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Sample records for nuclear jungle compartmentalization

  1. Compartmental analysis of dynamic nuclear medicine data: models and identifiability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delbary, Fabrice; Garbarino, Sara; Vivaldi, Valentina

    2016-12-01

    Compartmental models based on tracer mass balance are extensively used in clinical and pre-clinical nuclear medicine in order to obtain quantitative information on tracer metabolism in the biological tissue. This paper is the first of a series of two that deal with the problem of tracer coefficient estimation via compartmental modelling in an inverse problem framework. Specifically, here we discuss the identifiability problem for a general n-dimension compartmental system and provide uniqueness results in the case of two-compartment and three-compartment compartmental models. The second paper will utilize this framework in order to show how nonlinear regularization schemes can be applied to obtain numerical estimates of the tracer coefficients in the case of nuclear medicine data corresponding to brain, liver and kidney physiology.

  2. Phase separation as a possible means of nuclear compartmentalization.

    PubMed

    Aumiller, William M; Davis, Bradley W; Keating, Christine D

    2014-01-01

    The nucleus is perhaps the most familiar organelle within eukaryotic cells, serving as a compartment to house the genetic material. The nuclear volume is subdivided into a variety of functional and dynamic nuclear bodies not separated from the nucleoplasm by membranes. It has been hypothesized that aqueous phase separation brought about by macromolecular crowding may be in part responsible for these intranuclear compartments. This chapter discusses macromolecular solution chemistry with regard to several common types of phase separation in polymer solutions as well as to recent evidence that suggests that cytoplasmic and nuclear bodies may exist as liquid phases. We then examine the functional significance of phase separation and how it may serve as a means of compartmentalizing various nuclear activities, and describe recent studies that have used simple model systems to generate coexisting aqueous phase compartments, concentrate molecules within them, and perform localized biochemical reactions. © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Demonstration of nuclear compartmentalization of glutathione in hepatocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Bellomo, G; Vairetti, M; Stivala, L; Mirabelli, F; Richelmi, P; Orrenius, S

    1992-01-01

    The intracellular distribution of glutathione (GSH) in cultured hepatocytes has been investigated by using the compound monochlorobimane (BmCl), which interacts specifically with GSH to form a highly fluorescent adduct. Image analysis of BmCl-labeled hepatocytes predominantly localized the fluorescence in the nucleus; the nuclear/cytoplasmic concentration gradient was approximately three. This concentration gradient was collapsed by treatment of the cells with ATP-depleting agents. The uneven distribution of BmCl fluorescence was not attributable to (i) nonspecific interaction of BmCl with protein sulfhydryl groups, (ii) any selective nuclear localization of the GSH transferase(s) catalyzing formation of the GSH-BmCl conjugate, or (iii) any apparent alterations in cell morphology from culture conditions, suggesting that this distribution did, indeed, reflect a nuclear compartmentalization of GSH. That the nuclear pool of GSH was found more resistant to depletion by several agents than the cytoplasmic pool supports the assumption that GSH is essential in protecting DNA and other nuclear structures from chemical injury. Images PMID:1584774

  4. Nuclear Pore-Like Structures in a Compartmentalized Bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Sagulenko, Evgeny; Green, Kathryn; Yee, Benjamin; Morgan, Garry; Leis, Andrew; Lee, Kuo-Chang; Butler, Margaret K.; Chia, Nicholas; Pham, Uyen Thi Phuong; Lindgreen, Stinus; Catchpole, Ryan; Poole, Anthony M.; Fuerst, John A.

    2017-01-01

    Planctomycetes are distinguished from other Bacteria by compartmentalization of cells via internal membranes, interpretation of which has been subject to recent debate regarding potential relations to Gram-negative cell structure. In our interpretation of the available data, the planctomycete Gemmata obscuriglobus contains a nuclear body compartment, and thus possesses a type of cell organization with parallels to the eukaryote nucleus. Here we show that pore-like structures occur in internal membranes of G.obscuriglobus and that they have elements structurally similar to eukaryote nuclear pores, including a basket, ring-spoke structure, and eight-fold rotational symmetry. Bioinformatic analysis of proteomic data reveals that some of the G. obscuriglobus proteins associated with pore-containing membranes possess structural domains found in eukaryote nuclear pore complexes. Moreover, immunogold labelling demonstrates localization of one such protein, containing a β-propeller domain, specifically to the G. obscuriglobus pore-like structures. Finding bacterial pores within internal cell membranes and with structural similarities to eukaryote nuclear pore complexes raises the dual possibilities of either hitherto undetected homology or stunning evolutionary convergence. PMID:28146565

  5. Nuclear matrix and structural and functional compartmentalization of the eucaryotic cell nucleus.

    PubMed

    Razin, S V; Borunova, V V; Iarovaia, O V; Vassetzky, Y S

    2014-07-01

    Becoming popular at the end of the 20th century, the concept of the nuclear matrix implies the existence of a nuclear skeleton that organizes functional elements in the cell nucleus. This review presents a critical analysis of the results obtained in the study of nuclear matrix in the light of current views on the organization of the cell nucleus. Numerous studies of nuclear matrix have failed to provide evidence of the existence of such a structure. Moreover, the existence of a filamentous structure that supports the nuclear compartmentalization appears to be unnecessary, since this function is performed by the folded genome itself.

  6. Nuclear compartmentalization is abolished during fission yeast meiosis.

    PubMed

    Arai, Kunio; Sato, Masamitsu; Tanaka, Kayoko; Yamamoto, Masayuki

    2010-11-09

    In eukaryotic cells, the nuclear envelope partitions the nucleus from the cytoplasm. The fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe undergoes closed mitosis in which the nuclear envelope persists rather than being broken down, as in higher eukaryotic cells. It is therefore assumed that nucleocytoplasmic transport continues during the cell cycle. Here we show that nuclear transport is, in fact, abolished specifically during anaphase of the second meiotic nuclear division. During that time, both nucleoplasmic and cytoplasmic proteins disperse throughout the cell, reminiscent of the open mitosis of higher eukaryotes, but the architecture of the S. pombe nuclear envelope itself persists. This functional alteration of the nucleocytoplasmic barrier is likely induced by spore wall formation, because ectopic induction of sporulation signaling leads to premature dispersion of nucleoplasmic proteins. A photobleaching assay demonstrated that nuclear envelope permeability increases abruptly at the onset of anaphase of the second meiotic division. The permeability was not altered when sporulation was inhibited by blocking the trafficking of forespore-membrane vesicles from the endoplasmic reticulum to the Golgi. The evidence indicates that yeast gametogenesis produces vesicle transport-mediated forespore membranes by inducing nuclear envelope permeabilization.

  7. Nuclear Compartmentalization Contributes to Stage-Specific Gene Expression Control in Trypanosoma cruzi

    PubMed Central

    Pastro, Lucía; Smircich, Pablo; Di Paolo, Andrés; Becco, Lorena; Duhagon, María A.; Sotelo-Silveira, José; Garat, Beatriz

    2017-01-01

    In the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, as in other trypanosomatids, transcription of protein coding genes occurs in a constitutive fashion, producing large polycistronic transcription units. These units are composed of non-functionally related genes which are pervasively processed to yield each mRNA. Therefore, post-transcriptional processes are crucial to regulate gene expression. Considering that nuclear compartmentalization could contribute to gene expression regulation, we comparatively studied the nuclear, cytoplasmic and whole cell transcriptomes of the non-infective epimastigote stage of T. cruzi, using RNA-Seq. We found that the cytoplasmic transcriptome tightly correlates with the whole cell transcriptome and both equally correlate with the proteome. Nonetheless, 1,200 transcripts showed differential abundance between the nuclear and cytoplasmic fractions. For the genes with transcript content augmented in the nucleus, significant structural and compositional differences were found. The analysis of the reported epimastigote translatome and proteome, revealed scarce ribosome footprints and encoded proteins for them. Ontology analyses unveiled that many of these genes are distinctive of other parasite life-cycle stages. Finally, the relocalization of transcript abundance in the metacyclic trypomastigote infective stage was confirmed for specific genes. While gene expression is strongly dependent on transcript steady-state level, we here highlight the importance of the distribution of transcripts abundance between compartments in T. cruzi. Particularly, we show that nuclear compartmentation is playing an active role in the developmental stage determination preventing off-stage expression. PMID:28243589

  8. Nuclear Compartmentalization Contributes to Stage-Specific Gene Expression Control in Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Pastro, Lucía; Smircich, Pablo; Di Paolo, Andrés; Becco, Lorena; Duhagon, María A; Sotelo-Silveira, José; Garat, Beatriz

    2017-01-01

    In the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, as in other trypanosomatids, transcription of protein coding genes occurs in a constitutive fashion, producing large polycistronic transcription units. These units are composed of non-functionally related genes which are pervasively processed to yield each mRNA. Therefore, post-transcriptional processes are crucial to regulate gene expression. Considering that nuclear compartmentalization could contribute to gene expression regulation, we comparatively studied the nuclear, cytoplasmic and whole cell transcriptomes of the non-infective epimastigote stage of T. cruzi, using RNA-Seq. We found that the cytoplasmic transcriptome tightly correlates with the whole cell transcriptome and both equally correlate with the proteome. Nonetheless, 1,200 transcripts showed differential abundance between the nuclear and cytoplasmic fractions. For the genes with transcript content augmented in the nucleus, significant structural and compositional differences were found. The analysis of the reported epimastigote translatome and proteome, revealed scarce ribosome footprints and encoded proteins for them. Ontology analyses unveiled that many of these genes are distinctive of other parasite life-cycle stages. Finally, the relocalization of transcript abundance in the metacyclic trypomastigote infective stage was confirmed for specific genes. While gene expression is strongly dependent on transcript steady-state level, we here highlight the importance of the distribution of transcripts abundance between compartments in T. cruzi. Particularly, we show that nuclear compartmentation is playing an active role in the developmental stage determination preventing off-stage expression.

  9. Kinetics and intracellular compartmentalization of HTLV-1 gene expression: nuclear retention of HBZ mRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Rende, Francesca; Cavallari, Ilaria; Corradin, Alberto; Silic-Benussi, Micol; Toulza, Frederic; Toffolo, Gianna M.; Tanaka, Yuetsu; Jacobson, Steven; Taylor, Graham P.; D'Agostino, Donna M.; Bangham, Charles R. M.

    2011-01-01

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) codes for 9 alternatively spliced transcripts and 2 major regulatory proteins named Tax and Rex that function at the transcriptional and posttranscriptional levels, respectively. We investigated the temporal sequence of HTLV-1 gene expression in primary cells from infected patients using splice site-specific quantitative RT-PCR. The results indicated a two-phase kinetics with the tax/rex mRNA preceding expression of other viral transcripts. Analysis of mRNA compartmentalization in cells transfected with HTLV-1 molecular clones demonstrated the strict Rex-dependency of the two-phase kinetics and revealed strong nuclear retention of HBZ mRNAs, supporting their function as noncoding transcripts. Mathematical modeling underscored the importance of a delay between the functions of Tax and Rex, which was supported by experimental evidence of the longer half-life of Rex. These data provide evidence for a temporal pattern of HTLV-1 expression and reveal major differences in the intracellular compartmentalization of HTLV-1 transcripts. PMID:21398577

  10. Nuclear Compartmentalization of α1-Adrenergic Receptor Signaling in Adult Cardiac Myocytes

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Steven C.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract: Although convention dictates that G protein-coupled receptors localize to and signal at the plasma membrane, accumulating evidence suggests that G protein-coupled receptors localize to and signal at intracellular membranes, most notably the nucleus. In fact, there is now significant evidence indicating that endogenous alpha-1 adrenergic receptors (α1-ARs) localize to and signal at the nuclei in adult cardiac myocytes. Cumulatively, the data suggest that α1-ARs localize to the inner nuclear membrane, activate intranuclear signaling, and regulate physiologic function in adult cardiac myocytes. Although α1-ARs signal through Gαq, unlike other Gq-coupled receptors, α1-ARs mediate important cardioprotective functions including adaptive/physiologic hypertrophy, protection from cell death (survival signaling), positive inotropy, and preconditioning. Also unlike other Gq-coupled receptors, most, if not all, functional α1-ARs localize to the nuclei in adult cardiac myocytes, as opposed to the sarcolemma. Together, α1-AR nuclear localization and cardioprotection might suggest a novel model for compartmentalization of Gq-coupled receptor signaling in which nuclear Gq-coupled receptor signaling is cardioprotective. PMID:25264754

  11. Generation of compartmentalized pressure by a nuclear piston governs cell motility in a 3D matrix.

    PubMed

    Petrie, Ryan J; Koo, Hyun; Yamada, Kenneth M

    2014-08-29

    Cells use actomyosin contractility to move through three-dimensional (3D) extracellular matrices. Contractility affects the type of protrusions cells use to migrate in 3D, but the mechanisms are unclear. In this work, we found that contractility generated high-pressure lobopodial protrusions in human cells migrating in a 3D matrix. In these cells, the nucleus physically divided the cytoplasm into forward and rear compartments. Actomyosin contractility with the nucleoskeleton-intermediate filament linker protein nesprin-3 pulled the nucleus forward and pressurized the front of the cell. Reducing expression of nesprin-3 decreased and equalized the intracellular pressure. Thus, the nucleus can act as a piston that physically compartmentalizes the cytoplasm and increases the hydrostatic pressure between the nucleus and the leading edge of the cell to drive lamellipodia-independent 3D cell migration. Copyright © 2014, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  12. Compartmentalization and Functionality of Nuclear Disorder: Intrinsic Disorder and Protein-Protein Interactions in Intra-Nuclear Compartments.

    PubMed

    Meng, Fanchi; Na, Insung; Kurgan, Lukasz; Uversky, Vladimir N

    2015-12-25

    The cell nucleus contains a number of membrane-less organelles or intra-nuclear compartments. These compartments are dynamic structures representing liquid-droplet phases which are only slightly denser than the bulk intra-nuclear fluid. They possess different functions, have diverse morphologies, and are typically composed of RNA (or, in some cases, DNA) and proteins. We analyzed 3005 mouse proteins localized in specific intra-nuclear organelles, such as nucleolus, chromatin, Cajal bodies, nuclear speckles, promyelocytic leukemia (PML) nuclear bodies, nuclear lamina, nuclear pores, and perinuclear compartment and compared them with ~29,863 non-nuclear proteins from mouse proteome. Our analysis revealed that intrinsic disorder is enriched in the majority of intra-nuclear compartments, except for the nuclear pore and lamina. These compartments are depleted in proteins that lack disordered domains and enriched in proteins that have multiple disordered domains. Moonlighting proteins found in multiple intra-nuclear compartments are more likely to have multiple disordered domains. Protein-protein interaction networks in the intra-nuclear compartments are denser and include more hubs compared to the non-nuclear proteins. Hubs in the intra-nuclear compartments (except for the nuclear pore) are enriched in disorder compared with non-nuclear hubs and non-nuclear proteins. Therefore, our work provides support to the idea of the functional importance of intrinsic disorder in the cell nucleus and shows that many proteins associated with sub-nuclear organelles in nuclei of mouse cells are enriched in disorder. This high level of disorder in the mouse nuclear proteins defines their ability to serve as very promiscuous binders, possessing both large quantities of potential disorder-based interaction sites and the ability of a single such site to be involved in a large number of interactions.

  13. Compartmentalization and Functionality of Nuclear Disorder: Intrinsic Disorder and Protein-Protein Interactions in Intra-Nuclear Compartments

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Fanchi; Na, Insung; Kurgan, Lukasz; Uversky, Vladimir N.

    2015-01-01

    The cell nucleus contains a number of membrane-less organelles or intra-nuclear compartments. These compartments are dynamic structures representing liquid-droplet phases which are only slightly denser than the bulk intra-nuclear fluid. They possess different functions, have diverse morphologies, and are typically composed of RNA (or, in some cases, DNA) and proteins. We analyzed 3005 mouse proteins localized in specific intra-nuclear organelles, such as nucleolus, chromatin, Cajal bodies, nuclear speckles, promyelocytic leukemia (PML) nuclear bodies, nuclear lamina, nuclear pores, and perinuclear compartment and compared them with ~29,863 non-nuclear proteins from mouse proteome. Our analysis revealed that intrinsic disorder is enriched in the majority of intra-nuclear compartments, except for the nuclear pore and lamina. These compartments are depleted in proteins that lack disordered domains and enriched in proteins that have multiple disordered domains. Moonlighting proteins found in multiple intra-nuclear compartments are more likely to have multiple disordered domains. Protein-protein interaction networks in the intra-nuclear compartments are denser and include more hubs compared to the non-nuclear proteins. Hubs in the intra-nuclear compartments (except for the nuclear pore) are enriched in disorder compared with non-nuclear hubs and non-nuclear proteins. Therefore, our work provides support to the idea of the functional importance of intrinsic disorder in the cell nucleus and shows that many proteins associated with sub-nuclear organelles in nuclei of mouse cells are enriched in disorder. This high level of disorder in the mouse nuclear proteins defines their ability to serve as very promiscuous binders, possessing both large quantities of potential disorder-based interaction sites and the ability of a single such site to be involved in a large number of interactions. PMID:26712748

  14. Compartmentalization today

    Treesearch

    Kevin T. Smith

    2006-01-01

    For more than 30 years, the compartmentdization concept has helped tree care practitioners and land managers interpret patterns of decay in living trees. Understanding these patterns can help guide the selection of treatments that meet the needs of people and communities while respecting the underlying tree biology. At its simplest, compartmentalization resists the...

  15. This Artroom Is a Jungle!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porter, Karen A.

    1984-01-01

    Turning the art room into a tropical paradise engaged students from February to May. Rather than limit themselves to traditional art activities, students studying Gauguin created a total environment, including a creature hall of fame, a rain forest, a village market place, an island paradise, and a jungle village. (IS)

  16. Nuclear Compartmentalization of Serine Racemase Regulates D-Serine Production: IMPLICATIONS FOR N-METHYL-D-ASPARTATE (NMDA) RECEPTOR ACTIVATION.

    PubMed

    Kolodney, Goren; Dumin, Elena; Safory, Hazem; Rosenberg, Dina; Mori, Hisashi; Radzishevsky, Inna; Radzishevisky, Inna; Wolosker, Herman

    2015-12-25

    D-Serine is a physiological co-agonist that activates N-methyl D-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) and is essential for neurotransmission, synaptic plasticity, and behavior. D-Serine may also trigger NMDAR-mediated neurotoxicity, and its dysregulation may play a role in neurodegeneration. D-Serine is synthesized by the enzyme serine racemase (SR), which directly converts L-serine to D-serine. However, many aspects concerning the regulation of D-serine production under physiological and pathological conditions remain to be elucidated. Here, we investigate possible mechanisms regulating the synthesis of D-serine by SR in paradigms relevant to neurotoxicity. We report that SR undergoes nucleocytoplasmic shuttling and that this process is dysregulated by several insults leading to neuronal death, typically by apoptotic stimuli. Cell death induction promotes nuclear accumulation of SR, in parallel with the nuclear translocation of GAPDH and Siah proteins at an early stage of the cell death process. Mutations in putative SR nuclear export signals (NESs) elicit SR nuclear accumulation and its depletion from the cytosol. Following apoptotic insult, SR associates with nuclear GAPDH along with other nuclear components, and this is accompanied by complete inactivation of the enzyme. As a result, extracellular D-serine concentration is reduced, even though extracellular glutamate concentration increases severalfold. Our observations imply that nuclear translocation of SR provides a fail-safe mechanism to prevent or limit secondary NMDAR-mediated toxicity in nearby synapses. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  17. How Should We Teach "The Jungle"?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phelps, Christopher

    2006-01-01

    Upton Sinclair's "The Jungle" describes a callous America in which the dollar trumps justice. It famously exposed the American meatpacking industry's loathsome practices and prompted federal consumer-protection laws. It is, however, primarily a sympathetic sketch of the foreign born, those fabled "masses yearning to breathe free" that Americans…

  18. Teaching Communication Theories with "Jungle Fever."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adler, Ronald B.

    1995-01-01

    Describes the use of Spike Lee's film "Jungle Fever" in an introductory communication theory class. Demonstrates how the film can be used to help students understand four metatheoretical perspectives: laws, rules, systems, and critical approaches. Discusses when and how to use the film in class. (SR)

  19. How Should We Teach "The Jungle"?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phelps, Christopher

    2006-01-01

    Upton Sinclair's "The Jungle" describes a callous America in which the dollar trumps justice. It famously exposed the American meatpacking industry's loathsome practices and prompted federal consumer-protection laws. It is, however, primarily a sympathetic sketch of the foreign born, those fabled "masses yearning to breathe free" that Americans…

  20. Job Hunting? It's a Jungle out There! Jungle Survival Guide II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florida State Dept. of Education, Tallahassee. Div. of Vocational, Adult, and Community Education.

    This illustrated, jungle-theme book plans a job search. There are three major sections in the book: (1) plan your safari; (2) where to look for jobs; and (3) making contact. Section one includes information on resumes, references, official papers needed for a job, and 11 ideas to help find job openings. Section two suggests finding jobs in state…

  1. Evolution of intracellular compartmentalization.

    PubMed

    Diekmann, Yoan; Pereira-Leal, José B

    2013-01-15

    Cells compartmentalize their biochemical functions in a variety of ways, notably by creating physical barriers that separate a compartment via membranes or proteins. Eukaryotes have a wide diversity of membrane-based compartments, many that are lineage- or tissue-specific. In recent years, it has become increasingly evident that membrane-based compartmentalization of the cytosolic space is observed in multiple prokaryotic lineages, giving rise to several types of distinct prokaryotic organelles. Endosymbionts, previously believed to be a hallmark of eukaryotes, have been described in several bacteria. Protein-based compartments, frequent in bacteria, are also found in eukaryotes. In the present review, we focus on selected intracellular compartments from each of these three categories, membrane-based, endosymbiotic and protein-based, in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. We review their diversity and the current theories and controversies regarding the evolutionary origins. Furthermore, we discuss the evolutionary processes acting on the genetic basis of intracellular compartments and how those differ across the domains of life. We conclude that the distinction between eukaryotes and prokaryotes no longer lies in the existence of a compartmentalized cell plan, but rather in its complexity.

  2. [Genetic diversity of red jungle fowl in China (Gallus gallus spadiceus) and red jungle fowl (Gallus gallus gallus) in Thailand].

    PubMed

    Bao, Wen-Bin; Chen, Guo-Hong; Wu, Xin-Sheng; Xu, Qi; Wu, Sheng-Long; Shu, Jing-Ting; Weigend, Steffen

    2007-05-01

    Genetic diversity of red jungle fowl in China (Gallus gallus spadiceus) and red jungle fowl in Thailand (Gallus gallus gallus) was evaluated with 29 microstaellite loci, the genetic variability within subspecies and genetic differentiation between subspecies were estimated. The results showed that the 168 alleles were amplified with the number of alleles per locus from 2 to 13. The average expected heterozygosity and polymorphism information content (PIC) of all loci were 0.5780 and 0.53, respectively. The mean numbers of effective alleles of red jungle fowl in China and red jungle fowl in Thailand were 5.55 and 6.38. The heterozygosity and the genetic diversity of the two subspecies were high. Genetic differentiation index (FST) of these populations was 0.194 (P<0.01). Reynolds' genetic distance and gene flow between the two populations were 0.157 and 1.040, respectively. Based on these results, genetic structure and significant genetic differentiation of red jungle fowl in China were different from red jungle fowl in Thailand. The results of this study did not support to identify these red jungle fowl subspecies as the same subspecies, but supported the theory that Chinese domestic fowls have independent origin.

  3. Toxoplasmosis in military personnel involved in jungle operations.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Marín, Jorge Enrique; de-la-Torre, Alejandra; Barrios, Patricia; Cardona, Nestor; Álvarez, Catalina; Herrera, Claudia

    2012-04-01

    Tropical diseases, mainly leishmaniasis and malaria, increased among Colombian military personnel due to intensive operations in the jungle in the last ten years; as a result the Colombian army developed important preventive strategies for malaria and leishmaniasis. However, no knowledge exists about toxoplasmosis, an emergent disease in military personnel. We compared the prevalence of IgG anti-Toxoplasma antibodies by ELISA and of parasitaemia by a real time PCR assay, in 500 professional soldiers that operated in the jungle with a group of 501 soldiers working in an urban zone (Bogotá). We found that the prevalence was significantly different between both groups of soldiers (80% in soldiers operating in jungle vs. 45% in urban soldiers, adjusted OR 11.4; CI 95%: 3.8-34; p<0.0001). All soldiers operating in the jungle drink unboiled and chlorine untreated lake or river water. In urban soldiers, these risk factors along with eating wild animal meat or eating tigrillo (little spotted cat) were significantly associated with a higher prevalence. Characteristic toxoplasmic choriorretinal lesions were found in 4 soldiers that operated in the jungle (0.8%) and in one urban soldier (0.19%). All soldiers before being deployed in jungle operations should be tested for Toxoplasma antibodies and to receive adequate health information about the routine use of personnel filters to purify their water for consumption.

  4. Compartmentalization of Decay in Trees.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shigo, Alex L.

    1985-01-01

    Unlike animals, which heal, trees compartmentalize by setting boundaries that resist the spread of invading microorganisms. Discusses the creation of new walls by anatomical and chemical means in response to death of a branch or pruning. Points out that genetic control of compartmentalization has resulted from evolution of resistant species. (DH)

  5. Compartmentalization of mammalian pantothenate kinases.

    PubMed

    Alfonso-Pecchio, Adolfo; Garcia, Matthew; Leonardi, Roberta; Jackowski, Suzanne

    2012-01-01

    The pantothenate kinases (PanK) catalyze the first and the rate-limiting step in coenzyme A (CoA) biosynthesis and regulate the amount of CoA in tissues by differential isoform expression and allosteric interaction with metabolic ligands. The four human and mouse PanK proteins share a homologous carboxy-terminal catalytic domain, but differ in their amino-termini. These unique termini direct the isoforms to different subcellular compartments. PanK1α isoforms were exclusively nuclear, with preferential association with the granular component of the nucleolus during interphase. PanK1α also associated with the perichromosomal region in condensing chromosomes during mitosis. The PanK1β and PanK3 isoforms were cytosolic, with a portion of PanK1β associated with clathrin-associated vesicles and recycling endosomes. Human PanK2, known to associate with mitochondria, was specifically localized to the intermembrane space. Human PanK2 was also detected in the nucleus, and functional nuclear localization and export signals were identified and experimentally confirmed. Nuclear PanK2 trafficked from the nucleus to the mitochondria, but not in the other direction, and was absent from the nucleus during G2 phase of the cell cycle. The localization of human PanK2 in these two compartments was in sharp contrast to mouse PanK2, which was exclusively cytosolic. These data demonstrate that PanK isoforms are differentially compartmentalized allowing them to sense CoA homeostasis in different cellular compartments and enable interaction with regulatory ligands produced in these same locations.

  6. Cellular compartmentalization of secondary metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Kistler, H. Corby; Broz, Karen

    2015-01-01

    Fungal secondary metabolism is often considered apart from the essential housekeeping functions of the cell. However, there are clear links between fundamental cellular metabolism and the biochemical pathways leading to secondary metabolite synthesis. Besides utilizing key biochemical precursors shared with the most essential processes of the cell (e.g., amino acids, acetyl CoA, NADPH), enzymes for secondary metabolite synthesis are compartmentalized at conserved subcellular sites that position pathway enzymes to use these common biochemical precursors. Co-compartmentalization of secondary metabolism pathway enzymes also may function to channel precursors, promote pathway efficiency and sequester pathway intermediates and products from the rest of the cell. In this review we discuss the compartmentalization of three well-studied fungal secondary metabolite biosynthetic pathways for penicillin G, aflatoxin and deoxynivalenol, and summarize evidence used to infer subcellular localization. We also discuss how these metabolites potentially are trafficked within the cell and may be exported. PMID:25709603

  7. Physiology Education and the Linguistic Jungle of Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nordquist, Lina

    2008-01-01

    Life sciences can be complicated enough without getting into the names of all its Dalton-scale participants. For many students, composing a project plan or writing a paper is rather like learning a foreign language. In this article, the author argues that there is a linguistic jungle of science, and it may well discourage students from pursuing a…

  8. Physiology Education and the Linguistic Jungle of Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nordquist, Lina

    2008-01-01

    Life sciences can be complicated enough without getting into the names of all its Dalton-scale participants. For many students, composing a project plan or writing a paper is rather like learning a foreign language. In this article, the author argues that there is a linguistic jungle of science, and it may well discourage students from pursuing a…

  9. Qualitative theory of compartmental systems with lags.

    PubMed

    Jacquez, John A; Simon, Carl P

    2002-01-01

    Dynamic models of many processes in the biological and physical sciences give systems of ordinary differential equations called compartmental systems. Often, these systems include time lags; in this context, continuous probability density functions (pdfs) of lags are far more important than discrete lags. There is a relatively complete theory of compartmental systems without lags, both linear and non-linear [SIAM Rev. 35 (1993) 43]. The authors extend their previous work on compartmental systems without lags to show that, for discrete lags and for a very large class of pdfs of continuous lags, compartmental systems with lags are equivalent to larger compartmental systems without lags. Consequently, the properties of compartmental systems with lags are the same as those of compartmental systems without lags. For a very large class of compartmental systems with time lags, one can show that the time lags themselves can be generated by compartmental systems without lags. Thus, such systems can be partitioned into a main system, which is the original system without the lags, plus compartmental subsystems without lags that generate the lags. The latter may be linear or non-linear and may be inserted into main systems that are linear or non-linear. The state variables of the compartmental lag subsystems are hidden variables in the formulation with explicit lags.

  10. The Soldier Must be Trained Not to Fight the Jungle: Preparing the U.S. Army for Future Operations in a Jungle Environment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-06-09

    jungle. This examination should be informed by history , past and current doctrine, and stakeholder considerations. Once this is determined, gaps may... history , past and current doctrine, and stakeholder considerations. Once this is determined, gaps may be identified, and short and long-term solutions...of its short history . The Origins of Modern Army Jungle Warfare Doctrine When thirteen-year-old Cresson Kearny visited his uncle, Major Charles

  11. ["The fungal jungle". Medical mycology on the Internet].

    PubMed

    Voss, H; Hort, W; Wagner, R; Mayser, P

    2005-01-01

    The World Wide Web offers an enormous variety of information about medical mycology. To go through the "fungal jungle" and find the website containing the information that is needed requires a great deal of effort and a lot of time. This article provides help in finding information about medical mycology and describes the contents of preselected websites in German and English. These pages address physicians, scientists, and students interested in dermato-mycology. Most of the pages also contain information about mycoses relevant to other medical specialties.

  12. Unusual pox lesions found in Chinese jungle mynahs (Acridotheres cristatellus).

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Y C; Chen, S H; Wang, C W; Lee, Y F; Chung, W C; Tsai, M C; Chang, T C; Lien, Y Y; Tsai, S S

    2005-10-01

    Pox lesions involving feathered and unfeathered skin, the oral cavity and the uropygial gland were found in Chinese jungle mynahs. Characteristic intracytoplasmic inclusions were detected in the proliferative cells of all lesions. Ultrastructurally, the virus particles consisted of a convoluted outer membrane enclosing lateral bodies and a biconcave central core, typical for poxvirus. The nucleotide sequences of the amplicon obtained with a set of primers for the 4b core protein of fowl poxvirus revealed that the mynah poxvirus was phylogenetically related to wood pigeon poxvirus. This is the first report of poxvirus infection affecting the uropygial gland.

  13. Compartmentalization of the endoplasmic reticulum in the early C. elegans embryos

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Zuo Yen; Prouteau, Manoël

    2016-01-01

    The one-cell Caenorhabditis elegans embryo is polarized to partition fate determinants between the cell lineages generated during its first division. Using fluorescence loss in photobleaching, we find that the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) of the C. elegans embryo is physically continuous throughout the cell, but its membrane is compartmentalized shortly before nuclear envelope breakdown into an anterior and a posterior domain, indicating that a diffusion barrier forms in the ER membrane between these two domains. Using mutants with disorganized ER, we show that ER compartmentalization is independent of the morphological transition that the ER undergoes in mitosis. In contrast, compartmentalization takes place at the position of the future cleavage plane in a par-3–dependent manner. Together, our data indicate that the ER membrane is compartmentalized in cells as diverse as budding yeast, mouse neural stem cells, and the early C. elegans embryo. PMID:27597753

  14. Estimation of conventional C-Hπ (arene), unconventional C-Hπ (chelate) and C-Hπ (thiocyanate) interactions in hetero-nuclear nickel(ii)-cadmium(ii) complexes with a compartmental Schiff base.

    PubMed

    Roy, Sourav; Drew, Michael G B; Bauzá, Antonio; Frontera, Antonio; Chattopadhyay, Shouvik

    2017-04-07

    Three new heteronuclear nickel(ii)/cadmium(ii) complexes, [(SCN)(Cl)Cd(L)Ni(DMF)2] (1), [(SCN)(CH3CO2)Cd(L)Ni(CH3OH)2] (2) and [(SCN)(Cl)Cd(L)Ni(NH2CH2CH2CH2NH2)]n (3) {where H2L = N,N'-bis(3-ethoxy-salicylidene)propane-1,3-diamine is a N2O4 compartmental Schiff base}, have been synthesized and characterized. The structures of the complexes have been confirmed by single crystal X-ray diffraction studies. In each complex, nickel(ii) is placed in the inner N2O2 environment and cadmium(ii) is placed in the outer O4 compartment of the compartmental Schiff base. Furthermore, the importance of unconventional C-Hπ (chelate) interactions in the solid state of both complexes and C-Hπ (thiocyanate) interaction in complex 2 has been described by means of DFT and MEP calculations and characterized using NCI plots. All complexes show photoluminescence at room temperature upon irradiation by ultraviolet light. The lifetimes of excited states are in the range of 2-6 ns.

  15. Current Ideas about Prebiological Compartmentalization

    PubMed Central

    Monnard, Pierre-Alain; Walde, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Contemporary biological cells are highly sophisticated dynamic compartment systems which separate an internal volume from the external medium through a boundary, which controls, in complex ways, the exchange of matter and energy between the cell’s interior and the environment. Since such compartmentalization is a fundamental principle of all forms of life, scenarios have been elaborated about the emergence of prebiological compartments on early Earth, in particular about their likely structural characteristics and dynamic features. Chemical systems that consist of potentially prebiological compartments and chemical reaction networks have been designed to model pre-cellular systems. These systems are often referred to as “protocells”. Past and current protocell model systems are presented and compared. Since the prebiotic formation of cell-like compartments is directly linked to the prebiotic availability of compartment building blocks, a few aspects on the likely chemical inventory on the early Earth are also summarized. PMID:25867709

  16. Cryopreservation of Indian red jungle fowl (Gallus gallus murghi) semen.

    PubMed

    Rakha, B A; Ansari, M S; Akhter, S; Hussain, I; Blesbois, E

    2016-11-01

    The population of red jungle fowl is declining and needs special attention for its conservation with suitable approaches. For ex situ in vitro conservation of Indian red jungle fowl, establishment of semen cryobank is an appropriate option, for which an extender with adequate retrieval capacity for functional spermatozoa is required. Therefore, studies were designed to evaluate a wide range of extenders for cryopreservation of Indian red jungle fowl (Gallus gallus murghi) sperm to achieve maximal post-thawed semen quality and fertility. For this purpose, semen from eight mature cocks were collected, initially evaluated (percent sperm motility, volume and concentration), pooled, assessed for motility, plasma membrane integrity, viability and acrosome integrity, and divided into six aliquots for dilution (1:5; 37°C) in Beltsville poultry, red fowl extender, Lake, EK, Tselutin poultry and chicken semen extenders. Diluted semen was cooled from 37°C to 4°C @ -0.275°C/min. Glycerol (20%) was added to chilled semen, equilibrated for 10min, filled in 0.5mL French straws, kept over LN2 vapours for 10min and plunged into LN2 and stored at -196°C. Percentages of motility, plasma membrane integrity, viability and acrosome integrity were higher (P<0.05) in red fowl extender at 0, 2 and 4h of incubation post-thaw. After cryopreservation and post-thawing at 37°C the highest (P<0.05) recovery rates and absolute livability index was also recorded in red fowl extender that was thus used for further artificial insemination of cooled-diluted (Liquid) and cryopreserved sperm. The no. of fertilized eggs (Liquid, 20.6±0.4; Cryopreserved, 12.6±0.5), percent fertility (86.7±2.2; 57.2±3.9), no. of hatched chicks (18.2±0.8; 10.0±0.3), percent hatch (76.5±2.7; 45.3±2.2) and hatchability of fertilized eggs (88.3±3.4; 79.6±3.4) were higher with sperm respectively freshly cooled-diluted or cryopreserved in red fowl extender. However, the rates obtained with frozen-thawed sperm

  17. Eukaryotic genome evolution: rearrangement and coevolution of compartmentalized genetic information.

    PubMed

    Herrmann, Reinhold G; Maier, Rainer M; Schmitz-Linneweber, Christian

    2003-01-29

    The plant cell operates with an integrated, compartmentalized genome consisting of nucleus/cytosol, plastids and mitochondria that, in its entirety, is regulated in time, quantitatively, in multicellular organisms and also in space. This genome, as do genomes of eukaryotes in general, originated in endosymbiotic events, with at least three cells, and was shaped phylogenetically by a massive and highly complex restructuring and intermixing of the genetic potentials of the symbiotic partners and by lateral gene transfer. This was accompanied by fundamental changes in expression signals in the entire system at almost all regulatory levels. The gross genome rearrangements contrast with a highly specific compartmental interplay, which becomes apparent in interspecific nuclear-plastid cybrids or hybrids. Organelle exchanges, even between closely related species, can greatly disturb the intracellular genetic balance ("hybrid bleaching"), which is indicative of compartmental coevolution and is of relevance for speciation processes. The photosynthetic machinery of plastids, which is embedded in that genetic machinery, is an appealing model to probe into genomic and organismic evolution and to develop functional molecular genomics. We have studied the reciprocal Atropa belladonna-Nicotiana tabacum cybrids, which differ markedly in their phenotypes, and found that transcriptional and post-transcriptional processes can contribute to genome/plastome incompatibility. Allopolyploidy can influence this phenomenon by providing an increased, cryptic RNA editing potential and the capacity to maintain the integrity of organelles of different taxonomic origins.

  18. Evolutionary relationships of Red Jungle Fowl and chicken breeds

    PubMed Central

    Moiseyeva, Irina G; Romanov, Michael N; Nikiforov, Andrey A; Sevastyanova, Antonina A; Semyenova, Serafima K

    2003-01-01

    Published results were reassessed and original data are provided regarding the origin and relatedness of four postulated chicken breed lineages, egg-type, game, meat-type and Bantam, to each other and to the basic ancestral species of jungle fowls, Gallus gallus. A system approach was employed concerning the planning of the experiments. One element of the system approach is the choice of the breeds to be compared with G. gallus. These breeds were supposed to represent major evolutionary branches of chickens. Four experiments on genetic relationships were conducted using different estimation criteria including morphological discrete characters, body measurements, biochemical markers, and the activity of serum esterase-1. The greatest similarity was found between G. gallus and the egg-type breeds of Mediterranean roots and/or true Bantams. This fact might testify that the indicated chicken groups occupied earlier stages in the evolution from the wild progenitor to the present biodiversity of chickens in the world. PMID:12927074

  19. Positive roles of compartmentalization in internal reactions.

    PubMed

    Ichihashi, Norikazu; Yomo, Tetsuya

    2014-10-01

    Recently, many researchers have attempted to construct artificial cell models using a bottom-up approach in which various biochemical reactions that involve a defined set of molecules are reconstructed in cell-like compartments, such as liposomes and water-in-oil droplets. In many of these studies, the cell-like compartments have acted only as containers for the encapsulated biochemical reactions, whereas other studies have indicated that compartmentalization improves the rates and yields of these reactions. Here, we introduce two ways in which compartmentalization can improve internal reactions: the isolation effect and the condensation effect. These positive effects of compartmentalization might have played an important role in the genesis of the first primitive cell on early Earth.

  20. Compartmentalized storage tank for electrochemical cell system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piecuch, Benjamin Michael (Inventor); Dalton, Luke Thomas (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A compartmentalized storage tank is disclosed. The compartmentalized storage tank includes a housing, a first fluid storage section disposed within the housing, a second fluid storage section disposed within the housing, the first and second fluid storage sections being separated by a movable divider, and a constant force spring. The constant force spring is disposed between the housing and the movable divider to exert a constant force on the movable divider to cause a pressure P1 in the first fluid storage section to be greater than a pressure P2 in the second fluid storage section, thereby defining a pressure differential.

  1. Involvement of circadian clock in crowing of red jungle fowls (Gallus gallus).

    PubMed

    Ito, Shuichi; Hori, Shuho; Hirose, Makiko; Iwahara, Mari; Yatsushiro, Azusa; Matsumoto, Atsushi; Tanaka, Masayuki; Okamoto, Chinobu; Yayou, Ken-Ichi; Shimmura, Tsuyoshi

    2017-04-01

    The rhythmic locomotor behavior of flies and mice provides a phenotype for the identification of clock genes, and the underlying molecular mechanism is well studied. However, interestingly, when examining locomotor rhythm in the wild, several key laboratory-based assumptions on circadian behavior are not supported in natural conditions. The rooster crowing 'cock-a-doodle-doo' is a symbol of the break of dawn in many countries. Previously, we used domestic inbred roosters and showed that the timing of roosters' crowing is regulated by the circadian clock under laboratory conditions. However, it is still unknown whether the regulation of crowing by circadian clock is observed under natural conditions. Therefore, here we used red jungle fowls and first confirmed that similar crowing rhythms with domesticated chickens are observed in red jungle fowls under the laboratory conditions. Red jungle fowls show predawn crowing before light onset under 12:12 light : dim light conditions and the free-running rhythm of crowing under total dim light conditions. We next examined the crowing rhythms under semi-wild conditions. Although the crowing of red jungle fowls changed seasonally under semi-wild conditions, predawn crowing was observed before sunrise in all seasons. This evidence suggests that seasonally changed crowing of red jungle fowls is under the control of a circadian clock. © 2016 Japanese Society of Animal Science.

  2. Tick fauna of Malaysian red jungle fowl (Gallus gallus) in Bangi, Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    Konto, M.; Fufa, G. I.; Zakaria, A.; Tukur, S. M.; Watanabe, M.; Ola-Fadunsin, S. D.; Khan, M. S.; Shettima, Y. M.; Babjee, S. M. A.

    2015-01-01

    Aim: The red jungle fowl is generally considered as one of the endangered Asian wild Galleopheasants due to man-made encroachment of their habitats, coupled with the effect of disease and disease causing organisms like ticks and tick-borne infections. This study aimed to determine the tick fauna of the red jungle fowl and their predilection sites based on developmental stages. Materials and Methods: A total of 33 jungle fowls were sampled for this study from Bangi area of Selangor State, Peninsular Malaysian. The birds were captured using a locally made trap made-up of loops and bites. Ticks present on their bodies were detached using fine forceps and identified morphologically under a dissecting microscope. Results: 91% of the jungle fowls were infested with ticks, all of which belongs to the species Haemaphysalis wellingtoni. The ear region appeared to be the most common predilection site (63%) for all the developmental stages in which the larval stages are solely restricted to that region. Nymphal and adult stages were distributed on the comb, wattle, and facial region in addition to the ear region. Conclusion: This study was the first in its kind and showed a high prevalence of tick infestation among jungle fowls. H. wellingtoni was known to be a vector in transmission of many tick-borne pathogens. Therefore, there is the need for further investigation to identify the various pathogens associated with this tick. PMID:27047012

  3. Jesus and Maria in the Jungle: An Essay on Possibility and Constraint in the Third-Shift Third Space

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruna, Katherine Richardson

    2009-01-01

    One hundred years ago, Upton Sinclair, in "The Jungle," exposed the deplorable working conditions of eastern European immigrants in the meatpacking houses of Chicago. The backdrop of this article is the new Jungle of the 21st century--the hog plants of the rural Midwest. Here I speak to the lives of the Mexican workers they employ, and, more…

  4. [Differences in vocalization and morphology of the syrinx between Carrion crows (Corvus corone) and Jungle crows (C. macrorhynchos)].

    PubMed

    Tsukahara, Naoki; Aoyama, Masato; Sugita, Shoei

    2007-12-01

    The vocal characteristics and the morph of the syrinx in Carrion crows (Corvus corone) and those in Jungle crows (C. macrorhynchos) were compared. The vocalizations of both species of crow were recorded into sonograms and analyzed. The appearance and inner configuration of the syrinx were observed using stereoscopic microscope. In addition, the inside diameter of the syrinx, the sizes of the labia and the attached position of the syringeal muscles were measured. The attached figures of syringeal muscles were different between the two species. The vocalizations of Carrion crows were noisier than possibly because their labias were noticeably smaller than those of Jungle crows. The attachment patterns of the syringeal muscles in Jungle crows suggested that they allow for more flexibility on the inside structure of the syrinx. The inner space of the syrinx in Jungle crows was also wider than those of Carrion crows. These results suggested that Jungle crows may be able to make various vocalizations because of these morphological characteristics.

  5. Bilateral innervation of syringeal muscles by the hypoglossal nucleus in the jungle crow (Corvus macrorhynchos)

    PubMed Central

    Tsukahara, Naoki; Kamata, Naoki; Nagasawa, Miyuki; Sugita, Shoei

    2009-01-01

    Bird vocalizations are produced by contractions of syringeal muscles, which are controlled by the hypoglossal nucleus. In oscines, syringeal muscles are controlled by the hypoglossal nucleus ipsilaterally, whereas syringeal innervation is bilateral in non-oscines. We have determined the course of hypoglossal nerves in the jungle crow Corvus macrorhynchos. Our results indicate a cross-over of the hypoglossal nerve from the left side to the right side on the trachea 7 mm rostral to theMusculus sternotrachealis. We also investigated the innervation of the syringeal muscles of jungle crows from the hypoglossal nucleus using the horseradish peroxidase (HRP) method. After HRP was injected into the syringeal muscles on each side, HRP-labeled cells were found bilaterally in the hypoglossal nerve. These results suggest that the syringeal muscles of jungle crows are innervated bilaterally from the hypoglossal nucleus, although these birds are categorized as oscines. PMID:19490396

  6. Compartmental model of nitrate retention in streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faulkner, B. R.; Campana, M. E.

    2007-02-01

    A compartmental modeling approach is presented to route nitrate retention along a cascade of stream reach sections. A process transfer function is used for transient storage equations with first-order reaction terms to represent nitrate uptake in the free stream and denitrification in the storage regions. In the context of a short-term nitrate injection we define nitrate assimilative capacity as 1 - ?, where the attenuation factor, ?, is the fraction of injected nitrate mass that is flushed past the outlet of stream. Net exchange with groundwater is modeled by allowing free stream discharge to vary from one reach section to the next. A Monte Carlo simulation was used to compare results of the compartmental model with the OTIS numerical model. Out of 350 Monte Carlo simulations of a stream consisting of five reach sections the highest relative percent difference was 15%, most being well below 10%, as determined using moment analysis on breakthrough curves. Moment analysis on published experimental breakthrough curves showed assimilative capacities did not differ from those determined with the compartmental model by more than about 0.035 and were well within the uncertainty due to possible errors in measured stream metrics and net exchange with groundwater. The results show that the compartmental modeling approach, commonly used in analysis of groundwater data, can also be useful in evaluating nitrate retention in streams.

  7. Compartmentalized Platforms for Neuro-pharmacological Research

    PubMed Central

    Jadhav, Amol D.; Wei, Li; Shi, Peng

    2016-01-01

    Dissociated primary neuronal cell culture remains an indispensable approach for neurobiology research in order to investigate basic mechanisms underlying diverse neuronal functions, drug screening and pharmacological investigation. Compartmentalization, a widely adopted technique since its emergence in 1970s enables spatial segregation of neuronal segments and detailed investigation that is otherwise limited with traditional culture methods. Although these compartmental chambers (e.g. Campenot chamber) have been proven valuable for the investigation of Peripheral Nervous System (PNS) neurons and to some extent within Central Nervous System (CNS) neurons, their utility has remained limited given the arduous manufacturing process, incompatibility with high-resolution optical imaging and limited throughput. The development in the area of microfabrication and microfluidics has enabled creation of next generation compartmentalized devices that are cheap, easy to manufacture, require reduced sample volumes, enable precise control over the cellular microenvironment both spatially as well as temporally, and permit highthroughput testing. In this review we briefly evaluate the various compartmentalization tools used for neurobiological research, and highlight application of the emerging microfluidic platforms towards in vitro single cell neurobiology. PMID:26813122

  8. COMPARTMENTAL MODEL OF NITRATE RETENTION IN STREAMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A compartmental modeling approach is presented to route nitrate retention along a cascade of stream reach sections. A process transfer function is used for transient storage equations with first order reaction terms to represent nitrate uptake in the free stream, and denitrifica...

  9. COMPARTMENTAL MODEL OF NITRATE RETENTION IN STREAMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A compartmental modeling approach is presented to route nitrate retention along a cascade of stream reach sections. A process transfer function is used for transient storage equations with first order reaction terms to represent nitrate uptake in the free stream, and denitrifica...

  10. Compartmentalized Platforms for Neuro-Pharmacological Research.

    PubMed

    Jadhav, Amol D; Wei, Li; Shi, Peng

    2016-01-01

    Dissociated primary neuronal cell culture remains an indispensable approach for neurobiology research in order to investigate basic mechanisms underlying diverse neuronal functions, drug screening and pharmacological investigation. Compartmentalization, a widely adopted technique since its emergence in 1970s enables spatial segregation of neuronal segments and detailed investigation that is otherwise limited with traditional culture methods. Although these compartmental chambers (e.g. Campenot chamber) have been proven valuable for the investigation of Peripheral Nervous System (PNS) neurons and to some extent within Central Nervous System (CNS) neurons, their utility has remained limited given the arduous manufacturing process, incompatibility with high-resolution optical imaging and limited throughput. The development in the area of microfabrication and microfluidics has enabled creation of next generation compartmentalized devices that are cheap, easy to manufacture, require reduced sample volumes, enable precise control over the cellular microenvironment both spatially as well as temporally, and permit highthroughput testing. In this review we briefly evaluate the various compartmentalization tools used for neurobiological research, and highlight application of the emerging microfluidic platforms towards in vitro single cell neurobiology.

  11. A compartmentalized phosphorylation/dephosphorylation system that regulates U snRNA export from the nucleus.

    PubMed

    Kitao, Saori; Segref, Alexandra; Kast, Juergen; Wilm, Matthias; Mattaj, Iain W; Ohno, Mutsuhito

    2008-01-01

    PHAX (phosphorylated adaptor for RNA export) is the key regulator of U snRNA nuclear export in metazoa. Our previous work revealed that PHAX is phosphorylated in the nucleus and is exported as a component of the U snRNA export complex to the cytoplasm, where it is dephosphorylated (M. Ohno, A. Segref, A. Bachi, M. Wilm, and I. W. Mattaj, Cell 101:187-198, 2000). PHAX phosphorylation is essential for export complex assembly, whereas its dephosphorylation causes export complex disassembly. Thus, PHAX is subject to a compartmentalized phosphorylation/dephosphorylation cycle that contributes to transport directionality. However, neither essential PHAX phosphorylation sites nor the modifying enzymes that contribute to the compartmentalized system have been identified. Here, we identify PHAX phosphorylation sites that are necessary and sufficient for U snRNA export. Mutation of the phosphorylation sites inhibited U snRNA export in a dominant-negative way. We also show, by both biochemical and RNA interference knockdown experiments, that the nuclear kinase and the cytoplasmic phosphatase for PHAX are CK2 kinase and protein phosphatase 2A, respectively. Our results reveal the composition of the compartmentalized phosphorylation/dephosphorylation system that regulates U snRNA export. This finding was surprising in that such a specific system for U snRNA export regulation is composed of two such universal regulators, suggesting that this compartmentalized system is used more broadly for gene expression regulation.

  12. Geological mapping in the Amazon Jungle: A challenge to side-looking radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Correa, A. C.

    1980-01-01

    A brief outline of the physical environment and vegetation characteristics peculiar to the Amazon Jungle is given to provide the background for the discussion of energy target interaction models. Examples of radar images of the central part of the jungle are used to illustrate a common approach to geologic mapping in this environment. During the initial phase of interpretation, the interaction phenomenon is evaluated and textural and tonal characteristics of the radar image are observed. Field checking of selected areas is the next phase of a geologic mapping program. Reinterpretation of radar images and auxiliary data (aerial photographs, Landsat images, and field data) is the last phase of geologic mapping.

  13. Tracking Hazard Analysis Data in a Jungle of Changing Design

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, Robin S.; Young, Jonathan

    2006-05-14

    The biggest fear of the hazard analyst is the loss of data in the middle of the design jungle. When project schedules are demanding and design is changing rapidly it is essential that the hazard analysis data be tracked and kept current in order to provide the required project design, development, and regulatory support. Being able to identify the current information, as well as the past archived information, as the design progresses and to be able to show how the project is designing in safety through modifications based on hazard analysis results is imperative. At the DOE Hanford site in Washington State, Flour Hanford Inc is in the process of the removal and disposition of sludge from the 100 Area K Basins. The K Basins were used to store spent fuel from the operating reactors at the Hanford Site. The sludge is a by-product from the corrosion of the fuel and fuel storage canisters. The sludge removal project has been very dynamic involving the design, procurement and, more recently, the operation of processes at two basins, K East and K West. The project has an ambitious schedule with a large number of changes to design concepts. In order to support the complex K Basins project a technique to track the status of the hazard analysis data was developed. This paper will identify the most important elements of the tracking system and how it was used to assist the project in ensuring that current design data was reflected in a specific version of the hazard analysis and to show how the project was keeping up with the design and ensuring compliance with the requirements to design in safety. While the specifics of the data tracking strategy for the K Basins sludge removal project will be described in the paper, the general concepts of the strategy are applicable to similar projects requiring iteration of hazard analysis and design.

  14. In the Jungle of Astronomical On--line Data Services

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egret, D.

    The author tried to survive in the jungle of astronomical on--line data services. In order to find efficient answers to common scientific data retrieval requests, he had to collect many pieces of information, in order to formulate typical user scenarios, and try them against a number of different data bases, catalogue services, or information systems. He discovered soon how frustrating treasure coffers may be when their keys are not available, but he realized also that nice widgets and gadgets are of no help when the information is not there. And, before long, he knew he would have to navigate through several systems because no one was yet offering a general answer to all his questions. I will present examples of common user scenarios and show how they were tested against a number of services. I will propose some elements of classification which should help the end-user to evaluate how adequate the different services may be for providing satisfying answers to specific queries. For that, many aspects of the user interaction will be considered: documentation, access, query formulation, functionalities, qualification of the data, overall efficiency, etc. I will also suggest possible improvements to the present situation: the first of them being to encourage system managers to increase collaboration between one another, for the benefit of the whole astronomical community. The subjective review I will present, is based on publicly available astronomical on--line services from the U.S. and from Europe, most of which (excepting the newcomers) were described in ``Databases and On-Line Data in Astronomy", (Albrecht & Egret, eds, 1991): this includes databases (such as NED and Simbad ), catalog services ( StarCat , DIRA , XCatScan , etc.), and information systems ( ADS and ESIS ).

  15. Compartmentation of Metabolites in Regulating Epigenomes of Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Zhiqiang; Wang, Li; Di, Li-jun

    2016-01-01

    Covalent modifications of DNA and histones are important epigenetic events and the genomewide reshaping of epigenetic markers is common in cancer. Epigenetic markers are produced by enzymatic reactions, and some of these reactions require the presence of metabolites, specifically Epigenetic Enzyme Required Metabolites (EERMs), as cofactors. Recent studies found that the abundance of these EERMs correlates with epigenetic enzyme activities. Also, the subcellular compartmentation, especially the nuclear localization of these EERMs, may play a role in regulating the activities of epigenetic enzymes. Moreover, gene-specific recruitment of enzymes that produce the EERMs in the proximity of the epigenetic modification events accompanying the regulation of gene expression, were proposed. Therefore, it is important to summarize findings of EERMs in regulating epigenetic modifications at both the DNA and histone levels, and to understand how EERMs contribute to cancer development by addressing their global versus local distribution. PMID:27258652

  16. Transport, Compartmentation, and Metabolism of Homoserine in Higher Plant Cells

    PubMed Central

    Aubert, Serge; Curien, Gilles; Bligny, Richard; Gout, Elisabeth; Douce, Roland

    1998-01-01

    The transport, compartmentation, and metabolism of homoserine was characterized in two strains of meristematic higher plant cells, the dicotyledonous sycamore (Acer pseudoplatanus) and the monocotyledonous weed Echinochloa colonum. Homoserine is an intermediate in the synthesis of the aspartate-derived amino acids methionine, threonine (Thr), and isoleucine. Using 13C-nuclear magnetic resonance, we showed that homoserine actively entered the cells via a high-affinity proton-symport carrier (Km approximately 50–60 μm) at the maximum rate of 8 ± 0.5 μmol h−1 g−1 cell wet weight, and in competition with serine or Thr. We could visualize the compartmentation of homoserine, and observed that it accumulated at a concentration 4 to 5 times higher in the cytoplasm than in the large vacuolar compartment. 31P-nuclear magnetic resonance permitted us to analyze the phosphorylation of homoserine. When sycamore cells were incubated with 100 μm homoserine, phosphohomoserine steadily accumulated in the cytoplasmic compartment over 24 h at the constant rate of 0.7 μmol h−1 g−1 cell wet weight, indicating that homoserine kinase was not inhibited in vivo by its product, phosphohomoserine. The rate of metabolism of phosphohomoserine was much lower (0.06 μmol h−1 g−1 cell wet weight) and essentially sustained Thr accumulation. Similarly, homoserine was actively incorporated by E. colonum cells. However, in contrast to what was seen in sycamore cells, large accumulations of Thr were observed, whereas the intracellular concentration of homoserine remained low, and phosphohomoserine did not accumulate. These differences with sycamore cells were attributed to the presence of a higher Thr synthase activity in this strain of monocot cells. PMID:9490758

  17. Compartmental modelling for magnetic resonance renography.

    PubMed

    Sourbron, Steven

    2010-01-01

    A basic formalism is presented for generating and interpreting compartmental models for dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI data in the kidney. A graphical convention is introduced to represent and design compartmental models in a transparent and physically intuitive manner. A systematic system of notations and a simple set of rules allows direct translation of the graphical representation into a mathematical solution. The rules are derived from the physical principle of mass conservation, and the interpretation provided by the general tracer-kinetic theory of linear and stationary systems. The power of the formalism is illustrated using examples of models that have been proposed in the literature on perfusion MRI, and by generating a number of advanced models that may be of use in the kidney.

  18. "Tales from the Brazilian Jungle": Antonio Rocha, Storyteller. Cue Sheet for Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rees, Elizabeth

    This performance guide is designed for teachers to use with students before and after a performance of "Tales from the Brazilian Jungle" with storyteller Antonio Rocha. The guide, called a "Cuesheet," contains four sheets for use in class. The first, "About the Performance," prepares students for understanding…

  19. The Garden and the Jungle: Burnett, Kipling and the Nature of Imperial Childhood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodwin, Mary

    2011-01-01

    Imperial British India is the point of origin for protagonists in both Frances Hodgson Burnett's "The Secret Garden" (1911) and Rudyard Kipling's "The Jungle Books" (1894-1895), two influential children's stories in which late Victorian notions of childhood education and nature converge with those of national and imperial…

  20. Long-term memory of color stimuli in the jungle crow (Corvus macrorhynchos).

    PubMed

    Bogale, Bezawork Afework; Sugawara, Satoshi; Sakano, Katsuhisa; Tsuda, Sonoko; Sugita, Shoei

    2012-03-01

    Wild-caught jungle crows (n = 20) were trained to discriminate between color stimuli in a two-alternative discrimination task. Next, crows were tested for long-term memory after 1-, 2-, 3-, 6-, and 10-month retention intervals. This preliminary study showed that jungle crows learn the task and reach a discrimination criterion (80% or more correct choices in two consecutive sessions of ten trials) in a few trials, and some even in a single session. Most, if not all, crows successfully remembered the constantly reinforced visual stimulus during training after all retention intervals. These results suggest that jungle crows have a high retention capacity for learned information, at least after a 10-month retention interval and make no or very few errors. This study is the first to show long-term memory capacity of color stimuli in corvids following a brief training that memory rather than rehearsal was apparent. Memory of visual color information is vital for exploitation of biological resources in crows. We suspect that jungle crows could remember the learned color discrimination task even after a much longer retention interval.

  1. Shape discrimination and concept formation in the jungle crow (Corvus macrorhynchos).

    PubMed

    Bogale, Bezawork Afework; Sugita, Shoei

    2014-01-01

    We investigated whether jungle crows can learn concepts by using printouts of shapes in a simultaneous two-alternative task. Jungle crows were first trained with a red triangle and red square until they reached the discrimination criterion (80% of correct choices in two blocks of 10 trials each). Then, we tested crows with successive transfer tests to investigate both the discrimination cues being used and concept formation ability, by using novel triangular and non-triangular stimuli. All of the jungle crows learnt to discriminate between the triangle and square during training. The discrimination performance was generally not affected either by changes in the colour of the stimuli or when both shape and colour cues conflicted, with the previously non-rewarded shape but matching colour (red square) versus rewarded shape but non-matching colour (green triangle). The use of only outlines of the familiar stimuli also did not affect discrimination behaviour of crows. In addition, crows significantly discriminated novel triangular shapes during the limited trials given, suggesting their ability to form the concept of triangularity. However, failure to discriminate when the novel stimuli size deviated from the original suggests that there is a limit to shape concept formation in a familiar-novel context in the jungle crow.

  2. Jungle Quest: Adventures in Creating a HyperStudio Word Study Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ludwig, Jessica; Green, Lauren

    This paper describes the development, design, and implementation of an educational multimedia program. The program, "Jungle Quest," combined HyperStudio and word study in a game for classroom use. Methods for word study provide a carefully sequenced teaching of phonics, vocabulary, and spelling following children's natural stages of…

  3. Categorical learning between 'male' and 'female' photographic human faces in jungle crows (Corvus macrorhynchos).

    PubMed

    Bogale, Bezawork Afework; Aoyama, Masato; Sugita, Shoei

    2011-01-01

    We trained jungle crows to discriminate among photographs of human face according to their sex in a simultaneous two-alternative task to study their categorical learning ability. Once the crows reached a discrimination criterion (greater than or equal to 80% correct choices in two consecutive sessions; binomial probability test, p<.05), they next received generalization and transfer tests (i.e., greyscale, contour, and 'full' occlusion) in Experiment 1 followed by a 'partial' occlusion test in Experiment 2 and random stimuli pair test in Experiment 3. Jungle crows learned the discrimination task in a few trials and successfully generalized to novel stimuli sets. However, all crows failed the greyscale test and half of them the contour test. Neither occlusion of internal features of the face, nor randomly pairing of exemplars affected discrimination performance of most, if not all crows. We suggest that jungle crows categorize human face photographs based on perceptual similarities as other non-human animals do, and colour appears to be the most salient feature controlling discriminative behaviour. However, the variability in the use of facial contours among individuals suggests an exploitation of multiple features and individual differences in visual information processing among jungle crows. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Hypothesis: compartmentalization of cytokines in intraabdominal infection.

    PubMed

    Schein, M; Wittmann, D H; Holzheimer, R; Condon, R E

    1996-06-01

    Although the proximal role of systemic cytokines in the infectious-inflammatory cascades is well recognized, the magnitude and meaning of its intraperitoneal levels in peritonitis have received little attention. We hypothesized that in peritonitis a significant and clinically relevant cytokine-mediated inflammatory response is compartmentalized in the peritoneal cavity. MEDLINE was used to search the literature for all articles dealing with experimental, primary, and secondary bacterial peritonitis and cytokines. Bacterial peritonitis is associated with an immense intraperitoneally compartmentalized cytokine response, with plasma levels of cytokines representing only the tip of the iceberg. Although certain amount of cytokines may be beneficial to the peritoneal defense mechanisms, higher levels correlate with adverse outcome. Thus it is plausible to look at acute peritonitis as initially a combined infective (microorganism) and inflammatory (cytokines) process. The clinical significance of the distinction between peritoneal inflammation and infection and the relevance of our findings to the stratification and treatment of peritonitis are discussed. Current surgical and antibiotic therapy for peritonitis is able to clear the peritoneal cavity of infective concentration of bacteria, but many patients continue to die of an uncontrolled activation of the inflammatory cascade. We suggest that one potential venue for therapeutic progress is the modulation of the compartmentalized peritoneal inflammatory response.

  5. 'Chiral compartmentation' in metabolism: enzyme stereo-specificity yielding evolutionary options.

    PubMed

    Kuchel, Philip W; Pagès, Guilhem; Naumann, Christoph

    2013-09-02

    We introduce the concept of 'chiral compartmentation' in metabolism that emerges from the stereo-specificity of enzymes for their substrate(s). The fully differentiated mammalian erythrocyte has no sub-cellular organelles and yet it displays compartmentation of lactic acid that is generated either by glycolysis or the glyoxalase pathway. A form of 'operational compartmentation' exists, based not on the chemistry of the reactive groups in the molecules but their stereoisomerism. This we call 'chiral compartmentation', and the rationale for its 'natural selection' in the erythrocyte (and presumably in the cytoplasm of other cells) is discussed. Increasing awareness of the presence of d-amino acids in proteins in the otherwise dominant 'L-chiral biosphere', and of the preferential use of one enantiomer of a metabolite versus the other is largely due to recent developments in rapidly-applicable, analytical-chemical methods. We confirmed that the glyoxalase pathway yields D-lactic acid by using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy of stretched chiral hydrogels. The activities of the two lactate-producing pathways have been described by numerical integration of simultaneous non-linear differential equations, based on enzyme models like that introduced by Michaelis and Menten in 1913. Copyright © 2013 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. [Compartmentalization of the cell nucleus and spatial organization of the genome].

    PubMed

    Gavrilov, A A; Razin, S V

    2015-01-01

    The eukaryotic cell nucleus is one of the most complex cell organelles. Despite the absence of membranes, the nuclear space is divided into numerous compartments where different processes in- volved in the genome activity take place. The most important nuclear compartments include nucleoli, nuclear speckles, PML bodies, Cajal bodies, histone locus bodies, Polycomb bodies, insulator bodies, transcription and replication factories. The structural basis for the nuclear compartmentalization is provided by genomic DNA that occupies most of the nuclear volume. Nuclear compartments, in turn, guide the chromosome folding by providing a platform for the spatial interaction of individual genomic loci. In this review, we discuss fundamental principles of higher order genome organization with a focus on chromosome territories and chromosome domains, as well as consider the structure and function of the key nuclear compartments. We show that the func- tional compartmentalization of the cell nucleus and genome spatial organization are tightly interconnected, and that this form of organization is highly dynamic and is based on stochastic processes.

  7. Ras trafficking, localization and compartmentalized signalling.

    PubMed

    Prior, Ian A; Hancock, John F

    2012-04-01

    Ras proteins are proto-oncogenes that are frequently mutated in human cancers. Three closely related isoforms, HRAS, KRAS and NRAS, are expressed in all cells and have overlapping but distinctive functions. Recent work has revealed how differences between the Ras isoforms in their trafficking, localization and protein-membrane orientation enable signalling specificity to be determined. We review the various strategies used to characterize compartmentalized Ras localization and signalling. Localization is an important contextual modifier of signalling networks and insights from the Ras system are of widespread relevance for researchers interested in signalling initiated from membranes.

  8. Passive Noise Filtering by Cellular Compartmentalization.

    PubMed

    Stoeger, Thomas; Battich, Nico; Pelkmans, Lucas

    2016-03-10

    Chemical reactions contain an inherent element of randomness, which presents itself as noise that interferes with cellular processes and communication. Here we discuss the ability of the spatial partitioning of molecular systems to filter and, thus, remove noise, while preserving regulated and predictable differences between single living cells. In contrast to active noise filtering by network motifs, cellular compartmentalization is highly effective and easily scales to numerous systems without requiring a substantial usage of cellular energy. We will use passive noise filtering by the eukaryotic cell nucleus as an example of how this increases predictability of transcriptional output, with possible implications for the evolution of complex multicellularity.

  9. Human Lsg1 defines a family of essential GTPases that correlates with the evolution of compartmentalization

    PubMed Central

    Reynaud, Emmanuel G; Andrade, Miguel A; Bonneau, Fabien; Ly, Thi Bach Nga; Knop, Michael; Scheffzek, Klaus; Pepperkok, Rainer

    2005-01-01

    Background Compartmentalization is a key feature of eukaryotic cells, but its evolution remains poorly understood. GTPases are the oldest enzymes that use nucleotides as substrates and they participate in a wide range of cellular processes. Therefore, they are ideal tools for comparative genomic studies aimed at understanding how aspects of biological complexity such as cellular compartmentalization evolved. Results We describe the identification and characterization of a unique family of circularly permuted GTPases represented by the human orthologue of yeast Lsg1p. We placed the members of this family in the phylogenetic context of the YlqF Related GTPase (YRG) family, which are present in Eukarya, Bacteria and Archea and include the stem cell regulator Nucleostemin. To extend the computational analysis, we showed that hLsg1 is an essential GTPase predominantly located in the endoplasmic reticulum and, in some cells, in Cajal bodies in the nucleus. Comparison of localization and siRNA datasets suggests that all members of the family are essential GTPases that have increased in number as the compartmentalization of the eukaryotic cell and the ribosome biogenesis pathway have evolved. Conclusion We propose a scenario, consistent with our data, for the evolution of this family: cytoplasmic components were first acquired, followed by nuclear components, and finally the mitochondrial and chloroplast elements were derived from different bacterial species, in parallel with the formation of the nucleolus and the specialization of nuclear components. PMID:16209721

  10. Target mass control for uncertain compartmental systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sousa, Claudia; Mendonca, Teresa; Rocha, Paula

    2010-07-01

    In this article we analyse the total mass target control problem for compartmental systems under the presence of parameter uncertainties. We consider a state feedback control law with positivity constraints tuned for a nominal system, and prove that this law leads the value of the total mass of the real system to an interval whose bounds depend on the parameter uncertainties and can be made arbitrarily close to the desired value of the total mass when the uncertainties are sufficiently small. Moreover, we prove that for a class of compartmental systems in ℝ3 of interest, the state of the controlled system tends to an equilibrium point whose total mass lies within the aforementioned interval. Taking into account the relationship between the mass and the state components in steady state, it is possible to use the proposed mass control law to track the desired values for the steady state components. This is applied to the control of the neuromuscular blockade level of patients undergoing surgery, by means of the infusion of atracurium. Our results are illustrated by several simulations and a clinical case.

  11. Compartmentation of Redox Metabolism in Malaria Parasites

    PubMed Central

    Rahlfs, Stefan; Przyborski, Jude M.; Becker, Katja

    2010-01-01

    Malaria, caused by the apicomplexan parasite Plasmodium, still represents a major threat to human health and welfare and leads to about one million human deaths annually. Plasmodium is a rapidly multiplying unicellular organism undergoing a complex developmental cycle in man and mosquito – a life style that requires rapid adaptation to various environments. In order to deal with high fluxes of reactive oxygen species and maintain redox regulatory processes and pathogenicity, Plasmodium depends upon an adequate redox balance. By systematically studying the subcellular localization of the major antioxidant and redox regulatory proteins, we obtained the first complete map of redox compartmentation in Plasmodium falciparum. We demonstrate the targeting of two plasmodial peroxiredoxins and a putative glyoxalase system to the apicoplast, a non-photosynthetic plastid. We furthermore obtained a complete picture of the compartmentation of thioredoxin- and glutaredoxin-like proteins. Notably, for the two major antioxidant redox-enzymes – glutathione reductase and thioredoxin reductase – Plasmodium makes use of alternative-translation-initiation (ATI) to achieve differential targeting. Dual localization of proteins effected by ATI is likely to occur also in other Apicomplexa and might open new avenues for therapeutic intervention. PMID:21203490

  12. Functional compartmentation of the nucleotide pool

    SciTech Connect

    Volkin, E.

    1981-01-01

    Various lines of evidence show that the total cellular ribonucleoside triphosphate pool serves as the percursor pool for RNA synthesis. Other reports strongly support the thesis that the ribonucleotide pool is compartmentalized. In particular, the suggestion has been put forward that, in some cell lines, nucleosides such as uridine are rapidly channeled into the putative functional pool. The present experiments were designed to obtain a more direct answer to the question of nucleotide pool compartmentation. From these data, one can assess the feasibility of using specific activities of the total pool nucleoside triphosphates for calculating rates of RNA synthesis. Two cell lines were used in this investigation. A rat transformed tracheal cell line, cloned from a keratinizing squamous cell carcinoma, was grown as a stratified epithelium, and Novikoff hepatoma cell line, grown in suspension culture. Tritiated nucleoside and /sup 32/PO/sub 4/ were added to cells in exponential growth. Under the conditions used, between 85 to 100% of the RNA is hydrolyzed to 5'-mononucleotides. Furthermore, the enzyme was shown to be almost free of 5'-nucleotidase and totally devoid of deaminase and phosphoryl-transferring activities. (ERB)

  13. Compartmental model of 18F-choline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janzen, T.; Tavola, F.; Giussani, A.; Cantone, M. C.; Uusijärvi, H.; Mattsson, S.; Zankl, M.; Petoussi-Henß, N.; Hoeschen, C.

    2010-03-01

    The MADEIRA Project (Minimizing Activity and Dose with Enhanced Image quality by Radiopharmaceutical Administrations), aims to improve the efficacy and safety of 3D functional imaging by optimizing, among others, the knowledge of the temporal variation of the radiopharmaceuticals' uptake in and clearance from tumor and healthy tissues. With the help of compartmental modeling it is intended to optimize the time schedule for data collection and improve the evaluation of the organ doses to the patients. Administration of 18F-choline to screen for recurrence or the occurrence of metastases in prostate cancer patients is one of the diagnostic applications under consideration in the frame of the project. PET and CT images have been acquired up to four hours after injection of 18F-choline. Additionally blood and urine samples have been collected and measured in a gamma counter. The radioactivity concentration in different organs and data of plasma clearance and elimination into urine were used to set-up a compartmental model of the biokinetics of the radiopharmaceutical. It features a central compartment (blood) exchanging with organs. The structure describes explicitly liver, kidneys, spleen, plasma and bladder as separate units with a forcing function approach. The model is presented together with an evaluation of the individual and population kinetic parameters, and a revised time schedule for data collection is proposed. This optimized time schedule will be validated in a further set of patient studies.

  14. Reactive oxygen species and redox compartmentalization.

    PubMed

    Kaludercic, Nina; Deshwal, Soni; Di Lisa, Fabio

    2014-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation and signaling are of major importance and regulate a number of processes in physiological conditions. A disruption in redox status regulation, however, has been associated with numerous pathological conditions. In recent years it has become increasingly clear that oxidative and reductive modifications are confined in a spatio-temporal manner. This makes ROS signaling similar to that of Ca(2+) or other second messengers. Some subcellular compartments are more oxidizing (such as lysosomes or peroxisomes) whereas others are more reducing (mitochondria, nuclei). Moreover, although more reducing, mitochondria are especially susceptible to oxidation, most likely due to the high number of exposed thiols present in that compartment. Recent advances in the development of redox probes allow specific measurement of defined ROS in different cellular compartments in intact living cells or organisms. The availability of these tools now allows simultaneous spatio-temporal measurements and correlation between ROS generation and organelle and/or cellular function. The study of ROS compartmentalization and microdomains will help elucidate their role in physiology and disease. Here we will examine redox probes currently available and how ROS generation may vary between subcellular compartments. Furthermore, we will discuss ROS compartmentalization in physiological and pathological conditions focusing our attention on mitochondria, since their vulnerability to oxidative stress is likely at the basis of several diseases.

  15. Chemotherapeutic reactions of Chandlerella hawkingi, the filarial parasite of the Indian jungle crow, Corvus macrorhynchos (Agler).

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, R J; Sen, A B

    1969-02-01

    1. A high percentage of Indian jungle crows (Corvus macrorhynchos Wagler), found in and around Lucknow, harbour a natural filarial infection Chandlerella hawkingi. The microfilariae of this species are sheathed and show nocturnal periodicity.2. Fourteen compounds active against other kinds of filariae, especially against Litomosoides carinii, were tested against Ch. hawkingi in jungle crows to find whether this infection would be suitable for routine filarial chemotherapy. This is apparently the first report of systematic screening of antifilarial compounds against an avian filariasis.3. Tartar emetic (10 mg/kg intravenously, daily for 6 days) and arsenamide (5 mg/kg intraperitoneally, daily for 6 days) proved to be effective in killing adult worms. Trivalent tryparsamide, though effective, was toxic in the doses tried. Diethylcarbamazine and other compounds tested were ineffective.4. The chemotherapeutic susceptibilities of Ch. hawkingi differ considerably from those of L. carinii and Wuchereria bancrofti.

  16. Chemotherapeutic reactions of Chandlerella hawkingi, the filarial parasite of the Indian jungle crow, Corvus macrorhynchos (Wagler)

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, R. K.; Sen, A. B.

    1969-01-01

    1. A high percentage of Indian jungle crows (Corvus macrorhynchos Wagler), found in and around Lucknow, harbour a natural filarial infection Chandlerella hawkingi. The microfilariae of this species are sheathed and show nocturnal periodicity. 2. Fourteen compounds active against other kinds of filariae, especially against Litomosoides carinii, were tested against Ch. hawkingi in jungle crows to find whether this infection would be suitable for routine filarial chemotherapy. This is apparently the first report of systematic screening of antifilarial compounds against an avian filariasis. 3. Tartar emetic (10 mg/kg intravenously, daily for 6 days) and arsenamide (5 mg/kg intraperitoneally, daily for 6 days) proved to be effective in killing adult worms. Trivalent tryparsamide, though effective, was toxic in the doses tried. Diethylcarbamazine and other compounds tested were ineffective. 4. The chemotherapeutic susceptibilities of Ch. hawkingi differ considerably from those of L. carinii and Wuchereria bancrofti. PMID:5774047

  17. Jungle Skippers: The 317th Troop Carrier Group in the Southwest Pacific and Their Legacy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-01

    drome by their flashes and the noise of the 55 2/5 Infantry Battalion, War Diary, January...the war, positioned himself at the unused navigator’s station so that he could step up into the Plexiglas astrodome in the top of the cabin to look...about the cabin . Below, the Bulldog Track snaked upward through the jungle toward Wau. The channel funneled them onward. Finally, the formation

  18. Fasciola hepatica Infection in an Indigenous Community of the Peruvian Jungle.

    PubMed

    Cabada, Miguel M; Castellanos-Gonzalez, Alejandro; Lopez, Martha; Caravedo, María Alejandra; Arque, Eulogia; White, Arthur Clinton

    2016-06-01

    Fasciola hepatica is a zoonotic infection with a worldwide distribution. Autochthonous cases have not been reported in the Amazon region of Peru. Operculated eggs resembling F. hepatica were identified in the stools of five out of 215 subjects in a remote indigenous community of the Peruvian jungle. Polymerase chain reaction targeting Fasciola hepatica cytochrome oxidase subunit 1 (COI) gene and sequencing of the products confirmed Fasciola infection. © The American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.

  19. Cutaneous leishmaniasis in three Dutch military cohorts following jungle training in Belize.

    PubMed

    van Thiel, P P A M; Zeegelaar, J E; van Gool, T; Faber, W R; Kager, P A

    2011-05-01

    Skin lesions occur frequently in travelers to tropical countries. Military personnel acquire skin lesions regularly during jungle training as did Dutch troops who trained in the jungle of Belize in 1998, 2004 and 2009, in an area endemic for cutaneous leishmaniasis. Demographic and clinical data were collected retrospectively. Diagnostic investigations for cutaneous leishmaniasis included Giemsa stain, culture, PCR and NASBA and histopathology of biopsies. Treatment of leishmaniasis was with sodium stibogluconate, given intravenously or intralesionally, the latter with cryotherapy. In 1998 and 2004 cutaneous leishmaniasis due to Leishmania braziliensis and Leishmania mexicana infection was diagnosed in 25 persons out of 99 (attack rate 25.2%) and 14 persons out of 80 (attack rate 17.5%) respectively. In 2009 cutaneous leishmaniasis was not acquired. Skin problems were common during and after jungle training. Cutaneous leishmaniasis was important in the first two cohorts but not observed in the third cohort. Factors that could have played a role in the absence of cutaneous leishmaniasis in the third cohort include variability in transmission and availability of better preventive measures and adherence to these. Sodium stibogluconate treatment, intralesional or intravenous, was effective.

  20. A Compartmentalized Phosphorylation/Dephosphorylation System That Regulates U snRNA Export from the Nucleus▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Kitao, Saori; Segref, Alexandra; Kast, Juergen; Wilm, Matthias; Mattaj, Iain W.; Ohno, Mutsuhito

    2008-01-01

    PHAX (phosphorylated adaptor for RNA export) is the key regulator of U snRNA nuclear export in metazoa. Our previous work revealed that PHAX is phosphorylated in the nucleus and is exported as a component of the U snRNA export complex to the cytoplasm, where it is dephosphorylated (M. Ohno, A. Segref, A. Bachi, M. Wilm, and I. W. Mattaj, Cell 101:187-198, 2000). PHAX phosphorylation is essential for export complex assembly, whereas its dephosphorylation causes export complex disassembly. Thus, PHAX is subject to a compartmentalized phosphorylation/dephosphorylation cycle that contributes to transport directionality. However, neither essential PHAX phosphorylation sites nor the modifying enzymes that contribute to the compartmentalized system have been identified. Here, we identify PHAX phosphorylation sites that are necessary and sufficient for U snRNA export. Mutation of the phosphorylation sites inhibited U snRNA export in a dominant-negative way. We also show, by both biochemical and RNA interference knockdown experiments, that the nuclear kinase and the cytoplasmic phosphatase for PHAX are CK2 kinase and protein phosphatase 2A, respectively. Our results reveal the composition of the compartmentalized phosphorylation/dephosphorylation system that regulates U snRNA export. This finding was surprising in that such a specific system for U snRNA export regulation is composed of two such universal regulators, suggesting that this compartmentalized system is used more broadly for gene expression regulation. PMID:17967890

  1. Fractional kinetics in multi-compartmental systems.

    PubMed

    Dokoumetzidis, Aristides; Magin, Richard; Macheras, Panos

    2010-10-01

    Fractional calculus, the branch of calculus dealing with derivatives of non-integer order (e.g., the half-derivative) allows the formulation of fractional differential equations (FDEs), which have recently been applied to pharmacokinetics (PK) for one-compartment models. In this work we extend that theory to multi-compartmental models. Unlike systems defined by a single ordinary differential equation (ODE), considering fractional multi-compartmental models is not as simple as changing the order of the ordinary derivatives of the left-hand side of the ODEs to fractional orders. The latter may produce inconsistent systems which violate mass balance. We present a rationale for fractionalization of ODEs, which produces consistent systems and allows processes of different fractional orders in the same system. We also apply a method of solving such systems based on a numerical inverse Laplace transform algorithm, which we demonstrate that is consistent with analytical solutions when these are available. As examples of our approach, we consider two cases of a basic two-compartment PK model with a single IV dose and multiple oral dosing, where the transfer from the peripheral to the central compartment is of fractional order α < 1, accounting for anomalous kinetics and deep tissue trapping, while all other processes are of the usual order 1. Simulations with the studied systems are performed using the numerical inverse Laplace transform method. It is shown that the presence of a transfer rate of fractional order produces a non-exponential terminal phase, while multiple dose and constant infusion systems never reach steady state and drug accumulation carries on indefinitely. The IV fractional system is also fitted to PK data and parameter values are estimated. In conclusion, our approach allows the formulation of systems of FDEs, mixing different fractional orders, in a consistent manner and also provides a method for the numerical solution of these systems.

  2. Metabolic Flux and Compartmentation Analysis in the Brain In vivo

    PubMed Central

    Lanz, Bernard; Gruetter, Rolf; Duarte, João M. N.

    2013-01-01

    Through significant developments and progresses in the last two decades, in vivo localized nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) became a method of choice to probe brain metabolic pathways in a non-invasive way. Beside the measurement of the total concentration of more than 20 metabolites, 1H MRS can be used to quantify the dynamics of substrate transport across the blood-brain barrier by varying the plasma substrate level. On the other hand, 13C MRS with the infusion of 13C-enriched substrates enables the characterization of brain oxidative metabolism and neurotransmission by incorporation of 13C in the different carbon positions of amino acid neurotransmitters. The quantitative determination of the biochemical reactions involved in these processes requires the use of appropriate metabolic models, whose level of details is strongly related to the amount of data accessible with in vivo MRS. In the present work, we present the different steps involved in the elaboration of a mathematical model of a given brain metabolic process and its application to the experimental data in order to extract quantitative brain metabolic rates. We review the recent advances in the localized measurement of brain glucose transport and compartmentalized brain energy metabolism, and how these reveal mechanistic details on glial support to glutamatergic and GABAergic neurons. PMID:24194729

  3. Reading the Evolution of Compartmentalization in the Ribosome Assembly Toolbox: The YRG Protein Family

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Pulido, Antonio J.; Reynaud, Emmanuel G.; Andrade-Navarro, Miguel A.

    2017-01-01

    Reconstructing the transition from a single compartment bacterium to a highly compartmentalized eukaryotic cell is one of the most studied problems of evolutionary cell biology. However, timing and details of the establishment of compartmentalization are unclear and difficult to assess. Here, we propose the use of molecular markers specific to cellular compartments to set up a framework to advance the understanding of this complex intracellular process. Specifically, we use a protein family related to ribosome biogenesis, YRG (YlqF related GTPases), whose evolution is linked to the establishment of cellular compartments, leveraging the current genomic data. We analyzed orthologous proteins of the YRG family in a set of 171 proteomes for a total of 370 proteins. We identified ten YRG protein subfamilies that can be associated to six subcellular compartments (nuclear bodies, nucleolus, nucleus, cytosol, mitochondria, and chloroplast), and which were found in archaeal, bacterial and eukaryotic proteomes. Our analysis reveals organism streamlining related events in specific taxonomic groups such as Fungi. We conclude that the YRG family could be used as a compartmentalization marker, which could help to trace the evolutionary path relating cellular compartments with ribosome biogenesis. PMID:28072865

  4. Reading the Evolution of Compartmentalization in the Ribosome Assembly Toolbox: The YRG Protein Family.

    PubMed

    Mier, Pablo; Pérez-Pulido, Antonio J; Reynaud, Emmanuel G; Andrade-Navarro, Miguel A

    2017-01-01

    Reconstructing the transition from a single compartment bacterium to a highly compartmentalized eukaryotic cell is one of the most studied problems of evolutionary cell biology. However, timing and details of the establishment of compartmentalization are unclear and difficult to assess. Here, we propose the use of molecular markers specific to cellular compartments to set up a framework to advance the understanding of this complex intracellular process. Specifically, we use a protein family related to ribosome biogenesis, YRG (YlqF related GTPases), whose evolution is linked to the establishment of cellular compartments, leveraging the current genomic data. We analyzed orthologous proteins of the YRG family in a set of 171 proteomes for a total of 370 proteins. We identified ten YRG protein subfamilies that can be associated to six subcellular compartments (nuclear bodies, nucleolus, nucleus, cytosol, mitochondria, and chloroplast), and which were found in archaeal, bacterial and eukaryotic proteomes. Our analysis reveals organism streamlining related events in specific taxonomic groups such as Fungi. We conclude that the YRG family could be used as a compartmentalization marker, which could help to trace the evolutionary path relating cellular compartments with ribosome biogenesis.

  5. Field Testing of Compartmentalization Methods for Multifamily Construction

    SciTech Connect

    Ueno, K.; Lstiburek, J. W.

    2015-03-01

    The 2012 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) has an airtightness requirement of 3 air changes per hour at 50 Pascals test pressure (3 ACH50) for single-family and multifamily construction (in climate zones 3–8). The Leadership in Energy & Environmental Design certification program and ASHRAE Standard 189 have comparable compartmentalization requirements. ASHRAE Standard 62.2 will soon be responsible for all multifamily ventilation requirements (low rise and high rise); it has an exceptionally stringent compartmentalization requirement. These code and program requirements are driving the need for easier and more effective methods of compartmentalization in multifamily buildings.

  6. Subcellular compartmentation of ascorbate and its variation in disease states.

    PubMed

    Bánhegyi, Gábor; Benedetti, Angelo; Margittai, Eva; Marcolongo, Paola; Fulceri, Rosella; Németh, Csilla E; Szarka, András

    2014-09-01

    Beyond its general role as antioxidant, specific functions of ascorbate are compartmentalized within the eukaryotic cell. The list of organelle-specific functions of ascorbate has been recently expanded with the epigenetic role exerted as a cofactor for DNA and histone demethylases in the nucleus. Compartmentation necessitates the transport through intracellular membranes; members of the GLUT family and sodium-vitamin C cotransporters mediate the permeation of dehydroascorbic acid and ascorbate, respectively. Recent observations show that increased consumption and/or hindered entrance of ascorbate in/to a compartment results in pathological alterations partially resembling to scurvy, thus diseases of ascorbate compartmentation can exist. The review focuses on the reactions and transporters that can modulate ascorbate concentration and redox state in three compartments: endoplasmic reticulum, mitochondria and nucleus. By introducing the relevant experimental and clinical findings we make an attempt to coin the term of ascorbate compartmentation disease.

  7. Holocene cultural history of Red jungle fowl (Gallus gallus) and its domestic descendant in East Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, Joris; Lebrasseur, Ophélie; Deng, Hui; Larson, Greger

    2016-06-01

    Nearly three decades ago, zooarchaeologists postulated that chicken husbandry was practiced in Northern China by ∼8.0 ka calBP. Recently, ancient mitogenome analyses of galliform remains suggested that Red jungle fowl (Gallus gallus) was already present in the Yellow River basin several millennia earlier, shortly after the onset of the Holocene. If these conclusions are correct, the origins of chicken domestication and husbandry in the region may have been spurred by agricultural innovations in the lower Yellow River basin including millet cultivation, pig husbandry, and dog breeding. In addition, the dispersal of poultry farming from East Asia to Asia Minor and Europe could therefore date to the Neolithic along ancient trade routes across Central Asia rather than via South Asia and Mesopotamia. For this scenario to be plausible, the post-Pleistocene climatic conditions must have been favourable to allow for a northward extension of the native distribution of tropical Red jungle fowl currently not found north of ∼25°N. This study combines Holocene palaeoclimate and archaeofaunal archives with new zooarchaeological insights alongside a discussion of methodological issues and cultural aspects in order to revisit the hypothesis of an early Holocene Gallus domestication and Neolithic poultry husbandry in Northern China. Our results regarding the natural and cultural history of Red jungle fowl and domestic chickens in East Asia, and the timing of chicken dispersal across the Old World suggest that an early Holocene domestication of chickens is problematic at best. We conclude by postulating an alternative model for the early exploitation of a key domestic species in present-day East Asia.

  8. Cryopreservation of Indian red jungle fowl (Gallus gallus murghi) semen with polyvinylpyrrolidone.

    PubMed

    Rakha, Bushra Allah; Ansari, Muhammad Sajjad; Akhter, Shamim; Zafar, Zartasha; Hussain, Iftikhar; Santiago-Moreno, Julian; Blesbois, Elisabeth

    2017-10-01

    The Indian red jungle fowl is a sub-species of the genus Gallus native to South Asia; facing high risk of extinction in its native habitat. During cryopreservation, permeable cryoprotectants like glycerol are usually employed and we previously showed encouraging results with 20% glycerol. Because bird spermatozoa contain very little intracellular water, the possibility of replacing an internal cryoprotectant by an external one is opened. In the present study, we tested the replacement of internal cryoprotectant glycerol by the external cryoprotectant Polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP). PVP is a non-permeable cryoprotectant and keeps the sperm in glassy state both in cooling and warming stages without making ice crystallization within the sperm cell. We evaluated the effect of various levels of polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) on Indian red jungle fowl semen quality and fertility outcomes. The qualifying semen ejaculates collected from eight mature cocks were pooled, divided into five aliquots, diluted (37 °C) with red fowl semen extender having PVP [0% (control) 4% (w/v), 6% (w/v), 8% (w/v) and 10% (w/v)]. Diluted semen was cryopreserved and stored in liquid nitrogen. The whole experiment was repeated/replicated for five times independently. Sperm motility, plasma membrane integrity, viability and acrosome integrity were recorded highest (P < 0.05) with 6% PVP at post-dilution, cooling, equilibration and freeze-thawing. Higher (P < 0.05) no. of fertile eggs, fertility, no. of hatched chicks, percent hatch and hatchability was recorded with 6% PVP compared to control. It is concluded that 6% PVP maintained better post-taw quality and fertility of Indian red jungle fowl spermatozoa than glycerol and can be used in routine practice avoiding the contraceptive effects of glycerol. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Apoptosis-mediated seasonal testicular regression in the Japanese Jungle Crow (Corvus macrorhynchos).

    PubMed

    Islam, M Nazrul; Tsukahara, N; Sugita, S

    2012-06-01

    The present study investigated effects of apoptosis observed during seasonal testicular regression in Japanese Jungle Crows. The study was conducted during January to June 2008, 2009. Testes from adults captured during non-breeding (January), prebreeding (February to mid-March), main-breeding (late March to early May), transition (mid-May to late May), and post-breeding (June) seasons were analyzed. Apoptosis was assessed by in situ terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end-labeling (TUNEL) assay. Paired-testis volume increased 95-fold from the non-breeding to the main-breeding season (P < 0.05), and subsequently decreased 26-fold from the main breeding to the post-breeding season (P < 0.05). Testicular activity was evaluated from the total germ cell count and sperm index, which increased 42- and 5-fold, respectively, in the main-breeding season, and subsequently decreased 33- and 5-fold in the post-breeding season. In testes, TUNEL-positive germ cells were at low levels in the non-breeding season, absent in the prebreeding and the main-breeding seasons, and highest in mid-May (P < 0.05). In contrast, TUNEL-positive Sertoli cells occurred only in late-April. In addition, TUNEL-positive fibroblast-like cells were observed in the outer zone of the tunica albuginea in the post-breeding season. Collectively, these data suggested that the seasonal rise in the testicular competence occurred slowly in Japanese Jungle Crows; however, testis function was terminated rapidly after the breeding season. Furthermore, we concluded, similar to other avian species, Sertoli cell apoptosis followed by massive germ cell death was responsible for rapid testicular regression in Jungle Crows. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Calcium dynamics and compartmentalization in leech neurons.

    PubMed

    Andjelic, Sofija; Torre, Vincent

    2005-12-01

    Calcium dynamics in leech neurons were studied using a fast CCD camera. Fluorescence changes (DeltaF/F) of the membrane impermeable calcium indicator Oregon Green were measured. The dye was pressure injected into the soma of neurons under investigation. DeltaF/F caused by a single action potential (AP) in mechanosensory neurons had approximately the same amplitude and time course in the soma and in distal processes. By contrast, in other neurons such as the Anterior Pagoda neuron, the Annulus Erector motoneuron, the L motoneuron, and other motoneurons, APs evoked by passing depolarizing current in the soma produced much larger fluorescence changes in distal processes than in the soma. When APs were evoked by stimulating one distal axon through the root, DeltaF/F was large in all distal processes but very small in the soma. Our results show a clear compartmentalization of calcium dynamics in most leech neurons in which the soma does not give propagating action potentials. In such cells, the soma, while not excitable, can affect information processing by modulating the sites of origin and conduction of AP propagation in distal excitable processes.

  11. Compartmentalization and Transport in Synthetic Vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Schmitt, Christine; Lippert, Anna H.; Bonakdar, Navid; Sandoghdar, Vahid; Voll, Lars M.

    2016-01-01

    Nanoscale vesicles have become a popular tool in life sciences. Besides liposomes that are generated from phospholipids of natural origin, polymersomes fabricated of synthetic block copolymers enjoy increasing popularity, as they represent more versatile membrane building blocks that can be selected based on their specific physicochemical properties, such as permeability, stability, or chemical reactivity. In this review, we focus on the application of simple and nested artificial vesicles in synthetic biology. First, we provide an introduction into the utilization of multicompartmented vesosomes as compartmentalized nanoscale bioreactors. In the bottom-up development of protocells from vesicular nanoreactors, the specific exchange of pathway intermediates across compartment boundaries represents a bottleneck for future studies. To date, most compartmented bioreactors rely on unspecific exchange of substrates and products. This is either based on changes in permeability of the coblock polymer shell by physicochemical triggers or by the incorporation of unspecific porin proteins into the vesicle membrane. Since the incorporation of membrane transport proteins into simple and nested artificial vesicles offers the potential for specific exchange of substances between subcompartments, it opens new vistas in the design of protocells. Therefore, we devote the main part of the review to summarize the technical advances in the use of phospholipids and block copolymers for the reconstitution of membrane proteins. PMID:26973834

  12. Compartmentalized Cytokine Responses in Hidradenitis Suppurativa

    PubMed Central

    Savva, Athina; Kersten, Brigit; Pistiki, Aikaterini; van de Veerdonk, Frank L.; Netea, Mihai G.; van der Meer, Jos W.; Giamarellos-Bourboulis, Evangelos J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Favorable treatment outcomes with TNF blockade led us to explore cytokine responses in hidradenitis suppurativa (HS). Methods Blood monocytes of 120 patients and 24 healthy volunteers were subtyped by flow cytometry. Isolated blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were stimulated for cytokine production; this was repeated in 13 severe patients during treatment with etanercept. Cytokines in pus were measured. Results CD14brightCD16dim inflammatory monocytes and patrolling monocytes were increased in Hurley III patients. Cytokine production by stimulated PBMCs was low compared to controls but the cytokine gene copies did not differ, indicating post-translational inhibition. The low production of IL-17 was restored, when cells were incubated with adalimumab. In pus, high concentrations of pro-inflammatory cytokines were detected. Based on the patterns, six different cytokine profiles were discerned, which are potentially relevant for the choice of treatment. Clinical improvement with etanercept was predicted by increased production of IL-1β and IL-17 by PBMCs at week 8. Conclusions Findings indicate compartmentalized cytokine expression in HS; high in pus but suppressed in PBMCs. This is modulated through blockade of TNF. PMID:26091259

  13. Renormalization-Group Theory Study of Superfluidity and Phase Separation of Helium Mixtures Immersed in Jungle-Gym Aerogel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopatnikova, Anna; Berker, A. Nihat

    1997-03-01

    Superfluidity and phase separation in ^3He-^4He mixtures immersed in jungle-gym (non-random) aerogel are studied by renormalization-group theory.(Phys. Rev. B, in press (1996)) Phase diagrams are calculated for a variety of aerogel concentrations. Superfluidity at very low ^4He concentrations and a depressed tricritical temperature are found at the onset of superfluidity. A superfluid-superfluid phase separation, terminating at an isolated critical point, is found entirely within the superfluid phase. These phenomena, and trends with respect to aerogel concentration, are explained by the connectivity and tenuousness of jungle-gym aerogel.

  14. Digital processing of satellite imagery application to jungle areas of Peru

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pomalaza, J. C. (Principal Investigator); Pomalaza, C. A.; Espinoza, J.

    1976-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. The use of clustering methods permits the development of relatively fast classification algorithms that could be implemented in an inexpensive computer system with limited amount of memory. Analysis of CCTs using these techniques can provide a great deal of detail permitting the use of the maximum resolution of LANDSAT imagery. Potential cases were detected in which the use of other techniques for classification using a Gaussian approximation for the distribution functions can be used with advantage. For jungle areas, channels 5 and 7 can provide enough information to delineate drainage patterns, swamp and wet areas, and make a reasonable broad classification of forest types.

  15. Copper transport and compartmentation in grape cells.

    PubMed

    Martins, Viviana; Hanana, Mohsen; Blumwald, Eduardo; Gerós, Hernâni

    2012-11-01

    Copper-based fungicides have been widely used against several grapevine (Vitis vinifera L.) diseases since the late 1800s when the Bordeaux mixture was developed, but their intensive use has raised phytotoxicity concerns. In this study, physiological, biochemical and molecular approaches were combined to investigate the impacts of copper in grape cells and how it is transported and compartmented intracellularly. Copper reduced the growth and viability of grape cells (CSB, Cabernet Sauvignon Berry) in a dose-dependent manner above 100 µM and was accumulated in specific metal ion sinks. The copper-sensitive probe Phen Green SK was used to characterize copper transport across the plasma membrane of CSB cells. The transport system (K(m) = 583 µM; V(max) = 177 × 10(-6) %ΔF min(-1) protoplast(-1)) was regulated by copper availability in the culture medium, stimulated by Ca(2+) and inhibited by Zn(2+). The pH-sensitive fluorescent probe ACMA (9-amino-6-chloro-2-methoxyacridine) was used to evaluate the involvement of proton-dependent copper transport across the tonoplast. Cu(2+) compartmentation in the vacuole was dependent on the transmembrane pH gradient generated by both V-H(+)-ATPase and V-H(+)-pyrophosphatase (PPase). High copper levels in the growth medium did not affect the activity of V-H(+)-PPase but decreased the magnitude of the H(+) gradient generated by V-H(+)-ATPase. Expression studies of VvCTr genes showed that VvCTr1 and VvCTr8 were distinctly affected by CuSO(4) availability in grape cell cultures and that both genes were highly expressed in the green stage of grape berries.

  16. Modeling the Kinetics of a Memory-Associated Immediate Early Gene's Compartmental Expression After Sensory Experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willats, Adam; Ivanova, Tamara; Prinz, Astrid; Liu, Robert

    2015-03-01

    Immediate Early Genes (IEGs) are rapidly and transiently transcribed in neurons after a sensory experience. Some of these genes act as effector IEGs, which mediate specific effects on cellular function. Arc is one such effector IEG that is essential for synaptic plasticity and memory consolidation in hippocampus and cortex. The expression of Arc in neurons has previously been examined using an imaging method known as Compartmental Analysis of Temporal Fluorescent In-Situ Hybridization. Previous work found that the time course of Arc expression within the nuclear and perinuclear cytoplasmic compartments of a neuron is altered by prior sensory experience. We explore a simple model of the kinetics of IEG transcription and nuclear export, with the aim of eventually uncovering possible mechanisms for how experience alters expression kinetics. Thus far, we characterize our compartmental model using phase-plane analysis and validate it against several IEG expression data sets, including one where prior experience with vocalizing mice alters the time course of call-induced Arc expression in the auditory cortex of a listening mouse. Our model provides a framework to explore why Arc expression may change depending on a receiver's past sound experience and internal state. Adam Willats was supported by NIH Training Grant 5T90DA032466. This research was also supported by NIDCD R01 DC8343.

  17. Nuclear transport and transcription.

    PubMed

    Komeili, A; O'Shea, E K

    2000-06-01

    The compartmentalization of DNA in the nucleus of eukaryotic cells establishes a connection between the nuclear transport machinery and the transcriptional apparatus. General transcription factors, as well as specific transcriptional activators and repressors, such as p53 and NF-AT, need to be imported into the nucleus following their translation. In addition, nuclear transport plays a crucial role in regulating the activity of many transcription factors.

  18. Compartmentalization of prostaglandins in the canine kidney

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan-Boyd, R.L.

    1986-01-01

    The kidney has been shown to synthesize all of the naturally occurring major prostaglandins which may be restricted to a discrete part of the kidney where their actions are physiologically important, such as the vascular compartment and the tubular compartment. In order to examine this concept of compartmentalization, the authors conducted a series of experiments to determine whether PGl/sub 2/, measured as 6-keto-pGF/sub 1..cap alpha../, produced in the kidney is restricted to the renal vascular compartment or whether it also has access to the tubular compartment. Experiments were performed in the pentobarbital-anesthetized dog. Increasing pre-glomerular levels of 6-keto-PFG/sub 1..cap alpha../ caused marked increases in both the urinary excretion and the renal venous outflow to 6-keto-PGF/sub 1..cap alpha../. When /sup 3/H-6-keto-PGF/sub 1..cap alpha../ was co-infused with inulin into the renal artery, 33% of the radioactivity and 23% of the inulin was recovered on first pass. With infusion of /sup 3/H-PGl/sub 2/ and inulin, 20% of the radioactivity and 28% of the inulin reached the urine on first pass. Radioactive PGl/sub 2/ appeared to be less filterable at the glomeruli than either /sup 3/H-6-keto-PGF/sub 1..cap alpha../ or inulin. In the final set of experiments, in which dogs were prepared for a ureteral stopped-flow study, the PGE/sub 2//U/P/sub In/ ratio a peak was observed proximal to the Na/sup +/ plateau but distal to the Na+ nadir. In light of the results from the stopped-flow study and the intrarenal infusion studies, they conclude that PGE/sub 2/ synthesized in the kidney enters both the renal and tubular compartments. In contrast, they find that 6-keto-PGF/sub 1..cap alpha../ of renal origin enters only the renal origin enters only the renal vascular compartment and not the tubular compartment.

  19. Towards repurposing the yeast peroxisome for compartmentalizing heterologous metabolic pathways

    DOE PAGES

    DeLoache, William C.; Russ, Zachary N.; Dueber, John E.

    2016-03-30

    Compartmentalization of enzymes into organelles is a promising strategy for limiting metabolic crosstalk and improving pathway efficiency, but improved tools and design rules are needed to make this strategy available to more engineered pathways. Here we focus on the Saccharomyces cerevisiae peroxisome and develop a sensitive high-throughput assay for peroxisomal cargo import. We identify an enhanced peroxisomal targeting signal type 1 (PTS1) for rapidly sequestering non-native cargo proteins. Additionally, we perform the first systematic in vivo measurements of nonspecific metabolite permeability across the peroxisomal membrane using a polymer exclusion assay. Finally, we apply these new insights to compartmentalize a two-enzymemore » pathway in the peroxisome and characterize the expression regimes where compartmentalization leads to improved product titre. Lastly, this work builds a foundation for using the peroxisome as a synthetic organelle, highlighting both promise and future challenges on the way to realizing this goal.« less

  20. Towards repurposing the yeast peroxisome for compartmentalizing heterologous metabolic pathways

    SciTech Connect

    DeLoache, William C.; Russ, Zachary N.; Dueber, John E.

    2016-03-30

    Compartmentalization of enzymes into organelles is a promising strategy for limiting metabolic crosstalk and improving pathway efficiency, but improved tools and design rules are needed to make this strategy available to more engineered pathways. Here we focus on the Saccharomyces cerevisiae peroxisome and develop a sensitive high-throughput assay for peroxisomal cargo import. We identify an enhanced peroxisomal targeting signal type 1 (PTS1) for rapidly sequestering non-native cargo proteins. Additionally, we perform the first systematic in vivo measurements of nonspecific metabolite permeability across the peroxisomal membrane using a polymer exclusion assay. Finally, we apply these new insights to compartmentalize a two-enzyme pathway in the peroxisome and characterize the expression regimes where compartmentalization leads to improved product titre. Lastly, this work builds a foundation for using the peroxisome as a synthetic organelle, highlighting both promise and future challenges on the way to realizing this goal.

  1. Towards repurposing the yeast peroxisome for compartmentalizing heterologous metabolic pathways.

    PubMed

    DeLoache, William C; Russ, Zachary N; Dueber, John E

    2016-03-30

    Compartmentalization of enzymes into organelles is a promising strategy for limiting metabolic crosstalk and improving pathway efficiency, but improved tools and design rules are needed to make this strategy available to more engineered pathways. Here we focus on the Saccharomyces cerevisiae peroxisome and develop a sensitive high-throughput assay for peroxisomal cargo import. We identify an enhanced peroxisomal targeting signal type 1 (PTS1) for rapidly sequestering non-native cargo proteins. Additionally, we perform the first systematic in vivo measurements of nonspecific metabolite permeability across the peroxisomal membrane using a polymer exclusion assay. Finally, we apply these new insights to compartmentalize a two-enzyme pathway in the peroxisome and characterize the expression regimes where compartmentalization leads to improved product titre. This work builds a foundation for using the peroxisome as a synthetic organelle, highlighting both promise and future challenges on the way to realizing this goal.

  2. Compartmentalization of Incompatible Catalytic Transformations for Tandem Catalysis.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jie; Dimroth, Jonas; Weck, Marcus

    2015-10-14

    In Nature, incompatible catalytic transformations are being carried out simultaneously through compartmentalization that allows for the combination of incompatible catalysts in tandem reactions. Herein, we take the compartmentalization concept to the synthetic realm and present an approach that allows two incompatible transition metal catalyzed transformations to proceed in one pot in tandem. The key is the site isolation of both catalysts through compartmentalization using a core-shell micellar support in an aqueous environment. The support is based on amphiphilic triblock copolymers of poly(2-oxazoline)s with orthogonal functional groups on the side chain that can be used to cross-link covalently the micelle and to conjugate two metal catalysts in different domains of the micelle. The micelle core and shell provide different microenvironments for the transformations: Co-catalyzed hydration of an alkyne proceeds in the hydrophobic core, while the Rh-catalyzed asymmetric transfer hydrogenation of the intermediate ketone into a chiral alcohol occurs in the hydrophilic shell.

  3. Evidence of recent jungle yellow-fever activity in eastern Panama*

    PubMed Central

    Galindo, Pedro; Srihongse, Sunthorn

    1967-01-01

    Outbreaks of jungle yellow fever in man have been recorded twice from eastern Panama of recent years, first in 1948 and again in 1956. Since then, a close surveillance has been maintained on virus activity in eastern Panama. Recent field observations and serological tests on 402 monkey sera indicate that there was an outbreak of yellow fever among monkeys of southern Darién Province some time between 1963 and 1965. It does not appear that the outbreak has spread as yet to other areas. Virus transmission may have been permanently disrupted during the drought which affected the region in 1965. However, if the virus had managed to survive this unfavourable period, an epizootic wave might have evolved, invading forested areas immediately east of the Panama Canal, now inhabited by a dense non-immune human population. PMID:4962725

  4. Shared and Distinct Mechanisms of Compartmentalized and Cytosolic Ciliogenesis.

    PubMed

    Avidor-Reiss, Tomer; Leroux, Michel R

    2015-12-07

    Most motile and all non-motile (also known as primary) eukaryotic cilia possess microtubule-based axonemes that are assembled at the cell surface to form hair-like or more elaborate compartments endowed with motility and/or signaling functions. Such compartmentalized ciliogenesis depends on the core intraflagellar transport (IFT) machinery and the associated Bardet-Biedl syndrome complex (BBSome) for dynamic delivery of ciliary components. The transition zone (TZ), an ultrastructurally complex barrier or 'gate' at the base of cilia, also contributes to the formation of compartmentalized cilia. Yet, some ciliated protists do not have IFT components and, like some metazoan spermatozoa, use IFT-independent mechanisms to build axonemes exposed to the cytosol. Moreover, various ciliated protists lack TZ components, whereas Drosophila sperm surprisingly requires the activity of dynamically localized TZ proteins for cytosolic ciliogenesis. Here, we discuss the various ways eukaryotes use IFT and/or TZ proteins to generate the wide assortment of compartmentalized and cytosolic cilia observed in nature. Consideration of the different ciliogenesis pathways allows us to propose how three types of cytosol-exposed cilia (primary, secondary and tertiary), including cilia found in the human sperm proximal segment, are likely generated by evolutionary derivations of compartmentalized ciliogenesis.

  5. The Notion of Compartmentalization: The Case of Richard

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eraslan, Ali

    2007-01-01

    One of the important phenomena observed in the learning of mathematics is compartmentalization. This phenomenon occurs when a learner has two different, potentially contradictory schemes in his or her cognitive structure; in a typical case, a student deals with the same mathematical concept in an inconsistent or incoherent way, or activates a less…

  6. Compartmental models for continuous flow reactors derived from CFD simulations.

    PubMed

    Gresch, Markus; Brügger, Raphael; Meyer, Alain; Gujer, Willi

    2009-04-01

    Reactor modeling is of major interest in environmental technology. In this context, new contaminants with higher degradation requirements increase the importance of reactor hydraulics. CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) may meet this challenge but is expensive for everyday use. In this paper, we provide research and practice with a methodology designed to automatically reduce the complexity of such a high-dimensional flow model to a compartmental model. The derivation is based on the concentration field of a reacting species which is included in the steady state CFD simulation. While still capturing the most important flow features, the compartmental model is fast, easy to use, and open for process modeling with yet unknown compounds. The inherent overestimation of diffusion by compartmental models has been corrected by locally adjusting turbulent fluxes. We successfully applied the methodology to the ozonation process and experimentally verified it with tracer experiments. The loss of information was quantified as a deviation from CFD performance prediction for different reactions. With increasing discretisation of the compartmental model, these deviations diminish. General advice on the necessary discretisation is given.

  7. Constraining compartmental models using multiple voltage recordings and genetic algorithms.

    PubMed

    Keren, Naomi; Peled, Noam; Korngreen, Alon

    2005-12-01

    Compartmental models with many nonlinearly and nonhomogeneous distributions of voltage-gated conductances are routinely used to investigate the physiology of complex neurons. However, the number of loosely constrained parameters makes manually constructing the desired model a daunting if not impossible task. Recently, progress has been made using automated parameter search methods, such as genetic algorithms (GAs). However, these methods have been applied to somatically recorded action potentials using relatively simple target functions. Using a genetic minimization algorithm and a reduced compartmental model based on a previously published model of layer 5 neocortical pyramidal neurons we compared the efficacy of five cost functions (based on the waveform of the membrane potential, the interspike interval, trajectory density, and their combinations) to constrain the model. When the model was constrained using somatic recordings only, a combined cost function was found to be the most effective. This combined cost function was then applied to investigate the contribution of dendritic and axonal recordings to the ability of the GA to constrain the model. The more recording locations from the dendrite and the axon that were added to the data set the better was the genetic minimization algorithm able to constrain the compartmental model. Based on these simulations we propose an experimental scheme that, in combination with a genetic minimization algorithm, may be used to constrain compartmental models of neurons.

  8. Macroanatomy of compartmentalization in fire scars of three western conifers

    Treesearch

    Kevin T. Smith; Elaine Sutherland; Estelle Arbellay; Markus Stoffel; Donald. Falk

    2013-01-01

    Fire scars are visible evidence of compartmentalization and closure processes that contribute to tree survival after fire injury. Preliminary observations of dissected fire scars from trees injured within the last decade showed centripetal development of wound-initiated discoloration (WID) through 2-3 decades of former sapwood in Larix occidentalis and Pseudotsuga...

  9. Compartmentalization of decayed wood associated with Armillaria mellea in several tree species

    Treesearch

    Alex L. Shigo; Joanna T. Tippett

    1981-01-01

    Decayed wood associated with Armillaria mellea was compartmentalized according to the CODIT (Compartmentalization Of Decay In Trees) model. Compartmentalization in the sapwood began after the tree walled off the area of dead cambium associated with the inflection of the fungus. The fungus spread into dying sapwood beneath and beyond the area of...

  10. Kinetic compartmental analysis of carnitine metabolism in the dog

    SciTech Connect

    Rebouche, C.J.; Engel, A.G.

    1983-01-01

    This study was undertaken to quantitate the dynamic parameters of carnitine metabolism in the dog. Six mongrel dogs were given intravenous injections of L-(methyl-3H)carnitine and the specific radioactivity of carnitine was followed in plasma and urine for 19-28 days. The data were analyzed by kinetic compartmental analysis. A three-compartment, open-system model ((a) extracellular fluid, (b) cardiac and skeletal muscle, (c) other tissues, particularly liver and kidney) was adopted and kinetic parameters (carnitine flux, pool sizes, kinetic constants) were derived. In four of six dogs the size of the muscle carnitine pool obtained by kinetic compartmental analysis agreed (+/- 5%) with estimates based on measurement of carnitine concentrations in different muscles. In three of six dogs carnitine excretion rates derived from kinetic compartmental analysis agreed (+/- 9%) with experimentally measured values, but in three dogs the rates by kinetic compartmental analysis were significantly higher than the corresponding rates measured directly. Appropriate chromatographic analyses revealed no radioactive metabolites in muscle or urine of any of the dogs. Turnover times for carnitine were (mean +/- SEM): 0.44 +/- 0.05 h for extracellular fluid, 232 +/- 22 h for muscle, and 7.9 +/- 1.1 h for other tissues. The estimated flux of carnitine in muscle was 210 pmol/min/g of tissue. Whole-body turnover time for carnitine was 62.9 +/- 5.6 days (mean +/- SEM). Estimated carnitine biosynthesis ranged from 2.9 to 28 mumol/kg body wt/day. Results of this study indicate that kinetic compartmental analysis may be applicable to study of human carnitine metabolism.

  11. Compartmentalization of Gd liposomes: the quenching effect explained.

    PubMed

    Guenoun, Jamal; Doeswijk, Gabriela N; Krestin, Gabriel P; Bernsen, Monique R

    2016-01-01

    Cationic liposomes carrying high [Gd] can be used as efficient cell-labeling agents. In a compartmentalized state, Gd can cause signal loss (relaxivity quenching). The contributions of liposomal [Gd], size and compartmentalization state to relaxivity quenching were assessed. The dependency of signal intensity (SI) on intraliposomal [Gd] was assessed comparing three different [Gd] (0.3, 0.6 and 1.0 M Gd) in both small (80 nm) and large (120 nm) cationic liposomes. In addition, five compartmentalization states were compared: free Gd, intact Gd liposomes, ruptured Gd liposomes, Gd liposomes in intact cells and Gd liposomes in ruptured cells (simulating cell death). Gd also causes R2 effects, which is often overlooked. Therefore, both R1 and R2 relaxation rates of a dilution range were measured by T1 and T2 mapping on a 7 T clinical scanner. Less is more. As the unidirectional water efflux rate (outbound across the liposome membrane, κle) is proportional to the surface:volume ratio, smaller liposomes yielded a consistently higher R1 than larger liposomes. For equal voxel [Gd] less concentrated liposomes (0.3 M Gd) yielded higher R1/R2 ratio because of the higher extraliposomal water fraction (vl ). Gd exhibits a dualistic behavior: from hypointensity to hyperintensity to hypointensity, with decreasing [Gd]. Regarding compartmentalization, fewer membrane barriers means a higher R1 /R2 ratio. Gd liposomes exhibit a versatile contrast behavior, dependent on the compartmentalization state, liposomal size, intraliposomal [Gd] and liposome number. Both R1 and R2 effects contribute to this. The versatility allows one to tailor the optimal liposomal formulation to desired goals in cell labeling and tracking.

  12. Genetic differentiation and phylogeny relationships of functional ApoVLDL-II gene in red jungle fowl and domestic chicken populations.

    PubMed

    Musa, Hassan H; Cheng, Jin H; Bao, Wen B; Li, Bi C; Mekki, Dafaalla M; Chen, Guo H

    2007-08-01

    A total of 243 individuals from Red Jungle Fowl (Gallus gallus spadiceus), Rugao, Anka, Wenchang and Silikes chicken populations were used for polymorphism analysis in functional apoVLDL-II gene by Restriction fragment length polymorphism and single strand conformation polymorphism markers. The results show that Anka population has highest gene diversity and Shannon information index, while Red jungle fowl shows highest effective number of allele. In addition, the higher coefficient of genetic differentiation (Gst) across all loci in apoVLDL-II was indicating that high variation is proportioned among populations. As expected total gene diversity (Ht) has upper estimate compared with within population genetic diversity (Hs) across all loci. The mean Gst value across all loci was (0.194) indicating about 19.4% of total genetic variation could be explained by breeds differences, while the remaining 80.6% was accounted for differences among individuals. The average apoVLDL-II gene flow across all loci in five chicken populations was 1.189. The estimates of genetic identity and distance confirm that these genes are significantly different between genetically fat and lean population, because fat type breed Anka shows highest distance with the other Silikes and Rugao whish are genetically lean. In addition, Wenchang and Red jungle fowl were found more closely and genetically related than the other breeds with 49.4% bootstrapping percentages, then they were related to Silikes by 100% bootstrapping percentages followed by Rugao and finally all of them are related with exotic fat breed Anka.

  13. The epidemiology of dengue virus infection among urban, jungle, and rural populations in the Amazon region of Peru.

    PubMed

    Hayes, C G; Phillips, I A; Callahan, J D; Griebenow, W F; Hyams, K C; Wu, S J; Watts, D M

    1996-10-01

    The first confirmed outbreak of dengue fever in Peru occurred during 1990 in Iquitos, a city of approximately 300,000 residents in the Amazon region. Because of the apparent establishment of endemic transmission of this mosquito-borne viral disease following the outbreak, epidemiologic studies were initiated in 1992. Blood specimens and data on demographic, environmental, and medical history factors were collected from volunteers in an urban sector of Iquitos, in a rural area on the outskirts of Iquitos, and in three nearby jungle communities. A follow-up blood specimen was obtained approximately one year later from a sample of subjects. Sera were tested for dengue IgG antibody by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and specificity was verified using a plaque-reduction neutralization test. Dengue antibody prevalence was 66% in the urban population, 26% in the rural population, and 32-67% in the three jungle areas. A significant association was found between age and antibody prevalence, with a steady increase in prevalence from 18% among subjects less than five years of age to greater than 90% for subjects more than 50 years old. Increased antibody prevalence also was associated with urban and jungle residence and with a piped source of household drinking water. Seroconversions were documented in four of five surveyed communities. These results indicate that dengue virus transmission continues in and around Iquitos and suggest that transmission also occurred prior to the 1990 epidemic.

  14. Savannah River Laboratory DOSTOMAN code: a compartmental pathways computer model of contaminant transport

    SciTech Connect

    King, C M; Wilhite, E L; Root, Jr, R W; Fauth, D J; Routt, K R; Emslie, R H; Beckmeyer, R R; Fjeld, R A; Hutto, G A; Vandeven, J A

    1985-01-01

    The Savannah River Laboratory DOSTOMAN code has been used since 1978 for environmental pathway analysis of potential migration of radionuclides and hazardous chemicals. The DOSTOMAN work is reviewed including a summary of historical use of compartmental models, the mathematical basis for the DOSTOMAN code, examples of exact analytical solutions for simple matrices, methods for numerical solution of complex matrices, and mathematical validation/calibration of the SRL code. The review includes the methodology for application to nuclear and hazardous chemical waste disposal, examples of use of the model in contaminant transport and pathway analysis, a user's guide for computer implementation, peer review of the code, and use of DOSTOMAN at other Department of Energy sites. 22 refs., 3 figs.

  15. The Golgi apparatus regulates cGMP-dependent protein kinase I compartmentation and proteolysis.

    PubMed

    Kato, Shin; Chen, Jingsi; Cornog, Katherine H; Zhang, Huili; Roberts, Jesse D

    2015-06-01

    cGMP-dependent protein kinase I (PKGI) is an important effector of cGMP signaling that regulates vascular smooth muscle cell (SMC) phenotype and proliferation. PKGI has been detected in the perinuclear region of cells, and recent data indicate that proprotein convertases (PCs) typically resident in the Golgi apparatus (GA) can stimulate PKGI proteolysis and generate a kinase fragment that localizes to the nucleus and regulates gene expression. However, the role of the endomembrane system in PKGI compartmentation and processing is unknown. Here, we demonstrate that PKGI colocalizes with endoplasmic reticulum (ER), ER-Golgi intermediate compartment, GA cisterna, and trans-Golgi network proteins in pulmonary artery SMC and cell lines. Moreover, PKGI localizes with furin, a trans-Golgi network-resident PC known to cleave PKGI. ER protein transport influences PKGI localization because overexpression of a constitutively inactive Sar1 transgene caused PKGI retention in the ER. Additionally, PKGI appears to reside within the GA because PKGI immunoreactivity was determined to be resistant to cytosolic proteinase K treatment in live cells. The GA appears to play a role in PKGI proteolysis because overexpression of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor-associated cGMP kinase substrate, not only tethered heterologous PKGI-β to the ER and decreased its localization to the GA, but also diminished PKGI proteolysis and nuclear translocation. Also, inhibiting intra-GA protein transport with monensin was observed to decrease PKGI cleavage. These studies detail a role for the endomembrane system in regulating PKGI compartmentation and proteolysis. Moreover, they support the investigation of mechanisms regulating PKGI-dependent nuclear cGMP signaling in the pulmonary vasculature with Golgi dysfunction.

  16. Compartmentation of fluorescent tracers injected into the epidermal cells of Egeria densa leaves.

    PubMed

    Goodwin, P B; Shepherd, V; Erwee, M G

    1990-04-01

    We have compared the movement of a series of fluorescent tracers of increasing molecular weight injected into the cytoplasm in the epidermal cells of leaves of Egeria densa Planch. In general, the tracers showed major movement into three cellular compartments: first, to the cytoplasm of adjacent cells; secondly, from the cytoplasm, to the vacuole (irreversible); and thirdly, from the cytoplasm to the nucleus (reversible). No visible accumulation in chloroplasts or mitochondria, or loss across the plasmalemma was observed. No evidence for metabolic breakdown was found in extracts from injected leaves. The time course of accumulation of the dye in the three major compartments (cytoplasm, nucleus, vacuole) was monitored using fluorescence microscopy. The rate measurements and the quantified geometry of the cells were used to generate a model of compartmentation during intercellular transport. Permeability coefficients were calculated and related to the molecular sizes of the tracers. The coefficients for the tonoplast and nuclear envelope were independent of the molecular sizes of the tracers, and were in the range 2.4·10(-6)-4.1· 10(-6) cm·s(-1) for the tonoplast, and 2.6·10(-5)-9.4.10(-5) cm· s(-1) for the nuclear envelope. For intercellular movement, permeabilities were strongly dependent on molecular size, and ranged from 1.1·10(-4) cm·s(-1) for 6-carboxyfluorescein (376 daltons (Da)) to 9·10(-9) cm·s(-1) for fluorescein leucyldiglutamylleucine (874 Da). Thus, the differences in cell-to-cell movement of these tracers are based upon their differing ability to cross the intercellular walls, not upon differences in their intracellular compartmentation.

  17. Using extracellular action potential recordings to constrain compartmental models.

    PubMed

    Gold, Carl; Henze, Darrell A; Koch, Christof

    2007-08-01

    We investigate the use of extracellular action potential (EAP) recordings for biophysically faithful compartmental models. We ask whether constraining a model to fit the EAP is superior to matching the intracellular action potential (IAP). In agreement with previous studies, we find that the IAP method under-constrains the parameters. As a result, significantly different sets of parameters can have virtually identical IAP's. In contrast, the EAP method results in a much tighter constraint. We find that the distinguishing characteristics of the waveform--but not its amplitude-resulting from the distribution of active conductances are fairly invariant to changes of electrode position and detailed cellular morphology. Based on these results, we conclude that EAP recordings are an excellent source of data for the purpose of constraining compartmental models.

  18. Encapsulation as a Strategy for the Design of Biological Compartmentalization.

    PubMed

    Giessen, Tobias W; Silver, Pamela A

    2016-02-27

    Compartmentalization is one of the defining features of life. Through intracellular spatial control, cells are able to organize and regulate their metabolism. One of the most broadly used organizational principles in nature is encapsulation. Cellular processes can be encapsulated within either membrane-bound organelles or proteinaceous compartments that create distinct microenvironments optimized for a given task. Further challenges addressed through intracellular compartmentalization are toxic or volatile pathway intermediates, slow turnover rates and competing side reactions. This review highlights a selection of naturally occurring membrane- and protein-based encapsulation systems in microbes and their recent applications and emerging opportunities in synthetic biology. We focus on examples that use engineered cellular organization to control metabolic pathway flux for the production of useful compounds and materials.

  19. The challenges of cellular compartmentalization in plant metabolic engineering.

    PubMed

    Heinig, Uwe; Gutensohn, Michael; Dudareva, Natalia; Aharoni, Asaph

    2013-04-01

    The complex metabolic networks in plants are highly compartmentalized and biochemical steps of a single pathway can take place in multiple subcellular locations. Our knowledge regarding reactions and precursor compounds in the various cellular compartments has increased in recent years due to innovations in tracking the spatial distribution of proteins and metabolites. Nevertheless, to date only few studies have integrated subcellular localization criteria in metabolic engineering attempts. Here, we highlight the crucial factors for subcellular-localization-based strategies in plant metabolic engineering including substrate availability, enzyme targeting, the role of transporters, and multigene transfer approaches. The availability of compartmentalized metabolic network models for plants in the near future will greatly advance the integration of localization constraints in metabolic engineering experiments and aid in predicting their outcomes. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Transient compartmentalization of RNA replicators prevents extinction due to parasites.

    PubMed

    Matsumura, Shigeyoshi; Kun, Ádám; Ryckelynck, Michael; Coldren, Faith; Szilágyi, András; Jossinet, Fabrice; Rick, Christian; Nghe, Philippe; Szathmáry, Eörs; Griffiths, Andrew D

    2016-12-09

    The appearance of molecular replicators (molecules that can be copied) was probably a critical step in the origin of life. However, parasitic replicators would take over and would have prevented life from taking off unless the replicators were compartmentalized in reproducing protocells. Paradoxically, control of protocell reproduction would seem to require evolved replicators. We show here that a simpler population structure, based on cycles of transient compartmentalization (TC) and mixing of RNA replicators, is sufficient to prevent takeover by parasitic mutants. TC tends to select for ensembles of replicators that replicate at a similar rate, including a diversity of parasites that could serve as a source of opportunistic functionality. Thus, TC in natural, abiological compartments could have allowed life to take hold. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  1. Fractional two-compartmental model for articaine serum levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petronijevic, Branislava; Sarcev, Ivan; Zorica, Dusan; Janev, Marko; Atanackovic, Teodor M.

    2016-06-01

    Two fractional two-compartmental models are applied to the pharmacokinetics of articaine. Integer order derivatives are replaced by fractional derivatives, either of different, or of same orders. Models are formulated so that the mass balance is preserved. Explicit forms of the solutions are obtained in terms of the Mittag-Leffler functions. Pharmacokinetic parameters are determined by the use of the evolutionary algorithm and trust regions optimization to recover the experimental data.

  2. Indistinguishability and identifiability analysis of linear compartmental models.

    PubMed

    Zhang, L Q; Collins, J C; King, P H

    1991-02-01

    Two compartmental model structures are said to be indistinguishable if they have the same input-output properties. In cases in which available a priori information is not sufficient to specify a unique compartmental model structure, indistinguishable model structures may have to be generated and their attributes examined for relevance. An algorithm is developed that, for a given compartmental model, investigates the complete set of models with the same number of compartments and the same input-output structure as the original model, applies geometrical rules necessary for indistinguishable models, and test models meeting the geometrical criteria for equality of transfer functions. Identifiability is also checked in the algorithm. The software consists of three programs. Program 1 determines the number of locally identifiable parameters. Program 2 applies several geometrical rules that eliminate many (generally most) of the candidate models. Program 3 checks the equality between system transfer functions of the original model and models being tested. Ranks of Jacobian matrices and submatrices and other criteria are used to check patterns of moment invariants and local identifiability. Structural controllability and structural observability are checked throughout the programs. The approach was successfully used to corroborate results from examples investigated by others.

  3. Field Testing of Compartmentalization Methods for Multifamily Construction

    SciTech Connect

    Ueno, K.; Lstiburek, J.

    2015-03-01

    The 2012 IECC has an airtightness requirement of 3 air changes per hour at 50 Pascals test pressure for both single-family and multifamily construction in Climate Zones 3-8. Other programs (LEED, ASHRAE 189, ASHRAE 62.2) have similar or tighter compartmentalization requirements, driving the need for easier and more effective methods of compartmentalization in multifamily buildings. Builders and practitioners have found that fire-resistance rated wall assemblies are a major source of difficulty in air sealing/compartmentalization, particularly in townhouse construction. This problem is exacerbated when garages are “tucked in” to the units and living space is located over the garages. In this project, Building Science Corporation examined the taping of exterior sheathing details to improve air sealing results in townhouse and multifamily construction, when coupled with a better understanding of air leakage pathways. Current approaches are cumbersome, expensive, time consuming, and ineffective; these details were proposed as a more effective and efficient method. The effectiveness of these air sealing methods was tested with blower door testing, including “nulled” or “guarded” testing (adjacent units run at equal test pressure to null out inter-unit air leakage, or “pressure neutralization”). Pressure diagnostics were used to evaluate unit-to-unit connections and series leakage pathways (i.e., air leakage from exterior, into the fire-resistance rated wall assembly, and to the interior).

  4. Digital PCR on an integrated self-priming compartmentalization chip.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Qiangyuan; Qiu, Lin; Yu, Bingwen; Xu, Yanan; Gao, Yibo; Pan, Tingting; Tian, Qingchang; Song, Qi; Jin, Wei; Jin, Qinhan; Mu, Ying

    2014-03-21

    An integrated on-chip valve-free and power-free microfluidic digital PCR device is for the first time developed by making use of a novel self-priming compartmentalization and simple dehydration control to realize 'divide and conquer' for single DNA molecule detection. The high gas solubility of PDMS is exploited to provide the built-in power of self-priming so that the sample and oil are sequentially sucked into the device to realize sample self-compartmentalization based on surface tension. The lifespan of its self-priming capability was about two weeks tested using an air-tight packaging bottle sealed with a small amount of petroleum jelly, which is significant for a practical platform. The SPC chip contains 5120 independent 5 nL microchambers, allowing the samples to be compartmentalized completely. Using this platform, three different abundances of lung cancer related genes are detected to demonstrate the feasibility and flexibility of the microchip for amplifying a single nucleic acid molecule. For maximal accuracy, within less than 5% of the measurement deviation, the optimal number of positive chambers is between 400 and 1250 evaluated by the Poisson distribution, which means one panel can detect an average of 480 to 4804 template molecules. This device without world-to-chip connections eliminates the constraint of the complex pipeline control, and is an integrated on-chip platform, which would be a significant improvement to digital PCR automation and more user-friendly.

  5. Rewiring and regulation of cross-compartmentalized metabolism in protists

    PubMed Central

    Ginger, Michael L.; McFadden, Geoffrey I.; Michels, Paul A. M.

    2010-01-01

    Plastid acquisition, endosymbiotic associations, lateral gene transfer, organelle degeneracy or even organelle loss influence metabolic capabilities in many different protists. Thus, metabolic diversity is sculpted through the gain of new metabolic functions and moderation or loss of pathways that are often essential in the majority of eukaryotes. What is perhaps less apparent to the casual observer is that the sub-compartmentalization of ubiquitous pathways has been repeatedly remodelled during eukaryotic evolution, and the textbook pictures of intermediary metabolism established for animals, yeast and plants are not conserved in many protists. Moreover, metabolic remodelling can strongly influence the regulatory mechanisms that control carbon flux through the major metabolic pathways. Here, we provide an overview of how core metabolism has been reorganized in various unicellular eukaryotes, focusing in particular on one near universal catabolic pathway (glycolysis) and one ancient anabolic pathway (isoprenoid biosynthesis). For the example of isoprenoid biosynthesis, the compartmentalization of this process in protists often appears to have been influenced by plastid acquisition and loss, whereas for glycolysis several unexpected modes of compartmentalization have emerged. Significantly, the example of trypanosomatid glycolysis illustrates nicely how mathematical modelling and systems biology can be used to uncover or understand novel modes of pathway regulation. PMID:20124348

  6. Rewiring and regulation of cross-compartmentalized metabolism in protists.

    PubMed

    Ginger, Michael L; McFadden, Geoffrey I; Michels, Paul A M

    2010-03-12

    Plastid acquisition, endosymbiotic associations, lateral gene transfer, organelle degeneracy or even organelle loss influence metabolic capabilities in many different protists. Thus, metabolic diversity is sculpted through the gain of new metabolic functions and moderation or loss of pathways that are often essential in the majority of eukaryotes. What is perhaps less apparent to the casual observer is that the sub-compartmentalization of ubiquitous pathways has been repeatedly remodelled during eukaryotic evolution, and the textbook pictures of intermediary metabolism established for animals, yeast and plants are not conserved in many protists. Moreover, metabolic remodelling can strongly influence the regulatory mechanisms that control carbon flux through the major metabolic pathways. Here, we provide an overview of how core metabolism has been reorganized in various unicellular eukaryotes, focusing in particular on one near universal catabolic pathway (glycolysis) and one ancient anabolic pathway (isoprenoid biosynthesis). For the example of isoprenoid biosynthesis, the compartmentalization of this process in protists often appears to have been influenced by plastid acquisition and loss, whereas for glycolysis several unexpected modes of compartmentalization have emerged. Significantly, the example of trypanosomatid glycolysis illustrates nicely how mathematical modelling and systems biology can be used to uncover or understand novel modes of pathway regulation.

  7. Cross-membranes orchestrate compartmentalization and morphogenesis in Streptomyces

    PubMed Central

    Celler, Katherine; Koning, Roman I.; Willemse, Joost; Koster, Abraham J.; van Wezel, Gilles P.

    2016-01-01

    Far from being simple unicellular entities, bacteria have complex social behaviour and organization, living in large populations, and some even as coherent, multicellular entities. The filamentous streptomycetes epitomize such multicellularity, growing as a syncytial mycelium with physiologically distinct hyphal compartments separated by infrequent cross-walls. The viability of mutants devoid of cell division, which can be propagated from fragments, suggests the presence of a different form of compartmentalization in the mycelium. Here we show that complex membranes, visualized by cryo-correlative light microscopy and electron tomography, fulfil this role. Membranes form small assemblies between the cell wall and cytoplasmic membrane, or, as evidenced by FRAP experiments, large protein-impermeable cross-membrane structures, which compartmentalize the multinucleoid mycelium. All areas containing cross-membrane structures are nucleoid-restricted zones, suggesting that the membrane assemblies may also act to protect nucleoids from cell-wall restructuring events. Our work reveals a novel mechanism of controlling compartmentalization and development in multicellular bacteria. PMID:27291257

  8. Steady-state compartmentalization of lipid membranes by active proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Sabra, M C; Mouritsen, O G

    1998-01-01

    Using a simple microscopic model of lipid-protein interactions, based on the hydrophobic matching principle, we study some generic aspects of lipid-membrane compartmentalization controlled by a dispersion of active integral membrane proteins. The activity of the proteins is simulated by conformational excitations governed by an external drive, and the deexcitation is controlled by interaction of the protein with its lipid surroundings. In response to the flux of energy into the proteins from the environment and the subsequent dissipation of energy into the lipid bilayer, the lipid-protein assembly reorganizes into a steady-state structure with a typical length scale determined by the strength of the external drive. In the specific case of a mixed dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine-distearoylphosphatidylcholine bilayer in the gel-fluid coexistence region, it is shown explicitly by computer simulation that the activity of an integral membrane protein can lead to a compartmentalization of the lipid-bilayer membrane. The compartmentalization is related to the dynamical process of phase separation and lipid domain formation. PMID:9533687

  9. Histomorphology of the stomach, proventriculus and ventriculus of the red jungle fowl.

    PubMed

    Kadhim, K K; Zuki, A B Z; Noordin, M M; Babjee, S M A

    2011-06-01

    The cranial chamber (proventriculus) and caudal chamber (ventriculus) of the stomach of the Red jungle fowl (Gallus gallus spadiceus) were examined by means of light microscopy. Both chambers presented folds of the tunica mucosa lined by a simple prismatic epithelium that was positive for neutral mucin. Simple tubular glands occupied the lamina propria of both chambers; in the ventriculus of older birds, they showed a coiled base. These ventricular glands were lined by simple cuboidal cells represented by the chief cells and a few large basal cells. The luminal and tubular koilin rodlets and folds of the ventriculus were positive to periodic acid Schiff (PAS) stain. The proventricular glands were situated between the inner and outer layers of the lamina muscularis mucosae. Cells lining the tubulo-alveolar units of the proventricular glands showed a dentate appearance. Vacuoles were not observed, and the cells were negative for Alcian-PAS stain. The tunica submucosa was very thin in the proventricular wall. In the ventriculus, it was not separated from the lamina propria owing to the absence of any lamina muscularis mucosae. The tunica muscularis of the proventriculus was formed by a thick inner layer of circular smooth muscle fibres and a thin outer layer of longitudinal fibres. In addition to these layers, oblique muscle fibres formed the most internal layer of the tunica muscularis in the ventriculus. © 2011 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  10. Use of doubly labeled water technique in soldiers training for jungle warfare.

    PubMed

    Forbes-Ewan, C H; Morrissey, B L; Gregg, G C; Waters, D R

    1989-07-01

    The doubly labeled water method was used to estimate the energy expended by four members of an Australian Army platoon (34 soldiers) engaged in training for jungle warfare. Each subject received an oral isotope dose sufficient to raise isotope levels by 200-250 (18O) and 100-120 ppm (2H). The experimental period was 7 days. Concurrently, a factorial estimate of the energy expenditure of the platoon was conducted. Also, a food intake-energy balance study was conducted for the platoon. Mean daily energy expenditure by the doubly labeled water method was 4,750 kcal (range 4,152-5,394 kcal). The factorial estimate of mean daily energy expenditure was 4,535 kcal. Because of inherent inaccuracies in the food intake-energy balance technique, we were able to conclude only that energy expenditure, as measured by this method, was greater than the estimated mean daily intake of 4,040 kcal. The doubly labeled water technique was well tolerated, is noninvasive, and appears to be suitable in a wide range of field applications.

  11. Use of doubly labeled water technique in soldiers training for jungle warfare

    SciTech Connect

    Forbes-Ewan, C.H.; Morrissey, B.L.; Gregg, G.C.; Waters, D.R. )

    1989-07-01

    The doubly labeled water method was used to estimate the energy expended by four members of an Australian Army platoon (34 soldiers) engaged in training for jungle warfare. Each subject received an oral isotope dose sufficient to raise isotope levels by 200-250 ({sup 18}O) and 100-120 ppm ({sup 2}H). The experimental period was 7 days. Concurrently, a factorial estimate of the energy expenditure of the platoon was conducted. Also, a food intake-energy balance study was conducted for the platoon. Mean daily energy expenditure by the doubly labeled water method was 4,750 kcal (range 4,152-5,394 kcal). The factorial estimate of mean daily energy expenditure was 4,535 kcal. Because of inherent inaccuracies in the food intake-energy balance technique, we were able to conclude only that energy expenditure, as measured by this method, was greater than the estimated mean daily intake of 4,040 kcal. The doubly labeled water technique was well tolerated, is noninvasive, and appears to be suitable in a wide range of field applications.

  12. Comparative phylogeography of two crow species: jungle crow Corvus macrorhynchos and carrion crow Corvus corone.

    PubMed

    Kryukov, Alexey; Spiridonova, Liudmila; Nakamura, Sumio; Haring, Elisabeth; Suzuki, Hitoshi

    2012-08-01

    The jungle crow Corvus macrorhynchos Wagler, 1827, and the carrion crow Corvus corone L., 1758, are two closely related species with similar ecological requirements that occupy wide distribution ranges in the Palearctic. We studied patterns of their genetic variation by using sequences of the mitochondrial cytochrome b gene. Corvus macrorhynchos demonstrates a low level of variation and differentiation throughout its range, except for a highly diverged population of Cheju Island (Korea). The haplotype network shows two haplogroups. The island group comprises populations of Sakhalin, Hokkaido, Honshu, and Kyushu, while the haplotypes of Taiwan and Ryukyu Islands proved to be closer to the mainland group, which also includes populations from the Primorye, Khabarovsk, Amur, and Magadan regions in the Russian Far East. This pattern allowed us to develop a phylogeographic hypothesis regarding the two modes of settling of the island populations. Concerning C. corone, the presence of two distinct haplogroups was confirmed within the range of C. c. orientalis. Both haplogroups are found within the same populations in Kamchatka and North Sakhalin, which implies secondary contacts there. Populations of C. corone are found to be rather stable in the western parts of its range, while in the Far East populations experienced recent growth, as was observed for C. macrorhynchos in general. The two species appear to have passed through different evolutionary scenarios.

  13. Ultrastructural and histochemical properties of the olfactory system in the japanese jungle crow, Corvus macrorhynchos.

    PubMed

    Kondoh, Daisuke; Nashimoto, Mai; Kanayama, Shunsaku; Nakamuta, Nobuaki; Taniguchi, Kazuyuki

    2011-08-01

    Although it has been commonly believed that birds are more dependent on the vision and audition than the olfaction, recent studies indicate that the olfaction of birds is related to the reproductive, homing, and predatory behaviors. In an attempt to reveal the dependence on the olfactory system in crows, we examined the olfactory system of the Japanese jungle crow (Corvus macrorhynchos) by histological, ultrastructural, and lectin histochemical methods. The olfactory epithelium (OE) of the crow occupied remarkably a small area of the nasal cavity (NC) and had the histological and ultrastructural features like other birds. The olfactory bulb (OB) of the crow was remarkably small and did not possess the olfactory ventricle. The left and right halves of the OB were fused in many cases. In the lectin histochemistry, soybean agglutinin (SBA) and Vicia villosa agglutinin (VVA) stained a small number of the receptor cells (RCs) in the OE and the olfactory nerve layer (ONL) and glomerular layer (GL) on the dorsocaudal region of the OB. Phaseolus vulgaris agglutinin-E (PHA-E) stained several RCs in the OE and the ONL and GL on the ventral region of the OB. These results suggest that 1) the crow has less-developed olfactory system than other birds, and 2) the dedicated olfactory receptor cells project their axons to the specific regions of the OB in the crow.

  14. In the jungle of time: the concept of identity as a way out

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Bin; Pöppel, Ernst; Bao, Yan

    2014-01-01

    What could be a unifying principle for the manifold of temporal experiences: the simultaneity or temporal order of events, the subjective present, the duration of experiences, or the impression of a continuity of time? Furthermore, we time travel to the past visiting in imagination previous experiences in episodic memory, and we also time travel to the future anticipating actions or plans. For such time traveling we divide time into three domains: past, present, and future. What could be an escape out of this “jungle of time” characterized by many different perceptual and conceptual phenomena? The key concept we want to propose is “identity” which is derived from homeostasis as a fundamental biological principle. Within this conceptual frame two modes of identity are distinguished: individual or self-identity required because of homeostatic demands, and object-related identity necessary for the reliability and efficiency of neuro-cognitive processing. With this concept of self- and object-identity, the different temporal experiences can be conceptualized within a common frame. Thus, we propose a fundamental biological principle to conceptually unify temporal phenomena on the psychological level. PMID:25120528

  15. Comparative study of understorey birds diversity inhabiting lowland rainforest virgin jungle reserve and regenerated forest.

    PubMed

    Nor Hashim, Ezyan; Ramli, Rosli

    2013-01-01

    A comparative study of understorey birds inhabiting different habitats, that is, virgin jungle reserve (VJR) and regenerated forest (RF), was conducted in Ulu Gombak Forest Reserve and Selangor and Triang Forest Reserve, Negeri Sembilan, Peninsular Malaysia. The objective of this study was to assess the diversity of understorey birds in both habitats and the effects of forest regeneration on the understorey bird community. The mist-netting method was used to capture understorey birds inhabiting both habitats in both locations. Species composition and feeding guild indicated that understorey bird populations were similar in the two habitats. However, the number of secondary forest species such as Little spiderhunter (Arachnothera longirostra) in VJR is increasing due to its proximity to RF. This study discovered that RFs in both study areas are not yet fully recovered. However, based on the range of species discovered, the RFs have conservation value and should be maintained because they harbour important forest species such as babblers and flycatchers. The assessment of the community structure of understorey birds in VJR and RF is important for forest management and conservation, especially where both habitats are intact.

  16. Comparative Study of Understorey Birds Diversity Inhabiting Lowland Rainforest Virgin Jungle Reserve and Regenerated Forest

    PubMed Central

    Nor Hashim, Ezyan; Ramli, Rosli

    2013-01-01

    A comparative study of understorey birds inhabiting different habitats, that is, virgin jungle reserve (VJR) and regenerated forest (RF), was conducted in Ulu Gombak Forest Reserve and Selangor and Triang Forest Reserve, Negeri Sembilan, Peninsular Malaysia. The objective of this study was to assess the diversity of understorey birds in both habitats and the effects of forest regeneration on the understorey bird community. The mist-netting method was used to capture understorey birds inhabiting both habitats in both locations. Species composition and feeding guild indicated that understorey bird populations were similar in the two habitats. However, the number of secondary forest species such as Little spiderhunter (Arachnothera longirostra) in VJR is increasing due to its proximity to RF. This study discovered that RFs in both study areas are not yet fully recovered. However, based on the range of species discovered, the RFs have conservation value and should be maintained because they harbour important forest species such as babblers and flycatchers. The assessment of the community structure of understorey birds in VJR and RF is important for forest management and conservation, especially where both habitats are intact. PMID:24453888

  17. In the jungle of time: the concept of identity as a way out.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Bin; Pöppel, Ernst; Bao, Yan

    2014-01-01

    WHAT COULD BE A UNIFYING PRINCIPLE FOR THE MANIFOLD OF TEMPORAL EXPERIENCES: the simultaneity or temporal order of events, the subjective present, the duration of experiences, or the impression of a continuity of time? Furthermore, we time travel to the past visiting in imagination previous experiences in episodic memory, and we also time travel to the future anticipating actions or plans. For such time traveling we divide time into three domains: past, present, and future. What could be an escape out of this "jungle of time" characterized by many different perceptual and conceptual phenomena? The key concept we want to propose is "identity" which is derived from homeostasis as a fundamental biological principle. Within this conceptual frame two modes of identity are distinguished: individual or self-identity required because of homeostatic demands, and object-related identity necessary for the reliability and efficiency of neuro-cognitive processing. With this concept of self- and object-identity, the different temporal experiences can be conceptualized within a common frame. Thus, we propose a fundamental biological principle to conceptually unify temporal phenomena on the psychological level.

  18. DSB (Im)mobility and DNA repair compartmentalization in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Lemaître, Charlène; Soutoglou, Evi

    2015-02-13

    Chromosomal translocations are considered as causal in approximately 20% of cancers. Therefore, understanding their mechanisms of formation is crucial in the prevention of carcinogenesis. The first step of translocation formation is the concomitant occurrence of double-strand DNA breaks (DSBs) in two different chromosomes. DSBs can be repaired by different repair mechanisms, including error-free homologous recombination (HR), potentially error-prone non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) and the highly mutagenic alternative end joining (alt-EJ) pathways. Regulation of DNA repair pathway choice is crucial to avoid genomic instability. In yeast, DSBs are mobile and can scan the entire nucleus to be repaired in specialized DNA repair centers or if they are persistent, in order to associate with the nuclear pores or the nuclear envelope where they can be repaired by specialized repair pathways. DSB mobility is limited in mammals; therefore, raising the question of whether the position at which a DSB occurs influences its repair. Here, we review the recent literature addressing this question. We first present the reports describing the extent of DSB mobility in mammalian cells. In a second part, we discuss the consequences of non-random gene positioning on chromosomal translocations formation. In the third part, we discuss the mobility of heterochromatic DSBs in light of our recent data on DSB repair at the nuclear lamina, and finally, we show that DSB repair compartmentalization at the nuclear periphery is conserved from yeast to mammals, further pointing to a role for gene positioning in the outcome of DSB repair. When regarded as a whole, the different studies reviewed here demonstrate the importance of nuclear architecture on DSB repair and reveal gene positioning as an important parameter in the study of tumorigenesis.

  19. Ecology driving genetic variation: a comparative phylogeography of jungle cat (Felis chaus) and leopard cat (Prionailurus bengalensis) in India.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Shomita; Krishnan, Anand; Tamma, Krishnapriya; Home, Chandrima; Navya, R; Joseph, Sonia; Das, Arundhati; Ramakrishnan, Uma

    2010-10-29

    Comparative phylogeography links historical population processes to current/ecological processes through congruent/incongruent patterns of genetic variation among species/lineages. Despite high biodiversity, India lacks a phylogeographic paradigm due to limited comparative studies. We compared the phylogenetic patterns of Indian populations of jungle cat (Felis chaus) and leopard cat (Prionailurus bengalensis). Given similarities in their distribution within India, evolutionary histories, body size and habits, congruent patterns of genetic variation were expected. We collected scats from various biogeographic zones in India and analyzed mtDNA from 55 jungle cats (460 bp NADH5, 141 bp cytochrome b) and 40 leopard cats (362 bp NADH5, 202 bp cytochrome b). Jungle cats revealed high genetic variation, relatively low population structure and demographic expansion around the mid-Pleistocene. In contrast, leopard cats revealed lower genetic variation and high population structure with a F(ST) of 0.86 between North and South Indian populations. Niche-model analyses using two approaches (BIOCLIM and MaxEnt) support absence of leopard cats from Central India, indicating a climate associated barrier. We hypothesize that high summer temperatures limit leopard cat distribution and that a rise in temperature in the peninsular region of India during the LGM caused the split in leopard cat population in India. Our results indicate that ecological variables describing a species range can predict genetic patterns. Our study has also resolved the confusion over the distribution of the leopard cat in India. The reciprocally monophyletic island population in the South mandates conservation attention.

  20. Ecology Driving Genetic Variation: A Comparative Phylogeography of Jungle Cat (Felis chaus) and Leopard Cat (Prionailurus bengalensis) in India

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Shomita; Krishnan, Anand; Tamma, Krishnapriya; Home, Chandrima; R, Navya; Joseph, Sonia; Das, Arundhati; Ramakrishnan, Uma

    2010-01-01

    Background Comparative phylogeography links historical population processes to current/ecological processes through congruent/incongruent patterns of genetic variation among species/lineages. Despite high biodiversity, India lacks a phylogeographic paradigm due to limited comparative studies. We compared the phylogenetic patterns of Indian populations of jungle cat (Felis chaus) and leopard cat (Prionailurus bengalensis). Given similarities in their distribution within India, evolutionary histories, body size and habits, congruent patterns of genetic variation were expected. Methodology/Principal Findings We collected scats from various biogeographic zones in India and analyzed mtDNA from 55 jungle cats (460 bp NADH5, 141 bp cytochrome b) and 40 leopard cats (362 bp NADH5, 202 bp cytochrome b). Jungle cats revealed high genetic variation, relatively low population structure and demographic expansion around the mid-Pleistocene. In contrast, leopard cats revealed lower genetic variation and high population structure with a FST of 0.86 between North and South Indian populations. Niche-model analyses using two approaches (BIOCLIM and MaxEnt) support absence of leopard cats from Central India, indicating a climate associated barrier. We hypothesize that high summer temperatures limit leopard cat distribution and that a rise in temperature in the peninsular region of India during the LGM caused the split in leopard cat population in India. Conclusions/Significance Our results indicate that ecological variables describing a species range can predict genetic patterns. Our study has also resolved the confusion over the distribution of the leopard cat in India. The reciprocally monophyletic island population in the South mandates conservation attention. PMID:21060831

  1. Knowledge and power: the asymmetry of interests of Colombian and Rockefeller doctors in the construction of the concept of "jungle yellow fever," 1907-19381.

    PubMed

    Quevedo, Emilio; Manosalva, Carolina; Tafur, Monica; Bedoya, Joanna; Matiz, Giovanna; Morales, Elquin

    2008-01-01

    This study examines the asymmetries among the different interests of officials and medical doctors who worked for the Rockefeller Foundation and their Colombian counterparts in the development and consolidation of the concept of "jungle yellow fever," as distinguished from the known urban form of yellow fever. We explore the research responses to a variety of disease outbreaks in Colombia in the context of the Rockefeller campaigns against yellow fever, from the time of Roberto Franco's initial description of "yellow fever of the forests" in 1907 until the consolidation of the concept of "jungle yellow fever" by Fred Soper in 1938.

  2. Functional compartmentalization of the human superficial masseter muscle.

    PubMed

    Guzmán-Venegas, Rodrigo A; Biotti Picand, Jorge L; de la Rosa, Francisco J Berral

    2015-01-01

    Some muscles have demonstrated a differential recruitment of their motor units in relation to their location and the nature of the motor task performed; this involves functional compartmentalization. There is little evidence that demonstrates the presence of a compartmentalization of the superficial masseter muscle during biting. The aim of this study was to describe the topographic distribution of the activity of the superficial masseter (SM) muscle's motor units using high-density surface electromyography (EMGs) at different bite force levels. Twenty healthy natural dentate participants (men: 4; women: 16; age 20±2 years; mass: 60±12 kg, height: 163±7 cm) were selected from 316 volunteers and included in this study. Using a gnathodynamometer, bites from 20 to 100% maximum voluntary bite force (MVBF) were randomly requested. Using a two-dimensional grid (four columns, six electrodes) located on the dominant SM, EMGs in the anterior, middle-anterior, middle-posterior and posterior portions were simultaneously recorded. In bite ranges from 20 to 60% MVBF, the EMG activity was higher in the anterior than in the posterior portion (p-value = 0.001).The center of mass of the EMG activity was displaced towards the posterior part when bite force increased (p-value = 0.001). The topographic distribution of EMGs was more homogeneous at high levels of MVBF (p-value = 0.001). The results of this study show that the superficial masseter is organized into three functional compartments: an anterior, a middle and a posterior compartment. However, this compartmentalization is only seen at low levels of bite force (20-60% MVBF).

  3. Functional Compartmentalization of the Human Superficial Masseter Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Guzmán-Venegas, Rodrigo A.; Biotti Picand, Jorge L.; de la Rosa, Francisco J. Berral

    2015-01-01

    Some muscles have demonstrated a differential recruitment of their motor units in relation to their location and the nature of the motor task performed; this involves functional compartmentalization. There is little evidence that demonstrates the presence of a compartmentalization of the superficial masseter muscle during biting. The aim of this study was to describe the topographic distribution of the activity of the superficial masseter (SM) muscle’s motor units using high-density surface electromyography (EMGs) at different bite force levels. Twenty healthy natural dentate participants (men: 4; women: 16; age 20±2 years; mass: 60±12 kg, height: 163±7 cm) were selected from 316 volunteers and included in this study. Using a gnathodynamometer, bites from 20 to 100% maximum voluntary bite force (MVBF) were randomly requested. Using a two-dimensional grid (four columns, six electrodes) located on the dominant SM, EMGs in the anterior, middle-anterior, middle-posterior and posterior portions were simultaneously recorded. In bite ranges from 20 to 60% MVBF, the EMG activity was higher in the anterior than in the posterior portion (p-value = 0.001).The center of mass of the EMG activity was displaced towards the posterior part when bite force increased (p-value = 0.001). The topographic distribution of EMGs was more homogeneous at high levels of MVBF (p-value = 0.001). The results of this study show that the superficial masseter is organized into three functional compartments: an anterior, a middle and a posterior compartment. However, this compartmentalization is only seen at low levels of bite force (20–60% MVBF). PMID:25692977

  4. Nuclear Organization of Mammalian Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Sadoni, Nicolas; Langer, Sabine; Fauth, Christine; Bernardi, Giorgio; Cremer, Thomas; Turner, Bryan M.; Zink, Daniele

    1999-01-01

    We investigated the nuclear higher order compartmentalization of chromatin according to its replication timing (Ferreira et al. 1997) and the relations of this compartmentalization to chromosome structure and the spatial organization of transcription. Our aim was to provide a comprehensive and integrated view on the relations between chromosome structure and functional nuclear architecture. Using different mammalian cell types, we show that distinct higher order compartments whose DNA displays a specific replication timing are stably maintained during all interphase stages. The organizational principle is clonally inherited. We directly demonstrate the presence of polar chromosome territories that align to build up higher order compartments, as previously suggested (Ferreira et al. 1997). Polar chromosome territories display a specific orientation of early and late replicating subregions that correspond to R- or G/C-bands of mitotic chromosomes. Higher order compartments containing G/C-bands replicating during the second half of the S phase display no transcriptional activity detectable by BrUTP pulse labeling and show no evidence of transcriptional competence. Transcriptionally competent and active chromatin is confined to a coherent compartment within the nuclear interior that comprises early replicating R-band sequences. As a whole, the data provide an integrated view on chromosome structure, nuclear higher order compartmentalization, and their relation to the spatial organization of functional nuclear processes. PMID:10491386

  5. Organic tissues, graphite, and hydrocarbons in host rocks of the Rum Jungle Uranium Field, northern Australia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Foster, C.B.; Robbins, E.I.; Bone, Y.

    1990-01-01

    The Rum Jungle Uranium field consists of at least six early Proterozoic deposits that have been mined either for uranium and/or the associated base and precious metals. Organic matter in the host rocks of the Whites Formation and Coomalie Dolomite is now predominantly graphite, consistent with the metamorphic history of these rocks. For nine samples, the mean total organic carbon content is high (3.9 wt%) and ranged from 0.33 to 10.44 wt%. Palynological extracts from the host rocks include black, filamentous, stellate (Eoastrion-like), and spherical morphotypes, which are typical of early Proterozoic microbiota. The colour, abundance, and shapes of these morphotypes reflect the thermal history, organic richness, and probable lacustrine biofacies of the host rocks. Routine analysis of rock thin sections and of palynological residues shows that mineral grains in some of the host rocks are coated with graphitized organic matter. The grain coating is presumed to result from ultimate thermal degradation of a petroleum phase that existed prior to metamorphism. Hydrocarbons are, however, still present in fluid inclusions within carbonates of the Coomalie Dolomite and lower Whites Formation. The fluid inclusions fluoresce dull orange in blue-light excitation and their hydrocarbon content is confirmed by gas chromatography of whole-rock extracts. Preliminary analysis of the oil suggests that it is migrated, and because it has escaped graphitization through metamorphism it is probably not of early Proterozoic age. The presence of live oil is consistent with fluid inclusion data that suggest subsequent, low-temperature brine migration through the rocks. The present observations support earlier suggestions that organic matter in the host formations trapped uranium to form protore. Subsequent fluid migrations probably brought additional uranium and other metals to these formations, and the organic matter provided a reducing environment for entrapment. ?? 1990.

  6. Reproductive tract infections in rural women from the highlands, jungle, and coastal regions of Peru.

    PubMed Central

    García, Patricia J.; Chavez, Susana; Feringa, Barbara; Chiappe, Marina; Li, Weili; Jansen, Kathrin U.; Cárcamo, César; Holmes, King K.

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To define the prevalences and manifestations of reproductive tract infections (RTIs) in rural Peruvian women. METHODS: During 1997-98, we visited 18 rural districts in coastal, highlands, and jungle regions of Peru. We administered standardized questionnaires and pelvic examinations to members of women's community-based organizations; and collected vaginal fluid for pH, amine odour, Gram stain, microscopy, and culture for Trichomonas vaginalis; cervical specimens for Chlamydia trachomatis, Neisseria gonorrhoeae; human papilloma virus (HPV) by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays, and blood for syphilis serology. FINDINGS: The 754 participants averaged 36.9 years of age and 1.7 sex partners ever; 77% reported symptoms indicative of RTIs; 51% and 26% reported their symptoms spontaneously or only with specific questioning, respectively. Symptoms reported spontaneously included abnormal vaginal discharge (29.3% and 22.9%, respectively). One or more RTIs, found in 70.4% of participants, included bacterial vaginosis (43.7%), trichomoniasis (16.5%), vulvovaginal candidiasis (4.5%), chlamydial infection (6.8%), gonorrhoea (1.2%), syphilis seropositivity (1.7%), cervical HPV infection (4.9%), and genital warts or ulcers (2.8%). Of 715 adequate Pap smears, 7 revealed cancer, 4 high-grade squamous intra-epithelial lesions (SIL) and 15 low-grade SIL. Clinical algorithms had very low sensitivity and predictive values for cervical infection, but over half the women with symptoms of malodorous vaginal discharge, signs of abnormal vaginal discharge, or both, had bacterial vaginosis or trichomoniasis. CONCLUSION: Overall, 77% of women had symptoms indicative of RTIs, and 70% had objective evidence of one or more RTIs. Women with selected symptoms and signs of vaginal infection could benefit from standard metronidazole therapy. PMID:15508193

  7. Transit times and mean ages for nonautonomous and autonomous compartmental systems

    SciTech Connect

    Rasmussen, Martin; Hastings, Alan; Smith, Matthew J.; Agusto, Folashade B.; Chen-Charpentier, Benito M.; Hoffman, Forrest M.; Jiang, Jiang; Todd-Brown, Katherine E. O.; Wang, Ying; Wang, Ying-Ping; Luo, Yiqi

    2016-04-01

    We develop a theory for residence times and mean ages for nonautonomous compartmental systems. Using the McKendrick–von Forster equation, we show that the mean ages of mass in a compartmental system satisfy a linear nonautonomous ordinary differential equation that is exponentially stable. We then define a nonautonomous version of residence time as the mean age of mass leaving the compartmental system at a particular time and show that our nonautonomous theory is consistent with the autonomous case. We apply these results to study a nine-dimensional nonautonomous compartmental system modeling the carbon cycle, which is a simplified version of the Carnegie–Ames–Stanford approach (CASA) model.

  8. Analytical properties of a three-compartmental dynamical demographic model.

    PubMed

    Postnikov, E B

    2015-07-01

    The three-compartmental demographic model by Korotaeyv-Malkov-Khaltourina, connecting population size, economic surplus, and education level, is considered from the point of view of dynamical systems theory. It is shown that there exist two integrals of motion, which enables the system to be reduced to one nonlinear ordinary differential equation. The study of its structure provides analytical criteria for the dominance ranges of the dynamics of Malthus and Kremer. Additionally, the particular ranges of parameters enable the derived general ordinary differential equations to be reduced to the models of Gompertz and Thoularis-Wallace.

  9. Analytical properties of a three-compartmental dynamical demographic model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Postnikov, E. B.

    2015-07-01

    The three-compartmental demographic model by Korotaeyv-Malkov-Khaltourina, connecting population size, economic surplus, and education level, is considered from the point of view of dynamical systems theory. It is shown that there exist two integrals of motion, which enables the system to be reduced to one nonlinear ordinary differential equation. The study of its structure provides analytical criteria for the dominance ranges of the dynamics of Malthus and Kremer. Additionally, the particular ranges of parameters enable the derived general ordinary differential equations to be reduced to the models of Gompertz and Thoularis-Wallace.

  10. Septins and the lateral compartmentalization of eukaryotic membranes.

    PubMed

    Caudron, Fabrice; Barral, Yves

    2009-04-01

    Eukaryotic cells from neurons and epithelial cells to unicellular fungi frequently rely on cellular appendages such as axons, dendritic spines, cilia, and buds for their biology. The emergence and differentiation of these appendages depend on the formation of lateral diffusion barriers at their bases to insulate their membranes from the rest of the cell. Here, we review recent progress regarding the molecular mechanisms and functions of such barriers. This overview underlines the importance and conservation of septin-dependent diffusion barriers, which coordinately compartmentalize both plasmatic and internal membranes. We discuss their role in memory establishment and the control of cellular aging.

  11. Dynamic behaviors of a class of HIV compartmental models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiaoyan; Huang, Lihong; Yu, Pei

    2015-06-01

    Based on heterogeneities in drug efficacy (either spatial or phenotypic), two HIV compartmental models were proposed in Callaway and Perelson (2002) to study the HIV virus dynamics under drug treatment. In this paper, we provide a global analysis on the two models, including the positivity and boundedness of solutions and the global stability of equilibrium solutions. In particular, we show that when the basic reproduction number R0 ⩽ 1 (for which the infection equilibrium does not exist), the infection-free equilibrium is globally asymptotically stable; while when R0 > 1 (for which the infection equilibrium exists), the infection equilibrium is globally asymptotically stable.

  12. COMPARTMENTALIZED CANCER DRUG DISCOVERY TARGETING MITOCHONDRIAL Hsp90 CHAPERONES

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Byoung Heon; Altieri, Dario C.

    2009-01-01

    There is a plethora of attractive drug targets in cancer, but their therapeutic exploitation proved more difficult than expected, and only rarely truly successful. One possibility not often considered in drug discovery is that cancer signaling pathways are not randomly arranged in cells, but orchestrated in specialized subcellular compartments. The identification of Heat Shock Protein-90 (Hsp90) chaperones in mitochondria of tumors, but not most normal tissues, provides an example of a compartmentalized network of cell survival, opening fresh prospects for novel, subcellularly-targeted cancer drug discovery. PMID:19648961

  13. Rab Proteins and the Compartmentalization of the Endosomal System

    PubMed Central

    Wandinger-Ness, Angela; Zerial, Marino

    2014-01-01

    Of the approximately 70 human Rab GTPases, nearly three-quarters are involved in endocytic trafficking. Significant plasticity in endosomal membrane transport pathways is closely coupled to receptor signaling and Rab GTPase-regulated scaffolds. Here we review current literature pertaining to endocytic Rab GTPase localizations, functions, and coordination with regulatory proteins and effectors. The roles of Rab GTPases in (1) compartmentalization of the endocytic pathway into early, recycling, late, and lysosomal routes; (2) coordination of individual transport steps from vesicle budding to fusion; (3) effector interactomes; and (4) integration of GTPase and signaling cascades are discussed. PMID:25341920

  14. Super-resolution Microscopy Reveals Compartmentalization of Peroxisomal Membrane Proteins.

    PubMed

    Galiani, Silvia; Waithe, Dominic; Reglinski, Katharina; Cruz-Zaragoza, Luis Daniel; Garcia, Esther; Clausen, Mathias P; Schliebs, Wolfgang; Erdmann, Ralf; Eggeling, Christian

    2016-08-12

    Membrane-associated events during peroxisomal protein import processes play an essential role in peroxisome functionality. Many details of these processes are not known due to missing spatial resolution of technologies capable of investigating peroxisomes directly in the cell. Here, we present the use of super-resolution optical stimulated emission depletion microscopy to investigate with sub-60-nm resolution the heterogeneous spatial organization of the peroxisomal proteins PEX5, PEX14, and PEX11 around actively importing peroxisomes, showing distinct differences between these peroxins. Moreover, imported protein sterol carrier protein 2 (SCP2) occupies only a subregion of larger peroxisomes, highlighting the heterogeneous distribution of proteins even within the peroxisome. Finally, our data reveal subpopulations of peroxisomes showing only weak colocalization between PEX14 and PEX5 or PEX11 but at the same time a clear compartmentalized organization. This compartmentalization, which was less evident in cases of strong colocalization, indicates dynamic protein reorganization linked to changes occurring in the peroxisomes. Through the use of multicolor stimulated emission depletion microscopy, we have been able to characterize peroxisomes and their constituents to a yet unseen level of detail while maintaining a highly statistical approach, paving the way for equally complex biological studies in the future.

  15. Multiple compartmentalization of sodium conferred salt tolerance in Salicornia europaea.

    PubMed

    Lv, Sulian; Jiang, Ping; Chen, Xianyang; Fan, Pengxiang; Wang, Xuchu; Li, Yinxin

    2012-02-01

    Euhalophyte Salicornia europaea L., one of the most salt-tolerant plant species in the world, can tolerate more than 1000 mM NaCl. To study the salt tolerance mechanism of this plant, the effects of different NaCl concentrations on plant growth, as well as Na(+) accumulation and distribution at organ, tissue, and subcellular levels, were investigated. Optimal growth and an improved photosynthetic rate were observed with the plant treated with 200-400 mM NaCl. The Na(+) content in the shoots was considerably higher than that in the roots of S. europaea. The Na(+) in S. europaea cells may act as an effective osmotic adjuster to maintain cell turgor, promoting photosynthetic competence and plant growth. The results from the SEM-X-ray and TEM-X-ray microanalyses demonstrate that Na(+) was compartmentalized predominantly into the cell vacuoles of shoot endodermis tissues. Accordingly, the transcript amounts of SeNHX1, SeVHA-A, and SeVP1 increased significantly with increased NaCl concentration, suggesting their important roles in Na(+) sequestration into the vacuoles. Therefore, a multiple sodium compartmentalization mechanism is proposed to enhance further the salt tolerance of S. europaea.

  16. From Compartmentalized to Agent-based Models of Epidemics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macal, Charles

    Supporting decisions in the throes of an impending epidemic poses distinct technical challenges arising from the uncertainties in modeling disease propagation processes and the need for producing timely answers to policy questions. Compartmental models, because of their relative simplicity, produce timely information, but often do not include the level of fidelity of the information needed to answer specific policy questions. Highly granular agent-based simulations produce an extensive amount of information on all aspects of a simulated epidemic, yet complex models often cannot produce this information in a timely manner. We propose a two-phased approach to addressing the tradeoff between model complexity and the speed at which models can be used to answer to questions about an impending outbreak. In the first phase, in advance of an epidemic, ensembles of highly granular agent-based simulations are run over the entire parameter space, characterizing the space of possible model outcomes and uncertainties. Meta-models are derived that characterize model outcomes as dependent on uncertainties in disease parameters, data, and structural relationships. In the second phase, envisioned as during an epidemic, the meta-model is run in combination with compartmental models, which can be run very quickly. Model outcomes are compared as a basis for establishing uncertainties in model forecasts. This work is supported by the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract number DE-AC02-06CH11357 and National Science Foundation (NSF) RAPID Award DEB-1516428.

  17. Analysis of Ras/ERK Compartmentalization by Subcellular Fractionation.

    PubMed

    Agudo-Ibañez, Lorena; Crespo, Piero; Casar, Berta

    2017-01-01

    A vast number of stimuli use the Ras/Raf/MEK/ERK signaling cascade to transmit signals from their cognate receptors, in order to regulate multiple cellular functions, including key processes such as proliferation, cell cycle progression, differentiation, and survival. The duration, intensity and specificity of the responses are, in part, controlled by the compartmentalization/subcellular localization of the signaling intermediaries. Ras proteins are found in different plasma membrane microdomains and endomembranes. At these localizations, Ras is subject to site-specific regulatory mechanisms, distinctively engaging effector pathways and switching-on diverse genetic programs to generate a multitude of biological responses. The Ras effector pathway leading to ERKs activation is also subject to space-related regulatory processes. About half of ERK1/2 substrates are found in the nucleus and function mainly as transcription factors. The other half resides in the cytosol and other cellular organelles. Such subcellular distribution enhances the complexity of the Ras/ERK cascade and constitutes an essential mechanism to endow variability to its signals, which enables their participation in the regulation of a broad variety of functions. Thus, analyzing the subcellular compartmentalization of the members of the Ras/ERK cascade constitutes an important factor to be taken into account when studying specific biological responses evoked by Ras/ERK signals. Herein, we describe methods for such purpose.

  18. Super-resolution Microscopy Reveals Compartmentalization of Peroxisomal Membrane Proteins*

    PubMed Central

    Galiani, Silvia; Waithe, Dominic; Reglinski, Katharina; Cruz-Zaragoza, Luis Daniel; Garcia, Esther; Clausen, Mathias P.; Schliebs, Wolfgang; Erdmann, Ralf; Eggeling, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Membrane-associated events during peroxisomal protein import processes play an essential role in peroxisome functionality. Many details of these processes are not known due to missing spatial resolution of technologies capable of investigating peroxisomes directly in the cell. Here, we present the use of super-resolution optical stimulated emission depletion microscopy to investigate with sub-60-nm resolution the heterogeneous spatial organization of the peroxisomal proteins PEX5, PEX14, and PEX11 around actively importing peroxisomes, showing distinct differences between these peroxins. Moreover, imported protein sterol carrier protein 2 (SCP2) occupies only a subregion of larger peroxisomes, highlighting the heterogeneous distribution of proteins even within the peroxisome. Finally, our data reveal subpopulations of peroxisomes showing only weak colocalization between PEX14 and PEX5 or PEX11 but at the same time a clear compartmentalized organization. This compartmentalization, which was less evident in cases of strong colocalization, indicates dynamic protein reorganization linked to changes occurring in the peroxisomes. Through the use of multicolor stimulated emission depletion microscopy, we have been able to characterize peroxisomes and their constituents to a yet unseen level of detail while maintaining a highly statistical approach, paving the way for equally complex biological studies in the future. PMID:27311714

  19. MDCT of hand and wrist infections: emphasis on compartmental anatomy.

    PubMed

    Ahlawat, S; Corl, F M; LaPorte, D M; Fishman, E K; Fayad, L M

    2017-04-01

    Hand and wrist infections can present with a spectrum of manifestations ranging from cellulitis to deep-space collections. The various infectious processes can be categorised as superficial or deep infections based on their respective locations relative to the tendons. Superficial hand infections are located superficial to the tendons and are comprised of cellulitis, lymphangitis, paronychia, pulp-space infections, herpetic whitlow, and include volar as well as dorsal subcutaneous abscesses. Deep hand infections are located deep to the tendon sheaths and include synovial space infections, such as infectious tenosynovitis, deep fascial space infections, septic arthritis, necrotising fasciitis, and osteomyelitis. Knowledge of hand and wrist compartmental anatomy is essential for the accurate diagnosis and management of hand infections. Although early and superficial infections of the hand may respond to non-surgical management, most hand infections are surgical emergencies. Multidetector computed tomography (MDCT), with its muliplanar reformation (MPR) and three-dimensional (3D) capabilities, is a powerful tool in the emergency setting for the evaluation of acute hand and wrist pathology. The clinical and imaging features of hand and wrist infections as evident on MDCT will be reviewed with emphasis on contiguous and closed synovial and deep fascial spaces. Knowledge of hand compartmental anatomy enables accurate characterisation of the infectious process and localise the extent of disease in the acute setting. Copyright © 2016 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Detachment, compartmentalization, and schizophrenia: linking dissociation and psychosis by subtype.

    PubMed

    Vogel, Matthias; Braungardt, Tanja; Grabe, Hans Jörgen; Schneider, Wolfgang; Klauer, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    To explain the phenomenological overlap between dissociation and schizophrenia, a dissociative subtype of schizophrenia has been proposed as a possibility. Dissociation is often believed to be organized on a continuum, although 2 qualitatively different phenomena can be distinguished in theory, research, and clinical practice: (a) states of separation from self or environment (detachment dissociation) and (b) inaccessibility of normally accessible mental contents (compartmentalization dissociation). This study used the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) and the Association for Methodology and Documentation in Psychiatry module for the interview assessment of dissociation to investigate the relationships between PANSS subscales, detachment dissociation, and compartmentalization dissociation in a sample of 72 patients with schizophrenia. A confirmatory factor analysis sustained the bipartite model, yielding factors that grouped dissociative items around amnesia and depersonalization/derealization. The latter factor also contained identity disturbances and was therefore not entirely consistent with the theoretical formulations of detachment dissociation. It is important to note that the structure of those factors may be influenced by the symptoms of schizophrenia to which they were specifically linked: The factor containing depersonalization/derealization was connected to the positive symptoms subscale of the PANSS, whereas the factor containing amnesia was associated with the negative subscale. Hence, a dichotomy of dissociation is confirmed inasmuch as its subtypes are as distinguishable as PANSS subscales. This has implications on theoretical and clinical levels.

  1. Building America Case Study: Field Testing of Compartmentalization Methods for Multifamily Construction (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2015-01-01

    The 2012 IECC has an airtightness requirement of 3 air changes per hour at 50 Pascals test pressure for both single family and multifamily construction in Climate Zones 3-8. Other programs (LEED, ASHRAE 189, ASHRAE 62.2) have similar or tighter compartmentalization requirements, thus driving the need for easier and more effective methods of compartmentalization in multifamily buildings.

  2. Compartmental and Data-Based Modeling of Cerebral Hemodynamics: Linear Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Henley, B.C.; Shin, D.C.; Zhang, R.; Marmarelis, V.Z.

    2015-01-01

    Compartmental and data-based modeling of cerebral hemodynamics are alternative approaches that utilize distinct model forms and have been employed in the quantitative study of cerebral hemodynamics. This paper examines the relation between a compartmental equivalent-circuit and a data-based input-output model of dynamic cerebral autoregulation (DCA) and CO2-vasomotor reactivity (DVR). The compartmental model is constructed as an equivalent-circuit utilizing putative first principles and previously proposed hypothesis-based models. The linear input-output dynamics of this compartmental model are compared with data-based estimates of the DCA-DVR process. This comparative study indicates that there are some qualitative similarities between the two-input compartmental model and experimental results. PMID:26900535

  3. Compartmentalized vesicular traffic around the hair cell cuticular plate.

    PubMed

    Kachar, B; Battaglia, A; Fex, J

    1997-05-01

    Through thin-section and freeze-fracture electron microscopy, we identify structural correlates of an intense vesicular traffic in a narrow band of cytoplasm around the cuticular plate of the bullfrog vestibular hair cells. Myriads of coated and uncoated vesicles associated with longitudinally oriented microtubules populate the narrow cytoplasmic region between the cuticular plate and the actin network of the apical junctional belt. If microtubules in the sensory hair cells, like those in axons, are pathways for organelle transport, then the characteristic distribution of microtubules around the cuticular plate represents transport pathways across the apical region of the hair cells. This compartmentalized membrane traffic system appears to support an intense vesicular release and uptake along a band of apical plasma membrane near the cell border. Functions of this transport system may include membrane recycling as well as exocytotic and endocytotic exchange between the hair cell cytoplasm and the endolymphatic compartment.

  4. Molecular Mechanisms of Compartmentalization and Biomineralization in Magnetotactic Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Komeili, Arash

    2011-01-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria are remarkable organisms with the ability to exploit the earth’s magnetic field for navigational purposes. To do this, they build specialized compartments called magnetosomes that consist of a lipid membrane and a crystalline magnetic mineral. These organisms have the potential to serve as models for the study of compartmentalization as well as biomineralization in bacteria. Additionally, they offer the opportunity to design applications that take advantage of the particular properties of magnetosomes. In recent years, a sustained effort to identify the molecular basis of this process has resulted in a clearer understanding of the magnetosome formation and biomineralization. Here, I present an overview of magnetotactic bacteria and explore the possible molecular mechanisms of membrane remodeling, protein sorting, cytoskeletal organization, iron transport and biomineralization that lead to the formation of a functional magnetosome organelle. PMID:22092030

  5. The human NAD metabolome: Functions, metabolism and compartmentalization

    PubMed Central

    Nikiforov, Andrey; Kulikova, Veronika; Ziegler, Mathias

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The metabolism of NAD has emerged as a key regulator of cellular and organismal homeostasis. Being a major component of both bioenergetic and signaling pathways, the molecule is ideally suited to regulate metabolism and major cellular events. In humans, NAD is synthesized from vitamin B3 precursors, most prominently from nicotinamide, which is the degradation product of all NAD-dependent signaling reactions. The scope of NAD-mediated regulatory processes is wide including enzyme regulation, control of gene expression and health span, DNA repair, cell cycle regulation and calcium signaling. In these processes, nicotinamide is cleaved from NAD+ and the remaining ADP-ribosyl moiety used to modify proteins (deacetylation by sirtuins or ADP-ribosylation) or to generate calcium-mobilizing agents such as cyclic ADP-ribose. This review will also emphasize the role of the intermediates in the NAD metabolome, their intra- and extra-cellular conversions and potential contributions to subcellular compartmentalization of NAD pools. PMID:25837229

  6. Compartmentalization of NO signaling cascade in skeletal muscles

    SciTech Connect

    Buchwalow, Igor B. . E-mail: buchwalo@uni-muenster.de; Minin, Evgeny A.; Samoilova, Vera E.; Boecker, Werner; Wellner, Maren; Schmitz, Wilhelm; Neumann, Joachim

    2005-05-06

    Skeletal muscle functions regulated by NO are now firmly established. However, the literature on the compartmentalization of NO signaling in myocytes is highly controversial. To address this issue, we examined localization of enzymes engaged in L-arginine-NO-cGMP signaling in the rat quadriceps muscle. Employing immunocytochemical labeling complemented with tyramide signal amplification and electron microscopy, we found NO synthase expressed not only in the sarcolemma, but also along contractile fibers, in the sarcoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria. The expression pattern of NO synthase in myocytes showed striking parallels with the enzymes engaged in L-arginine-NO-cGMP signaling (arginase, phosphodiesterase, and soluble guanylyl cyclase). Our findings are indicative of an autocrine fashion of NO signaling in skeletal muscles at both cellular and subcellular levels, and challenge the notion that the NO generation is restricted to the sarcolemma.

  7. Compartmentalization of vertebrate optic neuroephithelium: external cues and transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyoung-Tai; Kim, Jin Woo

    2012-04-01

    The vertebrate eye is a laterally extended structure of the forebrain. It develops through a series of events, including specification and regionalization of the anterior neural plate, evagination of the optic vesicle (OV), and development of three distinct optic structures: the neural retina (NR), optic stalk (OS), and retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). Various external signals that act on the optic neuroepithelium in a spatial- and temporal-specific manner control the fates of OV subdomains by inducing localized expression of key transcription factors. Investigating the mechanisms underlying compartmentalization of these distinct optic neuroepithelium-derived tissues is therefore not only important from the standpoint of accounting for vertebrate eye morphogenesis, it is also helpful for understanding the fundamental basis of fate determination of other neuroectoderm- derived tissues. This review focuses on the molecular signatures of OV subdomains and the external factors that direct the development of tissues originating from the OV.

  8. Partitioning Variability of a Compartmentalized In Vitro Transcriptional Thresholding Circuit.

    PubMed

    Kapsner, Korbinian; Simmel, Friedrich C

    2015-10-16

    Encapsulation of in vitro biochemical reaction circuits into small, cell-sized compartments can result in considerable variations in the dynamical properties of the circuits. As a model system, we here investigate a simple in vitro transcriptional reaction circuit, which generates an ultrasensitive fluorescence response when the concentration of an RNA transcript reaches a preset threshold. The reaction circuit is compartmentalized into spherical water-in-oil microemulsion droplets, and the reaction progress is monitored by fluorescence microscopy. A quantitative statistical analysis of thousands of individual droplets ranging in size from a few up to 20 μm reveals a strong variability in effective RNA production rates, which by computational modeling is traced back to a larger-than-Poisson variability in RNAP activities in the droplets. The noise level in terms of the noise strength (the Fano factor) is strongly dependent on the ratio between transcription templates and polymerases, and increases for higher template concentrations.

  9. Physiological Consequences of Compartmentalized Acyl-CoA Metabolism*

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Daniel E.; Young, Pamela A.; Klett, Eric L.; Coleman, Rosalind A.

    2015-01-01

    Meeting the complex physiological demands of mammalian life requires strict control of the metabolism of long-chain fatty acyl-CoAs because of the multiplicity of their cellular functions. Acyl-CoAs are substrates for energy production; stored within lipid droplets as triacylglycerol, cholesterol esters, and retinol esters; esterified to form membrane phospholipids; or used to activate transcriptional and signaling pathways. Indirect evidence suggests that acyl-CoAs do not wander freely within cells, but instead, are channeled into specific pathways. In this review, we will discuss the evidence for acyl-CoA compartmentalization, highlight the key modes of acyl-CoA regulation, and diagram potential mechanisms for controlling acyl-CoA partitioning. PMID:26124277

  10. The human NAD metabolome: Functions, metabolism and compartmentalization.

    PubMed

    Nikiforov, Andrey; Kulikova, Veronika; Ziegler, Mathias

    2015-01-01

    The metabolism of NAD has emerged as a key regulator of cellular and organismal homeostasis. Being a major component of both bioenergetic and signaling pathways, the molecule is ideally suited to regulate metabolism and major cellular events. In humans, NAD is synthesized from vitamin B3 precursors, most prominently from nicotinamide, which is the degradation product of all NAD-dependent signaling reactions. The scope of NAD-mediated regulatory processes is wide including enzyme regulation, control of gene expression and health span, DNA repair, cell cycle regulation and calcium signaling. In these processes, nicotinamide is cleaved from NAD(+) and the remaining ADP-ribosyl moiety used to modify proteins (deacetylation by sirtuins or ADP-ribosylation) or to generate calcium-mobilizing agents such as cyclic ADP-ribose. This review will also emphasize the role of the intermediates in the NAD metabolome, their intra- and extra-cellular conversions and potential contributions to subcellular compartmentalization of NAD pools.

  11. Hydrological Compartmentalization: A Grand Challenge in the Critical Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonnell, J.; Evaristo, J. A.; Orlowski, N.; Jasechko, S.

    2014-12-01

    Current terrestrial biosphere models assume that plant transpiration, groundwater and streamflow are all sourced and mediated by the same well mixed soil reservoir. Recent stable water isotope data from Oregon and Mexico and now global meta-analysis and remote sensing measurements have all shown evidence of hydrological compartmentalization: a mobile compartment that forms groundwater and streamflow and a poorly mobile compartment that supplies plant transpiration. The way we now measure and model this poorly mobile water is a grand challenge for understanding subsurface mixing, water residence time, and its interaction and feedback to ecosystem processes. Here we review the latest results from this work and outline some of the future research challenges for understanding soil-plant-atmospheric interactions between the bedrock and the boundary layer.

  12. Hydrological Compartmentalization: A Grand Challenge in the Critical Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonnell, J.; Evaristo, J. A.; Orlowski, N.; Jasechko, S.

    2015-12-01

    Current terrestrial biosphere models assume that plant transpiration, groundwater and streamflow are all sourced and mediated by the same well mixed soil reservoir. Recent stable water isotope data from Oregon and Mexico and now global meta-analysis and remote sensing measurements have all shown evidence of hydrological compartmentalization: a mobile compartment that forms groundwater and streamflow and a poorly mobile compartment that supplies plant transpiration. The way we now measure and model this poorly mobile water is a grand challenge for understanding subsurface mixing, water residence time, and its interaction and feedback to ecosystem processes. Here we review the latest results from this work and outline some of the future research challenges for understanding soil-plant-atmospheric interactions between the bedrock and the boundary layer.

  13. Compartmentalization in penicillin G biosynthesis by Penicillium chrysogenum PQ-96.

    PubMed

    Kurzątkowski, Wiesław; Staniszewska, Monika; Bondaryk, Małgorzata; Gębska-Kuczerowska, Anita

    2014-01-01

    The arrangement of organelles in the sub-apical productive non-growing vacuolated hyphal cells of the high- and the low-penicillin-pro- ducing strains Penicillium chrysogenum was compared using transmission electron microscopy. In the productive cells of the high-yielding strain the endoplasmic reticulum and the polyribosomes with associated peroxisomes are frequently arranged at the periphery of the cytoplasm and around the vacuoles. At the high activity of penicillin G biosynthesis the immuno-label of the cytosolic isopenicillin N synthase is concentrated at the polyribosomes arranged in the peripheral cytoplasm and along the tonoplast as well as around the peroxisomes. On the basis of the obtained results the compartmentalization of the pathway of penicillin G biosymthesis is discussed. The obtained results support the phenylacetic acid detoxification hypothesis of penicillin G biosynthesis.

  14. Apartment Compartmentalization With an Aerosol-Based Sealing Process

    SciTech Connect

    Maxwell, S.; Berger, D.; Harrington, C.

    2015-03-01

    Air sealing of building enclosures is a difficult and time-consuming process. Current methods in new construction require laborers to physically locate small and sometimes large holes in multiple assemblies and then manually seal each of them. The innovation demonstrated under this research study was the automated air sealing and compartmentalization of buildings through the use of an aerosolized sealant, developed by the Western Cooling Efficiency Center at University of California Davis. CARB sought to demonstrate this new technology application in a multifamily building in Queens, NY. The effectiveness of the sealing process was evaluated by three methods: air leakage testing of overall apartment before and after sealing, point-source testing of individual leaks, and pressure measurements in the walls of the target apartment during sealing.

  15. Heart mitochondrial TTP synthesis and the compartmentalization of TMP.

    PubMed

    Kamath, Vasudeva G; Hsiung, Chia-Heng; Lizenby, Zachary J; McKee, Edward E

    2015-01-23

    The primary pathway of TTP synthesis in the heart requires thymidine salvage by mitochondrial thymidine kinase 2 (TK2). However, the compartmentalization of this pathway and the transport of thymidine nucleotides are not well understood. We investigated the metabolism of [(3)H]thymidine or [(3)H]TMP as precursors of [(3)H]TTP in isolated intact or broken mitochondria from the rat heart. The results demonstrated that [(3)H]thymidine was readily metabolized by the mitochondrial salvage enzymes to TTP in intact mitochondria. The equivalent addition of [(3)H]TMP produced far less [(3)H]TTP than the amount observed with [(3)H]thymidine as the precursor. Using zidovudine to inhibit TK2, the synthesis of [(3)H]TTP from [(3)H]TMP was effectively blocked, demonstrating that synthesis of [(3)H]TTP from [(3)H]TMP arose solely from the dephosphorysynthase pathway that includes deoxyuridine triphosphatelation of [(3)H]TMP to [(3)H]thymidine. To determine the role of the membrane in TMP metabolism, mitochondrial membranes were disrupted by freezing and thawing. In broken mitochondria, [(3)H]thymidine was readily converted to [(3)H]TMP, but further phosphorylation was prevented even though the energy charge was well maintained by addition of oligomycin A, phosphocreatine, and creatine phosphokinase. The failure to synthesize TTP in broken mitochondria was not related to a loss of membrane potential or inhibition of the electron transport chain, as confirmed by addition of carbonyl cyanide 4-(trifluoromethoxy) phenylhydrazone and potassium cyanide, respectively, in intact mitochondria. In summary, these data, taken together, suggest that the thymidine salvage pathway is compartmentalized so that TMP kinase prefers TMP synthesized by TK2 over medium TMP and that this is disrupted in broken mitochondria.

  16. A functional compartmental model of the Synechocystis PCC 6803 phycobilisome.

    PubMed

    van Stokkum, Ivo H M; Gwizdala, Michal; Tian, Lijin; Snellenburg, Joris J; van Grondelle, Rienk; van Amerongen, Herbert; Berera, Rudi

    2017-07-18

    In the light-harvesting antenna of the Synechocystis PCC 6803 phycobilisome (PB), the core consists of three cylinders, each composed of four disks, whereas each of the six rods consists of up to three hexamers (Arteni et al., Biochim Biophys Acta 1787(4):272-279, 2009). The rods and core contain phycocyanin and allophycocyanin pigments, respectively. Together these pigments absorb light between 400 and 650 nm. Time-resolved difference absorption spectra from wild-type PB and rod mutants have been measured in different quenching and annihilation conditions. Based upon a global analysis of these data and of published time-resolved emission spectra, a functional compartmental model of the phycobilisome is proposed. The model describes all experiments with a common set of parameters. Three annihilation time constants are estimated, 3, 25, and 147 ps, which represent, respectively, intradisk, interdisk/intracylinder, and intercylinder annihilation. The species-associated difference absorption and emission spectra of two phycocyanin and two allophycocyanin pigments are consistently estimated, as well as all the excitation energy transfer rates. Thus, the wild-type PB containing 396 pigments can be described by a functional compartmental model of 22 compartments. When the interhexamer equilibration within a rod is not taken into account, this can be further simplified to ten compartments, which is the minimal model. In this model, the slowest excitation energy transfer rates are between the core cylinders (time constants 115-145 ps), and between the rods and the core (time constants 68-115 ps).

  17. Cadherins in cerebellar development: translation of embryonic patterning into mature functional compartmentalization.

    PubMed

    Redies, Christoph; Neudert, Franziska; Lin, Juntang

    2011-09-01

    Cadherins are cell adhesion molecules with multiple morphogenic functions in brain development, for example, in neuroblast migration and aggregation, axon navigation, neural circuit formation, and synaptogenesis. More than 100 members of the cadherin superfamily are expressed in the developing and mature brain. Most of the cadherins investigated, in particular classic cadherins and δ-protocadherins, are expressed in the cerebellum. For several cadherin subtypes, expression begins at early embryonic stages and persists until mature stages of cerebellar development. At intermediate stages, distinct Purkinje cell clusters exhibit unique rostrocaudal and mediolateral expression profiles for each cadherin. In the chicken, mouse, and other species, the Purkinje cell clusters are separated by intervening raphes of migrating granule cells. This pattern of Purkinje cell clusters/raphes is, at least in part, continuous with the parasagittal striping pattern that is apparent in the mature cerebellar cortex, for example, for zebrin II/aldolase C. Moreover, subregions of the deep cerebellar nuclei, vestibular nuclei and the olivary complex also express cadherins differentially. Neuroanatomical evidence suggests that the nuclear subregions and cortical domains that express the same cadherin subtype are connected to each other, to form neural subcircuits of the cerebellar system. Cadherins thus provide a molecular code that specifies not only embryonic structures but also functional cerebellar compartmentalization. By following the implementation of this code, it can be revealed how mature functional architecture emerges from embryonic patterning during cerebellar development. Dysfunction of some cadherins is associated with psychiatric diseases and developmental impairments and may also affect cerebellar function.

  18. Dynamin regulates metaphase furrow formation and plasma membrane compartmentalization in the syncytial Drosophila embryo

    PubMed Central

    Rikhy, Richa; Mavrakis, Manos; Lippincott-Schwartz, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The successive nuclear division cycles in the syncytial Drosophila embryo are accompanied by ingression and regression of plasma membrane furrows, which surround individual nuclei at the embryo periphery, playing a central role in embryo compartmentalization prior to cellularization. Here, we demonstrate that cell cycle changes in dynamin localization and activity at the plasma membrane (PM) regulate metaphase furrow formation and PM organization in the syncytial embryo. Dynamin was localized on short PM furrows during interphase, mediating endocytosis of PM components. Dynamin redistributed off ingressed PM furrows in metaphase, correlating with stabilized PM components and the associated actin regulatory machinery on long furrows. Acute inhibition of dynamin in the temperature sensitive shibire mutant embryo resulted in morphogenetic consequences in the syncytial division cycle. These included inhibition of metaphase furrow ingression, randomization of proteins normally polarized to intercap PM and disruption of the diffusion barrier separating PM domains above nuclei. Based on these findings, we propose that cell cycle changes in dynamin orchestrate recruitment of actin regulatory machinery for PM furrow dynamics during the early mitotic cycles in the Drosophila embryo. PMID:25661871

  19. Compartmentalized low-rank recovery for high-resolution lipid unsuppressed MRSI.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Ipshita; Jacob, Mathews

    2017-10-01

    To introduce a novel algorithm for the recovery of high-resolution magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) data with minimal lipid leakage artifacts, from dual-density spiral acquisition. The reconstruction of MRSI data from dual-density spiral data is formulated as a compartmental low-rank recovery problem. The MRSI dataset is modeled as the sum of metabolite and lipid signals, each of which is support limited to the brain and extracranial regions, respectively, in addition to being orthogonal to each other. The reconstruction problem is formulated as an optimization problem, which is solved using iterative reweighted nuclear norm minimization. The comparisons of the scheme against dual-resolution reconstruction algorithm on numerical phantom and in vivo datasets demonstrate the ability of the scheme to provide higher spatial resolution and lower lipid leakage artifacts. The experiments demonstrate the ability of the scheme to recover the metabolite maps, from lipid unsuppressed datasets with echo time (TE) = 55 ms. The proposed reconstruction method and data acquisition strategy provide an efficient way to achieve high-resolution metabolite maps without lipid suppression. This algorithm would be beneficial for fast metabolic mapping and extension to multislice acquisitions. Magn Reson Med 78:1267-1280, 2017. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  20. Effect of season and age on Indian red jungle fowl (Gallus gallus murghi) semen characteristics: A 4-year retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Rakha, B A; Ansari, M S; Akhter, S; Blesbois, E

    2017-09-01

    The reproductive potential of the adult males is expected to vary with age/season and largely differ not only in closely related avian species but even in subspecies, breeds and/or strains of the same species. Thus, it is pre-requisite to have knowledge of seminal parameters to achieve maximum production potential of at-risk species for ex situ in vitro conservation programs. A 4-year study was designed to evaluate the effect of age and season (spring, summer, autumn and winter) on semen characteristics of Indian red jungle fowl (Gallus gallus murghi) in a retrospective manner. Semen ejaculates (n = 1148) were regularly collected from eight adult cocks 6 to 54 months of age. Quantitative and qualitative semen parameters viz; volume (μL), concentration (1 × 10(9) mL(-1)), total sperm number per ejaculate (1 × 10(9) mL(-1)), motility (%), viability (%), plasma membrane integrity (%), acrosome integrity (%) and semen quality factor were recorded. A chronological increasing trend with age of most sperm quantitative and qualitative traits (semen volume, sperm concentration, total sperm number per ejaculate, plasma membrane integrity, viability, acrosomal integrity and semen quality factor) was observed. The highest values were observed at four years of age (P < 0.05) with the exception of sperm motility that was not affected by the age. Spring was the best season for sperm parameters viz; volume, motility, plasma membrane integrity, viability and acrosomal integrity (P < 0.05), however a remarkable sperm production was noticed all over the year. It is concluded that Indian red jungle fowl exhibits an evolution of sperm production that greatly differs in many points from other fowl sub-species. It is suggested that semen ejaculates of highest quality achieved for semen banking at the age of four year in the spring season. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Compartmentation of sucrose during radial transfer in mature sorghum culm

    PubMed Central

    Tarpley, Lee; Vietor, Donald M

    2007-01-01

    Background The sucrose that accumulates in the culm of sorghum (Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench) and other large tropical andropogonoid grasses can be of commercial value, and can buffer assimilate supply during development. Previous study conducted with intact plants showed that sucrose can be radially transferred to the intracellular compartment of mature ripening sorghum internode without being hydrolysed. In this study, culm-infused radiolabelled sucrose was traced between cellular compartments and among related metabolites to determine if the compartmental path of sucrose during radial transfer in culm tissue was symplasmic or included an apoplasmic step. This transfer path was evaluated for elongating and ripening culm tissue of intact plants of two semidwarf grain sorghums. The metabolic path in elongating internode tissue was also evaluated. Results On the day after culm infusion of the tracer sucrose, the specific radioactivity of sucrose recovered from the intracellular compartment of growing axillary-branch tissue was greater (nearly twice) than that in the free space, indicating that sucrose was preferentially transferred through symplasmic routes. In contrast, the sucrose specific radioactivity in the intracellular compartment of the mature (ripening) culm tissue was probably less (about 3/4's) than that in free space indicating that sucrose was preferentially transferred through routes that included an apoplasmic step. In growing internodes of the axillary branch of sorghum, the tritium label initially provided in the fructose moiety of sucrose molecules was largely (81%) recovered in the fructose moiety, indicating that a large portion of sucrose molecules is not hydrolysed and resynthesized during radial transfer. Conclusion During radial transfer of sucrose in ripening internodes of intact sorghum plants, much of the sucrose is transferred intact (without hydrolysis and resynthesis) and primarily through a path that includes an apoplasmic step. In

  2. Transit times and mean ages for nonautonomous and autonomous compartmental systems

    SciTech Connect

    Rasmussen, Martin; Hastings, Alan; Smith, Matthew J.; Agusto, Folashade B.; Chen-Charpentier, Benito M.; Hoffman, Forrest M.; Jiang, Jiang; Todd-Brown, Katherine E. O.; Wang, Ying; Wang, Ying -Ping; Luo, Yiqi

    2016-04-01

    In this study, we develop a theory for transit times and mean ages for nonautonomous compartmental systems. Using the McKendrick–von Förster equation, we show that the mean ages of mass in a compartmental system satisfy a linear nonautonomous ordinary differential equation that is exponentially stable. We then define a nonautonomous version of transit time as the mean age of mass leaving the compartmental system at a particular time and show that our nonautonomous theory generalises the autonomous case. We apply these results to study a nine-dimensional nonautonomous compartmental system modeling the terrestrial carbon cycle, which is a modification of the Carnegie–Ames–Stanford approach model, and we demonstrate that the nonautonomous versions of transit time and mean age differ significantly from the autonomous quantities when calculated for that model.

  3. Transit times and mean ages for nonautonomous and autonomous compartmental systems

    DOE PAGES

    Rasmussen, Martin; Hastings, Alan; Smith, Matthew J.; ...

    2016-04-01

    In this study, we develop a theory for transit times and mean ages for nonautonomous compartmental systems. Using the McKendrick–von Förster equation, we show that the mean ages of mass in a compartmental system satisfy a linear nonautonomous ordinary differential equation that is exponentially stable. We then define a nonautonomous version of transit time as the mean age of mass leaving the compartmental system at a particular time and show that our nonautonomous theory generalises the autonomous case. We apply these results to study a nine-dimensional nonautonomous compartmental system modeling the terrestrial carbon cycle, which is a modification of themore » Carnegie–Ames–Stanford approach model, and we demonstrate that the nonautonomous versions of transit time and mean age differ significantly from the autonomous quantities when calculated for that model.« less

  4. MULTIMEDIA ENVIRONMENTAL DISTRIBUTION OF TOXICS (MEND-TOX): PART I, HYBRID COMPARTMENTAL-SPATIAL MODELING FRAMEWORK

    EPA Science Inventory

    An integrated hybrid spatial-compartmental modeling approach is presented for analyzing the dynamic distribution of chemicals in the multimedia environment. Information obtained from such analysis, which includes temporal chemical concentration profiles in various media, mass ...

  5. MULTIMEDIA ENVIRONMENTAL DISTRIBUTION OF TOXICS (MEND-TOX): PART I, HYBRID COMPARTMENTAL-SPATIAL MODELING FRAMEWORK

    EPA Science Inventory

    An integrated hybrid spatial-compartmental modeling approach is presented for analyzing the dynamic distribution of chemicals in the multimedia environment. Information obtained from such analysis, which includes temporal chemical concentration profiles in various media, mass ...

  6. Compartmentation prevents a lethal turbo-explosion of glycolysis in trypanosomes.

    PubMed

    Haanstra, Jurgen R; van Tuijl, Arjen; Kessler, Peter; Reijnders, Willem; Michels, Paul A M; Westerhoff, Hans V; Parsons, Marilyn; Bakker, Barbara M

    2008-11-18

    ATP generation by both glycolysis and glycerol catabolism is autocatalytic, because the first kinases of these pathways are fuelled by ATP produced downstream. Previous modeling studies predicted that either feedback inhibition or compartmentation of glycolysis can protect cells from accumulation of intermediates. The deadly parasite Trypanosoma brucei lacks feedback regulation of early steps in glycolysis yet sequesters the relevant enzymes within organelles called glycosomes, leading to the proposal that compartmentation prevents toxic accumulation of intermediates. Here, we show that glucose 6-phosphate indeed accumulates upon glucose addition to PEX14 deficient trypanosomes, which are impaired in glycosomal protein import. With glycerol catabolism, both in silico and in vivo, loss of glycosomal compartmentation led to dramatic increases of glycerol 3-phosphate upon addition of glycerol. As predicted by the model, depletion of glycerol kinase rescued PEX14-deficient cells of glycerol toxicity. This provides the first experimental support for our hypothesis that pathway compartmentation is an alternative to allosteric regulation.

  7. Compartmentalization of beta-adrenergic signals in cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Yang K

    2011-07-08

    Activation of adrenergic receptors (AR) represents the primary mechanism to increase cardiac performance under stress. Activated βAR couple to Gs protein, leading to adenylyl cyclase-dependent increases in secondary-messenger cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) to activate protein kinase A. The increased protein kinase A activities promote phosphorylation of diversified substrates, ranging from the receptor and its associated partners to proteins involved in increases in contractility and heart rate. Recent progress with live-cell imaging has drastically advanced our understanding of the βAR-induced cAMP and protein kinase A activities that are precisely regulated in a spatiotemporal fashion in highly differentiated myocytes. Several features stand out: membrane location of βAR and its associated complexes dictates the cellular compartmentalization of signaling; βAR agonist dose-dependent equilibrium between cAMP production and cAMP degradation shapes persistent increases in cAMP signals for sustained cardiac contraction response; and arrestin acts as an agonist dose-dependent master switch to promote cAMP diffusion and propagation into intracellular compartments by sequestrating phosphodiesterase isoforms associated with the βAR signaling cascades. These features and the underlying molecular mechanisms of dynamic regulation of βAR complexes with adenylyl cyclase and phosphodiesterase enzymes and the implication in heart failure are discussed.

  8. Compartmentalized nitric oxide signaling in the resistance vasculature

    PubMed Central

    Mutchler, Stephanie M.; Straub, Adam C.

    2015-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) was first described as a bioactive molecule through its ability to stimulate soluble guanylate cyclase, but the revelation that NO was the endothelium derived relaxation factor drove the field to its modern state. The wealth of research conducted over the past 30 years has provided us with a picture of how diverse NO signaling can be within the vascular wall, going beyond simple vasodilation to include such roles as signaling through protein S-nitrosation. This expanded view of NO’s actions requires highly regulated and compartmentalized production. Importantly, resistance arteries house multiple proteins involved in the production and transduction of NO allowing for efficient movement of the molecule to regulate vascular tone and reactivity. In this review, we focus on the many mechanisms regulating NO production and signaling action in the vascular wall, with a focus on the control of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), the enzyme responsible for synthesizing most of the NO within these confines. We also explore how cross talk between the endothelium and smooth muscle in the microcirculation can modulate NO signaling, illustrating that this one small molecule has the capability to produce a plethora of responses. PMID:26028569

  9. Shape control and compartmentalization in active colloidal cells.

    PubMed

    Spellings, Matthew; Engel, Michael; Klotsa, Daphne; Sabrina, Syeda; Drews, Aaron M; Nguyen, Nguyen H P; Bishop, Kyle J M; Glotzer, Sharon C

    2015-08-25

    Small autonomous machines like biological cells or soft robots can convert energy input into control of function and form. It is desired that this behavior emerges spontaneously and can be easily switched over time. For this purpose we introduce an active matter system that is loosely inspired by biology and which we term an active colloidal cell. The active colloidal cell consists of a boundary and a fluid interior, both of which are built from identical rotating spinners whose activity creates convective flows. Similarly to biological cell motility, which is driven by cytoskeletal components spread throughout the entire volume of the cell, active colloidal cells are characterized by highly distributed energy conversion. We demonstrate that we can control the shape of the active colloidal cell and drive compartmentalization by varying the details of the boundary (hard vs. flexible) and the character of the spinners (passive vs. active). We report buckling of the boundary controlled by the pattern of boundary activity, as well as formation of core-shell and inverted Janus phase-separated configurations within the active cell interior. As the cell size is increased, the inverted Janus configuration spontaneously breaks its mirror symmetry. The result is a bubble-crescent configuration, which alternates between two degenerate states over time and exhibits collective migration of the fluid along the boundary. Our results are obtained using microscopic, non-momentum-conserving Langevin dynamics simulations and verified via a phase-field continuum model coupled to a Navier-Stokes equation.

  10. Development-based compartmentalization of the Drosophila central brain.

    PubMed

    Pereanu, Wayne; Kumar, Abilasha; Jennett, Arnim; Reichert, Heinrich; Hartenstein, Volker

    2010-08-01

    The neuropile of the Drosophila brain is subdivided into anatomically discrete compartments. Compartments are rich in terminal neurite branching and synapses; they are the neuropile domains in which signal processing takes place. Compartment boundaries are defined by more or less dense layers of glial cells as well as long neurite fascicles. These fascicles are formed during the larval period, when the approximately 100 neuronal lineages that constitute the Drosophila central brain differentiate. Each lineage forms an axon tract with a characteristic trajectory in the neuropile; groups of spatially related tracts congregate into the brain fascicles that can be followed from the larva throughout metamorphosis into the adult stage. Here we provide a map of the adult brain compartments and the relevant fascicles defining compartmental boundaries. We have identified the neuronal lineages contributing to each fascicle, which allowed us to compare compartments of the larval and adult brain directly. Most adult compartments can be recognized already in the early larval brain, where they form a "protomap" of the later adult compartments. Our analysis highlights the morphogenetic changes shaping the Drosophila brain; the data will be important for studies that link early-acting genetic mechanisms to the adult neuronal structures and circuits controlled by these mechanisms.

  11. Compartmentation of cellular tetrahydrofolate pools in rat liver

    SciTech Connect

    Barlowe, C.K.; Appling, D.R.

    1987-05-01

    Folate coenzymes are essential in shuttling one carbon units between a number of cellular processes. Serine, glycine, histidine and formate may serve as one-carbon sources by donation of their one-carbon unit to tetrahydrofolate (THF) which may then be utilized in the biosynthesis of nucleic acids and amino acids or oxidized to carbon dioxide (CO/sub 2/) via formyl-THF dehydrogenase. Nitrous Oxide (N/sub 2/O) has been observed to inactivate methionine synthase causing an increase in the cellular concentration of methyl-THF at the expense of other folate forms, specifically THF. They are interested in determining if THF dependent pathways that utilize serine, formate and histidine are equally effected by N/sub 2/O. Radiometric methods indicate that oxidation of the ..beta..-carbon of serine to CO/sub 2/ is uneffected by N/sub 2/O exposure, but oxidation of formate and the 2-ring carbon of histidine to CO/sub 2/ are reduced by about 50% and 95% of control levels, respectively. In contrast, the use of these one carbon sources for purine biosynthesis are all reduced roughly 50% upon exposure to N/sub 2/O. These data suggest an intracellular compartmentation of THF pools available to different sources of one-carbon units.

  12. Adaptive and neuroadaptive control for nonnegative and compartmental dynamical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volyanskyy, Kostyantyn Y.

    Neural networks have been extensively used for adaptive system identification as well as adaptive and neuroadaptive control of highly uncertain systems. The goal of adaptive and neuroadaptive control is to achieve system performance without excessive reliance on system models. To improve robustness and the speed of adaptation of adaptive and neuroadaptive controllers several controller architectures have been proposed in the literature. In this dissertation, we develop a new neuroadaptive control architecture for nonlinear uncertain dynamical systems. The proposed framework involves a novel controller architecture with additional terms in the update laws that are constructed using a moving window of the integrated system uncertainty. These terms can be used to identify the ideal system weights of the neural network as well as effectively suppress system uncertainty. Linear and nonlinear parameterizations of the system uncertainty are considered and state and output feedback neuroadaptive controllers are developed. Furthermore, we extend the developed framework to discrete-time dynamical systems. To illustrate the efficacy of the proposed approach we apply our results to an aircraft model with wing rock dynamics, a spacecraft model with unknown moment of inertia, and an unmanned combat aerial vehicle undergoing actuator failures, and compare our results with standard neuroadaptive control methods. Nonnegative systems are essential in capturing the behavior of a wide range of dynamical systems involving dynamic states whose values are nonnegative. A sub-class of nonnegative dynamical systems are compartmental systems. These systems are derived from mass and energy balance considerations and are comprised of homogeneous interconnected microscopic subsystems or compartments which exchange variable quantities of material via intercompartmental flow laws. In this dissertation, we develop direct adaptive and neuroadaptive control framework for stabilization, disturbance

  13. Limb, Respiratory and Masticatory Muscle Compartmentalization: Developmental and Hormonal Considerations

    PubMed Central

    Widmer, C. G.; Morris-Wiman, J.

    2011-01-01

    Neuromuscular compartments are subvolumes of muscle that have unique biomechanical actions and can be activated singly or in groups to perform the necessary task. Beside unique biomechanical actions, other evidence that supports the neuromuscular compartmentalization of muscles includes segmental reflexes that preferentially excite motoneurons from the same compartment, proportions of motor unit types that differ among compartments and a central partitioning of motoneurons that innervate each compartment. The current knowledge regarding neuromuscular compartments in representative muscles involved in locomotion, respiration and mastication is presented to compare and contrast these different motor systems. Developmental features of neuromuscular compartment formation in these three motor systems are reviewed to identify when these compartments are formed, their innervation patterns and the process of refinement to achieve the adult phenotype. Finally, the role of androgen modulation of neuromuscular compartment maturation in representative muscles of these motor systems is reviewed and the impact of testosterone on specific myosin heavy chain fiber types is discussed based on recent data. In summary, neuromuscular compartments are pre-patterned output elements in muscle that undergo refinement of compartment boundaries and muscle fiber phenotype during maturation. Further studies are needed to understand how these output elements are selectively controlled during locomotion, respiration and mastication. PMID:21111201

  14. Shape control and compartmentalization in active colloidal cells

    PubMed Central

    Spellings, Matthew; Engel, Michael; Klotsa, Daphne; Sabrina, Syeda; Drews, Aaron M.; Nguyen, Nguyen H. P.; Bishop, Kyle J. M.; Glotzer, Sharon C.

    2015-01-01

    Small autonomous machines like biological cells or soft robots can convert energy input into control of function and form. It is desired that this behavior emerges spontaneously and can be easily switched over time. For this purpose we introduce an active matter system that is loosely inspired by biology and which we term an active colloidal cell. The active colloidal cell consists of a boundary and a fluid interior, both of which are built from identical rotating spinners whose activity creates convective flows. Similarly to biological cell motility, which is driven by cytoskeletal components spread throughout the entire volume of the cell, active colloidal cells are characterized by highly distributed energy conversion. We demonstrate that we can control the shape of the active colloidal cell and drive compartmentalization by varying the details of the boundary (hard vs. flexible) and the character of the spinners (passive vs. active). We report buckling of the boundary controlled by the pattern of boundary activity, as well as formation of core–shell and inverted Janus phase-separated configurations within the active cell interior. As the cell size is increased, the inverted Janus configuration spontaneously breaks its mirror symmetry. The result is a bubble–crescent configuration, which alternates between two degenerate states over time and exhibits collective migration of the fluid along the boundary. Our results are obtained using microscopic, non–momentum-conserving Langevin dynamics simulations and verified via a phase-field continuum model coupled to a Navier–Stokes equation. PMID:26253763

  15. Photoacoustic "nanobombs" fight against undesirable vesicular compartmentalization of anticancer drugs.

    PubMed

    Chen, Aiping; Xu, Chun; Li, Min; Zhang, Hailin; Wang, Diancheng; Xia, Mao; Meng, Gang; Kang, Bin; Chen, Hongyuan; Wei, Jiwu

    2015-10-20

    Undesirable intracellular vesicular compartmentalization of anticancer drugs in cancer cells is a common cause of chemoresistance. Strategies aimed at circumventing this problem may improve chemotherapeutic efficacy. We report a novel photophysical strategy for controlled-disruption of vesicular sequestration of the anticancer drug doxorubicin (DOX). Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs), modified with folate, were trapped in acidic vesicles after entering lung cancer cells. Upon irradiation by near-infrared pulsed laser, these vesicles were massively broken by the resulting photoacoustic shockwave, and the vesicle-sequestered contents were released, leading to redistribution of DOX from cytoplasm to the target-containing nucleus. Redistribution resulted in 12-fold decrease of the EC50 of DOX in lung cancer cells, and enhanced antitumor efficacy of low-dose DOX in tumor-bearing mice. Side effects were not observed. These findings provide insights of using nanotechnology to improve cancer chemotherapy, i.e. not only for drug delivery, but also for overcoming intracellular drug-transport hurdles.

  16. Applications of abduction: hypothesis testing of neuroendocrinological qualitative compartmental models.

    PubMed

    Menzies, T; Compton, P

    1997-06-01

    It is difficult to assess hypothetical models in poorly measured domains such as neuroendocrinology. Without a large library of observations to constrain inference, the execution of such incomplete models implies making assumptions. Mutually exclusive assumptions must be kept in separate worlds. We define a general abductive multiple-worlds engine that assesses such models by (i) generating the worlds and (ii) tests if these worlds contain known behaviour. World generation is constrained via the use of relevant envisionment. We describe QCM, a modeling language for compartmental models that can be processed by this inference engine. This tool has been used to find faults in theories published in international refereed journals; i.e. QCM can detect faults which are invisible to other methods. The generality and computational limits of this approach are discussed. In short, this approach is applicable to any representation that can be compiled into an and-or graph, provided the graphs are not too big or too intricate (fanout < 7).

  17. Mitochondrial genomes of the jungle crow Corvus macrorhynchos (Passeriformes: Corvidae) from shed feathers and a phylogenetic analysis of genus Corvus using mitochondrial protein-coding genes.

    PubMed

    Krzeminska, Urszula; Wilson, Robyn; Rahman, Sadequr; Song, Beng Kah; Seneviratne, Sampath; Gan, Han Ming; Austin, Christopher M

    2016-07-01

    The complete mitochondrial genomes of two jungle crows (Corvus macrorhynchos) were sequenced. DNA was extracted from tissue samples obtained from shed feathers collected in the field in Sri Lanka and sequenced using the Illumina MiSeq Personal Sequencer. Jungle crow mitogenomes have a structural organization typical of the genus Corvus and are 16,927 bp and 17,066 bp in length, both comprising 13 protein-coding genes, 22 transfer RNA genes, 2 ribosomal subunit genes, and a non-coding control region. In addition, we complement already available house crow (Corvus spelendens) mitogenome resources by sequencing an individual from Singapore. A phylogenetic tree constructed from Corvidae family mitogenome sequences available on GenBank is presented. We confirm the monophyly of the genus Corvus and propose to use complete mitogenome resources for further intra- and interspecies genetic studies.

  18. Lower extremity compartmental syndrome following snake-bite envenomation--one case report.

    PubMed

    Hsu, K Y; Shih, H N; Chen, L M; Shih, C H

    1990-03-20

    Acute compartmental syndrome develops when the intracompartmental pressure rises rapidly, even if only for a short duration. Loss of function and/or viability of the intracompartmental muscles may occur within a short period. Consequently early recognition and management are essential. We report a case where a young child with severe snake bite envenomation who and acute compartmental syndrome who had complete functional recovery following emergent fasciotomy and delayed primary closure.

  19. Compartmentalization of hepatitis C virus variants in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Pérez, Paula S; Di Lello, Federico A; Mullen, Eduardo G; Galdame, Omar A; Livellara, Beatriz I; Gadano, Adrián C; Campos, Rodolfo H; Flichman, Diego M

    2017-02-01

    Chronic Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) infection is a major risk for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) development. HCV Core protein has been associated with the modulation of potentially oncogenic cellular processes and E2 protein has been useful in evolutive studies to analyze the diversity of HCV. Thus, the aim of this study was to evaluate HCV compartmentalization in tumoral, non-tumoral liver tissue and serum and to identify viral mutations potentially involved in carcinogenesis. Samples were obtained from four patients with HCC who underwent liver transplantation. Core and E2 were amplified, cloned and sequenced. Phylogenies and BaTS Test were performed to analyze viral compartmentalization and a signature sequence analysis was conducted by VESPA. The likelihood and Bayesian phylogenies showed a wide degree of compartmentalization in the different patients, ranging from total clustering to a more scattered pattern with small groups. Nevertheless, the association test showed compartmentalization for the three compartments and both viral regions tested in all the patients. Signature amino acid pattern supported the compartmentalization in three of the cases for E2 protein and in two of them for Core. Changes observed in Core included polymorphism R70Q/H previously associated with HCC. In conclusion, evidence of HCV compartmentalization in the liver of HCC patients was provided and further biological characterization of these variants may contribute to the understanding of carcinogenesis mediated by HCV infection. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. The Role of Nuclear Bodies in Gene Expression and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Morimoto, Marie; Boerkoel, Cornelius F.

    2013-01-01

    This review summarizes the current understanding of the role of nuclear bodies in regulating gene expression. The compartmentalization of cellular processes, such as ribosome biogenesis, RNA processing, cellular response to stress, transcription, modification and assembly of spliceosomal snRNPs, histone gene synthesis and nuclear RNA retention, has significant implications for gene regulation. These functional nuclear domains include the nucleolus, nuclear speckle, nuclear stress body, transcription factory, Cajal body, Gemini of Cajal body, histone locus body and paraspeckle. We herein review the roles of nuclear bodies in regulating gene expression and their relation to human health and disease. PMID:24040563

  1. Efficient Vaccine Distribution Based on a Hybrid Compartmental Model

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Zhiwen; Liu, Jiming; Wang, Xiaowei; Zhu, Xianjun; Wang, Daxing; Han, Guoqiang

    2016-01-01

    To effectively and efficiently reduce the morbidity and mortality that may be caused by outbreaks of emerging infectious diseases, it is very important for public health agencies to make informed decisions for controlling the spread of the disease. Such decisions must incorporate various kinds of intervention strategies, such as vaccinations, school closures and border restrictions. Recently, researchers have paid increased attention to searching for effective vaccine distribution strategies for reducing the effects of pandemic outbreaks when resources are limited. Most of the existing research work has been focused on how to design an effective age-structured epidemic model and to select a suitable vaccine distribution strategy to prevent the propagation of an infectious virus. Models that evaluate age structure effects are common, but models that additionally evaluate geographical effects are less common. In this paper, we propose a new SEIR (susceptible—exposed—infectious šC recovered) model, named the hybrid SEIR-V model (HSEIR-V), which considers not only the dynamics of infection prevalence in several age-specific host populations, but also seeks to characterize the dynamics by which a virus spreads in various geographic districts. Several vaccination strategies such as different kinds of vaccine coverage, different vaccine releasing times and different vaccine deployment methods are incorporated into the HSEIR-V compartmental model. We also design four hybrid vaccination distribution strategies (based on population size, contact pattern matrix, infection rate and infectious risk) for controlling the spread of viral infections. Based on data from the 2009–2010 H1N1 influenza epidemic, we evaluate the effectiveness of our proposed HSEIR-V model and study the effects of different types of human behaviour in responding to epidemics. PMID:27233015

  2. Compartmentation and complexation of metals in hyperaccumulator plants

    PubMed Central

    Leitenmaier, Barbara; Küpper, Hendrik

    2013-01-01

    Hyperaccumulators are being intensely investigated. They are not only interesting in scientific context due to their “strange” behavior in terms of dealing with high concentrations of metals, but also because of their use in phytoremediation and phytomining, for which understanding the mechanisms of hyperaccumulation is crucial. Hyperaccumulators naturally use metal accumulation as a defense against herbivores and pathogens, and therefore deal with accumulated metals in very specific ways of complexation and compartmentation, different from non-hyperaccumulator plants and also non-hyperaccumulated metals. For example, in contrast to non-hyperaccumulators, in hyperaccumulators even the classical phytochelatin-inducing metal, cadmium, is predominantly not bound by such sulfur ligands, but only by weak oxygen ligands. This applies to all hyperaccumulated metals investigated so far, as well as hyperaccumulation of the metalloid arsenic. Stronger ligands, as they have been shown to complex metals in non-hyperaccumulators, are in hyperaccumulators used for transient binding during transport to the storage sites (e.g., nicotianamine) and possibly for export of Cu in Cd/Zn hyperaccumulators [metallothioneins (MTs)]. This confirmed that enhanced active metal transport, and not metal complexation, is the key mechanism of hyperaccumulation. Hyperaccumulators tolerate the high amount of accumulated heavy metals by sequestering them into vacuoles, usually in large storage cells of the epidermis. This is mediated by strongly elevated expression of specific transport proteins in various tissues from metal uptake in the shoots up to the storage sites in the leaf epidermis. However, this mechanism seems to be very metal specific. Non-hyperaccumulated metals in hyperaccumulators seem to be dealt with like in non-hyperaccumulator plants, i.e., detoxified by binding to strong ligands such as MTs. PMID:24065978

  3. Compartmentation and complexation of metals in hyperaccumulator plants.

    PubMed

    Leitenmaier, Barbara; Küpper, Hendrik

    2013-09-20

    Hyperaccumulators are being intensely investigated. They are not only interesting in scientific context due to their "strange" behavior in terms of dealing with high concentrations of metals, but also because of their use in phytoremediation and phytomining, for which understanding the mechanisms of hyperaccumulation is crucial. Hyperaccumulators naturally use metal accumulation as a defense against herbivores and pathogens, and therefore deal with accumulated metals in very specific ways of complexation and compartmentation, different from non-hyperaccumulator plants and also non-hyperaccumulated metals. For example, in contrast to non-hyperaccumulators, in hyperaccumulators even the classical phytochelatin-inducing metal, cadmium, is predominantly not bound by such sulfur ligands, but only by weak oxygen ligands. This applies to all hyperaccumulated metals investigated so far, as well as hyperaccumulation of the metalloid arsenic. Stronger ligands, as they have been shown to complex metals in non-hyperaccumulators, are in hyperaccumulators used for transient binding during transport to the storage sites (e.g., nicotianamine) and possibly for export of Cu in Cd/Zn hyperaccumulators [metallothioneins (MTs)]. This confirmed that enhanced active metal transport, and not metal complexation, is the key mechanism of hyperaccumulation. Hyperaccumulators tolerate the high amount of accumulated heavy metals by sequestering them into vacuoles, usually in large storage cells of the epidermis. This is mediated by strongly elevated expression of specific transport proteins in various tissues from metal uptake in the shoots up to the storage sites in the leaf epidermis. However, this mechanism seems to be very metal specific. Non-hyperaccumulated metals in hyperaccumulators seem to be dealt with like in non-hyperaccumulator plants, i.e., detoxified by binding to strong ligands such as MTs.

  4. Stoichiometry and compartmentation of NADH metabolism in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Bakker, B M; Overkamp, K M; van Maris AJ; Kötter, P; Luttik, M A; van Dijken JP; Pronk, J T

    2001-01-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, reduction of NAD(+) to NADH occurs in dissimilatory as well as in assimilatory reactions. This review discusses mechanisms for reoxidation of NADH in this yeast, with special emphasis on the metabolic compartmentation that occurs as a consequence of the impermeability of the mitochondrial inner membrane for NADH and NAD(+). At least five mechanisms of NADH reoxidation exist in S. cerevisiae. These are: (1) alcoholic fermentation; (2) glycerol production; (3) respiration of cytosolic NADH via external mitochondrial NADH dehydrogenases; (4) respiration of cytosolic NADH via the glycerol-3-phosphate shuttle; and (5) oxidation of intramitochondrial NADH via a mitochondrial 'internal' NADH dehydrogenase. Furthermore, in vivo evidence indicates that NADH redox equivalents can be shuttled across the mitochondrial inner membrane by an ethanol-acetaldehyde shuttle. Several other redox-shuttle mechanisms might occur in S. cerevisiae, including a malate-oxaloacetate shuttle, a malate-aspartate shuttle and a malate-pyruvate shuttle. Although key enzymes and transporters for these shuttles are present, there is as yet no consistent evidence for their in vivo activity. Activity of several other shuttles, including the malate-citrate and fatty acid shuttles, can be ruled out based on the absence of key enzymes or transporters. Quantitative physiological analysis of defined mutants has been important in identifying several parallel pathways for reoxidation of cytosolic and intramitochondrial NADH. The major challenge that lies ahead is to elucidate the physiological function of parallel pathways for NADH oxidation in wild-type cells, both under steady-state and transient-state conditions. This requires the development of techniques for accurate measurement of intracellular metabolite concentrations in separate metabolic compartments.

  5. Compartmentalization of the inflammatory response in sepsis and SIRS.

    PubMed

    Cavaillon, Jean-Marc; Annane, Djillali

    2006-01-01

    Sepsis and systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) are associated with an exacerbated production of both pro- and anti-inflammatory mediators that are mainly produced within tissues. Although a systemic process, the pathophysiological events differ from organ to organ, and from organ to peripheral blood, leading to the concept of compartmentalization. The nature of the insult (e.g. burn, hemorrhage, trauma, peritonitis), the cellular composition of each compartment (e.g. nature of phagocytes, nature of endothelial cells), and its micro-environment (e.g. local presence of granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor [GM-CSF] in the lungs, low levels of arginine in the liver, release of endotoxin from the gut), and leukocyte recruitment, have a great influence on local inflammation and on tissue injury. High levels of pro-inflammatory mediators (e.g. interleukin-1 [IL-1], tumor necrosis factor [TNF], gamma interferon [IFN-gamma], high mobility group protein-1 [HMGB1], macrophage migration inhibitory factor [MIF]) produced locally and released into the blood stream initiate remote organ injury as a consequence of an organ cross-talk. The inflammatory response within the tissues is greatly influenced by the local delivery of neuromediators by the cholinergic and sympathetic neurons. Acetylcholine and epinephrine contribute with IL-10 and other mediators to the anti-inflammatory compensatory response initiated to dampen the inflammatory process. Unfortunately, this regulatory response leads to an altered immune status of leukocytes that can increase the susceptibility to further infection. Again, the nature of the insult, the nature of the leukocytes, the presence of circulating microbial components, and the nature of the triggering agent employed to trigger cells, greatly influence the immune status of the leukocytes that may differ from one compartment to another. While anti-inflammatory mediators predominate within the blood stream to avoid igniting new

  6. Efficient Vaccine Distribution Based on a Hybrid Compartmental Model.

    PubMed

    Yu, Zhiwen; Liu, Jiming; Wang, Xiaowei; Zhu, Xianjun; Wang, Daxing; Han, Guoqiang

    2016-01-01

    To effectively and efficiently reduce the morbidity and mortality that may be caused by outbreaks of emerging infectious diseases, it is very important for public health agencies to make informed decisions for controlling the spread of the disease. Such decisions must incorporate various kinds of intervention strategies, such as vaccinations, school closures and border restrictions. Recently, researchers have paid increased attention to searching for effective vaccine distribution strategies for reducing the effects of pandemic outbreaks when resources are limited. Most of the existing research work has been focused on how to design an effective age-structured epidemic model and to select a suitable vaccine distribution strategy to prevent the propagation of an infectious virus. Models that evaluate age structure effects are common, but models that additionally evaluate geographical effects are less common. In this paper, we propose a new SEIR (susceptible-exposed-infectious šC recovered) model, named the hybrid SEIR-V model (HSEIR-V), which considers not only the dynamics of infection prevalence in several age-specific host populations, but also seeks to characterize the dynamics by which a virus spreads in various geographic districts. Several vaccination strategies such as different kinds of vaccine coverage, different vaccine releasing times and different vaccine deployment methods are incorporated into the HSEIR-V compartmental model. We also design four hybrid vaccination distribution strategies (based on population size, contact pattern matrix, infection rate and infectious risk) for controlling the spread of viral infections. Based on data from the 2009-2010 H1N1 influenza epidemic, we evaluate the effectiveness of our proposed HSEIR-V model and study the effects of different types of human behaviour in responding to epidemics.

  7. Deciphering Neuron-Glia Compartmentalization in Cortical Energy Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Jolivet, Renaud; Magistretti, Pierre J.; Weber, Bruno

    2009-01-01

    Energy demand is an important constraint on neural signaling. Several methods have been proposed to assess the energy budget of the brain based on a bottom-up approach in which the energy demand of individual biophysical processes are first estimated independently and then summed up to compute the brain's total energy budget. Here, we address this question using a novel approach that makes use of published datasets that reported average cerebral glucose and oxygen utilization in humans and rodents during different activation states. Our approach allows us (1) to decipher neuron-glia compartmentalization in energy metabolism and (2) to compute a precise state-dependent energy budget for the brain. Under the assumption that the fraction of energy used for signaling is proportional to the cycling of neurotransmitters, we find that in the activated state, most of the energy (∼80%) is oxidatively produced and consumed by neurons to support neuron-to-neuron signaling. Glial cells, while only contributing for a small fraction to energy production (∼6%), actually take up a significant fraction of glucose (50% or more) from the blood and provide neurons with glucose-derived energy substrates. Our results suggest that glycolysis occurs for a significant part in astrocytes whereas most of the oxygen is utilized in neurons. As a consequence, a transfer of glucose-derived metabolites from glial cells to neurons has to take place. Furthermore, we find that the amplitude of this transfer is correlated to (1) the activity level of the brain; the larger the activity, the more metabolites are shuttled from glia to neurons and (2) the oxidative activity in astrocytes; with higher glial pyruvate metabolism, less metabolites are shuttled from glia to neurons. While some of the details of a bottom-up biophysical approach have to be simplified, our method allows for a straightforward assessment of the brain's energy budget from macroscopic measurements with minimal underlying

  8. Regulation and compartmentalization of β‐lactam biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Martín, Juan F.; Ullán, Ricardo V.; García‐Estrada, Carlos

    2010-01-01

    Summary Penicillins and cephalosporins are β‐lactam antibiotics widely used in human medicine. The biosynthesis of these compounds starts by the condensation of the amino acids l‐α‐aminoadipic acid, l‐cysteine and l‐valine to form the tripeptide δ‐l‐α‐aminoadipyl‐l‐cysteinyl‐d‐valine catalysed by the non‐ribosomal peptide ‘ACV synthetase’. Subsequently, this tripeptide is cyclized to isopenicillin N that in Penicillium is converted to hydrophobic penicillins, e.g. benzylpenicillin. In Acremonium and in streptomycetes, isopenicillin N is later isomerized to penicillin N and finally converted to cephalosporin. Expression of genes of the penicillin (pcbAB, pcbC, pendDE) and cephalosporin clusters (pcbAB, pcbC, cefD1, cefD2, cefEF, cefG) is controlled by pleitropic regulators including LaeA, a methylase involved in heterochromatin rearrangement. The enzymes catalysing the last two steps of penicillin biosynthesis (phenylacetyl‐CoA ligase and isopenicillin N acyltransferase) are located in microbodies, as shown by immunoelectron microscopy and microbodies proteome analyses. Similarly, the Acremonium two‐component CefD1–CefD2 epimerization system is also located in microbodies. This compartmentalization implies intracellular transport of isopenicillin N (in the penicillin pathway) or isopenicillin N and penicillin N in the cephalosporin route. Two transporters of the MFS family cefT and cefM are involved in transport of intermediates and/or secretion of cephalosporins. However, there is no known transporter of benzylpenicillin despite its large production in industrial strains. PMID:21255328

  9. Shape control and compartmentalization in active colloidal cells

    DOE PAGES

    Spellings, Matthew; Engel, Michael; Klotsa, Daphne; ...

    2015-08-07

    Small autonomous machines like biological cells or soft robots can convert energy input into control of function and form. It is desired that this behavior emerges spontaneously and can be easily switched over time. For this purpose, in this paper we introduce an active matter system that is loosely inspired by biology and which we term an active colloidal cell. The active colloidal cell consists of a boundary and a fluid interior, both of which are built from identical rotating spinners whose activity creates convective flows. Similarly to biological cell motility, which is driven by cytoskeletal components spread throughout themore » entire volume of the cell, active colloidal cells are characterized by highly distributed energy conversion. We demonstrate that we can control the shape of the active colloidal cell and drive compartmentalization by varying the details of the boundary (hard vs. flexible) and the character of the spinners (passive vs. active). We report buckling of the boundary controlled by the pattern of boundary activity, as well as formation of core–shell and inverted Janus phase-separated configurations within the active cell interior. As the cell size is increased, the inverted Janus configuration spontaneously breaks its mirror symmetry. The result is a bubble–crescent configuration, which alternates between two degenerate states over time and exhibits collective migration of the fluid along the boundary. Finally, our results are obtained using microscopic, non–momentum-conserving Langevin dynamics simulations and verified via a phase-field continuum model coupled to a Navier–Stokes equation.« less

  10. In vivo compartmental analysis of leukocytes in mouse lungs

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Brijesh V.; Tatham, Kate C.; Wilson, Michael R.; O'Dea, Kieran P.

    2015-01-01

    The lung has a unique structure consisting of three functionally different compartments (alveolar, interstitial, and vascular) situated in an extreme proximity. Current methods to localize lung leukocytes using bronchoalveolar lavage and/or lung perfusion have significant limitations for determination of location and phenotype of leukocytes. Here we present a novel method using in vivo antibody labeling to enable accurate compartmental localization/quantification and phenotyping of mouse lung leukocytes. Anesthetized C57BL/6 mice received combined in vivo intravenous and intratracheal labeling with fluorophore-conjugated anti-CD45 antibodies, and lung single-cell suspensions were analyzed by flow cytometry. The combined in vivo intravenous and intratracheal CD45 labeling enabled robust separation of the alveolar, interstitial, and vascular compartments of the lung. In naive mice, the alveolar compartment consisted predominantly of resident alveolar macrophages. The interstitial compartment, gated by events negative for both intratracheal and intravenous CD45 staining, showed two conventional dendritic cell populations, as well as a Ly6Clo monocyte population. Expression levels of MHCII on these interstitial monocytes were much higher than on the vascular Ly6Clo monocyte populations. In mice exposed to acid aspiration-induced lung injury, this protocol also clearly distinguished the three lung compartments showing the dynamic trafficking of neutrophils and exudative monocytes across the lung compartments during inflammation and resolution. This simple in vivo dual-labeling technique substantially increases the accuracy and depth of lung flow cytometric analysis, facilitates a more comprehensive examination of lung leukocyte pools, and enables the investigation of previously poorly defined “interstitial” leukocyte populations during models of inflammatory lung diseases. PMID:26254421

  11. Compartmentalization of ER-Bound Chaperone Confines Protein Deposit Formation to the Aging Yeast Cell.

    PubMed

    Saarikangas, Juha; Caudron, Fabrice; Prasad, Rupali; Moreno, David F; Bolognesi, Alessio; Aldea, Martí; Barral, Yves

    2017-03-20

    In order to produce rejuvenated daughters, dividing budding yeast cells confine aging factors, including protein aggregates, to the aging mother cell. The asymmetric inheritance of these protein deposits is mediated by organelle and cytoskeletal attachment and by cell geometry. Yet it remains unclear how deposit formation is restricted to the aging lineage. Here, we show that selective membrane anchoring and the compartmentalization of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane confine protein deposit formation to aging cells during division. Supporting the idea that the age-dependent deposit forms through coalescence of smaller aggregates, two deposits rapidly merged when placed in the same cell by cell-cell fusion. The deposits localized to the ER membrane, primarily to the nuclear envelope (NE). Strikingly, weakening the diffusion barriers that separate the ER membrane into mother and bud compartments caused premature formation of deposits in the daughter cells. Detachment of the Hsp40 protein Ydj1 from the ER membrane elicited a similar phenotype, suggesting that the diffusion barriers and farnesylated Ydj1 functioned together to confine protein deposit formation to mother cells during division. Accordingly, fluorescence correlation spectroscopy measurements in dividing cells indicated that a slow-diffusing, possibly client-bound Ydj1 fraction was asymmetrically enriched in the mother compartment. This asymmetric distribution depended on Ydj1 farnesylation and intact diffusion barriers. Taking these findings together, we propose that ER-anchored Ydj1 binds deposit precursors and prevents them from spreading into daughter cells during division by subjecting them to the ER diffusion barriers. This ensures that the coalescence of precursors into a single deposit is restricted to the aging lineage.

  12. Functional morphometry demonstrates extraocular muscle compartmental contraction during vertical gaze changes.

    PubMed

    Clark, Robert A; Demer, Joseph L

    2016-01-01

    Anatomical studies demonstrate selective compartmental innervation of most human extraocular muscles (EOMs), suggesting the potential for differential compartmental control. This was supported by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) demonstrating differential lateral rectus (LR) compartmental contraction during ocular counterrolling, differential medial rectus (MR) compartmental contraction during asymmetric convergence, and differential LR, inferior rectus (IR), and superior oblique (SO) compartmental contraction during vertical vergence. To ascertain possible differential compartmental EOM contraction during vertical ductions, surface coil MRI was performed over a range of target-controlled vertical gaze positions in 25 orbits of 13 normal volunteers. Cross-sectional areas and partial volumes of EOMs were analyzed in contiguous, quasi-coronal 2-mm image planes spanning origins to globe equator to determine morphometric features correlating best with contractility. Confirming and extending prior findings for horizontal EOMs during horizontal ductions, the percent change in posterior partial volume (PPV) of vertical EOMs from 8 to 14 mm posterior to the globe correlated best with vertical duction. EOMs were then divided into equal transverse compartments to evaluate the effect of vertical gaze on changes in PPV. Differential contractile changes were detected in the two compartments of the same EOM during infraduction for the IR medial vs. lateral (+4.4%, P = 0.03), LR inferior vs. superior (+4.0%, P = 0.0002), MR superior vs. inferior (-6.0%, P = 0.001), and SO lateral vs. medial (+9.7%, P = 0.007) compartments, with no differential contractile changes in the superior rectus. These findings suggest that differential compartmental activity occurs during normal vertical ductions. Thus all EOMs may contribute to cyclovertical actions. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  13. B cells undergo unique compartmentalized redistribution in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Haas, Jürgen; Bekeredjian-Ding, Isabelle; Milkova, Miriam; Balint, Bettina; Schwarz, Alexander; Korporal, Mirjam; Jarius, Sven; Fritz, Brigitte; Lorenz, Hanns-Martin; Wildemann, Brigitte

    2011-12-01

    Increasing evidence fosters the role of B cells (BC) in multiple sclerosis (MS). The compartmentalized distribution of BC in blood and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is incompletely understood. In this study, we analyzed BC-patterns and BC-immunoreactivity at these sites during active and during stable disease and the impact of disease modifying drugs (DMD) on peripheral BC-homeostasis. For this purpose we assessed BC-subsets in blood and CSF from patients with clinically isolated syndrome (CIS), relapsing remitting MS (RRMS), rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and healthy controls (HC) by flow cytometric detection of whole (W-BC), naïve, transitional (TN-BC), class-switched memory (CSM-BC), unswitched memory (USM-BC), double-negative memory (DNM-BC) BC-phenotypes, plasma blasts (PB), and plasma cells (PC). FACS-data were correlated with BC-specific chemotactic activities in CSF, intrathecal CXCL13-levels, and immunoreactivity of peripheral W-BC. Our study revealed that frequencies of systemic CSM-BC/USM-BC became contracted in active CIS/MS while proportions of naive BC, TN-BC and DNM-BC were reciprocally expanded. Moreover, the shifted BC-composition promoted reduced immunoreactivity of W-BC and resolved during remission. Cross-over changes in CSF included privileged accumulation of CSM-BC linked to intrathecal CXCL13-concentrations and expansion of PB/PC. Treatment with interferon-beta and natalizumab evoked distinct though differing redistribution of circulating BC-subsets. We conclude that symptomatic CIS and MS are accompanied by distinctive changes in peripheral and CSF BC-homeostasis. The privileged reciprocal distribution between naïve versus CSM-phenotypes in both compartments together with the marked chemotactic driving force towards BC prompted by CSF supernatants renders it likely that CSF BC are mainly recruited from peripheral blood during active CIS/MS, whereas constantly low percentages of circulating PB/PC and their failure to respond to migratory stimuli

  14. Compartmentalized Intrapulmonary Pharmacokinetics of Amphotericin B and Its Lipid Formulations

    PubMed Central

    Groll, Andreas H.; Lyman, Caron A.; Petraitis, Vidmantas; Petraitiene, Ruta; Armstrong, Derek; Mickiene, Diana; Alfaro, Raul M.; Schaufele, Robert L.; Sein, Tin; Bacher, John; Walsh, Thomas J.

    2006-01-01

    We investigated the compartmentalized intrapulmonary pharmacokinetics of amphotericin B and its lipid formulations in healthy rabbits. Cohorts of three to seven noninfected, catheterized rabbits received 1 mg of amphotericin B deoxycholate (DAMB) per kg of body weight or 5 mg of either amphotericin B colloidal dispersion (ABCD), amphotericin B lipid complex (ABLC), or liposomal amphotericin B (LAMB) per kg once daily for a total of 8 days. Following sparse serial plasma sampling, rabbits were sacrificed 24 h after the last dose, and epithelial lining fluid (ELF), pulmonary alveolar macrophages (PAM), and lung tissue were obtained. Pharmacokinetic parameters in plasma were derived by model-independent techniques, and concentrations in ELF and PAM were calculated based on the urea dilution method and macrophage cell volume, respectively. Mean amphotericin B concentrations ± standard deviations (SD) in lung tissue and PAM were highest in ABLC-treated animals, exceeding concurrent plasma levels by 70- and 375-fold, respectively (in lung tissue, 16.24 ± 1.62 versus 2.71 ± 1.22, 6.29 ± 1.17, and 6.32 ± 0.57 μg/g for DAMB-, ABCD-, and LAMB-treated animals, respectively [P = 0.0029]; in PAM, 89.1 ± 37.0 versus 8.92 ± 2.89, 5.43 ± 1.75, and 7.52 ± 2.50 μg/ml for DAMB-, ABCD-, and LAMB-treated animals, respectively [P = 0.0246]). By comparison, drug concentrations in ELF were much lower than those achieved in lung tissue and PAM. Among the different cohorts, the highest ELF concentrations were found in LAMB-treated animals (2.28 ± 1.43 versus 0.44 ± 0.13, 0.68 ± 0.27, and 0.90 ± 0.28 μg/ml in DAMB-, ABCD-, and ABLC-treated animals, respectively [P = 0.0070]). In conclusion, amphotericin B and its lipid formulations displayed strikingly different patterns of disposition in lungs 24 h after dosing. Whereas the disposition of ABCD was overall not fundamentally different from that of DAMB, ABLC showed prominent accumulation in lung tissue and PAM, while LAMB

  15. Estimating the electrotonic structure of neurons with compartmental models.

    PubMed

    Holmes, W R; Rall, W

    1992-10-01

    1. A procedure based on compartmental modeling called the "constrained inverse computation" was developed for estimating the electrotonic structure of neurons. With the constrained inverse computation, a set of N electrotonic parameters are estimated iteratively with use of a Newton-Raphson algorithm given values of N parameters that can be measured or estimated from experimental data. 2. The constrained inverse computation is illustrated by several applications to the basic example of a neuron represented as one cylinder coupled to a soma. The number of unknown parameters estimated was different (ranging from 2 to 6) when different sets of constraints were chosen. The unknowns were chosen from the following: dendritic membrane resistivity Rmd, soma membrane resistivity Rms, intracellular resistivity Ri, membrane capacity Cm, dendritic membrane area AD, soma membrane area As, electrotonic length L, and resistivity-free length, rfl (rfl = 2l/d1/2 where l and d are length and diameter of the cylinder). The values of the unknown parameters were estimated from the values of an equal number of known parameters, which were chosen from the following: the time constants and coefficients of a voltage transient tau 0, tau 1, ..., C0, C1, ..., voltage-clamp time constants tau vc1, tau vc2, ..., and input resistance RN. Note that initially, morphological data were treated as unknown, rather than known. 3. When complete morphology was not known, parameters from voltage and current transients, combined with the input resistance were not sufficient to completely specify the electrotonic structure of the neuron. For a neuron represented as a cylinder coupled to a soma, there were an infinite number of combinations of Rmd, Rms, Ri, Cm, AS, AD, and L that could be fitted to the same voltage and current transients and input resistance. 4. One reason for the nonuniqueness when complete morphology was not specified is that the Ri estimate is intrinsically bound to the morphology. Ri

  16. Compartmentalization of proteinases and amylases in Nauphoeta cinerea midgut.

    PubMed

    Elpidina, E N; Vinokurov, K S; Gromenko, V A; Rudenskaya, Y A; Dunaevsky, Y E; Zhuzhikov, D P

    2001-12-01

    Compartmentalization of proteinases, amylases, and pH in the midgut of Nauphoeta cinerea Oliv. (Blattoptera:Blaberidae) was studied in order to understand the organization of protein and starch digestion. Total proteolytic activity measured with azocasein was maximal at pH 11.5 both in anterior (AM) and posterior (PM) halves of the midgut, but the bulk of activity (67%) was found in PM. Total AM and PM preparations were fractionated on a Sephadex G-50 column and further analysed by means of activity electrophoresis and specific inhibitors and activators. The major activity in PM was classified as an unusual SH-dependent proteinase with M(r) 24,000 and pH optimum with synthetic substrate BApNA at 10.0. The enzyme was 43-fold activated in the presence of 1 mM DTT, insensitive to synthetic inhibitors of serine (PMSF, TLCK, TPCK) and cysteine (IAA, E-64) proteinases, strongly inhibited by STI, and displayed four active bands on zymograms. In PM, activities of trypsin-like, chymotrypsin-like, subtilisin-like, and cysteine proteinases were observed. Aspartic and metalloproteinases were not detected. In AM, activity of unusual SH-dependent proteinase also dominated and activity of chymotrypsin-like proteinase was observed, but their levels were much lower than in PM. Distribution of amylase activity, exhibiting an optimum at pH 6.0, was quite the opposite. The major part of it (67%) was located in AM. Treatment of amylase preparation with proteinases from AM and PM reduced amylase activity twofold. pH of the midgut contents was 6.0-7.2 in AM, 6.4-7.6 in the first and 8.8-9.3 in the second halves of PM. Thus, pH in AM is in good agreement with the optimal pH of amylase, located in this compartment, but the activity of proteinases, including the ability to degrade amylase, in such an environment is low. Active proteolysis takes place in the second half of PM, where pH of the gut is close to the optimal pH of proteinases. Copyright 2001 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  17. Molecular-level characterization of the breathing behavior of the jungle-gym-type DMOF-1 metal-organic framework.

    PubMed

    Grosch, Jason S; Paesani, Francesco

    2012-03-07

    Fundamental insights into the molecular mechanisms that determine the breathing behavior of the jungle-gym-type DMOF-1 metal-organic framework upon adsorption of benzene and isopropyl alcohol are gained from computer simulations. In all cases, good agreement is obtained between the calculated and experimental structural parameters. In the case of benzene adsorption, DMOF-1 is predicted to exist in a narrow pore configuration at high loadings and/or low temperature. A structural transition into a large pore configuration is then observed as the temperature increases and/or the loading decreases, which is directly related to the spatial distribution and molecular interactions of the benzene molecules within the pores. The isopropyl alcohol adsorption simulations indicate that DMOF-1 undergoes two distinct structural transitions (from large pore to narrow pore and then back to large pore) as the number of adsorbed molecules increases, which is explained in terms of the formation of hydrogen bonds between the isopropyl molecules and the framework. © 2012 American Chemical Society

  18. Syntheses, crystal structures, and water adsorption behaviors of jungle-gym-type porous coordination polymers containing nitro moieties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uemura, Kazuhiro; Onishi, Fumiaki; Yamasaki, Yukari; Kita, Hidetoshi

    2009-10-01

    NO 2 containing dicarboxylate bridging ligands, nitroterephthalate (bdc-NO 2) and 2,5-dinitroterephthalate (bdc-(NO 2) 2), afford porous coordination polymers, {[Zn 2(bdc-NO 2) 2(dabco)]· solvents} n ( 2⊃ solvents) and {[Zn 2(bdc-(NO 2) 2) 2(dabco)]· solvents} n ( 3⊃ solvents). Both compounds form jungle-gym-type regularities, where a 2D square grid composed of dinuclear Zn 2 units and dicarboxylate ligands is bridged by dabco molecules to extend the 2D layers into a 3D structure. In 2⊃ solvents and 3⊃ solvents, a rectangle pore surrounded by eight Zn 2 corners contains two and four NO 2 moieties, respectively. Thermal gravimetry (TG) and X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD) measurements reveal that both compounds maintain the frameworks regularities without guest molecules and with solvents such as MeOH, EtOH, i-PrOH, and Me 2CO. Adsorption measurements reveal that dried 2 and 3 adsorb H 2O molecules to be {[Zn 2(bdc-NO 2) 2(dabco)]·4H 2O} n ( 2⊃4H 2O) and {[Zn 2(bdc-(NO 2) 2) 2(dabco)]·6H 2O} n ( 3⊃6H 2O), showing the pore hydrophilicity enhancement caused by NO 2 group introduction.

  19. [Phylogeographic carrion, hooded and jungle crows (Aves, Corvidae) from data on partial sequencing of the mitochondrial DNA cytochrome B gene].

    PubMed

    Kriukov, A P; Suzuki, H

    2000-08-01

    Distribution of mitochondrial DNA cytochrome b gene haplotypes in two crow species was examined by means of sequencing of the 336-bp gene fragment. The topology of the NJ and UPGMA trees showed that the carrion crow range was split into two parts due to the presence of significantly diverged ancestral lineage localized in the southeastern part of the range. The carrion crow populations, inhabiting a territory ranging from France to northern Sakhalin, along with interspersed hooded crow populations and hybrid Siberian populations, shared a common haplotype. The border between two carrion crow lineages revealed is located in central Sakhalin. The subdivision of two weakly differentiated lineages within the jungle crown range, also observed within this territory, coincided with the subspecies division of this species. The estimated genetic distances indicate the isolation of the subgenus Coloeus. These data also suggest the convergent similarity between the chough Pyrrhocorax pyrrhocorax and the Corvus genus, as well as the conspecificity of Corvus corone corone and C. c. cornix.

  20. Responses of young red jungle fowl (Gallus gallus) and White Leghorn layers to familiar and unfamiliar social stimuli.

    PubMed

    Väisänen, J; Jensen, P

    2004-03-01

    Social preferences of familiar over unfamiliar social stimuli in chicks may be used to measure sociality, a characteristic important for the welfare of poultry in commercial production. We studied social preferences and reaction to strangers in young White Leghorns and red jungle fowl (Gallus gallus) in 3 tests. All chicks were raised and housed in 2 groups of 34 individuals per breed. At 24 to 29 d of age 38 chicks per breed were tested in 2 runway tests. In the first, chicks had a free choice between familiar and unfamiliar breed members, and in the second the choice was between unfamiliar chicks of their own breed and the other breed. On d 41 to 42, spacing and agonistic interactions of 28 pairs of chicks per breed (in half of the pairs, chicks were unfamiliar to each other) were observed in an open field for 10 min (pair test). In the first runway test, clear preference for familiar chicks and avoidance of unfamiliar social stimuli was found only in Leghorns, whereas both breeds showed a preference for their own breed members in the second runway test. Affiliation to the familiar breed, however, was more pronounced in Leghorns. In the pair test, Leghorns were significantly more involved in agonistic interactions than wild-type chicks. Avoidance of unfamiliar and preference for familiar conspecifics might suggest a weaker capacity of Leghorns to cope with novel social and environmental stimuli, which might have implications for the welfare of the birds in production environments when encountering unfamiliar individuals.

  1. Isolation and molecular characterization of a H5N1 virus isolated from a Jungle crow (Corvus macrohynchos) in India.

    PubMed

    Nagarajan, S; Tosh, C; Murugkar, H V; Venkatesh, G; Katare, M; Jain, R; Behera, P; Khandia, R; Tripathi, S; Kulkarni, D D; Dubey, S C

    2010-08-01

    In 2008, India experienced widespread outbreaks of H5N1 virus in West Bengal, Tripura, and Assam. The virus was detected in Kamrup district of Assam in November 2008 and subsequently spread to eight more districts. Two Jungle or Large billed crows (Corvus macrohynchos) were found dead in a hospital campus at about 8 km from the foci of initial detection of the virus in the same district. One of the crows was positive for H5N1 avian influenza virus by virus isolation, real time RT-PCR, and RT-PCR tests. Full length sequencing of all the eight segments of the virus was carried out. The phylogenetic analysis indicated that all the eight genes grouped with clade 2.2 viruses and were closely related to the human isolate of Bangladesh and avian isolates from India, Bangladesh, Kuwait, Germany, and Saudi Arabia. The molecular analysis indicated avian receptor (alpha 2,3 sialic acid) specificity, susceptibility to oseltamivir and amantadine group of antivirals and lower pathogenicity to mice.

  2. Impact of epidemic influenza A-like acute respiratory illness in a remote jungle highland population in Irian Jaya, Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Corwin, A L; Simanjuntak, C H; Ingkokusumo, G; Sukri, N; Larasati, R P; Subianto, B; Muslim, H Z; Burni, E; Laras, K; Putri, M P; Hayes, C; Cox, N

    1998-04-01

    A suspected epidemic of unknown etiology was investigated in April/May 1996 in the remote jungle highlands of easternmost Indonesia. Trend analysis demonstrates the area-wide occurrence of a major respiratory infection outbreak in November 1995 through February 1996. The monthly mean rate of respiratory infection episodes for the peak outbreak months (2,477 episodes/100,000 persons) was significantly higher (P < .0001) than for the 34 months leading up to the outbreak (109 episodes/100,000 persons). Notable were the high attack rates, particularly among adults: 202 episodes/1,000 persons aged 20-50 years in one community. Excess morbidity attributed to the outbreak was an estimated 4,338 episodes. The overall case-fatality rate was 15.1% of outbreak cases. Laboratory evidence confirmed the circulation of influenza A/Taiwan/1/86-like viruses in the study population, and high hemagglutination inhibition titer responses were indicative of recent infections. Historical documents from neighboring Papua New Guinea highlight the role of influenza A virus in repeated area outbreaks.

  3. Na+ compartmentalization related to salinity stress tolerance in upland cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) seedlings

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Zhen; He, Shoupu; Sun, Junling; Pan, Zhaoe; Gong, Wenfang; Lu, Yanli; Du, Xiongming

    2016-01-01

    The capacity for ion compartmentalization among different tissues and cells is the key mechanism regulating salt tolerance in plants. In this study, we investigated the ion compartmentalization capacity of two upland cotton genotypes with different salt tolerances under salt shock at the tissue, cell and molecular levels. We found that the leaf glandular trichome could secrete more salt ions in the salt-tolerant genotype than in the sensitive genotype, demonstrating the excretion of ions from tissue may be a new mechanism to respond to short-term salt shock. Furthermore, an investigation of the ion distribution demonstrated that the ion content was significantly lower in critical tissues and cells of the salt-tolerant genotype, indicating the salt-tolerant genotype had a greater capacity for ion compartmentalization in the shoot. By comparing the membrane H+-ATPase activity and the expression of ion transportation-related genes, we found that the H+-ATPase activity and Na+/H+ antiporter are the key factors determining the capacity for ion compartmentalization in leaves, which might further determine the salt tolerance of cotton. The novel function of the glandular trichome and the comparison of Na+ compartmentalization between two cotton genotypes with contrasting salt tolerances provide a new understanding of the salt tolerance mechanism in cotton. PMID:27698468

  4. Preventing age-related decline of gut compartmentalization limits microbiota dysbiosis and extends lifespan

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hongjie; Qi, Yanyan; Jasper, Heinrich

    2016-01-01

    Summary Compartmentalization of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract of metazoans is critical for health. GI compartments contain specific microbiota, and microbiota dysbiosis is associated with intestinal dysfunction. Dysbiosis develops in aging intestines, yet how this relates to changes in GI compartmentalization remains unclear. The Drosophila GI tract is an accessible model to address this question. Here we show that the stomach-like copper cell region (CCR) in the middle midgut controls distribution and composition of the microbiota. We find that chronic activation of JAK/Stat signaling in the aging gut induces a metaplasia of the gastric epithelium, CCR decline, and subsequent commensal dysbiosis and epithelial dysplasia along the GI tract. Accordingly, inhibition of JAK/Stat signaling in the CCR specifically prevents age-related metaplasia, commensal dysbiosis and functional decline in old guts, and extends lifespan. Our results establish a mechanism by which age-related chronic inflammation causes the decline of intestinal compartmentalization and microbiota dysbiosis, limiting lifespan. PMID:26867182

  5. Global identifiability of linear compartmental models--a computer algebra algorithm.

    PubMed

    Audoly, S; D'Angiò, L; Saccomani, M P; Cobelli, C

    1998-01-01

    A priori global identifiability deals with the uniqueness of the solution for the unknown parameters of a model and is, thus, a prerequisite for parameter estimation of biological dynamic models. Global identifiability is however difficult to test, since it requires solving a system of algebraic nonlinear equations which increases both in nonlinearity degree and number of terms and unknowns with increasing model order. In this paper, a computer algebra tool, GLOBI (GLOBal Identifiability) is presented, which combines the topological transfer function method with the Buchberger algorithm, to test global identifiability of linear compartmental models. GLOBI allows for the automatic testing of a priori global identifiability of general structure compartmental models from general multi input-multi output experiments. Examples of usage of GLOBI to analyze a priori global identifiability of some complex biological compartmental models are provided.

  6. Preventing Age-Related Decline of Gut Compartmentalization Limits Microbiota Dysbiosis and Extends Lifespan.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongjie; Qi, Yanyan; Jasper, Heinrich

    2016-02-10

    Compartmentalization of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract of metazoans is critical for health. GI compartments contain specific microbiota, and microbiota dysbiosis is associated with intestinal dysfunction. Dysbiosis develops in aging intestines, yet how this relates to changes in GI compartmentalization remains unclear. The Drosophila GI tract is an accessible model to address this question. Here we show that the stomach-like copper cell region (CCR) in the middle midgut controls distribution and composition of the microbiota. We find that chronic activation of JAK/Stat signaling in the aging gut induces a metaplasia of the gastric epithelium, CCR decline, and subsequent commensal dysbiosis and epithelial dysplasia along the GI tract. Accordingly, inhibition of JAK/Stat signaling in the CCR specifically prevents age-related metaplasia, commensal dysbiosis and functional decline in old guts, and extends lifespan. Our results establish a mechanism by which age-related chronic inflammation causes the decline of intestinal compartmentalization and microbiota dysbiosis, limiting lifespan.

  7. A computer program for the analysis of controllability, observability and structural identifiability of biological compartmental systems.

    PubMed

    Cobelli, C; Polo, A; Romanin-Jacur, G

    1977-03-01

    A computer program to check structural identifiability of biological compartmental systems, that is the priori possibility of estamating all unknown system parameters through a multi input-multi output tracer experiment is presented. The procedure, as based only on the adopted compartmental structure and the chosen input-output experiment, is independent of the numerical values of the parameters: therefore the program can be usefully employed before parameter estimation algorithms, to assure that all the unknown parameters evidenced in the model can be estimated from the experimental data. After a short review on compartmental models, controllability observability and structural identifiability are defined and techniques to check them are provided. The digital computer implementation of the whole procedure is discussed in detail. Some typical program runs regarding the application to biological systems are given.

  8. Tracing compartmentalized NADPH metabolism in the cytosol and mitochondria of mammalian cells

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Caroline A.; Parker, Seth J.; Fiske, Brian P.; McCloskey, Douglas; Gui, Dan Y.; Green, Courtney R.; Vokes, Natalie I.; Feist, Adam M.; Heiden, Matthew G. Vander; Metallo, Christian M.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Eukaryotic cells compartmentalize biochemical processes in different organelles, often relying on metabolic cycles to shuttle reducing equivalents across intracellular membranes. NADPH serves as the electron carrier for the maintenance of redox homeostasis and reductive biosynthesis, with separate cytosolic and mitochondrial pools providing reducing power in each respective location. This cellular organization is critical for numerous functions but complicates analysis of metabolic pathways using available methods. Here we develop an approach to resolve NADP(H)-dependent pathways present within both the cytosol and the mitochondria. By tracing hydrogen in compartmentalized reactions that use NADPH as a cofactor, including the production of 2-hydroxyglutarate by mutant isocitrate dehydrogenase enzymes, we can observe metabolic pathway activity in these distinct cellular compartments. Using this system we determine the direction of serine/glycine interconversion within the mitochondria and cytosol, highlighting the ability of this approach to resolve compartmentalized reactions in intact cells. PMID:24882210

  9. Compartmentalization of incompatible reagents within Pickering emulsion droplets for one-pot cascade reactions.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hengquan; Fu, Luman; Wei, Lijuan; Liang, Jifen; Binks, Bernard P

    2015-01-28

    It is a dream that future synthetic chemistry can mimic living systems to process multistep cascade reactions in a one-pot fashion. One of the key challenges is the mutual destruction of incompatible or opposing reagents, for example, acid and base, oxidants and reductants. A conceptually novel strategy is developed here to address this challenge. This strategy is based on a layered Pickering emulsion system, which is obtained through lamination of Pickering emulsions. In this working Pickering emulsion, the dispersed phase can separately compartmentalize the incompatible reagents to avoid their mutual destruction, while the continuous phase allows other reagent molecules to diffuse freely to access the compartmentalized reagents for chemical reactions. The compartmentalization effects and molecular transport ability of the Pickering emulsion were investigated. The deacetalization-reduction, deacetalization-Knoevenagel, deacetalization-Henry and diazotization-iodization cascade reactions demonstrate well the versatility and flexibility of our strategy in processing the one-pot cascade reactions involving mutually destructive reagents.

  10. Association of efferent neurons to the compartmental architecture of the superior colliculus.

    PubMed Central

    Illing, R B

    1992-01-01

    The superior colliculus is a layered structure in the mammalian midbrain serving multimodal sensorimotor integration. Its intermediate layers are characterized by a compartmental architecture. These compartments are apparent through the clustering of terminals of major collicular afferents, which in many instances match the heterogeneous distribution of tissue components such as acetylcholinesterase, choline acetyltransferase, substance P, and parvalbumin. The present study was undertaken to determine whether efferent cells observe this compartmental architecture. It was found that subpopulations of both descending and ascending collicular efferents originate from perikarya situated in characteristic positions relative to the collicular compartments defined by elevated acetylcholinesterase activity and that their dendrites appear to be specifically coordinated with the heterogeneous environment. With the specific interlocking of afferent and efferent neurons through spatially distinguished neural networks, the compartmental architecture apparently constitutes an essential element for the determination of information flow in the superior colliculus. Images PMID:1438296

  11. Compartmentalization of cyclic nucleotide signaling: A question of when, where, and why?

    PubMed Central

    Arora, Kavisha; Sinha, Chandrima; Zhang, Weiqiang; Ren, Aixia; Moon, Chang Suk; Yarlagadda, Sunitha; Naren, Anjaparavanda P.

    2013-01-01

    Preciseness of cellular behavior depends upon how an extracellular cue mobilizes a correct orchestra of cellular messengers and effector proteins spatially and temporally. This concept, termed compartmentalization of cellular signaling, is now known to form the molecular basis of many aspects of cellular behavior in health and disease. The cyclic nucleotides cAMP and cGMP are ubiquitous cellular messengers that can be compartmentalized in three ways: first, by their physical containment; second, by formation of multiple protein signaling complexes; and third, by their selective depletion. Compartmentalized cyclic nucleotide signaling is a very prevalent response among all cell types. In order to understand how it becomes relevant to cellular behavior, it is important to know how it is executed in cells to regulate physiological responses and, also, how its execution or dysregulation can lead to a pathophysiological condition, which forms the current scope of the presented review. PMID:23604972

  12. A Computational Modeling and Simulation Approach to Investigate Mechanisms of Subcellular cAMP Compartmentation

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Pei-Chi; Boras, Britton W.; Jeng, Mao-Tsuen; Lewis, Timothy J.; McCulloch, Andrew D.; Harvey, Robert D.; Clancy, Colleen E.

    2016-01-01

    Subcellular compartmentation of the ubiquitous second messenger cAMP has been widely proposed as a mechanism to explain unique receptor-dependent functional responses. How exactly compartmentation is achieved, however, has remained a mystery for more than 40 years. In this study, we developed computational and mathematical models to represent a subcellular sarcomeric space in a cardiac myocyte with varying detail. We then used these models to predict the contributions of various mechanisms that establish subcellular cAMP microdomains. We used the models to test the hypothesis that phosphodiesterases act as functional barriers to diffusion, creating discrete cAMP signaling domains. We also used the models to predict the effect of a range of experimentally measured diffusion rates on cAMP compartmentation. Finally, we modeled the anatomical structures in a cardiac myocyte diad, to predict the effects of anatomical diffusion barriers on cAMP compartmentation. When we incorporated experimentally informed model parameters to reconstruct an in silico subcellular sarcomeric space with spatially distinct cAMP production sites linked to caveloar domains, the models predict that under realistic conditions phosphodiesterases alone were insufficient to generate significant cAMP gradients. This prediction persisted even when combined with slow cAMP diffusion. When we additionally considered the effects of anatomic barriers to diffusion that are expected in the cardiac myocyte dyadic space, cAMP compartmentation did occur, but only when diffusion was slow. Our model simulations suggest that additional mechanisms likely contribute to cAMP gradients occurring in submicroscopic domains. The difference between the physiological and pathological effects resulting from the production of cAMP may be a function of appropriate compartmentation of cAMP signaling. Therefore, understanding the contribution of factors that are responsible for coordinating the spatial and temporal

  13. Fully Automated Enhanced Tumor Compartmentalization: Man vs. Machine Reloaded

    PubMed Central

    Meier, Raphael; Verma, Rajeev; Jilch, Astrid; Fichtner, Jens; Knecht, Urspeter; Radina, Christian; Schucht, Philippe; Beck, Jürgen; Raabe, Andreas; Slotboom, Johannes; Reyes, Mauricio; Wiest, Roland

    2016-01-01

    Objective Comparison of a fully-automated segmentation method that uses compartmental volume information to a semi-automatic user-guided and FDA-approved segmentation technique. Methods Nineteen patients with a recently diagnosed and histologically confirmed glioblastoma (GBM) were included and MR images were acquired with a 1.5 T MR scanner. Manual segmentation for volumetric analyses was performed using the open source software 3D Slicer version 4.2.2.3 (www.slicer.org). Semi-automatic segmentation was done by four independent neurosurgeons and neuroradiologists using the computer-assisted segmentation tool SmartBrush® (referred to as SB), a semi-automatic user-guided and FDA-approved tumor-outlining program that uses contour expansion. Fully automatic segmentations were performed with the Brain Tumor Image Analysis (BraTumIA, referred to as BT) software. We compared manual (ground truth, referred to as GT), computer-assisted (SB) and fully-automated (BT) segmentations with regard to: (1) products of two maximum diameters for 2D measurements, (2) the Dice coefficient, (3) the positive predictive value, (4) the sensitivity and (5) the volume error. Results Segmentations by the four expert raters resulted in a mean Dice coefficient between 0.72 and 0.77 using SB. BT achieved a mean Dice coefficient of 0.68. Significant differences were found for intermodal (BT vs. SB) and for intramodal (four SB expert raters) performances. The BT and SB segmentations of the contrast-enhancing volumes achieved a high correlation with the GT. Pearson correlation was 0.8 for BT; however, there were a few discrepancies between raters (BT and SB 1 only). Additional non-enhancing tumor tissue extending the SB volumes was found with BT in 16/19 cases. The clinically motivated sum of products of diameters measure (SPD) revealed neither significant intermodal nor intramodal variations. The analysis time for the four expert raters was faster (1 minute and 47 seconds to 3 minutes and 39

  14. Compartmentation of cAMP signalling in cardiomyocytes in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Perera, R K; Nikolaev, V O

    2013-04-01

    3',5'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) is a ubiquitous second messenger critically involved in the regulation of heart function. It has been shown to act in discrete subcellular signalling compartments formed by differentially localized receptors, phosphodiesterases and protein kinases. Cardiac diseases such as hypertrophy or heart failure are associated with structural and functional remodelling of these microdomains which leads to changes in cAMP compartmentation. In this review, we will discuss recent key findings which provided new insights into cAMP compartmentation in cardiomyocytes with a particular focus on its alterations in heart disease.

  15. 21 CFR 888.3535 - Knee joint femorotibial (uni-compartmental) metal/polymer porous-coated uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    .../polymer porous-coated uncemented prosthesis. 888.3535 Section 888.3535 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... Devices § 888.3535 Knee joint femorotibial (uni-compartmental) metal/polymer porous-coated uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint femorotibial (uni-compartmental) metal/polymer...

  16. [Serologic response to a DNA recombinant vaccine against hepatitis B in natives of the Peruvian Amazonian jungle].

    PubMed

    Colichón, A; Vildósola, H; Sjogren, M; Cantella, R; Rojas, C

    1990-01-01

    Large areas of the Amazon basin in Brazil, Colombia, Ecuador, and in the nonoriental region of the peruvian jungle have been found to be hyperendemic to Hepatitis B with high prevalence of asymptomatic carriers (11 to 25%) and, in more selected areas, Hepatitis Delta has been also reported. In the present report, we have studied 108 volunteers from six different Jivaroes communities living in a hyperendemic Hepatitis B area. They received 2 doses of DNA recombinant yeast derivated HBV vaccine. All the selected persons were HBsAb negatives, but many (80%) had antibodies to HBc. Following immunization schedule, 80% responded with the formation of HBsAb; a better seroconversion was achieved in those negatives to anticore IgG compared with those having HBcAb. We obtained 90% of seroconversion in spite of the fact that our vaccination schedule was prolonged up to 10 months from the one recommended by the manufacturer. The vaccination schedule 0,4, 14 months, and the schedule 0,4 months, had 76 and 29% of seroconversion, respectively. We want to point out three observations: 1) It is quite possible that many of the Anti-core positives, that did not respond to vaccination were carriers of HBsAg undetectable by the conventional EIA test carried out; 2) The seroconversion rate in these natives was low (up to six months after the vaccination schedule); and 3) Many of the HBcAb were false positives and many of them were recently infected. We conclude: A) It is highly important to assess the anti-HBs hyperendemic areas before attempting vaccinations; B) All persons negative to anti-HBs should be vaccinated in spite to anticore antibodies; C) Areas with difficult access could be vaccinated even until 10 months without affecting good results, and D) DNA recombinant vaccine (ENGERIX B) was well tolerated. No side effects were observed.

  17. A Compartmentalized Out-of-Equilibrium Enzymatic Reaction Network for Sustained Autonomous Movement.

    PubMed

    Nijemeisland, Marlies; Abdelmohsen, Loai K E A; Huck, Wilhelm T S; Wilson, Daniela A; van Hest, Jan C M

    2016-11-23

    Every living cell is a compartmentalized out-of-equilibrium system exquisitely able to convert chemical energy into function. In order to maintain homeostasis, the flux of metabolites is tightly controlled by regulatory enzymatic networks. A crucial prerequisite for the development of lifelike materials is the construction of synthetic systems with compartmentalized reaction networks that maintain out-of-equilibrium function. Here, we aim for autonomous movement as an example of the conversion of feedstock molecules into function. The flux of the conversion is regulated by a rationally designed enzymatic reaction network with multiple feedforward loops. By compartmentalizing the network into bowl-shaped nanocapsules the output of the network is harvested as kinetic energy. The entire system shows sustained and tunable microscopic motion resulting from the conversion of multiple external substrates. The successful compartmentalization of an out-of-equilibrium reaction network is a major first step in harnessing the design principles of life for construction of adaptive and internally regulated lifelike systems.

  18. Krebs cycle metabolon formation: metabolite concentration gradient enhanced compartmentation of sequential enzymes.

    PubMed

    Wu, Fei; Pelster, Lindsey N; Minteer, Shelley D

    2015-01-25

    Dynamics of metabolon formation in mitochondria was probed by studying diffusional motion of two sequential Krebs cycle enzymes in a microfluidic channel. Enhanced directional co-diffusion of both enzymes against a substrate concentration gradient was observed in the presence of intermediate generation. This reveals a metabolite directed compartmentation of metabolic pathways.

  19. Compartmentalization: a conceptual framework for understanding how trees grow and defend themselves

    Treesearch

    Alex L. Shigo

    1984-01-01

    The purpose of this chapter is to describe a conceptual framework for understanding how trees grow and how they and other perennial plants defend themselves. The concept of compartmentalization has developed over many years, a synthesis of ideas from a number of investigators. It is derived from detailed studies of the gross morphology and cellular anatomy of the wood...

  20. Solution of homogeneous systems of linear equations arising from compartmental models

    SciTech Connect

    Funderlic, R.E.; Mankin, J.B.

    1981-12-01

    Systems of linear differential equations with constant coefficients, Ax = x, with the matrix A having nonnegative off-diagnonal elements and zero column sums, occur in compartmental analysis. The steady-state solution leads to the homogeneous system of linear equations Ax(infinity)=x(infinity)=0. LU-factorization, the Crout algorithm, error analysis and solution of a modified system are treated.

  1. Beyond Compartmentalization: A Relational Approach towards Agency and Vulnerability of Young Migrants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huijsmans, Roy

    2012-01-01

    Based on fieldwork material from Lao People's Democratic Republic, this paper introduces an analytical framework that transcends compartmentalized approaches towards migration involving young people. The notions of fluid and institutionalized forms of migration illuminate key differences and commonalities in the relational fabric underpinning…

  2. An actomyosin-based barrier inhibits cell mixing at compartmental boundaries in Drosophila embryos.

    PubMed

    Monier, Bruno; Pélissier-Monier, Anne; Brand, Andrea H; Sanson, Bénédicte

    2010-01-01

    Partitioning tissues into compartments that do not intermix is essential for the correct morphogenesis of animal embryos and organs. Several hypotheses have been proposed to explain compartmental cell sorting, mainly differential adhesion, but also regulation of the cytoskeleton or of cell proliferation. Nevertheless, the molecular and cellular mechanisms that keep cells apart at boundaries remain unclear. Here we demonstrate, in early Drosophila melanogaster embryos, that actomyosin-based barriers stop cells from invading neighbouring compartments. Our analysis shows that cells can transiently invade neighbouring compartments, especially when they divide, but are then pushed back into their compartment of origin. Actomyosin cytoskeletal components are enriched at compartmental boundaries, forming cable-like structures when the epidermis is mitotically active. When MyoII (non-muscle myosin II) function is inhibited, including locally at the cable by chromophore-assisted laser inactivation (CALI), in live embryos, dividing cells are no longer pushed back, leading to compartmental cell mixing. We propose that local regulation of actomyosin contractibility, rather than differential adhesion, is the primary mechanism sorting cells at compartmental boundaries.

  3. A-kinase anchoring proteins: cAMP compartmentalization in neurodegenerative and obstructive pulmonary diseases

    PubMed Central

    Poppinga, W J; Muñoz-Llancao, P; González-Billault, C; Schmidt, M

    2014-01-01

    The universal second messenger cAMP is generated upon stimulation of Gs protein-coupled receptors, such as the β2-adreneoceptor, and leads to the activation of PKA, the major cAMP effector protein. PKA oscillates between an on and off state and thereby regulates a plethora of distinct biological responses. The broad activation pattern of PKA and its contribution to several distinct cellular functions lead to the introduction of the concept of compartmentalization of cAMP. A-kinase anchoring proteins (AKAPs) are of central importance due to their unique ability to directly and/or indirectly interact with proteins that either determine the cellular content of cAMP, such as β2-adrenoceptors, ACs and PDEs, or are regulated by cAMP such as the exchange protein directly activated by cAMP. We report on lessons learned from neurons indicating that maintenance of cAMP compartmentalization by AKAP5 is linked to neurotransmission, learning and memory. Disturbance of cAMP compartments seem to be linked to neurodegenerative disease including Alzheimer's disease. We translate this knowledge to compartmentalized cAMP signalling in the lung. Next to AKAP5, we focus here on AKAP12 and Ezrin (AKAP78). These topics will be highlighted in the context of the development of novel pharmacological interventions to tackle AKAP-dependent compartmentalization. PMID:25132049

  4. Technology Solutions Case Study: Field Testing of Compartmentalization Methods for Multifamily Construction

    SciTech Connect

    2015-01-01

    Fire-resistance rated (or area separation) wall assemblies present a great difficulty in air sealing/compartmentalization, particularly in townhouse construction. To address this challenge, Building Science Corporation partnered with builder K. Hovnanian Homes to determine whether taping exterior sheathing details improves air sealing in townhouse and multifamily construction, and to better understand air leakage pathways.

  5. Meningoencephalitis and Compartmentalization of the Cerebral Ventricles Caused by Enterobacter sakazakii

    PubMed Central

    Kleiman, Martin B.; Allen, Stephen D.; Neal, Patricia; Reynolds, Janet

    1981-01-01

    A necrotizing meningoencephalitis complicated by ventricular compartmentalization and abscess formation caused by Enterobacter sakazakii in a previously healthy 5-week-old female is described. A detailed description of the isolate is presented. This communication firmly establishes the pathogenicity of E. sakazakii. PMID:7287892

  6. Origin of reservoir compartmentalization in Lower Ordovician Karstic Dolostones, Ellenburger Group, West Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Kerans, C.

    1988-01-01

    Ellenburger Group reservoirs constitute a major play in the Permian basin of west Texas, with over 1.4 billion bbl cumulative production through 1985. These reservoirs typically have been developed by assuming homogeneous fracture-related pore system. Examination of core, log, and production data demonstrates that most Ellenburger reservoirs are characterized by pronounced vertical and lateral heterogeneities created by post-Ellenburger karst development. Vertical reservoir compartmentalization in the Ellenburger evolved from development of a laterally extensive cave system between 100 and 300 ft beneath the original land surface. Caves were filled by relatively impermeable siliciclastics from the overlying Simpson Group, effectively isolating permeable cave-roof breccias (uppermost Ellenburger) from collapse breccias deposited on cave floors prior to shale infill. Lateral compartmentalization of Ellenburger reservoirs originated by localized collapse of the cave system both during karst formation and after burial. In the Shafter Lake field, lateral compartmentalization is the result of a 200-ft vertical collapse during deposition of Simpson Group sands. Abrupt lateral discontinuities in the Big Lake and Glasco fields may represent similar collapse-related features, such as are spectacularly displayed in Ellenburger-equivalent outcrops of the Franklin Mountains. An estimated 750 million bbl of remaining mobile oil, in addition to conventional reserves, occurs in this mature but complexly compartmentalized play. Considering this paleokarst model will aid in further exploitation of Ellenburger reservoirs.

  7. SYNCHROTRON X-RAY ABSORPTION-EDGE COMPUTED MICROTOMOGRAPHY IMAGING OF THALLIUM COMPARTMENTALIZATION IN IBERIS INTERMEDIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Thallium (TI) is an extremely toxic metal which, due to its similarities to K, is readily taken up by plants. Thallium is efficiently hyperaccumulated in Iberis intermedia as TI(I). Distribution and compartmentalization of TI in I. intermedia is highes...

  8. SYNCHROTRON X-RAY ABSORPTION-EDGE COMPUTED MICROTOMOGRAPHY IMAGING OF THALLIUM COMPARTMENTALIZATION IN IBERIS INTERMEDIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Thallium (TI) is an extremely toxic metal which, due to its similarities to K, is readily taken up by plants. Thallium is efficiently hyperaccumulated in Iberis intermedia as TI(I). Distribution and compartmentalization of TI in I. intermedia is highes...

  9. Analysis of a compartmental model of amyloid beta production, irreversible loss and exchange in humans.

    PubMed

    Elbert, Donald L; Patterson, Bruce W; Bateman, Randall J

    2015-03-01

    Amyloid beta (Aβ) peptides, and in particular Aβ42, are found in senile plaques associated with Alzheimer's disease. A compartmental model of Aβ production, exchange and irreversible loss was recently developed to explain the kinetics of isotope-labeling of Aβ peptides collected in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) following infusion of stable isotope-labeled leucine in humans. The compartmental model allowed calculation of the rates of production, irreversible loss (or turnover) and short-term exchange of Aβ peptides. Exchange of Aβ42 was particularly pronounced in amyloid plaque-bearing participants. In the current work, we describe in much greater detail the characteristics of the compartmental model to two distinct audiences: physician-scientists and biokineticists. For physician-scientists, we describe through examples the types of questions the model can and cannot answer, as well as correct some misunderstandings of previous kinetic analyses applied to this type of isotope labeling data. For biokineticists, we perform a system identifiability analysis and a sensitivity analysis of the kinetic model to explore the global and local properties of the model. Combined, these analyses motivate simplifications from a more comprehensive physiological model to the final model that was previously presented. The analyses clearly demonstrate that the current dataset and compartmental model allow determination with confidence a single 'turnover' parameter, a single 'exchange' parameter and a single 'delay' parameter. When combined with CSF concentration data for the Aβ peptides, production rates may also be obtained.

  10. Xylem Vessel Diameter Affects the Compartmentalization of the Vascular Pathogen Phaeomoniella chlamydospora in Grapevine.

    PubMed

    Pouzoulet, Jérôme; Scudiero, Elia; Schiavon, Marco; Rolshausen, Philippe E

    2017-01-01

    Fungal wilt diseases are a threat to global food safety. Previous studies in perennial crops showed that xylem vessel diameter affects disease susceptibility. We tested the hypothesis that xylem vessel diameter impacts occlusion processes and pathogen compartmentalization in Vitis vinifera L. We studied the interaction between four grape commercial cultivars with the vascular wilt pathogen Phaeomoniella chlamydospora. We used qPCR and wood necrotic lesion length to measure fungal colonization coupled with histological studies to assess differences in xylem morphology, pathogen compartmentalization, and fungal colonization strategy. We provided evidence that grape cultivar with wide xylem vessel diameter showed increased susceptibility to P. chlamydospora. The host response to pathogen included vessel occlusion with tyloses and gels, deposition of non-structural phenolic compounds and suberin in vessel walls and depletion of starch in parenchyma cells. Pathogen compartmentalization was less efficient in wide xylem vessels than in narrow diameter vessels. Large vessels displayed higher number of tyloses and gel pockets, which provided substrate for P. chlamydospora growth and routes to escape occluded vessels. We discuss in which capacity xylem vessel diameter is a key determinant of the compartmentalization process and in turn grape cultivar resistance to disease caused by P. chlamydospora.

  11. A Compartmentalized Out-of-Equilibrium Enzymatic Reaction Network for Sustained Autonomous Movement

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Every living cell is a compartmentalized out-of-equilibrium system exquisitely able to convert chemical energy into function. In order to maintain homeostasis, the flux of metabolites is tightly controlled by regulatory enzymatic networks. A crucial prerequisite for the development of lifelike materials is the construction of synthetic systems with compartmentalized reaction networks that maintain out-of-equilibrium function. Here, we aim for autonomous movement as an example of the conversion of feedstock molecules into function. The flux of the conversion is regulated by a rationally designed enzymatic reaction network with multiple feedforward loops. By compartmentalizing the network into bowl-shaped nanocapsules the output of the network is harvested as kinetic energy. The entire system shows sustained and tunable microscopic motion resulting from the conversion of multiple external substrates. The successful compartmentalization of an out-of-equilibrium reaction network is a major first step in harnessing the design principles of life for construction of adaptive and internally regulated lifelike systems. PMID:27924313

  12. Beyond Compartmentalization: A Relational Approach towards Agency and Vulnerability of Young Migrants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huijsmans, Roy

    2012-01-01

    Based on fieldwork material from Lao People's Democratic Republic, this paper introduces an analytical framework that transcends compartmentalized approaches towards migration involving young people. The notions of fluid and institutionalized forms of migration illuminate key differences and commonalities in the relational fabric underpinning…

  13. Macroanatomy and compartmentalization of recent fire scars in three North American conifers

    Treesearch

    Kevin T. Smith; Estelle Arbellay; Donald A. Falk; Elaine Kennedy Sutherland

    2016-01-01

    Fire scars are initiated by cambial necrosis caused by localized lethal heating of the tree stem. Scars develop as part of the linked survival processes of compartmentalization and wound closure. The position of scars within dated tree ring series is the basis for dendrochronological reconstruction of fire history. Macroanatomical features were described for western...

  14. Compartmentation of photosynthesis in cells and tissues of C(4) plants.

    PubMed

    Edwards, G E; Franceschi, V R; Ku, M S; Voznesenskaya, E V; Pyankov, V I; Andreo, C S

    2001-04-01

    Critical to defining photosynthesis in C(4) plants is understanding the intercellular and intracellular compartmentation of enzymes between mesophyll and bundle sheath cells in the leaf. This includes enzymes of the C(4) cycle (including three subtypes), the C(3) pathway and photorespiration. The current state of knowledge of this compartmentation is a consequence of the development and application of different techniques over the past three decades. Initial studies led to some alternative hypotheses on the mechanism of C(4) photosynthesis, and some controversy over the compartmentation of enzymes. The development of methods for separating mesophyll and bundle sheath cells provided convincing evidence on intercellular compartmentation of the key components of the C(4) pathway. Studies on the intracellular compartmentation of enzymes between organelles and the cytosol were facilitated by the isolation of mesophyll and bundle sheath protoplasts, which can be fractionated gently while maintaining organelle integrity. Now, the ability to determine localization of photosynthetic enzymes conclusively, through in situ immunolocalization by confocal light microscopy and transmission electron microscopy, is providing further insight into the mechanism of C(4) photosynthesis and its evolution. Currently, immunological, ultrastructural and cytochemical studies are revealing relationships between anatomical arrangements and photosynthetic mechanisms which are probably related to environmental factors associated with evolution of these plants. This includes interesting variations in the C(4) syndrome in leaves and cotyledons of species in the tribe Salsoleae of the family Chenopodiaceae, in relation to evolution and ecology. Thus, analysis of structure-function relationships using modern techniques is a very powerful approach to understanding evolution and regulation of the photosynthetic carbon reduction mechanisms.

  15. The relationship of natural and artificial maturation: Evidence for pressure compartmentalization, and for coal as a source of petroleum

    SciTech Connect

    MacGowan, D.B.; Britton, D.R.; Surdam, R.C. . Dept. of Geology and Geophysics)

    1992-01-01

    In the Greater Green River Basin (GRB), the Almond Fm. is an important reservoir, having yielded cumulative production of 100 MBO and 0.7 TCFG through 1986. A regional study of Almond Fm. shales and coals in wells from the northwestern to the southeastern GRB was undertaken. Core samples from the Almond Fm. were subjected to: anhydrous pyrolysis, total organic carbon, vitrinite reflectance, and nuclear magnetic resonance analyses. The Almond appears to be a moderate to rich source rock, and in the oil window over the depth range of sampling (4,500 - 14,500 ft.). Additionally, a series of hydrous pyrolysis experiments were conducted on Almond coal samples at temperatures of 290 to 360 C. The organic-geochemical analyses performed on the core samples were also performed on these coal samples. These experiments show that Almond coal may be a significant source of liquid hydrocarbons (27 mg oil/g coal) as well as a prolific source of natural gas (7.52 x 10[sup [minus]6] moles natural gas/g coal). Gas production from tight gas sands accounts for about 20% of gas production from the Almond; almost all of this production is from overpressured reservoirs that produce little or not water, conditions characteristic of compartmentalized, abnormally-pressured sandstones. Comparison of maturation trends observed in the well core data with the hydrous pyrolysis data suggest that this mechanism also may operate in the Almond Fm. in the GRB.

  16. Population abundance of potentially pathogenic organisms in intestinal microbiome of jungle crow (Corvus macrorhynchos) shown with 16S rRNA gene-based microbial community analysis.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Isamu; Siddiki, Mohammad Shohel Rana; Nozawa-Takeda, Tsutomu; Tsukahara, Naoki; Tani, Yuri; Naito, Taki; Sugita, Shoei

    2013-01-01

    Jungle Crows (Corvus macrorhynchos) prefer human habitats because of their versatility in feeding accompanied with human food consumption. Therefore, it is important from a public health viewpoint to characterize their intestinal microbiota. However, no studies have been involved in molecular characterization of the microbiota based on huge and reliable number of data acquisition. In this study, 16S rRNA gene-based microbial community analysis coupled with the next-generation DNA sequencing techniques was applied to the taxonomic classification of intestinal microbiome for three jungle crows. Clustering of the reads into 130 operational taxonomic units showed that at least 70% of analyzed sequences for each crow were highly homologous to Eimeria sp., which belongs to the protozoan phylum Apicomplexa. The microbiotas of three crows also contained potentially pathogenic bacteria with significant percentages, such as the genera Campylobacter and Brachyspira. Thus, the profiling of a large number of 16S rRNA gene sequences in crow intestinal microbiomes revealed the high-frequency existence or vestige of potentially pathogenic microorganisms.

  17. Population Abundance of Potentially Pathogenic Organisms in Intestinal Microbiome of Jungle Crow (Corvus macrorhynchos) Shown with 16S rRNA Gene-Based Microbial Community Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Maeda, Isamu; Siddiki, Mohammad Shohel Rana; Nozawa-Takeda, Tsutomu; Tsukahara, Naoki; Tani, Yuri; Naito, Taki; Sugita, Shoei

    2013-01-01

    Jungle Crows (Corvus macrorhynchos) prefer human habitats because of their versatility in feeding accompanied with human food consumption. Therefore, it is important from a public health viewpoint to characterize their intestinal microbiota. However, no studies have been involved in molecular characterization of the microbiota based on huge and reliable number of data acquisition. In this study, 16S rRNA gene-based microbial community analysis coupled with the next-generation DNA sequencing techniques was applied to the taxonomic classification of intestinal microbiome for three jungle crows. Clustering of the reads into 130 operational taxonomic units showed that at least 70% of analyzed sequences for each crow were highly homologous to Eimeria sp., which belongs to the protozoan phylum Apicomplexa. The microbiotas of three crows also contained potentially pathogenic bacteria with significant percentages, such as the genera Campylobacter and Brachyspira. Thus, the profiling of a large number of 16S rRNA gene sequences in crow intestinal microbiomes revealed the high-frequency existence or vestige of potentially pathogenic microorganisms. PMID:24058905

  18. Jesús and María in the jungle: an essay on possibility and constraint in the third-shift third space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson Bruna, Katherine

    2009-03-01

    One hundred years ago, Upton Sinclair, in The Jungle, exposed the deplorable working conditions of eastern European immigrants in the meatpacking houses of Chicago. The backdrop of this article is the new Jungle of the 21st century—the hog plants of the rural Midwest. Here I speak to the lives of the Mexican workers they employ, and, more specifically, the science-learning experiences and aspirations of third-shifters, Jesús and María. I use these students' stories as an opportunity to examine the take-up, in education, of the concept of hybridity, and, more particularly, to interrogate what I have come to regard as the "third space fetish." My principle argument is that Bhabha's understanding of liberatory Third Space has been distorted, in education, through teacher-centered and power-neutral multicultural discourse. I call for a more robust approach to hybridity in science education research, guided by the lessons of possibility and constraint contained in Jesús' and María's third-shift third space lives.

  19. Syntheses, crystal structures, and water adsorption behaviors of jungle-gym-type porous coordination polymers containing nitro moieties

    SciTech Connect

    Uemura, Kazuhiro; Onishi, Fumiaki; Yamasaki, Yukari; Kita, Hidetoshi

    2009-10-15

    NO{sub 2} containing dicarboxylate bridging ligands, nitroterephthalate (bdc-NO{sub 2}) and 2,5-dinitroterephthalate (bdc-(NO{sub 2}){sub 2}), afford porous coordination polymers, {l_brace}[Zn{sub 2}(bdc-NO{sub 2}){sub 2}(dabco)].solvents{r_brace}{sub n} (2 contains solvents) and {l_brace}[Zn{sub 2}(bdc-(NO{sub 2}){sub 2}){sub 2}(dabco)].solvents{r_brace}{sub n} (3 contains solvents). Both compounds form jungle-gym-type regularities, where a 2D square grid composed of dinuclear Zn{sub 2} units and dicarboxylate ligands is bridged by dabco molecules to extend the 2D layers into a 3D structure. In 2 contains solvents and 3 contains solvents, a rectangle pore surrounded by eight Zn{sub 2} corners contains two and four NO{sub 2} moieties, respectively. Thermal gravimetry (TG) and X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD) measurements reveal that both compounds maintain the frameworks regularities without guest molecules and with solvents such as MeOH, EtOH, i-PrOH, and Me{sub 2}CO. Adsorption measurements reveal that dried 2 and 3 adsorb H{sub 2}O molecules to be {l_brace}[Zn{sub 2}(bdc-NO{sub 2}){sub 2}(dabco)].4H{sub 2}O{r_brace}{sub n} (2 contains 4H{sub 2}O) and {l_brace}[Zn{sub 2}(bdc-(NO{sub 2}){sub 2}){sub 2}(dabco)].6H{sub 2}O{r_brace}{sub n} (3 contains 6H{sub 2}O), showing the pore hydrophilicity enhancement caused by NO{sub 2} group introduction. - Graphical abstract: Two hydrophilic porous coordination polymers, [Zn{sub 2}(bdc-NO{sub 2}){sub 2}(dabco)]{sub n} (2, bdc-NO{sub 2}=nitroterephthalate, dabco=1,4-diazabicyclo[2.2.2]octane) and [Zn{sub 2}(bdc-(NO{sub 2}){sub 2}){sub 2}(dabco)]{sub n} (3, bdc-(NO{sub 2}){sub 2}=2,5-dinitroterephthalate), have been synthesized and characterized by single X-ray analyses, thermal gravimetry, and adsorption measurements.

  20. Histone Modifications and Nuclear Architecture: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Bártová, Eva; Krejčí, Jana; Harničarová, Andrea; Galiová, Gabriela; Kozubek, Stanislav

    2008-01-01

    Epigenetic modifications, such as acetylation, phosphorylation, methylation, ubiquitination, and ADP ribosylation, of the highly conserved core histones, H2A, H2B, H3, and H4, influence the genetic potential of DNA. The enormous regulatory potential of histone modification is illustrated in the vast array of epigenetic markers found throughout the genome. More than the other types of histone modification, acetylation and methylation of specific lysine residues on N-terminal histone tails are fundamental for the formation of chromatin domains, such as euchromatin, and facultative and constitutive heterochromatin. In addition, the modification of histones can cause a region of chromatin to undergo nuclear compartmentalization and, as such, specific epigenetic markers are non-randomly distributed within interphase nuclei. In this review, we summarize the principles behind epigenetic compartmentalization and the functional consequences of chromatin arrangement within interphase nuclei. (J Histochem Cytochem 56:711–721, 2008) PMID:18474937

  1. Border safety: quality control at the nuclear envelope

    PubMed Central

    Webster, Brant M.; Lusk, C. Patrick

    2015-01-01

    The unique biochemical identity of the nuclear envelope confers its capacity to establish a barrier that protects the nuclear compartment and directly contributes to nuclear function. Recent work uncovered quality control mechanisms employing the ESCRT machinery and a new arm of ERAD to counteract the unfolding, damage or misassembly of nuclear envelope proteins and ensure the integrity of the nuclear envelope membranes. Moreover, cells have the capacity to recognize and triage defective nuclear pore complexes in order to prevent their inheritance and preserve the longevity of progeny. These mechanisms serve to highlight the diverse strategies used by cells to maintain nuclear compartmentalization; we suggest they mitigate the progression and severity of diseases associated with nuclear envelope malfunction like the laminopathies. PMID:26437591

  2. Structurally controlled and aligned tight gas reservoir compartmentalization in the San Juan and Piceance Basins

    SciTech Connect

    Decker, A.D.; Kuuskraa, V.A.; Klawitter, A.L.

    1995-10-01

    Recurrent basement faulting is the primary controlling mechanism for aligning and compartmentalizing upper Cretaceous aged tight gas reservoirs of the San Juan and Piceance Basins. Northwest trending structural lineaments that formed in conjunction with the Uncompahgre Highlands have profoundly influenced sedimentation trends and created boundaries for gas migration; sealing and compartmentalizing sedimentary packages in both basins. Fractures which formed over the structural lineaments provide permeability pathways which allowing gas recovery from otherwise tight gas reservoirs. Structural alignments and associated reservoir compartments have been accurately targeted by integrating advanced remote sensing imagery, high resolution aeromagnetics, seismic interpretation, stratigraphic mapping and dynamic structural modelling. This unifying methodology is a powerful tool for exploration geologists and is also a systematic approach to tight gas resource assessment in frontier basins.

  3. Compartmentalization in T-cell signalling: membrane microdomains and polarity orchestrate signalling and morphology.

    PubMed

    Russell, Sarah; Oliaro, Jane

    2006-02-01

    Lymphocyte function is regulated by complex signalling responses to diverse extracellular inputs, and a cell will often receive multiple, conflicting signals at one time. The mechanisms by which a lymphocyte integrates these signals into a single cellular response are not well understood. An important factor in the integration of signals likely involves the regulation of access of signalling molecules to cell surface receptors and of receptor signals to morphological determinants within the cell. Recent studies have led to important advances in our understanding of both the mechanisms by which signals are compartmentalized in T cells and the physiological role played by such compartmentalization. We review progress in the field, with a particular focus on membrane microdomains or lipid rafts and on cell polarity.

  4. Compartmentalization of metabolic pathways in yeast mitochondria improves the production of branched-chain alcohols.

    PubMed

    Avalos, José L; Fink, Gerald R; Stephanopoulos, Gregory

    2013-04-01

    Efforts to improve the production of a compound of interest in Saccharomyces cerevisiae have mainly involved engineering or overexpression of cytoplasmic enzymes. We show that targeting metabolic pathways to mitochondria can increase production compared with overexpression of the enzymes involved in the same pathways in the cytoplasm. Compartmentalization of the Ehrlich pathway into mitochondria increased isobutanol production by 260%, whereas overexpression of the same pathway in the cytoplasm only improved yields by 10%, compared with a strain overproducing enzymes involved in only the first three steps of the biosynthetic pathway. Subcellular fractionation of engineered strains revealed that targeting the enzymes of the Ehrlich pathway to the mitochondria achieves greater local enzyme concentrations. Other benefits of compartmentalization may include increased availability of intermediates, removing the need to transport intermediates out of the mitochondrion and reducing the loss of intermediates to competing pathways.

  5. Subcellular compartmentalization of saccharide moieties in cultured normal and malignant cells

    PubMed Central

    1980-01-01

    We studied subcellular localization of saccharide moieties in cultured normal and malignant cells fixed in paraformaldehyde and treated with a nonionic detergent, using lectins specific for various surgar residues as probes in fluorescence microscopy. In normal cells, concanavalin A and Lens culinaris agglutinin, specific for mannose-rich carbohydrate cores in glycoproteins, labeled the endoplasmic reticulum as a wide perinuclear region. Other lectins, on the other hand, stained the Golgi apparatus as a juxtanuclear reticular structure. A similar compartmentalization was also seen in all malignant cells studied, although the Golgi apparatus in these cells was distinctly vesicular in appearance. Our results indicate that saccharide moieties in both normal and malignant cells are similarly compartmentalized, and thus speak in favor of a unidirectional subcellular flow for both membrane and secreted glycoconjugates. PMID:7372714

  6. Differential distribution of NCX1 contributes to spine–dendrite compartmentalization in CA1 pyramidal cells

    PubMed Central

    Lőrincz, Andrea; Rózsa, Balázs; Katona, Gergely; Vizi, E. Sylvester; Tamás, Gábor

    2007-01-01

    Compartmentalization of Ca2+ between dendritic spines and shafts is governed by diffusion barriers and a range of Ca2+ extrusion mechanisms. The distinct contribution of different Ca2+ clearance systems to Ca2+ compartmentalization in dendritic spines versus shafts remains elusive. We applied a combination of ultrastructural and functional imaging methods to assess the subcellular distribution and role of NCX1 in rat CA1 pyramidal cells. Quantitative electron microscopic analysis of preembedding immunogold reactions revealed uniform densities of NCX1 along the shafts of apical and basal dendrites, but densities in dendritic shafts were approximately seven times higher than in dendritic spines. In line with these results, two-photon imaging of synaptically activated Ca2+ transients during NCX blockade showed preferential action localized to the dendritic shafts for NCXs in regulating spine–dendrite coupling. PMID:17215351

  7. Cell-free selection of domain antibodies by in vitro compartmentalization.

    PubMed

    Sepp, Armin; Griffiths, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    Efficient identification of antibodies, or any fragments thereof, displaying desired specificity and affinity is critical for the development of novel immunotherapeutics. Here we describe the adaptation of in vitro compartmentalization for the cell-free selection of Vκ and VH domain antibodies (dAbs™) from large combinatorial libraries. The dAbs™ are in vitro expressed in fusion to the N-terminus of single-chain variant of phage P22 Arc repressor DNA-binding domain that links the compartmentally expressed protein molecules to their encoding PCR fragment-based genes via cognate operator sites present on the DNA. Libraries of up to 10(10) in size can be rapidly assembled and selected for improved affinity in equilibrium and off-rate conditions.

  8. The compartmentalized bacteria of the planctomycetes-verrucomicrobia-chlamydiae superphylum have membrane coat-like proteins.

    PubMed

    Santarella-Mellwig, Rachel; Franke, Josef; Jaedicke, Andreas; Gorjanacz, Matyas; Bauer, Ulrike; Budd, Aidan; Mattaj, Iain W; Devos, Damien P

    2010-01-19

    The development of the endomembrane system was a major step in eukaryotic evolution. Membrane coats, which exhibit a unique arrangement of beta-propeller and alpha-helical repeat domains, play key roles in shaping eukaryotic membranes. Such proteins are likely to have been present in the ancestral eukaryote but cannot be detected in prokaryotes using sequence-only searches. We have used a structure-based detection protocol to search all proteomes for proteins with this domain architecture. Apart from the eukaryotes, we identified this protein architecture only in the Planctomycetes-Verrucomicrobia-Chlamydiae (PVC) bacterial superphylum, many members of which share a compartmentalized cell plan. We determined that one such protein is partly localized at the membranes of vesicles formed inside the cells in the planctomycete Gemmata obscuriglobus. Our results demonstrate similarities between bacterial and eukaryotic compartmentalization machinery, suggesting that the bacterial PVC superphylum contributed significantly to eukaryogenesis.

  9. Subcellular compartmentalization of saccharide moieties in cultured normal and malignant cells.

    PubMed

    Virtanen, I; Ekblom, P; Laurila, P

    1980-05-01

    We studied subcellular localization of saccharide moieties in cultured normal and malignant cells fixed in paraformaldehyde and treated with a nonionic detergent, using lectins specific for various surgar residues as probes in fluorescence microscopy. In normal cells, concanavalin A and Lens culinaris agglutinin, specific for mannose-rich carbohydrate cores in glycoproteins, labeled the endoplasmic reticulum as a wide perinuclear region. Other lectins, on the other hand, stained the Golgi apparatus as a juxtanuclear reticular structure. A similar compartmentalization was also seen in all malignant cells studied, although the Golgi apparatus in these cells was distinctly vesicular in appearance. Our results indicate that saccharide moieties in both normal and malignant cells are similarly compartmentalized, and thus speak in favor of a unidirectional subcellular flow for both membrane and secreted glycoconjugates.

  10. The MATCHIT Automaton: Exploiting Compartmentalization for the Synthesis of Branched Polymers

    PubMed Central

    Weyland, Mathias S.; Fellermann, Harold; Hadorn, Maik; Sorek, Daniel; Lancet, Doron; Rasmussen, Steen; Füchslin, Rudolf M.

    2013-01-01

    We propose an automaton, a theoretical framework that demonstrates how to improve the yield of the synthesis of branched chemical polymer reactions. This is achieved by separating substeps of the path of synthesis into compartments. We use chemical containers (chemtainers) to carry the substances through a sequence of fixed successive compartments. We describe the automaton in mathematical terms and show how it can be configured automatically in order to synthesize a given branched polymer target. The algorithm we present finds an optimal path of synthesis in linear time. We discuss how the automaton models compartmentalized structures found in cells, such as the endoplasmic reticulum and the Golgi apparatus, and we show how this compartmentalization can be exploited for the synthesis of branched polymers such as oligosaccharides. Lastly, we show examples of artificial branched polymers and discuss how the automaton can be configured to synthesize them with maximal yield. PMID:24489601

  11. Use of a simulated annealing algorithm to fit compartmental models with an application to fractal pharmacokinetics.

    PubMed

    Marsh, Rebeccah E; Riauka, Terence A; McQuarrie, Steve A

    2007-01-01

    Increasingly, fractals are being incorporated into pharmacokinetic models to describe transport and chemical kinetic processes occurring in confined and heterogeneous spaces. However, fractal compartmental models lead to differential equations with power-law time-dependent kinetic rate coefficients that currently are not accommodated by common commercial software programs. This paper describes a parameter optimization method for fitting individual pharmacokinetic curves based on a simulated annealing (SA) algorithm, which always converged towards the global minimum and was independent of the initial parameter values and parameter bounds. In a comparison using a classical compartmental model, similar fits by the Gauss-Newton and Nelder-Mead simplex algorithms required stringent initial estimates and ranges for the model parameters. The SA algorithm is ideal for fitting a wide variety of pharmacokinetic models to clinical data, especially those for which there is weak prior knowledge of the parameter values, such as the fractal models.

  12. Diversity in the dynamical behaviour of a compartmentalized programmable biochemical oscillator.

    PubMed

    Weitz, Maximilian; Kim, Jongmin; Kapsner, Korbinian; Winfree, Erik; Franco, Elisa; Simmel, Friedrich C

    2014-04-01

    In vitro compartmentalization of biochemical reaction networks is a crucial step towards engineering artificial cell-scale devices and systems. At this scale the dynamics of molecular systems becomes stochastic, which introduces several engineering challenges and opportunities. Here we study a programmable transcriptional oscillator system that is compartmentalized into microemulsion droplets with volumes between 33 fl and 16 pl. Simultaneous measurement of large populations of droplets reveals major variations in the amplitude, frequency and damping of the oscillations. Variability increases for smaller droplets and depends on the operating point of the oscillator. Rather than reflecting the stochastic kinetics of the chemical reaction network itself, the variability can be attributed to the statistical variation of reactant concentrations created during their partitioning into droplets. We anticipate that robustness to partitioning variability will be a critical challenge for engineering cell-scale systems, and that highly parallel time-series acquisition from microemulsion droplets will become a key tool for characterization of stochastic circuit function.

  13. Aspects of astrocyte energy metabolism, amino acid neurotransmitter homoeostasis and metabolic compartmentation

    PubMed Central

    Kreft, Marko; Bak, Lasse K; Waagepetersen, Helle S; Schousboe, Arne

    2012-01-01

    Astrocytes are key players in brain function; they are intimately involved in neuronal signalling processes and their metabolism is tightly coupled to that of neurons. In the present review, we will be concerned with a discussion of aspects of astrocyte metabolism, including energy-generating pathways and amino acid homoeostasis. A discussion of the impact that uptake of neurotransmitter glutamate may have on these pathways is included along with a section on metabolic compartmentation. PMID:22435484

  14. Aspects of astrocyte energy metabolism, amino acid neurotransmitter homoeostasis and metabolic compartmentation.

    PubMed

    Kreft, Marko; Bak, Lasse K; Waagepetersen, Helle S; Schousboe, Arne

    2012-04-27

    Astrocytes are key players in brain function; they are intimately involved in neuronal signalling processes and their metabolism is tightly coupled to that of neurons. In the present review, we will be concerned with a discussion of aspects of astrocyte metabolism, including energy-generating pathways and amino acid homoeostasis. A discussion of the impact that uptake of neurotransmitter glutamate may have on these pathways is included along with a section on metabolic compartmentation.

  15. Solution of homogeneous systems of linear equations arising from compartmental models

    SciTech Connect

    Funderlic, R.E.; Mankin, J.B.

    1980-12-01

    Systems of linear differential equations with constant coefficients, Ax = x-dot, with the matrix A having nonnegative off-diagonal elements and zero column sums occur in compartmental analysis. The steady-state solution leads to the homogeneous system of linear equations Ax(infinity) = x-dot(infinity) = 0. LU factorization, the Crout algorithm, error analysis, and solution of a modified system are treated. 3 figures.

  16. A compartmentalized solute transport model for redox zones in contaminated aquifers--1, Theory and development

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Abrams , Robert H.; Loague, Keith

    2000-01-01

    This paper, the first of two parts [see Abrams and Loague, this issue], takes the compartmentalized approach for the geochemical evolution of redox zones presented by Abrams et al. [1998] and embeds it within a solute transport framework. In this paper the compartmentalized approach is generalized to facilitate the description of its incorporation into a solute transport simulator. An equivalent formulation is developed which removes any discontinuities that may occur when switching compartments. Rate-limited redox reactions are modeled with a modified Monod relationship that allows either the organic substrate or the electron acceptor to be the rate-limiting reactant. Thermodynamic constraints are used to inhibit lower-energy redox reactions from occurring under infeasible geochemical conditions without imposing equilibrium on the lower-energy reactions. The procedure used allows any redox reaction to be simulated as being kinetically limited or thermodynamically limited, depending on local geochemical conditions. Empirical reaction inhibition methods are not needed. The sequential iteration approach (SIA), a technique which allows the number of solute transport equations to be reduced, is adopted to solve the coupled geochemical/solute transport problem. When the compartmentalized approach is embedded within the SIA, with the total analytical concentration of each component as the dependent variable in the transport equation, it is possible to reduce the number of transport equations even further than with the unmodified SIA. A one-dimensional, coupled geochemical/solute transport simulation is presented in which redox zones evolve dynamically in time and space. The compartmentalized solute transport (COMPTRAN) model described in this paper enables the development of redox zones to be simulated under both kinetic and thermodynamic constraints. The modular design of COMPTRAN facilitates the use of many different, preexisting solute transport and geochemical codes

  17. An Efficient and Effective Implementation of the Trust System for Power Grid Compartmentalization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-06-01

    System for Power Grid Compartmentalization THESIS Presented to the Faculty Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering Graduate School of...Industries/Tech Sites X Large Gathering Sites X 2.3 Electrical Power System or Power Grid The electrical transmission system (or Power Grid) developed in...through the power system , entering and exiting the 18 many grounding points on a transmission network [34]. GICs are produced when shocks

  18. Simulation of Drug Uptake in a Two Compartmental Fractional Model for a Biological System.

    PubMed

    Petráš, Ivo; Magin, Richard L

    2011-12-01

    This paper presents a very effective numerical method for the solution of the two-compartmental pharmacokinetic model for oral drug administration. This model consists of a set of two fractional order differential equations which connect the two compartments. The first compartment represents the gut while the second compartment corresponds to the drug concentration in the target tissue. For ease of computation, the numerical solution is also created as a Matlab function.

  19. The role of dendritic spine morphology in the compartmentalization and delivery of surface receptors.

    PubMed

    Simon, Cory M; Hepburn, Iain; Chen, Weiliang; De Schutter, Erik

    2014-06-01

    Since AMPA receptors are major molecular players in both short- and long-term plasticity, it is important to identify the time-scales of and factors affecting the lateral diffusion of AMPARs on the dendrite surface. Using a mathematical model, we study how the dendritic spine morphology affects two processes: (1) compartmentalization of the surface receptors in a single spine to retain local chemistry and (2) the delivery of receptors to the post-synaptic density (PSD) of spines via lateral diffusion following insertion onto the dendrite shaft. Computing the mean first passage time (MFPT) of surface receptors on a sample of real spine morphologies revealed that a constricted neck and bulbous head serve to compartmentalize receptors, consistent with previous works. The residence time of a Brownian diffusing receptor on the membrane of a single spine was computed to be ∼ 5 s. We found that the location of the PSD corresponds to the location at which the maximum MFPT occurs, the position that maximizes the residence time of a diffusing receptor. Meanwhile, the same geometric features of the spine that compartmentalize receptors inhibit the recruitment of AMPARs via lateral diffusion from dendrite insertion sites. Spines with narrow necks will trap a smaller fraction of diffusing receptors in the their PSD when considering competition for receptors between the spines, suggesting that ideal geometrical features involve a tradeoff depending on the intent of compartmentalizing the current receptor pool or recruiting new AMPARs in the PSD. The ultimate distribution of receptors among the spine PSDs by lateral diffusion from the dendrite shaft is an interplay between the insertion location and the shape and locations of both the spines and their PSDs. The time-scale for delivery of receptors to the PSD of spines via lateral diffusion was computed to be ∼ 60 s.

  20. Self-priming compartmentalization digital LAMP for point-of-care.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Qiangyuan; Gao, Yibo; Yu, Bingwen; Ren, Hao; Qiu, Lin; Han, Sihai; Jin, Wei; Jin, Qinhan; Mu, Ying

    2012-11-21

    Digital nucleic acid amplification provides unprecedented opportunities for absolute nucleic acid quantification by counting of single molecules. This technique is useful for molecular genetic analysis in cancer, stem cell, bacterial, non-invasive prenatal diagnosis in which many biologists are interested. This paper describes a self-priming compartmentalization (SPC) microfluidic chip platform for performing digital loop-mediated amplification (LAMP). The energy for the pumping is pre-stored in the degassed bulk PDMS by exploiting the high gas solubility of PDMS; therefore, no additional structures other than channels and reservoirs are required. The sample and oil are sequentially sucked into the channels, and the pressure difference of gas dissolved in PDMS allows sample self-compartmentalization without the need for further chip manipulation such as with pneumatic microvalves and control systems, and so on. The SPC digital LAMP chip can be used like a 384-well plate, so, the world-to-chip fluidic interconnections are avoided. The microfluidic chip contains 4 separate panels, each panel contains 1200 independent 6 nL chambers and can be used to detect 4 samples simultaneously. Digital LAMP on the microfluidic chip was tested quantitatively by using β-actin DNA from humans. The self-priming compartmentalization behavior is roughly predictable using a two-dimensional model. The uniformity of compartmentalization was analyzed by fluorescent intensity and fraction of volume. The results showed that the feasibility and flexibility of the microfluidic chip platform for amplifying single nucleic acid molecules in different chambers made by diluting and distributing sample solutions. The SPC chip has the potential to meet the requirements of a general laboratory: power-free, valve-free, operating at isothermal temperature, inexpensive, sensitive, economizing labour time and reagents. The disposable analytical devices with appropriate air-tight packaging should be

  1. Bioinspired genotype–phenotype linkages: mimicking cellular compartmentalization for the engineering of functional proteins

    PubMed Central

    van Vliet, Liisa D.; Colin, Pierre-Yves; Hollfelder, Florian

    2015-01-01

    The idea of compartmentalization of genotype and phenotype in cells is key for enabling Darwinian evolution. This contribution describes bioinspired systems that use in vitro compartments—water-in-oil droplets and gel-shell beads—for the directed evolution of functional proteins. Technologies based on these principles promise to provide easier access to protein-based therapeutics, reagents for processes involving enzyme catalysis, parts for synthetic biology and materials with biological components. PMID:26464791

  2. Compartmentalized HIV rebound in the central nervous system after interruption of antiretroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Gianella, Sara; Kosakovsky Pond, Sergei L; Oliveira, Michelli F; Scheffler, Konrad; Strain, Matt C; De la Torre, Antonio; Letendre, Scott; Smith, Davey M; Ellis, Ronald J

    2016-07-01

    To design effective eradication strategies, it may be necessary to target HIV reservoirs in anatomic compartments other than blood. This study examined HIV RNA rebound following interruption of antiretroviral therapy (ART) in blood and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) to determine whether the central nervous system (CNS) might serve as an independent source of resurgent viral replication. Paired blood and CSF samples were collected longitudinally from 14 chronically HIV-infected individuals undergoing ART interruption. HIV env (C2-V3), gag (p24) and pol (reverse transcriptase) were sequenced from cell-free HIV RNA and cell-associated HIV DNA in blood and CSF using the Roche 454 FLX Titanium platform. Comprehensive sequence and phylogenetic analyses were performed to search for evidence of unique or differentially represented viral subpopulations emerging in CSF supernatant as compared with blood plasma. Using a conservative definition of compartmentalization based on four distinct statistical tests, nine participants presented a compartmentalized HIV RNA rebound within the CSF after interruption of ART, even when sampled within 2 weeks from viral rebound. The degree and duration of viral compartmentalization varied considerably between subjects and between time-points within a subject. In 10 cases, we identified viral populations within the CSF supernatant at the first sampled time-point after ART interruption, which were phylogenetically distinct from those present in the paired blood plasma and mostly persisted over time (when longitudinal time-points were available). Our data suggest that an independent source of HIV RNA contributes to viral rebound within the CSF after treatment interruption. The most likely source of compartmentalized HIV RNA is a CNS reservoir that would need to be targeted to achieve complete HIV eradication.

  3. Mapping intracellular diffusion distribution using single quantum dot tracking: compartmentalized diffusion defined by endoplasmic reticulum.

    PubMed

    Li, Hui; Dou, Shuo-Xing; Liu, Yu-Ru; Li, Wei; Xie, Ping; Wang, Wei-Chi; Wang, Peng-Ye

    2015-01-14

    The crowded intracellular environment influences the diffusion-mediated cellular processes, such as metabolism, signaling, and transport. The hindered diffusion of macromolecules in heterogeneous cytoplasm has been studied over years, but the detailed diffusion distribution and its origin still remain unclear. Here, we introduce a novel method to map rapidly the diffusion distribution in single cells based on single-particle tracking (SPT) of quantum dots (QDs). The diffusion map reveals the heterogeneous intracellular environment and, more importantly, an unreported compartmentalization of QD diffusions in cytoplasm. Simultaneous observations of QD motion and green fluorescent protein-tagged endoplasmic reticulum (ER) dynamics provide direct evidence that the compartmentalization results from micron-scale domains defined by ER tubules, and ER cisternae form perinuclear areas that restrict QDs to enter. The same phenomenon was observed using fluorescein isothiocyanate-dextrans, further confirming the compartmentalized diffusion. These results shed new light on the diffusive movements of macromolecules in the cell, and the mapping of intracellular diffusion distribution may be used to develop strategies for nanoparticle-based drug deliveries and therapeutics.

  4. Verification of Compartmental Epidemiological Models using Metamorphic Testing, Model Checking and Visual Analytics

    SciTech Connect

    Ramanathan, Arvind; Steed, Chad A; Pullum, Laura L

    2012-01-01

    Compartmental models in epidemiology are widely used as a means to model disease spread mechanisms and understand how one can best control the disease in case an outbreak of a widespread epidemic occurs. However, a significant challenge within the community is in the development of approaches that can be used to rigorously verify and validate these models. In this paper, we present an approach to rigorously examine and verify the behavioral properties of compartmen- tal epidemiological models under several common modeling scenarios including birth/death rates and multi-host/pathogen species. Using metamorphic testing, a novel visualization tool and model checking, we build a workflow that provides insights into the functionality of compartmental epidemiological models. Our initial results indicate that metamorphic testing can be used to verify the implementation of these models and provide insights into special conditions where these mathematical models may fail. The visualization front-end allows the end-user to scan through a variety of parameters commonly used in these models to elucidate the conditions under which an epidemic can occur. Further, specifying these models using a process algebra allows one to automatically construct behavioral properties that can be rigorously verified using model checking. Taken together, our approach allows for detecting implementation errors as well as handling conditions under which compartmental epidemiological models may fail to provide insights into disease spread dynamics.

  5. Lipid transfer proteins and the tuning of compartmental identity in the Golgi apparatus.

    PubMed

    McDermott, Mark I; Mousley, Carl J

    2016-10-01

    The Golgi complex constitutes a central way station of the eukaryotic endomembrane system, an intricate network of organelles engaged in control of membrane trafficking and the processing of various cellular components. Previous ideas of compartmental stability within this network are gradually being reshaped by concepts describing a biochemical continuum of hybrid organelles whose constitution is regulated by compartmental maturation. Membrane lipid composition and lipid signaling processes make fundamental contributions to compartmentalization strategies that are themselves critical for organizing cellular architecture and biochemical activities. Phosphatidylinositol transfer proteins (PITPs) are increasingly recognized as key regulators of membrane trafficking through the secretory pathway. They do so by coordinating lipid metabolism with lipid signaling, translating this information to core protein components of the membrane trafficking machinery. In this capacity, PITPs can be viewed as regulators of an essential lipid-protein interface of cisternal maturation. It is also now becoming appreciated, for the first time, that such an interface plays important roles in larger systems processes that link secretory pathway function with cell proliferation.

  6. Self-concept structure and borderline personality disorder: evidence for negative compartmentalization.

    PubMed

    Vater, Aline; Schröder-Abé, Michela; Weißgerber, Susan; Roepke, Stefan; Schütz, Astrid

    2015-03-01

    Borderline personality disorder (BPD) is characterized by an unstable and incongruent self-concept. However, there is a dearth of empirical studies investigating self-concept in BPD. In order to bridge this research gap, the purpose of this study was to apply an in-depth analysis of structural aspects of the self-concept in BPD. We examined the degree of compartmentalization, i.e., a tendency to organize knowledge about the self into discrete, extremely valenced (i.e., either positive or negative) categories (Showers, 1992). We hypothesized and found that BPD patients had the most compartmentalized self-concept structure and a higher proportion of negative self-attributes relative to both a non-clinical and a depressed control group. Moreover, BPD patients rated negative self-aspects as more important than positive ones relative to non-clinical controls. We cannot determine whether causal relationships exist between psychological symptoms and self-concept structure. Moreover, further comparisons to patients with other psychiatric disorders are necessary in order to further confirm the clinical specificity of our results. Our findings indicate that a negative compartmentalized self-concept is a specific feature of BPD. Implications for future research, psychological assessment, and psychotherapeutic treatment are discussed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Analysis of the Compartmentalized Metabolome – A Validation of the Non-Aqueous Fractionation Technique

    PubMed Central

    Klie, Sebastian; Krueger, Stephan; Krall, Leonard; Giavalisco, Patrick; Flügge, Ulf-Ingo; Willmitzer, Lothar; Steinhauser, Dirk

    2011-01-01

    With the development of high-throughput metabolic technologies, a plethora of primary and secondary compounds have been detected in the plant cell. However, there are still major gaps in our understanding of the plant metabolome. This is especially true with regards to the compartmental localization of these identified metabolites. Non-aqueous fractionation (NAF) is a powerful technique for the determination of subcellular metabolite distributions in eukaryotic cells, and it has become the method of choice to analyze the distribution of a large number of metabolites concurrently. However, the NAF technique produces a continuous gradient of metabolite distributions, not discrete assignments. Resolution of these distributions requires computational analyses based on marker molecules to resolve compartmental localizations. In this article we focus on expanding the computational analysis of data derived from NAF. Along with an experimental workflow, we describe the critical steps in NAF experiments and how computational approaches can aid in assessing the quality and robustness of the derived data. For this, we have developed and provide a new version (v1.2) of the BestFit command line tool for calculation and evaluation of subcellular metabolite distributions. Furthermore, using both simulated and experimental data we show the influence on estimated subcellular distributions by modulating important parameters, such as the number of fractions taken or which marker molecule is selected. Finally, we discuss caveats and benefits of NAF analysis in the context of the compartmentalized metabolome. PMID:22645541

  8. Diminished viral replication and compartmentalization of hepatitis C virus in hepatocellular carcinoma tissue

    PubMed Central

    Harouaka, Djamila; Engle, Ronald E.; Wollenberg, Kurt; Diaz, Giacomo; Tice, Ashley B.; Zamboni, Fausto; Govindarajan, Sugantha; Alter, Harvey; Kleiner, David E.; Farci, Patrizia

    2016-01-01

    Analysis of hepatitis C virus (HCV) replication and quasispecies distribution within the tumor of patients with HCV-associated hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) can provide insight into the role of HCV in hepatocarcinogenesis and, conversely, the effect of HCC on the HCV lifecycle. In a comprehensive study of serum and multiple liver specimens from patients with HCC who underwent liver transplantation, we found a sharp and significant decrease in HCV RNA in the tumor compared with surrounding nontumorous tissues, but found no differences in multiple areas of control non-HCC cirrhotic livers. Diminished HCV replication was not associated with changes in miR-122 expression. HCV genetic diversity was significantly higher in livers containing HCC compared with control non-HCC cirrhotic livers. Tracking of individual variants demonstrated changes in the viral population between tumorous and nontumorous areas, the extent of which correlated with the decline in HCV RNA, suggesting HCV compartmentalization within the tumor. In contrast, compartmentalization was not observed between nontumorous areas and serum, or in controls between different areas of the cirrhotic liver or between liver and serum. Our findings indicate that HCV replication within the tumor is restricted and compartmentalized, suggesting segregation of specific viral variants in malignant hepatocytes. PMID:26787866

  9. Robust global identifiability theory using potentials--Application to compartmental models.

    PubMed

    Wongvanich, N; Hann, C E; Sirisena, H R

    2015-04-01

    This paper presents a global practical identifiability theory for analyzing and identifying linear and nonlinear compartmental models. The compartmental system is prolonged onto the potential jet space to formulate a set of input-output equations that are integrals in terms of the measured data, which allows for robust identification of parameters without requiring any simulation of the model differential equations. Two classes of linear and non-linear compartmental models are considered. The theory is first applied to analyze the linear nitrous oxide (N2O) uptake model. The fitting accuracy of the identified models from differential jet space and potential jet space identifiability theories is compared with a realistic noise level of 3% which is derived from sensor noise data in the literature. The potential jet space approach gave a match that was well within the coefficient of variation. The differential jet space formulation was unstable and not suitable for parameter identification. The proposed theory is then applied to a nonlinear immunological model for mastitis in cows. In addition, the model formulation is extended to include an iterative method which allows initial conditions to be accurately identified. With up to 10% noise, the potential jet space theory predicts the normalized population concentration infected with pathogens, to within 9% of the true curve. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. A Migrating Ciliary Gate Compartmentalizes the Site of Axoneme Assembly in Drosophila Spermatids

    PubMed Central

    Basiri, Marcus L.; Ha, Andrew; Chadha, Abhishek; Clark, Nicole M.; Polyanovsky, Andrey; Cook, Boaz; Avidor-Reiss, Tomer

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Background In most cells, the cilium is formed within a compartment separated from the cytoplasm. Entry into the ciliary compartment is regulated by a specialized gate located at the base of the cilium in a region known as the transition zone. The transition zone is closely associated with multiple structures of the ciliary base including the centriole, axoneme, and ciliary membrane. However, the contribution of these structures to the ciliary gate remains unclear. Results Here, we report that in Drosophila spermatids, a conserved module of transition zone proteins mutated in Meckel-Gruber Syndrome (MKS) including Cep290, Mks1, B9d1, and B9d2 comprise a ciliary gate that continuously migrates away from the centriole to compartmentalize the growing axoneme tip. We show that Cep290 is essential for transition zone composition, compartmentalization of the axoneme tip, and axoneme integrity, and find that MKS proteins also delimit a centriole-independent compartment in mouse spermatids. Conclusion Our findings demonstrate that the ciliary gate can migrate away from the base of the cilium, thereby functioning independently of the centriole and of a static interaction with the axoneme to compartmentalize the site of axoneme assembly. PMID:25447994

  11. A migrating ciliary gate compartmentalizes the site of axoneme assembly in Drosophila spermatids.

    PubMed

    Basiri, Marcus L; Ha, Andrew; Chadha, Abhishek; Clark, Nicole M; Polyanovsky, Andrey; Cook, Boaz; Avidor-Reiss, Tomer

    2014-11-17

    In most cells, the cilium is formed within a compartment separated from the cytoplasm. Entry into the ciliary compartment is regulated by a specialized gate located at the base of the cilium in a region known as the transition zone. The transition zone is closely associated with multiple structures of the ciliary base, including the centriole, axoneme, and ciliary membrane. However, the contribution of these structures to the ciliary gate remains unclear. Here we report that, in Drosophila spermatids, a conserved module of transition zone proteins mutated in Meckel-Gruber syndrome (MKS), including Cep290, Mks1, B9d1, and B9d2, comprise a ciliary gate that continuously migrates away from the centriole to compartmentalize the growing axoneme tip. We show that Cep290 is essential for transition zone composition, compartmentalization of the axoneme tip, and axoneme integrity and find that MKS proteins also delimit a centriole-independent compartment in mouse spermatids. Our findings demonstrate that the ciliary gate can migrate away from the base of the cilium, thereby functioning independently of the centriole and of a static interaction with the axoneme to compartmentalize the site of axoneme assembly. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Intracellular compartmentation of ions in salt adapted tobacco cells. [Nicotiana tabacum L

    SciTech Connect

    Binzel, M.L.; Hess, F.D.; Bressan, R.A.; Hasegawa, P.M. )

    1988-02-01

    Na{sup +} and Cl{sup {minus}} are the principal solutes utilized for osmotic adjustment in cells of Nicotiana tabacum L. var Wisconsin 38 (tobacco) adapted to NaCl, accumulating to levels of 472 and 386 millimolar, respectively, in cells adapted to 428 millimolar NaCl. X-ray microanalysis of unetched frozen-hydrated cells adapted to salt indicated that Na{sup +} and Cl{sup {minus}} were compartmentalized in the vacuole, at concentrations of 780 and 624 millimolar, respectively, while cytoplasmic concentrations of the ions were maintained at 96 millimolar. The morphometric differences which existed between unadapted and salt adapted cells, (cytoplasmic volume of 22 and 45% of the cell, respectively), facilitated containment of the excited volume of the x-ray signal in the cytoplasm of the adapted cells. Confirmation of ion compartmentation in salt adapted cells was obtained based on kinetic analyses of {sup 22}Na{sup +} and {sup 36}Cl{sup {minus}} efflux from cells in steady state. These data provide evidence that ion compartmentation is a component of salt adaptation of glycophyte cells.

  13. GM130 is required for compartmental organization of dendritic Golgi outposts

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Wei; Chang, Jin; Wang, Xin; Savelieff, Masha G.; Zhao, Yinyin; Ke, Shanshan; Ye, Bing

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Golgi complexes (Golgi) play important roles in the development and function of neurons [1–3]. Not only are Golgi present in the neuronal soma (somal Golgi) but they also exist in the dendrites as Golgi outposts [4–7]. Previous studies have shown that Golgi outposts serve as local microtubule organizing centers [8] and secretory stations in dendrites [6, 9]. It is unknown whether the structure and function of Golgi outposts differ from those of somal Golgi. Here we show in Drosophila that, unlike somal Golgi, the biochemically distinct cis, medial, and trans compartments of Golgi are often disconnected in dendrites in vivo. The Golgi structural protein GM130 is responsible for connecting distinct Golgi compartments in soma and dendritic branch points, and specific distribution of GM130 determines the compartmental organization of dendritic Golgi in dendritic shafts. We further show that compartmental organization regulates the role of Golgi in acentrosomal microtubule growth in dendrites and in dendritic branching. Our study provides insights into the structure and function of dendritic Golgi outposts as well as the regulation of compartmental organization of Golgi in general. PMID:24835455

  14. Multi-scale hierarchical approach for parametric mapping: assessment on multi-compartmental models.

    PubMed

    Rizzo, G; Turkheimer, F E; Bertoldo, A

    2013-02-15

    This paper investigates a new hierarchical method to apply basis function to mono- and multi-compartmental models (Hierarchical-Basis Function Method, H-BFM) at a voxel level. This method identifies the parameters of the compartmental model in its nonlinearized version, integrating information derived at the region of interest (ROI) level by segmenting the cerebral volume based on anatomical definition or functional clustering. We present the results obtained by using a two tissue-four rate constant model with two different tracers ([(11)C]FLB457 and [carbonyl-(11)C]WAY100635), one of the most complex models used in receptor studies, especially at the voxel level. H-BFM is robust and its application on both [(11)C]FLB457 and [carbonyl-(11)C]WAY100635 allows accurate and precise parameter estimates, good quality parametric maps and a low percentage of voxels out of physiological bound (<8%). The computational time depends on the number of basis functions selected and can be compatible with clinical use (~6h for a single subject analysis). The novel method is a robust approach for PET quantification by using compartmental modeling at the voxel level. In particular, different from other proposed approaches, this method can also be used when the linearization of the model is not appropriate. We expect that applying it to clinical data will generate reliable parametric maps. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. The mechanics of cellular compartmentalization as a model for tumor spreading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritsch, Anatol; Pawlizak, Steve; Zink, Mareike; Kaes, Josef A.

    2012-02-01

    Based on a recently developed surgical method of Michael H"ockel, which makes use of cellular confinement to compartments in the human body, we study the mechanics of the process of cell segregation. Compartmentalization is a fundamental process of cellular organization and occurs during embryonic development. A simple model system can demonstrate the process of compartmentalization: When two populations of suspended cells are mixed, this mixture will eventually segregate into two phases, whereas mixtures of the same cell type will not. In the 1960s, Malcolm S. Steinberg formulated the so-called differential adhesion hypothesis which explains the segregation in the model system and the process of compartmentalization by differences in surface tension and adhesiveness of the interacting cells. We are interested in to which extend the same physical principles affect tumor growth and spreading between compartments. For our studies, we use healthy and cancerous breast cell lines of different malignancy as well as primary cells from human cervix carcinoma. We apply a set of techniques to study their mechanical properties and interactions. The Optical Stretcher is used for whole cell rheology, while Cell-cell-adhesion forces are directly measured with a modified AFM. In combination with 3D segregation experiments in droplet cultures we try to clarify the role of surface tension in tumor spreading.

  16. Cell-free compartmentalized protein synthesis inside double emulsion templated liposomes with in vitro synthesized and assembled ribosomes.

    PubMed

    Caschera, Filippo; Lee, Jin Woo; Ho, Kenneth K Y; Liu, Allen P; Jewett, Michael C

    2016-04-07

    A cell-free expression platform for making bacterial ribosomes encapsulated within giant liposomes was capable of synthesizing sfGFP. The liposomes were prepared using a double emulsion template, and compartmentalized in vitro protein synthesis was analysed using spinning disk confocal microscopy. Two different liposome phospholipid formulations were investigated to characterize their effects on the compartmentalized reaction kinetics. This study was performed as a necessary step towards the synthesis of minimal cells.

  17. Identification of very small open reading frames in the genomes of Holmes Jungle virus, Ord River virus, and Wongabel virus of the genus Hapavirus, family Rhabdoviridae

    PubMed Central

    Gubala, Aneta; Walsh, Susan; McAllister, Jane; Weir, Richard; Davis, Steven; Melville, Lorna; Mitchell, Ian; Bulach, Dieter; Gauci, Penny; Skvortsov, Alex; Boyle, David

    2017-01-01

    Viruses of the family Rhabdoviridae infect a broad range of hosts from a variety of ecological and geographical niches, including vertebrates, arthropods, and plants. The arthropod-transmitted members of this family display considerable genetic diversity and remarkable genomic flexibility that enable coding for various accessory proteins in different locations of the genome. Here, we describe the genome of Holmes Jungle virus, isolated from Culex annulirostris mosquitoes collected in northern Australia, and make detailed comparisons with the closely related Ord River and Wongabel viruses, with a focus on identifying very small open reading frames (smORFs) in their genomes. This is the first systematic prediction of smORFs in rhabdoviruses, emphasising the intricacy of the rhabdovirus genome and the knowledge gaps. We speculate that these smORFs may be of importance to the life cycle of the virus in the arthropod vector. PMID:28747815

  18. The Peru Cervical Cancer Screening Study (PERCAPS): The Design and Implementation of a Mother/Daughter Screen, Treat, and Vaccinate Program in the Peruvian Jungle

    PubMed Central

    Levinson, Kimberly L.; Salmeron, Jorge; Sologuren, Carlos Vallejos; Fernandez, Maria Jose Vallejos; Belinson, Jerome L.

    2014-01-01

    Peru struggles to prevent cervical cancer (CC). In the jungle, prevention programs suffer from significant barriers although technology exists to detect CC precursors. This study used community based participatory research (CBPR) methods to overcome barriers. The objective was to evaluate the utility of CBPR techniques in a mother–child screen/treat and vaccinate program for CC prevention in the Peruvian jungle. The CC prevention program used self-sampling for human papillomavirus (HPV) for screening, cryotherapy for treatment and the HPV vaccine Gardasil for vaccination. Community health leaders (HL) from around Iquitos participated in a two half day educational course. The HLs then decided how to implement interventions in their villages or urban sectors. The success of the program was measured by: (1) ability of the HLs to determine an implementation plan, (2) proper use of research forms, (3) participation and retention rates, and (4) participants’ satisfaction. HLs successfully registered 320 women at soup kitchens, schools, and health posts. Screening, treatment, and vaccination were successfully carried out using forms for registration, consent, and results with minimum error. In the screen/treat intervention 100 % of participants gave an HPV sample and 99.7 % reported high satisfaction; 81 % of HPV + women were treated, and 57 % returned for 6-month followup. Vaccine intervention: 98 % of girls received the 1st vaccine, 88 % of those received the 2nd, and 65 % the 3rd. CBPR techniques successfully helped implement a screen/treat and vaccinate CC prevention program around Iquitos, Peru. These techniques may be appropriate for large-scale preventive health-care interventions. PMID:24276617

  19. Night Jungle Operations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-02-19

    and artificial features to march on, and sometimes by 5th columnists who would light bonfires to serve as points to march on. Control was maintained...Feb 1943, p.9. 7. U.S. War Department, Military Intellegence Division, "Notes on Japanese Warfare", Information Bulletin No. 8, (Washington D.C.: U.S

  20. The Learning Theory Jungle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minter, Robert L.

    2011-01-01

    This article addresses the myriad of pedagogical and andragogical issues facing university educators in the student learning process. It briefly explores the proliferation of learning theories in an attempt to develop awareness among faculty who teach at the university/college levels that not all theories of learning apply to the adult learner. In…

  1. The Learning Theory Jungle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minter, Robert L.

    2011-01-01

    This article addresses the myriad of pedagogical and andragogical issues facing university educators in the student learning process. It briefly explores the proliferation of learning theories in an attempt to develop awareness among faculty who teach at the university/college levels that not all theories of learning apply to the adult learner. In…

  2. The proteome map of spinach leaf peroxisomes indicates partial compartmentalization of phylloquinone (vitamin K1) biosynthesis in plant peroxisomes.

    PubMed

    Babujee, Lavanya; Wurtz, Virginie; Ma, Changle; Lueder, Franziska; Soni, Pradeep; van Dorsselaer, Alain; Reumann, Sigrun

    2010-03-01

    Leaf peroxisomes are fragile, low-abundance plant cell organelles that are difficult to isolate from one of the few plant species whose nuclear genome has been sequenced. Leaf peroxisomes were enriched at high purity from spinach (Spinacia oleracea) and approximately 100 protein spots identified from 2-dimensional gels by a combination of liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) and de novo sequencing. In addition to the predominant enzymes involved in photorespiration and detoxification, several minor enzymes were detected, underscoring the high sensitivity of the protein identification. The tryptic peptides of three unknown proteins shared high sequence similarity with Arabidopsis proteins that carry putative peroxisomal targeting signals type 1 or 2 (PTS1/2). The apparent Arabidopsis orthologues are a short-chain alcohol dehydrogenase (SDRa/IBR1, At4g05530, SRL>) and two enoyl-CoA hydratases/isomerases (ECHIa, At4g16210, SKL>; NS/ECHId, At1g60550, RLx(5)HL). The peroxisomal localization of the three proteins was confirmed in vivo by tagging with enhanced yellow fluorescent protein (EYFP), and the targeting signals were identified. The single Arabidopsis isoform of naphthoate synthase (NS) is orthologous to MenB from cyanobacteria, which catalyses an essential reaction in phylloquinone biosynthesis, a pathway previously assumed to be entirely compartmentalized in plastids in higher plants. In an extension of a previous study, the present in vivo targeting data furthermore demonstrate that the enzyme upstream of NS, chloroplastic acyl-CoA activating enzyme isoform 14 (AAE14, SSL>), is dually targeted to both plastids and peroxisomes. This proteomic study, extended by in vivo subcellular localization analyses, indicates a novel function for plant peroxisomes in phylloquinone biosynthesis.

  3. Compartmentalized oxidative stress in dopaminergic cell death induced by pesticides and complex I inhibitors: Distinct roles of superoxide anion and superoxide dismutases

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Rocha, Humberto; Garcia-Garcia, Aracely; Pickett, Chillian; Sumin, Li; Jones, Jocelyn; Chen, Han; Webb, Brian; Choi, Jae; Zhou, You; Zimmerman, Matthew C.; Franco, Rodrigo

    2013-01-01

    The loss of dopaminergic neurons induced by the parkinsonian toxins paraquat, rotenone and 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP+) is associated with oxidative stress. However, controversial reports exist regarding the source/compartmentalization of reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and its exact role in cell death. We aimed to determine in detail the role of superoxide anion (O2•−), oxidative stress and their subcellular compartmentalization in dopaminergic cell death induced by parkinsonian toxins. Oxidative stress and ROS formation was determined in the cytosol, intermembrane (IMS) and mitochondrial matrix compartments, using dihydroethidine derivatives, the redox sensor roGFP, as well as electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy. Paraquat induced an increase in ROS and oxidative stress in both the cytosol and mitochondrial matrix prior to cell death. MPP+ and rotenone primarily induced an increase in ROS and oxidative stress in the mitochondrial matrix. No oxidative stress was detected at the level of the IMS. In contrast to previous studies, overexpression of manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) or copper/zinc SOD (CuZnSOD) had no effect on ROS steady state levels, lipid peroxidation, loss of mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) and dopaminergic cell death induced by MPP+ or rotenone. In contrast, paraquat-induced oxidative stress and cell death were selectively reduced by MnSOD overexpression, but not by CuZnSOD or manganese-porphyrins. However, MnSOD also failed to prevent ΔΨm loss. Finally, paraquat, but not MPP+ or rotenone, induced the transcriptional activation the redox-sensitive antioxidant response elements (ARE) and nuclear factor kappa-B (NF-κB). These results demonstrate a selective role of mitochondrial O2•− in dopaminergic cell death induced by paraquat, and show that toxicity induced by the complex I inhibitors rotenone and MPP+ does not depend directly on mitochondrial O2•− formation. PMID:23602909

  4. A Crowdsourced nucleus: Understanding nuclear organization in terms of dynamically networked protein function

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Ashley M.; Garza-Gongora, Arturo G.; Kosak, Steven T.

    2014-01-01

    The spatial organization of the nucleus results in a compartmentalized structure that affects all aspects of nuclear function. This compartmentalization involves genome organization as well as the formation of nuclear bodies and plays a role in many functions, including gene regulation, genome stability, replication, and RNA processing. Here we review the recent findings associated with the spatial organization of the nucleus and reveal that a common theme for nuclear proteins is their ability to participate in a variety of functions and pathways. We consider this multiplicity of function in terms of Crowdsourcing, a recent phenomenon in the world of information technology, and suggest that this model provides a novel way to synthesize the many intersections between nuclear organization and function. PMID:24412853

  5. Study of compartmentalization in the visna clinical form of small ruminant lentivirus infection in sheep

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background A central nervous system (CNS) disease outbreak caused by small ruminant lentiviruses (SRLV) has triggered interest in Spain due to the rapid onset of clinical signs and relevant production losses. In a previous study on this outbreak, the role of LTR in tropism was unclear and env encoded sequences, likely involved in tropism, were not investigated. This study aimed to analyze heterogeneity of SRLV Env regions - TM amino terminal and SU V4, C4 and V5 segments - in order to assess virus compartmentalization in CNS. Results Eight Visna (neurologically) affected sheep of the outbreak were used. Of the 350 clones obtained after PCR amplification, 142 corresponded to CNS samples (spinal cord and choroid plexus) and the remaining to mammary gland, blood cells, bronchoalveolar lavage cells and/or lung. The diversity of the env sequences from CNS was 11.1-16.1% between animals and 0.35-11.6% within each animal, except in one animal presenting two sequence types (30% diversity) in the CNS (one grouping with those of the outbreak), indicative of CNS virus sequence heterogeneity. Outbreak sequences were of genotype A, clustering per animal and compartmentalizing in the animal tissues. No CNS specific signature patterns were found. Conclusions Bayesian approach inferences suggested that proviruses from broncoalveolar lavage cells and peripheral blood mononuclear cells represented the common ancestors (infecting viruses) in the animal and that neuroinvasion in the outbreak involved microevolution after initial infection with an A-type strain. This study demonstrates virus compartmentalization in the CNS and other body tissues in sheep presenting the neurological form of SRLV infection. PMID:22281181

  6. DISTING: A web application for fast algorithmic computation of alternative indistinguishable linear compartmental models.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Natalie R; Godfrey, Keith R; Alquaddoomi, Faisal; Nola, David; DiStefano, Joseph J

    2017-05-01

    We describe and illustrate use of DISTING, a novel web application for computing alternative structurally identifiable linear compartmental models that are input-output indistinguishable from a postulated linear compartmental model. Several computer packages are available for analysing the structural identifiability of such models, but DISTING is the first to be made available for assessing indistinguishability. The computational algorithms embedded in DISTING are based on advanced versions of established geometric and algebraic properties of linear compartmental models, embedded in a user-friendly graphic model user interface. Novel computational tools greatly speed up the overall procedure. These include algorithms for Jacobian matrix reduction, submatrix rank reduction, and parallelization of candidate rank computations in symbolic matrix analysis. The application of DISTING to three postulated models with respectively two, three and four compartments is given. The 2-compartment example is used to illustrate the indistinguishability problem; the original (unidentifiable) model is found to have two structurally identifiable models that are indistinguishable from it. The 3-compartment example has three structurally identifiable indistinguishable models. It is found from DISTING that the four-compartment example has five structurally identifiable models indistinguishable from the original postulated model. This example shows that care is needed when dealing with models that have two or more compartments which are neither perturbed nor observed, because the numbering of these compartments may be arbitrary. DISTING is universally and freely available via the Internet. It is easy to use and circumvents tedious and complicated algebraic analysis previously done by hand. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. In vivo kinematics of a robot-assisted uni- and multi-compartmental knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Toshifumi; Abbasi, Ali Z; Conditt, Michael A; Christopher, Jennifer; Kreuzer, Stefan; Otto, Jason K; Banks, Scott A

    2014-07-01

    There is great interest in providing reliable and durable treatments for one- and two-compartment arthritic degeneration of the cruciate-ligament intact knee. One approach is to resurface only the diseased compartments with discrete unicompartmental components, retaining the undamaged compartment(s). However, placing multiple small implants into the knee presents a greater surgical challenge than total knee arthroplasty, so it is not certain that the natural knee mechanics can be maintained or restored. The goal of this study was to determine whether near-normal knee kinematics can be obtained with a robot-assisted multi-compartmental knee arthroplasty. Thirteen patients with 15 multi-compartmental knee arthroplasties using haptic robotic-assisted bone preparation were involved in this study. Nine subjects received a medial unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA), three subjects received a medial UKA and patellofemoral (PF) arthroplasty, and three subjects received medial and lateral bi-unicondylar arthroplasty. Knee motions were recorded using video-fluoroscopy an average of 13 months (6-29 months) after surgery during stair and kneeling activities. The three-dimensional position and orientation of the implant components were determined using model-image registration techniques. Knee kinematics during maximum flexion kneeling showed femoral external rotation and posterior lateral condylar translation. All knees showed femoral external rotation and posterior condylar translation with flexion during the step activity. Knees with medial UKA and PF arthroplasty showed the most femoral external rotation and posterior translation, and knees with bicondylar UKA showed the least. Knees with accurately placed uni- or bi-compartmental arthroplasty exhibited stable knee kinematics consistent with intact and functioning cruciate ligaments. The patterns of tibiofemoral motion were more similar to natural knees than commonly has been observed in knees with total knee

  8. Regulation of NAD+ metabolism, signaling and compartmentalization in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Michiko; Lin, Su-Ju

    2014-01-01

    Pyridine nucleotides are essential coenzymes in many cellular redox reactions in all living systems. In addition to functioning as a redox carrier, NAD+ is also a required co-substrate for the conserved sirtuin deacetylases. Sirtuins regulate transcription, genome maintenance and metabolism and function as molecular links between cells and their environment. Maintaining NAD+ homeostasis is essential for proper cellular function and aberrant NAD+ metabolism has been implicated in a number of metabolic- and age-associated diseases. Recently, NAD+ metabolism has been linked to the phosphate-responsive signaling pathway (PHO pathway) in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Activation of the PHO pathway is associated with the production and mobilization of the NAD+ metabolite nicotinamide riboside (NR), which is mediated in part by PHO-regulated nucleotidases. Cross-regulation between NAD+ metabolism and the PHO pathway has also been reported; however, detailed mechanisms remain to be elucidated. The PHO pathway also appears to modulate the activities of common downstream effectors of multiple nutrient-sensing pathways (Ras-PKA, TOR, Sch9/AKT). These signaling pathways were suggested to play a role in calorie restriction-mediated beneficial effects, which have also been linked to Sir2 function and NAD+ metabolism. Here, we discuss the interactions of these pathways and their potential roles in regulating NAD+ metabolism. In eukaryotic cells, intracellular compartmentalization facilitates the regulation of enzymatic functions and also concentrates or sequesters specific metabolites. Various NAD+-mediated cellular functions such as mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation are compartmentalized. Therefore, we also discuss several key players functioning in mitochondrial, cytosolic and vacuolar compartmentalization of NAD+ intermediates, and their potential roles in NAD+ homeostasis. To date, it remains unclear how NAD+ and NAD+ intermediates shuttle between different

  9. Zinc compartmentation in Halimione portulacoides (L.) Aellen and some effects on leaf ultrastructure.

    PubMed

    Reboredo, Fernando

    2011-08-01

    The halophyte Halimione portulacoides collected in a polluted area of the river Sado estuary (Portugal) and obtained from hydroponic cultures was used to evaluate the compartmentation of Zn and its preferential binding sites. In parallel, we tried to assess if the minimum available Zn concentration found in marsh soil induces changes at the ultrastructural level. A sequential extraction method was used to study the Zn compartmentation within the cell. Both dried plant samples and extracts/residues from compartmentation studies were digested by HNO3–HClO4 (4:1) until dryness and analyzed by atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Segments of young leaves, previously exposed to Zn were fixed in glutaraldehyde and osmium tetroxide. Ultrathin sections were stained and examined by transmission electron microscopy at 80 kV. Proteins and carbohydrates of the cell walls constitute preferential binding sites of Zn, containing between 25% and 33% and between 30% and 40% of the total, respectively. Hydroponic plants accumulate Zn in their leaves up to (194 μg g−1) without visible damage or changes in the protein and chlorophyll concentrations, compared with the controls. Chlorenchyma chloroplasts of Zn-treated plants exhibited an unusual number of starch grains, which can be seen as an alert mechanism. Although so far the levels of Zn in the leaves within the studied area have not reached high values, monitoring them remains a priority. Also, issues related with starch synthesis and organic ligands must be evaluated. The understanding of the predictable behavior of this halophyte is our main goal, and the results here presented can contribute to this achievement.

  10. Development and testing of a compartmentalized reaction network model for redox zones in contaminated aquifers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Abrams, R.H.; Loague, K.; Kent, D.B.

    1998-01-01

    The work reported here is the first part of a larger effort focused on efficient numerical simulation of redox zone development in contaminated aquifers. The sequential use of various electron acceptors, which is governed by the energy yield of each reaction, gives rise to redox zones. The large difference in energy yields between the various redox reactions leads to systems of equations that are extremely ill-conditioned. These equations are very difficult to solve, especially in the context of coupled fluid flow, solute transport, and geochemical simulations. We have developed a general, rational method to solve such systems where we focus on the dominant reactions, compartmentalizing them in a manner that is analogous to the redox zones that are often observed in the field. The compartmentalized approach allows us to easily solve a complex geochemical system as a function of time and energy yield, laying the foundation for our ongoing work in which we couple the reaction network, for the development of redox zones, to a model of subsurface fluid flow and solute transport. Our method (1) solves the numerical system without evoking a redox parameter, (2) improves the numerical stability of redox systems by choosing which compartment and thus which reaction network to use based upon the concentration ratios of key constituents, (3) simulates the development of redox zones as a function of time without the use of inhibition factors or switching functions, and (4) can reduce the number of transport equations that need to be solved in space and time. We show through the use of various model performance evaluation statistics that the appropriate compartment choice under different geochemical conditions leads to numerical solutions without significant error. The compartmentalized approach described here facilitates the next phase of this effort where we couple the redox zone reaction network to models of fluid flow and solute transport.

  11. Regulation of NAD+ metabolism, signaling and compartmentalization in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Kato, Michiko; Lin, Su-Ju

    2014-11-01

    Pyridine nucleotides are essential coenzymes in many cellular redox reactions in all living systems. In addition to functioning as a redox carrier, NAD(+) is also a required co-substrate for the conserved sirtuin deacetylases. Sirtuins regulate transcription, genome maintenance and metabolism and function as molecular links between cells and their environment. Maintaining NAD(+) homeostasis is essential for proper cellular function and aberrant NAD(+) metabolism has been implicated in a number of metabolic- and age-associated diseases. Recently, NAD(+) metabolism has been linked to the phosphate-responsive signaling pathway (PHO pathway) in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Activation of the PHO pathway is associated with the production and mobilization of the NAD(+) metabolite nicotinamide riboside (NR), which is mediated in part by PHO-regulated nucleotidases. Cross-regulation between NAD(+) metabolism and the PHO pathway has also been reported; however, detailed mechanisms remain to be elucidated. The PHO pathway also appears to modulate the activities of common downstream effectors of multiple nutrient-sensing pathways (Ras-PKA, TOR, Sch9/AKT). These signaling pathways were suggested to play a role in calorie restriction-mediated beneficial effects, which have also been linked to Sir2 function and NAD(+) metabolism. Here, we discuss the interactions of these pathways and their potential roles in regulating NAD(+) metabolism. In eukaryotic cells, intracellular compartmentalization facilitates the regulation of enzymatic functions and also concentrates or sequesters specific metabolites. Various NAD(+)-mediated cellular functions such as mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation are compartmentalized. Therefore, we also discuss several key players functioning in mitochondrial, cytosolic and vacuolar compartmentalization of NAD(+) intermediates, and their potential roles in NAD(+) homeostasis. To date, it remains unclear how NAD(+) and NAD(+) intermediates

  12. Balancing Type I and Type II error concerns in fMRI through compartmentalized analysis.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, William A; Koscik, Timothy R

    2017-03-13

    We seek to balance the need to minimize false positives with the need to maximize power. We propose a compartmentalized series of analyses that a priori selects regions of voxels that have different degrees of predicted involvement. Alpha thresholds are allocated based on the strength of expected theoretical relationships. For example, confirmatory studies might allocate most of the error to the regions predicted from the literature and thus use a relatively more liberal threshold on these voxels. Simulations reveal that this technique increases power for hypothesized regions, while maintaining a constant false-positive rate and allowing exploratory analysis.

  13. Phosphodiesterases and subcellular compartmentalized cAMP signaling in the cardiovascular system.

    PubMed

    Stangherlin, Alessandra; Zaccolo, Manuela

    2012-01-01

    Phosphodiesterases are key enzymes in the cAMP signaling cascade. They convert cAMP in its inactive form 5'-AMP and critically regulate the intensity and the duration of cAMP-mediated signals. Multiple isoforms exist that possess different intracellular distributions, different affinities for cAMP, and different catalytic and regulatory properties. This complex repertoire of enzymes provides a multiplicity of ways to modulate cAMP levels, to integrate more signaling pathways, and to respond to the specific needs of the cell within distinct subcellular domains. In this review we summarize key findings on phosphodiesterase compartmentalization in the cardiovascular system.

  14. Time-dependent infectivity and flexible latent and infectious periods in compartmental models of plant disease.

    PubMed

    Cunniffe, N J; Stutt, R O J H; van den Bosch, F; Gilligan, C A

    2012-04-01

    Compartmental models have become the dominant theoretical paradigm in mechanistic modeling of plant disease and offer well-known advantages in terms of analytic tractability, ease of simulation, and extensibility. However, underlying assumptions of constant rates of infection and of exponentially distributed latent and infectious periods are difficult to justify. Although alternative approaches, including van der Plank's seminal discrete time model and models based on the integro-differential formulation of Kermack and McKendrick's model, have been suggested for plant disease and relax these unrealistic assumptions, they are challenging to implement and to analyze. Here, we propose an extension to the susceptible, exposed, infected, and removed (SEIR) compartmental model, splitting the latent and infection compartments and thereby allowing time-varying infection rates and more realistic distributions of latent and infectious periods to be represented. Although the model is, in fact, more general, we specifically target plant disease by demonstrating how it can represent both the van der Plank model and the most commonly used variant of the Kermack and McKendrick (K & M) model (in which the infectivity response is delay Gamma distributed). We show how our reformulation retains the numeric and analytic tractability of SEIR models, and how it can be used to replicate earlier analyses of the van der Plank and K & M models. Our reformulation has the advantage of using elementary mathematical techniques, making implementation easier for the nonspecialist. We show a practical implication of these results for disease control. By taking advantage of the easy extensibility characteristic of compartmental models, we also investigate the effects of including additional biological realism. As an example, we show how the more realistic infection responses we consider interact with host demography and lead to divergent invasion thresholds when compared with the "standard" SEIR

  15. Obesity, self-complexity, and compartmentalization: on the implications of obesity for self-concept organization.

    PubMed

    Blaine, B E; Johnson, C A

    2005-12-01

    The relationship between obesity and structural aspects of the self-concept was examined in adult women. Participants were 119 adult women [age range: 18-73, M=26.9; body mass index (BMI) range: 16.2-54.7, M=27.3] who completed measures of self-esteem, self-complexity, and the spontaneous self-concept. BMI was associated with less complex and more compartmentalized self-knowledge and more frequent mention of weight-stereotypic traits as self-descriptive. The findings are discussed in the context of research on obesity- related stigma.

  16. Nilpotent singularities and dynamics in an SIR type of compartmental model with hospital resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shan, Chunhua; Yi, Yingfei; Zhu, Huaiping

    2016-03-01

    An SIR type of compartmental model with a standard incidence rate and a nonlinear recovery rate was formulated to study the impact of available resources of public health system especially the number of hospital beds. Cusp, focus and elliptic type of nilpotent singularities of codimension 3 are discovered and analyzed in this three dimensional model. Complex dynamics of disease transmission including multi-steady states and multi-periodicity are revealed by bifurcation analysis. Large-amplitude oscillations found in our model provide a more reasonable explanation for disease recurrence. With clinical data, our studies have practical implications for the prevention and control of infectious diseases.

  17. A comparison of science achievement of fifth grade students in semi-departmentalized and compartmentalized instructional formats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, Gregorio

    The purpose of the proposed study was to examine the difference between semidepartmentalized instruction and compartmentalized instruction on the achievement of fifth grade students as measured by the Texas Assessment of Knowledge and Skills (TAKS) Fifth Grade Science test. The study utilized a Causal Comparative research design with six elementary schools that were comparable as defined by the Texas Education Agency. The independent variable was the type of organizational structure, semi-departmentalized instruction versus compartmentalized instruction. The dependent variable was the science achievement of fifth grade students as measured by the TAKS Fifth Grade Science test from spring 2004. A t-test for unpaired samples was used to analyze the data obtained from the semi-departmentalized group and the comparison group (compartmentalized). The ninety-five percent confidence level (p < 0.05) was used as the criterion level for determining statistical significance of the means. An effect size, Cohen's d, of 0.33 was used to determine educational significance between the means of the two groups. The results of the t-tests indicate that the semi-departmentalized schools had a mean scale score of 2026.52, while the compartmentalized schools had a mean scale score of 2041.22 that was not statistically significant ( p = .337). The effect size between the semi-departmentalized group and the compartmentalized comparison group yielded a Cohen's d = 0.08 that was not educationally significant.

  18. Nuclear envelope morphology constrains diffusion and promotes asymmetric protein segregation in closed mitosis.

    PubMed

    Boettcher, Barbara; Marquez-Lago, Tatiana T; Bayer, Mathias; Weiss, Eric L; Barral, Yves

    2012-06-25

    During vegetative growth, Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells divide asymmetrically: the mother cell buds to produce a smaller daughter cell. This daughter asymmetrically inherits the transcription factor Ace2, which activates daughter-specific transcriptional programs. In this paper, we investigate when and how this asymmetry is established and maintained. We show that Ace2 asymmetry is initiated in the elongated, but undivided, anaphase nucleus. At this stage, the nucleoplasm was highly compartmentalized; little exchange was observed for nucleoplasmic proteins between mother and bud. Using photobleaching and in silico modeling, we show that diffusion barriers compartmentalize the nuclear membranes. In contrast, the behavior of proteins in the nucleoplasm is well explained by the dumbbell shape of the anaphase nucleus. This compartmentalization of the nucleoplasm promoted Ace2 asymmetry in anaphase nuclei. Thus, our data indicate that yeast cells use the process of closed mitosis and the morphological constraints associated with it to asymmetrically segregate nucleoplasmic components.

  19. 4D maximum a posteriori reconstruction in dynamic SPECT using a compartmental model-based prior.

    PubMed

    Kadrmas, D J; Gullberg, G T

    2001-05-01

    A 4D ordered-subsets maximum a posteriori (OSMAP) algorithm for dynamic SPECT is described which uses a temporal prior that constrains each voxel's behaviour in time to conform to a compartmental model. No a priori limitations on kinetic parameters are applied; rather, the parameter estimates evolve as the algorithm iterates to a solution. The estimated parameters and time-activity curves are used within the reconstruction algorithm to model changes in the activity distribution as the camera rotates, avoiding artefacts due to inconsistencies of data between projection views. This potentially allows for fewer, longer-duration scans to be used and may have implications for noise reduction. The algorithm was evaluated qualitatively using dynamic 99mTc-teboroxime SPECT scans in two patients, and quantitatively using a series of simulated phantom experiments. The OSMAP algorithm resulted in images with better myocardial uniformity and definition, gave time-activity curves with reduced noise variations, and provided wash-in parameter estimates with better accuracy and lower statistical uncertainty than those obtained from conventional ordered-subsets expectation-maximization (OSEM) processing followed by compartmental modelling. The new algorithm effectively removed the bias in k21 estimates due to inconsistent projections for sampling schedules as slow as 60 s per timeframe, but no improvement in wash-out parameter estimates was observed in this work. The proposed dynamic OSMAP algorithm provides a flexible framework which may benefit a variety of dynamic tomographic imaging applications.

  20. Detecting compartmental non-Gaussian diffusion with symmetrized double-PFG MRI.

    PubMed

    Paulsen, Jeffrey L; Özarslan, Evren; Komlosh, Michal E; Basser, Peter J; Song, Yi-Qiao

    2015-11-01

    Diffusion in tissue and porous media is known to be non-Gaussian and has been used for clinical indications of stroke and other tissue pathologies. However, when conventional NMR techniques are applied to biological tissues and other heterogeneous materials, the presence of multiple compartments (pores) with different Gaussian diffusivities will also contribute to the measurement of non-Gaussian behavior. Here we present symmetrized double PFG (sd-PFG), which can separate these two contributions to non-Gaussian signal decay as having distinct angular modulation frequencies. In contrast to prior angular d-PFG methods, sd-PFG can unambiguously extract kurtosis as an oscillation from samples with isotropic or uniformly oriented anisotropic pores, and can generally extract a combination of compartmental anisotropy and kurtosis. The method further fixes its sensitivity with respect to the time dependence of the apparent diffusion coefficient. We experimentally demonstrate the measurement of the fourth cumulant (kurtosis) of diffusion and find it consistent with theoretical predictions. By enabling the unambiguous identification of contributions of compartmental kurtosis to the signal, sd-PFG has the potential to help identify the underlying micro-structural changes corresponding to current kurtosis based diagnostics, and act as a novel source of contrast to better resolve tissue micro-structure.

  1. Metabolism of the Raffinose Family Oligosaccharides in Leaves of Ajuga reptans L. (Inter- and Intracellular Compartmentation).

    PubMed Central

    Bachmann, M.; Keller, F.

    1995-01-01

    We recently suggested that leaves of the frost-hardy species Ajuga reptans L. (Lamiaceace) contain two pools of raffinose family oligosaccharides (RFO): a large long-term storage pool in the mesophyll, possibly also involved in frost resistance, and a transport pool in the phloem (M. Bachmann, P. Matile, F. Keller [1994] Plant Physiol 105: 1335-1345). In the present study, the inter- and intracellular compartmentation of anabolic RFO metabolism was investigated by comparing whole-leaf tissue with mesophyll protoplasts and vacuoles. The studies showed the mesophyll to be the primary site of RFO synthesis in A. reptans. Mesophyll protoplasts were capable of RFO formation upon in vitro 14CO2 photosynthesis. Sucrose-phosphate synthase, galactinol synthase, and the galactinol-independent galactosyltransferase, which is responsible for RFO chain elongation, were located predominantly in the mesophyll protoplasts. The percentage of stachyose synthase in the mesophyll changed greatly during the cold-acclimation period (from 26% at the beginning to 88% after 20 d). The remainder was most probably in the intermediary cells of the phloem. Compartmentation studies in which mesophyll protoplasts were compared with vacuoles isolated from them showed that, of the components of the RFO storage pool, galactinol synthase, stachyose synthase, myo-inositol, galactinol, and sucrose were extravacuolar (most probably cytosolic), whereas galactinol-independent galactosyltransferase and higher RFO oligomers (with degree of polymerization 4) were vacuolar. Raffinose was found in both locations and might serve as a cryoprotectant. PMID:12228647

  2. Reconstruction of Arabidopsis metabolic network models accounting for subcellular compartmentalization and tissue-specificity.

    PubMed

    Mintz-Oron, Shira; Meir, Sagit; Malitsky, Sergey; Ruppin, Eytan; Aharoni, Asaph; Shlomi, Tomer

    2012-01-03

    Plant metabolic engineering is commonly used in the production of functional foods and quality trait improvement. However, to date, computational model-based approaches have only been scarcely used in this important endeavor, in marked contrast to their prominent success in microbial metabolic engineering. In this study we present a computational pipeline for the reconstruction of fully compartmentalized tissue-specific models of Arabidopsis thaliana on a genome scale. This reconstruction involves automatic extraction of known biochemical reactions in Arabidopsis for both primary and secondary metabolism, automatic gap-filling, and the implementation of methods for determining subcellular localization and tissue assignment of enzymes. The reconstructed tissue models are amenable for constraint-based modeling analysis, and significantly extend upon previous model reconstructions. A set of computational validations (i.e., cross-validation tests, simulations of known metabolic functionalities) and experimental validations (comparison with experimental metabolomics datasets under various compartments and tissues) strongly testify to the predictive ability of the models. The utility of the derived models was demonstrated in the prediction of measured fluxes in metabolically engineered seed strains and the design of genetic manipulations that are expected to increase vitamin E content, a significant nutrient for human health. Overall, the reconstructed tissue models are expected to lay down the foundations for computational-based rational design of plant metabolic engineering. The reconstructed compartmentalized Arabidopsis tissue models are MIRIAM-compliant and are available upon request.

  3. Assessment of cellular mechanisms contributing to cAMP compartmentalization in pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Feinstein, Wei P; Zhu, Bing; Leavesley, Silas J; Sayner, Sarah L; Rich, Thomas C

    2012-03-15

    Cyclic AMP signals encode information required to differentially regulate a wide variety of cellular responses; yet it is not well understood how information is encrypted within these signals. An emerging concept is that compartmentalization underlies specificity within the cAMP signaling pathway. This concept is based on a series of observations indicating that cAMP levels are distinct in different regions of the cell. One such observation is that cAMP production at the plasma membrane increases pulmonary microvascular endothelial barrier integrity, whereas cAMP production in the cytosol disrupts barrier integrity. To better understand how cAMP signals might be compartmentalized, we have developed mathematical models in which cellular geometry as well as total adenylyl cyclase and phosphodiesterase activities were constrained to approximate values measured in pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells. These simulations suggest that the subcellular localizations of adenylyl cyclase and phosphodiesterase activities are by themselves insufficient to generate physiologically relevant cAMP gradients. Thus, the assembly of adenylyl cyclase, phosphodiesterase, and protein kinase A onto protein scaffolds is by itself unlikely to ensure signal specificity. Rather, our simulations suggest that reductions in the effective cAMP diffusion coefficient may facilitate the formation of substantial cAMP gradients. We conclude that reductions in the effective rate of cAMP diffusion due to buffers, structural impediments, and local changes in viscosity greatly facilitate the ability of signaling complexes to impart specificity within the cAMP signaling pathway.

  4. Metabolism of monoterpenes: evidence for compartmentation of l-menthone metabolism in peppermint (Mentha piperita) leaves

    SciTech Connect

    Martinkus, C.; Croteau, R.

    1981-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that the monoterpene ketone l-(G-/sup 3/H)-menthone is reduced to the epimeric alcohols l-menthol and d-neomenthol in leaf discs of flowering peppermint (Mentha piperita L.), and that a portion of the menthol is converted to menthyl acetate while the bulk of the neomenthol is transformed to neomenthyl-..beta..-D-glucoside. When l-(3-/sup 3/H)menthol and d-(3-/sup 3/H)neomenthol are separately administered to leaf discs, both menthyl and neomenthyl acetates and menthyl and neomenthyl glucosides are formed with nearly equal facility, suggesting that the metabolic specificity observed with the ketone precursor was not a function of the specificity of the transglucosylase or transacetylase but rather a result of compartmentation of each stereospecific dehydrogenase with the appropriate transferase. Co-purification of the acceptor-mediated activities, and differential activation and inhibition studies, provided strong evidence that the same UDP-glucose-dependent enzyme could transfer glucose to either l-menthol or d-neometnthol. These results demonstrate that the specific in vivo conversion of l-menthone to l-menthyl acetate and d-neomenthyl-..beta..-D-glucoside cannot be attributed to the selectivity of the transferases, and they clearly indicate that the metabolic specificity observed is a result of compartmentation effects.

  5. A compartmental-spatial system dynamics approach to ground water modeling.

    PubMed

    Roach, Jesse; Tidwell, Vince

    2009-01-01

    High-resolution, spatially distributed ground water flow models can prove unsuitable for the rapid, interactive analysis that is increasingly demanded to support a participatory decision environment. To address this shortcoming, we extend the idea of multiple cell (Bear 1979) and compartmental (Campana and Simpson 1984) ground water models developed within the context of spatial system dynamics (Ahmad and Simonovic 2004) for rapid scenario analysis. We term this approach compartmental-spatial system dynamics (CSSD). The goal is to balance spatial aggregation necessary to achieve a real-time integrative and interactive decision environment while maintaining sufficient model complexity to yield a meaningful representation of the regional ground water system. As a test case, a 51-compartment CSSD model was built and calibrated from a 100,0001 cell MODFLOW (McDonald and Harbaugh 1988) model of the Albuquerque Basin in central New Mexico (McAda and Barroll 2002). Seventy-seven percent of historical drawdowns predicted by the MODFLOW model were within 1 m of the corresponding CSSD estimates, and in 80% of the historical model run years the CSSD model estimates of river leakage, reservoir leakage, ground water flow to agricultural drains, and riparian evapotranspiration were within 30% of the corresponding estimates from McAda and Barroll (2002), with improved model agreement during the scenario period. Comparisons of model results demonstrate both advantages and limitations of the CCSD model approach.

  6. Distribution and compartmentalization of human circulating and tissue-resident memory T cell subsets

    PubMed Central

    Sathaliyawala, Taheri; Kubota, Masaru; Yudanin, Naomi; Turner, Damian; Camp, Philip; Thome, Joseph J. C.; Bickham, Kara L.; Lerner, Harvey; Goldstein, Michael; Sykes, Megan; Kato, Tomoaki; Farber, Donna L.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Knowledge of human T cells derives chiefly from studies of peripheral blood, whereas their distribution and function in tissues remains largely unknown. Here, we present a unique analysis of human T cells in lymphoid and mucosal tissues obtained from individual organ donors, revealing tissue-intrinsic compartmentalization of naive, effector and memory subsets conserved between diverse individuals. Effector-memory CD4+ T cells producing IL-2 predominated in mucosal tissues and accumulated as central-memory subsets in lymphoid tissue, whereas CD8+ T cells were maintained as naïve subsets in lymphoid tissues and IFN-γ-producing effector-memory CD8+ T cells in mucosal sites. The T cell activation marker, CD69, was constitutively expressed by memory T cells in all tissues, distinguishing them from circulating subsets, with mucosal memory T cells exhibiting additional distinct phenotypic and functional properties. Our results provide an assessment of human T cell compartmentalization as a new baseline for understanding human adaptive immunity. PMID:23260195

  7. Compartmental models for apical efflux by P-glycoprotein. Part 1. Evaluation of model complexity

    PubMed Central

    Nagar, Swati; Tucker, Jalia; Weiskircher, Erica A.; Bhoopathy, Siddhartha; Hidalgo, Ismael J.; Korzekwa, Ken

    2013-01-01

    Purpose With the goal of quantifying P-gp transport kinetics, Part 1 of these manuscripts evaluates different compartmental models and Part 2 applies these models to kinetic data. Methods Models were developed to simulate the effect of apical efflux transporters on intracellular concentrations of six drugs. The effect of experimental variability on model predictions was evaluated. Several models were evaluated, and characteristics including membrane configuration, lipid content, and apical surface area (asa) were varied. Results Passive permeabilities from MDCK-MDR1 cells in the presence of cyclosporine gave lower model errors than from MDCK control cells. Consistent with the results in Part 2, model configuration had little impact on calculated model errors. The 5-compartment model was the simplest model that reproduced experimental lag times. Lipid content and asa had minimal effect on model errors, predicted lag times, and intracellular concentrations. Including endogenous basolateral uptake activity can decrease model errors. Models with and without explicit membrane barriers differed markedly in their predicted intracellular concentrations for basolateral drug exposure. Single point data resulted in clearances similar to time course data. Conclusions Compartmental models are useful to evaluate the impact of efflux transporters on intracellular concentrations. Whereas a 3-compartment model may be sufficient to predict the impact of transporters that efflux drugs from the cell, a 5-compartment model with explicit membranes may be required to predict intracellular concentrations when efflux occurs from the membrane. More complex models including additional compartments may be unnecessary. PMID:24019023

  8. Distinct patterns of compartmentalization and proteolytic stability of PDE6C mutants linked to achromatopsia.

    PubMed

    Cheguru, Pallavi; Majumder, Anurima; Artemyev, Nikolai O

    2015-01-01

    Phosphodiesterase-6 (PDE6) is an essential effector enzyme in vertebrate photoreceptor cells. Mutations in rod and cone PDE6 cause recessive retinitis pigmentosa and achromatopsia, respectively. The mechanisms of missense PDE6 mutations underlying severe visual disorders are poorly understood. To probe these mechanisms, we expressed seven known missense mutants of cone PDE6C in rods of transgenic Xenopus laevis and examined their stability and compartmentalization. PDE6C proteins with mutations in the catalytic domain, H602L and E790K, displayed modestly reduced proteolytic stability, but they were properly targeted to the outer segment of photoreceptor cells. Mutations in the regulatory GAF domains, R104W, Y323N, and P391L led to a proteolytic degradation of the proteins involving a cleavage in the GAFb domain. Lastly, the R29W and M455V mutations residing outside the conserved PDE6 domains produced a pattern of subcellular compartmentalization different from that of PDE6C. Thus, our results suggest a spectrum of mechanisms of missense PDE6C mutations in achromatopsia including catalytic defects, protein mislocalization, or a specific sequence of proteolytic degradation.

  9. Compartmentalization and molecular traffic in secondary metabolism: a new understanding of established cellular processes

    PubMed Central

    Roze, Ludmila V.; Chanda, Anindya; Linz, John E.

    2010-01-01

    Great progress has been made in understanding the regulation of expression of genes involved in secondary metabolism. Less is known about the mechanisms that govern the spatial distribution of the enzymes, cofactors, and substrates that mediate catalysis of secondary metabolites within the cell. Filamentous fungi in the genus Aspergillus synthesize an array of secondary metabolites and provide useful systems to analyze the mechanisms that mediate the temporal and spatial regulation of secondary metabolism in eukaryotes. For example, aflatoxin biosynthesis in A. parasiticus has been studied intensively because this mycotoxin is highly toxic, mutagenic, and carcinogenic in humans and animals. Using aflatoxin synthesis to illustrate key concepts, this review focuses on the mechanisms by which sub-cellular compartmentalization and intra-cellular molecular traffic contribute to the initiation and completion of secondary metabolism within the cell. We discuss the recent discovery of aflatoxisomes, specialized trafficking vesicles that participate in the compartmentalization of aflatoxin synthesis and export of the toxin to the cell exterior; this work provides a new and clearer understanding of how cells integrate secondary metabolism into basic cellular metabolism via the intracellular trafficking machinery. PMID:20519149

  10. Compartmentalized metabolic network reconstruction of microbial communities to determine the effect of agricultural intervention on soils.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Silva, María Camila; Álvarez-Yela, Astrid Catalina; Gómez-Cano, Fabio; Zambrano, María Mercedes; Husserl, Johana; Danies, Giovanna; Restrepo, Silvia; González-Barrios, Andrés Fernando

    2017-01-01

    Soil microbial communities are responsible for a wide range of ecological processes and have an important economic impact in agriculture. Determining the metabolic processes performed by microbial communities is crucial for understanding and managing ecosystem properties. Metagenomic approaches allow the elucidation of the main metabolic processes that determine the performance of microbial communities under different environmental conditions and perturbations. Here we present the first compartmentalized metabolic reconstruction at a metagenomics scale of a microbial ecosystem. This systematic approach conceives a meta-organism without boundaries between individual organisms and allows the in silico evaluation of the effect of agricultural intervention on soils at a metagenomics level. To characterize the microbial ecosystems, topological properties, taxonomic and metabolic profiles, as well as a Flux Balance Analysis (FBA) were considered. Furthermore, topological and optimization algorithms were implemented to carry out the curation of the models, to ensure the continuity of the fluxes between the metabolic pathways, and to confirm the metabolite exchange between subcellular compartments. The proposed models provide specific information about ecosystems that are generally overlooked in non-compartmentalized or non-curated networks, like the influence of transport reactions in the metabolic processes, especially the important effect on mitochondrial processes, as well as provide more accurate results of the fluxes used to optimize the metabolic processes within the microbial community.

  11. Compartmentalized metabolic network reconstruction of microbial communities to determine the effect of agricultural intervention on soils

    PubMed Central

    Álvarez-Yela, Astrid Catalina; Gómez-Cano, Fabio; Zambrano, María Mercedes; Husserl, Johana; Danies, Giovanna; Restrepo, Silvia; González-Barrios, Andrés Fernando

    2017-01-01

    Soil microbial communities are responsible for a wide range of ecological processes and have an important economic impact in agriculture. Determining the metabolic processes performed by microbial communities is crucial for understanding and managing ecosystem properties. Metagenomic approaches allow the elucidation of the main metabolic processes that determine the performance of microbial communities under different environmental conditions and perturbations. Here we present the first compartmentalized metabolic reconstruction at a metagenomics scale of a microbial ecosystem. This systematic approach conceives a meta-organism without boundaries between individual organisms and allows the in silico evaluation of the effect of agricultural intervention on soils at a metagenomics level. To characterize the microbial ecosystems, topological properties, taxonomic and metabolic profiles, as well as a Flux Balance Analysis (FBA) were considered. Furthermore, topological and optimization algorithms were implemented to carry out the curation of the models, to ensure the continuity of the fluxes between the metabolic pathways, and to confirm the metabolite exchange between subcellular compartments. The proposed models provide specific information about ecosystems that are generally overlooked in non-compartmentalized or non-curated networks, like the influence of transport reactions in the metabolic processes, especially the important effect on mitochondrial processes, as well as provide more accurate results of the fluxes used to optimize the metabolic processes within the microbial community. PMID:28767679

  12. Directed evolution of an extremely fast phosphotriesterase by in vitro compartmentalization

    PubMed Central

    Griffiths, Andrew D.; Tawfik, Dan S.

    2003-01-01

    We describe the selection of a phosphotriesterase with a very fast kcat (over 105 s–1), 63 times higher than the already very efficient wild-type enzyme. The enzyme was selected from a library of 3.4 × 107 mutated phosphotriesterase genes using a novel strategy based on linking genotype and phenotype by in vitro compartmentalization (IVC) using water-in-oil emulsions. First, microbeads, each displaying a single gene and multiple copies of the encoded protein, are formed by compartmentalized in vitro translation. These microbeads can then be selected for catalysis or binding. To select for catalysis the microbeads are re-emulsified in a reaction buffer of choice with a soluble substrate. The product and any unreacted substrate are coupled to the beads when the reaction is finished. Product-coated beads, displaying active enzymes and the genes that encode them, are detected with anti-product antibodies and selected using flow cytometry. This completely in vitro process selects for all enzymatic features simultaneously (substrate recognition, product formation, rate acceleration and turnover) and single enzyme molecules can be detected. PMID:12505981

  13. Modulation in Wistar rats of blood corticosterone compartmentation by sex and a cafeteria diet.

    PubMed

    Romero, María del Mar; Holmgren-Holm, Fredrik; Grasa, Maria del Mar; Esteve, Montserrat; Remesar, Xavier; Fernández-López, José Antonio; Alemany, Marià

    2013-01-01

    In the metabolic syndrome, glucocorticoid activity is increased, but circulating levels show little change. Most of blood glucocorticoids are bound to corticosteroid-binding globulin (CBG), which liver expression and circulating levels are higher in females than in males. Since blood hormones are also bound to blood cells, and the size of this compartment is considerable for androgens and estrogens, we analyzed whether sex or eating a cafeteria diet altered the compartmentation of corticosterone in rat blood. The main corticosterone compartment in rat blood is that specifically bound to plasma proteins, with smaller compartments bound to blood cells or free. Cafeteria diet increased the expression of liver CBG gene, binding plasma capacity and the proportion of blood cell-bound corticosterone. There were marked sex differences in blood corticosterone compartmentation in rats, which were unrelated to testosterone. The use of a monoclonal antibody ELISA and a polyclonal Western blot for plasma CBG compared with both specific plasma binding of corticosterone and CBG gene expression suggested the existence of different forms of CBG, with varying affinities for corticosterone in males and females, since ELISA data showed higher plasma CBG for males, but binding and Western blot analyses (plus liver gene expression) and higher physiological effectiveness for females. Good cross-reactivity to the antigen for polyclonal CBG antibody suggests that in all cases we were measuring CBG. The different immunoreactivity and binding affinity may help explain the marked sex-related differences in plasma hormone binding as sex-linked different proportions of CBG forms.

  14. A compartmentalized solute transport model for redox zones in contaminated aquifers--2, Field-scale simulations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Abrams , Robert H.; Loague, Keith

    2000-01-01

    This paper, the second of two parts [see Abrams and Loague, this issue], reports the field-scale application of COMPTRAN (compartmentalized solute transport model) for simulating the development of redox zones. COMPTRAN is fully developed and described in the companion paper. Redox zones, which are often delineated by the relative concentrations of dissolved oxygen, have been observed around the globe. The distribution of other redox-sensitive species is affected by redox zonation. At the U.S. Geological Survey's Cape Cod research site, an anoxic zone containing high concentrations of dissolved iron has been observed. Field data were abstracted from the Cape Cod site for the one-dimensional and two-dimensional COMPTRAN simulations reported in this paper. The purpose of the concept-development simulations was to demonstrate that the compartmentalized approach reported by Abrams et al. [1998] can be linked with a solute transport model to simulate field-scale phenomena. The results presented in this paper show that COMPTRAN successfully simulated the development of redox zones at the field scale, including trends in pH and alkalinity. Thermodynamic constraints were used to prevent lower-energy redox reactions from occurring under infeasible geochemical conditions without imposing equilibrium among all redox species. Empirical methods of reaction inhibition were not needed for the simulations conducted for this study. COMPTRAN can be extended easily to include additional compartments and reactions and is capable of handling complex velocity fields in more than one dimension.

  15. Software for compartmental translation analysis and virtual three-dimensional visualization of the pivot shift phenomenon.

    PubMed

    Suero, Eduardo M; Citak, Musa; Choi, Daniel; Bosscher, Marianne Roberta Frederiek; Citak, Mustafa; Pearle, Andrew D; Plaskos, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury may cause knee instability and may result in damage to the menisci and the articular cartilage. The pivot shift test is commonly used to identify rotational instability of the knee following injury to the ACL. The magnitude of lateral compartment translation correlates well with the grade of the pivot shift. However, commonly used navigation systems do not readily provide individualized compartmental translation. We aimed to develop software to (a) quantify individual medial and lateral compartmental translation in the knee during the pivot shift test, and (b) generate animated three-dimensional renderings of recorded pivot shift examinations. Twelve paired cadaveric knees were used to test the software. Three mechanized pivot shift tests were performed on each knee with the ACL intact and again after sectioning the ACL. Using the Pivot Shift Processor, we successfully analyzed the data recorded using the navigation system. After sectioning the ACL, there was a greater increase in tibiofemoral translation in the lateral compartment compared to the medial compartment. The Pivot Shift Visualizer successfully produced a 3D rendering of the knee joint and the recorded pivot shift maneuvers. This virtual representation of the pivot shift phenomenon from multiple points of view allows for efficient side-by-side comparison of tibiofemoral motion tracking across conditions, which is not possible in the in vivo / in vitro settings. This, in turn, could lead to a better understanding of the kinematics in play during the pivot shift phenomenon.

  16. Intracellular Redox Compartmentation and ROS-Related Communication in Regulation and Signaling1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Recent years have witnessed enormous progress in understanding redox signaling related to reactive oxygen species (ROS) in plants. The consensus view is that such signaling is intrinsic to many developmental processes and responses to the environment. ROS-related redox signaling is tightly wedded to compartmentation. Because membranes function as barriers, highly redox-active powerhouses such as chloroplasts, peroxisomes, and mitochondria may elicit specific signaling responses. However, transporter functions allow membranes also to act as bridges between compartments, and so regulated capacity to transmit redox changes across membranes influences the outcome of triggers produced at different locations. As well as ROS and other oxidizing species, antioxidants are key players that determine the extent of ROS accumulation at different sites and that may themselves act as signal transmitters. Like ROS, antioxidants can be transported across membranes. In addition, the intracellular distribution of antioxidative enzymes may be modulated to regulate or facilitate redox signaling appropriate to the conditions. Finally, there is substantial plasticity in organellar shape, with extensions such as stromules, peroxules, and matrixules playing potentially crucial roles in organelle-organelle communication. We provide an overview of the advances in subcellular compartmentation, identifying the gaps in our knowledge and discussing future developments in the area. PMID:27208308

  17. Compartmentalized Fluid Flow In The Nevado Del Ruiz Volcano Hydrothermal System(S)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuluaga, C. A.; Mejia, E.

    2011-12-01

    Combination of several extensive and compressive fault/fracture systems with different lithologic units compartmentalized the hydrothermal system(s) in the vicinity of the Nevado del Ruiz volcano. Three main fault/fracture systems are observed in the Ruiz volcano area, a N10°-20°E system (San Jerónimo and Palestina faults), a N40°-60°W system (Villamaría-Termales, San Ramón, Nereidas, Río Claro, San Eugenio and Campoalegrito faults), and a N60°-80°E system (Santa Rosa fault). The NW trend system act as the main path for fluid circulation, location of faults and fractures belonging to this system and their intersections with other fault systems and/or with lithologic contacts control hot springs location. The observed fault location and hot spring location pattern allow to subdivide the hydrothermal system(s) in at least five blocks. In the southernmost block, hot springs are mostly located in one of the four quadrants originated by fault intersections suggesting that there is a compartmentalization into higher and lower permeability quadrants. It is still unknown if all blocks belong to the same hydrothermal system or if there is more than one hydrothermal system.

  18. Modulation in Wistar Rats of Blood Corticosterone Compartmentation by Sex and a Cafeteria Diet

    PubMed Central

    Romero, María del Mar; Holmgren-Holm, Fredrik; Grasa, Maria del Mar; Esteve, Montserrat; Remesar, Xavier; Fernández-López, José Antonio; Alemany, Marià

    2013-01-01

    In the metabolic syndrome, glucocorticoid activity is increased, but circulating levels show little change. Most of blood glucocorticoids are bound to corticosteroid-binding globulin (CBG), which liver expression and circulating levels are higher in females than in males. Since blood hormones are also bound to blood cells, and the size of this compartment is considerable for androgens and estrogens, we analyzed whether sex or eating a cafeteria diet altered the compartmentation of corticosterone in rat blood. The main corticosterone compartment in rat blood is that specifically bound to plasma proteins, with smaller compartments bound to blood cells or free. Cafeteria diet increased the expression of liver CBG gene, binding plasma capacity and the proportion of blood cell-bound corticosterone. There were marked sex differences in blood corticosterone compartmentation in rats, which were unrelated to testosterone. The use of a monoclonal antibody ELISA and a polyclonal Western blot for plasma CBG compared with both specific plasma binding of corticosterone and CBG gene expression suggested the existence of different forms of CBG, with varying affinities for corticosterone in males and females, since ELISA data showed higher plasma CBG for males, but binding and Western blot analyses (plus liver gene expression) and higher physiological effectiveness for females. Good cross- reactivity to the antigen for polyclonal CBG antibody suggests that in all cases we were measuring CBG.The different immunoreactivity and binding affinity may help explain the marked sex-related differences in plasma hormone binding as sex-linked different proportions of CBG forms. PMID:23451210

  19. Nuclear PTEN levels and G2 progression in melanoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Jacob, Abraham I.; Romigh, Todd; Waite, Kristin A.; Eng, Charis

    2009-01-01

    The phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) exerts its function, in part, by negatively regulating the well-known phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase/AKT signaling pathway. Previous histological work has suggested that alterations in the nuclear/cytoplasmic compartmentalization of PTEN may play a role in the development and progression of melanoma. In this study, we examined the nuclear/cytoplasmic compartmentalization of PTEN in melanoma cell lines and its correlation with the cell cycle. Studies were performed in melanoma cells lines using classic cell biological techniques. In contrast to breast cancer cell lines, we found that increased levels of nuclear PTEN levels correlate with G2 rather than with G1 arrest. In WM164 and SKmel28 cells, overexpression of PTEN protein did not significantly increase the number of cells in the G2 phase. Differential CDC2 phosphorylation levels in cells that overexpressed PTEN compared with those where PTEN was downregulated suggest some involvement of PTEN in G2 checkpoint regulation. The data suggest that although nuclear PTEN levels correlate with the G2 phase, the role of PTEN in modulating G2/M arrest is not limiting. Further, the specific cell cycle phase regulated by nuclear PTEN is cell-type dependent. Taken together, our observations suggest that in melanoma, nuclear PTEN is involved in G2 progression possibly through the modulation of CDC2, opening up a new arena for investigation. PMID:19478684

  20. Nuclear power and nuclear weapons

    SciTech Connect

    Vaughen, V.C.A.

    1983-01-01

    The proliferation of nuclear weapons and the expanded use of nuclear energy for the production of electricity and other peaceful uses are compared. The difference in technologies associated with nuclear weapons and nuclear power plants are described.

  1. Two-step adsorption on jungle-gym-type porous coordination polymers: dependence on hydrogen-bonding capability of adsorbates, ligand-substituent effect, and temperature.

    PubMed

    Uemura, Kazuhiro; Yamasaki, Yukari; Onishi, Fumiaki; Kita, Hidetoshi; Ebihara, Masahiro

    2010-11-01

    A preliminary study of isopropanol (IPA) adsorption/desorption isotherms on a jungle-gym-type porous coordination polymer, [Zn(2)(bdc)(2)(dabco)](n) (1, H(2)bdc = 1,4-benzenedicarboxylic acid, dabco =1,4-diazabicyclo[2.2.2]octane), showed unambiguous two-step profiles via a highly shrunk intermediate framework. The results of adsorption measurements on 1, using probing gas molecules of alcohol (MeOH and EtOH) for the size effect and Me(2)CO for the influence of hydrogen bonding, show that alcohol adsorption isotherms are gradual two-step profiles, whereas the Me(2)CO isotherm is a typical type-I isotherm, indicating that a two-step adsorption/desorption is involved with hydrogen bonds. To further clarify these characteristic adsorption/desorption behaviors, selecting nitroterephthalate (bdc-NO(2)), bromoterephthalate (bdc-Br), and 2,5-dichloroterephthalate (bdc-Cl(2)) as substituted dicarboxylate ligands, isomorphous jungle-gym-type porous coordination polymers, {[Zn(2)(bdc-NO(2))(2)(dabco)]·solvents}(n) (2 ⊃ solvents), {[Zn(2)(bdc-Br)(2)(dabco)]·solvents}(n) (3 ⊃ solvents), and {[Zn(2)(bdc-Cl(2))(2)(dabco)]·solvents}(n) (4 ⊃ solvents), were synthesized and characterized by single-crystal X-ray analyses. Thermal gravimetry, X-ray powder diffraction, and N(2) adsorption at 77 K measurements reveal that [Zn(2)(bdc-NO(2))(2)(dabco)](n) (2), [Zn(2)(bdc-Br)(2)(dabco)](n) (3), and [Zn(2)(bdc-Cl(2))(2)(dabco)](n) (4) maintain their frameworks without guest molecules with Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface areas of 1568 (2), 1292 (3), and 1216 (4) m(2) g(-1). As found in results of MeOH, EtOH, IPA, and Me(2)CO adsorption/desorption on 2-4, only MeOH adsorption on 2 shows an obvious two-step profile. Considering the substituent effects and adsorbate sizes, the hydrogen bonds, which are triggers for two-step adsorption, are formed between adsorbates and carboxylate groups at the corners in the pores, inducing wide pores to become narrow pores. Interestingly, such

  2. A molecular analysis of the patterns of genetic diversity in local chickens from western Algeria in comparison with commercial lines and wild jungle fowls.

    PubMed

    Mahammi, F Z; Gaouar, S B S; Laloë, D; Faugeras, R; Tabet-Aoul, N; Rognon, X; Tixier-Boichard, M; Saidi-Mehtar, N

    2016-02-01

    The objectives of this study were to characterize the genetic variability of village chickens from three agro-ecological regions of western Algeria: coastal (CT), inland plains (IP) and highlands (HL), to reveal any underlying population structure, and to evaluate potential genetic introgression from commercial lines into local populations. A set of 233 chickens was genotyped with a panel of 23 microsatellite markers. Geographical coordinates were individually recorded. Eight reference populations were included in the study to investigate potential gene flow: four highly selected commercial pure lines and four lines of French slow-growing chickens. Two populations of wild red jungle fowls were also genotyped to compare the range of diversity between domestic and wild fowls. A genetic diversity analysis was conducted both within and between populations. Multivariate redundancy analyses were performed to assess the relative influence of geographical location among Algerian ecotypes. The results showed a high genetic variability within the Algerian population, with 184 alleles and a mean number of 8.09 alleles per locus. The values of heterozygosity (He and Ho) ranged from 0.55 to 0.62 in Algerian ecotypes and were smaller than values found in Jungle fowl populations and higher than values found in commercial populations. Although the structuring analysis of genotypes did not reveal clear subpopulations within Algerian ecotypes, the supervised approach using geographical data showed a significant (p < 0.01) differentiation between the three ecotypes which was mainly due to altitude. Thus, the genetic diversity of Algerian ecotypes may be under the influence of two factors with contradictory effects: the geographical location and climatic conditions may induce some differentiation, whereas the high level of exchanges and gene flow may suppress it. Evidence of gene flow between commercial and Algerian local populations was observed, which may be due to unrecorded

  3. Nuclear rights - nuclear wrongs

    SciTech Connect

    Paul, E.F.; Miller, F.D.; Paul, J.; Ahrens, J.

    1986-01-01

    This book contains 11 selections. The titles are: Three Ways to Kill Innocent Bystanders: Some Conundrums Concerning the Morality of War; The International Defense of Liberty; Two Concepts of Deterrence; Nuclear Deterrence and Arms Control; Ethical Issues for the 1980s; The Moral Status of Nuclear Deterrent Threats; Optimal Deterrence; Morality and Paradoxical Deterrence; Immoral Risks: A Deontological Critique of Nuclear Deterrence; No War Without Dictatorship, No Peace Without Democracy: Foreign Policy as Domestic Politics; Marxism-Leninism and its Strategic Implications for the United States; Tocqueveille War.

  4. Nuclear organization of mammalian genomes. Polar chromosome territories build up functionally distinct higher order compartments.

    PubMed

    Sadoni, N; Langer, S; Fauth, C; Bernardi, G; Cremer, T; Turner, B M; Zink, D

    1999-09-20

    We investigated the nuclear higher order compartmentalization of chromatin according to its replication timing (Ferreira et al. 1997) and the relations of this compartmentalization to chromosome structure and the spatial organization of transcription. Our aim was to provide a comprehensive and integrated view on the relations between chromosome structure and functional nuclear architecture. Using different mammalian cell types, we show that distinct higher order compartments whose DNA displays a specific replication timing are stably maintained during all interphase stages. The organizational principle is clonally inherited. We directly demonstrate the presence of polar chromosome territories that align to build up higher order compartments, as previously suggested (Ferreira et al. 1997). Polar chromosome territories display a specific orientation of early and late replicating subregions that correspond to R- or G/C-bands of mitotic chromosomes. Higher order compartments containing G/C-bands replicating during the second half of the S phase display no transcriptional activity detectable by BrUTP pulse labeling and show no evidence of transcriptional competence. Transcriptionally competent and active chromatin is confined to a coherent compartment within the nuclear interior that comprises early replicating R-band sequences. As a whole, the data provide an integrated view on chromosome structure, nuclear higher order compartmentalization, and their relation to the spatial organization of functional nuclear processes.

  5. Neuroprotective effect of human mesenchymal stem cells in a compartmentalized neuronal membrane system.

    PubMed

    Piscioneri, Antonella; Morelli, Sabrina; Mele, Maria; Canonaco, Marcello; Bilotta, Eleonora; Pantano, Pietro; Drioli, Enrico; De Bartolo, Loredana

    2015-09-01

    In this work, we describe the development of a compartmentalized membrane system using neonatal rodent hippocampal cells and human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) to investigate the neuroprotective effects of hMSCs. To elucidate this interaction an in vitro oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) model was used that mimics central nervous system insults in vivo. Cells were cultured in a membrane system with a sandwich configuration in which the hippocampal cells were seeded on a fluorocarbon (FC) membrane, and were separated by hMSCs through a semipermeable polyethersulfone (PES) membrane that ensures the transport of molecules and paracrine factors, but prevents cell-to-cell contact. This system was used to simulate a cerebral ischemic damage by inducing OGD for 120min. The core contribution of the work highlights the neuroprotective effects of hMSCs on hippocampal cells in a membrane system for the first time. The novel results show that hMSC secretome factors protect hippocampal cells against OGD insults as indicated by the conservation of specific structural and functional cell features together with the development of a highly branched neural network after the damage. Moreover, neuronal cells co-cultured with hMSCs before OGD insult were able to maintain BDNF production and O2 consumption and did not express the apoptotic markers that were expressed in similarly insulted neuronal cells that had not been co-cultured with hMSCs. This compartmentalized membrane system appears to be a very useful and reliable system for studying the neuroprotective effects of hMSCs and identifying secreted factors that may be involved. This paper is based on a combined synergism of biomaterials technology and stem cell approach, focusing on the development of a compartmentalized membrane system that serves as an innovative tool for highlighting the role of hMSCs on hippocampal neurons upon damage. The membrane system consists of two different flat sheet membranes, giving rise to double

  6. Compartmentalized PDE4A5 Signaling Impairs Hippocampal Synaptic Plasticity and Long-Term Memory

    PubMed Central

    Park, Alan J.; Tolentino, Rosa E.; Bruinenberg, Vibeke M.; Tudor, Jennifer C.; Lee, Yool; Hansen, Rolf T.; Guercio, Leonardo A.; Linton, Edward; Neves-Zaph, Susana R.; Meerlo, Peter; Baillie, George S.; Houslay, Miles D.

    2016-01-01

    Alterations in cAMP signaling are thought to contribute to neurocognitive and neuropsychiatric disorders. Members of the cAMP-specific phosphodiesterase 4 (PDE4) family, which contains >25 different isoforms, play a key role in determining spatial cAMP degradation so as to orchestrate compartmentalized cAMP signaling in cells. Each isoform binds to a different set of protein complexes through its unique N-terminal domain, thereby leading to targeted degradation of cAMP in specific intracellular compartments. However, the functional role of specific compartmentalized PDE4 isoforms has not been examined in vivo. Here, we show that increasing protein levels of the PDE4A5 isoform in mouse hippocampal excitatory neurons impairs a long-lasting form of hippocampal synaptic plasticity and attenuates hippocampus-dependent long-term memories without affecting anxiety. In contrast, viral expression of a truncated version of PDE4A5, which lacks the unique N-terminal targeting domain, does not affect long-term memory. Further, overexpression of the PDE4A1 isoform, which targets a different subset of signalosomes, leaves memory undisturbed. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer sensor-based cAMP measurements reveal that the full-length PDE4A5, in contrast to the truncated form, hampers forskolin-mediated increases in neuronal cAMP levels. Our study indicates that the unique N-terminal localization domain of PDE4A5 is essential for the targeting of specific cAMP-dependent signaling underlying synaptic plasticity and memory. The development of compounds to disrupt the compartmentalization of individual PDE4 isoforms by targeting their unique N-terminal domains may provide a fruitful approach to prevent cognitive deficits in neuropsychiatric and neurocognitive disorders that are associated with alterations in cAMP signaling. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Neurons exhibit localized signaling processes that enable biochemical cascades to be activated selectively in specific subcellular

  7. Limited Near and Far Transfer Effects of Jungle Memory Working Memory Training on Learning Mathematics in Children with Attentional and Mathematical Difficulties

    PubMed Central

    Nelwan, Michel; Kroesbergen, Evelyn H.

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this randomized controlled trial was to investigate whether Jungle Memory working memory training (JM) affects performance on working memory tasks, performance in mathematics and gains made on a mathematics training (MT) in school aged children between 9–12 years old (N = 64) with both difficulties in mathematics, as well as attention and working memory. Children were randomly assigned to three groups and were trained in two periods: (1) JM first, followed by MT, (2) MT first, followed by JM, and (3) a control group that received MT only. Bayesian analyses showed possible short term effects of JM on near transfer measures of verbal working memory, but none on visual working memory. Furthermore, support was found for the hypothesis that children that received JM first, performed better after MT than children who did not follow JM first or did not train with JM at all. However, these effects could be explained at least partly by frequency of training effects, possibly due to motivational issues, and training-specific factors. Furthermore, it remains unclear whether the effects found on improving mathematics were actually mediated by gains in working memory. It is argued that JM might not train the components of working memory involved in mathematics sufficiently. Another possible explanation can be found in the training’s lack of adaptivity, therefore failing to provide the children with tailored instruction and feedback. Finally, it was hypothesized that, since effect sizes are generally small, training effects are bound to a critical period in development. PMID:27708595

  8. Limited Near and Far Transfer Effects of Jungle Memory Working Memory Training on Learning Mathematics in Children with Attentional and Mathematical Difficulties.

    PubMed

    Nelwan, Michel; Kroesbergen, Evelyn H

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this randomized controlled trial was to investigate whether Jungle Memory working memory training (JM) affects performance on working memory tasks, performance in mathematics and gains made on a mathematics training (MT) in school aged children between 9-12 years old (N = 64) with both difficulties in mathematics, as well as attention and working memory. Children were randomly assigned to three groups and were trained in two periods: (1) JM first, followed by MT, (2) MT first, followed by JM, and (3) a control group that received MT only. Bayesian analyses showed possible short term effects of JM on near transfer measures of verbal working memory, but none on visual working memory. Furthermore, support was found for the hypothesis that children that received JM first, performed better after MT than children who did not follow JM first or did not train with JM at all. However, these effects could be explained at least partly by frequency of training effects, possibly due to motivational issues, and training-specific factors. Furthermore, it remains unclear whether the effects found on improving mathematics were actually mediated by gains in working memory. It is argued that JM might not train the components of working memory involved in mathematics sufficiently. Another possible explanation can be found in the training's lack of adaptivity, therefore failing to provide the children with tailored instruction and feedback. Finally, it was hypothesized that, since effect sizes are generally small, training effects are bound to a critical period in development.

  9. Deriving effective vaccine allocation strategies for pandemic influenza: Comparison of an agent-based simulation and a compartmental model

    PubMed Central

    Dalgıç, Özden O.; Özaltın, Osman Y.; Ciccotelli, William A.; Erenay, Fatih S.

    2017-01-01

    Individuals are prioritized based on their risk profiles when allocating limited vaccine stocks during an influenza pandemic. Computationally expensive but realistic agent-based simulations and fast but stylized compartmental models are typically used to derive effective vaccine allocation strategies. A detailed comparison of these two approaches, however, is often omitted. We derive age-specific vaccine allocation strategies to mitigate a pandemic influenza outbreak in Seattle by applying derivative-free optimization to an agent-based simulation and also to a compartmental model. We compare the strategies derived by these two approaches under various infection aggressiveness and vaccine coverage scenarios. We observe that both approaches primarily vaccinate school children, however they may allocate the remaining vaccines in different ways. The vaccine allocation strategies derived by using the agent-based simulation are associated with up to 70% decrease in total cost and 34% reduction in the number of infections compared to the strategies derived by using the compartmental model. Nevertheless, the latter approach may still be competitive for very low and/or very high infection aggressiveness. Our results provide insights about potential differences between the vaccine allocation strategies derived by using agent-based simulations and those derived by using compartmental models. PMID:28222123

  10. Sequence Stratigraphy of the Dakota Sandstone, Eastern San Juan Basin, New Mexico, and its Relationship to Reservoir Compartmentalization

    SciTech Connect

    Varney, Peter J.

    2002-04-23

    This research established the Dakota-outcrop sequence stratigraphy in part of the eastern San Juan Basin, New Mexico, and relates reservoir quality lithologies in depositional sequences to structure and reservoir compartmentalization in the South Lindrith Field area. The result was a predictive tool that will help guide further exploration and development.

  11. 21 CFR 888.3535 - Knee joint femorotibial (uni-compartmental) metal/polymer porous-coated uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    .../polymer porous-coated uncemented prosthesis. 888.3535 Section 888.3535 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint femorotibial (uni-compartmental) metal/polymer porous-coated uncemented prosthesis is a device intended to be implanted to replace part of a knee joint. The device limits...

  12. Lipid droplet-associated proteins (LDAPs) are required for the dynamic regulation of neutral lipid compartmentation in plant cells

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Eukaryotic cells compartmentalize neutral lipids into organelles called lipid droplets (LDs), and while much is known about the role of LDs in storing triacylglycerols (TAGs) in seeds, their biogenesis and function in non-seed tissues is poorly understood. Recently, we identified a class of plant-sp...

  13. Dynamic of CSF and serum biomarkers in HIV-1 subtype C encephalitis with CNS genetic compartmentalization-case study.

    PubMed

    de Almeida, Sergio M; Rotta, Indianara; Ribeiro, Clea E; Oliveira, Michelli F; Chaillon, Antoine; de Pereira, Ana Paula; Cunha, Ana Paula; Zonta, Marise; Bents, Joao França; Raboni, Sonia M; Smith, Davey; Letendre, Scott; Ellis, Ronald J

    2017-02-28

    Despite the effective suppression of viremia with antiretroviral therapy, HIV can still replicate in the central nervous system (CNS). This was a longitudinal study of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and serum dynamics of several biomarkers related to inflammation, the blood-brain barrier, neuronal injury, and IgG intrathecal synthesis in serial samples of CSF and serum from a patient infected with HIV-1 subtype C with CNS compartmentalization.The phylogenetic analyses of plasma and CSF samples in an acute phase using next-generation sequencing and F-statistics analysis of C2-V3 haplotypes revealed distinct compartmentalized CSF viruses in paired CSF and peripheral blood mononuclear cell samples. The CSF biomarker analysis in this patient showed that symptomatic CSF escape is accompanied by CNS inflammation, high levels of cell and humoral immune biomarkers, CNS barrier dysfunction, and an increase in neuronal injury biomarkers with demyelization. Independent and isolated HIV replication can occur in the CNS, even in HIV-1 subtype C, leading to compartmentalization and development of quasispecies distinct from the peripheral plasma. These immunological aspects of the HIV CNS escape have not been described previously. To our knowledge, this is the first report of CNS HIV escape and compartmentalization in HIV-1 subtype C.

  14. Nucleolar structure across evolution: the transition between bi- and tri-compartmentalized nucleoli lies within the class Reptilia.

    PubMed

    Lamaye, Françoise; Galliot, Sonia; Alibardi, Lorenzo; Lafontaine, Denis L J; Thiry, Marc

    2011-05-01

    Two types of nucleolus can be distinguished among eukaryotic cells: a tri-compartmentalized nucleolus in amniotes and a bi-compartmentalized nucleolus in all the others. However, though the nucleolus' ultrastructure is well characterized in mammals and birds, it has been so far much less studied in reptiles. In this work, we examined the ultrastructural organization of the nucleolus in various tissues from different reptilian species (three turtles, three lizards, two crocodiles, and three snakes). Using cytochemical and immunocytological methods, we showed that in reptiles both types of nucleolus are present: a bi-compartmentalized nucleolus in turtles and a tri-compartmentalized nucleolus in the other species examined in this study. Furthermore, in a given species, the same type of nucleolus is present in all the tissues, however, the importance and the repartition of those nucleolar components could vary from one tissue to another. We also reveal that, contrary to the mammalian nucleolus, the reptilian fibrillar centers contain small clumps of condensed chromatin and that their surrounding dense fibrillar component is thicker. Finally, we also report that Cajal bodies are detected in reptiles. Altogether, we believe that these results have profound evolutionarily implications since they indicate that the point of transition between bipartite and tripartite nucleoli lies at the emergence of the amniotes within the class Reptilia.

  15. Subcellular Compartmentalization and Trafficking of the Biosynthetic Machinery for Fungal Melanin.

    PubMed

    Upadhyay, Srijana; Xu, Xinping; Lowry, David; Jackson, Jennifer C; Roberson, Robert W; Lin, Xiaorong

    2016-03-22

    Protection by melanin depends on its subcellular location. Although most filamentous fungi synthesize melanin via a polyketide synthase pathway, where and how melanin biosynthesis occurs and how it is deposited as extracellular granules remain elusive. Using a forward genetic screen in the pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus, we find that mutations in an endosomal sorting nexin abolish melanin cell-wall deposition. We find that all enzymes involved in the early steps of melanin biosynthesis are recruited to endosomes through a non-conventional secretory pathway. In contrast, late melanin enzymes accumulate in the cell wall. Such subcellular compartmentalization of the melanin biosynthetic machinery occurs in both A. fumigatus and A. nidulans. Thus, fungal melanin biosynthesis appears to be initiated in endosomes with exocytosis leading to melanin extracellular deposition, much like the synthesis and trafficking of mammalian melanin in endosomally derived melanosomes.

  16. Phagocytosis-inspired behaviour in synthetic protocell communities of compartmentalized colloidal objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-Arco, Laura; Li, Mei; Mann, Stephen

    2017-08-01

    The spontaneous assembly of micro-compartmentalized colloidal objects capable of controlled interactions offers a step towards rudimentary forms of collective behaviour in communities of artificial cell-like entities (synthetic protocells). Here we report a primitive form of artificial phagocytosis in a binary community of synthetic protocells in which multiple silica colloidosomes are selectively ingested by self-propelled magnetic Pickering emulsion (MPE) droplets comprising particle-free fatty acid-stabilized apertures. Engulfment of the colloidosomes enables selective delivery and release of water-soluble payloads, and can be coupled to enzyme activity within the MPE droplets. Our results highlight opportunities for the development of new materials based on consortia of colloidal objects, and provide a novel microscale engineering approach to inducing higher-order behaviour in mixed populations of synthetic protocells.

  17. Demonstration of the Intercellular Compartmentation of l-Menthone Metabolism in Peppermint (Mentha piperita) Leaves 1

    PubMed Central

    Croteau, Rodney; Winters, Jerry N.

    1982-01-01

    The metabolism of l-menthone, which is synthesized in the epidermal oil glands of peppermint (Mentha piperita L. cv. Black Mitcham) leaves, is compartmented; on leaf maturity, this ketone is converted to l-menthol and l-menthyl acetate in one compartment, and to d-neomenthol and d-neomenthyl glucoside in a separate compartment. All of the enzymes involved in these reactions are soluble when prepared from whole-leaf homogenates. Mechanical separation of epidermal fragments from the mesophyll, followed by preparation of the soluble enzyme fraction from each tissue, revealed that the neomenthol dehydrogenase and the glucosyl transferase resided specifically in the mesophyll layer, whereas the menthol dehydrogenase and substantial amounts of the acetyl transferase were located in the epidermis, presumably within the epidermal oil glands. These results suggest that the compartmentation of menthone metabolism in peppermint leaves is intercellular, not intracellular. PMID:16662329

  18. Estimation of pharmacokinetic parameters from non-compartmental variables using Microsoft Excel.

    PubMed

    Dansirikul, Chantaratsamon; Choi, Malcolm; Duffull, Stephen B

    2005-06-01

    This study was conducted to develop a method, termed 'back analysis (BA)', for converting non-compartmental variables to compartment model dependent pharmacokinetic parameters for both one- and two-compartment models. A Microsoft Excel spreadsheet was implemented with the use of Solver and visual basic functions. The performance of the BA method in estimating pharmacokinetic parameter values was evaluated by comparing the parameter values obtained to a standard modelling software program, NONMEM, using simulated data. The results show that the BA method was reasonably precise and provided low bias in estimating fixed and random effect parameters for both one- and two-compartment models. The pharmacokinetic parameters estimated from the BA method were similar to those of NONMEM estimation.

  19. Compartmentalization of gypsum and halite associated with cyanobacteria in saline soil crusts.

    PubMed

    Canfora, Loredana; Vendramin, Elisa; Vittori Antisari, Livia; Lo Papa, Giuseppe; Dazzi, Carmelo; Benedetti, Anna; Iavazzo, Pietro; Adamo, Paola; Jungblut, Anne D; Pinzari, Flavia

    2016-06-01

    The interface between biological and geochemical components in the surface crust of a saline soil was investigated using X-ray diffraction, and variable pressure scanning electron microscopy in combination with energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry. Mineral compounds such as halite and gypsum were identified crystallized around filaments of cyanobacteria. A total of 92 genera were identified from the bacterial community based on 16S gene pyrosequencing analysis. The occurrence of the gypsum crystals, their shapes and compartmentalization suggested that they separated NaCl from the immediate microenvironment of the cyanobacteria, and that some cyanobacteria and communities of sulfur bacteria may had a physical control over the distinctive halite and gypsum structures produced. This suggests that cyanobacteria might directly or indirectly promote the formation of a protective envelope made of calcium and sulfur-based compounds. © FEMS 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Mitochondrial Dynamics is a Distinguishing Feature of Skeletal Muscle Fiber Types and Regulates Organellar Compartmentalization.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Prashant; Varuzhanyan, Grigor; Pham, Anh H; Chan, David C

    2015-12-01

    Skeletal muscle fibers differentiate into specific fiber types with distinct metabolic properties determined by their reliance on oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS). Using in vivo approaches, we find that OXPHOS-dependent fibers, compared to glycolytic fibers, contain elongated mitochondrial networks with higher fusion rates that are dependent on the mitofusins Mfn1 and Mfn2. Switching of a glycolytic fiber to an oxidative IIA type is associated with elongation of mitochondria, suggesting that mitochondrial fusion is linked to metabolic state. Furthermore, we reveal that mitochondrial proteins are compartmentalized to discrete domains centered around their nuclei of origin. The domain dimensions are dependent on fiber type and are regulated by the mitochondrial dynamics proteins Mfn1, Mfn2, and Mff. Our results indicate that mitochondrial dynamics is tailored to fiber type physiology and provides a rationale for the segmental defects characteristic of aged and diseased muscle fibers.

  1. Compartmentalization of metabolic pathways in yeast mitochondria improves production of branched chain alcohols

    PubMed Central

    Avalos, José L.; Fink, Gerald R.; Stephanopoulos, Gregory

    2013-01-01

    Efforts to improve the production of a compound of interest in Saccharomyces cerevisiae have mainly involved engineering or overexpression of cytoplasmic enzymes. We show that targeted expression of metabolic pathways to mitochondria can increase production levels compared with expression of the same pathways in the cytoplasm. Compartmentalisation of the Ehrlich pathway into mitochondria increased isobutanol production by 260%, whereas overexpression of the same pathway in the cytoplasm only improved yields by 10%, compared with a strain overexpressing only the first three steps of the biosynthetic pathway. Subcellular fractionation of engineered strains reveals that targeting the enzymes of the Ehrlich pathway to the mitochondria achieves higher local enzyme concentrations. Other benefits of compartmentalization may include increased availability of intermediates, removing the need to transport intermediates out of the mitochondrion, and reducing the loss of intermediates to competing pathways. PMID:23417095

  2. Compartmentation of membrane processes and nucleotide dynamics in diffusion-restricted cardiac cell microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Alekseev, Alexey E; Reyes, Santiago; Selivanov, Vitaly A; Dzeja, Petras P; Terzic, Andre

    2012-02-01

    Orchestrated excitation-contraction coupling in heart muscle requires adequate spatial arrangement of systems responsible for ion movement and metabolite turnover. Co-localization of regulatory and transporting proteins into macromolecular complexes within an environment of microanatomical cell components raises intracellular diffusion barriers that hamper the mobility of metabolites and signaling molecules. Compared to substrate diffusion in the cytosol, diffusional restrictions underneath the sarcolemma are much larger and could impede ion and nucleotide movement by a factor of 10(3)-10(5). Diffusion barriers thus seclude metabolites within the submembrane space enabling rapid and vectorial effector targeting, yet hinder energy supply from the bulk cytosolic space implicating the necessity for a shunting transfer mechanism. Here, we address principles of membrane protein compartmentation, phosphotransfer enzyme-facilitated interdomain energy transfer, and nucleotide signal dynamics at the subsarcolemma-cytosol interface. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Local Signaling in Myocytes". Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Host–parasite oscillation dynamics and evolution in a compartmentalized RNA replication system

    PubMed Central

    Bansho, Yohsuke; Furubayashi, Taro; Ichihashi, Norikazu; Yomo, Tetsuya

    2016-01-01

    To date, various cellular functions have been reconstituted in vitro such as self-replication systems using DNA, RNA, and proteins. The next important challenges include the reconstitution of the interactive networks of self-replicating species and investigating how such interactions generate complex ecological behaviors observed in nature. Here, we synthesized a simple replication system composed of two self-replicating host and parasitic RNA species. We found that the parasitic RNA eradicates the host RNA under bulk conditions; however, when the system is compartmentalized, a continuous oscillation pattern in the population dynamics of the two RNAs emerges. The oscillation pattern changed as replication proceeded mainly owing to the evolution of the host RNA. These results demonstrate that a cell-like compartment plays an important role in host–parasite ecological dynamics and suggest that the origin of the host–parasite coevolution might date back to the very early stages of the evolution of life. PMID:27035976

  4. Plasma Membrane is Compartmentalized by a Self-Similar Cortical Actin Meshwork

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadegh, Sanaz; Higgins, Jenny L.; Mannion, Patrick C.; Tamkun, Michael M.; Krapf, Diego

    2017-01-01

    A broad range of membrane proteins display anomalous diffusion on the cell surface. Different methods provide evidence for obstructed subdiffusion and diffusion on a fractal space, but the underlying structure inducing anomalous diffusion has never been visualized because of experimental challenges. We addressed this problem by imaging the cortical actin at high resolution while simultaneously tracking individual membrane proteins in live mammalian cells. Our data confirm that actin introduces barriers leading to compartmentalization of the plasma membrane and that membrane proteins are transiently confined within actin fences. Furthermore, superresolution imaging shows that the cortical actin is organized into a self-similar meshwork. These results present a hierarchical nanoscale picture of the plasma membrane.

  5. Effects of frozen storage and sample temperature on water compartmentation and multiexponential transverse relaxation in cartilage.

    PubMed

    Reiter, David A; Peacock, Andrew; Spencer, Richard G

    2011-05-01

    Multiexponential transverse relaxation in tissue has been interpreted as a marker of water compartmentation. Articular cartilage has been reported to exhibit such relaxation in several studies, with the relative contributions of tissue heterogeneity and tissue microstructure remaining unspecified. In bovine nasal cartilage, conflicting data regarding the existence of multiexponential relaxation have been reported. Imaging and analysis artifacts as well as rapid chemical exchange between tissue compartments have been identified as potential causes for this discrepancy. Here, we find that disruption of cartilage microstructure by freeze-thawing can greatly alter the character of transverse relaxation in this tissue. We conclude that fresh cartilage exhibits multiexponential relaxation based upon its microstructural water compartments, but that multiexponentiality can be lost or rendered undetectable by freeze-thawing. In addition, we find that increasing chemical exchange by raising sample temperature from 4°C to 37°C does not substantially limit the ability to detect multiexponential relaxation. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Spatial Compartmentalization Specializes the Function of Aurora A and Aurora B.

    PubMed

    Li, Si; Deng, Zhaoxuan; Fu, Jingyan; Xu, Caiyue; Xin, Guangwei; Wu, Zhige; Luo, Jia; Wang, Gang; Zhang, Shuli; Zhang, Boyan; Zou, Fangdong; Jiang, Qing; Zhang, Chuanmao

    2015-07-10

    Aurora kinase A and B share great similarity in sequences, structures, and phosphorylation motif, yet they show different localizations and play distinct crucial roles. The factors that determine such differences are largely unknown. Here we targeted Aurora A to the localization of Aurora B and found that Aurora A phosphorylates the substrate of Aurora B and substitutes its function in spindle checkpoint. In return, the centrosome targeting of Aurora B substitutes the function of Aurora A in the mitotic entry. Expressing the chimera proteins of the Auroras with exchanged N termini in cells indicates that the divergent N termini are also important for their spatiotemporal localizations and functions. Collectively, we demonstrate that functional divergence of Aurora kinases is determined by spatial compartmentalization, and their divergent N termini also contribute to their spatial and functional differentiation.

  7. Spatial Compartmentalization Specializes the Function of Aurora A and Aurora B*

    PubMed Central

    Li, Si; Deng, Zhaoxuan; Fu, Jingyan; Xu, Caiyue; Xin, Guangwei; Wu, Zhige; Luo, Jia; Wang, Gang; Zhang, Shuli; Zhang, Boyan; Zou, Fangdong; Jiang, Qing; Zhang, Chuanmao

    2015-01-01

    Aurora kinase A and B share great similarity in sequences, structures, and phosphorylation motif, yet they show different localizations and play distinct crucial roles. The factors that determine such differences are largely unknown. Here we targeted Aurora A to the localization of Aurora B and found that Aurora A phosphorylates the substrate of Aurora B and substitutes its function in spindle checkpoint. In return, the centrosome targeting of Aurora B substitutes the function of Aurora A in the mitotic entry. Expressing the chimera proteins of the Auroras with exchanged N termini in cells indicates that the divergent N termini are also important for their spatiotemporal localizations and functions. Collectively, we demonstrate that functional divergence of Aurora kinases is determined by spatial compartmentalization, and their divergent N termini also contribute to their spatial and functional differentiation. PMID:25987563

  8. MAMCAT: an expert system for distinguishing between mammillary and catenary compartmental models.

    PubMed

    Kuhn de Chizelle, A N; DiStefano, J J

    1994-05-01

    MAMCAT is a user-friendly, interactive, graphics-based PC program for addressing a common compartmental model discrimination problem in the framework of model indistinguishability theory: can mammillary and catenary models of the same order be distinguished from each other? The software is designed to teach the theory and solve specific problems. The user is guided step-by-step through definitions, examples, theory and problem solution. Topological properties are used first to screen out some distinguishable models and thereby reduce the number of candidates for indistinguishability. Transfer function analysis is then used to explore the remaining candidates. Analytical results for up to 5-compartment models are given and a more general algorithm is induced from these results.

  9. Compartmentalization of oxidative stress and antioxidant defense in the larval gut of Spodoptera littoralis.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Natraj; Sehnal, Frantisek

    2006-09-01

    Allelochemicals play important roles in the plant defense against herbivorous insects. They act as feeding deterrents, interfere with digestion and nutrient absorption, and cause production of potentially dangerous oxidative radicals. This study demonstrates that the distributions of oxidative radicals and of the antioxidant enzymes that eliminate them are compartmentalized in the digestive tract of Spodoptera littoralis larvae. Feeding on diets supplemented with the tannic acid (TA), alpha-solanine, and demissidine, respectively, did not affect the rate of food passage through the digestive tract of larvae but 1.25, 2.5, and 5% TA evoked a strong oxidative response. The amount of the superoxide anion in the foregut tissue and content increased up to 70-fold and the titer of total peroxides in the foregut content about 3-fold. This oxidative stress was associated with enhanced carbonyl content in the foregut tissue proteins, indicative of certain tissue deterioration. Extensive foregut damage was probably prevented by elevated activity of the glutathione S-transferase peroxidase. A complex antioxidant response was elicited in the midgut. The activities of superoxide dismutase and catalase increased significantly in the midgut tissue and content, and the activity of ascorbate peroxidase rose in the midgut tissue. The enzymes apparently eliminated oxidative radicals passing to midgut from the foregut with the food bolus and thereby prevented carbonylation of the midgut proteins. We postulate that the generation of oxidative radicals in the foregut and the induction of antioxidant defense in the midgut are controlled processes and that their compartmentalization is an important functional feature of the digestive tract. The glycoalkaloid alpha-solanine and the aglycone demissidine applied at 0.05 and 0.1% concentrations had no effect on any of the examined parameters.

  10. Beyond switches: ratcheting a particle energetically uphill with a compartmentalized molecular machine.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Manashi N; Kay, Euan R; Leigh, David A

    2006-03-29

    Here we correlate chemical (covalent), physical (thermodynamic), and statistical (population distribution) descriptions of behavior with the way that two new types of simple molecular machines (the threads of rotaxanes) perform the task of transporting a Brownian substrate (the rotaxane macrocycle) between two distinguishable binding sites. The first machine-substrate ensemble is a [2]rotaxane that operates through a mechanism that intrinsically causes it to change the average position of the macrocycle irreversibly. This contrasts with the behavior of classic stimuli-responsive molecular shuttles that act as reversible molecular switches. The second system is a compartmentalized molecular machine that is able to pump its substrate energetically uphill using the energy provided by a photon by means of an olefin photoisomerization. Resetting this compartmentalized molecular machine does not undo the work it has carried out or the task performed, a significant difference to a simple molecular switch and a characteristic we recognize as "ratcheting" (see Scheme 8). The ratcheting mechanism allows the [2]rotaxane to carry out the transport function envisaged for the historical thought-machines, Smoluchowski's Trapdoor and Maxwell's Pressure Demon, albeit via an unrelated mechanism and using an input of energy. We define and exemplify the terms "ratcheting" and "escapement" in mechanical terms for the molecular level and outline the fundamental phenomenological differences that exist between what constitutes a two-state Brownian switch, a two-state Brownian memory or "flip-flop", and a (two-stroke) Brownian motor. We also suggest that considering the relationship between the parts of a molecular machine and a substrate in terms of "statistical balance" and "linkage" could be useful in the design of more complex systems and in helping to understand the role of individual amino acids and peptide fragments during the directional transport of substrates by biological pumps

  11. Compartmental distribution of GABAB receptor-mediated currents along the somatodendritic axis of hippocampal principal cells.

    PubMed

    Degro, Claudius E; Kulik, Akos; Booker, Sam A; Vida, Imre

    2015-01-01

    Activity of cortical principal cells is controlled by the GABAergic system providing inhibition in a compartmentalized manner along their somatodendritic axis. While GABAAR-mediated inhibitory synaptic transmission has been extensively characterized in hippocampal principal cells, little is known about the distribution of postsynaptic effects of GABABRs. In the present study, we have investigated the functional localization of GABABRs and their effector inwardly rectifying potassium (Kir3) channels by combining electrophysiological recordings in acute rat hippocampal slices, high-resolution immunoelectron microscopic analysis and single cell simulations. Pharmacologically isolated slow inhibitory postsynaptic currents were elicited in the three major hippocampal principal cell types by endogenous GABA released by electrical stimulation, photolysis of caged-GABA, as well as the canonical agonist baclofen, with the highest amplitudes observed in the CA3. Spatially restricted currents were assessed along the axis of principal cells by uncaging GABA in the different hippocampal layers. GABABR-mediated currents were present along the entire somatodendritic axis of principal cells, but non-uniformly distributed: largest currents and the highest conductance densities determined in the simulations were consistently found on the distal apical dendrites. Finally, immunocytochemical localization of GABABRs and Kir3 channels showed that distributions overlap but their densities diverge, particularly on the basal dendrites of pyramidal cells. GABABRs current amplitudes and the conductance densities correlated better with Kir3 density, suggesting a bottlenecking effect defined by the effector channel. These data demonstrate a compartmentalized distribution of the GABABR-Kir3 signaling cascade and suggest differential control of synaptic transmission, dendritic integration and synaptic plasticity at afferent pathways onto hippocampal principal cells.

  12. Compartmental distribution of GABAB receptor-mediated currents along the somatodendritic axis of hippocampal principal cells

    PubMed Central

    Degro, Claudius E.; Kulik, Akos; Booker, Sam A.; Vida, Imre

    2015-01-01

    Activity of cortical principal cells is controlled by the GABAergic system providing inhibition in a compartmentalized manner along their somatodendritic axis. While GABAAR-mediated inhibitory synaptic transmission has been extensively characterized in hippocampal principal cells, little is known about the distribution of postsynaptic effects of GABABRs. In the present study, we have investigated the functional localization of GABABRs and their effector inwardly rectifying potassium (Kir3) channels by combining electrophysiological recordings in acute rat hippocampal slices, high-resolution immunoelectron microscopic analysis and single cell simulations. Pharmacologically isolated slow inhibitory postsynaptic currents were elicited in the three major hippocampal principal cell types by endogenous GABA released by electrical stimulation, photolysis of caged-GABA, as well as the canonical agonist baclofen, with the highest amplitudes observed in the CA3. Spatially restricted currents were assessed along the axis of principal cells by uncaging GABA in the different hippocampal layers. GABABR-mediated currents were present along the entire somatodendritic axis of principal cells, but non-uniformly distributed: largest currents and the highest conductance densities determined in the simulations were consistently found on the distal apical dendrites. Finally, immunocytochemical localization of GABABRs and Kir3 channels showed that distributions overlap but their densities diverge, particularly on the basal dendrites of pyramidal cells. GABABRs current amplitudes and the conductance densities correlated better with Kir3 density, suggesting a bottlenecking effect defined by the effector channel. These data demonstrate a compartmentalized distribution of the GABABR-Kir3 signaling cascade and suggest differential control of synaptic transmission, dendritic integration and synaptic plasticity at afferent pathways onto hippocampal principal cells. PMID:25852540

  13. The construction of next-generation matrices for compartmental epidemic models.

    PubMed

    Diekmann, O; Heesterbeek, J A P; Roberts, M G

    2010-06-06

    The basic reproduction number (0) is arguably the most important quantity in infectious disease epidemiology. The next-generation matrix (NGM) is the natural basis for the definition and calculation of (0) where finitely many different categories of individuals are recognized. We clear up confusion that has been around in the literature concerning the construction of this matrix, specifically for the most frequently used so-called compartmental models. We present a detailed easy recipe for the construction of the NGM from basic ingredients derived directly from the specifications of the model. We show that two related matrices exist which we define to be the NGM with large domain and the NGM with small domain. The three matrices together reflect the range of possibilities encountered in the literature for the characterization of (0). We show how they are connected and how their construction follows from the basic model ingredients, and establish that they have the same non-zero eigenvalues, the largest of which is the basic reproduction number (0). Although we present formal recipes based on linear algebra, we encourage the construction of the NGM by way of direct epidemiological reasoning, using the clear interpretation of the elements of the NGM and of the model ingredients. We present a selection of examples as a practical guide to our methods. In the appendix we present an elementary but complete proof that (0) defined as the dominant eigenvalue of the NGM for compartmental systems and the Malthusian parameter r, the real-time exponential growth rate in the early phase of an outbreak, are connected by the properties that (0) > 1 if and only if r > 0, and (0) = 1 if and only if r = 0.

  14. Consequences of plant invasions on compartmentalization and species' roles in plant-pollinator networks.

    PubMed

    Albrecht, Matthias; Padrón, Benigno; Bartomeus, Ignasi; Traveset, Anna

    2014-08-07

    Compartmentalization-the organization of ecological interaction networks into subsets of species that do not interact with other subsets (true compartments) or interact more frequently among themselves than with other species (modules)-has been identified as a key property for the functioning, stability and evolution of ecological communities. Invasions by entomophilous invasive plants may profoundly alter the way interaction networks are compartmentalized. We analysed a comprehensive dataset of 40 paired plant-pollinator networks (invaded versus uninvaded) to test this hypothesis. We show that invasive plants have higher generalization levels with respect to their pollinators than natives. The consequences for network topology are that-rather than displacing native species from the network-plant invaders attracting pollinators into invaded modules tend to play new important topological roles (i.e. network hubs, module hubs and connectors) and cause role shifts in native species, creating larger modules that are more connected among each other. While the number of true compartments was lower in invaded compared with uninvaded networks, the effect of invasion on modularity was contingent on the study system. Interestingly, the generalization level of the invasive plants partially explains this pattern, with more generalized invaders contributing to a lower modularity. Our findings indicate that the altered interaction structure of invaded networks makes them more robust against simulated random secondary species extinctions, but more vulnerable when the typically highly connected invasive plants go extinct first. The consequences and pathways by which biological invasions alter the interaction structure of plant-pollinator communities highlighted in this study may have important dynamical and functional implications, for example, by influencing multi-species reciprocal selection regimes and coevolutionary processes.

  15. Caveolin-3 regulates compartmentation of cardiomyocyte beta2-adrenergic receptor-mediated cAMP signaling

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Peter T.; Nikolaev, Viacheslav O.; O’Hara, Thomas; Diakonov, Ivan; Bhargava, Anamika; Tokar, Sergiy; Schobesberger, Sophie; Shevchuk, Andrew I.; Sikkel, Markus B.; Wilkinson, Ross; Trayanova, Natalia A.; Lyon, Alexander R.; Harding, Sian E.; Gorelik, Julia

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether caveolin-3 (Cav3) regulates localization of β2-adrenergic receptor (β2AR) and its cAMP signaling in healthy or failing cardiomyocytes. We co-expressed wildtype Cav3 or its dominant-negative mutant (Cav3DN) together with the Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based cAMP sensor Epac2-camps in adult rat ventricular myocytes (ARVMs). FRET and scanning ion conductance microscopy were used to locally stimulate β2AR and to measure cytosolic cAMP. Cav3 overexpression increased the number of caveolae and decreased the magnitude of β2AR-cAMP signal. Conversely, Cav3DN expression resulted in an increased β2AR-cAMP response without altering the whole-cell L-type calcium current. Following local stimulation of Cav3DN-expressing ARVMs, β2AR response could only be generated in T-tubules. However, the normally compartmentalized β2AR-cAMP signal became diffuse, similar to the situation observed in heart failure. Finally, overexpression of Cav3 in failing myocytes led to partial β2AR redistribution back into the T-tubules. In conclusion, Cav3 plays a crucial role for the localization of β2AR and compartmentation of β2AR-cAMP signaling to the T-tubules of healthy ARVMs, and overexpression of Cav3 in failing myocytes can partially restore the disrupted localization of these receptors. PMID:24345421

  16. Pathway Compartmentalization in Peroxisome of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to Produce Versatile Medium Chain Fatty Alcohols.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Jiayuan; Stevens, Joseph; Feng, Xueyang

    2016-05-27

    Fatty alcohols are value-added chemicals and important components of a variety of industries, which have a >3 billion-dollar global market annually. Long chain fatty alcohols (>C12) are mainly used in surfactants, lubricants, detergents, pharmaceuticals and cosmetics while medium chain fatty alcohols (C6-C12) could be used as diesel-like biofuels. Microbial production of fatty alcohols from renewable feedstock stands as a promising strategy to enable sustainable supply of fatty alcohols. In this study, we report, for the first time, that medium chain fatty alcohols could be produced in yeast via targeted expression of a fatty acyl-CoA reductase (TaFAR) in the peroxisome of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. By tagging TaFAR enzyme with peroxisomal targeting signal peptides, the TaFAR could be compartmentalized into the matrix of the peroxisome to hijack the medium chain fatty acyl-CoA generated from the beta-oxidation pathway and convert them to versatile medium chain fatty alcohols (C10 &C12). The overexpression of genes encoding PEX7 and acetyl-CoA carboxylase further improved fatty alcohol production by 1.4-fold. After medium optimization in fed-batch fermentation using glucose as the sole carbon source, fatty alcohols were produced at 1.3 g/L, including 6.9% 1-decanol, 27.5% 1-dodecanol, 2.9% 1-tetradecanol and 62.7% 1-hexadecanol. This work revealed that peroxisome could be engineered as a compartmentalized organelle for producing fatty acid-derived chemicals in S. cerevisiae.

  17. Target-Dependent Compartmentalization of the Corelease of Glutamate and GABA from the Mossy Fibers.

    PubMed

    Galván, Emilio J; Gutiérrez, Rafael

    2017-01-18

    The mossy fibers (MFs) corelease glutamate and GABA onto pyramidal cells of CA3 during development, until the end of the third postnatal week. However, the major target cells of the MF are the interneurons of CA3. Therefore, it has been shown that the interneurons of the hilus and stratum lucidum receive this dual monosynaptic input on MF stimulation. Because the plasticity of glutamatergic transmission from the different terminals of the MF is target specific, we here asked whether the corelease of glutamate and GABA was also subjected to a target-dependent compartmentalization. We analyzed the occurrence and plasticity of MF simultaneous glutamatergic-GABAergic signaling onto interneurons of the different strata of CA3 in rats during the third postnatal week. We show the coexistence of time-locked, glutamate receptor and GABA receptor-mediated mono synaptic responses evoked by MF stimulation in interneurons from stratum lucidum and stratum radiatum, but not in interneurons from stratum lacunosum-moleculare. As expected from the transmission of MF origin, MF GABAergic responses were depressed by the activation of metabotropic glutamate receptors. Strikingly, while MF glutamatergic responses underwent LTD, the simultaneous MF GABAergic responses of stratum lucidum interneurons, but not of stratum radiatum interneurons, displayed a Hebbian form of LTP that was mimicked by PKC activation. PKA activation potentiated MF glutamatergic responses of stratum radiatum interneurons, whereas in stratum lucidum interneurons only GABAergic responses were potentiated. We here disclose that the corelease of glutamate and GABA, as well as their plasticity are compartmentalized in a target-dependent manner, showing counterbalanced compensatory plasticity of two neurotransmitters released by different terminals of the same pathway.

  18. The role of the bi-compartmental stem cell niche in delaying cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahriyari, Leili; Komarova, Natalia L.

    2015-10-01

    In recent years, by using modern imaging techniques, scientists have found evidence of collaboration between different types of stem cells (SCs), and proposed a bi-compartmental organization of the SC niche. Here we create a class of stochastic models to simulate the dynamics of such a heterogeneous SC niche. We consider two SC groups: the border compartment, S1, is in direct contact with transit-amplifying (TA) cells, and the central compartment, S2, is hierarchically upstream from S1. The S1 SCs differentiate or divide asymmetrically when the tissue needs TA cells. Both groups proliferate when the tissue requires SCs (thus maintaining homeostasis). There is an influx of S2 cells into the border compartment, either by migration, or by proliferation. We examine this model in the context of double-hit mutant generation, which is a rate-limiting step in the development of many cancers. We discover that this type of a cooperative pattern in the stem niche with two compartments leads to a significantly smaller rate of double-hit mutant production compared with a homogeneous, one-compartmental SC niche. Furthermore, the minimum probability of double-hit mutant generation corresponds to purely symmetric division of SCs, consistent with the literature. Finally, the optimal architecture (which minimizes the rate of double-hit mutant production) requires a large proliferation rate of S1 cells along with a small, but non-zero, proliferation rate of S2 cells. This result is remarkably similar to the niche structure described recently by several authors, where one of the two SC compartments was found more actively engaged in tissue homeostasis and turnover, while the other was characterized by higher levels of quiescence (but contributed strongly to injury recovery). Both numerical and analytical results are presented.

  19. Caveolin-3 regulates compartmentation of cardiomyocyte beta2-adrenergic receptor-mediated cAMP signaling.

    PubMed

    Wright, Peter T; Nikolaev, Viacheslav O; O'Hara, Thomas; Diakonov, Ivan; Bhargava, Anamika; Tokar, Sergiy; Schobesberger, Sophie; Shevchuk, Andrew I; Sikkel, Markus B; Wilkinson, Ross; Trayanova, Natalia A; Lyon, Alexander R; Harding, Sian E; Gorelik, Julia

    2014-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether caveolin-3 (Cav3) regulates localization of β2-adrenergic receptor (β2AR) and its cAMP signaling in healthy or failing cardiomyocytes. We co-expressed wildtype Cav3 or its dominant-negative mutant (Cav3DN) together with the Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based cAMP sensor Epac2-camps in adult rat ventricular myocytes (ARVMs). FRET and scanning ion conductance microscopy were used to locally stimulate β2AR and to measure cytosolic cAMP. Cav3 overexpression increased the number of caveolae and decreased the magnitude of β2AR-cAMP signal. Conversely, Cav3DN expression resulted in an increased β2AR-cAMP response without altering the whole-cell L-type calcium current. Following local stimulation of Cav3DN-expressing ARVMs, β2AR response could only be generated in T-tubules. However, the normally compartmentalized β2AR-cAMP signal became diffuse, similar to the situation observed in heart failure. Finally, overexpression of Cav3 in failing myocytes led to partial β2AR redistribution back into the T-tubules. In conclusion, Cav3 plays a crucial role for the localization of β2AR and compartmentation of β2AR-cAMP signaling to the T-tubules of healthy ARVMs, and overexpression of Cav3 in failing myocytes can partially restore the disrupted localization of these receptors.

  20. Cellular compartmentation of cadmium and zinc in relation to other elements in the hyperaccumulator Arabidopsis halleri.

    PubMed

    Küpper, H; Lombi, E; Zhao, F J; McGrath, S P

    2000-12-01

    The cellular compartmentation of elements was analysed in the Zn hyperaccumulator Arabidopsis halleri (L.) O'Kane & Al-Shehbaz (=Cardaminopsis halleri) using energy-dispersive X-ray microanalysis of frozen-hydrated tissues. Quantitative data were obtained using oxygen as an internal standard in the analyses of vacuoles, whereas a peak/background ratio method was used for quantification of elements in pollen and dehydrated trichomes. Arabidopsis halleri was found to hyperaccumulate not only Zn but also Cd in the shoot biomass. While large concentrations of Zn and Cd were found in the leaves and roots, flowers contained very little. In roots grown hydroponically, Zn and Cd accumulated in the cell wall of the rhizodermis (root epidermis), mainly due to precipitation of Zn/Cd phosphates. In leaves, the trichomes had by far the largest concentrations of Zn and Cd. Inside the trichomes there was a striking sub-cellular compartmentation, with almost all the Zn and Cd being accumulated in a narrow ring in the trichome base. This distribution pattern was very different from that for Ca and P. The epidermal cells other than trichomes were very small and contained lower concentrations of Zn and Cd than mesophyll cells. In particular, the concentrations of Cd and Zn in the mesophyll cells increased markedly in response to increasing Zn and Cd concentrations in the nutrient solution. This indicates that the mesophyll cells in the leaves of A. halleri are the major storage site for Zn and Cd, and play an important role in their hyperaccumulation.

  1. Polyamine/Nucleotide Coacervates Provide Strong Compartmentalization of Mg²⁺, Nucleotides, and RNA.

    PubMed

    Frankel, Erica A; Bevilacqua, Philip C; Keating, Christine D

    2016-03-01

    Phase separation of aqueous solutions containing polyelectrolytes can lead to formation of dense, solute-rich liquid droplets referred to as coacervates, surrounded by a dilute continuous phase of much larger volume. This type of liquid-liquid phase separation is thought to help explain the appearance of polyelectrolyte-rich intracellular droplets in the cytoplasm and nucleoplasm of extant biological cells and may be relevant to protocellular compartmentalization of nucleic acids on the early Earth. Here we describe complex coacervates formed upon mixing the polycation poly(allylamine) (PAH, 15 kDa) with the anionic nucleotides adenosine 5'-mono-, di-, and triphosphate (AMP, ADP, and ATP). Droplet formation was observed over a wide range of pH and MgCl2 concentrations. The nucleotides themselves as well as Mg(2+) and RNA oligonucleotides were all extremely concentrated within the coacervates. Nucleotides present at just 2.5 mM in bulk solution had concentrations greater than 1 M inside the coacervate droplets. A solution with a total Mg(2+) concentration of 10 mM had 1-5 M Mg(2+) in the coacervates, and RNA random sequence (N54) partitioned ∼10,000-fold into the coacervates. Coacervate droplets are thus rich in nucleotides, Mg(2+), and RNA, providing a medium favorable for generating functional RNAs. Compartmentalization of nucleotides at high concentrations could have facilitated their polymerization to form oligonucleotides, which preferentially accumulate in the droplets. Locally high Mg(2+) concentrations could have aided folding and catalysis in an RNA world, making coacervate droplets an appealing platform for exploring protocellular environments.

  2. Bioaccessibility of selenium after human ingestion in relation to its chemical species and compartmentalization in maize.

    PubMed

    Mombo, Stéphane; Schreck, Eva; Dumat, Camille; Laplanche, Christophe; Pierart, Antoine; Longchamp, Mélanie; Besson, Philippe; Castrec-Rouelle, Maryse

    2016-06-01

    Selenium is a micronutrient needed by all living organisms including humans, but often present in low concentration in food with possible deficiency. From another side, at higher concentrations in soils as observed in seleniferous regions of the world, and in function of its chemical species, Se can also induce (eco)toxicity. Root Se uptake was therefore studied in function of its initial form for maize (Zea mays L.), a plant widely cultivated for human and animal food over the world. Se phytotoxicity and compartmentalization were studied in different aerial plant tissues. For the first time, Se oral human bioaccessibility after ingestion was assessed for the main Se species (Se(IV) and Se(VI)) with the BARGE ex vivo test in maize seeds (consumed by humans), and in stems and leaves consumed by animals. Corn seedlings were cultivated in hydroponic conditions supplemented with 1 mg L(-1) of selenium (Se(IV), Se(VI), Control) for 4 months. Biomass, Se concentration, and bioaccessibility were measured on harvested plants. A reduction in plant biomass was observed under Se treatments compared to control, suggesting its phytotoxicity. This plant biomass reduction was higher for selenite species than selenate, and seed was the main affected compartment compared to control. Selenium compartmentalization study showed that for selenate species, a preferential accumulation was observed in leaves, whereas selenite translocation was very limited toward maize aerial parts, except in the seeds where selenite concentrations are generally high. Selenium oral bioaccessibility after ingestion fluctuated from 49 to 89 % according to the considered plant tissue and Se species. Whatever the tissue, selenate appeared as the most human bioaccessible form. A potential Se toxicity was highlighted for people living in seleniferous regions, this risk being enhanced by the high Se bioaccessibility.

  3. Evaluation of a compartmental model for estimating tumor hypoxia via FMISO dynamic PET imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wenli; Georgi, Jens-Christoph; Nehmeh, Sadek A.; Narayanan, Manoj; Paulus, Timo; Bal, Matthieu; O'Donoghue, Joseph; Zanzonico, Pat B.; Schmidtlein, C. Ross; Lee, Nancy Y.; Humm, John L.

    2009-05-01

    This paper systematically evaluates a pharmacokinetic compartmental model for identifying tumor hypoxia using dynamic positron emission tomography (PET) imaging with 18F-fluoromisonidazole (FMISO). A generic irreversible one-plasma two-tissue compartmental model was used. A dynamic PET image dataset was simulated with three tumor regions—normoxic, hypoxic and necrotic—embedded in a normal-tissue background, and with an image-based arterial input function. Each voxelized tissue's time activity curve (TAC) was simulated with typical values of kinetic parameters, as deduced from FMISO-PET data from nine head-and-neck cancer patients. The dynamic dataset was first produced without any statistical noise to ensure that correct kinetic parameters were reproducible. Next, to investigate the stability of kinetic parameter estimation in the presence of noise, 1000 noisy samples of the dynamic dataset were generated, from which 1000 noisy estimates of kinetic parameters were calculated and used to estimate the sample mean and covariance matrix. It is found that a more peaked input function gave less variation in various kinetic parameters, and the variation of kinetic parameters could also be reduced by two region-of-interest averaging techniques. To further investigate how bias in the arterial input function affected the kinetic parameter estimation, a shift error was introduced in the peak amplitude and peak location of the input TAC, and the bias of various kinetic parameters calculated. In summary, mathematical phantom studies have been used to determine the statistical accuracy and precision of model-based kinetic analysis, which helps to validate this analysis and provides guidance in planning clinical dynamic FMISO-PET studies.

  4. Pathway Compartmentalization in Peroxisome of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to Produce Versatile Medium Chain Fatty Alcohols

    PubMed Central

    Sheng, Jiayuan; Stevens, Joseph; Feng, Xueyang

    2016-01-01

    Fatty alcohols are value-added chemicals and important components of a variety of industries, which have a >3 billion-dollar global market annually. Long chain fatty alcohols (>C12) are mainly used in surfactants, lubricants, detergents, pharmaceuticals and cosmetics while medium chain fatty alcohols (C6–C12) could be used as diesel-like biofuels. Microbial production of fatty alcohols from renewable feedstock stands as a promising strategy to enable sustainable supply of fatty alcohols. In this study, we report, for the first time, that medium chain fatty alcohols could be produced in yeast via targeted expression of a fatty acyl-CoA reductase (TaFAR) in the peroxisome of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. By tagging TaFAR enzyme with peroxisomal targeting signal peptides, the TaFAR could be compartmentalized into the matrix of the peroxisome to hijack the medium chain fatty acyl-CoA generated from the beta-oxidation pathway and convert them to versatile medium chain fatty alcohols (C10 & C12). The overexpression of genes encoding PEX7 and acetyl-CoA carboxylase further improved fatty alcohol production by 1.4-fold. After medium optimization in fed-batch fermentation using glucose as the sole carbon source, fatty alcohols were produced at 1.3 g/L, including 6.9% 1-decanol, 27.5% 1-dodecanol, 2.9% 1-tetradecanol and 62.7% 1-hexadecanol. This work revealed that peroxisome could be engineered as a compartmentalized organelle for producing fatty acid-derived chemicals in S. cerevisiae. PMID:27230732

  5. Subcellular compartmentalization in protoplasts from Artemisia annua cell cultures: engineering attempts using a modified SNARE protein.

    PubMed

    Di Sansebastiano, Gian Pietro; Rizzello, Francesca; Durante, Miriana; Caretto, Sofia; Nisi, Rossella; De Paolis, Angelo; Faraco, Marianna; Montefusco, Anna; Piro, Gabriella; Mita, Giovanni

    2015-05-20

    Plants are ideal bioreactors for the production of macromolecules but transport mechanisms are not fully understood and cannot be easily manipulated. Several attempts to overproduce recombinant proteins or secondary metabolites failed. Because of an independent regulation of the storage compartment, the product may be rapidly degraded or cause self-intoxication. The case of the anti-malarial compound artemisinin produced by Artemisia annua plants is emblematic. The accumulation of artemisinin naturally occurs in the apoplast of glandular trichomes probably involving autophagy and unconventional secretion thus its production by undifferentiated tissues such as cell suspension cultures can be challenging. Here we characterize the subcellular compartmentalization of several known fluorescent markers in protoplasts derived from Artemisia suspension cultures and explore the possibility to modify compartmentalization using a modified SNARE protein as molecular tool to be used in future biotechnological applications. We focused on the observation of the vacuolar organization in vivo and the truncated form of AtSYP51, 51H3, was used to induce a compartment generated by the contribution of membrane from endocytosis and from endoplasmic reticulum to vacuole trafficking. The artificial compartment crossing exocytosis and endocytosis may trap artemisinin stabilizing it until extraction; indeed, it is able to increase total enzymatic activity of a vacuolar marker (RGUSChi), probably increasing its stability. Exploring the 51H3-induced compartment we gained new insights on the function of the SNARE SYP51, recently shown to be an interfering-SNARE, and new hints to engineer eukaryote endomembranes for future biotechnological applications. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. A Novel Three-Compartmental Model for Artificial Pancreas: Development and Validation.

    PubMed

    Piemonte, Vincenzo; Capocelli, Mauro; De Santis, Luca; Maurizi, Anna Rita; Pozzilli, Paolo

    2017-08-29

    Closed-loop insulin delivery system, also known as artificial pancreas (AP), provides the blood glucose control in diabetic patients, enabling the automatic blood-sugar management and reducing the risks and improving the lives of people with diabetes. A new three-compartmental model of glucose-insulin interaction for AP is presented and tested in this paper. The glucose and insulin "spaces" are split into a plasma compartment and interstitial fluids compartment, respectively. The model includes an additional subcutaneous compartment and provides three explicit delays and three parameters influencing the regulatory system and correlating with the physiopathology of the patients. Two delays are related with hepatic glucose production and insulin secretion; the third delay represents the lag time in the absorption of exogenous insulin in subcutaneous tissue. The parameters regulate the system dynamics acting on the glucose utilization and the insulin secretion. The clinical data (including information on food ingestion and exogenous insulin injection) from five case studies of Type 1 diabetics are presented and used to validate the mathematical model. After training the parameters for each case study, the model well simulates the glucose level during a 4-day test. The estimated values are physiologically meaningful and provide a further insight on the subject's dysfunctions and on the state of the disease. The results have been also compared with a parallel simulation carried out by implementing a previous two-compartmental model. The proposed algorithm produces a lower sum of the squared error between the simulated and the measured glucose concentrations over time. © 2017 International Center for Artificial Organs and Transplantation and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Effects of Air Stacking Maneuver on Cough Peak Flow and Chest Wall Compartmental Volumes of Subjects With Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Sarmento, Antonio; Resqueti, Vanessa; Dourado-Júnior, Mario; Saturnino, Lailane; Aliverti, Andrea; Fregonezi, Guilherme; de Andrade, Armele Dornelas

    2017-05-17

    To assess the acute effects of air stacking on cough peak flow (CPF) and chest wall compartmental volumes of persons with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) versus healthy subjects positioned at 45° body inclination. Cross-sectional study with a matched-pair design. University hospital. Persons (N=24) with ALS (n=12) and age-matched healthy subjects (n=12). CPF, chest wall compartmental inspiratory capacity, chest wall vital capacity, chest wall tidal volume and operational volumes, breathing pattern, and percentage of contribution of the compartments to the inspired volume were measured by optoelectronic plethysmography. Compared with healthy subjects, significantly lower CPF (P=.007), chest wall compartmental inspiratory capacity (P<.001), chest wall vital capacity (P<.001), and chest wall tidal volume (P<.001) were found in subjects with ALS. Immediately after air stacking, CPF (P<.001) and chest wall compartmental inspiratory capacity (P<.001) significantly increased in both groups, with values returning to basal only in healthy subjects. After air stacking, the abdominal compartment (P=.004) was determined to be responsible for the inspired volume in subjects with ALS. Significantly higher chest wall vital capacity (P=.05) was observed in subjects with ALS 5 minutes after air stacking, with the rib cage compartment (P=.049) being responsible for volume change. No differences were found in chest wall vital capacity and compartmental volumes of healthy subjects. Chest wall tidal volume (P<.001) significantly increased during the protocol in the healthy subjects, mainly because of end-inspiratory (P<.001) and abdominal volumes (P=.008). No significant differences were observed in percentage of contribution of the compartments to the inspired volume and end-expiratory volume of both groups. No significant differences were found in chest wall tidal volume, operational volume, and breathing pattern in persons with ALS. Air stacking is effective in increasing CPF

  8. Nuclear Medicine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Badawi, Ramsey D.

    2001-01-01

    Describes the use of nuclear medicine techniques in diagnosis and therapy. Describes instrumentation in diagnostic nuclear medicine and predicts future trends in nuclear medicine imaging technology. (Author/MM)

  9. Nuclear ventriculography

    MedlinePlus

    ... ventriculography (RNV); Multiple gate acquisition scan (MUGA); Nuclear cardiology; Cardiomyopathy - nuclear ventriculography ... 56. Udelson JE, Dilsizian V, Bonow RO. Nuclear cardiology. In: Bonow RO, Mann DL, Zipes DP, Libby ...

  10. Nuclear Medicine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Badawi, Ramsey D.

    2001-01-01

    Describes the use of nuclear medicine techniques in diagnosis and therapy. Describes instrumentation in diagnostic nuclear medicine and predicts future trends in nuclear medicine imaging technology. (Author/MM)

  11. Defective nuclear accumulation of androgen receptors in disorders of sexual differentiation.

    PubMed Central

    Gyorki, S; Warne, G L; Khalid, B A; Funder, J W

    1983-01-01

    Nuclear transfer of androgen receptors (AR) and glucocorticoid receptors (GR) was determined in cultured genital skin fibroblasts from 10 normal controls and eight patients with abnormalities of the external genitalia. In whole cell studies, cultures were incubated for 20 min at 37 degrees C with [3H]methyltrienolone (3H-R1881) or tritiated dexamethasone, and specific binding was determined in whole cell, cytoplasmic, and crude nuclear fractions. Between normal and affected fibroblasts no difference was seen in cellular levels of GR, or in cytoplasmic and nuclear distribution of GR. In normal fibroblasts, cytoplasmic binding of 3H-R1881 represented 56%, and crude nuclear binding 44%, of total binding; in fibroblasts from five of the eight patients similar values (cytoplasmic 55% and nuclear 44%) were seen for 3H-R1881 binding. In fibroblasts from the other three patients no decrease in total cellular levels of AR were seen; nuclear compartmentalization, however, was much lower (approximately 20%) than in other cultures. In vitro reconstitution studies, combining 3H-R1881-loaded cytosol with naive nuclei, lead us to suggest that the defect in nuclear compartmentalization lies at the level of the nuclear acceptor site rather than the cytoplasmic binder in affected cells. We interpret the data to suggest that defective nuclear binding of AR complexes may be involved in a proportion of cases of abnormal development of the external genitalia. PMID:6684127

  12. Nuclear data for nuclear transmutation

    SciTech Connect

    Harada, Hideo

    2009-05-04

    Current status on nuclear data for the study of nuclear transmutation of radioactive wastes is reviewed, mainly focusing on neutron capture reactions. It is stressed that the highest-precision frontier research in nuclear data measurements should be a key to satisfy the target accuracies on the nuclear data requested for realizing the nuclear transmutation.

  13. Nuclear data for nuclear transmutation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harada, Hideo

    2009-05-01

    Current status on nuclear data for the study of nuclear transmutation of radioactive wastes is reviewed, mainly focusing on neutron capture reactions. It is stressed that the highest-precision frontier research in nuclear data measurements should be a key to satisfy the target accuracies on the nuclear data requested for realizing the nuclear transmutation.

  14. Remodeling the nuclear membrane during closed mitosis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dan; Oliferenko, Snezhana

    2013-02-01

    The mitotic spindle assembly and chromosome segregation in eukaryotes must be coordinated with the nuclear envelope (NE) remodeling. In a so-called 'open' mitosis the envelope of the mother nucleus is dismantled allowing the cytoplasmic spindle microtubules to capture the chromosomes. Alternatively, cells undergoing 'closed' mitosis assemble the intranuclear spindle and divide the nucleus without ever losing the nucleocytoplasmic compartmentalization. Here we focus on the mechanisms underlying mitotic NE dynamics in unicellular eukaryotes undergoing a closed nuclear division, paying specific attention to the emerging roles of the lipid biosynthesis machinery in this process. We argue that lessons learned in these organisms may be generally relevant to understanding the NE remodeling and the evolution of mitotic mechanisms throughout the eukaryotic domain. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Activating the nuclear piston mechanism of 3D migration in tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Petrie, Ryan J; Harlin, Heather M; Korsak, Lulu I T; Yamada, Kenneth M

    2017-01-02

    Primary human fibroblasts have the remarkable ability to use their nucleus like a piston, switching from low- to high-pressure protrusions in response to the surrounding three-dimensional (3D) matrix. Although migrating tumor cells can also change how they migrate in response to the 3D matrix, it is not clear if they can switch between high- and low-pressure protrusions like primary fibroblasts. We report that unlike primary fibroblasts, the nuclear piston is not active in fibrosarcoma cells. Protease inhibition rescued the nuclear piston mechanism in polarized HT1080 and SW684 cells and generated compartmentalized pressure. Achieving compartmentalized pressure required the nucleoskeleton-cytoskeleton linker protein nesprin 3, actomyosin contractility, and integrin-mediated adhesion, consistent with lobopodia-based fibroblast migration. In addition, this activation of the nuclear piston mechanism slowed the 3D movement of HT1080 cells. Together, these data indicate that inhibiting protease activity during polarized tumor cell 3D migration is sufficient to restore the nuclear piston migration mechanism with compartmentalized pressure characteristic of nonmalignant cells.

  16. Activating the nuclear piston mechanism of 3D migration in tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Primary human fibroblasts have the remarkable ability to use their nucleus like a piston, switching from low- to high-pressure protrusions in response to the surrounding three-dimensional (3D) matrix. Although migrating tumor cells can also change how they migrate in response to the 3D matrix, it is not clear if they can switch between high- and low-pressure protrusions like primary fibroblasts. We report that unlike primary fibroblasts, the nuclear piston is not active in fibrosarcoma cells. Protease inhibition rescued the nuclear piston mechanism in polarized HT1080 and SW684 cells and generated compartmentalized pressure. Achieving compartmentalized pressure required the nucleoskeleton–cytoskeleton linker protein nesprin 3, actomyosin contractility, and integrin-mediated adhesion, consistent with lobopodia-based fibroblast migration. In addition, this activation of the nuclear piston mechanism slowed the 3D movement of HT1080 cells. Together, these data indicate that inhibiting protease activity during polarized tumor cell 3D migration is sufficient to restore the nuclear piston migration mechanism with compartmentalized pressure characteristic of nonmalignant cells. PMID:27998990

  17. The paraveinal mesophyll of soybean leaves in relation to assimilate transfer and compartmentation : II. Structural, metabolic and compartmental changes during reproductive growth.

    PubMed

    Franceschi, V R; Giaquinta, R T

    1983-04-01

    Nitrogen and carbohydrate assimilates were temporally and spatially compartmented among various cell types in soybean (Glycine max L., Merr.) leaves during seed filling. The paraveinal mesophyll (PVM), a unique cell layer found in soybean, was demonstrated to function in the synthesis, compartmentation and remobilization of nitrogen reserves prior to and during the seed-filling stages. At anthesis, the PVM vacuoles contain substantial protein which completely disappears by two weeks into the seed filling. Distinct changes in the PVM cytoplasm, tonoplast and organelles were correlated with the presence or absence of the vacuolar material. Microautoradiography following the accumulation of several radiolabeled sugars and amino acids demonstrated the glycoprotein nature of the vacuolar material. Incorporation of methionine, leucine, glucose, and glucosamine resulted in heavy labelling of the PVM vacuole, in contrast to galactose, proline, and mannose which resulted in a much reduced labelling pattern. In addition, starch is unequally compartmented and degraded among the various leaf cells during seed filling. At the end of the photoperiod at the flowering stage, the highest starch accumulation was in the second palisade layer followed by the spongy mesophyll and the first (uppermost) palisade layer. Starch in the first palisade layer was completely degraded during the dark whereas the starch in the second palisade and spongy mesophyll was not remobilized to any appreciable extent. By mid-podfilling (approximately five weeks postanthesis) starch was absent in the first palisade layer at the end of the photoperiod while the second palisade and spongy mesophyll layers contained substantial starch. Starch was remobilized from these latter cells during the remainder of seed filling when current photosynthetic production is low. Structural changes associated with cell senescence first appear in the upper palisade layer and then progress (excluding the PVM) to the second

  18. Compartmentalized PDE4A5 Signaling Impairs Hippocampal Synaptic Plasticity and Long-Term Memory.

    PubMed

    Havekes, Robbert; Park, Alan J; Tolentino, Rosa E; Bruinenberg, Vibeke M; Tudor, Jennifer C; Lee, Yool; Hansen, Rolf T; Guercio, Leonardo A; Linton, Edward; Neves-Zaph, Susana R; Meerlo, Peter; Baillie, George S; Houslay, Miles D; Abel, Ted

    2016-08-24

    Alterations in cAMP signaling are thought to contribute to neurocognitive and neuropsychiatric disorders. Members of the cAMP-specific phosphodiesterase 4 (PDE4) family, which contains >25 different isoforms, play a key role in determining spatial cAMP degradation so as to orchestrate compartmentalized cAMP signaling in cells. Each isoform binds to a different set of protein complexes through its unique N-terminal domain, thereby leading to targeted degradation of cAMP in specific intracellular compartments. However, the functional role of specific compartmentalized PDE4 isoforms has not been examined in vivo Here, we show that increasing protein levels of the PDE4A5 isoform in mouse hippocampal excitatory neurons impairs a long-lasting form of hippocampal synaptic plasticity and attenuates hippocampus-dependent long-term memories without affecting anxiety. In contrast, viral expression of a truncated version of PDE4A5, which lacks the unique N-terminal targeting domain, does not affect long-term memory. Further, overexpression of the PDE4A1 isoform, which targets a different subset of signalosomes, leaves memory undisturbed. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer sensor-based cAMP measurements reveal that the full-length PDE4A5, in contrast to the truncated form, hampers forskolin-mediated increases in neuronal cAMP levels. Our study indicates that the unique N-terminal localization domain of PDE4A5 is essential for the targeting of specific cAMP-dependent signaling underlying synaptic plasticity and memory. The development of compounds to disrupt the compartmentalization of individual PDE4 isoforms by targeting their unique N-terminal domains may provide a fruitful approach to prevent cognitive deficits in neuropsychiatric and neurocognitive disorders that are associated with alterations in cAMP signaling. Neurons exhibit localized signaling processes that enable biochemical cascades to be activated selectively in specific subcellular compartments. The

  19. A mitotic nuclear envelope tether for Gle1 also affects nuclear and nucleolar architecture

    PubMed Central

    Chemudupati, Mahesh; Osmani, Aysha H.; Osmani, Stephen A.

    2016-01-01

    During Aspergillus nidulans mitosis, peripheral nuclear pore complex (NPC) proteins (Nups) disperse from the core NPC structure. Unexpectedly, one predicted peripheral Nup, Gle1, remains at the mitotic nuclear envelope (NE) via an unknown mechanism. Gle1 affinity purification identified mitotic tether for Gle1 (MtgA), which tethers Gle1 to the NE during mitosis but not during interphase when Gle1 is at NPCs. MtgA is the orthologue of the Schizosaccharomyces pombe telomere-anchoring inner nuclear membrane protein Bqt4. Like Bqt4, MtgA has meiotic roles, but it is functionally distinct from Bqt4 because MtgA is not required for tethering telomeres to the NE. Domain analyses showed that MtgA targeting to the NE requires its C-terminal transmembrane domain and a nuclear localization signal. Of importance, MtgA functions beyond Gle1 mitotic targeting and meiosis and affects nuclear and nucleolar architecture when deleted or overexpressed. Deleting MtgA generates small, round nuclei, whereas overexpressing MtgA generates larger nuclei with altered nuclear compartmentalization resulting from NE expansion around the nucleolus. The accumulation of MtgA around the nucleolus promotes a similar accumulation of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) protein Erg24, reducing its levels in the ER. This study extends the functions of Bqt4-like proteins to include mitotic Gle1 targeting and modulation of nuclear and nucleolar architecture. PMID:27630260

  20. A microcomputer algorithm for solving first-order compartmental models involving recycling.

    PubMed

    Birchall, A; James, A C

    1989-06-01

    A general algorithm for solving first-order compartmental models including recycling systems has been developed and its implementation on a microcomputer is described. Matrix algebra is used to obtain for any compartmental model an analytical solution, which is expressed as the exponential of a matrix of rate constants. A special technique is used in the algorithm to enable this exponential to be evaluated with a rapidly converging series. Truncation errors incurred in this process are estimated automatically. Thus, in an extreme case, where these errors may be significant, the appropriate action can be taken. Given a particular model, the user enters the model parameters into a rate matrix according to a simple rule. The algorithm then uses this matrix to solve the model, and thus no specialized mathematical knowledge is needed. The algorithm is given in a short BASIC program (60 lines) listed in an appendix. No additional software is required. By running this program on a standard microcomputer, the user can solve models of any complexity: those up to 15 compartments in seconds and those up to 30 compartments within a minute. The algorithm is thus ideally suited to solve kinetic models describing the transport of radionuclides in the environment or the translocation of elements in biological systems such as the metabolic models recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP). Given the initial amount of material in each compartment at time t = 0, together with its radioactive decay constant, the algorithm gives both the amount in each compartment at any future time t and the number of disintegrations that will have occurred in each compartment up to time t. The computer program, shown in an appendix, could easily be used to calculate disintegrations over any time interval of interest, or to predict the quantities or fractions of an intake expected to be present in any in vivo or excretion compartments of interest. Thus, the algorithm

  1. Compartmentalization of endocannabinoids into lipid rafts in a microglial cell line devoid of caveorrlin-1

    PubMed Central

    Rimmerman, Neta; Bradshaw, Heather B; Kozela, Ewa; Levy, Rivka; Juknat, Ana; Vogel, Zvi

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE N-acyl ethanolamines (NAEs) and 2-arachidonoyl glycerol (2-AG) are endogenous cannabinoids and along with related lipids are synthesized on demand from membrane phospholipids. Here, we have studied the compartmentalization of NAEs and 2-AG into lipid raft fractions isolated from the caveolin-1-lacking microglial cell line BV-2, following vehicle or cannabidiol (CBD) treatment. Results were compared with those from the caveolin-1-positive F-11 cell line. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH BV-2 cells were incubated with CBD or vehicle. Cells were fractionated using a detergent-free continuous OptiPrep density gradient. Lipids in fractions were quantified using HPLC/MS/MS. Proteins were measured using Western blot. KEY RESULTS BV-2 cells were devoid of caveolin-1. Lipid rafts were isolated from BV-2 cells as confirmed by co-localization with flotillin-1 and sphingomyelin. Small amounts of cannabinoid CB1 receptors were found in lipid raft fractions. After incubation with CBD, levels and distribution in lipid rafts of 2-AG, N-arachidonoyl ethanolamine (AEA), and N-oleoyl ethanolamine (OEA) were not changed. Conversely, the levels of the saturated N-stearoyl ethanolamine (SEA) and N-palmitoyl ethanolamine (PEA) were elevated in lipid raft fractions. In whole cells with growth medium, CBD treatment increased AEA and OEA time-dependently, while levels of 2-AG, PEA and SEA did not change. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS Whereas levels of 2-AG were not affected by CBD treatment, the distribution and levels of NAEs showed significant changes. Among the NAEs, the degree of acyl chain saturation predicted the compartmentalization after CBD treatment suggesting a shift in cell signalling activity. LINKED ARTICLES This article is part of a themed section on Cannabinoids in Biology and Medicine. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2012.165.issue-8. To view Part I of Cannabinoids in Biology and Medicine visit http://dx.doi.org/10

  2. Compartmentalized cGMP Responses of Olfactory Sensory Neurons in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Shidara, Hisashi; Hotta, Kohji; Oka, Kotaro

    2017-04-05

    Cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) plays a crucial role as a second messenger in the regulation of sensory signal transduction in many organisms. In AWC olfactory sensory neurons of Caenorhabditis elegans, cGMP also has essential and distinctive functions in olfactory sensation and adaptation. According to molecular genetic studies, when nematodes are exposed to odorants, a decrease in cGMP regulates cGMP-gated channels for olfactory sensation. Conversely, for olfactory adaptation, an increase in cGMP activates protein kinase G to modulate cellular physiological functions. Although these opposing cGMP responses in single neurons may occur at the same time, it is unclear how cGMP actually behaves in AWC sensory neurons. A hypothetical explanation for opposing cGMP responses is region-specific behaviors in AWC: for odor sensation, cGMP levels in cilia could decrease, whereas odor adaptation is mediated by increased cGMP levels in soma. Therefore, we visualized intracellular cGMP in AWC with a genetically encoded cGMP indicator, cGi500, and examined spatiotemporal cGMP responses in AWC neurons. The cGMP imaging showed that, after odor exposure, cGMP levels in AWC cilia decreased transiently, whereas levels in dendrites and soma gradually increased. These region-specific responses indicated that the cGMP responses in AWC neurons are explicitly compartmentalized. In addition, we performed Ca(2+) imaging to examine the relationship between cGMP and Ca(2+) These results suggested that AWC sensory neurons are in fact analogous to vertebrate photoreceptor neurons.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) plays crucial roles in the regulation of sensory signal transduction in many animals. In AWC olfactory sensory neurons of Caenorhabditis elegans, cGMP also has essential and distinctive functions involving olfactory sensation and adaptation. Here, we visualized intracellular cGMP in AWC neurons with a genetically encoded cGMP indicator and examined how

  3. Engineering nanostructured polymer blends with controlled nanoparticle location for excellent microwave absorption: a compartmentalized approach.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Sourav; Kar, Goutam Prasanna; Bose, Suryasarathi

    2015-07-14

    In order to obtain better materials, control over the precise location of nanoparticles is indispensable. It is shown here that ordered arrangements of nanoparticles, possessing different characteristics (electrical/magnetic dipoles), in the blend structure can result in excellent microwave absorption. This is manifested from a high reflection loss of ca. -67 dB for the best blend structure designed here. To attenuate electromagnetic radiation, the key parameters of high electrical conductivity and large dielectric/magnetic loss are targeted here by including a conductive material [multiwall carbon nanotubes, MWNTs], ferroelectric nanostructured material with associated relaxations in the GHz frequency [barium titanate, BT] and lossy ferromagnetic nanoparticles [nickel ferrite, NF]. In this study, bi-continuous structures were designed using 50/50 (by wt) blends of polycarbonate (PC) and polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF). The MWNTs were modified using an electron acceptor molecule, a derivative of perylenediimide, which facilitates π-π stacking with the nanotubes and stimulates efficient charge transport in the blends. The nanoscopic materials have specific affinity towards the PVDF phase. Hence, by introducing surface-active groups, an ordered arrangement can be tailored. To accomplish this, both BT and NF were first hydroxylated followed by the introduction of amine-terminal groups on the surface. The latter facilitated nucleophilic substitution reactions with PC and resulted in their precise location. In this study, we have shown for the first time that by a compartmentalized approach, superior EM attenuation can be achieved. For instance, when the nanoparticles were localized exclusively in the PVDF phase or in both the phases, the minimum reflection losses were ca. -18 dB (for the MWNT/BT mixture) and -29 dB (for the MWNT/NF mixture), and the shielding occurred primarily through reflection. Interestingly, by adopting the compartmentalized approach wherein the

  4. Evaluation of cancer stem cell migration using compartmentalizing microfluidic devices and live cell imaging.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yu; Agrawal, Basheal; Clark, Paul A; Williams, Justin C; Kuo, John S

    2011-12-23

    In the last 40 years, the United States invested over 200 billion dollars on cancer research, resulting in only a 5% decrease in death rate. A major obstacle for improving patient outcomes is the poor understanding of mechanisms underlying cellular migration associated with aggressive cancer cell invasion, metastasis and therapeutic resistance. Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM), the most prevalent primary malignant adult brain tumor, exemplifies this difficulty. Despite standard surgery, radiation and chemotherapies, patient median survival is only fifteen months, due to aggressive GBM infiltration into adjacent brain and rapid cancer recurrence. The interactions of aberrant cell migratory mechanisms and the tumor microenvironment likely differentiate cancer from normal cells. Therefore, improving therapeutic approaches for GBM require a better understanding of cancer cell migration mechanisms. Recent work suggests that a small subpopulation of cells within GBM, the brain tumor stem cell (BTSC), may be responsible for therapeutic resistance and recurrence. Mechanisms underlying BTSC migratory capacity are only starting to be characterized. Due to a limitation in visual inspection and geometrical manipulation, conventional migration assays are restricted to quantifying overall cell populations. In contrast, microfluidic devices permit single cell analysis because of compatibility with modern microscopy and control over micro-environment. We present a method for detailed characterization of BTSC migration using compartmentalizing microfluidic devices. These PDMS-made devices cast the tissue culture environment into three connected compartments: seeding chamber, receiving chamber and bridging microchannels. We tailored the device such that both chambers hold sufficient media to support viable BTSC for 4-5 days without media exchange. Highly mobile BTSCs initially introduced into the seeding chamber are isolated after migration though bridging microchannels to the parallel

  5. Synthesis of Monodisperse Bi-Compartmentalized Amphiphilic Janus Microparticles for Tailored Assembly at the Oil-Water Interface.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jeong Won; Cho, Jangwoo; Cho, Jaehong; Park, Bum Jun; Kim, Yong-Jin; Choi, Kyung-Ho; Kim, Jin Woong

    2016-03-24

    Janus particles endowed with controlled anisotropies represent promising building blocks and assembly materials because of their asymmetric functionalities. Herein, we show that using the seeded monomer swelling and polymerization technique allows us to obtain bi-compartmentalized Janus microparticles that are generated depending on the phase miscibility of the poly (alkyl acrylate) chains against the polystyrene seed, thus minimizing the interfacial free energy. When tetradecyl acrylate is used, complete compartmentalization into two distinct bulbs can be achieved, while tuning the relative dimension ratio of compartmented bulb against the whole particle. Finally, we have demonstrated that selectively patching the silica nanoparticles onto one of the bulb surfaces gives amphiphilicity to the particles that can assemble at the oil-water interface with a designated level of adhesion, thus leading to development of a highly stable Pickering emulsion system.

  6. Gadoxetate-enhanced MR imaging and compartmental modelling to assess hepatocyte bidirectional transport function in rats with advanced liver fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Giraudeau, Céline; Leporq, Benjamin; Doblas, Sabrina; Lagadec, Matthieu; Pastor, Catherine M; Daire, Jean-Luc; Van Beers, Bernard E

    2017-05-01

    Changes in the expression of hepatocyte membrane transporters in advanced fibrosis decrease the hepatic transport function of organic anions. The aim of our study was to assess if these changes can be evaluated with pharmacokinetic analysis of the hepatobiliary transport of the MR contrast agent gadoxetate. Dynamic gadoxetate-enhanced MRI was performed in 17 rats with advanced fibrosis and 8 normal rats. After deconvolution, hepatocyte three-compartmental analysis was performed to calculate the hepatocyte influx, biliary efflux and sinusoidal backflux rates. The expression of Oatp1a1, Mrp2 and Mrp3 organic anion membrane transporters was assessed with reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. In the rats with advanced fibrosis, the influx and efflux rates of gadoxetate decreased and the backflux rate increased significantly (p = 0.003, 0.041 and 0.010, respectively). Significant correlations were found between influx and Oatp1a1 expression (r = 0.78, p < 0.001), biliary efflux and Mrp2 (r = 0.50, p = 0.016) and sinusoidal backflux and Mrp3 (r = 0.61, p = 0.002). These results show that changes in the bidirectional organic anion hepatocyte transport function in rats with advanced liver fibrosis can be assessed with compartmental analysis of gadoxetate-enhanced MRI. • Expression of hepatocyte transporters is modified in rats with advanced liver fibrosis. • Kinetic parameters at gadoxetate-enhanced MRI are correlated with hepatocyte transporter expression. • Hepatocyte transport function can be assessed with compartmental analysis of gadoxetate-enhanced MRI. • Compartmental analysis of gadoxetate-enhanced MRI might provide biomarkers in advanced liver fibrosis.

  7. Adenylyl Cyclase Subtype-Specific Compartmentalization: Differential Regulation of L-type Ca2+ Current in Ventricular Myocytes

    PubMed Central

    Timofeyev, Valeriy; Myers, Richard E.; Kim, Hyo Jeong; Woltz, Ryan L.; Sirish, Padmini; Heiserman, James P.; Li, Ning; Singapuri, Anil; Tang, Tong; Yarov-Yarovoy, Vladimir; Yamoah, Ebenezer N.; Hammond, H. Kirk; Chiamvimonvat, Nipavan

    2013-01-01

    Rationale Adenylyl cyclase (AC) represents one of the principal molecules in the β-adrenergic receptor (βAR) signaling pathway, responsible for the conversion of ATP to the second messenger, cAMP. AC type 5 (ACV) and 6 (ACVI) are the two main isoforms in the heart. While highly homologous in sequence, these two proteins nevertheless play different roles during the development of heart failure. Caveolin-3 is a scaffolding protein, integrating many intracellular signaling molecules in specialized areas called caveolae. In cardiomyocytes, caveolin is predominantly located along invaginations of the cell membrane known as t-tubules. Objective We take advantage of ACV and ACVI knockout mouse models to test the hypothesis that there is distinct compartmentalization of these two isoforms in ventricular myocytes. Methods and Results We demonstrate that ACV and ACVI isoforms exhibit distinct subcellular localization. ACVI isoform is localized in the plasma membrane outside of the t-tubular region, and is responsible for β1AR signaling-mediated enhancement of the L-type Ca2+ current (ICa,L) in ventricular myocytes. In contrast, ACV isoform is localized mainly in the t-tubular region where its influence on ICa,L is restricted by phosphodiesterase (PDE). We further demonstrate that the interaction between caveolin-3 with ACV and PDE is responsible for the compartmentalization of ACV signaling. Conclusions Our results provide new insights into the compartmentalization of the two AC isoforms in the regulation of ICa,L in ventricular myocytes. Since caveolae are found in most mammalian cells, the mechanism of βAR and AC compartmentalization may also be important for βAR signaling in other cell types. PMID:23609114

  8. Proposing a Compartmental Model for Leprosy and Parameterizing Using Regional Incidence in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Smith, Rebecca Lee

    2016-08-01

    Hansen's disease (HD), or leprosy, is still considered a public health risk in much of Brazil. Understanding the dynamics of the infection at a regional level can aid in identification of targets to improve control. A compartmental continuous-time model for leprosy dynamics was designed based on understanding of the biology of the infection. The transmission coefficients for the model and the rate of detection were fit for each region using Approximate Bayesian Computation applied to paucibacillary and multibacillary incidence data over the period of 2000 to 2010, and model fit was validated on incidence data from 2011 to 2012. Regional variation was noted in detection rate, with cases in the Midwest estimated to be infectious for 10 years prior to detection compared to 5 years for most other regions. Posterior predictions for the model estimated that elimination of leprosy as a public health risk would require, on average, 44-45 years in the three regions with the highest prevalence. The model is easily adaptable to other settings, and can be studied to determine the efficacy of improved case finding on leprosy control.

  9. Microfluidic device for the formation of optically excitable, three-dimensional, compartmentalized motor units

    PubMed Central

    Uzel, Sebastien G. M.; Platt, Randall J.; Subramanian, Vidya; Pearl, Taylor M.; Rowlands, Christopher J.; Chan, Vincent; Boyer, Laurie A.; So, Peter T. C.; Kamm, Roger D.

    2016-01-01

    Motor units are the fundamental elements responsible for muscle movement. They are formed by lower motor neurons and their muscle targets, synapsed via neuromuscular junctions (NMJs). The loss of NMJs in neurodegenerative disorders (such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis or spinal muscle atrophy) or as a result of traumatic injuries affects millions of lives each year. Developing in vitro assays that closely recapitulate the physiology of neuromuscular tissues is crucial to understand the formation and maturation of NMJs, as well as to help unravel the mechanisms leading to their degeneration and repair. We present a microfluidic platform designed to coculture myoblast-derived muscle strips and motor neurons differentiated from mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs) within a three-dimensional (3D) hydrogel. The device geometry mimics the spinal cord–limb physical separation by compartmentalizing the two cell types, which also facilitates the observation of 3D neurite outgrowth and remote muscle innervation. Moreover, the use of compliant pillars as anchors for muscle strips provides a quantitative functional readout of force generation. Finally, photosensitizing the ESC provides a pool of source cells that can be differentiated into optically excitable motor neurons, allowing for spatiodynamic, versatile, and noninvasive in vitro control of the motor units. PMID:27493991

  10. Plasma Membrane Polarity and Compartmentalization are Established Before Cellularization in the Fly Embryo

    PubMed Central

    Mavrakis, Manos; Rikhy, Richa; Lippincott-Schwartz, Jennifer

    2009-01-01

    Summary Patterning in the Drosophila embryo requires local activation and dynamics of proteins in the plasma membrane (PM). We used in vivo fluorescence imaging to characterize the organization and diffusional properties of the PM in the early embryonic syncytium. Before cellularization, the PM is polarized into discrete domains having epithelial-like characteristics. One domain resides above individual nuclei and has apical-like characteristics, while the other domain is lateral to nuclei and contains markers associated with basolateral membranes and junctions. Pulse-chase photoconversion experiments show that molecules can diffuse within each domain but do not exchange between PM regions above adjacent nuclei. Drug-induced F-actin depolymerization disrupted both the apicobasal-like polarity and the diffusion barriers within the syncytial PM. These events correlated with perturbations in the spatial pattern of dorsoventral Toll signaling. We propose that epithelial-like properties and an intact F-actin network compartmentalize the PM and shape morphogen gradients in the syncytial embryo. PMID:19154721

  11. Local Microenvironment Controls the Compartmentalization of NK Cell Responses during Systemic Inflammation in Mice.

    PubMed

    Rasid, Orhan; Ciulean, Ioana Sonya; Fitting, Catherine; Doyen, Noelle; Cavaillon, Jean-Marc

    2016-09-15

    Systemic inflammatory response syndrome is a whole-body reaction to a triggering insult that often results in life-threatening illness. Contributing to the development of this inflammatory cascade are numerous cellular partners, among which NK cells were shown to play a key role. Accumulating evidence points to organ-specific properties of systemic inflammation and NK cells. However, little is known about compartment-specific activation of NK cells during systemic inflammatory response syndrome or the relative contribution of NK cell-intrinsic properties and microenvironmental cues. In this study, we undertook a sequential characterization of NK responses in the spleen, lungs, bone marrow, peritoneum, and blood using a mouse model of endotoxemia. We report that, despite similar systemic dynamics of NK cell responses, expression of activation markers (CD69 and CD25) and effector molecules (IFN-γ, granzyme B, and IL-10) display organ-specific thresholds of maximum activation. Using adoptive transfers of spleen and lung NK cells, we found that these cells have the capacity to quickly adapt to a new environment and adjust their response levels to that of resident NK cells. This functional adaptation occurs without significant alterations in phenotype and independently of subpopulation-specific trafficking. Thus, using a dynamic in vivo-transfer system, to our knowledge our study is the first to report the compartmentalization of NK cells responses during systemic inflammation and to show that NK cell-intrinsic properties and microenvironmental cues are involved in this process, in a sequential manner.

  12. PGI2 synthesis and excretion in dog kidney: evidence for renal PG compartmentalization

    SciTech Connect

    Boyd, R.M.; Nasjletti, A.; Heerdt, P.M.; Baer, P.G.

    1986-01-01

    To assess the concept of compartmentalization of renal prostaglandins (PG), we compared entry of PGE2 and the PGI2 metabolite 6-keto-PGF1 alpha into the renal vascular and tubular compartments, in sodium pentobarbital-anesthetized dogs. Renal arterial 6-keto-PGF1 alpha infusion increased both renal venous and urinary 6-keto-PGF1 alpha outflow. In contrast, renal arterial infusion of arachidonic acid (AA) or bradykinin (BK) increased renal venous 6-keto-PGF1 alpha outflow but had no effect on its urinary outflow. Both urinary and renal venous PGE2 outflows increased during AA or BK infusion. Ureteral stopped-flow studies revealed no postglomerular 6-keto-PGF1 alpha entry into tubular fluid. During renal arterial infusion of (3H)PGI2 and inulin, first-pass 3H clearance was 40% of inulin clearance; 35% of urinary 3H was 6-keto-PGF1 alpha, and two other urinary metabolites were found. During renal arterial infusion of (3H)6-keto-PGF1 alpha and inulin, first-pass 3H clearance was 150% of inulin clearance; 75% of urinary 3H was 6-keto-PGF1 alpha, and only one other metabolite was found. We conclude that in the dog PGE2 synthesized in the kidney enters directly into both the renal vascular and tubular compartments, but 6-keto-PGF1 alpha of renal origin enters directly into only the renal vascular compartment.

  13. Nucleolus-like compartmentalization of the transcription machinery in fast-growing bacterial cells.

    PubMed

    Jin, Ding Jun; Mata Martin, Carmen; Sun, Zhe; Cagliero, Cedric; Zhou, Yan Ning

    2017-02-01

    We have learned a great deal about RNA polymerase (RNA Pol), transcription factors, and the transcriptional regulation mechanisms in prokaryotes for specific genes, operons, or transcriptomes. However, we have only begun to understand how the transcription machinery is three-dimensionally (3D) organized into bacterial chromosome territories to orchestrate the transcription process and to maintain harmony with the replication machinery in the cell. Much progress has been made recently in our understanding of the spatial organization of the transcription machinery in fast-growing Escherichia coli cells using state-of-the-art superresolution imaging techniques. Co-imaging of RNA polymerase (RNA Pol) with DNA and transcription elongation factors involved in ribosomal RNA (rRNA) synthesis, and ribosome biogenesis has revealed similarities between bacteria and eukaryotes in the spatial organization of the transcription machinery for growth genes, most of which are rRNA genes. Evidence supports the notion that RNA Pol molecules are concentrated, forming foci at the clustering of rRNA operons resembling the eukaryotic nucleolus. RNA Pol foci are proposed to be active transcription factories for both rRNA genes expression and ribosome biogenesis to support maximal growth in optimal growing conditions. Thus, in fast-growing bacterial cells, RNA Pol foci mimic eukaryotic Pol I activity, and transcription factories resemble nucleolus-like compartmentation. In addition, the transcription and replication machineries are mostly segregated in space to avoid the conflict between the two major cellular functions in fast-growing cells.

  14. Modeling Heterogeneity in Direct Infectious Disease Transmission in a Compartmental Model.

    PubMed

    Kong, Lingcai; Wang, Jinfeng; Han, Weiguo; Cao, Zhidong

    2016-02-24

    Mathematical models have been used to understand the transmission dynamics of infectious diseases and to assess the impact of intervention strategies. Traditional mathematical models usually assume a homogeneous mixing in the population, which is rarely the case in reality. Here, we construct a new transmission function by using as the probability density function a negative binomial distribution, and we develop a compartmental model using it to model the heterogeneity of contact rates in the population. We explore the transmission dynamics of the developed model using numerical simulations with different parameter settings, which characterize different levels of heterogeneity. The results show that when the reproductive number, R₀, is larger than one, a low level of heterogeneity results in dynamics similar to those predicted by the homogeneous mixing model. As the level of heterogeneity increases, the dynamics become more different. As a test case, we calibrated the model with the case incidence data for severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) in Beijing in 2003, and the estimated parameters demonstrated the effectiveness of the control measures taken during that period.

  15. A clickable neurosteroid photolabel reveals selective Golgi compartmentalization with preferential impact on proximal inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Xiaoping; Shu, Hong-Jin; Krishnan, Kathiresan; Qian, Mingxing; Taylor, Amanda A.; Covey, Douglas F.; Zorumski, Charles F.; Mennerick, Steven

    2016-01-01

    Anesthetic, GABA-active neurosteroids potently augment GABAA receptor function, leading to important behavioral consequences. Neurosteroids and their synthetic analogues are also models for a wide variety of cell-permeant neuroactive compounds. Cell permeation and compartmentalization raise the possibility that these compounds’ actions are influenced by their cellular partitioning, but these contributions are not typically considered experimentally or therapeutically. To examine the interplay between cellular accumulation and pharmacodynamics of neurosteroids, we synthesized a novel chemical biology analogue (bio-active, clickable photolabel) of GABA-active neurosteroids. We discovered that the analogue selectively photo-labels neuronal Golgi in rat hippocampal neurons. The active analogue’s selective distribution was distinct from endogenous cholesterol and not completely shared by some non-GABA active, neurosteroid-like analogues. On the other hand, the distribution was not enantioselective and did not require energy, in contrast to other recent precedents from the literature. We demonstrate that the soma-selective accumulation can act as a sink or source for steroid actions at plasma-membrane GABA receptors, altering steady-state and time course of effects at somatic GABAA receptors relative to dendritic receptors. Our results suggest a novel mechanism for compartment-selective drug actions at plasma-membrane receptors. PMID:27114255

  16. Compartmentalized system with membrane-bound glycerol kinase. Activity and product distribution versus asymmetrical substrate supply.

    PubMed Central

    Girard, A; Merchie, B; Maïsterrena, B

    1991-01-01

    An artificial-membrane-bound glycerokinase chosen as a membrane-bound two-substrate-enzyme model has been used to separate two unequal compartments of a specially designed diffusion cell. An interesting feature is the asymmetry of compartments and the existence of a diffusion layer adjacent to only one face of the enzymic membrane. In such a situation the apparent enzyme activity and the product distribution in the system have been studied versus all the possibilities of combination of ATP and glycerol supply. Our approach has lead us to differentiate two different roles played by a diffusion layer adjacent to a permeable enzymic membrane. Depending on the spatial origin of the enzymic substrates (i.e. from which compartment they derive), the diffusion layer can play either the role of a passive additional resistance to that of the membrane or the role of a third compartment in which the reaction product can partially accumulate before splitting on both parts of the membrane. Our results mainly demonstrate that a membrane-bound enzyme activity and the resulting product distribution occurring in a compartmentalized system may be regulated by the cumulative effect due to the asymmetry in volumes of the compartments, the presence of a diffusion layer and the different possibilities of substrate supply. With the topography studied, which is close to that reported for many 'in vivo' situations, the product may be diffused lead to vectorial metabolism processes. PMID:2012608

  17. The use of microelectrodes to investigate compartmentation and the transport of metabolized inorganic ions in plants.

    PubMed

    Miller, A J; Cookson, S J; Smith, S J; Wells, D M

    2001-04-01

    Microelectrode measurements can be used to investigate both the intracellular pools of ions and membrane transport processes of single living cells. Microelectrodes can report these processes in the surface layers of root and leaf cells of intact plants. By careful manipulation of the plant, a minimum of disruption is produced and therefore the information obtained from these measurements most probably represents the 'in vivo' situation. Microelectrodes can be used to assay for the activity of particular transport systems in the plasma membrane of cells. Compartmental concentrations of inorganic metabolite ions have been measured by several different methods and the results obtained for the cytosol are compared. Ion-selective microelectrodes have been used to measure the activities of ions in the apoplast, cytosol and vacuole of single cells. New sensors for these microelectrodes are being produced which offer lower detection limits and the opportunity to measure other previously unmeasured ions. Measurements can be used to determine the intracellular steady-state activities or report the response of cells to environmental changes.

  18. Origin and evolution of metabolic sub-cellular compartmentalization in eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Gabaldón, Toni; Pittis, Alexandros A

    2015-12-01

    A high level of subcellular compartmentalization is a hallmark of eukaryotic cells. This intricate internal organization was present already in the common ancestor of all extant eukaryotes, and the determination of the origins and early evolution of the different organelles remains largely elusive. Organellar proteomes are determined through regulated pathways that target proteins produced in the cytosol to their final subcellular destinations. This internal sorting of proteins can vary across different physiological conditions, cell types and lineages. Evolutionary retargeting - the alteration of a subcellular localization of a protein in the course of evolution - has been rampant in eukaryotes and involves any possible combination of organelles. This fact adds another layer of difficulty to the reconstruction of the origins and evolution of organelles. In this review we discuss current themes in relation to the origin and evolution of organellar proteomes. Throughout the text, a special focus is set on the evolution of mitochondrial and peroxisomal proteomes, which are two organelles for which extensive proteomic and evolutionary studies have been performed.

  19. Single cell digital polymerase chain reaction on self-priming compartmentalization chip.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Qiangyuan; Qiu, Lin; Xu, Yanan; Li, Guang; Mu, Ying

    2017-01-01

    Single cell analysis provides a new framework for understanding biology and disease, however, an absolute quantification of single cell gene expression still faces many challenges. Microfluidic digital polymerase chain reaction (PCR) provides a unique method to absolutely quantify the single cell gene expression, but only limited devices are developed to analyze a single cell with detection variation. This paper describes a self-priming compartmentalization (SPC) microfluidic digital polymerase chain reaction chip being capable of performing single molecule amplification from single cell. The chip can be used to detect four single cells simultaneously with 85% of sample digitization. With the optimized protocol for the SPC chip, we first tested the ability, precision, and sensitivity of our SPC digital PCR chip by assessing β-actin DNA gene expression in 1, 10, 100, and 1000 cells. And the reproducibility of the SPC chip is evaluated by testing 18S rRNA of single cells with 1.6%-4.6% of coefficient of variation. At last, by detecting the lung cancer related genes, PLAU gene expression of A549 cells at the single cell level, the single cell heterogeneity was demonstrated. So, with the power-free, valve-free SPC chip, the gene copy number of single cells can be quantified absolutely with higher sensitivity, reduced labor time, and reagent. We expect that this chip will enable new studies for biology and disease.

  20. Towards a human-on-chip: culturing multiple cell types on a chip with compartmentalized microenvironments.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chi; Zhao, Ziqing; Abdul Rahim, Nur Aida; van Noort, Danny; Yu, Hanry

    2009-11-21

    We have developed a multi-channel 3D microfluidic cell culture system (multi-channel 3D-microFCCS) with compartmentalized microenvironments for potential application in human drug screening. To this end, the multi-channel 3D-microFCCS was designed for culturing different 3D cellular aggregates simultaneously to mimic multiple organs in the body. Four human cell types (C3A, A549, HK-2 and HPA) were chosen to represent the liver, lung, kidney and the adipose tissue, respectively. Cellular functions were optimized by supplementing the common medium with growth factors. However, TGF-beta1 was found to enhance A549 functions but inhibit C3A functions. Therefore, TGF-beta1 was specifically controlled-released inside the A549 compartment by means of gelatin microspheres mixed with cells, thus creating a cell-specific microenvironment. The function of A549 cells was enhanced while the functions of C3A, HK-2 and HPA cells were uncompromised, demonstrating the limited cross-talk between cell culture compartments similar to the in vivo situation. Such a multi-channel 3D-microFCCS could be potentially used to supplement or even replace animal models in drug screening.

  1. Targeted Degradation of CTCF Decouples Local Insulation of Chromosome Domains from Genomic Compartmentalization.

    PubMed

    Nora, Elphège P; Goloborodko, Anton; Valton, Anne-Laure; Gibcus, Johan H; Uebersohn, Alec; Abdennur, Nezar; Dekker, Job; Mirny, Leonid A; Bruneau, Benoit G

    2017-05-18

    The molecular mechanisms underlying folding of mammalian chromosomes remain poorly understood. The transcription factor CTCF is a candidate regulator of chromosomal structure. Using the auxin-inducible degron system in mouse embryonic stem cells, we show that CTCF is absolutely and dose-dependently required for looping between CTCF target sites and insulation of topologically associating domains (TADs). Restoring CTCF reinstates proper architecture on altered chromosomes, indicating a powerful instructive function for CTCF in chromatin folding. CTCF remains essential for TAD organization in non-dividing cells. Surprisingly, active and inactive genome compartments remain properly segregated upon CTCF depletion, revealing that compartmentalization of mammalian chromosomes emerges independently of proper insulation of TADs. Furthermore, our data support that CTCF mediates transcriptional insulator function through enhancer blocking but not as a direct barrier to heterochromatin spreading. Beyond defining the functions of CTCF in chromosome folding, these results provide new fundamental insights into the rules governing mammalian genome organization. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. A Tale of Genome Compartmentalization: The Evolution of Virulence Clusters in Smut Fungi

    PubMed Central

    Dutheil, Julien Y.; Mannhaupt, Gertrud; Schweizer, Gabriel; M.K. Sieber, Christian; Münsterkötter, Martin; Güldener, Ulrich; Schirawski, Jan; Kahmann, Regine

    2016-01-01

    Smut fungi are plant pathogens mostly parasitizing wild species of grasses as well as domesticated cereal crops. Genome analysis of several smut fungi including Ustilago maydis revealed a singular clustered organization of genes encoding secreted effectors. In U. maydis, many of these clusters have a role in virulence. Reconstructing the evolutionary history of clusters of effector genes is difficult because of their intrinsically fast evolution, which erodes the phylogenetic signal and homology relationships. Here, we describe the use of comparative evolutionary analyses of quality draft assemblies of genomes to study the mechanisms of this evolution. We report the genome sequence of a South African isolate of Sporisorium scitamineum, a smut fungus parasitizing sugar cane with a phylogenetic position intermediate to the two previously sequenced species U. maydis and Sporisorium reilianum. We show that the genome of S. scitamineum contains more and larger gene clusters encoding secreted effectors than any previously described species in this group. We trace back the origin of the clusters and find that their evolution is mainly driven by tandem gene duplication. In addition, transposable elements play a major role in the evolution of the clustered genes. Transposable elements are significantly associated with clusters of genes encoding fast evolving secreted effectors. This suggests that such clusters represent a case of genome compartmentalization that restrains the activity of transposable elements on genes under diversifying selection for which this activity is potentially beneficial, while protecting the rest of the genome from its deleterious effect. PMID:26872771

  3. A Tale of Genome Compartmentalization: The Evolution of Virulence Clusters in Smut Fungi.

    PubMed

    Dutheil, Julien Y; Mannhaupt, Gertrud; Schweizer, Gabriel; M K Sieber, Christian; Münsterkötter, Martin; Güldener, Ulrich; Schirawski, Jan; Kahmann, Regine

    2016-02-12

    Smut fungi are plant pathogens mostly parasitizing wild species of grasses as well as domesticated cereal crops. Genome analysis of several smut fungi including Ustilago maydis revealed a singular clustered organization of genes encoding secreted effectors. In U. maydis, many of these clusters have a role in virulence. Reconstructing the evolutionary history of clusters of effector genes is difficult because of their intrinsically fast evolution, which erodes the phylogenetic signal and homology relationships. Here, we describe the use of comparative evolutionary analyses of quality draft assemblies of genomes to study the mechanisms of this evolution. We report the genome sequence of a South African isolate of Sporisorium scitamineum, a smut fungus parasitizing sugar cane with a phylogenetic position intermediate to the two previously sequenced species U. maydis and Sporisorium reilianum. We show that the genome of S. scitamineum contains more and larger gene clusters encoding secreted effectors than any previously described species in this group. We trace back the origin of the clusters and find that their evolution is mainly driven by tandem gene duplication. In addition, transposable elements play a major role in the evolution of the clustered genes. Transposable elements are significantly associated with clusters of genes encoding fast evolving secreted effectors. This suggests that such clusters represent a case of genome compartmentalization that restrains the activity of transposable elements on genes under diversifying selection for which this activity is potentially beneficial, while protecting the rest of the genome from its deleterious effect.

  4. Origin and evolution of metabolic sub-cellular compartmentalization in eukaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Gabaldón, Toni; Pittis, Alexandros A.

    2015-01-01

    A high level of subcellular compartmentalization is a hallmark of eukaryotic cells. This intricate internal organization was present already in the common ancestor of all extant eukaryotes, and the determination of the origins and early evolution of the different organelles remains largely elusive. Organellar proteomes are determined through regulated pathways that target proteins produced in the cytosol to their final subcellular destinations. This internal sorting of proteins can vary across different physiological conditions, cell types and lineages. Evolutionary retargeting – the alteration of a subcellular localization of a protein in the course of evolution – has been rampant in eukaryotes and involves any possible combination of organelles. This fact adds another layer of difficulty to the reconstruction of the origins and evolution of organelles. In this review we discuss current themes in relation to the origin and evolution of organellar proteomes. Throughout the text, a special focus is set on the evolution of mitochondrial and peroxisomal proteomes, which are two organelles for which extensive proteomic and evolutionary studies have been performed. PMID:25869000

  5. A compartmentalized culture device for studying the axons of CNS neurons.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Mei-Yun; Ho, Hsing-Hua; Huang, Tsung-Kai; Chuang, Chih-Fan; Chen, Hui-Yu; Chung, Hui-Wen; Leong, Wan-Chong; Yang, Wen-Cheng; Fu, Chien-Chung; Hsu, Yun-Hsin; Chang, Yen-Chung

    2017-09-21

    We report here the development of a compartmentalized culture device that allows the spatial separation of the somatodendrites and axons of central nervous system (CNS) neurons. The device consists of two compartments separated by a septum constructed by attaching a porous polycarbonate track etch (PCTE) filter on top of a microchannel-filled polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) membrane. The surface and microchannels of the septum are coated and filled, respectively, with materials that support neuron growth and neurite migration. When rat hippocampal neurons are cultured in the top compartment, axons are the only processes that can migrate through the septum to the bottom compartment. The axons in the bottom compartment can be studied directly in real-time or through immunofluorescence staining after fixation. Axons containing ∼3 μg protein can be isolated from each device for biochemical analyses. In addition, the septum also impedes the movement of small molecules between the top and bottom compartments. This feature allows the somatodendrites and axons of neurons, which occupy the top and bottom compartments of the device, respectively, to be manipulated independently. The potential applications of the device as a tool in diverse studies concerning neuronal axons and in screening reagents that regulate axonal functions have also been discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. The SPECT/CT Evaluation of Compartmental Changes after Open Wedge High Tibial Osteotomy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Tae Won; Kim, Byung Kag; Kim, Dong Whan; Sim, Jae Ang; Lee, Beom Koo; Lee, Yong Seuk

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to evaluate compartmental changes using combined single-photon emission computerized tomography and conventional computerized tomography (SPECT/CT) after open wedge high tibial osteotomy (OWHTO) for providing clinical guidance for proper correction. Materials and Methods Analysis was performed using SPECT/CT from around 1 year after surgery on 22 patients who underwent OWHTO. Postoperative mechanical axis was measured and classified into 3 groups: group I (varus), group II (0°–3° valgus), and group III (>3° valgus). Patella location was evaluated using Blackburne-Peel (BP) ratio. On SPECT/CT, the knee joint was divided into medial, lateral, and patellofemoral compartments and the brighter signal was marked as a positive signal. Results Increased signal activity in the medial compartment was observed in 12 cases. No correlation was observed between postoperative mechanical axis and medial signal increase. Lateral increased signal activity was observed in 3 cases, and as valgus degree increased, lateral compartment’s signal activity increased. Increased signal activity of the patellofemoral joint was observed in 7 cases, and significant correlation was observed between changes in BP ratio and increased signal activity. Conclusions For the treatment of medial osteoarthritis, OWHTO requires overcorrection that does not exceed 3 valgus. In addition, the possibility of a patellofemoral joint problem after OWHTO should be kept in mind. PMID:27894172

  7. Modeling Heterogeneity in Direct Infectious Disease Transmission in a Compartmental Model

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Lingcai; Wang, Jinfeng; Han, Weiguo; Cao, Zhidong

    2016-01-01

    Mathematical models have been used to understand the transmission dynamics of infectious diseases and to assess the impact of intervention strategies. Traditional mathematical models usually assume a homogeneous mixing in the population, which is rarely the case in reality. Here, we construct a new transmission function by using as the probability density function a negative binomial distribution, and we develop a compartmental model using it to model the heterogeneity of contact rates in the population. We explore the transmission dynamics of the developed model using numerical simulations with different parameter settings, which characterize different levels of heterogeneity. The results show that when the reproductive number, R0, is larger than one, a low level of heterogeneity results in dynamics similar to those predicted by the homogeneous mixing model. As the level of heterogeneity increases, the dynamics become more different. As a test case, we calibrated the model with the case incidence data for severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) in Beijing in 2003, and the estimated parameters demonstrated the effectiveness of the control measures taken during that period. PMID:26927140

  8. Three-compartmental analysis of effects of D-propranolol on thyroid hormone kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Van Der Heijden, J.T.M.; Krenning, E.P.; Van Toor, H.; Hennemann, G.; Docter, R. )

    1988-07-01

    Tracer thyroxine (T{sub 4}), 3,3{prime},5-triiodothyronine (T{sub 3}), and 3,3{prime},5{prime}-triiodothyronine (rT{sub 3}) kinetic studies were performed in normal T{sub 4} substituted subjects before and during oral D-propranolol treatment to determine whether changes in thyroid hormone metabolism in a propranolol-induced low-T{sub 3} syndrome result from inhibition of 5{prime}-deiodination or inhibition of transport of iodothyronines into tissues. Data were analyzed according to a three-compartmental model of distribution and metabolism. No changes were observed in size of the three T{sub 4} compartments or in fractional and mass transfer rates of T{sub 4} from plasma to the rapidly (REP) and slowly (SEP) equilibrating pools. Serum T{sub 3}, free T{sub 3}, T{sub 3} plasma pool, T{sub 3} mass transfer rate to REP and SEP, and the T{sub 3} pool masses were all significantly decreased during propranolol to a similar extent as the T{sub 3} plasma production rate (PR). It is concluded that the D-propranolol-induced changes in thyroid hormone metabolism, resulting in a low-T{sub 3} syndrome, are due to inhibition of thyroid hormone deiodination. This is in contrast to the low-T{sub 3} syndrome during caloric deprivation, which results from inhibition of transport of iodothyronines into the liver.

  9. Some Formal Approaches to the Analysis of Kinetic Data in Terms of Linear Compartmental Systems

    PubMed Central

    Berman, Mones; Shahn, Ezra; Weiss, Marjory F.

    1962-01-01

    A formal approach to the routine analysis of kinetic data in terms of linear compartmental systems is presented. The methods of analysis are general in that they include much of the theory in common use, such as direct solution of differential equations, integral equations, transfer functions, fitting of data to sums of exponentials, matrix solutions, etc. The key to the formalism presented lies in the fact that a basic operational unit—called “compartment”—has been defined, in terms of which physical and mathematical models as well as input and output functions can be expressed. Additional features for calculating linear combinations of functions and for setting linear dependence relations between parameters add to the versatility of this method. The actual computations for the values of model parameters to yield a least squares fit of the data are performed on a digital computer. A general computer program was developed that permits the routine fitting of data and the evolution of models. PMID:13867976

  10. Systems infection biology: a compartmentalized immune network of pig spleen challenged with Haemophilus parasuis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Network biology (systems biology) approaches are useful tools for elucidating the host infection processes that often accompany complex immune networks. Although many studies have recently focused on Haemophilus parasuis, a model of Gram-negative bacterium, little attention has been paid to the host's immune response to infection. In this article, we use network biology to investigate infection with Haemophilus parasuis in an in vivo pig model. Results By targeting the spleen immunogenome, we established an expression signature indicative of H. parasuis infection using a PCA/GSEA combined method. We reconstructed the immune network and estimated the network topology parameters that characterize the immunogene expressions in response to H. parasuis infection. The results showed that the immune network of H. parasuis infection is compartmentalized (not globally linked). Statistical analysis revealed that the reconstructed network is scale-free but not small-world. Based on the quantitative topological prioritization, we inferred that the C1R-centered clique might play a vital role in responding to H. parasuis infection. Conclusions Here, we provide the first report of reconstruction of the immune network in H. parasuis-infected porcine spleen. The distinguishing feature of our work is the focus on utilizing the immunogenome for a network biology-oriented analysis. Our findings complement and extend the frontiers of knowledge of host infection biology for H. parasuis and also provide a new clue for systems infection biology of Gram-negative bacilli in mammals. PMID:23339624

  11. Compartmental microfluidic system for studying muscle-neuron communication and neuromuscular junction maintenance.

    PubMed

    Ionescu, Ariel; Zahavi, Eitan Erez; Gradus, Tal; Ben-Yaakov, Keren; Perlson, Eran

    2016-02-01

    Molecular communication between the motoneuron and the muscle is vital for neuromuscular junction (NMJ) formation and maintenance. Disruption in the structure and function of NMJs is a hallmark of various neurodegenerative processes during both development and pathological events. Still due to the complexity of this process, it is very difficult to elucidate the cellular mechanisms underlying it, generating a keen interest for developing better tools for investigating it. Here we describe a simplified method to study mechanisms of NMJs formation, maintenance and disruption. A spinal cord explant from mice expressing the Hb9::GFP motoneuron marker is plated on one side of a compartmental chamber, and myotubes derived from muscle satellite progenitor cells are plated on the other. The GFP labeled motoneurons extend their axons via microgrooves in the chamber to innervate the muscle cells and to form functional in-vitro NMJs. Next we provide procedures to measure axon growth and to reliably quantify NMJ activity using imaging of both muscle contractions and fast intracellular calcium changes. This platform allows precise control, monitoring and manipulation of subcellular microenvironments. Specifically, it enables to distinguish local from retrograde signaling mechanisms and allows restricted experimental intervention in local compartments along the muscle-neuron route.

  12. A Compartmental Model for Zika Virus with Dynamic Human and Vector Populations.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eva K; Liu, Yifan; Pietz, Ferdinand H

    2016-01-01

    The Zika virus (ZIKV) outbreak in South American countries and its potential association with microcephaly in newborns and Guillain-Barré Syndrome led the World Health Organization to declare a Public Health Emergency of International Concern. To understand the ZIKV disease dynamics and evaluate the effectiveness of different containment strategies, we propose a compartmental model with a vector-host structure for ZIKV. The model utilizes logistic growth in human population and dynamic growth in vector population. Using this model, we derive the basic reproduction number to gain insight on containment strategies. We contrast the impact and influence of different parameters on the virus trend and outbreak spread. We also evaluate different containment strategies and their combination effects to achieve early containment by minimizing total infections. This result can help decision makers select and invest in the strategies most effective to combat the infection spread. The decision-support tool demonstrates the importance of "digital disease surveillance" in response to waves of epidemics including ZIKV, Dengue, Ebola and cholera.

  13. Reservoir compartmentalization and management strategies: Lessons learned in the Illinois basin

    SciTech Connect

    Grube, J.P.; Crockett, J.E.; Huff, B.G.

    1997-08-01

    A research project jointly sponsored by the US Department of Energy and the Illinois State Geological Survey focused on the Cypress and Aux Vases Formations (Mississippian), major clastic reservoirs in the Illinois Basin. Results from the research showed that understanding the nature and distribution of reservoir compartments, and using effective reservoir management strategies, can significantly improve recovery efficiencies from oil fields in this mature basin. Compartments can be most effectively drained where they are geologically well defined and reservoir management practices are coordinated through unified, compartment-wide, development programs. Our studies showed that the Cypress and Aux Vases reservoirs contain lateral and vertical permeability barriers forming compartments that range in size from isolated, interlaminated sandstone and shale beds to sandstone bodies tens of feet in thickness and more than a mile in length. Stacked or shingled, genetically similar sandstone bodies are commonly separated by thin impermeable intervals that can be difficult to distinguish on logs and can, therefore, cause correlation problems, even between wells drilled on spacing of less than ten acres. Lateral separation of sandstone bodies causes similar problems. Reservoir compartmentalization reduces primary and particularly secondary recovery by trapping pockets of by-passed or banked oil. Compartments can be detected by comparing recovery factors of genetically similar sandstone bodies within a field; using packers to separate commingled intervals and analyzing fluid recoveries and pressures; making detailed core-to-log calibrations that identify compartment boundaries; and analyzing pressure data from waterflood programs.

  14. Immunometabolism of obesity and diabetes: microbiota link compartmentalized immunity in the gut to metabolic tissue inflammation.

    PubMed

    McPhee, Joseph B; Schertzer, Jonathan D

    2015-12-01

    The bacteria that inhabit us have emerged as factors linking immunity and metabolism. Changes in our microbiota can modify obesity and the immune underpinnings of metabolic diseases such as Type 2 diabetes. Obesity coincides with a low-level systemic inflammation, which also manifests within metabolic tissues such as adipose tissue and liver. This metabolic inflammation can promote insulin resistance and dysglycaemia. However, the obesity and metabolic disease-related immune responses that are compartmentalized in the intestinal environment do not necessarily parallel the inflammatory status of metabolic tissues that control blood glucose. In fact, a permissive immune environment in the gut can exacerbate metabolic tissue inflammation. Unravelling these discordant immune responses in different parts of the body and establishing a connection between nutrients, immunity and the microbiota in the gut is a complex challenge. Recent evidence positions the relationship between host gut barrier function, intestinal T cell responses and specific microbes at the crossroads of obesity and inflammation in metabolic disease. A key problem to be addressed is understanding how metabolite, immune or bacterial signals from the gut are relayed and transferred into systemic or metabolic tissue inflammation that can impair insulin action preceding Type 2 diabetes. © 2015 Authors; published by Portland Press Limited.

  15. Proposing a Compartmental Model for Leprosy and Parameterizing Using Regional Incidence in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Hansen’s disease (HD), or leprosy, is still considered a public health risk in much of Brazil. Understanding the dynamics of the infection at a regional level can aid in identification of targets to improve control. A compartmental continuous-time model for leprosy dynamics was designed based on understanding of the biology of the infection. The transmission coefficients for the model and the rate of detection were fit for each region using Approximate Bayesian Computation applied to paucibacillary and multibacillary incidence data over the period of 2000 to 2010, and model fit was validated on incidence data from 2011 to 2012. Regional variation was noted in detection rate, with cases in the Midwest estimated to be infectious for 10 years prior to detection compared to 5 years for most other regions. Posterior predictions for the model estimated that elimination of leprosy as a public health risk would require, on average, 44–45 years in the three regions with the highest prevalence. The model is easily adaptable to other settings, and can be studied to determine the efficacy of improved case finding on leprosy control. PMID:27532862

  16. A nanoliter self-priming compartmentalization chip for point-of-care digital PCR analysis.

    PubMed

    Song, Qi; Gao, Yibo; Zhu, Qiangyuan; Tian, Qingchang; Yu, Bingwen; Song, Bofan; Xu, Yanan; Yuan, Maokai; Ma, Congcong; Jin, Wei; Zhang, Tao; Mu, Ying; Jin, Qinhan

    2015-01-01

    A nanoliter self-priming compartmentalization (SPC) microfluidic chip suited for the digital polymerase chain reaction (dPCR) analysis in point-of-care testing (POCT) has been developed. This dPCR chip is fabricated of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). After the dPCR chip is evacuated, there will be a negative pressure environment in the chip because of the gas solubility of PDMS. The negative pressure environment can provide a self-priming power so that the sample solutions can be sucked into each reaction chamber sequentially. The whole sampling process requires no external power and is valve-free. Channels that contain water are designed around each sample panel to prevent the solvent (water) from evaporating during dPCR process. A glass coverslip is also used as a waterproof layer, which is more convenient and more efficient than other waterproof methods seen in literature. This dPCR chip allows three samples to be amplified at the same time. Each sample is distributed into 1040 reaction chambers, and each chamber is only 2.08 nL. Human β-actin DNA solutions of known concentrations are used as the templates for the dPCR analyses to verify the sensitivity and accuracy of the method. Template DNA solutions diluted to concentrations of 300, 100 and 10 copies/μL are tested and shown that this simple, portable and self-priming dPCR chip can be used at any clinic as a real POCT technique.

  17. A nanoliter self-priming compartmentalization chip for point-of-care digital PCR analysis.

    PubMed

    Song, Qi; Gao, Yibo; Zhu, Qiangyuan; Tian, Qingchang; Yu, Bingwen; Song, Bofan; Xu, Yanan; Yuan, Maokai; Ma, Congcong; Jin, Wei; Zhang, Tao; Mu, Ying; Jin, Qinhan

    2015-01-01

    A nanoliter self-priming compartmentalization (SPC) microfluidic chip suited for the digital polymerase chain reaction (dPCR) analysis in point-of-care testing (POCT) has been developed. This dPCR chip is fabricated of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). After the dPCR chip is evacuated, there will be a negative pressure environment in the chip because of the gas solubility of PDMS. The negative pressure environment can provide a self-priming power so that the sample solutions can be sucked into each reaction chamber sequentially. The whole sampling process requires no external power and is valve-free. Channels that contain water are designed around each sample panel to prevent the solvent (water) from evaporating during dPCR process. A glass coverslip is also used as a waterproof layer, which is more convenient and more efficient than other waterproof methods seen in literature. This dPCR chip allows three samples to be amplified at the same time. Each sample is distributed into 1040 reaction chambers, and each chamber is only 2.08 nL. Human β-actin DNA solutions of known concentrations are used as the templates for the dPCR analyses to verify the sensitivity and accuracy of the method. Template DNA solutions diluted to concentrations of 300, 100 and 10 copies/μL are tested and shown that this simple, portable and self-priming dPCR chip can be used at any clinic as a real POCT technique.

  18. A bulk sub-femtoliter in vitro compartmentalization system using super-fine electrosprays

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Bineet; Takamura, Yuzuru; Shimoda, Tatsuya; Biyani, Manish

    2016-01-01

    The extreme miniaturization of biological and chemical assays in aqueous-droplet compartments enables spatiotemporal control for large-scale parallel experimentation and can thus permit new capabilities for “digitizing” directed molecular evolution methodologies. We report a remarkably facile bulk method to generate mega-scale monodisperse sub-femtoliter aqueous droplets by electrospray, using a prototype head with super-fine inkjet technology. Moreover, the electrostatic inkjet nozzle that injects the aqueous phase when immersed within an immiscible phase (an optimized oil/surfactant mixture) has the advantage of generating cell-like sub-femtoliter compartments for biomolecule encapsulation and successive biological and chemical reactions. Sub-femtoliter droplets of both liquid (water-in-oil, volumes ranging from 0.2 to 6.4 fL) and gel bead (agarose-in-oil, volume ranging from 0.3 to 15.6 fL) compartments with average sizes of 1.3 μm and 1.5 μm, respectively, were successfully generated using an inkjet nozzle at a speed of more than 105 droplets per second. We demonstrated the applicability of this system by synthesizing fluorescent proteins using a cell-free expression system inside electrosprayed sub-femtoliter droplets at an accelerated rate, thereby extending the utility of in vitro compartmentalization with improved analytical performance for a top-down artificial cellular system. PMID:27199080

  19. Kinase suppressor of Ras1 compartmentalizes hippocampal signal transduction and subserves synaptic plasticity and memory formation.

    PubMed

    Shalin, Sara C; Hernandez, Caterina M; Dougherty, Michele K; Morrison, Deborah K; Sweatt, J David

    2006-06-01

    The ERK/MAP kinase cascade is important for long-term memory formation and synaptic plasticity, with a myriad of upstream signals converging upon ERK activation. Despite this convergence of signaling, neurons routinely activate appropriate biological responses to different stimuli. Scaffolding proteins represent a mechanism to achieve compartmentalization of signaling and the appropriate targeting of ERK-dependent processes. We report that kinase suppressor of Ras (KSR1) functions biochemically in the hippocampus to scaffold the components of the ERK cascade, specifically regulating the cascade when a membrane fraction of ERK is activated via a PKC-dependent pathway but not via a cAMP/PKA-dependent pathway. Specificity of KSR1-dependent signaling also extends to specific downstream targets of ERK. Behaviorally and physiologically, we found that the absence of KSR1 leads to deficits in associative learning and theta burst stimulation-induced LTP. Our report provides novel insight into the endogenous scaffolding role of KSR1 in controlling kinase activation within the nervous system.

  20. A Compartmental Model for Zika Virus with Dynamic Human and Vector Populations

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Eva K; Liu, Yifan; Pietz, Ferdinand H

    2016-01-01

    The Zika virus (ZIKV) outbreak in South American countries and its potential association with microcephaly in newborns and Guillain-Barré Syndrome led the World Health Organization to declare a Public Health Emergency of International Concern. To understand the ZIKV disease dynamics and evaluate the effectiveness of different containment strategies, we propose a compartmental model with a vector-host structure for ZIKV. The model utilizes logistic growth in human population and dynamic growth in vector population. Using this model, we derive the basic reproduction number to gain insight on containment strategies. We contrast the impact and influence of different parameters on the virus trend and outbreak spread. We also evaluate different containment strategies and their combination effects to achieve early containment by minimizing total infections. This result can help decision makers select and invest in the strategies most effective to combat the infection spread. The decision-support tool demonstrates the importance of “digital disease surveillance” in response to waves of epidemics including ZIKV, Dengue, Ebola and cholera. PMID:28269870

  1. Fluvial architecture and reservoir compartmentalization in the Oligocene middle Frio Formation of south Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Kerr, D.R.; Jirik, L.A. )

    1990-09-01

    Seeligson, Stratton, and Agua Dulce fields are being studied as part of a Gas Research Institute/Department of Energy/State of Texas cosponsored program designed to develop and test methodologies and technologies for gas reserve growth in conventional reservoirs in mature gas fields. Over the last four decades, each field has produced approximately 2 tcf of gas from middle Frio reservoirs alone. Recent drilling and workover results and reservoir pressure data, however, point to the possibility of additional reserves. Stratigraphic and sedimentologic studies based on well logs and cores indicate that middle Frio reservoirs are architecturally complex. Deposition on an aggrading coastal plain resulted in a continuum of architectural styles that has important implications for reservoir compartmentalization. The middle Frio is composed of sand-rich channel-fill and splay deposits interstratified with floodplain mudstones, all forming part of the Gueydan fluvial system. Relatively slow aggradation resulted in laterally stacked channel systems; whereas more rapid aggradation resulted in vertically stacked channel systems. Laterally stacked sandstone bodies predominate at Seeligson field, leading to separate but potentially leaky reservoir compartments. By contrast, vertically stacked sandstone bodies predominate at Stratton and Agua Dulce fields, favoring more isolated reservoir compartments. Thus, a high potential for reserve growth through the identification of untapped compartments, poorly drained acreage, and bypassed zones exists for each of these fields, but differences in reservoir architecture must be taken into account as part of exploitation strategies.

  2. Quantitative analysis of axonal transport by using compartmentalized and surface micropatterned culture of neurons.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyung Joon; Park, Jeong Won; Byun, Jae Hwan; Poon, Wayne W; Cotman, Carl W; Fowlkes, Charless C; Jeon, Noo Li

    2012-06-20

    Mitochondria, synaptic vesicles, and other cytoplasmic constituents have to travel long distance along the axons from cell bodies to nerve terminals. Interruption of this axonal transport may contribute to many neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer's disease (AD). It has been recently shown that exposure of cultured neurons to β-amyloid (Aβ) resulted in severe impairment of mitochondrial transport. This Letter describes an integrated microfluidic platform that establishes surface patterned and compartmentalized culture of neurons for studying the effect of Aβ on mitochondria trafficking in full length of axons. We have successfully quantified the trafficking of fluorescently labeled mitochondria in distal and proximal axons using image processing. Selective treatment of Aβ in the somal or axonal compartments resulted in considerable decrease in mitochondria movement in a location dependent manner such that mitochondria trafficking slowed down more significantly proximal to the location of Aβ exposure. Furthermore, this result suggests a promising application of microfluidic technology for investigating the dysfunction of axonal transport related to neurodegenerative diseases.

  3. The anomalous kinetics of coupled aspartate aminotransferase and malate dehydrogenase. Evidence for compartmentation of oxaloacetate.

    PubMed Central

    Bryce, C F; Williams, D C; John, R A; Fasella, P

    1976-01-01

    Cytoplasmic aspartate aminotransferase and malate dehydrogenase were purified from pig heart. Kinetic parameters were determined for the separate reaction catalysed by each enzyme and used to predict the course of the coupled reaction: (see article). Although a lag phase should have been easily seen, none was detected. The same coupled reaction was also carried out by using radioactive aspartate in the presence of unlabelled oxaloacetate. The reaction was quenched with HClO4 after 70 ms and the specific radioactivity of the malate produced in this system was found to be essentially the same as that of the original aspartate. These results show that oxaloacetate produced by the aspartate aminotransferase is converted into malate by malate dehydrogenase before it equilibrates with the pool of unlabelled oxaloacetate and are consistent with a proposal that the enzymes are associated in a complex. However, no physical evidence of the existence of a complex could be found. An alternative means of compartmentation of the intermediate as an unstable isomer is considered. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 3. PMID:942372

  4. Systems infection biology: a compartmentalized immune network of pig spleen challenged with Haemophilus parasuis.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ming; Liu, Xiang-dong; Li, Xin-yun; Chen, Hong-bo; Jin, Hui; Zhou, Rui; Zhu, Meng-jin; Zhao, Shu-hong

    2013-01-22

    Network biology (systems biology) approaches are useful tools for elucidating the host infection processes that often accompany complex immune networks. Although many studies have recently focused on Haemophilus parasuis, a model of Gram-negative bacterium, little attention has been paid to the host's immune response to infection. In this article, we use network biology to investigate infection with Haemophilus parasuis in an in vivo pig model. By targeting the spleen immunogenome, we established an expression signature indicative of H. parasuis infection using a PCA/GSEA combined method. We reconstructed the immune network and estimated the network topology parameters that characterize the immunogene expressions in response to H. parasuis infection. The results showed that the immune network of H. parasuis infection is compartmentalized (not globally linked). Statistical analysis revealed that the reconstructed network is scale-free but not small-world. Based on the quantitative topological prioritization, we inferred that the C1R-centered clique might play a vital role in responding to H. parasuis infection. Here, we provide the first report of reconstruction of the immune network in H. parasuis-infected porcine spleen. The distinguishing feature of our work is the focus on utilizing the immunogenome for a network biology-oriented analysis. Our findings complement and extend the frontiers of knowledge of host infection biology for H. parasuis and also provide a new clue for systems infection biology of Gram-negative bacilli in mammals.

  5. Compartmentalized Epidermal Activation of β-Catenin Differentially Affects Lineage Reprogramming and Underlies Tumor Heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    Kretzschmar, Kai; Weber, Christine; Driskell, Ryan R; Calonje, Eduardo; Watt, Fiona M

    2016-01-12

    Wnt/β-catenin activation in adult epidermis can induce new hair follicle formation and tumor development. We used lineage tracing to uncover the relative contribution of different stem cell populations. LGR6(+) and LRIG1(+) stem cells contributed to ectopic hair follicles formed in the sebaceous gland upon β-catenin activation, whereas LGR5(+) cells did not. Lgr6, but not Lrig1 or Lgr5, was expressed in a subpopulation of interfollicular epidermal cells that were competent to form new hair follicles. Oncogenic β-catenin expression in LGR5(+) cells led to formation of pilomatricomas, while LRIG1(+) cells formed trichoadenomas and LGR6(+) cells formed dermatofibromas. Tumor formation was always accompanied by a local increase in dermal fibroblast density and transient extracellular matrix remodeling. However, each tumor had a distinct stromal signature in terms of immune cell infiltrate and expression of CD26 and CD44. We conclude that compartmentalization of epidermal stem cells underlies different responses to β-catenin and skin tumor heterogeneity. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Compartmentalized Epidermal Activation of β-Catenin Differentially Affects Lineage Reprogramming and Underlies Tumor Heterogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Kretzschmar, Kai; Weber, Christine; Driskell, Ryan R.; Calonje, Eduardo; Watt, Fiona M.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Wnt/β-catenin activation in adult epidermis can induce new hair follicle formation and tumor development. We used lineage tracing to uncover the relative contribution of different stem cell populations. LGR6+ and LRIG1+ stem cells contributed to ectopic hair follicles formed in the sebaceous gland upon β-catenin activation, whereas LGR5+ cells did not. Lgr6, but not Lrig1 or Lgr5, was expressed in a subpopulation of interfollicular epidermal cells that were competent to form new hair follicles. Oncogenic β-catenin expression in LGR5+ cells led to formation of pilomatricomas, while LRIG1+ cells formed trichoadenomas and LGR6+ cells formed dermatofibromas. Tumor formation was always accompanied by a local increase in dermal fibroblast density and transient extracellular matrix remodeling. However, each tumor had a distinct stromal signature in terms of immune cell infiltrate and expression of CD26 and CD44. We conclude that compartmentalization of epidermal stem cells underlies different responses to β-catenin and skin tumor heterogeneity. PMID:26771241

  7. Fault assessment for basement reservoir compartmentalization: Case study at Northeast Betara gas field, South Sumatra Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Risyad, M.; Suta, I. N.; Haris, A.

    2017-07-01

    Northeast Betara field is situated on the northern part of prolific South Sumatra Basin. It has produced gas from Lower Talang Akar Formation sandstone and over 90 wells have been drilled. A 3D seismic data was acquired in 2000 and reprocessed in 2012 to enhance the subsurface image. In 2013 an exploratory well NEB Base-1 was drilled and made gas and condensate discovery from the subsequent pre-tertiary basement which is confirmed as granite. The well proved fractured basement reservoir play on paleo high of the structure. The absence of full-diameter conventional core prompts well logs and seismic data analysis by using a workstation. Main methods for fracture prediction have been seismic attributes extraction and structural geology studies of basement provided by image logs on a few exploration wells. Ant tracking attribute is widely employed to image seismic event discontinuities due to extensive faults which generated the natural fractures. Delineations well NEB Base-2 was drilled on second paleo high and unfortunately, it did not find any gas indication from pre-tertiary basement target. Seismic structural interpretation and seismic attributes are conducted to image distribution of event discontinuities related to faults or fracture. We found that compartmentalization on basement involved old faults and both paleo high have undergone different structural history and stress character which resulted in separated fractures distribution.

  8. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrates compartmental muscle mechanisms of human vertical fusional vergence

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Robert A.

    2015-01-01

    Vertical fusional vergence (VFV) normally compensates for slight vertical heterophorias. We employed magnetic resonance imaging to clarify extraocular muscle contributions to VFV induced by monocular two-prism diopter (1.15°) base-up prism in 14 normal adults. Fusion during prism viewing requires monocular infraduction. Scans were repeated without prism, and with prism shifted contralaterally. Contractility indicated by morphometric indexes was separately analyzed in medial and lateral vertical rectus and superior oblique (SO) putative compartments, and superior and inferior horizontal rectus extraocular muscle putative compartments, but in the whole inferior oblique (IO). Images confirmed appropriate VFV that was implemented by the inferior rectus (IR) medial compartment contracting ipsilateral and relaxing contralateral to prism. There was no significant contractility in the IR lateral compartment. The superior but not inferior lateral rectus (LR) compartment contracted significantly in the prism viewing eye, but not contralateral to prism. The IO contracted ipsilateral but not contralateral to the prism. In the infraducting eye, the SO medial compartment relaxed significantly, while the lateral compartment was unchanged; contralateral to prism, the SO lateral compartment contracted, while the medial compartment was unchanged. There was no contractility in the superior or medial rectus muscles in either eye. There was no globe retraction. We conclude that the vertical component of VFV is primarily implemented by IR medial compartment contraction. Since appropriate vertical rotation is not directly implemented, or is opposed, by associated differential LR and SO compartmental activity, and IO contraction, these actions probably implement a torsional component of VFV. PMID:25589593

  9. Bystander effects and compartmental stress response to X-ray irradiation in L929 cells.

    PubMed

    Temelie, Mihaela; Stroe, Daniela; Petcu, Ileana; Mustaciosu, Cosmin; Moisoi, Nicoleta; Savu, Diana

    2016-08-01

    Bystander effects are indirect consequences of radiation and many other stress factors. They occur in cells that are not directly exposed to these factors, but receive signals from affected cells either by gap junctions or by molecules released in the medium. Characterizing these effects and deciphering the underlying mechanisms involved in radiation-induced bystander effects are relevant for cancer radiotherapy and radioprotection. At doses of X-ray radiation 0.5 and 1 Gy, we detected bystander effects as increased numbers of micronuclei shortly after the treatment, through medium transfer and by co-cultures. Interestingly, bystander cells did not exhibit long-term adverse changes in viability. Evaluation of several compartmental stress markers (CHOP, BiP, mtHsp60, cytHsp70) by qRT-PCR did not reveal expression changes at transcriptional level. We investigated the involvement of ROS and NO in this process by addition of specific scavengers of these molecules, DMSO or c-PTIO in the transferred medium. This approach proved that ROS but not NO is involved in the induction of lesions in the acceptor cells. These results indicate that L929 cells are susceptible to stress effects of radiation-induced bystander signaling.

  10. Technology Solutions Case Study: Apartment Compartmentalization with an Aerosol-Based Sealing Process

    SciTech Connect

    2015-07-01

    Air sealing of building enclosures is a difficult and time-consuming process. Current methods in new construction require laborers to physically locate small and sometimes large holes in multiple assemblies and then manually seal each of them. This research study by Building America team Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings demonstrated the automated air sealing and compartmentalization of buildings through the use of an aerosolized sealant developed by the Western Cooling Efficiency Center at University of California Davis. CARB demonstrated this new technology application in a multifamily building in Queens, NY. The effectiveness of the sealing process was evaluated by three methods: air leakage testing of overall apartment before and after sealing, point-source testing of individual leaks, and pressure measurements in the walls of the target apartment during sealing. Aerosolized sealing was successful by several measures in this study. Many individual leaks that are labor-intensive to address separately were well sealed by the aerosol particles. In addition, many diffuse leaks that are difficult to identify and treat were also sealed. The aerosol-based sealing process resulted in an average reduction of 71% in air leakage across three apartments and an average apartment airtightness of 0.08 CFM50/SF of enclosure area.

  11. Hypothalamic metabolic compartmentation during appetite regulation as revealed by magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy methods

    PubMed Central

    Lizarbe, Blanca; Benitez, Ania; Peláez Brioso, Gerardo A.; Sánchez-Montañés, Manuel; López-Larrubia, Pilar; Ballesteros, Paloma; Cerdán, Sebastián

    2013-01-01

    We review the role of neuroglial compartmentation and transcellular neurotransmitter cycling during hypothalamic appetite regulation as detected by Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and Spectroscopy (MRS) methods. We address first the neurochemical basis of neuroendocrine regulation in the hypothalamus and the orexigenic and anorexigenic feed-back loops that control appetite. Then we examine the main MRI and MRS strategies that have been used to investigate appetite regulation. Manganese-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MEMRI), Blood oxygenation level-dependent contrast (BOLD), and Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DWI) have revealed Mn2+ accumulations, augmented oxygen consumptions, and astrocytic swelling in the hypothalamus under fasting conditions, respectively. High field 1H magnetic resonance in vivo, showed increased hypothalamic myo-inositol concentrations as compared to other cerebral structures. 1H and 13C high resolution magic angle spinning (HRMAS) revealed increased neuroglial oxidative and glycolytic metabolism, as well as increased hypothalamic glutamatergic and GABAergic neurotransmissions under orexigenic stimulation. We propose here an integrative interpretation of all these findings suggesting that the neuroendocrine regulation of appetite is supported by important ionic and metabolic transcellular fluxes which begin at the tripartite orexigenic clefts and become extended spatially in the hypothalamus through astrocytic networks becoming eventually MRI and MRS detectable. PMID:23781199

  12. Subcellular compartmentalization of maize storage proteins in Xenopus oocytes injected with zein messenger RNAs

    PubMed Central

    1981-01-01

    Maize storage proteins synthesized in oocytes were compartmentalized in membrane vesicles because they were resistant to hydrolysis by protease, unless detergent was present. The site of storage protein deposition within the oocyte was determined by subcellular fractionation. Optimal separation of oocyte membranes and organelles was obtained when EDTA and high concentrations of NaCl were included in the homogenization and gradient buffers. Under these conditions, fractions in sucrose gradients containing a heterogeneous mixture of smooth membranes (presumably endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi apparatus, and plasma membrane, density = 1.10-1.12 g/cm3), mitochondria (densities = 1.14 and 1.16 g/cm3), yolk platelets (density = 1.21 g/cm3), and a dense matrix material (density = 1.22 g/cm3) could be separated. Some zein proteins were recovered in the mixed membrane fraction, but the majority occurred in vesicles sedimenting with yolk platelets and granular material at a density of approximately 1.22 g/cm3. When metrizamide was included in the gradient to increase the density, little of the dense matrix material was isolated, and vesicles containing zein proteins were separated from other oocyte components. These vesicles were similar to protein bodies in maize endosperm because they were of identical density and contained the same group of polypeptides. PMID:7251653

  13. Compartmentalization and Ca2+ buffering are essential for prevention of light-induced retinal degeneration.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Shirley; Kohn, Elkana; Dadon, Daniela; Katz, Ben; Peters, Maximilian; Lebendiker, Mario; Kosloff, Mickey; Colley, Nansi Jo; Minke, Baruch

    2012-10-17

    Fly photoreceptors are polarized cells, each of which has an extended interface between its cell body and the light-signaling compartment, the rhabdomere. Upon intense illumination, rhabdomeric calcium concentration reaches millimolar levels that would be toxic if Ca(2+) diffusion between the rhabdomere and cell body was not robustly attenuated. Yet, it is not clear how such effective attenuation is obtained. Here we show that Ca(2+) homeostasis in the photoreceptor cell relies on the protein calphotin. This unique protein functions as an immobile Ca(2+) buffer localized along the base of the rhabdomere, separating the signaling compartment from the cell body. Generation and analyses of transgenic Drosophila strains, in which calphotin-expression levels were reduced in a graded manner, showed that moderately reduced calphotin expression impaired Ca(2+) homeostasis while calphotin elimination resulted in severe light-dependent photoreceptor degeneration. Electron microscopy, electrophysiology, and optical methods revealed that the degeneration was rescued by prevention of Ca(2+) overload via overexpression of CalX, the Na(+)-Ca(2+) exchanger. In addition, Ca(2+)-imaging experiments showed that reduced calphotin levels resulted in abnormally fast kinetics of Ca(2+) elevation in photoreceptor cells. Together, the data suggest that calphotin functions as a Ca(2+) buffer; a possibility that we directly demonstrate by expressing calphotin in a heterologous expression system. We propose that calphotin-mediated compartmentalization and Ca(2+) buffering constitute an effective strategy to protect cells from Ca(2+) overload and light-induced degeneration.

  14. Microbial consortium and its spatial distribution in a compartmentalized anaerobic reactor.

    PubMed

    Xing, Ya-juan; Ji, Jun-yuan; Zheng, Ping; Zhang, Ji-qiang; Ghulam, Abbas

    2014-02-01

    The compartmentalized anaerobic reactor (CAR) is a patent novel high-rate reactor, which consists of three compartments. The reactor has a great potential for application due to its many advantages. In this work, the microbial consortium, spatial distribution, and their relationship with performance of CAR were investigated by means of polymerase chain reaction, denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis, and fluorescence in situ hybridization. The results showed that the predominant archaea were Methanobacterium, Methanosaeta, and Methanospirillum, and the predominant bacteria were Firmicutes, Deltaproteobacteria, Spirochaetes, Actinobacteria, and Gammaproteobacteria in the microbial consortium. The methanogenic archaea (MA), the hydrogen-producing acetogenic bacteria (HAB), and the hydrolytic fermentative bacteria (HFB) were found to be predominant in the upper, middle, and bottom compartments, respectively. The results revealed that the granular sludge took on a stratified microbial structure. The HFB, HAB, and MA were located in the outer shell, middle layer, and core, respectively. The microbial populations from the bottom compartment were relatively homogeneous in the granular sludge, and from the middle and upper compartments, they were relatively heterogeneous in the granular sludge. The microbial consortia and their spatial distribution were in accordance with the organic loading rate and chemical components in the three compartments.

  15. Integrated compartmental model for describing the transport of solute in a fractured porous medium. [FRACPORT

    SciTech Connect

    DeAngelis, D.L.; Yeh, G.T.; Huff, D.D.

    1984-10-01

    This report documents a model, FRACPORT, that simulates the transport of a solute through a fractured porous matrix. The model should be useful in analyzing the possible transport of radionuclides from shallow-land burial sites in humid environments. The use of the model is restricted to transport through saturated zones. The report first discusses the general modeling approach used, which is based on the Integrated Compartmental Method. The basic equations of solute transport are then presented. The model, which assumes a known water velocity field, solves these equations on two different time scales; one related to rapid transport of solute along fractures and the other related to slower transport through the porous matrix. FRACPORT is validated by application to a simple example of fractured porous medium transport that has previously been analyzed by other methods. Then its utility is demonstrated in analyzing more complex cases of pulses of solute into a fractured matrix. The report serves as a user's guide to FRACPORT. A detailed description of data input, along with a listing of input for a sample problem, is provided. 16 references, 18 figures, 3 tables.

  16. Tracking Quantum-Dot labeled neurotropic factors transport along primary neuronal axons in compartmental microfluidic chambers.

    PubMed

    Gluska, Shani; Chein, Michael; Rotem, Nimrod; Ionescu, Ariel; Perlson, Eran

    2016-01-01

    Neurons are highly polarized cells, with very long axons. Neurotrophic factors like the neuronal growth factor (NGF) are secreted from neuronal targets to promote neuron survival and proper function. These neurotrophic factors must undergo retrograde axonal transport towards the cell body, wherein they initiate signaling pathways important for neurons' various functions and overall health. This process of long-distance axonal signaling is conducted by the dynein motor protein, which transmits signaling endosomes of ligand-receptor complexes retrogradely along microtubule tracks. Here we describe step by step the use of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) compartmentalized microfluidic chambers for tracking axonal transport of trophic factors, with a focus on labeled NGF. We describe in detail how to fabricate the molds, assemble the PDMS platform, plate neurons and image, as well as analyze NGF transport along the axon. This method is useful for studying molecular communication mechanisms within the neuron's different compartments as well as between the neuron and its diverse microenvironments, both in health and under pathological conditions.

  17. Unchanged mitochondrial organization and compartmentation of high-energy phosphates in creatine-deficient GAMT-/- mouse hearts.

    PubMed

    Branovets, Jelena; Sepp, Mervi; Kotlyarova, Svetlana; Jepihhina, Natalja; Sokolova, Niina; Aksentijevic, Dunja; Lygate, Craig A; Neubauer, Stefan; Vendelin, Marko; Birkedal, Rikke

    2013-08-15

    Disruption of the creatine kinase (CK) system in hearts of CK-deficient mice leads to changes in the ultrastructure and regulation of mitochondrial respiration. We expected to see similar changes in creatine-deficient mice, which lack the enzyme guanidinoacetate methyltransferase (GAMT) to produce creatine. The aim of this study was to characterize the changes in cardiomyocyte mitochondrial organization, regulation of respiration, and intracellular compartmentation associated with GAMT deficiency. Three-dimensional mitochondrial organization was assessed by confocal microscopy. On populations of permeabilized cardiomyocytes, we recorded ADP and ATP kinetics of respiration, competition between mitochondria and pyruvate kinase for ADP produced by ATPases, ADP kinetics of endogenous pyruvate kinase, and ATP kinetics of ATPases. These data were analyzed by mathematical models to estimate intracellular compartmentation. Quantitative analysis of morphological and kinetic data as well as derived model fits showed no difference between GAMT-deficient and wild-type mice. We conclude that inactivation of the CK system by GAMT deficiency does not alter mitochondrial organization and intracellular compartmentation in relaxed cardiomyocytes. Thus, our results suggest that the healthy heart is able to preserve cardiac function at a basal level in the absence of CK-facilitated energy transfer without compromising intracellular organization and the regulation of mitochondrial energy homeostasis. This raises questions on the importance of the CK system as a spatial energy buffer in unstressed cardiomyocytes.

  18. Unchanged mitochondrial organization and compartmentation of high-energy phosphates in creatine-deficient GAMT−/− mouse hearts

    PubMed Central

    Branovets, Jelena; Sepp, Mervi; Kotlyarova, Svetlana; Jepihhina, Natalja; Sokolova, Niina; Aksentijevic, Dunja; Lygate, Craig A.; Neubauer, Stefan; Birkedal, Rikke

    2013-01-01

    Disruption of the creatine kinase (CK) system in hearts of CK-deficient mice leads to changes in the ultrastructure and regulation of mitochondrial respiration. We expected to see similar changes in creatine-deficient mice, which lack the enzyme guanidinoacetate methyltransferase (GAMT) to produce creatine. The aim of this study was to characterize the changes in cardiomyocyte mitochondrial organization, regulation of respiration, and intracellular compartmentation associated with GAMT deficiency. Three-dimensional mitochondrial organization was assessed by confocal microscopy. On populations of permeabilized cardiomyocytes, we recorded ADP and ATP kinetics of respiration, competition between mitochondria and pyruvate kinase for ADP produced by ATPases, ADP kinetics of endogenous pyruvate kinase, and ATP kinetics of ATPases. These data were analyzed by mathematical models to estimate intracellular compartmentation. Quantitative analysis of morphological and kinetic data as well as derived model fits showed no difference between GAMT-deficient and wild-type mice. We conclude that inactivation of the CK system by GAMT deficiency does not alter mitochondrial organization and intracellular compartmentation in relaxed cardiomyocytes. Thus, our results suggest that the healthy heart is able to preserve cardiac function at a basal level in the absence of CK-facilitated energy transfer without compromising intracellular organization and the regulation of mitochondrial energy homeostasis. This raises questions on the importance of the CK system as a spatial energy buffer in unstressed cardiomyocytes. PMID:23792673

  19. Nucleolus: the fascinating nuclear body

    PubMed Central

    Sirri, Valentina; Urcuqui-Inchima, Silvio; Roussel, Pascal

    2007-01-01

    Nucleoli are the prominent contrasted structures of the cell nucleus. In the nucleolus, ribosomal RNAs are synthesized, processed and assembled with ribosomal proteins. RNA polymerase I synthesizes the ribosomal RNAs and this activity is cell cycle regulated. The nucleolus reveals the functional organization of the nucleus in which the compartmentation of the different steps of ribosome biogenesis is observed whereas the nucleolar machineries are in permanent exchange with the nucleoplasm and other nuclear bodies. After mitosis, nucleolar assembly is a time and space regulated process controlled by the cell cycle. In addition, by generating a large volume in the nucleus with apparently no RNA polymerase II activity, the nucleolus creates a domain of retention/sequestration of molecules normally active outside the nucleolus. Viruses interact with the nucleolus and recruit nucleolar proteins to facilitate virus replication. The nucleolus is also a sensor of stress due to the redistribution of the ribosomal proteins in the nucleoplasm by nucleolus disruption. The nucleolus plays several crucial functions in the nucleus: in addition to its function as ribosome factory of the cells it is a multifunctional nuclear domain, and nucleolar activity is linked with several pathologies. Perspectives on the evolution of this research area are proposed. PMID:18046571

  20. Compartmentalized Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Originates from Long-Lived Cells in Some Subjects with HIV-1–Associated Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Schnell, Gretja; Spudich, Serena; Harrington, Patrick; Price, Richard W.; Swanstrom, Ronald

    2009-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) invades the central nervous system (CNS) shortly after systemic infection and can result in the subsequent development of HIV-1–associated dementia (HAD) in a subset of infected individuals. Genetically compartmentalized virus in the CNS is associated with HAD, suggesting autonomous viral replication as a factor in the disease process. We examined the source of compartmentalized HIV-1 in the CNS of subjects with HIV-1–associated neurological disease and in asymptomatic subjects who were initiating antiretroviral therapy. The heteroduplex tracking assay (HTA), targeting the variable regions of env, was used to determine which HIV-1 genetic variants in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) were compartmentalized and which variants were shared with the blood plasma. We then measured the viral decay kinetics of individual variants after the initiation of antiretroviral therapy. Compartmentalized HIV-1 variants in the CSF of asymptomatic subjects decayed rapidly after the initiation of antiretroviral therapy, with a mean half-life of 1.57 days. Rapid viral decay was also measured for CSF-compartmentalized variants in four HAD subjects (t1/2 mean = 2.27 days). However, slow viral decay was measured for CSF-compartmentalized variants from an additional four subjects with neurological disease (t1/2 range = 9.85 days to no initial decay). The slow decay detected for CSF-compartmentalized variants was not associated with poor CNS drug penetration, drug resistant virus in the CSF, or the presence of X4 virus genotypes. We found that the slow decay measured for CSF-compartmentalized variants in subjects with neurological disease was correlated with low peripheral CD4 cell count and reduced CSF pleocytosis. We propose a model in which infiltrating macrophages replace CD4+ T cells as the primary source of productive viral replication in the CNS to maintain high viral loads in the CSF in a substantial subset of subjects with HAD

  1. Nuclear Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chemical and Engineering News, 1979

    1979-01-01

    Provides a brief review of the latest developments in nuclear chemistry. Nuclear research today is directed toward increased activity in radiopharmaceuticals and formation of new isotopes by high-energy, heavy-ion collisions. (Author/BB)

  2. Nuclear Scans

    MedlinePlus

    Nuclear scans use radioactive substances to see structures and functions inside your body. They use a special ... images. Most scans take 20 to 45 minutes. Nuclear scans can help doctors diagnose many conditions, including ...

  3. Nuclear Winter.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ehrlich, Anne

    1984-01-01

    "Nuclear Winter" was recently coined to describe the climatic and biological effects of a nuclear war. These effects are discussed based on models, simulations, scenarios, and projections. Effects on human populations are also considered. (JN)

  4. Nuclear Medicine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home » Science Education » Science Topics » Nuclear Medicine SCIENCE EDUCATION SCIENCE EDUCATION Science Topics Resource Links for General Public Resource ... Related Documents: Nuclear Medicine Fact Sheet.pdf SCIENCE EDUCATION Science Topics Resource Links for General Public Resource ...

  5. Nuclear Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chemical and Engineering News, 1979

    1979-01-01

    Provides a brief review of the latest developments in nuclear chemistry. Nuclear research today is directed toward increased activity in radiopharmaceuticals and formation of new isotopes by high-energy, heavy-ion collisions. (Author/BB)

  6. Nuclear Winter.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ehrlich, Anne

    1984-01-01

    "Nuclear Winter" was recently coined to describe the climatic and biological effects of a nuclear war. These effects are discussed based on models, simulations, scenarios, and projections. Effects on human populations are also considered. (JN)

  7. Nuclear weapons, nuclear effects, nuclear war

    SciTech Connect

    Bing, G.F.

    1991-08-20

    This paper provides a brief and mostly non-technical description of the militarily important features of nuclear weapons, of the physical phenomena associated with individual explosions, and of the expected or possible results of the use of many weapons in a nuclear war. Most emphasis is on the effects of so-called ``strategic exchanges.``

  8. Nuclear Fuels.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nash, J. Thomas

    1983-01-01

    Trends in and factors related to the nuclear industry and nuclear fuel production are discussed. Topics addressed include nuclear reactors, survival of the U.S. uranium industry, production costs, budget cuts by the Department of Energy and U.S. Geological survey for resource studies, mining, and research/development activities. (JN)

  9. Nuclear Fuels.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nash, J. Thomas

    1983-01-01

    Trends in and factors related to the nuclear industry and nuclear fuel production are discussed. Topics addressed include nuclear reactors, survival of the U.S. uranium industry, production costs, budget cuts by the Department of Energy and U.S. Geological survey for resource studies, mining, and research/development activities. (JN)

  10. Two Compartmentalized Inner Receptors for the Tetramethylammonium Guest within a Keplerate-Type Capsule.

    PubMed

    Watfa, Nancy; Haouas, Mohamed; Floquet, Sébastien; Hijazi, Akram; Naoufal, Daoud; Taulelle, Francis; Cadot, Emmanuel

    2016-09-19

    The host-guest interactions between the spherical porous Keplerate anion, [Mo132O372(CH3CO2)30(H2O)72](42-) (abbreviated {Mo132}) and the tetramethylammonium cation have been investigated extensively by one- and two-dimensional (EXSY, ROESY, and DOSY) and variable-temperature NMR. Evidence of two inner receptor sites specific for a NMe4(+) guest appears consistent with a quite striking compartmentalization phenomenon. ROESY NMR analyses showed that both sites exhibit a close spatial proximity with the hanging inner acetate groups, while a quantitative EXSY study revealed that these two sites are differentiated by their exchange rates. These NMR data support the hypothesis that these two inner sites could be delimited by the hanging inner acetate groups forming triangular (S1) or pentagonal (S2) hydrophobic pockets on the inner side of the capsule wall. Furthermore, the stability constants associated with the trapping process of the NMe4(+) guest on both the S1 and S2 sites have been determined, showing that the stability constant of the S1 sites decreases significantly as the concentration of the capsule increases gradually, while that of the S2 sites remains nearly unaffected. Such an observation has been interpreted as a result of the plugging process of the {Mo9O9} pores by the counterions NH4(+), which causes unfavorable electrostatic interactions for the NMe4(+) coordination on the proximal S1 site. Finally, the thermodynamic parameters of the NMe4(+) transfer from the solvated situation to the interior of the capsule were estimated from variable-temperature NMR experiments that provide the split of the global process into two successive events corresponding to the plugging and transfer across the inorganic shell.

  11. Dynamic dendritic compartmentalization underlies stimulus-specific adaptation in an insect neuron.

    PubMed

    Prešern, Janez; Triblehorn, Jeffrey D; Schul, Johannes

    2015-06-01

    In many neural systems, repeated stimulation leads to stimulus-specific adaptation (SSA), with responses to repeated signals being reduced while responses to novel stimuli remain unaffected. The underlying mechanisms of SSA remain mostly hypothetical. One hypothesis is that dendritic processes generate SSA. Evidence for such a mechanism was recently described in an insect auditory interneuron (TN-1 in Neoconocephalus triops). Afferents, tuned to different frequencies, connect with different parts of the TN-1 dendrite. The specific adaptation of these inputs relies on calcium and sodium accumulation within the dendrite, with calcium having a transient and sodium a tonic effect. Using imaging techniques, we tested here whether the accumulation of these ions remained limited to the stimulated parts of the dendrite. Stimulation with a fast pulse rate, which results in strong adaptation, elicited a transient dendritic calcium signal. In contrast, the sodium signal was tonic, remaining high during the fast pulse rate stimulus. These time courses followed the predictions from the previous pharmacological experiments. The peak positions of the calcium and sodium signals differed with the carrier frequency of the stimulus; at 15 kHz, peak locations were significantly more rostral than at 40 kHz. This matched the predictions made from neuroanatomical data. Our findings confirm that excitatory postsynaptic potentials rather than spiking cause the increase of dendritic calcium and sodium concentrations and that these increases remain limited to the stimulated parts of the dendrite. This supports the hypothesis of "dynamic dendritic compartmentalization" underlying SSA in this auditory interneuron. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  12. Distribution and compartmental organization of GABAergic medium-sized spiny neurons in the mouse nucleus accumbens.

    PubMed

    Gangarossa, Giuseppe; Espallergues, Julie; de Kerchove d'Exaerde, Alban; El Mestikawy, Salah; Gerfen, Charles R; Hervé, Denis; Girault, Jean-Antoine; Valjent, Emmanuel

    2013-01-01

    The nucleus accumbens (NAc) is a critical brain region involved in many reward-related behaviors. The NAc comprises major compartments the core and the shell, which encompass several subterritories. GABAergic medium-sized spiny neurons (MSNs) constitute the output neurons of the NAc core and shell. While the functional organization of the NAc core outputs resembles the one described for the dorsal striatum, a simple classification of the NAc shell neurons has been difficult to define due to the complexity of the compartmental segregation of cells. We used a variety of BAC transgenic mice expressing enhanced green fluorescence (EGFP) or the Cre-recombinase (Cre) under the control of the promoter of dopamine D1, D2, and D3 receptors and of adenosine A2a receptor to dissect the microanatomy of the NAc. Moreover, using various immunological markers we characterized in detail the distribution of MSNs in the mouse NAc. In addition, cell-type specific extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) phosphorylation in the NAc subterritories was analyzed following acute administration of SKF81297 (a D1R-like agonist), quinpirole (a D2 receptors (D2R)-like agonist), apomorphine (a non-selective DA receptor agonist), raclopride (a D2R-like antagonist), and psychostimulant drugs, including cocaine and d-amphetamine. Each drug generated a unique topography and cell-type specific activation of ERK in the NAc. Our results show the existence of marked differences in the receptor expression pattern and functional activation of MSNs within the shell subterritories. This study emphasizes the anatomical and functional heterogeneity of the NAc, which will have to be considered in its further study.

  13. Compartmentation of the cerebellar cortex: adaptation to lifestyle in the star-nosed mole Condylura cristata.

    PubMed

    Marzban, Hassan; Hoy, Nathan; Buchok, Matthew; Catania, Kenneth C; Hawkes, Richard

    2015-04-01

    The adult mammalian cerebellum is histologically uniform. However, concealed beneath the simple laminar architecture, it is organized rostrocaudally and mediolaterally into complex arrays of transverse zones and parasagittal stripes that is both highly reproducible between individuals and generally conserved across mammals and birds. Beyond this conservation, the general architecture appears to be adapted to the animal's way of life. To test this hypothesis, we have examined cerebellar compartmentation in the talpid star-nosed mole Condylura cristata. The star-nosed mole leads a subterranean life. It is largely blind and instead uses an array of fleshy appendages (the "star") to navigate and locate its prey. The hypothesis suggests that cerebellar architecture would be modified to reduce regions receiving visual input and expand those that receive trigeminal afferents from the star. Zebrin II and phospholipase Cß4 (PLCß4) immunocytochemistry was used to map the zone-and-stripe architecture of the cerebellum of the adult star-nosed mole. The general zone-and-stripe architecture characteristic of all mammals is present in the star-nosed mole. In the vermis, the four typical transverse zones are present, two with alternating zebrin II/PLCß4 stripes, two wholly zebrin II+/PLCß4-. However, the central and nodular zones (prominent visual receiving areas) are proportionally reduced in size and conversely, the trigeminal-receiving areas (the posterior zone of the vermis and crus I/II of the hemispheres) are uncharacteristically large. We therefore conclude that cerebellar architecture is generally conserved across the Mammalia but adapted to the specific lifestyle of the species.

  14. Reservoir compartmentalization caused by mass transport deposition Northwest Stevens pool, Elk Hills Naval Petroleum Reserves, California

    SciTech Connect

    Milliken, M.D.; McJannet, G.S.; Shiflett, D.W.; Deutsch, H.A.

    1996-12-31

    The {open_quotes}A{close_quotes} sands of the Northwest Stevens Pool consist of six major subdivisions (A1-A6) and numerous sublayers. These sands are above the {open_quotes}N Point{close_quotes} stratigraphic marker, making them much younger than most other Stevens sands at Elk Hills. Cores show the A1-A3 sands to be possibly mass transport deposition, primarily debris flows, slumps, and sand injection bodies. The A4-A6 sands are characterized by normally graded sheet-like sand bodies Hospital of traditional outer fan turbidite lithofacies. Most current production from the A1-A2 interval comes from well 373A-7R, are completed waterflood wells that came on line in 1992 at 1400 BOPD. Well 373A-7R is an anomaly in the A1-A2 zone, where average production from the other ten wells is 200 BOPD. Other evidence for compartmentalization in the A1-A2 interval includes sporadic oil-water contacts and drawdown pressures, difficult log correlations, and rapid thickness changes. In 1973, well 362-7R penetrated 220 ft of wet Al sand. The well was redrilled updip and successfully completed in the A1, where the oil-water contact is more than 130 ft lower than the original hole and faulting is not apparent. In 1992, horizontal well 323H-7R unexpectedly encountered an entirely wet Al wedge zone. Reevaluation of the A1-A3 and other sands as mass transport origin is important for modeling initialization and production/development strategies.

  15. Reservoir compartmentalization caused by mass transport deposition Northwest Stevens pool, Elk Hills Naval Petroleum Reserves, California

    SciTech Connect

    Milliken, M.D.; McJannet, G.S. ); Shiflett, D.W. ); Deutsch, H.A. )

    1996-01-01

    The [open quotes]A[close quotes] sands of the Northwest Stevens Pool consist of six major subdivisions (A1-A6) and numerous sublayers. These sands are above the [open quotes]N Point[close quotes] stratigraphic marker, making them much younger than most other Stevens sands at Elk Hills. Cores show the A1-A3 sands to be possibly mass transport deposition, primarily debris flows, slumps, and sand injection bodies. The A4-A6 sands are characterized by normally graded sheet-like sand bodies Hospital of traditional outer fan turbidite lithofacies. Most current production from the A1-A2 interval comes from well 373A-7R, are completed waterflood wells that came on line in 1992 at 1400 BOPD. Well 373A-7R is an anomaly in the A1-A2 zone, where average production from the other ten wells is 200 BOPD. Other evidence for compartmentalization in the A1-A2 interval includes sporadic oil-water contacts and drawdown pressures, difficult log correlations, and rapid thickness changes. In 1973, well 362-7R penetrated 220 ft of wet Al sand. The well was redrilled updip and successfully completed in the A1, where the oil-water contact is more than 130 ft lower than the original hole and faulting is not apparent. In 1992, horizontal well 323H-7R unexpectedly encountered an entirely wet Al wedge zone. Reevaluation of the A1-A3 and other sands as mass transport origin is important for modeling initialization and production/development strategies.

  16. Action potential processing in a detailed Purkinje cell model reveals a critical role for axonal compartmentalization

    PubMed Central

    Masoli, Stefano; Solinas, Sergio; D'Angelo, Egidio

    2015-01-01

    The Purkinje cell (PC) is among the most complex neurons in the brain and plays a critical role for cerebellar functioning. PCs operate as fast pacemakers modulated by synaptic inputs but can switch from simple spikes to complex bursts and, in some conditions, show bistability. In contrast to original works emphasizing dendritic Ca-dependent mechanisms, recent experiments have supported a primary role for axonal Na-dependent processing, which could effectively regulate spike generation and transmission to deep cerebellar nuclei (DCN). In order to account for the numerous ionic mechanisms involved (at present including Nav1.6, Cav2.1, Cav3.1, Cav3.2, Cav3.3, Kv1.1, Kv1.5, Kv3.3, Kv3.4, Kv4.3, KCa1.1, KCa2.2, KCa3.1, Kir2.x, HCN1), we have elaborated a multicompartmental model incorporating available knowledge on localization and gating of PC ionic channels. The axon, including initial segment (AIS) and Ranvier nodes (RNs), proved critical to obtain appropriate pacemaking and firing frequency modulation. Simple spikes initiated in the AIS and protracted discharges were stabilized in the soma through Na-dependent mechanisms, while somato-dendritic Ca channels contributed to sustain pacemaking and to generate complex bursting at high discharge regimes. Bistability occurred only following Na and Ca channel down-regulation. In addition, specific properties in RNs K currents were required to limit spike transmission frequency along the axon. The model showed how organized electroresponsive functions could emerge from the molecular complexity of PCs and showed that the axon is fundamental to complement ionic channel compartmentalization enabling action potential processing and transmission of specific spike patterns to DCN. PMID:25759640

  17. Synapse-specific compartmentalization of signaling cascades for LTP induction in CA3 interneurons

    PubMed Central

    Galván, Emilio J; Pérez-Rosello, Tamara; Gómez-Lira, Gisela; Lara, Erika; Gutiérrez, Rafael; Barrionuevo, Germán

    2015-01-01

    Inhibitory interneurons with somata in strata radiatum and lacunosun-moleculare (SR/L-M) of hippocampal area CA3 receive excitatory input from pyramidal cells via the recurrent collaterals (RC), and the dentate gyrus granule cells via the mossy fibers (MFs). Here we demonstrate that Hebbian long-term potentiation (LTP) at RC synapses on SR/L-M interneurons requires the concomitant activation of calcium-impermeable AMPARs (CI- AMPARs) and NMDARs. RC LTP was prevented by voltage clamping the postsynaptic cell during high-frequency stimulation (HFS; 3 trains of 100 pulses delivered at 100 Hz every 10 s), with intracellular injections of the Ca2+ chelator BAPTA (20 mM), and with the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) antagonist D-AP5. In separate experiments, RC and MF inputs converging onto the same interneuron were sequentially activated. We found that RC LTP induction was blocked by inhibitors of the calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII; KN-62, 10 μM or KN-93, 10 μM) but MF LTP was CaMKII independent. Conversely, the application of the protein kinase A (PKA) activators forskolin/IBMX(50 μM/25 μM) potentiated MF EPSPs but not RC EPSPs. Together these data indicate that the aspiny dendrites of SR/L-M interneurons compartmentalize synaptic-specific Ca2+ signaling required for LTP induction at RC and MF synapses. We also show that the two signal transduction cascades converge to activate a common effector, protein kinase C (PKC). Specifically, LTP at RC and MF synapses on the same SR/LM interneuron was blocked by postsynaptic injections of chelerythrine (10 μM). These data indicate that both forms of LTP share a common mechanism involving PKC-dependent signaling modulation. PMID:25637803

  18. Relationships between metal compartmentalization and biomarkers in earthworms exposed to field-contaminated soils.

    PubMed

    Beaumelle, Léa; Hedde, Mickaël; Vandenbulcke, Franck; Lamy, Isabelle

    2017-05-01

    Partitioning tissue metal concentration into subcellular compartments reflecting toxicologically available pools may provide good descriptors of the toxicological effects of metals on organisms. Here we investigated the relationships between internal compartmentalization of Cd, Pb and Zn and biomarker responses in a model soil organism: the earthworm. The aim of this study was to identify metal fractions reflecting the toxic pressure in an endogeic, naturally occurring earthworm species (Aporrectodea caliginosa) exposed to realistic field-contaminated soils. After a 21 days exposure experiment to 31 field-contaminated soils, Cd, Pb and Zn concentrations in earthworms and in three subcellular fractions (cytosol, debris and granules) were quantified. Different biomarkers were measured: the expression of a metallothionein gene (mt), the activity of catalase (CAT) and of glutathione-s-transferase (GST), and the protein, lipid and glycogen reserves. Biomarkers were further combined into an integrated biomarker index (IBR). The subcellular fractionation provided better predictors of biomarkers than the total internal contents hence supporting its use when assessing toxicological bioavailability of metals to earthworms. The most soluble internal pools of metals were not always the best predictors of biomarker responses. metallothionein expression responded to increasing concentrations of Cd in the insoluble fraction (debris + granules). Protein and glycogen contents were also mainly related to Cd and Pb in the insoluble fraction. On the other hand, GST activity was better explained by Pb in the cytosolic fraction. CAT activity and lipid contents variations were not related to metal subcellular distribution. The IBR was best explained by both soluble and insoluble fractions of Pb and Cd. This study further extends the scope of mt expression as a robust and specific biomarker in an ecologically representative earthworm species exposed to field-contaminated soils. The

  19. Validation of Bayesian analysis of compartmental kinetic models in medical imaging.

    PubMed

    Sitek, Arkadiusz; Li, Quanzheng; El Fakhri, Georges; Alpert, Nathaniel M

    2016-10-01

    Kinetic compartmental analysis is frequently used to compute physiologically relevant quantitative values from time series of images. In this paper, a new approach based on Bayesian analysis to obtain information about these parameters is presented and validated. The closed-form of the posterior distribution of kinetic parameters is derived with a hierarchical prior to model the standard deviation of normally distributed noise. Markov chain Monte Carlo methods are used for numerical estimation of the posterior distribution. Computer simulations of the kinetics of F18-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) are used to demonstrate drawing statistical inferences about kinetic parameters and to validate the theory and implementation. Additionally, point estimates of kinetic parameters and covariance of those estimates are determined using the classical non-linear least squares approach. Posteriors obtained using methods proposed in this work are accurate as no significant deviation from the expected shape of the posterior was found (one-sided P>0.08). It is demonstrated that the results obtained by the standard non-linear least-square methods fail to provide accurate estimation of uncertainty for the same data set (P<0.0001). The results of this work validate new methods for a computer simulations of FDG kinetics. Results show that in situations where the classical approach fails in accurate estimation of uncertainty, Bayesian estimation provides an accurate information about the uncertainties in the parameters. Although a particular example of FDG kinetics was used in the paper, the methods can be extended for different pharmaceuticals and imaging modalities. Copyright © 2016 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Ultrafast Diffusion of a Fluorescent Cholesterol Analog in Compartmentalized Plasma Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Hiramoto-Yamaki, Nao; Tanaka, Kenji A K; Suzuki, Kenichi G N; Hirosawa, Koichiro M; Miyahara, Manami S H; Kalay, Ziya; Tanaka, Koichiro; Kasai, Rinshi S; Kusumi, Akihiro; Fujiwara, Takahiro K

    2014-01-01

    Cholesterol distribution and dynamics in the plasma membrane (PM) are poorly understood. The recent development of Bodipy488-conjugated cholesterol molecule (Bdp-Chol) allowed us to study cholesterol behavior in the PM, using single fluorescent-molecule imaging. Surprisingly, in the intact PM, Bdp-Chol diffused at the fastest rate ever found for any molecules in the PM, with a median diffusion coefficient (D) of 3.4 µm2/second, which was ∼10 times greater than that of non-raft phospholipid molecules (0.33 µm2/second), despite Bdp-Chol's probable association with raft domains. Furthermore, Bdp-Chol exhibited no sign of entrapment in time scales longer than 0.5 milliseconds. In the blebbed PM, where actin filaments were largely depleted, Bdp-Chol and Cy3-conjugated dioleoylphosphatidylethanolamine (Cy3-DOPE) diffused at comparable Ds (medians = 5.8 and 6.2 µm2/second, respectively), indicating that the actin-based membrane skeleton reduces the D of Bdp-Chol only by a factor of ∼2 from that in the blebbed PM, whereas it reduces the D of Cy3-DOPE by a factor of ∼20. These results are consistent with the previously proposed model, in which the PM is compartmentalized by the actin-based membrane-skeleton fence and its associated transmembrane picket proteins for the macroscopic diffusion of all of the membrane molecules, and suggest that the probability of Bdp-Chol passing through the compartment boundaries, once it enters the boundary, is ∼10× greater than that of Cy3-DOPE. Since the compartment sizes are greater than those of the putative raft domains, we conclude that raft domains coexist with membrane-skeleton-induced compartments and are contained within them. PMID:24506328

  1. Retinol metabolism in rats with low vitamin A status: A compartmental model

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, K.C.; Green, M.H.; Green, J.B.; Zech, L.A. )

    1990-09-01

    A compartmental model was developed to describe the metabolism of vitamin A in rats with low vitamin A status maintained by a low dietary intake of vitamin A (approximately 2 micrograms retinol equivalents/day). After the IV bolus injection of (3H)retinol in its physiological transport complex, tracer and trace data were obtained from plasma, organs (liver, kidneys, small intestine, eyes, adrenals, testes, lungs, carcass), and tracer data were obtained from urine and feces. The dietary protocol developed for this study resulted in animals having plasma vitamin A levels less than 10 micrograms retinol/dl and total liver vitamin A levels of approximately 1 microgram retinol equivalent. Four compartments were used to model the plasma: one to describe retinol, one to describe the nonphysiological portion of the dose, and two to simulate polar metabolites derived from retinol. The liver required two compartments and a delay, the carcass (small intestine, eyes, adrenals, testes, and lungs, plus remaining carcass) required three compartments, and the kidneys required two. The model predicted a vitamin A utilization rate of 1.65 micrograms retinol equivalents/day with the urine and feces accounting for most of the output. The plasma retinol turnover rate was approximately 20 micrograms retinol equivalents/day; this was 12 times greater than the utilization rate. This indicated that, of the large amount of retinol moving through the plasma each day, less than 10% of this was actually being irreversibly utilized. Similarly, as compared to the whole-body utilization rate, there was a relatively high turnover rate of retinol in the kidneys, carcass, and liver, coupled with a high degree of recycling of vitamin A through these tissues. Of the total vitamin A that entered the liver from all sources including the diet, approximately 86% was mobilized into the plasma.

  2. A Likelihood Approach for Real-Time Calibration of Stochastic Compartmental Epidemic Models

    PubMed Central

    Zimmer, Christoph; Cohen, Ted

    2017-01-01

    Stochastic transmission dynamic models are especially useful for studying the early emergence of novel pathogens given the importance of chance events when the number of infectious individuals is small. However, methods for parameter estimation and prediction for these types of stochastic models remain limited. In this manuscript, we describe a calibration and prediction framework for stochastic compartmental transmission models of epidemics. The proposed method, Multiple Shooting for Stochastic systems (MSS), applies a linear noise approximation to describe the size of the fluctuations, and uses each new surveillance observation to update the belief about the true epidemic state. Using simulated outbreaks of a novel viral pathogen, we evaluate the accuracy of MSS for real-time parameter estimation and prediction during epidemics. We assume that weekly counts for the number of new diagnosed cases are available and serve as an imperfect proxy of incidence. We show that MSS produces accurate estimates of key epidemic parameters (i.e. mean duration of infectiousness, R0, and Reff) and can provide an accurate estimate of the unobserved number of infectious individuals during the course of an epidemic. MSS also allows for accurate prediction of the number and timing of future hospitalizations and the overall attack rate. We compare the performance of MSS to three state-of-the-art benchmark methods: 1) a likelihood approximation with an assumption of independent Poisson observations; 2) a particle filtering method; and 3) an ensemble Kalman filter method. We find that MSS significantly outperforms each of these three benchmark methods in the majority of epidemic scenarios tested. In summary, MSS is a promising method that may improve on current approaches for calibration and prediction using stochastic models of epidemics. PMID:28095403

  3. Compartmentalized microbial composition, oxygen gradients and nitrogen fixation in the gut of Odontotaenius disjunctus

    PubMed Central

    Ceja-Navarro, Javier A; Nguyen, Nhu H; Karaoz, Ulas; Gross, Stephanie R; Herman, Donald J; Andersen, Gary L; Bruns, Thomas D; Pett-Ridge, Jennifer; Blackwell, Meredith; Brodie, Eoin L

    2014-01-01

    Coarse woody debris is an important biomass pool in forest ecosystems that numerous groups of insects have evolved to take advantage of. These insects are ecologically important and represent useful natural analogs for biomass to biofuel conversion. Using a range of molecular approaches combined with microelectrode measurements of oxygen, we have characterized the gut microbiome and physiology of Odontotaenius disjunctus, a wood-feeding beetle native to the eastern United States. We hypothesized that morphological and physiological differences among gut regions would correspond to distinct microbial populations and activities. In fact, significantly different communities were found in the foregut (FG), midgut (MG)/posterior hindgut (PHG) and anterior hindgut (AHG), with Actinobacteria and Rhizobiales being more abundant toward the FG and PHG. Conversely, fermentative bacteria such as Bacteroidetes and Clostridia were more abundant in the AHG, and also the sole region where methanogenic Archaea were detected. Although each gut region possessed an anaerobic core, micron-scale profiling identified radial gradients in oxygen concentration in all regions. Nitrogen fixation was confirmed by 15N2 incorporation, and nitrogenase gene (nifH) expression was greatest in the AHG. Phylogenetic analysis of nifH identified the most abundant transcript as related to Ni–Fe nitrogenase of a Bacteroidetes species, Paludibacter propionicigenes. Overall, we demonstrate not only a compartmentalized microbiome in this beetle digestive tract but also sharp oxygen gradients that may permit aerobic and anaerobic metabolism to occur within the same regions in close proximity. We provide evidence for the microbial fixation of N2 that is important for this beetle to subsist on woody biomass. PMID:23985746

  4. Compartmentalization and regulation of iron metabolism proteins protect male germ cells from iron overload.

    PubMed

    Leichtmann-Bardoogo, Yael; Cohen, Lyora A; Weiss, Avital; Marohn, Britta; Schubert, Stephanie; Meinhardt, Andreas; Meyron-Holtz, Esther G

    2012-06-15

    The universal importance of iron, its high toxicity, and complex chemistry present a challenge to biological systems in general and to protected compartments in particular. The high mitotic rate and avid mitochondriogenesis of developing male germ cells imply high iron requirements. Yet access to germ cells is tightly regulated by the blood-testis barrier that protects the meiotic and postmeiotic germ cells. To elucidate how iron is supplied to developing male germ cells, we analyzed iron deposition and iron transport proteins in testes of mice with iron overload and with genetic ablation of the iron regulators Hfe and iron regulatory protein 2. Iron accumulated mainly around seminiferous tubules, and only small amounts localized within the seminiferous tubules. The localization and regulation of proteins involved in iron import, storage, and export such as transferrin, transferrin receptor, the divalent metal transporter-1, cytosolic ferritin, and ferroportin strongly support a model of a largely autonomous iron cycle within seminiferous tubules. We show evidence that ferritin secretion from Sertoli cells may play an important role in iron acquisition of primary spermatocytes. During spermatogenic development iron is carried along from primary spermatocytes to spermatids, and from spermatids iron is recycled to the apical compartment of Sertoli cells, which traffic it back to a new generation of spermatocytes. Losses are replenished by the peripheral circulation. Such an internal iron cycle essentially detaches the iron homeostasis within the seminiferous tubule from the periphery and protects developing germ cells from iron fluctuations. This model explains how compartmentalization can optimize cellular and systemic nutrient homeostasis.

  5. Synapse-specific compartmentalization of signaling cascades for LTP induction in CA3 interneurons.

    PubMed

    Galván, E J; Pérez-Rosello, T; Gómez-Lira, G; Lara, E; Gutiérrez, R; Barrionuevo, G

    2015-04-02

    Inhibitory interneurons with somata in strata radiatum and lacunosum-molecular (SR/L-M) of hippocampal area CA3 receive excitatory input from pyramidal cells via the recurrent collaterals (RCs), and the dentate gyrus granule cells via the mossy fibers (MFs). Here we demonstrate that Hebbian long-term potentiation (LTP) at RC synapses on SR/L-M interneurons requires the concomitant activation of calcium-impermeable AMPARs (CI-AMPARs) and N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors (NMDARs). RC LTP was prevented by voltage clamping the postsynaptic cell during high-frequency stimulation (HFS; 3 trains of 100 pulses delivered at 100 Hz every 10s), with intracellular injections of the Ca(2+) chelator BAPTA (20mM), and with the NMDAR antagonist D-AP5. In separate experiments, RC and MF inputs converging onto the same interneuron were sequentially activated. We found that RC LTP induction was blocked by inhibitors of the calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII; KN-62, 10 μM or KN-93, 10 μM) but MF LTP was CaMKII independent. Conversely, the application of the protein kinase A (PKA) activators forskolin/IBMX (50 μM/25 μM) potentiated MF EPSPs but not RC EPSPs. Together these data indicate that the aspiny dendrites of SR/L-M interneurons compartmentalize synapse-specific Ca(2+) signaling required for LTP induction at RC and MF synapses. We also show that the two signal transduction cascades converge to activate a common effector, protein kinase C (PKC). Specifically, LTP at RC and MF synapses on the same SR/LM interneuron was blocked by postsynaptic injections of chelerythrine (10 μM). These data indicate that both forms of LTP share a common mechanism involving PKC-dependent signaling modulation.

  6. Axial compartmentation of descending and ascending thin limbs of Henle's loops.

    PubMed

    Westrick, Kristen Y; Serack, Bradley; Dantzler, William H; Pannabecker, Thomas L

    2013-02-01

    In the inner medulla, radial organization of nephrons and blood vessels around collecting duct (CD) clusters leads to two lateral interstitial regions and preferential intersegmental fluid and solute flows. As the descending (DTLs) and ascending thin limbs (ATLs) pass through these regions, their transepithelial fluid and solute flows are influenced by variable transepithelial solute gradients and structure-to-structure interactions. The goal of this study was to quantify structure-to-structure interactions, so as to better understand compartmentation and flows of transepithelial water, NaCl, and urea and generation of the axial osmotic gradient. To accomplish this, we determined lateral distances of AQP1-positive and AQP1-negative DTLs and ATLs from their nearest CDs, so as to gauge interactions with intercluster and intracluster lateral regions and interactions with interstitial nodal spaces (INSs). DTLs express reduced AQP1 and low transepithelial water permeability along their deepest segments. Deep AQP1-null segments, prebend segments, and ATLs lie equally near to CDs. Prebend segments and ATLs abut CDs and INSs throughout much of their descent and ascent, respectively; however, the distal 30% of ATLs of the longest loops lie distant from CDs as they approach the outer medullary boundary and have minimal interaction with INSs. These relationships occur regardless of loop length. Finally, we show that ascending vasa recta separate intercluster AQP1-positive DTLs from descending vasa recta, thereby minimizing dilution of gradients that drive solute secretion. We hypothesize that DTLs and ATLs enter and exit CD clusters in an orchestrated fashion that is important for generation of the corticopapillary solute gradient by minimizing NaCl and urea loss.

  7. Compartmentalized cyanophycin metabolism in the diazotrophic filaments of a heterocyst-forming cyanobacterium.

    PubMed

    Burnat, Mireia; Herrero, Antonia; Flores, Enrique

    2014-03-11

    Heterocyst-forming cyanobacteria are multicellular organisms in which growth requires the activity of two metabolically interdependent cell types, the vegetative cells that perform oxygenic photosynthesis and the dinitrogen-fixing heterocysts. Vegetative cells provide the heterocysts with reduced carbon, and heterocysts provide the vegetative cells with fixed nitrogen. Heterocysts conspicuously accumulate polar granules made of cyanophycin [multi-L-arginyl-poly (L-aspartic acid)], which is synthesized by cyanophycin synthetase and degraded by the concerted action of cyanophycinase (that releases β-aspartyl-arginine) and isoaspartyl dipeptidase (that produces aspartate and arginine). Cyanophycin synthetase and cyanophycinase are present at high levels in the heterocysts. Here we created a deletion mutant of gene all3922 encoding isoaspartyl dipeptidase in the model heterocyst-forming cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120. The mutant accumulated cyanophycin and β-aspartyl-arginine, and was impaired specifically in diazotrophic growth. Analysis of an Anabaena strain bearing an All3922-GFP (green fluorescent protein) fusion and determination of the enzyme activity in specific cell types showed that isoaspartyl dipeptidase is present at significantly lower levels in heterocysts than in vegetative cells. Consistently, isolated heterocysts released substantial amounts of β-aspartyl-arginine. These observations imply that β-aspartyl-arginine produced from cyanophycin in the heterocysts is transferred intercellularly to be hydrolyzed, producing aspartate and arginine in the vegetative cells. Our results showing compartmentalized metabolism of cyanophycin identify the nitrogen-rich molecule β-aspartyl-arginine as a nitrogen vehicle in the unique multicellular system represented by the heterocyst-forming cyanobacteria.

  8. Axial compartmentation of descending and ascending thin limbs of Henle's loops

    PubMed Central

    Westrick, Kristen Y.; Serack, Bradley; Dantzler, William H.

    2013-01-01

    In the inner medulla, radial organization of nephrons and blood vessels around collecting duct (CD) clusters leads to two lateral interstitial regions and preferential intersegmental fluid and solute flows. As the descending (DTLs) and ascending thin limbs (ATLs) pass through these regions, their transepithelial fluid and solute flows are influenced by variable transepithelial solute gradients and structure-to-structure interactions. The goal of this study was to quantify structure-to-structure interactions, so as to better understand compartmentation and flows of transepithelial water, NaCl, and urea and generation of the axial osmotic gradient. To accomplish this, we determined lateral distances of AQP1-positive and AQP1-negative DTLs and ATLs from their nearest CDs, so as to gauge interactions with intercluster and intracluster lateral regions and interactions with interstitial nodal spaces (INSs). DTLs express reduced AQP1 and low transepithelial water permeability along their deepest segments. Deep AQP1-null segments, prebend segments, and ATLs lie equally near to CDs. Prebend segments and ATLs abut CDs and INSs throughout much of their descent and ascent, respectively; however, the distal 30% of ATLs of the longest loops lie distant from CDs as they approach the outer medullary boundary and have minimal interaction with INSs. These relationships occur regardless of loop length. Finally, we show that ascending vasa recta separate intercluster AQP1-positive DTLs from descending vasa recta, thereby minimizing dilution of gradients that drive solute secretion. We hypothesize that DTLs and ATLs enter and exit CD clusters in an orchestrated fashion that is important for generation of the corticopapillary solute gradient by minimizing NaCl and urea loss. PMID:23195680

  9. Compartmentalized microbial composition, oxygen gradients and nitrogen fixation in the gut of Odontotaenius disjunctus.

    PubMed

    Ceja-Navarro, Javier A; Nguyen, Nhu H; Karaoz, Ulas; Gross, Stephanie R; Herman, Donald J; Andersen, Gary L; Bruns, Thomas D; Pett-Ridge, Jennifer; Blackwell, Meredith; Brodie, Eoin L

    2014-01-01

    Coarse woody debris is an important biomass pool in forest ecosystems that numerous groups of insects have evolved to take advantage of. These insects are ecologically important and represent useful natural analogs for biomass to biofuel conversion. Using a range of molecular approaches combined with microelectrode measurements of oxygen, we have characterized the gut microbiome and physiology of Odontotaenius disjunctus, a wood-feeding beetle native to the eastern United States. We hypothesized that morphological and physiological differences among gut regions would correspond to distinct microbial populations and activities. In fact, significantly different communities were found in the foregut (FG), midgut (MG)/posterior hindgut (PHG) and anterior hindgut (AHG), with Actinobacteria and Rhizobiales being more abundant toward the FG and PHG. Conversely, fermentative bacteria such as Bacteroidetes and Clostridia were more abundant in the AHG, and also the sole region where methanogenic Archaea were detected. Although each gut region possessed an anaerobic core, micron-scale profiling identified radial gradients in oxygen concentration in all regions. Nitrogen fixation was confirmed by (15)N2 incorporation, and nitrogenase gene (nifH) expression was greatest in the AHG. Phylogenetic analysis of nifH identified the most abundant transcript as related to Ni-Fe nitrogenase of a Bacteroidetes species, Paludibacter propionicigenes. Overall, we demonstrate not only a compartmentalized microbiome in this beetle digestive tract but also sharp oxygen gradients that may permit aerobic and anaerobic metabolism to occur within the same regions in close proximity. We provide evidence for the microbial fixation of N2 that is important for this beetle to subsist on woody biomass.

  10. A Likelihood Approach for Real-Time Calibration of Stochastic Compartmental Epidemic Models.

    PubMed

    Zimmer, Christoph; Yaesoubi, Reza; Cohen, Ted

    2017-01-01

    Stochastic transmission dynamic models are especially useful for studying the early emergence of novel pathogens given the importance of chance events when the number of infectious individuals is small. However, methods for parameter estimation and prediction for these types of stochastic models remain limited. In this manuscript, we describe a calibration and prediction framework for stochastic compartmental transmission models of epidemics. The proposed method, Multiple Shooting for Stochastic systems (MSS), applies a linear noise approximation to describe the size of the fluctuations, and uses each new surveillance observation to update the belief about the true epidemic state. Using simulated outbreaks of a novel viral pathogen, we evaluate the accuracy of MSS for real-time parameter estimation and prediction during epidemics. We assume that weekly counts for the number of new diagnosed cases are available and serve as an imperfect proxy of incidence. We show that MSS produces accurate estimates of key epidemic parameters (i.e. mean duration of infectiousness, R0, and Reff) and can provide an accurate estimate of the unobserved number of infectious individuals during the course of an epidemic. MSS also allows for accurate prediction of the number and timing of future hospitalizations and the overall attack rate. We compare the performance of MSS to three state-of-the-art benchmark methods: 1) a likelihood approximation with an assumption of independent Poisson observations; 2) a particle filtering method; and 3) an ensemble Kalman filter method. We find that MSS significantly outperforms each of these three benchmark methods in the majority of epidemic scenarios tested. In summary, MSS is a promising method that may improve on current approaches for calibration and prediction using stochastic models of epidemics.

  11. Application of oil gas-chromatography in reservoir compartmentalization in a mature Venezuelan oil field

    SciTech Connect

    Munoz, N.G.; Mompart, L.; Talukdar, S.C.

    1996-08-01

    Gas chromatographic oil {open_quotes}fingerprinting{close_quotes} was successfully applied in a multidisciplinary production geology project by Maraven, S.A. to define the extent of vertical and lateral continuity of Eocene and Miocene sandstone reservoirs in the highly faulted Bloque I field, Maracaibo Basin, Venezuela. Seventy-five non-biodegraded oils (20{degrees}-37.4{degrees} API) were analyzed with gas chromatography. Fifty were produced from the Eocene Misoa C-4, C-5, C-6 or C-7 horizons, fifteen from the Miocene basal La Rosa and ten from multizone completions. Gas chromatographic and terpane and sterane biomarker data show that all of the oils are genetically related. They were expelled from a type II, Upper Cretaceous marine La Luna source rock at about 0.80-0.90% R{sub o} maturity. Alteration in the reservoir by gas stripping with or without subsequent light hydrocarbons mixing was observed in some oils. Detailed chromatographic comparisons among the oils shown by star plots and cluster analysis utilizing several naphthenic and aromatic peak height ratios, resulted in oil pool groupings. This led to finding previously unknown lateral and vertical reservoir communication and also helped in checking and updating the scaling character of faults. In the commingled oils, percentages of each contributing zone in the mixture were also determined giving Maraven engineers a proven, rapid and inexpensive tool for production allocation and reservoir management The oil pool compartmentalization defined by the geochemical fingerprinting is in very good agreement with the sequence stratigraphic interpretation of the reservoirs and helped evaluate the influence of structure in oil migration and trapping.

  12. Compartmental and Data-Based Modeling of Cerebral Hemodynamics: Nonlinear Analysis.

    PubMed

    Henley, Brandon; Shin, Dae; Zhang, Rong; Marmarelis, Vasilis

    2016-07-09

    Objective-As an extension to our study comparing a putative compartmental and data-based model of linear dynamic cerebral autoregulation (CA) and CO2-vasomotor reactivity (VR), we study the CA-VR process in a nonlinear context. Methods- We use the concept of Principal Dynamic Modes (PDM) in order to obtain a compact and more easily interpretable input-output model. This in silico study permits the use of input data with a dynamic range large enough to simulate the classic homeostatic CA and VR curves using a putative structural model of the regulatory control of the cerebral circulation. The PDM model obtained using theoretical and experimental data are compared. Results- It was found that the PDM model was able to reflect accurately both the simulated static CA and VR curves in the Associated Nonlinear Functions (ANFs). Similar to experimental observations, the PDM model essentially separates the pressure-flow relationship into a linear component with fast dynamics and nonlinear components with slow dynamics. In addition, we found good qualitative agreement between the PDMs representing the dynamic theoretical and experimental CO2-flow relationship. Conclusion- Under the modeling assumption and in light of other experimental findings, we hypothesize that PDMs obtained from experimental data correspond with passive fluid dynamical and active regulatory mechanisms. Significance- Both hypothesis-based and data-based modeling approaches can be combined to offer some insight into the physiological basis of PDM model obtained from human experimental data. The PDM modeling approach potentially offers a practical way to quantify the status of specific regulatory mechanisms in the CA-VR process.

  13. Early ovarian cancer surgery with indocyanine-green-guided targeted compartmental lymphadenectomy (TCL, pelvic part).

    PubMed

    Kimmig, Rainer; Buderath, Paul; Rusch, Peter; Mach, Pawel; Aktas, Bahriye

    2017-09-01

    Para-aortic indocyanine-green (ICG)-guided targeted compartmental lymphadenectomy is feasible in early ovarian cancer; systematic pelvic and para-aortic lymphadenectomy could potentially be avoided if thoroughly investigated sentinel nodes could predict whether residual nodes will be involved or free of disease. In contrast to advanced ovarian cancer, where the therapeutic potential of lymphadenectomy will soon be clarified by the results of the Arbeitsgemeinschaft Gynäkologische Onkologie lymphadenectomy in ovarian neoplasms (AGO LION) trial, systematic lymphadenectomy seems to be mandatory for diagnostic and also therapeutic purposes in early ovarian cancer. Sentinel node biopsy or resection of the regional lymphatic network may reduce morbidity compared to systematic lymphadenectomy as shown already for other entities. Apart from the ovarian mesonephric pathway, a second Müllerian uterine pathway exists for lymphatic drainage of the ovary. Lymphatic valves apparently do not exist at this level of the utero-ovarian network since injection of radioactivity into the ovarian ligaments also labelled pelvic nodes. We applied ICG using 4×0.5 mL of a 1.66 mg/mL ICG solution for transcervical injection into the fundal and midcorporal myometrium at each side [10] instead of injection into the infundibulopelvic ligament, since the utero-ovarian drainage was intact. In this case a 1.8 cm cancer of the right ovary was removed in continuity with its draining lymphatic vessels and at least the first 2 sentinel nodes in each channel "en bloc" as shown in this video for the pelvic part, consistent with the loco-regional ontogenetic approach. This could potentially avoid most of systematic lymphadenectomies in early ovarian cancer.

  14. Compartmentalization of PDGF on extracellular binding sites dependent on exon-6-encoded sequences

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    The PDGFs are a family of molecules assembled as disulfide-bonded homo- and heterodimers from two distinct but highly homologous polypeptide chains (PDGF-A and PDGF-B). Two PDGF A-chain transcripts, which arise from alternative usage of the 69-bp exon 6 and exon 7, give rise to two forms of PDGF-A. In spite of the conservation of two PDGF A-chain forms over at least 350 million years, no differences in their biological activities have been identified. We have investigated the activity of the sequence encoded by the alternatively spliced exon 6 of the PDGF A- chain (peptide AL). Addition of peptide AL at 10(-5)-10(-9) M to cultured endothelium and smooth muscle induced a dose-dependent, 3-20- fold increase in PDGF in conditioned media within 30 min. Peptide AL had no detectable effect on A- or B-chain transcript levels, and decrease in culture temperature did not prevent rapid release of PDGF. In human umbilical vein endothelial cells treated with peptide AL, the PDGF release was principally PDGF-BB, while in smooth muscle cells it was primarily PDGF-AA. The capacity to induce release of PDGF is shared by the homologous peptide encoded by exon 6 of the B-chain of PDGF. Binding studies and cross-linking analysis are consistent with a charge- based association of exon 6 sequences with membrane- and matrix- associated heparan-sulfate proteoglycans. We hypothesize that translation of exon 6 of the A- or B-chain of PDGF results in compartmentalization of these forms of PDGF with HS-PG, whereas forms lacking this sequence would be soluble and diffuse. PMID:1309814

  15. Convex-Optimization-Based Compartmental Pharmacokinetic Analysis for Prostate Tumor Characterization Using DCE-MRI.

    PubMed

    Ambikapathi, ArulMurugan; Chan, Tsung-Han; Lin, Chia-Hsiang; Yang, Fei-Shih; Chi, Chong-Yung; Wang, Yue

    2016-04-01

    Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) is a powerful imaging modality to study the pharmacokinetics in a suspected cancer/tumor tissue. The pharmacokinetic (PK) analysis of prostate cancer includes the estimation of time activity curves (TACs), and thereby, the corresponding kinetic parameters (KPs), and plays a pivotal role in diagnosis and prognosis of prostate cancer. In this paper, we endeavor to develop a blind source separation algorithm, namely convex-optimization-based KPs estimation (COKE) algorithm for PK analysis based on compartmental modeling of DCE-MRI data, for effective prostate tumor detection and its quantification. The COKE algorithm first identifies the best three representative pixels in the DCE-MRI data, corresponding to the plasma, fast-flow, and slow-flow TACs, respectively. The estimation accuracy of the flux rate constants (FRCs) of the fast-flow and slow-flow TACs directly affects the estimation accuracy of the KPs that provide the cancer and normal tissue distribution maps in the prostate region. The COKE algorithm wisely exploits the matrix structure (Toeplitz, lower triangular, and exponential decay) of the original nonconvex FRCs estimation problem, and reformulates it into two convex optimization problems that can reliably estimate the FRCs. After estimation of the FRCs, the KPs can be effectively estimated by solving a pixel-wise constrained curve-fitting (convex) problem. Simulation results demonstrate the efficacy of the proposed COKE algorithm. The COKE algorithm is also evaluated with DCE-MRI data of four different patients with prostate cancer and the obtained results are consistent with clinical observations.

  16. Wls provides a new compartmental view of the rhombic lip in mouse cerebellar development.

    PubMed

    Yeung, Joanna; Ha, Thomas J; Swanson, Douglas J; Choi, Kunho; Tong, Yiai; Goldowitz, Dan

    2014-09-10

    Math1 is the defining molecule of the cerebellar rhombic lip and Pax6 is downstream in the Math1 pathway. In the present study, we discover that Wntless (Wls) is a novel molecular marker of the cells in the interior face of the rhombic lip throughout normal mouse cerebellar development. Wls expression is found complementary to the expression of Math1 and Pax6, which are localized to the exterior face of the rhombic lip. To determine the interaction between these molecules, we examine the loss-of-Math1 or loss-of-Pax6 in the cerebellum, i.e., the Math1-null and Pax6-null (Sey) mutant cerebella. The presence of Wls-positive cells in the Math1-null rhombic lip indicates that Wls expression is independent of Math1. In the Sey mutant cerebellum, there is an expansion of Wls-expressing cells into regions that are normally colonized by Pax6-expressing cells. The ectopic expression of Wls in the Pax6-null cerebellum suggests a negative interaction between Wls-expressing cells and Pax6-positive cells. These findings suggest that the rhombic lip is dynamically patterned by the expression of Wls, Math1, and Pax6. We also examine five rhombic lip cell markers (Wls, Math1, Pax6, Lmx1a, and Tbr2) to identify four molecularly distinct compartments in the rhombic lip during cerebellar development. The existence of spatial compartmentation in the rhombic lip and the interplay between Wls, Math1, and Pax6 in the rhombic lip provides novel views of early cerebellar development.

  17. Wls Provides a New Compartmental View of the Rhombic Lip in Mouse Cerebellar Development

    PubMed Central

    Yeung, Joanna; Ha, Thomas J.; Swanson, Douglas J.; Choi, Kunho; Tong, Yiai

    2014-01-01

    Math1 is the defining molecule of the cerebellar rhombic lip and Pax6 is downstream in the Math1 pathway. In the present study, we discover that Wntless (Wls) is a novel molecular marker of the cells in the interior face of the rhombic lip throughout normal mouse cerebellar development. Wls expression is found complementary to the expression of Math1 and Pax6, which are localized to the exterior face of the rhombic lip. To determine the interaction between these molecules, we examine the loss-of-Math1 or loss-of-Pax6 in the cerebellum, i.e., the Math1-null and Pax6-null (Sey) mutant cerebella. The presence of Wls-positive cells in the Math1-null rhombic lip indicates that Wls expression is independent of Math1. In the Sey mutant cerebellum, there is an expansion of Wls-expressing cells into regions that are normally colonized by Pax6-expressing cells. The ectopic expression of Wls in the Pax6-null cerebellum suggests a negative interaction between Wls-expressing cells and Pax6-positive cells. These findings suggest that the rhombic lip is dynamically patterned by the expression of Wls, Math1, and Pax6. We also examine five rhombic lip cell markers (Wls, Math1, Pax6, Lmx1a, and Tbr2) to identify four molecularly distinct compartments in the rhombic lip during cerebellar development. The existence of spatial compartmentation in the rhombic lip and the interplay between Wls, Math1, and Pax6 in the rhombic lip provides novel views of early cerebellar development. PMID:25209290

  18. Barcoding of GPCR trafficking and signaling through the various trafficking roadmaps by compartmentalized signaling networks.

    PubMed

    Bahouth, Suleiman W; Nooh, Mohammed M

    2017-08-01

    Proper signaling by G protein coupled receptors (GPCR) is dependent on the specific repertoire of transducing, enzymatic and regulatory kinases and phosphatases that shape its signaling output. Activation and signaling of the GPCR through its cognate G protein is impacted by G protein-coupled receptor kinase (GRK)-imprinted "barcodes" that recruit β-arrestins to regulate subsequent desensitization, biased signaling and endocytosis of the GPCR. The outcome of agonist-internalized GPCR in endosomes is also regulated by sequence motifs or "barcodes" within the GPCR that mediate its recycling to the plasma membrane or retention and eventual degradation as well as its subseque