Science.gov

Sample records for nuclear field effect

  1. Effective field theory in nuclear physics

    SciTech Connect

    Martin J. Savage

    2000-12-12

    I review recent developments in the application of effective field theory to nuclear physics. Emphasis is placed on precision two-body calculations and efforts to formulate the nuclear shell model in terms of an effective field theory.

  2. Power counting in nuclear effective field theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valderrama, M. Pavon

    2015-10-01

    The effective field theory formulation of nuclear forces is able to provide a systematic and model independent description of nuclear physics, where all processes involving nucleons and pions can be described in terms of the same set of couplings, the theoretical errors are known in advance and the connection with QCD is present. These features are a consequence of renormalization group invariance, which in turn determines the power counting of the theory. Here we present a brief outline of how to determine the power counting of nuclear effective field theory, what does it looks like and what are the predictions for the two-nucleon sector at lowest orders.

  3. Effective Field Theories of Nuclear Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furnstahl, Richard

    1996-10-01

    Traditional nuclear structure calculations have been pushed to new heights recently by exploiting new methods and increased computational power.(B. Pudliner et al)., Phys. Rev. Lett. 74, 4396 (1995); S.E. Koonin et al., nucl-th/9602006 (1996). Nevertheless, these developments have been made without direct input from quantum chromodynamics (QCD), the basic theory of strong interactions. Effective Field Theory provides a framework for connecting the energy scales and degrees of freedom appropriate for nuclear structure with those in the underlying QCD. Recent work shows how spontaneously broken chiral symmetry constrains the systematics of few-body nuclei.(See, for example, J.L. Friar, Few-Body Systems Suppl. 99), 1 (1996). Important ingredients are dimensional power counting and the assumption of naturalness,(A. Manohar and H. Georgi, Nucl. Phys. B234), 189 (1984). which allow estimates of the sizes of terms in effective lagrangians and imply the hierarchy of nuclear many-body forces. The delicacies of nuclear saturation introduce formidable obstacles to the systematic extension of effective chiral field theory to finite densities. For heavier nuclei, however, the successes of relativistic mean-field phenomenology can be understood in terms of nonrenormalizable effective field theories that are consistent with the symmetries of QCD. This framework provides new insight into issues of relativistic versus nonrelativistic formulations, nucleon compositeness, vacuum contributions, and extrapolations to high density.

  4. Nucleon propagation through nuclear matter in chiral effective field theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallik, S.; Mishra, H.

    2007-05-01

    We treat the propagation of a nucleon in nuclear matter by evaluating the ensemble average of the two-point function of the nucleon currents in the framework of chiral effective field theory. We first derive the effective parameters of the nucleon to one loop. The resulting formula for the effective mass has been known since before and gives an absurd value at normal nuclear density. We then modify it following Weinberg’s method for the two-nucleon system in the effective theory. Our results for the effective mass and the width of the nucleon are compared with those in the literature.

  5. Power counting and Wilsonian renormalization in nuclear effective field theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valderrama, Manuel Pavón

    2016-05-01

    Effective field theories are the most general tool for the description of low energy phenomena. They are universal and systematic: they can be formulated for any low energy systems we can think of and offer a clear guide on how to calculate predictions with reliable error estimates, a feature that is called power counting. These properties can be easily understood in Wilsonian renormalization, in which effective field theories are the low energy renormalization group evolution of a more fundamental — perhaps unknown or unsolvable — high energy theory. In nuclear physics they provide the possibility of a theoretically sound derivation of nuclear forces without having to solve quantum chromodynamics explicitly. However there is the problem of how to organize calculations within nuclear effective field theory: the traditional knowledge about power counting is perturbative but nuclear physics is not. Yet power counting can be derived in Wilsonian renormalization and there is already a fairly good understanding of how to apply these ideas to non-perturbative phenomena and in particular to nuclear physics. Here we review a few of these ideas, explain power counting in two-nucleon scattering and reactions with external probes and hint at how to extend the present analysis beyond the two-body problem.

  6. Recent Progress in Nuclear Lattice Simulations with Effective Field Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, D.

    2007-10-01

    This proceedings article summarizes recent work presented at Chiral Dynamics 2006 on nuclear lattice simulations with chiral effective field theory for light nuclei. This work has been done in collaboration with Bubar {gra} Borasoy , Evgeny Epelbaum, Hermann Krebs, and Ulf-G. Meißner.

  7. Nuclear Parity-Violation in Effective Field Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Shi-Lin Zhu; C.M. Maekawa; B.R. Holstein; M.J. Ramsey-Musolf; U van Kolck

    2005-02-21

    We reformulate the analysis of nuclear parity-violation (PV) within the framework of effective field theory (EFT). To order Q, the PV nucleon-nucleon (NN) interaction depends on five a priori unknown constants that parameterize the leading-order, short-range four-nucleon operators. When pions are included as explicit degrees of freedom, the potential contains additional medium- and long-range components parameterized by PV piNN couplings. We derive the form of the corresponding one- and two-pion-exchange potentials. We apply these considerations to a set of existing and prospective PV few-body measurements that may be used to determine the five independent low-energy constants relevant to the pionless EFT and the additional constants associated with dynamical pions. We also discuss the relationship between the conventional meson-exchange framework and the EFT formulation, and argue that the latter provides a more general and systematic basis for analyzing nuclear PV.

  8. Nuclear structure and reactions using lattice effective field theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rupak, Gautam

    2016-09-01

    Effective field theory (EFT) formulated on a space-time lattice provides a model-independent framework for ab initio nuclear structure and reaction calculations. The EFT interactions are rooted in quantum chromodynamics through low energy symmetry constraints. In this talk I present several recent developments in lattice EFT, in particular I present the so called adiabatic projection method that enables elastic and in-elastic reaction calculations. Bound state properties of atomic nuclei such as carbon and oxygen will also be presented. Partial support from US National Science Foundation Grant PHY-1307453 is acknowledged.

  9. Beyond-mean-field effects on nuclear triaxiality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ya, Tu; Chen, Yong-Shou; Gao, Zao-Chun; Liu, Ling; Chen, Yong-Jing

    2017-06-01

    The beyond-mean-field effects on nuclear triaxiality are studied by applying the projected total energy surface (PTES) calculations to the light tungsten isotopes -178W170, which have been well described as prolate rotors within the mean-field approximation. The present PTES calculations have well reproduced the experimental energies of the yrast states and the available experimental transition quardrupole moment (Qt) in function of spin. In particular, the results present a considerable large triaxiality for their ground states, with an average triaxial deformation γ ˜15∘ . For a comparison, the total Routhian surface calculations have also been performed for these nuclei, the results show a well-established axial quadrupole deformation in their ground states. The presence of the significant triaxial deformation can be attributed to the beyond-mean-field effect as the angular momentum projection. This effect is therefore essential for a variety of mean-field approaches since it is only associated with the necessary restoration of the rotational symmetry in the laboratory frame, which is spontaneously broken in the intrinsic frame.

  10. Effect of a strong magnetic field on the energy yield of nuclear reactions in dense nuclear matter

    SciTech Connect

    Sekerzhitskii, V.S.

    1995-01-01

    According to modern concepts, the electron-neutron-nuclear (Aen) phase of dense highly degenerate matter can be realized in the shells of neutron stars. This phase has relatively stable and absolutely stable states of thermodynamic equilibrium. Strong magnetic fields can exist in neutron stars. For this reason, analysis of their effect on the characteristics of the Aen phase is of great interest. It is specially important to study the influence of strong magnetic fields on the energy yield of nuclear reactions in dense nuclear matter because the transition to the absolute equilibrium state proceeds through these reactions.

  11. Power counting for nuclear forces in chiral effective field theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Bingwei

    2016-02-01

    The present note summarizes the discourse on power counting issues of chiral nuclear forces, with an emphasis on renormalization-group invariance. Given its introductory nature, I will lean toward narrating a coherent point of view on the concepts, rather than covering comprehensively the development of chiral nuclear forces in different approaches.

  12. Three-Body Nuclear Systems in Pionless Effective Field Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanasse, Jared

    2016-03-01

    New perturbative techniques for three-body systems with contact interactions are discussed. Their application to pionless effective field theory (EF{Tnot π }) for nd scattering is shown, and their extension to bound states addressed. With the extension to bound states a leading-order EF{Tnot π } calculation of the triton charge radius and novel treatments of three-body forces are discussed.

  13. Nuclear axial currents in chiral effective field theory

    SciTech Connect

    Baroni, Alessandro; Girlanda, Luca; Pastore, Saori; Schiavilla, Rocco; Viviani, Michele

    2016-01-11

    Two-nucleon axial charge and current operators are derived in chiral effective field theory up to one loop. The derivation is based on time-ordered perturbation theory and accounts for cancellations between the contributions of irreducible diagrams and the contributions owing to nonstatic corrections from energy denominators of reducible diagrams. Ultraviolet divergencies associated with the loop corrections are isolated in dimensional regularization. The resulting axial current is finite and conserved in the chiral limit, while the axial charge requires renormalization. As a result, a complete set of contact terms for the axial charge up to the relevant order in the power counting is constructed.

  14. Nuclear axial currents in chiral effective field theory

    DOE PAGES

    Baroni, Alessandro; Girlanda, Luca; Pastore, Saori; ...

    2016-01-11

    Two-nucleon axial charge and current operators are derived in chiral effective field theory up to one loop. The derivation is based on time-ordered perturbation theory and accounts for cancellations between the contributions of irreducible diagrams and the contributions owing to nonstatic corrections from energy denominators of reducible diagrams. Ultraviolet divergencies associated with the loop corrections are isolated in dimensional regularization. The resulting axial current is finite and conserved in the chiral limit, while the axial charge requires renormalization. As a result, a complete set of contact terms for the axial charge up to the relevant order in the power countingmore » is constructed.« less

  15. Ab initio nuclear structure from lattice effective field theory

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Dean

    2014-11-11

    This proceedings article reviews recent results by the Nuclear Lattice EFT Collaboration on an excited state of the {sup 12}C nucleus known as the Hoyle state. The Hoyle state plays a key role in the production of carbon via the triple-alpha reaction in red giant stars. We discuss the structure of low-lying states of {sup 12}C as well as the dependence of the triple-alpha reaction on the masses of the light quarks.

  16. Foundations of strangeness nuclear physics derived from chiral effective field theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meißner, Ulf-G.; Haidenbauer, Johann

    Dense compact objects like neutron stars or black holes have always been one of Gerry Brown’s favorite research topics. This is closely related to the effects of strangeness in nuclear physics. Here, we review the chiral Effective Field Theory approach to interactions involving nucleons and hyperons, the possible existence of strange dibaryons, the fate of hyperons in nuclear matter and the present status of three-body forces involving hyperons and nucleons.

  17. Spinodal instabilities and the distillation effect in nuclear matter under strong magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Rabhi, A.; Providencia, C.; Providencia, J. Da

    2009-01-15

    We study the effect of strong magnetic fields, of the order of 10{sup 18}-10{sup 19} G, on the instability region of nuclear matter at subsaturation densities. Relativistic nuclear models both with constant couplings and with density-dependent parameters are considered. It is shown that a strong magnetic field can have large effects on the instability regions giving rise to bands of instability and wider unstable regions. As a consequence, we predict larger transition densities at the inner edge of the crust of compact stars with strong magnetic fields. The direction of instability gives rise to a very strong distillation effect if the last Landau level is only partially filled. However, for almost completed Landau levels, an antidistillation effect may occur.

  18. Chiral symmetry and effective field theories for hadronic, nuclear and stellar matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holt, Jeremy W.; Rho, Mannque; Weise, Wolfram

    2016-03-01

    Chiral symmetry, first entering in nuclear physics in the 1970s for which Gerry Brown played a seminal role, has led to a stunningly successful framework for describing strongly-correlated nuclear dynamics both in finite and infinite systems. We review how the early, germinal idea conceived with the soft-pion theorems in the pre-QCD era has evolved into a highly predictive theoretical framework for nuclear physics, aptly assessed by Steven Weinberg: "it (chiral effective field theory) allows one to show in a fairly convincing way that what they (nuclear physicists) have been doing all along... is the correct first step in a consistent approximation scheme". Our review recounts both how the theory presently fares in confronting Nature and how one can understand its extremely intricate workings in terms of the multifaceted aspects of chiral symmetry, namely, chiral perturbation theory, skyrmions, Landau Fermi-liquid theory, the Cheshire cat phenomenon, and hidden local and mended symmetries.

  19. The ``Folk Theorem'' on effective field theory: How does it fare in nuclear physics?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rho, Mannque

    2017-10-01

    This is a brief history of what I consider as very important, some of which truly seminal, contributions made by young Korean nuclear theorists, mostly graduate students working on PhD thesis in 1990s and early 2000s, to nuclear effective field theory, nowadays heralded as the first-principle approach to nuclear physics. The theoretical framework employed is an effective field theory anchored on a single scale-invariant hidden local symmetric Lagrangian constructed in the spirit of Weinberg's "Folk Theorem" on effective field theory. The problems addressed are the high-precision calculations on the thermal np capture, the solar pp fusion process, the solar hep process — John Bahcall's challenge to nuclear theorists — and the quenching of g A in giant Gamow-Teller resonances and the whopping enhancement of first-forbidden beta transitions relevant in astrophysical processes. Extending adventurously the strategy to a wild uncharted domain in which a systematic implementation of the "theorem" is far from obvious, the same effective Lagrangian is applied to the structure of compact stars. A surprising, unexpected, result on the properties of massive stars, totally different from what has been obtained up to day in the literature, is predicted, such as the precocious onset of conformal sound velocity together with a hint for the possible emergence in dense matter of hidden symmetries such as scale symmetry and hidden local symmetry.

  20. QED and nuclear effects in strong optical and x-ray laser fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Piazza, A.; Pálffy, A.; Liao, W.-T.; Hatsagortsyan, K. Z.; Keitel, C. H.

    2011-06-01

    The possibility of employing strong optical and x-ray laser fields to investigate processes in the realm of classical and quantum electrodynamics as well as nuclear quantum optics is considered. In the first part we show on the theoretical side how modern strong optical laser fields can be employed to test the fundamental classical equations of motion of the electron which include radiation reaction, i.e., the effect of the radiation emitted by the electron on its own motion. Then, we clarify the quantum origin of radiation reaction and discuss a new radiation regime where both quantum and radiation effects dominate the electron dynamics. The second part is dedicated to the possibility of controlling nuclear transitions with coherent x-ray light. In particular, we investigate the resonant driving of nuclear transitions by super-intense x-ray laser fields considering parameters of upcoming high-frequency coherent light sources. As relevant application, the controlled pumping or release of energy stored in long-lived nuclear states is discussed.

  1. Effect of the {delta} meson on the instabilities of nuclear matter under strong magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Rabhi, A.; Providencia, C.; Da Providencia, J.

    2009-08-15

    We study the influence of the isovector-scalar meson on the spinodal instabilities and the distillation effect in asymmetric nonhomogenous nuclear matter under strong magnetic fields of the order of 10{sup 18}-10{sup 19} G. Relativistic nuclear models both with constant couplings (NLW) and with density-dependent parameters (DDRH) are considered. A strong magnetic field can have large effects on the instability regions giving rise to bands of instability and wider unstable regions. It is shown that for neutron-rich matter the inclusion of the {delta} meson increases the size of the instability region for NLW models and decreases it for the DDRH models. The effect of the {delta} meson on the transition density to homogeneous {beta}-equilibrium matter is discussed. The DDRH{delta} model predicts the smallest transition pressures, about half the values obtained for NL{delta}.

  2. EFFECTS OF MAGNETIC FIELDS ON THE PROPAGATION OF NUCLEAR FLAMES IN MAGNETIC WHITE DWARFS

    SciTech Connect

    Kutsuna, Masamichi; Shigeyama, Toshikazu

    2012-04-10

    We investigate the effects of the magnetic field on the propagation of laminar flames of nuclear reactions taking place in white dwarfs with masses close to the Chandrasekhar limit. We calculate the velocities of laminar flames parallel and perpendicular to uniform magnetic fields as eigenvalues of steady solutions for magnetic hydrodynamical equations. As a result, we find that even when the magnetic pressure does not dominate the entire pressure it is possible for the magnetic field to suppress the flame propagation through the thermal conduction. Above the critical magnetic field, the flame velocity decreases with increasing magnetic field strength as v {approx} B{sup -1}. In media with densities of 10{sup 7}, 10{sup 8}, and 10{sup 9} g cm{sup -3}, the critical magnetic fields are orders of {approx}10{sup 10}, 10{sup 11}, and 10{sup 12} G, respectively.

  3. The magnetic field dependence of cross-effect dynamic nuclear polarization under magic angle spinning

    SciTech Connect

    Mance, Deni; Baldus, Marc; Gast, Peter; Huber, Martina; Ivanov, Konstantin L.

    2015-06-21

    We develop a theoretical description of Dynamic Nuclear Polarization (DNP) in solids under Magic Angle Spinning (MAS) to describe the magnetic field dependence of the DNP effect. The treatment is based on an efficient scheme for numerical solution of the Liouville-von Neumann equation, which explicitly takes into account the variation of magnetic interactions during the sample spinning. The dependence of the cross-effect MAS-DNP on various parameters, such as the hyperfine interaction, electron-electron dipolar interaction, microwave field strength, and electron spin relaxation rates, is analyzed. Electron spin relaxation rates are determined by electron paramagnetic resonance measurements, and calculations are compared to experimental data. Our results suggest that the observed nuclear magnetic resonance signal enhancements provided by MAS-DNP can be explained by discriminating between “bulk” and “core” nuclei and by taking into account the slow DNP build-up rate for the bulk nuclei.

  4. The magnetic field dependence of cross-effect dynamic nuclear polarization under magic angle spinning.

    PubMed

    Mance, Deni; Gast, Peter; Huber, Martina; Baldus, Marc; Ivanov, Konstantin L

    2015-06-21

    We develop a theoretical description of Dynamic Nuclear Polarization (DNP) in solids under Magic Angle Spinning (MAS) to describe the magnetic field dependence of the DNP effect. The treatment is based on an efficient scheme for numerical solution of the Liouville-von Neumann equation, which explicitly takes into account the variation of magnetic interactions during the sample spinning. The dependence of the cross-effect MAS-DNP on various parameters, such as the hyperfine interaction, electron-electron dipolar interaction, microwave field strength, and electron spin relaxation rates, is analyzed. Electron spin relaxation rates are determined by electron paramagnetic resonance measurements, and calculations are compared to experimental data. Our results suggest that the observed nuclear magnetic resonance signal enhancements provided by MAS-DNP can be explained by discriminating between "bulk" and "core" nuclei and by taking into account the slow DNP build-up rate for the bulk nuclei.

  5. Chirality-sensitive effects induced by nuclear relaxation in an electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garbacz, Piotr

    2016-12-01

    Two effects induced by the interaction between an electric field E and a permanent electric dipole moment 𝝁𝒆 of a chiral molecule placed in a magnetic field B are discussed as follows: (i) a spin-1/2 nucleus relaxes faster and the increase in the relaxation rate is the same for both enantiomers and (ii) in a two-spin system a cross correlation between the dipole-dipole relaxation mechanism and the interaction between nuclear magnetic shielding and the dipole moment 𝝁𝒆 enables the direct discrimination between the enantiomers. The former effect is too small in magnitude to be observed experimentally. For detection of the latter, an experimental procedure based on the application of an electric field oscillating at a frequency equal to the difference between the spin-precession frequencies of two heteronuclear spins is proposed.

  6. Probing the effective nuclear-spin magnetic field in a single quantum dot via full counting statistics

    SciTech Connect

    Xue, Hai-Bin; Nie, Yi-Hang; Chen, Jingzhe; Ren, Wei

    2015-03-15

    We study theoretically the full counting statistics of electron transport through a quantum dot weakly coupled to two ferromagnetic leads, in which an effective nuclear-spin magnetic field originating from the configuration of nuclear spins is considered. We demonstrate that the quantum coherence between the two singly-occupied eigenstates and the spin polarization of two ferromagnetic leads play an important role in the formation of super-Poissonian noise. In particular, the orientation and magnitude of the effective field have a significant influence on the variations of the values of high-order cumulants, and the variations of the skewness and kurtosis values are more sensitive to the orientation and magnitude of the effective field than the shot noise. Thus, the high-order cumulants of transport current can be used to qualitatively extract information on the orientation and magnitude of the effective nuclear-spin magnetic field in a single quantum dot. - Highlights: • The effective nuclear-spin magnetic field gives rise to the off-diagonal elements of the reduced density matrix of single QD. • The off-diagonal elements of reduced density matrix of the QD have a significant impact on the high-order current cumulants. • The high-order current cumulants are sensitive to the orientation and magnitude of the effective nuclear-spin magnetic field. • The FCS can be used to detect the orientation and magnitude of the effective nuclear-spin magnetic field in a single QD.

  7. Nuclear magnetic resonance studies of quadrupolar nuclei and dipolar field effects

    SciTech Connect

    Urban, Jeffry Todd

    2004-01-01

    Experimental and theoretical research conducted in two areas in the field of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is presented: (1) studies of the coherent quantum-mechanical control of the angular momentum dynamics of quadrupolar (spin I > 1/2) nuclei and its application to the determination of molecular structure; and (2) applications of the long-range nuclear dipolar field to novel NMR detection methodologies.The dissertation is organized into six chapters. The first two chapters and associated appendices are intended to be pedagogical and include an introduction to the quantum mechanical theory of pulsed NMR spectroscopy and the time dependent theory of quantum mechanics. The third chapter describes investigations of the solid-state multiple-quantum magic angle spinning (MQMAS) NMR experiment applied to I = 5/2 quadrupolar nuclei. This work reports the use of rotary resonance-matched radiofrequency irradiation for sensitivity enhancement of the I = 5/2 MQMAS experiment. These experiments exhibited certain selective line narrowing effects which were investigated theoretically.The fourth chapter extends the discussion of multiple quantum spectroscopy of quadrupolar nuclei to a mostly theoretical study of the feasibility of enhancing the resolution of nitrogen-14 NMR of large biomolecules in solution via double-quantum spectroscopy. The fifth chapter continues to extend the principles of multiple quantum NMR spectroscopy of quadrupolar nuclei to make analogies between experiments in NMR/nuclear quadrupolar resonance (NQR) and experiments in atomic/molecular optics (AMO). These analogies are made through the Hamiltonian and density operator formalism of angular momentum dynamics in the presence of electric and magnetic fields.The sixth chapter investigates the use of the macroscopic nuclear dipolar field to encode the NMR spectrum of an analyte nucleus indirectly in the magnetization of a sensor nucleus. This technique could potentially serve as an

  8. Effect of the Nuclear Hyperfine Field on the 2D Electron Conductivity in the Quantum Hall Regime

    SciTech Connect

    VITKALOV,S.A.; BOWERS,C.R.; SIMMONS,JERRY A.; RENO,JOHN L.

    2000-07-13

    The effect of the nuclear hyperfine interaction on the dc conductivity of 2D electrons under quantum Hall effect conditions at filling factor v= 1 is observed for the first time. The local hyperfine field enhanced by dynamic nuclear polarization is monitored via the Overhauser shift of the 2D conduction electron spin resonance in AlGaAs/GaAs multiquantum-well samples. The experimentally observed change in the dc conductivity resulting from dynamic nuclear polarization is in agreement with a thermal activation model incorporating the Zeeman energy change due to the hyperfine interaction. The relaxation decay time of the dc conductivity is, within experimental error, the same as the relaxation time of the nuclear spin polarization determined from the Overhauser shift. These findings unequivocally establish the nuclear spin origins of the observed conductivity change.

  9. Nuclear weapons, nuclear effects, nuclear war

    SciTech Connect

    Bing, G.F.

    1991-08-20

    This paper provides a brief and mostly non-technical description of the militarily important features of nuclear weapons, of the physical phenomena associated with individual explosions, and of the expected or possible results of the use of many weapons in a nuclear war. Most emphasis is on the effects of so-called ``strategic exchanges.``

  10. Nuclear signature effect on spatial distribution of molecular harmonic in the presence of spatial inhomogeneous field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Liqiang; Li, Wenliang

    2017-01-01

    Spatial distribution of the molecular harmonic spectra from \\text{H}\\text{2}+ in the presence of inhomogeneous field has been theoretically investigated. It shows that (i) the harmonic intensities from the negative-H nucleus play the dominating role in harmonic emission spectra. (ii) Through the investigations of the nuclear signature effect on the spatial distribution of the molecular harmonic spectra, the differences of the harmonic intensities between the negative-H nucleus and the positive-H nucleus can be enhanced and reduced with the introduction of the higher vibrational state and the heavy nucleus (i.e. \\text{D}2+ ), respectively. The time-frequency analyses of the harmonic spectra, the time-dependent wave function and the electron localization have been shown to explain the harmonic spatial distribution and the electron motion. (iii) Due to the plasmon-resonance-enhancement near the metallic nanostructure, the harmonic cutoff can be remarkably enhanced as the spatial position of the inhomogeneous field moving away from the gap center. The ionization probabilities have been shown to explain the harmonic cutoff extension.

  11. Boundary effects of molecular diffusion in nanoporous materials: A pulsed field gradient nuclear magnetic resonance study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geier, Oliver; Snurr, Randall Q.; Stallmach, Frank; Kärger, Jörg

    2004-01-01

    The boundary conditions of intraparticle diffusion in nanoporous materials may be chosen to approach the limiting cases of either absorbing or reflecting boundaries, depending on the host-guest system under study and the temperature of measurement. Pulsed field gradient nuclear magnetic resonance is applied to monitor molecular diffusion of n-hexane and of an n-hexane-tetrafluoromethane mixture adsorbed in zeolite crystallites of type NaX under either of these limiting conditions. Taking advantage of the thus-established peculiarities of mass transfer at the interface between the zeolite bulk phase and the surrounding atmosphere, three independent routes for probing the crystal size are compared. These techniques are based on (i) the measurement of the effective diffusivity under complete confinement, (ii) the application of the so-called NMR tracer desorption technique, and (iii) an analysis of the time dependence of the effective diffusivity in the short-time limit where, by an appropriate variation of the adsorbate and the measuring conditions, the limiting cases of reflecting and adsorbing boundaries could be considered. All these techniques are found to yield coinciding results, which are in excellent agreement with the crystal sizes determined by microscopy.

  12. Molecular dynamics-based selectivity for Fast-Field-Cycling relaxometry by Overhauser and solid effect dynamic nuclear polarization.

    PubMed

    Neudert, Oliver; Mattea, Carlos; Stapf, Siegfried

    2017-03-01

    In the last decade nuclear spin hyperpolarization methods, especially Dynamic Nuclear Polarization (DNP), have provided unprecedented possibilities for various NMR techniques by increasing the sensitivity by several orders of magnitude. Recently, in-situ DNP-enhanced Fast Field Cycling (FFC) relaxometry was shown to provide appreciable NMR signal enhancements in liquids and viscous systems. In this work, a measurement protocol for DNP-enhanced NMR studies is introduced which enables the selective detection of nuclear spin hyperpolarized by either Overhauser effect or solid effect DNP. Based on field-cycled DNP and relaxation studies it is shown that these methods allow for the independent measurement of polymer and solvent nuclear spins in a concentrated solution of high molecular weight polybutadiene in benzene doped with α,γ-bisdiphenylene-β-phenylallyl radical. Appreciable NMR signal enhancements of about 10-fold were obtained for both constituents. Moreover, qualitative information about the dynamics of the radical and solvent was obtained. Selective DNP-enhanced FFC relaxometry is applied for the measurement of the (1)H nuclear magnetic relaxation dispersion of both constituents with improved precision. The introduced method is expected to greatly facilitate NMR studies of complex systems with multiple overlapping signal contributions that cannot be distinguished by standard methods. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Molecular dynamics-based selectivity for Fast-Field-Cycling relaxometry by Overhauser and solid effect dynamic nuclear polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neudert, Oliver; Mattea, Carlos; Stapf, Siegfried

    2017-03-01

    In the last decade nuclear spin hyperpolarization methods, especially Dynamic Nuclear Polarization (DNP), have provided unprecedented possibilities for various NMR techniques by increasing the sensitivity by several orders of magnitude. Recently, in-situ DNP-enhanced Fast Field Cycling (FFC) relaxometry was shown to provide appreciable NMR signal enhancements in liquids and viscous systems. In this work, a measurement protocol for DNP-enhanced NMR studies is introduced which enables the selective detection of nuclear spin hyperpolarized by either Overhauser effect or solid effect DNP. Based on field-cycled DNP and relaxation studies it is shown that these methods allow for the independent measurement of polymer and solvent nuclear spins in a concentrated solution of high molecular weight polybutadiene in benzene doped with α,γ-bisdiphenylene-β-phenylallyl radical. Appreciable NMR signal enhancements of about 10-fold were obtained for both constituents. Moreover, qualitative information about the dynamics of the radical and solvent was obtained. Selective DNP-enhanced FFC relaxometry is applied for the measurement of the 1H nuclear magnetic relaxation dispersion of both constituents with improved precision. The introduced method is expected to greatly facilitate NMR studies of complex systems with multiple overlapping signal contributions that cannot be distinguished by standard methods.

  14. A review on the relativistic effective field theory with parameterized couplings for nuclear matter and neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasconcellos, C. A. Zen

    2015-12-01

    Nuclear science has developed many excellent theoretical models for many-body systems in the domain of the baryon-meson strong interaction for the nucleus and nuclear matter at low, medium and high densities. However, a full microscopic understanding of nuclear systems in the extreme density domain of compact stars is still lacking. The aim of this contribution is to shed some light on open questions facing the nuclear many-body problem at the very high density domain. Here we focus our attention on the conceptual issue of naturalness and its role in shaping the baryon-meson phase space dynamics in the description of the equation of state (EoS) of nuclear matter and neutrons stars. In particular, in order to stimulate possible new directions of research, we discuss relevant aspects of a recently developed relativistic effective theory for nuclear matter within Quantum Hadrodynamics (QHD) with genuine many-body forces and derivative natural parametric couplings. Among other topics we discuss in this work the connection of this theory with other known effective QHD models of the literature and its potentiality in describing a new physics for dense matter. The model with parameterized couplings exhausts the whole fundamental baryon octet (n, p, Σ-, Σ0, Σ+, Λ, Ξ-, Ξ0) and simulates n-order corrections to the minimal Yukawa baryon couplings by considering nonlinear self-couplings of meson fields and meson-meson interaction terms coupled to the baryon fields involving scalar-isoscalar (σ, σ∗), vector-isoscalar (ω, ɸ), vector-isovector (ϱ) and scalar-isovector (δ) virtual sectors. Following recent experimental results, we consider in our calculations the extreme case where the Σ- experiences such a strong repulsion that its influence in the nuclear structure of a neutron star is excluded at all. A few examples of calculations of properties of neutron stars are shown and prospects for the future are discussed.

  15. Nuclear magnetic resonance dephasing effects in a spherical pore with a magnetic dipolar field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valckenborg, R. M. E.; Huinink, H. P.; Kopinga, K.

    2003-02-01

    The NMR dephasing behavior of the nuclear spins of a fluid confined in a porous material can be investigated by Hahn spin echoes. Previous experimental results on water in a magnetically doped clay have shown a nonmonoexponentially decaying magnetization, which can be understood neither by the known dephasing rate of freely diffusing spins in a uniform gradient nor by spins diffusing in a restricted geometry. For a better understanding of NMR measurements on these systems, a systematic survey was performed of the various length scales that are involved. The standard length scales for the situation of a uniform gradient are diffusing length, structure length, and dephasing length. We show that for a nonuniform gradient, a new length scale has to be introduced: the magnetic-field curvature length. When a particle diffuses less than this length scale, it experiences a local uniform gradient. In that case the spin-echo decay can be described by the so-called local gradient approximation (LGA). When a particle diffuses over a longer distance than the structure length, the spin-echo decay can be described by the motional averaging regime. For both regimes, scaling laws are derived. In this paper, a random-walk model is used to simulate the dephasing effect of diffusing spins in a spherical pore in the presence of a magnetic dipole field. By varying the dipole magnitude, situations can be created in which the dephasing behavior scales according to the motional averaging regime or according to the LGA regime, for certain ranges of echo times. Two model systems are investigated: a spherical pore in the vicinity of a magnetic point dipole and a spherical pore adjacent to a magnetic dipolar grain of the same size as the pore. The simulated magnetization decay curves of both model systems confirm the scaling laws. The LGA, characterized by a nonmonoexponential magnetization decay, is also investigated by calculating the spatially resolved magnetization in the pore. For this

  16. CO2 Injection Effects on Low-Field Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livo, K.; Prasad, M.

    2016-12-01

    We performed CO2 injection experiments on a saturated Berea sandstone core and a Niobrara mudpack to determine presence and magnitude of changes in low-field Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) response with CO2. Such NMR response changes can then be investigated to determine total CO2 adsorbed by rocks of differing mineralogies and to detect preferential pathways for CO2 created by dissolution. We recorded changes in NMR relaxation for low pressure CO2 injection in these differing rock types. Transverse relaxation (T2) experiments for acquiring the NMR signals were made with a low-field (2 MHz) MagritekTM NMR. The ProspaTM program was used for data inversion. T2 magnetic relaxation was acquired using Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) pulse sequences. CO2 was injected at a pressure of 50 psi with an ISCOTM syringe pump in an NMR pressure vessel made of torlon plastic. Results were obtained for a Berea sample, a Niobrara mudpack, and for both samples measured simultaneously. CO2 injection in the Berea core leads to a decrease in the relaxation time of the spectra data and an increase in signal amplitude at faster relaxation times. In the Niobrara sample, little shift in the relaxation time and smaller signal amplitude variation is seen.

  17. A review on the relativistic effective field theory with parameterized couplings for nuclear matter and neutron stars

    SciTech Connect

    Vasconcellos, C. A. Zen

    2015-12-17

    Nuclear science has developed many excellent theoretical models for many-body systems in the domain of the baryon-meson strong interaction for the nucleus and nuclear matter at low, medium and high densities. However, a full microscopic understanding of nuclear systems in the extreme density domain of compact stars is still lacking. The aim of this contribution is to shed some light on open questions facing the nuclear many-body problem at the very high density domain. Here we focus our attention on the conceptual issue of naturalness and its role in shaping the baryon-meson phase space dynamics in the description of the equation of state (EoS) of nuclear matter and neutrons stars. In particular, in order to stimulate possible new directions of research, we discuss relevant aspects of a recently developed relativistic effective theory for nuclear matter within Quantum Hadrodynamics (QHD) with genuine many-body forces and derivative natural parametric couplings. Among other topics we discuss in this work the connection of this theory with other known effective QHD models of the literature and its potentiality in describing a new physics for dense matter. The model with parameterized couplings exhausts the whole fundamental baryon octet (n, p, Σ{sup −}, Σ{sup 0}, Σ{sup +}, Λ, Ξ{sup −}, Ξ{sup 0}) and simulates n-order corrections to the minimal Yukawa baryon couplings by considering nonlinear self-couplings of meson fields and meson-meson interaction terms coupled to the baryon fields involving scalar-isoscalar (σ, σ∗), vector-isoscalar (ω, Φ), vector-isovector (ϱ) and scalar-isovector (δ) virtual sectors. Following recent experimental results, we consider in our calculations the extreme case where the Σ{sup −} experiences such a strong repulsion that its influence in the nuclear structure of a neutron star is excluded at all. A few examples of calculations of properties of neutron stars are shown and prospects for the future are discussed.

  18. Effects of Nuclear Weapons.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sartori, Leo

    1983-01-01

    Fundamental principles governing nuclear explosions and their effects are discussed, including three components of a nuclear explosion (thermal radiation, shock wave, nuclear radiation). Describes how effects of these components depend on the weapon's yield, its height of burst, and distance of detonation point. Includes effects of three…

  19. Effects of Nuclear Weapons.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sartori, Leo

    1983-01-01

    Fundamental principles governing nuclear explosions and their effects are discussed, including three components of a nuclear explosion (thermal radiation, shock wave, nuclear radiation). Describes how effects of these components depend on the weapon's yield, its height of burst, and distance of detonation point. Includes effects of three…

  20. Views of a devil`s advocate -- Fundamental challenges to effective field theory treatments of nuclear physics

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, T.D.

    1998-04-01

    The physics goals of the effective field theory program for nuclear phenomena are outlined. It is pointed out that there are multiple schemes for implementing EFT and it is presently not clear if any of these schemes is viable. Most of the applications of effective field theory ideas have been on nucleon-nucleon scattering. It is argued that this is little more than curve fitting and that other quantities need to be calculated to test the ideas. It is shown that EFT methods work well for certain bound state properties of the deuteron electric form factor. However, it is also shown that this success depends sensitively on the fact that the majority of the probability of the deuteron`s wave function is beyond the range of the potential. This circumstance is special to the deuteron suggesting that it will be very difficult to achieve the same kinds of success for tightly bound nuclei.

  1. Radiation effects on materials in the near-field of nuclear waste repository. 1998 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, L.M.; Ewing, R.C.

    1998-06-01

    'Site restoration activities at DOE facilities and the permanent disposal of nuclear waste generated at DOE facilities involve working with and within various types and levels of radiation fields. Once the nuclear waste is incorporated into a final form, radioactive decay will decrease the radiation field over geologic time scales, but the alpha-decay dose for these solids will still reach values as high as 10{sup 18} alpha-decay events/gm in periods as short as 1,000 years. This dose is well within the range for which important chemical (e.g., increased leach rate) and physical (e.g., volume expansion) changes may occur in crystalline ceramics. Release and sorption of long-lived actinides (e.g., {sup 237}Np) can provide a radiation exposure to backfill materials, and changes in important properties (e.g., cation exchange capacity) may occur. The objective of this research program is to evaluate the long term radiation effects in the materials in the near-field of a nuclear waste repository with accelerated experiments in the laboratory using energetic particles (electrons, ions and neutrons). Experiments on the microstructural evolution during irradiation of two important groups of materials, sheet silicates (e.g., clays) and zeolites (analcime), have been conducted; and studies of radiation-induced changes in chemical properties (e.g. cation exchange capacity) are underway. As of the mid-2nd year of the 3-year project, experiments on the microstructural evolution during irradiation of two important group of materials, sheet silicates (mica) and zeolites (analcime), have been conducted; and studies of radiation-induced changes in chemical properties (e.g., cation exchange capacity) are underway.'

  2. Toward order-by-order calculations of the nuclear and neutron matter equations of state in chiral effective field theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sammarruca, F.; Coraggio, L.; Holt, J. W.; Itaco, N.; Machleidt, R.; Marcucci, L. E.

    2015-05-01

    We calculate the nuclear and neutron matter equations of state from microscopic nuclear forces at different orders in chiral effective field theory and with varying momentum-space cutoff scales. We focus attention on how the order-by-order convergence depends on the choice of resolution scale and the implications for theoretical uncertainty estimates on the isospin asymmetry energy. Specifically we study the equations of state using consistent NLO and N2LO (next-to-next-to-leading order) chiral potentials where the low-energy constants cD and cE associated with contact vertices in the N2LO chiral three-nucleon force are fitted to reproduce the binding energies of H3 and He3 as well as the beta-decay lifetime of H3 . At these low orders in the chiral expansion there is little sign of convergence, while an exploratory study employing the N3LO two-nucleon force together with the N2LO three-nucleon force give first indications for (slow) convergence with low-cutoff potentials and poor convergence with higher-cutoff potentials. The consistent NLO and N2LO potentials described in the present work provide the basis for estimating theoretical uncertainties associated with the order-by-order convergence of nuclear many-body calculations in chiral effective field theory.

  3. Nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation and diffusion in the presence of internal gradients: the effect of magnetic field strength.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, J; Chandrasekera, T C; Johns, M L; Gladden, L F; Fordham, E J

    2010-02-01

    It is known that internal magnetic field gradients in porous materials, caused by susceptibility differences at the solid-fluid interfaces, alter the observed effective Nuclear Magnetic Resonance transverse relaxation times T2,eff. The internal gradients scale with the strength of the static background magnetic field B0. Here, we acquire data at various magnitudes of B0 to observe the influence of internal gradients on T2-T2 exchange measurements; the theory discussed and observations made are applicable to any T2-T2 analysis of heterogeneous materials. At high magnetic field strengths, it is possible to observe diffusive exchange between regions of local internal gradient extrema within individual pores. Therefore, the observed exchange pathways are not associated with pore-to-pore exchange. Understanding the significance of internal gradients in transverse relaxation measurements is critical to interpreting these results. We present the example of water in porous sandstone rock and offer a guideline to determine whether an observed T2,eff relaxation time distribution reflects the pore size distribution for a given susceptibility contrast (magnetic field strength) and spin echo separation. More generally, we confirm that for porous materials T1 provides a better indication of the pore size distribution than T2,eff at high magnetic field strengths (B0>1 T), and demonstrate the data analysis necessary to validate pore size interpretations of T2,eff measurements.

  4. Testing the Standard Model and Fundamental Symmetries in Nuclear Physics with Lattice QCD and Effective Field Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Walker-Loud, Andre

    2016-10-14

    The research supported by this grant is aimed at probing the limits of the Standard Model through precision low-energy nuclear physics. The work of the PI (AWL) and additional personnel is to provide theory input needed for a number of potentially high-impact experiments, notably, hadronic parity violation, Dark Matter direct detection and searches for permanent electric dipole moments (EDMs) in nucleons and nuclei. In all these examples, a quantitative understanding of low-energy nuclear physics from the fundamental theory of strong interactions, Quantum Chromo-Dynamics (QCD), is necessary to interpret the experimental results. The main theoretical tools used and developed in this work are the numerical solution to QCD known as lattice QCD (LQCD) and Effective Field Theory (EFT). This grant is supporting a new research program for the PI, and as such, needed to be developed from the ground up. Therefore, the first fiscal year of this grant, 08/01/2014-07/31/2015, has been spent predominantly establishing this new research effort. Very good progress has been made, although, at this time, there are not many publications to show for the effort. After one year, the PI accepted a job at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, so this final report covers just a single year of five years of the grant.

  5. Radiation effects on materials in the near-field of a nuclear waste repository. 1997 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, L.M.; Ewing, R.C.

    1997-11-25

    'Sheet silicates (e.g. micas and clays) are important constituents of a wide variety of geological formations such as granite, basalt, and sandstone. Sheet silicates, particularly clays such as bentonite are common materials in near-field engineered barriers in high-level nuclear waste (HLW) repositories. This is because migration of radionuclides from an underground HLW repository to the geosphere may be significantly reduced by sorption of radionuclides (e.g., Pu, U and Np) onto sheet silicates (e.g., clays and micas) that line the fractures and pores of the rocks along groundwater flowpaths. In addition to surface sorption, it has been suggested that some sheet silicates may also be able to incorporate many radionuclides, such as Cs and Sr, in the inter-layer sites of the sheet structure. However, theability of the sheet silicates to incorporate radionuclides and retard release and migration of radionuclides may be significantly affected by the near-field radiation due to the decay of fission products and actinides. for example, the unique properties of the sheet structures will be lost completely if the structure becomes amorphous due to irradiation effects. Thus, the study of irradiation effects on sheet-structures, such as structural damage and modification of chemical properties, are critical to the performance assessment of long-term repository behavior.'

  6. In Situ Effective Diffusion Coefficient Profiles in Live Biofilms Using Pulsed-Field Gradient Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Renslow, Ryan S.; Majors, Paul D.; McLean, Jeffrey S.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Ahmed, B.; Beyenal, Haluk

    2010-08-15

    Diffusive mass transfer in biofilms is characterized by the effective diffusion coefficient. It is well-documented that the effective diffusion coefficient can vary by location in a biofilm. The current literature is dominated by effective diffusion coefficient measurements for distinct cell clusters and stratified biofilms showing this spatial variation. Regardless of whether distinct cell clusters or surface-averaging methods are used, position-dependent measurements of the effective diffusion coefficient are currently: 1) invasive to the biofilm, 2) performed under unnatural conditions, 3) lethal to cells, and/or 4) spatially restricted to only certain regions of the biofilm. Invasive measurements can lead to inaccurate results and prohibit further (time dependent) measurements which are important for the mathematical modeling of biofilms. In this study our goals were to: 1) measure the effective diffusion coefficient for water in live biofilms, 2) monitor how the effective diffusion coefficient changes over time under growth conditions, and 3) correlate the effective diffusion coefficient with depth in the biofilm. We measured in situ two-dimensional effective diffusion coefficient maps within Shewanella oneidensis MR-1biofilms using pulsed-field gradient nuclear magnetic resonance methods, and used them to calculate surface-averaged relative effective diffusion coefficient (Drs) profiles. We found that 1) Drs decreased from the top of the biofilm to the bottom, 2) Drs profiles differed for biofilms of different ages, 3) Drs profiles changed over time and generally decreased with time, 4) all the biofilms showed very similar Drs profiles near the top of the biofilm, and 5) the Drs profile near the bottom of the biofilm was different for each biofilm. Practically, our results demonstrate that advanced biofilm models should use a variable effective diffusivity which changes with time and location in the biofilm.

  7. History and effectiveness of the enlistment bonus program for procuring nuclear-field personnel. Final report. [US Navy

    SciTech Connect

    Quester; Jeffries

    1985-10-01

    Enlistment bonuses are monetary incentives promised to potential recruits to induce them to sign contracts to join the Navy. The bonuses, paid upon successful completion of class A schools, have been awarded in military skill areas characterized by inadequate volunteer levels. This memorandum describes how the Navy has used enlistment bonuses. Additionally, it provides estimates of the efficacy of enlistment bonuses for procuring recruits for the nuclear field.

  8. Neutron-proton scattering at next-to-next-to-leading order in Nuclear Lattice Effective Field Theory

    DOE PAGES

    Alarcón, Jose Manuel; Du, Dechuan; Klein, Nico; ...

    2017-05-08

    Here, we present a systematic study of neutron-proton scattering in Nuclear Lattice Effective Field Theory (NLEFT), in terms of the computationally efficient radial Hamiltonian method. Our leading-order (LO) interaction consists of smeared, local contact terms and static one-pion exchange. We show results for a fully non-perturbative analysis up to next-to-next-to-leading order (NNLO), followed by a perturbative treatment of contributions beyond LO. The latter analysis anticipates practical Monte Carlo simulations of heavier nuclei. We explore how our results depend on the lattice spacing a, and estimate sources of uncertainty in the determination of the low-energy constants of the next-to-leading-order (NLO) two-nucleonmore » force. We give results for lattice spacings ranging from a = 1.97 fm down to a = 0.98 fm, and discuss the effects of lattice artifacts on the scattering observables. At a = 0.98 fm, lattice artifacts appear small, and our NNLO results agree well with the Nijmegen partial-wave analysis for S-wave and P-wave channels. We expect the peripheral partial waves to be equally well described once the lattice momenta in the pion-nucleon coupling are taken to coincide with the continuum dispersion relation, and higher-order (N3LO) contributions are included. Finally, we stress that for center-of-mass momenta below 100 MeV, the physics of the two-nucleon system is independent of the lattice spacing.« less

  9. Radiological Effects of Nuclear War.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shapiro, Charles S.

    1988-01-01

    Described are the global effects of nuclear war. Discussed are radiation dosages, limited nuclear attacks, strategic arms reductions, and other results reported at the workshop on nuclear war issues in Moscow in March 1988. (CW)

  10. Radiological Effects of Nuclear War.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shapiro, Charles S.

    1988-01-01

    Described are the global effects of nuclear war. Discussed are radiation dosages, limited nuclear attacks, strategic arms reductions, and other results reported at the workshop on nuclear war issues in Moscow in March 1988. (CW)

  11. Dynamic nuclear polarization at high magnetic fields

    PubMed Central

    Maly, Thorsten; Debelouchina, Galia T.; Bajaj, Vikram S.; Hu, Kan-Nian; Joo, Chan-Gyu; Mak–Jurkauskas, Melody L.; Sirigiri, Jagadishwar R.; van der Wel, Patrick C. A.; Herzfeld, Judith; Temkin, Richard J.; Griffin, Robert G.

    2009-01-01

    Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) is a method that permits NMR signal intensities of solids and liquids to be enhanced significantly, and is therefore potentially an important tool in structural and mechanistic studies of biologically relevant molecules. During a DNP experiment, the large polarization of an exogeneous or endogeneous unpaired electron is transferred to the nuclei of interest (I) by microwave (μw) irradiation of the sample. The maximum theoretical enhancement achievable is given by the gyromagnetic ratios (γe/γl), being ∼660 for protons. In the early 1950s, the DNP phenomenon was demonstrated experimentally, and intensively investigated in the following four decades, primarily at low magnetic fields. This review focuses on recent developments in the field of DNP with a special emphasis on work done at high magnetic fields (≥5 T), the regime where contemporary NMR experiments are performed. After a brief historical survey, we present a review of the classical continuous wave (cw) DNP mechanisms—the Overhauser effect, the solid effect, the cross effect, and thermal mixing. A special section is devoted to the theory of coherent polarization transfer mechanisms, since they are potentially more efficient at high fields than classical polarization schemes. The implementation of DNP at high magnetic fields has required the development and improvement of new and existing instrumentation. Therefore, we also review some recent developments in μw and probe technology, followed by an overview of DNP applications in biological solids and liquids. Finally, we outline some possible areas for future developments. PMID:18266416

  12. Nuclear polaron beyond the mean-field approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scalbert, D.

    2017-06-01

    In III-V semiconductors it was shown theoretically that under optical cooling the nuclear-spin polaron bound to neutral donors would form below some critical nuclear-spin temperature Tc [Merkulov, Phys. Solid State 40, 930 (1998), 10.1134/1.1130450]. The predicted critical behavior is a direct consequence of the use of the mean-field approximation. It is known however that in any finite-size system a critical behavior must be absent. Here we develop a model of the optically cooled nuclear polaron, which goes beyond the mean-field approximation. An expression of the generalized free energy of the optically cooled nuclear polaron, valid for a finite, albeit large, number of spins, is derived. This model permits us to describe the continuous transition from the fluctuation dominated regime to the collective regime, as the nuclear-spin temperature decreases. It is shown that due to the finite number of nuclear spins involved in the polaron, the critical effects close to Tc are smoothed by the spin fluctuations. Particularly, instead of a divergence, the nuclear-spin fluctuations exhibit a sharp peak at Tc, before being depressed well below Tc. Interestingly, the formation of the nuclear polaron can, in certain conditions, boost the nuclear polarization beyond the value obtained solely by optical pumping. Finally, we suggest that the nuclear polaron could be detected by spin noise spectroscopy or via its superparamagnetic behavior.

  13. Using nitrogen-14 nuclear quadrupole resonance and electric field gradient information for the study of radiation effects

    SciTech Connect

    Iselin, L.H.

    1995-12-01

    Nitrogen-14 nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) was used in an attempt to detect the effects of ionizing radiation on organic material. Previously reported resonances for urea were detected at 2,913.32 {+-} 0.01 kHz and 2,347.88 {+-} 0.08 kHz with associated T{sub 2}* values 780 {+-} 20 {micro}s and 523 {+-} 24 {micro}s, respectively. The previously unreported {nu}{sub {minus}} line for urea-d{sup 4} was detected at 2,381 {+-} 0.04 Khz and used to determine accurately for the first time the values for the nuclear quadrupole coupling constant {chi} (3,548.74 {+-} 0.03 kHz) and the asymmetry parameter {eta} (0.31571 {+-} 0.00007) for urea-d{sup 4}. The inverse linewidth parameter T{sub 2}* for {nu}{sub +} was measured at 928 {+-} 23 {micro}s and for {nu}{sub {minus}} at 721 {+-} 12 {micro}s. Townes and Dailey analysis was performed and urea-d{sup 4} exhibits a 0.004 increase in lone pair electronic density and a slight decrease in N-H bond electronic density, as compared to urea, probably due to the mass difference. A relationship is proposed, referred to as NQR linewidth analysis, between the dynamic spin relaxation times T{sub 2} and T{sub 2}* and the widths of the distributions of the NQR parameters. Linewidth analysis is presented as a tool for possible use in future NQR work in all area, not just radiation effects. This relationship is tested using sodium nitrite T{sub 2} and T{sub 2}* values for {nu}{sub {minus}} and {nu}{sub {minus}} as a function of temperature.

  14. Interactions between dendrimers and ionic liquids revealed by pulsed field gradient and nuclear Overhauser effect NMR studies.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Libo; Li, Cai; Zhang, Jiahai; Wu, Qinglin; Xu, Tongwen; Cheng, Yiyun

    2012-06-21

    The host-guest interactions of cationic and anionic poly(amidoamine) (PAMAM) dendrimers with three ionic liquids including 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium 2-(2-methoxyethoxy)ethyl sulfate ([BMIM][MDEGSO(4)]), 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide ([BMIM][TFSI]), and trihexyltetradecylphosphonium bis((trifluoromethyl)sulfonyl)imide ([THTDP][TFSI]) were investigated by several NMR techniques such as (1)H and (19)F NMR, pulsed field gradient (PFG) NMR, and 2D nuclear Overhauser enhancement spectroscopy (NOESY). Anionic PAMAM dendrimer interacts with the ionic liquids via ionic interactions. However, almost no interaction is observed between cationic PAMAM dendrimer and the ionic liquids without pH adjustment. Besides, no inclusion formation between the PAMAM dendrimers and the ionic liquids is observed on the basis of NOE NMR studies. The interactions between dendrimers and ionic liquids are very different from those between dendrimers and surfactants or amphiphilic drugs. The results obtained from PFG and NOE studies provide new insights into dendrimer-based host-guest systems.

  15. Updates of the nuclear equation of state for core-collapse supernovae and neutron stars: effects of 3-body forces, QCD, and magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathews, G. J.; Meixner, M.; Olson, J. P.; Suh, I.-S.; Kajino, T.; Maruyama, T.; Hidaka, J.; Ryu, C.-Y.; Cheoun, M.-K.; Lan, N. Q.

    2013-07-01

    We summarize several new developments in the nuclear equation of state for supernova simulations and neutron stars. We discuss an updated and improved Notre-Dame-Livermore Equation of State (NDL EoS) for use in supernovae simulations. This Eos contains many updates. Among them are the effects of 3- body nuclear forces at high densities and the possible transition to a QCD chiral and/or super-conducting color phase at densities. We also consider the neutron star equation of state and neutrino transport in the presence of strong magnetic fields. We study a new quantum hadrodynamic (QHD) equation of state for neutron stars (with and without hyperons) in the presence of strong magnetic fields. The parameters are constrained by deduced masses and radii. The calculated adiabatic index for these magnetized neutron stars exhibit rapid changes with density. This may provide a mechanism for star-quakes and flares in magnetars. We also investigate the strong magnetic field effects on the moments of inertia and spin down of neutron stars. The change of the moment of inertia associated with emitted magnetic flares is shown to match well with observed glitches in some magnetars. We also discuss a perturbative calculation of neutrino scattering and absorption in hot and dense hyperonic neutron-star matter in the presence of a strong magnetic field. The absorption cross-sections show a remarkable angular dependence in that the neutrino absorption strength is reduced in a direction parallel to the magnetic field and enhanced in the opposite direction. The pulsar kick velocities associated with this asymmetry comparable to observed pulsar velocities and may affect the early spin down rate of proto-neutron star magnetars with a toroidal field configuration.

  16. Heisenberg spin exchange effects of nitroxide radicals on Overhauser dynamic nuclear polarization in the low field limit at 1.5mT.

    PubMed

    Lingwood, Mark D; Ivanov, Ivan A; Cote, Alissa R; Han, Songi

    2010-05-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at very low magnetic fields (0.05-20mT) have gained interest due to the simple and portable magnet design and newly emerging applications outside of the usual laboratory setting. A method to enhance the NMR signal is needed due to the low thermal polarization of nuclear spins at these fields; dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) via the Overhauser effect from free radicals is an attractive option. In this report we describe a DNP-enhanced NMR system operating at a fixed field of 1.5mT and measure (1)H signal enhancements of up to -350 fold during the saturation of a selected electron spin resonance (ESR) transition of dissolved nitroxide radicals. This -350 fold enhanced polarization is equivalent to what would be obtained by prepolarization in a 0.53T field. The ESR spectra at varying radical concentrations are indirectly found through DNP-enhanced NMR detection. Here, ESR line broadening at higher radical concentrations due to Heisenberg electron spin exchange is observed. Enhancements in the limit of maximum power are reported as a function of concentration for three ESR transitions, and are found to increase with concentration. The >300 fold (1)H NMR signal amplifications achievable at 1.5mT will reduce experimental time by several orders of magnitude, permitting NMR relaxation, imaging or pulsed-field gradient diffusion experiments that are inaccessible without using the DNP effect at 1.5mT. We demonstrate the potential benefit of such large signal amplification schemes through T(1) and T(2) relaxation measurements carried out in a much shorter time when employing DNP. Finally, we compare our results to those obtained in the earth's magnetic field and find that the signal to noise ratio (SNR) of DNP-enhanced signal at 1.5mT is much greater than that obtained by previous studies utilizing DNP enhancement in the 0.05mT earth's magnetic field. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Effective field theory search for high-energy nuclear recoils using the XENON100 dark matter detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aprile, E.; Aalbers, J.; Agostini, F.; Alfonsi, M.; Amaro, F. D.; Anthony, M.; Arneodo, F.; Barrow, P.; Baudis, L.; Bauermeister, B.; Benabderrahmane, M. L.; Berger, T.; Breur, P. A.; Brown, A.; Brown, E.; Bruenner, S.; Bruno, G.; Budnik, R.; Bütikofer, L.; Calvén, J.; Cardoso, J. M. R.; Cervantes, M.; Cichon, D.; Coderre, D.; Colijn, A. P.; Conrad, J.; Cussonneau, J. P.; Decowski, M. P.; de Perio, P.; di Gangi, P.; di Giovanni, A.; Diglio, S.; Eurin, G.; Fei, J.; Ferella, A. D.; Fieguth, A.; Fulgione, W.; Gallo Rosso, A.; Galloway, M.; Gao, F.; Garbini, M.; Geis, C.; Goetzke, L. W.; Greene, Z.; Grignon, C.; Hasterok, C.; Hogenbirk, E.; Itay, R.; Kaminsky, B.; Kazama, S.; Kessler, G.; Kish, A.; Landsman, H.; Lang, R. F.; Lellouch, D.; Levinson, L.; Lin, Q.; Lindemann, S.; Lindner, M.; Lombardi, F.; Lopes, J. A. M.; Manfredini, A.; Maris, I.; Marrodán Undagoitia, T.; Masbou, J.; Massoli, F. V.; Masson, D.; Mayani, D.; Messina, M.; Micheneau, K.; Molinario, A.; Morâ, K.; Murra, M.; Naganoma, J.; Ni, K.; Oberlack, U.; Pakarha, P.; Pelssers, B.; Persiani, R.; Piastra, F.; Pienaar, J.; Pizzella, V.; Piro, M.-C.; Plante, G.; Priel, N.; Rauch, L.; Reichard, S.; Reuter, C.; Rizzo, A.; Rosendahl, S.; Rupp, N.; Dos Santos, J. M. F.; Sartorelli, G.; Scheibelhut, M.; Schindler, S.; Schreiner, J.; Schumann, M.; Scotto Lavina, L.; Selvi, M.; Shagin, P.; Silva, M.; Simgen, H.; Sivers, M. V.; Stein, A.; Thers, D.; Tiseni, A.; Trinchero, G.; Tunnell, C.; Vargas, M.; Wang, H.; Wang, Z.; Wei, Y.; Weinheimer, C.; Wulf, J.; Ye, J.; Zhang., Y.; Farmer, B.; Xenon Collaboration

    2017-08-01

    We report on weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) search results in the XENON100 detector using a nonrelativistic effective field theory approach. The data from science run II (34 kg ×224.6 live days) were reanalyzed, with an increased recoil energy interval compared to previous analyses, ranging from (6.6 -240 ) keVnr . The data are found to be compatible with the background-only hypothesis. We present 90% confidence level exclusion limits on the coupling constants of WIMP-nucleon effective operators using a binned profile likelihood method. We also consider the case of inelastic WIMP scattering, where incident WIMPs may up-scatter to a higher mass state, and set exclusion limits on this model as well.

  18. Nuclear oncology, a fast growing field of nuclear medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olivier, Pierre

    2004-07-01

    Nuclear Medicine in oncology has been for a long time synonymous with bone scintigraphy, the first ever whole body imaging modality, and with treatment of thyroid cancer with iodine-131. More recently, somatostatin receptor scintigraphy (SRS) using peptides such as 111In-labelled octreotide became a reference imaging method in the detection and staging of neuroendocrine tumors while 131I- and 123I-MIBG remain the tracers of reference for pheochromocytomas and neuroblastomas. Lymphoscintigraphic imaging based on peritumoral injection of 99mTc-labelled colloids supports, in combination with per operative detection, the procedure of sentinel node identification in breast cancers and melanomas. Positron Emission Tomography (PET) is currently experiencing a considerable growth in oncology based on the use of 18F-FDG (fluorodeoxyglucose), a very sensitive, although non-specific, tumor tracer. Development of instrumentation is crucial in this expansion of PET imaging with new crystals being more sensitive and hybrid imagers that permit to reduce the acquisition time and offer fused PET-CT images. Current developments in therapy can be classified into three categories. Radioimmunotherapy (RIT) based on monoclonal antibodies (or fragments) labelled with beta-emitters. This technique has recently made its entrance in clinical practice with a 90Y-labelled anti-CD20 antibody ( 90Y-ibritumomab tiuxetan (Zevalin ®)) approved in US for the treatment of some subtypes of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. Radionuclide-bone pain palliation has experienced developments with 153Sm-EDTMP, 186Re-HEDP or 89Sr, efficient in patients with widespread disease. Last, the same peptides, as those used in SRS, are being developed for therapy, labelled with 90Y, 111In or 177Lu in patients who failed to respond to other treatments. Overall, nuclear oncology is currently a fast growing field thanks to the combined developments of radiopharmaceuticals and instrumentation.

  19. Nuclear effects at HERA

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, S.J.

    1996-07-01

    The development of a nuclear beam facility at HERA would allow the study of fundamental features of quark and gluon interactions in QCD. I briefly review the physics underlying nuclear shadowing and anti-shadowing as well as other diffractive and jet fragmentation processes that can be studies in high energy electron-nucleus collisions.

  20. Technical Papers Presented at the Defense Nuclear Agency Global Effects Review. Held at Moffett Field, California on 25-29 February 1986. Volume 2.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-05-15

    A195 150 TECHICAL PRIERS PRESENTED AT THE DEFENSE NUCLEAR 1/4 AGENCY GLOBL EFFECTS R.. (U) DOD NUCLEAR INFOR ATION AND ANALYSIS CENTER SANTA BARBARA...341u1 IIIH Sll# I.. lul - III " iV AD-A 185 150 DASIAC-TN-86-29-V2 TECHNICAL PAPERS PRESENTED AT THE DEFENSE NUCLEAR AGENCY GLOBAL EFFECTS REVIEW...DH008684 11 TITLE (lIncludie Securit Classification) TECHNICAL PAPERS PRESENTED AT THE DEFENSE NUCLEAR AGENCY GLOBAL EFFECTS REVIEW Volume 11 12. P

  1. Nuclear spin Hall and Klein tunneling effects during oxidation with electric and magnetic field inductions in graphene.

    PubMed

    Little, Reginald B; McClary, Felicia; Rice, Bria; Jackman, Corine; Mitchell, James W

    2012-12-14

    The recent observation of the explosive oxidation of graphene with enhancement for decreasing temperature and the requirements for synchronizing oxidants for collective oxidation-reduction (redox) reactions presented a chemical scenario for the thermal harvesting by the magnetic spin Hall Effect. More experimental data are presented to demonstrate such spin Hall Effect by determining the influence of spins of so-called spectator fermionic cations. Furthermore, the so-called spectator bosonic cations are discovered to cause a Klein tunneling effect during the redox reaction of graphene. The Na(+) and K(+), fermionic cations and the Mg(2+) and Ca(2+), bosonic cations were observed and compared under a variety of experimental conditions: adiabatic reactions with initial temperatures (18-22 °C); reactions toward infinite dilution; isothermal reactions under nonadiabatic conditions at low temperature of 18 °C; reactions under paramagnetic O(2) or diamagnetic N(2) atmospheres of different permeabilities; reactions in applied and no applied external magnetic field; and reactions toward excess concentrations of common and uncommon Na(+) and Mg(2+) cations. The observed reaction kinetics and dynamics under these various, diverse conditions are consistent with the spin Hall mechanism, energy harvesting and short time violation of Second Law of Thermodynamics for redox reactions of graphene by the Na(+)K(+) mixture and are consistent with the Klein tunnel mechanism for the redox reactions of graphene by the Mg(2+)Ca(2+) mixture. Mixed spin Hall and Klein tunnel mechanisms are discovered to slow and modulate explosive redox reactions. Such spin Hall Effect also gives explanation of recent tunneling of electrons through boron nitride.

  2. Nuclear magnetization in gallium arsenide quantum dots at zero magnetic field

    PubMed Central

    Sallen, G.; Kunz, S.; Amand, T.; Bouet, L.; Kuroda, T.; Mano, T.; Paget, D.; Krebs, O.; Marie, X.; Sakoda, K.; Urbaszek, B.

    2014-01-01

    Optical and electrical control of the nuclear spin system allows enhancing the sensitivity of NMR applications and spin-based information storage and processing. Dynamic nuclear polarization in semiconductors is commonly achieved in the presence of a stabilizing external magnetic field. Here we report efficient optical pumping of nuclear spins at zero magnetic field in strain-free GaAs quantum dots. The strong interaction of a single, optically injected electron spin with the nuclear spins acts as a stabilizing, effective magnetic field (Knight field) on the nuclei. We optically tune the Knight field amplitude and direction. In combination with a small transverse magnetic field, we are able to control the longitudinal and transverse components of the nuclear spin polarization in the absence of lattice strain—that is, in dots with strongly reduced static nuclear quadrupole effects, as reproduced by our model calculations. PMID:24500329

  3. Nuclear magnetization in gallium arsenide quantum dots at zero magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Sallen, G; Kunz, S; Amand, T; Bouet, L; Kuroda, T; Mano, T; Paget, D; Krebs, O; Marie, X; Sakoda, K; Urbaszek, B

    2014-01-01

    Optical and electrical control of the nuclear spin system allows enhancing the sensitivity of NMR applications and spin-based information storage and processing. Dynamic nuclear polarization in semiconductors is commonly achieved in the presence of a stabilizing external magnetic field. Here we report efficient optical pumping of nuclear spins at zero magnetic field in strain-free GaAs quantum dots. The strong interaction of a single, optically injected electron spin with the nuclear spins acts as a stabilizing, effective magnetic field (Knight field) on the nuclei. We optically tune the Knight field amplitude and direction. In combination with a small transverse magnetic field, we are able to control the longitudinal and transverse components of the nuclear spin polarization in the absence of lattice strain--that is, in dots with strongly reduced static nuclear quadrupole effects, as reproduced by our model calculations.

  4. In-field analysis and assessment of nuclear material

    SciTech Connect

    Morgado, R.E.; Myers, W.S.; Olivares, J.A.; Phillips, J.R.; York, R.L.

    1996-05-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory has actively developed and implemented a number of instruments to monitor, detect, and analyze nuclear materials in the field. Many of these technologies, developed under existing US Department of Energy programs, can also be used to effectively interdict nuclear materials smuggled across or within national borders. In particular, two instruments are suitable for immediate implementation: the NAVI-2, a hand-held gamma-ray and neutron system for the detection and rapid identification of radioactive materials, and the portable mass spectrometer for the rapid analysis of minute quantities of radioactive materials. Both instruments provide not only critical information about the characteristics of the nuclear material for law-enforcement agencies and national authorities but also supply health and safety information for personnel handling the suspect materials.

  5. Flat RF coils in static field gradient nuclear magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Stork, H; Gädke, A; Nestle, N; Fujara, F

    2009-10-01

    The use of flat RF coils allows considerable gains in the sensitivity of static field gradient (SFG) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments. In this article, this effect is studied theoretically as well as experimentally. Additionally, the flat coil geometry has been studied theoretically depending on magnetic field gradient, pulse sequence and amplifier power. Moreover, detecting the signal directly from the free induction decay (FID) turned out to be quite attractive for STRAFI-like microimaging experiments, especially when using flat coils. In addition to wound rectangular flat coils also spiral flat coils have been developed which can be manufactured by photolithography from printed circuit boards.

  6. Modeling nuclear field shift isotope fractionation in crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schauble, E. A.

    2013-12-01

    In this study nuclear field shift fractionations in solids (and chemically similar liquids) are estimated using calibrated density functional theory calculations. The nuclear field shift effect is a potential driver of mass independent isotope fractionation(1,2), especially for elements with high atomic number such as Hg, Tl and U. This effect is caused by the different shapes and volumes of isotopic nuclei, and their interactions with electronic structures and energies. Nuclear field shift isotope fractionations can be estimated with first principles methods, but the calculations are computationally difficult, limiting most theoretical studies so far to small gas-phase molecules and molecular clusters. Many natural materials of interest are more complex, and it is important to develop ways to estimate field shift effects that can be applied to minerals, solutions, in biomolecules, and at mineral-solution interfaces. Plane-wave density functional theory, in combination with the projector augmented wave method (DFT-PAW), is much more readily adapted to complex materials than the relativistic all-electron calculations that have been the focus of most previous studies. DFT-PAW is a particularly effective tool for studying crystals with periodic boundary conditions, and may also be incorporated into molecular dynamics simulations of solutions and other disordered phases. Initial calibrations of DFT-PAW calculations against high-level all-electron models of field shift fractionation suggest that there may be broad applicability of this method to a variety of elements and types of materials. In addition, the close relationship between the isomer shift of Mössbauer spectroscopy and the nuclear field shift isotope effect makes it possible, at least in principle, to estimate the volume component of field shift fractionations in some species that are too complex even for DFT-PAW models, so long as there is a Mössbauer isotope for the element of interest. Initial results

  7. Nuclear effects in Neutrino Nuclear Cross-sections

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, S. K.; Athar, M. Sajjad

    2008-02-21

    Nuclear effects in the quasielastic and inelastic scattering of neutrinos(antineutrinos) from nuclear targets have been studied. The calculations are done in the local density approximation which take into account the effect of nucleon motion as well as renormalisation of weak transition strengths in the nuclear medium. The inelastic reaction leading to production of pions is calculated in a {delta} dominance model taking into account the renormalization of {delta} properties in the nuclear medium.

  8. Saturated symmetric nuclear matter in strong magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diener, J. P. W.; Scholtz, F. G.

    2013-06-01

    Strongly magnetized symmetric nuclear matter is investigated within the context of effective baryon-meson exchange models. The magnetic field is coupled to the charge as well as the dipole moment of the baryons by including the appropriate terms in the Lagrangian density. The saturation density of magnetized, symmetric nuclear matter ρ0(B) was calculated for magnetic fields of the order of 1017 gauss. For the calculated range of ρ0(B) the binding energy, symmetry energy coefficient a4, and compressibility K of nuclear matter were also calculated. It is found that with an increasing magnetic field ρ0(B) increases, while the system becomes less bound. Furthermore, the depopulation of proton Landau levels leaves a distinct fluctuating imprint on K and a4. The calculations were also performed for increased values of the baryon magnetic dipole moment. By increasing the dipole moment strength ρ0(B) is found to decrease, but the system becomes more tightly bound while the fluctuations in K and a4 persist.

  9. Nuclear effects hardened shelters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindke, Paul

    1990-11-01

    The Houston Fearless 76 Government Projects Group has been actively engaged for more than twenty-five years as a sub-contractor and currently as a prime contractor in the design, manufacture, repair and logistics support of custom mobile ground stations and their equipment accommodations. Other associated products include environmental control units (ECU's), mobilizers for shelters and a variety of mobile power generation units (MPU's). Since 1984, Houston Fearless 76 has designed and manufactured four 8' x 8' x 22' nuclear hardened mobile shelters. These shelters were designed to contain electronic data processing/reduction equipment. One shelter is currently being operated by the Air Force as a Defense Intelligence Agency (DIA) approved and certified Special Corrpartmented Information Facility (SCIF). During the development and manufacturing process of the shelters, we received continual technical assistance and design concept evaluations from Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC) Operations Analysis and Logistics Engineering Division and the Nondestructive Inspection Lab at McClellan AFB. SAIC was originally employed by the Air Force to design the nuclear hardening specifications applied to these shelters. The specific levels of hardening to which the shelters were designed are classified and will not be mentioned during this presentation.

  10. Effect of rock composition and texture on pore size distributions in shales: Applications in low field nuclear magnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saidian, Milad

    ), and thermal maturity are the main factors that affect the reliability of a measurement technique in organic rich shales. The final step for surface relaxivity measurement is to combine the mentioned petrophysical measurement with NMR data and investigating the effect of rock composition and texture on surface relaxivity. The surface relaxivities were calculated for organic rich samples with different thermal maturity and also shales with no organic content. My results show that identification of paramagnetic minerals that affect the surface relaxivity, their content and distribution are the key factors that affect the surface relaxivity of the rock. In absence of ferromagnetic minerals, paramagnetic clays such as chlorite, illite and illite-smectite mixed layer are the main mineral groups that affect the surface relaxivity. Since clays are one of the controlling factors of rock quality and gamma ray logs respond to clays occurring in oil and gas producing formations, these logs can be used to help perform a more accurate NMR log interpretation.

  11. Nuclear field shift effect as a possible cause of Te isotopic anomalies in the early solar system —An alternative explanation of Fehr et al. (2006 and 2009)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moynier, F.; Fujii, T.; Albarède, F.

    2009-12-01

    We explore the possibility that Te isotopic anomalies measured in Ca-Al-rich inclusions (Fehr et al. 2009) and in leachates of carbonaceous chondrites (Fehr et al. 2006) may be due to mass-independent effects controlled by nuclear field shift rather than to nucleosynthetic processes. Fehr et al.’s spectrum of mass-independent anomalies of Te isotopes shows a smooth correlation with mass number and nuclear charge distribution. Ratios of even to odd isotopes, as the 125Te/126Te ratio used by these authors for normalization are particularly prone to nuclear field shift effects. We show that the alternative normalization of isotopic ratios to 130Te/126Te strongly reduces the trend of isotopic fractionation with mass number, leaving only 125Te as truly anomalous. For both normalizations (125Te/126Te and 130Te/126Te), Fehr et al.’s results fit the theory of Bigeleisen (1996), which suggests that the nuclear field shift effect can potentially account for the observed Te isotope abundances, as an alternative to nucleosynthetic processes. We propose that these mass-independent effects may be acquired during accretion of sulfides from the solar nebula.

  12. Advances in nuclear reaction calculations by incorporating information from nuclear mean-field theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawano, Toshihiko

    2017-09-01

    Mean-field model calculations for nuclear structure theories are combined with the statistical Hauser-Feshbach code in order to improve predictive capabilities of nuclear reaction for experimentally unknown cross sections. Utilizing the mean-field calculation results we calculate second moments of matrix elements for the residual interaction. The second moments are applied to a microscopic level density model based on the random matrix theory. An example is shown for the 208Pb level density calculation.

  13. Nuclear quantum effects in water.

    PubMed

    Morrone, Joseph A; Car, Roberto

    2008-07-04

    A path-integral Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics simulation of liquid water and ice is performed. It is found that the inclusion of nuclear quantum effects systematically improves the agreement of first-principles simulations of liquid water with experiment. In addition, the proton momentum distribution is computed utilizing a recently developed open path-integral molecular dynamics methodology. It is shown that these results are in good agreement with experimental data.

  14. Dynamic nuclear magnetic resonance field sensing with part-per-trillion resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gross, Simon; Barmet, Christoph; Dietrich, Benjamin E.; Brunner, David O.; Schmid, Thomas; Pruessmann, Klaas P.

    2016-12-01

    High-field magnets of up to tens of teslas in strength advance applications in physics, chemistry and the life sciences. However, progress in generating such high fields has not been matched by corresponding advances in magnetic field measurement. Based mostly on nuclear magnetic resonance, dynamic high-field magnetometry is currently limited to resolutions in the nanotesla range. Here we report a concerted approach involving tailored materials, magnetostatics and detection electronics to enhance the resolution of nuclear magnetic resonance sensing by three orders of magnitude. The relative sensitivity thus achieved amounts to 1 part per trillion (10-12). To exemplify this capability we demonstrate the direct detection and relaxometry of nuclear polarization and real-time recording of dynamic susceptibility effects related to human heart function. Enhanced high-field magnetometry will generally permit a fresh look at magnetic phenomena that scale with field strength. It also promises to facilitate the development and operation of high-field magnets.

  15. Dynamic nuclear magnetic resonance field sensing with part-per-trillion resolution.

    PubMed

    Gross, Simon; Barmet, Christoph; Dietrich, Benjamin E; Brunner, David O; Schmid, Thomas; Pruessmann, Klaas P

    2016-12-02

    High-field magnets of up to tens of teslas in strength advance applications in physics, chemistry and the life sciences. However, progress in generating such high fields has not been matched by corresponding advances in magnetic field measurement. Based mostly on nuclear magnetic resonance, dynamic high-field magnetometry is currently limited to resolutions in the nanotesla range. Here we report a concerted approach involving tailored materials, magnetostatics and detection electronics to enhance the resolution of nuclear magnetic resonance sensing by three orders of magnitude. The relative sensitivity thus achieved amounts to 1 part per trillion (10(-12)). To exemplify this capability we demonstrate the direct detection and relaxometry of nuclear polarization and real-time recording of dynamic susceptibility effects related to human heart function. Enhanced high-field magnetometry will generally permit a fresh look at magnetic phenomena that scale with field strength. It also promises to facilitate the development and operation of high-field magnets.

  16. Dynamic nuclear magnetic resonance field sensing with part-per-trillion resolution

    PubMed Central

    Gross, Simon; Barmet, Christoph; Dietrich, Benjamin E.; Brunner, David O.; Schmid, Thomas; Pruessmann, Klaas P.

    2016-01-01

    High-field magnets of up to tens of teslas in strength advance applications in physics, chemistry and the life sciences. However, progress in generating such high fields has not been matched by corresponding advances in magnetic field measurement. Based mostly on nuclear magnetic resonance, dynamic high-field magnetometry is currently limited to resolutions in the nanotesla range. Here we report a concerted approach involving tailored materials, magnetostatics and detection electronics to enhance the resolution of nuclear magnetic resonance sensing by three orders of magnitude. The relative sensitivity thus achieved amounts to 1 part per trillion (10−12). To exemplify this capability we demonstrate the direct detection and relaxometry of nuclear polarization and real-time recording of dynamic susceptibility effects related to human heart function. Enhanced high-field magnetometry will generally permit a fresh look at magnetic phenomena that scale with field strength. It also promises to facilitate the development and operation of high-field magnets. PMID:27910860

  17. Global Effects of Nuclear War: A Status Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turco, R. P.; Golitsyn, G. S.

    1988-01-01

    Provided is an update on nuclear winter research based on reports made at the Moscow meeting of the Scientific Committee on Problems of the Environment (SCOPE) including early results from a major field experimentation program. Describes the development and effects of smoke produced from nuclear detonations. (CW)

  18. Catalysis of nuclear reactions in hydrogen in a strong magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khersonskii, V. K.

    1986-10-01

    Calculations are made of the probabilities of nuclear reactions in HD(+), D2(+), and DT(+) molecular ions in a strong magnetic field. It is shown, that as the field intensity increases from 10 to the 12th to 10 to the 13 G, the probabilities of the nuclear reactions increase by ten orders of magnitude. The calculations allow for the effect of the vibrational-rotational state of the molecules on the reaction probabilities.

  19. Nuclear spin effects in optical lattice clocks

    SciTech Connect

    Boyd, Martin M.; Zelevinsky, Tanya; Ludlow, Andrew D.; Blatt, Sebastian; Zanon-Willette, Thomas; Foreman, Seth M.; Ye Jun

    2007-08-15

    We present a detailed experimental and theoretical study of the effect of nuclear spin on the performance of optical lattice clocks. With a state-mixing theory including spin-orbit and hyperfine interactions, we describe the origin of the {sup 1}S{sub 0}-{sup 3}P{sub 0} clock transition and the differential g factor between the two clock states for alkaline-earth-metal(-like) atoms, using {sup 87}Sr as an example. Clock frequency shifts due to magnetic and optical fields are discussed with an emphasis on those relating to nuclear structure. An experimental determination of the differential g factor in {sup 87}Sr is performed and is in good agreement with theory. The magnitude of the tensor light shift on the clock states is also explored experimentally. State specific measurements with controlled nuclear spin polarization are discussed as a method to reduce the nuclear spin-related systematic effects to below 10{sup -17} in lattice clocks.

  20. Modeling nuclear volume isotope effects in crystals.

    PubMed

    Schauble, Edwin A

    2013-10-29

    Mass-independent isotope fractionations driven by differences in volumes and shapes of nuclei (the field shift effect) are known in several elements and are likely to be found in more. All-electron relativistic electronic structure calculations can predict this effect but at present are computationally intensive and limited to modeling small gas phase molecules and clusters. Density functional theory, using the projector augmented wave method (DFT-PAW), has advantages in greater speed and compatibility with a three-dimensional periodic boundary condition while preserving information about the effects of chemistry on electron densities within nuclei. These electron density variations determine the volume component of the field shift effect. In this study, DFT-PAW calculations are calibrated against all-electron, relativistic Dirac-Hartree-Fock, and coupled-cluster with single, double (triple) excitation methods for estimating nuclear volume isotope effects. DFT-PAW calculations accurately reproduce changes in electron densities within nuclei in typical molecules, when PAW datasets constructed with finite nuclei are used. Nuclear volume contributions to vapor-crystal isotope fractionation are calculated for elemental cadmium and mercury, showing good agreement with experiments. The nuclear-volume component of mercury and cadmium isotope fractionations between atomic vapor and montroydite (HgO), cinnabar (HgS), calomel (Hg2Cl2), monteponite (CdO), and the CdS polymorphs hawleyite and greenockite are calculated, indicating preferential incorporation of neutron-rich isotopes in more oxidized, ionically bonded phases. Finally, field shift energies are related to Mössbauer isomer shifts, and equilibrium mass-independent fractionations for several tin-bearing crystals are calculated from (119)Sn spectra. Isomer shift data should simplify calculations of mass-independent isotope fractionations in other elements with Mössbauer isotopes, such as platinum and uranium.

  1. Modeling nuclear volume isotope effects in crystals

    PubMed Central

    Schauble, Edwin A.

    2013-01-01

    Mass-independent isotope fractionations driven by differences in volumes and shapes of nuclei (the field shift effect) are known in several elements and are likely to be found in more. All-electron relativistic electronic structure calculations can predict this effect but at present are computationally intensive and limited to modeling small gas phase molecules and clusters. Density functional theory, using the projector augmented wave method (DFT-PAW), has advantages in greater speed and compatibility with a three-dimensional periodic boundary condition while preserving information about the effects of chemistry on electron densities within nuclei. These electron density variations determine the volume component of the field shift effect. In this study, DFT-PAW calculations are calibrated against all-electron, relativistic Dirac–Hartree–Fock, and coupled-cluster with single, double (triple) excitation methods for estimating nuclear volume isotope effects. DFT-PAW calculations accurately reproduce changes in electron densities within nuclei in typical molecules, when PAW datasets constructed with finite nuclei are used. Nuclear volume contributions to vapor–crystal isotope fractionation are calculated for elemental cadmium and mercury, showing good agreement with experiments. The nuclear-volume component of mercury and cadmium isotope fractionations between atomic vapor and montroydite (HgO), cinnabar (HgS), calomel (Hg2Cl2), monteponite (CdO), and the CdS polymorphs hawleyite and greenockite are calculated, indicating preferential incorporation of neutron-rich isotopes in more oxidized, ionically bonded phases. Finally, field shift energies are related to Mössbauer isomer shifts, and equilibrium mass-independent fractionations for several tin-bearing crystals are calculated from 119Sn spectra. Isomer shift data should simplify calculations of mass-independent isotope fractionations in other elements with Mössbauer isotopes, such as platinum and uranium

  2. Modeling nuclear volume isotope effects in crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schauble, Edwin A.

    2013-10-01

    Mass-independent isotope fractionations driven by differences in volumes and shapes of nuclei (the field shift effect) are known in several elements and are likely to be found in more. All-electron relativistic electronic structure calculations can predict this effect but at present are computationally intensive and limited to modeling small gas phase molecules and clusters. Density functional theory, using the projector augmented wave method (DFT-PAW), has advantages in greater speed and compatibility with a three-dimensional periodic boundary condition while preserving information about the effects of chemistry on electron densities within nuclei. These electron density variations determine the volume component of the field shift effect. In this study, DFT-PAW calculations are calibrated against all-electron, relativistic Dirac-Hartree-Fock, and coupled-cluster with single, double (triple) excitation methods for estimating nuclear volume isotope effects. DFT-PAW calculations accurately reproduce changes in electron densities within nuclei in typical molecules, when PAW datasets constructed with finite nuclei are used. Nuclear volume contributions to vapor-crystal isotope fractionation are calculated for elemental cadmium and mercury, showing good agreement with experiments. The nuclear-volume component of mercury and cadmium isotope fractionations between atomic vapor and montroydite (HgO), cinnabar (HgS), calomel (Hg2Cl2), monteponite (CdO), and the CdS polymorphs hawleyite and greenockite are calculated, indicating preferential incorporation of neutron-rich isotopes in more oxidized, ionically bonded phases. Finally, field shift energies are related to Mössbauer isomer shifts, and equilibrium mass-independent fractionations for several tin-bearing crystals are calculated from 119Sn spectra. Isomer shift data should simplify calculations of mass-independent isotope fractionations in other elements with Mössbauer isotopes, such as platinum and uranium.

  3. Nucleosynthesis: a field with still many open nuclear physics questions

    SciTech Connect

    Goriely, S.

    2010-06-01

    Stellar nucleosynthesis is a vastly interdisciplinary field. There is a large number of different problems invoked calling for a variety of different and complementary research fields. Impressive progress has been made for the last decades in the various fields related to nucleosynthesis, especially in experimental and theoretical nuclear physics, as well as in ground-based or space astronomical observations and astrophysical modellings. In spite of that success, major problems and puzzles remain. The three major nucleosynthesis processes called for to explain the origin of the elements heavier than iron are described and the major pending questions discussed. As far as nuclear physics is concerned, good quality nuclear data is known to be a necessary condition for a reliable modelling of stellar nucleosynthesis. Through some specific examples, the need for further theoretical or experimental developments is also critically discussed in view of their impact on nucleosynthesis predictions.

  4. Magnetic-field cycling instrumentation for dynamic nuclear polarization-nuclear magnetic resonance using photoexcited triplets.

    PubMed

    Kagawa, Akinori; Negoro, Makoto; Takeda, Kazuyuki; Kitagawa, Masahiro

    2009-04-01

    To advance static solid-state NMR with hyperpolarized nuclear spins, a system has been developed enabling dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) using electron spins in the photoexcited triplet state with X-band microwave apparatus, followed by static solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments using the polarized nuclear-spin system with a goniometer. In order to perform the DNP and NMR procedures in different magnetic fields, the DNP system and the NMR system are spatially separated, between which the sample can be shuttled while its orientation is controlled in a reproducible fashion. We demonstrate that the system developed in this work is operational for solid-state NMR with hyperpolarized nuclear-spin systems in static organic materials, and also discuss the application of our system.

  5. The Active Field of Nuclear and Radiochemistry: Not Just Nuclear Power.

    PubMed

    Walther, Clemens

    2016-08-01

    " … The number of universities teaching nuclear and radiochemistry has decreased, not least as radiochemistry is erroneously linked to the use of nuclear power … Radiochemistry is essential for a variety of fields, including radiopharmaceuticals, as well as the management of radioactive waste … we are facing a lack of specialists in the area of radiation protection …" Read more in the Editorial by Clemens Walther.

  6. Nuclear reaction cross sections of exotic nuclei in the Glauber model for relativistic mean field densities

    SciTech Connect

    Patra, S. K.; Panda, R. N.; Arumugam, P.; Gupta, Raj K.

    2009-12-15

    We have calculated the total nuclear reaction cross sections of exotic nuclei in the framework of the Glauber model, using as inputs the standard relativistic mean field (RMF) densities and the densities obtained from the more recently developed effective-field-theory-motivated RMF (the E-RMF). Both light and heavy nuclei are taken as the representative targets, and the light neutron-rich nuclei as projectiles. We found the total nuclear reaction cross section to increase as a function of the mass number, for both the target and projectile nuclei. The differential nuclear elastic scattering cross sections are evaluated for some selected systems at various incident energies. We found a large dependence of the differential elastic scattering cross section on incident energy. Finally, we have applied the same formalism to calculate both the total nuclear reaction cross section and the differential nuclear elastic scattering cross section for the recently discussed superheavy nucleus with atomic number Z=122.

  7. Nuclear size effects in vibrational spectra.

    PubMed

    Almoukhalalati, Adel; Shee, Avijit; Saue, Trond

    2016-06-01

    We present a theoretical study of nuclear volume in the rovibrational spectra of diatomic molecules which is an extension of a previous study restricted to rotational spectra [Chem. Phys., 2012, 401, 103]. We provide a new derivation for the electron-nucleus electrostatic interaction energy which is basically independent of the choice of model for the nuclear charge distribution. Starting from this expression we derive expressions for the electronic, rotational and vibrational field shift parameters in terms of effective electron density and its first and second derivatives with respect to internuclear distance. The effective density is often approximated by the contact density, but we demonstrate that this leads to errors on the order of 10% and is furthermore not necessary since the contact and effective densities can be obtained at the same computational cost. We calculate the field shift parameters at the 4-component relativistic coupled-cluster singles-and-doubles level and find that our results confirm the experimental findings of Tiemann and co-workers [Chem. Phys., 1982, 68(21), 1982, Ber. Bunsenges. Phys. Chem., 1982, 86, 821], whereas we find no theoretical justification for a scaling factor introduced in later work [Chem. Phys., 1985, 93, 349]. For lead sulfide we study the effective density as a function of internuclear distance and find a minimum some 0.2 Å inside the equilibrium bond distance. We also discuss Bigeleisen-Goeppert-Mayer theory of isotope fractionation in light of our results.

  8. The field treatment of the nuclear spectrum. Historical foundation and two contributions to its ensuing development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bes, Daniel R.

    2016-06-01

    The highlights of the model which was developed during the 1950s at the Niels Bohr Institute, Copenhagen, under the leadership of Aage Bohr and Ben Mottelson, are described in this contribution. Subsequently, it is shown that the field concept—the fundamental tool of the unified model—is not only an intelligent guess to describe the difficult many-body nuclear system. By means of a systematic expansion of field-coupling effects, the nuclear field theory (NFT) accounts for the overcompleteness of the initial product basis and the overlooking of the Pauli principle acting between constituents of the basis. Eventually it leads to the exact solution of the nuclear many-body problem. The description in terms of fields involves another problem if the field violates a symmetry inherent to the initial problem. The solution is borrowed from the BRST treatments of gauge systems, in which the lost symmetry is replaced by a more powerful one.

  9. Effective Giromagnetic Ratios in Artifical Nuclear Magnetization Pumping of the Noble Gases Mix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popov, E. N.; Barantsev, K. A.; Litvinov, A. N.

    2015-09-01

    Dynamic of the nuclear magnetization of the two noble gases mix was studied in this research. Nuclear magnetization pumped along the induction of external magnetic field. Vector of nuclear magnetization is given a tilt by the week rotational magnetic field, which makes NMR for noble gases. Interaction between the nuclear magnetic moments of the different noble gases adducted to shifts at the frequency of nuclear moments precession in external magnetic field. Effective gyromagnetic ratios of the nuclear of noble gases is defined and it different from the tabulated value. There is theoretical calculation of effective gyromagnetic ratios in this research.

  10. Development and applications of NMR (nuclear magnetic resonance) in low fields and zero field

    SciTech Connect

    Bielecki, A.

    1987-05-01

    This dissertation is about nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy in the absence of applied magnetic fields. NMR is usually done in large magnetic fields, often as large as can be practically attained. The motivation for going the opposite way, toward zero field, is that for certain types of materials, particularly powdered or polycrystalline solids, the NMR spectra in zero field are easier to interpret than those obtained in high field. 92 refs., 60 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Renormalizability of the nuclear many-body problem with the Skyrme interaction beyond mean field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, C. J.; Grasso, M.; Moghrabi, K.; van Kolck, U.

    2017-05-01

    Phenomenological effective interactions like Skyrme forces are currently used in mean-field calculations in nuclear physics. Mean-field models have strong analogies with the first order of the perturbative many-body problem and the currently used effective interactions are adjusted at the mean-field level. In this work, we analyze the renormalizability of the nuclear many-body problem in the case where the effective Skyrme interaction is employed in its standard form and the perturbative problem is solved up to second order. We focus on symmetric nuclear matter and its equation of state, which can be calculated analytically at this order. It is shown that only by applying specific density dependence and constraints to the interaction parameters can renormalizability be guaranteed in principle. This indicates that the standard Skyrme interaction does not in general lead to a renormalizable theory. To achieve renormalizability, other terms should be added to the interaction and employed perturbatively only at first order.

  12. Numerical study of the THM effects on the near-field safety of ahypothetical nuclear waste repository - BMT1 of the DECOVALEX IIIproject. Part 3: Effects of THM coupling in sparsely fracturedrocks

    SciTech Connect

    Rutqvist, J.; Chijimatsu, M.; Jing, L.; Millard, A.; Nguyen,T.S.; Rejeb, A.; Sugita, Y.; Tsang, C.F.

    2004-09-09

    BENCHPAR project, the impact of thermal-hydrological-mechanical (THM) couplings on the performance of a bentonite-back-filled nuclear waste repository in near-field crystalline rocks is evaluated in a Bench-Mark Test problem (BMT1) and the results are presented in a series of three companion papers in this issue. This is the third paper with focus on the effects of THM processes at a repository located in a sparsely fractured rock. Several independent coupled THM analyses presented in this paper show that THM couplings have the most significant impact on the mechanical stress evolution, which is important for repository design, construction and post-closure monitoring considerations. The results show that the stress evolution in the bentonite-back-filled excavations and the surrounding rock depends on the post-closure evolution of both fields of temperature and fluid pressure.It is further shown that the time required to full resaturation may play an important role for the mechanical integrity of the repository drifts.In this sense, the presence of hydraulically conducting fractures in the near-field rock might actually improve the mechanical performance of the repository. Hydraulically conducting fractures in the near-field rocks enhances the water supply to the buffers/back-fills, which promotes a more timely process of resaturation and development of swelling pressures in the back-fill, thus provides timely confining stress and support to the rock walls. In one particular case simulated in this study, it was shown that failure in the drift walls could be prevented if the compressive stresses in back-fill were fully developed within 50 years,which is when thermally induced rock strain begins to create high differential (failure-prone) stresses in the near-field rocks.

  13. Universal quantum control in zero-field nuclear magnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bian, Ji; Jiang, Min; Cui, Jiangyu; Liu, Xiaomei; Chen, Botao; Ji, Yunlan; Zhang, Bo; Blanchard, John; Peng, Xinhua; Du, Jiangfeng

    2017-05-01

    This paper describes a general method for the manipulation of nuclear spins in zero magnetic field. In the absence of magnetic fields, the spins lose the individual information on chemical shifts and inequivalent spins can only be distinguished by nuclear gyromagnetic ratios and spin-spin couplings. For spin-1/2 nuclei with different gyromagnetic ratios (i.e., different species) in zero magnetic field, we describe the scheme to realize a set of universal quantum logic gates, e.g., arbitrary single-qubit gates and a two-qubit controlled-not gate. This method allows for universal quantum control in systems which might provide promising applications in materials science, chemistry, biology, quantum information processing, and fundamental physics.

  14. Effect of prenatal loud music and noise on total number of neurons and glia, neuronal nuclear area and volume of chick brainstem auditory nuclei, field L and hippocampus: a stereological investigation.

    PubMed

    Sanyal, Tania; Palanisamy, Pradeep; Nag, T C; Roy, T S; Wadhwa, Shashi

    2013-06-01

    The present study explores whether prenatal patterned and unpatterned sound of high sound pressure level (110 dB) has any differential effect on the morphology of brainstem auditory nuclei, field L (auditory cortex analog) and hippocampus in chicks (Gallus domesticus). The total number of neurons and glia, mean neuronal nuclear area and total volume of the brainstem auditory nuclei, field L and hippocampus of post-hatch day 1 chicks were determined in serial, cresyl violet-stained sections, using stereology software. All regions studied showed a significantly increased total volume with increase in total neuron number and mean neuronal nuclear area in the patterned music stimulated group as compared to control. Contrastingly the unpatterned noise stimulated group showed an attenuated volume with reduction in the total neuron number. The mean neuronal nuclear area was significantly reduced in the auditory nuclei and hippocampus but increased in the field L. Glial cell number was significantly increased in both experimental groups, being highest in the noise group. The brainstem auditory nuclei and field L showed an increase in glia to neuron ratio in the experimental groups as compared to control. In the hippocampus the ratio remained unaltered between control and music groups, but was higher in the noise group. It is thus evident that though the sound pressure level in both experimental groups was the same there were differential changes in the morphological parameters of the brain regions studied, indicating that the characteristics of the sound had a role in mediating these effects. Copyright © 2013 ISDN. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Nuclear reaction inputs based on effective interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilaire, S.; Goriely, S.; Péru, S.; Dubray, N.; Dupuis, M.; Bauge, E.

    2016-11-01

    Extensive nuclear structure studies have been performed for decades using effective interactions as sole input. They have shown a remarkable ability to describe rather accurately many types of nuclear properties. In the early 2000s, a major effort has been engaged to produce nuclear reaction input data out of the Gogny interaction, in order to challenge its quality also with respect to nuclear reaction observables. The status of this project, well advanced today thanks to the use of modern computers as well as modern nuclear reaction codes, is reviewed and future developments are discussed.

  16. Electron nuclear dynamics of LiH and HF in an intense laser field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broeckhove, J.; Coutinho-Neto, M. D.; Deumens, E.; Öhrn, Y.

    1997-12-01

    The electron nuclear dynamics theory (END) extended to include a time-dependent external field is briefly described. The dynamical equations, in addition to the full electron nuclear coupling terms, now also contain the interactions of both the nuclei and the electrons with the external field. This extended END theory is applied to the study of vibrational excitations of the simple diatomics HF and LiH. The END results using an intense infrared laser field are compared with those of molecular dynamics as well as those from quantum wave-packet calculations. While the effect of the nonadiabatic electron-nuclear coupling terms on the vibrational dynamics is negligible for the chosen application, the electron-field coupling has a significant impact.

  17. Analysis of the Effect of Chronic and Low-Dose Radiation Exposure on Spermatogenic Cells of Male Large Japanese Field Mice ( Apodemus speciosus ) after the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant Accident.

    PubMed

    Takino, Sachio; Yamashiro, Hideaki; Sugano, Yukou; Fujishima, Yohei; Nakata, Akifumi; Kasai, Kosuke; Hayashi, Gohei; Urushihara, Yusuke; Suzuki, Masatoshi; Shinoda, Hisashi; Miura, Tomisato; Fukumoto, Manabu

    2017-02-01

    In this study we analyzed the effect of chronic and low-dose-rate (LDR) radiation on spermatogenic cells of large Japanese field mice ( Apodemus speciosus ) after the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (FNPP) accident. In March 2014, large Japanese field mice were collected from two sites located in, and one site adjacent to, the FNPP ex-evacuation zone: Tanashio, Murohara and Akogi, respectively. Testes from these animals were analyzed histologically. External dose rate from radiocesium (combined (134)Cs and (137)Cs) in these animals at the sampling sites exhibited 21 μGy/day in Tanashio, 304-365 μGy/day in Murohara and 407-447 μGy/day in Akogi. In the Akogi group, the numbers of spermatogenic cells and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA)-positive cells per seminiferous tubule were significantly higher compared to the Tanashio and Murohara groups, respectively. TUNEL-positive apoptotic cells tended to be detected at a lower level in the Murohara and Akogi groups compared to the Tanashio group. These results suggest that enhanced spermatogenesis occurred in large Japanese field mice living in and around the FNPP ex-evacuation zone. It remains to be elucidated whether this phenomenon, attributed to chronic exposure to LDR radiation, will benefit or adversely affect large Japanese field mice.

  18. Nuclear and extranuclear effects of vitamin A.

    PubMed

    Iskakova, Madina; Karbyshev, Mikhail; Piskunov, Aleksandr; Rochette-Egly, Cécile

    2015-12-01

    Vitamin A or retinol is a multifunctional vitamin that is essential at all stages of life from embryogenesis to adulthood. Up to now, it has been accepted that the effects of vitamin A are exerted by active metabolites, the major ones being 11-cis retinal for vision, and all trans-retinoic acid (RA) for cell growth and differentiation. Basically RA binds nuclear receptors, RARs, which regulate the expression of a battery of target genes in a ligand dependent manner. During the last decade, new scenarios have been discovered, providing a rationale for the understanding of other long-noted but not explained functions of retinol. These novel scenarios involve: (i) other nuclear receptors such as PPAR β/δ, which regulate the expression of other target genes with other functions; (ii) extranuclear and nontranscriptional effects, such as the activation of kinases, which phosphorylate RARs and other transcription factors, thus expanding the list of the RA-activated genes; (iii) finally, vitamin A is active per se and can work as a cytokine that regulates gene transcription by activating STRA6. New effects of vitamin A and RA are continuously being discovered in new fields, revealing new targets and new mechanisms thus improving the understanding the pleiotropicity of their effects.

  19. Mechanism of dynamic nuclear polarization in high magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrar, C. T.; Hall, D. A.; Gerfen, G. J.; Inati, S. J.; Griffin, R. G.

    2001-03-01

    Solid-state NMR signal enhancements of about two orders of magnitude (100-400) have been observed in dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) experiments performed at high magnetic field (5 T) and low temperature (10 K) using the nitroxide radical 4-amino TEMPO as the source of electron polarization. Since the breadth of the 4-amino TEMPO EPR spectrum is large compared to the nuclear Larmor frequency, it has been assumed that thermal mixing (TM) is the dominate mechanism by which polarization is transferred from electron to nuclear spins. However, theoretical explanations of TM generally assume a homogeneously broadened EPR line and, since the 4-amino TEMPO line at 5 T is inhomogeneously broadened, they do not explain the observed DNP enhancements. Accordingly, we have developed a treatment of DNP that explicitly uses electron-electron cross-relaxation to mediate electron-nuclear polarization transfer. The process proceeds via spin flip-flops between pairs of electronic spin packets whose Zeeman temperatures differ from one another. To confirm the essential features of the model we have studied the field dependence of electron-electron double resonance (ELDOR) data and DNP enhancement data. Both are well simulated using a simple model of electron cross-relaxation in the inhomogeneously broadened 4-amino TEMPO EPR line.

  20. DC superconducting quantum interference device usable in nuclear quadrupole resonance and zero field nuclear magnetic spectrometers

    DOEpatents

    Fan, Non Q.; Clarke, John

    1993-01-01

    A spectrometer for measuring the nuclear quadrupole resonance spectra or the zero-field nuclear magnetic resonance spectra generated by a sample is disclosed. The spectrometer uses an amplifier having a dc SQUID operating in a flux-locked loop for generating an amplified output as a function of the intensity of the signal generated by the sample. The flux-locked loop circuit includes an integrator. The amplifier also includes means for preventing the integrator from being driven into saturation. As a result, the time for the flux-locked loop to recover from the excitation pulses generated by the spectrometer is reduced.

  1. DC superconducting quantum interference device usable in nuclear quadrupole resonance and zero field nuclear magnetic spectrometers

    DOEpatents

    Fan, N.Q.; Clarke, J.

    1993-10-19

    A spectrometer for measuring the nuclear quadrupole resonance spectra or the zero-field nuclear magnetic resonance spectra generated by a sample is disclosed. The spectrometer uses an amplifier having a dc SQUID operating in a flux-locked loop for generating an amplified output as a function of the intensity of the signal generated by the sample. The flux-locked loop circuit includes an integrator. The amplifier also includes means for preventing the integrator from being driven into saturation. As a result, the time for the flux-locked loop to recover from the excitation pulses generated by the spectrometer is reduced. 7 figures.

  2. Stochastic Mean-Field Dynamics For Nuclear Collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Ayik, Sakir

    2008-11-11

    We discuss a stochastic approach to improve description of nuclear dynamics beyond the mean-field approximation at low energies. For small amplitude fluctuations, this approach gives a result for the dispersion of a one-body observable that is identical to the result obtained previously through a variational approach. Furthermore, it incorporates one-body dissipation and fluctuation mechanisms in accordance with quantal fluctuation-dissipation relation.

  3. DC SQUID Spectrometers for Nuclear Quadrupole and Low-Field Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    TonThat, Dinh M.

    1998-04-01

    The dc Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUJD) is a very sensitive detector of magnetic flux, with a typical flux noise of the order of 1 μΦ0Hz-1/2 at liquid helium temperature (Φ0=h/2e). This inherent flux sensitivity of the SQUID is used in a spectrometer for the detection of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR.)and nuclear quadruple resonance (NQR). The processing magnetic field from the nuclear spins is coupled to the SQUID by mean of a flux transformer. The SQUID NMR spectrometer is used to measure the longitudinal relaxation time T1 of solid 129Xe at 4.2 K down to 0.1 mT.

  4. Effective citizen advocacy of beneficial nuclear technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, S.; McKibben, Ph.D.

    2007-07-01

    In 1991, a small group of citizens from communities near the Savannah River Site (SRS) formed a pro-nuclear education and advocacy group, Citizens for Nuclear Technology Awareness (CNTA). Their purpose was to: (1) counter nuclear misinformation that dominated the nation's news outlets, (2) provide education on nuclear subjects to area citizens, students, elected officials, and (3) provide informed citizen support for potential new missions for SRS when needed. To effectively accomplish these objectives it is also essential to establish and maintain good relations with community leaders and reporters that cover energy and nuclear subjects. The organization has grown considerably since its inception and has expanded its sphere of influence. We believe that our experiences over these fifteen years are a good model for effectively communicating nuclear subjects with the public. This paper describes the structure, operation and some of the results of CNTA. (authors)

  5. Determination of hyperfine fields orientation in nuclear probe techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szymański, K.; Olszewski, W.; Satuła, D.; Gawryluk, D. J.; Krzton-Maziopa, A.; Kalska-Szostko, B.

    2017-02-01

    One of the most popular nuclear probes, 57Fe is used for the investigation of orientations of hyperfine fields and also for the determination of other important properties. In particular, the orientation of iron magnetic moments can be unambiguously determined, including its signs. Experiments with polarized radiation are presented with regard to selected systems. Orientation of electric field gradient is used for acquiring information about the shape of the texture-free spectra. Applications on the analysis of iron-based superconductors are presented.

  6. Determination of hyperfine fields orientation in nuclear probe techniques.

    PubMed

    Szymański, K; Olszewski, W; Satuła, D; Gawryluk, D J; Krzton-Maziopa, A; Kalska-Szostko, B

    2017-02-15

    One of the most popular nuclear probes, (57)Fe is used for the investigation of orientations of hyperfine fields and also for the determination of other important properties. In particular, the orientation of iron magnetic moments can be unambiguously determined, including its signs. Experiments with polarized radiation are presented with regard to selected systems. Orientation of electric field gradient is used for acquiring information about the shape of the texture-free spectra. Applications on the analysis of iron-based superconductors are presented.

  7. High-resolution two-field nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Cousin, Samuel F; Charlier, Cyril; Kadeřávek, Pavel; Marquardsen, Thorsten; Tyburn, Jean-Max; Bovier, Pierre-Alain; Ulzega, Simone; Speck, Thomas; Wilhelm, Dirk; Engelke, Frank; Maas, Werner; Sakellariou, Dimitrios; Bodenhausen, Geoffrey; Pelupessy, Philippe; Ferrage, Fabien

    2016-12-07

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is a ubiquitous branch of spectroscopy that can explore matter at the scale of an atom. Significant improvements in sensitivity and resolution have been driven by a steady increase of static magnetic field strengths. However, some properties of nuclei may be more favourable at low magnetic fields. For example, transverse relaxation due to chemical shift anisotropy increases sharply at higher magnetic fields leading to line-broadening and inefficient coherence transfers. Here, we present a two-field NMR spectrometer that permits the application of rf-pulses and acquisition of NMR signals in two magnetic centres. Our prototype operates at 14.1 T and 0.33 T. The main features of this system are demonstrated by novel NMR experiments, in particular a proof-of-concept correlation between zero-quantum coherences at low magnetic field and single quantum coherences at high magnetic field, so that high resolution can be achieved in both dimensions, despite a ca. 10 ppm inhomogeneity of the low-field centre. Two-field NMR spectroscopy offers the possibility to circumvent the limits of high magnetic fields, while benefiting from their exceptional sensitivity and resolution. This approach opens new avenues for NMR above 1 GHz.

  8. Technical Papers Presented at the Defense Nuclear Agency Global Effects Review. Held at Moffett Field, California on 25-27 February 1986. Volume 3.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-05-15

    TABLE OF CONTENTS (Continued) Page 48. Airborne Lidar Characterization of Optical and Physical Properties 202 of Nuclear Induced Atmospheric Events ...precipitation oc- curs /3 - in-cloud liquid water removal rate L - in-cloud liquid water content Tb = duration of the precipitation event within the time step...PHYSICAL PROPERTIES OF NUCLEAR INDUCED ATMOSPHERIC EVENTS Edward E. Lithe Warren B. Johnson SRI International Menlo Park, Ca. 94025 ABSTRACT

  9. Nuclear Weapons Effects (Self-Teaching Materials).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Defense Civil Preparedness Agency (DOD), Battle Creek, MI.

    Developed by the Civil Defense Preparedness Agency, this autoinstructional text deals with nuclear weapons effects. The destructive effects of an atomic blast are first introduced, and then long-term radioactive consequences are stressed. (CP)

  10. Dynamic nuclear polarisation via the integrated solid effect I: theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henstra, A.; Wenckebach, W. Th.

    2014-07-01

    In the hyperpolarisation method known as dynamic nuclear polarisation (DNP), a small amount of unpaired electron spins is added to the sample containing the nuclear spins and the polarisation of these unpaired electron spins is transferred to the nuclear spins by means of a microwave field. Traditional DNP uses weak continuous wave (CW) microwave fields, so perturbation methods can be used to calculate the polarisation transfer. A much faster transfer of the electron spin polarisation is obtained with the integrated solid effect (ISE) which uses strong pulsed microwave fields. As in nuclear orientation via electron spin locking, the polarisation transfer is coherent, similar to the coherence transfer between nuclear spins. This paper presents a theoretical approach to calculate this polarisation transfer. ISE is successfully used for a fast polarisation transfer from short-lived photo-excited triplet states to the surrounding nuclear spins in molecular crystals. These triplet states are strongly aligned in the photo-excitation process and do not require the low temperatures and strong magnetic fields needed to polarise the electron spins in traditional DNP. In the following paper, the theory is applied to the system naphthalene-h8 doped with pentacene-d14 which provides the photo-excited triplet states, and compared with experimental results.

  11. Phase transitions of nuclear matter beyond mean field theory

    SciTech Connect

    Tran Huu Phat; Nguyen Tuan Anh; Nguyen Van Long; Le Viet Hoa

    2007-10-15

    The Cornwall-Jackiw-Tomboulis (CJT) effective action approach is applied to study the phase transition of nuclear matter modeled by the four-nucleon interaction. It is shown that in the Hartree-Fock approximation (HFA) a first-order phase transition takes place at low temperature, whereas the phase transition is of second order at higher temperature.

  12. Psychological effects of nuclear and radiological warfare.

    PubMed

    Salter, C A

    2001-12-01

    Not since 1945 has the world experienced nuclear warfare, although there has been the threat of nuclear terrorism and a large number of nuclear/radiological accidents. Most people fear a nuclear/radiological threat even more than a conventional explosion due both to their inability to perceive the presence of radiation with the ordinary human senses and to concerns about perceived long-lasting radiation effects. Studies of radiological accidents have found that for every actually contaminated casualty, there may be as many as 500 people who are concerned, eager to be screened for contamination, sometimes panicked, and showing psychosomatic reactions mimicking actual radiation effects. Data from the Hiroshima and Nagasaki attacks revealed widespread acute reactions such as psychic numbing, severe anxiety, and disorganized behavior, and there were later chronic effects such as survivor guilt and psychosomatic reactions. Such responses would likely be common in any future nuclear/radiological accident, terrorist attack, or warfare.

  13. High Field Dynamic Nuclear Polarization NMR with Surfactant Sheltered Biradicals

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We illustrate the ability to place a water-insoluble biradical, bTbk, into a glycerol/water matrix with the assistance of a surfactant, sodium octyl sulfate (SOS). This surfactant approach enables a previously water insoluble biradical, bTbk, with favorable electron–electron dipolar coupling to be used for dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments in frozen, glassy, aqueous media. Nuclear Overhauser enhancement (NOE) and paramagnetic relaxation enhancement (PRE) experiments are conducted to determine the distribution of urea and several biradicals within the SOS macromolecular assembly. We also demonstrate that SOS assemblies are an effective approach by which mixed biradicals are created through an assembly process. PMID:24506193

  14. Relativistic mean-field models and nuclear matter constraints

    SciTech Connect

    Dutra, M.; Lourenco, O.; Carlson, B. V.; Delfino, A.; Menezes, D. P.; Avancini, S. S.; Stone, J. R.; Providencia, C.; Typel, S.

    2013-05-06

    This work presents a preliminary study of 147 relativistic mean-field (RMF) hadronic models used in the literature, regarding their behavior in the nuclear matter regime. We analyze here different kinds of such models, namely: (i) linear models, (ii) nonlinear {sigma}{sup 3}+{sigma}{sup 4} models, (iii) {sigma}{sup 3}+{sigma}{sup 4}+{omega}{sup 4} models, (iv) models containing mixing terms in the fields {sigma} and {omega}, (v) density dependent models, and (vi) point-coupling ones. In the finite range models, the attractive (repulsive) interaction is described in the Lagrangian density by the {sigma} ({omega}) field. The isospin dependence of the interaction is modeled by the {rho} meson field. We submit these sets of RMF models to eleven macroscopic (experimental and empirical) constraints, used in a recent study in which 240 Skyrme parametrizations were analyzed. Such constraints cover a wide range of properties related to symmetric nuclear matter (SNM), pure neutron matter (PNM), and both SNM and PNM.

  15. The environmental effects of nuclear war

    SciTech Connect

    MacCracken, M.C.

    1988-09-01

    Substantial environmental disruption will significantly add to the disastrous consequences caused by the direct thermal, blast, and radiological effects brought on by a major nuclear war. Local fallout could cover several percent of the Northern Hemisphere with potentially lethal doses. Smoke from post-nuclear fires could darken the skies and induce temperature decreases of tens of degrees in continental interiors. Stratospheric ozone could be significantly reduced due to nitric oxide injections and smoke-induced circulation changes. The environmental effects spread the consequences of a nuclear war to the world population, adding to the potentially large disruptive effects a further reason to avoid such a catastrophe. 27 refs., 4 figs.

  16. The environmental effects of nuclear war

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacCracken, Michael C.

    1988-12-01

    Substantial environmental disruption will significantly add to the disastrous consequences caused by the direct thermal, blast, and radiological effects brought on by a major nuclear war. Local fallout could cover several per cent of the Northern Hemisphere with potentially lethal doses. Smoke from post-nuclear fires could darken the skies and induce temperature decreases of tens of degrees in continental interiors. Stratospheric ozone could be significantly reduced due to nitric oxide injections and smoke-induced circulation changes. The environmental effects spread the consequences of a nuclear war to the world population, adding to the potentially large disruptive effects a further reason to avoid such a catastrophe.

  17. The use of nuclear data in the field of nuclear fuel recycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Julie-Fiona; Launay, Agnès; Grassi, Gabriele; Binet, Christophe; Lelandais, Jacques; Lecampion, Erick

    2017-09-01

    AREVA NC La Hague facility is the first step of the nuclear fuel recycling process implemented in France. The processing of the used fuel is governed by high standards of criticality-safety, and strong expectations on the quality of end-products. From the received used fuel assemblies, the plutonium and the uranium are extracted for further energy production purposes within the years following the reprocessing. Furthermore, the ultimate waste - fission products and minor actinides on the one hand, and hulls and end-pieces on the other hand - is adequately packaged for long term disposal. The used fuel is therefore separated into very different materials, and time scales which come into account may be longer than in some other nuclear fields of activity. Given the variety of the handled nuclear materials, as well as the time scales at stake, the importance given to some radionuclides, and hence to the associated nuclear data, can also be specific to the AREVA NC La Hague plant. A study has thus been led to identify a list of the most important radionuclides for the AREVA NC La Hague plant applications, relying on the running constraints of the facility, and the end-products expectations. The activities at the AREVA NC La Hague plant are presented, and the methodology to extract the most important radionuclides for the reprocessing process is detailed.

  18. Effects of exposure to gradient magnetic fields emitted by nuclear magnetic resonance devices on clonogenic potential and proliferation of human hematopoietic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Iachininoto, Maria Grazia; Camisa, Vincenzo; Leone, Lucia; Pinto, Rosanna; Lopresto, Vanni; Merla, Caterina; Giorda, Ezio; Carsetti, Rita; Zaffina, Salvatore; Podda, Maria Vittoria; Teofili, Luciana; Grassi, Claudio

    2016-05-01

    This study investigates effects of gradient magnetic fields (GMFs) emitted by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) devices on hematopoietic stem cells. Field measurements were performed to assess exposure to GMFs of staff working at 1.5 T and 3 T MRI units. Then an exposure system reproducing measured signals was realized to expose in vitro CD34+ cells to GMFs (1.5 T-protocol and 3 T-protocol). CD34+ cells were obtained by Fluorescence Activated Cell Sorting from six blood donors and three MRI-exposed workers. Blood donor CD34+ cells were exposed in vitro for 72 h to 1.5 T or 3 T-protocol and to sham procedure. Cells were then cultured and evaluated in colony forming unit (CFU)-assay up to 4 weeks after exposure. Results showed that in vitro GMF exposure did not affect cell proliferation but instead induced expansion of erythroid and monocytes progenitors soon after exposure and for the subsequent 3 weeks. No decrease of other clonogenic cell output (i.e., CFU-granulocyte/erythroid/macrophage/megakaryocyte and CFU-granulocyte/macrophage) was noticed, nor exposed CD34+ cells underwent the premature exhaustion of their clonogenic potential compared to sham-exposed controls. On the other hand, pilot experiments showed that CD34+ cells exposed in vivo to GMFs (i.e., samples from MRI workers) behaved in culture similarly to sham-exposed CD34+ cells, suggesting that other cells and/or microenvironment factors might prevent GMF effects on hematopoietic stem cells in vivo. Accordingly, GMFs did not affect the clonogenic potential of umbilical cord blood CD34+ cells exposed in vitro together with the whole mononuclear cell fraction.

  19. Nuclear quadrupole spin-lattice relaxation in Bi{sub 4}Ge{sub 3}O{sub 12} single crystals doped with atoms of d or f elements. Crystal field effects in compounds exhibiting anomalous magnetic properties

    SciTech Connect

    Orlov, V. G. Sergeev, G. S.; Asaji, Tetsuo; Kravchenko, E. A.; Kargin, Yu. F.

    2010-02-15

    The nuclear quadrupole spin-lattice relaxation was studied in the range 4.2-300 K for single crystals of Bi{sub 4}Ge{sub 3}O{sub 12} doped with minor amounts (the tenth fractions of mol%) of paramagnetic atoms of Cr, Nd, and Gd. Unusual spin dynamic features were recently found for these crystals at room temperature: a dramatic (up to 8-fold) increase in the effective nuclear quadrupole spin-spin relaxation time T{sub 2}* occurred upon doping the pure Bi{sub 4}Ge{sub 3}O{sub 12} sample. Unlike T{sub 2}*, the effective spin-lattice relaxation time T{sub 1}* at room temperature differs insignificantly for both doped and pure samples. But at lower temperatures, the samples exhibit considerably different behavior of the spin-lattice relaxation with temperature, which is caused by different contributions to the relaxation process of the dopant paramagnetic atoms. The distinctive maximum in the temperature dependence of the spin-lattice relaxation time for the Nd-doped crystal is shown to result from the crystal electric field effects.

  20. Coherent nuclear resonant scattering by {sup 61}Ni using the nuclear lighthouse effect

    SciTech Connect

    Roth, T.; Leupold, O.; Wille, H.-C.; Rueffer, R.; Quast, K.W.; Burkel, E.; Roehlsberger, R.

    2005-04-01

    We have observed coherent nuclear resonant scattering of synchrotron radiation from the 67.41-keV level of {sup 61}Ni. The time evolution of the forward scattering signal was recorded by employing the nuclear lighthouse effect. This method is used to investigate Moessbauer isotopes in a coherent scattering process with synchrotron radiation at high transition energies. The decay of the excited ensemble of nuclei in Ni metal shows quantum beats that allowed the determination of the magnetic hyperfine field at the {sup 61}Ni nucleus. Moreover, we determined the lifetime of the 67.41-keV level of {sup 61}Ni to be 7.4(1) ns.

  1. Nuclear magnetic resonance at millitesla fields using a zero-field spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Tayler, Michael C D; Sjolander, Tobias F; Pines, Alexander; Budker, Dmitry

    2016-09-01

    We describe new analytical capabilities for nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments in which signal detection is performed with chemical resolution (via spin-spin J couplings) in the zero to ultra-low magnetic field region, below 1μT. Using magnetic fields in the 100μT to 1mT range, we demonstrate the implementation of conventional NMR pulse sequences with spin-species selectivity.

  2. Nuclear effects in neutrino oscillation experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Chauhan, S.; Athar, M. Sajjad; Singh, S. K.

    2011-10-06

    We have studied the nuclear medium effects in the neutrino(antineutrino) induced interactions in nuclei which are relevant for present neutrino oscillation experiments in the few GeV energy region. The study is specially focused on calculating the cross sections and the event rates for atmospheric and accelerator neutrino experiments. The nuclear effects are found to be important for the quasielastic lepton production and the charged current incoherent and coherent pion production processes.

  3. Zero and Ultra-Low-Field Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy Via Optical Magnetometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanchard, John Woodland

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is among the most powerful analytical tools available to the chemical and biological sciences for chemical detection, characterization, and structure elucidation. NMR experiments are usually performed in large magnetic fields in order to maximize sensitivity and increase chemical shift resolution. However, the high magnetic fields required for conventional NMR necessitate large, immobile, and expensive superconducting magnets, limiting the use of the technique. New hyperpolarization and non-inductive detection methods have recently allowed for NMR measurements in the inverse regime of extremely low magnetic fields. Whereas a substantial body of research has been conducted in the high-field regime, taking advantage of the efficient coherent control afforded by a spectroscopy dominated by coupling to the spectrometer, the zero- and ultra-low-field (ZULF) regime has remained mostly unexplored. In this dissertation, we investigate the applicability of ZULF-NMR as a novel spectroscopic technique complimentary to high-field NMR. In particular, we consider various aspects of the ZULF-NMR experiment and the dynamics of nuclear spins under various local spin coupling Hamiltonians. We first survey zero-field NMR experiments on systems dominated by the electron-mediated indirect spin-spin coupling (J-coupling). The resulting J-spectra permit precision measurement of chemically relevant information due to the exquisite sensitivity of J-couplings to subtle changes in molecular geometry and electronic structure. We also consider the effects of weak magnetic fields and residual dipolar couplings in anisotropic media, which encode information about nuclear magnetic moments and geometry, and further resolve topological ambiguities by lifting degeneracies. By extending the understanding of the interactions that contribute to ZULF-NMR spectra, this work represents a significant advancement towards a complete description of zero- and ultra-low-field

  4. Effects of macromolecular crowding on nuclear size.

    PubMed

    Rosania, G R; Swanson, J A

    1995-05-01

    The concentration of macromolecules inside cells is high, and the resultant crowding of cytoplasm can be expected to affect many interactions involving macromolecular assemblies. Here, we have examined the effect of solute size and concentration on nuclear volume in saponin-permeabilized macrophages. Nuclei swelled in the presence of small solutes and shrank reversibly in the presence of larger permeant solutes. Remarkably, the smallest solutes capable of shrinking the nucleus were not excluded by the pores in the nuclear envelope. Indeed, nuclei shrank in the presence of such solutes even after the nuclear envelope had been sheared mechanically or permeabilized with detergent. Nuclei extracted with 1% Triton X-100 shrank in the presence of very high concentrations of small solute molecules (30% w/v) as well as in lower concentrations of larger solutes. Consistent with a macromolecular crowding effect, changes in nuclear volume were dependent on solute size and not simply dependent on the colligative properties of solutes or the exclusion of solutes by the nuclear envelope. Solute size-dependent changes in nuclear volume were independent of the chemical nature of the solutes and of the activity of the ions in the buffer. Together, these observations indicate that high concentrations of macromolecules such as those found inside cells can influence the size of the nucleus by directly affecting nuclear structure.

  5. Relativistic mean-field hadronic models under nuclear matter constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutra, M.; Lourenço, O.; Avancini, S. S.; Carlson, B. V.; Delfino, A.; Menezes, D. P.; Providência, C.; Typel, S.; Stone, J. R.

    2014-11-01

    Background: The microscopic composition and properties of infinite hadronic matter at a wide range of densities and temperatures have been subjects of intense investigation for decades. The equation of state (EoS) relating pressure, energy density, and temperature at a given particle number density is essential for modeling compact astrophysical objects such as neutron stars, core-collapse supernovae, and related phenomena, including the creation of chemical elements in the universe. The EoS depends not only on the particles present in the matter, but, more importantly, also on the forces acting among them. Because a realistic and quantitative description of infinite hadronic matter and nuclei from first principles in not available at present, a large variety of phenomenological models has been developed in the past several decades, but the scarcity of experimental and observational data does not allow a unique determination of the adjustable parameters. Purpose: It is essential for further development of the field to determine the most realistic parameter sets and to use them consistently. Recently, a set of constraints on properties of nuclear matter was formed and the performance of 240 nonrelativistic Skyrme parametrizations was assessed [M. Dutra et al., Phys. Rev. C 85, 035201 (2012), 10.1103/PhysRevC.85.035201] in describing nuclear matter up to about three times nuclear saturation density. In the present work we examine 263 relativistic-mean-field (RMF) models in a comparable approach. These models have been widely used because of several important aspects not always present in nonrelativistic models, such as intrinsic Lorentz covariance, automatic inclusion of spin, appropriate saturation mechanism for nuclear matter, causality, and, therefore, no problems related to superluminal speed of sound in medium. Method: Three different sets of constraints related to symmetric nuclear matter, pure neutron matter, symmetry energy, and its derivatives were used. The

  6. Global climatic effects of a nuclear war: An interdisciplinary problem

    SciTech Connect

    Ghan, S.J.

    1988-05-01

    In summary, an elucidation of the global-scale response to a nuclear war is a problem of great breadth, involving many of the sub-disciplines of aerosol physics, meteorology, oceanography, atmospheric chemistry and ecology. As diverse as these fields are, communication between the sub-disciplines has been remarkably effective, with two major interdisciplinary reports published in the last few years. It is my belief that, in addition to addressing the global-scale implications of a nuclear war, the global effects effort also serves as an excellent example of an interdisciplinary research program. 23 refs.

  7. Animal Effects from Soviet Atmospheric Nuclear Tests

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-03-01

    Acute Radiological Pathology ." Meditsina, p. 140, Moscow, 1968. 11. Tuzhilkova T.N., "Impact of X-rays on the Recovery Processes in the Musculoskeletal ...on the injury of sight organs from nuclear explosion effects during the 4 day and at night. Issues related to the pathologic anatomy of radiation...hygiene and toxicology. Divisions of pathological anatomy , laboratory, vivarium and pharmacy were also established. During the period of nuclear testing

  8. Solid effect in magic angle spinning dynamic nuclear polarization.

    PubMed

    Corzilius, Björn; Smith, Albert A; Griffin, Robert G

    2012-08-07

    For over five decades, the solid effect (SE) has been heavily utilized as a mechanism for performing dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP). Nevertheless, it has not found widespread application in contemporary, high magnetic field DNP experiments because SE enhancements display an ω(0)(-2) field dependence. In particular, for nominally forbidden zero and double quantum SE transitions to be partially allowed, it is necessary for mixing of adjacent nuclear spin states to occur, and this leads to the observed field dependence. However, recently we have improved our instrumentation and report here an enhancement of ε = 91 obtained with the organic radical trityl (OX063) in magic angle spinning experiments performed at 5 T and 80 K. This is a factor of 6-7 higher than previous values in the literature under similar conditions. Because the solid effect depends strongly on the microwave field strength, we attribute this large enhancement to larger microwave field strengths inside the sample volume, achieved with more efficient coupling of the gyrotron to the sample chamber. In addition, we develop a theoretical model to explain the dependence of the buildup rate of enhanced nuclear polarization and the steady-state enhancement on the microwave power. Buildup times and enhancements were measured as a function of (1)H concentration for both trityl and Gd-DOTA. Comparison of the results indicates that for trityl the initial polarization step is the slower, rate-determining step. However, for Gd-DOTA the spread of nuclear polarization via homonuclear (1)H spin diffusion is rate-limiting. Finally, we discuss the applicability of the solid effect at fields > 5 T and the requirements to address the unfavorable field dependence of the solid effect.

  9. Solid effect in magic angle spinning dynamic nuclear polarization

    PubMed Central

    Corzilius, Björn; Smith, Albert A.; Griffin, Robert G.

    2012-01-01

    For over five decades, the solid effect (SE) has been heavily utilized as a mechanism for performing dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP). Nevertheless, it has not found widespread application in contemporary, high magnetic field DNP experiments because SE enhancements display an \\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{upgreek} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\setlength{\\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \\begin{document} \\begin{equation*}\\omega _0 ^{ - 2}\\end{equation*} \\end{document}ω0−2 field dependence. In particular, for nominally forbidden zero and double quantum SE transitions to be partially allowed, it is necessary for mixing of adjacent nuclear spin states to occur, and this leads to the observed field dependence. However, recently we have improved our instrumentation and report here an enhancement of ɛ = 91 obtained with the organic radical trityl (OX063) in magic angle spinning experiments performed at 5 T and 80 K. This is a factor of 6-7 higher than previous values in the literature under similar conditions. Because the solid effect depends strongly on the microwave field strength, we attribute this large enhancement to larger microwave field strengths inside the sample volume, achieved with more efficient coupling of the gyrotron to the sample chamber. In addition, we develop a theoretical model to explain the dependence of the buildup rate of enhanced nuclear polarization and the steady-state enhancement on the microwave power. Buildup times and enhancements were measured as a function of 1H concentration for both trityl and Gd-DOTA. Comparison of the results indicates that for trityl the initial polarization step is the slower, rate-determining step. However, for Gd-DOTA the spread of nuclear polarization via homonuclear 1H spin diffusion is rate-limiting. Finally, we discuss the applicability of the solid effect at fields > 5 T and the requirements

  10. Solid Tumor-Targeting Theranostic Polymer Nanoparticle in Nuclear Medicinal Fields

    PubMed Central

    Makino, Akira; Kimura, Shunsaku

    2014-01-01

    Polymer nanoparticles can be prepared by self-assembling of amphiphilic polymers, and various types of molecular assemblies have been reported. In particular, in medicinal fields, utilization of these polymer nanoparticles as carriers for drug delivery system (DDS) has been actively tried, and some nanoparticulate drugs are currently under preclinical evaluations. A radionuclide is an unstable nucleus and decays with emission of radioactive rays, which can be utilized as a tracer in the diagnostic imaging systems of PET and SPECT and also in therapeutic purposes. Since polymer nanoparticles can encapsulate most of diagnostic and therapeutic agents with a proper design of amphiphilic polymers, they should be effective DDS carriers of radionuclides in the nuclear medicinal field. Indeed, nanoparticles have been recently attracting much attention as common platform carriers for diagnostic and therapeutic drugs and contribute to the development of nanotheranostics. In this paper, recent developments of solid tumor-targeting polymer nanoparticles in nuclear medicinal fields are reviewed. PMID:25379530

  11. Radiation Effects in Nuclear Waste Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, William J.

    2005-09-30

    The objective of this project is to develop a fundamental understanding of radiation effects in glasses and ceramics, as well as the influence of solid-state radiation effects on aqueous dissolution kinetics, which may impact the performance of nuclear waste forms and stabilized nuclear materials. This work provides the underpinning science to develop improved glass and ceramic waste forms for the immobilization and disposition of high-level tank waste, excess plutonium, plutonium residues and scrap, other actinides, and other nuclear waste streams. Furthermore, this work is developing develop predictive models for the performance of nuclear waste forms and stabilized nuclear materials. Thus, the research performed under this project has significant implications for the immobilization of High-Level Waste (HLW) and Nuclear Materials, two mission areas within the Office of Environmental Management (EM). With regard to the HLW mission, this research will lead to improved understanding of radiation-induced degradation mechanisms and their effects on dissolution kinetics, as well as development of predictive models for waste form performance. In the Nuclear Materials mission, this research will lead to improvements in the understanding of radiation effects on the chemical and structural properties of materials for the stabilization and long-term storage of plutonium, highly-enriched uranium, and other actinides. The research uses plutonium incorporation, ion-beam irradiation, and electron-beam irradiation to simulate the effects of alpha decay and beta decay on relevant glasses and ceramics. The research under this project has the potential to result in improved glass and ceramic materials for the stabilization and immobilization of high-level tank waste, plutonium residues and scraps, surplus weapons plutonium, highly-enriched uranium, other actinides, and other radioactive materials.

  12. Radiation Effects in Nuclear Waste Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, William J.

    2005-06-01

    The objective of this project is to develop a fundamental understanding of radiation effects in glasses and ceramics, as well as the influence of solid-state radiation effects on aqueous dissolution kinetics, which may impact the performance of nuclear waste forms and stabilized nuclear materials. This work provides the underpinning science to develop improved glass and ceramic waste forms for the immobilization and disposition of high-level tank waste, excess plutonium, plutonium residues and scrap, other actinides, and other nuclear waste streams. Furthermore, this work is developing develop predictive models for the performance of nuclear waste forms and stabilized nuclear materials. Thus, the research performed under this project has significant implications for the immobilization of High-Level Waste (HLW) and Nuclear Materials, two mission areas within the Office of Environmental Management (EM). With regard to the HLW mission, this research will lead to improved understanding of radiation-induced degradation mechanisms and their effects on dissolution kinetics, as well as development of predictive models for waste form performance. In the Nuclear Materials mission, this research will lead to improvements in the understanding of radiation effects on the chemical and structural properties of materials for the stabilization and long-term storage of plutonium, highly-enriched uranium, and other actinides. The research uses plutonium incorporation, ion-beam irradiation, and electron-beam irradiation to simulate the effects of alpha decay and beta decay on relevant glasses and ceramics. The research under this project has the potential to result in improved glass and ceramic materials for the stabilization and immobilization of high-level tank waste, plutonium residues and scraps, surplus weapons plutonium, highly-enriched uranium, other actinides, and other radioactive materials.

  13. Deregulation and Nuclear Training: Cost Effective Alternatives

    SciTech Connect

    Richard P. Coe; Patricia A. Lake

    2000-11-12

    Training is crucial to the success of any organization. It is also expensive, with some estimates exceeding $50 billion annually spent on training by U.S. corporations. Nuclear training, like that of many other highly technical organizations, is both crucial and costly. It is unlikely that the amount of training can be significantly reduced. If anything, current trends indicate that training needs will probably increase as the industry and workforce ages and changes. With the advent of energy deregulation in the United States, greater pressures will surface to make the costs of energy more cost-competitive. This in turn will drive businesses to more closely examine existing costs and find ways to do things in a more cost-effective way. The commercial nuclear industry will be no exception, and nuclear training will be equally affected. It is time for nuclear training and indeed the entire nuclear industry to begin using more aggressive techniques to reduce costs. This includes the need for nuclear training to find alternatives to traditional methods for the delivery of cost-effective high-quality training that meets regulatory requirements and produces well-qualified personnel capable of working in an efficient and safe manner. Computer-based and/or Web-based training are leading emerging technologies.

  14. Quantized Field Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freyberger, Matthias; Vogel, Karl; Schleich, Wolfgang; O'Connell, Robert

    The electromagnetic field appears almost everywhere in physics. Following the introduction of Maxwell's equations in 1864, Max Planck initiated quantum theory when he discovered h = 2πℏ in the laws of black-body radiation. In 1905 Albert Einstein explained the photoelectric effect on the hypothesis of a corpuscular nature of radiation and in 1917 this paradigm led to a description of the interaction between atoms and electromagnetic radiation.

  15. The transformation of the nuclear nanoarchitecture in human field carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Greta M; Stypula-Cyrus, Yolanda; Subramanian, Hariharan; Cherkezyan, Lusik; Viswanathan, Parvathi; Zhang, Di; Iyengar, Radha; Bagalkar, Saurabh; Derbas, Justin; Graff, Taylor; Gladstein, Scott; Almassalha, Luay M; Chandler, John E; Roy, Hemant K; Backman, Vadim

    2017-01-01

    Morphological alterations of the nuclear texture are a hallmark of carcinogenesis. At later stages of disease, these changes are well characterized and detectable by light microscopy. Evidence suggests that similar albeit nanoscopic alterations develop at the predysplastic stages of carcinogenesis. Using the novel optical technique partial wave spectroscopic microscopy, we identified profound changes in the nanoscale chromatin topology in microscopically normal tissue as a common event in the field carcinogenesis of many cancers. In particular, higher-order chromatin structure at supranucleosomal length scales (20–200 nm) becomes exceedingly heterogeneous, a measure we quantify using the disorder strength (Ld) of the spatial arrangement of chromatin density. Here, we review partial wave spectroscopic nanocytology clinical studies and the technology's promise as an early cancer screening technology. PMID:28884003

  16. Mixed radiation field dosimetry utilizing Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Hintenlang, D.

    1991-01-01

    This project has proposed to develop a novel dosimetry system that is capable of directly evaluating the chemical/biological damage caused by neutrons, photons, or both in a single measurement. The dosimeter itself will consist of a small volume of biological equivalent material that is probed for radiation damage with Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance (NQR) techniques. NQR has previously been utilized as a sensitive probe of structural and chemical changes at the molecular level for a variety of organic compounds. The biological equivalent materials used in this study will not only have a density similar to tissue (tissue equivalent) but will have the same atomic components as tissue. This is a significant requirement if the important neutron interactions that occur in tissue are to occur in the dosimeter as well. The overall objective of this study is to investigate a methodology to perform accurate mixed-field (neutron and photon) dosimetry for biological systems.

  17. A Novel Variable Field System for Field-Cycled Dynamic Nuclear Polarization Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Shet, Keerthi; Caia, George L.; Kesselring, Eric; Samouilov, Alexandre; Petryakov, Sergey; Lurie, David J.; Zweier, Jay L.

    2014-01-01

    Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) is an NMR-based technique which enables detection and spectral characterization of endogenous and exogenous paramagnetic substances measured via transfer of polarization from the saturated unpaired electron spin system to the NMR active nuclei. A variable field system capable of performing DNP spectroscopy with NMR detection at any magnetic field in the range 0 - 0.38 T is described. The system is built around a clinical open-MRI system. To obtain EPR spectra via DNP, partial cancellation of the detection field B0NMR is required to alter the evolution field B0EPR at which the EPR excitation is achieved. The addition of resistive actively shielded field cancellation coils in the gap of the primary magnet provides this field offset in the range of 0–100 mT. A description of the primary magnet, cancellation coils, power supplies, interfacing hardware, RF electronics and console are included. Performance of the instrument has been evaluated by acquiring DNP spectra of phantoms with aqueous nitroxide solutions (TEMPOL) at three NMR detection fields of 97 G, 200 G and 587 G corresponding to 413 kHz, 851.6 kHz and 2.5 MHz respectively and fixed EPR evolution field of 100 G corresponding to an irradiation frequency of 282.3 MHz. This variable field DNP system offers great flexibility for the performance of DNP spectroscopy with independent optimum choice of EPR excitation and NMR detection fields. PMID:20570197

  18. Adolescents' Knowledge of Nuclear Issues and the Effects of Nuclear War.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roscoe, Bruce; Goodwin, Megan P.

    1987-01-01

    Surveyed 357 college students to assess awareness of the status of nuclear arms development and possible effects of nuclear war on people and environment. Results suggest that older adolescents are extremely uninformed regarding the current status of nuclear issues and consequences of nuclear war. Indicates a strong need to educate young people…

  19. Integrated Battlefield Effects Research for the National Training Center. Appendix H. Designs of Nuclear and Chemical Field Simulators for the National Training Center

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-12-31

    same Desired web gear as the IM-174. N . -. - .-7 45 . . . . . .... . . 2.3.3 Alternatives & Trade-Offs The radiacmeter field simulator was analyzed...The setting device S. would be about the size of a canteen and could be carried on the standard web belt. The alternative was to add a package a...require too much power for a pocket application of the dosimeter, unless4 batteries were frequently replaced. Aplicability of a D motor with its feedbaCK

  20. Nonequilibrium nuclear polarization and induced hyperfine and dipolar magnetic fields in semiconductor nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ţifrea, Ionel; Flatté, Michael E.

    2011-10-01

    We investigate the dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) caused by hyperfine coupling between nonequilibrium electronic spins and nuclear spins in semiconductor nanostructures. We derive the time and position dependence of the resulting hyperfine and dipolar magnetic fields. In GaAs quantum wells the induced nuclear spin polarization greatly exceeds the polarization of the electronic system that causes the DNP. The induced magnetic fields vary between tens of tesla for the electronic hyperfine field acting on nuclei, to hundreds of gauss for the nuclear hyperfine field acting on electrons, to a few gauss for the induced nuclear dipolar fields that act on both nuclei and electrons. The field strengths should be measurable via optically induced nuclear magnetic resonance or time-resolved Faraday rotation experiments. We discuss the implications of our calculations for low-dimensional semiconductor nanostructures.

  1. Rotating-frame gradient fields for magnetic resonance imaging and nuclear magnetic resonance in low fields

    SciTech Connect

    Bouchard, Louis-Serge; Pines, Alexander; Demas, Vasiliki

    2014-01-21

    A system and method for Fourier encoding a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signal is disclosed. A static magnetic field B.sub.0 is provided along a first direction. An NMR signal from the sample is Fourier encoded by applying a rotating-frame gradient field B.sub.G superimposed on the B.sub.0, where the B.sub.G comprises a vector component rotating in a plane perpendicular to the first direction at an angular frequency .omega.in a laboratory frame. The Fourier-encoded NMR signal is detected.

  2. The climatic effects of nuclear war

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turco, R. P.; Toon, O. B.; Ackerman, T. P.; Pollack, J. B.; Sagan, C.

    1984-01-01

    The effects of various US-USSR nuclear-exchange scenarios on global climate are investigated by means of computer simulations, summarizing the results of Turco et al. (1983) and follow-up studies using 3D global-circulation models. A nuclear-scenario model is used to determine the amounts of dust, smoke, radioactivity, and pyrotoxins generated by a particular type of nuclear exchange (such as a general 5,000-Mt exchange, a 1,000-Mt limited exchange, a 5,000-Mt hard-target counterforce attack, and a 100-Mt attack on cities only): a particle-microphysics model predicts the evolution of the dust and smoke particles; and a radiative-convective climate model estimates the effects of the dust and smoke clouds on the global radiation budget. The findings are presented in graphs, diagrams, and a table. Thick clouds blocking most sunlight over the Northern Hemisphere midlatitudes for weeks or months and producing ground-temperature reductions of 20-40 C, disruption of global circulation patterns, and rapid spread of clouds to the Southern Hemisphere are among the 'nuclear-winter' effects predicted for the 5,000-Mt baseline case. The catastrophic consequences for plant, animal, and human populations are considered, and the revision of superpower nuclear strategies is urged.

  3. The climatic effects of nuclear war

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turco, R. P.; Toon, O. B.; Ackerman, T. P.; Pollack, J. B.; Sagan, C.

    1984-01-01

    The effects of various US-USSR nuclear-exchange scenarios on global climate are investigated by means of computer simulations, summarizing the results of Turco et al. (1983) and follow-up studies using 3D global-circulation models. A nuclear-scenario model is used to determine the amounts of dust, smoke, radioactivity, and pyrotoxins generated by a particular type of nuclear exchange (such as a general 5,000-Mt exchange, a 1,000-Mt limited exchange, a 5,000-Mt hard-target counterforce attack, and a 100-Mt attack on cities only): a particle-microphysics model predicts the evolution of the dust and smoke particles; and a radiative-convective climate model estimates the effects of the dust and smoke clouds on the global radiation budget. The findings are presented in graphs, diagrams, and a table. Thick clouds blocking most sunlight over the Northern Hemisphere midlatitudes for weeks or months and producing ground-temperature reductions of 20-40 C, disruption of global circulation patterns, and rapid spread of clouds to the Southern Hemisphere are among the 'nuclear-winter' effects predicted for the 5,000-Mt baseline case. The catastrophic consequences for plant, animal, and human populations are considered, and the revision of superpower nuclear strategies is urged.

  4. Earthquake-Soil-Structure Interaction Modeling of Nuclear Power Plants for Near-Field Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abell Mena, Jose Antonio

    This dissertation proposes an approach to modeling the response of a nuclear power facility considering soil-structure interaction, when subjected to earthquake motions originated in the near-field. It is argued that near-field earthquake-induced motions are complex in the sense that current state-of-practice assumptions made on the nature of seismic wave-field stemming from such events are oversimplified. Furthermore, even if near-field sources might not deliver the largest magnitude earthquakes for a given seismic setting, it is possible that the intensity of motions generated by such sources controls design of structural and/or non-structural components of nuclear facilities in some frequency range. Several nuclear power facilities are located in the vicinity of known smaller earthquake sources (within less than 10km). The domain reduction method is used to excite a model of the soil-structure system with a three-dimensional seismic wave-field which is computed using a state-of-the-art seismic simulation code. The response of this model is compared with that of an alternative model which assumes that the incoming wave-field is not three-dimensional but unidimensional. This last modeling approach is the most common in both the research and practice of nuclear power-plant seismic design. Two source-to-site geometries are evaluated to compare possible effects of the propagation path. Computation of non-linear soil response is achieved by using a new implementation of the classical elasto-plasticity constitutive modeling framework using the new language features of the C++11 standard. This novel implementation scheme aims at being both efficient and maintainable by software-engineering standards. Both these goals are hard to achieve with just the features of previous editions of the C++ standard.

  5. Metallic field effect transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farooq, Hassan

    This thesis investigates the principle of operation behind metallic-field effect transistors (METFETs) through a systematic study of atomistic simulations performed on metallic bulk, nanowire and transistor structures. In particular, density functional theory (DFT) and non-equilibrium green's function (NEGF) based models were used to study the effect on the bandstructure and density of states of highly scaled metallic nanowires with varying parameters such as crystal orientation, cross-sectional area, and applied external bias. Similarly, the effect of varying similar parameters on the transfer and output characteristics of highly scaled metallic transistors was studied. Furthermore, oxide interfaces with metallic channels were investigated. The simulation results show that a gold METFET in the [100] crystal orientation has an I ON /IOFF ratio of 41, ION of 29.5microA and fT of 6.7THz, outperforming similarly sized MOSFETs as a promising alternative for use in high-frequency circuits.

  6. Dirac-Brueckner-Hartree-Fock versus chiral effective field theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sammarruca, Francesca; Chen, B.; Coraggio, L.; Itaco, N.; Machleidt, R.

    2012-11-01

    We compare nuclear and neutron matter predictions based on two different ab initio approaches to nuclear forces and the nuclear many-body problem. The first consists of a realistic meson-theoretic nucleon-nucleon potential together with the relativistic counterpart of the Brueckner-Hartree-Fock theory of nuclear matter. The second is based on chiral effective field theory, with density-dependent interactions derived from leading-order chiral three-nucleon forces. We find the results to be very close and conclude that both approaches contain important features governing the physics of nuclear and neutron matter.

  7. Radiation Effects in Nuclear Waste Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, William J.; Corrales, L. Rene; Ness, Nancy J.; Williford, Ralph E.; Heinisch, Howard L.; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai; Icenhower, Jonathan P.; McGrail, B. Peter; Devanathan, Ramaswami; Van Ginhoven, Renee M.; Song, Jakyoung; Park, Byeongwon; Jiang, Weilin; Begg, Bruce D.; Birtcher, R. B.; Chen, X.; Conradson, Steven D.

    2000-10-02

    Radiation effects from the decay of radionuclides may impact the long-term performance and stability of nuclear waste forms and stabilized nuclear materials. In an effort to address these concerns, the objective of this project was the development of fundamental understanding of radiation effects in glasses and ceramics, particularly on solid-state radiation effects and their influence on aqueous dissolution kinetics. This study has employed experimental, theoretical and computer simulation methods to obtain new results and insights into radiation damage processes and to initiate the development of predictive models. Consequently, the research that has been performed under this project has significant implications for the High-Level Waste and Nuclear Materials focus areas within the current DOE/EM mission. In the High-Level Waste (HLW) focus area, the results of this research could lead to improvements in the understanding of radiation-induced degradation mechanisms and their effects on dissolution kinetics, as well as development of predictive models for waste form performance. In the Nuclear Materials focus area, the results of this research could lead to improvements in the understanding of radiation effects on the chemical and structural properties of materials for the stabilization and long-term storage of plutonium, highly-enriched uranium, and other actinides. Ultimately, this research could result in improved glass and ceramic materials for the stabilization and immobilization of high-level tank waste, plutonium residues and scraps, surplus weapons plutonium, highly-enriched uranium, other actinides, and other radioactive materials.

  8. Microwave field effect transistor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Ho-Chung (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    Electrodes of a high power, microwave field effect transistor are substantially matched to external input and output networks. The field effect transistor includes a metal ground plane layer, a dielectric layer on the ground plane layer, a gallium arsenide active region on the dielectric layer, and substantially coplanar spaced source, gate, and drain electrodes having active segments covering the active region. The active segment of the gate electrode is located between edges of the active segments of the source and drain electrodes. The gate and drain electrodes include inactive pads remote from the active segments. The pads are connected directly to the input and output networks. The source electrode is connected to the ground plane layer. The space between the electrodes and the geometry of the electrodes extablish parasitic shunt capacitances and series inductances that provide substantial matches between the input network and the gate electrode and between the output network and the drain electrode. Many of the devices are connected in parallel and share a common active region, so that each pair of adjacent devices shares the same source electrodes and each pair of adjacent devices shares the same drain electrodes. The gate electrodes for the parallel devices are formed by a continuous stripe that extends between adjacent devices and is connected at different points to the common gate pad.

  9. On the feasibility of neurocurrent imaging by low-field nuclear magnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burghoff, Martin; Albrecht, Hans-Helge; Hartwig, Stefan; Hilschenz, Ingo; Körber, Rainer; Höfner, Nora; Scheer, Hans-Jürgen; Voigt, Jens; Trahms, Lutz; Curio, Gabriel

    2010-06-01

    We describe a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrometer operating at 20 μT with a frequency resolution of 2 mHz to determine the intrinsic linewidth of the proton resonance in the human brain to be about 3 Hz. Using the same system we measured a biomagnetic field of 0.5 to 1 pT amplitude, which was generated by sustained brain activity evoked during repetitive median nerve stimulation. From these data, the effect of neuronal currents on the proton NMR signal was estimated. We conclude that neuronal currents may cause a measurable shift of the proton NMR line of brain tissue in low-fields.

  10. Effect of organics on nuclear cycles

    SciTech Connect

    Riddle, J.M. . Chemistry Services Section)

    1992-07-01

    Organics entering the nuclear cycle undergo hydrolysis or radiolysis and form carboxylic acids, acetic, formic, and propionic acids being the most prominent. Sequestered sulfur, halogens, metal species, and silica may also be released. The corrosion effects of halogens and sulfate are reasonably well understood. Historically, organic acids at low levels (e.g., 10 to 50 ppb) in nuclear cycles have been viewed as a nuisance or as potentially detrimental. This study reviews literature references of the effects of organics in nuclear cycles. Sources of organics and corrosion effects on plant materials are given from various references. Acetate can neutralize caustic in PWR steam generator crevices, whereas formate and oxalate as sodium salts can decompose to sodium carbonate. Sodium carbonate in crevices hydrolyzes to carbon dioxide and sodium hydroxide, which promotes SCC and IGA of Alloy 600. Formate and oxalate can act as oxygen scavengers in the BWR cycle and mitigate IGSCC of austenitic stainless steel. No firm evidence exists that organic acids have caused corrosion in turbines, piping, or heat exchangers in nuclear cycles, although organic acids at high levels can cause specific corrosion effects as a result of low pH.

  11. High-Field Dynamic Nuclear Polarization for Solid and Solution Biological NMR

    PubMed Central

    Barnes, A.B.; Paëpe, G. De; van der Wel, P.C.A.; Hu, K.-N.; Joo, C.-G.; Bajaj, V.S.; Mak-Jurkauskas, M.L.; Sirigiri, J.R.; Herzfeld, J.; Temkin, R.J.; Griffin, R.G.

    2008-01-01

    Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) results in a substantial nuclear polarization enhancement through a transfer of the magnetization from electrons to nuclei. Recent years have seen considerable progress in the development of DNP experiments directed towards enhancing sensitivity in biological nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). This review covers the applications, hardware, polarizing agents, and theoretical descriptions that were developed at the Francis Bitter Magnet Laboratory at Massachusetts Institute of Technology for high-field DNP experiments. In frozen dielectrics, the enhanced nuclear polarization developed in the vicinity of the polarizing agent can be efficiently dispersed to the bulk of the sample via 1H spin diffusion. This strategy has been proven effective in polarizing biologically interesting systems, such as nanocrystalline peptides and membrane proteins, without leading to paramagnetic broadening of the NMR signals. Gyrotrons have been used as a source of high-power (5–10 W) microwaves up to 460 GHz as required for the DNP experiments. Other hardware has also been developed allowing in situ microwave irradiation integrated with cryogenic magic-angle-spinning solid-state NMR. Advances in the quantum mechanical treatment are successful in describing the mechanism by which new biradical polarizing agents yield larger enhancements at higher magnetic fields. Finally, pulsed methods and solution experiments should play a prominent role in the future of DNP. PMID:19194532

  12. Climatic Effects of Regional Nuclear War

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oman, Luke D.

    2011-01-01

    We use a modern climate model and new estimates of smoke generated by fires in contemporary cities to calculate the response of the climate system to a regional nuclear war between emerging third world nuclear powers using 100 Hiroshima-size bombs (less than 0.03% of the explosive yield of the current global nuclear arsenal) on cities in the subtropics. We find significant cooling and reductions of precipitation lasting years, which would impact the global food supply. The climate changes are large and longlasting because the fuel loadings in modern cities are quite high and the subtropical solar insolation heats the resulting smoke cloud and lofts it into the high stratosphere, where removal mechanisms are slow. While the climate changes are less dramatic than found in previous "nuclear winter" simulations of a massive nuclear exchange between the superpowers, because less smoke is emitted, the changes seem to be more persistent because of improvements in representing aerosol processes and microphysical/dynamical interactions, including radiative heating effects, in newer global climate system models. The assumptions and calculations that go into these conclusions will be described.

  13. Nuclear Weapons Effects Mitigation Techniques

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-06-01

    absorb mors thermal onergy and nay ho burned more readily than har’e skin. Application of an effective sun sc~reen aid ( ir crelam over exposed skin...8217 Ilcioltatnt Doge (1ltds) Mnn i n cilon Nonne40 Man in )iI foot, -deepi foxhole 13300 wA th 1 (𔃻") .1otiril -- "Pland or nompaotei la t< ir iovlderis bft~tel...0s) mnust- he aconompli fitd ill a wheeled vehiocle, wearing of’ helmeats and steeol pots with chin etriipm :10. irred will help prevent, head

  14. Surface effects of underground nuclear explosions

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, B.M.; Drellack, S.L. Jr.; Townsend, M.J.

    1997-06-01

    The effects of nuclear explosions have been observed and studied since the first nuclear test (code named Trinity) on July 16, 1945. Since that first detonation, 1,053 nuclear tests have been conducted by the US, most of which were sited underground at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The effects of underground nuclear explosions (UNEs) on their surroundings have long been the object of much interest and study, especially for containment, engineering, and treaty verification purposes. One aspect of these explosion-induced phenomena is the disruption or alteration of the near-surface environment, also known as surface effects. This report was prepared at the request of the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), to bring together, correlate, and preserve information and techniques used in the recognition and documentation of surface effects of UNEs. This report has several main sections, including pertinent background information (Section 2.0), descriptions of the different types of surface effects (Section 3.0), discussion of their application and limitations (Section 4.0), an extensive bibliography and glossary (Section 6.0 and Appendix A), and procedures used to document geologic surface effects at the NTS (Appendix C). Because a majority of US surface-effects experience is from the NTS, an overview of pertinent NTS-specific information also is provided in Appendix B. It is not within the scope of this report to explore new relationships among test parameters, physiographic setting, and the types or degree of manifestation of surface effects, but rather to compile, summarize, and capture surface-effects observations and interpretations, as well as documentation procedures and the rationale behind them.

  15. A review: applications of the phase field method in predicting microstructure and property evolution of irradiated nuclear materials

    DOE PAGES

    Li, Yulan; Hu, Shenyang; Sun, Xin; ...

    2017-04-14

    Here, complex microstructure changes occur in nuclear fuel and structural materials due to the extreme environments of intense irradiation and high temperature. This paper evaluates the role of the phase field method in predicting the microstructure evolution of irradiated nuclear materials and the impact on their mechanical, thermal, and magnetic properties. The paper starts with an overview of the important physical mechanisms of defect evolution and the significant gaps in simulating microstructure evolution in irradiated nuclear materials. Then, the phase field method is introduced as a powerful and predictive tool and its applications to microstructure and property evolution in irradiatedmore » nuclear materials are reviewed. The review shows that (1) Phase field models can correctly describe important phenomena such as spatial-dependent generation, migration, and recombination of defects, radiation-induced dissolution, the Soret effect, strong interfacial energy anisotropy, and elastic interaction; (2) The phase field method can qualitatively and quantitatively simulate two-dimensional and three-dimensional microstructure evolution, including radiation-induced segregation, second phase nucleation, void migration, void and gas bubble superlattice formation, interstitial loop evolution, hydrate formation, and grain growth, and (3) The Phase field method correctly predicts the relationships between microstructures and properties. The final section is dedicated to a discussion of the strengths and limitations of the phase field method, as applied to irradiation effects in nuclear materials.« less

  16. A review: applications of the phase field method in predicting microstructure and property evolution of irradiated nuclear materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yulan; Hu, Shenyang; Sun, Xin; Stan, Marius

    2017-04-01

    Complex microstructure changes occur in nuclear fuel and structural materials due to the extreme environments of intense irradiation and high temperature. This paper evaluates the role of the phase field method in predicting the microstructure evolution of irradiated nuclear materials and the impact on their mechanical, thermal, and magnetic properties. The paper starts with an overview of the important physical mechanisms of defect evolution and the significant gaps in simulating microstructure evolution in irradiated nuclear materials. Then, the phase field method is introduced as a powerful and predictive tool and its applications to microstructure and property evolution in irradiated nuclear materials are reviewed. The review shows that (1) Phase field models can correctly describe important phenomena such as spatial-dependent generation, migration, and recombination of defects, radiation-induced dissolution, the Soret effect, strong interfacial energy anisotropy, and elastic interaction; (2) The phase field method can qualitatively and quantitatively simulate two-dimensional and three-dimensional microstructure evolution, including radiation-induced segregation, second phase nucleation, void migration, void and gas bubble superlattice formation, interstitial loop evolution, hydrate formation, and grain growth, and (3) The Phase field method correctly predicts the relationships between microstructures and properties. The final section is dedicated to a discussion of the strengths and limitations of the phase field method, as applied to irradiation effects in nuclear materials.

  17. Second-order correction to the Bigeleisen–Mayer equation due to the nuclear field shift

    PubMed Central

    Bigeleisen, Jacob

    1998-01-01

    The nuclear field shift affects the electronic, rotational, and vibrational energies of polyatomic molecules. The theory of the shifts in molecular spectra has been studied by Schlembach and Tiemann [Schlembach, J. & Tiemann, E. (1982) Chem. Phys. 68, 21]; measurements of the electronic and rotational shifts of the diatomic halides of Pb and Tl have been made by Tiemann et al. [Tiemann, E., Knöckel, H. & Schlembach, J. (1982) Ber. Bunsenges. Phys. Chem. 86, 821]. These authors have estimated the relative shifts in the harmonic frequencies of these compounds due to the nuclear field shift to be of the order of 10−6. I have used this estimate of the relative shift in vibrational frequency to calculate the correction to the harmonic oscillator approximation to the isotopic reduced partition-function ratio 208Pb32S/207Pb32S. The correction is 0.3% of the harmonic oscillator value at 300 K. In the absence of compelling evidence to the contrary, it suffices to calculate the nuclear field effect on the total isotopic partition-function ratio from its shift of the electronic zero point energy and the unperturbed molecular vibration. PMID:9560183

  18. Nuclear relaxation in an electric field enables the determination of isotropic magnetic shielding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garbacz, Piotr

    2016-08-01

    It is shown that in contrast to the case of nuclear relaxation in a magnetic field B, simultaneous application of the magnetic field B and an additional electric field E causes transverse relaxation of a spin-1/2 nucleus with the rate proportional to the square of the isotropic part of the magnetic shielding tensor. This effect can contribute noticeably to the transverse relaxation rate of heavy nuclei in molecules that possess permanent electric dipole moments. Relativistic quantum mechanical computations indicate that for 205Tl nucleus in a Pt-Tl bonded complex, Pt(CN)5Tl, the transverse relaxation rate induced by the electric field is of the order of 1 s-1 at E = 5 kV/mm and B = 10 T.

  19. Effects of electrospun chitosan wrapping for dry-ageing of beef, as studied by microbiological, physicochemical and low-field nuclear magnetic resonance analysis.

    PubMed

    Gudjónsdóttir, María; Gacutan, Manuel D; Mendes, Ana C; Chronakis, Ioannis S; Jespersen, Lene; Karlsson, Anders H

    2015-10-01

    The effects of using electrospun chitosan fibres as a wrapping material for dry-ageing beef was studied and compared to traditional dry-ageing and wet-ageing of beef for up to 21 days. The chitosan treatment showed improved results in terms of yield, reduction of microbial counts, yeasts and moulds, and lighter appearance compared to traditional dry-ageing. Weight and trimming losses were minimal in the wet-ageing beef. However, significant growth of lactic acid bacteria was observed in this group. Transverse relaxation times indicated a lower degree of muscle denaturation during ageing in the chitosan dry-ageing beef compared to the traditional dry-ageing meat. A principal component analysis furthermore indicated that 60.6% of the variation between samples and ageing treatments could be described by differences in the water content and distribution in the muscle. The study showed that electrospun chitosan fibre mats have potential as a wrapping material for improved quality during dry-ageing of beef. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Analytical relationships of nuclear field and microdosimetric quantities for target fragmentation in tissue systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, John W.; Cucinotta, Francis A.; Hajnal, Ferenc

    1991-01-01

    A simple analytic formula for the nuclear fields formed by target fragmentation in tissue systems is derived using the continuous slowing down approximation (CSDA). The energy fluctuations in sensitive localized sites within the tissue system caused by these nuclear events are defined by microdosimetry. In that CSDA is used, the energy fluctuations exclude the role of secondary electrons. The relations also relate to the response of microdosimetric devices to nuclear fragmentation fields.

  1. Evaluation of Near Field Atmospheric Dispersion Around Nuclear Facilities Using a Lorentzian Distribution Methodology

    SciTech Connect

    Hawkley, Gavin

    2014-01-01

    Atmospheric dispersion modeling within the near field of a nuclear facility typically applies a building wake correction to the Gaussian plume model, whereby a point source is modeled as a plane source. The plane source results in greater near field dilution and reduces the far field effluent concentration. However, the correction does not account for the concentration profile within the near field. Receptors of interest, such as the maximally exposed individual, may exist within the near field and thus the realm of building wake effects. Furthermore, release parameters and displacement characteristics may be unknown, particularly during upset conditions. Therefore, emphasis is placed upon the need to analyze and estimate an enveloping concentration profile within the near field of a release. This investigation included the analysis of 64 air samples collected over 128 wk. Variables of importance were then derived from the measurement data, and a methodology was developed that allowed for the estimation of Lorentzian-based dispersion coefficients along the lateral axis of the near field recirculation cavity; the development of recirculation cavity boundaries; and conservative evaluation of the associated concentration profile. The results evaluated the effectiveness of the Lorentzian distribution methodology for estimating near field releases and emphasized the need to place air-monitoring stations appropriately for complete concentration characterization. Additionally, the importance of the sampling period and operational conditions were discussed to balance operational feedback and the reporting of public dose.

  2. Coherent transfer of nuclear spin polarization in field-cycling NMR experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pravdivtsev, Andrey N.; Yurkovskaya, Alexandra V.; Vieth, Hans-Martin; Ivanov, Konstantin L.

    2013-12-01

    Coherent polarization transfer effects in a coupled spin network have been studied over a wide field range. The transfer mechanism is based on exciting zero-quantum coherences between the nuclear spin states by means of non-adiabatic field jump from high to low magnetic field. Subsequent evolution of these coherences enables conversion of spin order in the system, which is monitored after field jump back to high field. Such processes are most efficient when the spin system passes through an avoided level crossing during the field variation. The polarization transfer effects have been demonstrated for N-acetyl histidine, which has five scalar coupled protons; the initial spin order has been prepared by applying RF-pulses at high magnetic field. The observed oscillatory transfer kinetics is taken as a clear indication of a coherent mechanism; level crossing effects have also been demonstrated. The experimental data are in very good agreement with the theoretical model of coherent polarization transfer. The method suggested is also valid for other types of initial polarization in the spin system, most notably, for spin hyperpolarization.

  3. Coherent transfer of nuclear spin polarization in field-cycling NMR experiments.

    PubMed

    Pravdivtsev, Andrey N; Yurkovskaya, Alexandra V; Vieth, Hans-Martin; Ivanov, Konstantin L

    2013-12-28

    Coherent polarization transfer effects in a coupled spin network have been studied over a wide field range. The transfer mechanism is based on exciting zero-quantum coherences between the nuclear spin states by means of non-adiabatic field jump from high to low magnetic field. Subsequent evolution of these coherences enables conversion of spin order in the system, which is monitored after field jump back to high field. Such processes are most efficient when the spin system passes through an avoided level crossing during the field variation. The polarization transfer effects have been demonstrated for N-acetyl histidine, which has five scalar coupled protons; the initial spin order has been prepared by applying RF-pulses at high magnetic field. The observed oscillatory transfer kinetics is taken as a clear indication of a coherent mechanism; level crossing effects have also been demonstrated. The experimental data are in very good agreement with the theoretical model of coherent polarization transfer. The method suggested is also valid for other types of initial polarization in the spin system, most notably, for spin hyperpolarization.

  4. Coherent transfer of nuclear spin polarization in field-cycling NMR experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Pravdivtsev, Andrey N.; Yurkovskaya, Alexandra V.; Ivanov, Konstantin L.; Vieth, Hans-Martin

    2013-12-28

    Coherent polarization transfer effects in a coupled spin network have been studied over a wide field range. The transfer mechanism is based on exciting zero-quantum coherences between the nuclear spin states by means of non-adiabatic field jump from high to low magnetic field. Subsequent evolution of these coherences enables conversion of spin order in the system, which is monitored after field jump back to high field. Such processes are most efficient when the spin system passes through an avoided level crossing during the field variation. The polarization transfer effects have been demonstrated for N-acetyl histidine, which has five scalar coupled protons; the initial spin order has been prepared by applying RF-pulses at high magnetic field. The observed oscillatory transfer kinetics is taken as a clear indication of a coherent mechanism; level crossing effects have also been demonstrated. The experimental data are in very good agreement with the theoretical model of coherent polarization transfer. The method suggested is also valid for other types of initial polarization in the spin system, most notably, for spin hyperpolarization.

  5. Paper field effect transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortunato, E.; Correia, Nuno; Barquinha, Pedro; Costa, Cláudia; Pereira, Luís; Gonçalves, Gonçalo; Martins, Rodrigo

    2009-02-01

    In this paper we report the use of a sheet of cellulose fiber-based paper as the dielectric layer used in oxide based semiconductor thin film field-effect transistors (FETs). In this new approach we are using the cellulose fiber-based paper in an "interstrate" structure since the device is build on both sides of the cellulose sheet. Such hybrid FETs present excellent operating characteristics such as high channel saturation mobility (>30 cm2/Vs), drain-source current on/off modulation ratio of approximately 104, near-zero threshold voltage, enhancement n-type operation and sub-threshold gate voltage swing of 0.8 V/decade. The cellulose fiber-based paper FETs characteristics have been measured in air ambient conditions and present good stability. The obtained results outpace those of amorphous Si TFTs and rival with the same oxide based TFTs produced on either glass or crystalline silicon substrates. The compatibility of these devices with large-scale/large-area deposition techniques and low cost substrates as well as their very low operating bias delineates this as a promising approach to attain high-performance disposable electronics like paper displays, smart labels, smart packaging, RFID and point-of-care systems for self analysis in bio-applications, among others.

  6. Nuclear Winter: Uncertainties Surround the Long-Term Effects of Nuclear War. Report to the Congress.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    General Accounting Office, Washington, DC.

    Nuclear winter, a term used to describe potential long-term climate and environmental effects of nuclear war, has been a subject of debate and controversy. This report examines and presents scientific and policy implications of nuclear winter. Contents include: (1) an executive summary (highlighting previous and current studies on the topic); (2)…

  7. Periodic orbit bifurcations and local symmetry restorations in exotic-shape nuclear mean fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arita, Ken-ichiro

    2017-07-01

    The semiclassical origins of the enhancement of shell effects in exotic-shape mean-field potentials are investigated by focusing attention on the roles of the local symmetries associated with the periodic-orbit bifurcations. The deformed shell structures for four types of pure octupole shapes in the nuclear mean-field model having a realistic radial dependence are analyzed. Remarkable shell effects are shown for a large Y 32 deformation having tetrahedral symmetry. Much stronger shell effects found in the shape parametrization smoothly connecting the sphere and the tetrahedron are investigated from the view-point of the classical-quantum correspondence. The local dynamical symmetries associated with the bridge orbit bifurcations are shown to have significant roles in the emergence of exotic deformed shell structures for certain combinations of the surface diffuseness and the tetrahedral deformation parameters.

  8. Nuclear Magnetic Double Resonance Using Weak Perturbing RF Fields

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reynolds, G. Fredric

    1977-01-01

    Describes a nuclear magnetic resonance experimental example of spin tickling; also discusses a direct approach for verifying the relative signs of coupling constants in three-spin cyclopropyl systems. (SL)

  9. Nuclear Magnetic Double Resonance Using Weak Perturbing RF Fields

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reynolds, G. Fredric

    1977-01-01

    Describes a nuclear magnetic resonance experimental example of spin tickling; also discusses a direct approach for verifying the relative signs of coupling constants in three-spin cyclopropyl systems. (SL)

  10. Correlated electron and nuclear dynamics in strong field photoionization of H(2)(+).

    PubMed

    Silva, R E F; Catoire, F; Rivière, P; Bachau, H; Martín, F

    2013-03-15

    We present a theoretical study of H(2)(+) ionization under strong IR femtosecond pulses by using a method designed to extract correlated (2D) photoelectron and proton kinetic energy spectra. The results show two distinct ionization mechanisms-tunnel and multiphoton ionization-in which electrons and nuclei do not share the energy from the field in the same way. Electrons produced in multiphoton ionization share part of their energy with the nuclei, an effect that shows up in the 2D spectra in the form of energy-conservation fringes similar to those observed in weak-field ionization of diatomic molecules. In contrast, tunneling electrons lead to fringes whose position does not depend on the proton kinetic energy. At high intensity, the two processes coexist and the 2D plots show a very rich behavior, suggesting that the correlation between electron and nuclear dynamics in strong field ionization is more complex than one would have anticipated.

  11. Nuclear effects in neutrino production of pions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Iván; Siddikov, M.

    2015-04-01

    In this paper we study nuclear effects in the neutrino production of pions. We found that in a Bjorken kinematics, for moderate xB accessible in ongoing and forthcoming neutrino experiments, the cross section is dominated by the incoherent contribution; the coherent contribution becomes visible only for small |t |≲1 /RA2, which requires xB≲0.1 . Our results could be relevant to the kinematics of the ongoing MINERvA experiment in the middle-energy regime. We provide a code which could be used for the evaluation of the neutrino induced deeply virtual meson production observables using different parametrizations of generalized parton distributions and different models of nuclear structure.

  12. Electric field effects on nuclear magnetic shielding of the 1:1 and 2:1 (homo and heterochiral) complexes of XOOX' (X, X' = H, CH3) with lithium cation and their chiral discrimination.

    PubMed

    Alkorta, Ibon; Elguero, José; Provasi, Patricio F; Pagola, Gabriel I; Ferraro, Marta B

    2011-09-14

    The set of 1:1 and 2:1 complexes of XOOX' (X, X' = H, CH(3)) with lithium cation has been studied to determine if they are suitable candidates for chiral discrimination in an isotropic medium via nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Conventional nuclear magnetic resonance is unable to distinguish between enantiomers in the absence of a chiral solvent. The criterion for experimental detection is valuated by the isotropic part of nuclear shielding polarisability tensors, related to a pseudoscalar of opposite sign for two enantiomers. The study includes calculations at coupled Hartree-Fock and density functional theory schemes for (17)O nucleus in each compound. Additional calculations for (1)H are also included for some compounds. A huge static homogeneous electric field, perpendicular to the magnetic field of the spectromer, as big as ≈1.7 × 10(8) V m(-1) should be applied to observe a shift of ≈1 ppm for (17)O magnetic shielding in the proposed set of complexes. © 2011 American Institute of Physics

  13. Nuclear Spin Maser at Highly Stabilized Low Magnetic Field and Search for Atomic EDM

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshimi, A.; Asahi, K.; Inoue, T.; Uchida, M.; Hatakeyama, N.; Tsuchiya, M.; Kagami, S.

    2009-08-04

    A nuclear spin maser is operated at a low static field through an active feedback scheme based on an optical nuclear spin detection and succeeding spin control by a transverse field application. The frequency stability of this optical-coupling spin maser is improved by installation of a low-noise current source for a solenoid magnet producing a static magnetic field in the maser operation. Experimental devices for application of the maser to EDM experiment are being developed.

  14. Quadrupolar effects on nuclear spins of neutral arsenic donors in silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franke, David P.; Pflüger, Moritz P. D.; Mortemousque, Pierre-André; Itoh, Kohei M.; Brandt, Martin S.

    2016-04-01

    We present electrically detected electron nuclear double resonance measurements of the nuclear spins of ionized and neutral arsenic donors in strained silicon. In addition to a reduction of the hyperfine coupling, we find significant quadrupole interactions of the nuclear spin of the neutral donors of the order of 10 kHz. By comparing these to the quadrupole shifts due to crystal fields measured for the ionized donors, we identify the effect of the additional electron on the electric field gradient at the nucleus. This extra component is expected to be caused by the coupling to electric field gradients created due to changes in the electron wave function under strain.

  15. Measurement of the true transverse nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation in the presence of field gradients.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, J; Chandrasekera, T C; Gladden, L F

    2013-08-21

    A measure of the nuclear spin transverse relaxation time T2, as determined using the nuclear magnetic resonance Carr-Purcell Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) experiment, provides unique information characterizing the microstructure of porous media which are themselves ubiquitous across fields of petrophysics, biophysics, and chemical engineering. However, the CPMG measurement is sensitive to diffusion in large magnetic field gradients. Under such conditions an effective relaxation time T2,eff is observed instead, described by a combination of relaxation and diffusion exponents. The relaxation exponent always varies as nte (where n is the number, and te is the temporal separation, of spin echoes). The diffusion exponent varies as nte (k), where 1 < k ≤ 3, although the exact analytic form is often unknown. Here we present a general approach to separating the influence of relaxation and diffusion by utilizing a composite diffusion exponent. Any T2,eff component with a power of k > 1 is removed to provide a measure of the true T2 relaxation time distribution from CPMG data acquired in the presence of a strong background gradient. We apply the technique to discriminate between the effects of relaxation and diffusion in porous media using catalysts and rocks as examples. The method is generally applicable to any CPMG measurements conducted in the presence of a static magnetic field gradient.

  16. Nuclear matter properties in the relativistic mean-field theory at finite temperature with interaction between sigma-omega mesons

    SciTech Connect

    Costa, R. S.; Duarte, S. B.; Oliveira, J. C. T.; Chiapparini, M.

    2010-05-21

    We study the nuclear matter properties in the regime of high temperatures using a relativistic mean-field theory. Contrasting with the usual linear Walecka model, we include the sigma-omega meson coupling in order to investigate the role of this interaction in the nucleon effective mass behavior. Some numerical results are presented and discussed.

  17. Is nuclear medicine cost-effective?

    PubMed

    Ripley, S

    1991-03-01

    Clearly, there is currently no consensus on the cost-effectiveness of nuclear medicine--or in fact any other aspect of medicine. It is hoped that common sense prevails in clinical medicine today. An appropriate case history and physical examination may negate the need for any additional investigation. From the perspective of the capital cost of equipment and supply costs, ultrasound is clearly the most cost-effective diagnostic imaging modality. But while it is useful, it does not always provide definitive answers, and other modalities must be used to arrive at a diagnosis. In comparison, the capital cost of general radiology equipment and nuclear medicine equipment is relatively equal. Radiology has more operating costs per case than nuclear medicine and requires a lower staffing component per given volume of examinations. In any given diagnostic imaging procedure, the practitioner and imagist must maintain a dialogue to ascertain the appropriateness of the study and to use the available resources in the most effective manner. This is even more imperative when CT scanning and MRI are included in the equation. The development of an investigative protocol that makes the most efficient use of the various imaging modalities without compromising the quality of care makes sense for the patient, the physician and the insurance provider. It is unreasonable to expect the physician to be aware of the optimal protocol for the diagnostic workup of every patient. The guidance of the imaging department is required to maximize the efficient use of the available facilities. A critical and exhaustive appraisal of the medical literature may be required to determine the optimal diagnostic protocol.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  18. Nuclear forward scattering of synchrotron radiation in pulsed high magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Strohm, C; Van der Linden, P; Rüffer, R

    2010-02-26

    We report the demonstration of nuclear forward scattering of synchrotron radiation from 57Fe in ferromagnetic alpha iron in pulsed high magnetic fields up to 30 T. The observed magnetic hyperfine field follows the calculated high field bulk magnetization within 1%, establishing the technique as a precise tool for the study of magnetic solids in very high magnetic fields. To perform these experiments in pulsed fields, we have developed a detection scheme for fully time resolved nuclear forward scattering applicable to other pump probe experiments.

  19. Field-induced spin reorientation in [Fe/Cr ] n multilayers studied by nuclear resonance reflectivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreeva, M.; Gupta, A.; Sharma, G.; Kamali, S.; Okada, K.; Yoda, Y.

    2015-10-01

    We present depth-resolved nuclear resonance reflectivity studies of the magnetization evolution in [57Fe(3nm ) /Cr (1.2 nm ) ] 10 multilayer under applied external field. The measurements have been performed at the station BL09XU of SPring-8 at different values of the external field (0-1500 Oe). We apply the joint fit of the delayed reflectivity curves and the time spectra of the nuclear resonance reflectivity measured at different grazing angles for enhancement of the depth resolution and reliability of results. We show that the azimuth angle, which is used in all papers devoted to the magnetization profile determination, has a more complicated physical sense due to the partially coherent averaging of the scattering amplitudes from magnetic lateral domains. We describe how to select the true azimuth angle from the determined "effective azimuth angle." Finally we obtain the noncollinear twisted magnetization depth profiles where the spin-flop state appears sequentially in different 57Fe layers at increasing applied field.

  20. Measuring Nuclear Effects with MINERvA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiorentini, G.; Minerva Collaboration

    2011-04-01

    MINERνA (Main INjector Experiment for ν-A) is a neutrino scattering experiment in the 1-10 GeV energy range in the NuMI high-intensity neutrino beam at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory. MINERνA is now taking data and it was designed to measure neutrino-nucleus cross sections on a variety of different materials (C, Fe, Pb, He, H2O) allowing the study of nuclear effects and the A-dependence in neutrino interactions. This talk will present the current status in the analysis of inclusive charge current events in the iron, lead, and plastic targets.

  1. Ideal Channel Field Effect Transistors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-03-01

    to bring the electron energy in equilibrium with the local electric field, i.e. the electron energy lags the local electric field. This non...equilibrium effect makes the impact ionization depend mostly on the carrier energy instead of the local electric field. The electron kinetic energy (E - Ec...the peak of the electron energy does not happen at the peak local electric field. Therefore the breakdown voltage was calculated using a non- local

  2. Topical Developments in High-Field Dynamic Nuclear Polarization

    PubMed Central

    Kiesewetter, Matthew K.; Frantz, Derik K.; Walish, Joseph J.; Ravera, Enrico; Luchinat, Claudio; Swager, Timothy M.; Griffin, Robert G.

    2015-01-01

    We report our recent efforts directed at improving high-field DNP experiments. We investigated a series of thiourea nitroxide radicals and the associated DNP enhancements ranging from ε = 25 to 82 that demonstrate the impact of molecular structure on performance. We directly polarized low-gamma nuclei including 13C, 2H, and 17O using trityl via the cross effect. We discuss a variety of sample preparation techniques for DNP with emphasis on the benefit of methods that do not use a glass-forming cryoprotecting matrix. Lastly, we describe a corrugated waveguide for use in a 700 MHz / 460 GHz DNP system that improves microwave delivery and increases enhancements up to 50%. PMID:25977588

  3. Variation after projection with a triaxially deformed nuclear mean field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Zao-Chun; Horoi, Mihai; Chen, Y. S.

    2015-12-01

    We implemented a variation after projection (VAP) algorithm based on a triaxially deformed Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov vacuum state. This is the first projected mean field study that includes all the quantum numbers (except parity), i.e., spin (J ), isospin (T ), and mass number (A ). Systematic VAP calculations with JTA projection have been performed for the even-even s d -shell nuclei with the USDB Hamiltonian. All the VAP ground state energies are within 500 keV above the exact shell model values. Our VAP calculations show that the spin projection has two important effects: (1) the spin projection is crucial in achieving good approximation of the full shell model calculation; (2) the intrinsic shapes of the VAP wave functions with spin projection are always triaxial, while the Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov methods likely provide axial intrinsic shapes. Finally, our analysis suggests that one may not be possible to associate an intrinsic shape to an exact shell model wave function.

  4. Polarizing agents and mechanisms for high-field dynamic nuclear polarization of frozen dielectric solids.

    PubMed

    Hu, Kan-Nian

    2011-09-01

    This article provides an overview of polarizing mechanisms involved in high-frequency dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) of frozen biological samples at temperatures maintained using liquid nitrogen, compatible with contemporary magic-angle spinning (MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Typical DNP experiments require unpaired electrons that are usually exogenous in samples via paramagnetic doping with polarizing agents. Thus, the resulting nuclear polarization mechanism depends on the electron and nuclear spin interactions induced by the paramagnetic species. The Overhauser Effect (OE) DNP, which relies on time-dependent spin-spin interactions, is excluded from our discussion due the lack of conducting electrons in frozen aqueous solutions containing biological entities. DNP of particular interest to us relies primarily on time-independent, spin-spin interactions for significant electron-nucleus polarization transfer through mechanisms such as the Solid Effect (SE), the Cross Effect (CE) or Thermal Mixing (TM), involving one, two or multiple electron spins, respectively. Derived from monomeric radicals initially used in high-field DNP experiments, bi- or multiple-radical polarizing agents facilitate CE/TM to generate significant NMR signal enhancements in dielectric solids at low temperatures (<100 K). For example, large DNP enhancements (∼300 times at 5 T) from a biologically compatible biradical, 1-(TEMPO-4-oxy)-3-(TEMPO-4-amino)propan-2-ol (TOTAPOL), have enabled high-resolution MAS NMR in sample systems existing in submicron domains or embedded in larger biomolecular complexes. The scope of this review is focused on recently developed DNP polarizing agents for high-field applications and leads up to future developments per the CE DNP mechanism. Because DNP experiments are feasible with a solid-state microwave source when performed at <20K, nuclear polarization using lower microwave power (<100 mW) is possible by forcing a high proportion of biradicals to

  5. Aging effects of US space nuclear systems in orbit

    SciTech Connect

    Bartram, B.W.; Huang, R.; Tammara, S.R.; Thielke, N.R.

    1982-05-14

    This report presents information and data in support of a cost-benefit analysis being performed by Fair child Industries (FI) on the feasibility of retrieving existing US space nuclear systems in earth orbit by the Space Shuttle. This report evaluates, for US space nuclear systems presently in orbit, the radioisotopic inventory and external radiation field as a function of time, the effect of aging on fuel containment materials over the projected lifetime of the system, and the possible radioactive source terms should reentry eventually occur. Although the radioisotopic inventories and radiation fields have been evaluated for all systems, Transit 4A and Transit Triad have been emphasized in the evaluation of the aging effects and reentry consequences because these spacecraft have the shortest projected orbital lifetimes (570 and 150 years, respectively). In addition to existing systems in orbit, the radioisotopic inventory, radiation field, and reentry source terms have been evaluated for a General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) in a parking orbit due to an aborted Galileo Mission or International Solar Polar Mission (ISPM).

  6. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance in the Earth's Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hollos, Stefan; Hollos, Richard

    2002-10-01

    We will address the challenges of doing NMR in the Earth's magnetic field. The design of an Earth's field proton precession magnetometer will be presented along with some preliminary attempts to do spectroscopy with this device.

  7. Novel 1H low field nuclear magnetic resonance applications for the field of biodiesel

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Biodiesel production has increased dramatically over the last decade, raising the need for new rapid and non-destructive analytical tools and technologies. 1H Low Field Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (LF-NMR) applications, which offer great potential to the field of biodiesel, have been developed by the Phyto Lipid Biotechnology Lab research team in the last few years. Results Supervised and un-supervised chemometric tools are suggested for screening new alternative biodiesel feedstocks according to oil content and viscosity. The tools allowed assignment into viscosity groups of biodiesel-petrodiesel samples whose viscosity is unknown, and uncovered biodiesel samples that have residues of unreacted acylglycerol and/or methanol, and poorly separated and cleaned glycerol and water. In the case of composite materials, relaxation time distribution, and cross-correlation methods were successfully applied to differentiate components. Continuous distributed methods were also applied to calculate the yield of the transesterification reaction, and thus monitor the progress of the common and in-situ transesterification reactions, offering a tool for optimization of reaction parameters. Conclusions Comprehensive applied tools are detailed for the characterization of new alternative biodiesel resources in their whole conformation, monitoring of the biodiesel transesterification reaction, and quality evaluation of the final product, using a non-invasive and non-destructive technology that is new to the biodiesel research area. A new integrated computational-experimental approach for analysis of 1H LF-NMR relaxometry data is also presented, suggesting improved solution stability and peak resolution. PMID:23590829

  8. Novel 1H low field nuclear magnetic resonance applications for the field of biodiesel.

    PubMed

    Berman, Paula; Leshem, Adi; Etziony, Oren; Levi, Ofer; Parmet, Yisrael; Saunders, Michael; Wiesman, Zeev

    2013-04-16

    Biodiesel production has increased dramatically over the last decade, raising the need for new rapid and non-destructive analytical tools and technologies. 1H Low Field Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (LF-NMR) applications, which offer great potential to the field of biodiesel, have been developed by the Phyto Lipid Biotechnology Lab research team in the last few years. Supervised and un-supervised chemometric tools are suggested for screening new alternative biodiesel feedstocks according to oil content and viscosity. The tools allowed assignment into viscosity groups of biodiesel-petrodiesel samples whose viscosity is unknown, and uncovered biodiesel samples that have residues of unreacted acylglycerol and/or methanol, and poorly separated and cleaned glycerol and water. In the case of composite materials, relaxation time distribution, and cross-correlation methods were successfully applied to differentiate components. Continuous distributed methods were also applied to calculate the yield of the transesterification reaction, and thus monitor the progress of the common and in-situ transesterification reactions, offering a tool for optimization of reaction parameters. Comprehensive applied tools are detailed for the characterization of new alternative biodiesel resources in their whole conformation, monitoring of the biodiesel transesterification reaction, and quality evaluation of the final product, using a non-invasive and non-destructive technology that is new to the biodiesel research area. A new integrated computational-experimental approach for analysis of 1H LF-NMR relaxometry data is also presented, suggesting improved solution stability and peak resolution.

  9. Lattice Methods and Effective Field Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicholson, Amy

    Lattice field theory is a non-perturbative tool for studying properties of strongly interacting field theories, which is particularly amenable to numerical calculations and has quantifiable systematic errors. In these lectures we apply these techniques to nuclear Effective Field Theory (EFT), a non-relativistic theory for nuclei involving the nucleons as the basic degrees of freedom. The lattice formulation of Endres et al. (Phys Rev A 84:043644, 2011; Phys Rev A 87:023615, 2013) for so-called pionless EFT is discussed in detail, with portions of code included to aid the reader in code development. Systematic and statistical uncertainties of these methods are discussed at length, and extensions beyond pionless EFT are introduced in the final section.

  10. Nuclear mean field and double-folding model of the nucleus-nucleus optical potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khoa, Dao T.; Phuc, Nguyen Hoang; Loan, Doan Thi; Loc, Bui Minh

    2016-09-01

    Realistic density dependent CDM3Yn versions of the M3Y interaction have been used in an extended Hartree-Fock (HF) calculation of nuclear matter (NM), with the nucleon single-particle potential determined from the total NM energy based on the Hugenholtz-van Hove theorem that gives rise naturally to a rearrangement term (RT). Using the RT of the single-nucleon potential obtained exactly at different NM densities, the density and energy dependence of the CDM3Yn interactions was modified to account properly for both the RT and observed energy dependence of the nucleon optical potential. Based on a local density approximation, the double-folding model of the nucleus-nucleus optical potential has been extended to take into account consistently the rearrangement effect and energy dependence of the nuclear mean-field potential, using the modified CDM3Yn interactions. The extended double-folding model was applied to study the elastic 12C+12C and 16O+12C scattering at the refractive energies, where the Airy structure of the nuclear rainbow has been well established. The RT was found to affect significantly the real nucleus-nucleus optical potential at small internuclear distances, giving a potential strength close to that implied by the realistic optical model description of the Airy oscillation.

  11. [Study of the algorithm for inversion of low field nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation distribution].

    PubMed

    Chen, Shanshan; Wang, Hongzhi; Yang, Peiqiang; Zhang, Xuelong

    2014-06-01

    It is difficult to reflect the properties of samples from the signal directly collected by the low field nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analyzer. People must obtain the relationship between the relaxation time and the original signal amplitude of every relaxation component by inversion algorithm. Consequently, the technology of T2 spectrum inversion is crucial to the application of NMR data. This study optimized the regularization factor selection method and presented the regularization algorithm for inversion of low field NMR relaxation distribution, which is based on the regularization theory of ill-posed inverse problem. The results of numerical simulation experiments by Matlab7.0 showed that this method could effectively analyze and process the NMR relaxation data.

  12. Numerical study of the thm effects on the near-field safety of a hypothetical nuclear waste repository - bmt1 of the decovalex iii project. part 1: conceptualization and characterization of the problems and summary of results

    SciTech Connect

    Chijimatsu, M.; Nguyen, T.S.; Jing, L.; De Jonge, J.; Kohlmeier, M.; Millard, A.; Rejeb, A.; Rutqvist, J.; Souley, M.; Sugita, Y.

    2004-06-30

    Geological disposal of the spent nuclear fuel uses often the concept of multiple barrier systems. In order to predict the performance of these barriers, mathematical models have been developed, verified and validated against analytical solutions, laboratory tests and field experiments within the international DECOVALEX III project. These models in general consider the full coupling of thermal (T), hydraulic (H) and mechanical (M) processes that would prevail in the geological media around the repository. For Bench Mark Test no. 1 (BMT1) of the DECOVALEX III project, seven multinational research teams studied the implications of coupled THM processes on the safety of a hypothetical nuclear waste repository at the near-field and are presented in three accompany papers in this issue. This paper is the first of the three companion papers, which provides the conceptualization and characterization of the BMT1 as well as some general conclusions based on the findings of the numerical studies. It also shows the process of building confidence in the mathematical models by calibration with a reference T-H-M experiment with realistic rock mass conditions and bentonite properties and measured outputs of thermal, hydraulic and mechanical variables.

  13. Nuclear quantum effects and kinetic isotope effects in enzyme reactions.

    PubMed

    Vardi-Kilshtain, Alexandra; Nitoker, Neta; Major, Dan Thomas

    2015-09-15

    Enzymes are extraordinarily effective catalysts evolved to perform well-defined and highly specific chemical transformations. Studying the nature of rate enhancements and the mechanistic strategies in enzymes is very important, both from a basic scientific point of view, as well as in order to improve rational design of biomimetics. Kinetic isotope effect (KIE) is a very important tool in the study of chemical reactions and has been used extensively in the field of enzymology. Theoretically, the prediction of KIEs in condensed phase environments such as enzymes is challenging due to the need to include nuclear quantum effects (NQEs). Herein we describe recent progress in our group in the development of multi-scale simulation methods for the calculation of NQEs and accurate computation of KIEs. We also describe their application to several enzyme systems. In particular we describe the use of combined quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) methods in classical and quantum simulations. The development of various novel path-integral methods is reviewed. These methods are tailor suited to enzyme systems, where only a few degrees of freedom involved in the chemistry need to be quantized. The application of the hybrid QM/MM quantum-classical simulation approach to three case studies is presented. The first case involves the proton transfer in alanine racemase. The second case presented involves orotidine 5'-monophosphate decarboxylase where multidimensional free energy simulations together with kinetic isotope effects are combined in the study of the reaction mechanism. Finally, we discuss the proton transfer in nitroalkane oxidase, where the enzyme employs tunneling as a catalytic fine-tuning tool. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. The Field Artillery Battalion on the Nuclear Battlefield

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-06-06

    wm»w*m’W’> officer doubtful. Unit Co- location It is conmor pi-aotice to co- locate the headquarters and service elerents of the battalion wher . in...pre- pared. Accordingly, the European theater was selected as the locale of a tactical nuclear conflict. Europe Is the only location in the world...neutralization of artillery, once located , preclude radio from being the sole communications medium. Additionally, the danger of electromagnetic pulse

  15. Electronic and nuclear motion and their couplings in the presence of a magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmelcher, P.; Cederbaum, L. S.; Meyer, H.-D.

    1988-12-01

    The performance of an adiabatic separation of electronic and nuclear motion in the presence of a magnetic field is examined, and it is shown that the diagonal term of the nonadiabatic coupling elements must be added to the nuclear equation of motion in the Born-Oppenheimer (BO) approximation. The screened BO approximation is described which is particularly suited to describe the adiabatic separation of electronic and nuclear degrees of freedom in a magnetic field. A new interpretation of the well-known gauge-centering is presented. The results are of interest in connection with the studies of white dwarfs and neutron stars.

  16. Fast phase manipulation of the single nuclear spin in solids by rotating fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimo-Oka, T.; Tokura, Y.; Suzuki, Y.; Mizuochi, N.

    2017-03-01

    We propose fast phase gates of single nuclear spins interacting with single electron spins. The gate operation utilizes geometric phase shifts of the electron spin induced by fast and slow rotating fields; the path difference depending on nuclear-spin states enables nuclear phase shifts. The gate time is inversely proportional to the frequency of the slow rotating field. As an example, we use nitrogen-vacancy centers in diamond, and show, in principle, the phase-gate time orders of magnitude to be shorter than previously reported. We also confirmed the robustness of the gate against decoherence and systematic errors.

  17. Invited Review Article: Instrumentation for nuclear magnetic resonance in zero and ultralow magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Tayler, Michael C D; Theis, Thomas; Sjolander, Tobias F; Blanchard, John W; Kentner, Arne; Pustelny, Szymon; Pines, Alexander; Budker, Dmitry

    2017-09-01

    We review experimental techniques in our laboratory for nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) in zero and ultralow magnetic field (below 0.1 μT) where detection is based on a low-cost, non-cryogenic, spin-exchange relaxation free (87)Rb atomic magnetometer. The typical sensitivity is 20-30 fT/Hz(1/2) for signal frequencies below 1 kHz and NMR linewidths range from Hz all the way down to tens of mHz. These features enable precision measurements of chemically informative nuclear spin-spin couplings as well as nuclear spin precession in ultralow magnetic fields.

  18. Impact of an external radiation field on handheld XRF measurements for nuclear forensics applications

    SciTech Connect

    Steeb, Jennifer L.; Mertz, Carol J.; Finck, Martha R.; Engelstad, Gary; Carney, Kevin P.; Chamberlain, David B.

    2015-03-28

    X-ray fluorescence (XRF) is an attractive technique for nuclear forensics applications. We evaluated a handheld, portable XRF device by applying an external radiation field (10 mR/h to 17 R/h) using two types of radiography sources: a 60Co radiography camera to observe effects from high-energy gamma emissions and an 192Ir radiography camera to observe effects from several low-energy gamma (0.604, 0.468, and 0.317 MeV) and decay daughter x-ray emissions. External radiation tests proved that radiation, in general, has a significant effect on the dead time or background at dose rates over 1 R/hr for both the 192Ir and 60Co sources.

  19. Dynamic nuclear polarization and Hanle effect in (In,Ga)As/GaAs quantum dots. Role of nuclear spin fluctuations

    SciTech Connect

    Gerlovin, I. Ya.; Cherbunin, R. V.; Ignatiev, I. V.; Kuznetsova, M. S.; Verbin, S. Yu.; Flisinski, K.; Bayer, M.; Reuter, D.; Wieck, A. D.; Yakovlev, D. R.

    2013-12-04

    The degree of circular polarization of photoluminescence of (In,Ga)As quantum dots as a function of magnetic field applied perpendicular to the optical axis (Hanle effect) is experimentally studied. The measurements have been performed at various regimes of the optical excitation modulation. The analysis of experimental data has been performed in the framework of a vector model of regular nuclear spin polarization and its fluctuations. The analysis allowed us to evaluate the magnitude of nuclear polarization and its dynamics at the experimental conditions used.

  20. A comment on the pseudo-nuclear Zeeman effect.

    PubMed

    Sottini, Silvia; Groenen, Edgar J J

    2012-05-01

    For high-spin systems whose magnetic sublevels are arranged in doublets at zero field, the electron-paramagnetic-resonance (EPR) spectra are commonly described by an effective spin Hamiltonian. We show that also in this approach, if the mixing of the electron spin states by the hyperfine interaction is negligible, a proper description of electron-nuclear double resonance (ENDOR) spectra can be obtained using a nuclear spin Hamiltonian in which the electron spin angular momentum operator is replaced by its expectation value. Appropriate values of this expectation value can be obtained from a wave function correct to first-order in the electron Zeeman interaction. In terms of perturbation theory, such a description is more logical than the conventional practice based on the inclusion of a second-order cross term, the so-called pseudo-nuclear Zeeman effect, which involves both the electron Zeeman interaction and the hyperfine interaction. We illustrate our analysis with calculations of the expectation value of the electron spin angular momentum and of the energies of the hyperfine levels for a high-spin cobalt complex, which we studied by EPR and ENDOR recently. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Thermodynamic coupling of heat and matter flows in near-field regions of nuclear waste repositories

    SciTech Connect

    Carnahan, C.L.

    1983-11-01

    In near-field regions of nuclear waste repositories, thermodynamically coupled flows of heat and matter can occur in addition to the independent flows in the presence of gradients of temperature, hydraulic potential, and composition. The following coupled effects can occur: thermal osmosis, thermal diffusion, chemical osmosis, thermal filtration, diffusion thermal effect, ultrafiltration, and coupled diffusion. Flows of heat and matter associated with these effects can modify the flows predictable from the direct effects, which are expressed by Fourier's law, Darcy's law, and Fick's law. The coupled effects can be treated quantitatively together with the direct effects by the methods of the thermodynamics of irreversible processes. The extent of departure of fully coupled flows from predictions based only on consideration of direct effects depends on the strengths of the gradients driving flows, and may be significant at early times in backfills and in near-field geologic environments of repositories. Approximate calculations using data from the literature and reasonable assumptions of repository conditions indicate that thermal-osmotic and chemical-osmotic flows of water in semipermeable backfills may exceed Darcian flows by two to three orders of magnitude, while flows of solutes may be reduced greatly by ultrafiltration and chemical osmosis, relative to the flows predicted by advection and diffusion alone. In permeable materials, thermal diffusion may contribute to solute flows to a smaller, but still significant, extent.

  2. Permeabilization of the nuclear envelope following nanosecond pulsed electric field exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, Gary L.; Roth, Caleb C.; Kuipers, Marjorie A.; Tolstykh, Gleb P.; Beier, Hope T.; Ibey, Bennett L.

    2016-01-29

    Permeabilization of cell membranes occurs upon exposure to a threshold absorbed dose (AD) of nanosecond pulsed electric fields (nsPEF). The ultimate, physiological bioeffect of this exposure depends on the type of cultured cell and environment, indicating that cell-specific pathways and structures are stimulated. Here we investigate 10 and 600 ns duration PEF effects on Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell nuclei, where our hypothesis is that pulse disruption of the nuclear envelope membrane leads to observed cell death and decreased viability 24 h post-exposure. To observe short-term responses to nsPEF exposure, CHO cells have been stably transfected with two fluorescently-labeled proteins known to be sequestered for cellular chromosomal function within the nucleus – histone-2b (H2B) and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA). H2B remains associated with chromatin after nsPEF exposure, whereas PCNA leaks out of nuclei permeabilized by a threshold AD of 10 and 600 ns PEF. A downturn in 24 h viability, measured by MTT assay, is observed at the number of pulses required to induce permeabilization of the nucleus. - Highlights: • The ability of nsPEF to damage nuclear structures within cells is investigated. • Leakage of proliferating nuclear antigen from nuclei is induced by nsPEF. • High doses of nsPEF disrupt cortical lamin and cause chromatin decompaction. • Histone H2B remains attached to chromatin following nsPEF exposure. • DNA does not leak out of nsPEF-permeabilized nuclei.

  3. Field-cycling NMR with high-resolution detection under magic-angle spinning: determination of field-window for nuclear hyperpolarization in a photosynthetic reaction center.

    PubMed

    Gräsing, Daniel; Bielytskyi, Pavlo; Céspedes-Camacho, Isaac F; Alia, A; Marquardsen, Thorsten; Engelke, Frank; Matysik, Jörg

    2017-09-21

    Several parameters in NMR depend on the magnetic field strength. Field-cycling NMR is an elegant way to explore the field dependence of these properties. The technique is well developed for solution state and in relaxometry. Here, a shuttle system with magic-angle spinning (MAS) detection is presented to allow for field-dependent studies on solids. The function of this system is demonstrated by exploring the magnetic field dependence of the solid-state photochemically induced nuclear polarization (photo-CIDNP) effect. The effect allows for strong nuclear spin-hyperpolarization in light-induced spin-correlated radical pairs (SCRPs) under solid-state conditions. To this end, (13)C MAS NMR is applied to a photosynthetic reaction center (RC) of the purple bacterium Rhodobacter (R.) sphaeroides wildtype (WT). For induction of the effect in the stray field of the magnet and its subsequent observation at 9.4 T under MAS NMR conditions, the sample is shuttled by the use of an aerodynamically driven sample transfer technique. In the RC, we observe the effect down to 0.25 T allowing to determine the window for the occurrence of the effect to be between about 0.2 and 20 T.

  4. Polarizing Agents and Mechanisms for High-Field Dynamic Nuclear Polarization of Frozen Dielectric Solids

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Kan-Nian

    2011-01-01

    This article provides an overview of polarizing mechanisms involved in high-frequency dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) of frozen biological samples at temperatures maintained using liquid nitrogen, compatible with contemporary magic-angle spinning (MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Typical DNP experiments require unpaired electrons that are usually exogenous in samples via paramagnetic doping with polarizing agents. Thus, the resulting nuclear polarization mechanism depends on the electron and nuclear spin interactions induced by the paramagnetic species. The Overhauser Effect (OE) DNP, which relies on time-dependent spin-spin interactions, is excluded from our discussion due the lack of conducting electrons in frozen aqueous solutions containing biological entities. DNP of particular interest to us relies primarily on time-independent, spin interactions for significant electron-nucleus polarization transfer through mechanisms such as the Solid Effect (SE), the Cross Effect (CE) or Thermal Mixing (TM), involving one, two or multiple electron spins, respectively. Derived from monomeric radicals initially used in DNP experiments, bi- or multiple-radical polarizing agents facilitate CE/TM to generate significant NMR signal enhancements in dielectric solids at low temperatures (< 100 K). For example, large DNP enhancements (~300 times at 5 T) from a biologically compatible biradical, 1-(TEMPO-4-oxy)-3-(TEMPO-4-amino)propan-2-ol (TOTAPOL), have enabled high-resolution MAS NMR in sample systems existing in submicron domains or embedded in larger biomolecular complexes. The scope of this review is focused on recently developed DNP polarizing agents for high-field applications and leads up to future developments per the CE DNP mechanism. Because DNP experiments are feasible with a solid-state microwave source when performed at <20 K, nuclear polarization using lower microwave power (< 100 mW) is possible by forcing a high proportion of biradicals to fulfill the

  5. Psychotherapist countertransference in the nuclear age: Effects on therapeutic interventions

    SciTech Connect

    Oderberg, N.A.

    1991-01-01

    Since the early 1980s, there has been considerable attention in the psychology literature to mental health problems related to living in a world threatened by nuclear destruction. Questionnaires were mailed to 630 psychotherapists from the Colorado Psychological Association, California Psychotherapists for Social Responsibility, California Psychologists for Social Responsibility, the US Army, and the APA Division of Military Psychology; 174 questionnaires were returned. It was hypothesized that liberalism, nuclear weapons opposition, nuclear concern, nuclear awareness, and anti-nuclear activism in psychotherapists would facilitate perception of, and openness to working with, a client's nuclear concerns and thus, would be positively correlated with intentions to discuss nuclear issues with clients in three different clinical vignettes. Results indicated that when controlling for subject group, psychotherapy orientation, age, sex, and income, all five independent variables were positively correlated with responses to all three clinical vignettes, with nuclear concern having the strongest unique effect in accounting for variance in responses to the vignettes.

  6. Effective Field Theories, Reductionism and Scientific Explanation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartmann, Stephan

    Effective field theories have been a very popular tool in quantum physics for almost two decades. And there are good reasons for this. I will argue that effective field theories share many of the advantages of both fundamental theories and phenomenological models, while avoiding their respective shortcomings. They are, for example, flexible enough to cover a wide range of phenomena, and concrete enough to provide a detailed story of the specific mechanisms at work at a given energy scale. So will all of physics eventually converge on effective field theories? This paper argues that good scientific research can be characterised by a fruitful interaction between fundamental theories, phenomenological models and effective field theories. All of them have their appropriate functions in the research process, and all of them are indispensable. They complement each other and hang together in a coherent way which I shall characterise in some detail. To illustrate all this I will present a case study from nuclear and particle physics. The resulting view about scientific theorising is inherently pluralistic, and has implications for the debates about reductionism and scientific explanation.

  7. Landau Zener Effect in Superfluid Nuclear Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirea, M.

    The Landau Zener effect is generalized for many-body systems with pairing residual interactions. The microscopic equations of motion are obtained and the 14C decay of 223Ra spectroscopic factors are deduced. An asymmetric nuclear shape parametrization given by two intersected spheres is used. The single particle level scheme is determined in the frame of the superasymmetric two-center shell model. The deformation energy is computed in the microscopic macroscopic approximation. The penetrabilities are obtained within the WKB approximation. The fine structure of the cluster decay analyzed in the frame of this formalism gives a very good agreement with the experimental ratio of partial half-lives for transition to the first excited state and to the ground state.

  8. Zero-field nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of viscous liquids.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Y; Blanchard, J W; Pustelny, S; Saielli, G; Bagno, A; Ledbetter, M P; Budker, D; Pines, A

    2015-01-01

    We report zero-field NMR measurements of a viscous organic liquid, ethylene glycol. Zero-field spectra were taken showing resolved scalar spin-spin coupling (J-coupling) for ethylene glycol at different temperatures and water contents. Molecular dynamics strongly affects the resonance linewidth, which closely follows viscosity. Quantum chemical calculations have been used to obtain the relative stability and coupling constants of all ethylene glycol conformers. The results show the potential of zero-field NMR as a probe of molecular structure and dynamics in a wide range of environments, including viscous fluids. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Relativistic and Nuclear Medium Effects on the Coulomb Sum Rule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cloët, Ian C.; Bentz, Wolfgang; Thomas, Anthony W.

    2016-01-01

    In light of the forthcoming high precision quasielastic electron scattering data from Jefferson Lab, it is timely for the various approaches to nuclear structure to make robust predictions for the associated response functions. With this in mind, we focus here on the longitudinal response function and the corresponding Coulomb sum rule for isospin-symmetric nuclear matter at various baryon densities. Using a quantum field-theoretic quark-level approach which preserves the symmetries of quantum chromodynamics, as well as exhibiting dynamical chiral symmetry breaking and quark confinement, we find a dramatic quenching of the Coulomb sum rule for momentum transfers |q |≳0.5 GeV . The main driver of this effect lies in changes to the proton Dirac form factor induced by the nuclear medium. Such a dramatic quenching of the Coulomb sum rule was not seen in a recent quantum Monte Carlo calculation for carbon, suggesting that the Jefferson Lab data may well shed new light on the explicit role of QCD in nuclei.

  10. Relativistic and Nuclear Medium Effects on the Coulomb Sum Rule.

    PubMed

    Cloët, Ian C; Bentz, Wolfgang; Thomas, Anthony W

    2016-01-22

    In light of the forthcoming high precision quasielastic electron scattering data from Jefferson Lab, it is timely for the various approaches to nuclear structure to make robust predictions for the associated response functions. With this in mind, we focus here on the longitudinal response function and the corresponding Coulomb sum rule for isospin-symmetric nuclear matter at various baryon densities. Using a quantum field-theoretic quark-level approach which preserves the symmetries of quantum chromodynamics, as well as exhibiting dynamical chiral symmetry breaking and quark confinement, we find a dramatic quenching of the Coulomb sum rule for momentum transfers |q|≳0.5  GeV. The main driver of this effect lies in changes to the proton Dirac form factor induced by the nuclear medium. Such a dramatic quenching of the Coulomb sum rule was not seen in a recent quantum Monte Carlo calculation for carbon, suggesting that the Jefferson Lab data may well shed new light on the explicit role of QCD in nuclei.

  11. Effects of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear accident on goshawk reproduction

    PubMed Central

    Murase, Kaori; Murase, Joe; Horie, Reiko; Endo, Koichi

    2015-01-01

    Although the influence of nuclear accidents on the reproduction of top predators has not been investigated, it is important that we identify the effects of such accidents because humans are also top predators. We conducted field observation for 22 years and analysed the reproductive performance of the goshawk (Accipiter gentilis fujiyamae), a top avian predator in the North Kanto area of Japan, before and after the accidents at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant that occurred in 2011. The reproductive performance declined markedly compared with the pre-accident years and progressively decreased for the three post-accident study years. Moreover, it was suggested that these declines were primarily caused by an increase in the air dose rate of radio-active contaminants measured under the nests caused by the nuclear accidents, rather than by other factors. We consider the trends in the changes of the reproductive success rates and suggest that internal exposure may play an important role in the reproductive performance of the goshawk, as well as external exposure. PMID:25802117

  12. Radiation tolerant silicon nitride insulated gate field effect transistors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, P. A.

    1969-01-01

    Metal-Insulated-Semiconductor Field Effect Transistor /MISFET/ device uses a silicon nitride passivation layer over a thin silicon oxide layer to enhance the radiation tolerance. It is useful in electronic systems exposed to space radiation environment or the effects of nuclear weapons.

  13. Nuclear spin effects in semiconductor quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Chekhovich, E A; Makhonin, M N; Tartakovskii, A I; Yacoby, A; Bluhm, H; Nowack, K C; Vandersypen, L M K

    2013-06-01

    The interaction of an electronic spin with its nuclear environment, an issue known as the central spin problem, has been the subject of considerable attention due to its relevance for spin-based quantum computation using semiconductor quantum dots. Independent control of the nuclear spin bath using nuclear magnetic resonance techniques and dynamic nuclear polarization using the central spin itself offer unique possibilities for manipulating the nuclear bath with significant consequences for the coherence and controlled manipulation of the central spin. Here we review some of the recent optical and transport experiments that have explored this central spin problem using semiconductor quantum dots. We focus on the interaction between 10(4)-10(6) nuclear spins and a spin of a single electron or valence-band hole. We also review the experimental techniques as well as the key theoretical ideas and the implications for quantum information science.

  14. Connection between the nuclear matter mean-field equation of state and the quark and gluon condensates at high density

    SciTech Connect

    Malheiro, M.; Dey, M.; Delfino, A.; Dey, J. |||

    1997-01-01

    It is known now that chiral symmetry restoration requires the meson-nucleon couplings to be density-dependent in nuclear-matter mean-field models. We further show that, quite generally, the quark and gluon condensates in medium are related to the trace of the energy-momentum tensor of nuclear matter and in these models the incompressibility K must be less than 3 times the chemical potential {mu}. In the critical density {rho}{sub c}, the gluon condensate is only reduced by 20{percent}, indicating a larger effective nucleon mass. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  15. Low Field Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) using SQUIDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burghoff, Martin

    2007-03-01

    Using a high resolution SQUID system in a magnetically highly shielded room, we measured the precession of 1H nuclei of liquid benzene, distilled water, and chloroform in magnetic fields around a microTesla. We found that the NMR lines of these liquids are in the range of a few hundred milliHertz and increase linearly with the detection field over a Larmor frequency range of two orders of magnitude. The slope is attributed to the inhomogeneity of the detection field and enables the extrapolation of the natural line width to zero magnetic field. For this limit, where any molecular motion is fast with respect to the Larmor frequency, the natural resonance line widths of benzene, chloroform and distilled water were determined to be 120 mHz, 150 mHz, and 170 mHz, respectively. In low magnetic fields, chemical shift and homonuclear coupling become negligible. All that remains as a source of a spectral structure is pure J-coupling between nuclei of different gyromagnetic ratio. We studied pure J-coupling between methylene protons and fluorine nuclei of trifluorethanol and between methyl protons and phosphorus in trimethylphosphate at detection fields from 0.5 microTesla to 4 microTesla. This corresponds to a variation of d=J(H,F)/(f(H)-f(F)) from 8 to 1 and of d=J(H,P)/(f(H)-f(P)) from 0.8 to 0.08, respectively. At very low fields, i.e. at d=8, the spectra of trifluorethanol exhibited only one single resonance line with an irregular structure. With increasing field, more and more individual lines were revealed. For trimethylphosphate, d=0.08 represents the transition to the weak coupling regime. In addition, we employed a 304 SQUID vector magnetometer system for the recording of the magnetic field generated by water protons in two adjacent sample tubes precessing about a magnetic field of a microTesla. From the spatially resolved data, positions and moments of the samples were calculated, yielding a reconstructed moving image of the two precessing magnetic dipoles.

  16. Diamond-nitrogen-vacancy electronic and nuclear spin-state anticrossings under weak transverse magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clevenson, Hannah; Chen, Edward H.; Dolde, Florian; Teale, Carson; Englund, Dirk; Braje, Danielle

    2016-08-01

    We report on detailed studies of electronic and nuclear spin states in the diamond-nitrogen-vacancy (NV) center under weak transverse magnetic fields. We numerically predict and experimentally verify a previously unobserved NV hyperfine level anticrossing (LAC) occurring at bias fields of tens of gauss—two orders of magnitude lower than previously reported LACs at ˜500 and ˜1000 G axial magnetic fields. We then discuss how the NV ground-state Hamiltonian can be manipulated in this regime to tailor the NV's sensitivity to environmental factors and to map into the nuclear spin state.

  17. Role of effective interaction in nuclear disintegration processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basu, D. N.

    2003-07-01

    A simple superasymmetric fission model using microscopically calculated nuclear potentials has shown itself to be outstandingly successful in describing highly asymmetric spontaneous disintegration of nuclei into two composite nuclear fragments. The nuclear interaction potentials required to describe these nuclear decay processes have been calculated by double folding the density distribution functions of the two fragments with a realistic effective interaction. The microscopic nucleus-nucleus potential thus obtained, along with the Coulomb interaction potential and the minimum centrifugal barrier required for the spin-parity conservation, has been used successfully for the lifetime calculations of these nuclear disintegration processes.

  18. Screening Nuclear Field Fluctuations in Quantum Dots for Indistinguishable Photon Generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malein, R. N. E.; Santana, T. S.; Zajac, J. M.; Dada, A. C.; Gauger, E. M.; Petroff, P. M.; Lim, J. Y.; Song, J. D.; Gerardot, B. D.

    2016-06-01

    A semiconductor quantum dot can generate highly coherent and indistinguishable single photons. However, intrinsic semiconductor dephasing mechanisms can reduce the visibility of two-photon interference. For an electron in a quantum dot, a fundamental dephasing process is the hyperfine interaction with the nuclear spin bath. Here, we directly probe the consequence of the fluctuating nuclear spins on the elastic and inelastic scattered photon spectra from a resident electron in a single dot. We find the in-plane component of the nuclear Overhauser field leads to detuned Raman scattered photons, broadened over experimental time scales by field fluctuations, which are distinguishable from both the elastic and incoherent components of the resonance fluorescence. This significantly reduces two-photon interference visibility. However, we demonstrate successful screening of the nuclear spin noise, which enables the generation of coherent single photons that exhibit high visibility two-photon interference.

  19. Screening Nuclear Field Fluctuations in Quantum Dots for Indistinguishable Photon Generation.

    PubMed

    Malein, R N E; Santana, T S; Zajac, J M; Dada, A C; Gauger, E M; Petroff, P M; Lim, J Y; Song, J D; Gerardot, B D

    2016-06-24

    A semiconductor quantum dot can generate highly coherent and indistinguishable single photons. However, intrinsic semiconductor dephasing mechanisms can reduce the visibility of two-photon interference. For an electron in a quantum dot, a fundamental dephasing process is the hyperfine interaction with the nuclear spin bath. Here, we directly probe the consequence of the fluctuating nuclear spins on the elastic and inelastic scattered photon spectra from a resident electron in a single dot. We find the in-plane component of the nuclear Overhauser field leads to detuned Raman scattered photons, broadened over experimental time scales by field fluctuations, which are distinguishable from both the elastic and incoherent components of the resonance fluorescence. This significantly reduces two-photon interference visibility. However, we demonstrate successful screening of the nuclear spin noise, which enables the generation of coherent single photons that exhibit high visibility two-photon interference.

  20. Strong field dissociative ionization of the D2+: Nuclear wave packet analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tóth, A.; Borbély, S.; Halász, G. J.; Vibók, Á.

    2017-09-01

    Theoretical ab initio investigation of strong field dissociative ionization of the D2+ molecule in the multiphoton regime is reported. The dynamics is initiated by ultrashort laser pulses for fixed molecular axis orientations. Nuclear wave packet calculations are performed to provide the joint energy spectra (JES): ionization-dissociation probability density via electron (Ee) and nuclear (En) kinetic energy. Analyzing the time-dependent nuclear wave packet densities we have successfully identified the exact path followed by the D2+ target for each multiphoton peak.

  1. Nuclear effects in atmospheric and accelerator neutrino experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Chauhan, S.; Athar, M. Sajjad; Singh, S. K.

    2010-11-24

    We have studied the nuclear medium effects in the neutrino (antineutrino) induced interactions in nuclei at intermediate energy region. We have applied this study to calculate the event rates for atmospheric and accelerator neutrino experiments. The study of the nuclear effects has been done for the quasielastic lepton production and the charged current incoherent and coherent pion production processes.

  2. Narrowing of the Overhauser field distribution by feedback-enhanced dynamic nuclear polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tenberg, S.; McNeil, R. P. G.; Rubbert, S.; Bluhm, H.

    2015-11-01

    In many electron spin qubit systems coherent control is impaired by the fluctuating nuclear spin bath of the host material. Previous experiments have shown dynamic nuclear polarization with feedback to significantly prolong the inhomogeneous dephasing time T2* by narrowing the distribution of nuclear Overhauser field fluctuations. We present a model relating the achievable narrowing of the Overhauser field to both the pump rate and the noise magnitude and find reasonable agreement with experimental data. It shows that former experiments on gated GaAs quantum dots were limited by the pump rate of the pumping mechanism used. Here we propose an alternative feedback scheme using electron dipole spin resonance. Sequentially applying two ac electric fields with frequencies slightly detuned from the desired Larmor frequency results in a pump curve with a stable fixed point. Our model predicts that T2* values on the order of microseconds can be achieved.

  3. High-field Overhauser dynamic nuclear polarization in silicon below the metal-insulator transition.

    PubMed

    Dementyev, Anatoly E; Cory, David G; Ramanathan, Chandrasekhar

    2011-04-21

    Single crystal silicon is an excellent system to explore dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP), as it exhibits a continuum of properties from metallic to insulating as a function of doping concentration and temperature. At low doping concentrations DNP has been observed to occur via the solid effect, while at very high-doping concentrations an Overhauser mechanism is responsible. Here we report the hyperpolarization of (29)Si in n-doped silicon crystals, with doping concentrations in the range of (1-3) × 10(17) cm(-3). In this regime exchange interactions between donors become extremely important. The sign of the enhancement in our experiments and its frequency dependence suggest that the (29)Si spins are directly polarized by donor electrons via an Overhauser mechanism within exchange-coupled donor clusters. The exchange interaction between donors only needs to be larger than the silicon hyperfine interaction (typically much smaller than the donor hyperfine coupling) to enable this Overhauser mechanism. Nuclear polarization enhancement is observed for a range of donor clusters in which the exchange energy is comparable to the donor hyperfine interaction. The DNP dynamics are characterized by a single exponential time constant that depends on the microwave power, indicating that the Overhauser mechanism is a rate-limiting step. Since only about 2% of the silicon nuclei are located within 1 Bohr radius of the donor electron, nuclear spin diffusion is important in transferring the polarization to all the spins. However, the spin-diffusion time is much shorter than the Overhauser time due to the relatively weak silicon hyperfine coupling strength. In a 2.35 T magnetic field at 1.1 K, we observed a DNP enhancement of 244 ± 84 resulting in a silicon polarization of 10.4 ± 3.4% following 2 h of microwave irradiation.

  4. Unified description of structure and reactions: implementing the nuclear field theory program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broglia, R. A.; Bortignon, P. F.; Barranco, F.; Vigezzi, E.; Idini, A.; Potel, G.

    2016-06-01

    The modern theory of the atomic nucleus results from the merging of the liquid drop model of Niels Bohr and Fritz Kalckar, and of the shell model of Marie Goeppert Meyer and Hans Jensen. The first model contributed the concepts of collective excitations. The second, those of independent-particle motion. The unification of these apparently contradictory views in terms of the particle-vibration and particle-rotation couplings carried out by Aage Bohr and Ben Mottelson has allowed for an ever more complete, accurate and detailed description of nuclear structure. Nuclear field theory (NFT), developed by the Copenhagen-Buenos Aires collaboration, provided a powerful quantal embodiment of this unification. Reactions are not only at the basis of quantum mechanics (statistical interpretation, Max Born), but also the specific tools to probe the atomic nucleus. It is then natural that NFT is being extended to deal with processes which involve the continuum in an intrinsic fashion, so as to be able to treat them on an equal footing with those associated with bound states (structure). As a result, spectroscopic studies of transfer to continuum states could eventually make use of the NFT rules, properly extended to take care of recoil effects. In the present contribution we review the implementation of the NFT program of structure and reactions, setting special emphasis on open problems and outstanding predictions.

  5. Generation of low-frequency electric and magnetic fields during large- scale chemical and nuclear explosions

    SciTech Connect

    Adushkin, V.V.; Dubinya, V.A.; Karaseva, V.A.; Soloviev, S.P.; Surkov, V.V.

    1995-06-01

    We discuss the main parameters of the electric field in the surface layer of the atmosphere and the results of the investigations of the natural electric field variations. Experimental investigations of the electromagnetic field for explosions in air are presented. Electromagnetic signals generated by underground nuclear and chemical explosions are discussed and explosions for 1976--1991 are listed. Long term anomalies of the earth`s electromagnetic field in the vicinity of underground explosions were also investigated. Study of the phenomenon of the irreversible shock magnetization showed that in the zone nearest to the explosion the quasistatic magnetic field decreases in inverse proportion to the distance.

  6. INTRINSIC DOSIMETRY OF GLASS CONTAINERS USED TO TRANSPORT NUCLEAR MATERIALS: Potential Implications to the Field of Nuclear Forensics

    SciTech Connect

    Schwantes, Jon M.; Miller, Steven D.; Piper, Roman K.; Murphy, Mark K.; Amonette, James E.; Bonde, Steven E.; Duckworth, Douglas C.

    2008-09-15

    Thermoluminescence (TL) and Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) dosimetry were used to measure dose effects in borosilicate glass with time, from 10 minutes to ~60 days following exposure to a dose of up to 10,000 Rad. TL and EPR results were consistent and performed similarly, with both techniques capable of achieving an estimated limit of detection of between 50-100 Rad. Three peaks were identified in the TL glow curve at roughly 110oC, 205oC, and 225oC. The intensity of the 205oC peak was the dominant peak over the time period of this study. The stability of all of the peaks with time since irradiation increased with their corresponding temperature and little or no variation was observed in the glow curve response to a specified total dose attained at different dose rates. The intensity of the 205oC peak decreased logarithmically with time regardless of total dose. Based upon a conservative limit of detection of 330 Rad, a 10,000 Rad dose would still be detected 2.7E3 years after exposure. This paper introduces the concept of intrinsic dosimetry, the consideration of a measured dose received to container walls in concert with the physical characteristics of the radioactive material contained inside those walls, as a method for gathering rather unique pathway information about the history of that sample. Three hypothetical scenarios are presented to introduce this method and to illustrate how intrinsic dosimetry might benefit the fields of nuclear forensics and waste management.

  7. Microbial Effects on Nuclear Waste Packaging Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Horn, J; Martin, S; Carrillo, C; Lian, T

    2005-07-22

    Microorganisms may enhance corrosion of components of planned engineered barriers within the proposed nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain (YM). Corrosion could occur either directly, through processes collectively known as Microbiologically Influenced Corrosion (MIC), or indirectly, by adversely affecting the composition of water or brines that come into direct contact with engineered barrier surfaces. Microorganisms of potential concern (bacteria, archea, and fungi) include both those indigenous to Yucca Mountain and those that infiltrate during repository construction and after waste emplacement. Specific aims of the experimental program to evaluate the potential of microorganisms to affect damage to engineered barrier materials include the following: Indirect Effects--(1) Determine the limiting factors to microbial growth and activity presently in the YM environment. (2) Assess these limiting factors to aid in determining the conditions and time during repository evolution when MIC might become operant. (3) Evaluate present bacterial densities, the composition of the YM microbial community, and determining bacterial densities if limiting factors are overcome. During a major portion of the regulatory period, environmental conditions that are presently extant become reestablished. Therefore, these studies ascertain whether biomass is sufficient to cause MIC during this period and provide a baseline for determining the types of bacterial activities that may be expected. (4) Assess biogenic environmental effects, including pH, alterations to nitrate concentration in groundwater, the generation of organic acids, and metal dissolution. These factors have been shown to be those most relevant to corrosion of engineered barriers. Direct Effects--(1) Characterize and quantify microbiological effects on candidate containment materials. These studies were carried out in a number of different approaches, using whole YM microbiological communities, a subset of YM

  8. Electromagnetic Field Effects in Explosives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tasker, D. G.; Whitley, V. H.; Lee, R. J.

    2009-12-01

    Present and previous research on the effects of electromagnetic fields on the initiation and detonation of explosives and the electromagnetic properties of explosives are reviewed. Among the topics related to detonating explosives are: enhancement of performance; and control of initiation and growth of reaction. Two series of experiments were performed to determine the effects of 1-T magnetic fields on explosive initiation and growth in the modified gap test and on the propagation of explosively generated plasma into air. The results have implications for the control of reactions in explosives and for the use of electromagnetic particle velocity gauges.

  9. Covariant mean-field calculations of finite-temperature nuclear matter

    SciTech Connect

    R. J. Furnstahl; Brian D. Serot

    1990-01-01

    Hot nuclear matter is studied in the framework of quantum hadrodynamics. General principles of covariant thermodynamics and thermodynamic consistency are discussed, and these principles are illustrated by computing nuclear matter properties in an arbitrary reference frame, using the mean-field approximation to the Walecka model. The results are shown to be Lorentz covariant, and thermodynamic consistency is demonstrated by proving the equality of the ‘‘thermodynamic’’ and ‘‘hydrostatic’’ pressures. The mean-field results are used in a simple hydrodynamic picture to discuss the phenomenology of heavy-ion collisions and astrophysical systems, with an emphasis on new features that arise in a covariant approach.

  10. Effects of Nuclear Spin Polarization on Reaction Dynamics in Photosynthetic Bacterial Reaction Centers

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, Richard A.; Boxer, Steven G.

    1987-01-01

    Singlet-triplet mixing in the initial radical-pair state, P[unk]I[unk], of photosynthetic bacterial reaction centers is due to the hyperfine mechanism at low magnetic fields and both the hyperfine and Δg mechanisms at high magnetic fields (>1 kG). Since the hyperfine field felt by the electron spins in P[unk]I[unk] is dependent upon the nuclear spin state in each radical, the relative probabilities of charge recombination to the triplet state of the primary electron donor, 3PI, or the ground state, PI, will depend on the nuclear spin configuration. As a result these recombination products will have non-equilibrium distributions of nuclear spin states (nuclear spin polarization). This polarization will persist until the 3PI state decays. In addition, due to unequal nuclear spin relaxation rates in the diamagnetic PI and paramagnetic 3PI states, net polarization of the nuclear spins can result, especially in experiments that involve recycling of the system through the radical-pair state. This net polarization can persist for very long times, especially at low temperatures. Nuclear spin polarization can have consequences on any subsequent process that involves re-formation of the radical-pair state. Numerical calculations of the nuclear polarization caused by both of these mechanics are presented, including the effect of such polarization on subsequent yields of 3PI, 3PI decay rates, the decay rate of the radical pair, and saturation behavior. The effect of this polarization under certain circumstances can be very dramatic and can explain previously noted discrepancies between experiments and theories that do not include nuclear spin polarization effects. Our analysis suggests new classes of experiments and indicates the need to reinterpret some past experimental results. PMID:19431700

  11. Effects of nuclear spin polarization on reaction dynamics in photosynthetic bacterial reaction centers.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, R A; Boxer, S G

    1987-06-01

    Singlet-triplet mixing in the initial radical-pair state, P[unk]I[unk], of photosynthetic bacterial reaction centers is due to the hyperfine mechanism at low magnetic fields and both the hyperfine and Deltag mechanisms at high magnetic fields (>1 kG). Since the hyperfine field felt by the electron spins in P[unk]I[unk] is dependent upon the nuclear spin state in each radical, the relative probabilities of charge recombination to the triplet state of the primary electron donor, (3)PI, or the ground state, PI, will depend on the nuclear spin configuration. As a result these recombination products will have non-equilibrium distributions of nuclear spin states (nuclear spin polarization). This polarization will persist until the (3)PI state decays. In addition, due to unequal nuclear spin relaxation rates in the diamagnetic PI and paramagnetic (3)PI states, net polarization of the nuclear spins can result, especially in experiments that involve recycling of the system through the radical-pair state. This net polarization can persist for very long times, especially at low temperatures. Nuclear spin polarization can have consequences on any subsequent process that involves re-formation of the radical-pair state.Numerical calculations of the nuclear polarization caused by both of these mechanics are presented, including the effect of such polarization on subsequent yields of (3)PI, (3)PI decay rates, the decay rate of the radical pair, and saturation behavior. The effect of this polarization under certain circumstances can be very dramatic and can explain previously noted discrepancies between experiments and theories that do not include nuclear spin polarization effects. Our analysis suggests new classes of experiments and indicates the need to reinterpret some past experimental results.

  12. Influence of the nuclear Zeeman effect on mode locking in pulsed semiconductor quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beugeling, Wouter; Uhrig, Götz S.; Anders, Frithjof B.

    2017-09-01

    The coherence of the electron spin in a semiconductor quantum dot is strongly enhanced by mode locking through nuclear focusing, where the synchronization of the electron spin to periodic pulsing is slowly transferred to the nuclear spins of the semiconductor material, mediated by the hyperfine interaction between these. The external magnetic field that drives the Larmor oscillations of the electron spin also subjects the nuclear spins to a Zeeman-like coupling, albeit a much weaker one. For typical magnetic fields used in experiments, the energy scale of the nuclear Zeeman effect is comparable to that of the hyperfine interaction, so that it is not negligible. In this work, we analyze the influence of the nuclear Zeeman effect on mode locking quantitatively. Within a perturbative framework, we calculate the Overhauser-field distribution after a prolonged period of pulsing. We find that the nuclear Zeeman effect can exchange resonant and nonresonant frequencies. We distinguish between models with a single type and with multiple types of nuclei. For the latter case, the positions of the resonances depend on the individual g factors, rather than on the average value.

  13. Nuclear Effects in Generators: the Path Forward

    SciTech Connect

    Mosel, Ulrich

    2011-11-23

    The extraction of neutrino oscillation parameters requires the determination of the neutrino energy from observations of the hadronic final state. The use of nuclear targets then requires the use of event generators to isolate the interesting elementary processes and to take experimental acceptances into account. In this talk I briefly summarize the history of event generators and their use in nuclear physics, talk briefly about the generators used in the neutrino community and then discuss future necessary developments.

  14. Novel QCD effects in nuclear collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, S.J.

    1991-12-01

    Heavy ion collisions can provide a novel environment for testing fundamental dynamical processes in QCD, including minijet formation and interactions, formation zone phenomena, color filtering, coherent co-mover interactions, and new higher twist mechanisms which could account for the observed excess production and anomalous nuclear target dependence of heavy flavor production. The possibility of using light-cone thermodynamics and a corresponding covariant temperature to describe the QCD phases of the nuclear fragmentation region is also briefly discussed.

  15. Nuclear mean field on and near the drip lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otsuka, Takaharu; Fukunishi, Nobuhisa

    1996-01-01

    We discuss two subjects related to the structure of nuclei near the drip lines. The first is the vanishing of N = 20 magic structure in Z ≪ N = 20 nuclei. Large-scale state-of-the-art shell-model calculations with 2sld and lower 2plf shells are shown to present a unified description of N = 20 isotones with Z = 10-20, covering both stable and unstable nuclei. The calculations demonstrate that, although the N = 20 closed-shell structure remains for Z ≥ 14, the N = 20 closed-shell structure vanishes naturally towards nuclei with Z ≤ 12, giving rise to various anomalous features including those in 32Mg and 31Na. It is suggested that, in these nuclei, the deformed mean field overcomes the shell gap created by the spherical mean potential. Furthermore, the almost perfect agreement with a recent experiment is presented for the B(E2; 0 1+ → 2 1+) value of 32Mg. The second part is devoted to the mean field for loosely bound neutrons. The variational shell model (VSM) is explained with an application to the anomalous ground state of 11Be. The VSM has been proposed recently to describe the structure of neutron-rich unstable nuclei. Contrary to the failure of spherical Hartree-Fock, the anomalous {1}/{2}+ ground state and its neutron halo are reproduced with Skyrme SIII interaction. This state is bound due to dynamical coupling between the core and the loosely bound neutron which oscillates between 2 s{1}/{2} and l d{5}/{2} orbits. The direct neutron capture is discussed briefly in its relation to the neutron halo.

  16. Review of radiation effects in solid-nuclear-waste forms

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, W.J.

    1981-09-01

    Radiation effects on the stability of high-level nuclear waste (HLW) forms are an important consideration in the development of technology to immobilize high-level radioactive waste because such effects may significantly affect the containment of the radioactive waste. Since the required containment times are long (10/sup 3/ to 10/sup 6/ years), an understanding of the long-term cumulative effects of radiation damage on the waste forms is essential. Radiation damage of nuclear waste forms can result in changes in volume, leach rate, stored energy, structure/microstructure, and mechanical properties. Any one or combination of these changes might significantly affect the long-term stability of the nuclear waste forms. This report defines the general radiation damage problem in nuclear waste forms, describes the simulation techniques currently available for accelerated testing of nuclear waste forms, and reviews the available data on radiation effects in both glass and ceramic (primarily crystalline) waste forms. 76 references.

  17. Nuclear Safety

    SciTech Connect

    Silver, E G

    1989-01-01

    This document is a review journal that covers significant developments in the field of nuclear safety. Its scope includes the analysis and control of hazards associated with nuclear energy, operations involving fissionable materials, and the products of nuclear fission and their effects on the environment. Primary emphasis is on safety in reactor design, construction, and operation; however, the safety aspects of the entire fuel cycle, including fuel fabrication, spent-fuel processing, nuclear waste disposal, handling of radioisotopes, and environmental effects of these operations, are also treated.

  18. Radiation and Thermal Effects on Used Nuclear Fuel and Nuclear Waste Forms

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, William J.; Zhang, Yanwen

    2016-09-20

    This is the final report of the NEUP project “Radiation and Thermal Effects on Used Nuclear Fuel and Nuclear Waste Forms.” This project started on July 1, 2012 and was successfully completed on June 30, 2016. This report provides an overview of the main achievements, results and findings through the duration of the project. Additional details can be found in the main body of this report and in the individual Quarterly Reports and associated Deliverables of this project, which have been uploaded in PICS-NE. The objective of this research was to advance understanding and develop validated models on the effects of self-radiation from beta and alpha decay on the response of used nuclear fuel and nuclear waste forms during high-temperature interim storage and long-term permanent disposition. To achieve this objective, model used-fuel materials and model waste form materials were identified, fabricated, and studied.

  19. Synaptic Effects of Electric Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, Asif

    Learning and sensory processing in the brain relies on the effective transmission of information across synapses. The strength and efficacy of synaptic transmission is modifiable through training and can be modulated with noninvasive electrical brain stimulation. Transcranial electrical stimulation (TES), specifically, induces weak intensity and spatially diffuse electric fields in the brain. Despite being weak, electric fields modulate spiking probability and the efficacy of synaptic transmission. These effects critically depend on the direction of the electric field relative to the orientation of the neuron and on the level of endogenous synaptic activity. TES has been used to modulate a wide range of neuropsychiatric indications, for various rehabilitation applications, and cognitive performance in diverse tasks. How can a weak and diffuse electric field, which simultaneously polarizes neurons across the brain, have precise changes in brain function? Designing therapies to maximize desired outcomes and minimize undesired effects presents a challenging problem. A series of experiments and computational models are used to define the anatomical and functional factors leading to specificity of TES. Anatomical specificity derives from guiding current to targeted brain structures and taking advantage of the direction-sensitivity of neurons with respect to the electric field. Functional specificity originates from preferential modulation of neuronal networks that are already active. Diffuse electric fields may recruit connected brain networks involved in a training task and promote plasticity along active synaptic pathways. In vitro, electric fields boost endogenous synaptic plasticity and raise the ceiling for synaptic learning with repeated stimulation sessions. Synapses undergoing strong plasticity are preferentially modulated over weak synapses. Therefore, active circuits that are involved in a task could be more susceptible to stimulation than inactive circuits

  20. Topics in Effective Field Theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaplan, Lev

    In recent years. our understanding of the structure of quantum field theories has benefitted greatly from the introduction and development of effective field theory (EFT) techniques. The EFT language allows for a systematic characterization of interactions between degrees of freedom relevant in a given energy range, even when some of these interactions are induced by new physics at a higher energy, whose details may be complicated or unknown. In situations where the higher energy theory is well understood, it is nevertheless very useful to be able to describe the behavior of fields that are of interest in a given energy regime, without making reference to degrees of freedom present at different energy scales. In particular, this allows for a relatively straightforward comparison of the effects on low energy modes of different high energy interactions. We present here two previously published papers, in each of which the EFT concept plays a central role. In Chapter 1, nonperturbative (instanton) contributions to EFT scattering amplitudes are studied. It is found that when the high energy theory requires all fermions (heavy and light) to participate in such tunneling processes, instantons involving only the light fields are naturally absent in the effective theory. This is true even though no explicit mention of the heavy fermions which have been "integrated out" is made in the effective theory description. The resolution of what had been an apparent paradox in the literature is testimony to the generality and consistency of EFT techniques. In Chapter 2. EFT methods are applied to a problem of immediate practical and experimental interest--the possibility of quark compositeness. Top quark substructure, associated with new interactions present at scales above the top quark mass, but unrelated to electroweak physics, is examined with regard to possible effects on experimentally accessible production and decay rates of known particles. It is found that such new physics

  1. Communication: XFAIMS—eXternal Field Ab Initio Multiple Spawning for electron-nuclear dynamics triggered by short laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Mignolet, Benoit; Curchod, Basile F. E.; Martinez, Todd J.

    2016-11-17

    Attoscience is an emerging field where attosecond pulses or few cycle IR pulses are used to pump and probe the correlated electron-nuclear motion of molecules. We present the trajectory-guided eXternal Field Ab Initio Multiple Spawning (XFAIMS) method that models such experiments “on-the-fly,” from laser pulse excitation to fragmentation or nonadiabatic relaxation to the ground electronic state. For the photoexcitation of the LiH molecule, we show that XFAIMS gives results in close agreement with numerically exact quantum dynamics simulations, both for atto- and femtosecond laser pulses. As a result, we then show the ability of XFAIMS to model the dynamics in polyatomic molecules by studying the effect of nuclear motion on the photoexcitation of a sulfine (H2CSO).

  2. Communication: XFAIMS—eXternal Field Ab Initio Multiple Spawning for electron-nuclear dynamics triggered by short laser pulses

    DOE PAGES

    Mignolet, Benoit; Curchod, Basile F. E.; Martinez, Todd J.

    2016-11-17

    Attoscience is an emerging field where attosecond pulses or few cycle IR pulses are used to pump and probe the correlated electron-nuclear motion of molecules. We present the trajectory-guided eXternal Field Ab Initio Multiple Spawning (XFAIMS) method that models such experiments “on-the-fly,” from laser pulse excitation to fragmentation or nonadiabatic relaxation to the ground electronic state. For the photoexcitation of the LiH molecule, we show that XFAIMS gives results in close agreement with numerically exact quantum dynamics simulations, both for atto- and femtosecond laser pulses. As a result, we then show the ability of XFAIMS to model the dynamics inmore » polyatomic molecules by studying the effect of nuclear motion on the photoexcitation of a sulfine (H2CSO).« less

  3. Hybrid quantum magnetic-field sensor with an electron spin and a nuclear spin in diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuzaki, Yuichiro; Shimo-Oka, Takaaki; Tanaka, Hirotaka; Tokura, Yasuhiro; Semba, Kouichi; Mizuochi, Norikazu

    2016-11-01

    Recently, magnetic-field sensors based on an electron spin of a nitrogen vacancy center in diamond have been studied both from an experimental and theoretical point of view. This system provides a nanoscale magnetometer, and it is possible to detect a precession of a single spin. In this paper, we propose a sensor consisting of an electron spin and a nuclear spin in diamond. Although the electron spin has a reasonable interaction strength with magnetic field, the coherence time of the spin is relatively short. On the other hand, the nuclear spin has a longer lifetime while the spin has a negligible interaction with magnetic fields. We show that, through the combination of such two different spins via the hyperfine interaction, it is possible to construct a magnetic-field sensor with the sensitivity far beyond that of previous sensors using just a single electron spin.

  4. Nuclear spin-induced Cotton-Mouton effect in molecules.

    PubMed

    Fu, Li-juan; Vaara, Juha

    2013-05-28

    In nuclear magneto-optic spectroscopy, effects of nuclear magnetization are detected in light passing through a sample containing spin-polarized nuclei. An optical analogue of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) chemical shift has been predicted and observed in the nuclear spin optical rotation of linearly polarized light propagating parallel to the nuclear magnetization. A recently proposed magneto-optic analogue of the NMR spin-spin coupling, the nuclear spin-induced Cotton-Mouton (NSCM) effect entails an ellipticity induced to linearly polarized light when passing through a medium with the nuclear spins polarized in a direction perpendicular to the light beam. Here we present a first-principles electronic structure formulation of NSCM in terms of response theory as well as ab initio and density-functional theory calculations for small molecules. The roles of basis set (we use completeness-optimized sets), electron correlation, and relativistic effects are discussed. It is found that the explicitly temperature-dependent contribution to NSCM, arising from the partial orientation of the molecules due to the nuclear magnetization, typically dominates the effect. This part of NSCM is proportional to the tensor product of molecular polarizability and the NMR direct dipolar coupling tensor. Hence, NSCM provides a means of investigating the dipolar coupling and, thus, molecular structure in a formally isotropic medium. Overall ellipticities of the order of magnitude of 10(-8)...10(-7) rad/(M cm) are predicted for fully polarized nuclei. These should be detectable with modern instrumentation in the Voigt setup.

  5. Development of Career Opportunities for Technicians in the Nuclear Medicine Field. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Technical Education Research Center, Cambridge, MA.

    This report describes a nationally coordinated program development project whose purpose was to catalyze the implementation of needed postsecondary educational programs in the field of nuclear medicine technology (NMT). The NMT project was carried out during the six year period 1968-74 in cooperation with more than 36 community/junior colleges and…

  6. Mixed-radiation-field dosimetry utilizing Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Hintenlang, D.E.; Jamil, K.; Iselin, L.H.

    1992-01-01

    Radiation effects on urea, thiourea, guanidine carbonate and guanine sulfate were evaluated for both photon and neutron irradiations. Hydration of these materials typically provides a greatly increased sensitivity to both forms of radiation exposure, although not all materials lend themselves to this treatment without changing the chemical structure of the compound. Urea was found to be the most stable hydrated compound and provides the best sensitivity for quantifying radiation effects using NQR techniques. Urea permits a straight-forward quantification of each of the important parameters of the observed NQR signal, the FID. Several advanced data analysis methods were developed to assist in quantifying NQR spectra, both from urea and materials having more complex molecular structures, such as thiourea and guanidine sulfate. Unfortunately, these analysis techniques are frequently quite time consuming for the complex NQR spectra that result from some of these materials. The simpler analysis afforded by urea has therefore made it the prime candidate for an NQR dosimetry material. The moderate sensitivity of hydrated urea to photon irradiation does not permit this material to achieve the levels of performance required for a personnel dosimeter. It does, however, demonstrate acceptable sensitivity over dose ranges where it could provide a good biological dosimeter for several areas of radiation processing. The demonstrated photon sensitivity could permit hydrated urea to be used in applications such as food irradiation dosimetry. This material also exhibits a good sensitivity to neutron irradiation. The precise correlation between neutron exposure and the parameters of the resulting NQR spectra are currently being developed.

  7. Rearranging Pionless Effective Field Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Martin Savage; Silas Beane

    2001-11-19

    We point out a redundancy in the operator structure of the pionless effective field theory which dramatically simplifies computations. This redundancy is best exploited by using dibaryon fields as fundamental degrees of freedom. In turn, this suggests a new power counting scheme which sums range corrections to all orders. We explore this method with a few simple observables: the deuteron charge form factor, n p -> d gamma, and Compton scattering from the deuteron. Higher dimension operators involving electroweak gauge fields are not renormalized by the s-wave strong interactions, and therefore do not scale with inverse powers of the renormalization scale. Thus, naive dimensional analysis of these operators is sufficient to estimate their contribution to a given process.

  8. Inflating with large effective fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgess, C. P.; Cicoli, M.; Quevedo, F.; Williams, M.

    2014-11-01

    We re-examine large scalar fields within effective field theory, in particular focussing on the issues raised by their use in inflationary models (as suggested by BICEP2 to obtain primordial tensor modes). We argue that when the large-field and low-energy regimes coincide the scalar dynamics is most effectively described in terms of an asymptotic large-field expansion whose form can be dictated by approximate symmetries, which also help control the size of quantum corrections. We discuss several possible symmetries that can achieve this, including pseudo-Goldstone inflatons characterized by a coset G/H (based on abelian and non-abelian, compact and non-compact symmetries), as well as symmetries that are intrinsically higher dimensional. Besides the usual trigonometric potentials of Natural Inflation we also find in this way simple large-field power laws (like V propto phi2) and exponential potentials, V(phi) = ∑kVxe-kphi/M. Both of these can describe the data well and give slow-roll inflation for large fields without the need for a precise balancing of terms in the potential. The exponential potentials achieve large r through the limit |η| ll epsilon and so predict r simeq (8/3)(1-ns) consequently ns simeq 0.96 gives r simeq 0.11 but not much larger (and so could be ruled out as measurements on r and ns improve). We examine the naturalness issues for these models and give simple examples where symmetries protect these forms, using both pseudo-Goldstone inflatons (with non-abelian non-compact shift symmetries following familiar techniques from chiral perturbation theory) and extra-dimensional models.

  9. Inflating with large effective fields

    SciTech Connect

    Burgess, C.P.; Cicoli, M.; Quevedo, F.; Williams, M. E-mail: mcicoli@ictp.it E-mail: mwilliams@perimeterinsititute.ca

    2014-11-01

    We re-examine large scalar fields within effective field theory, in particular focussing on the issues raised by their use in inflationary models (as suggested by BICEP2 to obtain primordial tensor modes). We argue that when the large-field and low-energy regimes coincide the scalar dynamics is most effectively described in terms of an asymptotic large-field expansion whose form can be dictated by approximate symmetries, which also help control the size of quantum corrections. We discuss several possible symmetries that can achieve this, including pseudo-Goldstone inflatons characterized by a coset G/H (based on abelian and non-abelian, compact and non-compact symmetries), as well as symmetries that are intrinsically higher dimensional. Besides the usual trigonometric potentials of Natural Inflation we also find in this way simple large-field power laws (like V ∝ φ{sup 2}) and exponential potentials, V(φ) = ∑{sub k}V{sub x}e{sup −kφ/M}. Both of these can describe the data well and give slow-roll inflation for large fields without the need for a precise balancing of terms in the potential. The exponential potentials achieve large r through the limit |η| || ε and so predict r ≅ (8/3)(1-n{sub s}); consequently n{sub s} ≅ 0.96 gives r ≅ 0.11 but not much larger (and so could be ruled out as measurements on r and n{sub s} improve). We examine the naturalness issues for these models and give simple examples where symmetries protect these forms, using both pseudo-Goldstone inflatons (with non-abelian non-compact shift symmetries following familiar techniques from chiral perturbation theory) and extra-dimensional models.

  10. Nuclear medium effects in Drell–Yan process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haider, H.; Athar, M. Sajjad; Singh, S. K.; Ruiz Simo, I.

    2017-04-01

    We study the nuclear medium effects in Drell–Yan process using quark parton distribution functions calculated in a microscopic nuclear model which takes into account the effects of Fermi motion, nuclear binding and nucleon correlations through a relativistic nucleon spectral function. The contributions of π and ρ mesons as well as shadowing effects are also included. The beam energy loss is calculated using a phenomenological approach. The present theoretical results are compared with the experimental results of the E772 and E866 experiments. These results are applicable to the forthcoming experimental analysis of E906 Sea Quest experiment at the Fermi Lab.

  11. Nuclear magnetic resonance signal dynamics of liquids in the presence of distant dipolar fields, revisited.

    PubMed

    Barros, Wilson; Gochberg, Daniel F; Gore, John C

    2009-05-07

    The description of the nuclear magnetic resonance magnetization dynamics in the presence of long-range dipolar interactions, which is based upon approximate solutions of Bloch-Torrey equations including the effect of a distant dipolar field, has been revisited. New experiments show that approximate analytic solutions have a broader regime of validity as well as dependencies on pulse-sequence parameters that seem to have been overlooked. In order to explain these experimental results, we developed a new method consisting of calculating the magnetization via an iterative formalism where both diffusion and distant dipolar field contributions are treated as integral operators incorporated into the Bloch-Torrey equations. The solution can be organized as a perturbative series, whereby access to higher order terms allows one to set better boundaries on validity regimes for analytic first-order approximations. Finally, the method legitimizes the use of simple analytic first-order approximations under less demanding experimental conditions, it predicts new pulse-sequence parameter dependencies for the range of validity, and clarifies weak points in previous calculations.

  12. Continuum effects in nuclear transfer reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Marta, H. D.; Donangelo, R.; Fernandez Niello, J. O.; Pacheco, A. J.

    2007-02-12

    We develop a semiclassical calculation for nuclear transfer reactions where the continuum is treated in an exact way, and compare the results with those of a treatment in which the continuum is neglected. We conclude that the influence of the continuum is very important for weakly bound reactants.

  13. Solid effect in the electron spin dressed state: A new approach for dynamic nuclear polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weis, V.; Bennati, M.; Rosay, M.; Griffin, R. G.

    2000-10-01

    We describe a new type of solid effect for dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) that is based on simultaneous, near resonant microwave (mw) and radio frequency (rf) irradiation of a coupled electron nuclear spin system. The interaction of the electron spin with the mw field is treated as an electron spin dressed state. In contrast to the customary laboratory frame solid effect, it is possible to obtain nuclear polarization with the dressed state solid effect (DSSE) even in the absence of nonsecular hyperfine coupling. Efficient, selective excitation of dressed state transitions generates nuclear polarization in the nuclear laboratory frame on a time scale of tens of μs, depending on the strength of the electron-nuclear coupling, the mw and rf offset and field strength. The experiment employs both pulsed mw and rf irradiation at a repetition rate comparable to T1e-1, where T1e is the electronic spin lattice relaxation time. The DSSE is demonstrated on a perdeuterated BDPA radical in a protonated matrix of polystyrene.

  14. An effect of nuclear electric quadrupole moments in thermonuclear fusion plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    De, B. R.; Srnka, L. J.

    1978-01-01

    Consideration of the nuclear electric quadrupole terms in the expression for the fusion Coulomb barrier suggests that this electrostatic barrier may be substantially modified from that calculated under the usual plasma assumption that the nuclei are electric monopoles. This effect is a result of the nonspherical potential shape and the spatial quantization of the nuclear spins of the fully stripped ions in the presence of a magnetic field. For monopole-quadrupole fuel cycles like p-B-11, the fusion cross-section may be substantially increased at low energies if the protons are injected at a small angle relative to the confining magnetic field.

  15. An effect of nuclear electric quadrupole moments in thermonuclear fusion plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    De, B. R.; Srnka, L. J.

    1978-01-01

    Consideration of the nuclear electric quadrupole terms in the expression for the fusion Coulomb barrier suggests that this electrostatic barrier may be substantially modified from that calculated under the usual plasma assumption that the nuclei are electric monopoles. This effect is a result of the nonspherical potential shape and the spatial quantization of the nuclear spins of the fully stripped ions in the presence of a magnetic field. For monopole-quadrupole fuel cycles like p-B-11, the fusion cross-section may be substantially increased at low energies if the protons are injected at a small angle relative to the confining magnetic field.

  16. The Italian Activities in the Field of Nuclear Waste Management - 12439

    SciTech Connect

    Giorgiantoni, Giorgio; Marzo, Giuseppe A.; Sepielli, Massimo

    2012-07-01

    The Italian situation in the field of nuclear waste management is characterized by a relative small quantity of wastes, as a consequence of the giving up of energy production by nuclear generation in 1986. Notwithstanding this situation, Italy is a unique case study since the country needs to undertake the final decommissioning of four shut-down NPPs (size 100-200 MWe), each one different from the others. Therefore all the regulatory, technical, and financial actions are needed in the same way as if there was actual nuclear generation. Furthermore, the various non-power generating applications of nuclear energy still require management, a legal framework, a regulatory body, an industrial structure, and technical know-how. Notwithstanding the absence of energy production from nuclear sources, the country has the burden of radioactive waste management from the previous nuclear operations, which obliges it to implement at first a robust legislative framework, then to explore all the complex procedures to achieve the localization of the national interim storage facility, not excluding the chance to have a European regional facility for geologic disposal, under the clauses of the Council Directive of 19 July 2011 'Establishing a Community Framework for the Responsible and Safe Management of Radioactive Waste'. Then, as far as industrial, medical and R and D aspects, the improvement of the legislative picture, the creation of a regulatory body, is a good start for the future, to achieve the best efficiency of the Italian system. (authors)

  17. Correction of environmental magnetic fields for the acquisition of Nuclear magnetic relaxation dispersion profiles below Earth's field.

    PubMed

    Zampetoulas, Vasileios; Lurie, David J; Broche, Lionel M

    2017-09-01

    T1 relaxation times can be measured at a range of magnetic field strengths by Fast Field-Cycling (FFC) NMR relaxometry to provide T1-dispersion curves. These are valuable tools for the investigation of material properties as they provide information about molecular dynamics non-invasively. However, accessing information at fields below 230 μT (10kHz proton Larmor frequency) requires careful correction of unwanted environmental magnetic fields. In this work a novel method is proposed that compensates for the environmental fields on a FFC-NMR relaxometer and extends the acquisition of Nuclear Magnetic Relaxation Dispersion profiles to 2.3μT (extremely low field region), with direct application in the study of slow molecular motions. Our method is an improvement of an existing technique, reported by Anoardo and Ferrante in 2003, which exploits the non-adiabatic behaviour of the magnetisation in rapidly-varying magnetic fields and makes use of the oscillation of the signal amplitude to estimate the field strength. This increases the accuracy in measuring the environmental fields and allows predicting the optimal correction values by applying simple equations to fit the data acquired. Validation of the method is performed by comparisons with well-known dispersion curves obtained from polymers and benzene. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Correction of environmental magnetic fields for the acquisition of Nuclear magnetic relaxation dispersion profiles below Earth's field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zampetoulas, Vasileios; Lurie, David J.; Broche, Lionel M.

    2017-09-01

    T1 relaxation times can be measured at a range of magnetic field strengths by Fast Field-Cycling (FFC) NMR relaxometry to provide T1-dispersion curves. These are valuable tools for the investigation of material properties as they provide information about molecular dynamics non-invasively. However, accessing information at fields below 230 μT (10 kHz proton Larmor frequency) requires careful correction of unwanted environmental magnetic fields. In this work a novel method is proposed that compensates for the environmental fields on a FFC-NMR relaxometer and extends the acquisition of Nuclear Magnetic Relaxation Dispersion profiles to 2.3 μT (extremely low field region), with direct application in the study of slow molecular motions. Our method is an improvement of an existing technique, reported by Anoardo and Ferrante in 2003, which exploits the non-adiabatic behaviour of the magnetisation in rapidly-varying magnetic fields and makes use of the oscillation of the signal amplitude to estimate the field strength. This increases the accuracy in measuring the environmental fields and allows predicting the optimal correction values by applying simple equations to fit the data acquired. Validation of the method is performed by comparisons with well-known dispersion curves obtained from polymers and benzene.

  19. AMUSE-Field I: NUCLEAR X-RAY PROPERTIES OF LOCAL FIELD AND GROUP SPHEROIDS ACROSS THE STELLAR MASS SCALE

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Brendan; Gallo, Elena; Treu, Tommaso; Woo, Jong-Hak

    2012-03-01

    We present the first results from AMUSE-Field, a Chandra survey designed to characterize the occurrence and intensity of low-level accretion onto supermassive black holes (SMBHs) at the center of local early-type field galaxies. This is accomplished by means of a Large Program targeting a distance-limited (<30 Mpc) sample of 103 early types spanning a wide range in stellar masses. We acquired new ACIS-S observations for 61 objects down to a limiting (0.3-10 keV) luminosity of 2.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 38} erg s{sup -1}, and we include an additional 42 objects with archival (typically deeper) coverage. A nuclear X-ray source is detected in 52 out of the 103 galaxies. After accounting for potential contamination from low-mass X-ray binaries, we estimate that the fraction of accreting SMBHs within the sample is 45% {+-} 7%, which sets a firm lower limit on the occupation fraction within the field. The measured nuclear X-ray luminosities are invariably highly sub-Eddington, with L{sub X}/L{sub Edd} ratios between {approx}10{sup -4} and 10{sup -8}. As also found in a companion survey targeting Virgo early types, the active fraction increases with increasing host galaxy stellar mass, reflective of 'Eddington incompleteness' within the lower-mass objects. For the Field sample, the average nuclear X-ray luminosity scales with the host stellar mass as M{sup 0.71{+-}0.10}{sub star}, with an intrinsic scatter of 0.73 {+-} 0.09 dex. Qualitatively similar results hold for morphologically homogeneous (type E) or uniform sensitivity (new observations only) subsets. A majority of the AMUSE-Field galaxies (78%) inhabit groups, enabling us to investigate the influence of group richness on nuclear activity. We see no evidence for a positive correlation between nuclear X-ray luminosity, normalized to host properties, and galaxy density. Rather, while the scatter is substantial, it appears that the Eddington-scaled X-ray luminosity of group members may be slightly lower than for

  20. AMUSE-Field I: Nuclear X-Ray Properties of Local Field and Group Spheroids across the Stellar Mass Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Brendan; Gallo, Elena; Treu, Tommaso; Woo, Jong-Hak

    2012-03-01

    We present the first results from AMUSE-Field, a Chandra survey designed to characterize the occurrence and intensity of low-level accretion onto supermassive black holes (SMBHs) at the center of local early-type field galaxies. This is accomplished by means of a Large Program targeting a distance-limited (<30 Mpc) sample of 103 early types spanning a wide range in stellar masses. We acquired new ACIS-S observations for 61 objects down to a limiting (0.3-10 keV) luminosity of 2.5 × 1038 erg s-1, and we include an additional 42 objects with archival (typically deeper) coverage. A nuclear X-ray source is detected in 52 out of the 103 galaxies. After accounting for potential contamination from low-mass X-ray binaries, we estimate that the fraction of accreting SMBHs within the sample is 45% ± 7%, which sets a firm lower limit on the occupation fraction within the field. The measured nuclear X-ray luminosities are invariably highly sub-Eddington, with L X/L Edd ratios between ~10-4 and 10-8. As also found in a companion survey targeting Virgo early types, the active fraction increases with increasing host galaxy stellar mass, reflective of "Eddington incompleteness" within the lower-mass objects. For the Field sample, the average nuclear X-ray luminosity scales with the host stellar mass as M 0.71 ± 0.10 star, with an intrinsic scatter of 0.73 ± 0.09 dex. Qualitatively similar results hold for morphologically homogeneous (type E) or uniform sensitivity (new observations only) subsets. A majority of the AMUSE-Field galaxies (78%) inhabit groups, enabling us to investigate the influence of group richness on nuclear activity. We see no evidence for a positive correlation between nuclear X-ray luminosity, normalized to host properties, and galaxy density. Rather, while the scatter is substantial, it appears that the Eddington-scaled X-ray luminosity of group members may be slightly lower than for isolated galaxies, and that this trend continues to cluster early types.

  1. NMR-based structural biology enhanced by dynamic nuclear polarization at high magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Koers, Eline J; van der Cruijsen, Elwin A W; Rosay, Melanie; Weingarth, Markus; Prokofyev, Alexander; Sauvée, Claire; Ouari, Olivier; van der Zwan, Johan; Pongs, Olaf; Tordo, Paul; Maas, Werner E; Baldus, Marc

    2014-11-01

    Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) has become a powerful method to enhance spectroscopic sensitivity in the context of magnetic resonance imaging and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. We show that, compared to DNP at lower field (400 MHz/263 GHz), high field DNP (800 MHz/527 GHz) can significantly enhance spectral resolution and allows exploitation of the paramagnetic relaxation properties of DNP polarizing agents as direct structural probes under magic angle spinning conditions. Applied to a membrane-embedded K(+) channel, this approach allowed us to refine the membrane-embedded channel structure and revealed conformational substates that are present during two different stages of the channel gating cycle. High-field DNP thus offers atomic insight into the role of molecular plasticity during the course of biomolecular function in a complex cellular environment.

  2. Recursive polarization of nuclear spins in diamond at arbitrary magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Pagliero, Daniela; Laraoui, Abdelghani; Henshaw, Jacob D.; Meriles, Carlos A.

    2014-12-15

    We introduce an alternate route to dynamically polarize the nuclear spin host of nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers in diamond. Our approach articulates optical, microwave, and radio-frequency pulses to recursively transfer spin polarization from the NV electronic spin. Using two complementary variants of the same underlying principle, we demonstrate nitrogen nuclear spin initialization approaching 80% at room temperature both in ensemble and single NV centers. Unlike existing schemes, our approach does not rely on level anti-crossings and is thus applicable at arbitrary magnetic fields. This versatility should prove useful in applications ranging from nanoscale metrology to sensitivity-enhanced NMR.

  3. Radionuclide observables during the Integrated Field Exercise of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty

    SciTech Connect

    Burnett, Jonathan L.; Miley, Harry S.; Milbrath, Brian D.

    2016-03-01

    In 2014 the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO) undertook the Integrated Field Exercise (IFE) in Jordan. The exercise consisted of a simulated 0.5 – 2 kT underground explosion triggering an On-site Inspection (OSI) to search for evidence of a Treaty violation. This research evaluates two of the OSI techniques, including laboratory-based gamma-spectrometry of soil samples and in situ gamma-spectrometry for 17 particulate radionuclides indicative of nuclear weapon tests. The detection sensitivity is evaluated using real IFE and model data. It indicates that higher sensitivity laboratory measurements are the optimum technique during the IFE and OSI timeframes.

  4. Guidance for Deployment of Mobile Technologies for Nuclear Power Plant Field Workers

    SciTech Connect

    Heather D. Medema; Ronald K. Farris

    2012-09-01

    This report is a guidance document prepared for the benefit of commercial nuclear power plants’ (NPPs) supporting organizations and personnel who are considering or undertaking deployment of mobile technology for the purpose of improving human performance and plant status control (PSC) for field workers in an NPP setting. This document especially is directed at NPP business managers, Electric Power Research Institute, Institute of Nuclear Power Operations, and other non-Information Technology personnel. This information is not intended to replace basic project management practices or reiterate these processes, but is to support decision-making, planning, and preparation of a business case.

  5. Topics in Effective Field Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Hsi-Ming

    This dissertation focuses on two aspects of high energy physics---quantum chromodynamics (QCD) and the effective field theory. On the QCD side, the double parton scattering has become an important background in new physics searches. Correlations in double parton distribution function including flavor, spin, momentum fractions, and transverse separation were studied under the framework of proton bag model. Pile-up contamination also affects new physics searches. One way to suppress this effect is to use observables that depend only on charged particles. A non-perturbative object, the track function, was defined to deal with calculations that only involved charged particles. The track function formalism was applied to calculate the thrust with charged particles only. Then, the focus shifts to the effective field theory. Soft-collinear effective theory was used to resum the large logarithms in the thrust calculation. The one-loop anomalous dimension matrix for the dimension-six baryon number violating operators is computed. Lastly, the Standard Model effective theory was used to study the semileptonic hyperon decays.

  6. Report of the Defense Science Board Task Force on Nuclear Weapon Effects Test, Evaluation, and Simulation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-04-01

    scenario assessments , scripted gaming activities, and in field experiments involving operational resources. This scenario usage is discussed further in...HARDENING SYSTEMS AND ASSESSING COMPLIANCE – PAST AND PRESENT...The Hardening Process and Design Assessment ....................................32 5.3 Nuclear Weapon Effects Simulators

  7. Nuclear Deformation Effects in the Cluster Radioactivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misicu, Serban; Protopopescu, Dan

    1999-01-01

    We investigate the influence of the nuclear deformation on the decay rates of some cluster emission processes. The interaction between the daughter and the cluster is given by a double folding potential including quadrupole and hexadecupole deformed densities of both fragments. The nuclear part of the nucleus--nucleus interaction is density dependent and at small distances a repulsive core in the potential will occur. In the frame of the WKB-approximation the assault frequency of the cluster will depend on the geometric properties of the potential pocket whereas the penetrability will be sensitive to changes in the barrier location. The results obtained in this paper point out that various combinations of cluster and daughter deformations may account for the measured values of the decay rate. The decay rates are however more sensitive to the changes in the daughter deformation due to the large mass asymmetry of the process.

  8. Mobile high resolution xenon nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy in the earth's magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Appelt, Stephan; Häsing, F Wolfgang; Kühn, Holger; Perlo, Juan; Blümich, Bernhard

    2005-05-20

    Conventional high resolution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra are usually measured in homogeneous, high magnetic fields (>1 T), which are produced by expensive and immobile superconducting magnets. We show that chemically resolved xenon (Xe) NMR spectroscopy of liquid samples can be measured in the Earth's magnetic field (5 x 10(-5) T) with a continuous flow of hyperpolarized Xe gas. It was found that the measured normalized Xe frequency shifts are significantly modified by the Xe polarization density, which causes different dipolar magnetic fields in the liquid and in the gas phases.

  9. Chitosan Nanoparticles for Nuclear Targeting: The Effect of Nanoparticle Size and Nuclear Localization Sequence Density.

    PubMed

    Tammam, Salma N; Azzazy, Hassan M E; Breitinger, Hans G; Lamprecht, Alf

    2015-12-07

    Many recently discovered therapeutic proteins exert their main function in the nucleus, thus requiring both efficient uptake and correct intracellular targeting. Chitosan nanoparticles (NPs) have attracted interest as protein delivery vehicles due to their biocompatibility and ability to escape the endosomes offering high potential for nuclear delivery. Molecular entry into the nucleus occurs through the nuclear pore complexes, the efficiency of which is dependent on NP size and the presence of nuclear localization sequence (NLS). Chitosan nanoparticles of different sizes (S-NPs ≈ 25 nm; L-NP ≈ 150 nm) were formulated, and they were modified with different densities of the octapeptide NLS CPKKKRKV (S-NPs, 0.25, 0.5, 2.0 NLS/nm(2); L-NPs, 0.6, 0.9, 2 NLS/nm(2)). Unmodified and NLS-tagged NPs were evaluated for their protein loading capacity, extent of cell association, cell uptake, cell surface binding, and finally nuclear delivery efficiency in L929 fibroblasts. To avoid errors generated with cell fractionation and nuclear isolation protocols, nuclear delivery was assessed in intact cells utilizing Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) fluorometry and microscopy. Although L-NPs showed ≈10-fold increase in protein loading per NP when compared to S-NPs, due to higher cell association and uptake S-NPs showed superior protein delivery. NLS exerts a size and density dependent effect on nanoparticle uptake and surface binding, with a general reduction in NP cell surface binding and an increase in cell uptake with the increase in NLS density (up to 8.4-fold increase in uptake of High-NLS-L-NPs (2 NLS/nm(2)) compared to unmodified L-NPs). However, for nuclear delivery, unmodified S-NPs show higher nuclear localization rates when compared to NLS modified NPs (up to 5-fold by FRET microscopy). For L-NPs an intermediate NLS density (0.9 NLS/nm(2)) seems to provide highest nuclear localization (3.7-fold increase in nuclear delivery compared to High

  10. Microwave field distribution in a magic angle spinning dynamic nuclear polarization NMR probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nanni, Emilio A.; Barnes, Alexander B.; Matsuki, Yoh; Woskov, Paul P.; Corzilius, Björn; Griffin, Robert G.; Temkin, Richard J.

    2011-05-01

    We present a calculation of the microwave field distribution in a magic angle spinning (MAS) probe utilized in dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) experiments. The microwave magnetic field (B 1 S) profile was obtained from simulations performed with the High Frequency Structure Simulator (HFSS) software suite, using a model that includes the launching antenna, the outer Kel-F stator housing coated with Ag, the RF coil, and the 4 mm diameter sapphire rotor containing the sample. The predicted average B 1 S field is 13 μT/W 1/2, where S denotes the electron spin. For a routinely achievable input power of 5 W the corresponding value is γSB 1 S = 0.84 MHz. The calculations provide insights into the coupling of the microwave power to the sample, including reflections from the RF coil and diffraction of the power transmitted through the coil. The variation of enhancement with rotor wall thickness was also successfully simulated. A second, simplified calculation was performed using a single pass model based on Gaussian beam propagation and Fresnel diffraction. This model provided additional physical insight and was in good agreement with the full HFSS simulation. These calculations indicate approaches to increasing the coupling of the microwave power to the sample, including the use of a converging lens and fine adjustment of the spacing of the windings of the RF coil. The present results should prove useful in optimizing the coupling of microwave power to the sample in future DNP experiments. Finally, the results of the simulation were used to predict the cross effect DNP enhancement ( ɛ) vs. ω1 S/(2 π) for a sample of 13C-urea dissolved in a 60:40 glycerol/water mixture containing the polarizing agent TOTAPOL; very good agreement was obtained between theory and experiment.

  11. Radionuclide observables during the Integrated Field Exercise of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty.

    PubMed

    Burnett, Jonathan L; Miley, Harry S; Milbrath, Brian D

    2016-03-01

    In 2014 the Preparatory Commission for the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO) undertook an Integrated Field Exercise (IFE14) in Jordan. The exercise consisted of a simulated 0.5-2 kT underground nuclear explosion triggering an On-site Inspection (OSI) to search for evidence of a Treaty violation. This research paper evaluates two of the OSI techniques used during the IFE14, laboratory-based gamma-spectrometry of soil samples and in-situ gamma-spectrometry, both of which were implemented to search for 17 OSI relevant particulate radionuclides indicative of nuclear explosions. The detection sensitivity is evaluated using real IFE and model data. It indicates that higher sensitivity laboratory measurements are the optimum technique during the IFE and within the Treaty/Protocol-specified OSI timeframes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Anomalous Nuclear Reaction in Earth's Interior: a New Field in Physics Science?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Songsheng; He, Ming

    2012-05-01

    Tritium (3H) in excess of the atmospheric values was found at volcanic Lakes Pavin (France), Laacher (Germany) and Nemrut (Turkey), as well as Kilauea Volcano at Hawaii (USA) and other volcanoes. Because 3H has a short half-life of 12.3 years, the tritium and the resulting 3He must have formed recently in the Earth. The result suggests that nuclear reactions may generate a significant amount of tritium in the interior of the Earth, although we have not yet learned what the reaction mechanism may be responsible. The nuclear reaction that can be responsible for tritium production in the Earth is probably a new research field in physics science. Nuclear reactions that generate tritium might be a source of “missing" energy (heat) in the interior of the Earth. Finding in-situ 3H in the mantle may exhibit an alternative explanation of 3He origin in the deep Earth.

  13. Nuclear spin cooling using Overhauser-field selective coherent population trapping.

    PubMed

    Issler, M; Kessler, E M; Giedke, G; Yelin, S; Cirac, I; Lukin, M D; Imamoglu, A

    2010-12-31

    We show that a quantum interference effect in optical absorption from two electronic spin states of a solid-state emitter can be used to prepare the surrounding environment of nuclear spins in well-defined states, thereby suppressing electronic spin dephasing. The coupled electron-nuclei system evolves into a coherent population trapping state by optical-excitation-induced nuclear-spin diffusion for a broad range of initial optical detunings. The spectroscopic signature of this evolution where the single-electron strongly modifies its environment is a drastic broadening of the dark resonance in optical absorption experiments. The large difference in electronic and nuclear time scales allows us to verify the preparation of nuclear spins in the desired state.

  14. Phase II: Field Detector Development For Undeclared/Declared Nuclear Testing For Treaty Verfiation Monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Kriz, M.; Hunter, D.; Riley, T.

    2015-10-02

    Radioactive xenon isotopes are a critical part of the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty (CTBT) for the detection or confirmation of nuclear weapons tests as well as on-site treaty verification monitoring. On-site monitoring is not currently conducted because there are no commercially available small/robust field detector devices to measure the radioactive xenon isotopes. Xenon is an ideal signature to detect clandestine nuclear events since they are difficult to contain and can diffuse and migrate through soils due to their inert nature. There are four key radioxenon isotopes used in monitoring: 135Xe (9 hour half-life), 133mXe (2 day half-life), 133Xe (5 day half-life) and 131mXe (12 day half-life) that decay through beta emission and gamma emission. Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) is a leader in the field of gas collections and has developed highly selective molecular sieves that allow for the collection of xenon gas directly from air. Phase I assessed the development of a small, robust beta-gamma coincidence counting system, that combines collection and in situ detection methodologies. Phase II of the project began development of the custom electronics enabling 2D beta-gamma coincidence analysis in a field portable system. This will be a significant advancement for field detection/quantification of short-lived xenon isotopes that would not survive transport time for laboratory analysis.

  15. Ambipolar phosphorene field effect transistor.

    PubMed

    Das, Saptarshi; Demarteau, Marcel; Roelofs, Andreas

    2014-11-25

    In this article, we demonstrate enhanced electron and hole transport in few-layer phosphorene field effect transistors (FETs) using titanium as the source/drain contact electrode and 20 nm SiO2 as the back gate dielectric. The field effect mobility values were extracted to be ∼38 cm(2)/Vs for electrons and ∼172 cm(2)/Vs for the holes. On the basis of our experimental data, we also comprehensively discuss how the contact resistances arising due to the Schottky barriers at the source and the drain end effect the different regime of the device characteristics and ultimately limit the ON state performance. We also propose and implement a novel technique for extracting the transport gap as well as the Schottky barrier height at the metal-phosphorene contact interface from the ambipolar transfer characteristics of the phosphorene FETs. This robust technique is applicable to any ultrathin body semiconductor which demonstrates symmetric ambipolar conduction. Finally, we demonstrate a high gain, high noise margin, chemical doping free, and fully complementary logic inverter based on ambipolar phosphorene FETs.

  16. [New mechanisms of biological effects of electromagnetic fields].

    PubMed

    Buchachenko, A L; Kuznetsov, D A; Berdinskiĭ, V L

    2006-01-01

    The production of ATP in mitochondria depends on the magnesium nuclear spin and magnetic moment of a Mg2+ ion in creatine kinase and ATPase. This suggests that enzymatic synthesis of ATP is an ion-radical process and thus depends on the external magnetic field (magnetobiology originates from this fact) and microwave fields, which control the spin states of ion-radical pairs and affect the ATP synthesis. The chemical mechanism of ATP synthesis and the origin of biological effects of electromagnetic (microwave) fields are discussed.

  17. Line broadening interference for high-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance spectra under inhomogeneous magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, Zhiliang; Yang, Jian; Lin, Yanqin E-mail: chenz@xmu.edu.cn; Chen, Zhong E-mail: chenz@xmu.edu.cn; Chen, Youhe

    2015-04-07

    Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy serves as an important tool for analyzing chemicals and biological metabolites. However, its performance is subject to the magnetic-field homogeneity. Under inhomogeneous fields, peaks are broadened to overlap each other, introducing difficulties for assignments. Here, we propose a method termed as line broadening interference (LBI) to provide high-resolution information under inhomogeneous magnetic fields by employing certain gradients in the indirect dimension to interfere the magnetic-field inhomogeneity. The conventional spectral-line broadening is thus interfered to be non-diagonal, avoiding the overlapping among adjacent resonances. Furthermore, an inhomogeneity correction algorithm is developed based on pattern recognition to recover the high-resolution information from LBI spectra. Theoretical deductions are performed to offer systematic and detailed analyses on the proposed method. Moreover, experiments are conducted to prove the feasibility of the proposed method for yielding high-resolution spectra in inhomogeneous magnetic fields.

  18. Line broadening interference for high-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance spectra under inhomogeneous magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Wei, Zhiliang; Yang, Jian; Chen, Youhe; Lin, Yanqin; Chen, Zhong

    2015-04-07

    Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy serves as an important tool for analyzing chemicals and biological metabolites. However, its performance is subject to the magnetic-field homogeneity. Under inhomogeneous fields, peaks are broadened to overlap each other, introducing difficulties for assignments. Here, we propose a method termed as line broadening interference (LBI) to provide high-resolution information under inhomogeneous magnetic fields by employing certain gradients in the indirect dimension to interfere the magnetic-field inhomogeneity. The conventional spectral-line broadening is thus interfered to be non-diagonal, avoiding the overlapping among adjacent resonances. Furthermore, an inhomogeneity correction algorithm is developed based on pattern recognition to recover the high-resolution information from LBI spectra. Theoretical deductions are performed to offer systematic and detailed analyses on the proposed method. Moreover, experiments are conducted to prove the feasibility of the proposed method for yielding high-resolution spectra in inhomogeneous magnetic fields.

  19. Partial homogeneity based high-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance spectra under inhomogeneous magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, Zhiliang; Lin, Liangjie; Lin, Yanqin E-mail: chenz@xmu.edu.cn; Chen, Zhong E-mail: chenz@xmu.edu.cn; Chen, Youhe

    2014-09-29

    In nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) technique, it is of great necessity and importance to obtain high-resolution spectra, especially under inhomogeneous magnetic fields. In this study, a method based on partial homogeneity is proposed for retrieving high-resolution one-dimensional NMR spectra under inhomogeneous fields. Signals from series of small voxels, which characterize high resolution due to small sizes, are recorded simultaneously. Then, an inhomogeneity correction algorithm is developed based on pattern recognition to correct the influence brought by field inhomogeneity automatically, thus yielding high-resolution information. Experiments on chemical solutions and fish spawn were carried out to demonstrate the performance of the proposed method. The proposed method serves as a single radiofrequency pulse high-resolution NMR spectroscopy under inhomogeneous fields and may provide an alternative of obtaining high-resolution spectra of in vivo living systems or chemical-reaction systems, where performances of conventional techniques are usually degenerated by field inhomogeneity.

  20. Nuclear excitation by electronic processes: NEEC and NEET effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morel, P.; Daugas, J. M.; Gosselin, G.; Méot, V.; Gogny, D.

    2004-12-01

    The nuclear excitation by electron capture (NEEC) and nuclear excitation by electronic transition (NEET), and related de-excitation, are two important electromagnetic processes to modify the nuclear state populations. In this paper, we present, on one hand, an experiment, accepted at GANIL (France) in September 2004, to measure the NEEC effect with a fully stripped 57Fe ion beam and, on the other hand, a complete calculation leading to the NEET rate of the first excited state of the 235U in a local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) plasma.

  1. Nuclear Excitation by Electronic Processes: NEEC and NEET Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morel, P.; Daugas, J. M.; Gosselin, G.; Méot, V.; Gogny, D.

    2005-05-01

    The nuclear excitation by electron capture (NEEC) and nuclear excitation by electronic transition (NEET), and related de-excitation, are two important electromagnetic processes to modify the nuclear state populations. In this paper, we present, on one hand, an experiment accepted at GANIL (France) in September 2004 to measure the NEEC effect with a fully stripped 57Fe ion beam and, on the other hand, a complete calculation leading to the NEET rate of the first excited state of the 235U in a local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) plasma.

  2. Nuclear Weapon Effects Calculations in the TACWAR Code

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-10-20

    DNA 4702F NUCLEAR WEAPON EFFECTS _" CALCULATIONS IN THE TACWAR CODE _ Systems, Science & Software, Inc. i t, The Atrium, Suite 202 277 S. Washington...FOR PUBLIC RELEASE; - DISTRIBUTION UNLIMITED.1 THIS WORK SPONSORED BY THE DEFENSE NUCLEAR AGENCY1 " UNDER RDT&E RMSS CODE 836407046 V990AXNL12258 H25M0...Prepared forDD Director " - ! P DEFENSE NUCLEAR AGENCY JUL 23 1979 Washington, D. C. 20305 L • _. ,, ; .,.. : = *- k - .. _i , m i z "D ’ - ’ ’F 3 m

  3. Hydrogeologic effects of natural disruptive events on nuclear waste repositories

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, S.N.

    1980-06-01

    Some possible hydrogeologic effects of disruptive events that may affect repositories for nuclear wastte are described. A very large number of combinations of natural events can be imagined, but only those events which are judged to be most probable are covered. Waste-induced effects are not considered. The disruptive events discussed above are placed into four geologic settings. Although the geology is not specific to given repository sites that have been considered by other agencies, the geology has been generalized from actual field data and is, therefore, considered to be physically reasonable. The geologic settings considered are: (1) interior salt domes of the Gulf Coast, (2) bedded salt of southeastern New Mexico, (3) argillaceous rocks of southern Nevanda, and (4) granitic stocks of the Basin and Range Province. Log-normal distributions of permeabilities of rock units are given for each region. Chapters are devoted to: poresity and permeability of natural materials, regional flow patterns, disruptive events (faulting, dissolution of rock forming minerals, fracturing from various causes, rapid changes of hydraulic regimen); possible hydrologic effects of disruptive events; and hydraulic fracturing.

  4. State-of-the-art of beyond mean field theories with nuclear density functionals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egido, J. Luis

    2016-07-01

    We present an overview of different beyond mean field theories (BMFTs) based on the generator coordinate method (GCM) and the recovery of symmetries used in many body nuclear physics with effective forces. In a first step a short reminder of the Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov (HFB) theory is given. A general discussion of the shortcomings of any mean field approximation (MFA), stemming either from the lack of the elementary symmetries (like particle number and angular momentum) or the absence of fluctuations around the mean values, is presented. The recovery of the symmetries spontaneously broken in the HFB approach, in particular the angular momentum, is necessary, among others, to describe excited states and transitions. Particle number projection is also needed to guarantee the right number of protons and neutrons. Furthermore a projection before the variation prevents the pairing collapse in the weak pairing regime. A whole chapter is devoted to illustrate with examples the convenience of recovering symmetries and the differences between the projection before and after the variation. The lack of fluctuations around the average values of the MFA is a big shortcoming inherent to this approach. To build in correlations in BMFT one selects the relevant degrees of freedom of the atomic nucleus. In the low energy part of the spectrum these are the quadrupole, octupole and the pairing vibrations as well as the single particle degrees of freedom. In the GCM the operators representing these degrees of freedom are used as coordinates to generate, by the constrained (projected) HFB theory, a collective subspace. The highly correlated GCM wave function is finally written as a linear combination of a projected basis of this space. The variation of the coefficients of the linear combination leads to the Hill-Wheeler equation. The flexibility of the GCM Ansatz allows to describe a whole palette of physical situations by conveniently choosing the generator coordinates. We discuss the

  5. Nuclear effects in squark production at the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Espindola, Danusa B.; Mariotto, C. B.; Rodriguez, M. C.

    2013-03-25

    In this contribution we study the production of squarks. If squarks are found in proton-proton (pp) collisions at the LHC, they might also be produced in collisions involving nuclei (pA and AA collisions). Here we investigate the influence of nuclear effects in the production of squarks in nuclear collisions at the LHC, and estimate the transverse momentum dependence of the nuclear ratios R{sub pA} = (d{sigma}(pA)/d{sub pT})/A(d{sigma}(pp)/d{sub pT}) and R{sub AA} = (d{sigma}(AA)/d{sub pT})/A{sup 2}(d{sigma}(pp)/d{sub pT}). We demonstrate that depending on the magnitude of the nuclear effects, the production of squarks could be enhanced or suppressed, compared to proton-proton collisions at same energies.

  6. Low magnetic field dynamic nuclear polarization using a single-coil two-channel probe

    SciTech Connect

    TonThat, D.M.; Augustine, M.P.; Pines, A.; Clarke, J. |

    1997-03-01

    We describe the design and construction of a single-coil, two-channel probe for the detection of low-field magnetic resonance using dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP). The high-frequency channel of the probe, which is used to saturate the electron spins, is tuned to the electron Larmor frequency, 75 MHz at 2.7 mT, and matched to 50 {Omega}. Low-field, {sup 1}H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is detected through the second, low-frequency channel at frequencies {lt}1 MHz. The performance of the probe was tested by measuring the DNP of protons in a manganese (II) chloride solution at 2.7 mT. At the proton NMR frequency of 120 kHz, the signal amplitude was enhanced over the value without DNP by a factor of about 200. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  7. Low magnetic field dynamic nuclear polarization using a single-coil two-channel probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    TonThat, Dinh M.; Augustine, Matthew P.; Pines, Alexander; Clarke, John

    1997-03-01

    We describe the design and construction of a single-coil, two-channel probe for the detection of low-field magnetic resonance using dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP). The high-frequency channel of the probe, which is used to saturate the electron spins, is tuned to the electron Larmor frequency, 75 MHz at 2.7 mT, and matched to 50 Ω. Low-field, 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is detected through the second, low-frequency channel at frequencies <1 MHz. The performance of the probe was tested by measuring the DNP of protons in a manganese (II) chloride solution at 2.7 mT. At the proton NMR frequency of 120 kHz, the signal amplitude was enhanced over the value without DNP by a factor of about 200.

  8. Lateral Flow Field Behavior Downstream of Mixing Vanes In a Simulated Nuclear Fuel Rod Bundle

    SciTech Connect

    Conner, Michael E.; Smith, L. David III; Holloway, Mary V.; Beasley, Donald E.

    2004-07-01

    To assess the fuel assembly performance of PWR nuclear fuel assemblies, average subchannel flow values are used in design analyses. However, for this highly complex flow, it is known that local conditions around fuel rods vary dependent upon the location of the fuel rod in the fuel assembly and upon the support grid design that maintains the fuel rod pitch. To investigate the local flow in a simulated nuclear fuel rod bundle, a testing technique has been employed to measure the lateral flow field in a 5 x 5 rod bundle. Particle Image Velocimetry was used to measure the lateral flow field downstream of a support grid with mixing vanes for four unique subchannels in the 5 x 5 bundle. The dominant lateral flow structures for each subchannel are compared in this paper including the decay of these flow structures. (authors)

  9. 77 FR 30030 - Monitoring the Effectiveness of Maintenance at Nuclear Power Plants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-21

    ... COMMISSION Monitoring the Effectiveness of Maintenance at Nuclear Power Plants AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory... Maintenance at Nuclear Power Plants.'' This guide endorses Revision 4A to Nuclear Management and Resources Council (NUMARC) 93-01, ``Industry Guideline for Monitoring the Effectiveness of Maintenance at Nuclear...

  10. Molecular dynamics and composition of crude oil by low-field nuclear magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Jia, Zijian; Xiao, Lizhi; Wang, Zhizhan; Liao, Guangzhi; Zhang, Yan; Liang, Can

    2016-08-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques are widely used to identify pure substances and probe protein dynamics. Oil is a complex mixture composed of hydrocarbons, which have a wide range of molecular size distribution. Previous work show that empirical correlations of relaxation times and diffusion coefficients were found for simple alkane mixtures, and also the shape of the relaxation and diffusion distribution functions are related to the composition of the fluids. The 2D NMR is a promising qualitative evaluation method for oil composition. But uncertainty in the interpretation of crude oil indicated further study was required. In this research, the effect of each composition on relaxation distribution functions is analyzed in detail. We also suggest a new method for prediction of the rotational correlation time distribution of crude oil molecules using low field NMR (LF-NMR) relaxation time distributions. A set of down-hole NMR fluid analysis system is independently designed and developed for fluid measurement. We illustrate this with relaxation-relaxation correlation experiments and rotational correlation time distributions on a series of hydrocarbon mixtures that employ our laboratory-designed downhole NMR fluid analyzer. The LF-NMR is a useful tool for detecting oil composition and monitoring oil property changes. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Photovoltage field-effect transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adinolfi, Valerio; Sargent, Edward H.

    2017-02-01

    The detection of infrared radiation enables night vision, health monitoring, optical communications and three-dimensional object recognition. Silicon is widely used in modern electronics, but its electronic bandgap prevents the detection of light at wavelengths longer than about 1,100 nanometres. It is therefore of interest to extend the performance of silicon photodetectors into the infrared spectrum, beyond the bandgap of silicon. Here we demonstrate a photovoltage field-effect transistor that uses silicon for charge transport, but is also sensitive to infrared light owing to the use of a quantum dot light absorber. The photovoltage generated at the interface between the silicon and the quantum dot, combined with the high transconductance provided by the silicon device, leads to high gain (more than 104 electrons per photon at 1,500 nanometres), fast time response (less than 10 microseconds) and a widely tunable spectral response. Our photovoltage field-effect transistor has a responsivity that is five orders of magnitude higher at a wavelength of 1,500 nanometres than that of previous infrared-sensitized silicon detectors. The sensitization is achieved using a room-temperature solution process and does not rely on traditional high-temperature epitaxial growth of semiconductors (such as is used for germanium and III-V semiconductors). Our results show that colloidal quantum dots can be used as an efficient platform for silicon-based infrared detection, competitive with state-of-the-art epitaxial semiconductors.

  12. Photovoltage field-effect transistors.

    PubMed

    Adinolfi, Valerio; Sargent, Edward H

    2017-02-16

    The detection of infrared radiation enables night vision, health monitoring, optical communications and three-dimensional object recognition. Silicon is widely used in modern electronics, but its electronic bandgap prevents the detection of light at wavelengths longer than about 1,100 nanometres. It is therefore of interest to extend the performance of silicon photodetectors into the infrared spectrum, beyond the bandgap of silicon. Here we demonstrate a photovoltage field-effect transistor that uses silicon for charge transport, but is also sensitive to infrared light owing to the use of a quantum dot light absorber. The photovoltage generated at the interface between the silicon and the quantum dot, combined with the high transconductance provided by the silicon device, leads to high gain (more than 10(4) electrons per photon at 1,500 nanometres), fast time response (less than 10 microseconds) and a widely tunable spectral response. Our photovoltage field-effect transistor has a responsivity that is five orders of magnitude higher at a wavelength of 1,500 nanometres than that of previous infrared-sensitized silicon detectors. The sensitization is achieved using a room-temperature solution process and does not rely on traditional high-temperature epitaxial growth of semiconductors (such as is used for germanium and III-V semiconductors). Our results show that colloidal quantum dots can be used as an efficient platform for silicon-based infrared detection, competitive with state-of-the-art epitaxial semiconductors.

  13. Graphene field-effect transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy, Dharmendar; Register, Leonard F.; Carpenter, Gary D.; Banerjee, Sanjay K.

    2011-08-01

    Owing in part to scaling challenges for metal oxide semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFETs) and complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) logic, the semiconductor industry is placing an increased emphasis on emerging materials and devices that may provide improved MOSFET performance beyond the 22 nm node, or provide novel functionality for, e.g. 'beyond CMOS' devices. Graphene, with its novel and electron-hole symmetric band structure and its high carrier mobilities and thermal velocities, is one such material that has garnered a great deal of interest for both purposes. Single and few layer carbon sheets have been fabricated by a variety of techniques including mechanical exfoliation and chemical vapour deposition, and field-effect transistors have been demonstrated with room-temperature mobilities as high as 10 000 cm2 V-1 s-1. But graphene is a gapless semiconductor and gate control of current is challenging, off-state leakage currents are high, and current does not readily saturate with drain voltage. However, various ways to overcome, adapt to, or even embrace this property are now being considered for device applications. In this work we explore through illustrative examples the potential of and challenges to graphene use for conventional and novel device applications.

  14. Nucleon structure at large x: nuclear effects in deuterium

    SciTech Connect

    Wally Melnitchouk

    2010-07-01

    I review quark momentum distributions in the nucleon at large momentum fractions x. Particular attention is paid to the impact of nuclear effects in deuterium on the d/u quark distribution ratio as x -> 1. A new global study of parton distributions, using less restrictive kinematic cuts in Q^2 and W^2, finds strong suppression of the d quark distribution once nuclear corrections are accounted for.

  15. Nuclear spin-induced Cotton-Mouton effect in molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Li-juan; Vaara, Juha

    2013-05-01

    In nuclear magneto-optic spectroscopy, effects of nuclear magnetization are detected in light passing through a sample containing spin-polarized nuclei. An optical analogue of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) chemical shift has been predicted and observed in the nuclear spin optical rotation of linearly polarized light propagating parallel to the nuclear magnetization. A recently proposed magneto-optic analogue of the NMR spin-spin coupling, the nuclear spin-induced Cotton-Mouton (NSCM) effect entails an ellipticity induced to linearly polarized light when passing through a medium with the nuclear spins polarized in a direction perpendicular to the light beam. Here we present a first-principles electronic structure formulation of NSCM in terms of response theory as well as ab initio and density-functional theory calculations for small molecules. The roles of basis set (we use completeness-optimized sets), electron correlation, and relativistic effects are discussed. It is found that the explicitly temperature-dependent contribution to NSCM, arising from the partial orientation of the molecules due to the nuclear magnetization, typically dominates the effect. This part of NSCM is proportional to the tensor product of molecular polarizability and the NMR direct dipolar coupling tensor. Hence, NSCM provides a means of investigating the dipolar coupling and, thus, molecular structure in a formally isotropic medium. Overall ellipticities of the order of magnitude of 10-8…10-7 rad/(M cm) are predicted for fully polarized nuclei. These should be detectable with modern instrumentation in the Voigt setup.

  16. Measurement of the 14N nuclear quadrupole resonance frequencies by the solid effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seliger, J.; Žagar, V.

    2008-07-01

    1H- 14N nuclear quadrupole double resonance using magnetic field cycling between high and low magnetic field and solid effect in the low magnetic field is analyzed in details. The transition probabilities per unit time for the solid-effect transitions are calculated. The double resonance spectra are calculated in the limiting cases of fast and slow nitrogen spin-lattice relaxation. The double resonance spectra are measured in histamine and quinolinic acid. The experimental spectra are analyzed and the 14N NQR frequencies are determined.

  17. Prediction of low-field nuclear singlet lifetimes with molecular dynamics and quantum-chemical property surface.

    PubMed

    Håkansson, Pär

    2017-01-25

    Molecular dynamics and quantum chemistry methods are implemented to quantify nuclear spin-1/2 pair singlet-state relaxation rates for three molecular systems at low magnetic field and room temperature. Computational methodology is developed for weak interactions, particularly important for singlet states at low field. These include spin-rotation and spin-internal-motion effects, which describe the coupling of the spin-carrying nuclei to fluctuating local magnetic fields induced by the overall and internal molecular fluctuations, respectively. A high-dimensional tensor property surface using Kriging interpolation is developed to circumvent costly quantum-chemical calculations. Together with the intramolecular dipolar relaxation, all the simulated relaxation mechanisms are accounted for with a common theoretical framework. Comparison with experiment indicates that quantitative accuracy is obtained, sufficient to enable guidance in the molecular design of molecules with long-lived singlet order.

  18. Automated image analysis of nuclear atypia in high-power field histopathological image.

    PubMed

    Lu, Cheng; Ji, Mengyao; Ma, Zhen; Mandal, Mrinal

    2015-06-01

    We developed a computer-aided technique to study nuclear atypia classification in high-power field haematoxylin and eosin stained images. An automated technique for nuclear atypia score (NAS) calculation is proposed. The proposed technique uses sophisticated digital image analysis and machine-learning methods to measure the NAS for haematoxylin and eosin stained images. The proposed technique first segments all nuclei regions. A set of morphology and texture features is extracted from presegmented nuclei regions. The histogram of each feature is then calculated to characterize the statistical information of the nuclei. Finally, a support vector machine classifier is applied to classify a high-power field image into different nuclear atypia classes. A set of 1188 digital images was analysed in the experiment. We successfully differentiated the high-power field image with NAS1 versus non-NAS1, NAS2 versus non-NAS2 and NAS3 versus non-NAS3, with area under receiver-operating characteristic curve of 0.90, 0.86 and 0.87, respectively. In three classes evaluation, the average classification accuracy was 78.79%. We found that texture-based feature provides best performance for the classification. The automated technique is able to quantify statistical features that may be difficult to be measured by human and demonstrates the future potentials of automated image analysis technique in histopathology analysis. © 2015 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2015 Royal Microscopical Society.

  19. Health effects of the nuclear accident at Three Mile Island

    SciTech Connect

    Fabrikant, J.I.

    1980-05-01

    Between March 28 and April 15, 1979 the collective dose resulting from the radioactivity released to the population living within a 50-mile radius of the Three Mile Island nuclear plant was about 2000 person-rems, less than 1% of the annual natural background level. The average dose to a person living within 5 miles of the nuclear plant was less than 10% of annual background radiation. The maximum estimated radiation dose received by any one individual in the general population (excluding the nuclear plant workers) during the accident was 70 mrem. The doses received by the general population as a result of the accident were so small that there will be no detectable additional cases of cancer, developmental abnormalities, or genetic ill-health. Three Three Mile Island nuclear workers received radiation doses of about 3 to 4 rem, exceeding maximum permissible quarterly dose of 3 rem. The major health effect of the accident at Three Mile Island was that of a pronounced demoralizing effect on the general population in the Three Mile Island area, including teenagers and mothers of preschool children and the nuclear plant workers. However, this effect proved transient in all groups studied except the nuclear workers.

  20. Nuclear Material Control and Accountability System Effectiveness Tool (MSET)

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, Danny H; Elwood Jr, Robert H; Roche, Charles T; Campbell, Billy J; Hammond, Glenn A; Meppen, Bruce W; Brown, Richard F

    2011-01-01

    A nuclear material control and accountability (MC&A) system effectiveness tool (MSET) has been developed in the United States for use in evaluating material protection, control, and accountability (MPC&A) systems in nuclear facilities. The project was commissioned by the National Nuclear Security Administration's Office of International Material Protection and Cooperation. MSET was developed by personnel with experience spanning more than six decades in both the U.S. and international nuclear programs and with experience in probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) in the nuclear power industry. MSET offers significant potential benefits for improving nuclear safeguards and security in any nation with a nuclear program. MSET provides a design basis for developing an MC&A system at a nuclear facility that functions to protect against insider theft or diversion of nuclear materials. MSET analyzes the system and identifies several risk importance factors that show where sustainability is essential for optimal performance and where performance degradation has the greatest impact on total system risk. MSET contains five major components: (1) A functional model that shows how to design, build, implement, and operate a robust nuclear MC&A system (2) A fault tree of the operating MC&A system that adapts PRA methodology to analyze system effectiveness and give a relative risk of failure assessment of the system (3) A questionnaire used to document the facility's current MPC&A system (provides data to evaluate the quality of the system and the level of performance of each basic task performed throughout the material balance area [MBA]) (4) A formal process of applying expert judgment to convert the facility questionnaire data into numeric values representing the performance level of each basic event for use in the fault tree risk assessment calculations (5) PRA software that performs the fault tree risk assessment calculations and produces risk importance factor reports on the

  1. Monitoring microbial growth and activity using spectral induced polarization and low-field nuclear magnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chi; Keating, Kristina; Revil, Andre

    2015-04-01

    Microbes and microbial activities in the Earth's subsurface play a significant role in shaping subsurface environments and are involved in environmental applications such as remediation of contaminants in groundwater and oil fields biodegradation. Stimulated microbial growth in such applications could cause wide variety of changes of physical/chemical properties in the subsurface. It is critical to monitor and determine the fate and transportation of microorganisms in the subsurface during such applications. Recent geophysical studies demonstrate the potential of two innovative techniques, spectral induced polarization (SIP) and low-field nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), for monitoring microbial growth and activities in porous media. The SIP measures complex dielectric properties of porous media at low frequencies of exciting electric field, and NMR studies the porous structure of geologic media and characterizes fluids subsurface. In this laboratory study, we examined both SIP and NMR responses from bacterial growth suspension as well as suspension mixed with silica sands. We focus on the direct contribution of microbes to the SIP and NMR signals in the absence of biofilm formation or biomineralization. We used Zymomonas mobilis and Shewanella oneidensis (MR-1) for SIP and NMR measurements, respectively. The SIP measurements were collected over the frequency range of 0.1 - 1 kHz on Z. mobilis growth suspension and suspension saturated sands at different cell densities. SIP data show two distinct peaks in imaginary conductivity spectra, and both imaginary and real conductivities increased as microbial density increased. NMR data were collected using both CPMG pulse sequence and D-T2 mapping to determine the T2-distribution and diffusion properties on S. oneidensis suspension, pellets (live and dead), and suspension mixed with silica sands. NMR data show a decrease in the T2-distribution in S. oneidensis suspension saturated sands as microbial density increase. A

  2. Natural geochemical analogues of the near field of high-level nuclear waste repositories

    SciTech Connect

    Apps, J.A.

    1995-09-01

    United States practice has been to design high-level nuclear waste (HLW) geological repositories with waste densities sufficiently high that repository temperatures surrounding the waste will exceed 100{degrees}C and could reach 250{degrees}C. Basalt and devitrified vitroclastic tuff are among the host rocks considered for waste emplacement. Near-field repository thermal behavior and chemical alteration in such rocks is expected to be similar to that observed in many geothermal systems. Therefore, the predictive modeling required for performance assessment studies of the near field could be validated and calibrated using geothermal systems as natural analogues. Examples are given which demonstrate the need for refinement of the thermodynamic databases used in geochemical modeling of near-field natural analogues and the extent to which present models can predict conditions in geothermal fields.

  3. A dynamic nuclear polarization strategy for multi-dimensional Earth's field NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Halse, Meghan E; Callaghan, Paul T

    2008-12-01

    Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) is introduced as a powerful tool for polarization enhancement in multi-dimensional Earth's field NMR spectroscopy. Maximum polarization enhancements, relative to thermal equilibrium in the Earth's magnetic field, are calculated theoretically and compared to the more traditional prepolarization approach for NMR sensitivity enhancement at ultra-low fields. Signal enhancement factors on the order of 3000 are demonstrated experimentally using DNP with a nitroxide free radical, TEMPO, which contains an unpaired electron which is strongly coupled to a neighboring (14)N nucleus via the hyperfine interaction. A high-quality 2D (19)F-(1)H COSY spectrum acquired in the Earth's magnetic field with DNP enhancement is presented and compared to simulation.

  4. Pulsed Field Gradient Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and Applications in Yttrium Type Zeolites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Shaoxiong

    Molecular self-diffusion measurements by Pulsed Field Gradient Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (PFG NMR) spectroscopy can be applied to numerous fields. PFG NMR spectroscopy usually requires no special labeling for measuring hydrocarbon self-diffusion in a variety of samples. This is a significant advantage over using radioactive isotopes or photolabeled molecules since no special sample preparation or handling is required. A single set of experiments can yield diffusion coefficients and often can be performed in a few hours. The range of diffusion coefficients (10^{ -4} cm^2/s-10 ^{-10} cm^2/s) which can be determined by PFG NMR covers most ranges of molecular diffusion. This work describes the design of a PFG NMR spectrometer for measuring hydrocarbon self-diffusion in zeolites. The principles of PFG NMR spectroscopy are illustrated. A pulsed field gradient 60 MHz NMR spectrometer was constructed. Diffusion data were acquired by PFG NMR for standard samples of water, ammonia and glycerol and are in good agreement with those reported in the literature. Following verification of spectrometer performance, the self-diffusion coefficients of isobutane in cation exchanged Y type zeolites were determined. The results show that the mobility of molecules in zeolites depends on the nature of the cations. For small crystallite zeolites, intercrystalline and intracrystalline diffusion has been observed. The effective diffusion coefficients strongly depend on the concentration of adsorbate as well as the packing method. Large discrepancies between diffusion coefficients in zeolites measured by PFG NMR and by adsorption rate experiments have been reported. Surface area, crystallite size, percentage of water in the zeolite, percentage of cation exchanged into the zeolite and other physical chemical properties effect hydrocarbon diffusivity. Detailed methods for determining these properties are discussed. As an extended study of zeolite catalysts, the adsorption of ethylene on

  5. New parameterization of the effective field theory motivated relativistic mean field model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Bharat; Singh, S. K.; Agrawal, B. K.; Patra, S. K.

    2017-10-01

    A new parameter set is generated for finite and infinite nuclear system within the effective field theory motivated relativistic mean field (ERMF) formalism. The isovector part of the ERMF model employed in the present study includes the coupling of nucleons to the δ and ρ mesons and the cross-coupling of ρ mesons to the σ and ω mesons. The results for the finite and infinite nuclear systems obtained using our parameter set are in harmony with the available experimental data. We find the maximum mass of the neutron star to be 2.03M⊙ and yet a relatively smaller radius at the canonical mass, 12.69 km, as required by the available data.

  6. A Lagrangian effective field theory

    SciTech Connect

    Vlah, Zvonimir; White, Martin; Aviles, Alejandro

    2015-09-02

    We have continued the development of Lagrangian, cosmological perturbation theory for the low-order correlators of the matter density field. We provide a new route to understanding how the effective field theory (EFT) of large-scale structure can be formulated in the Lagrandian framework and a new resummation scheme, comparing our results to earlier work and to a series of high-resolution N-body simulations in both Fourier and configuration space. The `new' terms arising from EFT serve to tame the dependence of perturbation theory on small-scale physics and improve agreement with simulations (though with an additional free parameter). We find that all of our models fare well on scales larger than about two to three times the non-linear scale, but fail as the non-linear scale is approached. This is slightly less reach than has been seen previously. At low redshift the Lagrangian model fares as well as EFT in its Eulerian formulation, but at higher z the Eulerian EFT fits the data to smaller scales than resummed, Lagrangian EFT. Furthermore, all the perturbative models fare better than linear theory.

  7. A Lagrangian effective field theory

    SciTech Connect

    Vlah, Zvonimir; White, Martin; Aviles, Alejandro E-mail: mwhite@berkeley.edu

    2015-09-01

    We have continued the development of Lagrangian, cosmological perturbation theory for the low-order correlators of the matter density field. We provide a new route to understanding how the effective field theory (EFT) of large-scale structure can be formulated in the Lagrandian framework and a new resummation scheme, comparing our results to earlier work and to a series of high-resolution N-body simulations in both Fourier and configuration space. The 'new' terms arising from EFT serve to tame the dependence of perturbation theory on small-scale physics and improve agreement with simulations (though with an additional free parameter). We find that all of our models fare well on scales larger than about two to three times the non-linear scale, but fail as the non-linear scale is approached. This is slightly less reach than has been seen previously. At low redshift the Lagrangian model fares as well as EFT in its Eulerian formulation, but at higher z the Eulerian EFT fits the data to smaller scales than resummed, Lagrangian EFT. All the perturbative models fare better than linear theory.

  8. A Lagrangian effective field theory

    DOE PAGES

    Vlah, Zvonimir; White, Martin; Aviles, Alejandro

    2015-09-02

    We have continued the development of Lagrangian, cosmological perturbation theory for the low-order correlators of the matter density field. We provide a new route to understanding how the effective field theory (EFT) of large-scale structure can be formulated in the Lagrandian framework and a new resummation scheme, comparing our results to earlier work and to a series of high-resolution N-body simulations in both Fourier and configuration space. The `new' terms arising from EFT serve to tame the dependence of perturbation theory on small-scale physics and improve agreement with simulations (though with an additional free parameter). We find that all ofmore » our models fare well on scales larger than about two to three times the non-linear scale, but fail as the non-linear scale is approached. This is slightly less reach than has been seen previously. At low redshift the Lagrangian model fares as well as EFT in its Eulerian formulation, but at higher z the Eulerian EFT fits the data to smaller scales than resummed, Lagrangian EFT. Furthermore, all the perturbative models fare better than linear theory.« less

  9. DOSIMETRIC response of a REM-500 in low energy neutron fields typical of nuclear power plants.

    PubMed

    Aslam; Matysiak, W; Atanackovic, J; Waker, A J

    2012-06-01

    This study investigates the response of a REM-500 to assess neutron quality factor and dose equivalent in low energy neutron fields, which are commonly encountered in the workplace environment of nuclear power stations. The McMaster University 3 MV Van de Graaff accelerator facility was used to measure the response of the instrument in monoenergetic neutron fields in the energy range 51 to 727 keV by bombarding a thin LiF target with 1.93-2.50 MeV protons. The energy distribution of the neutron fields produced in the facility was measured by a (3)He filled gas ionization chamber. The MCA mode of the REM-500 instrument was used to collect lineal energy distributions at varying neutron energies and to calculate the frequency and dose-mean lineal energies. The effective quality factor, Q-, was also calculated using the values of Q(y)listed in the REM-500 operation manual and compared with those of ICRP 60. The authors observed a continuously increasing trend in y - F, y-D, and Q-with an increase in neutron energy. It is interesting to note that standard tissue equivalent proportional counters (TEPCs) filled with tissue equivalent(TE) gas give rise to a similar trend for these microdosimetric quantities of interest in the same energy range; however, the averages calculated in this study are larger by about 15%compared to a TEPC filled with propane-based TE gas probably because of the larger stopping power of protons in propane compared to TE gas. These somewhat larger event sizes did not result in any significant increase in the Q-compared to those obtained from a TEPC filled with TE gas and were found to be in good agreement with other measurements reported earlier at corresponding neutron energies. The instrument quality factor response, R(Q), defined as the ratio of measured quality factor to the calculated quality factor in an ICRU tissue sphere,was found to vary with neutron energy. The instrument response,R(Q), was ~0.6 at 727 keV, which deteriorates further to

  10. Predicting neutron star properties based on chiral effective field theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laduke, Alison; Sammarruca, Francesca

    2016-09-01

    The energy per nucleon as a function of density, known as the nuclear equation of state, is the crucial input in the structure equations of neutron stars and thus establishes the connection between nuclear physics and compact astrophysical objects. More precisely, the pressure which supports the star against gravitational collapse is mostly determined by the nature of the equation of state of highly neutron-rich matter. In this contribution, we will report on our work in progress to calculate neutron star masses and radii. The equation of state is obtained microscopically from Brueckner-Hartree-Fock calculations based on state-of-the-art nuclear forces which have been developed within the framework of chiral effective field theory. The latter has become popular in recent years as a fundamental and systematic approach firmly connected to low-energy quantum chromodynamics. Supported by the Hill Undergraduate Fellowship and the U.S. Department of Energy.

  11. Gyrator employing field effect transistors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hochmair, E. S. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    A gyrator circuit of the conventional configuration of two amplifiers in a circular loop, one producing zero phase shift and the other producing 180 deg phase reversal is examined. All active elements are MOS field effect transistors. Each amplifier comprises a differential amplifier configuration with current limiting transistor, followed by an output transistor in cascode configuration, and two load transistors of opposite conductivity type from the other transistors. A voltage divider control circuit comprises a series string of transistors with a central voltage input to provide control, with locations on the amplifiers receiving reference voltages by connection to appropriate points on the divider. The circuit produces excellent response and is well suited for fabrication by integrated circuits.

  12. Nuclear quantum effects and hydrogen bonding in liquids.

    PubMed

    Raugei, Simone; Klein, Michael L

    2003-07-30

    We have employed ab initio path integral molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the role of nuclear quantum effects on the strength of hydrogen bonds in liquid hydrogen fluoride. Nuclear quantum effects are shown to be responsible for a stronger hydrogen bond and an enhanced dipole-dipole interaction, which lead, in turn, to a shortening of the H...F intrachain distance. The simulation results are analyzed in terms of the electronic density shifts with respect to a purely classical treatment of the nuclei. The observed enhanced hydrogen-bond interaction, which arises from a coupling of intra- and intermolecular effects, should be a general phenomenon occurring in all hydrogen-bonded systems.

  13. Coulomb and nuclear effects in breakup and reaction cross sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Descouvemont, P.; Canto, L. F.; Hussein, M. S.

    2017-01-01

    We use a three-body continuum discretized coupled channel (CDCC) model to investigate Coulomb and nuclear effects in breakup and reaction cross sections. The breakup of the projectile is simulated by a finite number of square integrable wave functions. First we show that the scattering matrices can be split in a nuclear term and in a Coulomb term. This decomposition is based on the Lippmann-Schwinger equation and requires the scattering wave functions. We present two different methods to separate both effects. Then, we apply this separation to breakup and reaction cross sections of 7Li+208Pb . For breakup, we investigate various aspects, such as the role of the α +t continuum, the angular-momentum distribution, and the balance between Coulomb and nuclear effects. We show that there is a large ambiguity in defining the Coulomb and nuclear breakup cross sections, since both techniques, although providing the same total breakup cross sections, strongly differ for the individual components. We suggest a third method which could be efficiently used to address convergence problems at large angular momentum. For reaction cross sections, interference effects are smaller, and the nuclear contribution is dominant above the Coulomb barrier. We also draw attention to different definitions of the reaction cross section which exist in the literature and which may induce small, but significant, differences in the numerical values.

  14. From effective field theories to effective density functionals in and beyond the mean field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grasso, M.; Lacroix, D.; van Kolck, U.

    2016-06-01

    Since the 1975 Nobel Prize in Physics, nuclear theory has evolved along two main directions. On the one hand, the energy-density functional (EDF) theory was established, which presently encompasses (by enlarging the EDF framework) all the mean-field and beyond-mean-field theories based on energy functionals produced by effective phenomenological interactions. Highly sophisticated structure and reaction models are currently available for the treatment of medium-mass and heavy nuclei. On the other hand, effective field theories (EFTs) have rendered possible the formulation of QCD as a low-energy hadronic theory. Ab initio methods have recently achieved remarkable success in the application of EFT or EFT-inspired potentials to structure analyses of light nuclei. Different but complementary competences have been developed during the past few decades in the EDF and EFT communities. Bridges and connections have in some cases been identified and constructed. We review here some of the developments that have been performed within the EDF theory and the EFT during recent years, with some emphasis on analogies and connections that may one day provide a unified picture of the two theories. Illustrations are given for infinite matter and finite nuclei.

  15. Effects of Nuclear Interactions in Space Radiation Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Zi-Wei; Barghouty, A. F.

    2004-01-01

    Space radiation transport codes have been developed to calculate radiation effects behind materials in human missions to the Moon, Mars or beyond. We study how nuclear fragmentation processes affect predictions from such radiation transport codes. In particular, we investigate the effects of fragmentation cross sections at different energies on fluxes, dose and dose-equivalent from galactic cosmic rays behind typical shielding materials.

  16. Effects of Nuclear Interactions in Space Radiation Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Zi-Wei; Barghouty, A. F.

    2005-01-01

    Space radiation transport codes have been developed to calculate radiation effects behind materials in human mission to the Moon, Mars or beyond. We study how nuclear fragmentation processes affect predictions from such radiation transport codes. In particular, we investigate the effects of fragmentation cross sections at different energies on fluxes, dose and dose-equivalent from galactic cosmic rays behind typical shielding materials.

  17. Thermal effects on nuclear symmetry energy with a momentum-dependent effective interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Moustakidis, Ch. C.

    2007-08-15

    The knowledge of the nuclear symmetry energy of hot neutron-rich matter is important for understanding the dynamical evolution of massive stars and the supernova explosion mechanisms. In particular, the electron capture rate on nuclei and/or free protons in presupernova explosions is especially sensitive to the symmetry energy at finite temperature. In view of the above, in the present work we calculate the symmetry energy as a function of the temperature for various values of the baryon density by applying a momentum-dependent effective interaction. In addition to a previous work, the thermal effects are studied separately both in the kinetic part and the interaction part of the symmetry energy. We focus also on the calculations of the mean-field potential, employed extensively in heavy-ion reaction research, both for nuclear and pure neutron matter. The proton fraction and the electron chemical potential, which are crucial quantities for representing the thermal evolution of supernova and neutron stars, are calculated for various values of the temperature. Finally, we construct a temperature dependent equation of state of {beta}-stable nuclear matter, the basic ingredient for the evaluation of the neutron star properties.

  18. Icelandic basaltic geothermal field: A natural analog for nuclear waste isolation in basalt

    SciTech Connect

    Ulmer, G.C.; Grandstaff, D.E. . Dept. of Geology)

    1984-11-21

    Analog studies of Icelandic geothermal fields have shown that the design of nuclear waste repositories in basalt can benefit by comparison to the data base already available from the development of these geothermal fields. A high degree of similarity exists between these two systems: their petrology, groundwater geochemistry, mineral solubilities, hydrologic parameters, temperature ranges, water-rock redox equilibria, hydrothermal pH values, and secondary mineralogies all show considerable overlap in the range of values. The experimentally-simulated hydrothermal studies of the basaltic nuclear waste repository rocks have, at this time, produced a data base that receives a strong confirmation from the Icelandic analog. Furthermore, the Icelandic analog should eventually be employed to extrapolate into higher and lower temperatures, into longer time-base chemical comparisons, and into more realistic mineral deposition studies, than have been possible in the laboratory evaluations of the nuclear waste repository designs. This eventual use of the Icelandic analog will require cooperative work with the Icelandic Geological Survey. 46 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. Nuclear classical dynamics of H2 in an intense laser field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sami, Firoozeh; Vafaee, Mohsen; Shokri, Babak

    2011-08-01

    In the first part of this paper, the different distinguishable pathways and regions of the single and sequential double ionization are determined and discussed. It is shown that there are two distinguishable pathways for the single ionization and four distinct pathways for the sequential double ionization. It is also shown that there are two and three different regions of space which are related to the single and double ionization, respectively. In the second part of the paper, the time-dependent Schrödinger and Newton equations are solved simultaneously for the electrons and the nuclei of H2, respectively. The electron and nuclei dynamics are separated on the basis of the adiabatic approximation. The soft-core potential is used to model the electrostatic interaction between the electrons and the nuclei. A variety of wavelengths (390, 532 and 780 nm) and intensities (5 × 1014 and 5 × 1015 W cm-2) of the ultrashort intense laser pulses with a sinus second-order envelope function are used. The behaviour of the time-dependent classical nuclear dynamics in the absence and presence of the laser field is investigated and compared. In the absence of the laser field, there are three distinct sections for the nuclear dynamics on the electronic ground state energy curve. The bond hardening phenomenon does not appear in this classical nuclear dynamics simulation.

  20. The Nuclear Weapons Effects National Enterprise

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-06-01

    of underground testing. The approach should take advantage of advances in both aboveground simulators and high performance computing developed as...exposure to natural and man-made environments. As a result, they must be designed, fielded, and operated to mitigate or insulate operators and operations...and electromagnetic radiation. As an example, the earth, its people, and man-made creations are subjected to cosmic radiation—that is, extremely high

  1. Radioactive fallout from nuclear weapons. A review of airborne transport, effects and measures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergman, R.; Lindqvist, S.; Johansson, L.; Schelin, O.; Lagerstedt, O.; Edvarson, K.; Finck, R.; Danielson, G.

    1983-02-01

    The state of the art of radioactive fallout problems in Sweden was reviewed. Consequences of various fallout situations for the population are stressed, and information directed towards authorities involved in the planning for protective actions is given. The study emphasizes fallout caused by nuclear explosions outside Swedish territory, i.e., when Sweden is not directly involved in a nuclear war. Distribution and properties of fallout fields are described. Radiation effects on man from external sources as well as internal sources are considered. Consequences for agriculture and food production are investigated. Radiation sensitive materials such as electronic components are discussed, as well as possible protective actions.

  2. 1987 Annual Conference on Nuclear and Space Radiation Effects, Snowmass Village, CO, July 28-31, 1987, Proceedings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    Various papers on nuclear and space radiation effects are presented. The general topics addressed include: basic mechanisms of radiation effects, single-event phenomena, temperature and field effects, modeling and characterization of radiation effects, IC radiation effects and hardening, and EMP/SGEMP/IEMP phenomena. Also considered are: dosimetry/energy-dependent effects, sensors in and for radiation environments, spacecraft charging and space radiation effects, radiation effects and devices, radiation effects on isolation technologies, and hardness assurance and testing techniques.

  3. Effect of the Fukushima nuclear accident on the risk perception of residents near a nuclear power plant in China.

    PubMed

    Huang, Lei; Zhou, Ying; Han, Yuting; Hammitt, James K; Bi, Jun; Liu, Yang

    2013-12-03

    We assessed the influence of the Fukushima nuclear accident (FNA) on the Chinese public's attitude and acceptance of nuclear power plants in China. Two surveys (before and after the FNA) were administered to separate subsamples of residents near the Tianwan nuclear power plant in Lianyungang, China. A structural equation model was constructed to describe the public acceptance of nuclear power and four risk perception factors: knowledge, perceived risk, benefit, and trust. Regression analysis was conducted to estimate the relationship between acceptance of nuclear power and the risk perception factors while controlling for demographic variables. Meanwhile, we assessed the median public acceptable frequencies for three levels of nuclear events. The FNA had a significant impact on risk perception of the Chinese public, especially on the factor of perceived risk, which increased from limited risk to great risk. Public acceptance of nuclear power decreased significantly after the FNA. The most sensitive groups include females, those not in public service, those with lower income, and those living close to the Tianwan nuclear power plant. Fifty percent of the survey respondents considered it acceptable to have a nuclear anomaly no more than once in 50 y. For nuclear incidents and serious incidents, the frequencies are once in 100 y and 150 y, respectively. The change in risk perception and acceptance may be attributed to the FNA. Decreased acceptance of nuclear power after the FNA among the Chinese public creates additional obstacles to further development of nuclear power in China and require effective communication strategies.

  4. Effect of the Fukushima nuclear accident on the risk perception of residents near a nuclear power plant in China

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Lei; Zhou, Ying; Han, Yuting; Hammitt, James K.; Bi, Jun; Liu, Yang

    2013-01-01

    We assessed the influence of the Fukushima nuclear accident (FNA) on the Chinese public’s attitude and acceptance of nuclear power plants in China. Two surveys (before and after the FNA) were administered to separate subsamples of residents near the Tianwan nuclear power plant in Lianyungang, China. A structural equation model was constructed to describe the public acceptance of nuclear power and four risk perception factors: knowledge, perceived risk, benefit, and trust. Regression analysis was conducted to estimate the relationship between acceptance of nuclear power and the risk perception factors while controlling for demographic variables. Meanwhile, we assessed the median public acceptable frequencies for three levels of nuclear events. The FNA had a significant impact on risk perception of the Chinese public, especially on the factor of perceived risk, which increased from limited risk to great risk. Public acceptance of nuclear power decreased significantly after the FNA. The most sensitive groups include females, those not in public service, those with lower income, and those living close to the Tianwan nuclear power plant. Fifty percent of the survey respondents considered it acceptable to have a nuclear anomaly no more than once in 50 y. For nuclear incidents and serious incidents, the frequencies are once in 100 y and 150 y, respectively. The change in risk perception and acceptance may be attributed to the FNA. Decreased acceptance of nuclear power after the FNA among the Chinese public creates additional obstacles to further development of nuclear power in China and require effective communication strategies. PMID:24248341

  5. Storage of nuclear magnetization as long-lived singlet order in low magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Pileio, Giuseppe; Carravetta, Marina; Levitt, Malcolm H

    2010-10-05

    Hyperpolarized nuclear states provide NMR signals enhanced by many orders of magnitude, with numerous potential applications to analytical NMR, in vivo NMR, and NMR imaging. However, the lifetime of hyperpolarized magnetization is normally limited by the relaxation time constant T(1), which lies in the range of milliseconds to minutes, apart from in exceptional cases. In many cases, the lifetime of the hyperpolarized state may be enhanced by converting the magnetization into nuclear singlet order, where it is protected against many common relaxation mechanisms. However, all current methods for converting magnetization into singlet order require the use of a high-field, high-homogeneity NMR magnet, which is incompatible with most hyperpolarization procedures. We demonstrate a new method for converting magnetization into singlet order and back again. The new technique is suitable for magnetically inequivalent spin-pair systems in weak and inhomogeneous magnetic fields, and is compatible with known hyperpolarization technology. The method involves audio-frequency pulsed irradiation at the low-field nuclear Larmor frequency, employing coupling-synchronized trains of 180° pulses to induce singlet-triplet transitions. The echo trains are used as building blocks for a pulse sequence called M2S that transforms longitudinal magnetization into long-lived singlet order. The time-reverse of the pulse sequence, called S2M, converts singlet order back into longitudinal magnetization. The method is demonstrated on a solution of (15)N-labeled nitrous oxide. The magnetization is stored in low magnetic field for over 30 min, even though the T(1) is less than 3 min under the same conditions.

  6. Storage of nuclear magnetization as long-lived singlet order in low magnetic field

    PubMed Central

    Pileio, Giuseppe; Carravetta, Marina; Levitt, Malcolm H.

    2010-01-01

    Hyperpolarized nuclear states provide NMR signals enhanced by many orders of magnitude, with numerous potential applications to analytical NMR, in vivo NMR, and NMR imaging. However, the lifetime of hyperpolarized magnetization is normally limited by the relaxation time constant T1, which lies in the range of milliseconds to minutes, apart from in exceptional cases. In many cases, the lifetime of the hyperpolarized state may be enhanced by converting the magnetization into nuclear singlet order, where it is protected against many common relaxation mechanisms. However, all current methods for converting magnetization into singlet order require the use of a high-field, high-homogeneity NMR magnet, which is incompatible with most hyperpolarization procedures. We demonstrate a new method for converting magnetization into singlet order and back again. The new technique is suitable for magnetically inequivalent spin-pair systems in weak and inhomogeneous magnetic fields, and is compatible with known hyperpolarization technology. The method involves audio-frequency pulsed irradiation at the low-field nuclear Larmor frequency, employing coupling-synchronized trains of 180° pulses to induce singlet–triplet transitions. The echo trains are used as building blocks for a pulse sequence called M2S that transforms longitudinal magnetization into long-lived singlet order. The time-reverse of the pulse sequence, called S2M, converts singlet order back into longitudinal magnetization. The method is demonstrated on a solution of 15N-labeled nitrous oxide. The magnetization is stored in low magnetic field for over 30 min, even though the T1 is less than 3 min under the same conditions. PMID:20855584

  7. Deep-Earth reactor: Nuclear fission, helium, and the geomagnetic field

    PubMed Central

    Hollenbach, D. F.; Herndon, J. M.

    2001-01-01

    Geomagnetic field reversals and changes in intensity are understandable from an energy standpoint as natural consequences of intermittent and/or variable nuclear fission chain reactions deep within the Earth. Moreover, deep-Earth production of helium, having 3He/4He ratios within the range observed from deep-mantle sources, is demonstrated to be a consequence of nuclear fission. Numerical simulations of a planetary-scale geo-reactor were made by using the SCALE sequence of codes. The results clearly demonstrate that such a geo-reactor (i) would function as a fast-neutron fuel breeder reactor; (ii) could, under appropriate conditions, operate over the entire period of geologic time; and (iii) would function in such a manner as to yield variable and/or intermittent output power. PMID:11562483

  8. Deep-Earth reactor: Nuclear fission, helium, and the geomagnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hollenbach, D. F.; Herndon, J. M.

    2001-09-01

    Geomagnetic field reversals and changes in intensity are understandable from an energy standpoint as natural consequences of intermittent and/or variable nuclear fission chain reactions deep within the Earth. Moreover, deep-Earth production of helium, having 3He/4He ratios within the range observed from deep-mantle sources, is demonstrated to be a consequence of nuclear fission. Numerical simulations of a planetary-scale geo-reactor were made by using the SCALE sequence of codes. The results clearly demonstrate that such a geo-reactor (i) would function as a fast-neutron fuel breeder reactor; (ii) could, under appropriate conditions, operate over the entire period of geologic time; and (iii) would function in such a manner as to yield variable and/or intermittent output power.

  9. Deep-Earth reactor: nuclear fission, helium, and the geomagnetic field.

    PubMed

    Hollenbach, D F; Herndon, J M

    2001-09-25

    Geomagnetic field reversals and changes in intensity are understandable from an energy standpoint as natural consequences of intermittent and/or variable nuclear fission chain reactions deep within the Earth. Moreover, deep-Earth production of helium, having (3)He/(4)He ratios within the range observed from deep-mantle sources, is demonstrated to be a consequence of nuclear fission. Numerical simulations of a planetary-scale geo-reactor were made by using the SCALE sequence of codes. The results clearly demonstrate that such a geo-reactor (i) would function as a fast-neutron fuel breeder reactor; (ii) could, under appropriate conditions, operate over the entire period of geologic time; and (iii) would function in such a manner as to yield variable and/or intermittent output power.

  10. Effect of Nuclear Radiation on Materials at Cryogenic Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwanbeck, C. A.

    1965-01-01

    The tensile properties for 33 polycrystalline structural materials including aluminum, titanium, nickel and iron alloys were obtained at -256.5 C (30 deg R) after irradiation exposure at this temperature to 10(exp 17) nvt (E greater than 0.5 Mev), at -256.5 C without previous irradiation, and at approximately 27 C (540 deg R) without previous irradiation. The data were evaluated statistically to permit identification of cryogenic effects and nuclear-cryogenic effects. A number of conclusions were drawn regarding suitability of certain of the materials for use in nuclear-cryogenic applications and regarding the need for further investigation.

  11. Speed of sound in nuclear matter and Skyrme effective interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Su, R.K.; Kuo, T.T.S.

    1987-02-01

    Using a nuclear equation of state derived from a finite-temperature Green's function method and the Skyrme effective interactions SkI, SkIII and SkM*, the authors have calculated the speed of sound in symmetric nuclear matter. For certain densities and temperatures, this speed is found to become super-luminous. Causal boundaries in the density-temperature plane are determined, and they indicate that SkM* is a more desirable effective interaction than SkI and SkIII. Comparison with a similar calculation by Osnes and Strottman is made.

  12. Direct mapping of nuclear shell effects in the heaviest elements.

    PubMed

    Minaya Ramirez, E; Ackermann, D; Blaum, K; Block, M; Droese, C; Düllmann, Ch E; Dworschak, M; Eibach, M; Eliseev, S; Haettner, E; Herfurth, F; Heßberger, F P; Hofmann, S; Ketelaer, J; Marx, G; Mazzocco, M; Nesterenko, D; Novikov, Yu N; Plaß, W R; Rodríguez, D; Scheidenberger, C; Schweikhard, L; Thirolf, P G; Weber, C

    2012-09-07

    Quantum-mechanical shell effects are expected to strongly enhance nuclear binding on an "island of stability" of superheavy elements. The predicted center at proton number Z = 114, 120, or 126 and neutron number N = 184 has been substantiated by the recent synthesis of new elements up to Z = 118. However, the location of the center and the extension of the island of stability remain vague. High-precision mass spectrometry allows the direct measurement of nuclear binding energies and thus the determination of the strength of shell effects. Here, we present such measurements for nobelium and lawrencium isotopes, which also pin down the deformed shell gap at N = 152.

  13. 76 FR 55137 - Monitoring the Effectiveness of Maintenance at Nuclear Power Plants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-06

    ... COMMISSION Monitoring the Effectiveness of Maintenance at Nuclear Power Plants AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory..., ``Monitoring the Effectiveness of Maintenance at Nuclear Power Plants.'' This guide endorses Revision 4A to... Effectiveness of Maintenance at Nuclear Power Plants,'' which provides methods that are acceptable to the NRC...

  14. 76 FR 65753 - Monitoring the Effectiveness of Maintenance at Nuclear Power Plants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-24

    ... COMMISSION Monitoring the Effectiveness of Maintenance at Nuclear Power Plants AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory..., ``Monitoring the Effectiveness of Maintenance at Nuclear Power Plants,'' in the Federal Register for a 60 day... (NUMARC) 93-01, ``Industry Guideline for Monitoring the Effectiveness of Maintenance at Nuclear Power...

  15. Monitoring of organic contaminants in sediments using low field proton nuclear magnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chi; Rupert, Yuri

    2016-04-01

    The effective monitoring of soils and groundwater contaminated with organic compounds is an important goal of many environmental restoration efforts. Recent geophysical methods such as electrical resistivity, complex conductivity, and ground penetrating radar have been successfully applied to characterize organic contaminants in the subsurface and to monitor remediation process both in laboratory and in field. Low field proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is a geophysical tool sensitive to the molecular-scale physical and chemical environment of hydrogen-bearing fluids in geological materials and shows promise as a novel method for monitoring contaminant remediation. This laboratory research focuses on measurements on synthetic samples to determine the sensitivity of NMR to the presence of organic contaminants and improve understanding of relationships between NMR observables, hydrological properties of the sediments, and amount and state of contaminants in porous media. Toluene, a light non-aqueous phase liquid (LNAPL) has been selected as a representative organic contaminant. Three types of porous media (pure silica sands, montmorillonite clay, and various sand-clay mixtures with different sand/clay ratios) were prepared as synthetic sediments. NMR relaxation time (T2) and diffusion-relaxation (D - T2) correlation measurements were performed in each sediment saturated with water and toluene mixed fluid at assorted concentrations (0% toluene and 100% water, 1% toluene and 99% water, 5% toluene and 95% water, 25% toluene and 75% water, and 100% toluene and 0% water) to 1) understand the effect of different porous media on the NMR responses in each fluid mixture, 2) investigate the role of clay content on T2 relaxation of each fluid, 3) quantify the amount hydrocarbons in the presence of water in each sediment, and 4) resolve hydrocarbons from water in D - T2 map. Relationships between the compositions of porous media, hydrocarbon concentration, and hydraulic

  16. Quantum Monte Carlo calculations with chiral effective field theory interactions.

    PubMed

    Gezerlis, A; Tews, I; Epelbaum, E; Gandolfi, S; Hebeler, K; Nogga, A; Schwenk, A

    2013-07-19

    We present the first quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) calculations with chiral effective field theory (EFT) interactions. To achieve this, we remove all sources of nonlocality, which hamper the inclusion in QMC calculations, in nuclear forces to next-to-next-to-leading order. We perform auxiliary-field diffusion Monte Carlo (AFDMC) calculations for the neutron matter energy up to saturation density based on local leading-order, next-to-leading order, and next-to-next-to-leading order nucleon-nucleon interactions. Our results exhibit a systematic order-by-order convergence in chiral EFT and provide nonperturbative benchmarks with theoretical uncertainties. For the softer interactions, perturbative calculations are in excellent agreement with the AFDMC results. This work paves the way for QMC calculations with systematic chiral EFT interactions for nuclei and nuclear matter, for testing the perturbativeness of different orders, and allows for matching to lattice QCD results by varying the pion mass.

  17. The nuclear Overhauser effect from a quantitative perspective.

    PubMed

    Vögeli, Beat

    2014-04-01

    The nuclear Overhauser enhancement or effect (NOE) is the most important measure in liquid-state NMR with macromolecules. Thus, the NOE is the subject of numerous reviews and books. Here, the NOE is revisited in light of our recently introduced measurements of exact nuclear Overhauser enhancements (eNOEs), which enabled the determination of multiple-state 3D protein structures. This review encompasses all relevant facets from the theoretical considerations to the use of eNOEs in multiple-state structure calculation. Important aspects include a detailed presentation of the relaxation theory relevant for the nuclear Overhauser effect, the estimation of the correction for spin diffusion, the experimental determination of the eNOEs, the conversion of eNOE rates into distances and validation of their quality, the distance-restraint classification and the protocols for calculation of structures and ensembles. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Effects of Nuclear Interactions on Accuracy of Space Radiation Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Zi-Wei; Barghouty, A. F.

    2005-01-01

    Space radiation risk to astronauts and electronic equipments is one major obstacle in long term human space explorations. Space radiation transport codes have been developed to calculate radiation effects behind materials in human missions to the Moon, Mars or beyond. We study how nuclear fragmentation processes affect the accuracy of predictions from such radiation transport. In particular, we investigate the effects of fragmentation cross sections at different energies on fluxes, dose and dose-equivalent from galactic cosmic rays behind typical shielding materials. These results tell us at what energies nuclear cross sections are the most important for radiation risk evaluations, and how uncertainties in our knowledge about nuclear fragmentations relate to uncertainties in space transport predictions.

  19. Effects of Nuclear Interactions on Accuracy of Space Radiation Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Zi-Wei; Barghouty, A. F.

    2005-01-01

    Space radiation risk to astronauts and electronic equipments is one major obstacle in long term human space explorations. Space radiation transport codes have been developed to calculate radiation effects behind materials in human missions to the Moon, Mars or beyond. We study how nuclear fragmentation processes affect the accuracy of predictions from such radiation transport. In particular, we investigate the effects of fragmentation cross sections at different energies on fluxes, dose and dose-equivalent from galactic cosmic rays behind typical shielding materials. These results tell us at what energies nuclear cross sections are the most important for radiation risk evaluations, and how uncertainties in our knowledge about nuclear fragmentations relate to uncertainties in space transport predictions.

  20. Characterisation of radiation field for irradiation of biological samples at nuclear reactor-comparison of twin detector and recombination methods.

    PubMed

    Golnik, N; Gryziński, M A; Kowalska, M; Meronka, K; Tulik, P

    2014-10-01

    Central Laboratory for Radiological Protection is involved in achieving scientific project on biological dosimetry. The project includes irradiation of blood samples in radiation fields of nuclear reactor. A simple facility for irradiation of biological samples has been prepared at horizontal channel of the nuclear reactor MARIA in NCBJ in Poland. The radiation field, composed mainly of gamma radiation and thermal neutrons, has been characterised in terms of tissue kerma using twin-detector technique and recombination chambers.

  1. Uncertainty quantification of effective nuclear interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Pérez, R. Navarro; Amaro, J. E.; Arriola, E. Ruiz

    2016-03-02

    We give a brief review on the development of phenomenological NN interactions and the corresponding quanti cation of statistical uncertainties. We look into the uncertainty of effective interactions broadly used in mean eld calculations through the Skyrme parameters and effective eld theory counter-terms by estimating both statistical and systematic uncertainties stemming from the NN interaction. We also comment on the role played by different tting strategies on the light of recent developments.

  2. The development of the time dependence of the nuclear EMP electric field

    SciTech Connect

    Eng, C

    2009-10-30

    The nuclear electromagnetic pulse (EMP) electric field calculated with the legacy code CHAP is compared with the field given by an integral solution of Maxwell's equations, also known as the Jefimenko equation, to aid our current understanding on the factors that affect the time dependence of the EMP. For a fair comparison the CHAP current density is used as a source in the Jefimenko equation. At first, the comparison is simplified by neglecting the conduction current and replacing the standard atmosphere with a constant density air slab. The simplicity of the resultant current density aids in determining the factors that affect the rise, peak and tail of the EMP electric field versus time. The three dimensional nature of the radiating source, i.e. sources off the line-of-sight, and the time dependence of the derivative of the current density with respect to time are found to play significant roles in shaping the EMP electric field time dependence. These results are found to hold even when the conduction current and the standard atmosphere are properly accounted for. Comparison of the CHAP electric field with the Jefimenko electric field offers a direct validation of the high-frequency/outgoing wave approximation.

  3. A new application of the phase-field method for understanding the mechanisms of nuclear architecture reorganization.

    PubMed

    Lee, S Seirin; Tashiro, S; Awazu, A; Kobayashi, R

    2017-01-01

    Specific features of nuclear architecture are important for the functional organization of the nucleus, and chromatin consists of two forms, heterochromatin and euchromatin. Conventional nuclear architecture is observed when heterochromatin is enriched at nuclear periphery, and it represents the primary structure in the majority of eukaryotic cells, including the rod cells of diurnal mammals. In contrast to this, inverted nuclear architecture is observed when the heterochromatin is distributed at the center of the nucleus, which occurs in the rod cells of nocturnal mammals. The inverted architecture found in the rod cells of the adult mouse is formed through the reorganization of conventional architecture during terminal differentiation. Although a previous experimental approach has demonstrated the relationship between these two nuclear architecture types at the molecular level, the mechanisms underlying long-range reorganization processes remain unknown. The details of nuclear structures and their spatial and temporal dynamics remain to be elucidated. Therefore, a comprehensive approach, using mathematical modeling, is required, in order to address these questions. Here, we propose a new mathematical approach to the understanding of nuclear architecture dynamics using the phase-field method. We successfully recreated the process of nuclear architecture reorganization, and showed that it is robustly induced by physical features, independent of a specific genotype. Our study demonstrates the potential of phase-field method application in the life science fields.

  4. Effective field theory description of halo nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammer, H.-W.; Ji, C.; Phillips, D. R.

    2017-10-01

    Nuclear halos emerge as new degrees of freedom near the neutron and proton driplines. They consist of a core and one or a few nucleons which spend most of their time in the classically-forbidden region outside the range of the interaction. Individual nucleons inside the core are thus unresolved in the halo configuration, and the low-energy effective interactions are short-range forces between the core and the valence nucleons. Similar phenomena occur in clusters of 4He atoms, cold atomic gases near a Feshbach resonance, and some exotic hadrons. In these weakly-bound quantum systems universal scaling laws for s-wave binding emerge that are independent of the details of the interaction. Effective field theory (EFT) exposes these correlations and permits the calculation of non-universal corrections to them due to short-distance effects, as well as the extension of these ideas to systems involving the Coulomb interaction and/or binding in higher angular-momentum channels. Halo nuclei exhibit all these features. Halo EFT, the EFT for halo nuclei, has been used to compute the properties of single-neutron, two-neutron, and single-proton halos of s-wave and p-wave type. This review summarizes these results for halo binding energies, radii, Coulomb dissociation, and radiative capture, as well as the connection of these properties to scattering parameters, thereby elucidating the universal correlations between all these observables. We also discuss how Halo EFT's encoding of the long-distance physics of halo nuclei can be used to check and extend ab initio calculations that include detailed modeling of their short-distance dynamics.

  5. Isotropic proton-detected local-field nuclear magnetic resonancein solids

    SciTech Connect

    Havlin, Robert H.; Walls, Jamie D.; Pines, Alexander

    2004-08-04

    A new nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) method is presented which produces linear, isotropic proton-detected local-field spectra for InS spin systems in powdered samples. The method, HETeronuclear Isotropic Evolution (HETIE), refocuses the anisotropic portion of the heteronuclear dipolar coupling frequencies by evolving the system under a series of specially designed Hamiltonians and evolution pathways. The theory behind HETIE is represented along with experimental studies conducted on a powdered sample of ferrocene, demonstrating the methodology outlined in this paper. Applications of HETIE for structural determination in solid-state NMR are discussed.

  6. Enhancement of nuclear magnetic resonance in microtesla magnetic field with prepolarization field detected with high-Tc superconducting quantum interference device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Hong-Chang; Liao, Shu-Hsien; Horng, Herng-Er; Kuo, Shing-Ling; Chen, Hsin-Hsien; Yang, S. Y.

    2006-06-01

    We applied prepolarization field and high-Tc superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) detector to enhance nuclear magnetic resonance signal in a microtesla magnetic field. The minimum measuring magnetic field is 8.9μT at which the proton resonance frequency is 380Hz. The specificity instrumentation and the difficulty of using a high-Tc SQUID with prepolarization field were investigated. We applied gradient field to perform one-dimensional proton imaging in a microtesla magnetic field. Additionally, low field high-Tc SQUID-based NMR systems are promising in biomagnetic research due to its use, for example, in imaging with hyperpolarized noble gas.

  7. Free-field ground motions for the nonproliferation experiment: Preliminary comparisons with nearby nuclear events

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, K.H.; Peratt, A.L.

    1994-06-01

    Since 1987, we have installed fixed arrays of tri-axial accelerometers in the fire-field near the shot horizons for low-yield ({le} 20 kt) nuclear events in the N-tunnel complex beneath Rainier Mesa. For the Nonproliferation Experiment (NPE) we augmented the array to achieve 23 free-field stations. Goals are: (a) to examine robustness and stability of various free-field source function estimates -- e.g., reduced displacement potentials (RDP) and spectra; (b) to compare close-in with regional estimates to test whether detailed close-in free-field and/or surface ground motion data can improve predictability of regional-teleseismic source functions; (c) to provide experimental data for checking two-dimensional numerical simulations. We report preliminary comparisons between experimental free-field data for NPE (1993) and three nearby nuclear events (MISTY ECHO, 1988; MINERAL QUARRY, 1990; HUNTERS TROPHY, 1992). All four working points are within 1 km of each other in the same wet tuff bed, thus reducing concerns about possible large differences in material properties between widely separated shots. Initial comparison of acceleration and velocity seismograms for the four events reveals: (1) There is a large departure from the spherical symmetry commonly assumed in analytic treatments of source theory; both vertical and tangential components are surprisingly large. (2) All shots show similar first-peak particle-velocity amplitude decay rates suggesting significant attenuation even in the supposedly purely elastic region. (3) Sharp (>20 Hz) arrivals are not observed at tunnel level from near-surface pP reflections or spall-closure sources -- but broadened peaks are seen that suggest more diffuse reflected energy from the surface and from the Paleozoic limestone basement below tunnel level.

  8. Effect of organics on nuclear cycles. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Riddle, J.M.

    1992-07-01

    Organics entering the nuclear cycle undergo hydrolysis or radiolysis and form carboxylic acids, acetic, formic, and propionic acids being the most prominent. Sequestered sulfur, halogens, metal species, and silica may also be released. The corrosion effects of halogens and sulfate are reasonably well understood. Historically, organic acids at low levels (e.g., 10 to 50 ppb) in nuclear cycles have been viewed as a nuisance or as potentially detrimental. This study reviews literature references of the effects of organics in nuclear cycles. Sources of organics and corrosion effects on plant materials are given from various references. Acetate can neutralize caustic in PWR steam generator crevices, whereas formate and oxalate as sodium salts can decompose to sodium carbonate. Sodium carbonate in crevices hydrolyzes to carbon dioxide and sodium hydroxide, which promotes SCC and IGA of Alloy 600. Formate and oxalate can act as oxygen scavengers in the BWR cycle and mitigate IGSCC of austenitic stainless steel. No firm evidence exists that organic acids have caused corrosion in turbines, piping, or heat exchangers in nuclear cycles, although organic acids at high levels can cause specific corrosion effects as a result of low pH.

  9. Dynamical effects in the Coulomb expansion following nuclear fragmentation

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, K.C.; Donangelo, R.; Schechter, H.

    1987-09-01

    The effects of the Coulomb expansion on the fragment kinetic energy spectrum for a fragmentating hot nuclear system is investigated. In particular, /sup 12/C-fragment spectra are calculated and compared with those predicted by the uniform expansion approximation. The results indicate that the energy spectra of fragments are quite sensitive to the details of the Coulomb expansion treatment.

  10. Nuclear Quantum Effects in Different Ice Phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez-Serra, Marivi; Pamuk, Betul; Allen, Philip B.

    We have previously explained that the anomalous isotope effect in hexagonal ices is liked to the anticorrelation between the covalent OH bond and the hydrogen bond by using the quasiharmonic approximation combined with ab initio density functional theory. In this study, we show that similar physics plays a role in the isotope effect on temperature of the proton-order/disorder phase transition between ice XI and iceIh. By using a van der Waals density functional, we calculate a temperature difference between heavy and light ices of 6 K as compared to the experimental value of 4 K. Furthermore, we extend our study to analyze the zero-point effects in different ice phases and ice-like structures with different densities and crystal structures to understand how this can be linked to the anomalous isotope effect in liquid water. This work is supported by DOE Grants No. DE-FG02-09ER16052, No. DE-SC0003871 (M.V.F.S.), and No. DE-FG02-08ER46550 (P.B.A.) and the grant FIS2012-37549-C05 from the Spanish Ministry of Economy and Competitiveness.

  11. Exploring nuclear effects in neutrino interactions with MINERvA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osmanov, B.; Minerva Collaboration

    2012-08-01

    With the new era of neutrino-oscillation experiments, it becomes crucially important to know the neutrino interaction cross-sections with a high precision. This is the primary scientific aim of MINERvA experiment located in Fermilab. Another task is to examine the nuclear medium effects in neutrino-induced interactions such as final state modifications in the nucleus. The MINERvA collaboration has all the necessary tools in hand to achieve the above-stated goals: high-intensity neutrino beam, fine-granulated detector with EM and hadron calorimetry regions, various integrated nuclear targets and high-statistics event sample.

  12. Effects of nuclear isolation on psoralen affinity for chromatin

    SciTech Connect

    Inadomi, T.; Ross, P.M. )

    1989-09-29

    We have tested the effects of nuclear isolation on intercalation of TMP (a psoralen) at specific sequences and in total DNA of cultured human cells. DNA in nuclei photobound about 20% more TMP than in cells and about 10% as much as purified DNA. In contrast, a transcribed ras gene and a randomly selected polymorphic sequence each bound about 20% more TMP than total DNA in cells. However, in nuclei, as in purified DNA, both sequences were just as sensitive as total DNA. Apparently, chromatin in cells exists within diverse TMP-binding environments and some of this diversity was lost upon nuclear isolation.

  13. One-thousand-fold enhancement of high field liquid nuclear magnetic resonance signals at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guoquan; Levien, Marcel; Karschin, Niels; Parigi, Giacomo; Luchinat, Claudio; Bennati, Marina

    2017-07-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is a fundamental spectroscopic technique for the study of biological systems and materials, molecular imaging and the analysis of small molecules. It detects interactions at very low energies and is thus non-invasive and applicable to a variety of targets, including animals and humans. However, one of its most severe limitations is its low sensitivity, which stems from the small interaction energies involved. Here, we report that dynamic nuclear polarization in liquid solution and at room temperature can enhance the NMR signal of (13)C nuclei by up to three orders of magnitude at magnetic fields of ∼3 T. The experiment can be repeated within seconds for signal averaging, without interfering with the sample magnetic homogeneity. The method is therefore compatible with the conditions required for high-resolution NMR. Enhancement of (13)C signals on various organic compounds opens up new perspectives for dynamic nuclear polarization as a general tool to increase the sensitivity of liquid NMR.

  14. Correlated electron-nuclear kinetic energy distribution following strong-field ionization of H2^+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madsen, C. B.; Anis, F.; Madsen, L. B.; Esry, B. D.

    2010-03-01

    Being the simplest molecule, understanding the behavior of H2^+ in a strong laser field helps to understand more complex molecules. Theoretically, however, it is challenging to account for both electronic and nuclear motion in the ionization of even this simple molecule. Accordingly, calculating correlated electron-nuclear physical observables --- such as energy or momentum distributions --- has rarely been accomplished. Such calculations are needed to interpret recent measurements of coincidence momentum distributions of electrons and ions following the ionization of molecules by short intense laser pulses. We study how the energy absorbed from an intense laser pulse (400--800 nm, ˜10^14 W/cm^2, >=10 cycles) is shared among the nuclei and the electron of H2^+ by calculating the 2D electron-nuclei momentum distribution for a 1D model with soft-core Coulomb interactions. These 2D momentum plots reveal multiphoton structure with the energy shared between the nuclei and electron. This structure survives integrating out the nuclear energy, but not integrating out the electronic energy. ^*Supported by the Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences Division, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Office of Science, U.S. DoE.

  15. One-thousand-fold enhancement of high field liquid nuclear magnetic resonance signals at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Guoquan; Levien, Marcel; Karschin, Niels; Parigi, Giacomo; Luchinat, Claudio; Bennati, Marina

    2017-07-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is a fundamental spectroscopic technique for the study of biological systems and materials, molecular imaging and the analysis of small molecules. It detects interactions at very low energies and is thus non-invasive and applicable to a variety of targets, including animals and humans. However, one of its most severe limitations is its low sensitivity, which stems from the small interaction energies involved. Here, we report that dynamic nuclear polarization in liquid solution and at room temperature can enhance the NMR signal of 13C nuclei by up to three orders of magnitude at magnetic fields of ∼3 T. The experiment can be repeated within seconds for signal averaging, without interfering with the sample magnetic homogeneity. The method is therefore compatible with the conditions required for high-resolution NMR. Enhancement of 13C signals on various organic compounds opens up new perspectives for dynamic nuclear polarization as a general tool to increase the sensitivity of liquid NMR.

  16. Proton Damage Effects on Carbon Nanotube Field-Effect Transistors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-19

    PROTON DAMAGE EFFECTS ON CARBON NANOTUBE FIELD-EFFECT TRANSISTORS THESIS Evan R. Kemp, Ctr...United States. AFIT-ENP-T-14-J-39 PROTON DAMAGE EFFECTS ON CARBON NANOTUBE FIELD-EFFECT TRANSISTORS THESIS Presented to...PROTON DAMAGE EFFECTS ON CARBON NANOTUBE FIELD-EFFECT TRANSISTORS Evan R. Kemp, BS Ctr, USAF Approved: // Signed

  17. Nuclear Effects in Neutrino Scattering at MINERvA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tice, Brian

    2014-09-01

    MINERvA is a neutrino cross section experiment in the NuMI beamline at Fermilab. The MINERvA detector employs fine-grained plastic scintillator (CH) for tracking and calorimetry, and is capable of reconstructing exclusive final states. The detector includes nuclear targets of carbon, iron, lead, liquid helium, and water, with which MINERvA can measure the nuclear dependence of neutrino interactions. Neutrino scattering measurements complement those done with charged leptons, because neutrino scattering directly probes axial structure and is sensitive to the deep inelastic structure function F3. In addition, precise neutrino-nucleus measurements will reduce the significant nuclear model uncertainties incurred by using heavy nuclear targets to obtain high statistics in neutrino experiments. Such nuclear effects include both changes to the interaction cross section and alterations to the final state products through their interactions in the target nucleus. These uncertainties have implications for the utilization of neutrino deep inelastic scattering data in fitting parton distribution functions and for the extraction of neutrino oscillation parameters. We present three recent results from MINERvA that address this need for better knowledge of nuclear effects in neutrino scattering. First, measurements of νμ and νμ quasielastic cross sections. Then, a measurement of charged pion production from inclusive νμ interactions. Lastly, the first measurements of inclusive νμ cross section ratios of carbon, iron, and lead to scintillator as functions of neutrino energy and Bjorken-x. MINERvA is a neutrino cross section experiment in the NuMI beamline at Fermilab. The MINERvA detector employs fine-grained plastic scintillator (CH) for tracking and calorimetry, and is capable of reconstructing exclusive final states. The detector includes nuclear targets of carbon, iron, lead, liquid helium, and water, with which MINERvA can measure the nuclear dependence of neutrino

  18. Interaction of Strain and Nuclear Spins in Silicon: Quadrupolar Effects on Ionized Donors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franke, David P.; Hrubesch, Florian M.; Künzl, Markus; Becker, Hans-Werner; Itoh, Kohei M.; Stutzmann, Martin; Hoehne, Felix; Dreher, Lukas; Brandt, Martin S.

    2015-07-01

    The nuclear spins of ionized donors in silicon have become an interesting quantum resource due to their very long coherence times. Their perfect isolation, however, comes at a price, since the absence of the donor electron makes the nuclear spin difficult to control. We demonstrate that the quadrupolar interaction allows us to effectively tune the nuclear magnetic resonance of ionized arsenic donors in silicon via strain and determine the two nonzero elements of the S tensor linking strain and electric field gradients in this material to S11=1.5 ×1022 V /m2 and S44=6 ×1022 V /m2 . We find a stronger benefit of dynamical decoupling on the coherence properties of transitions subject to first-order quadrupole shifts than on those subject to only second-order shifts and discuss applications of quadrupole physics including mechanical driving of magnetic resonance, cooling of mechanical resonators, and strain-mediated spin coupling.

  19. Characterization of Radiation Fields in Biological Shields of Nuclear Power Plants for Assessing Concrete Degradationa

    SciTech Connect

    Remec, Igor; Rosseel, Thomas M; Field, Kevin G; Le Pape, Yann

    2016-01-01

    Life extensions of nuclear power plants to 60 and potentially 80 years of operation have renewed interest in long-term material degradation. One material being considered is concrete, with a particular focus on radiation-induced effects. Based on the projected neutron fluence values (E > 0.1 MeV) in the concrete biological shields of the US pressurized water reactor fleet and the available data on radiation effects on concrete, some decrease in mechanical properties of concrete cannot be ruled out during extended operation beyond 60 years. An expansion of the irradiated concrete database and a reliable determination of relevant neutron fluence energy cutoff value are necessary to ensure reliable risk assessment for extended operation of nuclear power plants.

  20. Field Effect Transistor in Nanoscale

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-04-26

    PB Public Release 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Weakly coupled molecular junctions are quite active and important field of research as they...applied perturbations modify both the site charge densities as well as occupation probabilities of transport active channels, resulting in a quite...a searchable DoD database. Weakly coupled molecular junctions are quite active and important field of research as they exhibit various non

  1. Effect of topological defects on "nuclear pasta" observables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, A. S.; Berry, D. K.; Caplan, M. E.; Horowitz, C. J.; Lin, Z.

    2016-06-01

    Background: The "pasta" phase of nuclear matter may play an important role in the structure and evolution of neutron stars. Recent works suggest nuclear pasta has a high resistivity which could be explained by the presence of long-lived topological defects. The defects act as impurities that decrease thermal and electrical conductivity of the pasta. Purpose: To quantify how topological defects affect transport properties of nuclear pasta and estimate this effect using an impurity parameter Qimp. Methods: Contrast molecular dynamics simulations of up to 409 600 nucleons arranged in parallel nuclear pasta slabs (perfect pasta) with simulations of pasta slabs connected by topological defects (impure pasta). From these simulations we compare the viscosity and heat conductivity of perfect and impure pasta to obtain an effective impurity parameter Qimp due to the presence of defects. Results: Both the viscosity and thermal conductivity calculated for both perfect and impure pasta are anisotropic, peaking along directions perpendicular to the slabs and reaching a minimum close to zero parallel to them. In our 409 600 nucleon simulation topological defects connecting slabs of pasta reduce both the thermal conductivity and viscosity on average by about 37%. We estimate an effective impurity parameter due to the defects of order Qimp˜30 . Conclusions: Topological defects in the pasta phase of nuclear matter have an effect similar to impurities in a crystal lattice. The irregularities introduced by the defects reduce the thermal and electrical conductivities and the viscosity of the system. This effect can be parametrized by a large impurity parameter Qimp˜30 .

  2. Minireview: Biological effects of magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Villa, M.; Mustarelli, P. ); Caprotti, M. )

    1991-01-01

    The literature about the biological effects of magnetic fields is reviewed. The authors begin by discussing the weak and/or time variable fields, responsible for subtle changes in the circadian rhythms of superior animals, which are believed to be induced by same sort of resonant mechanism. The safety issues related with the strong magnetic fields and gradients generated by clinical NMR magnets are then considered. The last portion summarizes the debate about the biological effects of strong and uniform magnetic fields.

  3. Effective contact pairing forces from realistic calculations in infinite homogeneous nuclear matter

    SciTech Connect

    Chamel, N.

    2010-07-15

    Nonempirical effective contact pairing forces to be used in self-consistent mean-field calculations are presented. These pairing forces, constructed so as to reproduce exactly any given microscopic pairing gaps in infinite homogeneous nuclear matter for any isospin asymmetry, are given in analytical form. As a by-product, this work provides an analytical solution of the BCS gap equations which could be applied to describe various many-body systems.

  4. An epistemology of nuclear weapons effects

    SciTech Connect

    Cassel, C.

    1983-02-01

    A graphic and detailed model is presented of the aftereffects in the event of a one-megaton fusion bomb explosion over Portland, Oregon. The role of the physician, under circumstances in which there are massive injuries from the blast and firestorm but in which there are shortages in medical supplies and facilities, is discussed. Radiation sickness in shelter occupants would be a major problem as simple sanitation would become impossible. Effects which would destroy the ozone layer and the protection it provides from ultraviolet radiation are described. (JMT)

  5. Nuclear magnetic resonance study of changes induced by the energy of ultrasonic field in the lungs.

    PubMed

    Gaită, A; Andru-Vangheli, D; Nagy, I; Coman, M; Covlescu, H

    156 laboratory mice were exposed to ultrasonic (US) waves under 12 different conditions. After exposure to ultrasounds, the left lung of each animal was studied morphopathologically and then analysed by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The study emphasized the possibility of hemorrhagical lesions in the lung through US and the fact that both measurement techniques (for T1 and T2) are alike in sensitivity. The effect on the lung is depending on the intensity and time of exposure to US.

  6. New Methodology For Use in Rotating Field Nuclear MagneticResonance

    SciTech Connect

    Jachmann, Rebecca C.

    2007-01-01

    High-resolution NMR spectra of samples with anisotropicbroadening are simplified to their isotropic spectra by fast rotation ofthe sample at the magic angle 54.7 circ. This dissertation concerns thedevelopment of novel Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) methodologies basedwhich would rotate the magnetic field instead of the sample, rotatingfield NMR. It provides an over of the NMR concepts, procedures, andexperiments needed to understand the methodologies that will be used forrotating field NMR. A simple two-dimensional shimming method based onharmonic corrector rings which can provide arbitrary multiple ordershimming corrections were developed for rotating field systems, but couldbe used in shimming other systems as well. Those results demonstrate, forexample, that quadrupolar order shimming improves the linewidth by up toan order of magnitude. An additional order of magnitude reduction is inprinciple achievable by utilizing this shimming method for z-gradientcorrection and higher order xy gradients. A specialized pulse sequencefor the rotating field NMR experiment is under development. The pulsesequence allows for spinning away from the magic angle and spinningslower than the anisotropic broadening. This pulse sequence is acombination of the projected magic angle spinning (p-MAS) and magic angleturning (MAT) pulse sequences. This will be useful to rotating field NMRbecause there are limits on how fast a field can be spun and spin at themagic angle is difficult. One of the goals of this project is forrotating field NMR to be used on biological systems. The p-MAS pulsesequence was successfully tested on bovine tissue samples which suggeststhat it will be a viable methodology to use in a rotating field set up. Aside experiment on steering magnetic particle by MRI gradients was alsocarried out. Some movement was seen in these experiment, but for totalcontrol over steering further experiments would need to bedone.

  7. New Methodology For Use in Rotating Field Nuclear MagneticResonance

    SciTech Connect

    Jachmann, Rebecca C.

    2007-05-18

    High-resolution NMR spectra of samples with anisotropicbroadening are simplified to their isotropic spectra by fast rotation ofthe sample at the magic angle 54.7 circ. This dissertation concerns thedevelopment of novel Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) methodologies basedwhich would rotate the magnetic field instead of the sample, rotatingfield NMR. It provides an over of the NMR concepts, procedures, andexperiments needed to understand the methodologies that will be used forrotating field NMR. A simple two-dimensional shimming method based onharmonic corrector rings which can provide arbitrary multiple ordershimming corrections were developed for rotating field systems, but couldbe used in shimming other systems as well. Those results demonstrate, forexample, that quadrupolar order shimming improves the linewidth by up toan order of magnitude. An additional order of magnitude reduction is inprinciple achievable by utilizing this shimming method for z-gradientcorrection and higher order xy gradients. A specialized pulse sequencefor the rotating field NMR experiment is under development. The pulsesequence allows for spinning away from the magic angle and spinningslower than the anisotropic broadening. This pulse sequence is acombination of the projected magic angle spinning (p-MAS) and magic angleturning (MAT) pulse sequences. This will be useful to rotating field NMRbecause there are limits on how fast a field can be spun and spin at themagic angle is difficult. One of the goals of this project is forrotating field NMR to be used on biological systems. The p-MAS pulsesequence was successfully tested on bovine tissue samples which suggeststhat it will be a viable methodology to use in a rotating field set up. Aside experiment on steering magnetic particle by MRI gradients was alsocarried out. Some movement was seen in these experiment, but for totalcontrol over steering further experiments would need to bedone.

  8. Separation of nuclear isomers for cancer therapeutic radionuclides based on nuclear decay after-effects.

    PubMed

    Bhardwaj, R; van der Meer, A; Das, S K; de Bruin, M; Gascon, J; Wolterbeek, H T; Denkova, A G; Serra-Crespo, P

    2017-03-13

    (177)Lu has sprung as a promising radionuclide for targeted therapy. The low soft tissue penetration of its β(-) emission results in very efficient energy deposition in small-size tumours. Because of this, (177)Lu is used in the treatment of neuroendocrine tumours and is also clinically approved for prostate cancer therapy. In this work, we report a separation method that achieves the challenging separation of the physically and chemically identical nuclear isomers, (177m)Lu and (177)Lu. The separation method combines the nuclear after-effects of the nuclear decay, the use of a very stable chemical complex and a chromatographic separation. Based on this separation concept, a new type of radionuclide generator has been devised, in which the parent and the daughter radionuclides are the same elements. The (177m)Lu/(177)Lu radionuclide generator provides a new production route for the therapeutic radionuclide (177)Lu and can bring significant growth in the research and development of (177)Lu based pharmaceuticals.

  9. Separation of nuclear isomers for cancer therapeutic radionuclides based on nuclear decay after-effects

    PubMed Central

    Bhardwaj, R.; van der Meer, A.; Das, S. K.; de Bruin, M.; Gascon, J.; Wolterbeek, H. T.; Denkova, A. G.; Serra-Crespo, P.

    2017-01-01

    177Lu has sprung as a promising radionuclide for targeted therapy. The low soft tissue penetration of its β− emission results in very efficient energy deposition in small-size tumours. Because of this, 177Lu is used in the treatment of neuroendocrine tumours and is also clinically approved for prostate cancer therapy. In this work, we report a separation method that achieves the challenging separation of the physically and chemically identical nuclear isomers, 177mLu and 177Lu. The separation method combines the nuclear after-effects of the nuclear decay, the use of a very stable chemical complex and a chromatographic separation. Based on this separation concept, a new type of radionuclide generator has been devised, in which the parent and the daughter radionuclides are the same elements. The 177mLu/177Lu radionuclide generator provides a new production route for the therapeutic radionuclide 177Lu and can bring significant growth in the research and development of 177Lu based pharmaceuticals. PMID:28287131

  10. Separation of nuclear isomers for cancer therapeutic radionuclides based on nuclear decay after-effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhardwaj, R.; van der Meer, A.; Das, S. K.; de Bruin, M.; Gascon, J.; Wolterbeek, H. T.; Denkova, A. G.; Serra-Crespo, P.

    2017-03-01

    177Lu has sprung as a promising radionuclide for targeted therapy. The low soft tissue penetration of its β‑ emission results in very efficient energy deposition in small-size tumours. Because of this, 177Lu is used in the treatment of neuroendocrine tumours and is also clinically approved for prostate cancer therapy. In this work, we report a separation method that achieves the challenging separation of the physically and chemically identical nuclear isomers, 177mLu and 177Lu. The separation method combines the nuclear after-effects of the nuclear decay, the use of a very stable chemical complex and a chromatographic separation. Based on this separation concept, a new type of radionuclide generator has been devised, in which the parent and the daughter radionuclides are the same elements. The 177mLu/177Lu radionuclide generator provides a new production route for the therapeutic radionuclide 177Lu and can bring significant growth in the research and development of 177Lu based pharmaceuticals.

  11. Systematic nuclear structure studies using relativistic mean field theory in mass region A ˜ 130

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukla, A.; Åberg, Sven; Bajpeyi, Awanish

    2017-02-01

    Nuclear structure studies for even-even nuclei in the mass region \\backsim 130, have been performed, with a special focus around N or Z = 64. On the onset of deformation and lying between two closed shell, these nuclei have attracted attention in a number of studies. A revisit to these experimentally accessible nuclei has been made via the relativistic mean field. The role of pairing and density depletion in the interior has been specially investigated. Qualitative analysis between two versions of relativistic mean field suggests that there is no significant difference between the two approaches. Moreover, the role of the filling {{{s}}}1/2 orbital in density depletion towards the centre has been found to be consistent with our earlier work on the subject Shukla and Åberg (2014 Phys. Rev. C 89 014329).

  12. Coulomb effects in low-energy nuclear fragmentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, John W.; Chun, Sang Y.; Badavi, Francis F.; John, Sarah

    1993-01-01

    Early versions of the Langley nuclear fragmentation code NUCFRAG (and a publicly released version called HZEFRG1) assumed straight-line trajectories throughout the interaction. As a consequence, NUCFRAG and HZEFRG1 give unrealistic cross sections for large mass removal from the projectile and target at low energies. A correction for the distortion of the trajectory by the nuclear Coulomb fields is used to derive fragmentation cross sections. A simple energy-loss term is applied to estimate the energy downshifts that greatly alter the Coulomb trajectory at low energy. The results, which are far more realistic than prior versions of the code, should provide the data base for future transport calculations. The systematic behavior of charge-removal cross sections compares favorably with results from low-energy experiments.

  13. [Accidents, disasters and crises: contribution of epidemiology in th nuclear field].

    PubMed

    Verger, P; Bard, D; Dab, W; Hubert, P

    1995-01-01

    The experience of the Chernobyl accident has shown the necessity of being prepared for epidemiological assessment of the death consequences of a nuclear or a radiological accident. We discuss the contribution of epidemiology in such situations, in addition to the existing tools designed to assess or manage radiological risks. From a decisional point of view, three issues are distinguished: the protection of the different population groups against ionizing radiations, the achievement of health care and the communication with the public and media. We discuss the input of epidemiological tools in both perspectives. Epidemiology may also contribute to the analysis of health events that may be observed after an accident, i.e. to assess whether these events are not statistical artifacts, whether they are an effect of the exposure to the ionizing radiations or a non specific consequence of any accident. Finally, epidemiological studies should be carried out to improve our knowledge on ionizing radiations effects with a special consideration given to the dose-effect relationships. Examples of past nuclear accidents are used to discuss these issues. The last part of this paper is focused on different research issues that should be developed for preparing epidemiological plans for nuclear accidents.

  14. Nuclear effects in neutrino interactions at low momentum transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miltenberger, Ethan

    This is a study to identify predicted effects of the carbon nucleus environment on neutrino - nucleus interactions with low momentum transfer. A large sample of neutrino interaction data collected by the MINERvA experiment is analyzed to show the distribution of charged hadron energy in a region with low momentum transfer. These distributions reveal a major discrepancy between the data and a popular interaction model with only the simplest Fermi gas nuclear effects. Detailed analysis of systematic uncertainties due to energy scale and resolution can account for only a little of the discrepancy. Two additional nuclear model effects, a suppression/screening effect (RPA), and the addition of a meson exchange current process (MEC), are shown to improve the description of the data.

  15. Nuclear Effects in Neutrino Interactions at Low Momentum Transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Miltenberger, Ethan Ryan

    2015-05-01

    This is a study to identify predicted effects of the carbon nucleus environment on neutrino - nucleus interactions with low momentum transfer. A large sample of neutrino interaction data collected by the MINERvA experiment is analyzed to show the distribution of charged hadron energy in a region with low momentum transfer. These distributions reveal a major discrepancy between the data and a popular interaction model with only the simplest Fermi gas nuclear effects. Detailed analysis of systematic uncertainties due to energy scale and resolution can account for only a little of the discrepancy. Two additional nuclear model effects, a suppression/screening effect (RPA), and the addition of a meson exchange current process (MEC), are shown to improve the description of the data.

  16. Kondo effect of D\\xAFs and D\\xAFs* mesons in nuclear matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasui, Shigehiro; Sudoh, Kazutaka

    2017-03-01

    We study the Kondo effect for D¯s and D¯s* mesons as impurity particles in nuclear matter. The spin-exchange interaction between the D¯s or D¯s* meson and the nucleon induces the enhancement of the effective coupling in the low-energy scattering in the infrared region, whose energy scale of singularity is given by the Kondo scale. We investigate the Kondo scale in the renormalization group equation at nucleon one-loop level. We furthermore study the ground state with the Kondo effect in the mean-field approach, and present that the Kondo scale is related to the mixing strength between the D¯s or D¯s* meson and the nucleon in nuclear matter. We show the spectral function of the impurity when the Kondo effect occurs.

  17. Concentration-dependent Effects of Nuclear Lamins on Nuclear Size in Xenopus and Mammalian Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Jevtić, Predrag; Edens, Lisa J.; Li, Xiaoyang; Nguyen, Thang; Chen, Pan; Levy, Daniel L.

    2015-01-01

    A fundamental question in cell biology concerns the regulation of organelle size. While nuclear size is exquisitely controlled in different cell types, inappropriate nuclear enlargement is used to diagnose and stage cancer. Clarifying the functional significance of nuclear size necessitates an understanding of the mechanisms and proteins that control nuclear size. One structural component implicated in the regulation of nuclear morphology is the nuclear lamina, a meshwork of intermediate lamin filaments that lines the inner nuclear membrane. However, there has not been a systematic investigation of how the level and type of lamin expression influences nuclear size, in part due to difficulties in precisely controlling lamin expression levels in vivo. In this study, we circumvent this limitation by studying nuclei in Xenopus laevis egg and embryo extracts, open biochemical systems that allow for precise manipulation of lamin levels by the addition of recombinant proteins. We find that nuclear growth and size are sensitive to the levels of nuclear lamins, with low and high concentrations increasing and decreasing nuclear size, respectively. Interestingly, each type of lamin that we tested (lamins B1, B2, B3, and A) similarly affected nuclear size whether added alone or in combination, suggesting that total lamin concentration, and not lamin type, is more critical to determining nuclear size. Furthermore, we show that altering lamin levels in vivo, both in Xenopus embryos and mammalian tissue culture cells, also impacts nuclear size. These results have implications for normal development and carcinogenesis where both nuclear size and lamin expression levels change. PMID:26429910

  18. Least Squares Magnetic-Field Optimization for Portable Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Magnet Design

    SciTech Connect

    Paulsen, Jeffrey L; Franck, John; Demas, Vasiliki; Bouchard, Louis-S.

    2008-03-27

    Single-sided and mobile nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) sensors have the advantages of portability, low cost, and low power consumption compared to conventional high-field NMR and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) systems. We present fast, flexible, and easy-to-implement target field algorithms for mobile NMR and MRI magnet design. The optimization finds a global optimum ina cost function that minimizes the error in the target magnetic field in the sense of least squares. When the technique is tested on a ring array of permanent-magnet elements, the solution matches the classical dipole Halbach solution. For a single-sided handheld NMR sensor, the algorithm yields a 640 G field homogeneous to 16 100 ppm across a 1.9 cc volume located 1.5 cm above the top of the magnets and homogeneous to 32 200 ppm over a 7.6 cc volume. This regime is adequate for MRI applications. We demonstrate that the homogeneous region can be continuously moved away from the sensor by rotating magnet rod elements, opening the way for NMR sensors with adjustable"sensitive volumes."

  19. Magnetic field-induced effects on NMR properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jokisaari, J.; Kantola, A. M.; Vaara, J.

    2017-08-01

    In principle, all the NMR observables, spin-spin coupling J, nuclear shielding σ and quadrupole coupling q, are magnetic field-dependent. The field dependence may be classified into two categories: direct and indirect (apparent) dependence. The former arises from the magnetic field-induced deformation of the molecular electronic cloud, while the latter stems from a slightly anisotropic orientation distribution of molecules, due to the interaction between the anisotropy of the molecular susceptibility tensor and the external magnetic field. Here we use 1,3,5-D3-benzene as a model system to investigate the indirect effect on the one-bond 1H-13C and 2H-13C spin-spin couplings (J couplings) and the 2H quadrupole coupling. Experiments carried out at four magnetic fields (4.7, 9.4, 14.1, and 18.8 T) show that the indirect effect is significant already at the magnetic fields commonly used in NMR spectrometers. A joint fit of the data extracted at the different field strengths provides experimental results for the susceptibility anisotropy, 2H quadrupole coupling constant and the related asymmetry parameter, as well as the one-bond CH and CD coupling constants extrapolated to vanishing field strength. The field-induced contributions are found to exceed the commonly assumed error margins of the latter. The data also indicate a primary isotope effect on the one-bond CH coupling constant. There is a tendency to further increase the magnetic field of NMR spectrometers, which leads to more pronounced indirect contributions and eventually significant direct effects as well.

  20. The effects of nuclear magnetic resonance on patients with cardiac pacemakers

    SciTech Connect

    Pavlicek, W.; Geisinger, M.; Castle, L.; Borkowski, G.P.; Meaney, T.F.; Bream, B.L.; Gallagher, J.H.

    1983-04-01

    The effect of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging on six representative cardiac pacemakers was studied. The results indicate that the threshold for initiating the asynchronous mode of a pacemaker is 17 gauss. Radiofrequency levels are present in an NMR unit and may confuse or possibly inhibit demand pacemakers, although sensing circuitry is normally provided with electromagnetic interference discrimination. Time-varying magnetic fields can generate pulse amplitudes and frequencies to mimic cardiac activity. A serious limitation in the possibility of imaging a patient with a pacemaker would be the alteration of normal pulsing parameters due to time-varying magnetic fields.

  1. Effect of Geomagnetism on 101Ru Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance Measurements of CeRu2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manago, Masahiro; Ishida, Kenji; Matsuda, Tatsuma D.; Ōnuki, Yoshichika

    2015-11-01

    We performed 101Ru nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) measurements on the s-wave superconductor CeRu2 and found oscillatory behavior in the spin-echo amplitude at the | ± 1/2> ≤ftrightarrow | ± 3/2> transitions but not at the | ± 3/2> ≤ftrightarrow | ± 5/2> transitions. The modulation disappears in the superconducting state or in a magnetic shield, which implies a geomagnetic field effect. Our results indicate that the NQR spin-echo decay curve at the | ± 1/2> ≤ftrightarrow | ± 3/2> transitions is sensitive to a weak magnetic field.

  2. Dynamic Nuclear Polarization Fast Field Cycling Method for the Selective Study of Molecular Dynamics in Block Copolymers.

    PubMed

    Gizatullin, Bulat; Neudert, Oliver; Stapf, Siegfried; Mattea, Carlos

    2017-09-06

    Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) is one of the most useful methods to increase sensitivity in NMR spectroscopy. It is based on the transfer of magnetization from an electron to the nuclear spin system. Based on previous work that demonstrated the feasibility of integrating DNP with fast field cycling (FFC) relaxometry and the possibility to distinguish between different mechanisms, such as the Overhauser effect (OE) and the solid effect (SE), the first FFC study of the differential relaxation properties of a copolymer is presented. For this purpose, concentrated solutions of the polystyrene-block-polybutadiene-block-polystyrene (SBS) triblock copolymer and the corresponding homopolymers were investigated. T1 -T2 relaxation data are discussed in terms of molecular mobility and the presence of radicals. The DNP selective data indicate a dominant SE contribution to the enhancement of the NMR signal for both blocks of the triblock copolymer and for the homopolymer solutions. The enhancement factors are different for both polymer types and in the copolymer, which is explained by the individual (1) H T1 relaxation times and different electron-nucleus coupling strength. The T1 relaxation dispersion measurements of the SE enhanced signal were performed, which led to improved signal-to-noise ratios that allowed the site-specific separation of relaxation times and their dependence on the Larmor frequency with a higher accuracy. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Induction of nuclear anomalies in exfoliated buccal cells of coca chewers: results of a field study.

    PubMed

    Nersesyan, Armen; Kundi, Michael; Krupitza, Georg; Barcelos, Gustavo; Mišík, Miroslav; Wultsch, Georg; Carrion, Juan; Carrion-Carrera, Gladys; Knasmueller, Siegfried

    2013-03-01

    The leaves of coca (Erythroxylum coca var. coca), a South American shrub which contains cocaine, other alkaloids and phenolics are widely used by indigenous populations of the Andes. It is currently not known if coca consumption causes genotoxic effects in humans. This information is important to predict potential long-term toxic effects such as cancer induction. Therefore, the buccal cytome assay was used to analyze oral cells from 45 uni- and bilateral chewers and 23 controls living in the Altiplano of the Peruvian Andes. In total, 123,471 cells were evaluated from chewers and 57,916 from controls. Information concerning the consumption levels and habits and also use of lime were collected with questionnaires. Chewing of the leaves did not induce nuclear anomalies reflecting genetic damage such as micronuclei (MNi) and nuclear buds; in the highest exposure group (but not in the overall group) even a significant decrease in the frequencies of cells with MNi (by 64 %) was observed. However, we found significantly elevated levels of other nuclear anomalies (karyorrhexis and karyolysis) which reflect cytotoxic effects in the coca users. The frequencies of these anomalies increased with the daily consumption and when lime was used to improve the release of the alkaloids. In contrast to other chewing habits (betel, tobacco and khat), consumption of coca leaves does not induce genetic instability in cells from the oral cavity and our findings indicate that no adverse health effects take place in chewers which are associated with DNA damage. However, the significant increase in certain anomalies shows that acute toxic effects are caused by coca consumption.

  4. Non-Abellian field dynamics in the early stage of ultrarelativistic nuclear collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Rischke, D.H.

    1997-09-22

    It was argued that the gluon field of a large, ultrarelativistic nucleus can be considered as a classical field for small values of the longitudinal momentum fraction x and on transverse momentum scales {Lambda}{sup 2}{sub QCD} << k{sup 2}{perpendicular} << {mu}{sup 2}, where {mu}{sup 2} is the transverse area density of color charges. The authors estimated {mu} {approx} 0.4 GeV for collisions of Au-nuclei at RHIC energies. Based on this argument, the gluon field produced in a collision of two ultrarelativistic nuclei is computed perturbatively by solving the classical Yang-Mills equations order by order in the strong coupling constant g. It is shown that to first order in g, the spectrum of produced gluons is identical to that obtained in a perturbative quantum calculation of gluon Bremsstrahlung. It is also identical with that of a coherent quantum state generated by independent collisions between the (classical) color charges in the two nuclei. The perturbative solution is unstable under perturbations. The instabilities arise from the non-Abelian terms in the equations of motion for the gluon field, which enter only at higher order in the perturbative solution scheme. The decay rate of the perturbative solution is shown to be of order {mu}. Since the non-Abelian terms describe the self-interaction of the produced gluon field, and since such interactions lead to thermalization, the decay rate provides an estimate for the thermalization time scale of classical color fields in ultrarelativistic nuclear collisions. For Au-nuclei, this time scale is therefore of order 0.5 fm/c, in agreement with results for the kinetic thermalization time scale.

  5. Low-frequency magnetic field effect on cytoskeleton and chromatin.

    PubMed

    Kroupová, Jana; Bártová, Eva; Fojt, Lukás; Strasák, Ludek; Kozubek, Stanislav; Vetterl, Vladimír

    2007-01-01

    The effect of magnetic fields on the living systems is studied in vivo or in vitro in very broad spectrum of organisms, cells and tissues. The mechanism of their acting is not known until now. We studied low-frequency magnetic field effect on cytoskeleton and on the structure of chromatin in human cells. We used cell line of small lung carcinoma (A549) and the effects of magnetic field on cytoskeleton and higher-order chromatin structure were analyzed 96 h of magnetic field exposure. Magnetic field generated by the cylindrical soil was homogenous and the cells were cultivated at 37 degrees C in humidified atmosphere containing 5% CO(2). Magnetic field induction was B(m)=2 mT and the net frequency f=50 Hz. In such affected and control cells the F-actin was estimated using FITC-conjugated Phalloidin and mitochondria were studied using MitoTracker (Molecular Probes). Images of cytoskeleton and genetic loci were acquired using confocal microscopy and analysis was performed by FISH 2.0 software. Slight morphological changes of F-actin filaments and mitochondria were observed in affected cells and nuclear condensation was found. These effects could be related to the process of cell death apoptosis probably induced by magnetic field. The studies aimed at centromeric heterochromatin (9cen) did not show statistically significant changes. Therefore, we suggest that magnetic field has no influence on higher order chromatin structure but certain changes could be observed on the level of cytoskeleton. However, these statements need a thorough verification. Our preliminary experiments will be extended and the effect of magnetic field on another structures of cytoskeleton and cell nuclei will be further studied.

  6. 10 CFR 50.65 - Requirements for monitoring the effectiveness of maintenance at nuclear power plants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... maintenance at nuclear power plants. 50.65 Section 50.65 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION DOMESTIC... Construction Permits § 50.65 Requirements for monitoring the effectiveness of maintenance at nuclear power..., including normal shutdown operations. (a)(1) Each holder of an operating license for a nuclear power plant...

  7. 10 CFR 50.65 - Requirements for monitoring the effectiveness of maintenance at nuclear power plants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... maintenance at nuclear power plants. 50.65 Section 50.65 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION DOMESTIC... Construction Permits § 50.65 Requirements for monitoring the effectiveness of maintenance at nuclear power..., including normal shutdown operations. (a)(1) Each holder of an operating license for a nuclear power plant...

  8. 10 CFR 50.65 - Requirements for monitoring the effectiveness of maintenance at nuclear power plants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... maintenance at nuclear power plants. 50.65 Section 50.65 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION DOMESTIC... Construction Permits § 50.65 Requirements for monitoring the effectiveness of maintenance at nuclear power..., including normal shutdown operations. (a)(1) Each holder of an operating license for a nuclear power plant...

  9. 10 CFR 50.65 - Requirements for monitoring the effectiveness of maintenance at nuclear power plants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... maintenance at nuclear power plants. 50.65 Section 50.65 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION DOMESTIC... Construction Permits § 50.65 Requirements for monitoring the effectiveness of maintenance at nuclear power..., including normal shutdown operations. (a)(1) Each holder of an operating license for a nuclear power plant...

  10. 10 CFR 50.65 - Requirements for monitoring the effectiveness of maintenance at nuclear power plants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... maintenance at nuclear power plants. 50.65 Section 50.65 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION DOMESTIC... Construction Permits § 50.65 Requirements for monitoring the effectiveness of maintenance at nuclear power..., including normal shutdown operations. (a)(1) Each holder of an operating license for a nuclear power plant...

  11. Effects of Containment on Radionuclide Releases from Underground Nuclear Explosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrigan, C. R.; Sun, Y.

    2016-12-01

    Confirming the occurrence of an underground nuclear explosion can require capturing short-lived noble gas radioisotopes produced by the explosion, sometimes referred to as the "smoking gun" for nuclear explosion detection. It is well known that the radioisotopic distribution resulting from the detonation evolves with time in the explosion cavity. In effect, the explosion cavity or chimney behaves as a chemical reactor. As long as the parent and daughter radionuclides remain in a closed and well-mixed cavity, parameters, such as radioxenon isotopic ratios, can be calculated analytically from a decay-chain network model. When gases from the cavity migrate into the containment regime, consideration of a "leaky reactor" model is more appropriate. We consider several implications of such a leaky reactor model relevant to interpretations of gas samples from the subsurface during an on-site inspection that could potentially be carried out under the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty. Additionally, we have attempted to validate our leaky reactor model against atmospheric observations of radioactive xenon isotopes detected by radionuclide monitoring stations in Japan and Russia following the February 2013 DPRK underground nuclear explosion (Carrigan et al., 2016). While both model uncertainty and observational error are significant, our model of isotopic evolution appears to be in broad agreement with radionuclide observations, and for the first time links atmospheric measurements of radioxenon isotopic ratios to estimates of seismic yield. Carrigan et al., Scientific Reports 6, Article number: 23032 (2016) doi:10.1038/srep23032

  12. Bis-Gadolinium Complexes for Solid Effect and Cross Effect Dynamic Nuclear Polarization.

    PubMed

    Kaushik, Monu; Qi, Mian; Godt, Adelheid; Corzilius, Björn

    2017-04-03

    High-spin complexes act as polarizing agents (PAs) for dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) in solid-state NMR spectroscopy and feature promising aspects towards biomolecular DNP. We present a study on bis(Gd-chelate)s which enable cross effect (CE) DNP owing to spatial confinement of two dipolar-coupled electron spins. Their well-defined Gd⋅⋅⋅Gd distances in the range of 1.2-3.4 nm allowed us to elucidate the Gd⋅⋅⋅Gd distance dependence of the DNP mechanism and NMR signal enhancement. We found that Gd⋅⋅⋅Gd distances above 2.1 nm result in solid effect DNP while distances between 1.2 and 2.1 nm enable CE for (1) H, (13) C, and (15) N nuclear spins. We compare 263 GHz electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectra with the obtained DNP field profiles and discuss possible CE matching conditions within the high-spin system and the influence of dipolar broadening of the EPR signal. Our findings foster the understanding of the CE mechanism and the design of high-spin PAs for specific applications of DNP. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Nuclear effects in Drell-Yan production at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krelina, M.; Basso, E.; Goncalves, V. P.; Nemchik, J.; Pasechnik, R.

    2016-07-01

    Using the color dipole formalism we study production of Drell-Yan (DY) pairs in proton-nucleus interactions in the kinematic region corresponding to LHC experiments. Lepton pairs produced in a hard scattering are not accompanied with any final state interactions leading to either energy loss or absorption. Consequently, dileptons may serve as more efficient and cleaner probes for the onset of nuclear effects than nclusive hadron production. We perform a systematic analysis of these effects in production of Drell-Yan pairs in pPb interaction at the LHC. We present predictions for the nuclear suppression as a function of the dilepton transverse momentum, rapidity and invariant mass which can be verified by the LHC measurements. We found that a strong nuclear suppression can be interpreted as an effective energy loss proportional to the initial energy universally induced by multiple initial state interactions. In addition, we study a contribution of coherent effects associated with the gluon shadowing affecting the observables predominantly at small and medium-high transverse momenta.

  14. Radiation effects in nuclear waste materials. 1998 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, W.J.; Corrales, L.R.; Birtcher, R.C.; Nastasi, M.

    1998-06-01

    'The objective of this multidisciplinary, multi-institutional research effort is to develop a fundamental understanding of radiation effects in glasses and ceramics at the atomic, microscopic, and macroscopic levels. The goal is to provide the underpinning science and models necessary to assess the performance of glasses and ceramics designed for the immobilization and disposal of high-level tank waste, plutonium residues, excess weapons plutonium, and other highly radioactive waste streams. A variety of experimental and computer simulation methods are employed in this effort. In general, research on glasses focuses on the electronic excitations due to ionizing radiation emitted from beta decay, since this is currently thought to be the principal mechanism for deleterious radiation effects in nuclear waste glasses. Research on ceramics focuses on defects and structural changes induced by the elastic interactions between alpha-decay particles and the atoms in the structure. Radiation effects can lead to changes in physical and chemical properties that may significantly impact long-term performance of nuclear waste materials. The current lack of fundamental understanding of radiation effects in nuclear waste materials makes it impossible to extrapolate the limited existing data bases to larger doses, lower dose rates, different temperature regimes, and different glass compositions or ceramic structures. This report summarizes work after almost 2 years of a 3-year project. Work to date has resulted in 9 publications. Highlights of the research over the past year are presented.'

  15. Environmental and health effects of the nuclear industry and nuclear weapons: a current evaluation.

    PubMed

    Johnson, C J

    1982-01-01

    The nuclear weapons industry in the U.S. comprises nine major plants, supported by a network of subcontractors and grantee institutions. Weapons development progresses at the Lawrence Livermore and Los Alamos Laboratories under the auspices of the University of California. Fissionable materials and tritium are produced at the Savannah River Plant (du Pont) or at Hanford. Reprocessing of plutonium and weapons grade uranium and manufacture of components are carried out at Rocky Flats (formerly Dow, now Rockwell Int.). Large amounts of radionuclides are generated or involved in operations at most of the nine plants. Internal reports of surveillance efforts by weapons plant personnel to monitor emissions of radioactive gases and particulates have now been released by several of the plants (in one case through litigation). Those reports document major releases of radioactive gases and particulates to the environment in the past, and continuing routine releases of some importance. Few investigations have been made of effects from these potent carcinogens in local populations. There have been several preliminary reports (Rocky Flats, Los Alamos and Savannah River) and one comprehensive report [Ambio 10: 176 (1981)]. Evidence of significantly increased rates of cancer of the more radiosensitive organs has been demonstrated. Adequate cancer registry and vital statistics data are essential for the comprehensive investigations of somatic and genetic effects which should be carried out around all nuclear installations near population centres.

  16. Hints on nuclear effects from ArgoNeuT data

    SciTech Connect

    Palamara, Ornella

    2015-05-15

    Initial results from a topological analysis of CC “0 pion” muon neutrino events in LAr collected by the ArgoNeuT experiment on the NuMI LE beam at Fermilab (in the few GeV energy region) are presented and compared with predictions from MC simulations. A new analysis method, based on the reconstruction of exclusive topologies, fully exploiting the LArTPC technique capabilities, is used to analyze the events and study nuclear effects in neutrino interactions on Argon nuclei. Multiple protons accompanying the leading muon and the presence of vertex activity are clearly visible (and measured) in the events. Ratios among rates of different exclusive topologies provide indications of the size of nuclear effects in neutrino-nucleus interactions in LAr.

  17. Heat capacity of water: A signature of nuclear quantum effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vega, C.; Conde, M. M.; McBride, C.; Abascal, J. L. F.; Noya, E. G.; Ramirez, R.; Sesé, L. M.

    2010-01-01

    In this note we present results for the heat capacity at constant pressure for the TIP4PQ/2005 model, as obtained from path-integral simulations. The model does a rather good job of describing both the heat capacity of ice Ih and of liquid water. Classical simulations using the TIP4P/2005, TIP3P, TIP4P, TIP4P-Ew, simple point charge/extended, and TIP5P models are unable to reproduce the heat capacity of water. Given that classical simulations do not satisfy the third law of thermodynamics, one would expect such a failure at low temperatures. However, it seems that for water, nuclear quantum effects influence the heat capacities all the way up to room temperature. The failure of classical simulations to reproduce Cp points to the necessity of incorporating nuclear quantum effects to describe this property accurately.

  18. Biological Effects of Nuclear Explosions (BENE) Domain Guide

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-01

    phantoms as well as study thermal effects on rats and dogs. Flash blindness (time to eyesight recovery after exposure to a nuclear flash) was...studied over a two year period. A large animal model (burro) was also used, and phantom dosimetry reconstructed. Swine, dogs, rabbits, guinea pigs...Project 39.8, Depth-Dose Studies in Phantoms with Initial Bomb Gamma and Neutron Radiation WT- 1508 Human tissue equivalent material tissue

  19. Effective specific impulse of external nuclear pulse propulsion systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reynolds, T. W.

    1972-01-01

    An investigation of a simple self-similar flow model for an external nuclear pulse propulsion system indicates that to achieve the high effective specific impulse of such a system three principal factors are required. The are (1) attaining pulses of optimum energy, (2) attaining good propellant collimation, and (3) using an ablative material for the pusher surface which has high absorptivity for radiant energy at the propellant stagnation temperature.

  20. Nuclear effects on tetraquark production by double parton scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carvalho, F.; Navarra, F. S.

    2017-03-01

    In this work we study the nuclear effects in exotic meson production. We estimate the total cross section as a function of the energy for pPb scattering using a version of the color evaporation model (CEM) adapted to Double Parton Scattering (DPS). We fond that the cross section grows significantly with the atomic number, indicating that the hypothesis of tetraquark states can be tested in pA collisions at LHC.

  1. Nuclear higher-twist effects in eA DIS

    SciTech Connect

    Zakharov, B. G.

    2009-03-23

    We discuss the relation between the treatments of the higher twist nuclear effects in eA DIS based on the pQCD collinear approximation and the light-cone path integral formalism. We show that in the collinear approximation the N = 1 rescattering contribution to the gluon emission vanishes. It is demonstrated that the nonzero gluon spectrum obtained by Guo, Wang and Zhang is a consequence of unjustified neglect of some terms in the collinear expansion.

  2. Characteristics of spectrum registration of condensed medium by the method of nuclear-magnetic resonance in a weak field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davydov, V. V.; Myazin, N. S.; Velichko, E. N.

    2017-07-01

    The characteristics of signal registration of nuclear-magnetic resonance in a weak magnetic field from a small volume of an investigated medium have been considered. The consideration of the characteristics revealed in a new developed design of a magnetic system for a compact nuclear-magnetic spectrometer, and also in the NMR-signal registration method allows significant extension of the possibility to use the phenomenon of nuclear-magnetic resonance for the study of condensed medium in an express mode. The experimental results of different media studies have been presented.

  3. Science field trips to nuclear power plants - A low capital cost program

    SciTech Connect

    Cramer, E.N.; Gabel, C.; Sayles, C. )

    1991-01-01

    School science field trips to nuclear power plants can be quite rewarding to both students and teachers if the right material is used from a perspective different from the textbooks. One does not need a large, expensive facility to have a program useful to students that addresses adult issues understandably. San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station hosted {approximately}110 visits (simulator tours) averaging 2,700 visitors in each of calendar years 1989 and 1990 after averaging 75 visits in each of the five preceding years. Most audiences were from middle schools located within a 50-mile radius. The station does not have a separate visitor's center; a classroom is reserved at the station's training and education center. The advantage is using real working laboratories; the disadvantage is not having the more traditional displays and interactive models. Therefore, the instructor emphasizes showing the integrated engineering applications of chemistry, physics, and geology - rather than repeating material that is more easily taught in the school's classroom. Generic issues are emphasized rather than the design details of the plant systems.

  4. Dependence of nuclear quadrupole resonance transitions on the electric field gradient asymmetry parameter for nuclides with half-integer spins

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Herman

    2016-02-28

    Allowed transition energies and eigenstate expansions have been calculated and tabulated in numerical form as functions of the electric field gradient asymmetry parameter for the zero field Hamiltonian of quadrupolar nuclides with I = 3/2,5/2,7/2, and 9/2. These results are essential to interpret nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) spectra and extract accurate values of the electric field gradient tensors. Furthermore, applications of NQR methods to studies of electronic structure in heavy element systems are proposed.

  5. Dependence of nuclear quadrupole resonance transitions on the electric field gradient asymmetry parameter for nuclides with half-integer spins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Herman

    2016-09-01

    Allowed transition energies and eigenstate expansions have been calculated and tabulated in numerical form as functions of the electric field gradient asymmetry parameter for the zero field Hamiltonian of quadrupolar nuclides with I = 3 / 2 , 5 / 2 , 7 / 2, and 9 / 2. These results are essential to interpret nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) spectra and extract accurate values of the electric field gradient tensors. Applications of NQR methods to studies of electronic structure in heavy element systems are proposed.

  6. Experimental observations to the electrical field for electrorefining of spent nuclear fuel in the Mark-IV electrorefiner.

    SciTech Connect

    Li, S. X.

    1998-05-13

    Experimental results from the pilot scale electrorefiner (Mark-IV ER) treating spent nuclear fuel are reported in this article. The electrorefining processes were carried out in a LiCl-KCl-UCl{sub 3} electrolyte. It has been noted that spool of molten cadmium below the electrolyte plays an important role in the electrorefining operations. In addition, formations of electrical shorting path between anode baskets and the electrorefiner vessel were observed, which lessened the uranium dissolution process from anode baskets, however appeared to improve the morphology of cathode deposit. The FIDAP simulation code was used to calculate the electrical potential field distributions and the potential gradient near the cathode. The effect of the electrical shorting between anode baskets and electrorefiner vessel on the morphology of cathode products is discussed.

  7. Field cage development for a time-projection chamber to constrain the nuclear symmetry energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estee, J.; Barney, J.; Chajecki, Z.; Famiano, M.; Dunn, J.; Lu, F.; Lynch, W. G.; McIntosh, A. B.; Isobe, T.; Murakami, T.; Sakurai, H.; Shane, R.; Taketani, A.; Tangwancharoen, S.; Tsang, M. B.; Yennello, S.

    2012-10-01

    The SAMURAI time-projection chamber (sTPC) is being developed for use in the dipole magnet of the newly-commissioned SAMURAI spectrometer at the RIBF facility in Japan. The main scientific objective of the sTPC is to provide constraints on the nuclear symmetry energy at supra-saturation densities. The TPC allows for tracking and identification of light charged particles such as pions, protons, tritons and ^3He. The sTPC must have a Cartesian geometry to match the symmetry of the dipole magnet. The walls of the field cage (FC) detector volume consist of sections of rigid, two-layer circuit boards. Inside and outside copper strips form decreasing equipotentials via a resistor chain, and create a uniform electric field with a maximum of 400 V/cm. The FC volume is hermetically sealed from the enclosure volume to create an insulation volume which can be filled with dry N2 to inhibit corona discharge. I will be presenting the current status of the design and assembly of the sTPC field cage.

  8. Low-field nuclear magnetic resonance for the in vivo study of water content in trees

    SciTech Connect

    Yoder, Jacob; Malone, Michael W.; Espy, Michelle A.; Sevanto, Sanna

    2014-09-15

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and magnetic resonance imaging have long been used to study water content in plants. Approaches have been primarily based on systems using large magnetic fields (∼1 T) to obtain NMR signals with good signal-to-noise. This is because the NMR signal scales approximately with the magnetic field strength squared. However, there are also limits to this approach in terms of realistic physiological configuration or those imposed by the size and cost of the magnet. Here we have taken a different approach – keeping the magnetic field low to produce a very light and inexpensive system, suitable for bulk water measurements on trees less than 5 cm in diameter, which could easily be duplicated to measure on many trees or from multiple parts of the same tree. Using this system we have shown sensitivity to water content in trees and their cuttings and observed a diurnal signal variation in tree water content in a greenhouse. We also demonstrate that, with calibration and modeling of the thermal polarization, the system is reliable under significant temperature variation.

  9. Low-field nuclear magnetic resonance for the in vivo study of water content in trees.

    PubMed

    Yoder, Jacob; Malone, Michael W; Espy, Michelle A; Sevanto, Sanna

    2014-09-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and magnetic resonance imaging have long been used to study water content in plants. Approaches have been primarily based on systems using large magnetic fields (~1 T) to obtain NMR signals with good signal-to-noise. This is because the NMR signal scales approximately with the magnetic field strength squared. However, there are also limits to this approach in terms of realistic physiological configuration or those imposed by the size and cost of the magnet. Here we have taken a different approach--keeping the magnetic field low to produce a very light and inexpensive system, suitable for bulk water measurements on trees less than 5 cm in diameter, which could easily be duplicated to measure on many trees or from multiple parts of the same tree. Using this system we have shown sensitivity to water content in trees and their cuttings and observed a diurnal signal variation in tree water content in a greenhouse. We also demonstrate that, with calibration and modeling of the thermal polarization, the system is reliable under significant temperature variation.

  10. p -shell carrier assisted dynamic nuclear spin polarization in single quantum dots at zero external magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fong, C. F.; Ota, Y.; Harbord, E.; Iwamoto, S.; Arakawa, Y.

    2016-03-01

    Repeated injection of spin-polarized carriers in a quantum dot (QD) leads to the polarization of nuclear spins, a process known as dynamic nuclear spin polarization (DNP). Here, we report the observation of p-shell carrier assisted DNP in single QDs at zero external magnetic field. The nuclear field—measured by using the Overhauser shift of the singly charged exciton state of the QDs—continues to increase, even after the carrier population in the s-shell saturates. This is also accompanied by an abrupt increase in nuclear spin buildup time as p-shell emission overtakes that of the s shell. We attribute the observation to p-shell electrons strongly altering the nuclear spin dynamics in the QD, supported by numerical simulation results based on a rate equation model of coupling between electron and nuclear spin system. Dynamic nuclear spin polarization with p-shell carriers could open up avenues for further control to increase the degree of nuclear spin polarization in QDs.

  11. Disordered nuclear pasta, magnetic field decay, and crust cooling in neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horowitz, C. J.; Berry, D. K.; Briggs, C. M.; Caplan, M. E.; Cumming, A.; Schneider, A. S.

    2015-04-01

    Nuclear pasta, with non-spherical shapes, is expected near the base of the crust in neutron stars. Large scale molecular dynamics simulations of pasta show long lived topological defects that could increase electron scattering and reduce both the thermal and electrical conductivities. We model a possible low conductivity pasta layer by increasing an impurity parameter Qimp. Predictions of light curves for the low mass X-ray binary MXB 1659-29, assuming a large Qimp, find continued late time cooling that is consistent with Chandra observations. The electrical and thermal conductivities are likely related. Therefore observations of late time crust cooling can provide insight on the electrical conductivity and the possible decay of neutron star magnetic fields (assuming these are supported by currents in the crust). This research was supported in part by DOE Grants DE-FG02-87ER40365 (Indiana University) and DE-SC0008808 (NUCLEI SciDAC Collaboration).

  12. A A field test for extremity dose assessment during outages at Korean nuclear power plants.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hee Geun; Kong, Tae Young

    2013-05-01

    During maintenance on the water chamber of a steam generator, the pressuriser heater and the pressure tube feeder in nuclear power plants, workers are likely to receive high radiation doses due to the severe workplace conditions. In particular, it is expected that workers' hands would receive the highest radiation doses because of their contact with the radioactive materials. In this study, field tests for extremity dose assessments in radiation workers undertaking contact tasks with high radiation doses were conducted during outages at pressurised water reactors and pressurised heavy water reactors in Korea. In the test, the radiation workers were required to wear additional thermoluminescent dosemeters (TLDs) on their backs and wrists and an extremity dosemeter on the finger, as well as a main TLD on the chest while performing the maintenance tasks.

  13. Mixed radiation field dosimetry utilizing Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance. Technical progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Hintenlang, D.

    1991-12-31

    This project has proposed to develop a novel dosimetry system that is capable of directly evaluating the chemical/biological damage caused by neutrons, photons, or both in a single measurement. The dosimeter itself will consist of a small volume of biological equivalent material that is probed for radiation damage with Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance (NQR) techniques. NQR has previously been utilized as a sensitive probe of structural and chemical changes at the molecular level for a variety of organic compounds. The biological equivalent materials used in this study will not only have a density similar to tissue (tissue equivalent) but will have the same atomic components as tissue. This is a significant requirement if the important neutron interactions that occur in tissue are to occur in the dosimeter as well. The overall objective of this study is to investigate a methodology to perform accurate mixed-field (neutron and photon) dosimetry for biological systems.

  14. Disordered nuclear pasta, magnetic field decay, and crust cooling in neutron stars.

    PubMed

    Horowitz, C J; Berry, D K; Briggs, C M; Caplan, M E; Cumming, A; Schneider, A S

    2015-01-23

    Nuclear pasta, with nonspherical shapes, is expected near the base of the crust in neutron stars. Large-scale molecular dynamics simulations of pasta show long lived topological defects that could increase electron scattering and reduce both the thermal and electrical conductivities. We model a possible low-conductivity pasta layer by increasing an impurity parameter Q_{imp}. Predictions of light curves for the low-mass x-ray binary MXB 1659-29, assuming a large Q_{imp}, find continued late time cooling that is consistent with Chandra observations. The electrical and thermal conductivities are likely related. Therefore, observations of late time crust cooling can provide insight on the electrical conductivity and the possible decay of neutron star magnetic fields (assuming these are supported by currents in the crust).

  15. Disordered Nuclear Pasta, Magnetic Field Decay, and Crust Cooling in Neutron Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horowitz, C. J.; Berry, D. K.; Briggs, C. M.; Caplan, M. E.; Cumming, A.; Schneider, A. S.

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear pasta, with nonspherical shapes, is expected near the base of the crust in neutron stars. Large-scale molecular dynamics simulations of pasta show long lived topological defects that could increase electron scattering and reduce both the thermal and electrical conductivities. We model a possible low-conductivity pasta layer by increasing an impurity parameter Qimp . Predictions of light curves for the low-mass x-ray binary MXB 1659-29, assuming a large Qimp, find continued late time cooling that is consistent with Chandra observations. The electrical and thermal conductivities are likely related. Therefore, observations of late time crust cooling can provide insight on the electrical conductivity and the possible decay of neutron star magnetic fields (assuming these are supported by currents in the crust).

  16. Concentration-dependent Effects of Nuclear Lamins on Nuclear Size in Xenopus and Mammalian Cells.

    PubMed

    Jevtić, Predrag; Edens, Lisa J; Li, Xiaoyang; Nguyen, Thang; Chen, Pan; Levy, Daniel L

    2015-11-13

    A fundamental question in cell biology concerns the regulation of organelle size. While nuclear size is exquisitely controlled in different cell types, inappropriate nuclear enlargement is used to diagnose and stage cancer. Clarifying the functional significance of nuclear size necessitates an understanding of the mechanisms and proteins that control nuclear size. One structural component implicated in the regulation of nuclear morphology is the nuclear lamina, a meshwork of intermediate lamin filaments that lines the inner nuclear membrane. However, there has not been a systematic investigation of how the level and type of lamin expression influences nuclear size, in part due to difficulties in precisely controlling lamin expression levels in vivo. In this study, we circumvent this limitation by studying nuclei in Xenopus laevis egg and embryo extracts, open biochemical systems that allow for precise manipulation of lamin levels by the addition of recombinant proteins. We find that nuclear growth and size are sensitive to the levels of nuclear lamins, with low and high concentrations increasing and decreasing nuclear size, respectively. Interestingly, each type of lamin that we tested (lamins B1, B2, B3, and A) similarly affected nuclear size whether added alone or in combination, suggesting that total lamin concentration, and not lamin type, is more critical to determining nuclear size. Furthermore, we show that altering lamin levels in vivo, both in Xenopus embryos and mammalian tissue culture cells, also impacts nuclear size. These results have implications for normal development and carcinogenesis where both nuclear size and lamin expression levels change. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  17. Nuclear war: preliminary estimates of the climatic effects of a nuclear exchange

    SciTech Connect

    MacCracken, M.C.

    1983-10-01

    The smoke rising from burning cities, industrial areas, and forests if such areas are attacked as part of a major nuclear exchange is projected to increase the hemispheric average atmospheric burden of highly absorbent carbonaceous material by 100 to 1000 times. As the smoke spreads from these fires, it would prevent sunlight from reaching the surface, leading to a sharp cooling of land areas over a several day period. Within a few weeks, the thick smoke would spread so as to largely cover the mid-latitudes of the Northern Hemisphere, cooling mid-continental smoke-covered areas by, perhaps, a few tens of degrees Celsius. Cooling of near coastal areas would be substantially less, since oceanic heat capacity would help to buffer temperature changes in such regions. The calculations on which these findings are based contain many assumptions, shortcomings and uncertainties that affect many aspects of the estimated response. It seems, nonetheless, quite possible that if a nuclear exchange involves attacks on a very large number of cities and industrial areas, thereby starting fires that generate as much smoke as is suggested by recent studies, substantial cooling could be expected that would last weeks to months over most continental regions of the Northern Hemisphere, but which may have relatively little direct effect on the Southern Hemisphere.

  18. Disentanglement of Nuclear Medium Effects in the Optical Model Potential

    SciTech Connect

    Arellano, H. F.; Bauge, E.

    2007-10-26

    The microscopic optical model potential for elastic hadron-nucleus scattering is usually represented as the convolution of a two-body effective interaction and the target ground-state mixed density. Traditionally, these convolutions become feasible with the use of simplifying assumptions and the use of the Brueckner-Bethe-Goldstone g-matrix approach for the effective interaction. As a consequence, nuclear medium effects are made explicit in the optical potential as spatial integrals through the bulk of the nucleus[1]. In this contribution we discuss a new and exact approach to track the manifestation of intrinsic nuclear medium effects. Indeed, by examining the structure in momentum and coordinate space of a two-body effective interaction spherically symmetric in its local coordinate, it is demonstrated that it can be expressed as the sum of two distinctive contributions. One of them is a medium-independent term and the other is functionally- and exclusively-proportional to the gradient of the reduced matrix element. As a result, the unabridged optical potential in momentum space becomes expressed as the sum of a medium-free and medium-dependent contributions. The latter depends exclusively on the variations of the effective interaction with respect to the density, being modulated by the gradient of the density ({rho}{sup '}{partial_derivative}/{partial_derivative}{rho}). This feature implies an enhancement of the intrinsic medium effects in the nuclear surface and suppression in the saturated volume. The manifestation of these features will be discussed in the context nucleon-nucleus elastic scattering at low and intermediate energies.

  19. Three-body systems in pionless effective field theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanasse, Jared

    2016-04-01

    Investigations of three-body nuclear systems using pionless effective field theory (EFTπ̸) are reviewed. The history of EFTπ̸ in nd and pd scattering is briefly discussed and emphasis put on the use of strict perturbative techniques. In addition renormalization issues appearing in pd scattering are also presented. Bound state calculations are addressed and new perturbative techniques for describing them are highlighted. Three-body breakup observables in nd scattering are also considered and the utility of EFTπ̸ for addressing them.

  20. Theory for cross effect dynamic nuclear polarization under magic-angle spinning in solid state nuclear magnetic resonance: The importance of level crossings

    PubMed Central

    Thurber, Kent R.; Tycko, Robert

    2012-01-01

    We present theoretical calculations of dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) due to the cross effect in nuclear magnetic resonance under magic-angle spinning (MAS). Using a three-spin model (two electrons and one nucleus), cross effect DNP with MAS for electron spins with a large g-anisotropy can be seen as a series of spin transitions at avoided crossings of the energy levels, with varying degrees of adiabaticity. If the electron spin-lattice relaxation time T1e is large relative to the MAS rotation period, the cross effect can happen as two separate events: (i) partial saturation of one electron spin by the applied microwaves as one electron spin resonance (ESR) frequency crosses the microwave frequency and (ii) flip of all three spins, when the difference of the two ESR frequencies crosses the nuclear frequency, which transfers polarization to the nuclear spin if the two electron spins have different polarizations. In addition, adiabatic level crossings at which the two ESR frequencies become equal serve to maintain non-uniform saturation across the ESR line. We present analytical results based on the Landau-Zener theory of adiabatic transitions, as well as numerical quantum mechanical calculations for the evolution of the time-dependent three-spin system. These calculations provide insight into the dependence of cross effect DNP on various experimental parameters, including MAS frequency, microwave field strength, spin relaxation rates, hyperfine and electron-electron dipole coupling strengths, and the nature of the biradical dopants. PMID:22938251

  1. Theory for cross effect dynamic nuclear polarization under magic-angle spinning in solid state nuclear magnetic resonance: the importance of level crossings.

    PubMed

    Thurber, Kent R; Tycko, Robert

    2012-08-28

    We present theoretical calculations of dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) due to the cross effect in nuclear magnetic resonance under magic-angle spinning (MAS). Using a three-spin model (two electrons and one nucleus), cross effect DNP with MAS for electron spins with a large g-anisotropy can be seen as a series of spin transitions at avoided crossings of the energy levels, with varying degrees of adiabaticity. If the electron spin-lattice relaxation time T(1e) is large relative to the MAS rotation period, the cross effect can happen as two separate events: (i) partial saturation of one electron spin by the applied microwaves as one electron spin resonance (ESR) frequency crosses the microwave frequency and (ii) flip of all three spins, when the difference of the two ESR frequencies crosses the nuclear frequency, which transfers polarization to the nuclear spin if the two electron spins have different polarizations. In addition, adiabatic level crossings at which the two ESR frequencies become equal serve to maintain non-uniform saturation across the ESR line. We present analytical results based on the Landau-Zener theory of adiabatic transitions, as well as numerical quantum mechanical calculations for the evolution of the time-dependent three-spin system. These calculations provide insight into the dependence of cross effect DNP on various experimental parameters, including MAS frequency, microwave field strength, spin relaxation rates, hyperfine and electron-electron dipole coupling strengths, and the nature of the biradical dopants.

  2. Carbon nanotube field effect transistors under high magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedorov, Georgy; Smirnov, Dmitry; Tselev, Alexander; Yang, Yanfei; Kalugin, Nikolay

    2006-03-01

    Magnetic field, when applied parallel to the CNT axis, alters the energy gap in the CNT electron spectrum with a period corresponding to one quantum of magnetic flux through the cross-section of the CNT. With available magnetic fields (10^1T by the order of magnitude), gap oscillations can be observed only in multi-wall CNTs with diameters larger than approx 5 nm, where effects of band structure variation are smeared out by defects and by quantum interference effects. As follows from [1], it is possible to separate effects of disorder from those of the band structure modification by studying magnetotransport in small diameter CNTs while controllably changing the position of the Fermi level of the CNT by electrostatic doping, i.e. by applying a gate voltage in the field effect transistor configuration. We have studied several samples of individual CTNs contacted by palladium electrodes placed on an oxidized heavily doped silicon substrate that served as a back-gate. We find that magnetoresistance of a CNT strongly depends on the Fermi level position with respect to the nanotube's charge neutrality point (CNP). Details and the analysis of our experimental data will be presented. [1] S. Roche, R. Saito, Phys. Rev. Lett. 87, 246803 (2001)

  3. Nuclear effects in the Drell-Yan process.

    SciTech Connect

    Raufeisen, J.

    2002-01-01

    In the target rest frame and at high energies, Drell-Yan (DY) dilepton production looks like bremsstrahlung of massive photons, rather than parton annihilation. The projectile quark is decomposed into a series of Fock states. Configurations with fixed transverse separations in impact parameter space are interaction eigenstates for p p scattering. The DY cross section can then be expressed in terms of the same color dipole cross section as DIS. We compare calculations in this dipole approach with E772 data and with next-to-leading order parton model calculations. This approach is especially suitable to describe nuclear effects, since it allows one to apply Glauber multiple scattering theory. We go beyond the Glauber eikonal approximation by taking into account transitions between states, which would be eigenstates for a proton target. We calculate nuclear shadowing at large Feynman-x{sub F} for DY in proton-nucleus collisions and compare to E772 data. Nuclear effects on the transverse momentum distribution are also investigated.

  4. Nuclear Matter from Effective Quark-Quark Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldo, M.; Fukukawa, K.

    2014-12-01

    We study neutron matter and symmetric nuclear matter with the quark-meson model for the two-nucleon interaction. The Bethe-Bruckner-Goldstone many-body theory is used to describe the correlations up to the three hole-line approximation with no extra parameters. At variance with other nonrelativistic realistic interactions, the three hole-line contribution turns out to be non-negligible and to have a substantial saturation effect. The saturation point of nuclear matter, the compressibility, the symmetry energy, and its slope are within the phenomenological constraints. Since the interaction also reproduces fairly well the properties of the three-nucleon system, these results indicate that the explicit introduction of the quark degrees of freedom within the considered constituent quark model is expected to reduce the role of three-body forces.

  5. Nuclear matter from effective quark-quark interaction.

    PubMed

    Baldo, M; Fukukawa, K

    2014-12-12

    We study neutron matter and symmetric nuclear matter with the quark-meson model for the two-nucleon interaction. The Bethe-Bruckner-Goldstone many-body theory is used to describe the correlations up to the three hole-line approximation with no extra parameters. At variance with other nonrelativistic realistic interactions, the three hole-line contribution turns out to be non-negligible and to have a substantial saturation effect. The saturation point of nuclear matter, the compressibility, the symmetry energy, and its slope are within the phenomenological constraints. Since the interaction also reproduces fairly well the properties of the three-nucleon system, these results indicate that the explicit introduction of the quark degrees of freedom within the considered constituent quark model is expected to reduce the role of three-body forces.

  6. Effect of nuclear ownership on utility bond ratings and yields

    SciTech Connect

    Nesse, R.J.

    1982-02-01

    The major objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that investors have required an additional interest rate premium before purchasing bonds of utilities with large investments in nuclear facilities. The study required several tasks. First, the literature relating to firm bankruptcy and default was reviewed. Second, the failing financial health of the electric utility industry was assessed in terms of construction problems, the impact of federal and state regulations, and the impact of Three Mile Island. Finally, data were collected on 63 electric utilities. This allowed statistical estimation of the magnitude of the risk premium associated with utility involvement in nuclear power. The effect of this involvement on a utility's bond ratings was also examined. Multiple regression was the statistical tool used for the statistical testing and estimation.

  7. Rotatable Small Permanent Magnet Array for Ultra-Low Field Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Instrumentation: A Concept Study

    PubMed Central

    Vegh, Viktor; Reutens, David C.

    2016-01-01

    Object We studied the feasibility of generating the variable magnetic fields required for ultra-low field nuclear magnetic resonance relaxometry with dynamically adjustable permanent magnets. Our motivation was to substitute traditional electromagnets by distributed permanent magnets, increasing system portability. Materials and Methods The finite element method (COMSOL®) was employed for the numerical study of a small permanent magnet array to calculate achievable magnetic field strength, homogeneity, switching time and magnetic forces. A manually operated prototype was simulated and constructed to validate the numerical approach and to verify the generated magnetic field. Results A concentric small permanent magnet array can be used to generate strong sample pre-polarisation and variable measurement fields for ultra-low field relaxometry via simple prescribed magnet rotations. Using the array, it is possible to achieve a pre-polarisation field strength above 100 mT and variable measurement fields ranging from 20–50 μT with 200 ppm absolute field homogeneity within a field-of-view of 5 x 5 x 5 cubic centimetres. Conclusions A dynamic small permanent magnet array can generate multiple highly homogeneous magnetic fields required in ultra-low field nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) instruments. This design can significantly reduce the volume and energy requirements of traditional systems based on electromagnets, improving portability considerably. PMID:27271886

  8. Rotatable Small Permanent Magnet Array for Ultra-Low Field Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Instrumentation: A Concept Study.

    PubMed

    Vogel, Michael W; Giorni, Andrea; Vegh, Viktor; Pellicer-Guridi, Ruben; Reutens, David C

    2016-01-01

    We studied the feasibility of generating the variable magnetic fields required for ultra-low field nuclear magnetic resonance relaxometry with dynamically adjustable permanent magnets. Our motivation was to substitute traditional electromagnets by distributed permanent magnets, increasing system portability. The finite element method (COMSOL®) was employed for the numerical study of a small permanent magnet array to calculate achievable magnetic field strength, homogeneity, switching time and magnetic forces. A manually operated prototype was simulated and constructed to validate the numerical approach and to verify the generated magnetic field. A concentric small permanent magnet array can be used to generate strong sample pre-polarisation and variable measurement fields for ultra-low field relaxometry via simple prescribed magnet rotations. Using the array, it is possible to achieve a pre-polarisation field strength above 100 mT and variable measurement fields ranging from 20-50 μT with 200 ppm absolute field homogeneity within a field-of-view of 5 x 5 x 5 cubic centimetres. A dynamic small permanent magnet array can generate multiple highly homogeneous magnetic fields required in ultra-low field nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) instruments. This design can significantly reduce the volume and energy requirements of traditional systems based on electromagnets, improving portability considerably.

  9. Effective kaon masses in dense nuclear and neutron matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waas, T.; Kaiser, N.; Weise, W.

    1996-02-01

    The effective mass and decay width of kaonic modes in baryonic matter are studied within a coupled-channel approach based on the Chiral SU(3) Effective Lagrangian which describes all available low energy data of the coupled overlineKN, π∑, πΛ system. Including Pauli blocking and Fermi motion in the kaon dispersion relation, we find a strong non-linear density dependence of the K - effective mass and decay width in symmetric nuclear matter at densities around 0.1 times normal nuclear matter density ϱ0 due to the in-medium dynamics of the Λ(1405) resonance. At higher densities the K - effective mass decreases slowly but stays above 0.5 mK at least up to densities below 3 ϱ0. In neutron matter the K - effective mass decreases almost linearly with increasing density but remains relatively large ( m K∗ > 0.65 m K) for ϱn ≲ 3 ϱ0. The K + effective mass turns out to increase very slowly with rising density.

  10. Spectroscopic study of energetic helium-ion irradiation effects on nuclear graphite tiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Do Wan; Lee, K. W.; Choi, D. M.; Noh, S. J.; Kim, H. S.; Lee, Cheol Eui

    2016-02-01

    Helium ion-irradiation effects on the nuclear graphite tiles were studied in order to understand the structural modifications and damages that can be produced by fusion reaction in tokamaks. The surface morphological changes due to increasing dose of the irradiation were examined by the field-effect scanning electron microscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy elucidated the changes in the shallow surface bonding configurations caused by the energetic irradiation. Raman spectroscopy revealed the structural defects and diamond-like carbon sites that increased with increasing irradiation dose, and the average inter-defect distance was found from the Raman peak intensities as a function of the irradiation dose.

  11. Liquid-gas phase transitions in a multicomponent nuclear system with Coulomb and surface effects

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S. J.; Mekjian, A. Z.

    2001-04-01

    The liquid-gas phase transition is studied in a multicomponent nuclear system using a local Skyrme interaction with Coulomb and surface effects. Some features are qualitatively the same as the results of Mu''ller and Serot where a relativistic mean field was used without Coulomb and surface effects. Surface tension brings the coexistence binodal surface to lower pressure. The Coulomb interaction makes the binodal surface smaller and causes another pair of binodal points at low pressure and large proton fraction with fewer protons in the liquid phase and more protons in the gas phase.

  12. Characterization of Radiation Fields in Biological Shields of Nuclear Power Plants for Assessing Concrete Degradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remec, Igor; Rosseel, Thomas M.; Field, Kevin G.; Le Pape, Yann

    2016-02-01

    Life extensions of nuclear power plants to 60 and potentially 80 years of operation have renewed interest in long-term material degradation. One material being considered is concrete, with a particular focus on radiation-induced effects. Based on the projected neutron fluence values (E > 0.1 MeV) in the concrete biological shields of the US pressurized water reactor fleet and the available data on radiation effects on concrete, some decrease in mechanical properties of concrete cannot be ruled out during extended operation beyond 60 years. An expansion of the irradiated concrete database and a reliable determination of relevant neutron fluence energy cutoff value are necessary to ensure reliable risk assessment for extended operation of nuclear power plants. Notice: This manuscript has been authored by UT-Battelle, LLC, under contract DE-AC0500OR22725 with the US Department of Energy. The United States Government retains and the publisher, by accepting the article for publication, acknowledges that the United States Government retains a nonexclusive, paid-up, irrevocable, worldwide license to publish or reproduce the published form of this manuscript, or allow others to do so, for United States Government purposes.

  13. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) in vivo studies: known thresholds for health effects

    SciTech Connect

    Budinger, T.F.

    1981-12-01

    Three sources of harmful health effects from nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) in vivo techniques have been examined with the following conclusions: (a) Static magnetic fields. Harmful effects on humans and reproducible cellular, biochemical, or genetic effects have not yet been observed at fields less than 2 Tesla (20,000 gauss). (b) Changing magnetic fields. The threshold for effects of induced currents is above that produced from <1 to 100 Hz sinusoidal field changes with a maximum field of 5 mT (50 gauss). Waveform, repetition rate, maximum B field, and duration of exposure are parameters requiring further study, (c) Radiofrequency (RF) heating. A practical upper level for absorbed power is 4 W/kg in medically important studies of short duration (less than 10 min). For long-term studies, 1.5 W/kg is a reasonable level in low humidity environments. The power absorbed by the subject can be estimated by measuring the RF coil Q before and after the subject is placed in the NMR instrument. Large metal objects will absorb power in proportion to the conductivity of the device of prosthesis.

  14. Effective colloidal interactions in rotating magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coughlan, Anna C. H.; Bevan, Michael A.

    2017-08-01

    Non-equilibrium, steady-state effective pair potentials of micron-sized superparamagnetic particles in rotating magnetic fields are obtained vs. field frequency and amplitude. Trajectories of center-to-center distance between particle pairs from Brownian dynamic simulations, which were previously matched to experimental measurements, are analyzed to obtain local drift and diffusion coefficients. These coefficients are used to obtain effective interaction potentials from solving a one-dimensional Fokker-Planck equation. Biased sampling of the effective energy landscape was implemented by intermittent switching between the field of interest and a repulsive field. Our findings show how the shape and attractive well-depth of pair interactions can be tuned by changing field frequency and amplitude.

  15. ARC: A compact, high-field, disassemblable fusion nuclear science facility and demonstration power plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorbom, Brandon; Ball, Justin; Palmer, Timothy; Mangiarotti, Franco; Sierchio, Jennifer; Bonoli, Paul; Kasten, Cale; Sutherland, Derek; Barnard, Harold; Haakonsen, Christian; Goh, Jon; Sung, Choongki; Whyte, Dennis

    2014-10-01

    The Affordable, Robust, Compact (ARC) reactor conceptual design aims to reduce the size, cost, and complexity of a combined Fusion Nuclear Science Facility (FNSF) and demonstration fusion pilot power plant. ARC is a 270 MWe tokamak reactor with a major radius of 3.3 m, a minor radius of 1.1 m, and an on-axis magnetic field of 9.2 T. ARC has Rare Earth Barium Copper Oxide (REBCO) superconducting toroidal field coils with joints to allow disassembly, allowing for removal and replacement of the vacuum vessel as a single component. Inboard-launched current drive of 25 MW LHRF power and 13.6 MW ICRF power is used to provide a robust, steady state core plasma far from disruptive limits. ARC uses an all-liquid blanket, consisting of low pressure, slowly flowing Fluorine Lithium Beryllium (FLiBe) molten salt. The liquid blanket acts as a working fluid, coolant, and tritium breeder, and minimizes the solid material that can become activated. The large temperature range over which FLiBe is liquid permits blanket operation at 800-900 K with single phase fluid cooling and allows use of a high-efficiency Brayton cycle for electricity production in the secondary coolant loop.

  16. HT to HTO conversion and field experiments near Darlington Nuclear Power Generating Station (DNPGS) site.

    PubMed

    Kim, S B; Stuart, M; Bredlaw, M; Festarini, A; Beaton, D

    2014-06-01

    The Canadian input parameters related to tritiated hydrogen gas (HT) used in tritium dose models are currently based on experiments performed at the Chalk River Laboratories (CRL) site in 1986, 1987 and 1994. There is uncertainty in how well other sites experiencing atmospheric HT releases are represented by these data. In order to address this uncertainty, HT to HTO conversion factors were evaluated at different locations near the Darlington Nuclear Power Generating Station (DNPGS) site using various experimental approaches. These were D2 gas exposure chamber experiments, atmospheric tritium measurements, and HTO and OBT measurements in vegetation and soil. In addition to these field experiments, chamber experiments were conducted using HT gas on field soil samples. The suggested Canadian input parameters for atmospheric tritium releases estimate the total fraction of HT oxidized in air and in soil, at the site, to be up to a maximum of 2.4%. Based on the more limited data obtained near DNPGS in early spring, this fraction would likely be closer to 0.5%. The result suggests that current parameters provide a conservative estimate for the DNPGS site.

  17. SQUIDs vs. Induction Coils for Ultra-Low Field Nuclear Magnetic Resonance: Experimental and Simulation Comparison.

    PubMed

    Matlashov, Andrei N; Schultz, Larry J; Espy, Michelle A; Kraus, Robert H; Savukov, Igor M; Volegov, Petr L; Wurden, Caroline J

    2011-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is widely used in medicine, chemistry and industry. One application area is magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Recently it has become possible to perform NMR and MRI in the ultra-low field (ULF) regime requiring measurement field strengths of the order of only 1 Gauss. This technique exploits the advantages offered by superconducting quantum interference devices or SQUIDs. Our group has built SQUID based MRI systems for brain imaging and for liquid explosives detection at airport security checkpoints. The requirement for liquid helium cooling limits potential applications of ULF MRI for liquid identification and security purposes. Our experimental comparative investigation shows that room temperature inductive magnetometers may provide enough sensitivity in the 3-10 kHz range and can be used for fast liquid explosives detection based on ULF NMR technique. We describe experimental and computer-simulation results comparing multichannel SQUID based and induction coils based instruments that are capable of performing ULF MRI for liquid identification.

  18. SQUIDs vs. Faraday coils for ultlra-low field nuclear magnetic resonance: experimental and simulation comparison

    SciTech Connect

    Matlashov, Andrei N; Espy, Michelle A; Kraus, Robert H; Sayukov, Igor M; Schultz, Larry J; Urbaitis, Algis V; Volegov, Petr L; Wurden, Caroline J

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) methods are widely used in medicine, chemistry and industry. One application area is magnetic resonance imaging or MRI. Recently it has become possible to perform NMR and MRI in ultra-low field (ULF) regime that requires measurement field strengths only of the order of 1 Gauss. These techniques exploit the advantages offered by superconducting quantum interference devices or SQUIDs. Our group at LANL has built SQUID based MRI systems for brain imaging and for liquid explosives detection at airports security checkpoints. The requirement for liquid helium cooling limits potential applications of ULF MRI for liquid identification and security purposes. Our experimental comparative investigation shows that room temperature inductive magnetometers provide enough sensitivity in the 3-10 kHz range and can be used for fast liquid explosives detection based on ULF NMR/MRI technique. We describe an experimental and computer simulation comparison of the world's first multichannel SQUID based and Faraday coils based instruments that are capable of performing ULF MRI for liquids identification.

  19. SQUIDs vs. Induction Coils for Ultra-Low Field Nuclear Magnetic Resonance: Experimental and Simulation Comparison

    PubMed Central

    Matlashov, Andrei N.; Schultz, Larry J.; Espy, Michelle A.; Kraus, Robert H.; Savukov, Igor M.; Volegov, Petr L.; Wurden, Caroline J.

    2011-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is widely used in medicine, chemistry and industry. One application area is magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Recently it has become possible to perform NMR and MRI in the ultra-low field (ULF) regime requiring measurement field strengths of the order of only 1 Gauss. This technique exploits the advantages offered by superconducting quantum interference devices or SQUIDs. Our group has built SQUID based MRI systems for brain imaging and for liquid explosives detection at airport security checkpoints. The requirement for liquid helium cooling limits potential applications of ULF MRI for liquid identification and security purposes. Our experimental comparative investigation shows that room temperature inductive magnetometers may provide enough sensitivity in the 3–10 kHz range and can be used for fast liquid explosives detection based on ULF NMR technique. We describe experimental and computer-simulation results comparing multichannel SQUID based and induction coils based instruments that are capable of performing ULF MRI for liquid identification. PMID:21747638

  20. Determining diffusion coefficients of ionic liquids by means of field cycling nuclear magnetic resonance relaxometry.

    PubMed

    Kruk, D; Meier, R; Rachocki, A; Korpała, A; Singh, R K; Rössler, E A

    2014-06-28

    Field Cycling Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (FC NMR) relaxation studies are reported for three ionic liquids: 1-ethyl-3- methylimidazolium thiocyanate (EMIM-SCN, 220-258 K), 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate (BMIM-BF4, 243-318 K), and 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate (BMIM-PF6, 258-323 K). The dispersion of (1)H spin-lattice relaxation rate R1(ω) is measured in the frequency range of 10 kHz-20 MHz, and the studies are complemented by (19)F spin-lattice relaxation measurements on BMIM-PF6 in the corresponding frequency range. From the (1)H relaxation results self-diffusion coefficients for the cation in EMIM-SCN, BMIM-BF4, and BMIM-PF6 are determined. This is done by performing an analysis considering all relevant intra- and intermolecular relaxation contributions to the (1)H spin-lattice relaxation as well as by benefiting from the universal low-frequency dispersion law characteristic of Fickian diffusion which yields, at low frequencies, a linear dependence of R1 on square root of frequency. From the (19)F relaxation both anion and cation diffusion coefficients are determined for BMIM-PF6. The diffusion coefficients obtained from FC NMR relaxometry are in good agreement with results reported from pulsed- field-gradient NMR. This shows that NMR relaxometry can be considered as an alternative route of determining diffusion coefficients of both cations and anions in ionic liquids.

  1. Spherical chamber effective solution for multipurpose nuclear microprobe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelicon, P.; Simčič, J.; Jakšić, M.; Medunić, Z.; Naab, F.; McDaniel, F. D.

    2005-04-01

    Vacuum chambers for multipurpose nuclear microprobes must provide for the installation and servicing of several detection systems operating simultaneously, as well as sample visual control and mechanical manipulation. Detectors for X-rays, scattered ions, nuclear reaction products, secondary electrons, secondary luminescence and optical microscopes are mounted at the angles preferably larger than 120° with respect to the beam direction. Their positioning should not increase the space in the region between the ion lens and the focal point of the microprobe. Spherical chambers presented here effectively solve this problem and offer, at the same time, ports for gamma-ray detector, annular microscope, easy manual access in the sample region, ports for vertical and horizontal sample positioning and manipulation, as well as STIM and ERDA detectors at forward scattering angles and the Faraday cup. The basic construction, resulting in the three different but similar chamber designs at three nuclear microprobes worldwide, are presented. Current installation details, comments on the performance and suggested improvements are given.

  2. Analysis of Near-Field Seismic Waveforms from Underground Nuclear Explosions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-09-15

    scaling relations for nuclear explosions in dry tuff and alluvium at Yucca Flats . This is a continuation of the approach we have used for modeling... seismic observations, Nuclear explosions, Dry tuff, I I Alluvium , Seismic detection of Nuclear Explosions ,. ABSTRACT ,Continue on reverse if necesasarv...determined for source strength of nuclear explosions detonated in dry tuff or alluvium , and was used to predict the amplitudes from several other Yucca

  3. Solar Magnetic Field: Zeeman and Hanle Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stenflo, J.; Murdin, P.

    2001-10-01

    An external magnetic field causes the atomic energy levels to split into different sublevels, and the emitted radiation becomes polarized. This phenomenon is called the ZEEMAN EFFECT. When atoms in a magnetic field scatter radiation via bound-bound transitions, the phase relations or quantum interferences between the Zeeman-split sublevels give rise to POLARIZATION phenomena that go under the nam...

  4. Vector meson production and nuclear effects in FNAL E866

    SciTech Connect

    Leitch, M.J.; Brooks, M.L.; Awes, T.C.

    1999-02-01

    Fermilab E866/NUSEA is a fixed-target experiment which has made a number of measurements of the production of vector mesons by 800 GeV protons. These include the nuclear dependence of J/{psi}, {psi}{prime} and {phi} over very broad ranges in x{sub F} and p{sub T}, and the J/{psi} decay angular distribution at very large x{sub F}. Preliminary results from measurements on Be, Fe and W targets are presented and discussed in the context of nuclear effects such as energy loss and multiple scattering of the partons, absorption of the produced c{anti c} pairs, and shadowing. Production mechanisms involving color-singlet or color-octet states for the c{anti c} pair which eventually forms a J{psi} or {psi}{prime} have implications on the strength of absorption in the nucleus and on the angular distribution of the decay muons. Preliminary results on the angular distributions versus x{sub F} and p{sub T} indicate some transverse polarization of the J/{psi} as predicted by models of production through the color octet state. Measurements of dimuons in the 1 to 3 GeV region explore the nuclear dependence of the {phi} meson and also the composition of the continuum between the {phi} and the J/{psi}. These studies of vector meson production and its nuclear dependence are critical in furthering their understanding of these processes towards future measurements at RHIC and new results from NA50 at CERN, where J/{psi} suppression is predicted to be an important signature of the creation of quark-gluon plasma in heavy-ion collisions.

  5. Approximate analytical solution for nuclear matter in a mean-field Walecka model and Coester line behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Delfino, A.; Silva, J.B.; Malheiro, M.

    2006-03-15

    We study nuclear matter, at the mean-field approximation, by considering as equal the values of the scalar and the vector density in the Walecka model, which is a very reasonable approximation up to the nuclear matter saturation density. It turns out that the model has an analytical solution for the scalar and vector couplings as functions only of the nuclear matter density and binding energy. The nuclear matter properties are very close to the original version of the model. This solution allows us to show that the correlation between the binding energy and the saturation density is Coester line like. The liquid-gas phase transition is also studied and the critical and flash temperatures are again very similar to the original ones.

  6. Characterization of Radiation Fields in Biological Shields of Nuclear Power Plants for Assessing Concrete Degradation

    SciTech Connect

    Remec, Igor; Rosseel, Thomas M; Field, Kevin G; Pape, Yann Le

    2016-01-01

    Life extensions of nuclear power plants to 60 and potentially 80 years of operation have renewed interest in long-term material degradation. One material being considered is concrete with a particular focus on radiation-induced effects. Based on the projected neutron fluence (E > 0.1 MeV) values in the concrete biological shields of the US PWR fleet and the available data on radiation effects on concrete, some decrease in mechanical properties of concrete cannot be ruled out during extended operation beyond 60 years. An expansion of the irradiated concrete database and a reliable determination of relevant neutron fluence energy cutoff value are necessary to assure reliable risk assessment for NPPs extended operation.

  7. Theoretical aspects of dynamic nuclear polarization in the solid state - the solid effect.

    PubMed

    Hovav, Yonatan; Feintuch, Akiva; Vega, Shimon

    2010-12-01

    Dynamic nuclear polarization has gained high popularity in recent years, due to advances in the experimental aspects of this methodology for increasing the NMR and MRI signals of relevant chemical and biological compounds. The DNP mechanism relies on the microwave (MW) irradiation induced polarization transfer from unpaired electrons to the nuclei in a sample. In this publication we present nuclear polarization enhancements of model systems in the solid state at high magnetic fields. These results were obtained by numerical calculations based on the spin density operator formalism. Here we restrict ourselves to samples with low electron concentrations, where the dipolar electron-electron interactions can be ignored. Thus the DNP enhancement of the polarizations of the nuclei close to the electrons is described by the Solid Effect mechanism. Our numerical results demonstrate the dependence of the polarization enhancement on the MW irradiation power and frequency, the hyperfine and nuclear dipole-dipole spin interactions, and the relaxation parameters of the system. The largest spin system considered in this study contains one electron and eight nuclei. In particular, we discuss the influence of the nuclear concentration and relaxation on the polarization of the core nuclei, which are coupled to an electron, and are responsible for the transfer of polarization to the bulk nuclei in the sample via spin diffusion. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Theoretical aspects of dynamic nuclear polarization in the solid state - The solid effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hovav, Yonatan; Feintuch, Akiva; Vega, Shimon

    2010-12-01

    Dynamic nuclear polarization has gained high popularity in recent years, due to advances in the experimental aspects of this methodology for increasing the NMR and MRI signals of relevant chemical and biological compounds. The DNP mechanism relies on the microwave (MW) irradiation induced polarization transfer from unpaired electrons to the nuclei in a sample. In this publication we present nuclear polarization enhancements of model systems in the solid state at high magnetic fields. These results were obtained by numerical calculations based on the spin density operator formalism. Here we restrict ourselves to samples with low electron concentrations, where the dipolar electron-electron interactions can be ignored. Thus the DNP enhancement of the polarizations of the nuclei close to the electrons is described by the Solid Effect mechanism. Our numerical results demonstrate the dependence of the polarization enhancement on the MW irradiation power and frequency, the hyperfine and nuclear dipole-dipole spin interactions, and the relaxation parameters of the system. The largest spin system considered in this study contains one electron and eight nuclei. In particular, we discuss the influence of the nuclear concentration and relaxation on the polarization of the core nuclei, which are coupled to an electron, and are responsible for the transfer of polarization to the bulk nuclei in the sample via spin diffusion.

  9. FieldREG II: consciousness field effects: replications and explorations.

    PubMed

    Nelson, R D; Jahn, R G; Dunne, B J; Dobyns, Y H; Bradish, G J

    2007-01-01

    Based on formal analysis of 18 exploratory applications, 12 of which have been reported previously, a testable general hypothesis for FieldREG experiments has been postulated, namely that data taken in environments fostering relatively intense or profound subjective resonance will show larger deviations of the mean relative to chance expectation than those generated in more pragmatic assemblies. The 61 subsequent FieldREG applications reported here comprise 21 hypothesis-based formal replications, along with 40 further explorations designed to learn more about the circumstances that favor anomalous deviations. The results of the formal replications strongly confirm the general hypothesis, yielding a composite probability against chance for the resonant subset of 2.2 x 10(-6) compared to 0.91 for the mundane subset. The exploratory work suggests other venues in which anomalous effects of group consciousness can be expected, and also identifies a number of situations that do not appear to be conducive to such responses.

  10. Electric field control of the magnetocaloric effect.

    PubMed

    Gong, Yuan-Yuan; Wang, Dun-Hui; Cao, Qing-Qi; Liu, En-Ke; Liu, Jian; Du, You-Wei

    2015-02-04

    Through strain-mediated magnetoelectric coupling, it is demonstrated that the magnetocaloric effect of a ferromagnetic shape-memory alloy can be controlled by an electric field. Large hysteresis and the limited operating temperature region are effectively overcome by applying an electric field on a laminate comprising a piezoelectric and the alloy. Accordingly, a model for an active magnetic refrigerator with high efficiency is proposed in principle.

  11. (13)C-Decoupled J-Coupling Spectroscopy Using Two-Dimensional Nuclear Magnetic Resonance at Zero-Field.

    PubMed

    Sjolander, Tobias F; Tayler, Michael C D; Kentner, Arne; Budker, Dmitry; Pines, Alexander

    2017-04-06

    We present a two-dimensional method for obtaining (13)C-decoupled, (1)H-coupled nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra in zero magnetic field using coherent spin-decoupling. The result is a spectrum determined only by the proton-proton J-coupling network. Detection of NMR signals in zero magnetic field requires at least two different nuclear spin species, but the proton J-spectrum is independent of isotopomer, thus potentially simplifying spectra and thereby improving the analytical capabilities of zero-field NMR. The protocol does not rely on a difference in Larmor frequency between the coupled nuclei, allowing for the direct determination of J-coupling constants between chemically equivalent spins. We obtain the (13)C-decoupled zero-field spectrum of [1-(13)C]-propionic acid and identify conserved quantum numbers governing the appearance of cross peaks in the two-dimensional spectrum.

  12. Diamond nitrogen vacancy electronic and nuclear spin-state anti-crossings under weak transverse magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clevenson, Hannah; Chen, Edward; Dolde, Florian; Teale, Carson; Englund, Dirk; Braje, Danielle

    2016-05-01

    We report on detailed studies of electronic and nuclear spin states in the diamond nitrogen vacancy (NV) center under moderate transverse magnetic fields. We numerically predict and experimentally verify a previously unobserved NV ground state hyperfine anti-crossing occurring at magnetic bias fields as low as tens of Gauss - two orders of magnitude lower than previously reported hyperfine anti-crossings at ~ 510 G and ~ 1000 G axial magnetic fields. We then discuss how this regime can be optimized for magnetometry and other sensing applications and propose a method for how the nitrogen-vacancy ground state Hamiltonian can be manipulated by small transverse magnetic fields to polarize the nuclear spin state. Acknowlegement: The Lincoln Laboratory portion of this work is sponsored by the Assistant Secretary of Defense for Research & Engineering under Air Force Contract #FA8721-05-C-0002. Opinions, interpretations, conclusions and recommendations are those of the authors and are not necessarily endorsed by the United States Government.

  13. Radiation effects on organic materials in nuclear plants. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Bruce, M B; Davis, M V

    1981-11-01

    A literature search was conducted to identify information useful in determining the lowest level at which radiation causes damage to nuclear plant equipment. Information was sought concerning synergistic effects of radiation and other environmental stresses. Organic polymers are often identified as the weak elements in equipment. Data on radiation effects are summarized for 50 generic name plastics and 16 elastomers. Coatings, lubricants, and adhesives are treated as separate groups. Inorganics and metallics are considered briefly. With a few noted exceptions, these are more radiation resistant than organic materials. Some semiconductor devices and electronic assemblies are extremely sensitive to radiation. Any damage threshold including these would be too low to be of practical value. With that exception, equipment exposed to less than 10/sup 4/ rads should not be significantly affected. Equipment containing no Teflon should not be significantly affected by 10/sup 5/ rads. Data concerning synergistic effects and radiation sensitization are discussed. The authors suggest correlations between the two effects.

  14. Polarization effects in molecular mechanical force fields

    PubMed Central

    Cieplak, Piotr; Dupradeau, François-Yves; Duan, Yong; Wang, Junmei

    2014-01-01

    The focus here is on incorporating electronic polarization into classical molecular mechanical force fields used for macromolecular simulations. First, we briefly examine currently used molecular mechanical force fields and the current status of intermolecular forces as viewed by quantum mechanical approaches. Next, we demonstrate how some components of quantum mechanical energy are effectively incorporated into classical molecular mechanical force fields. Finally, we assess the modeling methods of one such energy component—polarization energy—and present an overview of polarizable force fields and their current applications. Incorporating polarization effects into current force fields paves the way to developing potentially more accurate, though more complex, parameterizations that can be used for more realistic molecular simulations. PMID:21828594

  15. Temperature dependence of high field 13C dynamic nuclear polarization processes with trityl radicals below 35 Kelvin.

    PubMed

    Walker, Shamon A; Edwards, Devin T; Siaw, Ting Ann; Armstrong, Brandon D; Han, Songi

    2013-09-28

    In order to facilitate versatile applications with high field dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP), it is important to be able to optimize the DNP performance, i.e. reach high nuclear hyperpolarization within a short signal build up time. Given that the solid-state DNP process is strongly temperature-dependent, it is important to benchmark the temperature dependence of various DNP and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) parameters that can then be used to test and develop theories and models for high field DNP mechanisms. However, DNP and EPR experiments at high fields and cryogenic temperatures below 20 Kelvin usually require home built instrumentation, and therefore even basic experimental observations are lacking in the literature. DNP and EPR experiments at 7 T (197 GHz) and 8.5 T (240 GHz), respectively, were conducted at temperatures between 35 K and 3.7 K where the electron thermal polarization changes from 13.4% to 85.6%, respectively. The samples are frozen solutions of 15 mM OX063Me trityl radicals in various mixtures of [1-(13)C]pyruvic acid, glycerol, and Gd(3+)-chelates. For all sample mixtures, the trityl EPR lines are found to be inhomogeneously broadened and the dominant DNP mechanism is shown to be the cross effect (CE). A 20%, 11%, and 6.77% (13)C polarization is achieved at 3.7 K with a [1-(13)C]pyruvic-glycerol-H2O sample, the addition of 2 mM of Gd(3+)-chelates, and pure [1-(13)C]pyruvic acid, respectively. When T1n is sufficiently long, our results seem to suggest T1e is a key variable in the DNP process, where longer T1e values correlate with larger DNP enhancements (εDNP). The experimental data reported here on the temperature dependence of T1n, T1e, Tm (electron phase memory time), the EPR linewidth, TDNP and ε(DNP) at high fields will be helpful for testing the mechanism and theory of DNP processes.

  16. Scanning nuclear electric resonance microscopy using quantum-Hall-effect breakdown

    SciTech Connect

    Hashimoto, K. Tomimatsu, T.; Shirai, S.; Taninaka, S.; Nagase, K.; Sato, K.; Hirayama, Y.

    2016-07-15

    We present a scanning nuclear-spin resonance (NSR) method that incorporates resistive detection with electric-field induced NSR locally excited by a scanning metallic probe. In the quantum-Hall effect breakdown regime, NSR intensity mapping at both the fundamental NSR frequency f{sub 75As} and twice the frequency 2f{sub 75As} demonstrates the capability to probe the distribution of nuclear polarization, particularly in a semiconductor quantum well. We find that f{sub 75As} NSR excitation drives not only local NSR but also spatially overlapped nonlocal NSR, which suppresses the maximum intensity of local NSR, while the 2f{sub 75As} NSR yields purely local excitation conferring a larger intensity.

  17. Climate and chemistry effects of a regional scale nuclear conflict

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stenke, A.; Hoyle, C. R.; Luo, B.; Rozanov, E.; Gröbner, J.; Maag, L.; Brönnimann, S.; Peter, T.

    2013-05-01

    Previous studies have highlighted the severity of detrimental effects for life on Earth after an assumed regionally limited nuclear war. These effects are caused by climatic, chemical and radiative changes persisting for up to one decade. However, so far only a very limited number of climate model simulations have been performed, giving rise to the question how realistic previous computations have been. This study uses the coupled chemistry climate model (CCM) SOCOL, which belongs to a different family of CCMs than previously used, to investigate the consequences of such a hypothetical nuclear conflict. In accordance with previous studies, the present work assumes a scenario of a nuclear conflict between India and Pakistan, each applying 50 warheads with an individual blasting power of 15 kt ("Hiroshima size") against the major population centers, resulting in the emission of tiny soot particles, which are generated in the firestorms expected in the aftermath of the detonations. Substantial uncertainties related to the calculation of likely soot emissions, particularly concerning assumptions of target fuel loading and targeting of weapons, have been addressed by simulating several scenarios, with soot emissions ranging from 1 to 12 Tg. Their high absorptivity with respect to solar radiation leads to a tremendous self-lofting of the soot particles into the strato- and mesosphere, where they remain for several years. Consequently, the model suggests Earth's surface temperatures to drop by several degrees Celsius due to the shielding of solar irradiance by the soot, indicating a major global cooling. In addition, there is a substantial reduction of precipitation lasting 5 to 10 yr after the conflict, depending on the magnitude of the initial soot release. Extreme cold spells associated with massive sea ice formation are found during Northern Hemisphere winter, which expose the continental land masses of Northern America and Eurasia to chilling coldness. In the

  18. [Radiation-related health effects of major nuclear events].

    PubMed

    Orgiazzi, Jacques

    2015-01-01

    Three major nuclear events, the Hirosima and Nagasaki bombings and the Chernobyl and Fukushima catastrophes, have been selected to Illustrate the health consequences, observed or anticipated, of irradation of populations. Differences in doses and modalities of irradiation, with the combination of clinical epidemiology and dose estimates, recently revisited, allow for more accurate dose-effect relationship models of the risks. However, extrapolation to the low-doses (< 0.1 Gy) or very low-doses of these models obtained with doses ≥ 0.2 Gy remains hazardous.

  19. Nuclear EMC effect in non-extensive statistical model

    SciTech Connect

    Trevisan, Luis A.; Mirez, Carlos

    2013-05-06

    In the present work, we attempt to describe the nuclear EMC effect by using the proton structure functions obtained from the non-extensive statistical quark model. We record that such model has three fundamental variables, the temperature T, the radius, and the Tsallis parameter q. By combining different small changes, a good agreement with the experimental data may be obtained. Another interesting point of the model is to allow phenomenological interpretation, for instance, with q constant and changing the radius and the temperature or changing the radius and q and keeping the temperature.

  20. Nuclear Quantum Vibrational Effects in Shock Hugoniot Temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Goldman, N; Reed, E; Fried, L E

    2009-07-23

    We present a straightforward method for the inclusion of quantum nuclear vibrational effects in molecular dynamics calculations of shock Hugoniot temperatures. Using a Grueneisen equation of state and a quasiharmonic approximation to the vibrational energies, we derive a simple, post-processing method for calculation of the quantum corrected Hugoniot temperatures. We have used our novel technique on ab initio simulations of shock compressed water. Our results indicate significantly closer agreement with all available experimental temperature data. Our formalism and technique can be easily applied to a number of different shock compressed molecular liquids or solids.

  1. Research on the climatic effects of nuclear winter: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Dickinson, R.E.

    1986-12-03

    The National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) has undertaken a series of research efforts to develop and implement improvements to the Community Climate Model (CCM) needed to make the model more applicable to studies of the climatic effects of nuclear war. The development of the model improvements has reached a stage where implementation may proceed, and several of the developed routines are being incorporated into the next approved version of the CCM (CCM1). Formal documentation is being completed describing the specific model improvements that have been successfully implemented. This final report includes the series of annual proposals and progress reports that have guided the project.

  2. Graphene Field Effect Transistor for Radiation Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Mary J. (Inventor); Chen, Zhihong (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    The present invention relates to a graphene field effect transistor-based radiation sensor for use in a variety of radiation detection applications, including manned spaceflight missions. The sensing mechanism of the radiation sensor is based on the high sensitivity of graphene in the local change of electric field that can result from the interaction of ionizing radiation with a gated undoped silicon absorber serving as the supporting substrate in the graphene field effect transistor. The radiation sensor has low power and high sensitivity, a flexible structure, and a wide temperature range, and can be used in a variety of applications, particularly in space missions for human exploration.

  3. Screening nuclear field fluctuations to generate highly indistinguishable photons from negatively charged self-assembled InGaAs quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malein, Ralph; Santana, Ted; Zajac, Joanna; Petroff, Pierre; Gerardot, Brian

    2015-03-01

    Quantum dots (QDs) can generate highly coherent and indistinguishable single photons. However, a ground-state electron spin interacts with a QD's nuclear spins to create an effective Overhauser field (δBn) of ~30mT. We probe this interaction using resonance fluorescence. We observe the effect of δBn in high resolution (27 MHz) spectroscopy of the elastic and inelastic scattered photons, and characterize the effect of δBn on photon indistinguishability by monitoring the visibility of two-photon interference. With no external magnetic field (Bz = 0), δBn effectively splits the ground state, and at low Rabi frequencies we observe two broad (Γ = 200 MHz) peaks equally spaced by ~100MHz from the central elastic peak. The ratio of elastic to inelastic photons in the spectra gives a dephasing time T2 = 0 . 52T1 = 406 ps, far from the transform limit. With an external field Bz > δBn , we can successfully screen the fluctuating nuclear field. For Bz = 300 mT, nearly all photons in the spectrum are elastically scattered and we extract T2 = 1 . 94T1 = 1512 ps. This transform limited linewidth enables us to demonstrate very high visibility two-photon interference. These results point towards robust generation of indistinguishable photons.

  4. Effect of realistic nuclear charge distributions on isotope shifts and progress towards the extraction of higher-order nuclear radial moments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papoulia, A.; Carlsson, B. G.; Ekman, J.

    2016-10-01

    Atomic spectral lines from different isotopes display a small shift in energy, commonly referred to as the line isotope shift. One of the components of the isotope shift is the field shift, which depends on the extent and the shape of the nuclear charge density distribution. The purpose of this work is to investigate how sensitive field shifts are with respect to variations in the nuclear size and shape and what information of nuclear charge distributions can be extracted from measurements. Nuclear properties are obtained from nuclear density functional theory calculations based on the Skyrme-Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov approach. These results are combined with multiconfiguration Dirac-Hartree-Fock methods to obtain realistic field shifts and it is seen that phenomena such as nuclear deformation and variations in the diffuseness of nuclear charge distributions give measurable contributions to the isotope shifts. Using a different approach, we demonstrate the possibility to extract information concerning the nuclear charge densities from the observed field shifts. We deduce that combining methods used in atomic and nuclear structure theory gives an improved description of field shifts and that extracting additional nuclear information from measured isotope shifts is possible in the near future with improved experimental methods.

  5. Isotopic Effects in Nuclear Fragmentation and GCR Transport Problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2002-01-01

    Improving the accuracy of the galactic cosmic ray (GCR) environment and transport models is an important goal in preparing for studies of the projected risks and the efficiency of potential mitigations methods for space exploration. In this paper we consider the effects of the isotopic composition of the primary cosmic rays and the isotopic dependence of nuclear fragmentation cross sections on GCR transport models. Measurements are used to describe the isotopic composition of the GCR including their modulation throughout the solar cycle. The quantum multiple-scattering approach to nuclear fragmentation (QMSFRG) is used as the data base generator in order to accurately describe the odd-even effect in fragment production. Using the Badhwar and O'Neill GCR model, the QMSFRG model and the HZETRN transport code, the effects of the isotopic dependence of the primary GCR composition and on fragment production for transport problems is described for a complete GCR isotopic-grid. The principle finding of this study is that large errors ( 100%) will occur in the mass-flux spectra when comparing the complete isotopic-grid (141 ions) to a reduced isotopic-grid (59 ions), however less significant errors 30%) occur in the elemental-flux spectra. Because the full isotopic-grid is readily handled on small computer work-stations, it is recommended that they be used for future GCR studies.

  6. Effect of a magnetic field on sonoluminescence.

    PubMed

    Yasui, K

    1999-08-01

    The effect of a magnetic field on single-bubble sonoluminescence in water reported experimentally by Young, Schmiedel, and Kang [Phys. Rev. Lett. 77, 4816 (1996)] is studied theoretically. It is suggested that bubble dynamics is affected by the magnetic field because moving water molecules of the liquid suffer torque due to the Lorentz force acting on their electrical dipole moment, which results in the transformation of some of the kinetic energy into heat. It is shown that the magnetic field acts as if the ambient pressure of the liquid were increased. It is suggested that the effect increases as the amount of the liquid water increases. It is predicted that nonpolar liquid such as dodecane exhibits no effect of the magnetic field.

  7. Semiclassical description of hyperfine interaction in calculating chemically induced dynamic nuclear polarization in weak magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Purtov, P.A.; Salikhov, K.M.

    1987-09-01

    Semiclassical HFI description is applicable to calculating the integral CIDNP effect in weak fields. The HFI has been calculated for radicals with sufficiently numerous magnetically equivalent nuclei (n greater than or equal to 5) in satisfactory agreement with CIDNP calculations based on quantum-mechanical description of radical-pair spin dynamics.

  8. Effect of the interactions and environment on nuclear activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabater, J.; Best, P. N.; Argudo-Fernández, M.

    2013-03-01

    We present a study of the prevalence of optical and radio nuclear activity with respect to the environment and interactions in a sample of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) galaxies. The aim is to determine the independent effects of distinct aspects of source environment on the triggering of different types of nuclear activity. We defined a local density parameter and a tidal force estimator and used a cluster richness estimator from the literature to trace different aspects of environment and interaction. The possible correlations between the environmental parameters were removed using a principal component analysis. By far, the strongest trend found for the active galactic nuclei (AGN) fractions, of all AGN types, is with galaxy mass. We therefore applied a stratified statistical method that takes into account the effect of possible confounding factors like the galaxy mass. We found that (at fixed mass) the prevalence of optical AGN is a factor of 2-3 lower in the densest environments, but increases by a factor of ˜2 in the presence of strong one-on-one interactions. These effects are even more pronounced for star-forming nuclei. The importance of galaxy interactions decreases from star-forming nuclei to Seyferts to low-ionization nuclear emission-line regions to passive galaxies, in accordance with previous suggestions of an evolutionary time-sequence. The fraction of radio AGN increases very strongly (by nearly an order of magnitude) towards denser environments, and is also enhanced by galaxy interactions. Overall, the results agree with a scenario in which the mechanisms of accretion into the black hole are determined by the presence and nature of a supply of gas, which in turn is controlled by the local density of galaxies and their interactions. A plentiful cold gas supply is required to trigger star formation, optical AGN and radiatively efficient radio AGN. This is less common in the cold-gas-poor environments of groups and clusters, but is enhanced by

  9. Nuclear scales

    SciTech Connect

    Friar, J.L.

    1998-12-01

    Nuclear scales are discussed from the nuclear physics viewpoint. The conventional nuclear potential is characterized as a black box that interpolates nucleon-nucleon (NN) data, while being constrained by the best possible theoretical input. The latter consists of the longer-range parts of the NN force (e.g., OPEP, TPEP, the {pi}-{gamma} force), which can be calculated using chiral perturbation theory and gauged using modern phase-shift analyses. The shorter-range parts of the force are effectively parameterized by moments of the interaction that are independent of the details of the force model, in analogy to chiral perturbation theory. Results of GFMC calculations in light nuclei are interpreted in terms of fundamental scales, which are in good agreement with expectations from chiral effective field theories. Problems with spin-orbit-type observables are noted.

  10. Effects of static magnetic fields on plants.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsov, O.

    In our recent experiment on STS-107 (MFA-Biotube) we took advantage of the magnetic heterogeneity of the gravity receptor cells of flax roots, namely stronger diamagnetism of starch-filled amyloplasts compared to cytoplasm (Δ ≊ < 0). High gradient magnetic fields (HGMF, grad(H2/2) up to 109-1010 Oe2/cm) of the experimental chambers (MFCs) repelled amyloplasts from the zones of stronger field thus providing a directional stimulus for plant gravisensing system in microgravity, and causing the roots to react. Such reaction was observed in the video downlink pictures. Unfortunately, the ``Columbia'' tragedy caused loss of the plant material and most of the images, thus preventing us from detailed studies of the results. Currently we are looking for a possibility to repeat this experiment. Therefore, it is very important to understand, what other effects (besides displacing amyloplasts) static magnetic fields with intensities 0 to 2.5104 Oe, and with the size of the area of non-uniformity 10-3 to 1 cm. These effects were estimated theoretically and tested experimentally. No statistically significant differences in growth rates or rates of gravicurvature were observed in experiments with Linum, Arabidopsis, Hordeum, Avena, Ceratodon and Chara between the plants grown in uniform magnetic fields of various intensities (102 to 2.5104 Oe) and those grown in the Earth's magnetic field. Microscopic studies also did not detect any structural differences between test and control plants. The magnitudes of possible effects of static magnetic fields on plant cells and organs (including effects on ion currents, magneto-hydrodynamic effects in moving cytoplasm, ponderomotive forces on other cellular structures, effects on some biochemical reactions and biomolecules) were estimated theoretically. The estimations have shown, that these effects are small compared to the thermodynamic noise and thus are insignificant. Both theoretical estimations and control experiments confirm, that

  11. The Healthy Worker Effect and Nuclear Industry Workers

    PubMed Central

    Fornalski, Krzysztof W.; Dobrzyński, Ludwik

    2010-01-01

    The linear no-threshold (LNT) dose-effect relationship has been consistently used by most radiation epidemiologists to estimate cancer mortality risk. The large scattering of data by International Agency for Research on Cancer, IARC (Vrijheid et al. 2007; Therry-Chef et al. 2007; Cardis et al. 2007), interpreted in accordance with LNT, has been previously demonstrated (Fornalski and Dobrzyński 2009). Using conventional and Bayesian methods the present paper demonstrates that the standard mortality ratios (SMRs), lower in the IARC cohort of exposed nuclear workers than in the non exposed group, should be considered as a hormetic effect, rather than a healthy worker effect (HWE) as claimed by the IARC group. PMID:20585442

  12. A multifrequency high-field pulsed electron paramagnetic resonance/electron-nuclear double resonance spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morley, Gavin W.; Brunel, Louis-Claude; van Tol, Johan

    2008-06-01

    We describe a pulsed electron paramagnetic resonance spectrometer operating at several frequencies in the range of 110-336GHz. The microwave source at all frequencies consists of a multiplier chain starting from a solid state synthesizer in the 12-15GHz range. A fast p-i-n-switch at the base frequency creates the pulses. At all frequencies a Fabry-Pérot resonator is employed and the π /2 pulse length ranges from ˜100ns at 110GHzto˜600ns at 334GHz. Measurements of a single crystal containing dilute Mn2+ impurities at 12T illustrate the effects of large electron spin polarizations. The capabilities also allow for pulsed electron-nuclear double resonance (ENDOR) experiments as demonstrated by Mims ENDOR of K39 nuclei in Cr :K3NbO8.

  13. Nuclear Families and Nuclear Risks: The Effects of Gender, Geography, and Progeny on Attitudes toward a Nuclear Waste Facility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freudenburg, William R.; Davidson, Debra J.

    2007-01-01

    Studies of reactions to nuclear facilities have found consistent male/female differences, but the underlying reasons have never been well-clarified. The most common expectations involve traditional roles--with men focusing more on economic concerns and with women (especially mothers) being more concerned about family safety/health. Still, with…

  14. Nuclear Families and Nuclear Risks: The Effects of Gender, Geography, and Progeny on Attitudes toward a Nuclear Waste Facility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freudenburg, William R.; Davidson, Debra J.

    2007-01-01

    Studies of reactions to nuclear facilities have found consistent male/female differences, but the underlying reasons have never been well-clarified. The most common expectations involve traditional roles--with men focusing more on economic concerns and with women (especially mothers) being more concerned about family safety/health. Still, with…

  15. Structure of neutron star crusts from new Skyrme effective interactions constrained by chiral effective field theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Yeunhwan; Holt, Jeremy W.

    2017-06-01

    We investigate the structure of neutron star crusts, including the crust-core boundary, based on new Skyrme mean field models constrained by the bulk-matter equation of state from chiral effective field theory and the ground-state energies of doubly-magic nuclei. Nuclear pasta phases are studied using both the liquid drop model as well as the Thomas-Fermi approximation. We compare the energy per nucleon for each geometry (spherical nuclei, cylindrical nuclei, nuclear slabs, cylindrical holes, and spherical holes) to obtain the ground state phase as a function of density. We find that the size of the Wigner-Seitz cell depends strongly on the model parameters, especially the coefficients of the density gradient interaction terms. We employ also the thermodynamic instability method to check the validity of the numerical solutions based on energy comparisons.

  16. Tunnel effect in molecules in strong magnetic fields of neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khersonskii, V. K.

    1982-10-01

    The penetration coefficient and probability of tunnel transition in molecular ions H(2+) and HD(+), as functions of the magnetic field in the region B = 10 to the 11th-10 to the 13th G, is calculated. It is found that in this strong, neutron star magnetic field, the probability of tunnel effect increases significantly. It is probable that such an effect can catalyze nuclear reactions at the neutron star surface.

  17. Determining diffusion coefficients of ionic liquids by means of field cycling nuclear magnetic resonance relaxometry

    SciTech Connect

    Kruk, D.; Meier, R.; Rössler, E. A.; Rachocki, A.; Korpała, A.; Singh, R. K.

    2014-06-28

    Field Cycling Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (FC NMR) relaxation studies are reported for three ionic liquids: 1-ethyl-3- methylimidazolium thiocyanate (EMIM-SCN, 220–258 K), 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate (BMIM-BF{sub 4}, 243–318 K), and 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate (BMIM-PF{sub 6}, 258–323 K). The dispersion of {sup 1}H spin-lattice relaxation rate R{sub 1}(ω) is measured in the frequency range of 10 kHz–20 MHz, and the studies are complemented by {sup 19}F spin-lattice relaxation measurements on BMIM-PF{sub 6} in the corresponding frequency range. From the {sup 1}H relaxation results self-diffusion coefficients for the cation in EMIM-SCN, BMIM-BF{sub 4}, and BMIM-PF{sub 6} are determined. This is done by performing an analysis considering all relevant intra- and intermolecular relaxation contributions to the {sup 1}H spin-lattice relaxation as well as by benefiting from the universal low-frequency dispersion law characteristic of Fickian diffusion which yields, at low frequencies, a linear dependence of R{sub 1} on square root of frequency. From the {sup 19}F relaxation both anion and cation diffusion coefficients are determined for BMIM-PF{sub 6}. The diffusion coefficients obtained from FC NMR relaxometry are in good agreement with results reported from pulsed- field-gradient NMR. This shows that NMR relaxometry can be considered as an alternative route of determining diffusion coefficients of both cations and anions in ionic liquids.

  18. Biological effects of high DC magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Tenforde, T.S.

    1981-06-01

    The principal focus of the program is the analysis of magnetic field effects on physiological functions in experimental animals and selected organ and tissue systems. A major research effort has involved the use of electrical recording techniques to detect functional alterations in the cardiovascular, neural, and visual systems during the application of DC magnetic fields. These systems involve ionic conduction processes, and are therefore potentially sensitive to electrodynamic interactions with an applied magnetic field. In the specific case of the visual system, magnetic interactions could also arise through orientational effects on the magnetically anisotropic photopigment molecules within retinal photoreceptor cells. In addition to studies with potentially sensitive target tissues, an evaluation is being made of magnetic field effects on a broad range of other physiological functions in laboratory mammals, including the measurement of circadian rhythms using noninvasive recording techniques. Results of investigations of magnetic field effects on the conformation of DNA, and on the growth and development of plants and insects are also reported. Figures and tables provide a brief summary of some representative observations in each of the research areas described. No significant alterations were observed in any of the physiological parameters examined to date, with the exception of major changes that occur in the electrocardiogram during magnetic field exposure. Studies with several species of animals have provided evidence that this phenomenon is attributable to electrical potentials that are induced during pulsatile blood flow in the aorta and in other major vessels of the circulatory system.

  19. Rapid detection of peanut oil adulteration using low-field nuclear magnetic resonance and chemometrics.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Wenran; Wang, Xin; Chen, Lihua

    2017-02-01

    (1)H low-field nuclear magnetic resonance (LF-NMR) and chemometrics were employed to screen the quality changes of peanut oil (PEO) adulterated with soybean oil (SO), rapeseed oil (RO), or palm oil (PAO) in ratios ranging from 0% to 100%. Significant differences in the LF-NMR parameters, single component relaxation time (T2W), and peak area proportion (S21 and S22), were detected between pure and adulterated peanut oil samples. As the ratio of adulteration increased, the T2W, S21, and S22 changed linearly; however, the multicomponent relaxation times (T21 and T22) changed slightly. The established principal component analysis or discriminant analysis models can correctly differentiate authentic PEO from fake and adulterated samples with at least 10% of SO, RO, or PAO. The binary blends of oils can be clearly classified by discriminant analysis when the adulteration ratio is above 30%, illustrating possible applications in screening the oil species in peanut oil blends. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Soil wettability as determined from using low-field nuclear magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Manalo, Florence P; Kantzas, Apostolos; Langford, Cooper H

    2003-06-15

    The molarity of ethanol droplet and water drop penetration time methods are commonly used to determine soil wettability because these tests are quick and easy to perform. However, these tests do not provide reproducible results on the same sample. Low-field nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is shown as an alternative tool to determine soil wettability. Addition of small amounts of water in dry wettable porous media produces predominant amplitude peaks at transverse relaxation times (T2) of 100 ms or less while addition of water in dry water-repellent porous media with the same pore structure produce predominant amplitude peaks at T2 values near 1000 ms. The geometric mean of T2 (T(2gm)) from water-repellent samples immediately after the addition of water is greater than 1000 ms, which is close to that of bulk water, while T(2gm) from wettable samples immediately after the addition of water is significantly less than 1000 ms. Measurements over time show that water-repellent samples eventually reach the same equilibrium end point as its corresponding wettable sample when continually exposed to water. This paper will show that NMR can be used to formulate a screening criterion for quickly determining wettability. The advantage of using NMR is that the results are reproducible provided the sample is prepared and analyzed in a systematic manner.

  1. Asymmetric nuclear matter and neutron skin in an extended relativistic mean-field model

    SciTech Connect

    Agrawal, B. K.

    2010-03-15

    The density dependence of the symmetry energy, instrumental in understanding the behavior of the asymmetric nuclear matter, is investigated within the extended relativistic mean-field (ERMF) model, which includes the contributions from the self- and mixed-interaction terms for the scalar-isoscalar ({sigma}), vector-isoscalar ({omega}), and vector-isovector ({rho}) mesons up to the quartic order. Each of the 26 different parametrizations of the ERMF model employed is compatible with the bulk properties of the finite nuclei. The behavior of the symmetry energy for several parameter sets is found to be consistent with the empirical constraints on them as extracted from the analyses of the isospin diffusion data. The neutron-skin thickness in the {sup 208}Pb nucleus for these parameter sets of the ERMF model lies in the range of {approx}0.20-0.24 fm, which is in harmony with the thickness predicted by the Skyrme Hartree-Fock model. We also investigate the role of various mixed-interaction terms that are crucial for the density dependence of the symmetry energy.

  2. The nuclear mean field of sulfur from -80 to +80 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Ohali, M.A. |

    1994-12-31

    Neutron elastic-scattering differential cross section {sigma}({theta}) and analyzing power Ay({theta}) {delta}{alpha}{tau}{alpha} for {sup 32}S have been measured at incident neutron energies of 15.5 and 19 MeV. These data were combined with previous n-{sup 32}S scattering data (Ay({theta}), {sigma}({theta}) and total cross section) to form a large database in the energy range from 1 to 80 MeV. In addition, information about binding energies of the single-particle bound states for the n-{sup 32}S system was incorporated to extend the database to negative energies (down to {minus}80 MeV). The entire database was analyzed in the framework of the nuclear mean field (NMF). The NMF was derived from a Dispersive Optical Model (DOM) analysis that incorporates explicitly the dispersion relation which connects the real and the imaginary parts of the NMF. The extension of the DOM potential from positive to negative energy provides the shell-model potential used for predicting the binding energies of single-particle bound states. The DOM describes the scattering data very well in the energy range between 8 - 80 MeV, but it overestimates the total cross section for energies less than 8 MeV. The DOM predicts reasonably well the observed binding energies of the single-particle states.

  3. 7Li relaxation time measurements at very low magnetic field by 1H dynamic nuclear polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeghib, Nadir; Grucker, Daniel

    2001-09-01

    Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) of water protons was used to measure the relaxation time of lithium at very low magnetic field as a demonstration of the use of DNP for nuclei less abundant than water protons. Lithium (Li+) was chosen because it is an efficient treatment for manic-depressive illness, with an unknown action mechanism. After having recalled the theoretical basis of a three-spin system comprising two nuclei - the water proton of the solvent, the dissolved Li+ ion and the free electron of a free radical - we have developed a transient solution in order to optimize potential biological applications of Li DNP. The three-spin model has allowed computation of all the parameters of the system - the longitudinal relaxation rate per unit of free radical concentration, the dipolar and scalar part of the coupling between the nuclei and the electron, and the maximum signal enhancement achievable for both proton and lithium spins. All these measurements have been obtained solely through the detection of the proton resonance.

  4. High field nuclear magnetic resonance in transition metal substituted BaFe2As2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garitezi, T. M.; Lesseux, G. G.; Rosa, P. F. S.; Adriano, C.; Reyes, A. P.; Kuhns, P. L.; Pagliuso, P. G.; Urbano, R. R.

    2014-05-01

    We report high field 75As nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements on Co and Cu substituted BaFe2As2 single crystals displaying same structural/magnetic transition T0≃128 K. From our anisotropy studies in the paramagnetic state, we strikingly found virtually identical quadrupolar splitting and consequently the quadrupole frequency νQ≃2.57(1) MHz for both compounds, despite the claim that each Cu delivers 2 extra 3d electrons in BaFe2As2 compared to Co substitution. These results allow us to conclude that a subtle change in the crystallographic structure, particularly in the Fe-As tetrahedra, must be the most probable tuning parameter to determine T0 in this class of superconductors rather than electronic doping. Furthermore, our NMR data around T0 suggest coexistence of tetragonal/paramagnetic and orthorhombic/antiferromagnetic phases between the structural and the spin density wave magnetic phase transitions, similarly to what was reported for K-doped BaFe2As2 [Urbano et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 105, 107001 (2010)].

  5. Caloric curve for nuclear liquid-gas phase transition in relativistic mean-field hadronic model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parvan, A. S.

    2012-08-01

    The main thermodynamical properties of the first order phase transition of the relativistic mean-field (RMF) hadronic model were explored in the isobaric, the canonical and the grand canonical ensembles on the basis of the method of the thermodynamical potentials and their first derivatives. It was proved that the first order phase transition of the RMF model is the liquid-gas type one associated with the Gibbs free energy G. The thermodynamical potential G is the piecewise smooth function and its first order partial derivatives with respect to variables of state are the piecewise continuous functions. We have found that the energy in the caloric curve is discontinuous in the isobaric and the grand canonical ensembles at fixed values of the pressure and the chemical potential, respectively, and it is continuous, i.e. it has no plateau, in the canonical and microcanonical ensembles at fixed values of baryon density, while the baryon density in the isotherms is discontinuous in the isobaric and the canonical ensembles at fixed values of the temperature. The general criterion for the nuclear liquid-gas phase transition in the canonical ensemble was identified.

  6. Interference Effects of Radiation Emitted from Nuclear Excitons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potzel, W.; van Bürck, U.; Schindelmann, P.; Hagn, H.; Smirnov, G. V.; Popov, S. L.; Gerdau, E.; Shvyd'Ko, Yu. V.; Jäschke, J.; Rüter, H. D.; Chumakov, A. I.; Rüffer, R.

    2003-12-01

    Interference effects in nuclear forward scattering of synchrotron radiation (NFSSR) from two spatially separated stainless-steel foils A and B mounted downstream behind each other have been investigated. Target A can be sinusoidally vibrated by high-frequency (MHz) ultrasound (US), target B is moved at a constant Doppler velocity which is large compared to the natural width of the nuclear transition. Due to this large Doppler shift radiative coupling between both targets is disrupted and the nuclear excitons in A and B develop independently in space and time after the SR pulse. As a consequence, the emission from the whole system (A&B) is dominated by the interference of the emissions from A and B. The application of US to target A is a powerful method to change the relative phasing of the emissions and thus to investigate interference effects originating from the two nuclear excitons in detail. Four distinct cases were studied: (a) If target A is kept stationary and only B is moved at large constant velocity v, the interference pattern exhibits a Quantum Beat (QB) whose period is determined by v. (b) If, in addition, target A is sinusoidally vibrated in a piston-like motion by US and the initial US phase Φ0 is locked to the SR pulse, the QB is frequency modulated by the US. The variation of the QB frequency increases with the US modulation index m. (c) In the case that Φ0 is not synchronized to the SR pulse (phase averaging over Φ0) drastic changes of the amplitude and phase reversals of the QB pattern occur in the time regions around odd multiples of half of the US period. (d) If Φ0 is not synchronized to the SR pulse and the US motion is no longer pistonlike, the NFSSR intensity has to be averaged over both Φ0 and m (amplitude) of the US motion. Surprisingly the QB interference pattern does not vanish completely but a short QB signal remains at times of the full US period even at high values of m. All NFSSR patterns investigated are interpreted and

  7. Magnetic field effects on microwave absorbing materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldberg, Ira; Hollingsworth, Charles S.; Mckinney, Ted M.

    1991-01-01

    The objective of this program was to gather information to formulate a microwave absorber that can work in the presence of strong constant direct current (DC) magnetic fields. The program was conducted in four steps. The first step was to investigate the electrical and magnetic properties of magnetic and ferrite microwave absorbers in the presence of strong magnetic fields. This included both experimental measurements and a literature survey of properties that may be applicable to finding an appropriate absorbing material. The second step was to identify those material properties that will produce desirable absorptive properties in the presence of intense magnetic fields and determine the range of magnetic field in which the absorbers remain effective. The third step was to establish ferrite absorber designs that will produce low reflection and adequate absorption in the presence of intense inhomogeneous static magnetic fields. The fourth and final step was to prepare and test samples of such magnetic microwave absorbers if such designs seem practical.

  8. Update on nuclear structure effects in light muonic atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez, Oscar Javier; Dinur, Nir Nevo; Ji, Chen; Bacca, Sonia; Barnea, Nir

    2016-12-01

    We present calculations of the nuclear structure corrections to the Lamb shift in light muonic atoms, using state-of-the-art nuclear potentials. We outline updated results on finite nucleon size contributions.

  9. An investigation into the accuracy of the albedo dosimeter DVGN-01 in measuring personnel irradiation doses in the fields of neutron radiation at nuclear power installations of the joint institute for nuclear research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beskrovnaya, L. G.; Goroshkova, E. A.; Mokrov, Yu. V.

    2010-05-01

    The calculated results of research into the accuracy of an individual albedo dosimeter DVGN-01 as it corresponds to the personal equivalent dose for neutrons H p (10) and to the effective dose for neutrons E eff in the neutron fields at Joint Institute for Nuclear Research Nuclear Power Installations (JNPI) upon different geometries of irradiations are presented. It has been shown that correction coefficients are required for the specific estimation of doses by the dosimeter. These coefficients were calculated using the energy sensitivity curve of the dosimeter and the known neutron spectra at JNPI. By using the correction factors, the uncertainties of both doses will not exceed the limits given to the personnel according to the standards.

  10. Global anomalies and effective field theory

    SciTech Connect

    Golkar, Siavash; Sethi, Savdeep

    2016-05-17

    Here, we show that matching anomalies under large gauge transformations and large diffeomorphisms can explain the appearance and non-renormalization of couplings in effective field theory. We focus on thermal effective field theory, where we argue that the appearance of certain unusual Chern-Simons couplings is a consequence of global anomalies. As an example, we show that a mixed global anomaly in four dimensions fixes the chiral vortical effect coefficient (up to an overall additive factor). This is an experimentally measurable prediction from a global anomaly. For certain situations, we propose a simpler method for calculating global anomalies which uses correlation functions rather than eta invariants.

  11. Intrinsic dosimetry of glass containers used to transport nuclear materials: Potential implications to the fields of waste management and nuclear forensics

    SciTech Connect

    Schwantes, Jon M.; Miller, Steve D.; Piper, Roman K.; Murphy, Mark K.; Amonette, James E.; Bonde, Steven E.; Duckworth, Douglas C.

    2009-04-12

    Thermoluminescence (TL) and Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) dosimetry were used to measure dose effects in borosilicate glass with time, from 10 min to w60 days following exposure to a dose of up to 100 Gy. TL and EPR results were consistent and performed similarly, with both techniques capable of achieving an estimated limit of detection of between 0.5 and 1 Gy. Three peaks were identified in the TL glow curve at roughly 110 C, 205 C, and 225 C. The intensity of the 205 C peak was the dominant peak over the time period of this study. The stability of all of the peaks with time since irradiation increased with their corresponding temperature and no significant variation was observed in the glow curve response to a specified total dose attained at different dose rates. The intensity of the 205 C peak decreased logarithmically with time regardless of total dose. Based upon a conservative limit of detection of 3.3 Gy, a 100 Gy dose would still be detected 2.7E3 years after exposure. Here, we introduce the concept of intrinsic dosimetry, the measurement of the total absorbed dose received by the walls of a container containing radioactive material. The foreseen advantage of intrinsic dosimetry comes from considering the measured absorbed dose received by containers in concert with the characteristics (amount, type) of the source of that dose, the radioactive material contained within the walls of the container, in order to provide enhanced information about the history of an unknown sample in question. Three hypothetical scenarios are presented to introduce this method and to illustrate how intrinsic dosimetry might benefit the fields of nuclear forensics and waste management.

  12. Atmospheric effects and societal consequences of regional scale nuclear conflicts and acts of individual nuclear terrorism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toon, O. B.; Turco, R. P.; Robock, A.; Bardeen, C.; Oman, L.; Stenchikov, G. L.

    2007-04-01

    We assess the potential damage and smoke production associated with the detonation of small nuclear weapons in modern megacities. While the number of nuclear warheads in the world has fallen by about a factor of three since its peak in 1986, the number of nuclear weapons states is increasing and the potential exists for numerous regional nuclear arms races. Eight countries are known to have nuclear weapons, 2 are constructing them, and an additional 32 nations already have the fissile material needed to build substantial arsenals of low-yield (Hiroshima-sized) explosives. Population and economic activity worldwide are congregated to an increasing extent in megacities, which might be targeted in a nuclear conflict. We find that low yield weapons, which new nuclear powers are likely to construct, can produce 100 times as many fatalities and 100 times as much smoke from fires per kt yield as previously estimated in analyses for full scale nuclear wars using high-yield weapons, if the small weapons are targeted at city centers. A single "small" nuclear detonation in an urban center could lead to more fatalities, in some cases by orders of magnitude, than have occurred in the major historical conflicts of many countries. We analyze the likely outcome of a regional nuclear exchange involving 100 15-kt explosions (less than 0.1% of the explosive yield of the current global nuclear arsenal). We find that such an exchange could produce direct fatalities comparable to all of those worldwide in World War II, or to those once estimated for a "counterforce" nuclear war between the superpowers. Megacities exposed to atmospheric fallout of long-lived radionuclides would likely be abandoned indefinitely, with severe national and international implications. Our analysis shows that smoke from urban firestorms in a regional war would rise into the upper troposphere due to pyro-convection. Robock et al. (2007) show that the smoke would subsequently rise deep into the stratosphere due

  13. Solar modulation and nuclear fragmentation effects in galactic cosmic ray transport through shielding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Townsend, L. W.; Cucinotta, C. F.; Wilson, J. W.; Shinn, J. L.; Badhwar, G.

    1994-10-01

    Crews of manned interplanetary missions may accumulate significant radiation exposures from the Galactic Cosmic Ray (GCR) environment in space. Estimates of how these dose levels are affected by the assumed temporal and spatial variations in the composition of the GCR environment, and by the effects of the spacecraft and body self-shielding on the transported fields are presented. In this work, the physical processes through which shielding alters the transported radiation fields are described. We then present estimates of the effects on model calculations of (1) nuclear fragmentation model uncertainties, (2) solar modulation, (3) variations between solar cycles, and (4) proposed changes to the quality factors which relate dose equivalent to absorbed dose.

  14. Solar modulation and nuclear fragmentation effects in galactic cosmic ray transport through shielding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, L. W.; Cucinotta, C. F.; Wilson, J. W.; Shinn, J. L.; Badhwar, G.

    1994-01-01

    Crews of manned interplanetary missions may accumulate significant radiation exposures from the Galactic Cosmic Ray (GCR) environment in space. Estimates of how these dose levels are affected by the assumed temporal and spatial variations in the composition of the GCR environment, and by the effects of the spacecraft and body self-shielding on the transported fields are presented. In this work, the physical processes through which shielding alters the transported radiation fields are described. We then present estimates of the effects on model calculations of (1) nuclear fragmentation model uncertainties, (2) solar modulation, (3) variations between solar cycles, and (4) proposed changes to the quality factors which relate dose equivalent to absorbed dose.

  15. Spain-Chile and Spain-Ecuador cooperation in the field of research nuclear reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Avendano, G.; Rodriguez, M.L.; Manas, L.; Masalleras, E.; Montes, J.

    1981-01-01

    The Spanish Board of Nuclear Energy (JEN) has been cooperating for the last several years with the Comision Chilena de Energia Nuclear (Chilean Commission of Nuclear Energy (CCHEN)), on the one hand, and with the Comision Ecuatoriana de Energia Atomica (Ecuadorian Commission of Atomic Energy (CEEA)), on the other. The result of this cooperation has been the implementation of projects in both countries to create research centers around a nuclear reactor as the main working tool: the Lo Aguirre reactor in Chile and the Ruminahui reactor in Ecuador.

  16. Understanding the proton radius puzzle: Nuclear structure effects in light muonic atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Chen; Hernandez, Oscar Javier; Nevo Dinur, Nir; Bacca, Sonia; Barnea, Nir

    2016-03-01

    We present calculations of nuclear structure effects to the Lamb shift in light muonic atoms. We adopt a modern ab-initio approach by combining state-of-the-art nuclear potentials with the hyperspherical harmonics method. Our calculations are instrumental to the determination of nuclear charge radii in the Lamb shift measurements, which will shed light on the proton radius puzzle.

  17. 77 FR 5853 - In the Matter of Entergy Nuclear Operations Inc; Confirmatory Order Modifying License (Effective...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-06

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY...-47; DPR-28; NFP-38; EA-10-090; EA-10-248; EA-11-160] In the Matter of Entergy Nuclear Operations Inc; Confirmatory Order Modifying License (Effective Immediately) I Entergy Nuclear Operations, Inc. (Entergy...

  18. The effects of weak magnetic fields on radical pairs.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Frank S; Greenebaum, Ben

    2015-01-01

    It is proposed that radical concentrations can be modified by combinations of weak, steady and alternating magnetic fields that modify the population distribution of the nuclear and electronic spin state, the energy levels and the alignment of the magnetic moments of the components of the radical pairs. In low external magnetic fields, the electronic and nuclear angular momentum vectors are coupled by internal forces that outweigh the external fields' interactions and are characterized in the Hamiltonian by the total quantum number F. Radical pairs form with their unpaired electrons in singlet (S) or triplet (T) states with respect to each other. At frequencies corresponding to the energy separation between the various states in the external magnetic fields, transitions can occur that change the populations of both electron and nuclear states. In addition, the coupling between the nuclei, nuclei and electrons, and Zeeman shifts in the electron and nuclear energy levels can lead to transitions with resonances spanning frequencies from a few Hertz into the megahertz region. For nuclear energy levels with narrow absorption line widths, this can lead to amplitude and frequency windows. Changes in the pair recombination rates can change radical concentrations and modify biological processes. The overall conclusion is that the application of magnetic fields at frequencies ranging from a few Hertz to microwaves at the absorption frequencies observed in electron and nuclear resonance spectroscopy for radicals can lead to changes in free radical concentrations and have the potential to lead to biologically significant changes. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Supernova equations of state including full nuclear ensemble with in-medium effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furusawa, Shun; Sumiyoshi, Kohsuke; Yamada, Shoichi; Suzuki, Hideyuki

    2017-01-01

    We construct new equations of state for baryons at sub-nuclear densities for the use in core-collapse supernova simulations. The abundance of various nuclei is obtained together with thermodynamic quantities. The formulation is an extension of the previous model, in which we adopted the relativistic mean field theory with the TM1 parameter set for nucleons, the quantum approach for d, t, h and α as well as the liquid drop model for the other nuclei under the nuclear statistical equilibrium. We reformulate the model of the light nuclei other than d, t, h and α based on the quasi-particle description. Furthermore, we modify the model so that the temperature dependences of surface and shell energies of heavy nuclei could be taken into account. The pasta phases for heavy nuclei and the Pauli- and self-energy shifts for d, t, h and α are taken into account in the same way as in the previous model. We find that nuclear composition is considerably affected by the modifications in this work, whereas thermodynamical quantities are not changed much. In particular, the washout of shell effect has a great impact on the mass distribution above T ∼ 1 MeV. This improvement may have an important effect on the rates of electron captures and coherent neutrino scatterings on nuclei in supernova cores.

  20. Dependence of nuclear quadrupole resonance transitions on the electric field gradient asymmetry parameter for nuclides with half-integer spins

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Herman

    2016-09-01

    Allowed transition energies and eigenstate expansions have been calculated and tabulated in numerical form as functions of the electric field gradient asymmetry parameter for the zero field Hamiltonian of quadrupolar nuclides with I = 3/2, 5/2, 7/2, and 9/2. These results may be used to interpret nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) spectra and extract accurate values of the electric field gradient tensors. Applications of NQR methods to studies of electronic structure in heavy element systems are proposed. This material is based upon work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Heavy Element Chemistry program.