors due to size correction and the calculation of dynamical mass are assessed through Monte Carlo simulations. At fixed stellar or dynamical mass, we find moderate evolution in galaxy size and stellar velocity dispersion, in agreement with previous studies. We show that this results in a decrease of the dynamical to stellar mass ratio with redshift at >2σ significance. By combining our sample with high-redshift literature data, we find that this evolution of the dynamical to stellar mass ratio continues beyond z ∼ 0.7 up to z > 2 as M{sub dyn}/M{sub *} ∼(1 + z){sup –0.30±0.12}, further strengthening the evidence for an increase of M{sub dyn}/M{sub *} with cosmic time. This result is in line with recent predictions from galaxy formation simulations based on minor merger driven mass growth, in which the dark matter fraction within the half-light radius increases with cosmic time.

  2. Quantum wavepacket ab initio molecular dynamics: an approach for computing dynamically averaged vibrational spectra including critical nuclear quantum effects.

    PubMed

    Sumner, Isaiah; Iyengar, Srinivasan S

    2007-10-18

    We have introduced a computational methodology to study vibrational spectroscopy in clusters inclusive of critical nuclear quantum effects. This approach is based on the recently developed quantum wavepacket ab initio molecular dynamics method that combines quantum wavepacket dynamics with ab initio molecular dynamics. The computational efficiency of the dynamical procedure is drastically improved (by several orders of magnitude) through the utilization of wavelet-based techniques combined with the previously introduced time-dependent deterministic sampling procedure measure to achieve stable, picosecond length, quantum-classical dynamics of electrons and nuclei in clusters. The dynamical information is employed to construct a novel cumulative flux/velocity correlation function, where the wavepacket flux from the quantized particle is combined with classical nuclear velocities to obtain the vibrational density of states. The approach is demonstrated by computing the vibrational density of states of [Cl-H-Cl]-, inclusive of critical quantum nuclear effects, and our results are in good agreement with experiment. A general hierarchical procedure is also provided, based on electronic structure harmonic frequencies, classical ab initio molecular dynamics, computation of nuclear quantum-mechanical eigenstates, and employing quantum wavepacket ab initio dynamics to understand vibrational spectroscopy in hydrogen-bonded clusters that display large degrees of anharmonicities.

  3. Electron-Nuclear Spin Dynamics in a Mesoscopic Solid-State Quantum Computer

    SciTech Connect

    Berman, G.P.; Campbell, D.K.; Doolen, G.D.; Nagaev, K.E.

    1998-12-07

    We numerically simulate the process of nuclear spin measurement in Kane's quantum computer. For this purpose, we model the quantum dynamics of two coupled nuclear spins located on {sup 31}P donors implanted in Si. We estimate the minimum time of measurement necessary for the reliable transfer of quantum information from the nuclear spin subsystem to the electronic one and the probability of error for typical values of external noise.

  4. Dynamic nuclear polarisation by thermal mixing: quantum theory and macroscopic simulations.

    PubMed

    Karabanov, Alexander; Kwiatkowski, Grzegorz; Perotto, Carlo U; Wiśniewski, Daniel; McMaster, Jonathan; Lesanovsky, Igor; Köckenberger, Walter

    2016-11-02

    A theory of dynamic nuclear polarisation (DNP) by thermal mixing is suggested based on purely quantum considerations. A minimal 6-level microscopic model is developed to test the theory and link it to the well-known thermodynamic model. Optimal conditions for the nuclear polarization enhancement and effects of inhomogeneous broadening of the electron resonance are discussed. Macroscopic simulations of nuclear polarization spectra displaying good agreement with experiments, involving BDPA and trityl free radicals, are presented.

  5. DNA Ligase III is critical for mtDNA integrity but not Xrcc1-mediated nuclear DNA repair

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Yankun; Katyal, Sachin; Lee, Youngsoo; Zhao, Jingfeng; Rehg, Jerold E.; Russell, Helen R.; McKinnon, Peter J.

    2011-01-01

    DNA replication and repair in mammalian cells involves three distinct DNA ligases; ligase I (Lig1), ligase III (Lig3) and ligase IV (Lig4)1. Lig3 is considered a key ligase during base excision repair because its stability depends upon its nuclear binding partner Xrcc1, a critical factor for this DNA repair pathway2,3. Lig3 is also present in the mitochondria where its role in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) maintenance is independent of Xrcc14. However, the biological role of Lig3 is unclear as inactivation of murine Lig3 results in early embryonic lethality5. Here we report that Lig3 is essential for mtDNA integrity but dispensable for nuclear DNA repair. Inactivation of Lig3 in the mouse nervous system resulted in mtDNA loss leading to profound mitochondrial dysfunction, disruption of cellular homeostasis and incapacitating ataxia. Similarly, inactivation of Lig3 in cardiac muscle resulted in mitochondrial dysfunction and defective heart pump function leading to heart failure. However, Lig3 inactivation did not result in nuclear DNA repair deficiency, indicating essential DNA repair functions of Xrcc1 can occur in the absence of Lig3. Instead, we found that Lig1 was critical for DNA repair, but in a cooperative manner with Lig3. Additionally, Lig3 deficiency did not recapitulate the hallmark features of neural Xrcc1 inactivation such as DNA damage-induced cerebellar interneuron loss6, further underscoring functional separation of these DNA repair factors. Therefore, our data reveal that the critical biological role of Lig3 is to maintain mtDNA integrity and not Xrcc1-dependent DNA repair. PMID:21390131

  6. Executive summary. Conceptual studies nuclear energy center Lake Hartwell, S. C. , Phase III

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-01-01

    This document summarizes a conceptual study on the feasibility and practicality of developing a nuclear energy center (NEC) at a specific site in the SSEB region. The site selected for this conceptual study is at Lake Hartwell, South Carolina. The conceptual NEC at Lake Hartwell consists of twelve 1250-MW(e) LWRs arranged on the site in four cluster of three units each, know as triads. The nominal distance between triads was selected as 2-1/2 miles. The total electric output of 15,000 MWe to be generated by the NEC would be transmitted to five major utilities in South Carolina, North Carolina, and Georgia. Objective of the study was to assess the technical, socioeconomic, environmental, and institutional issues relating to the NEC at the conceptual study site. The basic finding was that the concept of a NEC on the Lake Hartwell site is feasible, but further analysis of institutional issues and possible legislation would be required.

  7. Confinement and Diffusion Effects in Dynamical Nuclear Polarization in Low Dimensional Nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henriksen, Dan; Tifrea, Ionel

    2012-02-01

    We investigate the dynamic nuclear polarization as it results from the hyperfine coupling between nonequilibrium electronic spins and nuclear spins in semiconductor nanostructures. The natural confinement provided by low dimensional nanostructures is responsible for an efficient nuclear spin - electron spin hyperfine coupling [1] and for a reduced value of the nuclear spin diffusion constant [2]. In the case of optical pumping, the induced nuclear spin polarization is position dependent even in the presence of nuclear spin diffusion. This effect should be measurable via optically induced nuclear magnetic resonance or time-resolved Faraday rotation experiments. We discuss the implications of our calculations for the case of GaAs quantum well structures.[4pt] [1] I. Tifrea and M. E. Flatt'e, Phys. Rev. B 84, 155319 (2011).[0pt] [2] A. Malinowski and R. T. Harley, Solid State Commun. 114, 419 (2000).

  8. Dynamical structure of solar radio burst type III as evidence of energy of solar flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamidi, Zety Sharizat Binti

    2013-11-01

    Observations of low frequency solar type III radio bursts associated with the ejection of plasma oscillations localized disturbance is due to excitation atoms in the plasma frequency incoherent radiations play a dominant role at the meter and decimeter wavelengths. Here, we report the results of the dynamical structure of solar flare type III that occurred on 9th March 2012 at National Space Centre, Sg Lang, Selangor, Malaysia by using the CALLISTO system. These bursts are associated with solar flare type M6 which suddenly ejected in the active region AR 1429 starting at 03:32 UT and ending at 05:00 UT with the peak at 04:12 UT. The observation showed an initial strong burst occurred due to strong signal at the beginning of the phase. We also found that both solar burst and flares tend to be a numerous on the same day and probability of chance coincidence is high. It is clearly seen that an impulsive lace burst was detected at 4:24 UT and it is more plausible that the energies are confined to the top of the loop when we compared with X-ray results. Associated with this event was type II with velocities 1285 km/s and type IV radio sweeps along with a full halo Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) first seen in SOHO/LASCO C2 imagery at 09/0426 Z. We concluded that the significance of study solar burst type III lies in the fact that the emission at decimetric wavelength comes from the role of magnetic field in active region that may provide the key to the energy release mechanism in a flare.

  9. Dynamics of Synoptic Eddy and Low-Frequency Flow Interaction. Part III: Baroclinic Model Results.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, L.-L.; Jin, F.-F.; Watanabe, M.

    2006-07-01

    In this three-part study, a linear closure has been developed for the synoptic eddy and low-frequency flow (SELF) interaction and demonstrated that internal dynamics plays an important role in generating the leading low-frequency modes in the extratropical circulation anomalies during cold seasons.In Part III, a new linearized primitive equation system is first derived for time-mean flow anomalies. The dynamical operator of the system includes a traditional part depending on the observed climatological mean state and an additional part from the SELF feedback closure utilizing the observed climatological properties of synoptic eddy activity. The latter part relates nonlocally all the anomalous eddy-forcing terms in equations of momentum, temperature, and surface pressure to the time-mean flow anomalies. Using the observational data, the closure was validated with reasonable success, and it was found that terms of the SELF feedback in the momentum and pressure equations tend to reinforce the low-frequency modes, whereas those in the thermodynamic equation tends to damp the temperature anomalies to make the leading modes equivalent barotropic. Through singular vector analysis of the linear dynamical operator, it is highlighted that the leading modes of the system resemble the observed patterns of the Arctic Oscillation, Antarctic Oscillation, and Pacific North American pattern, in which the SELF feedback plays an essential role, consistent with the finding of the barotropic model study in Part II.


  10. Nuclear dynamics consequence analysis of SNF disposed in volcanic tuff

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez, L.C.; Cochrane, K.; Rath, J.S.; Taylor, L.L.

    1998-05-01

    This paper describes criticality analyses for spent nuclear fuels in a geologic repository. The analyses investigated criticality potential, criticality excursion consequences, and the probability frequency for nuclear criticality. Key findings include: expected number of fissions per excursion range from 10{sup 17} to 10{sup 20}, repeated rate of criticalities range from 3 to 30 per year, and the probability frequency for criticality initiators (based on rough-order-of-magnitude calculations) is 7{times}10{sup {minus}7}. Overall results indicate that criticality consequences are a minor contribution to the biological hazards caused by the disposal of spent nuclear material.

  11. Coal-fired propulsion system dynamics. Volume III. Dynamic analysis of the cv-3600. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Greenlee, T.L.; Pearsons, J.L.

    1982-12-01

    This volume summarizes the results of a thorough analysis of the CV-3600 dynamic model that was discussed in Volume II. The purpose of this effort was to determine general engineering details and specifications for coal-fired propulsion systems based on a detailed analysis of a specific propulsion system design. The basis for these specifications included the sensitivity of ship propulsion system response to component parameter and control variations such as grate travel speed and controls, spreader and distributor feed and controls, fan speed and damper controls, steam dump (sizing, control valve characteristics and controls), feedwater pump controls (drum level controls), throttle control, and desuperheater steam attemperation controls. To develop greater insight into the effects of these variations, both open-loop (without control) and closed-loop (with control) versions of the propulsion system were studied. The open and closed-loop responses were further analyzed through the use of linear models and eigenvalue analyses. Specific conclusions regarding desirable trends in component specification are provided as part of the conclusions in this volume.

  12. Dynamic observation of phase transformation behaviors in indium(III) selenide nanowire based phase change memory.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yu-Ting; Huang, Chun-Wei; Chen, Jui-Yuan; Ting, Yi-Hsin; Lu, Kuo-Chang; Chueh, Yu-Lun; Wu, Wen-Wei

    2014-09-23

    Phase change random access memory (PCRAM) has been extensively investigated for its potential applications in next-generation nonvolatile memory. In this study, indium(III) selenide (In2Se3) was selected due to its high resistivity ratio and lower programming current. Au/In2Se3-nanowire/Au phase change memory devices were fabricated and measured systematically in an in situ transmission electron microscope to perform a RESET/SET process under pulsed and dc voltage swept mode, respectively. During the switching, we observed the dynamic evolution of the phase transformation process. The switching behavior resulted from crystalline/amorphous change and revealed that a long pulse width would induce the amorphous or polycrystalline state by different pulse amplitudes, supporting the improvement of the writing speed, retention, and endurance of PCRAM.

  13. Probing nuclear dynamics of oriented HeH+ with odd-even high-order harmonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, W. Y.; Yu, S. J.; Wang, S.; Chen, Y. J.

    2016-11-01

    We study the electron-nuclear coupled dynamics for oriented HeH+ molecules in strong laser fields numerically and analytically. At small orientation angles, the asymmetric molecule tends to stretch to distances larger than the equilibrium separation and strong even harmonics are emitted. We show that the permanent dipole of the system plays an important role in the vibrational dynamics of the nuclear wave packet. The nuclear motion and the molecular structure can be read from the spectra and ellipticity of odd-even high harmonics. Our results also have implications for strong-field ionization of the asymmetric system.

  14. Microtubules as key coordinators of nuclear envelope and endoplasmic reticulum dynamics during mitosis.

    PubMed

    Schlaitz, Anne-Lore

    2014-07-01

    During mitosis, cells comprehensively restructure their interior to promote the faithful inheritance of DNA and cytoplasmic contents. In metazoans, this restructuring entails disassembly of the nuclear envelope, redistribution of its components into the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and eventually nuclear envelope reassembly around the segregated chromosomes. The microtubule cytoskeleton has recently emerged as a critical regulator of mitotic nuclear envelope and ER dynamics. Microtubules and associated molecular motors tear open the nuclear envelope in prophase and remove nuclear envelope remnants from chromatin. Additionally, two distinct mechanisms of microtubule-based regulation of ER dynamics operate later in mitosis. First, association of the ER with microtubules is reduced, preventing invasion of ER into the spindle area, and second, organelle membrane is actively cleared from metaphase chromosomes. However, we are only beginning to understand the role of microtubules in shaping and distributing ER and other organelles during mitosis.

  15. Effect of electron spin dynamics on solid-state dynamic nuclear polarization performance.

    PubMed

    Siaw, Ting Ann; Fehr, Matthias; Lund, Alicia; Latimer, Allegra; Walker, Shamon A; Edwards, Devin T; Han, Song-I

    2014-09-21

    For the broadest dissemination of solid-state dynamic nuclear polarization (ssDNP) enhanced NMR as a material characterization tool, the ability to employ generic mono-nitroxide radicals as spin probes is critical. A better understanding of the factors contributing to ssDNP efficiency is needed to rationally optimize the experimental condition for the practically accessible spin probes at hand. This study seeks to advance the mechanistic understanding of ssDNP by examining the effect of electron spin dynamics on ssDNP performance at liquid helium temperatures (4-40 K). The key observation is that bi-radicals and mono-radicals can generate comparable nuclear spin polarization at 4 K and 7 T, which is in contrast to the observation for ssDNP at liquid nitrogen temperatures (80-150 K) that finds bi-radicals to clearly outperform mono-radicals. To rationalize this observation, we analyze the change in the DNP-induced nuclear spin polarization (Pn) and the characteristic ssDNP signal buildup time as a function of electron spin relaxation rates that are modulated by the mono- and bi-radical spin concentration. Changes in Pn are consistent with a systematic variation in the product of the electron spin-lattice relaxation time and the electron spin flip-flop rate that constitutes an integral saturation factor of an inhomogeneously broadened EPR spectrum. We show that the comparable Pn achieved with both radical species can be reconciled with a comparable integral EPR saturation factor. Surprisingly, the largest Pn is observed at an intermediate spin concentration for both mono- and bi-radicals. At the highest radical concentration, the stronger inter-electron spin dipolar coupling favors ssDNP, while oversaturation diminishes Pn, as experimentally verified by the observation of a maximum Pn at an intermediate, not the maximum, microwave (μw) power. At the maximum μw power, oversaturation reduces the electron spin population differential that must be upheld between

  16. Local Water Dynamics in Coacervated Polyelectrolytes Monitored Through Dynamic Nuclear Polarization-Enhanced 1H NMR

    PubMed Central

    Kausik, Ravinath; Srivastava, Aasheesh; Korevaar, Peter A.; Stucky, Galen; Waite, J. Herbert

    2009-01-01

    We present the first study of quantifying the diffusion coefficient of interfacial water on polyelectrolyte surfaces of systems fully dispersed in bulk water under ambient conditions. Such measurements were made possible through the implementation of a recently introduced Dynamic Nuclear Polarization (DNP) technique to selectively amplify the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signal of hydration water that is interacting with specifically located spin labels on polyelectrolyte surfaces. The merit of this novel capability is demonstrated in this report through the measurement of solvent microvisosity on the surface of two types of oppositely charged polyelectrolytes, when freely dissolved versus when complexed to form a liquid-liquid colloidal phase called complex coacervates. These complex coacervates were formed through electrostatic complexation between the imidazole-based cationic homopolymer poly(N-vinylimidazole) (PVIm), and anionic polypeptide polyaspartate (PAsp) in the pH range of 4.5 – 6.0, under which conditions the coacervate droplets are highly fluidic yet densely packed with polyelectrolytes. We also investigated the rotational diffusion coefficients of the spin labels covalently bound to the polyelectrolyte chains for both PVIm and PAsp, showing a 5 fold change in the rotational correlation time as well as anisotropy parameter upon coacervation, which represents a surprisingly small decrease given the high polymer concentration inside the dense microdroplets. For both DNP and ESR experiments, the polymers were covalently tagged with stable nitroxide radical spin labels (∼1 wt %) to probe the local solvent and polymer segment dynamics. We found that the surface water diffusion coefficients near uncomplexed PVIm and PAsp at pH 8 differ, and are around D∼1.3×10−9 m2 / s. In contrast, inside the complex coacervate phase, the water diffusion coefficient in the immediate vicinity of either polyelectrolyte was D∼ 0.25×10−9 m2 / s, which is about

  17. Nuclear Dynamics Consequence Analysis (NDCA) for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel in an Underground Geologic Repository - Volume 3: Appendices

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, L.L.; Wilson, J.R.; Sanchez, L.C.; Aguilar, R.; Trellue, H.R.; Cochrane, K.; Rath, J.S.

    1998-10-01

    The United States Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management's (DOE/EM's) National Spent Nuclear Fuel Program (NSNFP), through a collaboration between Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), is conducting a systematic Nuclear Dynamics Consequence Analysis (NDCA) of the disposal of SNFs in an underground geologic repository sited in unsaturated tuff. This analysis is intended to provide interim guidance to the DOE for the management of the SNF while they prepare for final compliance evaluation. This report presents results from a Nuclear Dynamics Consequence Analysis (NDCA) that examined the potential consequences and risks of criticality during the long-term disposal of spent nuclear fuel owned by DOE-EM. This analysis investigated the potential of post-closure criticality, the consequences of a criticality excursion, and the probability frequency for post-closure criticality. The results of the NDCA are intended to provide the DOE-EM with a technical basis for measuring risk which can be used for screening arguments to eliminate post-closure criticality FEPs (features, events and processes) from consideration in the compliance assessment because of either low probability or low consequences. This report is composed of an executive summary (Volume 1), the methodology and results of the NDCA (Volume 2), and the applicable appendices (Volume 3).

  18. Nuclear magnetic resonance structure of the III-IV-V three-way junction from the Varkud satellite ribozyme and identification of magnesium-binding sites using paramagnetic relaxation enhancement.

    PubMed

    Bonneau, Eric; Legault, Pascale

    2014-10-07

    The VS ribozyme is a catalytic RNA found within some natural isolates of Neurospora that is being used as a model system to improve our understanding of RNA structure, catalysis, and engineering. The catalytic domain contains five helical domains (SLII-SLVI) that are organized by two three-way junctions. The III-IV-V junction is required for high-affinity binding of the substrate domain (SLI) through formation of a kissing loop interaction with SLV. Here, we determine the high-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) structure of a 47-nucleotide RNA containing the III-IV-V junction (J345). The J345 RNA adopts a Y-shaped fold typical of the family C three-way junctions, with coaxial stacking between stems III and IV and an acute angle between stems III and V. The NMR structure reveals that the core of the III-IV-V junction contains four stacked base triples, a U-turn motif, a cross-strand stacking interaction, an A-minor interaction, and a ribose zipper. In addition, the NMR structure shows that the cCUUGg tetraloop used to stabilize stem IV adopts a novel RNA tetraloop fold, different from the known gCUUGc tetraloop structure. Using Mn(2+)-induced paramagnetic relaxation enhancement, we identify six Mg(2+)-binding sites within J345, including one associated with the cCUUGg tetraloop and two with the junction core. The NMR structure of J345 likely represents the conformation of the III-IV-V junction in the context of the active VS ribozyme and suggests that this junction functions as a dynamic hinge that contributes to substrate recognition and catalysis. Moreover, this study highlights a new role for family C three-way junctions in long-range tertiary interactions.

  19. The multi-configuration electron-nuclear dynamics method applied to LiH.

    PubMed

    Ulusoy, Inga S; Nest, Mathias

    2012-02-07

    The multi-configuration electron-nuclear dynamics (MCEND) method is a nonadiabatic quantum dynamics approach to the description of molecular processes. MCEND is a combination of the multi-configuration time-dependent Hartree (MCTDH) method for atoms and its antisymmetrized equivalent MCTDHF for electrons. The purpose of this method is to simultaneously describe nuclear and electronic wave packets in a quantum dynamical way, without the need to calculate potential energy surfaces and diabatic coupling functions. In this paper we present first exemplary calculations of MCEND applied to the LiH molecule, and discuss computational and numerical details of our implementation.

  20. Electron Dynamics upon Ionization of Polyatomic Molecules: Coupling to Quantum Nuclear Motion and Decoherence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vacher, Morgane; Bearpark, Michael J.; Robb, Michael A.; Malhado, João Pedro

    2017-02-01

    Knowledge about the electronic motion in molecules is essential for our understanding of chemical reactions and biological processes. The advent of attosecond techniques opens up the possibility to induce electronic motion, observe it in real time, and potentially steer it. A fundamental question remains the factors influencing electronic decoherence and the role played by nuclear motion in this process. Here, we simulate the dynamics upon ionization of the polyatomic molecules paraxylene and modified bismethylene-adamantane, with a quantum mechanical treatment of both electron and nuclear dynamics using the direct dynamics variational multiconfigurational Gaussian method. Our simulations give new important physical insights about the expected decoherence process. We have shown that the decoherence of electron dynamics happens on the time scale of a few femtoseconds, with the interplay of different mechanisms: the dephasing is responsible for the fast decoherence while the nuclear overlap decay may actually help maintain it and is responsible for small revivals.

  1. Dynamic evaluation of a nuclear main steam isolation valve actuator

    SciTech Connect

    Patten, A.J.

    1981-09-01

    Architect and Engineering Specifications for ASME Section III, Class I values include seismic requirements of natural frequency determination of the valve and valve actuator. Detailed tests of the springs were conducted to evaluate the effect of these component resonators on the actuator assembly. The importance of using clear, concise definitions within contract documents is discussed as related to the interpretation of experimental results. 16 refs.

  2. Dynamical effects in the Coulomb expansion following nuclear fragmentation

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, K.C.; Donangelo, R.; Schechter, H.

    1987-09-01

    The effects of the Coulomb expansion on the fragment kinetic energy spectrum for a fragmentating hot nuclear system is investigated. In particular, /sup 12/C-fragment spectra are calculated and compared with those predicted by the uniform expansion approximation. The results indicate that the energy spectra of fragments are quite sensitive to the details of the Coulomb expansion treatment.

  3. Electron dynamics following photoionization: Decoherence due to the nuclear-wave-packet width

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vacher, Morgane; Steinberg, Lee; Jenkins, Andrew J.; Bearpark, Michael J.; Robb, Michael A.

    2015-10-01

    The advent of attosecond techniques opens up the possibility to observe experimentally electron dynamics following ionization of molecules. Theoretical studies of pure electron dynamics at single fixed nuclear geometries in molecules have demonstrated oscillatory charge migration at a well-defined frequency but often neglecting the natural width of the nuclear wave packet. The effect on electron dynamics of the spatial delocalization of the nuclei is an outstanding question. Here, we show how the inherent distribution of nuclear geometries leads to dephasing. Using a simple analytical model, we demonstrate that the conditions for a long-lived electronic coherence are a narrow nuclear wave packet and almost parallel potential-energy surfaces of the states involved. We demonstrate with numerical simulations the decoherence of electron dynamics for two real molecular systems (paraxylene and polycyclic norbornadiene), which exhibit different decoherence time scales. To represent the quantum distribution of geometries of the nuclear wave packet, the Wigner distribution function is used. The electron dynamics decoherence result has significant implications for the interpretation of attosecond spectroscopy experiments since one no longer expects long-lived oscillations.

  4. Compartmental analysis of dynamic nuclear medicine data: models and identifiability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delbary, Fabrice; Garbarino, Sara; Vivaldi, Valentina

    2016-12-01

    Compartmental models based on tracer mass balance are extensively used in clinical and pre-clinical nuclear medicine in order to obtain quantitative information on tracer metabolism in the biological tissue. This paper is the first of a series of two that deal with the problem of tracer coefficient estimation via compartmental modelling in an inverse problem framework. Specifically, here we discuss the identifiability problem for a general n-dimension compartmental system and provide uniqueness results in the case of two-compartment and three-compartment compartmental models. The second paper will utilize this framework in order to show how nonlinear regularization schemes can be applied to obtain numerical estimates of the tracer coefficients in the case of nuclear medicine data corresponding to brain, liver and kidney physiology.

  5. Dynamic Computer Model of a Stirling Space Nuclear Power System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-05-04

    I would like to thank all Naval Academy faculty involved with the Trident Scholar program . The committee readers (Professors Cerza, Nakos, and...obstacles in structural integrity , stowing for launch, deployment in orbit, and sun pointing that are far from being solved with current technology. 6...the Systems for Nuclear Auxiliary Power (SNAP) program . This program resulted in the only reactor flown in space by the United States. Also, Russia

  6. Dynamic nuclear polarization solid-state NMR in heterogeneous catalysis research

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, Takeshi; Perras, Frédéric A.; Slowing, Igor I.; Sadow, Aaron D.; Pruski, Marek

    2015-10-20

    In this study, a revolution in solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (SSNMR) spectroscopy is taking place, attributable to the rapid development of high-field dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP), a technique yielding sensitivity improvements of 2–3 orders of magnitude. This higher sensitivity in SSNMR has already impacted materials research, and the implications of new methods on catalytic sciences are expected to be profound.

  7. Dynamic nuclear polarization solid-state NMR in heterogeneous catalysis research

    DOE PAGES

    Kobayashi, Takeshi; Perras, Frédéric A.; Slowing, Igor I.; ...

    2015-10-20

    In this study, a revolution in solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (SSNMR) spectroscopy is taking place, attributable to the rapid development of high-field dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP), a technique yielding sensitivity improvements of 2–3 orders of magnitude. This higher sensitivity in SSNMR has already impacted materials research, and the implications of new methods on catalytic sciences are expected to be profound.

  8. Efficient and dynamic nuclear localization of green fluorescent protein via RNA binding

    SciTech Connect

    Kitamura, Akira; Nakayama, Yusaku; Kinjo, Masataka

    2015-07-31

    Classical nuclear localization signal (NLS) sequences have been used for artificial localization of green fluorescent protein (GFP) in the nucleus as a positioning marker or for measurement of the nuclear-cytoplasmic shuttling rate in living cells. However, the detailed mechanism of nuclear retention of GFP-NLS remains unclear. Here, we show that a candidate mechanism for the strong nuclear retention of GFP-NLS is via the RNA-binding ability of the NLS sequence. GFP tagged with a classical NLS derived from Simian virus 40 (GFP-NLS{sup SV40}) localized not only in the nucleoplasm, but also to the nucleolus, the nuclear subdomain in which ribosome biogenesis takes place. GFP-NLS{sup SV40} in the nucleolus was mobile, and intriguingly, the diffusion coefficient, which indicates the speed of diffusing molecules, was 1.5-fold slower than in the nucleoplasm. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) analysis showed that GFP-NLS{sup SV40} formed oligomers via RNA binding, the estimated molecular weight of which was larger than the limit for passive nuclear export into the cytoplasm. These findings suggest that the nuclear localization of GFP-NLS{sup SV40} likely results from oligomerization mediated via RNA binding. The analytical technique used here can be applied for elucidating the details of other nuclear localization mechanisms, including those of several types of nuclear proteins. In addition, GFP-NLS{sup SV40} can be used as an excellent marker for studying both the nucleoplasm and nucleolus in living cells. - Highlights: • Nuclear localization signal-tagged GFP (GFP-NLS) showed clear nuclear localization. • The GFP-NLS dynamically localized not only in the nucleoplasm, but also to the nucleolus. • The nuclear localization of GFP-NLS results from transient oligomerization mediated via RNA binding. • Our NLS-tagging procedure is ideal for use in artificial sequestration of proteins in the nucleus.

  9. MarsSedEx III: linking Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) and reduced gravity experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhn, N. J.; Kuhn, B.; Gartmann, A.

    2015-12-01

    Nikolaus J. Kuhn (1), Brigitte Kuhn (1), and Andres Gartmann (2) (1) University of Basel, Physical Geography, Environmental Sciences, Basel, Switzerland (nikolaus.kuhn@unibas.ch), (2) Meteorology, Climatology, Remote Sensing, Environmental Sciences, University of Basel, Switzerland Experiments conducted during the MarsSedEx I and II reduced gravity experiments showed that using empirical models for sediment transport on Mars developed for Earth violates fluid dynamics. The error is caused by the interaction between runing water and sediment particles, which affect each other in a positive feedback loop. As a consequence, the actual flow conditions around a particle cannot be represented by drag coefficients derived on Earth. This study exmines the implications of such gravity effects on sediment movement on Mars, with special emphasis on the limits of sandstones and conglomerates formed on Earth as analogues for sedimentation on Mars. Furthermore, options for correctiong the errors using a combination of CFD and recent experiments conducted during the MarsSedEx III campaign are presented.

  10. System analysis shows distinct mechanisms and common principles of nuclear envelope protein dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Zuleger, Nikolaj; Kelly, David A.; Richardson, A. Christine; Kerr, Alastair R. W.; Goldberg, Martin W.; Goryachev, Andrew B.

    2011-01-01

    The nuclear envelope contains >100 transmembrane proteins that continuously exchange with the endoplasmic reticulum and move within the nuclear membranes. To better understand the organization and dynamics of this system, we compared the trafficking of 15 integral nuclear envelope proteins using FRAP. A surprising 30-fold range of mobilities was observed. The dynamic behavior of several of these proteins was also analyzed after depletion of ATP and/or Ran, two functions implicated in endoplasmic reticulum–inner nuclear membrane translocation. This revealed that ATP- and Ran-dependent translocation mechanisms are distinct and not used by all inner nuclear membrane proteins. The Ran-dependent mechanism requires the phenylalanine-glycine (FG)-nucleoporin Nup35, which is consistent with use of the nuclear pore complex peripheral channels. Intriguingly, the addition of FGs to membrane proteins reduces FRAP recovery times, and this also depends on Nup35. Modeling of three proteins that were unaffected by either ATP or Ran depletion indicates that the wide range in mobilities could be explained by differences in binding affinities in the inner nuclear membrane. PMID:21444689

  11. Quenching of dynamic nuclear polarization by spin-orbit coupling in GaAs quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Nichol, John M; Harvey, Shannon P; Shulman, Michael D; Pal, Arijeet; Umansky, Vladimir; Rashba, Emmanuel I; Halperin, Bertrand I; Yacoby, Amir

    2015-07-17

    The central-spin problem is a widely studied model of quantum decoherence. Dynamic nuclear polarization occurs in central-spin systems when electronic angular momentum is transferred to nuclear spins and is exploited in quantum information processing for coherent spin manipulation. However, the mechanisms limiting this process remain only partially understood. Here we show that spin-orbit coupling can quench dynamic nuclear polarization in a GaAs quantum dot, because spin conservation is violated in the electron-nuclear system, despite weak spin-orbit coupling in GaAs. Using Landau-Zener sweeps to measure static and dynamic properties of the electron spin-flip probability, we observe that the size of the spin-orbit and hyperfine interactions depends on the magnitude and direction of applied magnetic field. We find that dynamic nuclear polarization is quenched when the spin-orbit contribution exceeds the hyperfine, in agreement with a theoretical model. Our results shed light on the surprisingly strong effect of spin-orbit coupling in central-spin systems.

  12. Quantum Trajectory-Electronic Structure Approach for Exploring Nuclear Effects in the Dynamics of Nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Garashchuk, Sophya; Jakowski, Jacek; Wang, Lei; Sumpter, Bobby G

    2013-12-10

    A massively parallel, direct quantum molecular dynamics method is described. The method combines a quantum trajectory (QT) representation of the nuclear wave function discretized into an ensemble of trajectories with an electronic structure (ES) description of electrons, namely using the density functional tight binding (DFTB) theory. Quantum nuclear effects are included into the dynamics of the nuclei via quantum corrections to the classical forces. To reduce computational cost and increase numerical accuracy, the quantum corrections to dynamics resulting from localization of the nuclear wave function are computed approximately and included into selected degrees of freedom representing light particles where the quantum effects are expected to be the most pronounced. A massively parallel implementation, based on the message passing interface allows for efficient simulations of ensembles of thousands of trajectories at once. The QTES-DFTB dynamics approach is employed to study the role of quantum nuclear effects on the interaction of hydrogen with a model graphene sheet, revealing that neglect of nuclear effects can lead to an overestimation of adsorption.

  13. Quenching of dynamic nuclear polarization by spin–orbit coupling in GaAs quantum dots

    PubMed Central

    Nichol, John M.; Harvey, Shannon P.; Shulman, Michael D.; Pal, Arijeet; Umansky, Vladimir; Rashba, Emmanuel I.; Halperin, Bertrand I.; Yacoby, Amir

    2015-01-01

    The central-spin problem is a widely studied model of quantum decoherence. Dynamic nuclear polarization occurs in central-spin systems when electronic angular momentum is transferred to nuclear spins and is exploited in quantum information processing for coherent spin manipulation. However, the mechanisms limiting this process remain only partially understood. Here we show that spin–orbit coupling can quench dynamic nuclear polarization in a GaAs quantum dot, because spin conservation is violated in the electron–nuclear system, despite weak spin–orbit coupling in GaAs. Using Landau–Zener sweeps to measure static and dynamic properties of the electron spin–flip probability, we observe that the size of the spin–orbit and hyperfine interactions depends on the magnitude and direction of applied magnetic field. We find that dynamic nuclear polarization is quenched when the spin–orbit contribution exceeds the hyperfine, in agreement with a theoretical model. Our results shed light on the surprisingly strong effect of spin–orbit coupling in central-spin systems. PMID:26184854

  14. Stabilizing nuclear spins around semiconductor electrons via the interplay of optical coherent population trapping and dynamic nuclear polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onur, A. R.; de Jong, J. P.; O'Shea, D.; Reuter, D.; Wieck, A. D.; van der Wal, C. H.

    2016-04-01

    We experimentally demonstrate how coherent population trapping (CPT) for donor-bound electron spins in GaAs results in autonomous feedback that prepares stabilized states for the spin polarization of nuclei around the electrons. CPT was realized by excitation with two lasers to a bound-exciton state. Transmission studies of the spectral CPT feature on an ensemble of electrons directly reveal the statistical distribution of prepared nuclear-spin states. Tuning the laser driving from blue to red detuned drives a transition from one to two stable states. Our results have importance for ongoing research on schemes for dynamic nuclear-spin polarization, the central spin problem, and control of spin coherence.

  15. A Model for Electron Nuclear Dynamics of a Monatomic Chain

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-05-16

    density in cell m) and that on atom n. Due to the choice of basis functions these parameters depend on the di tane In3 - fI -- R but not on the...p2Msaers and t&e choice of basis functions in this time-dependent *hWry. The res Iul ing equations of moioon include eACcvOnic-vibrational couplings...of basis functions in molecular or crystal orbitals, or of "nuclear" type, i.e. characterizn the state vectors for the nuclei. The method has the

  16. Dynamics of heavy flavor quarks in high energy nuclear collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beraudo, Andrea

    2014-11-01

    A general overview on the role of heavy quarks as probes of the medium formed in high energy nuclear collisions is presented. Experimental data compared to model calculations at low and moderate pT are exploited to extract information on the transport coefficients of the medium, on possible modifications of heavy flavor hadronization in a hot environment and to provide quantitative answers to the issue of kinetic (and chemical, at conceivable future experimental facilities) thermalization of charm. Finally, the role of heavy flavor at high pT as a tool to study the mass and color-charge dependence the jet quenching is also analyzed.

  17. Impact of pion dynamics on nuclear shell structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litvinova, Elena

    2015-10-01

    Spin-isospin response in exotic nuclear systems is investigated. It is found that in some nuclei excitations with pionic quantum numbers (0-, 1+, 2-, …) appear at very low energies with large transition probabilities, which is an indication of the vicinity of the onset of pion condensation. As an example, 2- components of the spin-dipole resonance in 78Ni and 132Sn are considered. The existence of such modes points out to the necessity of taking into account their coupling to other elementary modes of excitation, e.g. single-quasiparticle ones. This coupling is introduced in the theory for the first time. Thereby, both rho-meson and pion-exchange contributions to the nucleon-nucleon interaction are included in the relativistic framework beyond the Hartree-Fock approximation. Namely, classes of Feynman diagrams are selected according to their significance for nuclear spectroscopic characteristics, such as single-particle energies and strength functions, and included into the nucleonic self-energy in all orders of meson-exchange. As an illustration, the impact of these new contributions on the single-particle energies of 100Sn is discussed.

  18. Impact of pion dynamics on nuclear shell structure

    SciTech Connect

    Litvinova, Elena

    2015-10-15

    Spin-isospin response in exotic nuclear systems is investigated. It is found that in some nuclei excitations with pionic quantum numbers (0{sup −}, 1{sup +}, 2{sup −}, …) appear at very low energies with large transition probabilities, which is an indication of the vicinity of the onset of pion condensation. As an example, 2{sup −} components of the spin-dipole resonance in {sup 78}Ni and {sup 132}Sn are considered. The existence of such modes points out to the necessity of taking into account their coupling to other elementary modes of excitation, e.g. single-quasiparticle ones. This coupling is introduced in the theory for the first time. Thereby, both rho-meson and pion-exchange contributions to the nucleon-nucleon interaction are included in the relativistic framework beyond the Hartree-Fock approximation. Namely, classes of Feynman diagrams are selected according to their significance for nuclear spectroscopic characteristics, such as single-particle energies and strength functions, and included into the nucleonic self-energy in all orders of meson-exchange. As an illustration, the impact of these new contributions on the single-particle energies of {sup 100}Sn is discussed.

  19. Molecular dynamics-based selectivity for Fast-Field-Cycling relaxometry by Overhauser and solid effect dynamic nuclear polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neudert, Oliver; Mattea, Carlos; Stapf, Siegfried

    2017-03-01

    In the last decade nuclear spin hyperpolarization methods, especially Dynamic Nuclear Polarization (DNP), have provided unprecedented possibilities for various NMR techniques by increasing the sensitivity by several orders of magnitude. Recently, in-situ DNP-enhanced Fast Field Cycling (FFC) relaxometry was shown to provide appreciable NMR signal enhancements in liquids and viscous systems. In this work, a measurement protocol for DNP-enhanced NMR studies is introduced which enables the selective detection of nuclear spin hyperpolarized by either Overhauser effect or solid effect DNP. Based on field-cycled DNP and relaxation studies it is shown that these methods allow for the independent measurement of polymer and solvent nuclear spins in a concentrated solution of high molecular weight polybutadiene in benzene doped with α,γ-bisdiphenylene-β-phenylallyl radical. Appreciable NMR signal enhancements of about 10-fold were obtained for both constituents. Moreover, qualitative information about the dynamics of the radical and solvent was obtained. Selective DNP-enhanced FFC relaxometry is applied for the measurement of the 1H nuclear magnetic relaxation dispersion of both constituents with improved precision. The introduced method is expected to greatly facilitate NMR studies of complex systems with multiple overlapping signal contributions that cannot be distinguished by standard methods.

  20. Molecular dynamics-based selectivity for Fast-Field-Cycling relaxometry by Overhauser and solid effect dynamic nuclear polarization.

    PubMed

    Neudert, Oliver; Mattea, Carlos; Stapf, Siegfried

    2017-03-01

    In the last decade nuclear spin hyperpolarization methods, especially Dynamic Nuclear Polarization (DNP), have provided unprecedented possibilities for various NMR techniques by increasing the sensitivity by several orders of magnitude. Recently, in-situ DNP-enhanced Fast Field Cycling (FFC) relaxometry was shown to provide appreciable NMR signal enhancements in liquids and viscous systems. In this work, a measurement protocol for DNP-enhanced NMR studies is introduced which enables the selective detection of nuclear spin hyperpolarized by either Overhauser effect or solid effect DNP. Based on field-cycled DNP and relaxation studies it is shown that these methods allow for the independent measurement of polymer and solvent nuclear spins in a concentrated solution of high molecular weight polybutadiene in benzene doped with α,γ-bisdiphenylene-β-phenylallyl radical. Appreciable NMR signal enhancements of about 10-fold were obtained for both constituents. Moreover, qualitative information about the dynamics of the radical and solvent was obtained. Selective DNP-enhanced FFC relaxometry is applied for the measurement of the (1)H nuclear magnetic relaxation dispersion of both constituents with improved precision. The introduced method is expected to greatly facilitate NMR studies of complex systems with multiple overlapping signal contributions that cannot be distinguished by standard methods.

  1. Studies in protein dynamics using heteronuclear nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vugmeyster, Liliya

    Dynamic processes in proteins are important for their biological function. Several issues in protein dynamics are addressed by applying existing NMR methodologies to investigate dynamics of several small proteins. Amide H/D exchange rates have been measured for the N-terminal domain of the ribosomal protein L9, residues 1--56. The results suggest that the structure of the domain is preserved in isolation and that the stability of the isolated domain is comparable to the stability of this domain in intact L9. Single domain proteins can fold in vitro at rates in excess of 1 x 104 s-1. Measurement of folding rates of this magnitude poses a considerable technical challenge. Off-resonance 15N R1rho measurements are shown to be capable of measuring such fast protein folding rates. The measurements were performed on a sample of the peripheral subunit-binding domain from the dihydrolopoamide acetyltransferase component of the pyruvate dehydrogenase multienzyme complex from Bacillus stearothermophilus 15N labeled at Ala 11. Fast intramolecular motions (on ps-ns time scale) can be studied by heteronuclear laboratory frame NMR relaxation. The temperature dependence of the backbone dynamics of the 36-resiude subdomain of the F-actin bundling protein villin has been investigated by studying the temperature dependence of order parameters obtained from 15N relaxation measurements. The results support the hypothesis that one of the possible mechanisms of thermostability is to lower the heat capacity difference between the folded and unfolded states by lowering the contribution from the backbone dynamics. A commonly used model-free approach for the interpretation of the relaxation data for macromolecules in solution is modified to correct for the decoupling approximation between the overall and internal motions.

  2. The old nuclear star cluster in the Milky Way: dynamics, mass, statistical parallax, and black hole mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatzopoulos, S.; Fritz, T. K.; Gerhard, O.; Gillessen, S.; Wegg, C.; Genzel, R.; Pfuhl, O.

    2015-02-01

    We derive new constraints on the mass, rotation, orbit structure, and statistical parallax of the Galactic old nuclear star cluster and the mass of the supermassive black hole. We combine star counts and kinematic data from Fritz et al., including 2500 line-of-sight velocities and 10 000 proper motions obtained with VLT instruments. We show that the difference between the proper motion dispersions σl and σb cannot be explained by rotation, but is a consequence of the flattening of the nuclear cluster. We fit the surface density distribution of stars in the central 1000 arcsec by a superposition of a spheroidal cluster with scale ˜100 arcsec and a much larger nuclear disc component. We compute the self-consistent two-integral distribution function f(E, Lz) for this density model, and add rotation self-consistently. We find that (i) the orbit structure of the f(E, Lz) gives an excellent match to the observed velocity dispersion profiles as well as the proper motion and line-of-sight velocity histograms, including the double-peak in the vl-histograms. (ii) This requires an axial ratio near q1 = 0.7 consistent with our determination from star counts, q1 = 0.73 ± 0.04 for r < 70 arcsec. (iii) The nuclear star cluster is approximately described by an isotropic rotator model. (iv) Using the corresponding Jeans equations to fit the proper motion and line-of-sight velocity dispersions, we obtain best estimates for the nuclear star cluster mass, black hole mass, and distance M*(r < 100 arcsec) = (8.94 ± 0.31|stat ± 0.9|syst) × 106 M⊙, M• = (3.86 ± 0.14|stat ± 0.4|syst) × 106 M⊙, and R0 = 8.27 ± 0.09|stat ± 0.1|syst kpc, where the estimated systematic errors account for additional uncertainties in the dynamical modelling. (v) The combination of the cluster dynamics with the S-star orbits around Sgr A* strongly reduces the degeneracy between black hole mass and Galactic Centre distance present in previous S-star studies. A joint statistical analysis with the

  3. Correlated electron-nuclear dynamics with conditional wave functions.

    PubMed

    Albareda, Guillermo; Appel, Heiko; Franco, Ignacio; Abedi, Ali; Rubio, Angel

    2014-08-22

    The molecular Schrödinger equation is rewritten in terms of nonunitary equations of motion for the nuclei (or electrons) that depend parametrically on the configuration of an ensemble of generally defined electronic (or nuclear) trajectories. This scheme is exact and does not rely on the tracing out of degrees of freedom. Hence, the use of trajectory-based statistical techniques can be exploited to circumvent the calculation of the computationally demanding Born-Oppenheimer potential-energy surfaces and nonadiabatic coupling elements. The concept of the potential-energy surface is restored by establishing a formal connection with the exact factorization of the full wave function. This connection is used to gain insight from a simplified form of the exact propagation scheme.

  4. Nuclear structure of 124Xe in dynamic PPQ model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, J. B.

    2014-07-01

    The Xe isotopes in the A = 130 region, with low quadrupole deformation β, are good examples of the γ-soft nuclei. Recent data of 124Xe exhibit well developed K-bands of ground, Kπ = 21+, 02+, 03+ and 41+. Its spectrum is studied in relation to the underlying dynamic symmetries. The absolute intra- and inter-band B (E2) values and the B (E2) ratios are compared with the theoretical predictions of the dynamic pairing plus quadrupole model in the microscopic approach, and the interacting boson model IBM-1. The potential energy surface illustrates the γ-soft character. The variation of inertia tensor over the (β , γ) space is studied, and the spread of the wave functions of three Iπ =0+ and two 2+ states over the (β , γ) space illustrate their varied character. Comparison is done with the dynamic symmetries of IBM for different bands. The O(6) symmetry breaking and preservation of the O(5) and O(6) symmetry are reviewed.

  5. Correlated electron-nuclear dynamics in above-threshold multiphoton ionization of asymmetric molecule.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhuo; Li, Min; Zhou, Yueming; Lan, Pengfei; Lu, Peixiang

    2017-02-20

    The partition of the photon energy into the subsystems of molecules determines many photon-induced chemical and physical dynamics in laser-molecule interactions. The electron-nuclear energy sharing from multiphoton ionization of molecules has been used to uncover the correlated dynamics of the electron and fragments. However, most previous studies focus on symmetric molecules. Here we study the electron-nuclear energy sharing in strong-field photoionization of HeH(2+) by solving the one-dimensional time-dependent Schrödinger equation (TDSE). Compared with symmetric molecules, the joint electron-nuclear energy spectrum (JES) of HeH(2+) reveals an anomalous energy shift at certain nuclear energies, while it disappears at higher and lower nuclear energies. Through tracing the time evolution of the wavepacket of bound states, we identify that this energy shift originates from the joint effect of the Stark shift, associated with the permanent dipole, and the Autler-Townes effect due to the coupling of the 2pσ and 2sσ states in strong fields. The energy shift in the JES appears at certain nuclear distances only when both Stark effect and Autler-Townes effect play important roles. We further demonstrate that the electron-nuclei energy sharing can be controlled by varying laser intensity for asymmetric molecules, providing alternative approaches to manipulate photochemical reactions for more complex molecules.

  6. Correlated electron-nuclear dynamics in above-threshold multiphoton ionization of asymmetric molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhuo; Li, Min; Zhou, Yueming; Lan, Pengfei; Lu, Peixiang

    2017-02-01

    The partition of the photon energy into the subsystems of molecules determines many photon-induced chemical and physical dynamics in laser-molecule interactions. The electron-nuclear energy sharing from multiphoton ionization of molecules has been used to uncover the correlated dynamics of the electron and fragments. However, most previous studies focus on symmetric molecules. Here we study the electron-nuclear energy sharing in strong-field photoionization of HeH2+ by solving the one-dimensional time-dependent Schrödinger equation (TDSE). Compared with symmetric molecules, the joint electron-nuclear energy spectrum (JES) of HeH2+ reveals an anomalous energy shift at certain nuclear energies, while it disappears at higher and lower nuclear energies. Through tracing the time evolution of the wavepacket of bound states, we identify that this energy shift originates from the joint effect of the Stark shift, associated with the permanent dipole, and the Autler-Townes effect due to the coupling of the 2pσ and 2sσ states in strong fields. The energy shift in the JES appears at certain nuclear distances only when both Stark effect and Autler-Townes effect play important roles. We further demonstrate that the electron-nuclei energy sharing can be controlled by varying laser intensity for asymmetric molecules, providing alternative approaches to manipulate photochemical reactions for more complex molecules.

  7. Cell cycle-dependent alteration in NAC1 nuclear body dynamics and morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Pei-Hsun; Hung, Shen-Hsiu; Ren, Tina; Shih, Ie-Ming; Tseng, Yiider

    2011-02-01

    NAC1, a BTB/POZ family member, has been suggested to participate in maintaining the stemness of embryonic stem cells and has been implicated in the pathogenesis of human cancer. In ovarian cancer, NAC1 upregulation is associated with disease aggressiveness and with the development of chemoresistance. Like other BTB/POZ proteins, NAC1 forms discrete nuclear bodies in non-dividing cells. To investigate the biological role of NAC1 nuclear bodies, we characterized the expression dynamics of NAC1 nuclear bodies during different phases of the cell cycle. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching assays revealed that NAC1 was rapidly exchanged between the nucleoplasm and NAC1 nuclear bodies in interphase cells. The number of NAC1 bodies significantly increased and their size decreased in the S phase as compared to the G0/G1 and G2 phases. NAC1 nuclear bodies disappeared and NAC1 became diffuse during mitosis. NAC1 nuclear bodies reappeared immediately after completion of mitosis. These results indicate that a cell cycle-dependent regulatory mechanism controls NAC1 body formation in the nucleus and suggest that NAC1 body dynamics are associated with mitosis or cytokinesis.

  8. Correlated electron-nuclear dynamics in above-threshold multiphoton ionization of asymmetric molecule

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhuo; Li, Min; Zhou, Yueming; Lan, Pengfei; Lu, Peixiang

    2017-01-01

    The partition of the photon energy into the subsystems of molecules determines many photon-induced chemical and physical dynamics in laser-molecule interactions. The electron-nuclear energy sharing from multiphoton ionization of molecules has been used to uncover the correlated dynamics of the electron and fragments. However, most previous studies focus on symmetric molecules. Here we study the electron-nuclear energy sharing in strong-field photoionization of HeH2+ by solving the one-dimensional time-dependent Schrödinger equation (TDSE). Compared with symmetric molecules, the joint electron-nuclear energy spectrum (JES) of HeH2+ reveals an anomalous energy shift at certain nuclear energies, while it disappears at higher and lower nuclear energies. Through tracing the time evolution of the wavepacket of bound states, we identify that this energy shift originates from the joint effect of the Stark shift, associated with the permanent dipole, and the Autler-Townes effect due to the coupling of the 2pσ and 2sσ states in strong fields. The energy shift in the JES appears at certain nuclear distances only when both Stark effect and Autler-Townes effect play important roles. We further demonstrate that the electron-nuclei energy sharing can be controlled by varying laser intensity for asymmetric molecules, providing alternative approaches to manipulate photochemical reactions for more complex molecules. PMID:28218294

  9. Dynamic nuclear magnetic resonance field sensing with part-per-trillion resolution.

    PubMed

    Gross, Simon; Barmet, Christoph; Dietrich, Benjamin E; Brunner, David O; Schmid, Thomas; Pruessmann, Klaas P

    2016-12-02

    High-field magnets of up to tens of teslas in strength advance applications in physics, chemistry and the life sciences. However, progress in generating such high fields has not been matched by corresponding advances in magnetic field measurement. Based mostly on nuclear magnetic resonance, dynamic high-field magnetometry is currently limited to resolutions in the nanotesla range. Here we report a concerted approach involving tailored materials, magnetostatics and detection electronics to enhance the resolution of nuclear magnetic resonance sensing by three orders of magnitude. The relative sensitivity thus achieved amounts to 1 part per trillion (10(-12)). To exemplify this capability we demonstrate the direct detection and relaxometry of nuclear polarization and real-time recording of dynamic susceptibility effects related to human heart function. Enhanced high-field magnetometry will generally permit a fresh look at magnetic phenomena that scale with field strength. It also promises to facilitate the development and operation of high-field magnets.

  10. Widths of K¯-nuclear deeply bound states in a dynamical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mareš, J.; Friedman, E.; Gal, A.

    2005-01-01

    The relativistic mean field (RMF) model is applied to a system of nucleons and a Kbar meson, interacting via scalar and vector boson fields. The model incorporates the standard RMF phenomenology for bound nucleons and, for the Kbar meson, it relates to low-energy Kbar N and K- atom phenomenology. Deeply bound Kbar nuclear states are generated dynamically across the periodic table and are exhibited for 12C and 16O over a wide range of binding energies. Substantial polarization of the core nucleus is found for these light nuclei. Absorption modes are also included dynamically, considering explicitly both the resulting compressed nuclear density and the reduced phase space for Kbar absorption from deeply bound states. The behavior of the calculated width as function of the Kbar binding energy is studied in order to explore limits on the possible existence of narrow Kbar nuclear states.

  11. Nuclear Dynamical Correlation Effects in X-ray Spectroscopy from a Theoretical Time-Domain Perspective.

    PubMed

    Karsten, Sven; Ivanov, Sergei D; Aziz, Saadullah G; Bokarev, Sergey I; Kühn, Oliver

    2017-03-02

    To date X-ray spectroscopy has become a routine tool that can reveal highly local and element-specific information on the electronic structure of atoms in complex environments. Here, we focus on nuclear dynamical correlation effects in X-ray spectra and develop a rigorous time-correlation function method employing ground state classical molecular dynamics simulations. The importance of nuclear correlation phenomena is demonstrated by comparison against the results from the conventional sampling approach performed on the same data set for gas phase water. In contrast to the first-order absorption, second-order resonant inelastic scattering spectra exhibit pronounced fingerprints of nuclear motions. The developed methodology is not biased to a particular electronic structure method and, owing to its generality, can be applied to, e.g., X-ray photoelectron and Auger spectroscopies.

  12. Quantum dynamical simulations for nuclear spin selective laser control of ortho- and para-fulvene.

    PubMed

    Belz, S; Grohmann, T; Leibscher, M

    2009-07-21

    In the present paper we explore the prospects for laser control of the photoinduced nonadiabatic dynamics of para- and ortho-fulvene with the help of quantum dynamical simulations. Previous investigations [Bearpark et al., J. Am. Chem. Soc. 118, 5253 (1996); Alfalah et al., J. Chem. Phys. 130, 124318 (2009)] show that photoisomerization of fulvene is hindered by ultrafast radiationless decay through a conical intersection at planar configuration. Here, we demonstrate that photoisomerization can nevertheless be initiated by damping unfavorable nuclear vibrations with properly designed laser pulses. Moreover, we show that the resulting intramolecular torsion is nuclear spin selective. The selectivity of the photoexcitation with respect to the nuclear spin isomers can be further enhanced by applying an optimized sequence of two laser pulses.

  13. Dynamic nuclear magnetic resonance field sensing with part-per-trillion resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gross, Simon; Barmet, Christoph; Dietrich, Benjamin E.; Brunner, David O.; Schmid, Thomas; Pruessmann, Klaas P.

    2016-12-01

    High-field magnets of up to tens of teslas in strength advance applications in physics, chemistry and the life sciences. However, progress in generating such high fields has not been matched by corresponding advances in magnetic field measurement. Based mostly on nuclear magnetic resonance, dynamic high-field magnetometry is currently limited to resolutions in the nanotesla range. Here we report a concerted approach involving tailored materials, magnetostatics and detection electronics to enhance the resolution of nuclear magnetic resonance sensing by three orders of magnitude. The relative sensitivity thus achieved amounts to 1 part per trillion (10-12). To exemplify this capability we demonstrate the direct detection and relaxometry of nuclear polarization and real-time recording of dynamic susceptibility effects related to human heart function. Enhanced high-field magnetometry will generally permit a fresh look at magnetic phenomena that scale with field strength. It also promises to facilitate the development and operation of high-field magnets.

  14. Dynamic nuclear magnetic resonance field sensing with part-per-trillion resolution

    PubMed Central

    Gross, Simon; Barmet, Christoph; Dietrich, Benjamin E.; Brunner, David O.; Schmid, Thomas; Pruessmann, Klaas P.

    2016-01-01

    High-field magnets of up to tens of teslas in strength advance applications in physics, chemistry and the life sciences. However, progress in generating such high fields has not been matched by corresponding advances in magnetic field measurement. Based mostly on nuclear magnetic resonance, dynamic high-field magnetometry is currently limited to resolutions in the nanotesla range. Here we report a concerted approach involving tailored materials, magnetostatics and detection electronics to enhance the resolution of nuclear magnetic resonance sensing by three orders of magnitude. The relative sensitivity thus achieved amounts to 1 part per trillion (10−12). To exemplify this capability we demonstrate the direct detection and relaxometry of nuclear polarization and real-time recording of dynamic susceptibility effects related to human heart function. Enhanced high-field magnetometry will generally permit a fresh look at magnetic phenomena that scale with field strength. It also promises to facilitate the development and operation of high-field magnets. PMID:27910860

  15. Dynamics of Arabidopsis SUN proteins during mitosis and their involvement in nuclear shaping.

    PubMed

    Oda, Yoshihisa; Fukuda, Hiroo

    2011-05-01

    The nuclear envelope (NE) is a highly active structure with a specific set of nuclear envelope proteins acting in diverse cellular events. SUN proteins are conserved NE proteins among eukaryotes. Although they form nucleocytoplasmic linkage complexes in metazoan cells, their functions in the plant kingdom are unknown. To understand the function of plant SUN proteins, in this study we first investigated the dynamics of Arabidopsis SUN proteins during mitosis in Arabidopsis roots and cultured cells. For this purpose, we performed dual and triple visualization of these proteins, microtubules, chromosomes, and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) in cultured cells, and observed their dynamics during mitosis using a high-speed spinning disk confocal microscope. The localizations of SUN proteins changed dynamically during mitosis, tightly coupled with NE dynamics. Moreover, NE re-formation marked with SUN proteins is temporally and spatially coordinated with plant-specific microtubule structures such as phragmoplasts. Finally, the analysis with gene knockdowns of AtSUN1 and AtSUN2 indicated that they are necessary for the maintenance and/or formation of polarized nuclear shape in root hairs. These results suggest that Arabidopsis SUN proteins function in the maintenance or formation of nuclear shape as components of the nucleocytoskeletal complex.

  16. Dynamic Operations Wayfinding System (DOWS) for Nuclear Power Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Boring, Ronald Laurids; Ulrich, Thomas Anthony; Lew, Roger Thomas

    2015-08-01

    A novel software tool is proposed to aid reactor operators in respond- ing to upset plant conditions. The purpose of the Dynamic Operations Wayfind- ing System (DOWS) is to diagnose faults, prioritize those faults, identify paths to resolve those faults, and deconflict the optimal path for the operator to fol- low. The objective of DOWS is to take the guesswork out of the best way to combine procedures to resolve compound faults, mitigate low threshold events, or respond to severe accidents. DOWS represents a uniquely flexible and dy- namic computer-based procedure system for operators.

  17. Dynamics of Nuclear DNA Quantities during Zygote Development in Barley.

    PubMed Central

    Mogensen, H. L.; Holm, P. B.

    1995-01-01

    Quantities of DNA were estimated in the nuclei of mechanically isolated egg and zygote protoplasts in two cultivars of barley using 4[prime],6-diamidino-2-phenylindole staining and microfluorometry. Unlike many previous studies on DNA amounts within the sex cells of flowering plants, we obtained consistent and unambiguous results indicating that the egg and sperm nuclei are at the 1C DNA level (basic haploid amount) at the time of karyogamy. Karyogamy was initiated within 60 min postpollination, and the male chromatin became completely integrated into the egg nucleus within 6 to 7 hr postpollination (hpp). Zygotic nuclear DNA levels began to increase at ~9 to 12 hpp in cultivar Alexis and at 12 to 15 hpp in cultivar Igri. The 4C DNA complement was reached in most zygotes by 22 to 26 hpp in cultivar Alexis and by 23 to 29 hpp in cultivar Igri. These data are fundamental to a better understanding of fertilization and zygote maturation in flowering plants. They are also relevant to studies in which the timing of zygotic DNA replication is of interest, such as ongoing investigations on genetic transformations in barley using the microinjection technique. PMID:12242375

  18. Nuclear dynamics of radiation-induced foci in euchromatin and heterochromatin

    SciTech Connect

    Chiolo, Irene; Tang, Jonathan; Georgescu, Walter; Costes, Sylvain V.

    2013-10-01

    Repair of double strand breaks (DSBs) is essential for cell survival and genome integrity. While much is known about the molecular mechanisms involved in DSB repair and checkpoint activation, the roles of nuclear dynamics of radiation-induced foci (RIF) in DNA repair are just beginning to emerge. Here, we summarize results from recent studies that point to distinct features of these dynamics in two different chromatin environments: heterochromatin and euchromatin. We also discuss how nuclear architecture and chromatin components might control these dynamics, and the need of novel quantification methods for a better description and interpretation of these phenomena. These studies are expected to provide new biomarkers for radiation risk and new strategies for cancer detection and treatment.

  19. Nuclear dynamics of radiation-induced foci in euchromatin and heterochromatin.

    PubMed

    Chiolo, Irene; Tang, Jonathan; Georgescu, Walter; Costes, Sylvain V

    2013-10-01

    Repair of double strand breaks (DSBs) is essential for cell survival and genome integrity. While much is known about the molecular mechanisms involved in DSB repair and checkpoint activation, the roles of nuclear dynamics of radiation-induced foci (RIF) in DNA repair are just beginning to emerge. Here, we summarize results from recent studies that point to distinct features of these dynamics in two different chromatin environments: heterochromatin and euchromatin. We also discuss how nuclear architecture and chromatin components might control these dynamics, and the need of novel quantification methods for a better description and interpretation of these phenomena. These studies are expected to provide new biomarkers for radiation risk and new strategies for cancer detection and treatment.

  20. Restrained torsional dynamics of nuclear DNA in living proliferative mammalian cells.

    PubMed Central

    Tramier, M; Kemnitz, K; Durieux, C; Coppey, J; Denjean, P; Pansu, R B; Coppey-Moisan, M

    2000-01-01

    Physical parameters, describing the state of chromatinized DNA in living mammalian cells, were revealed by in situ fluorescence dynamic properties of ethidium in its free and intercalated states. The lifetimes and anisotropy decays of this cationic chromophore were measured within the nuclear domain, by using the ultra-sensitive time-correlated single-photon counting technique, confocal microscopy, and ultra-low probe concentrations. We found that, in living cells: 1) free ethidium molecules equilibrate between extracellular milieu and nucleus, demonstrating that the cation is naturally transported into the nucleus; 2) the intercalation of ethidium into chromatinized DNA is strongly inhibited, with relaxation of the inhibition after mild (digitonin) cell treatment; 3) intercalation sites are likely to be located in chromatin DNA; and 4) the fluorescence anisotropy relaxation of intercalated molecules is very slow. The combination of fluorescence kinetic and fluorescence anisotropy dynamics indicates that the torsional dynamics of nuclear DNA is highly restrained in living cells. PMID:10777758

  1. Inhibition of Nuclear Transport of NF-ĸB p65 by the Salmonella Type III Secretion System Effector SpvD

    PubMed Central

    Rolhion, Nathalie; Furniss, R. Christopher D.; Grabe, Grzegorz; Ryan, Aindrias; Liu, Mei; Matthews, Sophie A.; Holden, David W.

    2016-01-01

    Salmonella enterica replicates in macrophages through the action of effector proteins translocated across the vacuolar membrane by a type III secretion system (T3SS). Here we show that the SPI-2 T3SS effector SpvD suppresses proinflammatory immune responses. SpvD prevented activation of an NF-ĸB-dependent promoter and caused nuclear accumulation of importin-α, which is required for nuclear import of p65. SpvD interacted specifically with the exportin Xpo2, which mediates nuclear-cytoplasmic recycling of importins. We propose that interaction between SpvD and Xpo2 disrupts the normal recycling of importin-α from the nucleus, leading to a defect in nuclear translocation of p65 and inhibition of activation of NF-ĸB regulated promoters. SpvD down-regulated pro-inflammatory responses and contributed to systemic growth of bacteria in mice. This work shows that a bacterial pathogen can manipulate host cell immune responses by interfering with the nuclear transport machinery. PMID:27232334

  2. Electron-nuclear wave-packet dynamics through a conical intersection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hader, Kilian; Albert, Julian; Gross, E. K. U.; Engel, Volker

    2017-02-01

    We investigate the coupled electron-nuclear dynamics in a model system showing a conical intersection (CoIn) between two excited state potential energy surfaces. Within the model, a single electron and nucleus move in two dimensions in an external static field. It is demonstrated that the nuclear density conserves its initial Gaussian shape when directly passing the CoIn, whereas the electronic density remains approximately constant. This is in sharp contrast to the picture which evolves from an analysis within the basis of adiabatic electronic states. There, dramatic changes are seen in the dynamics of the different nuclear components of the total wave function. It is thus documented that, in the case of a highly efficient population transfer between the respective adiabatic states, neither the nuclear nor the electronic density is influenced by the existence of a CoIn. This is the case because the nuclear-electronic wave packet moves on the complete potential energy surface which changes its topology smoothly as a function of all particle coordinates.

  3. Nuclear magnetic resonance of external protons using continuous dynamical decoupling with shallow NV centers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Las Casas, Charles; Ohno, Kenichi; Awschalom, David D.

    2015-03-01

    The nitrogen vacancy (NV) center in diamond is a paramagnetic defect with excellent spin properties that can reside within a few nanometers of the diamond surface, enabling atomic-scale magnetic resonance sensing of external nuclear spins. Here we use rotating frame longitudinal spin relaxation (T1ρ) based sensing schemes, known as Continuous Dynamical Decoupling (CDD), to detect external nuclear spins with shallow NV centers (<5 nm from the surface). Distinguishing neighboring nuclear spins from each other requires the NV center be near enough to create differences in the hyperfine shifts and coupling strengths of the nuclei. However, spin coherence time and consequently the sensitivity of dynamical decoupling techniques degrade sharply as NVs become shallower. We use strong continuous driving to overcome this fast decoherence and detect an ensemble of external nuclear spins using a single shallow NV center with a short T2 (<2 μs) at magnetic fields as high as 0.5 Tesla. The increased sensitivity of this method relative to pulsed dynamical decoupling techniques demonstrates the benefits of CDD for sensing with very shallow NV centers. This work was supported by DARPA, AFOSR, and the DIAMANT program.

  4. Chaotic features of nuclear structure and dynamics: selected topics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zelevinsky, Vladimir; Volya, Alexander

    2016-03-01

    Quantum chaos has become an important element of our knowledge about physics of complex systems. In typical mesoscopic systems of interacting particles the dynamics invariably become chaotic when the level density, growing by combinatorial reasons, leads to the increasing probability of mixing simple mean-field (particle-hole) configurations. The resulting stationary states have exceedingly complicated structures that are comparable to those in random matrix theory. We discuss the main properties of mesoscopic quantum chaos and show that it can serve as a justification for application of statistical mechanics to mesoscopic systems. We show that quantum chaos becomes a powerful instrument for experimental, theoretical and computational work. The generalization to open systems and effects in the continuum are discussed with the help of the effective non-Hermitian Hamiltonian; it is shown how to formulate this approach for numerous problems of quantum signal transmission. The artificially introduced randomness can also be helpful for a deeper understanding of physics. We indicate the problems that require more investigation so as to be understood further.

  5. Key Role of Polyphosphoinositides in Dynamics of Fusogenic Nuclear Membrane Vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Zhendre, Vanessa; Grélard, Axelle; Garnier-LHomme, Marie; Buchoux, Sébastien; Larijani, Banafshé; Dufourc, Erick J.

    2011-01-01

    The role of phosphoinositides has been thoroughly described in many signalling and membrane trafficking events but their function as modulators of membrane structure and dynamics in membrane fusion has not been investigated. We have reconstructed models that mimic the composition of nuclear envelope precursor membranes with naturally elevated amounts of phosphoinositides. These fusogenic membranes (membrane vesicle 1(MV1) and nuclear envelope remnants (NER) are critical for the assembly of the nuclear envelope. Phospholipids, cholesterol, and polyphosphoinositides, with polyunsaturated fatty acid chains that were identified in the natural nuclear membranes by lipid mass spectrometry, have been used to reconstruct complex model membranes mimicking nuclear envelope precursor membranes. Structural and dynamic events occurring in the membrane core and at the membrane surface were monitored by solid-state deuterium and phosphorus NMR. “MV1-like” (PC∶PI∶PIP∶PIP2, 30∶20∶18∶12, mol%) membranes that exhibited high levels of PtdIns, PtdInsP and PtdInsP2 had an unusually fluid membrane core (up to 20% increase, compared to membranes with low amounts of phosphoinositides to mimic the endoplasmic reticulum). “NER-like” (PC∶CH∶PI∶PIP∶PIP2, 28∶42∶16∶7∶7, mol%) membranes containing high amounts of both cholesterol and phosphoinositides exhibited liquid-ordered phase properties, but with markedly lower rigidity (10–15% decrease). Phosphoinositides are the first lipids reported to counterbalance the ordering effect of cholesterol. At the membrane surface, phosphoinositides control the orientation dynamics of other lipids in the model membranes, while remaining unchanged themselves. This is an important finding as it provides unprecedented mechanistic insight into the role of phosphoinositides in membrane dynamics. Biological implications of our findings and a model describing the roles of fusogenic membrane vesicles are proposed. PMID:21931619

  6. Dynamic considerations in the development of centrifugal separators used for reprocessing nuclear fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Strunk, W.D.; Singh, S.P.; Tuft, R.M.

    1988-01-01

    The development of centrifugal separators has been a key ingredient in improving the process used for reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel. The separators are used to segregate uranium and plutonium from the fission products produced by a controlled nuclear reaction. The separators are small variable speed centrifuges, designed to operate in a harsh environment. Dynamic problems were detected by vibration analysis and resolved using modal analysis and trending. Problems with critical speeds, resonances in the base, balancing, weak components, precision manufacturing, and short life have been solved.

  7. Solid effect in the electron spin dressed state: A new approach for dynamic nuclear polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weis, V.; Bennati, M.; Rosay, M.; Griffin, R. G.

    2000-10-01

    We describe a new type of solid effect for dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) that is based on simultaneous, near resonant microwave (mw) and radio frequency (rf) irradiation of a coupled electron nuclear spin system. The interaction of the electron spin with the mw field is treated as an electron spin dressed state. In contrast to the customary laboratory frame solid effect, it is possible to obtain nuclear polarization with the dressed state solid effect (DSSE) even in the absence of nonsecular hyperfine coupling. Efficient, selective excitation of dressed state transitions generates nuclear polarization in the nuclear laboratory frame on a time scale of tens of μs, depending on the strength of the electron-nuclear coupling, the mw and rf offset and field strength. The experiment employs both pulsed mw and rf irradiation at a repetition rate comparable to T1e-1, where T1e is the electronic spin lattice relaxation time. The DSSE is demonstrated on a perdeuterated BDPA radical in a protonated matrix of polystyrene.

  8. Nuclear classical dynamics of H2 in an intense laser field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sami, Firoozeh; Vafaee, Mohsen; Shokri, Babak

    2011-08-01

    In the first part of this paper, the different distinguishable pathways and regions of the single and sequential double ionization are determined and discussed. It is shown that there are two distinguishable pathways for the single ionization and four distinct pathways for the sequential double ionization. It is also shown that there are two and three different regions of space which are related to the single and double ionization, respectively. In the second part of the paper, the time-dependent Schrödinger and Newton equations are solved simultaneously for the electrons and the nuclei of H2, respectively. The electron and nuclei dynamics are separated on the basis of the adiabatic approximation. The soft-core potential is used to model the electrostatic interaction between the electrons and the nuclei. A variety of wavelengths (390, 532 and 780 nm) and intensities (5 × 1014 and 5 × 1015 W cm-2) of the ultrashort intense laser pulses with a sinus second-order envelope function are used. The behaviour of the time-dependent classical nuclear dynamics in the absence and presence of the laser field is investigated and compared. In the absence of the laser field, there are three distinct sections for the nuclear dynamics on the electronic ground state energy curve. The bond hardening phenomenon does not appear in this classical nuclear dynamics simulation.

  9. Automated motion correction based on target tracking for dynamic nuclear medicine studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Xinhua; Tetrault, Tracy; Fahey, Fred; Treves, Ted

    2008-03-01

    Nuclear medicine dynamic studies of kidneys, bladder and stomach are important diagnostic tools. Accurate generation of time-activity curves from regions of interest (ROIs) requires that the patient remains motionless for the duration of the study. This is not always possible since some dynamic studies may last from several minutes to one hour. Several motion correction solutions have been explored. Motion correction using external point sources is inconvenient and not accurate especially when motion results from breathing, organ motion or feeding rather than from body motion alone. Centroid-based motion correction assumes that activity distribution is only inside the single organ (without background) and uniform, but this approach is impractical in most clinical studies. In this paper, we present a novel technique of motion correction that first tracks the organ of interest in a dynamic series then aligns the organ. The implementation algorithm for target tracking-based motion correction consists of image preprocessing, target detection, target positioning, motion estimation and prediction, tracking (new search region generation) and target alignment. The targeted organ is tracked from the first frame to the last one in the dynamic series to generate a moving trajectory of the organ. Motion correction is implemented by aligning the organ ROIs in the image series to the location of the organ in the first image. The proposed method of motion correction has been applied to several dynamic nuclear medicine studies including radionuclide cystography, dynamic renal scintigraphy, diuretic renography and gastric emptying scintigraphy.

  10. Prospects for sub-micron solid state nuclear magnetic resonance imaging with low-temperature dynamic nuclear polarization.

    PubMed

    Thurber, Kent R; Tycko, Robert

    2010-06-14

    We evaluate the feasibility of (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging with sub-micron voxel dimensions using a combination of low temperatures and dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP). Experiments are performed on nitroxide-doped glycerol-water at 9.4 T and temperatures below 40 K, using a 30 mW tunable microwave source for DNP. With DNP at 7 K, a 0.5 microL sample yields a (1)H NMR signal-to-noise ratio of 770 in two scans with pulsed spin-lock detection and after 80 db signal attenuation. With reasonable extrapolations, we infer that (1)H NMR signals from 1 microm(3) voxel volumes should be readily detectable, and voxels as small as 0.03 microm(3) may eventually be detectable. Through homonuclear decoupling with a frequency-switched Lee-Goldburg spin echo technique, we obtain 830 Hz (1)H NMR linewidths at low temperatures, implying that pulsed field gradients equal to 0.4 G/d or less would be required during spatial encoding dimensions of an imaging sequence, where d is the resolution in each dimension.

  11. Solid state nuclear magnetic resonance with magic-angle spinning and dynamic nuclear polarization below 25 K

    PubMed Central

    Thurber, Kent R.; Potapov, Alexey; Yau, Wai-Ming; Tycko, Robert

    2012-01-01

    We describe an apparatus for solid state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) with dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) and magic-angle spinning (MAS) at 20–25 K and 9.4 Tesla. The MAS NMR probe uses helium to cool the sample space and nitrogen gas for MAS drive and bearings, as described earlier (Thurber et al., J. Magn. Reson. 2008) [1], but also includes a corrugated waveguide for transmission of microwaves from below the probe to the sample. With a 30 mW circularly polarized microwave source at 264 GHz, MAS at 6.8 kHz, and 21 K sample temperature, greater than 25-fold enhancements of cross-polarized 13C NMR signals are observed in spectra of frozen glycerol/water solutions containing the triradical dopant DOTOPA-TEMPO when microwaves are applied. As demonstrations, we present DNP-enhanced one-dimensional and two-dimensional 13C MAS NMR spectra of frozen solutions of uniformly 13C-labeled L-alanine and melittin, a 26-residue helical peptide that we have synthesized with four uniformly 13C-labeled amino acids. PMID:23238592

  12. Luminous Infrared Galaxies. III. Multiple Merger, Extended Massive Star Formation, Galactic Wind, and Nuclear Inflow in NGC 3256

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lípari, S.; Díaz, R.; Taniguchi, Y.; Terlevich, R.; Dottori, H.; Carranza, G.

    2000-08-01

    ouflow axis (at P.A.~160deg). We analyze in detail the physical conditions in the giant H II regions located in the asymmetric spiral arms, the two main optical nuclei, and the outflow component (using long-slit spectroscopy, plus standard models of photoionization, shocks, and starbursts). We present four detailed emission-line ratios (N II/Hα, S II/Hα, S II/S II), and FWHM (Hα) maps for the central region (30''×30'' rmax~22''~4 kpc), with a spatial resolution of 1". In the central region (r~5-6 kpc) we detected that the nuclear starburst and the extended giant H II regions (in the spiral arms) have very similar properties, i.e., high metallicity and low-ionization spectra, with Teff=35,000 K, solar abundance, a range of Te~6000-7000 K, and Ne~100-1000 cm-3. The nuclear and extended outflow shows properties typical of galactic wind/shocks, associated with the nuclear starburst. We suggest that the interaction between dynamical effects, the galactic wind (outflow), low-energy cosmic rays, and the molecular+ionized gas (probably in the inflow phase) could be the possible mechanism that generate the ``similar extended properties in the massive star formation, at a scale of 5-6 kpc!'' We have also studied the presence of the close merger/interacting systems NGC 3256C (at ~150 kpc, ΔV=-100 km s-1) and the possible association between the NGC 3256 and 3263 groups of galaxies. In conclusion, these results suggest that NGC 3256 is the product of a multiple merger, which generated an extended massive star formation process with an associated galactic wind plus a nuclear inflow. Therefore, NGC 3256 is another example in which the relation between mergers and extreme starburst (and the powerful galactic wind, ``multiple'' Type II supernova explosions) play an important role in the evolution of galaxies (the hypothesis of Rieke et al., Joseph et al., Terlevich et al., Heckman et al., and Lípari et al.). Based on observations obtained at the Hubble Space Telescope (HST; Wide

  13. Electron paramagnetic resonance study of the nuclear spin dynamics in an AlAs quantum well

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shchepetilnikov, A. V.; Frolov, D. D.; Nefyodov, Yu. A.; Kukushkin, I. V.; Tiemann, L.; Reichl, C.; Dietsche, W.; Wegscheider, W.

    2016-12-01

    The nuclear spin dynamics in an asymmetrically doped 16-nm AlAs quantum well grown along the [001] direction has been studied experimentally using the time decay of the Overhauser shift of paramagnetic resonance of conduction electrons. The nonzero spin polarization of nuclei causing the initial observed Overhauser shift is due the relaxation of the nonequilibrium spin polarization of electrons into the nuclear subsystem near electron paramagnetic resonance owing to the hyperfine interaction. The measured relaxation time of nuclear spins near the unity filling factor is (530 ± 30) min at the temperature T = 0.5 K. This value exceeds the characteristic spin relaxation times of nuclei in GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructures by more than an order of magnitude. This fact indicates the decrease in the strength of the hyperfine interaction in the AlAs quantum well in comparison with GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructures.

  14. Electrostatic Potential Determined Magnetic Dynamics Observed in Two Mononuclear β-Diketone Dysprosium(III) Single-Molecule Magnets.

    PubMed

    Cen, Pei-Pei; Zhang, Sheng; Liu, Xiang-Yu; Song, Wei-Ming; Zhang, Yi-Quan; Xie, Gang; Chen, San-Ping

    2017-03-20

    Two β-diketone mononuclear Dy(III) compounds, formulated as Dy(BTFA)3(H2O)2 (1) and Dy(BTFA)3(bpy) (2) (BTFA = 3-benzoyl-1,1,1-trifluoroacetone, bpy = 2,2'-bipyridine), were prepared. Compound 1 can be identified to transform to 2 in the attendance of bpy coligand, when the local geometry symmetry of eight-coordinated Dy(III) ion changes from a dodecahedron (D2d) in 1 to a square antiprism (D4d) in 2. Fine-tuning structure aroused by auxiliary ligand has dramatical impact on magnetic properties of compounds 1 and 2. Magnetic investigations demonstrate that both 1 and 2 display dynamic magnetic relaxation of single-molecule magnets (SMMs) behavior with different effective barriers (ΔE/kB) of 93.09 K for 1 under zero direct-current (DC) field as well as 296.50 K for 1 and 151.01 K for 2 under 1200 Oe DC field, respectively. As noticed, compound 1 possesses higher effective barrier than 2, despite 1 exhibiting a lower geometrical symmetry of the Dy(III) ion. Ab initio studies reveal that the Kramers doublet ground state is predominantly axial with the gz tensors of two compounds matching the Ising-limit factor of 20 anticipated for the pure MJ = ±15/2 state. Electrostatic analysis confirms the uniaxial anisotropy directions, highlighting that the proper electrostatic distribution of the coordination sphere around Ln(III) center is the critical factor to improve the magnetic anisotropy and determine the dynamic behaviors of SMMs.

  15. Measuring Process Dynamics and Nuclear Migration for Clones of Neural Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    De La Hoz, Edgar Cardenas; Winter, Mark R.; Apostolopoulou, Maria; Temple, Sally

    2016-01-01

    Neural stem and progenitor cells (NPCs) generate processes that extend from the cell body in a dynamic manner. The NPC nucleus migrates along these processes with patterns believed to be tightly coupled to mechanisms of cell cycle regulation and cell fate determination. Here, we describe a new segmentation and tracking approach that allows NPC processes and nuclei to be reliably tracked across multiple rounds of cell division in phase-contrast microscopy images. Results are presented for mouse adult and embryonic NPCs from hundreds of clones, or lineage trees, containing tens of thousands of cells and millions of segmentations. New visualization approaches allow the NPC nuclear and process features to be effectively visualized for an entire clone. Significant differences in process and nuclear dynamics were found among type A and type C adult NPCs, and also between embryonic NPCs cultured from the anterior and posterior cerebral cortex. PMID:27878138

  16. Varicella-zoster virus induces the formation of dynamic nuclear capsid aggregates

    SciTech Connect

    Lebrun, Marielle; Thelen, Nicolas; Thiry, Marc; Riva, Laura; Ote, Isabelle; Condé, Claude; Vandevenne, Patricia; Di Valentin, Emmanuel; Bontems, Sébastien; Sadzot-Delvaux, Catherine

    2014-04-15

    The first step of herpesviruses virion assembly occurs in the nucleus. However, the exact site where nucleocapsids are assembled, where the genome and the inner tegument are acquired, remains controversial. We created a recombinant VZV expressing ORF23 (homologous to HSV-1 VP26) fused to the eGFP and dually fluorescent viruses with a tegument protein additionally fused to a red tag (ORF9, ORF21 and ORF22 corresponding to HSV-1 UL49, UL37 and UL36). We identified nuclear dense structures containing the major capsid protein, the scaffold protein and maturing protease, as well as ORF21 and ORF22. Correlative microscopy demonstrated that the structures correspond to capsid aggregates and time-lapse video imaging showed that they appear prior to the accumulation of cytoplasmic capsids, presumably undergoing the secondary egress, and are highly dynamic. Our observations suggest that these structures might represent a nuclear area important for capsid assembly and/or maturation before the budding at the inner nuclear membrane. - Highlights: • We created a recombinant VZV expressing the small capsid protein fused to the eGFP. • We identified nuclear dense structures containing capsid and procapsid proteins. • Correlative microscopy showed that the structures correspond to capsid aggregates. • Procapsids and partial capsids are found within the aggregates of WT and eGFP-23 VZV. • FRAP and FLIP experiments demonstrated that they are dynamic structures.

  17. Spin dynamics of a confined electron interacting with magnetic or nuclear spins: A semiclassical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dietl, Tomasz

    2015-03-01

    A physically transparent and mathematically simple semiclassical model is employed to examine dynamics in the central-spin problem. The results reproduce previous findings obtained by various quantum approaches and, at the same time, provide information on the electron spin dynamics and Berry's phase effects over a wider range of experimentally relevant parameters than available previously. This development is relevant to dynamics of bound magnetic polarons and spin dephasing of an electron trapped by an impurity or a quantum dot, and coupled by a contact interaction to neighboring localized magnetic impurities or nuclear spins. Furthermore, it substantiates the applicability of semiclassical models to simulate dynamic properties of spintronic nanostructures with a mesoscopic number of spins.

  18. Monitoring Nonadiabatic Electron-Nuclear Dynamics in Molecules by Attosecond Streaking of Photoelectrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowalewski, Markus; Bennett, Kochise; Rouxel, Jérémy R.; Mukamel, Shaul

    2016-07-01

    Streaking of photoelectrons has long been used for the temporal characterization of attosecond extreme ultraviolet pulses. When the time-resolved photoelectrons originate from a coherent superposition of electronic states, they carry additional phase information, which can be retrieved by the streaking technique. In this contribution we extend the streaking formalism to include coupled electron and nuclear dynamics in molecules as well as initial coherences. We demonstrate how streaked photoelectrons offer a novel tool for monitoring nonadiabatic dynamics as it occurs in the vicinity of conical intersections and avoided crossings. Streaking can provide high time resolution direct signatures of electronic coherences, which affect many primary photochemical and biological events.

  19. Real-time electron dynamics simulation of two-electron transfer reactions induced by nuclear motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Yasumitsu; Yamashita, Koichi

    2012-04-01

    Real-time electron dynamics of two-electron transfer reactions induced by nuclear motion is calculated by three methods: the numerically exact propagation method, the time-dependent Hartree (TDH) method and the Ehrenfest method. We find that, as long as the nuclei move as localized wave packets, the TDH and Ehrenfest methods can reproduce the exact electron dynamics of a simple charge transfer reaction model containing two electrons qualitatively well, even when nonadiabatic transitions between adiabatic states occur. In particular, both methods can reproduce the cases where a complete two-electron transfer reaction occurs and those where it does not occur.

  20. Light-induced nuclear export reveals rapid dynamics of epigenetic modifications

    PubMed Central

    Yumerefendi, Hayretin; Lerner, Andrew Michael; Zimmerman, Seth Parker; Hahn, Klaus; Bear, James E; Strahl, Brian D.; Kuhlman, Brian

    2016-01-01

    We engineered a photoactivatable system for rapidly and reversibly exporting proteins from the nucleus by embedding a nuclear export signal in the LOV2 domain from phototropin 1. Fusing the chromatin modifier Bre1 to the photoswitch, we achieved light-dependent control of histone H2B monoubiquitylation in yeast, revealing fast turnover of the ubiquitin mark. Moreover, this inducible system allowed us to dynamically monitor the status of epigenetic modifications dependent on H2B ubiquitylation. PMID:27089030

  1. Discrimination of nuclear spin isomers exploiting the excited state dynamics of a quinodimethane derivative

    SciTech Connect

    Obaid, Rana; Kinzel, Daniel; Oppel, Markus González, Leticia

    2014-10-28

    Despite the concept of nuclear spin isomers (NSIs) exists since the early days of quantum mechanics, only few approaches have been suggested to separate different NSIs. Here, a method is proposed to discriminate different NSIs of a quinodimethane derivative using its electronic excited state dynamics. After electronic excitation by a laser field with femtosecond time duration, a difference in the behavior of several quantum mechanical operators can be observed. A pump-probe experimental approach for separating these different NSIs is then proposed.

  2. Discrimination of nuclear spin isomers exploiting the excited state dynamics of a quinodimethane derivative.

    PubMed

    Obaid, Rana; Kinzel, Daniel; Oppel, Markus; González, Leticia

    2014-10-28

    Despite the concept of nuclear spin isomers (NSIs) exists since the early days of quantum mechanics, only few approaches have been suggested to separate different NSIs. Here, a method is proposed to discriminate different NSIs of a quinodimethane derivative using its electronic excited state dynamics. After electronic excitation by a laser field with femtosecond time duration, a difference in the behavior of several quantum mechanical operators can be observed. A pump-probe experimental approach for separating these different NSIs is then proposed.

  3. Acetylation dynamics of human nuclear proteins during the ionizing radiation-induced DNA damage response.

    PubMed

    Bennetzen, Martin V; Larsen, Dorthe Helena; Dinant, Christoffel; Watanabe, Sugiko; Bartek, Jiri; Lukas, Jiri; Andersen, Jens S

    2013-06-01

    Genotoxic insults, such as ionizing radiation (IR), cause DNA damage that evokes a multifaceted cellular DNA damage response (DDR). DNA damage signaling events that control protein activity, subcellular localization, DNA binding, protein-protein interactions, etc. rely heavily on time-dependent posttranslational modifications (PTMs). To complement our previous analysis of IR-induced temporal dynamics of nuclear phosphoproteome, we now identify a range of human nuclear proteins that are dynamically regulated by acetylation, and predominantly deacetylation, during IR-induced DDR by using mass spectrometry-based proteomic approaches. Apart from cataloging acetylation sites through SILAC proteomic analyses before IR and at 5 and 60 min after IR exposure of U2OS cells, we report that: (1) key components of the transcriptional machinery, such as EP300 and CREBBP, are dynamically acetylated; (2) that nuclear acetyltransferases themselves are regulated, not on the protein abundance level, but by (de)acetylation; and (3) that the recently reported p53 co-activator and methyltransferase MLL3 is acetylated on five lysines during the DDR. For selected examples, protein immunoprecipitation and immunoblotting were used to assess lysine acetylation status and thereby validate the mass spectrometry data. We thus present evidence that nuclear proteins, including those known to regulate cellular functions via epigenetic modifications of histones, are regulated by (de)acetylation in a timely manner upon cell's exposure to genotoxic insults. Overall, these results present a resource of temporal profiles of a spectrum of protein acetylation sites during DDR and provide further insights into the highly dynamic nature of regulatory PTMs that help orchestrate the maintenance of genome integrity.

  4. Oxygen-17 dynamic nuclear polarisation enhanced solid-state NMR spectroscopy at 18.8 T.

    PubMed

    Brownbill, Nick J; Gajan, David; Lesage, Anne; Emsley, Lyndon; Blanc, Frédéric

    2017-02-23

    We report (17)O dynamic nuclear polarisation (DNP) enhanced solid-state NMR experiments at 18.8 T. Several formulations were investigated on the Mg(OH)2 compound. A signal enhancement factor of 17 could be obtained when the solid particles were incorporated into a glassy o-terphenyl matrix doped with BDPA using the Overhauser polarisation transfer scheme whilst the cross effect mechanism enabled by TEKPol yielded a slightly lower enhancement but more time efficient data acquisition.

  5. Electron dynamics upon ionization: Control of the timescale through chemical substitution and effect of nuclear motion

    SciTech Connect

    Vacher, Morgane; Bearpark, Michael J.; Robb, Michael A.; Mendive-Tapia, David

    2015-03-07

    Photoionization can generate a non-stationary electronic state, which leads to coupled electron-nuclear dynamics in molecules. In this article, we choose benzene cation as a prototype because vertical ionization of the neutral species leads to a Jahn-Teller degeneracy between ground and first excited states of the cation. Starting with equal populations of ground and first excited states, there is no electron dynamics in this case. However, if we add methyl substituents that break symmetry but do not radically alter the electronic structure, we see charge migration: oscillations in the spin density that we can correlate with particular localized electronic structures, with a period depending on the gap between the states initially populated. We have also investigated the effect of nuclear motion on electron dynamics using a complete active space self-consistent field (CASSCF) implementation of the Ehrenfest method, most previous theoretical studies of electron dynamics having been carried out with fixed nuclei. In toluene cation for instance, simulations where the nuclei are allowed to move show significant differences in the electron dynamics after 3 fs, compared to simulations with fixed nuclei.

  6. Peopling The American Colonies, Episode III. Resource Material Development: Population Dynamics in Eighth Grade American History.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Massialas, Byron G.; And Others

    This is the third unit in a series that introduces population concepts into the eighth grade American history curriculum. (See SO 013 782 for an overview to the guide.) In Episode III, the history topic is the late colonial periods. Unit objectives are to (1) examine the effects of different lifestyles on population changes in America and England;…

  7. Summary of findings: Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant aquatic monitoring program. Volume III, appendices d-h

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-08-01

    The report includes baseline studies for environmental impacts of Clavert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant construction which is located on the Chesapeake Bay. The appendix summarizes monitoring studies on: benthic invertebrates (including clams, crabs, and oysters); finfish; and ecosystem.

  8. The Planetary Nebula System and Dynamics of NGC 5128. III. Kinematics and Halo Mass Distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hui, Xiaohui; Ford, Holland C.; Freeman, Kenneth C.; Dopita, Michael A.

    1995-08-01

    We present a study of the halo dynamics and mass distributions of the nearby giant elliptical galaxy NGC 5128 using planetary nebulae (PNs) as test particles. Radial velocities of 433 PNs were obtained with multifiber spectrographs on both the Anglo-Australian Telescope (AAT) and the Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory (CTIO) 4 m telescope. The velocities were measured from the [O III] λ5007 emission line with a typical 1 σ error of ±4 km s-1 and ±30 km s-1 for the AAT and the CTIO data, respectively. These PNs cover the entire galaxy to a radius of 10 kpc and extend along the photometric major axis out to 20 kpc. The PN velocity field shows the distinctive characteristics of a triaxial potential: the galaxy's rotation axis is offset from its photometric minor axis by 39°±10°. the rotation axis and the line of maximum rotation are likely not orthogonal. We also find that the ordered motions of the stars become more important with increasing radius compared to their random motions. The rotation reaches approximately 100 km s-1 and 50 km s-1 along the photometric major and minor axes, giving a local V/σ ratio of about 1.0 and 0.5, respectively. The aximuthal variation of the velocity dispersion appears to be modulated by rotation, i.e., it reaches a maximum where the largest rotation is observed and drops to a minimum at zero rotation. The amplitude of this modulation is about 20km s-1, compared to a mean dispersion velocity of 110 km s-1. The kinematics of the globular clusters depend on the metallicity Taking [Fe/H] = -1.0 as the dividing point, the metal-poor clusters do not show any significant rotation. However, the metal-rich clusters show both major and minor axis rotation, and the amplitudes of the rotation are similar to that of the PNs. The stellar velocity dispersion measured from absorption-line spectra together with an Hα rotation curve of the dust lane suggest that the stellar orbits are isotropic and the mass-to-light ratio (M/LB) is 3

  9. Protection of centre spin coherence by dynamic nuclear spin polarization in diamond.

    PubMed

    Liu, Gang-Qin; Jiang, Qian-Qing; Chang, Yan-Chun; Liu, Dong-Qi; Li, Wu-Xia; Gu, Chang-Zhi; Po, Hoi Chun; Zhang, Wen-Xian; Zhao, Nan; Pan, Xin-Yu

    2014-09-07

    We experimentally investigate the protection of electron spin coherence of a nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centre in diamond by dynamic nuclear spin polarization (DNP). The electron spin decoherence of an NV centre is caused by the magnetic field fluctuation of the (13)C nuclear spin bath, which contributes large thermal fluctuation to the centre electron spin when it is in an equilibrium state at room temperature. To address this issue, we continuously transfer the angular momentum from electron spin to nuclear spins, and pump the nuclear spin bath to a polarized state under the Hartmann-Hahn condition. The bath polarization effect is verified by the observation of prolongation of the electron spin coherence time (T). Optimal conditions for the DNP process, including the pumping pulse duration and repeat numbers, are proposed by numerical simulation and confirmed by experiment. We also studied the depolarization effect of laser pulses. Our results provide a new route for quantum information processing and quantum simulation using the polarized nuclear spin bath.

  10. Dynamic nuclear spin polarization in the resonant laser excitation of an InGaAs quantum dot.

    PubMed

    Högele, A; Kroner, M; Latta, C; Claassen, M; Carusotto, I; Bulutay, C; Imamoglu, A

    2012-05-11

    Resonant optical excitation of lowest-energy excitonic transitions in self-assembled quantum dots leads to nuclear spin polarization that is qualitatively different from the well-known optical orientation phenomena. By carrying out a comprehensive set of experiments, we demonstrate that nuclear spin polarization manifests itself in quantum dots subjected to finite external magnetic field as locking of the higher energy Zeeman transition to the driving laser field, as well as the avoidance of the resonance condition for the lower energy Zeeman branch. We interpret our findings on the basis of dynamic nuclear spin polarization originating from noncollinear hyperfine interaction and find excellent agreement between experiment and theory. Our results provide evidence for the significance of noncollinear hyperfine processes not only for nuclear spin diffusion and decay, but also for buildup dynamics of nuclear spin polarization in a coupled electron-nuclear spin system.

  11. A new nuclear magnetic resonance algorithm to determine equilibrium constants of the species in the B(III)-H2O system.

    PubMed

    Botello, J C; Morales-Domínguez, E; Domínguez, J M; Gutiérrez, A; Rojas-Hernández, A; Ramírez, M T

    2003-05-01

    Several efforts have been attempted to study species formation by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) in systems with several chemical equilibria present. The majority of these are qualitative and only a few have tried to relate component fractions of a distribution diagram with experimental area fractions determined from NMR spectra to obtain equilibrium constants values. In this work we present a new focus that attempts to relate the species concentration fractions in the system with area fractions beneath NMR peaks to achieve this task. 11B-NMR data of B(III)-H2O systems have been processed with the aid of formation constant values (-log *beta) obtained by potentiometry which are 9.17+/-0.01 for B(OH)3, 9.79+/-0.08 for B2O(OH)5-, 19.90+/-0.09 for B3O3(OH)4- and 38.50+/-0.04 for B5O6(OH)4-, form B(III)-H2O systems with 0.075 M< or = [B(III)]total< or = 0.700 M, in agreement with previous reports and NMR behavior. The treatment of NMR data developed in this work gives a new methodology to obtain formation constants and suggests the possibility to establish a generalization of Beer's law to NMR spectroscopy.

  12. Taxonomical and functional microbial community dynamics in an Anammox-ASBR system under different Fe (III) supplementation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao; Shu, Duntao; Yue, Hong

    2016-12-01

    In the present study, we explored the metabolic versatility of anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) bacteria in a variety of Fe (III) concentrations. Specifically, we investigated the impacts of Fe (III) on anammox growth rates, on nitrogen removal performance, and on microbial community dynamics. The results from our short-term experiments revealed that Fe (III) concentrations (0.04-0.10 mM) significantly promote the specific anammox growth rate from 0.1343 to 0.1709 d(-1). In the long-term experiments, the Anammox-anaerobic sequencing batch reactor (ASBR) was operated over 120 days and achieved maximum NH4(+)-N, NO2(-)-N, and TN efficiencies of 90.98 ± 0.35, 93.78 ± 0.29, and 83.66 ± 0.46 %, respectively. Pearson's correlation coefficients between anammox-(narG + napA), anammox-nrfA, and anammox-FeRB all exceeded r = 0.820 (p < 0.05), confirming an interaction and ecological association among the nitrogen and iron-cycling-related microbial communities. Illumina MiSeq sequencing indicated that Chloroflexi (34.39-39.31 %) was the most abundant phylum in an Anammox-ASBR system, followed by Planctomycetes (30.73-35.31 %), Proteobacteria (15.40-18.61 %), and Chlorobi (4.78-6.58 %). Furthermore, we found that higher Fe (III) supplementation (>0.06 mM) could result in the community succession of anammox species, in which Candidatus Brocadia and Candidatus Kuenenia were the dominant anammox bacteria species. Combined analyses indicated that the coupling of anammox, dissimilatory nitrogen reduction to ammonium, and iron reduction accounted for nitrogen loss in the Anammox-ASBR system. Overall, the knowledge gained in this study provides novel insights into the microbial community dynamics and metabolic potential of anammox bacteria under Fe (III) supplementation.

  13. Optical Properties of Iridium(III) Cyclometalates: Excited State Interaction with Small Molecules and Dynamics of Light-Harvesting Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwartz, Kyle Robert

    The research presented in this thesis concerns the use and understanding of luminescent Ir(III) cyclometalates. Areas of research involve the design, synthesis, and characterization of novel luminescent Ir(III) cyclometalates, including photophysical investigation of their phosphorescent excited states using steady-state and time resolved absorption/luminescence spectroscopies. This broad research description may be further separated into two subareas: study of excited state interaction with small molecules and excited-state dynamics of metal-organic light harvesting dyads. Interaction of Ir(III) cyclometalates with the small molecule carbon dioxide (CO2) is the subject of Chapter One. Most optical detection schemes previously developed for CO2 use indirect detection methods, which rely upon measuring changes in pH brought about by hydrolysis of CO 2 on of CO2 were accomplished through development of a system where hydrazine, a simple amino ligand, when coupled into the coordination sphere of an Ir(III) cyclometalate reacts with CO2. The result of this reaction provides a shift in the luminescence wavelength, a previously unobserved optical response for CO2 detection. Chapter Two investigates phosphorescent excited states and their ability to function as triplet sensitizers for the generation of singlet oxygen ( 1O2) and luminescent probes for molecular oxygen (O 2) concentration. Interaction of phosphorescent excited states with O2 results in energy transfer from the luminescent probe to O 2, quenching the phosphorescent excited state. Energy transfer also generates the reactive oxygen species (ROS) 1O2. We have used this duality to develop an analytical methodology to follow the serendipitously discovered photoreactivity of 1O2 with common organic solvent dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) using the luminescence profile of Ir(III) and Ru(II) phosphors. In Chapter Three a detailed study involving the design, synthesis, and characterization of the electrochemical and

  14. Nonadiabatic nuclear dynamics of the ammonia cation studied by surface hopping classical trajectory calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Belyaev, Andrey K.; Domcke, Wolfgang; Lasser, Caroline Trigila, Giulio

    2015-03-14

    The Landau–Zener (LZ) type classical-trajectory surface-hopping algorithm is applied to the nonadiabatic nuclear dynamics of the ammonia cation after photoionization of the ground-state neutral molecule to the excited states of the cation. The algorithm employs a recently proposed formula for nonadiabatic LZ transition probabilities derived from the adiabatic potential energy surfaces. The evolution of the populations of the ground state and the two lowest excited adiabatic states is calculated up to 200 fs. The results agree well with quantum simulations available for the first 100 fs based on the same potential energy surfaces. Three different time scales are detected for the nuclear dynamics: Ultrafast Jahn–Teller dynamics between the excited states on a 5 fs time scale; fast transitions between the excited state and the ground state within a time scale of 20 fs; and relatively slow partial conversion of a first-excited-state population to the ground state within a time scale of 100 fs. Beyond 100 fs, the adiabatic electronic populations are nearly constant due to a dynamic equilibrium between the three states. The ultrafast nonradiative decay of the excited-state populations provides a qualitative explanation of the experimental evidence that the ammonia cation is nonfluorescent.

  15. Dynamic Nuclear Polarization and Relaxation of H and D Atoms in Solid Mixtures of Hydrogen Isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheludiakov, S.; Ahokas, J.; Järvinen, J.; Vainio, O.; Lehtonen, L.; Vasiliev, S.; Lee, D. M.; Khmelenko, V. V.

    2017-04-01

    We report on a study of dynamic nuclear polarization and electron and nuclear spin relaxation of atomic hydrogen and deuterium in solid molecular matrices of H2, D2, and HD mixtures. The electron and nuclear spin relaxation times (T_{1e} and T_{1N}) were measured within the temperature range 0.15-2.5 K in a magnetic field of 4.6 T, conditions which ensure a high polarization of electron spins. We found that T_{1e} is nearly temperature independent in this temperature range, while T_{1N} decreased by two orders of magnitude upon raising temperature. Such strong temperature dependence is typical for the nuclear Orbach mechanism of relaxation via the electron spins. We found that the nuclear spins of H atoms in solid D2 and D2{:}HD can be efficiently polarized by the Overhauser effect. Pumping the forbidden transitions of H atoms also leads to DNP, with the efficiency strongly dependent on the concentration of D atoms. This behavior indicates the cross effect mechanism of the DNP and nuclear relaxation, which turns out to be well resolved in the conditions of our experiments. Efficient DNP of H atoms was also observed when pumping the middle D line located in the center of the ESR spectrum. This phenomenon can be explained in terms of clusters or pairs of H atoms with a strong exchange interaction. These clusters have partially allowed transitions in the center of the ESR spectrum, and DNP may be created via the resolved cross effect.

  16. Spent nuclear fuel system dynamic stability under normal conditions of transportation

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Hao; Wang, Jy-An John

    2016-10-14

    In a horizontal layout of a spent nuclear fuel (SNF) assembly under normal conditions of transportation (NCT), the fuel assembly’s skeleton formed by guide tubes and spacer grids is the primary load bearing structure for carrying and transferring the vibration loads within an SNF assembly. Therefore, the integrity of guide tubes and spacer grids will dictate the vibration amplitude/intensity of the fuel assembly during transport, and must be considered when designing multipurpose purpose canister (MPC) for safe SNF transport. This paper investigates the SNF assembly deformation dynamics during normal vibration mode, as well as the transient shock mode inside the cask during NCT. In conclusion, dynamic analyses were performed in the frequency domain to study frequency characteristic of the fuel assembly system and in the time domain to simulate the transient dynamic response of the fuel assembly.

  17. Spent nuclear fuel system dynamic stability under normal conditions of transportation

    DOE PAGES

    Jiang, Hao; Wang, Jy-An John

    2016-10-14

    In a horizontal layout of a spent nuclear fuel (SNF) assembly under normal conditions of transportation (NCT), the fuel assembly’s skeleton formed by guide tubes and spacer grids is the primary load bearing structure for carrying and transferring the vibration loads within an SNF assembly. Therefore, the integrity of guide tubes and spacer grids will dictate the vibration amplitude/intensity of the fuel assembly during transport, and must be considered when designing multipurpose purpose canister (MPC) for safe SNF transport. This paper investigates the SNF assembly deformation dynamics during normal vibration mode, as well as the transient shock mode inside themore » cask during NCT. In conclusion, dynamic analyses were performed in the frequency domain to study frequency characteristic of the fuel assembly system and in the time domain to simulate the transient dynamic response of the fuel assembly.« less

  18. Dynamic Complexity Study of Nuclear Reactor and Process Heat Application Integration

    SciTech Connect

    J'Tia Patrice Taylor; David E. Shropshire

    2009-09-01

    Abstract This paper describes the key obstacles and challenges facing the integration of nuclear reactors with process heat applications as they relate to dynamic issues. The paper also presents capabilities of current modeling and analysis tools available to investigate these issues. A pragmatic approach to an analysis is developed with the ultimate objective of improving the viability of nuclear energy as a heat source for process industries. The extension of nuclear energy to process heat industries would improve energy security and aid in reduction of carbon emissions by reducing demands for foreign derived fossil fuels. The paper begins with an overview of nuclear reactors and process application for potential use in an integrated system. Reactors are evaluated against specific characteristics that determine their compatibility with process applications such as heat outlet temperature. The reactor system categories include light water, heavy water, small to medium, near term high-temperature, and far term high temperature reactors. Low temperature process systems include desalination, district heating, and tar sands and shale oil recovery. High temperature processes that support hydrogen production include steam reforming, steam cracking, hydrogen production by electrolysis, and far-term applications such as the sulfur iodine chemical process and high-temperature electrolysis. A simple static matching between complementary systems is performed; however, to gain a true appreciation for system integration complexity, time dependent dynamic analysis is required. The paper identifies critical issues arising from dynamic complexity associated with integration of systems. Operational issues include scheduling conflicts and resource allocation for heat and electricity. Additionally, economic and safety considerations that could impact the successful integration of these systems are considered. Economic issues include the cost differential arising due to an integrated

  19. Dynamic Nuclear Polarization in Samarium Doped Lanthanum Magnesium Nitrate. Ph.D. Thesis - Va. Polytechnic Inst.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byvik, C. E.

    1971-01-01

    The dynamic nuclear polarization of hydrogen nuclei by the solid effect in single crystals of samarium doped lanthanum magnesium nitrate (Sm:LMN) was studied theoretically and experimentally. The equations of evolution governing the dynamic nuclear polarization by the solid effect were derived in detail using the spin temperature theory and the complete expression for the steady state enhancement of the nuclear polarization was calculated. Experimental enhancements of the proton polarization were obtained for eight crystals at 9.2 GHz and liquid helium temperatures. The samarium concentration ranged from 0.1 percent to 1.1 percent as determined by X-ray fluorescence. A peak enhancement of 181 was measured for a 1.1 percent Sm:LMN crystal at 3.0 K. The maximum enhancements extrapolated with the theory using the experimental data for peak enhancement versus microwave power and correcting for leakage, agree with the ideal enhancement (240 in this experiment) within experimental error for three of the crystals.

  20. Nuclear dynamics during germination, conidiation, and hyphal fusion of Fusarium oxysporum.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Roldán, M Carmen; Köhli, Michael; Roncero, M Isabel G; Philippsen, Peter; Di Pietro, Antonio; Espeso, Eduardo A

    2010-08-01

    In many fungal pathogens, infection is initiated by conidial germination. Subsequent stages involve germ tube elongation, conidiation, and vegetative hyphal fusion (anastomosis). Here, we used live-cell fluorescence to study the dynamics of green fluorescent protein (GFP)- and cherry fluorescent protein (ChFP)-labeled nuclei in the plant pathogen Fusarium oxysporum. Hyphae of F. oxysporum have uninucleated cells and exhibit an acropetal nuclear pedigree, where only the nucleus in the apical compartment is mitotically active. In contrast, conidiation follows a basopetal pattern, whereby mononucleated microconidia are generated by repeated mitotic cycles of the subapical nucleus in the phialide, followed by septation and cell abscission. Vegetative hyphal fusion is preceded by directed growth of the fusion hypha toward the receptor hypha and followed by a series of postfusion nuclear events, including mitosis of the apical nucleus of the fusion hypha, migration of a daughter nucleus into the receptor hypha, and degradation of the resident nucleus. These previously unreported patterns of nuclear dynamics in F. oxysporum could be intimately related to its pathogenic lifestyle.

  1. Dynamic nuclear polarization via thermal mixing: Beyond the high temperature approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wenckebach, W. Th.

    2017-04-01

    Dynamic Nuclear Polarization (DNP) via the mechanism of thermal mixing has proven itself most powerful for the orientation of nuclear spins in polarized targets and hyperpolarization for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Unfortunately, theoretical descriptions of this mechanism have been limited to using-at least partially-the high temperature approximation, in which Boltzmann factors are expanded linearly. However, the high nuclear spin polarization required and obtained for these applications does not justify such approximations. This article extends the description of thermal mixing beyond the high temperature approximation, so Boltzmann factors are not expanded. It applies for DNP in samples doped with paramagnetic centres, for which the electron spin resonance spectrum is mainly inhomogeneously broadened by g-value anisotropy. It verifies Provotorov's hypothesis that fast spectral diffusion leads to a density matrix containing two inverse spin temperatures: the inverse electron Zeeman temperature and the inverse electron non-Zeeman temperature, while thermal mixing equalizes the nuclear Zeeman temperature and the electron non-Zeeman temperature. Equations are derived for the evolution of these temperatures and the energy flows between the spins and the lattice. Solutions are given for DNP of proton spins in samples doped with the radical TEMPO.

  2. Dynamic nuclear spin polarization of liquids and gases in contact with nanostructured diamond.

    PubMed

    Abrams, Daniel; Trusheim, Matthew E; Englund, Dirk R; Shattuck, Mark D; Meriles, Carlos A

    2014-05-14

    Optical pumping of spin polarization can produce almost complete spin order but its application is restricted to select atomic gases and condensed matter systems. Here, we theoretically investigate a novel route to nuclear spin hyperpolarization in arbitrary fluids in which target molecules are exposed to polarized paramagnetic centers located near the surface of a host material. We find that adsorbed nuclear spins relax to positive or negative polarization depending on the average paramagnetic center depth and nanoscale surface topology. For the particular case of optically pumped nitrogen-vacancy centers in diamond, we calculate strong nuclear spin polarization at moderate magnetic fields provided the crystal surface is engineered with surface roughness in the few-nanometer range. The equilibrium nuclear spin temperature depends only weakly on the correlation time describing the molecular adsorption dynamics and is robust in the presence of other, unpolarized paramagnetic centers. These features could be exploited to polarize flowing liquids or gases, as we illustrate numerically for the model case of a fluid brought in contact with an optically pumped diamond nanostructure.

  3. Relevance of electron spin dissipative processes to dynamic nuclear polarization via thermal mixing.

    PubMed

    Serra, Sonia Colombo; Filibian, Marta; Carretta, Pietro; Rosso, Alberto; Tedoldi, Fabio

    2014-01-14

    The available theoretical approaches aiming at describing Dynamic Nuclear spin Polarization (DNP) in solutions containing molecules of biomedical interest and paramagnetic centers are not able to model the behaviour observed upon varying the concentration of trityl radicals or the polarization enhancement caused by moderate addition of gadolinium complexes. In this manuscript, we first show experimentally that the nuclear steady state polarization reached in solutions of pyruvic acid with 15 mM trityl radicals is substantially independent on the average internuclear distance. This evidences a leading role of electron (over nuclear) spin relaxation processes in determining the ultimate performances of DNP. Accordingly, we have devised a variant of the Thermal Mixing model for inhomogenously broadened electron resonance lines which includes a relaxation term describing the exchange of magnetic anisotropy energy of the electron spin system with the lattice. Thanks to this additional term, the dependence of the nuclear polarization on the electron concentration can be properly accounted for. Moreover, the model predicts a strong increase of the final polarization upon shortening the electron spin-lattice relaxation time, providing a possible explanation for the effect of gadolinium doping.

  4. Theoretical aspects of dynamic nuclear polarization in the solid state - The solid effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hovav, Yonatan; Feintuch, Akiva; Vega, Shimon

    2010-12-01

    Dynamic nuclear polarization has gained high popularity in recent years, due to advances in the experimental aspects of this methodology for increasing the NMR and MRI signals of relevant chemical and biological compounds. The DNP mechanism relies on the microwave (MW) irradiation induced polarization transfer from unpaired electrons to the nuclei in a sample. In this publication we present nuclear polarization enhancements of model systems in the solid state at high magnetic fields. These results were obtained by numerical calculations based on the spin density operator formalism. Here we restrict ourselves to samples with low electron concentrations, where the dipolar electron-electron interactions can be ignored. Thus the DNP enhancement of the polarizations of the nuclei close to the electrons is described by the Solid Effect mechanism. Our numerical results demonstrate the dependence of the polarization enhancement on the MW irradiation power and frequency, the hyperfine and nuclear dipole-dipole spin interactions, and the relaxation parameters of the system. The largest spin system considered in this study contains one electron and eight nuclei. In particular, we discuss the influence of the nuclear concentration and relaxation on the polarization of the core nuclei, which are coupled to an electron, and are responsible for the transfer of polarization to the bulk nuclei in the sample via spin diffusion.

  5. Dynamic nuclear polarization via thermal mixing: Beyond the high temperature approximation.

    PubMed

    Wenckebach, W Th

    2017-04-01

    Dynamic Nuclear Polarization (DNP) via the mechanism of thermal mixing has proven itself most powerful for the orientation of nuclear spins in polarized targets and hyperpolarization for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Unfortunately, theoretical descriptions of this mechanism have been limited to using-at least partially-the high temperature approximation, in which Boltzmann factors are expanded linearly. However, the high nuclear spin polarization required and obtained for these applications does not justify such approximations. This article extends the description of thermal mixing beyond the high temperature approximation, so Boltzmann factors are not expanded. It applies for DNP in samples doped with paramagnetic centres, for which the electron spin resonance spectrum is mainly inhomogeneously broadened by g-value anisotropy. It verifies Provotorov's hypothesis that fast spectral diffusion leads to a density matrix containing two inverse spin temperatures: the inverse electron Zeeman temperature and the inverse electron non-Zeeman temperature, while thermal mixing equalizes the nuclear Zeeman temperature and the electron non-Zeeman temperature. Equations are derived for the evolution of these temperatures and the energy flows between the spins and the lattice. Solutions are given for DNP of proton spins in samples doped with the radical TEMPO.

  6. Quantitative rate determination by dynamic nuclear polarization enhanced NMR of a Diels-Alder reaction.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Haifeng; Lee, Youngbok; Hilty, Christian

    2010-11-01

    Emerging techniques for hyperpolarization of nuclear spins, foremost dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP), lend unprecedented sensitivity to nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Sufficient signal can be obtained from a single scan, and reactions even far from equilibrium can be studied in real-time. When following the progress of a reaction by nuclear magnetic resonance, however, spin relaxation occurs concomitantly with the reaction to alter resonance line intensities. Here, we present a model for accounting for spin-relaxation in such reactions studied by hyperpolarized NMR. The model takes into account auto- and cross-relaxation in dipole-dipole coupled spin systems and is therefore applicable to NMR of hyperpolarized protons, the most abundant NMR-active nuclei. Applied to the Diels-Alder reaction of 1,4-dipheneylbutadiene (DPBD) with 4-phenyl-1,2,4-triazole-3,5-dione (PTD), reaction rates could be obtained accurately and reproducibly. Additional parameters available from the same experiment include relaxation rates of the reaction product, which may yield further information about the molecular properties of the product. The method presented is also compatible with an experiment where a single spin in the reactant is labeled in its spin-state by a selective radio frequency pulse for subsequent tracking through the reaction, allowing the unambiguous identification of its position in the product molecule. In this case, the chemical shift specificity of high-resolution NMR can allow for the simultaneous determination of reaction rates and mechanistic information in one experiment.

  7. Chromatin Dynamics in Interphase Nuclei and Its Implications for Nuclear Structure

    PubMed Central

    Abney, James R.; Cutler, Bryan; Fillbach, Misty L.; Axelrod, Daniel; Scalettar, Bethe A.

    1997-01-01

    Translational dynamics of chromatin in interphase nuclei of living Swiss 3T3 and HeLa cells was studied using fluorescence microscopy and fluorescence recovery after photobleaching. Chromatin was fluorescently labeled using dihydroethidium, a membrane-permeant derivative of ethidium bromide. After labeling, a laser was used to bleach small (∼0.4 μm radius) spots in the heterochromatin and euchromatin of cells of both types. These spots were observed to persist for >1 h, implying that interphase chromatin is immobile over distance scales ⩾0.4 μm. Over very short times (<1 s), a partial fluorescence recovery within the spots was observed. This partial recovery is attributed to independent dye motion, based on comparison with results obtained using ethidium homodimer-1, which binds essentially irreversibly to nucleic acids. The immobility observed here is consistent with chromosome confinement to domains in interphase nuclei. This immobility may reflect motion-impeding steric interactions that arise in the highly concentrated nuclear milieu or outright attachment of the chromatin to underlying nuclear substructures, such as nucleoli, the nuclear lamina, or the nuclear matrix. PMID:9199163

  8. Dynamic nuclear polarization in solid samples by electrical-discharge-induced radicals.

    PubMed

    Katz, Itai; Blank, Aharon

    2015-12-01

    Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) is a method for enhancing nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signals that has many potential applications in chemistry and medicine. Traditionally, DNP signal enhancement is achieved through the use of exogenous radicals mixed in a solution with the molecules of interest. Here we show that proton DNP signal enhancements can be obtained for solid samples without the use of solvent and exogenous radicals. Radicals are generated primarily on the surface of a solid sample using electrical discharges. These radicals are found suitable for DNP. They are stable under moderate vacuum conditions, yet readily annihilate upon compound dissolution or air exposure. This feature makes them attractive for use in medical applications, where the current variety of radicals used for DNP faces regulatory problems. In addition, this solvent-free method may be found useful for analytical NMR of solid samples which cannot tolerate solvents, such as certain pharmaceutical products.

  9. Dynamic nuclear polarization in solid samples by electrical-discharge-induced radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katz, Itai; Blank, Aharon

    2015-12-01

    Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) is a method for enhancing nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signals that has many potential applications in chemistry and medicine. Traditionally, DNP signal enhancement is achieved through the use of exogenous radicals mixed in a solution with the molecules of interest. Here we show that proton DNP signal enhancements can be obtained for solid samples without the use of solvent and exogenous radicals. Radicals are generated primarily on the surface of a solid sample using electrical discharges. These radicals are found suitable for DNP. They are stable under moderate vacuum conditions, yet readily annihilate upon compound dissolution or air exposure. This feature makes them attractive for use in medical applications, where the current variety of radicals used for DNP faces regulatory problems. In addition, this solvent-free method may be found useful for analytical NMR of solid samples which cannot tolerate solvents, such as certain pharmaceutical products.

  10. The magnetic field dependence of cross-effect dynamic nuclear polarization under magic angle spinning

    SciTech Connect

    Mance, Deni; Baldus, Marc; Gast, Peter; Huber, Martina; Ivanov, Konstantin L.

    2015-06-21

    We develop a theoretical description of Dynamic Nuclear Polarization (DNP) in solids under Magic Angle Spinning (MAS) to describe the magnetic field dependence of the DNP effect. The treatment is based on an efficient scheme for numerical solution of the Liouville-von Neumann equation, which explicitly takes into account the variation of magnetic interactions during the sample spinning. The dependence of the cross-effect MAS-DNP on various parameters, such as the hyperfine interaction, electron-electron dipolar interaction, microwave field strength, and electron spin relaxation rates, is analyzed. Electron spin relaxation rates are determined by electron paramagnetic resonance measurements, and calculations are compared to experimental data. Our results suggest that the observed nuclear magnetic resonance signal enhancements provided by MAS-DNP can be explained by discriminating between “bulk” and “core” nuclei and by taking into account the slow DNP build-up rate for the bulk nuclei.

  11. Hyperpolarization of Frozen Hydrocarbon Gases by Dynamic Nuclear Polarization at 1.2 K.

    PubMed

    Vuichoud, Basile; Canet, Estel; Milani, Jonas; Bornet, Aurélien; Baudouin, David; Veyre, Laurent; Gajan, David; Emsley, Lyndon; Lesage, Anne; Copéret, Christophe; Thieuleux, Chloé; Bodenhausen, Geoffrey; Koptyug, Igor; Jannin, Sami

    2016-08-18

    We report a simple and general method for the hyperpolarization of condensed gases by dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP). The gases are adsorbed in the pores of structured mesoporous silica matrices known as HYPSOs (HYper Polarizing SOlids) that have paramagnetic polarizing agents covalently bound to the surface of the mesopores. DNP is performed at low temperatures and moderate magnetic fields (T = 1.2 K and B0 = 6.7 T). Frequency-modulated microwave irradiation is applied close to the electron spin resonance frequency (f = 188.3 GHz), and the electron spin polarization of the polarizing agents of HYPSO is transferred to the nuclear spins of the frozen gas. A proton polarization as high as P((1)H) = 70% can be obtained, which can be subsequently transferred to (13)C in natural abundance by cross-polarization, yielding up to P((13)C) = 27% for ethylene.

  12. Principles of chromatin organization in yeast: relevance of polymer models to describe nuclear organization and dynamics.

    PubMed

    Wang, Renjie; Mozziconacci, Julien; Bancaud, Aurélien; Gadal, Olivier

    2015-06-01

    Nuclear organization can impact on all aspects of the genome life cycle. This organization is thoroughly investigated by advanced imaging and chromosome conformation capture techniques, providing considerable amount of datasets describing the spatial organization of chromosomes. In this review, we will focus on polymer models to describe chromosome statics and dynamics in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We suggest that the equilibrium configuration of a polymer chain tethered at both ends and placed in a confined volume is consistent with the current literature, implying that local chromatin interactions play a secondary role in yeast nuclear organization. Future challenges are to reach an integrated multi-scale description of yeast chromosome organization, which is crucially needed to improve our understanding of the regulation of genomic transaction.

  13. Alignment dependent ultrafast electron-nuclear dynamics in molecular high-order harmonic generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Mu-Zi; Jia, Guang-Rui; Bian, Xue-Bin

    2017-02-01

    We investigated the high-order harmonic generation (HHG) process of diatomic molecular ion H2+ in non-Born-Oppenheimer approximations (NBOA). The corresponding three-dimensional time-dependent Schrödinger equation is solved with arbitrary alignment angles. It is found that the nuclear motion can lead to spectral modulation of HHG in both the tunneling and multiphoton ionization regimes. The universal redshifts of the whole spectrum are unique in molecular HHG. The spectral width of HHG increases in NBOA. We calculated possible influences on redshifts of HHG in real experimental conditions and found that redshifts decrease with the increase of alignment angles of the molecules and are sensitive to the initial vibrational states. It can be used to extract the ultrafast electron-nuclear dynamics and image molecular structure. It will be instructive to related experiments.

  14. Magnetization Dynamics Changes of Dysprosium(III) Single-Ion Magnets Associated with Guest Molecules.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Sheng; Ke, Hongshan; Sun, Lin; Li, Xin; Shi, Quan; Xie, Gang; Wei, Qing; Yang, Desuo; Wang, Wenyuan; Chen, Sanping

    2016-04-18

    Two Dy(III) single-ion magnets with a trigonal dodecahedron (D2d) for 1 and an approximately square-antiprismatic (SAP, D4d) N2O6 coordination environment for 2, formulated as [Dy(Phen)(tfmb)3] (1) and [Dy(Phen)(tfmb)3]·0.5(1,4-dioxane) (2) (tfmb = 4,4,4-trifluoro-1-(4-methylphenyl)-1,3-butanedione, Phen = 1,10-phenanthroline), were obtained. Therein, complex 1 was transformed to 2 in 1,4-dioxane solution. Structural analysis shows that complexes 1 and 2 have differing local symmetry of Dy(III) ions. Magnetic studies indicate that the barrier heights (ΔE/kB) of 1 and 2 are 63.56 and 102.82 K under zero dc field as well as 118.50 and 164.55 K under 1200 Oe dc field, respectively. Based on the frequency dependencies of the ac susceptibilities, the effective barriers (ΔE/kB) and the pre-exponential factors (τ0) are 67.05 K and 4.57 × 10(-6) s for 1 and 95.88 K and 2.39 × 10(-7) s for 2 under zero dc field. The present work illustrates that guest-determined notable structure change results in different barrier heights.

  15. Theoretical methods for attosecond electron and nuclear dynamics: applications to the H2 molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palacios, Alicia; Sanz-Vicario, José Luis; Martín, Fernando

    2015-12-01

    Attosecond science, born at the beginning of this century with the generation of the first bursts of light with durations shorter than a femtosecond, has opened the way to look at electron dynamics in atoms and molecules at its natural timescale. Thus controlling chemical reactions at the electronic level or obtaining time-resolved images of the electronic motion has become a goal for many physics and chemistry laboratories all over the world. The new experimental capabilities have spurred the development of sophisticated theoretical methods that can accurately predict phenomena occurring in the sub-fs timescale. This review provides an overview of the capabilities of existing theoretical tools to describe electron and nuclear dynamics resulting from the interaction of femto- and attosecond UV/XUV radiation with simple molecular targets. We describe one of these methods in more detail, the time-dependent Feshbach close-coupling (TDFCC) formalism, which has been used successfully over the years to investigate various attosecond phenomena in the hydrogen molecule and can easily be extended to other diatomics. In addition to describing the details of the method and discussing its advantages and limitations, we also provide examples of the new physics that one can learn by applying it to different problems: from the study of the autoionization decay that follows attosecond UV excitation to the imaging of the coupled electron and nuclear dynamics in H2 using different UV-pump/IR-probe and UV-pump/UV-probe schemes.

  16. FOREWORD: International Summer School for Advanced Studies 'Dynamics of open nuclear systems' (PREDEAL12)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delion, D. S.; Zamfir, N. V.; Raduta, A. R.; Gulminelli, F.

    2013-02-01

    This proceedings volume contains the invited lectures and contributions presented at the International Summer School on Nuclear Physics held at Trei Brazi, a summer resort of the Bioterra University, near the city of Predeal, Romania, on 9-20 July 2012. The long tradition of International Summer Schools on Nuclear Physics in Romania dates as far back as 1964, with the event being scheduled every two years. During this period of almost 50 years, many outstanding nuclear scientists have lectured on various topics related to nuclear physics and particle physics. This year we celebrate the 80th birthday of Aureliu Sandulescu, one of the founders of the Romanian school of theoretical nuclear physics. He was Serban Titeica's PhD student, one of Werner Heisenberg's PhD students, and he organized the first edition of this event. Aureliu Sandulescu's major contributions to the field of theoretical nuclear physics are related in particular to the prediction of cluster radioactivity, the physics of open quantum systems and the innovative technique of detecting superheavy nuclei using the double magic projectile 48Ca (Calcium), nowadays a widely used method at the JINR—Dubna and GSI—Darmstadt laboratories. The title of the event, 'Dynamics of Open Nuclear Systems', is in recognition of Aureliu Sandulescu's great personality. The lectures were attended by Romanian and foreign Master and PhD students and young researchers in nuclear physics. About 25 reputable professors and researchers in nuclear physics delivered lectures during this period. According to a well-established tradition, an interval of two hours was allotted for each lecture (including discussions). Therefore we kept a balance between the school and conference format. Two lectures were held during the morning and afternoon sessions. After lecture sessions, three or four oral contributions were given by young scientists. This was a good opportunity for them to present the results of their research in front of

  17. FINESSE: study of the issues, experiments and facilities for fusion nuclear technology research and development. Interim report. Volume III

    SciTech Connect

    Abdou, M.

    1984-10-01

    This chapter deals with the analysis and engineering scaling of solid breeded blankets. The limits under which full component behavior can be achieved under changed test conditions are explored. The characterization of these test requirements for integrated testing contributes to the overall test matrix and test plan for the understanding and development of fusion nuclear technology. The second chapter covers the analysis and engineering scaling of liquid metal blankets. The testing goals for a complete blanket program are described. (MOW)

  18. Maintenance Welding in Nuclear Power Plants/III, Conference Proceedings Held at Knoxville, Tennessee on 6-8 November 1985

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-11-06

    4 used in this experimental program. The power source is an Osaka Transformer Corporation (OTC) Transistarc 350 which uses frequency modulation to...m .~- IwLio(Lw U wU 7,e Al 192MI 77ŗ aR APPLICATIOlS OF KIPLOSIVE V=D= J. Wayne Schroeder Foster Wheeler Development Corporation Wylie S...primarily for welding tubes to nuclear condenser tubesheets. EPRI contracted the devel- opment to Lockheed Missiles and Space Corporation . Aside from

  19. Autophagy contributes to regulation of nuclear dynamics during vegetative growth and hyphal fusion in Fusarium oxysporum.

    PubMed

    Corral-Ramos, Cristina; Roca, M Gabriela; Di Pietro, Antonio; Roncero, M Isabel G; Ruiz-Roldán, Carmen

    2015-01-01

    In the fungal pathogen Fusarium oxysporum, vegetative hyphal fusion triggers nuclear mitotic division in the invading hypha followed by migration of a nucleus into the receptor hypha and degradation of the resident nucleus. Here we examined the role of autophagy in fusion-induced nuclear degradation. A search of the F. oxysporum genome database for autophagy pathway components identified putative orthologs of 16 core autophagy-related (ATG) genes in yeast, including the ubiquitin-like protein Atg8, which is required for the formation of autophagosomal membranes. F. oxysporum Foatg8Δ mutants were generated in a strain harboring H1-cherry fluorescent protein (ChFP)-labeled nuclei to facilitate analysis of nuclear dynamics. The Foatg8Δ mutants did not show MDC-positive staining in contrast to the wild type and the FoATG8-complemented (cFoATG8) strain, suggesting that FoAtg8 is required for autophagy in F. oxysporum. The Foatg8Δ strains displayed reduced rates of hyphal growth, conidiation, and fusion, and were significantly attenuated in virulence on tomato plants and in the nonvertebrate animal host Galleria mellonella. In contrast to wild-type hyphae, which are almost exclusively composed of uninucleated hyphal compartments, the hyphae of the Foatg8Δ mutants contained a significant fraction of hyphal compartments with 2 or more nuclei. The increase in the number of nuclei per hyphal compartment was particularly evident after hyphal fusion events. Time-lapse microscopy analyses revealed abnormal mitotic patterns during vegetative growth in the Foatg8Δ mutants. Our results suggest that autophagy mediates nuclear degradation after hyphal fusion and has a general function in the control of nuclear distribution in F. oxysporum.

  20. Ettingshausen Effect around a Landau Level Filling Factor ν=3 Studied by Dynamic Nuclear Polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komori, Yosuke; Sakuma, Satoru; Okamoto, Tohru

    2007-10-01

    A spin current perpendicular to the electric current is investigated around a Landau level filling factor ν=3 in a GaAs/AlGaAs two-dimensional electron system. Measurements of dynamic nuclear polarization in the vicinity of the edge of a specially designed Hall bar sample indicate that the direction of the spin current with respect to the Hall electric field reverses its polarity at ν=3, where the dissipative current carried by holes in the spin up Landau level is replaced with that by electrons in the spin down Landau level.

  1. Chemistry and biochemistry of 13C hyperpolarized magnetic resonance using dynamic nuclear polarization

    PubMed Central

    Keshari, Kayvan R.; Wilson, David M.

    2014-01-01

    The study of transient chemical phenomena by conventional NMR has proved elusive, particularly for non-1H nuclei. For 13C, hyperpolarization using the dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) technique has emerged as a powerful means to improve SNR. The recent development of rapid dissolution DNP methods has facilitated previously impossible in vitro and in vivo study of small molecules. This review presents the basics of the DNP technique, identification of appropriate DNP substrates, and approaches to increase hyperpolarized signal lifetimes. Also addressed are the biochemical events to which DNP-NMR has been applied, with descriptions of several probes that have met with in vivo success. PMID:24363044

  2. Dynamic nuclear polarization of membrane proteins: covalently bound spin-labels at protein-protein interfaces.

    PubMed

    Wylie, Benjamin J; Dzikovski, Boris G; Pawsey, Shane; Caporini, Marc; Rosay, Melanie; Freed, Jack H; McDermott, Ann E

    2015-04-01

    We demonstrate that dynamic nuclear polarization of membrane proteins in lipid bilayers may be achieved using a novel polarizing agent: pairs of spin labels covalently bound to a protein of interest interacting at an intermolecular interaction surface. For gramicidin A, nitroxide tags attached to the N-terminal intermolecular interface region become proximal only when bimolecular channels forms in the membrane. We obtained signal enhancements of sixfold for the dimeric protein. The enhancement effect was comparable to that of a doubly tagged sample of gramicidin C, with intramolecular spin pairs. This approach could be a powerful and selective means for signal enhancement in membrane proteins, and for recognizing intermolecular interfaces.

  3. Instrumentation for solid-state dynamic nuclear polarization with magic angle spinning NMR.

    PubMed

    Rosay, Melanie; Blank, Monica; Engelke, Frank

    2016-03-01

    Advances in dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) instrumentation and methodology have been key factors in the recent growth of solid-state DNP NMR applications. We review the current state of the art of solid-state DNP NMR instrumentation primarily based on available commercial platforms. We start with a general system overview, including options for microwave sources and DNP NMR probes, and then focus on specific developments for DNP at 100K with magic angle spinning (MAS). Gyrotron microwave sources, passive components to transmit microwaves, the DNP MAS probe, a cooling device for low-temperature MAS, and sample preparation procedures including radicals for DNP are considered.

  4. Instrumentation for solid-state dynamic nuclear polarization with magic angle spinning NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosay, Melanie; Blank, Monica; Engelke, Frank

    2016-03-01

    Advances in dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) instrumentation and methodology have been key factors in the recent growth of solid-state DNP NMR applications. We review the current state of the art of solid-state DNP NMR instrumentation primarily based on available commercial platforms. We start with a general system overview, including options for microwave sources and DNP NMR probes, and then focus on specific developments for DNP at 100 K with magic angle spinning (MAS). Gyrotron microwave sources, passive components to transmit microwaves, the DNP MAS probe, a cooling device for low-temperature MAS, and sample preparation procedures including radicals for DNP are considered.

  5. Dynamic nuclear polarization NMR spectroscopy allows high-throughput characterization of microporous organic polymers.

    PubMed

    Blanc, Frédéric; Chong, Samantha Y; McDonald, Tom O; Adams, Dave J; Pawsey, Shane; Caporini, Marc A; Cooper, Andrew I

    2013-10-16

    Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) solid-state NMR was used to obtain natural abundance (13)C and (15)N CP MAS NMR spectra of microporous organic polymers with excellent signal-to-noise ratio, allowing for unprecedented details in the molecular structure to be determined for these complex polymer networks. Sensitivity enhancements larger than 10 were obtained with bis-nitroxide radical at 14.1 T and low temperature (∼105 K). This DNP MAS NMR approach allows efficient, high-throughput characterization of libraries of porous polymers prepared by combinatorial chemistry methods.

  6. Dynamics of Langmuir and ion-sound waves in type III solar radio sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, P. A.; Willes, A. J.; Cairns, I. H.

    1993-01-01

    The study traces the evolution of Langmuir and ion-sound waves in type III sources, incorporating linear growth, linear damping, and nonlinear electrostatic decay. Improved estimates are obtained for the wavenumber range of growing waves and the nonlinear coupling coefficient for the decay process. It is shown that the conditions in the solar wind do not allow a steady state to be attained; instead, bursty linear and nonlinear interactions take place, consistent with the highly inhomogeneous and impulsive waves actually observed. Nonlinear growth is found to be rapid enough to saturate the growth of the parent Langmuir waves in the available interaction time. The competing processes of nonlinear wave collapse and quasi-linear relaxation are discussed, and it is concluded that neither is responsible for the saturation of Langmuir growth.

  7. Dynamics of Wet Oxidation of High-AL-Content III-V Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Ashby, C.I.H.

    1999-01-27

    Oxidation of layers of high-Al-content III-V materials by water vapor has become the enabling process for high-efficiency vertical cavity surface emitting lasers (VCSELS) and has potential applications for reducing substrate current leakage in GaAs-on-insulator (GOI) MESFETS. Because of the established importance of wet oxidation in optoelectronic devices and its potential applications in electronic devices, it has become increasingly important to understand the mechanism of wet oxidation and how it might be expected to affect both the fabrication and subsequent operation of devices that have been made using this technique. The mechanism of wet oxidation and the consequence of this mechanism for heterostructure design and ultimate device operation are discussed here.

  8. Dynamics of water-alcohol mixtures: Insights from nuclear magnetic resonance, broadband dielectric spectroscopy, and triplet solvation dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Sauer, D.; Schuster, B.; Rosenstihl, M.; Schneider, S.; Blochowicz, T.; Stühn, B.; Vogel, M.; Talluto, V.; Walther, T.

    2014-03-21

    We combine {sup 2}H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), broadband dielectric spectroscopy (BDS), and triplet solvation dynamics (TSD) to investigate molecular dynamics in glass-forming mixtures of water and propylene glycol in very broad time and temperature ranges. All methods yield consistent results for the α process of the studied mixtures, which hardly depends on the composition and shows Vogel-Fulcher temperature dependence as well as Cole-Davidson spectral shape. The good agreement between BDS and TDS data reveals that preferential solvation of dye molecules in microheterogeneous mixtures does not play an important role. Below the glass transition temperature T{sub g}, NMR and BDS studies reveal that the β process of the mixtures shows correlation times, which depend on the water concentration, but exhibit a common temperature dependence, obeying an Arrhenius law with an activation energy of E{sub a} = 0.54  eV, as previously reported for mixtures of water with various molecular species. Detailed comparison of NMR and BDS correlation functions for the β process unravels that the former decay faster and more stretched than the latter. Moreover, the present NMR data imply that propylene glycol participates in the β process and, hence, it is not a pure water process, and that the mechanism for molecular dynamics underlying the β process differs in mixtures of water with small and large molecules.

  9. Dynamics of water-alcohol mixtures: Insights from nuclear magnetic resonance, broadband dielectric spectroscopy, and triplet solvation dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauer, D.; Schuster, B.; Rosenstihl, M.; Schneider, S.; Talluto, V.; Walther, T.; Blochowicz, T.; Stühn, B.; Vogel, M.

    2014-03-01

    We combine 2H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), broadband dielectric spectroscopy (BDS), and triplet solvation dynamics (TSD) to investigate molecular dynamics in glass-forming mixtures of water and propylene glycol in very broad time and temperature ranges. All methods yield consistent results for the α process of the studied mixtures, which hardly depends on the composition and shows Vogel-Fulcher temperature dependence as well as Cole-Davidson spectral shape. The good agreement between BDS and TDS data reveals that preferential solvation of dye molecules in microheterogeneous mixtures does not play an important role. Below the glass transition temperature Tg, NMR and BDS studies reveal that the β process of the mixtures shows correlation times, which depend on the water concentration, but exhibit a common temperature dependence, obeying an Arrhenius law with an activation energy of Ea = 0.54 eV, as previously reported for mixtures of water with various molecular species. Detailed comparison of NMR and BDS correlation functions for the β process unravels that the former decay faster and more stretched than the latter. Moreover, the present NMR data imply that propylene glycol participates in the β process and, hence, it is not a pure water process, and that the mechanism for molecular dynamics underlying the β process differs in mixtures of water with small and large molecules.

  10. Effect of tacticity on the segmental dynamics of polypropylene melts investigated by 13C nuclear magnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lippow, S. M.; Qiu, XiaoHua; Ediger, M. D.

    2001-09-01

    13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) T1 and nuclear Overhauser effect measurements are reported for syndiotactic and isotactic polypropylene from their melting points to 525 K. These results indicate that the segmental dynamics of syndiotactic polypropylene are 1.7 times slower than for isotactic polypropylene at 500 K. Recent molecular dynamics computer simulations [Antoniadis, Samara, and Theodorou, Macromolecules 32, 8635 (1999)] predict this trend qualitatively but predict too large a dependence of dynamics upon tacticity. The contribution of normal mode relaxation to the decay of the C-H vector autocorrelation function is significantly larger for syndiotactic polypropylene than for either isotactic or atactic polypropylene.

  11. Dynamic characteristics of peripheral jet ACV. III - Coupling motion of heaving and pitching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, T.; Maeda, H.

    The paper presents the dynamic characteristics of peripheral jet ACV (Air Cushion Vehicle) which has two degrees of freedom, i.e., heaving and pitching motion. The experiments are carried out for an ACV model, noting that the experimental results agree considerably with the analytical values. Furthermore, the response characteristics of ACV induced by the ground board oscillations of various modes are also investigated.

  12. Predicted spatio-temporal dynamics of radiocesium deposited onto forests following the Fukushima nuclear accident

    PubMed Central

    Hashimoto, Shoji; Matsuura, Toshiya; Nanko, Kazuki; Linkov, Igor; Shaw, George; Kaneko, Shinji

    2013-01-01

    The majority of the area contaminated by the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant accident is covered by forest. To facilitate effective countermeasure strategies to mitigate forest contamination, we simulated the spatio-temporal dynamics of radiocesium deposited into Japanese forest ecosystems in 2011 using a model that was developed after the Chernobyl accident in 1986. The simulation revealed that the radiocesium inventories in tree and soil surface organic layer components drop rapidly during the first two years after the fallout. Over a period of one to two years, the radiocesium is predicted to move from the tree and surface organic soil to the mineral soil, which eventually becomes the largest radiocesium reservoir within forest ecosystems. Although the uncertainty of our simulations should be considered, the results provide a basis for understanding and anticipating the future dynamics of radiocesium in Japanese forests following the Fukushima accident. PMID:23995073

  13. Time-Domain Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Investigation of Water Dynamics in Different Ginger Cultivars.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chongyang; Zhou, Qi; Gao, Shan; Bao, Qingjia; Chen, Fang; Liu, Chaoyang

    2016-01-20

    Different ginger cultivars may contain different nutritional and medicinal values. In this study, a time-domain nuclear magnetic resonance method was employed to study water dynamics in different ginger cultivars. Significant differences in transverse relaxation time T2 values assigned to the distribution of water in different parts of the plant were observed between Henan ginger and four other ginger cultivars. Ion concentration and metabolic analysis showed similar differences in Mn ion concentrations and organic solutes among the different ginger cultivars, respectively. On the basis of Pearson's correlation analysis, many organic solutes and 6-gingerol, the main active substance of ginger, exhibited significant correlations with water distribution as determined by NMR T2 relaxation, suggesting that the organic solute differences may impact water distribution. Our work demonstrates that low-field NMR relaxometry provides useful information about water dynamics in different ginger cultivars as affected by the presence of different organic solutes.

  14. Nuclear dynamics of influenza A virus ribonucleoproteins revealed by live-cell imaging studies

    SciTech Connect

    Loucaides, Eva M.; Kirchbach, Johann C. von; Foeglein, Agnes; Sharps, Jane; Fodor, Ervin; Digard, Paul

    2009-11-10

    The negative sense RNA genome of influenza A virus is transcribed and replicated in the nuclei of infected cells by the viral RNA polymerase. Only four viral polypeptides are required but multiple cellular components are potentially involved. We used fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) to characterise the dynamics of GFP-tagged viral ribonucleoprotein (RNP) components in living cells. The nucleoprotein (NP) displayed very slow mobility that significantly increased on formation of transcriptionally active RNPs. Conversely, single or dimeric polymerase subunits showed fast nuclear dynamics that decreased upon formation of heterotrimers, suggesting increased interaction of the full polymerase complex with a relatively immobile cellular component(s). Treatment with inhibitors of cellular transcription indicated that in part, this reflected an interaction with cellular RNA polymerase II. Analysis of mutated influenza virus polymerase complexes further suggested that this was through an interaction between PB2 and RNA Pol II separate from PB2 cap-binding activity.

  15. PRESTO polarization transfer to quadrupolar nuclei: Implications for dynamic nuclear polarization

    DOE PAGES

    Perras, Frederic A.; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Pruski, Marek

    2015-08-04

    In this study, we show both experimentally and numerically on a series of model systems that in experiments involving transfer of magnetization from 1H to the quadrupolar nuclei under magic-angle-spinning (MAS), the PRESTO technique consistently outperforms traditionally used cross polarization (CP), affording more quantitative intensities, improved lineshapes, better overall sensitivity, and straightforward optimization. This advantage derives from the fact that PRESTO circumvents the convoluted and uncooperative spin dynamics during the CP transfer under MAS, by replacing the spin-locking of quadrupolar nuclei with a single central transition selective 90° pulse and using a symmetry-based recoupling sequence in the 1H channel. Thismore » is important in the context of dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) NMR of quadrupolar nuclei, where the efficient transfer of enhanced 1H polarization is desired to obtain the highest sensitivity.« less

  16. PRESTO polarization transfer to quadrupolar nuclei: Implications for dynamic nuclear polarization

    SciTech Connect

    Perras, Frederic A.; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Pruski, Marek

    2015-08-04

    In this study, we show both experimentally and numerically on a series of model systems that in experiments involving transfer of magnetization from 1H to the quadrupolar nuclei under magic-angle-spinning (MAS), the PRESTO technique consistently outperforms traditionally used cross polarization (CP), affording more quantitative intensities, improved lineshapes, better overall sensitivity, and straightforward optimization. This advantage derives from the fact that PRESTO circumvents the convoluted and uncooperative spin dynamics during the CP transfer under MAS, by replacing the spin-locking of quadrupolar nuclei with a single central transition selective 90° pulse and using a symmetry-based recoupling sequence in the 1H channel. This is important in the context of dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) NMR of quadrupolar nuclei, where the efficient transfer of enhanced 1H polarization is desired to obtain the highest sensitivity.

  17. The fragile-to-strong dynamic crossover transition in confined water: nuclear magnetic resonance results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallamace, F.; Broccio, M.; Corsaro, C.; Faraone, A.; Wanderlingh, U.; Liu, L.; Mou, C.-Y.; Chen, S. H.

    2006-04-01

    By means of a nuclear magnetic resonance experiment, we give evidence of the existence of a fragile-to-strong dynamic crossover transition (FST) in confined water at a temperature TL=223±2K. We have studied the dynamics of water contained in 1D cylindrical nanoporous matrices (MCM-41-S) in the temperature range 190-280K, where experiments on bulk water were so far hampered by crystallization. The FST is clearly inferred from the T dependence of the inverse of the self-diffusion coefficient of water (1/D) as a crossover point from a non-Arrhenius to an Arrhenius behavior. The combination of the measured self-diffusion coefficient D and the average translational relaxation time ⟨τT⟩, as measured by neutron scattering, shows the predicted breakdown of Stokes-Einstein relation in deeply supercooled water.

  18. The fragile-to-strong dynamic crossover transition in confined water: nuclear magnetic resonance results.

    PubMed

    Mallamace, F; Broccio, M; Corsaro, C; Faraone, A; Wanderlingh, U; Liu, L; Mou, C-Y; Chen, S H

    2006-04-28

    By means of a nuclear magnetic resonance experiment, we give evidence of the existence of a fragile-to-strong dynamic crossover transition (FST) in confined water at a temperature T(L)=223+/-2 K. We have studied the dynamics of water contained in 1D cylindrical nanoporous matrices (MCM-41-S) in the temperature range 190-280 K, where experiments on bulk water were so far hampered by crystallization. The FST is clearly inferred from the T dependence of the inverse of the self-diffusion coefficient of water (1D) as a crossover point from a non-Arrhenius to an Arrhenius behavior. The combination of the measured self-diffusion coefficient D and the average translational relaxation time tau(T), as measured by neutron scattering, shows the predicted breakdown of Stokes-Einstein relation in deeply supercooled water.

  19. The impact of interface bonding efficiency on high-burnup spent nuclear fuel dynamic performance

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Hao; Wang, Jy-An John; Wang, Hong

    2016-09-26

    Finite element analysis (FEA) was used to investigate the impact of interfacial bonding efficiency at pellet-pellet and pellet-clad interfaces of high-burnup (HBU) spent nuclear fuel (SNF) on system dynamic performance. Bending moments M were applied to FEA model to evaluate the system responses. From bending curvature, κ, flexural rigidity EI can be estimated as EI = M/κ. The FEA simulation results were benchmarked with experimental results from cyclic integrated reversal bending fatigue test (CIRFT) of HBR fuel rods. The consequence of interface debonding between fuel pellets and cladding is a redistribution of the loads carried by the fuel pellets to the clad, which results in a reduction in composite rod system flexural rigidity. Furthermore, the interface bonding efficiency at the pellet-pellet and pellet-clad interfaces can significantly dictate the SNF system dynamic performance. With the consideration of interface bonding efficiency, the HBU SNF fuel property was estimated with CIRFT test data.

  20. Dynamic use of geoscience information to develop scientific understanding for a nuclear waste repository

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, N.G.W.; Tsang, C.F.

    1990-01-01

    The development and safety evaluation of a nuclear waste geologic repository require a proper scientific understanding of the site response. Such scientific understanding depends on information from a number of geoscience disciplines, including geology, geophysics, geochemistry, geomechanics and hydrogeology. The information comes in four stages: (1) general regional survey data base, (2) surface-based testing, (3) exploratory shaft testing, and (4) repository construction and evaluation. A discussion is given on the dynamic use of the information through the different stages. We point out the need for abstracting, deriving and updating a quantitative spatial and process model (QSPM) to develop a scientific understanding of site responses as a crucial element in the dynamic procedure. 2 figs.

  1. Gating current harmonics. III. Dynamic transients and steady states with intact sodium inactivation gating.

    PubMed Central

    Fohlmeister, J F; Adelman, W J

    1986-01-01

    Internally perfused squid giant axons with intact sodium inactivation gating were prepared for gating current experiments. Gating current records were obtained in sinusoidally driven dynamic steady states and as dynamic transients as functions of the mean membrane potential and the frequency of the command sinusoid. Controls were obtained after internal protease treatment of the axons that fully removed inactivation. The nonlinear analysis consisted of determining and interpreting the harmonic content in the current records. The results indicate the presence of three kinetic processes, two of which are associated with activation gating (the so-called primary and secondary processes), and the third with inactivation gating. The dynamic steady state data show that inactivation gating does not contribute a component to the gating current, and has no direct voltage-dependence of its own. Rather, the inactivation kinetics appear to be coupled to the primary activation kinetics, and the coupling mechanism appears to be one of reciprocal steric hindrance between two molecular components. The mechanism allows the channel to become inactivated without first entering the conducting state, and will do so in about 40 percent of depolarizing voltage-clamp steps to 0 mV. The derived model kinetics further indicate that the conducting state may flicker between open and closed with the lifetime of either state being 10 microseconds. Dynamic transients generated by the model kinetics (i.e., the behavior of the harmonic components as a function of time after an instantaneous change in the mean membrane potential from a holding potential of -80 mV) match the experimental dynamic transients in all details. These transients have a duration of 7-10 ms (depending on the level of depolarization), and are the result of the developing inactivation following the discontinuous voltage change. A detailed hypothetical molecular model of the channel and gating machinery is presented. PMID

  2. Effects of proton irradiation on luminescence and carrier dynamics of self-assembled III-V quatum dots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leon, R.; Marcinkevicius, S.; Siegert, J.; Magness, B.; Taylor, W.; Lobo, C.

    2002-01-01

    The effects of proton irradiation (1.5 MeV) on photoluminescence intensities and carrier dynamics were compared between III-V quantum dots and similar quantum well structures. A significant enhancement in radiation tolerance is seen with three-dimensional quantum confinement. Measurements were carried out in different quantum dot (QD) structures, varying in material (InGaAs/GaAs and InAlAs/AlGaAs), QD surface density (4x10^8 to 3x10'^10 cm^-2), and substrate orientation [(100) and (311) B]. Similar trends were observed for all QD samples. A slight increase in PL emission after low to intermediate proton doses, are also observed in InGaAs/GaAs (100) QD structures. The latter is explained in terms of more efficient carrier transfer from the wetting layer via radiation-induced defects.

  3. Photophysics, photoelectrical properties and photoconductivity relaxation dynamics of quantum-sized bismuth(III) sulfide thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Pejova, Biljana . E-mail: biljana@iunona.pmf.ukim.edu.mk; Tanusevski, Atanas; Grozdanov, Ivan

    2005-06-15

    Electrical and photoelectrical properties (including both the stationary photoresponse and the photocarriers' relaxation dynamics) of nanocrystalline semiconducting bismuth(III) sulfide thin films were investigated. The experimental design of photoelectrical properties was achieved by controlling the chemistry of the deposition process (varying the reagent concentration in the reaction system) and also by physical means (controlling the crystal dimensions by post-deposition annealing). The band gap energy of thin films characterized by most pronounced photoelectrical properties was calculated, on the basis of measured photoconductivity spectral response curves, by several approaches. All of the obtained values are in very good agreement with the corresponding ones obtained from optical spectroscopy data within the framework of parabolic approximation for dispersion relation. On the basis of measured temperature dependence of dark electrical resistivity of nanocrystalline bismuth(III) sulfide films, the thermal band gap energy and the ionization energy of the impurity level (of donor type) were calculated. The corresponding values are 1.50 and 0.42eV. Dynamics of non-equilibrium charge carriers' relaxation processes was studied with the oscilloscopic method. By analysis of the photoconductivity decay kinetics data it is found that recombination of non-equilibrium charge carriers is carried out according to the linear mechanism. The calculated relaxation time of photoexcited charge carriers is 1.58ms, the relaxation processes occurring via local trapping centers. Recombination processes occurring via a single-type trapping center can be described within the framework of the Schockley-Read model. The practically linear regime detected in the measured lux-ampere characteristics of the studied films ({delta}{sigma}{approx}{phi}{sup 0.98}) indicate as well a linear recombination mechanism of the photoexcited charge carriers.

  4. Visualization of the dynamic multimerization of human Cytomegalovirus pp65 in punctuate nuclear foci

    SciTech Connect

    Cui Zongqiang; Zhang Ke; Zhang Zhiping; Liu Yalan; Zhou Yafeng; Wei Hongping; Zhang Xian-En

    2009-09-30

    The phosphorylated protein pp65 of human Cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is the predominant virion protein and the major tegument constituent. It plays important roles in HCMV infection and virion assembly. Live cell imaging and fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) analysis showed that HCMV pp65 accumulated dynamically in punctuate nuclear foci when transiently expressed in mammalian cells. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) imaging disclosed that pp65 can self-interact in its localization foci. Yeast two-hybrid assay verified that pp65 is a self-associating protein, and the N-terminal amino acids 14-22 were determined to be essential for pp65 self-association. However, these amino acids were not related to pp65 localization in the specific nuclear foci. The interaction of pp65 and ppUL97 was also studied by FRET microscopy, and the result suggested that there is another signal sequence in pp65, being the ppUL97 phosphorylation site, that is responsible for localization of pp65 in nuclear foci. These results help to understand the function of pp65 in HCMV infection and virion morphogenesis.

  5. Logical operations with single x-ray photons via dynamically-controlled nuclear resonances

    PubMed Central

    Gunst, Jonas; Keitel, Christoph H.; Pálffy, Adriana

    2016-01-01

    Photonic qubits lie at the heart of quantum information technology, often encoding information in their polarization state. So far, only low-frequency optical and infrared photons have been employed as flying qubits, as the resources that are at present easiest to control. With their essentially different way of interacting with matter, x-ray qubits would bear however relevant advantages: they are extremely robust, penetrate deep through materials, and can be focused down to few-nm waveguides, allowing unprecedented miniaturization. Also, x-rays are resonant to nuclear transitions, which are very well isolated from the environment and present long coherence times. Here, we show theoretically that x-ray polarization qubits can be dynamically controlled by nuclear Mössbauer resonances. The control knob is played by nuclear hyperfine magnetic fields, that allow via fast rotations precise processing of single x-ray quanta polarization. With such rotations, single-qubit and binary logical operations such as a destructive C-NOT gate can be implemented. PMID:27118340

  6. Dynamic nuclear polarization of carbonyl and methyl 13C spins in acetate using trityl OX063

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niedbalski, Peter; Parish, Christopher; Lumata, Lloyd

    2015-03-01

    Hyperpolarization via dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) is a physics technique that amplifies the magnetic resonance signals by several thousand-fold for biomedical NMR spectroscopy and imaging (MRI). Herein we have investigated the effect of carbon-13 isotopic location on the DNP of acetate (one of the biomolecules commonly used for hyperpolarization) at 3.35 T and 1.4 K using a narrow ESR linewidth free radical trityl OX063. We have found that the carbonyl 13C spins yielded about twice the polarization produced in methyl 13C spins. Deuteration of the methyl group, beneficial in the liquid-state, did not produce an improvement in the polarization level at cryogenic conditions. Concurrently, the solid-state nuclear relaxation of these samples correlate with the polarization levels achieved. These results suggest that the location of the 13C isotopic labeling in acetate has a direct impact on the solid-state polarization achieved and is mainly governed by the nuclear relaxation leakage factor.

  7. Magic angle spinning NMR of proteins: high-frequency dynamic nuclear polarization and (1)H detection.

    PubMed

    Su, Yongchao; Andreas, Loren; Griffin, Robert G

    2015-01-01

    Magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR studies of amyloid and membrane proteins and large macromolecular complexes are an important new approach to structural biology. However, the applicability of these experiments, which are based on (13)C- and (15)N-detected spectra, would be enhanced if the sensitivity were improved. Here we discuss two advances that address this problem: high-frequency dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) and (1)H-detected MAS techniques. DNP is a sensitivity enhancement technique that transfers the high polarization of exogenous unpaired electrons to nuclear spins via microwave irradiation of electron-nuclear transitions. DNP boosts NMR signal intensities by factors of 10(2) to 10(3), thereby overcoming NMR's inherent low sensitivity. Alternatively, it permits structural investigations at the nanomolar scale. In addition, (1)H detection is feasible primarily because of the development of MAS rotors that spin at frequencies of 40 to 60 kHz or higher and the preparation of extensively (2)H-labeled proteins.

  8. Solid-state dynamic nuclear polarization at 263 GHz: spectrometer design and experimental results†

    PubMed Central

    Rosay, Melanie; Tometich, Leo; Pawsey, Shane; Bader, Reto; Schauwecker, Robert; Blank, Monica; Borchard, Philipp M.; Cauffman, Stephen R.; Felch, Kevin L.; Weber, Ralph T.; Temkin, Richard J.; Griffin, Robert G.; Maas, Werner E.

    2015-01-01

    Dynamic Nuclear Polarization (DNP) experiments transfer polarization from electron spins to nuclear spins with microwave irradiation of the electron spins for enhanced sensitivity in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Design and testing of a spectrometer for magic angle spinning (MAS) DNP experiments at 263 GHz microwave frequency, 400 MHz 1H frequency is described. Microwaves are generated by a novel continuous-wave gyrotron, transmitted to the NMR probe via a transmission line, and irradiated on a 3.2 mm rotor for MAS DNP experiments. DNP signal enhancements of up to 80 have been measured at 95 K on urea and proline in water–glycerol with the biradical polarizing agent TOTAPOL. We characterize the experimental parameters affecting the DNP efficiency: the magnetic field dependence, temperature dependence and polarization build-up times, microwave power dependence, sample heating effects, and spinning frequency dependence of the DNP signal enhancement. Stable system operation, including DNP performance, is also demonstrated over a 36 h period. PMID:20449524

  9. Logical operations with single x-ray photons via dynamically-controlled nuclear resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunst, Jonas; Keitel, Christoph H.; Pálffy, Adriana

    2016-04-01

    Photonic qubits lie at the heart of quantum information technology, often encoding information in their polarization state. So far, only low-frequency optical and infrared photons have been employed as flying qubits, as the resources that are at present easiest to control. With their essentially different way of interacting with matter, x-ray qubits would bear however relevant advantages: they are extremely robust, penetrate deep through materials, and can be focused down to few-nm waveguides, allowing unprecedented miniaturization. Also, x-rays are resonant to nuclear transitions, which are very well isolated from the environment and present long coherence times. Here, we show theoretically that x-ray polarization qubits can be dynamically controlled by nuclear Mössbauer resonances. The control knob is played by nuclear hyperfine magnetic fields, that allow via fast rotations precise processing of single x-ray quanta polarization. With such rotations, single-qubit and binary logical operations such as a destructive C-NOT gate can be implemented.

  10. Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) region gene 1 (FRG1) is a dynamic nuclear and sarcomeric protein.

    PubMed

    Hanel, Meredith L; Sun, Chia-Yun Jessica; Jones, Takako I; Long, Steven W; Zanotti, Simona; Milner, Derek; Jones, Peter L

    2011-02-01

    Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) region gene 1 (FRG1) is a candidate gene for mediating FSHD pathophysiology, however, very little is known about the endogenous FRG1 protein. This study uses immunocytochemistry (ICC) and histology to provide insight into FRG1's role in vertebrate muscle development and address its potential involvement in FSHD pathophysiology. In cell culture, primary myoblast/myotube cultures, and mouse and human muscle sections, FRG1 showed distinct nuclear and cytoplasmic localizations and nuclear shuttling assays indicated the subcellular pools of FRG1 are linked. During myoblast differentiation, FRG1's subcellular distribution changed dramatically with FRG1 eventually associating with the matured Z-discs. This Z-disc localization was confirmed using isolated mouse myofibers and found to be maintained in adult human skeletal muscle biopsies. Thus, FRG1 is not likely involved in the initial assembly and alignment of the Z-disc but may be involved in sarcomere maintenance or signaling. Further analysis of human tissue showed FRG1 is strongly expressed in arteries, veins, and capillaries, the other prominently affected tissue in FSHD. Overall, we show that in mammalian cells, FRG1 is a dynamic nuclear and cytoplasmic protein, however in muscle, FRG1 is also a developmentally regulated sarcomeric protein suggesting FRG1 may perform a muscle-specific function. Thus, FRG1 is the only FSHD candidate protein linked to the muscle contractile machinery and may address why the musculature and vasculature are specifically susceptible in FSHD.

  11. Optimization of 13C dynamic nuclear polarization: isotopic labeling of free radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niedbalski, Peter; Parish, Christopher; Kiswandi, Andhika; Lumata, Lloyd

    Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) is a physics technique that amplifies the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signals by transferring the high polarization of the electrons to the nuclear spins. Thus, the choice of free radical is crucial in DNP as it can directly affect the NMR signal enhancement levels, typically on the order of several thousand-fold in the liquid-state. In this study, we have investigated the efficiency of four variants of the well-known 4-oxo-TEMPO radical (normal 4-oxo-TEMPO plus its 15N-enriched and/or perdeuterated variants) for use in DNP of an important metabolic tracer [1-13C]acetate. Though the variants have significant differences in electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectra, we have found that changing the composition of the TEMPO radical through deuteration or 15N doping yields no significant difference in 13C DNP efficiency at 3.35 T and 1.2 K. On the other hand, deuteration of the solvent causes a significant increase of 13C polarization that is consistent over all the 4-oxo-TEMPO variants. These findings are consistent with the thermal mixing model of DNP. This work is supported by US Dept of Defense Award No. W81XWH-14-1-0048 and the Robert A. Welch Foundation Grant No. AT-1877.

  12. Dynamic Nuclear Polarization (DNP) solid-state NMR spectroscopy, a new approach to study humic material?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knicker, Heike; Lange, Sascha; van Rossum, Barth; Oschkinat, Hartmut

    2016-04-01

    Compared to solution NMR spectroscopy, solid-state NMR spectra suffer from broad resonance lines and low resolution. This could be overcome by the use of 2-dimenstional solid-state NMR pulse sequences. Until recently, this approach has been unfeasible as a routine tool in soil chemistry, mainly because of the low NMR sensitivity of the respective samples. A possibility to circumvent those sensitivity problems represents high-field Dynamic Nuclear Polarization (DNP) solid-state NMR spectroscopy (Barnes et al., 2008), allowing considerable signal enhancements (Akbey et al., 2010). This is achieved by a microwave-driven transfer of polarization from a paramagnetic center to nuclear spins. Application of DNP to MAS spectra of biological systems (frozen solutions) showed enhancements of the factor 40 to 50 (Hall et al., 1997). Enhancements of this magnitude, thus may enable the use of at least some of the 2D solid-state NMR techniques that are presently already applied for pure proteins but are difficult to apply to soil peptides in their complex matrix. After adjusting the required acquisition parameters to the system "soil organic matter", lower but still promising enhancement factors were achieved. Additional optimization was performed and allowed the acquisition of 2D 13C and 15N solid-state NMR spectra of humified 13C and 15N enriched plant residues. Within the present contribution, the first solid-state DNP NMR spectra of humic material are presented. Those data demonstrate the great potential of this approach which certainly opens new doors for a better understanding of biochemical processes in soils, sediments and water. Akbey, Ü., Franks, W.T., Linden, A., Lange, S., Griffin, R.G., van Rossum, B.-J., Oschkinat, H., 2010. Dynamic nuclear polarization of deuterated proteins. Angewandte Chemie International Edition 49, 7803-7806. Barnes, A.B., De Paëpe, G., van der Wel, P.C.A., Hu, K.N., Joo, C.G., Bajaj, V.S., Mak-Jurkauskas, M.L., Sirigiri, J.R., Herzfeld, J

  13. Advances and applications of dynamic-angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Baltisberger, Jay Harvey

    1993-06-01

    This dissertation describes nuclear magnetic resonance experiments and theory which have been developed to study quadrupolar nuclei (those nuclei with spin greater than one-half) in the solid state. Primarily, the technique of dynamic-angle spinning (DAS) is extensively reviewed and expanded upon in this thesis. Specifically, the improvement in both the resolution (two-dimensional pure-absorptive phase methods and DAS angle choice) and sensitivity (pulse-sequence development), along with effective spinning speed enhancement (again through choice of DAS conditions or alternative multiple pulse schemes) of dynamic-angle spinning experiment was realized with both theory and experimental examples. The application of DAS to new types of nuclei (specifically the {sup 87}Rb and {sup 85}Rb nuclear spins) and materials (specifically amorphous solids) has also greatly expanded the possibilities of the use of DAS to study a larger range of materials. This dissertation is meant to demonstrate both recent advances and applications of the DAS technique, and by no means represents a comprehensive study of any particular chemical problem.

  14. High temperature spin dynamics in linear magnetic chains, molecular rings, and segments by nuclear magnetic resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Adelnia, Fatemeh; Lascialfari, Alessandro; Mariani, Manuel; Ammannato, Luca; Caneschi, Andrea; Rovai, Donella; Winpenny, Richard; Timco, Grigore; Corti, Maurizio Borsa, Ferdinando

    2015-05-07

    We present the room temperature proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) nuclear spin-lattice relaxation rate (NSLR) results in two 1D spin chains: the Heisenberg antiferromagnetic (AFM) Eu(hfac){sub 3}NITEt and the magnetically frustrated Gd(hfac){sub 3}NITEt. The NSLR as a function of external magnetic field can be interpreted very well in terms of high temperature spin dynamics dominated by a long time persistence of the decay of the two-spin correlation function due to the conservation of the total spin value for isotropic Heisenberg chains. The high temperature spin dynamics are also investigated in Heisenberg AFM molecular rings. In both Cr{sub 8} closed ring and in Cr{sub 7}Cd and Cr{sub 8}Zn open rings, i.e., model systems for a finite spin segment, an enhancement of the low frequency spectral density is found consistent with spin diffusion but the high cut-off frequency due to intermolecular anisotropic interactions prevents a detailed analysis of the spin diffusion regime.

  15. Genomic DNA hypomethylation by histone deacetylase inhibition implicates DNMT1 nuclear dynamics.

    PubMed

    Arzenani, Mohsen Karimi; Zade, Atosa Esteki; Ming, Yu; Vijverberg, Susanne J H; Zhang, Zhe; Khan, Zahidul; Sadique, Syed; Kallenbach, Lorenz; Hu, LiFu; Vukojević, Vladana; Ekström, Tomas J

    2011-10-01

    Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) are promising antitumor drugs acting through reactivation of silenced tumor suppressor genes. Several HDACi are currently in clinical trials both for hematological and solid tissue malignancies. Cooperative action of HDACi and DNA methylation inhibitors (DNMTi) has been reported, making combined treatment an attractive choice for cancer therapy. There is some evidence that synergistic effects of HDACi and DNMTi are achieved by their action on common targets, including DNA methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1). To further analyze this interaction, we investigated the effect of the HDACi trichostatin A on global and gene-specific DNA methylation and applied methods with single molecule sensitivity, confocal laser scanning microscopy with avalanche photodiode detectors (APD imaging) and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS), to study its effect on the nuclear dynamics of DNMT1 in live cells. Our data show that trichostatin A treatment reduces global DNA methylation and the DNMT1 protein level and alters DNMT1 nuclear dynamics and interactions with chromatin. The mechanisms underlying these effects are apparently distinct from the mechanisms of action of the DNMT inhibitor 5-azacytidine. Our study sheds light on the molecular mechanisms underlying the synergistic action of HDACi and DNMTi and may also help to define improved policies for cancer treatment.

  16. Dynamic sorting of nuclear components into distinct nucleolar caps during transcriptional inhibition.

    PubMed

    Shav-Tal, Yaron; Blechman, Janna; Darzacq, Xavier; Montagna, Cristina; Dye, Billy T; Patton, James G; Singer, Robert H; Zipori, Dov

    2005-05-01

    Nucleolar segregation is observed under some physiological conditions of transcriptional arrest. This process can be mimicked by transcriptional arrest after actinomycin D treatment leading to the segregation of nucleolar components and the formation of unique structures termed nucleolar caps surrounding a central body. These nucleolar caps have been proposed to arise from the segregation of nucleolar components. We show that contrary to prevailing notion, a group of nucleoplasmic proteins, mostly RNA binding proteins, relocalized from the nucleoplasm to a specific nucleolar cap during transcriptional inhibition. For instance, an exclusively nucleoplasmic protein, the splicing factor PSF, localized to nucleolar caps under these conditions. This structure also contained pre-rRNA transcripts, but other caps contained either nucleolar proteins, PML, or Cajal body proteins and in addition nucleolar or Cajal body RNAs. In contrast to the capping of the nucleoplasmic components, nucleolar granular component proteins dispersed into the nucleoplasm, although at least two (p14/ARF and MRP RNA) were retained in the central body. The nucleolar caps are dynamic structures as determined using photobleaching and require energy for their formation. These findings demonstrate that the process of nucleolar segregation and capping involves energy-dependent repositioning of nuclear proteins and RNAs and emphasize the dynamic characteristics of nuclear domain formation in response to cellular stress.

  17. Fermi resonance in CO2: Mode assignment and quantum nuclear effects from first principles molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Basire, Marie; Mouhat, Félix; Fraux, Guillaume; Bordage, Amélie; Hazemann, Jean-Louis; Louvel, Marion; Spezia, Riccardo; Bonella, Sara; Vuilleumier, Rodolphe

    2017-04-07

    Vibrational spectroscopy is a fundamental tool to investigate local atomic arrangements and the effect of the environment, provided that the spectral features can be correctly assigned. This can be challenging in experiments and simulations when double peaks are present because they can have different origins. Fermi dyads are a common class of such doublets, stemming from the resonance of the fundamental excitation of a mode with the overtone of another. We present a new, efficient approach to unambiguously characterize Fermi resonances in density functional theory (DFT) based simulations of condensed phase systems. With it, the spectral features can be assigned and the two resonating modes identified. We also show how data from DFT simulations employing classical nuclear dynamics can be post-processed and combined with a perturbative quantum treatment at a finite temperature to include analytically thermal quantum nuclear effects. The inclusion of these effects is crucial to correct some of the qualitative failures of the Newtonian dynamics simulations at a low temperature such as, in particular, the behavior of the frequency splitting of the Fermi dyad. We show, by comparing with experimental data for the paradigmatic case of supercritical CO2, that these thermal quantum effects can be substantial even at ambient conditions and that our scheme provides an accurate and computationally convenient approach to account for them.

  18. Dynamics of asymmetric binary glass formers. II. Results from nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Bock, D.; Kahlau, R.; Pötzschner, B.; Körber, T.; Wagner, E.; Rössler, E. A.

    2014-03-07

    Various {sup 2}H and {sup 31}P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy techniques are applied to probe the component dynamics of the binary glass former tripropyl phosphate (TPP)/polystyrene-d{sub 3} (PS) over the full concentration range. The results are quantitatively compared to those of a dielectric spectroscopy (DS) study on the same system previously published [R. Kahlau, D. Bock, B. Schmidtke, and E. A. Rössler, J. Chem. Phys. 140, 044509 (2014)]. While the PS dynamics does not significantly change in the mixtures compared to that of neat PS, two fractions of TPP molecules are identified, one joining the glass transition of PS in the mixture (α{sub 1}-process), the second reorienting isotropically (α{sub 2}-process) even in the rigid matrix of PS, although at low concentration resembling a secondary process regarding its manifestation in the DS spectra. Pronounced dynamical heterogeneities are found for the TPP α{sub 2}-process, showing up in extremely stretched, quasi-logarithmic stimulated echo decays. While the time window of NMR is insufficient for recording the full correlation functions, DS results, covering a larger dynamical range, provide a satisfactory interpolation of the NMR data. Two-dimensional {sup 31}P NMR spectra prove exchange within the broadly distributed α{sub 2}-process. As demonstrated by {sup 2}H NMR, the PS matrix reflects the faster α{sub 2}-process of TPP by performing a spatially highly hindered motion on the same timescale.

  19. Fragmentation dynamics of meso-tetraphenyl iron (III) porphyrin chloride dication under energy control.

    PubMed

    Li, B; Allouche, A R; Bernard, J; Brédy, R; Qian, D B; Ma, X; Martin, S; Chen, L

    2017-03-28

    Meso-tetraphenyl iron (III) porphyrin chloride dications (FeTPPCl(2+))(*) were prepared in collisions with F(+) and H(+) at 3 keV. The dominant fragmentation channels were observed to involve the loss of the Cl atom and the successive loss of neutral phenyl groups for both collisional systems. The mass spectra in correlation with the deposited excitation energy distributions of the parent ions for the main fragmentation channels were measured by using the collision induced dissociation under energy control method. The global excitation energy distribution was found to be shifted to lower energies in collisions with H(+) compared to collisions with F(+) showing a noteworthy change of the excitation energy window using different projectile ions. Partial excitation energy distributions of the parent ions FeTPPCl(2+) were obtained for each fragmentation group. In a theoretical work, we have calculated the dissociation energies for the loss of one and two phenyl groups, including phenyl and (phenyl ± H). The energy barrier for the hydrogen atom transfer during the loss of (phenyl-H) has been also calculated. The measured energy difference for the successive loss of two phenyl groups was compared with the theoretical values.

  20. Fragmentation dynamics of meso-tetraphenyl iron (III) porphyrin chloride dication under energy control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, B.; Allouche, A. R.; Bernard, J.; Brédy, R.; Qian, D. B.; Ma, X.; Martin, S.; Chen, L.

    2017-03-01

    Meso-tetraphenyl iron (III) porphyrin chloride dications (FeTPPCl2+)* were prepared in collisions with F+ and H+ at 3 keV. The dominant fragmentation channels were observed to involve the loss of the Cl atom and the successive loss of neutral phenyl groups for both collisional systems. The mass spectra in correlation with the deposited excitation energy distributions of the parent ions for the main fragmentation channels were measured by using the collision induced dissociation under energy control method. The global excitation energy distribution was found to be shifted to lower energies in collisions with H+ compared to collisions with F+ showing a noteworthy change of the excitation energy window using different projectile ions. Partial excitation energy distributions of the parent ions FeTPPCl2+ were obtained for each fragmentation group. In a theoretical work, we have calculated the dissociation energies for the loss of one and two phenyl groups, including phenyl and (phenyl ± H). The energy barrier for the hydrogen atom transfer during the loss of (phenyl-H) has been also calculated. The measured energy difference for the successive loss of two phenyl groups was compared with the theoretical values.

  1. Ultrafast excited-state dynamics in vitamin B12 and related cob(III)alamins.

    PubMed

    Shiang, Joseph J; Cole, Allwyn G; Sension, Roseanne J; Hang, Kun; Weng, Yuxiang; Trommel, Jenna S; Marzilli, Luigi G; Lian, Tianquan

    2006-01-25

    Femtosecond transient IR and visible absorption spectroscopies have been employed to investigate the excited-state photophysics of vitamin B12 (cyanocobalamin, CNCbl) and the related cob(III)alamins, azidocobalamin (N3Cbl), and aquocobalamin (H2OCbl). Excitation of CNCbl, H2OCbl, or N3Cbl results in rapid formation of a short-lived excited state followed by ground-state recovery on time scales ranging from a few picoseconds to a few tens of picoseconds. The lifetime of the intermediate state is influenced by the sigma-donating ability of the axial ligand, decreasing in the order CNCbl > N3Cbl > H2OCbl, and by the polarity of the solvent, decreasing with increasing solvent polarity. The peak of the excited-state visible absorption spectrum is shifted to ca. 490 nm, and the shape of the spectrum is characteristic of weak axial ligands, similar to those observed for cob(II)alamin, base-off cobalamins, or cobinamides. Transient IR spectra of the upper CN and N3 ligands are red-shifted 20-30 cm(-1) from the ground-state frequencies, consistent with a weakened Co-upper ligand bond. These results suggest that the transient intermediate state can be attributed to a corrin ring pi to Co 3d(z2) ligand to metal charge transfer (LMCT) state. In this state bonds between the cobalt and the axial ligands are weakened and lengthened with respect to the corresponding ground states.

  2. Evidence of a Supermassive Black Hole in the Galaxy NGC 1023 From The Nuclear Stellar Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bower, G. A.; Green, R. F.; Bender, R.; Gebhardt, K.; Lauer, T. R.; Magorrian, J.; Richstone, D. O.; Danks, A.; Gull, T.; Hutchings, J.

    2000-01-01

    We analyze the nuclear stellar dynamics of the SBO galaxy NGC 1023, utilizing observational data both from the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph aboard the Hubble Space Telescope and from the ground. The stellar kinematics measured from these long-slit spectra show rapid rotation (V equals approx. 70 km/s at a distance of O.1 deg = 4.9 pc from the nucleus) and increasing velocity dispersion toward the nucleus (where sigma = 295 +/- 30 km/s). We model the observed stellar kinematics assuming an axisymmetric mass distribution with both two and three integrals of motion. Both modeling techniques point to the presence of a central dark compact mass (which presumably is a supermassive black hole) with confidence > 99%. The isotropic two-integral models yield a best-fitting black hole mass of (6.0 +/- 0.4) x 10(exp 7) solar masses and mass-to-light ratio (M/L(sub v)) of 5.38 +/- 0.08, and the goodness-of-fit (CHI(exp 2)) is insensitive to reasonable values for the galaxy's inclination. The three-integral models, which non-parametrically fit the observed line-of-sight velocity distribution as a function of position in the galaxy, suggest a black hole mass of (3.9 +/- 0.4) x 10(exp 7) solar masses and M/L(sub v) of 5.56 +/- 0.02 (internal errors), and the edge-on models are vastly superior fits over models at other inclinations. The internal dynamics in NGC 1023 as suggested by our best-fit three-integral model shows that the velocity distribution function at the nucleus is tangentially anisotropic, suggesting the presence of a nuclear stellar disk. The nuclear line of sight velocity distribution has enhanced wings at velocities >= 600 km/s from systemic, suggesting that perhaps we have detected a group of stars very close to the central dark mass.

  3. Coupled electron-nuclear dynamics: Charge migration and charge transfer initiated near a conical intersection

    SciTech Connect

    Mendive-Tapia, David; Vacher, Morgane; Bearpark, Michael J.; Robb, Michael A.

    2013-07-28

    Coupled electron-nuclear dynamics, implemented using the Ehrenfest method, has been used to study charge migration with fixed nuclei, together with charge transfer when nuclei are allowed to move. Simulations were initiated at reference geometries of neutral benzene and 2-phenylethylamine (PEA), and at geometries close to potential energy surface crossings in the cations. Cationic eigenstates, and the so-called sudden approximation, involving removal of an electron from a correlated ground-state wavefunction for the neutral species, were used as initial conditions. Charge migration without coupled nuclear motion could be observed if the Ehrenfest simulation, using the sudden approximation, was started near a conical intersection where the states were both strongly coupled and quasi-degenerate. Further, the main features associated with charge migration were still recognizable when the nuclear motion was allowed to couple. In the benzene radical cation, starting from the reference neutral geometry with the sudden approximation, one could observe sub-femtosecond charge migration with a small amplitude, which results from weak interaction with higher electronic states. However, we were able to engineer large amplitude charge migration, with a period between 10 and 100 fs, corresponding to oscillation of the electronic structure between the quinoid and anti-quinoid cationic electronic configurations, by distorting the geometry along the derivative coupling vector from the D{sub 6h} Jahn-Teller crossing to lower symmetry where the states are not degenerate. When the nuclear motion becomes coupled, the period changes only slightly. In PEA, in an Ehrenfest trajectory starting from the D{sub 2} eigenstate and reference geometry, a partial charge transfer occurs after about 12 fs near the first crossing between D{sub 1}, D{sub 2} (N{sup +}-Phenyl, N-Phenyl{sup +}). If the Ehrenfest propagation is started near this point, using the sudden approximation without coupled

  4. Sensing actin dynamics: Structural basis for G-actin-sensitive nuclear import of MAL

    SciTech Connect

    Hirano, Hidemi; Matsuura, Yoshiyuki

    2011-10-22

    Highlights: {yields} MAL has a bipartite NLS that binds to Imp{alpha} in an extended conformation. {yields} Mutational analyses verified the functional significance of MAL-Imp{alpha} interactions. {yields} Induced folding and NLS-masking by G-actins inhibit nuclear import of MAL. -- Abstract: The coordination of cytoskeletal actin dynamics with gene expression reprogramming is emerging as a crucial mechanism to control diverse cellular processes, including cell migration, differentiation and neuronal circuit assembly. The actin-binding transcriptional coactivator MAL (also known as MRTF-A/MKL1/BSAC) senses G-actin concentration and transduces Rho GTPase signals to serum response factor (SRF). MAL rapidly shuttles between the cytoplasm and the nucleus in unstimulated cells but Rho-induced depletion of G-actin leads to MAL nuclear accumulation and activation of transcription of SRF:MAL-target genes. Although the molecular and structural basis of actin-regulated nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of MAL is not understood fully, it is proposed that nuclear import of MAL is mediated by importin {alpha}/{beta} heterodimer, and that G-actin competes with importin {alpha}/{beta} for the binding to MAL. Here we present structural, biochemical and cell biological evidence that MAL has a classical bipartite nuclear localization signal (NLS) in the N-terminal 'RPEL' domain containing Arg-Pro-X-X-X-Glu-Leu (RPEL) motifs. The NLS residues of MAL adopt an extended conformation and bind along the surface groove of importin-{alpha}, interacting with the major- and minor-NLS binding sites. We also present a crystal structure of wild-type MAL RPEL domain in complex with five G-actins. Comparison of the importin-{alpha}- and actin-complexes revealed that the binding of G-actins to MAL is associated with folding of NLS residues into a helical conformation that is inappropriate for importin-{alpha} recognition.

  5. Econometrics and data of the 9 sector Dynamic General Equilibrium Model. Volume III. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Berndt, E.R.; Fraumeni, B.M.; Hudson, E.A.; Jorgenson, D.W.; Stoker, T.M.

    1981-03-01

    This report presents the econometrics and data of the 9 sector Dynamic General Equilibrium Model. There are two key components of 9DGEM - the model of household behavior and the model of produconcrneer behavior. The household model is concerned with decisions on consumption, saving, labor supply and the composition of consumption. The producer model is concerned with output price formation and determination of input patterns and purchases for each of the nine producing sectors. These components form the behavioral basis of DGEM. The remaining components are concerned with constraints, balance conditions, accounting, and government revenues and expenditures (these elements are developed in the report on the model specification).

  6. Identification of high-pressure phases III and IV in hydrogen: Simulating Raman spectra using molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magdău, Ioan B.; Ackland, Graeme J.

    2013-05-01

    We present a technique for extracting Raman intensities from ab initio molecular dynamics (MD) simulations at high temperature. The method is applied to the highly anharmonic case of dense hydrogen up to 500 K for pressures ranging from 180 to 300 GPa. On heating or pressurizing we find first-order phase transitions under the experimental conditions of the phase III-IV boundary. At even higher pressures, close to 350 GPa, we find a second phase transformation to the previously proposed Cmca-4. Our method enables, for the first time, a direct comparison of Raman vibrons between theory and experiment at finite temperature. This turns out to provide excellent discrimination between subtly different structures found in MD. We find candidate structures whose Raman spectra are in good agreement with experiment. The new phase obtained in high-temperature simulations adopts a dynamic, simple hexagonal structure with three layer types: freely rotating hydrogen molecules, static hexagonal trimers, and rotating hexagonal trimers. We show that previously calculated structures for phase IV are inconsistent with experiment, and their appearance in simulation is due to finite-size effects.

  7. Hybrid approach for including electronic and nuclear quantum effects in molecular dynamics simulations of hydrogen transfer reactions in enzymes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Billeter, Salomon R.; Webb, Simon P.; Iordanov, Tzvetelin; Agarwal, Pratul K.; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2001-04-01

    A hybrid approach for simulating proton and hydride transfer reactions in enzymes is presented. The electronic quantum effects are incorporated with an empirical valence bond approach. The nuclear quantum effects of the transferring hydrogen are included with a mixed quantum/classical molecular dynamics method in which the hydrogen nucleus is described as a multidimensional vibrational wave function. The free energy profiles are obtained as functions of a collective reaction coordinate. A perturbation formula is derived to incorporate the vibrationally adiabatic nuclear quantum effects into the free energy profiles. The dynamical effects are studied with the molecular dynamics with quantum transitions (MDQT) surface hopping method, which incorporates nonadiabatic transitions among the adiabatic hydrogen vibrational states. The MDQT method is combined with a reactive flux approach to calculate the transmission coefficient and to investigate the real-time dynamics of reactive trajectories. This hybrid approach includes nuclear quantum effects such as zero point energy, hydrogen tunneling, and excited vibrational states, as well as the dynamics of the complete enzyme and solvent. The nuclear quantum effects are incorporated during the generation of the free energy profiles and dynamical trajectories rather than subsequently added as corrections. Moreover, this methodology provides detailed mechanistic information at the molecular level and allows the calculation of rates and kinetic isotope effects. An initial application of this approach to the enzyme liver alcohol dehydrogenase is also presented.

  8. Generation of a transgenic medaka (Oryzias latipes) strain for visualization of nuclear dynamics in early developmental stages.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Takanobu; Iida, Atsuo; Maegawa, Shingo; Sehara-Fujisawa, Atsuko; Kinoshita, Masato

    2016-12-01

    In this study, we verified nuclear transport activity of an artificial nuclear localization signal (aNLS) in medaka fish (Oryzias latipes). We generated a transgenic medaka strain expresses the aNLS tagged enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) driven by a medaka beta-actin promoter. The aNLS-EGFP was accumulated in the nuclei of somatic tissues and yolk nuclei of oocytes, but undetectable in the spermatozoa. The fluorescent signal was observed from immediately after fertilization by a maternal contribution. Furthermore, male and female pronuclei were visualized in fertilized eggs, and nuclear dynamics of pronuclear fusion and subsequent cleavage were captured by time-lapse imaging. In contrast, SV40NLS exhibited no activity of nuclear transport in early embryos. In conclusion, the aNLS possesses a strong nuclear localization activity and is a useful probe for fluorescent observation of the pronuclei and nuclei in early developmental stage of medaka.

  9. The confluence of structure and dynamics in lanthanide(III) chelates: how dynamics help define structure in solution

    PubMed Central

    Webber, Benjamin C.; Woods, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Coordination exchange processes tend to dominate the solution state behaviour of lanthanide chelates and generally prohibit the study of small conformational changes. In this article we take advantage of coordinatively rigid Eu3+ chelates to examine the small conformational changes that occur in these chelates as water dissociatively exchanges in and out of the inner coordination sphere. The results show that the time-averaged conformation of the chelate alters as the water exchange rate increases. This conformational change reflects a change in the hydration state (q/rLnH6) of the chelate. The hydration state has recently come to be expressed as two separate parameters q and rLnH. However, these two parameters simultaneously describe the same structural considerations which in solution, are indistinguishable and intrinsically related to, and dependent upon, the dissociative water exchange rate. This realization leads to the broader understanding that a solution state structure can only be appreciated with reference to the dynamics of the system. PMID:24100299

  10. Prediction of ground motion and dynamic stress change in Baekdusan (Changbaishan) volcano caused by a North Korean nuclear explosion.

    PubMed

    Hong, Tae-Kyung; Choi, Eunseo; Park, Seongjun; Shin, Jin Soo

    2016-02-17

    Strong ground motions induce large dynamic stress changes that may disturb the magma chamber of a volcano, thus accelerating the volcanic activity. An underground nuclear explosion test near an active volcano constitutes a direct treat to the volcano. This study examined the dynamic stress changes of the magma chamber of Baekdusan (Changbaishan) that can be induced by hypothetical North Korean nuclear explosions. Seismic waveforms for hypothetical underground nuclear explosions at North Korean test site were calculated by using an empirical Green's function approach based on a source-spectral model of a nuclear explosion; such a technique is efficient for regions containing poorly constrained velocity structures. The peak ground motions around the volcano were estimated from empirical strong-motion attenuation curves. A hypothetical M7.0 North Korean underground nuclear explosion may produce peak ground accelerations of 0.1684 m/s(2) in the horizontal direction and 0.0917 m/s(2) in the vertical direction around the volcano, inducing peak dynamic stress change of 67 kPa on the volcano surface and ~120 kPa in the spherical magma chamber. North Korean underground nuclear explosions with magnitudes of 5.0-7.6 may induce overpressure in the magma chamber of several tens to hundreds of kilopascals.

  11. Prediction of ground motion and dynamic stress change in Baekdusan (Changbaishan) volcano caused by a North Korean nuclear explosion

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Tae-Kyung; Choi, Eunseo; Park, Seongjun; Shin, Jin Soo

    2016-01-01

    Strong ground motions induce large dynamic stress changes that may disturb the magma chamber of a volcano, thus accelerating the volcanic activity. An underground nuclear explosion test near an active volcano constitutes a direct treat to the volcano. This study examined the dynamic stress changes of the magma chamber of Baekdusan (Changbaishan) that can be induced by hypothetical North Korean nuclear explosions. Seismic waveforms for hypothetical underground nuclear explosions at North Korean test site were calculated by using an empirical Green’s function approach based on a source-spectral model of a nuclear explosion; such a technique is efficient for regions containing poorly constrained velocity structures. The peak ground motions around the volcano were estimated from empirical strong-motion attenuation curves. A hypothetical M7.0 North Korean underground nuclear explosion may produce peak ground accelerations of 0.1684 m/s2 in the horizontal direction and 0.0917 m/s2 in the vertical direction around the volcano, inducing peak dynamic stress change of 67 kPa on the volcano surface and ~120 kPa in the spherical magma chamber. North Korean underground nuclear explosions with magnitudes of 5.0–7.6 may induce overpressure in the magma chamber of several tens to hundreds of kilopascals. PMID:26884136

  12. Solvation Dynamics in Liquid Water. III. Energy Fluxes and Structural Changes.

    PubMed

    Rey, Rossend; Hynes, James T

    2017-02-16

    In previous installments it has been shown how a detailed analysis of energy fluxes induced by electronic excitation of a solute can provide a quantitative understanding of the dominant molecular energy flow channels characterizing solvation-and in particular, hydration- relaxation dynamics. Here this work and power approach is complemented with a detailed characterization of the changes induced by such energy fluxes. We first examine the water solvent's spatial and orientational distributions and the assorted energy fluxes in the various hydration shells of the solute to provide a molecular picture of the relaxation. The latter analysis is also used to address the issue of a possible "inverse snowball" effect, an ansatz concerning the time scales of the different hydration shells to reach equilibrium. We then establish a link between the instantaneous torque, exerted on the water solvent neighbors' principal rotational axes immediately after excitation and the final energy transferred into those librational motions, which are the dominant short-time energy receptor.

  13. P-body components, Dhh1 and Pat1, are involved in tRNA nuclear-cytoplasmic dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Hurto, Rebecca L.; Hopper, Anita K.

    2011-01-01

    The nuclear-cytoplasmic distribution of tRNA depends on the balance between tRNA nuclear export/re-export and retrograde tRNA nuclear import in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The distribution of tRNA is sensitive to nutrient availability as cells deprived of various nutrients exhibit tRNA nuclear accumulation. Starvation induces numerous events that result in translational repression and P-body formation. This study investigated the possible coordination of these responses with tRNA nuclear-cytoplasmic distribution. Dhh1 and Pat1 function in parallel to promote translation repression and P-body formation in response to starvation. Loss of both, Dhh1 and Pat1, results in a failure to repress translation and to induce P-body formation in response to glucose starvation. This study reports that nutrient deprived dhh1 pat1 cells also fail to accumulate tRNA within nuclei. Conversely, inhibition of translation initiation and induction of P-body formation by overproduction of Dhh1 or Pat1 cause tRNA nuclear accumulation in nutrient-replete conditions. Also, loss of the mRNA decapping activator, Lsm1, causes tRNA nuclear accumulation. However, the coordination between P-body formation, translation repression, and tRNA distribution is limited to the early part of the P-body formation/translation repression pathway as loss of mRNA decapping or 5′ to 3′ degradation does not influence tRNA nuclear-cytoplasmic dynamics. The data provide the first link between P-body formation/translation initiation and tRNA nuclear-cytoplasmic dynamics. The current model is that Dhh1 and Pat1 function in parallel to promote starvation-induced tRNA nuclear accumulation. PMID:21398402

  14. Dynamic nuclear polarization assisted spin diffusion for the solid effect case.

    PubMed

    Hovav, Yonatan; Feintuch, Akiva; Vega, Shimon

    2011-02-21

    The dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) process in solids depends on the magnitudes of hyperfine interactions between unpaired electrons and their neighboring (core) nuclei, and on the dipole-dipole interactions between all nuclei in the sample. The polarization enhancement of the bulk nuclei has been typically described in terms of a hyperfine-assisted polarization of a core nucleus by microwave irradiation followed by a dipolar-assisted spin diffusion process in the core-bulk nuclear system. This work presents a theoretical approach for the study of this combined process using a density matrix formalism. In particular, solid effect DNP on a single electron coupled to a nuclear spin system is considered, taking into account the interactions between the spins as well as the main relaxation mechanisms introduced via the electron, nuclear, and cross-relaxation rates. The basic principles of the DNP-assisted spin diffusion mechanism, polarizing the bulk nuclei, are presented, and it is shown that the polarization of the core nuclei and the spin diffusion process should not be treated separately. To emphasize this observation the coherent mechanism driving the pure spin diffusion process is also discussed. In order to demonstrate the effects of the interactions and relaxation mechanisms on the enhancement of the nuclear polarization, model systems of up to ten spins are considered and polarization buildup curves are simulated. A linear chain of spins consisting of a single electron coupled to a core nucleus, which in turn is dipolar coupled to a chain of bulk nuclei, is considered. The interaction and relaxation parameters of this model system were chosen in a way to enable a critical analysis of the polarization enhancement of all nuclei, and are not far from the values of (13)C nuclei in frozen (glassy) organic solutions containing radicals, typically used in DNP at high fields. Results from the simulations are shown, demonstrating the complex dependences of the DNP

  15. Development and application of the dynamic system doctor to nuclear reactor probabilistic risk assessments.

    SciTech Connect

    Kunsman, David Marvin; Aldemir, Tunc; Rutt, Benjamin; Metzroth, Kyle; Catalyurek, Umit; Denning, Richard; Hakobyan, Aram; Dunagan, Sean C.

    2008-05-01

    This LDRD project has produced a tool that makes probabilistic risk assessments (PRAs) of nuclear reactors - analyses which are very resource intensive - more efficient. PRAs of nuclear reactors are being increasingly relied on by the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (U.S.N.R.C.) for licensing decisions for current and advanced reactors. Yet, PRAs are produced much as they were 20 years ago. The work here applied a modern systems analysis technique to the accident progression analysis portion of the PRA; the technique was a system-independent multi-task computer driver routine. Initially, the objective of the work was to fuse the accident progression event tree (APET) portion of a PRA to the dynamic system doctor (DSD) created by Ohio State University. Instead, during the initial efforts, it was found that the DSD could be linked directly to a detailed accident progression phenomenological simulation code - the type on which APET construction and analysis relies, albeit indirectly - and thereby directly create and analyze the APET. The expanded DSD computational architecture and infrastructure that was created during this effort is called ADAPT (Analysis of Dynamic Accident Progression Trees). ADAPT is a system software infrastructure that supports execution and analysis of multiple dynamic event-tree simulations on distributed environments. A simulator abstraction layer was developed, and a generic driver was implemented for executing simulators on a distributed environment. As a demonstration of the use of the methodological tool, ADAPT was applied to quantify the likelihood of competing accident progression pathways occurring for a particular accident scenario in a particular reactor type using MELCOR, an integrated severe accident analysis code developed at Sandia. (ADAPT was intentionally created with flexibility, however, and is not limited to interacting with only one code. With minor coding changes to input files, ADAPT can be linked to other

  16. Characterization and comparison of 128x128 element nuclear optical dynamic display system resistive arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayes, Alexander G.; Caraco, Fino J.; Harrison, David C.; Sorvari, John M.

    2006-05-01

    Dynamic infrared scene projection is a common technology used to provide end to end testing and characterization of infrared sensor systems. Scene projection technology will play an increasing role in infrared system evaluation and development as the cost and risk of flight testing increases and new display technologies begin to emerge. This paper describes a series of tests performed in the Seeker Experimental System (SES) at MIT Lincoln Laboratory (MIT LL). A small collection of 128×128 element Nuclear Optical Dynamic Display System (NODDS) resistive arrays were tested and compared using FIESTA drive electronics developed by ATK Mission Research. The residual spatial nonuniformity of the NODDS arrays were calculated after applying a sparse grid based nonuniformity correction algorithm developed at MIT LL. The nonuniformity correction algorithm is a slightly modified version of the industry standard sparse grid technique and is outlined in this paper. Additional metrics used to compare the arrays include emitter temporal response, raw nonuniformity, transfer function smoothness, dynamic range, and bad display pixel characteristics.

  17. Dynamic modeling efforts for system interface studies for nuclear hydrogen production.

    SciTech Connect

    Vilim, R. B.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2007-08-15

    System interface studies require not only identifying economically optimal equipment configurations, which involves studying mainly full power steady-state operation, but also assessing the operability of a design during load change and startup and assessing safety-related behavior during upset conditions. This latter task is performed with a dynamic simulation code. This report reviews the requirements of such a code. It considers the types of transients that will need to be simulated, the phenomena that will be present, the models best suited for representing the phenomena, and the type of numerical solution scheme for solving the models to obtain the dynamic response of the combined nuclear-hydrogen plant. Useful insight into plant transient behavior prior to running a dynamics code is obtained by some simple methods that take into account component time constants and energy capacitances. Methods for determining reactor stability, plant startup time, and temperature response during load change, and tripping of the reactor are described. Some preliminary results are presented.

  18. Constraining the Absolute Orientation of eta Carinae's Binary Orbit: A 3-D Dynamical Model for the Broad [Fe III] Emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madura, T. I.; Gull, T. R.; Owocki, S. P.; Groh, J. H.; Okazaki, A. T.; Russell, C. M. P.

    2011-01-01

    We present a three-dimensional (3-D) dynamical model for the broad [Fe III] emission observed in Eta Carinae using the Hubble Space Telescope/Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (HST/STIS). This model is based on full 3-D Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) simulations of Eta Car's binary colliding winds. Radiative transfer codes are used to generate synthetic spectro-images of [Fe III] emission line structures at various observed orbital phases and STIS slit position angles (PAs). Through a parameter study that varies the orbital inclination i, the PA(theta) that the orbital plane projection of the line-of-sight makes with the apastron side of the semi-major axis, and the PA on the sky of the orbital axis, we are able, for the first time, to tightly constrain the absolute 3-D orientation of the binary orbit. To simultaneously reproduce the blue-shifted emission arcs observed at orbital phase 0.976, STIS slit PA = +38deg, and the temporal variations in emission seen at negative slit PAs, the binary needs to have an i approx. = 130deg to 145deg, Theta approx. = -15deg to +30deg, and an orbital axis projected on the sky at a P A approx. = 302deg to 327deg east of north. This represents a system with an orbital axis that is closely aligned with the inferred polar axis of the Homunculus nebula, in 3-D. The companion star, Eta(sub B), thus orbits clockwise on the sky and is on the observer's side of the system at apastron. This orientation has important implications for theories for the formation of the Homunculus and helps lay the groundwork for orbital modeling to determine the stellar masses.

  19. Nuclear Dynamics Consequence Analysis (NDCA) for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel in an Underground Geologic Repository--Volume 2: Methodology and Results

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, L.L.; Wilson, J.R.; Sanchez, L.C.; Aguilar, R.; Trellue, H.R.; Cochrane, K.; Rath, J.S.

    1998-10-01

    The US Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management's (DOE/EM's) National Spent Nuclear Fuel Program (NSNFP), through a collaboration between Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), is conducting a systematic Nuclear Dynamics Consequence Analysis (NDCA) of the disposal of SNFs in an underground geologic repository sited in unsaturated tuff. This analysis is intended to provide interim guidance to the DOE for the management of the SNF while they prepare for final compliance evaluation. This report presents results from a Nuclear Dynamics Consequence Analysis (NDCA) that examined the potential consequences and risks of criticality during the long-term disposal of spent nuclear fuel owned by DOE-EM. This analysis investigated the potential of post-closure criticality, the consequences of a criticality excursion, and the probability frequency for post-closure criticality. The results of the NDCA are intended to provide the DOE-EM with a technical basis for measuring risk which can be used for screening arguments to eliminate post-closure criticality FEPs (features, events and processes) from consideration in the compliance assessment because of either low probability or low consequences. This report is composed of an executive summary (Volume 1), the methodology and results of the NDCA (Volume 2), and the applicable appendices (Volume 3).

  20. Nuclear Dynamics Consequence Analysis (NDCA) for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel in an Underground Geologic Repository--Volume 1: Executive Summary

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, L.L.; Wilson, J.R.; Sanchez, L.Z.; Aguilar, R.; Trellue, H.R.; Cochrane, K.; Rath, J.S.

    1998-10-01

    The US Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management's (DOE/EM's) National Spent Nuclear Fuel Program (NSNFP), through a collaboration between Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), is conducting a systematic Nuclear Dynamics Consequence Analysis (NDCA) of the disposal of SNFs in an underground geologic repository sited in unsaturated tuff. This analysis is intended to provide interim guidance to the DOE for the management of the SNF while they prepare for final compliance evaluation. This report presents results from a Nuclear Dynamics Consequence Analysis (NDCA) that examined the potential consequences and risks of criticality during the long-term disposal of spent nuclear fuel owned by DOE-EM. This analysis investigated the potential of post-closure criticality, the consequences of a criticality excursion, and the probability frequency for post-closure criticality. The results of the NDCA are intended to provide the DOE-EM with a technical basis for measuring risk which can be used for screening arguments to eliminate post-closure criticality FEPs (features, events and processes) from consideration in the compliance assessment because of either low probability or low consequences. This report is composed of an executive summary (Volume 1), the methodology and results of the NDCA (Volume 2), and the applicable appendices (Volume 3).

  1. Dynamic two-center interference in high-order harmonic generation from molecules with attosecond nuclear motion.

    PubMed

    Baker, S; Robinson, J S; Lein, M; Chirilă, C C; Torres, R; Bandulet, H C; Comtois, D; Kieffer, J C; Villeneuve, D M; Tisch, J W G; Marangos, J P

    2008-08-01

    We report a new dynamic two-center interference effect in high-harmonic generation from H2, in which the attosecond nuclear motion of H2+ initiated at ionization causes interference to be observed at lower harmonic orders than would be the case for static nuclei. To enable this measurement we utilize a recently developed technique for probing the attosecond nuclear dynamics of small molecules. The experimental results are reproduced by a theoretical analysis based upon the strong-field approximation which incorporates the temporally dependent two-center interference term.

  2. Nuclear quantum effect on intramolecular hydrogen bond of hydrogen maleate anion: An ab initio path integral molecular dynamics study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawashima, Yukio; Tachikawa, Masanori

    2013-05-01

    Ab initio path integral molecular dynamics simulation was performed to understand the nuclear quantum effect on the hydrogen bond of hydrogen malonate anion. Static calculation predicted the proton transfer barrier as 0.12 kcal/mol. Conventional ab initio molecular dynamics simulation at 300 K found proton distribution with a double peak on the proton transfer coordinate. Inclusion of thermal effect alone elongates the hydrogen bond length, which increases the barrier height. Inclusion of nuclear quantum effect washes out this barrier, and distributes a single broad peak in the center. H/D isotope effect on the proton transfer is also discussed.

  3. Dynamics of starbursting dwarf galaxies. III. A H I study of 18 nearby objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lelli, Federico; Verheijen, Marc; Fraternali, Filippo

    2014-06-01

    We investigate the dynamics of starbursting dwarf galaxies, using both new and archival H I observations. We consider 18 nearby galaxies that have been resolved into single stars by HST observations, providing their star formation history and total stellar mass. We find that 9 objects have a regularly rotating H I disk, 7 have a kinematically disturbed H I disk, and 2 show unsettled H I distributions. Two galaxies (NGC 5253 and UGC 6456) show a velocity gradient along the minor axis of the H I disk, which we interpret as strong radial motions. For galaxies with a regularly rotating disk we derive rotation curves, while for galaxies with a kinematically disturbed disk, we estimate the rotation velocities in their outer parts. We derive baryonic fractions within about 3 optical scale lengths and find that, on average, baryons constitute at least 30% of the total mass. Despite the star formation having injected ~1056 ergs in the ISM in the past ~500 Myr, these starbursting dwarfs have both baryonic and gas fractions similar to those of typical dwarf irregulars, suggesting that they did not eject a large amount of gas out of their potential wells. Appendices are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.orgH I datacubes (FITS files) are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/566/A71

  4. Dynamic nuclear renography kinetic analysis: Four-compartment model for assessing kidney function

    SciTech Connect

    Raswan, T. R. Haryanto, F.

    2014-09-30

    Dynamic nuclear renography method produces TACs of kidneys and bladder. Multiple TACs data can be further analyzed to obtain the overview of urinary system's condition. Tracer kinetic analysis was performed using four-compartment models. The system's model consist of four irreversible compartment with four transport constants (k1, k2, k3 and k4). The mathematical expressions of tracer's distributions is fitted to experimental data (TACs) resulting in model constants. This transport constants represent the urinary system behavior, and later can be used for analyzing system's condition. Different intervals of kinetics parameter are clearly shown by abnormal system with respect to the normal one. Furthermore, the system with delayed uptake has 82% lower uptake parameters (k1 and k2) than normal one. Meanwhile, the system with prolonged clearance time has its kinetics parameters k3 or k4 lower than the others. This model is promising for quantitatively describe urinary system's function especially if supplied with more data.

  5. Structural dynamic and thermal stress analysis of nuclear reactor vessel support system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chi-Diango, J.

    1972-01-01

    A nuclear reactor vessel is supported by a Z-ring and a box ring girder. The two proposed structural configurations to transmit the loads from the Z-ring and the box ring girder to the foundation are shown. The cantilever concrete ledge transmitting the load from the Z-ring and the box girder via the cavity wall to the foundation is shown, along with the loads being transmitted through one of the six steel columns. Both of these two supporting systems were analyzed by using rigid format 9 of NASTRAN for dynamic loads, and the thermal stresses were analyzed by AXISOL. The six column configuration was modeled by a combination of plate and bar elements, and the concrete cantilever ledge configuration was modeled by plate elements. Both configurations were found structurally satisfactory; however, nonstructural considerations favored the concrete cantilever ledge.

  6. Waveguide transition with vacuum window for multiband dynamic nuclear polarization systems.

    PubMed

    Rybalko, Oleksandr; Bowen, Sean; Zhurbenko, Vitaliy; Ardenkjær-Larsen, Jan Henrik

    2016-05-01

    A low loss waveguide transition section and oversized microwave vacuum window covering several frequency bands (94 GHz, 140 GHz, 188 GHz) is presented. The transition is compact and was optimized for multiband Dynamic Nuclear Polarization (DNP) systems in a full-wave simulator. The window is more broadband than commercially available windows, which are usually optimized for single band operation. It is demonstrated that high-density polyethylene with urethane adhesive can be used as a low loss microwave vacuum window in multiband DNP systems. The overall assembly performance and dimensions are found using full-wave simulations. The practical aspects of the window implementation in the waveguide are discussed. To verify the design and simulation results, the window is tested experimentally at the three frequencies of interest.

  7. Waveguide transition with vacuum window for multiband dynamic nuclear polarization systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rybalko, Oleksandr; Bowen, Sean; Zhurbenko, Vitaliy; Ardenkjær-Larsen, Jan Henrik

    2016-05-01

    A low loss waveguide transition section and oversized microwave vacuum window covering several frequency bands (94 GHz, 140 GHz, 188 GHz) is presented. The transition is compact and was optimized for multiband Dynamic Nuclear Polarization (DNP) systems in a full-wave simulator. The window is more broadband than commercially available windows, which are usually optimized for single band operation. It is demonstrated that high-density polyethylene with urethane adhesive can be used as a low loss microwave vacuum window in multiband DNP systems. The overall assembly performance and dimensions are found using full-wave simulations. The practical aspects of the window implementation in the waveguide are discussed. To verify the design and simulation results, the window is tested experimentally at the three frequencies of interest.

  8. Dynamics of the tri-nuclear system at spontaneous fission of 252Cf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tashkhodjaev, R. B.; Nasirov, A. K.; Alpomeshev, E. Kh.

    2016-11-01

    To describe the dynamics of ternary fission of 252Cf an equation of motion of the tri-nuclear system was obtained and it was solved numerically. The fission of the 70Ni+50Ca+132Sn channel was chosen as one of the more probable channels of true ternary fission of 252Cf. The collinearity of ternary fission was checked by analyzing the results of the equation of motion. The results show that if initially all nuclei are placed collinearly (potential energy of this position is the smallest) and the component of the middle fragment's initial velocity which is perpendicular to this line is zero, then ternary fission is collinear, otherwise noncollinear ternary fission takes place.

  9. Crucial role of nuclear dynamics for electron injection in a dye–semiconductor complex

    DOE PAGES

    Monti, Adriano; Negre, Christian F. A.; Batista, Victor S.; ...

    2015-06-05

    In this study, we investigate the electron injection from a terrylene-based chromophore to the TiO2 semiconductor bridged by a recently proposed phenyl-amide-phenyl molecular rectifier. The mechanism of electron transfer is studied by means of quantum dynamics simulations using an extended Hückel Hamiltonian. It is found that the inclusion of the nuclear motion is necessary to observe the photoinduced electron transfer. In particular, the fluctuations of the dihedral angle between the terrylene and the phenyl ring modulate the localization and thus the electronic coupling between the donor and acceptor states involved in the injection process. The electron propagation shows characteristic oscillatorymore » features that correlate with interatomic distance fluctuations in the bridge, which are associated with the vibrational modes driving the process. The understanding of such effects is important for the design of functional dyes with optimal injection and rectification properties.« less

  10. Dynamic nuclear renography kinetic analysis: Four-compartment model for assessing kidney function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raswan, T. R.; Haryanto, F.

    2014-09-01

    Dynamic nuclear renography method produces TACs of kidneys and bladder. Multiple TACs data can be further analyzed to obtain the overview of urinary system's condition. Tracer kinetic analysis was performed using four-compartment models. The system's model consist of four irreversible compartment with four transport constants (k1, k2, k3 and k4). The mathematical expressions of tracer's distributions is fitted to experimental data (TACs) resulting in model constants. This transport constants represent the urinary system behavior, and later can be used for analyzing system's condition. Different intervals of kinetics parameter are clearly shown by abnormal system with respect to the normal one. Furthermore, the system with delayed uptake has 82% lower uptake parameters (k1 and k2) than normal one. Meanwhile, the system with prolonged clearance time has its kinetics parameters k3 or k4 lower than the others. This model is promising for quantitatively describe urinary system's function especially if supplied with more data.

  11. A dynamic nuclear polarization strategy for multi-dimensional Earth's field NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Halse, Meghan E; Callaghan, Paul T

    2008-12-01

    Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) is introduced as a powerful tool for polarization enhancement in multi-dimensional Earth's field NMR spectroscopy. Maximum polarization enhancements, relative to thermal equilibrium in the Earth's magnetic field, are calculated theoretically and compared to the more traditional prepolarization approach for NMR sensitivity enhancement at ultra-low fields. Signal enhancement factors on the order of 3000 are demonstrated experimentally using DNP with a nitroxide free radical, TEMPO, which contains an unpaired electron which is strongly coupled to a neighboring (14)N nucleus via the hyperfine interaction. A high-quality 2D (19)F-(1)H COSY spectrum acquired in the Earth's magnetic field with DNP enhancement is presented and compared to simulation.

  12. Impact of nuclear dynamics on interatomic Coulombic decay in a He dimer

    SciTech Connect

    Sisourat, Nicolas; Kryzhevoi, Nikolai V.; Cederbaum, Lorenz S.; Kolorenc, Premysl; Scheit, Simona

    2010-11-15

    After simultaneous ionization and excitation of one helium atom within the giant weakly bound helium dimer, the excited ion can relax via interatomic Coulombic decay (ICD) and the excess energy is transferred to ionize the neighboring helium atom. We showed [Sisourat et al. Nature Phys. 6, 508 (2010)] that the distributions of the kinetic energy released by the two ions reflect the nodal structures of the ICD-involved vibrational wave functions. We also demonstrated that energy transfer via ICD between the two helium atoms can take place over more than 14 A. We report here a more detailed analysis of the ICD process and of the impact of the nuclear dynamics on the electronic decay. Nonadiabatic effects during the ICD process and the accuracy of the potential energy curve of helium dimer and of the computed decay rates are also investigated.

  13. A 129 GHz dynamic nuclear polarizer in a wide-bore superconducting magnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lumata, Lloyd; Martin, Richard; Jindal, Ashish; Malloy, Craig; Sherry, A. Dean; Conradi, Mark S.; Merritt, Matthew

    2011-03-01

    Dynamic nuclear polarization via fast dissolution method has allowed production of solutions containing highly-polarized nuclei (> 10 , 000 - foldenhancementoftheroom - temperatureliquid - stateNMRsignal) ofbio - moleculesfor invitro and invivo metabolicnuclearmagneticresonancespectroscopy (MRS) andimaging (MRI) . Herewepresenttheconstructionanduseofa 129 GHzdynamicnuclearpolarizerina 4.6 Twide - boresuperconductingmagnet . Therelativelylargebore (150 mm) ofthesuperconductingmagnetallowstheuseofacryostatseparatefromthemagnetandroutingofthemicrowavessuchthatthewaveguidedoesnothavetoberemovedbeforedissolution . A 100 mW microwave source operating at 129 GHz was used to irradiate the samples. The cryostat has a 10- liter liquid Helium capacity which lasts for 10-12 hrs of continuous operation. Base temperature of 1.15 K is achieved with a 450 m 3 / hr roots blower pump. Preliminary results will be discussed. This work is supported in part by the National Institutes of Health grant numbers 1R21EB009147-01 and RR02584.

  14. Dynamic Nuclear Polarization of membrane proteins: covalently bound spin-labels at protein-protein interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Wylie, Benjamin J; Dzikovski, Boris G.; Pawsey, Shane; Caporini, Marc; Rosay, Melanie; Freed, Jack H.; McDermott, Ann E.

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate that dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) of membrane proteins in lipid bilayers may be achieved using a novel polarizing agent: pairs of spin labels covalently bound to a protein of interest interacting at an intermolecular interaction surface. For gramicidin A, nitroxide tags attached to the N-terminal intermolecular interface region become proximal only when bimolecular channels forms in the membrane. We obtained signal enhancements of 6-fold for the dimeric protein. The enhancement affect was comparable to that of a doubly tagged sample of gramicidin C, with intramolecular spin pairs. This approach could be a powerful and selective means for signal enhancement in membrane proteins, and for recognizing intermolecular interfaces. PMID:25828256

  15. Crucial role of nuclear dynamics for electron injection in a dye–semiconductor complex

    SciTech Connect

    Monti, Adriano; Negre, Christian F. A.; Batista, Victor S.; Rego, Luis G. C.; de Groot, Huub J. M.; Buda, Francesco

    2015-06-05

    In this study, we investigate the electron injection from a terrylene-based chromophore to the TiO2 semiconductor bridged by a recently proposed phenyl-amide-phenyl molecular rectifier. The mechanism of electron transfer is studied by means of quantum dynamics simulations using an extended Hückel Hamiltonian. It is found that the inclusion of the nuclear motion is necessary to observe the photoinduced electron transfer. In particular, the fluctuations of the dihedral angle between the terrylene and the phenyl ring modulate the localization and thus the electronic coupling between the donor and acceptor states involved in the injection process. The electron propagation shows characteristic oscillatory features that correlate with interatomic distance fluctuations in the bridge, which are associated with the vibrational modes driving the process. The understanding of such effects is important for the design of functional dyes with optimal injection and rectification properties.

  16. CRISPR-Cas9 nuclear dynamics and target recognition in living cells

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Hanhui; Tu, Li-Chun; Zhang, Shaojie; Grunwald, David

    2016-01-01

    The bacterial CRISPR-Cas9 system has been repurposed for genome engineering, transcription modulation, and chromosome imaging in eukaryotic cells. However, the nuclear dynamics of clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)–associated protein 9 (Cas9) guide RNAs and target interrogation are not well defined in living cells. Here, we deployed a dual-color CRISPR system to directly measure the stability of both Cas9 and guide RNA. We found that Cas9 is essential for guide RNA stability and that the nuclear Cas9–guide RNA complex levels limit the targeting efficiency. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching measurements revealed that single mismatches in the guide RNA seed sequence reduce the target residence time from >3 h to as low as <2 min in a nucleotide identity- and position-dependent manner. We further show that the duration of target residence correlates with cleavage activity. These results reveal that CRISPR discriminates between genuine versus mismatched targets for genome editing via radical alterations in residence time. PMID:27551060

  17. Hyperpolarization of nitrogen-15 nuclei by cross polarization and dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milani, Jonas; Vuichoud, Basile; Bornet, Aurélien; Melzi, Roberto; Jannin, Sami; Bodenhausen, Geoffrey

    2017-01-01

    Dynamic Nuclear Polarization (DNP) is often achieved by the direct transfer of polarization from electrons to nuclei such as 13C, induced by microwave saturation of the wings of narrow EPR lines of radicals like trityl. In the indirect approach on the other hand, DNP is used to transfer the polarization from the electrons of radicals such as nitroxides that have broad EPR lines to nuclear spins I = 1H, followed by cross-polarization (CP) from I = 1H to S = 13C or other nuclei with low gyromagnetic ratios. This approach is particularly attractive for S = 15N, since direct DNP yields modest polarizations P(15N) < 4% with build-up times that can be as long as τDNP(15N) > 2 h. In this paper, we show that CP from 1H to 15N at 1.2 K can yield P(15N) = 25% with τCP-DNP(15N) = 10-15 min. After rapid dissolution and transfer to a solution-state NMR spectrometer, a polarization P(15N) = 20% was observed at 300 K. The longitudinal relaxation times in solution can be as long as T1(15N) > 800 s in favorable cases.

  18. Effect of Lanthanide Ions on Dynamic Nuclear Polarization Enhancement and Liquid State T1 Relaxation

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, Jeremy; Fain, Sean B.; Rowland, Ian J

    2012-01-01

    In the dynamic nuclear polarization process, microwave irradiation facilitates exchange of polarization from a radical’s unpaired electron to nuclear spins at cryogenic temperatures, increasing polarization by >10000. Doping samples with Gd3+ ions further increases the achievable solid-state polarization. However, upon dissolution, paramagnetic lanthanide metals can be potent relaxation agents, decreasing liquid-state polarization. Here, the effects of lanthanide metals on the solid and liquid-state magnetic properties of [1-13C]pyruvate are studied. The results show that in addition to gadolinium, holmium not only increases the achievable polarization but also the rate of polarization. Liquid-state relaxation studies found that unlike gadolinium, holmium minimally affects T1. Additionally, results reveal that linear contrast agents dissociate in pyruvic acid, greatly reducing liquid-state T1. While macrocyclic agents do not readily dissociate, they yield lower solid-state polarization. Results indicate that polarization with free lanthanides and subsequent chelation during dissolution produces the highest polarization enhancement while minimizing liquid-state relaxation. PMID:22367680

  19. Operational Characteristics of a 14-W 140-GHz Gyrotron for Dynamic Nuclear Polarization

    PubMed Central

    Joye, Colin D.; Griffin, Robert G.; Hornstein, Melissa K.; Hu, Kan-Nian; Kreischer, Kenneth E.; Rosay, Melanie; Shapiro, Michael A.; Sirigiri, Jagadishwar R.; Temkin, Richard J.; Woskov, Paul P.

    2006-01-01

    The operating characteristics of a 140-GHz 14-W long pulse gyrotron are presented. The device is being used in dynamic nuclear polarization enhanced nuclear magnetic resonance (DNP/NMR) spectroscopy experiments. The gyrotron yields 14 W peak power at 139.65 GHz from the TE(0,3) operating mode using a 12.3-kV 25-mA electron beam. Additionally, up to 12 W peak has been observed in the TE(2,3) mode at 136.90 GHz. A series of mode converters transform the TE(0,3) operating mode to the TE(1,1) mode. Experimental results are compared with nonlinear simulations and show reasonable agreement. The millimeter-wave output beam was imaged in a single shot using a pyroelectric camera. The mode patterns matched reasonably well to theory for both the TE(0,1) mode and the TE(1,1) mode. Repeatable mode patterns were obtained at intervals ranging from 0.8 s apart to 11 min apart at the output of the final mode converter. PMID:17431442

  20. Theoretical aspects of dynamic nuclear polarization in the solid state--spin temperature and thermal mixing.

    PubMed

    Hovav, Yonatan; Feintuch, Akiva; Vega, Shimon

    2013-01-07

    Dynamic nuclear polarization is a method which allows for a dramatic increase of the NMR signals due to polarization transfer between electrons and their neighboring nuclei, via microwave irradiation. These experiments have become popular in recent years due to the ability to create hyper-polarized chemically and biologically relevant molecules, in frozen glass forming mixtures containing free radicals. Three mechanisms have been proposed for the polarization transfer between electrons and their surrounding nuclei in such non-conducting samples: the solid effect and cross effect mechanisms, which are based on quantum mechanics and relaxation on small spin systems, and thermal mixing, which originates from the thermodynamic macroscopic notion of spin temperature. We have recently introduced a spin model, which is based on the density matrix formalism and includes relaxation, and applied it to study the solid effect and cross effect mechanisms on small spin systems. In this publication we use the same model to describe the thermal mixing mechanism, and the creation of spin temperature. This is obtained without relying on the spin temperature formalism. Simulations of small model systems are used on systems with homogeneously and inhomogeneously broadened EPR lines. For the case of a homogeneously broadened line we show that the nuclear enhancement results from the thermal mixing and solid effect mechanisms, and that spin temperatures are created in the system. In the inhomogeneous case the enhancements are attributed to the solid effect and cross effect mechanisms, but not thermal mixing.

  1. The Dynamic Architectural and Epigenetic Nuclear Landscape: Developing the Genomic Almanac of Biology and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Tai, Phillip W. L.; Zaidi, Sayyed K.; Wu, Hai; Grandy, Rodrigo A.; Montecino, Martin M.; van Wijnen, André J.; Lian, Jane B.; Stein, Gary S.; Stein, Janet L.

    2014-01-01

    Compaction of the eukaryotic genome into the confined space of the cell nucleus must occur faithfully throughout each cell cycle to retain gene expression fidelity. For decades, experimental limitations to study the structural organization of the interphase nucleus restricted our understanding of its contributions towards gene regulation and disease. However, within the past few years, our capability to visualize chromosomes in vivo with sophisticated fluorescence microscopy, and to characterize chromosomal regulatory environments via massively-parallel sequencing methodologies have drastically changed how we currently understand epigenetic gene control within the context of three-dimensional nuclear structure. The rapid rate at which information on nuclear structure is unfolding brings challenges to compare and contrast recent observations with historic findings. In this review, we discuss experimental breakthroughs that have influenced how we understand and explore the dynamic structure and function of the nucleus, and how we can incorporate historical perspectives with insights acquired from the ever-evolving advances in molecular biology and pathology. PMID:24242872

  2. Micropillar displacements by cell traction forces are mechanically correlated with nuclear dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Qingsen; Makhija, Ekta; Hameed, F.M.; Shivashankar, G.V.

    2015-05-29

    Cells sense physical cues at the level of focal adhesions and transduce them to the nucleus by biochemical and mechanical pathways. While the molecular intermediates in the mechanical links have been well studied, their dynamic coupling is poorly understood. In this study, fibroblast cells were adhered to micropillar arrays to probe correlations in the physical coupling between focal adhesions and nucleus. For this, we used novel imaging setup to simultaneously visualize micropillar deflections and EGFP labeled chromatin structure at high spatial and temporal resolution. We observed that micropillar deflections, depending on their relative positions, were positively or negatively correlated to nuclear and heterochromatin movements. Our results measuring the time scales between micropillar deflections and nucleus centroid displacement are suggestive of a strong elastic coupling that mediates differential force transmission to the nucleus. - Highlights: • Correlation between focal adhesions and nucleus studied using novel imaging setup. • Micropillar and nuclear displacements were measured at high resolution. • Correlation timescales show strong elastic coupling between cell edge and nucleus.

  3. Milli-tesla NMR and spectrophotometry of liquids hyperpolarized by dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yue; Chen, Chia-Hsiu; Wilson, Zechariah; Savukov, Igor; Hilty, Christian

    2016-09-01

    Hyperpolarization methods offer a unique means of improving low signal strength obtained in low-field NMR. Here, simultaneous measurements of NMR at a field of 0.7 mT and laser optical absorption from samples hyperpolarized by dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization (D-DNP) are reported. The NMR measurement field closely corresponds to a typical field encountered during sample injection in a D-DNP experiment. The optical spectroscopy allows determination of the concentration of the free radical required for DNP. Correlation of radical concentration to NMR measurement of spin polarization and spin-lattice relaxation time allows determination of relaxivity and can be used for optimization of the D-DNP process. Further, the observation of the nuclear Overhauser effect originating from hyperpolarized spins is demonstrated. Signals from 1H and 19F in a mixture of trifluoroethanol and water are detected in a single spectrum, while different atoms of the same type are distinguished by J-coupling patterns. The resulting signal changes of individual peaks are indicative of molecular contact, suggesting a new application area of hyperpolarized low-field NMR for the determination of intermolecular interactions.

  4. Dynamic nuclear polarization at 9 T using a novel 250 GHz gyrotron microwave source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bajaj, V. S.; Farrar, C. T.; Hornstein, M. K.; Mastovsky, I.; Vieregg, J.; Bryant, J.; Eléna, B.; Kreischer, K. E.; Temkin, R. J.; Griffin, R. G.

    2011-12-01

    In this communication, we report enhancements of nuclear spin polarization by dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) in static and spinning solids at a magnetic field strength of 9 T (250 GHz for g = 2 electrons, 380 MHz for 1H). In these experiments, 1H enhancements of up to 170 ± 50 have been observed in 1- 13C-glycine dispersed in a 60:40 glycerol/water matrix at temperatures of 20 K; in addition, we have observed significant enhancements in 15N spectra of unoriented pf1-bacteriophage. Finally, enhancements of ˜17 have been obtained in two-dimensional 13C- 13C chemical shift correlation spectra of the amino acid U- 13C, 15N-proline during magic angle spinning (MAS), demonstrating the stability of the DNP experiment for sustained acquisition and for quantitative experiments incorporating dipolar recoupling. In all cases, we have exploited the thermal mixing DNP mechanism with the nitroxide radical 4-amino-TEMPO as the paramagnetic dopant. These are the highest frequency DNP experiments performed to date and indicate that significant signal enhancements can be realized using the thermal mixing mechanism even at elevated magnetic fields. In large measure, this is due to the high microwave power output of the 250 GHz gyrotron oscillator used in these experiments.

  5. Dynamics of asymmetric binary glass formers. I. A dielectric and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy study

    SciTech Connect

    Kahlau, R.; Bock, D.; Schmidtke, B.; Rössler, E. A.

    2014-01-28

    Dielectric spectroscopy as well as {sup 2}H and {sup 31}P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) are applied to probe the component dynamics of the binary glass former tripropyl phosphate (TPP)/polystyrene (PS/PS-d{sub 3}) in the full concentration (c{sub TPP}) range. In addition, depolarized light scattering and differential scanning calorimetry experiments are performed. Two glass transition temperatures are found: T{sub g1}(c{sub TPP}) reflects PS dynamics and shows a monotonic plasticizer effect, while the lower T{sub g2}(c{sub TPP}) exhibits a maximum and is attributed to (faster) TPP dynamics, occurring in a slowly moving or immobilized PS matrix. Dielectric spectroscopy probing solely TPP identifies two different time scales, which are attributed to two sub-ensembles. One of them, again, shows fast TPP dynamics (α{sub 2}-process), the other (α{sub 1}-process) displays time constants identical with those of the slow PS matrix. Upon heating the α{sub 1}-fraction of TPP decreases until above some temperature T{sub c} only a single α{sub 2}-population exists. Inversely, below T{sub c} a fraction of the TPP molecules is trapped by the PS matrix. At low c{sub TPP} the α{sub 2}-relaxation does not follow frequency-temperature superposition (FTS), instead it is governed by a temperature independent distribution of activation energies leading to correlation times which follow Arrhenius laws, i.e., the α{sub 2}-relaxation resembles a secondary process. Yet, {sup 31}P NMR demonstrates that it involves isotropic reorientations of TPP molecules within a slowly moving or rigid matrix of PS. At high c{sub TPP} the super-Arrhenius temperature dependence of τ{sub 2}(T), as well as FTS are recovered, known as typical of the glass transition in neat systems.

  6. Induction and Relaxation Dynamics of the Regulatory Network Controlling the Type III Secretion System encoded within Salmonella Pathogenicity Island 1

    PubMed Central

    Temme, Karsten; Salis, Howard; Tullman-Ercek, Danielle; Levskaya, Anselm; Hong, Soon-Ho; Voigt, Christopher A.

    2008-01-01

    Summary Bacterial pathogenesis requires the precise spatial and temporal control of gene expression, the dynamics of which are controlled by regulatory networks. A network encoded within Salmonella Pathogenicity Island 1 controls the expression of a type III protein secretion system involved in the invasion of host cells. The dynamics of this network are measured in single cells using promoter-green fluorescent protein (gfp) reporters and flow cytometry. During induction, there is a temporal order of gene expression, with transcriptional inputs turning on first, followed by structure, and effector genes. The promoters show varying stochastic properties, where graded inputs are converted into all-or-none and hybrid responses. The relaxation dynamics are measured by shifting cells from inducing into non-inducing conditions and measuring the fluorescence decay. The gfp expressed from promoters controlling the transcriptional inputs (hilC and hilD) and structural genes (prgH) decay exponentially with a characteristic time of 50–55 minutes. In contrast, the gfp expressed from a promoter controlling the expression of effectors (sicA) persists for 110 ± 9 minutes. This promoter is controlled by a genetic circuit formed by a transcription factor (InvF), chaperone (SicA) and secreted protein (SipC) that regulates effector expression in response to the secretion capacity of the cell. A mathematical model of this circuit demonstrates that the delay is due to a split positive feedback loop. This model is tested in a ΔsicA knockout where sicA is complemented with and without the feedback loop. The delay is eliminated when the feedback loop is deleted. Further, a robustness analysis of the model predicts that the delay time can be tuned by changing the affinity of SicA:InvF multimers to an operator in the sicA promoter. This prediction is used to construct a targeted library, which contains mutants with both longer and shorter delays. This combination of theory and

  7. A multiwavelength study of the IRAS Deep Survey galaxy sample. III. Spectral classification and dynamical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bettoni, D.; Mazzei, P.; Della Valle, A.

    2012-02-01

    Context. The infrared deep sample (IDS), in the north ecliptical polar region (NEPR), is the first complete, far-IR selected sample, on which numerous studies of galaxy evolution are based. Such a sample allows direct investigation of the evolution of dusty galaxies up to a redshift of about 0.3, where the global star formation rate is known to evolve very fast. As discussed in previous papers, we performed optical and IR (ISOCAM, 15 μm,) follow-up of its galaxies and exploited our IR observations to correct the 60 μm fluxes for confusion effects and observational biases. In them we found indications of a significant incompleteness of IDS sample below S(60) ≃ 80 mJy. We constructed 15 μm and far-IR (60 μm) luminosity functions of a complete sample of 56 ISO/IRAS sources. Aims: Here we present and analyze the spectral classification of several galaxies in the IDS sample together with rotation curves which allow estimating the lower mass limits of a subsample of objects. Methods: We measured fluxes and intensity ratios of the emission lines in the visible region of the spectrum (λ4000-9000 Å) for 75 galaxy members. Moreover, for some of them (55%), the spectra obtained with the Keck II telescope have sufficient wavelength and spatial resolution to derive their rotation curve. Results: These galaxies turn out to be disk like systems, with a high fraction (~50%) of interacting systems. The spectroscopic classification of 42 galaxies, using the emission-line ratio diagnostic diagrams, shows that the NEPR sample is predominantly composed of starburst galaxies (71%), while the fraction of AGNs (7%) and LINERs (21%) is small. The dynamical analysis allows us to estimate the lower mass limits of 39 galaxies. Conclusions: The rest-frame FIR luminosity distribution of these galaxies spans the same range as that of the FIR selected complete sample, i.e. three orders of magnitude, with the same mean value, log(LFIR) = 10.2. This emphasizes that such galaxies represent

  8. Tunable Optical Phenomena and Carrier Recombination Dynamics in III-V Semiconductor Nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar Thota, Venkata Ramana

    . The results are presented in chapter 6. Finally, carrier recombination dynamics in rare-earth doped nanostructures are measured by using ultrafast spectroscopy. Carrier dynamics in InGaN:Yb 3+ nanowires and InGaN/GaN-Eu3+ superlattices are measured by frequency doubling the excitation laser, and the effects of implantation of rare-earth ions into the host material have been investigated. The results from the experimental measurements are presented in chapters 7 & 8. These experimental findings might help to understand the challenges associated with these nanostructured materials in the applications of quantum information processing, single photon emitters, and to integrate them into existing optoelectronic devices.

  9. C++ OPPS, a new software for the interpretation of protein dynamics from nuclear magnetic resonance measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zerbetto, Mirco; Polimeno, Antonino; Meirovitch, Eva

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is a powerful tool for elucidating protein dynamics because of the possibility to interpret nuclear spin relaxation properties in terms of microdynamic parameters. Magnetic relaxation times T1, T2, and NOE depend on dipolar and quadrupolar interactions, on chemical shift anisotropy and cross-correlation effects. Within the framework of given motional model, it is possible to express the NMR relaxation times as functions of spectral densities (Abragam, The Principles of Nuclear Magnetism; Oxford University Press: Clarendon, London, 1961), obtaining the connection between macroscopic observables and microscopic properties. In this context, recently Meirovitch et al. (Shapiro et al., Biochemistry 2002, 41, 6271, Meirovitch et al., J Phys Chem B 2006, 110, 20615, Meirovitch et al., J Phys Chem B 2007, 111, 12865) applied the dynamical model introduced by Polimeno and Freed (Polimeno and Freed, Adv Chem Phys 1993, 83, 89, Polimeno and Freed, J Phys Chem 1995, 99, 10995), known as the slowly relaxing local structure (SRLS) model, to the study of NMR data. The program C++OPPS (http://www.chimica.unipd.it/licc/), developed in our laboratory, implements the SRLS model in an user-friendly way with a graphical user interface (GUI), introduced to simplify the work to users who do not feel at ease with the complex mathematics of the model and the difficulties of command line based programs. The program is an evolution of the old FORTRAN 77 implementation COPPS (COupled Protein Probe Smoluchowski) and presents a number of new features: the presence of an easy to use GUI written in JAVA; high calculation performance thanks to features of C++ language, employment of BLAS (basic linear algebra subprograms) library (Blackford et al., Trans Math Soft 2002, 28, 135) in handling matrix-vector operations and parallelization of the code under the MPI (message passing interface) paradigm (Gropp et al., Parallel Comput 1996, 22, 789, Gropp and Lusk, User

  10. The dynamics of the internal phonons tris(quinolin-8-olato) aluminum(III) in crystalline β-phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degli Esposti, Alessandra; Brinkmann, Martin; Ruani, Giampiero

    2002-01-01

    A new approach to the analysis of the internal phonons of tris(quinolin-8-olato) aluminum(III) is presented, which enlightens the role played by the ligands in determining the vibrational properties of the organometallic compound and evidences the importance of the contributions arising from the coupling terms among the three quinolinato fragments. An accurate exam of the normal modes of the meridianal isomer evidences the role of the interactions among the fragments in the vibrational dynamics of the ground state. Due to the special attention paid to the quinolinato fragments, a preliminary investigation on the vibrational properties of 8-hydroxyquinoline, taken as a model fragment, was also performed. The vibrational properties of the polymorph species β of the organometallic molecule were obtained refining the calculated frequencies, the dipole moment derivative matrix, and the polarizability derivative tensor derived by the hybrid density functional B3LYP/6-31G* comparing with the frequencies and intensities recorded by the infrared and the Raman spectroscopies performed on a polycrystalline sample. One thus obtains the most accurate intramolecular force constants up to date for the meridianal isomer in a crystalline phase.

  11. Multistage ab initio quantum wavepacket dynamics for electronic structure and dynamics in open systems: momentum representation, coupled electron-nuclear dynamics, and external fields.

    PubMed

    Pacheco, Alexander B; Iyengar, Srinivasan S

    2011-02-21

    We recently proposed a multistage ab initio wavepacket dynamics (MS-AIWD) treatment for the study of delocalized electronic systems as well as electron transport through donor-bridge-acceptor systems such as those found in molecular-wire/electrode networks. In this method, the full donor-bridge-acceptor open system is treated through a rigorous partitioning scheme that utilizes judiciously placed offsetting absorbing and emitting boundary conditions. In this manner, the electronic coupling between the bridge molecule and surrounding electrodes is accounted. Here, we extend MS-AIWD to include the dynamics of open-electronic systems in conjunction with (a) simultaneous treatment of nuclear dynamics and (b) external electromagnetic fields. This generalization is benchmarked through an analysis of wavepackets propagated on a potential modeled on an Al(27) - C(7) - Al(27) nanowire. The wavepacket results are inspected in the momentum representation and the dependence of momentum of the wavepacket as well as its transmission probabilities on the magnitude of external bias are analyzed.

  12. Electron momentum spectroscopy of dimethyl ether taking account of nuclear dynamics in the electronic ground state.

    PubMed

    Morini, Filippo; Watanabe, Noboru; Kojima, Masataka; Deleuze, Michael Simon; Takahashi, Masahiko

    2015-10-07

    The influence of nuclear dynamics in the electronic ground state on the (e,2e) momentum profiles of dimethyl ether has been analyzed using the harmonic analytical quantum mechanical and Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics approaches. In spite of fundamental methodological differences, results obtained with both approaches consistently demonstrate that molecular vibrations in the electronic ground state have a most appreciable influence on the momentum profiles associated to the 2b1, 6a1, 4b2, and 1a2 orbitals. Taking this influence into account considerably improves the agreement between theoretical and newly obtained experimental momentum profiles, with improved statistical accuracy. Both approaches point out in particular the most appreciable role which is played by a few specific molecular vibrations of A1, B1, and B2 symmetries, which correspond to C-H stretching and H-C-H bending modes. In line with the Herzberg-Teller principle, the influence of these molecular vibrations on the computed momentum profiles can be unraveled from considerations on the symmetry characteristics of orbitals and their energy spacing.

  13. Electron momentum spectroscopy of dimethyl ether taking account of nuclear dynamics in the electronic ground state

    SciTech Connect

    Morini, Filippo; Deleuze, Michael Simon; Watanabe, Noboru; Kojima, Masataka; Takahashi, Masahiko

    2015-10-07

    The influence of nuclear dynamics in the electronic ground state on the (e,2e) momentum profiles of dimethyl ether has been analyzed using the harmonic analytical quantum mechanical and Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics approaches. In spite of fundamental methodological differences, results obtained with both approaches consistently demonstrate that molecular vibrations in the electronic ground state have a most appreciable influence on the momentum profiles associated to the 2b{sub 1}, 6a{sub 1}, 4b{sub 2}, and 1a{sub 2} orbitals. Taking this influence into account considerably improves the agreement between theoretical and newly obtained experimental momentum profiles, with improved statistical accuracy. Both approaches point out in particular the most appreciable role which is played by a few specific molecular vibrations of A{sub 1}, B{sub 1}, and B{sub 2} symmetries, which correspond to C–H stretching and H–C–H bending modes. In line with the Herzberg-Teller principle, the influence of these molecular vibrations on the computed momentum profiles can be unraveled from considerations on the symmetry characteristics of orbitals and their energy spacing.

  14. Nuclear receptor ligand-binding domains: reduction of helix H12 dynamics to favour crystallization

    SciTech Connect

    Nahoum, Virginie; Lipski, Alexandra; Quillard, Fabien; Guichou, Jean-François; Boublik, Yvan; Pérez, Efrèn; Germain, Pierre; Lera, Angel R. de; Bourguet, William

    2008-07-01

    Attempts have been made to crystallize the ligand-binding domain of the human retinoid X receptor in complex with a variety of newly synthesized ligands. An inverse correlation was observed between the ‘crystallizability’ and the structural dynamics of the various receptor–ligand complexes. Crystallization trials of the human retinoid X receptor α ligand-binding domain (RXRα LBD) in complex with various ligands have been carried out. Using fluorescence anisotropy, it has been found that when compared with agonists these small-molecule effectors enhance the dynamics of the RXRα LBD C-terminal helix H12. In some cases, the mobility of this helix could be dramatically reduced by the addition of a 13-residue co-activator fragment (CoA). In keeping with these observations, crystals have been obtained of the corresponding ternary RXRα LBD–ligand–CoA complexes. In contrast, attempts to crystallize complexes with a highly mobile H12 remained unsuccessful. These experimental observations substantiate the previously recognized role of co-regulator fragments in facilitating the crystallization of nuclear receptor LBDs.

  15. A nuclear magnetic resonance study of the dynamics of organofluorine interactions with a dissolved humic acid.

    PubMed

    Longstaffe, James G; Courtier-Murias, Denis; Simpson, Andre J

    2016-02-01

    A quantitative understanding of the dynamics of the interactions between organofluorine compounds and humic acids will contribute to an improved understanding of the role that Natural Organic Matter plays as a mediator in the fate, transport and distribution of these contaminants in the environment. Here, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy-based diffusion measurements are used to estimate the association dynamics between dissolved humic acid and selected organofluorine compounds: pentafluoroaniline, pentafluorophenol, potassium perfluorooctane sulfonate, and perfluorooctanoic acid. Under the conditions used here, the strength of the association with humic acid increases linearly as temperature decreases for all compounds except for perfluorooctanoic acid, which exhibits divergent behavior with a non-linear decrease in the extent of interaction as temperature decreases. A general interaction mechanism controlled largely by desolvation effects is suggested for all compounds examined here except for perfluorooctanoic acid, which exhibits a specific mode of interaction consistent with a proteinaceous binding site. Reverse Heteronuclear Saturation Transfer Difference NMR is used to confirm the identity and nature of the humic acid binding sites.

  16. Dynamical properties of nuclear and stellar matter and the symmetry energy

    SciTech Connect

    Pais, Helena; Santos, Alexandre; Brito, Lucilia; Providencia, Constanca

    2010-08-15

    The effects of density dependence of the symmetry energy on the collective modes and dynamical instabilities of cold and warm nuclear and stellar matter are studied in the framework of relativistic mean-field hadron models. The existence of the collective isovector and possibly an isoscalar collective mode above saturation density is discussed. It is shown that soft equations of state do not allow for a high-density isoscalar collective mode; however, if the symmetry energy is hard enough, an isovector mode will not disappear at high densities. The crust-core transition density and pressure are obtained as a function of temperature for {beta}-equilibrium matter with and without neutrino trapping. Estimations of the size of the clusters formed in the nonhomogeneous phase, as well as the corresponding growth rates and distillation effect, are made. It is shown that cluster sizes increase with temperature, that the distillation effect close to the inner edge of the crust-core transition is very sensitive to the symmetry energy, and that, within a dynamical instability calculation, the pasta phase exists in warm compact stars up to 10-12 MeV.

  17. Dynamic localization of tripartite motif-containing 22 in nuclear and nucleolar bodies

    SciTech Connect

    Sivaramakrishnan, Gayathri; Sun, Yang; Tan, Si Kee; Lin, Valerie C.L.

    2009-05-01

    Tripartite motif-containing 22 (TRIM22) exhibits antiviral and growth inhibitory properties, but there has been no study on the localization and dynamics of the endogenous TRIM22 protein. We report here that TRIM22 is dramatically induced by progesterone in MDA-MB-231-derived ABC28 cells and T47D cells. This induction was associated with an increase in TRIM22 nuclear bodies (NB), and an even more prominent increase in nucleolar TRIM22 bodies. Distinct endogenous TRIM22 NB were also demonstrated in several other cell lines including MCF7 and HeLa cells. These TRIM22 NB resemble Cajal bodies, co-localized with these structures and co-immunoprecipitated with p80-coilin. However, IFN{gamma}-induced TRIM22 in HeLa and MCF7 cells did not form NB, implying the forms and distribution of TRIM22 are regulated by specific cellular signals. This notion is also supported by the observation that TRIM22 NB undergoes dynamic cell-cycle dependent changes in distribution such that TRIM22 NB started to form in early G0/G1 but became dispersed in the S-phase. In light of its potential antiviral and antitumor properties, the findings here provide an interesting gateway to study the relationship between the different forms and functions of TRIM22.

  18. The impact of interface bonding efficiency on high-burnup spent nuclear fuel dynamic performance

    DOE PAGES

    Jiang, Hao; Wang, Jy-An John; Wang, Hong

    2016-09-26

    Finite element analysis (FEA) was used to investigate the impact of interfacial bonding efficiency at pellet-pellet and pellet-clad interfaces of high-burnup (HBU) spent nuclear fuel (SNF) on system dynamic performance. Bending moments M were applied to FEA model to evaluate the system responses. From bending curvature, κ, flexural rigidity EI can be estimated as EI = M/κ. The FEA simulation results were benchmarked with experimental results from cyclic integrated reversal bending fatigue test (CIRFT) of HBR fuel rods. The consequence of interface debonding between fuel pellets and cladding is a redistribution of the loads carried by the fuel pellets tomore » the clad, which results in a reduction in composite rod system flexural rigidity. Furthermore, the interface bonding efficiency at the pellet-pellet and pellet-clad interfaces can significantly dictate the SNF system dynamic performance. With the consideration of interface bonding efficiency, the HBU SNF fuel property was estimated with CIRFT test data.« less

  19. The Nuclear Stellar Dynamics of the S0 Galaxy NGC7332

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, C. H.; Weistrop, D.; Bower, G. A.; Green, R. F.; STIS Team

    1999-12-01

    STIS longslit spectroscopy of the nearby S0 galaxy NGC 7332 was obtained for the purpose of modeling the nuclear stellar dynamics and to search for evidence of a massive black hole. The primary stellar absorption features are the strong Ca II triplet lines at 8600 Angstroms. Stellar kinematical measurements characterizing the line-of-sight velocity distribution were extracted using the Fourier correlation quotient method (Bender 1990, A&Ap, 229, 441). Combined with ground-based imaging and spectroscopy (Fisher, Illingworth & Franx 1994, AJ, 107, 160) and HST WF/PC-1 imaging (Lauer et al. 1995, AJ, 110, 2622) these data were fitted with dynamical models developed by K. Gebhardt which included a compact massive dark object (MDO). We will discuss our results in the context of the relationship for spheroidal stellar systems between spheroid mass and the mass of the MDO, M, (see e.g. Kormendy & Richstone 1995, ARA&A, 33, 581). NGC 7332 is of particular interest since Magorrian et al. (1998, AJ, 115, 2285) find that of all the galaxies in their survey this one is most consistent with M=0 with an upper limit M<7*E6 Msun.

  20. Engineering light-inducible nuclear localization signals for precise spatiotemporal control of protein dynamics in living cells

    PubMed Central

    Niopek, Dominik; Benzinger, Dirk; Roensch, Julia; Draebing, Thomas; Wehler, Pierre; Eils, Roland; Di Ventura, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    The function of many eukaryotic proteins is regulated by highly dynamic changes in their nucleocytoplasmic distribution. The ability to precisely and reversibly control nuclear translocation would, therefore, allow dissecting and engineering cellular networks. Here we develop a genetically encoded, light-inducible nuclear localization signal (LINuS) based on the LOV2 domain of Avena sativa phototropin 1. LINuS is a small, versatile tag, customizable for different proteins and cell types. LINuS-mediated nuclear import is fast and reversible, and can be tuned at different levels, for instance, by introducing mutations that alter AsLOV2 domain photo-caging properties or by selecting nuclear localization signals (NLSs) of various strengths. We demonstrate the utility of LINuS in mammalian cells by controlling gene expression and entry into mitosis with blue light. PMID:25019686

  1. Engineering light-inducible nuclear localization signals for precise spatiotemporal control of protein dynamics in living cells.

    PubMed

    Niopek, Dominik; Benzinger, Dirk; Roensch, Julia; Draebing, Thomas; Wehler, Pierre; Eils, Roland; Di Ventura, Barbara

    2014-07-14

    The function of many eukaryotic proteins is regulated by highly dynamic changes in their nucleocytoplasmic distribution. The ability to precisely and reversibly control nuclear translocation would, therefore, allow dissecting and engineering cellular networks. Here we develop a genetically encoded, light-inducible nuclear localization signal (LINuS) based on the LOV2 domain of Avena sativa phototropin 1. LINuS is a small, versatile tag, customizable for different proteins and cell types. LINuS-mediated nuclear import is fast and reversible, and can be tuned at different levels, for instance, by introducing mutations that alter AsLOV2 domain photo-caging properties or by selecting nuclear localization signals (NLSs) of various strengths. We demonstrate the utility of LINuS in mammalian cells by controlling gene expression and entry into mitosis with blue light.

  2. Elasto-dynamic analysis of a gear pump-Part III: Experimental validation procedure and model extension to helical gears

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mucchi, E.; Dalpiaz, G.

    2015-01-01

    This work concerns external gear pumps for automotive applications, which operate at high speed and low pressure. In previous works of the authors (Part I and II, [1,2]), a non-linear lumped-parameter kineto-elastodynamic model for the prediction of the dynamic behaviour of external gear pumps was presented. It takes into account the most important phenomena involved in the operation of this kind of machine. The two main sources of noise and vibration are considered: pressure pulsation and gear meshing. The model has been used in order to foresee the influence of working conditions and design modifications on vibration generation. The model's experimental validation is a difficult task. Thus, Part III proposes a novel methodology for the validation carried out by the comparison of simulations and experimental results concerning forces and moments: it deals with the external and inertial components acting on the gears, estimated by the model, and the reactions and inertial components on the pump casing and the test plate, obtained by measurements. The validation is carried out comparing the level of the time synchronous average in the time domain and the waterfall maps in the frequency domain, with particular attention to identify system resonances. The validation results are satisfactory globally, but discrepancies are still present. Moreover, the assessed model has been properly modified for the application to a new virtual pump prototype with helical gears in order to foresee gear accelerations and dynamic forces. Part IV is focused on improvements in the modelling and analysis of the phenomena bound to the pressure evolution around the gears in order to achieve results closer to the measured values. As a matter of fact, the simulation results have shown that a variable meshing stiffness has a notable contribution on the dynamic behaviour of the pump but this is not as important as the pressure phenomena. As a consequence, the original model was modified with the

  3. Iii-V Compound Semiconductor Integrated Charge Storage Structures for Dynamic and Non-Volatile Memory Elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hetherington, Dale Laird

    This thesis presents an investigation into a novel group of GaAs charge storage devices. These devices, which are an integration of bipolar and junction field effect transistor structures were conceived, designed, fabricated, and tested within this study. The purpose was to analyse new types of charge storage devices, which are suitable for fabrication and lead to the development of dynamic and nonvolatile memories in III-V compound semiconductors. Currently, III-V semiconductor storage devices consist only of capacitors, where data is destroyed during reading and electrical erasure is difficult. In this work, four devices types were demonstrated that exhibit nondestructive reading, and three of the prototypes can be electrically erased. All types use the junction field effect transistor (JFET) for charge sensing, with each having different bipolar or epitaxial layer structure controlling the junction gate. The bottom epitaxial layer in each case served as the JFET channel. Two of the device types have three alternately doped layers, while the remaining two have four alternately doped layers. In all cases, removal of majority carriers from the middle layers constitutes stored charge. The missing carriers deplete the current carrying a region of the JFET channel. Drain current of the JFET becomes an indicator of stored charge. The basic function of each JFET memory element type is independent of interchanging n- and p- type doping within the structure type. Some performance advantage can be realized, however, by sensing with an n-type channel as compared to p- type due to increased carrier mobility. All device types exhibit storage time characteristics of order ten seconds. Devices are constructed in epitaxial layers grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) reactors. The design of the epitaxial layers is an intrinsic part, together with the electrical design, of the storage device concept. These concepts are implemented first with photolithography masks which are used

  4. Tracking nuclear wave-packet dynamics in molecular oxygen ions with few-cycle infrared laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    De, S.; Bocharova, I. A.; Magrakvelidze, M.; Ray, D.; Cao, W.; Thumm, U.; Cocke, C. L.; Bergues, B.; Kling, M. F.; Litvinyuk, I. V.

    2010-07-15

    We have tracked nuclear wave-packet dynamics in doubly charged states of molecular oxygen using few-cycle infrared laser pulses. Bound and dissociating wave packets were launched and subsequently probed via a pair of 8-fs pulses of 790 nm radiation. Ionic fragments from the dissociating molecules were monitored by velocity-map imaging. Pronounced oscillations in the delay-dependent kinetic energy release spectra were observed. The occurrence of vibrational revivals permits us to identify the potential curves of the O{sub 2} dication which are most relevant to the molecular dynamics. These studies show the accessibility to the dynamics of such higher-charged molecules.

  5. Coupled quantum-classical method for long range charge transfer: relevance of the nuclear motion to the quantum electron dynamics.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Robson; Hoff, Diego A; Rego, Luis G C

    2015-04-10

    Charge and excitonic-energy transfer phenomena are fundamental for energy conversion in solar cells as well as artificial photosynthesis. Currently, much interest is being paid to light-harvesting and energy transduction processes in supramolecular structures, where nuclear dynamics has a major influence on electronic quantum dynamics. For this reason, the simulation of long range electron transfer in supramolecular structures, under environmental conditions described within an atomistic framework, has been a difficult problem to study. This work describes a coupled quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics method that aims at describing long range charge transfer processes in supramolecular systems, taking into account the atomistic details of large molecular structures, the underlying nuclear motion, and environmental effects. The method is applied to investigate the relevance of electron-nuclei interaction on the mechanisms for photo-induced electron-hole pair separation in dye-sensitized interfaces as well as electronic dynamics in molecular structures.

  6. Cysteine-Specific Labeling of Proteins with a Nitroxide Biradical for Dynamic Nuclear Polarization NMR.

    PubMed

    Voinov, Maxim A; Good, Daryl B; Ward, Meaghan E; Milikisiyants, Sergey; Marek, Antonin; Caporini, Marc A; Rosay, Melanie; Munro, Rachel A; Ljumovic, Milena; Brown, Leonid S; Ladizhansky, Vladimir; Smirnov, Alex I

    2015-08-13

    Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) enhances the signal in solid-state NMR of proteins by transferring polarization from electronic spins to the nuclear spins of interest. Typically, both the protein and an exogenous source of electronic spins, such as a biradical, are either codissolved or suspended and then frozen in a glycerol/water glassy matrix to achieve a homogeneous distribution. While the use of such a matrix protects the protein upon freezing, it also reduces the available sample volume (by ca. a factor of 4 in our experiments) and causes proportional NMR signal loss. Here we demonstrate an alternative approach that does not rely on dispersing the DNP agent in a glassy matrix. We synthesize a new biradical, ToSMTSL, which is based on the known DNP agent TOTAPOL, but also contains a thiol-specific methanethiosulfonate group to allow for incorporating this biradical into a protein in a site-directed manner. ToSMTSL was characterized by EPR and tested for DNP of a heptahelical transmembrane protein, Anabaena sensory rhodopsin (ASR), by covalent modification of solvent-exposed cysteine residues in two (15)N-labeled ASR mutants. DNP enhancements were measured at 400 MHz/263 GHz NMR/EPR frequencies for a series of samples prepared in deuterated and protonated buffers and with varied biradical/protein ratios. While the maximum DNP enhancement of 15 obtained in these samples is comparable to that observed for an ASR sample cosuspended with ~17 mM TOTAPOL in a glycerol-d8/D2O/H2O matrix, the achievable sensitivity would be 4-fold greater due to the gain in the filling factor. We anticipate that the DNP enhancements could be further improved by optimizing the biradical structure. The use of covalently attached biradicals would broaden the applicability of DNP NMR to structural studies of proteins.

  7. Extended-life nuclear air cleaning filters via dynamic exclusion prefilters

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, S.R.; Crouch, H.S.; Bond, J.H.

    1997-08-01

    The primary objective of this investigation was to ascertain if a dynamic, self-cleaning particulate exclusion precleaner, designed for relatively large dust removal (2 to 100+ {mu}m diameter particles) from helicopter turbine inlets, could be extended to submicron filtration. The improved device could be used as a prefilter for HEPA filtration systems, significantly increasing service life. In nuclear air cleaning, its use would reduce the amount of nuclear particulate matter that would otherwise be entrapped in the HEPA filter cartridge/panel, causing fouling and increased back pressure, as well as requiring subsequent disposal of the contaminated media at considerable expense. A unique (patent-pending) mechanical separation device has recently been developed to extract particulate matter from fluid process streams based on a proprietary concept called Boundary Layer Momentum Transfer (BLMT). The device creates multiple boundary layers that actively exclude particles from entering the perimeter of the device, while allowing air to traverse the boundaries relatively unimpeded. A modified two-dimensional (2-D) computerized flow simulation model was used to assist in the prototype design. Empirical results are presented from particle breakthrough and AP experiments obtained from a reduced-scale prototype filter. Particles larger than 0.23 {mu}m were actively excluded by the prototype, but at a higher pressure drop than anticipated. Experimental data collected indicates that the filter housing and the inlet flow configuration may contribute significantly to improvements in device particle separation capabilities. Furthermore, preliminary experiments have shown that other downstream pressure drop considerations (besides those just across the spinning filtration disks) must be included to accurately portray the AP across the device. Further detailed quantitative investigations on a larger scale (1,000 CFM) prototype are warranted. 3 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. The use of dynamic nuclear polarization (13)C-pyruvate MRS in cancer.

    PubMed

    Gutte, Henrik; Hansen, Adam Espe; Johannesen, Helle Hjorth; Clemmensen, Andreas Ettrup; Ardenkjær-Larsen, Jan Henrik; Nielsen, Carsten Haagen; Kjær, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    In recent years there has been an immense development of new targeted anti-cancer drugs. For practicing precision medicine, a sensitive method imaging for non-invasive, assessment of early treatment response and for assisting in developing new drugs is warranted. Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (MRS) is a potent technique for non-invasive in vivo investigation of tissue chemistry and cellular metabolism. Hyperpolarization by Dynamic Nuclear Polarization (DNP) is capable of creating solutions of molecules with polarized nuclear spins in a range of biological molecules and has enabled the real-time investigation of in vivo metabolism. The development of this new method has been demonstrated to enhance the nuclear polarization more than 10,000-fold, thereby significantly increasing the sensitivity of the MRS with a spatial resolution to the millimeters and a temporal resolution at the subsecond range. Furthermore, the method enables measuring kinetics of conversion of substrates into cell metabolites and can be integrated with anatomical proton magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Many nuclei and substrates have been hyperpolarized using the DNP method. Currently, the most widely used compound is (13)C-pyruvate due to favoring technicalities. Intravenous injection of the hyperpolarized (13)C-pyruvate results in appearance of (13)C-lactate, (13)C-alanine and (13)C-bicarbonate resonance peaks depending on the tissue, disease and the metabolic state probed. In cancer, the lactate level is increased due to increased glycolysis. The use of DNP enhanced (13)C-pyruvate has in preclinical studies shown to be a sensitive method for detecting cancer and for assessment of early treatment response in a variety of cancers. Recently, a first-in-man 31-patient study was conducted with the primary objective to assess the safety of hyperpolarized (13)C-pyruvate in healthy subjects and prostate cancer patients. The study showed an elevated (13)C-lactate/(13)C-pyruvate ratio in regions of

  9. The use of dynamic nuclear polarization 13C-pyruvate MRS in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gutte, Henrik; Hansen, Adam Espe; Johannesen, Helle Hjorth; Clemmensen, Andreas Ettrup; Ardenkjær-Larsen, Jan Henrik; Nielsen, Carsten Haagen; Kjær, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    In recent years there has been an immense development of new targeted anti-cancer drugs. For practicing precision medicine, a sensitive method imaging for non-invasive, assessment of early treatment response and for assisting in developing new drugs is warranted. Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (MRS) is a potent technique for non-invasive in vivo investigation of tissue chemistry and cellular metabolism. Hyperpolarization by Dynamic Nuclear Polarization (DNP) is capable of creating solutions of molecules with polarized nuclear spins in a range of biological molecules and has enabled the real-time investigation of in vivo metabolism. The development of this new method has been demonstrated to enhance the nuclear polarization more than 10,000-fold, thereby significantly increasing the sensitivity of the MRS with a spatial resolution to the millimeters and a temporal resolution at the subsecond range. Furthermore, the method enables measuring kinetics of conversion of substrates into cell metabolites and can be integrated with anatomical proton magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Many nuclei and substrates have been hyperpolarized using the DNP method. Currently, the most widely used compound is 13C-pyruvate due to favoring technicalities. Intravenous injection of the hyperpolarized 13C-pyruvate results in appearance of 13C-lactate, 13C-alanine and 13C-bicarbonate resonance peaks depending on the tissue, disease and the metabolic state probed. In cancer, the lactate level is increased due to increased glycolysis. The use of DNP enhanced 13C-pyruvate has in preclinical studies shown to be a sensitive method for detecting cancer and for assessment of early treatment response in a variety of cancers. Recently, a first-in-man 31-patient study was conducted with the primary objective to assess the safety of hyperpolarized 13C-pyruvate in healthy subjects and prostate cancer patients. The study showed an elevated 13C-lactate/13C-pyruvate ratio in regions of biopsy

  10. Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance Investigation of Spin Dynamics in the Praseodymium Trihalides Praseodymium Trichloride and Praseodymium Tribromide.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Sunyu

    The spin dynamics of PrCl_3 and PrBr_3 have been studied in the temperature range from 124mK to 297K using Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance (NQR) techniques. In the low temperature regime, the Pr ions are in the ground state, and the dynamical properties of PrX_3 (X = Cl,Br) are well described by a 1D XY model. The data have been shown to be in agreement with the predictions of a relaxation theory for a magnetic interaction based on a rigorous treatment of the longitudinal dynamical correlation function < S_sp{z}{m}(t)S_sp {z}{n}(t)> of the electronic pseudo-spins S^{m} associated with the crystalline electric field ground state. The fits to the data have yielded reasonable values for the hyperfine interaction parameters A and exchange integrals J/k_{B}. The dynamical properties of the PrX_3 compounds depart from the 1D model as the temperature increases. The spin lattice relaxation rates display unusual temperature dependences in the high temperature regime. These temperature dependences have been qualitatively accounted for by considering the effect of populating the excited states of the crystal electric field. The theory of NQR mixed spin echoes in solids has been established using the interaction representation formalism. The NQR mixed spin echoes theory has been applied to the study of the spin interactions in PrBr_3 . It has been shown that the second moments due to quadrupole interaction M_sp{2} {q}, magnetic dipole-dipole interactions between like spins M_sp{2}{II } and magnetic dipole-dipole interactions between unlike spins M_sp{2}{IS}(Br,Pr ^{3+}),M_sp{2}{IS }(^{79}Br,^{81}Br ) can be simultaneously determined. NQR spectra have been obtained for both praseodymium trihalides. The low temperature spectrum of PrCl _3 has provided strong support to the earlier results. In addition, the present investigation of the NQR spectrum has resulted in a better estimate of the magnitude of dimerization in PrCl_3. The PrBr_3 low temperature NQR spectrum has revealed

  11. SU-E-J-61: Electrodynamics and Nano-Scale Fluid Dynamics in Protein Localization of Nuclear Pore Complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Cunningham, J; Gatenby, R

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To develop a simulation to catalyze a reevaluation of common assumptions about 3 dimensional diffusive processes and help cell biologists gain a more nuanced, intuitive understanding of the true physical hurdles of protein signaling cascades. Furthermore, to discuss the possibility of intracellular electrodynamics as a critical, unrecognized component of cellular biology and protein dynamics that is necessary for optimal information flow from the cell membrane to the nucleus. Methods: The Unity 3D gaming physics engine was used to build an accurate virtual scale model of the cytoplasm within a few hundred nanometers of the nuclear membrane. A cloud of simulated pERK proteins is controlled by the physics simulation, where diffusion is based on experimentally measured values and the electrodynamics are based on theoretical nano-fluid dynamics. The trajectories of pERK within the cytoplasm and through the 1250 nuclear pores on the nuclear surface is recorded and analyzed. Results: The simulation quickly demonstrates that pERKs moving solely by diffusion will rarely locate and come within capture distance of a nuclear pore. The addition of intracellular electrodynamics between charges on the nuclear pore complexes and on pERKs increases the number of successful translocations by allowing the electro-physical attractive effects to draw in pERKs from the cytoplasm. The effects of changes in intracellular shielding ion concentrations allowed for estimation of the “capture radius” under varying conditions. Conclusion: The simulation allows a shift in perspective that is paramount in attempting to communicate the scale and dynamics of intracellular protein cascade mechanics. This work has allowed researchers to more fully understand the parameters involved in intracellular electrodynamics, such as shielding anion concentration and protein charge. As these effects are still far below the spatial resolution of currently available measurement technology this

  12. Neutron Transport Characteristics of a Nuclear Reactor Based Dynamic Neutron Imaging System

    SciTech Connect

    Khaial, Anas M.; Harvel, Glenn D.; Chang, Jen-Shih

    2006-07-01

    An advanced dynamic neutron imaging system has been constructed in the McMaster Nuclear Reactor (MNR) for nondestructive testing and multi-phase flow studies in energy and environmental applications. A high quality neutron beam is required with a thermal neutron flux greater than 5.0 x 10{sup 6} n/cm{sup 2}-s and a collimation ratio of 120 at image plane to promote high-speed neutron imaging up to 2000 frames per second. Neutron source strength and neutron transport have been experimentally and numerically investigated. Neutron source strength at the beam tube entrance was evaluated experimentally by measuring the thermal and fast neutron fluxes, and simple analytical neutron transport calculations were performed based upon these measured neutron fluxes to predict facility components in accordance with high-speed dynamic neutron imaging and operation safety requirements. Monte-Carlo simulations (using MCNP-4B code) with multiple neutron energy groups have also been used to validate neutron beam parameters and to ensure shielding capabilities of facility shutter and cave walls. Neutron flux distributions at the image plane and the neutron beam characteristics were experimentally measured by irradiating a two-dimensional array of Copper foils and using a real-time neutron radiography system. The neutron image characteristics -- such as neutron flux, image size, beam quality -- measured experimentally and predicted numerically for beam tube, beam shutter and radiography cave are compared and discussed in detail in this paper. The experimental results show that thermal neutron flux at image plane is nearly uniform over an imaging area of 20.0-cm diameter and its magnitude ranges from 8.0 x 10{sup 6} - 1.0 x 10{sup 7} n/cm{sup 2}-sec while the neutron-to-gamma ratio is 6.0 x 10{sup 5} n/cm{sup 2}-{mu}Sv. (authors)

  13. Nuclear magnetic resonance structure and dynamics of the response regulator Sma0114 from Sinorhizobium meliloti.

    PubMed

    Sheftic, Sarah R; Garcia, Preston P; White, Emma; Robinson, Victoria L; Gage, Daniel J; Alexandrescu, Andrei T

    2012-09-04

    Receiver domains control intracellular responses triggered by signal transduction in bacterial two-component systems. Here, we report the solution nuclear magnetic resonance structure and dynamics of Sma0114 from the bacterium Sinorhizobium meliloti, the first such characterization of a receiver domain from the HWE-kinase family of two-component systems. The structure of Sma0114 adopts a prototypical α(5)/β(5) Rossman fold but has features that set it apart from other receiver domains. The fourth β-strand of Sma0114 houses a PFxFATGY sequence motif, common to many HWE-kinase-associated receiver domains. This sequence motif in Sma0114 may substitute for the conserved Y-T coupling mechanism, which propagates conformational transitions in the 455 (α4-β5-α5) faces of receiver domains, to prime them for binding downstream effectors once they become activated by phosphorylation. In addition, the fourth α-helix of the consensus 455 face in Sma0114 is replaced with a segment that shows high flexibility on the pico- to nanosecond time scale by (15)N relaxation data. Secondary structure prediction analysis suggests that the absence of helix α4 may be a conserved property of the HWE-kinase-associated family of receiver domains to which Sma0114 belongs. In spite of these differences, Sma0114 has a conserved active site, binds divalent metal ions such as Mg(2+) and Ca(2+) that are required for phosphorylation, and exhibits micro- to millisecond active-site dynamics similar to those of other receiver domains. Taken together, our results suggest that Sma0114 has a conserved active site but differs from typical receiver domains in the structure of the 455 face that is used to effect signal transduction following activation.

  14. Regulation of nuclear translocation of nuclear factor-kappaB relA: evidence for complex dynamics at the single-cell level.

    PubMed Central

    Schooley, Kenneth; Zhu, Ping; Dower, Steven K; Qwarnström, Eva E

    2003-01-01

    A nuclear transport in response to stimuli. The data are consistent with NF-kappaB constituting a dynamic and versatile system, regulated to a significant degree by binary events involving bidirectional trafficking between the cytoplasmic and nuclear compartments during pathway activation. PMID:12350227

  15. Overhauser Geomagnetic Sensor Based on the Dynamic Nuclear Polarization Effect for Magnetic Prospecting

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Jian; Dong, Haobin; Liu, Huan; Yuan, Zhiwen; Dong, He; Zhao, Zhizhuo; Liu, Yonghua; Zhu, Jun; Zhang, Haiyang

    2016-01-01

    Based on the dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) effect, an alternative design of an Overhauser geomagnetic sensor is presented that enhances the proton polarization and increases the amplitude of the free induction decay (FID) signal. The short-pulse method is adopted to rotate the enhanced proton magnetization into the plane of precession to create an FID signal. To reduce the negative effect of the powerful electromagnetic interference, the design of the anti-interference of the pick-up coil is studied. Furthermore, the radio frequency polarization method based on the capacitive-loaded coaxial cavity is proposed to improve the quality factor of the resonant circuit. In addition, a special test instrument is designed that enables the simultaneous testing of the classical proton precession and the Overhauser sensor. Overall, comparison experiments with and without the free radical of the Overhauser sensors show that the DNP effect does effectively improve the amplitude and quality of the FID signal, and the magnetic sensitivity, resolution and range reach to 10 pT/Hz1/2@1 Hz, 0.0023 nT and 20–100 μT, respectively. PMID:27258283

  16. Frequency swept microwaves for hyperfine decoupling and time domain dynamic nuclear polarization.

    PubMed

    Hoff, Daniel E M; Albert, Brice J; Saliba, Edward P; Scott, Faith J; Choi, Eric J; Mardini, Michael; Barnes, Alexander B

    2015-11-01

    Hyperfine decoupling and pulsed dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) are promising techniques to improve high field DNP NMR. We explore experimental and theoretical considerations to implement them with magic angle spinning (MAS). Microwave field simulations using the high frequency structural simulator (HFSS) software suite are performed to characterize the inhomogeneous phase independent microwave field throughout a 198GHz MAS DNP probe. Our calculations show that a microwave power input of 17W is required to generate an average EPR nutation frequency of 0.84MHz. We also present a detailed calculation of microwave heating from the HFSS parameters and find that 7.1% of the incident microwave power contributes to dielectric sample heating. Voltage tunable gyrotron oscillators are proposed as a class of frequency agile microwave sources to generate microwave frequency sweeps required for the frequency modulated cross effect, electron spin inversions, and hyperfine decoupling. Electron spin inversions of stable organic radicals are simulated with SPINEVOLUTION using the inhomogeneous microwave fields calculated by HFSS. We calculate an electron spin inversion efficiency of 56% at a spinning frequency of 5kHz. Finally, we demonstrate gyrotron acceleration potentials required to generate swept microwave frequency profiles for the frequency modulated cross effect and electron spin inversions.

  17. Dynamic nuclear polarization system for the SANS-J-II spectrometer at JAEA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumada, Takayuki; Noda, Yohei; Hashimoto, Takeji; Koizumi, Satoshi

    2009-09-01

    We have developed a dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) system for the SANS-J-II spectrometer at the JRR-3 atomic research reactor of Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA). The DNP system is composed of a split-type horizontal superconducting magnet (3.3 T), a Gunn oscillator as a microwave source (94 GHz), and a cryostat (1.2 K). In particular, a sample cell with ∅40 in inner diameter and the magnet with a field homogeneity of 5×10 -5 in a volume of ∅25 mm×8 mm were employed to polarize samples with a diameter of ∅20 mm for the ultra small-angle scattering experiment using the magnetic lens installed at the SANS-J-II spectrometer [S. Koizumi, H. Iwase, J. Suzuki, T. Oku, R. Motokawa, H. Sasao, H. Tanaka, D. Yamaguchi, H.M. Shimizu, T. Hashimoto, J. Appl. Crystallogr. 40 (2007) s474]. We obtained the proton polarization | P|=32% in the polyethylene doped with 2,2,6,6-tetra-methyl-piperidine-1-oxyl (TEMPO).

  18. Dynamic nuclear polarization-magnetic resonance imaging at low ESR irradiation frequency for ascorbyl free radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, Shinji; Hyodo, Fuminori

    2016-02-01

    Highly water-soluble ubiquinone-0 (CoQ0) reacts with ascorbate monoanion (Asc) to mediate the production of ascorbyl free radicals (AFR). Using aqueous reaction mixture of CoQ0 and Asc, we obtained positively enhanced dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP)-magnetic resonance (MR) images of the AFR at low frequency (ranging from 515 to 530 MHz) of electron spin resonance (ESR) irradiation. The shape of the determined DNP spectrum was similar to ESR absorption spectra with doublet spectral peaks. The relative locational relationship of spectral peaks in the DNP spectra between the AFR (520 and 525 MHz), 14N-labeled carbamoyl-PROXYL (14N-CmP) (526.5 MHz), and Oxo63 (522 MHz) was different from that in the X-band ESR spectra, but were similar to that in the 300-MHz ESR spectra. The ratio of DNP enhancement to radical concentration for the AFR was higher than those for 14N-CmP, Oxo63, and flavin semiquinone radicals. The spectroscopic DNP properties observed for the AFR were essentially the same as those for AFR mediated by pyrroloquinoline quinone. Moreover, we made a success of in vivo DNP-MR imaging of the CoQ0-mediated AFR which was administered by the subcutaneous and oral injections as an imaging probe.

  19. Structure of Colloidal Quantum Dots from Dynamic Nuclear Polarization Surface Enhanced NMR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Piveteau, Laura; Ong, Ta-Chung; Rossini, Aaron J; Emsley, Lyndon; Copéret, Christophe; Kovalenko, Maksym V

    2015-11-04

    Understanding the chemistry of colloidal quantum dots (QDs) is primarily hampered by the lack of analytical methods to selectively and discriminately probe the QD core, QD surface and capping ligands. Here, we present a general concept for studying a broad range of QDs such as CdSe, CdTe, InP, PbSe, PbTe, CsPbBr3, etc., capped with both organic and inorganic surface capping ligands, through dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) surface enhanced NMR spectroscopy. DNP can enhance NMR signals by factors of 10-100, thereby reducing the measurement times by 2-4 orders of magnitude. 1D DNP enhanced spectra acquired in this way are shown to clearly distinguish QD surface atoms from those of the QD core, and environmental effects such as oxidation. Furthermore, 2D NMR correlation experiments, which were previously inconceivable for QD surfaces, are demonstrated to be readily performed with DNP and provide the bonding motifs between the QD surfaces and the capping ligands.

  20. Frequency swept microwaves for hyperfine decoupling and time domain dynamic nuclear polarization

    PubMed Central

    Hoff, Daniel E.M.; Albert, Brice J.; Saliba, Edward P.; Scott, Faith J.; Choi, Eric J.; Mardini, Michael; Barnes, Alexander B.

    2015-01-01

    Hyperfine decoupling and pulsed dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) are promising techniques to improve high field DNP NMR. We explore experimental and theoretical considerations to implement them with magic angle spinning (MAS). Microwave field simulations using the high frequency structural simulator (HFSS) software suite are performed to characterize the inhomogeneous phase independent microwave field throughout a 198 GHz MAS DNP probe. Our calculations show that a microwave power input of 17 W is required to generate an average EPR nutation frequency of 0.84 MHz. We also present a detailed calculation of microwave heating from the HFSS parameters and find that 7.1% of the incident microwave power contributes to dielectric sample heating. Voltage tunable gyrotron oscillators are proposed as a class of frequency agile microwave sources to generate microwave frequency sweeps required for the frequency modulated cross effect, electron spin inversions, and hyperfine decoupling. Electron spin inversions of stable organic radicals are simulated with SPINEVOLUTION using the inhomogeneous microwave fields calculated by HFSS. We calculate an electron spin inversion efficiency of 56% at a spinning frequency of 5 kHz. Finally, we demonstrate gyrotron acceleration potentials required to generate swept microwave frequency profiles for the frequency modulated cross effect and electron spin inversions. PMID:26482131

  1. Nuclear magnetic resonance signal dynamics of liquids in the presence of distant dipolar fields, revisited.

    PubMed

    Barros, Wilson; Gochberg, Daniel F; Gore, John C

    2009-05-07

    The description of the nuclear magnetic resonance magnetization dynamics in the presence of long-range dipolar interactions, which is based upon approximate solutions of Bloch-Torrey equations including the effect of a distant dipolar field, has been revisited. New experiments show that approximate analytic solutions have a broader regime of validity as well as dependencies on pulse-sequence parameters that seem to have been overlooked. In order to explain these experimental results, we developed a new method consisting of calculating the magnetization via an iterative formalism where both diffusion and distant dipolar field contributions are treated as integral operators incorporated into the Bloch-Torrey equations. The solution can be organized as a perturbative series, whereby access to higher order terms allows one to set better boundaries on validity regimes for analytic first-order approximations. Finally, the method legitimizes the use of simple analytic first-order approximations under less demanding experimental conditions, it predicts new pulse-sequence parameter dependencies for the range of validity, and clarifies weak points in previous calculations.

  2. Molecular dynamics and composition of crude oil by low-field nuclear magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Jia, Zijian; Xiao, Lizhi; Wang, Zhizhan; Liao, Guangzhi; Zhang, Yan; Liang, Can

    2016-08-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques are widely used to identify pure substances and probe protein dynamics. Oil is a complex mixture composed of hydrocarbons, which have a wide range of molecular size distribution. Previous work show that empirical correlations of relaxation times and diffusion coefficients were found for simple alkane mixtures, and also the shape of the relaxation and diffusion distribution functions are related to the composition of the fluids. The 2D NMR is a promising qualitative evaluation method for oil composition. But uncertainty in the interpretation of crude oil indicated further study was required. In this research, the effect of each composition on relaxation distribution functions is analyzed in detail. We also suggest a new method for prediction of the rotational correlation time distribution of crude oil molecules using low field NMR (LF-NMR) relaxation time distributions. A set of down-hole NMR fluid analysis system is independently designed and developed for fluid measurement. We illustrate this with relaxation-relaxation correlation experiments and rotational correlation time distributions on a series of hydrocarbon mixtures that employ our laboratory-designed downhole NMR fluid analyzer. The LF-NMR is a useful tool for detecting oil composition and monitoring oil property changes. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Dynamic nuclear polarization-magnetic resonance imaging at low ESR irradiation frequency for ascorbyl free radicals

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Shinji; Hyodo, Fuminori

    2016-01-01

    Highly water-soluble ubiquinone-0 (CoQ0) reacts with ascorbate monoanion (Asc) to mediate the production of ascorbyl free radicals (AFR). Using aqueous reaction mixture of CoQ0 and Asc, we obtained positively enhanced dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP)-magnetic resonance (MR) images of the AFR at low frequency (ranging from 515 to 530 MHz) of electron spin resonance (ESR) irradiation. The shape of the determined DNP spectrum was similar to ESR absorption spectra with doublet spectral peaks. The relative locational relationship of spectral peaks in the DNP spectra between the AFR (520 and 525 MHz), 14N-labeled carbamoyl-PROXYL (14N-CmP) (526.5 MHz), and Oxo63 (522 MHz) was different from that in the X-band ESR spectra, but were similar to that in the 300-MHz ESR spectra. The ratio of DNP enhancement to radical concentration for the AFR was higher than those for 14N-CmP, Oxo63, and flavin semiquinone radicals. The spectroscopic DNP properties observed for the AFR were essentially the same as those for AFR mediated by pyrroloquinoline quinone. Moreover, we made a success of in vivo DNP-MR imaging of the CoQ0-mediated AFR which was administered by the subcutaneous and oral injections as an imaging probe. PMID:26892591

  4. A Novel Variable Field System for Field-Cycled Dynamic Nuclear Polarization Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Shet, Keerthi; Caia, George L.; Kesselring, Eric; Samouilov, Alexandre; Petryakov, Sergey; Lurie, David J.; Zweier, Jay L.

    2014-01-01

    Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) is an NMR-based technique which enables detection and spectral characterization of endogenous and exogenous paramagnetic substances measured via transfer of polarization from the saturated unpaired electron spin system to the NMR active nuclei. A variable field system capable of performing DNP spectroscopy with NMR detection at any magnetic field in the range 0 - 0.38 T is described. The system is built around a clinical open-MRI system. To obtain EPR spectra via DNP, partial cancellation of the detection field B0NMR is required to alter the evolution field B0EPR at which the EPR excitation is achieved. The addition of resistive actively shielded field cancellation coils in the gap of the primary magnet provides this field offset in the range of 0–100 mT. A description of the primary magnet, cancellation coils, power supplies, interfacing hardware, RF electronics and console are included. Performance of the instrument has been evaluated by acquiring DNP spectra of phantoms with aqueous nitroxide solutions (TEMPOL) at three NMR detection fields of 97 G, 200 G and 587 G corresponding to 413 kHz, 851.6 kHz and 2.5 MHz respectively and fixed EPR evolution field of 100 G corresponding to an irradiation frequency of 282.3 MHz. This variable field DNP system offers great flexibility for the performance of DNP spectroscopy with independent optimum choice of EPR excitation and NMR detection fields. PMID:20570197

  5. A high-speed, pressurised multi-wire gamma camera for dynamic imaging in nuclear medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barr, A.; Bonaldi, L.; Carugno, G.; Charpak, G.; Iannuzzi, D.; Nicoletto, M.; Pepato, A.; Ventura, S.

    2002-01-01

    High count rate detectors are of particular interest in nuclear medicine as they permit lower radiation doses to be received by the patient and allow dynamic images of high statistical quality to be obtained. We have developed a high-speed gamma camera based on a multi-wire proportional chamber. The chamber is filled with a xenon gas mixture and has been operated at pressures ranging from 5 to 10 bar. With an active imaging area of 25 cm×25 cm, the chamber has been equipped with an advanced, high rate, digital, electronic read-out system which carries out pulse shaping, energy discrimination, XY coincidence and cluster selection at speeds of up to a few megahertz. In order to ensure stable, long-term operation of the camera without degradation in performance, a gas purification system was designed and integrated into the camera. Measurements have been carried out to determine the properties and applicability of the camera using photon sources in the 20-120 keV energy range. We present some design features of the camera and selected results obtained from preliminary measurements carried out to measure its performance characteristics. Initial images obtained from the camera will also be presented.

  6. Cryogenic sample exchange NMR probe for magic angle spinning dynamic nuclear polarization

    PubMed Central

    Barnes, Alexander B.; Mak-Jurkauskas, Melody L.; Matsuki, Yoh; Bajaj, Vikram S.; van der Wel, Patrick C. A.; DeRocher, Ronald; Bryant, Jeffrey; Sirigiri, Jagadishwar R.; Temkin, Richard J.; Lugtenburg, Johan; Herzfeld, Judith; Griffin, Robert G.

    2009-01-01

    We describe a cryogenic sample exchange system that dramatically improves the efficiency of magic angle spinning (MAS) dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) experiments by reducing the time required to change samples and by improving long-term instrument stability. Changing samples in conventional cryogenic MAS DNP/NMR experiments involves warming the probe to room temperature, detaching all cryogenic, RF, and microwave connections, removing the probe from the magnet, replacing the sample, and reversing all the previous steps, with the entire cycle requiring a few hours. The sample exchange system described here — which relies on an eject pipe attached to the front of the MAS stator and a vacuum jacketed dewar with a bellowed hole — circumvents these procedures. To demonstrate the excellent sensitivity, resolution, and stability achieved with this quadruple resonance sample exchange probe, we have performed high precision distance measurements on the active site of the membrane protein bacteriorhodopsin. We also include a spectrum of the tripeptide N-f-MLF-OH at 100 K which shows 30 Hz linewidths. PMID:19356957

  7. Pump and amplification dynamics of gamma rays in a nuclear medium with the hidden population inversion

    SciTech Connect

    Rivlin, Lev A

    2009-12-31

    The features of the pump dynamics of isomeric nuclei excited by X-rays of a repetitively pulsed relativistic electron beam followed by the production of a medium with the negative absorption of gamma quanta are analysed. In the extended nuclear medium, the pump excites a travelling hidden-population-inversion wave with the anisotropic gamma amplification, which becomes positive in the case of the excess over the critical pump parameter equal to the product of the peak spectral power density of the X-ray source and the relative duration of an ultrashort relativistic electron bunch. In the alternative scheme with orthogonal directions of pumping X-rays and a flux of amplified gamma quanta, the absence of the amplification anisotropy opens up the possibility for constructing a standard two-mirror resonator with Bragg single-crystal reflectors. The critical peak value of the spectral pump power density is compared with the known characteristics of relativistic-electron X-ray sources by examples of some nuclides. (active media)

  8. Cryogenic sample exchange NMR probe for magic angle spinning dynamic nuclear polarization.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Alexander B; Mak-Jurkauskas, Melody L; Matsuki, Yoh; Bajaj, Vikram S; van der Wel, Patrick C A; Derocher, Ronald; Bryant, Jeffrey; Sirigiri, Jagadishwar R; Temkin, Richard J; Lugtenburg, Johan; Herzfeld, Judith; Griffin, Robert G

    2009-06-01

    We describe a cryogenic sample exchange system that dramatically improves the efficiency of magic angle spinning (MAS) dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) experiments by reducing the time required to change samples and by improving long-term instrument stability. Changing samples in conventional cryogenic MAS DNP/NMR experiments involves warming the probe to room temperature, detaching all cryogenic, RF, and microwave connections, removing the probe from the magnet, replacing the sample, and reversing all the previous steps, with the entire cycle requiring a few hours. The sample exchange system described here-which relies on an eject pipe attached to the front of the MAS stator and a vacuum jacketed dewar with a bellowed hole-circumvents these procedures. To demonstrate the excellent sensitivity, resolution, and stability achieved with this quadruple resonance sample exchange probe, we have performed high precision distance measurements on the active site of the membrane protein bacteriorhodopsin. We also include a spectrum of the tripeptide N-f-MLF-OH at 100K which shows 30 Hz linewidths.

  9. Bubble dynamics and the quark-hadron phase transition in nuclear collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fogaça, D. A.; Sanches, S. M.; Fariello, R.; Navarra, F. S.

    2016-05-01

    We study the nucleation of a quark-gluon plasma (QGP) phase in a hadron gas at low temperatures and high baryon densities. This kind of process will presumably happen very often in nuclear collisions at the GSI Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) and the Nuclotron-based Ion Collider Facility (NICA). When the appropriate energy densities (or baryon densities) and temperatures are reached the conversion of one phase into another is not instantaneous. It is a complex process, which involves the nucleation of bubbles of the new phase. One important element of this transition process is the rate of growth of a QGP bubble. In order to estimate it we solve the Relativistic Rayleigh-Plesset equation which governs the dynamics of a relativistic spherical bubble in a strongly interacting medium. The baryon rich hadron gas is represented by the nonlinear Walecka model and the QGP is described by the MIT bag model and also by a mean field model of QCD.

  10. A photochemically induced dynamic nuclear polarization study of denatured states of lysozyme

    SciTech Connect

    Broadhurst, R.W.; Dobson, C.M.; Hore, P.J.; Radford, S.E.; Rees, M.L. )

    1991-01-01

    Photochemically induced dynamic nuclear polarization (photo-CIDNP) techniques have been used to examine denatured states of lysozyme produced under a variety of conditions. {sup 1}H CIDNP difference spectra of lysozyme denatured thermally, by the addition of 10 M urea, or by the complete reduction of its four disulfide bonds were found to differ substantially not only from the spectrum of the native protein but also from that expected for a completely unstructured polypeptide chain. Specifically, denatured lysozyme showed a much reduced enhancement of tryptophan relative to tyrosine than did a mixture of blocked amino acids with the same composition as the intact protein. By contrast, the CIDNP spectrum of lysozyme denatured in dimethyl sulfoxide solution was found to be similar to that expected for a random coil. It is proposed that nonrandom hydrophobic interactions are present within the denatured states of lysozyme in aqueous solution and that these reduce the reactivity of tryptophan residues relative to tyrosine residues. Characterization of such interactions is likely to be of considerable significance for an understanding of the process of protein folding.

  11. 7Li relaxation time measurements at very low magnetic field by 1H dynamic nuclear polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeghib, Nadir; Grucker, Daniel

    2001-09-01

    Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) of water protons was used to measure the relaxation time of lithium at very low magnetic field as a demonstration of the use of DNP for nuclei less abundant than water protons. Lithium (Li+) was chosen because it is an efficient treatment for manic-depressive illness, with an unknown action mechanism. After having recalled the theoretical basis of a three-spin system comprising two nuclei - the water proton of the solvent, the dissolved Li+ ion and the free electron of a free radical - we have developed a transient solution in order to optimize potential biological applications of Li DNP. The three-spin model has allowed computation of all the parameters of the system - the longitudinal relaxation rate per unit of free radical concentration, the dipolar and scalar part of the coupling between the nuclei and the electron, and the maximum signal enhancement achievable for both proton and lithium spins. All these measurements have been obtained solely through the detection of the proton resonance.

  12. Non-Gaussian fluctuations and non-Markovian effects in the nuclear fusion process: Langevin dynamics emerging from quantum molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Wen, Kai; Sakata, Fumihiko; Li, Zhu-Xia; Wu, Xi-Zhen; Zhang, Ying-Xun; Zhou, Shan-Gui

    2013-07-05

    Macroscopic parameters as well as precise information on the random force characterizing the Langevin-type description of the nuclear fusion process around the Coulomb barrier are extracted from the microscopic dynamics of individual nucleons by exploiting the numerical simulation of the improved quantum molecular dynamics. It turns out that the dissipation dynamics of the relative motion between two fusing nuclei is caused by a non-Gaussian distribution of the random force. We find that the friction coefficient as well as the time correlation function of the random force takes particularly large values in a region a little bit inside of the Coulomb barrier. A clear non-Markovian effect is observed in the time correlation function of the random force. It is further shown that an emergent dynamics of the fusion process can be described by the generalized Langevin equation with memory effects by appropriately incorporating the microscopic information of individual nucleons through the random force and its time correlation function.

  13. Energetics and Dynamics of Electron Transfer and Proton Transfer in Dissociation of Metal III (salen)-Peptide Complexes in the Gas Phase

    SciTech Connect

    Laskin, Julia; Yang, Zhibo; Chu, Ivan K.

    2008-03-12

    Time- and collision energy-resolved surface-induced dissociation (SID) of ternary complexes of CoIII(salen)+, FeIII(salen)+, and MnIII(salen)+ with several angiotensin peptide analogs was studied using a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer (FT-ICR MS) specially equipped to perform SID experiments. Time-resolved fragmentation efficiency curves (TFECs) were modeled using an RRKM-based approach developed in our laboratory. The approach utilizes a very flexible analytical expression for the internal energy deposition function that is capable of reproducing both single-collision and multiple-collision activation in the gas phase and excitation by collisions with a surface. The energetics and dynamics of competing dissociation pathways obtained from the modeling provides important insight on the competition between proton transfer, electron transfer, loss of neutral peptide ligand, and other processes that determine gas-phase fragmentation of these model systems. Similar fragmentation behavior was obtained for various CoIII(salen)-peptide systems of different angiotensin analogs. In contrast, dissociation pathways and relative stabilities of the complexes changed dramatically when cobalt was replaced with trivalent iron or manganese. We demonstrate that the electron transfer efficiency is correlated with redox properties of the metalIII(salen) complexes (Co > Fe > Mn), while differences in the types of fragments formed from the complexes reflect differences in the modes of binding between the metal-salen complex and the peptide ligand. RRKM modeling of time- and collision energy-resolved SID data suggests that the competition between proton transfer and electron transfer during dissociation of CoIII(salen)-peptide complexes is mainly determined by differences in entropy effects while the energetics of these two pathways are very similar.

  14. Design of a microfluidic device to quantify dynamic intra-nuclear deformation during cell migration through confining environments

    PubMed Central

    Davidson, Patricia M.; Sliz, Josiah; Isermann, Philipp; Denais, Celine; Lammerding, Jan

    2015-01-01

    The ability of cells to migrate through tissues and interstitial space is an essential factor during development and tissue homeostasis, immune cell mobility, and in various human diseases. Deformation of the nucleus and its associated lamina during 3-D migration is gathering increasing interest in the context of cancer metastasis, with the underlying hypothesis that a softer nucleus, resulting from reduced levels of lamin A/C, may aid tumour spreading. However, current methods to study the migration of cells in confining three dimensional (3-D) environments are limited by their imprecise control over the confinement, physiological relevance, and/or compatibility with high resolution imaging techniques. We describe the design of a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microfluidic device composed of channels with precisely-defined constrictions mimicking physiological environments that enable high resolution imaging of live and fixed cells. The device promotes easy cell loading and rapid, yet long-lasting (>24 hours) chemotactic gradient formation without the need for continuous perfusion. Using this device, we obtained detailed, quantitative measurements of dynamic nuclear deformation as cells migrate through tight spaces, revealing distinct phases of nuclear translocation through the constriction, buckling of the nuclear lamina, and severe intranuclear strain. Furthermore, we found that lamin A/C-deficient cells exhibited increased and more plastic nuclear deformations compared to wild-type cells but only minimal changes in nuclear volume, implying that low lamin A/C levels facilitate migration through constrictions by increasing nuclear deformability rather than compressibility. The integration of our migration devices with high resolution time-lapse imaging provides a powerful new approach to study intracellular mechanics and dynamics in a variety of physiologically-relevant applications, ranging from cancer cell invasion to immune cell recruitment. PMID:26549481

  15. High-frequency dynamic nuclear polarization using biradicals: a multifrequency EPR lineshape analysis.

    PubMed

    Hu, Kan-Nian; Song, Changsik; Yu, Hsiao-Hua; Swager, Timothy M; Griffin, Robert G

    2008-02-07

    To date, the cross effect (CE) and thermal mixing (TM) mechanisms have consistently provided the largest enhancements in dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) experiments performed at high magnetic fields. Both involve a three-spin electron-electron-nucleus process whose efficiency depends primarily on two electron-electron interactions--the interelectron distance R and the correct electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) frequency separation that matches the nuclear Larmor frequency, /omega(e2)-omega(e1)/ = omega(n). Biradicals, for example, two 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-piperidine-1-oxyls (TEMPOs) tethered with a molecular linker, can in principle constrain both the distance and relative g-tensor orientation between two unpaired electrons, allowing these two spectral parameters to be optimized for the CE and TM. To verify this hypothesis, we synthesized a series of biradicals--bis-TEMPO tethered by n ethylene glycol units (a.k.a. BTnE)--that show an increasing DNP enhancement with a decreasing tether length. Specifically at 90 K and 5 T, the enhancement grew from approximately 40 observed with 10 mM monomeric TEMPO, where the average R approximately 56 A corresponding to electron-electron dipolar coupling constant omega(d)2 pi = 0.3 MHz, to approximately 175 with 5 mM BT2E (10 mM electrons) which has R approximately 13 A with omega(d)2 pi = 24 MHz. In addition, we compared these DNP enhancements with those from three biradicals having shorter and more rigid tethers-bis-TEMPO tethered by oxalyl amide, bis-TEMPO tethered by the urea structure, and 1-(TEMPO-4-oxyl)-3-(TEMPO-4-amino)-propan-2-ol (TOTAPOL) TOTAPOL is of particular interest since it is soluble in aqueous media and compatible with DNP experiments on biological systems such as membrane and amyloid proteins. The interelectron distances and relative g-tensor orientations of all of these biradicals were characterized with an analysis of their 9 and 140 GHz continuous-wave EPR lineshapes. The results show that the

  16. Interfacial Ca2+ environments in nanocrystalline apatites revealed by dynamic nuclear polarization enhanced 43Ca NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Daniel; Leroy, César; Crevant, Charlène; Bonhomme-Coury, Laure; Babonneau, Florence; Laurencin, Danielle; Bonhomme, Christian; de Paëpe, Gaël

    2017-01-01

    The interfaces within bones, teeth and other hybrid biomaterials are of paramount importance but remain particularly difficult to characterize at the molecular level because both sensitive and selective techniques are mandatory. Here, it is demonstrated that unprecedented insights into calcium environments, for example the differentiation of surface and core species of hydroxyapatite nanoparticles, can be obtained using solid-state NMR, when combined with dynamic nuclear polarization. Although calcium represents an ideal NMR target here (and de facto for a large variety of calcium-derived materials), its stable NMR-active isotope, calcium-43, is a highly unreceptive probe. Using the sensitivity gains from dynamic nuclear polarization, not only could calcium-43 NMR spectra be obtained easily, but natural isotopic abundance 2D correlation experiments could be recorded for calcium-43 in short experimental time. This opens perspectives for the detailed study of interfaces in nanostructured materials of the highest biological interest as well as calcium-based nanosystems in general.

  17. Communication: Quantum molecular dynamics simulation of liquid para-hydrogen by nuclear and electron wave packet approach.

    PubMed

    Hyeon-Deuk, Kim; Ando, Koji

    2014-05-07

    Liquid para-hydrogen (p-H2) is a typical quantum liquid which exhibits strong nuclear quantum effects (NQEs) and thus anomalous static and dynamic properties. We propose a real-time simulation method of wave packet (WP) molecular dynamics (MD) based on non-empirical intra- and inter-molecular interactions of non-spherical hydrogen molecules, and apply it to condensed-phase p-H2. The NQEs, such as WP delocalization and zero-point energy, are taken into account without perturbative expansion of prepared model potential functions but with explicit interactions between nuclear and electron WPs. The developed MD simulation for 100 ps with 1200 hydrogen molecules is realized at feasible computational cost, by which basic experimental properties of p-H2 liquid such as radial distribution functions, self-diffusion coefficients, and shear viscosities are all well reproduced.

  18. Interfacial Ca(2+) environments in nanocrystalline apatites revealed by dynamic nuclear polarization enhanced (43)Ca NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Daniel; Leroy, César; Crevant, Charlène; Bonhomme-Coury, Laure; Babonneau, Florence; Laurencin, Danielle; Bonhomme, Christian; De Paëpe, Gaël

    2017-01-27

    The interfaces within bones, teeth and other hybrid biomaterials are of paramount importance but remain particularly difficult to characterize at the molecular level because both sensitive and selective techniques are mandatory. Here, it is demonstrated that unprecedented insights into calcium environments, for example the differentiation of surface and core species of hydroxyapatite nanoparticles, can be obtained using solid-state NMR, when combined with dynamic nuclear polarization. Although calcium represents an ideal NMR target here (and de facto for a large variety of calcium-derived materials), its stable NMR-active isotope, calcium-43, is a highly unreceptive probe. Using the sensitivity gains from dynamic nuclear polarization, not only could calcium-43 NMR spectra be obtained easily, but natural isotopic abundance 2D correlation experiments could be recorded for calcium-43 in short experimental time. This opens perspectives for the detailed study of interfaces in nanostructured materials of the highest biological interest as well as calcium-based nanosystems in general.

  19. Communication: Quantum molecular dynamics simulation of liquid para-hydrogen by nuclear and electron wave packet approach

    SciTech Connect

    Hyeon-Deuk, Kim; Ando, Koji

    2014-05-07

    Liquid para-hydrogen (p-H{sub 2}) is a typical quantum liquid which exhibits strong nuclear quantum effects (NQEs) and thus anomalous static and dynamic properties. We propose a real-time simulation method of wave packet (WP) molecular dynamics (MD) based on non-empirical intra- and inter-molecular interactions of non-spherical hydrogen molecules, and apply it to condensed-phase p-H{sub 2}. The NQEs, such as WP delocalization and zero-point energy, are taken into account without perturbative expansion of prepared model potential functions but with explicit interactions between nuclear and electron WPs. The developed MD simulation for 100 ps with 1200 hydrogen molecules is realized at feasible computational cost, by which basic experimental properties of p-H{sub 2} liquid such as radial distribution functions, self-diffusion coefficients, and shear viscosities are all well reproduced.

  20. Observation of strongly forbidden solid effect dynamic nuclear polarization transitions via electron-electron double resonance detected NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Albert A.; Corzilius, Björn; Haze, Olesya; Swager, Timothy M.; Griffin, Robert G.

    2013-12-01

    We present electron paramagnetic resonance experiments for which solid effect dynamic nuclear polarization transitions were observed indirectly via polarization loss on the electron. This use of indirect observation allows characterization of the dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) process close to the electron. Frequency profiles of the electron-detected solid effect obtained using trityl radical showed intense saturation of the electron at the usual solid effect condition, which involves a single electron and nucleus. However, higher order solid effect transitions involving two, three, or four nuclei were also observed with surprising intensity, although these transitions did not lead to bulk nuclear polarization—suggesting that higher order transitions are important primarily in the transfer of polarization to nuclei nearby the electron. Similar results were obtained for the SA-BDPA radical where strong electron-nuclear couplings produced splittings in the spectrum of the indirectly observed solid effect conditions. Observation of high order solid effect transitions supports recent studies of the solid effect, and suggests that a multi-spin solid effect mechanism may play a major role in polarization transfer via DNP.

  1. Referencing strategy for the direct comparison of nuclear magnetic resonance and molecular dynamics motional parameters in RNA.

    PubMed

    Musselman, Catherine; Zhang, Qi; Al-Hashimi, Hashim; Andricioaei, Ioan

    2010-01-21

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are both techniques that can be used to characterize the structural dynamics of biomolecules and their underlying time scales. Comparison of relaxation parameters obtained through each methodology allows for cross validation of techniques and for complementarity in the analysis of dynamics. Here we present a combined NMR/MD study of the dynamics of HIV-1 transactivation response (TAR) RNA. We compute relaxation constants (R(1), R(2), and NOE) and model-free parameters (S(2) and tau) from a 65 ns molecular dynamics (MD) trajectory and compare them with the respective parameters measured in a domain-elongation NMR experiment. Using the elongated domain as the frame of reference for all computed parameters allows for a direct comparison between experiment and simulation. We see good agreement for many parameters and gain further insight into the nature of the local and global dynamics of TAR, which are found to be quite complex, spanning multiple time scales. For the few cases where agreement is poor, comparison of the dynamical parameters provides insight into the limits of each technique. We suggest a frequency-matching procedure that yields an upper bound for the time scale of dynamics to which the NMR relaxation experiment is sensitive.

  2. Emp is a component of the nuclear matrix of mammalian cells and undergoes dynamic rearrangements during cell division

    SciTech Connect

    Bala, Shashi; Kumar, Ajay; Soni, Shivani; Sinha, Sudha; Hanspal, Manjit . E-mail: manjit.hanspal@tufts.edu

    2006-04-21

    Emp, originally detected in erythroblastic islands, is expressed in numerous cell types and tissues suggesting a functionality not limited to hematopoiesis. To study the function of Emp in non-hematopoietic cells, an epitope-tagged recombinant human Emp was expressed in HEK cells. Preliminary studies revealed that Emp partitioned into both the nuclear and Triton X-100-insoluble cytoskeletal fractions in approximately a 4:1 ratio. In this study, we report investigations of Emp in the nucleus. Sequential extractions of interphase nuclei showed that recombinant Emp was present predominantly in the nuclear matrix. Immunofluorescence microscopy showed that Emp was present in typical nuclear speckles enriched with the spliceosome assembly factor SC35 and partially co-localized with actin staining. Coimmunoprecipitation and GST-pull-down assays confirmed the apparent close association of Emp with nuclear actin. During mitosis, Emp was detected at the mitotic spindle/spindle poles, as well as in the contractile ring during cytokinesis. These results suggest that Emp undergoes dynamic rearrangements within the nuclear architecture that are correlated with cell division.

  3. [The dynamic mitochondria-nuclear redistribution of FKBP51 during the process of adipocyte differentiation is regulated by PKA].

    PubMed

    Toneatto, Judith; Charó, Nancy L; Susperreguy, Sebastián; Piwien-Pilipuk, Graciela

    2013-01-01

    Glucocorticoids play an important role in adipogenesis via the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) that forms a heterocomplex with Hsp90-Hsp70 and a high molecular weight immunophilin FKBP51 or FKBP52. We have found that FKBP51 level of expression progressively increases, FKBP52 decreases, whereas Hsp90, Hsp70, and p23 remain unchanged when 3T3-L1 preadipocytes differentiate. Interestingly, FKBP51 translocates from mitochondria to the nucleus at the onset of adipogenesis. FKBP51 transiently concentrates in the nuclear lamina, at a time that this nuclear compartment undergoes its reorganization. FKBP51 nuclear localization is transient, after 48 h it cycles back to mitochondria. We found that the dynamic FKBP51 mitochondrial-nuclear shuttling is regulated by glucocorticoids and mainly on cAMP-PKA signaling since PKA inhibition by myristoilated-PKI, abrogated FKBP51 nuclear translocation induced by 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (IBMX). It has been reported that PKA interacts with GR in a ligand dependent manner potentiating its transcriptional capacity. GR transcriptional capacity is reduced when cells are incubated in the presence of IBMX, forskolin or dibutyryl-cAMP, compounds that induced nuclear translocation of FKBP51, therefore PKA may exert a dual role in the control of GR. In summary, the presence of FKBP51 in the nucleus may be critical for GR transcriptional control, and possibly for the control of other transcription factors that are not members of the nuclear receptor family but are regulated by PKA signaling pathway, when transcription has to be strictly controlled to succeed in the acquisition of the adipocyte phenotype.

  4. 35Cl dynamic nuclear polarization solid-state NMR of active pharmaceutical ingredients

    SciTech Connect

    Hirsh, David A.; Rossini, Aaron J.; Emsley, Lyndon; Schurko, Robert W.

    2016-08-24

    In this paper, we show how to obtain efficient dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) enhanced 35Cl solid-state NMR (SSNMR) spectra at 9.4 T and demonstrate how they can be used to characterize the molecular-level structure of hydrochloride salts of active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs) in both bulk and low wt% API dosage forms. 35Cl SSNMR central-transition powder patterns of chloride ions are typically tens to hundreds of kHz in breadth, and most cannot be excited uniformly with high-power rectangular pulses or acquired under conditions of magic-angle spinning (MAS). Herein, we demonstrate the combination of DNP and 1H–35Cl broadband adiabatic inversion cross polarization (BRAIN-CP) experiments for the acquisition of high quality wideline spectra of APIs under static sample conditions, and obtain signals up to 50 times greater than in spectra acquired without the use of DNP at 100 K. We report a new protocol, called spinning-on spinning-off (SOSO) acquisition, where MAS is applied during part of the polarization delay to increase the DNP enhancements and then the MAS rotation is stopped so that a wideline 35Cl NMR powder pattern free from the effects of spinning sidebands can be acquired under static conditions. This method provides an additional two-fold signal enhancement compared to DNP-enhanced SSNMR spectra acquired under purely static conditions. DNP-enhanced 35Cl experiments are used to characterize APIs in bulk and dosage forms with Cl contents as low as 0.45 wt%. These results are compared to DNP-enhanced 1H–13C CP/MAS spectra of APIs in dosage forms, which are often hindered by interfering signals arising from the binders, fillers and other excipient materials.

  5. Dynamic nuclear polarization-enhanced 13C NMR spectroscopy of static biological solids

    PubMed Central

    Potapov, Alexey; Yau, Wai-Ming; Tycko, Robert

    2013-01-01

    We explore the possibility of using dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) to enhance signals in structural studies of biological solids by solid state NMR without sample spinning. Specifically, we use 2D 13C-13C exchange spectroscopy to probe the peptide backbone torsion angles (ϕ,ψ) in a series of selectively 13C-labeled 40-residue β-amyloid (Aβ1–40) samples, in both fibrillar and non-fibrillar states. Experiments are carried out at 9.39 T and 8 K, using a static double-resonance NMR probe and low-power microwave irradiation at 264 GHz. In frozen solutions of Aβ1–40 fibrils doped with DOTOPA-TEMPO, we observe DNP signal enhancement factors of 16–21. We show that the orientation- and frequency-dependent spin polarization exchange between sequential backbone carbonyl 13C labels can be simulated accurately using a simple expression for the exchange rate, after experimentally determined homogeneous 13C lineshapes are incorporated in the simulations. The experimental 2D 13C-13C exchange spectra place constraints on the ϕ and ψ angles between the two carbonyl labels. Although the data are not sufficient to determine ϕ and ψ uniquely, the data do provide non-trivial constraints that could be included in structure calculations. With DNP at low temperatures, 2D 13C-13C exchange spectra can be obtained from a 3.5 mg sample of Aβ1–40 fibrils in 4 hr or less, despite the broad 13C chemical shift anisotropy line shapes that are observed in static samples. PMID:23562665

  6. XAFS And Molecular Dynamics Study of Natural Minerals, Analogues of Ceramics for Nuclear Waste Storage

    SciTech Connect

    Harfouche, M.; Farges, F.; Crocombette, J.P.; Flank, A.M.; /SLAC, SSRL

    2006-10-27

    Natural actinides (U and Th) are harmful for the crystalline structure of natural minerals, due to their irradiation. Natural minerals can then become amorphous to x-ray diffraction ('metamict') after being irradiated throughout a long period of time (10{sup 8} years). Then, they are used as natural analogues of ceramics for nuclear waste storage. XAFS studies were performed in zircon, monazite and titanite to understand the effect of radiation damage on the local structure around Th, U, Zr and P and compared to available molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. In zircon, a local expansion around actinides (when substituting for Zr) is found. The radial expansion is a function of the metamictisation degree: up to {approx}4 {angstrom} in crystalline zircon and larger in the metamict counterparts. Ab-initio calculations (FEFF7) were performed around Zr ({approx}23000 sites) and around U (1000 to 3000 sites) in various crystalline and alpha-decay damaged zircon MD simulations. The calculated averaged EXAFS spectra confirms this expansion, which validates the use of the potentials used in the simulations as well as the alpha decay damage model considered in these MD simulations. Tetravalent actinides were found to be 8-coordinated in the undamaged structure, whereas their coordination drops to 7 in the damaged structures. In contrast to zircon, no local expansion around actinides in monazite was detected, despite some polymerization around P is measured (related to radiation damage). Finally, in some phases (such as titanite), actinides are found as oxyde-type clusters (ThO{sub 2}, UO{sub 2}). Consequently, actinides do not 'systematically' substitute for major actions in these structure, in contrast to the common belief in mineralogy.

  7. Dynamic Nuclear Polarization enhanced NMR at 187 GHz/284 MHz using an Extended Interaction Klystron amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kemp, Thomas F.; Dannatt, Hugh R. W.; Barrow, Nathan S.; Watts, Anthony; Brown, Steven P.; Newton, Mark E.; Dupree, Ray

    2016-04-01

    A Dynamic Nuclear Polarisation (DNP) enhanced solid-state Magic Angle Spinning (MAS) NMR spectrometer which uses a 187 GHz (corresponding to 1H NMR frequency of 284 MHz) Extended Interaction Klystron (EIK) amplifier as the microwave source is briefly described. Its performance is demonstrated for a biomolecule (bacteriorhodopsin), a pharmaceutical, and surface functionalised silica. The EIK is very compact and easily incorporated into an existing spectrometer. The bandwidth of the amplifier is sufficient that it obviates the need for a sweepable magnetic field, once set, for all commonly used radicals. The variable power (CW or pulsed) output from the EIK is transmitted to the DNP-NMR probe using a quasi-optic system with a high power isolator and a corrugated waveguide which feeds the microwaves into the DNP-NMR probe. Curved mirrors inside the probe project the microwaves down the axis of the MAS rotor, giving a very efficient system such that maximum DNP enhancement is achieved with less than 3 W output from the microwave source. The DNP-NMR probe operates with a sample temperature down to 90 K whilst spinning at 8 kHz. Significant enhancements, in excess of 100 for bacteriorhodopsin in purple membrane (bR in PM), are shown along with spectra which are enhanced by ≈25 with respect to room temperature, for both the pharmaceutical furosemide and surface functionalised silica. These enhancements allow hitherto prohibitively time consuming experiments to be undertaken. The power at which the DNP enhancement in bR in PM saturates does not change significantly between 90 K and 170 K even though the enhancement drops by a factor of ≈11. As the DNP build up time decreases by a factor 3 over this temperature range, the reduction in T1n is presumably a significant contribution to the drop in enhancement.

  8. Phase-space averaging and natural branching of nuclear paths for nonadiabatic electron wavepacket dynamics.

    PubMed

    Yonehara, Takehiro; Takatsuka, Kazuo

    2008-10-07

    We propose a simple and tractable method to treat quantum electron wavepacket dynamics that nonadiabatically couples with "classical" nuclear motions in mixed quantum-classical representation. The electron wavepacket is propagated inducing electronic-state mixing along our proposed paths. It has been shown in our previous studies that classical force working on nuclei in a nonadiabatic region is represented in a matrix form (called the force matrix), and the solutions of the Hamilton canonical equations of motion for nuclei based on this force matrix give rise to a cascade of infinitely many branching paths when solved simultaneously with electronic-state mixing. As a tractable approximation to these rigorous solutions, we here devise a method to provide much simpler nonadiabatic paths: (i) extract one or a few number of representative paths by taking an average over the paths in phase space (not averaging over the forces) that should be otherwise undergo the fine branching. (ii) After the nonadiabatic coupling becomes sufficiently small, let these paths naturally branch by running them with their own individual eigenforces (the eigenvalues of the force matrix). Since the eigenforces coincide with the forces of adiabatic potential energy surfaces in the limit of zero nonadiabatic coupling, these branching paths eventually run on one of possible adiabatic potential energy surfaces, converging to a classical path (Born-Oppenheimer path). The paths thus created are theoretically satisfactory in that they realize the coherent mixing of electronic states in the manner of quantum entanglement and yet eventually become consistent with the Born-Oppenheimer classical trajectories. We test the present method numerically with the use of two- and three-state systems that are extracted from ab initio calculations for the excited states of LiH molecule.

  9. 35Cl dynamic nuclear polarization solid-state NMR of active pharmaceutical ingredients

    DOE PAGES

    Hirsh, David A.; Rossini, Aaron J.; Emsley, Lyndon; ...

    2016-08-24

    In this paper, we show how to obtain efficient dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) enhanced 35Cl solid-state NMR (SSNMR) spectra at 9.4 T and demonstrate how they can be used to characterize the molecular-level structure of hydrochloride salts of active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs) in both bulk and low wt% API dosage forms. 35Cl SSNMR central-transition powder patterns of chloride ions are typically tens to hundreds of kHz in breadth, and most cannot be excited uniformly with high-power rectangular pulses or acquired under conditions of magic-angle spinning (MAS). Herein, we demonstrate the combination of DNP and 1H–35Cl broadband adiabatic inversion cross polarizationmore » (BRAIN-CP) experiments for the acquisition of high quality wideline spectra of APIs under static sample conditions, and obtain signals up to 50 times greater than in spectra acquired without the use of DNP at 100 K. We report a new protocol, called spinning-on spinning-off (SOSO) acquisition, where MAS is applied during part of the polarization delay to increase the DNP enhancements and then the MAS rotation is stopped so that a wideline 35Cl NMR powder pattern free from the effects of spinning sidebands can be acquired under static conditions. This method provides an additional two-fold signal enhancement compared to DNP-enhanced SSNMR spectra acquired under purely static conditions. DNP-enhanced 35Cl experiments are used to characterize APIs in bulk and dosage forms with Cl contents as low as 0.45 wt%. These results are compared to DNP-enhanced 1H–13C CP/MAS spectra of APIs in dosage forms, which are often hindered by interfering signals arising from the binders, fillers and other excipient materials.« less

  10. A dynamical model for gas flows, star formation and nuclear winds in galactic centres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krumholz, Mark R.; Kruijssen, J. M. Diederik; Crocker, Roland M.

    2017-04-01

    We present a dynamical model for gas transport, star formation and winds in the nuclear regions of galaxies, focusing on the Milky Way's Central Molecular Zone (CMZ). In our model angular momentum and mass are transported by a combination of gravitational and bar-driven acoustic instabilities. In gravitationally unstable regions the gas can form stars, and the resulting feedback drives both turbulence and a wind that ejects mass from the CMZ. We show that the CMZ is in a quasi-steady state where mass deposited at large radii by the bar is transported inwards to a star-forming, ring-shaped region at ∼100 pc from the Galactic Centre, where the shear reaches a minimum. This ring undergoes episodic starbursts, with bursts lasting ∼5-10 Myr occurring at ∼20-40 Myr intervals. During quiescence the gas in the ring is not fully cleared, but is driven out of a self-gravitating state by the momentum injected by expanding supernova remnants. Starbursts also drive a wind off the star-forming ring, with a time-averaged mass flux comparable to the star formation rate. We show that our model agrees well with the observed properties of the CMZ, and places it near a star formation minimum within the evolutionary cycle. We argue that such cycles of bursty star formation and winds should be ubiquitous in the nuclei of barred spiral galaxies, and show that the resulting distribution of galactic nuclei on the Kennicutt-Schmidt relation is in good agreement with that observed in nearby galaxies.

  11. (13) C dynamic nuclear polarization using isotopically enriched 4-oxo-TEMPO free radicals.

    PubMed

    Niedbalski, Peter; Parish, Christopher; Kiswandhi, Andhika; Lumata, Lloyd

    2016-12-01

    The nitroxide-based free radical 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-1-piperidinyloxy (TEMPO) is a widely used polarizing agent in NMR signal amplification via dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP). In this study, we have thoroughly investigated the effects of (15) N and/or (2) H isotopic labeling of 4-oxo-TEMPO free radical on (13) C DNP of 3 M [1-(13) C] sodium acetate samples in 1 : 1 v/v glycerol : water at 3.35 T and 1.2 K. Four variants of this free radical were used for (13) C DNP: 4-oxo-TEMPO, 4-oxo-TEMPO-(15) N, 4-oxo-TEMPO-d16 and 4-oxo-TEMPO-(15) N,d16 . Our results indicate that, despite the striking differences seen in the electron spin resonance (ESR) spectral features, the (13) C DNP efficiency of these (15) N and/or (2) H-enriched 4-oxo-TEMPO free radicals are relatively the same compared with (13) C DNP performance of the regular 4-oxo-TEMPO. Furthermore, when fully deuterated glassing solvents were used, the (13) C DNP signals of these samples all doubled in the same manner, and the (13) C polarization buildup was faster by a factor of 2 for all samples. The data here suggest that the hyperfine coupling contributions of these isotopically enriched 4-oxo-TEMPO free radicals have negligible effects on the (13) C DNP efficiency at 3.35 T and 1.2 K. These results are discussed in light of the spin temperature model of DNP. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Theory of solid effect and cross effect dynamic nuclear polarization with half-integer high-spin metal polarizing agents in rotating solids.

    PubMed

    Corzilius, Björn

    2016-10-21

    Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) is a powerful method to enhance sensitivity especially of solid-state magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR by up to several orders of magnitude. The increased interest both from a practical as well as theoretical viewpoint has spawned several fields of active research such as the development of new polarizing agents with improved or unique properties and description of the underlying DNP mechanisms such as solid effect (SE) and cross effect (CE). Even though a novel class of unique polarizing agents based on high-spin metal ions such as Gd(iii) and Mn(ii) has already been utilized for MAS DNP a theoretical description of the involved DNP mechanism is still incomplete. Here, we review several aspects of DNP-relevant electron-paramagnetic resonance (EPR) properties of the general class of these half-integer high-spin metal ions with isotropic Zeeman interaction but significant zero-field splitting (ZFS). While the SE can be relatively easily described similar to that of a S = 1/2 system and is assumed to be effective only for polarizing agents featuring a narrow central EPR transitions (i.e., mS = -1/2 → +1/2) with respect to the nuclear Larmor frequency, the CE between two high-spin ions requires a more detailed theoretical investigation due to a multitude of possible transitions and matching conditions. This is especially interesting in light of recent understanding of CE being induced by MAS-driven level anti-crossings (LACs) between dipolar-coupled electron spins. We discuss the requirements of such CE-enabling LACs to occur due to anisotropy of ZFS, the expected adiabaticity, and the resulting possibilities of high-spin metal ion pairs to act as polarizing agents for DNP. This theoretical description serves as a framework for a detailed experimental study published directly following this work.

  13. Recent research directions in Fribourg: nuclear dynamics in resonances revealed by 2-dimensional EEL spectra, electron collisions with ionic liquids and electronic excitation of pyrimidine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allan, Michael; Regeta, Khrystyna; Gorfinkiel, Jimena D.; Mašín, Zdeněk; Grimme, Stefan; Bannwarth, Christoph

    2016-05-01

    The article briefly reviews three subjects recently investigated in Fribourg: (i) electron collisions with surfaces of ionic liquids, (ii) two-dimensional (2D) electron energy loss spectra and (iii) resonances in absolute cross sections for electronic excitation of unsaturated compounds. Electron energy loss spectra of four ionic liquids revealed a number of excited states, including triplet states. A solution of a dye in an ionic liquid showed an energy-loss band of the solute, but not in all ionic liquids. 2D spectra reveal state-to-state information (given resonance to given final state) and are shown to be an interesting means to gain insight into dynamics of nuclear motion in resonances. Absolute cross sections for pyrimidine are reported as a function of scattering angle and as a function of electron energy. They reveal resonant structure which was reproduced very nicely by R-matrix calculations. The calculation provided an assignment of the resonances which reveals common patterns in compounds containing double bonds.

  14. Tryptophan sidechain dynamics in hydrophobic oligopeptides determined by use of 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Weaver, A J; Kemple, M D; Prendergast, F G

    1988-07-01

    Two oligopeptides, t-boc-LAWAL-OMe and t-boc-LALALW-OMe, were synthesized for the purpose of examining the sidechain dynamics of the tryptophan residue in hydrophobic environments by 13C nuclear magnetic resonance and fluorescence spectroscopy. In both peptides, the tryptophan sidechain was greater than 95% enriched with 13C at the C delta 1 position. Spin-lattice relaxation time (T1) and steady-state nuclear Overhauser effect (NOE) data were obtained at 50.3 and 75.4 MHz for both peptides in CD3OD, and at 75.4 MHz for t-boc-LALALW-OMe in lysolecithin-D2O micelles. We have adapted the model-free approach of G. Lipari and A. Szabo (1982, J. Am. Chem. Soc. 104:4546) to interpret the 13C-NMR data. Computer-generated curves based on experimental data obtained at a single frequency demonstrate relationships between an effective correlation time for tryptophan sidechain motion (tau e), a generalized order parameter (sigma) describing the extent of motional restriction, and an overall correlation time for the peptide (tau m). Assuming predominantly dipolar relaxation, least-squares fits of the dual frequency relaxation data provide values for these parameters for both peptides. The contribution of chemical shift anisotropy (CSA), however, is also explicitly assessed in the data analysis, and is shown to perturb the predicted sigma, tau e, and tau m values and to decrease chi(2) values observed in nonlinear least-squares analysis of the data. Because of uncertainty in the contribution of CSA to the relaxation of the indole ring 13C delta 1 atom, nonlinear least-squares analysis of the relaxation data were performed with and without inclusion of a CSA term in the appropriate relaxation equations. Neglecting CSA, an overall peptide correlation time of 0.69 ns is predicted for t-boc-LAWAL-OMe in CD3OD at 20 degrees C compared with 1.28 ns for t-boc-LALALW-OMe. Given these tau m values and taking into account the effect of measurement error in the T1 and NOE data, the internal

  15. The sensitivities of high-harmonic generation and strong-field ionization to coupled electronic and nuclear dynamics.

    PubMed

    Baykusheva, Denitsa; Kraus, Peter M; Zhang, Song Bin; Rohringer, Nina; Wörner, Hans Jakob

    2014-01-01

    The sensitivities of high-harmonic generation (HHG) and strong-field ionization (SFI) to coupled electronic and nuclear dynamics are studied, using the nitric oxide (NO) molecule as an example. A coherent superposition of electronic and rotational states of NO is prepared by impulsive stimulated Raman scattering and probed by simultaneous detection of HHG and SFI yields. We observe a fourfold higher sensitivity of high-harmonic generation to electronic dynamics and attribute it to the presence of inelastic quantum paths connecting coherently related electronic states [Kraus et al., Phys. Rev. Lett.111, 243005 (2013)]. Whereas different harmonic orders display very different sensitivities to rotational or electronic dynamics, strong-field ionization is found to be most sensitive to electronic motion. We introduce a general theoretical formalism for high-harmonic generation from coupled nuclear-electronic wave packets. We show that the unequal sensitivities of different harmonic orders to electronic or rotational dynamics result from the angle dependence of the photorecombination matrix elements which encode several autoionizing and shape resonances in the photoionization continuum of NO. We further study the dependence of rotational and electronic coherences on the intensity of the excitation pulse and support the observations with calculations.

  16. Nuclear transport of paxillin depends on focal adhesion dynamics and FAT domains

    PubMed Central

    Sathe, Aneesh R.; Shivashankar, G. V.; Sheetz, Michael P.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The nuclear transport of paxillin appears to be crucial for paxillin function but the mechanism of transport remains unclear. Here, we show that the nuclear transport of paxillin is regulated by focal adhesion turnover and the presence of FAT domains. Focal adhesion turnover was controlled using triangular or circular fibronectin islands. Circular islands caused higher focal adhesion turnover and increased the nuclear transport of paxillin relative to triangular islands. Mutating several residues of paxillin had no effect on its nuclear transport, suggesting that the process is controlled by multiple domains. Knocking out FAK (also known as PTK2) and vinculin caused an increase in nuclear paxillin. This could be reversed by rescue with wild-type FAK but not by FAK with a mutated FAT domain, which inhibits paxillin binding. Expressing just the FAT domain of FAK not only brought down nuclear levels of paxillin but also caused a large immobile fraction of paxillin to be present at focal adhesions, as demonstrated by fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) studies. Taken together, focal adhesion turnover and FAT domains regulate the nuclear localization of paxillin, suggesting a possible role for transcriptional control, through paxillin, by focal adhesions. PMID:27068537

  17. Laminopathic mutations interfere with the assembly, localization, and dynamics of nuclear lamins.

    PubMed

    Wiesel, Naama; Mattout, Anna; Melcer, Shai; Melamed-Book, Naomi; Herrmann, Harald; Medalia, Ohad; Aebi, Ueli; Gruenbaum, Yosef

    2008-01-08

    Lamins are nuclear intermediate filament proteins and the major building blocks of the nuclear lamina. Besides providing nuclear shape and mechanical stability, lamins are required for chromatin organization, transcription regulation, DNA replication, nuclear assembly, nuclear positioning, and apoptosis. Mutations in human lamins cause many different heritable diseases, affecting various tissues and causing early aging. Although many of these mutations result in nuclear deformation, their effects on lamin filament assembly are unknown. Caenorhabditis elegans has a single evolutionarily conserved lamin protein, which can form stable 10-nm-thick filaments in vitro. To gain insight into the molecular basis of lamin filament assembly and the effects of laminopathic mutations on this process, we investigated mutations in conserved residues of the rod and tail domains that are known to cause various laminopathies in human. We show that 8 of 14 mutant lamins present WT-like assembly into filaments or paracrystals, whereas 6 mutants show assembly defects. Correspondingly, expressing these mutants in transgenic animals shows abnormal distribution of Ce-lamin, abnormal nuclear shape or change in lamin mobility. These findings help in understanding the role of individual residues and domains in laminopathy pathology and, eventually, promote the development of therapeutic interventions.

  18. Lattice Dynamical Properties of Group-III Nitrides AN (A = B, Al, Ga and In) in Zinc-Blende Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kushwaha, A. K.

    2016-03-01

    In the present paper, we have calculated the phonon dispersion relations, phonon density of states, Debye characteristic temperature and the zone boundary phonons for group-III nitrides AN (A = B, Al, Ga and In) using eleven-parameter three-body shell model with both the ions being polarizable. Our calculated results are in good agreement with experimental results available in the literature.

  19. Structural dynamics of the cell nucleus: basis for morphology modulation of nuclear calcium signaling and gene transcription.

    PubMed

    Queisser, Gillian; Wiegert, Simon; Bading, Hilmar

    2011-01-01

    Neuronal morphology plays an essential role in signal processing in the brain. Individual neurons can undergo use-dependent changes in their shape and connectivity, which affects how intracellular processes are regulated and how signals are transferred from one cell to another in a neuronal network. Calcium is one of the most important intracellular second messengers regulating cellular morphologies and functions. In neurons, intracellular calcium levels are controlled by ion channels in the plasma membrane such as NMDA receptors (NMDARs), voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs) and certain α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptors (AMPARs) as well as by calcium exchange pathways between the cytosol and internal calcium stores including the endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria. Synaptic activity and the subsequent opening of ligand and/or voltage-gated calcium channels can initiate cytosolic calcium transients which propagate towards the cell soma and enter the nucleus via its nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) embedded in the nuclear envelope. We recently described the discovery that in hippocampal neurons the morphology of the nucleus affects the calcium dynamics within the nucleus. Here we propose that nuclear infoldings determine whether a nucleus functions as an integrator or detector of oscillating calcium signals. We outline possible ties between nuclear mophology and transcriptional activity and discuss the importance of extending the approach to whole cell calcium signal modeling in order to understand synapse-to-nucleus communication in healthy and dysfunctional neurons.

  20. 250 GHz CW gyrotron oscillator for dynamic nuclear polarization in biological solid state NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bajaj, Vikram S.; Hornstein, Melissa K.; Kreischer, Kenneth E.; Sirigiri, Jagadishwar R.; Woskov, Paul P.; Mak-Jurkauskas, Melody L.; Herzfeld, Judith; Temkin, Richard J.; Griffin, Robert G.

    2007-12-01

    In this paper, we describe a 250 GHz gyrotron oscillator, a critical component of an integrated system for magic angle spinning (MAS) dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) experiments at 9 T, corresponding to 380 MHz 1H frequency. The 250 GHz gyrotron is the first gyro-device designed with the goal of seamless integration with an NMR spectrometer for routine DNP enhanced NMR spectroscopy and has operated under computer control for periods of up to 21 days with a 100% duty cycle. Following a brief historical review of the field, we present studies of the membrane protein bacteriorhodopsin (bR) using DNP enhanced multidimensional NMR. These results include assignment of active site resonances in [U- 13C, 15N]-bR and demonstrate the utility of DNP for studies of membrane proteins. Next, we review the theory of gyro-devices from quantum mechanical and classical viewpoints and discuss the unique considerations that apply to gyrotron oscillators designed for DNP experiments. We then characterize the operation of the 250 GHz gyrotron in detail, including its long-term stability and controllability. We have measured the spectral purity of the gyrotron emission using both homodyne and heterodyne techniques. Radiation intensity patterns from the corrugated waveguide that delivers power to the NMR probe were measured using two new techniques to confirm pure mode content: a thermometric approach based on the temperature-dependent color of liquid crystalline media applied to a substrate and imaging with a pyroelectric camera. We next present a detailed study of the mode excitation characteristics of the gyrotron. Exploration of the operating characteristics of several fundamental modes reveals broadband continuous frequency tuning of up to 1.8 GHz as a function of the magnetic field alone, a feature that may be exploited in future tunable gyrotron designs. Oscillation of the 250 GHz gyrotron at the second harmonic of cyclotron resonance begins at extremely low beam currents (as

  1. 250 GHz CW Gyrotron Oscillator for Dynamic Nuclear Polarization in Biological Solid State NMR

    PubMed Central

    Bajaj, Vikram S.; Hornstein, Melissa K.; Kreischer, Kenneth E.; Sirigiri, Jagadishwar R.; Woskov, Paul P.; Mak-Jurkauskas, Melody L.; Herzfeld, Judith; Temkin, Richard J.; Griffin, Robert G.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we describe a 250 GHz gyrotron oscillator, a critical component of an integrated system for magic angle spinning (MAS) dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) experiments at 9T, corresponding to 380 MHz 1H frequency. The 250 GHz gyrotron is the first gyro-device designed with the goal of seamless integration with an NMR spectrometer for routine DNP-enhanced NMR spectroscopy and has operated under computer control for periods of up to 21 days with a 100% duty cycle. Following a brief historical review of the field, we present studies of the membrane protein bacteriorhodopsin (bR) using DNP-enhanced multidimensional NMR. These results include assignment of active site resonances in [U-13C,15N]-bR and demonstrate the utility of DNP for studies of membrane proteins. Next, we review the theory of gyro-devices from quantum mechanical and classical viewpoints and discuss the unique considerations that apply to gyrotron oscillators designed for DNP experiments. We then characterize the operation of the 250 GHz gyrotron in detail, including its long-term stability and controllability. We have measured the spectral purity of the gyrotron emission using both homodyne and heterodyne techniques. Radiation intensity patterns from the corrugated waveguide that delivers power to the NMR probe were measured using two new techniques to confirm pure mode content: a thermometric approach based on the temperature-dependent color of liquid crystalline media applied to a substrate and imaging with a pyroelectric camera. We next present a detailed study of the mode excitation characteristics of the gyrotron. Exploration of the operating characteristics of several fundamental modes reveals broadband continuous frequency tuning of up to 1.8 GHz as a function of the magnetic field alone, a feature that may be exploited in future tunable gyrotron designs. Oscillation of the 250 GHz gyrotron at the second harmonic of cyclotron resonance begins at extremely low beam currents (as low

  2. A Crowdsourced nucleus: Understanding nuclear organization in terms of dynamically networked protein function

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Ashley M.; Garza-Gongora, Arturo G.; Kosak, Steven T.

    2014-01-01

    The spatial organization of the nucleus results in a compartmentalized structure that affects all aspects of nuclear function. This compartmentalization involves genome organization as well as the formation of nuclear bodies and plays a role in many functions, including gene regulation, genome stability, replication, and RNA processing. Here we review the recent findings associated with the spatial organization of the nucleus and reveal that a common theme for nuclear proteins is their ability to participate in a variety of functions and pathways. We consider this multiplicity of function in terms of Crowdsourcing, a recent phenomenon in the world of information technology, and suggest that this model provides a novel way to synthesize the many intersections between nuclear organization and function. PMID:24412853

  3. Dynamic assembly of brambleberry mediates nuclear envelope fusion during early development.

    PubMed

    Abrams, Elliott W; Zhang, Hong; Marlow, Florence L; Kapp, Lee; Lu, Sumei; Mullins, Mary C

    2012-08-03

    To accommodate the large cells following zygote formation, early blastomeres employ modified cell divisions. Karyomeres are one such modification, mitotic intermediates wherein individual chromatin masses are surrounded by nuclear envelope; the karyomeres then fuse to form a single mononucleus. We identified brambleberry, a maternal-effect zebrafish mutant that disrupts karyomere fusion, resulting in formation of multiple micronuclei. As karyomeres form, Brambleberry protein localizes to the nuclear envelope, with prominent puncta evident near karyomere-karyomere interfaces corresponding to membrane fusion sites. brambleberry corresponds to an unannotated gene with similarity to Kar5p, a protein that participates in nuclear fusion in yeast. We also demonstrate that Brambleberry is required for pronuclear fusion following fertilization in zebrafish. Our studies provide insight into the machinery required for karyomere fusion and suggest that specialized proteins are necessary for proper nuclear division in large dividing blastomeres.

  4. Nuclear Speckles

    PubMed Central

    Spector, David L.; Lamond, Angus I.

    2011-01-01

    Nuclear speckles, also known as interchromatin granule clusters, are nuclear domains enriched in pre-mRNA splicing factors, located in the interchromatin regions of the nucleoplasm of mammalian cells. When observed by immunofluorescence microscopy, they usually appear as 20–50 irregularly shaped structures that vary in size. Speckles are dynamic structures, and their constituents can exchange continuously with the nucleoplasm and other nuclear locations, including active transcription sites. Studies on the composition, structure, and dynamics of speckles have provided an important paradigm for understanding the functional organization of the nucleus and the dynamics of the gene expression machinery. PMID:20926517

  5. Nuclear power plant status diagnostics using a neural network with dynamic node architecture

    SciTech Connect

    Basu, A.

    1992-12-31

    This thesis is part of an ongoing project at Iowa State University to develop ANN based fault diagnostic systems to detect and classify operational transients at nuclear power plants. The project envisages the deployment of such an advisor at Iowa Electric Light and Power Company`s Duane Arnold Energy Center nuclear power plant located at Palo, IA. This advisor is expected to make status diagnosis in real time, thus providing the operators with more time for corrective measures.

  6. Nuclear power plant status diagnostics using a neural network with dynamic node architecture

    SciTech Connect

    Basu, A.

    1992-01-01

    This thesis is part of an ongoing project at Iowa State University to develop ANN based fault diagnostic systems to detect and classify operational transients at nuclear power plants. The project envisages the deployment of such an advisor at Iowa Electric Light and Power Company's Duane Arnold Energy Center nuclear power plant located at Palo, IA. This advisor is expected to make status diagnosis in real time, thus providing the operators with more time for corrective measures.

  7. Dynamics of lamin A/C in porcine embryos produced by nuclear transfer.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kiho; Fodor, William L; Machaty, Zoltan

    2007-09-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the presence of lamin A/C in porcine nuclear transfer embryos and to determine whether lamin A/C can serve as a potential marker for nuclear reprogramming. First, lamin A/C was studied in oocytes and embryos produced by fertilization or parthenogenetic oocyte activation. We found that lamin A/C was present in the nuclear lamina of oocytes at the germinal vesicle stage while it was absent in mature oocytes. Lamin A/C was detected throughout preimplantation development in both in vivo-derived and parthenogenetic embryos. Incubation of the activated oocytes in the presence of alpha-amanitin (an inhibitor of RNA polymerase II), or cycloheximide (a protein synthesis inhibitor) did not perturb lamin A/C assembly, indicating that the assembly resulted from solubilized lamins dispersed in the cytoplasm. In nuclear transfer embryos, the lamin A/C signal that had previously been identified in fibroblast nuclei disappeared soon after fusion. It became detectable again after the formation of the pronucleus-like structure, and all nuclear transfer embryos displayed lamin A/C staining during early development. Olfactory bulb progenitor cells lacked lamin A/C; however, when such cells were fused with enucleated oocytes, the newly formed nuclear envelopes stained positive for lamin A/C. These findings suggest that recipient oocytes remodel the donor nuclei using type A lamins dispersed in the ooplasm. The results also indicate that lamin A/C is present in the nuclear envelope of pig oocytes and early embryos and unlike in some other species, its presence after nuclear transfer is not an indicator of erroneous reprogramming.

  8. The Mark III VLBI System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, A. E. E.; Whitney, A. R.; Levine, J. I.; Nesman, E. F.; Webber, J. C.; Hinteregger, H. F.

    1988-01-01

    Geodetic measurements have errors in centimeter range. Collection of three reports describes both equipment and results of some measurements taken with Mark III very-long-baseline interferometry (VLBI) system. Has demonstrated high accuracy over short baselines, where phase-delay measurements used. Advanced hardware, called Mark III A, developed to improve system performance and efficiency. Original Mark III hardware and III A subsystem upgrades developed as part of NASA Crustal Dynamics Project at Haystack Observatory.

  9. Nuclear-wave-packet dynamics mapped out by two-center interference in the HeH2+ molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schüler, M.; Pavlyukh, Y.; Berakdar, J.

    2014-06-01

    Photoemission from diatomic molecules closely resembles the Young-type double-slit experiment where each of the two atomic sites represents a coherent emission source. When the photoelectron wavelength becomes commensurate with the effective interatomic distance, the resulting spatial interference gives rise to oscillations in the photoionization total and differential cross sections. This phenomenon provides detailed information on the molecular geometry, a fact that can be utilized for probing the nuclear dynamics triggered by the interaction with a laser field. We demonstrate how this coherent wave-packet evolution can be traced by observing the photoelectron angular distribution. Based on ab initio scattering calculations we perform a proof-of-principle reconstruction of the nuclear-wave-packet evolution in the HeH2+ molecule.

  10. Experimental and molecular dynamics studies of dysprosium(III) salt solutions for a better representation of the microscopic features used within the binding mean spherical approximation theory.

    PubMed

    Ruas, Alexandre; Guilbaud, Philippe; Den Auwer, Christophe; Moulin, Christophe; Simonin, Jean-Pierre; Turq, Pierre; Moisy, Philippe

    2006-10-19

    This work is aimed at a predictive description of the thermodynamic properties of actinide(III) salt solutions at high concentration and 25 degrees C. A new solution of the binding mean spherical approximation (BIMSA) theory, based on the Wertheim formalism, for taking into account 1:1 and also 1:2 complex formation, is used to reproduce, from a simple procedure, experimental osmotic coefficient variation with concentration for three binary salt solutions of the same lanthanide(III) cation: dysprosium(III) perchlorate, nitrate, and chloride. The relevance of the fitted parameters is discussed, and their values are compared with available literature values. UV-vis/near-IR, time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy experiments, and molecular dynamics (MD) calculations were conducted for dilute to concentrated solutions (ca. 3 mol.kg-1) for a study of the microscopic behavior of DyCl3 binary solutions. Coupling MD calculations and extended X-ray absorption fine structure led to the determination of reliable distances. The MD results were used for a discussion of the parameters used in the BIMSA.

  11. Science based integrated approach to advanced nuclear fuel development - integrated multi-scale multi-physics hierarchical modeling and simulation framework Part III: cladding

    SciTech Connect

    Tome, Carlos N; Caro, J A; Lebensohn, R A; Unal, Cetin; Arsenlis, A; Marian, J; Pasamehmetoglu, K

    2010-01-01

    Advancing the performance of Light Water Reactors, Advanced Nuclear Fuel Cycles, and Advanced Reactors, such as the Next Generation Nuclear Power Plants, requires enhancing our fundamental understanding of fuel and materials behavior under irradiation. The capability to accurately model the nuclear fuel systems to develop predictive tools is critical. Not only are fabrication and performance models needed to understand specific aspects of the nuclear fuel, fully coupled fuel simulation codes are required to achieve licensing of specific nuclear fuel designs for operation. The backbone of these codes, models, and simulations is a fundamental understanding and predictive capability for simulating the phase and microstructural behavior of the nuclear fuel system materials and matrices. In this paper we review the current status of the advanced modeling and simulation of nuclear reactor cladding, with emphasis on what is available and what is to be developed in each scale of the project, how we propose to pass information from one scale to the next, and what experimental information is required for benchmarking and advancing the modeling at each scale level.

  12. Tuning of Exchange Coupling and Switchable Magnetization Dynamics by Displacing the Bridging Ligands Observed in Two Dimeric Manganese(III) Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiang-Yu; Cen, Pei-Pei; Wu, Li-Zhou; Li, Fei-Fei; Song, Wei-Ming; Xie, Gang; Chen, San-Ping

    2017-01-01

    Two Mn(III)-based dimers, [Mn2(bpad)2(CH3O)4]n (1) and [Mn2(bpad)2(pa)2]n·2H2O (2) (Hbpad = N3-benzoylpyridine-2-carboxamidrazone, H2pa = phthalic acid), have been assembled from a tridentate Schiff-base chelator and various anionic coligands. Noteworthily, compound 1 could be identified as a reaction precursor to transform to 2 in the presence of phthalic acid, resulting in a rarely structural conversion process in which the bridges between intradimer Mn(III) ions alter from methanol oxygen atom with μ2-O mode in 1 (Mn Mn distance of 3.046 Å) to syn-anti carboxylate in 2 (Mn Mn distance of 4.043 Å), while the Mn(III) centers retain hexa-coordinated geometries with independently distorted octahedrons in two compounds. The dc magnetic determinations reveal that ferromagnetic coupling between two metal centers with J = 1.31 cm−1 exists in 1, whereas 2 displays weak antiferromagnetic interactions with the coupling constant J of −0.56 cm−1. Frequency-dependent ac susceptibilities in the absence of dc field for 1 suggest slow relaxation of the magnetization with an energy barrier of 13.9 K, signifying that 1 features single-molecule magnet (SMM) behavior. This work presents a rational strategy to fine-tune the magnetic interactions and further magnetization dynamics of the Mn(III)-containing dinuclear units through small structural variations driven by the ingenious chemistry. PMID:28322305

  13. Tuning of Exchange Coupling and Switchable Magnetization Dynamics by Displacing the Bridging Ligands Observed in Two Dimeric Manganese(III) Compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiang-Yu; Cen, Pei-Pei; Wu, Li-Zhou; Li, Fei-Fei; Song, Wei-Ming; Xie, Gang; Chen, San-Ping

    2017-03-01

    Two Mn(III)-based dimers, [Mn2(bpad)2(CH3O)4]n (1) and [Mn2(bpad)2(pa)2]n·2H2O (2) (Hbpad = N3-benzoylpyridine-2-carboxamidrazone, H2pa = phthalic acid), have been assembled from a tridentate Schiff-base chelator and various anionic coligands. Noteworthily, compound 1 could be identified as a reaction precursor to transform to 2 in the presence of phthalic acid, resulting in a rarely structural conversion process in which the bridges between intradimer Mn(III) ions alter from methanol oxygen atom with μ2-O mode in 1 (Mn Mn distance of 3.046 Å) to syn-anti carboxylate in 2 (Mn Mn distance of 4.043 Å), while the Mn(III) centers retain hexa-coordinated geometries with independently distorted octahedrons in two compounds. The dc magnetic determinations reveal that ferromagnetic coupling between two metal centers with J = 1.31 cm‑1 exists in 1, whereas 2 displays weak antiferromagnetic interactions with the coupling constant J of ‑0.56 cm‑1. Frequency-dependent ac susceptibilities in the absence of dc field for 1 suggest slow relaxation of the magnetization with an energy barrier of 13.9 K, signifying that 1 features single-molecule magnet (SMM) behavior. This work presents a rational strategy to fine-tune the magnetic interactions and further magnetization dynamics of the Mn(III)-containing dinuclear units through small structural variations driven by the ingenious chemistry.

  14. Dynamic SPR monitoring of yeast nuclear protein binding to a cis-regulatory element

    SciTech Connect

    Mao, Grace; Brody, James P.

    2007-11-09

    Gene expression is controlled by protein complexes binding to short specific sequences of DNA, called cis-regulatory elements. Expression of most eukaryotic genes is controlled by dozens of these elements. Comprehensive identification and monitoring of these elements is a major goal of genomics. In pursuit of this goal, we are developing a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) based assay to identify and monitor cis-regulatory elements. To test whether we could reliably monitor protein binding to a regulatory element, we immobilized a 16 bp region of Saccharomyces cerevisiae chromosome 5 onto a gold surface. This 16 bp region of DNA is known to bind several proteins and thought to control expression of the gene RNR1, which varies through the cell cycle. We synchronized yeast cell cultures, and then sampled these cultures at a regular interval. These samples were processed to purify nuclear lysate, which was then exposed to the sensor. We found that nuclear protein binds this particular element of DNA at a significantly higher rate (as compared to unsynchronized cells) during G1 phase. Other time points show levels of DNA-nuclear protein binding similar to the unsynchronized control. We also measured the apparent association complex of the binding to be 0.014 s{sup -1}. We conclude that (1) SPR-based assays can monitor DNA-nuclear protein binding and that (2) for this particular cis-regulatory element, maximum DNA-nuclear protein binding occurs during G1 phase.

  15. Biosilica-Entrapped Enzymes Studied by Using Dynamic Nuclear-Polarization-Enhanced High-Field NMR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Ravera, Enrico; Michaelis, Vladimir K; Ong, Ta-Chung; Keeler, Eric G; Martelli, Tommaso; Fragai, Marco; Griffin, Robert G; Luchinat, Claudio

    2015-08-12

    Enzymes are used as environmentally friendly catalysts in many industrial applications, and are frequently immobilized in a matrix to improve their chemical stability for long-term storage and reusability. Recently, it was shown that an atomic-level description of proteins immobilized in a biosilica matrix can be attained by examining their magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR spectra. However, even though MAS NMR is an excellent tool for determining structure, it is severely hampered by sensitivity. In this work we provide the proof of principle that NMR characterization of biosilica-entrapped enzymes could be assisted by high-field dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP).

  16. Enhancement of the Two-Dimensional Conduction Electron Zeeman Energy Near v=1 by Optical Dynamic Nuclear Polarization

    SciTech Connect

    Bowers, C.R.; Reno, J.L.; Simmons, J.A.; Vitkalov, S.A.

    1998-11-06

    Enhancement of the Zeeman energy of 2D conduction electrons near v = 1 by optical dynamic nuclear polarization (lINP), as observed by the Overhauser shift of the transport detected electron spin resonance, is measured quantitatively for the first time in GaAs/AIGaAs mukiquantum wells. The NMR signal enhancement is obtained under similar conditions in the same sample, allowing the hyperke coupling constant of 3.7T between between the nuclei and 2D conduction electrons to be measured for the first time. The potential to suppress the Zeeman energy by optical DNP is discussed in the context of its potential influence on Skyrmion formation.

  17. Structural analysis of a class III preQ1 riboswitch reveals an aptamer distant from a ribosome-binding site regulated by fast dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Liberman, Joseph A.; Suddala, Krishna C.; Aytenfisu, Asaminew; Chan, Dalen; Belashov, Ivan A.; Salim, Mohammad; Mathews, David H.; Spitale, Robert C.; Walter, Nils G.; Wedekind, Joseph E.

    2015-01-01

    PreQ1-III riboswitches are newly identified RNA elements that control bacterial genes in response to preQ1 (7-aminomethyl-7-deazaguanine), a precursor to the essential hypermodified tRNA base queuosine. Although numerous riboswitches fold as H-type or HLout-type pseudoknots that integrate ligand-binding and regulatory sequences within a single folded domain, the preQ1-III riboswitch aptamer forms a HLout-type pseudoknot that does not appear to incorporate its ribosome-binding site (RBS). To understand how this unusual organization confers function, we determined the crystal structure of the class III preQ1 riboswitch from Faecalibacterium prausnitzii at 2.75 Å resolution. PreQ1 binds tightly (KD,app 6.5 ± 0.5 nM) between helices P1 and P2 of a three-way helical junction wherein the third helix, P4, projects orthogonally from the ligand-binding pocket, exposing its stem-loop to base pair with the 3′ RBS. Biochemical analysis, computational modeling, and single-molecule FRET imaging demonstrated that preQ1 enhances P4 reorientation toward P1–P2, promoting a partially nested, H-type pseudoknot in which the RBS undergoes rapid docking (kdock ∼0.6 s−1) and undocking (kundock ∼1.1 s−1). Discovery of such dynamic conformational switching provides insight into how a riboswitch with bipartite architecture uses dynamics to modulate expression platform accessibility, thus expanding the known repertoire of gene control strategies used by regulatory RNAs. PMID:26106162

  18. Structural analysis of a class III preQ1 riboswitch reveals an aptamer distant from a ribosome-binding site regulated by fast dynamics.

    PubMed

    Liberman, Joseph A; Suddala, Krishna C; Aytenfisu, Asaminew; Chan, Dalen; Belashov, Ivan A; Salim, Mohammad; Mathews, David H; Spitale, Robert C; Walter, Nils G; Wedekind, Joseph E

    2015-07-07

    PreQ1-III riboswitches are newly identified RNA elements that control bacterial genes in response to preQ1 (7-aminomethyl-7-deazaguanine), a precursor to the essential hypermodified tRNA base queuosine. Although numerous riboswitches fold as H-type or HLout-type pseudoknots that integrate ligand-binding and regulatory sequences within a single folded domain, the preQ1-III riboswitch aptamer forms a HLout-type pseudoknot that does not appear to incorporate its ribosome-binding site (RBS). To understand how this unusual organization confers function, we determined the crystal structure of the class III preQ1 riboswitch from Faecalibacterium prausnitzii at 2.75 Å resolution. PreQ1 binds tightly (KD,app 6.5 ± 0.5 nM) between helices P1 and P2 of a three-way helical junction wherein the third helix, P4, projects orthogonally from the ligand-binding pocket, exposing its stem-loop to base pair with the 3' RBS. Biochemical analysis, computational modeling, and single-molecule FRET imaging demonstrated that preQ1 enhances P4 reorientation toward P1-P2, promoting a partially nested, H-type pseudoknot in which the RBS undergoes rapid docking (kdock ∼ 0.6 s(-1)) and undocking (kundock ∼ 1.1 s(-1)). Discovery of such dynamic conformational switching provides insight into how a riboswitch with bipartite architecture uses dynamics to modulate expression platform accessibility, thus expanding the known repertoire of gene control strategies used by regulatory RNAs.

  19. Structural analysis of a class III preQ1 riboswitch reveals an aptamer distant from a ribosome-binding site regulated by fast dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Liberman, Joseph A.; Suddala, Krishna C.; Aytenfisu, Asaminew; Chan, Dalen; Belashov, Ivan A.; Salim, Mohammad; Mathews, David H.; Spitale, Robert C.; Walter, Nils G.; Wedekind, Joseph E.

    2015-06-23

    PreQ1-III riboswitches are newly identified RNA elements that control bacterial genes in response to preQ1 (7-aminomethyl-7-deazaguanine), a precursor to the essential hypermodified tRNA base queuosine. Although numerous riboswitches fold as H-type or HLout-type pseudoknots that integrate ligand-binding and regulatory sequences within a single folded domain, the preQ1-III riboswitch aptamer forms a HLout-type pseudoknot that does not appear to incorporate its ribosome-binding site (RBS). To understand how this unusual organization confers function, in this paper we determined the crystal structure of the class III preQ1 riboswitch from Faecalibacterium prausnitzii at 2.75 Å resolution. PreQ1 binds tightly (KD,app 6.5 ± 0.5 nM) between helices P1 and P2 of a three-way helical junction wherein the third helix, P4, projects orthogonally from the ligand-binding pocket, exposing its stem-loop to base pair with the 3' RBS. Biochemical analysis, computational modeling, and single-molecule FRET imaging demonstrated that preQ1 enhances P4 reorientation toward P1–P2, promoting a partially nested, H-type pseudoknot in which the RBS undergoes rapid docking (kdock ~0.6 s-1) and undocking (kundock ~1.1 s-1). Finally, discovery of such dynamic conformational switching provides insight into how a riboswitch with bipartite architecture uses dynamics to modulate expression platform accessibility, thus expanding the known repertoire of gene control strategies used by regulatory RNAs.

  20. Structural analysis of a class III preQ1 riboswitch reveals an aptamer distant from a ribosome-binding site regulated by fast dynamics

    DOE PAGES

    Liberman, Joseph A.; Suddala, Krishna C.; Aytenfisu, Asaminew; ...

    2015-06-23

    PreQ1-III riboswitches are newly identified RNA elements that control bacterial genes in response to preQ1 (7-aminomethyl-7-deazaguanine), a precursor to the essential hypermodified tRNA base queuosine. Although numerous riboswitches fold as H-type or HLout-type pseudoknots that integrate ligand-binding and regulatory sequences within a single folded domain, the preQ1-III riboswitch aptamer forms a HLout-type pseudoknot that does not appear to incorporate its ribosome-binding site (RBS). To understand how this unusual organization confers function, in this paper we determined the crystal structure of the class III preQ1 riboswitch from Faecalibacterium prausnitzii at 2.75 Å resolution. PreQ1 binds tightly (KD,app 6.5 ± 0.5 nM)more » between helices P1 and P2 of a three-way helical junction wherein the third helix, P4, projects orthogonally from the ligand-binding pocket, exposing its stem-loop to base pair with the 3' RBS. Biochemical analysis, computational modeling, and single-molecule FRET imaging demonstrated that preQ1 enhances P4 reorientation toward P1–P2, promoting a partially nested, H-type pseudoknot in which the RBS undergoes rapid docking (kdock ~0.6 s-1) and undocking (kundock ~1.1 s-1). Finally, discovery of such dynamic conformational switching provides insight into how a riboswitch with bipartite architecture uses dynamics to modulate expression platform accessibility, thus expanding the known repertoire of gene control strategies used by regulatory RNAs.« less

  1. Physiological and Pathological Aging Affects Chromatin Dynamics, Structure and Function at the Nuclear Edge

    PubMed Central

    Robin, Jérôme D.; Magdinier, Frédérique

    2016-01-01

    Lamins are intermediate filaments that form a complex meshwork at the inner nuclear membrane. Mammalian cells express two types of Lamins, Lamins A/C and Lamins B, encoded by three different genes, LMNA, LMNB1, and LMNB2. Mutations in the LMNA gene are associated with a group of phenotypically diverse diseases referred to as laminopathies. Lamins interact with a large number of binding partners including proteins of the nuclear envelope but also chromatin-associated factors. Lamins not only constitute a scaffold for nuclear shape, rigidity and resistance to stress but also contribute to the organization of chromatin and chromosomal domains. We will discuss here the impact of A-type Lamins loss on alterations of chromatin organization and formation of chromatin domains and how disorganization of the lamina contributes to the patho-physiology of premature aging syndromes. PMID:27602048

  2. Physiological and Pathological Aging Affects Chromatin Dynamics, Structure and Function at the Nuclear Edge.

    PubMed

    Robin, Jérôme D; Magdinier, Frédérique

    2016-01-01

    Lamins are intermediate filaments that form a complex meshwork at the inner nuclear membrane. Mammalian cells express two types of Lamins, Lamins A/C and Lamins B, encoded by three different genes, LMNA, LMNB1, and LMNB2. Mutations in the LMNA gene are associated with a group of phenotypically diverse diseases referred to as laminopathies. Lamins interact with a large number of binding partners including proteins of the nuclear envelope but also chromatin-associated factors. Lamins not only constitute a scaffold for nuclear shape, rigidity and resistance to stress but also contribute to the organization of chromatin and chromosomal domains. We will discuss here the impact of A-type Lamins loss on alterations of chromatin organization and formation of chromatin domains and how disorganization of the lamina contributes to the patho-physiology of premature aging syndromes.

  3. Towards understanding nuclear pore complex architecture and dynamics in the age of integrative structural analysis.

    PubMed

    Hurt, Ed; Beck, Martin

    2015-06-01

    Determining the functional architecture of the nuclear pore complex, that remains only partially understood, requires bridging across different length scales. Recent technological advances in quantitative and cross-linking mass spectrometry, super-resolution fluorescence microscopy and electron microscopy have enormously accelerated the integration of different types of data into coherent structural models. Moreover, high-resolution structural analysis of nucleoporins and their in vitro reconstitution into complexes is now facilitated by the use of thermostable orthologs. In this review we highlight how the application of such technologies has led to novel insights into nuclear pore architecture and to a paradigm shift. Today nuclear pores are not anymore seen as static facilitators of nucleocytoplasmic transport but ensembles of multiple overlaying functional states that are involved in various cellular processes.

  4. Dynamic Isovector Reorientation of Deuteron as a Probe to Nuclear Symmetry Energy.

    PubMed

    Ou, Li; Xiao, Zhigang; Yi, Han; Wang, Ning; Liu, Min; Tian, Junlong

    2015-11-20

    We present the calculations on a novel reorientation effect of deuteron attributed to isovector interaction in the nuclear field of heavy target nuclei. The correlation angle determined by the relative momentum vector of the proton and the neutron originating from the breakup deuteron, which is experimentally detectable, exhibits significant dependence on the isovector nuclear potential but is robust against the variation of the isoscaler sector. In terms of sensitivity and cleanness, the breakup reactions induced by the polarized deuteron beam at about 100 MeV/u provide a more stringent constraint to the symmetry energy at subsaturation densities.

  5. Dynamic Isovector Reorientation of Deuteron as a Probe to Nuclear Symmetry Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ou, Li; Xiao, Zhigang; Yi, Han; Wang, Ning; Liu, Min; Tian, Junlong

    2015-11-01

    We present the calculations on a novel reorientation effect of deuteron attributed to isovector interaction in the nuclear field of heavy target nuclei. The correlation angle determined by the relative momentum vector of the proton and the neutron originating from the breakup deuteron, which is experimentally detectable, exhibits significant dependence on the isovector nuclear potential but is robust against the variation of the isoscaler sector. In terms of sensitivity and cleanness, the breakup reactions induced by the polarized deuteron beam at about 100 MeV /u provide a more stringent constraint to the symmetry energy at subsaturation densities.

  6. γ production as a probe for early state dynamics in high energy nuclear collisions at RHIC

    DOE PAGES

    Liu, Yunpeng; Chen, Baoyi; Xu, Nu; ...

    2011-02-01

    γ production in heavy ion collisions at RHIC energy is investigated. While the transverse momentum spectra of the ground state γ(1s) are controlled by the initial state Cronin effect, the excited bb⁻ states are characterized by the competition between the cold and hot nuclear matter effects and sensitive to the dissociation temperatures determined by the heavy quark potential. We emphasize that it is necessary to measure the excited heavy quark states in order to extract the early stage information in high energy nuclear collisions at RHIC.

  7. Quantum Dynamics and Spectroscopy of Ab Initio Liquid Water: The Interplay of Nuclear and Electronic Quantum Effects.

    PubMed

    Marsalek, Ondrej; Markland, Thomas E

    2017-04-06

    Understanding the reactivity and spectroscopy of aqueous solutions at the atomistic level is crucial for the elucidation and design of chemical processes. However, the simulation of these systems requires addressing the formidable challenges of treating the quantum nature of both the electrons and nuclei. Exploiting our recently developed methods that provide acceleration by up to 2 orders of magnitude, we combine path integral simulations with on-the-fly evaluation of the electronic structure at the hybrid density functional theory level to capture the interplay between nuclear quantum effects and the electronic surface. Here we show that this combination provides accurate structure and dynamics, including the full infrared and Raman spectra of liquid water. This allows us to demonstrate and explain the failings of lower-level density functionals for dynamics and vibrational spectroscopy when the nuclei are treated quantum mechanically. These insights thus provide a foundation for the reliable investigation of spectroscopy and reactivity in aqueous environments.

  8. Numerical study of the thm effects on the near-field safety of a hypothetical nuclear waste repository - bmt1 of the decovalex iii project. part 1: conceptualization and characterization of the problems and summary of results

    SciTech Connect

    Chijimatsu, M.; Nguyen, T.S.; Jing, L.; De Jonge, J.; Kohlmeier, M.; Millard, A.; Rejeb, A.; Rutqvist, J.; Souley, M.; Sugita, Y.

    2004-06-30

    Geological disposal of the spent nuclear fuel uses often the concept of multiple barrier systems. In order to predict the performance of these barriers, mathematical models have been developed, verified and validated against analytical solutions, laboratory tests and field experiments within the international DECOVALEX III project. These models in general consider the full coupling of thermal (T), hydraulic (H) and mechanical (M) processes that would prevail in the geological media around the repository. For Bench Mark Test no. 1 (BMT1) of the DECOVALEX III project, seven multinational research teams studied the implications of coupled THM processes on the safety of a hypothetical nuclear waste repository at the near-field and are presented in three accompany papers in this issue. This paper is the first of the three companion papers, which provides the conceptualization and characterization of the BMT1 as well as some general conclusions based on the findings of the numerical studies. It also shows the process of building confidence in the mathematical models by calibration with a reference T-H-M experiment with realistic rock mass conditions and bentonite properties and measured outputs of thermal, hydraulic and mechanical variables.

  9. Ab initio molecular dynamics with nuclear quantum effects at classical cost: Ring polymer contraction for density functional theory

    SciTech Connect

    Marsalek, Ondrej; Markland, Thomas E.

    2016-02-07

    Path integral molecular dynamics simulations, combined with an ab initio evaluation of interactions using electronic structure theory, incorporate the quantum mechanical nature of both the electrons and nuclei, which are essential to accurately describe systems containing light nuclei. However, path integral simulations have traditionally required a computational cost around two orders of magnitude greater than treating the nuclei classically, making them prohibitively costly for most applications. Here we show that the cost of path integral simulations can be dramatically reduced by extending our ring polymer contraction approach to ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. By using density functional tight binding as a reference system, we show that our ring polymer contraction scheme gives rapid and systematic convergence to the full path integral density functional theory result. We demonstrate the efficiency of this approach in ab initio simulations of liquid water and the reactive protonated and deprotonated water dimer systems. We find that the vast majority of the nuclear quantum effects are accurately captured using contraction to just the ring polymer centroid, which requires the same number of density functional theory calculations as a classical simulation. Combined with a multiple time step scheme using the same reference system, which allows the time step to be increased, this approach is as fast as a typical classical ab initio molecular dynamics simulation and 35× faster than a full path integral calculation, while still exactly including the quantum sampling of nuclei. This development thus offers a route to routinely include nuclear quantum effects in ab initio molecular dynamics simulations at negligible computational cost.

  10. Ab initio molecular dynamics with nuclear quantum effects at classical cost: Ring polymer contraction for density functional theory.

    PubMed

    Marsalek, Ondrej; Markland, Thomas E

    2016-02-07

    Path integral molecular dynamics simulations, combined with an ab initio evaluation of interactions using electronic structure theory, incorporate the quantum mechanical nature of both the electrons and nuclei, which are essential to accurately describe systems containing light nuclei. However, path integral simulations have traditionally required a computational cost around two orders of magnitude greater than treating the nuclei classically, making them prohibitively costly for most applications. Here we show that the cost of path integral simulations can be dramatically reduced by extending our ring polymer contraction approach to ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. By using density functional tight binding as a reference system, we show that our ring polymer contraction scheme gives rapid and systematic convergence to the full path integral density functional theory result. We demonstrate the efficiency of this approach in ab initio simulations of liquid water and the reactive protonated and deprotonated water dimer systems. We find that the vast majority of the nuclear quantum effects are accurately captured using contraction to just the ring polymer centroid, which requires the same number of density functional theory calculations as a classical simulation. Combined with a multiple time step scheme using the same reference system, which allows the time step to be increased, this approach is as fast as a typical classical ab initio molecular dynamics simulation and 35× faster than a full path integral calculation, while still exactly including the quantum sampling of nuclei. This development thus offers a route to routinely include nuclear quantum effects in ab initio molecular dynamics simulations at negligible computational cost.

  11. Applications of dynamic nuclear polarization to the study of reactions and reagents in organic and biomolecular chemistry.

    PubMed

    Hilty, Christian; Bowen, Sean

    2010-08-07

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) is an important spectroscopic tool for the identification and structural characterization of molecules in chemistry and biochemistry. The most significant limitation of NMR compared to other spectroscopies is its relatively low sensitivity, which thus often requires long measurement times or large amounts of sample. A way of increasing sensitivity of single scan NMR spectra by several orders of magnitude is through hyperpolarization of nuclear spins. Dynamic nuclear polarization allows hyperpolarization of most spins in small molecules encountered in chemistry and biochemistry. NMR spectra of small amounts of samples from natural source, or from chemical synthesis can readily be acquired. Perhaps more interestingly, the availability of the entire hyperpolarized NMR signal in one single scan allows the measurement of transient processes in real time, if applied together with a stopped-flow technique. Through observation of chemical shift, different reactant and product species can be distinguished, and kinetics and mechanisms, for example in enzyme catalyzed reactions, can be elucidated. Real-time hyperpolarization-enhanced NMR is uniquely amenable to correlating atomic positions not only through space, but also over time between reactant and product species. Such correlations carry mechanistic information about a reaction, and can prove reaction pathways. Applications of this technique are emerging in different areas of chemistry concerned with rapid reactions, including not only enzymatic processes, but also chemical catalysis and protein folding.

  12. Propagation of dynamic nuclear polarization across the xenon cluster boundaries: elucidation of the spin-diffusion bottleneck.

    PubMed

    Pourfathi, M; Kuzma, N N; Kara, H; Ghosh, R K; Shaghaghi, H; Kadlecek, S J; Rizi, R R

    2013-10-01

    Earlier Dynamic Nuclear Polarization (DNP) experiments with frozen xenon/1-propanol/trityl mixtures have demonstrated spontaneous formation of pure xenon clusters above 120 K, enabling spectrally-resolved real-time measurements of (129)Xe nuclear magnetization in the clusters and in the surrounding radical-rich matrix. A spin-diffusion bottleneck was postulated to explain the peculiar time evolution of (129)Xe signals in the clusters as well as the apparent discontinuity of (129)Xe polarization across the cluster boundaries. A self-contained ab initio model of nuclear spin diffusion in heterogeneous systems is developed here, incorporating the intrinsic T1 relaxation towards the temperature-dependent equilibrium polarization and the spin-diffusion coefficients based on the measured NMR line widths and the known atomic densities in each compartment. This simple model provides the physical basis for the observed spin-diffusion bottleneck and is in a good quantitative agreement with the earlier measurements. A simultaneous fit of the model to the time-dependent NMR data at two different DNP frequencies provides excellent estimates of the cluster size, the intrinsic sample temperature, and (129)Xe T1 constants. The model was also applied to the NMR data acquired during relaxation towards the thermal equilibrium after the microwaves were turned off, to estimate T1 relaxation time constants inside and outside the clusters. Fitting the model to the data during and after DNP provides consistent estimates of the cluster size.

  13. The impact of monochloramine on the diversity and dynamics of Legionella pneumophila subpopulations in a nuclear power plant cooling circuit.

    PubMed

    Jakubek, Delphine; Le Brun, Matthieu; Leblon, Gerard; DuBow, Michael; Binet, Marie

    2013-08-01

    Members of the pathogenic Legionella genus encounter suitable growth conditions in nuclear power plant cooling circuits. To limit its proliferation and ensure that levels remain below regulatory thresholds, chemical treatment with monochloramine can be used in continuous or sequential conditions. The aim of this study was to determine the impact of monochloramine on L. pneumophila subpopulations in the cooling circuits of a nuclear power plant. The chosen procedure involved monitoring the diversity and dynamics of L. pneumophila subpopulations every month over the course of a year in a nuclear power plant cooling circuit, which was treated for 2 months during the period under study. This study confirmed the effectiveness of monochloramine to limit L. pneumophila concentrations in cooling circuits. The culturable L. pneumophila community was strongly affected by the injection of monochloramine. Several subpopulations persisted during treatment at low concentrations (below the detection limit of standard methods), suggesting that the susceptibility of L. pneumophila is strain dependent. Although the composition of the subpopulations was not similar, the resilience of the community structure was observed. Indeed, the community eventually returned to its initial structure and presented a similar pattern of richness, diversity and uniformity to that seen before treatment.

  14. Propagation of Dynamic Nuclear Polarization across the Xenon Cluster Boundaries: Elucidation of the Spin-Diffusion Bottleneck

    PubMed Central

    Pourfathi, M.; Kuzma, N. N.; Kara, H.; Ghosh, R. K.; Shaghaghi, H.; Kadlecek, S. J.; Rizi, R. R.

    2013-01-01

    Earlier dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) experiments with frozen xenon/1-propanol/trityl mixtures have demonstrated spontaneous formation of pure xenon clusters above 120 K, enabling spectrally-resolved real-time measurements of 129Xe nuclear magnetization in the clusters and in the surrounding radical-rich matrix. A spin-diffusion bottleneck was postulated to explain the peculiar time evolution of 129Xe signals in the clusters as well as the apparent discontinuity of 129Xe polarization across the cluster boundaries. A self-contained ab initio model of nuclear spin diffusion in heterogeneous systems is developed here, incorporating the intrinsic T1 relaxation towards the temperature-dependent equilibrium along with the spin-diffusion coefficients based on the measured NMR line widths and the known atomic densities in each compartment. This simple model provides the physical basis for the observed spin-diffusion bottleneck and is in a good quantitative agreement with the earlier measurements. A simultaneous fit of the model to the time-dependent NMR data at two different DNP frequencies provides excellent estimates of the cluster size, the intrinsic sample temperature, and 129Xe T1 constants. The model was also applied to the NMR data acquired during relaxation towards thermal equilibrium after microwaves were turned off to estimate T1 relaxation time constants inside and outside the clusters. Fitting the model to data during and after DNP provides estimates of cluster size that are in complete agreement. PMID:23981341

  15. Global Proliferation-Dynamics, Acquisition Strategies, and Responses. Volume 2. Nuclear Proliferation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-09-01

    proposed agency would be responsible for developing and implementing a system of controls, including international inspections , over the distribution of...facility, violation of safeguards agreements, or con- finned use of nuclear weapons. a Support for special inspections and weapon destruction. The...United States will examine, in consultation with friends and allies, establishment of multilateral funding efforts to support special inspection regimes

  16. Structure, dynamics, evolution, and function of a major scaffold component in the nuclear pore complex.

    PubMed

    Sampathkumar, Parthasarathy; Kim, Seung Joong; Upla, Paula; Rice, William J; Phillips, Jeremy; Timney, Benjamin L; Pieper, Ursula; Bonanno, Jeffrey B; Fernandez-Martinez, Javier; Hakhverdyan, Zhanna; Ketaren, Natalia E; Matsui, Tsutomu; Weiss, Thomas M; Stokes, David L; Sauder, J Michael; Burley, Stephen K; Sali, Andrej; Rout, Michael P; Almo, Steven C

    2013-04-02

    The nuclear pore complex, composed of proteins termed nucleoporins (Nups), is responsible for nucleocytoplasmic transport in eukaryotes. Nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) form an annular structure composed of the nuclear ring, cytoplasmic ring, a membrane ring, and two inner rings. Nup192 is a major component of the NPC's inner ring. We report the crystal structure of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Nup192 residues 2-960 [ScNup192(2-960)], which adopts an α-helical fold with three domains (i.e., D1, D2, and D3). Small angle X-ray scattering and electron microscopy (EM) studies reveal that ScNup192(2-960) could undergo long-range transition between "open" and "closed" conformations. We obtained a structural model of full-length ScNup192 based on EM, the structure of ScNup192(2-960), and homology modeling. Evolutionary analyses using the ScNup192(2-960) structure suggest that NPCs and vesicle-coating complexes are descended from a common membrane-coating ancestral complex. We show that suppression of Nup192 expression leads to compromised nuclear transport and hypothesize a role for Nup192 in modulating the permeability of the NPC central channel.

  17. Interfacial Ca2+ environments in nanocrystalline apatites revealed by dynamic nuclear polarization enhanced 43Ca NMR spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Daniel; Leroy, César; Crevant, Charlène; Bonhomme-Coury, Laure; Babonneau, Florence; Laurencin, Danielle; Bonhomme, Christian; De Paëpe, Gaël

    2017-01-01

    The interfaces within bones, teeth and other hybrid biomaterials are of paramount importance but remain particularly difficult to characterize at the molecular level because both sensitive and selective techniques are mandatory. Here, it is demonstrated that unprecedented insights into calcium environments, for example the differentiation of surface and core species of hydroxyapatite nanoparticles, can be obtained using solid-state NMR, when combined with dynamic nuclear polarization. Although calcium represents an ideal NMR target here (and de facto for a large variety of calcium-derived materials), its stable NMR-active isotope, calcium-43, is a highly unreceptive probe. Using the sensitivity gains from dynamic nuclear polarization, not only could calcium-43 NMR spectra be obtained easily, but natural isotopic abundance 2D correlation experiments could be recorded for calcium-43 in short experimental time. This opens perspectives for the detailed study of interfaces in nanostructured materials of the highest biological interest as well as calcium-based nanosystems in general. PMID:28128197

  18. Photoexcited Nuclear Dynamics with Ab Initio Electronic Structure Theory: Is TD-DFT Ready For the Challenge?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subotnik, Joseph

    In this talk, I will give a broad overview of our work in nonadiabatic dynamics, i.e. the dynamics of strongly coupled nuclear-electronic motion whereby the relaxation of a photo-excited electron leads to the heating up of phonons. I will briefly discuss how to model such nuclear motion beyond mean field theory. Armed with the proper framework, I will then focus on how to calculate one flavor of electron-phonon couplings, known as derivative couplings in the chemical literature. Derivative couplings are the matrix elements that couple adiabatic electronic states within the Born-Oppenheimer treatment, and I will show that these matrix elements show spurious poles using formal (frequency-independent) time-dependent density functional theory. To correct this TD-DFT failure, a simple approximation will be proposed and evaluated. Finally, time permitting, I will show some ab initio calculations whereby one can use TD-DFT derivative couplings to study electronic relaxation through a conical intersection.

  19. Direct assessment of quantum nuclear effects on hydrogen bond strength by constrained-centroid ab initio path integral molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Brent; Michaelides, Angelos

    2010-11-01

    The impact of quantum nuclear effects on hydrogen (H-) bond strength has been inferred in earlier work from bond lengths obtained from path integral molecular dynamics (PIMD) simulations. To obtain a direct quantitative assessment of such effects, we use constrained-centroid PIMD simulations to calculate the free energy changes upon breaking the H-bonds in dimers of HF and water. Comparing ab initio simulations performed using PIMD and classical nucleus molecular dynamics (MD), we find smaller dissociation free energies with the PIMD method. Specifically, at 50 K, the H-bond in (HF)2 is about 30% weaker when quantum nuclear effects are included, while that in (H2O)2 is about 15% weaker. In a complementary set of simulations, we compare unconstrained PIMD and classical nucleus MD simulations to assess the influence of quantum nuclei on the structures of these systems. We find increased heavy atom distances, indicating weakening of the H-bond consistent with that observed by direct calculation of the free energies of dissociation.

  20. Solution structures of cyclosporin a and its complex with dysprosium(III) in SDS micelles: NMR and molecular dynamics studies.

    PubMed

    Bernardi, Francesca; D'Amelio, Nicola; Gaggelli, Elena; Molteni, Elena; Valensin, Gianni

    2008-01-24

    Cyclosporin A (CsA) is a cyclic naturally occurring peptide used to prevent graft rejection in organ transplantations. Its immunosuppressive activity is due to the formation of a complex with cyclophilin A (Cyp), in which the cis 9MeLeu-10MeLeu amide bond of CsA assumes a trans conformation. The mechanism of the conformational inversion has not been delineated, but it has been postulated that metal ions binding induces a conformational change that enables CsA to bind Cyp. In this work, we solved the structures of CsA in sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) micelles (which enhance its solubility and mimic the hydrophobic environment clinically used for drug delivery) and its complex with Dy(III) ion, whose coordination chemistry is frequently used to reproduce the effect of Ca(II). The paramagnetic properties of Dy(III) allowed us to build up a structure using proton relaxation enhancements, which remains stable in a MD simulation in the micelle environment.

  1. Cyclometalated Iridium(III) Complexes as Two-Photon Phosphorescent Probes for Specific Mitochondrial Dynamics Tracking in Living Cells.

    PubMed

    Jin, Chengzhi; Liu, Jiangping; Chen, Yu; Zeng, Leli; Guan, Ruilin; Ouyang, Cheng; Ji, Liangnian; Chao, Hui

    2015-08-17

    Five cyclometalated iridium(III) complexes with 2-phenylimidazo[4,5-f][1,10]phenanthroline derivatives (IrL1-IrL5) were synthesized and developed to image and track mitochondria in living cells under two-photon (750 nm) excitation, with two-photon absorption cross-sections of 48.8-65.5 GM at 750 nm. Confocal microscopy and inductive coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) demonstrated that these complexes selectively accumulate in mitochondria within 5 min, without needing additional reagents for membrane permeabilization, or replacement of the culture medium. In addition, photobleaching experiments and luminescence measurements confirmed the photostability of these complexes under continuous laser irradiation and physiological pH resistance. Moreover, results using 3D multicellular spheroids demonstrate the proficiency of these two-photon luminescent complexes in deep penetration imaging. Two-photon excitation using such novel complexes of iridium(III) for exclusive visualization of mitochondria in living cells may substantially enhance practical applications of bioimaging and tracking.

  2. Nuclear science research with dynamic high energy density plasmas at NIF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaughnessy, D. A.; Gharibyan, N.; Moody, K. J.; Despotopulos, J. D.; Grant, P. M.; Yeamans, C. B.; Berzak Hopkins, L.; Cerjan, C. J.; Schneider, D. H. G.; Faye, S.

    2016-05-01

    Nuclear reaction measurements are performed at the National Ignition Facility in a high energy density plasma environment by adding target materials to the outside of the hohlraum thermo-mechanical package on an indirect-drive exploding pusher shot. Materials are activated with 14.1-MeV neutrons and the post-shot debris is collected via the Solid Radiochemistry diagnostic, which consists of metal discs fielded 50 cm from target chamber center. The discs are removed post-shot and analyzed via radiation counting and mass spectrometry. Results from a shot using Nd and Tm foils as targets are presented, which indicate enhanced collection of the debris in the line of sight of a given collector. The capsule performance was not diminished due to the extra material. This provides a platform for future measurements of nuclear reaction data through the use of experimental packages mounted external to the hohlraum.

  3. Time-Dependent Dynamics of Massive Quarkonium Resonances in Nuclear and Quark-Gluon-Plasma Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mah Hussin, Noor Sabrina; Shalaby, Asmaa; Petridis, Athanasios

    2014-03-01

    The time-dependent Schrödinger equation is used to study the formation of quarkonia and their propagation in Quark-Gluon Plasma (QGP) and nuclear media. The initial bound (ground) state is computed using imaginary-time propagation in a confining potential. The QGP is simulated with a confining potential of an extended asymptotic freedom region. The initial state propagates through this potential in real time. The nuclear medium is simulated with a periodic potential. In all cases the survival probability is calculated versus time for various potential parameters and relative momenta of the quarkonium with respect to the surrounding medium. In all calculations the staggered-leap frog method is used with special attention paid to the issue of stability. It is found that quarkonium decay is typically non-exponential. Fast moving states decay faster. There is a distinctive difference in the time-dependence of the survival probability between QGP and the nuclear medium. The effects of more realistic potentials are investigated.

  4. Dynamic changes in microtubule configuration correlate with nuclear migration in the preblastoderm Drosophila embryo

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    Drosophila embryogenesis is initiated by a series of syncytial mitotic divisions. The first nine of these divisions are internal, and are accompanied by two temporally distinct nuclear movements that lead to the formation of a syncytial blastoderm with a uniform monolayer of cortical nuclei. The first of these movements, which we term axial expansion, occurs during division cycles 4-6 and distributes nuclei in a hollow ellipsoid underlying the cortex. This is followed by cortical migration, during cycles 7-10, which places the nuclei in a uniform monolayer at the cortex. Here we report that these two movements differ in their geometry, velocity, cell-cycle dependence, and protein synthesis requirement. We therefore conclude that axial expansion and cortical migration are mechanistically distinct, amplifying a similar conclusion based on pharmacological data (Zalokar and Erk, 1976). We have examined microtubule organization during cortical migration and find that a network of interdigitating microtubules connects the migrating nuclei. These anti-parallel microtubule arrays are observed between migrating nuclei and yolk nuclei located deeper in the embryo. These arrays are present during nuclear movement but break down when the nuclei are not moving. We propose that cortical migration is driven by microtubule-dependent forces that repel adjacent nuclei, leading to an expansion of the nuclear ellipsoid established by axial expansion. PMID:8314839

  5. Simultaneous determination of Cr(iii) and Cr(vi) using reversed-phased ion-pairing liquid chromatography with dynamic reaction cell inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wolf, R.E.; Morrison, J.M.; Goldhaber, M.B.

    2007-01-01

    A method for the simultaneous determination of Cr(iii) and Cr(vi) species in waters, soil leachates and synthetic bio-fluids is described. The method uses reversed-phase ion-pairing liquid chromatography to separate the chromium species and a dynamic reaction cell (DRC??) equipped ICP-MS for detection of chromium. Separation of the chromium species is carried out in less than 2 min. Cr(iii) is complexed with ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) prior to separation by mixing samples with the mobile phase containing 2.0 mM tetrabutylammonium hydroxide (TBAOH), 0.5 mM EDTA (dipotassium salt), and 5% (vol/vol) methanol, adjusted to pH 7.6. The interfering 40Ar 12C+ background peak at mass 52 was reduced by over four orders of magnitude to less than 200 cps by using 0.65 mL min-1 ammonia as a reaction gas and an RPq setting on the DRC of 0.75. Method detection limits (MDLs) of 0.09 ??g L-1 for Cr(iii) and 0.06 ??g L-1 for Cr(vi) were obtained based on peak areas at mass 52 for 50 ??L injections of low level spikes. Reproducibility at 2 ??g L-1 was 3% RSD for 5 replicate injections. The tolerance of the method to various levels of common cations and anions found in natural waters and to matrix constituents found in soil leachates and simulated gastric and lung fluids was tested by performing spike recovery calculations for a variety of samples. ?? The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  6. Progress in spin dynamics solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance with the application of Floquet-Magnus expansion to chemical shift anisotropy.

    PubMed

    Mananga, Eugene Stephane

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to present an historical overview of theoretical approaches used for describing spin dynamics under static or rotating experiments in solid state nuclear magnetic resonance. The article gives a brief historical overview for major theories in nuclear magnetic resonance and the promising theories. We present the first application of Floquet-Magnus expansion to chemical shift anisotropy when irradiated by BABA pulse sequence.

  7. Progress in Spin Dynamics Solid-State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance with the Application of Floquet-Magnus Expansion to Chemical Shift Anisotropy

    PubMed Central

    Mananga, Eugene Stephane

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to present an historical overview of theoretical approaches used for describing spin dynamics under static or rotating experiments in solid state nuclear magnetic resonance. The article gives a brief historical overview for major theories in nuclear magnetic resonance and the promising theories. We present the first application of Floquet-Magnus expansion to chemical shift anisotropy when irradiated by BABA pulse sequence. PMID:23711337

  8. Mean-field dynamics with stochastic decoherence (MF-SD): A new algorithm for nonadiabatic mixed quantum/classical molecular-dynamics simulations with nuclear-induced decoherence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bedard-Hearn, Michael J.; Larsen, Ross E.; Schwartz, Benjamin J.

    2005-12-01

    The key factors that distinguish algorithms for nonadiabatic mixed quantum/classical (MQC) simulations from each other are how they incorporate quantum decoherence—the fact that classical nuclei must eventually cause a quantum superposition state to collapse into a pure state—and how they model the effects of decoherence on the quantum and classical subsystems. Most algorithms use distinct mechanisms for modeling nonadiabatic transitions between pure quantum basis states ("surface hops") and for calculating the loss of quantum-mechanical phase information (e.g., the decay of the off-diagonal elements of the density matrix). In our view, however, both processes should be unified in a single description of decoherence. In this paper, we start from the density matrix of the total system and use the frozen Gaussian approximation for the nuclear wave function to derive a nuclear-induced decoherence rate for the electronic degrees of freedom. We then use this decoherence rate as the basis for a new nonadiabatic MQC molecular-dynamics (MD) algorithm, which we call mean-field dynamics with stochastic decoherence (MF-SD). MF-SD begins by evolving the quantum subsystem according to the time-dependent Schrödinger equation, leading to mean-field dynamics. MF-SD then uses the nuclear-induced decoherence rate to determine stochastically at each time step whether the system remains in a coherent mixed state or decoheres. Once it is determined that the system should decohere, the quantum subsystem undergoes an instantaneous total wave-function collapse onto one of the adiabatic basis states and the classical velocities are adjusted to conserve energy. Thus, MF-SD combines surface hops and decoherence into a single idea: decoherence in MF-SD does not require the artificial introduction of reference states, auxiliary trajectories, or trajectory swarms, which also makes MF-SD much more computationally efficient than other nonadiabatic MQC MD algorithms. The unified definition of

  9. Structure and dynamics of Type III periplasmic proteins VcFhuD and VcHutB reveal molecular basis of their distinctive ligand binding properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agarwal, Shubhangi; Dey, Sanjay; Ghosh, Biplab; Biswas, Maitree; Dasgupta, Jhimli

    2017-02-01

    Molecular mechanisms of xenosiderophore and heme acquisitions using periplasmic binding protein (PBP) dependent ATP-binding cassette transporters to scavenge the essential nutrient iron are elusive yet in Vibrio cholerae. Our current study delineates the structures, dynamics and ligand binding properties of two Type III PBPs of V. cholerae, VcFhuD and VcHutB. Through crystal structures and fluorescence quenching studies we demonstrate unique features of VcFhuD to bind both hydroxamate and catecholate type xenosiderophores. Like E. coli FhuD, VcFhuD binds ferrichrome and ferri-desferal using conserved Tryptophans and R102. However, unlike EcFhuD, slightly basic ligand binding pocket of VcFhuD could favour ferri-enterobactin binding with plausible participation of R203, along with R102, like it happens in catecholate binding PBPs. Structural studies coupled with spectrophotometric and native PAGE analysis indicated parallel binding of two heme molecules to VcHutB in a pH dependent manner, while mutational analysis established the relative importance of Y65 and H164 in heme binding. MD simulation studies exhibited an unforeseen inter-lobe swinging motion in Type III PBPs, magnitude of which is inversely related to the packing of the linker helix with its neighboring helices. Small inter-lobe movement in VcFhuD or dramatic twisting in VcHutB is found to influence ligand binding.

  10. Structure and dynamics of Type III periplasmic proteins VcFhuD and VcHutB reveal molecular basis of their distinctive ligand binding properties

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Shubhangi; Dey, Sanjay; Ghosh, Biplab; Biswas, Maitree; Dasgupta, Jhimli

    2017-01-01

    Molecular mechanisms of xenosiderophore and heme acquisitions using periplasmic binding protein (PBP) dependent ATP-binding cassette transporters to scavenge the essential nutrient iron are elusive yet in Vibrio cholerae. Our current study delineates the structures, dynamics and ligand binding properties of two Type III PBPs of V. cholerae, VcFhuD and VcHutB. Through crystal structures and fluorescence quenching studies we demonstrate unique features of VcFhuD to bind both hydroxamate and catecholate type xenosiderophores. Like E. coli FhuD, VcFhuD binds ferrichrome and ferri-desferal using conserved Tryptophans and R102. However, unlike EcFhuD, slightly basic ligand binding pocket of VcFhuD could favour ferri-enterobactin binding with plausible participation of R203, along with R102, like it happens in catecholate binding PBPs. Structural studies coupled with spectrophotometric and native PAGE analysis indicated parallel binding of two heme molecules to VcHutB in a pH dependent manner, while mutational analysis established the relative importance of Y65 and H164 in heme binding. MD simulation studies exhibited an unforeseen inter-lobe swinging motion in Type III PBPs, magnitude of which is inversely related to the packing of the linker helix with its neighboring helices. Small inter-lobe movement in VcFhuD or dramatic twisting in VcHutB is found to influence ligand binding. PMID:28216648

  11. Role of disulfide bonds in modulating internal motions of proteins to tune their function: molecular dynamics simulation of scorpion toxin Lqh III.

    PubMed

    Moghaddam, Majid Erfani; Naderi-Manesh, Hossein

    2006-04-01

    A series of 1-ns MD simulations were performed on the scorpion toxin Lqh III in native and disulfide bond broken states. The removal of disulfide bonds has caused hydrogen bond network alteration in the five-residue turn, the long loop, the alpha-helix, the loop connecting strands II and III, and the C-terminal region. In addition and more importantly, it has influenced the amplitude of the fluctuations of five-residue turn, loops, and C-terminal region with a minor effect on the fluctuations of the cysteines in the broken bond sites. These findings suggest that disulfide bonds are not the most important factors in rigidifying their own locations, while they have more important effects at a global scale. Furthermore, our results reveal that disulfide bonds have considerable influence on the functionally important essential modes of motions and the correlations between the motions of the binding site residues. Therefore, we can conclude that disulfide bonds have a crucial role in modulating the function via adjusting the dynamics of scorpion toxin molecules. Although this conclusion cannot be generalized to all peptides and proteins, it demonstrates the importance of more investigations on this aspect of disulfide bond efficacy.

  12. Imaging and modeling of flow in porous media using clinical nuclear emission tomography systems and computational fluid dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Boutchko, Rostyslav; Rayz, Vitaliy L.; Vandehey, Nicholas T.; O’Neil, James P.; Budinger, Thomas F.; Nico, Peter S.; Druhan, Jennifer L.; Saloner, David A.; Gullberg, Grant T.; Moses, William W.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents experimental and modeling aspects of applying nuclear emission tomography to study fluid flow in laboratory packed porous media columns of the type frequently used in geophysics, geochemistry and hydrology research. Positron emission tomography (PET) and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) are used as non-invasive tools to obtain dynamic 3D images of radioactive tracer concentrations. Dynamic sequences obtained using 18F-FDG PET are used to trace flow through a 5 cm diameter × 20 cm tall sand packed column with and without an impermeable obstacle. In addition, a custom-made rotating column setup placed in a clinical two-headed SPECT camera is used to image 99mTc-DTPA tracer propagation in a through-flowing column (10 cm diameter × 30 cm tall) packed with recovered aquifer sediments. A computational fluid dynamics software package FLUENT is used to model the observed flow dynamics. Tracer distributions obtained in the simulations in the smaller column uniformly packed with sand and in the column with an obstacle are remarkably similar to the reconstructed images in the PET experiments. SPECT results demonstrate strongly non-uniform flow patterns for the larger column slurry-packed with sub-surface sediment and slow upward flow. In the numerical simulation of the SPECT study, two symmetric channels with increased permeability are prescribed along the column walls, which result in the emergence of two well-defined preferential flow paths. Methods and results of this work provide new opportunities in hydrologic and biogeochemical research. The primary target application for developed technologies is non-destructive, non-perturbing, quantitative imaging of flow dynamics within laboratory scale porous media systems. PMID:24917693

  13. Imaging and modeling of flow in porous media using clinical nuclear emission tomography systems and computational fluid dynamics.

    PubMed

    Boutchko, Rostyslav; Rayz, Vitaliy L; Vandehey, Nicholas T; O'Neil, James P; Budinger, Thomas F; Nico, Peter S; Druhan, Jennifer L; Saloner, David A; Gullberg, Grant T; Moses, William W

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents experimental and modeling aspects of applying nuclear emission tomography to study fluid flow in laboratory packed porous media columns of the type frequently used in geophysics, geochemistry and hydrology research. Positron emission tomography (PET) and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) are used as non-invasive tools to obtain dynamic 3D images of radioactive tracer concentrations. Dynamic sequences obtained using (18)F-FDG PET are used to trace flow through a 5 cm diameter × 20 cm tall sand packed column with and without an impermeable obstacle. In addition, a custom-made rotating column setup placed in a clinical two-headed SPECT camera is used to image (99m)Tc-DTPA tracer propagation in a through-flowing column (10 cm diameter × 30 cm tall) packed with recovered aquifer sediments. A computational fluid dynamics software package FLUENT is used to model the observed flow dynamics. Tracer distributions obtained in the simulations in the smaller column uniformly packed with sand and in the column with an obstacle are remarkably similar to the reconstructed images in the PET experiments. SPECT results demonstrate strongly non-uniform flow patterns for the larger column slurry-packed with sub-surface sediment and slow upward flow. In the numerical simulation of the SPECT study, two symmetric channels with increased permeability are prescribed along the column walls, which result in the emergence of two well-defined preferential flow paths. Methods and results of this work provide new opportunities in hydrologic and biogeochemical research. The primary target application for developed technologies is non-destructive, non-perturbing, quantitative imaging of flow dynamics within laboratory scale porous media systems.

  14. Control of X-ray Induced Electron and Nuclear Dynamics in Ammonia and Glycine Aqueous Solution via Hydrogen Bonding.

    PubMed

    Unger, Isaak; Hollas, Daniel; Seidel, Robert; Thürmer, Stephan; Aziz, Emad F; Slavíček, Petr; Winter, Bernd

    2015-08-20

    Recently, a new family of autoionization processes has been identified in aqueous phases. The processes are initiated by core-electron ionization of a solute molecule and involve proton transfer along the solute-solvent hydrogen bond. As a result, short-lived singly charged cations form with structures sharing a proton between solute and solvent molecules. These molecular transients decay by autoionization, which creates reactive dicationic species with the positive charges delocalized over the entire molecular entity. Here, we investigate the ultrafast electron and nuclear dynamics following the core ionization of hydrated ammonia and glycine. Both molecules serve as models for exploring the possible role of the nonlocal relaxation processes in the chemical reactivity at the interface between, for instance, a protein surface and aqueous solution. The nature of the postionization dynamical processes is revealed by high-accuracy Auger-electron spectroscopy measurements on liquid microjets in vacuum. The proton-transfer-mediated processes are identified by electron signals in the high-energy tail of the Auger spectra with no analogue in the Auger spectra of the corresponding gas-phase molecule. This high-energy tail is suppressed for deuterated molecules. Such an isotope effect is found to be smaller for aqueous ammonia as compared to the hydrated H2O molecule, wherein hydrogen bonds are strong. An even weaker hydrogen bonding for the hydrated amino groups in glycine results in a negligibly small proton transfer. The dynamical processes and species formed upon the nitrogen-1s core-level ionization are interpreted using methods of quantum chemistry and molecular dynamics. With the assistance of such calculations, we discuss the conditions for the proton-transfer-mediated relaxation processes to occur. We also consider the solvent librational dynamics as an alternative intermolecular ultrafast relaxation pathway. In addition, we provide experimental evidence for the

  15. The START III bargaining space

    SciTech Connect

    Karas, T.H.

    1998-08-01

    The declining state of the Russian military and precarious Russian economic condition will give the US considerable advantages at the START III bargaining table. Taking the US-RF asymmetries into account, this paper discusses a menu of START III measures the US could ask for, and measures it could offer in return, in attempting to negotiate an equitable treaty. Measures the US might seek in a START III treaty include: further reductions in deployed strategic nuclear warheads, irreversibility of reductions through warhead dismantlement; beginning to bring theater nuclear weapons under mutual control, and increased transparency into the Russian nuclear weapons complex. The US may, however, wish to apply its bargaining advantages to attempting to achieve the first steps toward two long-range goals that would enhance US security: bringing theater nuclear weapons into the US-RF arms control arena, and increasing transparency into the Russian nuclear weapons complex. In exchange for measures relating to these objectives, the US might consider offering to Russia: Further strategic weapons reductions approaching levels at which the Russians believe they could maintain a degree of parity with the US; Measures to decrease the large disparities in potential deliver-system uploading capabilities that appear likely under current START II/START III scenarios; and Financial assistance in achieving START II/START III reductions as rapidly as is technically possible.

  16. A predictive model of nuclear power plant crew decision-making and performance in a dynamic simulation environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coyne, Kevin Anthony

    The safe operation of complex systems such as nuclear power plants requires close coordination between the human operators and plant systems. In order to maintain an adequate level of safety following an accident or other off-normal event, the operators often are called upon to perform complex tasks during dynamic situations with incomplete information. The safety of such complex systems can be greatly improved if the conditions that could lead operators to make poor decisions and commit erroneous actions during these situations can be predicted and mitigated. The primary goal of this research project was the development and validation of a cognitive model capable of simulating nuclear plant operator decision-making during accident conditions. Dynamic probabilistic risk assessment methods can improve the prediction of human error events by providing rich contextual information and an explicit consideration of feedback arising from man-machine interactions. The Accident Dynamics Simulator paired with the Information, Decision, and Action in a Crew context cognitive model (ADS-IDAC) shows promise for predicting situational contexts that might lead to human error events, particularly knowledge driven errors of commission. ADS-IDAC generates a discrete dynamic event tree (DDET) by applying simple branching rules that reflect variations in crew responses to plant events and system status changes. Branches can be generated to simulate slow or fast procedure execution speed, skipping of procedure steps, reliance on memorized information, activation of mental beliefs, variations in control inputs, and equipment failures. Complex operator mental models of plant behavior that guide crew actions can be represented within the ADS-IDAC mental belief framework and used to identify situational contexts that may lead to human error events. This research increased the capabilities of ADS-IDAC in several key areas. The ADS-IDAC computer code was improved to support additional

  17. Dynamics of rat entorhinal cortex layer II and III cells: characteristics of membrane potential resonance at rest predict oscillation properties near threshold

    PubMed Central

    Erchova, I; Kreck, G; Heinemann, U; Herz, A V M

    2004-01-01

    Neurones generate intrinsic subthreshold membrane potential oscillations (MPOs) under various physiological and behavioural conditions. These oscillations influence neural responses and coding properties on many levels. On the single-cell level, MPOs modulate the temporal precision of action potentials; they also have a pronounced impact on large-scale cortical activity. Recent studies have described a close association between the MPOs of a given neurone and its electrical resonance properties. Using intracellular sharp microelectrode recordings we examine both dynamical characteristics in layers II and III of the entorhinal cortex (EC). Our data from EC layer II stellate cells show strong membrane potential resonances and oscillations, both in the range of 5–15 Hz. At the resonance maximum, the membrane impedance can be more than twice as large as the input resistance. In EC layer III cells, MPOs could not be elicited, and frequency-resolved impedances decay monotonically with increasing frequency or has only a small peak followed by a subsequent decay. To quantify and compare the resonance and oscillation properties, we use a simple mathematical model that includes stochastic components to capture channel noise. Based on this model we demonstrate that electrical resonance is closely related though not equivalent to the occurrence of sag-potentials and MPOs. MPO frequencies can be predicted from the membrane impedance curve for stellate cells. The model also explains the broad-band nature of the observed MPOs. This underscores the importance of intrinsic noise sources for subthreshold phenomena and rules out a deterministic description of MPOs. In addition, our results show that the two identified cell classes in the superficial EC layers, which are known to target different areas in the hippocampus, also have different preferred frequency ranges and dynamic characteristics. Intrinsic cell properties may thus play a major role for the frequency

  18. Requirements for a Dynamic Solvent Extraction Module to Support Development of Advanced Technologies for the Recycle of Used Nuclear Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Jack Law; Veronica Rutledge; Candido Pereira; Jackie Copple; Kurt Frey; John Krebs; Laura Maggos; Kevin Nichols; Kent Wardle; Pratap Sadasivan; Valmor DeAlmieda; David Depaoli

    2011-06-01

    The Department of Energy's Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) Program has been established to create and deploy next generation, verified and validated nuclear energy modeling and simulation capabilities for the design, implementation, and operation of future nuclear energy systems to improve the U.S. energy security. As part of the NEAMS program, Integrated Performance and Safety Codes (IPSC's) are being produced to significantly advance the status of modeling and simulation of energy systems beyond what is currently available to the extent that the new codes be readily functional in the short term and extensible in the longer term. The four IPSC areas include Safeguards and Separations, Reactors, Fuels, and Waste Forms. As part of the Safeguards and Separations (SafeSeps) IPSC effort, interoperable process models are being developed that enable dynamic simulation of an advanced separations plant. A SafeSepss IPSC 'toolkit' is in development to enable the integration of separation process modules and safeguards tools into the design process by providing an environment to compose, verify and validate a simulation application to be used for analysis of various plant configurations and operating conditions. The modules of this toolkit will be implemented on a modern, expandable architecture with the flexibility to explore and evaluate a wide range of process options while preserving their stand-alone usability. Modules implemented at the plant-level will initially incorporate relatively simple representations for each process through a reduced modeling approach. Final versions will incorporate the capability to bridge to subscale models to provide required fidelity in chemical and physical processes. A dynamic solvent extraction model and its module implementation are needed to support the development of this integrated plant model. As a stand-alone application, it will also support solvent development of extraction flowsheets and integrated

  19. Spatiotemporal dynamics of the nuclear pore complex transport barrier resolved by high-speed atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakiyama, Yusuke; Mazur, Adam; Kapinos, Larisa E.; Lim, Roderick Y. H.

    2016-08-01

    Nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) are biological nanomachines that mediate the bidirectional traffic of macromolecules between the cytoplasm and nucleus in eukaryotic cells. This process involves numerous intrinsically disordered, barrier-forming proteins known as phenylalanine-glycine nucleoporins (FG Nups) that are tethered inside each pore. The selective barrier mechanism has so far remained unresolved because the FG Nups have eluded direct structural analysis within NPCs. Here, high-speed atomic force microscopy is used to visualize the nanoscopic spatiotemporal dynamics of FG Nups inside Xenopus laevis oocyte NPCs at timescales of ∼100 ms. Our results show that the cytoplasmic orifice is circumscribed by highly flexible, dynamically fluctuating FG Nups that rapidly elongate and retract, consistent with the diffusive motion of tethered polypeptide chains. On this basis, intermingling FG Nups exhibit transient entanglements in the central channel, but do not cohere into a tightly crosslinked meshwork. Therefore, the basic functional form of the NPC barrier is comprised of highly dynamic FG Nups that manifest as a central plug or transporter when averaged in space and time.

  20. Ethyne-bridged (porphinato)zinc(II)-(porphinato)iron(III) complexes: phenomenological dependence of excited-state dynamics upon (porphinato)iron electronic structure.

    PubMed

    Duncan, Timothy V; Wu, Sophia P; Therien, Michael J

    2006-08-16

    We report the synthesis, spectroscopy, potentiometric properties, and excited-state dynamical studies of 5-[(10,20-di-((4-ethyl ester)methylene-oxy)phenyl)porphinato]zinc(II)-[5'-[(10',20'- di-((4-ethyl ester)methylene-oxy)phenyl)porphinato]iron(III)-chloride]ethyne (PZn-PFe-Cl), along with a series of related supermolecules ([PZn-PFe-(L)1,2]+ species) that possess a range of metal axial ligation environments (L = pyridine, 4-cyanopyridine, 2,4,6-trimethylpyridine (collidine), and 2,6-dimethylpyridine (2,6-lutidine)). Relevant monomeric [(porphinato)iron-(ligand)1,2]+ ([PFe(L)1,2]+) benchmarks have also been synthesized and fully characterized. Ultrafast pump-probe transient absorption spectroscopic experiments that interrogate the initially prepared electronically excited states of [PFe(L)1,2]+ species bearing nonhindered axial ligands demonstrated subpicosecond-to-picosecond relaxation dynamics to the ground electronic state. Comparative pump-probe transient absorption experiments that interrogate the initially prepared excited states of PZn-PFe-Cl, [PZn-PFe-(py)2]+, [PZn-PFe-(4-CN-py)2]+, [PZn-PFe-(collidine)]+, and [PZn-PFe-(2,6-lutidine)]+ demonstrate that the spectra of all these species are dominated by a broad, intense NIR S1 --> Sn transient absorption manifold. While PZn-PFe-Cl, [PZn-PFe-(py)2]+, and [PZn-PFe-(4-CN-py)2]+ evince subpicosecond and picosecond time-scale relaxation of their respective initially prepared electronically excited states to the ground state, the excited-state dynamics observed for [PZn-PFe-(2,6-lutidine)]+ and [PZn-PFe-(collidine)]+ show fast relaxation to a [PZn+-PFe(II)] charge-separated state having a lifetime of nearly 1 ns. Potentiometric data indicate that while DeltaGCS for [PZn-PFe-(L)1,2]+ species is strongly influenced by the PFe+ ligation state [ligand (DeltaGCS): 4-cyanopyridine (-0.79 eV) < pyridine (-1.04 eV) < collidine (-1.35 eV) < chloride (-1.40 eV); solvent = CH2Cl2], the pump-probe transient absorption

  1. Image-Based Modeling Reveals Dynamic Redistribution of DNA Damageinto Nuclear Sub-Domains

    SciTech Connect

    Costes Sylvain V., Ponomarev Artem, Chen James L.; Nguyen, David; Cucinotta, Francis A.; Barcellos-Hoff, Mary Helen

    2007-08-03

    Several proteins involved in the response to DNA doublestrand breaks (DSB) f orm microscopically visible nuclear domains, orfoci, after exposure to ionizing radiation. Radiation-induced foci (RIF)are believed to be located where DNA damage occurs. To test thisassumption, we analyzed the spatial distribution of 53BP1, phosphorylatedATM, and gammaH2AX RIF in cells irradiated with high linear energytransfer (LET) radiation and low LET. Since energy is randomly depositedalong high-LET particle paths, RIF along these paths should also berandomly distributed. The probability to induce DSB can be derived fromDNA fragment data measured experimentally by pulsed-field gelelectrophoresis. We used this probability in Monte Carlo simulations topredict DSB locations in synthetic nuclei geometrically described by acomplete set of human chromosomes, taking into account microscope opticsfrom real experiments. As expected, simulations produced DNA-weightedrandom (Poisson) distributions. In contrast, the distributions of RIFobtained as early as 5 min after exposure to high LET (1 GeV/amu Fe) werenon-random. This deviation from the expected DNA-weighted random patterncan be further characterized by "relative DNA image measurements." Thisnovel imaging approach shows that RIF were located preferentially at theinterface between high and low DNA density regions, and were morefrequent than predicted in regions with lower DNA density. The samepreferential nuclear location was also measured for RIF induced by 1 Gyof low-LET radiation. This deviation from random behavior was evidentonly 5 min after irradiation for phosphorylated ATM RIF, while gammaH2AXand 53BP1 RIF showed pronounced deviations up to 30 min after exposure.These data suggest that DNA damage induced foci are restricted to certainregions of the nucleus of human epithelial cells. It is possible that DNAlesions are collected in these nuclear sub-domains for more efficientrepair.

  2. Dynamic load balancing in a concurrent plasma PIC code on the JPL/Caltech Mark III hypercube

    SciTech Connect

    Liewer, P.C.; Leaver, E.W.; Decyk, V.K.; Dawson, J.M.

    1990-12-31

    Dynamic load balancing has been implemented in a concurrent one-dimensional electromagnetic plasma particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation code using a method which adds very little overhead to the parallel code. In PIC codes, the orbits of many interacting plasma electrons and ions are followed as an initial value problem as the particles move in electromagnetic fields calculated self-consistently from the particle motions. The code was implemented using the GCPIC algorithm in which the particles are divided among processors by partitioning the spatial domain of the simulation. The problem is load-balanced by partitioning the spatial domain so that each partition has approximately the same number of particles. During the simulation, the partitions are dynamically recreated as the spatial distribution of the particles changes in order to maintain processor load balance.

  3. Molecular dynamics in the isothermal-isobaric ensemble: the requirement of a "shell" molecule. III. Discontinuous potentials.

    PubMed

    Uline, Mark J; Corti, David S

    2008-07-07

    Based on the approach of Gruhn and Monson [Phys. Rev. E 63, 061106 (2001)], we present a new method for deriving the collisions dynamics for particles that interact via discontinuous potentials. By invoking the conservation of the extended Hamiltonian, we generate molecular dynamics (MD) algorithms for simulating the hard-sphere and square-well fluids within the isothermal-isobaric (NpT) ensemble. Consistent with the recent rigorous reformulation of the NpT ensemble partition function, the equations of motion impose a constant external pressure via the introduction of a shell particle of known mass [M. J. Uline and D. S. Corti, J. Chem. Phys. 123, 164101 (2005); 123, 164102 (2005)], which serves to define uniquely the volume of the system. The particles are also connected to a temperature reservoir through the use of a chain of Nose-Hoover thermostats, the properties of which are not affected by a hard-sphere or square-well collision. By using the Liouville operator formalism and the Trotter expansion theorem to integrate the equations of motion, the update of the thermostat variables can be decoupled from the update of the positions of the particles and the momentum changes upon a collision. Hence, once the appropriate collision dynamics for the isobaric-isenthalpic (NpH) equations of motion is known, the adaptation of the algorithm to the NpT ensemble is straightforward. Results of MD simulations for the pure component square-well fluid are presented and serve to validate our algorithm. Finally, since the mass of the shell particle is known, the system itself, and not a piston of arbitrary mass, controls the time scales for internal pressure and volume fluctuations. We therefore consider the influence of the shell particle algorithm on the dynamics of the square-well fluid.

  4. AttoPhotoChemistry. Probing ultrafast electron dynamics by the induced nuclear motion: The prompt and delayed predissociation of N2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muskatel, B. H.; Remacle, F.; Levine, R. D.

    2014-05-01

    Quantum mechanical wavepacket dynamics simulation that includes the nuclear motion exhibit a prompt, few fs, dissociation of electronically attosecond excited N2 in addition to the slow dissociation evident from spectral line broadening in well resolved spectra. The simulations show that nuclear motion can probe early times electron dynamics. The separation of time scales is mimicked by a model study fashioned like chemical kinetics of unimolecular dissociation. The physical origin of the separation into prompt and delayed decay is argued to be the same in the vibrational and the present case, namely that there are more bound than dissociative channels.

  5. Dissolution Dynamic Nuclear Polarization Instrumentation for Real-time Enzymatic Reaction Rate Measurements by NMR.

    PubMed

    Balzan, Riccardo; Fernandes, Laetitia; Comment, Arnaud; Pidial, Laetitia; Tavitian, Bertrand; Vasos, Paul R

    2016-02-23

    The main limitation of NMR-based investigations is low sensitivity. This prompts for long acquisition times, thus preventing real-time NMR measurements of metabolic transformations. Hyperpolarization via dissolution DNP circumvents part of the sensitivity issues thanks to the large out-of-equilibrium nuclear magnetization stemming from the electron-to-nucleus spin polarization transfer. The high NMR signal obtained can be used to monitor chemical reactions in real time. The downside of hyperpolarized NMR resides in the limited time window available for signal acquisition, which is usually on the order of the nuclear spin longitudinal relaxation time constant, T1, or, in favorable cases, on the order of the relaxation time constant associated with the singlet-state of coupled nuclei, TLLS. Cellular uptake of endogenous molecules and metabolic rates can provide essential information on tumor development and drug response. Numerous previous hyperpolarized NMR studies have demonstrated the relevancy of pyruvate as a metabolic substrate for monitoring enzymatic activity in vivo. This work provides a detailed description of the experimental setup and methods required for the study of enzymatic reactions, in particular the pyruvate-to-lactate conversion rate in presence of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), by hyperpolarized NMR.

  6. Nuclear Envelope Lamin-A Couples Actin Dynamics with Immunological Synapse Architecture and T Cell Activation

    PubMed Central

    González-Granado, José María; Trigueros-Motos, Laia; Cibrián, Danay; Morlino, Giulia; Blanco-Berrocal, Marta; Osorio, Fernando Garcia; Freije, José María Pérez; López-Otín, Carlos; Sánchez-Madrid, Francisco; Andrés, Vicente

    2014-01-01

    In many cell types, nuclear A-type lamins have been implicated in structural and functional activities, including higher-order genome organization, DNA replication and repair, gene transcription, and signal transduction. However, their role in specialized immune cells remains largely unexplored. Here, we showed that the abundance of A-type lamins is almost negligible in resting naïve T lymphocytes, but that it is substantially increased upon activation of the T cell receptor (TCR), and is an early event that accelerates formation of the immunological synapse between T cells and antigen-presenting cells. We found that lamin-A enhanced the polymerization of F-actin in T cells, a critical step for immunological synapse formation, by physically connecting the nucleus to the plasma membrane through the linker of nucleoskeleton and cytoskeleton (LINC) complex. We also showed that lamin-A played a key role in other membrane, cytoplasmic, and nuclear events related to TCR activation, including receptor-clustering, downstream signaling, and target gene expression. Notably, the presence of lamin-A was associated with enhanced extracellular signal–regulated kinase 1/2 signaling, and pharmacological inhibition of this pathway reduced the extent of lamin-A–dependent T cell activation. Moreover, mice deficient in lamin-A exhibited impaired T cell responses in vivo. These findings underscore the importance of A-type lamins for TCR activation, and identify lamin-A as a previously unappreciated regulator of the immune response. PMID:24757177

  7. A dynamic, dependent type system for nuclear fuel cycle code generation

    SciTech Connect

    Scopatz, A.

    2013-07-01

    The nuclear fuel cycle may be interpreted as a network or graph, thus allowing methods from formal graph theory to be used. Nodes are often idealized as nuclear fuel cycle facilities (reactors, enrichment cascades, deep geologic repositories). With the advent of modern object-oriented programming languages - and fuel cycle simulators implemented in these languages - it is natural to define a class hierarchy of facility types. Bright is a quasi-static simulator, meaning that the number of material passes through a facility is tracked rather than natural time. Bright is implemented as a C++ library that models many canonical components such as reactors, storage facilities, and more. Cyclus is a discrete time simulator, meaning that natural time is tracked through out the simulation. Therefore a robust, dependent type system was developed to enable inter-operability between Bright and Cyclus. This system is capable of representing any fuel cycle facility. Types declared in this system can then be used to automatically generate code which binds a facility implementation to a simulator front end. Facility model wrappers may be used either internally to a fuel cycle simulator or as a mechanism for inter-operating multiple simulators. While such a tool has many potential use cases it has two main purposes: enabling easy performance of code-to-code comparisons and the verification and the validation of user input.

  8. Nuclear dynamics and spectator effects in resonant inelastic soft x-ray scattering of gas-phase water molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Weinhardt, Lothar; Benkert, Andreas; Meyer, Frank; Blum, Monika; Wilks, Regan G.; Yang, Wanli; Baer, Marcus; Reinert, Friedrich; and others

    2012-04-14

    The electronic structure of gas-phase H{sub 2}O and D{sub 2}O molecules has been investigated using resonant inelastic soft x-ray scattering (RIXS). We observe spectator shifts for all valence orbitals when exciting into the lowest three absorption resonances. Strong changes of the relative valence orbital emission intensities are found when exciting into the different absorption resonances, which can be related to the angular anisotropy of the RIXS process. Furthermore, excitation into the 4a{sub 1} resonance leads to nuclear dynamics on the time scale of the RIXS process; we find evidence for vibrational coupling and molecular dissociation in both, the spectator and the participant emission.

  9. MMCT-mediated chromosome engineering technique applicable to functional analysis of lncRNA and nuclear dynamics.

    PubMed

    Meguro-Horike, Makiko; Horike, Shin-Ichi

    2015-01-01

    Recent evidence implicated several long noncoding RNA (lncRNA) in gene expression in cis or trans through regulating the local chromosomal architecture. However, the mechanisms underlying the lncRNA mediated silencing of multiple genes remain unknown. We believe that Microcell Mediated Chromosome Transfer (MMCT) is a suitable approach for functional analysis of lncRNAs and nuclear dynamics. MMCT is a unique research technique that can be generally used to transfer a single chromosome from one mammalian cell to another. Transferred chromosomes can be stably maintained as functioning in the recipient cells. Since there is no size limit to introducing genomic locus, an approach using the chromosome transfer technique is suitable for functional analysis of a large chromosomal domain. Here we describe a general strategy of MMCT, applications of which have potential to be an alternative tool of existing gene delivery system.

  10. Prediction of low-field nuclear singlet lifetimes with molecular dynamics and quantum-chemical property surface.

    PubMed

    Håkansson, Pär

    2017-01-25

    Molecular dynamics and quantum chemistry methods are implemented to quantify nuclear spin-1/2 pair singlet-state relaxation rates for three molecular systems at low magnetic field and room temperature. Computational methodology is developed for weak interactions, particularly important for singlet states at low field. These include spin-rotation and spin-internal-motion effects, which describe the coupling of the spin-carrying nuclei to fluctuating local magnetic fields induced by the overall and internal molecular fluctuations, respectively. A high-dimensional tensor property surface using Kriging interpolation is developed to circumvent costly quantum-chemical calculations. Together with the intramolecular dipolar relaxation, all the simulated relaxation mechanisms are accounted for with a common theoretical framework. Comparison with experiment indicates that quantitative accuracy is obtained, sufficient to enable guidance in the molecular design of molecules with long-lived singlet order.

  11. Low-temperature dynamic nuclear polarization with helium-cooled samples and nitrogen-driven magic-angle spinning.

    PubMed

    Thurber, Kent; Tycko, Robert

    2016-03-01

    We describe novel instrumentation for low-temperature solid state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) with dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) and magic-angle spinning (MAS), focusing on aspects of this instrumentation that have not been described in detail in previous publications. We characterize the performance of an extended interaction oscillator (EIO) microwave source, operating near 264 GHz with 1.5 W output power, which we use in conjunction with a quasi-optical microwave polarizing system and a MAS NMR probe that employs liquid helium for sample cooling and nitrogen gas for sample spinning. Enhancement factors for cross-polarized (13)C NMR signals in the 100-200 range are demonstrated with DNP at 25K. The dependences of signal amplitudes on sample temperature, as well as microwave power, polarization, and frequency, are presented. We show that sample temperatures below 30K can be achieved with helium consumption rates below 1.3 l/h. To illustrate potential applications of this instrumentation in structural studies of biochemical systems, we compare results from low-temperature DNP experiments on a calmodulin-binding peptide in its free and bound states.

  12. On The Potential of Dynamic Nuclear Polarization Enhanced Diamonds in Solid-State and Dissolution (13) C NMR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Bretschneider, Christian O; Akbey, Ümit; Aussenac, Fabien; Olsen, Greg L; Feintuch, Akiva; Oschkinat, Hartmut; Frydman, Lucio

    2016-09-05

    Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) is a versatile option to improve the sensitivity of NMR and MRI. This versatility has elicited interest for overcoming potential limitations of these techniques, including the achievement of solid-state polarization enhancement at ambient conditions, and the maximization of (13) C signal lifetimes for performing in vivo MRI scans. This study explores whether diamond's (13) C behavior in nano- and micro-particles could be used to achieve these ends. The characteristics of diamond's DNP enhancement were analyzed for different magnetic fields, grain sizes, and sample environments ranging from cryogenic to ambient temperatures, in both solution and solid-state experiments. It was found that (13) C NMR signals could be boosted by orders of magnitude in either low- or room-temperature solid-state DNP experiments by utilizing naturally occurring paramagnetic P1 substitutional nitrogen defects. We attribute this behavior to the unusually long electronic/nuclear spin-lattice relaxation times characteristic of diamond, coupled with a time-independent cross-effect-like polarization transfer mechanism facilitated by a matching of the nitrogen-related hyperfine coupling and the (13) C Zeeman splitting. The efficiency of this solid-state polarization process, however, is harder to exploit in dissolution DNP-enhanced MRI contexts. The prospects for utilizing polarized diamond approaching nanoscale dimensions for both solid and solution applications are briefly discussed.

  13. The Dynamic Movement of Plutonium in an Underground Nuclear Test with Implications for the Contamination of Groundwater

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D K; Williams, R W

    2003-03-25

    The recent discovery of the migration of plutonium in groundwater away from underground nuclear tests at the Nevada Test Site has spawned considerable interest in the mechanisms by which plutonium may be released to the environment by a nuclear test. A suite of solid debris samples was collected during drilling through an expended test cavity and the overlying collapse chimney. Uranium and plutonium were analyzed for isotope ratios and concentration using high precision magnetic sector inductively coupled mass spectrometry. The data unequivocally shows that plutonium may be dispersed throughout the cavity and chimney environment at the time of the detonation. The {sup 239}Pu/{sup 240}Pu ratios are also fractionated relative to initial plutonium isotope ratio for the test device. Fractionation is the result of the volatilization of uranium and production of {sup 239}Pu by the reaction {sup 238}U (n,{gamma}). We conclude that for the test under consideration plutonium was deposited outside of the confines of the cavity by dynamic processes in early-time and it is this plutonium that is most likely first transferred to the groundwater regime.

  14. Ultrafast nuclear dynamics in halomethanes studied with time-resolved Coulomb explosion imaging and channel-selective Fourier spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malakar, Y.; Kaderiya, B.; Pearson, W. L.; Ziaee, F.; Kanaka Raju, P.; Zohrabi, M.; Jensen, K.; Rajput, J.; Ben-Itzhak, I.; Rolles, D.; Rudenko, A.

    2016-05-01

    Halomethanes have recently attracted considerable attention since they often serve as prototype systems for laser-controlled chemistry (e.g., selective bond breaking or concerted elimination reactions), and are important molecules in atmospheric chemistry. Here we combine a femtosecond laser pump-probe setup with coincident 3D ion momentum imaging apparatus to study strong-field induced nuclear dynamics in methane and several of its halogenated derivatives (CH3 I, CH2 I2, CH2 ICl). We apply a time-resolved Coulomb explosion imaging technique to map the nuclear motion on both, bound and continuum potential surfaces, disentangle different fragmentation pathways and, for halogenated molecules, observe clear signatures of vibrational wave packets in neutral or ionized states. Channel-selective and kinetic-energy resolved Fourier analysis of these data allows for unique identification of different electronic states and vibrational modes responsible for a particular structure. Supported by the Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences Division, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Office of Science, U. S. DOE. K. R. P. and W. L. P. supported by NSF Award No. IIA-143049. K.J. supported by the NSF-REU Grant No. PHYS-1461251.

  15. Synthesis and evaluation of nitroxide-based oligoradicals for low-temperature dynamic nuclear polarization in solid state NMR

    PubMed Central

    Yau, Wai-Ming; Thurber, Kent R.; Tycko, Robert

    2014-01-01

    We describe the synthesis of new nitroxide-based biradical, triradical, and tetraradical compounds and the evaluation of their performance as paramagnetic dopants in dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) experiments in solid state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy with magic-angle spinning (MAS). Under our experimental conditions, which include temperatures in the 25–30 K range, a 9.4 T magnetic field, MAS frequencies of 6.2–6.8 kHz, and microwave irradiation at 264.0 GHz from a 800 mW extended interaction oscillator source, the most eff