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Sample records for nuclear envelope breakdown

  1. Virtual breakdown of the nuclear envelope in fission yeast meiosis.

    PubMed

    Asakawa, Haruhiko; Kojidani, Tomoko; Mori, Chie; Osakada, Hiroko; Sato, Mamiko; Ding, Da-Qiao; Hiraoka, Yasushi; Haraguchi, Tokuko

    2010-11-09

    Asymmetric localization of Ran regulators (RanGAP1 and RanGEF/RCC1) produces a gradient of RanGTP across the nuclear envelope. In higher eukaryotes, the nuclear envelope breaks down as the cell enters mitosis (designated "open" mitosis). This nuclear envelope breakdown (NEBD) leads to collapse of the RanGTP gradient and the diffusion of nuclear and cytoplasmic macromolecules in the cell, resulting in irreversible progression of the cell cycle. On the other hand, in many fungi, chromosome segregation takes place without NEBD (designated "closed" mitosis). Here we report that in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, despite the nuclear envelope and the nuclear pore complex remaining intact throughout both the meiotic and mitotic cell cycles, nuclear proteins diffuse into the cytoplasm transiently for a few minutes at the onset of anaphase of meiosis II. We also found that nuclear protein diffusion into the cytoplasm occurred coincidently with nuclear localization of Rna1, an S. pombe RanGAP1 homolog that is usually localized in the cytoplasm. These results suggest that nuclear localization of RanGAP1 and depression of RanGTP activity in the nucleus may be mechanistically tied to meiosis-specific diffusion of nuclear proteins into the cytoplasm. This nucleocytoplasmic shuffling of RanGAP1 and nuclear proteins represents virtual breakdown of the nuclear envelope.

  2. Nuclear envelope breakdown induced by herpes simplex virus type 1 involves the activity of viral fusion proteins.

    PubMed

    Maric, Martina; Haugo, Alison C; Dauer, William; Johnson, David; Roller, Richard J

    2014-07-01

    Herpesvirus infection reorganizes components of the nuclear lamina usually without loss of integrity of the nuclear membranes. We report that wild-type HSV infection can cause dissolution of the nuclear envelope in transformed mouse embryonic fibroblasts that do not express torsinA. Nuclear envelope breakdown is accompanied by an eight-fold inhibition of virus replication. Breakdown of the membrane is much more limited during infection with viruses that lack the gB and gH genes, suggesting that breakdown involves factors that promote fusion at the nuclear membrane. Nuclear envelope breakdown is also inhibited during infection with virus that does not express UL34, but is enhanced when the US3 gene is deleted, suggesting that envelope breakdown may be enhanced by nuclear lamina disruption. Nuclear envelope breakdown cannot compensate for deletion of the UL34 gene suggesting that mixing of nuclear and cytoplasmic contents is insufficient to bypass loss of the normal nuclear egress pathway.

  3. Nuclear envelope breakdown induced by herpes simplex virus type 1 involves the activity of viral fusion proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Maric, Martina; Haugo, Alison C.; Dauer, William; Johnson, David; Roller, Richard J.

    2014-07-15

    Herpesvirus infection reorganizes components of the nuclear lamina usually without loss of integrity of the nuclear membranes. We report that wild-type HSV infection can cause dissolution of the nuclear envelope in transformed mouse embryonic fibroblasts that do not express torsinA. Nuclear envelope breakdown is accompanied by an eight-fold inhibition of virus replication. Breakdown of the membrane is much more limited during infection with viruses that lack the gB and gH genes, suggesting that breakdown involves factors that promote fusion at the nuclear membrane. Nuclear envelope breakdown is also inhibited during infection with virus that does not express UL34, but is enhanced when the US3 gene is deleted, suggesting that envelope breakdown may be enhanced by nuclear lamina disruption. Nuclear envelope breakdown cannot compensate for deletion of the UL34 gene suggesting that mixing of nuclear and cytoplasmic contents is insufficient to bypass loss of the normal nuclear egress pathway. - Highlights: • We show that wild-type HSV can induce breakdown of the nuclear envelope in a specific cell system. • The viral fusion proteins gB and gH are required for induction of nuclear envelope breakdown. • Nuclear envelope breakdown cannot compensate for deletion of the HSV UL34 gene.

  4. Large scale RNAi reveals the requirement of nuclear envelope breakdown for nuclear import of human papillomaviruses.

    PubMed

    Aydin, Inci; Weber, Susanne; Snijder, Berend; Samperio Ventayol, Pilar; Kühbacher, Andreas; Becker, Miriam; Day, Patricia M; Schiller, John T; Kann, Michael; Pelkmans, Lucas; Helenius, Ari; Schelhaas, Mario

    2014-05-01

    A two-step, high-throughput RNAi silencing screen was used to identify host cell factors required during human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16) infection. Analysis of validated hits implicated a cluster of mitotic genes and revealed a previously undetermined mechanism for import of the viral DNA (vDNA) into the nucleus. In interphase cells, viruses were endocytosed, routed to the perinuclear area, and uncoated, but the vDNA failed to be imported into the nucleus. Upon nuclear envelope perforation in interphase cells HPV16 infection occured. During mitosis, the vDNA and L2 associated with host cell chromatin on the metaphase plate. Hence, we propose that HPV16 requires nuclear envelope breakdown during mitosis for access of the vDNA to the nucleoplasm. The results accentuate the value of genes found by RNAi screens for investigation of viral infections. The list of cell functions required during HPV16 infection will, moreover, provide a resource for future virus-host cell interaction studies.

  5. Nuclear translocation of RanGAP1 coincides with virtual nuclear envelope breakdown in fission yeast meiosis.

    PubMed

    Asakawa, Haruhiko; Hiraoka, Yasushi; Haraguchi, Tokuko

    2011-05-01

    In higher eukaryotes, mitosis proceeds with nuclear envelope breakdown (NEBD) and disassembly of the nuclear pore complex (NPC); this is designated "open" mitosis. On the other hand, in many fungi, mitosis and chromosome segregation takes place without NEBD; this is designated "closed" mitosis. In a recent study on Schizosaccharomyces pombe, a closed mitosis organism, we reported a novel phenomenon that is equivalent to NEBD: a mixing of nuclear proteins and cytoplasmic proteins occurred transiently for a few minutes in meiosis without physical breakdown of the nuclear envelope. We designated this event virtual nuclear envelope breakdown (V-NEBD). In S. pombe, nuclear translocation of Rna1, a RanGAP1 homolog in S. pombe, occurs during meiosis, and this translocation of Rna1 leads to collapse of the Ran-GTP gradient across the nuclear envelope and occurs coincidently with V-NEBD. Here, we describe possible roles of RanGAP1 in V-NEBD in S. pombe and provide insights into the roles V-NEBD may play in meiosis.

  6. Virtual Nuclear Envelope Breakdown and Its Regulators in Fission Yeast Meiosis.

    PubMed

    Asakawa, Haruhiko; Yang, Hui-Ju; Hiraoka, Yasushi; Haraguchi, Tokuko

    2016-01-01

    Ran, a small GTPase, is required for the spindle formation and nuclear envelope (NE) formation. After NE breakdown (NEBD) during mitosis in metazoan cells, the Ran-GTP gradient across the NE is lost and Ran-GTP becomes concentrated around chromatin, thus affecting the stability of microtubules and promoting the assembly of spindle microtubules and segregation of chromosomes. Mitosis in which chromosomes are segregated subsequent to NEBD is called "open mitosis." In contrast, many fungi undergo a process termed "closed mitosis" in which chromosome segregation and spindle formation occur without NEBD. Although the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe undergoes a closed mitosis, it exhibits a short period during meiosis (anaphase of the second meiosis; called "anaphase II") when nuclear and cytoplasmic proteins are mixed in the presence of intact NE and nuclear pore complexes (NPC). This "virtual" nuclear envelope breakdown (vNEBD) involves changes in the localization of RanGAP1, an activator of Ran-GTP hydrolysis. Recently, Nup132, a component of the structural core Nup107-160 subcomplex of the NPC, has been shown to be involved in the maintenance of the nuclear cytoplasmic barrier in yeast meiosis. In this review, we highlight the possible roles of RanGAP1 and Nup132 in vNEBD and discuss the biological significance of vNEBD in S. pombe meiosis.

  7. Maturation-promoting factor induces nuclear envelope breakdown in cycloheximide-arrested embryos of Xenopus laevis

    PubMed Central

    1983-01-01

    We have studied the effect of maturation-promoting factor (MPF) on embryonic nuclei during the early cleavage stage of Xenopus laevis development. When protein synthesis is inhibited by cycloheximide during this stage, the embryonic cell cycle arrests in an artificially produced G2 phase-like state, after completion of one additional round of DNA synthesis. Approximately 100 nuclei can be arrested in a common cytoplasm if cytokinesis is first inhibited by cytochalasin B. Within 5 min after injection of MPF into such embryos, the nuclear envelope surrounding each nucleus disperses, as determined histologically or by immunofluorescent staining of the nuclear lamina with antilamin antiserum. The breakdown of the nuclear envelope occurs at levels of MPF comparable to or slightly lower than those required for oocyte maturation. Amplification of MPF activity, however, does not occur in the arrested egg as it does in the oocyte. These results suggest that MPF can act to advance interphase nuclei into the first events of mitosis and show that the nuclear lamina responds rapidly to MPF. PMID:6345556

  8. Meiosis, egg activation, and nuclear envelope breakdown are differentially reliant on Ca2+, whereas germinal vesicle breakdown is Ca2+ independent in the mouse oocyte

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tombes, R. M.; Simerly, C.; Borisy, G. G.; Schatten, G.

    1992-01-01

    During early development, intracellular Ca2+ mobilization is not only essential for fertilization, but has also been implicated during other meiotic and mitotic events, such as germinal vesicle breakdown (GVBD) and nuclear envelope breakdown (NEBD). In this study, the roles of intracellular and extracellular Ca2+ were examined during meiotic maturation and reinitiation at parthenogenetic activation and during first mitosis in a single species using the same methodologies. Cumulus-free metaphase II mouse oocytes immediately resumed anaphase upon the induction of a large, transient Ca2+ elevation. This resumption of meiosis and associated events, such as cortical granule discharge, were not sensitive to extracellular Ca2+ removal, but were blocked by intracellular Ca2+ chelators. In contrast, meiosis I was dependent on external Ca2+; in its absence, the formation and function of the first meiotic spindle was delayed, the first polar body did not form and an interphase-like state was induced. GVBD was not dependent on external Ca2+ and showed no associated Ca2+ changes. NEBD at first mitosis in fertilized eggs, on the other hand, was frequently, but not always associated with a brief Ca2+ transient and was dependent on Ca2+ mobilization. We conclude that GVBD is Ca2+ independent, but that the dependence of NEBD on Ca2+ suggests regulation by more than one pathway. As cells develop from Ca(2+)-independent germinal vesicle oocytes to internal Ca(2+)-dependent pronuclear eggs, internal Ca2+ pools increase by approximately fourfold.

  9. Meiosis, egg activation, and nuclear envelope breakdown are differentially reliant on Ca2+, whereas germinal vesicle breakdown is Ca2+ independent in the mouse oocyte

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    During early development, intracellular Ca2+ mobilization is not only essential for fertilization, but has also been implicated during other meiotic and mitotic events, such as germinal vesicle breakdown (GVBD) and nuclear envelope breakdown (NEBD). In this study, the roles of intracellular and extracellular Ca2+ were examined during meiotic maturation and reinitiation at parthenogenetic activation and during first mitosis in a single species using the same methodologies. Cumulus- free metaphase II mouse oocytes immediately resumed anaphase upon the induction of a large, transient Ca2+ elevation. This resumption of meiosis and associated events, such as cortical granule discharge, were not sensitive to extracellular Ca2+ removal, but were blocked by intracellular Ca2+ chelators. In contrast, meiosis I was dependent on external Ca2+; in its absence, the formation and function of the first meiotic spindle was delayed, the first polar body did not form and an interphase-like state was induced. GVBD was not dependent on external Ca2+ and showed no associated Ca2+ changes. NEBD at first mitosis in fertilized eggs, on the other hand, was frequently, but not always associated with a brief Ca2+ transient and was dependent on Ca2+ mobilization. We conclude that GVBD is Ca2+ independent, but that the dependence of NEBD on Ca2+ suggests regulation by more than one pathway. As cells develop from Ca(2+)-independent germinal vesicle oocytes to internal Ca(2+)-dependent pronuclear eggs, internal Ca2+ pools increase by approximately fourfold. PMID:1577859

  10. Nuclear membrane: nuclear envelope PORosity in fission yeast meiosis.

    PubMed

    Sazer, Shelley

    2010-11-09

    The fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe undergoes closed mitosis but 'virtual nuclear envelope breakdown' at anaphase of meiosis II, in which the nuclear envelope is structurally closed but functionally open.

  11. Pseudorabies Virus pUL46 Induces Activation of ERK1/2 and Regulates Herpesvirus-Induced Nuclear Envelope Breakdown

    PubMed Central

    Schulz, Katharina S.; Liu, XueQiao; Klupp, Barbara G.; Granzow, Harald; Cohen, Jeffrey I.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Herpesvirus capsid morphogenesis occurs in the nucleus, while final maturation takes place in the cytosol, requiring translocation of capsids through the nuclear envelope. The nuclear egress complex, consisting of homologs of herpes simplex virus pUL31 and pUL34, is required for efficient nuclear egress via primary envelopment and de-envelopment. Recently, we described an alternative mode of nuclear escape by fragmentation of the nuclear envelope induced by replication-competent pUL31 and pUL34 deletion mutants of the alphaherpesvirus pseudorabies virus (PrV), which had been selected by serial passaging in cell culture. Both passaged viruses carry congruent mutations in seven genes, including UL46, which encodes one of the major tegument proteins. Herpesvirus pUL46 homologs have recently been shown to activate the PI3K-Akt and ERK1/2 signaling pathways, which are involved in regulation of mitosis and apoptosis. Since in uninfected cells fragmentation of the nuclear envelope occurs during mitosis and apoptosis, we analyzed whether pUL46 of PrV is involved in signaling events impairing the integrity of the nuclear envelope. We show here that PrV pUL46 is able to induce phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and, thus, expression of ERK1/2 target genes but fails to activate the PI3K-Akt pathway. Deletion of UL46 from PrV-ΔUL34Pass and PrV-ΔUL31Pass or replacement by wild-type UL46 resulted in enhanced nuclear envelope breakdown, indicating that the mutations in pUL46 may limit the extent of NEBD. Thus, although pUL46 induces ERK1/2 phosphorylation, controlling the integrity of the nuclear envelope is independent of the ERK1/2 signaling pathway. IMPORTANCE Herpesvirus nucleocapsids can leave the nucleus by regulated, vesicle-mediated transport through the nuclear envelope, designated nuclear egress, or by inducing nuclear envelope breakdown (NEBD). The viral proteins involved in NEBD are unknown. We show here that the pseudorabies virus tegument protein pUL46 induces the

  12. Transcriptional regulation at the yeast nuclear envelope

    PubMed Central

    Steglich, Babett; Sazer, Shelley; Ekwall, Karl

    2013-01-01

    The spatial organization of the genome inside the nucleus affects many nuclear processes, such as DNA replication, DNA repair, and gene transcription. In metazoans, the nuclear periphery harbors mainly repressed genes that associate with the nuclear lamina. This review discusses how peripheral positioning is connected to transcriptional regulation in yeasts. Tethering of reporter genes to the nuclear envelope was found to result in transcriptional silencing. Similarly, repression of the silent mating type loci and subtelomeric genes is influenced by their position close to the nuclear envelope. In contrast, active genes are bound by nucleoporins and inducible genes associate with the nuclear pore complex upon activation. Taken together, these results portray the nuclear envelope as a platform for transcriptional regulation, both through activation at nuclear pores and silencing at the nuclear envelope. PMID:24021962

  13. [NESPRINS--nuclear envelope proteins ensuring integrity].

    PubMed

    Pershina, E G; Morozova, K N; Kiseleva, E V

    2014-01-01

    This review describes the nesprins (nuclear envelope spectrin-repeat proteins), which are recently discovered family of nuclear envelope proteins. These proteins play an important role in maintaining the cellular architecture and establish the link between the nucleus and other sub-cellular compartments. Many tissue-specific diseases including lipodystrophies, hearing loss, cardiac and skeletal myopathies are associated with nesprins mutations. These proteins comprise of multiple tissue specific isoforms which contain spectrin repeats providing interaction of nesprins with other nuclear membrane proteins, cytoskeleton and intranuclear matrix. We summarize recent findings and suggestions about nesprins structural organization and function inside the cell. Human diseases caused by abnormal nesprins expression are also described.

  14. Ultradonut topology of the nuclear envelope

    PubMed Central

    Torbati, Mehdi; Lele, Tanmay P.; Agrawal, Ashutosh

    2016-01-01

    The nuclear envelope is a unique topological structure formed by lipid membranes in eukaryotic cells. Unlike other membrane structures, the nuclear envelope comprises two concentric membrane shells fused at numerous sites with toroid-shaped pores that impart a “geometric” genus on the order of thousands. Despite the intriguing architecture and vital biological functions of the nuclear membranes, how they achieve and maintain such a unique arrangement remains unknown. Here, we used the theory of elasticity and differential geometry to analyze the equilibrium shape and stability of this structure. Our results show that modest in- and out-of-plane stresses present in the membranes not only can define the pore geometry, but also provide a mechanism for destabilizing membranes beyond a critical size and set the stage for the formation of new pores. Our results suggest a mechanism wherein nanoscale buckling instabilities can define the global topology of a nuclear envelope-like structure. PMID:27647910

  15. LINCing complex functions at the nuclear envelope

    PubMed Central

    Rothballer, Andrea; Schwartz, Thomas U.; Kutay, Ulrike

    2013-01-01

    Linker of nucleoskeleton and cytoskeleton (LINC) complexes span the double membrane of the nuclear envelope (NE) and physically connect nuclear structures to cytoskeletal elements. LINC complexes are envisioned as force transducers in the NE, which facilitate processes like nuclear anchorage and migration, or chromosome movements. The complexes are built from members of two evolutionary conserved families of transmembrane (TM) proteins, the SUN (Sad1/UNC-84) domain proteins in the inner nuclear membrane (INM) and the KASH (Klarsicht/ANC-1/SYNE homology) domain proteins in the outer nuclear membrane (ONM). In the lumen of the NE, the SUN and KASH domains engage in an intimate assembly to jointly form a NE bridge. Detailed insights into the molecular architecture and atomic structure of LINC complexes have recently revealed the molecular basis of nucleo-cytoskeletal coupling. They bear important implications for LINC complex function and suggest new potential and as yet unexplored roles, which the complexes may play in the cell. PMID:23324460

  16. Bursting the Bubble - Nuclear Envelope Rupture as a Path to Genomic Instability?

    PubMed

    Shah, Pragya; Wolf, Katarina; Lammerding, Jan

    2017-03-09

    The nuclear envelope safeguards the genetic material inside the nucleus by separating it from the cytoplasm. Until recently, it was assumed that nuclear envelope (NE) breakdown occurs only in a highly controlled fashion during mitosis when the chromatin is condensed and divided between the daughter cells. However, recent studies have demonstrated that adherent and migrating cells exhibit transient NE rupture during interphase caused by compression from cytoskeletal or external forces. NE rupture results in uncontrolled exchange between the nuclear interior and cytoplasm and leads to DNA damage. In this review, we discuss the causes and consequences of NE rupture, and how NE rupture could contribute to genomic instability.

  17. Tissue specificity in the nuclear envelope supports its functional complexity.

    PubMed

    de Las Heras, Jose I; Meinke, Peter; Batrakou, Dzmitry G; Srsen, Vlastimil; Zuleger, Nikolaj; Kerr, Alastair Rw; Schirmer, Eric C

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear envelope links to inherited disease gave the conundrum of how mutations in near-ubiquitous proteins can yield many distinct pathologies, each focused in different tissues. One conundrum-resolving hypothesis is that tissue-specific partner proteins mediate these pathologies. Such partner proteins may have now been identified with recent proteome studies determining nuclear envelope composition in different tissues. These studies revealed that the majority of the total nuclear envelope proteins are tissue restricted in their expression. Moreover, functions have been found for a number these tissue-restricted nuclear envelope proteins that fit with mechanisms proposed to explain how the nuclear envelope could mediate disease, including defects in mechanical stability, cell cycle regulation, signaling, genome organization, gene expression, nucleocytoplasmic transport, and differentiation. The wide range of functions to which these proteins contribute is consistent with not only their involvement in tissue-specific nuclear envelope disease pathologies, but also tissue evolution.

  18. Tissue specificity in the nuclear envelope supports its functional complexity

    PubMed Central

    de las Heras, Jose I; Meinke, Peter; Batrakou, Dzmitry G; Srsen, Vlastimil; Zuleger, Nikolaj; Kerr, Alastair RW; Schirmer, Eric C

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear envelope links to inherited disease gave the conundrum of how mutations in near-ubiquitous proteins can yield many distinct pathologies, each focused in different tissues. One conundrum-resolving hypothesis is that tissue-specific partner proteins mediate these pathologies. Such partner proteins may have now been identified with recent proteome studies determining nuclear envelope composition in different tissues. These studies revealed that the majority of the total nuclear envelope proteins are tissue restricted in their expression. Moreover, functions have been found for a number these tissue-restricted nuclear envelope proteins that fit with mechanisms proposed to explain how the nuclear envelope could mediate disease, including defects in mechanical stability, cell cycle regulation, signaling, genome organization, gene expression, nucleocytoplasmic transport, and differentiation. The wide range of functions to which these proteins contribute is consistent with not only their involvement in tissue-specific nuclear envelope disease pathologies, but also tissue evolution. PMID:24213376

  19. Border safety: quality control at the nuclear envelope

    PubMed Central

    Webster, Brant M.; Lusk, C. Patrick

    2015-01-01

    The unique biochemical identity of the nuclear envelope confers its capacity to establish a barrier that protects the nuclear compartment and directly contributes to nuclear function. Recent work uncovered quality control mechanisms employing the ESCRT machinery and a new arm of ERAD to counteract the unfolding, damage or misassembly of nuclear envelope proteins and ensure the integrity of the nuclear envelope membranes. Moreover, cells have the capacity to recognize and triage defective nuclear pore complexes in order to prevent their inheritance and preserve the longevity of progeny. These mechanisms serve to highlight the diverse strategies used by cells to maintain nuclear compartmentalization; we suggest they mitigate the progression and severity of diseases associated with nuclear envelope malfunction like the laminopathies. PMID:26437591

  20. Nuclear envelope rupture drives genome instability in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Sanghee; Quinton, Ryan J.; Ganem, Neil J.

    2016-01-01

    The nuclear envelope, composed of two lipid bilayers and numerous accessory proteins, has evolved to house the genetic material of all eukaryotic cells. In so doing, the nuclear envelope provides a physical barrier between chromosomes and the cytoplasm. Once believed to be highly stable, recent studies demonstrate that the nuclear envelope is prone to rupture. These rupture events expose chromosomal DNA to the cytoplasmic environment and have the capacity to promote DNA damage. Thus nuclear rupture may be an unappreciated mechanism of mutagenesis. PMID:27799497

  1. SIRT2 regulates nuclear envelope reassembly through ANKLE2 deacetylation

    PubMed Central

    Kaufmann, Tanja; Kukolj, Eva; Brachner, Andreas; Beltzung, Etienne; Bruno, Melania; Kostrhon, Sebastian; Opravil, Susanne; Hudecz, Otto; Mechtler, Karl; Warren, Graham

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Sirtuin 2 (SIRT2) is an NAD-dependent deacetylase known to regulate microtubule dynamics and cell cycle progression. SIRT2 has also been implicated in the pathology of cancer, neurodegenerative diseases and progeria. Here, we show that SIRT2 depletion or overexpression causes nuclear envelope reassembly defects. We link this phenotype to the recently identified regulator of nuclear envelope reassembly ANKLE2. ANKLE2 acetylation at K302 and phosphorylation at S662 are dynamically regulated throughout the cell cycle by SIRT2 and are essential for normal nuclear envelope reassembly. The function of SIRT2 therefore extends beyond the regulation of microtubules to include the regulation of nuclear envelope dynamics. PMID:27875273

  2. Nuclear envelope fission is linked to cytokinesis in budding yeast.

    PubMed

    Lippincott, J; Li, R

    2000-11-01

    We have investigated the relationship between nuclear envelope fission and cytokinesis during mitotic cell division in budding yeast. By carrying out time-lapse and optical sectioning video microscopy analysis of cells that express green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged nuclear envelope and actomyosin ring components, we found that nuclear division is temporally coupled to cytokinesis. Light and electron microscopy analysis also showed that nuclear envelope fission and the division of the nucleoplasm are severely delayed in cytokinesis mutants, resulting in discoupling between the nuclear division cycle and the budding cycle. These results suggest that homotypic membrane fusion may be activated by components or the mechanical action of cytokinetic structures and presents a mechanism for the equal partitioning of the nucleus and the temporal coordination of this event with chromosome segregation during mitosis.

  3. Virus strategies for passing the nuclear envelope barrier

    PubMed Central

    Kobiler, Oren; Drayman, Nir; Butin-Israeli, Veronika; Oppenheim, Ariella

    2012-01-01

    Viruses that replicate in the nucleus need to pass the nuclear envelope barrier during infection. Research in recent years indicates that the nuclear envelope is a major hurdle for many viruses. This review describes strategies to overcome this obstacle developed by seven virus families: herpesviridae, adenoviridae, orthomyxoviridae, lentiviruses (which are part of retroviridae), Hepadnaviridae, parvoviridae and polyomaviridae. Most viruses use the canonical nuclear pore complex (NPC) in order to get their genome into the nucleus. Viral capsids that are larger than the nuclear pore disassemble before or during passing through the NPC, thus allowing genome nuclear entry. Surprisingly, increasing evidence suggest that parvoviruses and polyomaviruses may bypass the nuclear pore by trafficking directly through the nuclear membrane. Additional studies are required for better understanding these processes. Since nuclear entry emerges as the limiting step in infection for many viruses, it may serve as an ideal target for antiviral drug development. PMID:22929056

  4. The dynamic nature of the nuclear envelope: lessons from closed mitosis.

    PubMed

    Arnone, James T; Walters, Alison D; Cohen-Fix, Orna

    2013-01-01

    In eukaryotes, chromosomes are encased by a dynamic nuclear envelope. In contrast to metazoans, where the nuclear envelope disassembles during mitosis, many fungi including budding yeast undergo "closed mitosis," where the nuclear envelope remains intact throughout the cell cycle. Consequently, during closed mitosis the nuclear envelope must expand to accommodate chromosome segregation to the two daughter cells. A recent study by Witkin et al. in budding yeast showed that if progression through mitosis is delayed, for example due to checkpoint activation, the nuclear envelope continues to expand despite the block to chromosome segregation. Moreover, this expansion occurs at a specific region of the nuclear envelope- adjacent to the nucleolus- forming an extension referred to as a "flare." These observations raise questions regarding the regulation of nuclear envelope expansion both in budding yeast and in higher eukaryotes, the mechanisms confining mitotic nuclear envelope expansion to a particular region and the possible consequences of failing to regulate nuclear envelope expansion during the cell cycle.

  5. A nuclear-envelope bridge positions nuclei and moves chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Starr, Daniel A

    2009-03-01

    Positioning the nucleus is essential for the formation of polarized cells, pronuclear migration, cell division, cell migration and the organization of specialized syncytia such as mammalian skeletal muscles. Proteins that are required for nuclear positioning also function during chromosome movement and pairing in meiosis. Defects in these processes lead to human diseases including laminopathies. To properly position the nucleus or move chromosomes within the nucleus, the cell must specify the outer surface of the nucleus and transfer forces across both membranes of the nuclear envelope. KASH proteins are specifically recruited to the outer nuclear membrane by SUN proteins, which reside in the inner nuclear membrane. KASH and SUN proteins physically interact in the perinuclear space, forming a bridge across the two membranes of the nuclear envelope. The divergent N-terminal domains of KASH proteins extend from the surface of the nucleus into the cytoplasm and interact with the cytoskeleton, whereas the N-termini of SUN proteins extend into the nucleoplasm to interact with the lamina or chromatin. The bridge of SUN and KASH across the nuclear envelope functions to transfer forces that are generated in the cytoplasm into the nucleoplasm during nuclear migration, nuclear anchorage, centrosome attachment, intermediate-filament association and telomere clustering.

  6. Causes and consequences of nuclear envelope alterations in tumour progression.

    PubMed

    Bell, Emily S; Lammerding, Jan

    2016-11-01

    Morphological changes in the size and shape of the nucleus are highly prevalent in cancer, but the underlying molecular mechanisms and the functional relevance remain poorly understood. Nuclear envelope proteins, which can modulate nuclear shape and organization, have emerged as key components in a variety of signalling pathways long implicated in tumourigenesis and metastasis. The expression of nuclear envelope proteins is altered in many cancers, and changes in levels of nuclear envelope proteins lamins A and C are associated with poor prognosis in multiple human cancers. In this review we highlight the role of the nuclear envelope in different processes important for tumour initiation and cancer progression, with a focus on lamins A and C. Lamin A/C controls many cellular processes with key roles in cancer, including cell invasion, stemness, genomic stability, signal transduction, transcriptional regulation, and resistance to mechanical stress. In addition, we discuss potential mechanisms mediating the changes in lamin levels observed in many cancers. A better understanding of cause-and-effect relationships between lamin expression and tumour progression could reveal important mechanisms for coordinated regulation of oncogenic processes, and indicate therapeutic vulnerabilities that could be exploited for improved patient outcome.

  7. Jumping the nuclear envelop barrier: Improving polyplex-mediated gene transfection efficiency by a selective CDK1 inhibitor RO-3306.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xuefei; Liu, Xiangrui; Zhao, Bingxiang; Liu, Xin; Zhu, Dingcheng; Qiu, Nasha; Zhou, Quan; Piao, Ying; Zhou, Zhuxian; Tang, Jianbin; Shen, Youqing

    2016-07-28

    Successful transfection of plasmid DNA (pDNA) requires intranuclear internalization of pDNA effectively and the nuclear envelope appears to be one of the critical intracellular barriers for polymer mediated pDNA delivery. Polyethylenimine (PEI), as the classic cationic polymer, compact the negatively charged pDNA tightly and make up stable polyplexes. The polyplexes are too large to enter the nuclear through nuclear pores and it is believed that the nuclear envelope breakdown in mitosis could facilitate the nuclear entry of polyplexes. To jump the nuclear envelope barrier, we used a selective and reversible CDK1 inhibitor RO-3306 to control the G2/M transition of the cell cycle and increased the proportion of mitotic cells which have disappeared nuclear envelope during transfection. Herein, we show that RO-3306 remarkably increases the transfection efficiency of PEI polyplexes through enhanced nuclear localization of PEI and pDNA. However, RO-3306 is less effective to the charge-reversal polymer poly[(2-acryloyl)ethyl(p-boronic acid benzyl)diethylammonium bromide] (B-PDEAEA) which responses to cellular stimuli and releases free pDNA in cytoplasm. Our findings not only offer new opportunities for improving non-viral based gene delivery but also provide theoretical support for the rational design of novel functional polymers for gene delivery. We also report current data showing that RO-3306 synergizes TRAIL gene induced apoptosis in cancer cells.

  8. Nuclear envelope reformation and chromosome decondensation are dissociable events.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, S; Paweletz, N; Armas-Portela, R

    1988-06-01

    Cells treated with 2,4-dinitrophenol, a metabolic inhibitor, show a strong retardation of anaphase movement. At the ultrastructural level these cells reveal nuclear envelope reformation without concurrent decondensation of the chromosomes which indicates that these are possibly two dissociable late mitotic events.

  9. A novel family of plant nuclear envelope-associated proteins.

    PubMed

    Pawar, Vidya; Poulet, Axel; Détourné, Gwénaëlle; Tatout, Christophe; Vanrobays, Emmanuel; Evans, David E; Graumann, Katja

    2016-10-01

    This paper describes the characterisation of a new family of higher plant nuclear envelope-associated proteins (NEAPs) that interact with other proteins of the nuclear envelope. In the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, the family consists of three genes expressed ubiquitously (AtNEAP1-3) and a pseudogene (AtNEAP4). NEAPs consist of extensive coiled-coil domains, followed by a nuclear localisation signal and a C-terminal predicted transmembrane domain. Domain deletion mutants confirm the presence of a functional nuclear localisation signal and transmembrane domain. AtNEAP proteins localise to the nuclear periphery as part of stable protein complexes, are able to form homo- and heteromers, and interact with the SUN domain proteins AtSUN1 and AtSUN2, involved in the linker of nucleoskeleton and cytoskeleton (LINC) complex. An A. thaliana cDNA library screen identified a putative transcription factor called AtbZIP18 as a novel interactor of AtNEAP1, which suggest a connection between NEAP and chromatin. An Atneap1 Atneap3 double-knockout mutant showed reduced root growth, and altered nuclear morphology and chromatin structure. Thus AtNEAPs are suggested as inner nuclear membrane-anchored coiled-coil proteins with roles in maintaining nuclear morphology and chromatin structure.

  10. The Novel Nuclear Envelope Protein KAKU4 Modulates Nuclear Morphology in Arabidopsis[W

    PubMed Central

    Goto, Chieko; Tamura, Kentaro; Fukao, Yoichiro; Shimada, Tomoo; Hara-Nishimura, Ikuko

    2014-01-01

    In animals, the nuclear lamina is a fibrillar meshwork on the inner surface of the nuclear envelope, composed of coiled-coil lamin proteins and lamin binding membrane proteins. Plants also have a meshwork on the inner surface of the nuclear envelope, but little is known about its composition other than the presence of members of the CROWDED NUCLEI (CRWN) protein family, possible plant lamin analogs. Here, we describe a candidate lamina component, based on two Arabidopsis thaliana mutants (kaku2 and kaku4) with aberrant nuclear morphology. The responsible gene in kaku2 encodes CRWN1, and the responsible gene in kaku4 encodes a plant-specific protein of unknown function (KAKU4) that physically interacts with CRWN1 and its homolog CRWN4. Immunogold labeling revealed that KAKU4 localizes at the inner nuclear membrane. KAKU4 deforms the nuclear envelope in a dose-dependent manner, in association with nuclear membrane invagination and stack formation. The KAKU4-dependent nuclear envelope deformation was enhanced by overaccumulation of CRWN1, although KAKU4 can deform the nuclear envelope even in the absence of CRWN1 and/or CRWN4. Together, these results suggest that plants have evolved a unique lamina-like structure to modulate nuclear shape and size. PMID:24824484

  11. Consequences of a tight squeeze: Nuclear envelope rupture and repair.

    PubMed

    Isermann, Philipp; Lammerding, Jan

    2017-03-13

    Cell migration through tight spaces can induce substantial deformations of the nucleus and cause nuclear envelope (NE) rupture, resulting in uncontrolled exchange of nuclear and cytosolic proteins. These events can cause DNA damage and, in severe cases, nuclear fragmentation, challenging the integrity of the genomic material. Cells overcome NE ruptures during interphase by repairing the NE using components of the endosomal sorting complexes required for transport (ESCRT) machinery. Paralleling the molecular mechanism employed during NE reformation in late mitosis, ESCRT-III subunits and the associated AAA-ATPase VPS4B are recruited to NE rupture sites and help restore NE integrity. While these findings are common to many cell types, they are particularly relevant in the context of cancer metastasis, where nuclear deformation and rupture could drive genomic instability in invading cells and further promote cancer progression. At the same time, inhibiting NE repair may offer new therapeutic approaches to specifically target invasive cancer cells.

  12. Release of chromosomes from the nuclear envelope: a universal mechanism for eukaryotic mitosis?

    PubMed

    Kanoh, Junko

    2013-01-01

    Multiple domains of chromosomes are associated with the nuclear envelope (NE) in interphase. The association between chromosomes and the NE is involved in a variety of chromosomal reactions, such as gene expression and DNA repair. However, efficient chromosome movements are required for the fidelity of chromosome segregation in mitosis. Most higher eukaryotes perform open mitosis, in which the NE is broken down, enabling chromosomes to be released from the NE as well as spindle microtubules to access to kinetochores. By contrast, lower eukaryotes, such as Schizosaccharomyces pombe, perform closed mitosis, during which NE breakdown does not occur. In S. pombe, telomeres are tethered to the NE in interphase. Phosphorylation of the telomere-binding protein Rap1 at M phase promotes transient dissociation of telomeres from the NE, facilitating the faithful chromosome segregation. These findings imply a common mechanism for genome stability via the dissociation of chromosomes from the NE in eukaryotic mitosis.

  13. Nuclear envelope protein MAN1 regulates clock through BMAL1

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Shu-Ting; Zhang, Luoying; Lin, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Linda Chen; Garcia, Valentina Elizabeth; Tsai, Chen-Wei; Ptáček, Louis; Fu, Ying-Hui

    2014-01-01

    Circadian clocks serve as internal pacemakers that influence many basic homeostatic processes; consequently, the expression and function of their components are tightly regulated by intricate networks of feedback loops that fine-tune circadian processes. Our knowledge of these components and pathways is far from exhaustive. In recent decades, the nuclear envelope has emerged as a global gene regulatory machine, although its role in circadian regulation has not been explored. We report that transcription of the core clock component BMAL1 is positively modulated by the inner nuclear membrane protein MAN1, which directly binds the BMAL1 promoter and enhances its transcription. Our results establish a novel connection between the nuclear periphery and circadian rhythmicity, therefore bridging two global regulatory systems that modulate all aspects of bodily functions. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02981.001 PMID:25182847

  14. LINC'ing form and function at the nuclear envelope.

    PubMed

    Meinke, Peter; Schirmer, Eric C

    2015-09-14

    The nuclear envelope is an amazing piece of engineering. On one hand it is built like a mediaeval fortress with filament systems reinforcing its membrane walls and its double membrane structure forming a lumen like a castle moat. On the other hand its structure can adapt while maintaining its integrity like a reed bending in a river. Like a fortress it has guarded drawbridges in the nuclear pore complexes, but also has other mechanical means of communication. All this is enabled largely because of the LINC complex, a multi-protein structure that connects the intermediate filament nucleoskeleton across the lumen of the double membrane nuclear envelope to multiple cytoplasmic filament systems that themselves could act simultaneously both like mediaeval buttresses and like lines on a suspension bridge. Although many details of the greater LINC structure remain to be discerned, a number of recent findings are giving clues as to how its structural organization can yield such striking dynamic yet stable properties. Combining double- and triple-helical coiled-coils, intrinsic disorder and order, tissue-specific components, and intermediate filaments enables these unique properties.

  15. Cytosol-dependent membrane fusion in ER, nuclear envelope and nuclear pore assembly: biological implications.

    PubMed

    Rafikova, Elvira R; Melikov, Kamran; Chernomordik, Leonid V

    2010-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum and nuclear envelope rearrangements after mitosis are often studied in the reconstitution system based on Xenopus egg extract. In our recent work we partially replaced the membrane vesicles in the reconstitution mix with protein-free liposomes to explore the relative contributions of cytosolic and transmembrane proteins. Here we discuss our finding that cytosolic proteins mediate fusion between membranes lacking functional transmembrane proteins and the role of membrane fusion in endoplasmic reticulum and nuclear envelope reorganization. Cytosol-dependent liposome fusion has allowed us to restore, without adding transmembrane nucleoporins, functionality of nuclear pores, their spatial distribution and chromatin decondensation in nuclei formed at insufficient amounts of membrane material and characterized by only partial decondensation of chromatin and lack of nuclear transport. Both the mechanisms and the biological implications of the discovered coupling between spatial distribution of nuclear pores, chromatin decondensation and nuclear transport are discussed.

  16. Nucleosome functions in spindle assembly and nuclear envelope formation

    PubMed Central

    Zierhut, Christian; Funabiki, Hironori

    2016-01-01

    Summary Chromosomes are not only carriers of the genetic material, but also actively regulate the assembly of complex intracellular architectures. During mitosis, chromosome-induced microtubule polymerisation ensures spindle assembly in cells without centrosomes and plays a supportive role in centrosome-containing cells. Chromosomal signals also mediate post-mitotic nuclear envelope (NE) re-formation. Recent studies using novel approaches to manipulate histones in oocytes, where functions can be analysed in the absence of transcription, have established that nucleosomes, but not DNA alone, mediate the chromosomal regulation of spindle assembly and NE formation. Both processes require the generation of RanGTP by RCC1 recruited to nucleosomes but nucleosomes also acquire cell cycle stage specific regulators, Aurora B in mitosis and ELYS, the initiator of nuclear pore complex assembly, at mitotic exit. Here, we review the mechanisms by which nucleosomes control assembly and functions of the spindle and the NE, and discuss their implications for genome maintenance. PMID:26222742

  17. Lipid partitioning at the nuclear envelope controls membrane biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Barbosa, Antonio Daniel; Sembongi, Hiroshi; Su, Wen-Min; Abreu, Susana; Reggiori, Fulvio; Carman, George M.; Siniossoglou, Symeon

    2015-01-01

    Partitioning of lipid precursors between membranes and storage is crucial for cell growth, and its disruption underlies pathologies such as cancer, obesity, and type 2 diabetes. However, the mechanisms and signals that regulate this process are largely unknown. In yeast, lipid precursors are mainly used for phospholipid synthesis in nutrient-rich conditions in order to sustain rapid proliferation but are redirected to triacylglycerol (TAG) stored in lipid droplets during starvation. Here we investigate how cells reprogram lipid metabolism in the endoplasmic reticulum. We show that the conserved phosphatidate (PA) phosphatase Pah1, which generates diacylglycerol from PA, targets a nuclear membrane subdomain that is in contact with growing lipid droplets and mediates TAG synthesis. We find that cytosol acidification activates the master regulator of Pah1, the Nem1-Spo7 complex, thus linking Pah1 activity to cellular metabolic status. In the absence of TAG storage capacity, Pah1 still binds the nuclear membrane, but lipid precursors are redirected toward phospholipids, resulting in nuclear deformation and a proliferation of endoplasmic reticulum membrane. We propose that, in response to growth signals, activation of Pah1 at the nuclear envelope acts as a switch to control the balance between membrane biogenesis and lipid storage. PMID:26269581

  18. NET23/STING promotes chromatin compaction from the nuclear envelope.

    PubMed

    Malik, Poonam; Zuleger, Nikolaj; de las Heras, Jose I; Saiz-Ros, Natalia; Makarov, Alexandr A; Lazou, Vassiliki; Meinke, Peter; Waterfall, Martin; Kelly, David A; Schirmer, Eric C

    2014-01-01

    Changes in the peripheral distribution and amount of condensed chromatin are observed in a number of diseases linked to mutations in the lamin A protein of the nuclear envelope. We postulated that lamin A interactions with nuclear envelope transmembrane proteins (NETs) that affect chromatin structure might be altered in these diseases and so screened thirty-one NETs for those that promote chromatin compaction as determined by an increase in the number of chromatin clusters of high pixel intensity. One of these, NET23 (also called STING, MITA, MPYS, ERIS, Tmem173), strongly promoted chromatin compaction. A correlation between chromatin compaction and endogenous levels of NET23/STING was observed for a number of human cell lines, suggesting that NET23/STING may contribute generally to chromatin condensation. NET23/STING has separately been found to be involved in innate immune response signaling. Upon infection cells make a choice to either apoptose or to alter chromatin architecture to support focused expression of interferon genes and other response factors. We postulate that the chromatin compaction induced by NET23/STING may contribute to this choice because the cells expressing NET23/STING eventually apoptose, but the chromatin compaction effect is separate from this as the condensation was still observed when cells were treated with Z-VAD to block apoptosis. NET23/STING-induced compacted chromatin revealed changes in epigenetic marks including changes in histone methylation and acetylation. This indicates a previously uncharacterized nuclear role for NET23/STING potentially in both innate immune signaling and general chromatin architecture.

  19. NET23/STING Promotes Chromatin Compaction from the Nuclear Envelope

    PubMed Central

    de las Heras, Jose I.; Saiz-Ros, Natalia; Makarov, Alexandr A.; Lazou, Vassiliki; Meinke, Peter; Waterfall, Martin; Kelly, David A.; Schirmer, Eric C.

    2014-01-01

    Changes in the peripheral distribution and amount of condensed chromatin are observed in a number of diseases linked to mutations in the lamin A protein of the nuclear envelope. We postulated that lamin A interactions with nuclear envelope transmembrane proteins (NETs) that affect chromatin structure might be altered in these diseases and so screened thirty-one NETs for those that promote chromatin compaction as determined by an increase in the number of chromatin clusters of high pixel intensity. One of these, NET23 (also called STING, MITA, MPYS, ERIS, Tmem173), strongly promoted chromatin compaction. A correlation between chromatin compaction and endogenous levels of NET23/STING was observed for a number of human cell lines, suggesting that NET23/STING may contribute generally to chromatin condensation. NET23/STING has separately been found to be involved in innate immune response signaling. Upon infection cells make a choice to either apoptose or to alter chromatin architecture to support focused expression of interferon genes and other response factors. We postulate that the chromatin compaction induced by NET23/STING may contribute to this choice because the cells expressing NET23/STING eventually apoptose, but the chromatin compaction effect is separate from this as the condensation was still observed when cells were treated with Z-VAD to block apoptosis. NET23/STING-induced compacted chromatin revealed changes in epigenetic marks including changes in histone methylation and acetylation. This indicates a previously uncharacterized nuclear role for NET23/STING potentially in both innate immune signaling and general chromatin architecture. PMID:25386906

  20. Spastin and ESCRT-III coordinate mitotic spindle disassembly and nuclear envelope sealing.

    PubMed

    Vietri, Marina; Schink, Kay O; Campsteijn, Coen; Wegner, Catherine Sem; Schultz, Sebastian W; Christ, Liliane; Thoresen, Sigrid B; Brech, Andreas; Raiborg, Camilla; Stenmark, Harald

    2015-06-11

    At the onset of metazoan cell division the nuclear envelope breaks down to enable capture of chromosomes by the microtubule-containing spindle apparatus. During anaphase, when chromosomes have separated, the nuclear envelope is reassembled around the forming daughter nuclei. How the nuclear envelope is sealed, and how this is coordinated with spindle disassembly, is largely unknown. Here we show that endosomal sorting complex required for transport (ESCRT)-III, previously found to promote membrane constriction and sealing during receptor sorting, virus budding, cytokinesis and plasma membrane repair, is transiently recruited to the reassembling nuclear envelope during late anaphase. ESCRT-III and its regulatory AAA (ATPase associated with diverse cellular activities) ATPase VPS4 are specifically recruited by the ESCRT-III-like protein CHMP7 to sites where the reforming nuclear envelope engulfs spindle microtubules. Subsequent association of another ESCRT-III-like protein, IST1, directly recruits the AAA ATPase spastin to sever microtubules. Disrupting spastin function impairs spindle disassembly and results in extended localization of ESCRT-III at the nuclear envelope. Interference with ESCRT-III functions in anaphase is accompanied by delayed microtubule disassembly, compromised nuclear integrity and the appearance of DNA damage foci in subsequent interphase. We propose that ESCRT-III, VPS4 and spastin cooperate to coordinate nuclear envelope sealing and spindle disassembly at nuclear envelope-microtubule intersection sites during mitotic exit to ensure nuclear integrity and genome safeguarding, with a striking mechanistic parallel to cytokinetic abscission.

  1. Nuclear envelope and genome interactions in cell fate

    PubMed Central

    Talamas, Jessica A.; Capelson, Maya

    2015-01-01

    The eukaryotic cell nucleus houses an organism’s genome and is the location within the cell where all signaling induced and development-driven gene expression programs are ultimately specified. The genome is enclosed and separated from the cytoplasm by the nuclear envelope (NE), a double-lipid membrane bilayer, which contains a large variety of trans-membrane and associated protein complexes. In recent years, research regarding multiple aspects of the cell nucleus points to a highly dynamic and coordinated concert of efforts between chromatin and the NE in regulation of gene expression. Details of how this concert is orchestrated and how it directs cell differentiation and disease are coming to light at a rapid pace. Here we review existing and emerging concepts of how interactions between the genome and the NE may contribute to tissue specific gene expression programs to determine cell fate. PMID:25852741

  2. Kid-mediated chromosome compaction ensures proper nuclear envelope formation.

    PubMed

    Ohsugi, Miho; Adachi, Kenjiro; Horai, Reiko; Kakuta, Shigeru; Sudo, Katsuko; Kotaki, Hayato; Tokai-Nishizumi, Noriko; Sagara, Hiroshi; Iwakura, Yoichiro; Yamamoto, Tadashi

    2008-03-07

    Toward the end of mitosis, neighboring chromosomes gather closely to form a compact cluster. This is important for reassembling the nuclear envelope around the entire chromosome mass but not individual chromosomes. By analyzing mice and cultured cells lacking the expression of chromokinesin Kid/kinesin-10, we show that Kid localizes to the boundaries of anaphase and telophase chromosomes and contributes to the shortening of the anaphase chromosome mass along the spindle axis. Loss of Kid-mediated anaphase chromosome compaction often causes the formation of multinucleated cells, specifically at oocyte meiosis II and the first couple of mitoses leading to embryonic death. In contrast, neither male meiosis nor somatic mitosis after the morula-stage is affected by Kid deficiency. These data suggest that Kid-mediated anaphase/telophase chromosome compaction prevents formation of multinucleated cells. This protection is especially important during the very early stages of development, when the embryonic cells are rich in ooplasm.

  3. Microtubules as key coordinators of nuclear envelope and endoplasmic reticulum dynamics during mitosis.

    PubMed

    Schlaitz, Anne-Lore

    2014-07-01

    During mitosis, cells comprehensively restructure their interior to promote the faithful inheritance of DNA and cytoplasmic contents. In metazoans, this restructuring entails disassembly of the nuclear envelope, redistribution of its components into the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and eventually nuclear envelope reassembly around the segregated chromosomes. The microtubule cytoskeleton has recently emerged as a critical regulator of mitotic nuclear envelope and ER dynamics. Microtubules and associated molecular motors tear open the nuclear envelope in prophase and remove nuclear envelope remnants from chromatin. Additionally, two distinct mechanisms of microtubule-based regulation of ER dynamics operate later in mitosis. First, association of the ER with microtubules is reduced, preventing invasion of ER into the spindle area, and second, organelle membrane is actively cleared from metaphase chromosomes. However, we are only beginning to understand the role of microtubules in shaping and distributing ER and other organelles during mitosis.

  4. Nuclear pore assembly proceeds by an inside-out extrusion of the nuclear envelope.

    PubMed

    Otsuka, Shotaro; Bui, Khanh Huy; Schorb, Martin; Hossain, M Julius; Politi, Antonio Z; Koch, Birgit; Eltsov, Mikhail; Beck, Martin; Ellenberg, Jan

    2016-09-15

    The nuclear pore complex (NPC) mediates nucleocytoplasmic transport through the nuclear envelope. How the NPC assembles into this double membrane boundary has remained enigmatic. Here, we captured temporally staged assembly intermediates by correlating live cell imaging with high-resolution electron tomography and super-resolution microscopy. Intermediates were dome-shaped evaginations of the inner nuclear membrane (INM), that grew in diameter and depth until they fused with the flat outer nuclear membrane. Live and super-resolved fluorescence microscopy revealed the molecular maturation of the intermediates, which initially contained the nuclear and cytoplasmic ring component Nup107, and only later the cytoplasmic filament component Nup358. EM particle averaging showed that the evagination base was surrounded by an 8-fold rotationally symmetric ring structure from the beginning and that a growing mushroom-shaped density was continuously associated with the deforming membrane. Quantitative structural analysis revealed that interphase NPC assembly proceeds by an asymmetric inside-out extrusion of the INM.

  5. Function of nuclear membrane proteins in shaping the nuclear envelope integrity during closed mitosis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hui-Ju; Iwamoto, Masaaki; Hiraoka, Yasushi; Haraguchi, Tokuko

    2017-04-08

    The nuclear envelope (NE) not only protects the genome from being directly accessed by detrimental agents but also regulates genome organization. Breaches in NE integrity threaten genome stability and impede cellular function. Nonetheless, the NE constantly remodels, and NE integrity is endangered in dividing or differentiating cells. Specifically, in unicellular eukaryotes undergoing closed mitosis, the NE expands instead of breaking down during chromosome segregation. The newly assembling nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) penetrate the existing NE in interphase. A peculiar example of NE remodeling during nuclear differentiation in Tetrahymena involves formation of the redundant NE and clustered NPCs. Even under these conditions, the NE remains intact. Many recent studies on unicellular organisms have revealed that nuclear membrane proteins, such as LEM-domain proteins, play a role in maintaining NE integrity. This review summarizes and discusses how nuclear membrane proteins participate in NE integrity.

  6. UnLINCing the nuclear envelope: towards an understanding of the physiological significance of nuclear positioning

    PubMed Central

    Razafsky, David; Zang, Shulun; Hodzic, Didier

    2017-01-01

    Appropriate tissue morphogenesis strictly requires the developmental regulation of different types of nuclear movements. LINC (linker of nucleoskeleton and cytoskeleton) complexes are macromolecular scaffolds that span the nuclear envelope and physically connect the nuclear interior to different cytoskeletal elements and molecular motors, thereby playing essential roles in nucleokinesis. Recent studies dedicated to the in vivo disruption of LINC complexes not only confirmed their widespread role in nuclear dynamics, but also led to a vigorous regain of interest in the physiological relevance of nuclear positioning within cells and syncitia. In the present paper, we review the results of LINC complex disruption in vivo across different organisms and the potential implications of observed phenotypes in human diseases. PMID:22103527

  7. A mitotic nuclear envelope tether for Gle1 also affects nuclear and nucleolar architecture

    PubMed Central

    Chemudupati, Mahesh; Osmani, Aysha H.; Osmani, Stephen A.

    2016-01-01

    During Aspergillus nidulans mitosis, peripheral nuclear pore complex (NPC) proteins (Nups) disperse from the core NPC structure. Unexpectedly, one predicted peripheral Nup, Gle1, remains at the mitotic nuclear envelope (NE) via an unknown mechanism. Gle1 affinity purification identified mitotic tether for Gle1 (MtgA), which tethers Gle1 to the NE during mitosis but not during interphase when Gle1 is at NPCs. MtgA is the orthologue of the Schizosaccharomyces pombe telomere-anchoring inner nuclear membrane protein Bqt4. Like Bqt4, MtgA has meiotic roles, but it is functionally distinct from Bqt4 because MtgA is not required for tethering telomeres to the NE. Domain analyses showed that MtgA targeting to the NE requires its C-terminal transmembrane domain and a nuclear localization signal. Of importance, MtgA functions beyond Gle1 mitotic targeting and meiosis and affects nuclear and nucleolar architecture when deleted or overexpressed. Deleting MtgA generates small, round nuclei, whereas overexpressing MtgA generates larger nuclei with altered nuclear compartmentalization resulting from NE expansion around the nucleolus. The accumulation of MtgA around the nucleolus promotes a similar accumulation of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) protein Erg24, reducing its levels in the ER. This study extends the functions of Bqt4-like proteins to include mitotic Gle1 targeting and modulation of nuclear and nucleolar architecture. PMID:27630260

  8. MCLIP Detection of Novel Protein-Protein Interactions at the Nuclear Envelope.

    PubMed

    Jafferali, Mohammed Hakim; Figueroa, Ricardo A; Hallberg, Einar

    2016-01-01

    The organization and function of the nuclear envelope (NE) involves hundreds of nuclear membrane proteins and myriad protein-protein interactions, most of which are still uncharacterized. Many NE proteins interact stably or dynamically with the nuclear lamina or chromosomes. This can make them difficult to extract under nondenaturing conditions, and greatly limits our ability to explore and identify functional protein interactions at the NE. This knowledge is needed to understand nuclear envelope structure and the mechanisms of human laminopathy diseases. This chapter provides detailed protocols for MCLIP (membrane cross-linking immunoprecipitation) identification of novel protein-protein interactions in mammalian cells.

  9. Nuclear pore assembly proceeds by an inside-out extrusion of the nuclear envelope

    PubMed Central

    Otsuka, Shotaro; Bui, Khanh Huy; Schorb, Martin; Hossain, M Julius; Politi, Antonio Z; Koch, Birgit; Eltsov, Mikhail; Beck, Martin; Ellenberg, Jan

    2016-01-01

    The nuclear pore complex (NPC) mediates nucleocytoplasmic transport through the nuclear envelope. How the NPC assembles into this double membrane boundary has remained enigmatic. Here, we captured temporally staged assembly intermediates by correlating live cell imaging with high-resolution electron tomography and super-resolution microscopy. Intermediates were dome-shaped evaginations of the inner nuclear membrane (INM), that grew in diameter and depth until they fused with the flat outer nuclear membrane. Live and super-resolved fluorescence microscopy revealed the molecular maturation of the intermediates, which initially contained the nuclear and cytoplasmic ring component Nup107, and only later the cytoplasmic filament component Nup358. EM particle averaging showed that the evagination base was surrounded by an 8-fold rotationally symmetric ring structure from the beginning and that a growing mushroom-shaped density was continuously associated with the deforming membrane. Quantitative structural analysis revealed that interphase NPC assembly proceeds by an asymmetric inside-out extrusion of the INM. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.19071.001 PMID:27630123

  10. Analysis of nuclear reconstitution, nuclear envelope assembly, and nuclear pore assembly using Xenopus in vitro assays.

    PubMed

    Bernis, Cyril; Forbes, Douglass J

    2014-01-01

    The large and complex eukaryotic nucleus is the arbiter of DNA replication, RNA transcription, splicing, and ribosome assembly. With the advent of in vitro nuclear reconstitution extracts derived from Xenopus eggs in the 1980s, it became possible to assemble multiple nuclei in vitro around added DNA or chromatin substrates. Such reconstituted nuclei contain a nuclear lamina, double nuclear membranes, nuclear pores, and are competent for DNA replication and nuclear import. In vitro nuclear reconstitution has allowed the assembly of "wild-type" and "biochemically mutant" nuclei in which the impact of individual components can be assessed. Here, we describe protocols for preparation of the nuclear reconstitution extract, nuclear reconstitution in vitro, assessment of nuclear membrane integrity, and a more specialized assay for nuclear pore assembly into preformed pore-free nuclear intermediates.

  11. Analysis of Nuclear Reconstitution, Nuclear Envelope Assembly, and Nuclear Pore Assembly Using Xenopus In Vitro Assays

    PubMed Central

    Bernis, Cyril; Forbes, Douglass J.

    2015-01-01

    The large and complex eukaryotic nucleus is the arbiter of DNA replication, RNA transcription, splicing, and ribosome assembly. With the advent of in vitro nuclear reconstitution extracts derived from Xenopus eggs in the 1980s, it became possible to assemble multiple nuclei in vitro around added DNA or chromatin substrates. Such reconstituted nuclei contain a nuclear lamina, double nuclear membranes, nuclear pores, and are competent for DNA replication and nuclear import. In vitro nuclear reconstitution has allowed the assembly of “wild-type” and “biochemically mutant” nuclei in which the impact of individual components can be assessed. Here, we describe protocols for preparation of the nuclear reconstitution extract, nuclear reconstitution in vitro, assessment of nuclear membrane integrity, and a more specialized assay for nuclear pore assembly into preformed pore-free nuclear intermediates. PMID:24857730

  12. Remodeling of the Nuclear Envelope and Lamina during Bovine Preimplantation Development and Its Functional Implications

    PubMed Central

    Popken, Jens; Graf, Alexander; Krebs, Stefan; Blum, Helmut; Schmid, Volker J.; Strauss, Axel; Guengoer, Tuna; Zakhartchenko, Valeri; Wolf, Eckhard; Cremer, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    The present study demonstrates a major remodeling of the nuclear envelope and its underlying lamina during bovine preimplantation development. Up to the onset of major embryonic genome activation (MGA) at the 8-cell stage nuclei showed a non-uniform distribution of nuclear pore complexes (NPCs). NPCs were exclusively present at sites where DNA contacted the nuclear lamina. Extended regions of the lamina, which were not contacted by DNA, lacked NPCs. In post-MGA nuclei the whole lamina was contacted rather uniformly by DNA. Accordingly, NPCs became uniformly distributed throughout the entire nuclear envelope. These findings shed new light on the conditions which control the integration of NPCs into the nuclear envelope. The switch from maternal to embryonic production of mRNAs was accompanied by multiple invaginations covered with NPCs, which may serve the increased demands of mRNA export and protein import. Other invaginations, as well as interior nuclear segments and vesicles without contact to the nuclear envelope, were exclusively positive for lamin B. Since the abundance of these invaginations and vesicles increased in concert with a massive nuclear volume reduction, we suggest that they reflect a mechanism for fitting the nuclear envelope and its lamina to a shrinking nuclear size during bovine preimplantation development. In addition, a deposit of extranuclear clusters of NUP153 (a marker for NPCs) without associated lamin B was frequently observed from the zygote stage up to MGA. Corresponding RNA-Seq data revealed deposits of spliced, maternally provided NUP153 mRNA and little unspliced, newly synthesized RNA prior to MGA, which increased strongly at the initiation of embryonic expression of NUP153 at MGA. PMID:25932910

  13. Mechanical and molecular basis for the symmetrical division of the fission yeast nuclear envelope.

    PubMed

    Castagnetti, Stefania; Božič, Bojan; Svetina, Saša

    2015-06-28

    In fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, the nuclear envelope remains intact throughout mitosis and undergoes a series of symmetrical morphological changes when the spindle pole bodies (SPBs), embedded in the nuclear envelope, are pushed apart by elongating spindle microtubules. These symmetrical membrane shape transformations do not correspond to the shape behavior of an analogous system based on lipid vesicles. Here we report that the symmetry of the dividing fission yeast nucleus is ensured by SPB-chromosome attachments, as loss of kinetochore clustering in the vicinity of SPBs results in the formation of abnormal asymmetric shapes with long membrane tethers. We integrated these findings in a biophysical model, which explains the symmetry of the nuclear shapes on the basis of forces exerted by chromosomes clustered at SPBs on the extending nuclear envelope. Based on this analysis we conclude that the fission yeast nuclear envelope exhibits the same mechanical properties as simple lipid vesicles, but interactions with other cellular components, such as chromosomes, influence the nuclear shape during mitosis, allowing the formation of otherwise energetically unfavorable symmetrical dumbbell structures upon spindle elongation. The model allows us to explain the appearance of abnormal asymmetric shapes in fission yeast mutants with mis-segregated chromosomes as well as with altered nuclear membrane composition.

  14. Chm7 and Heh1 collaborate to link nuclear pore complex quality control with nuclear envelope sealing.

    PubMed

    Webster, Brant M; Thaller, David J; Jäger, Jens; Ochmann, Sarah E; Borah, Sapan; Lusk, C Patrick

    2016-11-15

    The integrity of the nuclear envelope barrier relies on membrane remodeling by the ESCRTs, which seal nuclear envelope holes and contribute to the quality control of nuclear pore complexes (NPCs); whether these processes are mechanistically related remains poorly defined. Here, we show that the ESCRT-II/III chimera, Chm7, is recruited to a nuclear envelope subdomain that expands upon inhibition of NPC assembly and is required for the formation of the storage of improperly assembled NPCs (SINC) compartment. Recruitment to sites of NPC assembly is mediated by its ESCRT-II domain and the LAP2-emerin-MAN1 (LEM) family of integral inner nuclear membrane proteins, Heh1 and Heh2. We establish direct binding between Heh2 and the "open" forms of both Chm7 and the ESCRT-III, Snf7, and between Chm7 and Snf7. Interestingly, Chm7 is required for the viability of yeast strains where double membrane seals have been observed over defective NPCs; deletion of CHM7 in these strains leads to a loss of nuclear compartmentalization suggesting that the sealing of defective NPCs and nuclear envelope ruptures could proceed through similar mechanisms.

  15. A role for the nuclear envelope in controlling DNA replication within the cell cycle.

    PubMed

    Blow, J J; Laskey, R A

    1988-04-07

    In eukaryotes the entire genome is replicated precisely once in each cell cycle. No DNA is re-replicated until passage through mitosis into the next S-phase. We have used a cell-free DNA replication system from Xenopus eggs to determine which mitotic changes permit DNA to re-replicate. The system efficiently replicates sperm chromatin, but no DNA is re-replicated in a single incubation. This letter shows that nuclei replicated in vitro are unable to re-replicate in fresh replication extract until they have passed through mitosis. However, the only mitotic change which is required to permit re-replication is nuclear envelope permeabilization. This suggests a simple model for the control of DNA replication in the cell cycle, whereby an essential replication factor is unable to cross the nuclear envelope but can only gain access to DNA when the nuclear envelope breaks down at mitosis.

  16. Prm3p is a pheromone-induced peripheral nuclear envelope protein required for yeast nuclear fusion.

    PubMed

    Shen, Shu; Tobery, Cynthia E; Rose, Mark D

    2009-05-01

    Nuclear membrane fusion is the last step in the mating pathway of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We adapted a bioinformatics approach to identify putative pheromone-induced membrane proteins potentially required for nuclear membrane fusion. One protein, Prm3p, was found to be required for nuclear membrane fusion; disruption of PRM3 caused a strong bilateral defect, in which nuclear congression was completed but fusion did not occur. Prm3p was localized to the nuclear envelope in pheromone-responding cells, with significant colocalization with the spindle pole body in zygotes. A previous report, using a truncated protein, claimed that Prm3p is localized to the inner nuclear envelope. Based on biochemistry, immunoelectron microscopy and live cell microscopy, we find that functional Prm3p is a peripheral membrane protein exposed on the cytoplasmic face of the outer nuclear envelope. In support of this, mutations in a putative nuclear localization sequence had no effect on full-length protein function or localization. In contrast, point mutations and deletions in the highly conserved hydrophobic carboxy-terminal domain disrupted both protein function and localization. Genetic analysis, colocalization, and biochemical experiments indicate that Prm3p interacts directly with Kar5p, suggesting that nuclear membrane fusion is mediated by a protein complex.

  17. Nuclear envelope attachment is not necessary for telomere function in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Chikashige, Yuji; Haraguchi, Tokuko; Hiraoka, Yasushi

    2010-01-01

    Inner nuclear membrane (INM) proteins can be important for positioning chromosomes within the nucleus. Little is known about INM proteins in the fission yeast Schizossacharomayces pombe. Telomeres are the most obvious chromosomal sites that are anchored to the nuclear envelope in this organism. A group of proteins that tether telomeres to the spindle-pole body (SPB) during meiotic prophase, such as Bqt1, Bqt2 and Sad1, has been identified previously, but proteins for anchoring telomeres to the nuclear envelope in vegetative cells have not been identified until recently. A recent report demonstrates that Bqt3 and Bqt4 are INM proteins that affect nuclear positioning of telomeres in vegetative cells, and consequently affect the telomere clustering in meiotic prophase. Interestingly, in the absence of Bqt4, telomeres are separated from the nuclear envelope but telomere silencing and telomere length are properly regulated. An important implication of these results is that the functional integrity of telomeres is maintained independently of their connection to the nuclear envelope.

  18. N-terminal sequences from Autographa californica nuclear polyhedrosis virus envelope proteins ODV-E66 and ODV-E25 are sufficient to direct reporter proteins to the nuclear envelope, intranuclear microvesicles and the envelope of occlusion derived virus.

    PubMed

    Hong, T; Summers, M D; Braunagel, S C

    1997-04-15

    Baculovirus occlusion-derived virus (ODV) derives its envelope from an intranuclear membrane source. N-terminal amino acid sequences of the Autographa californica nuclear polyhedrosis virus (AcMNPV) envelope proteins, ODV-E66 and ODV-E25 (23 and 24 amino acids, respectively) are highly hydrophobic. Recombinant viruses that express the two N-terminal amino acid sequences fused to green fluorescent protein (23GFP or 24GFP) provided visual markers to follow protein transport and localization within the nucleus during infection. Autoflourescence was first detected along the cytoplasmic periphery of the nucleus and subsequently localized as foci to discrete locations within the nucleus. Immunoelectron microscopy confirmed that these foci predominantly contained intranuclear microvesicles and the reporter fusion proteins were also detected in cytoplasmic membranes near the nucleus, and the outer and inner nuclear membrane. Therefore, these defined hydrophobic domains are sufficient to direct native and fusion proteins to induced membrane microvesicles within a baculovirus-infected cell nucleus and the viral envelope. In addition, these data suggest that movement of these proteins into the nuclear envelope may initiate through cytoplasmic membranes, such as endoplasmic reticulum, and that transport into the nucleus may be mediated through the outer and inner nuclear membrane.

  19. Dynamic assembly of brambleberry mediates nuclear envelope fusion during early development.

    PubMed

    Abrams, Elliott W; Zhang, Hong; Marlow, Florence L; Kapp, Lee; Lu, Sumei; Mullins, Mary C

    2012-08-03

    To accommodate the large cells following zygote formation, early blastomeres employ modified cell divisions. Karyomeres are one such modification, mitotic intermediates wherein individual chromatin masses are surrounded by nuclear envelope; the karyomeres then fuse to form a single mononucleus. We identified brambleberry, a maternal-effect zebrafish mutant that disrupts karyomere fusion, resulting in formation of multiple micronuclei. As karyomeres form, Brambleberry protein localizes to the nuclear envelope, with prominent puncta evident near karyomere-karyomere interfaces corresponding to membrane fusion sites. brambleberry corresponds to an unannotated gene with similarity to Kar5p, a protein that participates in nuclear fusion in yeast. We also demonstrate that Brambleberry is required for pronuclear fusion following fertilization in zebrafish. Our studies provide insight into the machinery required for karyomere fusion and suggest that specialized proteins are necessary for proper nuclear division in large dividing blastomeres.

  20. Localization of P-glycoprotein at the nuclear envelope of rat brain cells

    SciTech Connect

    Babakhanian, Karlo; Bendayan, Moise; Bendayan, Reina . E-mail: r.bendayan@utoronto.ca

    2007-09-21

    P-Glycoprotein is a plasma membrane drug efflux protein implicated in extrusion of cytotoxic compounds out of a cell. There is now evidence that suggests expression of this transporter at several subcellular sites, including the nucleus, mitochondria, and Golgi apparatus. This study investigated the localization and expression of P-glycoprotein at the nuclear membrane of rat brain microvessel endothelial (RBE4) and microglial (MLS-9) cell lines. Immunocytochemistry at the light and electron microscope levels using P-glycoprotein monoclonals antibodies demonstrated the localization of the protein at the nuclear envelope of RBE4 and MLS-9 cells. Western blot analysis revealed a single band of 170-kDa in purified nuclear membranes prepared from isolated nuclei of RBE4 and MLS-9 cells. These findings indicate that P-glycoprotein is expressed at the nuclear envelope of rat brain cells and suggest a role in multidrug resistance at this subcellular site.

  1. TMEM120A and B: Nuclear Envelope Transmembrane Proteins Important for Adipocyte Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Batrakou, Dzmitry G.; de las Heras, Jose I.; Czapiewski, Rafal; Mouras, Rabah; Schirmer, Eric C.

    2015-01-01

    Recent work indicates that the nuclear envelope is a major signaling node for the cell that can influence tissue differentiation processes. Here we present two nuclear envelope trans-membrane proteins TMEM120A and TMEM120B that are paralogs encoded by the Tmem120A and Tmem120B genes. The TMEM120 proteins are expressed preferentially in fat and both are induced during 3T3-L1 adipocyte differentiation. Knockdown of one or the other protein altered expression of several genes required for adipocyte differentiation, Gata3, Fasn, Glut4, while knockdown of both together additionally affected Pparg and Adipoq. The double knockdown also increased the strength of effects, reducing for example Glut4 levels by 95% compared to control 3T3-L1 cells upon pharmacologically induced differentiation. Accordingly, TMEM120A and B knockdown individually and together impacted on adipocyte differentiation/metabolism as measured by lipid accumulation through binding of Oil Red O and coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy (CARS). The nuclear envelope is linked to several lipodystrophies through mutations in lamin A; however, lamin A is widely expressed. Thus it is possible that the TMEM120A and B fat-specific nuclear envelope transmembrane proteins may play a contributory role in the tissue-specific pathology of this disorder or in the wider problem of obesity. PMID:26024229

  2. Brca2-Pds5 complexes mobilize persistent meiotic recombination sites to the nuclear envelope.

    PubMed

    Kusch, Thomas

    2015-02-15

    Homologous recombination is required for reciprocal exchange between homologous chromosome arms during meiosis. Only select meiotic recombination events become chromosomal crossovers; the majority of recombination outcomes are noncrossovers. Growing evidence suggests that crossovers are repaired after noncrossovers. Here, I report that persisting recombination sites are mobilized to the nuclear envelope of Drosophila pro-oocytes during mid-pachytene. Their number correlates with the average crossover rate per meiosis. Proteomic and interaction studies reveal that the recombination mediator Brca2 associates with lamin and the cohesion factor Pds5 to secure persistent recombination sites at the nuclear envelope. In Rad51(-/-) females, all persistent DNA breaks are directed to the nuclear envelope. By contrast, a reduction of Pds5 or Brca2 levels abolishes the movement and has a negative impact on crossover rates. The data suggest that persistent meiotic DNA double-strand breaks might correspond to crossovers, which are mobilized to the nuclear envelope for their repair. The identification of Brca2-Pds5 complexes as key mediators of this process provides a first mechanistic explanation for the contribution of lamins and cohesins to meiotic recombination.

  3. Organellar proteomics: the prizes and pitfalls of opening the nuclear envelope

    PubMed Central

    Schirmer, Eric C; Gerace, Larry

    2002-01-01

    Proteomic studies have the potential to comprehensively define the composition of organelles but are limited by the organellar cross-contamination that arises during subcellular fractionation. Comparative proteomics of organellar subfractions can mitigate these problems, as demonstrated by a recent study involving the nuclear envelope. PMID:11983061

  4. Phosphoinositide 3-Kinase Beta Protects Nuclear Envelope Integrity by Controlling RCC1 Localization and Ran Activity

    PubMed Central

    Redondo-Muñoz, Javier; Pérez-García, Vicente; Rodríguez, María J.; Valpuesta, José M.

    2014-01-01

    The nuclear envelope (NE) forms a barrier between the nucleus and the cytosol that preserves genomic integrity. The nuclear lamina and nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) are NE components that regulate nuclear events through interaction with other proteins and DNA. Defects in the nuclear lamina are associated with the development of laminopathies. As cells depleted of phosphoinositide 3-kinase beta (PI3Kβ) showed an aberrant nuclear morphology, we studied the contribution of PI3Kβ to maintenance of NE integrity. pik3cb depletion reduced the nuclear membrane tension, triggered formation of areas of lipid bilayer/lamina discontinuity, and impaired NPC assembly. We show that one mechanism for PI3Kβ regulation of NE/NPC integrity is its association with RCC1 (regulator of chromosome condensation 1), the activator of nuclear Ran GTPase. PI3Kβ controls RCC1 binding to chromatin and, in turn, Ran activation. These findings suggest that PI3Kβ regulates the nuclear envelope through upstream regulation of RCC1 and Ran. PMID:25348717

  5. Inner nuclear envelope protein SUN1 plays a prominent role in mammalian mRNA export.

    PubMed

    Li, Ping; Noegel, Angelika A

    2015-11-16

    Nuclear export of messenger ribonucleoproteins (mRNPs) through the nuclear pore complex (NPC) can be roughly classified into two forms: bulk and specific export, involving an nuclear RNA export factor 1 (NXF1)-dependent pathway and chromosome region maintenance 1 (CRM1)-dependent pathway, respectively. SUN proteins constitute the inner nuclear envelope component of the l I: nker of N: ucleoskeleton and C: ytoskeleton (LINC) complex. Here, we show that mammalian cells require SUN1 for efficient nuclear mRNP export. The results indicate that both SUN1 and SUN2 interact with heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) F/H and hnRNP K/J. SUN1 depletion inhibits the mRNP export, with accumulations of both hnRNPs and poly(A)+RNA in the nucleus. Leptomycin B treatment indicates that SUN1 functions in mammalian mRNA export involving the NXF1-dependent pathway. SUN1 mediates mRNA export through its association with mRNP complexes via a direct interaction with NXF1. Additionally, SUN1 associates with the NPC through a direct interaction with Nup153, a nuclear pore component involved in mRNA export. Taken together, our results reveal that the inner nuclear envelope protein SUN1 has additional functions aside from being a central component of the LINC complex and that it is an integral component of the mammalian mRNA export pathway suggesting a model whereby SUN1 recruits NXF1-containing mRNP onto the nuclear envelope and hands it over to Nup153.

  6. Inner nuclear envelope protein SUN1 plays a prominent role in mammalian mRNA export

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ping; Noegel, Angelika A.

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear export of messenger ribonucleoproteins (mRNPs) through the nuclear pore complex (NPC) can be roughly classified into two forms: bulk and specific export, involving an nuclear RNA export factor 1 (NXF1)-dependent pathway and chromosome region maintenance 1 (CRM1)-dependent pathway, respectively. SUN proteins constitute the inner nuclear envelope component of the linker of nucleoskeleton and cytoskeleton (LINC) complex. Here, we show that mammalian cells require SUN1 for efficient nuclear mRNP export. The results indicate that both SUN1 and SUN2 interact with heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) F/H and hnRNP K/J. SUN1 depletion inhibits the mRNP export, with accumulations of both hnRNPs and poly(A)+RNA in the nucleus. Leptomycin B treatment indicates that SUN1 functions in mammalian mRNA export involving the NXF1-dependent pathway. SUN1 mediates mRNA export through its association with mRNP complexes via a direct interaction with NXF1. Additionally, SUN1 associates with the NPC through a direct interaction with Nup153, a nuclear pore component involved in mRNA export. Taken together, our results reveal that the inner nuclear envelope protein SUN1 has additional functions aside from being a central component of the LINC complex and that it is an integral component of the mammalian mRNA export pathway suggesting a model whereby SUN1 recruits NXF1-containing mRNP onto the nuclear envelope and hands it over to Nup153. PMID:26476453

  7. Nuclear transport of cancer extracellular vesicle-derived biomaterials through nuclear envelope invagination-associated late endosomes.

    PubMed

    Rappa, Germana; Santos, Mark F; Green, Toni M; Karbanová, Jana; Hassler, Justin; Bai, Yongsheng; Barsky, Sanford H; Corbeil, Denis; Lorico, Aurelio

    2017-02-28

    Extracellular membrane vesicles (EVs) function as vehicles of intercellular communication, but how the biomaterials they carry reach the target site in recipient cells is an open question. We report that subdomains of Rab7+ late endosomes and nuclear envelope invaginations come together to create a sub-nuclear compartment, where biomaterials associated with CD9+ EVs are delivered. EV-derived biomaterials were also found in the nuclei of host cells. The inhibition of nuclear import and export pathways abrogated the nuclear localization of EV-derived biomaterials or led to their accumulation therein, respectively, suggesting that their translocation is dependent on nuclear pores. Nuclear envelope invagination-associated late endosomes were observed in ex vivo biopsies in both breast carcinoma and associated stromal cells. The transcriptome of stromal cells exposed to cancer cell-derived CD9+ EVs revealed that the regulation of eleven genes, notably those involved in inflammation, relies on the nuclear translocation of EV-derived biomaterials. Our findings uncover a new cellular pathway used by EVs to reach nuclear compartment.

  8. System analysis shows distinct mechanisms and common principles of nuclear envelope protein dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Zuleger, Nikolaj; Kelly, David A.; Richardson, A. Christine; Kerr, Alastair R. W.; Goldberg, Martin W.; Goryachev, Andrew B.

    2011-01-01

    The nuclear envelope contains >100 transmembrane proteins that continuously exchange with the endoplasmic reticulum and move within the nuclear membranes. To better understand the organization and dynamics of this system, we compared the trafficking of 15 integral nuclear envelope proteins using FRAP. A surprising 30-fold range of mobilities was observed. The dynamic behavior of several of these proteins was also analyzed after depletion of ATP and/or Ran, two functions implicated in endoplasmic reticulum–inner nuclear membrane translocation. This revealed that ATP- and Ran-dependent translocation mechanisms are distinct and not used by all inner nuclear membrane proteins. The Ran-dependent mechanism requires the phenylalanine-glycine (FG)-nucleoporin Nup35, which is consistent with use of the nuclear pore complex peripheral channels. Intriguingly, the addition of FGs to membrane proteins reduces FRAP recovery times, and this also depends on Nup35. Modeling of three proteins that were unaffected by either ATP or Ran depletion indicates that the wide range in mobilities could be explained by differences in binding affinities in the inner nuclear membrane. PMID:21444689

  9. Characterization of multiple epoxide hydrolase activities in mouse liver nuclear envelope.

    PubMed

    Guenthner, T M

    1986-10-01

    A nuclear envelope-associated epoxide hydrolase in mouse liver that hydrates trans-stilbene oxide has been identified and characterized. This epoxide hydrolase is distinct from the enzyme in nuclear envelopes that hydrates benzo[a]pyrene 4,5-oxide and other arene oxides. This distinction was demonstrated by the criteria of pH optima, response to specific inhibitors in vitro, and precipitation by specific antibodies. The new epoxide hydrolase had a pH optimum of 6.8, was poorly inhibited by trichloropropene oxide, was potently inhibited by 4-phenylchalcone oxide, and did not bind to antiserum against benzo[a]pyrene 4,5-oxide hydrolase. This nuclear enzyme is similar in many of its properties to cytosolic and microsomal trans-stilbene oxide hydrolases and may be nuclear envelope-bound form of these other epoxide hydrolases. It differed from these other trans-stilbene oxide hydrolases in that its affinities for both trans-stilbene oxide (measured as apparent Km) and 4-phenylchalcone oxide (measured as I50) were 4- to 20-fold lower than those of either the cytosolic or microsomal forms.

  10. Mutational analyses of fs(1)Ya, an essential, developmentally regulated, nuclear envelope protein in Drosophila

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Jun; Song, Kiwon; Wolfner, M.F.

    1995-12-01

    The fs(1)Ya protein (YA) is an essential, maternally encoded, nuclear lamina protein that is under both developmental and cell cycle control. A strong Ya mutation results in early arrest of embryos. To define the function of YA in the nuclear envelope during early embryonic development, we characterized the phenotypes of four Ya mutant alleles and determined their molecular lesions. Ya mutant embryos arrest with abnormal nuclear envelopes prior to the first mitotic division; a proportion of embryos from two leaky Ya mutants proceed beyond this but arrest after several abnormal divisions. Ya unfertilized eggs contain nuclei of different sizes and condensation states, apparently due to abnormal fusion of the meiotic products immediately after meiosis. Lamin is localized at the periphery of the uncondensed nuclei in these eggs. These results suggest that Ya function is required during and after egg maturation to facilitate proper chromatin condensation, rather than to allow a lamin-containing nuclear envelope to form. Two leaky Ya alleles that partially complement have lesions at opposite ends of the YA protein, suggesting that the N- and C-termini are important for YA function might interact with itself either directly or indirectly. 27 refs., 6 figs.

  11. Reduction of a 4q35-encoded nuclear envelope protein in muscle differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Ostlund, Cecilia; Guan, Tinglu; Figlewicz, Denise A.; Hays, Arthur P.; Worman, Howard J.; Gerace, Larry; Schirmer, Eric C.

    2009-11-13

    Muscular dystrophy and peripheral neuropathy have been linked to mutations in genes encoding nuclear envelope proteins; however, the molecular mechanisms underlying these disorders remain unresolved. Nuclear envelope protein p19A is a protein of unknown function encoded by a gene at chromosome 4q35. p19A levels are significantly reduced in human muscle as cells differentiate from myoblasts to myotubes; however, its levels are not similarly reduced in all differentiation systems tested. Because 4q35 has been linked to facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) and some adjacent genes are reportedly misregulated in the disorder, levels of p19A were analyzed in muscle samples from patients with FSHD. Although p19A was increased in most cases, an absolute correlation was not observed. Nonetheless, p19A downregulation in normal muscle differentiation suggests that in the cases where its gene is inappropriately re-activated it could affect muscle differentiation and contribute to disease pathology.

  12. AIM2 inflammasome is activated by pharmacological disruption of nuclear envelope integrity

    PubMed Central

    Di Micco, Antonia; Frera, Gianluca; Lugrin, Jérôme; Jamilloux, Yvan; Hsu, Erh-Ting; Tardivel, Aubry; De Gassart, Aude; Zaffalon, Léa; Bujisic, Bojan; Siegert, Stefanie; Quadroni, Manfredo; Broz, Petr; Henry, Thomas; Hrycyna, Christine A.

    2016-01-01

    Inflammasomes are critical sensors that convey cellular stress and pathogen presence to the immune system by activating inflammatory caspases and cytokines such as IL-1β. The nature of endogenous stress signals that activate inflammasomes remains unclear. Here we show that an inhibitor of the HIV aspartyl protease, Nelfinavir, triggers inflammasome formation and elicits an IL-1R–dependent inflammation in mice. We found that Nelfinavir impaired the maturation of lamin A, a structural component of the nuclear envelope, thereby promoting the release of DNA in the cytosol. Moreover, deficiency of the cytosolic DNA-sensor AIM2 impaired Nelfinavir-mediated inflammasome activation. These findings identify a pharmacologic activator of inflammasome and demonstrate the role of AIM2 in detecting endogenous DNA release upon perturbation of nuclear envelope integrity. PMID:27462105

  13. Modeling meiotic chromosome pairing: nuclear envelope attachment, telomere-led active random motion, and anomalous diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, Wallace F.; Fung, Jennifer C.

    2016-04-01

    The recognition and pairing of homologous chromosomes during meiosis is a complex physical and molecular process involving a combination of polymer dynamics and molecular recognition events. Two highly conserved features of meiotic chromosome behavior are the attachment of telomeres to the nuclear envelope and the active random motion of telomeres driven by their interaction with cytoskeletal motor proteins. Both of these features have been proposed to facilitate the process of homolog pairing, but exactly what role these features play in meiosis remains poorly understood. Here we investigate the roles of active motion and nuclear envelope tethering using a Brownian dynamics simulation in which meiotic chromosomes are represented by a Rouse polymer model subjected to tethering and active forces at the telomeres. We find that tethering telomeres to the nuclear envelope slows down pairing relative to the rates achieved by unattached chromosomes, but that randomly directed active forces applied to the telomeres speed up pairing dramatically in a manner that depends on the statistical properties of the telomere force fluctuations. The increased rate of initial pairing cannot be explained by stretching out of the chromosome conformation but instead seems to correlate with anomalous diffusion of sub-telomeric regions.

  14. Modeling meiotic chromosome pairing: nuclear envelope attachment, telomere-led active random motion, and anomalous diffusion

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, Wallace F.; Fung, Jennifer C.

    2016-01-01

    The recognition and pairing of homologous chromosomes during meiosis is a complex physical and molecular process involving a combination of polymer dynamics and molecular recognition events. Two highly conserved features of meiotic chromosome behavior are the attachment of telomeres to the nuclear envelope and the active random motion of telomeres driven by their interaction with cytoskeletal motor proteins. Both of these features have been proposed to facilitate the process of homolog pairing, but exactly what role these features play in meiosis remains poorly understood. Here we investigate the roles of active motion and nuclear envelope tethering using a Brownian dynamics simulation in which meiotic chromosomes are represented by a Rouse polymer model subjected to tethering and active forces at the telomeres. We find that tethering telomeres to the nuclear envelope slows down pairing relative to the rates achieved by un-attached chromosomes, but that randomly-directed active forces applied to the telomeres speeds up pairing dramatically in a manner that depends on the statistical properties of the telomere force fluctuations. The increased rate of initial pairing cannot be explained by stretching out of the chromosome conformation but instead seems to correlate with anomalous diffusion of sub-telomeric regions. PMID:27046097

  15. Nuclear transport defects and nuclear envelope alterations are associated with mutation of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae NPL4 gene.

    PubMed Central

    DeHoratius, C; Silver, P A

    1996-01-01

    To identify components involved in nuclear protein import, we used a genetic selection to isolate mutants that mislocalized a nuclear-targeted protein. We identified temperature-sensitive mutants that accumulated several different nuclear proteins in the cytoplasm when shifted to the semipermissive temperature of 30 degrees C; these were termed npl (nuclear protein localization) mutants. We now present the properties of yeast strains bearing mutations in the NPL4 gene and report the cloning of the NPL4 gene and the characterization of the Np14 protein. The npl4-1 mutant was isolated by the previously described selection scheme. The second allele, npl4-2, was identified from an independently derived collection of temperature-sensitive mutants. The npl4-1 and npl4-2 strains accumulate nuclear-targeted proteins in the cytoplasm at the nonpermissive temperature consistent with a defect in nuclear protein import. Using an in vitro nuclear import assay, we show that nuclei prepared from temperature-shifted npl4 mutant cells are unable to import nuclear-targeted proteins, even in the presence of cytosol prepared from wild-type cells. In addition, npl4-2 cells accumulate poly(A)+ RNA in the nucleus at the nonpermissive temperature, consistent with a failure to export mRNA from the nucleus. The npl4-1 and npl4-2 cells also exhibit distinct, temperature-sensitive structural defects: npl4-1 cells project extra nuclear envelope into the cytoplasm, whereas npl4-2 cells from nuclear envelope herniations that appear to be filled with poly(A)+ RNA. The NPL4 gene encodes an essential M(r) 64,000 protein that is located at the nuclear periphery and localizes in a pattern similar to nuclear pore complex proteins. Taken together, these results indicate that this gene encodes a novel nuclear pore complex or nuclear pore complex-associated component required for nuclear membrane integrity and nuclear transport. Images PMID:8930904

  16. Comparative proteomic analyses of the nuclear envelope and pore complex suggests a wide range of heretofore unexpected functions.

    PubMed

    Batrakou, Dzmitry G; Kerr, Alastair R W; Schirmer, Eric C

    2009-02-15

    Since the discovery of several inherited diseases linked to the nuclear envelope the number of functions ascribed to this subcellular organelle has skyrocketed. However the molecular pathways underlying these functions are not clear in most cases, perhaps because of missing components. Several recent proteomic analyses of the nuclear envelope and nuclear pore complex proteomes have yielded not only enough missing components to potentially elucidate these pathways, but suggest an exponentially greater number of functions at the nuclear periphery than ever imagined. Many of these functions appear to derive from recapitulation of pathways utilized at the plasma membrane and from other membrane systems. Additionally, many proteins identified in the comparative nuclear envelope studies have sequence characteristics suggesting that they might also contribute to nuclear pore complex functions. In particular, the striking enrichment for proteins in the nuclear envelope fractions that carry phenylalanine-glycine (FG) repeats may be significant for the mechanism of nuclear transport. In retrospect, these findings are only surprising in context of the notion held for many years that the nuclear envelope was only a barrier protecting the genome. In fact, it is arguably the most complex membrane organelle in the cell.

  17. Aurora B–mediated localized delays in nuclear envelope formation facilitate inclusion of late-segregating chromosome fragments

    PubMed Central

    Karg, Travis; Warecki, Brandt; Sullivan, William

    2015-01-01

    To determine how chromosome segregation is coordinated with nuclear envelope formation (NEF), we examined the dynamics of NEF in the presence of lagging acentric chromosomes in Drosophila neuroblasts. Acentric chromosomes often exhibit delayed but ultimately successful segregation and incorporation into daughter nuclei. However, it is unknown whether these late-segregating acentric fragments influence NEF to ensure their inclusion in daughter nuclei. Through live analysis, we show that acentric chromosomes induce highly localized delays in the reassembly of the nuclear envelope. These delays result in a gap in the nuclear envelope that facilitates the inclusion of lagging acentrics into telophase daughter nuclei. Localized delays of nuclear envelope reassembly require Aurora B kinase activity. In cells with reduced Aurora B activity, there is a decrease in the frequency of local nuclear envelope reassembly delays, resulting in an increase in the frequency of acentric-bearing, lamin-coated micronuclei. These studies reveal a novel role of Aurora B in maintaining genomic integrity by promoting the formation of a passageway in the nuclear envelope through which late-segregating acentric chromosomes enter the telophase daughter nucleus. PMID:25877868

  18. The nuclear envelope protein Nesprin-2 has roles in cell proliferation and differentiation during wound healing.

    PubMed

    Rashmi, R N; Eckes, Beate; Glöckner, Gernot; Groth, Marco; Neumann, Sascha; Gloy, Joachim; Sellin, Lorenz; Walz, Gerd; Schneider, Maria; Karakesisoglou, Iakowos; Eichinger, Ludwig; Noegel, Angelika A

    2012-03-01

    Nesprin-2, a type II transmembrane protein of the nuclear envelope, is a component of the LINC complex that connects the nuclear lamina with the actin cytoskeleton. To elucidate its physiological role we studied wound healing in Nesprin-2 Giant deficient mice and found that a loss of the protein affected wound healing particularly at later stages during fibroblast differentiation and keratinocyte proliferation leading to delayed wound closure. We identified altered expression and localization of transcription factors as one of the underlying mechanisms. Furthermore, the actin cytoskeleton which surrounds the nucleus was altered and keratinocyte migration was slowed down and focal adhesion formation enhanced. We also uncovered a new activity of Nesprin-2. When we probed for an interaction of Nesprin-2 Giant with chromatin we observed in ChIP Seq experiments an association of the protein with heterochromatic and centromeric DNA. Through this activity Nesprin-2 can affect the nuclear landscape and gene regulation. Our findings suggest functions for Nesprin-2 at the nuclear envelope (NE) in gene regulation and in regulation of the actin cytoskeleton which impact on wound healing.

  19. Untethering the Nuclear Envelope and Cytoskeleton: Biologically Distinct Dystonias Arising from a Common Cellular Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Atai, Nadia A.; Ryan, Scott D.; Kothary, Rashmi; Breakefield, Xandra O.; Nery, Flávia C.

    2012-01-01

    Most cases of early onset DYT1 dystonia in humans are caused by a GAG deletion in the TOR1A gene leading to loss of a glutamic acid (ΔE) in the torsinA protein, which underlies a movement disorder associated with neuronal dysfunction without apparent neurodegeneration. Mutation/deletion of the gene (Dst) encoding dystonin in mice results in a dystonic movement disorder termed dystonia musculorum, which resembles aspects of dystonia in humans. While torsinA and dystonin proteins do not share modular domain architecture, they participate in a similar function by modulating a structural link between the nuclear envelope and the cytoskeleton in neuronal cells. We suggest that through a shared interaction with the nuclear envelope protein nesprin-3α, torsinA and the neuronal dystonin-a2 isoform comprise a bridge complex between the outer nuclear membrane and the cytoskeleton, which is critical for some aspects of neuronal development and function. Elucidation of the overlapping roles of torsinA and dystonin-a2 in nuclear/endoplasmic reticulum dynamics should provide insights into the cellular mechanisms underlying the dystonic phenotype. PMID:22611399

  20. The nuclear envelope protein Nesprin-2 has roles in cell proliferation and differentiation during wound healing

    PubMed Central

    Rashmi, R.N.; Eckes, Beate; Glöckner, Gernot; Groth, Marco; Neumann, Sascha; Gloy, Joachim; Sellin, Lorenz; Walz, Gerd; Schneider, Maria; Karakesisoglou, Iakowos; Eichinger, Ludwig; Noegel, Angelika A.

    2012-01-01

    Nesprin-2, a type II transmembrane protein of the nuclear envelope, is a component of the LINC complex that connects the nuclear lamina with the actin cytoskeleton. To elucidate its physiological role we studied wound healing in Nesprin-2 Giant deficient mice and found that a loss of the protein affected wound healing particularly at later stages during fibroblast differentiation and keratinocyte proliferation leading to delayed wound closure. We identified altered expression and localization of transcription factors as one of the underlying mechanisms. Furthermore, the actin cytoskeleton which surrounds the nucleus was altered and keratinocyte migration was slowed down and focal adhesion formation enhanced. We also uncovered a new activity of Nesprin-2. When we probed for an interaction of Nesprin-2 Giant with chromatin we observed in ChIP Seq experiments an association of the protein with heterochromatic and centromeric DNA. Through this activity Nesprin-2 can affect the nuclear landscape and gene regulation. Our findings suggest functions for Nesprin-2 at the nuclear envelope (NE) in gene regulation and in regulation of the actin cytoskeleton which impact on wound healing. PMID:22198684

  1. Glimpsing over the event horizon: evolution of nuclear pores and envelope.

    PubMed

    Jékely, Gáspár

    2005-02-01

    The origin of eukaryotes from prokaryotic ancestors is one of the major evolutionary transitions in the history of life. The nucleus, a membrane bound compartment for confining the genome, is a central feature of eukaryotic cells and its origin also has to be a central feature of any workable theory that ventures to explain eukaryotic origins. Recent bioinformatic analyses of components of the nuclear pore complex (NPC), the nuclear envelope (NE), and the nuclear transport systems revealed exciting evolutionary connections (e.g., between NPC and coated vesicles) and provided a useful record of the phyletic distribution and history of NPC and NE components. These analyses allow us to refine theories on the origin and evolution of the nucleus, and consequently, of the eukaryotic cell.

  2. Nuclear envelope rupture is induced by actin-based nucleus confinement.

    PubMed

    Hatch, Emily M; Hetzer, Martin W

    2016-10-10

    Repeated rounds of nuclear envelope (NE) rupture and repair have been observed in laminopathy and cancer cells and result in intermittent loss of nucleus compartmentalization. Currently, the causes of NE rupture are unclear. Here, we show that NE rupture in cancer cells relies on the assembly of contractile actin bundles that interact with the nucleus via the linker of nucleoskeleton and cytoskeleton (LINC) complex. We found that the loss of actin bundles or the LINC complex did not rescue nuclear lamina defects, a previously identified determinant of nuclear membrane stability, but did decrease the number and size of chromatin hernias. Finally, NE rupture inhibition could be rescued in cells treated with actin-depolymerizing drugs by mechanically constraining nucleus height. These data suggest a model of NE rupture where weak membrane areas, caused by defects in lamina organization, rupture because of an increase in intranuclear pressure from actin-based nucleus confinement.

  3. Nuclear envelope expansion is crucial for proper chromosomal segregation during a closed mitosis.

    PubMed

    Takemoto, Ai; Kawashima, Shigehiro A; Li, Juan-Juan; Jeffery, Linda; Yamatsugu, Kenzo; Elemento, Olivier; Nurse, Paul

    2016-03-15

    Here, we screened a 10,371 library of diverse molecules using a drug-sensitive fission yeast strain to identify compounds which cause defects in chromosome segregation during mitosis. We identified a phosphorium-ylide-based compound Cutin-1 which inhibits nuclear envelope expansion and nuclear elongation during the closed mitosis of fission yeast, and showed that its target is the β-subunit of fatty acid synthase. A point mutation in the dehydratase domain of Fas1 conferred in vivo and in vitro resistance to Cutin-1. Time-lapse photomicrography showed that the bulk of the chromosomes were only transiently separated during mitosis, and nucleoli separation was defective. Subsequently sister chromatids re-associated leading to chromosomal mis-segregation. These segregation defects were reduced when the nuclear volume was increased and were increased when the nuclear volume was reduced. We propose that there needs to be sufficient nuclear volume to allow the nuclear elongation necessary during a closed mitosis to take place for proper chromosome segregation, and that inhibition of fatty acid synthase compromises nuclear elongation and leads to defects in chromosomal segregation.

  4. Kar5p is required for multiple functions in both inner and outer nuclear envelope fusion in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Jason V; Rose, Mark D

    2014-12-02

    During mating in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, two haploid nuclei fuse via two sequential membrane fusion steps. SNAREs (i.e., soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptors) and Prm3p mediate outer nuclear membrane fusion, but the inner membrane fusogen remains unknown. Kar5p is a highly conserved transmembrane protein that localizes adjacent to the spindle pole body (SPB), mediates nuclear envelope fusion, and recruits Prm3p adjacent to the SPB. To separate Kar5p's functions, we tested localization, Prm3p recruitment, and nuclear fusion efficiency in various kar5 mutants. All domains and the conserved cysteine residues were essential for nuclear fusion. Several kar5 mutant proteins localized properly but did not mediate Prm3p recruitment; other kar5 mutant proteins localized and recruited Prm3p but were nevertheless defective for nuclear fusion, demonstrating additional functions beyond Prm3p recruitment. We identified one Kar5p domain required for SPB localization, which is dependent on the half-bridge protein Mps3p. Electron microscopy revealed a kar5 mutant that arrests with expanded nuclear envelope bridges, suggesting that Kar5p is required after outer nuclear envelope fusion. Finally, a split-GFP assay demonstrated that Kar5p localizes to both the inner and outer nuclear envelope. These insights suggest a mechanism by which Kar5p mediates inner nuclear membrane fusion.

  5. Loss of the integral nuclear envelope protein SUN1 induces alteration of nucleoli.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Ayaka; Sakamoto, Chiyomi; Matsumori, Haruka; Katahira, Jun; Yasuda, Yoko; Yoshidome, Katsuhide; Tsujimoto, Masahiko; Goldberg, Ilya G; Matsuura, Nariaki; Nakao, Mitsuyoshi; Saitoh, Noriko; Hieda, Miki

    2016-01-01

    A supervised machine learning algorithm, which is qualified for image classification and analyzing similarities, is based on multiple discriminative morphological features that are automatically assembled during the learning processes. The algorithm is suitable for population-based analysis of images of biological materials that are generally complex and heterogeneous. Here we used the algorithm wndchrm to quantify the effects on nucleolar morphology of the loss of the components of nuclear envelope in a human mammary epithelial cell line. The linker of nucleoskeleton and cytoskeleton (LINC) complex, an assembly of nuclear envelope proteins comprising mainly members of the SUN and nesprin families, connects the nuclear lamina and cytoskeletal filaments. The components of the LINC complex are markedly deficient in breast cancer tissues. We found that a reduction in the levels of SUN1, SUN2, and lamin A/C led to significant changes in morphologies that were computationally classified using wndchrm with approximately 100% accuracy. In particular, depletion of SUN1 caused nucleolar hypertrophy and reduced rRNA synthesis. Further, wndchrm revealed a consistent negative correlation between SUN1 expression and the size of nucleoli in human breast cancer tissues. Our unbiased morphological quantitation strategies using wndchrm revealed an unexpected link between the components of the LINC complex and the morphologies of nucleoli that serves as an indicator of the malignant phenotype of breast cancer cells.

  6. Loss of the integral nuclear envelope protein SUN1 induces alteration of nucleoli

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, Ayaka; Sakamoto, Chiyomi; Matsumori, Haruka; Katahira, Jun; Yasuda, Yoko; Yoshidome, Katsuhide; Tsujimoto, Masahiko; Goldberg, Ilya G; Matsuura, Nariaki; Nakao, Mitsuyoshi; Saitoh, Noriko; Hieda, Miki

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT A supervised machine learning algorithm, which is qualified for image classification and analyzing similarities, is based on multiple discriminative morphological features that are automatically assembled during the learning processes. The algorithm is suitable for population-based analysis of images of biological materials that are generally complex and heterogeneous. Here we used the algorithm wndchrm to quantify the effects on nucleolar morphology of the loss of the components of nuclear envelope in a human mammary epithelial cell line. The linker of nucleoskeleton and cytoskeleton (LINC) complex, an assembly of nuclear envelope proteins comprising mainly members of the SUN and nesprin families, connects the nuclear lamina and cytoskeletal filaments. The components of the LINC complex are markedly deficient in breast cancer tissues. We found that a reduction in the levels of SUN1, SUN2, and lamin A/C led to significant changes in morphologies that were computationally classified using wndchrm with approximately 100% accuracy. In particular, depletion of SUN1 caused nucleolar hypertrophy and reduced rRNA synthesis. Further, wndchrm revealed a consistent negative correlation between SUN1 expression and the size of nucleoli in human breast cancer tissues. Our unbiased morphological quantitation strategies using wndchrm revealed an unexpected link between the components of the LINC complex and the morphologies of nucleoli that serves as an indicator of the malignant phenotype of breast cancer cells. PMID:26962703

  7. Exploring laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy for nuclear materials analysis and in-situ applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Madhavi Z.; Allman, Steve; Brice, Deanne J.; Martin, Rodger C.; Andre, Nicolas O.

    2012-08-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) has been used to determine the limits of detection of strontium (Sr) and cesium (Cs), common nuclear fission products. Additionally, detection limits were determined for cerium (Ce), often used as a surrogate for radioactive plutonium in laboratory studies. Results were obtained using a laboratory instrument with a Nd:YAG laser at fundamental wavelength of 1064 nm, frequency doubled to 532 nm with energy of 50 mJ/pulse. The data was compared for different concentrations of Sr and Ce dispersed in a CaCO3 (white) and carbon (black) matrix. We have addressed the sampling errors, limits of detection, reproducibility, and accuracy of measurements as they relate to multivariate analysis in pellets that were doped with the different elements at various concentrations. These results demonstrate that LIBS technique is inherently well suited for in situ analysis of nuclear materials in hot cells. Three key advantages are evident: (1) small samples (mg) can be evaluated; (2) nuclear materials can be analyzed with minimal sample preparation; and (3) samples can be remotely analyzed very rapidly (ms-seconds). Our studies also show that the methods can be made quantitative. Very robust multivariate models have been used to provide quantitative measurement and statistical evaluation of complex materials derived from our previous research on wood and soil samples.

  8. The nuclear envelope lamina network has elasticity and a compressibility limit suggestive of a molecular shock absorber.

    PubMed

    Dahl, Kris Noel; Kahn, Samuel M; Wilson, Katherine L; Discher, Dennis E

    2004-09-15

    Mechanical properties of the nuclear envelope have implications for cell and nuclear architecture as well as gene regulation. Using isolated Xenopus oocyte nuclei, we have established swelling conditions that separate the intact nuclear envelope (membranes, pore complexes and underlying lamin filament network) from nucleoplasm and the majority of chromatin. Swelling proves reversible with addition of high molecular mass dextrans. Micropipette aspiration of swollen and unswollen nuclear envelopes is also reversible and yields a network elastic modulus, unaffected by nucleoplasm, that averages 25 mN/m. Compared to plasma membranes of cells, the nuclear envelope is much stiffer and more resilient. Our results suggest that the nuclear lamina forms a compressed network shell of interconnected rods that is extensible but limited in compressibility from the native state, thus acting as a 'molecular shock absorber'. In light of the conservation of B-type lamins in metazoan evolution, the mechanical properties determined in this investigation suggest physical mechanisms by which mutated lamins can either destabilize nuclear architecture or influence nuclear responses to mechanical signals in Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy, cardiomyopathy, progeria syndromes (premature 'aging') and other laminopathies.

  9. Alterations of nuclear envelope and chromatin organization in mandibuloacral dysplasia, a rare form of laminopathy.

    PubMed

    Filesi, Ilaria; Gullotta, Francesca; Lattanzi, Giovanna; D'Apice, Maria Rosaria; Capanni, Cristina; Nardone, Anna Maria; Columbaro, Marta; Scarano, Gioacchino; Mattioli, Elisabetta; Sabatelli, Patrizia; Maraldi, Nadir M; Biocca, Silvia; Novelli, Giuseppe

    2005-10-17

    Autosomal recessive mandibuloacral dysplasia [mandibuloacral dysplasia type A (MADA); Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) no. 248370] is caused by a mutation in LMNA encoding lamin A/C. Here we show that this mutation causes accumulation of the lamin A precursor protein, a marked alteration of the nuclear architecture and, hence, chromatin disorganization. Heterochromatin domains are altered or completely lost in MADA nuclei, consistent with the finding that heterochromatin-associated protein HP1beta and histone H3 methylated at lysine 9 and their nuclear envelope partner protein lamin B receptor (LBR) are delocalized and solubilized. Both accumulation of lamin A precursor and chromatin defects become more severe in older patients. These results strongly suggest that altered chromatin remodeling is a key event in the cascade of epigenetic events causing MADA and could be related to the premature-aging phenotype.

  10. Transmembrane protein TMEM170A is a newly discovered regulator of ER and nuclear envelope morphogenesis in human cells.

    PubMed

    Christodoulou, Andri; Santarella-Mellwig, Rachel; Santama, Niovi; Mattaj, Iain W

    2016-04-15

    The mechanism of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) morphogenesis is incompletely understood. ER tubules are shaped by the reticulons (RTNs) and DP1/Yop1p family members, but the mechanism of ER sheet formation is much less clear. Here, we characterize TMEM170A, a human transmembrane protein, which localizes in ER and nuclear envelope membranes. Silencing or overexpressing TMEM170A in HeLa K cells alters ER shape and morphology. Ultrastructural analysis reveals that downregulation of TMEM170A specifically induces tubular ER formation, whereas overexpression of TMEM170A induces ER sheet formation, indicating that TMEM170A is a newly discovered ER-sheet-promoting protein. Additionally, downregulation of TMEM170A alters nuclear shape and size, decreases the density of nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) in the nuclear envelope and causes either a reduction in inner nuclear membrane (INM) proteins or their relocalization to the ER. TMEM170A interacts with RTN4, a member of the reticulon family; simultaneous co-silencing of TMEM170A and RTN4 rescues ER, NPC and nuclear-envelope-related phenotypes, implying that the two proteins have antagonistic effects on ER membrane organization, and nuclear envelope and NPC formation.

  11. The tethering of chromatin to the nuclear envelope supports nuclear mechanics

    PubMed Central

    Schreiner, Sarah M.; Koo, Peter K.; Zhao, Yao; Mochrie, Simon G. J.; King, Megan C.

    2015-01-01

    The nuclear lamina is thought to be the primary mechanical defence of the nucleus. However, the lamina is integrated within a network of lipids, proteins and chromatin; the interdependence of this network poses a challenge to defining the individual mechanical contributions of these components. Here, we isolate the role of chromatin in nuclear mechanics by using a system lacking lamins. Using novel imaging analyses, we observe that untethering chromatin from the inner nuclear membrane results in highly deformable nuclei in vivo, particularly in response to cytoskeletal forces. Using optical tweezers, we find that isolated nuclei lacking inner nuclear membrane tethers are less stiff than wild-type nuclei and exhibit increased chromatin flow, particularly in frequency ranges that recapitulate the kinetics of cytoskeletal dynamics. We suggest that modulating chromatin flow can define both transient and long-lived changes in nuclear shape that are biologically important and may be altered in disease. PMID:26074052

  12. Expression of Leukemia-Associated Nup98 Fusion Proteins Generates an Aberrant Nuclear Envelope Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Fahrenkrog, Birthe; Martinelli, Valérie; Nilles, Nadine; Fruhmann, Gernot; Chatel, Guillaume; Juge, Sabine; Sauder, Ursula; Di Giacomo, Danika; Mecucci, Cristina; Schwaller, Jürg

    2016-01-01

    Chromosomal translocations involving the nucleoporin NUP98 have been described in several hematopoietic malignancies, in particular acute myeloid leukemia (AML). In the resulting chimeric proteins, Nup98's N-terminal region is fused to the C-terminal region of about 30 different partners, including homeodomain (HD) transcription factors. While transcriptional targets of distinct Nup98 chimeras related to immortalization are relatively well described, little is known about other potential cellular effects of these fusion proteins. By comparing the sub-nuclear localization of a large number of Nup98 fusions with HD and non-HD partners throughout the cell cycle we found that while all Nup98 chimeras were nuclear during interphase, only Nup98-HD fusion proteins exhibited a characteristic speckled appearance. During mitosis, only Nup98-HD fusions were concentrated on chromosomes. Despite the difference in localization, all tested Nup98 chimera provoked morphological alterations in the nuclear envelope (NE), in particular affecting the nuclear lamina and the lamina-associated polypeptide 2α (LAP2α). Importantly, such aberrations were not only observed in transiently transfected HeLa cells but also in mouse bone marrow cells immortalized by Nup98 fusions and in cells derived from leukemia patients harboring Nup98 fusions. Our findings unravel Nup98 fusion-associated NE alterations that may contribute to leukemogenesis. PMID:27031510

  13. Expression of Leukemia-Associated Nup98 Fusion Proteins Generates an Aberrant Nuclear Envelope Phenotype.

    PubMed

    Fahrenkrog, Birthe; Martinelli, Valérie; Nilles, Nadine; Fruhmann, Gernot; Chatel, Guillaume; Juge, Sabine; Sauder, Ursula; Di Giacomo, Danika; Mecucci, Cristina; Schwaller, Jürg

    2016-01-01

    Chromosomal translocations involving the nucleoporin NUP98 have been described in several hematopoietic malignancies, in particular acute myeloid leukemia (AML). In the resulting chimeric proteins, Nup98's N-terminal region is fused to the C-terminal region of about 30 different partners, including homeodomain (HD) transcription factors. While transcriptional targets of distinct Nup98 chimeras related to immortalization are relatively well described, little is known about other potential cellular effects of these fusion proteins. By comparing the sub-nuclear localization of a large number of Nup98 fusions with HD and non-HD partners throughout the cell cycle we found that while all Nup98 chimeras were nuclear during interphase, only Nup98-HD fusion proteins exhibited a characteristic speckled appearance. During mitosis, only Nup98-HD fusions were concentrated on chromosomes. Despite the difference in localization, all tested Nup98 chimera provoked morphological alterations in the nuclear envelope (NE), in particular affecting the nuclear lamina and the lamina-associated polypeptide 2α (LAP2α). Importantly, such aberrations were not only observed in transiently transfected HeLa cells but also in mouse bone marrow cells immortalized by Nup98 fusions and in cells derived from leukemia patients harboring Nup98 fusions. Our findings unravel Nup98 fusion-associated NE alterations that may contribute to leukemogenesis.

  14. Nuclear Envelope Retention of LINC Complexes Is Promoted by SUN-1 Oligomerization in the Caenorhabditis elegans Germ Line

    PubMed Central

    Daryabeigi, Anahita; Woglar, Alexander; Baudrimont, Antoine; Silva, Nicola; Paouneskou, Dimitra; Vesely, Cornelia; Rauter, Manuel; Penkner, Alexandra; Jantsch, Michael; Jantsch, Verena

    2016-01-01

    SUN (Sad1 and UNC-84) and KASH (Klarsicht, ANC-1, and Syne homology) proteins are constituents of the inner and outer nuclear membranes. They interact in the perinuclear space via C-terminal SUN-KASH domains to form the linker of nucleoskeleton and cytoskeleton (LINC) complex thereby bridging the nuclear envelope. LINC complexes mediate numerous biological processes by connecting chromatin with the cytoplasmic force-generating machinery. Here we show that the coiled-coil domains of SUN-1 are required for oligomerization and retention of the protein in the nuclear envelope, especially at later stages of female gametogenesis. Consistently, deletion of the coiled-coil domain makes SUN-1 sensitive to unilateral force exposure across the nuclear membrane. Premature loss of SUN-1 from the nuclear envelope leads to embryonic death due to loss of centrosome–nuclear envelope attachment. However, in contrast to previous notions we can show that the coiled-coil domain is dispensable for functional LINC complex formation, exemplified by successful chromosome sorting and synapsis in meiotic prophase I in its absence. PMID:27098914

  15. Structure of Sad1-UNC84 homology (SUN) domain defines features of molecular bridge in nuclear envelope.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhaocai; Du, Xiulian; Cai, Zheng; Song, Xiaomin; Zhang, Hongtao; Mizuno, Takako; Suzuki, Emi; Yee, Marla Rosanne; Berezov, Alan; Murali, Ramachandran; Wu, Shiaw-Lin; Karger, Barry L; Greene, Mark I; Wang, Qiang

    2012-02-17

    The SUN (Sad1-UNC-84 homology) domain is conserved in a number of nuclear envelope proteins involved in nuclear migration, meiotic telomere tethering, and antiviral responses. The LINC (linker of nucleoskeleton and cytoskeleton) complex, formed by the SUN and the nesprin proteins at the nuclear envelope, serves as a mechanical linkage across the nuclear envelope. Here we report the crystal structure of the SUN2 protein SUN domain, which reveals a homotrimer. The SUN domain is sufficient to mediate binding to the KASH (Klarsicht, ANC-1, and Syne homology) domain of nesprin 2, and the regions involved in the interaction have been identified. Binding of the SUN domain to the KASH domain is abolished by deletion of a region important for trimerization or by point mutations associated with nuclear migration failure. We propose a model of the LINC complex, where the SUN and the KASH domains form a higher ordered oligomeric network in the nuclear envelope. These findings provide the structural basis for understanding the function and the regulation of the LINC complex.

  16. Dysregulated interactions between lamin A and SUN1 induce abnormalities in the nuclear envelope and endoplasmic reticulum in progeric laminopathies.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zi-Jie; Wang, Wan-Ping; Chen, Yu-Ching; Wang, Jing-Ya; Lin, Wen-Hsin; Tai, Lin-Ai; Liou, Gan-Guang; Yang, Chung-Shi; Chi, Ya-Hui

    2014-04-15

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is a human progeroid disease caused by a point mutation on the LMNA gene. We reported previously that the accumulation of the nuclear envelope protein SUN1 contributes to HGPS nuclear aberrancies. However, the mechanism by which interactions between mutant lamin A (also known as progerin or LAΔ50) and SUN1 produce HGPS cellular phenotypes requires further elucidation. Using light and electron microscopy, this study demonstrated that SUN1 contributes to progerin-elicited structural changes in the nuclear envelope and the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) network. We further identified two domains through which full-length lamin A associates with SUN1, and determined that the farnesylated cysteine within the CaaX motif of lamin A has a stronger affinity for SUN1 than does the lamin A region containing amino acids 607 to 656. Farnesylation of progerin enhanced its interaction with SUN1 and reduced SUN1 mobility, thereby promoting the aberrant recruitment of progerin to the ER membrane during postmitotic assembly of the nuclear envelope, resulting in the accumulation of SUN1 over consecutive cellular divisions. These results indicate that the dysregulated interaction of SUN1 and progerin in the ER during nuclear envelope reformation determines the progression of HGPS.

  17. Immunohistochemistry on a panel of Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy samples reveals nuclear envelope proteins as inconsistent markers for pathology.

    PubMed

    Le Thanh, Phu; Meinke, Peter; Korfali, Nadia; Srsen, Vlastimil; Robson, Michael I; Wehnert, Manfred; Schoser, Benedikt; Sewry, Caroline A; Schirmer, Eric C

    2017-04-01

    Reports of aberrant distribution for some nuclear envelope proteins in cells expressing a few Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy mutations raised the possibility that such protein redistribution could underlie pathology and/or be diagnostic. However, this disorder is linked to 8 different genes encoding nuclear envelope proteins, raising the question of whether a particular protein is most relevant. Therefore, myoblast/fibroblast cultures from biopsy and tissue sections from a panel of nine Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy patients (4 male, 5 female) including those carrying emerin and FHL1 (X-linked) and several lamin A (autosomal dominant) mutations were stained for the proteins linked to the disorder. As tissue-specific nuclear envelope proteins have been postulated to mediate the tissue-specific pathologies of different nuclear envelopathies, patient samples were also stained for several muscle-specific nuclear membrane proteins. Although linked proteins nesprin 1 and SUN2 and muscle-specific proteins NET5/Samp1 and Tmem214 yielded aberrant distributions in individual patient cells, none exhibited defects through the larger patient panel. Muscle-specific Tmem38A normally appeared in both the nuclear envelope and sarcoplasmic reticulum, but most patient samples exhibited a moderate redistribution favouring the sarcoplasmic reticulum. The absence of striking uniform defects in nuclear envelope protein distribution indicates that such staining will be unavailing for general diagnostics, though it remains possible that specific mutations exhibiting protein distribution defects might reflect a particular clinical variant. These findings further argue that multiple pathways can lead to the generally similar pathologies of this disorder while at the same time the different cellular phenotypes observed possibly may help explain the considerable clinical variation of EDMD.

  18. The Malleable Nature of the Budding Yeast Nuclear Envelope: Flares, Fusion, and Fenestrations.

    PubMed

    Meseroll, Rebecca A; Cohen-Fix, Orna

    2016-11-01

    In eukaryotes, the nuclear envelope (NE) physically separates nuclear components and activities from rest of the cell. The NE also provides rigidity to the nucleus and contributes to chromosome organization. At the same time, the NE is highly dynamic; it must change shape and rearrange its components during development and throughout the cell cycle, and its morphology can be altered in response to mutation and disease. Here we focus on the NE of budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, which has several unique features: it remains intact throughout the cell cycle, expands symmetrically during interphase, elongates during mitosis and, expands asymmetrically during mitotic delay. Moreover, its NE is safely breached during mating and when large structures, such as nuclear pore complexes and the spindle pole body, are embedded into its double membrane. The budding yeast NE lacks lamins and yet the nucleus is capable of maintaining a spherical shape throughout interphase. Despite these eccentricities, studies of the budding yeast NE have uncovered interesting, and likely conserved, processes that contribute to NE dynamics. In particular, we discuss the processes that drive and enable NE expansion and the dramatic changes in the NE that lead to extensions and fenestrations. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 2353-2360, 2016. Published 2016. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  19. Human Cytomegalovirus Nuclear Egress Proteins Ectopically Expressed in the Heterologous Environment of Plant Cells are Strictly Targeted to the Nuclear Envelope.

    PubMed

    Lamm, Christian E; Link, Katrin; Wagner, Sabrina; Milbradt, Jens; Marschall, Manfred; Sonnewald, Uwe

    2016-03-10

    In all eukaryotic cells, the nucleus forms a prominent cellular compartment containing the cell's nuclear genome. Although structurally similar, animal and plant nuclei differ substantially in details of their architecture. One example is the nuclear lamina, a layer of tightly interconnected filament proteins (lamins) underlying the nuclear envelope of metazoans. So far no orthologous lamin genes could be detected in plant genomes and putative lamin-like proteins are only poorly described in plants. To probe for potentially conserved features of metazoan and plant nuclear envelopes, we ectopically expressed the core nuclear egress proteins of human cytomegalovirus pUL50 and pUL53 in plant cells. pUL50 localizes to the inner envelope of metazoan nuclei and recruits the nuclear localized pUL53 to it, forming heterodimers. Upon expression in plant cells, a very similar localization pattern of both proteins could be determined. Notably, pUL50 is specifically targeted to the plant nuclear envelope in a rim-like fashion, a location to which coexpressed pUL53 becomes strictly corecruited from its initial nucleoplasmic distribution. Using pUL50 as bait in a yeast two-hybrid screening, the cytoplasmic re-initiation supporting protein RISP could be identified. Interaction of pUL50 and RISP could be confirmed by coexpression and coimmunoprecipitation in mammalian cells and by confocal laser scanning microscopy in plant cells, demonstrating partial pUL50-RISP colocalization in areas of the nuclear rim and other intracellular compartments. Thus, our study provides strong evidence for conserved structural features of plant and metazoan nuclear envelops and identifies RISP as a potential pUL50-interacting plant protein.

  20. LEM2 recruits CHMP7 for ESCRT-mediated nuclear envelope closure in fission yeast and human cells.

    PubMed

    Gu, Mingyu; LaJoie, Dollie; Chen, Opal S; von Appen, Alexander; Ladinsky, Mark S; Redd, Michael J; Nikolova, Linda; Bjorkman, Pamela J; Sundquist, Wesley I; Ullman, Katharine S; Frost, Adam

    2017-03-14

    Endosomal sorting complexes required for transport III (ESCRT-III) proteins have been implicated in sealing the nuclear envelope in mammals, spindle pole body dynamics in fission yeast, and surveillance of defective nuclear pore complexes in budding yeast. Here, we report that Lem2p (LEM2), a member of the LEM (Lap2-Emerin-Man1) family of inner nuclear membrane proteins, and the ESCRT-II/ESCRT-III hybrid protein Cmp7p (CHMP7), work together to recruit additional ESCRT-III proteins to holes in the nuclear membrane. In Schizosaccharomyces pombe, deletion of the ATPase vps4 leads to severe defects in nuclear morphology and integrity. These phenotypes are suppressed by loss-of-function mutations that arise spontaneously in lem2 or cmp7, implying that these proteins may function upstream in the same pathway. Building on these genetic interactions, we explored the role of LEM2 during nuclear envelope reformation in human cells. We found that CHMP7 and LEM2 enrich at the same region of the chromatin disk periphery during this window of cell division and that CHMP7 can bind directly to the C-terminal domain of LEM2 in vitro. We further found that, during nuclear envelope formation, recruitment of the ESCRT factors CHMP7, CHMP2A, and IST1/CHMP8 all depend on LEM2 in human cells. We conclude that Lem2p/LEM2 is a conserved nuclear site-specific adaptor that recruits Cmp7p/CHMP7 and downstream ESCRT factors to the nuclear envelope.

  1. LEM2 recruits CHMP7 for ESCRT-mediated nuclear envelope closure in fission yeast and human cells

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Mingyu; LaJoie, Dollie; Chen, Opal S.; von Appen, Alexander; Ladinsky, Mark S.; Redd, Michael J.; Nikolova, Linda; Bjorkman, Pamela J.; Sundquist, Wesley I.; Ullman, Katharine S.; Frost, Adam

    2017-01-01

    Endosomal sorting complexes required for transport III (ESCRT-III) proteins have been implicated in sealing the nuclear envelope in mammals, spindle pole body dynamics in fission yeast, and surveillance of defective nuclear pore complexes in budding yeast. Here, we report that Lem2p (LEM2), a member of the LEM (Lap2-Emerin-Man1) family of inner nuclear membrane proteins, and the ESCRT-II/ESCRT-III hybrid protein Cmp7p (CHMP7), work together to recruit additional ESCRT-III proteins to holes in the nuclear membrane. In Schizosaccharomyces pombe, deletion of the ATPase vps4 leads to severe defects in nuclear morphology and integrity. These phenotypes are suppressed by loss-of-function mutations that arise spontaneously in lem2 or cmp7, implying that these proteins may function upstream in the same pathway. Building on these genetic interactions, we explored the role of LEM2 during nuclear envelope reformation in human cells. We found that CHMP7 and LEM2 enrich at the same region of the chromatin disk periphery during this window of cell division and that CHMP7 can bind directly to the C-terminal domain of LEM2 in vitro. We further found that, during nuclear envelope formation, recruitment of the ESCRT factors CHMP7, CHMP2A, and IST1/CHMP8 all depend on LEM2 in human cells. We conclude that Lem2p/LEM2 is a conserved nuclear site-specific adaptor that recruits Cmp7p/CHMP7 and downstream ESCRT factors to the nuclear envelope. PMID:28242692

  2. The spindle pole body of Schizosaccharomyces pombe enters and leaves the nuclear envelope as the cell cycle proceeds.

    PubMed Central

    Ding, R; West, R R; Morphew, D M; Oakley, B R; McIntosh, J R

    1997-01-01

    The cycle of spindle pole body (SPB) duplication, differentiation, and segregation in Schizosaccharomyces pombe is different from that in some other yeasts. Like the centrosome of vertebrate cells, the SPB of S. pombe spends most of interphase in the cytoplasm, immediately next to the nuclear envelope. Some gamma-tubulin is localized on the SPB, suggesting that it plays a role in the organization of interphase microtubules (MTs), and serial sections demonstrate that some interphase MTs end on or very near to the SPB. gamma-Tubulin is also found on osmiophilic material that lies near the inner surface of the nuclear envelope, immediately adjacent to the SPB, even though there are no MTs in the interphase nucleus. Apparently, the MT initiation activities of gamma-tubulin in S. pombe are regulated. The SPB duplicates in the cytoplasm during late G2 phase, and the two resulting structures are connected by a darkly staining bridge until the mitotic spindle forms. As the cell enters mitosis, the nuclear envelope invaginates beside the SPB, forming a pocket of cytoplasm that accumulates dark amorphous material. The nuclear envelope then opens to form a fenestra, and the duplicated SPB settles into it. Each part of the SPB initiates intranuclear MTs, and then the two structures separate to lie in distinct fenestrae as a bipolar spindle forms. Through metaphase, the SPBs remain in their fenestrae, bound to the polar ends of spindle MTs; at about this time, a small bundle of cytoplasmic MTs forms in association with each SPB. These MTs are situated with one end near to, but not on, the SPBs, and they project into the cytoplasm at an orientation that is oblique to the simple axis. As anaphase proceeds, the nuclear fenestrae close, and the SPBs are extruded back into the cytoplasm. These observations define new fields of enquiry about the control of SPB duplication and the dynamics of the nuclear envelope. Images PMID:9285819

  3. AFM visualization of sub-50nm polyplex disposition to the nuclear pore complex without compromising the integrity of the nuclear envelope.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Helene; Parhamifar, Ladan; Hunter, A Christy; Shahin, Victor; Moghimi, S Moein

    2016-12-28

    It has been questioned as to whether polyplexes in the cytoplasm can reach the nuclear compartment and if so in what form. By applying atomic force microscopy (AFM) to the nuclear envelope and the nuclear pore complexes, we demonstrate that disposition of polyethylenimine (PEI)/DNA polyplexes that were microinjected into the oocytes of Xenopus laevis, as an example of a non-dividing cell, is exclusive to the nuclear pore complex (NPC). AFM images show NPCs clogged only with sub-50nm polyplexes. This mode of disposition neither altered the morphology/integrity of the nuclear membrane nor the NPC. AFM images further show polyplexes on the nucleoplasmic side of the envelope, presumably indicating species in transit. Transmission electron microscopy studies of ruptured nuclei from transfected human cell lines demonstrate the presence of sub-50nm particles resembling polyplexes in morphology compared with control preparations.

  4. Differential nuclear envelope assembly at the end of mitosis in suspension-cultured Apium graveolens cells.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Yuta; Kuroda, Chie; Masuda, Kiyoshi

    2010-04-01

    NMCP1 is a plant protein that has a long coiled-coil domain within the molecule. Newly identified NMCP2 of Daucus carota and Apium graveolens showed similar peripheral localization in the interphase nucleus, and the sequence spanning the coiled-coil domain exhibited significant similarity with the corresponding region of NMCP1. To better understand disassembly and assembly of the nuclear envelope (NE) during mitosis, subcellular distribution of NMCP1 and NMCP2 was examined using A. graveolens cells. AgNMCP1 (NMCP1 in Apium) disassembled at prometaphase, dispersed mainly within the spindle, and accumulated on segregating chromosomes, while AgNMCP2 (NMCP2 in Apium), following disassembly at prometaphase with timing similar to that of AgNMCP1, dispersed throughout the mitotic cytoplasm at metaphase and anaphase. The protein accumulated at the periphery of reforming nuclei at telophase. A probe for the endomembrane indicated that the nuclear membrane (NM) disappears at prometaphase and begins to reappear at early telophase. Growth of the NM continued after mitosis was completed. NMCP2 in the mitotic cytoplasm localized in vesicular structures that could be distinguished from the bulk endomembrane system. These results suggest that NMCP1 and NMCP2 are recruited for NE assembly in different pathways in mitosis and that NMCP2 associates with NM-derived vesicles in the mitotic cytoplasm.

  5. Dissecting Torsin/cofactor function at the nuclear envelope: a genetic study

    PubMed Central

    Laudermilch, Ethan; Tsai, Pei-Ling; Graham, Morven; Turner, Elizabeth; Zhao, Chenguang; Schlieker, Christian

    2016-01-01

    The human genome encodes four Torsin ATPases, the functions of which are poorly understood. In this study, we use CRISPR/Cas9 engineering to delete all four Torsin ATPases individually and in combination. Using nuclear envelope (NE) blebbing as a phenotypic measure, we establish a direct correlation between the number of inactivated Torsin alleles and the occurrence of omega-shaped herniations within the lumen of the NE. A similar, although not identical, redundancy is observed for LAP1 and LULL1, which serve as regulatory cofactors for a subset of Torsin ATPases. Unexpectedly, deletion of Tor2A in a TorA/B/3A-deficient background results in a stark increase of bleb formation, even though Tor2A does not respond to LAP1/LULL1 stimulation. The robustness of the observed phenotype in Torsin-deficient cells enables a structural analysis via electron microscopy tomography and a compositional analysis via immunogold labeling. Ubiquitin and nucleoporins were identified as distinctively localizing components of the omega-shaped bleb structure. These findings suggest a functional link between the Torsin/cofactor system and NE/nuclear pore complex biogenesis or homeostasis and establish a Torsin-deficient cell line as a valuable experimental platform with which to decipher Torsin function. PMID:27798237

  6. Acute Manipulation of Diacylglycerol Reveals Roles in Nuclear Envelope Assembly & Endoplasmic Reticulum Morphology

    PubMed Central

    Peddie, Christopher J.; Chung, Gary H. C.; Wang, Alan; Yeh, Karen; Jethwa, Nirmal; Zhang, Qifeng; Wakelam, Michael J. O.; Woscholski, Rudiger; Byrne, Richard D.; Collinson, Lucy M.; Poccia, Dominic L.; Larijani, Banafshé

    2012-01-01

    The functions and morphology of cellular membranes are intimately related and depend not only on their protein content but also on the repertoire of lipids that comprise them. In the absence of in vivo data on lipid asymmetry in endomembranes, it has been argued that motors, scaffolding proteins or integral membrane proteins rather than non-lamellar bilayer lipids such as diacylglycerol (DAG), are responsible for shaping of organelles, local membrane curvature and fusion. The effects of direct alteration of levels of such lipids remain predominantly uninvestigated. Diacylglycerol (DAG) is a well documented second messenger. Here we demonstrate two additional conserved functions of DAG: a structural role in organelle morphology, and a role in localised extreme membrane curvature required for fusion for which proteins alone are insufficient. Acute and inducible DAG depletion results in failure of the nuclear envelope (NE) to reform at mitosis and reorganisation of the ER into multi-lamellar sheets as revealed by correlative light and electron microscopy and 3D reconstructions. Remarkably, depleted cells divide without a complete NE, and unless rescued by 1,2 or 1,3 DAG soon die. Attenuation of DAG levels by enzyme microinjection into echinoderm eggs and embryos also results in alterations of ER morphology and nuclear membrane fusion. Our findings demonstrate that DAG is an in vivo modulator of organelle morphology in mammalian and echinoderm cells, indicating a fundamental role conserved across the deuterostome superphylum. PMID:23227247

  7. Muscular Dystrophy Mutations Impair the Nuclear Envelope Emerin Self-assembly Properties.

    PubMed

    Herrada, Isaline; Samson, Camille; Velours, Christophe; Renault, Louis; Östlund, Cecilia; Chervy, Pierre; Puchkov, Dmytro; Worman, Howard J; Buendia, Brigitte; Zinn-Justin, Sophie

    2015-12-18

    More than 100 genetic mutations causing X-linked Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy have been identified in the gene encoding the integral inner nuclear membrane protein emerin. Most mutations are nonsense or frameshift mutations that lead to the absence of emerin in cells. Only very few cases are due to missense or short in-frame deletions. Molecular mechanisms explaining the corresponding emerin variants' loss of function are particularly difficult to identify because of the mostly intrinsically disordered state of the emerin nucleoplasmic region. We now demonstrate that this EmN region can be produced as a disordered monomer, as revealed by nuclear magnetic resonance, but rapidly self-assembles in vitro. Increases in concentration and temperature favor the formation of long curvilinear filaments with diameters of approximately 10 nm, as observed by electron microscopy. Assembly of these filaments can be followed by fluorescence through Thioflavin-T binding and by Fourier-transform Infrared spectrometry through formation of β-structures. Analysis of the assembly properties of five EmN variants reveals that del95-99 and Q133H impact filament assembly capacities. In cells, these variants are located at the nuclear envelope, but the corresponding quantities of emerin-emerin and emerin-lamin proximities are decreased compared to wild-type protein. Furthermore, variant P183H favors EmN aggregation in vitro, and variant P183T provokes emerin accumulation in cytoplasmic foci in cells. Substitution of residue Pro183 might systematically favor oligomerization, leading to emerin aggregation and mislocalization in cells. Our results suggest that emerin self-assembly is necessary for its proper function and that a loss of either the protein itself or its ability to self-assemble causes muscular dystrophy.

  8. The spindle pole bodies facilitate nuclear envelope division during closed mitosis in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Liling; Schwartz, Cindi; Magidson, Valentin; Khodjakov, Alexey; Oliferenko, Snezhana

    2007-07-01

    Many organisms divide chromosomes within the confines of the nuclear envelope (NE) in a process known as closed mitosis. Thus, they must ensure coordination between segregation of the genetic material and division of the NE itself. Although many years of work have led to a reasonably clear understanding of mitotic spindle function in chromosome segregation, the NE division mechanism remains obscure. Here, we show that fission yeast cells overexpressing the transforming acid coiled coil (TACC)-related protein, Mia1p/Alp7p, failed to separate the spindle pole bodies (SPBs) at the onset of mitosis, but could assemble acentrosomal bipolar and antiparallel spindle structures. Most of these cells arrested in anaphase with fully extended spindles and nonsegregated chromosomes. Spindle poles that lacked the SPBs did not lead the division of the NE during spindle elongation, but deformed it, trapping the chromosomes within. When the SPBs were severed by laser microsurgery in wild-type cells, we observed analogous deformations of the NE by elongating spindle remnants, resulting in NE division failure. Analysis of dis1Delta cells that elongate spindles despite unattached kinetochores indicated that the SPBs were required for maintaining nuclear shape at anaphase onset. Strikingly, when the NE was disassembled by utilizing a temperature-sensitive allele of the Ran GEF, Pim1p, the abnormal spindles induced by Mia1p overexpression were capable of segregating sister chromatids to daughter cells, suggesting that the failure to divide the NE prevents chromosome partitioning. Our results imply that the SPBs preclude deformation of the NE during spindle elongation and thus serve as specialized structures enabling nuclear division during closed mitosis in fission yeast.

  9. Membrane Binding by CHMP7 Coordinates ESCRT-III-Dependent Nuclear Envelope Reformation.

    PubMed

    Olmos, Yolanda; Perdrix-Rosell, Anna; Carlton, Jeremy G

    2016-10-10

    In addition to its role in membrane abscission during cytokinesis, viral budding, endosomal sorting, and plasma membrane repair [1], the endosomal sorting complex required for transport-III (ESCRT-III) machinery has recently been shown to seal holes in the reforming nuclear envelope (NE) during mitotic exit [2, 3]. ESCRT-III also acts during interphase to repair the NE upon migration-induced rupture [4, 5], highlighting its key role as an orchestrator of membrane integrity at this organelle. While NE localization of ESCRT-III is dependent upon the ESCRT-III component CHMP7 [3], it is unclear how this complex is able to engage nuclear membranes. Here we show that the N terminus of CHMP7 acts as a novel membrane-binding module. This membrane-binding ability allows CHMP7 to bind to the ER, an organelle continuous with the NE, and it provides a platform to direct NE recruitment of ESCRT-III during mitotic exit. CHMP7's N terminus comprises tandem Winged-Helix domains [6], and, by using homology modeling and structure-function analysis, we identify point mutations that disrupt membrane binding and prevent both ER localization of CHMP7 and its subsequent enrichment at the reforming NE. These mutations also prevent assembly of downstream ESCRT-III components at the reforming NE and proper establishment of post-mitotic nucleo-cytoplasmic compartmentalization. These data identify a novel membrane-binding activity within an ESCRT-III subunit that is essential for post-mitotic nuclear regeneration.

  10. Integrating complex functions: coordination of nuclear pore complex assembly and membrane expansion of the nuclear envelope requires a family of integral membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Schneiter, Roger; Cole, Charles N

    2010-01-01

    The nuclear envelope harbors numerous large proteinaceous channels, the nuclear pore complexes (NPCs), through which macromolecular exchange between the cytosol and the nucleoplasm occurs. This double-membrane nuclear envelope is continuous with the endoplasmic reticulum and thus functionally connected to such diverse processes as vesicular transport, protein maturation and lipid synthesis. Recent results obtained from studies in Saccharomyces cerevisiae indicate that assembly of the nuclear pore complex is functionally dependent upon maintenance of lipid homeostasis of the ER membrane. Previous work from one of our laboratories has revealed that an integral membrane protein Apq12 is important for the assembly of functional nuclear pores. Cells lacking APQ12 are viable but cannot grow at low temperatures, have aberrant NPCs and a defect in mRNA export. Remarkably, these defects in NPC assembly can be overcome by supplementing cells with a membrane fluidizing agent, benzyl alcohol, suggesting that Apq12 impacts the flexibility of the nuclear membrane, possibly by adjusting its lipid composition when cells are shifted to a reduced temperature. Our new study now expands these findings and reveals that an essential membrane protein, Brr6, shares at least partially overlapping functions with Apq12 and is also required for assembly of functional NPCs. A third nuclear envelope membrane protein, Brl1, is related to Brr6, and is also required for NPC assembly. Because maintenance of membrane homeostasis is essential for cellular survival, the fact that these three proteins are conserved in fungi that undergo closed mitoses, but are not found in metazoans or plants, may indicate that their functions are performed by proteins unrelated at the primary sequence level to Brr6, Brl1 and Apq12 in cells that disassemble their nuclear envelopes during mitosis.

  11. Distinct ion channel classes are expressed on the outer nuclear envelope of T- and B-lymphocyte cell lines.

    PubMed Central

    Franco-Obregón, A; Wang, H W; Clapham, D E

    2000-01-01

    The outer nuclear membrane, endoplasmic reticulum, and mitochondrial membrane ion channels are poorly understood, although they are important in the control of compartmental calcium levels, cell division, and apoptosis. Few direct recordings of these ion channels have been made because of the difficulty of accessing these intracellular membranes. Using patch-clamp techniques on isolated nuclei, we measured distinct ion channel classes on the outer nuclear envelope of T-cell (human Jurkat) and BFL5 cell (murine promyelocyte) lines. We first imaged the nuclear envelopes of both Jurkat and FL5 cells with atomic force microscopy to determine the density of pore proteins. The nuclear pore complex was intact at roughly similar densities in both cell types. In patch-clamp recordings of Jurkat nuclear membranes, Cl channels (105 +/- 5 pS) predominated and inactivated with negative pipette potentials. Nucleotides transiently inhibited the anion channel. In contrast, FL5 nuclear channels were cation selective (52 +/- 2 pS), were inactivated with positive membrane potentials, and were insensitive to GTPgammaS applied to the bath. We hypothesize that T- and B-cell nuclear membrane channels are distinct, and that this is perhaps related to their unique roles in the immune system. PMID:10866948

  12. Effects of 2-acetylaminofluorene, dietary fats and antioxidants on nuclear envelope cytochrome P-450

    SciTech Connect

    Carubelli, R.; Graham, S.A.; Griffin, M.J.; McCay, P.B.

    1986-05-01

    The authors reported a marked loss of cytochrome P-450 in hepatic nuclear envelope (NE) but not in microsomes of male Sprague-Dawley rats fed a semipurified diet containing 0.05% w/w 2-acetylaminofluorene (AAF) for 3 weeks. This may reflect loss of NE capacity to detoxify AAF metabolites generated by microsomal P-450. They are now investigating if dietary effects such as progressive decrease in the incidence of AAF-induced tumors in rats fed high polyunsaturated fat diet (HPUF) vs. high saturated fat diet (HSF) vs. low fat diet (LF), and the anticarcinogenic activity of butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT; 0.3% w/w) correlate with preservation of NE P-450. Rats fed AAF HSF (25.6% w/w corn oil) showed marked loss of NE P-450 after 3 weeks; BHT protected against this loss. Rats fed AAF in HSF (25.6% w/w; 18 parts beef tallow + 2 parts corn oil), on the other hand, experienced a marked drop in NE P-450 after 9 weeks; BHT protected against this loss. Comparison of NE P-450 levels in control rats fed HPUF or HSF for 3 weeks with those of rats fed a semipurified diet with 10% fat or Purina chow (ca. 5% fat), support the prediction of an inverse correlation between the levels of dietary fat and the NE P-450 content. Studies on AAF and BHT effects using LF (2% w/w corn oil) are in progress.

  13. Dystonin/Bpag1 is a necessary endoplasmic reticulum/nuclear envelope protein in sensory neurons

    SciTech Connect

    Young, Kevin G.; Kothary, Rashmi

    2008-09-10

    Dystonin/Bpag1 proteins are cytoskeletal linkers whose loss of function in mice results in a hereditary sensory neuropathy with a progressive loss of limb coordination starting in the second week of life. These mice, named dystonia musculorum (dt), succumb to the disease and die of unknown causes prior to sexual maturity. Previous evidence indicated that cytoskeletal defects in the axon are a primary cause of dt neurodegeneration. However, more recent data suggests that other factors may be equally important contributors to the disease process. In the present study, we demonstrate perikaryal defects in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons at stages preceding the onset of loss of limb coordination in dt mice. Abnormalities include alterations in endoplasmic reticulum (ER) chaperone protein expression, indicative of an ER stress response. Dystonin in sensory neurons localized in association with the ER and nuclear envelope (NE). A fusion protein ofthe dystonin-a2 isoform, which harbors an N-terminal transmembrane domain, associated with and reorganized the ER in cell culture. This isoform also interacts with the NE protein nesprin-3{alpha}, but not nesprin-3{beta}. Defects in dt mice, as demonstrated here, may ultimately result in pathogenesis involving ER dysfunction and contribute significantly to the dt phenotype.

  14. Preparation and mechanism insight of nuclear envelope-like polymer vesicles for facile loading of biomacromolecules and enhanced biocatalytic activity.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yunqing; Wang, Fangyingkai; Zhang, Cong; Du, Jianzhong

    2014-07-22

    The facile loading of sensitive and fragile biomacromolecules, such as glucose oxidase, hemoglobin, and ribonucleic acid (RNA), via synthetic vehicles directly in pure aqueous media is an important technical challenge. Inspired by the nucleus pore complex that connects the cell nucleus and the cytoplasm across the nuclear envelope, here we describe the development of a kind of polymeric nuclear envelope-like vesicle (NEV) to address this problem. The NEV is tailored to form the polymer pore complex (70 nm, similar to a nucleus pore complex) within the vesicle membrane based on nanophase segregation, which is confirmed via fluorescence spectrometry and dynamic light scattering (DLS) during self-assembly. This pH-triggered polymer pore complex can mediate the transportation of biomacromolecules across the vesicle membrane. Moreover, the NEVs facilitate the natural consecutive enzyme-catalyzed reactions via the H(+) sponge effect. This simple strategy might also be extended for mimicking other synthetic cell organelles.

  15. Nuclear envelope proteins modulate proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells during cyclic stretch application.

    PubMed

    Qi, Ying-Xin; Yao, Qing-Ping; Huang, Kai; Shi, Qian; Zhang, Ping; Wang, Guo-Liang; Han, Yue; Bao, Han; Wang, Lu; Li, Hai-Peng; Shen, Bao-Rong; Wang, Yingxiao; Chien, Shu; Jiang, Zong-Lai

    2016-05-10

    Cyclic stretch is an important inducer of vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) proliferation, which is crucial in vascular remodeling during hypertension. However, the molecular mechanism remains unclear. We studied the effects of emerin and lamin A/C, two important nuclear envelope proteins, on VSMC proliferation in hypertension and the underlying mechano-mechanisms. In common carotid artery of hypertensive rats in vivo and in cultured cells subjected to high (15%) cyclic stretch in vitro, VSMC proliferation was increased significantly, and the expression of emerin and lamin A/C was repressed compared with normotensive or normal (5%) cyclic stretch controls. Using targeted siRNA to mimic the repressed expression of emerin or lamin A/C induced by 15% stretch, we found that VSMC proliferation was enhanced under static and 5%-stretch conditions. Overexpression of emerin or lamin A/C reversed VSMC proliferation induced by 15% stretch. Hence, emerin and lamin A/C play critical roles in suppressing VSMC hyperproliferation induced by hyperstretch. ChIP-on-chip and MOTIF analyses showed that the DNAs binding with emerin contain three transcription factor motifs: CCNGGA, CCMGCC, and ABTTCCG; DNAs binding with lamin A/C contain the motifs CVGGAA, GCCGCYGC, and DAAGAAA. Protein/DNA array proved that altered emerin or lamin A/C expression modulated the activation of various transcription factors. Furthermore, accelerating local expression of emerin or lamin A/C reversed cell proliferation in the carotid artery of hypertensive rats in vivo. Our findings establish the pathogenetic role of emerin and lamin A/C repression in stretch-induced VSMC proliferation and suggest mechanobiological mechanism underlying this process that involves the sequence-specific binding of emerin and lamin A/C to specific transcription factor motifs.

  16. Quantified effects of chromosome-nuclear envelope attachments on 3D organization of chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Kinney, Nicholas Allen; Onufriev, Alexey V; Sharakhov, Igor V

    2015-01-01

    We use a combined experimental and computational approach to study the effects of chromosome-nuclear envelope (Chr-NE) attachments on the 3D genome organization of Drosophila melanogaster (fruit fly) salivary gland nuclei. We consider 3 distinct models: a Null model - without specific Chr-NE attachments, a 15-attachment model - with 15 previously known Chr-NE attachments, and a 48-attachment model - with 15 original and 33 recently identified Chr-NE attachments. The radial densities of chromosomes in the models are compared to the densities observed in 100 experimental images of optically sectioned salivary gland nuclei forming "z-stacks." Most of the experimental z-stacks support the Chr-NE 48-attachment model suggesting that as many as 48 chromosome loci with appreciable affinity for the NE are necessary to reproduce the experimentally observed distribution of chromosome density in fruit fly nuclei. Next, we investigate if and how the presence and the number of Chr-NE attachments affect several key characteristics of 3D genome organization: chromosome territories and gene-gene contacts. This analysis leads to novel insight about the possible role of Chr-NE attachments in regulating the genome architecture. Specifically, we find that model nuclei with more numerous Chr-NE attachments form more distinct chromosome territories and their chromosomes intertwine less frequently. Intra-chromosome and intra-arm contacts are more common in model nuclei with Chr-NE attachments compared to the Null model (no specific attachments), while inter-chromosome and inter-arm contacts are less common in nuclei with Chr-NE attachments. We demonstrate that Chr-NE attachments increase the specificity of long-range inter-chromosome and inter-arm contacts. The predicted effects of Chr-NE attachments are rationalized by intuitive volume vs. surface accessibility arguments.

  17. Nuclear envelope proteins modulate proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells during cyclic stretch application

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Ying-Xin; Yao, Qing-Ping; Huang, Kai; Shi, Qian; Zhang, Ping; Wang, Guo-Liang; Han, Yue; Bao, Han; Wang, Lu; Li, Hai-Peng; Shen, Bao-Rong; Wang, Yingxiao; Chien, Shu; Jiang, Zong-Lai

    2016-01-01

    Cyclic stretch is an important inducer of vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) proliferation, which is crucial in vascular remodeling during hypertension. However, the molecular mechanism remains unclear. We studied the effects of emerin and lamin A/C, two important nuclear envelope proteins, on VSMC proliferation in hypertension and the underlying mechano-mechanisms. In common carotid artery of hypertensive rats in vivo and in cultured cells subjected to high (15%) cyclic stretch in vitro, VSMC proliferation was increased significantly, and the expression of emerin and lamin A/C was repressed compared with normotensive or normal (5%) cyclic stretch controls. Using targeted siRNA to mimic the repressed expression of emerin or lamin A/C induced by 15% stretch, we found that VSMC proliferation was enhanced under static and 5%-stretch conditions. Overexpression of emerin or lamin A/C reversed VSMC proliferation induced by 15% stretch. Hence, emerin and lamin A/C play critical roles in suppressing VSMC hyperproliferation induced by hyperstretch. ChIP-on-chip and MOTIF analyses showed that the DNAs binding with emerin contain three transcription factor motifs: CCNGGA, CCMGCC, and ABTTCCG; DNAs binding with lamin A/C contain the motifs CVGGAA, GCCGCYGC, and DAAGAAA. Protein/DNA array proved that altered emerin or lamin A/C expression modulated the activation of various transcription factors. Furthermore, accelerating local expression of emerin or lamin A/C reversed cell proliferation in the carotid artery of hypertensive rats in vivo. Our findings establish the pathogenetic role of emerin and lamin A/C repression in stretch-induced VSMC proliferation and suggest mechanobiological mechanism underlying this process that involves the sequence-specific binding of emerin and lamin A/C to specific transcription factor motifs. PMID:27114541

  18. Myopathy in Marinesco-Sjögren syndrome links endoplasmic reticulum chaperone dysfunction to nuclear envelope pathology.

    PubMed

    Roos, Andreas; Buchkremer, Stephan; Kollipara, Laxmikanth; Labisch, Thomas; Gatz, Christian; Zitzelsberger, Manuela; Brauers, Eva; Nolte, Kay; Schröder, J Michael; Kirschner, Janbernd; Jesse, Christopher Marvin; Goebel, Hans Hilmar; Goswami, Anand; Zimmermann, Richard; Zahedi, René Peiman; Senderek, Jan; Weis, Joachim

    2014-05-01

    Marinesco-Sjögren syndrome (MSS) features cerebellar ataxia, mental retardation, cataracts, and progressive vacuolar myopathy with peculiar myonuclear alterations. Most MSS patients carry homozygous or compound heterozygous SIL1 mutations. SIL1 is a nucleotide exchange factor for the endoplasmic reticulum resident chaperone BiP which controls a plethora of essential processes in the endoplasmic reticulum. In this study we made use of the spontaneous Sil1 mouse mutant woozy to explore pathomechanisms leading to Sil1 deficiency-related skeletal muscle pathology. We found severe, progressive myopathy characterized by alterations of the sarcoplasmic reticulum, accumulation of autophagic vacuoles, mitochondrial changes, and prominent myonuclear pathology including nuclear envelope and nuclear lamina alterations. These abnormalities were remarkably similar to the myopathy in human patients with MSS. In particular, the presence of perinuclear membranous structures which have been reported as an ultrastructural hallmark of MSS-related myopathy could be confirmed in woozy muscles. We found that these structures are derived from the nuclear envelope and nuclear lamina and associate with proliferations of the sarcoplasmic reticulum. In line with impaired function of BiP secondary to loss of its nucleotide exchange factor Sil1, we observed activation of the unfolded protein response and the endoplasmic-reticulum-associated protein degradation-pathway. Despite initiation of the autophagy-lysosomal system, autophagic clearance was found ineffective which is in agreement with the formation of autophagic vacuoles. This report identifies woozy muscle as a faithful phenocopy of the MSS myopathy. Moreover, we provide a link between two well-established disease mechanisms in skeletal muscle, dysfunction of chaperones and nuclear envelope pathology.

  19. Caspase-mediated cleavage of C53/LZAP protein causes abnormal microtubule bundling and rupture of the nuclear envelope.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jianchun; Jiang, Hai; Luo, Shouqing; Zhang, Mingsheng; Zhang, Yinghua; Sun, Fei; Huang, Shuang; Li, Honglin

    2013-05-01

    Apoptotic nucleus undergoes distinct morphological and biochemical changes including nuclear shrinkage, chromatin condensation and DNA fragmentation, which are attributed to caspase-mediated cleavage of several nuclear substrates such as lamins. As most of active caspases reside in the cytoplasm, disruption of the nuclear-cytoplasmic barrier is essential for caspases to reach their nuclear targets. The prevailing proposed mechanism is that the increase in the permeability of nuclear pores induced by caspases allows the caspases and other apoptotic factors to diffuse into the nucleus, thereby resulting in the nuclear destruction. Here, we report a novel observation that physical rupture of the nuclear envelope (NE) occurs in the early stage of apoptosis. We found that the NE rupture was caused by caspase-mediated cleavage of C53/LZAP, a protein that has been implicated in various signaling pathways, including NF-κB signaling and DNA damage response, as well as tumorigenesis and metastasis. We also demonstrated that C53/LZAP bound indirectly to the microtubule (MT), and expression of the C53/LZAP cleavage product caused abnormal MT bundling and NE rupture. Taken together, our findings suggest a novel role of C53/LZAP in the regulation of MT dynamics and NE structure during apoptotic cell death. Our study may provide an additional mechanism for disruption of the nuclear-cytoplasmic barrier during apoptosis.

  20. Caspase-mediated cleavage of C53/LZAP protein causes abnormal microtubule bundling and rupture of the nuclear envelope

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jianchun; Jiang, Hai; Luo, Shouqing; Zhang, Mingsheng; Zhang, Yinghua; Sun, Fei; Huang, Shuang; Li, Honglin

    2013-01-01

    Apoptotic nucleus undergoes distinct morphological and biochemical changes including nuclear shrinkage, chromatin condensation and DNA fragmentation, which are attributed to caspase-mediated cleavage of several nuclear substrates such as lamins. As most of active caspases reside in the cytoplasm, disruption of the nuclear-cytoplasmic barrier is essential for caspases to reach their nuclear targets. The prevailing proposed mechanism is that the increase in the permeability of nuclear pores induced by caspases allows the caspases and other apoptotic factors to diffuse into the nucleus, thereby resulting in the nuclear destruction. Here, we report a novel observation that physical rupture of the nuclear envelope (NE) occurs in the early stage of apoptosis. We found that the NE rupture was caused by caspase-mediated cleavage of C53/LZAP, a protein that has been implicated in various signaling pathways, including NF-κB signaling and DNA damage response, as well as tumorigenesis and metastasis. We also demonstrated that C53/LZAP bound indirectly to the microtubule (MT), and expression of the C53/LZAP cleavage product caused abnormal MT bundling and NE rupture. Taken together, our findings suggest a novel role of C53/LZAP in the regulation of MT dynamics and NE structure during apoptotic cell death. Our study may provide an additional mechanism for disruption of the nuclear-cytoplasmic barrier during apoptosis. PMID:23478299

  1. B-type nuclear lamin and the nuclear pore complex Nup107-160 influences maintenance of the spindle envelope required for cytokinesis in Drosophila male meiosis

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Daisuke; Tanabe, Karin; Katsube, Hiroka

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT In higher eukaryotes, nuclear envelope (NE) disassembly allows chromatin to condense and spindle microtubules to access kinetochores. The nuclear lamina, which strengthens the NE, is composed of a polymer meshwork made of A- and B-type lamins. We found that the B-type lamin (Lam) is not fully disassembled and continues to localize along the spindle envelope structure during Drosophila male meiosis I, while the A-type lamin (LamC) is completely dispersed throughout the cytoplasm. Among the nuclear pore complex proteins, Nup107 co-localized with Lam during this meiotic division. Surprisingly, Lam depletion resulted in a higher frequency of cytokinesis failure in male meiosis. We also observed the similar meiotic phenotype in Nup107-depleted cells. Abnormal localization of Lam was found in the Nup-depleted cells at premeiotic and meiotic stages. The central spindle microtubules became abnormal and recruitment of a contractile ring component to the cleavage sites was disrupted in Lam-depleted cells and Nup107-depleted cells. Therefore, we speculate that both proteins are required for a reinforcement of the spindle envelope, which supports the formation of central spindle microtubules essential for cytokinesis in Drosophila male meiosis. PMID:27402967

  2. Obox4-silencing-activated STAT3 and MPF/MAPK signaling accelerate nuclear membrane breakdown in mouse oocytes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyun-Seo; Kim, Kyeoung-Hwa; Kim, Eun-Young; Lee, Su-Yeon; Ko, Jung-Jae; Lee, Kyung-Ah

    2016-04-01

    Mouse oocytes begin to mature in vitro once liberated from ovarian follicles. Previously, we showed that oocyte-specific homeobox 4 (Obox4) is critical for maintaining the intact nuclear membrane of the germinal vesicle (GV) in oocytes and for completing meiosis at the metaphase I-II (MI-MII) transition. This study further examines the molecular mechanisms of OBOX4 in regulating GV nuclear membrane breakdown. Maturation-promoting factor (MPF) and MAPK are normally inactive in GV stage oocytes but were activated prematurely in arrested GV stage oocytes by 3-isobutyl-1-metyl-xanthine (IBMX) in vitro after Obox4 RNA interference (RNAi). Furthermore, signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) was significantly activated by Obox4 RNAi. We confirmed that this Obox4 RNAi-induced premature STAT3 and MPF/MAPK activation at the GV stage provoked subsequent GV breakdown (GVBD) despite the opposing force of high cAMP in the IBMX-supplemented medium to maintain intact GV. When cumulus-oocyte complexes were exposed to interferon α (IFNA), a STAT3 activator, oocytes matured and cumulus cells expanded to resume nuclear maturation in IBMX-supplemented medium, suggesting that STAT3 activation is sufficient for stimulating the continuation of meiosis. Using Stattic, a specific STAT3 inhibitor, we confirmed that GVBD involves STAT3 activation in Obox4-silenced oocytes. Based on these findings, we concluded that i) Obox4 is an important upstream regulator of MPF/MAPK and STAT3 signaling, and ii) Obox4 is a key regulator of the GV arrest mechanism in oocytes.

  3. GIP Contributions to the Regulation of Centromere at the Interface Between the Nuclear Envelope and the Nucleoplasm

    PubMed Central

    Chabouté, Marie-Edith; Berr, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    Centromeres are known as specific chromatin domains without which eukaryotic cells cannot divide properly during mitosis. Despite the considerable efforts to understand the centromere/kinetochore assembly during mitosis, until recently, comparatively few studies have dealt with the regulation of centromere during interphase. Here, we briefly review and discuss past and recent advances about the architecture of centromeres and their regulation during the cell cycle. Furthermore, we highlight and discuss new findings and hypotheses regarding the specific regulation of centromeres in both plant and animal nuclei, especially with GIP proteins at the interface between the nuclear envelope and the nucleoplasm. PMID:26904080

  4. Regulation of nuclear envelope dynamics via APC/C is necessary for the progression of semi-open mitosis in Schizosaccharomyces japonicus.

    PubMed

    Aoki, Keita; Shiwa, Yuh; Takada, Hiraku; Yoshikawa, Hirofumi; Niki, Hironori

    2013-09-01

    Three types of mitosis, which are open, closed or semi-open mitosis, function in eukaryotic cells, respectively. The open mitosis involves breakage of the nuclear envelope before nuclear division, whereas the closed mitosis proceeds with an intact nuclear envelope. To understand the mechanism and significance of three types of mitotic division in eukaryotes, we investigated the process of semi-open mitosis, in which the nuclear envelope is only partially broken, in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces japonicus. In anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C) mutants of Sz. japonicus, the nuclear envelope remained relatively intact during anaphase, resulting in impaired semi-open mitosis. As a suppressor of apc2 mutant, a mutation of Oar2, which was a 3-oxoacyl-[acyl carrier protein] reductase, was obtained. The level of the Oar2, which had two destruction-box motifs recognized by APC/C, was increased in APC/C mutants. Furthermore, the defective semi-open mitosis observed in an apc2 mutant was restored by mutated oar2+. Based on these findings, we propose that APC/C regulates the dynamics of the nuclear envelope through degradation of Oar2 dependent on APC/C during the metaphase-to-anaphase transition of semi-open mitosis in Sz. japonicus.

  5. Herpes simplex virus glycoproteins gB and gH function in fusion between the virion envelope and the outer nuclear membrane.

    PubMed

    Farnsworth, Aaron; Wisner, Todd W; Webb, Michael; Roller, Richard; Cohen, Gary; Eisenberg, Roselyn; Johnson, David C

    2007-06-12

    Herpesviruses must traverse the nuclear envelope to gain access to the cytoplasm and, ultimately, to exit cells. It is believed that herpesvirus nucleocapsids enter the perinuclear space by budding through the inner nuclear membrane (NM). To reach the cytoplasm these enveloped particles must fuse with the outer NM and the unenveloped capsids then acquire a second envelope in the trans-Golgi network. Little is known about the process by which herpesviruses virions fuse with the outer NM. Here we show that a herpes simplex virus (HSV) mutant lacking both the two putative fusion glycoproteins gB and gH failed to cross the nuclear envelope. Enveloped virions accumulated in the perinuclear space or in membrane vesicles that bulged into the nucleoplasm (herniations). By contrast, mutants lacking just gB or gH showed only minor or no defects in nuclear egress. We concluded that either HSV gB or gH can promote fusion between the virion envelope and the outer NM. It is noteworthy that fusion associated with HSV entry requires the cooperative action of both gB and gH, suggesting that the two types of fusion (egress versus entry) are dissimilar processes.

  6. The Red Queen in mitochondria: cyto-nuclear co-evolution, hybrid breakdown and human disease

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Jui-Yu; Leu, Jun-Yi

    2015-01-01

    Cyto-nuclear incompatibility, a specific form of Dobzhansky-Muller incompatibility caused by incompatible alleles between mitochondrial and nuclear genomes, has been suggested to play a critical role during speciation. Several features of the mitochondrial genome (mtDNA), including high mutation rate, dynamic genomic structure, and uniparental inheritance, make mtDNA more likely to accumulate mutations in the population. Once mtDNA has changed, the nuclear genome needs to play catch-up due to the intimate interactions between these two genomes. In two populations, if cyto-nuclear co-evolution is driven in different directions, it may eventually lead to hybrid incompatibility. Although cyto-nuclear incompatibility has been observed in a wide range of organisms, it remains unclear what type of mutations drives the co-evolution. Currently, evidence supporting adaptive mutations in mtDNA remains limited. On the other hand, it has been known that some mutations allow mtDNA to propagate more efficiently but compromise the host fitness (described as selfish mtDNA). Arms races between such selfish mtDNA and host nuclear genomes can accelerate cyto-nuclear co-evolution and lead to a phenomenon called the Red Queen Effect. Here, we discuss how the Red Queen Effect may contribute to the frequent observation of cyto-nuclear incompatibility and be the underlying driving force of some human mitochondrial diseases. PMID:26042149

  7. Nuclear envelope localization of LEMD2 is developmentally dynamic and lamin A/C dependent yet insufficient for heterochromatin tethering.

    PubMed

    Thanisch, Katharina; Song, Congdi; Engelkamp, Dieter; Koch, Jeannette; Wang, Audrey; Hallberg, Einar; Foisner, Roland; Leonhardt, Heinrich; Stewart, Colin L; Joffe, Boris; Solovei, Irina

    Peripheral heterochromatin in mammalian nuclei is tethered to the nuclear envelope by at least two mechanisms here referred to as the A- and B-tethers. The A-tether includes lamins A/C and additional unknown components presumably INM protein(s) interacting with both lamins A/C and chromatin. The B-tether includes the inner nuclear membrane (INM) protein Lamin B-receptor, which binds B-type lamins and chromatin. Generally, at least one of the tethers is always present in the nuclear envelope of mammalian cells. Deletion of both causes the loss of peripheral heterochromatin and consequently inversion of the entire nuclear architecture, with this occurring naturally in rod photoreceptors of nocturnal mammals. The tethers are differentially utilized during development, regulate gene expression in opposite manners, and play an important role during cell differentiation. Here we aimed to identify the unknown chromatin binding component(s) of the A-tether. We analyzed 10 mouse tissues by immunostaining with antibodies against 7 INM proteins and found that every cell type has specific, although differentially and developmentally regulated, sets of these proteins. In particular, we found that INM protein LEMD2 is concomitantly expressed with A-type lamins in various cell types but is lacking in inverted nuclei of rod cells. Truncation or deletion of Lmna resulted in the downregulation and mislocalization of LEMD2, suggesting that the two proteins interact and pointing at LEMD2 as a potential chromatin binding mediator of the A-tether. Using nuclei of mouse rods as an experimental model lacking peripheral heterochromatin, we expressed a LEMD2 transgene alone or in combination with lamin C in these cells and observed no restoration of peripheral heterochromatin in either case. We conclude that in contrary to the B-tether, the A-tether has a more intricate composition and consists of multiple components that presumably vary, at differing degrees of redundancy, between cell

  8. Investigation of the Chromosome Regions with Significant Affinity for the Nuclear Envelope in Fruit Fly – A Model Based Approach

    PubMed Central

    Kinney, Nicholas Allen; Sharakhov, Igor V.; Onufriev, Alexey V.

    2014-01-01

    Three dimensional nuclear architecture is important for genome function, but is still poorly understood. In particular, little is known about the role of the “boundary conditions” – points of attachment between chromosomes and the nuclear envelope. We describe a method for modeling the 3D organization of the interphase nucleus, and its application to analysis of chromosome-nuclear envelope (Chr-NE) attachments of polytene (giant) chromosomes in Drosophila melanogaster salivary glands. The model represents chromosomes as self-avoiding polymer chains confined within the nucleus; parameters of the model are taken directly from experiment, no fitting parameters are introduced. Methods are developed to objectively quantify chromosome territories and intertwining, which are discussed in the context of corresponding experimental observations. In particular, a mathematically rigorous definition of a territory based on convex hull is proposed. The self-avoiding polymer model is used to re-analyze previous experimental data; the analysis suggests 33 additional Chr-NE attachments in addition to the 15 already explored Chr-NE attachments. Most of these new Chr-NE attachments correspond to intercalary heterochromatin – gene poor, dark staining, late replicating regions of the genome; however, three correspond to euchromatin – gene rich, light staining, early replicating regions of the genome. The analysis also suggests 5 regions of anti-contact, characterized by aversion for the NE, only two of these correspond to euchromatin. This composition of chromatin suggests that heterochromatin may not be necessary or sufficient for the formation of a Chr-NE attachment. To the extent that the proposed model represents reality, the confinement of the polytene chromosomes in a spherical nucleus alone does not favor the positioning of specific chromosome regions at the NE as seen in experiment; consequently, the 15 experimentally known Chr-NE attachment positions do not appear to

  9. Investigation of the chromosome regions with significant affinity for the nuclear envelope in fruit fly--a model based approach.

    PubMed

    Kinney, Nicholas Allen; Sharakhov, Igor V; Onufriev, Alexey V

    2014-01-01

    Three dimensional nuclear architecture is important for genome function, but is still poorly understood. In particular, little is known about the role of the "boundary conditions"--points of attachment between chromosomes and the nuclear envelope. We describe a method for modeling the 3D organization of the interphase nucleus, and its application to analysis of chromosome-nuclear envelope (Chr-NE) attachments of polytene (giant) chromosomes in Drosophila melanogaster salivary glands. The model represents chromosomes as self-avoiding polymer chains confined within the nucleus; parameters of the model are taken directly from experiment, no fitting parameters are introduced. Methods are developed to objectively quantify chromosome territories and intertwining, which are discussed in the context of corresponding experimental observations. In particular, a mathematically rigorous definition of a territory based on convex hull is proposed. The self-avoiding polymer model is used to re-analyze previous experimental data; the analysis suggests 33 additional Chr-NE attachments in addition to the 15 already explored Chr-NE attachments. Most of these new Chr-NE attachments correspond to intercalary heterochromatin--gene poor, dark staining, late replicating regions of the genome; however, three correspond to euchromatin--gene rich, light staining, early replicating regions of the genome. The analysis also suggests 5 regions of anti-contact, characterized by aversion for the NE, only two of these correspond to euchromatin. This composition of chromatin suggests that heterochromatin may not be necessary or sufficient for the formation of a Chr-NE attachment. To the extent that the proposed model represents reality, the confinement of the polytene chromosomes in a spherical nucleus alone does not favor the positioning of specific chromosome regions at the NE as seen in experiment; consequently, the 15 experimentally known Chr-NE attachment positions do not appear to arise due to

  10. A flow cytometry-based screen of nuclear envelope transmembrane proteins identifies NET4/Tmem53 as involved in stress-dependent cell cycle withdrawal.

    PubMed

    Korfali, Nadia; Srsen, Vlastimil; Waterfall, Martin; Batrakou, Dzmitry G; Pekovic, Vanja; Hutchison, Christopher J; Schirmer, Eric C

    2011-04-14

    Disruption of cell cycle regulation is one mechanism proposed for how nuclear envelope protein mutation can cause disease. Thus far only a few nuclear envelope proteins have been tested/found to affect cell cycle progression: to identify others, 39 novel nuclear envelope transmembrane proteins were screened for their ability to alter flow cytometry cell cycle/DNA content profiles when exogenously expressed. Eight had notable effects with seven increasing and one decreasing the 4N:2N ratio. We subsequently focused on NET4/Tmem53 that lost its effects in p53(-/-) cells and retinoblastoma protein-deficient cells. NET4/TMEM53 knockdown by siRNA altered flow cytometry cell cycle/DNA content profiles in a similar way as overexpression. NET4/TMEM53 knockdown did not affect total retinoblastoma protein levels, unlike nuclear envelope-associated proteins Lamin A and LAP2α. However, a decrease in phosphorylated retinoblastoma protein was observed along with a doubling of p53 levels and a 7-fold increase in p21. Consequently cells withdrew from the cell cycle, which was confirmed in MRC5 cells by a drop in the percentage of cells expressing Ki-67 antigen and an increase in the number of cells stained for ß-galactosidase. The ß-galactosidase upregulation suggests that cells become prematurely senescent. Finally, the changes in retinoblastoma protein, p53, and p21 resulting from loss of NET4/Tmem53 were dependent upon active p38 MAP kinase. The finding that roughly a fifth of nuclear envelope transmembrane proteins screened yielded alterations in flow cytometry cell cycle/DNA content profiles suggests a much greater influence of the nuclear envelope on the cell cycle than is widely held.

  11. A Flow Cytometry-Based Screen of Nuclear Envelope Transmembrane Proteins Identifies NET4/Tmem53 as Involved in Stress-Dependent Cell Cycle Withdrawal

    PubMed Central

    Waterfall, Martin; Batrakou, Dzmitry G.; Pekovic, Vanja; Hutchison, Christopher J.; Schirmer, Eric C.

    2011-01-01

    Disruption of cell cycle regulation is one mechanism proposed for how nuclear envelope protein mutation can cause disease. Thus far only a few nuclear envelope proteins have been tested/found to affect cell cycle progression: to identify others, 39 novel nuclear envelope transmembrane proteins were screened for their ability to alter flow cytometry cell cycle/DNA content profiles when exogenously expressed. Eight had notable effects with seven increasing and one decreasing the 4N∶2N ratio. We subsequently focused on NET4/Tmem53 that lost its effects in p53−/− cells and retinoblastoma protein-deficient cells. NET4/TMEM53 knockdown by siRNA altered flow cytometry cell cycle/DNA content profiles in a similar way as overexpression. NET4/TMEM53 knockdown did not affect total retinoblastoma protein levels, unlike nuclear envelope-associated proteins Lamin A and LAP2α. However, a decrease in phosphorylated retinoblastoma protein was observed along with a doubling of p53 levels and a 7-fold increase in p21. Consequently cells withdrew from the cell cycle, which was confirmed in MRC5 cells by a drop in the percentage of cells expressing Ki-67 antigen and an increase in the number of cells stained for ß-galactosidase. The ß-galactosidase upregulation suggests that cells become prematurely senescent. Finally, the changes in retinoblastoma protein, p53, and p21 resulting from loss of NET4/Tmem53 were dependent upon active p38 MAP kinase. The finding that roughly a fifth of nuclear envelope transmembrane proteins screened yielded alterations in flow cytometry cell cycle/DNA content profiles suggests a much greater influence of the nuclear envelope on the cell cycle than is widely held. PMID:21533191

  12. NSF- and SNARE-mediated membrane fusion is required for nuclear envelope formation and completion of nuclear pore complex assembly in Xenopus laevis egg extracts.

    PubMed

    Baur, Tina; Ramadan, Kristijan; Schlundt, Andreas; Kartenbeck, Jürgen; Meyer, Hemmo H

    2007-08-15

    Despite the progress in understanding nuclear envelope (NE) reformation after mitosis, it has remained unclear what drives the required membrane fusion and how exactly this is coordinated with nuclear pore complex (NPC) assembly. Here, we show that, like other intracellular fusion reactions, NE fusion in Xenopus laevis egg extracts is mediated by SNARE proteins that require activation by NSF. Antibodies against Xenopus NSF, depletion of NSF or the dominant-negative NSF(E329Q) variant specifically inhibited NE formation. Staging experiments further revealed that NSF was required until sealing of the envelope was completed. Moreover, excess exogenous alpha-SNAP that blocks SNARE function prevented membrane fusion and caused accumulation of non-flattened vesicles on the chromatin surface. Under these conditions, the nucleoporins Nup107 and gp210 were fully recruited, whereas assembly of FxFG-repeat-containing nucleoporins was blocked. Together, we define NSF- and SNARE-mediated membrane fusion events as essential steps during NE formation downstream of Nup107 recruitment, and upstream of membrane flattening and completion of NPC assembly.

  13. Dynamics of PLCγ and Src Family Kinase 1 Interactions during Nuclear Envelope Formation Revealed by FRET-FLIM

    PubMed Central

    Byrne, Richard D.; Applebee, Christopher; Poccia, Dominic L.; Larijani, Banafshé

    2012-01-01

    The nuclear envelope (NE) breaks down and reforms during each mitotic cycle. A similar process happens to the sperm NE following fertilisation. The formation of the NE in both these circumstances involves endoplasmic reticulum membranes enveloping the chromatin, but PLCγ-dependent membrane fusion events are also essential. Here we demonstrate the activation of PLCγ by a Src family kinase (SFK1) during NE assembly. We show by time-resolved FRET for the first time the direct in vivo interaction and temporal regulation of PLCγ and SFK1 in sea urchins. As a prerequisite for protein activation, there is a rapid phosphorylation of PLCγ on its Y783 residue in response to GTP in vitro. This phosphorylation is dependent upon SFK activity; thus Y783 phosphorylation and NE assembly are susceptible to SFK inhibition. Y783 phosphorylation is also observed on the surface of the male pronucleus (MPN) in vivo during NE formation. Together the corroborative in vivo and in vitro data demonstrate the phosphorylation and activation of PLCγ by SFK1 during NE assembly. We discuss the potential generality of such a mechanism. PMID:22848394

  14. The Ubiquitin Ligase Itch and Ubiquitination Regulate BFRF1-Mediated Nuclear Envelope Modification for Epstein-Barr Virus Maturation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chung-Pei; Liu, Guan-Ting; Kung, Hsiu-Ni; Liu, Po-Ting; Liao, Yen-Tzu; Chow, Lu-Ping; Chang, Ling-Shih; Chang, Yu-Hsin; Chang, Chou-Wei; Shu, Wen-Chi; Angers, Annie; Farina, Antonella; Tsai, Ching-Hwa; Bouamr, Fadila

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The cellular endosomal sorting complex required for transport (ESCRT) was recently found to mediate important morphogenesis processes at the nuclear envelope (NE). We previously showed that the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) BFRF1 protein recruits the ESCRT-associated protein Alix to modulate NE structure and promote EBV nuclear egress. Here, we uncover new cellular factors and mechanisms involved in this process. BFRF1-induced NE vesicles are similar to those observed following EBV reactivation. BFRF1 is ubiquitinated, and elimination of possible ubiquitination by either lysine mutations or fusion of a deubiquitinase hampers NE-derived vesicle formation and virus maturation. While it interacts with multiple Nedd4-like ubiquitin ligases, BFRF1 preferentially binds Itch ligase. We show that Itch associates with Alix and BFRF1 and is required for BFRF1-induced NE vesicle formation. Our data demonstrate that Itch, ubiquitin, and Alix control the BFRF1-mediated modulation of the NE and EBV maturation, uncovering novel regulatory mechanisms of nuclear egress of viral nucleocapsids. IMPORTANCE The nuclear envelope (NE) of eukaryotic cells not only serves as a transverse scaffold for cellular processes, but also as a natural barrier for most DNA viruses that assemble their nucleocapsids in the nucleus. Previously, we showed that the cellular endosomal sorting complex required for transport (ESCRT) machinery is required for the nuclear egress of EBV. Here, we further report the molecular interplay among viral BFRF1, the ESCRT adaptor Alix, and the ubiquitin ligase Itch. We found that BFRF1-induced NE vesicles are similar to those observed following EBV reactivation. The lysine residues and the ubiquitination of BFRF1 regulate the formation of BFRF1-induced NE-derived vesicles and EBV maturation. During the process, a ubiquitin ligase, Itch, preferably associates with BFRF1 and is required for BFRF1-induced NE vesicle formation. Therefore, our data indicate that Itch

  15. [Comparative Analysis of DNA Sequences of Regions of X-Chromosome Attachment to the Nuclear Envelope of Nurse Cells Anopheles messeae Fall].

    PubMed

    Artemov, G N; Vasil'eva, O Yu; Stegniy, V N

    2015-07-01

    Polytene chromosomes of ovarian nurse cells of Anopheles mosquitoes form strong contacts with the nuclear envelope. The presence of contacts, their position at nurse cell chromosomes, and their morphological features are species-specific in malaria mosquitoes. It is important to determine the nature of these interspecies differences in the nuclear architecture, both to understand the function of the nucleus and to assess the role of the spatial organization of chromosomes in evolution. Using dot-blot hybridization, we compared DNA sequences of the clone library from the X-chromosome attachment region to the nuclear envelope of ovarian nurse cells of Anopheles messeae with DNA-probes: (1) of the X-chromosome attachment region of An. atroparvus, (2) of the 3R chromosome attachment region ofAn. messeae, and (3) of the chromosome 2 pericentromeric region of An. messeae, without expressed contacts with the nuclear envelope. It has been shown that the chromosome attachment regions have a significantly higher number of homologous DNA sequences as compared with the pericentromeric region of chromosome 2. Sequences that are common for attachment regions are largely potentially able to participate in the formation of chromatin loop domains and to interact with some nucleus frameworks, according to the analysis in the ChrClass program. The obtained results support the important role of DNA in the formation of strong chromosomal attachments to the nuclear envelope in nurse cells of Anopheles mosquitoes.

  16. Herpesvirus gB-induced fusion between the virion envelope and outer nuclear membrane during virus egress is regulated by the viral US3 kinase.

    PubMed

    Wisner, Todd W; Wright, Catherine C; Kato, Akihisa; Kawaguchi, Yasushi; Mou, Fan; Baines, Joel D; Roller, Richard J; Johnson, David C

    2009-04-01

    Herpesvirus capsids collect along the inner surface of the nuclear envelope and bud into the perinuclear space. Enveloped virions then fuse with the outer nuclear membrane (NM). We previously showed that herpes simplex virus (HSV) glycoproteins gB and gH act in a redundant fashion to promote fusion between the virion envelope and the outer NM. HSV mutants lacking both gB and gH accumulate enveloped virions in herniations, vesicles that bulge into the nucleoplasm. Earlier studies had shown that HSV mutants lacking the viral serine/threonine kinase US3 also accumulate herniations. Here, we demonstrate that HSV gB is phosphorylated in a US3-dependent manner in HSV-infected cells, especially in a crude nuclear fraction. Moreover, US3 directly phosphorylated the gB cytoplasmic (CT) domain in in vitro assays. Deletion of gB in the context of a US3-null virus did not add substantially to defects in nuclear egress. The majority of the US3-dependent phosphorylation of gB involved the CT domain and amino acid T887, a residue present in a motif similar to that recognized by US3 in other proteins. HSV recombinants lacking gH and expressing either gB substitution mutation T887A or a gB truncated at residue 886 displayed substantial defects in nuclear egress. We concluded that phosphorylation of the gB CT domain is important for gB-mediated fusion with the outer NM. This suggested a model in which the US3 kinase is incorporated into the tegument layer (between the capsid and envelope) in HSV virions present in the perinuclear space. By this packaging, US3 might be brought close to the gB CT tail, leading to phosphorylation and triggering fusion between the virion envelope and the outer NM.

  17. Inner nuclear envelope proteins SUN1 and SUN2 play a prominent role in the DNA damage response

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Kai; Zhu, Xiaoqiang; Xu, Rener; Xu, Tian; Zhuang, Yuan; Han, Min

    2012-01-01

    Summary The DNA damage response (DDR) and DNA repair are critical for maintaining genomic stability and evading many human diseases [1, 2]. Recent findings indicate accumulation of SUN1, a nuclear envelope (NE) protein, is a significant pathogenic event in Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy and Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome, both caused by mutations in LMNA [3, 4]. However, roles of mammalian SUN proteins in mitotic cell division and genomic stability are unknown. Here we report that the inner NE proteins SUN1 and SUN2 may play a redundant role in DDR. Mouse embryonic fibroblasts from Sun1−/−Sun2−/− mice displayed premature proliferation arrest in S phase of cell cycle, increased apoptosis and DNA damage, and decreased perinuclear heterochromatin, indicating genome instability. Furthermore, activation of ATM and H2A.X, early events in DDR, were impaired in Sun1−/−Sun2−/− fibroblasts. A biochemical screen identified interactions between SUN1/2 and DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNAPK) complex that functions in DNA nonhomologous end joining repair and possibly in DDR [2, 5, 6]. Knockdown of DNAPK reduced ATM activation in NIH3T3 cells, consistent with a potential role of SUN1/2-DNAPK interaction during DDR. SUN1/2 could affect DDR by localizing certain nuclear factors to the NE or by mediating the communication between nuclear and cytoplasmic events. PMID:22863315

  18. MCLIP, an effective method to detect interactions of transmembrane proteins of the nuclear envelope in live cells.

    PubMed

    Jafferali, Mohammed Hakim; Vijayaraghavan, Balaje; Figueroa, Ricardo A; Crafoord, Ellinor; Gudise, Santhosh; Larsson, Veronica J; Hallberg, Einar

    2014-10-01

    Investigating interactions of proteins in the nuclear envelope (NE) using co-immunoprecipitation (Co-IP) has previously been difficult or even impossible due to their inherent resistance to extraction. We have developed a novel method, MCLIP (Membrane protein Cross-Link ImmunoPrecipitation), which takes advantage of a cell permeable crosslinker to enable effective detection and analysis of specific interactions of NE proteins in live cells using Western blot. Using MCLIP we show that, in U2OS cells, the integral inner nuclear membrane protein Samp1 interacts with Lamin B1, the LINC (Linker of nucleoskeleton and cytoskeleton) complex protein, Sun1 and the soluble small GTPase Ran. The results show that the previously detected in vitro interaction between Samp1 and Emerin also takes place in live cells. In vitro pull down experiments show, that the nucleoplasmic domains of Samp1 and Emerin can bind directly to each other. We also, show that MCLIP is suitable to coprecipitate protein interactions in different stages of the cell cycle.

  19. The single transmembrane segment of gp210 is sufficient for sorting to the pore membrane domain of the nuclear envelope

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    The glycoprotein gp210 is located in the "pore membrane," a specialized domain of the nuclear envelope to which the nuclear pore complex (NPC) is anchored. gp210 contains a large cisternal domain, a single transmembrane segment (TM), and a COOH-terminal, 58-amino acid residue cytoplasmic tail (CT) (Wozniak, R. W., E. Bartnik, and G. Blobel. 1989. J. Cell Biol. 108:2083-2092; Greber, U. F., A. Senior, and L. Gerace. 1990. EMBO (Eur. Mol. Biol. Organ.) J. 9:1495-1502). To locate determinants for sorting of gp210 to the pore membrane, we constructed various cDNAs coding for wild-type, mutant, and chimeric gp210, and monitored localization of the expressed protein in 3T3 cells by immunofluorescence microscopy using appropriate antibodies. The large cisternal domain of gp210 (95% of its mass) did not reveal any sorting determinants. Surprisingly, the TM of gp210 is sufficient for sorting to the pore membrane. The CT also contains a sorting determinant, but it is weaker than that of the TM. We propose specific lateral association of the transmembrane helices of two proteins to yield either a gp210 homodimer or a heterodimer of gp210 and another protein. The cytoplasmically oriented tails of these dimers may bind cooperatively to the adjacent NPCs. In addition, we demonstrate that gp210 co-localizes with cytoplasmically dispersed nucleoporins, suggesting a cytoplasmic association of these components. PMID:1281815

  20. Identification and analysis of an Autographa californica nuclear polyhedrosis virus structural protein of the occlusion-derived virus envelope: ODV-E56.

    PubMed

    Braunagel, S C; Elton, D M; Ma, H; Summers, M D

    1996-03-01

    An Autographa californica nuclear polyhedrosis virus gene encoding an occlusion-derived virus (ODV) envelope protein of 56 kDa was identified and sequenced. Transcription initiates from a conserved baculovirus late motif (ATAAG) with transcripts detected from 16 through 72 hr p.i. The protein is detected in infected cell extracts from 36 hr p.i. Western blot assay of ODV, BV, viral envelope, and nucleocapsid preparations coupled with immunoelectron microscopy reveal that this protein localizes to the ODV envelope. This protein is named ODV-E56 to identify its viral origin, envelope location, and apparent molecular weight. ODV-E56 is enriched in viral induced intranuclear microvesicles as determined by immunogold labeling. A mutant was constructed with the C-terminal portion of the protein replaced with beta-galactosidase. The fusion protein, E56-beta-gal, locates to the viral nucleocapsids and not to the ODV envelope or intranuclear microvesicles. This suggests that the signals necessary for transport and/or retention into these structures lies within the C-terminal portion of ODV-E56. Additionally, both ODV-E56 and E56-beta-gal are enriched in electron dense regions that cluster around the inner nuclear membrane and within the nucleoplasm.

  1. MAF1, a novel plant protein interacting with matrix attachment region binding protein MFP1, is located at the nuclear envelope.

    PubMed Central

    Gindullis, F; Peffer, N J; Meier, I

    1999-01-01

    The interaction of chromatin with the nuclear matrix via matrix attachment region (MAR) DNA is considered to be of fundamental importance for chromatin organization in all eukaryotic cells. MAR binding filament-like protein 1 (MFP1) from tomato is a novel plant protein that specifically binds to MAR DNA. Its filament protein-like structure makes it a likely candidate for a structural component of the nuclear matrix. MFP1 is located at nuclear matrix-associated, specklelike structures at the nuclear envelope. Here, we report the identification of a novel protein that specifically interacts with MFP1 in yeast two-hybrid and in vitro binding assays. MFP1 associated factor 1 (MAF1) is a small, soluble, serine/threonine-rich protein that is ubiquitously expressed and has no similarity to known proteins. MAF1, like MFP1, is located at the nuclear periphery and is a component of the nuclear matrix. These data suggest that MFP1 and MAF1 are in vivo interaction partners and that both proteins are components of a nuclear substructure, previously undescribed in plants, that connects the nuclear envelope and the internal nuclear matrix. PMID:10488241

  2. Accumulation of the inner nuclear envelope protein Sun1 is pathogenic in progeric and dystrophic laminopathies.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chia-Yen; Chi, Ya-Hui; Mutalif, Rafidah Abdul; Starost, Matthew F; Myers, Timothy G; Anderson, Stasia A; Stewart, Colin L; Jeang, Kuan-Teh

    2012-04-27

    Human LMNA gene mutations result in laminopathies that include Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy (AD-EDMD) and Hutchinson-Gilford progeria, the premature aging syndrome (HGPS). The Lmna null (Lmna(-/-)) and progeroid LmnaΔ9 mutant mice are models for AD-EDMD and HGPS, respectively. Both animals develop severe tissue pathologies with abbreviated life spans. Like HGPS cells, Lmna(-/-) and LmnaΔ9 fibroblasts have typically misshapen nuclei. Unexpectedly, Lmna(-/-) or LmnaΔ9 mice that are also deficient for the inner nuclear membrane protein Sun1 show markedly reduced tissue pathologies and enhanced longevity. Concordantly, reduction of SUN1 overaccumulation in LMNA mutant fibroblasts and in cells derived from HGPS patients corrected nuclear defects and cellular senescence. Collectively, these findings implicate Sun1 protein accumulation as a common pathogenic event in Lmna(-/-), LmnaΔ9, and HGPS disorders.

  3. cut11+: A Gene Required for Cell Cycle-dependent Spindle Pole Body Anchoring in the Nuclear Envelope and Bipolar Spindle Formation in Schizosaccharomyces pombe

    PubMed Central

    West, Robert R.; Vaisberg, Elena V.; Ding, Rubai; Nurse, Paul; McIntosh, J. Richard

    1998-01-01

    The “cut” mutants of Schizosaccharomyces pombe are defective in spindle formation and/or chromosome segregation, but they proceed through the cell cycle, resulting in lethality. Analysis of temperature-sensitive alleles of cut11+ suggests that this gene is required for the formation of a functional bipolar spindle. Defective spindle structure was revealed with fluorescent probes for tubulin and DNA. Three-dimensional reconstruction of mutant spindles by serial sectioning and electron microscopy showed that the spindle pole bodies (SPBs) either failed to complete normal duplication or were free floating in the nucleoplasm. Localization of Cut11p tagged with the green fluorescent protein showed punctate nuclear envelope staining throughout the cell cycle and SPBs staining from early prophase to mid anaphase. This SPB localization correlates with the time in the cell cycle when SPBs are inserted into the nuclear envelope. Immunoelectron microscopy confirmed the localization of Cut11p to mitotic SPBs and nuclear pore complexes. Cloning and sequencing showed that cut11+ encodes a novel protein with seven putative membrane-spanning domains and homology to the Saccharomyces cerevisiae gene NDC1. These data suggest that Cut11p associates with nuclear pore complexes and mitotic SPBs as an anchor in the nuclear envelope; this role is essential for mitosis. PMID:9763447

  4. Nuclear Envelope Lamin-A Couples Actin Dynamics with Immunological Synapse Architecture and T Cell Activation

    PubMed Central

    González-Granado, José María; Trigueros-Motos, Laia; Cibrián, Danay; Morlino, Giulia; Blanco-Berrocal, Marta; Osorio, Fernando Garcia; Freije, José María Pérez; López-Otín, Carlos; Sánchez-Madrid, Francisco; Andrés, Vicente

    2014-01-01

    In many cell types, nuclear A-type lamins have been implicated in structural and functional activities, including higher-order genome organization, DNA replication and repair, gene transcription, and signal transduction. However, their role in specialized immune cells remains largely unexplored. Here, we showed that the abundance of A-type lamins is almost negligible in resting naïve T lymphocytes, but that it is substantially increased upon activation of the T cell receptor (TCR), and is an early event that accelerates formation of the immunological synapse between T cells and antigen-presenting cells. We found that lamin-A enhanced the polymerization of F-actin in T cells, a critical step for immunological synapse formation, by physically connecting the nucleus to the plasma membrane through the linker of nucleoskeleton and cytoskeleton (LINC) complex. We also showed that lamin-A played a key role in other membrane, cytoplasmic, and nuclear events related to TCR activation, including receptor-clustering, downstream signaling, and target gene expression. Notably, the presence of lamin-A was associated with enhanced extracellular signal–regulated kinase 1/2 signaling, and pharmacological inhibition of this pathway reduced the extent of lamin-A–dependent T cell activation. Moreover, mice deficient in lamin-A exhibited impaired T cell responses in vivo. These findings underscore the importance of A-type lamins for TCR activation, and identify lamin-A as a previously unappreciated regulator of the immune response. PMID:24757177

  5. SUN anchors pollen WIP–WIT complexes at the vegetative nuclear envelope and is necessary for pollen tube targeting and fertility

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xiao; Groves, Norman Reid; Meier, Iris

    2015-01-01

    LINC (linker of nucleoskeleton and cytoskeleton) complexes play an essential role in nuclear migration by connecting the nucleus to the cytoskeleton and/or motor proteins. Plant LINC complexes have recently been identified in Arabidopsis thaliana, with the inner nuclear membrane SUN and outer nuclear membrane WIP proteins comprising the first identified complex. A recent study identified a nuclear movement defect in Arabidopsis pollen vegetative nuclei linked to the outer nuclear envelope WIP and WIT proteins. However, the role that SUN proteins may play in pollen nuclear migration has yet to be addressed. To explore this question, a SUN2 lumenal domain that was targeted to the ER specifically in pollen was over-expressed. It is shown that the ER-targeted SUN2 lumenal domain was able to displace WIP and WIT proteins from the pollen vegetative nuclear envelope. Expression of this dominant-negative transgene led to impaired VN mobility, impaired pollen tube guidance, and defective pollen tube reception. The observed pollen defects are similar to phenotypes observed in a wip1-1 wip2-1 wip3-1 wit1-1 wit2-1 mutant. It is also shown that these defects were dependent on the KASH-binding function of the SUN2 lumenal domain. These data support a model where LINC complexes formed by SUN, WIP, and WIT at the VNE are responsible for VN migration and suggest an important function of SUN, WIP, and WIT in pollen tube guidance and reception. PMID:26409047

  6. Essential role of the Cdk2 activator RingoA in meiotic telomere tethering to the nuclear envelope

    PubMed Central

    Mikolcevic, Petra; Isoda, Michitaka; Shibuya, Hiroki; del Barco Barrantes, Ivan; Igea, Ana; Suja, José A.; Shackleton, Sue; Watanabe, Yoshinori; Nebreda, Angel R.

    2016-01-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) play key roles in cell cycle regulation. Genetic analysis in mice has revealed an essential role for Cdk2 in meiosis, which renders Cdk2 knockout (KO) mice sterile. Here we show that mice deficient in RingoA, an atypical activator of Cdk1 and Cdk2 that has no amino acid sequence homology to cyclins, are sterile and display meiotic defects virtually identical to those observed in Cdk2 KO mice including non-homologous chromosome pairing, unrepaired double-strand breaks, undetectable sex-body and pachytene arrest. Interestingly, RingoA is required for Cdk2 targeting to telomeres and RingoA KO spermatocytes display severely affected telomere tethering as well as impaired distribution of Sun1, a protein essential for the attachment of telomeres to the nuclear envelope. Our results identify RingoA as an important activator of Cdk2 at meiotic telomeres, and provide genetic evidence for a physiological function of mammalian Cdk2 that is not dependent on cyclins. PMID:27025256

  7. Nuclear envelope alterations generate an aging-like epigenetic pattern in mice deficient in Zmpste24 metalloprotease.

    PubMed

    Osorio, Fernando G; Varela, Ignacio; Lara, Ester; Puente, Xose S; Espada, Jesús; Santoro, Raffaella; Freije, José M P; Fraga, Mario F; López-Otín, Carlos

    2010-12-01

    Mutations in the nuclear envelope protein lamin A or in its processing protease ZMPSTE24 cause human accelerated aging syndromes, including Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome. Similarly, Zmpste24-deficient mice accumulate unprocessed prelamin A and develop multiple progeroid symptoms, thus representing a valuable animal model for the study of these syndromes. Zmpste24-deficient mice also show marked transcriptional alterations associated with chromatin disorganization, but the molecular links between both processes are unknown. We report herein that Zmpste24-deficient mice show a hypermethylation of rDNA that reduces the transcription of ribosomal genes, being this reduction reversible upon treatment with DNA methyltransferase inhibitors. This alteration has been previously described during physiological aging in rodents, suggesting its potential role in the development of the progeroid phenotypes. We also show that Zmpste24-deficient mice present global hypoacetylation of histones H2B and H4. By using a combination of RNA sequencing and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays, we demonstrate that these histone modifications are associated with changes in the expression of several genes involved in the control of cell proliferation and metabolic processes, which may contribute to the plethora of progeroid symptoms exhibited by Zmpste24-deficient mice. The identification of these altered genes may help to clarify the molecular mechanisms underlying aging and progeroid syndromes as well as to define new targets for the treatment of these dramatic diseases.

  8. Kar1 binding to Sfi1 C-terminal regions anchors the SPB bridge to the nuclear envelope

    PubMed Central

    Seybold, Christian; Elserafy, Menattallah; Rüthnick, Diana; Ozboyaci, Musa; Neuner, Annett; Flottmann, Benjamin; Heilemann, Mike; Wade, Rebecca C.

    2015-01-01

    The yeast spindle pole body (SPB) is the functional equivalent of the mammalian centrosome. The half bridge is a SPB substructure on the nuclear envelope (NE), playing a key role in SPB duplication. Its cytoplasmic components are the membrane-anchored Kar1, the yeast centrin Cdc31, and the Cdc31-binding protein Sfi1. In G1, the half bridge expands into the bridge through Sfi1 C-terminal (Sfi1-CT) dimerization, the licensing step for SPB duplication. We exploited photo-activated localization microscopy (PALM) to show that Kar1 localizes in the bridge center. Binding assays revealed direct interaction between Kar1 and C-terminal Sfi1 fragments. kar1Δ cells whose viability was maintained by the dominant CDC31-16 showed an arched bridge, indicating Kar1’s function in tethering Sfi1 to the NE. Cdc31-16 enhanced Cdc31–Cdc31 interactions between Sfi1–Cdc31 layers, as suggested by binding free energy calculations. In our model, Kar1 binding is restricted to Sfi1-CT and Sfi1 C-terminal centrin-binding repeats, and centrin and Kar1 provide cross-links, while Sfi1-CT stabilizes the bridge and ensures timely SPB separation. PMID:26076691

  9. Sigma-1 receptor mediates cocaine-induced transcriptional regulation by recruiting chromatin-remodeling factors at the nuclear envelope.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Shang-Yi A; Chuang, Jian-Ying; Tsai, Meng-Shan; Wang, Xiao-Fei; Xi, Zheng-Xiong; Hung, Jan-Jong; Chang, Wen-Chang; Bonci, Antonello; Su, Tsung-Ping

    2015-11-24

    The sigma-1 receptor (Sig-1R) chaperone at the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) plays important roles in cellular regulation. Here we found a new function of Sig-1R, in that it translocates from the ER to the nuclear envelope (NE) to recruit chromatin-remodeling molecules and regulate the gene transcription thereof. Sig-1Rs mainly reside at the ER-mitochondrion interface. However, on stimulation by agonists such as cocaine, Sig-1Rs translocate from ER to the NE, where Sig-1Rs bind NE protein emerin and recruit chromatin-remodeling molecules, including lamin A/C, barrier-to-autointegration factor (BAF), and histone deacetylase (HDAC), to form a complex with the gene repressor specific protein 3 (Sp3). Knockdown of Sig-1Rs attenuates the complex formation. Cocaine was found to suppress the gene expression of monoamine oxidase B (MAOB) in the brain of wild-type but not Sig-1R knockout mouse. A single dose of cocaine (20 mg/kg) in rats suppresses the level of MAOB at nuclear accumbens without affecting the level of dopamine transporter. Daily injections of cocaine in rats caused behavioral sensitization. Withdrawal from cocaine in cocaine-sensitized rats induced an apparent time-dependent rebound of the MAOB protein level to about 200% over control on day 14 after withdrawal. Treatment of cocaine-withdrawn rats with the MAOB inhibitor deprenyl completely alleviated the behavioral sensitization to cocaine. Our results demonstrate a role of Sig-1R in transcriptional regulation and suggest cocaine may work through this newly discovered genomic action to achieve its addictive action. Results also suggest the MAOB inhibitor deprenyl as a therapeutic agent to block certain actions of cocaine during withdrawal.

  10. Sigma-1 receptor mediates cocaine-induced transcriptional regulation by recruiting chromatin-remodeling factors at the nuclear envelope

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Shang-Yi A.; Chuang, Jian-Ying; Tsai, Meng-Shan; Wang, Xiao-fei; Hung, Jan-Jong; Chang, Wen-Chang; Bonci, Antonello; Su, Tsung-Ping

    2015-01-01

    The sigma-1 receptor (Sig-1R) chaperone at the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) plays important roles in cellular regulation. Here we found a new function of Sig-1R, in that it translocates from the ER to the nuclear envelope (NE) to recruit chromatin-remodeling molecules and regulate the gene transcription thereof. Sig-1Rs mainly reside at the ER–mitochondrion interface. However, on stimulation by agonists such as cocaine, Sig-1Rs translocate from ER to the NE, where Sig-1Rs bind NE protein emerin and recruit chromatin-remodeling molecules, including lamin A/C, barrier-to-autointegration factor (BAF), and histone deacetylase (HDAC), to form a complex with the gene repressor specific protein 3 (Sp3). Knockdown of Sig-1Rs attenuates the complex formation. Cocaine was found to suppress the gene expression of monoamine oxidase B (MAOB) in the brain of wild-type but not Sig-1R knockout mouse. A single dose of cocaine (20 mg/kg) in rats suppresses the level of MAOB at nuclear accumbens without affecting the level of dopamine transporter. Daily injections of cocaine in rats caused behavioral sensitization. Withdrawal from cocaine in cocaine-sensitized rats induced an apparent time-dependent rebound of the MAOB protein level to about 200% over control on day 14 after withdrawal. Treatment of cocaine-withdrawn rats with the MAOB inhibitor deprenyl completely alleviated the behavioral sensitization to cocaine. Our results demonstrate a role of Sig-1R in transcriptional regulation and suggest cocaine may work through this newly discovered genomic action to achieve its addictive action. Results also suggest the MAOB inhibitor deprenyl as a therapeutic agent to block certain actions of cocaine during withdrawal. PMID:26554014

  11. Nuclear envelope lamin-A couples actin dynamics with immunological synapse architecture and T cell activation.

    PubMed

    González-Granado, José M; Silvestre-Roig, Carlos; Rocha-Perugini, Vera; Trigueros-Motos, Laia; Cibrián, Danay; Morlino, Giulia; Blanco-Berrocal, Marta; Osorio, Fernando G; Freije, José M P; López-Otín, Carlos; Sánchez-Madrid, Francisco; Andrés, Vicente

    2014-04-22

    In many cell types, nuclear A-type lamins regulate multiple cellular functions, including higher-order genome organization, DNA replication and repair, gene transcription, and signal transduction; however, their role in specialized immune cells remains largely unexplored. We showed that the abundance of A-type lamins was almost negligible in resting naïve T lymphocytes, but was increased upon activation of the T cell receptor (TCR). The increase in lamin-A was an early event that accelerated formation of the immunological synapse between T cells and antigen-presenting cells. Polymerization of F-actin in T cells is a critical step for immunological synapse formation, and lamin-A interacted with the linker of nucleoskeleton and cytoskeleton (LINC) complex to promote F-actin polymerization. We also showed that lamin-A expression accelerated TCR clustering and led to enhanced downstream signaling, including extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) signaling, as well as increased target gene expression. Pharmacological inhibition of the ERK pathway reduced lamin-A-dependent T cell activation. Moreover, mice lacking lamin-A in immune cells exhibited impaired T cell responses in vivo. These findings underscore the importance of A-type lamins for TCR activation and identify lamin-A as a previously unappreciated regulator of the immune response.

  12. POM152 is an integral protein of the pore membrane domain of the yeast nuclear envelope

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    We have identified a concanavalin A-reactive glycoprotein of 150 kD that coenriches with isolated yeast nuclear pore complexes. Molecular cloning and sequencing of this protein revealed a single canonical transmembrane segment. Epitope tagging and localization by both immunofluorescence and immunoelectron microscopy confirmed that it is a pore membrane protein. The protein was termed POM152 (for pore membrane protein of 152 kD) on the basis of its location and cDNA-deduced molecular mass. POM152 is likely to be a type II membrane protein with its NH2-terminal region (175 residues) and its COOH-terminal region (1,142 residues) positioned on the pore side and cisternal side of the pore membrane, respectively. The proposed cisternally exposed domain contains eight repetitive motifs of approximately 24 residues. Surprisingly, POM152 deletion mutants were viable and their growth rate was indistinguishable from that of wild-type cells at temperatures between 17 and 37 degrees C. However, overproduction of POM152 inhibited cell growth. When expressed in mouse 3T3 cells, POM152 was found to be localized to the pore membrane, suggesting a conserved sorting pathway between yeast and mammals. PMID:8138573

  13. Characterization of the pattern of alphas1- and beta-casein breakdown and release of a bioactive peptide by a cell envelope proteinase from Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. lactis CRL 581.

    PubMed

    Hebert, Elvira María; Mamone, Gianfranco; Picariello, Gianluca; Raya, Raúl R; Savoy, Graciela; Ferranti, Pasquale; Addeo, Francesco

    2008-06-01

    The cell envelope-associated proteinases (CEPs) of the lactobacilli have key roles in bacterial nutrition and contribute to the development of the organoleptic properties of fermented milk products as well, as they can release bioactive health-beneficial peptides from milk proteins. The influence of the peptide supply, carbohydrate source, and osmolites on the CEP activity of the cheese starter Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. lactis CRL 581 was investigated. The CEP activity levels were controlled by the peptide content of the growth medium. The maximum activity was observed in a basal minimal defined medium, whereas in the presence of Casitone, Casamino Acids, or yeast extract, the synthesis of CEP was inhibited 99-, 70-, and 68-fold, respectively. The addition of specific di- or tripeptides containing branched-chain amino acids, such as leucylleucine, prolylleucine, leucylglycylglycine, or leucylproline, to the growth medium negatively affected CEP activity, whereas dipeptides without branched-chain amino acids had no effect on the enzyme's production. The carbon source and osmolites did not affect CEP activity. The CEP of L. delbrueckii subsp. lactis CRL 581 exhibited a mixed-type CEP(I/III) variant caseinolytic specificity. Mass-spectrometric screening of the main peptide peaks isolated by reverse-phase high-pressure liquid chromatography allowed the identification of 33 and 32 peptides in the alpha(s1)- and beta-casein hydrolysates, respectively. By characterizing the peptide sequence in these hydrolysates, a pattern of alpha(s1)- and beta-casein breakdown was defined and is reported herein, this being the first report for a CEP of L. delbrueckii subsp. lactis. In this pattern, a series of potentially bioactive peptides (antihypertensive and phosphopeptides) which are encrypted within the precursor protein could be visualized.

  14. Advanced Paramagnetic Resonance Spectroscopies of Iron-Sulfur Proteins: Electron Nuclear Double Resonance (ENDOR) and Electron Spin Echo Envelope Modulation (ESEEM)

    PubMed Central

    Cutsail, George E.; Telser, Joshua; Hoffman, Brian M.

    2015-01-01

    The advanced electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) techniques, electron nuclear double resonance (ENDOR) and electron spin echo envelope modulation (ESEEM) spectroscopies, provide unique insights into the structure, coordination chemistry, and biochemical mechanism of Nature’s widely distributed iron-sulfur cluster (FeS) proteins. This review describes the ENDOR and ESEEM techniques and then provides a series of case studies on their application to a wide variety of FeS proteins including ferredoxins, nitrogenase, and radical SAM enzymes. PMID:25686535

  15. SAFEGUARDS ENVELOPE

    SciTech Connect

    Duc Cao; Richard Metcalf

    2010-07-01

    The Safeguards Envelope is a strategy to determine a set of specific operating parameters within which nuclear facilities may operate to maximize safeguards effectiveness without sacrificing safety or plant efficiency. This paper details advanced statistical techniques that will be applied to real plant process monitoring (PM) data from the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP). In a simulation based on this data, multi-tank and multi-attribute correlations were tested against synthetic diversion scenarios. Kernel regression smoothing was used to fit a curve to the historical data, and multivariable, residual analysis and cumulative sum techniques set parameters for operating conditions. Diversion scenarios were created and tested, showing improved results when compared with a previous study utilizing only one-variable Z-testing. A brief analysis of the impact of the safeguards optimization on the rest of plant efficiency, criticality concerns, and overall requirements is presented.

  16. Autographa californica nuclear polyhedrosis virus: subcellular localization and protein trafficking of BV/ODV-E26 to intranuclear membranes and viral envelopes.

    PubMed

    Beniya, H; Braunagel, S C; Summers, M D

    1998-01-05

    The Autographa californica nuclear polyhedrosis virus da26 gene codes for an envelope protein of both budded virus (BV) and occlusion derived virus (ODV). Western blot and temporal analysis of infected cell extracts detected a protein of 26 kDa by 4 h postinfection (p.i.). The amount of protein increased by 16 h p.i. and remained at high levels throughout infection. By 36 h p.i. several additional immunoreactive proteins were detected which migrated at approximately 18 kDa and remained through 96 h p.i. Western blot analysis of purified virus envelope and nucleocapsid preparations revealed that both the 26- and 18-kDa proteins are structural proteins of the envelope of BV and ODV. Immunoelectron microscopy performed at a time when only the 26-kDa species of the protein was present confirmed that the protein located to ODV envelope. The protein was named BV/ODV-E26 to designate incorporation into viral progeny, envelope location, and apparent molecular weight. Studies designed to follow localization of BV/ODV-E26 demonstrated that early in infection, the protein was incorporated into cytoplasmic vesicles and by 16 h p.i., BV/ODV-E26 was detected in the nucleus associated with virus-induced intranuclear microvesicles and ODV envelope. Coimmunoprecipitation and yeast two-hybrid assays showed that BV/ODV-E26 and FP25K were capable of interacting with each other to form a complex and coimmunoprecipitation assays indicated that cellular actin was a third component of this complex. Together, these data suggest that FP25K and cellular actin may participate in the regulation, or movement through the cell, of baculovirus proteins and/or virus nucleocapsids.

  17. The nuclear pore complex protein ALADIN is anchored via NDC1 but not via POM121 and GP210 in the nuclear envelope

    SciTech Connect

    Kind, Barbara; Koehler, Katrin; Lorenz, Mike; Huebner, Angela

    2009-12-11

    The nuclear pore complex (NPC) consists of {approx}30 different proteins and provides the only sites for macromolecular transport between cytoplasm and nucleus. ALADIN was discovered as a new member of the NPC. Mutations in ALADIN are known to cause triple A syndrome, a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by adrenal insufficiency, alacrima, and achalasia. The function and exact location of the nucleoporin ALADIN within the NPC multiprotein complex is still unclear. Using a siRNA-based approach we downregulated the three known membrane integrated nucleoporins NDC1, GP210, and POM121 in stably expressing GFP-ALADIN HeLa cells. We identified NDC1 but not GP210 and POM121 as the main anchor of ALADIN within the NPC. Solely the depletion of NDC1 caused mislocalization of ALADIN. Vice versa, the depletion of ALADIN led also to disappearance of NDC1 at the NPC. However, the downregulation of two further membrane-integral nucleoporins GP210 and POM121 had no effect on ALADIN localization. Furthermore, we could show a direct association of NDC1 and ALADIN in NPCs by fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) measurements. Based on our findings we conclude that ALADIN is anchored in the nuclear envelope via NDC1 and that this interaction gets lost, if ALADIN is mutated. The loss of integration of ALADIN in the NPC is a main pathogenetic aspect for the development of the triple A syndrome and suggests that the interaction between ALADIN and NDC1 may be involved in the pathogenesis of the disease.

  18. Nuclear envelope assembly is promoted by phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C with selective recruitment of phosphatidylinositol-enriched membranes

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    Nuclear envelope (NE) formation in a cell-free egg extract proceeds by precursor membrane vesicle binding to chromatin in an ATP-dependent manner, followed by a GTP-induced NE assembly step. The requirement for GTP in the latter step of this process can be mimicked by addition of bacterial PI-PLC [phosphoinositide (PtdIns)-specific phospholipase C]. The NE assembly process is here dissected in relation to the requirement for endogenous phosphoinositide metabolism, employing recombinant eukaryotic PI-PLC, inhibitors and direct phospholipid analysis using ESI-MS (electrospray ionization mass spectrometry). PtdIns (phosphatidylinositol) species analysis by ESI-MS indicates that the chromatin-bound NE precursor vesicles are enriched for specific PtdIns species. Moreover, during GTP-induced precursor vesicle fusion, the membrane vesicles become partially depleted of the PtdIns 18:0/20:4 species. These data indicate that eukaryotic PI-PLC can support NE formation, and the sensitivity to exogenous recombinant PtdIns-5-phosphatases shows that the endogenous PLC hydrolyses a 5-phosphorylated species. It is shown further that the downstream target of this DAG (diacylglycerol) pathway does not involve PKC (protein kinase C) catalytic function, but is mimicked by phorbol esters, indicating a possible engagement of one of the non-PKC phorbol ester receptors. The results show that ESI-MS can be used as a sensitive means to measure the lipid composition of biological membranes and their changes during, for example, membrane fusogenic events. We have exploited this and the intervention studies to illustrate a pivotal role for PI-PLC and its product DAG in the formation of NEs. PMID:15554872

  19. SEPT12/SPAG4/LAMINB1 Complexes Are Required for Maintaining the Integrity of the Nuclear Envelope in Postmeiotic Male Germ Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yeh, Chung-Hsin; Kuo, Pao-Lin; Wang, Ya-Yun; Wu, Ying-Yu; Chen, Mei-Feng; Lin, Ding-Yen; Lai, Tsung-Hsuan; Chiang, Han-Sun; Lin, Ying-Hung

    2015-01-01

    Male infertility affects approximately 50% of all infertile couples. The male-related causes of intracytoplasmic sperm injection failure include the absence of sperm, immotile or immature sperm, and sperm with structural defects such as those caused by premature chromosomal condensation and DNA damage. Our previous studies based on a knockout mice model indicated that SEPT12 proteins are critical for the terminal morphological formation of sperm. SEPT12 mutations in men result in teratozospermia and oligozospermia. In addition, the spermatozoa exhibit morphological defects of the head and tail, premature chromosomal condensation, and nuclear damage. However, the molecular functions of SEPT12 during spermatogenesis remain unclear. To determine the molecular functions of SEPT12, we applied a yeast 2-hybrid system to identify SEPT12 interactors. Seven proteins that interact with SEPT12 were identified: SEPT family proteins (SEPT4 and SEPT6), nuclear or nuclear membrane proteins (protamine 2, sperm-associated antigen 4, and NDC1 transmembrane nucleoproine), and sperm-related structural proteins (pericentriolar material 1 and obscurin-like 1). Sperm-associated antigen 4 (SPAG4; also known as SUN4) belongs to the SUN family of proteins and acts as a linker protein between nucleoskeleton and cytoskeleton proteins and localizes in the nuclear membrane. We determined that SEPT12 interacts with SPAG4 in a male germ cell line through coimmunoprecipitation. During human spermiogenesis, SEPT12 is colocalized with SPAG4 near the nuclear periphery in round spermatids and in the centrosome region in elongating spermatids. Furthermore, we observed that SEPT12/SPAG4/LAMINB1 formed complexes and were coexpressed in the nuclear periphery of round spermatids. In addition, mutated SEPT12, which was screened from an infertile man, affected the integration of these nuclear envelope complexes through coimmunoprecipitation. This was the first study that suggested that SEPT proteins link to

  20. VAP-B binds to Rab3GAP1 at the ER: its implication in nuclear envelope formation through the ER-Golgi intermediate compartment.

    PubMed

    Hantan, Degejirihu; Yamamoto, Yasunori; Sakisaka, Toshiaki

    2014-10-01

    The vesicle-associated membrane protein-associated protein B (VAP-B) is a tail-anchored protein in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). VAP-B functions as an adaptor protein to recruit target proteins to the ER and execute various cellular functions, lipid transport, membrane traffic, ER stress etc. Recently, VAP-B has been shown to regulate the nuclear envelope protein transport through the ER-Golgi intermediate compartment (ERGIC). We showed here that VAP-B directly binds to Rab3 GTPase activating protein 1 (Rab3GAP1), the catalytic subunit of Rab3GAP, through the two phenylalanines (FF) in an acidic tract (FFAT)-like motif of Rab3GAP1. Rab3GAP consists of two subunits, the catalytic subunit Rab3GAP1 and the non-catalytic subunit Rab3GAP2. VAP-B binds to Rab3GAP1 even in the Rab3GAP1/2 heterodimer complex. A single amino acid substitution of the FFAT-like motif reduces the binding activity of Rab3GAP1 to VAP-B. On the other hand, the FFAT-like motif mutation increases the binding activity of Rab3GAP1 to ERGIC-53, the ERGIC marker protein. Overexpression of Rab3GAP1 affects nuclear envelope formation more potently than that of Rab3GAP1 FFAT-like motif mutant. These results suggest that the binding of VAP-B to Rab3GAP1 is implicated in the regulation of nuclear envelope formation through ERGIC.

  1. A-type and B-type lamins initiate layer assembly at distinct areas of the nuclear envelope in living cells

    SciTech Connect

    Furukawa, Kazuhiro; Ishida, Kazuya; Tsunoyama, Taka-aki; Toda, Suguru; Osoda, Shinichi; Horigome, Tsuneyoshi; Fisher, Paul A.; Sugiyama, Shin

    2009-04-15

    To investigate nuclear lamina re-assembly in vivo, Drosophila A-type and B-type lamins were artificially expressed in Drosophila lamin Dm{sub 0}null mutant brain cells. Both exogenous lamin C (A-type) and Dm{sub 0} (B-type) formed sub-layers at the nuclear periphery, and efficiently reverted the abnormal clustering of the NPC. Lamin C initially appeared where NPCs were clustered, and subsequently extended along the nuclear periphery accompanied by the recovery of the regular distribution of NPCs. In contrast, lamin Dm{sub 0} did not show association with the clustered NPCs during lamina formation and NPC spacing recovered only after completion of a closed lamin Dm{sub 0} layer. Further, when lamin Dm{sub 0} and C were both expressed, they did not co-polymerize, initiating layer formation in separate regions. Thus, A and B-type lamins reveal differing properties during lamina assembly, with A-type having the primary role in organizing NPC distribution. This previously unknown complexity in the assembly of the nuclear lamina could be the basis for intricate nuclear envelope functions.

  2. toca-1 is in a novel pathway that functions in parallel with a SUN-KASH nuclear envelope bridge to move nuclei in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yu-Tai; Dranow, Daniel; Kuhn, Jonathan; Meyerzon, Marina; Ngo, Minh; Ratner, Dmitry; Warltier, Karin; Starr, Daniel A

    2013-01-01

    Moving the nucleus to an intracellular location is critical to many fundamental cell and developmental processes, including cell migration, differentiation, fertilization, and establishment of cellular polarity. Bridges of SUN and KASH proteins span the nuclear envelope and mediate many nuclear positioning events, but other pathways function independently through poorly characterized mechanisms. To identify and characterize novel mechanisms of nuclear migration, we conducted a nonbiased forward genetic screen for mutations that enhanced the nuclear migration defect of unc-84, which encodes a SUN protein. In Caenorhabditis elegans larvae, failure of hypodermal P-cell nuclear migration results in uncoordinated and egg-laying-defective animals. The process of P-cell nuclear migration in unc-84 null animals is temperature sensitive; at 25° migration fails in unc-84 mutants, but at 15° the migration occurs normally. We hypothesized that an additional pathway functions in parallel to the unc-84 pathway to move P-cell nuclei at 15°. In support of our hypothesis, forward genetic screens isolated eight emu (enhancer of the nuclear migration defect of unc-84) mutations that disrupt nuclear migration only in a null unc-84 background. The yc20 mutant was determined to carry a mutation in the toca-1 gene. TOCA-1 functions to move P-cell nuclei in a cell-autonomous manner. TOCA-1 is conserved in humans, where it functions to nucleate and organize actin during endocytosis. Therefore, we have uncovered a player in a previously unknown, likely actin-dependent, pathway that functions to move nuclei in parallel to SUN-KASH bridges. The other emu mutations potentially represent other components of this novel pathway.

  3. A Fungal Sarcolemmal Membrane-Associated Protein (SLMAP) Homolog Plays a Fundamental Role in Development and Localizes to the Nuclear Envelope, Endoplasmic Reticulum, and Mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Nordzieke, Steffen; Zobel, Thomas; Fränzel, Benjamin; Wolters, Dirk A.

    2014-01-01

    Sarcolemmal membrane-associated protein (SLMAP) is a tail-anchored protein involved in fundamental cellular processes, such as myoblast fusion, cell cycle progression, and chromosomal inheritance. Further, SLMAP misexpression is associated with endothelial dysfunctions in diabetes and cancer. SLMAP is part of the conserved striatin-interacting phosphatase and kinase (STRIPAK) complex required for specific signaling pathways in yeasts, filamentous fungi, insects, and mammals. In filamentous fungi, STRIPAK was initially discovered in Sordaria macrospora, a model system for fungal differentiation. Here, we functionally characterize the STRIPAK subunit PRO45, a homolog of human SLMAP. We show that PRO45 is required for sexual propagation and cell-to-cell fusion and that its forkhead-associated (FHA) domain is essential for these processes. Protein-protein interaction studies revealed that PRO45 binds to STRIPAK subunits PRO11 and SmMOB3, which are also required for sexual propagation. Superresolution structured-illumination microscopy (SIM) further established that PRO45 localizes to the nuclear envelope, endoplasmic reticulum, and mitochondria. SIM also showed that localization to the nuclear envelope requires STRIPAK subunits PRO11 and PRO22, whereas for mitochondria it does not. Taken together, our study provides important insights into fundamental roles of the fungal SLMAP homolog PRO45 and suggests STRIPAK-related and STRIPAK-unrelated functions. PMID:25527523

  4. Task breakdown

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pavlich, Jane

    1990-01-01

    The topics concerning the Center for Space Construction (CSC) space construction breakdown structure are presented in viewgraph form. It is concluded that four components describe a task -- effecting, information gathering, analysis, and regulation; uncertainties effect the relative amount of information gathering and analysis that occurs; and that task timing requirements drive the 'location in time' of cognition.

  5. The Use of Two-Photon FRET-FLIM to Study Protein Interactions During Nuclear Envelope Fusion In Vivo and In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Byrne, Richard D; Larijani, Banafshé; Poccia, Dominic L

    2016-01-01

    FRET-FLIM techniques have wide application in the study of protein and protein-lipid interactions in cells. We have pioneered an imaging platform for accurate detection of functional states of proteins and their interactions in fixed cells. This platform, two-site-amplified Förster resonance energy transfer (a-FRET), allows greater signal generation while retaining minimal noise thus enabling application of fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) to be routinely deployed in different types of cells and tissue. We have used the method described here, time-resolved FRET monitored by two-photon FLIM, to demonstrate the direct interaction of Phospholipase Cγ (PLCγ) by Src Family Kinase 1 (SFK1) during nuclear envelope formation and during male and female pronuclear membrane fusion in fertilized sea urchin eggs. We describe here a generic method that can be applied to monitor any proteins of interest.

  6. Electrical Breakdown in Solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hjalmarson, Harold; Zutavern, Fred; Kambour, Kenneth; Moore, Chris; Mar, Alan

    During electron breakdown of a solid subjected to a large electric field, impact ionization causes growth of an electron-hole plasma. This growth process is opposed by Auger recombination of the electron-hole pairs. In our work, such breakdown is investigated by obtaining steady-state solutions to the Boltzmann equation. In these calculations, the carriers are heated by the electric field and cooled by phonon emission. Our results imply that breakdown may lead to high carrier-density current filaments. Conductive filaments have been observed in optically-triggered, high-power photoconductive semiconductor switch (PCSS) devices being developed at Sandia Labs. The relationship between the steady-state computed solutions to the observed filaments will be discussed in the presentation. This work was supported by the Laboratory Directed Research and Development program at Sandia National Laboratories. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  7. Fast regulation of AP-1 activity through interaction of lamin A/C, ERK1/2, and c-Fos at the nuclear envelope

    PubMed Central

    González, José María; Navarro-Puche, Ana; Casar, Berta; Crespo, Piero; Andrés, Vicente

    2008-01-01

    Sequestration of c-Fos at the nuclear envelope (NE) through interaction with A-type lamins suppresses AP-1–dependent transcription. We show here that c-Fos accumulation within the extraction-resistant nuclear fraction (ERNF) and its interaction with lamin A are reduced and enhanced by gain-of and loss-of ERK1/2 activity, respectively. Moreover, hindering ERK1/2-dependent phosphorylation of c-Fos attenuates its release from the ERNF induced by serum and promotes its interaction with lamin A. Accordingly, serum stimulation rapidly releases preexisting c-Fos from the NE via ERK1/2-dependent phosphorylation, leading to a fast activation of AP-1 before de novo c-Fos synthesis. Moreover, lamin A–null cells exhibit increased AP-1 activity and reduced levels of c-Fos phosphorylation. We also find that active ERK1/2 interacts with lamin A and colocalizes with c-Fos and A-type lamins at the NE. Thus, NE-bound ERK1/2 functions as a molecular switch for rapid mitogen-dependent AP-1 activation through phosphorylation-induced release of preexisting c-Fos from its inhibitory interaction with lamin A/C. PMID:19015316

  8. Inhibition of TGF-β Signaling at the Nuclear Envelope: Characterization of Interactions between MAN1, Smad2 and 3, and PPM1A

    PubMed Central

    Bourgeois, Benjamin; Gilquin, Bernard; Tellier-Lebègue, Carine; Östlund, Cecilia; Wu, Wei; Pérez, Javier; El Hage, Perla; Lallemand, François; Worman, Howard J.; Zinn-Justin, Sophie

    2013-01-01

    Signaling by transforming growth factor–β (TGF-β) is critical for various developmental processes and culminates in the activation of the transcription factors Smad2 and Smad3. MAN1, an integral protein of the inner nuclear membrane, inhibits TGF-β signalling by binding to Smad2 and Smad3. Depletion of the gene LEMD3 encoding MAN1 leads to developmental anomalies in mice, and heterozygous loss-of-function mutations in LEMD3 in humans cause sclerosing bone dysplasia. We modeled the three-dimensional structure of the MAN1-Smad2 complex from nuclear magnetic resonance and small angle x-ray scattering data. As predicted by this model, we found that MAN1 competed in vitro and in cells with the transcription factor FAST1 (forkhead activin signal transducer 1) for binding to Smad2. The model further predicted that MAN1 bound to activated Smad2-Smad4 or Smad3-Smad4 complexes, which was confirmed by in vitro experiments; however, in cells, MAN1 bound only to Smad2 and Smad3, and not to the Smad4-containing complexes. Overexpression of MAN1 led to dephosphorylation of Smad2 and Smad3, thus hindering their recognition by Smad4, and MAN1 bound directly in vitro to the phosphatase PPM1A, which catalyzes the dephosphorylation of Smad2/3. These results demonstrate a nuclear envelope-localized mechanism of inactivating TGF-β signaling in which MAN1 competes with transcription factors for binding to Smad2 and Smad3 and facilitates their dephosphorylation by PPM1A. PMID:23779087

  9. Evaluation of nitrogen nuclear hyperfine and quadrupole coupling parameters for the proximal imidazole in myoglobin-azide, -cyanide, and -mercaptoethanol complexes by electron spin echo envelope modulation spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Magliozzo, R S; Peisach, J

    1993-08-24

    Electron spin echo envelope modulation (ESEEM) spectroscopy and computer simulation of spectra has been used to evaluate the nitrogen nuclear hyperfine and quadrupole coupling parameters for the proximal imidazole nitrogen directly coordinated to iron in three low-spin heme complexes, myoglobin-azide, -cyanide, and -mercaptoethanol (MbN3, MbCN, and MbRS). The variability in the weak electron-nuclear coupling parameters reveals the electronic flexibility within the heme group that depends on properties of the exogenous ligands. For example, the isotropic component of the nitrogen nuclear hyperfine coupling ranges from 4.4 MHz for MbN3 to 2.2 MHz for both MbCN and MbRS. The weaker coupling in MbCN and MbRS is taken as evidence for delocalization of unpaired electron spin from iron into the exogenous anionic ligands. The value of e2Qq, the nuclear quadrupole coupling constant for the axial imidazole nitrogen in MbCN and MbRS, was 2.5 MHz but was significantly larger, 3.2 MHz, in MbN3. This large value is considered evidence for a weakened sigma bond between the proximal imidazole and ferric iron in this form, and for a feature contributing to the origin of the high spin-low spin equilibrium exhibited by MbN3 [Beetlestone, J., & George, P. (1964) Biochemistry 5, 707-714]. The ESEEM results have allowed a correlation to be made between the orientation of the g tensor axes, the orientation of the p-pi orbital of the proximal imidazole nitrogen, and sigma- and pi-bonding features of the axial ligands. Furthermore, the proximal imidazole is suggested to act as a pi-acceptor in low-spin heme complexes in order to support strong sigma electron donation from the lone pair orbital to iron. An evaluation of the nitrogen nuclear hyperfine coupling parameters for the porphyrin pyrrole sites in MbRS reveals a large inequivalence in isotropic components consistent with an orientation of rhombic axes (and g tensor axes) that eclipses the Fe-Npyrrole vector directions.

  10. Effects of globularifolin on cell survival, nuclear factor-κB activity, neopterin production, tryptophan breakdown and free radicals in vitro.

    PubMed

    Sipahi, Hande; Becker, Kathrin; Gostner, Johanna M; Charehsaz, Mohammad; Kirmizibekmez, Hasan; Schennach, Harald; Aydin, Ahmet; Fuchs, Dietmar

    2014-01-01

    The potential effects of globularifolin, an acylated iridoid glucoside, on cell survival, inflammation markers and free radicals scavenging were investigated. Viability assay on human myelomomonocytic cell line THP-1 and human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) using the Cell-Titer Blue assay proved that globularifolin had no toxic effect at the tested concentrations. Conversely, it is proportional to the dose globularifolin increased growth of THP-1 cells (p <0.01). On human PBMC, globularifolin at 6.25 and 12.5 μM concentrations showed a stimulatory effect, while at 12.5-200 μM it suppressed response of PBMC to stimulation with phytohemagglutinin (PHA). Globularifolin (50-200 μM) enhanced neopterin formation dose-dependently, whereas tryptophan breakdown was not influenced. At 50-200 μM in unstimulated PBMC in THP-1 cells, globularifolin induced a significant expression of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) as was quantified by Quanti-Blue assay. By contrast, in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated cells, the higher concentrations of globularifolin suppressed NF-κB expression dose-dependently and a significant decrease was observed at 200 μM concentration. A positive correlation was found between increased neopterin and NF-κB activity (p <0.01). Similarly, a positive correlation was observed between neopterin levels in mitogen-induced cells and NF-κB activity in LPS-stimulated cells after treatment with globularifolin (p=0.001). The free radical scavenging capacity of globularifolin evaluated by Oxygen Radical Absorbance Capacity (ORAC) assay showed relative ORAC values of 0.36±0.05 μmol Trolox equivalent/μmol. All together, results show that natural antioxidant globularifolin might represent a potential immunomodulatory as well as proliferative agent, which deserves further in vitro and in vivo studies.

  11. Nuclear envelope proteins Nesprin2 and LaminA regulate proliferation and apoptosis of vascular endothelial cells in response to shear stress.

    PubMed

    Han, Yue; Wang, Lu; Yao, Qing-Ping; Zhang, Ping; Liu, Bo; Wang, Guo-Liang; Shen, Bao-Rong; Cheng, Binbin; Wang, Yingxiao; Jiang, Zong-Lai; Qi, Ying-Xin

    2015-05-01

    The dysfunction of vascular endothelial cells (ECs) influenced by flow shear stress is crucial for vascular remodeling. However, the roles of nuclear envelope (NE) proteins in shear stress-induced EC dysfunction are still unknown. Our results indicated that, compared with normal shear stress (NSS), low shear stress (LowSS) suppressed the expression of two types of NE proteins, Nesprin2 and LaminA, and increased the proliferation and apoptosis of ECs. Targeted small interfering RNA (siRNA) and gene overexpression plasmid transfection revealed that Nesprin2 and LaminA participate in the regulation of EC proliferation and apoptosis. A protein/DNA array was further used to detect the activation of transcription factors in ECs following transfection with target siRNAs and overexpression plasmids. The regulation of AP-2 and TFIID mediated by Nesprin2 and the activation of Stat-1, Stat-3, Stat-5 and Stat-6 by LaminA were verified under shear stress. Furthermore, using Ingenuity Pathway Analysis software and real-time RT-PCR, the effects of Nesprin2 or LaminA on the downstream target genes of AP-2, TFIID, and Stat-1, Stat-3, Stat-5 and Stat-6, respectively, were investigated under LowSS. Our study has revealed that NE proteins are novel mechano-sensitive molecules in ECs. LowSS suppresses the expression of Nesprin2 and LaminA, which may subsequently modulate the activation of important transcription factors and eventually lead to EC dysfunction.

  12. DC Breakdown Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Calatroni, S.; Descoeudres, A.; Levinsen, Y.; Taborelli, M.; Wuensch, W.

    2009-01-22

    In the context of the CLIC (Compact Linear Collider) project investigations of DC breakdown in ultra high vacuum are carried out in parallel with high power RF tests. From the point of view of saturation breakdown field the best material tested so far is stainless steel, followed by titanium. Copper shows a four times weaker breakdown field than stainless steel. The results indicate clearly that the breakdown events are initiated by field emission current and that the breakdown field is limited by the cathode. In analogy to RF, the breakdown probability has been measured in DC and the data show similar behaviour as a function of electric field.

  13. Spectrin Repeat Containing Nuclear Envelope 1 and Forkhead Box Protein E1 Are Promising Markers for the Detection of Colorectal Cancer in Blood

    PubMed Central

    Melotte, Veerle; Yi, Joo Mi; Lentjes, Marjolein H.F.M.; Smits, Kim M.; Van Neste, Leander; Niessen, Hanneke E.C.; Wouters, Kim A.D.; Louwagie, Joost; Schuebel, Kornel E.; Herman, James G.; Baylin, Stephen B.; van Criekinge, Wim; Meijer, Gerrit A.; Ahuja, Nita; van Engeland, Manon

    2015-01-01

    Identifying biomarkers in body fluids may improve the noninvasive detection of colorectal cancer. Previously, we identified N-Myc downstream-regulated gene 4 (NDRG4) and GATA binding protein 5 (GATA5) methylation as promising biomarkers for colorectal cancer in stool DNA. Here, we examined the utility of NDRG4, GATA5, and two additional markers [Forkhead box protein E1 (FOXE1) and spectrin repeat containing nuclear envelope 1 (SYNE1)] promoter methylation as biomarkers in plasma DNA. Quantitative methylation-specific PCR was performed on plasma DNA from 220 patients with colorectal cancer and 684 noncancer controls, divided in a training set and a test set. Receiver operating characteristic analysis was performed to measure the area under the curve of GATA5, NDRG4, SYNE1, and FOXE1 methylation. Functional assays were performed in SYNE1 and FOXE1 stably transfected cell lines. The sensitivity of NDRG4, GATA5, FOXE1, and SYNE1 methylation in all stages of colorectal cancer (154 cases, 444 controls) was 27% [95% confidence interval (CI), 20%–34%), 18% (95% CI, 12%–24%), 46% (95% CI, 38%– 54%), and 47% (95% CI, 39%–55%), with a specificity of 95% (95% CI, 93%–97%), 99% (95% CI, 98%–100%), 93% (95% CI, 91%–95%), and 96% (95% CI, 94%–98%), respectively. Combining SYNE1 and FOXE1, increased the sensitivity to 56% (95% CI, 48%–64%), while the specificity decreased to 90% (95% CI, 87%–93%) in the training set and to 58% sensitivity (95% CI, 46%–70%) and 91% specificity (95% CI, 80%–100%) in a test set (66 cases, 240 controls). SYNE1 overexpression showed no major differences in cell proliferation, migration, and invasion compared with controls. Overexpression of FOXE1 significantly decreased the number of colonies in SW480 and HCT116 cell lines. Overall, our data suggest that SYNE1 and FOXE1 are promising markers for colorectal cancer detection. PMID:25538088

  14. Novel Ca2+ increases in the maturing oocytes of starfish during the germinal vesicle breakdown.

    PubMed

    Limatola, Nunzia; Chun, Jong T; Kyozuka, Keiichiro; Santella, Luigia

    2015-11-01

    It has been known that the intracellular Ca(2+) level transiently rises at the specific stages of mitosis such as the moment of nuclear envelope breakdown and at the metaphase-anaphase transition. Comparable intracellular Ca(2+) increases may also take place during meiosis, as was intermittently reported in mouse, Xenopus, and starfish oocytes. In a majority of starfish species, the maturing oocytes display an intracellular Ca(2+) increase within few minutes after the addition of the maturation hormone, 1-methyladenine (1-MA). Although starfish oocytes at meiosis also manifest a Ca(2+) increase at the time of polar body extrusion, a similar Ca(2+) increase has never been observed during the envelope breakdown of the nucleus (germinal vesicle, GV). Here, we report, for the first time, the existence of an additional Ca(2+) response in the maturing oocytes of Asterina pectinifera at the time of GV breakdown. In contrast to the immediate early Ca(2+) response to 1-MA, which is independent of external Ca(2+) and takes a form of intracellular Ca(2+) wave traveling three times as fast as that in the fertilized eggs, this late stage Ca(2+) response comprised a train of numerous spikes representing Ca(2+) influx. These Ca(2+) spikes coinciding with GV breakdown were mostly eliminated when the GV was removed from the oocytes prior to the addition of 1-MA, suggesting that the Ca(2+) spikes are rather a consequence of the GV breakdown. In support of the idea that these Ca(2+) spikes play a physiological role, the oocytes matured in calcium-free seawater had a higher rate of cleavage failure 2h after the fertilization in natural seawater. Specific inhibitors of L-type Ca(2+) channels, verapamil and diltiazem, severely suppressed the amplitude of the individual Ca(2+) spikes, but not their frequencies. On the other hand, latrunculin-A (LAT-A), which promotes net depolymerization of the actin cytoskeleton, had a dual effect on this late Ca(2+) response. When added immediately

  15. Elevated temperature envelope forming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burg, Bruce M. (Inventor); Gane, David H. (Inventor); Starowski, Robert M. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    Elevated temperature envelope forming includes enclosing a part blank and form tool within an envelope sealed against the atmosphere, heat treating the combination while forming pressure holds the envelope and part against the form tool, and allowing part cool down to occur in an inert atmosphere with forming pressure removed. The forming pressure is provided by evacuating the envelope and may be aided by differential force applied between the envelope and the form tool.

  16. Dynamics of Sun5 Localization during Spermatogenesis in Wild Type and Dpy19l2 Knock-Out Mice Indicates That Sun5 Is Not Involved in Acrosome Attachment to the Nuclear Envelope

    PubMed Central

    Yassine, Sandra; Escoffier, Jessica; Nahed, Roland Abi; Pierre, Virginie; Karaouzene, Thomas; Ray, Pierre F.; Arnoult, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    The acrosome is an organelle that is central to sperm physiology and a defective acrosome biogenesis leads to globozoospermia, a severe male infertility. The identification of the actors involved in acrosome biogenesis is therefore particularly important to decipher the molecular pathogeny of globozoospermia. We recently showed that a defect in the DPY19L2 gene is present in more than 70% of globozoospermic men and demonstrated that Dpy19l2, located in the inner nuclear membrane, is the first protein involved in the attachment of the acrosome to the nuclear envelope (NE). SUN proteins serve to link the nuclear envelope to the cytoskeleton and are therefore good candidates to participate in acrosome-nucleus attachment, potentially by interacting with DPY19L2. In order to characterize new actors of acrosomal attachment, we focused on Sun5 (also called Spag4l), which is highly expressed in male germ cells, and investigated its localization during spermatogenesis. Using immunohistochemistry and Western blot experiments in mice, we showed that Sun5 transits through different cellular compartments during meiosis. In pachytene spermatocytes, it is located in a membranous compartment different to the reticulum. In round spermatids, it progresses to the Golgi and the NE before to be located to the tail/head junction in epididymal sperm. Interestingly, we demonstrate that Sun5 is not, as initially reported, facing the acrosome but is in fact excluded from this zone. Moreover, we show that in Dpy19l2 KO spermatids, upon the detachment of the acrosome, Sun5 relocalizes to the totality of the NE suggesting that the acrosome attachment excludes Sun5 from the NE facing the acrosome. Finally, Western-blot experiments demonstrate that Sun5 is glycosylated. Overall, our work, associated with other publications, strongly suggests that the attachment of the acrosome to the nucleus does not likely depend on the formation of SUN complexes. PMID:25775128

  17. Vortex breakdown simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakamura, Y.; Leonard, A.; Spalart, P. R.

    1985-01-01

    A vortex breakdown was simulated by the vortex filament method, and detailed figures are presented based on the results. Deformations of the vortex filaments showed clear and large swelling at a particular axial station which implied the presence of a recirculation bubble at that station. The tendency for two breakdowns to occur experimentally was confirmed by the simulation, and the jet flow inside the bubble was well simulated. The particle paths spiralled with expansion, and the streamlines took spiral forms at the breakdown with expansion.

  18. Temporal Differences in the Appearance of NEP-B78 and an LBR-like Protein during Xenopus Nuclear Envelope Reassembly Reflect the Ordered Recruitment of Functionally Discrete Vesicle Types

    PubMed Central

    Drummond, Sheona; Ferrigno, Paul; Lyon, Carol; Murphy, Jackie; Goldberg, Martin; Allen, Terry; Smythe, Carl; Hutchison, Christopher J.

    1999-01-01

    In this work, we have used novel mAbs against two proteins of the endoplasmic reticulum and outer nuclear membrane, termed NEP-B78 and p65, in addition to a polyclonal antibody against the inner nuclear membrane protein LBR (lamin B receptor), to study the order and dynamics of NE reassembly in the Xenopus cell-free system. Using these reagents, we demonstrate differences in the timing of recruitment of their cognate membrane proteins to the surface of decondensing chromatin in both the cell-free system and XLK-2 cells. We show unequivocally that, in the cell-free system, two functionally and biochemically distinct vesicle types are necessary for NE assembly. We find that the process of distinct vesicle recruitment to chromatin is an ordered one and that NEP-B78 defines a vesicle population involved in the earliest events of reassembly in this system. Finally, we present evidence that NEP-B78 may be required for the targeting of these vesicles to the surface of decondensing chromatin in this system. The results have important implications for the understanding of the mechanisms of nuclear envelope disassembly and reassembly during mitosis and for the development of systems to identify novel molecules that control these processes. PMID:9922450

  19. Surface breakdown of silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feuerstein, R. J.; Senitzky, B.

    1991-07-01

    The surface electrical breakdown of n(+)nn(+) rectangular solid blocks of silicon was investigated. Studies were performed in air at pressures of 10 to the -6th torr and 1 atm, and in transformer oil, ethylene glycol, and deionized water, under pulsed electrical excitation. The breakdown voltage (BV) of these devices was found to increase as the dielectric constant of the ambient increased. Glow discharge cleaning of the surface in vacuum was found to have no effect on the BV. A theory of surface charging leading to field enhancement along the surface is developed on the basis of these findings.

  20. Analysis of Laser Breakdown Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Roger

    2009-03-01

    Experiments on laser breakdown for ns pulses of 532 nm or 1064 nm light in water and dozens of simple hydrocarbon liquids are analyzed and compared to widely-used models and other laser breakdown experiments reported in the literature. Particular attention is given to the curve for the probability of breakdown as a function of the laser fluence at the beam focus. Criticism is made of the na"ive forms of both ``avalanche'' breakdown and multi-photon breakdown. It appears that the process is complex and is intimately tied to the chemical group of the material. Difficulties with developing an accurate model of laser breakdown in liquids are outlined.

  1. Exclusion of mRNPs and ribosomal particles from a thin zone beneath the nuclear envelope revealed upon inhibition of transport

    SciTech Connect

    Kylberg, Karin; Bjoerk, Petra; Fomproix, Nathalie; Ivarsson, Birgitta; Wieslander, Lars; Daneholt, Bertil

    2010-04-01

    We have studied the nucleocytoplasmic transport of a specific messenger RNP (mRNP) particle, named Balbiani ring (BR) granule, and ribosomal RNP (rRNP) particles in the salivary glands of the dipteran Chironomus tentans. The passage of the RNPs through the nuclear pore complex (NPC) was inhibited with the nucleoporin-binding wheat germ agglutinin, and the effects were examined by electron microscopy. BR mRNPs bound to the nuclear basket increased in number, while BR mRNPs translocating through the central channel decreased, suggesting that the initiation of translocation proper had been inhibited. The rRNPs accumulated heavily in nucleoplasm, while no or very few rRNPs were recorded within nuclear baskets. Thus, the transport of rRNPs had been blocked prior to the entry into the baskets. Remarkably, the rRNPs had been excluded both from baskets and the space in between the baskets. We propose that normally basket fibrils move freely and repel RNPs from the exclusion zone unless the particles have affinity for and bind to nucleoporins within the baskets.

  2. Exclusion of mRNPs and ribosomal particles from a thin zone beneath the nuclear envelope revealed upon inhibition of transport.

    PubMed

    Kylberg, Karin; Björk, Petra; Fomproix, Nathalie; Ivarsson, Birgitta; Wieslander, Lars; Daneholt, Bertil

    2010-04-01

    We have studied the nucleocytoplasmic transport of a specific messenger RNP (mRNP) particle, named Balbiani ring (BR) granule, and ribosomal RNP (rRNP) particles in the salivary glands of the dipteran Chironomus tentans. The passage of the RNPs through the nuclear pore complex (NPC) was inhibited with the nucleoporin-binding wheat germ agglutinin, and the effects were examined by electron microscopy. BR mRNPs bound to the nuclear basket increased in number, while BR mRNPs translocating through the central channel decreased, suggesting that the initiation of translocation proper had been inhibited. The rRNPs accumulated heavily in nucleoplasm, while no or very few rRNPs were recorded within nuclear baskets. Thus, the transport of rRNPs had been blocked prior to the entry into the baskets. Remarkably, the rRNPs had been excluded both from baskets and the space in between the baskets. We propose that normally basket fibrils move freely and repel RNPs from the exclusion zone unless the particles have affinity for and bind to nucleoporins within the baskets.

  3. Beauty in the Breakdown

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brisco, Nicole

    2008-01-01

    Most human beings look at erosion as the destruction of a surface, but artists can see that erosion often creates indefinable beauty. Where do you see beauty in the breakdown? In this article, the author presents an innovative lesson that would allow students to observe both human and physical nature. In this activity students will create a work…

  4. Measuring Breakdown Voltage.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Auer, Herbert J.

    1978-01-01

    The article discusses an aspect of conductivity, one of the electrical properties subdivisions, and describes a tester that can be shop-built. Breakdown voltage of an insulation material is specifically examined. Test procedures, parts lists, diagrams, and test data form are included. (MF)

  5. SAFEGUARDS ENVELOPE: PREVIOUS WORK AND EXAMPLES

    SciTech Connect

    Richard Metcalf; Aaron Bevill; William Charlton; Robert Bean

    2008-07-01

    The future expansion of nuclear power will require not just electricity production but fuel cycle facilities such as fuel fabrication and reprocessing plants. As large reprocessing facilities are built in various states, they must be built and operated in a manner to minimize the risk of nuclear proliferation. Process monitoring has returned to the spotlight as an added measure that can increase confidence in the safeguards of special nuclear material (SNM). Process monitoring can be demonstrated to lengthen the allowable inventory period by reducing accountancy requirements, and to reduce the false positive indications. The next logical step is the creation of a Safeguards Envelope, a set of operational parameters and models to maximize anomaly detection and inventory period by process monitoring while minimizing operator impact and false positive rates. A brief example of a rudimentary Safeguards Envelope is presented, and shown to detect synthetic diversions overlaying a measured processing plant data set. This demonstration Safeguards Envelope is shown to increase the confidence that no SNM has been diverted with minimal operator impact, even though it is based on an information sparse environment. While the foundation on which a full Safeguards Envelope can be built has been presented in historical demonstrations of process monitoring, several requirements remain yet unfulfilled. Future work will require reprocessing plant transient models, inclusion of “non-traditional” operating data, and exploration of new methods of identifying subtle events in transient processes.

  6. Mechanism of Dissolution of Envelopes of the Extreme Halophile Halobacterium cutirubrum1

    PubMed Central

    Onishi, H.; Kushner, D. J.

    1966-01-01

    Onishi, H. (National Research Council, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada), and D. J. Kushner. Mechanism of dissolution of envelopes of the extreme halophile Halobacterium cutirubrum. J. Bacteriol. 91:646–652. 1966.—Envelopes of Halobacterium cutirubrum dissolved rapidly in media of low ionic strength. Heating partially inhibited breakdown, probably because of nonspecific protein coagulation rather than inactivation of a lytic enzyme(s). Dissolution of envelopes in water did not involve splitting of peptide bonds or protein-lipid bonds, or any extensive breakdown of carbohydrate polymers. Dissolution was increased by alcohols and urea, even at high salt concentrations, but was not affected by metabolic inhibitors. Thus, no evidence was found for a dilution-activated lytic enzyme that contributes to envelope breakdown. Cells of H. cutirubrum were stable in 2 m NaCl, but lysis occurred in 2 m KCl or NH4Cl. This lysis did not involve an extensive breakdown of the envelope. No evidence for different sites of Na+, K+, and NH4+ action was obtained from the pattern of release of envelope constituents in different concentrations of these salts. Ultracentrifugation studies showed that adding salts to envelopes that had been dissolved in water led to a nonspecific reaggregation of envelope material. No difference was seen between the effects of KCl and NaCl, except at 3 to 4 m concentrations where KCl caused more aggregation. The preferential effect of Na+ on intact cells is probably due to its ability specifically to prevent leakage rather than to an overall effect on envelope integrity. Images PMID:5883109

  7. VUV Radiation and Breakdown

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-02-28

    ultraviolet light on surface breakdown. The first experimental setup was designed so that VUV emission from an excited surface flashover event is focused onto...name attached. Garrett Rogers An experimental setup used to study pulsed dielectric surface flashover in various gases at atmospheric pressure...radiation on streamer propagation. A significant amount of VUV emission was observed from excited surface flashover events, and most of this

  8. Space Charge Modulated Electrical Breakdown

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shengtao; Zhu, Yuanwei; Min, Daomin; Chen, George

    2016-01-01

    Electrical breakdown is one of the most important physical phenomena in electrical and electronic engineering. Since the early 20th century, many theories and models of electrical breakdown have been proposed, but the origin of one key issue, that the explanation for dc breakdown strength being twice or higher than ac breakdown strength in insulating materials, remains unclear. Here, by employing a bipolar charge transport model, we investigate the space charge dynamics in both dc and ac breakdown processes. We demonstrate the differences in charge accumulations under both dc and ac stresses and estimate the breakdown strength, which is modulated by the electric field distortion induced by space charge. It is concluded that dc breakdown initializes in the bulk whereas ac breakdown initializes in the vicinity of the sample-electrode interface. Compared with dc breakdown, the lower breakdown strength under ac stress and the decreasing breakdown strength with an increase in applied frequency, are both attributed to the electric field distortion induced by space charges located in the vicinity of the electrodes. PMID:27599577

  9. Drug design from the cryptic inhibitor envelope.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chul-Jin; Liang, Xiaofei; Wu, Qinglin; Najeeb, Javaria; Zhao, Jinshi; Gopalaswamy, Ramesh; Titecat, Marie; Sebbane, Florent; Lemaitre, Nadine; Toone, Eric J; Zhou, Pei

    2016-02-25

    Conformational dynamics plays an important role in enzyme catalysis, allosteric regulation of protein functions and assembly of macromolecular complexes. Despite these well-established roles, such information has yet to be exploited for drug design. Here we show by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy that inhibitors of LpxC--an essential enzyme of the lipid A biosynthetic pathway in Gram-negative bacteria and a validated novel antibiotic target--access alternative, minor population states in solution in addition to the ligand conformation observed in crystal structures. These conformations collectively delineate an inhibitor envelope that is invisible to crystallography, but is dynamically accessible by small molecules in solution. Drug design exploiting such a hidden inhibitor envelope has led to the development of potent antibiotics with inhibition constants in the single-digit picomolar range. The principle of the cryptic inhibitor envelope approach may be broadly applicable to other lead optimization campaigns to yield improved therapeutics.

  10. Drug design from the cryptic inhibitor envelope

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chul-Jin; Liang, Xiaofei; Wu, Qinglin; Najeeb, Javaria; Zhao, Jinshi; Gopalaswamy, Ramesh; Titecat, Marie; Sebbane, Florent; Lemaitre, Nadine; Toone, Eric J.; Zhou, Pei

    2016-01-01

    Conformational dynamics plays an important role in enzyme catalysis, allosteric regulation of protein functions and assembly of macromolecular complexes. Despite these well-established roles, such information has yet to be exploited for drug design. Here we show by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy that inhibitors of LpxC—an essential enzyme of the lipid A biosynthetic pathway in Gram-negative bacteria and a validated novel antibiotic target—access alternative, minor population states in solution in addition to the ligand conformation observed in crystal structures. These conformations collectively delineate an inhibitor envelope that is invisible to crystallography, but is dynamically accessible by small molecules in solution. Drug design exploiting such a hidden inhibitor envelope has led to the development of potent antibiotics with inhibition constants in the single-digit picomolar range. The principle of the cryptic inhibitor envelope approach may be broadly applicable to other lead optimization campaigns to yield improved therapeutics. PMID:26912110

  11. Research into vortex breakdown control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, Anthony M.; Délery, Jean

    2001-05-01

    Vortex breakdown remains a significant and intriguing phenomenon that can have detrimental or beneficial effects, depending on the application. Thus there is a strong need to both better understand the phenomenon and to control it, either to prevent breakdown or to promote it. For the past 50 years, multiple flow control techniques have demonstrated the ability to manipulate the vortex breakdown location over slender delta wings at high angles of attack. An extensive historical review of these diverse control methods, mechanical and pneumatic, steady or periodic, is presented and discussed; however, none of these techniques has clearly demonstrated a superior efficiency or effectiveness in controlling either the vortical flow structure or the vortex breakdown location. Each technique, does, on the other hand, provide a unique approach to the control of the vortex breakdown depending on the desired outcome. There are still major obstacles to overcome before the control of vortex breakdown is implemented in flight. For example, oscillations of the vortex breakdown locations are difficult to quantify and to identify. The often poor effectiveness of control techniques can be in great part attributed to insufficient knowledge of breakdown and in an inability to accurately predict breakdown. When considering the large quantity of studies aimed at vortex breakdown control and their relative success, it is clear that decisive progress in this domain will require further basic investigations to clearly elucidate the physics of the phenomenon and to improve the predictive capability.

  12. Safeguards Envelope Progress FY10

    SciTech Connect

    Richard Metcalf

    2010-10-01

    The Safeguards Envelope is a strategy to determine a set of specific operating parameters within which nuclear facilities may operate to maximize safeguards effectiveness without sacrificing safety or plant efficiency. This paper details the additions to the advanced operating techniques that will be applied to real plant process monitoring (PM) data from the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP). Research this year focused on combining disparate pieces of data together to maximize operating time with minimal downtime due to safeguards. A Chi-Square and Croiser's cumulative sum were both included as part of the new analysis. Because of a major issue with the original data, the implementation of the two new tests did not add to the existing set of tests, though limited one-variable optimization made a small increase in detection probability. Additional analysis was performed to determine if prior analysis would have caused a major security or safety operating envelope issue. It was determined that a safety issue would have resulted from the prior research, but that the security may have been increased under certain conditions.

  13. FRACTIONAL CRYSTALLIZATION FEED ENVELOPE

    SciTech Connect

    HERTING DL

    2008-03-19

    Laboratory work was completed on a set of evaporation tests designed to establish a feed envelope for the fractional crystallization process. The feed envelope defines chemical concentration limits within which the process can be operated successfully. All 38 runs in the half-factorial design matrix were completed successfully, based on the qualitative definition of success. There is no feed composition likely to be derived from saltcake dissolution that would cause the fractional crystallization process to not meet acceptable performance requirements. However, some compositions clearly would provide more successful operation than other compositions.

  14. Subnanosecond Breakdown of Insulating Media

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-09-29

    50so O0 PRESSURE Itorr] Fig. 6. Breakdown voltage for argon and air with 100 kV pulser amplitude Breakdown voltages for surface flashover differ from the...developments in the field of high speed/high power electromagnetics applica- tions, such as Ultrawideband (UWB) radar, plasma limiters, and fast general...voltages for short pulses is of relevance for many switching and insulation tasks, for both volume breakdown in differ- ent media as well as for surface

  15. On Preliminary Breakdown

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beasley, W. H.; Petersen, D.

    2013-12-01

    The preliminary breakdown phase of a negative cloud-to-ground lightning flash was observed in detail. Observations were made with a Photron SA1.1 high-speed video camera operating at 9,000 frames per second, fast optical sensors, a flat-plate electric field antenna covering the SLF to MF band, and VHF and UHF radio receivers with bandwidths of 20 MHz. Bright stepwise extensions of a negative leader were observed at an altitude of 8 km during the first few milliseconds of the flash, and were coincident with bipolar electric field pulses called 'characteristic pulses'. The 2-D step lengths of the preliminary processes were in excess of 100 meters, with some 2-D step lengths in excess of 200 meters. Smaller and shorter unipolar electric field pulses were superposed onto the bipolar electric field pulses, and were coincident with VHF and UHF radio pulses. After a few milliseconds, the emerging negative stepped leader system showed a marked decrease in luminosity, step length, and propagation velocity. Details of these events will be discussed, including the possibility that the preliminary breakdown phase consists not of a single developing lightning leader system, but of multiple smaller lightning leader systems that eventually join together into a single system.

  16. Control of vortex breakdown

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Husain, H.; Shtern, F.; Hussain, V.

    1996-11-01

    The paper develops means of vortex breakdown (VB) control with the help of Controlling Vortex Generators (CVGs). Vortex breakdown plays the crucial role in many practical swirling flows, e.g. (a) leading-edge vortices above delta wings create a strong lift and (b) trailing vortices behind large aircraft disturbances are potentially dangerous to subsequent aircraft. It is useful to prevent VB in case (a) and to stimulate VB in case (b). We have recently obtained significant theoretical and experimental results related to swirling flow prediction and control. Firstly, a theory has been developed which models jump transitions in swirling flow (e.g. jumps in VB locations) and predicts ranges of control parameters where multiple stable states occur. Secondly, our experiments have revealed that effective control (enhancement and suppression) of VB can be achieved using CVGs. In our experiments we have used a thin rotaing rod as a CVG, placed along the axis of the basic swirling flow in a sealed cylinder driven by the rotating bottom disc. The effect of the rod depends on the direction of the rotation. With increasing rod co-rotational speed, the VB 'bubble' (VBB) becomes smaller and then disappear, and a cone-shaped wake forms. Counter-rotation of the rod causes increases VBBs' diameter and makes the flow unsteady. The VBBs begin to advect downstream, undergo tearing and pairing, and, hence, enhance mixing.

  17. Pushing the endogenous envelope

    PubMed Central

    Henzy, Jamie E.; Johnson, Welkin E.

    2013-01-01

    The majority of retroviral envelope glycoproteins characterized to date are typical of type I viral fusion proteins, having a receptor binding subunit associated with a fusion subunit. The fusion subunits of lentiviruses and alpha-, beta-, delta- and gammaretroviruses have a very conserved domain organization and conserved features of secondary structure, making them suitable for phylogenetic analyses. Such analyses, along with sequence comparisons, reveal evidence of numerous recombination events in which retroviruses have acquired envelope glycoproteins from heterologous sequences. Thus, the envelope gene (env) can have a history separate from that of the polymerase gene (pol), which is the most commonly used gene in phylogenetic analyses of retroviruses. Focusing on the fusion subunits of the genera listed above, we describe three distinct types of retroviral envelope glycoproteins, which we refer to as gamma-type, avian gamma-type and beta-type. By tracing these types within the ‘fossil record’ provided by endogenous retroviruses, we show that they have surprisingly distinct evolutionary histories and dynamics, with important implications for cross-species transmissions and the generation of novel lineages. These findings validate the utility of env sequences in contributing phylogenetic signal that enlarges our understanding of retrovirus evolution. PMID:23938755

  18. Jacketed lamp bulb envelope

    DOEpatents

    MacLennan, Donald A.; Turner, Brian P.; Gitsevich, Aleksandr; Bass, Gary K.; Dolan, James T.; Kipling, Kent; Kirkpatrick, Douglas A.; Leng, Yongzhang; Levin, Izrail; Roy, Robert J.; Shanks, Bruce; Smith, Malcolm; Trimble, William C.; Tsai, Peter

    2001-01-01

    A jacketed lamp bulb envelope includes a ceramic cup having an open end and a partially closed end, the partially closed end defining an aperture, a lamp bulb positioned inside the ceramic cup abutting the aperture, and a reflective ceramic material at least partially covering a portion of the bulb not abutting the aperture. The reflective ceramic material may substantially fill an interior volume of the ceramic cup not occupied by the bulb. The ceramic cup may include a structural feature for aiding in alignment of the jacketed lamp bulb envelope in a lamp. The ceramic cup may include an external flange about a periphery thereof. One example of a jacketed lamp bulb envelope includes a ceramic cup having an open end and a closed end, a ceramic washer covering the open end of the ceramic cup, the washer defining an aperture therethrough, a lamp bulb positioned inside the ceramic cup abutting the aperture, and a reflective ceramic material filling an interior volume of the ceramic cup not occupied by the bulb. A method of packing a jacketed lamp bulb envelope of the type comprising a ceramic cup with a lamp bulb disposed therein includes the steps of filling the ceramic cup with a flowable slurry of reflective material, and applying centrifugal force to the cup to pack the reflective material therein.

  19. Blueprint for Breakdown: Three Mile Island and the Media before the Accident.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friedman, Sharon M.

    1981-01-01

    Discusses media coverage of the Three Mile Island nuclear power plant before and during the disaster. Concludes that there was a communication breakdown prior to the accident. Outlines the causes and offers suggestions for avoiding similar breakdowns in the future. (JMF)

  20. Breakdown of organic insulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuddihy, E. F.

    1983-01-01

    Solar cells and their associated electrical interconnects and leads were encapsulated in transparent elastomeric materials. Their purpose in a photovoltaic module, one of the most important for these elastomeric encapsulation materials, is to function as electrical insulation. This includes internal insulation between adjacent solar cells, between other encapsulated electrical parts, and between the total internal electrical circuitry and external metal frames, grounded areas, and module surfaces. Catastrophic electrical breakdown of the encapsulant insulation materials or electrical current through these materials or module edges to external locations can lead to module failure and can create hazards to humans. Electrical insulation stability, advanced elastomeric encapsulation materials are developed which are intended to be intrinsically free of in-situ ionic impurities, have ultralow water absorption, be weather-stable (UV, oxygen), and have high mechanical flexibility. Efforts to develop a method of assessing the life potential of organic insulation materials in photovoltaic modules are described.

  1. Safeguards Envelope Progress FY09

    SciTech Connect

    Richard Metcalf; Robert Bean

    2009-09-01

    The Safeguards Envelope is a strategy to determine a set of specific operating parameters which nuclear facilities may operate within to maximize safeguards effectiveness without sacrificing safety or plant efficiency. This paper details advanced statistical techniques will be applied to real plant process monitoring (PM) data from the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP). As a result of the U.S. having no operating nuclear chemical reprocessing plants, there has been a strong interest in obtaining process monitoring data from the ICPP. The ICPP was shut down in 1996 and a recent effort has been made to retrieve the PM data from storage in a data mining effort. In a simulation based on this data, multi-tank and multi-attribute correlations were tested against synthetic diversion scenarios. Kernel regression smoothing was used to fit a curve to the historical data, and multivariable, residual analysis and cumulative sum techniques set parameters for operating conditions. Diversion scenarios were created and tested, showing improved results when compared with a previous study utilizing only one-variable Z- testing7.

  2. Coordinated events of nuclear assembly.

    PubMed

    LaJoie, Dollie; Ullman, Katharine S

    2017-02-08

    Each time a metazoan cell undergoes open mitosis, the nucleus is dismantled in order to partition DNA content to the daughter cells. After chromosomes separate, changes at the chromatin surface usher in reestablishment of nuclear architecture. Proteins destined for the nuclear envelope are attracted to chromatin and concomitantly recruit membrane. As nuclear envelope and protein constituents spread to coat chromatin, distinct regions emerge-some rich in rapid pore formation, others occupied by microtubules that remain attached to kinetochores. Microtubule connections present physical barriers that must be remodeled in order for the nuclear envelope to seal. Regions of the nascent nuclear envelope that are initially characterized by contrasting repertoires of nuclear envelope proteins rapidly coalesce as nuclei expand and enter interphase.

  3. Breakdown in the pretext tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Benesch, J.F.

    1981-06-01

    Data are presented on the application of ion cyclotron resonance RF power to preionization in tokamaks. We applied 0.3-3 kW at 12 MHz to hydrogen and obtained a visible discharge, but found no scaling of breakdown voltage with any parameter we were able to vary. A possible explanation for this, which implies that higher RF power would have been much more effective, is discussed. Finally, we present our investigation of the dV/dt dependence of breakdown voltage in PRETEXT, a phenomenon also seen in JFT-2. The breakdown is discussed in terms of the physics of Townsend discharges.

  4. Nonlinear Theory and Breakdown

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Frank

    2007-01-01

    The main points of recent theoretical and computational studies on boundary-layer transition and turbulence are to be highlighted. The work is based on high Reynolds numbers and attention is drawn to nonlinear interactions, breakdowns and scales. The research focuses in particular on truly nonlinear theories, i.e. those for which the mean-flow profile is completely altered from its original state. There appear to be three such theories dealing with unsteady nonlinear pressure-displacement interactions (I), with vortex/wave interactions (II), and with Euler-scale flows (III). Specific recent findings noted for these three, and in quantitative agreement with experiments, are the following. Nonlinear finite-time break-ups occur in I, leading to sublayer eruption and vortex formation; here the theory agrees with experiments (Nishioka) regarding the first spike. II gives rise to finite-distance blowup of displacement thickness, then interaction and break-up as above; this theory agrees with experiments (Klebanoff, Nishioka) on the formation of three-dimensional streets. III leads to the prediction of turbulent boundary-layer micro-scale, displacement-and stress-sublayer-thicknesses.

  5. Nuclear transport: shifting gears in fungal nuclear and cytoplasmic organization.

    PubMed

    Casey, Amanda K; Wente, Susan R

    2012-10-09

    In fungi, nuclear pore complexes are free to move through the nuclear envelope; however, little is known about how movement is regulated. New evidence reveals roles for molecular motors and potential impacts on genomic organization.

  6. Model scattering envelopes of young stellar objects. II - Infalling envelopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitney, Barbara A.; Hartmann, Lee

    1993-01-01

    We present scattered light images for models of young stellar objects surrounded by dusty envelopes. The envelopes are assumed to have finite angular momentum and are falling in steady flow onto a disk. The model envelopes include holes, such as might be created by energetic bipolar flows. We calculate images using the Monte Carlo method to follow the light scattered in the dusty envelope and circumstellar disk, assuming that the photons originate from the central source. Adopting typical interstellar medium dust opacities and expected mass infall rates for protostars of about 10 exp -6 solar mass/yr, we find that detectable amounts of optical radiation can escape from envelopes falling into a disk as small as about 10-100 AU, depending upon the viewing angle and the size of the bipolar flow cavity. We suggest that the extended optical and near-IR light observed around several young stars is scattered by dusty infalling envelopes rather than disks.

  7. Dark current related breakdown mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Faya; Ge, Lixin

    2012-12-01

    High power tests of an 805 MHz pillbox cavity for the Muon Collider program have shown that the breakdown related damage increases and the sustainable gradient decreases with the application of a strong external magnetic field. To try to explain these results, a model of dark current associated breakdown was formulated and simulated with the Track3P code. The results show in general how the gradient could be reduced as function of magnetic field. This paper summarizes these studies to date.

  8. Refrigerated cryogenic envelope

    DOEpatents

    Loudon, John D.

    1976-11-16

    An elongated cryogenic envelope including an outer tube and an inner tube coaxially spaced within said inner tube so that the space therebetween forms a vacuum chamber for holding a vacuum. The inner and outer tubes are provided with means for expanding or contracting during thermal changes. A shield is located in the vacuum chamber intermediate the inner and outer tubes; and, a refrigeration tube for directing refrigeration to the shield is coiled about at least a portion of the inner tube within the vacuum chamber to permit the refrigeration tube to expand or contract along its length during thermal changes within said vacuum chamber.

  9. Molecular biology of the baculovirus occlusion-derived virus envelope.

    PubMed

    Braunagel, Sharon C; Summers, Max D

    2007-10-01

    Study of the biology of the occlusion-derived virus (ODV) of the baculovirus Autographa californica nucleopolyhedrovirus provides opportunities to reveal new discoveries into the mechanism of several cellular pathways. The synchronous pulse of multiple ODV envelope proteins that integrate into the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and traffic to the nuclear membranes on their way to the ODV envelope provide a unique tool to study the mechanisms of integral membrane protein trafficking from the ER to the outer and inner nuclear membrane. Studies of the formation of virus-induced, intranuclear membrane microvesicles provide insight on mechanisms that alter fluidity and regulate budding of the inner nuclear membrane. Since ODV is specially adapted for primary infection of the insect gut, studies of the structure and function of ODV envelope proteins reveals insights on the mechanism of viral invasion of the gut and this knowledge is fundamental for the development of new strategies for insect control. This review focuses on recent advances in understanding the source of the ODV envelope and the molecular events that sort and traffic integral membrane proteins from the ER to the ODV envelope. The composition of ODV is reviewed, however it is worth noting that the function of many ODV proteins are currently unknown.

  10. Generalizing Microdischarge Breakdown Scaling Laws for Pressure and Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loveless, Amanda; Garner, Allen

    2016-10-01

    Shrinking device dimensions for micro- and nanoelectromechanical systems necessitates accurate breakdown voltage predictions for reliable operation. Additionally, one must accurately predict breakdown voltage to optimize system geometry for applications in microplasmas and micropropulsion. Traditional approaches use Paschen's law (PL) to predict breakdown, but PL fails at small gap distances ( 15 μm) where field emission dominates. Subsequent work derived scaling laws and analytic expressions for breakdown voltage in argon at atmospheric pressure. Applications at high (e.g. combustion) and low (e.g. vacuum nanoelectronics) pressures for various gases motivate the generalization of these models for pressure and gas. This work addresses these concerns by deriving scaling laws generalized for gap distance, pressure, and gas, while also specifically incorporating and exploring the impact of field enhancement and work function. We compare these analytic scaling laws to experimental data and particle-in-cell simulations. Funded by a U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Nuclear Education Program Faculty Development Grant Program at Purdue University.

  11. Electrical breakdown in tissue electroporation.

    PubMed

    Guenther, Enric; Klein, Nina; Mikus, Paul; Stehling, Michael K; Rubinsky, Boris

    2015-11-27

    Electroporation, the permeabilization of the cell membrane by brief, high electric fields, has become an important technology in medicine for diverse application ranging from gene transfection to tissue ablation. There is ample anecdotal evidence that the clinical application of electroporation is often associated with loud sounds and extremely high currents that exceed the devices design limit after which the devices cease to function. The goal of this paper is to elucidate and quantify the biophysical and biochemical basis for this phenomenon. Using an experimental design that includes clinical data, a tissue phantom, sound, optical, ultrasound and MRI measurements, we show that the phenomenon is caused by electrical breakdown across ionized electrolysis produced gases near the electrodes. The breakdown occurs primarily near the cathode. Electrical breakdown during electroporation is a biophysical phenomenon of substantial importance to the outcome of clinical applications. It was ignored, until now.

  12. Breakdown properties of epoxy nanodielectric

    SciTech Connect

    Tuncer, Enis; Cantoni, Claudia; More, Karren Leslie; James, David Randy; Polyzos, Georgios; Sauers, Isidor; Ellis, Alvin R

    2010-01-01

    Recent developments in polymeric dielectric nanocomposites have shown that these novel materials can improve design of high voltage (hv) components and systems. Some of the improvements can be listed as reduction in size (compact hv systems), better reliability, high energy density, voltage endurance, and multifunctionality. Nanodielectric systems demonstrated specific improvements that have been published in the literature by different groups working with electrical insulation materials. In this paper we focus on the influence of in-situ synthesized titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) nanoparticles on the dielectric breakdown characteristics of an epoxy-based nanocomposite system. The in-situ synthesis of the particles creates small nanoparticles on the order of 10 nm with narrow size distribution and uniform particle dispersion in the matrix. The breakdown strength of the nanocomposite was studied as a function of TiO{sub 2} concentration at cryogenic temperatures. It was observed that between 2 and 6wt% yields high breakdown values for the nanodielectric.

  13. Electrical Breakdown in Water Vapor

    SciTech Connect

    Skoro, N.; Maric, D.; Malovic, G.; Petrovic, Z. Lj.; Graham, W. G.

    2011-11-15

    In this paper investigations of the voltage required to break down water vapor are reported for the region around the Paschen minimum and to the left of it. In spite of numerous applications of discharges in biomedicine, and recent studies of discharges in water and vapor bubbles and discharges with liquid water electrodes, studies of the basic parameters of breakdown are lacking. Paschen curves have been measured by recording voltages and currents in the low-current Townsend regime and extrapolating them to zero current. The minimum electrical breakdown voltage for water vapor was found to be 480 V at a pressure times electrode distance (pd) value of around 0.6 Torr cm ({approx}0.8 Pa m). The present measurements are also interpreted using (and add additional insight into) the developing understanding of relevant atomic and particularly surface processes associated with electrical breakdown.

  14. Solvable models of material breakdown

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leath, P. L.; Duxbury, P. M.

    The history of the study of fracture of materials is briefly reviewed. Then the importance of analytically solvable models in understanding material breakdown is illustrated by a review of the work of Duxbury, Leath and Beale on simple analytically solvable models of fuse network breakdown in brittle systems. We then review recent work extending this analytically to include close pairs of clusters of defects or double clusters, which also exhibit the double-exponential failure distribution. Finally, a new analytic recursion method is presented for breakdown of systems with linear cracks, but a continuous distribution of breaking strengths. Remarkably, these systems exhibit an optimum sample size where the failure probability can, at low stress, be reduced by many orders of magnitude below that of a single bond.

  15. Fast Moreau envelope computation I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucet, Yves

    2006-11-01

    The present article summarizes the state of the art algorithms to compute the discrete Moreau envelope, and presents a new linear-time algorithm, named NEP for NonExpansive Proximal mapping. Numerical comparisons between the NEP and two existing algorithms: The Linear-time Legendre Transform (LLT) and the Parabolic Envelope (PE) algorithms are performed. Worst-case time complexity, convergence results, and examples are included. The fast Moreau envelope algorithms first factor the Moreau envelope as several one-dimensional transforms and then reduce the brute force quadratic worst-case time complexity to linear time by using either the equivalence with Fast Legendre Transform algorithms, the computation of a lower envelope of parabolas, or, in the convex case, the non expansiveness of the proximal mapping.

  16. The structure of vortex breakdown

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leibovich, S.

    1978-01-01

    The term 'vortex breakdown', as used in the reported investigation, refers to a disturbance characterized by the formation of an internal stagnation point on the vortex axis, followed by reversed flow in a region of limited axial extent. Two forms of vortex breakdown, which predominate, are shown in photographs. One form is called 'near-axisymmetric' (sometimes 'axisymmetric'), and the other is called 'spiral'. A survey is presented of work published since the 1972 review by Hall. Most experimental data taken since Hall's review have been in tubes, and the survey deals primarily with such cases. It is found that the assumption of axial-symmetry has produced useful results. The classification of flows as supercritical or subcritical, a step that assumes symmetry, has proved universally useful. Experiments show that vortex breakdown is always preceded by an upstream supercritical flow and followed by a subcritical wake. However, a comparison between experiments and attempts at prediction is less than encouraging. For a satisfactory understanding of the structure of vortex breakdown it is apparently necessary to take into account also aspects of asymmetry.

  17. Envelope glycoprotein of arenaviruses.

    PubMed

    Burri, Dominique J; da Palma, Joel Ramos; Kunz, Stefan; Pasquato, Antonella

    2012-10-17

    Arenaviruses include lethal human pathogens which pose serious public health threats. So far, no FDA approved vaccines are available against arenavirus infections, and therapeutic options are limited, making the identification of novel drug targets for the development of efficacious therapeutics an urgent need. Arenaviruses are comprised of two RNA genome segments and four proteins, the polymerase L, the envelope glycoprotein GP, the matrix protein Z, and the nucleoprotein NP. A crucial step in the arenavirus life-cycle is the biosynthesis and maturation of the GP precursor (GPC) by cellular signal peptidases and the cellular enzyme Subtilisin Kexin Isozyme-1 (SKI-1)/Site-1 Protease (S1P) yielding a tripartite mature GP complex formed by GP1/GP2 and a stable signal peptide (SSP). GPC cleavage by SKI-1/S1P is crucial for fusion competence and incorporation of mature GP into nascent budding virion particles. In a first part of our review, we cover basic aspects and newer developments in the biosynthesis of arenavirus GP and its molecular interaction with SKI-1/S1P. A second part will then highlight the potential of SKI-1/S1P-mediated processing of arenavirus GPC as a novel target for therapeutic intervention to combat human pathogenic arenaviruses.

  18. Masonry building envelope analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMullan, Phillip C.

    1993-04-01

    Over the past five years, infrared thermography has proven an effective tool to assist in required inspections on new masonry construction. However, with more thermographers providing this inspection service, establishing a standard for conducting these inspections is imperative. To attempt to standardize these inspections, it is important to understand the nature of the inspection as well as the context in which the inspection is typically conducted. The inspection focuses on evaluating masonry construction for compliance with the design specifications with regard to structural components and thermal performance of the building envelope. The thermal performance of the building includes both the thermal resistance of the material as well as infiltration/exfiltration characteristics. Given that the inspections occur in the 'field' rather than the controlled environment of a laboratory, there are numerous variables to be considered when undertaking this type of inspection. Both weather and site conditions at the time of the inspection can vary greatly. In this paper we will look at the variables encountered during recent inspections. Additionally, the author will present the standard which was employed in collecting this field data. This method is being incorporated into a new standard to be included in the revised version of 'Guidelines for Specifying and Performing Infrared Inspections' developed by the Infraspection Institute.

  19. Multifamily Envelope Leakage Model

    SciTech Connect

    Faakye, Omari; Griffiths, Dianne

    2015-05-08

    “The cost for blower testing is high, because it is labor intensive, and it may disrupt occupants in multiple units. This high cost and disruption deter program participants, and dissuade them from pursuing energy improvements that would trigger air leakage testing, such as improvements to the building envelope.” This statement found in a 2012 report by Heschong Mahone Group for several California interests emphasizes the importance of reducing the cost and complexity of blower testing in multifamily buildings. Energy efficiency opportunities are being bypassed. The cost of single blower testing is on the order of $300. The cost for guarded blower door testing—the more appropriate test for assessing energy savings opportunities—could easily be six times that, and that’s only if you have the equipment and simultaneous access to multiple apartments. Thus, the proper test is simply not performed. This research seeks to provide an algorithm for predicting the guarded blower door test result based upon a single, total blower door test.

  20. Isolation and preliminary characterization of herpes simplex virus 1 primary enveloped virions from the perinuclear space.

    PubMed

    Padula, Maryn E; Sydnor, Mariam L; Wilson, Duncan W

    2009-05-01

    Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) nucleocapsids exit the nucleus by budding into the inner nuclear membrane, where they exist briefly as primary enveloped virions. These virus particles subsequently fuse their envelopes with the outer nuclear membrane, permitting nucleocapsids to then enter the cytoplasm and complete assembly. We have developed a method to isolate primary enveloped virions from HSV-1-infected cells and subjected the primary enveloped virion preparation to MALDI-MS/MS (matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-tandem mass spectrometry) analyses. We identified most capsid proteins, a tegument protein (VP22), a glycoprotein (gD), and a cellular protein (annexin A2) in the primary enveloped virion preparation. We determined that annexin A2 does not play an essential role in infection under our experimental conditions. Elucidating the structure and biochemical properties of this unique virus assembly intermediate will provide new insights into HSV-1 biology.

  1. Radiative accelerations in stellar envelopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seaton, M. J.

    1997-08-01

    In stars which are sufficiently quiescent, changes in the relative abundances of the chemical elements can result from gravitational settling and from levitation produced by radiation pressure forces, usually expressed as radiative accelerations g_rad. Those changes can affect the structure of such stars, due to modifications in opacities, and can lead to marked peculiarities in observed atmospheric abundances. It is necessary to consider diffusive movements both in the atmospheres and in much deeper layers of the stellar envelopes. For the envelopes the equation of radiative transfer can be solved in a diffusion approximation and, for an element k in ionization stage j, one obtains expressions for g_rad(j, k) proportional to the total radiative flux, to the Rosseland-mean opacity kappa_R (which may depend on the abundance of k), and to a dimensionless quantity gamma(j, k) which, due to saturation effects, can be sensitive to the abundance of k. The radiative accelerations are required for each ionization stage, because the diffusion coefficients depend on j. Using atomic data obtained in the course of the work of the Opacity Project (OP), we calculate kappa_R and gamma(j, k) for the chemical elements C, N, O, Ne, Na, Mg, Al, Si, S, Ar, Ca, Cr, Mn, Fe and Ni. We start from standard Solar system abundances, and then vary the abundance of one element at a time (element k) by a factor chi. The following results are obtained and are available at the Centre de Donnees astronomiques de Strasbourg (CDS). (1) Files stages.zz (where zz specifies the nuclear charge of the selected element k) containing values of kappa_R and gamma(j, k) on a mesh of values of (T, N_e, chi), where T is temperature, and N_e is electron density. We include derivatives of kappa_R and gamma(j, k) with respect to chi, which are used for making interpolations. (2) A code add.f which reads a file stages.zz and writes a file acc.zz containing values of gamma(k) obtained on summing the gamma(j, k

  2. Second Harmonic Breakdown in KSTAR

    SciTech Connect

    Bae, Y. S.; England, A. C.; Kwon, M.; Lee, G. S.

    2007-09-28

    An 84-GHz electron cyclotron heating (ECH) system is being installed on the KSTAR tokamak. KSTAR adopts ECH-assisted start-up for the flexibility and reliability of the KSTAR operation with the plasma breakdown voltage reduced. The available maximum power of the 84 GHz ECH system is presently 500 kW with maximum duration of 2 s. Currently, the second harmonic ECH-assisted start-up is under consideration because a low toroidal field of B{sub T}{approx}1.5 T is desirable for safety and also for the high-beta experiments in the initial operation phase. The studies in this paper are on the effectiveness of the second harmonic breakdown using a 0-D time dependent plasma evolution code and the comparison with the recent DIII-D experimental results on the second harmonic pre-ionization.

  3. Breakdown mechanisms in electrostatic deflector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Re, M.; Cuttone, G.; Zappalà, E.; Passarello, S.

    2001-12-01

    The Electrostatic Beam Deflectors for the K800 Superconducting Cyclotron are the most critical elements of the beam extraction system. It has been carried out an accurate investigation from the microscopic point of view, leading to a better comprehension of the complex phenomena taking part in the breakdown process. The environmental conditions are high electric field (up to 130 kV/cm), high magnetic field (up to 5 T) in addition with high energy (70 MeV/u) and high power ion beam. It has been found that all the materials constituent the electrostatic deflector, and not only the electrodes, give an important contribute to the mechanism of breakdown that occurs in two main ways: insulator metalization and enhanced electrodes electron emission. These two effects are involved in a positive feedback process which amplifies the effects leading to a fast breakdown. These phenomena are here shown and some possible solutions are at the moment under test using several bulk (Mo, Ti, Cu) and coating materials (TiN, Diamond Like Carbon).

  4. Initiation of breakdown in slender compressible vortices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krause, E.; Menne, S.; Liu, C. H.

    1986-01-01

    The initiation of the breakdown process for axially symmetric compressible flows is investigated using a numerical solution of the conservation equations for mass, momentum, and energy. The vortex is isolated, with its axis parallel to the direction of the main stream, and the core radius is small compared to the breakdown length. Computations for several flowfields indicate that the breakdown of the solution is shifted further downstream with increasing Mach number until breakdown is no longer observed. In the subsonic case, the influence of the initial temperature distribution on the breakdown length of the solution is more pronounced than in the supersonic case, with heating of the core enhancing breakdown, and cooling delaying it. The breakdown of the solution is seen to always occur for nonvanishing axial velocity components.

  5. Proposed RF Breakdown Studies at the AWA

    SciTech Connect

    Antipov, S.; Conde, M.; Gai, W.; Power, J.G.; Spentzouris, L.; Yusof, Z.; Dolgashev, V.; /SLAC

    2007-03-21

    A study of breakdown mechanism has been initiated at the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator (AWA). Breakdown may include several factors such as local field enhancement, explosive electron emission, Ohmic heating, tensile stress produced by electric field, and others. The AWA is building a dedicated facility to test various models for breakdown mechanisms and to determine the roles of different factors in the breakdown. We plan to trigger breakdown events with a high-powered laser at various wavelengths (IR to UV) to determine the role of explosive electron emission in the breakdown process. Another experimental idea follows from the recent work on a Schottky-enabled photoemission in an RF photoinjector [1] that allows us to determine in situ the field enhancement factor on a cathode surface. Monitoring the field enhancement factor before and after the breakdown can shed some light on a number of observations such as the crater formation process.

  6. Flame-enhanced laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Liu, L; Li, S; He, X N; Huang, X; Zhang, C F; Fan, L S; Wang, M X; Zhou, Y S; Chen, K; Jiang, L; Silvain, J F; Lu, Y F

    2014-04-07

    Flame-enhanced laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) was investigated to improve the sensitivity of LIBS. It was realized by generating laser-induced plasmas in the blue outer envelope of a neutral oxy-acetylene flame. Fast imaging and temporally resolved spectroscopy of the plasmas were carried out. Enhanced intensity of up to 4 times and narrowed full width at half maximum (FWHM) down to 60% for emission lines were observed. Electron temperatures and densities were calculated to investigate the flame effects on plasma evolution. These calculated electron temperatures and densities showed that high-temperature and low-density plasmas were achieved before 4 µs in the flame environment, which has the potential to improve LIBS sensitivity and spectral resolution.

  7. Personnel occupied woven envelope robot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wessling, F. C.

    1986-01-01

    The use of nonmetallic or fabric structures for space application is considered. The following structures are suggested: (1) unpressurized space hangars; (2) extendable tunnels for soft docking; and (3) manned habitat for space stations, storage facilities, and work structures. The uses of the tunnel as a passageway: for personnel and equipment, eliminating extravehicular activity, for access to a control cabin on a space crane and between free flyers and the space station are outlined. The personnal occupied woven envelope robot (POWER) device is shown. The woven envelope (tunnel) acts as part of the boom of a crane. Potential applications of POWER are outlined. Several possible deflection mechanisms and design criteria are determined.

  8. Carbon chemistry of circumstellar envelopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bieging, John H.

    1990-01-01

    The chemical composition of envelopes surrounding cool evolved stars, as determined from microwave spectroscopic observations, is reviewed. Emphasis is placed on recent observations with the new large mm-wavelength telescopes and interferometer arrays, and on new theoretical work, especially concerning ion-molecule chemistry of carbon-bearing in these envelopes. Thermal (as opposed to maser) emission lines are discussed. Much progress has been made in the past few years in the theoretical understanding of these objects. It is already clear, however, that observations with the new generation of mm-telescopes will require substantial improvements in the theoretical models to achieve a thorough understanding of the data now becoming available.

  9. High Voltage Water Breakdown Studies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-01-01

    Terman [20] gives the following equation for a rectangle that has sides that are S1 by S2 and is made up of a rectangular bar that is b by c, L = 0.02339...Dielectrics," Proc. Tenth IEEE Pulsed Power Confer- ence, June, 1995, p. 574. (UNCLASSIFIED) 86 (20) Terman , F. E., Radio Engineers’ Handbook, McGraw-Hill Book...34 Conference Rec- ord, Eighth International Conference on Conduction and Breakdown in Dielectric Liquids, pp. 176-179, July, 1984. Lewis , T. J., High

  10. Nuclear concentration and mitotic dispersion of the essential cell cycle protein, p13suc1, examined in living cells.

    PubMed Central

    Hepler, P K; Sek, F J; John, P C

    1994-01-01

    Stamen hair cells of Tradescantia virginiana have been microinjected with p13suc1 labeled with carboxyfluorescein (CF) and studied throughout the division cycle in living cells by using the confocal laser scanning microscope. The protein, p13suc1, is essential for the rapid inactivation of the key mitotic catalyst, p34cdc2 kinase, at anaphase and for completion of nuclear division. During interphase or prophase, CF-p13suc1 concentrates quickly (< 2 min) in nuclei, reaching levels that are approximately 2-fold greater than those in the cytoplasm. At nuclear envelope breakdown, CF-p13suc1 permeates throughout the entire spindle and nonspindle cytoplasm. The protein is excluded from the tightly condensed chromosomes but otherwise no regions accumulate or exclude the protein. It remains evenly distributed throughout metaphase, anaphase, and well into cytokinesis; however, during telophase CF-p13suc1 reconcentrates in the daughter nuclei. Images PMID:8134368

  11. Internal structure of a vortex breakdown

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakamura, Y.; Leonard, A.; Spalart, P. R.

    1986-01-01

    An axisymmetric vortex breakdown was well simulated by the vortex filament method. The agreement with the experiment was qualitatively good. In particular, the structure in the interior of the vortex breakdown was ensured to a great degree by the present simulation. The second breakdown, or spiral type, which occurs downstream of the first axisymmetric breakdown, was simulated more similarly to the experiment than before. It shows a kink of the vortex filaments and strong three-dimensionality. Furthermore, a relatively low velocity region was observed near the second breakdown. It was also found that it takes some time for this physical phenomenon to attain its final stage. The comparison with the experiment is getting better as time goes on. In this paper, emphasis is placed on the comparison of the simulated results with the experiment. The present results help to make clear the mechanism of a vortex breakdown.

  12. On a criterion for vortex breakdown

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spall, R. E.; Gatski, T. B.; Grosch, C. H.

    1987-01-01

    A criterion for the onset of vortex breakdown is proposed. Based upon previous experimental, computational, and theoretical studies, an appropriately defined local Rossby number is used to delineate the region where breakdown occurs. In addition, new numerical results are presented which further validate this criterion. A number of previous theoretical studies concentrating on inviscid standing-wave analyses for trailing wing-tip vortices are reviewed and reinterpreted in terms of the Rossby number criterion. Consistent with previous studies, the physical basis for the onset of breakdown is identified as the ability of the flow to sustain such waves. Previous computational results are reviewed and re-evaluated in terms of the proposed breakdown criterion. As a result, the cause of breakdown occurring near the inflow computational boundary, common to several numerical studies, is identified. Finally, previous experimental studies of vortex breakdown for both leading edge and trailing wing-tip vortices are reviewed and quantified in terms of the Rossby number criterion.

  13. Characteristics of edge breakdowns on Teflon samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yadlowsky, E. J.; Hazelton, R. C.; Churchill, R. J.

    1980-01-01

    The characteristics of electrical discharges induced on silverbacked Teflon samples irradiated by a monoenergetic electron beam have been studied under controlled laboratory conditions. Measurements of breakdown threshold voltages indicate a marked anisotropy in the electrical breakdown properties of Teflon: differences of up to 10 kV in breakdown threshold voltage are observed depending on the sample orientation. The material anisotropy can be utilized in spacecraft construction to reduce the magnitude of discharge currents.

  14. RF Breakdown Prevention, Part 2 Product Overview

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-05-07

    RF Breakdown Prevention, Part 2 Product Overview May 7, 2015 Preston T. Partridge Antenna Systems Department Communication Systems Implementation...REPORT TYPE Final 3. DATES COVERED - 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE RF Breakdown Prevention, Part 2 Product Overview 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER FA8802-14-C...5 - 7, 2015 RF Breakdown Prevention, Part 2 James Farrell, Boeing Satellite Systems Dr. Jeffrey P. Tate, Raytheon Space and Airborne Systems Preston

  15. Laser-induced electric breakdown in solids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bloembergen, N.

    1974-01-01

    A review is given of recent experimental results on laser-induced electric breakdown in transparent optical solid materials. A fundamental breakdown threshold exists characteristic for each material. The threshold is determined by the same physical process as dc breakdown, namely, avalanche ionization. The dependence of the threshold on laser pulse duration and frequency is consistent with this process. The implication of this breakdown mechanism for laser bulk and surface damage to optical components is discussed. It also determines physical properties of self-focused filaments.

  16. Relativistic breakdown in planetary atmospheres

    SciTech Connect

    Dwyer, J. R.

    2007-04-15

    In 2003, a new electrical breakdown mechanism involving the production of runaway avalanches by positive feedback from runaway positrons and energetic photons was introduced. This mechanism, which shall be referred to as 'relativistic feedback', allows runaway discharges in gases to become self-sustaining, dramatically increasing the flux of runaway electrons, the accompanying high-energy radiation, and resulting ionization. Using detailed Monte Carlo calculations, properties of relativistic feedback are investigated. It is found that once relativistic feedback fully commences, electrical breakdown will occur and the ambient electric field, extending over cubic kilometers, will be discharged in as little as 2x10{sup -5} s. Furthermore, it is found that the flux of energetic electrons and x rays generated by this mechanism can exceed the flux generated by the standard relativistic runaway electron model by a factor of 10{sup 13}, making relativistic feedback a good candidate for explaining terrestrial gamma-ray flashes and other high-energy phenomena observed in the Earth's atmosphere.

  17. Work Breakdown Structure (WBS) Handbook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to provide program/project teams necessary instruction and guidance in the best practices for Work Breakdown Structure (WBS) and WBS dictionary development and use for project implementation and management control. This handbook can be used for all types of NASA projects and work activities including research, development, construction, test and evaluation, and operations. The products of these work efforts may be hardware, software, data, or service elements (alone or in combination). The aim of this document is to assist project teams in the development of effective work breakdown structures that provide a framework of common reference for all project elements. The WBS and WBS dictionary are effective management processes for planning, organizing, and administering NASA programs and projects. The guidance contained in this document is applicable to both in-house, NASA-led effort and contracted effort. It assists management teams from both entities in fulfilling necessary responsibilities for successful accomplishment of project cost, schedule, and technical goals. Benefits resulting from the use of an effective WBS include, but are not limited to: providing a basis for assigned project responsibilities, providing a basis for project schedule development, simplifying a project by dividing the total work scope into manageable units, and providing a common reference for all project communication.

  18. Hybrid Breakdown in Cichlid Fish

    PubMed Central

    Stelkens, Rike Bahati; Schmid, Corinne; Seehausen, Ole

    2015-01-01

    Studies from a wide diversity of taxa have shown a negative relationship between genetic compatibility and the divergence time of hybridizing genomes. Theory predicts the main breakdown of fitness to happen after the F1 hybrid generation, when heterosis subsides and recessive allelic (Dobzhansky-Muller) incompatibilities are increasingly unmasked. We measured the fitness of F2 hybrids of African haplochromine cichlid fish bred from species pairs spanning several thousand to several million years divergence time. F2 hybrids consistently showed the lowest viability compared to F1 hybrids and non-hybrid crosses (crosses within the grandparental species), in agreement with hybrid breakdown. Especially the short- and long-term survival (2 weeks to 6 months) of F2 hybrids was significantly reduced. Overall, F2 hybrids showed a fitness reduction of 21% compared to F1 hybrids, and a reduction of 43% compared to the grandparental, non-hybrid crosses. We further observed a decrease of F2 hybrid viability with the genetic distance between grandparental lineages, suggesting an important role for negative epistatic interactions in cichlid fish postzygotic isolation. The estimated time window for successful production of F2 hybrids resulting from our data is consistent with the estimated divergence time between the multiple ancestral lineages that presumably hybridized in three major adaptive radiations of African cichlids. PMID:25996870

  19. Perforating the nuclear boundary - how nuclear pore complexes assemble.

    PubMed

    Weberruss, Marion; Antonin, Wolfram

    2016-12-15

    The nucleus is enclosed by the nuclear envelope, a double membrane which creates a selective barrier between the cytoplasm and the nuclear interior. Its barrier and transport characteristics are determined by nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) that are embedded within the nuclear envelope, and control molecular exchange between the cytoplasm and nucleoplasm. In this Commentary, we discuss the biogenesis of these huge protein assemblies from approximately one thousand individual proteins. We will summarize current knowledge about distinct assembly modes in animal cells that are characteristic for different cell cycle phases and their regulation.

  20. Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS): specific applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trtica, M. S.; Savovic, J.; Stoiljkovic, M.; Kuzmanovic, M.; Momcilovic, M.; Ciganovic, J.; Zivkovic, S.

    2015-12-01

    A short overview of Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) with emphasis on the new trends is presented. Nowadays, due to unique features of this technique, LIBS has found applications in a great variety of fields. Achievements in the application of LIBS in nuclear area, for hazardous materials detection and in geology were considered. Also, some results recently obtained at VINCA Institute, with LIBS system based on transversely excited atmospheric (TEA) CO2 laser, are presented. Future investigations of LIBS will be oriented toward further improvement of the analytical performance of this technique, as well as on finding new application fields.

  1. Phospholipid turnover and ultrastructural correlates during spontaneous germinal vesicle breakdown of the bovine oocyte: Effects of a cyclic AMP phosphodiesterase inhibitor

    SciTech Connect

    Homa, S.T.; Webster, S.D.; Russell, R.K. )

    1991-08-01

    The turnover of (32P)orthophosphate in bovine oocyte phospholipids was studied during the early stages of spontaneous meiotic maturation, and during inhibition of this process by the cAMP phosphodiesterase inhibitor 3-isobutyl-1-methyl-xanthine (IBMX). Radioactive lipids were separated by TLC and the meiotic stage was determined cytogenetically. Ultrastructure of the nuclear membrane was examined using transmission EM. During the commitment period to meiotic resumption, which precedes germinal vesicle breakdown (GVBD), small localized convolutions appeared in the intact nuclear membrane. This was accompanied by a decrease in (32P)phosphatidic acid (PA) and an increase in (32P)-phosphatidylcholine (PC). This was followed by extensive convolutions, and subsequent dissociation, of the nuclear membrane, concomitant with a tremendous surge in (32P)PC and (32P)phosphatidylethanolamine (PE). The cAMP-mediated maintenance of meiotic arrest involved retention of entire nuclear envelope integrity and total inhibition of the surge in (32P)PC and (32P)PE which accompanied GVBD. The increase in (32P)phosphatidylinositol (PI) associated with all stages of early meiotic resumption was unaffected by IBMX. Microinjection of heparin inhibited GVBD, and injection of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) overrode IBMX-maintained meiotic arrest in almost 40% of the oocytes. The results suggest that there may be several functions for phospholipid turnover in the regulation of spontaneous meiotic resumption in the bovine oocyte. The first precedes the commitment period, and involves IP3 generation to serve as the primary signal for meiotic resumption. The second occurs concomitant with the commitment period, is unaffected by the level of intracellular cAMP, and is associated with the general turnover of phospholipid.

  2. Nuclear removal during terminal lens fiber cell differentiation requires CDK1 activity: appropriating mitosis-related nuclear disassembly

    PubMed Central

    Chaffee, Blake R.; Shang, Fu; Chang, Min-Lee; Clement, Tracy M.; Eddy, Edward M.; Wagner, Brad D.; Nakahara, Masaki; Nagata, Shigekazu; Robinson, Michael L.; Taylor, Allen

    2014-01-01

    Lens epithelial cells and early lens fiber cells contain the typical complement of intracellular organelles. However, as lens fiber cells mature they must destroy their organelles, including nuclei, in a process that has remained enigmatic for over a century, but which is crucial for the formation of the organelle-free zone in the center of the lens that assures clarity and function to transmit light. Nuclear degradation in lens fiber cells requires the nuclease DNase IIβ (DLAD) but the mechanism by which DLAD gains access to nuclear DNA remains unknown. In eukaryotic cells, cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (CDK1), in combination with either activator cyclins A or B, stimulates mitotic entry, in part, by phosphorylating the nuclear lamin proteins leading to the disassembly of the nuclear lamina and subsequent nuclear envelope breakdown. Although most post-mitotic cells lack CDK1 and cyclins, lens fiber cells maintain these proteins. Here, we show that loss of CDK1 from the lens inhibited the phosphorylation of nuclear lamins A and C, prevented the entry of DLAD into the nucleus, and resulted in abnormal retention of nuclei. In the presence of CDK1, a single focus of the phosphonuclear mitotic apparatus is observed, but it is not focused in CDK1-deficient lenses. CDK1 deficiency inhibited mitosis, but did not prevent DNA replication, resulting in an overall reduction of lens epithelial cells, with the remaining cells possessing an abnormally large nucleus. These observations suggest that CDK1-dependent phosphorylations required for the initiation of nuclear membrane disassembly during mitosis are adapted for removal of nuclei during fiber cell differentiation. PMID:25139855

  3. Breakdown of interdependent directed networks

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xueming; Stanley, H. Eugene; Gao, Jianxi

    2016-01-01

    Increasing evidence shows that real-world systems interact with one another via dependency connectivities. Failing connectivities are the mechanism behind the breakdown of interacting complex systems, e.g., blackouts caused by the interdependence of power grids and communication networks. Previous research analyzing the robustness of interdependent networks has been limited to undirected networks. However, most real-world networks are directed, their in-degrees and out-degrees may be correlated, and they are often coupled to one another as interdependent directed networks. To understand the breakdown and robustness of interdependent directed networks, we develop a theoretical framework based on generating functions and percolation theory. We find that for interdependent Erdős–Rényi networks the directionality within each network increases their vulnerability and exhibits hybrid phase transitions. We also find that the percolation behavior of interdependent directed scale-free networks with and without degree correlations is so complex that two criteria are needed to quantify and compare their robustness: the percolation threshold and the integrated size of the giant component during an entire attack process. Interestingly, we find that the in-degree and out-degree correlations in each network layer increase the robustness of interdependent degree heterogeneous networks that most real networks are, but decrease the robustness of interdependent networks with homogeneous degree distribution and with strong coupling strengths. Moreover, by applying our theoretical analysis to real interdependent international trade networks, we find that the robustness of these real-world systems increases with the in-degree and out-degree correlations, confirming our theoretical analysis. PMID:26787907

  4. Safeguards Envelope Progress FY08

    SciTech Connect

    Robert Bean; Richard Metcalf; Aaron Bevill

    2008-09-01

    The Safeguards Envelope Project met its milestones by creating a rudimentary safeguards envelope, proving the value of the approach on a small scale, and determining the most appropriate path forward. The Idaho Chemical Processing Plant’s large cache of reprocessing process monitoring data, dubbed UBER Data, was recovered and used in the analysis. A probabilistic Z test was used on a Markov Monte Carlo simulation of expected diversion data when compared with normal operating data. The data regarding a fully transient event in a tank was used to create a simple requirement, representative of a safeguards envelope, whose impact was a decrease in operating efficiency by 1.3% but an increase in material balance period of 26%. This approach is operator, state, and international safeguards friendly and should be applied to future reprocessing plants. Future requirements include tank-to-tank correlations in reprocessing facilities, detailed operations impact studies, simulation inclusion, automated optimization, advanced statistics analysis, and multi-attribute utility analysis.

  5. Heat recovery in building envelopes

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, Iain S.; Sherman, Max H.

    2003-08-01

    Infiltration has traditionally been assumed to contribute to the energy load of a building by an amount equal to the product of the infiltration flow rate and the enthalpy difference between inside and outside. Some studies have indicated that application of such a simple formula may produce an unreasonably high contribution because of heat recovery within the building envelope. The major objective of this study was to provide an improved prediction of the energy load due to infiltration by introducing a correction factor that multiplies the expression for the conventional load. This paper discusses simplified analytical modeling and CFD simulations that examine infiltration heat recovery (IHR) in an attempt to quantify the magnitude of this effect for typical building envelopes. For comparison, we will also briefly examine the results of some full-scale field measurements of IHR based on infiltration rates and energy use in real buildings. The results of this work showed that for houses with insulated walls the heat recovery is negligible due to the small fraction of the envelope that participates in heat exchange with the infiltrating air. However; there is the potential for IHR to have a significant effect for higher participation dynamic walls/ceilings or uninsulated walls. This result implies that the existing methods for evaluating infiltration related building loads provide adequate results for typical buildings.

  6. Nuclear γ-tubulin associates with nucleoli and interacts with tumor suppressor protein C53.

    PubMed

    Hořejší, Barbora; Vinopal, Stanislav; Sládková, Vladimíra; Dráberová, Eduarda; Sulimenko, Vadym; Sulimenko, Tetyana; Vosecká, Věra; Philimonenko, Anatoly; Hozák, Pavel; Katsetos, Christos D; Dráber, Pavel

    2012-01-01

    γ-Tubulin is assumed to be a typical cytosolic protein necessary for nucleation of microtubules from microtubule organizing centers. Using immunolocalization and cell fractionation techniques in combination with siRNAi and expression of FLAG-tagged constructs, we have obtained evidence that γ-tubulin is also present in nucleoli of mammalian interphase cells of diverse cellular origins. Immunoelectron microscopy has revealed γ-tubulin localization outside fibrillar centers where transcription of ribosomal DNA takes place. γ-Tubulin was associated with nucleolar remnants after nuclear envelope breakdown and could be translocated to nucleoli during mitosis. Pretreatment of cells with leptomycin B did not affect the distribution of nuclear γ-tubulin, making it unlikely that rapid active transport via nuclear pores participates in the transport of γ-tubulin into the nucleus. This finding was confirmed by heterokaryon assay and time-lapse imaging of photoconvertible protein Dendra2 tagged to γ-tubulin. Immunoprecipitation from nuclear extracts combined with mass spectrometry revealed an association of γ-tubulin with tumor suppressor protein C53 located at multiple subcellular compartments including nucleoli. The notion of an interaction between γ-tubulin and C53 was corroborated by pull-down and co-immunoprecipitation experiments. Overexpression of γ-tubulin antagonized the inhibitory effect of C53 on DNA damage G(2) /M checkpoint activation. The combined results indicate that aside from its known role in microtubule nucleation, γ-tubulin may also have nuclear-specific function(s).

  7. The structure of common-envelope remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Philip D.

    2015-05-01

    We investigate the structure and evolution of the remnants of common-envelope evolution in binary star systems. In a common-envelope phase, two stars become engulfed in a gaseous envelope and, under the influence of drag forces, spiral to smaller separations. They may merge to form a single star or the envelope may be ejected to leave the stars in a shorter period orbit. This process explains the short orbital periods of many observed binary systems, such as cataclysmic variables and low-mass X-ray binary systems. Despite the importance of these systems, and of common-envelope evolution to their formation, it remains poorly understood. Specifically, we are unable to confidently predict the outcome of a common-envelope phase from the properties at its onset. After presenting a review of work on stellar evolution, binary systems, common-envelope evolution and the computer programs used, we describe the results of three computational projects on common-envelope evolution. Our work specifically relates to the methods and prescriptions which are used for predicting the outcome. We use the Cambridge stellar-evolution code STARS to produce detailed models of the structure and evolution of remnants of common-envelope evolution. We compare different assumptions about the uncertain end-of-common envelope structure and envelope mass of remnants which successfully eject their common envelopes. In the first project, we use detailed remnant models to investigate whether planetary nebulae are predicted after common-envelope phases initiated by low-mass red giants. We focus on the requirement that a remnant evolves rapidly enough to photoionize the nebula and compare the predictions for different ideas about the structure at the end of a common-envelope phase. We find that planetary nebulae are possible for some prescriptions for the end-of-common envelope structure. In our second contribution, we compute a large set of single-star models and fit new formulae to the core radii of

  8. Scintillation Breakdowns in Chip Tantalum Capacitors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teverovsky, Alexander

    2008-01-01

    Scintillations in solid tantalum capacitors are momentarily local breakdowns terminated by a self-healing or conversion to a high-resistive state of the manganese oxide cathode. This conversion effectively caps the defective area of the tantalum pentoxide dielectric and prevents short-circuit failures. Typically, this type of breakdown has no immediate catastrophic consequences and is often considered as nuisance rather than a failure. Scintillation breakdowns likely do not affect failures of parts under surge current conditions, and so-called "proofing" of tantalum chip capacitors, which is a controllable exposure of the part after soldering to voltages slightly higher than the operating voltage to verify that possible scintillations are self-healed, has been shown to improve the quality of the parts. However, no in-depth studies of the effect of scintillations on reliability of tantalum capacitors have been performed so far. KEMET is using scintillation breakdown testing as a tool for assessing process improvements and to compare quality of different manufacturing lots. Nevertheless, the relationship between failures and scintillation breakdowns is not clear, and this test is not considered as suitable for lot acceptance testing. In this work, scintillation breakdowns in different military-graded and commercial tantalum capacitors were characterized and related to the rated voltages and to life test failures. A model for assessment of times to failure, based on distributions of breakdown voltages, and accelerating factors of life testing are discussed.

  9. Breakdown characteristics of xenon HID Lamps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babaeva, Natalia; Sato, Ayumu; Brates, Nanu; Noro, Koji; Kushner, Mark

    2009-10-01

    The breakdown characteristics of mercury free xenon high intensity discharge (HID) lamps exhibit a large statistical time lag often having a large scatter in breakdown voltages. In this paper, we report on results from a computational investigation of the processes which determine the ignition voltages for positive and negative pulses in commercial HID lamps having fill pressures of up to 20 atm. Steep voltage rise results in higher avalanche electron densities and earlier breakdown times. Circuit characteristics also play a role. Large ballast resistors may limit current to the degree that breakdown is quenched. The breakdown voltage critically depends on cathode charge injection by electric field emission (or other mechanisms) which in large part controls the statistical time lag for breakdown. For symmetric lamps, ionization waves (IWs) simultaneously develop from the bottom and top electrodes. Breakdown typically occurs when the top and bottom IWs converge. Condensed salt layers having small conductivities on the inner walls of HID lamps and on the electrodes can influence the ignition behavior. With these layers, IWs tend to propagate along the inner wall and exhibit a different structure depending on the polarity.

  10. Calculations of Second Breakdown in Silicon Diodes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-08-01

    Diodes Area I ’ x 10-4 cm 2 *****~*... ... *.*. 35 "Mai" 1. INTRODUCTION The phenomenon of second breakdown was first reported in diodes by Tauc ...written for study of electrical breakdown in gases, 8 modified for study of 1 J. Tauc and A . Abraham, Thermal Breakdown in Silicon P-N Junctions...this plot was chosen to be the first time that VB, (80 V) was attained. Both figures 13 and 14 110 , 0 loI --- - - 1 0 100 10 1 ,0 Figure 13. Dynamic

  11. Electrodynamic thermal breakdown of a capacitor insulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emel'Yanov, O. A.

    2011-11-01

    A mechanism of the electrical breakdown is proposed for modern metal-field capacitors with the well-known property of self-healing of the breakdown strength. Upon an increase in the working voltage, the self-healing time increases to tens of microseconds, and the heating of adjacent insulator layers becomes significant. The propagating thermally activated conduction wave facilitates the enhancement of the electric field up to breakdown values. Analysis of the dynamics of electric field increase is carried out for capacitors based on polyethylene terephthalate (PET) dielectric.

  12. RF Breakdown in High Frequency Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Doebert, S

    2004-05-27

    RF breakdown in high-frequency accelerators appears to limit the maximum achievable gradient as well as the reliability of such devices. Experimental results from high power tests, obtained mostly in the framework of the NLC/GLC project at 11 GHz and from the CLIC study at 30 GHz, will be used to illustrate the important issues. The dependence of the breakdown phenomena on rf pulse length, operating frequency and fabrication material will be described. Since reliability is extremely important for large scale accelerators such as a linear collider, the measurements of breakdown rate as a function of the operating gradient will be highlighted.

  13. Isolating The Building Thermal Envelope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrje, D. T.; Dutt, G. S.; Gadsby, K. J.

    1981-01-01

    The evaluation of the thermal integrity of building envelopes by infrared scanning tech-niques is often hampered in mild weather because temperature differentials across the envelope are small. Combining the infrared scanning with positive or negative building pressures, induced by a "blower door" or the building ventilation system, considerably extends the periods during which meaningful diagnostics can be conducted. Although missing or poorly installed insulation may lead to a substantial energy penalty, it is the search for air leakage sites that often has the largest potential for energy savings. Infrared inspection of the attic floor with air forced from the occupied space through ceiling by-passes, and inspecting the interior of the building when outside air is being sucked through the envelope reveals unexpected leakage sites. Portability of the diagnostic equipment is essential in these surveys which may include access into some tight spaces. A catalog of bypass heat losses that have been detected in residential housing using the combined infrared pressure differential technique is included to point out the wide variety of leakage sites which may compromise the benefits of thermal insulation and allow excessive air infiltration. Detection and suppression of such leaks should be key items in any building energy audit program. Where a calibrated blower door is used to pressurize or evacuate the house, the leakage rate can be quantified and an excessively tight house recognized. Houses that are too tight may be improved with a minimal energy penalty by forced ventilation,preferably with a heat recuperator and/or by providing combustion air directly to the furnace.

  14. Aircraft maneuver envelope warning system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bivens, Courtland C. (Inventor); Rosado, Joel M. (Inventor); Lee, Burnett (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A maneuver envelope warning system for an aircraft having operating limits, operating condition sensors and an indicator driver. The indicator driver has a plurality of visual indicators. The indicator driver determines a relationship between sensed operating conditions and the operating limits; such as, a ratio therebetween. The indicator driver illuminates a number of the indicators in proportion to the determined relationship. The position of the indicators illuminated represents to a pilot in an easily ascertainable manner whether the operational conditions are approaching operational limits of the aircraft, and the degree to which operational conditions lie within or exceed operational limits.

  15. Flexible Envelope Request Notation (FERN)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zoch, David R.; Lavallee, David; Weinstein, Stuart

    1991-01-01

    The following topics are presented in view graph form and include the following: scheduling application; the motivation for the Flexible Envelope Request Notation (FERN); characteristics of FERN; types of information needed in requests; where information is stored in requests; FERN structures; generic requests; resource availability for pooled resources; expressive notation; temporal constraints; time formats; changes to FERN; sample FERN requests; the temporal relationship between two steps; maximum activity length to limit step delays; alternative requests; the temporal relationship between two activities; and idle resource usage between steps.

  16. Edge overload breakdown in evolving networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holme, Petter

    2002-09-01

    We investigate growing networks based on Barabási and Albert's algorithm for generating scale-free networks, but with edges sensitive to overload breakdown. The load is defined through edge betweenness centrality. We focus on the situation where the average number of connections per vertex is, like the number of vertices, linearly increasing in time. After an initial stage of growth, the network undergoes avalanching breakdowns to a fragmented state from which it never recovers. This breakdown is much less violent if the growth is by random rather than by preferential attachment (as defines the Barabási and Albert model). We briefly discuss the case where the average number of connections per vertex is constant. In this case no breakdown avalanches occur. Implications to the growth of real-world communication networks are discussed.

  17. Initiation of breakdown in slender compressible vortices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krause, E.; Menne, S.; Liu, C. H.

    1986-01-01

    The onset of vortex breakdown in compressible flows is investigated analytically for the case in which the flow is axially symmetric, the vortex is isolated, its axis is parallel to the main flow, and the vortex radius is small compared to the breakdown length. The conservation equations for mass, momentum, and energy are formulated and solved numerically using a finite-difference scheme, as described by Krause (1985); numerical results are presented in graphs and briefly characterized.

  18. Surface breakdown igniter for mercury arc devices

    DOEpatents

    Bayless, John R.

    1977-01-01

    Surface breakdown igniter comprises a semiconductor of medium resistivity which has the arc device cathode as one electrode and has an igniter anode electrode so that when voltage is applied between the electrodes a spark is generated when electrical breakdown occurs over the surface of the semiconductor. The geometry of the igniter anode and cathode electrodes causes the igniter discharge to be forced away from the semiconductor surface.

  19. Breakdown phenomena in high power klystrons

    SciTech Connect

    Vlieks, A.E.; Allen, M.A.; Callin, R.S.; Fowkes, W.R.; Hoyt, E.W.; Lebacqz, J.V.; Lee, T.G.

    1988-03-01

    In the course of developing new high peak power klystrons at SLAC, high electric fields in several regions of these devices have become an important source of vacuum breakdown phenomena. In addition, a renewed interest in breakdown phenomena for nanosecond pulse, multi-megavolt per centimeter fields has been sparked by recent R and D work in the area of gigawatt RF sources. The most important regions of electrical breakdown are in the output cavity gap area, the RF ceramic windows, and the gun ceramic insulator. The details of the observed breakdown in these regions, experiments performed to understand the phenomena and solutions found to alleviate the problems will be discussed. Recently experiments have been performed on a new prototype R and D klystron. Peak electric fields across the output cavity gaps of this klystron exceed 2 MV/cm. The effect of peak field duration (i.e. pulse width) on the onset of breakdown have been measured. The pulse widths varied from tens of nanoseconds to microseconds. Results from these experiments will be presented. The failure of ceramic RF windows due to multipactor and puncturing was an important problem to overcome in order that our high power klystrons would have a useful life expectancy. Consequently many studies and tests were made to understand and alleviate window breakdown phenomena. Some of the results in this area, especially the effects of surface coatings, window materials and processing techniques and their effects on breakdown will be discussed. Another important source of klystron failure in the recent past at SLAC has been the puncturing of the high voltage ceramic insulator in the gun region. A way of alleviating this problem has been found although the actual cause of the puncturing is not yet clear. The ''practical'' solution to this breakdown process will be described and a possible mechanism for the puncturing will be presented. 9 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  20. Humidity effects on wire insulation breakdown strength.

    SciTech Connect

    Appelhans, Leah

    2013-08-01

    Methods for the testing of the dielectric breakdown strength of insulation on metal wires under variable humidity conditions were developed. Two methods, an ASTM method and the twisted pair method, were compared to determine if the twisted pair method could be used for determination of breakdown strength under variable humidity conditions. It was concluded that, although there were small differences in outcomes between the two testing methods, the non-standard method (twisted pair) would be appropriate to use for further testing of the effects of humidity on breakdown performance. The dielectric breakdown strength of 34G copper wire insulated with double layer Poly-Thermaleze/Polyamide-imide insulation was measured using the twisted pair method under a variety of relative humidity (RH) conditions and exposure times. Humidity at 50% RH and below was not found to affect the dielectric breakdown strength. At 80% RH the dielectric breakdown strength was significantly diminished. No effect for exposure time up to 140 hours was observed at 50 or 80%RH.

  1. Circumplanetary disc or circumplanetary envelope?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szulágyi, J.; Masset, F.; Lega, E.; Crida, A.; Morbidelli, A.; Guillot, T.

    2016-08-01

    We present three-dimensional simulations with nested meshes of the dynamics of the gas around a Jupiter mass planet with the JUPITER and FARGOCA codes. We implemented a radiative transfer module into the JUPITER code to account for realistic heating and cooling of the gas. We focus on the circumplanetary gas flow, determining its characteristics at very high resolution (80 per cent of Jupiter's diameter). In our nominal simulation where the temperature evolves freely by the radiative module and reaches 13000 K at the planet, a circumplanetary envelope was formed filling the entire Roche lobe. Because of our equation of state is simplified and probably overestimates the temperature, we also performed simulations with limited maximal temperatures in the planet region (1000, 1500, and 2000 K). In these fixed temperature cases circumplanetary discs (CPDs) were formed. This suggests that the capability to form a CPD is not simply linked to the mass of the planet and its ability to open a gap. Instead, the gas temperature at the planet's location, which depends on its accretion history, plays also fundamental role. The CPDs in the simulations are hot and cooling very slowly, they have very steep temperature and density profiles, and are strongly sub-Keplerian. Moreover, the CPDs are fed by a strong vertical influx, which shocks on the CPD surfaces creating a hot and luminous shock-front. In contrast, the pressure supported circumplanetary envelope is characterized by internal convection and almost stalled rotation.

  2. Early Site Permit Demonstration Program: Plant parameters envelope report. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-03-01

    The Early Site Permit (ESP) Demonstration Program is the nuclear industry`s initiative for piloting the early resolution of siting-related issues before the detailed design proceedings of the combined operating license review. The ESP Demonstration Program consists of three phases. The plant parameters envelopes task is part of Phase 1, which addresses the generic review of applicable federal regulations and develops criteria for safety and environmental assessment of potential sites. The plant parameters envelopes identify parameters that characterize the interface between an ALWR design and a potential site, and quantify the interface through values selected from the Utility Requirements Documents, vendor design information, or engineering assessments. When augmented with site-specific information, the plant parameters envelopes provide sufficient information to allow ESPs to be granted based on individual ALWR design information or enveloping design information for the evolutionary, passive, or generic ALWR plants. This document is expected to become a living document when used by future applicants.

  3. 7 CFR 51.1009 - Stylar end breakdown.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Stylar end breakdown. 51.1009 Section 51.1009... (INSPECTION, CERTIFICATION, AND STANDARDS) United States Standards for Persian (Tahiti) Limes Definitions § 51.1009 Stylar end breakdown. Stylar end breakdown is a physiological breakdown starting at the base...

  4. 7 CFR 51.1009 - Stylar end breakdown.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Stylar end breakdown. 51.1009 Section 51.1009... STANDARDS) United States Standards for Persian (Tahiti) Limes Definitions § 51.1009 Stylar end breakdown. Stylar end breakdown is a physiological breakdown starting at the base of the nipple as a grayish...

  5. 7 CFR 51.1582 - Soft rot or wet breakdown.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Soft rot or wet breakdown. 51.1582 Section 51.1582... Soft rot or wet breakdown. Soft rot or wet breakdown means any soft, mushy, or leaky condition of the tissue such as slimy soft rot, leak, or wet breakdown following freezing injury, scald, or other injury....

  6. 7 CFR 51.1563 - Soft rot or wet breakdown.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Soft rot or wet breakdown. 51.1563 Section 51.1563....1563 Soft rot or wet breakdown. Soft rot or wet breakdown means any soft, mushy, or leaky condition of the tissue such as slimy soft rot, leak, or wet breakdown following freezing injury....

  7. 7 CFR 51.1563 - Soft rot or wet breakdown.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Soft rot or wet breakdown. 51.1563 Section 51.1563....1563 Soft rot or wet breakdown. Soft rot or wet breakdown means any soft, mushy, or leaky condition of the tissue such as slimy soft rot, leak, or wet breakdown following freezing injury....

  8. 7 CFR 51.1582 - Soft rot or wet breakdown.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Soft rot or wet breakdown. 51.1582 Section 51.1582... Soft rot or wet breakdown. Soft rot or wet breakdown means any soft, mushy, or leaky condition of the tissue such as slimy soft rot, leak, or wet breakdown following freezing injury, scald, or other injury....

  9. A computational study of the topology of vortex breakdown

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spall, Robert E.; Gatski, Thomas B.

    1991-01-01

    A fully three-dimensional numerical simulation of vortex breakdown using the unsteady, incompressible Navier-Stokes equations has been performed. Solutions to four distinct types of breakdown are identified and compared with experimental results. The computed solutions include weak helical, double helix, spiral, and bubble-type breakdowns. The topological structure of the various breakdowns as well as their interrelationship are studied. The data reveal that the asymmetric modes of breakdown may be subject to additional breakdowns as the vortex core evolves in the streamwise direction. The solutions also show that the freestream axial velocity distribution has a significant effect on the position and type of vortex breakdown.

  10. Thermodynamics of nuclear transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ching-Hao; Mehta, Pankaj; Elbaum, Michael

    Molecular transport across the nuclear envelope is important for eukaryotes for gene expression and signaling. Experimental studies have revealed that nuclear transport is inherently a nonequilibrium process and actively consumes energy. In this work we present a thermodynamics theory of nuclear transport for a major class of nuclear transporters that are mediated by the small GTPase Ran. We identify the molecular elements responsible for powering nuclear transport, which we term the ``Ran battery'' and find that the efficiency of transport, measured by the cargo nuclear localization ratio, is limited by competition between cargo molecules and RanGTP to bind transport receptors, as well as the amount of NTF2 (i.e. RanGDP carrier) available to circulate the energy flow. This picture complements our current understanding of nuclear transport by providing a comprehensive thermodynamics framework to decipher the underlying biochemical machinery. Pm and CHW were supported by a Simons Investigator in the Mathematical Modeling in Living Systems grant (to PM).

  11. Rapid Detection of Enveloped Viruses.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-03-12

    pL PBS-Tween. 101 15. Add 100 PL p- nitrophenol phosphate substrate in diethanolamine buffer. 16. Incubate for 1 hour at room temperature in dark. 17...containing the M-protein gene demonstrates that the signal for nuclear transport of M-protein is located within the M-protein sequence; synthesis of...protein; synthesis of other influenza viral proteins is not necessary for nuclear transport of M-protein to occur. Our collaborative work with Dr

  12. Planned waveguide electric field breakdown studies

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Faya; Li Zenghai

    2012-12-21

    This paper presents an experimental setup for X-band rf breakdown studies. The setup is composed of a section of WR90 waveguide with a tapered pin located at the middle of the waveguide E-plane. Another pin is used to rf match the waveguide so it operates in a travelling wave mode. By adjusting the penetration depth of the tapered pin, different surface electric field enhancements can be obtained. The setup will be used to study the rf breakdown rate dependence on power flow in the waveguide for a constant maximum surface electric field on the pin. Two groups of pins have been designed. The Q of one group is different and very low. The other has a similar Q. With the test of the two groups of pins, we should be able to discern how the net power flow and Q affect the breakdown. Furthermore, we will apply an electron beam treatment to the pins to study its effect on breakdown. Overall, these experiments should be very helpful in understanding rf breakdown phenomena and could significantly benefit the design of high gradient accelerator structures.

  13. Investigating Electrical Breakdown in Liquid Helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouman, Nathaniel; SNS nEDM Collaboration

    2016-09-01

    The SNS nEDM experiment at Oak Ridge National Laboratory aims to search for the electric dipole moment of the neutron (nEDM) at the 3x10-28 level. The experiment is currently in the critical component demonstration phase. The design of the experiment calls for an electric field of 75 kV/cm across the experimental cells between electrodes within a bath of liquid helium (LHe). However, the electric breakdown phenomenon in LHe is poorly understood. Experiments investigating the breakdown of LHe were carried out at Los Alamos National Laboratory using a small-scale high voltage (SSHV) test apparatus at temperatures from 1.7K to 4K. Effects of varying temperature, pressure, and electrode surface conditions on LHe breakdown were investigated. Results and their implications to the SNS nEDM experiment will be presented.

  14. Intense microwave pulse propagation through gas breakdown plasmas in a waveguide

    SciTech Connect

    Byrne, D.P.

    1986-10-08

    High-power microwave pulse-compression techniques are used to generate 2.856 GHz pulses which are propagated in a TE/sub 10/ mode through a gas filled section of waveguide, where the pulses interact with self-generated gas-breakdown plasmas. Pulse envelopes transmitted through the plasmas, with duration varying from 2 ns to greater than 1 ..mu..s, and peak powers of a few kW to nearly 100 MW, are measured as a function of incident pulse and gas pressure for air, nitrogen, and helium. In addition, the spatial and temporal development of the optical radiation emitted by the breakdown plasmas are measured. For transmitted pulse durations greater than or equal to 100 ns, good agreement is found with both theory and existing measurements. For transmitted pulse duration as short as 2 ns (less than 10 rf cycles), a two-dimensional model is used in which the electrons in the plasma are treated as a fluid whose interactions with the microwave pulse are governed by a self-consistent set of fluid equations and Maxwell's equations for the electromagnetic field. The predictions of this model for air are compared with the experimental results over a pressure range of 0.8 torr to 300 torr. Good agreement is obtained above about 1 torr pressure, demonstrating that microwave pulse propagation above the breakdown threshold can be accurately modeled on this time scale. 63 refs., 44 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Spectrometers for RF breakdown studies for CLIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacewicz, M.; Ziemann, V.; Ekelöf, T.; Dubrovskiy, A.; Ruber, R.

    2016-08-01

    An e+e- collider of several TeV energy will be needed for the precision studies of any new physics discovered at the LHC collider at CERN. One promising candidate is CLIC, a linear collider which is based on a two-beam acceleration scheme that efficiently solves the problem of power distribution to the acceleration structures. The phenomenon that currently prevents achieving high accelerating gradients in high energy accelerators such as the CLIC is the electrical breakdown at very high electrical field. The ongoing experimental work within the CLIC collaboration is trying to benchmark the theoretical models focusing on the physics of vacuum breakdown which is responsible for the discharges. In order to validate the feasibility of accelerating structures and observe the characteristics of the vacuum discharges and their eroding effects on the structure two dedicated spectrometers are now commissioned at the high-power test-stands at CERN. First, the so called Flashbox has opened up a possibility for non-invasive studies of the emitted breakdown currents during two-beam acceleration experiments. It gives a unique possibility to measure the energy of electrons and ions in combination with the arrival time spectra and to put that in context with accelerated beam, which is not possible at any of the other existing test-stands. The second instrument, a spectrometer for detection of the dark and breakdown currents, is operated at one of the 12 GHz stand-alone test-stands at CERN. Built for high repetition rate operation it can measure the spatial and energy distributions of the electrons emitted from the acceleration structure during a single RF pulse. Two new analysis tools: discharge impedance tracking and tomographic image reconstruction, applied to the data from the spectrometer make possible for the first time to obtain the location of the breakdown inside the structure both in the transversal and longitudinal direction thus giving a more complete picture of the

  16. Breakdowns in Coordination Between Air Traffic Controllers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bearman, Chris; Orasanu, Judith; Miller, Ronald C.

    2011-01-01

    This talk outlines the complexity of coordination in air traffic control, introduces the NextGen technologies, identifies common causes for coordination breakdowns in air traffic control and examines whether these causes are likely to be reduced with the introduction of NextGen technologies. While some of the common causes of breakdowns will be reduced in a NextGen environment this conclusion should be drawn carefully given the current stage of development of the technologies and the observation that new technologies often shift problems rather than reduce them.

  17. The theoretical polarization of pure scattering axisymmetric circumstellar envelopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, G. K.

    1994-01-01

    The Sobolev approach to the scattering of starlight through a pure scattering circumstellar envelope is developed. The theoretical polarization due to electron scattering in Be star envelopes is calculated for two geometries (an equatorially enhanced envelope and a spheroidal envelope). Only the disk-type envelope is found to yield a maximum polarization consistent with the observed range for Be stars. A lower limit, analytical approximation to the theoretical polarization from a pure scattering envelope is obtained.

  18. Personnel occupied woven envelope robot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wessling, Francis; Teoh, William; Ziemke, M. Carl

    1988-01-01

    The Personnel Occupied Woven Envelope Robot (POWER) provides an alternative to extravehicular activity (EVA) of space suited astronauts and/or use of long slender manipulator arms such as are used in the Shuttle Remote Manipulator System. POWER provides the capability for a shirt sleeved astronaut to perform such work by entering a control pod through air locks at both ends of an inflated flexible bellows (access tunnel). The exoskeleton of the tunnel is a series of six degrees of freedom (Six-DOF) articulated links compressible to 1/6 of their fully extended length. The operator can maneuver the control pod to almost any location within about 50 m of the base attachment to the space station. POWER can be envisioned as a series of hollow Six-DOF manipulator segments or arms wherein each arm grasps the shoulder of the next arm. Inside the hollow arms ia a bellow-type access tunnel. The control pod is the fist of the series of linked hollow arms. The fingers of the fist are conventional manipulator arms under direct visual control of the nearby operator in the pod. The applications and progress to date of the POWER system is given.

  19. Resource envelope concepts for mission planning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ibrahim, K. Y.; Weiler, J. D.; Tokaz, J. C.

    1991-01-01

    Seven proposed methods for creating resource envelopes for Space Station Freedom mission planning are detailed. Four reference science activity models are used to illustrate the effect of adding operational flexibility to mission timelines. For each method, a brief explanation is given along with graphs to illustrate the application of the envelopes to the power and crew resources. The benefits and costs of each method are analyzed in terms of resource utilization. In addition to the effect on individual activities, resource envelopes are analyzed at the experiment level.

  20. Factors affecting foster care breakdown in Spain.

    PubMed

    López López, Mónica; del Valle, Jorge F; Montserrat, Carme; Bravo, Amaia

    2011-05-01

    Breakdown of foster care has been defined as the situation in which one of the involved parties terminates the intervention before having achieved the goals established for the case plan. This work presents a study carried out with a Spanish sample of 318 closed cases of children who were placed in foster homes and kinship care. The data were collected through the exhaustive review of the child protection and foster placement files, complemented with interviews of the welfare workers in charge of each case. The rate of breakdown of the entire sample was 26.1%, although it was significantly different in kinship care (19.7%) and foster care (31.2%). The results of this study indicate that the variables related to breakdown depend on the placement modality, either in foster care or kinship care. In the first case, the variables related to the child's characteristics are noteworthy, especially behavior and academic problems, with special relevance in the 9-12-year-old group, and in children who were previously in residential care. In contrast, in kinship care, the parents' problems (prison, mental health) and having some measure of guardianship are the most important. The fact of undergoing foster placement after having lived in various residential homes is transcendental. Lastly, the availability of economic resources and even the foster carers' studies seem to be related to foster breakdown.

  1. Breakdown mechanism in buried silicon oxide films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayo, Santos; Suehle, John S.; Roitman, Peter

    1993-09-01

    Charge injection leading to catastrophic breakdown has been used to study the dielectric properties of the buried oxide layer in silicon implanted with high-energy oxygen ions. Current versus gate bias, current versus time, and capacitance versus gate bias were used to characterize, at various temperatures, MOS metal-oxide-semiconductor capacitors with areas in the 1×10-4-1×10-2 cm2 range fabricated with commercially available single- or triple-implant separation by implanted oxygen silicon wafers. The data show that injected charge accumulates in the buried oxide at donorlike oxide traps ultimately leading to catastrophic breakdown. Both Poole-Frenkel and Fowler-Nordheim conduction, as well as impact-ionization mechanisms, have been identified in the oxide. The charge and field to breakdown in the best buried oxides are, respectively, near 1 C cm-2 and 10 MV cm-1, similar to the thermally grown oxide parameters. Cumulative distributions of these parameters measured over a large number of capacitors show that the frequency of breakdown events caused by extrinsic defects is scaled with the capacitor area. Intrinsic and extrinsic defect distributions are broader than with thermally grown oxides.

  2. Electrical Breakdown Phenomena Involving Material Interfaces

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-01

    vol. 119, pp. 520-524, 1960. [14] H. P. Hjalmarson, R. L. Pease, and R. A. B. Devine, “Calculations of radiation dose-rate sensitivity of bipolar ... transistors ,” IEEE Trans. Nucl. Sci., vol. 55, pp. 3009– 3015, 2008. [15] J. M. Meek and J. D. Craggs, Electrical Breakdown of Gases. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1953. 798

  3. Heme content and breakdown in developing chloroplasts

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, J.; Weinstein, J.D. )

    1990-05-01

    Heme regulates tetrapyrrole biosynthesis in plants by inhibition of {delta}-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) synthesis, product inhibition of heme synthesis, and possibly other mechanisms. Plastid heme levels may be modulated by heme synthesis, breakdown and/or efflux. Heme breakdown may be catalyzed by a chloroplast localized heme oxygenase. Chloroplasts isolated from greening cucumber cotyledons were incubated in the presence or absence of various components thought to modulate heme breakdown. Following the incubations, the chloroplasts were broken (freeze-thaw) and then supplemented with horseradish peroxidase apoenzyme. The reconstituted peroxidase activity was used to determine the amount of free heme remaining (Thomas Weinstein (1989) Plant Physiol. 89S: 74). Chloroplasts, freshly isolated from seedlings greened for 16 hours, contained approximately 37 pmol heme/mg protein. When chloroplasts were incubated with 5 mM NADPH for 30 min, the endogenous heme dropped to unmeasurable levels. Exogenous heme was also broken down when NADPH was included in the incubation. Heme levels could be increased by the inclusion of 50 {mu}M ALA and/or p-hydroxymercuribenzoate. The increase due to exogenous ALA was blocked by levulinic acid, an inhibitor of ALA utilization. NADPH-dependent heme breakdown acid was inhibited by p-hydroxymercuribenzoate.

  4. RF Breakdown of Metallic Surfaces in Hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    BastaniNejad, M.; Elmustafa, A.A.; Yonehara, K.; Chung, M.; Jansson, A.; Hu, M.; Moretti, A.; Popovic, M.; Alsharo'a, M.; Neubauer, M.; Sah, R.; /Muons Inc., Batavia

    2009-05-01

    In earlier reports, microscopic images of the surfaces of metallic electrodes used in high-pressure gas-filled 805 MHz RF cavity experiments were used to investigate the mechanism of RF breakdown of tungsten, molybdenum, and beryllium electrode surfaces. Plots of remnants were consistent with the breakdown events being due to field emission, due to the quantum mechanical tunnelling of electrons through a barrier as described by Fowler and Nordheim. In the work described here, these studies have been extended to include tin, aluminium, and copper. Contamination of the surfaces, discovered after the experiments concluded, have cast some doubt on the proper qualities to assign to the metallic surfaces. However, two significant results are noted. First, the maximum stable RF gradient of contaminated copper electrodes is higher than for a clean surface. Second, the addition of as little as 0.01% of SF6 to the hydrogen gas increased the maximum stable gradient, which implies that models of RF breakdown in hydrogen gas will be important to the study of metallic breakdown.

  5. Temperature Dependence of Laser Induced Breakdown

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-01-01

    consistent dependence on the temperature of the medium. The theory of the temperature dependence of LIB and experimental observations for all pulse...durations and their implications for retinal damage are discussed. Laser Induced Breakdown, Temperature dependence , Threshold valve, Nanosecond, Picosecond, Femtosecond, laser pulses.

  6. Numerical Borehole Breakdown Investigations using XFEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beckhuis, Sven; Leonhart, Dirk; Meschke, Günther

    2016-04-01

    During pressurization of a wellbore a typical downhole pressure record shows the following regimes: first the applied wellbore pressure balances the reservoir pressure, then after the compressive circumferential hole stresses are overcome, tensile stresses are induced on the inside surface of the hole. When the magnitude of these stresses reach the tensile failure stress of the surrounding rock medium, a fracture is initiated and propagates into the reservoir. [1] In standard theories this pressure, the so called breakdown pressure, is the peak pressure in the down-hole pressure record. However experimental investigations [2] show that the breakdown did not occur even if a fracture was initiated at the borehole wall. Drilling muds had the tendency to seal and stabilize fractures and prevent fracture propagation. Also fracture mechanics analysis of breakdown process in mini-frac or leak off tests [3] show that the breakdown pressure could be either equal or larger than the fracture initiation pressure. In order to gain a deeper understanding of the breakdown process in reservoir rock, numerical investigations using the extended finite element method (XFEM) for hydraulic fracturing of porous materials [4] are discussed. The reservoir rock is assumed to be pre-fractured. During pressurization of the borehole, the injection pressure, the pressure distribution and the position of the highest flux along the fracture for different fracturing fluid viscosities are recorded and the influence of the aforementioned values on the stability of fracture propagation is discussed. [1] YEW, C. H. (1997), "Mechanics of Hydraulic Fracturing", Gulf Publishing Company [2] MORITA, N.; BLACK, A. D.; FUH, G.-F. (1996), "Borehole Breakdown Pressure with Drilling Fluids". International Journal of Rock Mechanics and Mining Sciences 33, pp. 39-51 [3] DETOURNAY, E.; CARBONELL, R. (1996), "Fracture Mechanics Analysis of the Breakdown Process in Minifrac or Leakoff Test", Society of Petroleum

  7. Electrical breakdown of carbon nanotube devices and the predictability of breakdown position

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goswami, Gopal Krishna; Nanda, Karuna Kar

    2012-06-01

    We have investigated electrical transport properties of long (>10 μm) multiwalled carbon nanotubes (NTs) by dividing individuals into several segments of identical length. Each segment has different resistance because of the random distribution of defect density in an NT and is corroborated by Raman studies. Higher is the resistance, lower is the current required to break the segments indicating that breakdown occurs at the highly resistive segment/site and not necessarily at the middle. This is consistent with the one-dimensional thermal transport model. We have demonstrated the healing of defects by annealing at moderate temperatures or by current annealing. To strengthen our mechanism, we have carried out electrical breakdown of nitrogen doped NTs (NNTs) with diameter variation from one end to the other. It reveals that the electrical breakdown occurs selectively at the narrower diameter region. Overall, we believe that our results will help to predict the breakdown position of both semiconducting and metallic NTs.

  8. RF Breakdown in High Vacuum Multimegawatt X-Band Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Dolgashev, V

    2004-06-15

    Increasing the power handling capabilities of rf components is an important issue for the design of rf accelerators and rf sources. RF breakdown is a phenomena that limit the high power performance. A major concern is the damage that can occur in rf components from breakdown. To better understand this damage, we have studied rf breakdown in a rectangular waveguide experimentally and theoretically. The breakdown process in a waveguide is both easier to measure and simulate than breakdown in a complex geometry such as an accelerating structure. We used a particle tracking code and a Particle-In-Cell code to model the breakdown behavior. Models developed for the waveguide were applied to the breakdown in accelerating structures. RF breakdown in traveling wave and standing wave accelerating structures was simulated. We compare the experimental data with results of the simulations for the accelerating structures.

  9. The Latitude Dependence of Dielectric Breakdown on the Moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, A. P.; Stubbs, T. J.; Wilson, J. K.; Hayne, P. O.; Schwadron, N. A.; Spence, H. E.; Izenberg, N. R.

    2016-11-01

    Solar energetic particles may cause dielectric breakdown on the nightside of the Moon. We predict that breakdown weathering may have melted or vaporized about 4-11 wt% of impact gardened regolith on the Moon.

  10. The Prolyl Isomerase Pin1 Promotes the Herpesvirus-Induced Phosphorylation-Dependent Disassembly of the Nuclear Lamina Required for Nucleocytoplasmic Egress

    PubMed Central

    Milbradt, Jens; Hutterer, Corina; Bahsi, Hanife; Wagner, Sabrina; Sonntag, Eric; Kaufer, Benedikt B.; Mori, Yasuko; Sticht, Heinrich; Fossen, Torgils; Marschall, Manfred

    2016-01-01

    The nuclear lamina lines the inner nuclear membrane providing a structural framework for the nucleus. Cellular processes, such as nuclear envelope breakdown during mitosis or nuclear export of large ribonucleoprotein complexes, are functionally linked to the disassembly of the nuclear lamina. In general, lamina disassembly is mediated by phosphorylation, but the precise molecular mechanism is still not completely understood. Recently, we suggested a novel mechanism for lamina disassembly during the nuclear egress of herpesviral capsids which involves the cellular isomerase Pin1. In this study, we focused on mechanistic details of herpesviral nuclear replication to demonstrate the general importance of Pin1 for lamina disassembly. In particular, Ser22-specific lamin phosphorylation consistently generates a Pin1-binding motif in cells infected with human and animal alpha-, beta-, and gammaherpesviruses. Using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, we showed that binding of Pin1 to a synthetic lamin peptide induces its cis/trans isomerization in vitro. A detailed bioinformatic evaluation strongly suggests that this structural conversion induces large-scale secondary structural changes in the lamin N-terminus. Thus, we concluded that a Pin1-induced conformational change of lamins may represent the molecular trigger responsible for lamina disassembly. Consistent with this concept, pharmacological inhibition of Pin1 activity blocked lamina disassembly in herpesvirus-infected fibroblasts and consequently impaired virus replication. In addition, a phospho-mimetic Ser22Glu lamin mutant was still able to form a regular lamina structure and overexpression of a Ser22-phosphorylating kinase did not induce lamina disassembly in Pin1 knockout cells. Intriguingly, this was observed in absence of herpesvirus infection proposing a broader importance of Pin1 for lamina constitution. Thus, our results suggest a functional model of similar events leading to disassembly of the nuclear

  11. Personnel occupied woven envelope robot power

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wessling, F. C.

    1988-01-01

    The Personnel Occupied Woven Envelope Robot (POWER) concept has evolved over the course of the study. The goal of the project was the development of methods and algorithms for solid modeling for the flexible robot arm.

  12. A computational study of the taxonomy of vortex breakdown

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spall, Robert E.; Gatski, Thomas B.

    1990-01-01

    The results of a fully three-dimensional numerical simulation of vortex breakdown using the unsteady, incompressible Navier-Stokes equations are presented. The solutions show that the freestream axial velocity distribution has a significant effect on the position and type of vortex breakdown. Common features between bubble-type and spiral-type breakdown are identified and the role of flow stagnation and the critical state are discussed as complimentary ideas describing the initiation of breakdown.

  13. Bulk charging and breakdown in electron-irradiated polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frederickson, A. R.

    1981-01-01

    High energy electron irradiations were performed in an experimental and theoretical study of ten common polymers. Breakdowns were monitored by measuring currents between the electrodes on each side of the planar samples. Sample currents as a function of time during irradiation are compared with theory. Breakdowns are correlated with space charge electric field strength and polarity. Major findings include evidence that all polymers tested broke down, breakdowns remove negligible bulk charge and no breakdowns are seen below 20 million V/m.

  14. Creating a Lunar EVA Work Envelope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffin, Brand N.; Howard, Robert; Rajulu, Sudhakar; Smitherman, David

    2009-01-01

    A work envelope has been defined for weightless Extravehicular Activity (EVA) based on the Space Shuttle Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU), but there is no equivalent for planetary operations. The weightless work envelope is essential for planning all EVA tasks because it determines the location of removable parts, making sure they are within reach and visibility of the suited crew member. In addition, using the envelope positions the structural hard points for foot restraints that allow placing both hands on the job and provides a load path for reacting forces. EVA operations are always constrained by time. Tasks are carefully planned to ensure the crew has enough breathing oxygen, cooling water, and battery power. Planning first involves computers using a virtual work envelope to model tasks, next suited crew members in a simulated environment refine the tasks. For weightless operations, this process is well developed, but planetary EVA is different and no work envelope has been defined. The primary difference between weightless and planetary work envelopes is gravity. It influences anthropometry, horizontal and vertical mobility, and reaction load paths and introduces effort into doing "overhead" work. Additionally, the use of spacesuits other than the EMU, and their impacts on range of motion, must be taken into account. This paper presents the analysis leading to a concept for a planetary EVA work envelope with emphasis on lunar operations. There is some urgency in creating this concept because NASA has begun building and testing development hardware for the lunar surface, including rovers, habitats and cargo off-loading equipment. Just as with microgravity operations, a lunar EVA work envelope is needed to guide designers in the formative stages of the program with the objective of avoiding difficult and costly rework.

  15. NUCLEAR MEMBRANES FROM MAMMALIAN LIVER

    PubMed Central

    Franke, Werner W.; Deumling, Barbara; Ermen, Baerbel; Jarasch, Ernst-Dieter; Kleinig, Hans

    1970-01-01

    Nuclear membranes were isolated from rat and pig liver by sonication of highly purified nuclear fractions and subsequent removal of adhering nucleoproteins in a high salt medium. The fractions were examined in the electron microscope by both negative staining and thin sectioning techniques and were found to consist of nuclear envelope fragments of widely varying sizes. Nuclear pore complex constituents still could frequently be recognized. The chemical composition of the nuclear membrane fractions was determined and compared with those of microsomal fractions prepared in parallel. For total nuclei as well as for nuclear membranes and microsomes, various enzyme activities were studied. The results indicate that a similarity exists between both fractions of cytomembranes, nuclear envelope, and endoplasmic reticulum, with respect to their RNA:protein ratio and their content of polar and nonpolar lipids. Both membranous fractions had many proteins in common including some membrane-bound enzymes. Activities in Mg-ATPase and the two examined cytochrome reductases were of the same order of magnitude. The content of cytochrome b5 as well as of P-450 was markedly lower in the nuclear membranes. The nuclear membranes were found to have a higher buoyant density and to be richer in protein. The glucose-6-phosphatase and Na-K-ATPase activities in the nuclear membrane fraction were very low. In the gel electrophoresis, in addition to many common protein bands, some characteristic ones for either microsomal or nuclear membranous material were detected. Significant small amounts of DNA and RNA were found to remain closely associated with the nuclear envelope fragments. Our findings indicate that nuclear and endoplasmic reticulum membranes which are known to be in morphological continuity have, besides a far-reaching similarity, some characteristic differences. PMID:4317731

  16. Genetic diversity of koala retroviral envelopes.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wenqin; Gorman, Kristen; Santiago, Jan Clement; Kluska, Kristen; Eiden, Maribeth V

    2015-03-17

    Genetic diversity, attributable to the low fidelity of reverse transcription, recombination and mutation, is an important feature of infectious retroviruses. Under selective pressure, such as that imposed by superinfection interference, gammaretroviruses commonly adapt their envelope proteins to use alternative receptors to overcome this entry block. The first characterized koala retroviruses KoRV subgroup A (KoRV-A) were remarkable in their absence of envelope genetic variability. Once it was determined that KoRV-A was present in all koalas in US zoos, regardless of their disease status, we sought to isolate a KoRV variant whose presence correlated with neoplastic malignancies. More than a decade after the identification of KoRV-A, we isolated a second subgroup of KoRV, KoRV-B from koalas with lymphomas. The envelope proteins of KoRV-A and KoRV-B are sufficiently divergent to confer the ability to bind and employ distinct receptors for infection. We have now obtained a number of additional KoRV envelope variants. In the present studies we report these variants, and show that they differ from KoRV-A and KoRV-B envelopes in their host range and superinfection interference properties. Thus, there appears to be considerable variation among KoRVs envelope genes suggesting genetic diversity is a factor following the KoRV-A infection process.

  17. Cooling of neutron stars with diffusive envelopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beznogov, M. V.; Fortin, M.; Haensel, P.; Yakovlev, D. G.; Zdunik, J. L.

    2016-12-01

    We study the effects of heat blanketing envelopes of neutron stars on their cooling. To this aim, we perform cooling simulations using newly constructed models of the envelopes composed of binary ion mixtures (H-He, He-C, C-Fe) varying the mass of lighter ions (H, He or C) in the envelope. The results are compared with those calculated using the standard models of the envelopes which contain the layers of lighter (accreted) elements (H, He and C) on top of the Fe layer, varying the mass of accreted elements. The main effect is that the chemical composition of the envelopes influences their thermal conductivity and, hence, thermal insulation of the star. For illustration, we apply these results to estimate the internal temperature of the Vela pulsar and to study the cooling of neutron stars of ages of 105-106 yr at the photon cooling stage. The uncertainties of the cooling models associated with our poor knowledge of chemical composition of the heat insulating envelopes strongly complicate theoretical reconstruction of the internal structure of cooling neutron stars from observations of their thermal surface emission.

  18. The joke envelope: a neglected precursor of the psychic envelope concept in Freud's writing.

    PubMed

    Spero, Moshe Halevi

    2009-01-01

    The concepts of the primeval skin ego, psychic envelope, and related pre-ego containing and wrapping functions elaborated respectively by Esther Bick, Didier Anzieu, and Francis Tustin occupy an important position in contemporary psychoanalytic theory and clinical practice. The psychic envelope begins as a virtual mental protostructure ("proto" because it is not yet based on fully symbolized representations) that holds the budding mind together pending further developments. With maturity, the enveloping functions adopt symbolized, metaphoric form (for example, the aesthetic use of cloth, the analytic framework), but can regress to more concrete and pathological forms. The aforementioned authors based their ideas on a cluster of specific allusions to the idea of a psychic covering, barrier, or envelope in Freud's work. Yet they neglected one reference, hidden in Freud's analysis of the structure ofjokes and humor: the 'joke envelope"--die witzige Einkleidung. The present essay explores Freud's use of the term Einkleidung, including his intriguing idea that a joke requires three people whereas a dream does not and the fact that Freud nowhere speaks of a "dream envelope. "I take the "joke envelope" beyond its original context and posit a relationship between laughter and the early, normative traumas of breathing, crying, and loss, and the dawn of rhythmic envelopes that enable mentalization. Jokes and joking symbolically repeat the early rupture and rapture of breathing and self-other differentiation and the internalization of maternal containing and envelopment.

  19. 7 CFR 51.1563 - Soft rot or wet breakdown.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Soft rot or wet breakdown. 51.1563 Section 51.1563... STANDARDS) United States Standards for Grades of Potatoes 1 Definitions § 51.1563 Soft rot or wet breakdown. Soft rot or wet breakdown means any soft, mushy, or leaky condition of the tissue such as slimy...

  20. 7 CFR 51.1582 - Soft rot or wet breakdown.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Soft rot or wet breakdown. 51.1582 Section 51.1582... STANDARDS) United States Consumer Standards for Potatoes Definitions § 51.1582 Soft rot or wet breakdown. Soft rot or wet breakdown means any soft, mushy, or leaky condition of the tissue such as slimy...

  1. 7 CFR 51.1563 - Soft rot or wet breakdown.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Soft rot or wet breakdown. 51.1563 Section 51.1563... STANDARDS) United States Standards for Grades of Potatoes 1 Definitions § 51.1563 Soft rot or wet breakdown. Soft rot or wet breakdown means any soft, mushy, or leaky condition of the tissue such as slimy...

  2. 7 CFR 51.1582 - Soft rot or wet breakdown.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Soft rot or wet breakdown. 51.1582 Section 51.1582... STANDARDS) United States Consumer Standards for Potatoes Definitions § 51.1582 Soft rot or wet breakdown. Soft rot or wet breakdown means any soft, mushy, or leaky condition of the tissue such as slimy...

  3. 7 CFR 51.1582 - Soft rot or wet breakdown.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Soft rot or wet breakdown. 51.1582 Section 51.1582... STANDARDS) United States Consumer Standards for Potatoes Definitions § 51.1582 Soft rot or wet breakdown. Soft rot or wet breakdown means any soft, mushy, or leaky condition of the tissue such as slimy...

  4. 7 CFR 51.1563 - Soft rot or wet breakdown.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Soft rot or wet breakdown. 51.1563 Section 51.1563... STANDARDS) United States Standards for Grades of Potatoes 1 Definitions § 51.1563 Soft rot or wet breakdown. Soft rot or wet breakdown means any soft, mushy, or leaky condition of the tissue such as slimy...

  5. Three Techniques for Task Analysis: Examples from the Nuclear Utilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlisle, Kenneth E.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses three task analysis techniques utilized at the Palo Verde Nuclear Generating Station to review training programs: analysis of (1) job positions, (2) procedures, and (3) instructional presentations. All of these include task breakdown, relationship determination, and task restructuring. (MBR)

  6. Solitary Alfven wave envelopes and the modulational instability

    SciTech Connect

    Kennel, C.F.

    1987-06-01

    The derivative nonlinear Schroedinger equation describes the modulational instability of circularly polarized dispersive Alfven wave envelopes. It also may be used to determine the properties of finite amplitude localized stationary wave envelopes. Such envelope solitons exist only in conditions of modulational stability. This leaves open the question of whether, and if so, how, the modulational instability produces envelope solitons. 12 refs.

  7. Non-Nuclear Testing of Space Nuclear Systems at NASA MSFC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houts, Michael G.; Pearson, Boise J.; Aschenbrenner, Kenneth C.; Bradley, David E.; Dickens, Ricky; Emrich, William J.; Garber, Anne; Godfroy, Thomas J.; Harper, Roger T.; Martin, Jim J.; Polzin, Kurt; Schoenfeld, Michael P.; Webster, Kenneth L.

    2010-01-01

    Highly realistic non-nuclear testing can be used to investigate and resolve potential issues with space nuclear power and propulsion systems. Non-nuclear testing is particularly useful for systems designed with fuels and materials operating within their demonstrated nuclear performance envelope. Non-nuclear testing allows thermal hydraulic, heat transfer, structural, integration, safety, operational, performance, and other potential issues to be investigated and resolved with a greater degree of flexibility and at reduced cost and schedule compared to nuclear testing. The primary limit of non-nuclear testing is that nuclear characteristics and potential nuclear issues cannot be directly investigated. However, non-nuclear testing can be used to augment the potential benefit from any nuclear testing that may be required for space nuclear system design and development. This paper describes previous and ongoing non-nuclear testing related to space nuclear systems at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC).

  8. Safeguards Envelope: The First Steps

    SciTech Connect

    Richard Metcalf; Jean Ragusa; Robert Bean

    2008-03-01

    The possibility exists for real time accountancy and assay of nuclear materials as they move through a reprocessing facility. This project aims to establish working parameters and local figures of merit to identify possible diversion in real time with minimal operational impact. Factors such as pH, NOX gas concentration, flow speeds and radiation fields are rarely taken into account in safeguards methodologies and will be included to increase the confidence of location and assay of nuclear materials. An adaptable, real data model is being created of the contactors of the Advanced Fuel Cycle Facility and will be analyzed using the appropriate modeling codes. This model will then be subjected to three, diversion scenarios and a figure of merit methodology will be utilized to create the operational parameters under which these diversion scenarios would be detected. This analysis for figure of merit methodology will include statistical fluctuations, operator error, and a rudimentary analysis of transient conditions. The long term goal of the project includes expansion universally over the plant, methods of detection without requiring access to proprietary information, and an evaluation of the requirements for future figure of merit methodologies.

  9. Measurement of Irradiated Pyroprocessing Samples via Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Phongikaroon, Supathorn

    2016-10-31

    The primary objective of this research is to develop an applied technology and provide an assessment to remotely measure and analyze the real time or near real time concentrations of used nuclear fuel (UNF) dissolute in electrorefiners. Here, Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS), in UNF pyroprocessing facilities will be investigated. LIBS is an elemental analysis method, which is based on the emission from plasma generated by focusing a laser beam into the medium. This technology has been reported to be applicable in the media of solids, liquids (includes molten metals), and gases for detecting elements of special nuclear materials. The advantages of applying the technology for pyroprocessing facilities are: (i) Rapid real-time elemental analysis|one measurement/laser pulse, or average spectra from multiple laser pulses for greater accuracy in < 2 minutes; (ii) Direct detection of elements and impurities in the system with low detection limits|element specific, ranging from 2-1000 ppm for most elements; and (iii) Near non-destructive elemental analysis method (about 1 g material). One important challenge to overcome is achieving high-resolution spectral analysis to quantitatively analyze all important fission products and actinides. Another important challenge is related to accessibility of molten salt, which is heated in a heavily insulated, remotely operated furnace in a high radiation environment with an argon atmosphere.

  10. On the measurement of laser-induced plasma breakdown thresholds

    SciTech Connect

    Brieschenk, Stefan; Kleine, Harald; O'Byrne, Sean

    2013-09-07

    The breakdown threshold of a gas exposed to intense laser-radiation is a function of gas and laser properties. Breakdown thresholds reported in the literature often vary greatly and these differences can partially be traced back to the method that is typically used to determine breakdown thresholds. This paper discusses the traditional method used to determine breakdown thresholds and the potential errors that can arise using this approach, and presents an alternative method which can yield more accurate data especially when determining breakdown thresholds as functions of gas pressure.

  11. Breakdown and partial discharges in magnetic liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herchl, F.; Marton, K.; Tomčo, L.; Kopčanský, P.; Timko, M.; Koneracká, M.; Kolcunová, I.

    2008-05-01

    The dielectric properties (permittivity, loss factor, dielectric breakdown strength) of magnetic liquids were investigated. The magnetic liquids were composed of magnetite particles coated with oleic acid as surfactant and dispersed in transformer oil. To determine their dielectric properties they were subjected to a uniform magnetic field at high alternating electric fields up to 14 MV m-1. Nearly constant permittivity of magnetic liquid with particle volume concentration Φ = 0.0019 as a function of electric field was observed. Magnetic liquids with concentrations Φ = 0.019 and 0.032 showed significant changes of permittivity and loss factor dependent on electric and magnetic fields. The best concentration of magnetic fluid was found at which partial current impulse magnitudes were the lowest. The breakdown strength distribution of the magnetic liquid with Φ = 0.0025 was fitted with the Duxbury-Leath, Weibull and Gauss distribution functions.

  12. Franck-Condon breakdown from Cooper minima.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, R. M.; Poliakoff, E. D.; Wang, K.; McKoy, V.

    1996-05-01

    We report Cooper minima-induced Franck-Condon breakdown for N2 2σ_u-1 photoionization. The measurements are over an extended energy range (230 eV), and we find that the v^+= 2/v^+= 0 and v^+= 1/v^+= 0 vibrational branching ratios vary strongly over a 100 eV range. This is a dramatic deviation from Franck-Condon predictions, and calculations show that this coupling between vibrational and electronic motion arises from a dependence of Cooper minima on molecular bond length. To our knowledge, this is the only example of a broad-range Franck-Condon breakdown due to a non-resonant mechanism, and is the broadest deviation from Franck-Condon behavior observed to date. The ubiquitous nature of Cooper minima suggests this effect to be common in molecular systems.

  13. Electrical breakdown studies with Mycalex insulators

    SciTech Connect

    Waldron, W.; Greenway, W.; Eylon, S.; Henestroza, E.; Yu, S.

    2003-05-01

    Insulating materials such as alumina and glass-bonded mica (Mycalex) are used in accelerator systems for high voltage feedthroughs, structural supports, and barriers between high voltage insulating oil and the vacuum beam pipe in induction accelerator cells. Electric fields in the triple points should be minimized to prevent voltage breakdown. Mechanical stress can compromise seals and result in oil contamination of the insulator surface. We have tested various insulator cleaning procedures including ultrasonic cleaning with a variety of aqueous-based detergents, and manual scrubbing with various detergents. Water sheeting tests were used to determine the initial results of the cleaning methods. Ultimately, voltage breakdown tests will be used to quantify the benefits of these cleaning procedures.

  14. Prevention of breakdown behind railgun projectiles

    DOEpatents

    Hawke, R.S.

    1992-10-13

    An electromagnetic railgun accelerator system, for accelerating projectiles by a plasma arc, introduces a breakdown inhibiting gas into the railgun chamber behind the accelerating projectile. The breakdown inhibiting gas, which absorbs electrons, is a halide or a halide compound such as fluorine or SF[sub 6]. The gas is introduced between the railgun rails after the projectile has passed through inlets in the rails or the projectile; by coating the rails or the projectile with a material which releases the gas after the projectile passes over it; by fabricating the rails or the projectile or insulators out of a material which releases the gas into the portions of the chamber through which the projectile has travelled. The projectile may have a cavity at its rear to control the release of ablation products. 12 figs.

  15. Prevention of breakdown behind railgun projectiles

    DOEpatents

    Hawke, R.S.

    1992-09-01

    An electromagnetic railgun accelerator system, for accelerating projectiles by a plasma arc, introduces a breakdown inhibiting gas into the railgun chamber behind the accelerating projectile. The breakdown inhibiting gas, which absorbs electrons, is a halide or a halide compound such as fluorine or SF[sub 6]. The gas is introduced between the railgun rails after the projectile has passed through inlets in the rails or the projectile; by coating the rails or the projectile with a material which releases the gas after the projectile passes over it; by fabricating the rails or the projectile or insulators out of a material which releases the gas into the portions of the chamber through which the projectile has travelled. The projectile may have a cavity at its rear to control the release of ablation products. 12 figs.

  16. Prevention of breakdown behind railgun projectiles

    DOEpatents

    Hawke, Ronald S.

    1992-01-01

    An electromagnetic railgun accelerator system, for accelerating projectiles (14, 15, 114, 214, 314, 414) by a plasma arc (3), introduces a breakdown inhibiting gas into the railgun chamber (26) behind the accelerating projectile (14). The breakdown inhibiting gas, which absorbs electrons, is a halide or a halide compound such as fluorine or SF.sub.6. The gas is introduced between the railgun rails (12) after the projectile (14) has passed through inlets (16) in the rails (12) or the projectile (114); by coating the rails (12) or the projectile (15) with a material (28) which releases the gas after the projectile (14) passes over it; by fabricating the rails (12) or the projectile (15) or insulators out of a material which releases the gas into the portions of the chamber (26) through which the projectile has travelled. The projectile (214, 314, 414) may have a cavity (232, 332, 432) at its rear to control the release of ablation products (4).

  17. Prevention of breakdown behind railgun projectiles

    DOEpatents

    Hawke, Ronald S.

    1992-01-01

    An electromagnetic railgun accelerator system, for accelerating projectiles (14, 15, 114, 214, 314, 444) by a plasma arc (3), introduces a breakdown inhibiting gas into the railgun chamber (26) behind the accelerating projectile (14). The breakdown inhibiting gas, which absorbs electrons, is a halide or a halide compound such as fluorine or SF.sub.6. The gas is introduced between the railgun rails (12) after the projectile (14) has passed through inlets (16) in the rails (12) or the projectile (114); by coating the rails (12) or the projectile (15) with a material (28) which releases the gas after the projectile (14 ) passes over it; by fabricating the rails (12) or the projectile (15) or insulators out of a material which releases the gas into the portions of the chamber (26) through which the projectile has travelled. The projectile (214, 314, 414) may have a cavity (232, 332, 432) at its rear to control the release of ablation products (4).

  18. Three-dimensional simulation of vortex breakdown

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuruvila, G.; Salas, M. D.

    1990-01-01

    The integral form of the complete, unsteady, compressible, three-dimensional Navier-Stokes equations in the conservation form, cast in generalized coordinate system, are solved, numerically, to simulate the vortex breakdown phenomenon. The inviscid fluxes are discretized using Roe's upwind-biased flux-difference splitting scheme and the viscous fluxes are discretized using central differencing. Time integration is performed using a backward Euler ADI (alternating direction implicit) scheme. A full approximation multigrid is used to accelerate the convergence to steady state.

  19. Nuclear entry of nonviral vectors

    PubMed Central

    Dean, DA; Strong, DD; Zimmer, WE

    2015-01-01

    Nonviral gene delivery is limited to a large extent by multiple extracellular and intracellular barriers. One of the major barriers, especially in nondividing cells, is the nuclear envelope. Once in the cytoplasm, plasmids must make their way into the nucleus in order to be expressed. Numerous studies have demonstrated that transfections work best in dividing populations of cells in which the nuclear envelope disassembles during mitosis, thus largely eliminating the barrier. However, since many of the cells that are targets for gene therapy do not actively undergo cell division during the gene transfer process, the mechanisms of nuclear transport of plasmids in nondividing cells are of critical importance. In this review, we summarize recent studies designed to elucidate the mechanisms of plasmid nuclear import in nondividing cells and discuss approaches to either exploit or circumvent these processes to increase the efficiency of gene transfer and therapy. PMID:15908994

  20. Runaway breakdown and electrical discharges in thunderstorms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milikh, Gennady; Roussel-Dupré, Robert

    2010-12-01

    This review considers the precise role played by runaway breakdown (RB) in the initiation and development of lightning discharges. RB remains a fundamental research topic under intense investigation. The question of how lightning is initiated and subsequently evolves in the thunderstorm environment rests in part on a fundamental understanding of RB and cosmic rays and the potential coupling to thermal runaway (as a seed to RB) and conventional breakdown (as a source of thermal runaways). In this paper, we describe the basic mechanism of RB and the conditions required to initiate an observable avalanche. Feedback processes that fundamentally enhance RB are discussed, as are both conventional breakdown and thermal runaway. Observations that provide clear evidence for the presence of energetic particles in thunderstorms/lightning include γ-ray and X-ray flux intensifications over thunderstorms, γ-ray and X-ray bursts in conjunction with stepped leaders, terrestrial γ-ray flashes, and neutron production by lightning. Intense radio impulses termed narrow bipolar pulses (or NBPs) provide indirect evidence for RB particularly when measured in association with cosmic ray showers. Our present understanding of these phenomena and their enduring enigmatic character are touched upon briefly.

  1. Kinetic Simulations of Dense Plasma Focus Breakdown

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, A.; Higginson, D. P.; Jiang, S.; Link, A.; Povilus, A.; Sears, J.; Bennett, N.; Rose, D. V.; Welch, D. R.

    2015-11-01

    A dense plasma focus (DPF) device is a type of plasma gun that drives current through a set of coaxial electrodes to assemble gas inside the device and then implode that gas on axis to form a Z-pinch. This implosion drives hydrodynamic and kinetic instabilities that generate strong electric fields, which produces a short intense pulse of x-rays, high-energy (>100 keV) electrons and ions, and (in deuterium gas) neutrons. A strong factor in pinch performance is the initial breakdown and ionization of the gas along the insulator surface separating the two electrodes. The smoothness and isotropy of this ionized sheath are imprinted on the current sheath that travels along the electrodes, thus making it an important portion of the DPF to both understand and optimize. Here we use kinetic simulations in the Particle-in-cell code LSP to model the breakdown. Simulations are initiated with neutral gas and the breakdown modeled self-consistently as driven by a charged capacitor system. We also investigate novel geometries for the insulator and electrodes to attempt to control the electric field profile. The initial ionization fraction of gas is explored computationally to gauge possible advantages of pre-ionization which could be created experimentally via lasers or a glow-discharge. Prepared by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  2. Dielectric breakdown induced by picosecond laser pulses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, W. L.; Bechtel, J. H.; Bloembergen, N.

    1976-01-01

    The damage thresholds of transparent optical materials were investigated. Single picosecond pulses at 1.06 microns, 0.53 microns and 0.35 microns were obtained from a mode locked Nd-YAG oscillator-amplifier-frequency multiplier system. The pulses were Gaussian in space and time and permitted the determination of breakdown thresholds with a reproducibility of 15%. It was shown that the breakdown thresholds are characteristic of the bulk material, which included nine alkali halides, five different laser host materials, KDP, quartz, sapphire and calcium fluoride. The extension of the damage data to the ultraviolet is significant, because some indication was obtained that two- and three-photon absorption processes begin to play a role in determining the threshold. Throughout the visible region of the spectrum the threshold is still an increasing function of frequency, indicating that avalanche ionization is the dominant factor in determining the breakdown threshold. This was confirmed by a detailed study of the damage morphology with a high resolution microscope just above the threshold. The influence of self focusing is discussed, and evidence for beam distortion below the power threshold for complete self focusing is presented, confirming the theory of Marburger.

  3. Shock/vortex interaction and vortex-breakdown modes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kandil, Osama A.; Kandil, H. A.; Liu, C. H.

    1992-01-01

    Computational simulation and study of shock/vortex interaction and vortex-breakdown modes are considered for bound (internal) and unbound (external) flow domains. The problem is formulated using the unsteady, compressible, full Navier-Stokes (NS) equations which are solved using an implicit, flux-difference splitting, finite-volume scheme. For the bound flow domain, a supersonic swirling flow is considered in a configured circular duct and the problem is solved for quasi-axisymmetric and three-dimensional flows. For the unbound domain, a supersonic swirling flow issued from a nozzle into a uniform supersonic flow of lower Mach number is considered for quasi-axisymmetric and three-dimensional flows. The results show several modes of breakdown; e.g., no-breakdown, transient single-bubble breakdown, transient multi-bubble breakdown, periodic multi-bubble multi-frequency breakdown and helical breakdown.

  4. Herpes simplex virus glycoproteins gB and gD function in a redundant fashion to promote secondary envelopment.

    PubMed

    Johnson, David C; Wisner, Todd W; Wright, Catherine C

    2011-05-01

    Egress of herpes simplex virus (HSV) and other herpesviruses from cells involves extensive modification of cellular membranes and sequential envelopment and deenvelopment steps. HSV glycoproteins are important in these processes, and frequently two or more glycoproteins can largely suffice in any step. Capsids in the nucleus undergo primary envelopment at the inner nuclear membrane (INM), and then enveloped virus particles undergo deenvelopment by fusing with the outer nuclear membrane (ONM). Capsids delivered into the cytoplasm then undergo secondary envelopment, involving trans-Golgi network (TGN) membranes. The deenvelopment step involves HSV glycoproteins gB and gH/gL acting in a redundant fashion. This fusion has features common to the fusion that occurs between the virion envelope and cellular membranes when HSV enters cells, a process requiring gB, gD, and gH/gL. Whether HSV gD also participates (in a redundant fashion with gB or gH/gL) in deenvelopment has not been characterized. Secondary envelopment in the cytoplasm is known to involve HSV gD and gE/gI, also acting in a redundant fashion. Whether gB might also contribute to secondary envelopment, collaborating with gD and gE/gI, is also not clear. To address these questions, we constructed an HSV double mutant lacking gB and gD. The HSV gB(-)/gD(-) mutant exhibited no substantial defects in nuclear egress. In contrast, secondary envelopment was markedly reduced, and there were numerous unenveloped capsids that accumulated in the cytoplasm, as well as increased numbers of partially enveloped capsids and morphologically aberrant enveloped particles with thicker, oblong tegument layers. These defects were different from those observed with HSV gD(-)/gE(-)/gI(-) mutants, which accumulated capsids in large, aggregated masses in the cytoplasm. Our results suggest that HSV gB functions in secondary envelopment, apparently acting downstream of gE/gI.

  5. Morphologically complex protostellar envelopes : structure and kinematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobin, John J.

    I present an in-depth study of protostars and their surrounding envelopes of dense gas and dust, using a multitude of observational methods to reveal new details of the star formation process. I use mid-infrared imaging from the Spitzer Space Telescope, combined with photometry spanning the near-infrared to millimeter wavelengths, to construct a model of the L1527 protostellar system. I modeled both the spectral energy distribution and resolved scattered light images to determine physical properties of the protostellar system. The nature of the apparent central point source in the Spitzer images was uncertain until high-resolution L-band imaging from the Gemini observatory resolved the point source into a disk in scattered light, having a radius of 200 AU. Protostellar envelopes are also often found to cast shadows against the 8 micron Galactic background in Spitzer imaging, enabling direct probes of envelope structure. The shadow images show that the dense envelopes around twenty-two Class 0 protostars are generally morphologically complex from 0.1 pc scales down to ˜1000 AU; they are often filamentary, and frequently non-axisymmetric. The observed envelope structure indicates a likely origin in turbulent cloud structure rather than a quasi-static/equilibrium formation. The complex envelope structure also may indicate an increased likelihood of fragmentation during collapse, forming close binaries. To further characterize these envelopes, I have observed them in the dense molecular gas tracers nthp and nht, both of which closely follow the 8 micron extinction morphology. The magnitude of the velocity gradients and envelope complexity on ˜10000 AU scales indicates that the velocity structure may reflect large-scale infall in addition to the often assumed rotation. Comparisons with three-dimensional filamentary and symmetric rotating collapse models reinforce the interpretation of velocities reflecting large-scale infall, showing that the structure of the envelope

  6. The cell envelope proteome of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans.

    PubMed

    Smith, K P; Fields, J G; Voogt, R D; Deng, B; Lam, Y-W; Mintz, K P

    2015-04-01

    The cell envelope of gram-negative bacteria serves a critical role in maintenance of cellular homeostasis, resistance to external stress, and host-pathogen interactions. Envelope protein composition is influenced by the physiological and environmental demands placed on the bacterium. In this study, we report a comprehensive compilation of cell envelope proteins from the periodontal and systemic pathogen Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans VT1169, an afimbriated serotype b strain. The urea-extracted membrane proteins were identified by mass spectrometry-based shotgun proteomics. The membrane proteome, isolated from actively growing bacteria under normal laboratory conditions, included 648 proteins representing 27% of the predicted open reading frames in the genome. Bioinformatic analyses were used to annotate and predict the cellular location and function of the proteins. Surface adhesins, porins, lipoproteins, numerous influx and efflux pumps, multiple sugar, amino acid and iron transporters, and components of the type I, II and V secretion systems were identified. Periplasmic space and cytoplasmic proteins with chaperone function were also identified. A total of 107 proteins with unknown function were associated with the cell envelope. Orthologs of a subset of these uncharacterized proteins are present in other bacterial genomes, whereas others are found exclusively in A. actinomycetemcomitans. This knowledge will contribute to elucidating the role of cell envelope proteins in bacterial growth and survival in the oral cavity.

  7. Adaptive Spectral Envelope Estimation for Doppler Ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Kathpalia, Aditi; Karabiyik, Yucel; Eik-Nes, Sturla; Tegnander, Eva; Ekroll, Ingvild; Kiss, Gabriel; Torp, Hans

    2016-07-07

    Estimation of accurate maximum velocities and spectral envelope in ultrasound Doppler blood flow spectrograms are both essential for clinical diagnostic purposes. However, obtaining accurate maximum velocity is not straightforward due to intrinsic spectral broadening and variance in the power spectrum estimate. The method proposed in this work for maximum velocity point detection has been developed by modifying an existing method - Signal Noise Slope Intersection (SNSI), incorporating in it steps from an altered version of another method called Geometric Method (GM). Adaptive noise estimation from the spectrogram ensures that a smooth spectral envelope is obtained post detection of these maximum velocity points. The method has been tested on simulated Doppler signal with scatterers possessing a parabolic flow velocity profile constant in time, steady and pulsatile string phantom recordings as well as in vivo recordings from uterine, umbilical, carotid and subclavian arteries. Results from simulation experiments indicate a bias of less than 2.5% in maximum velocities when estimated for a range of peak velocities, Doppler angles and SNR levels. Standard deviation in the envelope is low - less than 2% in case of experiments done by varying the peak velocity and Doppler angle for steady phantom and simulated flow; and also less than 2% in case of experiments done by varying SNR but keeping constant flow conditions for in vivo and simulated flow. Low variability in the envelope makes the prospect of using the envelope for automated blood flow measurements possible and is illustrated for the case of Pulsatility Index estimation in uterine and umbilical arteries.

  8. Featured Image: Orbiting Stars Share an Envelope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-03-01

    This beautiful series of snapshots from a simulation (click for a better look!) shows what happens when two stars in a binary system become enclosed in the same stellar envelope. In this binary system, one of the stars has exhausted its hydrogen fuel and become a red giant, complete with an expanding stellar envelope composed of hydrogen and helium. Eventually, the envelope expands so much that the companion star falls into it, where it releases gravitational potential energy into the common envelope. A team led by Sebastian Ohlmann (Heidelberg Institute for Theoretical Studies and University of Wrzburg) recently performed hydrodynamic simulations of this process. Ohlmann and collaborators discovered that the energy release eventually triggers large-scale flow instabilities, which leads to turbulence within the envelope. This process has important consequences for how these systems next evolve (for instance, determining whether or not a supernova occurs!). You can check out the authors video of their simulated stellar inspiral below, or see their paper for more images and results from their study.CitationSebastian T. Ohlmann et al 2016 ApJ 816 L9. doi:10.3847/2041-8205/816/1/L9

  9. COMPLEX STRUCTURE IN CLASS 0 PROTOSTELLAR ENVELOPES

    SciTech Connect

    Tobin, John J.; Hartmann, Lee; Looney, Leslie W.; Chiang, Hsin-Fang

    2010-04-01

    We use archived Infrared Array Camera images from the Spitzer Space Telescope to show that many Class 0 protostars exhibit complex, irregular, and non-axisymmetric structure within their dusty envelopes. Our 8 {mu}m extinction maps probe some of the densest regions in these protostellar envelopes. Many of the systems are observed to have highly irregular and non-axisymmetric morphologies on scales {approx}>1000 AU, with a quarter of the sample exhibiting filamentary or flattened dense structures. Complex envelope structure is observed in regions spatially distinct from outflow cavities, and the densest structures often show no systematic alignment perpendicular to the cavities. These results indicate that mass ejection is not responsible for much of the irregular morphologies we detect; rather, we suggest that the observed envelope complexity is mostly the result of collapse from protostellar cores with initially non-equilibrium structures. The striking non-axisymmetry in many envelopes could provide favorable conditions for the formation of binary systems. We also note that protostars in the sample appear to be formed preferentially near the edges of clouds or bends in filaments, suggesting formation by gravitational focusing.

  10. RF BREAKDOWN STUDIES USING PRESSURIZED CAVITIES

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Rolland

    2014-09-21

    Many present and future particle accelerators are limited by the maximum electric gradient and peak surface fields that can be realized in RF cavities. Despite considerable effort, a comprehensive theory of RF breakdown has not been achieved and mitigation techniques to improve practical maximum accelerating gradients have had only limited success. Part of the problem is that RF breakdown in an evacuated cavity involves a complex mixture of effects, which include the geometry, metallurgy, and surface preparation of the accelerating structures and the make-up and pressure of the residual gas in which plasmas form. Studies showed that high gradients can be achieved quickly in 805 MHz RF cavities pressurized with dense hydrogen gas, as needed for muon cooling channels, without the need for long conditioning times, even in the presence of strong external magnetic fields. This positive result was expected because the dense gas can practically eliminate dark currents and multipacting. In this project we used this high pressure technique to suppress effects of residual vacuum and geometry that are found in evacuated cavities in order to isolate and study the role of the metallic surfaces in RF cavity breakdown as a function of magnetic field, frequency, and surface preparation. One of the interesting and useful outcomes of this project was the unanticipated collaborations with LANL and Fermilab that led to new insights as to the operation of evacuated normal-conducting RF cavities in high external magnetic fields. Other accomplishments included: (1) RF breakdown experiments to test the effects of SF6 dopant in H2 and He gases with Sn, Al, and Cu electrodes were carried out in an 805 MHz cavity and compared to calculations and computer simulations. The heavy corrosion caused by the SF6 components led to the suggestion that a small admixture of oxygen, instead of SF6, to the hydrogen would allow the same advantages without the corrosion in a practical muon beam line. (2) A

  11. When lamins go bad: nuclear structure and disease.

    PubMed

    Schreiber, Katherine H; Kennedy, Brian K

    2013-03-14

    Mutations in nuclear lamins or other proteins of the nuclear envelope are the root cause of a group of phenotypically diverse genetic disorders known as laminopathies, which have symptoms that range from muscular dystrophy to neuropathy to premature aging syndromes. Although precise disease mechanisms remain unclear, there has been substantial progress in our understanding of not only laminopathies, but also the biological roles of nuclear structure. Nuclear envelope dysfunction is associated with altered nuclear activity, impaired structural dynamics, and aberrant cell signaling. Building on these findings, small molecules are being discovered that may become effective therapeutic agents.

  12. Envelope Solitons in Acoustically Dispersive Vitreous Silica

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cantrell, John H.; Yost, William T.

    2012-01-01

    Acoustic radiation-induced static strains, displacements, and stresses are manifested as rectified or dc waveforms linked to the energy density of an acoustic wave or vibrational mode via the mode nonlinearity parameter of the material. An analytical model is developed for acoustically dispersive media that predicts the evolution of the energy density of an initial waveform into a series of energy solitons that generates a corresponding series of radiation-induced static strains (envelope solitons). The evolutionary characteristics of the envelope solitons are confirmed experimentally in Suprasil W1 vitreous silica. The value (-11.9 plus or minus 1.43) for the nonlinearity parameter, determined from displacement measurements of the envelope solitons via a capacitive transducer, is in good agreement with the value (-11.6 plus or minus 1.16) obtained independently from acoustic harmonic generation measurements. The agreement provides strong, quantitative evidence for the validity of the model.

  13. The photodissociation of CO in circumstellar envelopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mamon, G. A.; Glassgold, A. E.; Huggins, P. J.

    1988-01-01

    The CO photodissociation rate for the unshielded ISM is calculated using recent laboratory results which confirm that photodissociation occurs by way of line absorption. A value of 2.0 x 10 to the -10th/s, an order of magnitude higher than the rate used in the past, is obtained. The new rate and a treatment of the radiative transfer and shielding are used to develop a theory for the CO abundance in the circumstellar envelopes of cool, evolved stars, and results are presented on the spatial variation of CO, C, and C(+). It is shown that these distributions play important roles in determining the observational properties of circumstellar envelopes.

  14. Consumer access to utility billing envelopes

    SciTech Connect

    Anglin, M.K.

    1984-09-13

    Billing envelope inserts are a medium of advertising used by utilities for a variety of purposes, from encouraging conservation to expressing political opinions. Recently, consumer groups have begun to assert a right of access to the same medium. A constitutional right of reply has been advocated. Commissions have found regulatory authority to direct companies to provide access on the basis of several different theories. At least two states have passed legislation permitting consumer groups to use bill inserts to solicit members and contributions. When examined, these developments reveal a trend of granting organizations access to utility billing envelopes.

  15. Perception and coding of envelopes in weakly electric fishes.

    PubMed

    Stamper, Sarah A; Fortune, Eric S; Chacron, Maurice J

    2013-07-01

    Natural sensory stimuli have a rich spatiotemporal structure and can often be characterized as a high frequency signal that is independently modulated at lower frequencies. This lower frequency modulation is known as the envelope. Envelopes are commonly found in a variety of sensory signals, such as contrast modulations of visual stimuli and amplitude modulations of auditory stimuli. While psychophysical studies have shown that envelopes can carry information that is essential for perception, how envelope information is processed in the brain is poorly understood. Here we review the behavioral salience and neural mechanisms for the processing of envelopes in the electrosensory system of wave-type gymnotiform weakly electric fishes. These fish can generate envelope signals through movement, interactions of their electric fields in social groups or communication signals. The envelopes that result from the first two behavioral contexts differ in their frequency content, with movement envelopes typically being of lower frequency. Recent behavioral evidence has shown that weakly electric fish respond in robust and stereotypical ways to social envelopes to increase the envelope frequency. Finally, neurophysiological results show how envelopes are processed by peripheral and central electrosensory neurons. Peripheral electrosensory neurons respond to both stimulus and envelope signals. Neurons in the primary hindbrain recipient of these afferents, the electrosensory lateral line lobe (ELL), exhibit heterogeneities in their responses to stimulus and envelope signals. Complete segregation of stimulus and envelope information is achieved in neurons in the target of ELL efferents, the midbrain torus semicircularis (Ts).

  16. Insulator breakdown measurements in a poor vacuum and their interpretation

    SciTech Connect

    Vogtlin, G.E.

    1990-06-01

    Breakdown measurements have been made on insulators with 0 and 45 degree angle surfaces. A technique of observing the electrons produced from the process has given some insight into the mechanisms involved. A three nanosecond pulse was used to induce breakdown. The electrons striking the anode were observed with a plastic fluor and open shutter camera. Two breakdown patterns were interpreted as cathode initiated and anode initiated breakdown. The breakdown process normally encountered was anode initiated with a positive 45 degree insulator. If the anode side was relieved with an internal electrode, the breakdown changed to cathode initiated at a higher level. If the cathode surface was then anodized, the breakdown switched back to the anode at an even higher level. Individual explosive emission sites on the cathode surface could be observed. Insulator breakdown was usually not associated with these sites. Multiple pulses allowed measurement of plasma expansion of the explosive emission sites. It is believed that breakdown with longer pulses is due to the expansion of the explosive emission site plasma to the insulator surface. Measurements were conducted with and without voltage conditioning. It appears that conditioning is achieved without explosive emission. It is believed that this is due to organic fibers that are removed by the conditioning. Organic fibers were used to induce both anode and cathode breakdown. Measurements of fiberous material have shown explosive emission a low as 100 kV on a three nanosecond time scale and below 20 kv/cm on a longer time scale. 8 refs., 5 figs.

  17. Phytochrome regulates GTP-binding protein activity in the envelope of pea nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, G. B.; Memon, A. R.; Thompson, G. A. Jr; Roux, S. J.

    1993-01-01

    Three GTP-binding proteins with apparent molecular masses of 27, 28 and 30 kDa have been detected in isolated nuclei of etiolated pea plumules. After LDS-PAGE and transfer to nitrocellulose these proteins bind [32P]GTP in the presence of excess ATP, suggesting that they are monomeric G proteins. When nuclei are disrupted, three proteins co-purify with the nuclear envelope fraction and are highly enriched in this fraction. The level of [32P]GTP-binding for all three protein bands is significantly increased when harvested pea plumules are irradiated by red light, and this effect is reversed by far-red light. The results indicate that GTP-binding activity associated with the nuclear envelope of plant cells is photoreversibly regulated by the pigment phytochrome.

  18. Nucleoporins NPP-10, NPP-13 and NPP-20 are required for HCP-4 nuclear import to establish correct centromere assembly.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Jorge; Stear, Jeffrey H; Saumweber, Harald

    2017-03-01

    Centromeres form a chromosomal platform for the assembly of the kinetochores, which are required for orderly chromosome segregation. Assembly of both centromeres and kinetochores proceeds by a step-by-step mechanism that is regulated in time and space. It has been suggested that the regulated nuclear import of centromeric proteins is involved in this process. We show that the knockdown of nucleoporins NPP-10, NPP-13 and NPP-20 in Caenorhabditiselegans affects early steps in centromere formation and sister centromere resolution, and results in severe chromosomal defects in the early embryo. These phenotypes mirror the knockdown phenotype of HCP-4 (an ortholog of mammalian CENP-C), a key factor for centromere formation and inner kinetochore assembly. HCP-4 is present in the cytoplasm during interphase. It is imported into nuclei and assembled in centromeres during prophase. Following the knockdown of NPP-10, NPP-13 and NPP-20, HCP-4 remains in the cytosol throughout prophase due to stalled import. In prometaphase and later mitotic stages after breakdown of the nuclear envelope, HCP-4 is not incorporated into centromeres. These results indicate that correct timing of the availability of HCP-4 by nuclear import is essential.

  19. Development of laser induced breakdown spectroscopy instrumentatin for safeguards applications

    SciTech Connect

    Barefield Il, James E; Clegg, Samuel M; Le, Loan A; Lopez, Leon N

    2010-01-01

    In September 2006, a Technical Meeting on Application of Laser Spectrometry Techniques in IAEA Safeguards was held at IAEA headquarters (HQ). One of the principal recommendations from this meeting was the need to 'pursue the development of novel complementary access instrumentation based on laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) for the detection of gaseous and solid signatures and indicators of nuclear fuel cycle processes and associated materials.' Pursuant to this recommendation the Department of Safeguards (SG) under the Division of Technical Support (SGTS) convened the Experts and Users Advisory Meeting on Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) for Safeguards Applications. This meeting was held at IAEA HQ from July 7-11,2008 and hosted by the Novel Technologies Unit (NTU). The meeting was attended by 12 LIBS experts from the Czech Republic, the European Commission, France, the Republic of Korea, the United States of America, Germany, the United Kingdom of Great Britain, Canada, and Northern Ireland. After a presentation of the needs of the IAEA inspectors, the LIBS experts were in agreement that needs as presented could be partially or fully fulfilled using LIBS instrumentation. The needs of the IAEA inspectors were grouped in the following broad categories: (1) Improvements to in-field measurements/environmental sampling; (2) Monitoring status of activity in a Hot Cell; (3) Verifying status of activity at a declared facility via process monitoring; and (4) Need for pre-screening of environmental samples before analysis. Under the Department of Energy/National Nuclear Security Administration (DOE/NNSA) Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI) Los Alamos National Laboratory is exploring three potential applications of LIBS for international safeguards. As part of this work, we are developing: (1) a user-friendly man-portable LIBS system to characterize samples across a wide range of elements in the periodic table from hydrogen up to heavy elements

  20. Dengue Type-2 Virus Envelope Protein Made Using Recombinant Baculovirus Protects Mice Against Virus Challenge

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-01-01

    the envelope (E) glycoprotein of dengue 2 virus was cloned into baculovirus (IAutographa californical nuclear polyhedrosis virus, AcNPV). The...polyclonal, anti- dengue type 2 antibody and a dengue type 2-specific, neutralizing monoclonal antibody. Balb/c mice immunized with the recombinant...antigen produced only non-neutralizing antibody against dengue 2 virus but were partially protected against morbidity and mortality after

  1. Human skeletal muscle protein breakdown during spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stein, T. P.; Schluter, M. D.

    1997-01-01

    Human spaceflight is associated with a loss of body protein. Excretion of 3-methylhistidine (3-MH) in the urine is a useful measurement of myofibrillar protein breakdown. Bed rest, particularly with 6 degrees head-down tilt, is an accepted ground-based model for human spaceflight. The objectives of this report were to compare 3-MH excretion from two Life Sciences shuttle missions (duration 9.5 and 15 days, n = 9) and from 17 days of bed rest (n = 7) with 6 degrees head-down tilt. The bed rest study was designed to mimic an actual Life Sciences spaceflight and so incorporated an extensive battery of physiological tests focused on the musculoskeletal system. Results showed that nitrogen retention, based on excretion of nitrogen in the urine, was reduced during both bed rest [from 22 +/- 1 to 1 +/- 5 mg N x kg(-1) x day(-1) (n = 7; P < 0.05)] and spaceflight [from 57 +/- 9 to 19 +/- 3 mg N x kg(-1) x day(-1) (n = 9; P < 0.05)]. 3-MH excretion was unchanged with either bed rest [pre-bed rest 5.30 +/- 0.29 vs. bed rest 5.71 +/- 0.30 micromol 3-MH x kg(-1) x day(-1), n = 7; P = not significant (NS)] or spaceflight [preflight 4.98 +/- 0.37 vs. 4.59 +/- 0.39 micromol 3-MH x kg(-1) x day(-1) in-flight, n = 9; P = NS]. We conclude that 1) 3-MH excretion was unaffected by spaceflight on the shuttle or with bed rest plus exercise, and 2) because protein breakdown (elevated 3-MH) was increased on Skylab but not on the shuttle, it follows that muscle protein breakdown is not an inevitable consequence of spaceflight.

  2. cdc25 is a nuclear protein expressed constitutively throughout the cell cycle in nontransformed mammalian cells

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    A family of proteins homologous to the cdc25 gene product of the fission yeast bear specific protein tyrosine phosphatase activity involved in the activation of the p34cdc2-cyclin B kinase. Using affinity-purified antibodies raised against a synthetic peptide corresponding to the catalytic site of the cdc25 phosphatase, we show that cdc25 protein is constitutively expressed throughout the cell cycle of nontransformed mammalian fibroblasts and does not undergo major changes in protein level. By indirect immunofluorescence, cdc25 protein is found essentially localized in the nucleus throughout interphase and during early prophase. Just before the complete nuclear envelope breakdown at the prophase-prometaphase boundary, cdc25 proteins are redistributed throughout the cytoplasm. During metaphase and anaphase, cdc25 staining remains distributed throughout the cell and excludes the condensed chromosomes. The nuclear locale reappears during telophase. In light of the recent data describing the cytoplasmic localization of cyclin B protein (Pines, J., and T. Hunter. 1991. J. Cell Biol. 115:1-17), the data presented here suggest that separation in two distinct cellular compartments of the cdc25 phosphatase and its substrate p34cdc2-cyclin B may be of importance in the regulation of the cdc2 kinase activity. PMID:1500423

  3. Nuclear translocation of phospholipase C-zeta, an egg-activating factor, during early embryonic development

    SciTech Connect

    Sone, Yoshie; Ito, Masahiko; Shirakawa, Hideki; Shikano, Tomohide; Takeuchi, Hiroyuki; Kinoshita, Katsuyuki; Miyazaki, Shunichi . E-mail: shunm@research.twmu.ac.jp

    2005-05-13

    Phospholipase C-zeta (PLC{zeta}), a strong candidate of the egg-activating sperm factor, causes intracellular Ca{sup 2+} oscillations and egg activation, and is subsequently accumulated into the pronucleus (PN), when expressed in mouse eggs by injection of RNA encoding PLC{zeta}. Changes in the localization of expressed PLC{zeta} were investigated by tagging with a fluorescent protein. PLC{zeta} began to translocate into the PN formed at 5-6 h after RNA injection and increased there. Observation in the same embryo revealed that PLC{zeta} in the PN dispersed to the cytoplasm upon nuclear envelope breakdown and translocated again into the nucleus after cleavage. The dynamics was found in the second mitosis as well. When RNA was injected into fertilization-originated 1-cell embryos or blastomere(s) of 2-8-cell embryos, the nuclear localization of expressed PLC{zeta} was recognized in every embryo up to blastocyst. Thus, PLC{zeta} exhibited alternative cytoplasm/nucleus localization during development. This supports the view that the sperm factor could control cell cycle-dependent generation of Ca{sup 2+} oscillations in early embryogenesis.

  4. Kinetic theory of runaway air-breakdown

    SciTech Connect

    Roussel-Dupre, R.A.; Gurevich, A.V.; Tunnell, T.; Milikh, G.M.

    1993-09-01

    The kinetic theory for a new air breakdown mechanism advanced in a previous paper is developed. The relevant form of the Boltzmann equation is derived and the particle orbits in both velocity space and configuration space are computed. A numerical solution of the Boltzmann equation, assuming a spatially uniform electric field, is obtained and the temporal evolution of the electron velocity distribution function is described. The results of our analysis are used to estimate the magnitude of potential x-ray emissions from discharges in thunderstorms.

  5. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy in Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhen-Zhen; Deguchi, Yoshihiro; Zhang, Zhen-Zhen; Wang, Zhe; Zeng, Xiao-Yan; Yan, Jun-Jie

    2016-12-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is an analytical detection technique based on atomic emission spectroscopy to measure the elemental composition. LIBS has been extensively studied and developed due to the non-contact, fast response, high sensitivity, real-time and multi-elemental detection features. The development and applications of LIBS technique in Asia are summarized and discussed in this review paper. The researchers in Asia work on different aspects of the LIBS study in fundamentals, data processing and modeling, applications and instrumentations. According to the current research status, the challenges, opportunities and further development of LIBS technique in Asia are also evaluated to promote LIBS research and its applications.

  6. Theoretical and experimental investigation of vortex breakdown

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krause, E.

    1986-01-01

    The slender-vortex approximation was analyzed for incompressible and compressible flow. First the equations of motion were reduced in an order of magnitude analysis. Then compatibility conditions were formulated for the inflow conditions. Thereafter finite-difference-solutions were constructed for incompressible and compressible flow. Finally it was shown that these solutions can be used to describe the flow in slender vortices. The analysis of the breakdown process must, however, be excluded, since its upstream influence cannot be predicted with the slender vortex approximation. The investigaton of this problem is left for future work.

  7. Kinetic theory of runaway air breakdown

    SciTech Connect

    Roussel-Dupre, R.A. ); Gurevich, A.V. ); Tunnell, T. ); Milikh, G.M. )

    1994-03-01

    The kinetic theory for an air breakdown mechanism advanced in a previous paper [Phys. Lett. A 165, 463 (1992)] is developed. The relevant form of the Boltzmann equation is derived and the particle orbits in both velocity space and configuration space are computed. A numerical solution of the Boltzmann equation, assuming a spatially uniform electric field, is obtained and the temporal evolution of the electron velocity distribution function is described. The results of our analysis are used to estimate the magnitude of potential x-ray emissions from discharges in thunderstorms.

  8. The Methodology of Data Envelopment Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sexton, Thomas R.

    1986-01-01

    The methodology of data envelopment analysis, (DEA) a linear programming-based method, is described. Other procedures often used for measuring relative productive efficiency are discussed in relation to DEA, including ratio analysis and multiple regression analysis. The DEA technique is graphically illustrated for only two inputs and one output.…

  9. Ultraviolet Opacity and Fluorescence in Supernova Envelopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Hongwei; McCray, Richard

    1996-01-01

    By the time the expanding envelope of a Type 2 supernova becomes transparent in the optical continuum, most of the gamma-ray luminosity produced by radioactive Fe/Co/Ni clumps propagates into the hydrogen/helium envelope and is deposited there, if at all. The resulting fast electrons excite He 1 and H 1, the two- photon continua of which are the dominant internal sources of ultraviolet radiation. The UV radiation is blocked by scattering in thousands of resonance lines of metals and converted by fluorescence into optical and infrared emission lines that escape freely. We describe results of Monte Carlo calculations that simulate non-LTE scattering and fluorescence in more than five million allowed lines of Ca, Sc, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, and Ni. For a model approximating conditions in the envelope of SN 1987A, the calculated emergent spectrum resembles the observed one. For the first 2 yr after explosion, the ultraviolet radiation (lambda less than or approximately equals 3000) is largely blocked and converted into a quasi continuum of many thousands of weak optical and infrared emission lines and some prominent emission features, such as the Ca 2 lambdalambda8600 triplet. Later, as the envelope cools and expands, it becomes more transparent, and an increasing fraction of the luminosity emerges in the UV band.

  10. Discriminating Dysarthria Type from Envelope Modulation Spectra

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liss, Julie M.; LeGendre, Sue; Lotto, Andrew J.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Previous research demonstrated the ability of temporally based rhythm metrics to distinguish among dysarthrias with different prosodic deficit profiles (J. M. Liss et al., 2009). The authors examined whether comparable results could be obtained by an automated analysis of speech envelope modulation spectra (EMS), which quantifies the…

  11. 14 CFR 23.333 - Flight envelope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... any combination of airspeed and load factor on and within the boundaries of a flight envelope (similar... altitudes between sea level and 20,000 feet. The gust velocity may be reduced linearly from 50 f.p.s. at 20... considered at altitudes between sea level and 20,000 feet. The gust velocity may be reduced linearly from...

  12. 14 CFR 23.333 - Flight envelope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... any combination of airspeed and load factor on and within the boundaries of a flight envelope (similar... altitudes between sea level and 20,000 feet. The gust velocity may be reduced linearly from 50 f.p.s. at 20... considered at altitudes between sea level and 20,000 feet. The gust velocity may be reduced linearly from...

  13. Ozone Reductions Using Residential Building Envelopes

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, Iain S.; Sherman, Max; Nazaroff, William W.

    2009-02-01

    Ozone is an air pollutant with that can have significant health effects and a significant source of ozone in some regions of California is outdoor air. Because people spend the vast majority of their time indoors, reduction in indoor levels of ozone could lead to improved health for many California residents. Ozone is removed from indoor air by surface reactions and can also be filtered by building envelopes. The magnitude of the envelope impact depends on the specific building materials that the air flows over and the geometry of the air flow paths through the envelope that can be changes by mechanical ventilation operation. The 2008 Residential Building Standards in California include minimum requirements for mechanical ventilation by referencing ASHRAE Standard 62.2. This study examines the changes in indoor ozone depending on the mechanical ventilation system selected to meet these requirements. This study used detailed simulations of ventilation in a house to examine the impacts of different ventilation systems on indoor ozone concentrations. The simulation results showed that staying indoors reduces exposure to ozone by 80percent to 90percent, that exhaust ventilation systems lead to lower indoor ozone concentrations, that opening of windows should be avoided at times of high outdoor ozone, and that changing the time at which mechanical ventilation occurs has the ability to halve exposure to ozone. Future work should focus on the products of ozone reactions in the building envelope and the fate of these products with respect to indoor exposures.

  14. Right to Light: Ralph Knowles's Solar Envelope.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morton, David

    1979-01-01

    At the University of Southern California solar-access design research project, Barry Knowles and students have devised a solar envelope: the largest volumetric container over a land parcel that allows solar access to all adjacent neighbors within useful time constraints. (Author/MLF)

  15. Adaptive envelope protection methods for aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unnikrishnan, Suraj

    Carefree handling refers to the ability of a pilot to operate an aircraft without the need to continuously monitor aircraft operating limits. At the heart of all carefree handling or maneuvering systems, also referred to as envelope protection systems, are algorithms and methods for predicting future limit violations. Recently, envelope protection methods that have gained more acceptance, translate limit proximity information to its equivalent in the control channel. Envelope protection algorithms either use very small prediction horizon or are static methods with no capability to adapt to changes in system configurations. Adaptive approaches maximizing prediction horizon such as dynamic trim, are only applicable to steady-state-response critical limit parameters. In this thesis, a new adaptive envelope protection method is developed that is applicable to steady-state and transient response critical limit parameters. The approach is based upon devising the most aggressive optimal control profile to the limit boundary and using it to compute control limits. Pilot-in-the-loop evaluations of the proposed approach are conducted at the Georgia Tech Carefree Maneuver lab for transient longitudinal hub moment limit protection. Carefree maneuvering is the dual of carefree handling in the realm of autonomous Uninhabited Aerial Vehicles (UAVs). Designing a flight control system to fully and effectively utilize the operational flight envelope is very difficult. With the increasing role and demands for extreme maneuverability there is a need for developing envelope protection methods for autonomous UAVs. In this thesis, a full-authority automatic envelope protection method is proposed for limit protection in UAVs. The approach uses adaptive estimate of limit parameter dynamics and finite-time horizon predictions to detect impending limit boundary violations. Limit violations are prevented by treating the limit boundary as an obstacle and by correcting nominal control

  16. CO line emission from circumstellar envelopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teyssier, D.; Hernandez, R.; Bujarrabal, V.; Yoshida, H.; Phillips, T. G.

    2006-04-01

    Aims.We present the results of a multi-transition CO observational program conducted on a sample of AGB and post-AGB stars envelopes. We have collected maps and single pointing observations of these envelopes in 5 rotational transitions ranging from J = 1-0 to J = 6-5, including in particular new observations of the CO line at 691 GHz at the CSO. The use of such a set of mm and submm CO line on stellar envelopes is rare and limited to the work of some authors on IRC+10216. Methods: .Using a model for the CO emission of an AGB circumstellar envelope, in combination with a standard LVG approach, we have conducted a systematic modelling analysis using the whole set of CO data collected for a sample of 12 sources. We simultaneously fit all five transitions, taking into account the spatial information provided by the maps. Results: .We find mass-loss rates in the range 1 × 10-7 to 4 × 10-4 M_⊙/yr, and envelope temperatures ranging from 20 K to 1000 K at a radius of 1016 cm. There seem to be a general anti-correlation between mass loss rates and temperature, the high mass loss rate AGBs having low temperatures, and vice versa. We show that most AGB data can be fitted using a constant mass loss rate, at least within the calibration uncertainties associated with the data collected at different frequencies. For some cases though (e.g. CIT 6, R Hya, χ Cyg), a change in the mass loss rate history needs to be invoked to reconcile data at low- and high-J, a scenario already mentioned by several authors to explain observations of WX Psc.

  17. The Circumstellar Envelope of IRC +10216.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keady, John Joseph

    1982-03-01

    Using recently obtained spatial and spectral line data on the circumstellar envelope of IRC +10216, we have attempted to semi-empirically probe the conditions in this envelope. The computational techniques utilized in our analysis accurately incorporate the effects of geometrical extension and velocity fields on the radiative transfer. We have also attempted to account for the non-equilibrium expected in the vibrational level populations of the gas phase species. Our modelling of the spatial distribution of the dust-produced circumstellar radiation field at 5 (mu)m and 11 (mu)m indicates that dust may be condensing in the circumstellar envelope. The dominant opacity source in our calculations, amorphous carbon, also seems to provide sufficient far-infrared flux. Modelling of the SiC emission feature confirms previous results that suggest a nonuniform particle-shape distribution for the SiC. We can produce multi-component absorption lines, very similar to the 2 (mu)m CO first overtone lines seen in IRC +10216, with continuous distributions of material. The requirement is regions of relatively low acceleration. Modelling of our high resolution, high signal-to-noise observations of the CO fundamental and first overtone indicates a mass -loss rate of 1.5(10('-4)) M(,(CIRCLE))/yr. Our calculations to date indicate that the gas reaches terminal velocity between 10 and 20 R(,*). The envelope mass within 100 R(,*) is 3(10('-2)) M(,(CIRCLE)), with the ratio (by mass) of dust to gas being 10('-3). The assumption of a constant mass-loss rate implies an envelope mass of (TURN)1 M(,(CIRCLE)) within 5000 R(,*). The computational techniques utilized are sufficiently adaptable and economical so that considerable future refinement of the modelling is possible.

  18. Adaptive Spectral Envelope Estimation for Doppler Ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Kathpalia, Aditi; Karabiyik, Yucel; Eik-Nes, Sturla H; Tegnander, Eva; Ekroll, Ingvild Kinn; Kiss, Gabriel; Torp, Hans

    2016-11-01

    Estimation of accurate maximum velocities and spectral envelope in ultrasound Doppler blood flow spectrograms are both essential for clinical diagnostic purposes. However, obtaining accurate maximum velocity is not straightforward due to intrinsic spectral broadening and variance in the power spectrum estimate. The method proposed in this paper for maximum velocity point detection has been developed by modifying an existing method-signal noise slope intersection, incorporating in it steps from an altered version of another method called geometric method. Adaptive noise estimation from the spectrogram ensures that a smooth spectral envelope is obtained postdetection of these maximum velocity points. The method has been tested on simulated Doppler signal with scatterers possessing a parabolic flow velocity profile constant in time, steady and pulsatile string phantom recordings, as well as in vivo recordings from uterine, umbilical, carotid, and subclavian arteries. The results from simulation experiments indicate a bias of less than 2.5% in maximum velocities when estimated for a range of peak velocities, Doppler angles, and SNR levels. Standard deviation in the envelope is low-less than 2% in the case of experiments done by varying the peak velocity and Doppler angle for steady phantom and simulated flow, and also less than 2% in the case of experiments done by varying SNR but keeping constant flow conditions for in vivo and simulated flow. Low variability in the envelope makes the prospect of using the envelope for automated blood flow measurements possible and is illustrated for the case of pulsatility index estimation in uterine and umbilical arteries.

  19. The envelope-based cyclic periodogram

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borghesani, P.

    2015-06-01

    Cyclostationary analysis has proven effective in identifying signal components for diagnostic purposes. A key descriptor in this framework is the cyclic power spectrum, traditionally estimated by the averaged cyclic periodogram and the smoothed cyclic periodogram. A lengthy debate about the best estimator finally found a solution in a cornerstone work by Antoni, who proposed a unified form for the two families, thus allowing a detailed statistical study of their properties. Since then, the focus of cyclostationary research has shifted towards algorithms, in terms of computational efficiency and simplicity of implementation. Traditional algorithms have proven computationally inefficient and the sophisticated "cyclostationary" definition of these estimators slowed their spread in the industry. The only attempt to increase the computational efficiency of cyclostationary estimators is represented by the cyclic modulation spectrum. This indicator exploits the relationship between cyclostationarity and envelope analysis. The link with envelope analysis allows a leap in computational efficiency and provides a "way in" for the understanding by industrial engineers. However, the new estimator lies outside the unified form described above and an unbiased version of the indicator has not been proposed. This paper will therefore extend the analysis of envelope-based estimators of the cyclic spectrum, proposing a new approach to include them in the unified form of cyclostationary estimators. This will enable the definition of a new envelope-based algorithm and the detailed analysis of the properties of the cyclic modulation spectrum. The computational efficiency of envelope-based algorithms will be also discussed quantitatively for the first time in comparison with the averaged cyclic periodogram. Finally, the algorithms will be validated with numerical and experimental examples.

  20. Validating predictions from climate envelope models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Watling, J.; Bucklin, D.; Speroterra, C.; Brandt, L.; Cabal, C.; Romañach, Stephanie S.; Mazzotti, Frank J.

    2013-01-01

    Climate envelope models are a potentially important conservation tool, but their ability to accurately forecast species’ distributional shifts using independent survey data has not been fully evaluated. We created climate envelope models for 12 species of North American breeding birds previously shown to have experienced poleward range shifts. For each species, we evaluated three different approaches to climate envelope modeling that differed in the way they treated climate-induced range expansion and contraction, using random forests and maximum entropy modeling algorithms. All models were calibrated using occurrence data from 1967–1971 (t1) and evaluated using occurrence data from 1998–2002 (t2). Model sensitivity (the ability to correctly classify species presences) was greater using the maximum entropy algorithm than the random forest algorithm. Although sensitivity did not differ significantly among approaches, for many species, sensitivity was maximized using a hybrid approach that assumed range expansion, but not contraction, in t2. Species for which the hybrid approach resulted in the greatest improvement in sensitivity have been reported from more land cover types than species for which there was little difference in sensitivity between hybrid and dynamic approaches, suggesting that habitat generalists may be buffered somewhat against climate-induced range contractions. Specificity (the ability to correctly classify species absences) was maximized using the random forest algorithm and was lowest using the hybrid approach. Overall, our results suggest cautious optimism for the use of climate envelope models to forecast range shifts, but also underscore the importance of considering non-climate drivers of species range limits. The use of alternative climate envelope models that make different assumptions about range expansion and contraction is a new and potentially useful way to help inform our understanding of climate change effects on species.

  1. SIMULATION OF RF BREAKDOWN EFFECTS ON NLC BEAM

    SciTech Connect

    Dolgashev, V

    2004-08-24

    The linacs of the Next Linear Collider / Global Linear Collider will contain several thousand traveling wave X-band accelerator structures operating at an input power of about 60 MW. At this input power, prototypes of NLC/GLC structures have breakdown rates lower than one breakdown in ten hours. RF breakdowns disrupt flow of energy inside the structure and create arcs with electron and ion currents. Electromagnetic fields of these currents interact with the NLC beam. The authors simulated the deflection of the NLC beam caused by breakdown currents using the particle-in-cell code MAGIC. In this paper they present modeling considerations and simulation results.

  2. Pre-breakdown evaluation of gas discharge mechanisms in microgaps

    SciTech Connect

    Semnani, Abbas; Peroulis, Dimitrios; Venkattraman, Ayyaswamy; Alexeenko, Alina A.

    2013-04-29

    The individual contributions of various gas discharge mechanisms to total pre-breakdown current in microgaps are quantified numerically. The variation of contributions of field emission and secondary electron emission with increasing electric field shows contrasting behavior even for a given gap size. The total current near breakdown decreases rapidly with gap size indicating that microscale discharges operate in a high-current, low-voltage regime. This study provides the first such analysis of breakdown mechanisms and aids in the formulation of physics-based theories for microscale breakdown.

  3. NASA Work Breakdown Structure (WBS) Handbook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleming, Jon F.; Poole, Kenneth W.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to provide program/project teams necessary instruction and guidance in the best practices for Work Breakdown Structure (WBS) and WBS dictionary development and use for project implementation and management control. This handbook can be used for all types of NASA projects and work activities including research, development, construction, test and evaluation, and operations. The products of these work efforts may be hardware, software, data, or service elements (alone or in combination). The aim of this document is to assist project teams in the development of effective work breakdown structures that provide a framework of common reference for all project elements. The WBS and WBS dictionary are effective management processes for planning, organizing, and administering NASA programs and projects. The guidance contained in this document is applicable to both in-house, NASA-led effort and contracted effort. It assists management teams from both entities in fulfilling necessary responsibilities for successful accomplishment of project cost, schedule, and technical goals. Benefits resulting from the use of an effective WBS include, but are not limited to: providing a basis for assigned project responsibilities, providing a basis for project schedule and budget development, simplifying a project by dividing the total work scope into manageable units, and providing a common reference for all project communication.

  4. Functions of Carotenoid Metabolites and Breakdown Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Britton, George

    It is not only intact carotenoids but also fragments of carotenoid molecules that have important natural functions and actions. The electron-rich polyene chain of the carotenoids is very susceptible to oxidative breakdown, which may be enzymic or non-enzymic. Central cleavage gives C20 compounds, retinoids, as described in Chapter 16. Cleavage at other positions gives smaller fragments, notably C10, C13 and C15 compounds that retain the carotenoid end group. The formation of these is described in Chapter 17 and in Volume 3, Chapter 4. Oxidative breakdown can also take place during storage, processing and curing of plant material, and the products contribute to the desired aroma/flavour properties of, for example, tea, wine and tobacco. The importance of vitamin A (C20) in animals is well known. Vitamin A deficiency is still a major concern in many parts of the world. It can lead to blindness and serious ill-health or death, especially in young children. Volatile smaller carotenoid fragments (`norisoprenoids') are widespread scent/flavour compounds in plants.

  5. Electrostatic Breakdown Analysis using EMsolve and BEMSTER

    SciTech Connect

    Fasenfest, B; White, D

    2005-05-27

    Computer simulations modeling electrostatic behavior were used to simulate dielectric breakdown problems. These simulations modeled composite dielectric and conducting structures to see how much voltage difference or charge accumulation could occur before dielectric breakdown occurred in an air region. Two different computer codes were used for the analysis; EMSolve and BEMSTER. EMSolve, an existing LLNL internal finite element code, requires that a complete volume mesh of the problem be constructed. BEMSTER, a boundary-element code, was developed from an extension of the FEMSTER libraries which power EMSolve. The boundary-integral code offers the advantages of solving for accumulated charge and maximum electric field directly, and of only requiring a surface mesh. However, because it does not automatically solve for the voltage and electric field everywhere in space, post-processing and visualization are slightly more difficult than with EMSolve. Both codes were compared to several analytical solutions, and then applied to the structures of interest. Both codes showed good agreement with the analytic solution and with each other.

  6. The Psp system of Mycobacterium tuberculosis integrates envelope stress-sensing and envelope-preserving functions.

    PubMed

    Datta, Pratik; Ravi, Janani; Guerrini, Valentina; Chauhan, Rinki; Neiditch, Matthew B; Shell, Scarlet S; Fortune, Sarah M; Hancioglu, Baris; Igoshin, Oleg A; Gennaro, Maria Laura

    2015-08-01

    The bacterial envelope integrates essential stress-sensing and adaptive functions; thus, envelope-preserving functions are important for survival. In Gram-negative bacteria, envelope integrity during stress is maintained by the multi-gene Psp response. Mycobacterium tuberculosis was thought to lack the Psp system since it encodes only pspA and no other psp ortholog. Intriguingly, pspA maps downstream from clgR, which encodes a transcription factor regulated by the MprAB-σ(E) envelope-stress-signaling system. clgR inactivation lowered ATP concentration during stress and protonophore treatment-induced clgR-pspA expression, suggesting that these genes express Psp-like functions. We identified a four-gene set - clgR, pspA (rv2744c), rv2743c, rv2742c - that is regulated by clgR and in turn regulates ClgR activity. Regulatory and protein-protein interactions within the set and a requirement of the four genes for functions associated with envelope integrity and surface-stress tolerance indicate that a Psp-like system has evolved in mycobacteria. Among Actinobacteria, the four-gene module occurred only in tuberculous mycobacteria and was required for intramacrophage growth, suggesting links between its function and mycobacterial virulence. Additionally, the four-gene module was required for MprAB-σ(E) stress-signaling activity. The positive feedback between envelope-stress-sensing and envelope-preserving functions allows sustained responses to multiple, envelope-perturbing signals during chronic infection, making the system uniquely suited to tuberculosis pathogenesis.

  7. Thermodynamics and fluid dynamics of the double shell (envelope) house

    SciTech Connect

    Reno, V.

    1980-01-01

    The concepts of the envelope house are summarized and a systems approach to the house heat energy flows is presented. Some basic principles of physics in the area of thermodynamic conduction are discussed in relation to the envelope concept. (MHR)

  8. Analysis Code for High Gradient Dielectric Insulator Surface Breakdown

    SciTech Connect

    Ives, Robert Lawrence; Verboncoeur, John; Aldan, Manuel

    2010-05-30

    High voltage (HV) insulators are critical components in high-energy, accelerator and pulsed power systems that drive diverse applications in the national security, nuclear weapons science, defense and industrial arenas. In these systems, the insulator may separate vacuum/non-vacuum regions or conductors with high electrical field gradients. These insulators will often fail at electric fields over an order of magnitude lower than their intrinsic dielectric strength due to flashover at the dielectric interface. Decades of studies have produced a wealth of information on fundamental processes and mechanisms important for flashover initiation, but only for relatively simple insulator configurations in controlled environments. Accelerator and pulsed power system designers are faced with applying the fundamental knowledge to complex, operational devices with escalating HV requirements. Designers are forced to rely on “best practices” and expensive prototype testing, providing boundaries for successful operation. However, the safety margin is difficult to estimate, and system design must be very conservative for situations where testing is not practicable, or replacement of failed parts is disruptive or expensive. The Phase I program demonstrated the feasibility of developing an advanced code for modeling insulator breakdown. Such a code would be of great interest for a number of applications, including high energy physics, microwave source development, fusion sciences, and other research and industrial applications using high voltage devices.

  9. The action of three antiseptics/disinfectants against enveloped and non-enveloped viruses.

    PubMed

    Wood, A; Payne, D

    1998-04-01

    The antiviral action of chloroxylenol, benzalkonium chloride and cetrimide/chlorhexidine was assessed against a range of enveloped and non-enveloped human viruses using a suspension test method. Viral suspensions of 10(6)-10(7) pfu/TCID50 or sfu were prepared in each of the antiseptic/disinfectant solutions in the presence of a bovine serum/yeast extract mixture to simulate 'dirty conditions'. During incubation, aliquots were removed at predetermined timepoints up to 10 min to assess the kinetics of inactivation. Results indicate that all products were effective in inactivating the enveloped viruses herpes simplex virus type 1 and human immunodeficiency virus type 1, whilst being ineffective in inactivating human coronavirus, also enveloped, and the non-enveloped viruses. The exception to this was the benzalkonium chloride-based product (Dettol Hospital Concentrate) which was active against the non-enveloped human coxsackie virus. Four antiseptic/disinfectant solutions with chloroxylenol, benzalkonium chloride, cetrimide/chlorhexidine and povidone-iodine were also assessed for antiviral effect against human immunodeficiency virus in the presence of whole human blood. All four solutions proved to be effective within 1 min despite the cytotoxic nature of the compounds to the detection system.

  10. The significance of the Golgi complex in envelopment of bovine herpesvirus 1 (BHV-1) as revealed by cryobased electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Wild, Peter; Schraner, Elisabeth M; Cantieni, Daniel; Loepfe, Eva; Walther, Paul; Müller, Martin; Engels, Monika

    2002-01-01

    Nucleocapsids of herpesviruses originate in the nucleus of host cells and bud through the inner nuclear membrane acquiring tegument and envelope. The release of the enveloped virus particle from the perinuclear space is unknown. Cryobased electron microscopic imaging revealed enveloped virus particles within cisterns associated with the perinuclear space, a pre-Golgi compartment connecting Golgi cisterns to the perinuclear space, and enveloped virus particles in Golgi cisterns where they are packaged into transport vacuoles by membrane fission. To our knowledge, our images show for the first time the connectivity from the perinuclear space to Golgi cisterns. The data strongly indicate an intracisternal transport of enveloped virus particles from the budding site to the packaging site. Budding starts by condensation at the inner membrane. Condensation involving the viral envelope and peripheral tegument was persistent in virus particles within perinuclear space and associated cisterns. Virus particles within Golgi cisterns and transport vacuoles originating by Golgi membrane fission, however, lacked condensation. Instead, spikes were clearly evident. The phenomenon of condensation is considered likely to be responsible for preventing fusion of the viral envelope with cisternal membranes and/or for driving virions from the perinuclear space to Golgi cisterns. Glycoprotein K is discussed to likely play a role in the intracisternal transportation of virions. In addition to the pathway including intracisternal transport and packaging, there were clear indications for the well-known pathway involving wrapping of cytoplasmic nucleocapsids by Golgi membranes. The origin of the cytoplasmic nucleocapsids, however, remains obscure. Lack of evidence for release of nucleocapsids at the outer nuclear membrane suggests that the process is very rapid, or that nucleocapsids pass the nucleocytoplasmic barrier via an alternative route.

  11. Solar Effective Envelope Design Advisor (SEEDA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahaek, Ekkachai

    The lack of effort by mainstream architects in integrating energy-efficient strategies in architectural designing is due to the complexity in a building's energy conscious concepts and theories, the difficulties to visualize and quantify energy consumption, and the late implementing of energy consumption analysis in the conventional design process. This task would be accomplishing by a building system's engineer where results might be determined only after the basic architectural design has been completed. An effective simple tool and method should then be available to assist architects in building's energy-efficient designing at the beginning of the design. The building's energy consumption is directly and mainly influenced by the relationship of the sun, site, and its building configuration. The solar radiations will first impact on the building's envelope, which will have a direct effect on the amount of energy a building will consume. If an architect can define or map the intensity of solar energy on the site's buildable volume, and use this information to determine the levels of solar insolation, a more energy efficient building form can be proposed. This research hypothesis has shared the fundamental techniques of the Solar Envelope projection by Professor Ralph Knowles [Knowles, 1981] of the University of Southern California. However a different approach is taken by including the influence of regional restrictions and the surrounding buildings' shadows when projecting of solar volumes and solar envelope. The research methodology will discuss the development of a computer-based approach to develop a three-dimensional architectural form based on an insolation map related to the design site. The prototype computer program is referred as the Solar Effective Envelope Design Advisor (SEEDA). The solar insolation volume of the site is determined by integrating three types of computer-generated models include the Buildable Volume model based on design constraints

  12. Nucleocytoplasmic transport of nucleocapsid proteins of enveloped RNA viruses

    PubMed Central

    Wulan, Wahyu N.; Heydet, Deborah; Walker, Erin J.; Gahan, Michelle E.; Ghildyal, Reena

    2015-01-01

    Most viruses with non-segmented single stranded RNA genomes complete their life cycle in the cytoplasm of infected cells. However, despite undergoing replication in the cytoplasm, the structural proteins of some of these RNA viruses localize to the nucleus at specific times in the virus life cycle, primarily early in infection. Limited evidence suggests that this enhances successful viral replication by interfering with or inhibiting the host antiviral response. Nucleocapsid proteins of RNA viruses have a well-established, essential cytoplasmic role in virus replication and assembly. Intriguingly, nucleocapsid proteins of some RNA viruses also localize to the nucleus/nucleolus of infected cells. Their nuclear function is less well understood although significant advances have been made in recent years. This review will focus on the nucleocapsid protein of cytoplasmic enveloped RNA viruses, including their localization to the nucleus/nucleolus and function therein. A greater understanding of the nuclear localization of nucleocapsid proteins has the potential to enhance therapeutic strategies as it can be a target for the development of live-attenuated vaccines or antiviral drugs. PMID:26082769

  13. 200 Area Deactivation Project Facilities Authorization Envelope Document

    SciTech Connect

    DODD, E.N.

    2000-03-28

    Project facilities as required by HNF-PRO-2701, Authorization Envelope and Authorization Agreement. The Authorization Agreements (AA's) do not identify the specific set of environmental safety and health requirements that are applicable to the facility. Therefore, the facility Authorization Envelopes are defined here to identify the applicable requirements. This document identifies the authorization envelopes for the 200 Area Deactivation.

  14. Analysis of Building Envelope Construction in 2003 CBECS

    SciTech Connect

    Winiarski, David W.; Halverson, Mark A.; Jiang, Wei

    2007-06-01

    The purpose of this analysis is to determine "typical" building envelope characteristics for buildings built after 1980. We address three envelope components in this paper - roofs, walls, and window area. These typical building envelope characteristics were used in the development of DOE’s Reference Buildings .

  15. Application of the Envelope Difference Index to Spectrally Sparse Speech

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Souza, Pamela; Hoover, Eric; Gallun, Frederick

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Amplitude compression is a common hearing aid processing strategy that can improve speech audibility and loudness comfort but also has the potential to alter important cues carried by the speech envelope. In previous work, a measure of envelope change, the Envelope Difference Index (EDI; Fortune, Woodruff, & Preves, 1994), was moderately…

  16. Three-dimensional visualization of the Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus occlusion-derived virion envelopment process gives new clues as to its mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Yang; Li, Kunpeng; Tang, Peiping; Li, Yinyin; Zhou, Qiang; Yang, Kai; Zhang, Qinfen

    2015-02-15

    Baculoviruses produce two virion phenotypes, occlusion-derived virion (ODV) and budded virion (BV). ODV envelopment occurs in the nucleus. Morphogenesis of the ODV has been studied extensively; however, the mechanisms underlying microvesicle formation and ODV envelopment in nuclei remain unclear. In this study, we used electron tomography (ET) together with the conventional electron microscopy to study the envelopment of Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) ODV. Our results demonstrate that not only the inner but also the outer nuclear membrane can invaginate and vesiculate into microvesicles and that intranuclear microvesicles are the direct source of the ODV membrane. Five main events in the ODV envelopment process are summarized, from which we propose a model to explain this process. - Highlights: • Both the inner and outer nuclear membranes could invaginate. • Both the inner and outer nuclear membranes could vesiculate into microvesicles. • Five main events in the ODV envelopment process are summarized. • A model is proposed to explain this ODV envelopment.

  17. Environmental factors associated with reproductive barrier breakdown in sympatric trout populations on Vancouver Island.

    PubMed

    Heath, Daniel; Bettles, Cory M; Roff, Derek

    2010-01-01

    The incidence of hybridization between coastal cutthroat (Oncorhynchus clarki clarki) and rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) varies widely among populations. The breakdown of reproductive isolation is of concern to managers, and raises the question: how have the two species retained their genetic and morphological divergence? Using a combination of mitochondrial DNA and nuclear DNA markers coupled with watershed attribute and disturbance data, we determined the distribution and frequency of trout hybridization on Vancouver Island, BC and the environmental factors associated with the hybridization. We found 284 hybrids (among 1004 fish) in 29 of 36 sampled populations. High variation in levels of hybridization was observed among populations, and no single environmental factor was found to dominate in determining hybridization levels. However, logging activity, urban infrastructure development, and stocking of hatchery rainbow trout played significant roles in determining hybridization levels, and populations in small watersheds are more at risk of reproductive barrier breakdown. This study illustrates that cutthroat-rainbow trout reproductive barrier breakdown is widespread on Vancouver Island and that anthropogenic disturbance plays a role in the process. As similar environmental disturbance is common in much of coastal trout habitat, large-scale hybridization may be occurring elsewhere and thus may represent a critical management issue for Pacific trout species.

  18. Environmental factors associated with reproductive barrier breakdown in sympatric trout populations on Vancouver Island

    PubMed Central

    Heath, Daniel; Bettles, Cory M; Roff, Derek

    2010-01-01

    The incidence of hybridization between coastal cutthroat (Oncorhynchus clarki clarki) and rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) varies widely among populations. The breakdown of reproductive isolation is of concern to managers, and raises the question: how have the two species retained their genetic and morphological divergence? Using a combination of mitochondrial DNA and nuclear DNA markers coupled with watershed attribute and disturbance data, we determined the distribution and frequency of trout hybridization on Vancouver Island, BC and the environmental factors associated with the hybridization. We found 284 hybrids (among 1004 fish) in 29 of 36 sampled populations. High variation in levels of hybridization was observed among populations, and no single environmental factor was found to dominate in determining hybridization levels. However, logging activity, urban infrastructure development, and stocking of hatchery rainbow trout played significant roles in determining hybridization levels, and populations in small watersheds are more at risk of reproductive barrier breakdown. This study illustrates that cutthroat–rainbow trout reproductive barrier breakdown is widespread on Vancouver Island and that anthropogenic disturbance plays a role in the process. As similar environmental disturbance is common in much of coastal trout habitat, large-scale hybridization may be occurring elsewhere and thus may represent a critical management issue for Pacific trout species. PMID:25567905

  19. Hydrogen sulfide in a circumstellar envelope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ukita, N.; Morris, M.

    1983-01-01

    A search for hydrogen sulfide in the cool circumstellar envelopes of 25 stars was made using the 1(10)-1(01) rotational line at 1.8 mm. It was detected in the bipolar nebula/OH maser OH231.8+4.2, an object having a high rate of mass loss. An approximate analysis indicates that 1/60 of the sulfur in this outflowing envelope is in the form of H2S, a fraction which may be similar to that in the atmosphere of the central star. In addition, the shape of the observed line profile is discussed in terms of a possible variation of the outflow velocity with latitude above the system's equatorial plane.

  20. Development of High Specific Strength Envelope Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komatsu, Keiji; Sano, Masa-Aki; Kakuta, Yoshiaki

    Progress in materials technology has produced a much more durable synthetic fabric envelope for the non-rigid airship. Flexible materials are required to form airship envelopes, ballonets, load curtains, gas bags and covering rigid structures. Polybenzoxazole fiber (Zylon) and polyalirate fiber (Vectran) show high specific tensile strength, so that we developed membrane using these high specific tensile strength fibers as a load carrier. The main material developed is a Zylon or Vectran load carrier sealed internally with a polyurethane bonded inner gas retention film (EVOH). The external surface provides weather protecting with, for instance, a titanium oxide integrated polyurethane or Tedlar film. The mechanical test results show that tensile strength 1,000 N/cm is attained with weight less than 230g/m2. In addition to the mechanical properties, temperature dependence of the joint strength and solar absorptivity and emissivity of the surface are measured. 

  1. Constant envelope chirped OFDM power efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dida, Mussa A.; Hao, Huan; Anjum, M. R.; Ran, Tao

    2016-10-01

    Fractional Fourier OFDM or simply chirped OFDM performs better in time-frequency selective channel than its convectional OFDM. Although chirped OFDM outperforms OFDM it still inherits Peak to Average Power Ratio (PAPR) drawback as a convectional OFDM. To eliminate PAPR drawback Constant Envelope OFDM was developed and for better performance in time frequency selective channel Constant Envelope Fractional Fourier OFDM (CE-COFDM) is used. Its BER performance is analyzed and compared to chirped OFDM and OFDM in AWGN and Rayleigh channel. The simulations show the BER performance of CE-COFDM is the same as chirped OFDM and OFDM. The power efficiency of CE-COFDM is also studied and different simulations performed shows CE-COFDM is more power efficient than chirped OFDM and convectional OFDM for class A and class B Linear Power Amplifier (LPA).

  2. Small carbon chains in circumstellar envelopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hargreaves, R. J.; Hinkle, K.; Bernath, P. F.

    2014-11-01

    Observations of carbon-rich circumstellar envelopes were made using the Phoenix spectrograph on the Gemini South telescope to determine the abundance of small carbon chain molecules. Vibration-rotation lines of the ν3 antisymmetric stretch of C3 near 2040 cm-1 (4.902 μm) have been used to determine the column density for four carbon-rich circumstellar envelopes: CRL 865, CRL 1922, CRL 2023 and IRC +10216. We additionally calculate the column density of C5 for IRC +10216, and provide an upper limit for five more objects. An upper limit estimate for the C7 column density is also provided for IRC+10216. A comparison of these column densities suggests a revision to current circumstellar chemical models may be needed.

  3. Femtosecond laser induced breakdown for combustion diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Kotzagianni, M.; Couris, S.

    2012-06-25

    The focused beam of a 100 fs, 800 nm laser is used to induce a spark in some laminar premixed air-methane flames operating with variable fuel content (equivalence ratio). The analysis of the light escaping from the plasma revealed that the Balmer hydrogen lines, H{sub {alpha}} and H{sub {beta}}, and some molecular origin emissions were the most prominent spectral features, while the CN ({Beta}{sup 2}{Sigma}{sup +}-{Chi}{sup 2}{Sigma}{sup +}) band intensity was found to depend linearly with methane content, suggesting that femtosecond laser induced breakdown spectroscopy can be a useful tool for the in-situ determination and local mapping of fuel content in hydrocarbon-air combustible mixtures.

  4. Vortex breakdown in a truncated conical bioreactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balci, Adnan; Brøns, Morten; Herrada, Miguel A.; Shtern, Vladimir N.

    2015-12-01

    This numerical study explains the eddy formation and disappearance in a slow steady axisymmetric air-water flow in a vertical truncated conical container, driven by the rotating top disk. Numerous topological metamorphoses occur as the water height, Hw, and the bottom-sidewall angle, α, vary. It is found that the sidewall convergence (divergence) from the top to the bottom stimulates (suppresses) the development of vortex breakdown (VB) in both water and air. At α = 60°, the flow topology changes eighteen times as Hw varies. The changes are due to (a) competing effects of AMF (the air meridional flow) and swirl, which drive meridional motions of opposite directions in water, and (b) feedback of water flow on AMF. For small Hw, the AMF effect dominates. As Hw increases, the swirl effect dominates and causes VB. The water flow feedback produces and modifies air eddies. The results are of fundamental interest and can be relevant for aerial bioreactors.

  5. Streamer parameters and breakdown in CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seeger, M.; Avaheden, J.; Pancheshnyi, S.; Votteler, T.

    2017-01-01

    CO2 is a promising gas for the replacement of SF6 in high-voltage transmission and distribution networks due to its lower environmental impact. The insulation properties of CO2 are, therefore, of great interest. For this, the properties of streamers are important, since they determine the initial discharge propagation and possibly the transition to a leader. The present experimental investigation addresses the streamer inception and propagation at ambient temperature in the pressure range 0.05-0.5 MPa at both polarities. Streamer parameters, namely the stability field, radius and velocity, were deduced in uniform and in strongly non-uniform background fields. The measured breakdown fields can then be understood by streamer propagation and streamer-to-leader transition.

  6. Storage Lesion. Role of Red Cell Breakdown

    PubMed Central

    Kim-Shapiro, Daniel B.; Lee, Janet; Gladwin, Mark T.

    2011-01-01

    As stored blood ages intraerythrocytic energy sources are depleted resulting in reduced structural integrity of the membrane. Thus, stored red cells become less deformable and more fragile as they age. This fragility leads to release of cell-free hemoglobin and formation of microparticles, sub-micron hemoglobin-containing vesicles. Upon transfusion, it is likely that additional hemolysis and microparticle formation occurs due to breakdown of fragile red blood cells. Release of cell-free hemoglobin and microparticles leads to increased consumption of nitric oxide (NO), an important signaling molecule that modulates blood flow, and may promote inflammation. Stored blood may also be deficient in recently discovered blood nitric oxide synthase activity. We hypothesize that these factors play a potential role in the blood storage lesion. PMID:21496045

  7. State Regulation, Family Breakdown, and Lone Motherhood

    PubMed Central

    Meek, Jeff

    2014-01-01

    Using a range of parish records, records from the Registrar General of Scotland, charity organizations, and media reports, this article contributes to the historiography which evaluates the effects of World War I in Britain as well as the history of lone mothers and their children. It highlights how during the war, women, especially lone mothers, made significant gains through the welfare system, changing approaches to illegitimacy and the plentiful nature of women’s work but also how in doing so this brought them under greater surveillance by the state, local parishes, and charity organizations. Moreover, as this article will demonstrate, many of the gains made by women were short-lived and in fact the war contributed to high levels of family breakdown and gendered and intergenerational poverty endured by lone mothers and their children. PMID:26538794

  8. Vortex breakdown in simple pipe bends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ault, Jesse; Shin, Sangwoo; Stone, Howard

    2016-11-01

    Pipe bends and elbows are one of the most common fluid mechanics elements that exists. However, despite their ubiquity and the extensive amount of research related to these common, simple geometries, unexpected complexities still remain. We show that for a range of geometries and flow conditions, these simple flows experience unexpected fluid dynamical bifurcations resembling the bubble-type vortex breakdown phenomenon. Specifically, we show with simulations and experiments that recirculation zones develop within the bends under certain conditions. As a consequence, fluid and particles can remain trapped within these structures for unexpectedly-long time scales. We also present simple techniques to mitigate this recirculation effect which can potentially have impact across industries ranging from biomedical and chemical processing to food and health sciences.

  9. Experimental Study on Electrical Breakdown for Devices with Micrometer Gaps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Guodong; Cheng, Yonghong; Dong, Chengye; Wu, Kai

    2014-12-01

    The understanding of electrical breakdown in atmospheric air across micrometer gaps is critically important for the insulation design of micro & nano electronic devices. In this paper, planar aluminum electrodes with gaps ranging from 2 μm to 40 μm were fabricated by microelectromechanical system technology. The influence factors including gap width and surface dielectric states were experimentally investigated using the home-built test and measurement system. Results showed that for SiO2 layers the current sustained at 2-3 nA during most of the pre-breakdown period, and then rose rapidly to 10-30 nA just before breakdown due to field electron emission, followed by the breakdown. The breakdown voltage curves demonstrated three stages: (1) a constantly decreasing region (the gap width d < 5 μm), where the field emission effect played an important role just near breakdown, supplying enough initial electrons for the breakdown process; (2) a plateau region with a near constant breakdown potential (5 μm < d < 10 μm) (3) a region for large gaps that adhered to Paschen's curve (d > 10 μm). And the surface dielectric states including the surface resistivity and secondary electron yield were verified to be related to the propagation of discharge due to the interaction between initial electrons and dielectrics.

  10. 7 CFR 51.1009 - Stylar end breakdown.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Stylar end breakdown. 51.1009 Section 51.1009... STANDARDS) United States Standards for Persian (Tahiti) Limes Definitions § 51.1009 Stylar end breakdown... affected area becomes darker and usually sinks below the healthy surface, but the area remains firm...

  11. Intrinsic laser-induced breakdown of silicate glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glebov, Leonid B.

    2002-03-01

    This paper is a survey of experimental results in laser- induced damage observed mainly at State Optical Institute (St. Petersburg, Russia; at School of Optics/CREOL (Orlando, FL) which expounds conditions of observation of an intrinsic breakdown of high-purity silicate glasses and proposes the general idea of its mechanism. It is shown that the surface laser-induced breakdown of dielectrics is resulted from photo- and thermo-ionization of surface defects but not from interaction of laser radiation with dielectric material itself. Conditions of thermal ionization of the volume of dielectric materials are determined in dependence on features of absorption of material and temporal features of laser radiation. Statistical properties of laser-induced breakdown of high-purity glasses are caused by statistical properties of laser radiation while the breakdown itself is a deterministic process. Elimination of impact of self-focusing on the results of the breakdown threshold measurements is observed if the spot size of laser radiation in focal plane is less than the wavelength. No photoionization of glass matrix is detected before laser- induced breakdown, and there is no effect of photoionization of impurities and defects on intrinsic breakdown. A mechanism of intrinsic laser-induced breakdown is proposed which is a spasmodic transformation of the electronic level structure in a wide-bandgap dielectric caused by the electric field of laser radiation. This is a collective process converting a transparent material to the opaque state but not an individual process of any type of ionization.

  12. Envelope instability and the fourth order resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chao; Zhao, Ya Liang

    2014-12-01

    The well-known envelope instability or the second order even collective mode [I. Hofmann, Phys. Rev. E 57, 4 (1998)] and the fourth order resonance 4 σ =360 ° due to the nonlinear space charge effect in high intensity beams have been studied previously. A wide stop band around 15° is found in a pure periodic focusing channel. In addition, it is illustrated that the fourth order resonance dominates over the envelope instability and practically replaces it in the stop band [D. Jeon et al., Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams 12, 054204 (2009)]. In this paper, for a continuous beam with remarkable space charge, our 2D self-consistent particle-in-cell simulation work with the code topopic shows these two kinds of effects respectively in a periodic focusing defocusing (FD) channel. For a fixed tune depression η =0.8 , a stop band with a width of almost 15° is also demonstrated. Moreover, it is confirmed that analytical results of the rms envelope instability diagram are a valid tool to interpret the width of the stop band. Emittance growth rates in stop band are also well explained. It is found that, for a nearly rms matched beam, the emittance growth in the stop band is almost proportional to the saturation time of the nonlinear instability of the envelope, which happens in a quick manner and takes only a few FD cells. In contrast, the fourth order resonance is independent of rms matching and will be accompanied by beam evolution as "a long term effect" once the related mechanism is excited.

  13. The cell envelope glycoconjugates of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Angala, Shiva Kumar; Belardinelli, Juan Manuel; Huc-Claustre, Emilie; Wheat, William H.; Jackson, Mary

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) remains the second most common cause of death due to a single infectious agent. The cell envelope of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), the causative agent of the disease in humans, is a source of unique glycoconjugates and the most distinctive feature of the biology of this organism. It is the basis of much of Mtb pathogenesis and one of the major causes of its intrinsic resistance to chemotherapeutic agents. At the same time, the unique structures of Mtb cell envelope glycoconjugates, their antigenicity and essentiality for mycobacterial growth provide opportunities for drug, vaccine, diagnostic and biomarker development, as clearly illustrated by recent advances in all of these translational aspects. This review focuses on our current understanding of the structure and biogenesis of Mtb glycoconjugates with particular emphasis on one of most intriguing and least understood aspect of the physiology of mycobacteria: the translocation of these complex macromolecules across the different layers of the cell envelope. It further reviews the rather impressive progress made in the last ten years in the discovery and development of novel inhibitors targeting their biogenesis. PMID:24915502

  14. Nuclear instrumentation cable end seal

    DOEpatents

    Cannon, Collins P.; Brown, Donald P.

    1979-01-01

    An improved coaxial end seal for hermetically sealed nuclear instrumentation cable exhibiting an improved breakdown pulse noise characteristic under high voltage, high temperature conditions. A tubular insulator body has metallized interior and exterior surface portions which are braze sealed to a center conductor and an outer conductive sheath. The end surface of the insulator body which is directed toward the coaxial cable to which it is sealed has a recessed surface portion within which the braze seal material terminates.

  15. Investigation of breakdown in porous ceramics initiated by nanosecond pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Punanov, I. F.; Emlin, R. V.; Morozov, P. A.; Cholakh, S. O.

    2012-07-01

    Breakdown delay times are measured and velocities of forming a conductive channel in aluminum oxide based porous ceramic materials impregnated with transformer oil are determined for pulsed electrical breakdown initiated by nanosecond pulses at a voltage of 140 kV. The breakdown delay times are also measured in monolithic aluminum oxide ceramics and leuco-sapphire single crystals. It is demonstrated that in porous ceramics, the average velocity of breakdown channel propagation decreases with increasing volume of the sample occupied by the liquid dielectric in comparison with single crystal and monolythic ceramics; it makes 50% of the velocity of breakdown channel propagation in leuco-sapphire and exceeds 3 times the corresponding value in transformer oil measured at the same voltage and pulse duration.

  16. On the electric breakdown in liquid argon at centimeter scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auger, M.; Blatter, A.; Ereditato, A.; Goeldi, D.; Janos, S.; Kreslo, I.; Luethi, M.; von Rohr, C. Rudolf; Strauss, T.; Weber, M. S.

    2016-03-01

    We present a study on the dependence of electric breakdown discharge properties on electrode geometry and the breakdown field in liquid argon near its boiling point. The measurements were performed with a spherical cathode and a planar anode at distances ranging from 0.1 mm to 10.0 mm. A detailed study of the time evolution of the breakdown volt-ampere characteristics was performed for the first time. It revealed a slow streamer development phase in the discharge. The results of a spectroscopic study of the visible light emission of the breakdowns complement the measurements. The light emission from the initial phase of the discharge is attributed to electro-luminescence of liquid argon following a current of drifting electrons. These results contribute to set benchmarks for breakdown-safe design of ionization detectors, such as Liquid Argon Time Projection Chambers (LAr TPC).

  17. Determining the mode of high voltage breakdowns in vacuum devices

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, H.C.; Furno, E.J.; Sturtz, J.P.

    1980-08-11

    Devices were constructed which were essentially vacuum diodes equipped with windows allowing observation of high voltage breakdowns. The waveform of the applied voltage was photographed, and the x-ray output was monitored to investigate electrical breakdown in these vacuum diodes. Results indicate that breakdowns may be divided into two types: (1) vacuum (interelectrode) breakdown - characterized by a diffuse moderately bright discharge, a relative slow and smooth voltage collapse, and a large burst of x-rays, and (2) surface (insulator) flashover - characterized by a bright discharge with a very bright filamentary core, a relatively fast and noisy voltage collapse and no x-ray burst. Useful information concerning the type of breakdown in a vacuum device can be obtained by monitoring the voltage (current) waveform and the x-ray output.

  18. Breakdown voltage of metal-oxide resistors in liquid argon

    SciTech Connect

    Bagby, L. F.; Gollapinni, S.; James, C. C.; Jones, B. J.P.; Jostlein, H.; Lockwitz, S.; Naples, D.; Raaf, J. L.; Rameika, R.; Schukraft, A.; Strauss, T.; Weber, M. S.; Wolbers, S. A.

    2014-11-07

    We characterized a sample of metal-oxide resistors and measured their breakdown voltage in liquid argon by applying high voltage (HV) pulses over a 3 second period. This test mimics the situation in a HV-divider chain when a breakdown occurs and the voltage across resistors rapidly rise from the static value to much higher values. All resistors had higher breakdown voltages in liquid argon than their vendor ratings in air at room temperature. Failure modes range from full destruction to coating damage. In cases where breakdown was not catastrophic, subsequent breakdown voltages were lower in subsequent measuring runs. One resistor type withstands 131 kV pulses, the limit of the test setup.

  19. Development of Hybrid Product Breakdown Structure for NASA Ground Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monaghan, Mark W.; Henry, Robert J.

    2013-01-01

    The Product Breakdown Structure is traditionally a method of identification of the products of a project in a tree structure. It is a tool used to assess, plan, document, and display the equipment requirements for a project. It is part of a product based planning technique, and attempts to break down all components of a project in as much detail as possible, so that nothing is overlooked. The PBS for ground systems at the Kennedy Space Center is being developed to encompass the traditional requirements including the alignment of facility, systems, and components to the organizational hierarchy. The Ground Operations Product Breakdown Structure is a hybrid in nature in that some aspects of a work breakdown structure will be incorporated and merged with the Architecture Concept of Operations, Master Subsystem List, customer interface, and assigned management responsibility. The Ground Operations Product Breakdown Structure needs to be able to identify the flexibility of support differing customers (internal and external) usage of ground support equipment within the Kennedy Space Center launch and processing complex. The development of the Product Breakdown Structure is an iterative activity Initially documenting the organization hierarchy structure and relationships. The Product Breakdown Structure identifies the linkage between the customer program requirements, allocation of system resources, development of design goals, and identification logistics products. As the Product Breakdown Structure progresses the incorporation of the results of requirement planning for the customer occurs identifying facility needs and systems. The mature Product Breakdown Structure is baselined with a hierarchical drawing, the Product Breakdown Structure database, and an associated document identifying the verification of the data through the life cycle of the program/product line. This paper will document, demonstrate, and identify key aspects of the life cycle of a Hybrid Product

  20. Multiscale envelope manifold for enhanced fault diagnosis of rotating machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jun; He, Qingbo; Kong, Fanrang

    2015-02-01

    The wavelet transform has been widely used in the field of machinery fault diagnosis for its good property of band-pass filtering. However, the filtered signal still faces the contamination of in-band noise. This paper focuses on wavelet enveloping, and proposes a new method, called multiscale envelope manifold (MEM), to extract the envelope information of fault impacts with in-band noise suppression. The MEM addresses manifold learning on the wavelet envelopes at multiple scales. Specifically, the proposed method is conducted by three following steps. First, the continuous wavelet transform (CWT) with complex Morlet wavelet base is introduced to obtain the wavelet envelopes at all scales. Second, the wavelet envelopes are restricted in one or more narrow scale bands to simply include the envelope information of fault impacts. The scale band is determined through a smoothness index-based (SI-based) selection method by considering the impulsiveness inside the power spectrum. Third, the manifold learning algorithm is conducted on the wavelet envelopes at selected scales to extract the intrinsic envelope manifold of fault-related impulses. The MEM combines the envelope information at multiple scales in a nonlinear approach, and may thus preserve the factual envelope structure of machinery fault. Simulation studies and experimental verifications confirm that the new method is effective for enhanced fault diagnosis of rotating machines.

  1. Structural Basis of Vesicle Formation at the Inner Nuclear Membrane.

    PubMed

    Hagen, Christoph; Dent, Kyle C; Zeev-Ben-Mordehai, Tzviya; Grange, Michael; Bosse, Jens B; Whittle, Cathy; Klupp, Barbara G; Siebert, C Alistair; Vasishtan, Daven; Bäuerlein, Felix J B; Cheleski, Juliana; Werner, Stephan; Guttmann, Peter; Rehbein, Stefan; Henzler, Katja; Demmerle, Justin; Adler, Barbara; Koszinowski, Ulrich; Schermelleh, Lothar; Schneider, Gerd; Enquist, Lynn W; Plitzko, Jürgen M; Mettenleiter, Thomas C; Grünewald, Kay

    2015-12-17

    Vesicular nucleo-cytoplasmic transport is becoming recognized as a general cellular mechanism for translocation of large cargoes across the nuclear envelope. Cargo is recruited, enveloped at the inner nuclear membrane (INM), and delivered by membrane fusion at the outer nuclear membrane. To understand the structural underpinning for this trafficking, we investigated nuclear egress of progeny herpesvirus capsids where capsid envelopment is mediated by two viral proteins, forming the nuclear egress complex (NEC). Using a multi-modal imaging approach, we visualized the NEC in situ forming coated vesicles of defined size. Cellular electron cryo-tomography revealed a protein layer showing two distinct hexagonal lattices at its membrane-proximal and membrane-distant faces, respectively. NEC coat architecture was determined by combining this information with integrative modeling using small-angle X-ray scattering data. The molecular arrangement of the NEC establishes the basic mechanism for budding and scission of tailored vesicles at the INM.

  2. Structural Basis of Vesicle Formation at the Inner Nuclear Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Hagen, Christoph; Dent, Kyle C.; Zeev-Ben-Mordehai, Tzviya; Grange, Michael; Bosse, Jens B.; Whittle, Cathy; Klupp, Barbara G.; Siebert, C. Alistair; Vasishtan, Daven; Bäuerlein, Felix J.B.; Cheleski, Juliana; Werner, Stephan; Guttmann, Peter; Rehbein, Stefan; Henzler, Katja; Demmerle, Justin; Adler, Barbara; Koszinowski, Ulrich; Schermelleh, Lothar; Schneider, Gerd; Enquist, Lynn W.; Plitzko, Jürgen M.; Mettenleiter, Thomas C.; Grünewald, Kay

    2015-01-01

    Summary Vesicular nucleo-cytoplasmic transport is becoming recognized as a general cellular mechanism for translocation of large cargoes across the nuclear envelope. Cargo is recruited, enveloped at the inner nuclear membrane (INM), and delivered by membrane fusion at the outer nuclear membrane. To understand the structural underpinning for this trafficking, we investigated nuclear egress of progeny herpesvirus capsids where capsid envelopment is mediated by two viral proteins, forming the nuclear egress complex (NEC). Using a multi-modal imaging approach, we visualized the NEC in situ forming coated vesicles of defined size. Cellular electron cryo-tomography revealed a protein layer showing two distinct hexagonal lattices at its membrane-proximal and membrane-distant faces, respectively. NEC coat architecture was determined by combining this information with integrative modeling using small-angle X-ray scattering data. The molecular arrangement of the NEC establishes the basic mechanism for budding and scission of tailored vesicles at the INM. PMID:26687357

  3. Antiviral Activity of Graphene–Silver Nanocomposites against Non-Enveloped and Enveloped Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yi-Ning; Hsueh, Yi-Huang; Hsieh, Chien-Te; Tzou, Dong-Ying; Chang, Pai-Ling

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of novel antiviral materials is important because many infectious diseases are caused by viruses. Silver nanoparticles have demonstrated strong antiviral activity, and graphene is a potential antimicrobial material due to its large surface area, high carrier mobility, and biocompatibility. No studies on the antiviral activity of nanomaterials on non-enveloped viruses have been reported. To investigate the antiviral activity of graphene oxide (GO) sheets and GO sheets with silver particles (GO-Ag) against enveloped and non-enveloped viruses, feline coronavirus (FCoV) with an envelope and infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) without an envelope were chosen. The morphology and sizes of GO and GO-Ag were characterized by transmission, scanning electron microscopy, and X-ray diffraction. A virus inhibition assay was used to identify the antiviral activity of GO and GO-Ag. Go-Ag inhibited 25% of infection by FCoV and 23% by IBDV, whereas GO only inhibited 16% of infection by FCoV but showed no antiviral activity against the infection by IBDV. Further application of GO and GO-Ag can be considered for personal protection equipment to decrease the transmission of viruses. PMID:27104546

  4. Nuclear compartmentalization is abolished during fission yeast meiosis.

    PubMed

    Arai, Kunio; Sato, Masamitsu; Tanaka, Kayoko; Yamamoto, Masayuki

    2010-11-09

    In eukaryotic cells, the nuclear envelope partitions the nucleus from the cytoplasm. The fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe undergoes closed mitosis in which the nuclear envelope persists rather than being broken down, as in higher eukaryotic cells. It is therefore assumed that nucleocytoplasmic transport continues during the cell cycle. Here we show that nuclear transport is, in fact, abolished specifically during anaphase of the second meiotic nuclear division. During that time, both nucleoplasmic and cytoplasmic proteins disperse throughout the cell, reminiscent of the open mitosis of higher eukaryotes, but the architecture of the S. pombe nuclear envelope itself persists. This functional alteration of the nucleocytoplasmic barrier is likely induced by spore wall formation, because ectopic induction of sporulation signaling leads to premature dispersion of nucleoplasmic proteins. A photobleaching assay demonstrated that nuclear envelope permeability increases abruptly at the onset of anaphase of the second meiotic division. The permeability was not altered when sporulation was inhibited by blocking the trafficking of forespore-membrane vesicles from the endoplasmic reticulum to the Golgi. The evidence indicates that yeast gametogenesis produces vesicle transport-mediated forespore membranes by inducing nuclear envelope permeabilization.

  5. Regulation of nuclear pore complex conformation by IP(3) receptor activation.

    PubMed Central

    Moore-Nichols, David; Arnott, Anne; Dunn, Robert C

    2002-01-01

    In recent years, both the molecular architecture and functional dynamics of nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) have been revealed with increasing detail. These large, supramolecular assemblages of proteins form channels that span the nuclear envelope of cells, acting as crucial regulators of nuclear import and export. From the cytoplasmic face of the nuclear envelope, nuclear pore complexes exhibit an eightfold symmetric ring structure encompassing a central lumen. The lumen often appears occupied by an additional structure alternatively referred to as the central granule, nuclear transport complex, or nuclear plug. Previous studies have suggested that the central granule may play a role in mediating calcium-dependent regulation of diffusion across the nuclear envelope for intermediate sized molecules (10-40 kDa). Using atomic force microscopy to measure the surface topography of chemically fixed Xenopus laevis oocyte nuclear envelopes, we present measurements of the relative position of the central granule within the NPC lumen under a variety of conditions known to modify nuclear Ca(2+) stores. These measurements reveal a large, approximately 9-nm displacement of the central granule toward the cytoplasmic face of the nuclear envelope under calcium depleting conditions. Additionally, activation of nuclear inositol triphosphate (IP(3)) receptors by the specific agonist, adenophostin A, results in a concentration-dependent displacement of central granule position with an EC(50) of ~1.2 nM. The displacement of the central granule within the NPC is observed on both the cytoplasmic and nucleoplasmic faces of the nuclear envelope. The displacement is blocked upon treatment with xestospongin C, a specific inhibitor of IP(3) receptor activation. These results extend previous models of NPC conformational dynamics linking central granule position to depletion of IP(3) sensitive nuclear envelope calcium stores. PMID:12202368

  6. Targeting and biogenesis of transporters and channels in chloroplast envelope membranes: Unsolved questions.

    PubMed

    Oh, Young Jun; Hwang, Inhwan

    2015-07-01

    Chloroplasts produce carbohydrates, hormones, vitamins, amino acids, pigments, nucleotides, ATP, and secondary metabolites. Channels and transporters are required for the movement of molecules across the two chloroplast envelope membranes. These transporters and channel proteins are grouped into two different types, including β-barrel proteins and transmembrane-domain (TMD) containing proteins. Most β-barrel proteins are localized at the outer chloroplast membrane, and TMD-containing proteins are localized at the inner chloroplast membrane. Many of these transporters and channels are encoded by nuclear genes; therefore, they have to be imported into chloroplasts after translation on cytosolic ribosomes. These proteins should have specific targeting signals for their final destination in the chloroplast membrane and for assembly into specific complexes. In this review, we summarize recent progress in the identification, functional characterization, and biogenesis of transporters and channels at the chloroplast envelope membranes, and discuss outstanding questions regarding transporter and channel protein biogenesis.

  7. Gas Temperature Effects on Electrical Breakdown in Cylindrical Electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uhm, Han; Jung, She

    2002-11-01

    One of the most important applications of atmospheric pressure plasma is in the corona discharge system, for the potential reduction of NOx and SOx gas emissions from diesel engines. However, the conventional corona discharge system for the emission control application requires a high electrical voltage (typically 45 kV or higher), making its high voltage modulator heavy and bulky with insulating material. We, therefore, investigate the influence of the gas temperature on the electrical breakdown properties in the cylindrical electrode system. A theoretical model of the electrical breakdown in a cylindrical electrode system is briefly summarized, by making use of Paschen¡¯s law. The breakdown voltage increases, reaches its peak and decreases, as the aspect ratio a/b increases from 0.01 to unity, where a and b are radii of the inner and outer electrodes, respectively. The experimental data agree remarkably well with the theoretical predictions. The breakdown voltage V in a high gas temperature Tg is given by V = (Tr/Tg)V0, where V0 is the breakdown voltage at the room temperature Tr. Obviously, the breakdown voltage decreases as the gas temperature Tg increases. The experimental data agree well with the theoretical values. It is, therefore, concluded that the breakdown voltage is inversely proportional to the gas temperature Tg as predicted from the theoretical analysis.

  8. Have NEC Coat, Will Travel: Structural Basis of Membrane Budding During Nuclear Egress in Herpesviruses.

    PubMed

    Bigalke, J M; Heldwein, E E

    2017-01-01

    Herpesviruses are unusual among enveloped viruses because they bud twice yet acquire a single envelope. Furthermore, unlike other DNA viruses that replicate in the nucleus, herpesviruses do not exit it by passing through the nuclear pores or by rupturing the nuclear envelope. Instead, herpesviruses have a complex mechanism of nuclear escape whereby nascent capsids bud at the inner nuclear membrane to form perinuclear virions that subsequently fuse with the outer nuclear membrane, releasing capsids into the cytosol. This makes them some of the very few known viruses that bud into the nuclear envelope. The envelope acquired during nuclear budding does not end up in the mature viral particle but instead allows the capsid to translocate from the nucleus into the cytosol. The viral nuclear egress complex (NEC) is a critical player in the nuclear egress, yet its function and mechanism have remained enigmatic. Recent studies have demonstrated that the NEC buds membranes without the help of other proteins by forming a honeycomb coat, which established the NEC as the first virally encoded budding machine that operates at the nuclear, as opposed to cytoplasmic, membrane. This review discusses our current understanding of the NEC budding mechanism, with the emphasis on studies that illuminated the structure of the NEC coat and its role in capsid budding during herpesvirus nuclear escape.

  9. Have NEC Coat, Will Travel: Structural Basis of Membrane Budding During Nuclear Egress in Herpesviruses

    PubMed Central

    Bigalke, J.M.; Heldwein, E.E.

    2017-01-01

    Herpesviruses are unusual among enveloped viruses because they bud twice yet acquire a single envelope. Furthermore, unlike other DNA viruses that replicate in the nucleus, herpesviruses do not exit it by passing through the nuclear pores or by rupturing the nuclear envelope. Instead, herpesviruses have a complex mechanism of nuclear escape whereby nascent capsids bud at the inner nuclear membrane to form perinuclear virions that subsequently fuse with the outer nuclear membrane, releasing capsids into the cytosol. This makes them some of the very few known viruses that bud into the nuclear envelope. The envelope acquired during nuclear budding does not end up in the mature viral particle but instead allows the capsid to translocate from the nucleus into the cytosol. The viral nuclear egress complex (NEC) is a critical player in the nuclear egress, yet its function and mechanism have remained enigmatic. Recent studies have demonstrated that the NEC buds membranes without the help of other proteins by forming a honeycomb coat, which established the NEC as the first virally encoded budding machine that operates at the nuclear, as opposed to cytoplasmic, membrane. This review discusses our current understanding of the NEC budding mechanism, with the emphasis on studies that illuminated the structure of the NEC coat and its role in capsid budding during herpesvirus nuclear escape. PMID:28057257

  10. Modeling pollutant penetration across building envelopes

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, De-Ling; Nazaroff, William W.

    2001-04-01

    As air infiltrates through unintentional openings in building envelopes, pollutants may interact with adjacent surfaces. Such interactions can alter human exposure to air pollutants of outdoor origin. We present modeling explorations of the proportion of particles and reactive gases (e.g., ozone) that penetrate building envelopes as air enters through cracks and wall cavities. Calculations were performed for idealized rectangular cracks, assuming regular geometry, smooth inner crack surface and steady airflow. Particles of 0.1-1.0 {micro}m diameter are predicted to have the highest penetration efficiency, nearly unity for crack heights of 0.25 mm or larger, assuming a pressure difference of 4 Pa or greater and a flow path length of 3 cm or less. Supermicron and ultrafine particles are significantly removed by means of gravitational settling and Brownian diffusion, respectively. In addition to crack geometry, ozone penetration depends on its reactivity with crack surfaces, as parameterized by the reaction probability. For reaction probabilities less than {approx}10{sup -5}, penetration is complete for cracks heights greater than 1 mm. However, penetration through mm scale cracks is small if the reaction probability is {approx}10{sup -4} or greater. For wall cavities, fiberglass insulation is an efficient particle filter, but particles would penetrate efficiently through uninsulated wall cavities or through insulated cavities with significant airflow bypass. The ozone reaction probability on fiberglass fibers was measured to be 10{sup -7} for fibers previously exposed to high ozone levels and 6 x 10{sup -6} for unexposed fibers. Over this range, ozone penetration through fiberglass insulation would vary from >90% to {approx}10-40%. Thus, under many conditions penetration is high; however, there are realistic circumstances in which building envelopes can provide substantial pollutant removal. Not enough is yet known about the detailed nature of pollutant penetration

  11. Effects of macromolecular crowding on nuclear size.

    PubMed

    Rosania, G R; Swanson, J A

    1995-05-01

    The concentration of macromolecules inside cells is high, and the resultant crowding of cytoplasm can be expected to affect many interactions involving macromolecular assemblies. Here, we have examined the effect of solute size and concentration on nuclear volume in saponin-permeabilized macrophages. Nuclei swelled in the presence of small solutes and shrank reversibly in the presence of larger permeant solutes. Remarkably, the smallest solutes capable of shrinking the nucleus were not excluded by the pores in the nuclear envelope. Indeed, nuclei shrank in the presence of such solutes even after the nuclear envelope had been sheared mechanically or permeabilized with detergent. Nuclei extracted with 1% Triton X-100 shrank in the presence of very high concentrations of small solute molecules (30% w/v) as well as in lower concentrations of larger solutes. Consistent with a macromolecular crowding effect, changes in nuclear volume were dependent on solute size and not simply dependent on the colligative properties of solutes or the exclusion of solutes by the nuclear envelope. Solute size-dependent changes in nuclear volume were independent of the chemical nature of the solutes and of the activity of the ions in the buffer. Together, these observations indicate that high concentrations of macromolecules such as those found inside cells can influence the size of the nucleus by directly affecting nuclear structure.

  12. Reverse Bias Second Breakdown in Power Switching Transistors.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-05-01

    AD-All0 145 REVERSE BIAS SECOND BREAKDOWN IN POWER SWITCHING TRANSISTORSU) TEXAS TECH UNIV LUBBOCK W M PORTNOY MAY 83 AFWL-TR-82-139 F29601-81-K-0037...139 AFWL-TR-2 82-139 ADA1 O1 5 REVERSE BIAS SECOND BREAKDOWN IN POWER SWITCHING TRANSISTORS W. M. Portnoy Texas Tech University Lubbock, Texas 79409...BREAKDOWN IN POWER SWITCHING Final Report TRANSISTORS 6. PERFORMING ORG. REPORT NUMBER 7. AUTHOR(s) a. CONTRACT OR GRANT NUMBER(s) W. M. Portnoy F29601

  13. The protein translocon of the plastid envelopes.

    PubMed

    Vojta, Aleksandar; Alavi, Marcel; Becker, Thomas; Hörmann, Friederike; Küchler, Michael; Soll, Jürgen; Thomson, Rowena; Schleiff, Enrico

    2004-05-14

    The Toc and Tic translocon facilitate import of preproteins into chloroplasts. In the past, it was speculated that several translocon subunits act specifically for different types of precursor proteins or in different tissues. To generate a comprehensive picture of the expression and tissue-specific localization of the translocon subunits, their transcript levels were analyzed in roots and leaves. Certain Tocs and Tics were found to be tissue-specific. The protein composition of the transloci in the envelope membranes of chloroplasts was analyzed to describe the function and possible stoichiometry. In contrast to Tic subunits, several Toc subunits seem to have a high turnover.

  14. Surface area coefficients for airship envelopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diehl, W S

    1922-01-01

    In naval architecture, it is customary to determine the wetted surface of a ship by means of some formula which involves the principal dimensions of the design and suitable constants. These formulas of naval architecture may be extended and applied to the calculation of the surface area of airship envelopes by the use of new values of the constants determined for this purpose. Surface area coefficients were calculated from the actual dimensions, surfaces, and volumes of 52 streamline bodies, which form a series covering the entire range of shapes used in the present aeronautical practice.

  15. Low heat-leak cryogenic envelope

    DOEpatents

    DeHaan, James R.

    1976-10-19

    A plurality of cryogenic envelope sections are joined together to form a power transmission line. Each of the sections is comprised of inner and outer tubes having multilayer metalized plastic spirally wrapped within a vacuum chamber formed between the inner and outer tubes. A refrigeration tube traverses the vacuum chamber, but exits one section and enters another through thermal standoffs for reducing heat-leak from the outer tube to the refrigeration tube. The refrigeration tube passes through a spirally wrapped shield within each section's vacuum chamber in a manner so that the refrigeration tube is in close thermal contact with the shield, but is nevertheless slideable with respect thereto.

  16. Medical Applications of Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pathak, A. K.; Rai, N. K.; Singh, Ankita; Rai, A. K.; Rai, Pradeep K.; Rai, Pramod K.

    2014-11-01

    Sedentary lifestyle of human beings has resulted in various diseases and in turn we require a potential tool that can be used to address various issues related to human health. Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) is one such potential optical analytical tool that has become quite popular because of its distinctive features that include applicability to any type/phase of samples with almost no sample preparation. Several reports are available that discusses the capabilities of LIBS, suitable for various applications in different branches of science which cannot be addressed by traditional analytical methods but only few reports are available for the medical applications of LIBS. In the present work, LIBS has been implemented to understand the role of various elements in the formation of gallstones (formed under the empyema and mucocele state of gallbladder) samples along with patient history that were collected from Purvancal region of Uttar Pradesh, India. The occurrence statistics of gallstones under the present study reveal higher occurrence of gallstones in female patients. The gallstone occurrence was found more prevalent for those male patients who were having the habit of either tobacco chewing, smoking or drinking alcohols. This work further reports in-situ LIBS study of deciduous tooth and in-vivo LIBS study of human nail.

  17. Theoretical studies of breakdown in random media

    SciTech Connect

    Duxbury, P.M.

    1993-01-01

    Failure initiates in local regions of a material microstructure which are either especially weak, or which carry an especially large field. The size and location of these weak or hotspots'' depends on the microstructure, and is especially sensitive to microstructural disorder. Using model random microstructures, we have developed analytic and numerical tools to predict where failure initiates, its initiation field, and how it propagates from the initiation sites. We have found it useful to divide the failure process into a nucleation stage, in which damage occurs quite randomly throughout the material, a localisation stage, where a critical crack nucleates, and a catastrophic failure stage during which an unstable crack propagates through the material. Results are being compared with experiments on: Highly porous materials (porous glass, and porous gold); dielectric breakdown of metal loaded insulators (e.g. aluminum in poly-ethyelene) and; the critical current of superconductors containing cracks (Nb and Nb[sub 3]Ge). This report summarises our efforts in these areas.

  18. Investigation of electrical breakdown in vacuum

    SciTech Connect

    Elizondo, J.M.; Moeny, W.M.

    1991-07-11

    The program objectives are focused on increasing the voltage applied across an electron beam diode. Two objectives were pursued during the program. The first was to increase the total voltage applied to anelectron gun anode--cathode (A-K) structure by suppressing electron emission from regions other than the electron source. The second objective was to prevent surface flashover from the cathode surface due to fiber contamination from the carbon felt used to enhance electron emission from the source. The primary approach consisted of using a dielectric coating (or a surface treatment), to suppress undesired electron emission from non-emission areas of the cathode. In addition to the dielectric coating, the electrode surfaces were profiled to eliminate field enhancements in the transition areas. The program objectives were met by demonstrating 300 kv/cm fields across the gap during current conduction with no breakdown or surface flashover. This field value was obtained with electrodes coated with a dielectric polymer on the surfaces around the electron source (carbon felt) and with electrodes without the coating. Total pulse width duration was 300 nsec for electrodes with no emitter (carbon felt) and 100 nsec for electrodes with the emitter.

  19. Electrical Breakdown in a Martian Gas Mixture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buhler, C. R.; Calle, C. I.; Nelson, E.

    2003-01-01

    The high probability for dust interactions during Martian dust storms and dust devils combined with the cold, dry climate of Mars most likely result in airborne dust that is highly charged. On Earth, potential gradients up to 5 kV/m have been recorded and in some cases resulted in lightning. Although the Martian atmosphere is not conducive to lightning generation, it is widely believed that electrical discharge in the form of a corona occurs. In order to understand the breakdown of gases, Paschen measurements are taken which relate the minimum potential required to spark across a gap between two electrodes. The minimum potential is plotted versus the pressure-distance value for electrodes of a given geometry. For most gases, the potential decreases as the pressure decreases. For CO2, the minimum in the curve happens to be at Mars atmospheric pressures (5-7 mm Hg) for many distances and geometries. However, a very small amount (<0.1%) of mixing gases radically changes the curve, as noted by Leach. Here, we present the first experimental results of a Paschen curve for a Mars gas mixture compared with 100% pure CO2.

  20. Fire Whirls, Vortex Breakdown(?), and Blue Whirls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oran, Elaine; Xiao, Huahua; Gollner, Michael

    2016-11-01

    As we were investigating the efficiency of fire-whirl burning on water, we observed the usual transformation of a pool fire to a fire whirl, and then suddenly, we saw the fire undergo a third transition. A blue cup appeared around the base of the fire whirl, surrounding the yellow flame, the yellow flame receded into the cup and finally disappeared. What remained was a small, rapidly spinning blue flame that burned until the fuel on the water was consumed. The blue whirl was shaped like a spinning cup, closed at the bottom near the water surface, and spreading in radius moving upwards towards the rim. Above the blue cup lip, there was a purple cone-shaped mist. The fuel was usually n-heptane, but at one point it was crude oil, and still the blue whirl formed naturally. The height of the fire whirl on the laboratory pan was larger than a half meter, and this evolved into a blue whirl about 4-8 cm high. Occasionally the blue whirl would become "unstable" and revert to a transitional state of blue cup holding a yellow flame. When the blue whirl formed, turbulence seemed to disappear, and the flame became quiet. We will show videos of how this happened and discuss the evolution of the fire whirl to the blue whirl in vortex-breakdown concepts. This work was supported by and EAGER award from NSF and Minta Martin Endowment Funds in the Department of Aerospace Engineering at the University of Maryland.

  1. Rupture models with dynamically determined breakdown displacement

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Andrews, D.J.

    2004-01-01

    The critical breakdown displacement, Dc, in which friction drops to its sliding value, can be made dependent on event size by specifying friction to be a function of variables other than slip. Two such friction laws are examined here. The first is designed to achieve accuracy and smoothness in discrete numerical calculations. Consistent resolution throughout an evolving rupture is achieved by specifying friction as a function of elapsed time after peak stress is reached. Such a time-weakening model produces Dc and fracture energy proportional to the square root of distance rupture has propagated in the case of uniform stress drop. The second friction law is more physically motivated. Energy loss in a damage zone outside the slip zone has the effect of increasing Dc and limiting peak slip velocity (Andrews, 1976). This article demonstrates a converse effect, that artificially limiting slip velocity on a fault in an elastic medium has a toughening effect, increasing fracture energy and Dc proportionally to rupture propagation distance in the case of uniform stress drop. Both the time-weakening and the velocity-toughening models can be used in calculations with heterogeneous stress drop.

  2. Nuclear size control in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Neumann, Frank R; Nurse, Paul

    2007-11-19

    A long-standing biological question is how a eukaryotic cell controls the size of its nucleus. We report here that in fission yeast, nuclear size is proportional to cell size over a 35-fold range, and use mutants to show that a 16-fold change in nuclear DNA content does not influence the relative size of the nucleus. Multi-nucleated cells with unevenly distributed nuclei reveal that nuclei surrounded by a greater volume of cytoplasm grow more rapidly. During interphase of the cell cycle nuclear growth is proportional to cell growth, and during mitosis there is a rapid expansion of the nuclear envelope. When the nuclear/cell (N/C) volume ratio is increased by centrifugation or genetic manipulation, nuclear growth is arrested while the cell continues to grow; in contrast, low N/C ratios are rapidly corrected by nuclear growth. We propose that there is a general cellular control linking nuclear growth to cell size.

  3. Envelope as Climate Negotiator: Evaluating adaptive building envelope's capacity to moderate indoor climate and energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erickson, James

    Through manipulation of adaptable opportunities available within a given environment, individuals become active participants in managing personal comfort requirements, by exercising control over their comfort without the assistance of mechanical heating and cooling systems. Similarly, continuous manipulation of a building skin's form, insulation, porosity, and transmissivity qualities exerts control over the energy exchanged between indoor and outdoor environments. This research uses four adaptive response variables in a modified software algorithm to explore an adaptive building skin's potential in reacting to environmental stimuli with the purpose of minimizing energy use without sacrificing occupant comfort. Results illustrate that significant energy savings can be realized with adaptive envelopes over static building envelopes even under extreme summer and winter climate conditions; that the magnitude of these savings are dependent on climate and orientation; and that occupant thermal comfort can be improved consistently over comfort levels achieved by optimized static building envelopes. The resulting adaptive envelope's unique climate-specific behavior could inform designers in creating an intelligent kinetic aesthetic that helps facilitate adaptability and resiliency in architecture.

  4. On-Line Safe Flight Envelope Determination for Impaired Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lombaerts, Thomas; Schuet, Stefan; Acosta, Diana; Kaneshige, John

    2015-01-01

    The design and simulation of an on-line algorithm which estimates the safe maneuvering envelope of aircraft is discussed in this paper. The trim envelope is estimated using probabilistic methods and efficient high-fidelity model based computations of attainable equilibrium sets. From this trim envelope, a robust reachability analysis provides the maneuverability limitations of the aircraft through an optimal control formulation. Both envelope limits are presented to the flight crew on the primary flight display. In the results section, scenarios are considered where this adaptive algorithm is capable of computing online changes to the maneuvering envelope due to impairment. Furthermore, corresponding updates to display features on the primary flight display are provided to potentially inform the flight crew of safety critical envelope alterations caused by the impairment.

  5. Glycolate transporter of the pea chloroplast envelope

    SciTech Connect

    Howitz, K.T.

    1985-01-01

    The discovery of a glycolate transporter in the pea (Pisum sativum) chloroplast envelope is described. Several novel silicone oil centrifugation methods were developed to resolve the initial rate kinetics of (/sup 14/C)glycolate transport by isolated, intact pea chloroplasts. Chloroplast glycolate transport was found to be carrier mediated. Transport rates saturated with increasing glycolate concentration. N-Ethylmaleimide (NEM) pretreatment of chloroplasts inhibited transport, an inhibition prevented by glycolate. Glycolate distributed across the envelope in a way which equalized stromal and medium glycolic acid concentrations, limiting possible transport mechanisms to facilitated glycolic acid diffusion, proton symport or hydroxyl antiport. The effects of stomal and medium pH's on the K/sub m/ and V/sub max/ fit the predictions of mobile carrier kinetic models of hydroxyl antiport or proton symport (H/sup +/ binds first). The carrier mediated transport was fast enough to be consistent with in vivo rates of photorespiration. The 2-hydroxymonocarboxylates, glycerate, lactate and glyoxylate are competitive inhibitors of chloroplast glycolate uptake. Glyoxylate, D-lactate and D-glycerate cause glycolate counterflow, indicating that they are also substrates of the glycolate carrier. This finding was confirmed for D-glycerate by studies on glycolate effects on (1-/sup 14/C)D-glycerate transport.

  6. Envelope Modes of Beams with Angular Momentum

    SciTech Connect

    Barnard, J J; Losic, B

    2000-08-21

    For a particle beam propagating in an alternating gradient focusing system, envelope equations are often employed to describe the evolution of the beam radii in the two directions transverse to the direction of propagation, and aligned with the principle axes of the alternating gradient system. When the beams have zero net angular momentum and when the alternating gradient focusing is approximated by a continuous focusing system, there are two normal modes to the envelope equations: the 'breathing' mode and a 'quadrupole' mode. In the former, the two radii oscillate in phase, and in the latter the radii oscillate 180 degrees out of phase. In this paper, we extend the analysis to include beams that have a finite angular momentum. We perturb the moment equations of ref. [1], wherein it was assumed that space charge is a distributed in a uniform density ellipse. Two additional modes are obtained. The breathing mode remains, but the quadrupole mode is split into two modes, and a new low frequency mode appears. We calculate the frequencies and eigenmodes of these four modes as a function of tune depression and a dimensionless net angular momentum. These modes can be excited by rotational errors of the quadrupoles in an alternating gradient focusing channel.

  7. Precision envelope detector and linear rectifier circuitry

    DOEpatents

    Davis, Thomas J.

    1980-01-01

    Disclosed is a method and apparatus for the precise linear rectification and envelope detection of oscillatory signals. The signal is applied to a voltage-to-current converter which supplies current to a constant current sink. The connection between the converter and the sink is also applied through a diode and an output load resistor to a ground connection. The connection is also connected to ground through a second diode of opposite polarity from the diode in series with the load resistor. Very small amplitude voltage signals applied to the converter will cause a small change in the output current of the converter, and the difference between the output current and the constant current sink will be applied either directly to ground through the single diode, or across the output load resistor, dependent upon the polarity. Disclosed also is a full-wave rectifier utilizing constant current sinks and voltage-to-current converters. Additionally, disclosed is a combination of the voltage-to-current converters with differential integrated circuit preamplifiers to boost the initial signal amplitude, and with low pass filtering applied so as to obtain a video or signal envelope output.

  8. Functional organization of the HIV lipid envelope

    PubMed Central

    Huarte, Nerea; Carravilla, Pablo; Cruz, Antonio; Lorizate, Maier; Nieto-Garai, Jon A.; Kräusslich, Hans-Georg; Pérez-Gil, Jesús; Requejo-Isidro, Jose; Nieva, José L.

    2016-01-01

    The chemical composition of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) membrane is critical for fusion and entry into target cells, suggesting that preservation of a functional lipid bilayer organization may be required for efficient infection. HIV-1 acquires its envelope from the host cell plasma membrane at sites enriched in raft-type lipids. Furthermore, infectious particles display aminophospholipids on their surface, indicative of dissipation of the inter-leaflet lipid asymmetry metabolically generated at cellular membranes. By combining two-photon excited Laurdan fluorescence imaging and atomic force microscopy, we have obtained unprecedented insights into the phase state of membranes reconstituted from viral lipids (i.e., extracted from infectious HIV-1 particles), established the role played by the different specimens in the mixtures, and characterized the effects of membrane-active virucidal agents on membrane organization. In determining the molecular basis underlying lipid packing and lateral heterogeneity of the HIV-1 membrane, our results may help develop compounds with antiviral activity acting by perturbing the functional organization of the lipid envelope. PMID:27678107

  9. TRANSPARENT HELIUM IN STRIPPED ENVELOPE SUPERNOVAE

    SciTech Connect

    Piro, Anthony L.; Morozova, Viktoriya S.

    2014-09-01

    Using simple arguments based on photometric light curves and velocity evolution, we propose that some stripped envelope supernovae (SNe) show signs that a significant fraction of their helium is effectively transparent. The main pieces of evidence are the relatively low velocities with little velocity evolution, as are expected deep inside an exploding star, along with temperatures that are too low to ionize helium. This means that the helium should not contribute to the shaping of the main SN light curve, and thus the total helium mass may be difficult to measure from simple light curve modeling. Conversely, such modeling may be more useful for constraining the mass of the carbon/oxygen core of the SN progenitor. Other stripped envelope SNe show higher velocities and larger velocity gradients, which require an additional opacity source (perhaps the mixing of heavier elements or radioactive nickel) to prevent the helium from being transparent. We discuss ways in which similar analysis can provide insights into the differences and similarities between SNe Ib and Ic, which will lead to a better understanding of their respective formation mechanisms.

  10. Sensitivity to changes in amplitude envelope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallun, Erick; Hafter, Ervin R.; Bonnel, Anne-Marie

    2002-05-01

    Detection of a brief increment in a tonal pedestal is less well predicted by energy-detection (e.g., Macmillan, 1973; Bonnel and Hafter, 1997) than by sensitivity to changes in the stimulus envelope. As this implies a mechanism similar to an envelope extractor (Viemeister, 1979), sinusoidal amplitude modulation was used to mask a single ramped increment (10, 45, or 70 ms) added to a 1000-ms pedestal with carrier frequency (cf)=477 Hz. As in informational masking (Neff, 1994) and ``modulation-detection interference'' (Yost and Sheft, 1989), interference occurred with masker cfs of 477 and 2013 Hz. While slight masking was found with modulation frequencies (mfs) from 16 to 96 Hz, masking grew inversely with still lower mfs, being greatest for mf=4 Hz. This division is reminiscent of that said to separate sensations of ``roughness'' and ``beats,'' respectively (Terhardt, 1974), with the latter also being related to durations associated with auditory groupings in music and speech. Importantly, this result held for all of the signal durations and onset-offset ramps tested, suggesting that an increment on a pedestal is treated as a single auditory object whose detection is most difficult in the presence of other objects (in this case, ``beats'').

  11. Three-dimensional visualization of the Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus occlusion-derived virion envelopment process gives new clues as to its mechanism.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yang; Li, Kunpeng; Tang, Peiping; Li, Yinyin; Zhou, Qiang; Yang, Kai; Zhang, Qinfen

    2015-02-01

    Baculoviruses produce two virion phenotypes, occlusion-derived virion (ODV) and budded virion (BV). ODV envelopment occurs in the nucleus. Morphogenesis of the ODV has been studied extensively; however, the mechanisms underlying microvesicle formation and ODV envelopment in nuclei remain unclear. In this study, we used electron tomography (ET) together with the conventional electron microscopy to study the envelopment of Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) ODV. Our results demonstrate that not only the inner but also the outer nuclear membrane can invaginate and vesiculate into microvesicles and that intranuclear microvesicles are the direct source of the ODV membrane. Five main events in the ODV envelopment process are summarized, from which we propose a model to explain this process.

  12. Improved model for window breakdown at low pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, C.; Chen, H. B.; Liu, G. Z.; Zhu, X. X.; Fang, J. Y.

    2009-03-15

    An improved global model is proposed to analyze high power microwave dielectric window breakdown at low pressure. The effect of ionization on the average momentum and energy of electrons is taken into account and a Maxwellian electron energy distribution function is adopted. The plasma energy flow and density loss to dielectric, and partially secondary electrons returning plasma to compensate the density loss, have been analytically considered. Space charge potential drop and the generalized Bohm criterion are deduced analytically. After considering the energy and density loss as well as the secondary electron compensation, the breakdown time by using numerical calculation under low pressure gets shorter compared with that under no wall loss condition. In other words, the dielectric surface breakdown time is lower than plasma volume breakdown time.

  13. Electric field-free gas breakdown in explosively driven generators

    SciTech Connect

    Shkuratov, Sergey I.; Baird, Jason; Talantsev, Evgueni F.; Altgilbers, Larry L.

    2010-07-15

    All known types of gas discharges require an electric field to initiate them. We are reporting on a unique type of gas breakdown in explosively driven generators that does not require an electric field.

  14. Skin barrier breakdown: a renaissance in emollient therapy.

    PubMed

    Cork, Michael J; Danby, Simon

    Breakdown of the skin barrier is the first event in the development of atopic eczema (atopic dermatitis). Research over the past five years has indicated that this arises as a result of the interaction of environmental agents such as soap and other detergents with the products of changes in several genes. These genetic changes predispose to the breakdown of the skin barrier, which allows the penetration of allergens, triggering a flare of atopic eczema. This new understanding of how breakdown of the skin barrier is the first event in the development of atopic eczema provides a rationale for a renaissance in the use of a complete emollient therapy regimen in atopic eczema and related skin barrier breakdown diseases, such as asteatotic eczema and irritant contact dermatitis.

  15. Vortex breakdown in closed containers with polygonal cross sections

    SciTech Connect

    Naumov, I. V. Dvoynishnikov, S. V.; Kabardin, I. K.; Tsoy, M. A.

    2015-12-15

    The vortex breakdown bubble in the confined flow generated by a rotating lid in closed containers with polygonal cross sections was analysed both experimentally and numerically for the height/radius aspect ratio equal to 2. The stagnation point locations of the breakdown bubble emergence and the corresponding Reynolds number were determined experimentally and in addition computed numerically by STAR-CCM+ CFD software for square, pentagonal, hexagonal, and octagonal cross section configurations. The flow pattern and the velocity were observed and measured by combining the seeding particle visualization and the temporal accuracy of laser Doppler anemometry. The vortex breakdown size and position on the container axis were determined for Reynolds numbers, ranging from 1450 to 2400. The obtained results were compared with the flow structure in the closed container of cubical and cylindrical configurations. It is shown that the measured evolution of steady vortex breakdown is in close agreement with the numerical results.

  16. Nanosecond-gated laser induced breakdown spectroscopy in hydrocarbon mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Kazunobu; Bak, Moon Soo; Tanaka, Hiroki; Do, Hyungrok

    2015-09-01

    Nanosecond-gated laser induced breakdown spectroscopy have been carried out in four different hydrocarbon gas mixtures (CH4/CO2/O2/N2, C2H4/O2/N2, C3H8/CO2/O2/N2 and C4H10/CO2/O2/N2) to investigate the effect of gas species on the laser induced breakdown kinetics and resulting the plasma emission. For this purpose, each mixture that consists of different species has the same atom composition. It is found that the temporal emission spectra and the decay rates of atomic line-intensities are almost identical for the breakdowns in the four different mixtures. This finding may indicate that the breakdown plasmas of these mixtures reach a similar thermodynamic and physiochemical state after its formation, resulting in a similar trend of quenching of excited species.

  17. Nuclear condensation during mouse erythropoiesis requires caspase-3-mediated nuclear opening

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Baobing; Mei, Yang; Schipma, Matthew J; Roth, Eric Wayne; Bleher, Reiner; Rappoport, Joshua Z.; Wickrema, Amittha; Yang, Jing; Ji, Peng

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Mammalian erythropoiesis involves chromatin condensation that is initiated in the early stage of terminal differentiation. The mechanisms of chromatin condensation during erythropoiesis are unclear. Here, we show that the mouse erythroblast forms large, transient, and recurrent nuclear openings that coincide with the condensation process. The opening lacks nuclear lamina, nuclear pore complexes, and nuclear membrane, but it is distinct from nuclear envelope changes that occur during apoptosis and mitosis. A fraction of the major histones are released from the nuclear opening and degraded in the cytoplasm. We demonstrate that caspase-3 is required for the nuclear opening formation throughout terminal erythropoiesis. Loss of caspase-3 or ectopic expression of a caspase-3 non-cleavable lamin B mutant blocks nuclear opening formation, histone release, chromatin condensation, and terminal erythroid differentiation. We conclude that caspase-3-mediated nuclear opening formation accompanied by histone release from the opening is a critical step towards chromatin condensation during erythropoiesis in mice. PMID:26954545

  18. Nuclear Condensation during Mouse Erythropoiesis Requires Caspase-3-Mediated Nuclear Opening.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Baobing; Mei, Yang; Schipma, Matthew J; Roth, Eric Wayne; Bleher, Reiner; Rappoport, Joshua Z; Wickrema, Amittha; Yang, Jing; Ji, Peng

    2016-03-07

    Mammalian erythropoiesis involves chromatin condensation that is initiated in the early stage of terminal differentiation. The mechanisms of chromatin condensation during erythropoiesis are unclear. Here, we show that the mouse erythroblast forms large, transient, and recurrent nuclear openings that coincide with the condensation process. The opening lacks nuclear lamina, nuclear pore complexes, and nuclear membrane, but it is distinct from nuclear envelope changes that occur during apoptosis and mitosis. A fraction of the major histones are released from the nuclear opening and degraded in the cytoplasm. We demonstrate that caspase-3 is required for the nuclear opening formation throughout terminal erythropoiesis. Loss of caspase-3 or ectopic expression of a caspase-3 non-cleavable lamin B mutant blocks nuclear opening formation, histone release, chromatin condensation, and terminal erythroid differentiation. We conclude that caspase-3-mediated nuclear opening formation accompanied by histone release from the opening is a critical step toward chromatin condensation during erythropoiesis in mice.

  19. Laser-induced gas breakdown - Spectroscopic and chemical studies.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    De Montgolfier, PH.; Dumont, P.; Mille, Y.; Villermaux, J.

    1972-01-01

    Discussion of the results of several experimental investigations on laser-induced gas breakdown. The experiments included time-resolved spectroscopy, direct detection of H atoms with a TiO2 probe, and chemical reactions; each of them provided insight into the behavior of the medium at different times. Chemical reactions and explosions have been initiated by the laser beam when a plasma was created. No primary multiphotonic absorption and no macroscopic chemical reactions were observed below the breakdown threshold.

  20. Ionizing potential waves and high-voltage breakdown streamers.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albright, N. W.; Tidman, D. A.

    1972-01-01

    The structure of ionizing potential waves driven by a strong electric field in a dense gas is discussed. Negative breakdown waves are found to propagate with a velocity proportional to the electric field normal to the wavefront. This causes a curved ionizing potential wavefront to focus down into a filamentary structure, and may provide the reason why breakdown in dense gases propagates in the form of a narrow leader streamer instead of a broad wavefront.

  1. Effects of Excess Charge Density on Dielectric Breakdown in Solids

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-11-10

    insulator , and the associated light emission is ther- 1 11 2 mal in character. No new conduction mechansim has to be hypothesized in thermal breakdown...breakdown in solid insulators . In Chapter II, a short review of earlier experimental observations and theoretical work will be given as background...the sample. Local removal of the electrode material does not isolate this path because surface flashover from one electrode to the gaseous channel

  2. Nanopore formation by controlled electrical breakdown: Efficient molecular-sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdalla, S.; Al-Marzouki, F. M.; Abdel-Daiem, A. M.

    2016-08-01

    A controlled electrical breakdown is used to produce efficient nanopore (NP) sensors. This phenomenon can be used to precisely fabricate these nanopore (NP) sensors through the membranes of the polydimethylsiloxane microarrays. This can be carried out, when localizing the electrical potential through a suitable microfluidic channel. Organic molecules, and other different protein-molecules, can be easily and precisely detected using this procedure referred to as controlled electrical breakdown technique.

  3. Acoustics of laminar boundary layers breakdown

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Meng

    1994-01-01

    Boundary layer flow transition has long been suggested as a potential noise source in both marine (sonar-dome self noise) and aeronautical (aircraft cabin noise) applications, owing to the highly transient nature of process. The design of effective noise control strategies relies upon a clear understanding of the source mechanisms associated with the unsteady flow dynamics during transition. Due to formidable mathematical difficulties, theoretical predictions either are limited to early linear and weakly nonlinear stages of transition, or employ acoustic analogy theories based on approximate source field data, often in the form of empirical correlation. In the present work, an approach which combines direct numerical simulation of the source field with the Lighthill acoustic analogy is utilized. This approach takes advantage of the recent advancement in computational capabilities to obtain detailed information about the flow-induced acoustic sources. The transitional boundary layer flow is computed by solving the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations without model assumptions, thus allowing a direct evaluation of the pseudosound as well as source functions, including the Lighthill stress tensor and the wall shear stress. The latter are used for calculating the radiated pressure field based on the Curle-Powell solution of the Lighthill equation. This procedure allows a quantitative assessment of noise source mechanisms and the associated radiation characteristics during transition from primary instability up to the laminar breakdown stage. In particular, one is interested in comparing the roles played by the fluctuating volume Reynolds stress and the wall-shear-stresses, and in identifying specific flow processes and structures that are effective noise generators.

  4. AVLIS Production Plant work breakdown structure and Dictionary

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-11-15

    The work breakdown structure has been prepared for the AVLIS Production Plant to define, organize, and identify the work efforts and is summarized in Fig. 1-1 for the top three project levels. The work breakdown structure itself is intended to be the primary organizational tool of the AVLIS Production Plant and is consistent with the overall AVLIS Program Work Breakdown Structure. It is designed to provide a framework for definition and accounting of all of the elements that are required for the eventual design, procurement, and construction of the AVLIS Production Plant. During the present phase of the AVLIS Project, the conceptual engineering phase, the work breakdown structure is intended to be the master structure and project organizer of documents, designs, and cost estimates. As the master project organizer, the key role of the work breakdown structure is to provide the mechanism for developing completeness in AVLIS cost estimates and design development of all hardware and systems. The work breakdown structure provides the framework for tracking, on a one-to-one basis, the component design criteria, systems requirements, design concepts, design drawings, performance projections, and conceptual cost estimates. It also serves as a vehicle for contract reporting. 12 figures, 2 tables.

  5. Breakdown of atmospheric pressure microgaps at high excitation frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levko, Dmitry; Raja, Laxminarayan

    2015-09-01

    Microwave breakdown of atmospheric pressure microgaps was studied by a one-dimensional Particle-in-Cell Monte Carlo Collisions numerical model. The effect of both field electron emission and secondary electron emission (due to electron impact, ion impact, and primary electron reflection) from surfaces on the breakdown process is considered. For conditions where field emission is the dominant electron emission mechanism from the electrode surfaces, it is found that the breakdown voltage of mw microdischarge coincides with the breakdown voltage of direct-current microdischarge. When microdischarge properties are controlled by both field and secondary electron emission, breakdown voltage of mw microdischarge exceeds that of dc microdischarge. When microdischarge is controlled only by secondary electron emission, breakdown voltage of mw microdischarge is smaller than that of dc microdischarge. It is shown that if the interelectrode gap exceeds some critical value, mw microdischarge can be ignited only by electrons initially seeded within the gap volume. In addition, the influence of electron reflection and secondary emission due to electron impact is studied. This work was supported by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research.

  6. Breakdown of atmospheric pressure microgaps at high excitation frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levko, Dmitry; Raja, Laxminarayan L.

    2015-05-01

    Microwave (mw) breakdown of atmospheric pressure microgaps is studied by a one-dimensional Particle-in-Cell Monte Carlo Collisions numerical model. The effect of both field electron emission and secondary electron emission (due to electron impact, ion impact, and primary electron reflection) from surfaces on the breakdown process is considered. For conditions where field emission is the dominant electron emission mechanism from the electrode surfaces, it is found that the breakdown voltage of mw microdischarge coincides with the breakdown voltage of direct-current (dc) microdischarge. When microdischarge properties are controlled by both field and secondary electron emission, breakdown voltage of mw microdischarge exceeds that of dc microdischarge. When microdischarge is controlled only by secondary electron emission, breakdown voltage of mw microdischarge is smaller than that of dc microdischarge. It is shown that if the interelectrode gap exceeds some critical value, mw microdischarge can be ignited only by electrons initially seeded within the gap volume. In addition, the influence of electron reflection and secondary emission due to electron impact is studied.

  7. Breakdown of atmospheric pressure microgaps at high excitation frequencies

    SciTech Connect

    Levko, Dmitry; Raja, Laxminarayan L.

    2015-05-07

    Microwave (mw) breakdown of atmospheric pressure microgaps is studied by a one-dimensional Particle-in-Cell Monte Carlo Collisions numerical model. The effect of both field electron emission and secondary electron emission (due to electron impact, ion impact, and primary electron reflection) from surfaces on the breakdown process is considered. For conditions where field emission is the dominant electron emission mechanism from the electrode surfaces, it is found that the breakdown voltage of mw microdischarge coincides with the breakdown voltage of direct-current (dc) microdischarge. When microdischarge properties are controlled by both field and secondary electron emission, breakdown voltage of mw microdischarge exceeds that of dc microdischarge. When microdischarge is controlled only by secondary electron emission, breakdown voltage of mw microdischarge is smaller than that of dc microdischarge. It is shown that if the interelectrode gap exceeds some critical value, mw microdischarge can be ignited only by electrons initially seeded within the gap volume. In addition, the influence of electron reflection and secondary emission due to electron impact is studied.

  8. High-Power Microwave Breakdown of Dielectric Interfaces.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calico, Steve Eugene

    A project to study the electrical breakdown of microwave windows due to high-power pulsed microwave fields was undertaken at Texas Tech University. The pulsed power equipment was acquired from the Air Force Weapons Laboratory in Albuquerque, NM, refurbished and redesigned as necessary, and serves as the high-power microwave source. The microwaves are used to test various vacuum to atmosphere interfaces (windows) in an attempt to isolate the mechanisms governing the electrical breakdown at the window. Windows made of three different materials and of three basic geometrical designs were tested in this experiment. Additionally, the surfaces of two windows were sanded with different grit sandpapers to determine the effect the surface texture has on the breakdown. The windows were tested in atmospheric pressure air, argon, helium, and to a lesser extent sulfur-hexafluoride. Estimates of the breakdown threshold in air and argon on a Lexan window were obtained as a consequence of these tests and were found to be considerably lower than that reported for pulsed microwave breakdown in gases. A hypothesis is presented in an attempt to explain the lower breakdown phenomena. A discussion of the comparative performance of the windows and an explanation as to the enhanced performance of some windows is given.

  9. Layer-by-layer dielectric breakdown of hexagonal boron nitride.

    PubMed

    Hattori, Yoshiaki; Taniguchi, Takashi; Watanabe, Kenji; Nagashio, Kosuke

    2015-01-27

    Hexagonal boron nitride (BN) is widely used as a substrate and gate insulator for two-dimensional (2D) electronic devices. The studies on insulating properties and electrical reliability of BN itself, however, are quite limited. Here, we report a systematic investigation of the dielectric breakdown characteristics of BN using conductive atomic force microscopy. The electric field strength was found to be ∼ 12 MV/cm, which is comparable to that of conventional SiO2 oxides because of the covalent bonding nature of BN. After the hard dielectric breakdown, the BN fractured like a flower into equilateral triangle fragments. However, when the applied voltage was terminated precisely in the middle of the dielectric breakdown, the formation of a hole that did not penetrate to the bottom metal electrode was clearly observed. Subsequent I-V measurements of the hole indicated that the BN layer remaining in the hole was still electrically inactive. On the basis of these observations, layer-by-layer breakdown was confirmed for BN with regard to both physical fracture and electrical breakdown. Moreover, statistical analysis of the breakdown voltages using a Weibull plot suggested the anisotropic formation of defects. These results are unique to layered materials and unlike the behavior observed for conventional 3D amorphous oxides.

  10. Comparison of nuclear electric resonance and nuclear magnetic resonance in integer and fractional quantum Hall states

    SciTech Connect

    Tomimatsu, Toru Shirai, Shota; Hashimoto, Katsushi Sato, Ken; Hirayama, Yoshiro

    2015-08-15

    Electric-field-induced nuclear resonance (NER: nuclear electric resonance) involving quantum Hall states (QHSs) was studied at various filling factors by exploiting changes in nuclear spins polarized at quantum Hall breakdown. Distinct from the magnetic dipole interaction in nuclear magnetic resonance, the interaction of the electric-field gradient with the electric quadrupole moment plays the dominant role in the NER mechanism. The magnitude of the NER signal strongly depends on whether electronic states are localized or extended. This indicates that NER is sensitive to the screening capability of the electric field associated with QHSs.

  11. Epistasis underlying female sterility detected in hybrid breakdown in a Japonica-Indica cross of rice (Oryza sativa L.).

    PubMed

    Kubo, Takahiko; Yoshimura, Atsushi

    2005-01-01

    Epistasis is considered to be a primary genetic basis of hybrid breakdown. We found novel epistatic genes causing hybrid breakdown in an intraspecific cross of cultivated rice (Oryza sativa L.). F2 progeny derived from a cross between a Japonica variety, Asominori, and an Indica variety, IR24, showed segregation of high sterility for seeds, even though the reciprocal F1 hybrids showed about 60% seed fertility. Backcross populations (BC3F2, BC3F3), obtained from repeated backcrossing with Asominori, showed the segregation of causal genes in a simple Mendelian fashion. Using these populations, we identified that this sterility was hybrid breakdown caused by interaction among three nuclear genes distributed on the both parental genomes. These new genes, designated as hsa1, hsa2, and hsa3, were found to be involved in female gamete development by histological examination. The Indica parent IR24 has a sterile allele, hsa1-IR, which was located at near RFLP marker G148 on chromosome 12, whereas the Japonica parent Asominori has two sterile alleles, hsa2-As on chromosome 8 (close to G104) and hsa3-As on chromosome 9 (close to RM285). Female gametes carrying the hsa1-IR, hsa2-As, and hsa3-As alleles aborted in hsa1-IR homozygous plant, leading to seed sterility and selective elimination of the specific allelic combination. This study provides direct evidence that hybrid breakdown is attributed to epistatic interaction of genes from both parents and suggests that complicated mechanisms has been developed for hybrid breakdown during the evolution of rice.

  12. Defining the Core Proteome of the Chloroplast Envelope Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Simm, Stefan; Papasotiriou, Dimitrios G.; Ibrahim, Mohamed; Leisegang, Matthias S.; Müller, Bernd; Schorge, Tobias; Karas, Michael; Mirus, Oliver; Sommer, Maik S.; Schleiff, Enrico

    2013-01-01

    High-throughput protein localization studies require multiple strategies. Mass spectrometric analysis of defined cellular fractions is one of the complementary approaches to a diverse array of cell biological methods. In recent years, the protein content of different cellular (sub-)compartments was approached. Despite of all the efforts made, the analysis of membrane fractions remains difficult, in that the dissection of the proteomes of the envelope membranes of chloroplasts or mitochondria is often not reliable because sample purity is not always warranted. Moreover, proteomic studies are often restricted to single (model) species, and therefore limited in respect to differential individual evolution. In this study we analyzed the chloroplast envelope proteomes of different plant species, namely, the individual proteomes of inner and outer envelope (OE) membrane of Pisum sativum and the mixed envelope proteomes of Arabidopsis thaliana and Medicago sativa. The analysis of all three species yielded 341 identified proteins in total, 247 of them being unique. 39 proteins were genuine envelope proteins found in at least two species. Based on this and previous envelope studies we defined the core envelope proteome of chloroplasts. Comparing the general overlap of the available six independent studies (including ours) revealed only a number of 27 envelope proteins. Depending on the stringency of applied selection criteria we found 231 envelope proteins, while less stringent criteria increases this number to 649 putative envelope proteins. Based on the latter we provide a map of the outer and inner envelope core proteome, which includes many yet uncharacterized proteins predicted to be involved in transport, signaling, and response. Furthermore, a foundation for the functional characterization of yet unidentified functions of the inner and OE for further analyses is provided. PMID:23390424

  13. Experimental studies of breakdown characteristics in pulse-modulated radio-frequency atmospheric discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huo, W. G.; Zhang, X.; Gu, J. L.; Ding, Z. F.

    2016-12-01

    The influences of the pulse off-time on the breakdown voltage of the first pulse and the stable pulse discharge (having repeatedly undergone a process of ignition, maintenance, and extinction) are experimentally investigated in a pulse-modulated radio-frequency atmospheric pressure argon discharge. The experimental results show that the first pulse discharge breakdown voltage decreases, but the stable pulse discharge breakdown voltage increases with increasing the pulse off-time. In a large region of the pulse off-time, the luminescence property of the initial breakdown stage is studied using a high speed camera. The captured images at different pulse off-times demonstrate that the gas breakdown exhibits five key characteristics: single-point random breakdown, multi-point random breakdown, stable uniform breakdown, stable glow mixed with pattern breakdown, and stable nonuniform pattern breakdown. The physical reasons for these results are discussed.

  14. EWS-FLI1 impairs aryl hydrocarbon receptor activation by blocking tryptophan breakdown via the kynurenine pathway.

    PubMed

    Mutz, Cornelia N; Schwentner, Raphaela; Kauer, Maximilian O; Katschnig, Anna M; Kromp, Florian; Aryee, Dave N T; Erhardt, Sophie; Goiny, Michel; Alonso, Javier; Fuchs, Dietmar; Kovar, Heinrich

    2016-07-01

    Ewing sarcoma (ES) is an aggressive pediatric tumor driven by the fusion protein EWS-FLI1. We report that EWS-FLI1 suppresses TDO2-mediated tryptophan (TRP) breakdown in ES cells. Gene expression and metabolite analyses reveal an EWS-FLI1-dependent regulation of TRP metabolism. TRP consumption increased in the absence of EWS-FLI1, resulting in kynurenine and kynurenic acid accumulation, both aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) ligands. Activated AHR binds to the promoter region of target genes. We demonstrate that EWS-FLI1 knockdown results in AHR nuclear translocation and activation. Our data suggest that EWS-FLI1 suppresses autocrine AHR signaling by inhibiting TDO2-catalyzed TRP breakdown.

  15. 2D Axisymmetric vs 1D: A PIC/DSMC Model of Breakdown in Triggered Vacuum Spark Gaps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Stan; Moore, Chris; Boerner, Jeremiah

    2015-09-01

    Last year at GEC14, we presented results of one-dimensional PIC/DSMC simulations of breakdown in triggered vacuum spark gaps. In this talk, we extend the model to two-dimensional axisymmetric and compare the results to the previous 1D case. Specially, we vary the fraction of the cathode that emits electrons and neutrals (holding the total injection rates over the cathode surface constant) and show the effects of the higher dimensionality on the time to breakdown. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U. S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  16. Fullerenes and fulleranes in circumstellar envelopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yong; Kwok, Sun; Sadjadi, SeyedAbdolreza

    2016-07-01

    Three decades of search have recently led to convincing discoveries of cosmic fullerenes. The presence of C60 and C+ 60 in both circumstellar and interstellar environments suggests that these molecules and their derivatives can be efficiently formed in circumstellar envelopes and survive in harsh conditions. Detailed analysis of the infrared bands from fullerenes and their connections with the local properties can provide valuable information on the physical conditions and chemical processes that occurred in the late stages of stellar evolution. The identification of C+ 60 as the carrier of four diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs) suggests that fullerene- related compounds are abundant in interstellar space and are essential for resolving the DIB mystery. Experiments have revealed a high hydrogenation rate when C60 is exposed to atomic hydrogen, motivating the attempt to search for cosmic fulleranes. In this paper, we present a short review of current knowledge of cosmic fullerenes and fulleranes and briefly discuss the implications on circumstellar chemistry.

  17. ESCRTs breach the nuclear border.

    PubMed

    Webster, Brant M; Lusk, C Patrick

    2015-01-01

    The endosomal sorting complexes required for transport (ESCRT) are best known for their role in sorting ubiquitylated membrane proteins into endosomes. The most ancient component of the ESCRT machinery is ESCRT-III, which is capable of oligomerizing into a helical filament that drives the invagination and scission of membranes aided by the AAA ATPase, Vps4, in several additional subcellular contexts. Our recent study broadens the work of ESCRT-III by identifying its role in a quality control pathway at the nuclear envelope (NE) that ensures the normal biogenesis of nuclear pore complexes (NPCs). Here, we will elaborate on how we envision this mechanism to progress and incorporate ESCRT-III into an emerging model of nuclear pore formation. Moreover, we speculate there are additional roles for the ESCRT-III machinery at the NE that broadly function to ensure its integrity and the maintenance of the nuclear compartment.

  18. ASYMMETRIC ACCRETION FLOWS WITHIN A COMMON ENVELOPE

    SciTech Connect

    MacLeod, Morgan; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico

    2015-04-10

    This paper examines flows in the immediate vicinity of stars and compact objects dynamically inspiralling within a common envelope (CE). Flow in the vicinity of the embedded object is gravitationally focused, leading to drag and potentially to gas accretion. This process has been studied numerically and analytically in the context of Hoyle–Lyttleton accretion (HLA). Yet, within a CE, accretion structures may span a large fraction of the envelope radius, and in so doing sweep across a substantial radial gradient of density. We quantify these gradients using detailed stellar evolution models for a range of CE encounters. We provide estimates of typical scales in CE encounters that involve main sequence stars, white dwarfs, neutron stars, and black holes with giant-branch companions of a wide range of masses. We apply these typical scales to hydrodynamic simulations of three-dimensional HLA with an upstream density gradient. This density gradient breaks the symmetry that defines HLA flow, and imposes an angular momentum barrier to accretion. Material that is focused into the vicinity of the embedded object thus may not be able to accrete. As a result, accretion rates drop dramatically, by one to two orders of magnitude, while drag rates are only mildly affected. We provide fitting formulae to the numerically derived rates of drag and accretion as a function of the density gradient. The reduced ratio of accretion to drag suggests that objects that can efficiently gain mass during CE evolution, such as black holes and neutron stars, may grow less than implied by the HLA formalism.

  19. Diversity in the fertilization envelopes of echinoderms.

    PubMed

    Oulhen, Nathalie; Reich, Adrian; Wong, Julian L; Ramos, Isabela; Wessel, Gary M

    2013-01-01

    Cell surface changes in an egg at fertilization are essential to begin development and for protecting the zygote. Most fertilized eggs construct a barrier around themselves by modifying their original extracellular matrix. This construction usually results from calcium-induced exocytosis of cortical granules, the contents of which in sea urchins function to form the fertilization envelope (FE), an extracellular matrix of cortical granule contents built upon a vitelline layer scaffold. Here, we examined the molecular mechanism of this process in sea stars, a close relative of the sea urchins, and analyze the evolutionary changes that likely occurred in the functionality of this structure between these two organisms. We find that the FE of sea stars is more permeable than in sea urchins, allowing diffusion of molecules in excess of 2 megadaltons. Through a proteomic and transcriptomic approach, we find that most, but not all, of the proteins present in the sea urchin envelope are present in sea stars, including SFE9, proteoliaisin, and rendezvin. The mRNAs encoding these FE proteins accumulated most densely in early oocytes, and then beginning with vitellogenesis, these mRNAs decreased in abundance to levels nearly undetectable in eggs. Antibodies to the SFE9 protein of sea stars showed that the cortical granules in sea star also accumulated most significantly in early oocytes, but different from sea urchins, they translocated to the cortex of the oocytes well before meiotic initiation. These results suggest that the preparation for cell surface changes in sea urchins has been shifted to later in oogenesis, and perhaps reflects the meiotic differences among the species-sea star oocytes are stored in prophase of meiosis and fertilized during the meiotic divisions, as in most animals, whereas sea urchins are one of the few taxons in which eggs have completed meiosis prior to fertilization.

  20. Enhanced conformational sampling using enveloping distribution sampling.

    PubMed

    Lin, Zhixiong; van Gunsteren, Wilfred F

    2013-10-14

    To lessen the problem of insufficient conformational sampling in biomolecular simulations is still a major challenge in computational biochemistry. In this article, an application of the method of enveloping distribution sampling (EDS) is proposed that addresses this challenge and its sampling efficiency is demonstrated in simulations of a hexa-β-peptide whose conformational equilibrium encompasses two different helical folds, i.e., a right-handed 2.7(10∕12)-helix and a left-handed 3(14)-helix, separated by a high energy barrier. Standard MD simulations of this peptide using the GROMOS 53A6 force field did not reach convergence of the free enthalpy difference between the two helices even after 500 ns of simulation time. The use of soft-core non-bonded interactions in the centre of the peptide did enhance the number of transitions between the helices, but at the same time led to neglect of relevant helical configurations. In the simulations of a two-state EDS reference Hamiltonian that envelops both the physical peptide and the soft-core peptide, sampling of the conformational space of the physical peptide ensures that physically relevant conformations can be visited, and sampling of the conformational space of the soft-core peptide helps to enhance the transitions between the two helices. The EDS simulations sampled many more transitions between the two helices and showed much faster convergence of the relative free enthalpy of the two helices compared with the standard MD simulations with only a slightly larger computational effort to determine optimized EDS parameters. Combined with various methods to smoothen the potential energy surface, the proposed EDS application will be a powerful technique to enhance the sampling efficiency in biomolecular simulations.

  1. Nuclear Exodus: Herpesviruses Lead the Way.

    PubMed

    Bigalke, Janna M; Heldwein, Ekaterina E

    2016-09-29

    Most DNA viruses replicate in the nucleus and exit it either by passing through the nuclear pores or by rupturing the nuclear envelope. Unusually, herpesviruses have evolved a complex mechanism of nuclear escape whereby nascent capsids bud at the inner nuclear membrane to form perinuclear virions that subsequently fuse with the outer nuclear membrane, releasing capsids into the cytosol. Although this general scheme is accepted in the field, the players and their roles are still debated. Recent studies illuminated critical mechanistic features of this enigmatic process and uncovered surprising parallels with a novel cellular nuclear export process. This review summarizes our current understanding of nuclear egress in herpesviruses, examines the experimental evidence and models, and outlines outstanding questions with the goal of stimulating new research in this area.

  2. Nuclear Exodus: Herpesviruses Lead the Way

    PubMed Central

    Bigalke, Janna M.; Heldwein, Ekaterina E.

    2016-01-01

    Most DNA viruses replicate in the nucleus and exit it either by passing through the nuclear pores or by rupturing the nuclear envelope. Unusually, herpesviruses have evolved a complex mechanism of nuclear escape whereby nascent capsids bud at the inner nuclear membrane to form perinuclear virions that subsequently fuse with the outer nuclear membrane, releasing capsids into the cytosol. Although this general scheme is accepted in the field, the players and their roles are still debated. Recent studies illuminated critical mechanistic features of this enigmatic process and uncovered surprising parallels with a novel cellular nuclear export process. This review summarizes our current understanding of nuclear egress in herpesviruses, examines the experimental evidence and models, and outlines outstanding questions with the goal of stimulating new research in this area. PMID:27482898

  3. Modeling Protostar Envelopes and Disks Seen With ALMA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terebey, Susan; Flores-Rivera, Lizxandra; Willacy, Karen

    2017-01-01

    Thermal continuum emission from protostars comes from both the envelope and circumstellar disk. The dust emits on a variety of spatial scales, ranging from sub-arcseconds for disks to roughly 10 arcseconds for envelopes for nearby protostars. We present models of what ALMA should detect that incorporate a self-consistent collapse solution, radiative transfer, and realistic dust properties.

  4. Computer-Based Instruction on Skills for Addressing Envelopes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Humes, Ann

    The approach to computer-based instruction for third and fourth grade elementary students which is sketched teaches component placement, capitalization, and punctuation skills of addressing envelopes within the context of a simulated envelope. Part of a larger design for a complete program of composition instruction, this program comprises a set…

  5. Data Envelopment Analysis: Measurement of Educational Efficiency in Texas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Lacy

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the efficiency of Texas public school districts through Data Envelopment Analysis. The Data Envelopment Analysis estimation method calculated and assigned efficiency scores to each of the 931 school districts considered in the study. The efficiency scores were utilized in two phases. First, the school…

  6. 10 CFR 434.516 - Building exterior envelope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Building exterior envelope. 434.516 Section 434.516 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ENERGY CODE FOR NEW FEDERAL COMMERCIAL AND MULTI-FAMILY HIGH RISE RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS Building Energy Cost Compliance Alternative § 434.516 Building exterior envelope....

  7. Rolling bearing feature frequency extraction using extreme average envelope decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Kunju; Liu, Shulin; Jiang, Chao; Zhang, Hongli

    2016-09-01

    The vibration signal contains a wealth of sensitive information which reflects the running status of the equipment. It is one of the most important steps for precise diagnosis to decompose the signal and extracts the effective information properly. The traditional classical adaptive signal decomposition method, such as EMD, exists the problems of mode mixing, low decomposition accuracy etc. Aiming at those problems, EAED(extreme average envelope decomposition) method is presented based on EMD. EAED method has three advantages. Firstly, it is completed through midpoint envelopment method rather than using maximum and minimum envelopment respectively as used in EMD. Therefore, the average variability of the signal can be described accurately. Secondly, in order to reduce the envelope errors during the signal decomposition, replacing two envelopes with one envelope strategy is presented. Thirdly, the similar triangle principle is utilized to calculate the time of extreme average points accurately. Thus, the influence of sampling frequency on the calculation results can be significantly reduced. Experimental results show that EAED could separate out single frequency components from a complex signal gradually. EAED could not only isolate three kinds of typical bearing fault characteristic of vibration frequency components but also has fewer decomposition layers. EAED replaces quadratic enveloping to an envelope which ensuring to isolate the fault characteristic frequency under the condition of less decomposition layers. Therefore, the precision of signal decomposition is improved.

  8. Planet formation with envelope enrichment: new insights on planetary diversity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venturini, Julia; Alibert, Yann; Benz, Willy

    2016-12-01

    Aims: We compute for the first time self-consistent models of planet growth that include the effect of envelope enrichment. The change in envelope metallicity is assumed to be the result of planetesimal disruption or icy pebble sublimation. Methods: We solved internal structure equations taking into account global energy conservation for the envelope to compute in situ planetary growth. We considered different opacities and equations of state suited for a wide range of metallicities. Results: We find that envelope enrichment speeds up the formation of gas giants. It also explains naturally the formation of low- and intermediate-mass objects with large fractions of H-He ( 20-30% in mass). High-opacity models explain the metallicity of the giant planets of the solar system well, while low-opacity models are suited to explain the formation of low-mass objects with thick H-He envelopes and gas giants with sub-solar envelope metallicities. We find good agreement between our models and the estimated water abundance for WASP-43b. For HD 189733b, HD 209458b, and WASP-12b we predict fractions of water higher than what is estimated from observations by at least a factor 2. Conclusions: Envelope enrichment by icy planetesimals is the natural scenario to explain the formation of a wide variety of objects, ranging from mini-Neptunes to gas giants. We predict that the total and envelope metallicity decrease with planetary mass.

  9. 14 CFR 29.87 - Height-velocity envelope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Height-velocity envelope. 29.87 Section 29... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Flight Performance § 29.87 Height-velocity envelope. (a) If there is any combination of height and forward velocity (including hover) under which a...

  10. 14 CFR 29.87 - Height-velocity envelope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Height-velocity envelope. 29.87 Section 29... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Flight Performance § 29.87 Height-velocity envelope. (a) If there is any combination of height and forward velocity (including hover) under which a...

  11. 14 CFR 29.87 - Height-velocity envelope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Height-velocity envelope. 29.87 Section 29... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Flight Performance § 29.87 Height-velocity envelope. (a) If there is any combination of height and forward velocity (including hover) under which a...

  12. 14 CFR 29.87 - Height-velocity envelope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Height-velocity envelope. 29.87 Section 29... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Flight Performance § 29.87 Height-velocity envelope. (a) If there is any combination of height and forward velocity (including hover) under which a...

  13. 14 CFR 29.87 - Height-velocity envelope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Height-velocity envelope. 29.87 Section 29... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Flight Performance § 29.87 Height-velocity envelope. (a) If there is any combination of height and forward velocity (including hover) under which a...

  14. An Inside Look at the Two Envelopes Paradox

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Falk, Ruma; Nickerson, Raymond S.

    2009-01-01

    When two sealed envelopes contain money, one twice as much as the other, a player should be indifferent between them. But when one envelope is opened, one's decision should vary as a function of the observed value and one's subjective probabilities.

  15. Strategies on the nuclear-targeted delivery of genes

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Jing; Fan, Ying; Li, Yuanke; Huang, Leaf

    2016-01-01

    To improve the nuclear-targeted delivery of non-viral vectors, extensive effort has been carried out on the development of smart vectors which could overcome multiple barriers. The nuclear envelope presents a major barrier to transgene delivery. Viruses are capable of crossing the nuclear envelope to efficiently deliver their genome into the nucleus through the specialized protein components. However, non-viral vectors are preferred over viral ones because of the safety concerns associated with the latter. Non-viral delivery systems have been designed to include various types of components to enable nuclear translocation at the periphery of the nucleus. This review summarizes the progress of research regarding nuclear transport mechanisms. “Smart” non-viral vectors that have been modified by peptides and other small molecules are able to facilitate the nuclear translocation and enhance the efficacy of gene expression. The resulting technology may also enhance delivery of other macromolecules to the nucleus. PMID:23964565

  16. A Spectral Algorithm for Envelope Reduction of Sparse Matrices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnard, Stephen T.; Pothen, Alex; Simon, Horst D.

    1993-01-01

    The problem of reordering a sparse symmetric matrix to reduce its envelope size is considered. A new spectral algorithm for computing an envelope-reducing reordering is obtained by associating a Laplacian matrix with the given matrix and then sorting the components of a specified eigenvector of the Laplacian. This Laplacian eigenvector solves a continuous relaxation of a discrete problem related to envelope minimization called the minimum 2-sum problem. The permutation vector computed by the spectral algorithm is a closest permutation vector to the specified Laplacian eigenvector. Numerical results show that the new reordering algorithm usually computes smaller envelope sizes than those obtained from the current standard algorithms such as Gibbs-Poole-Stockmeyer (GPS) or SPARSPAK reverse Cuthill-McKee (RCM), in some cases reducing the envelope by more than a factor of two.

  17. Nuclear rights - nuclear wrongs

    SciTech Connect

    Paul, E.F.; Miller, F.D.; Paul, J.; Ahrens, J.

    1986-01-01

    This book contains 11 selections. The titles are: Three Ways to Kill Innocent Bystanders: Some Conundrums Concerning the Morality of War; The International Defense of Liberty; Two Concepts of Deterrence; Nuclear Deterrence and Arms Control; Ethical Issues for the 1980s; The Moral Status of Nuclear Deterrent Threats; Optimal Deterrence; Morality and Paradoxical Deterrence; Immoral Risks: A Deontological Critique of Nuclear Deterrence; No War Without Dictatorship, No Peace Without Democracy: Foreign Policy as Domestic Politics; Marxism-Leninism and its Strategic Implications for the United States; Tocqueveille War.

  18. Top predator absence enhances leaf breakdown in an intermittent stream.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Lozano, Pablo; Rieradevall, Maria; Prat, Narcís

    2016-12-01

    Current biodiversity loss is characterized by the extinction of top predators, but small-bodied freshwater fish are often overlooked in research and conservation management even when threatened because they usually lack commercial value. Therefore, the ecosystem impacts of their possible loss remain mostly unknown. We assessed whether the presence/absence of an endangered predatory fish (Barbus meridionalis (A. Risso, 1827)) in an intermittent stream affects leaf fungal biomass and leaf quality (i.e. leaf carbon:nitrogen ratio and leaf toughness), macroinvertebrate assemblages colonizing leaf packs, and leaf breakdown rates. We conducted a leaf bag experiment comparing a control reach with a population of B. meridionalis with an adjacent upstream fishless reach. In the fishless reach, leaf fungal biomass and microbially mediated breakdown rate were lower compared to the control reach. This was probably caused by the lack of the bottom-up stimulation through nutrient recycling by fish. Shredders and scrapers were found at higher abundance and biomass in the fishless compared to the control reach, and the whole macroinvertebrate community composition changed with fish absence. Consequently, macroinvertebrate mediated leaf breakdown was faster in the fishless than in the control reach, not only compensating for the lower microbially mediated leaf breakdown in the fishless reach, but accelerating the overall leaf breakdown rate. Our study contributes to understand the potential cascading effects produced by the extirpation of endangered small-bodied fish.

  19. Basic study of transient breakdown voltage in solid dielectric cables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahder, G.; Sosnowski, M.; Katz, C.

    1980-09-01

    A comprehensive review of the technical and scientific publications relating to crosslinked polyethylene (XLPE) and ethylene propylene rubber (EPR) insulated cables revealed that there is very little known with respect to the life expectancy, the final factory voltage test background and the mechanism of voltage breakdown of these cables. A new methodology for the investigation of breakdown voltages of XLPE and EPR insulated cables was developed which is based on the investigation of breakdown voltages at various voltage transients such as unipolarity pulses and dual-polarity pulses, and a.c. voltage at power and high frequency. Also, a new approach to statistical testing was developed which allows one to establish a correlation among the breakdown voltages obtained with various voltage transients. Finally, a method for the determination of threshold voltage regardless of the magnitude of apparent charge was developed. A model of breakdown and electrical aging of XLPE and EPR insulated cables was developed as well as life expectancy characteristics for high voltage stress XLPE insulated cables operated in a dry environment at room temperature and at 900 C.

  20. Acoustic localization of breakdown in radio frequency accelerating cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lane, Peter

    Current designs for muon accelerators require high-gradient radio frequency (RF) cavities to be placed in solenoidal magnetic fields. These fields help contain and efficiently reduce the phase space volume of source muons in order to create a usable muon beam for collider and neutrino experiments. In this context and in general, the use of RF cavities in strong magnetic fields has its challenges. It has been found that placing normal conducting RF cavities in strong magnetic fields reduces the threshold at which RF cavity breakdown occurs. To aid the effort to study RF cavity breakdown in magnetic fields, it would be helpful to have a diagnostic tool which can localize the source of breakdown sparks inside the cavity. These sparks generate thermal shocks to small regions of the inner cavity wall that can be detected and localized using microphones attached to the outer cavity surface. Details on RF cavity sound sources as well as the hardware, software, and algorithms used to localize the source of sound emitted from breakdown thermal shocks are presented. In addition, results from simulations and experiments on three RF cavities, namely the Aluminum Mock Cavity, the High-Pressure Cavity, and the Modular Cavity, are also given. These results demonstrate the validity and effectiveness of the described technique for acoustic localization of breakdown.

  1. Study of the breakdown voltage of SiPMs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chmill, V.; Garutti, E.; Klanner, R.; Nitschke, M.; Schwandt, J.

    2017-02-01

    The breakdown behaviour of SiPMs (Silicon PhotoMultiplier) with pixel sizes of 15 × 15 , 25 × 25 , 50 × 50, and 100 × 100 μm2, manufactured by KETEK, has been investigated. From the current-voltage characteristics measured with and without illumination by LED light of 470 nm wavelength, the current-breakdown voltage, VI, and from linear fits of the voltage dependence of the SiPM gain, measured by recording pulse-area spectra, the gain-breakdown voltage, VG, have been obtained. The voltage dependence of the Geiger-breakdown probability was determined from the fraction of zero photoelectron events with LED illumination. By comparing the results to a model calculation, the photodetection-breakdown voltage, VPD, has been determined. Within experimental uncertainties, VI and VPD are equal and independent of pixel size. For VG, a dependence on pixel size is observed. The difference VI -VG is about 1 V for the SiPM with 15 μm pixels, decreases with pixel size and is compatible with zero for the SiPM with 100 μm pixels.

  2. Dramatically enhanced electrical breakdown strength in cellulose nanopaper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jianwen; Zhou, Yuanxiang; Zhou, Zhongliu; Liu, Rui

    2016-09-01

    Electrical breakdown behaviors of nanopaper prepared from nanofibrillated cellulose (NFC) were investigated. Compared to conventional insulating paper made from micro softwood fibers, nanopaper has a dramatically enhanced breakdown strength. Breakdown field of nanopaper is 67.7 kV/mm, whereas that of conventional paper is only 20 kV/mm. Air voids in the surface of conventional paper are observed by scanning electron microscope (SEM). Further analyses using mercury intrusion show that pore diameter of conventional paper is around 1.7 μ m , while that of nanopaper is below 3 nm. Specific pore size of nanopaper is determined to be approximately 2.8 nm by the gas adsorption technique. In addition, theoretical breakdown strengths of nanopaper and conventional paper are also calculated to evaluate the effect of pore size. It turns out that theoretical values agree well with experimental data, indicating that the improved strength in nanopaper is mainly attributed to the decreased pore size. Due to its outstanding breakdown strength, this study indicates the suitability of nanopaper for electrical insulation in ultra-high voltage convert transformers and other electrical devices.

  3. Pulsed electrical breakdown of a void-filled dielectric

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, R. A.; Lagasse, R. R.; Schroeder, J. L.

    2002-05-01

    We report breakdown strengths in a void-filled dielectric material, epoxy containing 48 vol % hollow glass microballoon filler, which is stressed with unipolar voltage pulses of the order of 10 μs duration. The microballoon voids had mean diameters of approximately 40 μm and contained SO2 gas at roughly 30% atmospheric pressure. This void-filled material displays good dielectric strength (of the order of 100 kV mm-1) under these short-pulse test conditions. Results from a variety of electrode geometries are reported, including arrangements in which the electric stress is highly nonuniform. Conventional breakdown criteria based on mean or peak electric stress do not account for these data. A statistics-based predictive breakdown model is developed, in which the dielectric is divided into independent, microballoon-sized "discharge cells" and the spontaneous discharge of a single cell is presumed to launch full breakdown of the composite. We obtain two empirical parameters, the mean and standard deviation of the spontaneous discharge field, by fitting breakdown data from two electrode geometries having roughly uniform fields but with greatly differing volumes of electrically stressed material. This model accounts for many aspects of our data, including the inherent statistical scatter and the dependence on the stressed volume, and it provides informative predictions with electrode geometries giving highly nonuniform fields. Issues related to computational spatial resolution and cutoff distance are also discussed.

  4. Communication breakdowns and diagnostic errors: a radiology perspective

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Daniel R.; Singh, Hardeep; Berlin, Leonard

    2016-01-01

    Timely and accurate communication is essential to safe and effective health care. Despite increased awareness over the past decade of the frequency of medical errors and greater efforts directed towards improving patient safety, patient harm due to communication breakdowns remains a significant problem. Communication problems related to diagnostic testing may account for nearly half of all errors made by typical primary care physicians in their medical practices. This article provides an overview of communication breakdowns in the context of radiology related diagnostic errors. In radiology, communication breakdowns between radiologists, referring clinicians, and patients can lead to failure of critical information to be relayed, resulting in delayed or missed diagnosis. New technologies, such electronic health records (EHRs), contribute to the increasing complexity of communication in health care, but if used correctly, they can provide several benefits to safe and effective communication. To address the complexity of communication breakdowns, a multifaceted sociotechnical approach is needed to address both technical and non-technical aspects of health care delivery. The article also provides some future directions in reducing communication breakdowns related to diagnostic testing, including proactive risk assessment of communication practices using recently released SAFER self-assessment guides. PMID:27006890

  5. Suppression of vacuum breakdown using thin film coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Fleddermann, C.B.; Mayberry, C.S.; Wroblewski, B.; Schamiloglu, E.

    1993-12-01

    The use of thin film coatings for increasing the breakdown voltage in a parallel-plane high-voltage gap has been investigated. Both metallic and ceramic thin films were deposited at varying thicknesses and deposition conditions on a screen cathode using ion-beam sputtering. Improvements in breakdown voltage were observed for nearly any type of deposited film, with significant variations in breakdown voltage depending on film thickness and oxygen and partial pressure during ceramic film deposition. For 500 nm thick metallic or oxide films, breakdown voltage was nearly doubled compared to the bare stainless steel screen, which is attributed to the burying of surface imperfections on the cathode. For 200 nm thick films, the covering of imperfections is less effective; however, high breakdown voltages can still be obtained by choosing an appropriate oxygen partial pressure during film deposition. Electric fields as high as 60 kV/mm were sustained across a 1 mm gap for 10 {mu}sec pulses; lesser fields could be sustained for as long as 10 ms. These coatings allowed for the successful study of a planar liquid metal ion source.

  6. Accoustic Localization of Breakdown in Radio Frequency Accelerating Cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Lane, Peter Gwin

    2016-07-01

    Current designs for muon accelerators require high-gradient radio frequency (RF) cavities to be placed in solenoidal magnetic fields. These fields help contain and efficiently reduce the phase space volume of source muons in order to create a usable muon beam for collider and neutrino experiments. In this context and in general, the use of RF cavities in strong magnetic fields has its challenges. It has been found that placing normal conducting RF cavities in strong magnetic fields reduces the threshold at which RF cavity breakdown occurs. To aid the effort to study RF cavity breakdown in magnetic fields, it would be helpful to have a diagnostic tool which can localize the source of breakdown sparks inside the cavity. These sparks generate thermal shocks to small regions of the inner cavity wall that can be detected and localized using microphones attached to the outer cavity surface. Details on RF cavity sound sources as well as the hardware, software, and algorithms used to localize the source of sound emitted from breakdown thermal shocks are presented. In addition, results from simulations and experiments on three RF cavities, namely the Aluminum Mock Cavity, the High-Pressure Cavity, and the Modular Cavity, are also given. These results demonstrate the validity and effectiveness of the described technique for acoustic localization of breakdown.

  7. Envelope Enhancement Increases Cortical Sensitivity to Interaural Envelope Delays with Acoustic and Electric Hearing

    PubMed Central

    Hartley, Douglas E. H.; Isaiah, Amal

    2014-01-01

    Evidence from human psychophysical and animal electrophysiological studies suggests that sensitivity to interaural time delay (ITD) in the modulating envelope of a high-frequency carrier can be enhanced using half-wave rectified stimuli. Recent evidence has shown potential benefits of equivalent electrical stimuli to deaf individuals with bilateral cochlear implants (CIs). In the current study we assessed the effects of envelope shape on ITD sensitivity in the primary auditory cortex of normal-hearing ferrets, and profoundly-deaf animals with bilateral CIs. In normal-hearing animals, cortical sensitivity to ITDs (±1 ms in 0.1-ms steps) was assessed in response to dichotically-presented i) sinusoidal amplitude-modulated (SAM) and ii) half-wave rectified (HWR) tones (100-ms duration; 70 dB SPL) presented at the best-frequency of the unit over a range of modulation frequencies. In separate experiments, adult ferrets were deafened with neomycin administration and bilaterally-implanted with intra-cochlear electrode arrays. Electrically-evoked auditory brainstem responses (EABRs) were recorded in response to bipolar electrical stimulation of the apical pair of electrodes with singe biphasic current pulses (40 µs per phase) over a range of current levels to measure hearing thresholds. Subsequently, we recorded cortical sensitivity to ITDs (±800 µs in 80-µs steps) within the envelope of SAM and HWR biphasic-pulse trains (40 µs per phase; 6000 pulses per second, 100-ms duration) over a range of modulation frequencies. In normal-hearing animals, nearly a third of cortical neurons were sensitive to envelope-ITDs in response to SAM tones. In deaf animals with bilateral CI, the proportion of ITD-sensitive cortical neurons was approximately a fifth in response to SAM pulse trains. In normal-hearing and deaf animals with bilateral CI the proportion of ITD sensitive units and neural sensitivity to ITDs increased in response to HWR, compared with SAM stimuli. Consequently

  8. Rf breakdown studies in a SLAC disk-loaded structure

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J.W.; Nguyen-Tuong, V.; Loew, G.A.

    1986-04-01

    Rf breakdown studies in an S-band standing-wave disk-loaded accelerator structure have been completed. An equivalent traveling-wave accelerating gradient as high as 147 MV/m and a peak field in excess of 300 MV/m have been obtained. At these high gradients, considerable amounts of field emission and x-ray radiation are observed. Some of the field-emitted electrons are captured and focused by the rf fields and can be extracted on the axis of the structure. Their current, energy distribution and the x-ray radiation they produce are given. Rf processing as measured by the frequency of breakdown and the reduction in field emitted electron currents inside the structure can be speeded up considerably by the presence of argon. Some conjectures on the causes of breakdown are presented.

  9. Electrical breakdown gas detector featuring carbon nanotube array electrodes.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seongyul; Pal, Sunil; Ajayan, Pulickel M; Borca-Tasciuc, Theodorian; Koratkar, Nikhil

    2008-01-01

    We demonstrate here detection of dichloro-difluoro-methane and oxygen in mixtures with helium using a carbon nanotube electrical breakdown sensor device. The sensor is comprised of an aligned array of multiwalled carbon nanotubes deposited on a nickel based super-alloy (Inconel 600) as the anode; the counter electrode is a planar nickel sheet. By monitoring the electrical breakdown characteristics of oxygen and dichloro-difluoro-methane in a background of helium, we find that the detection limit for dichloro-difluoro-methane is approximately 0.1% and the corresponding limit for oxygen is approximately 1%. A phenomenologigal model is proposed to describe the trends observed in detection of the two mixtures. These results indicate that carbon nanotube based electrical breakdown sensors show potential as end detectors in gas-chromatography devices.

  10. Breakdown Limit Studies in High-Rate Gaseous Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ivaniouchenkov, Yu; Fonte, P.; Peskov, V.; Ramsey, B. D.

    1999-01-01

    We report results from a systematic study of breakdown limits for novel high-rate gaseous detectors: MICROMEGAS, CAT and GEM, together with more conventional devices such as thin-gap parallel-mesh chambers and high-rate wire chambers. It was found that for all these detectors, the maximum achievable pin, before breakdown appears, drops dramatically with incident flux, and is sometimes inversely proportional to it. Further, in the presence of alpha particles, typical of the breakgrounds in high-energy experiments, additional gain drops of 1-2 orders of magnitude were observed for many detectors. It was found that breakdowns at high rates occur through what we have termed an "accumulative" mechanism, which does not seem to have been previously reported in the literature. Results of these studies may help in choosing the optimum detector for given experimental conditions.

  11. On sample preparation and dielectric breakdown in nanostructured epoxy resins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reading, M.; Xu, Z.; Vaughan, A. S.; Lewin, P. L.

    2011-08-01

    There are many methods available to achieve a good dispersion of fillers within a polymeric matrix. This investigation considered several methods of dispersing three chosen fillers within an epoxy resin; the same processes were also performed on unfilled materials to investigate any effects they may have on the host material. For this investigation, the epoxy system (EP) was combined with sodium montmorillonite (MMT), micrometric silicon dioxide (SD) or nanometric silicon dioxide (NSD) as fillers. The effect of the different sample preparation routes on breakdown behaviour was then evaluated. While more thorough mixing protocols were found to lead to improved breakdown behaviour in the case of the various filled systems, surprisingly, an entirely equivalent form of behaviour was also seen in the unfilled epoxy. The influence of changes in sample geometry on the breakdown strength was established.

  12. High-voltage atmospheric breakdown across intervening rutile dielectrics.

    SciTech Connect

    Williamson, Kenneth Martin; Simpson, Sean; Coats, Rebecca Sue; Jorgenson, Roy Eberhardt; Hjalmarson, Harold Paul; Pasik, Michael Francis

    2013-09-01

    This report documents work conducted in FY13 on electrical discharge experiments performed to develop predictive computational models of the fundamental processes of surface breakdown in the vicinity of high-permittivity material interfaces. Further, experiments were conducted to determine if free carrier electrons could be excited into the conduction band thus lowering the effective breakdown voltage when UV photons (4.66 eV) from a high energy pulsed laser were incident on the rutile sample. This report documents the numerical approach, the experimental setup, and summarizes the data and simulations. Lastly, it describes the path forward and challenges that must be overcome in order to improve future experiments for characterizing the breakdown behavior for rutile.

  13. Breakdown Strength in Electrical and Elastic Random Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espinoza Ortiz, Julio; Rajapakse, Chamith; Gunaratne, Gemunu

    2003-03-01

    Electrical or elastic networks provide a natural model to study transport processes such as dielectric breakdown to metal insulator transition in disordered inhomogeneous conductors. We present an expression for the mean breakdown strength of such networks. First, we introduce a method to evaluate the redistribution of current due to the removal of a finite number of elements from a hyper-cubic network of conductances. It is used to determine the reduction of breakdown strength due to a fracture of size κ. Numerical analysis is used to show that the analogous reduction due to random removal of elements from electrical and elastic networks follow a similar form. We discuss one possible application, namely the use of bone density as a diagnostic tools for osteoporosis.

  14. Exploration of Underwater Laser Breakdown Using Two Synchronized Gated Cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huwel, Lutz; Baumgart, Clayton; Betts, Susannah; Morgan, Thomas J.; Graham, William G.

    2014-10-01

    Using two synchronized intensified CCD cameras, we have studied spatial and temporal characteristics of optical breakdown in water created by a focused 10 ns pulsed Nd:YAG laser operating at 1064 nm. For three water samples with different impurity content (ultrapure, distilled, and tap water), the plasma evolution was monitored up to 1 ms after breakdown. Images taken by the two cameras, systematically delayed relative to each other, reveal that the center of emission intensity does not remain at a fixed location. In single plasma events, the center first moves, on average, toward the incoming laser beam. Then, at about 100 to 200 ns, the apparent direction of motion reverses and the center returns towards the focal point. On the other hand, in repetitive breakdown the time averaged center moves steadily downstream with each subsequent pulse. Details of this behavior depend on repetition frequency. We will also present shadowgraphy results revealing time resolved speeds of both shockwave and bubble expansion.

  15. New phenomenology of gas breakdown in DC and RF fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrović, Zoran Lj; Sivoš, Jelena; Savić, Marija; Škoro, Nikola; Radmilović Radenović, Marija; Malović, Gordana; Gocić, Saša; Marić, Dragana

    2014-05-01

    This paper follows a review lecture on the new developments in the field of gas breakdown and low current discharges, usually covered by a form of Townsend's theory and phenomenology. It gives an overview of a new approach to identifying which feedback agents provide breakdown, how to model gas discharge conditions and reconcile the results with binary experiments and how to employ that knowledge in modelling gas discharges. The next step is an illustration on how to record volt-ampere characteristics and use them on one hand to obtain the breakdown voltage and, on the other, to identify the regime of operation and model the secondary electron yields. The second aspect of this section concerns understanding the different regimes, their anatomy, how those are generated and how free running oscillations occur. While temporal development is the most useful and interesting part of the new developments, the difficulty of presenting the data in a written form precludes an easy publication and discussion. Thus, we shall only mention some of the results that stem from these measurements. Most micro discharges operate in DC albeit with complex geometries. Thus, parallel plate micro discharge measurements were needed to establish that Townsend's theory, with all its recent extensions, is still valid until some very small gaps. We have shown, for example, how a long-path breakdown puts in jeopardy many experimental observations and why a flat left-hand side of the Paschen curve often does not represent good physics. We will also summarize a kinetic representation of the RF breakdown revealing a somewhat more complex picture than the standard model. Finally, we will address briefly the breakdown in radially inhomogeneous conditions and how that affects the measured properties of the discharge. This review has the goal of summarizing (rather than developing details of) the current status of the low-current DC discharges formation and operation as a discipline which, in spite of

  16. Neural coding of echo-envelope disparities in echolocating bats.

    PubMed

    Borina, Frank; Firzlaff, Uwe; Wiegrebe, Lutz

    2011-05-01

    The effective use of echolocation requires not only measuring the delay between the emitted call and returning echo to estimate the distance of an ensonified object. To locate an object in azimuth and elevation, the bat's auditory system must analyze the returning echoes in terms of their binaural properties, i.e., the echoes' interaural intensity and time differences (IIDs and ITDs). The effectiveness of IIDs for echolocation is undisputed, but when bats ensonify complex objects, the temporal structure of echoes may facilitate the analysis of the echo envelope in terms of envelope ITDs. Using extracellular recordings from the auditory midbrain of the bat, Phyllostomus discolor, we found a population of neurons that are sensitive to envelope ITDs of echoes of their sonar calls. Moreover, the envelope-ITD sensitivity improved with increasing temporal fluctuations in the echo envelopes, a sonar parameter related to the spatial statistics of complex natural reflectors like vegetation. The data show that in bats envelope ITDs may be used not only to locate external, prey-generated rustling sounds but also in the context of echolocation. Specifically, the temporal fluctuations in the echo envelope, which are created when the sonar emission is reflected from a complex natural target, support ITD-mediated echolocation.

  17. Vitelline envelope, chorion, and micropyle of Fundulus heteroclitus eggs

    SciTech Connect

    Dumont, J.N.; Brummet, A.R.

    1980-01-01

    The architecture and transformation of the vitelline envelope of the developing oocyte into the chorion of the mature egg of Fundulus heteroclitus have been examined by scanning and transmission electron microscopy. The mature vitelline envelope is structurally complex and consists of about nine strata. The envelope is penetrated by pore canals that contain microvilli arising from the oocyte and macrovilli from follicle cells. During the envelope's transformation into the chorion, the pore canals are lost and the envelope becomes more fibrous and compact and its stratified nature less apparent. The micropyle, or pore, through which the sperm gains access to the enclosed egg is located at the bottom of a small funnel-shaped depression in the envelope. Internally, the micropyle opens on the apex of a cone-like elevation of the chorion. During the development of the envelope, structured chorionic fibrils, the components of which are presumed to be synthesized by the follicle cells, become attached to its surface. These chorionic fibrils are thought to aid in the attachment of the egg to the substratum and perhaps to help prevent water loss during low tides when the egg may be exposed.

  18. Cell Walls and the Convergent Evolution of the Viral Envelope

    PubMed Central

    Buchmann, Jan P.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Why some viruses are enveloped while others lack an outer lipid bilayer is a major question in viral evolution but one that has received relatively little attention. The viral envelope serves several functions, including protecting the RNA or DNA molecule(s), evading recognition by the immune system, and facilitating virus entry. Despite these commonalities, viral envelopes come in a wide variety of shapes and configurations. The evolution of the viral envelope is made more puzzling by the fact that nonenveloped viruses are able to infect a diverse range of hosts across the tree of life. We reviewed the entry, transmission, and exit pathways of all (101) viral families on the 2013 International Committee on Taxonomy of Viruses (ICTV) list. By doing this, we revealed a strong association between the lack of a viral envelope and the presence of a cell wall in the hosts these viruses infect. We were able to propose a new hypothesis for the existence of enveloped and nonenveloped viruses, in which the latter represent an adaptation to cells surrounded by a cell wall, while the former are an adaptation to animal cells where cell walls are absent. In particular, cell walls inhibit viral entry and exit, as well as viral transport within an organism, all of which are critical waypoints for successful infection and spread. Finally, we discuss how this new model for the origin of the viral envelope impacts our overall understanding of virus evolution. PMID:26378223

  19. CLOSE STELLAR BINARY SYSTEMS BY GRAZING ENVELOPE EVOLUTION

    SciTech Connect

    Soker, Noam

    2015-02-20

    I suggest a spiral-in process in which a stellar companion grazes the envelope of a giant star while both the orbital separation and the giant radius shrink simultaneously, forming a close binary system. The binary system might be viewed as evolving in a constant state of 'just entering a common envelope (CE) phase.' In cases where this process takes place, it can be an alternative to CE evolution where the secondary star is immersed in the giant's envelope. Grazing envelope evolution (GEE) is made possible only if the companion manages to accrete mass at a high rate and launches jets that remove the outskirts of the giant envelope, hence preventing the formation of a CE. The high accretion rate is made possible by the accretion disk launching jets which efficiently carry the excess angular momentum and energy from the accreted mass. The orbital decay itself is caused by the gravitational interaction of the secondary star with the envelope inward of its orbit, i.e., dynamical friction (gravitational tide). Mass loss through the second Lagrangian point can carry additional angular momentum and envelope mass. The GEE lasts for tens to hundreds of years. The high accretion rate, with peaks lasting from months to years, might lead to a bright object referred to as the intermediate luminosity optical transient (Red Novae; Red Transients). A bipolar nebula and/or equatorial ring are formed around the binary remnant.

  20. Hymenolepis nana: the fine structure of the embryonic envelopes.

    PubMed

    Fairweather, I; Threadgold, L T

    1981-06-01

    The fine structure of the envelopes surrounding hatched and unhatched oncospheres of Hymenolepis nana has been investigated by transmission and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), together with light microscope histochemical observations of JB-4 embedded material. The oncosphere is surrounded by 3 layers--the capsule, the outer envelope and the inner envelope, the latter giving rise to the embryophore and the 'oncospheral membrane'. An additional layer--the polar filament layer--lies between the 'oncospheral membrane' and the oncosphere. Shell material is deposited on the capsule as a thin layer. It is secreted by the outer envelope, which degenerates once shell formation is complete. The uterus may also contribute to shell formation. The embryophore forms a thin incomplete and peripheral layer within the inner envelope. In the basal region of this envelope, partial development of an 'oncospheral membrane' takes place, but it does not become detached as a separate layer. The polar filaments, which are characteristic of the oncosphere of H. nana, are derived from the epithelial covering of the oncosphere itself, which delaminates to form a separate polar filament layer. The filaments arise from knob-like projections at opposite poles of this layer. The design of the embryonic envelopes in H. nana show a number of modifications from the basic cyclophyllidean pattern, and these can be related to the demands of its 'direct' life-cycle.