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Sample records for nuclear level density

  1. Moment methods and nuclear level densities

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Calvin W.

    2008-04-17

    Working in a shell-model framework, I use moments of the nuclear many-body Hamiltonian to illustrate the importance of the residual interaction to microscopic calculations of the nuclear level density.

  2. Shell Model Approach to Nuclear Level Density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horoi, Mihai

    2000-04-01

    Nuclear level densities (NLD) are traditionally estimated using variations of Fermi Gas Formula (FGF) or combinatoric techniques. Recent investigations using Monte Carlo Shell Model (MCSM) techniques indicate that a shell model description of NLD may be an accurate and stable approach. Full shell model calculations of NLD are very difficult. We calculated the NLD for all nuclei in the sd shell and show that the results can be described by a single particle combinatoric model, which depends on two parameters similar to FGF. We further investigated other models and find that a sum of gaussians with means and variances given by French and Ratcliff averages (Phys. Rev. C 3, 94(1971)) is able to accurately describe shell model NLD, even when shell effects are present. The contribution of the spurious center-of-mass motion to the shell model NLD is also discussed.

  3. Unified model of nuclear mass and level density formulas

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, H.; Fukahori, T.

    2005-12-15

    Nuclear ground and excited state properties are described by using parameter systematics on mass and level density formulas. The formulas are based on an analytical expression of the single-particle state density by introducing the shell-pairing correlation in a new way. Main features are the shell, pairing, and deformation effects on the droplet model near the ground state, which are washed out at higher excitation energies. The main aim of the paper is to provide in the analytical framework the improved energy dependent shell, pairing, and deformation corrections generalized to the collective enhancement factors, which offer a systematic prescription over a great number of nuclear reactions. The new formulas are shown to be in close agreement with not only the empirical nuclear mass data but also the measured slow neutron resonance spacings and experimental systematics observed in the excitation energy dependent properties.

  4. Nuclear Level Densities Off of the Stability Line

    SciTech Connect

    Grimes, Steven M.; Massey, T. N.; Oginni, B. M.; Shukla, S.; Voinov, A.

    2008-04-17

    Nuclear level densities have been extensively studied on or near the valley of stability. Because the data base is so sparse away from the valley of stability, the systematics found for stable nuclei are assumed to apply off the line of stability as well. A model which predicts different systematics off of the stability line is examined. A pair of recent measurements provide tentative support for the new hypothesis, though it is clear additional data are needed.

  5. Nuclear shape evolution based on microscopic level densities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, D. E.; Carlsson, B. G.; Døssing, T.; Möller, P.; Randrup, J.; Åberg, S.

    2017-02-01

    By combining microscopically calculated level densities with the Metropolis walk method, we develop a consistent framework for treating the energy and angular-momentum dependence of the nuclear shape evolution in the fission process. For each nucleus under consideration, the level density is calculated microscopically for each of more than five million shapes with a recently developed combinatorial method. The method employs the same single-particle levels as those used for the extraction of the pairing and shell contributions to the macroscopic-microscopic potential-energy surface. Containing no new parameters, the treatment is suitable for elucidating the energy dependence of the dynamics of warm nuclei on pairing and shell effects. It is illustrated for the fission fragment mass distribution for several uranium and plutonium isotopes of particular interest.

  6. Effect of collectivity on the nuclear level density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Pratap; Banerjee, K.; Gohil, M.; Bhattacharya, C.; Kundu, S.; Rana, T. K.; Ghosh, T. K.; Mukherjee, G.; Pandey, R.; Pai, H.; Srivastava, V.; Meena, J. K.; Banerjee, S. R.; Mukhopadhyay, S.; Pandit, D.; Pal, S.; Bhattacharya, S.

    2013-09-01

    Neutron evaporation spectra at backward angles from 201Tl*, 185Re*, and 169Tm* compound nuclei, having different ground-state deformations, have been measured at two excitation energies (E* ˜ 37 and 26 MeV). The values of the inverse level density parameter (k), extracted at these excitations using statistical model calculations, are observed to decrease substantially at the lower excitation energy (˜26 MeV) for nuclei having large ground-state deformation (residues of 185Re* and 169Tm*), whereas for near-spherical nuclei (residues of 201Tl*), the k value remains unchanged at the two energies. The decrease in k at the lower excitation energy for the deformed systems amounts to a relative increase in nuclear level density, indicating a collective enhancement. The present observation clearly establishes the existence of a strong correlation between collectivity and ground-state deformation.

  7. IAEA advisory group meeting on basic and applied problems of nuclear level densities

    SciTech Connect

    Bhat, M.R.

    1983-06-01

    Separate entries were made in the data base for 17 of the 19 papers included. Two papers were previously included in the data base. Workshop reports are included on (1) nuclear level density theories and nuclear model reaction cross-section calculations and (2) extraction of nuclear level density information from experimental data. (WHK)

  8. Nuclear spectroscopy in the chaotic domain: level densities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    French, J. B.; Rab, S.; Smith, J. F.; Haq, R. U.; Kota, V. K. B.

    2006-08-01

    In heavy nuclei, the structure generating the slow-neutron resonance spectrum extends downward in energy to similar to(1-2) MeV excitation and, of course, upward as well until particle emission becomes significant, thereby generating an Embedded Gaussian Orthogonal Ensemble (EGOE) spectrum built on a secular mean-density function. In this extended chaotic domain, principles and methods for the calculation of one-point quantities (e.g., level densities, spin-cutoff factors, occupancies, etc.,) have been well developed during the last several years. The economy and the resultant generic forms follow from the dominance of unitary symmetries, central limit theorems, and quantum chaos. In this paper, techniques used for level densities are illustrated by a detailed study of several heavy nuclei, the input data being taken from the observed low-lying spectrum and the far-separated neutron-resonance spectrum, this in itself saying much about long-range spectral rigidity. Explicit forms for the interacting particle state densities, expectation values, and expectation-value densities of operators in Hamiltonian eigenstates are given. Extension of the formalism to two-point functions that deal with spectral fluctuations, transition strengths, and analysis of measures for broken symmetries and which involve the same formal structure is indicated; higher order correlation functions are of little immediate interest because they define quantities only rarely measurable.

  9. Determination of nuclear level densities from experimental information

    SciTech Connect

    Cole, B.J. ); Davidson, N.J. , P.O. Box 88, Manchester M60 1QD ); Miller, H.G. )

    1994-10-01

    A novel information theory based method for determining the density of states from prior information is presented. The energy dependence of the density of states is determined from the observed number of states per energy interval, and model calculations suggest that the method is sufficiently reliable to calculate the thermal properties of nuclei over a reasonable temperature range.

  10. Calculation of Nuclear Level Density Parameters of Some Light Deformed Medical Radionuclides Using Collective Excitation Modes of Observed Nuclear Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okuducu, Ş.; Akti, N. N.; Saraç, H.; Bölükdemir, M. H.; Tel, E.

    In this study the nuclear energy level density based on nuclear collective excitation mechanism has been identified in terms of the low-lying collective level bands near the neutron binding energy. Nuclear level density parameters of some light deformed medical radionuclides used widely in medical applications have been calculated by using different collective excitation modes of observed nuclear spectra. The calculated parameters have been used successfully in estimation of the neutron-capture cross section basic data for the production of new medical radionuclides. The investigated radionuclides have been considered in the region of mass number 40

  11. Nuclear level densities and gamma-ray strength functions of 145,149,151Nd isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ay, K. O.; Ozgur, M.; Algin, E.; Guttormsen, M.; Bello Garrote, F. L.; Crespo Campo, L.; Görgen, A.; Hagen, T. W.; Ingeberg, V. W.; Kheswa, B. V.; Klintefjord, M.; Larsen, A. C.; Midtbo, J. E.; Modamio, V.; Renstrom, T.; Rose, S. J.; Sahin, E.; Siem, S.; Tveten, G. M.; Zeiser, F.

    2016-10-01

    The nuclear level densities and gamma-ray strength functions are the key elements for Hauser-Feshbach statistical model calculations to predict reaction cross sections which have many applications including astrophysics. The nuclear level densities and y-ray strength functions have been determined for 145,149,151Nd isotopes below the neutron separation energies using the Oslo method with the 144,148,150Nd(d,p) reactions. The results from the first measurements as well as planned experiments at OCL will be presented.

  12. Experimental nuclear level densities and {gamma}-ray strength functions in Sc and V isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Larsen, A. C.; Guttormsen, M.; Ingebretsen, F.; Messelt, S.; Rekstad, J.; Siem, S.; Syed, N. U. H.; Chankova, R.; Loennroth, T.; Schiller, A.; Voinov, A.

    2008-04-17

    The nuclear physics group at the Oslo Cyclotron Laboratory has developed a method to extract nuclear level density and {gamma}-ray strength function from first-generation {gamma}-ray spectra. This method is applied on the nuclei {sup 44,45}Sc and {sup 50,51}V in this work. The experimental level densities of {sup 44,45}Sc are compared to calculated level densities using a microscopic model based on BCS quasiparticles within the Nilsson level scheme. The {gamma}-ray strength functions are also compared to theoretical expectations, showing an unexpected enhancement of the {gamma}-ray strength for low {gamma} energies (E{sub {gamma}}{<=}3 MeV) in all the isotopes studied here. The physical origin of this enhancement is not yet understood.

  13. Non-invasive liquid level and density gauge for nuclear power reactor pressure vessels

    SciTech Connect

    Baratta, A.J.; Jester, W.A.; Kenney, E.S.; Mc Master, I.B.; Schultz, M.A.

    1987-01-27

    A method is described of non-invasively determining the liquid coolant level and density in a nuclear power reactor pressure vessel comprising the steps: positioning at least three neutron detector fission chambers externally of the reactor pressure vessel at multiple spaced positions along the side of the fuel core. One of the neutron detectors is positioned at the side near the bottom of the fuel core. The multiple spaced positions along the side remove any ambiguity as to whether the liquid level is decreasing or increasing: shielding the neutron detector fission chamber from thermal neutrons to avoid the noise associated therewith, and eliminating the effects of gamma radiation from the detected signals; monitoring the detected neutron level signals to determine to coolant liquid level and density in the nuclear power reactor pressure vessel.

  14. Experimental Study of Level Density and {gamma}-strength Functions from Compound Nuclear Reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Voinov, A. V.; Grimes, S. M.; Brune, C. R.; Massey, T. N.; Schiller, A.; Guttormsen, M.; Siem, S.

    2008-04-17

    The current status of experimental study of level density and {gamma}-strength functions is reviewed. Three experimental techniques are used. These are measurements of particle evaporation spectra from compound nuclear reactions, the measurements of particle-{gamma} coincidences from inelastic scattering and pick-up reactions and the method of two-step {gamma}-cascades following neutron/proton radiative capture. Recent experimental data on level densities from neutron evaporation spectra are shown. The first results on the cascade {gamma}-spectrum from the {sup 59}Co(p,2{gamma}){sup 60}Ni reaction are presented.

  15. The Hagedorn spectrum, nuclear level densities and first order phase transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Moretto, Luciano G.; Larsen, A. C.; Guttormsen, M.; Siem, S.

    2015-10-15

    An exponential mass spectrum, like the Hagedorn spectrum, with slope 1/T{sub H} was interpreted as fixing an upper limiting temperature T{sub H} that the system can achieve. However, thermodynamically, such spectrum indicates a 1{sup st} order phase transition at a fixed temperature T{sub H}. A much lower energy example is the log linear level nuclear density below the neutron binding energy that prevails throughout the nuclear chart. We show that, for non-magic nuclei, such linearity implies a 1{sup st} order phase transition from the pairing superfluid to an ideal gas of quasi particles.

  16. Angular momentum dependence of the nuclear level density in the A ≈170 -200 region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gohil, M.; Roy, Pratap; Banerjee, K.; Bhattacharya, C.; Kundu, S.; Rana, T. K.; Ghosh, T. K.; Mukherjee, G.; Pandey, R.; Pai, H.; Srivastava, V.; Meena, J. K.; Banerjee, S. R.; Mukhopadhyay, S.; Pandit, D.; Pal, S.; Bhattacharya, S.

    2015-01-01

    Neutron evaporation spectra along with γ multiplicity has been measured from 201Tl*,185Re*, and 169Tm* compound nuclei at the excitation energies of ˜27 and 37 MeV. Statistical model analysis of the experimental data has been carried out to extract the value of the inverse level density parameter k at different angular-momentum (J ) regions corresponding to different γ multiplicities. It is observed that, for the present systems the value of k remains almost constant for different J . The present results for the angular-momentum dependence of the nuclear level density (NLD) parameter a ˜(=A /k ) , for nuclei with A ˜180 are quite different from those obtained in earlier measurements in the case of light- and medium-mass systems. The present study provides useful information to understand the angular-momentum dependence of the NLD at different nuclear mass regions.

  17. Conditions for observation of fade out of collective enhancement of the nuclear level density

    SciTech Connect

    Grimes, S. M.

    2008-11-15

    The results of two recent papers searching for the disappearance of collective enhancements with energy in nuclear level densities are examined. It is found that the effects of such enhancements are less than has been assumed. The reduction in the size of the effect only partially resolves the disagreement between theory and experiment. This effect also plays a role in explaining the results of an earlier experiment.

  18. Direct evidence of fadeout of collective enhancement in nuclear level density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, K.; Roy, Pratap; Pandit, Deepak; Sadhukhan, Jhilam; Bhattacharya, S.; Bhattacharya, C.; Mukherjee, G.; Ghosh, T. K.; Kundu, S.; Sen, A.; Rana, T. K.; Manna, S.; Pandey, R.; Roy, T.; Dhal, A.; Asgar, Md. A.; Mukhopadhyay, S.

    2017-09-01

    The phenomenon of collective enhancement in nuclear level density and its fadeout has been probed using neutron evaporation study of two strongly deformed (173Lu, 185Re), and one spherical (201Tl) compound nuclei over the excitation energy (E*) range of ∼ 22- 56 MeV. Clear signature of the fadeout of collective enhancement in nuclear level density was observed for the first time in both the deformed evaporation residues 172Lu and 184Re at an excitation energy range ∼ 14- 21 MeV. Calculations based on finite temperature density functional theory, as well as macroscopic-microscopic shape transition model, have strongly established a close correlation between the observed fadeout of collective enhancement and a deformed to spherical nuclear shape transition in these nuclei occurring in the same excitation energy zone. Interestingly, a weak signature of fadeout has also been observed for the spherical residue 200Tl. This is due to a similar shape transition of the deformed excited state configuration of 200Tl.

  19. Level density inputs in nuclear reaction codes and the role of the spin cutoff parameter

    SciTech Connect

    Voinov, A. V.; Grimes, S. M.; Brune, C. R.; Burger, A.; Gorgen, A.; Guttormsen, M.; Larsen, A. C.; Massey, T. N.; Siem, S.

    2014-09-03

    Here, the proton spectrum from the 57Fe(α,p) reaction has been measured and analyzed with the Hauser-Feshbach model of nuclear reactions. Different input level density models have been tested. It was found that the best description is achieved with either Fermi-gas or constant temperature model functions obtained by fitting them to neutron resonance spacing and to discrete levels and using the spin cutoff parameter with much weaker excitation energy dependence than it is predicted by the Fermi-gas model.

  20. Level density inputs in nuclear reaction codes and the role of the spin cutoff parameter

    DOE PAGES

    Voinov, A. V.; Grimes, S. M.; Brune, C. R.; ...

    2014-09-03

    Here, the proton spectrum from the 57Fe(α,p) reaction has been measured and analyzed with the Hauser-Feshbach model of nuclear reactions. Different input level density models have been tested. It was found that the best description is achieved with either Fermi-gas or constant temperature model functions obtained by fitting them to neutron resonance spacing and to discrete levels and using the spin cutoff parameter with much weaker excitation energy dependence than it is predicted by the Fermi-gas model.

  1. Diazepam affects the nuclear thyroid hormone receptor density and their expression levels in adult rat brain.

    PubMed

    Constantinou, Caterina; Bolaris, Stamatis; Valcana, Theony; Margarity, Marigoula

    2005-07-01

    Thyroid hormones (THs) are involved in the occurrence of anxiety and affective disorders; however, the effects following an anxiolytic benzodiazepine treatment, such as diazepam administration, on the mechanism of action of thyroid hormones has not yet been investigated. The effect of diazepam on the in vitro nuclear T3 binding, on the relative expression of the TH receptors (TRs) and on the synaptosomal TH availability were examined in adult rat cerebral hemispheres 24 h after a single intraperitoneal dose (5 mg/kg BW) of this tranquillizer. Although, diazepam did not affect the availability of TH either in blood circulation or in the synaptosomal fraction, it decreased (33%) the nuclear T3 maximal binding density (B(max)). No differences were observed in the equilibrium dissociation constant (K(d)). The TRalpha2 variant (non-T3-binding) mRNA levels were increased by 33%, whereas no changes in the relative expression of the T3-binding isoforms of TRs (TRalpha1, TRbeta1) were observed. This study shows that a single intraperitoneal injection of diazepam affects within 24 h, the density of the nuclear TRs and their expression pattern. The latest effect occurs in an isoform-specific manner involving specifically the TRalpha2 mRNA levels in adult rat brain.

  2. Nuclear level densities of 64,66 Zn from neutron evaporation

    DOE PAGES

    Ramirez, A. P. D.; Voinov, A. V.; Grimes, S. M.; ...

    2013-12-26

    Double differential cross sections of neutrons from d+63,65Cu reactions have been measured at deuteron energies of 6 and 7.5 MeV. The cross sections measured at backward angles have been compared to theoretical calculations in the framework of the statistical Hauser-Feshbach model. Three different level density models were tested: the Fermi-gas model, the Gilbert-Cameron model, and the microscopic approach through the Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov method (HFBM). The calculations using the Gilbert-Cameron model are in best agreement with our experimental data. Level densities of the residual nuclei 64Zn and 66Zn have been obtained from statistical neutron evaporation spectra. In conclusion, the angle-integrated cross sectionsmore » have been analyzed with the exciton model of nuclear reaction.« less

  3. Nuclear level densities of 64,66Zn from neutron evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramirez, A. P. D.; Voinov, A. V.; Grimes, S. M.; Schiller, A.; Brune, C. R.; Massey, T. N.; Salas-Bacci, A.

    2013-12-01

    Double differential cross sections of neutrons from d+63,65Cu reactions have been measured at deuteron energies of 6 and 7.5 MeV. The cross sections measured at backward angles have been compared to theoretical calculations in the framework of the statistical Hauser-Feshbach model. Three different level density models were tested: the Fermi-gas model, the Gilbert-Cameron model, and the microscopic approach through the Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov method (HFBM). The calculations using the Gilbert-Cameron model are in best agreement with our experimental data. Level densities of the residual nuclei 64Zn and 66Zn have been obtained from statistical neutron evaporation spectra. The angle-integrated cross sections have been analyzed with the exciton model of nuclear reaction.

  4. Simultaneous Microscopic Description of Nuclear Level Density and Radiative Strength Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hung, N. Quang; Dang, N. Dinh; Huong, L. T. Quynh

    2017-01-01

    The nuclear level density (NLD) and radiative strength function (RSF) are simultaneously described within a microscopic approach, which takes into account the thermal effects of the exact pairing as well as the giant resonances within the phonon-damping model. The good agreement between the results of calculations and experimental data extracted by the Oslo group for 170,171,172Yb isotopes shows the importance of exact thermal pairing in the description of NLD at low and intermediate excitation energies. It also invalidates the assumption based on the Brink-Axel hypothesis in the description of the RSF.

  5. A high-performance Fortran code to calculate spin- and parity-dependent nuclear level densities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sen'kov, R. A.; Horoi, M.; Zelevinsky, V. G.

    2013-01-01

    A high-performance Fortran code is developed to calculate the spin- and parity-dependent shell model nuclear level densities. The algorithm is based on the extension of methods of statistical spectroscopy and implies exact calculation of the first and second Hamiltonian moments for different configurations at fixed spin and parity. The proton-neutron formalism is used. We have applied the method for calculating the level densities for a set of nuclei in the sd-, pf-, and pf+g- model spaces. Examples of the calculations for 28Si (in the sd-model space) and 64Ge (in the pf+g-model space) are presented. To illustrate the power of the method we estimate the ground state energy of 64Ge in the larger model space pf+g, which is not accessible to direct shell model diagonalization due to the prohibitively large dimension, by comparing with the nuclear level densities at low excitation energy calculated in the smaller model space pf. Program summaryProgram title: MM Catalogue identifier: AENM_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AENM_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 193181 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 1298585 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Fortran 90, MPI. Computer: Any architecture with a Fortran 90 compiler and MPI. Operating system: Linux. RAM: Proportional to the system size, in our examples, up to 75Mb Classification: 17.15. External routines: MPICH2 (http://www.mcs.anl.gov/research/projects/mpich2/) Nature of problem: Calculating of the spin- and parity-dependent nuclear level density. Solution method: The algorithm implies exact calculation of the first and second Hamiltonian moments for different configurations at fixed spin and parity. The code is parallelized using the Message

  6. Nuclear Level Densities for Modeling Nuclear Reactions: An Efficient Approach Using Statistical Spectroscopy: Annual Report 2003-2004

    SciTech Connect

    Calvin W. Johnson

    2004-07-30

    The general goal of the project is to develop and implement computer codes and input files to compute nuclear densities of state. Such densities are important input into calculations of statistical neutron capture, and are difficult to access experimentally. In particular, we will focus on calculating densities for nuclides in the mass range A ?????? 50 - 100. We use statistical spectroscopy, a moments method based upon a microscopic framework, the interacting shell model. In this report we present our progress for the past year.

  7. The role of seniority-zero states in nuclear level densities

    SciTech Connect

    Åberg, S.; Carlsson, B. G.; Døssing, Th.; Möller, P.

    2015-06-01

    At low excitation energies seniority-zero states dominate the level density of K=0 bands in deformed even–even nuclei, while they play no role at higher excitation energies. We describe the level densities in a Fermi-gas model as well as in a combinatorial level-density model and compare to detailed experimental data for some rare-earth nuclei.

  8. The role of seniority-zero states in nuclear level densities

    DOE PAGES

    Åberg, S.; Carlsson, B. G.; Døssing, Th.; ...

    2015-06-01

    At low excitation energies seniority-zero states dominate the level density of K=0 bands in deformed even–even nuclei, while they play no role at higher excitation energies. We describe the level densities in a Fermi-gas model as well as in a combinatorial level-density model and compare to detailed experimental data for some rare-earth nuclei.

  9. Nuclear level densities of 64,66Zn from neutron evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramirez, Anthony Paul; Voinov, Alexander; Grimes, Steven; Brune, Carl; Massey, Thomas

    2013-10-01

    The neutron spectra from the reactions 63Cu(d,n)64Zn and 65Cu(d,n)66Zn have been measured at deuteron beam energies of 6 and 7.5 MeV. Level densities of the residual nuclei 64Zn and 66Zn were extracted and compared with different level density models: (1) Gilbert-Cameron model, (2) Backshifted Fermi gas model using the Egidy systematics, and (3) microscopic combinatorial level densities. We found that the Gilbert-Cameron model closely agrees with the experimental results. We have also studied the non-compound component of the reactions from the neutron angular distributions. The non-compound component has been shown to be dominant in forward angles and is more pronounced at high neutron emission energies. We have also observed a slight enhancement of the non-compound contribution as the incident deuteron energy is increased.

  10. Nuclear Level Density and gamma-ray Strength Function of 243Pu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laplace, Thibault Andre

    The level density and gamma-ray strength function of 243Pu have been determined using the Oslo method. A 12 MeV deuteron beam from the University of Oslo cyclotron was used to populate excited states in the quasi-continuum of 243Pu using the 242Pu(d,p) reaction. The distribution of primary gamma-rays as function of the excitation energy has been extracted from particle-gamma coincidence data. Based on the Brink-Axel asumption that the primary gamma-ray spectrum is proportional to the product of the gamma-ray transmission coefficient (which only depends on the transition energy) times the level density at the excitation energy of the final state. The gamma-ray strength function is calculated from the gamma-ray transmission coefficient assuming pure dipole radiation. Both, the level density and gamma-ray strength function, are normalized using available experimental data from libraries. The level density of 243Pu follows closely the constant-temperature level density formula. An enhancement of the gamma-ray strength function is seen at low energies that is similar to that previously measured in other actinides. This structure is interpreted as the M1 scissors resonance. Its centroid o=2.42(5) MeV and its total strength B =10.1(15) mu N2 are in excellent agreement with sum-rule estimates. The measured level density and gamma-ray strength function were then used to calculate the 242Pu(n,gamma) cross section within the Hauser-Feshbach formalism.

  11. Nuclear level densities below 40 MeV excitation energy in the mass region A ≃ 50

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avrigeanu, M.; Ivaşcu, M.; Avrigeanu, V.

    1990-09-01

    Consistent pre-equilibrium emission and statistical model calculations of fast neutron induced reaction cross sections are used to validate nuclear level densities for excitation energies up to 40 MeV in the mass region A ≃50. A “composed” level density approach has been employed by using the back-shifted Fermi gas model for excitation energies lower than 12 MeV and a realistic analytical formula for higher excitations. In the transition region from the BSFG model range to that of full applicability of the realistic formula, an interpolation between the predictions of the two models is adopted. The interpolation rule, suggested by microscopic level density calculations, has been validated through the comparison of the calculated and experimental cross sections.

  12. Binomial level densities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuker, A. P.

    2001-08-01

    It is shown that nuclear level densities in a finite space are described by a continuous binomial function, determined by the first three moments of the Hamiltonian, and the dimensionality of the underlying vector space. Experimental values for 55Mn, 56Fe, and 60Ni are very well reproduced by the binomial form, which turns out to be almost perfectly approximated by Bethe's formula with backshift. A proof is given for which binomial densities reproduce the low moments of Hamiltonians of any rank: A strong form of the famous central limit result of Mon and French. Conditions under which the proof may be extended to the full spectrum are examined.

  13. Nuclear level densities in 47V, 48V, 49V, 53Mn, and 54Mn from neutron evaporation spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuravlev, B. V.; Lychagin, A. A.; Titarenko, N. N.; Demenkov, V. G.; Trykova, V. I.

    2011-03-01

    The spectra of neutrons from the ( p, n) reactions on 47Ti, 48Ti, 49Ti, 53Cr, and 54Cr nuclei were measured in the proton-energy range 7-11 MeV. The measurements were performed with the aid of a fast-neutron spectrometer by the time-of-flight method over the base of the EGP-15 tandem accelerator of the Institute for Physics and Power Engineering (IPPE, Obninsk). Owing to a high resolution and a high stability of the time-of-flight spectrometer used, low-lying discrete levels could be identified reliably along with a continuum section of neutron spectra. An analysis of measured data was performed within the statistical equilibrium and preequilibrium models of nuclear reactions. The relevant calculations were performed by using the exact formalism of Hauser-Feshbach statistical theory supplemented with the generalized model of a superfluid nucleus, the back-shifted Fermi gas model, and the Gilbert-Cameron composite formula for the nuclear level density. The nuclear level densities for 47V, 48V, 49V, 53Mn, and 54Mn were determined along with their energy dependences and model parameters. The results are discussed together with available experimental data and recommendations of model systematics.

  14. Experimental differential cross sections, level densities, and spin cutoffs as a testing ground for nuclear reaction codes

    DOE PAGES

    Voinov, Alexander V.; Grimes, Steven M.; Brune, Carl R.; ...

    2013-11-08

    Proton double-differential cross sections from 59Co(α,p)62Ni, 57Fe(α,p)60Co, 56Fe(7Li,p)62Ni, and 55Mn(6Li,p)60Co reactions have been measured with 21-MeV α and 15-MeV lithium beams. Cross sections have been compared against calculations with the empire reaction code. Different input level density models have been tested. It was found that the Gilbert and Cameron [A. Gilbert and A. G. W. Cameron, Can. J. Phys. 43, 1446 (1965)] level density model is best to reproduce experimental data. Level densities and spin cutoff parameters for 62Ni and 60Co above the excitation energy range of discrete levels (in continuum) have been obtained with a Monte Carlo technique. Furthermore,more » excitation energy dependencies were found to be inconsistent with the Fermi-gas model.« less

  15. Experimental differential cross sections, level densities, and spin cutoffs as a testing ground for nuclear reaction codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voinov, A. V.; Grimes, S. M.; Brune, C. R.; Bürger, A.; Görgen, A.; Guttormsen, M.; Larsen, A. C.; Massey, T. N.; Siem, S.

    2013-11-01

    Proton double-differential cross sections from 59Co(α,p)62Ni, 57Fe(α,p)60Co, 56Fe(7Li,p)62Ni, and 55Mn(6Li,p)60Co reactions have been measured with 21-MeV α and 15-MeV lithium beams. Cross sections have been compared against calculations with the empire reaction code. Different input level density models have been tested. It was found that the Gilbert and Cameron [A. Gilbert and A. G. W. Cameron, Can. J. Phys.0008-420410.1139/p65-139 43, 1446 (1965)] level density model is best to reproduce experimental data. Level densities and spin cutoff parameters for 62Ni and 60Co above the excitation energy range of discrete levels (in continuum) have been obtained with a Monte Carlo technique. Excitation energy dependencies were found to be inconsistent with the Fermi-gas model.

  16. Renormalized particle-particle and particle-hole random-phase approximation correlations at finite temperature: Effects upon the nuclear level density parameter

    SciTech Connect

    Civitarese, O.; Dumrauf, A.G.; Reboiro, M. )

    1990-04-01

    Finite temperature bosonic contributions to the nuclear level density parameter are calculated. The adopted formalism is based on the random-phase approximation treatment of particle-particle, hole-hole, and particle-hole channels of an isospin-independent {delta} force. The particle-particle (hole-hole) channels are renormalized and they are treated together with the particle-hole channels. Random-phase approximation contributions to the level density parameter are found to display low-temperature features which are similar to the ones that are due to the collapse of pairing correlations.

  17. Experimental differential cross sections, level densities, and spin cutoffs as a testing ground for nuclear reaction codes

    SciTech Connect

    Voinov, Alexander V.; Grimes, Steven M.; Brune, Carl R.; Burger, Alexander; Gorgen, Andreas; Guttormsen, Magne; Larsen, Ann -Cecilie; Massey, Thomas N.; Siem, Sunniva

    2013-11-08

    Proton double-differential cross sections from 59Co(α,p)62Ni, 57Fe(α,p)60Co, 56Fe(7Li,p)62Ni, and 55Mn(6Li,p)60Co reactions have been measured with 21-MeV α and 15-MeV lithium beams. Cross sections have been compared against calculations with the empire reaction code. Different input level density models have been tested. It was found that the Gilbert and Cameron [A. Gilbert and A. G. W. Cameron, Can. J. Phys. 43, 1446 (1965)] level density model is best to reproduce experimental data. Level densities and spin cutoff parameters for 62Ni and 60Co above the excitation energy range of discrete levels (in continuum) have been obtained with a Monte Carlo technique. Furthermore, excitation energy dependencies were found to be inconsistent with the Fermi-gas model.

  18. Experimental level densities of atomic nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Guttormsen, M.; Aiche, M.; Bernstein, L. A.; Bleuel, D. L.; Byun, Y.; Ducasse, Q.; Giacoppo, F.; Gorgen, A.; Gunsing, F.; Hagen, T. W.; Jurado, B.; Larsen, A. C.; Lebois, L.; Leniau, B.; Nyhus, H. T.; Renstrom, T.; Rose, S. J.; Sahin, E.; Siem, S.; Tornyi, T. G.; Tveten, G. M.; Voinov, A.; Wiedeking, M.; Wilson, J.

    2015-12-23

    It is almost 80 years since Hans Bethe described the level density as a non-interacting gas of protons and neutrons. In all these years, experimental data were interpreted within this picture of a fermionic gas. However, the renewed interest of measuring level density using various techniques calls for a revision of this description. In particular, the wealth of nuclear level densities measured with the Oslo method favors the constant-temperature level density over the Fermi-gas picture. Furthermore, trom the basis of experimental data, we demonstrate that nuclei exhibit a constant-temperature level density behavior for all mass regions and at least up to the neutron threshold.

  19. Significant role of level-density parameters in probing nuclear dissipation with light-ion-induced fission excitation functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, W.; Wang, N.

    2013-01-01

    We study the influence of the ratio of level-density parameters at saddle to that at ground-state configuration (af/an) on the sensitivity of fission cross sections (σfiss) to presaddle dissipation effects by comparing fission excitation functions measured in the 3He + 197Au (208Pb) reactions with three distinct types of model calculations: the standard Bohr-Wheeler theory with af/an = 1 (i) and af/an ≠ 1 (ii) as well as the Langevin approach with af/an ≠ 1 (iii). It is shown that both cases (i) and (ii) cannot provide a reasonable, satisfactory description of the measured σfiss. A presaddle friction strength (β) of (4-4.5) × 1021 s-1 is extracted through reproducing data with Langevin simulations. We find from the comparison of the experimental and calculated σfiss in cases (ii) and (iii) that a precise determination of β depends sensitively on af/an. The finding indicates that level-density parameters play a significant role in accurately probing presaddle friction; that is, to stringently constrain β it is important to take into account a realistic and an elaborate evaluation of af/an in theoretical calculations. We further find that high energy increases the sensitivity of σfiss to β, suggesting that in experiments, to obtain precise information of presaddle dissipation by measuring σfiss, it is best to populate a compound nucleus with high energy.

  20. Nuclear-level densities in the 49V and 57Co nuclei on the basis of evaporated-neutron spectra in ( p, n) and ( d, n) reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuravlev, B. V.; Titarenko, N. N.

    2016-03-01

    The spectra of neutrons from the reactions 49Ti( p, n)49V and 57Fe ( p, n)57Co were measured in the range of proton energies between 8 and 11 MeV along with their counterparts from the reactions 48Ti( d, n)49V and 56Fe ( d, n)57Co at the deuteron energies of 2.7 and 3.8 MeV. These measurements were conducted with the aid of a time-of-flight fast-neutron spectrometer on the basis of the EGP-15 pulsed tandem accelerator of the Institute for Physics and Power Engineering (IPPE, Obninsk). An analysis of measured data was performed within the statistical equilibrium and preequilibrium models of nuclear reactions. The respective calculations based on the Hauser-Feshbach formalism of statistical theory were carried out with nuclear-level densities given by the generalized superfluid model of the nucleus, the backshifted Fermi-gas model, and the Gilbert-Cameron composite formula. The nuclear-level densities of 49V and 57Co and their energy dependences were determined. The results were discussed together with available experimental data and data recommended by model systematics.

  1. High level nuclear waste

    SciTech Connect

    Crandall, J L

    1980-01-01

    The DOE Division of Waste Products through a lead office at Savannah River is developing a program to immobilize all US high-level nuclear waste for terminal disposal. DOE high-level wastes include those at the Hanford Plant, the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant, and the Savannah River Plant. Commercial high-level wastes, for which DOE is also developing immobilization technology, include those at the Nuclear Fuel Services Plant and any future commercial fuels reprocessing plants. The first immobilization plant is to be the Defense Waste Processing Facility at Savannah River, scheduled for 1983 project submission to Congress and 1989 operation. Waste forms are still being selected for this plant. Borosilicate glass is currently the reference form, but alternate candidates include concretes, calcines, other glasses, ceramics, and matrix forms.

  2. Nuclear level densities of 64,66 Zn from neutron evaporation

    SciTech Connect

    Ramirez, A. P. D.; Voinov, A. V.; Grimes, S. M.; Schiller, A.; Brune, C. R.; Massey, T. N.; Salas-Bacci, A.

    2013-12-26

    Double differential cross sections of neutrons from d+63,65Cu reactions have been measured at deuteron energies of 6 and 7.5 MeV. The cross sections measured at backward angles have been compared to theoretical calculations in the framework of the statistical Hauser-Feshbach model. Three different level density models were tested: the Fermi-gas model, the Gilbert-Cameron model, and the microscopic approach through the Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov method (HFBM). The calculations using the Gilbert-Cameron model are in best agreement with our experimental data. Level densities of the residual nuclei 64Zn and 66Zn have been obtained from statistical neutron evaporation spectra. In conclusion, the angle-integrated cross sections have been analyzed with the exciton model of nuclear reaction.

  3. Nuclear cusps in the HSF electron density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cioslowski, Jerzy; Challacombe, Matt

    1994-07-01

    The Hiller-Sucher-Feinberg (HSF) identity provides an alternative definition for the electron density. The behavior of the HSF electron density in the vicinity of nuclei is analyzed. It is shown that the HSF density possesses nuclear cusps at which its gradient is discontinuous. The discontinuities in the HSF density gradient satisfy a simple equation analogous to Kato's electron-nuclear cusp condition. However, in contrast to Kato's condition, the electron-nuclear cusp condition is satisfied by HSF densities originating from both exact and approximate electronic wavefunctions. Several numerical examples are presented to illustrate this property of the HSF electron density.

  4. Density dependence of nuclear symmetry energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behera, B.; Routray, T. R.; Tripathy, S. K.

    2016-10-01

    High density behavior of nuclear symmetry energy is studied on the basis of the stiffest density dependence of asymmetric contribution to energy per nucleon in charge neutral n + p + e + μ matter under beta equilibrium. The density dependence of nuclear symmetry energy obtained in this way is neither very stiff nor soft at high densities and is found to be in conformity with recent observations of neutron stars.

  5. Experimental level densities of atomic nuclei

    DOE PAGES

    Guttormsen, M.; Aiche, M.; Bello Garrote, F. L.; ...

    2015-12-23

    It is almost 80 years since Hans Bethe described the level density as a non-interacting gas of protons and neutrons. In all these years, experimental data were interpreted within this picture of a fermionic gas. However, the renewed interest of measuring level density using various techniques calls for a revision of this description. In particular, the wealth of nuclear level densities measured with the Oslo method favors the constant-temperature level density over the Fermi-gas picture. Furthermore, trom the basis of experimental data, we demonstrate that nuclei exhibit a constant-temperature level density behavior for all mass regions and at least upmore » to the neutron threshold.« less

  6. Determination of the effects of nuclear level density parameters on photofission cross sections of 235U up to 20 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarpün, Ismail Hakki; Aydın, Abdullah; Pekdoğan, Hakan

    2017-09-01

    The level density models and level density parameters are two of important quantities for describing the properties of nuclei. Especially, the level density parameter has an important role as input in calculation of reaction cross sections. In this study, the cross sections on 235U(g,f) reaction were calculated for different level density models using the TALYS 1.6 code up to 20 MeV gamma incident energies. First, it was determined the level density model that was the closest to the experimental data. Secondly, cross sections obtained for different level density parameters of this model were compared with experimental data from the EXFOR database. Thus it was determined the best level density parameter fit to experimental data.

  7. Universal Nuclear Energy Density Functional

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, Joseph; Furnstahl, Richard; Horoi, Mihai; Lusk, Rusty; Nazarewicz, Witold; Ng, Esmond; Thompson, Ian; Vary, James

    2012-12-01

    An understanding of the properties of atomic nuclei is crucial for a complete nuclear theory, for element formation, for properties of stars, and for present and future energy and defense applications. During the period of Dec. 1 2006 – Jun. 30, 2012, the UNEDF collaboration carried out a comprehensive study of all nuclei, based on the most accurate knowledge of the strong nuclear interaction, the most reliable theoretical approaches, the most advanced algorithms, and extensive computational resources, with a view towards scaling to the petaflop platforms and beyond. Until recently such an undertaking was hard to imagine, and even at the present time such an ambitious endeavor would be far beyond what a single researcher or a traditional research group could carry out.

  8. Fission Dynamics with Microscopic Level Densities

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, D.; Carlsson, B. G.; Dossing, Th.; Moller, P.; Randrup, J.; Aberg, S.

    2017-01-01

    We present a consistent framework for treating the energy and angularmomentum dependence of the shape evolution in the nuclear fission. It combines microscopically calculated level densities with the Metropolis-walk method, has no new parameters, and can elucidate the energy-dependent influence of pairing and shell effects on the dynamics of warm nuclei.

  9. HIGH DENSITY NUCLEAR FUEL COMPOSITION

    DOEpatents

    Litton, F.B.

    1962-07-17

    ABS>A nuclear fuel consisting essentially of uranium monocarbide and containing 2.2 to 4.6 wt% carbon, 0.1 to 2.3 wt% oxygen, 0.05 to 2.5 wt% nitrogen, and the balance uranium was developed. The maximum oxygen content was less than one-half the carbon content by weight and the carbon, oxygen, and nitrogen are present as a single phase substituted solid solution of UC, C, O, and N. A method of preparing the fuel composition is described. (AEC)

  10. Nuclear energy density functional and the nuclear α decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Yeunhwan; Oh, Yongseok

    2017-03-01

    The nuclear α decay of heavy nuclei is investigated based on the nuclear energy density functional, which leads to the α potential inside the parent nucleus in terms of the proton and neutron density profiles of the daughter nucleus. We use the Skyrme force model, Gogny force model, and relativistic mean-field model to get the nucleon density profiles inside heavy nuclei. Once the nucleon density profiles are determined, the parameters of the nuclear α potential are fitted to the observed α decay half-lives of heavy nuclei. This approach is then applied to predict unknown α decay half-lives of heavy nuclei. To estimate the Q values of unobserved α decays, we make use of the liquid droplet model.

  11. Uncertainty Quantification for Nuclear Density Functional Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonnell, Jordan; Schunck, Nicolas; Nazarewicz, Witold; Higdon, Dave; Sarich, Jason; Wild, Stefan

    2014-09-01

    Nuclear density functional theory exhibits good overall agreement with measured nuclear masses for medium-mass to heavy nuclei. But the predictions of various models diverge substantially near the neutron and proton drip lines. Quantifying the theory's inherent uncertainty is essential for making reliable predictions. Through a Bayesian analysis, we calculate the theoretical uncertainty for nuclear masses obtained with a Skyrme-class energy density functional. We also assess whether a recent set of mass measurements of neutron-rich nuclei reduces the uncertainty in this model's predictions near the neutron drip line. Nuclear density functional theory exhibits good overall agreement with measured nuclear masses for medium-mass to heavy nuclei. But the predictions of various models diverge substantially near the neutron and proton drip lines. Quantifying the theory's inherent uncertainty is essential for making reliable predictions. Through a Bayesian analysis, we calculate the theoretical uncertainty for nuclear masses obtained with a Skyrme-class energy density functional. We also assess whether a recent set of mass measurements of neutron-rich nuclei reduces the uncertainty in this model's predictions near the neutron drip line. This work was supported by the US Department of Energy under Contracts No. DE-SC0008499 and No. DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  12. Spin Density Matrices for Nuclear Density Functionals with Parity Violation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrett, Bruce; Giraud, Bertrand

    2010-11-01

    Within the context of the radial density functional [1], we apply the spin density matrix (SDM) used in atomic and molecular physics [2] to nuclear physics. The vector part of the SDM defines a ``hedgehog'' situation, which exists only if nuclear states contain some amount of parity violation. Thus, looking for the vector profile of the SDM could be used as a test for parity violation in nuclei. The difference between the scalar profile and the vector profile of the SDM will be illustrated by a toy model. [4pt] [1] B. G. Giraud, Phys. Rev. C 78, 014307 (2008).[0pt] [2] A. Goerling, Phys. Rev. A 47, 2783 (1993).

  13. Clustering and pasta phases in nuclear density functional theory

    DOE PAGES

    Schuetrumpf, Bastian; Zhang, Chunli; Nazarewicz, Witold

    2017-05-23

    Nuclear density functional theory is the tool of choice in describing properties of complex nuclei and intricate phases of bulk nucleonic matter. It is a microscopic approach based on an energy density functional representing the nuclear interaction. An attractive feature of nuclear DFT is that it can be applied to both finite nuclei and pasta phases appearing in the inner crust of neutron stars. While nuclear pasta clusters in a neutron star can be easily characterized through their density distributions, the level of clustering of nucleons in a nucleus can often be difficult to assess. To this end, we usemore » the concept of nucleon localization. We demonstrate that the localization measure provides us with fingerprints of clusters in light and heavy nuclei, including fissioning systems. Furthermore we investigate the rod-like pasta phase using twist-averaged boundary conditions, which enable calculations in finite volumes accessible by state of the art DFT solvers.« less

  14. Supernovae and high density nuclear matter

    SciTech Connect

    Kahana, S.

    1986-01-01

    The role of the nuclear equation of state (EOS) in producing prompt supernova explosions is examined. Results of calculations of Baron, Cooperstein, and Kahana incorporating general relativity and a new high density EOS are presented, and the relevance of these calculations to laboratory experiments with heavy ions considered. 31 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Moments Method for the Nuclear Density of States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teran, Edgar; Johnson, Calvin

    2006-04-01

    We utilize statistical spectroscopy to model the nuclear level density in the interacting shell model. Low-lying statistical moments of each configuration of the shell model space are computed. Partial (configuration) densities are generated from the moments, and the sum of all the contributions is the total level density. Modified Breit-Wigner (MBW) distributions are used to model the partial densities. The properties of such functions allow for exact reproduction of the moments at large asymmetries, which are needed to accurately reproduce the overall level density. We work in the sd-shell with USD interaction, and the pf-shell with GXPF1, FPD6G an KB3G interactions. Results from level densities generated with method will be shown in the sd-shell and pf-shell, as well as comparisons to exact calculations and experimental data.

  16. Nuclear Energy Density Functional for KIDS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gil, H.; Papakonstantinou, P.; Hyun, C. H.; Park, T.-S.; Oh, Y.

    The density functional theory (DFT) is based on the existence and uniqueness of a universal functional $E[\\rho]$, which determines the dependence of the total energy on single-particle density distributions. However, DFT says nothing about the form of the functional. Our strategy is to first look at what we know, from independent considerations, about the analytical density dependence of the energy of nuclear matter and then, for practical applications, to obtain an appropriate density-dependent effective interaction by reverse engineering. In a previous work on homogeneous matter, we identified the most essential terms to include in our "KIDS" functional, named after the early-stage participating institutes. We now present first results for finite nuclei, namely the energies and radii of $^{16,28}$O, $^{40,60}$Ca.

  17. Error analysis in nuclear density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schunck, Nicolas; McDonnell, Jordan D.; Sarich, Jason; Wild, Stefan M.; Higdon, Dave

    2015-03-01

    Nuclear density functional theory (DFT) is the only microscopic, global approach to the structure of atomic nuclei. It is used in numerous applications, from determining the limits of stability to gaining a deep understanding of the formation of elements in the Universe or the mechanisms that power stars and reactors. The predictive power of the theory depends on the amount of physics embedded in the energy density functional as well as on efficient ways to determine a small number of free parameters and solve the DFT equations. In this article, we discuss the various sources of uncertainties and errors encountered in DFT and possible methods to quantify these uncertainties in a rigorous manner.

  18. Error Analysis in Nuclear Density Functional Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Schunck, Nicolas; McDonnell, Jordan D.; Sarich, Jason; Wild, Stefan M.; Higdon, Dave

    2015-03-01

    Nuclear density functional theory (DFT) is the only microscopic, global approach to the structure of atomic nuclei. It is used in numerous applications, from determining the limits of stability to gaining a deep understanding of the formation of elements in the Universe or the mechanisms that power stars and reactors. The predictive power of the theory depends on the amount of physics embedded in the energy density functional as well as on efficient ways to determine a small number of free parameters and solve the DFT equations. In this article, we discuss the various sources of uncertainties and errors encountered in DFT and possible methods to quantify these uncertainties in a rigorous manner.

  19. Central depression of nuclear charge density distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Chu Yanyun; Ren Zhongzhou; Wang Zaijun; Dong Tiekuang

    2010-08-15

    The center-depressed nuclear charge distributions are investigated with the parametrized distribution and the relativistic mean-field theory, and their corresponding charge form factors are worked out with the phase shift analysis method. The central depression of nuclear charge distribution of {sup 46}Ar and {sup 44}S is supported by the relativistic mean-field calculation. According to the calculation, the valence protons in {sup 46}Ar and {sup 44}S prefer to occupy the 1d{sub 3/2} state rather than the 2s{sub 1/2} state, which is different from that in the less neutron-rich argon and sulfur isotopes. As a result, the central proton densities of {sup 46}Ar and {sup 44}S are highly depressed, and so are their central charge densities. The charge form factors of some argon and sulfur isotopes are presented, and the minima of the charge form factors shift upward and inward when the central nuclear charge distributions are more depressed. Besides, the effect of the central depression on the charge form factors is studied with a parametrized distribution, when the root-mean-square charge radii remain constant.

  20. Building a Universal Nuclear Energy Density Functional

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, Joe A.; Furnstahl, Dick; Horoi, Mihai; Lust, Rusty; Nazaewicc, Witek; Ng, Esmond; Thompson, Ian; Vary, James

    2012-12-30

    During the period of Dec. 1 2006 – Jun. 30, 2012, the UNEDF collaboration carried out a comprehensive study of all nuclei, based on the most accurate knowledge of the strong nuclear interaction, the most reliable theoretical approaches, the most advanced algorithms, and extensive computational resources, with a view towards scaling to the petaflop platforms and beyond. The long-term vision initiated with UNEDF is to arrive at a comprehensive, quantitative, and unified description of nuclei and their reactions, grounded in the fundamental interactions between the constituent nucleons. We seek to replace current phenomenological models of nuclear structure and reactions with a well-founded microscopic theory that delivers maximum predictive power with well-quantified uncertainties. Specifically, the mission of this project has been three-fold: First, to find an optimal energy density functional (EDF) using all our knowledge of the nucleonic Hamiltonian and basic nuclear properties; Second, to apply the EDF theory and its extensions to validate the functional using all the available relevant nuclear structure and reaction data; Third, to apply the validated theory to properties of interest that cannot be measured, in particular the properties needed for reaction theory.

  1. Nucleon localization within nuclear density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chunli; Schuetrumpf, Bastian; Nazarewicz, Witold

    2016-09-01

    Recently, a nucleon localization measure based on Hartree-Fock densities has been introduced to investigate α-cluster structures in light nuclei. Compared to the local nucleonic density, the nucleon localization function (NLF) has been shown to be an excellent indicator of cluster correlations. To investigate the cluster structures in light nuclei and study the development of fission fragments in heavy nuclei, we analyse NLFs in deformed nuclei. We use both the deformed harmonic oscillator model and self-consistent nuclear density functional theory (DFT) with energy density functionals UNEDF1 and UNEDF1-HFB, which were optimized for fission studies. In this contribution, we will discuss particle densities and spatial localization functions for deformed configurations of 8Be and 20Ne and along fission pathways of 232Th and 240Pu. We illustrate the usefulness of the NLF by showing how the third hyperdeformed minimum of 232Th can be understood in terms of the ground states of 132Sn and 100Zr. This material is based upon work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science under Award Numbers DOE-DE-NA0002847, DE-SC0013365 (Michigan State University), and DE-SC0008511 (NUCLEI SciDAC-3 collaboration).

  2. Nuclear level densities in {sup 208}Bi and {sup 209}Po from the neutron spectra in the (p, n) reactions on {sup 208}Pb and {sup 209}Bi nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Zhuravlev, B. V. Lychagin, A. A. Titarenko, N. N.; Demenkov, V. G.; Trykova, V. I.

    2010-07-15

    The spectra of neutrons from the (p, n) reactions on the {sup 208}Pb and {sup 209}Bi nuclei were measured in the proton-energy range 8-11 MeV. These measurements were performed by using a time-of-flight spectrometer of fast neutrons on the basis of the pulsed tandem accelerator EGP-15 of the Institute of Physics and Power Engineering (Obninsk, Russian Federation). A high resolution and stability of the time-of-flight spectrometermade it possible to identify reliably low-lying discrete levels alongwith the continuum section of the neutron spectra. The measured data were analyzed on the basis of the statistical equilibrium and preequilibrium models of nuclear reactions. The respective calculations were performed by using the precise formalism of Hauser-Feshbach statistical theory together with the generalized model of a superfluid nucleus and the back-shifted Fermi gas model for the nuclear-level density. The nuclear-level densities in {sup 208}Bi and {sup 209}Po were determined along with their energy dependencies and model parameters. Our results are discussed together with available experimental data and recommendations of model systematics.

  3. Nuclear-level densities in the {sup 49}V and {sup 57}Co nuclei on the basis of evaporated-neutron spectra in (p, n) and (d, n) reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Zhuravlev, B. V. Titarenko, N. N.

    2016-03-15

    The spectra of neutrons from the reactions {sup 49}Ti(p, n){sup 49}V and {sup 57}Fe (p, n){sup 57}Co were measured in the range of proton energies between 8 and 11 MeV along with their counterparts from the reactions {sup 48}Ti(d, n){sup 49}V and {sup 56}Fe (d, n){sup 57}Co at the deuteron energies of 2.7 and 3.8 MeV. These measurements were conducted with the aid of a time-of-flight fast-neutron spectrometer on the basis of the EGP-15 pulsed tandem accelerator of the Institute for Physics and Power Engineering (IPPE, Obninsk). An analysis of measured data was performed within the statistical equilibrium and preequilibrium models of nuclear reactions. The respective calculations based on the Hauser–Feshbach formalism of statistical theory were carried out with nuclear-level densities given by the generalized superfluid model of the nucleus, the backshifted Fermi-gas model, and the Gilbert–Cameron composite formula. The nuclear-level densities of {sup 49}V and {sup 57}Co and their energy dependences were determined. The results were discussed together with available experimental data and data recommended by model systematics.

  4. 2004 Progress Report for Grant No. DE-FG03-03NA00076 Nuclear Level Densities and Gamma-ray Strength Functions: Stewardship Sciences Academic Alliances Program

    SciTech Connect

    G. E. Mitchell

    2004-10-18

    To verify the apparent large enhancement of the radiative strength function in light and medium nuclei, the 56Fe(n,2gamma)57Fe reaction was measured. The two-step cascade intensities with soft primary intensities confirm the enhancement. The combined results have been published in Physical Review Letters and featured in the Physics News Update. Data for the Yb isotopes have been combined to examine the systematics of level densities and strength function in three Yb isotopes. A paper on these results have been accepted for publication in Physical Review C. Analysis of the gamma rays from neutron induced reactions on 48Ti have been measured and analyzed for neturon energies from 1 to 250 MeV.

  5. Symmetry energy at subnuclear densities deduced from nuclear masses

    SciTech Connect

    Oyamatsu, Kazuhiro; Iida, Kei

    2010-05-15

    We examine how nuclear masses are related to the density dependence of the symmetry energy. Using a macroscopic nuclear model we calculate nuclear masses in a way dependent on the equation of state of asymmetric nuclear matter. We find by comparison with empirical two-proton separation energies that a smaller symmetry energy at subnuclear densities, corresponding to a larger density symmetry coefficient L, is favored. This tendency, which is clearly seen for nuclei that are neutron-rich, nondeformed, and light, can be understood from the property of the surface symmetry energy in a compressible liquid-drop picture.

  6. Quantification of Uncertainties in Nuclear Density Functional Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schunck, N.; McDonnell, J. D.; Higdon, D.; Sarich, J.; Wild, S.

    2015-01-01

    Reliable predictions of nuclear properties are needed as much to answer fundamental science questions as in applications such as reactor physics or data evaluation. Nuclear density functional theory is currently the only microscopic, global approach to nuclear structure that is applicable throughout the nuclear chart. In the past few years, a lot of effort has been devoted to setting up a general methodology to assess theoretical uncertainties in nuclear DFT calculations. In this paper, we summarize some of the recent progress in this direction. Most of the new material discussed here will be be published in separate articles.

  7. Quantification of Uncertainties in Nuclear Density Functional Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Schunck, N.; McDonnell, J.D.; Higdon, D.; Sarich, J.; Wild, S.

    2015-01-15

    Reliable predictions of nuclear properties are needed as much to answer fundamental science questions as in applications such as reactor physics or data evaluation. Nuclear density functional theory is currently the only microscopic, global approach to nuclear structure that is applicable throughout the nuclear chart. In the past few years, a lot of effort has been devoted to setting up a general methodology to assess theoretical uncertainties in nuclear DFT calculations. In this paper, we summarize some of the recent progress in this direction. Most of the new material discussed here will be be published in separate articles.

  8. Testing for parity violation in nuclei using spin density matrices for nuclear density functionals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrett, B. R.; Giraud, B. G.

    2015-06-01

    The spin density matrix (SDM) used in atomic and molecular physics is revisited for nuclear physics, in the context of the radial density functional theory. The vector part of the SDM defines a ‘hedgehog’ situation, which exists only if nuclear states contain some amount of parity violation. A toy model is given as an illustrative example.

  9. Multicomponent Density Functional Theory: Impact of Nuclear Quantum Effects on Proton Affinities and Geometries.

    PubMed

    Brorsen, Kurt R; Yang, Yang; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2017-08-03

    Nuclear quantum effects such as zero point energy play a critical role in computational chemistry and often are included as energetic corrections following geometry optimizations. The nuclear-electronic orbital (NEO) multicomponent density functional theory (DFT) method treats select nuclei, typically protons, quantum mechanically on the same level as the electrons. Electron-proton correlation is highly significant, and inadequate treatments lead to highly overlocalized nuclear densities. A recently developed electron-proton correlation functional, epc17, has been shown to provide accurate nuclear densities for molecular systems. Herein, the NEO-DFT/epc17 method is used to compute the proton affinities for a set of molecules and to examine the role of nuclear quantum effects on the equilibrium geometry of FHF(-). The agreement of the computed results with experimental and benchmark values demonstrates the promise of this approach for including nuclear quantum effects in calculations of proton affinities, pKa's, optimized geometries, and reaction paths.

  10. Linear response of homogeneous nuclear matter with energy density functionals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pastore, A.; Davesne, D.; Navarro, J.

    2015-03-01

    Response functions of infinite nuclear matter with arbitrary isospin asymmetry are studied in the framework of the random phase approximation. The residual interaction is derived from a general nuclear Skyrme energy density functional. Besides the usual central, spin-orbit and tensor terms it could also include other components as new density-dependent terms or three-body terms. Algebraic expressions for the response functions are obtained from the Bethe-Salpeter equation for the particle-hole propagator. Applications to symmetric nuclear matter, pure neutron matter and asymmetric nuclear matter are presented and discussed. Spin-isospin strength functions are analyzed for varying conditions of density, momentum transfer, isospin asymmetry, and temperature for some representative Skyrme functionals. Particular attention is paid to the discussion of instabilities, either real or unphysical, which could manifest in finite nuclei.

  11. Spectral densities and nuclear spin relaxation in solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beckmann, Peter A.

    1988-12-01

    We investigate the properties of ten spectral densities relevant for nuclear spin relaxation studies in solids. This is preceded by a brief review of nuclear spin relaxation in solids which includes a discussion of the appropriate spin-dependent interactions and the various relaxation rates which can be measured. Also, the link between nuclear spin relaxation and dielectric relaxation is discussed. Where possible and/or appropriate each of the spectral densities is expressed as a continuous distribution of Bloembergen-Purcell-Pound (or Debye) spectral densities 2ξ /(1 + ξ 2 ω 2) for nuclear Larmor angular frequency ω and correlation time ξ. The spectral densities are named after their originators or the shape of the distributions of correlation times or both and are (1) Bloembergen-Purcell-Pound or δ-function, (2) Havriliak-Negami, (3) Cole-Cole, (4) Davidson-Cole, (5) Fang, (6) Fuoss-Kirkwood, (7) Bryn Mawr, (8) Wagner or log-Gaussian, (9) log-Lorentzian, and (10) Fröhlich or energy box. The Havriliak-Negami spectral density is related to the Dissado-Hill theory for dielectric relaxation. The spectral densities are expressed in a way which makes them easy to compare with each other and with experimental data. Many plots of the distributions of correlation times and of the spectral densities vs. various correlation times characterizing the distributions are given.

  12. Determination of the density of human nuclear cataract lenses

    PubMed Central

    XU, KE; HAO, YANSHENG

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to detect senile nuclear cataract lens density and provide a quantitative measurement of lens density for the long-term clinical observation of cataracts. An Anterior Segment Analysis System was used to detect the lens density of 422 simple senile cataract eyes and normal contralateral eyes. The density values were taken at the optical axis at various depths measured from the anterior capsule. The differences in lens density at various photographic orientations and in various nuclear grading groups were investigated. The density at 90º orientation was larger than that at 30 and 150º (P<0.05). The density was reduced beyond the 1.0-mm depth point in all the lenses. Prior to the 2.5-mm depth point, there were differences among the five grade groups (P<0.05). Beyond the 3.0-mm depth point, values in all the grade groups were low and not significantly different (P>0.05). In the grade 4 group, the decrease was more evident. The average density values at all the depth points showed a tendency to increase with increasing nuclear grade. Measuring the density of the anterior half of the lens at 90º orientation is therefore more reliable compared with that of the posterior half and at other orientations. Results of the present study have shown that the Anterior Segment Analysis System may be used to detect senile nuclear cataract lens density and provide a quantitative measurement of lens density for long-term clinical observation of cataracts. PMID:24026512

  13. Nuclear charge radii: density functional theory meets Bayesian neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utama, R.; Chen, Wei-Chia; Piekarewicz, J.

    2016-11-01

    The distribution of electric charge in atomic nuclei is fundamental to our understanding of the complex nuclear dynamics and a quintessential observable to validate nuclear structure models. The aim of this study is to explore a novel approach that combines sophisticated models of nuclear structure with Bayesian neural networks (BNN) to generate predictions for the charge radii of thousands of nuclei throughout the nuclear chart. A class of relativistic energy density functionals is used to provide robust predictions for nuclear charge radii. In turn, these predictions are refined through Bayesian learning for a neural network that is trained using residuals between theoretical predictions and the experimental data. Although predictions obtained with density functional theory provide a fairly good description of experiment, our results show significant improvement (better than 40%) after BNN refinement. Moreover, these improved results for nuclear charge radii are supplemented with theoretical error bars. We have successfully demonstrated the ability of the BNN approach to significantly increase the accuracy of nuclear models in the predictions of nuclear charge radii. However, as many before us, we failed to uncover the underlying physics behind the intriguing behavior of charge radii along the calcium isotopic chain.

  14. Mammographic breast density and serum phytoestrogen levels.

    PubMed

    Lowry, Sarah J; Sprague, Brian L; Aiello Bowles, Erin J; Hedman, Curtis J; Hemming, Jocelyn; Hampton, John M; Burnside, Elizabeth S; Sisney, Gale A; Buist, Diana S M; Trentham-Dietz, Amy

    2012-08-01

    Some forms of estrogen are associated with breast cancer risk as well as with mammographic density (MD), a strong marker of breast cancer risk. Whether phytoestrogen intake affects breast density, however, remains unclear. We evaluated the association between serum levels of phytoestrogens and MD in postmenopausal women. We enrolled 269 women, ages 55-70 yr, who received a screening mammogram and had no history of postmenopausal hormone use. Subjects completed a survey on diet and factors related to MD and provided a blood sample for analysis of 3 phytoestrogens: genistein, daidzein, and coumestrol. We examined whether mean percent MD was related to serum level of phytoestrogens, adjusting for age and body mass index. Genistein and daidzein levels correlated with self-reported soy consumption. Mean percent MD did not differ across women with different phytoestrogen levels. For example, women with nondetectable genistein levels had mean density of 11.0% [95% confidence intervals (CI) = 9.9-12.4], compared to 10.5% (95% CI = 8.0-13.7) and 11.2% (95% CI = 8.7-14.6) for < and ≥ median detectable levels, respectively. In a population with relatively low soy intake, serum phytoestrogens were not associated with mammographic density. Additional studies are needed to determine effects of higher levels, particularly given patterns of increasing phytoestrogen intake.

  15. Constraining the nuclear equation of state at subsaturation densities.

    PubMed

    Khan, E; Margueron, J; Vidaña, I

    2012-08-31

    Only one-third of the nucleons in 208Pb occupy the saturation density area. Consequently, nuclear observables related to the average properties of nuclei, such as masses or radii, constrain the equation of state not at the saturation density but rather around the so-called crossing density, localized close to the mean value of the density of nuclei: ρ is approximately equal to 0.11 fm(-3). This provides an explanation for the empirical fact that several equation of state quantities calculated with various functionals cross at a density significantly lower than the saturation one. The third derivative M of the energy per unit of volume at the crossing density is constrained by the giant monopole resonance measurements in an isotopic chain rather than the incompressibility at saturation density. The giant monopole resonance measurements provide M=1100±70 MeV (6% uncertainty), whose extrapolation gives K(∞)=230±40 MeV (17% uncertainty).

  16. Reflection-Asymmetric Nuclear Deformations within the Density Functional Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, E; Erler, J; Nazarewicz, W.; Stoitsov, M

    2012-01-01

    Within the nuclear density functional theory (DFT) we study the effect of reflection- asymmetric shapes on ground-state binding energies and binding energy differences. To this end, we developed the new DFT solver axialhfb that uses an approximate second-order gradient to solve the Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov equations of superconducting DFT with the quasi-local Skyrme energy density functionals. Illustrative calculations are carried out for even- even isotopes of radium and thorium.

  17. Nuclear structure and dynamics with density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stetcu, Ionel

    2015-10-01

    Even in the absence of ab initio methods capable of tackling heavy nuclei without restrictions, one can obtain an ab initio description of ground-state properties by means of the density functional theory (DFT), and its extension to superfluid systems in its local variant, the superfluid local density approximation (SLDA). Information about the properties of excited states can be obtained in the same framework by using an extension to the time-dependent (TD) phenomena. Unlike other approaches in which the nuclear structure information is used as a separate input into reaction models, the TD approach treats on the same footing the nuclear structure and dynamics, and is well suited to provide more reliable description for a large number of processes involving heavy nuclei, from the nuclear response to electroweak probes, to nuclear reactions, such as neutron-induced reactions, or nuclear fusion and fission. Such processes, sometimes part of integrated nuclear systems, have important applications in astrophysics, energy production, global security, etc. In this talk, I will present the simulation of a simple reaction, that is the Coulomb excitation of a 238U nucleus, and discuss the application of the TD-DFT formalism to the description of induced fission. I gratefully acknowledge partial support of the U.S. Department of Energy through an Early Career Award of the LANL/LDRD Program.

  18. Continuum Level Density in Complex Scaling Method

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, R.; Myo, T.; Kato, K.

    2005-11-21

    A new calculational method of continuum level density (CLD) at unbound energies is studied in the complex scaling method (CSM). It is shown that the CLD can be calculated by employing the discretization of continuum states in the CSM without any smoothing technique.

  19. Central depression in nucleonic densities: Trend analysis in the nuclear density functional theory approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuetrumpf, B.; Nazarewicz, W.; Reinhard, P.-G.

    2017-08-01

    Background: The central depression of nucleonic density, i.e., a reduction of density in the nuclear interior, has been attributed to many factors. For instance, bubble structures in superheavy nuclei are believed to be due to the electrostatic repulsion. In light nuclei, the mechanism behind the density reduction in the interior has been discussed in terms of shell effects associated with occupations of s orbits. Purpose: The main objective of this work is to reveal mechanisms behind the formation of central depression in nucleonic densities in light and heavy nuclei. To this end, we introduce several measures of the internal nucleonic density. Through the statistical analysis, we study the information content of these measures with respect to nuclear matter properties. Method: We apply nuclear density functional theory with Skyrme functionals. Using the statistical tools of linear least square regression, we inspect correlations between various measures of central depression and model parameters, including nuclear matter properties. We study bivariate correlations with selected quantities as well as multiple correlations with groups of parameters. Detailed correlation analysis is carried out for 34Si for which a bubble structure has been reported recently, 48Ca, and N =82 , 126, and 184 isotonic chains. Results: We show that the central depression in medium-mass nuclei is very sensitive to shell effects, whereas for superheavy systems it is firmly driven by the electrostatic repulsion. An appreciable semibubble structure in proton density is predicted for 294Og, which is currently the heaviest nucleus known experimentally. Conclusion: Our correlation analysis reveals that the central density indicators in nuclei below 208Pb carry little information on parameters of nuclear matter; they are predominantly driven by shell structure. On the other hand, in the superheavy nuclei there exists a clear relationship between the central nucleonic density and symmetry energy.

  20. Electronic and nuclear flux densities in the H2 molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermann, G.; Paulus, B.; Pérez-Torres, J. F.; Pohl, V.

    2014-05-01

    We present a theoretical study of the electronic and nuclear flux densities of a vibrating H2 molecule after an electronic excitation by a short femtosecond laser pulse. The final state, a coherent superposition of the electronic ground state X1Σg+ and the electronic excited state B1Σu+, evolves freely and permits the partition of the electronic flux density into two competing fluxes: the adiabatic and the transition flux density. The nature of the two fluxes allows us to identify two alternating dynamics of the electronic motion, occurring on the attosecond and the femtosecond time scales. In contradistinction to the adiabatic electronic flux density, the transition electronic flux density shows a dependence on the carrier-envelope phase of the laser field, encoding information of the interaction of the electrons with the electric field. Furthermore, the nuclear flux density displays multiple reversals, a quantum effect recently discovered by Manz et al. [J. Manz, J. F. Pérez-Torres, and Y. Yang, Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 153004 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.111.153004], calling for investigation of the electronic flux density.

  1. Level densities and thermodynamical properties of Pt and Au isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giacoppo, F.; Bello Garrote, F. L.; Bernstein, L. A.; Bleuel, D. L.; Eriksen, T. K.; Firestone, R. B.; Görgen, A.; Guttormsen, M.; Hagen, T. W.; Kheswa, B. V.; Klintefjord, M.; Koehler, P. E.; Larsen, A. C.; Nyhus, H. T.; Renstrøm, T.; Sahin, E.; Siem, S.; Tornyi, T.

    2014-11-01

    The nuclear level densities of Pt-196194 and Au,198197 below the neutron separation energy have been measured using transfer and scattering reactions. All the level density distributions follow the constant-temperature description. Each group of isotopes is characterized by the same temperature above the energy threshold corresponding to the breaking of the first Cooper pair. A constant entropy excess Δ S =1.9 kB and 1.1 kB is observed in 195Pt and 198Au with respect to 196Pt and 197Au, respectively, giving information on the available single-particle level space for the last unpaired valence neutron. The breaking of nucleon Cooper pairs is revealed by sequential peaks in the microcanonical caloric curve.

  2. Time-dependent density-functional description of nuclear dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakatsukasa, Takashi; Matsuyanagi, Kenichi; Matsuo, Masayuki; Yabana, Kazuhiro

    2016-10-01

    The basic concepts and recent developments in the time-dependent density-functional theory (TDDFT) for describing nuclear dynamics at low energy are presented. The symmetry breaking is inherent in nuclear energy density functionals, which provides a practical description of important correlations at the ground state. Properties of elementary modes of excitation are strongly influenced by the symmetry breaking and can be studied with TDDFT. In particular, a number of recent developments in the linear response calculation have demonstrated their usefulness in the description of collective modes of excitation in nuclei. Unrestricted real-time calculations have also become available in recent years, with new developments for quantitative description of nuclear collision phenomena. There are, however, limitations in the real-time approach; for instance, it cannot describe the many-body quantum tunneling. Thus, the quantum fluctuations associated with slow collective motions are explicitly treated assuming that time evolution of densities is determined by a few collective coordinates and momenta. The concept of collective submanifold is introduced in the phase space associated with the TDDFT and used to quantize the collective dynamics. Selected applications are presented to demonstrate the usefulness and quality of the new approaches. Finally, conceptual differences between nuclear and electronic TDDFT are discussed, with some recent applications to studies of electron dynamics in the linear response and under a strong laser field.

  3. Liquid level measurement in high level nuclear waste slurries

    SciTech Connect

    Weeks, G.E.; Heckendorn, F.M.; Postles, R.L.

    1990-01-01

    Accurate liquid level measurement has been a difficult problem to solve for the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). The nuclear waste sludge tends to plug or degrade most commercially available liquid-level measurement sensors. A liquid-level measurement system that meets demanding accuracy requirements for the DWPF has been developed. The system uses a pneumatic 1:1 pressure repeater as a sensor and a computerized error correction system. 2 figs.

  4. Radiative Strength Functions and Level Densities

    SciTech Connect

    Schiller, A; Becker, J A; Bernstein, L A; Voinov, A; Guttormsen, M; Hjorth-Jensen, M; Rekstad, J; Siem, S; Mitchell, G E; Tavukcu, E

    2002-08-28

    Radiative strength functions and level densities have been extracted from primary {gamma}-ray spectra for {sup 27,28}Si, {sup 56,57}Fe, {sup 96,97}Mo, and several rare earth nuclei. An unexpectedly strong ({approx} 1 mb MeV) resonance at 3 MeV in the radiative strength function has been observed for well-deformed rare earth nuclei. The physical origin of this resonance and its connection to the scissors mode is discussed.

  5. Chitosan Nanoparticles for Nuclear Targeting: The Effect of Nanoparticle Size and Nuclear Localization Sequence Density.

    PubMed

    Tammam, Salma N; Azzazy, Hassan M E; Breitinger, Hans G; Lamprecht, Alf

    2015-12-07

    Many recently discovered therapeutic proteins exert their main function in the nucleus, thus requiring both efficient uptake and correct intracellular targeting. Chitosan nanoparticles (NPs) have attracted interest as protein delivery vehicles due to their biocompatibility and ability to escape the endosomes offering high potential for nuclear delivery. Molecular entry into the nucleus occurs through the nuclear pore complexes, the efficiency of which is dependent on NP size and the presence of nuclear localization sequence (NLS). Chitosan nanoparticles of different sizes (S-NPs ≈ 25 nm; L-NP ≈ 150 nm) were formulated, and they were modified with different densities of the octapeptide NLS CPKKKRKV (S-NPs, 0.25, 0.5, 2.0 NLS/nm(2); L-NPs, 0.6, 0.9, 2 NLS/nm(2)). Unmodified and NLS-tagged NPs were evaluated for their protein loading capacity, extent of cell association, cell uptake, cell surface binding, and finally nuclear delivery efficiency in L929 fibroblasts. To avoid errors generated with cell fractionation and nuclear isolation protocols, nuclear delivery was assessed in intact cells utilizing Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) fluorometry and microscopy. Although L-NPs showed ≈10-fold increase in protein loading per NP when compared to S-NPs, due to higher cell association and uptake S-NPs showed superior protein delivery. NLS exerts a size and density dependent effect on nanoparticle uptake and surface binding, with a general reduction in NP cell surface binding and an increase in cell uptake with the increase in NLS density (up to 8.4-fold increase in uptake of High-NLS-L-NPs (2 NLS/nm(2)) compared to unmodified L-NPs). However, for nuclear delivery, unmodified S-NPs show higher nuclear localization rates when compared to NLS modified NPs (up to 5-fold by FRET microscopy). For L-NPs an intermediate NLS density (0.9 NLS/nm(2)) seems to provide highest nuclear localization (3.7-fold increase in nuclear delivery compared to High

  6. Relations among several nuclear and electronic density functional reactivity indexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torrent-Sucarrat, Miquel; Luis, Josep M.; Duran, Miquel; Toro-Labbé, Alejandro; Solà, Miquel

    2003-11-01

    An expansion of the energy functional in terms of the total number of electrons and the normal coordinates within the canonical ensemble is presented. A comparison of this expansion with the expansion of the energy in terms of the total number of electrons and the external potential leads to new relations among common density functional reactivity descriptors. The formulas obtained provide explicit links between important quantities related to the chemical reactivity of a system. In particular, the relation between the nuclear and the electronic Fukui functions is recovered. The connection between the derivatives of the electronic energy and the nuclear repulsion energy with respect to the external potential offers a proof for the "Quantum Chemical le Chatelier Principle." Finally, the nuclear linear response function is defined and the relation of this function with the electronic linear response function is given.

  7. BUILDING A UNIVERSAL NUCLEAR ENERGY DENSITY FUNCTIONAL (UNEDF)

    SciTech Connect

    Nazarewicz, Witold

    2012-07-01

    The long-term vision initiated with UNEDF is to arrive at a comprehensive, quantitative, and unified description of nuclei and their reactions, grounded in the fundamental interactions between the constituent nucleons. We seek to replace current phenomenological models of nuclear structure and reactions with a well-founded microscopic theory that delivers maximum predictive power with well-quantified uncertainties. Specifically, the mission of this project has been three-fold: First, to find an optimal energy density functional (EDF) using all our knowledge of the nucleonic Hamiltonian and basic nuclear properties. Second, to apply the EDF theory and its extensions to validate the functional using all the available relevant nuclear structure and reaction data. Third, to apply the validated theory to properties of interest that cannot be measured, in particular the properties needed for reaction theory.

  8. Uncertainty Quantification and Propagation in Nuclear Density Functional Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Schunck, N.; McDonnell, J. D.; Higdon, D.; Sarich, J.; Wild, S. M.

    2015-12-23

    Nuclear density functional theory (DFT) is one of the main theoretical tools used to study the properties of heavy and superheavy elements, or to describe the structure of nuclei far from stability. While on-going efforts seek to better root nuclear DFT in the theory of nuclear forces (see Duguet et al., this Topical Issue), energy functionals remain semi-phenomenological constructions that depend on a set of parameters adjusted to experimental data in finite nuclei. In this paper, we review recent efforts to quantify the related uncertainties, and propagate them to model predictions. In particular, we cover the topics of parameter estimation for inverse problems, statistical analysis of model uncertainties and Bayesian inference methods. Illustrative examples are taken from the literature.

  9. Uncertainty Quantification and Propagation in Nuclear Density Functional Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Schunck, N; McDonnell, J D; Higdon, D; Sarich, J; Wild, S M

    2015-03-17

    Nuclear density functional theory (DFT) is one of the main theoretical tools used to study the properties of heavy and superheavy elements, or to describe the structure of nuclei far from stability. While on-going eff orts seek to better root nuclear DFT in the theory of nuclear forces, energy functionals remain semi-phenomenological constructions that depend on a set of parameters adjusted to experimental data in fi nite nuclei. In this paper, we review recent eff orts to quantify the related uncertainties, and propagate them to model predictions. In particular, we cover the topics of parameter estimation for inverse problems, statistical analysis of model uncertainties and Bayesian inference methods. Illustrative examples are taken from the literature.

  10. Nuclear matter symmetry energy from polarizabilities at low density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braghin, Fábio L.

    2010-03-01

    The nuclear matter polarizability had been proposed as a suitable framework to investigate the symmetry energy [F.L. Braghin, Nucl. Phys. A 665 (2000) 13; 696 (2001) 413; Err709 (2002) 487; F.L. Braghin, Phys. Rev. C 71 064303 (2005); Phys. Rev. C 79 069902(E) (2009); Proc. of XXX Braz. Meeting on Nucl. Phys. 2007, ed. by A. Suaide, Braz. Phys. Soc. (2008)]. It provides an original and rich conceptual framework yielding the simultaneous dependences of the symmetry energy on diverse variables. We present few different results for the symmetry energy dependence mainly on: temperature and momentum at low nuclear densities (ρ=0.1ρ). Based on the form of the polarizability we present an argument supporting that, due to the behavior of the density fluctuations, a third order term in the n-p asymmetry can yield a more reasonable result than a linear term.

  11. Nuclear chiral and magnetic rotation in covariant density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Jie; Zhao, Pengwei

    2016-05-01

    Excitations of chiral rotation observed in triaxial nuclei and magnetic and/or antimagnetic rotations (AMR) seen in near-spherical nuclei have attracted a lot of attention. Unlike conventional rotation in well-deformed or superdeformed nuclei, here the rotational axis is not necessary coinciding with any principal axis of the nuclear density distribution. Thus, tilted axis cranking (TAC) is mandatory to describe these excitations self-consistently in the framework of covariant density functional theory (CDFT). We will briefly introduce the formalism of TAC-CDFT and its application for magnetic and AMR phenomena. Configuration-fixed CDFT and its predictions for nuclear chiral configurations and for favorable triaxial deformation parameters are also presented, and the discoveries of the multiple chiral doublets in 133Ce and 103Rh are discussed.

  12. Study of nuclear matter density distributions using hadronic probes

    SciTech Connect

    Kohama, Akihisa; Iida, Kei; Oyamatsu, Kazuhiro

    2011-05-06

    We briefly review our formula for a proton-nucleus total reaction cross section, {sigma}{sub R}, constructed in the black-sphere approximation of nuclei, in which a nucleus is viewed as a 'black' sphere of radius 'a'. Some years ago, using the Glauber model, one of the authors (A.K.) and his collaborators performed numerical simulations to examine the possibility to probe the nuclear matter density distributions of neutron-rich unstable nuclei from proton elastic scatterings 'model-independently'. The present study is another attempt to seek a 'model-independent' framework for systematically analyzing scattering data for studying the matter density distributions of atomic nuclei.

  13. Level density parameters from excitation cross sections of isomeric states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skakun, E. A.; Batij, V. G.

    1992-03-01

    Cross section ratios were measured for the production of the isomeric pairs99m,gRh,101m,gRh,102m,gRh,104m,gRh and108m,gIn in the (p,n)-reaction,107m,gIn and109m,gIn in the ( p, γ)-reaction over the energy range up to 9 MeV, and116m,gSb and118m,gSb in the (α, n)-reaction up to 24 MeV. The experimental results for these nuclei as well as for other isometric pairs excited in the ( p, n)-reaction were analysed in the frame of the statistical model for extracting the level density parameter values in the vicinity of closed nucleon shells. The level density parameter behaviour is discussed in the range of nuclear mass numbers under study.

  14. Unified approach to nuclear densities from exotic atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedman, E.

    2009-09-01

    Parameters of nuclear density distributions are derived from least-squares fits to strong interaction observables in exotic atoms. Global analyses of antiprotonic and pionic atoms show reasonably good agreement between the two types of probes regarding the average behaviour of root-mean-square radii of the neutron distributions. Apparent conflict regarding the shape of the neutron distribution is attributed to different radial sensitivities of these two probes.

  15. "Sloppy" nuclear energy density functionals. II. Finite nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikšić, T.; Imbrišak, M.; Vretenar, D.

    2017-05-01

    A study of parameter sensitivity of nuclear energy density functionals, initiated in the first part of this work [Nikšić and Vretenar, Phys. Rev. C 94, 024333 (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevC.94.024333], is extended by the inclusion of data on ground-state properties of finite nuclei in the application of the manifold boundary approximation method (MBAM). Density functionals used in self-consistent mean-field calculations, and nuclear structure models based on them, are generally "sloppy" and exhibit an exponential range of sensitivity to parameter variations. Concepts of information geometry are used to identify the presence of effective functionals of lower dimension in parameter space associated with parameter combinations that can be tightly constrained by data. The MBAM is used in an iterative procedure that systematically reduces the complexity and dimension of parameter space of a sloppy functional, with properties of nuclear matter and data on finite nuclei determining not only the values of model parameters but also the optimal functional form of the density dependence.

  16. SURFACE SYMMETRY ENERGY OF NUCLEAR ENERGY DENSITY FUNCTIONALS

    SciTech Connect

    Nikolov, N; Schunck, N; Nazarewicz, W; Bender, M; Pei, J

    2010-12-20

    We study the bulk deformation properties of the Skyrme nuclear energy density functionals. Following simple arguments based on the leptodermous expansion and liquid drop model, we apply the nuclear density functional theory to assess the role of the surface symmetry energy in nuclei. To this end, we validate the commonly used functional parametrizations against the data on excitation energies of superdeformed band-heads in Hg and Pb isotopes, and fission isomers in actinide nuclei. After subtracting shell effects, the results of our self-consistent calculations are consistent with macroscopic arguments and indicate that experimental data on strongly deformed configurations in neutron-rich nuclei are essential for optimizing future nuclear energy density functionals. The resulting survey provides a useful benchmark for further theoretical improvements. Unlike in nuclei close to the stability valley, whose macroscopic deformability hangs on the balance of surface and Coulomb terms, the deformability of neutron-rich nuclei strongly depends on the surface-symmetry energy; hence, its proper determination is crucial for the stability of deformed phases of the neutron-rich matter and description of fission rates for r-process nucleosynthesis.

  17. Nuclear isomers as ultra-high-energy-density materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poppe, C. H.; Weiss, M. S.; Anderson, J. D.

    1992-09-01

    A major energy advance could result if the enormous potential of nuclear energy storage could be tapped without the penalty of radioactive by-products. Recent research has uncovered a new method for nuclear energy storage with high energy density and no residual radioactivity. Nuclear isomers are metastable states of atomic nuclei which release their energy in a prompt burst of electromagnetic radiation; in many cases the product remaining after decay of isomer is stable and no activity is produced by the electromagnetic decay. Two kinds of nuclear isomers are known: spin isomers and shape isomers. The former lacks a release mechanism. Theory has predicted the existence of shape isomers in the mass range around mercury and gold where decay by fission is prohibited. Experiments on the existence of fissionless shape isomers have resulted in evidence for 27 different shape isomers in isotopes of mercury, lead, and thallium. Three potential candidates for release mechanisms have been identified to date: neutron catalysis (Hf- 178), laser-electron-nuclear coupling (Th-229), and Stark-shift-induced mixing (speculative). Ways of producing nonfissioning shape isomers are discussed.

  18. Regulation of high density lipoprotein levels

    SciTech Connect

    Krauss, R.M.

    1982-03-01

    An increasing awareness of the physiologic and pathologic importance of serum high density lipoproteins (HDL) has led to a large number of observations regarding factors which influence their concentrations. HDL consists of a heterogeneous collection of macromolecules with diverse physical properties and chemical constituents. While laboratory techniques have made it possible to measure HDL and their individual components, there are as yet large gaps in our knowledge of the biochemical mechanisms and clinical significance of changes in these laboratory parameters. In this review, current concepts of the structure and metabolism of HDL will be briefly summarized, and the factors influencing their levels in humans will be surveyed. 313 references.

  19. Introduction to suspension levels: nuclear medicine.

    PubMed

    Christofides, Stelios; Malone, Lesley; Mattson, Soren; Horton, Pat

    2013-02-01

    In 2007, the European Commission (EC) commissioned a group of experts to undertake the revision of Report Radiation Protection (RP) 91, written in 1997, on 'Criteria for acceptability of radiological (including radiotherapy) and nuclear medicine installations'. The revised draft report was submitted to the EC. Before publication, the EC issued this document for public consultation and has commissioned the same group of experts to consider the comments of the public consultation in further improving the revised report. The EC intends to publish the final report under its Radiation Report Series with the number RP 162. This paper introduces the project and presents the methodology adopted to devise the criteria of acceptability/suspension levels for nuclear medicine equipment.

  20. Building A Universal Nuclear Energy Density Functional (UNEDF)

    SciTech Connect

    Joe Carlson; Dick Furnstahl; Mihai Horoi; Rusty Lusk; Witek Nazarewicz; Esmond Ng; Ian Thompson; James Vary

    2012-09-30

    During the period of Dec. 1 2006 - Jun. 30, 2012, the UNEDF collaboration carried out a comprehensive study of all nuclei, based on the most accurate knowledge of the strong nuclear interaction, the most reliable theoretical approaches, the most advanced algorithms, and extensive computational resources, with a view towards scaling to the petaflop platforms and beyond. The long-term vision initiated with UNEDF is to arrive at a comprehensive, quantitative, and unified description of nuclei and their reactions, grounded in the fundamental interactions between the constituent nucleons. We seek to replace current phenomenological models of nuclear structure and reactions with a well-founded microscopic theory that delivers maximum predictive power with well-quantified uncertainties. Specifically, the mission of this project has been three-fold: first, to find an optimal energy density functional (EDF) using all our knowledge of the nucleonic Hamiltonian and basic nuclear properties; second, to apply the EDF theory and its extensions to validate the functional using all the available relevant nuclear structure and reaction data; third, to apply the validated theory to properties of interest that cannot be measured, in particular the properties needed for reaction theory. The main physics areas of UNEDF, defined at the beginning of the project, were: ab initio structure; ab initio functionals; DFT applications; DFT extensions; reactions.

  1. "Sloppy" nuclear energy density functionals: Effective model reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikšić, Tamara; Vretenar, Dario

    2016-08-01

    Concepts from information geometry are used to analyze parameter sensitivity for a nuclear energy density functional, representative of a class of semiempirical functionals that start from a microscopically motivated ansatz for the density dependence of the energy of a system of protons and neutrons. It is shown that such functionals are "sloppy," namely, characterized by an exponential range of sensitivity to parameter variations. Responsive to only a few stiff parameter combinations, sloppy functionals exhibit an exponential decrease of sensitivity to variations of the remaining soft parameters. By interpreting the space of model predictions as a manifold embedded in the data space, with the parameters of the functional as coordinates on the manifold, it is also shown that the exponential distribution of model manifold widths corresponds to the range of parameter sensitivity. Using the manifold boundary approximation method, we illustrate how to systematically construct effective nuclear density functionals of successively lower dimension in parameter space until sloppiness is eventually eliminated and the resulting functional contains only stiff combinations of parameters.

  2. Augmented Lagrangian method for constrained nuclear density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staszczak, A.; Stoitsov, M.; Baran, A.; Nazarewicz, W.

    2010-10-01

    The augmented Lagrangiam method (ALM), widely used in quantum chemistry constrained optimization problems, is applied in the context of the nuclear Density Functional Theory (DFT) in the self-consistent constrained Skyrme Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov (CHFB) variant. The ALM allows precise calculations of multi-dimensional energy surfaces in the space of collective coordinates that are needed to, e.g., determine fission pathways and saddle points; it improves the accuracy of computed derivatives with respect to collective variables that are used to determine collective inertia; and is well adapted to supercomputer applications.

  3. Augmented Lagrangian Method for Constrained Nuclear Density Functiional Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Staszczak, A.; Stoitsov, Mario; Baran, Andrzej K; Nazarewicz, Witold

    2010-01-01

    The augmented Lagrangian method (ALM), widely used in quantum chemistry constrained optimization problems, is applied in the context of the nuclear Density Functional Theory (DFT) in the self-consistent constrained Skyrme Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov (CHFB) variant. The ALM allows precise calculations of multidimensional energy surfaces in the space of collective coordinates that are needed to, e.g., determine fission pathways and saddle points; it improves accuracy of computed derivatives with respect to collective variables that are used to determine collective inertia and is well adapted to supercomputer applications.

  4. Surveying Temperature and Density Measurements in Nuclear Calorimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raciti, G.; Bassini, R.; Begemann-Blaich, M.; Fritz, S.; Groß, C.; Immè, G.; Iori, I.; Lynen, U.; Mahi, M.; Möhlenkamp, T.; Müller, W. F. J.; Ocker, B.; Odeh, T.; Pochodzalla, J.; Riccobene, G.; Romano, F. P.; Saija, A.; Schwarz, C.; Serfling, V.; Schnittker, M.; Schüttauf, A.; Seidel, W.; Sfienti, C.; Trautmann, W.; Trzclnski, A.; Verde, G.; Xi, Hongfei; Zwieglinski, B.

    2001-11-01

    An experimental investigation on thermodynamical observables characterizing the conditions of multifragmenting systems is reported. High granularity hodoscopes allowed simultaneous measurements of isotopic and emission temperatures. HBT interferometry with light charged particles allowed radii measurements. The disagreement between the two temperature measurements could be related to the space-time evolution of the fragmentation process as confirmed by density measurements. The slope temperatures derived from the target spectator decay fragment energy spectra suggest a dependence on the Fermi motion within the initial system. The dependence of the Nuclear Caloric Curve on the mass of the systems was probed.

  5. Nuclear clustering in the energy density functional approach

    SciTech Connect

    Ebran, J.-P.; Khan, E.; Nikšić, T.; Vretenar, D.

    2015-10-15

    Nuclear Energy Density Functionals (EDFs) are a microscopic tool of choice extensively used over the whole chart to successfully describe the properties of atomic nuclei ensuing from their quantum liquid nature. In the last decade, they also have proved their ability to deal with the cluster phenomenon, shedding a new light on its fundamental understanding by treating on an equal footing both quantum liquid and cluster aspects of nuclei. Such a unified microscopic description based on nucleonic degrees of freedom enables to tackle the question pertaining to the origin of the cluster phenomenon and emphasizes intrinsic mechanisms leading to the emergence of clusters in nuclei.

  6. Laboratory tests of low density astrophysical nuclear equations of state.

    PubMed

    Qin, L; Hagel, K; Wada, R; Natowitz, J B; Shlomo, S; Bonasera, A; Röpke, G; Typel, S; Chen, Z; Huang, M; Wang, J; Zheng, H; Kowalski, S; Barbui, M; Rodrigues, M R D; Schmidt, K; Fabris, D; Lunardon, M; Moretto, S; Nebbia, G; Pesente, S; Rizzi, V; Viesti, G; Cinausero, M; Prete, G; Keutgen, T; El Masri, Y; Majka, Z; Ma, Y G

    2012-04-27

    Clustering in low density nuclear matter has been investigated using the NIMROD multidetector at Texas A&M University. Thermal coalescence modes were employed to extract densities, ρ, and temperatures, T, for evolving systems formed in collisions of 47A MeV (40)Ar+(112)Sn, (124)Sn and (64)Zn+(112)Sn, (124)Sn. The yields of d, t, (3)He, and (4)He have been determined at ρ=0.002 to 0.03 nucleons/fm(3) and T=5 to 11 MeV. The experimentally derived equilibrium constants for α particle production are compared with those predicted by a number of astrophysical equations of state. The data provide important new constraints on the model calculations.

  7. Fuel areal density distributions derived from nuclear scattering signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bionta, R. M.; Casey, D. T.; Cerjan, C. J.; Yeamans, C. B.; Gatu Johnson, M. G.

    2016-10-01

    The spatial variation of activities measured in the array of 20 Nuclear Activation Detectors mounted on the flanges around the NIF target chamber (FNADs) are correlated with asymmetries in the underlying fuel areal density of compressed ICF targets. The asymmetric areal density distributions cause variations in the neutron spectra with direction which are seen in the dsr (down scattered ratio) metric, the ratio of the number of 10-12 MeV neutrons to the number of 13-15 MeV neutrons. We show, using a simple physics based simulation of neutron scattering through an idealized non-uniform DT shell with a realistic neutron source, that for most shots an areal distribution can be found which reproduces both the FNAD activity and the dsr measurements. Furthermore, by linking the simulation to a Marquardt minimizer, we fit the areal distribution to a truncated set of spherical harmonics. Prepared by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  8. Evaluation of population density and distribution criteria in nuclear power plant siting

    SciTech Connect

    Young, M.

    1994-06-01

    The NRC has proposed revisions to 10 CFR 100 which include the codification of nuclear reactor site population density limits to 500 people per square mile, at the siting stage, averaged over any radial distance out to 30 miles, and 1,000 people per square mile within the 40-year lifetime of a nuclear plant. This study examined whether there are less restrictive alternative population density and/or distribution criteria which would provide equivalent or better protection to human health in the unlikely event of a nuclear accident. This study did not attempt to directly address the issue of actual population density limits because there are no US risk standards established for the evaluation of population density limits. Calculations were performed using source terms for both a current generation light water reactor (LWR) and an advanced light water reactor (ALWR) design. The results of this study suggest that measures which address the distribution of the population density, including emergency response conditions, could result in lower average individual risks to the public than the proposed guidelines that require controlling average population density. Studies also indicate that an exclusion zone size, determined by emergency response conditions and reactor design (power level and safety features), would better serve to protect public health than a rigid standard applied to all sites.

  9. Empirical Proton-Neutron Interactions and Nuclear Density Functional Theory: Global, Regional, and Local Comparisons

    SciTech Connect

    Stoitsov, Mario; Cakirli, R. B.; Casten, R. F.; Nazarewicz, Witold; Satula, W.

    2007-01-01

    Calculations of nuclear masses, using nuclear density functional theory, are presented for even-even nuclei spanning the nuclear chart. The resulting binding energy differences can be interpreted in terms of valence proton-neutron interactions. These are compared globally, regionally, and locally with empirical values. Overall, excellent agreement is obtained. Discrepancies highlight neglected degrees of freedom and can point to improved density functionals.

  10. Empirical Proton-Neutron Interactions and Nuclear Density Functional Theory: Global, Regional, and Local Comparisons

    SciTech Connect

    Stoitsov, M.; Cakirli, R. B.; Casten, R. F.; Nazarewicz, W.; Satula, W.

    2007-03-30

    Calculations of nuclear masses, using nuclear density functional theory, are presented for even-even nuclei spanning the nuclear chart. The resulting binding energy differences can be interpreted in terms of valence proton-neutron interactions. These are compared globally, regionally, and locally with empirical values. Overall, excellent agreement is obtained. Discrepancies highlight neglected degrees of freedom and can point to improved density functionals.

  11. Empirical proton-neutron interactions and nuclear density functional theory: global, regional, and local comparisons.

    PubMed

    Stoitsov, M; Cakirli, R B; Casten, R F; Nazarewicz, W; Satuła, W

    2007-03-30

    Calculations of nuclear masses, using nuclear density functional theory, are presented for even-even nuclei spanning the nuclear chart. The resulting binding energy differences can be interpreted in terms of valence proton-neutron interactions. These are compared globally, regionally, and locally with empirical values. Overall, excellent agreement is obtained. Discrepancies highlight neglected degrees of freedom and can point to improved density functionals.

  12. Shear viscosity to entropy density ratio in nuclear multifragmentation

    SciTech Connect

    Pal, Subrata

    2010-05-15

    Nuclear multifragmentation in intermediate-energy heavy-ion collisions has long been associated with liquid-gas phase transition. We calculate the shear viscosity to entropy density ratio eta/s for an equilibrated system of nucleons and fragments produced in multifragmentation within an extended statistical multifragmentation model. The temperature dependence of eta/s exhibits behavior surprisingly similar to that of H{sub 2}O. In the coexistence phase of fragments and light particles, the ratio eta/s reaches a minimum of depth comparable to that for water in the vicinity of the critical temperature for liquid-gas phase transition. The effects of freeze-out volume and surface symmetry energy on eta/s in multifragmentation are studied.

  13. Constraining the level density using fission of lead projectiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-Sánchez, J. L.; Benlliure, J.; Álvarez-Pol, H.; Audouin, L.; Ayyad, Y.; Bélier, G.; Boutoux, G.; Casarejos, E.; Chatillon, A.; Cortina-Gil, D.; Gorbinet, T.; Heinz, A.; Kelić-Heil, A.; Laurent, B.; Martin, J.-F.; Paradela, C.; Pellereau, E.; Pietras, B.; Ramos, D.; Rodríguez-Tajes, C.; Rossi, D. M.; Simon, H.; Taïeb, J.; Vargas, J.; Voss, B.

    2015-10-01

    The nuclear level density is one of the main ingredients for the statistical description of the fission process. In this work, we propose to constrain the description of this parameter by using fission reactions induced by protons and light ions on 208Pb at high kinetic energies. The experiment was performed at GSI (Darmstadt), where the combined use of the inverse kinematics technique with an efficient detection setup allowed us to measure the atomic number of the two fission fragments in coincidence. This measurement permitted us to obtain with high precision the partial fission cross sections and the width of the charge distribution as a function of the atomic number of the fissioning system. These data and others previously measured, covering a large range in fissility, are compared to state-of-the-art calculations. The results reveal that total and partial fission cross sections cannot unambiguously constrain the level density at ground-state and saddle-point deformations and additional observables, such as the width of the charge distribution of the final fission fragments, are required.

  14. Modeled Salt Density for Nuclear Material Estimation in the Treatment of Spent Nuclear Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    DeeEarl Vaden; Robert. D. Mariani

    2010-09-01

    Spent metallic nuclear fuel is being treated in a pyrometallurgical process that includes electrorefining the uranium metal in molten eutectic LiCl-KCl as the supporting electrolyte. We report a model for determining the density of the molten salt. Inventory operations account for the net mass of salt and for the mass of actinides present. It was necessary to know the molten salt density but difficult to measure, and it was decided to model the salt density for the initial treatment operations. The model assumes that volumes are additive for the ideal molten salt solution as a starting point; subsequently a correction factor for the lanthanides and actinides was developed. After applying the correction factor, the percent difference between the net salt mass in the electrorefiner and the resulting modeled salt mass decreased from more than 4.0% to approximately 0.1%. As a result, there is no need to measure the salt density at 500 C for inventory operations; the model for the salt density is found to be accurate.

  15. Modeled salt density for nuclear material estimation in the treatment of spent nuclear fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mariani, Robert D.; Vaden, DeeEarl

    2010-09-01

    Spent metallic nuclear fuel is being treated in a pyrometallurgical process that includes electrorefining the uranium metal in molten eutectic LiCl-KCl as the supporting electrolyte. We report a model for determining the density of the molten salt. Material balances account for the net mass of salt and for the mass of actinides present. It was necessary to know the molten salt density, but difficult to measure. It was also decided to model the salt density for the initial treatment operations. The model assumes that volumes are additive for the ideal molten salt solution as a starting point; subsequently, a correction factor for the lanthanides and actinides was developed. After applying the correction factor, the percent difference between the net salt mass in the electrorefiner and the resulting modeled salt mass decreased from more than 4.0% to approximately 0.1%. As a result, there is no need to measure the salt density at 500 °C for inventory operations; the model for the salt density is found to be accurate.

  16. Constraining the density slope of nuclear symmetry energy at subsaturation densities using electric dipole polarizability in 208Pb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhen; Chen, Lie-Wen

    2014-12-01

    Nuclear structure observables usually most effectively probe the properties of nuclear matter at subsaturation densities rather than at saturation density. We demonstrate that the electric dipole polarizibility αD in 208Pb is sensitive to both the magnitude Esym(ρc) and density slope L (ρc) of the symmetry energy at the subsaturation cross density ρc=0.11 fm-3. Using the experimental data of αD in 208Pb from RCNP (Research Center for Nuclear Physics, Osaka University) and the recent accurate constraint of Esym(ρc) from the binding energy difference of heavy isotope pairs, we extract a value of L (ρc)=47.3 ±7.8 MeV. The implication of the present constraint of L (ρc) to the symmetry energy at saturation density, the neutron skin thickness of 208Pb and the core-crust transition density in neutron stars is discussed.

  17. Asymptotic level density in topological feature maps.

    PubMed

    Dersch, D R; Tavan, P

    1995-01-01

    The Kohonen algorithm entails a topology conserving mapping of an input pattern space X subsetR(n) characterized by an a priori probability distribution P(x), xinX, onto a discrete lattice of neurons r with virtual positions w(r)inX. Extending results obtained by Ritter (1991) the authors show in the one-dimensional case for an arbitrary monotonously decreasing neighborhood function h(|r-r'|) that the point density D(W(r)) of the virtual net is a polynomial function of the probability density P(x) with D(w(r))~P(alpha)(w(r)). Here the distortion exponent is given by alpha=(1+12R)/3(1+6R) and is determined by the normalized second moment R of the neighborhood function. A Gaussian neighborhood interaction is discussed and the analytical results are checked by means of computer simulations.

  18. The effect of nanoparticle size and NLS density on nuclear targeting in cancer and normal cells; impaired nuclear import and aberrant nanoparticle intracellular trafficking in glioma.

    PubMed

    Tammam, Salma N; Azzazy, Hassan M E; Lamprecht, Alf

    2017-02-27

    The cell nucleus is an interesting target in many diseases with particular interest in cancer. Previously, nuclear targeted small and large chitosan nanoparticles (S-NPs≈25nm, and L-NPs≈150nm respectively), modified with low, intermediate and high densities of NLS (L-NLS, I-NLS and H-NLS) were developed and assessed in L929 fibroblasts. However, to evade apoptosis and stimulate tumor growth cancer cells are capable of manipulating the nuclear-cytoplasmic transport on many levels, making NPs that are capable of nuclear targeting in normal cells incapable of doing so in cancer. For such reason, here, the nuclear delivery efficiency of S-NPs and L-NPs was assessed as a function of their NLS density in cancer and non-cancer cells. For S-NPs, in all cells tested, NLS was unnecessary for nuclear delivery; unmodified S-NPs showed higher nuclear delivery than NLS-S-NPs due to their ability to gain nuclear entry in a passive manner. For L-NPs, L-NLS-L-NPs showed ≈ 8.5, 33, 1.8 and 7.2 fold higher nuclear deliveries than H-NLS-L-NPs in L929 fibroblasts, primary human fibroblasts, HEK 293 and lung cancer cells, respectively. In glioma however, unmodified L-NPs showed highest nuclear delivery, whereas NLS-L-NPs were retained in the cytoplasm. Experiments conducted in the presence of inhibitors of the classical nuclear import pathway indicated that due to overexpression of importin α, classical nuclear import in glioma is impaired leading to aberrant NP intracellular trafficking and nuclear import.

  19. Nuclear charge and neutron radii and nuclear matter: Trend analysis in Skyrme density-functional-theory approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinhard, P.-G.; Nazarewicz, W.

    2016-05-01

    Background: Radii of charge and neutron distributions are fundamental nuclear properties. They depend on both nuclear interaction parameters related to the equation of state of infinite nuclear matter and on quantal shell effects, which are strongly impacted by the presence of nuclear surface. Purpose: In this work, by studying the correlation of charge and neutron radii, and neutron skin, with nuclear matter parameters, we assess different mechanisms that drive nuclear sizes. Method: We apply nuclear density functional theory using a family of Skyrme functionals obtained by means of optimization protocols, which do not include any radius information. By performing the Monte Carlo sampling of reasonable functionals around the optimal parametrization, we scan all correlations between nuclear matter properties and observables characterizing charge and neutron distributions of spherical closed-shell nuclei 48Ca,208Pb, and 298Fl. Results: By considering the influence of various nuclear matter properties on charge and neutron radii in a multidimensional parameter space of Skyrme functionals, we demonstrate the existence of two strong relationships: (i) between the nuclear charge radii and the saturation density of symmetric nuclear matter ρ0, and (ii) between the neutron skins and the slope of the symmetry energy L . The impact of other nuclear matter properties on nuclear radii is weak or nonexistent. For functionals optimized to experimental binding energies only, proton and neutron radii are found to be weakly correlated due to canceling trends from different nuclear matter characteristics. Conclusion: The existence of only two strong relations connecting nuclear radii with nuclear matter properties has important consequences. First, by requiring that the nuclear functional reproduces the empirical saturation point of symmetric nuclear matter practically fixes the charge (or proton) radii, and vice versa. This explains the recent results of ab initio calculations

  20. Materials Science of High-Level Nuclear Waste Immobilization

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, William J.; Navrotsky, Alexandra; Stefanovsky, S. V.; Vance, E. R.; Vernaz, Etienne Y.

    2009-01-09

    With the increasing demand for the development of more nuclear power comes the responsibility to address the technical challenges of immobilizing high-level nuclear wastes in stable solid forms for interim storage or disposition in geologic repositories. The immobilization of high-level nuclear wastes has been an active area of research and development for over 50 years. Borosilicate glasses and complex ceramic composites have been developed to meet many technical challenges and current needs, although regulatory issues, which vary widely from country to country, have yet to be resolved. Cooperative international programs to develop advanced proliferation-resistant nuclear technologies to close the nuclear fuel cycle and increase the efficiency of nuclear energy production might create new separation waste streams that could demand new concepts and materials for nuclear waste immobilization. This article reviews the current state-of-the-art understanding regarding the materials science of glasses and ceramics for the immobilization of high-level nuclear waste and excess nuclear materials and discusses approaches to address new waste streams.

  1. Thyroid hormone action at the nuclear level.

    PubMed

    Oppenheimer, J H

    1985-03-01

    Recent findings have led to a greater understanding of thyroid hormone action. The nuclear receptor for triiodothyronine is an integral component of a larger chromatin fragment. A stereospecific energy-dependent transport system appears responsible for translocation of triiodothyronine from cytosol to nucleus. In the liver, a multiplicative interaction between a signal from the triiodothyronine-nuclear receptor complex and a signal generated from carbohydrate metabolism results in the induction of specific mRNAs. Two-dimensional mRNA activity profiles suggest that approximately 8% of the visible mRNA sequences are differentially affected by alterations in thyroid states. Almost 30% to 40% of these changes are mediated by an increase in pituitary growth hormone induced by triiodothyronine. Sequential analyses of mRNA activity profiles have identified an mRNA sequence (mRNAs14) coding for a protein (S14) with Mr 17 010 and pI 4.9 which responds to triiodothyronine with a lag time of less than 20 minutes. The coordinate regulation of mRNAs14 by carbohydrate and triiodothyronine and its presence in lipogenic tissues (fat, liver, lactating mammary tissue) suggests that S14 is involved in some aspect of fatty acid synthesis degradation or storage.

  2. Single-level resonance parameters fit nuclear cross-sections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drawbaugh, D. W.; Gibson, G.; Miller, M.; Page, S. L.

    1970-01-01

    Least squares analyses of experimental differential cross-section data for the U-235 nucleus have yielded single level Breit-Wigner resonance parameters that fit, simultaneously, three nuclear cross sections of capture, fission, and total.

  3. On the global and local nuclear stopping in mass asymmetric nuclear collisions using density-dependent symmetry energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amandeep, K.; Suneel, K.

    2017-09-01

    The present theoretical calculations have been performed within the framework of IQMD model to study a particular set of mass symmetric and asymmetric reactions (keeping total mass fixed) over a wide range of incident energies and colliding geometries. It has been observed that global as well as local nuclear stopping is influenced by the mass asymmetry of the reaction strongly. Influence of density-dependent symmetry energy has been observed in local nuclear stopping. Global stopping decreases with the increase in colliding geometry. Effect of colliding geometry on nuclear stopping is more at higher energies.

  4. Parity dependence of level densities in sup 49 V

    SciTech Connect

    York, B.W.

    1991-01-01

    In this research, we have studied {sup 48}Ti(p, p{sub 1}) and {sup 48}(p, p{sub 1}{gamma}) in an effort to determine the dependence of level densities on parity in the compound nucleus {sup 49}V. This nuclide was chosen because of the high level density of the {sup 49}V system (leading to good statistical accuracy) and because the target is zero spin (making the assignment of J easier). 5 refs., 3 figs.

  5. Time-dependent density-functional theory method in the electron nuclear dynamics framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ajith Perera, S.; McLaurin, Patrick M.; Grimes, Thomas V.; Morales, Jorge A.

    2010-08-01

    A time-dependent density-functional theory (DFT) dynamics method in the electron nuclear dynamics (END) framework is presented. This time-dependent variational method treats simultaneously the nuclei and electrons of a system without utilizing predetermined potential energy surfaces. Like the simplest-level END, this method adopts a classical-mechanics description for the nuclei and a Thouless single-determinantal representation for the electrons. However, the electronic description is now expressed in a Kohn-Sham DFT form that provides electron correlation effects absent in the simplest-level END. Current implementation of this method employs the adiabatic approximation in the exchange-correlation action and potential. Simulations of molecular vibrations and proton-molecule reactions attest to the accuracy of the present method.

  6. Nuclear PTEN levels and G2 progression in melanoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Jacob, Abraham I.; Romigh, Todd; Waite, Kristin A.; Eng, Charis

    2009-01-01

    The phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) exerts its function, in part, by negatively regulating the well-known phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase/AKT signaling pathway. Previous histological work has suggested that alterations in the nuclear/cytoplasmic compartmentalization of PTEN may play a role in the development and progression of melanoma. In this study, we examined the nuclear/cytoplasmic compartmentalization of PTEN in melanoma cell lines and its correlation with the cell cycle. Studies were performed in melanoma cells lines using classic cell biological techniques. In contrast to breast cancer cell lines, we found that increased levels of nuclear PTEN levels correlate with G2 rather than with G1 arrest. In WM164 and SKmel28 cells, overexpression of PTEN protein did not significantly increase the number of cells in the G2 phase. Differential CDC2 phosphorylation levels in cells that overexpressed PTEN compared with those where PTEN was downregulated suggest some involvement of PTEN in G2 checkpoint regulation. The data suggest that although nuclear PTEN levels correlate with the G2 phase, the role of PTEN in modulating G2/M arrest is not limiting. Further, the specific cell cycle phase regulated by nuclear PTEN is cell-type dependent. Taken together, our observations suggest that in melanoma, nuclear PTEN is involved in G2 progression possibly through the modulation of CDC2, opening up a new arena for investigation. PMID:19478684

  7. Determination of nuclear-matter temperature and density

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, K.L.

    1980-01-01

    Some of the things learned about nuclear matter under extreme conditions during the past few years in relativistic heavy ion studies are reviewed. Two developments are discussed. The completion of analyses and publication of results from the impact parameter selected, single-particle inclusive experiments have proven to be important. Preliminary results from the new generation of two-particle correlation and particle-exclusive measurements, especially those using streamer chambers, look even more definitive. Also the measurement of more exotic ejectiles with long mean free paths in nuclear matter promises to provide more basic information. Calculations are offering real guidance and are providing explanations of high energy collisions. The Monte Carlo and intranuclear cascade calculations discussed are especially informative.

  8. Technology Readiness Levels for Advanced Nuclear Fuels and Materials Development

    SciTech Connect

    Jon Carmack

    2014-01-01

    The Technology Readiness Level (TRL) process is used to quantitatively assess the maturity of a given technology. The TRL process has been developed and successfully used by the Department of Defense (DOD) for development and deployment of new technology and systems for defense applications. In addition, NASA has also successfully used the TRL process to develop and deploy new systems for space applications. Advanced nuclear fuels and materials development is a critical technology needed for closing the nuclear fuel cycle. Because the deployment of a new nuclear fuel forms requires a lengthy and expensive research, development, and demonstration program, applying the TRL concept to the advanced fuel development program is very useful as a management and tracking tool. This report provides definition of the technology readiness level assessment process as defined for use in assessing nuclear fuel technology development for the Advanced Fuel Campaign (AFC).

  9. Automatic calculation and visualization of nuclear density in whole slide images of hepatic histological sections.

    PubMed

    Nagase, Akito; Takahashi, Masanobu; Nakano, Masayuki

    2015-01-01

    An automatic method for estimating the density of cell nuclei in whole slide images (WSI's) of hepatic histological sections is presented. The method can be applied to hematoxylin-eosin (H&E) stained sections with slight histological atypism, such as early well-differentiated hepatocellular carcinoma (ewHCC). It is shown that measured nuclear density is affected by the nuclear size due to fragments of nuclei. This size-dependent problem has been solved by estimating the standard nuclear area for each image patch. The method extracts typical nuclei, which are used to automatically adjust the parameters, including the standard nuclear area. The method is robust for variations in contrast, color, and nuclear size. 40 image patches sampled from 20 WSI's of surgical sections were used for accuracy evaluation. The mean absolute percentage error of estimated nuclear densities was 8.2%. It was also confirmed that the distributions of nuclear density were successfully estimated and visualized for all 20 WSI's. The computation time for a WSI of typical surgical section (754 mm2, about 1,280,000 nuclei) was about 57 minutes on a PC.

  10. Quantum Chromodynamics and Nuclear Physics at Extreme Energy Density

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, B.; Bass, S.A.; Chandrasekharan, S.; Mehen, T.; Springer, R.P.

    2005-11-07

    The report describes research in theoretical quantum chromodynamics, including effective field theories of hadronic interactions, properties of strongly interacting matter at extreme energy density, phenomenology of relativistic heavy ion collisions, and algorithms and numerical simulations of lattice gauge theory and other many-body systems.

  11. The role of ligand density and size in mediating quantum dot nuclear transport.

    PubMed

    Tang, Peter S; Sathiamoorthy, Sarmitha; Lustig, Lindsay C; Ponzielli, Romina; Inamoto, Ichiro; Penn, Linda Z; Shin, Jumi A; Chan, Warren C W

    2014-10-29

    Studying the effects of the physicochemical properties of nanomaterials on cellular uptake, toxicity, and exocytosis can provide the foundation for designing safer and more effective nanoparticles for clinical applications. However, an understanding of the effects of these properties on subcellular transport, accumulation, and distribution remains limited. The present study investigates the effects of surface density and particle size of semiconductor quantum dots on cellular uptake as well as nuclear transport kinetics, retention, and accumulation. The current work illustrates that cellular uptake and nuclear accumulation of nanoparticles depend on surface density of the nuclear localization signal (NLS) peptides with nuclear transport reaching a plateau at 20% surface NLS density in as little as 30 min. These intracellular nanoparticles have no effects on cell viability up to 72 h post treatment. These findings will set a foundation for engineering more sophisticated nanoparticle systems for imaging and manipulating genetic targets in the nucleus.

  12. Nuclear reaction cross sections of exotic nuclei in the Glauber model for relativistic mean field densities

    SciTech Connect

    Patra, S. K.; Panda, R. N.; Arumugam, P.; Gupta, Raj K.

    2009-12-15

    We have calculated the total nuclear reaction cross sections of exotic nuclei in the framework of the Glauber model, using as inputs the standard relativistic mean field (RMF) densities and the densities obtained from the more recently developed effective-field-theory-motivated RMF (the E-RMF). Both light and heavy nuclei are taken as the representative targets, and the light neutron-rich nuclei as projectiles. We found the total nuclear reaction cross section to increase as a function of the mass number, for both the target and projectile nuclei. The differential nuclear elastic scattering cross sections are evaluated for some selected systems at various incident energies. We found a large dependence of the differential elastic scattering cross section on incident energy. Finally, we have applied the same formalism to calculate both the total nuclear reaction cross section and the differential nuclear elastic scattering cross section for the recently discussed superheavy nucleus with atomic number Z=122.

  13. Covariant energy density functionals: The assessment of global performance across the nuclear landscape

    SciTech Connect

    Afanasjev, A. V.

    2015-10-15

    The assessment of the global performance of the state-of-the-art covariant energy density functionals and related theoretical uncertainties in the description of ground state observables has recently been performed. Based on these results, the correlations between global description of binding energies and nuclear matter properties of covariant energy density functionals have been studied in this contribution.

  14. SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL NUMBER DENSITIES FOR MULTI-PURPOSE CANISTER CRITICALITY CALCULATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    D. A. Thomas

    1996-01-12

    The purpose of this analysis is to calculate the number densities for spent nuclear fuel (SNF) to be used in criticality evaluations of the Multi-Purpose Canister (MPC) waste packages. The objective of this analysis is to provide material number density information which will be referenced by future MPC criticality design analyses, such as for those supporting the Conceptual Design Report.

  15. Zinc mapping and density imaging of rabbit pancreas endocrine tissue sections using nuclear microscopy.

    PubMed

    Ynsa, M D; Ren, M Q; Rajendran, R; Sidhapuriwala, J N; van Kan, J A; Bhatia, M; Watt, F

    2009-08-01

    Nuclear microscopy is a suite of techniques based on a focused beam of MeV protons. These techniques have the unique ability to image density and structural variations in relatively thick tissue sections, map trace elements at the cellular level to the microgram per gram (dry weight) level, and extract quantitative information on these elements. The trace elemental studies can be carried out on unstained freeze-dried tissue sections, thereby minimizing any problems of contamination or redistribution of elements during conventional staining and fixing procedures. The pancreas is a gland with different specialized cells and a complex hormonal activity where trace elements play an important role. For example, zinc has an active role in insulin production, and calcium ions participate in the stimulation and secretion process of insulin. Using nuclear microscopy with a spatial resolution of 1 mum, we have located, using zinc mapping, the islets of Langerhans in freeze-dried normal rabbit tissue sections. The islets of Langerhans contain beta-cells responsible for insulin production. Subsequent quantitative analyses have indicated elevations in most elements within the islets of Langerhans, and significantly so for the concentrations of Zn [3,300 compared to 90 microg/g (dry weight)] and Ca [1,100 compared to 390 microg/g (dry weight)].

  16. Finite-size instabilities in nuclear energy density functionals

    SciTech Connect

    Hellemans, V.; Heenen, P.-H.; Bender, M.

    2012-10-20

    The systematic lack of convergence of self-consistent mean-field calculations with certain parameterizations of the Skyrme energy density functional has been attributed to the appearance of finite-size instabilities. In this contribution, we investigate what happens at the instability associated with the C{sub 0}{sup {Delta}s}s{sub 0} Dot-Operator {Delta}s{sub 0} term in a high-spin state of the superdeformed band in {sup 194}Hg.

  17. Nuclear matter at high temperature and low net baryonic density

    SciTech Connect

    Costa, R. S.; Duarte, S. B.; Oliveira, J. C. T.; Chiapparini, M.

    2010-11-12

    We study the effect of the {sigma}-{omega} mesons interaction on nucleon-antinucleon matter properties. This interaction is employed in the context of the linear Walecka model to discuss the behavior of this system at high temperature and low net baryonic density regime. The field equations are solved in the relativistic mean-field approximation and our results show that the phase transition pointed out in the literature for this regime is eliminated when the meson interaction are considered.

  18. Spectroscopic properties of nuclear skyrme energy density functionals.

    PubMed

    Tarpanov, D; Dobaczewski, J; Toivanen, J; Carlsson, B G

    2014-12-19

    We address the question of how to improve the agreement between theoretical nuclear single-particle energies (SPEs) and observations. Empirically, in doubly magic nuclei, the SPEs can be deduced from spectroscopic properties of odd nuclei that have one more or one less neutron or proton. Theoretically, bare SPEs, before being confronted with observations, must be corrected for the effects of the particle vibration coupling (PVC). In the present work, we determine the PVC corrections in a fully self-consistent way. Then, we adjust the SPEs, with PVC corrections included, to empirical data. In this way, the agreement with observations, on average, improves; nevertheless, large discrepancies still remain. We conclude that the main source of disagreement is still in the underlying mean fields, and not in including or neglecting the PVC corrections.

  19. Level density of a bose gas and extreme value statistics.

    PubMed

    Comtet, A; Leboeuf, P; Majumdar, Satya N

    2007-02-16

    We establish a connection between the level density of a gas of noninteracting bosons and the theory of extreme value statistics. Depending on the exponent that characterizes the growth of the underlying single-particle spectrum, we show that at a given excitation energy the limiting distribution function for the number of excited particles follows the three universal distribution laws of extreme value statistics, namely, the Gumbel, Weibull, and Fréchet distributions. Implications of this result, as well as general properties of the level density at different energies, are discussed.

  20. Effect of interstitial low level laser stimulation in skin density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Seulki; Ha, Myungjin; Lee, Sangyeob; Yu, Sungkon; Park, Jihoon; Radfar, Edalat; Hwang, Dong Hyun; Lee, Han A.; Kim, Hansung; Jung, Byungjo

    2016-03-01

    As the interest in skin was increased, number of studies on skin care also have been increased. The reduction of skin density is one of the symptoms of skin aging. It reduces elasticity of skin and becomes the reason of wrinkle formation. Low level laser therapy (LLLT) has been suggested as one of the effective therapeutic methods for skin aging as in hasten to change skin density. This study presents the effect of a minimally invasive laser needle system (MILNS) (wavelength: 660nm, power: 20mW) in skin density. Rabbits were divided into three groups. Group 1 didn't receive any laser stimulation as a control group. Group 2 and 3 as test groups were exposed to MILNS with energy of 8J and 6J on rabbits' dorsal side once a week, respectively. Skin density of rabbits was measured every 12 hours by using an ultrasound skin scanner.

  1. The relationship between education level and mammographic density.

    PubMed

    Sung, Joohon; Song, Yun-Mi

    2015-11-01

    To further understand the factors that contribute to interindividual variation in mammographic density, we evaluated the relationship between education level and each component of the mammographic density measures. Study participants included 535 women between 40 and 65 years of age who received a mammogram for a population-based twin and family study. Mammographic density was measured from digital mammograms using a computer-assisted thresholding method. To avoid negative confounding by obesity level, we calculated BMI-adjusted mammographic measures. Thereafter, each of the mammographic density measures was t-transformed using its mean value and SD for each age strata. The level of education was chosen as a marker representing socioeconomic status at the individual level. A linear mixed model considering familial correlations was used for analyses. In the unadjusted analysis for all women, the BMI-adjusted nondense area gradually decreased with an increase in education level (P for trend=0.017). This association persisted after adjusting for menstrual and reproductive factors. When we repeated the analysis according to menopausal status, an inverse association between education level and nondense area was evident in premenopausal women, whereas the inverse association attenuated to a statistically insignificant level after adjusting for menstrual and reproductive factors in postmenopausal women. Absolute dense area and percentage dense area were not associated with education level. The significant association between nondense area and education level after eliminating the effect of age and BMI suggests that socioeconomic factors may have an influential role in determining the amount of fat tissue in the breast.

  2. Density measurements of road overlays samples with nuclear gauges and a Step Frequency Radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fauchard, C.; Li, B.; Kadi, M.

    2012-04-01

    The density of Hot-Mix Asphalt layers (HMA) and thin overlays is an important parameter for the pavement quality and its long time performance. In the laboratory, the density could be measured with nuclear gauges based on the gamma rays absorption through cores samples drilled from the pavement. However, it is a destructive testing. For in-place control, the density could be measured with nuclear gauges based on the back-scattered gamma rays. But it is limited to overlays thickness greater than 3 cm. For both cases, nuclear gauges require specific training and certification for users. The use of a nuclear source (generally Cesium 137) is a major constraint for transportation and is a threat for operator safety. This work proposes a laboratory density measurement with an electromagnetic method, the Step Frequency Radar developped in our institute (Fauchard et al, 2009). It is based on the same physical principle than the Ground Penetrating Radar, but the used frequencies allow the study of very thin asphalt overlays less than 3 cm and the possible non-destructive measurement of in-place density with high performance. For this study, the dimensions of the device are designed to measure the density of slab samples (40*60*8 cm) in laboratory. The results are compared to the nuclear density measurement used in French Labs. Three kinds of slabs are implemented with four various degrees of compaction (88, 90, 92 and 94%) according to the French norm. Their composition is known and differs mainly with the nature of the aggregates (basalt, quartzite and limestone) that represent the main part of the mix materials. Then the permittivity of the samples is measured according to the reflected waves on surface and bottom slabs. A Complex Refractive Index Model gives the measured permittivity of the tested mix as a function of the compaction and the content, permittiviy and density of each component (filler, aggregates and bitumen). The obtained density is very closed to the

  3. Local acceptance of a high-level nuclear waste repository.

    PubMed

    Sjöberg, Lennart

    2004-06-01

    The siting of nuclear waste facilities has been very difficult in all countries. Recent experience in Sweden indicates, however, that it may be possible, under certain circumstances, to gain local support for the siting of a high-level nuclear waste (HLNW) repository. The article reports on a study of attitudes and risk perceptions of people living in four municipalities in Sweden where HLNW siting was being intensely discussed at the political level, in media, and among the public. Data showed a relatively high level of consensus on acceptability of at least further investigation of the issue; in two cases local councils have since voted in favor of a go-ahead, and in one case only a very small majority defeated the issue. Models of policy attitudes showed that these were related to attitude to nuclear power, attributes of the perceived HLNW risk, and trust. Factors responsible for acceptance are discussed at several levels. One is the attitude to nuclear power, which is becoming more positive, probably because no viable alternatives are in sight. Other factors have to do with the extensive information programs conducted in these municipalities, and with the logical nature of the conclusion that they would be good candidates for hosting the national HLNW repository.

  4. New Generation Nuclear Plant -- High Level Functions and Requirements

    SciTech Connect

    J. M. Ryskamp; E. J. Gorski; E. A. Harvego; S. T. Khericha; G. A. Beitel

    2003-09-01

    This functions and requirements (F&R) document was prepared for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. The highest-level functions and requirements for the NGNP preconceptual design are identified in this document, which establishes performance definitions for what the NGNP will achieve. NGNP designs will be developed based on these requirements by commercial vendor(s).

  5. Generalized Freud's equation and level densities with polynomial potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boobna, Akshat; Ghosh, Saugata

    2013-08-01

    We study orthogonal polynomials with weight $\\exp[-NV(x)]$, where $V(x)=\\sum_{k=1}^{d}a_{2k}x^{2k}/2k$ is a polynomial of order 2d. We derive the generalised Freud's equations for $d=3$, 4 and 5 and using this obtain $R_{\\mu}=h_{\\mu}/h_{\\mu -1}$, where $h_{\\mu}$ is the normalization constant for the corresponding orthogonal polynomials. Moments of the density functions, expressed in terms of $R_{\\mu}$, are obtained using Freud's equation and using this, explicit results of level densities as $N\\rightarrow\\infty$ are derived.

  6. Network signatures of nuclear and cytoplasmic density alterations in a model of pre and postmetastatic colorectal cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damania, Dhwanil; Subramanian, Hariharan; Backman, Vadim; Anderson, Eric C.; Wong, Melissa H.; McCarty, Owen J. T.; Phillips, Kevin G.

    2014-01-01

    Cells contributing to the pathogenesis of cancer possess cytoplasmic and nuclear structural alterations that accompany their aberrant genetic, epigenetic, and molecular perturbations. Although it is known that architectural changes in primary and metastatic tumor cells can be quantified through variations in cellular density at the nanometer and micrometer spatial scales, the interdependent relationships among nuclear and cytoplasmic density as a function of tumorigenic potential has not been thoroughly investigated. We present a combined optical approach utilizing quantitative phase microscopy and partial wave spectroscopic microscopy to perform parallel structural characterizations of cellular architecture. Using the isogenic SW480 and SW620 cell lines as a model of pre and postmetastatic transition in colorectal cancer, we demonstrate that nuclear and cytoplasmic nanoscale disorder, micron-scale dry mass content, mean dry mass density, and shape metrics of the dry mass density histogram are uniquely correlated within and across different cellular compartments for a given cell type. The correlations of these physical parameters can be interpreted as networks whose nodal importance and level of connection independence differ according to disease stage. This work demonstrates how optically derived biophysical parameters are linked within and across different cellular compartments during the architectural orchestration of the metastatic phenotype.

  7. Network signatures of nuclear and cytoplasmic density alterations in a model of pre and postmetastatic colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Damania, Dhwanil; Subramanian, Hariharan; Backman, Vadim; Anderson, Eric C; Wong, Melissa H; McCarty, Owen J T; Phillips, Kevin G

    2014-01-01

    Cells contributing to the pathogenesis of cancer possess cytoplasmic and nuclear structural alterations that accompany their aberrant genetic, epigenetic, and molecular perturbations. Although it is known that architectural changes in primary and metastatic tumor cells can be quantified through variations in cellular density at the nanometer and micrometer spatial scales, the interdependent relationships among nuclear and cytoplasmic density as a function of tumorigenic potential has not been thoroughly investigated. We present a combined optical approach utilizing quantitative phase microscopy and partial wave spectroscopic microscopy to perform parallel structural characterizations of cellular architecture. Using the isogenic SW480 and SW620 cell lines as a model of pre and postmetastatic transition in colorectal cancer, we demonstrate that nuclear and cytoplasmic nanoscale disorder, micron-scale dry mass content, mean dry mass density, and shape metrics of the dry mass density histogram are uniquely correlated within and across different cellular compartments for a given cell type. The correlations of these physical parameters can be interpreted as networks whose nodal importance and level of connection independence differ according to disease stage. This work demonstrates how optically derived biophysical parameters are linked within and across different cellular compartments during the architectural orchestration of the metastatic phenotype.

  8. Network signatures of nuclear and cytoplasmic density alterations in a model of pre and postmetastatic colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Damania, Dhwanil; Subramanian, Hariharan; Backman, Vadim; Anderson, Eric C.; Wong, Melissa H.; McCarty, Owen J. T.; Phillips, Kevin G.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. Cells contributing to the pathogenesis of cancer possess cytoplasmic and nuclear structural alterations that accompany their aberrant genetic, epigenetic, and molecular perturbations. Although it is known that architectural changes in primary and metastatic tumor cells can be quantified through variations in cellular density at the nanometer and micrometer spatial scales, the interdependent relationships among nuclear and cytoplasmic density as a function of tumorigenic potential has not been thoroughly investigated. We present a combined optical approach utilizing quantitative phase microscopy and partial wave spectroscopic microscopy to perform parallel structural characterizations of cellular architecture. Using the isogenic SW480 and SW620 cell lines as a model of pre and postmetastatic transition in colorectal cancer, we demonstrate that nuclear and cytoplasmic nanoscale disorder, micron-scale dry mass content, mean dry mass density, and shape metrics of the dry mass density histogram are uniquely correlated within and across different cellular compartments for a given cell type. The correlations of these physical parameters can be interpreted as networks whose nodal importance and level of connection independence differ according to disease stage. This work demonstrates how optically derived biophysical parameters are linked within and across different cellular compartments during the architectural orchestration of the metastatic phenotype. PMID:24441943

  9. Competing quantum Hall phases in the second Landau level in low density limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Wei; Serafin, A.; Xia, J. S.; Yin, L.; Sullivan, N. S.; Baldwin, K. W.; West, K. W.; Pfeiffer, L. N.; Tsui, D. C.

    2015-03-01

    We present here the results from two high quality, low density GaAs quantum wells. In sample A of electron density n = 5.0 x 1010 cm-2, anisotropic electronic transport behavior was observed at ν = 7/2 in the second Landau level. We believe that the anisotropy is due to the large Landau level mixing effect in this sample. In sample B of density 4.1 x 1010 cm-2, strong 8/3, 5/2, and 7/3 fractional quantum Hall states were observed. Furthermore, our energy gap data obtained in various samples of different densities suggest that the 5/2 state may be spin unpolarized in the low density limit. The results from both samples show that the strong electron-electron interactions and a large Landau level mixing effect play an import role in the competing ground states in the second landau level. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Basic Energy Sciences, Materials Sciences and Engineering Division.

  10. Temperature and density dependence of properties of nuclear matter deduced from heavy ion collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Shlomo, Shalom

    2010-11-24

    Heavy-ion collision experiments are often employed to determine properties of nuclear matter under extreme conditions of temperature and density. This has been the subject of many investigations in recent decades, since understanding the equation of state of hot nuclear matter is very important in the study supernovae, neutron stars and nuclei. We present a short and limited review of the theoretical and experimental status of determining the temperature and density of the disassembling hot nucleus from ratios of the yields of emitted fragments.

  11. Entangled electron and nuclear spin states in 15N@C60: Density matrix tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scherer, Werner; Mehring, Michael

    2008-02-01

    Procedures of the preparation and detection of entangled electron-nuclear spin states in N15@C60 by combining electron spin resonance and electron nuclear double resonance pulse techniques are presented. A quantitative evaluation of the complete density matrix is obtained by a special density matrix tomography. All four Bell states of a two qubit subsystem were analyzed and experimental decoherence times are presented. In addition, we estimate a quantum critical temperature of Tq=7.76K for this system at an electron spin resonance frequency of 95GHz.

  12. Wave-function frozen-density embedding: Approximate analytical nuclear ground-state gradients.

    PubMed

    Heuser, Johannes; Höfener, Sebastian

    2016-05-05

    We report the derivation of approximate analytical nuclear ground-state uncoupled frozen density embedding (FDEu) gradients for the resolution of identity (RI) variant of the second-order approximate coupled cluster singles and doubles (RICC2) as well as density functional theory (DFT), and an efficient implementation thereof in the KOALA program. In order to guarantee a computationally efficient treatment, those gradient terms are neglected which would require the exchange of orbital information. This approach allows for geometry optimizations of single molecules surrounded by numerous molecules with fixed nuclei at RICC2-in-RICC2, RICC2-in-DFT, and DFT-in-DFT FDE level of theory using a dispersion correction, required due to the DFT-based treatment of the interaction in FDE theory. Accuracy and applicability are assessed by the example of two case studies: (a) the Watson-Crick pair adenine-thymine, for which the optimized structures exhibit a maximum error of about 0.08 Å for our best scheme compared to supermolecular reference calculations, (b) carbon monoxide on a magnesium oxide surface model, for which the error amount up to 0.1 Å for our best scheme. Efficiency is demonstrated by successively including environment molecules and comparing to an optimized conventional supermolecular implementation, showing that the method is able to outperform conventional RICC2 schemes already with a rather small number of environment molecules, gaining significant speed up in computation time. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Volume and surface contributions to the nuclear symmetry energy within the coherent density fluctuation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonov, A. N.; Gaidarov, M. K.; Sarriguren, P.; Moya de Guerra, E.

    2016-07-01

    The volume and surface components of the nuclear symmetry energy (NSE) and their ratio are calculated within the coherent density fluctuation model (CDFM). The estimations use the results of the model for the NSE in finite nuclei based on the Brueckner energy-density functional for nuclear matter. In addition, we present results for the NSE and its volume and surface contributions obtained by using the Skyrme energy-density functional. The CDFM weight function is obtained using the proton and neutron densities from the self-consistent HF+BCS method with Skyrme interactions. We present and discuss the values of the volume and surface contributions to the NSE and their ratio obtained for the Ni, Sn, and Pb isotopic chains, studying their isotopic sensitivity. The results are compared with estimations of other approaches which have used available experimental data on binding energies, neutron-skin thicknesses, excitation energies to isobaric analog states (IAS), and also with results of other theoretical methods.

  14. Laplacian-level density functionals for the kinetic energy density and exchange-correlation energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perdew, John P.; Constantin, Lucian A.

    2007-04-01

    We construct a Laplacian-level meta-generalized-gradient-approximation (meta-GGA) for the noninteracting (Kohn-Sham orbital) positive kinetic energy density τ of an electronic ground state of density n . This meta-GGA is designed to recover the fourth-order gradient expansion τGE4 in the appropriate slowly varying limit and the von Weizsäcker expression τW=∣∇n∣2/(8n) in the rapidly varying limit. It is constrained to satisfy the rigorous lower bound τW(r)⩽τ(r) . Our meta-GGA is typically a strong improvement over the gradient expansion of τ for atoms, spherical jellium clusters, jellium surfaces, the Airy gas, Hooke’s atom, one-electron Gaussian density, quasi-two-dimensional electron gas, and nonuniformly scaled hydrogen atom. We also construct a Laplacian-level meta-GGA for exchange and correlation by employing our approximate τ in the Tao-Perdew-Staroverov-Scuseria (TPSS) meta-GGA density functional. The Laplacian-level TPSS gives almost the same exchange-correlation enhancement factors and energies as the full TPSS, suggesting that τ and ∇2n carry about the same information beyond that carried by n and ∇n . Our kinetic energy density integrates to an orbital-free kinetic energy functional that is about as accurate as the fourth-order gradient expansion for many real densities (with noticeable improvement in molecular atomization energies), but considerably more accurate for rapidly varying ones.

  15. Spontaneous Fission Modes and Lifetimes of Superheavy Elements in the Nuclear Density Functional Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Staszczak, A,

    2013-01-01

    Background: The reactions with the neutron-rich 48Ca beam and actinide targets resulted in the detection of new superheavy (SH) nuclides with Z=104 118. The unambiguous identification of the new isotopes, however, still poses a problem because their -decay chains terminate by spontaneous fission (SF) before reaching the known region of the nuclear chart. The understanding of the competition between -decay and SF channels in SH nuclei is, therefore, of crucial importance for our ability to map the SH region and to assess its extent.

    Purpose: We perform self-consistent calculations of the competing decay modes of even-even SH isotopes with 108 Z 126 and 148 N 188.

    Methods: We use the state-of-the-art computational framework based on self-consistent symmetry-unrestricted nuclear density functional theory capable of describing the competition between nuclear attraction and electrostatic repulsion. We apply the SkM* Skyrme energy density functional. The collective mass tensor of the fissioning superfluid nucleus is computed by means of the cranking approximation to the adiabatic time-dependent Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov (HFB) approach. This paper constitutes a systematic self-consistent study of spontaneous fission in the SH region, carried out at a full HFB level, that simultaneously takes into account both triaxiality and reflection asymmetry.

    Results: Breaking axial symmetry and parity turns out to be crucial for a realistic estimate of collective action; it results in lowering SF lifetimes by more than 7 orders of magnitude in some cases. We predict two competing SF modes: reflection symmetric modes and reflection asymmetric modes.

    Conclusions: The shortest-lived SH isotopes decay by SF; they are expected to lie in a narrow corridor formed by 280Hs, 284Fl, and 118284Uuo that separates the regions of SH nuclei synthesized in cold-fusion and hot-fusion reactions. The region of long-lived SH nuclei is expected to be centered on 294Ds with a total half-life of

  16. Spontaneous fission modes and lifetimes of superheavy elements in the nuclear density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staszczak, A.; Baran, A.; Nazarewicz, W.

    2013-02-01

    Background: The reactions with the neutron-rich 48Ca beam and actinide targets resulted in the detection of new superheavy (SH) nuclides with Z=104-118. The unambiguous identification of the new isotopes, however, still poses a problem because their α-decay chains terminate by spontaneous fission (SF) before reaching the known region of the nuclear chart. The understanding of the competition between α-decay and SF channels in SH nuclei is, therefore, of crucial importance for our ability to map the SH region and to assess its extent.Purpose: We perform self-consistent calculations of the competing decay modes of even-even SH isotopes with 108≤Z≤126 and 148≤N≤188.Methods: We use the state-of-the-art computational framework based on self-consistent symmetry-unrestricted nuclear density functional theory capable of describing the competition between nuclear attraction and electrostatic repulsion. We apply the SkM* Skyrme energy density functional. The collective mass tensor of the fissioning superfluid nucleus is computed by means of the cranking approximation to the adiabatic time-dependent Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov (HFB) approach. This paper constitutes a systematic self-consistent study of spontaneous fission in the SH region, carried out at a full HFB level, that simultaneously takes into account both triaxiality and reflection asymmetry.Results: Breaking axial symmetry and parity turns out to be crucial for a realistic estimate of collective action; it results in lowering SF lifetimes by more than 7 orders of magnitude in some cases. We predict two competing SF modes: reflection symmetric modes and reflection asymmetric modes.Conclusions: The shortest-lived SH isotopes decay by SF; they are expected to lie in a narrow corridor formed by 280Hs, 284Fl, and 118284Uuo that separates the regions of SH nuclei synthesized in “cold-fusion” and “hot-fusion” reactions. The region of long-lived SH nuclei is expected to be centered on 294Ds with a total half

  17. Float level switch for a nuclear power plant containment vessel

    DOEpatents

    Powell, J.G.

    1993-11-16

    This invention is a float level switch used to sense rise or drop in water level in a containment vessel of a nuclear power plant during a loss of coolant accident. The essential components of the device are a guide tube, a reed switch inside the guide tube, a float containing a magnetic portion that activates a reed switch, and metal-sheathed, ceramic-insulated conductors connecting the reed switch to a monitoring system outside the containment vessel. Special materials and special sealing techniques prevent failure of components and allow the float level switch to be connected to a monitoring system outside the containment vessel. 1 figures.

  18. Float level switch for a nuclear power plant containment vessel

    DOEpatents

    Powell, James G.

    1993-01-01

    This invention is a float level switch used to sense rise or drop in water level in a containment vessel of a nuclear power plant during a loss of coolant accident. The essential components of the device are a guide tube, a reed switch inside the guide tube, a float containing a magnetic portion that activates a reed switch, and metal-sheathed, ceramic-insulated conductors connecting the reed switch to a monitoring system outside the containment vessel. Special materials and special sealing techniques prevent failure of components and allow the float level switch to be connected to a monitoring system outside the containment vessel.

  19. Calculation of nuclear spin-spin coupling constants using frozen density embedding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Götz, Andreas W.; Autschbach, Jochen; Visscher, Lucas

    2014-03-01

    We present a method for a subsystem-based calculation of indirect nuclear spin-spin coupling tensors within the framework of current-spin-density-functional theory. Our approach is based on the frozen-density embedding scheme within density-functional theory and extends a previously reported subsystem-based approach for the calculation of nuclear magnetic resonance shielding tensors to magnetic fields which couple not only to orbital but also spin degrees of freedom. This leads to a formulation in which the electron density, the induced paramagnetic current, and the induced spin-magnetization density are calculated separately for the individual subsystems. This is particularly useful for the inclusion of environmental effects in the calculation of nuclear spin-spin coupling constants. Neglecting the induced paramagnetic current and spin-magnetization density in the environment due to the magnetic moments of the coupled nuclei leads to a very efficient method in which the computationally expensive response calculation has to be performed only for the subsystem of interest. We show that this approach leads to very good results for the calculation of solvent-induced shifts of nuclear spin-spin coupling constants in hydrogen-bonded systems. Also for systems with stronger interactions, frozen-density embedding performs remarkably well, given the approximate nature of currently available functionals for the non-additive kinetic energy. As an example we show results for methylmercury halides which exhibit an exceptionally large shift of the one-bond coupling constants between 199Hg and 13C upon coordination of dimethylsulfoxide solvent molecules.

  20. Calculation of nuclear spin-spin coupling constants using frozen density embedding.

    PubMed

    Götz, Andreas W; Autschbach, Jochen; Visscher, Lucas

    2014-03-14

    We present a method for a subsystem-based calculation of indirect nuclear spin-spin coupling tensors within the framework of current-spin-density-functional theory. Our approach is based on the frozen-density embedding scheme within density-functional theory and extends a previously reported subsystem-based approach for the calculation of nuclear magnetic resonance shielding tensors to magnetic fields which couple not only to orbital but also spin degrees of freedom. This leads to a formulation in which the electron density, the induced paramagnetic current, and the induced spin-magnetization density are calculated separately for the individual subsystems. This is particularly useful for the inclusion of environmental effects in the calculation of nuclear spin-spin coupling constants. Neglecting the induced paramagnetic current and spin-magnetization density in the environment due to the magnetic moments of the coupled nuclei leads to a very efficient method in which the computationally expensive response calculation has to be performed only for the subsystem of interest. We show that this approach leads to very good results for the calculation of solvent-induced shifts of nuclear spin-spin coupling constants in hydrogen-bonded systems. Also for systems with stronger interactions, frozen-density embedding performs remarkably well, given the approximate nature of currently available functionals for the non-additive kinetic energy. As an example we show results for methylmercury halides which exhibit an exceptionally large shift of the one-bond coupling constants between (199)Hg and (13)C upon coordination of dimethylsulfoxide solvent molecules.

  1. Calculation of nuclear spin-spin coupling constants using frozen density embedding

    SciTech Connect

    Götz, Andreas W.; Autschbach, Jochen; Visscher, Lucas

    2014-03-14

    We present a method for a subsystem-based calculation of indirect nuclear spin-spin coupling tensors within the framework of current-spin-density-functional theory. Our approach is based on the frozen-density embedding scheme within density-functional theory and extends a previously reported subsystem-based approach for the calculation of nuclear magnetic resonance shielding tensors to magnetic fields which couple not only to orbital but also spin degrees of freedom. This leads to a formulation in which the electron density, the induced paramagnetic current, and the induced spin-magnetization density are calculated separately for the individual subsystems. This is particularly useful for the inclusion of environmental effects in the calculation of nuclear spin-spin coupling constants. Neglecting the induced paramagnetic current and spin-magnetization density in the environment due to the magnetic moments of the coupled nuclei leads to a very efficient method in which the computationally expensive response calculation has to be performed only for the subsystem of interest. We show that this approach leads to very good results for the calculation of solvent-induced shifts of nuclear spin-spin coupling constants in hydrogen-bonded systems. Also for systems with stronger interactions, frozen-density embedding performs remarkably well, given the approximate nature of currently available functionals for the non-additive kinetic energy. As an example we show results for methylmercury halides which exhibit an exceptionally large shift of the one-bond coupling constants between {sup 199}Hg and {sup 13}C upon coordination of dimethylsulfoxide solvent molecules.

  2. Chemical digestion of low level nuclear solid waste material

    DOEpatents

    Cooley, Carl R.; Lerch, Ronald E.

    1976-01-01

    A chemical digestion for treatment of low level combustible nuclear solid waste material is provided and comprises reacting the solid waste material with concentrated sulfuric acid at a temperature within the range of 230.degree.-300.degree.C and simultaneously and/or thereafter contacting the reacting mixture with concentrated nitric acid or nitrogen dioxide. In a special embodiment spent ion exchange resins are converted by this chemical digestion to noncombustible gases and a low volume noncombustible residue.

  3. Case for retrievable high-level nuclear waste disposal

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Roseboom, Eugene H.

    1994-01-01

    Plans for the nation's first high-level nuclear waste repository have called for permanently closing and sealing the repository soon after it is filled. However, the hydrologic environment of the proposed site at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, should allow the repository to be kept open and the waste retrievable indefinitely. This would allow direct monitoring of the repository and maintain the options for future generations to improve upon the disposal methods or use the uranium in the spent fuel as an energy resource.

  4. Level densities and γ-ray strength functions in Sn isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toft, H. K.; Larsen, A. C.; Agvaanluvsan, U.; Bürger, A.; Guttormsen, M.; Mitchell, G. E.; Nyhus, H. T.; Schiller, A.; Siem, S.; Syed, N. U. H.; Voinov, A.

    2010-06-01

    The nuclear level densities of Sn118,119 and the γ-ray strength functions of Sn116,118,119 below the neutron separation energy are extracted with the Oslo method using the (He3,αγ) and (He3,He3'γ) reactions. The level-density function of Sn119 displays steplike structures. The microcanonical entropies are deduced from the level densities, and the single neutron entropy of Sn119 is determined to be 1.7 ± 0.2 kB. Results from a combinatorial model support the interpretation that some of the low-energy steps in the level density function are caused by neutron pair breaking. An enhancement in all the γ-ray strength functions of Sn116-119, compared to standard models for radiative strength, is observed for the γ-ray energy region of ≃4-11 MeV. These small resonances all have a centroid energy of 8.0(1) MeV and an integrated strength corresponding to 1.7(9)% of the classical Thomas-Reiche-Kuhn sum rule. The Sn resonances may be due to electric dipole neutron skin oscillations or to an enhancement of the giant magnetic dipole resonance.

  5. Technology readiness levels for advanced nuclear fuels and materials development

    SciTech Connect

    Carmack, W. J.; Braase, L. A.; Wigeland, R. A.; Todosow, M.

    2016-12-23

    The Technology Readiness Level (TRL) process is used to quantitatively assess the maturity of a given technology. It was pioneered by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) in the 1980s to develop and deploy new systems for space applications. The process was subsequently adopted by the Department of Defense (DoD) to develop and deploy new technology and systems for defense applications as well as the Department of Energy (DOE) to evaluate the maturity of new technologies in major construction projects. Advanced nuclear fuels and materials development is a critical technology needed for improving the performance and safety of current and advanced reactors, and ultimately closing the nuclear fuel cycle. Because deployment of new nuclear fuel forms requires a lengthy and expensive research, development, and demonstration program, applying the TRL concept to the advanced fuel development program is very useful as a management, communication and tracking tool. Furthermore, this article provides examples regarding the methods by which TRLs are currently used to assess the maturity of nuclear fuels and materials under development in the DOE Fuel Cycle Research and Development (FCRD) Program within the Advanced Fuels Campaign (AFC).

  6. Technology readiness levels for advanced nuclear fuels and materials development

    DOE PAGES

    Carmack, W. J.; Braase, L. A.; Wigeland, R. A.; ...

    2016-12-23

    The Technology Readiness Level (TRL) process is used to quantitatively assess the maturity of a given technology. It was pioneered by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) in the 1980s to develop and deploy new systems for space applications. The process was subsequently adopted by the Department of Defense (DoD) to develop and deploy new technology and systems for defense applications as well as the Department of Energy (DOE) to evaluate the maturity of new technologies in major construction projects. Advanced nuclear fuels and materials development is a critical technology needed for improving the performance and safety of currentmore » and advanced reactors, and ultimately closing the nuclear fuel cycle. Because deployment of new nuclear fuel forms requires a lengthy and expensive research, development, and demonstration program, applying the TRL concept to the advanced fuel development program is very useful as a management, communication and tracking tool. Furthermore, this article provides examples regarding the methods by which TRLs are currently used to assess the maturity of nuclear fuels and materials under development in the DOE Fuel Cycle Research and Development (FCRD) Program within the Advanced Fuels Campaign (AFC).« less

  7. np Pairing Correlations in Low-Density Region of Nuclear Matter

    SciTech Connect

    Isayev, A.A.; Bastrukov, S.I.; Yang, J.

    2004-10-01

    In the framework of Green's function formalism at finite temperatures, superfluidity of nuclear matter with np pairing correlations is studied. It is shown that, at low densities, equations for the energy gap in the spectrum of quasiparticles and chemical potentials of protons and neutrons allow solutions with negative chemical potential, which corresponds to appearance of Bose-Einstein condensation of deuterons in the low-density region of nuclear matter. In this region, np pairing correlations survive even for large isospin asymmetry. Interaction between nucleons is described by the effective zero range force, developed to reproduce the energy gap in the isospin singlet pairing channel, calculated with the use of the Paris NN potential. The obtained results may be of importance for description of thermal properties of outer low-density regions of neutron stars.

  8. Warm unstable asymmetric nuclear matter: Critical properties and the density dependence of the symmetry energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alam, N.; Pais, H.; Providência, C.; Agrawal, B. K.

    2017-05-01

    The spinodal instabilities in hot asymmetric nuclear matter and some important critical parameters derived thereof are studied by using six different families of relativistic mean-field models. The slopes of the symmetry energy coefficient vary over a wide range within each family. The critical densities and proton fractions are more sensitive to the symmetry energy slope parameter at temperatures much below its critical value (Tc˜14 -16 MeV ). The spread in the critical proton fraction at a given symmetry energy slope parameter is noticeably larger near Tc, indicating that the equation of state of warm asymmetric nuclear matter at subsaturation densities is not sufficiently constrained. The distillation effects are sensitive to the density dependence of the symmetry energy at low temperatures which tend to wash out with increasing temperature.

  9. Nuclear magnetic and nuclear quadrupole resonance parameters of β-carboline derivatives calculated using density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmadinejad, Neda; Tari, Mostafa Talebi

    2017-04-01

    A density functional theory (DFT) calculations using B3LYP/6-311++G( d,p) method were carried out to investigate the relative stability of the molecules of β-carboline derivatives such as harmaline, harmine, harmalol, harmane and norharmane. Calculated nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) parameters were used to determine the 14N nuclear quadrupole coupling constant χ, asymmetry parameter η and EFG tensor ( q zz ). For better understanding of the electronic structure of β-carboline derivatives, natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis, isotropic and anisotropic NMR chemical shieldings were calculated for 14N nuclei using GIAO method for the optimized structures. The NBO analysis shows that pyrrole ring nitrogen (N9) atom has greater tendency than pyridine ring nitrogen (N2) atom to participate in resonance interactions and aromaticity development in the all of these structures. The NMR and NQR parameters were studied in order to find the correlations between electronic structure and the structural stability of the studied molecules.

  10. Torsional ultrasound efficiency under different vacuum levels in different degrees of nuclear cataract.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yujuan; Xia, Yuanling; Zeng, Mingbing; Liu, Xialin; Luo, Lixia; Chen, Bing; Liu, Yuhua; Liu, Yizhi

    2009-11-01

    To evaluate the efficiency of torsional ultrasound (US) under different vacuum levels in eyes with cataract with different degrees of nuclear density. Cataract Service, Zhongshan Ophthalmic Center, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, China. In this prospective randomized series, eyes with age-related cataract were divided into 3 groups based on nuclear density. Eyes in each group were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 subgroups and treated with phacoemulsification under vacuum of 250 mm Hg (subgroup 1), 450 mm Hg (subgroup 2), or 600 mm Hg (subgroup 3). Data included preoperative and postoperative corrected distance visual acuity (CDVA), endothelial cell density, and central corneal thickness (CCT) and intraoperative US time and cumulative dissipated energy (CDE). The study evaluated 998 patients (1073 eyes). In each group, there was a statistically significant decrease in US time, CDE, and postoperative endothelial cell loss with increased vacuum (P<.05). At 1 day and 7 days, the CDVA was statistically significantly better in subgroups 2 and 3 (P<.05) and the CCT was thinner when vacuum was higher. There was no statistically significant difference in CDVA and CCT between subgroups 30 days postoperatively (P>.05). Torsional US with a high vacuum level was safe for cataract extraction. With less US energy and endothelial cell loss, torsional US was more efficient than with higher vacuum levels with lower levels.

  11. Nuclear matter at high density: Phase transitions, multiquark states, and supernova outbursts

    SciTech Connect

    Krivoruchenko, M. I.; Nadyozhin, D. K.; Rasinkova, T. L.; Simonov, Yu. A.; Trusov, M. A. Yudin, A. V.

    2011-03-15

    Phase transition from hadronic matter to quark-gluon matter is discussed for various regimes of temperature and baryon number density. For small and medium densities, the phase transition is accurately described in the framework of the Field Correlation Method, whereas at high density predictions are less certain and leave room for the phenomenological models. We study formation of multiquark states (MQS) at zero temperature and high density. Relevant MQS components of the nuclear matter can be described using a previously developed formalism of the quark compound bags (QCB). Partialwave analysis of nucleon-nucleon scattering indicates the existence of 6QS which manifest themselves as poles of P matrix. In the framework of the QCB model, we formulate a self-consistent system of coupled equations for the nucleon and 6QS propagators in nuclear matter and the G matrix. The approach provides a link between high-density nuclear matter with the MQS components and the cumulative effect observed in reactions on the nuclei, which requires the admixture of MQS in the wave functions of nuclei kinematically. 6QS determines the natural scale of the density for a possible phase transition into theMQS phase of nuclear matter. Such a phase transition can lead to dynamic instability of newly born protoneutron stars and dramatically affect the dynamics of supernovae. Numerical simulations show that the phase transition may be a good remedy for the triggering supernova explosions in the spherically symmetric supernovamodels. A specific signature of the phase transition is an additional neutrino peak in the neutrino light curve. For a Galactic core-collapse supernova, such a peak could be resolved by the present neutrino detectors. The possibility of extracting the parameters of the phase of transition from observation of the neutrino signal is discussed also.

  12. High density multi-level recording for archival data preservation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holzner, F.; Paul, Ph.; Drechsler, U.; Despont, M.; Knoll, A. W.; Duerig, U.

    2011-07-01

    Archival data storage is predominantly based on magnetic tape technology. An alternative probe based multi-level recording scheme is proposed which specifically addresses the issue of long term data preservation. In a first step, the data are written as topographic relief in an organic resist. To achieve long term preservation, the relief structure is transferred in a Si based inorganic carrier by means of reactive ion etching. Thereby, the data are preserved as written in stone. Using 3-level logic, a storage density of 99 Gb/in2 is demonstrated and read-back of the data is accomplished with an error rate of 10-3 based on threshold detection. Exploiting etch anisotropy in layered substrates, logic levels can be physically separated from one another in different layers which enhances tamper resistance and also provides a means for heterogeneous storage concepts.

  13. Measuring the Nuclear Levels in 19Ne using GODDESS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Matthew; Experiment 1488 Collaboration Collaboration

    2016-09-01

    A direct way to test nova explosion models is to observe gamma rays created in the decay of radioactive isotopes produced in the nova. One such isotope, 18F, is believed to be the main source of observable 511-keV gamma rays. The main destruction mechanism of 18F is thought to be the 18F(p,α)15O reaction, and the uncertainty in the reaction rate is attributed to uncertainties in the energies, spins, and parities of the nuclear levels in 19Ne above the proton threshold. A 3He beam was used at Argonne National Lab in an effort to understand the levels in 19Ne via the 19F(3He,t)19Ne reaction. Gammasphere ORRUBA Dual Detectors for Experimental Structure Studies (GODDESS) was used to measure gamma rays from the decay of 19Ne in coincidence with the reaction tritons. Preliminary data from the experiment will be presented. This research was supported by the National Science Foundation, the US DOE Office of Nuclear Physics and the National Nuclear Security Administration.

  14. Socioeconomic studies of high-level nuclear waste disposal.

    PubMed Central

    White, G F; Bronzini, M S; Colglazier, E W; Dohrenwend, B; Erikson, K; Hansen, R; Kneese, A V; Moore, R; Page, E B; Rappaport, R A

    1994-01-01

    The socioeconomic investigations of possible impacts of the proposed repository for high-level nuclear waste at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, have been unprecedented in several respects. They bear on the public decision that sooner or later will be made as to where and how to dispose permanently of the waste presently at military weapons installations and that continues to accumulate at nuclear power stations. No final decision has yet been made. There is no clear precedent from other countries. The organization of state and federal studies is unique. The state studies involve more disciplines than any previous efforts. They have been carried out in parallel to federal studies and have pioneered in defining some problems and appropriate research methods. A recent annotated bibliography provides interested scientists with a compact guide to the 178 published reports, as well as to relevant journal articles and related documents. PMID:7971963

  15. Accuracy of Determination of the Parameters of Exotic Nuclei Nuclear Density Distributions in the Glauber Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rueter, Keiti; Novikov, Ivan

    2016-09-01

    Parameters of a nuclear density distribution for an exotic nuclei with halo or skin structures can be determined from the experimentally measure interaction cross-section. In the presented work, to extract parameters for a halo and core, we compare experimental data on interaction cross section with reaction cross-sections calculated using expressions obtained in the Glauber Model and its optical approximation. These calculations are performed using Markov Chain Monte Carlo algorithm. In addition, we discuss the accuracy of the Monte Carlo approach to calculating the interaction and reaction cross-sections. The dependence of the accuracy of the density parameters of various exotic nuclei on the ``quality'' of the random numbers chains (here, ``quality'' is defined by lag-1 autocorrelation time of a sequence of random numbers) is obtained for the Gaussian density distribution for a core and the Gaussian density distribution for a halo. KY NSF EPSCoR Research Scholars Program.

  16. Constraints on the inner edge of neutron star crusts from relativistic nuclear energy density functionals

    SciTech Connect

    Moustakidis, Ch. C.; Lalazissis, G. A.; Niksic, T.; Vretenar, D.; Ring, P.

    2010-06-15

    The transition density n{sub t} and pressure P{sub t} at the inner edge between the liquid core and the solid crust of a neutron star are analyzed using the thermodynamical method and the framework of relativistic nuclear energy density functionals. Starting from a functional that has been carefully adjusted to experimental binding energies of finite nuclei, and varying the density dependence of the corresponding symmetry energy within the limits determined by isovector properties of finite nuclei, we estimate the constraints on the core-crust transition density and pressure of neutron stars: 0.086 fm{sup -3}<=n{sub t}<0.090 fm{sup -3} and 0.3 MeV fm{sup -3}

  17. Nuclear parton density functions from jet production in DIS at an EIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klasen, M.; Kovařík, K.; Potthoff, J.

    2017-05-01

    We investigate the potential of inclusive-jet production in deep-inelastic scattering (DIS) at a future electron-ion collider (EIC) to improve our current knowledge of nuclear parton density functions (PDFs). We demonstrate that the kinematic reach is extended similarly to inclusive DIS, but that the uncertainty of the nuclear PDFs, in particular of the gluon density at low Bjorken-x , is considerably reduced, by up to an order of magnitude compared to the present situation. Using an approximate next-to-next-to-leading order (aNNLO) calculation implemented in the program JetViP, we also make predictions for three different EIC designs and for four different light and heavy nuclei.

  18. Fragmentation in isotopic and isobaric systems as probe of density dependence of nuclear symmetry energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Mandeep; Gautam, Sakshi; Puri, Rajeev K.

    2016-11-01

    We probe the density-dependent behavior of symmetry energy using the yield of various fragments in central collisions of various isotopic and isobaric colliding pairs. We calculate the yields of free nucleons, light charged particles and intermediate mass fragments in neutron-rich colliding systems as well as the ratio of relative yields of above fragments and free nucleons. Our findings reveal that the ratio of relative yield of light charged particles poses better candidate to probe the density dependence of nuclear symmetry energy.

  19. On the similarity between molecular electron densities, electrostatic potentials and bare nuclear potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gadre, Shridhar R.; Bendale, Rajeev D.

    1986-10-01

    The similarities among the molecular contours of three scalar fields, viz. electron density (ED), electrostatic potential (ESP) and bare nuclear potential (BNP) have been investigated. The topological resemblance between ESP and ED contour diagrams (as prompted by the Thomas-Fermi model) is more pronounced than that for BNP and ED contour diagrams (as predicted by the local density functional model of Parr, Gadre and Bartolotti) with three-membered ring systems as test cases. An analysis of critical points of these distributions has also been included. Thus it may be conjectured that ED maps may prove useful in predicting reactive sites in molecules.

  20. Probing the Symmetry Term of the Nuclear Equation of State at High Baryonic Densities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russotto, P.; Acosta, L.; Adamczyk, M.; Al-Ajlan, A.; Al-Garawi, M.; Al-Homaidhi, S.; Amorini, F.; Auditore, L.; Aumann, T.; Ayyad, Y.; Basrak, Z.; Benlliure, J.; Boisjoli, M.; Boretzky, K.; Brzychczyk, J.; Budzanowski, A.; Caesar, C.; Cardella, G.; Cammarata, P.; Chajecki, Z.; Chartier, M.; Chbihi, A.; Colonna, M.; Cozma, M. D.; Czech, B.; De Filippo, E.; Di Toro, M.; Famiano, M.; Gannon, S.; Gašparić, I.; Grassi, L.; Guazzoni, C.; Guazzoni, P.; Heil, M.; Heilborn, L.; Introzzi, R.; Isobe, T.; Kezzar, K.; Kiš, M.; Krasznahorkay, A.; Kupny, S.; Kurz, N.; La Guidara, E.; Lanzalone, G.; Lasko, P.; Le Fèvre, A.; Leifels, Y.; Lemmon, R. C.; Li, QF; Lombardo, I.; Łukasik, J.; Lynch, W. G.; Marini, P.; Matthews, Z.; May, L.; Minniti, T.; Mostazo, M.; Pagano, A.; Pagano, E. V.; Papa, M.; Pawłowski, P.; Pirrone, S.; Politi, G.; Porto, F.; Reviol, W.; Riccio, F.; Rizzo, F.; Rosato, E.; Rossi, D.; Santoro, S.; Sarantites, D. G.; Simon, H.; Skwirczynska, I.; Sosin, Z.; Stuhl, L.; Trautmann, W.; Trifirò, A.; Trimarchi, M.; Tsang, M. B.; Verde, G.; Veselsky, M.; Vigilante, M.; Wang, Yongjia; Wieloch, A.; Wigg, P.; Winkelbauer, J.; Wolter, H. H.; Wu, P.; Yennello, S.; Zambon, P.; Zetta, L.; Zoric, M.

    2017-06-01

    In the ASY-EOS experiment flows of neutrons and light charged particles were measured for 197Au+197Au collisions at 400 MeV/nucleon, in order to investigate the strength of the symmetry term of the nuclear equation of state at supra-saturation densities. By comparing the experimental data with the UrQMD transport model predictions, we have extracted a new constraint in agreement with the moderately soft to linear density dependence obtained in the former analysis on FOPI-LAND data, but reducing the associated uncertainty by a factor ∼ 2.

  1. High energy-density physics: From nuclear testing to the superlasers

    SciTech Connect

    Teller, E.; Campbell, E.M.; Holmes, N.C.; Libby, S.B.; Remington, B.A.

    1995-08-14

    The authors describe the role for the next-generation ``superlasers`` in the study of matter under extremely high energy density conditions, in comparison to previous uses of nuclear explosives for this purpose. As examples, the authors focus on three important areas of physics that have unresolved issues which must be addressed by experiment: equations of state, turbulent hydrodynamics, and the transport of radiation. They describe the advantages the large lasers will have in a comprehensive experimental program.

  2. Capacitance-level/density monitor for fluidized-bed combustor

    DOEpatents

    Fasching, George E.; Utt, Carroll E.

    1982-01-01

    A multiple segment three-terminal type capacitance probe with segment selection, capacitance detection and compensation circuitry and read-out control for level/density measurements in a fluidized-bed vessel is provided. The probe is driven at a high excitation frequency of up to 50 kHz to sense quadrature (capacitive) current related to probe/vessel capacitance while being relatively insensitive to the resistance current component. Compensation circuitry is provided for generating a negative current of equal magnitude to cancel out only the resistive component current. Clock-operated control circuitry separately selects the probe segments in a predetermined order for detecting and storing this capacitance measurement. The selected segment acts as a guarded electrode and is connected to the read-out circuitry while all unselected segments are connected to the probe body, which together form the probe guard electrode. The selected probe segment capacitance component signal is directed to a corresponding segment channel sample and hold circuit dedicated to that segment to store the signal derived from that segment. This provides parallel outputs for display, computer input, etc., for the detected capacitance values. The rate of segment sampling may be varied to either monitor the dynamic density profile of the bed (high sampling rate) or monitor average bed characteristics (slower sampling rate).

  3. Possibility of determination of the asymptotic level-density parameter

    SciTech Connect

    Kudyaev, G.A.; Ostapenko, Y.B.; Svirin, M.I.; Smirenkin, G.N.

    1988-02-01

    We investigate the sensitivity of the fissility of nuclei to the parameters of the density of excited levels and conclude that the nuclei in the region of Pb are most favorable for an experimental estimate of the asymptotic parameter a-italic-tilde = ..cap alpha..A. The mean value ..cap alpha.. = 0.086 +- 0.009 MeV/sup -1/ is found from analysis of the fission of seven nuclei from /sup 201/Tl to /sup 213/At. This value is in agreement with the phenomenological description of the energy dependence a(U) (..cap alpha.. = 0.093 MeV/sup -1/) and with the theoretical prediction ..cap alpha.. = 0.09 MeV/sup -1/ obtained for a Woods-Saxon potential.

  4. Building a Universal Nuclear Energy Density Functional (UNEDF): SciDAC-2 Project

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, Joe; Furnstahl, Dick; Lusk, Rusty; Nazarewicz, Witek; Ng, Esmond; Thompson, Ian; Vary, James

    2012-06-30

    An understanding of the properties of atomic nuclei is crucial for a complete nuclear theory, for element formation, for properties of stars, and for present and future energy and defense applications. During the period of Dec. 1, 2006 - Jun. 30, 2012, the UNEDF collaboration carried out a comprehensive study of all nuclei based on the most accurate knowledge of the strong nuclear interaction, the most reliable theoretical approaches, the most advanced algorithms, and extensive computational resources, with a view towards scaling to the petaflop platforms and beyond. The long-term vision initiated with UNEDF is to arrive at a comprehensive, quantitative, and unified description of nuclei and their reactions, grounded in the fundamental interactions between the constituent nucleons. We seek to replace current phenomenological models of nuclear structure and reactions with a well-founded microscopic theory that delivers maximum predictive power with well-quantified uncertainties. Specifically, the mission of this project has been three-fold: first, to find an optimal energy density functional (EDF) using all our knowledge of the nucleonic Hamiltonian and basic nuclear properties; second, to apply the EDF theory and its extensions to validate the functional using all the available relevant nuclear structure and reaction data; and third, to apply the validated theory to properties of interest that cannot be measured, in particular the properties needed for reaction theory.

  5. Dose estimation for nuclear power plant 4 accident in Taiwan at Fukushima nuclear meltdown emission level.

    PubMed

    Tang, Mei-Ling; Tsuang, Ben-Jei; Kuo, Pei-Hsuan

    2016-05-01

    An advanced Gaussian trajectory dispersion model is used to evaluate the evacuation zone due to a nuclear meltdown at the Nuclear Power Plant 4 (NPP4) in Taiwan, with the same emission level as that occurred at Fukushima nuclear meltdown (FNM) in 2011. Our study demonstrates that a FNM emission level would pollute 9% of the island's land area with annual effective dose ≥50 mSv using the meteorological data on 11 March 2011 in Taiwan. This high dose area is also called permanent evacuation zone (denoted as PEZ). The PEZ as well as the emergency-planning zone (EPZ) are found to be sensitive to meteorological conditions on the event. In a sunny day under the dominated NE wind conditions, the EPZ can be as far as 100 km with the first 7-day dose ≥20 mSv. Three hundred sixty-five daily events using the meteorological data from 11 March 2011 to 9 March 2012 are evaluated. It is found that the mean land area of Taiwan in becoming the PEZ is 11%. Especially, the probabilities of the northern counties/cities (Keelung, New Taipei, Taipei, Taoyuan, Hsinchu City, Hsinchu County and Ilan County) to be PEZs are high, ranging from 15% in Ilan County to 51% in Keelung City. Note that the total population of the above cities/counties is as high as 10 million people. Moreover, the western valleys of the Central Mountain Range are also found to be probable being PEZs, where all of the reservoirs in western Taiwan are located. For example, the probability can be as high as 3% in the far southern-most tip of Taiwan Island in Pingtung County. This shows that the entire populations in western Taiwan can be at risk due to the shortage of clean water sources under an event at FNM emission level, especially during the NE monsoon period. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  6. Transverse isospin response function of asymmetric nuclear matter from a local isospin density functional

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipparini, Enrico; Pederiva, Francesco

    2016-08-01

    The time dependent local isospin density approximation (TDLIDA) has been extended to the study of the transverse isospin response function in nuclear matter with an arbitrary neutron-proton asymmetry parameter ξ . The energy density functional has been chosen in order to fit existing accurate quantum Monte Carlo calculations with a density dependent potential. The evolution of the response with ξ in the Δ Tz=±1 channels is quite different. While the strength of the Δ Tz=+1 channel disappears rather quickly by increasing the asymmetry, the Δ Tz=-1 channel develops a stronger and stronger collective mode that in the regime typical of neutron star matter at β equilibrium almost completely exhausts the excitation spectrum of the system. The neutrino mean free paths obtained from the TDLIDA responses are strongly dependent on ξ and on the presence of collective modes, leading to a sizable difference with respect to the prediction of the Fermi gas model.

  7. Mammographic density and serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Vitamin D, which influences cellular proliferation and breast tissue characteristics, has been inversely correlated with breast cancer risk. Dietary vitamin D intake has been associated with lower mammographic density (MD), a strong intermediate marker of breast cancer risk. Findings We examined the relationship between MD and serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D], an integrated measure of vitamin D status from dietary sources and sunlight exposure, in a multi-ethnic cohort of women undergoing screening mammography. We recruited women age 40–60 years without a history of breast cancer at the time of their routine screening mammogram, and conducted in-person interviews and collected blood specimens. We enrolled 195 women from 2007–2008, 120 gave blood, and 114 were evaluable, including 25% white, 41% African American, 18% African Caribbean, and 16% Hispanic. We digitized mammograms and calculated percent density, dense area, and non-dense area on cranial-caudal images. We measured serum 25(OH)D in batched, archived specimens. Median serum 25(OH)D was 22 ng/ml (range, 8–66 ng/ml). In univariable analysis, higher serum 25(OH)D was associated with white race, higher educational level, ever breast feeding, and blood draw during the summer. After adjusting for body mass index and other confounders, we found no association between serum 25(OH)D and different measures of MD. However, when stratified by season, 25(OH)D was inversely associated with dense area during July-December (p = 0.034). Conclusions Overall, our findings suggest that circulating vitamin D, a potentially modifiable breast cancer risk factor, is not associated with MD; the seasonal effects we observed need to be replicated in larger cohorts. PMID:24742098

  8. Technical basis for staffing levels at nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Shurberg, D.A.; Haber, S.B.; Morisseau, D.

    1995-04-01

    The objective of this project is to provide a technical basis for the establishment of criteria for minimum staffing levels of licensed and non-licensed NPP shift personnel. Minimum staffing levels for the purpose of this study, are defined as those necessary for successful accomplishment of all safety and additional functions that must be performed in order for the licensee to meet applicable regulatory requirements. This project involves a multi-faceted approach to the investigation of the issue. Relevant NRC documentation was identified and reviewed. Using the information obtained from this documentation review, a test plan was developed to aid in the collection of further information regarding the adequacy of current shift staffing levels. The test plan addresses three different activities to be conducted to provide information to the NRC for use in the assessment of current minimum staffing levels. The first activity is collection of data related to industry shift staffing practices through site visits to seven nuclear power plants. The second activity is a simulator study, which will use licensed operator crews responding to a simulated event, under two different staffing levels. Finally, workload models will be constructed for both licensed and non-licensed personnel, using a priori knowledge of the simulator scenarios with data resulting from one of the staffing levels studied in the simulator, and the data collected from the site visits. The model will then be validated against the data obtained from the second staffing level studied in the simulator. The validated model can then be used to study the impact of changing staffing-related variables on the plant shift crew`s ability to effectively mitigate an event.

  9. Complex-energy approach to sum rules within nuclear density functional theory

    DOE PAGES

    Hinohara, Nobuo; Kortelainen, Markus; Nazarewicz, Witold; ...

    2015-04-27

    The linear response of the nucleus to an external field contains unique information about the effective interaction, correlations governing the behavior of the many-body system, and properties of its excited states. To characterize the response, it is useful to use its energy-weighted moments, or sum rules. By comparing computed sum rules with experimental values, the information content of the response can be utilized in the optimization process of the nuclear Hamiltonian or nuclear energy density functional (EDF). But the additional information comes at a price: compared to the ground state, computation of excited states is more demanding. To establish anmore » efficient framework to compute energy-weighted sum rules of the response that is adaptable to the optimization of the nuclear EDF and large-scale surveys of collective strength, we have developed a new technique within the complex-energy finite-amplitude method (FAM) based on the quasiparticle random- phase approximation. The proposed sum-rule technique based on the complex-energy FAM is a tool of choice when optimizing effective interactions or energy functionals. The method is very efficient and well-adaptable to parallel computing. As a result, the FAM formulation is especially useful when standard theorems based on commutation relations involving the nuclear Hamiltonian and external field cannot be used.« less

  10. Complex-energy approach to sum rules within nuclear density functional theory

    SciTech Connect

    Hinohara, Nobuo; Kortelainen, Markus; Nazarewicz, Witold; Olsen, Erik

    2015-04-27

    The linear response of the nucleus to an external field contains unique information about the effective interaction, correlations governing the behavior of the many-body system, and properties of its excited states. To characterize the response, it is useful to use its energy-weighted moments, or sum rules. By comparing computed sum rules with experimental values, the information content of the response can be utilized in the optimization process of the nuclear Hamiltonian or nuclear energy density functional (EDF). But the additional information comes at a price: compared to the ground state, computation of excited states is more demanding. To establish an efficient framework to compute energy-weighted sum rules of the response that is adaptable to the optimization of the nuclear EDF and large-scale surveys of collective strength, we have developed a new technique within the complex-energy finite-amplitude method (FAM) based on the quasiparticle random- phase approximation. The proposed sum-rule technique based on the complex-energy FAM is a tool of choice when optimizing effective interactions or energy functionals. The method is very efficient and well-adaptable to parallel computing. As a result, the FAM formulation is especially useful when standard theorems based on commutation relations involving the nuclear Hamiltonian and external field cannot be used.

  11. Modeling Nuclear Fusion in High Energy Density Plasmas Using a Strongly Magnetized Non-neutral Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubin, D. H. E.

    2005-10-01

    In the hot dense interiors of stars and giant planets, nuclear reactions are predicted to occur at rates that are greatly enhanced compared to those at low densities. The enhancement is caused by plasma screening of the reacting pairs, increasing the probability of close collisions. However, strongly enhanced nuclear reaction rates have never been observed in the laboratory. This poster discusses a method for observing the enhancement using an analogy between nuclear energy and cyclotron energy in a non-neutral plasma in a strong magnetic field. In such a plasma, cyclotron energy is an adiabatic invariant, and is released only through close collisions that break this invariant. It is shown that the rate of release of cyclotron energy is enhanced by precisely the same factor as that for the release of nuclear energy, because both processes rely on close collisions that are enhanced by plasma screening.ootnotetextD. Dubin, Phys. Rev. Lett. 94, 025002 (2005). Simulations measuring the screening enhancement will be presented, and the possibility of exciting and studying burn fronts will be discussed.ootnotetextSee also adjacent poster by J. Bollinger.

  12. Cell density-dependent nuclear/cytoplasmic localization of NORPEG (RAI14) protein

    SciTech Connect

    Kutty, R. Krishnan . E-mail: kuttyk@nei.nih.gov; Chen, Shanyi; Samuel, William; Vijayasarathy, Camasamudram; Duncan, Todd; Tsai, Jen-Yue; Fariss, Robert N.; Carper, Deborah; Jaworski, Cynthia; Wiggert, Barbara

    2006-07-14

    NORPEG (RAI14), a developmentally regulated gene induced by retinoic acid, encodes a 980 amino acid (aa) residue protein containing six ankyrin repeats and a long coiled-coil domain [Kutty et al., J. Biol. Chem. 276 (2001), pp. 2831-2840]. We have expressed aa residues 1-287 of NORPEG and used the recombinant protein to produce an anti-NORPEG polyclonal antibody. Confocal immunofluorescence analysis showed that the subcellular localization of NORPEG in retinal pigment epithelial (ARPE-19) cells varies with cell density, with predominantly nuclear localization in nonconfluent cells, but a cytoplasmic localization, reminiscent of cytoskeleton, in confluent cultures. Interestingly, an evolutionarily conserved putative monopartite nuclear localization signal (P{sup 27}KKRKAP{sup 276}) was identified by analyzing the sequences of NORPEG and its orthologs. GFP-NORPEG (2-287 aa), a fusion protein containing this signal, was indeed localized to nuclei when expressed in ARPE-19 or COS-7 cells. Deletion and mutation analysis indicated that the identified nuclear localization sequence is indispensable for nuclear targeting.

  13. Level Densities and Radiative Strength Functions in 56FE and 57FE

    SciTech Connect

    Tavukcu, Emel

    2002-12-10

    Understanding nuclear level densities and radiative strength functions is important for pure and applied nuclear physics. Recently, the Oslo Cyclotron Group has developed an experimental method to extract level densities and radiative strength functions simultaneously from the primary γ rays after a light-ion reaction. A primary γ-ray spectrum represents the γ-decay probability distribution. The Oslo method is based on the Axel-Brink hypothesis, according to which the primary γ-ray spectrum is proportional to the product of the level density at the final energy and the radiative strength function. The level density and the radiative strength function are fit to the experimental primary γ-ray spectra, and then normalized to known data. The method works well for heavy nuclei. The present measurements extend the Oslo method to the lighter mass nuclei 56Fe and 57Fe. The experimental level densities in 56Fe and 57Fe reveal step structure. This step structure is a signature for nucleon pair breaking. The predicted pairing gap parameter is in good agreement with the step corresponding to the first pair breaking. Thermodynamic quantities for 56Fe and 57Fe are derived within the microcanonical and canonical ensembles using the experimental level densities. Energy-temperature relations are considered using caloric curves and probability density functions. The differences between the thermodynamics of small and large systems are emphasized. The experimental heat capacities are compared with the recent theoretical calculations obtained in the Shell Model Monte Carlo method. Radiative strength functions in 56Fe and 57Fe have surprisingly high values at low γ-ray energies. This behavior has not been observed for heavy nuclei, but has been observed in other light- and medium-mass nuclei. The origin of this low γ-ray energy effect remains unknown.

  14. Influence of Density-Dependent Coupling Constants on Equation of State of Infinite Symmetric Nuclear Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hua-Ju; Ye, Xian-Mei; Chen, Wei

    2016-11-01

    In the mean field approximation of nonlinear relativistic σ—ω—ρ model, we have studied the influence of density-dependent coupling constants between nucleons and mesons on the equation of state (EOS) of infinite symmetric nuclear matter in different conditions. We find that the EOS of nuclear matter will become stiffer as c, d in the self-interaction of σ meson increase when the coefficients except aω in Γω, in which the opposite occurs, are fixed. On the other hand, greater values of aσ, bσ, cσ, aω, dω and smaller values of dσ, bω, cω will lead to stiffer EOS if c and d are fixed. Besides, greater values of Γσ,ω lead to stiffer EOS in high density region for the EOS with same incompressibility coefficient at saturation density. Supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant No. 11275073

  15. Nuclear science research with dynamic high energy density plasmas at NIF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaughnessy, D. A.; Gharibyan, N.; Moody, K. J.; Despotopulos, J. D.; Grant, P. M.; Yeamans, C. B.; Berzak Hopkins, L.; Cerjan, C. J.; Schneider, D. H. G.; Faye, S.

    2016-05-01

    Nuclear reaction measurements are performed at the National Ignition Facility in a high energy density plasma environment by adding target materials to the outside of the hohlraum thermo-mechanical package on an indirect-drive exploding pusher shot. Materials are activated with 14.1-MeV neutrons and the post-shot debris is collected via the Solid Radiochemistry diagnostic, which consists of metal discs fielded 50 cm from target chamber center. The discs are removed post-shot and analyzed via radiation counting and mass spectrometry. Results from a shot using Nd and Tm foils as targets are presented, which indicate enhanced collection of the debris in the line of sight of a given collector. The capsule performance was not diminished due to the extra material. This provides a platform for future measurements of nuclear reaction data through the use of experimental packages mounted external to the hohlraum.

  16. Evidence for in-medium modification of the phi meson at normal nuclear density.

    PubMed

    Muto, R; Chiba, J; En'yo, H; Fukao, Y; Funahashi, H; Hamagaki, H; Ieiri, M; Ishino, M; Kanda, H; Kitaguchi, M; Mihara, S; Miwa, K; Miyashita, T; Murakami, T; Nakura, T; Naruki, M; Ozawa, K; Sakuma, F; Sasaki, O; Sekimoto, M; Tabaru, T; Tanaka, K H; Togawa, M; Yamada, S; Yokkaichi, S; Yoshimura, Y

    2007-01-26

    Invariant mass spectra of e(+) e(-) pairs have been measured in 12 GeV p + A reactions to detect possible in-medium modification of vector mesons. Copper and carbon targets are used to study the nuclear-size dependence of e(+) e(-) invariant mass distributions. A significant excess on the low-mass side of the phi meson peak is observed in the low betagamma(= beta/square root(1-beta(2))) region of phi mesons (betagamma < 1.25) with copper targets. However, in the high betagamma region (betagamma > 1.25), spectral shapes of phi mesons are well described by the Breit-Wigner shape when experimental effects are considered. Thus, in addition to our earlier publications on rho/omega modification, this study has experimentally verified vector meson mass modification at normal nuclear density.

  17. Towards the improvement of spin-isospin properties in nuclear energy density functionals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roca-Maza, X.; Colò, G.; Liang, H. Z.; Meng, J.; Ring, P.; Sagawa, H.; Zhao, P. W.

    2016-06-01

    We address the problem of improving existing nuclear Energy Density Functionals (EDFs) in the spin-isospin channel. For that, we propose two different ways. The first one is to carefully take into account in the fitting protocol some of the key ground state properties for an accurate description of the most studied spin-isospin resonances: the Gamow-Teller Resonance (GTR) [1]. The second consists in providing a strategy to build local covariant EDF keeping the main features from their non-local counterparts [2]. The RHF model based on a Lagrangian where heavy mesons carry the nuclear effective interaction have been shown to be successful in the description of spin-isospin resonances [3].

  18. Measurement of hydrogen and lithium ion energy densities on PBFA II using direct nuclear activation diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz, C. L.; Cooper, G. W.; Chambers, G.; Schmidlapp, F. A.

    1997-01-01

    In the light-ion-beam fusion program at Sandia National Laboratories an intense lithium beam is being developed to drive inertial confinement fusion targets. An important issue is the purity of the beam. To assess this concern, direct nuclear activation diagnostics based on the reactions 7Li(p,n)7Be, 10B(p,α)7Be, and 19F(7Li,d)24Na were fielded to measure the energy densities of hydrogen and lithium in the beam. The hydrogen beam energy density was measured to be less than 2% of the lithium beam energy density on a majority (10) of the 19 LiF anode shots taken and was always less than 10%. The total hydrogen energy in the beam ranged from only 0.5-10 kJ. Over this shot series increasing efforts were made to clean the anode prior to each shot. In general, there was a modest reduction in the hydrogen energy fraction with improved cleaning, but no corresponding increase in the lithium energy density was seen. The lithium energy density as a function of location was also measured and found to typically vary by factors of 1.5-4 over the diode.

  19. Corrosion issues in high-level nuclear waste containers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asl, Samin Sharifi

    In this dissertation different aspects of corrosion and electrochemistry of copper, candidate canister material in Scandinavian high-level nuclear waste disposal program, including the thermodynamics and kinetics of the reactions that are predicted to occur in the practical system have been studied. A comprehensive thermodynamic study of copper in contact with granitic groundwater of the type and composition that is expected in the Forsmark repository in Sweden has been performed. Our primary objective was to ascertain whether copper would exist in the thermodynamically immune state in the repository, in which case corrosion could not occur and the issue of corrosion in the assessment of the storage technology would be moot. In spite of the fact that metallic copper has been found to exist for geological times in granitic geological formations, copper is well-known to be activated from the immune state to corrode by specific species that may exist in the environment. The principal activator of copper is known to be sulfur in its various forms, including sulfide (H2S, HS-, S2-), polysulfide (H2Sx, HSx -, Sx 2-), poly sulfur thiosulfate ( SxO3 2-), and polythionates (SxO6 2-). A comprehensive study of this aspect of copper chemistry has never been reported, and yet an understanding of this issue is vital for assessing whether copper is a suitable material for fabricating canisters for the disposal of HLNW. Our study identifies and explores those species that activate copper; these species include sulfur-containing entities as well as other, non-sulfur species that may be present in the repository. The effects of temperature, solution pH, and hydrogen pressure on the kinetics of the hydrogen electrode reaction (HER) on copper in borate buffer solution have been studied by means of steady-state polarization measurements, including electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). In order to obtain electrokinetic parameters, such as the exchange current density and the

  20. Estimations of electron densities and temperatures in He-3 dominated plasmas. [in nuclear pumped lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Depaola, B. D.; Marcum, S. D.; Wrench, H. K.; Whitten, B. L.; Wells, W. E.

    1979-01-01

    It is very useful to have a method of estimation for electron temperature and electron densities in nuclear pumped plasmas because measurements of such quantities are very difficult. This paper describes a method, based on rate equation analysis of the ionized species in the plasma and the electron energy balance. In addition to the ionized species, certain neutral species must also be calculated. Examples are given for pure helium and a mixture of helium and argon. In the HeAr case, He(+), He2(+), He/2 3S/, Ar(+), Ar2(+), and excited Ar are evaluated.

  1. Combining Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy and Density Functional Theory Calculations to Characterize Carvedilol Polymorphs.

    PubMed

    Rezende, Carlos A; San Gil, Rosane A S; Borré, Leandro B; Pires, José Ricardo; Vaiss, Viviane S; Resende, Jackson A L C; Leitão, Alexandre A; De Alencastro, Ricardo B; Leal, Katia Z

    2016-09-01

    The experiments of carvedilol form II, form III, and hydrate by (13)C and (15)N cross-polarization magic-angle spinning (CP MAS) are reported. The GIPAW (gauge-including projector-augmented wave) method from DFT (density functional theory) calculations was used to simulate (13)C and (15)N chemical shifts. A very good agreement was found for the comparison between the global results of experimental and calculated nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) chemical shifts for carvedilol polymorphs. This work aims a comprehensive understanding of carvedilol crystalline forms employing solution and solid-state NMR as well as DFT calculations. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  2. Level density and level-spacing distributions of random, self-adjoint, non-Hermitian matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joglekar, Yogesh N.; Karr, William A.

    2011-03-01

    We investigate the level density σ(x) and the level-spacing distribution p(s) of random matrices M=AF≠M†, where F is a (diagonal) inner product and A is a random, real, symmetric or complex, Hermitian matrix with independent entries drawn from a probability distribution q(x) with zero mean and finite higher moments. Although not Hermitian, the matrix M is self-adjoint with respect to F and thus has purely real eigenvalues. We find that the level density σF(x) is independent of the underlying distribution q(x) and solely characterized by F, and therefore generalizes the Wigner semicircle distribution σW(x). We find that the level-spacing distributions p(s) are independent of q(x), and are dependent upon both the inner product F and whether A is real or complex, and therefore generalize the Wigner surmise for level spacing. Our results suggest F-dependent generalizations of the well-known Gaussian Orthogonal Ensemble and Gaussian Unitary Ensemble classes.

  3. Competition between fermions and bosons in nuclear matter at low densities and finite temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mabiala, J.; Zheng, H.; Bonasera, A.; Kohley, Z.; Yennello, S. J.

    2016-12-01

    We derive the free energy for fermions and bosons from fragmentation data. Inspired by the symmetry and pairing energy of the Weizsäcker mass formula, we obtain the free energy of fermions (nucleons) and bosons (alphas and deuterons) using Landau's free-energy approach. We confirm previously obtained results for fermions and show that the free energy for α particles is negative and close to the free energy for ideal Bose gases and in perfect agreement with the free energy of an interacting Bose gas under the repulsive Coulomb force. Deuterons behave more similarly to fermions (positive free energy) rather than bosons, which is probably due to their low binding energy. We show that the α -particle fraction is dominant at all temperatures and densities explored in this work. This is consistent with their negative free energy, which favors clusterization of nuclear matter into α particles at subsaturation densities and finite temperatures.

  4. Level density and mechanism of deuteron-induced reactions on 54,58,56Fe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramirez, A. P. D.; Voinov, A. V.; Grimes, S. M.; Byun, Y.; Brune, C. R.; Massey, T. N.; Akhtar, S.; Dhakal, S.; Parker, C. E.

    2015-07-01

    Deuteron elastic cross sections, as well as neutron, proton, and α -particle emission spectra, from d + 54,58,56Fe reactions have been measured with deuteron beam energies of 5, 7, and 9 MeV. Optical model parameters have been tested against our experimental data. The fraction of total reaction cross section responsible for the formation of compound nuclei has been deduced from the angular distributions. The degree of discrepancy between calculated and experimental compound cross sections was found to increase with increasing neutron number. The nuclear level densities of the residual nuclei 57Co, 55Co, 57Fe, 55Fe, 52Mn, 54Mn have been deduced from the compound double differential cross sections. The Gilbert-Cameron model with Iljinov parameter systematics [A. S. Iljinov and M. V. Mebel, Nucl. Phys. A 543, 517 (1992)], 10.1016/0375-9474(92)90278-R was found to have a good agreement with our results.

  5. Level density and mechanism of deuteron-induced reactions on Fe54,56,58

    DOE PAGES

    Ramirez, A. P. D.; Voinov, A. V.; Grimes, S. M.; ...

    2015-07-06

    Here, deuteron elastic cross sections, as well as neutron, proton, and α-particle emission spectra, from d+54,56,58Fe reactions have been measured with deuteron beam energies of 5, 7, and 9 MeV. Optical model parameters have been tested against our experimental data. The fraction of total reaction cross section responsible for the formation of compound nuclei has been deduced from the angular distributions. The degree of discrepancy between calculated and experimental compound cross sections was found to increase with increasing neutron number. The nuclear level densities of the residual nuclei 55Co, 57Co, 55Fe, 57Fe, 52Mn, and 54Mn have been deduced from themore » compound double differential cross sections. The Gilbert-Cameron model with Iljinov parameter systematics [A. S. Iljinov and M. V. Mebel, Nucl. Phys. A 543, 517 (1992)] was found to have a good agreement with our results.« less

  6. Structural Determination of Biomolecular Interfaces by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance of Proteins with Reduced Proton Density

    PubMed Central

    Ferrage, Fabien; Dutta, Kaushik; Shekhtman, Alexander; Cowburn, David

    2013-01-01

    Protein interactions are important for understanding many molecular mechanisms underlying cellular processes. So far, interfaces between interacting proteins have been characterized by NMR spectroscopy mostly by using chemical shift perturbations and cross-saturation via intermolecular cross-relaxation. Although powerful, these techniques cannot provide unambiguous estimates of intermolecular distances between interacting proteins. Here, we present an alternative approach, called REDSPRINT (REDduced/Standard PRoton density INTerface identification), to map protein interfaces with greater accuracy by using multiple NMR probes. Our approach is based on monitoring the cross-relaxation from a source protein (or from an arbitrary ligand that need not be a protein) with high proton density to a target protein (or other biomolecule) with low proton density using isotope-filtered nuclear Overhauser spectroscopy (NOESY). This methodology uses different isotropic labeling for the source and target proteins to identify the source-target interface and also determine the proton density of the source protein at the interface for protein-protein or protein-ligand docking. The utility of this technique, including a method for direct determination of the protein surface, is demonstrated for two different protein-protein complexes. PMID:20372977

  7. Nuclear motion effects on the density matrix of crystals: An ab initio Monte Carlo harmonic approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pisani, Cesare; Erba, Alessandro; Ferrabone, Matteo; Dovesi, Roberto

    2012-07-01

    In the frame of the Born-Oppenheimer approximation, nuclear motions in crystals can be simulated rather accurately using a harmonic model. In turn, the electronic first-order density matrix (DM) can be expressed as the statistically weighted average over all its determinations each resulting from an instantaneous nuclear configuration. This model has been implemented in a computational scheme which adopts an ab initio one-electron (Hartree-Fock or Kohn-Sham) Hamiltonian in the CRYSTAL program. After selecting a supercell of reasonable size and solving the corresponding vibrational problem in the harmonic approximation, a Metropolis algorithm is adopted for generating a sample of nuclear configurations which reflects their probability distribution at a given temperature. For each configuration in the sample the "instantaneous" DM is calculated, and its contribution to the observables of interest is extracted. Translational and point symmetry of the crystal as reflected in its average DM are fully exploited. The influence of zero-point and thermal motion of nuclei on such important first-order observables as x-ray structure factors and Compton profiles can thus be estimated.

  8. Nuclear motion effects on the density matrix of crystals: an ab initio Monte Carlo harmonic approach.

    PubMed

    Pisani, Cesare; Erba, Alessandro; Ferrabone, Matteo; Dovesi, Roberto

    2012-07-28

    In the frame of the Born-Oppenheimer approximation, nuclear motions in crystals can be simulated rather accurately using a harmonic model. In turn, the electronic first-order density matrix (DM) can be expressed as the statistically weighted average over all its determinations each resulting from an instantaneous nuclear configuration. This model has been implemented in a computational scheme which adopts an ab initio one-electron (Hartree-Fock or Kohn-Sham) Hamiltonian in the CRYSTAL program. After selecting a supercell of reasonable size and solving the corresponding vibrational problem in the harmonic approximation, a Metropolis algorithm is adopted for generating a sample of nuclear configurations which reflects their probability distribution at a given temperature. For each configuration in the sample the "instantaneous" DM is calculated, and its contribution to the observables of interest is extracted. Translational and point symmetry of the crystal as reflected in its average DM are fully exploited. The influence of zero-point and thermal motion of nuclei on such important first-order observables as x-ray structure factors and Compton profiles can thus be estimated.

  9. Generalized nuclear Fukui functions in the framework of spin-polarized density-functional theory

    SciTech Connect

    Chamorro, E.; Proft, F. de; Geerlings, P.

    2005-08-22

    An extension of Cohen's nuclear Fukui function is presented in the spin-polarized framework of density-functional theory (SP-DFT). The resulting new nuclear Fukui function indices {phi}{sub N{alpha}} and {phi}{sub S{alpha}} are intended to be the natural descriptors for the responses of the nuclei to changes involving charge transfer at constant multiplicity and also the spin polarization at constant number of electrons. These generalized quantities allow us to gain new insights within a perturbative scheme based on DFT. Calculations of the electronic and nuclear SP-DFT quantities are presented within a Kohn-Sham framework of chemical reactivity for a sample of molecules, including H{sub 2}O, H{sub 2}CO, and some simple nitrenes (NX) and phosphinidenes (PX), with X=H, Li, F, Cl, OH, SH, NH{sub 2}, and PH{sub 2}. Results have been interpreted in terms of chemical bonding in the context of Berlin's theorem, which provides a separation of the molecular space into binding and antibinding regions.

  10. Intracellular calcium levels can regulate Importin-dependent nuclear import

    SciTech Connect

    Kaur, Gurpreet; Ly-Huynh, Jennifer D.; Jans, David A.

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • High intracellular calcium inhibits Impα/β1- or Impβ1-dependent nuclear protein import. • The effect of Ca{sup 2+} on nuclear import does not relate to changes in the nuclear pore. • High intracellular calcium can result in mislocalisation of Impβ1, Ran and RCC1. - Abstract: We previously showed that increased intracellular calcium can modulate Importin (Imp)β1-dependent nuclear import of SRY-related chromatin remodeling proteins. Here we extend this work to show for the first time that high intracellular calcium inhibits Impα/β1- or Impβ1-dependent nuclear protein import generally. The basis of this relates to the mislocalisation of the transport factors Impβ1 and Ran, which show significantly higher nuclear localization in contrast to various other factors, and RCC1, which shows altered subnuclear localisation. The results here establish for the first time that intracellular calcium modulates conventional nuclear import through direct effects on the nuclear transport machinery.

  11. Uncertainty quantification for nuclear density functional theory and information content of new measurements

    DOE PAGES

    McDonnell, J. D.; Schunck, N.; Higdon, D.; ...

    2015-03-24

    Statistical tools of uncertainty quantification can be used to assess the information content of measured observables with respect to present-day theoretical models, to estimate model errors and thereby improve predictive capability, to extrapolate beyond the regions reached by experiment, and to provide meaningful input to applications and planned measurements. To showcase new opportunities offered by such tools, we make a rigorous analysis of theoretical statistical uncertainties in nuclear density functional theory using Bayesian inference methods. By considering the recent mass measurements from the Canadian Penning Trap at Argonne National Laboratory, we demonstrate how the Bayesian analysis and a direct least-squaresmore » optimization, combined with high-performance computing, can be used to assess the information content of the new data with respect to a model based on the Skyrme energy density functional approach. Employing the posterior probability distribution computed with a Gaussian process emulator, we apply the Bayesian framework to propagate theoretical statistical uncertainties in predictions of nuclear masses, two-neutron dripline, and fission barriers. Overall, we find that the new mass measurements do not impose a constraint that is strong enough to lead to significant changes in the model parameters. In addition, the example discussed in this study sets the stage for quantifying and maximizing the impact of new measurements with respect to current modeling and guiding future experimental efforts, thus enhancing the experiment-theory cycle in the scientific method.« less

  12. Uncertainty quantification for nuclear density functional theory and information content of new measurements

    SciTech Connect

    McDonnell, J. D.; Schunck, N.; Higdon, D.; Sarich, J.; Wild, S. M.; Nazarewicz, W.

    2015-03-24

    Statistical tools of uncertainty quantification can be used to assess the information content of measured observables with respect to present-day theoretical models, to estimate model errors and thereby improve predictive capability, to extrapolate beyond the regions reached by experiment, and to provide meaningful input to applications and planned measurements. To showcase new opportunities offered by such tools, we make a rigorous analysis of theoretical statistical uncertainties in nuclear density functional theory using Bayesian inference methods. By considering the recent mass measurements from the Canadian Penning Trap at Argonne National Laboratory, we demonstrate how the Bayesian analysis and a direct least-squares optimization, combined with high-performance computing, can be used to assess the information content of the new data with respect to a model based on the Skyrme energy density functional approach. Employing the posterior probability distribution computed with a Gaussian process emulator, we apply the Bayesian framework to propagate theoretical statistical uncertainties in predictions of nuclear masses, two-neutron dripline, and fission barriers. Overall, we find that the new mass measurements do not impose a constraint that is strong enough to lead to significant changes in the model parameters. As a result, the example discussed in this study sets the stage for quantifying and maximizing the impact of new measurements with respect to current modeling and guiding future experimental efforts, thus enhancing the experiment-theory cycle in the scientific method.

  13. Uncertainty quantification for nuclear density functional theory and information content of new measurements

    SciTech Connect

    McDonnell, J. D.; Schunck, N.; Higdon, D.; Sarich, J.; Wild, S. M.; Nazarewicz, W.

    2015-03-24

    Statistical tools of uncertainty quantification can be used to assess the information content of measured observables with respect to present-day theoretical models, to estimate model errors and thereby improve predictive capability, to extrapolate beyond the regions reached by experiment, and to provide meaningful input to applications and planned measurements. To showcase new opportunities offered by such tools, we make a rigorous analysis of theoretical statistical uncertainties in nuclear density functional theory using Bayesian inference methods. By considering the recent mass measurements from the Canadian Penning Trap at Argonne National Laboratory, we demonstrate how the Bayesian analysis and a direct least-squares optimization, combined with high-performance computing, can be used to assess the information content of the new data with respect to a model based on the Skyrme energy density functional approach. Employing the posterior probability distribution computed with a Gaussian process emulator, we apply the Bayesian framework to propagate theoretical statistical uncertainties in predictions of nuclear masses, two-neutron dripline, and fission barriers. Overall, we find that the new mass measurements do not impose a constraint that is strong enough to lead to significant changes in the model parameters. In addition, the example discussed in this study sets the stage for quantifying and maximizing the impact of new measurements with respect to current modeling and guiding future experimental efforts, thus enhancing the experiment-theory cycle in the scientific method.

  14. Uncertainty quantification for nuclear density functional theory and information content of new measurements.

    PubMed

    McDonnell, J D; Schunck, N; Higdon, D; Sarich, J; Wild, S M; Nazarewicz, W

    2015-03-27

    Statistical tools of uncertainty quantification can be used to assess the information content of measured observables with respect to present-day theoretical models, to estimate model errors and thereby improve predictive capability, to extrapolate beyond the regions reached by experiment, and to provide meaningful input to applications and planned measurements. To showcase new opportunities offered by such tools, we make a rigorous analysis of theoretical statistical uncertainties in nuclear density functional theory using Bayesian inference methods. By considering the recent mass measurements from the Canadian Penning Trap at Argonne National Laboratory, we demonstrate how the Bayesian analysis and a direct least-squares optimization, combined with high-performance computing, can be used to assess the information content of the new data with respect to a model based on the Skyrme energy density functional approach. Employing the posterior probability distribution computed with a Gaussian process emulator, we apply the Bayesian framework to propagate theoretical statistical uncertainties in predictions of nuclear masses, two-neutron dripline, and fission barriers. Overall, we find that the new mass measurements do not impose a constraint that is strong enough to lead to significant changes in the model parameters. The example discussed in this study sets the stage for quantifying and maximizing the impact of new measurements with respect to current modeling and guiding future experimental efforts, thus enhancing the experiment-theory cycle in the scientific method.

  15. Complex-energy approach to sum rules within nuclear density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinohara, Nobuo; Kortelainen, Markus; Nazarewicz, Witold; Olsen, Erik

    2015-04-01

    Background: The linear response of the nucleus to an external field contains unique information about the effective interaction, the correlations governing the behavior of the many-body system, and the properties of its excited states. To characterize the response, it is useful to use its energy-weighted moments, or sum rules. By comparing computed sum rules with experimental values, the information content of the response can be utilized in the optimization process of the nuclear Hamiltonian or the nuclear energy density functional (EDF). But the additional information comes at a price: compared to the ground state, computation of excited states is more demanding. Purpose: To establish an efficient framework to compute energy-weighted sum rules of the response that is adaptable to the optimization of the nuclear EDF and large-scale surveys of collective strength, we have developed a new technique within the complex-energy finite-amplitude method (FAM) based on the quasiparticle random-phase approximation (QRPA). Methods: To compute sum rules, we carry out contour integration of the response function in the complex-energy plane. We benchmark our results against the conventional matrix formulation of the QRPA theory, the Thouless theorem for the energy-weighted sum rule, and the dielectric theorem for the inverse-energy-weighted sum rule. Results: We derive the sum-rule expressions from the contour integration of the complex-energy FAM. We demonstrate that calculated sum-rule values agree with those obtained from the matrix formulation of the QRPA. We also discuss the applicability of both the Thouless theorem about the energy-weighted sum rule and the dielectric theorem for the inverse-energy-weighted sum rule to nuclear density functional theory in cases when the EDF is not based on a Hamiltonian. Conclusions: The proposed sum-rule technique based on the complex-energy FAM is a tool of choice when optimizing effective interactions or energy functionals. The method

  16. Increase of inherent protection level in spent nuclear fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Krasnobaev, A.; Kryuchkov, E.; Glebov, V.

    2006-07-01

    The paper is devoted to upgrading inherent proliferation protection of fissionable nuclear materials (FNM). Some possibilities were investigated to form high radiation barrier inside spent fuel assemblies (SFA) discharged from power reactors of VVER-1000 type and research reactors of IRT type. The radiation barrier is estimated in the terms of rate of equivalent dose (RED) at 30-cm distance from SFA. The values of RED were calculated with application of the computer code package SCALE 4.3. The paper considers the criteria adopted for estimation of FNM proliferation resistance. The paper presents numerical results on a component-wise analysis of the radiation barrier in SFA from reactors of VVER-1000 and IRT type and on capability of various radionuclides to prolong action of the radiation barrier. Isotopic admixtures were selected and amounts of these admixtures were evaluated for significant prolongation of the radiation barrier action at the levels of the radiation standards used for estimation of FNM proliferation resistance. The paper considers vulnerability of the radiation barriers in respect to thermal processing of spent fuel. (authors)

  17. [Reducing low density lipoprotein-cholesterol levels by apheresis].

    PubMed

    Reiber, I; Gógl, A

    1994-03-13

    The predominate number of homozygote familial hypercholesterolemic and approximately 20% of heterozygotes are resistant to low cholesterol diet and lipid lowering pharmacological treatment even in combination of 2 or more drugs. In such cases, the selective lipoprotein apheresis has become a promising alternative and indicated absolute (homozygotes) or relative (heterozygotes). The combination of low density lipoprotein apheresis, together with diet and drugs, should allow a maximal lowering of low density lipoprotein-cholesterol (-60-70%). Besides low density lipoprotein, various apheresis procedures may also eliminate other potentially atherogenic factors, such as lipoprotein(a) and fibrinogen and acutely improve the haemo-rheological status of the patient. The authors review several lipoprotein apheresis procedures with varying degrees of selectivity, those have and furthermore analysis the advantages and disadvantages and cost of each procedure.

  18. Analytic energy-level densities of separable harmonic oscillators including approximate hindered rotor corrections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Döntgen, M.

    2016-09-01

    Energy-level densities are key for obtaining various chemical properties. In chemical kinetics, energy-level densities are used to predict thermochemistry and microscopic reaction rates. Here, an analytic energy-level density formulation is derived using inverse Laplace transformation of harmonic oscillator partition functions. Anharmonic contributions to the energy-level density are considered approximately using a literature model for the transition from harmonic to free motions. The present analytic energy-level density formulation for rigid rotor-harmonic oscillator systems is validated against the well-studied CO+O˙ H system. The approximate hindered rotor energy-level density corrections are validated against the well-studied H2O2 system. The presented analytic energy-level density formulation gives a basis for developing novel numerical simulation schemes for chemical processes.

  19. Nuclear size is sensitive to NTF2 protein levels in a manner dependent on Ran binding

    PubMed Central

    Vuković, Lidija D.; Jevtić, Predrag; Zhang, Zhaojie; Stohr, Bradley A.; Levy, Daniel L.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Altered nuclear size is associated with many cancers, and determining whether cancer-associated changes in nuclear size contribute to carcinogenesis necessitates an understanding of mechanisms of nuclear size regulation. Although nuclear import rates generally positively correlate with nuclear size, NTF2 levels negatively affect nuclear size, despite the role of NTF2 (also known as NUTF2) in nuclear recycling of the import factor Ran. We show that binding of Ran to NTF2 is required for NTF2 to inhibit nuclear expansion and import of large cargo molecules in Xenopus laevis egg and embryo extracts, consistent with our observation that NTF2 reduces the diameter of the nuclear pore complex (NPC) in a Ran-binding-dependent manner. Furthermore, we demonstrate that ectopic NTF2 expression in Xenopus embryos and mammalian tissue culture cells alters nuclear size. Finally, we show that increases in nuclear size during melanoma progression correlate with reduced NTF2 expression, and increasing NTF2 levels in melanoma cells is sufficient to reduce nuclear size. These results show a conserved capacity for NTF2 to impact on nuclear size, and we propose that NTF2 might be a new cancer biomarker. PMID:26823604

  20. Nuclear size is sensitive to NTF2 protein levels in a manner dependent on Ran binding.

    PubMed

    Vuković, Lidija D; Jevtić, Predrag; Zhang, Zhaojie; Stohr, Bradley A; Levy, Daniel L

    2016-03-15

    Altered nuclear size is associated with many cancers, and determining whether cancer-associated changes in nuclear size contribute to carcinogenesis necessitates an understanding of mechanisms of nuclear size regulation. Although nuclear import rates generally positively correlate with nuclear size, NTF2 levels negatively affect nuclear size, despite the role of NTF2 (also known as NUTF2) in nuclear recycling of the import factor Ran. We show that binding of Ran to NTF2 is required for NTF2 to inhibit nuclear expansion and import of large cargo molecules in Xenopus laevis egg and embryo extracts, consistent with our observation that NTF2 reduces the diameter of the nuclear pore complex (NPC) in a Ran-binding-dependent manner. Furthermore, we demonstrate that ectopic NTF2 expression in Xenopus embryos and mammalian tissue culture cells alters nuclear size. Finally, we show that increases in nuclear size during melanoma progression correlate with reduced NTF2 expression, and increasing NTF2 levels in melanoma cells is sufficient to reduce nuclear size. These results show a conserved capacity for NTF2 to impact on nuclear size, and we propose that NTF2 might be a new cancer biomarker. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  1. Feasibility study on the development of a non-invasive liquid-level gauge for nuclear power reactors. [PWR

    SciTech Connect

    Baratta, A.J.; Jester, W.A.; Imel, G.R.; Okyere, E.W.; Foderaro, A.H.; Kenney, E.S.; McMaster, I.B.; Gundy, M.L.

    1983-05-01

    During the TMI-2 accident the source range detector exhibited anomalous behavior. Analysis of the detector output by the authors and others attributed this behavior to the density and level changes that occurred in the reactor pressure vessel during the TMI-2 accident. As a result of this analysis, a pressure vessel level and density gauge was proposed which uses a string of neutron detectors external to the vessel. This project investigates the feasibility of such a system. Experiments were conducted using an experimental apparatus and The Pennsylvania State University's Breazeale Nuclear Reactor to simulate a reactor during a LOCA. In addition, analytical studies were performed to explain these experiments and aid in further understanding the TMI-2 detector reading. An analysis of recent LOFT data was also conducted. Each of these confirms the ability of an external string of neutron detectors to sense and unambiguously measure water level and density variations in a reactor pressure vessel.

  2. Spent nuclear fuel project high-level information management plan

    SciTech Connect

    Main, G.C.

    1996-09-13

    This document presents the results of the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project (SNFP) Information Management Planning Project (IMPP), a short-term project that identified information management (IM) issues and opportunities within the SNFP and outlined a high-level plan to address them. This high-level plan for the SNMFP IM focuses on specific examples from within the SNFP. The plan`s recommendations can be characterized in several ways. Some recommendations address specific challenges that the SNFP faces. Others form the basis for making smooth transitions in several important IM areas. Still others identify areas where further study and planning are indicated. The team`s knowledge of developments in the IM industry and at the Hanford Site were crucial in deciding where to recommend that the SNFP act and where they should wait for Site plans to be made. Because of the fast pace of the SNFP and demands on SNFP staff, input and interaction were primarily between the IMPP team and members of the SNFP Information Management Steering Committee (IMSC). Key input to the IMPP came from a workshop where IMSC members and their delegates developed a set of draft IM principles. These principles, described in Section 2, became the foundation for the recommendations found in the transition plan outlined in Section 5. Availability of SNFP staff was limited, so project documents were used as a basis for much of the work. The team, realizing that the status of the project and the environment are continually changing, tried to keep abreast of major developments since those documents were generated. To the extent possible, the information contained in this document is current as of the end of fiscal year (FY) 1995. Programs and organizations on the Hanford Site as a whole are trying to maximize their return on IM investments. They are coordinating IM activities and trying to leverage existing capabilities. However, the SNFP cannot just rely on Sitewide activities to meet its IM requirements

  3. Isospin effects and the density dependence of the nuclear symmetry energy

    SciTech Connect

    Souza, S. R.; Tsang, M. B.; Lynch, W. G.; Steiner, A. W.; Carlson, B. V.; Donangelo, R.

    2009-10-15

    The density dependence of the nuclear symmetry energy is inspected using the statistical multifragmentation model with Skyrme effective interactions. The model consistently considers the expansion of the fragments' volumes at finite temperature at the freeze-out stage. By selecting parametrizations of the Skyrme force that lead to very different equations of state for the symmetry energy, we investigate the sensitivity of the isoscaling parameter and the isotopic distributions to differences in the symmetry energy. Our results suggest that, in spite of being sensitive to the thermal dilation of the fragments' volumes, it is difficult to distinguish among the Skyrme forces from the isoscaling analysis. On the other hand, the isotopic distribution of the emitted fragments turns out to be very sensitive to the force employed in the calculation.

  4. Energy density functional study of nuclear matrix elements for neutrinoless ββ decay.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Tomás R; Martínez-Pinedo, Gabriel

    2010-12-17

    We present an extensive study of nuclear matrix elements (NME) for the neutrinoless double-beta decay of the nuclei 48Ca, 76Ge, 82Se, 96Zr, 100Mo, 116Cd, 124Sn, 128Te, 130Te, 136Xe, and 150Nd based on state-of-the-art energy density functional methods using the Gogny D1S functional. Beyond-mean-field effects are included within the generating coordinate method with particle number and angular momentum projection for both initial and final ground states. We obtain a rather constant value for the NMEs around 4.7 with the exception of 48Ca and 150Nd, where smaller values are found. We analyze the role of deformation and pairing in the evaluation of the NME and present detailed results for the decay of 150Nd.

  5. Density dependence of the nuclear symmetry energy from measurements of neutron radii in nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Viñas, X.; Centelles, M.; Roca-Maza, X.; Warda, M.

    2014-07-23

    We study the density dependence of the nuclear symmetry energy, characterized by its slope parameter L, by means of the information provided by the neutron radius and the neutron skin thickness in finite nuclei. These quantities are extracted from the analysis of data obtained in antiprotonic atoms, from the parity-violating asymmetry at low-momentum transfer in polarized electron scattering in {sup 208}Pb, and from the electric dipole polarizability obtained via polarized proton inelastic scattering at forward angles in {sup 208}Pb. All these experiments provide different constraints on the slope L of the symmetry energy but the corresponding values have a considerable overlap in a range around 50 MeV ≤ L ≤ 70 MeV, in a reasonable agreement with other estimates that use different observables and methods to extract L.

  6. A journey from nuclear criticality methods to high energy density radflow experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Urbatsch, Todd James

    2016-11-08

    Los Alamos National Laboratory is a nuclear weapons laboratory supporting our nation's defense. In support of this mission is a high energy-density physics program in which we design and execute experiments to study radiationhydrodynamics phenomena and improve the predictive capability of our largescale multi-physics software codes on our big-iron computers. The Radflow project’s main experimental effort now is to understand why we haven't been able to predict opacities on Sandia National Laboratory's Z-machine. We are modeling an increasing fraction of the Z-machine's dynamic hohlraum to find multi-physics explanations for the experimental results. Further, we are building an entirely different opacity platform on Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's National Ignition Facility (NIF), which is set to get results early 2017. Will the results match our predictions, match the Z-machine, or give us something entirely different? The new platform brings new challenges such as designing hohlraums and spectrometers. The speaker will recount his history, starting with one-dimensional Monte Carlo nuclear criticality methods in graduate school, radiative transfer methods research and software development for his first 16 years at LANL, and, now, radflow technology and experiments. Who knew that the real world was more than just radiation transport? Experiments aren't easy and they are as saturated with politics as a presidential election, but they sure are fun.

  7. Analytical nuclear derivatives for the parametric two-electron reduced density matrix method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valentine, Andrew J. S.; Mazziotti, David A.

    2017-10-01

    Efficient and accurate nuclear gradients are essential to performing molecular optimizations. Here for the first time we present analytical nuclear gradients for the parametric two-electron reduced-density-matrix method (p2-RDM), which uses the 2-RDM as the primary variable in calculations in lieu of the many-electron wavefunction. While numerical gradients require six energy evaluations for each atom, analytical gradients require only a single calculation for each geometry sampled. We present benchmark p2-RDM geometry optimizations that show analytical gradients reduce CPU times by as much as 80%, even for small molecules. We also use p2-RDM to evaluate the bond length alternation (BLA), or the difference in length between adjacent single and double bonds, of trans-polyacetylene (PA). We find that the BLA in the extrapolated limit to be 0.080 Å, in agreement with experiment and closely mirroring the prediction of the more expensive coupled-cluster with single and double excitations with perturbative triples (CCSD(T)).

  8. Natural geochemical analogues of the near field of high-level nuclear waste repositories

    SciTech Connect

    Apps, J.A.

    1995-09-01

    United States practice has been to design high-level nuclear waste (HLW) geological repositories with waste densities sufficiently high that repository temperatures surrounding the waste will exceed 100{degrees}C and could reach 250{degrees}C. Basalt and devitrified vitroclastic tuff are among the host rocks considered for waste emplacement. Near-field repository thermal behavior and chemical alteration in such rocks is expected to be similar to that observed in many geothermal systems. Therefore, the predictive modeling required for performance assessment studies of the near field could be validated and calibrated using geothermal systems as natural analogues. Examples are given which demonstrate the need for refinement of the thermodynamic databases used in geochemical modeling of near-field natural analogues and the extent to which present models can predict conditions in geothermal fields.

  9. Short-term cooling increases serum triglycerides and small high-density lipoprotein levels in humans.

    PubMed

    Hoeke, Geerte; Nahon, Kimberly J; Bakker, Leontine E H; Norkauer, Sabine S C; Dinnes, Donna L M; Kockx, Maaike; Lichtenstein, Laeticia; Drettwan, Diana; Reifel-Miller, Anne; Coskun, Tamer; Pagel, Philipp; Romijn, Fred P H T M; Cobbaert, Christa M; Jazet, Ingrid M; Martinez, Laurent O; Kritharides, Leonard; Berbée, Jimmy F P; Boon, Mariëtte R; Rensen, Patrick C N

    Cold exposure and β3-adrenergic receptor agonism, which both activate brown adipose tissue, markedly influence lipoprotein metabolism by enhancing lipoprotein lipase-mediated catabolism of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins and increasing plasma high-density lipoprotein (HDL) levels and functionality in mice. However, the effect of short-term cooling on human lipid and lipoprotein metabolism remained largely elusive. The objective was to assess the effect of short-term cooling on the serum lipoprotein profile and HDL functionality in men. Body mass index-matched young, lean men were exposed to a personalized cooling protocol for 2 hours. Before and after cooling, serum samples were collected for analysis of lipids and lipoprotein composition by (1)H-nuclear magnetic resonance. Adenosine triphosphate-binding cassette A1 (ABCA1)-mediated cholesterol efflux capacity of HDL was measured using [(3)H]cholesterol-loaded ABCA1-transfected Chinese hamster ovary cells. Short-term cooling increased serum levels of free fatty acids, triglycerides, and cholesterol. Cooling increased the concentration of large very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL) particles accompanied by increased mean size of VLDL particles. In addition, cooling enhanced the concentration of small LDL and small HDL particles as well as the cholesterol levels within these particles. The increase in small HDL was accompanied by increased ABCA1-dependent cholesterol efflux in vitro. Our data show that short-term cooling increases the concentration of large VLDL particles and increases the generation of small LDL and HDL particles. We interpret that cooling increases VLDL production and turnover, which results in formation of surface remnants that form small HDL particles that attract cellular cholesterol. Copyright © 2017 National Lipid Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Xanthophylls increased HDLC level and nuclear factor PPARγ, RXRγ and RARα expression in hens and chicks.

    PubMed

    Gao, Y-Y; Jin, L; Peng, H; Xu, L-H; Wang, Q-X; Ji, J; Wang, C-K; Bi, Y-Z

    2017-05-15

    This study was designed to investigate effects of xanthophylls on serum lipid profile (triglyceride, TG; cholesterol, CHO; high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, HDLC; and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, LDLC) and nuclear factor (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma, PPARγ; PPAR gamma coactivator 1 alpha, PGC1α; retinoid X receptor gamma, RXRγ; and retinoic acid receptor alpha, RARα) gene expression of breeding hens and chicks. In experiment 1, 432 hens were divided into three groups and fed diets supplemented with 0 (as control group), 20 or 40 mg/kg xanthophylls. Blood was sampled at 7, 14, 21, 28 and 35 days of trial. Liver, duodenum, jejunum and ileum were sampled at 35 days of trial. Results showed that serum HDLC level of hens was increased after dietary 40 mg/kg xanthophyll addition for 21, 28 and 35 days, while serum TG, CHO and LDLC were not affected. Xanthophyll addition also increased PPARγ expression in jejunum, RXRγ expression in duodenum and jejunum, and RARα expression in liver and duodenum. Experiment 2 was a 2 × 2 factorial design. Male chicks hatched from 0 or 40 mg/kg xanthophyll diet of hens were fed diet containing either 0 or 40 mg/kg xanthophylls. Liver, duodenum, jejunum and ileum were sampled at 0, 7, 14 and 21 days after hatching. Blood samples were also collected at 21 days. Results showed that in ovo xanthophylls elevated PPARγ in duodenum and jejunum, and RXRγ and RARα in liver of chicks mainly within 1 week after hatching, while dietary xanthophylls increased serum HDLC level and PPARγ and RXRγ in liver from 2 weeks onwards. In conclusion, our research suggested xanthophylls can regulate serum lipid profile and nuclear factor expression in hens and chicks. © 2017 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  11. Environmental radioactivity levels in the Cumberland River at the Hartsville Nuclear Project site, 1975-1982

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-07-01

    Samples of surface water taken from the Cumberland River during the period from 1975 through 1982 exhibited radioactivity levels less than 1% of the maximum permissible concentrations published by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Radioactivity concentrations reported herein are typical of natural radioactivity levels with slight indications of influences from fallout of radioactivity from atmospheric nuclear weapons testing.

  12. The phonon density of states measured with synchrotron radiation and nuclear resonances.

    SciTech Connect

    Sturhahn, W.; Hu, M.; Shastri, S.; Toellner, T.

    2001-01-26

    In this experiment, we will use synchrotron radiation to measure the density of states of vibrational excitations (phonons.) Each group of students will conduct an experiment at sector 3-ID of the Advanced Photon Source, the nation's premier synchrotron radiation facility. We provide one support staff per group, i.e., Drs. Michael Hu, Sarvjit Shastri, Wolfgang Sturhahn, and Tom Toellner will help their group to perform the experiment and interpret the data. After data collection (1-2 h per group), the remaining time will be spent with evaluation and interpretation. In addition to your own data, we provide similar sets of data. Computer hardware (iMac running as X-terminals) and software for data manipulation will be provided. It is important that you understand the basic principles of the experimental method. Therefore we strongly recommend that you read the next section and the attached article Phonon Density of States Measured by Inelastic Nuclear Resonant Scattering. You are expected to use this description to familiarize yourself with the experimental setup and its individual components before the start of the experiment. You should be able to solve at least 75% of the quiz correctly. If you have particular questions or a general problem in understanding this document, please contact Dr. W. Sturhahn, Bldg. 431, Rm. D007, tel. 0163.

  13. Systematic theoretical study of non-nuclear electron density maxima in some diatomic molecules.

    PubMed

    Terrabuio, Luiz A; Teodoro, Tiago Q; Rachid, Marina G; Haiduke, Roberto L A

    2013-10-10

    First, exploratory calculations were performed to investigate the presence of non-nuclear maxima (NNMs) in ground-state electron densities of homonuclear diatomic molecules from hydrogen up to calcium at their equilibrium geometries. In a second stage, only for the cases in which these features were previously detected, a rigorous analysis was carried out by several combinations of theoretical methods and basis sets in order to ensure that they are not only calculation artifacts. Our best results support that Li2, B2, C2, and P2 are molecules that possess true NNMs. A NNM was found in values obtained from the largest basis sets for Na2, but it disappeared at the experimental geometry because optimized bond lengths are significantly inaccurate for this case (deviations of 0.10 Å). Two of these maxima are also observed in Si2 with CCSD and large basis sets, but they are no longer detected as core-valence correlation or multiconfigurational wave functions are taken into account. Therefore, the NNMs in Si2 can be considered unphysical features due to an incomplete treatment of electron correlation. Finally, we show that a NNM is encountered in LiNa, representing the first discovery of such electron density maxima in a heteronuclear diatomic system at its equilibrium geometry, to our knowledge. Some results for LiNa, found in variations in internuclear distances, suggest that molecular electric moments, such as dipole and quadrupole, are sensitive to the presence of NNMs.

  14. 76 FR 35137 - Vulnerability and Threat Information for Facilities Storing Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-16

    ... Storing Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste AGENCY: U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission... Independent Storage of Spent Nuclear Fuel, High-Level Radioactive Waste, and Reactor-Related Greater Than...-based security regulations for Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) and High-Level Radioactive Waste (HLW)...

  15. Low density instabilities in asymmetric nuclear matter within the quark-meson coupling (QMC) model with the {delta} meson

    SciTech Connect

    Santos, Alexandre M.; Providencia, Constanca; Panda, Prafulla K.

    2009-04-15

    In the present work we include the isovector-scalar {delta} meson in the quark-meson coupling (QMC) model and study the properties of asymmetric nuclear within QMC without and with the {delta} meson. Recent constraints set by isospin diffusion on the slope parameter of the nuclear symmetry energy at saturation density are used to adjust the model parameters. The thermodynamical spinodal surfaces are obtained and the instability region at subsaturation densities within QMC and QMC{delta} models are compared with mean-field relativistic models. The distillation effect in the QMC model is discussed.

  16. Connection between the nuclear matter mean-field equation of state and the quark and gluon condensates at high density

    SciTech Connect

    Malheiro, M.; Dey, M.; Delfino, A.; Dey, J. |||

    1997-01-01

    It is known now that chiral symmetry restoration requires the meson-nucleon couplings to be density-dependent in nuclear-matter mean-field models. We further show that, quite generally, the quark and gluon condensates in medium are related to the trace of the energy-momentum tensor of nuclear matter and in these models the incompressibility K must be less than 3 times the chemical potential {mu}. In the critical density {rho}{sub c}, the gluon condensate is only reduced by 20{percent}, indicating a larger effective nucleon mass. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  17. The Effect of the Presence and Density of Shewanella oneidensis on Nuclear Magnetic Relaxation Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keating, K.; Halsey, J.

    2011-12-01

    A recent interest in the use of non-invasive geophysical methods to detect the presence of and measure the growth of microbes in the subsurface has arisen due to the potential use of such methods to monitor the progress of bioremediation. Previous research to this end has focused on electrical measurements, such as complex resistivity, which are sensitive to the presence of microbes but can be difficult to interpret. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), an emerging near-surface geophysical method, is sensitive to the presence and physiochemical environment of hydrogen. Typically, NMR measurements in geophysics are used to detect hydrogen in water or hydrocarbons and to determine its pore environment; however, NMR imaging measurements have shown that NMR can also detect hydrogen in microbes. Geophysical NMR measurements thus have the potential to directly detect microbes in geologic material or indirectly detect the way in which the presence of microbes alters the physical and chemical properties of a water-saturated geologic material. This laboratory-scale study was designed to explore the effect of the presence and density of microbes on NMR relaxation measurements. Measurements were collected on microbial slurries and microbes in porous media both during microbial growth and on samples with known microbial density. Shewanella oneidensis was used as a representative environmental microbe in this study. The research shows that low field NMR measurements are sensitive to the presence and density of microbes and provides fundamental information required to determine if low-field NMR measurements can be used to monitor microbial growth during bioremediation.

  18. Four-Component Relativistic Density-Functional Theory Calculations of Nuclear Spin-Rotation Constants: Relativistic Effects in p-Block Hydrides.

    PubMed

    Komorovsky, Stanislav; Repisky, Michal; Malkin, Elena; Demissie, Taye B; Ruud, Kenneth

    2015-08-11

    We present an implementation of the nuclear spin-rotation (SR) constants based on the relativistic four-component Dirac-Coulomb Hamiltonian. This formalism has been implemented in the framework of the Hartree-Fock and Kohn-Sham theory, allowing assessment of both pure and hybrid exchange-correlation functionals. In the density-functional theory (DFT) implementation of the response equations, a noncollinear generalized gradient approximation (GGA) has been used. The present approach enforces a restricted kinetic balance condition for the small-component basis at the integral level, leading to very efficient calculations of the property. We apply the methodology to study relativistic effects on the spin-rotation constants by performing calculations on XHn (n = 1-4) for all elements X in the p-block of the periodic table and comparing the effects of relativity on the nuclear SR tensors to that observed for the nuclear magnetic shielding tensors. Correlation effects as described by the density-functional theory are shown to be significant for the spin-rotation constants, whereas the differences between the use of GGA and hybrid density functionals are much smaller. Our calculated relativistic spin-rotation constants at the DFT level of theory are only in fair agreement with available experimental data. It is shown that the scaling of the relativistic effects for the spin-rotation constants (varying between Z(3.8) and Z(4.5)) is as strong as for the chemical shieldings but with a much smaller prefactor.

  19. Origin of the Nuclear Equation of State at the Quark Level

    SciTech Connect

    A.W. Thomas

    2007-05-01

    There is a measure of debate within the nuclear community concerning the relevance of quark degrees of freedom in understanding nuclear structure. We briefly outline some of the key issues and review the impressive progress made recently within the framework of the quark-meson coupling model. In particular, we explain in quite general terms how the modification of the internal structure of hadrons in-medium leads naturally to three- and four-body forces, or equivalently to density dependent effective interactions.

  20. Progress in Understanding the Nuclear Equation of State at the Quark Level

    SciTech Connect

    A.W. Thomas; P.A.M. Guichon

    2007-01-03

    At the present time there is a lively debate within the nuclear community concerning the relevance of quark degrees of freedom in understanding nuclear structure. We outline the key issues and review the impressive progress made recently within the framework of the quark-meson coupling model. In particular, we explain in quite general terms how the modification of the internal structure of hadrons in-medium leads naturally to three- and four-body forces, or equivalently, to density dependent effective interactions.

  1. Shampoo, Soy Sauce, and the Prince's Pendant: Density for Middle-Level Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chandrasekhar, Meera; Litherland, Rebecca

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the authors describe a series of activities they have used with middle-level students. The first set of lessons explores density through the layering of liquids. In the second set, they use some of the same liquids to explore the density of solids. The third set investigates how temperature affects the density of…

  2. Shampoo, Soy Sauce, and the Prince's Pendant: Density for Middle-Level Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chandrasekhar, Meera; Litherland, Rebecca

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the authors describe a series of activities they have used with middle-level students. The first set of lessons explores density through the layering of liquids. In the second set, they use some of the same liquids to explore the density of solids. The third set investigates how temperature affects the density of…

  3. State-of-the-art of beyond mean field theories with nuclear density functionals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egido, J. Luis

    2016-07-01

    classical β and γ vibrations by considering the quadrupole operators as coordinates. We present pairing fluctuations by considering the pairing gaps as generator coordinates. The combination of quadrupole and pairing fluctuations mirrors the elementary modes of excitation of the atomic nucleus and provides a realistic description of it. Lastly the explicit consideration of the time reversal symmetry breaking in the HFB wave function by the cranking procedure allows the alignment of nucleon pairs opening a new dimension in the BMFT calculations. Abundant calculations with the finite range density dependent Gogny force applied to exotic nuclei illustrate the state-of-the-art of BMFTs with nuclear density functionals. We conclude with a thorough discussion on the potential poles of the theory.

  4. Fine Structure of the Gamow-Teller Resonance in {sup 90}Nb and Level Density of 1{sup +} States

    SciTech Connect

    Kalmykov, Y.; Neumann-Cosel, P. von; Ponomarev, V.Yu.; Richter, A.; Shevchenko, A.; Wambach, J.; Adachi, T.; Fujita, Y.; Shimbara, Y.; Berg, G.P.A.; Fujita, K.; Hatanaka, K.; Kamiya, J.; Nakanishi, K.; Sakamoto, N.; Sakemi, Y.; Shimizu, Y.; Wakasa, T.; Fujita, H.; Smit, F.D.

    2006-01-13

    The fine structure of the Gamow-Teller resonance in a medium-heavy nucleus is observed for the first time in a high-resolution {sup 90}Zr({sup 3}He,t){sup 90}Nb experiment at the Research Center for Nuclear Physics, Osaka. Using a novel wavelet analysis technique, it is possible to extract characteristic energy scales and to quantify their relative importance for the generation of the fine structure. This method combined with the selectivity of the reaction permits an extraction of the level density of 1{sup +} states in {sup 90}Nb.

  5. ATMS_Phase_II: a standalone code for counting non-overlapping high-density nuclear tracks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khayat, Omid

    2014-02-01

    In this paper we focus on counting and density measurements of non-overlapping high-density nuclear track images. This paper is a continuum of another paper of the author introducing ATMS software which has been particularly developed for overlapping nuclear tracks. Here, as the second phase of the ATMS software, a hybrid algorithm is presented for counting the tracks according to user parameter initialization, template inserting and correlation estimation to initially detect nuclear track candidates, then to evaluate geometrical and contextual features of track candidates and finally a decision-making process according to the user's sensitivity considerations. The presented hybrid algorithm is verified and validated by a database containing 100 randomly selected Alpha track images captured from the surface of CR-39 polycarbonate detectors irradiated by environmental Alpha particles emitted from Rn-222 near a copper mine around Anarak city.

  6. A Method for Determining Bulk Density, Material Density, and Porosity of Melter Feed During Nuclear Waste Vitrification

    SciTech Connect

    Hilliard, Zachary; Hrma, Pavel; Vance, E.

    2015-09-24

    Abstract Glass making efficiency largely depends on heat transfer to reacting glass batch (melter feed), which in turn is influenced by the bulk density (ρb) and porosity (Φ) as functions of temperature (T). Neither b(T) nor Φ(T) functions are readily accessible to direct measurement, but they can be determined based on monitoring the profile area of heated glass batch pellets and material density of batches quenched at various stages of conversion via pycnometry. For the determination of Φb, the bulk volume must be calculated as a function of temperature. This is done via a program constructed in MATLAB which takes an image of a pellet profile at a given temperature and calculates the volume of said pellet. The quenched density measured by pycnometry must be converted to the density at heat treatment temperature. This is done by taking into account the volume change due to thermal expansion/contraction.

  7. Low-density homogeneous symmetric nuclear matter: Disclosing dinucleons in coexisting phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arellano, Hugo F.; Delaroche, Jean-Paul

    2015-01-01

    The effect of in-medium dinucleon bound states on self-consistent single-particle fields in Brueckner, Bethe and Goldstone theory is investigated in symmetric nuclear matter at zero temperature. To this end, dinucleon bound state occurences in the 1 S 0 and 3 SD 1 channels are explicitly accounted for --within the continuous choice for the auxiliary fields-- while imposing self-consistency in Brueckner-Hartree-Fock approximation calculations. Searches are carried out at Fermi momenta in the range fm-1, using the Argonne bare nucleon-nucleon potential without resorting to the effective-mass approximation. As a result, two distinct solutions meeting the self-consistency requirement are found with overlapping domains in the interval 0.130 fm-1 0.285 fm-1, corresponding to mass densities between and g cm-3. Effective masses as high as three times the nucleon mass are found in the coexistence domain. The emergence of superfluidity in relationship with BCS pairing gap solutions is discussed.

  8. 75 FR 61228 - Board Meeting: Technical Lessons Gained From High-Level Nuclear Waste Disposal Efforts

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-04

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR WASTE TECHNICAL REVIEW BOARD Board Meeting: Technical Lessons Gained From High-Level Nuclear Waste Disposal Efforts... Board will consider technical lessons that can be gained from those experiences that may be useful...

  9. Workshop on the role of natural analogs in geologic disposal of high-level nuclear waste

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, W.M.; Kovach, L.A.

    1995-09-01

    A workshop on the Role of Natural Analogs in Geologic Disposal of High-Level Nuclear Waste (HLW) was held in San Antonio, Texas, on July 22-25, 1991. It was sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and the Center for Nuclear Waste Regulatory Analyses (CNWRA). Invitations to the workshop were extended to a large number of individuals with a variety of technical and professional interests related to geologic disposal of nuclear waste and natural analog studies. The objective of the workshop was to examine the role of natural analog studies in performance assessment, site characterization, and prioritization of research related to geologic disposal of HLW.

  10. Density measurements as a condition monitoring approach for following the aging of nuclear power plant cable materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillen, K. T.; Celina, M.; Clough, R. L.

    1999-10-01

    Monitoring changes in material density has been suggested as a potentially useful condition monitoring (CM) method for following the aging of cable jacket and insulation materials in nuclear power plants. In this study, we compare density measurements and ultimate tensile elongation results versus aging time for most of the important generic types of commercial nuclear power plant cable materials. Aging conditions, which include thermal-only, as well as combined radiation plus thermal, were chosen such that potentially anomalous effects caused by diffusion-limited oxidation (DLO) are unimportant. The results show that easily measurable density increases occur in most important cable materials. For some materials and environments, the density change occurs at a fairly constant rate throughout the mechanical property lifetime. For cases involving so-called induction-time behavior, density increases are slow to moderate until after the induction time, at which point they begin to increase dramatically. In other instances, density increases rapidly at first, then slows down. The results offer strong evidence that density measurements, which reflect property changes under both radiation and thermal conditions, could represent a very useful CM approach.

  11. Enhancement of DFT-calculations at petascale: Nuclear Magnetic Resonance, Hybrid Density Functional Theory and Car-Parrinello calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varini, Nicola; Ceresoli, Davide; Martin-Samos, Layla; Girotto, Ivan; Cavazzoni, Carlo

    2013-08-01

    One of the most promising techniques used for studying the electronic properties of materials is based on Density Functional Theory (DFT) approach and its extensions. DFT has been widely applied in traditional solid state physics problems where periodicity and symmetry play a crucial role in reducing the computational workload. With growing compute power capability and the development of improved DFT methods, the range of potential applications is now including other scientific areas such as Chemistry and Biology. However, cross disciplinary combinations of traditional Solid-State Physics, Chemistry and Biology drastically improve the system complexity while reducing the degree of periodicity and symmetry. Large simulation cells containing of hundreds or even thousands of atoms are needed to model these kind of physical systems. The treatment of those systems still remains a computational challenge even with modern supercomputers. In this paper we describe our work to improve the scalability of Quantum ESPRESSO (Giannozzi et al., 2009 [3]) for treating very large cells and huge numbers of electrons. To this end we have introduced an extra level of parallelism, over electronic bands, in three kernels for solving computationally expensive problems: the Sternheimer equation solver (Nuclear Magnetic Resonance, package QE-GIPAW), the Fock operator builder (electronic ground-state, package PWscf) and most of the Car-Parrinello routines (Car-Parrinello dynamics, package CP). Final benchmarks show our success in computing the Nuclear Magnetic Response (NMR) chemical shift of a large biological assembly, the electronic structure of defected amorphous silica with hybrid exchange-correlation functionals and the equilibrium atomic structure of height Porphyrins anchored to a Carbon Nanotube, on many thousands of CPU cores.

  12. Process for solidifying high-level nuclear waste

    DOEpatents

    Ross, Wayne A.

    1978-01-01

    The addition of a small amount of reducing agent to a mixture of a high-level radioactive waste calcine and glass frit before the mixture is melted will produce a more homogeneous glass which is leach-resistant and suitable for long-term storage of high-level radioactive waste products.

  13. Density and energy level of a deep-level Mg acceptor in 4H-SiC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuura, Hideharu; Morine, Tatsuya; Nagamachi, Shinji

    2015-01-01

    Reliably determining the densities and energy levels of deep-level dominant acceptors in heavily doped wide-band-gap semiconductors has been a topic of recent discussion. In these discussions, the focus is on both Hall scattering factors for holes and distribution functions for acceptors. Mg acceptor levels in 4H-SiC seem to be deep, and so here the electrical properties of Mg-implanted 4H-SiC layers are studied by measuring Hall effects. The obtained Hall scattering factors are not reliable because they drop to less than 0.5 at high measurement temperatures. Moreover, the Fermi-Dirac distribution function is unsuitable for examining Mg acceptors because the obtained acceptor density is much higher than the concentration of implanted Mg atoms. However, by using a distribution function that includes the influence of the excited states of a deep-level acceptor, the density and energy level of Mg acceptors can be reliably determined.

  14. High Energy Density Plasmas (HEDP) for studies of basic nuclear science relevant to Stellar and Big Bang Nucleosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frenje, Johan

    2014-06-01

    Thermonuclear reaction rates and nuclear processes have been explored traditionally by means of conventional accelerator experiments, which are difficult to execute at conditions relevant to stellar nucleosynthesis. Thus, nuclear reactions at stellar energies are often studied through extrapolations from higher-energy data or in low-background underground experiments. Even when measurements are possible using accelerators at relevant energies, thermonuclear reaction rates in stars are inherently different from those in accelerator experiments. The fusing nuclei are surrounded by bound electrons in accelerator experiments, whereas electrons occupy mainly continuum states in a stellar environment. Nuclear astrophysics research will therefore benefit from an enlarged toolkit for studies of nuclear reactions. In this presentation, we report on the first use of High Energy Density Plasmas for studies of nuclear reactions relevant to basic nuclear science, stellar and Big Bang nucleosynthesis. These experiments were carried out at the OMEGA laser facility at University of Rochester and the National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, in which spherical capsules were irradiated with powerful lasers to compress and heat the fuel to high enough temperatures and densities for nuclear reactions to occur. Four experiments will be highlighted in this presentation. In the first experiment, the differential cross section for the elastic neutron-triton (n-T) scattering at 14.1 MeV was measured with significantly higher accuracy than achieved in accelerator experiments. In the second experiment, the T(t,2n)4He reaction, a mirror reaction to the 3He(3He,2p)4He reaction that plays an important role in the proton-proton chain that transforms hydrogen into ordinary 4He in stars like our Sun, was studied at energies in the range 15-40 keV. In the third experiment, the 3He+3He solar fusion reaction was studied directly, and in the fourth experiment, we

  15. Correlation of lens density measured using the Pentacam Scheimpflug system with the Lens Opacities Classification System III grading score and visual acuity in age-related nuclear cataract.

    PubMed

    Pei, X; Bao, Y; Chen, Y; Li, X

    2008-11-01

    To investigate the relationship between lens density measured with the Pentacam Scheimpflug System and grading score using the Lens Opacities Classification System (LOCS) III as well as that between lens density and visual acuity in age-related nuclear cataract patients. Lens density and grading score were evaluated in 138 cases (180 eyes) with age-related nuclear cataract. LogMAR visual acuity was tested with the Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study chart. The correlations between lens density value and LOCS III nuclear opacity (NO) and nuclear colour (NC) grading score and that between lens density value and logMAR visual acuity were analysed. There was a linear increasing relationship between lens density value and LOCS III grading score in nuclear cataract patients. Lens density value had a stronger significant correlation with LOCS III NO score than that with NC score. The correlation between the nuclear lens density value and logMAR visual acuity was stronger than that between NO score and logMAR visual acuity or between NC score and logMAR visual acuity. Lens density as a quantitative and objective parameter can present the degree of NO and associated visual impairment due to nuclear cataract. The LOCS III criterion as an economic cataract grading system provides data that are in satisfactory concordance with the results obtained using the Pentacam Scheimpflug system.

  16. Non-Born-Oppenheimer electronic and nuclear densities for a Hooke-Calogero three-particle model: Non-uniqueness of density-derived molecular structure

    SciTech Connect

    Ludena, E. V.; Echevarria, L.; Lopez, X.; Ugalde, J. M.

    2012-02-28

    We consider the calculation of non-Born-Oppenheimer, nBO, one-particle densities for both electrons and nuclei. We show that the nBO one-particle densities evaluated in terms of translationally invariant coordinates are independent of the wavefunction describing the motion of center of mass of the whole system. We show that they depend, however, on an arbitrary reference point from which the positions of the vectors labeling the particles are determined. We examine the effect that this arbitrary choice has on the topology of the one-particle density by selecting the Hooke-Calogero model of a three-body system for which expressions for the one-particle densities can be readily obtained in analytic form. We extend this analysis to the one-particle densities obtained from full Coulomb interaction wavefunctions for three-body systems. We conclude, in view of the fact that there is a close link between the choice of the reference point and the topology of one-particle densities that the molecular structure inferred from the topology of these densities is not unique. We analyze the behavior of one-particle densities for the Hooke-Calogero Born-Oppenheimer, BO, wavefunction and show that topological transitions are also present in this case for a particular mass value of the light particles even though in the BO regime the nuclear masses are infinite. In this vein, we argue that the change in topology caused by variation of the mass ratio between light and heavy particles does not constitute a true indication in the nBO regime of the emergence of molecular structure.

  17. Non-Born-Oppenheimer electronic and nuclear densities for a Hooke-Calogero three-particle model: Non-uniqueness of density-derived molecular structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludeña, E. V.; Echevarría, L.; Lopez, X.; Ugalde, J. M.

    2012-02-01

    We consider the calculation of non-Born-Oppenheimer, nBO, one-particle densities for both electrons and nuclei. We show that the nBO one-particle densities evaluated in terms of translationally invariant coordinates are independent of the wavefunction describing the motion of center of mass of the whole system. We show that they depend, however, on an arbitrary reference point from which the positions of the vectors labeling the particles are determined. We examine the effect that this arbitrary choice has on the topology of the one-particle density by selecting the Hooke-Calogero model of a three-body system for which expressions for the one-particle densities can be readily obtained in analytic form. We extend this analysis to the one-particle densities obtained from full Coulomb interaction wavefunctions for three-body systems. We conclude, in view of the fact that there is a close link between the choice of the reference point and the topology of one-particle densities that the molecular structure inferred from the topology of these densities is not unique. We analyze the behavior of one-particle densities for the Hooke-Calogero Born-Oppenheimer, BO, wavefunction and show that topological transitions are also present in this case for a particular mass value of the light particles even though in the BO regime the nuclear masses are infinite. In this vein, we argue that the change in topology caused by variation of the mass ratio between light and heavy particles does not constitute a true indication in the nBO regime of the emergence of molecular structure.

  18. Non-Born-Oppenheimer electronic and nuclear densities for a Hooke-Calogero three-particle model: non-uniqueness of density-derived molecular structure.

    PubMed

    Ludeña, E V; Echevarría, L; Lopez, X; Ugalde, J M

    2012-02-28

    We consider the calculation of non-Born-Oppenheimer, nBO, one-particle densities for both electrons and nuclei. We show that the nBO one-particle densities evaluated in terms of translationally invariant coordinates are independent of the wavefunction describing the motion of center of mass of the whole system. We show that they depend, however, on an arbitrary reference point from which the positions of the vectors labeling the particles are determined. We examine the effect that this arbitrary choice has on the topology of the one-particle density by selecting the Hooke-Calogero model of a three-body system for which expressions for the one-particle densities can be readily obtained in analytic form. We extend this analysis to the one-particle densities obtained from full Coulomb interaction wavefunctions for three-body systems. We conclude, in view of the fact that there is a close link between the choice of the reference point and the topology of one-particle densities that the molecular structure inferred from the topology of these densities is not unique. We analyze the behavior of one-particle densities for the Hooke-Calogero Born-Oppenheimer, BO, wavefunction and show that topological transitions are also present in this case for a particular mass value of the light particles even though in the BO regime the nuclear masses are infinite. In this vein, we argue that the change in topology caused by variation of the mass ratio between light and heavy particles does not constitute a true indication in the nBO regime of the emergence of molecular structure.

  19. Computation of indirect nuclear spin-spin couplings with reduced complexity in pure and hybrid density functional approximations.

    PubMed

    Luenser, Arne; Kussmann, Jörg; Ochsenfeld, Christian

    2016-09-28

    We present a (sub)linear-scaling algorithm to determine indirect nuclear spin-spin coupling constants at the Hartree-Fock and Kohn-Sham density functional levels of theory. Employing efficient integral algorithms and sparse algebra routines, an overall (sub)linear scaling behavior can be obtained for systems with a non-vanishing HOMO-LUMO gap. Calculations on systems with over 1000 atoms and 20 000 basis functions illustrate the performance and accuracy of our reference implementation. Specifically, we demonstrate that linear algebra dominates the runtime of conventional algorithms for 10 000 basis functions and above. Attainable speedups of our method exceed 6 × in total runtime and 10 × in the linear algebra steps for the tested systems. Furthermore, a convergence study of spin-spin couplings of an aminopyrazole peptide upon inclusion of the water environment is presented: using the new method it is shown that large solvent spheres are necessary to converge spin-spin coupling values.

  20. Computation of indirect nuclear spin-spin couplings with reduced complexity in pure and hybrid density functional approximations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luenser, Arne; Kussmann, Jörg; Ochsenfeld, Christian

    2016-09-01

    We present a (sub)linear-scaling algorithm to determine indirect nuclear spin-spin coupling constants at the Hartree-Fock and Kohn-Sham density functional levels of theory. Employing efficient integral algorithms and sparse algebra routines, an overall (sub)linear scaling behavior can be obtained for systems with a non-vanishing HOMO-LUMO gap. Calculations on systems with over 1000 atoms and 20 000 basis functions illustrate the performance and accuracy of our reference implementation. Specifically, we demonstrate that linear algebra dominates the runtime of conventional algorithms for 10 000 basis functions and above. Attainable speedups of our method exceed 6 × in total runtime and 10 × in the linear algebra steps for the tested systems. Furthermore, a convergence study of spin-spin couplings of an aminopyrazole peptide upon inclusion of the water environment is presented: using the new method it is shown that large solvent spheres are necessary to converge spin-spin coupling values.

  1. Probing the low and high density nuclear matter by hadron scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eliseev, S. M.; Kosmachev, O. S.

    2017-03-01

    The subject of this report is connected with the widely discussed manifestation of in-medium effect in nuclear collisions. At present, the medium modification of hadron properties in the normal and in a dense nuclear matter is one of the fundamental questions of strong interaction physics. A new Glauber Monte Carlo model for hadron-nuclei interaction at intermediate energy is proposed. We utilized the principal assumptions as in the approaches of other authors describing nuclear collisions at high energy in the framework of the models without QGP. Yet, a number of new ingredients (noneikonal corrections, correlations of nucleons, in the nuclei, the nuclear Fermi motion, etc.) are introduced.

  2. Level Densities in the actinide region and indirect n,y cross section measurements using the surrogate method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, J. N.; Gunsing, F.; Bernstein, L.; Bürger, A.; Görgen, A.; Thompson, I. J.; Guttormssen, M.; Larsen, A.-C.; Mansouri, P.; Renstrøm, T.; Rose, S. J.; Siem, S.; Wiedeking, M.; Wiborg, T.

    2012-02-01

    Results from a program of measurements of level densities and gamma ray strength functions in the actinide region are presented. Experiments at the Oslo cyclotron involving the Cactus/Siri detectors and 232Th(d,x) and 232Th(3He,x) reactions were carried out to help answer the question of which level density model is the most appropriate for actinide nuclei, since it will have an impact on cross section calculations important for reactor physics simulations. A new technique for extracting level densities and gamma ray strength functions from particle-gamma coincidence data is proposed and results from the development of this technique are presented. In addition, simultaneous measurements of compound nuclear gamma decay probabilities have been performed for the key thorium cycle nuclei 233Th, 231Th and 232Pa up to around 1MeV above the neutron binding energy and have enabled extraction of indirect neutron induced capture cross sections for the 232Th, 231Pa and 230Th nuclei using the surrogate reaction method. Since the neutron capture cross section for 232Th is already well known from direct measurements a comparison provides a stringent test of the applicability of the surrogate technique in the actinide region.

  3. Corrosion Behavior of Alloy 625 in Simulated Nuclear High-Level Waste Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girija, S.; Nandakumar, T.; Mudali, U. Kamachi

    2015-11-01

    The present investigation aims to study the effect of various ions present in nuclear high-level waste (HLW) (acidic) medium on the corrosion resistance of Alloy 625, with solution-annealed and sensitized microstructure. The heat-affected zones are prone to sensitization during welding of components and subsequent exposure to acidic waste during service could result in intergranular corrosion in these regions and hence it was attempted to study the corrosion behavior of the alloy under sensitized conditions. Double loop electrochemical potentiokinetic reactivation test was carried out to obtain the extent of chromium depletion. Potentiodynamic anodic polarization and electrochemical noise investigations were carried out on Alloy 625 in 3 M nitric acid and simulated nuclear HLW medium (prepared in 3 M nitric acid) at 298 K and 323 K. The study showed that the alloy possess good corrosion resistance in 3 M nitric acid and simulated HLW medium. However, a marginal decrease in the corrosion resistance occurred in simulated HLW when compared to the plain acid, as observed from an increase in passivation current density, decrease in transpassive potentials, and decrease in electrochemical noise resistance. Increase in temperature of the medium and change in microstructure from solution-annealed to sensitized state further decreased the corrosion resistance of Alloy 625. Electrochemical noise time records obtained at open circuit conditions showed a stable passive film for 22 h of immersion of the alloy in 3 M nitric acid and simulated HLW. However, the amplitude of current fluctuations was higher for the sensitized microstructure when compared to the solution-annealed microstructure.

  4. Effects of prebiotic, protein level, and stocking density on performance, immunity, and stress indicators of broilers.

    PubMed

    Houshmand, M; Azhar, K; Zulkifli, I; Bejo, M H; Kamyab, A

    2012-02-01

    An experiment was conducted to determine the effects of period on the performance, immunity, and some stress indicators of broilers fed 2 levels of protein and stocked at a normal or high stocking density. Experimental treatments consisted of a 2 × 2 × 2 factorial arrangement with 2 levels of prebiotic (with or without prebiotic), 2 levels of dietary CP [NRC-recommended or low CP level (85% of NRC-recommended level)], and 2 levels of stocking density (10 birds/m(2) as the normal density or 16 birds/m(2) as the high density), for a total of 8 treatments. Each treatment had 5 replicates (cages). Birds were reared in 3-tiered battery cages with wire floors in an open-sided housing system under natural tropical conditions. Housing and general management practices were similar for all treatment groups. Starter and finisher diets in mash form were fed from 1 to 21 d and 22 to 42 d of age, respectively. Supplementation with a prebiotic had no significant effect on performance, immunity, and stress indicators (blood glucose, cholesterol, corticosterone, and heterophil:lymphocyte ratio). Protein level significantly influenced broiler performance but did not affect immunity or stress indicators (except for cholesterol level). The normal stocking density resulted in better FCR and also higher antibody titer against Newcastle disease compared with the high stocking density. However, density had no significant effect on blood levels of glucose, cholesterol, corticosterone, and the heterophil:lymphocyte ratio. Significant interactions between protein level and stocking density were observed for BW gain and final BW. The results indicated that, under the conditions of this experiment, dietary addition of a prebiotic had no significant effect on the performance, immunity, and stress indicators of broilers.

  5. Effects of population density on corticosterone levels of prairie voles in the field.

    PubMed

    Blondel, Dimitri V; Wallace, Gerard N; Calderone, Stefanie; Gorinshteyn, Marija; St Mary, Colette M; Phelps, Steven M

    2016-01-01

    High population density is often associated with increased levels of stress-related hormones, such as corticosterone (CORT). Prairie voles (Microtus ochrogaster) are a socially monogamous species known for their large population density fluctuations in the wild. Although CORT influences the social behavior of prairie voles in the lab, the effect of population density on CORT has not previously been quantified in this species in the field. We validated a non-invasive hormone assay for measuring CORT metabolites in prairie vole feces. We then used semi-natural enclosures to experimentally manipulate population density, and measured density effects on male space use and fecal CORT levels. Our enclosures generated patterns of space use and social interaction that were consistent with previous prairie vole field studies. Contrary to the positive relationship between CORT and density typical of other taxa, we found that lower population densities (80 animals/ha) produced higher fecal CORT than higher densities (240/ha). Combined with prior work in the lab and field, the data suggest that high prairie vole population densities indicate favorable environments, perhaps through reduced predation risk. Lastly, we found that field animals had lower fecal CORT levels than laboratory-living animals. The data emphasize the usefulness of prairie voles as models for integrating ecological, evolutionary, and mechanistic questions in social behavior.

  6. Effects of population density on corticosterone levels of prairie voles in the field

    PubMed Central

    Blondel, Dimitri V.; Wallace, Gerard N.; Calderone, Stefanie; Gorinshteyn, Marija; St. Mary, Colette M.; Phelps, Steven M.

    2015-01-01

    High population density is often associated with increased levels of stress-related hormones, such as corticosterone (CORT). Prairie voles (Microtus ochrogaster) are a socially monogamous species known for their large population density fluctuations in the wild. Although CORT influences the social behavior of prairie voles in the lab, the effect of population density on CORT has not previously been quantified in this species in the field. We validated a non-invasive hormone assay for measuring CORT metabolites in prairie vole feces. We then used semi-natural enclosures to experimentally manipulate population density, and measured density effects on male space use and fecal CORT levels. Our enclosures generated patterns of space use and social interaction that were consistent with previous prairie vole field studies. Contrary to the positive relationship between CORT and density typical of other taxa, we found that lower population densities (80 animals/ha) produced higher fecal CORT than high densities (240/ha). Combined with prior work in the lab and field, the data suggest that high prairie vole population densities indicate favorable environments, perhaps through reduced predation risk. Lastly, we found that field animals had lower fecal CORT levels than laboratory-living animals. The data emphasize the usefulness of prairie voles as models for integrating ecological, evolutionary and mechanistic questions in social behavior. PMID:26342968

  7. Multiple external hazards compound level 3 PSA methods research of nuclear power plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Handing; Liang, Xiaoyu; Zhang, Xiaoming; Yang, Jianfeng; Liu, Weidong; Lei, Dina

    2017-01-01

    2011 Fukushima nuclear power plant severe accident was caused by both earthquake and tsunami, which results in large amount of radioactive nuclides release. That accident has caused the radioactive contamination on the surrounding environment. Although this accident probability is extremely small, once such an accident happens that is likely to release a lot of radioactive materials into the environment, and cause radiation contamination. Therefore, studying accidents consequences is important and essential to improve nuclear power plant design and management. Level 3 PSA methods of nuclear power plant can be used to analyze radiological consequences, and quantify risk to the public health effects around nuclear power plants. Based on multiple external hazards compound level 3 PSA methods studies of nuclear power plant, and the description of the multiple external hazards compound level 3 PSA technology roadmap and important technical elements, as well as taking a coastal nuclear power plant as the reference site, we analyzed the impact of off-site consequences of nuclear power plant severe accidents caused by multiple external hazards. At last we discussed the impact of off-site consequences probabilistic risk studies and its applications under multiple external hazards compound conditions, and explained feasibility and reasonableness of emergency plans implementation.

  8. Probing nuclear symmetry energy at high densities using pion, kaon, eta and photon productions in heavy-ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Zhi-Gang; Yong, Gao-Chan; Chen, Lie-Wen; Li, Bao-An; Zhang, Ming; Xiao, Guo-Qing; Xu, Nu

    2014-02-01

    The high-density behavior of nuclear symmetry energy is among the most uncertain properties of dense neutron-rich matter. Its accurate determination has significant ramifications in understanding not only the reaction dynamics of heavy-ion reactions, especially those induced by radioactive beams, but also many interesting phenomena in astrophysics, such as the explosion mechanism of supernova and the properties of neutron stars. The heavy-ion physics community has devoted much effort during the last few years to constrain the high-density symmetry using various probes. In particular, the / ratio has been most extensively studied both theoretically and experimentally. All models have consistently predicted qualitatively that the / ratio is a sensitive probe of the high-density symmetry energy especially with beam energies near the pion production threshold. However, the predicted values of the / ratio are still quite model dependent mostly because of the complexity of modeling pion production and reabsorption dynamics in heavy-ion collisions, leading to currently still controversial conclusions regarding the high-density behavior of nuclear symmetry energy from comparing various model calculations with available experimental data. As more / data become available and a deeper understanding about the pion dynamics in heavy-ion reactions is obtained, more penetrating probes, such as the K +/ K 0 ratio, meson and high-energy photons are also being investigated or planned at several facilities. Here, we review some of our recent contributions to the community effort of constraining the high-density behavior of nuclear symmetry energy in heavy-ion collisions. In addition, the status of some worldwide experiments for studying the high-density symmetry energy, including the HIRFL-CSR external target experiment (CEE) are briefly introduced.

  9. Increases in Serum Estrone Sulfate Level Are Associated with Increased Mammographic Density during Menopausal Hormone Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Crandall, Carolyn J.; Guan, Min; Laughlin, Gail A.; Ursin, Giske A.; Stanczyk, Frank Z.; Ingles, Sue A.; Barrett-Connor, Elizabeth; Greendale, Gail A.

    2009-01-01

    Background Menopausal hormone therapy increases mammographic density. We determined whether increases in serum estrone sulfate (E1S) levels during menopausal hormone therapy predict increased mammographic density. Methods We measured percent mammographic density and serum E1S levels in 428 participants of the Postmenopausal Estrogen/Progestin Interventions study who were randomly assigned to daily conjugated equine estrogen (CEE) 0.625 mg alone, CEE + daily medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA) 2.5 mg, CEE + cyclical MPA (10 mg days 1-12 per 28-day cycle), or CEE + cyclical micronized progesterone (10 mg days 1-12). Serum E1S levels were determined by RIA. Information about covariates was determined by annual questionnaire. Using linear regression, we determined the association between change in E1S level from baseline to 12 months and change in percent mammographic density (by semiquantitative interactive threshold method). Results After controlling for baseline mammographic density, age, body mass index, alcohol intake, parity, smoking, ethnicity, physical activity, and age at first pregnancy, mammographic density increased by 1.3% for every 1 ng/mL increase in E1S level (P < 0.0001). The association between change in E1S level and change in mammographic density differed by treatment group (greater effect in CEE + cyclical MPA group versus CEE group; P = 0.05). After controlling for treatment group, change in the ratio of E1S to E1 was also positively associated with change in mammographic density. Conclusions Increases in serum E1S levels during menopausal hormone therapy are associated with increases in mammographic density. The relative contribution of E1S and E1 to stimulation of breast tissue awaits further elucidation. PMID:18628419

  10. Core Versus Nuclear Gauge Methods of Determining Soil Bulk Density and Moisture Content

    Treesearch

    Jacqueline G. Steele; Jerry L. Koger; Albert C. Trouse; Donald L. Sirois

    1983-01-01

    Soil bulk and moisture content measurements were obtained using two nuclear gauge systems and those compared to those obtained from soil cores. The soils, a Hiwassee sandy loam, a Lakeland loamy sand, and a Loyd clay, were free of organic matter and uniform in mechanical composition. The regression equations developed for the nuclear guages for the first phase of the...

  11. Structure, spectra and antioxidant action of ascorbic acid studied by density functional theory, Raman spectroscopic and nuclear magnetic resonance techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Gurpreet; Mohanty, B. P.; Saini, G. S. S.

    2016-02-01

    Structure, vibrational and nuclear magnetic resonance spectra, and antioxidant action of ascorbic acid towards hydroxyl radicals have been studied computationally and in vitro by ultraviolet-visible, nuclear magnetic resonance and vibrational spectroscopic techniques. Time dependant density functional theory calculations have been employed to specify various electronic transitions in ultraviolet-visible spectra. Observed chemical shifts and vibrational bands in nuclear magnetic resonance and vibrational spectra, respectively have been assigned with the help of calculations. Changes in the structure of ascorbic acid in aqueous phase have been examined computationally and experimentally by recording Raman spectra in aqueous medium. Theoretical calculations of the interaction between ascorbic acid molecule and hydroxyl radical predicted the formation of dehydroascorbic acid as first product, which has been confirmed by comparing its simulated spectra with the corresponding spectra of ascorbic acid in presence of hydrogen peroxide.

  12. Structure, spectra and antioxidant action of ascorbic acid studied by density functional theory, Raman spectroscopic and nuclear magnetic resonance techniques.

    PubMed

    Singh, Gurpreet; Mohanty, B P; Saini, G S S

    2016-02-15

    Structure, vibrational and nuclear magnetic resonance spectra, and antioxidant action of ascorbic acid towards hydroxyl radicals have been studied computationally and in vitro by ultraviolet-visible, nuclear magnetic resonance and vibrational spectroscopic techniques. Time dependant density functional theory calculations have been employed to specify various electronic transitions in ultraviolet-visible spectra. Observed chemical shifts and vibrational bands in nuclear magnetic resonance and vibrational spectra, respectively have been assigned with the help of calculations. Changes in the structure of ascorbic acid in aqueous phase have been examined computationally and experimentally by recording Raman spectra in aqueous medium. Theoretical calculations of the interaction between ascorbic acid molecule and hydroxyl radical predicted the formation of dehydroascorbic acid as first product, which has been confirmed by comparing its simulated spectra with the corresponding spectra of ascorbic acid in presence of hydrogen peroxide. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Effect of spin-orbit nuclear charge density corrections due to the anomalous magnetic moment on halonuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Ong, A.; Berengut, J. C.; Flambaum, V. V.

    2010-07-15

    In this paper we consider the contribution of the anomalous magnetic moments of protons and neutrons to the nuclear charge density. We show that the spin-orbit contribution to the mean-square charge radius, which has been neglected in recent nuclear calculations, can be important in light halonuclei. We estimate the size of the effect in helium, lithium, and beryllium nuclei. It is found that the spin-orbit contribution represents a approx2% correction to the charge density at the center of the {sup 7}Be nucleus. We derive a simple expression for the correction to the mean-square charge radius due to the spin-orbit term and find that in light halonuclei it may be larger than the Darwin-Foldy term and comparable to finite size corrections. A comparison of experimental and theoretical mean-square radii including the spin-orbit contribution is presented.

  14. Density functional theory study of indirect nuclear spin-spin coupling constants with spin-orbit corrections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oprea, Corneliu I.; Rinkevicius, Zilvinas; Vahtras, Olav; Ågren, Hans; Ruud, Kenneth

    2005-07-01

    This work outlines the calculation of indirect nuclear spin-spin coupling constants with spin-orbit corrections using density functional response theory. The nonrelativistic indirect nuclear spin-spin couplings are evaluated using the linear response method, whereas the relativistic spin-orbit corrections are computed using quadratic response theory. The formalism is applied to the homologous systems H2X (X=O,S,Se,Te) and XH4 (X =C,Si,Ge,Sn,Pb) to calculate the indirect nuclear spin-spin coupling constants between the protons. The results confirm that spin-orbit corrections are important for compounds of the H2X series, for which the electronic structure allows for an efficient coupling between the nuclei mediated by the spin-orbit interaction, whereas in the case of the XH4 series the opposite situation is encountered and the spin-orbit corrections are negligible for all compounds of this series. In addition we analyze the performance of the density functional theory in the calculations of nonrelativistic indirect nuclear spin-spin coupling constants.

  15. Temporal and spatial variations of radioactive cesium levels in Northeast Japan following the Fukushima nuclear accident.

    PubMed

    Arai, Takaomi

    2016-10-01

    Radioactive emissions into the environment from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident led to global contamination. Radionuclides such as (131)I, (134)Cs, and (137)Cs were further transported to North America and Europe. Thus, the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident is a global concern for both human health and the ecosystem because a number of countries ban or impose restrictions the import of Japanese products. In the present study, three-year (May 2011 to May 2014) fluctuations and accumulations of Cs, (134)Cs, and (137)Cs in two salmonid fish, white-spotted char and masu salmon were examined in Northeast Japan. The total Cs, (134)Cs, and (137)Cs levels in the fish gradually decreased throughout the three-year studied period after the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident; however, higher levels (more than 100 Bq kg(-1)) were still detected in the Fukushima prefecture and neighboring prefectures in Japan 3 years after the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident. Spatial radiocesium levels gradually decreased with increasing distance from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (Fukushima prefecture). The radiocesium levels facing the Pacific Ocean area were generally higher than those facing the Sea of Japan area. These results suggest that radionuclides from Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant are still widely distributed and remain in the natural environment in Northeast Japan.

  16. Corrosion susceptibility of steel drums containing cemented intermediate level nuclear wastes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duffó, Gustavo S.; Farina, Silvia B.; Schulz, Fátima M.; Marotta, Francesca

    2010-10-01

    Cementation processes are used as immobilization techniques for low or intermediate level radioactive waste for economical and safety reasons and for being a simple operation. In particular, ion-exchange resins commonly used for purification of radioactive liquid waste from nuclear reactors are immobilized before being stored to improve the leach resistance of the waste matrix and to maintain mechanical stability. Combustible solid radioactive waste can be incinerated and the resulting ashes can also be immobilized before storage. The immobilized resins and ashes are then contained in steel drums that may undergo corrosion depending on the presence of certain contaminants. The work described in this paper was aimed at evaluating the corrosion susceptibility of steel drums in contact with cemented ion-exchange resins and incineration ashes containing different concentrations of aggressive species (mostly chloride and sulphate ions). A special type of specimen was designed to simulate the cemented waste in the drum. The evolution of the corrosion potential and the corrosion current density of the steel, as well as the electrical resistivity of the matrix were monitored over a time period of 1 year. The results show the deleterious effect of chloride on the expected lifespan of the waste containers.

  17. Water migration through compacted bentonite backfills for containment of high-level nuclear waste

    SciTech Connect

    Westsik, J.H.; Hodges, F.N.; Kuhn, W.L.; Myers, T.R.

    1983-01-01

    Tests carried out with compacted sodium and calcium bentonites at room temperature indicate that bentonite backfills will effectively control water movement near a high-level nuclear waste package. Saturation tests indicate that water will rapidly diffuse into a dry bentonite backfill, reaching saturation in times on the order of tens of years. The apparent diffusion coefficient for sodium bentonite (about5 wt% initial water content) compacted to 2.1 g/cm/sup 3/ is 1.7 x 10/sup -6/ cm/sup 2//sec. However, the hydraulic conductivities of saturated bentonites are low, ranging from approximately 10/sup -11/ cm/sec to 10/sup -13/ cm/sec over a density range of 1.5 g/cm/sup 3/ to 2.2 g/cm/sup 3/. The hydraulic conductivities of compacted bentonites are at least several orders of magnitude lower than those of candidate-host silicate rocks, indicating that most flowing groundwater contacting a bentonite backfill would be diverted around the backfill rather than flowing through it. In addition, because of the very low hydraulic conductivities of bentonite backfills, the rate of chemical transport between the containerized waste and the surrounding host rock will be effectively controlled by diffusion through the backfill. The formation of a diffusion barrier by the backfill will significantly reduce the long-term rate of radionuclide release from the waste package, an advantage distinct from the delay in release resulting from the sorptive properties of a bentonite backfill.

  18. Modern Alchemy: Solidifying high-level nuclear waste

    SciTech Connect

    Newton, C.C.

    1997-07-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy is putting a modern version of alchemy to work to produce an answer to a decades-old problem. It is taking place at the Savannah River Site (SRS) in Aiken, South Carolina and at the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) near Buffalo, New York. At both locations, contractor Westinghouse Electric Corporation is applying technology that is turning liquid high-level radioactive waste (HLW) into a stabilized, durable glass for safer and easier management. The process is called vitrification. SRS and WVDP are now operating the nation`s first full-scale HLW vitrification plants.

  19. Nuclear reactor with low-level core coolant intake

    DOEpatents

    Challberg, Roy C.; Townsend, Harold E.

    1993-01-01

    A natural-circulation boiling-water reactor has skirts extending downward from control rod guide tubes to about 10 centimeters from the reactor vessel bottom. The skirts define annular channels about control rod drive housings that extend through the reactor vessel bottom. Recirculating water is forced in through the low-level entrances to these channels, sweeping bottom water into the channels in the process. The sweeping action prevents cooler water from accumulating at the bottom. This in turn minimizes thermal shock to bottom-dwelling components as would occur when accumulated cool water is swept away and suddenly replaced by warmer water.

  20. Modification of nucleon-nucleon interactions in nuclear medium and neutron densities extracted via proton elastic scattering at intermediate energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeda, Hiroyuki

    2003-03-01

    Spin rotation parameters of proton elastic scattering from 58Ni have been measured at Ep=200, 300 and 400 MeV. By combining them with the previously measured cross sections and analyzing powers at the same energies, the series of measurements has become the "complete" experiment. Cross sections and analyzing powers of proton elastic scattering from 58Ni at 250 MeV, those of 120Sn at Ep=200, 250, 300 and 400 MeV and spin rotation parameters of 120Sn at Ep=300 MeV have been also newly measured. The experiment has been performed at Research Center for Nuclear Phyiscs, Osaka University. In order to explain the 58Ni data, it has been necessary to use realistic density distributions deduced from the nuclear charge distribution and to modify coupling constants and masses of σ and ω mesons. For 120Sn, we have assumed the same modification and used the proton distribution deduced from the charge distribution, we have searched the neutron density distribution which has reproduced 120Sn data at 300 MeV. The deduced neutron distribution has an increase at the nuclear center, which seems to be due to wave functions of neutrons in the 3s1/2 orbit. It also explains the 120Sn data at other energies than 300 MeV. Effects of ρ meson modifications on neutron densities are also mentioned.

  1. Survey of ambient electromagnetic and radio-frequency interference levels in nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Kercel, S.W.; Moore, M.R.; Blakeman, E.D.; Ewing, P.D.; Wood, R.T.

    1996-11-01

    This document reports the results of a survey of ambient electromagnetic conditions in representative nuclear power plants. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research engaged the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to perform these measurements to characterize the electromagnetic interference (EMI) and radio-frequency interference (RFI) levels that can be expected in nuclear power plant environments. This survey is the first of its kind, being based on long-term unattended observations. The data presented in this report were measured at eight different nuclear units and required 14 months to collect. A representative sampling of power plant conditions (reactor type, operating mode, site location) monitored over extended observation periods (up to 5 weeks) were selected to more completely determine the characteristic electromagnetic environment for nuclear power plants. Radiated electric fields were measured over the frequency range of 5 MHz to 8 GHz. Radiated magnetic fields and conducted EMI events were measured over the frequency range of 305 Hz to 5 MHz. Highest strength observations of the electromagnetic ambient environment across all measurement conditions at each site provide frequency-dependent profiles for EMI/RFI levels in nuclear power plants.

  2. Effects of level density parameter on the superheavy production in cold fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pahlavani, M. R.; Alavi, S. A.

    2014-12-01

    By using semiclassical method and considering Woods-Saxon and Coulomb potentials, the level density parameter a was calculated for three superheavy nuclei 270110, 278112 and 290116. Obtained results showed that the value of level density parameter of these nuclei is near to the simple relation a ≈ A/10. In framework of the dinuclear system model, the effects of level density parameter on the probability of the formation of a compound nucleus, the ratio of neutron emission width and fission width, and evaporation residue cross-section of three cold fusion reactions 62Ni+208Pb, 70Zn+208Pb and 82Se+208Pb, leading to superheavy elements were investigated. The findings indicate that the level density parameter play a significant role in calculations of heavy-ion fusion-fission reactions. The obtained results in the case of a = A/12 have larger values in comparison with calculated level density parameter with Woods-Saxon potential (aWS) and a = A/10. The theoretical results of the evaporation residue cross-section are very sensitive to the choice of level density parameter. The calculated values with aWS are in good agreement with experimental values.

  3. YY1 Controls Immunoglobulin Class Switch Recombination and Nuclear Activation-Induced Deaminase Levels

    PubMed Central

    Zaprazna, Kristina

    2012-01-01

    Activation-induced deaminase (AID) is an enzyme required for class switch recombination (CSR) and somatic hypermutation (SHM), processes that ensure antibody maturation and expression of different immunoglobulin isotypes. AID function is tightly regulated by tissue- and stage-specific expression, nuclear localization, and protein stability. Transcription factor YY1 is crucial for early B cell development, but its function at late B cell stages is unknown. Here, we show that YY1 conditional knockout in activated splenic B cells interferes with CSR. Knockout of YY1 did not affect B cell proliferation, transcription of the AID and IgM genes, or levels of various switch region germ line transcripts. However, we show that YY1 physically interacts with AID and controls the accumulation of nuclear AID, at least in part, by increasing nuclear AID stability. We show for the first time that YY1 plays a novel role in CSR and controls nuclear AID protein levels. PMID:22290437

  4. Using Direct Sub-Level Entity Access to Improve Nuclear Stockpile Simulation Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, Robert Y.

    1999-08-01

    Direct sub-level entity access is a seldom-used technique in discrete-event simulation modeling that addresses the accessibility of sub-level entity information. The technique has significant advantages over more common, alternative modeling methods--especially where hierarchical entity structures are modeled. As such, direct sub-level entity access is often preferable in modeling nuclear stockpile, life-extension issues, an area to which it has not been previously applied. Current nuclear stockpile, life-extension models were demonstrated to benefit greatly from the advantages of direct sub-level entity access. In specific cases, the application of the technique resulted in models that were up to 10 times faster than functionally equivalent models where alternative techniques were applied. Furthermore, specific implementations of direct sub-level entity access were observed to be more flexible, efficient, functional, and scalable than corresponding implementations using common modeling techniques. Common modeling techniques (''unbatch/batch'' and ''attribute-copying'') proved inefficient and cumbersome in handling many nuclear stockpile modeling complexities, including multiple weapon sites, true defect analysis, and large numbers of weapon and subsystem types. While significant effort was required to enable direct sub-level entity access in the nuclear stockpile simulation models, the enhancements were worth the effort--resulting in more efficient, more capable, and more informative models that effectively addressed the complexities of the nuclear stockpile.

  5. Density functional theory computation of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance parameters in light and heavy nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutter, Kiplangat

    This thesis illustrates the utilization of Density functional theory (DFT) in calculations of gas and solution phase Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) properties of light and heavy nuclei. Computing NMR properties is still a challenge and there are many unknown factors that are still being explored. For instance, influence of hydrogen-bonding; thermal motion; vibration; rotation and solvent effects. In one of the theoretical studies of 195Pt NMR chemical shift in cisplatin and its derivatives illustrated in Chapter 2 and 3 of this thesis. The importance of representing explicit solvent molecules explicitly around the Pt center in cisplatin complexes was outlined. In the same complexes, solvent effect contributed about half of the J(Pt-N) coupling constant. Indicating the significance of considering the surrounding solvent molecules in elucidating the NMR measurements of cisplatin binding to DNA. In chapter 4, we explore the Spin-Orbit (SO) effects on the 29Si and 13C chemical shifts induced by surrounding metal and ligands. The unusual Ni, Pd, Pt trends in SO effects to the 29Si in metallasilatrane complexes X-Si-(mu-mt)4-M-Y was interpreted based on electronic and relativistic effects rather than by structural differences between the complexes. In addition, we develop a non-linear model for predicting NMR SO effects in a series of organics bonded to heavy nuclei halides. In chapter 5, we extend the idea of "Chemist's orbitals" LMO analysis to the quantum chemical proton NMR computation of systems with internal resonance-assisted hydrogen bonds. Consequently, we explicitly link the relationship between the NMR parameters related to H-bonded systems and intuitive picture of a chemical bond from quantum calculations. The analysis shows how NMR signatures characteristic of H-bond can be explained by local bonding and electron delocalization concepts. One shortcoming of some of the anti-cancer agents like cisplatin is that they are toxic and researchers are looking for

  6. Effects of long-term exposure of tuffs to high-level nuclear waste-repository conditions. Preliminary report

    SciTech Connect

    Blacic, J.; Carter, J.; Halleck, P.; Johnson, P.; Shankland, T.; Andersen, R.; Spicochi, K.; Heller, A.

    1982-02-01

    Tests have been performed to explore the effects of extended exposure of tuffs from the southwestern portion of the Nevada Test Site to temperatures and pressures similar to those that will be encountered in a high-level nuclear waste repository. Tuff samples ranging from highly welded, nonzeolitized to unwelded, highly zeolitized varieties were subjected to temperatures of 80, 120, and 180{sup 0}C; confining pressures of 9.7 and 19.7 MPa; and water-pore pressures of 0.5 to 19.7 MPa for durations of 2 to 6 months. The following basic properties were measured before and after exposure and compared: tensile strength, uniaxial compressive strength, grain density, porosity, mineralogy, permeability, thermal expansion, and thermal conductivity. Depending on rock type and exposure conditions, significant changes in ambient tensile strength, compressive strength, grain density, and porosity were measured. Mineralogic examination, permeability, and thermal property measurements remain to be completed.

  7. Effect of medium dependent binding energies on inferring the temperatures and freeze-out density of disassembling hot nuclear matter from cluster yields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shlomo, S.; Röpke, G.; Natowitz, J. B.; Qin, L.; Hagel, K.; Wada, R.; Bonasera, A.

    2009-03-01

    We explore the abundance of light clusters in asymmetric nuclear matter at subsaturation density. With increasing density, binding energies and wave functions are modified due to medium effects. The method of Albergo, Costa, Costanzo, and Rubbino (ACCR) for determining the temperature and free nucleon density of a disassembling hot nuclear source from fragment yields is modified to include, in addition to Coulomb effects and flow, also effects of medium modifications of cluster properties, which become of importance when the nuclear matter density is above 10-3fm-3. We show how the analysis of cluster yields, to infer temperature and nucleon densities, is modified if the shifts in binding energies of in medium clusters are included. Although, at low densities, the temperature calculated from given yields changes only modestly if medium effects are taken into account, larger discrepancies are observed when the nucleon densities are determined from measured yields.

  8. Lead iron phosphate glass as a containment medium for disposal of high-level nuclear waste

    DOEpatents

    Boatner, Lynn A.; Sales, Brian C.

    1989-01-01

    Lead-iron phosphate glasses containing a high level of Fe.sub.2 O.sub.3 for use as a storage medium for high-level radioactive nuclear waste. By combining lead-iron phosphate glass with various types of simulated high-level nuclear waste, a highly corrosion resistant, homogeneous, easily processed glass can be formed. For corroding solutions at 90.degree. C., with solution pH values in the range between 5 and 9, the corrosion rate of the lead-iron phosphate nuclear waste glass is at least 10.sup.2 to 10.sup.3 times lower than the corrosion rate of a comparable borosilicate nuclear waste glass. The presence of Fe.sub.2 O.sub.3 in forming the lead-iron phosphate glass is critical. Lead-iron phosphate nuclear waste glass can be prepared at temperatures as low as 800.degree. C., since they exhibit very low melt viscosities in the 800.degree. to 1050.degree. C. temperature range. These waste-loaded glasses do not readily devitrify at temperatures as high as 550.degree. C. and are not adversely affected by large doses of gamma radiation in H.sub.2 O at 135.degree. C. The lead-iron phosphate waste glasses can be prepared with minimal modification of the technology developed for processing borosilicate glass nuclear wasteforms.

  9. Why consider subseabed disposal of high-level nuclear waste

    SciTech Connect

    Heath, G. R.; Hollister, C. D.; Anderson, D. R.; Leinen, M.

    1980-01-01

    Large areas of the deep seabed warrant assessment as potential disposal sites for high-level radioactive waste because: (1) they are far from seismically and tectonically active lithospheric plate boundaries; (2) they are far from active or young volcanos; (3) they contain thick layers of very uniform fine-grained clays; (4) they are devoid of natural resources likely to be exploited in the forseeable future; (5) the geologic and oceanographic processes governing the deposition of sediments in such areas are well understood, and are remarkably insensitive to past oceanographic and climatic changes; and (6) sedmentary records of tens of millions of years of slow, uninterrupted deposition of fine grained clay support predictions of the future stability of such sites. Data accumulated to date on the permeability, ion-retardation properties, and mechanical strength of pelagic clay sediments indicate that they can act as a primary barrier to the escape of buried nuclides. Work in progress should determine within the current decade whether subseabed disposal is environmentally acceptable and technically feasible, as well as address the legal, political and social issues raised by this new concept.

  10. Quantitative Analysis of Lens Nuclear Density Using Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) with a Liquid Optics Interface: Correlation between OCT Images and LOCS III Grading

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jin Hyoung

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To quantify whole lens and nuclear lens densities using anterior-segment optical coherence tomography (OCT) with a liquid optics interface and evaluate their correlation with Lens Opacities Classification System III (LOCS III) lens grading and corrected distance visual acuity (BCVA). Methods. OCT images of the whole lens and lens nucleus of eyes with age-related nuclear cataract were analyzed using ImageJ software. The lens grade and nuclear density were represented in pixel intensity units (PIU) and correlations between PIU, BCVA, and LOCS III were assessed. Results. Forty-seven eyes were analyzed. The mean whole lens and lens nuclear densities were 26.99 ± 5.23 and 19.43 ± 6.15 PIU, respectively. A positive linear correlation was observed between lens opacities (R2 = 0.187, p < 0.01) and nuclear density (R2 = 0.316, p < 0.01) obtained from OCT images and LOCS III. Preoperative BCVA and LOCS III were also positively correlated (R2 = 0.454, p < 0.01). Conclusions. Whole lens and lens nuclear densities obtained from OCT correlated with LOCS III. Nuclear density showed a higher positive correlation with LOCS III than whole lens density. OCT with a liquid optics interface is a potential quantitative method for lens grading and can aid in monitoring and managing age-related cataracts. PMID:27651952

  11. 10 CFR 73.51 - Requirements for the physical protection of stored spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. 73.51 Section 73.51 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION....51 Requirements for the physical protection of stored spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive... radioactive waste pursuant to paragraphs (a)(1)(i), (ii), and (2) of this section. This includes— (1) Spent...

  12. 10 CFR 73.51 - Requirements for the physical protection of stored spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. 73.51 Section 73.51 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION....51 Requirements for the physical protection of stored spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive... radioactive waste pursuant to paragraphs (a)(1)(i), (ii), and (2) of this section. This includes— (1) Spent...

  13. 10 CFR 73.51 - Requirements for the physical protection of stored spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. 73.51 Section 73.51 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION... radioactive waste pursuant to paragraphs (a)(1)(i), (ii), and (2) of this section. This includes— (1) Spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste stored under a specific license issued pursuant to part...

  14. 10 CFR 73.51 - Requirements for the physical protection of stored spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. 73.51 Section 73.51 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION... radioactive waste pursuant to paragraphs (a)(1)(i), (ii), and (2) of this section. This includes— (1) Spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste stored under a specific license issued pursuant to part...

  15. 10 CFR 73.51 - Requirements for the physical protection of stored spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. 73.51 Section 73.51 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION... radioactive waste pursuant to paragraphs (a)(1)(i), (ii), and (2) of this section. This includes— (1) Spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste stored under a specific license issued pursuant to part...

  16. Big Bang Nucleosynthesis: Impact of Nuclear Physics Uncertainties on Baryonic Matter Density

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Michael Scott; Roberts, Luke F; Hix, William Raphael; Bruner, Blake D; Kozub, R. L.; Tytler, David; Fuller, George M; Lingerfelt, Eric J; Nesaraja, Caroline D

    2008-01-01

    We performed new Big Bang Nucleosynthesis simulations with the bigbangonline.org suite of codes to determine, from the nuclear physics perspective, the highest achievable precision of the constraint on the baryon-to-photo ratio {eta} given current observational uncertainties. We also performed sensitivity studies to determine the impact that particular nuclear physics measurements would have on the uncertainties of predicted abundances and on the {eta} constraint.

  17. Big Bang Nucleosynthesis: Impact of Nuclear Physics Uncertainties on Baryonic Matter Density Constraints

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Michael Scott; Bruner, Blake D; KOZUB, RAYMOND L; Roberts, Luke F; Tytler, David; Fuller, George M; Lingerfelt, Eric J; Hix, William Raphael; Nesaraja, Caroline D

    2008-01-01

    We ran new Big Bang Nucleosynthesis simulations with the bigbangonline.org suite of codes to determine, from the nuclear physics perspective, the highest achievable precision of the constraint on the baryon-to-photo ratio eta given current observational uncertainties. We also ran sensitivity studies to determine the impact that particular nuclear physics measurements would have on the uncertainties of predicted abundances and on the eta constraint.

  18. Inspection and evaluation of Nuclear Fuel Services high-level waste storage system, program plan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1980-01-01

    Information concerning the condition of the high-level waste tanks at the Western New York State Nuclear Service center near West Valley, New York is presented. This information is to be used in evaluating the safety of continued storage and in the development of alternatives for final disposition of the high-level waste.

  19. Formation of selfbound states in a one-dimensional nuclear model—a renormalization group based density functional study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kemler, Sandra; Pospiech, Martin; Braun, Jens

    2017-01-01

    In nuclear physics, density functional theory (DFT) provides the basis for state-of-the art studies of ground-state properties of heavy nuclei. However, the direct relation of the density functional underlying these calculations and the microscopic nuclear forces is not yet fully understood. We present a combination of DFT and renormalization group (RG) techniques which allows to study selfbound many-body systems from microscopic interactions. We discuss its application with the aid of systems of identical fermions interacting via a long-range attractive and short-range repulsive two-body force in one dimension. We compute ground-state energies, intrinsic densities, and density correlation functions of these systems and compare our results to those obtained from other methods. In particular, we show how energies of excited states as well as the absolute square of the ground-state wave function can be extracted from the correlation functions within our approach. The relation between many-body perturbation theory and our DFT-RG approach is discussed and illustrated with the aid of the calculation of the second-order energy correction for a system of N identical fermions interacting via a general two-body interaction. Moreover, we discuss the control of spuriously emerging fermion self-interactions in DFT studies within our framework. In general, our approach may help to guide the development of energy functionals for future quantitative DFT studies of heavy nuclei from microscopic interactions.

  20. A high throughput approach for analysis of cell nuclear deformability at single cell level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ermis, Menekse; Akkaynak, Derya; Chen, Pu; Demirci, Utkan; Hasirci, Vasif

    2016-11-01

    Various physiological and pathological processes, such as cell differentiation, migration, attachment, and metastasis are highly dependent on nuclear elasticity. Nuclear morphology directly reflects the elasticity of the nucleus. We propose that quantification of changes in nuclear morphology on surfaces with defined topography will enable us to assess nuclear elasticity and deformability. Here, we used soft lithography techniques to produce 3 dimensional (3-D) cell culture substrates decorated with micron sized pillar structures of variable aspect ratios and dimensions to induce changes in cellular and nuclear morphology. We developed a high content image analysis algorithm to quantify changes in nuclear morphology at the single-cell level in response to physical cues from the 3-D culture substrate. We present that nuclear stiffness can be used as a physical parameter to evaluate cancer cells based on their lineage and in comparison to non-cancerous cells originating from the same tissue type. This methodology can be exploited for systematic study of mechanical characteristics of large cell populations complementing conventional tools such as atomic force microscopy and nanoindentation.

  1. A high throughput approach for analysis of cell nuclear deformability at single cell level

    PubMed Central

    Ermis, Menekse; Akkaynak, Derya; Chen, Pu; Demirci, Utkan; Hasirci, Vasif

    2016-01-01

    Various physiological and pathological processes, such as cell differentiation, migration, attachment, and metastasis are highly dependent on nuclear elasticity. Nuclear morphology directly reflects the elasticity of the nucleus. We propose that quantification of changes in nuclear morphology on surfaces with defined topography will enable us to assess nuclear elasticity and deformability. Here, we used soft lithography techniques to produce 3 dimensional (3-D) cell culture substrates decorated with micron sized pillar structures of variable aspect ratios and dimensions to induce changes in cellular and nuclear morphology. We developed a high content image analysis algorithm to quantify changes in nuclear morphology at the single-cell level in response to physical cues from the 3-D culture substrate. We present that nuclear stiffness can be used as a physical parameter to evaluate cancer cells based on their lineage and in comparison to non-cancerous cells originating from the same tissue type. This methodology can be exploited for systematic study of mechanical characteristics of large cell populations complementing conventional tools such as atomic force microscopy and nanoindentation. PMID:27841297

  2. From famine to feast? Selecting nuclear DNA sequence loci for plant species-level phylogeny reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Colin E; Eastwood, Ruth J; Donovan Bailey, C

    2005-01-01

    Phylogenetic analyses of DNA sequences have prompted spectacular progress in assembling the Tree of Life. However, progress in constructing phylogenies among closely related species, at least for plants, has been less encouraging. We show that for plants, the rapid accumulation of DNA characters at higher taxonomic levels has not been matched by conventional sequence loci at the species level, leaving a lack of well-resolved gene trees that is hindering investigations of many fundamental questions in plant evolutionary biology. The most popular approach to address this problem has been to use low-copy nuclear genes as a source of DNA sequence data. However, this has had limited success because levels of variation among nuclear intron sequences across groups of closely related species are extremely variable and generally lower than conventionally used loci, and because no universally useful low-copy nuclear DNA sequence loci have been developed. This suggests that solutions will, for the most part, be lineage-specific, prompting a move away from ‘universal’ gene thinking for species-level phylogenetics. The benefits and limitations of alternative approaches to locate more variable nuclear loci are discussed and the potential of anonymous non-genic nuclear loci is highlighted. Given the virtually unlimited number of loci that can be generated using these new approaches, it is clear that effective screening will be critical for efficient selection of the most informative loci. Strategies for screening are outlined. PMID:16553318

  3. Competing Quantum Hall Phases in the Second Landau Level in Low Density Limit

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Wei; Serafin, A.; Xia, J. S.; Liang, Y.; Sullivan, N. S.; Baldwin, K. W.; West, K. W.; Pfeiffer, L. N.; Tsui, D. C.

    2015-01-01

    Up to date, studies of the fractional quantum Hall effect (FQHE) states in the second Landau level have mainly been carried out in the high electron density regime, where the electron mobility is the highest. Only recently, with the advance of high quality low density MBE growth, experiments have been pushed to the low density regime [1], where the electron-electron interactions are strong and the Landau level mixing parameter, defined by κ = e2/εIB/ℏωe, is large. Here, lB = (ℏe/B)1/2 is the magnetic length and ωc = eB/m the cyclotron frequency. All other parameters have their normal meanings. It has been shown that a large Landau level mixing effect strongly affects the electron physics in the second Landau level [2].

  4. Interrelationships between seminal parameters and sperm nuclear DNA damage before and after density gradient centrifugation: implications for assisted conception.

    PubMed

    Tomlinson, M J; Moffatt, O; Manicardi, G C; Bizzaro, D; Afnan, M; Sakkas, D

    2001-10-01

    With an increase in the use of assisted reproduction technologies the requirements of the diagnostic semen analysis are constantly changing. Spermatozoa from patients undergoing IVF were analysed by examining the conventional semen parameters and DNA/chromatin integrity, using in-situ nick translation (NT) and the Chromomycin A(3) fluorochrome, which indirectly demonstrates a decreased presence of protamine. Samples were examined before and after preparation using discontinuous density gradient centrifugation. Density gradient centrifugation enriched samples by improving the percentage of morphologically normal forms by 138% and sperm nuclear integrity by 450%. Sperm nuclear integrity as assessed by in-situ nick translation (NT) demonstrated a very clear relationship with sperm concentration, motility and morphology. Morphology correlated with fertilization rates of patients undergoing IVF, while NT values of the spermatozoa post-preparation were significantly lower in pregnant patients. We have demonstrated that along with the classical semen parameters, the assessment of nuclear integrity improves the characterization of the semen sample and may be used as a tool for allocating patients to specific assisted reproduction treatments.

  5. Correlation of vitamin D, bone mineral density and parathyroid hormone levels in adults with low bone density.

    PubMed

    Kota, Sunil; Jammula, Sruti; Kota, Siva; Meher, Lalit; Modi, Kirtikumar

    2013-07-01

    Bone mineral densiy (BMD) is known to be affected by serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH) D) levels, intact parathyroid hormone (iPTH) levels. Indian data pertinent to above observation is scant. Our study aimed to investigate the relationships between serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH) D) levels, intact parathyroid hormone (iPTH) levels and bone mineral density (BMD) in a cohort of Indian patients. Adults with or without fragility fractures with low BMD at the hip or lumbar spine were evaluated clinically along with laboratory investigations. T-scores of the hip and spine were derived from BMD-DEXA (dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry). Multivariate regression models were used to investigate the relationships between serum 25(OH) D, iPTH and BMD. Total of 102 patients (male:female = 38:64) with a mean age of 62.5 ± 6.4 years were included in the study. Forty-four patients had osteopenia. Osteoporosis was present in 58 patients. The mean values for serum 25(OH) D and iPTH levels were 21.3 ± 0.5 ng/ml and 53.1 ± 22.3 pg/ml, respectively. In 84.3% of patients, serum 25(OH) D levels were below 30 ng/ml (Normal = 30-74 ng/ml), confirming vitamin D deficiency. There was no association between 25(OH) D levels and BMD at the hip or lumbar spine (P = 0.473 and 0.353, respectively). Both at the hip and lumbar spine; iPTH levels, male gender, body mass index (BMI) and age were found to be significant predictors of BMD. Patients with higher BMI had significantly lower BMD and T-score. At levels <30 ng/ml, 25(OH) D was negatively associated with iPTH (P = 0.041). Among our cohort of patients with low BMD, no direct relationship between serum 25(OH) D levels and BMD was observed. However, a negative correlation between iPTH and 25(OH) D at serum 25(OH) D concentrations <30 ng/ml. Serum iPTH levels showed a significant negative association with BMD at the hip and lumbar spine. Our findings underscore the critical role of parathyroid hormone in bone metabolism and health.

  6. Correlation of vitamin D, bone mineral density and parathyroid hormone levels in adults with low bone density

    PubMed Central

    Kota, Sunil; Jammula, Sruti; Kota, Siva; Meher, Lalit; Modi, Kirtikumar

    2013-01-01

    Background: Bone mineral densiy (BMD) is known to be affected by serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH) D) levels, intact parathyroid hormone (iPTH) levels. Indian data pertinent to above observation is scant. Our study aimed to investigate the relationships between serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH) D) levels, intact parathyroid hormone (iPTH) levels and bone mineral density (BMD) in a cohort of Indian patients. Materials and Methods: Adults with or without fragility fractures with low BMD at the hip or lumbar spine were evaluated clinically along with laboratory investigations. T-scores of the hip and spine were derived from BMD-DEXA (dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry). Multivariate regression models were used to investigate the relationships between serum 25(OH) D, iPTH and BMD. Results: Total of 102 patients (male:female = 38:64) with a mean age of 62.5 ± 6.4 years were included in the study. Forty-four patients had osteopenia. Osteoporosis was present in 58 patients. The mean values for serum 25(OH) D and iPTH levels were 21.3 ± 0.5 ng/ml and 53.1 ± 22.3 pg/ml, respectively. In 84.3% of patients, serum 25(OH) D levels were below 30 ng/ml (Normal = 30-74 ng/ml), confirming vitamin D deficiency. There was no association between 25(OH) D levels and BMD at the hip or lumbar spine (P = 0.473 and 0.353, respectively). Both at the hip and lumbar spine; iPTH levels, male gender, body mass index (BMI) and age were found to be significant predictors of BMD. Patients with higher BMI had significantly lower BMD and T-score. At levels <30 ng/ml, 25(OH) D was negatively associated with iPTH (P = 0.041). Conclusion: Among our cohort of patients with low BMD, no direct relationship between serum 25(OH) D levels and BMD was observed. However, a negative correlation between iPTH and 25(OH) D at serum 25(OH) D concentrations <30 ng/ml. Serum iPTH levels showed a significant negative association with BMD at the hip and lumbar spine. Our findings underscore the critical role of

  7. Nuclear criticality safety assessment of the low level radioactive waste disposal facility trenches

    SciTech Connect

    Kahook, S.D.

    1994-04-01

    Results of the analyses performed to evaluate the possibility of nuclear criticality in the Low Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Facility (LLRWDF) trenches are documented in this report. The studies presented in this document are limited to assessment of the possibility of criticality due to existing conditions in the LLRWDF. This document does not propose nor set limits for enriched uranium (EU) burial in the LLRWDF and is not a nuclear criticality safety evaluation nor analysis. The calculations presented in the report are Level 2 calculations as defined by the E7 Procedure 2.31, Engineering Calculations.

  8. Population-Level Density Dependence Influences the Origin and Maintenance of Parental Care.

    PubMed

    Reyes, Elijah; Thrasher, Patsy; Bonsall, Michael B; Klug, Hope

    2016-01-01

    Parental care is a defining feature of animal breeding systems. We now know that both basic life-history characteristics and ecological factors influence the evolution of care. However, relatively little is known about how these factors interact to influence the origin and maintenance of care. Here, we expand upon previous work and explore the relationship between basic life-history characteristics (stage-specific rates of mortality and maturation) and the fitness benefits associated with the origin and the maintenance of parental care for two broad ecological scenarios: the scenario in which egg survival is density dependent and the case in which adult survival is density dependent. Our findings suggest that high offspring need is likely critical in driving the origin, but not the maintenance, of parental care regardless of whether density dependence acts on egg or adult survival. In general, parental care is more likely to result in greater fitness benefits when baseline adult mortality is low if 1) egg survival is density dependent or 2) adult mortality is density dependent and mutant density is relatively high. When density dependence acts on egg mortality, low rates of egg maturation and high egg densities are less likely to lead to strong fitness benefits of care. However, when density dependence acts on adult mortality, high levels of egg maturation and increasing adult densities are less likely to maintain care. Juvenile survival has relatively little, if any, effect on the origin and maintenance of egg-only care. More generally, our results suggest that the evolution of parental care will be influenced by an organism's entire life history characteristics, the stage at which density dependence acts, and whether care is originating or being maintained.

  9. Population-Level Density Dependence Influences the Origin and Maintenance of Parental Care

    PubMed Central

    Reyes, Elijah; Thrasher, Patsy; Bonsall, Michael B.; Klug, Hope

    2016-01-01

    Parental care is a defining feature of animal breeding systems. We now know that both basic life-history characteristics and ecological factors influence the evolution of care. However, relatively little is known about how these factors interact to influence the origin and maintenance of care. Here, we expand upon previous work and explore the relationship between basic life-history characteristics (stage-specific rates of mortality and maturation) and the fitness benefits associated with the origin and the maintenance of parental care for two broad ecological scenarios: the scenario in which egg survival is density dependent and the case in which adult survival is density dependent. Our findings suggest that high offspring need is likely critical in driving the origin, but not the maintenance, of parental care regardless of whether density dependence acts on egg or adult survival. In general, parental care is more likely to result in greater fitness benefits when baseline adult mortality is low if 1) egg survival is density dependent or 2) adult mortality is density dependent and mutant density is relatively high. When density dependence acts on egg mortality, low rates of egg maturation and high egg densities are less likely to lead to strong fitness benefits of care. However, when density dependence acts on adult mortality, high levels of egg maturation and increasing adult densities are less likely to maintain care. Juvenile survival has relatively little, if any, effect on the origin and maintenance of egg-only care. More generally, our results suggest that the evolution of parental care will be influenced by an organism’s entire life history characteristics, the stage at which density dependence acts, and whether care is originating or being maintained. PMID:27093056

  10. Lack of correlation of glucose levels in filtered blood plasma to density and conductivity measurements.

    PubMed

    Gordon, David M; Ash, Stephen R

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this research project was to determine whether the glucose level of a blood plasma sample from a diabetic patient could be predicted by measuring the density and conductivity of ultrafiltrate of plasma created by a 30,000 m.w. cutoff membrane. Conductivity of the plasma filtrate measures electrolyte concentration and should correct density measurements for changes in electrolytes and water concentration. In vitro studies were performed measuring conductivity and density of solutions of varying glucose and sodium chloride concentrations. Plasma from seven hospitalized patients with diabetes was filtered across a 30,000 m.w. cutoff membrane. The filtrate density and conductivity were measured and correlated to glucose levels. In vitro studies confirmed the ability to predict glucose from density and conductivity measurements, in varying concentrations of glucose and saline. In plasma filtrate, the conductivity and density measurements of ultrafiltrate allowed estimation of glucose in some patients with diabetes but not others. The correlation coefficient for the combined patient data was 0.45 which was significant but only explained 20% of the variability in the glucose levels. Individually, the correlation was significant in only two of the seven patients with correlation coefficients of 0.79 and 0.88. The reasons for lack of correlation are not clear, and cannot be explained by generation of idiogenic osmoles, effects of alcohol dehydrogenase, water intake, etc. This combination of physical methods for glucose measurement is not a feasible approach to measuring glucose in plasma filtrate.

  11. Correlation between High Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol (HDL) Level and Aerobic Activity Level.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-04-01

    over a 40 day period for HDtJICholesteroll and Total Choleis- added with the "reverse" technique, This technique is only poai- tarot . The results are...Stand- tarot and Total Cholestero levels, it is beat that eet laoatr ard and a control Serum were each analyzed 10 times giving the * determinle its

  12. Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein E1 regulates protein disulphide isomerase translation in oxidized low-density lipoprotein-activated endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Meng, N; Peng, N; Huang, S; Wang, S Q; Zhao, J; Su, L; Zhang, Y; Zhang, S; Zhao, B; Miao, J

    2015-03-01

    Endothelium-derived protein disulphide isomerase (PDI) is required for thrombus formation in vivo. But, how to control PDI overproduction in oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL)-activated vascular endothelial cells (VECs) is not well understood. In this study, we try to answer this question using our newly identified activator of mTOC1 3-benzyl-5-((2-nitrophenoxy) methyl)-dihydrofuran-2 (3H)-one (3BDO) that has been shown to protect VECs. First, we performed a proteomics analysis on the oxLDL-activated vascular VECs in the presence or absence of 3BDO. Next, we constructed the heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein E1 (hnRNP E1) mutants at Ser43 and used the RNA-ChIP technique to investigate the relationship between hnRNP E1 and PDI production. Furthermore, we examined the effect of 3BDO on oxLDL-altered phosphorylation of Akt1 and Akt2. Finally, we studied the effect of 3BDO on oxLDL-altered PDI protein level in apolipoprotein E(-/-) mice with advanced atherosclerosis. In VECs, oxLDL-increased PDI protein level, induced hnRNP E1 phosphorylation at Ser43, suppressed the binding of hnRNP E1 to PDI 5'UTR and induced the phosphorylation of Akt2 but not Akt1. All of these processes were blocked by 3BDO. Importantly, Ser43 mutant of hnRNP E1 inhibited the increase of PDI protein level and the decrease of the binding of hnRNP E1 and PDI 5'UTR induced by oxLDL. Furthermore, 3BDO suppressed oxLDL-induced PDI protein increase in the serum and plaque endothelium of apolipoprotein E(-/-) mice. hnRNP E1 is a new regulator of PDI translation in oxLDL-activated VECs, and 3BDO is a powerful agent for controlling PDI overproduction. © 2014 Scandinavian Physiological Society. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Three-dimensional visualization of electron- and nuclear-density distributions in inorganic materials by MEM-based technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izumi, F.; Momma, K.

    2011-03-01

    The analysis of observed structure factors estimated after Rietveld analysis by the maximum-entropy method (MEM) gives electron or nuclear densities in the unit cell. The resultant densities are, more or less, biased toward a structural model in the Rietveld analysis. To overcome such a problem, we devised a sophisticated technique named MEM-based pattern fitting (MPF). For this purpose, a pattern-fitting system, RIETAN-FP, and a MEM analysis programs, PRIMA or its successor called Dysnomia, were virtually integrated into a structure-refinement system, whereby the pattern calculated from structure factors obtained by MEM is fit to the whole observed pattern. The resulting observed structure factors are analyzed again by MEM. In this way, whole-pattern fitting and MEM analysis are alternately repeated until R factors in the former no longer decrease. MPF virtually represents the crystal structure by electron or nuclear densities. MPF is, therefore, very effective in visualizing positional, occupational, and orientational disorder, chemical bonding, and anharmonic thermal motion. New programs, MPF_multi and VESTA 3, used in MPF are briefly introduced, and two representative applications of MPF to inorganic materials containing highly disordered chemical species are demonstrated.

  14. Experimental Level Densities and {gamma}-Strength Functions in rare earth nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Siem, S.; Guttormsen, M.; Larsen, A. C.; Nyhus, H. T.; Ingebretsen, F.; Messelt, S.; Rekstad, J.; Syed, N. U. H.; Chankova, R.; Schiller, A.; Voinov, A.; Oedegaard, S. W.

    2008-04-17

    The level density and radiative strength function for {sup 146,147}Sm and {sup 163,164}Dy have been extracted from primary {gamma} spectra using the Oslo method. As one approaches the closed N = 82 neutron shell, the structures in the level density become more pronounced due to shell effects. The experimental level densities can be used to explore thermodynamic properties of the nucleus within the microcanonical ensemble. Pygmy resonances, which are based on the scissors mode and seen in deformed rare-earth nuclei, are not observed in near-spherical {sup 146,147}Sm, as expected. Pygmy resonances in {sup 163,164}Dy were studied after {sup 3}He-induced reactions and their width was found to be twice as wide as compared to results reported after neutron-capture reactions.

  15. Mammographic Density and Vitamin D Levels - A Cross-sectional Study.

    PubMed

    Straub, Loreen; Riedel, Johanna; Luppa, Peter B; Wissing, Johanna; Artmann, Almut; Kiechle, Marion; Seifert-Klauss, Vanadin Regina

    2017-03-01

    Background Some studies have already proposed an inverse association between vitamin D levels and breast density. As breast density is already considered an established risk factor for breast cancer, such a connection could offer a new starting point for the prevention of breast cancer. Material and Methods To investigate this suggested connection, a total of 412 pre- and 572 post-menopausal women for whom mammography was indicated were recruited into this cross-sectional study. In addition to a questionnaire-based interview on the patient's general and gynecological medical history, her eating habits and lifestyle, serum levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D], calcium, phosphate and creatinine were determined. Breast density was determined by mammography and categorized as 1 to 4 according to the ACR classification. In addition to performing descriptive analysis to get a better overview of the data, a number of multivariate regression models were developed to determine the impact of confounders and the connection between vitamin D and mammographic density. Results More than half of all participants had low levels of 25(OH)D (< 20 ng/ml) and only a small minority of women (5.7 %) had what are currently considered to be optimal serum levels of 25(OH)D of at least 30 ng/ml. The significant majority of the cohort had a medium mammographic density (n = 463 had ACR 2; n = 343 had ACR 3). Logistic regression analysis showed that lower 25(OH)D serum levels were associated significantly more often with high rather than medium breast density. This association remained, even after adjusting for other factors which influence breast density such as age, BMI and menopausal status (p = 0.032 for ACR 4 vs. ACR 2; p = 0.028 for ACR 4 vs. ACR 3). When the same analysis was done separately for pre-menopausal and post-menopausal women, BMI in both groups was found to be inversely correlated with breast density and this inverse correlation was highly

  16. New Kohn-Sham density functional based on microscopic nuclear and neutron matter equations of state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldo, M.; Robledo, L. M.; Schuck, P.; Viñas, X.

    2013-06-01

    A new version of the Barcelona-Catania-Paris energy functional is applied to a study of nuclear masses and other properties. The functional is largely based on calculated ab initio nuclear and neutron matter equations of state. Compared to typical Skyrme functionals having 10-12 parameters apart from spin-orbit and pairing terms, the new functional has only 2 or 3 adjusted parameters, fine tuning the nuclear matter binding energy and fixing the surface energy of finite nuclei. An energy rms value of 1.58 MeV is obtained from a fit of these three parameters to the 579 measured masses reported in the Audi and Wapstra [Nucl. Phys. ANUPABL0375-947410.1016/j.nuclphysa.2003.11.003 729, 337 (2003)] compilation. This rms value compares favorably with the one obtained using other successful mean field theories, which range from 1.5 to 3.0 MeV for optimized Skyrme functionals and 0.7 to 3.0 for the Gogny functionals. The other properties that have been calculated and compared to experiment are nuclear radii, the giant monopole resonance, and spontaneous fission lifetimes.

  17. French diagnostic reference levels in diagnostic radiology, computed tomography and nuclear medicine: 2004-2008 review.

    PubMed

    Roch, P; Aubert, B

    2013-04-01

    After 5 y of collecting data on diagnostic reference levels (DRLs), the Nuclear Safety and Radiation Protection French Institute (IRSN) presents the analyses of this data. The analyses of the collected data for radiology, computed tomography (CT) and nuclear medicine allow IRSN to estimate the level of regulatory application by health professionals and the representativeness of current DRL in terms of relevant examinations, dosimetric quantities, numerical values and patient morphologies. Since 2004, the involvement of professionals has highly increased, especially in nuclear medicine, followed by CT and then by radiology. Analyses show some discordance between regulatory examinations and clinical practice. Some of the dosimetric quantities used for the DRL setting are insufficient or not relevant enough, and some numerical values should also be reviewed. On the basis of these findings, IRSN formulates recommendations to update regulatory DRL with current and relevant examination lists, dosimetric quantities and numerical values.

  18. Efficient calculation of nuclear spin-rotation constants from auxiliary density functional theory.

    PubMed

    Zuniga-Gutierrez, Bernardo; Camacho-Gonzalez, Monica; Bendana-Castillo, Alfonso; Simon-Bastida, Patricia; Calaminici, Patrizia; Köster, Andreas M

    2015-09-14

    The computation of the spin-rotation tensor within the framework of auxiliary density functional theory (ADFT) in combination with the gauge including atomic orbital (GIAO) scheme, to treat the gauge origin problem, is presented. For the spin-rotation tensor, the calculation of the magnetic shielding tensor represents the most demanding computational task. Employing the ADFT-GIAO methodology, the central processing unit time for the magnetic shielding tensor calculation can be dramatically reduced. In this work, the quality of spin-rotation constants obtained with the ADFT-GIAO methodology is compared with available experimental data as well as with other theoretical results at the Hartree-Fock and coupled-cluster level of theory. It is found that the agreement between the ADFT-GIAO results and the experiment is good and very similar to the ones obtained by the coupled-cluster single-doubles-perturbative triples-GIAO methodology. With the improved computational performance achieved, the computation of the spin-rotation tensors of large systems or along Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics trajectories becomes feasible in reasonable times. Three models of carbon fullerenes containing hundreds of atoms and thousands of basis functions are used for benchmarking the performance. Furthermore, a theoretical study of temperature effects on the structure and spin-rotation tensor of the H(12)C-(12)CH-DF complex is presented. Here, the temperature dependency of the spin-rotation tensor of the fluorine nucleus can be used to identify experimentally the so far unknown bent isomer of this complex. To the best of our knowledge this is the first time that temperature effects on the spin-rotation tensor are investigated.

  19. Efficient calculation of nuclear spin-rotation constants from auxiliary density functional theory

    SciTech Connect

    Zuniga-Gutierrez, Bernardo; Camacho-Gonzalez, Monica; Bendana-Castillo, Alfonso; Simon-Bastida, Patricia; Calaminici, Patrizia; Köster, Andreas M.

    2015-09-14

    The computation of the spin-rotation tensor within the framework of auxiliary density functional theory (ADFT) in combination with the gauge including atomic orbital (GIAO) scheme, to treat the gauge origin problem, is presented. For the spin-rotation tensor, the calculation of the magnetic shielding tensor represents the most demanding computational task. Employing the ADFT-GIAO methodology, the central processing unit time for the magnetic shielding tensor calculation can be dramatically reduced. In this work, the quality of spin-rotation constants obtained with the ADFT-GIAO methodology is compared with available experimental data as well as with other theoretical results at the Hartree-Fock and coupled-cluster level of theory. It is found that the agreement between the ADFT-GIAO results and the experiment is good and very similar to the ones obtained by the coupled-cluster single-doubles-perturbative triples-GIAO methodology. With the improved computational performance achieved, the computation of the spin-rotation tensors of large systems or along Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics trajectories becomes feasible in reasonable times. Three models of carbon fullerenes containing hundreds of atoms and thousands of basis functions are used for benchmarking the performance. Furthermore, a theoretical study of temperature effects on the structure and spin-rotation tensor of the H{sup 12}C–{sup 12}CH–DF complex is presented. Here, the temperature dependency of the spin-rotation tensor of the fluorine nucleus can be used to identify experimentally the so far unknown bent isomer of this complex. To the best of our knowledge this is the first time that temperature effects on the spin-rotation tensor are investigated.

  20. Efficient calculation of nuclear spin-rotation constants from auxiliary density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuniga-Gutierrez, Bernardo; Camacho-Gonzalez, Monica; Bendana-Castillo, Alfonso; Simon-Bastida, Patricia; Calaminici, Patrizia; Köster, Andreas M.

    2015-09-01

    The computation of the spin-rotation tensor within the framework of auxiliary density functional theory (ADFT) in combination with the gauge including atomic orbital (GIAO) scheme, to treat the gauge origin problem, is presented. For the spin-rotation tensor, the calculation of the magnetic shielding tensor represents the most demanding computational task. Employing the ADFT-GIAO methodology, the central processing unit time for the magnetic shielding tensor calculation can be dramatically reduced. In this work, the quality of spin-rotation constants obtained with the ADFT-GIAO methodology is compared with available experimental data as well as with other theoretical results at the Hartree-Fock and coupled-cluster level of theory. It is found that the agreement between the ADFT-GIAO results and the experiment is good and very similar to the ones obtained by the coupled-cluster single-doubles-perturbative triples-GIAO methodology. With the improved computational performance achieved, the computation of the spin-rotation tensors of large systems or along Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics trajectories becomes feasible in reasonable times. Three models of carbon fullerenes containing hundreds of atoms and thousands of basis functions are used for benchmarking the performance. Furthermore, a theoretical study of temperature effects on the structure and spin-rotation tensor of the H12C-12CH-DF complex is presented. Here, the temperature dependency of the spin-rotation tensor of the fluorine nucleus can be used to identify experimentally the so far unknown bent isomer of this complex. To the best of our knowledge this is the first time that temperature effects on the spin-rotation tensor are investigated.

  1. Spinodal amplification of density fluctuations in fluid-dynamical simulations of relativistic nuclear collisions.

    PubMed

    Steinheimer, Jan; Randrup, Jørgen

    2012-11-21

    Extending a previously developed two-phase equation of state, we simulate head-on relativistic lead-lead collisions with fluid dynamics, augmented with a finite-range term, and study the effects of the phase structure on the evolution of the baryon density. For collision energies that bring the bulk of the system into the mechanically unstable spinodal region of the phase diagram, the density irregularities are being amplified significantly. The resulting density clumping may be exploited as a signal of the phase transition, possibly through an enhanced production of composite particles.

  2. Linear-scaling method for calculating nuclear magnetic resonance chemical shifts using gauge-including atomic orbitals within Hartree-Fock and density-functional theory.

    PubMed

    Kussmann, Jörg; Ochsenfeld, Christian

    2007-08-07

    Details of a new density matrix-based formulation for calculating nuclear magnetic resonance chemical shifts at both Hartree-Fock and density functional theory levels are presented. For systems with a nonvanishing highest occupied molecular orbital-lowest unoccupied molecular orbital gap, the method allows us to reduce the asymptotic scaling order of the computational effort from cubic to linear, so that molecular systems with 1000 and more atoms can be tackled with today's computers. The key feature is a reformulation of the coupled-perturbed self-consistent field (CPSCF) theory in terms of the one-particle density matrix (D-CPSCF), which avoids entirely the use of canonical MOs. By means of a direct solution for the required perturbed density matrices and the adaptation of linear-scaling integral contraction schemes, the overall scaling of the computational effort is reduced to linear. A particular focus of our formulation is to ensure numerical stability when sparse-algebra routines are used to obtain an overall linear-scaling behavior.

  3. Excited-state nuclear forces on adiabatic potential-energy surfaces by time-dependent density-functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haruyama, Jun; Suzuki, Takahiro; Hu, Chunping; Watanabe, Kazuyuki

    2012-01-01

    We present a simple and computationally efficient method to calculate excited-state nuclear forces on adiabatic potential-energy surfaces (APES) from linear-response time-dependent density-functional theory within a real-space framework. The Casida ansatz, which has been validated for computing first-order nonadiabatic couplings in previous studies, was applied to the calculation of the excited-state forces. Our method is validated by the consistency of results in the lower excited states, which reproduce well those obtained by the numerical derivative of each APES. We emphasize the usefulness of this technique by demonstrating the excited-state molecular-dynamics simulation.

  4. Salt tolerance and stress level affect plant biomass-density relationships and neighbor effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Zhenxing; Chen, Wenwen; Zhang, Qian; Yang, Haishui; Tang, Jianjun; Weiner, Jacob; Chen, Xin

    2014-07-01

    It has been shown that plant biomass-density relationships are altered under extreme or stressed conditions. We do not know whether variation in biomass-density relationships is a direct result of stress tolerance or occurs via changes in plant-plant interactions. Here, we evaluated biomass-density relationships and neighbor effects in six plant species that differ in salt tolerance in a salt marsh, and conducted a literature review of biomass-density relationship under higher and lower stress levels. Our field study showed that both neighbor effects and the exponent of the biomass-density relationship (α) varied among plant species with different degrees of salt tolerance. There was a positive relationship between neighbor effects (measured as relative interaction index) and α-value among the tested species. The literature review showed that α and its variation increased under higher stress. Our results indicate that plant species with different salinity tolerance differ in the direction and strength of neighbor effects, resulting in variation in biomass-density relationships. Our results support the hypothesis that differences in biomass-density relationships among species are not due to differences in stress tolerance alone, they are mediated by changes in plant-plant interactions.

  5. Levelized Costs for Nuclear, Gas and Coal for Electricity, under the Mexican Scenario

    SciTech Connect

    Palacios, J.C.; Alonso, G.; Ramirez, R.; Gomez, A.; Ortiz, J.; Longoria, L.C.

    2004-10-06

    In the case of new nuclear power stations, it is necessary to pay special attention to the financial strategy that will be applied, time of construction, investment cost, and the discount and return rate. The levelized cost quantifies the unitary cost of the electricity (the kWh) generated during the lifetime of the nuclear power plant; and allows the immediate comparison with the cost of other alternative technologies. The present paper shows levelized cost for different nuclear technologies and it provides comparison among them as well as with gas and coal electricity plants. For the calculations we applied our own methodology to evaluate the levelized cost considering investment, fuel and operation and maintenance costs, making assumptions for the Mexican market, and taking into account the gas prices projections. The study also shows comparisons using different discount rates (5% and 10%), and some comparisons between our results and an OECD 1998 study. The results are i n good agreement and shows that nuclear option is cost competitive in Mexico on the basis of levelized costs.

  6. Chem I Supplement. Chemistry Related to Isolation of High-Level Nuclear Waste.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffman, Darleane C.; Choppin, Gregory R.

    1986-01-01

    Discusses some of the problems associated with the safe disposal of high-level nuclear wastes. Describes several waste disposal plans developed by various nations. Outlines the multiple-barrier concept of isolation in deep geological questions associated with the implementation of such a method. (TW)

  7. A Survey of Students' Levels of Concern and Knowledge about Nuclear War.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lyon, Mark A.; Russo, Thomas J.

    There has been considerable conjecture about the psychological effects of the threat of nuclear war. This study examined political, psychological, and educational variables based on previous clinical impressions; survey research and interview observations that might help explain students' levels of concern; and objective knowledge about nuclear…

  8. Chem I Supplement. Chemistry Related to Isolation of High-Level Nuclear Waste.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffman, Darleane C.; Choppin, Gregory R.

    1986-01-01

    Discusses some of the problems associated with the safe disposal of high-level nuclear wastes. Describes several waste disposal plans developed by various nations. Outlines the multiple-barrier concept of isolation in deep geological questions associated with the implementation of such a method. (TW)

  9. Influence of the density of states on the odd-even staggering in the charge distribution of the emitted fragments in nuclear heavy-ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calleya, N. L.; Souza, S. R.; Carlson, B. V.; Donangelo, R.; Lynch, W. G.; Tsang, M. B.; Winkelbauer, J. R.

    2014-11-01

    The fragmentation of thermalized sources is studied using a version of the Statistical Multifragmentation Model which employs state densities that take the pairing gap in the nuclear levels into account. Attention is focused on the properties of the charge distributions observed in the breakup of the source. Since the microcanonical version of the model used in this study provides the primary fragment excitation energy distribution, one may correlate the reduction of the odd-even staggering in the charge distribution with the increasing occupation of high-energy states. Thus, in the framework of this model, such staggering tends to disappear as a function of the total excitation energy of the source, although the energy per particle may be small for large systems. We also find that, although the deexcitation of the primary fragments should, in principle, blur these odd-even effects as the fragments follow their decay chains, the consistent treatment of pairing may significantly enhance these staggering effects on the final yields. In the framework of this model, we find that odd-even effects in the charge distributions should be observed in the fragmentation of relatively light systems at very low excitation energies. Our results also suggest that the odd-even staggering may provide useful information on the nuclear state density.

  10. Universal Nuclear Energy Density Functional: Tools and Resources from the UNEDF SciDAC Collaboration

    DOE Data Explorer

    UNEDF supports the Low-Energy Nuclear Physics National HPC Initiative. There are approximately 3,000 known nuclei, most of them produced in the laboratory, with an additional 6,000 that could in principle still be created. An understanding of the properties of these elements is crucial for future energy and defense applications. The long-term vision of UNEF is to arrive at a comprehensive and unified description of nuclei and their reactions, grounded in the fundamental interactions between the constituent nucleons. It seeks to replace current phenomenological models of nuclear structure and reactions with a well-founded microscopic theory that delivers maximum predictive power with well-quantified uncertainties.

  11. Low total, low-density lipoprotein, high-density lipoprotein, and non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels in patients with complex congenital heart disease after Fontan palliation.

    PubMed

    Whiteside, Wendy; Tan, Meng; Yu, Sunkyung; Rocchini, Albert

    2013-06-01

    To test the hypothesis that patients with complex congenital heart disease who have undergone Fontan palliation have low total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) levels. We retrospectively reviewed the random serum lipid profiles obtained at cardiology clinic visits between May 2010 and November 2011 in patients who had undergone the Fontan procedure. We compared these serum lipid levels against age- and sex-matched established normal data from the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Eighty-eight patients who had undergone the Fontan procedure also had laboratory test data obtained during their visits. Median total cholesterol level in the Fontan group was 127 mg/dL (IQR, 116-144 mg/dL), median HDL-C was 40 mg/dL (IQR, 33-45 mg/dL), median non-HDL-C was 86 mg/dL (IQR, 76-109 mg/dL), and median LDL-C was 66 mg/dL (IQR, 57-83 mg/dL). Total cholesterol, LDL-C, non-HDL-C, and HDL-C levels were significantly lower in patients who had undergone a Fontan procedure compared with age- and sex-matched normal individuals (mean z-score, -1.4, -1.2, -1.0, and -1.0 respectively; all P<.0001). Cholesterol levels were below the 25th percentile for age and sex for total cholesterol in 82% of patients, for LDL-C in 76%, for non-HDL-C in 67%, and for HDL-C in 57%. Patients who have undergone the Fontan procedure have significantly lower serum total cholesterol, LDL-C, HDL-C and non-HDL-C levels than age- and sex-matched normal individuals. Although the implications of this finding are unknown, it raises the possibility of abnormalities in cholesterol absorption, synthesis, or catabolism in this patient population. Copyright © 2013 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Building a Universal Nuclear Energy Density Functional (UNEDF). SciDAC-2 Project

    SciTech Connect

    Vary, James P.; Carlson, Joe; Furnstahl, Dick; Horoi, Mihai; Lusk, Rusty; Nazarewicz, Witek; Ng, Esmond; Thompson, Ian

    2012-09-29

    An understanding of the properties of atomic nuclei is crucial for a complete nuclear theory, for element formation, for properties of stars, and for present and future energy and defense applications. During the period of Dec. 1 2006 – Jun. 30, 2012, the UNEDF collaboration carried out a comprehensive study of all nuclei, based on the most accurate knowledge of the strong nuclear interaction, the most reliable theoretical approaches, the most advanced algorithms, and extensive computational resources, with a view towards scaling to the petaflop platforms and beyond. Until recently such an undertaking was hard to imagine, and even at the present time such an ambitious endeavor would be far beyond what a single researcher or a traditional research group could carry out. The UNEDF SciDAC project has developed several key computational codes and algorithms for reaching the goal of solving the nuclear quantum many-body problem throughout the chart of nuclei. Without such developments, scientific progress would not be possible. In addition the UNEDF SciDAC successfully applied these developments to solve many forefront research problems.

  13. Lead-iron phosphate glass as a containment medium for the disposal of high-level nuclear wastes

    DOEpatents

    Boatner, L.A.; Sales, B.C.

    1984-04-11

    Disclosed are lead-iron phosphate glasses containing a high level of Fe/sub 2/O/sub 3/ for use as a storage medium for high-level radioactive nuclear waste. By combining lead-iron phosphate glass with various types of simulated high-level nuclear waste

  14. a Study of the SILICON-29 Level Density from 3 TO 22 Mev

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bateman, Fred Bruce

    A study of the level density of ^ {29}{rm Si} has been completed over the excitation energy range 3 to 22 MeV. Three techniques were used to obtain level density values from experimental data. In the region of resolved levels, level densities were derived from level counting while neutron resonance data was used in the region of slightly overlapping levels near the binding energy. At high excitation energy, characterized by strongly overlapping levels, Ericson theory was employed to deduce level densities by examining energy modulations in cross sections. To conduct an Ericson analysis, two reactions yielding the same ^{29}{ rm Si} compound nucleus were investigated. One such study involved (n,p) and (n,alpha) reactions on ^{28}{rm Si}. Silicon surface barrier detectors served as both neutron targets and detectors. Neutrons continuous in energy, travelled over a 90 meter flight path before interacting with the detectors. Standard neutron time -of-flight techniques were used to determine the energy. An experimental resolution of less than 8 keV was achieved for the lowest neutron energies. A second experiment was conducted to investigate the ^{27} {rm Al(d,n)}^{28}{ rm Si} reaction. NE213 liquid scintillators viewed by photomultiplier tubes were used to detect neutrons over a 30 meter flight path. Neutron time-of-flight techniques were again used, including pulse shape discrimination to eliminate gamma-ray background. These data were used to determine excitation functions for several exit channels over a wide range of projectile energies. Partial cross sections, averaged over 500 keV intervals, were compared with the predictions of Hauser -Feshbach theory. Reasonable agreement was found in the case of the (n,p) and (n,alpha) data. Less consistent results were obtained for the (d,n) data, possibly caused by an uncertainty in input parameters. The Ericson theory of fluctuations was applied to the measured cross sections. Level density results from all three techniques

  15. What are Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste ?

    SciTech Connect

    DOE

    2002-12-01

    Spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste are materials from nuclear power plants and government defense programs. These materials contain highly radioactive elements, such as cesium, strontium, technetium, and neptunium. Some of these elements will remain radioactive for a few years, while others will be radioactive for millions of years. Exposure to such radioactive materials can cause human health problems. Scientists worldwide agree that the safest way to manage these materials is to dispose of them deep underground in what is called a geologic repository.

  16. Measurements of nuclear-level lifetimes by the Doppler techniques with large multidetector arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Pasternak, A. A.

    2008-07-15

    This is a brief review of the investigations carried out by scientists from the Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute (St. Petersburg) within the framework of international projects for the study of the structure of high-spin nuclear states using heavy-ion beams and arrays of tens and hundreds of detectors for recording gamma rays and charged particles. The development and results of measurements of nuclear-level lifetime by Doppler techniques in the range 10{sup -14}-10{sup -9} s are discussed.

  17. High density lipoprotein level is negatively associated with the increase of oxidized low density lipoprotein lipids after a fatty meal.

    PubMed

    Tiainen, Sanna; Ahotupa, Markku; Ylinen, Petteri; Vasankari, Tommi

    2014-12-01

    Recent reports show that a fatty meal can substantially increase the concentration of oxidized lipids in low density lipoprotein (LDL). Knowing the LDL-specific antioxidant effects of high density lipoprotein (HDL), we aimed to investigate whether HDL can modify the postprandial oxidative stress after a fatty meal. Subjects of the study (n = 71) consumed a test meal (a standard hamburger meal) rich in lipid peroxides, and blood samples were taken before, 120, 240, and 360 min after the meal. The study subjects were divided into four subgroups according to the pre-meal HDL cholesterol value (HDL subgroup 1, 0.66-0.91; subgroup 2, 0.93-1.13; subgroup 3, 1.16-1.35; subgroup 4, 1.40-2.65 mmol/L). The test meal induced a marked postprandial increase in the concentration of oxidized LDL lipids in all four subgroups. The pre-meal HDL level was associated with the extent of the postprandial rise in oxidized LDL lipids. From baseline to 6 h after the meal, the concentration of ox-LDL increased by 48, 31, 24, and 16% in the HDL subgroup 1, 2, 3, and 4, respectively, and the increase was higher in subgroup 1 compared to subgroup 3 (p = 0.028) and subgroup 4 (p = 0.0081), respectively. The pre-meal HDL correlated with both the amount and the rate of increase of oxidized LDL lipids. Results of the present study show that HDL is associated with the postprandial appearance of lipid peroxides in LDL. It is therefore likely that the sequestration and transport of atherogenic lipid peroxides is another significant mechanism contributing to cardioprotection by HDL.

  18. Level densities and barriers of deformed 59Cu nuclei with 28ħ<=Jav<=34ħ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fornal, B.; Prete, G.; Nebbia, G.; Trotti, F.; Viesti, G.; Fabris, D.; Hagel, K.; Natowitz, J. B.

    1988-06-01

    The spectra of α particles emitted from narrow windows of angular momentum with 28ħ<=Jav<=34ħ show systematic deviations from spectra calculated using the statistical model as the spin of the emitter increases to values for which strong deformations are predicted. The barrier reduction and the enhancement of the level density needed to reproduce the experimental spectra have been determined.

  19. Probabilistic approach to derive operational intervention levels for nuclear emergency preparedness.

    PubMed

    Lauritzen, B; Bäverstam, U

    1999-08-01

    A probabilistic approach is presented for the derivation of operational intervention levels as guidelines for intervention in a nuclear emergency. The probabilistic approach differs from the standard, deterministic approach in that the many variables needed for a risk and dose estimate are allowed to fluctuate and sampled, rather than using point estimate of key parameters. The fluctuations have a large effect on the operational intervention levels, leading to optimized levels that depend both on the accident scenario and on the distance from the site of the hypothetical accident. The methodology is illustrated for the case of dose rate operational intervention levels for sheltering. At distances larger than a few kilometers, values of dose rate operational intervention levels are obtained that are considerably higher than values developed through deterministic practices. As demonstrated, calculations of site-specific operational intervention levels can augment the emergency preparedness for nuclear facilities. In principle, the approach can be expanded to yield optimized emergency response planning for any nuclear facility subject to various accident conditions.

  20. Considerations for CBI Screen Design with Respect to Text Density Levels in Content Learning from an Integrated Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ipek, Ismail

    This paper examines variations of text density levels for learning in a computer-based instruction (CBI) tutorial from an integrated perspective, and addresses the following questions: (1) What is the text density? (2) What are the relationships among text density approaches? and (3) What are the contributions of text density for learning and how…

  1. Analytical nuclear excited-state gradients for the Tamm-Dancoff approximation using uncoupled frozen-density embedding.

    PubMed

    Heuser, Johannes; Höfener, Sebastian

    2017-10-15

    We report the derivation and implementation of analytical nuclear gradients for excited states using time-dependent density functional theory using the Tamm-Dancoff approximation combined with uncoupled frozen-density embedding using density fitting. Explicit equations are presented and discussed. The implementation is able to treat singlet as well as triplet states and functionals using the local density approximation, the generalized gradient approximation, combinations with Hartree-Fock exchange (hybrids), and range-separated functionals such as CAM-B3LYP. The new method is benchmarked against supermolecule calculations in two case studies: The solvatochromic shift of the (vertical) fluorescence energy of 4-aminophthalimide on solvation, and the first local excitation of the benzonitrile dimer. Whereas for the 4-aminophthalimide-water complex deviations of about 0.2 eV are obtained to supermolecular calculations, for the benzonitrile dimer the maximum error for adiabatic excitation energies is below 0.01 eV due to a weak coupling of the subsystems. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Using electrochemical separation to reduce the volume of high-level nuclear waste

    SciTech Connect

    Slater, S.A.; Gay, E.C.

    1998-07-01

    Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) has developed an electrochemical separation technique called electrorefining that will treat a variety of metallic spent nuclear fuel and reduce the volume of high-level nuclear waste that requires disposal. As part of that effort, ANL has developed a high throughput electrorefiner (HTER) that has a transport rate approximately three times faster than electrorefiners previously developed at ANL. This higher rate is due to the higher electrode surface area, a shorter transport path, and more efficient mixing, which leads to smaller boundary layers about the electrodes. This higher throughput makes electrorefining an attractive option in treating Department of Energy spent nuclear fuels. Experiments have been done to characterize the HTER, and a simulant metallic fuel has been successfully treated. The HTER design and experimental results is discussed.

  3. On-site storage of high level nuclear waste: attitudes and perceptions of local residents.

    PubMed

    Bassett, G W; Jenkins-Smith, H C; Silva, C

    1996-06-01

    No public policy issue has been as difficult as high-level nuclear waste. Debates continue regarding Yucca Mountain as a disposal site, and-more generally-the appropriateness of geologic disposal and the need to act quickly. Previous research has focused on possible social, political, and economic consequences of a facility in Nevada. Impacts have been predicted to be potentially large and to emanate mainly from stigmatization of the region due to increased perceptions of risk. Analogous impacts from leaving waste at power plants have been either ignored or assumed to be negligible. This paper presents survey results on attitudes of residents in three counties where nuclear waste is currently stored. Topics include perceived risk, knowledge of nuclear waste and radiation, and impacts on jobs, tourism, and housing values from leaving waste on site. Results are similar to what has been reported for Nevada; the public is concerned about possible adverse effects from on-site storage of waste.

  4. Can Sisyphus succeed? Getting U.S. high-level nuclear waste into a geological repository.

    PubMed

    North, D Warner

    2013-01-01

    The U.S. government has the obligation of managing the high-level radioactive waste from its defense activities and also, under existing law, from civilian nuclear power generation. This obligation is not being met. The January 2012 Final Report from the Blue Ribbon Commission on America's Nuclear Future provides commendable guidance but little that is new. The author, who served on the federal Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board from 1989 to 1994 and subsequently on the Board on Radioactive Waste Management of the National Research Council from 1994 to 1999, provides a perspective both on the Commission's recommendations and a potential path toward progress in meeting the federal obligation. By analogy to Sisyphus of Greek mythology, our nation needs to find a way to roll the rock to the top of the hill and have it stay there, rather than continuing to roll back down again.

  5. Nuclear characteristics of vitrified high-level waste at the West Valley Demonstration Project

    SciTech Connect

    Arakali, V.S.; Barnes, S.M. )

    1991-11-01

    High-level liquid nuclear waste stored in underground tanks at West Valley, New York, will be vitrified as borosilicate glass and stored in stainless steel canisters prior to disposal at a waste repository. The nuclear characteristics of the vitrified waste must meet certain repository design specifications. This paper presents an evaluation of the waste form produced at West Valley with respect to its compliance to the repository specifications of heat and gas generation rates and neutron and gamma dose rates. The method consists of analyzing the composition of liquid nuclear waste in underground tanks and estimating the amount of other chemicals needed to encapsulate radionuclides in glass matrices. The number of waste canisters and the composition of each batch of canistered waste are determined from the vitrification process flow sheet. This data is used in computer codes to evaluate the waste form against repository specifications.

  6. Central depression in nuclear density and its consequences for the shell structure of superheavy nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Afanasjev, A.V.; Frauendorf, S.

    2005-02-01

    The influence of the central depression in the density distribution of spherical superheavy nuclei on the shell structure is studied within the relativistic mean-field theory. A large depression leads to the shell gaps at the proton Z=120 and neutron N=172 numbers, whereas a flatter density distribution favors N=184 and leads to the appearance of a Z=126 shell gap and to the decrease of the size of the Z=120 shell gap. The correlations between the magic shell gaps and the magnitude of the central depression are discussed for relativistic and nonrelativistic mean field theories.

  7. High density, uniformly distributed W/UO2 for use in Nuclear Thermal Propulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tucker, Dennis S.; Barnes, Marvin W.; Hone, Lance; Cook, Steven

    2017-04-01

    An inexpensive, quick method has been developed to obtain uniform distributions of UO2 particles in a tungsten matrix utilizing 0.5 wt percent low density polyethylene. Powders were sintered in a Spark Plasma Sintering (SPS) furnace at 1600 °C, 1700 °C, 1750 °C, 1800 °C and 1850 °C using a modified sintering profile. This resulted in a uniform distribution of UO2 particles in a tungsten matrix with high densities, reaching 99.46% of theoretical for the sample sintered at 1850 °C. The powder process is described and the results of this study are given below.

  8. Density and hardness of Nd-doped zircon ceramics as nuclear waste forms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Xun; Liu, Xudong; Wang, Lan; Lu, Xirui

    2017-04-01

    Zircon ceramics were employed as host material for immobilization of element Nd, which was used as the surrogate of trivalent actinide nuclide. A series of Zr2-x Nd x Si2O8-0.5x compounds were prepared by solid-state reaction method at 1500 °C for 72 h in air and investigated in respect of their physics performances. These performances were characterized by density and hardness. The results show that the density raises as the value of x increases from 0.02 to 0.20. Moreover, the hardness of the Nd-doped ceramic also increase with enhanced Nd content.

  9. Hydrolysis Profiles of Formalin Fixed Paraffin-Embedded Tumors Based on IOD (Integrated Optical Density) and Nuclear Texture Feature Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Fležar, Margareta; Us‐Krašovec, Marija; žganec, Mario; Lavrenčak, Jaka; Golouh, Rastko

    1999-01-01

    The aim of the study was to determine optimal hydrolysis time for the Feulgen DNA staining of archival formalin fixed paraffin‐embedded surgical samples, prepared as single cell suspensions for image cytometric measurements. The nuclear texture features along with the IOD (integrated optical density) of the tumor nuclei were analysed by an automated high resolution image cytometer as a function of duration of hydrolysis treatment (in 5 N HCl at room temperature). Tissue blocks of breast carcinoma, ovarian serous carcinoma, ovarian serous tumor of borderline malignancy and leiomyosarcoma were included in the study. IOD hydrolysis profiles showed plateau between 30 and 60 min in the breast carcinoma and leiomyosarcoma, and between 40 and 60 min in the ovarian serous carcinoma and ovarian serous tumor of borderline malignancy. Most of the nuclear texture features remained stable after 20 min of hydrolysis treatment. Our results indicate that the optimal hydrolysis time for IOD and for nuclear texture feature measurements, was between 40 and 60 min in the cell preparations from tissue blocks of three epithelial and one soft tissue tumor. PMID:10866273

  10. Fission fragment charge and mass distributions in 239Pu(n ,f ) in the adiabatic nuclear energy density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regnier, D.; Dubray, N.; Schunck, N.; Verrière, M.

    2016-05-01

    Background: Accurate knowledge of fission fragment yields is an essential ingredient of numerous applications ranging from the formation of elements in the r process to fuel cycle optimization for nuclear energy. The need for a predictive theory applicable where no data are available, together with the variety of potential applications, is an incentive to develop a fully microscopic approach to fission dynamics. Purpose: In this work, we calculate the pre-neutron emission charge and mass distributions of the fission fragments formed in the neutron-induced fission of 239Pu using a microscopic method based on nuclear density functional theory (DFT). Methods: Our theoretical framework is the nuclear energy density functional (EDF) method, where large-amplitude collective motion is treated adiabatically by using the time-dependent generator coordinate method (TDGCM) under the Gaussian overlap approximation (GOA). In practice, the TDGCM is implemented in two steps. First, a series of constrained EDF calculations map the configuration and potential-energy landscape of the fissioning system for a small set of collective variables (in this work, the axial quadrupole and octupole moments of the nucleus). Then, nuclear dynamics is modeled by propagating a collective wave packet on the potential-energy surface. Fission fragment distributions are extracted from the flux of the collective wave packet through the scission line. Results: We find that the main characteristics of the fission charge and mass distributions can be well reproduced by existing energy functionals even in two-dimensional collective spaces. Theory and experiment agree typically within two mass units for the position of the asymmetric peak. As expected, calculations are sensitive to the structure of the initial state and the prescription for the collective inertia. We emphasize that results are also sensitive to the continuity of the collective landscape near scission. Conclusions: Our analysis confirms

  11. Four themes that underlie the high-level nuclear waste management program

    SciTech Connect

    Sprecher, W.M.

    1989-01-01

    In 1982, after years of deliberation and in response to mounting pressures from environmental, industrial, and other groups, the US Congress enacted the Nuclear Waste Policy Act (NWPA) of 1982, which was signed into law by the President in January 1983. That legislation signified a major milestone in the nation's management of high-level nuclear waste, since it represented a consensus among the nation's lawmakers to tackle a problem that had evaded solution for decades. Implementation of the NWPA has proven to be exceedingly difficult, as attested by the discord generated by the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) geologic repository and monitored retrievable storage (MRS) facility siting activities. The vision that motivated the crafters of the 1982 act became blurred as opposition to the law increased. After many hearings that underscored the public's concern with the waste management program, the Congress enacted the Nuclear Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1987 (Amendments Act), which steamlined and focused the program, while establishing three independent bodies: the MRS Review Commission, the Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board, and the Office of the Nuclear Waste Negotiator. Yet, even as the program evolves, several themes characterizing the nation's effort to solve the waste management problem continue to prevail. The first of these themes has to do with social consciousness, and the others that follow deal with technical leadership, public involvement and risk perceptions, and program conservatism.

  12. Bone mineral density level by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Makhdoom, Asadullah; Rahopoto, Muhammad Qasim; Awan, Shazia; Tahir, Syed Muhammad; Memon, Shazia; Siddiqui, Khaleeque Ahmed

    2017-01-01

    To observe the level of bone mineral density by Dual Energy X-ray Absorptiometry in rheumatoid arthritis patients. The observational study was conducted at Liaquat University of Medical and Health Sciences, Jamshoro, Pakistan, from January 2011 to December 2014. Bone mineral density was measured from the femoral neck, ward's triangle and lumbar spine, in patients 25-55 years of age, who were diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis. All the cases were assessed for bone mineral density from appendicular as well as axial skeleton. Data was collected through a designed proforma and analysis was performed using SPSS 21. Of the 229 rheumatoid arthritis patients, 33(14.4%) were males. Five (15.1%) males had normal bone density, 14(42.4%) had osteopenia and 14(42.4%) had osteoporosis. Of the 196(85.5%) females, 45(29.9%) had normal bone density, 72 (37.7%) had osteopenia and 79(40.30%) had osteoporosis. Of the 123(53.7%) patients aged 30-50 years, 38(30.9%) had normal bone density, 59(48.0%) had osteopenia, and 26(21.1%) had osteoporosis. Of the 106(46.3%) patients over 50 years, 12(11.3%) had normal bone density, 27 (25.5%) had osteopenia and 67(63.2%) had osteoporosis. Osteoporosis and osteopenia were most common among rheumatoid arthritis patients. Assessment of bone mineral density by Dual Energy X-ray Absorptiometry can lead to quick relief in the clinical symptoms with timely therapy.

  13. Evaluation of a Non-Nuclear Soil Density Gauge on Fine-Grained Soils

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-05-01

    U.S. STANDARD SIEVE NUMBERS HYDROMETER fY, in o/. in. 318 in #140 6 in. 3 in. 2 in. 1 in. ’A in #4 ’" #20 #30 #40 ឬ #100 #200 100 J I ’ I I I I I...1 3-20 31 C L-2 U.S. SIEVE OPENING IN INCHES U.S. STANDARD SIEVE NUMBERS HYDROMETER 1Y,in. ’/.in Un~/8 in #140 6 in 3 in. 2 in. 1in. " #4...Particle Size Distribution Reoort Fine PL 14 HYDROMETER %Fines Silt -------,---- PI Project Non-Nuclear Gau_ge Proiect 27 Area Boring No. 3 Date

  14. Laser-driven target of high-density nuclear-polarized hydrogen gas

    SciTech Connect

    Clasie, B.; Crawford, C.; Seely, J.; Xu, W.; Dutta, D.; Gao, H.

    2006-02-15

    We report the best figure-of-merit achieved for an internal nuclear polarized hydrogen gas target and a Monte Carlo simulation of spin-exchange optical pumping. The dimensions of the apparatus were optimized using the simulation, and the experimental results were in good agreement with the simulation. The best result achieved for this target was 50.5% polarization with 58.2% degree of dissociation of the sample beam exiting the storage cell at a hydrogen flow rate of 1.1x10{sup 18} atoms/s.

  15. Laser-driven target of high-density nuclear-polarized hydrogen gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clasie, B.; Crawford, C.; Seely, J.; Xu, W.; Dutta, D.; Gao, H.

    2006-02-01

    We report the best figure-of-merit achieved for an internal nuclear polarized hydrogen gas target and a Monte Carlo simulation of spin-exchange optical pumping. The dimensions of the apparatus were optimized using the simulation, and the experimental results were in good agreement with the simulation. The best result achieved for this target was 50.5% polarization with 58.2% degree of dissociation of the sample beam exiting the storage cell at a hydrogen flow rate of 1.1×1018atoms/s .

  16. Structural analysis of some sodium and alumina rich high-level nuclear waste glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Goel, Ashutosh; McCloy, John S.; Fox, Kevin M.; Leslie, Clifford J.; Riley, Brian J.; Rodriguez, Carmen P.; Schweiger, Michael J.

    2012-02-01

    Sodium and aluminum rich high level nuclear waste glasses are prone to nepheline (NaAlSiO4) crystallization. Since nepheline removes three moles of glass forming oxides (Al2O3 and SiO2) per each mole of Na2O, its formation can result in sever deterioration of the chemical durability. The present study aims at investigating the relationships between the molecular-level structure of sodium alumino-borosilicate based simulated high-level nuclear waste glasses and their crystallization behavior by infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and x-ray diffraction, respectively. The molecular structure of most of the investigated glasses comprises of a mixture of Q2 and Q3 (Si) units while aluminum and boron are predominantly present in tetrahedral and trigonal coordination, respectively. The increasing boron content has been shown to suppress the nepheline formation in the glasses. The structural influence of various glass components on nepheline crystallization has been discussed.

  17. Non-Nuclear Alternatives to Monitoring Moisture-Density Response in Soils

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-01

    deflectometers, a dynamic cone penetrometer , the Clegg Hammer, and the GeoGauge. This investigation consisted of full-scale construction of seven soils...13  Dynamic Cone Penetrometer (DCP) .......................................................................................... 14  Volume... Dynamic Cone Penetrometer (single and dual mass used). ........................................... 15  Figure 11. Sand Cone Density apparatus and

  18. Validation Tests of a Non-Nuclear Combined Asphalt and Soil Density Gauge

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-04-01

    construction purposes only, constant monitoring of the soil moisture content was performed by using the standard laboratory microwave oven (ASTM...content of the soil by the microwave oven heating. Designation D 4643-08. West Conshohocken, PA: American Society for Testing and Materials...moisture content between NDG and oven dried. ....................................... 24 Figure 22. Calibrated NDG wet density readings from sand cone

  19. Similar to Adiponectin, Serum Levels of Osteocalcin are Associated with Mammographic Breast Density in Postmenopausal Women.

    PubMed

    Vega, Sara; Basurto, Lourdes; Saucedo, Renata; Barrera, Susana; Reyes-Maldonado, Elba; Garcia-Latorre, Ethel A; Zarate, Arturo

    2017-09-15

    Breast cancer is the most common type of cancer in Canadian women and worldwide. Mammographic density is a well-established breast cancer risk. Recent evidence suggested inverse correlations among adiponectin, osteocalcin, and the risk developing breast cancer. The objective of the study was to evaluate the relationship between breast density and adiponectin and osteocalcin concentrations. A cross-sectional study was performed in 239 women, age range 40 to 60. Mammographic density, serum adiponectin, and osteocalcin levels were measured. According to the Wolfe method, participants were divided into those with low-risk and high-risk pattern mammograms. The study population included 107 premenopausal and 132 postmenopausal women. Parameters were no different between women with low-risk and high-risk patterns. In obese postmenopausal women, the high-risk pattern mammogram group had significantly higher values of adiponectin and osteocalcin compared with the low-risk pattern group. Multiple linear regression analyses showed that adiponectin and osteocalcin levels were associated with high-risk pattern mammograms. Adiponectin and osteocalcin levels were directly associated with high-risk pattern mammograms in obese postmenopausal women. These results do not support the use of adipokines as biomarkers; nevertheless, the most important factor is to assess the risk through breast density. Copyright © 2017 Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of Canada. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. The novel measurement method of liquid level and density in airtight container

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Zhe; Zhao, Yulong; Tian, Bian; Guo, Fangfang

    2012-12-01

    This paper describes a novel method of liquid level and density measurement with application in airtight container such as oil storage tank. In order to prove the method, a multifunctional pressure-type liquidometer (MPTL) was designed. The MPTL comprises two pressure sensors for capturing the underwater pressure accurately, by which the MPTL could calculate the density of the liquid and back-calculate the level of the liquid. A digital temperature sensor was implanted in the MPTL to collect the temperature of the liquid. Series of experiments show a favorable linearity of 0.2% and a high accuracy of 0.27%. Besides, the simple fabrication, low cost and unconstrained conditions guarantee its popularity in the petrochemical industry fields. Overall, the findings of this study confirm the feasibility of the novel liquid level measure method and offer an economical scheme for mass producing.

  1. Correlation of Friedewald's calculated low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels with direct low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels in a tertiary care hospital.

    PubMed

    Nanda, Sunil Kumar; Bharathy, M; Dinakaran, Asha; Ray, Lopamudra; Ravichandran, K

    2017-01-01

    One of the risk factors for the development of coronary heart disease is high low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol levels. National Cholesterol Education Program ATP III guidelines suggest drug therapy to be considered at LDL-cholesterol levels >130 mg/dl. This makes accurate reporting of LDL cholesterol crucial in the management of Coronary heart disease. Estimation of LDL cholesterol by direct LDL method is accurate, but it is expensive. Hence, We compared Friedewald's calculated LDL values with direct LDL values. To evaluate the correlation of Friedewalds calculated LDL with direct LDL method. We compared LDL cholesterol measured by Friedewald's formula with direct LDL method in 248 samples between the age group of 20-70 years. Paired t-test was used to test the difference in LDL concentration obtained by a direct method and Friedewald's formula. The level of significance was taken as P < 0.05. Pearsons correlation formula was used to test the correlation between direct LDL values with Friedewald's formula. There was no significant difference between the direct LDL values when compared to calculated LDL by Friedewalds formula (P = 0.140). Pearson correlation showed there exists good correlation between direct LDL versus Friedewalds formula (correlation coefficient = 0.98). The correlation between direct LDL versus Friedewalds calculated LDL was best at triglycerides values between 101 and 200 mg/dl. This study indicates calculated LDL by Friedewalds equation can be used instead of direct LDL in patients who cannot afford direct LDL method.

  2. Ab initio molecular dynamics with nuclear quantum effects at classical cost: Ring polymer contraction for density functional theory.

    PubMed

    Marsalek, Ondrej; Markland, Thomas E

    2016-02-07

    Path integral molecular dynamics simulations, combined with an ab initio evaluation of interactions using electronic structure theory, incorporate the quantum mechanical nature of both the electrons and nuclei, which are essential to accurately describe systems containing light nuclei. However, path integral simulations have traditionally required a computational cost around two orders of magnitude greater than treating the nuclei classically, making them prohibitively costly for most applications. Here we show that the cost of path integral simulations can be dramatically reduced by extending our ring polymer contraction approach to ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. By using density functional tight binding as a reference system, we show that our ring polymer contraction scheme gives rapid and systematic convergence to the full path integral density functional theory result. We demonstrate the efficiency of this approach in ab initio simulations of liquid water and the reactive protonated and deprotonated water dimer systems. We find that the vast majority of the nuclear quantum effects are accurately captured using contraction to just the ring polymer centroid, which requires the same number of density functional theory calculations as a classical simulation. Combined with a multiple time step scheme using the same reference system, which allows the time step to be increased, this approach is as fast as a typical classical ab initio molecular dynamics simulation and 35× faster than a full path integral calculation, while still exactly including the quantum sampling of nuclei. This development thus offers a route to routinely include nuclear quantum effects in ab initio molecular dynamics simulations at negligible computational cost.

  3. Ab initio molecular dynamics with nuclear quantum effects at classical cost: Ring polymer contraction for density functional theory

    SciTech Connect

    Marsalek, Ondrej; Markland, Thomas E.

    2016-02-07

    Path integral molecular dynamics simulations, combined with an ab initio evaluation of interactions using electronic structure theory, incorporate the quantum mechanical nature of both the electrons and nuclei, which are essential to accurately describe systems containing light nuclei. However, path integral simulations have traditionally required a computational cost around two orders of magnitude greater than treating the nuclei classically, making them prohibitively costly for most applications. Here we show that the cost of path integral simulations can be dramatically reduced by extending our ring polymer contraction approach to ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. By using density functional tight binding as a reference system, we show that our ring polymer contraction scheme gives rapid and systematic convergence to the full path integral density functional theory result. We demonstrate the efficiency of this approach in ab initio simulations of liquid water and the reactive protonated and deprotonated water dimer systems. We find that the vast majority of the nuclear quantum effects are accurately captured using contraction to just the ring polymer centroid, which requires the same number of density functional theory calculations as a classical simulation. Combined with a multiple time step scheme using the same reference system, which allows the time step to be increased, this approach is as fast as a typical classical ab initio molecular dynamics simulation and 35× faster than a full path integral calculation, while still exactly including the quantum sampling of nuclei. This development thus offers a route to routinely include nuclear quantum effects in ab initio molecular dynamics simulations at negligible computational cost.

  4. Spectral density of Cooper pairs in two level quantum dot-superconductors Josephson junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhyani, A.; Rawat, P. S.; Tewari, B. S.

    2016-09-01

    In the present paper, we report the role of quantum dot energy levels on the electronic spectral density for a two level quantum dot coupled to s-wave superconducting leads. The theoretical arguments in this work are based on the Anderson model so that it necessarily includes dot energies, single particle tunneling and superconducting order parameter for BCS superconductors. The expression for single particle spectral function is obtained by using the Green's function equation of motion technique. On the basis of numerical computation of spectral function of superconducting leads, it has been found that the charge transfer across such junctions can be controlled by the positions and availability of the dot levels.

  5. Nuclear energy density functionals: What we can learn about/from their global performance?

    SciTech Connect

    Afanasjev, A. V.; Agbemava, S. E.; Ray, D.; Ring, P.

    2014-10-15

    A short review of recent results on the global performance of covariant energy density functionals is presented. It is focused on an analysis of the accuracy of the description of physical observables of ground and excited states as well as to related theoretical uncertainties. In addition, a global analysis of pairing properties is presented and the impact of pairing on the position of two-neutron drip line is discussed.

  6. Ettingshausen Effect around a Landau Level Filling Factor ν=3 Studied by Dynamic Nuclear Polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komori, Yosuke; Sakuma, Satoru; Okamoto, Tohru

    2007-10-01

    A spin current perpendicular to the electric current is investigated around a Landau level filling factor ν=3 in a GaAs/AlGaAs two-dimensional electron system. Measurements of dynamic nuclear polarization in the vicinity of the edge of a specially designed Hall bar sample indicate that the direction of the spin current with respect to the Hall electric field reverses its polarity at ν=3, where the dissipative current carried by holes in the spin up Landau level is replaced with that by electrons in the spin down Landau level.

  7. Models for relativistic coulomb sum rules: Expansions in moments of the nuclear momentum density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donnelly, T. W.; Kronenberg, E. L.; Van Orden, J. W.

    1989-04-01

    Relativistic Coulomb sum rules for quasielastic electron scattering from nuclei are developed using a class of relativistic models for the nuclear ground-state momentum distribution. Approximate sum rules at constant 3- or 4-momentum transfer are expressed as expansions in moments of the momentum distribution. New sum-rule functions are derived which, even for very large values of energy and momentum where relativistic effects become dominant, approach simple asymptotic values; in doing so they approximately retain the flavor of the nonrelativistic Coulomb sum rule which approaches Z. Specific ways of achieving an optimum separation of effects relating to the electromagnetic response of a single nucleon and of a many-body system of structureless particles are discussed, including a study of sensitivities to alternative parameterizations of GEn. Comparisons of results using different momentum distributions for the case of 16O are presented.

  8. Population-level consequences of heterospecific density-dependent movements in predator-prey systems.

    PubMed

    Sjödin, Henrik; Brännström, Ke; Söderquist, Mårten; Englund, Göran

    2014-02-07

    In this paper we elucidate how small-scale movements, such as those associated with searching for food and avoiding predators, affect the stability of predator-prey dynamics. We investigate an individual-based Lotka-Volterra model with density-dependent movement, in which the predator and prey populations live in a very large number of coupled patches. The rates at which individuals leave patches depend on the local densities of heterospecifics, giving rise to one reaction norm for each of the two species. Movement rates are assumed to be much faster than demographics rates. A spatial structure of predators and prey emerges which affects the global population dynamics. We derive a criterion which reveals how demographic stability depends on the relationships between the per capita covariance and densities of predators and prey. Specifically, we establish that a positive relationship with prey density and a negative relationship with predator density tend to be stabilizing. On a more mechanistic level we show how these relationships are linked to the movement reaction norms of predators and prey. Numerical results show that these findings hold both for local and global movements, i.e., both when migration is biased towards neighbouring patches and when all patches are reached with equal probability. © 2013 Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. The use of a non-nuclear density gauge for monitoring the compaction process of asphalt pavement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van den bergh, Wim; Vuye, Cedric; Kara, Patricia; Couscheir, Karolien; Blom, Johan; Van Bouwel, Philippe

    2017-09-01

    The mechanical performance of an asphalt pavement affects its durability – thus carbon footprint. Many parameters contribute to the success of a durable asphalt mix, e.g. material selection, an accurate mix and even the road design in which the asphalt mix quality is quantified. The quality of the asphalt mix, by its mechanical properties, is also related to the compaction degree. However, and specifically for high volume rates, the laying process at the construction site needs an effective method to monitor and adjust immediately the compaction quality before cooling and without damaging the layer, which is now absent. In this paper the use of a non-nuclear density gauge (PQI – Pavement Quality Indicator) is evaluated, based on a site at Brussels Airport. Considering the outcome of the present research, this PQI is advised as a unique tool for continuous density measurements and allow immediate adjustments during compaction, and decreases the number of core drilling for quality control, and as a posteriori asphalt pavement density test where cores are prohibited. The use of PQI could be recommended to be a part of the standard quality control process in the Flemish region.

  10. Simulation modeling of nuclear steam generator water level process--a case study

    PubMed

    Zhao; Ou; Du

    2000-01-01

    Simulation modeling of the nuclear steam generator (SG) water level process in Qinshan Nuclear Power Plant (QNPP) is described in this paper. A practical methodology was adopted so that the model is both simple and accurate for control engineering implementation. The structure of the model is in the form of a transfer function, which was determined based on first-principles analysis and expert experience. The parameters of the model were obtained by taking advantage of the recorded historical response curves under the existing closed-loop control system. The results of process dimensional data verification and experimental tests demonstrate that the simulation model depicts the main dynamic characteristics of the SG water level process and is in accordance with the field recorded response curves. The model has been successfully applied to the design and test of an advanced digital feedwater control system in QNPP.

  11. Level scheme of /sup 148/Pm and the s-process neutron density

    SciTech Connect

    Lesko, K.T.; Norman, E.B.; Larimer, R.; Bacelar, J.C.; Beck, E.M.

    1989-02-01

    A level scheme of /sup 148/Pm up to 800 keV is deduced from gamma-ray coincidence data and published particle transfer data. Approximately 106 gamma-ray transitions have been placed between 36 levels. We have identified three levels below 500 keV in excitation which decay to both the ground state and to the isomeric level at 137 keV. The presence of these levels guarantees that /sup 148/Pm/sup g//sup ,//sup m/ are in thermal equilibrium during the s process. The s-process neutron density inferred from the branch point at /sup 148/Pm is deduced to be 3 x 10/sup 8//cm/sup 3/.

  12. POPCYCLE: a computer code for calculating nuclear and fossil plant levelized life-cycle power costs

    SciTech Connect

    Hardie, R.W.

    1982-02-01

    POPCYCLE, a computer code designed to calculate levelized life-cycle power costs for nuclear and fossil electrical generating plants is described. Included are (1) derivations of the equations and a discussion of the methodology used by POPCYCLE, (2) a description of the input required by the code, (3) a listing of the input for a sample case, and (4) the output for a sample case.

  13. Advanced Quantum Mechanical Calculation of Superheavy Ions: Energy Levels, Radiation and Finite Nuclear Size Effects

    SciTech Connect

    Glushkov, Alexander V.; Gurnitskaya, E.P.; Loboda, A.V.

    2005-10-26

    Advanced quantum approach to calculation of spectra for superheavy ions with an account of relativistic, correlation, nuclear, radiative effects is developed and based on the gauge invariant quantum electrodynamics (QED) perturbation theory (PT). The Lamb shift polarization part is calculated in the Ueling approximation, self-energy part is defined within a new non-PT procedure of Ivanov-Ivanova. Calculation results for energy levels, hyperfine structure parameters of some heavy elements ions are presented.

  14. Probing the density dependence of the nuclear symmetry energy via heavy-residue isoscaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souliotis, G. A.; Shetty, D. V.; Keksis, A.; Bell, E.; Jandel, M.; Veselsky, M.; Yennello, S. J.

    2004-10-01

    The isoscaling properties of isotopically resolved projectile residues from semi-peripheral collisions of ^86Kr(25MeV/nucleon) and ^64Ni(25MeV/nucleon) beams on a variety of target pairs are employed to probe the density dependence of the symmetry energy. The measurements were perfromed with beams from the K500 Superconducting Cyclotron at the Cyclotron Institute of Texas A University. The reactions of ^86Kr with ^64,58Ni and ^124,112Sn were studied with the MARS recoil separator. Their general isoscaling properties have already been presented [1]. The reactions of ^64Ni with ^64,58Ni and ^124,112Sn, as well as ^208PB, ^232Th were studied with the recently commissioned Superconducting Solenoid (BigSol) Line. In the present study, special attention was given to the heavy projectile fragments produced in semiperipheral collisions near the onset of multifragment emission. For these fragments, the measured velocities were used to extract excitation energies. Subsequently, the excitation energies were used to infer the density of the fragmenting quasiprojectiles using the experimental systematics of [2]. Under the scenario of an expanding Fermi gas at a given excitation energy, the value of the symmetry energy was obtained from the measured isoscaling parameter "alpha". A correlation of the symmetry energy with density was thus obtained and compared with existing parametrizations and model predictions. Implications of this study, comparisons with parallel studies of central collisions [3] and, finally, plans for further detailed studies will be discussed. [1] G.A. Souliotis et al., Phys. Rev. C 68 024605 (2003). [2] J.B. Natowitz et al., Phys. Rev. C 66 031601 (2002). [3] D.V. Shetty et al., Phys. Rev. C in press, nucl-ex/0406008.

  15. Shell energy and the level-density parameter of hot nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Nerlo-Pomorska, Bozena; Pomorski, Krzysztof; Bartel, Johann

    2006-09-15

    Macroscopic-microscopic calculations have been performed with the Yukawa folded mean field for 134 spherical even-even nuclei and 6 deformed ones at temperatures 0{<=}T{<=}5 MeV and elongations ranging from oblate shapes to the scission configuration of fissioning nuclei. The Strutinsky type free-energy shell corrections for this sample of nuclei and their temperature and deformation dependence are found by a folding procedure in particle-number space. The average dependence of the single-particle level-density parameter on mass number A and isospin I is determined and compared with previous estimates obtained using the relativistic mean-field theory, the Hartree-Fock approximation with the Skyrme effective interaction, and the phenomenological Thomas-Fermi approach adjusted to experimental data. The estimates for the level-density parameter obtained for different deformations are fitted by a liquid-drop type expression.

  16. Excitation energy dependence of the level density parameter close to the doubly magic 208Pb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Pratap; Banerjee, K.; Bhattacharya, C.; Pandey, R.; Sen, A.; Manna, S.; Kundu, S.; Rana, T. K.; Ghosh, T. K.; Mukherjee, G.; Roy, T.; Dhal, A.; Dey, A.; Meena, J. K.; Saha, A. K.; Pandit, Deepak; Mukhopadhyay, S.; Bhattacharya, S.

    2016-12-01

    Neutron evaporation spectra have been measured from 4He+208Pb and 4He+209Bi reactions by using 4He-ion beams of several bombarding energies. Excitation-energy dependence of the level density parameter has been studied for the two systems in the excitation energy range of ˜18 -50 MeV. For both the reactions an overall reduction of the asymptotic level density parameter with increasing excitation energy (temperature) is observed. The trend of the data was compared with the Thomas-Fermi model predictions and found to be in reasonable agreement. The value of the shell damping parameter has been extracted from the lowest-energy data in the case of Po,211210 and At,212211 nuclei close to the Z =82 and N =126 shell closure, and it was found to be consistent with the recent measurement in the vicinity of doubly magic 208Pb nucleus.

  17. Effect of altered reproductive function and lowered testosterone levels on bone density in male endurance athletes

    PubMed Central

    Bennell, Kim L; Brukner, Peter D; Malcolm, Susan A

    1996-01-01

    The effect of intense physical activity on female reproductive hormones is well recognised1–3 and there is evidence that menstrual disturbances associated with hypo-oestrogenism adversely affect bone density especially at the lumbar spine.4 5 Physical activity can also have a range of effects on male reproductive function depending upon the intensity and duration of the activity and the fitness of the individual.6 In particular, endurance training may be associated with reductions in circulating testosterone levels. Since testosterone has important anabolic roles, alterations in reproductive hormone profiles may have detrimental skeletal consequences similar to those seen in females with menstrual disturbances. The aim of this brief review is to present the limited literature on the relation between bone density and testosterone levels in male endurance athletes. PMID:8889111

  18. Comparison of algorithms for the calculation of molecular vibrational level densities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, K.

    2008-05-01

    Level densities of vibrational degrees of freedom are calculated numerically with formulas based on the inversion of the canonical vibrational partition function. The calculated level densities are compared with other approximate equations from literature and with the exact Beyer-Swinehart values, for which a simplified but equivalent version is given. All approximate equations agree at high excitation energies, but our results are vastly superior at low energies for large molecules. The results presented here are therefore of particular relevance for thermal processes of very large molecules, e.g., of biological nature, for which the exact state counting can be prohibitively slow. Furthermore, it is valid for situations where anharmonic motion significantly influences the thermal properties.

  19. Gamma Strength Functions and Level Densities from 300 MeV Proton Scatttering at 0°

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Neumann-Cosel, Peter; Bassauer, Sergej; Martin, Dirk

    The gamma strength function (GSF) as well as total level densities (LDs) in 208Pb and 96Mo were extracted from high-resolution forward angle inelastic proton scattering data taken at RCNP, Osaka, Japan, and compared to experimental results obtained with the Oslo method in order to test the validity of the Brink-Axel (BA) hypothesis in the energy region of the pygmy dipole resonance. The case of 208Pb is inconclusive because of strong fluctuations of the GSF due to the small level density in a doubly closed-shell nucleus. In 96Mo the data are consistent with the BA hypothesis. The good agreement of LDs provides an independent confirmation of the approach underlying the decomposition of GSF and LDs in Oslo-type experiments.

  20. Chromium speciation and mobility in a high level nuclear waste vadose zone plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zachara, John M.; Ainsworth, Calvin C.; Brown, Gordon E.; Catalano, Jeffrey G.; McKinley, James P.; Qafoku, Odeta; Smith, Steven C.; Szecsody, James E.; Traina, Sam J.; Warner, Jeffrey A.

    2004-01-01

    Radioactive core samples containing elevated concentrations of Cr from a high level nuclear waste plume in the Hanford vadose zone were studied to asses the future mobility of Cr. Cr(VI) is an important subsurface contaminant at the Hanford Site. The plume originated in 1969 by leakage of self-boiling supernate from a tank containing REDOX process waste. The supernate contained high concentrations of alkali (NaOH ≈ 5.25 mol/L), salt (NaNO 3/NaNO 2 >10 mol/L), aluminate [Al(OH) 4- = 3.36 mol/L], Cr(VI) (0.413 mol/L), and 137Cs + (6.51 × 10 -5 mol/L). Water and acid extraction of the oxidized subsurface sediments indicated that a significant portion of the total Cr was associated with the solid phase. Mineralogic analyses, Cr valence speciation measurements by X-ray adsorption near edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy, and small column leaching studies were performed to identify the chemical retardation mechanism and leachability of Cr. While X-ray diffraction detected little mineralogic change to the sediments from waste reaction, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) showed that mineral particles within 5 m of the point of tank failure were coated with secondary, sodium aluminosilicate precipitates. The density of these precipitates decreased with distance from the source (e.g., beyond 10 m). The XANES and column studies demonstrated the reduction of 29-75% of the total Cr to insoluble Cr(III), and the apparent precipitation of up to 43% of the Cr(VI) as an unidentified, non-leachable phase. Both Cr(VI) reduction and Cr(VI) precipitation were greater in sediments closer to the leak source where significant mineral alteration was noted by SEM. These and other observations imply that basic mineral hydrolysis driven by large concentrations of OH - in the waste stream liberated Fe(II) from the otherwise oxidizing sediments that served as a reductant for CrO 42-. The coarse-textured Hanford sediments contain silt-sized mineral phases (biotite, clinochlore, magnetite, and

  1. Robotics and remote handling concepts for disposal of high-level nuclear waste

    SciTech Connect

    McAffee, Douglas; Raczka, Norman; Schwartztrauber, Keith

    1997-04-27

    This paper summarizes preliminary remote handling and robotic concepts being developed as part of the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Yucca Mountain Project. The DOE is currently evaluating the Yucca Mountain Nevada site for suitability as a possible underground geologic repository for the disposal of high level nuclear waste. The current advanced conceptual design calls for the disposal of more than 12,000 high level nuclear waste packages within a 225 km underground network of tunnels and emplacement drifts. Many of the waste packages may weigh as much as 66 tonnes and measure 1.8 m in diameter and 5.6 m long. The waste packages will emit significant levels of radiation and heat. Therefore, remote handling is a cornerstone of the repository design and operating concepts. This paper discusses potential applications areas for robotics and remote handling technologies within the subsurface repository. It also summarizes the findings of a preliminary technology survey which reviewed available robotic and remote handling technologies developed within the nuclear, mining, rail and industrial robotics and automation industries, and at national laboratories, universities, and related research institutions and government agencies.

  2. Risk perception on management of nuclear high-level and transuranic waste storage

    SciTech Connect

    Dees, Lawrence A.

    1994-08-15

    The Department of Energy`s program for disposing of nuclear High-Level Waste (HLW) and transuranic (TRU) waste has been impeded by overwhelming political opposition fueled by public perceptions of actual risk. Analysis of these perceptions shows them to be deeply rooted in images of fear and dread that have been present since the discovery of radioactivity. The development and use of nuclear weapons linked these images to reality and the mishandling of radioactive waste from the nations military weapons facilities has contributed toward creating a state of distrust that cannot be erased quickly or easily. In addition, the analysis indicates that even the highly educated technical community is not well informed on the latest technology involved with nuclear HLW and TRU waste disposal. It is not surprising then, that the general public feels uncomfortable with DOE`s management plans for with nuclear HLW and TRU waste disposal. Postponing the permanent geologic repository and use of Monitored Retrievable Storage (MRS) would provide the time necessary for difficult social and political issues to be resolved. It would also allow time for the public to become better educated if DOE chooses to become proactive.

  3. Improved performance comparisons of radioxenon systems for low level releases in nuclear explosion monitoring.

    PubMed

    Haas, Derek A; Eslinger, Paul W; Bowyer, Theodore W; Cameron, Ian M; Hayes, James C; Lowrey, Justin D; Miley, Harry S

    2017-08-14

    The Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty bans all nuclear tests and mandates development of verification measures to detect treaty violations. One verification measure is detection of radioactive xenon isotopes produced in the fission of actinides. The International Monitoring System (IMS) currently deploys automated radioxenon systems that can detect four radioxenon isotopes. Radioxenon systems with lower detection limits are currently in development. Historically, the sensitivity of radioxenon systems was measured by the minimum detectable concentration for each isotope. In this paper we analyze the response of radioxenon systems using rigorous metrics in conjunction with hypothetical representative releases indicative of an underground nuclear explosion instead of using only minimum detectable concentrations. Our analyses incorporate the impact of potential spectral interferences on detection limits and the importance of measuring isotopic ratios of the relevant radioxenon isotopes in order to improve discrimination from background sources particularly for low-level releases. To provide a sufficient data set for analysis, hypothetical representative releases are simulated every day from the same location for an entire year. The performance of three types of samplers are evaluated assuming they are located at 15 IMS radionuclide stations in the region of the release point. The performance of two IMS-deployed samplers and a next-generation system is compared with proposed metrics for detection and discrimination using representative releases from the nuclear test site used by the Democratic People's Republic of Korea. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  4. Optical Pumping and Laser Induced Nuclear Orientation of a Microsecond Isomeric Level in BARIUM-134

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Curtis John

    Using optical pumping techniques, on and off-line experiments were performed on a microsecond nuclear isomer (('134m)Ba 10('+) ). Shifts in atomic resonances detected by changes in the angular distribution of characteristic nuclear radiations (expressed as changes in shape and size) yield information on changes in nuclear structure. The 10('+) isomeric state was produced using a 49 MeV pulsed beam of ('13)C on an isotopically enriched ('124)Sn target. The reaction products recoil out of the target and are slowed to thermal velocities in 10 torr of xenon in a region illuminated with circularly polarized light (553.5 nm) from a Coherent 699-21 dye laser. Nuclear parameters measured were the lifetime (3.8(2)(mu)s) and g-factor (g = -.20(1)) of the 10('+) state. Atomic parameters measured for barium were the depolarization cross sections of the ('1)P(,1) atomic level (6.0(6) nm('2)) in xenon, the quenching cross section for hydrogen (0.042(4) nm('2)), and the branching ratio of the metastable (('1,3)D(,1,2,3)) atomic states (0.011(1)). A possible anisotropy signal and the cumulative results (no measurable anisotropy) are presented. Difficulties encountered were insufficient neutralization, and unexpectedly large spatial distribution, and 'trapping' in metastable atomic states.

  5. Sorption of strontium on uranyl peroxide: implications for a high-level nuclear waste repository.

    PubMed

    Sureda, Rosa; Martínez-Lladó, Xavier; Rovira, Miquel; de Pablo, Joan; Casas, Ignasi; Giménez, Javier

    2010-09-15

    Strontium-90 is considered the most important radioactive isotope in the environment and one of the most frequently occurring radionuclides in groundwaters at nuclear facilities. The uranyl peroxide studtite (UO2O2 . 4H2O) has been observed to be formed in spent nuclear fuel leaching experiments and seems to have a relatively high sorption capacity for some radionuclides. In this work, the sorption of strontium onto studtite is studied as a function of time, strontium concentration in solution and pH. The main results obtained are (a) sorption is relatively fast although slower than for cesium; (b) strontium seems to be sorbed via a monolayer coverage of the studtite surface, (c) sorption has a strong dependence on ionic strength, is negligible at acidic pH, and increases at neutral to alkaline pH (almost 100% of the strontium in solution is sorbed above pH 10). These results point to uranium secondary solid phase formation on the spent nuclear fuel as an important mechanism for strontium retention in a high-level nuclear waste repository (HLNW).

  6. Correlation of Friedewald's calculated low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels with direct low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels in a tertiary care hospital

    PubMed Central

    Nanda, Sunil Kumar; Bharathy, M; Dinakaran, Asha; Ray, Lopamudra; Ravichandran, K

    2017-01-01

    Background: One of the risk factors for the development of coronary heart disease is high low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol levels. National Cholesterol Education Program ATP III guidelines suggest drug therapy to be considered at LDL-cholesterol levels >130 mg/dl. This makes accurate reporting of LDL cholesterol crucial in the management of Coronary heart disease. Estimation of LDL cholesterol by direct LDL method is accurate, but it is expensive. Hence, We compared Friedewald's calculated LDL values with direct LDL values. Aim: To evaluate the correlation of Friedewalds calculated LDL with direct LDL method. Materials and Methods: We compared LDL cholesterol measured by Friedewald's formula with direct LDL method in 248 samples between the age group of 20–70 years. Paired t-test was used to test the difference in LDL concentration obtained by a direct method and Friedewald's formula. The level of significance was taken as P < 0.05. Pearsons correlation formula was used to test the correlation between direct LDL values with Friedewald's formula. Results: There was no significant difference between the direct LDL values when compared to calculated LDL by Friedewalds formula (P = 0.140). Pearson correlation showed there exists good correlation between direct LDL versus Friedewalds formula (correlation coefficient = 0.98). The correlation between direct LDL versus Friedewalds calculated LDL was best at triglycerides values between 101 and 200 mg/dl. Conclusion: This study indicates calculated LDL by Friedewalds equation can be used instead of direct LDL in patients who cannot afford direct LDL method. PMID:28251110

  7. Ocean Turbulence V: Mesoscale Modeling in Level Coordinates. The Effect of Random Nature of Density

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canuto, V. M.; Dubovikov, M. S.

    1998-01-01

    The main result of this paper is the derivation of a new expression for the tracer subgrid term in level coordinates S(l) to be employed in O-GCM. The novel feature is the proper account of the random nature of the density field which strongly affects the transformation from isopycnal to level coordinates of the variables of interest, velocity and tracer fields, their correlation functions and ultimately the subgrid terms. In deriving our result we made use of measured properties of vertical ocean turbulence. The major new results are: 1) the new subgrid expression is different from that of the heuristic GM model, 2) u++(tracer)=1/2u+(thickness), where u++ and u+ are the tracer and thickness bolus velocities. In previous models, u++ = u+, 2) the subgrid for a tracer tau is not the same as that for the density rho even when one accounts for the obvious absence of a diffusion term in the latter. The difference stems from a new treatment of the stochastic nature of the density, 3) the mesoscale diffusivity enters both locally and non-locally, as the integral over all z's from the bottom of the ocean to the level z.

  8. Spin- and Parity-Dependent Level Densities in Exotic Calcium Isotopes?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usman, I. T.; Carter, J.; Sideras-Haddad, E.; Jingo, M.; Kureba, C. O.; Donaldson, L.; Latif, M.; Neveling, R.; Smit, F. D.; Swartz, C.; Nemulodi, F.; von Neumann-Cosel, P.; Richter, A.; Fearick, R. W.; Fujita, H.; Fulita, Y.; Tamii, A.

    2015-11-01

    Level densities of 2+ and 1- states in 40Ca have been extracted from high energy-resolution (p,p') experiments performed using the K600 magnetic spectrometer at iThemba LABS, South Africa. The success of the method depends on the accurate determination of various background components underneath the giant resonance. It was found that using the nearly model-independent method of Discrete Wavelet Transform (DWT) background determination using bi-orthogonal wavelets of high order of vanishing moments proved sufficient for the extraction of level density in the excitation energy region of the Isoscalar Giant Quadrupole Resonance (ISGQR) and Isovector Giant Dipole Resonance (IVGDR). Comparison of the experimentally extracted 2+ and 1- level densities with Back-Shifted Fermi Gas Model (BSFG), Hartree-Fock Bogoliubov (HFB) and Hartree-Fock-Bardeen-Cooper Schriffer (HF-BCS) theoretical model predictions were made. Future interests in the use of radioactive-ion beams of different intensities will provide opportunities in elucidating this important property experimentally for more exotic calcium isotopes.

  9. Effects of long-term exposure of tuffs to high-level nuclear waste repository conditions. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Blacic, J.D.; Vaniman, D.T.; Bish, D.L.; Duffy, C.J.; Gooley, R.C.

    1986-08-01

    We have performed exploratory tests to investigate the effects of extended exposure of tuffs from Yucca Mountain, Nevada, to temperatures and pressures similar to those that will be encountered in a high-level nuclear waste repository. In a preliminary report we described statistically significant changes in strength properties and generally minor changes in porosity and grain density. In the present report we describe additional measurements that indicate possible changes in permeability (in one tuff type) after exposure for 2 to 6 months at temperatures from 80 to 180 C, confining pressures of 9.7 and 19.7 MPa, and water pore pressures of 0.5 and 19.7 MPa. Mineralogic examinations have established reactions involving dissolution of silica and feldspar minerals and possible conversion of clinoptilolite to mordenite. We conclude that rock properties important to the operation of a nuclear waste repository in tuff are likely to change over time when exposed to simulated repository conditions, and the details of these time-dependent processes should be investigated further.

  10. Multiparticle Correlation Functions: A probe for the High Energy Density Nuclear Matter created at RHIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holzmann, Wolf

    2002-04-01

    In a recent publication [1], the PHENIX collaboration has reported on the transverse momentum spectra for charged hadrons and for neutral pions in the range 1 < pT < 5 GeV/c. The spectra from peripheral nuclear collisions were found to be consistent with a simple scaling of the spectra from p+p collisions by the average number of nucleon-nucleon binary collisions. In contrast, the spectra from central collisions appeared to be significantly suppressed when compared to that from peripheral collisions as well as to the scaled p+p expectation. These observations have been interpreted as an important signature for jet quenching( [1],[2]) in central Au + Au collisions at RHIC. Significant jet production should also lead to discernable multi-particle correlations. Thus, the study of such correlations and their possible modification due to quenching, offers a promising opportunity for the investigation and study of QGP formation at RHIC. The multiparticle correlation analysis technique will be presented in conjunction with possible results for Au + Au data (sqrt(s) = 200GeV/c) obtained with the PHENIX detector at RHIC [1] Adcox et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 88, 022301 (2001) [2] M. Gyulassy and X.-N. Wang, Nucl. Phys. B420, 583 (1994)X.-N. Wang, M.Gyulassy and M. Pluemer, Phys. Rev. D 51, 3436 (1995)

  11. 95Mo nuclear magnetic resonance parameters of molybdenum hexacarbonyl from density functional theory: appraisal of computational and geometrical parameters.

    PubMed

    Cuny, Jérôme; Sykina, Kateryna; Fontaine, Bruno; Le Pollès, Laurent; Pickard, Chris J; Gautier, Régis

    2011-11-21

    Solid-state (95)Mo nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) properties of molybdenum hexacarbonyl have been computed using density functional theory (DFT) based methods. Both quadrupolar coupling and chemical shift parameters were evaluated and compared with parameters of high precision determined using single-crystal (95)Mo NMR experiments. Within a molecular approach, the effects of major computational parameters, i.e. basis set, exchange-correlation functional, treatment of relativity, have been evaluated. Except for the isotropic parameter of both chemical shift and chemical shielding, computed NMR parameters are more sensitive to geometrical variations than computational details. Relativistic effects do not play a crucial part in the calculations of such parameters for the 4d transition metal, in particular isotropic chemical shift. Periodic DFT calculations were tackled to measure the influence of neighbouring molecules on the crystal structure. These effects have to be taken into account to compute accurate solid-state (95)Mo NMR parameters even for such an inorganic molecular compound.

  12. Unraveling multi-spin effects in rotational resonance nuclear magnetic resonance using effective reduced density matrix theory

    SciTech Connect

    SivaRanjan, Uppala; Ramachandran, Ramesh

    2014-02-07

    A quantum-mechanical model integrating the concepts of reduced density matrix and effective Hamiltonians is proposed to explain the multi-spin effects observed in rotational resonance (R{sup 2}) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments. Employing this approach, the spin system of interest is described in a reduced subspace inclusive of its coupling to the surroundings. Through suitable model systems, the utility of our theory is demonstrated and verified with simulations emerging from both analytic and numerical methods. The analytic results presented in this article provide an accurate description/interpretation of R{sup 2} experimental results and could serve as a test-bed for distinguishing coherent/incoherent effects in solid-state NMR.

  13. On a Unified Approach to Average Phase Space Density in Some Sulphur-Induced High Energy Nuclear Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharyya, S.; De, Bhaskar

    The Average Phase Space Density (APSD) of very high energy nuclear collisions at the total ``freeze-out'' temperature offers an indirect but convenient tool to assess the merit and worth of the pionisation models. We have attempted to apply here a specific multiple production model with a view to estimating the APSD of pions for a set of sulphur-induced ultrarelativistic heavy-ion collisions in a unified manner, to compare them finally with the experiment-based results of NA35 and NA44-groups at CERN and also with the calculational results based on the thermal model. The specific implications of the present approach have also been pointed out in the end.

  14. Energy–density functional plus quasiparticle–phonon model theory as a powerful tool for nuclear structure and astrophysics

    SciTech Connect

    Tsoneva, N.; Lenske, H.

    2016-11-15

    During the last decade, a theoretical method based on the energy–density functional theory and quasiparticle–phonon model, including up to three-phonon configurations was developed. The main advantages of themethod are that it incorporates a self-consistentmean-field and multi-configuration mixing which are found of crucial importance for systematic investigations of nuclear low-energy excitations, pygmy and giant resonances in an unified way. In particular, the theoretical approach has been proven to be very successful in predictions of new modes of excitations, namely pygmy quadrupole resonance which is also lately experimentally observed. Recently, our microscopically obtained dipole strength functions are implemented in predictions of nucleon-capture reaction rates of astrophysical importance. A comparison to available experimental data is discussed.

  15. Progestogen levels, Progesterone Receptor Gene polymorphisms, and mammographic density changes: results from the Postmenopausal Estrogen/Progestin Interventions Mammographic Density Study (PEPI-MDS)

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Eunjung; Ingles, Sue A.; Van Den Berg, David; Wang, Wei; LaVallee, Chris; Huang, Mei-Hua; Crandall, Carolyn J.; Stanczyk, Frank Z.; Greendale, Gail A.; Ursin, Giske

    2015-01-01

    Objective Estrogen plus progestin therapy (EPT) in postmenopausal women increases breast cancer risk and mammographic density to a higher extent than does estrogen therapy (ET) alone. Data from the randomized placebo-controlled Postmenopausal Estrogen/Progestin Interventions (PEPI) trial showed that EPT-induced increases in serum estrone and estrone sulfate levels were positively correlated with increases in mammographic density. Here, after adjusting for serum estrone and estrone sulfate levels, we investigated the roles of post-treatment serum progestogen increase and of progesterone receptor gene (PGR) genetic variations on changes in mammographic density. Methods We measured percent mammographic density and serum progestogen levels in 280 PEPI participants randomized to EPT treatment. Analyses of genetic variations in PGR were limited to 260 white women for whom we successfully obtained PGR genotypes. We used linear regression analyses to determine how increase in progestogen levels and PGR genetic variations influenced mammographic density change following EPT. Results The increase in post-treatment serum progestogen level was positively associated with greater increases in mammographic density after adjustment for covariates (P-trend=0.044). Compared to women in the lowest quartile of serum progestogen, women in the highest quartile experienced a 3.5% greater increase in mammographic density (P=0.046). We did not find a strong indication that genetic variations in PGR were associated with mammographic density increase, or modified the association with serum progestogen, however confidence in these null findings is constrained by our small sample size. Conclusions Our results suggest that higher serum progestogen levels resulting from EPT treatment lead to greater increases in mammographic density. PMID:22105149

  16. Spine and total body bone mineral density and serum testosterone levels in male athletes.

    PubMed

    Smith, R; Rutherford, O M

    1993-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the effects of intense endurance vs strengthening exercise on bone mass and serum testosterone levels in male athletes. Bone mineral density (BMD) of the total body and spine and serum testosterone levels were measured in male rowers (n = 12), triathletes (n = 8) and sedentary controls (n = 13). The total body scan also gave values for percentage body fat and regional bone densities. Calcium intake and physical activity levels were measured by questionnaire. The rowers had significantly higher BMD in the spine and total body than the triathletes (P < 0.01 and P < 0.05 respectively) and sedentary controls (P < 0.01 and P < 0.05). There were no differences between the triathletes and controls. Serum testosterone levels were significantly lower in the triathletes than in the controls (P < 0.05); there was no significant difference between the rowers and controls. All groups fell within the normal range for testosterone. In a step-wise multiple regression, including age, body mass, height, calcium intake and activity, no single factor had a significant effect on spine BMD. Body mass had a significant effect on total body BMD and could account for the differences between the groups. A significant positive correlation was found between calcium intake and total body BMD. The heavy weight training typical of rowing training seemed to result in significant bone accretion. The low testosterone levels in the triathletes may have negated any positive effect of the increased exercise on BMD.

  17. The effect of halo nuclear density on reaction cross-section for light ion collision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassan, M. A. M.; Nour El-Din, M. S. M.; Ellithi, A.; Ismail, E.; Hosny, H.

    2015-08-01

    In the framework of the optical limit approximation (OLA), the reaction cross-section for halo nucleus — stable nucleus collision at intermediate energy, has been studied. The projectile nuclei are taken to be one-neutron halo (1NHP) and two-neutron halo (2NHP). The calculations are carried out for Gaussian-Gaussian (GG), Gaussian-Oscillator (GO), and Gaussian-2S (G2S) densities for each considered projectile. As a target, the stable nuclei in the range 4-28 of the mass number are used. An analytic expression of the phase shift function has been derived. The zero range approximation is considered in the calculations. Also, the in-medium effect is studied. The obtained results are analyzed and compared with the geometrical reaction cross-section and the available experimental data.

  18. High level nuclear waste repository in salt: Sealing systems status and planning report: Draft report

    SciTech Connect

    1985-09-01

    This report documents the initial conceptual design studies for a repository sealing system for a high-level nuclear waste repository in salt. The first step in the initial design studies was to review the current design level, termed schematic designs. This review identified practicality of construction and development of a design methodology as two key issues for the conceptual design. These two issues were then investigated during the initial design studies for seal system materials, seal placement, backfill emplacement, and a testing and monitoring plan. The results of these studies have been used to develop a program plan for completion of the sealing system conceptual design. 60 refs., 26 figs., 18 tabs.

  19. Radiation attenuation and nuclear properties of high density concrete made with steel aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bashter, I. I.

    The fast neutron and gamma ray spectra measured behind different thickness of steel scrap concrete with density of 4 g/cm3 have been studied. The mix proportions by weight of this type of concrete were 1 cement: 6.89 steel scrap: 2.9 sand and 0.5 Water. Comparison with a standard ordinary concrete of density 2.3 g/cm3 have been carried out. The measurements were made using a collimated beam of both gamma rays and neutrons emitted from one of the horizontal channel of the Egyptian Research Reactor-1. A fast neutron and gamma ray spectrometer with a stilbene crystal was used to measure the spectra of fast neutrons and gamma rays. Pulse shape discrimination using the zero cross over technique was used to separate the photon pulses from the electron pulses. The equation due to Schmidt has been modified and applied for determining the neutron effective removal cross sections (˜R) for steel scrap, ordinary, hematite-serpentine, ilmenite-limonite and ilmenite concretes. This equation gives results which are in good agreement with the measured values. The derived empirical equation in a previous work to calculate the neutron integral flux behind different thicknesses of different types of concretes, gives good results for steel scrap concrete under investigation comparing with the corresponding experimental data. Total neutron macroscopic cross sections, linear attenuation coefficients for gamma rays and the half-value layers for both radiations at different energies have been obtained for steel scrap concrete and comparing with the corresponding values of ordinary concrete. The results show that steel scrap concrete is better than ordinary, hematite-serpentine, ilmenite-limonite and ilmenite concretes from the radiation shielding point of view.

  20. The shell model Monte Carlo approach to level densities: from medium-mass to heavy deformed nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Alhassid, Y.

    2008-04-17

    The shell model Monte Carlo (SMMC) approach is a powerful state-of-the-art method for the microscopic calculation of level densities in the presence of correlations. With this method it is possible to perform realistic calculations in model spaces that are many orders of magnitude larger than spaces that can be treated with conventional diagonalization methods. SMMC level densities of medium-mass nuclei were found to be in remarkably good agreement with experimental level densities without any adjustable parameters. We discuss recent developments, including a spin projection method for calculating the spin distribution of level densities and the extension of SMMC to heavy deformed nuclei.

  1. The dependence of plasma density in the topside ionosphere on the solar activity level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, L.; Wan, W.; Yue, X.; Zhao, B.; Ning, B.; Zhang, M.-L.

    2007-06-01

    In this paper, the ten-year (1996-2005) total ion density Ni measurements from the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) spacecraft in the morning and evening (09:30 and 21:30 LT) sectors have been analyzed to explore the dependence of plasma densities in the topside ionosphere at middle and low latitudes on the solar activity level. Results indicate that there is a strong solar activity dependence of DMSP Ni at 848 km altitude, which has latitudinal and seasonal features. The plasma density in the topside ionosphere has an approximately linear dependence on daily F107 and a strongly nonlinear dependence on SEM/SOHO EUV, such that the change rate of Ni becomes greater with increasing solar EUV. This is quite different from the dependence of Ni near the F-Region peak (NmF2), at which the rate of change of NmF2 decreases with increasing solar EUV. The rate of change of Ni at the DMSP altitude is greatest in the latitude range where Ni is greatest during high solar activity. We suggest that this greater rate of change (or amplification effect) of Ni at the DMSP altitude is mainly a consequence of the solar activity variations of the topside scale height. The changes in the height of the F-Region peak (hmF2) and the density NmF2 play a secondary role.

  2. Measurements of population densities of metastable and resonant levels of argon using laser induced fluorescence

    SciTech Connect

    Nikolić, M.; Newton, J.; Sukenik, C. I.; Vušković, L.; Popović, S.

    2015-01-14

    We present a new approach to measure population densities of Ar I metastable and resonant excited states in low temperature Ar plasmas at pressures higher than 1 Torr. This approach combines the time resolved laser induced fluorescence technique with the kinetic model of Ar. The kinetic model of Ar is based on calculating the population rates of metastable and resonant levels by including contributions from the processes that affect population densities of Ar I excited states. In particular, we included collisional quenching processes between atoms in the ground state and excited states, since we are investigating plasma at higher pressures. We also determined time resolved population densities of Ar I 2 p excited states by employing optical emission spectroscopy technique. Time resolved Ar I excited state populations are presented for the case of the post-discharge of the supersonic flowing microwave discharge at pressures of 1.7 and 2.3 Torr. The experimental set-up consists of a pulsed tunable dye laser operating in the near infrared region and a cylindrical resonance cavity operating in TE{sub 111} mode at 2.45 GHz. Results show that time resolved population densities of Ar I metastable and resonant states oscillate with twice the frequency of the discharge.

  3. Cost Effectiveness of Achieving Targets of Low-Density Lipoprotein Particle Number Versus Low-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol Level.

    PubMed

    Grabner, Michael; Winegar, Deborah A; Punekar, Rajeshwari S; Quimbo, Ralph A; Cziraky, Mark J; Cromwell, William C

    2017-02-01

    A recent analysis of a commercially insured US population found fewer cardiovascular disease (CVD) events in high-risk patients attaining low levels of low-density lipoprotein (LDL), as measured by LDL particle number (LDL-P) versus low LDL cholesterol (LDL-C). Here, we investigated the cost effectiveness of LDL-lowering therapy guided by LDL-P. Patients were selected from the HealthCore Integrated Research Database and followed for 12 to 36 months. Patients who achieved LDL-P <1,000 nmol/l were placed into the LDL-P cohort, whereas those without LDL-P tests, but who achieved LDL-C <100 mg/dl, were placed into the LDL-C cohort. CVD-related costs included all health plan paid amounts related to CVD events or lipid management. Cost effectiveness was assessed through incremental cost-effectiveness ratios, defined as difference in total costs across the cohorts divided by difference in CVD events, measured over follow-up. Each cohort included 2,094, 1,242, and 705 patients over 12-, 24-, and 36-month follow-up. Patients in the LDL-P cohort received more aggressive lipid-lowering therapy and had fewer CVD events during follow-up compared to patients in the LDL-C cohort. This led to greater pharmacy costs and lower medical costs over time. Incremental cost-effectiveness ratio estimates ranged from $23,131 per CVD event avoided at 12 months to $3,439 and -$4,555 at 24- and 36-month follow-up, suggesting a high likelihood that achieving LDL-P <1,000 nmol/l is cost effective. In conclusion, LDL-lowering therapy guided by LDL-P was demonstrated to be cost effective, with greater clinical and economic benefit seen over longer time horizons and with the increased use of generic statins. Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Assessment of thermal comfort level at pedestrian level in high-density urban area of Hong Kong

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, J.; Ng, E.; Yuan, C.; Lai, A.

    2015-12-01

    Hong Kong is a subtropical city which is very hot and humid in the summer. Pedestrians commonly experience thermal discomfort. Various studies have shown that the tall bulky buildings intensify the urban heat island effect and reduce urban air ventilation. However, relatively few studies have focused on modeling the thermal load at pedestrian level (~ 2 m). This study assesses the thermal comfort level, quantified by PET (Physiological Equivalent Temperature), using a GIS - based simulation approach. A thermal comfort level map shows the PET value of a typical summer afternoon in the high building density area. For example, the averaged PET in Sheung Wan is about 41 degree Celsius in a clear day and 38 degree Celsius in a cloudy day. This map shows where the walkways, colonnades, and greening is most needed. In addition, given a start point, a end point, and weather data, we generate the most comfort walking routes weighted by the PET. In the simulation, shortwave irradiance is calculated using the topographic radiation model (Fu and Rich, 1999) under various cloud cover scenarios; longwave irradiance is calculated based the radiative transfer equation (Swinbank, 1963). Combining these two factors, Tmrt (mean radiant temperature) is solved. And in some cases, the Tmrt differ more than 40 degree Celsius between areas under the sun and under the shades. Considering thermal load and wind information, we found that shading from buildings has stronger effect on PET than poor air ventilation resulted from dense buildings. We predict that pedestrians would feel more comfortable (lower PET) in a hot summer afternoon when walking in the higher building density area.

  5. United States Program on Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste Management

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, L.

    2004-10-03

    The President signed the Congressional Joint Resolution on July 23, 2002, that designated the Yucca Mountain site for a proposed geologic repository to dispose of the nation's spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and high-level radioactive waste (HLW). The United States (U.S.) Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) is currently focusing its efforts on submitting a license application to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in December 2004 for construction of the proposed repository. The legislative framework underpinning the U.S. repository program is the basis for its continuity and success. The repository development program has significantly benefited from international collaborations with other nations in the Americas.

  6. Pseudospin-orbit splitting and its consequences for the central depression in nuclear density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jia Jie; Long, Wen Hui; Song, Jun Ling; Zhao, Qiang

    2016-05-01

    The occurrence of the bubble-like structure has been studied, in the light of pseudospin degeneracy, within the relativistic Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov (RHFB) theory. It is concluded that the charge/neutron bubble-like structure is predicted to occur in the mirror system of {34Si,34Ca } commonly by the selected Lagrangians, due to the persistence of Z (N )=14 subshell gaps above which the π (ν ) 2 s1 /2 states are not occupied. However, for the popular candidate 46Ar, the RHFB Lagrangian PKA1 does not support the occurrence of the bubble-like structure in the charge (proton) density profiles, due to the almost degenerate pseudospin doublet {π 2 s1 /2,π 1 d3 /2} and coherent pairing effects. The formation of a semibubble in heavy nuclei is less possible as a result of small pseudospin-orbit (PSO) splitting, while it tends to appear at Z =120 superheavy systems which coincides with large PSO splitting of the doublet {π 3 p3 /2,π 2 f5 /2} and couples with significant shell effects. Pairing correlations, which can work against bubble formation, significantly affect the PSO splitting. Furthermore, we found that the influence on semibubble formation due to different types of pairing interactions is negligible. The quenching of the spin-orbit splitting in the p orbit has been also stressed, and it may be considered the hallmark for semibubble nuclei.

  7. Noninvasive method for determining the liquid level and density inside of a container

    DOEpatents

    Sinha, Dipen N.

    2000-01-01

    Noninvasive method for determining the liquid level and density inside of a container having arbitrary dimension and shape. By generating a flexural acoustic wave in the container shell and measuring the phase difference of the detected flexural wave from that of the originally generated wave a small distance from the generated wave, while moving the generation and detection means through the liquid/vapor interface, this interface can be detected. Both the wave generation and wave detection may be achieved by transducers on the surface of the container. A change in the phase difference over the outer surface of the vessel signifies that a liquid/vapor interface has been crossed, while the magnitude of the phase difference can be related to fluid density immediately opposite the measurement position on the surface of the vessel.

  8. Predator diversity and density affect levels of predation upon strongly interactive species in temperate rocky reefs.

    PubMed

    Guidetti, Paolo

    2007-12-01

    Indirect effects of predators in the classic trophic cascade theory involve the effects of basal species (e.g. primary producers) mediated by predation upon strongly interactive consumers (e.g. grazers). The diversity and density of predators, and the way in which they interact, determine whether and how the effects of different predators on prey combine. Intraguild predation, for instance, was observed to dampen the effects of predators on prey in many ecosystems. In marine systems, species at high trophic levels are particularly susceptible to extinction (at least functionally). The loss of such species, which is mainly attributed to human activities (mostly fishing), is presently decreasing the diversity of marine predators in many areas of the world. Experimental studies that manipulate predator diversity and investigate the effects of this on strongly interactive consumers (i.e. those potentially capable of causing community-wide effects) in marine systems are scant, especially in the rocky sublittoral. I established an experiment that utilised cage enclosures to test whether the diversity and density of fish predators (two sea breams and two wrasses) would affect predation upon juvenile and adult sea urchins, the most important grazers in Mediterranean sublittoral rocky reefs. Changes in species identity (with sea breams producing major effects) and density of predators affected predation upon sea urchins more than changes in species richness per se. Predation upon adult sea urchins decreased in the presence of multiple predators, probably due to interference competition between sea breams and wrasses. This study suggests that factors that influence both fish predator diversity and density in Mediterranean rocky reefs (e.g. fishing and climate change) may have the potential to affect the predators' ability to control sea urchin population density, with possible repercussions for the whole benthic community structure.

  9. Verification of screening level for decontamination implemented after Fukushima nuclear accident

    PubMed Central

    Ogino, Haruyuki; Ichiji, Takeshi; Hattori, Takatoshi

    2012-01-01

    The screening level for decontamination that has been applied for the surface of the human body and contaminated handled objects after the Fukushima nuclear accident was verified by assessing the doses that arise from external irradiation, ingestion, inhalation and skin contamination. The result shows that the annual effective dose that arises from handled objects contaminated with the screening level for decontamination (i.e. 100 000 counts per minute) is <1 mSv y−1, which can be considered as the intervention exemption level in accordance with the International Commission on Radiological Protection recommendations. Furthermore, the screening level is also found to protect the skin from the incidence of a deterministic effect because the absorbed dose of the skin that arises from direct deposition on the surface of the human body is calculated to be lower than the threshold of the deterministic effect assuming a practical exposure duration. PMID:22228683

  10. Excited-state quantum phase transitions in systems with two degrees of freedom: Level density, level dynamics, thermal properties

    SciTech Connect

    Stránský, Pavel; Macek, Michal; Cejnar, Pavel

    2014-06-15

    Quantum systems with a finite number of freedom degrees f develop robust singularities in the energy spectrum of excited states as the system’s size increases to infinity. We analyze the general form of these singularities for low f, particularly f=2, clarifying the relation to classical stationary points of the corresponding potential. Signatures in the smoothed energy dependence of the quantum state density and in the flow of energy levels with an arbitrary control parameter are described along with the relevant thermodynamical consequences. The general analysis is illustrated with specific examples of excited-state singularities accompanying the first-order quantum phase transition. -- Highlights: •ESQPTs found in infinite-size limit of systems with low numbers of freedom degrees f. •ESQPTs related to non-analytical evolutions of classical phase–space properties. •ESQPT signatures analyzed for general f, particularly f=2, extending known case f=1. •ESQPT signatures identified in smoothened density and flow of energy spectrum. •ESQPTs shown to induce a new type of thermodynamic anomalies.

  11. Hypo-high-density Lipoprotein Cholesterolemia Caused by Evacuation after the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant Accident: Results from the Fukushima Health Management Survey.

    PubMed

    Satoh, Hiroaki; Ohira, Tetsuya; Nagai, Masato; Hosoya, Mitsuaki; Sakai, Akira; Watanabe, Tsuyoshi; Ohtsuru, Akira; Kawasaki, Yukihiko; Suzuki, Hitoshi; Takahashi, Atsushi; Kobashi, Gen; Ozasa, Kotaro; Yasumura, Seiji; Yamashita, Shunichi; Kamiya, Kenji; Abe, Masafumi

    2016-01-01

    Objective The Great East Japan Earthquake and the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster forced the evacuation of residents and led to many changes in the lifestyle of the evacuees. A comprehensive health check was implemented to support the prevention of lifestyle-related disease, and we analyzed changes in lipid metabolism before and after these disasters. Methods Subjects included Japanese men and women living near the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant in Fukushima Prefecture. Annual health checkups, focusing on metabolic syndromes, were conducted for persons ≥40 years of age by the Heath Care Insures. Results A total of 27,486 subjects underwent a follow-up examination after the disaster, with a mean follow-up of 1.6 years. Following the disaster, the prevalence of hypo-high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterolemia increased significantly from 6.0% to 7.2%. In the hypo-HDL cholesterolemia group, the body mass index (BMI), blood pressure, and LDL-C level increased significantly in men after the disaster. On the other hand, in the normal HDL-C level group, the BMI, blood pressure, glucose and lipid metabolism, and liver function were adversely affected. The decrease in HDL-C was significantly greater in evacuees than non-evacuees in the normal HDL-C level group. Furthermore, a multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that the evacuation was significantly associated with the incidence of hypo-HDL cholesterolemia. Conclusion This is the first study to evaluate how the evacuation affected the incidence of hypo-HDL cholesterolemia and led to an increase in cardiovascular disease. This information may be important in the follow-up and lifestyle change recommendations for evacuees.

  12. Improvement of the noise level of the Split Langmuir Probe - a spatial current density meter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marusenkov, Andriy; Dudkin, Fedor; Shuvalov, Valentyn

    2013-04-01

    One of the main tasks at the experimental investigations of the wave processes in space plasma is the determination of the dispersion relations between their wave vector and frequency. The frequency analysis of the magnetic field fluctuations and the electric current density in plasma is very efficient in this case. It had been shown that the simultaneous measurements of the magnetic field orthogonal components and the spatial current density fluctuations can give the wave vector k values for the plane wave spectra, by which a wave field in a plasma reference frame can be represented. The measurements of the magnetic field fluctuations usually are made by a variety of magnetometers using well developed methods. Unfortunately, up to the moment the methods and instruments for the reliable measurements of the space current density are not so good developed as the magnetic ones. There are three independent techniques to study the spatial current density in plasma: the contactless Rogovsky coil, the Faraday cap and the Split Langmuir Probe (SLP). The attempt to compare the different approaches and instruments was carried out during the experiment "Variant" onboard Ukrainian remote sensing satellite SICH-1M launched 2004. The clear advantages of the SLP over other instruments were revealed and proved. Using whistler as a test signal the very good consistency between the magnetic and electric fields and the spatial electric current density was obtained. However, the signal-to-noise ratio of the current density meters has to be further improved. In this report we analyze the sources of the SLP noises and propose the ways to decrease it. The computer simulation of the improved current density meter reveals that the introduced changes have almost no influence on the sensor matching with the space plasma and, as a result, the minor changes of the transformation factor in operation frequency band are expected. The modernized version of the SLP was successfully tested in the

  13. Coupled-channels density-matrix approach to low-energy nuclear collision dynamics: A technique for quantifying quantum decoherence effects on reaction observables

    SciTech Connect

    Diaz-Torres, Alexis

    2010-11-15

    The coupled-channels density-matrix technique for nuclear reaction dynamics, which is based on the Liouville-von Neumann equation with Lindblad dissipative terms, is developed with the inclusion of full angular momentum couplings. It allows a quantitative study of the role and importance of quantum decoherence in nuclear scattering. Formulas of asymptotic observables that can reveal effects of quantum decoherence are given. A method for extracting energy-resolved scattering information from the time-dependent density matrix is introduced. As an example, model calculations are carried out for the low-energy collision of the {sup 16}O projectile on the {sup 154}Sm target.

  14. Should we take high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels at face value?

    PubMed

    Leite, Jose Oyama; Fernandez, Maria Luz

    2010-01-01

    The inverse correlation between high-density lipoprotein (HDL) levels and cardiovascular disease has driven several investigators to target the increase in this lipoprotein to prevent atherosclerosis and its complications. However, many reports have demonstrated that the use of HDL cholesterol (HDL-C) levels as a means to prevent and treat atherosclerosis has mainly resulted in negative outcomes. These findings may help to increase our knowledge of HDL metabolism and its protective effect. There is evidence that the mechanism by which HDL-C levels are raised has a great impact on cardiovascular outcomes. When the increase in HDL-C levels is secondary to greater synthesis, a strong beneficial effect in the prevention of cardiovascular diseases is observed. Even small increases in HDL-C levels induce a marked reduction in cardiovascular events; this has been observed during treatment with fibrates. In contrast, when the increase in HDL-C levels is secondary to a reduction in HDL catabolism, unexpectedly, the opposite effects are usually noted. Even dramatic increases in HDL-C levels are not associated with better cardiovascular outcomes. In fact, these increases have been related to a greater number of cardiovascular-related deaths. This became clear from the results of trials that tested inhibitors of cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP). We suggest that increases in reverse cholesterol transport are more important than HDL-C levels. Strong evidence is provided by individuals that express apolipoprotein (apo)A-I Milano. These individuals have extremely low HDL-C levels due to greater catabolism of the lipoprotein. However, reverse cholesterol transport is increased in these individuals and, as a consequence, they have a low incidence of cardiovascular diseases. We reinforce that, in clinical practice, the currently recommended levels of HDL-C should still be a major target to be aimed for. However, in the research field, we emphasize the need to look for other

  15. Low density lipoprotein levels linkage with the periodontal status patients of coronary heart disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Nafisah Ibrahim; Masulili, Sri Lelyati C.; Lessang, Robert; Radi, Basuni

    2017-02-01

    Studies found an association between periodontitis and coronary heart disease (CHD), but relationship between periodontal status CHD patients with LDL (Low Density Lipoprotein) levels, as risk factors for atherosclerosis, has not been studied. Objective: To analyze relationship between LDL and periodontal status CHD. Methods: Periodontal status of 60 CHD, 40 controls were examined (PBI, PPD, CAL) and their blood was taken to assess levels of LDL. Result: Found significant differences LDL (p=0.005), correlation between LDL with PPD (p=0.003) and CAL CHD (p=0.013), and PPD (p=0.001), CAL (p=0.008) non-CHD, but no significant correlation between LDL with PBI CAD (p=0.689) and PBI non-CHD (p=0.320). Conclusion: There is a correlation between the LDL levels with periodontal status.

  16. [Composition and Density of Soil Fauna in the Region with Enhanced Radioactivity Level (Komi Republic, Vodnyi)].

    PubMed

    Kolesnikova, A A; Kudrin, A A; Konakova, T N; Taskaeva, A A

    2015-01-01

    Studies on the influence of high levels of radiation on soil fauna were carried out in 2012 in the territory formed as a result of the activity of the enterprise for extraction and production of radium from reservoir water and waste of uranium ore from 1931 to 1956. At present the local radioactive pollution in this area is caused by the presence of heavy natural radionuclides 226Ra, 238U and products of their disintegration in soils. The oppression of soil invertebrate.fauna in pine forests and meadows with high levels of radionuclides and heavy metals is revealed. Also shown is the decrease in the number and density of different taxonomic groups of invertebrates, reduction of the diversity and spectrum of trophic groups and vital forms in the area with a high content of radionuclides in soil. Our results are in agreement with the results obtained by the similar studies showing negative influence of high-level ionizing radiation on soil fauna.

  17. Voluntary exercise and caloric restriction enhance hippocampal dendritic spine density and BDNF levels in diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Stranahan, Alexis M; Lee, Kim; Martin, Bronwen; Maudsley, Stuart; Golden, Erin; Cutler, Roy G; Mattson, Mark P

    2009-10-01

    Diabetes may adversely affect cognitive function, but the underlying mechanisms are unknown. To investigate whether manipulations that enhance neurotrophin levels will also restore neuronal structure and function in diabetes, we examined the effects of wheel running and dietary energy restriction on hippocampal neuron morphology and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) levels in db/db mice, a model of insulin resistant diabetes. Running wheel activity, caloric restriction, or the combination of the two treatments increased levels of BDNF in the hippocampus of db/db mice. Enhancement of hippocampal BDNF was accompanied by increases in dendritic spine density on the secondary and tertiary dendrites of dentate granule neurons. These studies suggest that diabetes exerts detrimental effects on hippocampal structure, and that this state can be attenuated by increasing energy expenditure and decreasing energy intake.

  18. Pairing in the BCS and LN approximations using continuum single particle level density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Id Betan, R. M.; Repetto, C. E.

    2017-04-01

    Understanding the properties of drip line nuclei requires to take into account the correlations with the continuum spectrum of energy of the system. This paper has the purpose to show that the continuum single particle level density is a convenient way to consider the pairing correlation in the continuum. Isospin mean-field and isospin pairing strength are used to find the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer (BCS) and Lipkin-Nogami (LN) approximate solutions of the pairing Hamiltonian. Several physical properties of the whole chain of the Tin isotope, as gap parameter, Fermi level, binding energy, and one- and two-neutron separation energies, were calculated and compared with other methods and with experimental data when they exist. It is shown that the use of the continuum single particle level density is an economical way to include explicitly the correlations with the continuum spectrum of energy in large scale mass calculation. It is also shown that the computed properties are in good agreement with experimental data and with more sophisticated treatment of the pairing interaction.

  19. Lowering low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Bays, Harold E

    2014-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is characterized by hyperglycemia, insulin resistance, and/or progressive loss of β-cell function. T2DM patients are at increased risk of micro- and macrovascular disease, and are often considered as representing an atherosclerotic coronary heart disease (CHD) risk equivalent. Interventions directed at glucose and lipid level control in T2DM patients may reduce micro- and macrovascular disease. The optimal T2DM agent is one that lowers glucose levels with limited risk for hypoglycemia, and with no clinical trial evidence of worsening CHD risk. Lipid-altering drugs should preferably reduce low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and apolipoprotein B (apo B) and have evidence that the mechanism of action reduces CHD risk. Statins reduce low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and apo B and have evidence of improving CHD outcomes, and are thus first-line therapy for the treatment of hypercholesterolemia. In patients who do not achieve optimal lipid levels with statin therapy, or who are intolerant to statin therapy, add-on therapy or alternative therapies may be indicated. Additional available agents to treat hypercholesterolemic patients with T2DM include bile acid sequestrants, fibrates, niacin, and ezetimibe. This review discusses the use of these alternative agents to treat hypercholesterolemia in patients with T2DM, either as monotherapy or in combination with statin therapy. PMID:25045281

  20. Lowering low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Bays, Harold E

    2014-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is characterized by hyperglycemia, insulin resistance, and/or progressive loss of β-cell function. T2DM patients are at increased risk of micro- and macrovascular disease, and are often considered as representing an atherosclerotic coronary heart disease (CHD) risk equivalent. Interventions directed at glucose and lipid level control in T2DM patients may reduce micro- and macrovascular disease. The optimal T2DM agent is one that lowers glucose levels with limited risk for hypoglycemia, and with no clinical trial evidence of worsening CHD risk. Lipid-altering drugs should preferably reduce low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and apolipoprotein B (apo B) and have evidence that the mechanism of action reduces CHD risk. Statins reduce low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and apo B and have evidence of improving CHD outcomes, and are thus first-line therapy for the treatment of hypercholesterolemia. In patients who do not achieve optimal lipid levels with statin therapy, or who are intolerant to statin therapy, add-on therapy or alternative therapies may be indicated. Additional available agents to treat hypercholesterolemic patients with T2DM include bile acid sequestrants, fibrates, niacin, and ezetimibe. This review discusses the use of these alternative agents to treat hypercholesterolemia in patients with T2DM, either as monotherapy or in combination with statin therapy.

  1. Density matrix reconstruction of three-level atoms via Rydberg electromagnetically induced transparency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavryusev, V.; Signoles, A.; Ferreira-Cao, M.; Zürn, G.; Hofmann, C. S.; Günter, G.; Schempp, H.; Robert-de-Saint-Vincent, M.; Whitlock, S.; Weidemüller, M.

    2016-08-01

    We present combined measurements of the spatially resolved optical spectrum and the total excited-atom number in an ultracold gas of three-level atoms under electromagnetically induced transparency conditions involving high-lying Rydberg states. The observed optical transmission of a weak probe laser at the center of the coupling region exhibits a double peaked spectrum as a function of detuning, while the Rydberg atom number shows a comparatively narrow single resonance. By imaging the transmitted light onto a charge-coupled-device camera, we record hundreds of spectra in parallel, which are used to map out the spatial profile of Rabi frequencies of the coupling laser. Using all the information available we can reconstruct the full one-body density matrix of the three-level system, which provides the optical susceptibility and the Rydberg density as a function of spatial position. These results help elucidate the connection between three-level interference phenomena, including the interplay of matter and light degrees of freedom and will facilitate new studies of many-body effects in optically driven Rydberg gases.

  2. Increasing the maximally random jammed density with electric field to reduce the fat level in chocolate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, R.; Tang, H.

    Chocolate is one of the most popular food types and flavors in the world. Unfortunately, at present, chocolate products contain too much fat, leading to obesity. For example, a typical molding chocolate has various fat up to 40% in total and chocolate for covering ice cream has fat 50 -60%. Especially, as children are the leading chocolate consumers, reducing the fat level in chocolate products to make them healthier is important and urgent. While this issue was called into attention and elaborated in articles and books decades ago and led to some patent applications, no actual solution was found unfortunately. Why is reducing fat in chocolate so difficult? What is the underlying physical mechanism? We have found that this issue is deeply related to the basic science of soft matters, especially to their viscosity and maximally random jammed (MRJ) density φx. All chocolate productions are handling liquid chocolate, a suspension with cocoa solid particles in melted fat, mainly cocoa butter. The fat level cannot be lower than 1-φxin order to have liquid chocolate to flow. Here we show that that with application of an electric field to liquid chocolate, we can aggregate the suspended particles into prolate spheroids. This microstructure change reduces liquid chocolate's viscosity along the flow direction and increases its MRJ density significantly. Hence the fat level in chocolate can be effectively reduced. We are looking forward to a new class of healthier and tasteful chocolate coming to the market soon. Dept. of Physics, Temple Univ, Philadelphia, PA 19122.

  3. Progress on Plant-Level Components for Nuclear Fuel Recycling: Commonality

    SciTech Connect

    de Almeida, Valmor F.

    2011-08-15

    Progress made in developing a common mathematical modeling framework for plant-level components of a simulation toolkit for nuclear fuel recycling is summarized. This ongoing work is performed under the DOE Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) program which has an element focusing on safeguards and separations (SafeSeps). One goal of this element is to develop a modeling and simulation toolkit for used nuclear fuel recycling. The primary function of the SafeSeps simulation toolkit is to enable the time-dependent coupling of separation modules and safeguards tools (either native or third-party supplied) that simulate and/or monitor the individual separation processes in a separations plant. The toolkit integration environment will offer an interface for the modules to register in the toolkit domain based on the commonality of diverse unit operations. This report discusses the source of this commonality from a combined mathematical modeling and software design perspectives, and it defines the initial basic concepts needed for development of application modules and their integrated form, that is, an application software. A unifying mathematical theory of chemical thermomechanical network transport for physicochemical systems is proposed and outlined as the basis for developing advanced modules. A program for developing this theory from the underlying first-principles continuum thermomechanics will be needed in future developments; accomplishment of this task will enable the development of a modern modeling approach for plant-level models. Rigorous, advanced modeling approaches at the plant-level can only proceed from the development of reduced (or low-order) models based on a solid continuum field theory foundation. Such development will pave the way for future programmatic activities on software verification, simulation validation, and model uncertainty quantification on a scientific basis; currently, no satisfactory foundation exists for

  4. On-site storage of high level nuclear waste: Attitudes and perceptions of local residents

    SciTech Connect

    Bassett, G.W. Jr.; Jenkins-Smith, H.C.; Silva, C.

    1996-06-01

    No public policy issue has been as difficult as high-level nuclear waste. Debates continue regarding Yucca Mountain as a disposal site, and - more generally - the appropriateness of geologic disposal and the need to act quickly. Previous research has focused on possible social, political, and economic consequences of a facility in Nevada. Impacts have been predicted to be potentially large and to emanate mainly from stigmatization of the region due to increased perceptions of risk. Analogous impacts from leaving waste at power plants have been either ignored or assumed to be negligible. This paper presents survey results on attitudes of residents in three countries where nuclear waste is currently stored. Topics include perceived risk, knowledge of nuclear waste and radiation, and impacts on jobs, tourism, and housing values from leaving waste on site. Results are similar to what has been reported for Nevada; the public is concerned about possible adverse effects from on-site storage of waste. 24 refs., 7 figs., 5 tabs.

  5. Albedo Neutron Dosimetry in a Deep Geological Disposal Repository for High-Level Nuclear Waste.

    PubMed

    Pang, Bo; Becker, Frank

    2016-06-24

    Albedo neutron dosemeter is the German official personal neutron dosemeter in mixed radiation fields where neutrons contribute to personal dose. In deep geological repositories for high-level nuclear waste, where neutrons can dominate the radiation field, it is of interest to investigate the performance of albedo neutron dosemeter in such facilities. In this study, the deep geological repository is represented by a shielding cask loaded with spent nuclear fuel placed inside a rock salt emplacement drift. Due to the backscattering of neutrons in the drift, issues concerning calibration of the dosemeter arise. Field-specific calibration of the albedo neutron dosemeter was hence performed with Monte Carlo simulations. In order to assess the applicability of the albedo neutron dosemeter in a deep geological repository over a long time scale, spent nuclear fuel with different ages of 50, 100 and 500 years were investigated. It was found out, that the neutron radiation field in a deep geological repository can be assigned to the application area 'N1' of the albedo neutron dosemeter, which is typical in reactors and accelerators with heavy shielding.

  6. Attempts to develop a new nuclear measurement technique of β-glucuronidase levels in biological samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ünak, T.; Avcibasi, U.; Yildirim, Y.; Çetinkaya, B.

    2003-01-01

    β-Glucuronidase is one of the most important hydrolytic enzymes in living systems and plays an essential role in the detoxification pathway of toxic materials incorporated into the metabolism. Some organs, especially liver and some tumour tissues, have high level of β-glucuronidase activity. As a result the enzymatic activity of some kind of tumour cells, the radiolabelled glucuronide conjugates of cytotoxic, as well as radiotoxic compounds have potentially very valuable diagnostic and therapeutic applications in cancer research. For this reason, a sensitive measurement of β-glucuronidase levels in normal and tumour tissues is a very important step for these kinds of applications. According to the classical measurement method of β-glucuronidase activity, in general, the quantity of phenolphthalein liberated from its glucuronide conjugate, i.e. phenolphthalein-glucuronide, by β-glucuronidase has been measured by use of the spectrophotometric technique. The lower detection limit of phenolphthalein by the spectrophotometric technique is about 1 3 μg. This means that the β-glucuronidase levels could not be detected in biological samples having lower levels of β-glucuronidase activity and therefore the applications of the spectrophotometric technique in cancer research are very seriously limited. Starting from this consideration, we recently attempted to develop a new nuclear technique to measure much lower concentrations of β-glucuronidase in biological samples. To improve the detection limit, phenolphthalein-glucuronide and also phenyl-N-glucuronide were radioiodinated with 131I and their radioactivity was measured by use of the counting technique. Therefore, the quantity of phenolphthalein or aniline radioiodinated with 131I and liberated by the deglucuronidation reactivity of β-glucuronidase was used in an attempt to measure levels lower than the spectrophotometric measurement technique. The results obtained clearly verified that 0.01 pg level of

  7. Attempts to develop a new nuclear measurement technique of β-glucuronidase levels in biological samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ünak, T.; Avcibasi, U.; Yildirim, Y.; Çetinkaya, B.

    2003-01-01

    β-Glucuronidase is one of the most important hydrolytic enzymes in living systems and plays an essential role in the detoxification pathway of toxic materials incorporated into the metabolism. Some organs, especially liver and some tumour tissues, have high level of β-glucuronidase activity. As a result the enzymatic activity of some kind of tumour cells, the radiolabelled glucuronide conjugates of cytotoxic, as well as radiotoxic compounds have potentially very valuable diagnostic and therapeutic applications in cancer research. For this reason, a sensitive measurement of β-glucuronidase levels in normal and tumour tissues is a very important step for these kinds of applications. According to the classical measurement method of β-glucuronidase activity, in general, the quantity of phenolphthalein liberated from its glucuronide conjugate, i.e. phenolphthalein-glucuronide, by β-glucuronidase has been measured by use of the spectrophotometric technique. The lower detection limit of phenolphthalein by the spectrophotometric technique is about 1-3 μg. This means that the β-glucuronidase levels could not be detected in biological samples having lower levels of β-glucuronidase activity and therefore the applications of the spectrophotometric technique in cancer research are very seriously limited. Starting from this consideration, we recently attempted to develop a new nuclear technique to measure much lower concentrations of β-glucuronidase in biological samples. To improve the detection limit, phenolphthalein-glucuronide and also phenyl-N-glucuronide were radioiodinated with 131I and their radioactivity was measured by use of the counting technique. Therefore, the quantity of phenolphthalein or aniline radioiodinated with 131I and liberated by the deglucuronidation reactivity of β-glucuronidase was used in an attempt to measure levels lower than the spectrophotometric measurement technique. The results obtained clearly verified that 0.01 pg level of

  8. Development of Liquid Level and Density Bubbler for DWPF Canyon Vessels. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Duignan, M.R.; Barnes, A.B.

    1994-10-01

    Under Activity No. SRT-ETF-TT-94003-0 (approved March 31, 1994), which is the result of Technical Assistance Request 93-DWPT-PMC-A0002 (issued February 2, 1994), an experiment was performed to test several alternate liquid-level and density measuring bubbler tubes to replace the standard straight tube bubbler sensor used in DWPF canyon vessels and Holledge-type sensors, which are currently in use. This report describes an experiment that elicited positive results from two alternate bubbler tubes that incorporate all of the advantages of the fundamentally simple straight tube bubbler while trying to minimize plugging.

  9. Error analysis of coefficient-based regularized algorithm for density-level detection.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hong; Pan, Zhibin; Li, Luoqing; Tang, Yuanyan

    2013-04-01

    In this letter, we consider a density-level detection (DLD) problem by a coefficient-based classification framework with [Formula: see text]-regularizer and data-dependent hypothesis spaces. Although the data-dependent characteristic of the algorithm provides flexibility and adaptivity for DLD, it leads to difficulty in generalization error analysis. To overcome this difficulty, an error decomposition is introduced from an established classification framework. On the basis of this decomposition, the estimate of the learning rate is obtained by using Rademacher average and stepping-stone techniques. In particular, the estimate is independent of the capacity assumption used in the previous literature.

  10. F-cell levels are altered with erythrocyte density in sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Basu, Sumanta; Dash, Bisnu Prasad; Patel, Dilip Kumar; Chakravarty, Sudipa; Chakravarty, Amit; Banerjee, Debashis; Chakrabarti, Abhijit

    2011-08-15

    Lighter cells from density fractionated erythrocytes of sickle cell disease (SCD) patients carry higher amount of externalized phosphatidylserine (PS) and cell surface glycophorins compared to the denser counterparts. Further analysis also revealed that the denser cells contained higher levels of fetal hemoglobin (HbF) compared to the lighter cells, supported by the presence of larger number of F-cells in these populations. In this report, we have found direct evidence on the higher survival of the HbF rich erythrocytes in SCD.

  11. U.S. block-level population density rasters for 1990, 2000, and 2010

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Falcone, James

    2016-01-01

    This dataset consists of three raster datasets representing population density for the years 1990, 2000, and 2010. All three rasters are based on block-level census geography data. The 1990 and 2000 data are derived from data normalized to 2000 block boundaries, while the 2010 data are based on 2010 block boundaries. The 1990 and 2000 data are rasters at 100-meter (m) resolution, while the 2010 data are at 60-m resolution. See details about each dataset in the specific metadata for each raster.

  12. Level Density In Interacting Boson-Fermion-Fermion Model (IBFFM) Of The Odd-Odd Nucleus 196Au

    SciTech Connect

    Kabashi, Skender; Bekteshi, Sadik

    2007-04-23

    The level density of the odd-odd nucleus 196Au is investigated in the interacting boson-fermion-fermion model (IBFFM) which accounts for collectivity and complex interaction between quasiparticle and collective modes.The IBFFM total level density is fitted by Gaussian and its tail is also fitted by Bethe formula and constant temperature Fermi gas model.

  13. First Pregnancy Characteristics, Postmenopausal Breast Density, and Salivary Sex Hormone Levels in a Population at High Risk for Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Mockus, Mary; Prebil, LeeAnn; Ereman, Rochelle; Dollbaum, Charles; Powell, Mark; Yau, Christina; Benz, Christopher C

    2015-06-01

    It remains unknown if later life breast cancer risk as determined by reproductive history is mediated by postmenopausal breast density and/or sex steroid levels. Increased breast density is a strong surrogate for future breast cancer risk. A cross-sectional study with a longitudinal follow up for breast health outcomes evaluated women without breast cancer (n = 1,023; 682 = parous), drawn from a high risk postmenopausal population, with questionnaire reported reproductive histories. The questionnaire was linked to prospective screening mammogram breast density measurements, and saliva biospecimens that were used to assess sex steroid hormone levels. Expected age and postmenopause related declines in salivary estradiol (E), progesterone (P), dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) and testosterone (T) levels were observed. This was most pronounced for DHEA and T, which were also the only postmenopausal hormone levels significantly associated with any reproductive characteristics: parity and breast feeding for DHEA, age-at-first birth for T. Postmenopausal breast density was borderline significantly lower with parity and higher body mass index (BMI). After multivariate analysis, T was the only hormone level to retain any association (negative, p<0.05) with breast density. While reproductive characteristics, in particular parity, generally demonstrated independent associations with postmenopausal breast density and E, P and DHEA levels, T levels showed concordant inverse associations with age-at-first birth and breast density. These findings suggest that reproductive effects and later life salivary sex steroid hormone levels may have independent effects on later life breast density and cancer risk.

  14. Low-density lipoprotein cholesterol level and statin use among Medicare beneficiaries with diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Qualls, Laura G; Hammill, Bradley G; Maciejewski, Matthew L; Curtis, Lesley H; Jones, W Schuyler

    2016-05-01

    At the time of this study, guidelines recommended a primary goal of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol level less than 100 mg/dL for all patients, an optional goal of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol less than 70 mg/dL for patients with overt cardiovascular disease and statins for patients with diabetes and overt cardiovascular disease and patients 40 years and older with diabetes and at least one risk factor for cardiovascular disease. This study examined statin use and achievement of lipid goals among 111,730 Medicare fee-for-service beneficiaries 65 years and older in 2011. Three-quarters of patients met the low-density lipoprotein cholesterol goal of less than 100 mg/dL. Patients with cardiovascular disease were more likely to meet the goal than those without, not controlling for other differences. Patients on a statin were more likely to meet the goal. There is considerable opportunity for improvement in cholesterol management in high-risk patients with diabetes mellitus. © The Author(s) 2016.

  15. Measurement of Ar resonance and metastable level number densities in argon containing plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiebrandt, Marcel; Hillebrand, Bastian; Spiekermeier, Stefan; Bibinov, Nikita; Böke, Marc; Awakowicz, Peter

    2017-09-01

    The resonance 1s_4~({\\hspace{0pt}}^3P_1), ~1s_2~({\\hspace{0pt}}^1P_1) and metastable 1s_5~({\\hspace{0pt}}^3P_2), ~1s_3~({\\hspace{0pt}}^3P_0) level number densities of argon are determined by means of the branching fraction method in an inductively coupled plasma at 5 Pa and 10 Pa in argon with admixture of hydrogen, nitrogen and oxygen. The 1s_5~({\\hspace{0pt}}^3P_2) densities are compared to laser absorption spectroscopy measurements to evaluate the reliability of the branching fraction method and its limitations. The results are in good agreement and the use of a compact, low cost, low resolution spectrometer (Δλ = 1.3 nm) is sufficient to reliably determine the first four excited states of argon in argon-hydrogen and argon-oxygen mixtures. The addition of nitrogen results in unreliable densities, as the observed argon lines overlap with emission of the N_2(B^3\\Pi_g-A^3Σ_u^+) transition.

  16. Ultrasonics for fluid-level monitoring in nuclear power plant pipes

    SciTech Connect

    Jossinet, G. ); David, J. ); Steele, C. ); Leon, J. )

    1989-11-01

    Ultrasonic techniques are of great interest for noninvasive physical measurements of fluids in hostile environments. Electricite de France (EdF) has developed several products in this area to monitor sensitive parameters in nuclear plants. As an example, we present a system to monitor the water level of the primary coolant circuit during a refueling outage. Pressurized water reactor refueling requires a plant outage during which the steam generator tubes must be drained. Primary circuit pipes are drained for this purpose. Nevertheless, it is necessary to maintain a minimum level of fluid in the system to guarantee proper operation of the residual heat removal (RHR) system. Damage to the RHR pumps because of drainage of the suction port must be avoided. Fine and accurate monitoring of this operation is difficult using conventional differential pressure level transmitters. Due to several incidents in French nuclear plants regarding RHR operations, the EdF maintenance department (SPT/UTO), in 1988, asked the EdF research and development department (DER) to study and develop a new method of monitoring this critical parameter. The method and results are described.

  17. Strategic Minimization of High Level Waste from Pyroprocessing of Spent Nuclear Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, Michael F.; Benedict, Robert W.

    2007-09-01

    The pyroprocessing of spent nuclear fuel results in two high-level waste streams--ceramic and metal waste. Ceramic waste contains active metal fission product-loaded salt from the electrorefining, while the metal waste contains cladding hulls and undissolved noble metals. While pyroprocessing was successfully demonstrated for treatment of spent fuel from Experimental Breeder Reactor-II in 1999, it was done so without a specific objective to minimize high-level waste generation. The ceramic waste process uses “throw-away” technology that is not optimized with respect to volume of waste generated. In looking past treatment of EBR-II fuel, it is critical to minimize waste generation for technology developed under the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP). While the metal waste cannot be readily reduced, there are viable routes towards minimizing the ceramic waste. Fission products that generate high amounts of heat, such as Cs and Sr, can be separated from other active metal fission products and placed into short-term, shallow disposal. The remaining active metal fission products can be concentrated into the ceramic waste form using an ion exchange process. It has been estimated that ion exchange can reduce ceramic high-level waste quantities by as much as a factor of 3 relative to throw-away technology.

  18. Carbon-14 levels in the vicinity of the Lithuanian nuclear power plant Ignalina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magnusson, Å.; Stenström, K.; Adliene, D.; Adlys, G.; Dias, C.; Rääf, C.; Skog, G.; Zakaria, M.; Mattsson, S.

    2007-06-01

    Carbon-14 levels in the vicinity of the Lithuanian nuclear power plant Ignalina have been investigated. During 2001-2004, approximately 70 samples were collected and analysed using accelerator mass spectrometry. The study included samples of leaves, grass, moss, soil and aquatic plants, covering a distance up to 32 km from the power plant. The highest 14C specific activities were found in soil samples from moss-covered sites close to the power plant, probably indicating the release of particulate material. The results are compared with those from studies around other types of reactors also investigated within the project.

  19. Microwave energy for post-calcination treatment of high-level nuclear wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Gombert, D.; Priebe, S.J.; Berreth, J.R.

    1980-01-01

    High-level radioactive wastes generated from nuclear fuel reprocessing require treatment for effective long-term storage. Heating by microwave energy is explored in processing of two possible waste forms: (1) drying of a pelleted form of calcined waste; and (2) vitrification of calcined waste. It is shown that residence times for these processes can be greatly reduced when using microwave energy rather than conventional heating sources, without affecting product properties. Compounds in the waste and in the glass frit additives couple very well with the 2.45 GHz microwave field so that no special microwave absorbers are necessary.

  20. Nuclear and Particle Physics Simulations: The Consortium of Upper-Level Physics Software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bigelow, Roberta; Moloney, Michael J.; Philpott, John; Rothberg, Joseph

    1995-06-01

    The Consortium for Upper Level Physics Software (CUPS) has developed a comprehensive series of Nine Book/Software packages that Wiley will publish in FY `95 and `96. CUPS is an international group of 27 physicists, all with extensive backgrounds in the research, teaching, and development of instructional software. The project is being supported by the National Science Foundation (PHY-9014548), and it has received other support from the IBM Corp., Apple Computer Corp., and George Mason University. The Simulations being developed are: Astrophysics, Classical Mechanics, Electricity & Magnetism, Modern Physics, Nuclear and Particle Physics, Quantum Mechanics, Solid State, Thermal and Statistical, and Wave and Optics.

  1. High level nuclear waste treatment in the Defense Waste Processing Facility: Overview and integrated flowsheet model

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, A.S.; Fowler, J.R.; Edwards, R.E. Jr.; Randall, C.T.

    1991-01-01

    Design and construction of the world's largest vitrification facility for high level nuclear waste has been nearly completed at the US Department of Energy's Savannah River Site. Equipment testing and calibration are currently being performed in preparation for the nonradioactive Chemical Runs in the late 1991. In 1993, the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) will begin producing 100 kg/hr of radioactive waste glass at 28 wt% waste oxide loading. This paper describes all phases of waste processing operations in DWPF and waste tank farms using the integrated flowsheet modeling approach. Particular emphases are given to recent developments in the DWPF processes and design.

  2. High level nuclear waste treatment in the Defense Waste Processing Facility: Overview and integrated flowsheet model

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, A.S.; Fowler, J.R.; Edwards, R.E. Jr.; Randall, C.T.

    1991-12-31

    Design and construction of the world`s largest vitrification facility for high level nuclear waste has been nearly completed at the US Department of Energy`s Savannah River Site. Equipment testing and calibration are currently being performed in preparation for the nonradioactive Chemical Runs in the late 1991. In 1993, the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) will begin producing 100 kg/hr of radioactive waste glass at 28 wt% waste oxide loading. This paper describes all phases of waste processing operations in DWPF and waste tank farms using the integrated flowsheet modeling approach. Particular emphases are given to recent developments in the DWPF processes and design.

  3. The potential detection of low-level aerosol isotopes from new civilian nuclear processes.

    PubMed

    Miley, H S; Burnett, J L; Foxe, M P; Haas, D A; Keillor, M E; Lowrey, J D; Mayer, M F; McIntyre, J I; Wood, J S

    2017-08-01

    As the world faces a challenging future in maintaining the commercial availability of radioactive isotopes for medical use, new methods of medical isotope production are being pursued. Many of these are small in size and could effectively operate continuously. With the potential for much shorter retention times, a new suite of isotopes may soon be found in the environment. The authors estimate that many more aerosols containing low-level isotopes of gas/volatile origin could be detectable at short range and times, and a few at longer ranges and times as compared to those released in more common nuclear reactor operations. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  4. Density heterogeneity and fluid-blood levels in patients aged over 55 with lobar hematoma.

    PubMed

    Renard, D; Waconge, A; Bouly, S; Castelli, C; Thouvenot, E

    2016-01-01

    Density heterogeneity and fluid-blood levels (FBLs) are frequently seen on acute CT scans of deep brain hemorrhage. Our aim was to analyze the density heterogeneity and FBLs seen on acute/subacute CT in patients aged>55 with lobar haemorrhage (LH), and to study the relationship of these brain abnormalities with other parameters, including cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA)-related abnormalities. This was an observational study and retrospective analysis of early CT scans (<7 days) in patients aged>55 years with acute lobar hemorrhage who, between 2012 and 2015, were entered into our stroke database. A total of 37 LH episodes (without trauma, abnormal coagulation/platelet counts, vascular malformation, tumor or vasculitis) in 35 patients were analyzed. Other studied parameters were gender, age, history of hypertension, blood pressure on admission, prior antiplatelet treatment, aPTT, PTT, platelet count, hematocrit, timing of first CT, LH volume, involved lobe, cortical superficial siderosis, microbleeds, chronic LH and CAA (classic and modified Boston) criteria. CAA-related abnormalities seen on MRI were also scored. Overall, in 26 LH episodes (70%), CT was performed within 24h. Density heterogeneity and FBLs were seen in 19 (51%) and 9 (24%) LH episodes, respectively. Also, according to classic and modified Boston criteria, 18 (51%) and 24 (69%) patients, respectively, fulfilled criteria for probable/definite CAA. As for the presence of FBLs, a statistically significant association was found with both the presence of probable/definite CAA according to modified Boston criteria (P=0.033) and the presence of superficial siderosis (P=0.019). Density heterogeneity and, to a lesser degree, FBLs are frequently seen in patients aged>55 with LH. FBLs may also be associated with CAA-related hemorrhage. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. Environmental gamma radiation analysis for Ulsan city with the highest nuclear power plant density in Korea.

    PubMed

    Lee, UkJae; Bae, Jun Woo; Kim, Hee Reyoung

    2017-08-25

    This study presents a real-time measurement-based rapid radiation distribution visualization system for radionuclide recognition, which can quickly scan a contaminated environment. The system combines a portable detector with a digital map and a program for quick data treatment. Radiation information at the measurement location is transferred between a detector and a laptop. It includes environmental and artificial components, specific radionuclides, and total radionuclides. After scanning the area, the radiation distributions are comprehensively displayed in 2D and 3D maps corresponding to the measured area, all in a few tens of seconds. The proposed method was verified using the standard (137)Cs and (60)Co sources. The gamma radiation distribution of the areas measured in Ulsan city, which included non-destructive testing and radioisotope treatment facilities, hospitals, transportation spots, and residential and commercial areas, showed that Ulsan city has maintained safe levels of radiation. The system performed well. In addition, it was found that this system could detect unexpected hot spots quickly in affected environments. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Does alcohol outlet density differ by area-level disadvantage in metropolitan Perth?

    PubMed

    Foster, Sarah; Hooper, Paula; Knuiman, Matthew; Trapp, Georgina; Wood, Lisa

    2017-09-01

    Research suggests that there are area-level disparities in alcohol outlets, with greater density in disadvantaged areas. In part, this might be explained by the inequitable distribution of retail, attracted by lower rents to disadvantaged neighbourhoods. This ecological study examines the distribution of liquor licences in Perth, Australia, and whether discrepancies in the distribution of retail land-uses could account for a socio-economic gradient. Area disadvantage was determined for each Statistical Area 1 (SA1) using the Australian Bureau of Statistics Index of Relative Socio-economic Disadvantage, and licence locations were mapped in GIS. Negative binomial loglinear models examined whether licence densities within SA1s differed by area disadvantage, controlling for demographics and spatial correlation. Models included an offset term, so the estimated effects of area-level disadvantage were on licences per km(2) , or licences per retail destination. In the area-based analyses, for every unit increase in disadvantage decile (i.e. a reduction in relative disadvantage), general licences reduced by 15% (P = 0.000) and liquor stores reduced by 7% (P = 0.004). These gradients were not apparent when licences were examined as a function of retail; however, for every unit increase in disadvantage decile, the density of on-premise licences per retail destination increased by 14% (P = 0.000). The direction of the socio-economic gradient for general licences and liquor stores in Perth is concerning, as all licences selling packaged alcohol were more abundant in disadvantaged areas. However, the over-representation of packaged liquor in disadvantaged areas may relate to the increased provision of retail. © 2017 Australasian Professional Society on Alcohol and other Drugs.

  7. Measurement of resonance level densities in rare gas plasmas and modeling of their resulting VUV emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boffard, J. B.; Culver, C. L.; Wang, S.; Lin, C. C.; Wendt, A. E.; Radovanov, S. B.; Persing, H. M.

    2013-09-01

    In the rare gases, the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) emissions are dominated by the decays from the 1s2 and 1s4 (Paschen's notation) principal resonance levels. In isolation, atoms excited to these resonance levels have a short radiative lifetime (< 10 ns), but resonance blockade of the VUV transitions to the ground state significantly extend the effective lifetimes of these levels under typical plasma conditions with pressures greater than a mTorr. Despite this re-absorption, rare gas plasmas do produce copious VUV emissions that may play an important role in critical surface reactions under certain process conditions. We have measured the resonance level densities as a function of pressure in rare-gas discharges (Ne,Ar,Kr,Xe) in an inductively coupled plasma using both white-light absorption spectroscopy and optical emission spectroscopy by monitoring changes in the 2px --> 1sy branching fractions. The measured resonance level concentrations are subsequently used as inputs to a simple VUV transport model to determine the VUV flux to surfaces. These model VUV flux calculations are compared to measurements made with an absolutely calibrated VUV photodiode. This work was supported in part by NSF grant PHY-1068670.

  8. Long interspersed nuclear element (LINE)-1 methylation level as a molecular marker of early gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun Jung; Chung, Woo Chul; Kim, Dae Bum; Kim, Yeon-Ji; Lee, Ji Min; Jung, Ji Han; Lee, Yun Kyung

    2016-09-01

    This study was performed to examine the state of long interspersed nuclear element (LINE)-1 methylation level in gastric epithelial dysplasias (GEDs) and evaluate as a molecular marker for gastric carcinogenesis when it was compared with RUNX3 expression. We examined 89 patients with GEDs subcategorized by the Vienna classification - 41 category 3 (low grade) and 48 category 4 (high grade/intramucosal carcinoma) lesion. All tissue samples were evaluated for RUNX3 immunohistochemical staining and the level of LINE-1 methylation. The rate of negative expression of RUNX3 in category 4 lesion was significant higher than category 3 (P<0.01). LINE-1 methylation level was statistically different between category 3 and category 4 lesion (P<0.01). Between positive and negative expression of RUNX3 in GEDs, there was a significant difference of LINE-1 methylation level (P<0.01). The area under the ROC curve (AUC) of LINE-1 methylation level for diagnosis of category 4 lesion was 0.88 (95% CI, 0.76-1.00). LINE-1 methylation level was well correlated with the Vienna classification of GED and it had a close relationship with the negative expression of RUNX3 in category 4 lesion. LINE-1 methylation level could be a good candidate for a molecular marker of early gastric cancer. Copyright © 2016 Editrice Gastroenterologica Italiana S.r.l. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Parity-projected shell model Monte Carlo level densities for medium-mass nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Oezen, C.; Langanke, K.; Martinez-Pinedo, G.; Dean, D. J.

    2008-11-11

    We investigate the effects of single-particle structure and pairing on the equilibration of positive and negative-parity level densities for the even-even nuclei {sup 58,62,66}Fe and {sup 58}Ni and the odd-A nuclei {sup 59}Ni and {sup 65}Fe. Calculations are performed using the shell model Monte Carlo method in the complete fp-gds shell-model space using a pairing+quadrupole type residual interaction. We find for the even-even nuclei that the positive-parity states dominate at low excitation energies due to strong pairing correlations. At excitation energies at which pairs are broken, single-particle structure of these nuclei is seen to play the decisive role for the energy dependence of the ratio of negative-to-positive parity level densities. We also find that equilibration energies are noticeably lower for the odd-A nuclei {sup 59}Ni and {sup 65}Fe than for the neighboring even-even nuclei {sup 58}Ni and {sup 66}Fe.

  10. Examination of level density prescriptions for the interpretation of high-energy γ -ray spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, Srijit; Pandit, Deepak; Dey, Balaram; Mondal, Debasish; Mukhopadhyay, S.; Pal, Surajit; De, A.; Banerjee, S. R.

    2014-11-01

    High-energy γ -ray spectra measured by our group involving the compound nuclei (CN) 63Cu at excitation energy E*˜36 MeV with average angular momentum J =12 -17 ℏ , 97Tc at E*˜29 -50 MeV with J =12 -14 ℏ , 113Sb at E*=109 and 121 MeV with J =49 -59 ℏ , and 201Tl at E*=39.5 and 47.5 MeV with J =18 -24 ℏ have been analyzed utilizing the level density prescriptions of (i) Ignatyuk, Smirenkin, and Tishin (IST), (ii) Budtz-Jorgensen and Knitter (BJK), and (iii) Kataria, Ramamurthy, and Kapoor (KRK). These three prescriptions have been tested for the correct statistical model description of high-energy γ rays in the light of extracting the giant dipole resonance (GDR) parameters at low excitation energy and spin where shell effects might play an important role, as well as at high excitation energy where shell effects have melted. Interestingly, only the IST level density prescription could explain the high-energy γ -ray spectra with reasonable GDR parameters for all four nuclei.

  11. Effect of housing density on reproductive parameters and corticosterone levels in nursing mice.

    PubMed

    O'Malley, James; Dambrosia, James M; Davis, Judith A

    2008-03-01

    The Guide for the Care and Use of Laboratory Animals (Guide) recommends minimum floor space per mouse based on weight, with no other factors considered. We conducted a randomized experiment to evaluate the effect of housing density on reproductive indices and corticosterone levels in lactating mice. Female mice matched for age, strain, and date-of-pregnancy were housed individually. At parturition the dams were randomly allocated to have litters culled or remain intact. The experimental group had litters culled to meet the Guide's space density requirement. Litters of the second group were maintained as the numbers born to each dam. Fecal corticosterone levels (first-generation mice only), growth, and weaning weights were measured for mice in all cages; in addition, the reproductive behavior of progeny generated under both housing conditions was assessed to determine whether a space x litter size interaction affected subsequent reproduction. The growth rates for pups from culled litters were significantly greater than those from intact litters. The first-generation pups showed no statistically significant differences in fecal corticosterone or reproductive parameters. The second-generation pups showed no statistically significant differences in growth rates. The results of the study suggest that a strict interpretation of space requirements as listed in Table 2.1 of the Guide is not warranted for lactating dams with litters.

  12. Effect of Housing Density on Reproductive Parameters and Corticosterone Levels in Nursing Mice

    PubMed Central

    O'Malley, James; Dambrosia, James M; Davis, Judith A

    2008-01-01

    The Guide for the Care and Use of Laboratory Animals (Guide) recommends minimum floor space per mouse based on weight, with no other factors considered. We conducted a randomized experiment to evaluate the effect of housing density on reproductive indices and corticosterone levels in lactating mice. Female mice matched for age, strain, and date-of-pregnancy were housed individually. At parturition the dams were randomly allocated to have litters culled or remain intact. The experimental group had litters culled to meet the Guide’s space density requirement. Litters of the second group were maintained as the numbers born to each dam. Fecal corticosterone levels (first-generation mice only), growth, and weaning weights were measured for mice in all cages; in addition, the reproductive behavior of progeny generated under both housing conditions was assessed to determine whether a space × litter size interaction affected subsequent reproduction. The growth rates for pups from culled litters were significantly greater than those from intact litters. The first-generation pups showed no statistically significant differences in fecal corticosterone or reproductive parameters. The second-generation pups showed no statistically significant differences in growth rates. The results of the study suggest that a strict interpretation of space requirements as listed in Table 2.1 of the Guide is not warranted for lactating dams with litters. PMID:18351716

  13. Targeted mutation of plasma phospholipid transfer protein gene markedly reduces high-density lipoprotein levels

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Xian-cheng; Bruce, Can; Mar, Jefferson; Lin, Min; Ji, Yong; Francone, Omar L.; Tall, Alan R.

    1999-01-01

    It has been proposed that the plasma phospholipid transfer protein (PLTP) facilitates the transfer of phospholipids and cholesterol from triglyceride-rich lipoproteins (TRL) into high-density lipoproteins (HDL). To evaluate the in vivo role of PLTP in lipoprotein metabolism, we used homologous recombination in embryonic stem cells and produced mice with no PLTP gene expression. Analysis of plasma of F2 homozygous PLTP–/– mice showed complete loss of phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylinositol, sphingomyelin, and partial loss of free cholesterol transfer activities. Moreover, the in vivo transfer of [3H]phosphatidylcholine ether from very-low-density proteins (VLDL) to HDL was abolished in PLTP–/– mice. On a chow diet, PLTP–/– mice showed marked decreases in HDL phospholipid (60%), cholesterol (65%), and apo AI (85%), but no significant change in non-HDL lipid or apo B levels, compared with wild-type littermates. On a high-fat diet, HDL levels were similarly decreased, but there was also an increase in VLDL and LDL phospholipids (210%), free cholesterol (60%), and cholesteryl ester (40%) without change in apo B levels, suggesting accumulation of surface components of TRL. Vesicular lipoproteins were shown by negative-stain electron microscopy of the free cholesterol– and phospholipid-enriched IDL/LDL fraction. Thus, PLTP is the major factor facilitating transfer of VLDL phospholipid into HDL. Reduced plasma PLTP activity causes markedly decreased HDL lipid and apoprotein, demonstrating the importance of transfer of surface components of TRL in the maintenance of HDL levels. Vesicular lipoproteins accumulating in PLTP–/– mice on a high-fat diet could influence the development of atherosclerosis. PMID:10079112

  14. Sound velocities of bridgmanite from density of states determined by nuclear inelastic scattering and first-principles calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCammon, Catherine; Caracas, Razvan; Glazyrin, Konstantin; Potapkin, Vasily; Kantor, Anastasia; Sinmyo, Ryosuke; Prescher, Clemens; Kupenko, Ilya; Chumakov, Aleksandr; Dubrovinsky, Leonid

    2016-12-01

    Sound velocities of bridgmanite measured in the laboratory are a key to deciphering the composition of the lower mantle. Here, we report Debye sound velocities determined using nuclear inelastic scattering (NIS) for one majorite composition (Mg0.82Fe0.18SiO3) and five bridgmanite compositions (Mg0.82Fe0.18SiO3, Mg0.86Fe0.14Si0.98Al0.02O3, Mg0.88Fe0.12SiO3, Mg0.6Fe0.4Si0.63Al0.37O3, Mg0.83Fe0.15Si0.98Al0.04O3) measured in a diamond anvil cell at pressures up to 89 GPa at room temperature. Debye sound velocities for majorite determined from NIS are consistent with literature data from Brillouin scattering and ultrasonics, while Debye sound velocities for bridgmanite are significantly lower than literature values from the same methods. We calculated partial and total density of states (DOS) for MgSiO3 and FeSiO3 bridgmanite using density functional theory and demonstrate that Debye sound velocities calculated from the reduced DOS using the same approach as for the experimental data (i.e., the limit of D(E)/E2 as energy goes to zero) give the same sound velocities for each phase irrespective of which partial DOS is used. In addition, we show that Debye sound velocities calculated using this approach are consistent with values obtained from the calculation of the full elastic tensor. Comparison of the calculated DOS with the one obtained from NIS indicates that the experimental DOS has enhanced intensity at low energies that leads to a different slope of the DOS and hence a lower sound velocity. This effect is present in all of the bridgmanite samples examined in this study.

  15. Triton-{sup 3}He relative and differential flows as probes of the nuclear symmetry energy at supra-saturation densities

    SciTech Connect

    Yong Gaochan; Li Baoan; Chen Liewen; Zhang Xunchao

    2009-10-15

    Using a transport model coupled with a phase-space coalescence afterburner, we study the triton-{sup 3}He (t-{sup 3}He) ratio with both relative and differential transverse flows in semicentral {sup 132}Sn+{sup 124}Sn reactions at a beam energy of 400 MeV/nucleon. The neutron-proton ratios with relative and differential flows are also discussed as a reference. We find that similar to the neutron-proton pairs, the t-{sup 3}He pairs also carry interesting information regarding the density dependence of the nuclear symmetry energy. Moreover, the nuclear symmetry energy affects more strongly the t-{sup 3}He relative and differential flows than the {pi}{sup -}/{pi}{sup +} ratio in the same reaction. The t-{sup 3}He relative flow can be used as a particularly powerful probe of the high-density behavior of the nuclear symmetry energy.

  16. Yucca Mountain and High-Level Nuclear Waste Disposal: Contributions of Mineralogy to Policy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macfarlane, A.

    2006-05-01

    High-level nuclear waste from the nuclear power industry and the nuclear weapons complex requires a geologic repository for disposal. The United States has identified a site at Yucca Mountain, Nevada for this purpose. Site selection and characterization have relied on input from earth scientists, including information about waste form behavior in a repository environment. The question of waste forms is central to the issue of reducing uncertainties in predicting the performance of a geologic repository over thousands to hundreds of thousands of years, the periods covered by standards that govern the release of radioactivity into the environment. The repository characterized by the U.S. Department of Energy at Yucca Mountain will be located in the unsaturated zone and will consequently provide an oxidizing environment for the waste emplaced there. The geochemical environment will have a large impact on the behavior of the waste, the majority of which will be spent nuclear fuel from nuclear power plants. Spent fuel is largely composed of UO2, in addition to a small fraction of fission products and actinides. Studies of natural analogues have shown that UO2 is not stable in an oxidizing environment in the presence of water and will alter to other phases. The ability of these alteration phases to contain radioactivity is still a subject of analysis. Other countries have addressed the issue of waste form stability by selecting a reducing environment in a location below the water table for their repositories. Such a choice increases the durability of spent fuel by orders of magnitude and thus reduces the uncertainties associated with predicting the performance of the repository. In the United States, the emphasis has turned away from the selection of appropriate natural barriers to transport of radioactivity and towards improvement of engineered barriers. This shift reflects a decision to abandon the natural barriers in favor of engineered ones, resulting in the

  17. Screening level dose assessment of aquatic biota downstream of the Marcoule nuclear complex in southern France

    SciTech Connect

    St-Pierre, S.; Chambers, D.B.; Lowe, L.M.; Bontoux, J.G.

    1999-09-01

    Aquatic biota in the Rhone River downstream of the Marcoule nuclear complex in France are exposed to natural sources of radiation and to radioactivity released from the Marcoule complex. A simple conservative screening level model was used to estimate the range of concentrations in aquatic media of both artificial and natural radionuclides and the consequent absorbed dose rates for aquatic organisms. Five categories of aquatic organisms were studied, namely, submerged aquatic plants (phanerogam), non-bottom-feeding fish, bottom-feeding fish, mollusca, and fish-eating birds. The analysis was based on the radionuclide concentrations reported in four consecutive annual radioecological monitoring reports published by French agencies with nuclear regulatory responsibilities. The results of this assessment were used to determine, qualitatively, the magnitude of any potential health impacts on each of the five categories of aquatic organisms studied. The range of dose rate estimates ranged over three orders of magnitude, with maximum dose rates estimated to be in the order of 1 to 10 {micro}Gy h{sup {minus}1}. These maximum dose rates are a factor 40 or more below the international guideline intended to ensure the protection of aquatic populations, and a factor ten or more below the level which may trigger the need for a more detailed evaluation of potential ecological consequences to the exposed populations.

  18. Humpback whale-generated ambient noise levels provide insight into singers' spatial densities.

    PubMed

    Seger, Kerri D; Thode, Aaron M; Urbán-R, Jorge; Martínez-Loustalot, Pamela; Jiménez-López, M Esther; López-Arzate, Diana

    2016-09-01

    Baleen whale vocal activity can be the dominant underwater ambient noise source for certain locations and seasons. Previous wind-driven ambient-noise formulations have been adjusted to model ambient noise levels generated by random distributions of singing humpback whales in ocean waveguides and have been combined to a single model. This theoretical model predicts that changes in ambient noise levels with respect to fractional changes in singer population (defined as the noise "sensitivity") are relatively unaffected by the source level distributions and song spectra of individual humpback whales (Megaptera novaeangliae). However, the noise "sensitivity" does depend on frequency and on how the singers' spatial density changes with population size. The theoretical model was tested by comparing visual line transect surveys with bottom-mounted passive acoustic data collected during the 2013 and 2014 humpback whale breeding seasons off Los Cabos, Mexico. A generalized linear model (GLM) estimated the noise "sensitivity" across multiple frequency bands. Comparing the GLM estimates with the theoretical predictions suggests that humpback whales tend to maintain relatively constant spacing between one another while singing, but that individual singers either slightly increase their source levels or song duration, or cluster more tightly as the singing population increases.

  19. Leveling coatings for reducing the atomic oxygen defect density in protected graphite fiber epoxy composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaworske, D. A.; Degroh, K. K.; Podojil, G.; Mccollum, T.; Anzic, J.

    1992-01-01

    Pinholes or other defect sites in a protective oxide coating provide pathways for atomic oxygen in low Earth orbit to reach underlying material. One concept for enhancing the lifetime of materials in low Earth orbits is to apply a leveling coating to the material prior to applying any reflective and protective coatings. Using a surface tension leveling coating concept, a low viscosity epoxy was applied to the surface of several composite coupons. A protective layer of 1000 A of SiO2 was deposited on top of the leveling coating, and the coupons were exposed to an atomic oxygen environment in a plasma asher. Pinhole populations per unit area were estimated by counting the number of undercut sites observed by scanning electron microscopy. Defect density values of 180,000 defects/sq cm were reduced to about 1000 defects/sq cm as a result of the applied leveling coating. These improvements occur at a mass penalty of about 2.5 mg/sq cm.

  20. Leveling coatings for reducing the atomic oxygen defect density in protected graphite fiber epoxy composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaworske, D. A.; Degroh, Kim K.; Podojil, G.; Mccollum, T.; Anzic, J.

    1992-01-01

    Pinholes or other defect sites in a protective oxide coating provide pathways for atomic oxygen in low Earth orbit to reach underlying material. One concept of enhancing the lifetime of materials in low Earth orbit is to apply a leveling coating to the material prior to applying any reflective and protective coatings. Using a surface tension leveling coating concept, a low viscosity epoxy was applied to the surface of several composite coupons. A protective layer of 1000 A of SiO2 was deposited on top of the leveling coating, and the coupons were exposed to an atomic oxygen environment in a plasma asher. Pinhole populations per unit area were estimated by counting the number of undercut sites observed by scanning electron microscopy. Defect density values of 180,000 defects/sq cm were reduced to about 1000 defects/sq cm as a result of the applied leveling coating. These improvements occur at a mass penalty of about 2.5 mg/sq cm.

  1. 137Cs in the Ground Level Air and Deposition in the Ignalina Nuclear Power Plant Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jasiulionis, R.; Rozkov, A.

    2007-04-01

    Results of 137Cs activity concentration measurements in the ground level air and deposition at the station of the Institute of Physics situated 3.5 km from the Ignalina Nuclear Power Plant (Ignalina NPP), Lithuania, in 2002-2006 are analyzed. 137Cs atmospheric depositional fluxes are estimated, and particle deposition rates are calculated. Results on solubility in water of atmospheric aerosols - carriers of 137Cs - are discussed. The Hybrid Single-Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory (HYSPLIT) model of the global dispersion and deposition is used to explain increases in 137Cs activity concentration in the ground-level air and deposition in the Ignalina NPP region. Modelling results show that the Chernobyl NPP Unit 4 Sarcophagus can be a source of 137Cs to the environment of the Ignalina NPP.

  2. Highly absorptive curcumin reduces serum atherosclerotic low-density lipoprotein levels in patients with mild COPD.

    PubMed

    Funamoto, Masafumi; Sunagawa, Yoichi; Katanasaka, Yasufumi; Miyazaki, Yusuke; Imaizumi, Atsushi; Kakeya, Hideaki; Yamakage, Hajime; Satoh-Asahara, Noriko; Komiyama, Maki; Wada, Hiromichi; Hasegawa, Koji; Morimoto, Tatsuya

    2016-01-01

    COPD is mainly caused by tobacco smoking and is associated with a high frequency of coronary artery disease. There is growing recognition that the inflammation in COPD is not only confined to the lungs but also involves the systemic circulation and can impact nonpulmonary organs, including blood vessels. α1-antitrypsin-low-density lipoprotein (AT-LDL) complex is an oxidatively modified LDL that accelerates atherosclerosis. Curcumin, one of the best-investigated natural products, is a powerful antioxidant. However, the effects of curcumin on AT-LDL remain unknown. We hypothesized that Theracurmin(®), a highly absorptive curcumin with improved bioavailability using a drug delivery system, ameliorates the inflammatory status in subjects with mild COPD. This is a randomized, double-blind, parallel-group study. Subjects with stages I-II COPD according to the Japanese Respiratory Society criteria were randomly assigned to receive 90 mg Theracurmin(®) or placebo twice a day for 24 weeks, and changes in inflammatory parameters were evaluated. There were no differences between the Theracurmin(®) and placebo groups in terms of age, male/female ratio, or body mass index in 39 evaluable subjects. The percent changes in blood pressure and hemoglobin A1c and LDL-cholesterol, triglyceride, or high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol levels after treatment were similar for the two groups. However, the percent change in the AT-LDL level was significantly (P=0.020) lower in the Theracurmin(®) group compared with the placebo group. Theracurmin(®) reduced levels of atherosclerotic AT-LDL, which may lead to the prevention of future cardiovascular events in mild COPD subjects.

  3. PTPRO Promotes Oxidized Low-Density Lipoprotein Induced Oxidative Stress and Cell Apoptosis through Toll-Like Receptor 4/Nuclear Factor κB Pathway.

    PubMed

    Liang, Caihong; Wang, Xiaochen; Hu, Jianping; Lian, Xiaoqing; Zhu, Tiantian; Zhang, Hui; Gu, Ning

    2017-01-01

    Critical roles of phosphatase receptor type O (PTPRO) and toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) have been implicated in inflammation. However, little is known about their functional effects on atherosclerosis (AS). We aim to study their potential function in AS. An oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) induced AS model constructed with PTPRO over-expressing RAW264.7 cells and PTPRO knockout macrophages. Cell apoptosis was assayed by flow cytometry and fatty accumulation was evaluated by oil red staining. The production of ROS (reactive oxygen species), SOD (superoxide dismutase), MDA (malondialdehyde), TC (Triglyceride), and TG (total cholesterol) was evaluated. Western blot was performed to detect the expression of CD36, TLR4 and nuclear factor kB (NF-κB). PTPRO expression was promoted in a dose-dependent and time-dependent manner following ox-LDL challenging. In PTPRO-over-expressing cells, CD36 expression and the level of oil-red staining, TC and TG were increased; ROS production, MDA and level of cell apoptosis were improved, but SOD was reduced. However, in PTPRO knockout cells opposite results were found. TLR4 and NF-κB/p65 phosphorylation was significantly enhanced in PTPRO over-expressing cells, while significantly down-regulated in PTPRO knockout cells. PTPRO plays ital roles in AS via promoting ox-LDL induced oxidative stress and cell apoptosis through TLR4/NF-κB pathway. © 2017 The Author(s). Published by S. Karger AG, Basel.

  4. Structure and dynamics of [3.3]paracyclophane as studied by nuclear magnetic resonance and density functional theory calculations.

    PubMed

    Dodziuk, Helena; Szymański, Sławomir; Jaźwiński, Jarosław; Marchwiany, Maciej E; Hopf, Henning

    2010-09-30

    Strained cyclophanes with small (-CH(2)-)(n) bridges connecting two benzene rings are interesting objects of basic research, mostly because of the nonplanarity of the rings and of interference of π-electrons of the latter. For title [3.3]paracyclophane, in solutions occurring in two interconverting cis and trans conformers, the published nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) data are incomplete and involve its partially deuterated isotopomers. In this paper, variable-temperature NMR studies of its perprotio isotopomer combined with DFT quantum chemical calculations provide a complete characterization of the solution structure, NMR parameters, and interconversion of the cis and trans isomers of the title compound. Using advanced methods of spectral analysis, total quantitative interpretation of its proton NMR spectra in both the static and dynamic regimes is conducted. In particular, not only the geminal but also all of the vicinal J(HH) values for the bridge protons are determined, and for the first time, complete Arrhenius data for the interconversion process are reported. The experimental proton and carbon chemical shifts and the (n)J(HH), (1)J(CH), and (1)J(CC) coupling constants are satisfactorily reproduced theoretically by the values obtained from the density functional theory calculations.

  5. Density functional calculations on structural materials for nuclear energy applications and functional materials for photovoltaic energy applications (abstract only).

    PubMed

    Domain, C; Olsson, P; Becquart, C S; Legris, A; Guillemoles, J F

    2008-02-13

    Ab initio density functional theory calculations are carried out in order to predict the evolution of structural materials under aggressive working conditions such as cases with exposure to corrosion and irradiation, as well as to predict and investigate the properties of functional materials for photovoltaic energy applications. Structural metallic materials used in nuclear facilities are subjected to irradiation which induces the creation of large amounts of point defects. These defects interact with each other as well as with the different elements constituting the alloys, which leads to modifications of the microstructure and the mechanical properties. VASP (Vienna Ab initio Simulation Package) has been used to determine the properties of point defect clusters and also those of extended defects such as dislocations. The resulting quantities, such as interaction energies and migration energies, are used in larger scale simulation methods in order to build predictive tools. For photovoltaic energy applications, ab initio calculations are used in order to search for new semiconductors and possible element substitutions for existing ones in order to improve their efficiency.

  6. Correlation of mammographic density and serum calcium levels in patients with primary breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Hack, Carolin C; Stoll, Martin J; Jud, Sebastian M; Heusinger, Katharina; Adler, Werner; Haeberle, Lothar; Ganslandt, Thomas; Heindl, Felix; Schulz-Wendtland, Rüdiger; Cavallaro, Alexander; Uder, Michael; Beckmann, Matthias W; Fasching, Peter A; Bayer, Christian M

    2017-06-01

    Percentage mammographic breast density (PMD) is one of the most important risk factors for breast cancer (BC). Calcium, vitamin D, bisphosphonates, and denosumab have been considered and partly confirmed as factors potentially influencing the risk of BC. This retrospective observational study investigated the association between serum calcium level and PMD. A total of 982 BC patients identified in the research database at the University Breast Center for Franconia with unilateral BC, calcium and albumin values, and mammogram at the time of first diagnosis were included. PMD was assessed, using a semiautomated method by two readers. Linear regression analyses were conducted to investigate the impact on PMD of the parameters of serum calcium level adjusted for albumin level, and well-known clinical predictors such as age, body mass index (BMI), menopausal status and confounder for serum calcium like season in which the BC was diagnosed. Increased calcium levels were associated with reduced PMD (P = 0.024). Furthermore, PMD was inversely associated with BMI (P < 0.001) and age (P < 0.001). There was also an association between PMD and menopausal status (P < 0.001). The goodness-of-fit of the regression model was moderate. This is the first study assessing the association between serum calcium level and PMD. An inverse association with adjusted serum calcium levels was observed. These findings add to previously published data relating to vitamin D, bisphosphonates, denosumab, and the RANK/RANKL signaling pathway in breast cancer risk and prevention. © 2017 The Authors. Cancer Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Evidence for low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels in Australian indigenous peoples: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Low plasma high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) levels are a strong, independent, but poorly understood risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD). Although this atherogenic lipid abnormality has been widely reported in Australia’s Indigenous peoples, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders, the evidence has not come under systematic review. This review therefore examines published data for Indigenous Australians reporting 1) mean HDL-C levels for both sexes and 2) factors associated with low HDL-C. Methods PubMed, Medline and Informit ATSI Health databases were systematically searched between 1950 and 2012 for studies on Indigenous Australians reporting mean HDL-C levels in both sexes. Retrieved studies were evaluated by standard criteria. Low HDL-C was defined as: <1.0 mmol/L. Analyses of primary data associating measures of HDL-C with other CVD risk factors were also performed. Results Fifteen of 93 retrieved studies were identified for inclusion. These provided 58 mean HDL-C levels; 29 for each sex, most obtained in rural/regional (20%) or remote settings (60%) and including 51–1641 participants. For Australian Aborigines, mean HDL-C values ranged between 0.81-1.50 mmol/L in females and 0.76-1.60 mmol/L in males. Two of 15 studies reported HDL-C levels for Torres Strait Islander populations, mean HDL-C: 1.00 or 1.11 mmol/L for females and 1.01 or 1.13 mmol/L for males. Low HDL-C was observed only in rural/regional and remote settings - not in national or urban studies (n = 3) in either gender. Diabetes prevalence, mean/median waist-to-hip ratio and circulating C-reactive protein levels were negatively associated with HDL-C levels (all P < 0.05). Thirty-four per cent of studies reported lower mean HDL-C levels in females than in males. Conclusions Very low mean HDL-C levels are common in Australian Indigenous populations living in rural and remote communities. Inverse associations between HDL-C and central obesity, diabetes

  8. Positive correlation between PEDF expression levels and macrophage density in the human prostate

    PubMed Central

    Nelius, Thomas; Samathanam, Christina; Martinez-Marin, Dalia; Gaines, Natalie; Stevens, Jessica; Hickson, Johnny; de Riese, Werner; Filleur, Stéphanie

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND In this study, we investigated the capacity of PEDF to modulate the recruitment and the differentiation of monocytes/macrophages both in vitro and in human prostate. METHODS Using Boyden chambers, we assessed PEDF effect on the migration of monocytes and chemically-activated RAW264.7 macrophages. Normal, prostatitis and prostate cancer specimens were retrospectively selected and examined by immunohistochemistry for PEDF expression and infiltration of immune CD68+macrophagic cells. PEDF expression and macrophage density were then correlated with each other and clinicopathological parameters. M1 and M2 differentiation markers were quantified by qRT-PCR, western blotting and ELISA. RESULTS In chemotaxis, PEDF induced the migration of monocytes/macrophages. In immunohistochemistry, macrophages were markedly increased in prostatitis and malignant compared to normal tissues. PEDF was expressed at variable levels in the stroma and epithelium. PEDF mRNA was down-regulated in both prostate cancer and prostatitis compared to normal tissues. In correlation studies, macrophage density and PEDF expression were respectively positively and negatively associated with prostate size. Most importantly, PEDF expression positively correlated with macrophage density. Finally, PEDF stimulated the expression of iNOS, IL12 and TNFα; and inhibited IL10 and arginase 1 in mouse and human macrophages confirming a M1-type differentiation. CONCLUSIONS Our data demonstrate that PEDF acts directly on monocytes/macrophages by inducing their migration and differentiation into M1-type cells. These findings suggest a possible role of macrophages in PEDF anti-tumor properties and may support further development of PEDF-based anti-cancer therapy. PMID:23038613

  9. Understanding thermodynamic properties at the molecular level: multiple temperature charge density study of ribitol and xylitol.

    PubMed

    Madsen, Anders Østergaard; Mattson, Rikke; Larsen, Sine

    2011-07-07

    X-ray diffraction data of high quality measured to high resolution on crystals of the two pentitol epimers ribitol (centric) and xylitol (acentric) at 101, 141, and 181 K and data on the two compounds previously recorded at 122 K have formed the basis for multipole refinements with the VALRAY system. Our analysis showed that it is possible to obtain a reliable crystal electron density for an acentric compound (xylitol) from X-ray diffraction data and that the thermal motion can be deconvoluted from the static density in this temperature range. The Bader-type topological analysis of the static electron densities revealed virtually identical intramolecular interactions as well as very similar hydrogen bond interactions of ribitol and xylitol; the only minor differences are found in the weaker intermolecular interactions. The high-level periodic DFT calculations are in accordance with the thermodynamic measurements that show that the two pentitols have identical sublimation energies. A rigid body normal coordinate analysis was performed on the atomic displacement parameters obtained at the four different temperatures. The translational and librational mean square deviations derived through this analysis were used in a quantum statistical approach to derive frequencies of the corresponding harmonic oscillators. The analysis showed a consistent vibrational model for all temperatures. The frequencies were subsequently used to calculate crystal entropies assuming an Einstein-type behavior. These calculations show that the crystal entropy of ribitol is 8 J K(-1) mol(-1) higher than the crystal entropy of xylitol, confirming that it is a difference in the entropy of the two compounds that causes the difference in their free energy. Our results presented in this Article show the potential to use X-ray diffraction data to obtain physicochemical properties of crystals.

  10. Hysteresis in Carbon Nanotube Transistors: Measurement and Analysis of Trap Density, Energy Level, and Spatial Distribution.

    PubMed

    Park, Rebecca Sejung; Shulaker, Max Marcel; Hills, Gage; Suriyasena Liyanage, Luckshitha; Lee, Seunghyun; Tang, Alvin; Mitra, Subhasish; Wong, H-S Philip

    2016-04-26

    We present a measurement technique, which we call the Pulsed Time-Domain Measurement, for characterizing hysteresis in carbon nanotube field-effect transistors, and demonstrate its applicability for a broad range of 1D and 2D nanomaterials beyond carbon nanotubes. The Pulsed Time-Domain Measurement enables the quantification (density, energy level, and spatial distribution) of charged traps responsible for hysteresis. A physics-based model of the charge trapping process for a carbon nanotube field-effect transistor is presented and experimentally validated using the Pulsed Time-Domain Measurement. Leveraging this model, we discover a source of traps (surface traps) unique to devices with low-dimensional channels such as carbon nanotubes and nanowires (beyond interface traps which exist in today's silicon field-effect transistors). The different charge trapping mechanisms for interface traps and surface traps are studied based on their temperature dependencies. Through these advances, we are able to quantify the interface trap density for carbon nanotube field-effect transistors (∼3 × 10(13) cm(-2) eV(-1) near midgap), and compare this against a range of previously studied dielectric/semiconductor interfaces.

  11. Reconstruction of Family-Level Phylogenetic Relationships within Demospongiae (Porifera) Using Nuclear Encoded Housekeeping Genes

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Malcolm S.; Hill, April L.; Lopez, Jose; Peterson, Kevin J.; Pomponi, Shirley; Diaz, Maria C.; Thacker, Robert W.; Adamska, Maja; Boury-Esnault, Nicole; Cárdenas, Paco; Chaves-Fonnegra, Andia; Danka, Elizabeth; De Laine, Bre-Onna; Formica, Dawn; Hajdu, Eduardo; Lobo-Hajdu, Gisele; Klontz, Sarah; Morrow, Christine C.; Patel, Jignasa; Picton, Bernard; Pisani, Davide; Pohlmann, Deborah; Redmond, Niamh E.; Reed, John; Richey, Stacy; Riesgo, Ana; Rubin, Ewelina; Russell, Zach; Rützler, Klaus; Sperling, Erik A.; di Stefano, Michael; Tarver, James E.; Collins, Allen G.

    2013-01-01

    Background Demosponges are challenging for phylogenetic systematics because of their plastic and relatively simple morphologies and many deep divergences between major clades. To improve understanding of the phylogenetic relationships within Demospongiae, we sequenced and analyzed seven nuclear housekeeping genes involved in a variety of cellular functions from a diverse group of sponges. Methodology/Principal Findings We generated data from each of the four sponge classes (i.e., Calcarea, Demospongiae, Hexactinellida, and Homoscleromorpha), but focused on family-level relationships within demosponges. With data for 21 newly sampled families, our Maximum Likelihood and Bayesian-based approaches recovered previously phylogenetically defined taxa: Keratosap, Myxospongiaep, Spongillidap, Haploscleromorphap (the marine haplosclerids) and Democlaviap. We found conflicting results concerning the relationships of Keratosap and Myxospongiaep to the remaining demosponges, but our results strongly supported a clade of Haploscleromorphap+Spongillidap+Democlaviap. In contrast to hypotheses based on mitochondrial genome and ribosomal data, nuclear housekeeping gene data suggested that freshwater sponges (Spongillidap) are sister to Haploscleromorphap rather than part of Democlaviap. Within Keratosap, we found equivocal results as to the monophyly of Dictyoceratida. Within Myxospongiaep, Chondrosida and Verongida were monophyletic. A well-supported clade within Democlaviap, Tetractinellidap, composed of all sampled members of Astrophorina and Spirophorina (including the only lithistid in our analysis), was consistently revealed as the sister group to all other members of Democlaviap. Within Tetractinellidap, we did not recover monophyletic Astrophorina or Spirophorina. Our results also reaffirmed the monophyly of order Poecilosclerida (excluding Desmacellidae and Raspailiidae), and polyphyly of Hadromerida and Halichondrida. Conclusions/Significance These results, using an

  12. Multilayer Protective Coatings for High-Level Nuclear Waste Storage Containers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fusco, Michael

    Corrosion-based failures of high-level nuclear waste (HLW) storage containers are potentially hazardous due to a possible release of radionuclides through cracks in the canister due to corrosion, especially for above-ground storage (i.e. dry casks). Protective coatings have been proposed to combat these premature failures, which include stress-corrosion cracking and hydrogen-diffusion cracking, among others. The coatings are to be deposited in multiple thin layers as thin films on the outer surface of the stainless steel waste basket canister. Coating materials include: TiN, ZrO2, TiO2, Al 2O3, and MoS2, which together may provide increased resistances to corrosion and mechanical wear, as well as act as a barrier to hydrogen diffusion. The focus of this research is on the corrosion resistance and characterization of single layer coatings to determine the possible benefit from the use of the proposed coating materials. Experimental methods involve electrochemical polarization, both DC and AC techniques, and corrosion in circulating salt brines of varying pH. DC polarization allows for estimation of corrosion rates, passivation behavior, and a qualitative survey of localized corrosion, whereas AC electrochemistry has the benefit of revealing information about kinetics and interfacial reactions that is not obtainable using DC techniques. Circulation in salt brines for nearly 150 days revealed sustained adhesion of the coatings and minimal weight change of the steel samples. One-inch diameter steel coupons composed of stainless steel types 304 and 316 and A36 low alloy carbon steel were coated with single layers using magnetron sputtering with compound targets in an inert argon atmosphere. This resulted in very thin films for the metal-oxides based on low sputter rates. DC polarization showed that corrosion rates were very similar between bare and coated stainless steel samples, whereas a statistically significant decrease in uniform corrosion was measured on coated

  13. Effect of collective enhancement in level density in the fission of pre-actinides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Tathagata; Nath, S.; Jhingan, A.; Saneesh, N.; Kumar, Mohit; Yadav, Abhishek; Kaur, Gurpreet; Dubey, R.; Shareef, M.; Laveen, P. V.; Shamlath, A.; Shaikh, Md. Moin; Biswas, S.; Gehlot, J.; Golda, K. S.; Sugathan, P.; Pal, Santanu

    2017-07-01

    Fission fragment angular distributions for three reactions, 19F+182W,19F+187Re , and 19F+193Ir , are measured in the laboratory energy range of 82-120 MeV. Extracted fission cross sections of the present systems as well as those of three others from literature (19F+192Os,19F+194Pt , and 19F+197Au ) are compared with the predictions of a statistical model which takes into account the effects of shell, orientation degree of freedom, and collective enhancement in level density (CELD). In all the cases, the standard statistical model predictions overestimate the measured fission cross section, indicating the presence of some amount of dynamical effects in the exit channel. A dissipation strength of 2 ×1021s-1 is found to be sufficient to reproduce the data of all the reactions. No scaling of fission barrier height to fit the data is required.

  14. Newer therapeutic strategies to alter high-density lipoprotein level and function.

    PubMed

    Bosch, Nicholas; Frishman, William H

    2014-01-01

    Measurements of low levels of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol have been identified as a risk factor for premature coronary artery disease, however, to date, current pharmacologic approaches for raising HDL have provided little benefit, if at all, in reducing cardiovascular outcomes. It has been shown that HDL can modify many aspects of plaque pathogenesis. Its most established role is in reverse cholesterol transportation, but HDL can also affect oxidation, inflammation, cellular adhesion, and vasodilatation. Considering these potential benefits of HDL, newer treatments have been developed to modify HDL activity, which include the use of oral cholesteryl ester transfer protein inhibitors, apolipoprotein (apo)A-I infusions, apoA-I mimetics, drugs to increase apoA-I synthesis, and agonists of the liver X receptor. These new therapies are reviewed in this article.

  15. Organic semiconductor density of states controls the energy level alignment at electrode interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Oehzelt, Martin; Koch, Norbert; Heimel, Georg

    2014-01-01

    Minimizing charge carrier injection barriers and extraction losses at interfaces between organic semiconductors and metallic electrodes is critical for optimizing the performance of organic (opto-) electronic devices. Here, we implement a detailed electrostatic model, capable of reproducing the alignment between the electrode Fermi energy and the transport states in the organic semiconductor both qualitatively and quantitatively. Covering the full phenomenological range of interfacial energy level alignment regimes within a single, consistent framework and continuously connecting the limiting cases described by previously proposed models allows us to resolve conflicting views in the literature. Our results highlight the density of states in the organic semiconductor as a key factor. Its shape and, in particular, the energy distribution of electronic states tailing into the fundamental gap is found to determine both the minimum value of practically achievable injection barriers as well as their spatial profile, ranging from abrupt interface dipoles to extended band-bending regions. PMID:24938867

  16. Plasma miRNA levels correlate with sensitivity to bone mineral density in postmenopausal osteoporosis patients.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongqiu; Wang, Zhe; Fu, Qin; Zhang, Jing

    2014-11-01

    In our study, we detect the levels of three micro-RNAs (miRNAs; miR-21, miR-133a and miR-146a) in the plasma of 120 Chinese postmenopausal women who were divided into three groups (normal, osteopenia and osteoporosis) according to the T-scores. Downregulation of miR-21, as well as upregulation of miR-133a, was validated in the plasma of osteoporosis and osteopenia patients versus the normal group. The difference in expression regarding the miR-146a level in plasma among the three groups was not significant (p > 0.01). The circulating miRNA expression levels and bone mineral density (BMD) were examined during a multiple correlation analysis as a dependent variable after adjusting for age, weight and height. We have demonstrated that specific miRNAs species are significantly changed in the plasma of osteoporosis and osteopenia patients and correlated with the BMD. Our study suggested a potential use of miR-21 and miR-133a as sensitive and plasma biomarkers for postmenopausal osteoporosis.

  17. Reliable Energy Level Alignment at Physisorbed Molecule–Metal Interfaces from Density Functional Theory

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    A key quantity for molecule–metal interfaces is the energy level alignment of molecular electronic states with the metallic Fermi level. We develop and apply an efficient theoretical method, based on density functional theory (DFT) that can yield quantitatively accurate energy level alignment information for physisorbed metal–molecule interfaces. The method builds on the “DFT+Σ” approach, grounded in many-body perturbation theory, which introduces an approximate electron self-energy that corrects the level alignment obtained from conventional DFT for missing exchange and correlation effects associated with the gas-phase molecule and substrate polarization. Here, we extend the DFT+Σ approach in two important ways: first, we employ optimally tuned range-separated hybrid functionals to compute the gas-phase term, rather than rely on GW or total energy differences as in prior work; second, we use a nonclassical DFT-determined image-charge plane of the metallic surface to compute the substrate polarization term, rather than the classical DFT-derived image plane used previously. We validate this new approach by a detailed comparison with experimental and theoretical reference data for several prototypical molecule–metal interfaces, where excellent agreement with experiment is achieved: benzene on graphite (0001), and 1,4-benzenediamine, Cu-phthalocyanine, and 3,4,9,10-perylene-tetracarboxylic-dianhydride on Au(111). In particular, we show that the method correctly captures level alignment trends across chemical systems and that it retains its accuracy even for molecules for which conventional DFT suffers from severe self-interaction errors. PMID:25741626

  18. Reliable Energy Level Alignment at Physisorbed Molecule–Metal Interfaces from Density Functional Theory

    DOE PAGES

    Egger, David A.; Liu, Zhen-Fei; Neaton, Jeffrey B.; ...

    2015-03-05

    We report a key quantity for molecule–metal interfaces is the energy level alignment of molecular electronic states with the metallic Fermi level. We develop and apply an efficient theoretical method, based on density functional theory (DFT) that can yield quantitatively accurate energy level alignment information for physisorbed metal–molecule interfaces. The method builds on the “DFT+Σ” approach, grounded in many-body perturbation theory, which introduces an approximate electron self-energy that corrects the level alignment obtained from conventional DFT for missing exchange and correlation effects associated with the gas-phase molecule and substrate polarization. Here, we extend the DFT+Σ approach in two important ways:more » first, we employ optimally tuned range-separated hybrid functionals to compute the gas-phase term, rather than rely on GW or total energy differences as in prior work; second, we use a nonclassical DFT-determined image-charge plane of the metallic surface to compute the substrate polarization term, rather than the classical DFT-derived image plane used previously. We validate this new approach by a detailed comparison with experimental and theoretical reference data for several prototypical molecule–metal interfaces, where excellent agreement with experiment is achieved: benzene on graphite (0001), and 1,4-benzenediamine, Cu-phthalocyanine, and 3,4,9,10-perylene-tetracarboxylic-dianhydride on Au(111). In particular, we show that the method correctly captures level alignment trends across chemical systems and that it retains its accuracy even for molecules for which conventional DFT suffers from severe self-interaction errors.« less

  19. Anticipated Degradation Modes of Metallic Engineered Barriers for High-Level Nuclear Waste Repositories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez, Martín A.

    2014-03-01

    Metallic engineered barriers must provide a period of absolute containment to high-level radioactive waste in geological repositories. Candidate materials include copper alloys, carbon steels, stainless steels, nickel alloys, and titanium alloys. The national programs of nuclear waste management have to identify and assess the anticipated degradation modes of the selected materials in the corresponding repository environment, which evolves in time. Commonly assessed degradation modes include general corrosion, localized corrosion, stress-corrosion cracking, hydrogen-assisted cracking, and microbiologically influenced corrosion. Laboratory testing and modeling in metallurgical and environmental conditions of similar and higher aggressiveness than those expected in service conditions are used to evaluate the corrosion resistance of the materials. This review focuses on the anticipated degradation modes of the selected or reference materials as corrosion-resistant barriers in nuclear repositories. These degradation modes depend not only on the selected alloy but also on the near-field environment. The evolution of the near-field environment varies for saturated and unsaturated repositories considering backfilled and unbackfilled conditions. In saturated repositories, localized corrosion and stress-corrosion cracking may occur in the initial aerobic stage, while general corrosion and hydrogen-assisted cracking are the main degradation modes in the anaerobic stage. Unsaturated repositories would provide an oxidizing environment during the entire repository lifetime. Microbiologically influenced corrosion may be avoided or minimized by selecting an appropriate backfill material. Radiation effects are negligible provided that a thick-walled container or an inner shielding container is used.

  20. Conceptualization of a hypothetical high-level nuclear waste repository site in unsaturated, fractured tuff

    SciTech Connect

    Parsons, A.M.; Olague, N.E.; Gallegos, D.P.

    1991-01-01

    Under the sponsorship of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) is developing a performance assessment methodology for the analysis of long-term disposal and isolation of high-level nuclear wastes (HLW) in alternative geologic media. As part of this exercise, SNL created a conceptualization of ground-water flow and radionuclide transport in the far field of a hypothetical HLW repository site located in unsaturated, fractured tuff formations. This study provides a foundation for the development of conceptual mathematical, and numerical models to be used in this performance assessment methodology. This conceptualization is site specific in terms of geometry, the regional ground-water flow system, stratigraphy, and structure in that these are based on information from Yucca Mountain located on the Nevada Test Site. However, in terms of processes in unsaturated, fractured, porous media, the model is generic. This report also provides a review and evaluation of previously proposed conceptual models of unsaturated and saturated flow and solute transport. This report provides a qualitative description of a hypothetical HLW repository site in fractured tuff. However, evaluation of the current knowledge of flow and transport at Yucca Mountain does not yield a single conceptual model. Instead, multiple conceptual models are possible given the existing information.

  1. 129I level in seawater near a nuclear power plant determined by accelerator mass spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Chaohui; Hou, Xiaolin; Zhao, Yaolin; Wang, Zhiwen; Li, Huaibin; Chen, Ning; Liu, Qi; Zhang, Luyuan; Luo, Maoyi; Liang, Wangguo; Fan, Yukun; Zhao, Xiaolei

    2011-03-01

    129I concentration in the seawater samples near a nuclear power plant was determined in the Xi'an Accelerator Mass Spectrometer (AMS) Center. Isotope dilution method was used via addition of excessive amount of stable iodine ( 127I) in the sample before separation, and iodine in the seawater was separated by solvent extraction, and the back extracted iodine in iodide form was precipitated as AgI, which was used as AMS target for 129I measurement. 125I tracer was added to monitor the recovery of iodine in the whole separation process. 129I/ 127I ratios in the prepared target were determined by AMS. The concentration of 127I in seawater samples was determined by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. The results show that the 129I/ 127I atomic ratios in the seawater range from 8.29×10 -11 to 9.45×10 -10, approximately one order of magnitude higher than that in seaweed collected in the pre-nuclear era, but fall in the environmental level of global fallout.

  2. Waste package performance evaluations for the proposed high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain.

    PubMed

    Mon, Kevin G; Bullard, Bryan E; Mehta, Sunil; Lee, Joon H

    2004-04-01

    The evaluation studies of the proposed repository for long-term storage of spent nuclear fuel and high-level nuclear waste at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, are underway. Fulfillment of the requirements for limiting dose to the public, which includes containment of the radioactive waste emplaced in the proposed repository and subsequent slow release of radionuclides from the Engineered Barrier System (EBS) into the geosphere, will rely on a robust waste container design, among other EBS components. Part of the evaluation process involves sensitivity studies aimed at elucidating which model parameters contribute most to the waste package and overlying drip shield degradation characteristics. The model parameters identified for this study include (1) general corrosion rate parameters and (2) stress corrosion cracking (SCC) parameters. Temperature dependence and parameter uncertainty are evaluated for the general corrosion rate model parameters while for the SCC model parameters, uncertainty treatment of stress intensity factor, crack initiation threshold, and manufacturing flaw orientations are evaluated. Based on these evaluations new uncertainty distributions are generated and recommended for future analyses. Also, early waste package failures due to improper heat treatment were added to the waste package degradation model. The results of these investigations indicate that the waste package failure profiles are governed by the manufacturing flaw orientation model parameters.

  3. Effects of maximal doses of atorvastatin versus rosuvastatin on small dense low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Maximal doses of atorvastatin and rosuvastatin are highly effective in lowering low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol and triglyceride levels; however, rosuvastatin has been shown to be significantly more effective than atorvastatin in lowering LDL cholesterol and in increasing high-density lipo...

  4. Association between serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels and bone mineral density in normal postmenopausal women

    PubMed Central

    Kamineni, Vasundhara; Latha, Akkenapally Prasanna; Ramathulasi, K.

    2016-01-01

    Aim: This study was conducted with the objective of assessing serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) in postmenopausal women (PMW), to detect osteopenia or osteoporosis in PMW and to establish a correlation between serum 25(OH)D levels and bone mineral density (BMD). Materials and Methods: A total of 100 healthy PMW were selected, and a prospective observational study was conducted to correlate the BMD with serum 25(OH)D levels. Their laboratory investigations along with serum 25(OH)D levels were done. Their BMD was assessed with dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry at lumbar spine and neck of femur; T-scores were derived. Correlation analysis was done to investigate the relationship between serum 25(OH)D levels and BMD. Results: The proportion of osteoporosis at the hip was 31.9% in deficient group, 16.1% in insufficient, and 18.2% in sufficient group and at lumbar spine, it was 27.7%, 16.1%, and 22.7%, respectively. Forty-seven percent of PMW had deficient (<20 ng/ml) serum 25(OH)D levels and 31% had insufficiency. T-score at hip in deficient group was −2.05 ± 0.25, and in an insufficient group, it was −1.79 ± 0.13; T-score at lumbar spine was −1.92 ± 0.12 and −1.79 ± 0.12, respectively, but both were not statistically significant. Osteoporosis was seen in 24%, osteopenia in 55% at hip level and 23% and 59% respectively at lumbar spine. There was no association between serum 25(OH)D levels and BMD neither at hip nor at lumbar spine (P = 0.51 and P = 0.79 respectively). Conclusion: In this study, among our cohort of patients there was no correlation between serum 25(OH)D levels and BMD. However, Vitamin D deficiency coexists with low BMD. Vitamin D insufficiency is a common risk factor for osteoporosis associated with increased bone remodeling and low bone mass. PMID:28096639

  5. REGIONAL BINNING FOR CONTINUED STORAGE OF SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL AND HIGH-LEVEL WASTES

    SciTech Connect

    W. Lee Poe, Jr

    1998-10-01

    In the Continued Storage Analysis Report (CSAR) (Reference 1), DOE decided to analyze the environmental consequences of continuing to store the commercial spent nuclear fuel (SNF) at 72 commercial nuclear power sites and DOE-owned spent nuclear fuel and high-level waste at five Department of Energy sites by region rather than by individual site. This analysis assumes that three commercial facilities pairs--Salem and Hope Creek, Fitzpatrick and Nine-Mile Point, and Dresden and Moms--share common storage due to their proximity to each other. The five regions selected for this analysis are shown on Figure 1. Regions 1, 2, and 3 are the same as those used by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission in their regulatory oversight of commercial power reactors. NRC Region 4 was subdivided into two regions to more appropriately define the two different climates that exist in NRC Region 4. A single hypothetical site in each region was assumed to store all the SNF and HLW in that region. Such a site does not exist and has no geographic location but is a mathematical construct for analytical purposes. To ensure that the calculated results for the regional analyses reflect appropriate inventory, facility and material degradation, and radionuclide transport, the waste inventories, engineered barriers, and environmental conditions for the hypothetical sites were developed from data for each of the existing sites within the given region. Weighting criteria to account for the amount and types of SNF and HLW at each site were used in the development of the environmental data for the regional site, such that the results of the analyses for the hypothetical site were representative of the sum of the results of each actual site if they had been modeled independently. This report defines the actual site data used in development of this hypothetical site, shows how the individual site data was weighted to develop the regional site, and provides the weighted data used in the CSAR analysis. It is

  6. γ strength function and level density of 208Pb from forward-angle proton scattering at 295 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bassauer, S.; von Neumann-Cosel, P.; Tamii, A.

    2016-11-01

    Background: γ strength functions (GSFs) and level densities (LDs) are essential ingredients of statistical nuclear reaction theory with many applications in astrophysics, reactor design, and waste transmutation. Purpose: The aim of the present work is a test of systematic parametrizations of the GSF recommended by the RIPL-3 database for the case of 208Pb. The upward GSF and LD in 208Pb are compared to γ decay data from an Oslo-type experiment to examine the validity of the Brink-Axel (BA) hypothesis. Methods: The E 1 and M1 parts of the total GSF are determined from high-resolution forward angle inelastic proton scattering data taken at 295 MeV at the Research Center for Nuclear Physics (RCNP), Osaka, Japan. The total LD in 208Pb is derived from the 1- LD extracted with a fluctuation analysis in the energy region of the isovector giant dipole resonance. Results: The E 1 GSF is compared to parametrizations recommended by the RIPL-3 database showing systematic deficiencies of all models in the energy region around neutron threshold. The new data for the poorly known spin-flip M 1 resonance call for a substantial revision of the model suggested in RIPL-3. The total GSF derived from the present data is larger in the PDR energy region than the Oslo data but the strong fluctuations due to the low LD resulting from the double shell closure of 208Pb prevent a conclusion on a possible violation of the BA hypothesis. Using the parameters suggested by RIPL-3 for a description of the LD in 208Pb with the back-shifted Fermi gas model, remarkable agreement between the two experiments spanning a wide excitation energy range is obtained. Conclusions: Systematic parametrizations of the E 1 and M 1 GSF parts need to be reconsidered at low excitation energies. The good agreement of the LD provides an independent confirmation of the approach underlying the decomposition of GSF and LD in Oslo-type experiments.

  7. Sex hormone levels as determinants of bone mineral density and osteoporosis in Vietnamese women and men.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Huong T T; von Schoultz, Bo; Nguyen, Tuan V; Thang, Trinh X; Chau, Tran T; Duc, Pham T M; Hirschberg, Angelica L

    2015-11-01

    This study sought to investigate the prevalence of osteoporosis and the role of sex hormone levels in the determination of bone mineral density (BMD) and osteoporosis in a Vietnamese population of women and men. The cross-sectional study involved 269 women and 222 men aged 13-83 years, who were randomly selected from urban and rural areas in northern Vietnam. Serum concentrations of estradiol and testosterone were analyzed, and BMD was measured by dual X-ray absorptiometry. We found that the prevalence of osteoporosis in postmenopausal women was 18, 17, and 37 % for the femoral neck, total hip, and lumbar spine, respectively. For men aged 50 years or older, the corresponding values were 8, 7, and 12 %. In men, the most important predictors of BMD for the femoral neck and total hip were age, body mass index, and serum levels of estradiol. For the BMD of the lumbar spine, testosterone also had a significant influence. Determinants of osteoporosis in men for the total hip and lumbar spine were age, weight, and serum concentrations of estradiol and testosterone. In postmenopausal women, age, weight, and residence (urban vs rural) were the most important predictors of BMD and osteoporosis. For all women (including those of reproductive age), serum levels of estradiol were also significant. These data suggest that the prevalence of osteoporosis in the Vietnamese population is high also in men, and that estradiol levels are essential for bone mass in both men and women. The results should have clinical implications and increase awareness of an important health issue within Vietnamese society.

  8. Serum low-density lipoprotein levels, statin use, and cognition in patients with coronary artery disease

    PubMed Central

    Rej, Soham; Saleem, Mahwesh; Herrmann, Nathan; Stefatos, Anthi; Rau, Allison; Lanctôt, Krista L

    2016-01-01

    Aim Statins have been associated with decreased cognition due to the effects of low concentrations of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) on brain function. This has remained controversial and is particularly relevant to patients with coronary artery disease (CAD), who have an increased risk of cognitive decline and are frequently prescribed statins. This study hypothesized that low concentration of LDL is associated with poor cognition in CAD patients using statins. It also explored the association between high-dose versus low-dose statins on cognition in this population. Patients and methods Baseline cross-sectional data from a longitudinal study of 120 statin-using CAD patients were examined (mean statin duration 25±43 months). The main outcomes were measures of global cognition and cognitive domains, with poor cognition defined as cognitive performance ≤1 standard deviation below the population age and education adjusted means. A battery of cognitive tests was used to assess verbal memory, executive function, speed of processing, visuospatial memory, and global cognition. Adjusting for age, sex, education, and other covariates, multivariable logistic regression analyses assessed associations between low LDL levels (<1.5 mmol/L), statin use, and poor cognition. Results LDL levels were not associated with global cognition or individual cognitive domains. High-dose statin use was associated with higher visuospatial memory (odds ratio, OR [95% confidence interval, CI] =0.12 [0.02–0.66], P=0.01) and executive functioning (OR =0.25 [0.06–0.99], P=0.05). This effect was independent of covariates such as LDL levels. Conclusion Low LDL levels do not appear to be associated with poor cognition in CAD patients using statins. Whether high-dose statin use may have positive effects on cognition in CAD patients could be investigated in future studies. PMID:27877045

  9. High-performance gamma spectroscopy for equipment retrieval from Hanford high-level nuclear waste tanks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troyer, Gary L.; Hillesand, K. E.; Goodwin, S. G.; Kessler, S. F.; Killian, E. W.; Legare, D.; Nelson, Joseph V., Jr.; Richard, R. F.; Nordquist, E. M.

    1999-01-01

    The cleanup of high level defense nuclear waste at the Hanford site presents several progressive challenges. Among these is the removal and disposal of various components from buried active waste tanks to allow new equipment insertion or hazards mitigation. A unique automated retrieval system at the tank provides for retrieval, high pressure washing, inventory measurement, and containment for disposal. Key to the inventory measurement is a three detector HPGe high performance gamma spectroscopy system capable of recovering data at up to ninety per cent saturation (200,000 counts per second). Data recovery is based on a unique embedded electronic pulser and specialized software to report the inventory. Each of the detectors have different shielding specified through Monte Carlo simulation with the MCNP program. This shielding provides performance over a dynamic range of eight orders of magnitude. System description, calibration issues and operational experiences are discussed.

  10. Characterization of high-level nuclear waste glass using magnetic measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Senftle, F.E.; Thorpe, A.N.; Grant, J.R.; Barkatt, A.

    1994-12-31

    Magnetic measurements constitute a promising method for the characterization of nuclear waste glasses in view of their simplicity and small sample weight requirements. Initial studies of simulated high-level waste glasses show that the Curie constant is generally a useful indicator of the Fe{sup 2+}:Fe{sup 3+} ratio. Glasses produced by air-cooling in large vessels show systematic deviations between experimental and calcined values, which are indicative of the presence of small amounts of crystalline iron-containing phases. Most of the iron in these phases becomes dissolved in the glass upon re-heating and more rapid quenching. The studies further show that upon leaching the glass in water some of the iron in the surface regions of the glass is converted to a form which has high temperature-independent magnetic susceptibility.

  11. Strontium and Actinide Separations from High Level Nuclear Waste Solutions using Monosodium Titanate - Actual Waste Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, T.B.; Barnes, M.J.; Hobbs,D.T.; Walker, D.D.; Fondeur, F.F.; Norato, M.A.; Pulmano, R.L.; Fink, S.D.

    2005-11-01

    Pretreatment processes at the Savannah River Site will separate {sup 90}Sr, alpha-emitting and radionuclides (i.e., actinides) and {sup 137}Cs prior to disposal of the high-level nuclear waste. Separation of {sup 90}Sr and alpha-emitting radionuclides occurs by ion exchange/adsorption using an inorganic material, monosodium titanate (MST). Previously reported testing with simulants indicates that the MST exhibits high selectivity for strontium and actinides in high ionic strength and strongly alkaline salt solutions. This paper provides a summary of data acquired to measure the performance of MST to remove strontium and actinides from actual waste solutions. These tests evaluated the effects of ionic strength, mixing, elevated alpha activities, and multiple contacts of the waste with MST. Tests also provided confirmation that MST performs well at much larger laboratory scales (300-700 times larger) and exhibits little affinity for desorption of strontium and plutonium during washing.

  12. Selective removal of cesium and strontium using porous frameworks from high level nuclear waste.

    PubMed

    Aguila, Briana; Banerjee, Debasis; Nie, Zimin; Shin, Yongsoon; Ma, Shengqian; Thallapally, Praveen K

    2016-05-01

    Efficient and cost-effective removal of radioactive (137)Cs and (90)Sr found in spent fuel is an important step for safe, long-term storage of nuclear waste. Solid-state materials such as resins and titanosilicate zeolites have been assessed for the removal of Cs and Sr from aqueous solutions, but there is room for improvement in terms of capacity and selectivity. Herein, we report the Cs(+) and Sr(2+) exchange potential of an ultra stable MOF, namely, MIL-101-SO3H, as a function of different contact times, concentrations, pH levels, and in the presence of competing ions. Our preliminary results suggest that MOFs with suitable ion exchange groups can be promising alternate materials for cesium and strontium removal.

  13. Role of geophysics in identifying and characterizing sites for high-level nuclear waste repositories.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wynn, J.C.; Roseboom, E.H.

    1987-01-01

    Evaluation of potential high-level nuclear waste repository sites is an area where geophysical capabilities and limitations may significantly impact a major governmental program. Since there is concern that extensive exploratory drilling might degrade most potential disposal sites, geophysical methods become crucial as the only nondestructive means to examine large volumes of rock in three dimensions. Characterization of potential sites requires geophysicists to alter their usual mode of thinking: no longer are anomalies being sought, as in mineral exploration, but rather their absence. Thus the size of features that might go undetected by a particular method take on new significance. Legal and regulatory considerations that stem from this different outlook, most notably the requirements of quality assurance (necessary for any data used in support of a repository license application), are forcing changes in the manner in which geophysicists collect and document their data. -Authors

  14. Optically Pumped Nuclear Magnetic Resonance near Landau level filling ν = 1/3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khandelwal, P.; Kuzma, N. N.; Barrett, S. E.; Pfeiffer, L. N.; West, K. W.

    1997-03-01

    Optical pumping enables the direct detection of the nuclear magnetic resonance signal of ^71Ga nuclei located in an electron doped GaAs quantum well.footnote S. E. Barrett et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 72, 1368 (1994) Using this technique, measurements of the Knight shift (K_S)footnote S. E. Barrett et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 74, 5112 (1995) and spin-lattice relaxation time (T_1)footnote R. Tycko et al., Science 268, 1460 (1995) have been carried out in the Quantum Hall regimes. In this talk will present our recent measurements of KS and T1 near Landau level filling ν = 1/3, which were carried out in high magnetic fields (up to 12 Tesla) and at low temperatures (T < 1 Kelvin). We will compare these results to the data obtained near ν = 1 and ν = 2/3.

  15. Tectonic characterization of a potential high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Whitney, John W.; O'Leary, Dennis W.

    1993-01-01

    Tectonic characterization of a potential high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, is needed to assess seismic and possible volcanic hazards that could affect the site during the preclosure (next 100 years) and the behavior of the hydrologic system during the postclosure (the following 10,000 years) periods. Tectonic characterization is based on assembling mapped geological structures in their chronological order of development and activity, and interpreting their dynamic interrelationships. Addition of mechanistic models and kinematic explanations for the identified tectonic processes provides one or more tectonic models having predictive power. Proper evaluation and application of tectonic models can aid in seismic design and help anticipate probable occurrence of future geologic events of significance to the repository and its design.

  16. Container materials for high-level nuclear waste at the proposed Yucca Mountain site

    SciTech Connect

    McCright, R.D.

    1991-05-01

    Candidate container materials for high-level nuclear waste packages to be emplaced at the proposed Yucca Mountain repository site are being considered for their long-term resistance to corrosion, oxidation, embrittlement and other kinds of degradation. An extensive compilation of the degradation phenomena for six candidate materials is complete, and further studies have begun on the degradation modes affecting additional candidate materials. Phenomenological models for predicting container degradation rates are being advanced for environmental conditions applicable to Yucca Mountain. An experimental program is underway to evaluate the susceptibility of container materials is localized corrosion, stress corrosion cracking, and enhancement of corrosion and oxidation attack by gamma radiation. Initial evaluations of container fabrication and welding processes have identified some processes that appear to alleviate some long-term susceptibility concerns. 10 refs., 2 figs.

  17. A conceptual subsurface facility design for a high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain

    SciTech Connect

    McKenzie, D.G., III; Bhattacharyya, K.K.; Segrest, A.M.

    1996-09-01

    The US Department of Energy is responsible for the design, construction, operation and closure of a repository in which to permanently dispose of the nation`s high level nuclear waste. In addition to the objective of safely isolating the waste inventory, the repository must provide a safe working environment for its workforce, and protect the public. The conceptual design for this facility is currently being developed. Tunnel Boring Machine will be used to excavate 228 kilometers of tunneling to construct the facility over a 30 year period. The excavation operations will be physically separated from the waste emplacement operations, and each operation will have its own dedicated ventilation system. The facility is being designed to remain open for 150 years.

  18. Modelling energy level alignment at organic interfaces and density functional theory.

    PubMed

    Flores, F; Ortega, J; Vázquez, H

    2009-10-21

    A review of our theoretical understanding of the band alignment at organic interfaces is presented with particular emphasis on the metal/organic (MO) case. The unified IDIS (induced density of interface states) and the ICT (integer charge transfer) models are reviewed and shown to describe qualitatively and semiquantitatively the barrier height formation at those interfaces. The IDIS model, governed by the organic CNL (charge neutrality level) and the interface screening includes: (a) charge transfer across the interface; (b) the "pillow" (or Pauli) effect associated with the compression of the metal wavefunction tails; and (c) the molecular dipoles. We argue that the ICT-model can be described as a limiting case of the unified IDIS-model for weak interface screening. For a fully quantitative understanding of the band alignment at organic interfaces, use of DFT (density functional theory) or quantum chemistry methods is highly desirable. In this Perspective review, we concentrate our discussion on DFT and show that conventional LDA or GGA calculations are limited by the "energy gap problem of the organic materials", because the LDA (or GGA) Kohn-Sham energy levels have to be corrected by the self-interaction energy of the corresponding wavefunction, to provide the appropriate molecule transport energy gap. Image potential and polarization effects at MO interfaces tend to cancel these self-interaction corrections; in particular, we show that for organic molecules lying flat on Cu and Ag, these cancellations are so strong that we can rely on conventional DFT to calculate their interface properties. For Au, however, the cancellations are weaker making it necessary to go beyond conventional DFT. We discuss several alternatives beyond conventional LDA or GGA. The most accurate approach is the well-known GW-technique, but its use is limited by its high demanding computer time. In a very simple approach one can combine conventional DFT with a "scissor" operator which

  19. Circulating levels of IGF-1 directly regulate bone growth and density

    PubMed Central

    Yakar, Shoshana; Rosen, Clifford J.; Beamer, Wesley G.; Ackert-Bicknell, Cheryl L.; Wu, Yiping; Liu, Jun-Li; Ooi, Guck T.; Setser, Jennifer; Frystyk, Jan; Boisclair, Yves R.; LeRoith, Derek

    2002-01-01

    IGF-1 is a growth-promoting polypeptide that is essential for normal growth and development. In serum, the majority of the IGFs exist in a 150-kDa complex including the IGF molecule, IGF binding protein 3 (IGFBP-3), and the acid labile subunit (ALS). This complex prolongs the half-life of serum IGFs and facilitates their endocrine actions. Liver IGF-1–deficient (LID) mice and ALS knockout (ALSKO) mice exhibited relatively normal growth and development, despite having 75% and 65% reductions in serum IGF-1 levels, respectively. Double gene disrupted mice were generated by crossing LID+ALSKO mice. These mice exhibited further reductions in serum IGF-1 levels and a significant reduction in linear growth. The proximal growth plates of the tibiae of LID+ALSKO mice were smaller in total height as well as in the height of the proliferative and hypertrophic zones of chondrocytes. There was also a 10% decrease in bone mineral density and a greater than 35% decrease in periosteal circumference and cortical thickness in these mice. IGF-1 treatment for 4 weeks restored the total height of the proximal growth plate of the tibia. Thus, the double gene disruption LID+ALSKO mouse model demonstrates that a threshold concentration of circulating IGF-1 is necessary for normal bone growth and suggests that IGF-1, IGFBP-3, and ALS play a prominent role in the pathophysiology of osteoporosis. PMID:12235108

  20. Star formation history of early-type galaxies in low density environments. I. Nuclear line-strength indices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longhetti, M.; Rampazzo, R.; Bressan, A.; Chiosi, C.

    1998-06-01

    This paper is the first of a series \\cite[(Longhetti et al. 1997a,b)]{lon97} dedicated to the study of the star formation history in early-type galaxies which show fine structures and/or signatures of interaction. It presents nuclear line-strength indices for a sample composed of 21 shell galaxies, from the \\cite[Malin & Carter (1983)]{mal83} southern survey, and 30 members of isolated interacting pairs, from the \\cite[Reduzzi & Rampazzo (1995)]{red95} catalogue, located in low density environments. The spectral range covers 3700 Angstroms < lambda < 5700 Angstroms at 2.1 Angstroms FWHM resolution. We measure 16 red (lambda > 4200 Angstroms) indices defined by the Lick Group. Measures have been transformed into the Lick-IDS ``standard'' system. The procedure has been tested on a set of 5 elliptical galaxies selected from the \\cite[Gonzalez (1993)]{gon93} sample. We derive also three blue (lambda < 4200) indices, namely Delta (4000 Angstroms) defined by \\cite[Hamilton (1985)]{ham85}, H+K(CaII) and Hdelta /FeI defined by \\cite[Rose (1984, 1985)]{ros84}. Blue indices are correlated to the age of the last starburst occurred in a galaxy \\cite[(Leonardi & Rose 1996)]{leo96}. The determination of these indices, the estimate of the measurement errors and the correction for the galaxies velocity dispersions are discussed in detail. In the Appendix A we present the indices for a set of hot stars (T> 10000 K) which may be used for extending W92 fitting functions toward high temperatures. Based on observations obtained at ESO, La Silla, Chile. Tables 1-8 are also available in electronic form at CDS and Tables 9-15 are only available in electronic form at CDS: via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsweb.u-strasbg.fr/Abstract.html