Science.gov

Sample records for nuclear g-factor measurements

  1. Towards high precision measurements of nuclear g-factors for the Be isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takamine, A.; Wada, M.; Okada, K.; Ito, Y.; Schury, P.; Arai, F.; Katayama, I.; Imamura, K.; Ichikawa, Y.; Ueno, H.; Wollnik, H.; Schuessler, H. A.

    2016-06-01

    We describe the present status of future high-precision measurements of nuclear g-factors utilizing laser-microwave double and laser-microwave-rf triple resonance methods for online-trapped, laser-cooled radioactive beryllium isotope ions. These methods have applicability to other suitably chosen isotopes and for beryllium show promise in deducing the hyperfine anomaly of 11Be with a sufficiently high precision to study the nuclear magnetization distribution of this one-neutron halo nucleus in a nuclear-model-independent manner.

  2. Nuclear-polarization correction to the bound-electron g factor in heavy hydrogenlike ions.

    PubMed

    Nefiodov, A V; Plunien, G; Soff, G

    2002-08-19

    The influence of nuclear polarization on the bound-electron g factor in heavy hydrogenlike ions is investigated. Numerical calculations are performed for the K- and L-shell electrons taking into account the dominant virtual nuclear excitations. This determines the ultimate limit for tests of QED utilizing measurements of the bound-electron g factor in highly charged ions.

  3. QCD Nuclear g-factor and the Spin-Statistics Theorem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    Consideration of the composite three-quark nucleon spin structure and its Pauli spin-statistics follows a new QCD g-factor with implications for the magnetic dipole moments of nucleons and their form factors. The reformulation of the nucleon magnetic moments using the new QCD nucleon g-factor is shown to be in striking agreement with global polarized and unpolarized e-p scattering data using the Sachs electric and magnetic form factors, thus reconciling long standing discrepancies between measurements. Additionally, the introduction of QCD isospin symmetry breaking (ISB) strange quarks terms contained within the meson-baryon exchange currents allow the partially conserved EM axial currents to be restored as well as providing a precise measure of the strange quark probabilities of the nucleons. Work performed under the auspices of US Department of Energy.

  4. Toward tests of QED and CPT with improved electron and positron g-factor measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novitski, Elise; Dorr, Joshua; Fogwell Hoogerheide, Shannon; Gabrielse, Gerald

    2013-05-01

    We describe progress toward improved measurements of the electron and positron g-factors using quantum jump spectroscopy between the lowest quantum states of either particle trapped in a 100 mK cylindrical Penning trap. In a new apparatus--designed for improved stability and a better geometry for cavity-assisted sideband cooling--we have trapped a single electron, driven and observed single cyclotron transitions, and trapped positrons in a loading trap. This should enable measurements of both g-factors with better than the 0.28 ppt precision of the best electron value (the most precise measurement of a fundamental property of an elementary particle), thereby improving the positron value by a factor of more than 15., These measurements, in combination with QED theory relating the electron g-factor to α, will improve on the most precise determination of α, the fine structure constant. The comparison of this value with an independent measurement of α is the most precise test of QED. The comparison of the e- and e+ g-factors will improve upon the best test of CPT symmetry in a lepton system. This work is supported by the NSF

  5. Single particle signatures in high-spin, quasicontinuum, states in {sup 193,194}Hg from g-factor measurements.

    SciTech Connect

    Weissman, L.; Mayer, R. H.; Kumbartzki, G.; Benczer-Koller, N.; Broude, C.; Cizewski, J. A.; Hass, M.; Holden, J.; Janssens, R. V. F.; Lauritsen, T.; Lee, I. Y.; Macchiavelli, A. O.; McNabb, D. P.; Satteson, M.; Physics; Weizmann Inst. of Science; Rutgers Univ.; LBNL

    1999-01-14

    The average g factors of high spin, high-excitation energy, quasicontinuum structures in {sup 194,193}Hg were measured by observing the precessions of the angular distributions of {gamma}-ray transitions in several normal-deformation bands that coalesce in the decay of the entry distribution of states. The average g factors of the states leading to the three main bands in the {sup 193,194}Hg isotopes were: {l_angle}g({sup 193}Hg){r_angle}=+0.19(1) and {l_angle}g({sup 194}Hg){r_angle}=+0.26(1), respectively. These average g factors are smaller than the average of the g factors of the high energy states in the three superdeformed bands of {sup 194}Hg, {l_angle}g(SD; {sup 194}Hg){r_angle}=+0.41(8). While the nucleus in the superdeformed well behaves like a rigid rotor, the present results demonstrate the important role played by multiple, quasiparticle neutron configurations in the structure of normal-deformation, highly-excited nuclear states.

  6. Conduction electron g-factors in ruthenium and osmium from de Haas-van Alphen measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Startsev, V. E.; Coleridge, P. T.; Templeton, I. M.; Fawcett, E.; Muir, C.; Perz, J. M.

    1984-04-01

    Conduction electron g-factors have been deduced from de Haas-van Alphen line shapes in the hexagonal group VIII 4 d transition metal ruthenium and the electronically analogous 5 d metal osmium. The values for orbits normal to [0001] are 1.8±0.1 and 1.3±0.1 for the ellipsoids centered on the line LM in ruthenium and osmium, respectively, and 1.9±0.2 for the Γ-centered ellipsoid in ruthenium. The more marked suppression of the g-factor in osmium, where spin-orbit coupling is stronger, is consistent with recent theoretical studies of transition metal g-factor trends.

  7. g-Factor of Composite Fermions around ν = 3/2 from Angular Dependent Activation Energy Measurements.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, A. S.; Du, R. R.; Stormer, H. L.; Tsui, D. C.; Pfeiffer, L. N.; West, K. W.

    1997-03-01

    The fractional quantum Hall states around ν = 3/2 have been successfully interpreted as composite fermions (CFs) with a spin and a g-factor. In Reference 1, the g-factor was obtained from fixed temperature magnetoresistance measurements at several specific angles at which the energy gaps vanished. In the present experiment, we probe the CF energy gaps at arbitrary angle. We directly observe the opening and closing of the gaps, supporting the picture of composite fermions with a spin. At fixed filling factor, we calculate CF g-factors from the rate of change in the energy gap with respect to the total magnetic field. Our GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructure of density n = 1.13x10^11 cm-2 and mobility μ = 6.8x10^6 cm^2/V s shows activated behavior for close to two orders of magnitude for most angles between 0 degrees and 57.1 degrees. We find g-factors of 0.59 for ν = 5/3, 0.76 for ν = 4/3, and 0.56 for ν = 8/5. These g-factors agree to within 10% of previous results. [1] R. R. Du, A. S. Yeh, H. L. Stormer, D. C. Tsui, L. N. Pfeiffer, K. W. West, Phys. Rev. Lett 75, 3926 (1995).

  8. Low-energy structure of the even-A {sup 96-104}Ru isotopes via g-factor measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, M. J.; Bentley, M. A.; Guerdal, G.; Kumbartzki, G.; Benczer-Koller, N.; Sharon, Y. Y.; Stuchbery, A. E.; Berant, Z.; Casperson, R. J.; Casten, R. F.; Heinz, A.; Ilie, G.; McCutchan, E. A.; Qian, J.; Werner, V.; Williams, E.; Winkler, R.; Luettke, R.; Shoraka, B.

    2011-04-15

    The transient-field-perturbed angular correlation technique was used with Coulomb excitation in inverse kinematics to perform a systematic measurement of the g factors of the first excited 2{sub 1}{sup +} states in the stable even-A isotopes {sup 96-104}Ru. The measurements have been made relative to one another under matched kinematic conditions and include a measurement of g(2{sub 1}{sup +})=+0.47(3) in {sup 96}Ru.

  9. New measurement of the {sup 68}Zn(4{sub 1}{sup +}) g factor combined with a reanalysis of previous data

    SciTech Connect

    Moschner, K.; Bernards, C.; Bettermann, L.; Speidel, K.-H.; Leske, J.; Bauer, C.; Moeller, T.; Honma, M.; Maier-Komor, P.; Muecher, D.

    2010-07-15

    We have remeasured and have redetermined the g factor for the 4{sub 1}{sup +} state in {sup 68}Zn following inconsistencies between earlier measurements and a recent result. We have reanalyzed several former measurements by applying an alternative analysis procedure, which allows for determining the precession effect separately for each gamma detector implying less uncertainties in the background subtraction for the relevant spectra. In addition, all measured g-factor and B(E2) data for the first 2{sup +} and 4{sup +} states in all stable even-A Zn isotopes and the radioactive {sup 62}Zn, are compared with new large-scale shell model calculations based on the most advanced effective interaction in the fpg-shell model space.

  10. Vanishing electron g factor and long-lived nuclear spin polarization in weakly strained nanohole-filled GaAs/AlGaAs quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulhaq, A.; Duan, Q.; Zallo, E.; Ding, F.; Schmidt, O. G.; Tartakovskii, A. I.; Skolnick, M. S.; Chekhovich, E. A.

    2016-04-01

    GaAs/AlGaAs quantum dots grown by in situ droplet etching and nanohole in-filling offer a combination of strong charge confinement, optical efficiency, and high spatial symmetry advantageous for polarization entanglement and spin-photon interface. Here, we study experimentally electron and nuclear spin properties of such dots. We find nearly vanishing electron g factors (ge<0.05 ), providing a potential route for electrically driven spin control schemes. Optical manipulation of the nuclear spin environment is demonstrated with nuclear spin polarization up to 65 % achieved. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy reveals two distinct types of quantum dots: with tensile and with compressive strain along the growth axis. In both types of dots, the magnitude of strain ɛb<0.02 % is nearly three orders of magnitude smaller than in self-assembled dots: On the one hand, this provides a route for eliminating a major source of electron spin decoherence arising from nuclear quadrupolar interactions, and on the other hand such strain is sufficient to suppress nuclear spin diffusion leading to a stable nuclear spin bath with nuclear spin lifetimes exceeding 500 s. The spin properties revealed in this work make this new type of quantum dot an attractive alternative to self-assembled dots for the applications in quantum information technologies.

  11. First direct measurements of {bold {ital g}} factors of the three superdeformed bands of {sup 194}Hg

    SciTech Connect

    Mayer, R.H.; Kumbartzki, G.; Benczer-Koller, N.; Cizewski, J.A.; Holden, J.; McNabb, D.P.; Satteson, M.; Weissman, L.; Broude, C.; Hass, M.; Janssens, R.V.; Lauritsen, T.; Lee, I.Y.; Macchiavelli, A.O.

    1998-11-01

    The average {ital g} factors of the high-energy states of the three superdeformed bands in {sup 194}Hg were determined {ital directly} in a transient field experiment. The reaction {sup 150}Nd({sup 48}Ca,4n){sup 194}Hg at a beam energy of 203 MeV was used to provide recoiling reaction product nuclei with sufficient velocity to traverse a gadolinium ferromagnetic layer. The resulting {ital g} factors g(SD1)=0.36(10), g(SD2)=0.41(20), and g(SD3)=0.71(26) are in agreement with cranked Hartree-Fock calculations as well as with the picture of a rigid rotation for which g=Z/A. thinsp {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  12. Electromagnetically induced absorption and transparency in degenerate two level systems of metastable Kr atoms and measurement of Landé g-factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kale, Y. B.; Tiwari, V. B.; Mishra, S. R.; Singh, S.; Rawat, H. S.

    2016-12-01

    We report electromagnetically induced absorption (EIA) and transparency (EIT) resonances of sub-natural linewidth in degenerate two level systems (DTLSs) of metastable 84Kr (84Kr*) and 83Kr (83Kr*) atoms. Using the spectrally narrow EIA signals obtained corresponding to the closed hyperfine transition 4p55s[3/2]2(F=13/2) to 4p55p[5/2]3(F‧ = 15 / 2) in 83Kr* atom, we have measured the Landé g-factor (gF) for the lower hyperfine level involved in this transition by application of small values of magnetic field of few Gauss.

  13. Perpendicular ferromagnetic resonance measurements of damping and Landég- factor in sputtered (Co2Mn)1-xGex thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nembach, H. T.; Silva, T. J.; Shaw, J. M.; Schneider, M. L.; Carey, M. J.; Maat, S.; Childress, J. R.

    2011-08-01

    X-ray diffraction (XRD), magnetometry, and ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) measurements were performed on sputtered thin films of the nominal Heusler alloy (Co2Mn)1-xGex with varying Ge content and annealing temperatures. XRD indicates some degree of B2 alloy formation, with strong (110) texturing. FMR measurements were performed in a perpendicular geometry that minimized the contribution of two-magnon scattering to the linewidth. The FMR data indicate a significant increase in linewidth for samples that lack a well-defined (220) peak, presumably as a result of inhomogeneous line broadening. Samples annealed at 200 °C exhibit decreasing Landau-Lifshitz damping with increasing Ge content, while samples annealed at 245 and 300 °C have a nonlinear dependence of linewidth on frequency. The nonlinear component of the linewidth data was successfully fit with a generalized theory of slowly relaxing impurities, originally proposed by Van Vleck and Orbach. The modified theory includes the possibility of transverse coherence during the relaxation process. Magnetometry and FMR spectroscopy results were analyzed in the context of Malozemoff's generalized Slater-Pauling (GSP) theory, with the conclusion that the Ge sites support a significant negative-polarized spin density of several tens of percent. The GSP analysis results were consistent with a more conventional analysis of the spectroscopic g-factor that is appropriate for alloys. The proportionality of the strength of the slow-relaxer contribution to the damping suggests that the negatively polarized Ge atoms are acting as the slowly relaxing impurities in question.

  14. Gyroscopic g factor of rare earth metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogata, Y.; Chudo, H.; Ono, M.; Harii, K.; Matsuo, M.; Maekawa, S.; Saitoh, E.

    2017-02-01

    We develop the in situ magnetization measurement apparatus for observing the Barnett effect consisting of a fluxgate sensor, a high speed rotor with frequencies of up to 1.5 kHz, and a magnetic shield at room temperature. The effective magnetic field (Barnett field) in a sample arising from rotation magnetizes the sample and is proportional to the rotational frequency. The gyroscopic g factor, g ' , of rare earth metals, in particular, Gd, Tb, and Dy, was estimated to be 2.00 ± 0.08, 1.53 ± 0.17, and 1.15 ± 0.32, respectively, from the slopes of the rotation dependence of the Barnett field. This study provides a technique to determine the g ' factor even in samples where the spectroscopic method may not be available.

  15. Measurements of the spin-orbit interaction and Landé g factor in a pure-phase InAs nanowire double quantum dot in the Pauli spin-blockade regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jiyin; Huang, Shaoyun; Lei, Zijin; Pan, Dong; Zhao, Jianhua; Xu, H. Q.

    2016-08-01

    We demonstrate direct measurements of the spin-orbit interaction and Landé g factors in a semiconductor nanowire double quantum dot. The device is made from a single-crystal pure-phase InAs nanowire on top of an array of finger gates on a Si/SiO2 substrate and the measurements are performed in the Pauli spin-blockade regime. It is found that the double quantum dot exhibits a large singlet-triplet energy splitting of ΔST ˜ 2.3 meV, a strong spin-orbit interaction of ΔSO ˜ 140 μeV, and a large and strongly level-dependent Landé g factor of ˜12.5. These results imply that single-crystal pure-phase InAs nanowires are desired semiconductor nanostructures for applications in quantum information technologies.

  16. Fresh nuclear fuel measurements at Ukrainian nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Kuzminski, Jozef; Ewing, Tom; Dickman, Debbie; Gavrilyuk, Victor; Drapey, Sergey; Kirischuk, Vladimir; Strilchuk, Nikolay

    2009-01-01

    In 2005, the Provisions on Nuclear Material Measurement System was enacted in Ukraine as an important regulatory driver to support international obligations in nuclear safeguards and nonproliferation. It defines key provisions and requirements for material measurement and measurement control programs to ensure the quality and reliability of measurement data within the framework of the State MC&A System. Implementing the Provisions requires establishing a number of measurement techniques for both fresh and spent nuclear fuel for various types of Ukrainian reactors. Our first efforts focused on measurements of fresh nuclear fuel from a WWR-1000 power reactor.

  17. Perpendicular ferromagnetic resonance measurements of damping and the Landé g-factor in sputtered (Co 2Mn)(1 - x) Ge xthin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nembach, Hans

    2011-03-01

    We analyzed vector network analyzer-ferromagnetic resonance data for sputtered polycrystalline (Co 2 Mn)(1 - x) Ge x thin films measured in a perpendicular configuration to minimize two magnon scattering. The films were grown with varying Ge content and subjected to post-deposition annealing at 200, 245, and 300circ; C. We can adequately fit the data with the slow relaxing impurity model for damping, similar to what was successfully used to explain enhanced damping in RE- doped Permalloy films. However, it was required to generalize the theory to include coherence effects that modify the original fluctuating field correlation function from a damped exponential to an exponentially damping cosine. We find that the spectroscopic splitting factor g is a clearly decreasing function of Ge content for 245 and 300circ; C anneal samples. Analysis of the content dependence for g provides strong evidence of a significant negative spin polarization between -0.15 and -0.35 spins at the Ge sites. This is consistent with our analysis of magnetometry data in the context of generalized Slater Pauling (GSP) theory, which presumes that the minority band density of states has a deep minimum at the Fermi energy. GSP analysis yields a spin polarization of -0.25 at the Ge sites. The substantial antiferromagnetic spin polarization of the Ge sites, in addition to the correlation of the slow relaxing damping strength with Ge content, suggests that Ge atoms, perhaps in the form of point defects in the Co sub-lattice, are acting as the slow relaxing impurities. Finally, successful fitting of linewidth data with a model that includes coherence during the relaxation process indicates slight transverse as well as longitudinal exchange coupling between the Ge ``impurities'' and the magnetization, giving rise to mixing of the electronic energy levels responsible for the relaxation process.

  18. Theory of Bound-Electron g Factor in Highly Charged Ions

    SciTech Connect

    Shabaev, V. M.; Glazov, D. A.; Plunien, G.; Volotka, A. V.

    2015-09-15

    The paper presents the current status of the theory of bound-electron g factor in highly charged ions. The calculations of the relativistic, quantum electrodynamics (QED), nuclear recoil, nuclear structure, and interelectronic-interaction corrections to the g factor are reviewed. Special attention is paid to tests of QED effects at strong coupling regime and determinations of the fundamental constants.

  19. Giant g-factors of natural impurities in synthetic quartz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goryachev, Maxim; Farr, Warrick G.; Tobar, Michael E.

    2013-12-01

    We report the observation of g-factors of natural paramagnetic impurities in a pure synthetic quartz crystal at milli-Kelvin temperatures. Measurements are made by performing spectroscopy using multiple high-Q whispering gallery modes sustained in the crystal. Extreme sensitivity of the method at low temperatures allows the determination of natural residual impurities introduced during the crystal growth. We observe g-factors that significantly differ from integer multiples of the electron g-factor in vacuum, and with values of up to 7.6, which reveals much stronger coupling between impurities and the crystal lattice than in previous studies. Both substitutional and interstitial ions are proposed as candidates for the observed interactions.

  20. Giant g-factors of natural impurities in synthetic quartz

    SciTech Connect

    Goryachev, Maxim; Farr, Warrick G.; Tobar, Michael E.

    2013-12-23

    We report the observation of g-factors of natural paramagnetic impurities in a pure synthetic quartz crystal at milli-Kelvin temperatures. Measurements are made by performing spectroscopy using multiple high-Q whispering gallery modes sustained in the crystal. Extreme sensitivity of the method at low temperatures allows the determination of natural residual impurities introduced during the crystal growth. We observe g-factors that significantly differ from integer multiples of the electron g-factor in vacuum, and with values of up to 7.6, which reveals much stronger coupling between impurities and the crystal lattice than in previous studies. Both substitutional and interstitial ions are proposed as candidates for the observed interactions.

  1. g factor of an electron or muon bound by an arbitrary central potential

    SciTech Connect

    Karshenboim, S.G.; Lee, R.N.; Milstein, A.I.

    2005-10-15

    We consider the g factor of a spin-1/2 particle (electron or muon) bound by an arbitrary central field. We present an approach that allows one to express the relativistic g factor in terms of the binding energy. We derive the general expression for the correction to the g factor caused by a deviation of the central potential from the Coulomb one. As the application of this method, we consider the corrections to the g factor due to the finite nuclear size, including vacuum polarization radiative correction. The effect of the anomalous magnetic moment is also taken into account.

  2. Mass-spectrometric measurements for nuclear safeguards

    SciTech Connect

    Carter, J.A.; Smith, D.H.; Walker, R.L.

    1982-01-01

    The need of an on-site inspection device to provide isotopic ratio measurements led to the development of a quadrupole mass spectrometer mounted in a van. This mobile laboratory has the ability, through the use of the resin bead technique, to acquire, prepare, and analyze samples of interest to nuclear safeguards. Precision of the measurements is about 1 to 2%.

  3. The Landé-g factor in heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardoso, J. L.; Pereyra, P.

    2005-05-01

    We have studied the behavior of the Shubnikov-de Haas oscillations in magnetoresistance under applied magnetic fields with an arbitrary orientation. Different procedures to measure the Landé-g factor have been used in the literature. We propose four unambiguous methods and formulas for the evaluation of this quantity. The Landé-g factor obtained using these formulas compares within the 5% with the reported results of Brosig et al. [1] in InAs - AlSb quantum wells, Bompadre et al. [2] for Bismuth crystals, Kobayashi et al. [3] measuring magnetoresistance as a function of the gate Voltage and F. Fang et al. [4] for InAs - GaSb heterostructure.

  4. Holdup measurement for nuclear fuel manufacturing plants

    SciTech Connect

    Zucker, M.S.; Degen, M.; Cohen, I.; Gody, A.; Summers, R.; Bisset, P.; Shaub, E.; Holody, D.

    1981-07-13

    The assay of nuclear material holdup in fuel manufacturing plants is a laborious but often necessary part of completing the material balance. A range of instruments, standards, and a methodology for assaying holdup has been developed. The objectives of holdup measurement are ascertaining the amount, distribution, and how firmly fixed the SNM is. The purposes are reconciliation of material unbalance during or after a manufacturing campaign or plant decommissioning, to decide security requirements, or whether further recovery efforts are justified.

  5. Geochemical Controls on Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Knight, Rosemary; Prasad, Manika; Keating, Kristina

    2003-11-11

    OAK-B135 Our research objectives are to determine, through an extensive set of laboratory experiments, the effect of the specific mineralogic form of iron and the effect of the distribution of iron on proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxation mechanisms. In the first nine months of this project, we have refined the experimental procedures to be used in the acquisition of the laboratory NMR data; have ordered, and conducted preliminary measurements on, the sand samples to be used in the experimental work; and have revised and completed the theoretical model to use in this project. Over the next year, our focus will be on completing the first phase of the experimental work where the form and distribution of the iron in the sands in varied.

  6. Nonlinear Ultrasonic Measurements in Nuclear Reactor Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinhardt, Brian T.

    Several Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE) programs, such as the Fuel Cycle Research and Development (FCRD), Advanced Reactor Concepts (ARC), Light Water Reactor Sustainability, and Next Generation Nuclear Power Plants (NGNP), are investigating new fuels, materials, and inspection paradigms for advanced and existing reactors. A key objective of such programs is to understand the performance of these fuels and materials during irradiation. In DOE-NE's FCRD program, ultrasonic based technology was identified as a key approach that should be pursued to obtain the high-fidelity, high-accuracy data required to characterize the behavior and performance of new candidate fuels and structural materials during irradiation testing. The radiation, high temperatures, and pressure can limit the available tools and characterization methods. In this thesis, two ultrasonic characterization techniques will be explored. The first, finite amplitude wave propagation has been demonstrated to be sensitive to microstructural material property changes. It is a strong candidate to determine fuel evolution; however, it has not been demonstrated for in-situ reactor applications. In this thesis, finite amplitude wave propagation will be used to measure the microstructural evolution in Al-6061. This is the first demonstration of finite amplitude wave propagation at temperatures in excess of 200 °C and during an irradiation test. Second, a method based on contact nonlinear acoustic theory will be developed to identify compressed cracks. Compressed cracks are typically transparent to ultrasonic wave propagation; however, by measuring harmonic content developed during finite amplitude wave propagation, it is shown that even compressed cracks can be characterized. Lastly, piezoelectric transducers capable of making these measurements are developed. Specifically, three piezoelectric sensors (Bismuth Titanate, Aluminum Nitride, and Zinc Oxide) are tested in the Massachusetts

  7. Nuclear Mass Measurement and Evaluation Relevant to Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Meng

    Nuclear mass data are crucial input for the astrophysics models. Thanks to the developments of radioactive nuclear beam facilities and novel mass spectrometers, the experimental knowledge of nuclear masses has been continuously expanding to the exotic nuclei far from the stability which play a critical role in astrophysics. The recent progress and future perspective of mass measurement relevant to astrophysics will be discussed. By evaluating all available experimental data from nuclear reactions, radioactive decays and direct mass measurements, the Atomic Mass Evaluation (AME) serve the research community with reliable source for comprehensive information related to the nuclear masses. The next AME version is envisioned to be published at the end of 2016.

  8. g-factor of the 2{sup+}{sub{1} state of {sup179}Hf.

    SciTech Connect

    Berant, Z.; Oster, E.; Wolf, A.; Casperson, R. J.; Werner, V.; McCutchan, E. A.

    2009-01-01

    The g factor of the 2{sub 1}{sup +} state of {sup 172}Hf was measured using the perturbed angular correlation technique in a static external magnetic field. The result, g(2{sub 1}{sup +}) = 0.25(5), is discussed in relation to the systematics of the previously reported g factors in the Hf isotopes and compared with the predictions of several models. An interesting outcome of the analysis presented in this paper is the agreement between the calculated g factors within the interacting boson approximation (IBA) and the results of a large-scale shell model calculation. This agreement supports the emphasis in the IBA on the valence space. The undershooting of the empirical g factors near midshell in both models suggests that they underestimate the role of the saturation of collectivity, which is explicitly incorporated into a phenomenological model that agrees better with the data.

  9. InAs 2DEGs:What's the g-factor?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCombe, B. D.; Pakmehr, Mehdi; Khaetskii, A.; Chiatti, Olivio; Fischer, S. F.; Buchholz, S.; Heyn, C.; Hansen, W.; Cahay, M.; Newrock, R. S.; Bandari, Nikhil

    2014-03-01

    Interest in spin-orbit effects in semiconductors has led us to study the electron g-factor in quasi-2DEG InAs samples. We have made magneto-transport and -photoresponse (PR) measurements on InAs QW structures in magnetic fields up to 10 T. THz cyclotron resonance (CR) is manifested in PR as a resonant envelope of the amplitude of quantum oscillations, which show clear spin-splitting (for lower mobility samples) down 4T, while direct R_xx measurements show no spin-splitting up to 9T. R_xx oscillations in a higher mobility sample show well-resolved spin-splittings over a range of fields as does the PR. We have simulated the data with a theoretical expression for 2DEG SdH oscillations (coupled with CR resonant carrier heating for the PR) and extracted g-factors from fits. We also used a different (commonly used) method, SdH oscillations vs. tilt angle of the field to extract g-factors from the angle at which the SdH frequency doubles. We find very large g-factors from fits to R_xx and PR (14 - 20), but g-factors 2-3 times smaller for these same samples from tilted field experiments (close to estimated band g-factors). These results are discussed in terms of exchange effects. Support: NSF DMR 1008138 (Buffalo); NSF ECCE 1028483(Cincinnati); DFG Fi932/4-1(Berlin).

  10. Fifty years of nuclear fission: Nuclear data and measurements series

    SciTech Connect

    Lynn, J.E.

    1989-06-01

    This report is the written version of a colloquium first presented at Argonne National Laboratory in January 1989. The paper begins with an historical preamble about the events leading to the discovery of nuclear fission. This leads naturally to an account of early results and understanding of the fission phenomena. Some of the key concepts in the development of fission theory are then discussed. The main theme of this discussion is the topography of the fission barrier, in which the interplay of the liquid-drop model and nucleon shell effects lead to a wide range of fascinating phenomena encompassing metastable isomers, intermediate-structure effects in fission cross-sections, and large changes in fission product properties. It is shown how study of these changing effects and theoretical calculations of the potential energy of the deformed nucleus have led to broad qualitative understanding of the nature of the fission process. 54 refs., 35 figs.

  11. Development of Nuclear Emulsion for Fast Neutron Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machii, Shogo; Kuwabara, Kenichi; Morishima, Kunihiro

    Nuclear emulsion is high sensitive photographic film used for detection of three-dimensional trajectory of charged particles. Energy resolution of nuclear emulsion is 21% (12%) FWHM against neutron energy of 2.8 MeV (4.9 MeV). Nuclear emulsion has high gamma ray rejection power. For now, at least 2×104 gamma rays/cm2, no increase of as a background for neutron measurement when scan using automatic nuclear emulsion read out system HTS. This value suggests that it is applicable even under high gamma ray environment, such as nuclear fusion reactor.

  12. The Measurement of Nuclear War Attitudes: Methods and Concerns.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayton, Daniel M., II

    Measures of adults' attitudes toward nuclear war are briefly discussed, and Mayton's Modified World Affairs Questionnaire (MWAQ) is described. The 23-item MWAQ was developed from Novak and Lerner's World Affairs Questionnaire, a nuclear war attitude measure by Mayton and Delamater, and related interview items by Jeffries. When the MWAQ was…

  13. The g-factor of the K = 25 isomer in /sup 182/Os

    SciTech Connect

    Alderson, A.; Broude, C.; Bruce, A.; Dafni, E.; Fallon, P.; Goldring, G.; Hass, M; Nyberg, J.; Roberts, J.; Sharpey-Schafer, J.; Sletten, G.; Twin, P.

    1988-01-01

    The g-factor of the K = I = 25, 120 ns isomer in /sup 182/Os has been measured by observing the angular precession of the decay /gamma/-rays in an external magnetic field. Our preliminary result is g = 0.46(5). Comparing this result to predictions based on experimental g-factors of single-particle Nilsson orbitals in this mass region suggests equal contributions of neutron and proton spin to the total spin of I = 25. An attempt has also been undertaken to measure the quadrupole moment of this level by observing the time-dependent quadrupole interaction pattern of Os nuclei recoiling into an Os single crystal. The analysis of the quadrupole moment measurement, as well as a more detailed analysis of the g-factor measurement, is now in progress. 7 refs., 2 figs.

  14. Nuclear recoil measurements with the ARIS experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Alden; ARIS Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    As direct dark matter searches become increasingly sensitive, it is important to fully characterize the target of the search. The goal of the Argon Recoil Ionization and Scintillation (ARIS) experiment is to quantify information related to the scintillation and ionization energy scale, quenching factor, ion recombination probability, and scintillation time response of nuclear recoils, as expected from WIMPs, in liquid argon. A time projection chamber with an active mass of 0.5 kg of liquid argon and capable of full 3D position reconstruction was exposed to an inverse kinematic neutron beam at the Institut de Physique Nucleaire d'Orsay in France. A scan of nuclear recoil energies was performed through coincidence with a set of neutron detectors to quantify properties of nuclear recoils in liquid argon at various electric fields. The difference in ionization and scintillation response with differing recoil track angle to the electric field was also studied. The preliminary results of the experiment will be presented.

  15. Self-energy correction to the hyperfine splitting and the electron g factor in hydrogenlike ions

    SciTech Connect

    Yerokhin, Vladimir A.; Jentschura, Ulrich D.

    2010-01-15

    The hyperfine structure (hfs) and the g factor of a bound electron are caused by external magnetic fields. For the hfs, the magnetic field is due to the nuclear spin. A uniform-in-space and constant-in-time magnetic field is used to probe the bound-electron g factor. The self-energy corrections to these effects are more difficult to evaluate than those to the Lamb shift. Here, we describe a numerical approach for both effects in the notoriously problematic regime of hydrogenlike bound systems with low nuclear charge numbers. The calculation is nonperturbative in the binding Coulomb field. Accurate numerical values for the remainder functions are provided for 2P states and for nS states with n=1,2,3.

  16. A Measurement Control Program for Nuclear Material Accounting

    SciTech Connect

    Brouns, R. J.; Roberts, F. P.; Merrill, J. A.; Brown, W. B.

    1980-06-01

    A measurement control program for nuclear material accounting monitors and controls the quality of the measurements of special nuclear material that are involved in material balances. The quality is monitored by collecting data from which the current precision and accuracy of measurements can be evaluated. The quality is controlled by evaluations, reviews, and other administrative measures for control of selection or design of facilities. equipment and measurement methods and the training and qualification of personnel who perform SNM measurements. This report describes the most important elements of a program by which management can monitor and control measurement quality.

  17. Effective g factor in black phosphorus thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xiaoying; Lou, Wen-Kai; Zhang, Dong; Cheng, Fang; Zhou, Guanghui; Chang, Kai

    2017-01-01

    We theoretically investigate the effective g factor in the black phosphorus (BP) thin films (TFs) based on a multiband k .p theory. We demonstrate that the effective single particle g factor in pristine BP TF is anisotropic arising from its anisotropic band structure with gxx *≈gyy *≈2.0 and gzz * sensitively depending on the interband coupling and the band gap. The gzz * approaches 2.0 with increasing hole doping density and gate electric field since both of them minish the interband coupling by reducing the overlap integral between the electron and hole wave functions. We also estimate the exchange interaction enhancement on the effective single particle g factor by using the screened Hartree-Fock approximation. The exchange interaction enhanced g factor (gex) shows maxima (minima) at odd (even) filling factors. The effective g factor (g*) oscillates with the increase of magnetic field and sensitively depends on the Landau level broadening as well as the gate electric field since both of them affect the interband coupling and the electron-electron interactions.

  18. Measuring Neutrino Oscillations with Nuclear Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    McKeown, R. D.

    2007-10-26

    Since the first direct observations of antineutrino events by Reines and Cowan in the 1950's, nuclear reactors have been an important tool in the study of neutrino properties. More recently, the study of neutrino oscillations has been a very active area of research. The pioneering observation of oscillations by the KamLAND experiment has provided crucial information on the neutrino mixing matrix. New experiments to study the remaining unknown mixing angle are currently under development. These recent studies and potential future developments will be discussed.

  19. Hadronization measurements in cold nuclear matter

    SciTech Connect

    Dupre, Raphael

    2015-05-01

    Hadronization is the non-perturbative process of QCD by which partons become hadrons. It has been studied at high energies through various processes, we focus here on the experiments of lepto-production of hadrons in cold nuclear matter. By studying the dependence of observables to the atomic number of the target, these experimentscan give information on the dynamic of the hadronization at the femtometer scale. In particular, we will present preliminary results from JLab Hall B (CLAS collaboration), which give unprecedented statistical precision. Then, we will present results of a phenomenological study showing how HERMES data can be described with pure energyloss models.

  20. Predicted Landé g-factors for open shell diatomic molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semenov, Mikhail; Yurchenko, Sergei. N.; Tennyson, Jonathan

    2016-12-01

    The program DUO (Yurchenko et al., 2016) provides direct solutions of the nuclear motion Schrödinger equation for the (coupled) potential energy curves of open shell diatomic molecules. Wavefunctions from DUO are used to compute Landé g-factors valid for weak magnetic fields; the results are compared with the idealized predictions of both Hund's case (a) and Hund's case (b) coupling schemes. Test calculations are performed for AlO, NO, CrH and C2. The computed gJ 's both provide a sensitive test of the underlying spectroscopic model used to represent the system and an indication of whether states of the molecule are well-represented by the either of the Hund's cases considered. The computation of Landé g-factors is implemented as a standard option in the latest release of DUO.

  1. Nuclear-Spin Measurements of Quantum Hall Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirayama, Yoshiro

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is widely used in the physical, chemical, and biological sciences. However, conventional NMR techniques based on induction-detection have drawbacks of low-sensitivity and the need of a relatively large sample. It is not suitable to investigate single or double layers (or their nanostructure), which is essential in studying quantum Hall (QH) effects. In this presentation, I discussed a resistively-detected technique to overcome the low-sensitivity limitation of conventional NMR and its application to QH systems. Resistively-detected nuclear-spin-based measurements rely on enhanced interactions between electron and nuclear spins at the degenerate point of different electron-spin states. For example, at the ν = 2/3 degenerate point in a AlGaAs/GaAs system,1-3 nuclear-spin polarization far beyond the thermal equilibrium is generated using current flow (dynamic nuclear-spin polarization). Moreover, nuclear-spin polarization can be detected as enhanced resistance, which is proportional to the magnetization, Mz, of nuclear spins.2 It should be stressed that the special states of ν = 2/3 are needed for dynamic nuclear-spin polarization and Mz detection, but we can apply NMR spectrum and nuclear-spin relaxation (T1 time) measurements for any state we want to estimate. These nuclear-spin-based measurements were successfully applied to characterize QH systems, especially their electron-spin features, using single and double layer systems where characteristics are controlled electrically by the gate biases. For a single layer, we could clarify skyrmion,2 spin-polarization of composite fermion,4 and enhanced spin-orbit interactions in a strongly asymmetric confinement.5 Exciting phases, like a canted antiferromagnetic phase, were studied in a double layer QH system with a total filling factor of 2 (Refs. 6, 7). The low-frequency mode was sensitively detected by monitoring T1, reflecting correlated electron spin features.7 The clear

  2. Measurements of nuclear spin dynamics by spin-noise spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Ryzhov, I. I.; Poltavtsev, S. V.; Kozlov, G. G.; Zapasskii, V. S.; Kavokin, K. V.; Glazov, M. M.; Vladimirova, M.; Scalbert, D.; Cronenberger, S.; Lemaître, A.; Bloch, J.

    2015-06-15

    We exploit the potential of the spin noise spectroscopy (SNS) for studies of nuclear spin dynamics in n-GaAs. The SNS experiments were performed on bulk n-type GaAs layers embedded into a high-finesse microcavity at negative detuning. In our experiments, nuclear spin polarisation initially prepared by optical pumping is monitored in real time via a shift of the peak position in the electron spin noise spectrum. We demonstrate that this shift is a direct measure of the Overhauser field acting on the electron spin. The dynamics of nuclear spin is shown to be strongly dependent on the electron concentration.

  3. Monitoring the Random Errors of Nuclear Material Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    ,

    1980-06-01

    Monitoring and controlling random errors is an important function of a measurement control program. This report describes the principal sources of random error in the common nuclear material measurement processes and the most important elements of a program for monitoring, evaluating and controlling the random error standard deviations of these processes.

  4. Determination of parameters of a nuclear reactor through noise measurements

    DOEpatents

    Cohn, C.E.

    1975-07-15

    A method of measuring parameters of a nuclear reactor by noise measurements is described. Noise signals are developed by the detectors placed in the reactor core. The polarity coincidence between the noise signals is used to develop quantities from which various parameters of the reactor can be calculated. (auth)

  5. A dc amplifier for nuclear particle measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macnee, A. B.; Masnari, N. A.

    1978-01-01

    A monolithic preamplifier-postamplifier combination has been developed for use with solid state particle detectors. The direct coupled amplifiers employ interdigitated n-channel JFET's, diodes, and diffused resistors. The circuits developed demonstrate the feasibility of matching the performance of existing discrete component designs. The fabrication procedures for the monolithic amplifier fabrication are presented and the results of measurements on a limited number of sample amplifiers are given.

  6. High resolution image measurements of nuclear tracks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shirk, E. K.; Price, P. B.

    1980-01-01

    The striking clarity and high contrast of the mouths of tracks etched in CR-39 plastic detectors allow automatic measurement of track parameters to be made with simple image-recognition equipment. Using a commercially available Vidicon camera system with a microprocessor-controlled digitizer, resolution for normally incident C-12 and N-14 ions at 32 MeV/amu equivalent to a 14sigma separation of adjacent charges was demonstrated.

  7. Precision Measurement of Nuclear Electron Capture Decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koltick, David; Liu, Shih-Chieh; Wang, Haoyu; Heim, Jordan; Nistor, Jonathan

    2017-01-01

    The method of accurately measuring the radioactive decay constant of a isotope by measuring the decay rate as a function of time requires that both the detector and environment be stable over time periods comparable to the life-time of the isotope. In addition statistical accuracy requires initial counting rates be high but limited by the dead time capability of the data collection system and the detectors double-event resolving time. A High Purity Germanium (HPGe) spectrometer, sensitive to radiation from 3-KeV to over 3-MeV, has been built to measure radioactive decay constants to a level of 10-5 10-6 at a location only 6 meters from the core of the High Flux Isotope Reactor located at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Such accuracy requires understanding of, background, signal-processing algorithms, and both the double and triple event pile-up in the observed spectrum. The approach taken is to fit the collected energy spectrum with invariant shapes, independent of event rate. By fixing the source-detector geometry and environmental conditions, the invariant shapes are (1) ideal energy spectrum without pile-up and background, (2) the ideal double event pile-up spectrum, (3) the ideal triple event pile-up spectrum, and (4) the stable background spectrum. A method is presented that finds these ideal shapes using the collected data in situ. Taking this approach the HPGe detector photopeak shape in the absence of background and pile-up is presented showing associated structure over a range of 7 orders of magnitude.

  8. Recent measurements for hadrontherapy and space radiation: nuclear physics.

    PubMed

    Miller, J

    2001-01-01

    The particles and energies commonly used for hadron therapy overlap the low end of the charge and energy range of greatest interest for space radiation applications, Z=1-26 and approximately 100-1000 MeV/nucleon. It has been known for some time that the nuclear interactions of the incident ions must be taken into account both in treatment planning and in understanding and addressing the effects of galactic cosmic ray ions on humans in space. Until relatively recently, most of the studies of nuclear fragmentation and transport in matter were driven by the interests of the nuclear physics and later, the hadron therapy communities. However, the experimental and theoretical methods and the accelerator facilities developed for use in heavy ion nuclear physics are directly applicable to radiotherapy and space radiation studies. I will briefly review relevant data taken recently at various accelerators, and discuss the implications of the measurements for radiotherapy, radiobiology and space radiation research.

  9. Recent measurements for hadrontherapy and space radiation: nuclear physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, J.

    2001-01-01

    The particles and energies commonly used for hadron therapy overlap the low end of the charge and energy range of greatest interest for space radiation applications, Z=1-26 and approximately 100-1000 MeV/nucleon. It has been known for some time that the nuclear interactions of the incident ions must be taken into account both in treatment planning and in understanding and addressing the effects of galactic cosmic ray ions on humans in space. Until relatively recently, most of the studies of nuclear fragmentation and transport in matter were driven by the interests of the nuclear physics and later, the hadron therapy communities. However, the experimental and theoretical methods and the accelerator facilities developed for use in heavy ion nuclear physics are directly applicable to radiotherapy and space radiation studies. I will briefly review relevant data taken recently at various accelerators, and discuss the implications of the measurements for radiotherapy, radiobiology and space radiation research.

  10. 78 FR 45573 - Compensatory and Alternative Regulatory Measures for Nuclear Power Plant Fire Protection (CARMEN...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-29

    ... COMMISSION Compensatory and Alternative Regulatory Measures for Nuclear Power Plant Fire Protection (CARMEN-FIRE) AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION: Notice of availability; request for public comment.../CR-7135, ``Compensatory and Alternative Regulatory Measures for Nuclear Power Plant Fire...

  11. Measurements of nitric oxide after a nuclear burst

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcghan, M.; Shaw, A.; Megill, L. R.; Sedlacek, W.; Guthals, P. R.; Fowler, M. M.

    1981-01-01

    Measurements of ozone and nitric oxide in a nuclear cloud 7 days after the explosion are reported. No measurable increase above ambient density of either ozone or nitric oxide was found. Results from a chemistry model of the cloud do not agree with the measurement unless 'nonstandard' assumptions are made with regard to the operating chemical processes. A number of possible explanations of the results are discussed.

  12. Liquid level measurement in high level nuclear waste slurries

    SciTech Connect

    Weeks, G.E.; Heckendorn, F.M.; Postles, R.L.

    1990-01-01

    Accurate liquid level measurement has been a difficult problem to solve for the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). The nuclear waste sludge tends to plug or degrade most commercially available liquid-level measurement sensors. A liquid-level measurement system that meets demanding accuracy requirements for the DWPF has been developed. The system uses a pneumatic 1:1 pressure repeater as a sensor and a computerized error correction system. 2 figs.

  13. Using Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy for Measuring Ternary Phase Diagrams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woodworth, Jennifer K.; Terrance, Jacob C.; Hoffmann, Markus M.

    2006-01-01

    A laboratory experiment is presented for the upper-level undergraduate physical chemistry curriculum in which the ternary phase diagram of water, 1-propanol and n-heptane is measured using proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The experiment builds upon basic concepts of NMR spectral analysis, typically taught in the undergraduate…

  14. Dispersion of the electron g factor anisotropy in InAs/InP self-assembled quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belykh, V. V.; Yakovlev, D. R.; Schindler, J. J.; van Bree, J.; Koenraad, P. M.; Averkiev, N. S.; Bayer, M.; Silov, A. Yu.

    2016-08-01

    The electron g factor in an ensemble of InAs/InP quantum dots with emission wavelengths around 1.4 μm is measured using time-resolved pump-probe Faraday rotation spectroscopy in different magnetic field orientations. Thereby, we can extend recent single dot photoluminescence measurements significantly towards lower optical transition energies through 0.86 eV. This allows us to obtain detailed insight into the dispersion of the recently discovered g factor anisotropy in these infrared emitting quantum dots. We find with decreasing transition energy over a range of 50 meV a strong enhancement of the g factor difference between magnetic field normal and along the dot growth axis, namely, from 1 to 1.7. We argue that the g factor cannot be solely determined by the confinement energy, but the dot asymmetry underlying this anisotropy therefore has to increase with increasing dot size.

  15. Nuclear Data Measurements for 21st Century Reactor Physics Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Rahmat Aryaeinejad; Jerald D. Cole; Mark W. Drigert; James K. Jewell; Christopher A. McGrath; David W. Nigg; Edward L. Reber

    2003-03-01

    The United States Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Nuclear Energy (NE) has embarked on a long-term program to significantly advance the science and technology of nuclear energy. This is in response to the overall national plan for accelerated development of domestic energy resources on several fronts, punctuated by recent dramatic events that have emphasized the need for the US to reduce its dependence on foreign petroleum supplies. Key aspects of the DOE-NE agenda are embodied in the Generation-IV (Gen-IV) advanced nuclear energy systems development program and in the Advanced Fuel Cycle (AFC) program. The planned efforts involve near-term and intermediate-term improvements in fuel utilization and recycling in current nuclear power reactor systems as well as the longer-term development of new nuclear energy systems that offer much improved fuel utilization and proliferation resistance, along with continued advances in operational safety. The success of the overall NE effort will depend not only on sophisticated system development and engineering, but also on the advances in the supporting sciences and technologies. Of these, one of the most important is the improvement of the relevant fundamental nuclear science data bases, especially the evaluated neutron interaction cross section files that serve as the foundation of all reactor system designs, operating strategies, and fuel cycle engineering activities. The new concepts for reactors and fuel cycles involve the use of transuranic nuclides that were previously of little interest, and where experimentally measured information is lacking. The current state of the cross section database for some of these nuclides is such that design computations for advanced fast-spectrum reactor systems and fuel cycles that incorporate such materials in significant quantities are meaningful only for approximate conceptual applications. No actual system could reliably be designed according to currently accepted standards, nor

  16. Nuclear fragmentation measurements for hadrontherapy and space radiation protection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Napoli, M.; Agodi, C.; Battistoni, G.; Blancato, A. A.; Bondı, M.; Cappuzzello, F.; Carbone, D.; Cavallaro, M.; Cirrone, G. A. P.; Cuttone, G.; Giacoppo, F.; Morone, M. C.; Nicolosi, D.; Pandola, L.; Raciti, G.; Rapisarda, E.; Romano, F.; Sardina, D.; Scuderi, V.; Sfienti, C.; Tropea, S.

    2013-04-01

    Nuclear fragmentation measurements are necessary in hadrontherapy and space radiation protection, to predict the effects of the ion nuclear interactions within the human body. Nowadays, a very limited set of carbon fragmentation cross sections has been measured and in particular, to our knowledge, no double differential fragmentation cross sections at intermediate energies are available in literature. We have measured the double differential cross sections and the angular distributions of the secondary fragments produced in the 12C fragmentation at 62 AMeV on a thin carbon target. The experimental data have been also used to benchmark the prediction capability of the Geant4 Monte Carlo code at intermediate energies, where it was never tested before.

  17. Thermal measurements in the nuclear winter fire test

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, M.E.; Keltner, N.R.; Kent, L.A.

    1989-01-01

    In March, 1987, a large open pool fire test was performed to provide test measurements to help define the thermal characteristics of large open pool fires and estimates of the smoke source term for the nuclear winter (global effects) scenario. This report will present the results of the thermal measurements as well as comparisons with previous test results. These measurements included flame temperatures, heat fluxes to a variety of calorimeters, and gas velocities in the lower flame regions. 13 refs., 76 figs., 7 tabs.

  18. A nuclear data approach for the Hubble constant measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Pritychenko, B.

    2015-06-09

    An extraordinary number of Hubble constant measurements challenges physicists with selection of the best numerical value. The standard U.S. Nuclear Data Program (USNDP) codes and procedures have been applied to resolve this issue. The nuclear data approach has produced the most probable or recommended Hubble constant value of 67.00(770) (km/sec)/Mpc. This recommended value is based on the last 25 years of experimental research and includes contributions from different types of measurements. The present result implies (14.6±1.7) x 109 years as a rough estimate for the age of the Universe. The complete list of recommended results is given and possible implications are discussed.

  19. Method and apparatus for measuring nuclear magnetic properties

    DOEpatents

    Weitekamp, Daniel P.; Bielecki, Anthony; Zax, David B.; Zilm, Kurt W.; Pines, Alexander

    1987-01-01

    A method for studying the chemical and structural characteristics of materials is disclosed. The method includes placement of a sample material in a high strength polarizing magnetic field to order the sample nucleii. The condition used to order the sample is then removed abruptly and the ordering of the sample allowed to evolve for a time interval. At the end of the time interval, the ordering of the sample is measured by conventional nuclear magnetic resonance techniques.

  20. Method and apparatus for measuring nuclear magnetic properties

    DOEpatents

    Weitekamp, D.P.; Bielecki, A.; Zax, D.B.; Zilm, K.W.; Pines, A.

    1987-12-01

    A method for studying the chemical and structural characteristics of materials is disclosed. The method includes placement of a sample material in a high strength polarizing magnetic field to order the sample nuclei. The condition used to order the sample is then removed abruptly and the ordering of the sample allowed to evolve for a time interval. At the end of the time interval, the ordering of the sample is measured by conventional nuclear magnetic resonance techniques. 5 figs.

  1. Senate examines measures to improve nuclear safety following Japan disaster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2012-03-01

    One year after Japan suffered a devastating magnitude 9.0 earthquake and the resulting tsunami and nuclear disaster, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has taken a number of measures to try to ensure that nuclear plants in the United States are safe from natural hazards. At a U.S. Senate hearing on 15 March, NRC chair Gregory Jaczko announced that the commission had issued three key orders and several requests for information on 12 March that plant licensees must follow, and that NRC also plans to take additional actions. However, the commission is not moving quickly enough in some areas, such as ensuring that all plants are safe from seismic hazards, including those in areas with low seismic activity, according to Jaczko's testimony before the Senate Committee on Environment and Public Works (EPW) and the Subcommittee on Clean Air and Nuclear Safety. The 12 March orders require licensees to have strategies to maintain or restore core cooling, containment, and spent-fuel pool cooling capabilities "following a beyond-design-basis extreme natural event" and have a reliable indication of the water level in spent-fuel storage pools.

  2. Problems in detection and measurement in nuclear medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aysun Ugur, Fatma

    2015-07-01

    Nuclear Medicine studies are performed with a variety of types of radiation measurement instruments, depending on the kind of radiation source that is being measured and the type of information sought. For example, some instruments are designed for in vitro measurements on blood samples, urine specimens, and so forth. Others are designed for in vivo measurements of radioactivity in patients. All these instruments have special design characteristics to optimize them for their specific tasks, as described in this study; however, some considerations of design characteristics and performance limitations are common to all of them. An important consideration for any radiation measurement instrument is its detection efficiency. Maximum detection efficiency is desirable because one thus obtains maximum information with a minimum amount of radioactivity. Also important are instrument's counting rate limitations. There are finite counting rate limits for all counting and imaging instruments used in nuclear medicine, above which accurate results are obtained because of data losses and other data distortions. Non penetrating radiations, such as ß particles, have special detection and measurement problems. In this study, some of these general considerations have been discussed.

  3. Indirect measurement of nuclear reactions of astrophysical interest

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, W. P.; Li, Z. H.; Bai, X. X.; Wang, Y. B.; Guo, B.; Lian, G.; Su, J.; Zeng, S.; Wang, B. X.; Yan, S. Q.; Li, Y. J.; Li, E. T.; Jin, S. J.

    2010-05-12

    Systematic indirect measurements of nuclear astrophysical reactions using the unstable ion beam facility GIRAFFE in CIAE were performed. We have measured the angular distributions of transfer reactions, such as {sup 8}Li(d,p){sup 9}Li, {sup 8}Li(d,n){sup 9}Be and {sup 8}Li(p,d){sup 7}Li in inverse kinematics, and derived the astrophysical S-factors or reaction rates for {sup 8}Li(n,gamma){sup 9}Li and {sup 8}Li(p,gamma){sup 9}Be by using asymptotic normalization coefficient (ANC) or spectroscopic factor methods.

  4. Temperature measuring analysis of the nuclear reactor fuel assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Urban, F. E-mail: zdenko.zavodny@stuba.sk; Kučák, L. E-mail: zdenko.zavodny@stuba.sk; Bereznai, J. E-mail: zdenko.zavodny@stuba.sk; Závodný, Z. E-mail: zdenko.zavodny@stuba.sk; Muškát, P. E-mail: zdenko.zavodny@stuba.sk

    2014-08-06

    Study was based on rapid changes of measured temperature values from the thermocouple in the VVER 440 nuclear reactor fuel assembly. Task was to determine origin of fluctuations of the temperature values by experiments on physical model of the fuel assembly. During an experiment, heated water was circulating in the system and cold water inlet through central tube to record sensitivity of the temperature sensor. Two positions of the sensor was used. First, just above the central tube in the physical model fuel assembly axis and second at the position of the thermocouple in the VVER 440 nuclear reactor fuel assembly. Dependency of the temperature values on time are presented in the diagram form in the paper.

  5. QED theory of the nuclear magnetic shielding in hydrogenlike ions.

    PubMed

    Yerokhin, V A; Pachucki, K; Harman, Z; Keitel, C H

    2011-07-22

    The shielding of the nuclear magnetic moment by the bound electron in hydrogenlike ions is calculated ab initio with inclusion of relativistic, nuclear, and quantum electrodynamics (QED) effects. The QED correction is evaluated to all orders in the nuclear binding strength parameter and, independently, to the first order in the expansion in this parameter. The results obtained lay the basis for the high-precision determination of nuclear magnetic dipole moments from measurements of the g factor of hydrogenlike ions.

  6. Charged fusion product loss measurements using nuclear activation

    SciTech Connect

    Bonheure, G.; Hult, M.; Gonzalez de Orduna, R.; Wieslander, E.; Arnold, D.; Dombrowski, H.; Laubenstein, M.; Murari, A.; Collaboration: JET-EFDA Contributors

    2010-10-15

    In ITER, {alpha} particle loss measurements will be required in order to understand the alpha particle physics. Techniques capable of operating in a fusion reactor environment need further development. Recent experimental studies on JET demonstrated the potential of nuclear activation to measure the flux of escaping MeV ions. New results from MeV ion induced activation of metallic, ceramic, and crystal samples placed near the plasma edge are reported. Activation products were measured as function of orientation with respect to the magnetic field as well as function of the distance to the plasma. Sample activity was measured using ultralow-level gamma-ray spectrometry. Distribution of 14.68 MeV fusion proton induced activation products is strongly anisotropic in agreement with simulations and falls off sharply with increasing distance to the plasma. Prospects for using the technique in ITER are discussed.

  7. Trojan Horse technique to measure nuclear astrophysics rearrangement reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spitaleri, Claudio

    2013-03-01

    The knowledge of nucleosynthesis and of energy production in stars requires an increasingly precise measurement of nuclear fusion reactions at the Gamow energy. Because of the Coulomb barrier reaction cross sections in astrophysics cannot be accessed directly at ultra -low energies, unless very favorable conditions are met. Moreover, the energies characterizing nuclear processes in several astrophysical contexts are so low that the presence of atomic electrons must be taken into account. Theoretical extrapolations of available data are then needed to derive astrophysical S(E)-factors. To overcome these experimental difficulties the Trojan Horse Method (THM) has been introduced. The method provides a valid alternative path to measure unscreened low-energy cross sections of reactions between charged particles, and to retrieve information on the electron screening potential when ultra-low energy direct measurements are available. While the theory has been discussed in detail in some theoretical works, present in the scientific literature, also in relation to different types of excitation functions (e.g. non-resonant and resonant), work on detailed methodology used to extract the events to be considered for the bare nucleus cross section measurements is still on going. In this work we will present some critical points in the application of THM that deserve to be discussed in more detail.

  8. Measuring the Nuclear Levels in 19Ne using GODDESS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Matthew; Experiment 1488 Collaboration Collaboration

    2016-09-01

    A direct way to test nova explosion models is to observe gamma rays created in the decay of radioactive isotopes produced in the nova. One such isotope, 18F, is believed to be the main source of observable 511-keV gamma rays. The main destruction mechanism of 18F is thought to be the 18F(p,α)15O reaction, and the uncertainty in the reaction rate is attributed to uncertainties in the energies, spins, and parities of the nuclear levels in 19Ne above the proton threshold. A 3He beam was used at Argonne National Lab in an effort to understand the levels in 19Ne via the 19F(3He,t)19Ne reaction. Gammasphere ORRUBA Dual Detectors for Experimental Structure Studies (GODDESS) was used to measure gamma rays from the decay of 19Ne in coincidence with the reaction tritons. Preliminary data from the experiment will be presented. This research was supported by the National Science Foundation, the US DOE Office of Nuclear Physics and the National Nuclear Security Administration.

  9. Weighted difference of g factors of light Li-like and H-like ions for an improved determination of the fine-structure constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yerokhin, V. A.; Berseneva, E.; Harman, Z.; Tupitsyn, I. I.; Keitel, C. H.

    2016-08-01

    A weighted difference of the g factors of the Li- and H-like ion of the same element is studied and optimized in order to maximize the cancelation of nuclear effects. To this end, a detailed theoretical investigation is performed for the finite nuclear size correction to the one-electron g factor, the one- and two-photon exchange effects, and the QED effects. The coefficients of the Z α expansion of these corrections are determined, which allows us to set up the optimal definition of the weighted difference. It is demonstrated that, for moderately light elements, such weighted difference is nearly free from uncertainties associated with nuclear effects and can be utilized to extract the fine-structure constant from bound-electron g -factor experiments with an accuracy competitive with or better than its current literature value.

  10. Nuclear Technology Series. Course 11: Radiation Detection and Measurement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Technical Education Research Center, Waco, TX.

    This technical specialty course is one of thirty-five courses designed for use by two-year postsecondary institutions in five nuclear technician curriculum areas: (1) radiation protection technician, (2) nuclear instrumentation and control technician, (3) nuclear materials processing technician, (4) nuclear quality-assurance/quality-control…

  11. Superallowed nuclear beta decay: Precision measurements for basic physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardy, J. C.

    2012-11-01

    For 60 years, superallowed 0+→0+ nuclear beta decay has been used to probe the weak interaction, currently verifying the conservation of the vector current (CVC) to high precision (±0.01%) and anchoring the most demanding available test of the unitarity of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa (CKM) matrix (±0.06%), a fundamental pillar of the electroweak standard model. Each superallowed transition is characterized by its ft-value, a result obtained from three measured quantities: the total decay energy of the transition, its branching ratio, and the half-life of the parent state. Today's data set is composed of some 150 independent measurements of 13 separate superallowed transitions covering a wide range of parent nuclei from 10C to 74Rb. Excellent consistency among the average results for all 13 transitions - a prediction of CVC - also confirms the validity of the small transition-dependent theoretical corrections that have been applied to account for isospin symmetry breaking. With CVC consistency established, the value of the vector coupling constant, GV, has been extracted from the data and used to determine the top left element of the CKM matrix, Vud. With this result the top-row unitarity test of the CKM matrix yields the value 0.99995(61), a result that sets a tight limit on possible new physics beyond the standard model. To have any impact on these fundamental weak-interaction tests, any measurement must be made with a precision of 0.1% or better - a substantial experimental challenge well beyond the requirements of most nuclear physics measurements. I overview the current state of the field and outline some of the requirements that need to be met by experimentalists if they aim to make measurements with this high level of precision.

  12. Superallowed nuclear beta decay: Precision measurements for basic physics

    SciTech Connect

    Hardy, J. C.

    2012-11-20

    For 60 years, superallowed 0{sup +}{yields}0{sup +} nuclear beta decay has been used to probe the weak interaction, currently verifying the conservation of the vector current (CVC) to high precision ({+-}0.01%) and anchoring the most demanding available test of the unitarity of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa (CKM) matrix ({+-}0.06%), a fundamental pillar of the electroweak standard model. Each superallowed transition is characterized by its ft-value, a result obtained from three measured quantities: the total decay energy of the transition, its branching ratio, and the half-life of the parent state. Today's data set is composed of some 150 independent measurements of 13 separate superallowed transitions covering a wide range of parent nuclei from {sup 10}C to {sup 74}Rb. Excellent consistency among the average results for all 13 transitions - a prediction of CVC - also confirms the validity of the small transition-dependent theoretical corrections that have been applied to account for isospin symmetry breaking. With CVC consistency established, the value of the vector coupling constant, G{sub V}, has been extracted from the data and used to determine the top left element of the CKM matrix, V{sub ud}. With this result the top-row unitarity test of the CKM matrix yields the value 0.99995(61), a result that sets a tight limit on possible new physics beyond the standard model. To have any impact on these fundamental weak-interaction tests, any measurement must be made with a precision of 0.1% or better - a substantial experimental challenge well beyond the requirements of most nuclear physics measurements. I overview the current state of the field and outline some of the requirements that need to be met by experimentalists if they aim to make measurements with this high level of precision.

  13. Indirect measurements of nuclear astrophysics reactions at CIAE

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Weiping; Li Zhihong; Bai Xixiang; Wang Youbao; Lian Gang; Guo Bing; Zeng Sheng; Yan Shengquan; Wang Baoxiang; Su Jun; Shu Nengchuan; Chen Yongshou

    2006-11-02

    This paper described the nuclear astrophysical studies using the unstable ion beam facility GIRAFFE, by indirect measurements. We measured the angular distributions for some single proton or neutron transfer reactions, such as 7Be(d,n)8B, 11C(d,n)12N, 8Li(d,n)9Be, 8Li(d,p)9Li and 13N(d,n)14O in inverse kinematics, and derived the astrophysical S-factors or reaction rates of 7Be(p,{gamma})8B, 11C(p,{gamma})12N, 8Li(n,{gamma})9Li, 13N(p,{gamma})14O by asymptotic normalization coefficient, spectroscopic factor, and R-matrix approach at astrophysically relevant energies.

  14. Lifetime Measurement of the 229Th nuclear isomer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seiferle, Benedict; von der Wense, Lars; Thirolf, Peter G.

    2017-01-01

    The first excited isomeric state of 229Th possesses the lowest energy among all known excited nuclear states. The expected energy is accessible with today's laser technology and in principle allows for a direct optical laser excitation of the nucleus. The isomer decays via three channels to its ground state (internal conversion, γ decay, and bound internal conversion), whose strengths depend on the charge state of Thm229 . We report on the measurement of the internal-conversion decay half-life of neutral Thm229 . A half-life of 7 ±1 μ s has been measured, which is in the range of theoretical predictions and, based on the theoretically expected lifetime of ≈1 04 s of the photonic decay channel, gives further support for an internal conversion coefficient of ≈1 09, thus constraining the strength of a radiative branch in the presence of internal conversion.

  15. Precise determination of atomic g-factor ratios from a dual isotope magneto-optical trap

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, I.; Barrett, B.; Kumarakrishnan, A.

    2011-09-15

    We demonstrate a technique, for carrying out precise measurements of atomic g-factor ratios, which relies on measurements of Larmor oscillations from coherences between magnetic sublevels in the ground states of {sup 85}Rb and {sup 87}Rb atoms confined in a dual isotope magneto-optical trap. We show that a measurement of g{sub F}{sup (87)}/g{sub F}{sup (85)} with a resolution of 0.69 parts per 10{sup 6} is possible by recording the ratio of Larmor frequencies in the presence of a constant magnetic field. This represents the most precise single measurement of g{sub F}{sup (87)}/g{sub F}{sup (85)} without correcting for systematic effects.

  16. g factor of the J/sup. pi. / = 25/2/sup +/ isomer in /sup 205/Tl and the anomalous orbital magnetism of the proton

    SciTech Connect

    Maier, K.H.; Becker, J.A.; Carlson, J.B.; Lanier, R.G.; Mann, L.G.; Struble, G.L.; Nail, T.; Sheline, R.K.; Stoeffl, W.; Ussery, L.

    1982-02-15

    The nuclear gyromagnetic ratio of the 3291-keV J/sup ..pi../ = 25/2/sup +/ /sup 205/Tl level has been measured with use of ..gamma..-ray perturbed angular distribution techniques with the result g = 0.544 +- 0.008. The state was populated with the reaction /sup 204/Hg(t,2n)/sup 205/Tl. With use of the known quantities g(/sup 206/Pb 7/sup -/; E/sub x/ = 2200 keV) and g(/sup 209/Bi 9/2/sup +/; E/sub x/ = 0 keV) the proton orbital magnetic g factor for the 1h orbital was deduced to be g/sub 1/ = 1.115 +- 0.02. This result has been corrected for wave-function admixtures and core polarization effects.

  17. MicroRaman Measurements for Nuclear Fuel Reprocessing Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Casella, Amanda; Lines, Amanda; Nelson, Gilbert; Bello, Job; Bryan, Samuel

    2016-01-01

    Treatment and reuse of used nuclear fuel is a key component in closing the nuclear fuel cycle. Solvent extraction reprocessing methods that have been developed contain various steps tailored to the separation of specific radionuclides, which are highly dependent upon solution properties. The instrumentation used to monitor these processes must be robust, require little or no maintenance, and be able to withstand harsh environments such as high radiation fields and aggressive chemical matrices. Our group has been investigating the use of optical spectroscopy for the on-line monitoring of actinides, lanthanides, and acid strength within fuel reprocessing streams. This paper will focus on the development and application of a new MicroRaman probe for on-line real-time monitoring of the U(VI)/nitrate ion/nitric acid in solutions relevant to used nuclear fuel reprocessing. Previous research has successfully demonstrated the applicability on the macroscopic scale, using sample probes requiring larger solution volumes. In an effort to minimize waste and reduce dose to personnel, we have modified this technique to allow measurement at the microfluidic scale using a Raman microprobe. Under the current sampling environment, Raman samples typically require upwards of 10 mL and larger. Using the new sampling system, we can sample volumes at 10 μL or less, which is a scale reduction of over 1,000 fold in sample size. This paper will summarize our current work in this area including: comparisons between the macroscopic and microscopic probes for detection limits, optimized channel focusing, and application in a flow cell with varying levels of HNO3, and UO2(NO3)2.

  18. MicroRaman measurements for nuclear fuel reprocessing applications

    DOE PAGES

    Casella, Amanda; Lines, Amanda; Nelson, Gilbert; ...

    2016-12-01

    Treatment and reuse of used nuclear fuel is a key component in closing the nuclear fuel cycle. Solvent extraction reprocessing methods that have been developed contain various steps tailored to the separation of specific radionuclides, which are highly dependent upon solution properties. The instrumentation used to monitor these processes must be robust, require little or no maintenance, and be able to withstand harsh environments such as high radiation fields and aggressive chemical matrices. Our group has been investigating the use of optical spectroscopy for the on-line monitoring of actinides, lanthanides, and acid strength within fuel reprocessing streams. This paper willmore » focus on the development and application of a new MicroRaman probe for on-line real-time monitoring of the U(VI)/nitrate ion/nitric acid in solutions relevant to used nuclear fuel reprocessing. Previous research has successfully demonstrated the applicability on the macroscopic scale, using sample probes requiring larger solution volumes. In an effort to minimize waste and reduce dose to personnel, we have modified this technique to allow measurement at the microfluidic scale using a Raman microprobe. Under the current sampling environment, Raman samples typically require upwards of 10 mL and larger. Using the new sampling system, we can sample volumes at 10 μL or less, which is a scale reduction of over 1,000 fold in sample size. Finally, this paper will summarize our current work in this area including: comparisons between the macroscopic and microscopic probes for detection limits, optimized channel focusing, and application in a flow cell with varying levels of HNO3, and UO2(NO3)2.« less

  19. MicroRaman measurements for nuclear fuel reprocessing applications

    SciTech Connect

    Casella, Amanda; Lines, Amanda; Nelson, Gilbert; Bello, Job; Bryan, Samuel

    2016-12-01

    Treatment and reuse of used nuclear fuel is a key component in closing the nuclear fuel cycle. Solvent extraction reprocessing methods that have been developed contain various steps tailored to the separation of specific radionuclides, which are highly dependent upon solution properties. The instrumentation used to monitor these processes must be robust, require little or no maintenance, and be able to withstand harsh environments such as high radiation fields and aggressive chemical matrices. Our group has been investigating the use of optical spectroscopy for the on-line monitoring of actinides, lanthanides, and acid strength within fuel reprocessing streams. This paper will focus on the development and application of a new MicroRaman probe for on-line real-time monitoring of the U(VI)/nitrate ion/nitric acid in solutions relevant to used nuclear fuel reprocessing. Previous research has successfully demonstrated the applicability on the macroscopic scale, using sample probes requiring larger solution volumes. In an effort to minimize waste and reduce dose to personnel, we have modified this technique to allow measurement at the microfluidic scale using a Raman microprobe. Under the current sampling environment, Raman samples typically require upwards of 10 mL and larger. Using the new sampling system, we can sample volumes at 10 μL or less, which is a scale reduction of over 1,000 fold in sample size. Finally, this paper will summarize our current work in this area including: comparisons between the macroscopic and microscopic probes for detection limits, optimized channel focusing, and application in a flow cell with varying levels of HNO3, and UO2(NO3)2.

  20. 78 FR 55765 - Compensatory and Alternative Regulatory Measures for Nuclear Power Plant Fire Protection (CARMEN...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-11

    ... COMMISSION Compensatory and Alternative Regulatory Measures for Nuclear Power Plant Fire Protection (CARMEN-FIRE) AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION: Draft NUREG/CR, reopening of comment period... Measures for Nuclear Power Plant Fire Protection (CARMEN-FIRE).'' In response to comments from members...

  1. An experiment for the direct determination of the g-factor of a single proton in a Penning trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodegheri, C. C.; Blaum, K.; Kracke, H.; Kreim, S.; Mooser, A.; Quint, W.; Ulmer, S.; Walz, J.

    2012-06-01

    A new apparatus has been designed that aims at a direct precision measurement of the g-factor of a single isolated proton or antiproton in a Penning trap. We present a thorough discussion on the trap design and a method for the experimental trap optimization using a single stored proton. A first attempt at the g-factor determination has been made in a section of the trap with a magnetic bottle. The Larmor frequency of the proton has been measured with a relative uncertainty of 1.8 × 10-6 and the magnetic moment has been determined with a relative uncertainty of 8.9 × 10-6. A g-factor of 5.585 696(50) has been obtained, which is in excellent agreement with previous measurements and predictions. Future experiments shall drive the spin-flip transition in a section of the trap with a homogeneous magnetic field. This has the potential to improve the precision of the measured g-factor of the proton and the antiproton by several orders of magnitude.

  2. Nuclear radiation-warning detector that measures impedance

    DOEpatents

    Savignac, Noel Felix; Gomez, Leo S; Yelton, William Graham; Robinson, Alex; Limmer, Steven

    2013-06-04

    This invention is a nuclear radiation-warning detector that measures impedance of silver-silver halide on an interdigitated electrode to detect light or radiation comprised of alpha particles, beta particles, gamma rays, X rays, and/or neutrons. The detector is comprised of an interdigitated electrode covered by a layer of silver halide. After exposure to alpha particles, beta particles, X rays, gamma rays, neutron radiation, or light, the silver halide is reduced to silver in the presence of a reducing solution. The change from the high electrical resistance (impedance) of silver halide to the low resistance of silver provides the radiation warning that detected radiation levels exceed a predetermined radiation dose threshold.

  3. Measurement of Vud with 0+→0+ nuclear beta decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardy, J. C.; Towner, I. S.

    2013-10-01

    Results from superallowed 0+→0+ nuclear beta decays today provide the best value for Vud, with an uncertainty of ±0.02%. Some 150 independent measurements of 13 separate superallowed transitions covering a wide range of parent nuclei from 10C to 74Rb constitute a very robust data set. Excellent consistency among the average results for all 13 transitions - an expected consequence of the conservation of vector current (CVC) - also confirms the validity of the small transition-dependent theoretical corrections that have been applied to account for isospin-symmetry breaking. With CVC consistency established, the value of the vector coupling constant, GV, has been extracted from the data and used to determine |Vud| = 0.97425 (22).

  4. Radioecological indexes of fallout measurements from the Fukushima nuclear accident

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manolopoulou, Metaxia; Stoulos, Stylianos; Ioannidou, Alexandra; Vagena, Eleni

    2014-05-01

    Fallout from the Fukushima nuclear accident has been monitored for about 1 month in Thessaloniki, Northern Greece. Three different radionuclides, one short-lived, one relatively long-lived and one long- lived fission product were identified in air, grass and milk samples. The 131I, 137Cs and 134Cs activity concentrations in air reached 497, 145 and 126 μBqm-3, respectively on 4 April, 2011. These radionuclides are of particular concern regarding their transfer from the environment to population through the ingestion pathways for the assessment of the Fukushima accident consequences. Radioecological indexes (eco-indexes) of fallout measurements in the air-grass-cow-milk-man pathway for 131I were determined, as they are related to radiological impact of the Fukushima derived radionuclides on the public and environment.

  5. Measurement of doses to the extremities of nuclear medicine staff

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shousha, Hany A.; Farag, Hamed; Hassan, Ramadan A.

    2010-01-01

    Medical uses of ionizing radiation now represent>95% of all man-made radiation exposure, and is the largest single radiation source after natural background radiation. Therefore, it is important to quantify the amount of radiation received by occupational individuals to optimize the working conditions for staff, and further, to compare doses in different departments to ensure compatibility with the recommended standards. For some groups working with unsealed sources in nuclear medicine units, the hands are more heavily exposed to ionizing radiation than the rest of the body. A personal dosimetry service runs extensively in Egypt. But doses to extremities have not been measured to a wide extent. The purpose of this study was to investigate the equivalent radiation doses to the fingers for five different nuclear medicine staff occupational groups for which heavy irradiation of the hands was suspected. Finger doses were measured for (1) nuclear medicine physicians, (2) technologists, (3) nurses and (4) physicists. The fifth group contains three technicians handling 131I, while the others handled 99mTc. Each staff member working with the radioactive material wore two thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) during the whole testing period, which lasted from 1 to 4 weeks. Staff performed their work on a regular basis throughout the month, and mean annual doses were calculated for these groups. Results showed that the mean equivalent doses to the fingers of technologist, nurse and physicist groups were 30.24±14.5, 30.37±17.5 and 16.3±7.7 μSv/GBq, respectively. Equivalent doses for the physicians could not be calculated per unit of activity because they did not handle the radiopharmaceuticals directly. Their doses were reported in millisieverts (mSv) that accumulated in one week. Similarly, the dose to the fingers of individuals in Group 5 was estimated to be 126.13±38.2 μSv/GBq. The maximum average finger dose, in this study, was noted in the technologists who handled

  6. In-Pile Thermal Conductivity Measurement Method for Nuclear Fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Joy L. Rempe; Brandon Fox; Heng Ban; Joshua E. Daw; Darrell L. Knudson; Keith G. Condie

    2009-08-01

    Thermophysical properties of advanced nuclear fuels and materials during irradiation must be known prior to their use in existing, advanced, or next generation reactors. Thermal conductivity is one of the most important properties for predicting fuel and material performance. A joint Utah State University (USU) / Idaho National Laboratory (INL) project, which is being conducted with assistance from the Institute for Energy Technology at the Norway Halden Reactor Project, is investigating in-pile fuel thermal conductivity measurement methods. This paper focuses on one of these methods – a multiple thermocouple method. This two-thermocouple method uses a surrogate fuel rod with Joule heating to simulate volumetric heat generation to gain insights about in-pile detection of thermal conductivity. Preliminary results indicated that this method can measure thermal conductivity over a specific temperature range. This paper reports the thermal conductivity values obtained by this technique and compares these values with thermal property data obtained from standard thermal property measurement techniques available at INL’s High Test Temperature Laboratory. Experimental results and material properties data are also compared to finite element analysis results.

  7. Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence to Measure Plutonium Mass in Spent Nuclear Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Ludewigt, Bernhard A; Quiter, Brian J.; Ambers, Scott D.

    2011-01-14

    The Next Generation Safeguard Initiative (NGSI) of the U.S Department of Energy is supporting a multi-lab/university collaboration to quantify the plutonium (Pu) mass in spent nuclear fuel (SNF) assemblies and to detect the diversion of pins with non-destructive assay (NDA) methods. The following 14 NDA techniques are being studied: Delayed Neutrons, Differential Die-Away, Differential Die-Away Self-Interrogation, Lead Slowing Down Spectrometer, Neutron Multiplicity, Passive Neutron Albedo Reactivity, Total Neutron (Gross Neutron), X-Ray Fluorescence, {sup 252}Cf Interrogation with Prompt Neutron Detection, Delayed Gamma, Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence, Passive Prompt Gamma, Self-integration Neutron Resonance Densitometry, and Neutron Resonance Transmission Analysis. Understanding and maturity of the techniques vary greatly, ranging from decades old, well-understood methods to new approaches. Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence (NRF) is a technique that had not previously been studied for SNF assay or similar applications. Since NRF generates isotope-specific signals, the promise and appeal of the technique lies in its potential to directly measure the amount of a specific isotope in an SNF assay target. The objectives of this study were to design and model suitable NRF measurement methods, to quantify capabilities and corresponding instrumentation requirements, and to evaluate prospects and the potential of NRF for SNF assay. The main challenge of the technique is to achieve the sensitivity and precision, i.e., to accumulate sufficient counting statistics, required for quantifying the mass of Pu isotopes in SNF assemblies. Systematic errors, considered a lesser problem for a direct measurement and only briefly discussed in this report, need to be evaluated for specific instrument designs in the future. Also, since the technical capability of using NRF to measure Pu in SNF has not been established, this report does not directly address issues such as cost, size

  8. Distinguishing Carbonate Reservoir Pore Facies with Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Genty, Coralie; Jensen, Jerry L. Ahr, Wayne M.

    2007-03-15

    Characterization of carbonate rocks may involve identifying the important pore types which are present. In the past, this task has required detailed petrographic analysis of many core samples. Here, we describe a method which uses nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements to reduce the amount of petrographic analysis needed for porosity typing of carbonate reservoir rocks.For a rock sample which has been measured with NMR, our method decomposes the log(T{sub 2}) spectrum into at most three Gaussian-shaped components and gives a set of nine parameters. Two characteristic quantities having geological significance are extracted from the nine parameters. Values of the two quantities are compared with a reference set, established from samples having both NMR and petrographic evaluations of porosity types. We use a Bayesian approach to the classification of the dominant porosity type.Tests of our method on 103 samples show a correct prediction in 60 to 90 percent of the samples. The lower success rate was obtained for samples with five porosity types from three fields; the higher success rate obtained with samples with three porosity types from one well. The use of geologically significant quantities extracted from the decomposition gives comparable success rate to those obtained using a standard, non-geological approach such as canonical variates.

  9. Strain-induced g -factor tuning in single InGaAs/GaAs quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tholen, H. M. G. A.; Wildmann, J. S.; Rastelli, A.; Trotta, R.; Pryor, C. E.; Zallo, E.; Schmidt, O. G.; Koenraad, P. M.; Silov, A. Yu.

    2016-12-01

    The tunability of the exciton g factor in InGaAs quantum dots using compressive biaxial stress applied by piezoelectric actuators is investigated. We find a clear relation between the exciton g factor and the applied stress. A linear decrease of the g factor with compressive biaxial strain is observed consistently in all investigated dots. A connection is established between the response of the exciton g factor to the voltage applied to the piezoelectric actuator and the response of the quantum dot emission energy. We employ a numerical model based on eight-band k .p theory to calculate the exciton g factor of a typical dot as a function of strain and a good agreement with our experiments is found. Our calculations reveal that the change in exciton g factor is dominated by the contribution of the valence band and originates from increased heavy hole light hole splitting when applying external stress.

  10. Potential cooperative measures on nuclear issues in Asia

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, J.

    1997-08-01

    Cooperation on nuclear issues is receiving increased attention in Asia. In Northeast Asia, where the nuclear industry is well-developed, cooperation in the back end of the nuclear fuel cycle could help deal with issues such as disposition of spent fuel and long term storage options. In Southeast Asia, where countries are just beginning to introduce nuclear energy, cooperation would be useful in developing standards for the nuclear industry. Throughout Asia, nuclear research and power activities can raise concerns about safety, environmental pollution and proliferation. The sharing of relevant information, i.e. cooperative monitoring, will be essential to addressing these issues. In fact, a number of regional interactions on nuclear issues are already occurring. These range from training exchanges sponsored by the more advanced states to participation in environmental monitoring of the East Sea (Sea of Japan). Several states are considering sharing information from their nuclear facilities; some exchanges of radiation data are already in place. The KEDO reactor project will involve close working relations between the nuclear experts of South Korea, North Korea, Japan, and the US. Areas for further regional cooperation are discussed.

  11. Large anisotropy of electron and hole g factors in infrared-emitting InAs/InAlGaAs self-assembled quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belykh, V. V.; Yakovlev, D. R.; Schindler, J. J.; Zhukov, E. A.; Semina, M. A.; Yacob, M.; Reithmaier, J. P.; Benyoucef, M.; Bayer, M.

    2016-03-01

    A detailed study of the g -factor anisotropy of electrons and holes in InAs/In0.53Al0.24Ga0.23As self-assembled quantum dots emitting in the telecom spectral range of 1.5 -1.6 μ m (around 0.8 eV photon energy) is performed by time-resolved pump-probe ellipticity technique using a superconducting vector magnet. All components of the g -factor tensors are measured, including their spread in the quantum dot (QD) ensemble. Surprisingly, the electron g factor shows a large anisotropy changing from ge ,x=-1.63 to ge ,z=-2.52 between directions perpendicular and parallel to the dot growth axis, respectively, at an energy of 0.82 eV. The hole g -factor anisotropy at this energy is even stronger: | gh,x|=0.64 and | gh,z|=2.29 . On the other hand, the in-plane anisotropies of electron and hole g factors are small. The pronounced out-of-plane anisotropy is also observed for the spread of the g factors, determined from the spin dephasing time. The hole longitudinal g factors are described with a theoretical model that allows us to estimate the QD parameters. We find that the QD height-to-diameter ratio increases while the indium composition decreases with increasing QD emission energy.

  12. Nuclear matrix elements from direct lifetime or cross-section measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Werner, V.; Cooper, N.; Hinton, M.; Ilie, G.; Radeck, D.

    2012-11-20

    The method of simultaneous lifetime and g factor measurements using a plunger device and the RDDS and TDRIV techniques is introduced. Results on lifetimes and hyperfine-interaction parameters for 2{sup +}{sub 1} states in {sup 104-108}Pd, {sup 96,98,104}Ru, and {sup 92,94}Zr, using a plunger device. Another method to obtain electromagnetic matrix elements is direct cross section measurements using NRF. The method is outlined, and some recent results on {sup 76}Se are shown.

  13. Giant M 1 resonance in sup 120 Sn and the quenching of the nucleon spin g factors

    SciTech Connect

    Alarcon, R.; Laszewski, R.M.; Dale, D.S. )

    1989-09-01

    The distribution of magnetic dipole transition strength in {sup 120}Sn has been measured at excitations between 7.3 and 9.3 MeV using highly polarized tagged photons. A total {ital M}1 strength of {Sigma} eV corresponding to {ital B}({ital M}1{up arrow})=8.8{sub {minus}0.9}{sup +1.1}{mu}{sub 0}{sup 2} {ital was found to be more or less uniformly distributed throughout the region}. {ital This result and previous polarized photon measurements in} {sup 90}Zr and the Pb nuclei present a consistent picture of {ital M}1 strengths in closed-shell nuclei in terms of the required normalization for the spin nucleon {ital g} factors. Normalizations with respect to the bare nucleon values are 0.68{plus minus}0.02 and 0.64{plus minus}0.03 for the proton and neutron spin {ital g} factors, respectively.

  14. Improved measurement of parity nonconservation in atomic cesium and first measurement of the nuclear anapole moment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, Chris

    1998-05-01

    Historically, atomic parity nonconservation (PNC) measurements have bridged the gap between high energy and low energy physics. Our recently completed 0.35% measurement of PNC in cesium(C. S. Wood et al., Science) 275, 1759 (1997) has gone a step further and created a bridge between atomic physics and nuclear physics. This measurement represents the best low energy test of electroweak unification and, in addition, we have made a 14% measurement of the parity violating nuclear anapole moment(V.V. Flambaum et al., Phys. Lett. B) 146, 367 (1984). Cesium continues to hold a special place for atomic PNC measurements due to the accuracy (1%) with which the necessary atomic structure calculations can be made(S.A. Blundell, J. Sapirstein, and W. R. Johnson, Phys. Rev. D) 45, 1602 (1992); V.A. Dzuba, V. V. Flambaum, and O. P. Sushkov, Phys. Lett. A 141, 147 (1989)., and our result has motivated new calculations. The experiment uses a Stark interference technique to measure PNC, and has achieved a factor of seven improvement over our previous result. Two frequency-stabilized diode lasers are used to optically pump an intense cesium beam, while a third is used for detection and a fourth is used to monitor the spin polarization of the atomic beam using stimulated Raman transitions. A dye laser operating at 540nm, phase locked to a finesse 100,000 power buildup cavity, is used to excite the forbidden 6S-7S transition in a region of crossed electric and magnetic fields. These fields serve to define an experimental coordinate system. We have developed 5 different ways to parity transform this coordinate system, which are crucial to our ability to suppress systematic errors. Our signal is the interference of an allowed 6S-7S transition amplitude with the PNC transition amplitude, which causes a tiny (6 ppm) fractional modulation of the 6S-7S excitation rate synchronous with all 5 parity transformations.

  15. Pipken Award: Nuclear physics mysteries revealed by precision ion trap measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dilling, Jens

    2017-01-01

    Nuclear Physics is a fundamental science discipline for over 100 years, and started with precision measurements by Rutherford. Much has been learned and understood in the meantime, but some questions remain and also new nuclear phenomena have been discovered. Precision experiments open new venue to address these. Ion trap technologies, originally conceived for atomic and molecular physics have been adapted to the specific requirements stemming from nuclear physics, for example, to couple ion traps to accelerators and achieve very high speed and efficiencies. In this talk I will show some recent examples and technical developments pertaining to nuclear physics questions and phenomena and how they are addressed with precision ion trap measurements.

  16. Determination of hole g-factor in InAs/InGaAs/InAlAs quantum wells by magneto-photoluminescence studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terent'ev, Ya. V.; Danilov, S. N.; Durnev, M. V.; Loher, J.; Schuh, D.; Bougeard, D.; Ivanov, S. V.; Ganichev, S. D.

    2017-02-01

    A circularly polarized magneto-photoluminescence (magneto-PL) technique has been applied to investigate the Zeeman effect in InAs/InGaAs/InAlAs quantum wells (QWs) in the Faraday geometry. Structures with different thicknesses of the QW barriers have been studied in the magnetic field parallel and tilted with respect to the sample normal. The effective electron-hole g-factor has been found by measurement of splitting of polarized magneto-PL lines. Landé factors of electrons have been calculated using the 14-band k . p method, and the g-factor of holes was determined by subtracting the calculated contribution of the electrons from the effective electron-hole g-factor. Anisotropy of the hole g-factor has been studied applying the tilted magnetic field.

  17. Measurement of Nuclear Dependence in Inclusive Charged Current Neutrino Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Tice, Brian George

    2014-01-01

    Neutrino experiments use heavy nuclei (C, Fe, Pb) to achieve necessary statistics. However, the use of heavy nuclei exposes these experiments to the nuclear dependence of neutrino-nucleus cross sections, which are poorly known and difficult to model. This dissertation presents an analysis of the nuclear dependence of inclusive chargedcurrent neutrino scattering using events in carbon, iron, lead, and scintillator targets of the MINERvA detector. MINERvA (Main INjector ExpeRiment for -A) is a few-GeV neutrinonucleus scattering experiment at Fermilab.

  18. g-factor anisotropy in nanowire-based InAs quantum dots

    SciTech Connect

    D'Hollosy, Samuel; Fábián, Gábor; Baumgartner, Andreas; Schönenberger, Christian; Nygård, Jesper

    2013-12-04

    The determination and control of the electron g-factor in semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) are fundamental prerequisites in modern concepts of spintronics and spin-based quantum computation. We study the dependence of the g-factor on the orientation of an external magnetic field in quantum dots (QDs) formed between two metallic contacts on stacking fault free InAs nanowires. We extract the g-factor from the splitting of Kondo resonances and find that it varies continuously in the range between |g*| = 5 and 15.

  19. Synergistic smart fuel for in-pile nuclear reactor measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, J.A.; Kotter, D.K.; Ali, R.A.; Garrett, S.L.

    2013-07-01

    The thermo-acoustic fuel rod sensor developed in this research has demonstrated a novel technique for monitoring the temperature within the core of a nuclear reactor or the temperature of the surrounding heat-transfer fluid. It uses the heat from the nuclear fuel to generate sustained acoustic oscillations whose frequency will be indicative of the temperature. Converting a nuclear fuel rod into this type of thermo-acoustic sensor simply requires the insertion of a porous material (stack). This sensor has demonstrated a synergy with the elevated temperatures that exist within the nuclear reactor using materials that have only minimal susceptibility to high-energy particle fluxes. When the sensor is in operation, the sound waves radiated from the fuel rod resonator will propagate through the surrounding cooling fluid. The frequency of these oscillations is directly correlated with an effective temperature within the fuel rod resonator. This device is self-powered and is operational even in case of total loss of power of the reactor.

  20. Slotted surface coil with reduced g-factor for SENSE imaging.

    PubMed

    Ocegueda, K; Rodriguez, A O

    2006-01-01

    A new coil design inspired on the slot-and-hole magnetron tube is proposed for SENSE imaging. To investigate its g-factor behaviour: an SNR formula was derived using the quasi-static approach, and combined with the ultimate g-factor formula to compute the ultimate-factor-g-vs-depth plots. A g-factor expression was derived for the circular coil using the same approach for comparison purposes. SNR-vs-depth profiles of an 4-slot coil showed an important improvement over the circular coil. The 4-slot coil g-factor can be up to 58.32% lower than that of a single circular-shaped coil. This improvement makes the slotted surface coil a good choice for SENSE imaging.

  1. Synergistic Smart Fuel For In-pile Nuclear Reactor Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    James A. Smith; Dale K. Kotter; Randall A. Ali; Steven L . Garrett

    2013-10-01

    In March 2011, an earthquake of magnitude 9.0 on the Richter scale struck Japan with its epicenter on the northeast coast, near the Tohoku region. In addition to the immense physical destruction and casualties across the country, several nuclear power plants (NPP) were affected. It was the Fukushima Daiichi NPP that experienced the most severe and irreversible damage. The earthquake brought the reactors at Fukushima to an automatic shutdown and because the power transmission lines were damaged, emergency diesel generators (EDGs) were activated to ensure that there was continued cooling of the reactors and spent fuel pools. The situation was being successfully managed until the tsunami hit about forty-five minutes later with a maximum wave height of approximately 15 m. The influx of water submerged the EDGs, the electrical switchgear, and dc batteries, resulting in the total loss of power to the reactors.2 At this point, the situation became critical. There was a loss of the sensors and instrumentation within the reactor that could have provided valuable information to guide the operators to make informed decisions and avoid the unfortunate events that followed. In the light of these events, we have developed and tested a potential self-powered thermoacoustic system, which will have the ability to serve as a temperature sensor and can transmit data independently of electronic networks. Such a device is synergistic with the harsh environment of the nuclear reactor as it utilizes the heat from the nuclear fuel to provide the input power.

  2. Comparison of the activity measurements in nuclear medicine services in the Brazilian northeast region.

    PubMed

    de Farias Fragoso, Maria da Conceição; de Albuquerque, Antônio Morais; de Oliveira, Mércia L; de Lima, Fabiana Farias; Barreto, Flávio Chiappetta Paes; de Andrade Lima, Ricardo

    2013-12-01

    The Northeastern Regional Centre for Nuclear Sciences (CRCN-NE), National Nuclear Energy Commission, has organized for the first time in nuclear medicine services (NMSs) in the Brazilian northeast region a comparison of activity measurements for (99m)Tc, (131)I, (67)Ga, (201)Tl and (57)Co. This tool is widely utilized to evaluate not only the accuracy of radionuclide calibrators, but also the competence of NMSs to measure the activity of the radiopharmaceuticals and the performance of the personnel involved in these measurements. The comparison results showed that 90% of the results received from participants are within the ±10% limit established by the Brazilian Norm.

  3. Measurement of nuclear effects in neutrino interactions with minimal dependence on neutrino energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, X.-G.; Pickering, L.; Dolan, S.; Barr, G.; Coplowe, D.; Uchida, Y.; Wark, D.; Wascko, M. O.; Weber, A.; Yuan, T.

    2016-07-01

    We present a phenomenological study of nuclear effects in neutrino charged-current interactions, using transverse kinematic imbalances in exclusive measurements. Novel observables with minimal dependence on neutrino energy are proposed to study quasielastic scattering and especially resonance production. They should be able to provide direct constraints on nuclear effects in neutrino- and antineutrino-nucleus interactions.

  4. Revealing the Atomic Site-Dependent g Factor within a Single Magnetic Molecule via the Extended Kondo Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Shixuan

    Control over charge and spin states at the single molecule level is crucial not only for a fundamental understanding of charge and spin interactions but also represents a prerequisite for development of molecular electronics and spintronics. In this talk, I will talk about the extended spin distribution in space beyond the central Mn ion, and onto the non-magnetic constituent atoms of the MnPc molecule. This extended spin distribution results in an extended Kondo effect, which can be explained by spin polarization induced by symmetry breaking of the molecular framework, as confirmed by DFT calculations. Measuring the evolution of the Kondo splitting with applied magnetic fields at different atomic sites, we find a spatial variation of the g-factor within a single molecule for the first time. The existence of atomic site-dependent g-factors can be attributed to specific molecular orbitals distributed over the entire molecule. This work not only open up a new opportunity for quantum information recording, but also provide a new route to explore the internal electronic and spin structure of complex molecules, hard to achieve otherwise. (L. W. Liu et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 2015, 114, 126601. In collaboration with Liwei Liu, Kai Yang, Yuhang Jiang, Li Gao, Qi Liu, Boqun Song, Wende Xiao, Haitao Zhou, Hongjun Gao in CAS, Min Ouyang in MU, and A.H. Castro Neto in SNU.) Revealing the Atomic Site-Dependent g Factor within a Single Magnetic Molecule via the Extended Kondo Effect.

  5. Rapid flow cytometric measurement of protein inclusions and nuclear trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Whiten, D. R.; San Gil, R.; McAlary, L.; Yerbury, J. J.; Ecroyd, H.; Wilson, M. R.

    2016-01-01

    Proteinaceous cytoplasmic inclusions are an indicator of dysfunction in normal cellular proteostasis and a hallmark of many neurodegenerative diseases. We describe a simple and rapid new flow cytometry-based method to enumerate, characterise and, if desired, physically recover protein inclusions from cells. This technique can analyse and resolve a broad variety of inclusions differing in both size and protein composition, making it applicable to essentially any model of intracellular protein aggregation. The method also allows rapid quantification of the nuclear trafficking of fluorescently labelled molecules. PMID:27516358

  6. Nuclear Emulsion Measurements of the Astronauts’ Radiation Exposures on Skylab Missions 2, 3 and 4,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-12-10

    AD-AO19 804 NUCLEAR EMULSION MEASUREMENTS OF THE ASTRONAUTS’ RADIATION EXPOSURES ON SKYLAB MISSIONS 2, 3 AND 4 Hermann J. Schaefer, et al Naval...N/A NUCLEAR EMULSION MEASUREMENTS OF THE ASTRONAUTS’ RADIATION EXPOSURES ON SKYLAB MISSIONS 2, 3, AND 4. N/ ___ _ _ ANZ Hermann J. Schaefer and...corresponding shield distribution of the entire vehicle tesi alirections ofetionable whether the very large effort involved in this eask isd• ~~really

  7. Passive Measurement of Organic-Scintillator Neutron Signatures for Nuclear Safeguards Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Jennfier L. Dolan; Eric C. Miller; Alexis C. Kaplan; Andreas Enqvist; Marek Flaska; Alice Tomanin; Paolo Peerani; David L. Chichester; Sara A. Pozzi

    2012-10-01

    At nuclear facilities, domestically and internationally, most measurement systems used for nuclear materials’ control and accountability rely on He-3 detectors. Due to resource shortages, alternatives to He-3 systems are needed. This paper presents preliminary simulation and experimental efforts to develop a fast-neutron-multiplicity counter based on liquid organic scintillators. This mission also provides the opportunity to broaden the capabilities of such safeguards measurement systems to improve current neutron-multiplicity techniques and expand the scope to encompass advanced nuclear fuels.

  8. Projective measurement of a single nuclear spin qubit by using two-mode cavity QED.

    PubMed

    Eto, Yujiro; Noguchi, Atsushi; Zhang, Peng; Ueda, Masahito; Kozuma, Mikio

    2011-04-22

    We report the implementation of projective measurement on a single 1/2 nuclear spin of the (171)Yb atom by measuring the polarization of cavity-enhanced fluorescence. To obtain cavity-enhanced fluorescence having a nuclear-spin-dependent polarization, we construct a two-mode cavity QED system, in which two cyclic transitions are independently coupled to each of the orthogonally polarized cavity modes, by manipulating the energy level of (171)Yb. This system can associate the nuclear spin degrees of freedom with the polarization of photons, which will facilitate the development of hybrid quantum systems.

  9. The effective excitonic g factors of Mn-doped InAs nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Wen

    2017-04-01

    Based on the derived eight-band k · p Hamiltonian, the electronic structures of Mn-doped InAs nanowires in the magnetic field are calculated. We find the lowest optical transition will be split to four individual transitions when the magnetic field is applied along z axis, and two of them are σ polarized light. Furthermore, the Zeeman splitting energy at the Γ point of two σ polarized light will increase nonlinearly as the increase of the magnetic field. Additionally, an effective excitonic g factor at the Γ point is defined, and the effective excitonic g factors will decrease greatly with the increase of the radius of nanowires and the decrease of the concentration of manganese ions, while the effective excitonic g factors decrease slightly when the magnetic field increases. Interestingly, the effective excitonic g factors can experience a substantial decrease when the temperature increases from 10 K to 100 K and is almost not affected when the temperature varies from 100 K to 300 K. Therefore, we can infer that large effective excitonic g factors can be obtained when small radius of nanowires, high concentration of manganese ions and low temperature are satisfied.

  10. Very high temperature measurements: Application to nuclear reactor safety tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parga, Clemente Jose

    This PhD dissertation focuses on the improvement of very high temperature thermometry (1100ºC to 2480ºC), with special emphasis on the application to the field of nuclear reactor safety and severe accident research. Two main projects were undertaken to achieve this objective: -The development, testing and transposition of high-temperature fixed point (HTFP) metal-carbon eutectic cells, from metrology laboratory precision (+/-0.001ºC) to applied research with a reasonable degradation of uncertainties (+/-3-5ºC). -The corrosion study and metallurgical characterization of Type-C thermocouple (service temp. 2300ºC) prospective sheath material was undertaken to extend the survivability of TCs used for molten metallic/oxide corium thermometry (below 2000ºC).

  11. Determination of nuclear fuel burn-up axial profile by neutron emission measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prokopowicz, Rafal; Pytel, Krzysztof

    2016-12-01

    Burning-up of nuclear fuel is usually not a space-isotropic phenomenon. It depends on both the neutron flux density and energy spectrum distribution during fuel operation in a nuclear reactor. This paper presents the method of measurement of burn-up spatial distribution of spent nuclear fuel element. The method is based on recording of the neutron emission from investigated fuel element. Based on performed analyses and calculations, a suitable measuring setup has been designed and constructed. The subjects of investigation were fuel elements used in the MARIA research reactor, operated by National Centre for Nuclear Research in Świerk, Poland. The results of measurements made over a period of several years by means of the described method are presented in the paper.

  12. Gate-controlled electron g-factor in lateral quantum dot molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribeiro-Santos, D.; Qu, Fanyao; Morais, P. C.; Lopez-Richard, V.; Marques, G. E.

    2011-12-01

    We investigate theoretically the tunability of the effective electron g-factor in lateral double quantum dots, subjected simultaneously to spin-orbit interaction and vertical electrical and magnetic fields. We find that, by sweeping interdot barrier voltage or by changing interdot distance, the character of the electronic states can be modified from atomic-like to molecular-like and vice-versa. We report theoretical predictions for interdot voltage induced giant effective g-factor and study its dependence on the spin-orbit interaction strength. To avoid numerical artifacts in the single-electron energy spectrum, we adopt a set of modified Gaussian functions as basis, divide the full Hilbert space into orthogonal sub-spaces, and use an exact diagonalization method. In order to correct ill-definitions of g-factor found in the literature, we point out an unambiguous way to evaluate it.

  13. Many-electron QED corrections to the g factor of lithiumlike ions.

    PubMed

    Volotka, A V; Glazov, D A; Shabaev, V M; Tupitsyn, I I; Plunien, G

    2014-06-27

    A rigorous QED evaluation of the two-photon exchange corrections to the g factor of lithiumlike ions is presented. The screened self-energy corrections are calculated for the intermediate-Z region, and its accuracy for the high-Z region is essentially improved in comparison with that of previous calculations. As a result, the theoretical accuracy of the g factor of lithiumlike ions is significantly increased. The theoretical prediction obtained for the g factor of (28)Si(11+) g(th) = 2.000 889 892(8) is in an excellent agreement with the corresponding experimental value g(exp) = 2.000 889 889 9(21) [A. Wagner et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 033003 (2013).

  14. C+C Fusion Cross Sections Measurements for Nuclear Astrophysics

    SciTech Connect

    Almaraz-Calderon, S.; Carnelli, P. F. F.; Rehm, K. E.; Albers, M.; Alcorta, M.; Bertone, P. F.; Digiovine, B.; Esbensen, H.; Fernandez Niello, J. O.; Henderson, D.; Jiang, C. L.; Lai, J.; Marley, S. T.; Nusair, O.; Palchan-Hazan, T.; Pardo, R. C.; Paul, M.; Ugalde, C.; Giardina, G.; Eidelman, S.; Venanzoni, G.; Battaglieri, M.; Mandaglio, G.

    2015-06-02

    Total fusion cross section of carbon isotopes were obtained using the newly developed MUSIC detector. MUSIC is a highly efficient, active target-detector system designed to measure fusion excitation functions with radioactive beams. The present measurements are relevant for understanding x-ray superbursts. The results of the first MUSIC campaign as well as the astrophysical implications are presented in this work.

  15. USCEA/NIST measurement assurance programs for the radiopharmaceutical and nuclear power industries

    SciTech Connect

    Golas, D.B.

    1993-12-31

    In cooperation with the U.S. Council for Energy Awareness (USCEA), the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) supervises and administers two measurement assurance programs for radioactivity measurement traceability. One, in existence since the mid 1970s, provides traceability to suppliers of radiochemicals and radiopharmaceuticals, dose calibrators, and nuclear pharmacy services. The second program, begun in 1987, provides traceability to the nuclear power industry for utilities, source suppliers, and service laboratories. Each program is described, and the results of measurements of samples of known, but undisclosed activity, prepared at NIST and measured by the participants are presented.

  16. New Observables for Measuring Rapidity Correlation Structure in Nuclear Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carzon, Patrick; Gavin, Sean; Moschelli, George; Zin, Chris

    2016-09-01

    The rapidity dependence of two-particle momentum correlations can be used to probe the viscosity of the liquid produced in heavy nuclei collisions at RHIC. In addition, more refined rapidity structure of these correlations can be used to measure the isotropization time scale τπ of this liquid. While earlier theory and measurements have focused on correlations of the transverse momentum pt, the interpretation of these measurements is ambiguous because pt is not a conserved quantity. Correlations of the Cartesian components of transverse momenta, px and py are easier to understand because they are conserved. We use the heavy ion simulation code AMPT to explore the correlations of these quantities.

  17. Assessment of Nuclear Fuels using Radiographic Thickness Measurement Method

    SciTech Connect

    Muhammad Abir; Fahima Islam; Hyoung Koo Lee; Daniel Wachs

    2014-11-01

    The Convert branch of the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) focuses on the development of high uranium density fuels for research and test reactors for nonproliferation. This fuel is aimed to convert low density high enriched uranium (HEU) based fuel to high density low enriched uranium (LEU) based fuel for high performance research reactors (HPRR). There are five U.S. reactors that fall under the HPRR category, including: the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Reactor (MITR), the National Bureau of Standards Reactor (NBSR), the Missouri University Research Reactor (UMRR), the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), and the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR). U-Mo alloy fuel phase in the form of either monolithic or dispersion foil type fuels, such as ATR Full-size In center flux trap Position (AFIP) and Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactor (RERTR), are being designed for this purpose. The fabrication process1 of RERTR is susceptible to introducing a variety of fuel defects. A dependable quality control method is required during fabrication of RERTR miniplates to maintain the allowable design tolerances, therefore evaluating and analytically verifying the fabricated miniplates for maintaining quality standards as well as safety. The purpose of this work is to analyze the thickness of the fabricated RERTR-12 miniplates using non-destructive technique to meet the fuel plate specification for RERTR fuel to be used in the ATR.

  18. Direct Measurement of the g-factor in crystalline bismuth at high B/T

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bompadre, Silvia; Biagini, Cristiano; Maslov, Dmitrii; Hebard, Arthur

    2000-03-01

    Magneto transport data have been obtained for high purity bismuth crystals with various orientations in fields B as high as 20T and temperatures as low as 25mK. For fields on the order of 15T in the trigonal direction we find, in agreement with theoretical expectations, that all holes are in the lowest Landau level. More than twenty-five Shubnikov de Haas oscillations due to holes are observed. Electron oscillations are strongly attenuated. Close inspection of the data reveals a non-linear correction to the reciprocal field spacings together with the appearance of doublets at each field oscillation with spacings that scale as B^2. The absence of a doublet in the n=1 Landau level allows us to conclude that the Zeeman splitting is sufficiently strong to fully polarize the holes in the n=0,1,2 Landau levels. This information together with the quadratic dependence of the doublets allows us to infer g = 34 for holes.

  19. Alpha spectrometry — A tool for nuclear data measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiltshire, R. A. P.

    1984-06-01

    Alpha spectrometry is a precise technique which can be applied to the measurement of data such as half-lives and the production cross-sections of higher actinides. The application of this technique to the measurement of 239Pu and 242Cm half-lives, to the production cross-sections for curium isotopes in fast reactor spectra and to the analysis of irradiated fuel for alpha emitting higher actinide nuclides are discussed.

  20. Tuneable paramagnetic susceptibility and exciton g-factor in Mn-doped PbS colloidal nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turyanska, L.; Hill, R. J. A.; Makarovsky, O.; Moro, F.; Knott, A. N.; Larkin, O. J.; Patanè, A.; Meaney, A.; Christianen, P. C. M.; Fay, M. W.; Curry, R. J.

    2014-07-01

    We report on PbS colloidal nanocrystals that combine within one structure solubility in physiological solvents with near-infrared photoluminescence, and magnetic and optical properties tuneable by the controlled incorporation of magnetic impurities (Mn). We use high magnetic fields (B up to 30 T) to measure the magnetization of the nanocrystals in liquid and the strength of the sp-d exchange interaction between the exciton and the Mn-ions. With increasing Mn-content from 0.1% to 7%, the mass magnetic susceptibility increases at a rate of ~10-7 m3 kg-1 per Mn percentage; correspondingly, the exciton g-factor decreases from 0.47 to 0.10. The controlled modification of the paramagnetism, fluorescence and exciton g-factor of the nanocrystals is relevant to the implementation of these paramagnetic semiconductor nanocrystals in quantum technologies ranging from quantum information to magnetic resonance imaging.We report on PbS colloidal nanocrystals that combine within one structure solubility in physiological solvents with near-infrared photoluminescence, and magnetic and optical properties tuneable by the controlled incorporation of magnetic impurities (Mn). We use high magnetic fields (B up to 30 T) to measure the magnetization of the nanocrystals in liquid and the strength of the sp-d exchange interaction between the exciton and the Mn-ions. With increasing Mn-content from 0.1% to 7%, the mass magnetic susceptibility increases at a rate of ~10-7 m3 kg-1 per Mn percentage; correspondingly, the exciton g-factor decreases from 0.47 to 0.10. The controlled modification of the paramagnetism, fluorescence and exciton g-factor of the nanocrystals is relevant to the implementation of these paramagnetic semiconductor nanocrystals in quantum technologies ranging from quantum information to magnetic resonance imaging. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Details of the experiments techniques and results are available for the following studies: Raman and PL

  1. Nuclear fuel assemblies' deformations measurement by optoelectronic methods in cooling ponds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senchenko, E. S.; Zavyalov, P. S.; Finogenov, L. V.; Khakimov, D. R.

    2013-12-01

    Increasing the reliability and life-time of nuclear fuel is actual problems for nuclear power engineering. It takes to provide the high geometric stability of nuclear fuel assemblies (FA) under exploitation, since various factors cause FA mechanical deformation (bending and twisting). To obtain the objective information and make recommendations for the FA design improvement one have to fulfill the post reactor FA analysis. Therefore it takes measurements of the FA geometric parameters in cooling ponds of nuclear power plants. As applied to this problem we have developed and investigated the different optoelectronic methods, namely, structured light method, television and shadow ones. In this paper effectiveness of these methods has been investigated using the special experimental test stand and fulfilled researches are described. The experimental results of FA measurements by different methods and recommendation for their usage is given.

  2. Lead Slowing Down Spectrometry Analysis of Data from Measurements on Nuclear Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, Glen A.; Anderson, Kevin K.; Kulisek, Jonathan A.; Danon, Yaron; Weltz, Adam; Gavron, Victor A.; Harris, Jason; Stewart, Trevor N.

    2015-01-12

    Improved non-destructive assay of isotopic masses in used nuclear fuel would be valuable for nuclear safeguards operations associated with the transport, storage and reprocessing of used nuclear fuel. Our collaboration is examining the feasibility of using lead slowing down spectrometry techniques to assay the isotopic fissile masses in used nuclear fuel assemblies. We present the application of our analysis algorithms on measurements conducted with a lead spectrometer. The measurements involved a single fresh fuel pin and discrete 239Pu and 235U samples. We are able to describe the isotopic fissile masses with root mean square errors over seven different configurations to 6.35% for 239Pu and 2.7% for 235U over seven different configurations. Funding Source(s):

  3. Calorimeter measures high nuclear heating rates and their gradients across a reactor test hole

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burwell, D.; Coombe, J. R.; Mc Bride, J.

    1970-01-01

    Pedestal-type calorimeter measures gamma-ray heating rates from 0.5 to 7.0 watts per gram of aluminum. Nuclear heating rate is a function of cylinder temperature change, measured by four chromel-alumel thermocouples attached to the calorimeter, and known thermoconductivity of the tested material.

  4. One centimeter spatial resolution temperature measurements in a nuclear reactor using Rayleigh scatter in optical fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sang, A. K.; Gifford, D. K.; Dickerson, B. D.; Fielder, B. F.; Froggatt, M. E.

    2007-07-01

    We present the use of swept wavelength interferometry for distributed fiber-optic temperature measurements in a Nuclear Reactor. The sensors consisted of 2 m segments of commercially available, single mode optical fibers. The interrogation technique is based on measuring the spectral shift of the intrinsic Rayleigh backscatter signal along the optical fiber and converting the spectral shift to temperature.

  5. Measurement of Charged Pions from Neutrino-produced Nuclear Resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Simon, Clifford N.

    2014-01-01

    A method for identifying stopped pions in a high-resolution scintillator bar detector is presented. I apply my technique to measure the axial mass MΔAfor production of the Δ(1232) resonance by neutrino, with the result MΔA = 1.16±0.20 GeV (68% CL) (limited by statistics). The result is produced from the measured spectrum of reconstructed momentum-transfer Q2. I proceed by varying the value of MΔA in a Rein-Sehgal-based Monte Carlo to produce the best agreement, using shape only (not normalization). The consistency of this result with recent reanalyses of previous bubble-chamber experiments is discussed.

  6. Nuclear Astrophysics and Neutron Cross Section Measurements Using the ORELA

    SciTech Connect

    Winters, R. R.

    2000-08-25

    This is the final report for a research program which has been continuously supported by the AEC, ERDA, or USDOE since 1973. The neutron total and capture cross sections for n + {sup 88}Sr have been measured over the neutron energy range 100 eV to 1 MeV. The report briefly summaries our results and the importance of this work for nucleosynthesis and the optical model.

  7. Nuclear Threat Reduction Measures for India and Pakistan

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-02-17

    drive systems, and on-line fuel charging and discharging equipment for CANDU reactors. considered to have made “substantial progress in the...Reduction Measures for India and Pakistan Updated February 17, 2005 Sharon Squassoni Specialist in National Defense Foreign Affairs, Defense, and Trade...hour per response, including the time for reviewing instructions, searching existing data sources, gathering and maintaining the data needed, and

  8. Cross section measurements via residual nuclear decays: Analysis methods

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou Fengqun; Gao Lei; Li Kuohu; Song Yueli; Zhang Fang; Kong Xiangzhong; Luo Junhua

    2009-11-15

    We develop an approach to calculating the pure cross section of the ground state of artificial radioactive nuclides that subtracts the effect of an excited state on the ground state. We apply a formalism to obtaining pure cross sections by subtracting the effect of excited states in the reactions {sup 122}Te(n,2n){sup 121}Te{sup g} and {sup 128}Te(n,2n){sup 127}Te{sup g}, induced by neutrons of about 14 MeV. The cross sections are measured by an activation relative to the {sup 93}Nb(n,2n){sup 92}Nb{sup m} reaction and are compared with results that take into account the effect of the excited state. Measurements are carried out by {gamma} detection using a coaxial high-purity germanium (HPGe) detector. As samples, spectroscopically pure Te powder is used. The fast neutrons are produced by the {sup 3}H(d,n){sup 4}He reaction. The neutron energies in these measurements are determined using the method of cross-section ratios between the {sup 90}Zr(n,2n){sup 89}Zr{sup m+g} and {sup 93}Nb(n,2n){sup 92}Nb{sup m} reactions.

  9. Neutron scattering and models: Iron. Nuclear data and measurements series

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, A.B.

    1995-08-01

    Differential elastic and inelastic neutron-scattering cross sections of elemental iron are measured from 4.5 to 10 MeV in increments of {approx} 0.5 MeV. At each incident energy the measurements are made at forty or more scattering angles distributed between {approx} 17{degrees} and 160{degrees}, with emphasis on elastic scattering and inelastic scattering due to the excitation of the yrast 2{sup +} state. The measured data is combined with earlier lower-energy results from this laboratory, with recent high-precision {approx} 9.5 {yields} 15 MeV results from the Physilalisch Technische Bundesanstalt and with selected values from the literature to provide a detailed neutron-scattering data base extending from {approx} 1.5 to 26 MeV. This data is interpreted in the context of phenomenological spherical-optical and coupled-channels (vibrational and rotational) models, and physical implications discussed. Deformation, coupling, asymmetry and dispersive effects are explored. It is shown that, particularly in a collective context, a good description of the interaction of neutrons with iron is achieved over the energy range {approx} 0 {yields} 26 MeV, avoiding the dichotomy between high and low-energy interpretations found in previous work.

  10. Optical control over electron g factor and spin decoherence in (In ,Ga ) As /Ga As quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rietjens, J. H. H.; Quax, G. W. W.; Bosco, C. A. C.; Nötzel, R.; Silov, A. Yu.; Koopmans, B.

    2008-04-01

    We have studied the dependence of the electron in-plane g factor and spin decoherence time on the built-in electric field (Ei) at the position of a single layer of self-assembled (In ,Ga ) As /Ga As quantum dots (QDs). Control of Ei is achieved by inducing screening charges in a p -i -n GaAs matrix with a continuous wave (cw) laser. Using a time-resolved pump-probe technique to measure the spin dynamics via the magneto-optical Kerr effect, we observe a large hole spin decoherence time of 440 ps . Measurements as function of the cw laser power and, thus, of Ei show that the electron spin decay time in the QDs depends strongly on Ei and decreases from 310 to110 ps with increasing Ei. We attribute this effect to increasing tunneling rates of electrons out of the QDs at high Ei. We observe a slight increase of the electron g factor from 0.40 ±0.03 to 0.46 ±0.04 with increasing Ei, which might be a result of a changing wavefunction as a result of a different confinement potential due to Ei.

  11. Activities on Nuclear Data Measurements at Pohang Neutron Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Guinyun

    2009-03-01

    We report the activities of the Pohang Neutron Facility which consists of an electron linear accelerator, a water-cooled Ta target, and a 12-m time-of-flight path. It has been equipped with a four-position sample changer controlled remotely by a CAMAC data acquisition system, which allows simultaneous accumulation of the neutron time of flight spectra from 4 different detectors. It can be possible to measure the neutron total cross-sections in the neutron energy range from 0.1 eV to few hundreds eV by using the neutron time-of-flight method. A 6LiZnS(Ag) glass scintillator was used as a neutron detector. The neutron flight path from the water-cooled Ta target to the neutron detector was 12.1 m. The background level was determined by using notch-filters of Co, In, Ta, and Cd sheets. In order to reduce the gamma rays from bremsstrahlung and those from neutron capture, we employed a neutron-gamma separation system based on their different pulse shapes. The present measurements of several samples (Ta, Mo) are in general agreement with the evaluated data in ENDF/B-VI. We measured the thermal neutron capture cross-sections and the resonance integrals of the 186W(n,γ)187W reaction and the 98Mo(n,γ)99Mo reaction by the activation method using the 197Au(n,γ)198Au monitor reaction as a single comparator. We also report the isomeric yield ratios for the 44 m, gSc isomeric pairs produced from four different photonuclear reactions 45Sc(γ,n)44m,gSc, natTi(γ,xn1p)44m,gSc, natFe(γ,xn5p)52m,gMn, and 103Rh(γ,4n)99m,gRh by using the activation method.

  12. Correlation measurements in nuclear {beta}-decay using traps and polarized low energy beams

    SciTech Connect

    Naviliat-Cuncic, Oscar

    2013-05-06

    Precision measurements in nuclear {beta}-decay provide sensitive means to test discrete symmetries in the weak interaction and to determine some of the fundamental constants in semi-leptonic decays, like the coupling of the lightest quarks to charged weak bosons. The main motivation of such measurements is to find deviations from Standard Model predictions as possible indications of new physics. In this contribution I will focus on two topics related to precision measurements in nuclear {beta}-decay: i) the determination of the V{sub ud} element of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa quark mixing matrix from nuclear mirror transitions and ii) the search for exotic scalar or tensor contributions from {beta}{nu} angular correlations. The purpose is to underline the role being played by experimental techniques based on the confinement of radioactive species with atom and ion traps as well as the plans to use low energy polarized beams.

  13. First measurement of the ionization yield of nuclear recoils in liquid argon

    SciTech Connect

    Joshi, T.; Sangiorgio, Samuele; Bernstein, A.; Foxe, Michael P.; Hagmann, Chris; Jovanovic, Igor; Kazkaz, K.; Mozin, Vladimir V.; Norman, E. B.; Pereverzev, S. V.; Rebassoo, Finn O.; Sorensen, Peter F.

    2014-05-01

    Liquid phase argon has long been used as a target medium for particle detection via scintillation light. Recently there has been considerable interest in direct detection of both hypothetical darkmatter particles and coherent elastic neutrino nucleus scattering. These as-yet unobserved neutral particle interactions are expected to result in a recoiling argon atom O(keV), generally referred to in the literature as a nuclear recoil. This prompts the question of the available electromagnetic signal in a liquid argon detector. In this Letter we report the first measurement of the ionization yield (Qy), detected electrons per unit energy, resulting from nuclear recoils in liquid argon, measured at 6.7 keV. This is also the lowest energy measurement of nuclear recoils in liquid argon.

  14. Recent Fast Neutron Imaging Measurements with the Fieldable Nuclear Materials Identification System

    SciTech Connect

    Mullens, James Allen; Mihalczo, John T; Archer, Daniel E; Thompson, Thad; Britton Jr, Charles L; Ezell, N Dianne Bull; Ericson, Milton Nance; Farquhar, Ethan; Lind, Randall F; Carter, Jake

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes some recent fast neutron imaging measurements of the fieldable nuclear materials identification system (FNMIS) under development by the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA-NA-22) for possible future use in arms control and nonproliferation applications. The general configuration of FNMIS has been previously described, and a description of the application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) electronics designed for FNMIS has been reported. This paper presents initial imaging measurements performed at ORNL with a Thermo Fisher API 120 DT generator and the fast-neutron imaging module of FNMIS.

  15. Measurement method for the nuclear anapole moment of laser-trapped alkali-metal atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Gomez, E.; Aubin, S.; Sprouse, G. D.; Orozco, L. A.; DeMille, D. P.

    2007-03-15

    Weak interactions within a nucleus generate a nuclear spin dependent, parity-violating electromagnetic moment, the anapole moment. We analyze a method to measure the nuclear anapole moment through the electric dipole transition it induces between hyperfine states of the ground level. The method requires tight confinement of the atoms to position them at the antinode of a standing wave Fabry-Perot cavity driving the anapole-induced microwave E1 transition. We explore the necessary limits in the number of atoms, excitation fields, trap type, interrogation method, and systematic tests necessary for such measurements in francium, the heaviest alkali.

  16. Measurement of the nuclear polarization of hydrogen and deuterium molecules using a Lamb-shift polarimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Engels, Ralf Gorski, Robert; Grigoryev, Kiril; Mikirtychyants, Maxim; Rathmann, Frank; Seyfarth, Hellmut; Ströher, Hans; Weiss, Philipp; Kochenda, Leonid; Kravtsov, Peter; Trofimov, Viktor; Tschernov, Nikolay; Vasilyev, Alexander; Vznuzdaev, Marat; Schieck, Hans Paetz gen.

    2014-10-15

    Lamb-shift polarimeters are used to measure the nuclear polarization of protons and deuterons at energies of a few keV. In combination with an ionizer, the polarization of hydrogen and deuterium atoms was determined after taking into account the loss of polarization during the ionization process. The present work shows that the nuclear polarization of hydrogen or deuterium molecules can be measured as well, by ionizing the molecules and injecting the H{sub 2}{sup +} (or D{sub 2}{sup +}) ions into the Lamb-shift polarimeter.

  17. Calibration of stack monitors for measurement of noble gases in nuclear facilities.

    PubMed

    Kovar, Petr; Dryak, Pavel; Suran, Jiri; Gudelis, Arunas

    2012-09-01

    In nuclear facilities stack monitors are used for the measurement of the volumetric activity of noble gases. Spectrometric measurement is needed because the content of stack effluents is always a mixture of radionuclides. In some nuclear power plants new types of monitors were installed based on HPGe detectors. For efficiency calibration a standard with the radionuclide Xe-127 was developed and calibration curve constructed in the energy range 81 keV-1293 keV. Experiental efficiencies were checked using an MC model.

  18. Measurement of the nuclear polarization of hydrogen and deuterium molecules using a Lamb-shift polarimeter.

    PubMed

    Engels, Ralf; Gorski, Robert; Grigoryev, Kiril; Mikirtychyants, Maxim; Rathmann, Frank; Seyfarth, Hellmut; Ströher, Hans; Weiss, Philipp; Kochenda, Leonid; Kravtsov, Peter; Trofimov, Viktor; Tschernov, Nikolay; Vasilyev, Alexander; Vznuzdaev, Marat; Paetz gen Schieck, Hans

    2014-10-01

    Lamb-shift polarimeters are used to measure the nuclear polarization of protons and deuterons at energies of a few keV. In combination with an ionizer, the polarization of hydrogen and deuterium atoms was determined after taking into account the loss of polarization during the ionization process. The present work shows that the nuclear polarization of hydrogen or deuterium molecules can be measured as well, by ionizing the molecules and injecting the H2(+) (or D2(+)) ions into the Lamb-shift polarimeter.

  19. Plutonium Measurements with a Fast-Neutron Multiplicity Counter for Nuclear Safeguards Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Jennifer L. Dolan; Marek Flaska; Alexis Poitrasson-Riviere; Andreas Enqvist; Paolo Peerani; David L. Chichester; Sara A. Pozzi

    2014-11-01

    Measurements were performed at the Joint Research Centre in Ispra, Italy to field test a fast-neutron multiplicity counter developed at the University of Michigan. The measurements allowed the illustration of the system’s photon discrimination abilities, efficiency when measuring neutron multiplicity, ability to characterize 240Pueff mass, and performance relative to a currently deployed neutron coincidence counter. This work is motivated by the need to replace and improve upon 3He neutron detection systems for nuclear safeguards applications.

  20. Monte Carlo Simulation Study of a Differential Calorimeter Measuring the Nuclear Heating in Material Testing Reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amharrak, H.; Reynard-Carette, C.; Lyoussi, A.; Carette, M.; Brun, J.; De Vita, C.; Fourmentel, D.; Villard, J.-F.; Guimbal, P.

    2016-02-01

    The nuclear heating measurements in Material Testing Reactors (MTRs) are crucial for the study of nuclear materials and fuels under irradiation. The reference measurements of this nuclear heating are especially performed by a differential calorimeter including a graphite sample material. Then these measurements are used for other materials, other geometries, or other experimental conditions in order to predict the nuclear heating and thermal conditions induced in the irradiation devices. This paper will present new simulations with MCNP Monte-Carlo transport code to determine the gamma heating profile inside the calorimeter. The whole complex geometry of the sensor has been considered. We use as an input source in the model, the photon spectra calculated in various positions of CARMEN-1 irradiation program in OSIRIS reactor. After a description of the differential calorimeter device, the MCNP modeling used for the calculations of radial profile of nuclear heating inside the calorimeter elements will be introduced. The obtained results of different simulations will be detailed and discussed in this paper. The charged particle equilibrium inside the calorimeter elements will be studied. Then we will focus on parametric studies of the various components of the calorimeter. The influence of source type will be also took into account. Moreover the influence of the material used for the sample will be described.

  1. Density measurements of road overlays samples with nuclear gauges and a Step Frequency Radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fauchard, C.; Li, B.; Kadi, M.

    2012-04-01

    The density of Hot-Mix Asphalt layers (HMA) and thin overlays is an important parameter for the pavement quality and its long time performance. In the laboratory, the density could be measured with nuclear gauges based on the gamma rays absorption through cores samples drilled from the pavement. However, it is a destructive testing. For in-place control, the density could be measured with nuclear gauges based on the back-scattered gamma rays. But it is limited to overlays thickness greater than 3 cm. For both cases, nuclear gauges require specific training and certification for users. The use of a nuclear source (generally Cesium 137) is a major constraint for transportation and is a threat for operator safety. This work proposes a laboratory density measurement with an electromagnetic method, the Step Frequency Radar developped in our institute (Fauchard et al, 2009). It is based on the same physical principle than the Ground Penetrating Radar, but the used frequencies allow the study of very thin asphalt overlays less than 3 cm and the possible non-destructive measurement of in-place density with high performance. For this study, the dimensions of the device are designed to measure the density of slab samples (40*60*8 cm) in laboratory. The results are compared to the nuclear density measurement used in French Labs. Three kinds of slabs are implemented with four various degrees of compaction (88, 90, 92 and 94%) according to the French norm. Their composition is known and differs mainly with the nature of the aggregates (basalt, quartzite and limestone) that represent the main part of the mix materials. Then the permittivity of the samples is measured according to the reflected waves on surface and bottom slabs. A Complex Refractive Index Model gives the measured permittivity of the tested mix as a function of the compaction and the content, permittiviy and density of each component (filler, aggregates and bitumen). The obtained density is very closed to the

  2. Quantized Conductance and Large g-Factor Anisotropy in InSb Quantum Point Contacts.

    PubMed

    Qu, Fanming; van Veen, Jasper; de Vries, Folkert K; Beukman, Arjan J A; Wimmer, Michael; Yi, Wei; Kiselev, Andrey A; Nguyen, Binh-Minh; Sokolich, Marko; Manfra, Michael J; Nichele, Fabrizio; Marcus, Charles M; Kouwenhoven, Leo P

    2016-12-14

    Because of a strong spin-orbit interaction and a large Landé g-factor, InSb plays an important role in research on Majorana fermions. To further explore novel properties of Majorana fermions, hybrid devices based on quantum wells are conceived as an alternative approach to nanowires. In this work, we report a pronounced conductance quantization of quantum point contact devices in InSb/InAlSb quantum wells. Using a rotating magnetic field, we observe a large in-plane (|g1| = 26) and out-of-plane (|g1| = 52) g-factor anisotropy. Additionally, we investigate crossings of subbands with opposite spins and extract the electron effective mass from magnetic depopulation of one-dimensional subbands.

  3. Further investigation of g factors for the lead monofluoride ground state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skripnikov, L. V.; Petrov, A. N.; Titov, A. V.; Mawhorter, R. J.; Baum, A. L.; Sears, T. J.; Grabow, J.-U.

    2015-09-01

    We report the results of our theoretical study and analysis of earlier experimental data for the g -factor tensor components of the ground 2Π1 /2 state of the free PbF radical. The values were obtained both within the relativistic coupled-cluster method combined with the generalized relativistic effective core potential approach and with our fit of the experimental data from [R. J. Mawhorter, B. S. Murphy, A. L. Baum, T. J. Sears, T. Yang, P. M. Rupasinghe, C. P. McRaven, N. E. Shafer-Ray, L. D. Alphei, and J.-U. Grabow, Phys. Rev. A 84, 022508 (2011), 10.1103/PhysRevA.84.022508; A. L. Baum, B.A. thesis, Pomona College, 2011]. The obtained results agree very well with each other but contradict the previous fit performed in the cited works. Our final prediction for g factors is G∥=0.081 (5 ) ,G⊥=-0.27 (1 ) .

  4. Further investigation of g factors for the lead monofluoride ground state

    DOE PAGES

    Skripnikov, L. V.; Petrov, A. N.; Titov, A. V.; ...

    2015-09-15

    We report the results of our theoretical study and analysis of earlier experimental data for the g-factor tensor components of the ground 2II1/2 state of the free PbF radical. These values obtained both within the relativistic coupled-cluster method combined with the generalized relativistic effective core potential approach and with our fit of the experimental data from [R. J. Mawhorter, B. S. Murphy, A. L. Baum, T. J. Sears, T. Yang, P. M. Rupasinghe, C. P. McRaven, N. E. Shafer-Ray, L. D. Alphei, and J.-U. Grabow, Phys. Rev. A 84, 022508 (2011); A. L. Baum, B.A. thesis, Pomona College, 2011]. Themore » obtained results agree very well with each other but contradict the previous fit performed in the cited works. Our final prediction for g factors is G∥=0.081(5),G⊥=–0.27(1).« less

  5. Effective g-factors of carriers in inverted InAs/GaSb bilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Mu, Xiaoyang; Sullivan, Gerard; Du, Rui-Rui

    2016-01-04

    We perform tilt-field transport experiment on inverted InAs/GaSb, which hosts quantum spin Hall insulator. By means of coincidence method, Landau level (LL) spectra of electron and hole carriers are systematically studied at different carrier densities tuned by gate voltages. When Fermi level stays in the conduction band, we observe LL crossing and anti-crossing behaviors at odd and even filling factors, respectively, with a corresponding g-factor of 11.5. It remains nearly constant for varying filling factors and electron densities. On the contrary, for GaSb holes, only a small Zeeman splitting is observed even at large tilt angles, indicating a g-factor of less than 3.

  6. Virtual light-by-light scattering and the g factor of a bound electron

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, R.N.; Milstein, A.I.; Terekhov, I.S.; Karshenboim, S.G.

    2005-05-15

    The contribution of the light-by-light diagram to the g factor of an electron and muon bound in a Coulomb field is obtained. For an electron in a ground state, our results are in good agreement with the results of other authors obtained numerically for large Z. For relatively small Z our results have essentially higher accuracy as compared to the previous ones. For muonic atoms, the contribution is obtained with a high accuracy in the whole region of Z.

  7. Neutron Cross Section Measurements at ORELA for Improved Nuclear Data and Their Application

    SciTech Connect

    Guber, Klaus H; Leal, Luiz C; Sayer, Royce O; Koehler, Paul Edward; Valentine, Timothy E; Derrien, Herve; Harvey, John A

    2005-02-01

    Many older neutron cross-section evaluations from libraries such as ENDF/B-VI or JENDL-3.2 exhibit deficiencies or do not cover energy ranges that are important for criticality safety applications. These deficiencies may occur in the resolved and unresolved-resonance regions. Consequently, these evaluated data may not be adequate for nuclear criticality calculations where effects such as self-shielding, multiple scattering, or Doppler broadening are important. To support the Nuclear Criticality Predictability Program, neutron cross-section measurements have been initiated at the Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator (ORELA). ORELA is the only high-power white neutron source with excellent time resolution still operating in the United States. It is ideally suited to measure fission, neutron total, and capture cross sections in the energy range from 1 eV to {approx}600 keV, which is important for many nuclear criticality safety applications.

  8. New Neutron Cross Section Measurements at ORELA for Improved Nuclear Data

    SciTech Connect

    Guber, Klaus H; Leal, Luiz C; Sayer, Royce O; Koehler, Paul Edward; Valentine, Timothy E; Derrien, Herve; Harvey, John A

    2004-07-01

    Many older neutron cross-section evaluations from libraries such as ENDF/B-VI or JENDL-3.2 exhibit deficiencies or do not cover energy ranges that are important for criticality safety applications. These deficiencies may occur in the resolved and unresolved-resonance regions. Consequently, these evaluated data may not be adequate for nuclear criticality calculations where effects such as self-shielding, multiple scattering, or Doppler broadening are important. To support the Nuclear Criticality Predictability Program, neutron cross-section measurements have been initiated at the Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator (ORELA). ORELA is the only high-power white neutron source with excellent time resolution still operating in the United States. It is ideally suited to measure fission, neutron total, and capture cross sections in the energy range from 1 eV to {approx}600 keV, which is important for many nuclear criticality safety applications.

  9. New Neutron Cross-Section Measurements at ORELA for Improved Nuclear Criticality Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Guber, Klaus H; Leal, Luiz C; Sayer, Royce O; Koehler, Paul Edward; Valentine, Timothy E; Derrien, Herve; Harvey, John A

    2005-05-01

    Many older neutron cross-section evaluations from libraries such as ENDF/B-VI or JENDL-3.2 exhibit deficiencies or do not cover energy ranges that are important for criticality safety applications. These deficiencies may occur in the resolved and unresolved-resonance regions. Consequently, these evaluated data may not be adequate for nuclear criticality calculations where effects such as self-shielding, multiple scattering, or Doppler broadening are important. To support the Nuclear Criticality Predictability Program, neutron cross-section measurements have been initiated at the Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator (ORELA). ORELA is the only high-power white neutron source with excellent time resolution still operating in the United States. It is ideally suited to measure fission, neutron total, and capture cross sections in the energy range from 1 eV to {approx}600 keV, which is important for many nuclear criticality safety applications.

  10. New Neutron Cross-Section Measurements at ORELA for Improved Nuclear Data Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Guber, K.H.; Leal, L.C.; Sayer, R.O.; Koehler, P.E.; Valentine, T.E.; Derrien, H.; Harvey, J.A.

    2005-05-24

    Many older neutron cross-section evaluations from libraries such as ENDF/B-VI or JENDL-3.2 exhibit deficiencies or do not cover energy ranges that are important for criticality safety applications. These deficiencies may occur in the resolved and unresolved-resonance regions. Consequently, these evaluated data may not be adequate for nuclear criticality calculations where effects such as self-shielding, multiple scattering, or Doppler broadening are important. To support the Nuclear Criticality Predictability Program, neutron cross-section measurements have been initiated at the Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator (ORELA). ORELA is the only high-power white neutron source with excellent time resolution still operating in the United States. It is ideally suited to measure fission, neutron total, and capture cross sections in the energy range from 1 eV to {approx}600 keV, which is important for many nuclear criticality safety applications.

  11. Neutron cross section measurements at ORELA for improved nuclear data and their application.

    PubMed

    Guber, K H; Leal, L C; Sayer, R O; Koehler, P E; Valentine, T E; Derrien, H; Harvey, J A

    2005-01-01

    To support the Nuclear Criticality Safety Program, the Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator (ORELA) has been used to measure the total and capture neutron cross sections of several nuclides in the energy range from 100 eV to -600 keV. Concerns about the use of existing cross section data in nuclear criticality calculations have been a prime motivator for the new cross-section measurements. Our new capture cross sections of aluminium, silicon, chlorine, fluorine and potassium in the energy range from 100 eV to 600 keV are substantially different from the cross sections in evaluated nuclear data files of ENDF/B-VI and JENDL-3.2.

  12. Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence Measurements on ^237Np for Security and Safeguards Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angell, C. T.; Joshi, T.; Yee, Ryan; Norman, E. B.; Kulp, W. D.; Warren, G. A.; Korbly, S.; Klimenko, A.; Wilson, C.; Copping, R.; Shuh, D. K.

    2009-10-01

    The smuggling of nuclear material and the diversion of fissile material for covert weapon programs both present grave risks to world security. Methods are needed to detect nuclear material smuggled in cargo, and for proper material accountability in civilian fuel re-processing facilities. Nuclear resonance fluorescence (NRF) is a technique that can address both needs. It is a non-destructive active interrogation method that provides isotope-specific information. It works by using a γ-ray beam to resonantly excite levels in a nucleus and observing the γ-rays emitted whose energy and intensity are characteristic of that isotope. ^237Np presents significant safeguard challenges; it is fissile yet currently has fewer safeguard restrictions. NRF measurements on ^237Np will expand the nuclear database and will permit designing interrogation and assay systems. Measurements were made using the bremsstrahlung beam at the HVRL at MIT on a 7 g target of ^237Np with two incident electron energies of 2.8 and 3.1 MeV. Results will be presented with discussion of the relevant nuclear structure necessary to predict levels in other actinides.

  13. An Undergraduate Experiment on Nuclear Lifetime Measurement Using the Doppler Effect

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, J. L.; And Others

    1972-01-01

    While designed for a senior undergraduate laboratory, the experiment illustrates the principles involved in the various Doppler techniques currently used in nuclear lifetime studies and demonstrates the versatility of the Ge(Li) detector in applications other than direct energy or intensity measurement. (Author/TS)

  14. Measuring Radon in Air, Soil and Water: An Introduction to Nuclear Physics for Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johansson, K. E.; Nilsson, Ch.; Wachtmeister, S.

    2007-01-01

    With the radon measurement activities at Stockholm House of Science, nuclear and experimental physics is introduced in a way that attracts the attention and interest of the students. These projects give the students the opportunity to use mobile detectors, either in their school, in the House of Science or in their homes. During 2006, 34 radon…

  15. Quantitative nuclear magnetic resonance to measure body composition in infants and children

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Quantitative Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (QMR) is being used in human adults to obtain measures of total body fat (FM) with high precision. The current study assessed a device specially designed to accommodate infants and children between 3 and 50 kg (EchoMRI-AH™). Body composition of 113 infants and...

  16. Nuclear magnetic resonance for measurement of body composition in infants and children

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Measurement of body composition in infants and children is currently challenging. Air Displacement Plethysmography (ADP) has not been validated between ages 6 mo and 6 y and the requirement for stillness of the Dual-energy X-ray Absorptiometry (DXA) technique limits its use. Quantitative Nuclear Ma...

  17. Aerial Radiation Measurements from the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant Accident

    SciTech Connect

    Guss, P. P.

    2012-07-16

    This document is a slide show type presentation concerning DOE and Aerial Measuring System (AMS) activities and results with respect to assessing the consequences of the releases from the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant. These include ground monitoring and aerial monitoring.

  18. Measurements of extinct fission products in nuclear bomb debris: Determination of the yield of the Trinity nuclear test 70 y later.

    PubMed

    Hanson, Susan K; Pollington, Anthony D; Waidmann, Christopher R; Kinman, William S; Wende, Allison M; Miller, Jeffrey L; Berger, Jennifer A; Oldham, Warren J; Selby, Hugh D

    2016-07-19

    This paper describes an approach to measuring extinct fission products that would allow for the characterization of a nuclear test at any time. The isotopic composition of molybdenum in five samples of glassy debris from the 1945 Trinity nuclear test has been measured. Nonnatural molybdenum isotopic compositions were observed, reflecting an input from the decay of the short-lived fission products (95)Zr and (97)Zr. By measuring both the perturbation of the (95)Mo/(96)Mo and (97)Mo/(96)Mo isotopic ratios and the total amount of molybdenum in the Trinity nuclear debris samples, it is possible to calculate the original concentrations of the (95)Zr and (97)Zr isotopes formed in the nuclear detonation. Together with a determination of the amount of plutonium in the debris, these measurements of extinct fission products allow for new estimates of the efficiency and yield of the historic Trinity test.

  19. Measurements of extinct fission products in nuclear bomb debris: Determination of the yield of the Trinity nuclear test 70 y later

    PubMed Central

    Hanson, Susan K.; Pollington, Anthony D.; Waidmann, Christopher R.; Kinman, William S.; Wende, Allison M.; Miller, Jeffrey L.; Berger, Jennifer A.; Oldham, Warren J.; Selby, Hugh D.

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes an approach to measuring extinct fission products that would allow for the characterization of a nuclear test at any time. The isotopic composition of molybdenum in five samples of glassy debris from the 1945 Trinity nuclear test has been measured. Nonnatural molybdenum isotopic compositions were observed, reflecting an input from the decay of the short-lived fission products 95Zr and 97Zr. By measuring both the perturbation of the 95Mo/96Mo and 97Mo/96Mo isotopic ratios and the total amount of molybdenum in the Trinity nuclear debris samples, it is possible to calculate the original concentrations of the 95Zr and 97Zr isotopes formed in the nuclear detonation. Together with a determination of the amount of plutonium in the debris, these measurements of extinct fission products allow for new estimates of the efficiency and yield of the historic Trinity test. PMID:27382169

  20. Measurements of extinct fission products in nuclear bomb debris: Determination of the yield of the Trinity nuclear test 70 y later

    DOE PAGES

    Hanson, Susan Kloek; Pollington, Anthony Douglas; Waidmann, Christopher Russell; ...

    2016-07-05

    This study describes an approach to measuring extinct fission products that would allow for the characterization of a nuclear test at any time. The isotopic composition of molybdenum in five samples of glassy debris from the 1945 Trinity nuclear test has been measured. Nonnatural molybdenum isotopic compositions were observed, reflecting an input from the decay of the short-lived fission products 95Zr and 97Zr. By measuring both the perturbation of the 95Mo/96Mo and 97Mo/96Mo isotopic ratios and the total amount of molybdenum in the Trinity nuclear debris samples, it is possible to calculate the original concentrations of the 95Zr and 97Zrmore » isotopes formed in the nuclear detonation. Together with a determination of the amount of plutonium in the debris, these measurements of extinct fission products allow for new estimates of the efficiency and yield of the historic Trinity test.« less

  1. [The Chinese nuclear test and 'atoms for peace' as a measure for preventing nuclear armament of Japan: the nuclear non-proliferation policy of the United States and the introduction of light water reactors into Japan, 1964-1968].

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Masakatsu

    2014-07-01

    Japan and the United States signed in 1968 a new atomic energy agreement through which US light-water nuclear reactors, including those of the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant of Tokyo Electric Power Company, were to be introduced into Japan. This paper studies the history of negotiations for the 1968 agreement using documents declassified in the 1990s in the US and Japan. After the success of the Chinese nuclear test in October 1964, the United States became seriously concerned about nuclear armament of other countries in Asia including Japan. Expecting that Japan would not have its own nuclear weapons, the US offered to help the country to demonstrate its superiority in some fields of science including peaceful nuclear energy to counter the psychological effect of the Chinese nuclear armament. Driven by his own political agenda, the newly appointed Prime Minister Eisaku Sato responded to the US expectation favorably. When he met in January 1965 with President Johnson, Sato made it clear that Japan would not pursue nuclear weapons. Although the US continued its support after this visit, it nevertheless gave priority to the control of nuclear technology in Japan through the bilateral peaceful nuclear agreement. This paper argues that the 1968 agreement implicitly meant a strategic measure to prevent Japan from going nuclear and also a tactic to persuade Japan to join the Nuclear Non -Proliferation Treaty.

  2. Insight on the inconsistencies of Barkhausen signal measurements for radiation damage on nuclear reactor steel

    SciTech Connect

    Barroso, Soraia Pirfo; Fitzpatrick, Michael E.; Gillemot, Ferenc; Horváth, Marta; Horváth, Ákos; Szekely, Richard

    2014-02-18

    This paper focuses on the use of magnetic measurements, using Barkhausen signals to determine the irradiation effects, attempting to predict fracture toughness changes on nuclear reactor structural materials and correlating these measurements to mechanical testing and microstructure. For this study, two types of nuclear reactor materials were investigated: one sensitive to irradiation effects, the JRQ IAEA's reference material (A533B- -type); and one resistant material, 15KH2MFA WWER's reactor pressure vessel steel. The samples were carefully identified within the original heat block, i.e. forged or rolled plate. These calibrated samples were irradiated at different neutron fluences up to 10{sup 23} n/m{sup 2}. We show how microstructural anisotropy can mask the irradiation effects in the magnetic measurements. A correlation between irradiation effects and the magnetic measurements is explained based on this study.

  3. Transmission Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence Measurements of 238U in Thick Targets

    SciTech Connect

    Quiter, Brian J.; Ludewigt, Bernhard A.; Mozin, Vladimir V.; Wilson, Cody; Korbly, Steve

    2010-08-31

    Transmission nuclear resonance fluorescence measurements were made on targets consisting of Pb and depleted U with total areal densities near 86 g/cm2. The 238U content n the targets varied from 0 to 8.5percent (atom fraction). The experiment demonstrates the capability of using transmission measurements as a non-destructive technique to identify and quantify the presence of an isotope in samples with thicknesses comparable to he average thickness of a nuclear fuel assembly. The experimental data also appear to demonstrate the process of notch refilling with a predictable intensity. Comparison of measured spectra to previous backscatter 238U measurements indicates general agreement in observed excited states. Two new 238U excited states and possibly a third state have also been observed.

  4. Measurement of prompt neutron generation time at the VIR-2M pulsed nuclear reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glukhov, L. Yu.; Kotkov, S. P.; Kuznetsov, M. S.; Chursin, S. S.

    2016-12-01

    The prompt neutron generation time is measured in the core of the VIR-2M research nuclear reactor. The measurements are performed using the Babala method while the reactor is in the subcritical state. The VIR-2M reactor and the relevant experimental equipment are briefly described, and the experimental procedure and data processing technique are presented. It is shown that the prompt neutron generation time with empty experimental channels is 35 ± 1 μs.

  5. An Information Approach To Model Selection For Feedwater Inferential Measurements In A Nuclear Power Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Urmanov, Aleksey M.; Gribok, Andrei V.; Hines, J. Wesley; Uhrig, Robert E.

    2002-07-01

    Inferential sensing is a method that can be used to evaluate the parameters of a physical system based on a set of measurements related to those parameters. Inferential sensing uses mathematical models to infer the parameter value from correlated sensor values. However, inferential sensing is an ill-posed problem because of non-uniqueness and instability of the solution. This paper shows that complexity-penalized model selection can be used to produce a unique and stable solution. An important example of monitoring the nuclear power plant feedwater flow rate is given using data from Carolina Power and Light's Crystal River Nuclear Power Plant. (authors)

  6. Residential housing and nuclear attack: The ineffectiveness of current civil defence measures

    SciTech Connect

    Diacon, D.

    1985-01-01

    Diane Diacon of the Building and Social Housing Foundation has conducted an independent investigation of the question, and in this book she sums up the results. She first examines the nature of nuclear attack, and then goes on to explore the usefulness of specially-designed nuclear shelters and the likely disruption of essential services in the case of war. She concludes that the protection afforded by residential housing is in fact extremely poor, and that the civil defence measures contemplated by government bureaucrats are likely to be utterly ineffective.

  7. Measurements of nuclear-level lifetimes by the Doppler techniques with large multidetector arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Pasternak, A. A.

    2008-07-15

    This is a brief review of the investigations carried out by scientists from the Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute (St. Petersburg) within the framework of international projects for the study of the structure of high-spin nuclear states using heavy-ion beams and arrays of tens and hundreds of detectors for recording gamma rays and charged particles. The development and results of measurements of nuclear-level lifetime by Doppler techniques in the range 10{sup -14}-10{sup -9} s are discussed.

  8. The CERN n_TOF facility: a unique tool for nuclear data measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mingrone, F.; Aberle, O.; Andrzejewski, J.; Audouin, L.; Bécares, V.; Bacak, M.; Balibrea-Correa, J.; Barbagallo, M.; Barros, S.; Bečvář, F.; Beinrucker, C.; Berthoumieux, E.; Billowes, J.; Bosnar, D.; Brugger, M.; Caamaño, M.; Calviño, F.; Calviani, M.; Cano-Ott, D.; Cardella, R.; Casanovas, A.; Castelluccio, D. M.; Cerutti, F.; Chen, Y.; Chiaveri, E.; Colonna, N.; Cortés-Giraldo, M. A.; Cortés, G.; Cosentino, L.; Damone, L.; Diakaki, M.; Domingo-Pardo, C.; Dressler, R.; Dupont, E.; Durán, I.; Fernández-Domínguez, B.; Ferrari, A.; Ferreira, P.; Finocchiaro, P.; Furman, V.; Ganesan, S.; Garcia-Rios, A. A.; Gawlik, A.; Gheorghe, I.; Glodariu, T.; Gonçalves, I. F.; Gonzàlez, E.; Goverdovski, A.; Griesmayer, E.; Guerrero, C.; Gunsing, F.; Göbel, K.; Harada, H.; Heftrich, T.; Heinitz, S.; Heyse, J.; Jenkins, G.; Jericha, E.; Käppeler, F.; Kadi, Y.; Katabuchi, T.; Kavrigin, P.; Ketlerov, V.; Khryachkov, V.; Kimura, A.; Kivel, N.; Kokkoris, M.; Krtička, M.; Leal-Cidoncha, E.; Lederer, C.; Leeb, H.; Lerendegui, J.; Lo Meo, S.; Lonsdale, S.; Losito, R.; Macina, D.; Marganiec, J.; Martínez, T.; Massimi, C.; Mastinu, P.; Mastromarco, M.; Matteucci, F.; Maugeri, E. A.; Mendoza, E.; Mengoni, A.; Milazzo, P. M.; Mirea, M.; Montesano, S.; Musumarra, A.; Nolte, R.; Oprea, A.; Patronis, N.; Pavlik, A.; Perkowski, J.; Praena, J.; Quesada, J. M.; Rajeev, K.; Rauscher, T.; Reifarth, R.; Riego-Perez, A.; Rout, P.; Rubbia, C.; Ryan, J. A.; Sabaté-Gilarte, M.; Saxena, A.; Schillebeeckx, P.; Schmidt, S.; Schumann, D.; Sedyshev, P.; Smith, A. G.; Stamatopoulos, A.; Tagliente, G.; Tain, J. L.; Tarifeño-Saldivia, A.; Tassan-Got, L.; Tsinganis, A.; Valenta, S.; Vannini, G.; Variale, V.; Vaz, P.; Ventura, A.; Vlachoudis, V.; Vlastou, R.; Wallner, A.; Warren, S.; Weigand, M.; Weiss, C.; Wolf, C.; Woods, P. J.; Wright, T.; Žugec, P.

    2016-06-01

    The study of the resonant structures in neutron-nucleus cross-sections, and therefore of the compound-nucleus reaction mechanism, requires spectroscopic measurements to determine with high accuracy the energy of the neutron interacting with the material under study. To this purpose, the neutron time-of-flight facility n_TOF has been operating since 2001 at CERN. Its characteristics, such as the high intensity instantaneous neutron flux, the wide energy range from thermal to few GeV, and the very good energy resolution, are perfectly suited to perform high-quality measurements of neutron-induced reaction cross sections. The precise and accurate knowledge of these cross sections plays a fundamental role in nuclear technologies, nuclear astrophysics and nuclear physics. Two different measuring stations are available at the n_TOF facility, called EAR1 and EAR2, with different characteristics of intensity of the neutron flux and energy resolution. These experimental areas, combined with advanced detection systems lead to a great flexibility in performing challenging measurement of high precision and accuracy, and allow the investigation isotopes with very low cross sections, or available only in small quantities, or with very high specific activity. The characteristics and performances of the two experimental areas of the n_TOF facility will be presented, together with the most important measurements performed to date and their physics case. In addition, the significant upcoming measurements will be introduced.

  9. Simultaneous measurements of the X-ray and nuclear shock-bang times in ICF plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutcliffe, G.; Sio, H.; Rinderknecht, H.; Frenje, J.; Zylstra, A.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Seguin, F.; Li, C. K.; Petrasso, R.; Rygg, J. R.; Macphee, A.; MacKinnon, A.; Le Pape, S.; Berzak Hopkins, L.; Regan, S. P.; Sangster, C.; Kilkenny, J.; Olson, R.

    2015-11-01

    Recent measurements of nuclear and x-ray shock-bang times in ICF implosions at OMEGA and the NIF provide new constraints on implosion modeling and may elucidate the underlying physics of e-i equilibration during the shock phase. As the ions are predominantly heated by the converging and rebounding shock, the ion temperature is initially much higher than the electron temperature and the difference relaxes at the e-i equilibration time scale. Nuclear and x-ray bang times are expected to differ because of different temperature dependence. At OMEGA, nuclear shock-bang time and burn history are routinely measured using streak camera diagnostics, while x-ray self-emission is observed with x-ray framing cameras. We are exploring the possibility of measuring both x-ray and nuclear shock-bang times with a single diagnostic with high relative accuracy, and will discuss the precision with which they can be made and the diagnostics necessary at OMEGA. This work was supported in part by NLUF, US DOE, and LLE.

  10. A potential nuclear magnetic resonance imaging approach for noncontact temperature measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manatt, Stanley L.

    1989-01-01

    It is proposed that in a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging experiment that it should be possible to measure temperature through an extended volume. The basis for such a measurement would depend upon sensing a temperature dependent on NMR parameter in an inert, volatile molecule (or fluid) filling the volume of interest. Exploratory work suggest that one suitable candidate for such a purpose might be CH3Cl. Possible parameters, other inert gases and feasible measurement schemes that might provide such temperature measurement are discussed.

  11. The g factor of the lowest 7+ state in100Rh and 6- state in104Rh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bizzeti-Sona, A. M.; Blasi, P.; Donvito, M.; Stefanini, A. A.; Bazzacco, D.; Brandolini, F.; Löwenich, K.; Pavan, P.; Rossi-Alvarez, C.; de Poli, M.; Haque, A. M. I.

    1990-12-01

    The g-factor of the 7+ state in100Rh with T 1/2=140(5) ns and of the 6- state in104Rh with T 1/2=47(3)ns has been measured by the time-differential perturbed γ-ray angular distribution method (TDPAD). The obtained values are +0.67(2) and +0.33(1) respectively. The two nuclei were populated with reactions induced by7Li on96,100Mo at a bombarding energy of 30 MeV. Shell model calculations using effective single particle moments show that the 7+ state in100Rh has mostly a π g 9/2 ⊗ v d 5/2 configuration, while the main component of the 6- state in104Rh is the π g 9/2 ⊗ v h 11/2.

  12. Damage dosimetry and embrittlement monitoring of nuclear pressure vessels in real time by magnetic properties measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Stubbins, J.F.; Ougouag, A.M.; Williams, J.G.

    1992-07-01

    The objective of this project is to develop a technique for real-time monitoring of neutron dose and of the onset and progression of embrittlement in operating nuclear pressure vessels. The technique relies on the measurement of magnetic properties of steel and other magnetic materials which are extremely sensitive to radiation-induced properties changes. The approach being developed here is innovative and unique. It promises to be readily applicable to all existing and planned reactor structures. The significance of this program is that it addresses a major concern in the operation of existing nuclear pressure vessels. The development of microscopic defect clusters during irradiation in the nuclear pressure vessel beltline region leads to an increase in material yield strength and a concomitant decrease in ductility, or ability to absorb energy in fracture (i.e. fracture toughness). This decrease in fracture toughness is alarming since it may impair the ability of the pressure vessel to resist fracture during unusual loading situations.

  13. Measuring the Low Energy Nuclear Quenching Factor in Liquid Argon for a Coherent Neutrino Scatter Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foxe, M.; Bernstein, A.; Hagmann, C.; Joshi, T.; Jovanovic, I.; Kazkaz, K.; Sangiorgio, S.

    2012-08-01

    Coherent neutrino-nucleus scattering (CNS) is an as-yet undetected, flavor-independent neutrino interaction predicted by the Standard Model [D. Freedman, Phys. Rev. D 9 (5) (1974) 1389-1392]. One of the primary reasons the CNS interaction has yet to be observed is the very low energy depositions (less than 1 keV for MeV-energy neutrinos) [A. Drukier, L. Stodolsky, Phys. Rev. D 30 (11) (1984) 2295-2309]. An additional challenge in detecting CNS is nuclear quenching, which is a phenomenon encountered in many detection materials in which nuclear recoils produce less observable energy per unit energy deposited than electronic recoils. The ratio observed signal for nuclear recoils to electronic recoils or nuclear ionization quench factor, is presently unknown in argon at typical CNS energies [C. Hagmann, A. Bernstein, IEEE Trans. on Nucl. Sci. 51 (5) (2004) 2151-2155]. Here we present plans for using the Gamma or Neutron Argon Recoils Resulting in Liquid Ionization (G/NARRLI) detector to measure the nuclear ionization quench factor at ˜8 keV.

  14. Dry, portable calorimeter for nondestructive measurement of the activity of nuclear fuel

    DOEpatents

    Beyer, Norman S.; Lewis, Robert N.; Perry, Ronald B.

    1976-01-01

    The activity of a quantity of heat-producing nuclear fuel is measured rapidly, accurately and nondestructively by a portable dry calorimeter comprising a preheater, an array of temperature-controlled structures comprising a thermally guarded temperature-controlled oven, and a calculation and control unit. The difference between the amounts of electric power required to maintain the oven temperature with and without nuclear fuel in the oven is measured to determine the power produced by radioactive disintegration and hence the activity of the fuel. A portion of the electronic control system is designed to terminate a continuing sequence of measurements when the standard deviation of the variations of the amount of electric power required to maintain oven temperature is within a predetermined value.

  15. Deflection Measurements of a Thermally Simulated Nuclear Core Using a High-Resolution CCD-Camera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stanojev, B. J.; Houts, M.

    2004-01-01

    Space fission systems under consideration for near-term missions all use compact. fast-spectrum reactor cores. Reactor dimensional change with increasing temperature, which affects neutron leakage. is the dominant source of reactivity feedback in these systems. Accurately measuring core dimensional changes during realistic non-nuclear testing is therefore necessary in predicting the system nuclear equivalent behavior. This paper discusses one key technique being evaluated for measuring such changes. The proposed technique is to use a Charged Couple Device (CCD) sensor to obtain deformation readings of electrically heated prototypic reactor core geometry. This paper introduces a technique by which a single high spatial resolution CCD camera is used to measure core deformation in Real-Time (RT). Initial system checkout results are presented along with a discussion on how additional cameras could be used to achieve a three- dimensional deformation profile of the core during test.

  16. Compilation of directly measured nuclear spins of ground states and long-lived isomers

    SciTech Connect

    MacDonald, Allison; Karamy, Babak; Setoodehnia, Kiana; Singh, Balraj

    2013-02-15

    A compilation of the nuclear spins of ground and isomeric states measured by direct methods is presented. The first compilation of direct measurements of nuclear spins and moments was published in 1976 (G. H. Fuller, J. Phys. Chem. Ref. Data 5, 835, (1976)) with literature covered up to 1974. To our knowledge, the present work is the first such compilation since then. It is anticipated that the area of direct spin measurement will continue to expand using the state-of-the-art radioactive ion-beam and laser techniques. Literature cutoff date for the present compilation is February 2013. It is intended that the present compilation will be kept updated in a timely manner.

  17. Effective Mass and g Factor of Four-Flux-Quanta Composite Fermions

    SciTech Connect

    Yeh, A.S.; Tsui, D.C.; Stormer, H.L.; Pfeiffer, L.N.; Baldwin, K.W.; West, K.W.; Stormer, H.L.; Tsui, D.C.

    1999-01-01

    We investigate the properties of composite fermions with four attached flux quanta through tilted-field experiments near Landau level filling factor {nu}=3/4 . The observed collapse of fractional quantum Hall gaps in the vicinity of this quarter-filling state can be comprehensively understood in terms of composite fermions with mass and spin. Remarkably, the effective mass and g factor of these four-flux-quanta composite fermions around {nu}=3/4 are very similar to those of two-flux-quanta composite fermions around {nu}=3/2 . {copyright} {ital 1999} {ital The American Physical Society }

  18. Exchange enhancement of the g factor in InAs/AlSb heterostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Aleshkin, V. Ya.; Gavrilenko, V. I.; Ikonnikov, A. V.; Krishtopenko, S. S.; Sadofyev, Yu. G.; Spirin, K. E.

    2008-07-15

    The evolution of the Shubnikov-de Haas oscillations in InAs/AlSb heterostructures with twodimensional electron gas in InAs quantum wells 12-18 nm wide with considerable variation in the electron concentration (3-8) x 10{sup 11} cm{sup -2} due to the effect of negative persistent photoconductivity is studied. The values of the effective Lande factor for electrons g* = -(15-35) are determined. It is shown that the value of the g* factor increases as the quantum well width increases.

  19. Three-dimensional direct measurement of cardiomyocyte volume, nuclearity, and ploidy in thick histological sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bensley, Jonathan Guy; de Matteo, Robert; Harding, Richard; Black, Mary Jane

    2016-04-01

    Quantitative assessment of myocardial development and disease requires accurate measurement of cardiomyocyte volume, nuclearity (nuclei per cell), and ploidy (genome copies per cell). Current methods require enzymatically isolating cells, which excludes the use of archived tissue, or serial sectioning. We describe a method of analysis that permits the direct simultaneous measurement of cardiomyocyte volume, nuclearity, and ploidy in thick histological sections. To demonstrate the utility of our technique, heart tissue was obtained from four species (rat, mouse, rabbit, sheep) at up to three life stages: prenatal, weaning and adulthood. Thick (40 μm) paraffin sections were stained with Wheat Germ Agglutinin-Alexa Fluor 488 to visualise cell membranes, and DAPI (4‧,6-diamidino-2-phenylindole) to visualise nuclei and measure ploidy. Previous methods have been restricted to thin sections (2–10 μm) and offer an incomplete picture of cardiomyocytes. Using confocal microscopy and three-dimensional image analysis software (Imaris Version 8.2, Bitplane AG, Switzerland), cardiomyocyte volume, nuclearity, and ploidy were measured. This method of staining and analysis of cardiomyocytes enables accurate morphometric measurements in thick histological sections, thus unlocking the potential of archived tissue. Our novel time-efficient method permits the entire cardiomyocyte to be visualised directly in 3D, eliminating the need for precise alignment of serial sections.

  20. Three-dimensional direct measurement of cardiomyocyte volume, nuclearity, and ploidy in thick histological sections

    PubMed Central

    Bensley, Jonathan Guy; De Matteo, Robert; Harding, Richard; Black, Mary Jane

    2016-01-01

    Quantitative assessment of myocardial development and disease requires accurate measurement of cardiomyocyte volume, nuclearity (nuclei per cell), and ploidy (genome copies per cell). Current methods require enzymatically isolating cells, which excludes the use of archived tissue, or serial sectioning. We describe a method of analysis that permits the direct simultaneous measurement of cardiomyocyte volume, nuclearity, and ploidy in thick histological sections. To demonstrate the utility of our technique, heart tissue was obtained from four species (rat, mouse, rabbit, sheep) at up to three life stages: prenatal, weaning and adulthood. Thick (40 μm) paraffin sections were stained with Wheat Germ Agglutinin-Alexa Fluor 488 to visualise cell membranes, and DAPI (4′,6-diamidino-2-phenylindole) to visualise nuclei and measure ploidy. Previous methods have been restricted to thin sections (2–10 μm) and offer an incomplete picture of cardiomyocytes. Using confocal microscopy and three-dimensional image analysis software (Imaris Version 8.2, Bitplane AG, Switzerland), cardiomyocyte volume, nuclearity, and ploidy were measured. This method of staining and analysis of cardiomyocytes enables accurate morphometric measurements in thick histological sections, thus unlocking the potential of archived tissue. Our novel time-efficient method permits the entire cardiomyocyte to be visualised directly in 3D, eliminating the need for precise alignment of serial sections. PMID:27048757

  1. Time-correlated pulse-height measurements of low-multiplying nuclear materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, E. C.; Dolan, J. L.; Clarke, S. D.; Pozzi, S. A.; Tomanin, A.; Peerani, P.; Marleau, P.; Mattingly, J. K.

    2013-11-01

    Methods for the determination of the subcritical neutron multiplication of nuclear materials are of interest in the field of nuclear nonproliferation and safeguards. A series of measurements were performed at the Joint Research Center facility in Ispra, Italy to investigate the possibility of using a time-correlated pulse-height (TCPH) analysis to estimate the sub-critical multiplication of nuclear material. The objective of the measurements was to evaluate the effectiveness of this technique, and to benchmark the simulation capabilities of MCNPX-PoliMi/MPPost. In this campaign, two low-multiplication samples were measured: a 1-kg mixed oxide (MOX) powder sample and several low-mass plutonium-gallium (PuGa) disks. The measured results demonstrated that the sensitivity of the TCPH technique could not clearly distinguish samples with very-low levels of multiplication. However, the simulated TCPH distributions agree well with the measured data, within 12% for all cases, validating the simulation capabilities of MCNPX-PoliMi/MPPost. To investigate the potential of the TCPH method for identifying high-multiplication samples, the validated MCNPX-PoliMi/MPPost codes were used to simulate sources of higher multiplications. Lastly, a characterization metric, the cumulative region integral (CRI), was introduced to estimate the level of multiplication in a source. However, this response was shown to be insensitive over the range of multiplications of interest.

  2. Electric dipole spin resonance in systems with a valley-dependent g factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rančić, Marko J.; Burkard, Guido

    2016-05-01

    In this theoretical study we qualitatively and quantitatively investigate the electric dipole spin resonance (EDSR) in a single Si/SiGe quantum dot in the presence of a magnetic field gradient, e.g., produced by a ferromagnet. We model a situation in which the control of electron spin states is achieved by applying an oscillatory electric field, inducing real-space oscillations of the electron inside the quantum dot. One of the goals of our study is to present a microscopic theory of valley-dependent g factors in Si/SiGe quantum dots and investigate how valley relaxation combined with a valley-dependent g factor leads to a novel electron spin dephasing mechanism. Furthermore, we discuss the interplay of spin and valley relaxations in Si/SiGe quantum dots. Our findings suggest that the electron spin dephases due to valley relaxation, and are in agreement with recent experimental studies [Nat. Nanotechnol. 9, 666 (2014), 10.1038/nnano.2014.153].

  3. The permanent electric dipole moments and magnetic g factors of uranium monoxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heaven, Michael C.; Goncharov, Vasiliy; Steimle, Timothy C.; Ma, Tongmei; Linton, Colan

    2006-11-01

    Permanent electric dipole moments and magnetic g factors for uranium monoxide (UO) have been determined from analyses of optical Stark and Zeeman spectra recorded at a spectral resolution that approaches the natural linewidth limit. Numerous branch features in the previously characterized [L. A. Kaledin et al., J. Mol. Spectrosc. 164, 27 (1994)] (0,0) [18403]5-X(1)4 and (0,0) [18404]5-X(1)4 electronic transitions were recorded in the presence of tunable static electric (Stark effect) or magnetic (Zeeman effect) fields. The lines exhibited unusually large Zeeman tuning effects. A ligand field model and an ab initio electronic structure calculation [R. Tyagi, Ph.D. thesis, The Ohio State University (2005)] were used to interpret the ground state properties. The results indicate that the low energy electronic states of UO are sufficiently ionic for the meaningful application of ligand field theory models. The dipole moments and g factors were distinctly different for the three electronic states examined, which implies that these properties may be used to deduce the underlying electronic state configurations.

  4. TIME-OF-FLIGHT MASS MEASUREMENTS AND THEIR IMPORTANCE FOR NUCLEAR ASTROPHYSICS

    SciTech Connect

    Matos, M.; Shapira, Dan

    2009-01-01

    Atomic masses play an important role in nuclear astrophysics. The lack of experimental values for nuclides of interest has triggered a rapid development of new mass measurement devices around the world, including Time-of-Flight (TOF) mass measurements offering an access to the most exotic nuclides. Recently, the TOF-B rho technique that includes a position measurement for magnetic rigidity correction has been implemented at the NSCL. An experiment with a similar TOF-B rho technique is approved and planned at the next generation radioactive beam facility (RIBF) at RIKEN.

  5. Time-of-Flight Mass Measurements and Their Importance for Nuclear Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matoš, M.; Estrade, A.; Amthor, A. M.; Bazin, D.; Becerril, A.; Elliot, T.; Famiano, M.; Gade, A.; Galaviz, D.; Lorusso, G.; Pereira, J.; Portillo, M.; Rogers, A.; Schatz, H.; Shapira, D.; Smith, E.; Stolz, A.; Wallace, M.

    2009-03-01

    Atomic masses play an important role in nuclear astrophysics. The lack of experimental values for nuclides of interest has triggered a rapid development of new mass measurement devices around the world, including Time-of-Flight (TOF) mass measurements offering an access to the most exotic nuclides. Recently, the TOF-Brho technique that includes a position measurement for magnetic rigidity correction has been implemented at the NSCL. An experiment with a similar TOF-Brho technique is approved and planned at the next generation radioactive beam facility (RIBF) at RIKEN.

  6. Prospects for using coherent elastic neutrino-nucleus scattering to measure the nuclear neutron form factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patton, Kelly; McLaughlin, Gail; Scholberg, Kate; Engel, Jon; Schunck, Nicolas

    2017-01-01

    Coherent elastic neutrino-nucleus scattering is a potential probe of nuclear neutron form factors. We show that the neutron root-mean-square (RMS) radius can be measured with tonne-scale detectors of argon, germanium, or xenon. In addition, the fourth moment of the neutron distribution can be studied experimentally using this method. The impacts of both detector size and detector shape uncertainty on such a measurement were considered. The important limiting factor was found to be the detector shape uncertainty. In order to measure the neutron RMS radius to 5%, comparable to current experimental uncertainties, the detector shape uncertainty needs to be known to 1% or better.

  7. Thoron activity level and radon measurement by a nuclear track detector.

    PubMed

    Planinić, J; Faj, Z; Vuković, B

    1993-03-01

    Radon activity concentrations in the air were measured with LR-115 nuclear track detectors at three locations in Osijek. The respective equilibrium factors and the effective dose equivalents were determined. Indoor concentrations were from 9.8 to 58.2 Bq m-3 and relative errors of the track etching method were near 19 per cent. The indoor alpha potential energy of the radon and thoron progenies was measured with an ISD detector. Independent measurements, performed with a Radhome semiconductor detector, showed that the indoor thoron concentration was nearly 20 per cent of the radon one.

  8. g-factor and quadrupole moment of the 21/2- isomeric state in 131La: Signature for a weakly-deformed magnetic rotational band head

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Jasmeet; Bansal, Neeraj; Bhati, A. K.; Kumar, R.; Sharma, Vijay R.; Kapoor, K.; Kumar, V.; Kaur, Navneet

    2017-02-01

    The g-factor and the static quadrupole moment of a magnetic rotational band head 21/2- at 2121 keV in 131La have been determined by means of the time-differential perturbed angular distribution technique. The measured value of the g-factor, + 1.060 (4), is in agreement with the theoretical value for a three quasi-proton, π3 {11/2- [ 505 ] ⊗5/2+ [ 422 ] ⊗5/2+ [ 413 ] } Nilsson configuration assignment. The observed spectroscopic quadrupole moment ratio, Qs (21/2- ,131 La)/Qs (19/2- ,137 La) = 0.457 (4), supports the collective oblate shape (γ ∼ - 60 °) with quadrupole deformation β2 < 0.07. The half-life of the 21/2- state, 37.2(1) ns, is re-measured with better accuracy.

  9. Nuclear Reaction Data from Surrogate Measurements: A Consideration of (n,f) Cross Sections

    SciTech Connect

    Escher, J E; Bernstein, L A; Burke, J T; Dietrich, F S; Lyles, B F

    2007-07-30

    A brief summary of the Surrogate reaction method, an indirect approach for determining compound-nuclear reaction cross sections, is presented. The possibilities for obtaining accurate (n,f) cross sections from Surrogate measurements that are analyzed in the Weisskopf-Ewing and Ratio approximations are considered. Theoretical studies and benchmark experiments that provide new insights into the validity and limitations of the Surrogate approach, are discussed.

  10. Study for Nuclear Structures of 22-35Na Isotopes via Measurements of Reaction Cross Sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Shinji

    2014-09-01

    T. Ohtsubo, M. Nagashima, T. Ogura, Y. Shimbara (Grad. Sch. of Sc., Niigata Univ.), M.Takechi, H. Geissel, M. Winkler (GSI), D. Nishimura, T. Sumikama (Dept. of Phys., Tokyo Univ. of Sc.), M. Fukuda, M. Mihara, H. Uenishi (Dept. of Phys., Osaka Univ.), T. Kuboki, T. Suzuki, T. Yamaguchi, H. Furuki, C. S. Lee, K. Sato (Dept. of Phys., Saitama Univ.), A. Ozawa, H. Ohnishi, T. Moriguchi, S. Fukuda, Y. Ishibashi, D. Nagae, R. Nishikiori, T. Niwa (Inst. of Phys., Univ. of Tsukuba), N. Aoi (RCNP), Rui-Jiu Chen, N. Inabe, D. Kameda, T. Kubo, M. Lantz, T. Ohnishi, K. Okumura, H. Sakurai, H. Suzuki, H. Takeda, S. Takeuchi, K. Tanaka, Y. Yanagisawa (RIKEN), De-Qing Fang, Yu-Gang Ma (SINAP), T. Izumikawa (RI Ctr., Niigata Univ.), and S. Momota (Fac. of Engn., Kochi Univ. of Tech.) Reaction cross sections (σR) for 22-35Na isotopes have been measured at around 240 MeV/nucleon. The σR for 22-35Na were measured for the first time. Enhancement in cross sections is clearly observed from the systematics for stable nuclei, for isotopes with large mass numbers. These enhancement can be mainly ascribed to the nuclear deformation. We will discuss the nuclear structure (neutron skin, nuclear shell structure) for neutron-excess Na isotopes. T. Ohtsubo, M. Nagashima, T. Ogura, Y. Shimbara (Grad. Sch. of Sc., Niigata Univ.), M.Takechi, H. Geissel, M. Winkler (GSI), D. Nishimura, T. Sumikama (Dept. of Phys., Tokyo Univ. of Sc.), M. Fukuda, M. Mihara, H. Uenishi (Dept. of Phys., Osaka Univ.), T. Kuboki, T. Suzuki, T. Yamaguchi, H. Furuki, C. S. Lee, K. Sato (Dept. of Phys., Saitama Univ.), A. Ozawa, H. Ohnishi, T. Moriguchi, S. Fukuda, Y. Ishibashi, D. Nagae, R. Nishikiori, T. Niwa (Inst. of Phys., Univ. of Tsukuba), N. Aoi (RCNP), Rui-Jiu Chen, N. Inabe, D. Kameda, T. Kubo, M. Lantz, T. Ohnishi, K. Okumura, H. Sakurai, H. Suzuki, H. Takeda, S. Takeuchi, K. Tanaka, Y. Yanagisawa (RIKEN), De-Qing Fang, Yu-Gang Ma (SINAP), T. Izumikawa (RI Ctr., Niigata Univ.), and S. Momota (Fac. of Engn

  11. Nuclear data production, calculation and measurement: a global overview of the gamma heating issue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colombier, A.-C.; Amharrak, H.; Fourmentel, D.; Ravaux, S.; Régnier, D.; Gueton, O.; Hudelot, J.-P.; Lemaire, M.

    2013-03-01

    The gamma heating evaluation in different materials found in current and future generations of nuclear reactor (EPRTM, GENIV, MTR-JHR), is becoming an important issue especially for the design of many devices (control rod, heavy reflector, in-core & out-core experiments…). This paper deals with the works started since 2009 in the Reactor Studies Department of CEA Cadarache in ordre to answer to several problematic which have been identified as well for nuclear data production and calculation as for experimental measurement methods. The selected subjects are: Development of a Monte Carlo code (FIFRELIN) to simulate the prompt fission gamma emission which represents the major part of the gamma heating production inside the core Production and qualification of new evaluations of nuclear data especially for radiative capture and inelastic neutron scattering which are the main sources of gamma heating out-core Development and qualification of a recommended method for the total gamma heating calculation using the Monte Carlo simulation code TRIPOLI-4 Development, test and qualification of new devices dedicated to the in-core gamma heating measurement as well in MTR-JHR as in zero power facilities (EOLE-MINERVE) of CEA, Cadarache to increase the experimental measurement accuracy.

  12. Carbon fragmentation measurements and validation of the Geant4 nuclear reaction models for hadrontherapy.

    PubMed

    De Napoli, M; Agodi, C; Battistoni, G; Blancato, A A; Cirrone, G A P; Cuttone, G; Giacoppo, F; Morone, M C; Nicolosi, D; Pandola, L; Patera, V; Raciti, G; Rapisarda, E; Romano, F; Sardina, D; Sarti, A; Sciubba, A; Scuderi, V; Sfienti, C; Tropea, S

    2012-11-21

    Nuclear fragmentation measurements are necessary when using heavy-ion beams in hadrontherapy to predict the effects of the ion nuclear interactions within the human body. Moreover, they are also fundamental to validate and improve the Monte Carlo codes for their use in planning tumor treatments. Nowadays, a very limited set of carbon fragmentation cross sections are being measured, and in particular, to our knowledge, no double-differential fragmentation cross sections at intermediate energies are available in the literature. In this work, we have measured the double-differential cross sections and the angular distributions of the secondary fragments produced in the (12)C fragmentation at 62 A MeV on a thin carbon target. The experimental data have been used to benchmark the prediction capability of the Geant4 Monte Carlo code at intermediate energies, where it was never tested before. In particular, we have compared the experimental data with the predictions of two Geant4 nuclear reaction models: the Binary Light Ions Cascade and the Quantum Molecular Dynamic. From the comparison, it has been observed that the Binary Light Ions Cascade approximates the angular distributions of the fragment production cross sections better than the Quantum Molecular Dynamic model. However, the discrepancies observed between the experimental data and the Monte Carlo simulations lead to the conclusion that the prediction capability of both models needs to be improved at intermediate energies.

  13. Carbon fragmentation measurements and validation of the Geant4 nuclear reaction models for hadrontherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Napoli, M.; Agodi, C.; Battistoni, G.; Blancato, A. A.; Cirrone, G. A. P.; Cuttone, G.; Giacoppo, F.; Morone, M. C.; Nicolosi, D.; Pandola, L.; Patera, V.; Raciti, G.; Rapisarda, E.; Romano, F.; Sardina, D.; Sarti, A.; Sciubba, A.; Scuderi, V.; Sfienti, C.; Tropea, S.

    2012-11-01

    Nuclear fragmentation measurements are necessary when using heavy-ion beams in hadrontherapy to predict the effects of the ion nuclear interactions within the human body. Moreover, they are also fundamental to validate and improve the Monte Carlo codes for their use in planning tumor treatments. Nowadays, a very limited set of carbon fragmentation cross sections are being measured, and in particular, to our knowledge, no double-differential fragmentation cross sections at intermediate energies are available in the literature. In this work, we have measured the double-differential cross sections and the angular distributions of the secondary fragments produced in the 12C fragmentation at 62 A MeV on a thin carbon target. The experimental data have been used to benchmark the prediction capability of the Geant4 Monte Carlo code at intermediate energies, where it was never tested before. In particular, we have compared the experimental data with the predictions of two Geant4 nuclear reaction models: the Binary Light Ions Cascade and the Quantum Molecular Dynamic. From the comparison, it has been observed that the Binary Light Ions Cascade approximates the angular distributions of the fragment production cross sections better than the Quantum Molecular Dynamic model. However, the discrepancies observed between the experimental data and the Monte Carlo simulations lead to the conclusion that the prediction capability of both models needs to be improved at intermediate energies.

  14. Use of DWPF redox measurement technique on glasses from West Valley Nuclear Fuel Services Demonstration Project

    SciTech Connect

    Jantzen, C.M.

    1990-10-01

    Liquid high-level nuclear waste will be immobilized at the Savannah River Site (SRS) by vitrification in borosilicate glass in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). A similar vitrification facility exists at the West Valley Nuclear Fuel Services. In both of these facilities, control of the oxidation/reduction (redox) equilibrium in the glass melter is critical for processing of the nuclear waste. Redox can be determined by measuring the ratio of ferrous to ferric ions in the glass melt. A colorimetric procedure has been developed for the DWPF which has been shown to give rapid and reliable analytical results. This colorimetric technique has been shown to measure the Fe{sup 2+} component of glasses more accurately than other existing redox measurement methods. The DWPF redox technique was applied to a series of six glasses taken from the West Valley melter during a transient melter excursion. This excursion caused the glasses to become progressively more reducing with time. Application of the DWPF redox technique to these glasses correctly indicated the redox trends with a higher precision and with more accuracy than the West Valley wet chemical method and/or Alfred University's Mossbauer method. 1 fig., 18 refs.

  15. Measured 19F(α,n) with VANDLE for Nuclear Safeguards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, William; Clement, R. C. C.; Smith, M. S.; Pain, S.; Febbraro, M.; Pittman, S.; Thomspon, S.; Grinder, M.; Cizewski, J. A.; Reingold, C.; Manning, B.; Burcher, S.; Bardayan, D. W.; Tan, W.-P.; Stech, E.; Smith, M. K.; Avetisyan, R.; Gyurjinyan, A.; Lowe, M.; Ilyushkin, S.; Grzywacz, R.; Madurga, M.; Paulauskas, S. V.; Taylor, S. Z.; Smith, K.

    2015-10-01

    One of the most promising non-destructive assay (NDA) methods to monitor UF6 canisters consists of measuring gross neutron rates induced by uranium-decay alpha particles reacting with the fluorine and emitting a neutron. This method currently lacks reliable nuclear data on the 19F(α,n) reaction cross section to determine an accurate neutron yield rate for a given sample of UF6. We have measured the cross section and coincident neutron spectrum for the alpha-decay energy range using the VANDLE system. This experiment had two parts: first at Notre Dame with a LaF3 target and and a pulsed alpha-particle beam, and second at ORNL with a windowless He-gas target and a 19F beam. The motivation for this measurement and cross section results will be presented. This work is funded in part by the DOE Office of Science, the National Nuclear Security Administration SSAA and the Office of Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation R&D, and the NSF.

  16. A confirmatory research approach to the measurement of EMI/RFI in commercial nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Kercel, S.W.

    1995-02-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is conducting confirmatory research on the measurement of electromagnetic/radio frequency interference (EMI/RFI) in nuclear power plants while it makes a good beginning, the currently available research data are not sufficient to characterize the EMI/RFI environment of the typical nuclear plant. Data collected over several weeks at each of several observation points are required to meet this need. To collect the required data, several approaches are examined, the most promising of which is the relatively new technology of application specific spectral receivers. While several spectral receiver designs have been described in the literature, none is well suited for nuclear power plant EMI/RFI surveys. This paper describes the development of two receivers specifically designed for nuclear power plant EMI/RFI surveys. One receiver surveys electric fields between 5 MHz and 8 GHz, while the other surveys magnetic fields between 305 Hz and 5 MHz. The results of field tests at TVA`s Bull Run Fossil Plant are reported.

  17. A confirmatory research approach to the measurement of EMI/RFI in commercial nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Kercel, S.W.

    1995-04-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is conducting confirmatory research on the measurement of electromagnetic/radio frequency interference (EMI/RFI) in nuclear power plants. While it makes a good beginning, the currently available research data are not sufficient to characterize the EMI/RFI environment of the typical nuclear plant. Data collected over several weeks at each of several observation points are required to meet this need. To collect the required data, several approaches are examined, the most promising of which is the relatively new technology of application specific spectral receivers. While several spectral receiver designs have been described in the literature, none is well suited for nuclear power plant EMI/RFI surveys. This paper describes the development of two receivers specifically designed for nuclear power plant EMI/RFI surveys. One receiver surveys electric fields between 5 MHz and 8 GHz, while the other surveys magnetic fields between 305 Hz and 5 MHz. The results of field tests at TVA`s Bull Run Fossil Plant are reported.

  18. Holes localized in nanostructures in an external magnetic field: g-factor and mixing of states

    SciTech Connect

    Semina, M. A.; Suris, R. A.

    2015-06-15

    The energy spectrum and wave functions of holes in the valence band in semiconductor nanosystems, including quantum wells, quantum wires, and quantum dots, in an external magnetic field are theoretically investigated. The dependence of Zeeman splitting of the hole ground state upon variation in the size-quantization parameters with regard to the complex structure of the valence band and magnetic field-induced mixing of hole states is traced. Analytical formulas for describing the Zeeman effect in the valence band in the limiting cases of a quantum disk, spherically symmetric quantum dot, and quantum wire are presented. It is demonstrated that the g-factor of a hole is extremely sensitive to the hole-state composition (heavy or light hole) and, consequently, to the geometry of the size-quantization potential.

  19. DAPI-fluorescent fading: a problem in microscopy or a way to measure nuclear DNA content?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallardo-Escárate, Cristian; Álvarez-Borrego, Josué; Kober, V.; del Río-Portilla, Miguel Á.

    2006-01-01

    In observation by confocal or conventional fluorescence microscopy, the retardation of the lost in fluorescence, from highest signal of fluorescence to lowest intensity are important factors in order to obtain accurate images. This problem is very common in fluorochromes for nuclear DNA and especially for DAPI stain. The fluorescence of DAPI is rapidly lost when it is exposure to excitation by ultra violet (UV) light, and especially under optimal condition of observation. Although the fading process could be retardate by using of mounting medium with antifading solutions, the photochemical process underlying the fluorescence decay has not yet been fully explained. In addiction, neither relationship has been tested between the fluorescence fading and nuclear DNA content. However, the capacity of the DNA to absorb UV light is knows. In order to test this relationship we measured by means of image analysis the fluorescence intensity in several nuclei types during a fading period. The analysis was performed by an algorithm specifically built in MATLAB software. The relationship between nuclear DNA content and DAPI-fluorescence fading was found equal to 99%. This study demonstrates the feasibility for estimates genome size by quantification of fluorescence fading. In this context, the present method allows to measure nuclear DNA content in several medical applications (cancer, HIV, organ transplants, etc). Nowadays, for measuring DNA content, flow cytometry is widely used; however, with the flow cytometry method it is not possible to select a specific group of cells, such as from a specific region of a tumor. Moreover, the using of image analysis allows automatizing diagnostics procedures.

  20. Measurement of Scintillation and Ionization Yield and Scintillation Pulse Shape from Nuclear Recoils in Liquid Argon

    DOE PAGES

    Cao, H.

    2015-05-26

    We have measured the scintillation and ionization yield of recoiling nuclei in liquid argon as a function of applied electric field by exposing a dual-phase liquid argon time projection chamber (LAr-TPC) to a low energy pulsed narrow band neutron beam produced at the Notre Dame Institute for Structure and Nuclear Astrophysics. Liquid scintillation counters were arranged to detect and identify neutrons scattered in the TPC and to select the energy of the recoiling nuclei. We also report measurements of the scintillation yields for nuclear recoils with energies from 10.3 to 57.3 keV and for median applied electric fields from 0more » to 970 V/cm. For the ionization yields, we report measurements from 16.9 to 57.3 keV and for electric fields from 96.4 to 486 V/cm. Furthermore, we report the observation of an anticorrelation between scintillation and ionization from nuclear recoils, which is similar to the anticorrelation between scintillation and ionization from electron recoils. Assuming that the energy loss partitions into excitons and ion pairs from 83mKr internal conversion electrons is comparable to that from 207Bi conversion electrons, we obtained the numbers of excitons (Nex) and ion pairs (Ni) and their ratio (Nex/Ni) produced by nuclear recoils from 16.9 to 57.3 keV. Motivated by arguments suggesting direction sensitivity in LAr-TPC signals due to columnar recombination, a comparison of the light and charge yield of recoils parallel and perpendicular to the applied electric field is presented for the first time.« less

  1. Measurement of scintillation and ionization yield and scintillation pulse shape from nuclear recoils in liquid argon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, H.; Alexander, T.; Aprahamian, A.; Avetisyan, R.; Back, H. O.; Cocco, A. G.; Dejongh, F.; Fiorillo, G.; Galbiati, C.; Grandi, L.; Guardincerri, Y.; Kendziora, C.; Lippincott, W. H.; Love, C.; Lyons, S.; Manenti, L.; Martoff, C. J.; Meng, Y.; Montanari, D.; Mosteiro, P.; Olvitt, D.; Pordes, S.; Qian, H.; Rossi, B.; Saldanha, R.; Sangiorgio, S.; Siegl, K.; Strauss, S. Y.; Tan, W.; Tatarowicz, J.; Walker, S.; Wang, H.; Watson, A. W.; Westerdale, S.; Yoo, J.; Scene Collaboration

    2015-05-01

    We have measured the scintillation and ionization yield of recoiling nuclei in liquid argon as a function of applied electric field by exposing a dual-phase liquid argon time projection chamber (LAr-TPC) to a low energy pulsed narrow band neutron beam produced at the Notre Dame Institute for Structure and Nuclear Astrophysics. Liquid scintillation counters were arranged to detect and identify neutrons scattered in the TPC and to select the energy of the recoiling nuclei. We report measurements of the scintillation yields for nuclear recoils with energies from 10.3 to 57.3 keV and for median applied electric fields from 0 to 970 V /cm . For the ionization yields, we report measurements from 16.9 to 57.3 keV and for electric fields from 96.4 to 486 V /cm . We also report the observation of an anticorrelation between scintillation and ionization from nuclear recoils, which is similar to the anticorrelation between scintillation and ionization from electron recoils. Assuming that the energy loss partitions into excitons and ion pairs from Krm83 internal conversion electrons is comparable to that from 207Bi conversion electrons, we obtained the numbers of excitons (Nex) and ion pairs (Ni) and their ratio (Nex/Ni ) produced by nuclear recoils from 16.9 to 57.3 keV. Motivated by arguments suggesting direction sensitivity in LAr-TPC signals due to columnar recombination, a comparison of the light and charge yield of recoils parallel and perpendicular to the applied electric field is presented for the first time.

  2. Measurement of Scintillation and Ionization Yield and Scintillation Pulse Shape from Nuclear Recoils in Liquid Argon

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, H.

    2015-05-26

    We have measured the scintillation and ionization yield of recoiling nuclei in liquid argon as a function of applied electric field by exposing a dual-phase liquid argon time projection chamber (LAr-TPC) to a low energy pulsed narrow band neutron beam produced at the Notre Dame Institute for Structure and Nuclear Astrophysics. Liquid scintillation counters were arranged to detect and identify neutrons scattered in the TPC and to select the energy of the recoiling nuclei. We also report measurements of the scintillation yields for nuclear recoils with energies from 10.3 to 57.3 keV and for median applied electric fields from 0 to 970 V/cm. For the ionization yields, we report measurements from 16.9 to 57.3 keV and for electric fields from 96.4 to 486 V/cm. Furthermore, we report the observation of an anticorrelation between scintillation and ionization from nuclear recoils, which is similar to the anticorrelation between scintillation and ionization from electron recoils. Assuming that the energy loss partitions into excitons and ion pairs from 83mKr internal conversion electrons is comparable to that from 207Bi conversion electrons, we obtained the numbers of excitons (Nex) and ion pairs (Ni) and their ratio (Nex/Ni) produced by nuclear recoils from 16.9 to 57.3 keV. Motivated by arguments suggesting direction sensitivity in LAr-TPC signals due to columnar recombination, a comparison of the light and charge yield of recoils parallel and perpendicular to the applied electric field is presented for the first time.

  3. Results on the neutron energy distribution measurements at the RECH-1 Chilean nuclear reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguilera, P.; Molina, F.; Romero-Barrientos, J.

    2016-07-01

    Neutron activations experiments has been perform at the RECH-1 Chilean Nuclear Reactor to measure its neutron flux energy distribution. Samples of pure elements was activated to obtain the saturation activities for each reaction. Using - ray spectroscopy we identify and measure the activity of the reaction product nuclei, obtaining the saturation activities of 20 reactions. GEANT4 and MCNP was used to compute the self shielding factor to correct the cross section for each element. With the Expectation-Maximization algorithm (EM) we were able to unfold the neutron flux energy distribution at dry tube position, near the RECH-1 core. In this work, we present the unfolding results using the EM algorithm.

  4. Uncertainty quantification for nuclear density functional theory and information content of new measurements

    SciTech Connect

    McDonnell, J. D.; Schunck, N.; Higdon, D.; Sarich, J.; Wild, S. M.; Nazarewicz, W.

    2015-03-24

    Statistical tools of uncertainty quantification can be used to assess the information content of measured observables with respect to present-day theoretical models, to estimate model errors and thereby improve predictive capability, to extrapolate beyond the regions reached by experiment, and to provide meaningful input to applications and planned measurements. To showcase new opportunities offered by such tools, we make a rigorous analysis of theoretical statistical uncertainties in nuclear density functional theory using Bayesian inference methods. By considering the recent mass measurements from the Canadian Penning Trap at Argonne National Laboratory, we demonstrate how the Bayesian analysis and a direct least-squares optimization, combined with high-performance computing, can be used to assess the information content of the new data with respect to a model based on the Skyrme energy density functional approach. Employing the posterior probability distribution computed with a Gaussian process emulator, we apply the Bayesian framework to propagate theoretical statistical uncertainties in predictions of nuclear masses, two-neutron dripline, and fission barriers. Overall, we find that the new mass measurements do not impose a constraint that is strong enough to lead to significant changes in the model parameters. In addition, the example discussed in this study sets the stage for quantifying and maximizing the impact of new measurements with respect to current modeling and guiding future experimental efforts, thus enhancing the experiment-theory cycle in the scientific method.

  5. Uncertainty quantification for nuclear density functional theory and information content of new measurements

    DOE PAGES

    McDonnell, J. D.; Schunck, N.; Higdon, D.; ...

    2015-03-24

    Statistical tools of uncertainty quantification can be used to assess the information content of measured observables with respect to present-day theoretical models, to estimate model errors and thereby improve predictive capability, to extrapolate beyond the regions reached by experiment, and to provide meaningful input to applications and planned measurements. To showcase new opportunities offered by such tools, we make a rigorous analysis of theoretical statistical uncertainties in nuclear density functional theory using Bayesian inference methods. By considering the recent mass measurements from the Canadian Penning Trap at Argonne National Laboratory, we demonstrate how the Bayesian analysis and a direct least-squaresmore » optimization, combined with high-performance computing, can be used to assess the information content of the new data with respect to a model based on the Skyrme energy density functional approach. Employing the posterior probability distribution computed with a Gaussian process emulator, we apply the Bayesian framework to propagate theoretical statistical uncertainties in predictions of nuclear masses, two-neutron dripline, and fission barriers. Overall, we find that the new mass measurements do not impose a constraint that is strong enough to lead to significant changes in the model parameters. In addition, the example discussed in this study sets the stage for quantifying and maximizing the impact of new measurements with respect to current modeling and guiding future experimental efforts, thus enhancing the experiment-theory cycle in the scientific method.« less

  6. Uncertainty quantification for nuclear density functional theory and information content of new measurements.

    PubMed

    McDonnell, J D; Schunck, N; Higdon, D; Sarich, J; Wild, S M; Nazarewicz, W

    2015-03-27

    Statistical tools of uncertainty quantification can be used to assess the information content of measured observables with respect to present-day theoretical models, to estimate model errors and thereby improve predictive capability, to extrapolate beyond the regions reached by experiment, and to provide meaningful input to applications and planned measurements. To showcase new opportunities offered by such tools, we make a rigorous analysis of theoretical statistical uncertainties in nuclear density functional theory using Bayesian inference methods. By considering the recent mass measurements from the Canadian Penning Trap at Argonne National Laboratory, we demonstrate how the Bayesian analysis and a direct least-squares optimization, combined with high-performance computing, can be used to assess the information content of the new data with respect to a model based on the Skyrme energy density functional approach. Employing the posterior probability distribution computed with a Gaussian process emulator, we apply the Bayesian framework to propagate theoretical statistical uncertainties in predictions of nuclear masses, two-neutron dripline, and fission barriers. Overall, we find that the new mass measurements do not impose a constraint that is strong enough to lead to significant changes in the model parameters. The example discussed in this study sets the stage for quantifying and maximizing the impact of new measurements with respect to current modeling and guiding future experimental efforts, thus enhancing the experiment-theory cycle in the scientific method.

  7. Uncertainty quantification for nuclear density functional theory and information content of new measurements

    SciTech Connect

    McDonnell, J. D.; Schunck, N.; Higdon, D.; Sarich, J.; Wild, S. M.; Nazarewicz, W.

    2015-03-24

    Statistical tools of uncertainty quantification can be used to assess the information content of measured observables with respect to present-day theoretical models, to estimate model errors and thereby improve predictive capability, to extrapolate beyond the regions reached by experiment, and to provide meaningful input to applications and planned measurements. To showcase new opportunities offered by such tools, we make a rigorous analysis of theoretical statistical uncertainties in nuclear density functional theory using Bayesian inference methods. By considering the recent mass measurements from the Canadian Penning Trap at Argonne National Laboratory, we demonstrate how the Bayesian analysis and a direct least-squares optimization, combined with high-performance computing, can be used to assess the information content of the new data with respect to a model based on the Skyrme energy density functional approach. Employing the posterior probability distribution computed with a Gaussian process emulator, we apply the Bayesian framework to propagate theoretical statistical uncertainties in predictions of nuclear masses, two-neutron dripline, and fission barriers. Overall, we find that the new mass measurements do not impose a constraint that is strong enough to lead to significant changes in the model parameters. As a result, the example discussed in this study sets the stage for quantifying and maximizing the impact of new measurements with respect to current modeling and guiding future experimental efforts, thus enhancing the experiment-theory cycle in the scientific method.

  8. Measurement of conductivity and permittivity on samples sealed in nuclear magnetic resonance tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, W.; Angell, C. A.; Yarger, J. L.; Richert, R.

    2013-07-15

    We present a broadband impedance spectroscopy instrument designed to measure conductivity and/or permittivity for samples that are sealed in glass tubes, such as the standard 5 mm tubes used for nuclear magnetic resonance experiments. The calibrations and corrections required to extract the dielectric properties of the sample itself are outlined. It is demonstrated that good estimates of the value of dc-conductivity can be obtained even without correcting for the effects of glass or air on the overall impedance. The approach is validated by comparing data obtained from samples sealed in nuclear magnetic resonance tubes with those from standard dielectric cells, using glycerol and butylmethylimidazolium-hexafluorophosphate as respective examples of a molecular and an ionic liquid. This instrument and approach may prove useful for other studies of permittivity and conductivity where contact to the metal electrodes or to the ambient atmosphere needs to be avoided.

  9. Measurement of the nuclear multiplicity ratio or image hadronization K0s at CLAS

    DOE PAGES

    Daniel, A.; Hicks, K.; Brooks, W. K.; ...

    2011-11-01

    The influence of cold nuclear matter on lepto-production of hadrons in semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering is measured using the CLAS detector in Hall B at Jefferson Lab and a 5.014 GeV electron beam. We report the K0s multiplicity ratios for targets of C, Fe, and Pb relative to deuterium as a function of the fractional virtual photon energy z transferred to the K0sand the transverse momentum squared p2T of the K0s. We find that the multiplicity ratios for K0s are reduced in the nuclear medium at high z and low p2T, with a trend for the K0s transverse momentum tomore » be broadened in the nucleus for large p2T.« less

  10. Cooperative measures to support the Indo-Pak Agreement Reducing Risk from Accidents Relating to Nuclear Weapons.

    SciTech Connect

    Mishra, Sitakanta; Ahmed, Mansoor

    2014-04-01

    In 2012, India and Pakistan reaffirmed the Agreement on Reducing the Risk from Accidents Relating to Nuclear Weapons. Despite a history of mutual animosity and persistent conflict between the two countries, this agreement derives strength from a few successful nuclear confidence building measures that have stood the test of time. It also rests on the hope that the region would be spared a nuclear holocaust from an accidental nuclear weapon detonation that might be misconstrued as a deliberate use of a weapon by the other side. This study brings together two emerging strategic analysts from South Asia to explore measures to support the Agreement and further develop cooperation around this critical issue. This study briefly dwells upon the strategic landscape of nuclear South Asia with the respective nuclear force management structures, doctrines, and postures of India and Pakistan. It outlines the measures in place for the physical protection and safety of nuclear warheads, nuclear materials, and command and control mechanisms in the two countries, and it goes on to identify the prominent, emerging challenges posed by the introduction of new weapon technologies and modernization of the respective strategic forces. This is followed by an analysis of the agreement itself leading up to a proposed framework for cooperative measures that might enhance the spirit and implementation of the agreement.

  11. Nuclear heating measurements by in-pile calorimetry: prospective works for a microsensor design

    SciTech Connect

    Reynard-Carette, C.; Carette, M.; Aguir, K.; Bendahan, M.; Fiorido, T.; Lyoussi, A.; Fourmentel, D.; Villard, J.F.; Barthes, M.; Lanzetta, F.; Layes, G.; Vives, S.

    2015-07-01

    Since 2009 works have been performed in the framework of joint research programs between CEA and Aix-Marseille University. The main aim of these programs is to design and develop in-pile instrumentations, advanced calibration procedure and accurate measurement methods in particular for the new Material Testing Reactor (MTR) under construction in the South of France: Jules Horowitz Reactor (JHR). One major sensor is a specific radiometric calorimeter, which was studied out-of-pile from a thermal point of view and in-pile during irradiation campaigns. This sensor type is dedicated to measurements of nuclear heating (energy deposition rate per mass unit induced by interactions between nuclear rays and matter) inside experimental channels of MTRs. This kind of in-pile calorimeter corresponds to heat flux calorimeter exchanging with the external cooling fluid. This thermal running mode allows the establishment of steady thermal conditions inside the sensor to carry out online continuous measurements inside the reactor (core or reflector). Two main types of calorimeters exist. The first type consists of a single cell calorimeter. It is divided into a sample of material to be tested and a jacket instrumented with two thermocouples or a single thermocouple (Gamma Thermometer). The second, called a differential calorimeter, is composed of two superposed twin cells (a measurement cell containing a sample of material, and a reference cell to remove the heating of the cell body) instrumented with four thermocouples and two electrical heaters. Contrary to a single-cell calorimeter, a differential calorimeter allows the compensation of the parasite nuclear heating of the sensor body or jacket. Moreover, it possesses interesting advantages: thanks to the heaters embedded in the cells, three different measurement methods can be applied during irradiations to quantify nuclear heating. The first one is based on the use of out-of-pile calibration curves obtained by generating a heat

  12. Accurate Measurement of Velocity and Acceleration of Seismic Vibrations near Nuclear Power Plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arif, Syed Javed; Imdadullah; Asghar, Mohammad Syed Jamil

    In spite of all prerequisite geological study based precautions, the sites of nuclear power plants are also susceptible to seismic vibrations and their consequent effects. The effect of the ongoing nuclear tragedy in Japan caused by an earthquake and its consequent tsunami on March 11, 2011 is currently beyond contemplations. It has led to a rethinking on nuclear power stations by various governments around the world. Therefore, the prediction of location and time of large earthquakes has regained a great importance. The earth crust is made up of several wide, thin and rigid plates like blocks which are in constant motion with respect to each other. A series of vibrations on the earth surface are produced by the generation of elastic seismic waves due to sudden rupture within the plates during the release of accumulated strain energy. The range of frequency of seismic vibrations is from 0 to 10 Hz. However, there appears a large variation in magnitude, velocity and acceleration of these vibrations. The response of existing or conventional methods of measurement of seismic vibrations is very slow, which is of the order of tens of seconds. A systematic and high resolution measurement of velocity and acceleration of these vibrations are useful to interpret the pattern of waves and their anomalies more accurately, which are useful for the prediction of an earthquake. In the proposed work, a fast rotating magnetic field (RMF) is used to measure the velocity and acceleration of seismic vibrations in the millisecond range. The broad spectrum of pulses within one second range, measured by proposed method, gives all possible values of instantaneous velocity and instantaneous acceleration of the seismic vibrations. The spectrum of pulses in millisecond range becomes available which is useful to measure the pattern of fore shocks to predict the time and location of large earthquakes more accurately. Moreover, instead of average, the peak values of these quantities are helpful

  13. On-site gamma-ray spectroscopic measurements of fission gas release in irradiated nuclear fuel.

    PubMed

    Matsson, I; Grapengiesser, B; Andersson, B

    2007-01-01

    An experimental, non-destructive in-pool, method for measuring fission gas release (FGR) in irradiated nuclear fuel has been developed. Using the method, a significant number of experiments have been performed in-pool at several nuclear power plants of the BWR type. The method utilises the 514 keV gamma-radiation from the gaseous fission product (85)Kr captured in the fuel rod plenum volume. A submergible measuring device (LOKET) consisting of an HPGe-detector and a collimator system was utilised allowing for single rod measurements on virtually all types of BWR fuel. A FGR database covering a wide range of burn-ups (up to average rod burn-up well above 60 MWd/kgU), irradiation history, fuel rod position in cross section and fuel designs has been compiled and used for computer code benchmarking, fuel performance analysis and feedback to reactor operators. Measurements clearly indicate the low FGR in more modern fuel designs in comparison to older fuel types.

  14. EPR g factors and defect structures for V4+ and Cr5+ in the rutile-type crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Minjie; Zhu, Lianxuan

    2016-08-01

    The g-factor formulas for V4+ and Cr5+ ions in the rutile-type crystals are deduced from Jahn-Teller effect and contributions of the charge transfer levels. The tetragonal distortions ΔR = -0.0045, -0.0045 and -0.0067 nm, and Δθ = 0°, -0.001° and 0°, for GeO2:V4+, TiO2:V4+ and TiO2:Cr5+, respectively. The calculations of the g-factors agree well with the experimental values. The contributions of the charge transfer levels to g factors increase with the increasing valence state. It must be taken into account in the precise calculations of g factors for the high valence state d1 ions in crystals.

  15. Nuclear magnetic resonance measurement of ammonia diffusion in dense solid-liquid slurries. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Bobroff, S.; Phillips, R.J.; Shekarriz, A.

    1998-01-01

    The flammability and toxicity of ammonia released from the nuclear waste tanks at Hanford have been the subject of several recent studies. These releases may occur episodically, such as the buoyant plume releases occurring in various double-shell tanks (DSTs); gradually through the surface of the waste; or from the partially saturated saltcakes in the single-shell tanks during salt-well pumping. The diffusion of ammonium ions in aqueous solutions was measured by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) using the pulsed field gradient (PFG) method. The ammonium ions were obtained from aqueous solutions of ammonium chloride, ammonium sulfate, ammonium bicarbonate, and ammonium hydroxide. The translational diffusion of the ammonium ions was determined by measuring the diffusion of nitrogen nuclei in solution. Results showed that the ammonium diffusion coefficient can be measured in aqueous solutions with concentrations as low as 20 {times} 10{sup {minus}3} {und M}. Typical values measured for the diffusion coefficient of the ammonium ion are 2 {times} 10{sup {minus}5} cm{sup 2}/s ({+-}10%), similar to the values found for pure water. Due to the effect of the solution pH upon the NMR relaxation parameters for {sup 14}N, measurements are constrained to pH values below 8.5. However, {sup 15}N labeled ammonia is less sensitive to the solution pH, extending the measurement range to pH of 9.5. The results show that the solution viscosity has a measurable impact on the diffusion coefficient. The diffusion coefficient is almost inversely proportional to the relative viscosity of the solution, irrespective of how the viscosity is increased. Further, a randomly-packed porous bed of 200 {micro}m PMMA resulted in a reduction of {approximately} 30% in the diffusion coefficient as a result of hindered diffusion.

  16. Single-molecule conductance measurements of biomolecule translocation across biomimetic nuclear pores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dekker, Cees

    2012-02-01

    After a brief overview of our recent work on solid-state nanopores, I will present single-molecule transport data across biomimetic nanopores that contain the key regulating parts of the nuclear pore complex (NPC). The mechanism for the remarkable selectivity of NPCs has remained unclear in a large part due to difficulties in designing experiments that can probe the transport at the relevant length and time scales. Building and measuring on biomimetic NPCs provides new opportunities to address this long-standing problem. covalently tether the natively unfolded Phe-Gly rich domains (FG-domains) of human nuclear binding proteins to a solid-state nanopore (a 10-100 nm sized hole in a SiN membrane). Ionic current measurements provide a probe to monitor single molecules that traverse the pore. Translocation events are observed for transport receptors (Impβ), whereas transport of passive molecules (BSA) is found to be blocked. Interestingly, a single type of nuclear pore proteins appears already sufficient to form a selective barrier for transport. A translocation time of about 2.5 ms is measured for Impβ. This time is found to be similar for transport across Nup153 and Nup98 coated pores, although the observed ionic conductance differs between these two types of pores. We compare two simple models for the pore conductance and find, for both Nups, that the data fits best to a model with an open central channel and a condensed layer along the outer circumference of the pore. reproducing the key features of the NPC, our biomimetic approach opens the way to study a wide variety of nucleo-cytoplasmic transport processes at the single-molecule level in vitro.

  17. Nuclear magnetic resonance measurement of ammonia diffusion in dense solid-liquid slurries

    SciTech Connect

    Bobroff, S.; Phillips, R.J.; Shekarriz, A.

    1997-09-01

    The diffusion of ammonium ions in aqueous solutions was measured by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) using the pulsed field gradient (PFG) method. The ammonium ions were obtained from aqueous solutions of ammonium chloride, ammonium sulfate, ammonium bicarbonate, and ammonium hydroxide. The translation diffusion of the ammonium ions was determined by measuring the diffusion of nitrogen nuclei ({sup 14}N and {sup 15}N) in solution. Our results showed that the ammonium diffusion coefficient can be measured in aqueous solutions with concentrations as low as 20 x 10{sup -3} M. Typical values measured for the diffusion coefficient of the ammonium ion are 2 x 10{sup -5} cm{sup 2/s} ({+-}10%), similar to the values found for pure water. Due to the effect of the solution pH upon the NMR relaxation parameters for {sup 14}N, measurements are constrained to pH values below 8.5. However, {sup 15}N labeled ammonium is less sensitive to the solution pH, extending the measurement range to pH of 9.5. Diffusion measurements were conducted with solutions of varying viscosity and porosity. The results show that the solution viscosity has a measureable impact on the diffusion coefficient. The diffusion coefficient is almost inversely proportional to the relative viscosity of the solution, irrespective of how the viscosity is increased. Further, a randomly-packed porous bed of 200 mm PMMA resulted in a reduction of {approximately}30% in the diffusion coefficient as a result of hindered diffusion.

  18. Demonstration of a transmission nuclear resonance fluorescence measurement for a realistic radioactive waste canister scenario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angell, C. T.; Hajima, R.; Hayakawa, T.; Shizuma, T.; Karwowski, H. J.; Silano, J.

    2015-03-01

    Transmission nuclear resonance fluorescence (NRF) is a promising method for precision non-destructive assay (NDA) of fissile isotopes-including 239Pu-in spent fuel while inside a storage canister. The assay, however, could be confounded by the presence of overlapping resonances from competing isotopes in the canister. A measurement is needed to demonstrate that transmission NRF is unaffected by the shielding material. To this end, we carried out a transmission NRF measurement using a mono-energetic γ-ray beam on a proxy target (Al) and absorbing material simulating a realistic spent fuel storage canister. Similar amounts of material as would be found in a possible spent fuel storage canister were placed upstream: concrete, stainless steel (SS 304), lead (as a proxy for U), and water. An Al absorption target was also used as a reference. These measurements demonstrated that the canister material should not significantly influence the non-destructive assay.

  19. Precision measurements of nuclear CR energy spectra and composition with the AMS-02 experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiandrini, E.

    2016-05-01

    The Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer 02 (AMS-02) is a large acceptance high-energy physics experiment operating since May 2011 on board the International Space Station. More than 60 billion events have been collected by the instrument in the first four years of operation. AMS-02 offers a unique opportunity to study the Cosmic Rays (CRs) since it measures the spectra of all the species simultaneously. We report on the precision measurements of primary and secondary nuclear spectra, in the GeV-TeV energy interval. These measurements allow for the first time a detailed study of the spectral index variation with rigidity providing a new insight on the origin and propagation of CR.

  20. A new measurement of electron transverse polarization in polarized nuclear β-decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawamura, H.; Akiyama, T.; Hata, M.; Hirayama, Y.; Ikeda, M.; Ikeda, Y.; Ishii, T.; Kameda, D.; Mitsuoka, S.; Miyatake, H.; Nagae, D.; Nakaya, Y.; Ninomiya, K.; Nitta, M.; Ogawa, N.; Onishi, J.; Seitaibashi, E.; Tanaka, S.; Tanuma, R.; Totsuka, Y.; Toyoda, T.; Watanabe, Y. X.; Murata, J.

    2017-03-01

    The Mott polarimetry for T-violation (MTV) experiment tests time-reversal symmetry in polarized nuclear β-decay by measuring an electron’s transverse polarization as a form of angular asymmetry in Mott scattering using a thin metal foil. A Mott scattering analyzer system developed using a tracking detector to measure scattering angles offers better event selectivity than conventional counter experiments. In this paper, we describe a pilot experiment conducted at KEK-TRIAC using a prototype system with a polarized 8Li beam. The experiment confirmed the sound performance of our Mott analyzer system to measure T-violating triple correlation (R correlation), and therefore recommends its use in higher-precision experiments at the TRIUMF-ISAC.

  1. Measurement of the nuclear electromagnetic cascade development in glass at energies above 200 GeV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gillespie, C. R.; Huggett, R. W.; Humphreys, D. R.; Jones, W. V.; Levit, L. B.

    1971-01-01

    The longitudinal development of nuclear-electromagnetic cascades with energies greater than 200 GeV was measured in a low-Z (glass) absorber. This was done in the course of operating an ionization spectrometer at mountain altitude in an experiment to study the properties of gamma rays emitted from individual interactions at energies around 10,000 GeV. The ionization produced by a cascade is sampled by 20 sheets of plastic scintillator spaced uniformly in depth every 2.2 radiation lengths. Adjacent pairs of scintillators are viewed by photomultipliers which measure the mean ionization produced by an individual cascade in 10 layers each 1.1 interaction length (4.4 radiation lengths) thick. The longitudinal development of the cascades was measured for about 250 cascades having energies ranging from 200 GeV to 2500 GeV. The observations are compared with the predictions of calculations made for this specific spectrometer using a three-dimensional Monte Carlo model of the nuclear-electromagnetic cascade.

  2. An accurate optical technique for measuring the nuclear polarisation of 3He gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talbot, C.; Batz, M.; Nacher, P.-J.; Tastevin, G.

    2011-06-01

    In the metastability exchange optical pumping cells of our on-site production unit and of our other experimental set-ups, we use a light absorption technique to measure the 3He nuclear polarisation. It involves weak probe beams at 1083 nm, that are either perpendicular or parallel to the magnetic field and cell axis, with suitable light polarisations. When metastability exchange collisions control the populations of the sublevels in the 23S state, absolute values of the 3He ground state nuclear polarisation are directly inferred from the ratio of the absorption rates measured for these probe beams. Our report focuses on the transverse detection scheme for which this ratio, measured at low magnetic field for σ and π light polarisations, hardly depends on gas pressure or the presence of an intense pump beam. This technique has been systematically tested both in pure 3He and isotopic mixtures and it is routinely used for accurate control of the optical pumping efficiency as well as for calibration of the NMR system.

  3. Precise measurement of the nuclear dependence of the EMC effect at large x

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniel, Aji

    Experiment E03-103, carried out in Hall C at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, measuring inclusive electron scattering cross sections from nuclear targets over a broad range of x (0.3 < x < 1) up to Q2 ≈ 8 GeV 2. The bulk of the data were taken at a beam energy of 5.8 GeV, with beam currents ranging from 30 to 80 muA. This dissertation describes the experiment in detail, and presents the extracted EMC ratios for the cryogenic targets 3He, 4He and solid targets Be, C, Cu, and Au. Our data provide the first measurement of the EMC effect in 3He at x > 0.4, and improve the known precision of the existing measurements of the effect in 4He and other nuclear targets at large x. The data have also been analyzed in terms of the structure function FA2 to examine the scaling of the inelastic scattering in x and xi.

  4. Recent Developments in Nuclear Data Measurement capabilities at the Gaerttner LINAC Center at RPI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danon, Y.; Daskalakis, A.; McDermott, B.; Thompson, N.; Youmans, A.; Block, R.; Barry, D.; Epping, B.; Leinweber, G.; Rapp, M.; Donovan, T.

    2016-03-01

    The Gaerttner LINAC Center at RPI uses a 60 MeV electron linear accelerator to produce short pulses of neutrons with duration of 5-5000 ns. The main research thrust at the Center is nuclear data for nuclear reactors and criticality safety applications. The Center includes several setups for time-of-flight measurements including neutron transmission, capture and scattering detectors, and a lead slowing-down spectrometer. Experiments were designed to produce neutron interaction cross sections that cover the energy range of 0.01 eV to 20 MeV. Recently added experiments include: setups for keV and fast neutron transmission, a C6D6 detector array for keV neutron capture measurements, and a fast neutron scattering system. Results discussed here include fast neutron scattering and angular distributions for natFe, iron capture measurements for incident neutrons from 1 keV to 2 MeV, fast neutron transmission through W and H2O samples, and keV transmission through Mo isotopes.

  5. Measurement of the 14N nuclear quadrupole resonance frequencies by the solid effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seliger, J.; Žagar, V.

    2008-07-01

    1H- 14N nuclear quadrupole double resonance using magnetic field cycling between high and low magnetic field and solid effect in the low magnetic field is analyzed in details. The transition probabilities per unit time for the solid-effect transitions are calculated. The double resonance spectra are calculated in the limiting cases of fast and slow nitrogen spin-lattice relaxation. The double resonance spectra are measured in histamine and quinolinic acid. The experimental spectra are analyzed and the 14N NQR frequencies are determined.

  6. Modeling and Simulation Approaches to Developing Human Performance Measures in Nuclear Industry

    SciTech Connect

    Bruce P. Hallbert; Jeffrey C. Joe; Molly J. Keefe; Julius J. Persensky

    2007-08-01

    Human performance is a key component to the safe operation of nuclear power plants. Further, human performance is quite variable, and while some variability may be random, much of it may be attributed to factors that are difficult to assess. There is a need to identify and assess aspects of human performance that relate to plant safety and to develop measures that can be used to successfully assess human performance for purposes of research that can lead to technical basis for developing human factors review criteria.

  7. Measuring nuclear transparency from exclusive vector meson production in lepton-nucleus scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, G.Y.

    1994-04-01

    Preliminary results on the measurement of nuclear transparencies from exclusive {rho}{sup 0} meson production from E665 at Fermilab are reported. The data were collected on hydrogen, deuterium, carbon, calcium, and lead targets with a mean beam energy of 470 GeV. Increases in the transparencies are observed in both coherent and incoherent production channels as the virtuality of the photon increases, as expected of color transparency. Ideas of systematic studies of color transparency in exclusive vector meson production at CEBAF are discussed.

  8. Sensors Synergistic With Nature For In-pile Nuclear Reactor Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    James A. Smith; Dale K. Kotter; Steven L. Garrett; Randall A. Ali

    2012-10-01

    To be able to evolve fuel and structural microstructure within a nuclear power reactor in an engineered manner, an effective extreme environment sensor must exist. The development of sensor technology for nondestructive and nonintrusive measurements in harsh environments is a very active field. However most of the effort has been in adapting existing sensing technology to meet the harsh environmental requirements. A different approach is being presented. The fundamental question that we are trying to answer is how do we take advantage of the harsh environment and maintain synergy between the sensor and the environment. This paper will discuss the synergistic senor being developed that takes advantage of the harsh environments.

  9. Measuring Human Performance in Simulated Nuclear Power Plant Control Rooms Using Eye Tracking

    SciTech Connect

    Kovesdi, Casey Robert; Rice, Brandon Charles; Bower, Gordon Ross; Spielman, Zachary Alexander; Hill, Rachael Ann; LeBlanc, Katya Lee

    2015-11-01

    Control room modernization will be an important part of life extension for the existing light water reactor fleet. As part of modernization efforts, personnel will need to gain a full understanding of how control room technologies affect performance of human operators. Recent advances in technology enables the use of eye tracking technology to continuously measure an operator’s eye movement, which correlates with a variety of human performance constructs such as situation awareness and workload. This report describes eye tracking metrics in the context of how they will be used in nuclear power plant control room simulator studies.

  10. Superconducting quantum spin-Hall systems with giant orbital g-factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hankiewicz, Ewelina; Reinthaler, Rolf; Tkachov, Grigory

    Topological aspects of superconductivity in quantum spin-Hall systems (QSHSs) such as thin layers of three-dimensional topological insulators (3D Tis) or two-dimensional Tis are in the focus of current research. Here, we describe a novel superconducting quantum spin-Hall effect (quantum spin Hall system in the proximity to the s-wave superconductor and in the orbital in-plane magnetic field), which is protected against elastic backscattering by combined time-reversal and particle-hole symmetry. This effect is characterized by spin-polarized edge states, which can be manipulated in weak magnetic fields due to a giant effective orbital g-factor, allowing the generation of spin currents. The phenomenon provides a novel solution to the outstanding challenge of detecting the spin-polarization of the edge states. Here we propose the detection of the edge polarization in the three-terminal junction using unusual transport properties of superconducting quantum Hall-effect: a non-monotonic excess current and a zero-bias conductance splitting. We thank for the financial support the German Science Foundation (DFG), Grants No HA 5893/4-1 within SPP 1666, HA5893/5-2 within FOR1162 and TK60/1-1 (G.T.), as well the ENB graduate school ``Topological insulators''.

  11. The ULT trxG factors play a role in arabidopsis fertilization

    PubMed Central

    Monfared, Mona M; Fletcher, Jennifer C

    2014-01-01

    Trithorax group (trxG) and Polycomb group (PcG) proteins are epigenetic modifiers that play key roles in eukaryotic development by promoting active or repressive gene expression states, respectively. Although PcG proteins have well-defined roles in controlling developmental transitions, cell fate decisions and cellular differentiation in plants, relatively little is known about the functions of plant trxG factors. We recently determined the biological roles for the ULT1 and ULT2 trxG genes during Arabidopsis vegetative and reproductive development. Our study revealed that ULT1 and ULT2 genes have overlapping activities in regulating Arabidopsis shoot and floral stem cell activity, and that they have a redundant function in establishing the apical-basal polarity axis of the gynoecium. Here we present data that ult1 and ult1 ult2 siliques contain a significant proportion of aborted ovules, supporting an additional role for ULT1 in Arabidopsis fertility. Our results add to the number of plant developmental processes that are regulated by trxG activity. PMID:25531183

  12. Measurements of extinct fission products in nuclear bomb debris: Determination of the yield of the Trinity nuclear test 70 y later

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, Susan Kloek; Pollington, Anthony Douglas; Waidmann, Christopher Russell; Kinman, William Scott; Wende, Allison Marie; Miller, Jeffrey L.; Berger, Jennifer A.; Oldham, Warren James; Selby, Hugh D.

    2016-07-05

    This study describes an approach to measuring extinct fission products that would allow for the characterization of a nuclear test at any time. The isotopic composition of molybdenum in five samples of glassy debris from the 1945 Trinity nuclear test has been measured. Nonnatural molybdenum isotopic compositions were observed, reflecting an input from the decay of the short-lived fission products 95Zr and 97Zr. By measuring both the perturbation of the 95Mo/96Mo and 97Mo/96Mo isotopic ratios and the total amount of molybdenum in the Trinity nuclear debris samples, it is possible to calculate the original concentrations of the 95Zr and 97Zr isotopes formed in the nuclear detonation. Together with a determination of the amount of plutonium in the debris, these measurements of extinct fission products allow for new estimates of the efficiency and yield of the historic Trinity test.

  13. Nuclear spin effects in optical lattice clocks

    SciTech Connect

    Boyd, Martin M.; Zelevinsky, Tanya; Ludlow, Andrew D.; Blatt, Sebastian; Zanon-Willette, Thomas; Foreman, Seth M.; Ye Jun

    2007-08-15

    We present a detailed experimental and theoretical study of the effect of nuclear spin on the performance of optical lattice clocks. With a state-mixing theory including spin-orbit and hyperfine interactions, we describe the origin of the {sup 1}S{sub 0}-{sup 3}P{sub 0} clock transition and the differential g factor between the two clock states for alkaline-earth-metal(-like) atoms, using {sup 87}Sr as an example. Clock frequency shifts due to magnetic and optical fields are discussed with an emphasis on those relating to nuclear structure. An experimental determination of the differential g factor in {sup 87}Sr is performed and is in good agreement with theory. The magnitude of the tensor light shift on the clock states is also explored experimentally. State specific measurements with controlled nuclear spin polarization are discussed as a method to reduce the nuclear spin-related systematic effects to below 10{sup -17} in lattice clocks.

  14. g-factor and spin-parity assignments of excited states in the N=83 isotones {sup 135}Te, {sup 136}I, {sup 137}Xe, and {sup 138}Cs

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, S. H.; Hamilton, J. H.; Ramayya, A. V.; Hwang, J. K.; Covello, A.; Itaco, N.; Gargano, A.; Stone, N. J.; Daniel, A. V.; Luo, Y. X.; Rasmussen, J. O.; Ter-Akopian, G. M.; Zhu, S. J.; Ma, W. C.

    2010-01-15

    The g factor of the 15/2{sup -} state in {sup 137}Xe was measured for the first time by using a newly developed technique for measuring angular correlations with Gammasphere. Spins and parities were assigned to several levels in the N=83 isotones {sup 135}Te, {sup 136}I, {sup 137}Xe, and {sup 138}Cs. The calculated g factor in the shell-model frame is in good agreement with the measured one in the present work. Shell-model calculations also support our spin-parity assignments.

  15. Integrated Geophysical Measurements for Bioremediation Monitoring: Combining Spectral Induced Polarization, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and Magnetic Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Keating, Kristina; Slater, Lee; Ntarlagiannis, Dimitris; Williams, Kenneth H.

    2015-02-24

    This documents contains the final report for the project "Integrated Geophysical Measurements for Bioremediation Monitoring: Combining Spectral Induced Polarization, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and Magnetic Methods" (DE-SC0007049) Executive Summary: Our research aimed to develop borehole measurement techniques capable of monitoring subsurface processes, such as changes in pore geometry and iron/sulfur geochemistry, associated with remediation of heavy metals and radionuclides. Previous work has demonstrated that geophysical method spectral induced polarization (SIP) can be used to assess subsurface contaminant remediation; however, SIP signals can be generated from multiple sources limiting their interpretation value. Integrating multiple geophysical methods, such as nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and magnetic susceptibility (MS), with SIP, could reduce the ambiguity of interpretation that might result from a single method. Our research efforts entails combining measurements from these methods, each sensitive to different mineral forms and/or mineral-fluid interfaces, providing better constraints on changes in subsurface biogeochemical processes and pore geometries significantly improving our understanding of processes impacting contaminant remediation. The Rifle Integrated Field Research Challenge (IFRC) site was used as a test location for our measurements. The Rifle IFRC site is located at a former uranium ore-processing facility in Rifle, Colorado. Leachate from spent mill tailings has resulted in residual uranium contamination of both groundwater and sediments within the local aquifer. Studies at the site include an ongoing acetate amendment strategy, native microbial populations are stimulated by introduction of carbon intended to alter redox conditions and immobilize uranium. To test the geophysical methods in the field, NMR and MS logging measurements were collected before, during, and after acetate amendment. Next, laboratory NMR, MS, and SIP measurements

  16. Measurement of Nuclear Recoils in the CDMS II Dark Matter Search

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fallows, Scott M.

    The Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS) experiment is designed to directly detect elastic scatters of weakly-interacting massive dark matter particles (WIMPs), on target nuclei in semiconductor crystals composed of Si and Ge. These scatters would occur very rarely, in an overwhelming background composed primarily of electron recoils from photons and electrons, as well as a smaller but non-negligible background of WIMP-like nuclear recoils from neutrons. The CDMS~II generation of detectors simultaneously measure ionization and athermal phonon signals from each scatter, allowing discrimination against virtually all electron recoils in the detector bulk. Pulse-shape timing analysis allows discrimination against nearly all remaining electron recoils taking place near detector surfaces. Along with carefully limited neutron backgrounds, this experimental program allowed for "background-free'' operation of CDMS~II at Soudan, with less than one background event expected in each WIMP-search analysis. As a result, exclusionary upper-limits on WIMP-nucleon interaction cross section were placed over a wide range of candidate WIMP masses, ruling out large new regions of parameter space. These results, like any others, are subject to a variety of systematic effects that may alter their final interpretations. A primary focus of this dissertation will be difficulties in precisely calibrating the energy scale for nuclear recoil events like those from WIMPs. Nuclear recoils have suppressed ionization signals relative to electron recoils of the same recoil energy, so the response of the detectors is calibrated differently for each recoil type. The overall normalization and linearity of the energy scale for electron recoils in CDMS~II detectors is clearly established by peaks of known gamma energy in the ionization spectrum of calibration data from a 133Ba source. This electron-equivalent keVee) energy scale enables calibration of the total phonon signal (keVt) by enforcing unity

  17. Evidence that the beta-catenin nuclear translocation assay allows for measuring presenilin 1 dysfunction.

    PubMed Central

    Van Gassen, G.; De Jonghe, C.; Nishimura, M.; Yu, G.; Kuhn, S.; St George-Hyslop, P.; Van Broeckhoven, C.

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Mutations in the presenilin (PSEN) genes are responsible for the majority of early-onset Alzheimer disease (AD) cases. PSEN1 is a component of a high molecular weight, endoplasmic reticulum, membrane-bound protein complex, including beta-catenin. Pathogenic PSEN1 mutations were demonstrated to have an effect on beta-catenin and glycogen synthase kinase-3beta(GSK-3beta), two members of the wingless Wnt pathway. The nuclear translocation and the stability of beta-catenin, and the interaction between GSK3beta and PSEN1 were influenced. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Stably transfected human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293 cells overexpressing wild-type (wt) and mutant (mt) PSEN1, treated with and without LiCl, were used to isolate cytoplasmic and nuclear fractions. By Western blot analysis, endogenous beta-catenin levels were examined. By analyzing cytosolic fractions of PSEN1, transfected and nontransfected HEK 293 cells, and total brain extracts of AD patients and controls, we evaluated the effect of PSEN1 overexpression on beta-catenin stability. Finally, we analyzed the effect of pathogenic PSEN1 mutations on the interaction between PSEN1 and GSK3beta by co-immunoprecipitation experiments. RESULTS: We report reduced nuclear translocation of beta-catenin in cells stably expressing I143T, G384A, and T113-114ins PSEN1. The G384A PSEN1 mutation showed a similar pronounced effect on nuclear translocation of beta-catenin, as reported for processing of amyloid precursor protein (APP) into amyloid beta(Abeta). Overexpression of PSEN1 and the presence of pathogenic mutations in PSEN1 had no significant effect on the stability of beta-catenin. Nonspecific binding of overexpressed PSEN1 to endogenous GSK3beta was observed when GSK3beta was immunoprecipitated. Immunoprecipitation of PSEN1 in cells overexpressing PSEN1 and in native cells, however, did not result in co-immunoprecipitation of endogenous GSK3beta. CONCLUSION: Our results further establish the nuclear

  18. Karyotype characterization and nuclear DNA content measurement in Bromeliaceae: state of the art and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Nunes, Andrei C P; Clarindo, Wellington R

    2014-12-01

    In Bromeliaceae, cytogenetic and flow cytometry analyses have been performed to clarify systematic and evolutionary aspects. Karyotyping approaches have shown the relatively high chromosome number, similar morphology and small size of the chromosomes. These facts have prevented a correct chromosome counting and characterization. Authors have established a basic chromosome number of x = 25 for Bromeliaceae. Recently, one karyomorphological analysis revealed that x = 25 is no longer the basic chromosome number, whose genome may have a polyploid origin. Besides cytogenetic characterization, the 2C DNA content of bromeliads has been measured. Nuclear DNA content has varied from 2C = 0.60 to 2C = 3.34 picograms. Thus, in relation to most angiosperms, the 2C DNA content of Bromeliaceae species as well as their chromosome size can be considered relatively small. In spite of some advances, cytogenetic and flow cytometry data are extremely scarce in this group. In this context, this review reports the state of the art in karyotype characterization and nuclear DNA content measurement in Bromeliaceae, emphasizing the main problems and suggesting prospective solutions and ideas for future research.

  19. Ground-state nuclear-moment measurement of neutron-rich sulfur isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohtomo, Yuichi; Ichikawa, Yuichi; Shirai, Hazuki; Ueno, Hideki; Ishibashi, Youko; Suzuki, Takahiro; Furukawa, Takeshi; Yoshimi, Akihiro; Abe, Yasushi; Asahi, Koichiro; Daugasu, J. M.; Fujita, Tomomi; Hayasaka, Miki; Imamura, Kei; Kishi, Shota; Kojima, Shuichiro; Nagae, Daisuke; Nakao, Aiko; Sagayama, Tsubasa; Sakamoto, Yu; Sato, Tomoya

    2014-09-01

    Recently the erosion of N = 28 shell gap has been suggested from several spectroscopic experimental data on neutron-rich nuclei. In particular, 43S isotope is of much interest since shape coexistence is expected to occur which provides key information to understand the evolution of shell gaps far from the stability. The isomeric state of 43S at 320 keV is suggested to have a shape close to sphericity with spin-parity of 7/2, but both the spin-parity and deformed parameter of the ground-state have not been determined directly. In order to investigate mechanisms leading to such an anomalous nuclear structure, we aim at measuring the ground-state nuclear-moment for 41,43S. As the first step, the measurement of μ moment of 41S was performed using the technique of β-NMR method at the RIPS facility at RIKEN. In the presentation, the result of this work will be reported.

  20. Rotational and translational water diffusion in the hemoglobin hydration shell: dielectric and proton nuclear relaxation measurements.

    PubMed Central

    Steinhoff, H J; Kramm, B; Hess, G; Owerdieck, C; Redhardt, A

    1993-01-01

    The dynamic properties of water in the hydration shell of hemoglobin have been studied by means of dielectric permittivity measurements and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The temperature behavior of the complex permittivity of hemoglobin solutions has been measured at 3.02, 3.98, 8.59, and 10.80 GHz. At a temperature of 298 K the average rotational correlation time tau of water within a hydration shell of 0.5-nm thickness is determined from the activation parameters to be 68 +/- 10 ps, which is 8-fold the corresponding value of bulk water. Solvent proton magnetic relaxation induced by electron-nuclear dipole interaction between hemoglobin bound nitroxide spin labels and water protons is used to determine the translational diffusion coefficient D(T) of the hydration water. The temperature dependent relaxation behavior for Lamor frequencies between 3 and 90 MHz yields an average value D(298K) = (5 +/- 2) x 10(-10)m2 s-1, which is about one-fifth of the corresponding value of bulk water. The decrease of the water mobility in the hydration shell compared to the bulk is mainly due to an enhanced activation enthalpy. PMID:8274642

  1. Measurement of plutonium in spent nuclear fuel by self-induced x-ray fluorescence

    SciTech Connect

    Hoover, Andrew S; Rudy, Cliff R; Tobin, Steve J; Charlton, William S; Stafford, A; Strohmeyer, D; Saavadra, S

    2009-01-01

    Direct measurement of the plutonium content in spent nuclear fuel is a challenging problem in non-destructive assay. The very high gamma-ray flux from fission product isotopes overwhelms the weaker gamma-ray emissions from plutonium and uranium, making passive gamma-ray measurements impossible. However, the intense fission product radiation is effective at exciting plutonium and uranium atoms, resulting in subsequent fluorescence X-ray emission. K-shell X-rays in the 100 keV energy range can escape the fuel and cladding, providing a direct signal from uranium and plutonium that can be measured with a standard germanium detector. The measured plutonium to uranium elemental ratio can be used to compute the plutonium content of the fuel. The technique can potentially provide a passive, non-destructive assay tool for determining plutonium content in spent fuel. In this paper, we discuss recent non-destructive measurements of plutonium X-ray fluorescence (XRF) signatures from pressurized water reactor spent fuel rods. We also discuss how emerging new technologies, like very high energy resolution microcalorimeter detectors, might be applied to XRF measurements.

  2. Nuclear Alignment in Projectile Fragmentation as a Tool for Moment Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Georgiev, G.; Matea, I.; Oliveira Santos, F. de; Lewitowicz, M.; Daugas, J.M.; Belier, G.; Goutte, H.; Meot, V.; Roig, O.; Astabatyan, R.; Lukyanov, S.; Penionzhkevich, Yu.E.; Balabanski, D.L.; Borremans, D.; Himpe, P.; Neyens, G.; Sawicka, M.

    2004-02-27

    The application of the Time Dependent Perturbed Angular Distribution (TDPAD) method to study isomeric states produced and oriented in projectile-fragmentation reactions provides the opportunity to perform nuclear-moment measurements in a wide range of neutron-rich nuclei, unaccessible by other means. An absolute necessity for the application of the TDPAD technique is a spin-aligned ensemble of nuclei. The preliminary results from a recent application of this method on 61mFe and 54mFe at GANIL, Caen, France showed that a significant increase of the amount of the observed alignment, compared to our previous measurement on 67mNi and 69mCu, can be obtained. Some experimental details, concerning the conservation of the reaction obtained alignment, are discussed.

  3. Non-Contact Measurement of Thermal Diffusivity in Ion-Implanted Nuclear Materials

    PubMed Central

    Hofmann, F.; Mason, D. R.; Eliason, J. K.; Maznev, A. A.; Nelson, K. A.; Dudarev, S. L.

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge of mechanical and physical property evolution due to irradiation damage is essential for the development of future fission and fusion reactors. Ion-irradiation provides an excellent proxy for studying irradiation damage, allowing high damage doses without sample activation. Limited ion-penetration-depth means that only few-micron-thick damaged layers are produced. Substantial effort has been devoted to probing the mechanical properties of these thin implanted layers. Yet, whilst key to reactor design, their thermal transport properties remain largely unexplored due to a lack of suitable measurement techniques. Here we demonstrate non-contact thermal diffusivity measurements in ion-implanted tungsten for nuclear fusion armour. Alloying with transmutation elements and the interaction of retained gas with implantation-induced defects both lead to dramatic reductions in thermal diffusivity. These changes are well captured by our modelling approaches. Our observations have important implications for the design of future fusion power plants. PMID:26527099

  4. Non-Contact Measurement of Thermal Diffusivity in Ion-Implanted Nuclear Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmann, F.; Mason, D. R.; Eliason, J. K.; Maznev, A. A.; Nelson, K. A.; Dudarev, S. L.

    2015-11-01

    Knowledge of mechanical and physical property evolution due to irradiation damage is essential for the development of future fission and fusion reactors. Ion-irradiation provides an excellent proxy for studying irradiation damage, allowing high damage doses without sample activation. Limited ion-penetration-depth means that only few-micron-thick damaged layers are produced. Substantial effort has been devoted to probing the mechanical properties of these thin implanted layers. Yet, whilst key to reactor design, their thermal transport properties remain largely unexplored due to a lack of suitable measurement techniques. Here we demonstrate non-contact thermal diffusivity measurements in ion-implanted tungsten for nuclear fusion armour. Alloying with transmutation elements and the interaction of retained gas with implantation-induced defects both lead to dramatic reductions in thermal diffusivity. These changes are well captured by our modelling approaches. Our observations have important implications for the design of future fusion power plants.

  5. Use of First Order Reversal Curve Measurements to Understand Barkhausen Noise Emission in Nuclear Steel

    SciTech Connect

    McCloy, John S.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Henager, Charles H.

    2013-02-25

    A prototypical ferritic/martensitic alloy, HT-9, of interest to the nuclear materials community was investigated for microstructure effects on Barkhausen noise emission and first-order reversal curve (FORC) analysis for three different heat-treated samples. It was observed that Barkhausen noise emission and reversible component of magnetization, computed from the FORC data, decreased with increasing measured mechanical hardness. The results are discussed in terms of the use of magnetic signatures for use in nondestructive interrogation of radiation damage and other microstructural changes in ferritic/martensitic alloys. FORC analysis is shown to be particularly useful for detailed characterization of defect density and pinning, which can be correlated to bulk non-destructive evaluation field measurements such as Barkhausen noise emission.

  6. Advanced Nuclear Measurements - Sensitivity Analysis Emerging Safeguards, Problems and Proliferation Risk

    SciTech Connect

    Dreicer, J.S.

    1999-07-15

    During the past year this component of the Advanced Nuclear Measurements LDRD-DR has focused on emerging safeguards problems and proliferation risk by investigating problems in two domains. The first is related to the analysis, quantification, and characterization of existing inventories of fissile materials, in particular, the minor actinides (MA) formed in the commercial fuel cycle. Understanding material forms and quantities helps identify and define future measurement problems, instrument requirements, and assists in prioritizing safeguards technology development. The second problem (dissertation research) has focused on the development of a theoretical foundation for sensor array anomaly detection. Remote and unattended monitoring or verification of safeguards activities is becoming a necessity due to domestic and international budgetary constraints. However, the ability to assess the trustworthiness of a sensor array has not been investigated. This research is developing an anomaly detection methodology to assess the sensor array.

  7. Non-Contact Measurement of Thermal Diffusivity in Ion-Implanted Nuclear Materials

    DOE PAGES

    Hofmann, F.; Mason, D. R.; Eliason, J. K.; ...

    2015-11-03

    Knowledge of mechanical and physical property evolution due to irradiation damage is essential for the development of future fission and fusion reactors. Ion-irradiation provides an excellent proxy for studying irradiation damage, allowing high damage doses without sample activation. Limited ion-penetration-depth means that only few-micron-thick damaged layers are produced. Substantial effort has been devoted to probing the mechanical properties of these thin implanted layers. Yet, whilst key to reactor design, their thermal transport properties remain largely unexplored due to a lack of suitable measurement techniques. Here we demonstrate non-contact thermal diffusivity measurements in ion-implanted tungsten for nuclear fusion armour. Alloying withmore » transmutation elements and the interaction of retained gas with implantation-induced defects both lead to dramatic reductions in thermal diffusivity. These changes are well captured by our modelling approaches. Our observations have important implications for the design of future fusion power plants.« less

  8. Non-Contact Measurement of Thermal Diffusivity in Ion-Implanted Nuclear Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Hofmann, F.; Mason, D. R.; Eliason, J. K.; Maznev, A. A.; Nelson, K. A.; Dudarev, S. L.

    2015-11-03

    Knowledge of mechanical and physical property evolution due to irradiation damage is essential for the development of future fission and fusion reactors. Ion-irradiation provides an excellent proxy for studying irradiation damage, allowing high damage doses without sample activation. Limited ion-penetration-depth means that only few-micron-thick damaged layers are produced. Substantial effort has been devoted to probing the mechanical properties of these thin implanted layers. Yet, whilst key to reactor design, their thermal transport properties remain largely unexplored due to a lack of suitable measurement techniques. Here we demonstrate non-contact thermal diffusivity measurements in ion-implanted tungsten for nuclear fusion armour. Alloying with transmutation elements and the interaction of retained gas with implantation-induced defects both lead to dramatic reductions in thermal diffusivity. These changes are well captured by our modelling approaches. Our observations have important implications for the design of future fusion power plants.

  9. An investigation of temperature measurement methods in nuclear power plant reactor pressure vessel annealing

    SciTech Connect

    Acton, R.U.; Gill, W.; Sais, D.J.; Schulze, D.H.; Nakos, J.T.

    1996-05-01

    The objective of this project was to provide an assessment of several methods by which the temperature of a commercial nuclear power plant reactor pressure vessel (RPV) could be measured during an annealing process. This project was a coordinated effort between DOE`s Office of Nuclear Energy, Science and Technology; DOE`s Light Water Reactor Technology Center at Sandia National Laboratories; and the Electric Power Research Institute`s Non- Destructive Evaluation Center. Ball- thermocouple probes similar to those described in NUREG/CR-5760, spring-loaded, metal- sheathed thermocouple probes, and 1778 air- suspended thermocouples were investigated in experiments that heated a section of an RPV wall to simulate a thermal annealing treatment. A parametric study of ball material, emissivity, thermal conductivity, and thermocouple function locations was conducted. Also investigated was a sheathed thermocouple failure mode known as shunting (electrical breakdown of insulation separating the thermocouple wires). Large errors were found between the temperature as measured by the probes and the true RPV wall temperature during heat-up and cool-down. At the annealing soak temperature, in this case 454{degrees}C [850`F], all sensors measured the same temperature within about {plus_minus}5% (23.6{degrees}C [42.5{degrees}F]). Because of these errors, actual RPV wall heating and cooling rates differed from those prescribed (by up to 29%). Shunting does not appear to be a problem under these conditions. The large temperature measurement errors led to the development of a thermal model that predicts the RPV wall temperature from the temperature of a ball- probe. Comparisons between the model and the experimental data for ball-probes indicate that the model could be a useful tool in predicting the actual RPV temperature based on the indicated ball- probe temperature. The model does not predict the temperature as well for the spring-loaded and air suspended probes.

  10. The Effect of the Presence and Density of Shewanella oneidensis on Nuclear Magnetic Relaxation Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keating, K.; Halsey, J.

    2011-12-01

    A recent interest in the use of non-invasive geophysical methods to detect the presence of and measure the growth of microbes in the subsurface has arisen due to the potential use of such methods to monitor the progress of bioremediation. Previous research to this end has focused on electrical measurements, such as complex resistivity, which are sensitive to the presence of microbes but can be difficult to interpret. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), an emerging near-surface geophysical method, is sensitive to the presence and physiochemical environment of hydrogen. Typically, NMR measurements in geophysics are used to detect hydrogen in water or hydrocarbons and to determine its pore environment; however, NMR imaging measurements have shown that NMR can also detect hydrogen in microbes. Geophysical NMR measurements thus have the potential to directly detect microbes in geologic material or indirectly detect the way in which the presence of microbes alters the physical and chemical properties of a water-saturated geologic material. This laboratory-scale study was designed to explore the effect of the presence and density of microbes on NMR relaxation measurements. Measurements were collected on microbial slurries and microbes in porous media both during microbial growth and on samples with known microbial density. Shewanella oneidensis was used as a representative environmental microbe in this study. The research shows that low field NMR measurements are sensitive to the presence and density of microbes and provides fundamental information required to determine if low-field NMR measurements can be used to monitor microbial growth during bioremediation.

  11. Integration of neural networks with fuzzy reasoning for measuring operational parameters in a nuclear reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Ikonomopoulos, A.; Tsoukalas, L.H. . Dept. of Nuclear Engineering); Uhrig, R.E. )

    1993-10-01

    A novel approach is described for measuring variables with operational significance in a complex system such as a nuclear reactor. The methodology is based on the integration of artificial neural networks with fuzzy reasoning. Neural networks are used to map dynamic time series to a set of user-defined linguistic labels called fuzzy values. The process takes place in a manner analogous to that of measurement. Hence, the entire procedure is referred to as virtual measurement and its software implementation as a virtual measuring device. An optimization algorithm based on information criteria and fuzzy algebra augments the process and assists in the identification of different states of the monitored parameter. The proposed technique is applied for monitoring parameters such as performance, valve position, transient type, and reactivity. The results obtained from the application of the neural network-fuzzy reasoning integration in a high power research reactor clearly demonstrate the excellent tolerance of the virtual measuring device to faulty signals as well as its ability to accommodate noisy inputs.

  12. Nuclear Structure Measurements of Fermium-254 and Advances in Target Production Methodologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gothe, Oliver Ralf

    The Berkeley Gas-filled Separator (BGS) has been upgraded with a new gas control system. It allows for accurate control of hydrogen and helium gas mixtures. This greatly increases the capabilities of the separator by reducing background signals in the focal plane detector for asymmetric nuclear reactions. It has also been shown that gas mixtures can be used to focus the desired reaction products into a smaller area, thereby increasing the experimental efficiency. A new electrodeposition cell has been developed to produce metal oxide targets for experiments at the BGS. The new cell has been characterized and was used to produce americium targets for the production of element 115 in the reaction 243Am(48Ca.3n) 288115. Additionally, a new method of producing targets for nuclear reactions was explored. A procedure for producing targets via Polymer Assisted Deposition (PAD) was developed and targets produced via this method were tested using the nuclear reaction 208Pb(40Ar.4 n)244Fm to determine their in-beam performance. It was determined that the silicon nitride backings used in this procedure are not feasible due to their crystal structures, and alternative backing materials have been tested and proposed. A previously unknown level in 254Fm has been identified at 985.7 keV utilizing a newly developed low background coincident apparatus. 254m was produced in the reaction 208Pb(48Ca. n)254No. Reaction products were guided to the two-clover low background detector setup via a recoil transfer chamber. The new level has been assigned a spin of 2- and has tentatively been identified as the octupole vibration in 254Fm. Transporting evaporation residues to a two-clover, low background detector setup can effectively be used to perform gamma-spectroscopy measurements of nuclei that are not accessible by current common methodologies. This technique provides an excellent addition to previously available tools such as in-beam spectroscopy and gamma-ray tracking arrays.

  13. Ambient Dose Equivalent measured at the Instituto Nacional de Cancerologia Department of Nuclear Medicine

    SciTech Connect

    Avila, O.; Torres-Ulloa, C. L.; Medina, L. A.; Trujillo-Zamudio, F. E.; Gamboa de Buen, I.; Buenfil, A. E.; Brandan, M. E.

    2010-12-07

    Ambient dose equivalent values were determined in several sites at the Instituto Nacional de Cancerologia, Departmento de Medicina Nuclear, using TLD-100 and TLD-900 thermoluminescent dosemeters. Additionally, ambient dose equivalent was measured at a corridor outside the hospitalization room for patients treated with {sup 137}Cs brachytherapy. Dosemeter calibration was performed at the Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Laboratorio de Metrologia, to known {sup 137}Cs gamma radiation air kerma. Radionuclides considered for this study are {sup 131}I, {sup 18}F, {sup 67}Ga, {sup 99m}Tc, {sup 111}In, {sup 201}Tl and {sup 137}Cs, with main gamma energies between 93 and 662 keV. Dosemeters were placed during a five month period in the nuclear medicine rooms (containing gamma-cameras), injection corridor, patient waiting areas, PET/CT study room, hot lab, waste storage room and corridors next to the hospitalization rooms for patients treated with {sup 131}I and {sup 137}Cs. High dose values were found at the waste storage room, outside corridor of {sup 137}Cs brachytherapy patients and PET/CT area. Ambient dose equivalent rate obtained for the {sup 137}Cs brachytherapy corridor is equal to (18.51{+-}0.02)x10{sup -3} mSv/h. Sites with minimum doses are the gamma camera rooms, having ambient dose equivalent rates equal to (0.05{+-}0.03)x10{sup -3} mSv/h. Recommendations have been given to the Department authorities so that further actions are taken to reduce doses at high dose sites in order to comply with the ALARA principle (as low as reasonably achievable).

  14. Parametric study of the energy deposition inside the calorimeter measuring the nuclear heating in Material Testing Reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amharrak, H.; Reynard-Carette, C.; Lyoussi, A.; Carette, M.; Brun, J.; De Vita, C.; Fourmentel, D.; Villard, J.-F.

    2015-11-01

    The nuclear heating measurements in Material Testing Reactors (MTRs) are crucial for the study of nuclear materials and fuels under irradiation. The reference measurements of this nuclear heating are especially performed by a differential calorimeter including a graphite sample material and two calorimetric cells. Then these measurements are used for other experimental conditions in order to predict the nuclear heating and thermal conditions induced in the irradiation devices. This paper will present simulations with MCNP5 Monte-Carlo transport code (using ENDF/B-VI nuclear data library) to evaluate the nuclear heating inside the calorimeter during irradiation campaigns of the CARMEN-1P mock-up inside OSIRIS reactor periphery (MTR based on Saclay, France). The whole complete geometry of the sensor has been considered. The calculation method corresponds to a calculation in two steps. Consequently, we used as an input source in the model, the neutron and photon spectra calculated in various experimental locations tested during the irradiation campaign (H9, H10, H11, D9). After a description of the differential calorimeter sensor, the MCNP5 model used for the calculations of nuclear heating inside the calorimeter elements is introduced by two quantities: KERMA and energy deposition rate per mass unit. The Charged Particle Equilibrium (CPE) inside the calorimeter elements is studied. The contribution of prompt gamma and neutron is determined. A comparison between this total nuclear heating calculation and the experimental results in a graphite sample will be made. Then parametric studies performed on the influence of the various calorimeter components on the nuclear heating are presented and discussed. The studies of the influence of the nature of materials, the sensor jacket, the source type and the comparison of the results obtained for the two calorimetric cells leads to some proposals for the sensor improvement.

  15. The Effect of Measurement Bias on Nuclear Criticality Safety Calculations for WIPP TRUPACT-II Shipments

    SciTech Connect

    Blackwood, Larry G.; Harker, Yale D.

    2000-12-15

    Current nuclear criticality safety limit requirements for transporting TRUPACT-II waste containers to the U.S. Department of Energy's Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) specify that the {sup 239}Pu fissile gram equivalent (FGE) plus two times its measurement error must be {<=}325 g for a payload of fourteen 55-gal drums. The authorized method for calculating a TRUPACT-II FGE measurement error value is to take the square root of the sum of the squared error values for the individual containers (often called root-sum-squares or simply RSS). However, to the extent that the individual drum measurements contain common bias effects (e.g., due to common calibration or other adjustment factors), the corresponding measurement errors are correlated, and simple RSS calculations will underestimate the true error in the TRUPACT-II FGE value.The RSS calculations assume independence, while common bias effects can induce strong correlations between the errors in measurements. Significant bias effects can occur when the matrix characteristics for a particular waste type are not fully accounted for in the measurement process. Depending on the relative size of the bias error compared to precision error, the true measurement error can be greater than twice that calculated by RSS. In such cases, the FGE shipping requirement may not be met. To avoid underestimating the error, bias components should be estimated and propagated separately (combined only at the final step in the TRUPACT-II FGE calculation), or the effect of bias on covariance between measurements must be calculated. These covariance terms then need to be included in the final uncertainty calculations.

  16. Exchange enhancement of the electron g-factor in a two-dimensional semimetal in HgTe quantum wells

    SciTech Connect

    Bovkun, L. S. Krishtopenko, S. S.; Zholudev, M. S.; Ikonnikov, A. V.; Spirin, K. E.; Dvoretsky, S. A.; Mikhailov, N. N.; Teppe, F.; Knap, W.; Gavrilenko, V. I.

    2015-12-15

    The exchange enhancement of the electron g-factor in perpendicular magnetic fields to 12 T in HgTe/CdHgTe quantum wells 20 nm wide with a semimetal band structure is studied. The electron effective mass and g-factor at the Fermi level are determined by analyzing the temperature dependence of the amplitude of Shubnikov–de Haas oscillation in weak fields and near odd Landau-level filling factors ν ≤ 9. The experimental values are compared with theoretical calculations performed in the one-electron approximation using the eight-band kp Hamiltonian. The found dependence of g-factor enhancement on the electron concentration is explained by changes in the contributions of hole- and electron-like states to exchange corrections to the Landau-level energies in the conduction band.

  17. Laser-Induced Fluorescence Measurements for Optical Single Atom Detection for Nuclear Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parzuchowski, Kristen; Singh, Jaideep; Wenzl, Jennifer; Frisbie, Dustin; Johnson, Maegan

    2016-09-01

    We propose a new highly selective detector to measure rare nuclear reactions relevant for nuclear astrophysics. Our primary interest is the 22Ne(α , n) 25Mg reaction, which is a primary source of neutrons for the s-process. Our proposed detector, in conjunction with a recoil separator, captures the recoil products resulting from the reaction in a cryogenically frozen thin film of solid neon. The fluorescence spectra of the captured atoms is shifted from the absorption spectra by hundreds of nanometers. This allows for the optical detection of individual fluorescence photons against a background of intense excitation light. We will describe our initial studies of laser-induced fluorescence of Yb and Mg in solid Ne. Neon is an attractive medium because it is optically transparent and provides efficient, pure, stable, & chemically inert confinement for a wide variety of atomic and molecular species. Yb is used as a test atom because of its similar atomic structure to Mg and much brighter fluorescence signal. This work is supported by funds from Michigan State University.

  18. Dissolution Dynamic Nuclear Polarization Instrumentation for Real-time Enzymatic Reaction Rate Measurements by NMR.

    PubMed

    Balzan, Riccardo; Fernandes, Laetitia; Comment, Arnaud; Pidial, Laetitia; Tavitian, Bertrand; Vasos, Paul R

    2016-02-23

    The main limitation of NMR-based investigations is low sensitivity. This prompts for long acquisition times, thus preventing real-time NMR measurements of metabolic transformations. Hyperpolarization via dissolution DNP circumvents part of the sensitivity issues thanks to the large out-of-equilibrium nuclear magnetization stemming from the electron-to-nucleus spin polarization transfer. The high NMR signal obtained can be used to monitor chemical reactions in real time. The downside of hyperpolarized NMR resides in the limited time window available for signal acquisition, which is usually on the order of the nuclear spin longitudinal relaxation time constant, T1, or, in favorable cases, on the order of the relaxation time constant associated with the singlet-state of coupled nuclei, TLLS. Cellular uptake of endogenous molecules and metabolic rates can provide essential information on tumor development and drug response. Numerous previous hyperpolarized NMR studies have demonstrated the relevancy of pyruvate as a metabolic substrate for monitoring enzymatic activity in vivo. This work provides a detailed description of the experimental setup and methods required for the study of enzymatic reactions, in particular the pyruvate-to-lactate conversion rate in presence of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), by hyperpolarized NMR.

  19. Development of neutron measurement in high gamma field using new nuclear emulsion

    SciTech Connect

    Kawarabayashi, J.; Ishihara, K.; Takagi, K.; Tomita, H.; Iguchi, T.; Naka, T.; Morishima, K.; Maeda, S.

    2011-07-01

    To precisely measure the neutron emissions from a spent fuel assembly of a fast breeder reactor, we formed nuclear emulsions based on a non-sensitized Oscillation Project with Emulsion tracking Apparatus (OPERA) film with AgBr grain sizes of 60, 90, and 160 nm. The efficiency for {sup 252}Cf neutron detection of the new emulsion was calculated to be 0.7 x 10{sup -4}, which corresponded to an energy range from 0.3 to 2 MeV and was consistent with a preliminary estimate based on experimental results. The sensitivity of the new emulsion was also experimentally estimated by irradiating with 565 keV and 14 MeV neutrons. The emulsion with an AgBr grain size of 60 nm had the lowest sensitivity among the above three emulsions but was still sensitive enough to detect protons. Furthermore, the experimental data suggested that there was a threshold linear energy transfer of 15 keV/{mu}m for the new emulsion, below which no silver clusters developed. Further development of nuclear emulsion with an AgBr grain size of a few tens of nanometers will be the next stage of the present study. (authors)

  20. Δg: The new aromaticity index based on g-factor calculation applied for polycyclic benzene rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ucun, Fatih; Tokatlı, Ahmet

    2015-02-01

    In this work, the aromaticity of polycyclic benzene rings was evaluated by the calculation of g-factor for a hydrogen placed perpendicularly at geometrical center of related ring plane at a distance of 1.2 Å. The results have compared with the other commonly used aromatic indices, such as HOMA, NICSs, PDI, FLU, MCI, CTED and, generally been found to be in agreement with them. So, it was proposed that the calculation of the average g-factor as Δg could be applied to study the aromaticity of polycyclic benzene rings without any restriction in the number of benzene rings as a new magnetic-based aromaticity index.

  1. Measuring the Fr Weak Nuclear Charge by Observing a Linear Stark Shift with Small Atomic Samples

    SciTech Connect

    Bouchiat, Marie-Anne

    2008-03-28

    We study the chirality of ground-state alkali atoms in E and B fields, dressed with a circularly-polarized beam near-detuned (< or approx. )1 GHz) from an E-field-assisted forbidden transition such as 7S-8S in Fr. We predict parity violating energy shifts of their sublevels, linear in E and the weak nuclear charge Q{sub W}. A dressing beam of 10 kW/cm{sup 2} at 506 nm produces a shift of {approx}100 {mu}Hz at E=100 V/cm, B > or approx. 50 mG which should be observable with {approx}10{sup 4} Fr atoms confined in an optical dipole trap. We discuss optimal conditions, parameter reversals, and a calibration procedure to measure Q{sub W}.

  2. Nuclear magnetic resonance measurements of velocity distributions in an ultrasonically vibrated granular bed.

    PubMed

    Huntley, J M; Tarvaz, T; Mantle, M D; Sederman, A J; Gladden, L F; Sheikh, N A; Wildman, R D

    2014-05-13

    We report the results of nuclear magnetic resonance imaging experiments on granular beds of mustard grains fluidized by vertical vibration at ultrasonic frequencies. The variation of both granular temperature and packing fraction with height was measured within the three-dimensional cell for a range of vibration frequencies, amplitudes and numbers of grains. Small increases in vibration frequency were found--contrary to the predictions of classical 'hard-sphere' expressions for the energy flux through a vibrating boundary--to result in dramatic reductions in granular temperature. Numerical simulations of the grain-wall interactions, using experimentally determined Hertzian contact stiffness coefficients, showed that energy flux drops significantly as the vibration period approaches the grain-wall contact time. The experiments thus demonstrate the need for new models for 'soft-sphere' boundary conditions at ultrasonic frequencies.

  3. Application of TL dosemeters for dose distribution measurements at high temperatures in nuclear reactors.

    PubMed

    Osvay, M; Deme, S

    2006-01-01

    Al2O3:Mg,Y ceramic thermoluminescence dosemeters were developed at the Institute of Isotopes for high dose applications at room temperatures. The glow curve of Al2O3:Mg,Y exhibits two peaks--one at 250 degrees C (I) and another peak at approximately 400 degrees C (II). In order to extend the application of these dosemeters to high temperatures, the effect of irradiation temperature was investigated using temperature controlled heating system during high dose irradiation at various temperatures (20-100 degrees C). The new calibration and measuring method has been successfully applied for dose mapping within the hermetic zone of the Paks Nuclear Power Plant even at high temperature parts of blocks.

  4. Time of flight measurements of unirradiated and irradiated nuclear graphite under cyclic compressive load

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodel, W.; Atkin, C.; Marsden, B. J.

    2017-04-01

    The time-of-flight technique has been used to investigate the stiffness of nuclear graphite with respect to the grade and grain direction. A loading rig was developed to collect time-of-flight measurements during cycled compressive loading up to 80% of the material's compressive strength and subsequent unloading of specimens along the axis of the applied stress. The transmission velocity (related to Young's modulus), decreased with increasing applied stress; and depending on the graphite grade and orientation, the modulus then increased, decreased or remained constant upon unloading. These tests were repeated while observing the microstructure during the load/unload cycles. Initial decreases in transmission velocity with compressive load are attributed to microcrack formation within filler and binder phases. Three distinct types of behaviour occur on unloading, depending on the grade, irradiation, and loading direction. These different behaviours can be explained in terms of the material microstructure observed from the microscopy performed during loading.

  5. Measurements of alpha particle energy using nuclear tracks in solids methodology.

    PubMed

    Espinosa, G; Amero, C; Gammage, R B

    2002-01-01

    In this paper we present a method for the measurement of alpha particle energy using polycarbonate materials as nuclear track detectors (NTDs). This method is based on the interaction of the radiation with the solid-state materials, using the relationship between the energy deposited in the material by the ionising particle and the track developed after an established chemical process. The determination of the geometrical parameters of the formed track, such as major axis, minor axis and overall track length, permit determination of the energy of the alpha particle. The track analysis is performed automatically using a digital image system, and the data are processed in a PC with commercial software. In this experiment 148Gd, 238U, 230Th, 239Pu and 244Cm alpha particle emitters were used. The values for alpha particle energy resolution, the linear response to energy, the confidence in the results and the automatisation of the procedure make this method a promising analysis system.

  6. Nuclear reaction measurements on tissue-equivalent materials and GEANT4 Monte Carlo simulations for hadrontherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Napoli, M.; Romano, F.; D'Urso, D.; Licciardello, T.; Agodi, C.; Candiano, G.; Cappuzzello, F.; Cirrone, G. A. P.; Cuttone, G.; Musumarra, A.; Pandola, L.; Scuderi, V.

    2014-12-01

    When a carbon beam interacts with human tissues, many secondary fragments are produced into the tumor region and the surrounding healthy tissues. Therefore, in hadrontherapy precise dose calculations require Monte Carlo tools equipped with complex nuclear reaction models. To get realistic predictions, however, simulation codes must be validated against experimental results; the wider the dataset is, the more the models are finely tuned. Since no fragmentation data for tissue-equivalent materials at Fermi energies are available in literature, we measured secondary fragments produced by the interaction of a 55.6 MeV u-1 12C beam with thick muscle and cortical bone targets. Three reaction models used by the Geant4 Monte Carlo code, the Binary Light Ions Cascade, the Quantum Molecular Dynamic and the Liege Intranuclear Cascade, have been benchmarked against the collected data. In this work we present the experimental results and we discuss the predictive power of the above mentioned models.

  7. Nuclear reaction measurements of 95 MeV/u 12C interactions on PMMA for hadrontherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braunn, B.; Labalme, M.; Ban, G.; Chevallier, M.; Colin, J.; Cussol, D.; Dauvergne, D.; Fontbonne, J. M.; Haas, F.; Guertin, A.; Lebhertz, D.; Le Foulher, F.; Pautard, C.; Ray, C.; Rousseau, M.; Salsac, M. D.; Stuttge, L.; Testa, E.; Testa, M.

    2011-11-01

    The ion dose deposition in tissues is characterized by a favorable depth dose profile (i.e. Bragg peak) and a small lateral spread. In order to keep these benefits of ions in cancer treatments, a very high accuracy is required on the dose deposition (±3%). For given target stoichiometry and geometry, the largest uncertainty on the physical dose deposition is due to the ion nuclear fragmentation. We have performed an experiment at GANIL with a 95 MeV/u 12C beam on thick tissue equivalent PMMA targets (thicknesses: 5, 10, 15, 20 and 25 mm). The main goals of this experiment are to provide experimental fragmentation data for benchmarking the physical models used for treatment planning. Production rates, energy and angular distributions of charged fragments have been measured. The purpose of this paper is to present the results of this experiment.

  8. Nuclear reaction measurements on tissue-equivalent materials and GEANT4 Monte Carlo simulations for hadrontherapy.

    PubMed

    De Napoli, M; Romano, F; D'Urso, D; Licciardello, T; Agodi, C; Candiano, G; Cappuzzello, F; Cirrone, G A P; Cuttone, G; Musumarra, A; Pandola, L; Scuderi, V

    2014-12-21

    When a carbon beam interacts with human tissues, many secondary fragments are produced into the tumor region and the surrounding healthy tissues. Therefore, in hadrontherapy precise dose calculations require Monte Carlo tools equipped with complex nuclear reaction models. To get realistic predictions, however, simulation codes must be validated against experimental results; the wider the dataset is, the more the models are finely tuned.Since no fragmentation data for tissue-equivalent materials at Fermi energies are available in literature, we measured secondary fragments produced by the interaction of a 55.6 MeV u(-1) (12)C beam with thick muscle and cortical bone targets. Three reaction models used by the Geant4 Monte Carlo code, the Binary Light Ions Cascade, the Quantum Molecular Dynamic and the Liege Intranuclear Cascade, have been benchmarked against the collected data. In this work we present the experimental results and we discuss the predictive power of the above mentioned models.

  9. Nuclear magnetic resonance measurements of velocity distributions in an ultrasonically vibrated granular bed

    PubMed Central

    Huntley, J. M.; Tarvaz, T.; Mantle, M. D.; Sederman, A. J.; Gladden, L. F.; Sheikh, N. A.; Wildman, R. D.

    2014-01-01

    We report the results of nuclear magnetic resonance imaging experiments on granular beds of mustard grains fluidized by vertical vibration at ultrasonic frequencies. The variation of both granular temperature and packing fraction with height was measured within the three-dimensional cell for a range of vibration frequencies, amplitudes and numbers of grains. Small increases in vibration frequency were found—contrary to the predictions of classical ‘hard-sphere’ expressions for the energy flux through a vibrating boundary—to result in dramatic reductions in granular temperature. Numerical simulations of the grain–wall interactions, using experimentally determined Hertzian contact stiffness coefficients, showed that energy flux drops significantly as the vibration period approaches the grain–wall contact time. The experiments thus demonstrate the need for new models for ‘soft-sphere’ boundary conditions at ultrasonic frequencies. PMID:24711488

  10. Measurement of Low Energy Electronic Recoil Response and Electronic/Nuclear Recoils Discrimination in XENON100

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Jingqiang; Xenon Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The XENON100 detector uses liquid xenon time projection chamber to search for nuclear recoils(NR) caused by hypothetical Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs). The backgrounds are mostly electronic recoils(ER), thus it's crucial to distinguish NR from ER. Using high statistical calibration data from tritiated methane, AmBe and other sources in XENON100, the ER/NR discrimination under different electric fields are measured. The Photon yield and recombination fluctuation of low energy electronic recoils under different fields will also be presented and compared to results from NEST and other experiments, which is crucial to understanding the response of liquid xenon detectors in the energy regime of searching dark matter.

  11. Heat Transfer in Waste Glass Melts - Measurement and Implications for Nuclear Waste Vitrification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chuan

    Thermal properties of waste glass melts, such as high temperature density and thermal conductivity, are relevant to heat transfer processes in nuclear waste vitrification. Experimental measurement techniques were developed and applied to four nuclear waste glasses representative of those currently projected for treatment of Hanford HLW and LAW streams to study heat flow mechanisms in nuclear waste vitrification. Density measurement results by Archimedes' method indicated that densities of the melts investigated varied considerably with composition and temperature. Thermal diffusivities of waste melts were determined at nominal melter operating temperatures using a temperature-wave technique. Thermal conductivities were obtained by combining diffusivity data with the experimentally-acquired densities of the melts and their known heat capacities. The experimental results display quite large positive dependences of conductivities on temperature for some samples and much weaker positive temperature dependences for others. More importantly, there is observed a big change in the slopes of the conductivities versus temperature as temperature is increased for two of the melts, but not for the other two. This behavior was interpreted in terms of the changing contributions of radiation and conduction with temperature and composition dependence of the absorption coefficient. Based on the obtained thermal conductivities, a simple model for a waste glass melter was set up, which was used to analyze the relative contributions of conduction and radiation individually and collectively to the overall heat flow and to investigate factors and conditions that influence the radiation contribution to heat flow. The modeling results showed that unlike the case at lower temperatures, the radiant energy flow through waste melts could be predominant compared with conduction at temperature of about 900 °C or higher. However, heat flow due to radiation was roughly equal to that from

  12. Filter Measurement System for Nuclear Material Storage Canisters. End of Year Report FY 2013

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, Murray E.; Reeves, Kirk P.

    2014-02-03

    A test system has been developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory to measure the aerosol collection efficiency of filters in the lids of storage canisters for special nuclear materials. Two FTS (filter test system) devices have been constructed; one will be used in the LANL TA-55 facility with lids from canisters that have stored nuclear material. The other FTS device will be used in TA-3 at the Radiation Protection Division’s Aerosol Engineering Facility. The TA-3 system will have an expanded analytical capability, compared to the TA-55 system that will be used for operational performance testing. The LANL FTS is intended to be automatic in operation, with independent instrument checks for each system component. The FTS has been described in a complete P&ID (piping and instrumentation diagram) sketch, included in this report. The TA-3 FTS system is currently in a proof-of-concept status, and TA-55 FTS is a production-quality prototype. The LANL specification for (Hagan and SAVY) storage canisters requires the filter shall “capture greater than 99.97% of 0.45-micron mean diameter dioctyl phthalate (DOP) aerosol at the rated flow with a DOP concentration of 65±15 micrograms per liter”. The percent penetration (PEN%) and pressure drop (DP) of fifteen (15) Hagan canister lids were measured by NFT Inc. (Golden, CO) over a period of time, starting in the year 2002. The Los Alamos FTS measured these quantities on June 21, 2013 and on Oct. 30, 2013. The LANL(6-21-2013) results did not statistically match the NFT Inc. data, and the LANL FTS system was re-evaluated, and the aerosol generator was replaced and the air flow measurement method was corrected. The subsequent LANL(10-30-2013) tests indicate that the PEN% results are statistically identical to the NFT Inc. results. The LANL(10-30-2013) pressure drop measurements are closer to the NFT Inc. data, but future work will be investigated. An operating procedure for the FTS (filter test system) was written, and

  13. Traceability for measurements of radioactivity in waste materials arising from nuclear site decommissioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dean, Julian C. J.; Adsley, Ian; Burgess, Peter H.

    2007-08-01

    Site decommissioning is now a major aspect of the work of the nuclear industry worldwide. One of its many technical challenges is the need to measure levels of radioactivity in a range of materials (e.g. concrete, brick and steel) in order that radioactive waste may be identified, sentenced and consigned to the appropriate waste stream in accordance with national regulations. This is done using any of a number of measurement techniques, falling under three categories: (i) bulk monitoring (for γ and neutron emitters), (ii) surface monitoring (predominantly for α and β emitters) and (iii) radiochemical analysis. The last is often used to determine a 'radionuclide fingerprint' for a particular operational area for use in conjunction with data from in situ monitoring. Traceability to national standards can be difficult to demonstrate for measurements of this type. Only a limited number of standards and reference materials are available, and their chemical and physical forms do not match those of the very wide range of samples being measured. Traceability for surface measurements is further complicated by the subjective nature of monitoring using hand-held detectors. This paper describes some of the detector types used for γ non-destructive assay (NDA) and for surface measurements, gives examples of currently available standards and calibration procedures and provides some guidance in how to achieve traceability. A generic analysis regime for an operational area is presented which demonstrates points where traceability can, in principle, be attained. A new methodology for developing 'realistic' large-volume standard sources, traceable to national standards, has been developed by the National Physical Laboratory (NPL), and this is described.

  14. Sensitivity of MR Diffusion Measurements to Variations in Intracellular Structure: Effects of Nuclear Size

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Junzhong; Does, Mark D.; Gore, John C.

    2009-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging measurements of the apparent rate of water diffusion in tumors are sensitive to variations in tissue cellularity, which have been shown useful for characterizing tumors and their responses to treatments. However, because of technical limitations on most MRI systems, conventional pulse gradient spin echo (PGSE) methods measure relatively long time scales, during which water molecules may encounter diffusion barriers at multiple spatial scales, including those much greater than typical cell dimensions. As such they cannot distinguish changes on sub-cellular scales from gross changes in cell density. Oscillating gradient spin echo (OGSE) methods have the potential to distinguish effects on restriction at much shorter time and length scales. Both PGSE and OGSE methods have been studied numerically by simulating diffusion in a three-dimensional, multi-compartment tissue model. The results show that conventional measurements with the PGSE method cannot selectively probe variations over short length scales and, therefore, are relatively insensitive to intracellular structure, whereas results using OGSE methods at moderate gradient frequencies are affected by variations in cell nuclear sizes and can distinguish tissues that differ only over sub-cellular length scales. This additional sensitivity suggests that OGSE imaging may have significant advantages over conventional PGSE methods for characterizing tumors. PMID:19205020

  15. Systematic and Statistical Errors Associated with Nuclear Decay Constant Measurements Using the Counting Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koltick, David; Wang, Haoyu; Liu, Shih-Chieh; Heim, Jordan; Nistor, Jonathan

    2016-03-01

    Typical nuclear decay constants are measured at the accuracy level of 10-2. There are numerous reasons: tests of unconventional theories, dating of materials, and long term inventory evolution which require decay constants accuracy at a level of 10-4 to 10-5. The statistical and systematic errors associated with precision measurements of decays using the counting technique are presented. Precision requires high count rates, which introduces time dependent dead time and pile-up corrections. An approach to overcome these issues is presented by continuous recording of the detector current. Other systematic corrections include, the time dependent dead time due to background radiation, control of target motion and radiation flight path variation due to environmental conditions, and the time dependent effects caused by scattered events are presented. The incorporation of blind experimental techniques can help make measurement independent of past results. A spectrometer design and data analysis is reviewed that can accomplish these goals. The author would like to thank TechSource, Inc. and Advanced Physics Technologies, LLC. for their support in this work.

  16. Aerial measurements of artificial radionuclides in Germany in case of a nuclear accident.

    PubMed

    Winkelmann, I; Strobl, C; Thomas, M

    2004-01-01

    Gamma-ray spectrometric systems carried by helicopters prove to be indispensable for the surveillance of environmental radioactivity. The aerial measurements are an important tool for rapid and large-scale nuclide specific determination of soil contamination after an accidental release of radionuclides from a nuclear facility. Furthermore this technique is also applied for the determination of anomalies of elevated radioactivity of natural radionuclides, the detection of lost radioactive sources and geological mapping. For the measurements the helicopters are equipped with a NaI(Tl)-detector array and a high purity germanium-semiconductor (HPGe) detector. Especially with the HPGe-detector it is possible to clearly identify individual radionuclides. To improve and to guarantee the quality of this method several exercises with different fields of interest have been carried out during the last years. Thereby the main focus is on the improvement of the instrumentation, data handling and data analysis. The results of the airborne radionuclide measurements from the Black Forest which was performed in co-operation with the Swiss National Emergency Operation Centre, are presented here. During this exercise the gamma dose rate, soil contamination due to 137Cs and the specific activities of natural radionuclides in soil were determined.

  17. Time-of-flight mass measurements for nuclear processes in neutron star crusts

    SciTech Connect

    Estrade, Alfredo; Matos, M.; Schatz, Hendrik; Amthor, A. M.; Bazin, D.; Beard, Mary; Becerril, A.; Brown, Edward; Elliot, T; Gade, A.; Galaviz, D.; George, S.; Gupta, Sanjib; Hix, William Raphael; Lau, Rita; Moeller, Peter; Pereira, J.; Portillo, M.; Rogers, A. M.; Shapira, Dan; Smith, E.; Stolz, A.; Wallace, M.; Wiescher, Michael

    2011-01-01

    The location of electron capture heat sources in the crust of accreting neutron stars depends on the masses of extremely neutron-rich nuclei. We present first results from a new implementation of the time-of-flight technique to measure nuclear masses of rare isotopes at the National Supercon- ducting Cyclotron Laboratory. The masses of 16 neutron-rich nuclei in the Sc Ni element range were determined simultaneously, improving the accuracy compared to previous data in 12 cases. The masses of 61V, 63Cr, 66Mn, and 74Ni were measured for the first time with mass excesses of 30.510(890) MeV, 35.280(650) MeV, 36.900(790) MeV, and 49.210(990) MeV, respectively. With the measurement of the 66Mn mass, the location of the two dominant heat sources in the outer crust of accreting neutron stars, which exhibit so called superbursts, is now experimentally constrained. We find that the location of the 66Fe 66Mn electron capture transition occurs sig- nificantly closer to the surface than previously assumed because our new experimental Q-value is 2.1 MeV smaller than predicted by the FRDM mass model. The results also provide new insights into the structure of neutron-rich nuclei around N = 40.

  18. Feasibility study of measuring the 229Th nuclear isomer transition with 233U-doped crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stellmer, Simon; Schreitl, Matthias; Kazakov, Georgy A.; Sterba, Johannes H.; Schumm, Thorsten

    2016-07-01

    We propose a simple approach to measure the energy of the few-eV isomeric state in 229Th. To this end, 233U nuclei are doped into VUV-transparent crystals, where they undergo α decay into 229Th, and, with a probability of 2%, populate the isomeric state. These Thm229 nuclei may decay into the nuclear ground state under emission of the sought-after VUV γ ray, whose wavelength can be determined with a spectrometer. Based on measurements of the optical transmission of 238U:CaF2 crystals in the VUV range, we expect a signal at least two orders of magnitude larger compared to current schemes using surface implantation of recoil nuclei. The signal background is dominated by Cherenkov radiation induced by β decays of the thorium decay chain. We estimate that, even if the isomer undergoes radiative de-excitation with a probability of only 0.1%, the VUV γ ray can be detected within a reasonable measurement time.

  19. phi meson measurements and flavor-dependent nuclear suppression at RHIC-PHENIX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kijima, Kotaro M.; PHENIX Collaboration

    2010-09-01

    Measurement of low mass vector mesons (ρ, ω, phi) provides important information to understand the properties of quark-gluon plasma (QGP) created in the central heavy-ion collision at RHIC. The mass and branching ratio of the phi meson decay into di-electron and di-kaon could be modified in the excited vacuum due to the effect of partial chiral symmetry restoration. In addition, phi meson contains hidden strangeness and hence its measurement can figure out the strangeness production. The suppression pattern of phi meson with high transverse momentum in heavy-ion collisions, compared to scaled p + p results, provides the information to understand the mechanism of production and energy loss of strange quark with the strongly coupled matter. The PHENIX experiment at RHIC has measured the phi meson production in p+p, d+Au and Au+Au collisions at \\sqrt{s_{NN}} up to 200 GeV at mid-rapidity. In this paper, we will present recent PHENIX results about the phi meson production. The mass peaks for phi have been observed in both di-electron and di-kaon invariant mass spectra. The extracted spectra, mass and width of phi in p+p, d+Au and Au+Au are reviewed. Moreover, we compare the nuclear modification factors of various hadrons and discuss flavor dependence of their suppression patterns.

  20. First measurement of nuclear recoil head-tail sense in a fiducialised WIMP dark matter detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battat, J. B. R.; Daw, E.; Ezeribe, A. C.; Gauvreau, J.-L.; Harton, J. L.; Lafler, R.; Lee, E. R.; Loomba, D.; Lumnah, A.; Miller, E. H.; Mouton, F.; Murphy, A. StJ.; Paling, S. M.; Phan, N. S.; Robinson, M.; Sadler, S. W.; Scarff, A.; Schuckman, F. G., II; Snowden-Ifft, D. P.; Spooner, N. J. C.

    2016-10-01

    Recent computational results suggest that directional dark matter detectors have potential to probe for WIMP dark matter particles below the neutrino floor. The DRIFT-IId detector used in this work is a leading directional WIMP search time projection chamber detector. We report the first measurements of the detection of the directional nuclear recoils in a fully fiducialised low-pressure time projection chamber. In this new operational mode, the distance between each event vertex and the readout plane is determined by the measurement of minority carriers produced by adding a small amount of oxygen to the nominal CS2+CF4 target gas mixture. The CS2+CF4+O2 mixture has been shown to enable background-free operation at current sensitivities. Sulfur, fluorine, and carbon recoils were generated using neutrons emitted from a 252Cf source positioned at different locations around the detector. Measurement of the relative energy loss along the recoil tracks allowed the track vector sense, or the so-called head-tail asymmetry parameter, to be deduced. Results show that the previously reported observation of head-tail sensitivity in pure CS2 is well retained after the addition of oxygen to the gas mixture.

  1. Characterization of organic contaminants in porous media using nuclear magnetic resonance and spectral induced polarization measurements.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rupert, Y. K.

    2015-12-01

    The remediation and monitoring of soils and groundwater contaminated with organic compounds is an important goal of many environmental restoration efforts. This laboratory research focuses on combining two innovative geophysical methods: nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and spectral induced polarization (SIP) to assess their suitability to characterize and quantify organic contaminants in porous media. Toluene, a light non-aqueous phase liquid (LNAPL), and ethoxy-nonafluorobutane, an engineered dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL), have been selected as representative organic contaminants. Low-field NMR relaxation time (T2) measurements and diffusion-relaxation (D-T2) correlation measurements, as well as low frequency SIP measurements (<10 kHz) are performed to quantify the amount of these two organic compounds in the presence of water in three types of porous media (sands, clay, and various sand-clay mixtures). The T2, D-T2, and SIP measurements are made on water, toluene, and the synthetic DNAPL in each porous media to understand the effect of different porous media on the NMR and SIP responses in each fluid. We then plan to make measurements on water-organic mixtures with varied concentrations of organic compounds in each porous medium to resolve the NMR and SIP response of the organic contaminants from that of water and to quantify the amount of organic contaminants. Building a relationship between SIP and NMR signatures from organic contaminants not only provides a fundamental yet important petrophysical relationship, but also builds a framework for continued investigation into how these two methods synergize. This will also provide spatially dense information about organic contaminated natural sediments at scales that will improve the quantitative characterization and remediation of contaminated sites.The remediation and monitoring of soils and groundwater contaminated with organic compounds is an important goal of many environmental restoration efforts

  2. G factor of the 2/sub 1//sup +/ state in /sup 140/Ba and /sup 142/Ba

    SciTech Connect

    Pauling, L.

    1987-06-01

    A simple calculation on the basis of the revolving cluster model leads to the value 0.495 for the g factor of /sub //sub <1/ /sub 56//sup 42/Ba/sub 86/, in agreement with the experimental value 0.48 +- 0.14. The same value is predicted for /sup 140/Ba.

  3. Correlated biofilm imaging, transport and metabolism measurements via combined nuclear magnetic resonance and confocal microscopy

    PubMed Central

    McLean, Jeffrey S; Ona, Ositadinma N; Majors, Paul D

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial biofilms are complex, three-dimensional communities found nearly everywhere in nature and are also associated with many human diseases. Detailed metabolic information is critical to understand and exploit beneficial biofilms as well as combat antibiotic-resistant, disease-associated forms. However, most current techniques used to measure temporal and spatial metabolite profiles in these delicate structures are invasive or destructive. Here, we describe imaging, transport and metabolite measurement methods and their correlation for live, non-invasive monitoring of biofilm processes. This novel combination of measurements is enabled by the use of an integrated nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and confocal laser scanning microscope (CLSM). NMR methods provide macroscopic structure, metabolic pathway and rate data, spatially resolved metabolite concentrations and water diffusion profiles within the biofilm. In particular, current depth-resolved spectroscopy methods are applied to detect metabolites in 140–190 nl volumes within biofilms of the dissimilatory metal-reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1 and the oral bacterium implicated in caries disease, Streptococcus mutans strain UA159. The perfused sample chamber also contains a transparent optical window allowing for the collection of complementary fluorescence information using a unique, in-magnet CLSM. In this example, the entire three-dimensional biofilm structure was imaged using magnetic resonance imaging. This was then correlated to a fluorescent CLSM image by employing a green fluorescent protein reporter construct of S. oneidensis. Non-invasive techniques such as described here, which enable measurements of dynamic metabolic processes, especially in a depth-resolved fashion, are expected to advance our understanding of processes occurring within biofilm communities. PMID:18253132

  4. Establishing protective long term measures after severe nuclear accidents using multiple criteria.

    PubMed

    Papazoglou, I A; Kollas, J G

    1997-05-01

    This paper proposes a methodology supporting decisions on protective measures following severe nuclear accidents and demonstrates its use. A multicriteria decision analysis approach is adopted where value tradeoffs are postponed until the very last stage of the decision process. All feasible solutions are implicitly considered and evaluated in the chosen criteria. Technically inferior solutions are excluded. Only the non-dominated or efficient solutions forming the "efficient frontier" are retained and presented to the decision makers. Implementation of inefficient solutions is in this way avoided. A choice among the efficient solutions, although it implies value tradeoffs among the multiple criteria, avoids the direct and apriori assessment of preferences. An interactive computer package has been developed with which the decision maker can choose a point on the efficient frontier in the consequence space and immediately see the corresponding alternative in the decision space. The methodology is demonstrated through an application on the choice among possible protective measures in contaminated areas of the former USSR after the Chernobyl accident using as criteria the collective effective life-time dose received by the population and the cost associated with each possible decision.

  5. Revised rates for the stellar triple-α process from measurement of 12C nuclear resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fynbo, Hans O. U.; Diget, Christian Aa.; Bergmann, Uffe C.; Borge, Maria J. G.; Cederkäll, Joakim; Dendooven, Peter; Fraile, Luis M.; Franchoo, Serge; Fedosseev, Valentin N.; Fulton, Brian R.; Huang, Wenxue; Huikari, Jussi; Jeppesen, Henrik B.; Jokinen, Ari S.; Jones, Peter; Jonson, Björn; Köster, Ulli; Langanke, Karlheinz; Meister, Mikael; Nilsson, Thomas; Nyman, Göran; Prezado, Yolanda; Riisager, Karsten; Rinta-Antila, Sami; Tengblad, Olof; Turrion, Manuela; Wang, Youbao; Weissman, Leonid; Wilhelmsen, Katarina; Äystö, Juha; ISOLDE Collaboration

    2005-01-01

    In the centres of stars where the temperature is high enough, three α-particles (helium nuclei) are able to combine to form 12C because of a resonant reaction leading to a nuclear excited state. (Stars with masses greater than ~0.5 times that of the Sun will at some point in their lives have a central temperature high enough for this reaction to proceed.) Although the reaction rate is of critical significance for determining elemental abundances in the Universe, and for determining the size of the iron core of a star just before it goes supernova, it has hitherto been insufficiently determined. Here we report a measurement of the inverse process, where a 12C nucleus decays to three α-particles. We find a dominant resonance at an energy of ~11MeV, but do not confirm the presence of a resonance at 9.1MeV (ref. 3). We show that interference between two resonances has important effects on our measured spectrum. Using these data, we calculate the triple-α rate for temperatures from 107K to 1010K and find significant deviations from the standard rates. Our rate below ~5 × 107K is higher than the previous standard, implying that the critical amounts of carbon that catalysed hydrogen burning in the first stars are produced twice as fast as previously believed. At temperatures above 109K, our rate is much less, which modifies predicted nucleosynthesis in supernovae.

  6. Measurements for spin inversion and noninversion in successive decays via nuclear magnetic resonance on oriented nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Ohya, S.; Ohtsubo, T.; Komatsuzaki, K.; Cho, D.J.; Muto, S.

    1996-09-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance on oriented nuclei (NMR-ON) measurements were performed on the successive decays of {sup 89}Zr-{sup 89}Y{sup {ital m}} and {sup 191}Os-{sup 191}Ir{sup {ital m}} in Fe. The NMR-ON spectra of {sup 89}Zr{ital Fe} and {sup 191}Os{ital Fe} were obtained by detecting {gamma} rays from the decay of the isomers, {sup 89}Y{sup m} and {sup 191}Ir{sup m}, respectively. For {sup 89}Zr{ital Fe}, the anisotropy of the {gamma} ray increased at the resonance. On the other hand, for {sup 191}Os{ital Fe} the anisotropy of the {gamma} ray decreased at the resonance. These phenomena were explained using the spin inversion and spin noninversion processes including the lifetimes of the isomers and spin lattice relaxation times. NMR-ON measurements for such spin inversion and noninversion processes were reported. The resonance spectra were also observed by detecting {beta} rays from {sup 89}Zr and {sup 191}Os. In these experiments the magnetic moments of {sup 89}Zr and {sup 191}Os were determined to be {minus}1.08 (2) {mu}{sub N} and 0.962 (28) {mu}{sub N}, respectively. The signs of the magnetic moments of {sup 89}Y{sup m} and {sup 191}Ir{sup m} were also determined to be positive. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  7. High-pressure autoclave for multipurpose nuclear magnetic resonance measurements up to 10 MPa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behr, W.; Haase, A.; Reichenauer, G.; Fricke, J.

    1999-05-01

    High-pressure nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is an established method in NMR spectroscopy: on-line coupling of high-performance liquid chromatography with NMR, for example, reveals structural information which cannot be obtained with any other method. However, applications has been focused solely on high-pressure NMR spectroscopy, even though high-pressure NMR imaging allows in situ studies of processes such as the fluid exchange in porous media. A versatile high-pressure autoclave for NMR imaging is described in this article. The autoclave allows measurements in any horizontal NMR imager using magnetic field coil systems with an inside diameter of more than 70 mm. Any sample with a diameter up to 28 mm and a length of about 200 mm can be investigated. The autoclave is constructed for operating pressures up to 10 MPa and is temperature controlled between 10 and 60 °C. The materials of the high-pressure cell which are the thermoplastic polyetheretherketon (PEEK) for the pressure tube and brass (63% Cu, 37% Zn) for the caps also permit investigations with aggressive fluids such as supercritical carbon dioxide. Inlet and outlet valves allow replacement of fluids and pressure variations in the autoclave during the NMR measurement. FLASH NMR images of the fluid exchange of methanol for liquid carbon dioxide in silica alcogels at 6.5 MPa are presented in order to demonstrate possible applications.

  8. Correlated Biofilm Imaging, Transport and Metabolism Measurements via Combined Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and Confocal Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Mclean, Jeffrey S.; Ona, Ositadinma; Majors, Paul D.

    2008-02-18

    Bacterial biofilms are complex, three-dimensional, communities that are found nearly everywhere in nature1 and are being recognized as the cause of treatment-resistant infections1 2. Advanced methods are required to characterize their collective and spatial patterns of metabolism however most techniques are invasive or destructive. Here we describe the use of a combined confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) microscopy system to monitor structure, mass transport, and metabolism in active biofilms. Non-invasive NMR methods provide macroscopic structure along with spatially-resolved metabolite profiles and diffusion measurements. CLSM enables monitoring of cells by fluorescent protein reporters to investigate biofilm structure and gene expression concurrently. A planar sample chamber design facilitates depth-resolved measurements on 140 nL sample volumes under laminar flow conditions. The techniques and approaches described here are applicable to environmental and medically relevant microbial communities, thus providing key metabolic information for promoting beneficial biofilms and treating associated diseases.

  9. The aftermath of the Fukushima nuclear accident: Measures to contain groundwater contamination.

    PubMed

    Gallardo, Adrian H; Marui, Atsunao

    2016-03-15

    Several measures are being implemented to control groundwater contamination at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Plant. This paper presents an overview of work undertaken to contain the spread of radionuclides, and to mitigate releases to the ocean via hydrological pathways. As a first response, contaminated water is being held in tanks while awaiting treatment. Limited storage capacity and the risk of leakage make the measure unsustainable in the long term. Thus, an impervious barrier has been combined with a drain system to minimize the discharge of groundwater offshore. Caesium in seawater at the plant port has largely dropped, although some elevated concentrations are occasionally recorded. Moreover, a dissimilar decline of the radioactivity in fish could indicate additional sources of radionuclides intake. An underground frozen shield is also being constructed around the reactors. This structure would reduce inflows to the reactors and limit the interaction between fresh and contaminated waters. Additional strategies include groundwater abstraction and paving of surfaces to lower water levels and further restrict the mobilisation of radionuclides. Technical difficulties and public distrust pose an unprecedented challenge to the site remediation. Nevertheless, the knowledge acquired during the initial work offers opportunities for better planning and more rigorous decisions in the future.

  10. Time-of-Flight Mass Measurements for Nuclear Processes in Neutron Star Crusts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estradé, A.; Matoš, M.; Schatz, H.; Amthor, A. M.; Bazin, D.; Beard, M.; Becerril, A.; Brown, E. F.; Cyburt, R.; Elliot, T.; Gade, A.; Galaviz, D.; George, S.; Gupta, S. S.; Hix, W. R.; Lau, R.; Lorusso, G.; Möller, P.; Pereira, J.; Portillo, M.; Rogers, A. M.; Shapira, D.; Smith, E.; Stolz, A.; Wallace, M.; Wiescher, M.

    2011-10-01

    We present results from time-of-flight nuclear mass measurements at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory that are relevant for neutron star crust models. The masses of 16 neutron-rich nuclei in the scandium-nickel range were determined simultaneously, with the masses of V61, Cr63, Mn66, and Ni74 measured for the first time with mass excesses of -30.510(890)MeV, -35.280(650)MeV, -36.900(790)MeV, and -49.210(990)MeV, respectively. With these results the locations of the dominant electron capture heat sources in the outer crust of accreting neutron stars that exhibit super bursts are now experimentally constrained. We find the experimental Q value for the Fe66→Mn66 electron capture to be 2.1 MeV (2.6σ) smaller than predicted, resulting in the transition occurring significantly closer to the neutron star surface.

  11. Method for Non-Intrusively Identifying a Contained Material Utilizing Uncollided Nuclear Transmission Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Morrison, John L.; Stephens, Alan G.; Grover Blaine S.

    1999-02-26

    An improved nuclear diagnostic method identifies a contained target material by measuring on-axis, mono-energetic uncollided particle radiation transmitted through a target material for two penetrating radiation beam energies, and applying specially developed algorithms to estimate a ratio of macroscopic neutron cross-sections for the uncollided particle radiation at the two energies, where the penetrating radiation is a neutron beam, or a ratio of linear attenuation coefficients for the uncollided particle radiation at the two energies, where the penetrating radiation is a gamma-ray beam. Alternatively, the measurements are used to derive a minimization formula based on the macroscopic neutron cross-sections for the uncollided particle radiation at the two neutron beam energies, or the linear attenuation coefficients for the uncollided particle radiation at the two gamma-ray beam energies. A candidate target material database, including known macroscopic neutron cross-sections or linear attenuation coefficients for target materials at the selected neutron or gamma-ray beam energies, is used to approximate the estimated ratio or to solve the minimization formula, such that the identity of the contained target material is discovered.

  12. The phonon density of states measured with synchrotron radiation and nuclear resonances.

    SciTech Connect

    Sturhahn, W.; Hu, M.; Shastri, S.; Toellner, T.

    2001-01-26

    In this experiment, we will use synchrotron radiation to measure the density of states of vibrational excitations (phonons.) Each group of students will conduct an experiment at sector 3-ID of the Advanced Photon Source, the nation's premier synchrotron radiation facility. We provide one support staff per group, i.e., Drs. Michael Hu, Sarvjit Shastri, Wolfgang Sturhahn, and Tom Toellner will help their group to perform the experiment and interpret the data. After data collection (1-2 h per group), the remaining time will be spent with evaluation and interpretation. In addition to your own data, we provide similar sets of data. Computer hardware (iMac running as X-terminals) and software for data manipulation will be provided. It is important that you understand the basic principles of the experimental method. Therefore we strongly recommend that you read the next section and the attached article Phonon Density of States Measured by Inelastic Nuclear Resonant Scattering. You are expected to use this description to familiarize yourself with the experimental setup and its individual components before the start of the experiment. You should be able to solve at least 75% of the quiz correctly. If you have particular questions or a general problem in understanding this document, please contact Dr. W. Sturhahn, Bldg. 431, Rm. D007, tel. 0163.

  13. Method for non-intrusively identifying a contained material utilizing uncollided nuclear transmission measurements

    DOEpatents

    Morrison, John L.; Stephens, Alan G.; Grover, S. Blaine

    2001-11-20

    An improved nuclear diagnostic method identifies a contained target material by measuring on-axis, mono-energetic uncollided particle radiation transmitted through a target material for two penetrating radiation beam energies, and applying specially developed algorithms to estimate a ratio of macroscopic neutron cross-sections for the uncollided particle radiation at the two energies, where the penetrating radiation is a neutron beam, or a ratio of linear attenuation coefficients for the uncollided particle radiation at the two energies, where the penetrating radiation is a gamma-ray beam. Alternatively, the measurements are used to derive a minimization formula based on the macroscopic neutron cross-sections for the uncollided particle radiation at the two neutron beam energies, or the linear attenuation coefficients for the uncollided particle radiation at the two gamma-ray beam energies. A candidate target material database, including known macroscopic neutron cross-sections or linear attenuation coefficients for target materials at the selected neutron or gamma-ray beam energies, is used to approximate the estimated ratio or to solve the minimization formula, such that the identity of the contained target material is discovered.

  14. Material accountancy measurement techniques in dry-powdered processing of nuclear spent fuels.

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, S. F.

    1999-03-24

    The paper addresses the development of inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICPMS), thermal ionization-mass spectrometry (TIMS), alpha-spectrometry, and gamma spectrometry techniques for in-line analysis of highly irradiated (18 to 64 GWD/T) PWR spent fuels in a dry-powdered processing cycle. The dry-powdered technique for direct elemental and isotopic accountancy assay measurements was implemented without the need for separation of the plutonium, uranium and fission product elements in the bulk powdered process. The analyses allow the determination of fuel burn-up based on the isotopic composition of neodymium and/or cesium. An objective of the program is to develop the ICPMS method for direct fissile nuclear materials accountancy in the dry-powdered processing of spent fuel. The ICPMS measurement system may be applied to the KAERI DUPIC (direct use of spent PWR fuel in CANDU reactors) experiment, and in a near-real-time mode for international safeguards verification and non-proliferation policy concerns.

  15. Precision measurement of the nuclear polarization of laser-cooled, optically pumped 37K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behr, J. A.; Craiciu, I.; Gorelov, A.; Smale, S.; Warner, C. L.; Lawrence, L.; Fenker, B.; Behling, R. S.; Mehlman, M.; Melconian, D.; Gwinner, G.; Anholm, M.; McNeil, J.; Ashery, D.; Cohen, I.

    2016-09-01

    We have spin-polarized laser cooled 37K by direct optical pumping and measured the polarization to < 0 . 1 % accuracy [B. Fenker arXiv:1602.04526]. Our polarization method naturally monitors the polarization of the nuclei as they decay. The atoms absorb circularly polarized light directed along the quantization axis near-resonant with the atomic S1 / 2 to P1 / 2 transition. Once the atoms are polarized, they stop absorbing light, so the ratio between the final P1 / 2 population and its initial maximum probes the degree of polarization. We monitor the P1 / 2 population using UV photons energetic enough to photoionize the P1 / 2 state but not the S1 / 2 state. Since the final P1 / 2 population nearly vanishes, 5% precision on the final/maximum ratio determines the polarization to 0.1%. We eliminate a nonclassical effect, coherent population trapping, which could produce poorly polarized unexcited atoms. We show planned upgrades. Our result for the nuclear vector polarization during our Aβ measurement [B. Fenker, this conference] was 99.13(9)%, not the dominant systematic. Supported by NSERC, D.O.E., Israel Science Foundation. TRIUMF receives federal funding via a contribution agreement with the National Research Council of Canada.

  16. 7Li relaxation time measurements at very low magnetic field by 1H dynamic nuclear polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeghib, Nadir; Grucker, Daniel

    2001-09-01

    Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) of water protons was used to measure the relaxation time of lithium at very low magnetic field as a demonstration of the use of DNP for nuclei less abundant than water protons. Lithium (Li+) was chosen because it is an efficient treatment for manic-depressive illness, with an unknown action mechanism. After having recalled the theoretical basis of a three-spin system comprising two nuclei - the water proton of the solvent, the dissolved Li+ ion and the free electron of a free radical - we have developed a transient solution in order to optimize potential biological applications of Li DNP. The three-spin model has allowed computation of all the parameters of the system - the longitudinal relaxation rate per unit of free radical concentration, the dipolar and scalar part of the coupling between the nuclei and the electron, and the maximum signal enhancement achievable for both proton and lithium spins. All these measurements have been obtained solely through the detection of the proton resonance.

  17. Nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation and diffusion measurements as a proxy for soil properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duschl, Markus; Pohlmeier, Andreas; Galvosas, Petrik; Vereecken, Harry

    2013-04-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) relaxation and NMR diffusion measurements are two of a series of fast and non-invasive NMR applications widely used e.g. as well logging tools in petroleum exploration [1]. For experiments with water, NMR relaxation measures the relaxation behaviour of former excited water molecules, and NMR diffusion evaluates the self-diffusion of water. Applied in porous media, both relaxation and diffusion measurements depend on intrinsic properties of the media like pore size distribution, connectivity and tortuosity of the pores, and water saturation [2, 3]. Thus, NMR can be used to characterise the pore space of porous media not only in consolidated sediments but also in soil. The physical principle behind is the relaxation of water molecules in an external magnetic field after excitation. In porous media water molecules in a surface layer of the pores relax faster than the molecules in bulk water because of interactions with the pore wall. Thus, the relaxation in smaller pores is generally faster than in bigger pores resulting in a relaxation time distribution for porous media with a range of pore sizes like soil [4]. In NMR diffusion experiments, there is an additional encoding of water molecules by application of a magnetic field gradient. Subsequent storage of the magnetization and decoding enables the determination of the mean square displacement and therefore of the self-diffusion of the water molecules [5]. Employing various relaxation and diffusion experiments, we get a measure of the surface to volume ratio of the pores and the tortuosity of the media. In this work, we show the characterisation of a set of sand and soil samples covering a wide range of textural classes by NMR methods. Relaxation times were monitored by the Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill sequence and analysed using inverse Laplace transformation. Apparent self-diffusion constants were detected by a 13-intervall pulse sequence and variation of the storage time. We

  18. Measurement of soil carbon oxidation state and oxidative ratio by 13C nuclear magnetic resonance

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hockaday, W.C.; Masiello, C.A.; Randerson, J.T.; Smernik, R.J.; Baldock, J.A.; Chadwick, O.A.; Harden, J.W.

    2009-01-01

    The oxidative ratio (OR) of the net ecosystem carbon balance is the ratio of net O2 and CO2 fluxes resulting from photosynthesis, respiration, decomposition, and other lateral and vertical carbon flows. The OR of the terrestrial biosphere must be well characterized to accurately estimate the terrestrial CO2 sink using atmospheric measurements of changing O2 and CO2 levels. To estimate the OR of the terrestrial biosphere, measurements are needed of changes in the OR of aboveground and belowground carbon pools associated with decadal timescale disturbances (e.g., land use change and fire). The OR of aboveground pools can be measured using conventional approaches including elemental analysis. However, measuring the OR of soil carbon pools is technically challenging, and few soil OR data are available. In this paper we test three solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques for measuring soil OR, all based on measurements of the closely related parameter, organic carbon oxidation state (Cox). Two of the three techniques make use of a molecular mixing model which converts NMR spectra into concentrations of a standard suite of biological molecules of known C ox. The third technique assigns Cox values to each peak in the NMR spectrum. We assess error associated with each technique using pure chemical compounds and plant biomass standards whose Cox and OR values can be directly measured by elemental analyses. The most accurate technique, direct polarization solid-state 13C NMR with the molecular mixing model, agrees with elemental analyses to ??0.036 Cox units (??0.009 OR units). Using this technique, we show a large natural variability in soil Cox and OR values. Soil Cox values have a mean of -0.26 and a range from -0.45 to 0.30, corresponding to OR values of 1.08 ?? 0.06 and a range from 0.96 to 1.22. We also estimate the OR of the carbon flux from a boreal forest fire. Analysis of soils from nearby intact soil profiles imply that soil carbon losses associated

  19. New neutron cross-section measurements on {sup 19}F, {sup 39,41}K, {sup 55}Mn, and {sup 103}Rh for improved nuclear criticality safety

    SciTech Connect

    Guber, K. H.; Leal, L. C.; Sayer, R. O.; Koehler, P. E.; Wiarda, D.; Valentine, T. E.; Derrien, H.; Harvey, J. A.; Kopecky, S.; Siegler, P.; Schillebeeckx, P.; Wynants, R.; Ivanov, I.; Borella, A.

    2006-07-01

    A series of new measurements has been undertaken in response to deficiencies identified in nuclear data libraries of crucial importance to the Nuclear Criticality Safety Program as well as for burnup credit studies involving the transportation of spent nuclear fuel. New data and evaluations including covariances are required for several stable fission products as well as for materials found in mixtures with uranium. (authors)

  20. Measurement and Analysis of Gamma-Rays Emitted From Spent Nuclear Fuel Above 3 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, Douglas C.; Anderson, Elaina R.; Anderson, Kevin K.; Campbell, Luke W.; Fast, James E.; Jarman, Kenneth D.; Kulisek, Jonathan A.; Orton, Christopher R.; Runkle, Robert C.; Stave, Sean C.

    2013-12-01

    The gamma-ray spectrum of spent nuclear fuel in the 3- to 6-MeV energy range is important for active interrogation since emitted gamma rays emitted from nuclear decay are not expected to interfere with measurements in this energy region. There is, unfortunately, a dearth of empirical measurements from spent nuclear fuel in this region. This work is an initial attempt to partially ll this gap by presenting an analysis of gamma-ray spectra collected from a set of spent nuclear fuel sources using a high-purity germanium detector array. This multi-crystal array possesses a large collection volume, providing high energy resolution up to 16 MeV. The results of these measurements establish the continuum count-rate in the energy region between 3- and 6-MeV. Also assessed is the potential for peaks from passive emissions to interfere with peak measurements resulting from active interrogation delayed emissions. As one of the first documented empirical measurements of passive emissions from spent fuel for energies above 3 MeV, this work provides a foundation for active interrogation model validation and detector development.

  1. Solution of resource allocation problem for identification of cost-effective measures to reduce nuclear proliferation risks

    SciTech Connect

    Andrianov, A.; Kuptsov, I.

    2013-07-01

    This report presents a methodology of selection of cost-effective measures to reduce nuclear proliferation risks. The methodology relies on a graded security model used in practice in different applications. The method is based on the controlled finite Markov chain approach set in combination with discrete dynamic programming and MCDM (Multi Criteria Decision Making) techniques that enables the expert to select the cost-effective measures to reduce nuclear proliferation risks depending on availability of resources. The analysis performed with different number of possible measures confirms the conclusions that the implementation of extra-large costs may not produce the required effect, and the increase in resources above a certain level does not appear sensitive. Diversification in improving the effectiveness of other measures seems more rational and efficient for the whole system than the unlimited improvement of the effectiveness of only one measure.

  2. Robust determination of surface relaxivity from nuclear magnetic resonance DT(2) measurements.

    PubMed

    Luo, Zhi-Xiang; Paulsen, Jeffrey; Song, Yi-Qiao

    2015-10-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is a powerful tool to probe into geological materials such as hydrocarbon reservoir rocks and groundwater aquifers. It is unique in its ability to obtain in situ the fluid type and the pore size distributions (PSD). The T1 and T2 relaxation times are closely related to the pore geometry through the parameter called surface relaxivity. This parameter is critical for converting the relaxation time distribution into the PSD and so is key to accurately predicting permeability. The conventional way to determine the surface relaxivity ρ2 had required independent laboratory measurements of the pore size. Recently Zielinski et al. proposed a restricted diffusion model to extract the surface relaxivity from the NMR diffusion-T2 relaxation (DT2) measurement. Although this method significantly improved the ability to directly extract surface relaxivity from a pure NMR measurement, there are inconsistencies with their model and it relies on a number of preset parameters. Here we propose an improved signal model to incorporate a scalable LT and extend their method to extract the surface relaxivity based on analyzing multiple DT2 maps with varied diffusion observation time. With multiple diffusion observation times, the apparent diffusion coefficient correctly describes the restricted diffusion behavior in samples with wide PSDs, and the new method does not require predetermined parameters, such as the bulk diffusion coefficient and tortuosity. Laboratory experiments on glass beads packs with the beads diameter ranging from 50 μm to 500 μm are used to validate the new method. The extracted diffusion parameters are consistent with their known values and the determined surface relaxivity ρ2 agrees with the expected value within ±7%. This method is further successfully applied on a Berea sandstone core and yields surface relaxivity ρ2 consistent with the literature.

  3. Skeletal Muscle Quantitative Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Spectroscopy as an Outcome Measure for Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Carlier, Pierre G.; Marty, Benjamin; Scheidegger, Olivier; Loureiro de Sousa, Paulo; Baudin, Pierre-Yves; Snezhko, Eduard; Vlodavets, Dmitry

    2016-01-01

    Recent years have seen tremendous progress towards therapy of many previously incurable neuromuscular diseases. This new context has acted as a driving force for the development of novel non-invasive outcome measures. These can be organized in three main categories: functional tools, fluid biomarkers and imagery. In the latest category, nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (NMRI) offers a considerable range of possibilities for the characterization of skeletal muscle composition, function and metabolism. Nowadays, three NMR outcome measures are frequently integrated in clinical research protocols. They are: 1/ the muscle cross sectional area or volume, 2/ the percentage of intramuscular fat and 3/ the muscle water T2, which quantity muscle trophicity, chronic fatty degenerative changes and oedema (or more broadly, “disease activity”), respectively. A fourth biomarker, the contractile tissue volume is easily derived from the first two ones. The fat fraction maps most often acquired with Dixon sequences have proven their capability to detect small changes in muscle composition and have repeatedly shown superior sensitivity over standard functional evaluation. This outcome measure will more than likely be the first of the series to be validated as an endpoint by regulatory agencies. The versatility of contrast generated by NMR has opened many additional possibilities for characterization of the skeletal muscle and will result in the proposal of more NMR biomarkers. Ultra-short TE (UTE) sequences, late gadolinium enhancement and NMR elastography are being investigated as candidates to evaluate skeletal muscle interstitial fibrosis. Many options exist to measure muscle perfusion and oxygenation by NMR. Diffusion NMR as well as texture analysis algorithms could generate complementary information on muscle organization at microscopic and mesoscopic scales, respectively. 31P NMR spectroscopy is the reference technique to assess muscle energetics non-invasively during and

  4. Finding the "g"-Factor in Brain Structure Using the Method of Correlated Vectors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colom, Roberto; Jung, Rex E.; Haier, Richard J.

    2006-01-01

    It is unclear whether brain mechanisms underlying human intelligence are distributed throughout the brain or mainly concentrated in the frontal lobes. Data are inconsistent possibly due, at least in part, to the different ways the construct of intelligence is measured. Here we apply the method of correlated vectors to determine how the general…

  5. Driving mechanism for damping and g-factor in non-amorphous ferromagnetic CoFeZr ultrathin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Graët, C.; Spenato, D.; Beaulieu, N.; Dekadjevi, D. T.; Jay, J.-Ph.; Pogossian, S. P.; Warot-Fonrose, B.; Ben Youssef, J.

    2016-07-01

    We demonstrate that an in-plane uniaxial anisotropy may be induced in non-amorphous soft CoFeZr films. We used broadband ferromagnetic resonance spectroscopy and complex permeability spectra to investigate the spin dynamics in CoFeZr films. We report a systematic study of the FM thickness on the fundamental dynamic parameters such as the effective magnetisation, the g-factor and relaxation mechanisms. Our study reveals that the decrease of the effective magnetisation mesured with FMR with thickness is not due to perpendicular anisotropy but to low dimentionality. Moreover, we observed a decrease of the g-factor with thickness and a modification of the ratio of the orbital to the spin magnetic moment. These films exhibit good high-frequency performance red (i.e. high permeability in a broad frequency range and a low damping) at low thickness of about a few nanometers.

  6. Nuclear-magnetic-resonance measurements of the hydrogen dynamics in nanocrystalline graphite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanik, E.; Majer, G.; Orimo, S.; Ichikawa, T.; Fujii, H.

    2005-08-01

    Hydrogen-loaded nanocrystalline graphite samples have been prepared by mechanical milling under a hydrogen atmosphere. Milling vials and balls made of agate and ZrO2 have been used to prepare samples with hydrogen contents between 1 and 2wt%. The proton nuclear-magnetic-resonance (H1-NMR) spectra of these samples are well represented by the sum of a broad Gaussian and a more narrow Lorentzian line corresponding to hydrogen in C-H covalent bonds as well as to hydrogen in methyl groups. The temperature dependence of the Lorentzian line can be ascribed to a hindered rotation of the methyl groups. The corresponding activation enthalpy of about 0.12eV has been deduced from the spin-lattice relaxation rates between 250 and 450K. Below about 200K the relaxation rates are temperature independent but they depend strongly on the NMR frequency and on the parameters of the sample preparation. The relaxation due to paramagnetic impurities as well as the cross relaxation of the proton spins with spins of quadrupolar impurity nuclei are proposed to contribute significantly to the measured spin-lattice relaxation rates.

  7. Symmetry based frequency domain processing to remove harmonic noise from surface nuclear magnetic resonance measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hein, Annette; Larsen, Jakob Juul; Parsekian, Andrew D.

    2017-02-01

    Surface nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is a unique geophysical method due to its direct sensitivity to water. A key limitation to overcome is the difficulty of making surface NMR measurements in environments with anthropogenic electromagnetic noise, particularly constant frequency sources such as powerlines. Here we present a method of removing harmonic noise by utilizing frequency domain symmetry of surface NMR signals to reconstruct portions of the spectrum corrupted by frequency-domain noise peaks. This method supplements the existing NMR processing workflow and is applicable after despiking, coherent noise cancellation, and stacking. The symmetry based correction is simple, grounded in mathematical theory describing NMR signals, does not introduce errors into the data set, and requires no prior knowledge about the harmonics. Modelling and field examples show that symmetry based noise removal reduces the effects of harmonics. In one modelling example, symmetry based noise removal improved signal-to-noise ratio in the data by 10 per cent. This improvement had noticeable effects on inversion parameters including water content and the decay constant T2*. Within water content profiles, aquifer boundaries and water content are more accurate after harmonics are removed. Fewer spurious water content spikes appear within aquifers, which is especially useful for resolving multilayered structures. Within T2* profiles, estimates are more accurate after harmonics are removed, especially in the lower half of profiles.

  8. Sheltering--a protective measure following an accidental atmospheric release from a nuclear power plant

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, J.; Tadmor, J.

    1988-06-01

    The effectiveness of sheltering the population for reducing radiological effects following an accidental release of radioactivity at a nuclear power plant was investigated. Different levels of respiratory protection and the administration of a thyroid blocking agent were also studied as possible complements to sheltering. Specific conditions were assumed, concerning the high protection factors of regular buildings and the high availability of civil defense shelters. Computations were performed by means of a probabilistic consequence model, which allows a comprehensive description of exposure modes and processes dealing with the implementation of sheltering and which takes into account a broad range of radiological effects. Sheltering, even in regular buildings, was found to be efficient in reducing early fatalities and other non-stochastic effects. However, it was shown that respiratory protection is also needed in order to alleviate stochastic effects and that, for this purpose, expedient individual filtration methods may be satisfactory. Under the conditions studied, sheltering was found to be preferable in most cases over evacuation, as the main immediate protective measure, unless evacuation can be carried out before the radioactive cloud reaches the populated area.

  9. Sheltering--a protective measure following an accidental atmospheric release from a nuclear power plant.

    PubMed

    Koch, J; Tadmor, J

    1988-06-01

    The effectiveness of sheltering the population for reducing radiological effects following an accidental release of radioactivity at a nuclear power plant was investigated. Different levels of respiratory protection and the administration of a thyroid blocking agent were also studied as possible complements to sheltering. Specific conditions were assumed, concerning the high protection factors of regular buildings and the high availability of civil defense shelters. Computations were performed by means of a probabilistic consequence model, which allows a comprehensive description of exposure modes and processes dealing with the implementation of sheltering and which takes into account a broad range of radiological effects. Sheltering, even in regular buildings, was found to be efficient in reducing early fatalities and other non-stochastic effects. However, it was shown that respiratory protection is also needed in order to alleviate stochastic effects and that, for this purpose, expedient individual filtration methods may be satisfactory. Under the conditions studied, sheltering was found to be preferable in most cases over evacuation, as the main immediate protective measure, unless evacuation can be carried out before the radioactive cloud reaches the populated area.

  10. Measurement of Nuclear Recoils in the CDMS II Dark Matter Search

    SciTech Connect

    Fallows, Scott Mathew

    2014-12-01

    The Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS) experiment is designed to directly detect elastic scatters of weakly-interacting massive dark matter particles (WIMPs), on target nuclei in semiconductor crystals composed of Si and Ge. These scatters would occur very rarely, in an overwhelming background composed primarily of electron recoils from photons and electrons, as well as a smaller but non-negligible background of WIMP-like nuclear recoils from neutrons. The CDMS II generation of detectors simultaneously measure ionization and athermal phonon signals from each scatter, allowing discrimination against virtually all electron recoils in the detector bulk. Pulse-shape timing analysis allows discrimination against nearly all remaining electron recoils taking place near detector surfaces. Along with carefully limited neutron backgrounds, this experimental program allowed for \\background- free" operation of CDMS II at Soudan, with less than one background event expected in each WIMP-search analysis. As a result, exclusionary upper-limits on WIMP-nucleon interaction cross section were placed over a wide range of candidate WIMP masses, ruling out large new regions of parameter space.

  11. Symmetry based frequency domain processing to remove harmonic noise from surface nuclear magnetic resonance measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hein, Annette; Larsen, Jakob Juul; Parsekian, Andrew D.

    2016-11-01

    Surface nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is a unique geophysical method due to its direct sensitivity to water. A key limitation to overcome is the difficulty of making surface NMR measurements in environments with anthropogenic electromagnetic noise, particularly constant frequency sources such as powerlines. Here we present a method of removing harmonic noise by utilizing frequency domain symmetry of surface NMR signals to reconstruct portions of the spectrum corrupted by frequency-domain noise peaks. This method supplements the existing NMR processing workflow and is applicable after despiking, coherent noise cancellation, and stacking. The symmetry based correction is simple, grounded in mathematical theory describing NMR signals, does not introduce errors into the dataset, and requires no prior knowledge about the harmonics. Modeling and field examples show that symmetry based noise removal reduces the effects of harmonics. In one modeling example, symmetry based noise removal improved signal to noise ratio in the data by 10%. This improvement had noticeable effects on inversion parameters including water content and the decay constant T2*. Within water content profiles, aquifer boundaries and water content are more accurate after harmonics are removed. Fewer spurious water content spikes appear within aquifers, which is especially useful for resolving multi-layered structures. Within T2* profiles, estimates are more accurate after harmonics are removed, especially in the lower half of profiles.

  12. Direct Measurement of Surface Dissolution Rates in Potential Nuclear Waste Forms: The Example of Pyrochlore.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Cornelius; Finkeldei, Sarah; Brandt, Felix; Bosbach, Dirk; Luttge, Andreas

    2015-08-19

    The long-term stability of ceramic materials that are considered as potential nuclear waste forms is governed by heterogeneous surface reactivity. Thus, instead of a mean rate, the identification of one or more dominant contributors to the overall dissolution rate is the key to predict the stability of waste forms quantitatively. Direct surface measurements by vertical scanning interferometry (VSI) and their analysis via material flux maps and resulting dissolution rate spectra provide data about dominant rate contributors and their variability over time. Using pyrochlore (Nd2Zr2O7) pellet dissolution under acidic conditions as an example, we demonstrate the identification and quantification of dissolution rate contributors, based on VSI data and rate spectrum analysis. Heterogeneous surface alteration of pyrochlore varies by a factor of about 5 and additional material loss by chemo-mechanical grain pull-out within the uppermost grain layer. We identified four different rate contributors that are responsible for the observed dissolution rate range of single grains. Our new concept offers the opportunity to increase our mechanistic understanding and to predict quantitatively the alteration of ceramic waste forms.

  13. Radiological investigations at the "Taiga" nuclear explosion site: Site description and in situ measurements.

    PubMed

    Ramzaev, V; Repin, V; Medvedev, A; Khramtsov, E; Timofeeva, M; Yakovlev, V

    2011-07-01

    In the summer of 2009, we performed a field survey of the "Taiga" peaceful underground nuclear explosion site, the Perm region, Russia (61.30° N, 56.60° E). The explosion was carried out by the USSR in 1971. This paper provides an extended summary of the available published data on the "Taiga" experiment. A detailed description of the site is illustrated by original aerial and ground-level photos. A large artificial lake (700 m long and 350 m wide) currently occupies the central area of the experimental site. The ground lip surrounding the lake is covered by a newly grown mixed forest. In situ measurements, performed in August 2009, revealed elevated levels of the γ-ray dose rate in air on the banks of the lake "Taiga". Two hot spots were detected on the eastern bank of the lake. The excess of the γ-ray radiation is attributable to the man-made radionuclides (60)Co and (137)Cs. The current external γ-ray dose rate to a human from the contaminations associated with the "Taiga" experiment was between 9 and 70 μSv per week. Periodic monitoring the site is recommended.

  14. Measurement of (131)I activity in thyroid of nuclear medical staff and internal dose assessment in a Polish nuclear medical hospital.

    PubMed

    Brudecki, K; Kowalska, A; Zagrodzki, P; Szczodry, A; Mroz, T; Janowski, P; Mietelski, J W

    2017-03-01

    This paper presents results of (131)I thyroid activity measurements in 30 members of the nuclear medicine personnel of the Department of Endocrinology and Nuclear Medicine Holy Cross Cancer Centre in Kielce, Poland. A whole-body spectrometer equipped with two semiconductor gamma radiation detectors served as the basic research instrument. In ten out of 30 examined staff members, the determined (131)I activity was found to be above the detection limit (DL = 5 Bq of (131)I in the thyroid). The measured activities ranged from (5 ± 2) Bq to (217 ± 56) Bq. The highest activities in thyroids were detected for technical and cleaning personnel, whereas the lowest values were recorded for medical doctors. Having measured the activities, an attempt has been made to estimate the corresponding annual effective doses, which were found to range from 0.02 to 0.8 mSv. The highest annual equivalent doses have been found for thyroid, ranging from 0.4 to 15.4 mSv, detected for a cleaner and a technician, respectively. The maximum estimated effective dose corresponds to 32% of the annual background dose in Poland, and to circa 4% of the annual limit for the effective dose due to occupational exposure of 20 mSv per year, which is in compliance with the value recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection.

  15. Accurate optical measurement of nuclear polarization in optically pumped ^3He gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bigelow, N. P.; Nacher, P. J.; Leduc, M.

    1992-12-01

    Large nuclear polarizations M (over 80 %) can now be achieved in gaseous ^3He by optical pumping. The gas is excited by an RF discharge and is oriented using a high power LNA laser which is lamp pumped and tuned to the 2 ^3S-2 ^3P transition at 1.08 μm. In this paper we describe an experiment in which we measure M with high absolute precision. Our method is based on a change as a function of M in the ratio of σ or π polarized light absorbed from a weak probe beam by the 2 ^3S metastable atoms. The probe was delivered by a diode pumped LNA laser and propagated perpendicular to the direction of the magnetization. Simultaneous measurement of M was made by monitoring the degree of circular polarization \\cal{P} of the optical line at 668 nm emitted by the discharge. Our measurements show a linear relationship between M and \\cal{P} for all accessible M values and for a wide range of experimental conditions (sample pressure, magnetic field, RF discharge level, etc.). This provides a second method of measurement of the ^3He nuclear polarization which is simple to operate and is calibrated and is calibrated over a pressure range of 0.15 to 6.5 torr. On peut maintenant produire par pompage optique de fortes polarisations nucléaires M (M supérieure à 80 % dans l' ^3He gazeux. Le gaz est excité par une décharge radiofréquence et orienté à l'aide d'un laser LNA de forte intensité qui est pompé par des lampes et accordé sur la transition 2 ^3S-2 ^3P à 1,08 μm. Dans cet article, nous décrivons une expérience où nous mesurons M avec une grande précision absolue. Notre méthode est fondée sur la variation en fonction de M de l'absorption par les atomes métastables d'un faisceau sonde de faible intensité polarisé linéairement. Nous mesurons le rapport des absorptions pour des polarisations π et σ. Le faisceau sonde est un laser LNA pompé par diode qui se propage perpendiculairement à la direction de l'aimantation. Simultanément, nous mesurons M par le

  16. Measurement of the ionization produced by sub-keV silicon nuclear recoils in a CCD dark matter detector

    DOE PAGES

    Chavarria, A. E.; Collar, J. I.; Peña, J. R.; ...

    2016-10-15

    We report a measurement of the ionization efficiency of silicon nuclei recoiling with sub-keV kinetic energy in the bulk silicon of a charge-coupled device (CCD). Nuclear recoils are produced by low-energy neutrons (<24 keV) from a 124Sb–9Be photoneutron source, and their ionization signal is measured down to 60 eV electron equivalent. This energy range, previously unexplored, is relevant for the detection of low-mass dark matter particles. The measured efficiency is found to deviate from the extrapolation to low energies of the Lindhard model. Furthermore, this measurement also demonstrates the sensitivity to nuclear recoils of CCDs employed by DAMIC, a darkmore » matter direct detection experiment located in the SNOLAB underground laboratory.« less

  17. Measurement of the ionization produced by sub-keV silicon nuclear recoils in a CCD dark matter detector

    SciTech Connect

    Chavarria, A. E.; Collar, J. I.; Peña, J. R.; Privitera, P.; Robinson, A. E.; Scholz, B.; Sengul, C.; Zhou, J.; Estrada, J.; Izraelevitch, F.; Tiffenberg, J.; de Mello Neto, J. R. T.; Machado, D. Torres

    2016-10-15

    We report a measurement of the ionization efficiency of silicon nuclei recoiling with sub-keV kinetic energy in the bulk silicon of a charge-coupled device (CCD). Nuclear recoils are produced by low-energy neutrons (<24 keV) from a 124Sb–9Be photoneutron source, and their ionization signal is measured down to 60 eV electron equivalent. This energy range, previously unexplored, is relevant for the detection of low-mass dark matter particles. The measured efficiency is found to deviate from the extrapolation to low energies of the Lindhard model. Furthermore, this measurement also demonstrates the sensitivity to nuclear recoils of CCDs employed by DAMIC, a dark matter direct detection experiment located in the SNOLAB underground laboratory.

  18. Dimensional reduction of the Luttinger Hamiltonian and g -factors of holes in symmetric two-dimensional semiconductor heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miserev, D. S.; Sushkov, O. P.

    2017-02-01

    The spin-orbit interaction of holes in zinc-blende semiconductors is much stronger than that of electrons. This makes the hole systems very attractive for possible spintronics applications. In three dimensions (3D), the dynamics of holes is described by well-known Luttinger Hamiltonian. However, most recent spintronics applications are related to two-dimensional (2D) heterostructures where dynamics in one direction is frozen due to quantum confinement. The confinement results in dimensional reduction of the Luttinger Hamiltonian, 3 D →2 D . Due to the interplay of the spin-orbit interaction, the external magnetic field, and the lateral gate potential imposed on the heterostructure, the reduction is highly nontrivial and as yet unknown. In the present work we perform the reduction and hence derive the general effective Hamiltonian which describes spintronics effects in symmetric 2D heterostructures. In particular, we do the following: (i) derive the spin-orbit interaction and the Darwin interaction related to the lateral gate potential, (ii) determine the momentum-dependent out-of-plane g -factor, (iii) point out that there are two independent in-plane g -factors, (iv) determine momentum dependencies of the in-plane g -factors.

  19. Calculation of the g Factors and Local Angular Distortions for ZnO:Cu2+ Nanocrystals With Various Copper Concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, G.-L.; Wu, S.-Y.; Hu, X.-F.; Teng, B.-H.; Wu, M.-H.

    2016-07-01

    Based on the perturbation treatments for a tetragonally distorted tetrahedral 3d 9 cluster, the g factors and local angular distortions are calculated for ZnO:Cu2+ nanocrystals with various Cu2+ concentrations in different systems I and II under dissimilar experimental conditions. Because of the dynamic Jahn-Teller effect, the bond angles θ between the four equivalent Cu2+-O2- bonds and the C4 axis are about 1.5o larger than that (θ0 ≈ 54.736o) of an ideal tetrahedron. Consequently, the original slightly trigonally distorted oxygen tetrahedron of the host Zn2+ site is transformed into a tetragonally compressed one. The isotropy of g factors may be attributed to the appropriate angular distortions Δθ = θ - θ0 due to the dynamic Jahn-Teller effect. The slightly increasing (or decreasing) g factors with concentration x can be illustrated as the delicate increases (or decreases) of the angular distortions (Δθ) and the covalency factors (N) for system I (or II), respectively, under almost equivalent crystal-fi eld strengths (Dq).

  20. Sorption (Kd) measurements in support of dose assessments for Zion Nuclear Station Decommissioning

    SciTech Connect

    Yim S. P.; Sullivan T.; Milian, L.

    2012-12-12

    The Zion Nuclear Power Station is being decommissioned. ZionSolutions proposes to leave much of the below grade structures in place and to fill them with “clean” concrete demolition debris from the above grade parts of the facility. This study, commissioned by ZionSolutions and conducted by the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) was performed to provide site-specific data for performance assessment calculations to support the request to terminate the NRC license and allow unrestricted use of the facility. Specifically, this study measured the distribution coefficient for five radionuclides of concern using site-specific soils and groundwater. The distributions coefficient is a measure of the amount of the radionuclide that will remain sorbed to the soil or concrete that is present relative to the amount that will remain in solution. A high distribution coefficient indicates most of the radionuclide will remain on the solid material and will not be available for transport by the groundwater. The radionuclides of concern are Fe-55, Co-60, Ni-63, Sr-90, and Cs-137. Tests were performed following ASTM C1733-10, Standard Test Methods for Distribution Coefficients of Inorganic Species by the Batch Method. Sr-85 was used in the testing as an analogue for Sr-90 because it behaves similarly with respect to sorption and has a gamma emission that is easier to detect than the beta emission from Sr-90. Site-specific soils included disturbed sand (sand removed during construction and used as backfill), native sand, silt/clay and silt. In addition, concrete cores from the Unit-1 Containment Building and the Crib House were broken into particles less than 2 mm in size and tested to obtain distribution coefficients for the five nuclides.

  1. Time-dependent nuclear measurements of fuel-shell mix in ICF implosions at OMEGA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rygg, J. Ryan

    2006-10-01

    Fuel-shell mix remains a pivotal concern in inertial confinement fusion (ICF), as it can preclude ignition. Mix is the result of saturation of Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability growth at a density interface that leads to small-scale, turbulent eddies and atomic-level mixing of cool, high-density fuel in the shell with hot, low-density fuel in the core. If sufficient mixing occurs, it will disrupt the formation of the ``hot-spot'' required for ignition. To sensitively probe the evolution and extent of mix in spherical implosions, the time dependence of the D^3He nuclear reaction rate was measured from implosions of capsules filled with pure ^3He. The capsule shell was comprised of a 1-μm layer of CD inside a 19-μm layer of CH. Nuclear burn will only occur in such capsules if there is sufficient mixing of D from the shell with hot ^3He in the core. By utilizing novel D^3He reaction-rate and proton spectrometers, all sensitive to the 14.7 MeV D^3He protons, a comprehensive, time dependent picture of mix was constructed. Important qualitative features were immediately evident: first, the shock burn of D^3He, always present for gas fills of D^3He, was absent, enabling a strong limit to be set on the amount and extent of D penetration into the ^3He. Second, the time necessary for RT instabilities to induce mix and to be heated by the hot core resulted in a 90 ps delay in the D^3He bang time as compared to bang time for implosions with D^3He fills. And third, when the gas pressure of ^3He was reduced from 20 to 4 atm, the extent of mix was enhanced by about a factor of 5. This work was supported in part by LLE, LLNL, the U.S. DoE, and the N.Y. State Energy Research and Development Authority.

  2. High resolution positron Q-value measurements and nuclear structure studies far from the stability line. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Avignone, F.T. III

    1982-02-28

    Research progress in briefly described, and details are presented in the attached preprints and reprints: (1) precision mass differences in light rubidium and krypton isotopes utilizing beta endpoint measurements; (2) precision mass measurements utilizing beta endpoints; (3) Monte Carlo calculations predicting the response of intrinsic GE detectors to electrons and positrons; and (4) reactor antineutrino spectra and nuclear spectroscopy of isotopes far from beta stability. (WHK)

  3. g-Factors of Isomeric States in the Neutron-Rich Nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Georgiev, G.; Neyens, G.; Hass, M.; Balabanski, Dimiter Loukanov; Bingham, Carrol R; Borcea, C.; Coulier, N.; Coussenment, R.; Daugas, J. M.; De France, Gilles M; Gorska, M.; Grawe, Hubert H; Grzywacz, Robert Kazimierz; Lewitowicz, Marek; Mach, Henryk A; Matea, I.; de Oliveira Santos, F.; Page, R. D.; Pfutzner, Marek; Penionzhkevich, Yu. E.; Podolyak, Zsolt F; Regan, Patrick H; Rykaczewski, Krzysztof Piotr; Sawicka, M.; Smirnova, N. A.; Sobolev, Yu.; Stanoiu, M.; Teughels, S.; Vyvey, K.

    2004-02-01

    We report the results from the first experiment to measure gyromagnetic factors of {micro}s isomers in neutron-rich nuclei produced by intermediate-energy projectile-fragmentation reactions. The Time Dependent Perturbed Angular Distribution (TDPAD) method was applied in combination with the heavy-ion-gamma correlation technique. The nuclides in the vicinity of {sup 68}Ni were produced and spin-oriented following the fragmentation of a {sup 76}Ge, 61.4 MeV/ u beam at GANIL. The results obtained, |g|({sup 69 m}Cu) = 0.225(25) and |g|({sup 67 m}Ni) = 0.125(6) provide another indication of the importance of proton excitation across the Z = 28 shell gap for the description of these states.

  4. [Medical and psychological aspects of safety measures maintenance among nuclear and power station personnel].

    PubMed

    Ipatov, P L; Sorokin, A V; Basov, V I

    2004-01-01

    The article deals with 15-year experience of medical and psychophysiologic service in Medical and Sanitary Establishment No. 156 and Balakovo nuclear power station on providing reliability of occupational activities for the station personnel.

  5. Overview of a FPGA-based nuclear instrumentation dedicated to primary activity measurements.

    PubMed

    Bobin, C; Bouchard, J; Pierre, S; Thiam, C

    2012-09-01

    In National Metrology Institutes like LNE-LNHB, renewal and improvement of the instrumentation is an important task. Nowadays, the current trend is to adopt digital boards, which present numerous advantages over the standard electronics. The feasibility of an on-line fulfillment of nuclear-instrumentation functionalities using a commercial FPGA-based (Field-Programmable Gate Array) board has been validated in the case of TDCR primary measurements (Triple to Double Coincidence Ratio method based on liquid scintillation). The new applications presented in this paper have been included to allow either an on-line processing of the information or a raw-data acquisition for an off-line treatment. Developed as a complementary tool for TDCR counting, a time-to-digital converter specifically designed for this technique has been added. In addition, the description is given of a spectrometry channel based on the connection between conventional shaping amplifiers and the analog-to-digital converter (ADC) input available on the same digital board. First results are presented in the case of α- and γ-counting related to, respectively, the defined solid angle and well-type NaI(Tl) primary activity techniques. The combination of two different channels (liquid scintillation and γ-spectrometry) implementing the live-time anticoincidence processing is also described for the application of the 4πβ-γ coincidence method. The need for an optimized coupling between the analog chain and the ADC stage is emphasized. The straight processing of the signals delivered by the preamplifier connected to a HPGe detector is also presented along with the first development of digital filtering.

  6. Measures of the environmental footprint of the front end of the nuclear fuel cycle

    SciTech Connect

    E. Schneider; B. Carlsen; E. Tavrides; C. van der Hoeven; U. Phathanapirom

    2013-11-01

    Previous estimates of environmental impacts associated with the front end of the nuclear fuel cycle (FEFC) have focused primarily on energy consumption and CO2 emissions. Results have varied widely. This work builds upon reports from operating facilities and other primary data sources to build a database of front end environmental impacts. This work also addresses land transformation and water withdrawals associated with the processes of the FEFC. These processes include uranium extraction, conversion, enrichment, fuel fabrication, depleted uranium disposition, and transportation. To allow summing the impacts across processes, all impacts were normalized per tonne of natural uranium mined as well as per MWh(e) of electricity produced, a more conventional unit for measuring environmental impacts that facilitates comparison with other studies. This conversion was based on mass balances and process efficiencies associated with the current once-through LWR fuel cycle. Total energy input is calculated at 8.7 x 10- 3 GJ(e)/MWh(e) of electricity and 5.9 x 10- 3 GJ(t)/MWh(e) of thermal energy. It is dominated by the energy required for uranium extraction, conversion to fluoride compound for subsequent enrichment, and enrichment. An estimate of the carbon footprint is made from the direct energy consumption at 1.7 kg CO2/MWh(e). Water use is likewise dominated by requirements of uranium extraction, totaling 154 L/MWh(e). Land use is calculated at 8 x 10- 3 m2/MWh(e), over 90% of which is due to uranium extraction. Quantified impacts are limited to those resulting from activities performed within the FEFC process facilities (i.e. within the plant gates). Energy embodied in material inputs such as process chemicals and fuel cladding is identified but not explicitly quantified in this study. Inclusion of indirect energy associated with embodied energy as well as construction and decommissioning of facilities could increase the FEFC energy intensity estimate by a factor of up

  7. g factors of the lowest (5/2)+ and (7/2)+ states in 197Au and calibration of the transient magnetic field in Gd

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazzacco, D.; Brandolini, F.; Loewenich, K.; Pavan, P.; Rossi-Alvarez, C.; Zannoni, R.; de Poli, M.

    1986-05-01

    The angular precessions of the lowest (5/2)+ and (7/2)+ states in 197Au have been measured employing the transient field method. The 197Au nuclei, Coulomb-excited by a 180 MeV 63Cu beam, traversed the Gd foil with velocities between 5v0 and 2v0 (v0=c/137). We have obtained the values g((5/2)+)=0.21(2) and g((7/2)+)=0.15(2), which are consistent with the predictions of the particle-core weak-coupling model. The field has been calibrated with the Chalk River parametrization, which has been checked using the known g factors of the lowest 2+ states in 184W, 186W, 194Pt, and 196Pt as probes.

  8. Helium diffusion coefficient measurements in R7T7 nuclear glass by 3He(d,α) 1H nuclear reaction analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamssedine, F.; Sauvage, T.; Peuget, S.; Fares, T.; Martin, G.

    2010-05-01

    The immobilization of fission products and minor actinides by vitrification is the reference process for industrial management of high-level radioactive wastes generated by spent fuel reprocessing. Radiation damage and radiogenic helium accumulation must be specifically studied to evaluate the effects of minor actinide alpha decay on the glass long-term behavior under repository conditions. A specific experimental study was conducted for a comprehensive evaluation of the behavior of helium and its diffusion mechanisms in borosilicate nuclear waste glass. Helium production was simulated by external implantation with 3He ions at a concentration (≈1 at.%) 30 times higher than obtained after 10,000 years of storage. Helium diffusion coefficients as a function of temperature were extracted from the depth profiles after annealing. The 3He(d,α) 1H nuclear reaction analysis (NRA) technique was successfully adopted for low-temperature in situ measurements of depth profiles. Its high depth resolution revealed helium mobility at temperatures as low as 253 K and the presence of a trapped helium fraction. The diffusion coefficients of un-trapped helium atoms follow an Arrhenius law between 253 K and 323 K. An activation energy of 0.55 ± 0.03 eV was determined, which is consistent with a process controlled by diffusion in the glass free volume.

  9. Measurement of 37Ar to support technology for On-Site Inspection under the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-BanTreaty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aalseth, C. E.; Day, A. R.; Haas, D. A.; Hoppe, E. W.; Hyronimus, B. J.; Keillor, M. E.; Mace, E. K.; Orrell, J. L.; Seifert, A.; Woods, V. T.

    2011-10-01

    On-Site Inspection (OSI) is a key component of the verification regime for the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT). Measurements of radionuclide isotopes created by an underground nuclear explosion are a valuable signature of a Treaty violation. Argon-37 is produced by neutron interaction with calcium in soil, 40Ca( n, α) 37Ar. For OSI, the 35-day half-life of 37Ar provides both high specific activity and sufficient time for completion of an inspection before decay limits sensitivity. This paper presents a low-background internal-source gas proportional counter with an 37Ar measurement sensitivity level equivalent to 45 mBq/SCM in wholeair.

  10. Measurement of 37Ar to support technology for On-site Inspection under the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty

    SciTech Connect

    Aalseth, Craig E.; Day, Anthony R.; Haas, Derek A.; Hoppe, Eric W.; Hyronimus, Brian J.; Keillor, Martin E.; Mace, Emily K.; Orrell, John L.; Seifert, Allen; Woods, Vincent T.

    2011-10-01

    On-Site Inspection (OSI) is a key component of the verification regime for the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT). Measurements of radionuclide isotopes created by an underground nuclear explosion are a valuable signature of a Treaty violation. Argon-37 is produced from neutron interaction with calcium in soil, 40Ca(n,α)37Ar. For OSI, the 35-day half-life of 37Ar provides both high specific activity and sufficient time for completion of an inspection before decay limits sensitivity. This paper presents a low-background internal-source gas proportional counter with an 37Ar measurement sensitivity level equivalent to 45.1 mBq/SCM in whole air.

  11. The incentives and feasibility for direct measurement of spent nuclear fuel characteristics in the Federal Waste Management System

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-08-01

    The purpose of this work is to assess the nature and extent of the need for direct measurements of spent fuel characteristics within the utility and federal portions of the waste management system, and to evaluate the capability and limitations of various measurement devices for meeting those needs. The need for direct measurement is evaluated relative to the alternative sources of the spent fuel characteristics data required for the safe and effective operation of the system. The results of this work are intended to support Federal Waste Management System (FWMS) planners by identifying the probable and potential requirements for direct measurements and for making related programmatic decisions based on the adequacy or development requirements for appropriate measurement technologies to support the needs of facility and equipment designers and operators. The designers and operators of the FWMS need to know the characteristics of the spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and related wastes that will be handled, processed, stored, transported and ultimately emplaced underground for final disposal. There are typically two basic sources of this needed information: (1) historical records of measurements made when the fuel was being fabricated or was producing energy; and (2) direct measurements made during handling prior to disposal. Historical records would include the design and fabrication records of the nuclear fuel assemblies and the subsequent utility records of reactor and core operations. 21 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs.

  12. Advanced nondestructive examination technologies for measuring fatigue damage in nuclear power plant components

    SciTech Connect

    MacDonald, P.E.; Shah, V.N.; Akers, D.W.

    1995-12-01

    This paper presents recent results from an ongoing project at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) to develop advanced nondestructive methods to characterize the aging degradation of nuclear power plant pressure boundary components. One of the advanced methods, positron annihilation, is being developed for in situ characterization of fatigue damage in nuclear power plant piping and other components. This technique can detect and correlate the microstructural changes that are precursors of fatigue cracking in austenitic stainless steel components. In fact, the initial INEL test results show that the method can detect fatigue damage in stainless steel ranging from a few percent of the fatigue life up to 40 percent.

  13. Response of sheep lymphocytes to PHA: quantitation by nuclear volume measurement and cell counts (40764)

    SciTech Connect

    Chandra, P.; Chanana, A.D.; Joel, D.D.

    1980-03-01

    Phytohemagglutinin response of peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) of sheep was studied. Assessment of proliferative response was performed by determination of nuclear volumes and cell counts in cultures from 14 sheep and by incorporation of tritiated thymidine in cultures in four additional sheep. PBL of sheep were found to transform and proliferate with PHA similarly to human peripheral blood lymphocytes with minor differences. Quantitation of the proliferative response by determining the cell count and nuclear volumes provided more information on cell kinetics in culture than the commonly used isotope-labeled thymidine incorporation method.

  14. Measurements of individual radiation doses in residents living around the Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant.

    PubMed

    Nagataki, Shigenobu; Takamura, Noboru; Kamiya, Kenji; Akashi, Makoto

    2013-11-01

    At the outset of the accident at Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant in March 2011, the radiation doses experienced by residents were calculated from the readings at monitoring posts, with several assumptions being made from the point of view of protection and safety. However, health effects should also be estimated by obtaining measurements of the individual radiation doses. The individual external radiation doses, determined by a behavior survey in the "evacuation and deliberate evacuation area" in the first 4 months, were <5 mSv in 97.4% of residents (maximum: 15 mSv). Doses in Fukushima Prefecture were <3 mSv in 99.3% of 386,572 residents analyzed. External doses in Fukushima City determined by personal dosimeters were <1 mSv/3 months (September-November, 2011) in 99.7% of residents (maximum: 2.7 mSv). Thyroid radiation doses, determined in March using a NaI (TI) scintillation survey meter in children in the evacuation and deliberate evacuation area, were <10 mSv in 95.7% of children (maximum: 35 mSv). Therefore, all doses were less than the intervention level of 50 mSv proposed by international organizations. Internal radiation doses determined by cesium-134 ((134)C) and cesium-137 ((137)C) whole-body counters (WBCs) were <1 mSv in 99% of the residents, and the maximum thyroid equivalent dose by iodine-131 WBCs was 20 mSv. The exploratory committee of the Fukushima Health Management Survey mentions on its website that radiation from the accident is unlikely to be a cause of adverse health effects in the future. In any event, sincere scientific efforts must continue to obtain individual radiation doses that are as accurate as possible. However, observation of the health effects of the radiation doses described above will require reevaluation of the protocol used for determining adverse health effects. The dose-response relationship is crucial, and the aim of the survey should be to collect sufficient data to confirm the presence or absence of radiation health

  15. A nonintrusive nuclear monitor for measuring liquid contents in sealed vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, J. J.; Mall, G. H.

    1984-01-01

    A nonintrusive nuclear technique for monitoring fluid contents in sealed vessels, regardless of the fluid distribution inside the vessels is described. The technique is applicable to all-g environments. It is based on the differences in Cesium-137 gamma ray attenuation coefficients in air and the test liquids.

  16. Predictions of the nuclear activation of materials on LDEF produced by the space radiation environment and comparison with flight measurements.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, T W; Colborn, B L; Harmon, B A; Laird, C E

    1996-11-01

    Model calculations have been made to compare with the induced radioactivity measured for materials on the LDEF satellite. Predictions and data comparisons are made for aluminum spacecraft components and for vanadium and nickel samples placed at multiple locations on the spacecraft. The calculated vs observed activations provide an indication of present model uncertainties in predicting nuclear activation as well as the magnitude and directionality of the trapped proton environment for low-Earth orbit missions. Environment model uncertainties based on the activation measurements are consistent with the uncertainties evaluated using other LDEF radiation dosimetry data.

  17. Delayed Gamma Measurements in Different Nuclear Research Reactors Bringing Out the Importance of the Delayed Contribution in Gamma Flux Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Fourmentel, D.; Radulovic, V.; Barbot, L.; Villard, J-F.; Zerovnik, G.; Snoj, L.; Tarchalski, M.; Pytel, K.; Malouch, F.

    2015-07-01

    Neutron and gamma flux levels are key parameters in nuclear research reactors. In Material Testing Reactors, such as the future Jules Horowitz Reactor, under construction at the French Alternative Energies and Atomic Energy Commission (CEA Cadarache, France), the expected gamma flux levels are very high (nuclear heating is of the order of 20 W/g at 100 MWth). As gamma rays deposit their energy in the reactor structures and structural materials it is important to take them into account when designing irradiation devices. There are only a few sensors which allow measurements of the nuclear heating ; a recent development at the CEA Cadarache allows measurements of the gamma flux using a miniature ionization chamber (MIC). The measured MIC response is often compared with calculation using modern Monte Carlo (MC) neutron and photon transport codes, such as TRIPOLI-4 and MCNP6. In these calculations only the production of prompt gamma rays in the reactor is usually modelled thus neglecting the delayed gamma rays. Hence calculations and measurements are usually in better accordance for the neutron flux than for the gamma flux. In this paper we study the contribution of delayed gamma rays to the total MIC signal in order to estimate the systematic error in gamma flux MC calculations. In order to experimentally determine the delayed gamma flux contributions to the MIC response, we performed gamma flux measurements with CEA developed MIC at three different research reactors: the OSIRIS reactor (MTR - 70 MWth at CEA Saclay, France), the TRIGA MARK II reactor (TRIGA - 250 kWth at the Jozef Stefan Institute, Slovenia) and the MARIA reactor (MTR - 30 MWth at the National Center for Nuclear Research, Poland). In order to experimentally assess the delayed gamma flux contribution to the total gamma flux, several reactor shut down (scram) experiments were performed specifically for the purpose of the measurements. Results show that on average about 30 % of the MIC signal is due to

  18. Measuring Process Dynamics and Nuclear Migration for Clones of Neural Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    De La Hoz, Edgar Cardenas; Winter, Mark R.; Apostolopoulou, Maria; Temple, Sally

    2016-01-01

    Neural stem and progenitor cells (NPCs) generate processes that extend from the cell body in a dynamic manner. The NPC nucleus migrates along these processes with patterns believed to be tightly coupled to mechanisms of cell cycle regulation and cell fate determination. Here, we describe a new segmentation and tracking approach that allows NPC processes and nuclei to be reliably tracked across multiple rounds of cell division in phase-contrast microscopy images. Results are presented for mouse adult and embryonic NPCs from hundreds of clones, or lineage trees, containing tens of thousands of cells and millions of segmentations. New visualization approaches allow the NPC nuclear and process features to be effectively visualized for an entire clone. Significant differences in process and nuclear dynamics were found among type A and type C adult NPCs, and also between embryonic NPCs cultured from the anterior and posterior cerebral cortex. PMID:27878138

  19. Measures of the Environmental Footprint of the Front End of the Nuclear Fuel Cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Brett Carlsen; Emily Tavrides; Erich Schneider

    2010-08-01

    Previous estimates of environmental impacts associated with the front end of the nuclear fuel cycle have focused primarily on energy consumption and CO2 emissions. Results have varied widely. Section 2 of this report provides a summary of historical estimates. This study revises existing empirical correlations and their underlying assumptions to fit to a more complete set of existing data. This study also addresses land transformation, water withdrawals, and occupational and public health impacts associated with the processes of the front end of the once-through nuclear fuel cycle. These processes include uranium mining, milling, refining, conversion, enrichment, and fuel fabrication. Metrics are developed to allow environmental impacts to be summed across the full set of front end processes, including transportation and disposition of the resulting depleted uranium.

  20. A simple double quantum coherence ESR sequence that minimizes nuclear modulations in Cu2+-ion based distance measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruthstein, Sharon; Ji, Ming; Shin, Byong-kyu; Saxena, Sunil

    2015-08-01

    Double quantum coherence (DQC) ESR is a sensitive method to measure magnetic dipolar interactions between spin labels. However, the DQC experiment on Cu2+ centers presents a challenge at X-band. The Cu2+ centers are usually coordinated to histidine residues in proteins. The electron-nuclear interaction between the Cu2+ ion and the remote nitrogen in the imidazole ring can interfere with the electron-electron dipolar interaction. Herein, we report on a modified DQC experiment that has the advantage of reduced contributions from electron-nuclear interactions, which enhances the resolution of the DQC signal to the electron-electron dipolar modulations. The modified pulse-sequence is verified on Cu2+-NO system in a polyalanine-based peptide and on a coupled Cu2+ system in a polyproline-based peptide. The modified DQC data were compared with the DEER data and good agreement was found.

  1. Development of fast neutron pinhole camera using nuclear emulsion for neutron emission profile measurement in KSTAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izumi, Y.; Tomita, H.; Nakayama, Y.; Hayashi, S.; Morishima, K.; Isobe, M.; Cheon, M. S.; Ogawa, K.; Nishitani, T.; Naka, T.; Nakano, T.; Nakamura, M.; Iguchi, T.

    2016-11-01

    We have developed a compact fast neutron camera based on a stack of nuclear emulsion plates and a pinhole collimator. The camera was installed at J-port of Korea superconducting tokamak advanced research at National Fusion Research Institute, Republic of Korea. Fast neutron images agreed better with calculated ones based on Monte Carlo neutron simulation using the uniform distribution of Deuterium-Deuterium (DD) neutron source in a torus of 40 cm radius.

  2. A new fast scanning system for the measurement of large angle tracks in nuclear emulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexandrov, A.; Buonaura, A.; Consiglio, L.; D'Ambrosio, N.; De Lellis, G.; Di Crescenzo, A.; Di Marco, N.; Galati, G.; Lauria, A.; Montesi, M. C.; Pupilli, F.; Shchedrina, T.; Tioukov, V.; Vladymyrov, M.

    2015-11-01

    Nuclear emulsions have been widely used in particle physics to identify new particles through the observation of their decays thanks to their unique spatial resolution. Nevertheless, before the advent of automatic scanning systems, the emulsion analysis was very demanding in terms of well trained manpower. Due to this reason, they were gradually replaced by electronic detectors, until the '90s, when automatic microscopes started to be developed in Japan and in Europe. Automatic scanning was essential to conceive large scale emulsion-based neutrino experiments like CHORUS, DONUT and OPERA. Standard scanning systems have been initially designed to recognize tracks within a limited angular acceptance (θ lesssim 30°) where θ is the track angle with respect to a line perpendicular to the emulsion plane. In this paper we describe the implementation of a novel fast automatic scanning system aimed at extending the track recognition to the full angular range and improving the present scanning speed. Indeed, nuclear emulsions do not have any intrinsic limit to detect particle direction. Such improvement opens new perspectives to use nuclear emulsions in several fields in addition to large scale neutrino experiments, like muon radiography, medical applications and dark matter directional detection.

  3. Measurement of the 19F(α,n)22Na Cross Section for Nuclear Safeguards Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowe, Marcus; Smith, M. S.; Pain, S.; Febbraro, M.; Pittman, S.; Chipps, K. A.; Thompson, S. J.; Grinder, M.; Grzywacz, R.; Smith, K.; Thornsberry, C.; Thompson, P.; Peters, W. A.; Waddell, D.; Blanchard, R.; Carls, A.; Shadrick, S.; Engelhardt, A.; Hertz-Kintish, D.; Allen, N.; Sims, H.

    2015-10-01

    Enriched uranium is commonly stored in fluoride matrices such as UF6. Alpha decays of uranium in UF6 will create neutrons via the 19F(α,n)22Na reaction. An improved cross section for this reaction will enable improved nondestructive assays of uranium content in storage cylinders at material enrichment facilities. To determine this reaction cross section, we have performed experiments using both forward and inverse kinematic techniques at the University of Notre Dame (forward) and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (inverse). Both experiments utilized the Versatile Array of Neutron Detectors at Low Energy (VANDLE) for neutron detection. The ORNL experiment also used a new ionization chamber for 22Na particle identification. Gating on the 22Na nuclei detected drastically reduced the background counts in the neutron time-of-flight spectra. The latest analysis and results will be presented for 19F beam energies ranging from 20-37 MeV. This work is funded in part by the DOE Office of Nuclear Physics, the National Nuclear Security Administration's Office of Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation R&D, and the NSF.

  4. Strong confinement-induced engineering of the g factor and lifetime of conduction electron spins in Ge quantum wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giorgioni, Anna; Paleari, Stefano; Cecchi, Stefano; Vitiello, Elisa; Grilli, Emanuele; Isella, Giovanni; Jantsch, Wolfgang; Fanciulli, Marco; Pezzoli, Fabio

    2016-12-01

    Control of electron spin coherence via external fields is fundamental in spintronics. Its implementation demands a host material that accommodates the desirable but contrasting requirements of spin robustness against relaxation mechanisms and sizeable coupling between spin and orbital motion of the carriers. Here, we focus on Ge, which is a prominent candidate for shuttling spin quantum bits into the mainstream Si electronics. So far, however, the intrinsic spin-dependent phenomena of free electrons in conventional Ge/Si heterojunctions have proved to be elusive because of epitaxy constraints and an unfavourable band alignment. We overcome these fundamental limitations by investigating a two-dimensional electron gas in quantum wells of pure Ge grown on Si. These epitaxial systems demonstrate exceptionally long spin lifetimes. In particular, by fine-tuning quantum confinement we demonstrate that the electron Landé g factor can be engineered in our CMOS-compatible architecture over a range previously inaccessible for Si spintronics.

  5. Antimalarial bicyclic peroxides belonging to the G-factor family: mechanistic aspects of their formation and iron (II) induced reduction.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, Jeremy; Azema, Joelle; Payrastre, Corinne; Baltas, Michel; Tuccio, Beatrice; Vial, Henri; Andre-Barres, Christiane

    2014-01-01

    Artemisinin and its derivatives are peroxide-containing compounds targeting P. falciparum. We review here structural analogues of bicyclic peroxides belonging to the G factors family presenting antimalarial properties. They were synthesised under Mannich type conditions, followed by an autoxidation step resulting exclusively in the peroxide. As the electron transfer from haem or free iron to the peroxide is the first step in the mode of action of artemisinin-like compounds, the redox properties of some endoperoxides were studied by electrochemistry allowing the evaluation of the reduction standard potentials. The Fe(II) induced reduction was also investigated and the reactivity of the C-centered radical intermediate formed was linked to the antimalarial activity. These bicyclic peroxides both with various hybrid molecules containing the endoperoxide framework were evaluated in vitro against Plasmodium falciparum. They exhibited moderate to good activities.

  6. Strong confinement-induced engineering of the g factor and lifetime of conduction electron spins in Ge quantum wells

    PubMed Central

    Giorgioni, Anna; Paleari, Stefano; Cecchi, Stefano; Vitiello, Elisa; Grilli, Emanuele; Isella, Giovanni; Jantsch, Wolfgang; Fanciulli, Marco; Pezzoli, Fabio

    2016-01-01

    Control of electron spin coherence via external fields is fundamental in spintronics. Its implementation demands a host material that accommodates the desirable but contrasting requirements of spin robustness against relaxation mechanisms and sizeable coupling between spin and orbital motion of the carriers. Here, we focus on Ge, which is a prominent candidate for shuttling spin quantum bits into the mainstream Si electronics. So far, however, the intrinsic spin-dependent phenomena of free electrons in conventional Ge/Si heterojunctions have proved to be elusive because of epitaxy constraints and an unfavourable band alignment. We overcome these fundamental limitations by investigating a two-dimensional electron gas in quantum wells of pure Ge grown on Si. These epitaxial systems demonstrate exceptionally long spin lifetimes. In particular, by fine-tuning quantum confinement we demonstrate that the electron Landé g factor can be engineered in our CMOS-compatible architecture over a range previously inaccessible for Si spintronics. PMID:28000670

  7. Nuclear Fission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denschlag, J. O.

    This chapter first gives a survey on the history of the discovery of nuclear fission. It briefly presents the liquid-drop and shell models and their application to the fission process. The most important quantities accessible to experimental determination such as mass yields, nuclear charge distribution, prompt neutron emission, kinetic energy distribution, ternary fragment yields, angular distributions, and properties of fission isomers are presented as well as the instrumentation and techniques used for their measurement. The contribution concentrates on the fundamental aspects of nuclear fission. The practical aspects of nuclear fission are discussed in http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4419-0720-2_57 of Vol. 6.

  8. Status of the nuclear measurement stations for the process control of spent fuel reprocessing at AREVA NC/La Hague

    SciTech Connect

    Eleon, Cyrille; Passard, Christian; Hupont, Nicolas; Estre, Nicolas; Battel, Benjamin; Doumerc, Philippe; Dupuy, Thierry; Batifol, Marc; Grassi, Gabriele

    2015-07-01

    Nuclear measurements are used at AREVA NC/La Hague for the monitoring of spent fuel reprocessing. The process control is based on gamma-ray spectroscopy, passive neutron counting and active neutron interrogation, and gamma transmission measurements. The main objectives are criticality and safety, online process monitoring, and the determination of the residual fissile mass and activities in the metallic waste remained after fuel shearing and dissolution (empty hulls, grids, end pieces), which are put in radioactive waste drums before compaction. The whole monitoring system is composed of eight measurement stations which will be described in this paper. The main measurement stations no. 1, 3 and 7 are needed for criticality control. Before fuel element shearing for dissolution, station no. 1 allows determining the burn-up of the irradiated fuel by gamma-ray spectroscopy with HP Ge (high purity germanium) detectors. The burn-up is correlated to the {sup 137}Cs and {sup 134}Cs gamma emission rates. The fuel maximal mass which can be loaded in one bucket of the dissolver is estimated from the lowest burn-up fraction of the fuel element. Station no. 3 is dedicated to the control of the correct fuel dissolution, which is performed with a {sup 137}Cs gamma ray measurement with a HP Ge detector. Station no. 7 allows estimating the residual fissile mass in the drums filled with the metallic residues, especially in the hulls, from passive neutron counting (spontaneous fission and alpha-n reactions) and active interrogation (fission prompt neutrons induced by a pulsed neutron generator) with proportional {sup 3}He detectors. The measurement stations have been validated for the reprocessing of Uranium Oxide (UOX) fuels with a burn-up rate up to 60 GWd/t. This paper presents a brief overview of the current status of the nuclear measurement stations. (authors)

  9. [Radiation measures and trend after the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident].

    PubMed

    Okazaki, Ryuji

    2014-02-01

    The radioactive materials spread by the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) accident in March, 2011 caused NPP workers to be exposed to radiation above ordinance limits. The number of workers exposed to radiation within ordinance limits is increasing. Decontamination began at many places in Fukushima, although new laws were enforced in the decontamination work, in the current situation, medical examinations for radiation are limited due to a shortage of doctors. In this paper, I introduce the ordinances on the prevention of ionizing radiation hazards and the revised points about radiation exposure doses of the NPP workers, as well as the new ordinance for decontamination.

  10. [Quality assurance of nuclear medicine measuring systems: what do the new regulations say?].

    PubMed

    Jordan, K; Knoop, B; Harke, H

    1994-04-01

    New specifications for quality control of nuclear medical instrumentation are given in the German "Richtlinie Strahlenschutz in der Medizin", published in 1993. These specifications include the corresponding DIN-Normen, the German standards. In both papers the description of the various test procedures is given in a very abbreviated form, so that many of the people having to perform these test procedures are more or less puzzled. This paper will provide for a better understanding of what is meant and will also give many useful hints in performing the test procedures. A discussion of the necessary test phantoms and auxiliary devices completes this paper.

  11. Nuclear and electronic energy loss by 1 keV to 60 keV ions in silicon : comparison of measurement to SRIM

    SciTech Connect

    Funsten, H. O.; Harper, R. W.; Ritzau, S. M.; Korde, R.

    2003-01-01

    Comparison of TRIM simulations with measurements of the energy lost to electronic and nuclear stopping processes using 1 00% internal carrier collection efficiency silicon photodiodes shows a large, systematic overestimation by TRIM of electronic energy loss.

  12. Double-Pionic Fusion of Nuclear Systems and the 'ABC' Effect: Approaching a Puzzle by Exclusive and Kinematically Complete Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Bashkanov, M.; Clement, H.; Doroshkevich, E.; Khakimova, O.; Kren, F.; Meier, R.; Pricking, A.; Skorodko, T.; Wagner, G. J.; Bargholtz, C.; Geren, L.; Lindberg, K.; Tegner, P.-E.; Zartova, I.; Berlowski, M.; Stepaniak, J.; Bogoslawsky, D.; Ivanov, G.; Jiganov, E.; Morosov, B.

    2009-02-06

    The ABC effect--a puzzling low-mass enhancement in the {pi}{pi} invariant mass spectrum, first observed by Abashian, Booth, and Crowe--is well known from inclusive measurements of two-pion production in nuclear fusion reactions. Here we report on the first exclusive and kinematically complete measurements of the most basic double-pionic fusion reaction pn{yields}d{pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0} at beam energies of 1.03 and 1.35 GeV. The measurements, which have been carried out at CELSIUS-WASA, reveal the ABC effect to be a ({pi}{pi}){sub I=L=0} channel phenomenon associated with both a resonancelike energy dependence in the integral cross section and the formation of a {delta}{delta} system in the intermediate state. A corresponding simple s-channel resonance ansatz provides a surprisingly good description of the data.

  13. Evolution of nuclear shapes in odd-mass yttrium and niobium isotopes from lifetime measurements following fission reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagen, T. W.; Görgen, A.; Korten, W.; Grente, L.; Salsac, M.-D.; Farget, F.; Ragnarsson, I.; Braunroth, T.; Bruyneel, B.; Celikovic, I.; Clément, E.; de France, G.; Delaune, O.; Dewald, A.; Dijon, A.; Hackstein, M.; Jacquot, B.; Litzinger, J.; Ljungvall, J.; Louchart, C.; Michelagnoli, C.; Napoli, D. R.; Recchia, F.; Rother, W.; Sahin, E.; Siem, S.; Sulignano, B.; Theisen, Ch.; Valiente-Dobon, J. J.

    2017-03-01

    Lifetimes of excited states in 99Y,101Y,101Nb,103Nb, and 105Nb were measured in an experiment using the recoil distance Doppler shift method at GANIL (Grand Accélérateur National d'Ions Lourds). The neutron-rich nuclei were produced in fission reactions between a 238U beam and a 9Be target. Prompt γ rays were measured with the EXOGAM array and correlated with fission fragments that were identified in mass and atomic number with the VAMOS++ spectrometer. The measured lifetimes, together with branching ratios, provide B (M 1 ) and B (E 2 ) values for the strongly coupled rotational bands built on the [422 ] 5 /2+ ground state in the Y and Nb nuclei with neutron number N ≥60 . The comparison of the experimental results with triaxial particle-rotor calculations provides information about the evolution of the nuclear shape in this mass region.

  14. Measuring radioactive noble gases by absorption in polycarbonates and other organics: From radon indoors to nuclear safety

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pressyanov, Dobromir S.

    2013-07-01

    The report summarizes recent research and practice of using materials with high absorption ability to noble gases to measure their radioactive isotopes. Most of the studies employ bisphenol-A based polycarbonates, because of their remarkably high absorption ability to noble gases. This is the material of which commercial CDs/DVDs are made and they may serve as serendipitous, already available in dwellings, radon and thoron detectors. We present the essence of the gathered experimental evidence that the CD/DVD method can successfully address some long-lasted problems in radon dosimetry: The first is making sufficiently precise retrospective 222Rn dosimetry for the purposes of epidemiological studies and risk estimation. The second is rapid identification of buildings with radon problem. We demonstrate how this can be used to develop an integrated approach to the radon problem. Within this approach detection, diagnostic and mitigation are considered as an unified whole, and the interval between the decision to provide disks for analysis and the complete mitigation of the building, if radon problem is identified, is short. Besides radon and thoron, bisphenol-A based polycarbonates were successfully used to measure 85Kr and 133Xe for the purposes of the effluents control and nuclear safety of nuclear installations. The perspectives to employ other organic materials in which noble gases are highly soluble for measurement of their radioactive isotopes are also discussed.

  15. Measurement of inclusive jet production and nuclear modifications in pPb collisions at [Formula: see text].

    PubMed

    Khachatryan, V; Sirunyan, A M; Tumasyan, A; Adam, W; Asilar, E; Bergauer, T; Brandstetter, J; Brondolin, E; Dragicevic, M; Erö, J; Flechl, M; Friedl, M; Frühwirth, R; Ghete, V M; Hartl, C; Hörmann, N; Hrubec, J; Jeitler, M; Knünz, V; König, A; Krammer, M; Krätschmer, I; Liko, D; Matsushita, T; Mikulec, I; Rabady, D; Rad, N; Rahbaran, B; Rohringer, H; Schieck, J; Schöfbeck, R; Strauss, J; Treberer-Treberspurg, W; Waltenberger, W; Wulz, C-E; Mossolov, V; Shumeiko, N; Suarez Gonzalez, J; Alderweireldt, S; Cornelis, T; De Wolf, E A; Janssen, X; Knutsson, A; Lauwers, J; Luyckx, S; Van De Klundert, M; Van Haevermaet, H; Van Mechelen, P; Van Remortel, N; Van Spilbeeck, A; Abu Zeid, S; Blekman, F; D'Hondt, J; Daci, N; De Bruyn, I; Deroover, K; Heracleous, N; Keaveney, J; Lowette, S; Moreels, L; Olbrechts, A; Python, Q; Strom, D; Tavernier, S; Van Doninck, W; Van Mulders, P; Van Onsem, G P; Van Parijs, I; Barria, P; Brun, H; Caillol, C; Clerbaux, B; De Lentdecker, G; Fang, W; Fasanella, G; Favart, L; Goldouzian, R; Grebenyuk, A; Karapostoli, G; Lenzi, T; Léonard, A; Maerschalk, T; Marinov, A; Perniè, L; Randle-Conde, A; Seva, T; Vander Velde, C; Vanlaer, P; Yonamine, R; Zenoni, F; Zhang, F; Beernaert, K; Benucci, L; Cimmino, A; Crucy, S; Dobur, D; Fagot, A; Garcia, G; Gul, M; Mccartin, J; Ocampo Rios, A A; Poyraz, D; Ryckbosch, D; Salva, S; Sigamani, M; Tytgat, M; Van Driessche, W; Yazgan, E; Zaganidis, N; Basegmez, S; Beluffi, C; Bondu, O; Brochet, S; Bruno, G; Caudron, A; Ceard, L; Delaere, C; Delcourt, M; Favart, D; Forthomme, L; Giammanco, A; Jafari, A; Jez, P; Komm, M; Lemaitre, V; Mertens, A; Musich, M; Nuttens, C; Perrini, L; Piotrzkowski, K; Popov, A; Quertenmont, L; Selvaggi, M; Vidal Marono, M; Beliy, N; Hammad, G H; Aldá Júnior, W L; Alves, F L; Alves, G A; Brito, L; Correa Martins Junior, M; Hamer, M; Hensel, C; Moraes, A; Pol, M E; Rebello Teles, P; Belchior Batista Das Chagas, E; Carvalho, W; Chinellato, J; Custódio, A; Da Costa, E M; De Jesus Damiao, D; De Oliveira Martins, C; Fonseca De Souza, S; Huertas Guativa, L M; Malbouisson, H; Matos Figueiredo, D; Mora Herrera, C; Mundim, L; Nogima, H; Prado Da Silva, W L; Santoro, A; Sznajder, A; Tonelli Manganote, E J; Vilela Pereira, A; Ahuja, S; Bernardes, C A; De Souza Santos, A; Dogra, S; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T R; Gregores, E M; Mercadante, P G; Moon, C S; Novaes, S F; Padula, Sandra S; Romero Abad, D; Ruiz Vargas, J C; Aleksandrov, A; Hadjiiska, R; Iaydjiev, P; Rodozov, M; Stoykova, S; Sultanov, G; Vutova, M; Dimitrov, A; Glushkov, I; Litov, L; Pavlov, B; Petkov, P; Ahmad, M; Bian, J G; Chen, G M; Chen, H S; Chen, M; Cheng, T; Du, R; Jiang, C H; Leggat, D; Plestina, R; Romeo, F; Shaheen, S M; Spiezia, A; Tao, J; Wang, C; Wang, Z; Zhang, H; Asawatangtrakuldee, C; Ban, Y; Li, Q; Liu, S; Mao, Y; Qian, S J; Wang, D; Xu, Z; Avila, C; Cabrera, A; Chaparro Sierra, L F; Florez, C; Gomez, J P; Gomez Moreno, B; Sanabria, J C; Godinovic, N; Lelas, D; Puljak, I; Ribeiro Cipriano, P M; Antunovic, Z; Kovac, M; Brigljevic, V; Kadija, K; Luetic, J; Micanovic, S; Sudic, L; Attikis, A; Mavromanolakis, G; Mousa, J; Nicolaou, C; Ptochos, F; Razis, P A; Rykaczewski, H; Bodlak, M; Finger, M; Finger, M; Abdelalim, A A; Awad, A; Mahrous, A; Radi, A; Calpas, B; Kadastik, M; Murumaa, M; Raidal, M; Tiko, A; Veelken, C; Eerola, P; Pekkanen, J; Voutilainen, M; Härkönen, J; Karimäki, V; Kinnunen, R; Lampén, T; Lassila-Perini, K; Lehti, S; Lindén, T; Luukka, P; Peltola, T; Tuominiemi, J; Tuovinen, E; Wendland, L; Talvitie, J; Tuuva, T; Besancon, M; Couderc, F; Dejardin, M; Denegri, D; Fabbro, B; Faure, J L; Favaro, C; Ferri, F; Ganjour, S; Givernaud, A; Gras, P; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Jarry, P; Locci, E; Machet, M; Malcles, J; Rander, J; Rosowsky, A; Titov, M; Zghiche, A; Abdulsalam, A; Antropov, I; Baffioni, S; Beaudette, F; Busson, P; Cadamuro, L; Chapon, E; Charlot, C; Davignon, O; Filipovic, N; Granier de Cassagnac, R; Jo, M; Lisniak, S; Mastrolorenzo, L; Miné, P; Naranjo, I N; Nguyen, M; Ochando, C; Ortona, G; Paganini, P; Pigard, P; Regnard, S; Salerno, R; Sauvan, J B; Sirois, Y; Strebler, T; Yilmaz, Y; Zabi, A; Agram, J-L; Andrea, J; Aubin, A; Bloch, D; Brom, J-M; Buttignol, M; Chabert, E C; Chanon, N; Collard, C; Conte, E; Coubez, X; Fontaine, J-C; Gelé, D; Goerlach, U; Goetzmann, C; Le Bihan, A-C; Merlin, J A; Skovpen, K; Van Hove, P; Gadrat, S; Beauceron, S; Bernet, C; Boudoul, G; Bouvier, E; Carrillo Montoya, C A; Chierici, R; Contardo, D; Courbon, B; Depasse, P; El Mamouni, H; Fan, J; Fay, J; Gascon, S; Gouzevitch, M; Ille, B; Lagarde, F; Laktineh, I B; Lethuillier, M; Mirabito, L; Pequegnot, A L; Perries, S; Ruiz Alvarez, J D; Sabes, D; Sordini, V; Vander Donckt, M; Verdier, P; Viret, S; Toriashvili, T; Tsamalaidze, Z; Autermann, C; Beranek, S; Feld, L; Heister, A; Kiesel, M K; Klein, K; Lipinski, M; Ostapchuk, A; Preuten, M; Raupach, F; Schael, S; Schulte, J F; Verlage, T; Weber, H; Zhukov, V; Ata, M; Brodski, M; Dietz-Laursonn, E; Duchardt, D; Endres, M; Erdmann, M; Erdweg, S; Esch, T; Fischer, R; Güth, A; Hebbeker, T; Heidemann, C; Hoepfner, K; Knutzen, S; Kreuzer, P; Merschmeyer, M; Meyer, A; Millet, P; Mukherjee, S; Olschewski, M; Padeken, K; Papacz, P; Pook, T; Radziej, M; Reithler, H; Rieger, M; Scheuch, F; Sonnenschein, L; Teyssier, D; Thüer, S; Cherepanov, V; Erdogan, Y; Flügge, G; Geenen, H; Geisler, M; Hoehle, F; Kargoll, B; Kress, T; Künsken, A; Lingemann, J; Nehrkorn, A; Nowack, A; Nugent, I M; Pistone, C; Pooth, O; Stahl, A; Aldaya Martin, M; Asin, I; Bartosik, N; Behnke, O; Behrens, U; Borras, K; Burgmeier, A; Campbell, A; Contreras-Campana, C; Costanza, F; Diez Pardos, C; Dolinska, G; Dooling, S; Dorland, T; Eckerlin, G; Eckstein, D; Eichhorn, T; Flucke, G; Gallo, E; Garcia, J Garay; Geiser, A; Gizhko, A; Gunnellini, P; Hauk, J; Hempel, M; Jung, H; Kalogeropoulos, A; Karacheban, O; Kasemann, M; Katsas, P; Kieseler, J; Kleinwort, C; Korol, I; Lange, W; Leonard, J; Lipka, K; Lobanov, A; Lohmann, W; Mankel, R; Melzer-Pellmann, I-A; Meyer, A B; Mittag, G; Mnich, J; Mussgiller, A; Naumann-Emme, S; Nayak, A; Ntomari, E; Perrey, H; Pitzl, D; Placakyte, R; Raspereza, A; Roland, B; Sahin, M Ö; Saxena, P; Schoerner-Sadenius, T; Seitz, C; Spannagel, S; Stefaniuk, N; Trippkewitz, K D; Walsh, R; Wissing, C; Blobel, V; Centis Vignali, M; Draeger, A R; Erfle, J; Garutti, E; Goebel, K; Gonzalez, D; Görner, M; Haller, J; Hoffmann, M; Höing, R S; Junkes, A; Klanner, R; Kogler, R; Kovalchuk, N; Lapsien, T; Lenz, T; Marchesini, I; Marconi, D; Meyer, M; Nowatschin, D; Ott, J; Pantaleo, F; Peiffer, T; Perieanu, A; Pietsch, N; Poehlsen, J; Rathjens, D; Sander, C; Scharf, C; Schleper, P; Schlieckau, E; Schmidt, A; Schumann, S; Schwandt, J; Sola, V; Stadie, H; Steinbrück, G; Stober, F M; Tholen, H; Troendle, D; Usai, E; Vanelderen, L; Vanhoefer, A; Vormwald, B; Barth, C; Baus, C; Berger, J; Böser, C; Butz, E; Chwalek, T; Colombo, F; De Boer, W; Descroix, A; Dierlamm, A; Fink, S; Frensch, F; Friese, R; Giffels, M; Gilbert, A; Haitz, D; Hartmann, F; Heindl, S M; Husemann, U; Katkov, I; Kornmayer, A; Lobelle Pardo, P; Maier, B; Mildner, H; Mozer, M U; Müller, T; Müller, Th; Plagge, M; Quast, G; Rabbertz, K; Röcker, S; Roscher, F; Schröder, M; Sieber, G; Simonis, H J; Ulrich, R; Wagner-Kuhr, J; Wayand, S; Weber, M; Weiler, T; Williamson, S; Wöhrmann, C; Wolf, R; Anagnostou, G; Daskalakis, G; Geralis, T; Giakoumopoulou, V A; Kyriakis, A; Loukas, D; Psallidas, A; Topsis-Giotis, I; Agapitos, A; Kesisoglou, S; Panagiotou, A; Saoulidou, N; Tziaferi, E; Evangelou, I; Flouris, G; Foudas, C; Kokkas, P; Loukas, N; Manthos, N; Papadopoulos, I; Paradas, E; Strologas, J; Bencze, G; Hajdu, C; Hazi, A; Hidas, P; Horvath, D; Sikler, F; Veszpremi, V; Vesztergombi, G; Zsigmond, A J; Beni, N; Czellar, S; Karancsi, J; Molnar, J; Szillasi, Z; Bartók, M; Makovec, A; Raics, P; Trocsanyi, Z L; Ujvari, B; Choudhury, S; Mal, P; Mandal, K; Sahoo, D K; Sahoo, N; Swain, S K; Bansal, S; Beri, S B; Bhatnagar, V; Chawla, R; Gupta, R; Bhawandeep, U; Kalsi, A K; Kaur, A; Kaur, M; Kumar, R; Mehta, A; Mittal, M; Singh, J B; Walia, G; Kumar, Ashok; Bhardwaj, A; Choudhary, B C; Garg, R B; Malhotra, S; Naimuddin, M; Nishu, N; Ranjan, K; Sharma, R; Sharma, V; Bhattacharya, S; Chatterjee, K; Dey, S; Dutta, S; Majumdar, N; Modak, A; Mondal, K; Mukhopadhyay, S; Roy, A; Roy, D; Roy Chowdhury, S; Sarkar, S; Sharan, M; Chudasama, R; Dutta, D; Jha, V; Kumar, V; Mohanty, A K; Pant, L M; Shukla, P; Topkar, A; Aziz, T; Banerjee, S; Bhowmik, S; Chatterjee, R M; Dewanjee, R K; Dugad, S; Ganguly, S; Ghosh, S; Guchait, M; Gurtu, A; Jain, Sa; Kole, G; Kumar, S; Mahakud, B; Maity, M; Majumder, G; Mazumdar, K; Mitra, S; Mohanty, G B; Parida, B; Sarkar, T; Sur, N; Sutar, B; Wickramage, N; Chauhan, S; Dube, S; Kapoor, A; Kothekar, K; Sharma, S; Bakhshiansohi, H; Behnamian, H; Etesami, S M; Fahim, A; Khakzad, M; Mohammadi Najafabadi, M; Naseri, M; Paktinat Mehdiabadi, S; Rezaei Hosseinabadi, F; Safarzadeh, B; Zeinali, M; Felcini, M; Grunewald, M; Abbrescia, M; Calabria, C; Caputo, C; Colaleo, A; Creanza, D; Cristella, L; De Filippis, N; De Palma, M; Fiore, L; Iaselli, G; Maggi, G; Maggi, M; Miniello, G; My, S; Nuzzo, S; Pompili, A; Pugliese, G; Radogna, R; Ranieri, A; Selvaggi, G; Silvestris, L; Venditti, R; Abbiendi, G; Battilana, C; Bonacorsi, D; Braibant-Giacomelli, S; Brigliadori, L; Campanini, R; Capiluppi, P; Castro, A; Cavallo, F R; Chhibra, S S; Codispoti, G; Cuffiani, M; Dallavalle, G M; Fabbri, F; Fanfani, A; Fasanella, D; Giacomelli, P; Grandi, C; Guiducci, L; Marcellini, S; Masetti, G; Montanari, A; Navarria, F L; Perrotta, A; Rossi, A M; Rovelli, T; Siroli, G P; Tosi, N; Cappello, G; Chiorboli, M; Costa, S; Di Mattia, A; Giordano, F; Potenza, R; Tricomi, A; Tuve, C; Barbagli, G; Ciulli, V; Civinini, C; D'Alessandro, R; Focardi, E; Gori, V; Lenzi, P; Meschini, M; Paoletti, S; Sguazzoni, G; Viliani, L; Benussi, L; Bianco, S; Fabbri, F; Piccolo, D; Primavera, F; Calvelli, V; Ferro, F; Lo Vetere, M; Monge, M R; Robutti, E; Tosi, S; Brianza, L; Dinardo, M E; Fiorendi, S; Gennai, S; Gerosa, R; Ghezzi, A; Govoni, P; Malvezzi, S; Manzoni, R A; Marzocchi, B; Menasce, D; Moroni, L; Paganoni, M; Pedrini, D; Ragazzi, S; Redaelli, N; Tabarelli de Fatis, T; Buontempo, S; Cavallo, N; Di Guida, S; Esposito, M; Fabozzi, F; Iorio, A O M; Lanza, G; Lista, L; Meola, S; Merola, M; Paolucci, P; Sciacca, C; Thyssen, F; Azzi, P; Bacchetta, N; Benato, L; Bisello, D; Boletti, A; Branca, A; Carlin, R; Checchia, P; Dall'Osso, M; Dorigo, T; Dosselli, U; Fanzago, F; Gasparini, F; Gasparini, U; Gozzelino, A; Kanishchev, K; Lacaprara, S; Margoni, M; Meneguzzo, A T; Pazzini, J; Pozzobon, N; Ronchese, P; Simonetto, F; Torassa, E; Tosi, M; Zanetti, M; Zotto, P; Zucchetta, A; Zumerle, G; Braghieri, A; Magnani, A; Montagna, P; Ratti, S P; Re, V; Riccardi, C; Salvini, P; Vai, I; Vitulo, P; Alunni Solestizi, L; Bilei, G M; Ciangottini, D; Fanò, L; Lariccia, P; Mantovani, G; Menichelli, M; Saha, A; Santocchia, A; Androsov, K; Azzurri, P; Bagliesi, G; Bernardini, J; Boccali, T; Castaldi, R; Ciocci, M A; Dell'Orso, R; Donato, S; Fedi, G; Foà, L; Giassi, A; Grippo, M T; Ligabue, F; Lomtadze, T; Martini, L; Messineo, A; Palla, F; Rizzi, A; Savoy-Navarro, A; Serban, A T; Spagnolo, P; Tenchini, R; Tonelli, G; Venturi, A; Verdini, P G; Barone, L; Cavallari, F; D'imperio, G; Del Re, D; Diemoz, M; Gelli, S; Jorda, C; Longo, E; Margaroli, F; Meridiani, P; Organtini, G; Paramatti, R; Preiato, F; Rahatlou, S; Rovelli, C; Santanastasio, F; Traczyk, P; Amapane, N; Arcidiacono, R; Argiro, S; Arneodo, M; Bellan, R; Biino, C; Cartiglia, N; Costa, M; Covarelli, R; Degano, A; Demaria, N; Finco, L; Kiani, B; Mariotti, C; Maselli, S; Migliore, E; Monaco, V; Monteil, E; Obertino, M M; Pacher, L; Pastrone, N; Pelliccioni, M; Pinna Angioni, G L; Ravera, F; Romero, A; Ruspa, M; Sacchi, R; Solano, A; Staiano, A; Belforte, S; Candelise, V; Casarsa, M; Cossutti, F; Della Ricca, G; Gobbo, B; La Licata, C; Marone, M; Schizzi, A; Zanetti, A; Kropivnitskaya, A; Nam, S K; Kim, D H; Kim, G N; Kim, M S; Kong, D J; Lee, S; Oh, Y D; Sakharov, A; Son, D C; Brochero Cifuentes, J A; Kim, H; Kim, T J; Song, S; Cho, S; Choi, S; Go, Y; Gyun, D; Hong, B; Kim, H; Kim, Y; Lee, B; Lee, K; Lee, K S; Lee, S; Lim, J; Park, S K; Roh, Y; Yoo, H D; Choi, M; Kim, H; Kim, J H; Lee, J S H; Park, I C; Ryu, G; Ryu, M S; Choi, Y; Goh, J; Kim, D; Kwon, E; Lee, J; Yu, I; Dudenas, V; Juodagalvis, A; Vaitkus, J; Ahmed, I; Ibrahim, Z A; Komaragiri, J R; Md Ali, M A B; Mohamad Idris, F; Wan Abdullah, W A T; Yusli, M N; Zolkapli, Z; Casimiro Linares, E; Castilla-Valdez, H; De La Cruz-Burelo, E; Heredia-De La Cruz, I; Hernandez-Almada, A; Lopez-Fernandez, R; Mejia Guisao, J; Sanchez-Hernandez, A; Carrillo Moreno, S; Vazquez Valencia, F; Pedraza, I; Salazar Ibarguen, H A; Morelos Pineda, A; Krofcheck, D; Butler, P H; Ahmad, A; Ahmad, M; Hassan, Q; Hoorani, H R; Khan, W A; Khurshid, T; Shoaib, M; Waqas, M; Bialkowska, H; Bluj, M; Boimska, B; Frueboes, T; Górski, M; Kazana, M; Nawrocki, K; Romanowska-Rybinska, K; Szleper, M; Zalewski, P; Brona, G; Bunkowski, K; Byszuk, A; Doroba, K; Kalinowski, A; Konecki, M; Krolikowski, J; Misiura, M; Olszewski, M; Walczak, M; Bargassa, P; Da Cruz E Silva, C Beirão; Di Francesco, A; Faccioli, P; Parracho, P G Ferreira; Gallinaro, M; Hollar, J; Leonardo, N; Lloret Iglesias, L; Nguyen, F; Rodrigues Antunes, J; Seixas, J; Toldaiev, O; Vadruccio, D; Varela, J; Vischia, P; Afanasiev, S; Bunin, P; Gavrilenko, M; Golutvin, I; Gorbunov, I; Kamenev, A; Karjavin, V; Lanev, A; Malakhov, A; Matveev, V; Moisenz, P; Palichik, V; Perelygin, V; Shmatov, S; Shulha, S; Skatchkov, N; Smirnov, V; Zarubin, A; Golovtsov, V; Ivanov, Y; Kim, V; Kuznetsova, E; Levchenko, P; Murzin, V; Oreshkin, V; Smirnov, I; Sulimov, V; Uvarov, L; Vavilov, S; Vorobyev, A; Andreev, Yu; Dermenev, A; Gninenko, S; Golubev, N; Karneyeu, A; Kirsanov, M; Krasnikov, N; Pashenkov, A; Tlisov, D; Toropin, A; Epshteyn, V; Gavrilov, V; Lychkovskaya, N; Popov, V; Pozdnyakov, L; Safronov, G; Spiridonov, A; Vlasov, E; Zhokin, A; Chadeeva, M; Chistov, R; Danilov, M; Rusinov, V; Tarkovskii, E; Andreev, V; Azarkin, M; Dremin, I; Kirakosyan, M; Leonidov, A; Mesyats, G; Rusakov, S V; Baskakov, A; Belyaev, A; Boos, E; Ershov, A; Gribushin, A; Kaminskiy, A; Kodolova, O; Korotkikh, V; Lokhtin, I; Miagkov, I; Obraztsov, S; Petrushanko, S; Savrin, V; Snigirev, A; Vardanyan, I; Azhgirey, I; Bayshev, I; Bitioukov, S; Kachanov, V; Kalinin, A; Konstantinov, D; Krychkine, V; Petrov, V; Ryutin, R; Sobol, A; Tourtchanovitch, L; Troshin, S; Tyurin, N; Uzunian, A; Volkov, A; Adzic, P; Cirkovic, P; Devetak, D; Milosevic, J; Rekovic, V; Alcaraz Maestre, J; Calvo, E; Cerrada, M; Chamizo Llatas, M; Colino, N; De La Cruz, B; Delgado Peris, A; Escalante Del Valle, A; Fernandez Bedoya, C; Ramos, J P Fernández; Flix, J; Fouz, M C; Garcia-Abia, P; Gonzalez Lopez, O; Goy Lopez, S; Hernandez, J M; Josa, M I; Navarro De Martino, E; Yzquierdo, A Pérez-Calero; Puerta Pelayo, J; Quintario Olmeda, A; Redondo, I; Romero, L; Soares, M S; Albajar, C; de Trocóniz, J F; Missiroli, M; Moran, D; Cuevas, J; Fernandez Menendez, J; Folgueras, S; Gonzalez Caballero, I; Palencia Cortezon, E; Vizan Garcia, J M; Cabrillo, I J; Calderon, A; Castiñeiras De Saa, J R; Curras, E; De Castro Manzano, P; Fernandez, M; Garcia-Ferrero, J; Gomez, G; Lopez Virto, A; Marco, J; Marco, R; Martinez Rivero, C; Matorras, F; Piedra Gomez, J; Rodrigo, T; Rodríguez-Marrero, A Y; Ruiz-Jimeno, A; Scodellaro, L; Trevisani, N; Vila, I; Vilar Cortabitarte, R; Abbaneo, D; Auffray, E; Auzinger, G; Bachtis, M; Baillon, P; Ball, A H; Barney, D; Benaglia, A; Bendavid, J; Benhabib, L; Berruti, G M; Bloch, P; Bocci, A; Bonato, A; Botta, C; Breuker, H; Camporesi, T; Castello, R; Cepeda, M; Cerminara, G; D'Alfonso, M; d'Enterria, D; Dabrowski, A; Daponte, V; David, A; De Gruttola, M; De Guio, F; De Roeck, A; De Visscher, S; Di Marco, E; Dobson, M; Dordevic, M; Dorney, B; du Pree, T; Duggan, D; Dünser, M; Dupont, N; Elliott-Peisert, A; Franzoni, G; Fulcher, J; Funk, W; Gigi, D; Gill, K; Giordano, D; Girone, M; Glege, F; Guida, R; Gundacker, S; Guthoff, M; Hammer, J; Harris, P; Hegeman, J; Innocente, V; Janot, P; Kirschenmann, H; Kortelainen, M J; Kousouris, K; Krajczar, K; Lecoq, P; Lourenço, C; Lucchini, M T; Magini, N; Malgeri, L; Mannelli, M; Martelli, A; Masetti, L; Meijers, F; Mersi, S; Meschi, E; Moortgat, F; Morovic, S; Mulders, M; Nemallapudi, M V; Neugebauer, H; Orfanelli, S; Orsini, L; Pape, L; Perez, E; Peruzzi, M; Petrilli, A; Petrucciani, G; Pfeiffer, A; Pierini, M; Piparo, D; Racz, A; Reis, T; Rolandi, G; Rovere, M; Ruan, M; Sakulin, H; Schäfer, C; Schwick, C; Seidel, M; Sharma, A; Silva, P; Simon, M; Sphicas, P; Steggemann, J; Stieger, B; Stoye, M; Takahashi, Y; Treille, D; Triossi, A; Tsirou, A; Veres, G I; Wardle, N; Wöhri, H K; Zagozdzinska, A; Zeuner, W D; Bertl, W; Deiters, K; Erdmann, W; Horisberger, R; Ingram, Q; Kaestli, H C; Kotlinski, D; Langenegger, U; Rohe, T; Bachmair, F; Bäni, L; Bianchini, L; Casal, B; Dissertori, G; Dittmar, M; Donegà, M; Eller, P; Grab, C; Heidegger, C; Hits, D; Hoss, J; Kasieczka, G; Lecomte, P; Lustermann, W; Mangano, B; Marionneau, M; Martinez Ruiz Del Arbol, P; Masciovecchio, M; Meinhard, M T; Meister, D; Micheli, F; Musella, P; Nessi-Tedaldi, F; Pandolfi, F; Pata, J; Pauss, F; Perrin, G; Perrozzi, L; Quittnat, M; Rossini, M; Schönenberger, M; Starodumov, A; Takahashi, M; Tavolaro, V R; Theofilatos, K; Wallny, R; Aarrestad, T K; Amsler, C; Caminada, L; Canelli, M F; Chiochia, V; De Cosa, A; Galloni, C; Hinzmann, A; Hreus, T; Kilminster, B; Lange, C; Ngadiuba, J; Pinna, D; Rauco, G; Robmann, P; Salerno, D; Yang, Y; Chen, K H; Doan, T H; Jain, Sh; Khurana, R; Konyushikhin, M; Kuo, C M; Lin, W; Lu, Y J; Pozdnyakov, A; Yu, S S; Kumar, Arun; Chang, P; Chang, Y H; Chang, Y W; Chao, Y; Chen, K F; Chen, P H; Dietz, C; Fiori, F; Grundler, U; Hou, W-S; Hsiung, Y; Liu, Y F; Lu, R-S; Miñano Moya, M; Petrakou, E; Tsai, J F; Tzeng, Y M; Asavapibhop, B; Kovitanggoon, K; Singh, G; Srimanobhas, N; Suwonjandee, N; Adiguzel, A; Damarseckin, S; Demiroglu, Z S; Dozen, C; Dumanoglu, I; Girgis, S; Gokbulut, G; Guler, Y; Gurpinar, E; Hos, I; Kangal, E E; Kayis Topaksu, A; Onengut, G; Ozdemir, K; Ozturk, S; Sunar Cerci, D; Tali, B; Topakli, H; Zorbilmez, C; Bilin, B; Bilmis, S; Isildak, B; Karapinar, G; Yalvac, M; Zeyrek, M; Gülmez, E; Kaya, M; Kaya, O; Yetkin, E A; Yetkin, T; Cakir, A; Cankocak, K; Sen, S; Vardarlı, F I; Grynyov, B; Levchuk, L; Sorokin, P; Aggleton, R; Ball, F; Beck, L; Brooke, J J; Burns, D; Clement, E; Cussans, D; Flacher, H; Goldstein, J; Grimes, M; Heath, G P; Heath, H F; Jacob, J; Kreczko, L; Lucas, C; Meng, Z; Newbold, D M; Paramesvaran, S; Poll, A; Sakuma, T; Seif El Nasr-Storey, S; Senkin, S; Smith, D; Smith, V J; Belyaev, A; Brew, C; Brown, R M; Calligaris, L; Cieri, D; Cockerill, D J A; Coughlan, J A; Harder, K; Harper, S; Olaiya, E; Petyt, D; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C H; Thea, A; Tomalin, I R; Williams, T; Worm, S D; Baber, M; Bainbridge, R; Buchmuller, O; Bundock, A; Burton, D; Casasso, S; Citron, M; Colling, D; Corpe, L; Dauncey, P; Davies, G; De Wit, A; Della Negra, M; Dunne, P; Elwood, A; Futyan, D; Hall, G; Iles, G; Lane, R; Lucas, R; Lyons, L; Magnan, A-M; Malik, S; Nash, J; Nikitenko, A; Pela, J; Pesaresi, M; Raymond, D M; Richards, A; Rose, A; Seez, C; Tapper, A; Uchida, K; Vazquez Acosta, M; Virdee, T; Zenz, S C; Cole, J E; Hobson, P R; Khan, A; Kyberd, P; Leslie, D; Reid, I D; Symonds, P; Teodorescu, L; Turner, M; Borzou, A; Call, K; Dittmann, J; Hatakeyama, K; Liu, H; Pastika, N; Charaf, O; Cooper, S I; Henderson, C; Rumerio, P; Arcaro, D; Avetisyan, A; Bose, T; Gastler, D; Rankin, D; Richardson, C; Rohlf, J; Sulak, L; Zou, D; Alimena, J; Benelli, G; Berry, E; Cutts, D; Ferapontov, A; Garabedian, A; Hakala, J; Heintz, U; Jesus, O; Laird, E; Landsberg, G; Mao, Z; Narain, M; Piperov, S; Sagir, S; Syarif, R; Breedon, R; Breto, G; De La Barca Sanchez, M Calderon; Chauhan, S; Chertok, M; Conway, J; Conway, R; Cox, P T; Erbacher, R; Funk, G; Gardner, M; Ko, W; Lander, R; Mclean, C; Mulhearn, M; Pellett, D; Pilot, J; Ricci-Tam, F; Shalhout, S; Smith, J; Squires, M; Stolp, D; Tripathi, M; Wilbur, S; Yohay, R; Cousins, R; Everaerts, P; Florent, A; Hauser, J; Ignatenko, M; Saltzberg, D; Takasugi, E; Valuev, V; Weber, M; Burt, K; Clare, R; Ellison, J; Gary, J W; Hanson, G; Heilman, J; Ivova Paneva, M; Jandir, P; Kennedy, E; Lacroix, F; Long, O R; Malberti, M; Negrete, M Olmedo; Shrinivas, A; Wei, H; Wimpenny, S; Yates, B R; Branson, J G; Cerati, G B; Cittolin, S; D'Agnolo, R T; Derdzinski, M; Holzner, A; Kelley, R; Klein, D; Letts, J; Macneill, I; Olivito, D; Padhi, S; Pieri, M; Sani, M; Sharma, V; Simon, S; Tadel, M; Vartak, A; Wasserbaech, S; Welke, C; Würthwein, F; Yagil, A; Zevi Della Porta, G; Bradmiller-Feld, J; Campagnari, C; Dishaw, A; Dutta, V; Flowers, K; Franco Sevilla, M; Geffert, P; George, C; Golf, F; Gouskos, L; Gran, J; Incandela, J; Mccoll, N; Mullin, S D; Richman, J; Stuart, D; Suarez, I; West, C; Yoo, J; Anderson, D; Apresyan, A; Bornheim, A; Bunn, J; Chen, Y; Duarte, J; Mott, A; Newman, H B; Pena, C; Spiropulu, M; Vlimant, J R; Xie, S; Zhu, R Y; Andrews, M B; Azzolini, V; Calamba, A; Carlson, B; Ferguson, T; Paulini, M; Russ, J; Sun, M; Vogel, H; Vorobiev, I; Cumalat, J P; Ford, W T; Gaz, A; Jensen, F; Johnson, A; Krohn, M; Mulholland, T; Nauenberg, U; Stenson, K; Wagner, S R; Alexander, J; Chatterjee, A; Chaves, J; Chu, J; Dittmer, S; Eggert, N; Mirman, N; Nicolas Kaufman, G; Patterson, J R; Rinkevicius, A; Ryd, A; Skinnari, L; Soffi, L; Sun, W; Tan, S M; Teo, W D; Thom, J; Thompson, J; Tucker, J; Weng, Y; Wittich, P; Abdullin, S; Albrow, M; Apollinari, G; Banerjee, S; Bauerdick, L A T; Beretvas, A; Berryhill, J; Bhat, P C; Bolla, G; Burkett, K; Butler, J N; Cheung, H W K; Chlebana, F; Cihangir, S; Elvira, V D; Fisk, I; Freeman, J; Gottschalk, E; Gray, L; Green, D; Grünendahl, S; Gutsche, O; Hanlon, J; Hare, D; Harris, R M; Hasegawa, S; Hirschauer, J; Hu, Z; Jayatilaka, B; Jindariani, S; Johnson, M; Joshi, U; Klima, B; Kreis, B; Lammel, S; Lewis, J; Linacre, J; Lincoln, D; Lipton, R; Liu, T; Lopes De Sá, R; Lykken, J; Maeshima, K; Marraffino, J M; Maruyama, S; Mason, D; McBride, P; Merkel, P; Mrenna, S; Nahn, S; Newman-Holmes, C; O'Dell, V; Pedro, K; Prokofyev, O; Rakness, G; Sexton-Kennedy, E; Soha, A; Spalding, W J; Spiegel, L; Stoynev, S; Strobbe, N; Taylor, L; Tkaczyk, S; Tran, N V; Uplegger, L; Vaandering, E W; Vernieri, C; Verzocchi, M; Vidal, R; Wang, M; Weber, H A; Whitbeck, A; Acosta, D; Avery, P; Bortignon, P; Bourilkov, D; Brinkerhoff, A; Carnes, A; Carver, M; Curry, D; Das, S; Field, R D; Furic, I K; Konigsberg, J; Korytov, A; Kotov, K; Ma, P; Matchev, K; Mei, H; Milenovic, P; Mitselmakher, G; Rank, D; Rossin, R; Shchutska, L; Snowball, M; Sperka, D; Terentyev, N; Thomas, L; Wang, J; Wang, S; Yelton, J; Hewamanage, S; Linn, S; Markowitz, P; Martinez, G; Rodriguez, J L; Ackert, A; Adams, J R; Adams, T; Askew, A; Bein, S; Bochenek, J; Diamond, B; Haas, J; Hagopian, S; Hagopian, V; Johnson, K F; Khatiwada, A; Prosper, H; Weinberg, M; Baarmand, M M; Bhopatkar, V; Colafranceschi, S; Hohlmann, M; Kalakhety, H; Noonan, D; Roy, T; Yumiceva, F; Adams, M R; Apanasevich, L; Berry, D; Betts, R R; Bucinskaite, I; Cavanaugh, R; Evdokimov, O; Gauthier, L; Gerber, C E; Hofman, D J; Kurt, P; O'Brien, C; Sandoval Gonzalez, L D; Turner, P; Varelas, N; Wu, Z; Zakaria, M; Zhang, J; Bilki, B; Clarida, W; Dilsiz, K; Durgut, S; Gandrajula, R P; Haytmyradov, M; Khristenko, V; Merlo, J-P; Mermerkaya, H; Mestvirishvili, A; Moeller, A; Nachtman, J; Ogul, H; Onel, Y; Ozok, F; Penzo, A; Snyder, C; Tiras, E; Wetzel, J; Yi, K; Anderson, I; Barnett, B A; Blumenfeld, B; Cocoros, A; Eminizer, N; Fehling, D; Feng, L; Gritsan, A V; Maksimovic, P; Osherson, M; Roskes, J; Sarica, U; Swartz, M; Xiao, M; Xin, Y; You, C; Baringer, P; Bean, A; Bruner, C; Kenny, R P; Majumder, D; Malek, M; Mcbrayer, W; Murray, M; Sanders, S; Stringer, R; Wang, Q; Ivanov, A; Kaadze, K; Khalil, S; Makouski, M; Maravin, Y; Mohammadi, A; Saini, L K; Skhirtladze, N; Toda, S; Lange, D; Rebassoo, F; Wright, D; Anelli, C; Baden, A; Baron, O; Belloni, A; Calvert, B; Eno, S C; Ferraioli, C; Gomez, J A; Hadley, N J; Jabeen, S; Kellogg, R G; Kolberg, T; Kunkle, J; Lu, Y; Mignerey, A C; Shin, Y H; Skuja, A; Tonjes, M B; Tonwar, S C; Apyan, A; Barbieri, R; Baty, A; Bi, R; Bierwagen, K; Brandt, S; Busza, W; Cali, I A; Demiragli, Z; Di Matteo, L; Gomez Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; Gulhan, D; Iiyama, Y; Innocenti, G M; Klute, M; Kovalskyi, D; Lai, Y S; Lee, Y-J; Levin, A; Luckey, P D; Marini, A C; Mcginn, C; Mironov, C; Narayanan, S; Niu, X; Paus, C; Roland, C; Roland, G; Salfeld-Nebgen, J; Stephans, G S F; Sumorok, K; Tatar, K; Varma, M; Velicanu, D; Veverka, J; Wang, J; Wang, T W; Wyslouch, B; Yang, M; Zhukova, V; Benvenuti, A C; Dahmes, B; Evans, A; Finkel, A; Gude, A; Hansen, P; Kalafut, S; Kao, S C; Klapoetke, K; Kubota, Y; Lesko, Z; Mans, J; Nourbakhsh, S; Ruckstuhl, N; Rusack, R; Tambe, N; Turkewitz, J; Acosta, J G; Oliveros, S; Avdeeva, E; Bartek, R; Bloom, K; Bose, S; Claes, D R; Dominguez, A; Fangmeier, C; Gonzalez Suarez, R; Kamalieddin, R; Knowlton, D; Kravchenko, I; Meier, F; Monroy, J; Ratnikov, F; Siado, J E; Snow, G R; Alyari, M; Dolen, J; George, J; Godshalk, A; Harrington, C; Iashvili, I; Kaisen, J; Kharchilava, A; Kumar, A; Rappoccio, S; Roozbahani, B; Alverson, G; Barberis, E; Baumgartel, D; Chasco, M; Hortiangtham, A; Massironi, A; Morse, D M; Nash, D; Orimoto, T; Teixeira De Lima, R; Trocino, D; Wang, R-J; Wood, D; Zhang, J; Bhattacharya, S; Hahn, K A; Kubik, A; Low, J F; Mucia, N; Odell, N; Pollack, B; Schmitt, M; Sung, K; Trovato, M; Velasco, M; Dev, N; Hildreth, M; Jessop, C; Karmgard, D J; Kellams, N; Lannon, K; Marinelli, N; Meng, F; Mueller, C; Musienko, Y; Planer, M; Reinsvold, A; Ruchti, R; Smith, G; Taroni, S; Valls, N; Wayne, M; Wolf, M; Woodard, A; Antonelli, L; Brinson, J; Bylsma, B; Durkin, L S; Flowers, S; Hart, A; Hill, C; Hughes, R; Ji, W; Ling, T Y; Liu, B; Luo, W; Puigh, D; Rodenburg, M; Winer, B L; Wulsin, H W; Driga, O; Elmer, P; Hardenbrook, J; Hebda, P; Koay, S A; Lujan, P; Marlow, D; Medvedeva, T; Mooney, M; Olsen, J; Palmer, C; Piroué, P; Stickland, D; Tully, C; Zuranski, A; Malik, S; Barker, A; Barnes, V E; Benedetti, D; Bortoletto, D; Gutay, L; Jha, M K; Jones, M; Jung, A W; Jung, K; Kumar, A; Miller, D H; Neumeister, N; Radburn-Smith, B C; Shi, X; Shipsey, I; Silvers, D; Sun, J; Svyatkovskiy, A; Wang, F; Xie, W; Xu, L; Parashar, N; Stupak, J; Adair, A; Akgun, B; Chen, Z; Ecklund, K M; Geurts, F J M; Guilbaud, M; Li, W; Michlin, B; Northup, M; Padley, B P; Redjimi, R; Roberts, J; Rorie, J; Tu, Z; Zabel, J; Betchart, B; Bodek, A; de Barbaro, P; Demina, R; Eshaq, Y; Ferbel, T; Galanti, M; Garcia-Bellido, A; Han, J; Hindrichs, O; Khukhunaishvili, A; Lo, K H; Tan, P; Verzetti, M; Chou, J P; Contreras-Campana, E; Ferencek, D; Gershtein, Y; Halkiadakis, E; Heindl, M; Hidas, D; Hughes, E; Kaplan, S; Kunnawalkam Elayavalli, R; Lath, A; Nash, K; Saka, H; Salur, S; Schnetzer, S; Sheffield, D; Somalwar, S; Stone, R; Thomas, S; Thomassen, P; Walker, M; Foerster, M; Riley, G; Rose, K; Spanier, S; Thapa, K; Bouhali, O; Castaneda Hernandez, A; Celik, A; Dalchenko, M; De Mattia, M; Delgado, A; Dildick, S; Eusebi, R; Gilmore, J; Huang, T; Kamon, T; Krutelyov, V; Mueller, R; Osipenkov, I; Pakhotin, Y; Patel, R; Perloff, A; Rose, A; Safonov, A; Tatarinov, A; Ulmer, K A; Akchurin, N; Cowden, C; Damgov, J; Dragoiu, C; Dudero, P R; Faulkner, J; Kunori, S; Lamichhane, K; Lee, S W; Libeiro, T; Undleeb, S; Volobouev, I; Appelt, E; Delannoy, A G; Greene, S; Gurrola, A; Janjam, R; Johns, W; Maguire, C; Mao, Y; Melo, A; Ni, H; Sheldon, P; Tuo, S; Velkovska, J; Xu, Q; Arenton, M W; Cox, B; Francis, B; Goodell, J; Hirosky, R; Ledovskoy, A; Li, H; Lin, C; Neu, C; Sinthuprasith, T; Sun, X; Wang, Y; Wolfe, E; Wood, J; Xia, F; Clarke, C; Harr, R; Karchin, P E; Kottachchi Kankanamge Don, C; Lamichhane, P; Sturdy, J; Belknap, D A; Carlsmith, D; Dasu, S; Dodd, L; Duric, S; Gomber, B; Grothe, M; Herndon, M; Hervé, A; Klabbers, P; Lanaro, A; Levine, A; Long, K; Loveless, R; Mohapatra, A; Ojalvo, I; Perry, T; Pierro, G A; Polese, G; Ruggles, T; Sarangi, T; Savin, A; Sharma, A; Smith, N; Smith, W H; Taylor, D; Verwilligen, P; Woods, N; Collaboration, Authorinst The Cms

    2016-01-01

    Inclusive jet production in pPb collisions at a nucleon-nucleon (NN) center-of-mass energy of [Formula: see text] is studied with the CMS detector at the LHC. A data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 30.1 nb[Formula: see text] is analyzed. The jet transverse momentum spectra are studied in seven pseudorapidity intervals covering the range [Formula: see text] in the NN center-of-mass frame. The jet production yields at forward and backward pseudorapidity are compared and no significant asymmetry about [Formula: see text] is observed in the measured kinematic range. The measurements in the pPb system are compared to reference jet spectra obtained by extrapolation from previous measurements in pp collisions at [Formula: see text]. In all pseudorapidity ranges, nuclear modifications in inclusive jet production are found to be small, as predicted by next-to-leading order perturbative QCD calculations that incorporate nuclear effects in the parton distribution functions.

  16. (135)Xe measurements with a two-element CZT-based radioxenon detector for nuclear explosion monitoring.

    PubMed

    Ranjbar, Lily; Farsoni, Abi T; Becker, Eric M

    2017-04-01

    Measurement of elevated concentrations of xenon radioisotopes ((131m)Xe, (133m)Xe, (133)Xe and (135)Xe) in the atmosphere has been shown to be a very powerful method for verifying whether or not a detected explosion is nuclear in nature. These isotopes are among the few with enough mobility and with half-lives long enough to make their detection at long distances realistic. Existing radioxenon detection systems used by the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO) suffer from problems such as complexity, need for high maintenance and memory effect. To study the response of CdZnTe (CZT) detectors to xenon radioisotopes and investigate whether it is capable of mitigating the aforementioned issues with the current radioxenon detection systems, a prototype detector utilizing two coplanar CZT detectors was built and tested at Oregon State University. The detection system measures xenon radioisotopes through beta-gamma coincidence technique by detecting coincidence events between the two detectors. In this paper, we introduce the detector design and report our measurement results with radioactive lab sources and (135)Xe produced in the OSU TRIGA reactor. Minimum Detectable Concentration (MDC) for (135)Xe was calculated to be 1.47 ± 0.05 mBq/m(3).

  17. A measurement of the angular distribution of the diffuse optical transmittance of etched nuclear tracks in CR-39

    SciTech Connect

    Vázquez-López, C.; Zendejas-Leal, B. E.; Bogard, James S; Golzarri, J. I.; Espinosa Garcia, Guillermo

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a device to measure the angular distribution of the diffuse optical transmittance produced by etched nuclear tracks in polyallyl diglycol carbonate (PADC) detector. The device makes use of a stepper motor to move an array of four photodetectors around the sample in 1.8-degree steps. The integrated transmitted light was observed to increase monotonically with the etched track density in a range from zero to 2.8 x 10^5 per cm^2, using a neutron Am Be source.

  18. Analysis of Round Robin Test for Ultrasonic Thickness Measurement of Wall Thinned Pipe in Nuclear Power Plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Dae-Hoon; Lee, Seung-Joon; Lee, Joon-Hyun; Lee, Sung-Ho

    2008-02-01

    It is well recognized that one of the most serious problems on the maintenance of piping system in Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs) is the wall thinning of carbon steel pipe components. The objective of this research is to verify confidence of wall thinning measurement system by conducting Round Robin Test (RRT). 23 specimens with different size and shape of pipe were used according to standard practice in RRT. The gage R&R analysis was introduced for each sigma quality level, so that repeatability and reproducibility can be estimated from RRT results.

  19. A CF4 TPC to measure the ν¯e magnetic moment at a nuclear reactor.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broggini, C.; Jörgens, V.; Treichel, M.; Twerenbold, D.; Vuilleumier, J.-L.

    An experiment is described which offers a significant improvement for the measurement of the ν¯ee- cross section at low energy. The experiment will be sensitive to a neutrino magnetic moment down to a few 10-11 Bohr magnetons, on the level of that introduced to explain the solar neutrino puzzle. The detector, to be placed close to a nuclear reactor, is a 1 m3 Time Pojection Chamber surrounded by an active shielding. The key point of the experiment is the use of tetrafluoromethane, CF4, at the pressure of 5 bar in the TPC.

  20. Spectroscopic and physicochemical measurements for on-line monitoring of used nuclear fuel separation processes

    SciTech Connect

    Nee, Ko; Nilsson, M.; Bryan, S.; Levitskaia, T.

    2013-07-01

    Separation processes for used nuclear fuel are often complicated and challenging due to the high constraints in purity of the products and safeguards of the process streams. In order to achieve a safe, secure and efficient separation process, the liquid streams in the separation process require close monitoring. Due to the high radiation environment, sampling of the materials is difficult. Availability of a detection technique that is remote, non-destructive and can avoid time-delay caused by retrieving samples would be beneficial and could minimize the exposure to personnel and provide material accountancy to avoid diversion (non-proliferation). For example, Ultra Violet (UV), Visible (Vis), Near-Infrared (NIR) and Raman spectroscopy that detect and quantify elements present in used nuclear fuel, e.g. lanthanides, actinides and molecules such as nitrate, can be used. In this work, we have carried out NIR and Raman spectroscopy to study aqueous solutions composed of different concentrations of nitric acid, sodium nitrate, and neodymium at varied temperatures. A chemometric model for online monitoring based on the PLS-Toolbox (MATLAB) software has been developed and validated to provide chemical composition of process streams based on spectroscopic data. In conclusion, both of our NIR and Raman spectra were useful for H{sup +} and NO{sub 3} prediction, and only NIR was helpful for the Nd{sup 3+} prediction.

  1. Measurement of partonic nuclear effects in deep-inelastic neutrino scattering using MINERvA

    DOE PAGES

    Mousseau, J.

    2016-04-19

    Here, the MINERvA Collaboration reports a novel study of neutrino-nucleus charged-current deep inelastic scattering (DIS) using the same neutrino beam incident on targets of polystyrene, graphite, iron, and lead. Results are presented as ratios of C, Fe, and Pb to CH. The ratios of total DIS cross sections as a function of neutrino energy and flux-integrated differential cross sections as a function of the Bjorken scaling variable x are presented in the neutrino-energy range of 5–50 GeV. Based on the predictions of charged-lepton scattering ratios, good agreement is found between the data and prediction at medium x and low neutrino energy.more » However, the ratios appear to be below predictions in the vicinity of the nuclear shadowing region, x < 0.1. This apparent deficit, reflected in the DIS cross-section ratio at high Eν, is consistent with previous MINERvA observations [B. Tice (MINERvA Collaboration), Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 231801 (2014).] and with the predicted onset of nuclear shadowing with the axial-vector current in neutrino scattering.« less

  2. Measurement of partonic nuclear effects in deep-inelastic neutrino scattering using MINERvA

    SciTech Connect

    Mousseau, J.

    2016-04-19

    Here, the MINERvA Collaboration reports a novel study of neutrino-nucleus charged-current deep inelastic scattering (DIS) using the same neutrino beam incident on targets of polystyrene, graphite, iron, and lead. Results are presented as ratios of C, Fe, and Pb to CH. The ratios of total DIS cross sections as a function of neutrino energy and flux-integrated differential cross sections as a function of the Bjorken scaling variable x are presented in the neutrino-energy range of 5–50 GeV. Based on the predictions of charged-lepton scattering ratios, good agreement is found between the data and prediction at medium x and low neutrino energy. However, the ratios appear to be below predictions in the vicinity of the nuclear shadowing region, x < 0.1. This apparent deficit, reflected in the DIS cross-section ratio at high Eν, is consistent with previous MINERvA observations [B. Tice (MINERvA Collaboration), Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 231801 (2014).] and with the predicted onset of nuclear shadowing with the axial-vector current in neutrino scattering.

  3. Measurement of partonic nuclear effects in deep-inelastic neutrino scattering using MINERvA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mousseau, J.; Wospakrik, M.; Aliaga, L.; Altinok, O.; Bellantoni, L.; Bercellie, A.; Betancourt, M.; Bodek, A.; Bravar, A.; Budd, H.; Cai, T.; Carneiro, M. F.; Christy, M. E.; Chvojka, J.; da Motta, H.; Devan, J.; Dytman, S. A.; Díaz, G. A.; Eberly, B.; Felix, J.; Fields, L.; Fine, R.; Gago, A. M.; Galindo, R.; Gallagher, H.; Ghosh, A.; Golan, T.; Gran, R.; Harris, D. A.; Higuera, A.; Hurtado, K.; Kiveni, M.; Kleykamp, J.; Kordosky, M.; Le, T.; Maher, E.; Manly, S.; Mann, W. A.; Marshall, C. M.; Martinez Caicedo, D. A.; McFarland, K. S.; McGivern, C. L.; McGowan, A. M.; Messerly, B.; Miller, J.; Mislivec, A.; Morfín, J. G.; Naples, D.; Nelson, J. K.; Norrick, A.; Nuruzzaman; Osta, J.; Paolone, V.; Park, J.; Patrick, C. E.; Perdue, G. N.; Rakotondravohitra, L.; Ramirez, M. A.; Ransome, R. D.; Ray, H.; Ren, L.; Rimal, D.; Rodrigues, P. A.; Ruterbories, D.; Schellman, H.; Schmitz, D. W.; Solano Salinas, C. J.; Tagg, N.; Tice, B. G.; Valencia, E.; Walton, T.; Wolcott, J.; Zavala, G.; Zhang, D.; Minerν A Collaboration

    2016-04-01

    The MINERvA Collaboration reports a novel study of neutrino-nucleus charged-current deep inelastic scattering (DIS) using the same neutrino beam incident on targets of polystyrene, graphite, iron, and lead. Results are presented as ratios of C, Fe, and Pb to CH. The ratios of total DIS cross sections as a function of neutrino energy and flux-integrated differential cross sections as a function of the Bjorken scaling variable x are presented in the neutrino-energy range of 5-50 GeV. Based on the predictions of charged-lepton scattering ratios, good agreement is found between the data and prediction at medium x and low neutrino energy. However, the ratios appear to be below predictions in the vicinity of the nuclear shadowing region, x <0.1 . This apparent deficit, reflected in the DIS cross-section ratio at high Eν, is consistent with previous MINERvA observations [B. Tice et al. (MINERvA Collaboration), Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 231801 (2014).] and with the predicted onset of nuclear shadowing with the axial-vector current in neutrino scattering.

  4. The g-factor of quasi-two-dimensional electrons in InAs/InGaAs/InAlAs inserted-channels

    SciTech Connect

    Pakmehr, Mehdi; Khaetskii, A.; McCombe, B. D.; Bhandari, N.; Cahay, M.; Chiatti, Olivio; Fischer, S. F.; Heyn, C.; Hansen, W.

    2015-08-24

    We have measured the Landau-level spin-splitting of two-dimensional electrons in the composite InAs/InGaAs channels of two InAs/InGaAs/InAlAs heterostructures with different alloy compositions by magnetotransport and THz magneto-photoconductivity in magnetic fields up to 10 T. The structures differ importantly in the mobility of the channel, the electron density and the composition of the barriers. The magnitudes of the experimental g-factors for B along the quantization axis and their anisotropies are larger by at least a factor of 2 than the corresponding calculated single particle values. The angular dependence of many-body exchange contributions and the effects of broadening of Landau–level densities of states are necessary for understanding this behaviour. We find evidence for a marked decrease of the exchange contribution at low perpendicular magnetic fields in the higher mobility sample from coincidence measurements, but no indications of such behaviour in the lower mobility sample.

  5. Investigations of defect structures and g factors for octahedral (CrO6)7- and (VO6)8- clusters in rutile-type crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Lianxuan; Wang, Minjie

    2016-05-01

    The electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) g factor formulas for Cr5+ and V4+ ions in Al2O3, TiO2 and VO2 crystals are deduced from Jahn-Teller effect and contributions of the charge transfer (CT) levels. The tetragonal distortions. ΔR(R∥- R⊥) = -0.0184,-0.0045 and -0.0124 nm, and Δ𝜃 = 0∘, - 0.001∘ and 0∘, for Al2O3:Cr5+, TiO2:V4+ and VO2, respectively. The calculations of the g factors agree well with the experimental values. The contributions of the CT levels to g factors increase with the increasing valence state. It must be taken into account in the precise calculations of g factors for the high valence state d1 ions in crystals.

  6. C++ OPPS, a new software for the interpretation of protein dynamics from nuclear magnetic resonance measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zerbetto, Mirco; Polimeno, Antonino; Meirovitch, Eva

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is a powerful tool for elucidating protein dynamics because of the possibility to interpret nuclear spin relaxation properties in terms of microdynamic parameters. Magnetic relaxation times T1, T2, and NOE depend on dipolar and quadrupolar interactions, on chemical shift anisotropy and cross-correlation effects. Within the framework of given motional model, it is possible to express the NMR relaxation times as functions of spectral densities (Abragam, The Principles of Nuclear Magnetism; Oxford University Press: Clarendon, London, 1961), obtaining the connection between macroscopic observables and microscopic properties. In this context, recently Meirovitch et al. (Shapiro et al., Biochemistry 2002, 41, 6271, Meirovitch et al., J Phys Chem B 2006, 110, 20615, Meirovitch et al., J Phys Chem B 2007, 111, 12865) applied the dynamical model introduced by Polimeno and Freed (Polimeno and Freed, Adv Chem Phys 1993, 83, 89, Polimeno and Freed, J Phys Chem 1995, 99, 10995), known as the slowly relaxing local structure (SRLS) model, to the study of NMR data. The program C++OPPS (http://www.chimica.unipd.it/licc/), developed in our laboratory, implements the SRLS model in an user-friendly way with a graphical user interface (GUI), introduced to simplify the work to users who do not feel at ease with the complex mathematics of the model and the difficulties of command line based programs. The program is an evolution of the old FORTRAN 77 implementation COPPS (COupled Protein Probe Smoluchowski) and presents a number of new features: the presence of an easy to use GUI written in JAVA; high calculation performance thanks to features of C++ language, employment of BLAS (basic linear algebra subprograms) library (Blackford et al., Trans Math Soft 2002, 28, 135) in handling matrix-vector operations and parallelization of the code under the MPI (message passing interface) paradigm (Gropp et al., Parallel Comput 1996, 22, 789, Gropp and Lusk, User

  7. Review of geochemical measurement techniques for a nuclear waste repository in bedded salt

    SciTech Connect

    Knauss, K.G.; Steinborn, T.L.

    1980-05-22

    A broad, general review is presented of geochemical measurement techniques that can provide data necessary for site selection and repository effectiveness assessment for a radioactive waste repository in bedded salt. The available measurement techniques are organized according to the parameter measured. The list of geochemical parameters include all those measurable geochemical properties of a sample whole values determine the geochemical characteristics or behavior of the system. For each technique, remarks are made pertaining to the operating principles of the measurement instrument and the purpose for which the technique is used. Attention is drawn to areas where further research and development are needed.

  8. Nuclear Heating Measurement in Critical Facilities and Experimental Validation of Code and Libraries - An Application to Prompt and Delayed γ Nuclear Data Needs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blaise, P.; Di Salvo, J.; Vaglio-Gaudard, C.; Bernard, D.; Amharrak, H.; Lemaire, M.; Ravaux, S.

    Energy from prompt and delayed gammas in actual and future nuclear systems are more and more taken into account into design studies as they play an important role in the assessment of performance and safety concerns. Their incomplete knowledge (both prompt and delayed) require to take conservative design margins on local dimensioning parameters, thus reducing the awaited performances or flexibility of these facilities, with costs that are far from being negligible. The local energy photon deposit must be accurately known for Generation-III (Gen-III), Generation-IV (Gen-IV) or the new MTR Jules Horowitz Reactor (JHR). The last 2 decades has seen the realization, in Zero Power Reactors (ZPR), of several programs partially devoted to γ-heating measurements. Experimental programs were and are still conducted in different Cadarache facilities such as MASURCA (for SFR), and later in MINERVE and EOLE (for JHR and Gen-III reactors). The adequacy of the γ-heating calculation was compared to experimental data using thermo-luminescent (TL) detectors and γ-fission chambers. Inconsistencies in C/E and associated uncertainties led to improvement of both libraries and experimental techniques. For these last one, characterization for TL and optically stimulated (OSL) detectors (calibration, individual response), and Monte Carlo calculation of charge repartition in those detectors and their environment were carefully checked and optimized. This step enabled to reduce the associated experimental uncertainty by a factor of 2 (8% at 2σ). Nevertheless, interpretation of integral experiment with updated calculation schemes and improved experimental techniques still tend to prove that there are some nuclei for which there are missing or erroneous data, mainly in structural and absorbing materials. New integral and differential measurements are needed to guide new evaluation efforts, which could benefit from consolidated theoretical and experimental modeling techniques.

  9. 10 CFR 50.60 - Acceptance criteria for fracture prevention measures for lightwater nuclear power reactors for...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... lightwater nuclear power reactors for normal operation. 50.60 Section 50.60 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY... lightwater nuclear power reactors for normal operation. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section, all light-water nuclear power reactors, other than reactor facilities for which...

  10. 10 CFR 50.60 - Acceptance criteria for fracture prevention measures for lightwater nuclear power reactors for...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... lightwater nuclear power reactors for normal operation. 50.60 Section 50.60 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY... lightwater nuclear power reactors for normal operation. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section, all light-water nuclear power reactors, other than reactor facilities for which...

  11. Impact of an external radiation field on handheld XRF measurements for nuclear forensics applications

    SciTech Connect

    Steeb, Jennifer L.; Mertz, Carol J.; Finck, Martha R.; Engelstad, Gary; Carney, Kevin P.; Chamberlain, David B.

    2015-03-28

    X-ray fluorescence (XRF) is an attractive technique for nuclear forensics applications. We evaluated a handheld, portable XRF device by applying an external radiation field (10 mR/h to 17 R/h) using two types of radiography sources: a 60Co radiography camera to observe effects from high-energy gamma emissions and an 192Ir radiography camera to observe effects from several low-energy gamma (0.604, 0.468, and 0.317 MeV) and decay daughter x-ray emissions. External radiation tests proved that radiation, in general, has a significant effect on the dead time or background at dose rates over 1 R/hr for both the 192Ir and 60Co sources.

  12. Density dependence of the nuclear symmetry energy from measurements of neutron radii in nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Viñas, X.; Centelles, M.; Roca-Maza, X.; Warda, M.

    2014-07-23

    We study the density dependence of the nuclear symmetry energy, characterized by its slope parameter L, by means of the information provided by the neutron radius and the neutron skin thickness in finite nuclei. These quantities are extracted from the analysis of data obtained in antiprotonic atoms, from the parity-violating asymmetry at low-momentum transfer in polarized electron scattering in {sup 208}Pb, and from the electric dipole polarizability obtained via polarized proton inelastic scattering at forward angles in {sup 208}Pb. All these experiments provide different constraints on the slope L of the symmetry energy but the corresponding values have a considerable overlap in a range around 50 MeV ≤ L ≤ 70 MeV, in a reasonable agreement with other estimates that use different observables and methods to extract L.

  13. Measurement of the nucleon structure function F2 in the nuclear medium and evaluation of its moments

    DOE PAGES

    Osipenko, M.

    2010-06-01

    We report on the measurement of inclusive electron scattering off a carbon target performed with CLAS at Jefferson Laboratory. A combination of three different beam energies 1.161, 2.261 and 4.461 GeV allowed us to reach an invariant mass of the final-state hadronic system W ≈ 2.4 GeV with four-momentum transfers Q2 ranging from 0.2 to 5 GeV2. These data, together with previous measurements of the inclusive electron scattering off proton and deuteron, which cover a similar continuous two-dimensional region of Q2 and Bjorken variable x, permit the study of nuclear modifications of the nucleon structure. By using these, as wellmore » as other world data, we evaluated the F2 structure function and its moments. Using an OPE-based twist expansion, we studied the Q2-evolution of the moments, obtaining a separation of the leading-twist and the total higher-twist terms. The carbon-to-deuteron ratio of the leading-twist contributions to the F2 moments exhibits the well known EMC effect, compatible with that discovered previously in x-space. The total higher-twist term in the carbon nucleus appears, although with large systematic uncertainites, to be smaller with respect to the deuteron case for n < 7, suggesting partial parton deconfinement in nuclear matter. Lastly, we speculate that the spatial extension of the nucleon is changed when it is immersed in the nuclear medium.« less

  14. Measurement of the nucleon structure function F2 in the nuclear medium and evaluation of its moments

    SciTech Connect

    Osipenko, M.

    2010-06-01

    We report on the measurement of inclusive electron scattering off a carbon target performed with CLAS at Jefferson Laboratory. A combination of three different beam energies 1.161, 2.261 and 4.461 GeV allowed us to reach an invariant mass of the final-state hadronic system W ≈ 2.4 GeV with four-momentum transfers Q2 ranging from 0.2 to 5 GeV2. These data, together with previous measurements of the inclusive electron scattering off proton and deuteron, which cover a similar continuous two-dimensional region of Q2 and Bjorken variable x, permit the study of nuclear modifications of the nucleon structure. By using these, as well as other world data, we evaluated the F2 structure function and its moments. Using an OPE-based twist expansion, we studied the Q2-evolution of the moments, obtaining a separation of the leading-twist and the total higher-twist terms. The carbon-to-deuteron ratio of the leading-twist contributions to the F2 moments exhibits the well known EMC effect, compatible with that discovered previously in x-space. The total higher-twist term in the carbon nucleus appears, although with large systematic uncertainites, to be smaller with respect to the deuteron case for n < 7, suggesting partial parton deconfinement in nuclear matter. Lastly, we speculate that the spatial extension of the nucleon is changed when it is immersed in the nuclear medium.

  15. [Measurement of left atrial and ventricular volumes in real-time 3D echocardiography. Validation by nuclear magnetic resonance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, F.; Shiota, T.; Qin, J. X.; White, R. D.; Thomas, J. D.

    2001-01-01

    The measurement of the left ventricular ejection fraction is important for the evaluation of cardiomyopathy and depends on the measurement of left ventricular volumes. There are no existing conventional echocardiographic means of measuring the true left atrial and ventricular volumes without mathematical approximations. The aim of this study was to test anew real time 3-dimensional echocardiographic system of calculating left atrial and ventricular volumes in 40 patients after in vitro validation. The volumes of the left atrium and ventricle acquired from real time 3-D echocardiography in the apical view, were calculated in 7 sections parallel to the surface of the probe and compared with atrial (10 patients) and ventricular (30 patients) volumes calculated by nuclear magnetic resonance with the simpson method and with volumes of water in balloons placed in a cistern. Linear regression analysis showed an excellent correlation between the real volume of water in the balloons and volumes given in real time 3-dimensional echocardiography (y = 0.94x + 5.5, r = 0.99, p < 0.001, D = -10 +/- 4.5 ml). A good correlation was observed between real time 3-dimensional echocardiography and nuclear magnetic resonance for the measurement of left atrial and ventricular volumes (y = 0.95x - 10, r = 0.91, p < 0.001, D = -14.8 +/- 19.5 ml and y = 0.87x + 10, r = 0.98, P < 0.001, D = -8.3 +/- 18.7 ml, respectively. The authors conclude that real time three-dimensional echocardiography allows accurate measurement of left heart volumes underlying the clinical potential of this new 3-D method.

  16. Low-frequency electromagnetic measurements as a zero-time discriminant of nuclear and chemical explosions -- OSI research final report

    SciTech Connect

    Sweeney, J. J.

    1996-12-01

    This is the final report on a series of investigations of low frequency (1-40 Hz) electromagnetic signals produced by above ground and underground chemical explosions and their use for confidence building under the Comprehensive Test-Ban Treaty. I conclude that low frequency electromagnetic measurements can be a very powerful tool for zero-time discrimination of chemical and nuclear explosions for yields of 1 Kt or greater, provided that sensors can be placed within 1-2 km of the suspected detonation point in a tamper-proof, low noise environment. The report includes descriptions and analyses of low frequency electromagnetic measurements associated with chemical explosions carried out in a variety of settings (shallow borehole, open pit mining, underground mining). I examine cavity pressure data from the Non-Proliferation Experiment (underground chemical explosion) and present the hypothesis that electromagnetic signals produced by underground chemical explosions could be produced during rock fracturing. I also review low frequency electromagnetic data from underground nuclear explosions acquired by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory during the late 1980s.

  17. Investigations of the g factors and hyperfine structure parameters for Er3+ ion in zircon-type compounds.

    PubMed

    Shao-Yi, Wu; Wen-Chen, Zheng

    2002-12-01

    The electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) g factors g(parallel), g(perpendicular) and hyperfine structure parameters A(parallel), A(perpendicular) of the tetragonal Er3+ centers in zircon-type compounds YXO4 (X = As, P, V), ScVO4 and RSiO4 (R = Zr, Hf, Th) are calculated from the perturbation formulas of EPR parameters for 4f11 ion in tetragonal symmetry. In these formulas, the second-order perturbation contributions are included in addition to the first-order perturbation contributions considered in the previous papers. The crystal-field parameters used in the calculations are obtained by analyzing the optical spectral data from the superposition model. Although the superposition model intrinsic parameters An(R0) used in this paper for Er3+ in various zircon-type compounds are not as scattered as those in the previous paper, the calculated results of both the optical spectra and EPR parameters show better agreement than those in the previous paper with the observed values, suggesting that the above calculation method and parameters are more reasonable. The contributions of the second-order perturbation terms to EPR parameters are also discussed.

  18. Using magnetic moments to study the nuclear structure of I ≥ 2 states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres, D. A.

    2013-05-01

    The experimental study of magnetic moments for nuclear states near the ground state, I ≥ 2, provides a powerful tool to test nuclear structure models. Traditionally, the use of Coulomb excitation reactions have been utilized to study low spin states, mostly I = 2. The use of alternative reaction channels, such as α transfer, for the production of radioactive species that, otherwise, will be only produced in future radioactive beam facilities has proved to be an alternative to measure not only excited states with I > 2, but to populate and study long-live radioactive nuclei. This contribution will present the experimental tools and challenges for the use of the transient field technique for the measurement of g factors in nuclear states with I ≥ 2, using Coulomb excitation and α-transfer reactions. Recent examples of experimental results near the N = 50 shell closure, and the experimental challenges for future implementations with radioactive beams, will be discussed.

  19. Flow accelerated corrosion and its control measures for the secondary circuit pipelines in Indian nuclear power plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kain, Vivekanand; Roychowdhury, S.; Mathew, Thomas; Bhandakkar, Atul

    2008-12-01

    A plain carbon steel feeder pipeline in the secondary circuit failed downstream of a flow measurement device (orifice meter) during operation at nuclear power plant. A detailed failure analysis done on the failed pipeline is described in this paper. The results established the fine surface pattern of 'Horseshoe pits' at the affected regions. X-ray diffraction analysis on the samples far from the failed regions showed presence of magnetite but on the sample from the failed region showed peaks due to base metal only, indicating dissolution of the oxide. Thickness profiling of the pipeline indicated reduction of thickness from the design 7.62 mm to a minimum of 0.4-1.4 mm at the location of the failure. These observations are characteristic of single phase flow accelerated corrosion. This paper details the extent of flow accelerated corrosion in various Indian power plants and the remedial measures for replacement and possible design and water chemistry changes to combat it.

  20. Measurement of lateral diffusion rates in membranes by pulsed magnetic field gradient, magic angle spinning-proton nuclear magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Gawrisch, Klaus; Gaede, Holly C

    2007-01-01

    Membrane organization, including the presence of domains, can be characterized by measuring lateral diffusion rates of lipids and membrane-bound substances. Magic angle spinning (MAS) yields well-resolved proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) of lipids in biomembranes. When combined with pulsed-field gradient NMR (rendering what is called "pulsed magnetic field gradients-MAS-NMR"), it permits precise diffusion measurements on the micrometer lengths scale for any substance with reasonably well-resolved proton MAS-NMR resonances, without the need of preparing oriented samples. Sample preparation procedures, the technical requirements for the NMR equipment, and spectrometer settings are described. Additionally, equations for analysis of diffusion data obtained from unoriented samples, and a method for correcting the data for liposome curvature are provided.

  1. MEASUREMENTS OF THE CONFINEMENT LEAKTIGHTNESS AT THE KOLA NUCLEAR POWER STATION (UNIT 2) IN RUSSIA

    SciTech Connect

    GREENE,G.A.; GUPPY,J.G.

    1998-08-01

    This is the final report on the INSP project entitled, ``Kola Confinement Leaktightness'' conducted by BNL under the authorization of Project Work Plan WBS 1.2.2.1. This project was initiated in February 1993 to assist the Russians to reduce risks associated with the continued operation of older Soviet-designed nuclear power plants, specifically the Kola VVER-440/230 Units 1 and 2, through upgrades in the confinement performance to reduce the uncontrolled leakage rate. The major technical objective of this-project was to improve the leaktightness of the Kola NPP VVER confinement boundaries, through the application of a variety of sealants to penetrations, doors and hatches, seams and surfaces, to the extent that current technology permitted. A related objective was the transfer, through training of Russian staff, of the materials application procedures to the staff of the Kola NPP. This project was part of an overall approach to minimizing uncontrolled releases from the Kola NPP VVER440/230s in the event of a serious accident, and to thereby significantly mitigate the consequences of such an accident. The US provided materials, application technology, and applications equipment for application of sealant materials, surface coatings, potting materials and gaskets, to improve the confinement leaktightness of the Kola VVER-440/23Os. The US provided for training of Russian personnel in the applications technology.

  2. Assessment of uncertainties in measurement of pH in hostile environments characteristic of nuclear repositories

    SciTech Connect

    Kreider, K.G.; Tarlov, M.J.; Huang, P.H. )

    1991-10-01

    This report focuses on evaluation and characteristics of sputtered thin film pH electrodes which can be used to assess the corrosivity of hot (100{degree}C) aqueous solutions present in nuclear repositories. Sputtered thin films have the advantages of high temperature capability, ruggedness, and low cost. The iridium oxide films were found to have a linear, 58 mV/pH, response to changes in pH. They had little hysteresis but drifted approximately 0.2 V over a period of two days exposure to pH 2--12 solutions. The films were found to be insensitive to interference from most ions such as alkali ions but had redox sensitivity to ferri-/ferrocyanide ions. Although special surface treatments were needed for the films for good adherence at 200{degree}C the films were not degraded after 20 hours exposure at pH 4, 7, and 10 at 200{degree}C. Ruthenium oxide sputtered films performed equally well to the iridium oxide films in parallel tests. The report also contains information on electrochemistry and testing of thin film electrodes and the characterization of the thin films by x-ray photoemission spectroscopy, ultraviolet photoemission spectroscopy, and ion scattering spectroscopy. 123 refs., 29 figs., 7 tabs.

  3. Rotational diffusion measurements of suspended colloidal particles using two-dimensional exchange nuclear magnetic resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Barrall, G.A.; Schmidt-Rohr, K.; Lee, Y.K.; Landfester, K.; Zimmermann, H.; Chingas, G.C.; Pines, A. |

    1996-01-01

    We present here an experimental and theoretical study of the application of two-dimensional exchange nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) to the investigation of the rotational diffusion of colloidal particles. The theoretical discussion includes the nature of the NMR frequency time-correlation function where the NMR interaction is represented by the chemical shift anisotropy (CSA). Time-correlation functions for the isotropic rotational diffusion of a suspension of colloidal particles containing single and multiple sites are derived in addition to time-correlation functions for the rotational diffusion of a suspension of symmetric top particles containing an isotropic distribution of a single CSA interaction. Simulations of two-dimensional exchange spectra for particles undergoing isotropic rotational diffusion are presented. We performed two-dimensional exchange NMR experiments on a colloidal suspension of spherical poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) particles which were synthesized with a 20{percent} enrichment in {sup 13}C at the carbonyl site. Rotational diffusion time-correlation functions determined from the experimental exchange spectra are consistent with the composition of the colloidal suspension. Detailed explanations of the syntheses of the enriched methyl {sup 13}C-(carbonyl)-methacrylate monomer and the small quantities of 20{percent} enriched {sup 13}C-(carbonyl)-poly(methyl methacrylate) microspheres used for this study are presented. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  4. Measurement and modelling of reactive transport in geological barriers for nuclear waste containment.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Qingrong; Joseph, Claudia; Schmeide, Katja; Jivkov, Andrey P

    2015-11-11

    Compacted clays are considered as excellent candidates for barriers to radionuclide transport in future repositories for nuclear waste due to their very low hydraulic permeability. Diffusion is the dominant transport mechanism, controlled by a nano-scale pore system. Assessment of the clays' long-term containment function requires adequate modelling of such pore systems and their evolution. Existing characterisation techniques do not provide complete pore space information for effective modelling, such as pore and throat size distributions and connectivity. Special network models for reactive transport are proposed here using the complimentary character of the pore space and the solid phase. This balances the insufficient characterisation information and provides the means for future mechanical-physical-chemical coupling. The anisotropy and heterogeneity of clays is represented using different length parameters and percentage of pores in different directions. Resulting networks are described as mathematical graphs with efficient discrete calculus formulation of transport. Opalinus Clay (OPA) is chosen as an example. Experimental data for the tritiated water (HTO) and U(vi) diffusion through OPA are presented. Calculated diffusion coefficients of HTO and uranium species are within the ranges of the experimentally determined data in different clay directions. This verifies the proposed pore network model and validates that uranium complexes are diffusing as neutral species in OPA. In the case of U(vi) diffusion the method is extended to account for sorption and convection. Rather than changing pore radii by coarse grained mathematical formula, physical sorption is simulated in each pore, which is more accurate and realistic.

  5. Estimation of male gene flow from measures of nuclear and female genetic differentiation.

    PubMed

    Hedrick, Philip W; Allendorf, Fred W; Baker, C Scott

    2013-01-01

    An approach is provided to estimate male gene flow and the ratio of male to female gene flow, given that there are estimates of diploid, nuclear gene flow and haploid, female gene flow. This approach can be applied to estimates of differentiation (F ST ) from biparentally and maternally inherited markers, assuming the equilibrium island model and equal effective numbers of males and females. Corrections to formulas used previously for California sea lions (González-Suárez M, Flatz R, Aurioles-Gamboa D, Hedrick PW, Gerber LR. 2009. Isolation by distance among California sea lion populations in Mexico: redefining management stocks. Mol Ecol. 18:1088-1099.) and American bison (Halbert ND, Gogan PJP, Hedrick PW, Wahl L, Derr JN. 2012. Genetic population substructure in bison in Yellowstone National Park. J Hered. 103:360-370.) are given and revised values for those species are calculated. The effect of unequal male and female effective population sizes, nonequilibrium conditions, and approximations of differentiation formulas are briefly discussed.

  6. Measurements on spent-fuel assemblies at Arkansas Nuclear One using the Fork system. Final report, January 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Ewing, R.I.; Bronowski, D.R.; Bosler, G.E.; Siebelist, R.; Priore, J.; Hansford, C.H.; Sullivan, S.

    1997-03-01

    The Fork measurement system has been used to examine spent-fuel assemblies at the two reactors of Arkansas Nuclear One, operated by Entergy Operations, Inc. The Unit 1 reactor is a Babcock and Wilcox (B and W) design, and the Unit 2 reactor is a Combustion Engineering (CE) design. The neutron and gamma-ray emissions from individual spent-fuel assemblies were measured in the storage pools by raising each assembly pathway out of the storage rack and performing a measurement near the center of the assembly. The overall accuracy of the measurements after corrections is about 2%. Thirty-four assemblies were examined at Unit 1, and forty-one assemblies at Unit 2. The average deviation of the burnup measurements from the calibration was 3.0% at Unit 1 and 3.5% at Unit 2, indicating 2 to 3% random variation among the reactor records. There was no indication of clearly anomalous assemblies. Axial Scans of the variation in neutron and gamma ray emission were obtained by collecting data at several locations along the length of three assemblies at Unit 2. Two of these assemblies were nonstandard in that each contained a small neutron source. The sources were detected by the axial scans. The test program was a cooperative effort involving Sandia National Laboratories, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Entergy Operations, Inc., the Electric Power Research Institute, and the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management of the US Department of Energy.

  7. Ambient Dose Equivalent measured at the Instituto Nacional de Cancerología Department of Nuclear Medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ávila, O.; Torres-Ulloa, C. L.; Medina, L. A.; Trujillo-Zamudio, F. E.; de Buen, I. Gamboa; Buenfil, A. E.; Brandan, M. E.

    2010-12-01

    Ambient dose equivalent values were determined in several sites at the Instituto Nacional de Cancerología, Departmento de Medicina Nuclear, using TLD-100 and TLD-900 thermoluminescent dosemeters. Additionally, ambient dose equivalent was measured at a corridor outside the hospitalization room for patients treated with 137Cs brachytherapy. Dosemeter calibration was performed at the Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Laboratorio de Metrología, to known 137Cs gamma radiation air kerma. Radionuclides considered for this study are 131I, 18F, 67Ga, 99mTc, 111In, 201Tl and 137Cs, with main gamma energies between 93 and 662 keV. Dosemeters were placed during a five month period in the nuclear medicine rooms (containing gamma-cameras), injection corridor, patient waiting areas, PET/CT study room, hot lab, waste storage room and corridors next to the hospitalization rooms for patients treated with 131I and 137Cs. High dose values were found at the waste storage room, outside corridor of 137Cs brachytherapy patients and PET/CT area. Ambient dose equivalent rate obtained for the 137Cs brachytherapy corridor is equal to (18.51±0.02)×10-3 mSv/h. Sites with minimum doses are the gamma camera rooms, having ambient dose equivalent rates equal to (0.05±0.03)×10-3 mSv/h. Recommendations have been given to the Department authorities so that further actions are taken to reduce doses at high dose sites in order to comply with the ALARA principle (as low as reasonably achievable).

  8. [Estimation of radiation exposed area by the nuclear accident occurred at Tokai village using ESR measurements of household sugar].

    PubMed

    Kuzuya, M; Kondo, S; Ito, K; Sawa, T

    2001-04-01

    The area of radiation exposure by the nuclear accident occurred at Tokai village in 1999 was estimated by the ESR measurement of 95 household sugar samples collected from the accident area. These samples were roughly classified into three types of sugar, fine white sugar, fine brown sugar and coarse brown sugar. The control fine white sugar showed no radical in the ESR spectrum, while those of fine brown sugar and coarse brown sugar showed the presence of a small amount of radicals. It was also shown that, among these three kinds of sugar, the radical concentration of fine white sugar sampled from wooden houses at the area similar to each other did not vary much with the samples, while those of fine brown sugar and coarse brown sugar varied to a considerable extent. Thus, the fine white sugar is considered to be more suitable for the estimation of the level of radiation exposure. The radical concentration of each fine white sugar sample was plotted against the distance from the site of the nuclear accident with a correction of the difference in the shielding effect between concrete houses and wooden houses. The samples obtained at more than 2 km north of the site of nuclear accident showed no ESR spectral signal to a detectable extent. On the other hand, the ESR spectra were observed from the samples obtained within 10 km south and 4 km west of the accident site. These results suggest that the radiation exposure by the contaminant blown by the northeast wind blowing on the day of the accident may occur at the south and west areas.

  9. Nuclear Targets for a Precision Measurement of the Neutral Pion Radiative Width

    SciTech Connect

    Martel, Philippe; Clinton, Eric; McWilliams, R.; Lawrence, Dave; Miskimen, Rory; Ahmidouch, Abdellah; Ambrozewicz, Pawel; Asaturyan, Arshak; Baker, O.; Benton, LaRay; Bernstein, Aron; Cole, Philip; Collins, Patrick; Dale, Daniel; Danagoulian, Samuel; Davidenko, G.; Demirchyan, Raphael; Deur, Alexandre; DOLGOLENKO, A.; Dzyubenko, Georgiy; Evdokimov, Anatoly; Feng, JIng; Gabrielyan, Marianna; Gan, Liping; Gasparian, Ashot; Glamazdin, Oleksandr; Goryachev, Vladimir; Gyurjyan, Vardan; Hardy, K.; Ito, Mark; Khandaker, Mahbubul; Kingsberry, Paul; Kolarkar, Ameya; Konchatnyi, Mykhailo; Korchin, O.; Korsch, Wolfgang; Kowalski, Stanley; Kubantsev, Mikhail; Kubarovsky, Valery; LARIN, Ilya; MATVEEV, V.; McNulty, Dustin; Milbrath, Brian; Minehart, Ralph; Mochalov, Vasiliy; Mtingwa, Sekazi; Nakagawa, Itaru; Overby, Steven; Pasyuk, Evgueni; Payen, Marvin; Pedroni, Ronald; Prok, Yelena; Ritchie, Barry; Salgado, Carlos; Sitnikov, Anatoly; Sober, Daniel; Stephens, W.; Teymurazyan, Aram; Underwood, Jarreas; VASILIEV, A.; VEREBRYUSOV, V.; Vishnyakov, Vladimir; Wood, Michael

    2009-12-01

    A technique is presented for precision measurements of the area densities, density * T, of approximately 5% radiation length carbon and 208Pb targets used in an experiment at Jefferson Laboratory to measure the neutral pion radiative width. The precision obtained in the area density for the carbon target is +/- 0.050%, and that obtained for the lead target through an x-ray attenuation technique is +/- 0.43%.

  10. A Comparison of Measured and Calculated Air-Transported Radiation from a Fast. Unshielded Nuclear Reactor.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-12-01

    gamma-ray spectra ...... 40 APPENDIX III DREO calculated neutron and gamma-ray spectra ...41 APPENDIX IV Measured 252- Californium spectra... Californium neutron spectrum ............ 43 27 : DREO measured 252- Californium gamma-ray spectrum .......... 44 TABLES I : Reactor, detector and weather...previously found it necessary to modify their response matrices below 2 MeV in order to reproduce 252- californium fission-neutron spectra according to

  11. Expected total counts for the Self-Interrogation Neutron Resonance Densitometry measurements of spent nuclear fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Rossa, Riccardo; Borella, Alessandro; Van der Meer, Klaas; Labeau, Pierre-Etienne; Pauly, Nicolas

    2015-07-01

    The Self-Interrogation Neutron Resonance Densitometry (SINRD) is a passive neutron technique that aims at a direct quantification of {sup 239}Pu in spent fuel assemblies by measuring the attenuation of the neutron flux in the energy region close to the 0.3 eV resonance of {sup 239}Pu. The {sup 239}Pu mass is estimated by calculating the SINRD signature, that is the ratio between the neutron counts in the fast energy region and around the 0.3 eV resonance region. The SINRD measurement approach in this study consisted in introducing a small neutron detector in the central guide tube of a PWR 17x17 fuel assembly. In order to measure the neutron flux in the energy regions defined in the SINRD signature, different detector types were used. The response of a bare {sup 238}U fission chamber is considered for the determination of the fast neutron flux, while other thermal-epithermal detectors wrapped in neutron absorbers are envisaged to measure the neutron flux around the resonance region. This paper provides an estimation of the total neutron counts that can be achieved with the detector types proposed for the SINRD measurement. In the first section a set of detectors are evaluated in terms of total neutron counts and sensitivity to the {sup 239}Pu content, in order to identify the optimal measurement configuration for each detector type. Then a study is performed to increase the total neutron counts by increasing the detector size. The study shows that the highest total neutron counts are achieved by using either {sup 3}He or {sup 10}B proportional counters because of the high neutron efficiency of these detectors. However, the calculations indicate that the biggest contribution to the measurement uncertainty is due to the measurement of the fast neutron flux. Finally, similar sensitivity to the {sup 239}Pu content is obtained by using the different detector types for the measurement of the neutron flux close to the resonance region. Therefore, the total neutron counts

  12. Nuclear microscopy measurement of copper in atherosclerosis Sensitivity and limitations to spatial resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajendran, Reshmi; Ren, Minqin; Ning, Pan; Huat, Benny Tan Kwong; Halliwell, Barry; Watt, Frank

    2007-07-01

    Nuclear microscopy studies at the Centre for Ion Beam Applications have indicated a link between iron, zinc and the development of atherosclerosis. In the present study, we have extended this study to copper, since copper is also capable of inducing free radical mediated damage. As copper in biological tissue occurs at the parts per million level and therefore close to the detection limits for PIXE analysis, we have substantially increased the beam intensity and scanning time to obtain adequate statistics and analytical sensitivity. The experiments were conducted on male New Zealand White rabbits, weighing approximately 2.5 kg and fed on high cholesterol diets for 8 weeks. Unlike iron concentrations, which were observed to be increased in the atherosclerotic lesion, our experiments show that copper is depleted in the lesion (1.9 ppm) compared with the adjacent artery wall (4.1 ppm). The concentration of copper present in the lesion is also much less than iron (approximately 30 times less on average), indicating that iron, rather than copper, is more likely to induce atherosclerosis through free radical mediated damage, purely on the basis of greatly reduced concentrations. To obtain adequate statistics for copper, a 2.1 MeV proton beam focused to 2 μm with a relatively high beam current (from about 800 pA to 1 nA) was scanned over the sample for approximately 4 h. The effects of beam damage due to these high beam currents have been investigated and it was found that the tissue shrinks 10% each in the X and Y direction contributing to total area shrinkage of 20%. Despite tissue shrinkage problems, our results indicate that even with 1 nA beam currents, 4 h scan times and scan sizes of around 1 × 1 mm 2, we can still extract accurate trace elemental concentrations.

  13. Application of dosimetry measurements to analyze the neutron activation of a stainless steel sample in a training nuclear reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ródenas, J.; Gallardo, S.; Weirich, F.; Hansen, W.

    2014-11-01

    All materials present in the core of a nuclear reactor are activated by neutron irradiation. The activity so generated produces a dose around the material. This dose is a potential risk for workers in the surrounding area when materials are withdrawn from the reactor. Therefore, it is necessary to assess the activity generated and the dose produced. In previous works, neutron activation of control rods and doses around the storage pool where they are placed have been calculated for a Boiling Water Reactor using the MCNP5 code based on the Monte Carlo method. Most of the activation is produced indeed in stainless steel components of the nuclear reactor core not only control rods. In this work, a stainless steel sample is irradiated in the Training Reactor AKR-2 of the Technical University Dresden. Dose measurements around the sample have been performed for different times after the irradiation. Experimental dosimetric values are compared with results of Monte Carlo simulation of the irradiation. Comparison shows a good agreement. Hence, the activation Monte Carlo model can be considered as validated.

  14. Validating mass spectrometry measurements of nuclear materials via a non-contact volume analysis method of ion sputter craters

    SciTech Connect

    Willingham, David G.; Naes, Benjamin E.; Fahey, Albert J.

    2015-01-01

    A combination of secondary ion mass spectrometry, optical profilometry and a statistically-driven algorithm was used to develop a non-contact volume analysis method to validate the useful yields of nuclear materials. The volume analysis methodology was applied to ion sputter craters created in silicon and uranium substrates sputtered by 18.5 keV O- and 6.0 keV Ar+ ions. Sputter yield measurements were determined from the volume calculations and were shown to be comparable to Monte Carlo calculations and previously reported experimental observations. Additionally, the volume calculations were used to determine the useful yields of Si+, SiO+ and SiO2+ ions from the silicon substrate and U+, UO+ and UO2+ ions from the uranium substrate under 18.5 keV O- and 6.0 keV Ar+ ion bombardment. This work represents the first steps toward validating the interlaboratory and cross-platform performance of mass spectrometry for the analysis of nuclear materials.

  15. Measurement of the nuclear multiplicity ratio or image hadronization K0s at CLAS

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel, A.; Hicks, K.; Brooks, W. K.; Hakobyan, H.; Adhikari, K. P.; Adikaram, D.; Aghasyan, M.; Amarian, M.; Anghinolfi, M.; Avakian, H.; Baghdasaryan, H.; Battaglieri, M.; Batourine, V.; Bedlinskiy, I.; Bennett, R. P.; Biselli, A. S.; Bookwalter, C.; Briscoe, W. J.; Burkert, V. D.; Carman, D. S.; Casey, L.; Celentano, A.; Chandavar, S.; Cole, P. L.; Contalbrigo, M.; Crede, V.; DʼAngelo, A.; Dashyan, N.; De Vita, R.; De Sanctis, E.; Deur, A.; Dey, B.; Dickson, R.; Djalali, C.; Dodge, G. E.; Doughty, D.; Egiyan, H.; El Fassi, L.; Elouadrhiri, L.; Eugenio, P.; Fedotov, G.; Fegan, S.; Gabrielyan, M. Y.; Gevorgyan, N.; Gilfoyle, G. P.; Giovanetti, K. L.; Girod, F. X.; Goetz, J. T.; Gohn, W.; Golovatch, E.; Gothe, R. W.; Griffioen, K. A.; Guidal, M.; Guo, L.; Hanretty, C.; Heddle, D.; Holtrop, M.; Hyde, C. E.; Ilieva, Y.; Ireland, D. G.; Ishkhanov, B. S.; Isupov, E. L.; Jawalkar, S. S.; Jo, H. S.; Joo, K.; Kalantarians, N.; Keller, D.; Khandaker, M.; Khetarpal, P.; Kim, A.; Kim, W.; Klein, A.; Klein, F. J.; Kubarovsky, V.; Kuleshov, S. V.; Kuznetsov, V.; Lu, H. Y.; MacGregor, I. J. D.; Mao, Y.; Markov, N.; Mayer, M.; McAndrew, J.; McKinnon, B.; Meyer, C. A.; Mineeva, T.; Mirazita, M.; Mokeev, V.; Moutarde, H.; Munevar, E.; Nadel-Turonski, P.; Ni, A.; Niccolai, S.; Niculescu, G.; Niculescu, I.; Osipenko, M.; Ostrovidov, A. I.; Paolone, M.; Pappalardo, L.; Paremuzyan, R.; Park, K.; Park, S.; Pasyuk, E.; Anefalos Pereira, S.; Phelps, E.; Pisano, S.; Pogorelko, O.; Pozdniakov, S.; Price, J. W.; Procureur, S.; Protopopescu, D.; Raue, B. A.; Ricco, G.; Rimal, D.; Ripani, M.; Rosner, G.; Rossi, P.; Sabatié, F.; Saini, M. S.; Salgado, C.; Schott, D.; Schumacher, R. A.; Seraydaryan, H.; Sharabian, Y. G.; Smith, G. D.; Sober, D. I.; Sokhan, D.; Stepanyan, S. S.; Stepanyan, S.; Strauch, S.; Taiuti, M.; Tang, W.; Taylor, C. E.; Tkachenko, S.; Ungaro, M.; Vernarsky, B.; Vineyard, M. F.; Voskanyan, H.; Voutier, E.; Watts, D. P.; Weinstein, L. B.; Weygand, D. P.; Wood, M. H.; Zana, L.; Zachariou, N.; Zhao, B.; Zhao, Z. W.

    2011-11-01

    The influence of cold nuclear matter on lepto-production of hadrons in semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering is measured using the CLAS detector in Hall B at Jefferson Lab and a 5.014 GeV electron beam. We report the K0s multiplicity ratios for targets of C, Fe, and Pb relative to deuterium as a function of the fractional virtual photon energy z transferred to the K0sand the transverse momentum squared p2T of the K0s. We find that the multiplicity ratios for K0s are reduced in the nuclear medium at high z and low p2T, with a trend for the K0s transverse momentum to be broadened in the nucleus for large p2T.

  16. Measurement of neutron multiplicity from fission of {sup 228}U and nuclear dissipation

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Hardev; Behera, B. R.; Singh, Gulzar; Govil, I. M.; Golda, K. S.; Jhingan, Akhil; Singh, R. P.; Sugathan, P.; Chatterjee, M. B.; Datta, S. K.; Pal, Santanu; Ranjeet; Mandal, S.; Shidling, P. D.; Viesti, G.

    2009-12-15

    Pre- and post-scission neutron multiplicities are measured at different excitation energies of the compound nucleus {sup 228}U populated using the {sup 19}F+{sup 209}Bi reaction. The measured yield of pre-scission and total neutrons are compared with the statistical model calculation for the decay of a compound nucleus. The statistical model calculations are performed using the Bohr-Wheeler transition state fission width as well as the dissipative dynamical fission width due to Kramers. Comparison between the measured and the calculated values shows that, while the Bohr-Wheeler fission width grossly underestimates the pre-scission neutron yield, a large amount of dissipation is required in the Kramers width to fit the experimental pre-scission multiplicities. Various factors contributing to the large excitation energy dependence of the fitted values of the dissipation coefficient are discussed.

  17. Measurements of gamma-ray production cross sections for shielding materials of space nuclear systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orphan, V. J.; John, J.; Hoot, C. G.

    1972-01-01

    Measurements of secondary gamma ray production from neutron interactions have been made over the entire energy range of interest in shielding applications. The epithermal capture gamma ray yields for both resolved gamma ray lines and continuum have been measured from thermal energies to 100 KeV for natural tungsten and U-238, two important candidate shield materials in SNAP reactor systems. Data are presented to illustrate the variation of epithermal capture gamma ray yields with neutron energy. The gamma ray production cross sections from (n,xy) reactions have been measured for Fe and Al from the threshold energies for inelastic scattering to approximately 16 MeV. Typical Fe and Al cross sections obtained with high-neutron energy resolution and averaged over broad neutron-energy groups are presented.

  18. Nuclear structure of 76Ge from inelastic neutron scattering measurements and shell model calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukhopadhyay, S.; Crider, B. P.; Brown, B. A.; Ashley, S. F.; Chakraborty, A.; Kumar, A.; McEllistrem, M. T.; Peters, E. E.; Prados-Estévez, F. M.; Yates, S. W.

    2017-01-01

    The low-lying, low-spin levels of 76Ge were studied with the (n ,n'γ ) reaction. Gamma-ray excitation function measurements were performed at incident neutron energies from 1.6 to 3.7 MeV, and γ -ray angular distributions were measured at neutron energies of 3.0 and 3.5 MeV. From these measurements, level spins, level lifetimes, γ -ray intensities, and multipole mixing ratios were determined. No evidence for a number of previously placed levels was found. Below 3.3 MeV, many new levels were identified, and the level scheme was re-evaluated. The B (E 2 ) values support low-lying band structure. The 2+ mixed-symmetry state has been identified for the first time. A comparison of the level characteristics with large-scale shell model calculations yielded excellent agreement.

  19. Feasibility of a nuclear gauge for fuel quantity measurement aboard aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Signh, J. J.; Mall, G. H.; Sprinkle, D. R.; Chegini, H.

    1986-01-01

    Capacitance fuel gauges have served as the basis for fuel quantity indicating systems in aircraft for several decades. However, there have been persistent reports by the airlines that these gauges often give faulty indications due to microbial growth and other contaminants in the fuel tanks. This report describes the results of a feasibility study of using gamma ray attenuation as the basis for measuring fuel quantity in the tanks. Studies with a weak Am-241 59.5-keV radiation source indicate that it is possible to continuously monitor the fuel quantity in the tanks to an accuracy of better than 1 percent. These measurements also indicate that there are easily measurable differences in the physical properties and resultant attenuation characteristics of JP-4, JP-5, and Jet A fuels. The experimental results, along with a suggested source-detector geometrical configuration are described.

  20. Development of self-interrogation neutron resonance densitometry (sinrd) to measure the fissile content in nuclear fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LaFleur, Adrienne Marie

    The development of non-destructive assay (NDA) capabilities to directly measure the fissile content in spent fuel is needed to improve the timely detection of the diversion of significant quantities of fissile material. Currently, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) does not have effective NDA methods to verify spent fuel and recover continuity of knowledge in the event of a containment and surveillance systems failure. This issue has become increasingly critical with the worldwide expansion of nuclear power, adoption of enhanced safeguards criteria for spent fuel verification, and recent efforts by the IAEA to incorporate an integrated safeguards regime. In order to address these issues, the use of Self-Interrogation Neutron Resonance Densitometry (SINRD) has been developed to improve existing nuclear safeguards and material accountability measurements. The following characteristics of SINRD were analyzed: (1) ability to measure the fissile content in Light Water Reactors (LWR) fuel assemblies and (2) sensitivity and penetrability of SINRD to the removal of fuel pins from an assembly. The Monte Carlo Neutral Particle eXtended (MCNPX) transport code was used to simulate SINRD for different geometries. Experimental measurements were also performed with SINRD and were compared to MCNPX simulations of the experiment to verify the accuracy of the MCNPX model of SINRD. Based on the results from these simulations and measurements, we have concluded that SINRD provides a number of improvements over current IAEA verification methods. These improvements include: (1) SINRD provides absolute measurements of burnup independent of the operator's declaration. (2) SINRD is sensitive to pin removal over the entire burnup range and can verify the diversion of 6% of fuel pins within 3o from LWR spent LEU and MOX fuel. (3) SINRD is insensitive to the boron concentration and initial fuel enrichment and can therefore be used at multiple spent fuel storage facilities. (4) The

  1. Progress and goals for INMM ASC N15 consensus standard ""Administrative practices for the determination and reporting of results of non-destructive assay measurements of nuclear material in situ for safeguards nuclear criticality safety and other purposes

    SciTech Connect

    Bracken, David S; Lamb, Frank W

    2009-01-01

    This paper will discuss the goals and progress to date on the development of INMM Accredited Standard Committee (ASC) N15 consensus standard Administrative Practices for the Determination and Reporting of Results of Non-Destructive Assay Measurements of Nuclear Material in situ for Safeguards, Nuclear Criticality Safety, and Other Purposes. This standard will define administrative practices in the areas of data generation and reporting of NDA assay of holdup deposits with consideration of the stakeholders of the reported results. These stakeholders may include nuclear material accounting and safeguards, nuclear criticality safety, waste management, health physics, facility characterization, authorization basis, radiation safety, and site licensing authorities. Stakeholder input will be solicited from interested parties and incorporated during the development of the document. Currently only one consensus standard exists that explicitly deals with NDA holdup measurements: ASTM C1455 Standard Test Method for Nondestructive Assay of Special Nuclear Material Holdup Using Gamma-Ray Spectroscopic Methods. The ASTM International standard emphasizes the activities involved in actually making measurements, and was developed by safeguards and NDA experts. This new INMM ASC N15 standard will complement the existing ASTM international standard. One of the largest driving factors for writing this new standard was the recent emphasis on in situ NDA measurements by the safeguards community due to the Defense Nuclear Facility Safety Board (DNFSB) recommendation 2007-1 on in situ NDA measurements. Specifically, DNFSB recommendation 2007-1 referenced the lack of programmatic requirements for accurate in situ measurements and the use of measurement results for compliance with safety based requirements. That being the case, this paper will also discuss the progress made on the Implementation Plan for Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Recommendation 2007-1 Safety-Related In Situ

  2. Field experiment provides ground truth for surface nuclear magnetic resonance measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knight, Rosemary; Grunewald, Elliot; Irons, Trevor; Dlubac, Katherine; Song, Yiqiao; Bachman, Henry N.; Grau, Ben; Walsh, Dave; Abraham, Jared D.; Cannia, Jim

    2012-02-01

    The need for sustainable management of fresh water resources is one of the great challenges of the 21st century. Since most of the planet's liquid fresh water exists as groundwater, it is essential to develop non-invasive geophysical techniques to characterize groundwater aquifers. A field experiment was conducted in the High Plains Aquifer, central United States, to explore the mechanisms governing the non-invasive Surface NMR (SNMR) technology. We acquired both SNMR data and logging NMR data at a field site, along with lithology information from drill cuttings. This allowed us to directly compare the NMR relaxation parameter measured during logging, T2, to the relaxation parameter T2* measured using the SNMR method. The latter can be affected by inhomogeneity in the magnetic field, thus obscuring the link between the NMR relaxation parameter and the hydraulic conductivity of the geologic material. When the logging T2 data were transformed to pseudo- T2* data, by accounting for inhomogeneity in the magnetic field and instrument dead time, we found good agreement with T2* obtained from the SNMR measurement. These results, combined with the additional information about lithology at the site, allowed us to delineate the physical mechanisms governing the SNMR measurement. Such understanding is a critical step in developing SNMR as a reliable geophysical method for the assessment of groundwater resources.

  3. Field experiment provides ground truth for surface nuclear magnetic resonance measurement

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Knight, R.; Grunewald, E.; Irons, T.; Dlubac, K.; Song, Y.; Bachman, H.N.; Grau, B.; Walsh, D.; Abraham, J.D.; Cannia, J.

    2012-01-01

    The need for sustainable management of fresh water resources is one of the great challenges of the 21st century. Since most of the planet's liquid fresh water exists as groundwater, it is essential to develop non-invasive geophysical techniques to characterize groundwater aquifers. A field experiment was conducted in the High Plains Aquifer, central United States, to explore the mechanisms governing the non-invasive Surface NMR (SNMR) technology. We acquired both SNMR data and logging NMR data at a field site, along with lithology information from drill cuttings. This allowed us to directly compare the NMR relaxation parameter measured during logging, T 2, to the relaxation parameter T 2 * measured using the SNMR method. The latter can be affected by inhomogeneity in the magnetic field, thus obscuring the link between the NMR relaxation parameter and the hydraulic conductivity of the geologic material. When the logging T 2 data were transformed to pseudo-T 2 * data, by accounting for inhomogeneity in the magnetic field and instrument dead time, we found good agreement with T 2 * obtained from the SNMR measurement. These results, combined with the additional information about lithology at the site, allowed us to delineate the physical mechanisms governing the SNMR measurement. Such understanding is a critical step in developing SNMR as a reliable geophysical method for the assessment of groundwater resources. Copyright 2012 by the American Geophysical Union.

  4. Comparison of measured and calculated dose rates near nuclear medicine patients.

    PubMed

    Yi, Y; Stabin, M G; McKaskle, M H; Shone, M D; Johnson, A B

    2013-08-01

    Widely used release criteria for patients receiving radiopharmaceuticals (NUREG-1556, Vol. 9, Rev.1, Appendix U) are known to be overly conservative. The authors measured external exposure rates near patients treated with I, Tc, and F and compared the measurements to calculated values using point and line source models. The external exposure dose rates for 231, 11, and 52 patients scanned or treated with I, Tc, and F, respectively, were measured at 0.3 m and 1.0 m shortly after radiopharmaceutical administration. Calculated values were always higher than measured values and suggested the application of "self-shielding factors," as suggested by Siegel et al. in 2002. The self-shielding factors of point and line source models for I at 1 m were 0.60 ± 0.16 and 0.73 ± 0.20, respectively. For Tc patients, the self-shielding factors for point and line source models were 0.44 ± 0.19 and 0.55 ± 0.23, and the values were 0.50 ± 0.09 and 0.60 ± 0.12, respectively, for F (all FDG) patients. Treating patients as unshielded point sources of radiation is clearly inappropriate. In reality, they are volume sources, but treatment of their exposures using a line source model with appropriate self-shielding factors produces a more realistic, but still conservative, approach for managing patient release.

  5. Basalt identification by interpreting nuclear and electrical well logging measurements using fuzzy technique (case study from southern Syria).

    PubMed

    Asfahani, J; Abdul Ghani, B; Ahmad, Z

    2015-11-01

    Fuzzy analysis technique is proposed in this research for interpreting the combination of nuclear and electrical well logging data, which include natural gamma ray, density and neutron-porosity, while the electrical well logging include long and short normal. The main objective of this work is to describe, characterize and establish the lithology of the large extended basaltic areas in southern Syria. Kodana well logging measurements have been used and interpreted for testing and applying the proposed technique. The established lithological cross section shows the distribution and the identification of four kinds of basalt, which are hard massive basalt, hard basalt, pyroclastic basalt and the alteration basalt products, clay. The fuzzy analysis technique is successfully applied on the Kodana well logging data, and can be therefore utilized as a powerful tool for interpreting huge well logging data with higher number of variables required for lithological estimations.

  6. Nuclear blast response of airbreathing propulsion systems: laboratory measurements with an operational J-85-5 turbojet engine

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, M.G.; Rafferty, J.M.

    1982-07-01

    This paper describes an experimental technique for controlled laboratory measurements of the nuclear blast response of airbreathing propulsion systems. The experiments utilize an available G.E. J-855 turbojet engine located in the test section of the Calspan Ludwieg-tube facility. Significant modifications were made to this facility in order to adapt it to the desired configuration. The J-85 engine had previously been used at Calspan for other purposes and thus came equipped with eight pressure transducers at four axial locations along the compressor section. These transducers have a frequency response on the order of 40 KHz. Pressure histories obtained at several circumferential and axial locations along the compressor are presented for blastwave equivalent overpressures up to 17.2 kPa (2.5 psi) at corrected engine speeds on the order of 94 percent of maximum speed.

  7. A critical assembly designed to measure neutronic benchmarks in support of the space nuclear thermal propulsion program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parma, Edward J.; Ball, Russell M.; Hoovler, Gary S.; Selcow, Elizabeth C.; Cerbone, Ralph J.

    1993-01-01

    A reactor designed to perform criticality experiments in support of the Space Nuclear Thermal Propulsion program is currently in operation at the Sandia National Laboratories' reactor facility. The reactor is a small, water-moderated system that uses highly enriched uranium particle fuel in a 19-element configuration. Its purpose is to obtain neutronic measurements under a variety of experimental conditions that are subsequently used to benchmark rector-design computer codes. Brookhaven National Laboratory, Babcock & Wilcox, and Sandia National Laboratories participated in determining the reactor's performance requirements, design, follow-on experimentation, and in obtaining the licensing approvals. Brookhaven National Laboratory is primarily responsible for the analytical support, Babcock & Wilcox the hardware design, and Sandia National Laboratories the operational safety. All of the team members participate in determining the experimentation requirements, performance, and data reduction. Initial criticality was achieved in October 1989. An overall description of the reactor is presented along with key design features and safety-related aspects.

  8. A critical assembly designed to measure neutronic benchmarks in support of the Space Nuclear Thermal Propulsion program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parma, E. J.; Ball, R. M.; Hoovler, G. S.; Selcow, E. C.; Cerbone, R. J.

    1992-10-01

    A reactor designed to perform criticality experiments in support of the Space Nuclear Thermal Propulsion program is currently in operation at the Sandia National Laboratories' reactor facility. The reactor is a small, water-moderated system that uses highly enriched uranium particle fuel in a 19-element configuration. Its purpose is to obtain neutronic measurements under a variety of experimental conditions that are subsequently used to benchmark reactor-design computer codes. Brookhaven National Laboratory, Babcock & Wilcox, and Sandia National Laboratories participated in determining the reactor's performance requirements, design, follow on experimentation, and in obtaining the licensing approvals. Brookhaven National Laboratory is primarily responsible for the analytical support, Babcock & Wilcox the hardware design, and Sandia National Laboratories the operational safety. All of the team members participate in determining the experimentation requirements, performance, and data reduction. Initial criticality was achieved in October 1989. An over-all description of the reactor is presented along with key design features and safety-related aspects.

  9. Nuclear stopping in heavy-ion collisions at 100 MeV/nucleon from inclusive and exclusive neutral pion measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Badala, A.; Barbera, R.; Palmeri, A.; Pappalardo, G.S.; Riggi, F.; Russo, A.C.; Russo, G.; Turrisi, R. ||

    1996-04-01

    Inclusive and exclusive measurements of neutral pions in heavy-ion collisions around 100 MeV/nucleon, carried out in a near 4{pi} geometry, have been analyzed to obtain information on the nuclear stopping of the projectile. Stopping of the projectile has been investigated by the analysis of the source velocity, of the distribution of the energetic products of the collisions, and of the associated rapidity distribution of the baryon matter. Collisions were classified according to their centrality by the charged particle multiplicity. Clear evidence for this phenomenon has been obtained by the study of different observables. Both stopping and reabsorption effects play an essential role in the interpretation of the results. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  10. Development of an energy discriminate CR-39(®) nuclear track etch dosimeter for Radon-220 gas measurements.

    PubMed

    Brown, J M C; Solomon, S; Tinker, R A

    2011-10-01

    An energy discriminate CR-39(®) nuclear track etch dosimeter for use in a (220)Rn and (222)Rn gas monitor has been developed and experimentally assessed. It utilises a thin film of Mylar(®) C to attenuate the alpha particle energies to allow only the damage tracks created by the 8.785 MeV alpha particles emitted from (212)Po of the (232)Th decay chain to be registered in the CR-39(®) plaque, allowing for the direct measurement of (220)Rn gas concentrations. The dosimeter was developed through a combination of experimental investigations and theoretical simulations using the Monte Carlo ion transport modelling program Stopping and Range of Ions in Materials (SRIM 2008). A film thickness of 54 μm has been shown to attenuate all alpha energies less then 7.7 MeV.

  11. Conversion electron measurements of 195Au using ICEBall for Nuclear Structure and Astrophysics at the University of Notre Dame

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battaglia, Anthony; Tan, Wanpeng; Aprahamian, Ani; Bauder, William; Casarella, Clark; Gurdal, Gulhan; Long, Alexander; Nystrom, Andrew; Siegl, Kevin; Smith, Karl; Smith, Mallory

    2013-10-01

    The Internal Conversion Electron Ball Array (ICEBall) consists of six Si(Li) detectors and it was recently re-comissioned at the University of Notre Dame Nuclear Science Laboratory for spectroscopic studies of heavy nuclei. For the commissioning experiment, a 16 MeV bunched proton beam was used from the FN Tandem for a (p,2n) reaction to populate low spin states of 195Au. Both conversion electrons and gamma-rays were detected in coincidence between ICEBall and a single high-purity germanium detector. A total of 14 conversion coeffcients were measured. The results will be presented and compared to previous results. This work was supported by the National Science Foundation under contract number NSF PHY-1068192. M.P. Metlay, J.X. Saladin, I.Y. Lee, and O. Dietzsch, Nucl. Instrum. Meth. A, 336, 162 (1993).

  12. Highly Depleted Ethane and Slightly Depleted Methanol in Comet 21P/Giacobini-Zinner: Application of Empirical g-Factors for CH3OH Near 50K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DiSanti, Michael A.; Bonev, Boncho P.; Mumma, Michael J.; Villanueva, Geronimo L.

    2010-01-01

    We report high resolution (lambda/delta lambda approximately 24,000) observations of Comet 21 P/Giacobini-Zinner (21P) between approximately 2.85 -- 3.54 micrometers, obtained with NIRSPEC at Keck 2 on UT 2005 June 03 (R(sub h) = 1.12 AU, delta = 1.45 AU). These simultaneously sampled multiple emissions from the v7 band of C2H6 and the v2 and v3 bands of CH3OH, together with several hot bands of H2O, permitting a direct measure of parent volatile abundances in 21P. Our spectra reveal highly depleted C2H6 (0.13-0.14 percent relative to H2O) and CH3OH/C2H6 approximately 10, consistent with previously published abundances from observations in the IR [1,2] and millimeter sub-mm (reporting CH3OH/H2O [3]) during its previous apparition in 1998. We observed similarly high CH3OH/C2H6, and also similar rotational temperature to that measured for 21 P, in Comet 8P/Tuttle [4,5]. We used our (higher signal-to-noise) NIRSPEC observations of 8P to produce effective (empirical) CH3OH g-factors for several lines in the v2 band. These will be presented together with interpretation of our results, including constraints on the spin temperature of water. We acknowledge support from the NASA Planetary Atmospheres, Planetary Astronomy, and Astrobiology Programs and from the NSF Astronomy and Astrophysics Research Grants Program.

  13. Highly accurate nuclear and electronic stopping cross sections derived using Monte Carlo simulations to reproduce measured range data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wittmaack, Klaus; Mutzke, Andreas

    2017-03-01

    We have examined and confirmed the previously unexplored concept of using Monte Carlo calculations in combination with measured projected ranges of ions implanted in solids to derive a quantitative description of nuclear interaction and electronic stopping. The study involved 98 ranges of 11B in Si between 1 keV and 8 MeV, contained in 12 sets of 10 different groups. Systematic errors by up to ±8% were removed to establish a refined data base with 93 ranges featuring only statistical uncertainties (±1.8%). The Monte Carlo calculations could be set up to reproduce the refined ranges with a mean ratio 1.002 ± 1.7%. The input parameters required for this very high level of agreement are as follows. Nuclear interaction is best described by the Kr-C potential, but in obligatory combination with the Lindhard-Scharff (LS) screening length. Up to 300 keV, the electronic stopping cross section is proportional to the projectile velocity, Se = kSe,LS, with k = 1.46 ± 0.01. At higher energies, Se falls progressively short of kSe,LS. Around the Bragg peak, i.e., between 0.8 and 10 MeV, Se is modeled by an adjustable function serving to tailor the peak shape properly. Calculated and measured isotope effects for ranges of 10B and 11B in Si agree within the experimental uncertainty (±0.25%). The range-based Se,R(E) reported here predicts the scarce experimental data derived from the energy loss in projectile transmission through thin Si foils to within 2% or better. By contrast, Se(E) data of available stopping power tables exhibit deviations from Se,R(E) between -40% and +14%.

  14. Cross section measurement of the 159Tb(n, γ)Tb160 nuclear reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dzysiuk, N.; Kadenko, I.; Gressier, V.; Koning, A. J.

    2015-04-01

    The cross section of the 159Tb(n, γ)Tb160 reaction was measured in four mono-energetic neutron fields of energy 3.7, 4.3, 5.4, and 6.85 MeV, respectively, with the activation technique applied to metal discs of natural composition. To ensure an acceptable precision of the results all major sources of uncertainties were taken into account. Calculations of detector efficiency, incident neutron spectrum and correction factors were performed with the Monte Carlo code (MCNPX), whereas theoretical excitation functions were calculated with the TALYS-1.2 code and compared to the experimental cross section values. This paper presents both measurements and calculation leading to the cross section values.

  15. Measurement of rates of transport across erythrocyte membranes by 1H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guy, Robert D.; Tahir Razi, M.; Rabenstein, Dallas L.

    The use of 1H NMR to monitor the transport of small molecules across the membrane of erythrocytes is evaluated. Cells are separated, as a function of time, from a suspension medium containing the small molecule of interest, and then analyzed for the small molecule by 1H NMR. 1H NMR spectra of either the intact cells or cell lysate are measured by the protein saturation pulse/Fourier transform (PSP/FT) technique. With this technique, interfering hemoglobin resonances are suppressed with a selective presaturation pulse and high-resolution spectra are obtained for small molecules. The detection limit is on the order of 0. 10 m M Membrane transport rates were measured for alanine, penicillamine, N-acetylpenicillamine, and S-methylcysteine.

  16. Precise Lifetime Measurements in Light Nuclei for Benchmarking Modern Ab-initio Nuclear Structure Models

    SciTech Connect

    Lister, C.J.; McCutchan, E.A.

    2014-06-15

    A new generation of ab-initio calculations, based on realistic two- and three-body forces, is having a profound impact on our view of how nuclei work. To improve the numerical methods, and the parameterization of 3-body forces, new precise data are needed. Electromagnetic transitions are very sensitive to the dynamics which drive mixing between configurations. We have made a series of precise (< 3%) measurements of electromagnetic transitions in the A=10 nuclei {sup 10}C and {sup 10}Be by using the Doppler Shift Attenuation method carefully. Many interesting features can be reproduced including the strong α clustering. New measurements on {sup 8}Be and {sup 12}Be highlight the interplay between the alpha clusters and their valence neutrons.

  17. Silicon isotope ratio measurements by inductively coupled plasma tandem mass spectrometry for alteration studies of nuclear waste glasses.

    PubMed

    Gourgiotis, Alkiviadis; Ducasse, Thomas; Barker, Evelyne; Jollivet, Patrick; Gin, Stéphane; Bassot, Sylvain; Cazala, Charlotte

    2017-02-15

    High-level, long-lived nuclear waste arising from spent fuel reprocessing is vitrified in silicate glasses for final disposal in deep geologic formations. In order to better understand the mechanisms driving glass dissolution, glass alteration studies, based on silicon isotope ratio monitoring of (29)Si-doped aqueous solutions, were carried out in laboratories. This work explores the capabilities of the new type of quadrupole-based ICP-MS, the Agilent 8800 tandem quadrupole ICP-MS/MS, for accurate silicon isotope ratio determination for alteration studies of nuclear waste glasses. In order to avoid silicon polyatomic interferences, a new analytical method was developed using O2 as the reaction gas in the Octopole Reaction System (ORS), and silicon isotopes were measured in mass-shift mode. A careful analysis of the potential polyatomic interferences on SiO(+) and SiO2(+) ion species was performed, and we found that SiO(+) ion species suffer from important polyatomic interferences coming from the matrix of sample and standard solutions (0.5M HNO3). For SiO2(+), no interferences were detected, and thus, these ion species were chosen for silicon isotope ratio determination. A number of key settings for accurate isotope ratio analysis like, detector dead time, integration time, number of sweeps, wait time offset, memory blank and instrumental mass fractionation, were considered and optimized. Particular attention was paid to the optimization of abundance sensitivity of the quadrupole mass filter before the ORS. We showed that poor abundance sensitivity leads to a significant shift of the data away from the Exponential Mass Fractionation Law (EMFL) due to the spectral overlaps of silicon isotopes combined with different oxygen isotopes (i.e. (28)Si(16)O(18)O(+), (30)Si(16)O(16)O(+)). The developed method was validated by measuring a series of reference solutions with different (29)Si enrichment. Isotope ratio trueness, uncertainty and repeatability were found to be <0

  18. Precise Nuclear Data Measurements Possible with the NIFFTE fissionTPC for Advanced Reactor Designs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Towell, Rusty; Niffte Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    The Neutron Induced Fission Fragment Tracking Experiment (NIFFTE) Collaboration has applied the proven technology of Time Projection Chambers (TPC) to the task of precisely measuring fission cross sections. With the NIFFTE fission TPC, precise measurements have been made during the last year at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center from both U-235 and Pu-239 targets. The exquisite tracking capabilities of this device allow the full reconstruction of charged particles produced by neutron beam induced fissions from a thin central target. The wealth of information gained from this approach will allow systematics to be controlled at the level of 1%. The fissionTPC performance will be presented. These results are critical to the development of advanced uranium-fueled reactors. However, there are clear advantages to developing thorium-fueled reactors such as Liquid Fluoride Thorium Reactors over uranium-fueled reactors. These advantages include improved reactor safety, minimizing radioactive waste, improved reactor efficiency, and enhanced proliferation resistance. The potential for using the fissionTPC to measure needed cross sections important to the development of thorium-fueled reactors will also be discussed.

  19. A facility for measurements of nuclear cross sections for fast neutron cancer therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dangtip, S.; Ataç, A.; Bergenwall, B.; Blomgren, J.; Elmgren, K.; Johansson, C.; Klug, J.; Olsson, N.; Carlsson, G. A.; Söderberg, J.; Jonsson, O.; Nilsson, L.; Renberg, P.-U.; Nadel-Turonski, P.; Brun, C. L.; Lecolley, F.-R.; Lecolley, J.-F.; Varignon, C.; Eudes, P.; Haddad, F.; Kerveno, M.; Kirchner, T.; Lebrun, C.

    2000-10-01

    A facility for measurements of neutron-induced double-differential light-ion production cross-sections, for application within, e.g., fast neutron cancer therapy, is described. The central detection elements are three-detector telescopes consisting of two silicon detectors and a CsI crystal. Use of /ΔE-ΔE-E techniques allows good particle identification for p, d, t, 3He and alpha particles over an energy range from a few MeV up to 100 MeV. Active plastic scintillator collimators are used to define the telescope solid angle. Measurements can be performed using up to eight telescopes at /20° intervals simultaneously, thus covering a wide angular range. The performance of the equipment is illustrated using experimental data taken with a carbon target at En=95 MeV. Distortions of the measured charged-particle spectra due to energy and particle losses in the target are corrected using a newly developed computer code. Results from such correction calculations are presented.

  20. The effect of diffusion in internal gradients on nuclear magnetic resonance transverse relaxation measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Muncaci, S.; Ardelean, I.; Boboia, S.

    2013-11-13

    In the present work we study the internal gradient effects on diffusion attenuation of the echo train appearing in the well-known Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) technique, extensively used for transverse relaxation measurements. Our investigations are carried out on two porous ceramics, prepared with the same amount of magnetic impurities (Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}) but different pore sizes. It is shown that diffusion effects on the CPMG echo train attenuation are strongly influenced by the pore size for the same magnetic susceptibility of the two samples. The experimental results were compared with a theoretical model taking into account the limit of free or restricted diffusion on echo train attenuation. The NMR experiments were performed on water filled samples using a low-field NMR instrument. The porous ceramics were prepared using both the replica technique and the powder compression technique. Magnetic susceptibility measurements indicated close values of the susceptibility constant for the two samples whereas the SEM images indicated different pore sizes. The results reported here may have impact in the interpretation of NMR relaxation measurements of water in soils or concrete samples.

  1. Quantitative Fundus Autofluorescence in Mice: Correlation With HPLC Quantitation of RPE Lipofuscin and Measurement of Retina Outer Nuclear Layer Thickness

    PubMed Central

    Sparrow, Janet R.; Blonska, Anna; Flynn, Erin; Duncker, Tobias; Greenberg, Jonathan P.; Secondi, Roberta; Ueda, Keiko; Delori, François C.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. Our study was conducted to establish procedures and protocols for quantitative autofluorescence (qAF) measurements in mice, and to report changes in qAF, A2E bisretinoid concentration, and outer nuclear layer (ONL) thickness in mice of different genotypes and age. Methods. Fundus autofluorescence (AF) images (55° lens, 488 nm excitation) were acquired in albino Abca4−/−, Abca4+/−, and Abca4+/+ mice (ages 2–12 months) with a confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscope (cSLO). Gray levels (GLs) in each image were calibrated to an internal fluorescence reference. The bisretinoid A2E was measured by quantitative high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Histometric analysis of ONL thicknesses was performed. Results. The Bland-Altman coefficient of repeatability (95% confidence interval) was ±18% for between-session qAF measurements. Mean qAF values increased with age (2–12 months) in all groups of mice. qAF was approximately 2-fold higher in Abca4−/− mice than in Abca4+/+ mice and approximately 20% higher in heterozygous mice. HPLC measurements of the lipofuscin fluorophore A2E also revealed age-associated increases, and the fold difference between Abca4−/− and wild-type mice was more pronounced (approximately 3–4-fold) than measurable by qAF. Moreover, A2E levels declined after 8 months of age, a change not observed with qAF. The decline in A2E levels in the Abca4−/− mice corresponded to reduced photoreceptor cell viability as reflected in ONL thinning beginning at 8 months of age. Conclusions. The qAF method enables measurement of in vivo lipofuscin and the detection of genotype and age-associated differences. The use of this approach has the potential to aid in understanding retinal disease processes and will facilitate preclinical studies. PMID:23548623

  2. Tuning the g-factor of neutral and charged excitons confined to self-assembled (Al,Ga)As shell quantum dots

    SciTech Connect

    Corfdir, P. Van Hattem, B.; Phillips, R. T.; Fontana, Y.; Russo-Averchi, E.; Heiss, M.; Fontcuberta i Morral, A.

    2014-12-01

    We study the neutral exciton (X) and charged exciton (CX) transitions from (Al,Ga)As shell quantum dots located in core-shell nanowires, in the presence of a magnetic field. The g-factors and the diamagnetic coefficients of both the X and the CX depend on the orientation of the field with respect to the nanowire axis. The aspect ratio of the X wavefunction is quantified based on the anisotropy of the diamagnetic coefficient. For specific orientations of the magnetic field, it is possible to cancel the g-factor of the bright states of the X and the CX by means of an inversion of the sign of the hole's g-factor, which is promising for quantum information processing applications.

  3. Measurement and verification of positron emitter nuclei generated at each treatment site by target nuclear fragment reactions in proton therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Miyatake, Aya; Nishio, Teiji; Ogino, Takashi; Saijo, Nagahiro; Esumi, Hiroyasu; Uesaka, Mitsuru

    2010-08-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to verify the characteristics of the positron emitter nuclei generated at each treatment site by proton irradiation. Methods: Proton therapy using a beam on-line PET system mounted on a rotating gantry port (BOLPs-RGp), which the authors developed, is provided at the National Cancer Center Kashiwa, Japan. BOLPs-RGp is a monitoring system that can confirm the activity distribution of the proton irradiated volume by detection of a pair of annihilation gamma rays coincidentally from positron emitter nuclei generated by the target nuclear fragment reactions between irradiated proton nuclei and nuclei in the human body. Activity is measured from a start of proton irradiation to a period of 200 s after the end of the irradiation. The characteristics of the positron emitter nuclei generated in a patient's body were verified by the measurement of the activity distribution at each treatment site using BOLPs-RGp. Results: The decay curves for measured activity were able to be approximated using two or three half-life values regardless of the treatment site. The activity of half-life value of about 2 min was important for a confirmation of the proton irradiated volume. Conclusions: In each proton treatment site, verification of the characteristics of the generated positron emitter nuclei was performed by using BOLPs-RGp. For the monitoring of the proton irradiated volume, the detection of {sup 15}O generated in a human body was important.

  4. Sequential multi-nuclide emission rate estimation method based on gamma dose rate measurement for nuclear emergency management.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaole; Raskob, Wolfgang; Landman, Claudia; Trybushnyi, Dmytro; Li, Yu

    2017-03-05

    In case of a nuclear accident, the source term is typically not known but extremely important for the assessment of the consequences to the affected population. Therefore the assessment of the potential source term is of uppermost importance for emergency response. A fully sequential method, derived from a regularized weighted least square problem, is proposed to reconstruct the emission and composition of a multiple-nuclide release using gamma dose rate measurement. The a priori nuclide ratios are incorporated into the background error covariance (BEC) matrix, which is dynamically augmented and sequentially updated. The negative estimations in the mathematical algorithm are suppressed by utilizing artificial zero-observations (with large uncertainties) to simultaneously update the state vector and BEC. The method is evaluated by twin experiments based on the JRodos system. The results indicate that the new method successfully reconstructs the emission and its uncertainties. Accurate a priori ratio accelerates the analysis process, which obtains satisfactory results with only limited number of measurements, otherwise it needs more measurements to generate reasonable estimations. The suppression of negative estimation effectively improves the performance, especially for the situation with poor a priori information, where it is more prone to the generation of negative values.

  5. Measurement of Nuclear Reaction Q-values with High Accuracy: 7Li(p, n)7Be

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, R. E.; Barker, P. H.; Lovelock, D. M. J.

    1985-01-01

    A technique is described for the measurement of nuclear reaction Q-values with an accuracy of a few parts in 105, in which the ultimate reference is a one-volt standard. As a test of the technique the accurately known threshold energy of the 7Li(p, n)7Be reaction, 1880.51 +/- 0.08 keV, has been remeasured. The value found using the present technique is 1880.443 +/- 0.020 keV, in good agreement with previous values. An attempt to see evidence for atomic excitation effects in the 27A1(p,n)27Si reaction is also discussed. This yielded a new value of 5803.73 +/- 0.12 keV for the threshold of this reaction, again in a good agreement with, but more accurate than, previous values. Further test measurements are summarized. The main application of the technique, in measurements related to the theory of weak interactions, is discussed briefly and the results obtained to date are presented.

  6. Measurements of electrical conductivity for characterizing and monitoring nuclear waste repositories

    SciTech Connect

    Morrison, H.F.; Becker, A.; Lee, K.H.

    1986-11-01

    The detection of major fractures is one topic of this study but another equally important problem is to develop quantitative relationships between large scale resistivity and fracture systems in rock. There has been very little work done on this central issue. Empirical relations between resistivity and porosity have been derived on the basis of laboratory samples or from well logging, but there are no comparable 'laws' for rock masses with major fracture or joint patterns. Hydrologic models for such rocks have been recently been derived but the corresponding resistivity models have not been attempted. Resistivity due to fracture distributions with preferred orientation could be determined with such models, as could quantitative interpretation of changes as fracture aperature varies with load. This study is not only important for the assessment of a repository site, but has far ranging implications in reservoir studies for oil, gas, and geothermal resources. The electrical conductivity can be measured in two ways. Current can be injected into the ground through pairs of electrodes and corresponding voltage drops can be measured in the vicinity with other pairs of electrodes. The electrical conductivity can also be measured inductively. Instead of injecting current into the ground as described in the dc resistivity method, currents can be induced to flow by a changing magnetic field. In these inductive or electromagnetic (em) methods the interpretation depends both on transmitter-receiver geometry and frequency of operation. In principle the interpretation should be more definitive than with the dc resistivity methods. Rigorous confirmation of this statement in inhomogeneous media awaits the development of generalized inversion techniques for em methods.

  7. A system for the measurement of delayed neutrons and gammas from special nuclear materials

    DOE PAGES

    Andrews, M. T.; Corcoran, E. C.; Goorley, J. T.; ...

    2014-11-27

    The delayed neutron counting (DNC) system at the Royal Military College of Canada has been upgraded to accommodate concurrent delayed neutron and gamma measurements. This delayed neutron and gamma counting (DNGC) system uses a SLOWPOKE-2 reactor to irradiate fissile materials before their transfer to a counting arrangement consisting of six ³He and one HPGe detector. The application of this system is demonstrated in an example where delayed neutron and gamma emissions are used in complement to examine ²³³U content and determine fissile mass with an average relative error and accuracy of -2.2 and 1.5 %, respectively.

  8. Spent fuel and residue measurement instrumentation at the Sellafield nuclear fuel reprocessing facility

    SciTech Connect

    Chesterman, A.S.; Clark, P.A.

    1995-12-31

    The Sellafield reprocessing plant receives and reprocesses several thousand tonnes of spent light water reactor (LWR), advanced gas cooled reactor (AGR) and natural uranium magnesium alloy clad (Magnox) fuels each year. The safety and cost effectiveness of these operations has been supported by the development and installation, at key points in the process, of a range of special purpose radiometric instrumentation. Systems in routine operational use verify the cooling time, burn-tip and initial and final U-235 equivalent enrichment of fuel assemblies in the storage and handling ponds. Other systems determine the radionuclide inventories of fuel residues in intermediate level waste arising from plant operations. The measurement techniques employed include high resolution gamma spectrometry, passive neutron counting and neutron interrogation by the use of a Cf-252 source and deuterium-tritium (D-T) pulsed neutron generators. Details of the instruments including mechanical installation arrangements and measurement data are presented in the paper along with a discussion of possible future uses of similar instruments for burn-up credit associated with fuel and residue storage, transportation and disposal.

  9. Measurement of Uranium Isotope Ratios in Keratinous Materials: A Noninvasive Bioassay for Special Nuclear Material.

    PubMed

    Brockman, John D; Brown, John W N; Morrell, Jonathan S; Robertson, J David

    2016-09-06

    Hair, toenail, and fingernail are noninvasive, integrative biological monitors routinely used to assess mineral intake.1-4 In this study, we demonstrate the feasibility of distinguishing between exposure to natural, depleted, and enriched U by measuring the (235)U/(238)U, (234)U/(238)U, and (236)U/(238)U ratios in the hair, fingernails, and toenails of occupationally exposed workers and control volunteers. The exposure history of cases and controls to non-natural U was assessed through voluntary self-reporting using a simple questionnaire. The measured U isotope ratios and U concentration in the hair, toenail, and fingernail of cases were compared to a nonexposed control group. No difference was observed in the uranium concentration between the two groups. Significant differences between the cases and the control group were observed in the (235)U/(238)U and (236)U/(238)U isotope ratios but not the (234)U/(238)U. This is the first time that hair, fingernail, and toenail have been demonstrated to be sensitive to occupational exposure to enriched and depleted U, a result with significant implications for proliferation compliance monitoring.

  10. Early in situ measurement of radioactive fallout in Fukushima city due to Fukushima Daiichi nuclear accident.

    PubMed

    Takada, Masashi; Suzuki, Toshikazu

    2013-07-01

    Using a high-purity germanium detector, both indoor and outdoor radionuclides that had deposited 1.5 d after the radioactive fallout events in the city of Fukushima were experimentally measured. Eleven artificial ((131)I, (132)I, (134)Cs, (136)Cs, (137)Cs, (129)Te, (129m)Te, (131m)Te, (132)Te, (140)La and (99m)Tc) and 5 natural radionuclides were identified. Total air kerma rates were mainly due to (132)I, (134)Cs and (136)Cs from 4 to 6 µGy/h at a 7.5-cm height from the ground. Radioactive contamination on the ground was contributed by (132)I and (132)Te, from 330 to 420 Bq/cm(2). In a worst-case scenario, the maximum skin dose rates were estimated to be from 520 to 670 µGy/h. Effective dose rates were evaluated to be 10 to 15 µSv/h and reached 17.9 µSv/h at 4 a.m. on 16 March. In the effective dose rates, (132)I, (134)Cs and (132)Te were the main contributors. Our measurements are useful for estimating dose levels in the public in the city of Fukushima during the days after radioactive fallout contamination.

  11. Considerations for Possible Light Impact of Spent Nuclear Fuel for Safeguards Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Brian K. Castle; Kelly D. Ellis

    2012-09-01

    This effort is designed to be a preliminary study to determine the appropriateness of lightly contacting SNF with zirconium-based cladding, in wet storage, for the purpose of taking safeguards measurements. Contact will likely consist of an initial impact followed by a light tensile load on the exterior surface of the SNF cladding. In the past, concerns have been raised that contacting SNF cladding could result in a loss of long-term mechanical integrity due to crack initiation, uncontrolled crack propagation, and a mechanical exfoliation of the protective oxide layer. The mechanical integrity concerns are addressed with an analytic model that evaluates the threshold impact limits for degraded, but undamaged SNF cladding. Aqueous corrosion concerns, associated with exfoliation of the protective oxide layer, are addressed with a qualitative argument, focusing on the possible corrosion mechanisms of zirconium-based cladding.

  12. First Measurement of the {rho} Spectral Function in High-Energy Nuclear Collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Arnaldi, R.; Colla, A.; Cortese, P.; Ferretti, A.; Oppedisano, C.; Scomparin, E.; Averbeck, R.; Drees, A.; Banicz, K.; Specht, H.J.; Castor, J.; Devaux, A.; Fargeix, J.; Force, P.; Manso, F.; Chaurand, B.; Cicalo, C.; De Falco, A.; Floris, M.; Masoni, A.

    2006-04-28

    We report on a precision measurement of low-mass muon pairs in 158 AGeV indium-indium collisions at the CERN SPS. A significant excess of pairs is observed above the yield expected from neutral meson decays. The unprecedented sample size of 360 000 dimuons and the good mass resolution of about 2% allow us to isolate the excess by subtraction of the decay sources. The shape of the resulting mass spectrum is consistent with a dominant contribution from {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{yields}{rho}{yields}{mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} annihilation. The associated space-time averaged {rho} spectral function shows a strong broadening, but essentially no shift in mass. This may rule out theoretical models linking hadron masses directly to the chiral condensate.

  13. (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) as a tool to measure dehydration in mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Matthew; Vassiliou, Christophoros C; Colucci, Lina A; Cima, Michael J

    2015-08-01

    Dehydration is a prevalent pathology, where loss of bodily water can result in variable symptoms. Symptoms can range from simple thirst to dire scenarios involving loss of consciousness. Clinical methods exist that assess dehydration from qualitative weight changes to more quantitative osmolality measurements. These methods are imprecise, invasive, and/or easily confounded, despite being practiced clinically. We investigate a non-invasive, non-imaging (1)H NMR method of assessing dehydration that attempts to address issues with existing clinical methods. Dehydration was achieved by exposing mice (n = 16) to a thermally elevated environment (37 °C) for up to 7.5 h (0.11-13% weight loss). Whole body NMR measurements were made using a Bruker LF50 BCA-Analyzer before and after dehydration. Physical lean tissue, adipose, and free water compartment approximations had NMR values extracted from relaxation data through a multi-exponential fitting method. Changes in before/after NMR values were compared with clinically practiced metrics of weight loss (percent dehydration) as well as blood and urine osmolality. A linear correlation between tissue relaxometry and both animal percent dehydration and urine osmolality was observed in lean tissue, but not adipose or free fluids. Calculated R(2) values for percent dehydration were 0.8619 (lean, P < 0.0001), 0.5609 (adipose, P = 0.0008), and 0.0644 (free fluids, P = 0.3445). R(2) values for urine osmolality were 0.7760 (lean, P < 0.0001), 0.5005 (adipose, P = 0.0022), and 0.0568 (free fluids, P = 0.3739). These results suggest that non-imaging (1)H NMR methods are capable of non-invasively assessing dehydration in live animals.

  14. Cobalt, fast neutrons and physical models: Nuclear data and measurements series

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, A.B.; Guenther, P.T.; Whalen, J.F.; Lawson, R.D.

    1987-07-01

    Energy-averaged neutron total cross sections of cobalt were measured from approx. =0.5 to 12.0 MeV. Differential elastic- and inelastic-scattering cross sections were measured from approx. =1.5 to 10.0 MeV over the scattering-angle range approx. =18/sup 0/ to 160/sup 0/, with sufficient detail to define the energy-averaged behavior. Inelastic neutron groups were observed corresponding to ''levels'' at: 1115 +- 29, 1212 +- 24, 1307 +- 24, 1503 +- 33, 1778 +- 40, 2112 +- 40, 2224 +- 35, 2423 +- 39, 2593 +- 41 and 2810 keV. The experimental results were interpreted in terms of the spherical optical-statistical and coupled-channels models. An unusually successful description of observables was achieved over a wide energy range (<-15.0 to > 20.0 MeV) with a spherical model having energy-dependent strengths and geometries. The energy dependencies are large below approx. =7.0 MeV (i.e., approx. =19.0 MeV above the Fermi energy), but become smaller and similar to those reported for ''global'' potentials at higher energies. The imaginary strength is large and decreases with energy. These imaginary-potential characteristics are attributed to neutron shell closure and collective-vibrational processes. The weak-coupling model also offers an explanation of the unusual negative energy slope and relatively small radius of the imaginary potential. The spherical optical model derived from the neutron-scattering results was extrapolated to bound energies using the dispersion relationship and the method of moments. The resulting real-potential strength and radius peak at approx. =-10.0 MeV, while concurrently the real diffuseness is at a minimum. The extrapolated potential is approx. =8% larger than that implied by reported particle-state energies, and approx. =13% smaller than indicated by hole-state energies. 68 refs., 15 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Nuclear emulsion measurements of the astronauts' radiation exposures on Skylab missions 2, 3, and 4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaefer, H. J.; Sullivan, J. J.

    1975-01-01

    On the Skylab missions, Ilford G.5 and K.2 emulsions were flown as part of passive dosimeter packs carried by the astronauts on their wrists. Due to the long mission times, latent image fading and track crowing imposed limitations on a quantitative track and grain count analysis. For Skylab 2, the complete proton energy spectrum was determined within reasonable error limits. A combined mission dose equivalent of 2,490 millirems from protons, tissue stars and neutrons was measured on Skylab 2. A stationary emulsion stack, kept in a film vault drawer on the same mission, displayed a highly structured directional distribution of the fluence of low-energy protons (enders) reflecting the local shield distribution. On the 59 and 84-day mission 3 and 4, G.5 emulsions had to be cut on the microtom to 5-7 microns for microscopic examination. Even so, the short track segments in such thin layers precluded a statistically reliable grain count analysis. However, the K.2 emulsions still allowed accurate proton ender counts without special provisions.

  16. Measurement of Radiation Induced Damages in Semiconductor Materials Useful as Photovoltaic and Nuclear Detection Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gul, Rubi; Keeter, Kara; Rodriguez, Rene

    2007-05-01

    Radiation interactions with materials cause a change in electronic and physical properties of the material, which affect the performance of the devices. It is a key issue in the employment of these materials in medical, space, security and other scientific applications. In our research we have determined the defects and their generation rate induced by gamma rays of energy 0.11-22 MeV, in CuInS2. We have used a simple model consisting of classical physics principles and Monte Carlo simulation software. The simulation results are in agreement with other published results done for other semiconductor materials. Our collaborators at INL will investigate different techniques for fabrication of thin films of CdZnTe and CuInS2 by using Radiofrequency Pulsed Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition and Pressurized Solvent techniques. Next, defects will be induced in the thin-film samples by exposure to a bremsstrahlung gamma-ray beam. The radiation dose will range from 5 to 25 kGy. Qualitative and quantitative measurements of the defects in the crystals will be done by gamma-ray spectroscopy and PICTS (Photo induced current transient spectroscopy). To cite this abstract, use the following reference: http://meetings.aps.org/link/BAPS.2007.NWS07.C1.5

  17. Element-sensitive measurement of the hole-nuclear spin interaction in quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chekhovich, E. A.; Glazov, M. M.; Krysa, A. B.; Hopkinson, M.; Senellart, P.; Lemaître, A.; Skolnick, M. S.; Tartakovskii, A. I.

    2013-02-01

    It has been proposed that valence-band holes can form robust spin qubits owing to their weaker hyperfine coupling compared with electrons. However, it was demonstrated recently that the hole hyperfine interaction is not negligible, although a consistent picture of the mechanism controlling its magnitude is still lacking. Here we address this problem by measuring the hole hyperfine constant independently for each chemical element in InGaAs/GaAs, InP/GaInP and GaAs/AlGaAs quantum dots. Contrary to existing models we find that the hole hyperfine constant has opposite signs for cations and anions and ranges from -15% to +15% relative to that for electrons. We attribute such changes to the competing positive contributions of p-symmetry atomic orbitals and the negative contributions of d-orbitals. These findings yield information on the orbital composition of the valence band and enable a fundamentally new approach for verification of computed Bloch wavefunctions in semiconductor nanostructures. Furthermore, we show that the contribution of cationic d-orbitals leads to a new mechanism of hole spin decoherence.

  18. Molecular dynamics simulations as a complement to nuclear magnetic resonance and X-ray diffraction measurements.

    PubMed

    Feller, Scott E

    2007-01-01

    Advances in the field of atomic-level membrane simulations are being driven by continued growth in computing power, improvements in the available potential energy functions for lipids, and new algorithms that implement advanced sampling techniques. These developments are allowing simulations to assess time- and length scales wherein meaningful comparisons with experimental measurements on macroscopic systems can be made. Such comparisons provide stringent tests of the simulation methodologies and force fields, and thus, advance the simulation field by pointing out shortcomings of the models. Extensive testing against available experimental data suggests that for many properties modern simulations have achieved a level of accuracy that provides substantial predictive power and can aid in the interpretation of experimental data. This combination of closely coupled laboratory experiments and molecular dynamics simulations holds great promise for the understanding of membrane systems. In the following, the molecular dynamics method is described with particular attention to those aspects critical for simulating membrane systems and to the calculation of experimental observables from the simulation trajectory.

  19. Highly Depleted Ethane and Slightly Depleted Methanol in Comet 21P/Giacobini-Zinner: Application of Empirical g-factors for CH3OH near 50 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DiSanti, Michael A.; Bonev, B. P.; Villanueva, G. L.; Mumma, M. J.

    2012-10-01

    We report results from high resolution (λ/Δλ 24,000) infrared spectra of Comet 21P/Giacobini-Zinner (21P/GZ) using NIRSPEC at Keck II on UT 2005 June 03, approximately one month before perihelion. We simultaneously sampled emissions from the ν7 band of C2H6, the ν2 and ν3 bands of CH3OH, and several hot bands of H2O, permitting a direct measure of parent volatile abundances in 21P/GZ. Our production rate for H2O was consistent with that measured from previous apparitions as retrieved from optical, infrared, and mm-wavelength observations. Our analysis of C2H6 confirmed its previously reported strong depletion from IR observations during the 1998 apparition [1,2], similar to the depletion of C2 in 21P/GZ known from optical studies [3]. For CH3OH, we applied our recently published quantum model for ν3 [4], obtaining Trot consistent with that for H2O ( 50 K) and a high abundance ratio CH3OH/C2H6 ( 9). We observed similar Trot and CH3OH/C2H6 in Comet 8P/Tuttle [5,6], and used these to produce effective (empirical) ν2 g-factors for 157 lines [7]. Application of our empirical ν2 model to 21P/GZ provided a production rate consistent with that from ν3, and an abundance ratio CH3OH/H2O in agreement with that measured previously [1,8]. We present a summary of our results for 21P/GZ and compare with abundances obtained for other Jupiter family comets. Our study provides the first measure of primary volatile production rates for any JFC over multiple apparitions using high resolution ground-based IR spectroscopy. We acknowledge support from the NASA Planetary Atmospheres, Planetary Astronomy, and Astrobiology Programs and from the NSF Astronomy and Astrophysics Research Grants Program. References [1] Weaver et al. 1999 Icarus 142:482 [2] Mumma et al. 2000 ApJ 531:L155 [3] A’Hearn et al. 1995 Icarus 118:223 [4] Villanueva et al. 2012 ApJ 747:37 [5] Bonev et al. 2008 ApJ 680:L61 [6] Boehnhardt et al. 2008 ApJ 683:L71 [7] DiSanti et al. 2012 ApJ (in press) [8] Biver

  20. Fissile and fertile nuclear material measurements using a new differential die-away self-interrogation technique

    SciTech Connect

    Menlove, Howard O; Tobin, Stephen J; Menlove, S H

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents a new technique for the measurement of fissile and fertile nuclear materials in spent fuel and plutonium laden materials such as mixed oxide (MOX) fuel. The technique, called differential die-away self-interrogation, is similar to traditional differential die-away analysis, but it does not require a pulsed neutron generator or pulsed beam accelerator, and it can measure the fertile mass in addition to the fissile mass. The new method uses the spontaneous fission neutrons from {sup 244}Cm in spent fuel and {sup 240}Pu effective neutrons in MOX as the 'pulsed' neutron source with an average of {approx} 2.7 neutrons per pulse. The time correlated neutrons from the spontaneous fission and the subsequent induced fissions are analyzed as a function of time to determine the spontaneous fission rate, the induced fast-neutron fissions, and the induced thermal-neutron fissions. The fissile mass is determined from the induced thermal-neutron fissions that are produced by reflected thermal neutrons that originated from the spontaneous fission reaction. The sensitivity of the fissile mass measurement is enhanced by the use of two measurements, with and without a cadmium liner between the sample and the hydrogenous moderator. The fertile mass is determined from the multiplicity analysis of the neutrons detected soon after the initial triggering neutron is detected. The method obtains good sensitivity by the optimal design of two different neutron die-away regions: a short die-away for the neutron detector region and a longer die-away for the sample interrogation region.

  1. Measurements of forward proton production with incident protons and charged pions on nuclear targets at the CERN Proton Synchrotron

    SciTech Connect

    Apollonio, M.; Chimenti, P.; Giannini, G.; Artamonov, A.; Giani, S.; Gilardoni, S.; Gorbunov, P.; Grant, A.; Grossheim, A.; Ivanchenko, A.; Ivanchenko, V.; Kayis-Topaksu, A.; Panman, J.; Papadopoulos, I.; Tcherniaev, E.; Tsukerman, I.; Wiebusch, C.; Zucchelli, P.; Bagulya, A.; Grichine, V.

    2010-10-15

    Measurements of the double-differential proton production cross-section d{sup 2{sigma}}/dpd{Omega} in the range of momentum 0.5 GeV/c{<=}p<8.0 GeV/c and angle 0.05 rad{<=}{theta}<0.25 rad in collisions of charged pions and protons on beryllium, carbon, aluminium, copper, tin, tantalum, and lead are presented. The data were taken with the large acceptance HARP detector in the T9 beam line of the CERN Proton Synchrotron. Incident particles were identified by an elaborate system of beam detectors and impinged on a target of 5% of a nuclear interaction length. The tracking and identification of the produced particles was performed using the forward spectrometer of the HARP experiment. Results are obtained for the double-differential cross-sections mainly at four incident beam momenta (3,5,8, and 12 GeV/c). Measurements are compared with predictions of the geant4 and mars Monte Carlo generators.

  2. Measurement of the neutrino-oxygen neutral-current interaction cross section by observing nuclear deexcitation γ rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, K.; Adam, J.; Aihara, H.; Akiri, T.; Andreopoulos, C.; Aoki, S.; Ariga, A.; Ariga, T.; Assylbekov, S.; Autiero, D.; Barbi, M.; Barker, G. J.; Barr, G.; Bass, M.; Batkiewicz, M.; Bay, F.; Bentham, S. W.; Berardi, V.; Berger, B. E.; Berkman, S.; Bertram, I.; Bhadra, S.; Blaszczyk, F. d. M.; Blondel, A.; Bojechko, C.; Bordoni, S.; Boyd, S. B.; Brailsford, D.; Bravar, A.; Bronner, C.; Buchanan, N.; Calland, R. G.; Caravaca Rodríguez, J.; Cartwright, S. L.; Castillo, R.; Catanesi, M. G.; Cervera, A.; Cherdack, D.; Christodoulou, G.; Clifton, A.; Coleman, J.; Coleman, S. J.; Collazuol, G.; Connolly, K.; Cremonesi, L.; Dabrowska, A.; Danko, I.; Das, R.; Davis, S.; de Perio, P.; De Rosa, G.; Dealtry, T.; Dennis, S. R.; Densham, C.; Dewhurst, D.; Di Lodovico, F.; Di Luise, S.; Drapier, O.; Duboyski, T.; Duffy, K.; Dufour, F.; Dumarchez, J.; Dytman, S.; Dziewiecki, M.; Emery-Schrenk, S.; Ereditato, A.; Escudero, L.; Finch, A. J.; Fiorentini Aguirre, G. A.; Friend, M.; Fujii, Y.; Fukuda, Y.; Furmanski, A. P.; Galymov, V.; Gaudin, A.; Giffin, S.; Giganti, C.; Gilje, K.; Goeldi, D.; Golan, T.; Gomez-Cadenas, J. J.; Gonin, M.; Grant, N.; Gudin, D.; Hadley, D. R.; Haegel, L.; Haesler, A.; Haigh, M. D.; Hamilton, P.; Hansen, D.; Hara, T.; Hartz, M.; Hasegawa, T.; Hastings, N. C.; Hayato, Y.; Hearty, C.; Helmer, R. L.; Hierholzer, M.; Hignight, J.; Hillairet, A.; Himmel, A.; Hiraki, T.; Hirota, S.; Holeczek, J.; Horikawa, S.; Huang, K.; Ichikawa, A. K.; Ieki, K.; Ieva, M.; Ikeda, M.; Imber, J.; Insler, J.; Irvine, T. J.; Ishida, T.; Ishii, T.; Ives, S. J.; Iwai, E.; Iwamoto, K.; Iyogi, K.; Izmaylov, A.; Jacob, A.; Jamieson, B.; Johnson, R. A.; Johnson, S.; Jo, J. H.; Jonsson, P.; Jung, C. K.; Kabirnezhad, M.; Kaboth, A. C.; Kajita, T.; Kakuno, H.; Kameda, J.; Kanazawa, Y.; Karlen, D.; Karpikov, I.; Katori, T.; Kearns, E.; Khabibullin, M.; Khotjantsev, A.; Kielczewska, D.; Kikawa, T.; Kilinski, A.; Kim, J.; King, S.; Kisiel, J.; Kitching, P.; Kobayashi, T.; Koch, L.; Kolaceke, A.; Konaka, A.; Kormos, L. L.; Korzenev, A.; Koseki, K.; Koshio, Y.; Kreslo, I.; Kropp, W.; Kubo, H.; Kudenko, Y.; Kumaratunga, S.; Kurjata, R.; Kutter, T.; Lagoda, J.; Laihem, K.; Lamont, I.; Larkin, E.; Laveder, M.; Lawe, M.; Lazos, M.; Lee, K. P.; Licciardi, C.; Lindner, T.; Lister, C.; Litchfield, R. P.; Longhin, A.; Ludovici, L.; Macaire, M.; Magaletti, L.; Mahn, K.; Malek, M.; Manly, S.; Marino, A. D.; Marteau, J.; Martin, J. F.; Martynenko, S.; Maruyama, T.; Marzec, J.; Mathie, E. L.; Matveev, V.; Mavrokoridis, K.; Mazzucato, E.; McCarthy, M.; McCauley, N.; McFarland, K. S.; McGrew, C.; Mefodiev, A.; Metelko, C.; Mezzetto, M.; Mijakowski, P.; Miller, C. A.; Minamino, A.; Mineev, O.; Mine, S.; Missert, A.; Miura, M.; Monfregola, L.; Moriyama, S.; Mueller, Th. A.; Murakami, A.; Murdoch, M.; Murphy, S.; Myslik, J.; Nagasaki, T.; Nakadaira, T.; Nakahata, M.; Nakai, T.; Nakamura, K.; Nakayama, S.; Nakaya, T.; Nakayoshi, K.; Nantais, C.; Naples, D.; Nielsen, C.; Nirkko, M.; Nishikawa, K.; Nishimura, Y.; Nowak, J.; O'Keeffe, H. M.; Ohta, R.; Okumura, K.; Okusawa, T.; Oryszczak, W.; Oser, S. M.; Ovsyannikova, T.; Owen, R. A.; Oyama, Y.; Palladino, V.; Palomino, J. L.; Paolone, V.; Payne, D.; Pearce, G. F.; Perevozchikov, O.; Perkin, J. D.; Petrov, Y.; Pickard, L.; Pinzon Guerra, E. S.; Pistillo, C.; Plonski, P.; Poplawska, E.; Popov, B.; Posiadala-Zezula, M.; Poutissou, J.-M.; Poutissou, R.; Przewlocki, P.; Quilain, B.; Radicioni, E.; Ratoff, P. N.; Ravonel, M.; Rayner, M. A. M.; Redij, A.; Reeves, M.; Reinherz-Aronis, E.; Riccio, C.; Retiere, F.; Robert, A.; Rodrigues, P. A.; Rojas, P.; Rondio, E.; Roth, S.; Rubbia, A.; Ruterbories, D.; Sacco, R.; Sakashita, K.; Sánchez, F.; Sato, F.; Scantamburlo, E.; Scholberg, K.; Schoppmann, S.; Schwehr, J.; Scott, M.; Seiya, Y.; Sekiguchi, T.; Sekiya, H.; Sgalaberna, D.; Shaker, F.; Shiozawa, M.; Short, S.; Shustrov, Y.; Sinclair, P.; Smith, B.; Smith, R. J.; Smy, M.; Sobczyk, J. T.; Sobel, H.; Sorel, M.; Southwell, L.; Stamoulis, P.; Steinmann, J.; Still, B.; Suda, Y.; Suzuki, A.; Suzuki, K.; Suzuki, S. Y.; Suzuki, Y.; Szeglowski, T.; Tacik, R.; Tada, M.; Takahashi, S.; Takeda, A.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tanaka, H. K.; Tanaka, H. A.; Tanaka, M. M.; Taylor, I. J.; Terhorst, D.; Terri, R.; Thompson, L. F.; Thorley, A.; Tobayama, S.; Toki, W.; Tomura, T.; Totsuka, Y.; Touramanis, C.; Tsukamoto, T.; Tzanov, M.; Uchida, Y.; Ueno, K.; Vacheret, A.; Vagins, M.; Vasseur, G.; Wachala, T.; Waldron, A. V.; Walter, C. W.; Wark, D.; Wascko, M. O.; Weber, A.; Wendell, R.; Wilkes, R. J.; Wilking, M. J.; Wilkinson, C.; Williamson, Z.; Wilson, J. R.; Wilson, R. J.; Wongjirad, T.; Yamada, Y.; Yamamoto, K.; Yanagisawa, C.; Yano, T.; Yen, S.; Yershov, N.; Yokoyama, M.; Yuan, T.; Yu, M.; Zalewska, A.; Zalipska, J.; Zambelli, L.; Zaremba, K.; Ziembicki, M.; Zimmerman, E. D.; Zito, M.; Żmuda, J.; T2K Collaboration

    2014-10-01

    We report the first measurement of the neutrino-oxygen neutral-current quasielastic (NCQE) cross section. It is obtained by observing nuclear deexcitation γ rays which follow neutrino-oxygen interactions at the Super-Kamiokande water Cherenkov detector. We use T2K data corresponding to 3.01 ×1 020 protons on target. By selecting only events during the T2K beam window and with well-reconstructed vertices in the fiducial volume, the large background rate from natural radioactivity is dramatically reduced. We observe 43 events in the 4-30 MeV reconstructed energy window, compared with an expectation of 51.0, which includes an estimated 16.2 background events. The background is primarily nonquasielastic neutral-current interactions and has only 1.2 events from natural radioactivity. The flux-averaged NCQE cross section we measure is 1.55 ×1 0-38 cm2 with a 68% confidence interval of (1.22 ,2.20 )×1 0-38 cm2 at a median neutrino energy of 630 MeV, compared with the theoretical prediction of 2.01 ×1 0-38 cm2 .

  3. Lifetime measurements in mass regions A=100 and A=130 as a test for chirality in nuclear systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tonev, D.; Yavahchova, M. S.; de Angelis, G.; Brant, S.; Frauendorf, S.; Petkov, P.; Dewald, A.; Zhong, Q.; Curien, D.; Goutev, N.; Bhowmik, R. K.; Singh, R. P.; Muralithar, S.; Madhavan, N.; Kumar, R.; Raju, M. Kumar; Kaur, J.; Mahanto, G.; Singh, A.; Kaur, N.; Garg, R.; Sukla, A.; Geleva, E.; Marinov, Ts. K.

    2016-01-01

    Two odd-odd nuclei from the A ~ 100 and A ~ 130 regions, namely 102Rh and 134Pr have been studied in search for chiral doublet bands via 94Zr(11B,3n)102Rh and 119Sn(19F,4n)134Pr reactions, respectively. Two nearly degenerate bands built on the πg9/2 ⊗ vh11/2 configuration have been identified in 102Rh and on the πg11/2 ⊗ vh11/2 configuration for 134Pr. Lifetimes of excited nuclear states were measured using Dopplershift attenuation method and recoil distance Doppler-shift method. The deexciting gamma rays were registered by the Indian National Gamma Array for 102Rh and using the EUROBALL IV detector array with an inner Bismuth Germanate (BGO) ball for 134Pr, respectively. Polarization and angular correlation measurements have been performed to establish the spin and parity assignments for these bands. The derived reduced transition probabilities are compared to the predicitons of the two quasiparticles + triaxial rotor and interacting boson fermion-fermion models.

  4. Measurement of leakage neutron spectra from graphite cylinders irradiated with D-T neutrons for validation of evaluated nuclear data.

    PubMed

    Luo, F; Han, R; Chen, Z; Nie, Y; Shi, F; Zhang, S; Lin, W; Ren, P; Tian, G; Sun, Q; Gou, B; Ruan, X; Ren, J; Ye, M

    2016-10-01

    A benchmark experiment for validation of graphite data evaluated from nuclear data libraries was conducted for 14MeV neutrons irradiated on graphite cylinder samples. The experiments were performed using the benchmark experimental facility at the China Institute of Atomic Energy (CIAE). The leakage neutron spectra from the surface of graphite (Φ13cm×20cm) at 60° and 120° and graphite (Φ13cm×2cm) at 60° were measured by the time-of-flight (TOF) method. The obtained results were compared with the measurements made by the Monte Carlo neutron transport code MCNP-4C with the ENDF/B-VII.1, CENDL-3.1 and JENDL-4.0 libraries. The results obtained from a 20cm-thick sample revealed that the calculation results with CENDL-3.1 and JENDL-4.0 libraries showed good agreements with the experiments conducted in the whole energy region. However, a large discrepancy of approximately 40% was observed below the 3MeV energy region with the ENDF/B-VII.1 library. For the 2cm-thick sample, the calculated results obtained from the abovementioned three libraries could not reproduce the experimental data in the energy range of 5-7MeV. The graphite data in CENDL-3.1 were verified for the first time and were proved to be reliable.

  5. Failure of the Woods-Saxon nuclear potential to simultaneously reproduce precise fusion and elastic scattering measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Mukherjee, A.; Hinde, D. J.; Dasgupta, M.; Newton, J. O.; Butt, R. D.; Hagino, K.

    2007-04-15

    A precise fusion excitation function has been measured for the {sup 12}C+{sup 208}Pb reaction at energies around the barrier, allowing the fusion barrier distribution to be extracted. The fusion cross sections at high energies differ significantly from existing fusion data. Coupled reaction channels calculations have been carried out with the code FRESCO. A bare potential previously claimed to uniquely describe a wide range of {sup 12}C+{sup 208}Pb near-barrier reaction channels failed to reproduce the new fusion data. The nuclear potential diffuseness of 0.95 fm which fits the fusion excitation function over a broad energy range fails to reproduce the elastic scattering. A diffuseness of 0.55 fm reproduces the fusion barrier distribution and elastic scattering data, but significantly overpredicts the fusion cross sections at high energies. This may be due to physical processes not included in the calculations. To constrain calculations, it is desirable to have precisely measured fusion cross sections, especially at energies around the barrier.

  6. Nuclear medium cooling scenario in light of new Cas A cooling data and the 2M⊙ pulsar mass measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blaschke, D.; Grigorian, H.; Voskresensky, D. N.

    2013-12-01

    Recently, Elshamounty et al. performed a reanalysis of the surface temperature of the neutron star in the supernova remnant Cassiopeia A on the basis of Chandra data measured during the last decade and added a new data point. We show that all reliably known temperature data of neutron stars including those belonging to Cassiopeia A can be comfortably explained in our "nuclear medium cooling" scenario of neutron stars. The cooling rates account for medium-modified one-pion exchange in dense matter, polarization effects in the pair-breaking-formation processes operating on superfluid neutrons and protons paired in the 1S0 state, and other relevant processes. The emissivity of the pair-breaking-formation process in the 3P2 state is a tiny quantity within our scenario. Crucial for a successful description of the Cassiopeia A cooling proves to be the thermal conductivity from both the electrons and nucleons being reduced by medium effects. Moreover, we exploit an equation of state which stiffens at high densities due to an excluded volume effect and is capable of describing a maximum mass of 2.1M⊙, thus including the recent measurements of PSR J1614-2230 and PSR J0348+0432.

  7. Effect of mica content on pore-size distribution and porosity of sandy sediment using proton nuclear magnetic resonance measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, S.

    2015-12-01

    As a part of a Japanese National hydrate research program (MH21, funded by METI), we performed a study on effect of mica content on pore size distribution and porosity of sandy sediment. This study used proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) to measure the pore-size distribution and porosity of specimen to investigate mica content effect in sandy sediment. A mixture of silica sand No. 7 and mica (mica of 0 wt. %, 5 wt. % and 20 wt. %) was used in this study. The median D50 by laser diffraction method was obtained as 215.7 μm of silica sand No. 7 and 278.9 μm of mica. Pore-size distributions of specimens by the distribution of transverse magnetic relaxation time (T2) measurement by NMR were performed for the water-saturated sample under effective confining pressure of 1.0 MPa. The peaks of pore-size distribution curves decreased and showed finer shifts with increasing of mica content. The porosity of silica sand No. 7 specimen was 46.3%, and that of mica 5% and 20 % were 45.9% and 42.2%m, respectively. A change in pore-size distribution and porosity were observed with an increasing ratio of mica.

  8. Thermal study of a non adiabatic differential calorimeter used for nuclear heating measurements inside an experimental channel of the Jules Horowitz Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynard-Carette, C.; Lyoussi, A.; Brun, J.; Muraglia, M.; Carette, M.; Janulyte, A.; Zerega, Y.; André, J.; Bignan, G.; Chauvin, J.-P.; Fourmentel, D.; Gonnier, C.; Guimbal, P.; Malo, J.-Y.; Villard, J.-F.

    2012-11-01

    New online in-pile measurement methods are crucial during irradiations in Material Testing Reactors (MTR) for a better understanding of accelerated material ageing and nuclear fuel behaviour. In particular, instrumentation for measurements of one relevant parameter: nuclear heat deposition rate, called nuclear heating, has to be improved. The knowledge of this quantity is a great interest for various safety, scientist and end-user requirements (design of specific irradiation devices and associated cooling systems with imposed conditions). This paper focuses on thermal experimental and numerical studies carried out under non irradiation conditions on an in-pile calorimeter dedicated to nuclear heating quantification inside a new experimental device which will be dedicated to the experimental condition mapping (neutron and photon fluxes and nuclear heating) inside the JHR experimental channels. Experimental results concerning the calorimeter response during its electrical calibration (<3W) under laminar forced convection conditions show that its sensitivity does not depend on the cooling flow. Temperature and heat flux density measurements lead to the conclusion of a good directional conductive heat flow design (increased with a higher Reynolds number). A parametric numerical stationary study highlights a sensor sensitivity increasing. At last, the usual calorimeter design is compared to a single calorimeter which gives promising results (miniaturization, higher sensitivity).

  9. Activity measurements of 18F and 90Y with commercial radionuclide calibrators for nuclear medicine in Switzerland.

    PubMed

    Caffari, Yvan; Spring, Philippe; Bailat, Claude; Nedjadi, Youcef; Bochud, François

    2010-01-01

    The activity of radiopharmaceuticals in nuclear medicine is measured before patient injection with radionuclide calibrators. In Switzerland, the general requirements for quality controls are defined in a federal ordinance and a directive of the Federal Office of Metrology (METAS) which require each instrument to be verified. A set of three gamma sources (Co-57, Cs-137 and Co-60) is used to verify the response of radionuclide calibrators in the gamma energy range of their use. A beta source, a mixture of (90)Sr and (90)Y in secular equilibrium, is used as well. Manufacturers are responsible for the calibration factors. The main goal of the study was to monitor the validity of the calibration factors by using two sources: a (90)Sr/(90)Y source and a (18)F source. The three types of commercial radionuclide calibrators tested do not have a calibration factor for the mixture but only for (90)Y. Activity measurements of a (90)Sr/(90)Y source with the (90)Y calibration factor are performed in order to correct for the extra-contribution of (90)Sr. The value of the correction factor was found to be 1.113 whereas Monte Carlo simulations of the radionuclide calibrators estimate the correction factor to be 1.117. Measurements with (18)F sources in a specific geometry are also performed. Since this radionuclide is widely used in Swiss hospitals equipped with PET and PET-CT, the metrology of the (18)F is very important. The (18)F response normalized to the (137)Cs response shows that the difference with a reference value does not exceed 3% for the three types of radionuclide calibrators.

  10. Effective bilayer expansion and erythrocyte shape change induced by monopalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine. Quantitative light microscopy and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy measurements.

    PubMed Central

    Chi, L M; Wu, W G

    1990-01-01

    When human erythrocytes are treated with exogenous monopalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine (MPPC), the normal biconcave disk shape red blood cells (RBC) become spiculate echinocytes. The present study examines the quantitative aspect of the relationship between effective bilayer expansion and erythrocyte shape change by a newly developed method. This method is based on the combination of direct surface area measurement of micropipette and relative bilayer expansion measurement of 13C crosspolarization/magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Assuming that 13C NMR chemical shift of fatty acyl chain can be used as an indicator of lateral packing of membrane bilayers, it is possible for us to estimate the surface area expansion of red cell membrane induced by MPPC from that induced by ethanol. Partitions of lipid molecules into cell membrane were determined by studies of shape change potency as a function of MPPC and red cell concentration. It is found that 8(+/- 0.5) x 10(6) molecules of MPPC per cell will effectively induce stage three echinocytes and yield 3.2(+/- 0.2)% expansion of outer monolayer surface area. Surface area of normal cells determined by direct measurements from fixed geometry of red cells aspirated by micropipette was 118.7 +/- 8.5 microns2. The effective cross-sectional area of MPPC molecules in the cell membrane therefore was determined to be 48(+/- 4) A2, which is in agreement with those determined by x-ray from model membranes and crystals of lysophospholipids. We concluded that surface area expansion of RBC can be explained by a simple consideration of cross-sectional area of added molecules and that erythrocyte shape changes correspond quantitatively to the incorporated lipid molecules. Images FIGURE 3 PMID:2393706

  11. Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance Measurement of the Ferromagnetic Filled-Skutterudite Compound EuRu4Sb12

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koyama, Takehide; Maeda, Yoshitaka; Ueda, Koichi; Mito, Takeshi; Sugawara, Hitoshi

    2015-08-01

    We report the detailed analysis of the 101Ru nuclear quadrupolar resonance spectrum in the ferromagnetically ordered state of EuRu4Sb121 and propose that Eu 4f moments align in the [111] direction. The localized character of Eu 4f electrons is suggested from the temperature dependence of the nuclear spin-lattice relaxation rate.

  12. Changing Facets of Nuclear Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Covello, Aldo

    2008-04-01

    Section I. Exotic nuclear structure. Radioactive beams at TRIUMF / A. C. Shotter. Status of RI-beam factory project at RIKEN / H. Ueno. Population of neutron unbound states via two-proton knockout reactions / N. Frank ... [et al.]. Studies of neutron-rich nuclei using ISOL facilities at CERN and Jyväskylä / J. Äystö. Shell structure evolution far from stability: recent results from GANIL / F. Azaiez. Magnetic moment meaurements: pushing the limits / N. Benczer-Koller. Technique for measuring angular correlations and g-factors of excited states with large multi-detector arrays: an application to neutron rich nuclei produced in spontaneous fission / A. V. Ramayya ... [et al.]. Isospin symmetry and proton decay: identification of the 10+ isomer in [symbol]Ni / C. Fahlander ... [et al.]. Exploring the evolution of the shell structure by means of deep inelastic reactions / G. de Angelis. Studies on the exotic structure of [symbol]Al by measurements of [symbol] and P[symbol] / D. Q. Fang ... [et al.]. Extended cluster model for light and medium nuclei / M. Tomaselli ... [et al.]. Nuclear structure studies on exotic nuclei with radioactive beams - present status and future perspectives at FAIR / P. Egelhof. The SPES direct target project at the Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro / G. Prete ... [et al.] -- Section II. Nuclear structure and nuclear forces. Modern aspects of nuclear structure theory / J. Wambach. Correlations in nuclei: a review / R. Schiavilla. Correlated nucleons in k- and r-space / I. Sick. Roles of all-order core polarizations and Brown-Rho scaling in nucleon effective interactions / T. T. S. Kuo ... [et al.]. Ab initio and ab exitu no core shell model / J. P. Vary ... [et al.]. Ab-initio coupled cluster theory for open quantum systems / G. Hagen ... [et al.]. Symplectic no-core shell model / J. P. Draayer ... [et al.]. Role of deformed symplectic configurations in ab initio no-core shell model results / T. Dytrych ... [et al.]. Nuclear structure

  13. Controlled manipulation of elastomers with radiation: Insights from multiquantum nuclear-magnetic-resonance data and mechanical measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Maiti, A.; Weisgraber, T.; Dinh, L. N.; Gee, R. H.; Wilson, T.; Chinn, S.; Maxwell, R. S.

    2011-03-15

    Filled and cross-linked elastomeric rubbers are versatile network materials with a multitude of applications ranging from artificial organs and biomedical devices to cushions, coatings, adhesives, interconnects, and seismic-isolation, thermal, and electrical barriers. External factors such as mechanical stress, temperature fluctuations, or radiation are known to create chemical changes in such materials that can directly affect the molecular weight distribution (MWD) of the polymer between cross-links and alter the structural and mechanical properties. From a materials science point of view it is highly desirable to understand, affect, and manipulate such property changes in a controlled manner. Unfortunately, that has not yet been possible due to the lack of experimental characterization of such networks under controlled environments. In this work we expose a known rubber material to controlled dosages of {gamma} radiation and utilize a newly developed multiquantum nuclear-magnetic-resonance technique to characterize the MWD as a function of radiation. We show that such data along with mechanical stress-strain measurements are amenable to accurate analysis by simple network models and yield important insights into radiation-induced molecular-level processes.

  14. High homogeneity B(1) 30.2 MHz Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Probe for off-resonance relaxation times measurements.

    PubMed

    Baranowski, M; Woźniak-Braszak, A; Jurga, K

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports on design and construction of a double coil high-homogeneity ensuring Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Probe for off-resonance relaxation time measurements. NMR off-resonance experiments pose unique technical problems. Long irradiation can overheat the sample, dephase the spins because of B(1) field inhomogeneity and degrade the signal received by requiring the receiver bandwidth to be broader than that needed for normal experiment. The probe proposed solves these problems by introducing a separate off-resonance irradiation coil which is larger than the receiver coil and is wound up on the dewar tube that separates it from the receiver coil thus also thermally protects the sample from overheating. Large size of the irradiation coil also improves the field homogeneity because as a ratio of the sample diameter to the magnet (coil) diameter increases, the field inhomogeneity also increases (Blümich et al., 2008) [1]. The small receiver coil offers maximization of the filling factor and a high signal to the noise ratio.

  15. High-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance measurements in inhomogeneous magnetic fields: A fast two-dimensional J-resolved experiment.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yuqing; Lin, Yung-Ya; Cai, Shuhui; Yang, Yu; Sun, Huijun; Lin, Yanqin; Chen, Zhong

    2016-03-14

    High spectral resolution in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is a prerequisite for achieving accurate information relevant to molecular structures and composition assignments. The continuous development of superconducting magnets guarantees strong and homogeneous static magnetic fields for satisfactory spectral resolution. However, there exist circumstances, such as measurements on biological tissues and heterogeneous chemical samples, where the field homogeneity is degraded and spectral line broadening seems inevitable. Here we propose an NMR method, named intermolecular zero-quantum coherence J-resolved spectroscopy (iZQC-JRES), to face the challenge of field inhomogeneity and obtain desired high-resolution two-dimensional J-resolved spectra with fast acquisition. Theoretical analyses for this method are given according to the intermolecular multiple-quantum coherence treatment. Experiments on (a) a simple chemical solution and (b) an aqueous solution of mixed metabolites under externally deshimmed fields, and on (c) a table grape sample with intrinsic field inhomogeneity from magnetic susceptibility variations demonstrate the feasibility and applicability of the iZQC-JRES method. The application of this method to inhomogeneous chemical and biological samples, maybe in vivo samples, appears promising.

  16. High-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance measurements in inhomogeneous magnetic fields: A fast two-dimensional J-resolved experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yuqing; Lin, Yung-Ya; Cai, Shuhui; Yang, Yu; Sun, Huijun; Lin, Yanqin; Chen, Zhong

    2016-03-01

    High spectral resolution in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is a prerequisite for achieving accurate information relevant to molecular structures and composition assignments. The continuous development of superconducting magnets guarantees strong and homogeneous static magnetic fields for satisfactory spectral resolution. However, there exist circumstances, such as measurements on biological tissues and heterogeneous chemical samples, where the field homogeneity is degraded and spectral line broadening seems inevitable. Here we propose an NMR method, named intermolecular zero-quantum coherence J-resolved spectroscopy (iZQC-JRES), to face the challenge of field inhomogeneity and obtain desired high-resolution two-dimensional J-resolved spectra with fast acquisition. Theoretical analyses for this method are given according to the intermolecular multiple-quantum coherence treatment. Experiments on (a) a simple chemical solution and (b) an aqueous solution of mixed metabolites under externally deshimmed fields, and on (c) a table grape sample with intrinsic field inhomogeneity from magnetic susceptibility variations demonstrate the feasibility and applicability of the iZQC-JRES method. The application of this method to inhomogeneous chemical and biological samples, maybe in vivo samples, appears promising.

  17. Calibration of solid state nuclear track detectors at high energy ion beams for cosmic radiation measurements: HAMLET results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szabó, J.; Pálfalvi, J. K.

    2012-12-01

    The MATROSHKA experiments and the related HAMLET project funded by the European Commission aimed to study the dose burden of the crew working on the International Space Station (ISS). During these experiments a human phantom equipped with several thousands of radiation detectors was exposed to cosmic rays inside and outside the ISS. Besides the measurements realized in Earth orbit, the HAMLET project included also a ground-based program of calibration and intercomparison of the different detectors applied by the participating groups using high-energy ion beams. The Space Dosimetry Group of the Centre for Energy Research (formerly Atomic Energy Research Institute) participated in these experiments with passive solid state nuclear track detectors (SSNTDs). The paper presents the results of the calibration experiments performed in the years 2008-2011 at the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator (HIMAC) of the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS), Chiba, Japan. The data obtained serve as update and improvement for the previous calibration curves which are necessary for the evaluation of the SSNTDs exposed in unknown space radiation fields.

  18. Bridging the gap between event-by-event fluctuation measurements and theory predictions in relativistic nuclear collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun-Munzinger, P.; Rustamov, A.; Stachel, J.

    2017-04-01

    We develop methods to deal with non-dynamical contributions to event-by-event fluctuation measurements of net-particle numbers in relativistic nuclear collisions. These contributions arise from impact parameter fluctuations and from the requirement of overall net-baryon number or net-charge conservation and may mask the dynamical fluctuations of interest, such as those due to critical endpoints in the QCD phase diagram. Within a model of independent particle sources we derive formulae for net-particle fluctuations and develop a rigorous approach to take into account contributions from participant fluctuations in realistic experimental environments and at any cumulant order. Interestingly, contributions from participant fluctuations to the second and third cumulants of net-baryon distributions are found to vanish at mid-rapidity for LHC energies while higher cumulants of even order are non-zero even when the net-baryon number at mid-rapidity is zero. At lower beam energies the effect of participant fluctuations increases and induces spurious higher moments. The necessary corrections become large and need to be carefully taken into account before comparison to theory. We also provide a procedure for selecting the optimal phase-space coverage of particles for fluctuation analyses and discuss quantitatively the necessary correction due to global charge conservation.

  19. Measurement of liquid film flow on nuclear rod bundle in micro-scale by using very high speed camera system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pham, Son; Kawara, Zensaku; Yokomine, Takehiko; Kunugi, Tomoaki

    2012-11-01

    Playing important roles in the mass and heat transfer as well as the safety of boiling water reactor, the liquid film flow on nuclear fuel rods has been studied by different measurement techniques such as ultrasonic transmission, conductivity probe, etc. Obtained experimental data of this annular two-phase flow, however, are still not enough to construct the physical model for critical heat flux analysis especially at the micro-scale. Remain problems are mainly caused by complicated geometry of fuel rod bundles, high velocity and very unstable interface behavior of liquid and gas flow. To get over these difficulties, a new approach using a very high speed digital camera system has been introduced in this work. The test section simulating a 3×3 rectangular rod bundle was made of acrylic to allow a full optical observation of the camera. Image data were taken through Cassegrain optical system to maintain the spatiotemporal resolution up to 7 μm and 20 μs. The results included not only the real-time visual information of flow patterns, but also the quantitative data such as liquid film thickness, the droplets' size and speed distributions, and the tilt angle of wavy surfaces. These databases could contribute to the development of a new model for the annular two-phase flow. Partly supported by the Global Center of Excellence (G-COE) program (J-051) of MEXT, Japan.

  20. Nuclear Enterprise Performance Measurement

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-01

    sustainability metrics ( Sikdar , 2009). It is used by the Environmental Protection Agency to help determine which biofuels are most sustainable. The method... Sikdar , 2009). ∏ / / (3) This method is...performance metrics. Aggregation metric D is a method developed to aggregate environmental sustainability metrics ( Sikdar , 2009). It is used by the

  1. Measurement/Evaluation Techniques and Nuclear Data Associated with Fission of 239Pu by Fission Spectrum Neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Baisden, P; Bauge, E; Ferguson, J; Gilliam, D; Granier, T; Jeanloz, R; McMillan, C; Robertson, D; Thompson, P; Verdon, C; Wilkerson, C; Young, P

    2010-03-16

    This Panel was chartered to review and assess new evaluations of work on fission product data, as well as the evaluation process used by the two U.S. nuclear weapons physics laboratories. The work focuses on fission product yields resulting from fission spectrum neutrons incident on plutonium, and includes data from measurements that had not been previously published as well as new or revised fission product cumulative yield data, and related quantities such as Q values and R values. This report documents the Panel's assessment of the work presented by Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). Based on the work presented we have seven key observations: (1) Experiments conducted in the 1970s at LANL, some of which were performed in association with a larger, NIST-led, program, have recently been documented. A preliminary assessment of this work, which will be referred to in this document as ILRR-LANL, shows it to be technically sound. (2) LLNL has done a thorough, unbiased review and evaluation of the available literature and is in the process of incorporating the previously unavailable LANL data into its evaluation of key fission product yields. The results of the LLNL effort, which includes a preliminary evaluation of the ILRR-LANL data, have been documented. (3) LANL has also conducted an evaluation of fission product yields for fission spectrum neutrons on plutonium including a meta-analysis of benchmark data as part of a planned upgrade to the ENDF/B compilation. We found that the approach of using meta-analysis provides valuable additional insight for evaluating the sparse data sets involved in this assessment. (4) Both laboratories have provided convincing evidence for energy dependence in the fission product yield of {sup 147}Nd produced from the bombardment of {sup 239}Pu with fission spectrum neutrons over an incident neutron energy range of 0.2 to 1.9 MeV. (5) Consistent, complete, and explicit treatment of

  2. Use of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance as an Experimental Probe in Multiphase Systems: Determination of the Instrument Weight Function for Measurements of Liquid-Phase Volume Fractions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maneval, J. E.; McCarthy, M. J.; Whitaker, S.

    1990-11-01

    The relativist approach (Baveye and Sposito (1984)) to the interpretation of measurements in multiphase systems was proposed in order to incorporate the details of measurements into theoretical analyses of multiphase transport processes. To help establish the utility of this approach, the weight functions for actual experimental probes must be determined. In this paper we analyze the measurement of liquid-phase porosity in a model system by nuclear magnetic resonance imaging. We show how both nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) physics and experimental technique combine to determine the weight function for the spin-warp spin-echo sequence. The analysis shows clearly what aspects of the weight function are determined by the experimental method and what aspects are determined by the system being studied. The results will help establish the utility of the relativist approach as well as improve understanding NMR measurements in multiphase systems.

  3. Inhibitory effect of hydroxypropyl methylcellulose acetate succinate on drug recrystallization from a supersaturated solution assessed using nuclear magnetic resonance measurements.

    PubMed

    Ueda, Keisuke; Higashi, Kenjirou; Yamamoto, Keiji; Moribe, Kunikazu

    2013-10-07

    We examined the inhibitory effect of hydroxypropyl methylcellulose acetate succinate (HPMC-AS) on drug recrystallization from a supersaturated solution using carbamazepine (CBZ) and phenytoin (PHT) as model drugs. HPMC-AS HF grade (HF) inhibited the recrystallization of CBZ more strongly than that by HPMC-AS LF grade (LF). 1D-1H NMR measurements showed that the molecular mobility of CBZ was clearly suppressed in the HF solution compared to that in the LF solution. Interaction between CBZ and HF in a supersaturated solution was directly detected using nuclear Overhauser effect spectroscopy (NOESY). The cross-peak intensity obtained using NOESY of HF protons with CBZ aromatic protons was greater than that with the amide proton, which indicated that CBZ had hydrophobic interactions with HF in a supersaturated solution. In contrast, no interaction was observed between CBZ and LF in the LF solution. Saturation transfer difference NMR measurement was used to determine the interaction sites between CBZ and HF. Strong interaction with CBZ was observed with the acetyl substituent of HPMC-AS although the interaction with the succinoyl substituent was quite small. The acetyl groups played an important role in the hydrophobic interaction between HF and CBZ. In addition, HF appeared to be more hydrophobic than LF because of the smaller ratio of the succinoyl substituent. This might be responsible for the strong hydrophobic interaction between HF and CBZ. The intermolecular interactions between CBZ and HPMC-AS shown by using NMR spectroscopy clearly explained the strength of inhibition of HPMC-AS on drug recrystallization.

  4. Sorption (Kd) measurements on cinder block and grout in support of dose assessments for Zion Nuclear Station decommissioning

    SciTech Connect

    Milian L.; Sullivan T.

    2014-06-24

    The Zion Nuclear Power Station is being decommissioned. ZionSolutions proposes to leave much of the below grade structures in place and to fill them with a backfill to provide structural support. Backfills under consideration include “clean” concrete demolition debris from the above grade parts of the facility, a flowable grout, cinder block construction debris and sand. A previous study (Yim, 2012) examined the sorption behavior of five nuclides (Fe-55, Co-60, Ni-63, Sr-85, and Cs-137) on concrete and local soils. This study, commissioned by ZionSolutions and conducted by the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) examines the sorption behavior on cinder block and grout materials. Specifically, this study measured the distribution coefficient for four radionuclides of concern using site-groundwater and cinder block from the Zion site and a flowable grout. The distributions coefficient is a measure of the amount of the radionuclide that will remain sorbed to the solid material that is present relative to the amount that will remain in solution. A high distribution coefficient indicates most of the radionuclide will remain on the solid material and will not be available for transport by the groundwater. The radionuclides examined in this set of tests were Co-60, Ni-63, Sr-85, and Cs-137. Tests were performed following ASTM C1733-10, Standard Test Methods for Distribution Coefficients of Inorganic Species by the Batch Method. Sr-85 was used in the testing as an analogue for Sr-90 because it behaves similarly with respect to sorption and has a gamma emission that is easier to detect than the beta emission from Sr-90.

  5. Damage dosimetry and embrittlement monitoring of nuclear pressure vessels in real time by magnetic properties measurement. Technical progress report for year 2, October 1, 1991--September 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Stubbins, J.F.; Ougouag, A.M.; Williams, J.G.

    1992-07-01

    The objective of this project is to develop a technique for real-time monitoring of neutron dose and of the onset and progression of embrittlement in operating nuclear pressure vessels. The technique relies on the measurement of magnetic properties of steel and other magnetic materials which are extremely sensitive to radiation-induced properties changes. The approach being developed here is innovative and unique. It promises to be readily applicable to all existing and planned reactor structures. The significance of this program is that it addresses a major concern in the operation of existing nuclear pressure vessels. The development of microscopic defect clusters during irradiation in the nuclear pressure vessel beltline region leads to an increase in material yield strength and a concomitant decrease in ductility, or ability to absorb energy in fracture (i.e. fracture toughness). This decrease in fracture toughness is alarming since it may impair the ability of the pressure vessel to resist fracture during unusual loading situations.

  6. Calculated g -factors of 5 d double perovskites Ba2NaOsO6 and Ba2YOsO6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Kyo-Hoon; Pajskr, Karel; Lee, Kwan-Woo; Kuneš, Jan

    2017-02-01

    Using Wannier functions to represent the density functional results we calculate the hybridization corrections to the orbital momentum operator in the Os 5 d shell of the Mott insulators Ba2NaOsO6 and Ba2YOsO6 . The g -factors are obtained by evaluating the spin and orbital momentum operators in the atomic ground states of the Os ion. While the hybridization corrections play a minor role in the d3 ion of Ba2YOsO6 with a dominant spin moment, they are instrumental for the observation of the nonzero g -factor of the d1 ions of Ba2NaOsO6 . In addition, we analyze the exchange interactions in Ba2YOsO6 and find them to be consistent with the reported magnetic structure.

  7. Electrostatic Energetics of Bacillus subtilis Ribonuclease P Protein Determined by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance-Based Histidine pKa Measurements.

    PubMed

    Mosley, Pamela L; Daniels, Kyle G; Oas, Terrence G

    2015-09-08

    The pKa values of ionizable groups in proteins report the free energy of site-specific proton binding and provide a direct means of studying pH-dependent stability. We measured histidine pKa values (H3, H22, and H105) in the unfolded (U), intermediate (I), and sulfate-bound folded (F) states of RNase P protein, using an efficient and accurate nuclear magnetic resonance-monitored titration approach that utilizes internal reference compounds and a parametric fitting method. The three histidines in the sulfate-bound folded protein have pKa values depressed by 0.21 ± 0.01, 0.49 ± 0.01, and 1.00 ± 0.01 units, respectively, relative to that of the model compound N-acetyl-l-histidine methylamide. In the unliganded and unfolded protein, the pKa values are depressed relative to that of the model compound by 0.73 ± 0.02, 0.45 ± 0.02, and 0.68 ± 0.02 units, respectively. Above pH 5.5, H22 displays a separate resonance, which we have assigned to I, whose apparent pKa value is depressed by 1.03 ± 0.25 units, which is ∼0.5 units more than in either U or F. The depressed pKa values we observe are consistent with repulsive interactions between protonated histidine side chains and the net positive charge of the protein. However, the pKa differences between F and U are small for all three histidines, and they have little ionic strength dependence in F. Taken together, these observations suggest that unfavorable electrostatics alone do not account for the fact that RNase P protein is intrinsically unfolded in the absence of ligand. Multiple factors encoded in the P protein sequence account for its IUP property, which may play an important role in its function.

  8. Magnetotelluric and Surface Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Measurements of Regional and Local Variability of Deep Saline Permafrost in Adventdalen, Svalbard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bense, V.; Binley, A. M.; Keating, K.; Van Dam, R. L.; Christiansen, H. H.; Cohen, S.; McGuffy, C.

    2014-12-01

    In most Arctic areas the interplay between permafrost and parameters such as climate variability and geological history is not well understood or documented. Nevertheless, knowledge on the thermal state of permafrost, its thickness and ice/water content is crucial for a credible assessment of the impacts of surface warming on a suite of environmental processes such as groundwater flow to riverbeds and the release of methane from areas of degrading permafrost. We carried out geophysical surveys using non-invasive Magnetotelluric (MT) and Surface Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (SNMR) techniques to map permafrost occurrence in Adventdalen, Svalbard, a river valley in a typical coastal Arctic landscape. MT, which is sensitive to changes in the electrical conductivity and can be used to distinguish saline, fresh, and frozen soils, was used to determine the total thickness of permafrost (potentially several 100s of meters). SNMR, which is directly sensitive the volume of liquid water, was used to determine the unfrozen water content and the heterogeneity of permafrost at depths of up to ~100 m. We collected measurements in transects across and along the valley which is filled with Holocene estuarine sediments. MT observations suggest that permafrost thickens substantially to up to several hundreds of meters along the ~12 km long transect from the coastal area inland. The electrical resistivities observed are relatively low (~200-400 Ωm) when compared to permafrost environments in Alpine settings, which is most likely attributed to a high salinity of pore waters in our study area. In the parts of the valley above the marine limit (~70 m above sea-level) SNMR did not detect any unfrozen water content. However, closely spaced SNMR transects across the valley several kilometers from the coast show a substantial signal, potentially due to unfrozen water content in supra-permafrost taliks near the main river channel. This is the first study to illustrate the ability of combining

  9. A method to measure neutron polarization using P-even asymmetry of {gamma}-quantum emission in the neutron-nuclear interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Gledenov, Yu. M.; Nesvizhevsky, V. V.; Sedyshev, P. V.; Shul'gina, E. V.; Vesna, V. A.

    2012-07-15

    A new method to measure polarization of cold/thermal neutrons using P-even asymmetry in nuclear reactions induced by polarized neutrons is proposed. A scheme profiting from a large correlation of the neutron spin and the circular {gamma}-quantum polarization in the reaction (n, {gamma}) of polarized neutrons with nuclei is analyzed. This method could be used, for instance, to measure the neutron-beam polarization in experiments with frequently varying configuration. We show that high accuracy and reliability of measurements could be expected.

  10. Measuring surface-area-to-volume ratios in soft porous materials using laser-polarized xenon interphase exchange nuclear magnetic resonance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, J. P.; Mair, R. W.; Hoffmann, D.; Hrovat, M. I.; Rogers, R. A.; Topulos, G. P.; Walsworth, R. L.; Patz, S.

    2002-01-01

    We demonstrate a minimally invasive nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) technique that enables determination of the surface-area-to-volume ratio (S/V) of soft porous materials from measurements of the diffusive exchange of laser-polarized 129Xe between gas in the pore space and 129Xe dissolved in the solid phase. We apply this NMR technique to porous polymer samples and find approximate agreement with destructive stereological measurements of S/V obtained with optical confocal microscopy. Potential applications of laser-polarized xenon interphase exchange NMR include measurements of in vivo lung function in humans and characterization of gas chromatography columns.

  11. Polyatomic interferences on high precision uranium isotope ratio measurements by MC-ICP-MS: Applications to environmental sampling for nuclear safeguards

    SciTech Connect

    Pollington, Anthony D.; Kinman, William S.; Hanson, Susan K.; Steiner, Robert E.

    2015-09-04

    Modern mass spectrometry and separation techniques have made measurement of major uranium isotope ratios a routine task; however accurate and precise measurement of the minor uranium isotopes remains a challenge as sample size decreases. One particular challenge is the presence of isobaric interferences and their impact on the accuracy of minor isotope 234U and 236U measurements. Furthermore, we present techniques used for routine U isotopic analysis of environmental nuclear safeguards samples and evaluate polyatomic interferences that negatively impact accuracy as well as methods to mitigate their impacts.

  12. Polyatomic interferences on high precision uranium isotope ratio measurements by MC-ICP-MS: Applications to environmental sampling for nuclear safeguards

    DOE PAGES

    Pollington, Anthony D.; Kinman, William S.; Hanson, Susan K.; ...

    2015-09-04

    Modern mass spectrometry and separation techniques have made measurement of major uranium isotope ratios a routine task; however accurate and precise measurement of the minor uranium isotopes remains a challenge as sample size decreases. One particular challenge is the presence of isobaric interferences and their impact on the accuracy of minor isotope 234U and 236U measurements. Furthermore, we present techniques used for routine U isotopic analysis of environmental nuclear safeguards samples and evaluate polyatomic interferences that negatively impact accuracy as well as methods to mitigate their impacts.

  13. Uncertainty evaluation of nuclear reaction model parameters using integral and microscopic measurements. Covariances evaluation with CONRAD code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Saint Jean, C.; Habert, B.; Archier, P.; Noguere, G.; Bernard, D.; Tommasi, J.; Blaise, P.

    2010-10-01

    In the [eV;MeV] energy range, modelling of the neutron induced reactions are based on nuclear reaction models having parameters. Estimation of co-variances on cross sections or on nuclear reaction model parameters is a recurrent puzzle in nuclear data evaluation. Major breakthroughs were asked by nuclear reactor physicists to assess proper uncertainties to be used in applications. In this paper, mathematical methods developped in the CONRAD code[2] will be presented to explain the treatment of all type of uncertainties, including experimental ones (statistical and systematic) and propagate them to nuclear reaction model parameters or cross sections. Marginalization procedure will thus be exposed using analytical or Monte-Carlo solutions. Furthermore, one major drawback found by reactor physicist is the fact that integral or analytical experiments (reactor mock-up or simple integral experiment, e.g. ICSBEP, …) were not taken into account sufficiently soon in the evaluation process to remove discrepancies. In this paper, we will describe a mathematical framework to take into account properly this kind of information.

  14. Measurement of the scintillation time spectra and pulse-shape discrimination of low-energy β and nuclear recoils in liquid argon with DEAP-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amaudruz, P.-A.; Batygov, M.; Beltran, B.; Bonatt, J.; Boudjemline, K.; Boulay, M. G.; Broerman, B.; Bueno, J. F.; Butcher, A.; Cai, B.; Caldwell, T.; Chen, M.; Chouinard, R.; Cleveland, B. T.; Cranshaw, D.; Dering, K.; Duncan, F.; Fatemighomi, N.; Ford, R.; Gagnon, R.; Giampa, P.; Giuliani, F.; Gold, M.; Golovko, V. V.; Gorel, P.; Grace, E.; Graham, K.; Grant, D. R.; Hakobyan, R.; Hallin, A. L.; Hamstra, M.; Harvey, P.; Hearns, C.; Hofgartner, J.; Jillings, C. J.; Kuźniak, M.; Lawson, I.; La Zia, F.; Li, O.; Lidgard, J. J.; Liimatainen, P.; Lippincott, W. H.; Mathew, R.; McDonald, A. B.; McElroy, T.; McFarlane, K.; McKinsey, D. N.; Mehdiyev, R.; Monroe, J.; Muir, A.; Nantais, C.; Nicolics, K.; Nikkel, J.; Noble, A. J.; O'Dwyer, E.; Olsen, K.; Ouellet, C.; Pasuthip, P.; Peeters, S. J. M.; Pollmann, T.; Rau, W.; Retière, F.; Ronquest, M.; Seeburn, N.; Skensved, P.; Smith, B.; Sonley, T.; Tang, J.; Vázquez-Jáuregui, E.; Veloce, L.; Walding, J.; Ward, M.

    2016-12-01

    The DEAP-1 low-background liquid argon detector was used to measure scintillation pulse shapes of electron and nuclear recoil events and to demonstrate the feasibility of pulse-shape discrimination down to an electron-equivalent energy of 20 keVee. In the surface dataset using a triple-coincidence tag we found the fraction of β events that are misidentified as nuclear recoils to be < 1.4 ×10-7 (90% C.L.) for energies between 43-86 keVee and for a nuclear recoil acceptance of at least 90%, with 4% systematic uncertainty on the absolute energy scale. The discrimination measurement on surface was limited by nuclear recoils induced by cosmic-ray generated neutrons. This was improved by moving the detector to the SNOLAB underground laboratory, where the reduced background rate allowed the same measurement to be done with only a double-coincidence tag. The combined data set contains 1.23 × 108 events. One of those, in the underground data set, is in the nuclear-recoil region of interest. Taking into account the expected background of 0.48 events coming from random pileup, the resulting upper limit on the level of electronic recoil contamination is < 2.7 ×10-8 (90% C.L.) between 44-89 keVee and for a nuclear recoil acceptance of at least 90%, with 6% systematic uncertainty on the absolute energy scale. We developed a general mathematical framework to describe pulse-shape-discrimination parameter distributions and used it to build an analytical model of the distributions observed in DEAP-1. Using this model, we project a misidentification fraction of approximately 10-10 for an electron-equivalent energy threshold of 15 keVee for a detector with 8 PE/keVee light yield. This reduction enables a search for spin-independent scattering of WIMPs from 1000 kg of liquid argon with a WIMP-nucleon cross-section sensitivity of 10-46 cm2, assuming negligible contribution from nuclear recoil backgrounds.

  15. The "g" Factor and Cognitive Test Session Behavior: Using a Latent Variable Approach in Examining Measurement Invariance Across Age Groups on the WJ III

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frisby, Craig L.; Wang, Ze

    2016-01-01

    Data from the standardization sample of the Woodcock-Johnson Psychoeducational Battery--Third Edition (WJ III) Cognitive standard battery and Test Session Observation Checklist items were analyzed to understand the relationship between g (general mental ability) and test session behavior (TSB; n = 5,769). Latent variable modeling methods were used…

  16. Chernobyl nuclear reactor accident fallout: Measurement and consequences. (Latest citations from the NTIS Bibliographic database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    1993-09-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the consequences of radioactive fallout from the Chernobyl nuclear reactor accident. Citations discuss radioactive monitoring, health hazards, and radiation dosimetry. Radiation contamination in the air, soil, vegetation, and food is examined. (Contains a minimum of 208 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  17. Chernobyl nuclear reactor accident fallout: Measurement and consequences. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    1995-02-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the consequences of radioactive fallout from the Chernobyl nuclear reactor accident. Citations discuss radioactive monitoring, health hazards, and radiation dosimetry. Radiation contamination in the air, soil, vegetation, and food is examined. (Contains a minimum of 247 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  18. Chernobyl Nuclear Reactor accident fallout: Measurement and consequences. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    1996-11-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the consequences of radioactive fallout from the Chernobyl nuclear reactor accident. Citations discuss radioactive monitoring, health hazards, and radiation dosimetry. Radiation contamination in the air, soil, vegetation, and food is examined. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

  19. Chernobyl nuclear reactor accident fallout: Measurement and consequences. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    1994-01-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the consequences of radioactive fallout from the Chernobyl nuclear reactor accident. Citations discuss radioactive monitoring, health hazards, and radiation dosimetry. Radiation contamination in the air, soil, vegetation, and food is examined. (Contains a minimum of 210 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  20. Chernobyl nuclear reactor accident fallout: Measurement and consequences. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    1996-01-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the consequences of radioactive fallout from the Chernobyl nuclear reactor accident. Citations discuss radioactive monitoring, health hazards, and radiation dosimetry. Radiation contamination in the air, soil, vegetation, and food is examined. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

  1. Effects of sp-d exchange on a bound polaron and the g-factor of the exciton in a GaMnAs quantum dot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lalitha, D.; John Peter, A.; Yoo, Chang Kyoo

    2013-08-01

    Magneto bound polaron in a GaMnAs/Ga0.6Al0.4As quantum dot is investigated with the inclusion of exchange interaction effects due to Mn alloy content and the geometrical confinement. The exciton binding energy and the optical transition energy are computed as functions of dot radius and the magnetic field strength for a fixed Mn alloy content (x = 0.02) in a GaMnAs quantum dot. Numerical calculations are performed using variational method within a single band effective mass approximation. The spin polaronic energy of the heavy hole exciton is studied with the spatial confinement using a mean field theory in the presence of magnetic field strength. The magnetization as a function of dot radius is investigated in a GaMnAs/Ga0.6Al0.4As quantum dot. The magnetic field induced size dependence of g-factor is studied. The effective g-factor of conduction (valence) band electron (hole) is obtained in the GaMnAs quantum dot. The results bring out that (i) the geometrical dependence on sp-d exchange interaction in the GaMnAs/Ga0.6Al0.4As quantum dot has great influence with the magnetic field strength, (ii) the Landé factor is more sensitive if the geometrical confinement effect is included and (iii) the value of g-factor increases when the magnetic field strength is enhanced for all the dot radii. Our results are in good agreement with the other investigators.

  2. Measurements of miniature ionization chamber currents in the JSI TRIGA Mark II reactor demonstrate the importance of the delayed contribution to the photon field in nuclear reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radulović, Vladimir; Fourmentel, Damien; Barbot, Loïc; Villard, Jean-François; Kaiba, Tanja; Gašper, Žerovnik; Snoj, Luka

    2015-12-01

    The characterization of experimental locations of a research nuclear reactor implies the determination of neutron and photon flux levels within, with the best achievable accuracy. In nuclear reactors, photon fluxes are commonly calculated by Monte Carlo simulations but rarely measured on-line. In this context, experiments were conducted with a miniature gas ionization chamber (MIC) based on miniature fission chamber mechanical parts, recently developed by the CEA (French Atomic Energy and Alternative Energies Commission) irradiated in the core of the Jožef Stefan Institute TRIGA Mark II reactor in Ljubljana, Slovenia. The aim of the study was to compare the measured MIC currents with calculated currents based on simulations with the MCNP6 code. A discrepancy of around 50% was observed between the measured and the calculated currents; in the latter taking into consideration only the prompt photon field. Further experimental measurements of MIC currents following reactor SCRAMs (reactor shutdown with rapid insertions of control rods) provide evidence that over 30% of the total measured signal is due to the delayed photon field, originating from fission and activation products, which are untreated in the calculations. In the comparison between the measured and calculated values, these findings imply an overall discrepancy of less than 20% of the total signal which is still unexplained.

  3. Nuclear rights - nuclear wrongs

    SciTech Connect

    Paul, E.F.; Miller, F.D.; Paul, J.; Ahrens, J.

    1986-01-01

    This book contains 11 selections. The titles are: Three Ways to Kill Innocent Bystanders: Some Conundrums Concerning the Morality of War; The International Defense of Liberty; Two Concepts of Deterrence; Nuclear Deterrence and Arms Control; Ethical Issues for the 1980s; The Moral Status of Nuclear Deterrent Threats; Optimal Deterrence; Morality and Paradoxical Deterrence; Immoral Risks: A Deontological Critique of Nuclear Deterrence; No War Without Dictatorship, No Peace Without Democracy: Foreign Policy as Domestic Politics; Marxism-Leninism and its Strategic Implications for the United States; Tocqueveille War.

  4. Measurement of changes in high-energy phosphates in the cardiac cycle by using gated /sup 31/P nuclear magnetic resonance. [Rats

    SciTech Connect

    Fossel, E.T.; Morgan, H.E.; Ingwall, J.S.

    1980-06-01

    Levels of the high-energy phosphate-containing compounds, ATP and creatine phosphate, and of inorganic phosphate (P/sub i/ were measured as a function of position in the cardiac cycle. Measurements were made on isolated, perfused, working rat hearts through the use of gated /sup 31/P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Levels of ATP and creatine phosphate were found to vary during the cardiac cycle and were maximal at minimal aortic pressure and minimal at maximal aortic pressure. P/sub i/ varied inversely with the high-energy phosphates.

  5. LOKET—a gamma-ray spectroscopy system for in-pool measurements of thermal power distribution in irradiated nuclear fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsson, Ingvar; Grapengiesser, Björn; Andersson, Björn

    2006-12-01

    An important issue in the operations of nuclear power plants is the independent validation of core physics codes like e.g. Westinghouse PHOENIX-4/POLCA-7. Such codes are used to predict the thermal power distribution down to single node level in the core. In this paper, a dedicated measurement system (LOKET) is described and experimental results are discussed. The system is based on a submergible housing, containing a high-resolution germanium detector, allowing for measurements in-pool. The system can be transported to virtually any nuclear power plant's fuel storage pool for measurements in-pool during outage. The methodology utilises gamma radiation specific for 140La, whose decay is governed by the parent 140Ba, reflecting a weighted average power distribution, representative for the last weeks of operation of the core. Good agreements between measured power distribution and core physics calculations (Ba distribution) have been obtained during a series of experiments at Leibstadt NPP in Switzerland and Cofrentes NPP in Spain (BWRs) for both fuel assemblies and single fuel rods. The system has proven as a very useful tool for the experimental validation of core calculations also for the most complex fuel designs and challenging core configurations. Experimental errors (on the 1- σ level), has been demonstrated below ±2% on nodal level for assembly measurements.

  6. Studies of the EPR g factor for Ni2+ ion in CsMgX3 (X=Cl, Br, I) crystals.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Wen-Chen; Wu, Xiao-Xuan

    2006-06-01

    The complete high-order perturbation formula of g factor, including not only the widely used crystal-field (CF) mechanism, but also the neglected change-transfer (CT) mechanism in the CF theory, is established for a 3d8 ion in cubic octahedral site. From the formula, the g-shifts Deltag (=g-gs, where gs approximately 2.0023, the value of free electron) of Ni2+ ion in CsMgX3 (X=Cl, Br, I) crystals are calculated. The results suggest that the g-shift DeltagCT due to the CT mechanism and the DeltagCF due to CF mechanism have the same sign and the importance of DeltagCT follows the order: CsMgI3: Ni2+>CsMgBr3: Ni2+>CsMgCl3: Ni2+. So, in the calculations of g or Deltag of 3dn MXm clusters in crystals, the contributions to g factor from both the CT and CF mechanisms should be taken into account in the case of heavy-element ligand ions, such as Br- and I- ions.

  7. Genetics and g-factors.

    SciTech Connect

    Julian, S. R.; Norman , M. R.

    2011-03-01

    Every metal has a Fermi surface, which gives rise to quantum oscillations in a magnetic field. But the nature of the Fermi surface in cuprate superconductors is a profound mystery that scientists are only starting to unravel.

  8. Ferromagnetic critical behavior in U(Co1-xFex)Al (0 ≤x ≤0.02 ) studied by 59Co nuclear quadrupole resonance measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karube, K.; Hattori, T.; Ishida, K.; Kimura, N.

    2015-02-01

    In order to investigate physical properties around a ferromagnetic (FM) quantum transition point and a tricritical point (TCP) in the itinerant-electron metamagnetic compound UCoAl, we have performed the 59Co nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) measurement for the Fe-substituted U(Co1-xFex)Al(x =0 ,0.5 ,1 ,and2 %) in zero external magnetic field. The Fe concentration dependence of 59Co -NQR spectra at low temperatures indicates that the first-order FM transition occurs at least above x =1 % . The magnetic fluctuations along the c axis detected by the nuclear spin-spin relaxation rate 1 /T2 exhibit an anomaly at Tmax˜20 K and enhance with increasing x . These results are in good agreement with theoretical predictions and indicate the presence of prominent critical fluctuations at the TCP in this system.

  9. Source term estimation of radioxenon released from the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear reactors using measured air concentrations and atmospheric transport modeling.

    PubMed

    Eslinger, P W; Biegalski, S R; Bowyer, T W; Cooper, M W; Haas, D A; Hayes, J C; Hoffman, I; Korpach, E; Yi, J; Miley, H S; Rishel, J P; Ungar, K; White, B; Woods, V T

    2014-01-01

    Systems designed to monitor airborne radionuclides released from underground nuclear explosions detected radioactive fallout across the northern hemisphere resulting from the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant accident in March 2011. Sampling data from multiple International Modeling System locations are combined with atmospheric transport modeling to estimate the magnitude and time sequence of releases of (133)Xe. Modeled dilution factors at five different detection locations were combined with 57 atmospheric concentration measurements of (133)Xe taken from March 18 to March 23 to estimate the source term. This analysis suggests that 92% of the 1.24 × 10(19) Bq of (133)Xe present in the three operating reactors at the time of the earthquake was released to the atmosphere over a 3 d period. An uncertainty analysis bounds the release estimates to 54-129% of available (133)Xe inventory.

  10. Optical Pumping and Laser Induced Nuclear Orientation of a Microsecond Isomeric Level in BARIUM-134

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Curtis John

    Using optical pumping techniques, on and off-line experiments were performed on a microsecond nuclear isomer (('134m)Ba 10('+) ). Shifts in atomic resonances detected by changes in the angular distribution of characteristic nuclear radiations (expressed as changes in shape and size) yield information on changes in nuclear structure. The 10('+) isomeric state was produced using a 49 MeV pulsed beam of ('13)C on an isotopically enriched ('124)Sn target. The reaction products recoil out of the target and are slowed to thermal velocities in 10 torr of xenon in a region illuminated with circularly polarized light (553.5 nm) from a Coherent 699-21 dye laser. Nuclear parameters measured were the lifetime (3.8(2)(mu)s) and g-factor (g = -.20(1)) of the 10('+) state. Atomic parameters measured for barium were the depolarization cross sections of the ('1)P(,1) atomic level (6.0(6) nm('2)) in xenon, the quenching cross section for hydrogen (0.042(4) nm('2)), and the branching ratio of the metastable (('1,3)D(,1,2,3)) atomic states (0.011(1)). A possible anisotropy signal and the cumulative results (no measurable anisotropy) are presented. Difficulties encountered were insufficient neutralization, and unexpectedly large spatial distribution, and 'trapping' in metastable atomic states.

  11. Analyzing Nuclear Fuel Cycles from Isotopic Ratios of Waste Products Applicable to Measurement by Accelerator Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Biegalski, S R; Whitney, S M; Buchholz, B

    2005-08-24

    An extensive study was conducted to determine isotopic ratios of nuclides in spent fuel that may be utilized to reveal historical characteristics of a nuclear reactor cycle. This forensic information is important to determine the origin of unknown nuclear waste. The distribution of isotopes in waste products provides information about a nuclear fuel cycle, even when the isotopes of uranium and plutonium are removed through chemical processing. Several different reactor cycles of the PWR, BWR, CANDU, and LMFBR were simulated for this work with the ORIGEN-ARP and ORIGEN 2.2 codes. The spent fuel nuclide concentrations of these reactors were analyzed to find the most informative isotopic ratios indicative of irradiation cycle length and reactor design. Special focus was given to long-lived and stable fission products that would be present many years after their creation. For such nuclides, mass spectrometry analysis methods often have better detection limits than classic gamma-ray spectroscopy. The isotopic ratios {sup 151}Sm/{sup 146}Sm, {sup 149}Sm/{sup 146}Sm, and {sup 244}Cm/{sup 246}Cm were found to be good indicators of fuel cycle length and are well suited for analysis by accelerator mass spectroscopy.

  12. A G/NARRLI Effort. Measuring the Ionization Yield of Low-Energy Nuclear Recoils in Liquid Argon

    SciTech Connect

    Joshi, Tenzing Henry Yatish

    2014-01-01

    Liquid argon has long been used for particle detection due to its attractive drift properties, ample abundance, and reasonable density. The response of liquid argon to lowenergy O(102 -1044 eV) interactions is, however, largely unexplored. Weakly interacting massive particles such as neutrinos and hypothetical dark-matter particles (WIMPs) are predicted to coherently scatter on atomic nuclei, leaving only an isolated low-energy nuclear recoil as evidence. The response of liquid argon to low-energy nuclear recoils must be studied to determine the sensitivity of liquid argon based detectors to these unobserved interactions. Detectors sensitive to coherent neutrino-nucleus scattering may be used to monitor nuclear reactors from a distance, to detect neutrinos from supernova, and to test the predicted behavior of neutrinos. Additionally, direct detection of hypothetical weakly interacting dark matter would be a large step toward understanding the substance that accounts for nearly 27% of the universe. In this dissertation I discuss a small dual-phase (liquid-gas) argon proportional scintillation counter built to study the low-energy regime and several novel calibration and characterization techniques developed to study the response of liquid argon to low-energy O(102 -104 eV) interactions.

  13. Apparatus development for measurement of (134)Cs and (137)Cs radioactivity of soil contaminated by the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident.

    PubMed

    Kajimoto, Tsuyoshi; Endo, Satoru; Tanaka, Kenichi; Okashiro, Yasuharu; Kai, Hiroaki; Fujii, Syuuji; Mishima, Atsushi; Matsubara, Takahide; Yoshida, Shinji

    2016-09-01

    We developed an apparatus containing a NaI(Tl) scintillator to measure the (134)Cs and (137)Cs radioactivity of soil contaminated by the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident. The unfolding method with the least-squares technique was used to determine the radioactivity. Detector responses for each radionuclide in soil were calculated with EGS5 code for the unfolding method. The radionuclides that were measured were (40)K, (134)Cs, (137)Cs, (208)Tl, (214)Bi, and (228)Ac. The measured spectrum agreed well with the spectrum calculated from the response matrix and measured radioactivities. The unfolding method allows us to use the NaI(Tl) scintillator despite the overlap of peaks.

  14. Direct measurement of the hole-nuclear spin interaction in single InP/GaInP quantum dots using photoluminescence spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Chekhovich, E A; Krysa, A B; Skolnick, M S; Tartakovskii, A I

    2011-01-14

    We measure the hyperfine interaction of the valence band hole with nuclear spins in single InP/GaInP semiconductor quantum dots. Detection of photoluminescence (PL) of both "bright" and "dark" excitons enables direct measurement of the Overhauser shift of states with the same electron but opposite hole spin projections. We find that the hole hyperfine constant is ≈11% of that of the electron and has the opposite sign. By measuring the degree of circular polarization of the PL, an upper limit to the contribution of the heavy-light hole mixing to the measured value of the hole hyperfine constant is deduced. Our results imply that environment-independent hole spins are not realizable in III-V semiconductor, a result important for solid-state quantum information processing using hole spin qubits.

  15. Nuclear magnetic moments and related sum rules

    SciTech Connect

    Bentz, Wolfgang; Arima, Akito

    2011-05-06

    We first review the history and our present understanding of nuclear magnetic moments and Gamow-Teller transitions, with emphasis on the roles of configuration mixing and meson exchange currents. Then we discuss the renormalization of the orbital g-factor in nuclei, and its relation to the E1 sum rule for photoabsorption and the M1 sum rule for the scissors mode of deformed nuclei.

  16. Nuclear Medicine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Badawi, Ramsey D.

    2001-01-01

    Describes the use of nuclear medicine techniques in diagnosis and therapy. Describes instrumentation in diagnostic nuclear medicine and predicts future trends in nuclear medicine imaging technology. (Author/MM)

  17. Advanced instrumentation and analysis methods for in-pile thermal and nuclear measurements: from out-of-pile studies to irradiation campaigns

    SciTech Connect

    Reynard-Carette, C.; Lyoussi, A.

    2015-07-01

    Research and development on nuclear fuel behavior under irradiations and accelerated ageing of structure materials is a key issue for sustainable nuclear energy in order to meet specific needs by keeping the best level of safety. A new Material Testing Reactor (MTR), the Jules Horowitz Reactor (JHR) currently under construction in the South of France in the CEA Cadarache research centre will offer a real opportunity to perform R and D programs and hence will crucially contribute to the selection, optimization and qualification of innovative materials and fuels. To perform such programs advanced accurate and innovative experiments, irradiation devices that contain material and fuel samples are required to be set up inside or beside the reactor core. These experiments needs beforehand in situ and on line sophisticated measurements to accurately reach specific and determining parameters such as thermal and fast neutron fluxes, nuclear heating and temperature conditions to precisely monitor and control the conducted assays. Consequently, since 2009 CEA and Aix-Marseille University collaborate in order to design and develop a new multi-sensor device which will be dedicated to measuring profiles of such conditions inside the experimental channels of the JHR. These works are performed in the framework of two complementary joint research programs called MAHRI-BETHY and INCORE. These programs couple experimental studies carried out both out-of nuclear fluxes (in laboratory) and under irradiation conditions (in OSIRIS MTR reactor in France and MARIA MTR reactor in Poland) with numerical works realized by thermal simulations (CAST3M code) and Monte Carlo simulations (MCNP code). These programs deal with three main aims. The first one corresponds to the design and/or the test of new in-pile instrumentation. The second one concerns the development of advanced calibration procedures in particular in the case of one specific sensor: a differential calorimeter used to quantify

  18. Chernobyl nuclear reactor accident fallout: measurement and consequences. (Latest citations from the NTIS data base). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-04-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the consequences of radioactive fallout from the Chernobyl nuclear reactor accident. Coverage includes transfrontier radioactive contamination, deposition of radioactive pollutants from the atmosphere, and radionuclide concentrations in ground-level air and soil contamination, and in vegetation and food. Monthly radioactive monitoring in different countries, possible health hazards caused by the radiation, and estimates of radiation doses to the population from the fallout are also discussed. (Contains a minimum of 209 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  19. Thermodynamics of nuclear transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ching-Hao; Mehta, Pankaj; Elbaum, Michael

    Molecular transport across the nuclear envelope is important for eukaryotes for gene expression and signaling. Experimental studies have revealed that nuclear transport is inherently a nonequilibrium process and actively consumes energy. In this work we present a thermodynamics theory of nuclear transport for a major class of nuclear transporters that are mediated by the small GTPase Ran. We identify the molecular elements responsible for powering nuclear transport, which we term the ``Ran battery'' and find that the efficiency of transport, measured by the cargo nuclear localization ratio, is limited by competition between cargo molecules and RanGTP to bind transport receptors, as well as the amount of NTF2 (i.e. RanGDP carrier) available to circulate the energy flow. This picture complements our current understanding of nuclear transport by providing a comprehensive thermodynamics framework to decipher the underlying biochemical machinery. Pm and CHW were supported by a Simons Investigator in the Mathematical Modeling in Living Systems grant (to PM).

  20. Education and training in the field of nuclear instrumentation and measurement: CEA/INSTN (National Institute for Nuclear Sciences and Technologies) strategy to improve and develop new pedagogical tools and methods

    SciTech Connect

    Vitart, Xavier; Foulon, Francois; Bodineau, Jean Christophe; Lescop, Bernard; Massiot, Philippe

    2015-07-01

    Part of the French Alternative Energies and Atomic Energy Commission (CEA), the National Institute for Nuclear Science and Technology (INSTN) is a higher education institution whose mission is to provide students and professionals a high level of scientific and technological qualification in all disciplines related to nuclear energy applications. In this frame, INSTN carries out education and training (E and T) programs in nuclear instrumentation and radioprotection. Its strategy has always been to complete theoretical courses by training courses and laboratory works carried out on an extensive range of training tools that includes a large panel of nuclear instrumentation as well as software applications. Since its creation in 1956, the INSTN has conducted both education and vocational programs on ionizing radiation detection. An extensive range of techniques have commonly been used during practical works with students and employees of companies who need to get the knowledge and specialization in this field. Today, the INSTN is mainly equipped with usual detectors and electronics in large numbers in order to be able to accommodate up to 48 trainees at the same time in two classrooms, with only two trainees for one workstation in order to optimize their learning. In the field of the neutron detection systems, the INSTN has strongly developed its offer taking advantage of the use of research reactors, such as ISIS reactor (700 kW) at Saclay. The implementation of neutron detection systems specific to the courses offers a unique way of observing and analysing the signal coming from neutron detectors, as well as learning how to set the parameters of the detection system in real conditions. Providing the trainees with an extensive overview of each part of the neutron monitoring instrumentation apply to a nuclear reactor, hands-on measurements on the ISIS reactor play a major role in ensuring a practical and comprehensive understanding of the neutron detection system and